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Sample records for ablation cloud surrounding

  1. The Interstellar Cloud Surrounding the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisch, P. C.

    Ultraviolet spectral data of nearby stars indicate that the cloud surrounding the solar system has an average neutral density n(HI)~0.1 cm-3, temperature ~6800 K, and turbulence ~1.7 km/s. Comparisons between the anomalous cosmic ray data and ultraviolet data suggest that the electron density is in the range n(e-)~0.22 to 0.44 cm-3. This cloud is flowing past the Sun from a position centered in the Norma-Lupis region. The cloud properties are consistent with interstellar gas which originated as material evaporated from the surfaces of embedded clouds in the Scorpius-Centaurus Association, and which was then displaced towards the Sun by a supernova event about 4 Myrs ago. The Sun and surrounding cloud velocities are nearly perpendicular in space, and this cloud is sweeping past the Sun. The morphology of this cloud can be reconstructed by assuming that the cloud moves in a direction parallel to the surface normal. With this assumption, the Sun entered the surrounding cloud 2000 to 8000 years ago, and is now about 0.05 to 0.16 pc from the cloud surface. Prior to its recent entry into the surrounding cloud complex, the Sun was embedded in a region of space with average density lower than 0.0002 cm-3. If a denser cloud velocity component seen towards alpha Cen A,B is real, it will encounter the solar system within 50,000 yr. The nearby magnetic field seen upwind has a spatial orientation that is parallel to the cloud surface. The nearby star Sirius is viewed through the wake of the solar system, but this direction also samples the hypothetical cloud interface. Comparisons of anomalous cosmic ray and interstellar absorption line data suggest that trace elements in the surrounding cloud are in ionization equilibrium. Data towards nearby white dwarfs indicate partial helium ionization, N(N(HI)(/N(HeI)>~13.7, which is consistent with pickup ion data within the solar system if less than 40% hydrogen ionization occurs in the heliopause region. However, the white dwarfs may

  2. Numerical Studies of Ablative Mass Loss from Wind Accelerated Clouds.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knerr, Jeffrey Matthew

    1993-01-01

    We have used numerical hydrodynamics to study the acceleration of dense gas clouds via wind ram pressure. Our goal has been to examine a model for the explanation of broad absorption lines (BALs) seen in the spectra of a certain fraction of observed QSOs. This model postulates cool dense clouds moving at very high speeds as the source of the BALs. Furthermore, it invokes simple wind ram pressure as the acceleration mechanism for the clouds. A crucial question is whether the clouds can survive potentially disruptive fluid instabilities, allowing time for acceleration to speeds comparable to the wind velocity. Linear stability arguments imply Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability growth occurs on time scales much shorter than the acceleration time scale. These arguments conclude acceleration via ram pressure cannot produce bulk cloud velocities in excess of the cloud's internal sound speed. Our simulations show this is simply not true. We present two-dimensional slab-symmetric simulations where clouds are accelerated to speeds close to an order of magnitude greater than their internal sound speed. Ablative mass loss by the flow of shocked wind gas around the periphery of the clouds acts to limit the growth of potentially disruptive instabilities. Simulations run at different computational grid resolutions clearly show the stabilizing effect ablation has on the evolution of the clouds. Simplified models for line profiles have been developed using mass-velocity histograms generated from the numerical simulations. There is good qualitative agreement between the simulated line profiles and observed BAL profiles.

  3. Spectroscopic diagnostics for ablation cloud of tracer-encapsulated solid pellet in LHD.

    PubMed

    Tamura, N; Sergeev, V Yu; Kalinina, D V; Miroshnikov, I V; Sato, K; Sharov, I A; Bakhareva, O A; Ivanova, D M; Timokhin, V M; Sudo, S; Kuteev, B V

    2008-10-01

    In the Large Helical Device (LHD), various spectroscopic diagnostics have been applied to study the ablation process of an advanced impurity pellet, tracer-encapsulated solid pellet (TESPEL). The total light emission from the ablation cloud of TESPEL is measured by photomultipliers equipped with individual interference filters, which provide information about the TESPEL penetration depth. The spectra emitted from the TESPEL ablation cloud are measured with a 250 mm Czerny-Turner spectrometer equipped with an intensified charge coupled device detector, which is operated in the fast kinetic mode. This diagnostic allows us to evaluate the temporal evolution of the electron density in the TESPEL ablation cloud. In order to gain information about the spatial distribution of the cloud parameters, a nine image optical system that can simultaneously acquire nine images of the TESPEL ablation cloud has recently been developed. Several images of the TESPEL ablation cloud in different spectral domains will give us the spatial distribution of the TESPEL cloud density and temperature.

  4. Imaging spectroscopy diagnosis of internal electron temperature and density distributions of plasma cloud surrounding hydrogen pellet in the Large Helical Device

    SciTech Connect

    Motojima, G.; Sakamoto, R.; Goto, M.; Matsuyama, A.; Yamada, H.; Mishra, J. S.

    2012-09-15

    To investigate the behavior of hydrogen pellet ablation, a novel method of high-speed imaging spectroscopy has been used in the Large Helical Device (LHD) for identifying the internal distribution of the electron density and temperature of the plasma cloud surrounding the pellet. This spectroscopic system consists of a five-branch fiberscope and a fast camera, with each objective lens having a different narrow-band optical filter for the hydrogen Balmer lines and the background continuum radiation. The electron density and temperature in the plasma cloud are obtained, with a spatial resolution of about 6 mm and a temporal resolution of 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} s, from the intensity ratio measured through these filters. To verify the imaging, the average electron density and temperature also have been measured from the total emission by using a photodiode, showing that both density and temperature increase with time during the pellet ablation. The electron density distribution ranging from 10{sup 22} to 10{sup 24} m{sup -3} and the temperature distribution around 1 eV have been observed via imaging. The electron density and temperature of a 0.1 m plasma cloud are distributed along the magnetic field lines and a significant electron pressure forms in the plasma cloud for typical experimental conditions of the LHD.

  5. Imaging spectroscopy diagnosis of internal electron temperature and density distributions of plasma cloud surrounding hydrogen pellet in the Large Helical Device.

    PubMed

    Motojima, G; Sakamoto, R; Goto, M; Matsuyama, A; Mishra, J S; Yamada, H

    2012-09-01

    To investigate the behavior of hydrogen pellet ablation, a novel method of high-speed imaging spectroscopy has been used in the Large Helical Device (LHD) for identifying the internal distribution of the electron density and temperature of the plasma cloud surrounding the pellet. This spectroscopic system consists of a five-branch fiberscope and a fast camera, with each objective lens having a different narrow-band optical filter for the hydrogen Balmer lines and the background continuum radiation. The electron density and temperature in the plasma cloud are obtained, with a spatial resolution of about 6 mm and a temporal resolution of 5 × 10(-5) s, from the intensity ratio measured through these filters. To verify the imaging, the average electron density and temperature also have been measured from the total emission by using a photodiode, showing that both density and temperature increase with time during the pellet ablation. The electron density distribution ranging from 10(22) to 10(24) m(-3) and the temperature distribution around 1 eV have been observed via imaging. The electron density and temperature of a 0.1 m plasma cloud are distributed along the magnetic field lines and a significant electron pressure forms in the plasma cloud for typical experimental conditions of the LHD.

  6. A new perspective on the interstellar cloud surrounding the Sun from UV absorption line results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gry, Cecile; Jenkins, Edward B.

    2015-01-01

    We offer a new, more inclusive, picture of the local interstellar medium, where it is composed of a single, monolithic cloud that surrounds the Sun in all directions. Our study of velocities based on Mg II and Fe II ultraviolet absorption lines indicates that the cloud has an average motion consistent with the velocity vector of gas impacting the heliosphere and does not behave like a rigid body: gas within the cloud is being differentially decelerated in the direction of motion, and the cloud is expanding in directions perpendicular to this flow, much like the squashing of a balloon. The outer boundary of the cloud is in average 10 pc away from us but is highly irregular, being only a few parsecs away in some directions, with possibly a few extensions up to 20 pc. Average H I volume densities vary between 0.03 and 0.1 cm3 over different sight lines. Metals appear to be significantly depleted onto grains, and there is a steady increase in this effect from the rear of the cloud to the apex of motion. There is no evidence that changes in the ionizing radiation influence the apparent abundances. Additional, secondary velocity components are detected in 60% of the sight lines. Almost all of them appear to be interior to the volume holding the gas that we identify with the main cloud. Half of the sight lines exhibit a secondary component moving at about - 7.2 km/s with respect to the main component, which may be the signature of an implosive shock propagating toward the cloud's interior.

  7. Aerosol-Cloud Interactions Measured at Puijo Measurement Station: The effect of surrounding terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romakkaniemi, Sami; Hellsten, Antti; Ahmad, Irshad; Tonttila, Juha; Jaatinen, Antti; Portin, Harri; Leskinen, Ari; Hao, Liqing; Virtanen, Annele; Komppula, Mika

    2015-04-01

    Puijo measurement station has provided continuous data on aerosol-cloud interactions since 2006. The station is located on top of the Puijo observation tower (tower height 75m, measurement altitude 224 m above the surrounding lake level) in Kuopio, Finland. The top of the tower is covered by low altitude cloud about 15 % of days, offering perfect conditions for studying aerosol-cloud interactions. In the measurements, a twin-inlet setup (total and interstitial inlets) is used to separate the activated particles from the interstitial (non-activated) particles. The continuous twin-inlet measurements include aerosol size distribution, scattering and absorption. In addition weather parameters and cloud droplet size distribution are measured continuously. During the campaigns the twin-inlet system is additionally equipped with aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) and cloud condensation nuclei counter (CCNC). This way we were able to define the differences in chemical composition of the activated and non-activated particles, and the number of potential cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) in different supersaturations. As the tower is located on the top of a hill, it is possible that updrafts created by the hill are affecting the cloud droplet formation. In this study the terrain effect on wind fields around the measurement station was modelled using PALM Large Eddy Simulation model. The LES domain covered 15 km x 8 km area around the Puijo tower and extended up to 1 km height while the boundary-layer depth was about 370 m. The LES grid spacing was 5 m in the mean wind direction and 4 m in both cross-wind and vertical directions. The terrain topography needed was obtained from the National Land Survey of Finland with spatial resolution of 2 meters. Results from this work show that in some conditions the updrafts caused by the hill are affecting cloud droplet number concentration measured at the station. This is dependent on the wind speed and direction, and cloud base height. In

  8. Sedna and the cloud of comets surrounding the solar system in Milgromian dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paučo, R.; Klačka, J.

    2016-05-01

    We reconsider the hypothesis of a vast cometary reservoir surrounding the solar system - the Oort cloud of comets - within the framework of Milgromian dynamics (MD or MOND). For this purpose we built a numerical model of the cloud, assuming the theory of modified gravity, QUMOND. In modified gravity versions of MD, the internal dynamics of a system is influenced by the external gravitational field in which the system is embedded, even when this external field is constant and uniform, a phenomenon dubbed the external field effect (EFE). Adopting the popular pair ν(x) = [1-exp(-x1 / 2)] -1 for the MD interpolating function and a0 = 1.2 × 10-10 m s-2 for the MD acceleration scale, we found that the observationally inferred Milgromian cloud of comets is much more radially compact than its Newtonian counterpart. The comets of the Milgromian cloud stay away from the zone where the Galactic tide can torque their orbits significantly. However, this does not need to be an obstacle for the injection of the comets into the inner solar system as the EFE can induce significant change in perihelion distance during one revolution of a comet around the Sun. Adopting constraints on different interpolating function families and a revised value of a0 (provided recently by the Cassini spacecraft), the aforementioned qualitative results no longer hold, and, in conclusion, the Milgromian cloud is very similar to the Newtonian in its overall size, binding energies of comets and hence the operation of the Jupiter-Saturn barrier. However, EFE torquing of perihelia still play a significant role in the inner parts of the cloud. Consequently Sedna-like orbits and orbits of large semi-major axis Centaurs are easily comprehensible in MD. In MD, they both belong to the same population, just in different modes of their evolution.

  9. THE SIZE AND EXTENT OF THE INTERSTELLAR GAS CLOUD SURROUNDING THE SUN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Two astronomical observatories in orbit around the Earth, the Hubble Space Telescope and the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer, have been used to investigate the structure of the interstellar gas cloud in which the Sun resides. A compilation and interpretation of the results of these studies is being presented today at the American Astronomical Society meeting in Madison, WI by Drs. Jeffrey L. Linsky, Nikolai Piskunov, and Brian E. Wood of JILA and the University of Colorado. Measuring the properties of the local interstellar medium (LISM) is important for understanding how the LISM interacts with the solar wind and for investigating the possibility that changes in the LISM in the immediate vicinity of the Sun could have an effect on the Earth's atmosphere and climate. When astronomers observe the ultraviolet light emitted by nearby stars, it is always found that some of the light is absorbed by atoms and ions in the LISM. The properties of the LISM can therefore be investigated by measuring the amount of absorption observed. Using ultraviolet spectra taken by the Hubble Space Telescope and the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer, the total amount of local interstellar matter has been measured for many lines of sight through the LISM. These studies suggest that the interstellar gas surrounding the Sun has a temperature of about 7000 K (about 12,000 degrees Fahrenheit) and has a velocity of about 16 miles per second relative to the Sun. Measurements made for very short (less than 10 light years) lines of sight toward very nearby stars suggest an average density of about 0.1 hydrogen atoms per cubic centimeter for the local interstellar gas, hydrogen being by far the most abundant atom in the LISM. Measurements made for lines of sight toward more distant stars suggest lower average densities. This suggests that parts of the lines of sight to these more distant stars are in regions of space with extremely low densities. We believe this means that these stars lie outside the local

  10. Ionization recombination processes and ablation cloud structure for a carbon pellet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, D. Kh.; Gervids, V. I.; Senichenkov, I. Yu.; Veselova, I. Yu.; Rozhansky, V. A.; Schneider, R.

    2004-02-01

    Modelling of carbon pellet injection into hot hydrogen plasma is performed. Models of ionization and radiation processes previously used for descriptions of the ablation clouds are discussed. It is demonstrated that the assumption made by other authors that the plasma is transparent significantly overestimated ionization lengths for carbon. The optical thickness of the cloud is estimated. With typical ablation rates, the cloud in the vicinity of the pellet is opaque for resonant radiation in lines, in contrast to the visual transparency for non-resonant photons. The ionization by incident electrons is not sufficient to provide the short experimental cloud sizes. A reduced model for the ion stripping dynamics and energy losses in optically thick plasmas is proposed. Two very important phenomena are taken into account: partial trapping of resonant photons in the cloud and ionization from the excited state. The model is included into the MHD pellet code LLP. Calculations with the new model show at least a qualitative agreement with the experimental sizes of the carbon clouds, in contrast to the models used earlier.

  11. THE SIZE AND EXTENT OF THE INTERSTELLAR GAS CLOUD SURROUNDING THE SUN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Two astronomical observatories in orbit around the Earth, the Hubble Space Telescope and the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer, have been used to investigate the structure of the interstellar gas cloud in which the Sun resides. A compilation and interpretation of the results of these studies is being presented today at the American Astronomical Society meeting in Madison, WI by Drs. Jeffrey L. Linsky, Nikolai Piskunov, and Brian E. Wood of JILA and the University of Colorado. Measuring the properties of the local interstellar medium (LISM) is important for understanding how the LISM interacts with the solar wind and for investigating the possibility that changes in the LISM in the immediate vicinity of the Sun could have an effect on the Earth's atmosphere and climate. When astronomers observe the ultraviolet light emitted by nearby stars, it is always found that some of the light is absorbed by atoms and ions in the LISM. The properties of the LISM can therefore be investigated by measuring the amount of absorption observed. Using ultraviolet spectra taken by the Hubble Space Telescope and the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer, the total amount of local interstellar matter has been measured for many lines of sight through the LISM. These studies suggest that the interstellar gas surrounding the Sun has a temperature of about 7000 K (about 12,000 degrees Fahrenheit) and has a velocity of about 16 miles per second relative to the Sun. Measurements made for very short (less than 10 light years) lines of sight toward very nearby stars suggest an average density of about 0.1 hydrogen atoms per cubic centimeter for the local interstellar gas, hydrogen being by far the most abundant atom in the LISM. Measurements made for lines of sight toward more distant stars suggest lower average densities. This suggests that parts of the lines of sight to these more distant stars are in regions of space with extremely low densities. We believe this means that these stars lie outside the local

  12. The surrounding landscape influences the diversity of leaf-litter ants in riparian cloud forest remnants

    PubMed Central

    Valenzuela-González, Jorge E.; Escobar-Sarria, Federico; López-Barrera, Fabiola; Castaño-Meneses, Gabriela

    2017-01-01

    Riparian vegetation is a distinctive and ecologically important element of landscapes worldwide. However, the relative influence of the surrounding landscape on the conservation of the biodiversity of riparian remnants in human-modified tropical landscapes is poorly understood. We studied the surrounding landscape to evaluate its influence on leaf-litter-ant alpha and beta diversity in riparian remnants in the tropical montane cloud forest region of central Veracruz, Mexico. Sampling was carried out in 12 sites with riparian vegetation during both rainy (2011) and dry (2012) seasons. Ten leaf-litter samples were collected along a 100-m transect per site and processed with Berlese-Tullgren funnels and Winkler sacks. Using remotely-sensed and ground-collected data, we characterized the landscape around each site according to nine land cover types and computed metrics of landscape composition and configuration. We collected a total of 8,684 ant individuals belonging to 53 species, 22 genera, 11 tribes, and 7 subfamilies. Species richness and the diversity of Shannon and Simpson increased significantly in remnants immersed in landscapes with a high percentage of riparian land cover and a low percentage of land covers with areas reforested with Pinus, cattle pastures, and human settlements and infrastructure. The composition of ant assemblages was a function of the percentage of riparian land cover in the landscape. This study found evidence that leaf-litter ants, a highly specialized guild of arthropods, are mainly impacted by landscape composition and the configuration of the focal remnant. Maintaining or improving the surrounding landscape quality of riparian vegetation remnants can stimulate the movement of biodiversity among forest and riparian remnants and foster the provision of ecosystem services by these ecosystems. Effective outcomes may be achieved by considering scientific knowledge during the early stages of riparian policy formulation, in addition to

  13. Compression and ablation of the photo-irradiated molecular cloud the Orion Bar

    PubMed Central

    Goicoechea, Javier R.; Pety, Jérôme; Cuadrado, Sara; Cernicharo, José; Chapillon, Edwige; Fuente, Asunción; Gerin, Maryvonne; Joblin, Christine; Marcelino, Nuria; Pilleri, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    The Orion Bar is the archetypal edge-on molecular cloud surface illuminated by strong ultraviolet radiation from nearby massive stars. Owing to the close distance to Orion (about 1,350 light-year), the effects of stellar feedback on the parental cloud can be studied in detail. Visible-light observations of the Bar1 show that the transition between the hot ionised gas and the warm neutral atomic gas (the ionisation front) is spatially well separated from the transition from atomic to molecular gas (the dissociation front): about 15 arcseconds or 6,200 astronomical units. (One astronomical unit is the Earth-Sun distance.) Static equilibrium models2,3 used to interpret previous far-infrared and radio observations of the neutral gas in the Bar4,5,6 (typically at 10-20 arcsecond resolution) predict an inhomogeneous cloud structure consisting of dense clumps embedded in a lower density extended gas component. Here we report 1 arcsecond resolution millimetre-wave images that allow us to resolve the molecular cloud surface and constrain the gas density and temperature structures at small spatial scales. In contrast to stationary model predictions7,8,9, there is no appreciable offset between the peak of the H2 vibrational emission (delineating the H/H2 transition) and the edge of the observed CO and HCO+ emission. This implies that the H/H2 and C+/C/CO transition zones are very close. These observations reveal a fragmented ridge of high-density substructures, photo-ablative gas flows and instabilities at the molecular cloud surface. They suggest that the cloud edge has been compressed by a high-pressure wave that currently moves into the molecular cloud. The images demonstrate that dynamical and nonequilibrium effects are important. Thus, they should be included in any realistic description of irradiated interstellar matter. PMID:27509859

  14. Fog in a marginal agricultural area surrounded by montane Andean cloud forest during El Niño climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Santos, G.

    2010-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate temporal variations of water inputs, rainfall and fog (cloud water), and its contribution to the water balance in a marginal agricultural area of potato surrounded by tropical montane cloud forest in Colombia. Fog in the air boundary layer was estimated using a cylindrical fog collector. Liquid water content of fog events were evaluated before and during natural climate event of El Niño. Our study shows the temporal variation of these two water inputs in both daily and monthly cycles on Boyacá at 2900 m a.s.l. Rainfall was the most frequently observed atmospheric phenomenon, being present on average 62% of the days per year, whereas fog was 45% of the time. Reflected on the lower frequency, annual amount of fog was 11% of precipitation. However during the anomalous dry climate of El Niño, total amount of rainfall was negligible and the few fog events were the only water source for plant growth. Estimated water crop requirements were higher than the water inputs. The survival of the crops was explained by meteorological conditions during dew and fog events. High relative humidity might have eased the plant’s water stress by decreasing transpiration and temperature in leaves and soil, affecting the water balance and the heat exchange between the atmosphere-land interfaces in the marginal agricultural areas during exceptional dry climate.

  15. Endometrial ablation

    MedlinePlus

    Hysteroscopy-endometrial ablation; Laser thermal ablation; Endometrial ablation-radiofrequency; Endometrial ablation-thermal balloon ablation; Rollerball ablation; Hydrothermal ablation; Novasure ablation

  16. Cloud effects on surface energy and mass balance in the ablation area of Brewster Glacier, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conway, J. P.; Cullen, N. J.

    2016-02-01

    The effect of clouds on glacier surface energy balance (SEB) has received increased attention in the last decade, but how clouds interact with other meteorological forcing to influence surface mass balance (SMB) is not as well understood. This paper resolves the SEB and SMB at a site in the ablation zone of Brewster Glacier over a 22-month period, using high-quality radiation data to carefully evaluate SEB terms and define clear-sky and overcast conditions. A fundamental change in glacier SEB in cloudy conditions was driven by increased effective sky emissivity and surface vapour pressure, rather than a minimal change in air temperature and wind speed. During overcast conditions, positive net long-wave radiation and latent heat fluxes allowed melt to be maintained through a much greater length of time compared to clear-sky conditions, and led to similar melt in each sky condition. The sensitivity of SMB to changes in air temperature was greatly enhanced in overcast compared to clear-sky conditions due to more frequent melt and changes in precipitation phase that created a strong albedo feedback. During the spring and autumn seasons, the sensitivity during overcast conditions was strongest. To capture these processes, future attempts to explore glacier-climate interactions should aim to resolve the effects of atmospheric moisture (vapour, cloud, and precipitation) on melt as well as accumulation, through enhanced statistical or physically based methods.

  17. Compression and ablation of the photo-irradiated molecular cloud the Orion Bar.

    PubMed

    Goicoechea, Javier R; Pety, Jérôme; Cuadrado, Sara; Cernicharo, José; Chapillon, Edwige; Fuente, Asunción; Gerin, Maryvonne; Joblin, Christine; Marcelino, Nuria; Pilleri, Paolo

    2016-09-08

    The Orion Bar is the archetypal edge-on molecular cloud surface illuminated by strong ultraviolet radiation from nearby massive stars. Our relative closeness to the Orion nebula (about 1,350 light years away from Earth) means that we can study the effects of stellar feedback on the parental cloud in detail. Visible-light observations of the Orion Bar show that the transition between the hot ionized gas and the warm neutral atomic gas (the ionization front) is spatially well separated from the transition between atomic and molecular gas (the dissociation front), by about 15 arcseconds or 6,200 astronomical units (one astronomical unit is the Earth-Sun distance). Static equilibrium models used to interpret previous far-infrared and radio observations of the neutral gas in the Orion Bar (typically at 10-20 arcsecond resolution) predict an inhomogeneous cloud structure comprised of dense clumps embedded in a lower-density extended gas component. Here we report one-arcsecond-resolution millimetre-wave images that allow us to resolve the molecular cloud surface. In contrast to stationary model predictions, there is no appreciable offset between the peak of the H2 vibrational emission (delineating the H/H2 transition) and the edge of the observed CO and HCO(+) emission. This implies that the H/H2 and C(+)/C/CO transition zones are very close. We find a fragmented ridge of high-density substructures, photoablative gas flows and instabilities at the molecular cloud surface. The results suggest that the cloud edge has been compressed by a high-pressure wave that is moving into the molecular cloud, demonstrating that dynamical and non-equilibrium effects are important for the cloud evolution.

  18. Compression and ablation of the photo-irradiated molecular cloud the Orion Bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goicoechea, Javier R.; Pety, Jérôme; Cuadrado, Sara; Cernicharo, José; Chapillon, Edwige; Fuente, Asunción; Gerin, Maryvonne; Joblin, Christine; Marcelino, Nuria; Pilleri, Paolo

    2016-09-01

    The Orion Bar is the archetypal edge-on molecular cloud surface illuminated by strong ultraviolet radiation from nearby massive stars. Our relative closeness to the Orion nebula (about 1,350 light years away from Earth) means that we can study the effects of stellar feedback on the parental cloud in detail. Visible-light observations of the Orion Bar show that the transition between the hot ionized gas and the warm neutral atomic gas (the ionization front) is spatially well separated from the transition between atomic and molecular gas (the dissociation front), by about 15 arcseconds or 6,200 astronomical units (one astronomical unit is the Earth-Sun distance). Static equilibrium models used to interpret previous far-infrared and radio observations of the neutral gas in the Orion Bar (typically at 10-20 arcsecond resolution) predict an inhomogeneous cloud structure comprised of dense clumps embedded in a lower-density extended gas component. Here we report one-arcsecond-resolution millimetre-wave images that allow us to resolve the molecular cloud surface. In contrast to stationary model predictions, there is no appreciable offset between the peak of the H2 vibrational emission (delineating the H/H2 transition) and the edge of the observed CO and HCO+ emission. This implies that the H/H2 and C+/C/CO transition zones are very close. We find a fragmented ridge of high-density substructures, photoablative gas flows and instabilities at the molecular cloud surface. The results suggest that the cloud edge has been compressed by a high-pressure wave that is moving into the molecular cloud, demonstrating that dynamical and non-equilibrium effects are important for the cloud evolution.

  19. X-ray reverberations and the giant X-ray bursts. [short duration pulse in plasma cloud surrounding X-ray source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canizares, C. R.

    1976-01-01

    It is shown that the shape and spectral evolution of the giant X-ray bursts from the source 3U 1820-30 can be explained by Compton scattering of a short, intense X-ray pulse in a cloud surrounding the source. Pulse shapes due to Thomson scattering of an X-ray burst in an electron cloud were calculated for the (1) optically thin case on the assumption of one scattering per photon, (2) intermediate case with optical depth of about unity, and (3) optically thick case where the process is regarded as diffusion of photons through a uniform sphere. For the intermediate case, the effects of the reverberation were determined explicitly by Monte Carlo calculation. For an optical depth of 3, square pulse duration of 2 sec, characteristic cloud radius of 70,000 km, characteristic cloud density of 4 times 10 to the 14th per cu cm, and temperature of 5-30 keV, the calculations give a reasonably accurate description of X-ray bursts from 3U 1820-30. The scattering model does not imply the existence of a supermassive, central black hole.

  20. Role of shielding in modelling cryogenic deuterium pellet ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gál, K.; Belonohy, É.; Kocsis, G.; Lang, P. T.; Veres, G.; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2008-08-01

    For the better characterization of pellet ablation, the numerical LLP code has been enhanced by combining two relevant shielding mechanisms: that of the spherically expanding neutral cloud surrounding the pellet and that of the field elongated ionized material forming a channel flow. In contrast to our expectation the presence of the channel flow can increase the ablation rate although it reduces the heat flux travelling through it. The contribution of the different shielding effect in the ablation process is analysed for several pellet and plasma parameters and an ablation rate scaling is presented based on simple regression in the ASDEX Upgrade pellet and plasma parameter range. Finally the simulated results are compared with experimental data from typical ASDEX Upgrade discharges.

  1. Pellet ablation and temperature profile measurements in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, D.K.; Schmidt, G.L.; Cavallo, A.; Grek, B.; Hulse, R.; Johnson, D.; Mansfield, D.; McNeill, D.; Park, H.; Taylor, G.

    1988-01-01

    Single and multiple deuterium pellets have been injected into a variety of TFTR plasmas, including ohmically heated plasmas with wide range of electron temperatures, neutral beam heated plasmas at several NBI powers and high T/sub e/, post NBI plasmas. Pellet penetration into these plasmas was determined by measuring the pellet speed and duration of the H/sub ..cap alpha..//D/sub ..cap alpha../ light emission during pellet ablation in the plasma. These penetration measurements are compared to the predicted penetration computed using the ablation model developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The plasma density profiles before and after pellet injection are used to estimate the number of particles deposited in the plasma. The plasma particle increase compared to the estimated number of atoms in the pellet yields a measure of the fueling efficiency of pellets in TFTR. The ablation cloud parameters are discussed based on polychromater measurements of the H/sub ..cap alpha..//D/sub ..cap alpha../ line emission from the neutral cloud surrounding the pellet. The electron temperature profile evolution after pellet injection is examined for the case of multiple pellet injection into an ohmically heated plasma. The ORNL pellet ablation code was used to compare measured pellet penetration depths with a theoretical model. The measured input parameters to the model are the electron density and temperature profiles, the neutral beam heating profile, the neutral density profile, the pellet size, pellet speed and pellet composition. The free parameter in the model is the thickness of the neutral cloud surrounding the pellet. This parameter is adjusted to arrive at a reasonable agreement between measured and calculated pellet penetration depths. The output of the model which is directly comparable to experiment is the calculated ablation rate. It is assumed that the broad-band H/sub ..cap alpha..//D/sub ..cap alpha../ emission is proportional to the ablation rate.

  2. Pulmonary vein isolation using new technologies to improve ablation lesion formation: Initial results comparing enhanced catheter tip irrigation (Surround Flow®) with contact force measurement (Smarttouch®)

    PubMed Central

    Fichtner, Stephanie; Reents, Tilko; Ammar, Sonia; Semmler, Verena; Kathan, Susanne; Dillier, Roger; Buiatti, Alexandra; Hessling, Gabriele; Deisenhofer, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Pulmonary vein reconnection after pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) is a significant problem in the treatment of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF). We report about patients who underwent contact force (CF) guided PVI using CF catheter and compared them to patients with PVI using an ablation catheter with enhanced tip irrigation. Methods A total of 59 patients were included in the analysis. In 30 patients circumferential PVI was performed using the Thermocool Smarttouch® ablation catheter (ST) whereas in 29 patients circumferential PVI using the Thermocool Surround Flow SF® ablation catheter (SF) was performed. Patients were compared in regard to procedure time, fluoroscopy time/dose as well as RF-application duration and completeness of PVI. Adverse events (pericardial effusion, PV stenosis, stroke, death) were evaluated. The presence of sinus rhythm off antiarrhythmic medication was assessed during 6 months follow-up using multiple 7 day Holter-ECGs. Results In both groups, all PVs were isolated without serious adverse events. Procedure time was 2.15 ± 0.5 h (ST) vs. 2.37 ± 1.13 h (SF) (p = 0.19). Duration of RF-applications was 46.6 ± 18 min (ST) and 49.8 ± 19 min (SF) (p = 0.52). Fluoroscopy time was 25.2 ± 13 min (ST) vs. 29 ± 18 min (SF), fluoroscopy dose 2675.6 ± 1658 versus 3038.3 ± 1997 cGym2 (p = 0.36 and 0.46 respectively). Sinus rhythm off antiarrhythmic medication validated with 7 day Holter ECGs was present in both groups in 72% of patients after 6 months of follow up. Conclusion PVI using the new contact force catheter is safe and effective in patients with paroxysmal AF. PMID:26937108

  3. OCDR guided laser ablation device

    DOEpatents

    Dasilva, Luiz B.; Colston, Jr., Bill W.; James, Dale L.

    2002-01-01

    A guided laser ablation device. The device includes a mulitmode laser ablation fiber that is surrounded by one or more single mode optical fibers that are used to image in the vicinity of the laser ablation area to prevent tissue damage. The laser ablation device is combined with an optical coherence domain reflectometry (OCDR) unit and with a control unit which initializes the OCDR unit and a high power laser of the ablation device. Data from the OCDR unit is analyzed by the control unit and used to control the high power laser. The OCDR images up to about 3 mm ahead of the ablation surface to enable a user to see sensitive tissue such as a nerve or artery before damaging it by the laser.

  4. A large-scale CO survey of the Rosette Molecular Cloud: assessing the effects of O stars on surrounding molecular gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dent, W. R. F.; Hovey, G. J.; Dewdney, P. E.; Burgess, T. A.; Willis, A. G.; Lightfoot, J. F.; Jenness, T.; Leech, J.; Matthews, H. E.; Heyer, M.; Poulton, C. J.

    2009-06-01

    We present a new large-scale survey of the J = 3-2 12CO emission covering 4.8deg2 around the Rosette Nebula. The results reveal the complex dynamics of the molecular gas in this region. We identify about 2000 compact gas clumps having a mass distribution given by dN/dM ~ M-1.8, with no dependence of the power-law index on distance from the central O stars. A detailed study of a number of the clumps in the inner region shows that most exhibit velocity gradients in the range 1-3kms-1pc-1, generally directed away from the exciting nebula. The magnitude of the velocity gradient decreases with distance from the central O stars, and we compare the apparent clump acceleration with a photoionized gas acceleration model. For most clumps outside the central nebula, the model predicts lifetimes of a few 105yr. In one of the most extended of these clumps, however, a near-constant velocity gradient can be measured over 1.7pc, which is difficult to explain with radiatively driven models of clump acceleration. As well as the individual accelerated clumps, an unresolved limb-brightened rim lies at the interface between the central nebular cavity and the Rosette Molecular Cloud. Extending over 4pc along the edge of the nebula, this region is thought to be at an earlier phase of disruption than the accelerating compact globules. Blueshifted gas clumps around the nebula are in all cases associated with dark absorbing optical globules, indicating that this material lies in front of the nebula and has been accelerated towards us. Redshifted gas shows little evidence of associated line-of-sight dark clouds, indicating that the dominant bulk molecular gas motion throughout the region is expansion away from the O stars. In addition, we find evidence that many of the clumps lie in a molecular ring, having an expansion velocity of 30kms-1 and radius 11pc. The dynamical time-scale derived for this structure (~106yr) is similar to the age of the nebula as a whole (2 × 106yr). The J = 3

  5. Laser ablation based fuel ignition

    DOEpatents

    Early, James W.; Lester, Charles S.

    1998-01-01

    There is provided a method of fuel/oxidizer ignition comprising: (a) application of laser light to a material surface which is absorptive to the laser radiation; (b) heating of the material surface with the laser light to produce a high temperature ablation plume which emanates from the heated surface as an intensely hot cloud of vaporized surface material; and (c) contacting the fuel/oxidizer mixture with the hot ablation cloud at or near the surface of the material in order to heat the fuel to a temperature sufficient to initiate fuel ignition.

  6. Laser ablation based fuel ignition

    DOEpatents

    Early, J.W.; Lester, C.S.

    1998-06-23

    There is provided a method of fuel/oxidizer ignition comprising: (a) application of laser light to a material surface which is absorptive to the laser radiation; (b) heating of the material surface with the laser light to produce a high temperature ablation plume which emanates from the heated surface as an intensely hot cloud of vaporized surface material; and (c) contacting the fuel/oxidizer mixture with the hot ablation cloud at or near the surface of the material in order to heat the fuel to a temperature sufficient to initiate fuel ignition. 3 figs.

  7. Catheter ablation.

    PubMed

    Fromer, M; Shenasa, M

    1991-02-01

    Catheter ablation is gaining increasing interest for the therapy of symptomatic, sustained arrhythmias of various origins. The scope of this review is to give an overview of the biophysical aspects and major characteristics of some of the most widely used energy sources in catheter ablation, e.g., the discharge of conventional defibrillators, modified defibrillators, laser light, and radiofrequency current application. Results from animal studies are considered to explain the basic mechanisms of catheter ablation. The recent achievements with the use of radiofrequency current to modify or ablate cardiac conduction properties are outlined in more detail.

  8. Thermal ablation.

    PubMed

    Webb, Heather; Lubner, Meghan G; Hinshaw, J Louis

    2011-04-01

    Image-guided tumor ablation refers to a group of treatment modalities that have emerged during the past 2 decades as important tools in the treatment of a wide range of tumors throughout the body. Although most widely recognized in the treatment of hepatic and renal malignancies, the role of thermal ablation has expanded to include lesions of the lung, breast, prostate, bone, as well as other organs and its clinical applications continue to increase. In the following article, we discuss the major thermal ablation modalities, their respective strengths and weaknesses, potential complications and how to avoid them, as well as possible future applications.

  9. Catheter Ablation

    MedlinePlus

    ... you during the procedure. Machines will measure your heart’s activity. All types of ablation require cardiac catheterization to place flexible tubes, or catheters, inside your heart to make the scars. Your doctor will clean ...

  10. On the Ablation Models of Fuel Pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Rozhansky, V.A.; Senichenkov, I.Yu.

    2005-12-15

    The neutral gas shielding model and neutral-gas-plasma shielding model are analyzed qualitatively. The main physical processes that govern the formation of the shielding gas cloud and, consequently, the ablation rate are considered. For the neutral gas shielding model, simple formulas relating the ablation rate and cloud parameters to the parameters of the pellet and the background plasma are presented. The estimates of the efficiency of neutral gas shielding and plasma shielding are compared. It is shown that the main portion of the energy flux of the background electrons is released in the plasma cloud. Formulas for the ablation rate and plasma parameters are derived in the neutral-gas-plasma shielding model. The question is discussed as to why the neutral gas shielding model describes well the ablation rate of the pellet material, although it does not take into account the ionization effects and the effects associated with the interaction of ionized particles with the magnetic field. The reason is that the ablation rate depends weakly on the energy flux of hot electrons; as a result, the attenuation of this flux by the electrostatic shielding and plasma shielding has little effect on the ablation rate. This justifies the use of the neutral gas shielding model to estimate the ablation rate (to within a factor of about 2) over a wide range of parameters of the pellet and the background plasma.

  11. Clouds in Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, R.

    1999-01-01

    In the terrestrial atmosphere clouds are familiar as vast collections of small water drops or ice cyrstals suspended in the air. The study of clouds touches on many facets of armospheric science. The chemistry of clouds is tied to the chemistry of the surrounding atmosphere.

  12. Silver nanoparticles generated by pulsed laser ablation in supercritical CO2 medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machmudah, Siti; Sato, Takayuki; Wahyudiono; Sasaki, Mitsuru; Goto, Motonobu

    2012-03-01

    Pulsed laser ablation (PLA) has been widely employed in industrial and biological applications and in other fields. The environmental conditions in which PLA is conducted are important parameters that affect both the solid particle cloud and the deposition produced by the plume. In this work, the generation of nanoparticles (NPs) has been developed by performing PLA of silver (Ag) plates in a supercritical CO2 medium. Ag NPs were successfully generated by allowing the selective generation of clusters. Laser ablation was performed with an excitation wavelength of 532 nm under various pressures and temperatures of CO2 medium. On the basis of the experimental result, both surface of the irradiated Ag plate and structure of Ag NPs were significantly affected by the changes in supercritical CO2 pressure and temperature. With increasing irradiation pressure, plume deposited in the surrounding crater created by the ablation was clearly observed. In Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM) the image of the generated Ag NPs on the silicon wafer and the morphology of Ag particles were basically a sphere-like structure. Ag particles contain NPs with large-varied diameter ranging from 5 nm to 1.2 μm. The bigger Ag NPs melted during the ablation process and then ejected smaller spherical Ag NPs, which formed nanoclusters attached on the molten Ag NPs. The smaller Ag NPs were also formed around the bigger Ag NPs. Based on the results, this new method can also be used to obtain advanced nano-structured materials.

  13. Simulation of Pellet Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parks, P. B.; Ishizaki, Ryuichi

    2000-10-01

    In order to clarify the structure of the ablation flow, 2D simulation is carried out with a fluid code solving temporal evolution of MHD equations. The code includes electrostatic sheath effect at the cloud interface.(P.B. Parks et al.), Plasma Phys. Contr. Fusion 38, 571 (1996). An Eulerian cylindrical coordinate system (r,z) is used with z in a spherical pellet. The code uses the Cubic-Interpolated Psudoparticle (CIP) method(H. Takewaki and T. Yabe, J. Comput. Phys. 70), 355 (1987). that divides the fluid equations into non-advection and advection phases. The most essential element of the CIP method is in calculation of the advection phase. In this phase, a cubic interpolated spatial profile is shifted in space according to the total derivative equations, similarly to a particle scheme. Since the profile is interpolated by using the value and the spatial derivative value at each grid point, there is no numerical oscillation in space, that often appears in conventional spline interpolation. A free boundary condition is used in the code. The possibility of a stationary shock will also be shown in the presentation because the supersonic ablation flow across the magnetic field is impeded.

  14. Pellet ablation and ablation model development

    SciTech Connect

    Houlberg, W.A.

    1989-01-01

    A broad survey of pellet ablation is given, based primarily on information presented at this meeting. The implications of various experimental observations for ablation theory are derived from qualitative arguments of the physics involved. The major elements of a more complete ablation theory are then outlined in terms of these observations. This is followed by a few suggestions on improving the connections between theory and experimental results through examination of ablation data. Although this is a rather aggressive undertaking for such a brief (and undoubtedly incomplete) assessment, some of the discussion may help us advance the understanding of pellet ablation. 17 refs.

  15. Limits to Cloud Susceptibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coakley, James A., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    1-kilometer AVHRR observations of ship tracks in low-level clouds off the west coast of the U S. were used to determine limits for the degree to which clouds might be altered by increases in anthropogenic aerosols. Hundreds of tracks were analyzed to determine whether the changes in droplet radii, visible optical depths, and cloud top altitudes that result from the influx of particles from underlying ships were consistent with expectations based on simple models for the indirect effect of aerosols. The models predict substantial increases in sunlight reflected by polluted clouds due to the increases in droplet numbers and cloud liquid water that result from the elevated particle concentrations. Contrary to the model predictions, the analysis of ship tracks revealed a 15-20% reduction in liquid water for the polluted clouds. Studies performed with a large-eddy cloud simulation model suggested that the shortfall in cloud liquid water found in the satellite observations might be attributed to the restriction that the 1-kilometer pixels be completely covered by either polluted or unpolluted cloud. The simulation model revealed that a substantial fraction of the indirect effect is caused by a horizontal redistribution of cloud water in the polluted clouds. Cloud-free gaps in polluted clouds fill in with cloud water while the cloud-free gaps in the surrounding unpolluted clouds remain cloud-free. By limiting the analysis to only overcast pixels, the current study failed to account for the gap-filling predicted by the simulation model. This finding and an analysis of the spatial variability of marine stratus suggest new ways to analyze ship tracks to determine the limit to which particle pollution will alter the amount of sunlight reflected by clouds.

  16. Physical processes of laser tissue ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furzikov, Nickolay P.

    1991-05-01

    The revised ablation model applicable to homogeneous tissues is presented. It is based on the thermal mechanism and involves the instability of the laserinduced evaporation (thermodestruction) front the growth of the surface ripple structure the interference of the laser wave and of the surface wave arising by diffraction on the ripples Beer''s law violation the pulsed thermodestruction of the organic structural component the tissue water boiling and gas dynamic expansion of the resulting products into the surrounding medium which is followed by the shock wave formation. The UV and IR ablation schemes were implemented and compared to the corneal ablation experiments. The initial ablation pressure and temperature are given restored from the timeofflight measurements of the supersonic expansion of the product. 1.

  17. Radiofrequency Ablation of Liver Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Site Index A-Z Radiofrequency Ablation (RFA) of Liver Tumors Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a treatment that ... of Liver Tumors? What is Radiofrequency Ablation of Liver Tumors? Radiofrequency ablation, sometimes referred to as RFA, ...

  18. Ablative skin resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Chwalek, Jennifer; Goldberg, David J

    2011-01-01

    Ablative skin resurfacing has remained the gold standard for treating photodamage and acne scars since the development of the first CO(2) lasers. CO(2) and Er:YAG lasers emit infrared light, which targets water resulting in tissue contraction and collagen formation. The first ablative laser systems created significant thermal damage resulting in unacceptably high rates of scarring and prolonged healing. Newer devices, such as high-energy pulsed lasers and fractional ablative lasers, are capable of achieving significant improvements with fewer side effects and shorter recovery times. While ablative resurfacing has become safer, careful patient selection is still important to avoid post-treatment scarring, dyspigmentation, and infections. Clinicians utilizing ablative devices need to be aware of possible side effects in order to maximize results and patient satisfaction. This chapter reviews the background of ablative lasers including the types of ablative lasers, mechanism of action, indications for ablative resurfacing, and possible side effects.

  19. The Emprint™ Ablation System with Thermosphere™ Technology: One of the Newer Next-Generation Microwave Ablation Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Alonzo, Marc; Bos, Aaron; Bennett, Shelby; Ferral, Hector

    2015-01-01

    Microwave ablation is a recent development in the field of tumor ablation that uses electromagnetic waves to establish a microwave near-field with direct tissue heating. Some of the limitations of the earlier generation devices had been unpredictable size and shape of the ablation zones with changes in the surrounding tissue environment as well as differences across various different tissue types. The Emprint Ablation System with Thermosphere Technology (Covidien, Boulder, CO) is the most recent generation ablation system that attempts to produce predictable large spherical zones of ablation despite varying tissue environments across different tissue types such as liver, lung, and bone to name a few. This article will discuss these recent device developments as well as review some basic microwave characteristics. PMID:26622094

  20. Hilly Surroundings (polar)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 360-degree view shows the terrain surrounding NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit on the rover's 189th sol on Mars (July 15, 2004). It was assembled from images taken by the rover's navigation camera at a position referred to as Site 72, which is at the base of the 'West Spur' portion of the 'Columbia Hills.' The view is presented in a polar projection with geometrical seam correction.

  1. Hilly Surroundings (cylindrical)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 360-degree view of the terrain surrounding NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit was taken on the rover's 189th sol on Mars (July 15, 2004). It was assembled from images taken by the rover's navigation camera at a position referred to as Site 72, which is at the base of the 'West Spur' portion of the 'Columbia Hills.' The view is presented in a cylindrical projection with geometrical seam correction.

  2. Hilly Surroundings (vertical)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 360-degree view of the terrain surrounding NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit was taken on the rover's 189th sol on Mars (July 15, 2004). It was assembled from images taken by the rover's navigation camera at a position referred to as Site 72, which is at the base of the 'West Spur' portion of the 'Columbia Hills.'' The view is presented in a vertical projection with geometrical seam correction.

  3. Optically thick ablation fronts. [in interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konigl, A.

    1984-01-01

    The physical characteristics of optically thick ablation fronts such as interstellar clouds are analyzed. Attention is given to cold clumps in both planar and spherical geometries and modifications caused by accelerations in a gravitational field or by evaporation of the clumps when encountered hot gas. The effects of ablation on the appearance of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability are examined in both linear and nonlinear regimes. The results of the calculations are applied to the astrophysical phenomena of cold clumps immersed in a supersonic flow, optically thick jets, and ablation in stellar envelopes. Evaporation in an optically thick front is projected to be orders of magnitude larger than evaporation in electron-conduction fronts in optically thin conditions. The optically thick processes could then be useful for modeling flows from, e.g., newly formed stars and active galactic nuclei.

  4. Surface chemical reaction of laser ablated aluminum sample for detonation initiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Chang-hwan; Yoh, Jack J.

    2011-05-01

    We explore the evolution of metal plasma generated by high laser irradiances and its effect on the surrounding air by using shadowgraph images after laser pulse termination; hence the formation of laser supported detonation and combustion processes has been investigated. The essence of the paper is in observing initiation of chemical reaction between ablated aluminum plasma and oxygen from air by inducing high power laser pulse (>1000 mJ/pulse) and conduct a quantitative comparison of chemically reactive laser initiated waves with the classical detonation of exploding aluminum (dust) cloud in air. Findings in this work may lead to a new method of initiating detonation from metal sample in its bulk form without the need of mixing nano-particles with oxygen for initiation.

  5. Nonequilibrium Ablation of Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milos, Frank S.; Chen, Yih K.; Gokcen, Tahir

    2012-01-01

    In previous work, an equilibrium ablation and thermal response model for Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator was developed. In general, over a wide range of test conditions, model predictions compared well with arcjet data for surface recession, surface temperature, in-depth temperature at multiple thermocouples, and char depth. In this work, additional arcjet tests were conducted at stagnation conditions down to 40 W/sq cm and 1.6 kPa. The new data suggest that nonequilibrium effects become important for ablation predictions at heat flux or pressure below about 80 W/sq cm or 10 kPa, respectively. Modifications to the ablation model to account for nonequilibrium effects are investigated. Predictions of the equilibrium and nonequilibrium models are compared with the arcjet data.

  6. Search Cloud

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/cloud.html Search Cloud To use the sharing features on this page, ... chest pa and lateral Share the MedlinePlus search cloud with your users by embedding our search cloud ...

  7. Heat-Based Tumor Ablation: Role of the Immune Response.

    PubMed

    Wu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    The ideal cancer therapy not only induces the death of all localized tumor cells with less damage to surrounding normal tissue, but also activates a systemic antitumor immunity. Heat-based tumor ablation has the potential to be such a treatment as it can minimal-invasively ablate a targeted tumor below the skin surface, and may subsequently augment host antitumor immunity. This chapter primarily introduces increasing pre-clinical and clinical evidence linking antitumor immune response to thermal tumor ablation, and then discusses the potential mechanisms involved in ablation-enhanced host antitumor immunity. The seminal studies performed so far indicate that although it is not possible to make definite conclusions on the connection between thermal ablation and antitumor immune response, it is nonetheless important to conduct extensive studies on the subject in order to elucidate the processes involved.

  8. Pulmonary ablation: a primer.

    PubMed

    Roberton, Benjamin J; Liu, David; Power, Mark; Wan, John M C; Stuart, Sam; Klass, Darren; Yee, John

    2014-05-01

    Percutaneous image-guided thermal ablation is safe and efficacious in achieving local control and improving outcome in the treatment of both early stage non-small-cell lung cancer and pulmonary metastatic disease, in which surgical treatment is precluded by comorbidity, poor cardiorespiratory reserve, or unfavorable disease distribution. Radiofrequency ablation is the most established technology, but new thermal ablation technologies such as microwave ablation and cryoablation may offer some advantages. The use of advanced techniques, such as induced pneumothorax and the popsicle stick technique, or combining thermal ablation with radiotherapy, widens the treatment options available to the multidisciplinary team. The intent of this article is to provide the reader with a practical knowledge base of pulmonary ablation by concentrating on indications, techniques, and follow-up.

  9. Renal Ablation Update

    PubMed Central

    Khiatani, Vishal; Dixon, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    Thermal ablative technologies have evolved considerably in the recent past and are now an important component of current clinical guidelines for the treatment of small renal masses. Both radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation have intermediate-term oncologic control that rivals surgical options, with favorable complication profiles. Studies comparing cryoablation and radiofrequency ablation show no significant difference in oncologic control or complication profile between the two modalities. Early data from small series with microwave ablation have shown similar promising results. Newer technologies including irreversible electroporation and high-intensity–focused ultrasound have theoretical advantages, but will require further research before becoming a routine part of the ablation armamentarium. The purpose of this review article is to discuss the current ablative technologies available, briefly review their mechanisms of action, discuss technical aspects of each, and provide current data supporting their use. PMID:25049445

  10. Laser ablation of gall bladder stones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marafi, M.; Makdisi, Y.; Bhatia, K. S.; Abdulah, A. H.; Kokaj, Y.; Mathew, K.; Quinn, F.; Qabazard, A.

    1999-06-01

    Study of laser interaction with calculi is presented. A system of Nd-Yag and Ho-Yag pulsed lasers were used to produce fluorescence and plasma signals at the stone surface surrounded by saline and bile fluids. Fourth harmonic from Nd-Yag laser was transmitted to the samples by graded UV optical fibres. Gall bladder stones of various compositions were subjected to the high power Ho-Yag laser. Temporal transients and spectral evolution of plasma and fluorescence signals were monitored by a streak camera. A profile of acoustic pressures generated by shock waves was recorded with sensitive hydrophones placed in the surrounding fluids. Ablation threshold, cavitation process and fluorescence dependence on the laser parameters were studied in detail. Potential of stone identification by fluorescence and possible hydrodynamic model for ablation of biological samples is discussed.

  11. Radiofrequency Ablation of Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Marc; Mikityansky, Igor; Kam, Anthony; Libutti, Steven K.; Walther, McClellan M.; Neeman, Ziv; Locklin, Julia K.; Wood, Bradford J.

    2004-09-15

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has been used for over 18 years for treatment of nerve-related chronic pain and cardiac arrhythmias. In the last 10 years, technical developments have increased ablation volumes in a controllable, versatile, and relatively inexpensive manner. The host of clinical applications for RFA have similarly expanded. Current RFA equipment, techniques, applications, results, complications, and research avenues for local tumor ablation are summarized.

  12. Lung Ablation: Whats New?

    PubMed

    Xiong, Lillian; Dupuy, Damian E

    2016-07-01

    Lung cancer had an estimated incidence of 221,200 in 2015, making up 13% of all cancer diagnoses. Tumor ablation is an important treatment option for nonsurgical lung cancer and pulmonary metastatic patients. Radiofrequency ablation has been used for over a decade with newer modalities, microwave ablation, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation presenting as additional and possibly improved treatment options for patients. This minimally invasive therapy is best for small primary lesions or favorably located metastatic tumors. These technologies can offer palliation and sometimes cure of thoracic malignancies. This article discusses the current available technologies and techniques available for tumor ablation.

  13. Observational evidence linking precipitation and mesoscale cloud fraction in the southeast Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapp, Anita D.

    2016-07-01

    Precipitation has been hypothesized to play an important role in the transition of low clouds from closed to open cell cumulus in regions of large-scale subsidence. A synthesis of A-Train satellite measurements is used to examine the relationship between precipitation and mesoscale cloud fraction across a transition region in the southeastern Pacific. Low cloud pixels are identified in 4 years of CloudSat/CALIPSO observations and along-track mean cloud fraction within 2.5-500 km surrounding the clouds calculated. Results show that cloud fraction decreases more rapidly in areas surrounding precipitating clouds than around nonprecipitating clouds. The closed to open cell transition region appears especially sensitive, with the surrounding mesoscale cloud fraction decreasing 30% faster in the presence of precipitation compared to nonprecipitating clouds. There is also dependence on precipitation rate and cloud liquid water path (LWP), with higher rain rates or lower LWP showing larger decreases in surrounding cloud fraction.

  14. Ablative Thermal Protection System Fundamentals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, Robin A. S.

    2013-01-01

    This is the presentation for a short course on the fundamentals of ablative thermal protection systems. It covers the definition of ablation, description of ablative materials, how they work, how to analyze them and how to model them.

  15. Sprayable lightweight ablative coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, William G. (Inventor); Sharpe, Max H. (Inventor); Hill, William E. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An improved lightweight, ablative coating is disclosed that may be spray applied and cured without the development of appreciable shrinkage cracks. The ablative mixture consists essentially of phenolic microballoons, hollow glass spheres, glass fibers, ground cork, a flexibilized resin binder, and an activated colloidal clay.

  16. Laboratory Micrometeroid/Dust Ablation Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, E.; Horanyi, M.; Janches, D.; Munsat, T. L.; Plane, J. M. C.; Simolka, J.; Sternovsky, Z.

    2014-12-01

    Each day, somewhere between 5-270 tonnes of meteoric material ablates in Earth's upper atmosphere. Thisenormous range is significant because the Interplanetary Dust Particle (IDP) input has implications in ourunderstanding of meteor transport in the atmosphere, the formation of layers of metal atoms and ions,nucleation of noctilucent clouds, effects on stratospheric aerosols and O3 chemistry, and dust evolution inour solar system. As the dust ablates, it produces light, as well as a plasma trail of ionized atmosphericatoms and electrons. These meteor signatures are detected by photographic means, or by radar, but thereremain uncertainties in the luminous efficiency and ionization coefficient of meteors - two parameters thatare essential to evaluate densities, masses, height distributions and fluxes. Precise measurements of theseparameters would allow for not only an understanding of the layers of metal atoms and ions and meteoricsmoke particles in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere, but also would allow for the Earth's atmosphereto be used as a dust detector to detect and characterize the dust environment in our solar system. This work discusses the preliminary results of the new dust ablation facility at the 3 MV hypervelocity dust accelerator at the Institute for Modeling Plasma, Atmospheres and Cosmic Dust (IMPACT) at the University of Colorado, which aims to characterize the ionization coefficient and luminous efficiency of ablating micrometeroids.

  17. Tumor Ablation and Nanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Manthe, Rachel L.; Foy, Susan P.; Krishnamurthy, Nishanth; Sharma, Blanka; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2010-01-01

    Next to surgical resection, tumor ablation is a commonly used intervention in the treatment of solid tumors. Tumor ablation methods include thermal therapies, photodynamic therapy, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) producing agents. Thermal therapies induce tumor cell death via thermal energy and include radiofrequency, microwave, high intensity focused ultrasound, and cryoablation. Photodynamic therapy and ROS producing agents cause increased oxidative stress in tumor cells leading to apoptosis. While these therapies are safe and viable alternatives when resection of malignancies is not feasible, they do have associated limitations that prevent their widespread use in clinical applications. To improve the efficacy of these treatments, nanoparticles are being studied in combination with nonsurgical ablation regimens. In addition to better thermal effect on tumor ablation, nanoparticles can deliver anticancer therapeutics that show synergistic anti-tumor effect in the presence of heat and can also be imaged to achieve precision in therapy. Understanding the molecular mechanism of nanoparticle-mediated tumor ablation could further help engineer nanoparticles of appropriate composition and properties to synergize the ablation effect. This review aims to explore the various types of nonsurgical tumor ablation methods currently used in cancer treatment and potential improvements by nanotechnology applications. PMID:20866097

  18. Ventricular Arrhythmias from the Left Ventricular Summit: Critical Importance of Anatomy, Imaging, and Detailed Mapping to Allow Safe and Effective Ablation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Saurabh; Tedrow, Usha B; Stevenson, William G

    2016-03-01

    Ventricular arrhythmias arising from the region of the left ventricular summit can be challenging for catheter-based percutaneous ablation. A detailed knowledge of the anatomy of this region and the need of high-density mapping of surrounding structures are critical in ensuring safe and effective ablation. This case-based review focuses on the particular challenges with ablation in this region.

  19. Thermal ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Head, Hayden W; Dodd, Gerald D

    2004-11-01

    Thermal ablation, as a form of minimally invasive therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), has become an important treatment modality. Because of the limitations of surgery, the techniques of thermal ablation have become standard therapies for HCC in some situations. This article reviews 4 thermal ablation techniques-radiofrequency (RF) ablation, microwave ablation, laser ablation, and cryoablation. Each of these techniques may have a role in treating HCC, and the mechanisms, equipment, patient selection, results, and complications of each are considered. Furthermore, combined therapies consisting of thermal ablation and adjuvant chemotherapy also show promise for enhancing these techniques. Important areas of research into thermal ablation remain, including improving the ability of ablation to treat larger tumors, determining the indications for each thermal ablation modality, optimizing image guidance, and obtaining good outcome data on the efficacy of these techniques.

  20. Ablative skin resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Nidhi; Smith, Greg; Heffelfinger, Ryan

    2014-02-01

    Ablative laser resurfacing has evolved as a safe and effective treatment for skin rejuvenation. Although traditional lasers were associated with significant thermal damage and lengthy recovery, advances in laser technology have improved safety profiles and reduced social downtime. CO2 lasers remain the gold standard of treatment, and fractional ablative devices capable of achieving remarkable clinical improvement with fewer side effects and shorter recovery times have made it a more practical option for patients. Although ablative resurfacing has become safer, careful patient selection and choice of suitable laser parameters are essential to minimize complications and optimize outcomes. This article describes the current modalities used in ablative laser skin resurfacing and examines their efficacy, indications, and possible side effects.

  1. Moldable cork ablation material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A successful thermal ablative material was manufactured. Moldable cork sheets were tested for density, tensile strength, tensile elongation, thermal conductivity, compression set, and specific heat. A moldable cork sheet, therefore, was established as a realistic product.

  2. Endometrial Ablation for Menorrhagia

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Barry H.

    1992-01-01

    Endometrial ablation is a relatively new treatment for patients with persistent menorrhagia. The procedure can be performed by either laser photocoagulation or electrocoagulation; both have a very low risk of complication. Generally, less than 24 hours of hospitalization is required and return to normal activities, including work, is almost immediate. Endometrial ablation is likely to become a mainstay of treatment for menorrhagia as the technology and training become more readily available. PMID:21229128

  3. Automatic cloud cover mapping.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strong, J. P., III; Rosenfeld, A.

    1971-01-01

    A method of converting a picture into a 'cartoon' or 'map' whose regions correspond to differently textured regions is described. Texture edges in the picture are detected, and solid regions surrounded by these (usually broken) edges are 'colored in' using a propagation process. The resulting map is cleaned by comparing the region colors with the textures of the corresponding regions in the picture, and also by merging some regions with others according to criteria based on topology and size. The method has been applied to the construction of cloud cover maps from cloud cover pictures obtained by satellites.

  4. Infrared laser bone ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Nuss, R.C.; Fabian, R.L.; Sarkar, R.; Puliafito, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    The bone ablation characteristics of five infrared lasers, including three pulsed lasers (Nd:YAG, lambda = 1064 micron; Hol:YSGG, lambda = 2.10 micron; and Erb:YAG, lambda = 2.94 micron) and two continuous-wave lasers (Nd:YAG, lambda = 1.064 micron; and CO/sub 2/, lambda = 10.6 micron), were studied. All laser ablations were performed in vitro, using moist, freshly dissected calvarium of guinea pig skulls. Quantitative etch rates of the three pulsed lasers were calculated. Light microscopy of histologic sections of ablated bone revealed a zone of tissue damage of 10 to 15 micron adjacent to the lesion edge in the case of the pulsed Nd:YAG and the Erb:YAG lasers, from 20 to 90 micron zone of tissue damage for bone ablated by the Hol:YSGG laser, and 60 to 135 micron zone of tissue damage in the case of the two continuous-wave lasers. Possible mechanisms of bone ablation and tissue damage are discussed.

  5. Educational Success and Surrounding Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, Garrison

    2016-01-01

    The curriculum, instruction, and services we provide in schools, colleges, and universities matter a lot, but if we continue to ignore our students' "surrounding culture," progress toward a more educated nation will continue to be disappointing.

  6. Artificial ascites and pneumoperitoneum to facilitate thermal ablation of liver tumors: a pictorial essay.

    PubMed

    Bhagavatula, Sharath K; Chick, Jeffrey F B; Chauhan, Nikunj R; Shyn, Paul B

    2017-02-01

    Image-guided percutaneous thermal ablation is increasingly utilized in the treatment of hepatic malignancies. Peripherally located hepatic tumors can be difficult to access or located adjacent to critical structures that can be injured. As a result, ablation of peripheral tumors may be avoided or may be performed too cautiously, leading to inadequate ablation coverage. In these cases, separating the tumor from adjacent critical structures can increase the efficacy and safety of procedures. Artificial ascites and artificial pneumoperitoneum are techniques that utilize fluid and gas, respectively, to insulate critical structures from the thermal ablation zone. Induction of artificial ascites and artificial pneumoperitoneum can enable complete ablation of otherwise inaccessible hepatic tumors, improve tumor visualization, minimize unintended thermal injury to surrounding organs, and reduce post-procedural pain. This pictorial essay illustrates and discusses the proper technique and clinical considerations for successful artificial ascites and pneumoperitoneum creation to facilitate safe peripheral hepatic tumor ablation.

  7. Thermochemical Ablation Analysis of the Orion Heatshield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sixel, William

    2015-01-01

    The Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle will one day carry astronauts to the Moon and beyond, and Orion's heatshield is a critical component in ensuring their safe return to Earth. The Orion heatshield is the structural component responsible for absorbing the intense heating environment caused by re-entry to Earth's atmosphere. The heatshield is primarily composed of Avcoat, an ablative material that is consumed during the re-entry process. Ablation is primarily characterized by two processes: pyrolysis and recession. The decomposition of in-depth virgin material is known as pyrolysis. Recession occurs when the exposed surface of the heatshield reacts with the surrounding flow. The Orion heatshield design was changed from an individually filled Avcoat honeycomb to a molded block Avcoat design. The molded block Avcoat heatshield relies on an adhesive bond to keep it attached to the capsule. In some locations on the heatshield, the integrity of the adhesive bond cannot be verified. For these locations, a mechanical retention device was proposed. Avcoat ablation was modelled in CHAR and the in-depth virgin material temperatures were used in a Thermal Desktop model of the mechanical retention device. The retention device was analyzed and shown to cause a large increase in the maximum bondline temperature. In order to study the impact of individual ablation modelling parameters on the heatshield sizing process, a Monte Carlo simulation of the sizing process was proposed. The simulation will give the sensitivity of the ablation model to each of its input parameters. As part of the Monte Carlo simulation, statistical uncertainties on material properties were required for Avcoat. Several properties were difficult to acquire uncertainties for: the pyrolysis gas enthalpy, non-dimensional mass loss rate (B´c), and Arrhenius equation parameters. Variability in the elemental composition of Avcoat was used as the basis for determining the statistical uncertainty in pyrolysis gas

  8. Shuttle subscale ablative nozzle tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, L. B.; Bailey, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    Recent subscale nozzle tests have identified new and promising carbon phenolic nozzle ablatives which utilize staple rayon, PAN, and pitch based carbon cloth. A 4-inch throat diameter submerged test nozzle designed for the 48-inch Jet Propulsion Laboratory char motor was used to evaluate five different designs incorporating 20 candidate ablatives. Test results indicate that several pitch and PAN-based carbon phenolic ablatives can provide erosion and char performance equivalent or superior to the present continuous rayon-based SRM ablative.

  9. Winter Clouds Over Mie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    12 March 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) red wide angle image shows late winter clouds over the 104 km (65 mi) diameter crater, Mie. Cellular clouds occur in the lower martian atmosphere, surrounding Mie Crater. Their cloudtops are at an altitude that is below the crater rim. Higher than the crater rim occurs a series of lee wave clouds, indicating air circulation moving from west/northwest (left) toward the east/southeast (right). Mie Crater is located in Utopia Planitia, not too far from the Viking 2 landing site, near 48.5 N, 220.4 W. Sunlight illuminates this January 2004 scene from the lower left.

  10. Dynamics of multiple plumes in laser ablation: Modeling of the shielding effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinovik, Igor; Povitsky, Alex

    2006-07-01

    The scattering and absorption of laser radiation by previously ablated plumes in laser ablation (known as the shielding effect) dramatically affect the efficiency of laser ablation process. The ablated plumes consisting of water vapor, droplets, and particles are modeled as a gas-particle equilibrium mixture by solution of the Euler equations combined with the transport equation for the ratio of heat capacities. Shielding effect on the overall ablated mass by multiple plumes is studied for a wide range of concentration of particles in vaporized plumes, various laser repetition rates, scattering, and absorption of laser energy. The shielding phenomenon is studied for short sequences of discrete plumes to focus on the shielding effect of individual plumes. The results of numerical modeling were compared to experimental results of laser-induced water explosive vaporization. Ablation rate was calculated for a single ablated plume and for the sequence of six laser pulses at the repetition rates of 0.33 and 1MHz at which gas dynamics interactions between plumes are strong but plumes have not yet form a continuous jet. A single ablated plume has an initial semispherical shape which transforms into mushroomlike cloud with a thin stem and a ring vortex as it was observed in experiments with water and cornea ablation. For the plume with a given ablated mass, the longer ejection of plume with smaller density produces the plume with smaller shielding capacity. For multiple laser pulses, the velocity of ejected mixture increases from the center of the target to its periphery because of the shielding effect. The ablated mass of the current plume depends on the attenuation of the incident laser beam energy caused by the propagation of laser beam through previously ablated plumes. In the case of laser energy absorption, the ablation rate per pulse exceeds 2-2.5 times the rate obtained for the laser energy scattering.

  11. Pulsed laser ablation of dental calculus in the near ultraviolet.

    PubMed

    Schoenly, Joshua E; Seka, Wolf; Rechmann, Peter

    2014-02-01

    Pulsed lasers emitting wavelengths near 400 nm can selectively ablate dental calculus without damaging underlying and surrounding sound dental hard tissue. Our results indicate that calculus ablation at this wavelength relies on the absorption of porphyrins endogenous to oral bacteria commonly found in calculus. Sub- and supragingival calculus on extracted human teeth, irradiated with 400-nm, 60-ns laser pulses at ≤8  J/cm2, exhibits a photobleached surface layer. Blue-light microscopy indicates this layer highly scatters 400-nm photons, whereas fluorescence spectroscopy indicates that bacterial porphyrins are permanently photobleached. A modified blow-off model for ablation is proposed that is based upon these observations and also reproduces our calculus ablation rates measured from laser profilometry. Tissue scattering and a stratified layering of absorbers within the calculus medium explain the gradual decrease in ablation rate from successive pulses. Depending on the calculus thickness, ablation stalling may occur at <5  J/cm2 but has not been observed above this fluence.

  12. Cloud Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Pete Beckman and Ian Foster

    2009-12-04

    Chicago Matters: Beyond Burnham (WTTW). Chicago has become a world center of "cloud computing." Argonne experts Pete Beckman and Ian Foster explain what "cloud computing" is and how you probably already use it on a daily basis.

  13. Transurethral radio frequency ablation of the prostate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabalin, John N.

    1996-05-01

    Since 1993, radiofrequency ablation of the prostate has been studied as a potential treatment for symptomatic bladder outlet obstruction due to benign prostatic hyperplasia. Two transurethral radiofrequency delivery systems have been developed to the point of undergoing initial human clinical trials. The TUNATM system involves focal interstitial radiofrequency energy application, while the TURAPYTM system involves a circumferential application of radiofrequency energy to the prostatic urethra via a simple delivery catheter. Experimental studies in animal models and human prostate tissue have demonstrated the nature of radiofrequency induced tissue heating and thermal injury. Observed thermal effects are relatively focused, with steep temperature gradients occurring over a few millimeters from the radiofrequency emission source. This allows precise and focused tissue treatment with little or no danger of injury to surrounding structures. Early human clinical experience in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia has demonstrated efficacy in the relief of voiding symptoms and safety and minimal morbidity associated with this technology. The existing operative approaches are relatively simple. Ongoing development of more versatile delivery systems for radiofrequency ablation of the prostate is expected. Results from larger clinical trials with longer term followup will eventually allow adequate assessment of the role of radiofrequency ablation in the surgical management of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

  14. Aerosol and Cloud Microphysical Characteristics of Rifts and Gradients in Maritime Stratocumulus Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharon, Tarah M.; Albrecht, Bruce A.; Jonsson, Haflidi H.; Minnis, Patrick; Khaiyer, Mandana M.; Van Reken, Timothy; Seinfeld, John; Flagan, Rick

    2008-01-01

    A cloud rift is characterized as a large-scale, persistent area of broken, low reflectivity stratocumulus clouds usually surrounded by a solid deck of stratocumulus. A rift observed off the coast of Monterey Bay, California on 16 July 1999 was studied to compare the aerosol and cloud microphysical properties in the rift with those of the surrounding solid stratus deck. Variables measured from an instrumented aircraft included temperature, water vapor, and cloud liquid water. These measurements characterized the thermodynamic properties of the solid deck and rift areas. Microphysical measurements made included aerosol, cloud drop and drizzle drop concentrations and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations. The microphysical characteristics in a solid stratus deck differ substantially from those of a broken, cellular rift where cloud droplet concentrations are a factor of 2 lower than those in the solid cloud. Further, CCN concentrations were found to be about 3 times greater in the solid cloud area compared with those in the rift and aerosol concentrations showed a similar difference as well. Although drizzle was observed near cloud top in parts of the solid stratus cloud, the largest drizzle rates were associated with the broken clouds within the rift area. In addition to marked differences in particle concentrations, evidence of a mesoscale circulation near the solid cloud rift boundary is presented. This mesoscale circulation provides a mechanism for maintaining a rift, but further study is required to understand the initiation of a rift and the conditions that may cause it to fill.

  15. Laser ablation and high precision patterning of biomaterials and intraocular lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafetinides, A. A.; Spyratou, E.; Makropoulou, M.

    2010-10-01

    The use of intraocular lenses (IOL) is the most promising method for restoring excellent vision in cataract surgery. In addition, multifocal intraocular lenses for good distant and near vision are investigated. Several new materials, techniques and patterns are studied for the formation and etching of intraocular lenses in order to improve their optical properties and reduce the diffractive aberrations. As pulsed laser ablation is well established as a universal tool for surface processing of organic polymer materials, this study was focused in using laser ablation with short and ultra short laser pulses for surface modification of PMMA and intraocular lenses, instead of using other conventional techniques. The main advantage of using very short laser pulses, e.g. of ns, ps or fs duration, is that heat diffusion into the polymer material is negligible. As a result high precision patterning of the sample, without thermal damage of the surroundings, becomes possible. In this study, laser ablation was performed using commercially available hydrophobic acrylic IOLs, hydrophilic acrylic IOLs, and PMMA IOLs, with various diopters. We investigated the ablation efficiency and the phenomenology of the etched patterns by testing the ablation rate, versus laser energy fluence, at several wavelengths and the surface modification with atomic force microscopy (AFM), or scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The irradiated polymers have different optical properties, at the applied wavelengths, and therefore, present different ablation behaviour and morphology of the laser ablated crater walls and surrounding surfaces. The experimental results, some theoretical assumptions for mathematical modeling of the relevant ablation mechanisms are discussed.

  16. Plasma mediated ablation of biological tissues with ultrashort laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Oraevsky, A.A. |; DaSilva, L.B.; Feit, M.D.

    1995-03-08

    Plasma mediated ablation of collagen gels and porcine cornea was studied at various laser pulse durations in the range from 350 fs to 1 ns at 1,053 nm wavelength. A time resolved stress detection technique was employed to measure transient stress profiles and amplitudes. Optical microscopy was used to characterize ablation craters qualitatively, while a wide band acoustic transducer helped to quantify tissue mechanical response and the ablation threshold. The ablation threshold was measured as a function of laser pulse duration and linear absorption coefficient. For nanosecond pulses the ablation threshold was found to have a strong dependence on the linear absorption coefficient of the material. As the pulse length decreased into the subpicosecond regime the ablation threshold became insensitive to the linear absorption coefficient. The ablation efficiency was found to be insensitive to both the laser pulse duration and the linear absorption coefficient. High quality ablation craters with no thermal or mechanical damage to surrounding material were obtained with 350 fs laser pulses. The mechanism of optical breakdown at the tissue surface was theoretically investigated. In the nanosecond regime, optical breakdown proceeds as an electron collisional avalanche ionization initiated by thermal seed electrons. These seed electrons are created by heating of the tissue by linear absorption. In the ultrashort pulse range, optical breakdown is initiated by the multiphoton ionization of the irradiated medium (6 photons in case of tissue irradiated at 1,053 nm wavelength), and becomes less sensitive to the linear absorption coefficient. The energy deposition profile is insensitive to both the laser pulse duration and the linear absorption coefficient.

  17. Percutaneous ablation of adrenal tumors.

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, Aradhana M; Locklin, Julia; Dupuy, Damian E; Wood, Bradford J

    2010-06-01

    Adrenal tumors comprise a broad spectrum of benign and malignant neoplasms and include functional adrenal adenomas, pheochromocytomas, primary adrenocortical carcinoma, and adrenal metastases. Percutaneous ablative approaches that have been described and used in the treatment of adrenal tumors include percutaneous radiofrequency ablation, cryoablation, microwave ablation, and chemical ablation. Local tumor ablation in the adrenal gland presents unique challenges, secondary to the adrenal gland's unique anatomic and physiological features. The results of clinical series employing percutaneous ablative techniques in the treatment of adrenal tumors are reviewed in this article. Clinical and technical considerations unique to ablation in the adrenal gland are presented, including approaches commonly used in our practices, and risks and potential complications are discussed.

  18. Ablation of skeletal metastases: current status.

    PubMed

    Kurup, A Nicholas; Callstrom, Matthew R

    2010-08-01

    Image-guided percutaneous ablation of bone metastases is an effective, minimally invasive alternative to conventional therapies in the palliation of pain from metastatic disease. Ablative technologies applied in the treatment of skeletal metastases include radiofrequency ablation, cryoablation, microwave ablation, laser ablation, ethanol ablation, and, most recently, focused ultrasound. These ablative methods may be performed in combination with percutaneous cementoplasty to provide support and stabilization for metastases in weight-bearing bones at risk for pathologic fracture.

  19. A Study of Ablation-Flowfield Coupling Relevant to the Orion Heatshield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Christopher O.; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Mazaheri, Alireza

    2009-01-01

    The coupled interaction between an ablating surface and the surrounding aerothermal environment is studied. An equilibrium ablation model is coupled to the LAURA flowfield solver, which allows the char ablation rate (m-dot(sub c)) to be computed as part of the flowfield solution. The wall temperature (T(sub w)) and pyrolysis ablation rate (m-dot(sub g)) may be specified by the user, obtained from the steady-state ablation approximation, or computed from a a material response code. A 32 species thermochemical nonequilibrium flowfield model is applied, which permits the treatment of C, H, O, N, and Si containing species. Coupled ablation cases relevant to the Orion heatshield are studied. These consist of diffusion-limited oxidation cases with Avcoat as the ablation material. The m-dot(sub c) values predicted from the developed coupled ablation analysis were compared with those obtained from a typical uncoupled ablation analysis. The coupled results were found to be as much as 50% greater than the uncoupled values. This is shown to be a result of the cumulative effect of the two fundamental approximations inherent in the uncoupled analysis.

  20. Visual Surround Suppression in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Tibber, Marc S.; Anderson, Elaine J.; Bobin, Tracy; Antonova, Elena; Seabright, Alice; Wright, Bernice; Carlin, Patricia; Shergill, Sukhwinder S.; Dakin, Steven C.

    2013-01-01

    Compared to unaffected observers patients with schizophrenia (SZ) show characteristic differences in visual perception, including a reduced susceptibility to the influence of context on judgments of contrast – a manifestation of weaker surround suppression (SS). To examine the generality of this phenomenon we measured the ability of 24 individuals with SZ to judge the luminance, contrast, orientation, and size of targets embedded in contextual surrounds that would typically influence the target’s appearance. Individuals with SZ demonstrated weaker SS compared to matched controls for stimuli defined by contrast or size, but not for those defined by luminance or orientation. As perceived luminance is thought to be regulated at the earliest stages of visual processing our findings are consistent with a suppression deficit that is predominantly cortical in origin. In addition, we propose that preserved orientation SS in SZ may reflect the sparing of broadly tuned mechanisms of suppression. We attempt to reconcile these data with findings from previous studies. PMID:23450069

  1. [Ablative and fractional lasers].

    PubMed

    Beylot, C; Grognard, C; Michaud, T

    2009-10-01

    The use of pulsed or scanning Carbon Dioxide, and pulsed Erbium-YAG lasers allows the programmable and reproducible photocoagulation of thin layers of the epidermis and superficial dermis. Thermal damage depends on the type of laser and is greater with CO(2) lasers. The degree of neocollagenesis is proportional to the thermal damage and is better with CO(2) lasers. Their main indication is the correction of photoaged facial skin but they can also be used for corrective dermatology, e.g. for scars and genodermatosis. Results are highly satisfactory but the technique is invasive and the patient experiences a social hindrance of around two weeks. Fractionated techniques treat 25% of the defective skin area at each session in noncontiguous microzones; four sessions are therefore necessary to treat the entire cutaneous surface. The treatment is given under topical anesthesia and is much less invasive, particularly with nonablative fractional laser treatment in which photothermolysis does not penetrate below the epidermis and/or the effects are slight, with no or very little social isolation. However, the results are much less satisfactory than the results of ablative laser and there is no firming effect. Other zones than the face can be treated. With the fractional CO(2) and Erbium ablative lasers, which have multiplied over the past 2 years, the much wider impacts cause perforation of the epidermis and there is a zone of ablation by laser photovaporization, with a zone of thermal damage below. The results are better in correcting photoaging of the face, without, however, achieving the efficacy of ablative lasers, which remain the reference technique. However, the effects are not insignificant, requiring at least 5 days of social isolation.

  2. Dynamical history of the Oort cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissman, Paul R.

    1991-01-01

    An overview of recent dynamical studies on the Oort cloud of comets surrounding the solar system is presented. Cometary orbits in the cloud evolve under the complex interaction of stellar, galactic, and giant molecular cloud perturbations, as well as planetary and nongravitational perturbations when the orbits reenter the planetary region. There is mounting evidence for a dense, inner Oort cloud of comets which acts as a reservoir to replenish the outer cloud as comets there are stripped away. A ring of comets beyond the orbit of Neptune, which may be the source of the short-period comets, is also likely. Temporal variations in the flux of comets from the Oort cloud into the planetary region by a factor of 50 percent are typical, and by factors of 20 to 200 are possible. Comets in the Oort cloud are processed by galactic cosmic rays, heated by nearby supernovae, eroded by interstellar dust impacts, and disrupted by mutual collisions.

  3. Catheter Ablation for Ventricular Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Nof, Eyal; Stevenson, William G; John, Roy M

    2013-01-01

    Catheter ablation has emerged as an important and effective treatment option for many recurrent ventricular arrhythmias. The approach to ablation and the risks and outcomes are largely determined by the nature of the severity and type of underlying heart disease. In patients with structural heart disease, catheter ablation can effectively reduce ventricular tachycardia (VT) episodes and implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) shocks. For VT and symptomatic premature ventricular beats that occur in the absence of structural heart disease, catheter ablation is often effective as the sole therapy. Advances in catheter technology, imaging and mapping techniques have improved success rates for ablation. This review discusses current approaches to mapping and ablation for ventricular arrhythmias. PMID:26835040

  4. Radiofrequency Ablation for Liver Cancer.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Amy

    2015-01-01

    Interventional ablative technologies aided by imaging techniques such as ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging have been crucial in managing patients with primary liver cancer and liver metastases over the past 20 years. Several ablative technologies have been used to treat liver cancer; however, radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has emerged as the most common ablative therapy for hepatic lesions, both in the United States and globally. RFA is the treatment of choice for patients who cannot have surgical resection of the liver. This article focuses on the role of imaging in RFA treatment of primary and metastatic hepatic lesions.

  5. Cloud Computing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-12

    Eucalyptus Systems • Provides an open-source application that can be used to implement a cloud computing environment on a datacenter • Trying to establish an...Summary Cloud Computing is in essence an economic model • It is a different way to acquire and manage IT resources There are multiple cloud providers...edgeplatform.html • Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2): http://aws.amazon.com/ec2/ • Amazon Simple Storage Solution (S3): http://aws.amazon.com/s3/ • Eucalyptus

  6. Opportunity's Surroundings on Sol 1818

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this full-circle view of the rover's surroundings during the 1,818th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's surface mission (March 5, 2009). South is at the center; north at both ends.

    The rover had driven 80.3 meters (263 feet) southward earlier on that sol. Tracks from the drive recede northward in this view.

    The terrain in this portion of Mars' Meridiani Planum region includes dark-toned sand ripples and lighter-toned bedrock.

    This view is presented as a cylindrical projection with geometric seam correction.

  7. High temperature ablative foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Matthew T. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An ablative foam composition is formed of approximately 150 to 250 parts by weight polymeric isocyanate having an isocyanate functionality of 2.6 to 3.2; approximately 15 to 30 parts by weight reactive flame retardant having a hydroxyl number range from 200-260; approximately 10 to 40 parts by weight non-reactive flame retardant; approximately 10 to 40 parts by weight nonhydrolyzable silicone copolymer having a hydroxyl number range from 75-205; and approximately 3 to 16 parts by weight amine initiated polyether resin having an isocyanate functionality greater than or equal to 3.0 and a hydroxyl number range from 400-800.

  8. Matricectomy and nail ablation.

    PubMed

    Baran, Robert; Haneke, Eckart

    2002-11-01

    Matricectomy refers to the complete extirpation of the nail matrix, resulting in permanent nail loss. Usually however, matricectomy is only partial, restricted to one or both lateral horns of the matrix. Nail ablation is the definitive removal of the entire nail organ. The most important common denominator in the successful matricectomy is the total removal or destruction of the matrix tissue. Matricectomy may be indicated for the management of onychauxis, onychogryphosis, congenital nail dystrophies, and chronic painful nail, such as recalcitrant ingrown toenail or split within the medial or lateral one-third of the nail.

  9. Cloud Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Moncrieff, Mitchell; Einaud, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Numerical cloud models have been developed and applied extensively to study cloud-scale and mesoscale processes during the past four decades. The distinctive aspect of these cloud models is their ability to treat explicitly (or resolve) cloud-scale dynamics. This requires the cloud models to be formulated from the non-hydrostatic equations of motion that explicitly include the vertical acceleration terms since the vertical and horizontal scales of convection are similar. Such models are also necessary in order to allow gravity waves, such as those triggered by clouds, to be resolved explicitly. In contrast, the hydrostatic approximation, usually applied in global or regional models, does allow the presence of gravity waves. In addition, the availability of exponentially increasing computer capabilities has resulted in time integrations increasing from hours to days, domain grids boxes (points) increasing from less than 2000 to more than 2,500,000 grid points with 500 to 1000 m resolution, and 3-D models becoming increasingly prevalent. The cloud resolving model is now at a stage where it can provide reasonably accurate statistical information of the sub-grid, cloud-resolving processes poorly parameterized in climate models and numerical prediction models.

  10. Cloud Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinstein, Margery

    2012-01-01

    Your learning curriculum needs a new technological platform, but you don't have the expertise or IT equipment to pull it off in-house. The answer is a learning system that exists online, "in the cloud," where learners can access it anywhere, anytime. For trainers, cloud-based coursework often means greater ease of instruction resulting in greater…

  11. Complex Clouds

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    ...     View Larger Image The complex structure and beauty of polar clouds are highlighted by these images acquired ... corner, the edge of the Antarctic coastline and some sea ice can be seen through some thin, high cirrus clouds. The right-hand panel ...

  12. Cloud Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramaswami, Rama; Raths, David; Schaffhauser, Dian; Skelly, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    For many IT shops, the cloud offers an opportunity not only to improve operations but also to align themselves more closely with their schools' strategic goals. The cloud is not a plug-and-play proposition, however--it is a complex, evolving landscape that demands one's full attention. Security, privacy, contracts, and contingency planning are all…

  13. Cloud Cover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffhauser, Dian

    2012-01-01

    This article features a major statewide initiative in North Carolina that is showing how a consortium model can minimize risks for districts and help them exploit the advantages of cloud computing. Edgecombe County Public Schools in Tarboro, North Carolina, intends to exploit a major cloud initiative being refined in the state and involving every…

  14. Arctic Clouds

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    ...   View Larger Image Stratus clouds are common in the Arctic during the summer months, and are important modulators of ... from MISR's two most obliquely forward-viewing cameras. The cold, stable air causes the clouds to persist in stratified layers, and this ...

  15. Laser ablation in analytical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Russo, Richard E; Mao, Xianglei; Gonzalez, Jhanis J; Zorba, Vassilia; Yoo, Jong

    2013-07-02

    In 2002, we wrote an Analytical Chemistry feature article describing the Physics of Laser Ablation in Microchemical Analysis. In line with the theme of the 2002 article, this manuscript discusses current issues in fundamental research, applications based on detecting photons at the ablation site (LIBS and LAMIS) and by collecting particles for excitation in a secondary source (ICP), and directions for the technology.

  16. Opportunity's Surroundings on Sol 1798

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this 180-degree view of the rover's surroundings during the 1,798th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's surface mission (Feb. 13, 2009). North is on top.

    The rover had driven 111 meters (364 feet) southward on the preceding sol. Tracks from that drive recede northward in this view. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about 1 meter (about 40 inches).

    The terrain in this portion of Mars' Meridiani Planum region includes dark-toned sand ripples and lighter-toned bedrock.

    This view is presented as a cylindrical projection with geometric seam correction.

  17. Opportunity's Surroundings on Sol 1687

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this 360-degree view of the rover's surroundings on the 1,687th Martian day, or sol, of its surface mission (Oct. 22, 2008).

    Opportunity had driven 133 meters (436 feet) that sol, crossing sand ripples up to about 10 centimeters (4 inches) tall. The tracks visible in the foreground are in the east-northeast direction.

    Opportunity's position on Sol 1687 was about 300 meters southwest of Victoria Crater. The rover was beginning a long trek toward a much larger crater, Endeavour, about 12 kilometers (7 miles) to the southeast.

    This view is presented as a cylindrical projection with geometric seam correction.

  18. Cloud Thickness from Offbeam Returns - Thor Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahalan, R.; Kolasinski, J.; McGill, M.; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Physical thickness of a cloud layer, and sometimes multiple cloud layers, can be estimated from the time delay of off-beam returns from a pulsed laser source illuminating one side of the cloud layer. In particular, the time delay of light returning from the outer diffuse halo of light surrounding the beam entry point, relative to the time delay at beam center, determines the cloud physical thickness. The delay combined with the pulse stretch gives the optical thickness. The halo method works best for thick cloud layers, typically optical thickness exceeding 2, and thus compliments conventional lidar which cannot penetrate thick clouds. Cloud layer top and base have been measured independently over the ARM/SGP site using conventional laser ranging (lidar) and the top minus base thickness are compared with a cloud top halo estimate obtained from the NASA/Goddard THOR System (THOR = THickness from Offbeam Returns). THOR flies on the NASA P3, and measures the halo timings from several km above cloud top, at the same time providing conventional lidar cloud top height. The ARM/SGP micropulse lidar provides cloud base height for validation.

  19. Bubble and bubble cloud dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2000-07-01

    Cavitation bubbles are formed from small air bubbles, so-called nuclei, with the surrounding pressure reduction caused by the flow, and then, the bubbles shrink and collapse with the surrounding pressure rise. Such volumetric changes of bubbles are calculated in detail and it is found that they are significantly influenced by the internal phenomena, such as thermal diffusion, mist formation due to a homogeneous condensation, mass diffusion between vapor and noncondensable gas, heat and mass transfer through the bubble wall. The structure in cavitating flow interacts with the cavitation bubbles, and those bubbles form a cloud cavitation. It is well known that cloud cavitation is one of the most destructive forms. The behavior of bubble clouds is simulated numerically. An inward propagating shock wave is formed during the collapse of the bubble cloud, and the shock wave and its precursor are focused at the cloud center area. These phenomena associate high frequency pressure oscillations and violent bubble collapses. Those bubble collapses emit high pressure peaks, which are several hundreds times larger than that of a single bubble collapse.

  20. CALIPSO Observations of Aerosol Properties Near Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshak, Alexander; Varnai, Tamas; Yang, Weidong

    2010-01-01

    Clouds are surrounded by a transition zone of rapidly changing aerosol properties. Characterizing this zone is important for better understanding aerosol-cloud interactions and aerosol radiative effects as well as for improving satellite measurements of aerosol properties. We present a statistical analysis of a global dataset of CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation) Lidar observations over oceans. The results show that the transition zone extends as far as 15 km away from clouds and it is ubiquitous over all oceans. The use of only high confidence level cloud-aerosol discrimination (CAD) data confirms the findings. However, the results underline the need for caution to avoid biases in studies of satellite aerosol products, aerosol-cloud interactions, and aerosol direct radiative effects.

  1. Dynamical history of the Oort Cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissman, P. R.

    1982-01-01

    Oort's hypothesis for the origin of long-period comets is reviewed, along with evidence for the existence of the Oort Cloud and recent research in stellar perturbations of cometary orbits. A Monte Carlo model is used to analyze the dynamics of comets in the Oort Cloud, to estimate the present and original populations of the cloud, and to examine implications for various theories of the origin of comets. The problem of interstellar comets is briefly considered. It is concluded that: (1) the weight of evidence favors Oort's hypothesis of a cloud of a trillion comets surrounding the solar system and extending out to about 100,000 AU; (2) the dynamical evolution of the cloud is consistent with observational data on long-period comets; and (3) estimates of the population necessary to produce the observed flux of dynamically new comets lead to physically reasonable values for the current and initial cloud masses.

  2. Volcanic explosion clouds - Density, temperature, and particle content estimates from cloud motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, L.; Self, S.

    1980-01-01

    Photographic records of 10 vulcanian eruption clouds produced during the 1978 eruption of Fuego Volcano in Guatemala have been analyzed to determine cloud velocity and acceleration at successive stages of expansion. Cloud motion is controlled by air drag (dominant during early, high-speed motion) and buoyancy (dominant during late motion when the cloud is convecting slowly). Cloud densities in the range 0.6 to 1.2 times that of the surrounding atmosphere were obtained by fitting equations of motion for two common cloud shapes (spheres and vertical cylinders) to the observed motions. Analysis of the heat budget of a cloud permits an estimate of cloud temperature and particle weight fraction to be made from the density. Model results suggest that clouds generally reached temperatures within 10 K of that of the surrounding air within 10 seconds of formation and that dense particle weight fractions were less than 2% by this time. The maximum sizes of dense particles supported by motion in the convecting clouds range from 140 to 1700 microns.

  3. Thermal response and ablation characteristics of light weight ceramic ablators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tran, Huy K.; Rasky, Daniel J.; Esfahani, Lili

    1993-01-01

    An account is given of the thermal performance and ablation characteristics of the NASA-Ames Lightweight Ceramic Ablators (LCAs) in supersonic, high-enthalpy convective environments, which use low density ceramic or carbon fiber matrices as substrates for main structural support, with organic resin fillers. LCA densities are in the 0.224-1.282 g/cu cm range. In-depth temperature data have been obtained to determine thermal penetration depths and conductivity. The addition of SiC and PPMA is noted to significantly improve the ablation performance of LCAs with silica substrates. Carbon-based LCAs are the most mass-efficient at high flux levels.

  4. The effects of magnetic fields in cold clouds in cooling flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friaça, A. C. S.; Jafelice, L. C.

    1999-01-01

    Large masses of absorbing material are inferred to exist in cooling flows in clusters of galaxies from the excess X-ray absorption in the spectra of some X-ray clusters. The absorbing material is probably in the form of cold clouds pressure-confined by the surrounding, hot, X-ray-emitting gas. The cold clouds could remain relatively static until they are destroyed by evaporation or ablation, or give rise to star formation. If the final fate of the clouds is stars, the initial mass function (IMF) of the stars formed over the whole cooling-flow region (r~ 100 kpc) should be biased to low masses, to avoid a very luminous, blue halo for the central galaxy of the cooling flow. However, there is evidence for bright star formation in the innermost (r<= 10 kpc) regions of some cooling flows, and, therefore, the biasing of the IMF towards low masses should not occur or should be less important at smaller radii. The consideration of magnetic fields may shed light on these two points. If magnetic fields are present, the magnetic critical mass should be considered, besides the Jeans mass, in establishing a natural mass-scale for star formation. When this new mass-scale is taken into account, we obtain the right variation of the biasing of the IMF with the radius in addition to inhibition of high-mass star formation at large radii. We also demonstrate that magnetic reconnection is a more efficient mechanism than ambipolar diffusion to remove magnetic fields in cold clouds.

  5. Core-collapse supernova remnants and interactions with their surroundings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brantseg, Thomas Felton

    This thesis examines three core-collapse supernova remnants (SNR)---the Cygnus Loop in the Milky Way and 0453-68.5 and 0540-69.3 in the Large Magellanic Cloud---of varying ages and in varying states of interaction with the surrounding interstellar medium (ISM), using X-ray imaging spectroscopy with Chandra and supplemental data from other wavelengths. We use results from our analysis to address three main questions. First, we examine the applicability of the common Sedov-Taylor adiabatic blast wave model to core-collapse supernovae. Second, we determine the elemental abundances around the shell of these supernova remnants to determine if the use of SNRs as a gauge of abundances in the ISM is justified. Finally, we examine the pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) in 0453-68.5 and 0540-69.3 and search for evidence of interaction between these PWNe and their immediate surroundings. We see highly inhomogeneous ISM surrounding all three surveyed SNRs, contrary to the key assumption in the Sedov-Taylor model of a uniform surrounding medium. In all three studied SNRs, we find that shock speeds are dependent on the density of the surrounding material. As subsidiary results, we also find depleted elemental abundances of oxygen, magnesium, and silicon, relative to typical ISM, around all three studied supernova remnants. Although this subsidiary result is not conclusive, we believe that it merits a followup study. In 0540-69.3 and 0453-68.5, which contain central pulsars, we find that the explosion directionality, which can be inferred from the pulsar's proper motion relative to the SNR, is not related to the morphology of the SNR itself. We conclude from this that the asymmetric shapes common in core-collapse supernova remnants can be more a function of the complex environments surrounding the progenitors of core-collapse supernovae than of the supernova explosions themselves. Finally, we see that the PWN in 0453-68.5 shows signs of having mixed with the surrounding thermal- emitting

  6. Pellet cloud characterisation, scaling and estimation of the material- and temperature distribution inside the cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cseh, G.; Kocsis, G.; Lang, P. T.; Plöckl, B.; Szepesi, T.; Veres, G.; The ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2017-01-01

    Using spatially calibrated images of fast visible cameras, a database was established containing pellet cloud images and the related pellet- and plasma parameters. Using this database, two scalings were derived for the cloud size along the magnetic field lines as a function of pellet speed and ablation rate (first case) and pellet speed, pellet volume, plasma temperature and plasma density (second case). Using the images—based on the number of radiation maxima—the four main cloud shapes were also categorized. The isotope effect (the effect of hydrogen pellets in hydrogen or helium plasma) was also investigated with particular attention devoted to the cloud characteristics. Finally, a synthetic diagnostic—which simulates the measurement system and produces a synthetic pellet cloud image based on the output of the pellet cloud simulation—was developed to reveal the underlying density- and temperature distributions of the observed pellet cloud images. Using this synthetic diagnostic, one of the main identified cloud shapes was reconstructed. Our goal is to derive a scaling law for the toroidal extension of the pellet cloud at different pellet- and plasma conditions, to give a more reliable input for the pellet ELM triggering simulations and using these two results—a better understanding of the pellet-caused pressure perturbation.

  7. Cloud Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Mark Talmage

    2004-05-01

    Cloud formation is crucial to the heritage of modern physics, and there is a rich literature on this important topic. In 1927, Charles T.R. Wilson was awarded the Nobel Prize in physics for applications of the cloud chamber.2 Wilson was inspired to study cloud formation after working at a meteorological observatory on top of the highest mountain in Scotland, Ben Nevis, and testified near the end of his life, "The whole of my scientific work undoubtedly developed from the experiments I was led to make by what I saw during my fortnight on Ben Nevis in September 1894."3 To form clouds, Wilson used the sudden expansion of humid air.4 Any structure the cloud may have is spoiled by turbulence in the sudden expansion, but in 1912 Wilson got ion tracks to show up by using strobe photography of the chamber immediately upon expansion.5 In the interim, Millikan's study in 1909 of the formation of cloud droplets around individual ions was the first in which the electron charge was isolated. This study led to his famous oil drop experiment.6 To Millikan, as to Wilson, meteorology and physics were professionally indistinct. With his meteorological physics expertise, in WWI Millikan commanded perhaps the first meteorological observation and forecasting team essential to military operation in history.7 But even during peacetime meteorology is so much of a concern to everyone that a regular news segment is dedicated to it. Weather is the universal conversation topic, and life on land could not exist as we know it without clouds. One wonders then, why cloud formation is never covered in physics texts.

  8. [New techniques of tumor ablation (microwaves, electroporation)].

    PubMed

    de Baere, T

    2011-09-01

    Since the introduction of radiofrequency tumor ablation of liver tumors in the late 1990s, local destructive therapies have been applied to lung, renal and bone lesions. In addition, new techniques have been introduced to compensate for the limitations of radiofrequency ablation, namely the reduced rate of complete ablation for tumors larger than 3 cm and tumors near vessels larger than 3 mm. Microwave ablation is currently evolving rapidly. While it is a technique based on thermal ablation similar to radiofrequency ablation, there are significant differences between both techniques. Electroporation, of interest because of the non-thermal nature of the ablation process, also is under evaluation.

  9. Ablative heat shield design for space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiferth, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    Ablator heat shield configuration optimization studies were conducted for the orbiter. Ablator and reusable surface insulation (RSI) trajectories for design studies were shaped to take advantage of the low conductance of ceramic RSI and high temperature capability of ablators. Comparative weights were established for the RSI system and for direct bond and mechanically attached ablator systems. Ablator system costs were determined for fabrication, installation and refurbishment. Cost penalties were assigned for payload weight penalties, if any. The direct bond ablator is lowest in weight and cost. A mechanically attached ablator using a magnesium subpanel is highly competitive for both weight and cost.

  10. Magnetic and robotic navigation for catheter ablation: "joystick ablation".

    PubMed

    Ernst, Sabine

    2008-10-01

    Catheter ablation has become the treatment of choice to cure various arrhythmias in the last decades. The newest advancement of this general concept is made on the navigation ability using remote-controlled ablation catheters. This review summarizes the concept of the two currently available systems, followed by a critical review of the published clinical reports for each system, respectively. Despite the limited amount of data, an attempt to compare the two systems is made.

  11. Focused liver ablation by cavitation in the rabbit: a potential new method of extracorporeal treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Prat, F; Chapelon, J Y; Abou el Fadil, F; Sibille, A; Theillière, Y; Ponchon, T; Cathignol, D

    1994-01-01

    A new device was used to achieve focused tissue ablation by shockwave induced cavitation. The device produced a half cycle of negative pressure followed by a shock wave, thus enhancing cavitation. Twenty eight New Zealand rabbits were treated. Therapeutic ultrasound was targeted at the centre of the liver under ultrasound guidance. The focal volume was scanned with a computer operated x-y-z micropositioner. The number and frequency of bursts as well as the distance between two x-y-z displacements were preselected. The relation of tissue ablation seen to preselected parameters, effects on surrounding tissues, biological side effects, and mode of healing were studied. Macroscopy, planimetry, and quantitative microscopy were used. Focused and homogeneous tissue ablation was achieved within well defined limits. Maximal tissue ablation was seen in the centre of the target. Liver surrounding the target remained unaffected. Lesions were made of a-cellular spots surrounded by disorganised rims of necrotic hepatocytes; 24 hours after treatment, the changes (mean (SEM)) in alanine transaminase and haemoglobin were +225 (36)% and -2.4 (2)% respectively. Serum transaminases, haemoglobinaemia, and packed cell volume were normal 21 days after treatment and the target area was replaced by a fibrous scar. It is concluded that ultrasound cavitation may achieve extracorporeal intrahepatic tissue ablation inside a predetermined target. This technique should now be tested in an animal hepatic tumour model. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8150355

  12. TPS Ablator Technologies for Interplanetary Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curry, Donald M.

    2004-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the status of Thermal Protection System (TPS) Ablator technologies and the preparation for use in interplanetary spacecraft. NASA does not have adequate TPS ablatives and sufficient selection for planned missions. It includes a comparison of shuttle and interplanetary TPS requirements, the status of mainline TPS charring ablator materials, a summary of JSC SBIR accomplishments in developing advanced charring ablators and the benefits of SBIR Ablator/fabrication technology.

  13. Model-based optimal planning of hepatic radiofrequency ablation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiyong; Müftü, Sinan; Meral, Faik Can; Tuncali, Kemal; Akçakaya, Murat

    2016-07-19

    This article presents a model-based pre-treatment optimal planning framework for hepatic tumour radiofrequency (RF) ablation. Conventional hepatic radiofrequency (RF) ablation methods rely on pre-specified input voltage and treatment length based on the tumour size. Using these experimentally obtained pre-specified treatment parameters in RF ablation is not optimal to achieve the expected level of cell death and usually results in more healthy tissue damage than desired. In this study we present a pre-treatment planning framework that provides tools to control the levels of both the healthy tissue preservation and tumour cell death. Over the geometry of tumour and surrounding tissue, we formulate the RF ablation planning as a constrained optimization problem. With specific constraints over the temperature profile (TP) in pre-determined areas of the target geometry, we consider two different cost functions based on the history of the TP and Arrhenius index (AI) of the target location, respectively. We optimally compute the input voltage variation to minimize the damage to the healthy tissue while ensuring a complete cell death in the tumour and immediate area covering the tumour. As an example, we use a simulation of a 1D symmetric target geometry mimicking the application of single electrode RF probe. Results demonstrate that compared to the conventional methods both cost functions improve the healthy tissue preservation.

  14. Leonid meteor ablation, energy exchange and trail morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Zinn, John; Judd, O'Dean P.; ReVelle, D. O.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes theoretical model studies of the interaction of Leonid meteoroids with the earth's atmosphere. Subject to some modest-to-strenuous approximations we compute the rates of ablation and deceleration, energy deposition, and terminal altitudes of the meteors as functions of their initial mass and bulk density, velocity, trajectory entry angle, drag coefficient, heat of ablation, and an ablation energy transfer fraction. We find that the dominant energy deposition in the atmosphere is associated with the stopping of the ablated meteor particles and vapor by the surrounding air. Then having computed the energy deposition rates versus altitude we compute the hydrodynamic and radiative expansion of the hot wake material in the radial direction, along with the associated air chemistry. From the computed results we can then plot two-dimensional temperature contours -- as functions of the instantaneous distance behind the meteor and radial distance from the center of the wake, at various altitudes along the meteor's path. We also compute the rates of emission of radiation and the radiative efficiency, and discuss comparisons with observations.

  15. On the hydrodynamic interaction of shock waves with interstellar clouds. 1: Nonradiative shocks in small clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, Richard I.; Mckee, Christopher F.; Colella, Philip

    1994-01-01

    The interstellar medium (ISM) is inhomogeneous, with clouds of various temperatures and densities embedded in a tenuous intercloud medium. Shocks propagating through the ISM can ablate or destroy the clouds, at the same time significantly altering the properties of the intercloud medium. This paper presents a comprehensive numerical study of the simplest case of the interaction between a shock wave and a spherical cloud, in which the shock far from the cloud is steady and planar, and in which radiative losses, thermal conduction, magnetic fields, and gravitational forces are all neglected. As a result, the problem is completely specified by two numbers: the Mach number of the shock, M, and the ratio of the density of the cloud to that of the intercloud medium, Chi. For strong shocks we show that the dependence on M scales out, so the primary independent parameter is Chi. Variations from this simple case are also considered: the potential effect of radiative losses is assessed by calculations in which the ratio of specific heats in the cloud is 1.1 instead of 5/3; the effect of the initial shape of the cloud is studied by using a cylindrical cloud instead of a spherical one; and the role of the initial shock is determined by considering the case of a cloud embedded in a wind. Local adaptive mesh refinement techniques with a second-order, two-fluid, two-dimensional Godunov hydrodynamic scheme are used to address these problems, allowing heretofore unobtainable numerical resolution. Convergence studies to be described in a subsequent paper demonstrate that about 100 zones per cloud radius are needed for accurate results; previous calculations have generally used about a third of this number. The results of the calculations are analyzed in terms of global quantities which provide an overall description of te shocked cloud: the size and shape of the cloud, the mean density, the mean pressure, the mean velocity, the velocity dispersion, and the total circulation.

  16. Data Fitting to Study Ablated Hard Dental Tissues by Nanosecond Laser Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Daiem, A. M.; Ansari, M. Shahnawaze; Babkair, Saeed S.; Salah, Numan A.; Al-Mujtaba, A.

    2016-01-01

    Laser ablation of dental hard tissues is one of the most important laser applications in dentistry. Many works have reported the interaction of laser radiations with tooth material to optimize laser parameters such as wavelength, energy density, etc. This work has focused on determining the relationship between energy density and ablation thresholds using pulsed, 5 nanosecond, neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet; Nd:Y3Al5O12 (Nd:YAG) laser at 1064 nanometer. For enamel and dentin tissues, the ablations have been performed using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique. The ablation thresholds and relationship between energy densities and peak areas of calcium lines, which appeared in LIBS, were determined using data fitting. Furthermore, the morphological changes were studied using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Moreover, the chemical stability of the tooth material after ablation has been studied using Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDX). The differences between carbon atomic % of non-irradiated and irradiated samples were tested using statistical t-test. Results revealed that the best fitting between energy densities and peak areas of calcium lines were exponential and linear for enamel and dentin, respectively. In addition, the ablation threshold of Nd:YAG lasers in enamel was higher than that of dentin. The morphology of the surrounded ablated region of enamel showed thermal damages. For enamel, the EDX quantitative analysis showed that the atomic % of carbon increased significantly when laser energy density increased. PMID:27228169

  17. CLOUD CHEMISTRY.

    SciTech Connect

    SCHWARTZ,S.E.

    2001-03-01

    Clouds present substantial concentrations of liquid-phase water, which can potentially serve as a medium for dissolution and reaction of atmospheric gases. The important precursors of acid deposition, SO{sub 2} and nitrogen oxides NO and NO{sub 2} are only sparingly soluble in clouds without further oxidation to sulfuric and nitric acids. In the case of SO{sub 2} aqueous-phase reaction with hydrogen peroxide, and to lesser extent ozone, are identified as important processes leading to this oxidation, and methods have been described by which to evaluate the rates of these reactions. The limited solubility of the nitrogen oxides precludes significant aqueous-phase reaction of these species, but gas-phase reactions in clouds can be important especially at night.

  18. Neptune's clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The bright cirrus-like clouds of Neptune change rapidly, often forming and dissipating over periods of several to tens of hours. In this sequence Voyager 2 observed cloud evolution in the region around the Great Dark Spot (GDS). The surprisingly rapid changes which occur separating each panel shows that in this region Neptune's weather is perhaps as dynamic and variable as that of the Earth. However, the scale is immense by our standards -- the Earth and the GDS are of similar size -- and in Neptune's frigid atmosphere, where temperatures are as low as 55 degrees Kelvin (-360 F), the cirrus clouds are composed of frozen methane rather than Earth's crystals of water ice. The Voyager Mission is conducted by JPL for NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications

  19. Our World: Cool Clouds

    NASA Video Gallery

    Learn how clouds are formed and watch an experiment to make a cloud using liquid nitrogen. Find out how scientists classify clouds according to their altitude and how clouds reflect and absorb ligh...

  20. Modeling of long term behavior of ablation plumes produced with ultrashort laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Feit, M D; Komashko, A M; Rubenchik, A M

    2000-02-10

    Expansion of ablation plumes created by intense ultrashort lasers is determined by various complicated physical processes which have very different spatial and time scales. Since complete simulation by one model is practically impossible, the authors suggest using two models describing initial and final stages that can be matched at an intermediate time. The proposed modeling procedure connects laser parameters to plume properties far away from the ablation spot. Laser material interaction and beginning of the expansion are simulated with a one-dimensional hydrodynamics code and the final stage is modeled using an analytical solution for an expanding three-dimensional ellipsoidal gas cloud.

  1. Feature-based attention modulates surround suppression

    PubMed Central

    Flevaris, Anastasia V.; Murray, Scott O.

    2015-01-01

    Stimuli appearing in the surround of the classical receptive field (CRF) can reduce neuronal firing and perceived contrast of a preferred stimulus in the CRF, a phenomenon referred to as surround suppression. Suppression is greatest when the surrounding stimulus has the same orientation and spatial frequency (SF) as the central target. Although spatial attention has been shown to influence surround suppression, the effects of feature-based attention have yet to be characterized. Using behavioral contrast adaptation in humans, we examined center-surround interactions between SF and orientation, and asked whether attending to one feature dimension versus the other influenced suppression. A center-surround triplet comprised of a central target Gabor and two flanking Gabors were used for adaptation. The flankers could have the same SF and orientation as the target, or differ in one or both of the feature dimensions. Contrast thresholds were measured for the target before and after adapting to center-surround triplets, and postadaptation thresholds were taken as an indirect measure of surround suppression. Both feature dimensions contributed to surround suppression and did not summate. Moreover, when center and surround had the same feature value in one dimension (e.g., same orientation) but had different values in the other dimension (e.g., different SF), there was more suppression when attention was directed to the feature dimension that matched between center and surround than when attention was directed to the feature dimension that differed. These results demonstrate that feature-based attention can influence center-surround interactions by enhancing the effects of the attended dimension. PMID:25630380

  2. Jupiter Clouds in Depth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    bright near the pole. The equatorial band is also very bright in the strong 890-nm (right) image and to a lesser extent in the 727 band (middle image) but is subdued in the weak 619-nm image on the left. These are high, thin, haze layers that are nearly transparent at wavelengths outside the methane absorption bands. Another prominent feature is the Great Red Spot. About a third of it appears at the right-hand edge of the frame. It is a bright feature in methane absorption because it has extensive cloud cover reaching to high altitude. A wisp of high thin cloud can be seen trailing off its western rim in the middle and right images.

    Features mentioned above have been seen from ground-based telescopes, from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope and from NASA's Galileo spacecraft. This is the first high-resolution image in all three methane bands, and a comparison of all three reveals some interesting features. Chief among these is the very dark patch seen in the left (weak methane) image near the top-middle of the frame. It is almost invisible in the right image and it appears to be composed of strands of bright clouds in the middle image. This is a region similar to the hot spot where the Galileo Probe entered Jupiter's atmosphere in 1995. These images indicate that cloud cover is present at the higher altitudes but absent from the lower altitudes. This is also what the Galileo Probe found when it entered Jupiter's atmosphere.

    To the northwest (above and to the left) of the dark feature is a small cloud that is bright in the 619-nm (left) image but has no contrast at the other wavelengths. This is the signature expected for a thick water cloud. Another feature seen only in the weak-methane (left image) ratio is a dark ring near the center of the image. This feature is probably a counter-clockwise rotating, upwelling core surrounded by a sinking perimeter with diminished cloudiness. The fact that it is seen only in the weak methane ratio indicates the effects of a lower

  3. Cloud Front

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA02171 Cloud Front

    These clouds formed in the south polar region. The faintness of the cloud system likely indicates that these are mainly ice clouds, with relatively little dust content.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -86.7N, Longitude 212.3E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  4. Cloud Arcs

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    ... a sinking motion elsewhere, are very common, the degree of organization exhibited here is relatively rare, as the wind field at different altitudes usually disrupts such patterns. The degree of self organization of this cloud image, whereby three or four such circular events ...

  5. Thin Clouds

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-18

    ... one of a new generation of instruments flying aboard the NASA Earth Observing System's Terra satellite, views Earth with nine cameras ... of thin cirrus minutes after MISR imaged the cloud from space. At the same time, another NASA high-altitude jet, the WB-57, flew right ...

  6. Laser Ablation of Biological Tissue Using Pulsed CO{sub 2} Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Hashishin, Yuichi; Sano, Shu; Nakayama, Takeyoshi

    2010-10-13

    Laser scalpels are currently used as a form of laser treatment. However, their ablation mechanism has not been clarified because laser excision of biological tissue occurs over a short time scale. Biological tissue ablation generates sound (laser-induced sound). This study seeks to clarify the ablation mechanism. The state of the gelatin ablation was determined using a high-speed video camera and the power reduction of a He-Ne laser beam. The aim of this study was to clarify the laser ablation mechanism by observing laser excision using the high-speed video camera and monitoring the power reduction of the He-Ne laser beam. We simulated laser excision of a biological tissue by irradiating gelatin (10 wt%) with radiation from a pulsed CO{sub 2} laser (wavelength: 10.6 {mu}m; pulse width: 80 ns). In addition, a microphone was used to measure the laser-induced sound. The first pulse caused ablation particles to be emitted in all directions; these particles were subsequently damped so that they formed a mushroom cloud. Furthermore, water was initially evaporated by laser irradiation and then tissue was ejected.

  7. Femtosecond laser ablation of enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Quang-Tri; Bertrand, Caroline; Vilar, Rui

    2016-06-01

    The surface topographical, compositional, and structural modifications induced in human enamel by femtosecond laser ablation is studied. The laser treatments were performed using a Yb:KYW chirped-pulse-regenerative amplification laser system (560 fs and 1030 nm) and fluences up to 14 J/cm2. The ablation surfaces were studied by scanning electron microscopy, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, and micro-Raman spectroscopy. Regardless of the fluence, the ablation surfaces were covered by a layer of resolidified material, indicating that ablation is accompanied by melting of hydroxyapatite. This layer presented pores and exploded gas bubbles, created by the release of gaseous decomposition products of hydroxyapatite (CO2 and H2O) within the liquid phase. In the specimen treated with 1-kHz repetition frequency and 14 J/cm2, thickness of the resolidified material is in the range of 300 to 900 nm. The micro-Raman analysis revealed that the resolidified material contains amorphous calcium phosphate, while grazing incidence x-ray diffraction analysis allowed detecting traces of a calcium phosphate other than hydroxyapatite, probably β-tricalcium phosphate Ca3), at the surface of this specimen. The present results show that the ablation of enamel involves melting of enamel's hydroxyapatite, but the thickness of the altered layer is very small and thermal damage of the remaining material is negligible.

  8. Laser ablation studies of concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Savina, M.; Xu, Z.; Wang, Y.; Reed, C.; Pellin, M.

    1999-10-20

    Laser ablation was studied as a means of removing radioactive contaminants from the surface and near-surface regions of concrete. The authors present the results of ablation tests on cement and concrete samples using a 1.6 kW pulsed Nd:YAG laser with fiber optic beam delivery. The laser-surface interaction was studied using cement and high density concrete as targets. Ablation efficiency and material removal rates were determined as functions of irradiance and pulse overlap. Doped samples were also ablated to determine the efficiency with which surface contaminants were removed and captured in the effluent. The results show that the cement phase of the material melts and vaporizes, but the aggregate portion (sand and rock) fragments. The effluent consists of both micron-size aerosol particles and chunks of fragmented aggregate material. Laser-induced optical emission spectroscopy was used to analyze the surface during ablation. Analysis of the effluent showed that contaminants such as cesium and strontium were strongly segregated into different regions of the particle size distribution of the aerosol.

  9. Fragmentation and ablation during entry

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1997-09-01

    This note discusses objects that both fragment and ablate during entry, using the results of previous reports to describe the velocity, pressure, and fragmentation of entering objects. It shows that the mechanisms used there to describe the breakup of non-ablating objects during deceleration remain valid for most ablating objects. It treats coupled fragmentation and ablation during entry, building on earlier models that separately discuss the entry of objects that are hard, whose high heat of ablation permits little erosion, and those who are strong whose strength prevents fragmentation, which are discussed in ``Radiation from Hard Objects,`` ``Deceleration and Radiation of Strong, Hard, Asteroids During Atmospheric Impact,`` and ``Meteor Signature Interpretation.`` This note provides a more detailed treatment of the further breakup and separation of fragments during descent. It replaces the constraint on mass per unit area used earlier to determine the altitude and magnitude of peak power radiation with a detailed analytic solution of deceleration. Model predictions are shown to be in agreement with the key features of numerical calculations of deceleration. The model equations are solved for the altitudes of maximum radiation, which agree with numerical integrations. The model is inverted analytically to infer object size and speed from measurements of peak power and altitude to provide a complete model for the approximate inversion of meteor data.

  10. Thermal ablation of lung tumors.

    PubMed

    McTaggart, Ryan A; Dupuy, Damian E

    2007-06-01

    Thermal ablation can be applied to treat any thoracic malignancy: primary lung cancers, recurrent primary lung cancers, metastatic disease, chest wall masses, and painful, bony metastases. Since the first reported use of thermal ablation for lung cancer in 2000 there has been an explosive use of the procedure, and by 2010 the number of procedures to treat thoracic malignancy is expected to exceed 150,000 per year. Presently, thermal ablation is best used for patients with early-stage lung cancers in patients who are not surgical candidates, patients with small and favorably located pulmonary metastases, and patients in whom palliation of tumor-related symptoms is the goal. Radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, and cryoablation are novel treatment modalities for lung cancer and can safely accomplish tumor destruction and even complete eradication of tumor in patients who are not candidates for surgical resection. In this article, we discuss technical considerations for each modality and the periprocedure and postprocedure management of patients with this disease.

  11. Theoretical Modeling for Hepatic Microwave Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Punit

    2010-01-01

    Thermal tissue ablation is an interventional procedure increasingly being used for treatment of diverse medical conditions. Microwave ablation is emerging as an attractive modality for thermal therapy of large soft tissue targets in short periods of time, making it particularly suitable for ablation of hepatic and other tumors. Theoretical models of the ablation process are a powerful tool for predicting the temperature profile in tissue and resultant tissue damage created by ablation devices. These models play an important role in the design and optimization of devices for microwave tissue ablation. Furthermore, they are a useful tool for exploring and planning treatment delivery strategies. This review describes the status of theoretical models developed for microwave tissue ablation. It also reviews current challenges, research trends and progress towards development of accurate models for high temperature microwave tissue ablation. PMID:20309393

  12. Image-guided ablation of adrenal lesions.

    PubMed

    Yamakado, Koichiro

    2014-06-01

    Although laparoscopic adrenalectomy has remained the standard of care for the treatment for adrenal tumors, percutaneous image-guided ablation therapy, such as chemical ablation, radiofrequency ablation, cryoablation, and microwave ablation, has been shown to be clinically useful in many nonsurgical candidates. Ablation therapy has been used to treat both functioning adenomas and malignant tumors, including primary adrenal carcinoma and metastasis. For patients with functioning adenomas, biochemical and symptomatic improvement is achieved in 96 to 100% after ablation; for patients with malignant adrenal neoplasms, however, the survival benefit from ablation therapy remains unclear, though good initial results have been reported. This article outlines the current role of ablation therapy for adrenal lesions, as well as identifying some of the technical considerations for this procedure.

  13. Ultrasound ablation enhances drug accumulation and survival in mammary carcinoma models

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Andrew W.; Fite, Brett Z.; Liu, Yu; Kheirolomoom, Azadeh; Seo, Jai W.; Watson, Katherine D.; Mahakian, Lisa M.; Tam, Sarah M.; Zhang, Hua; Foiret, Josquin; Borowsky, Alexander D.; Ferrara, Katherine W.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance–guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) facilitates noninvasive image-guided conformal thermal therapy of cancer. Yet in many scenarios, the sensitive tissues surrounding the tumor constrain the margins of ablation; therefore, augmentation of MRgFUS with chemotherapy may be required to destroy remaining tumor. Here, we used 64Cu-PET-CT, MRI, autoradiography, and fluorescence imaging to track the kinetics of long-circulating liposomes in immunocompetent mammary carcinoma–bearing FVB/n and BALB/c mice. We observed a 5-fold and 50-fold enhancement of liposome and drug concentration, respectively, within MRgFUS thermal ablation–treated tumors along with dense accumulation within the surrounding tissue rim. Ultrasound-enhanced drug accumulation was rapid and durable and greatly increased total tumor drug exposure over time. In addition, we found that the small molecule gadoteridol accumulates around and within ablated tissue. We further demonstrated that dilated vasculature, loss of vascular integrity resulting in extravasation of blood cells, stromal inflammation, and loss of cell-cell adhesion and tissue architecture all contribute to the enhanced accumulation of the liposomes and small molecule probe. The locally enhanced liposome accumulation was preserved even after a multiweek protocol of doxorubicin-loaded liposomes and partial ablation. Finally, by supplementing ablation with concurrent liposomal drug therapy, a complete and durable response was obtained using protocols for which a sub-mm rim of tumor remained after ablation. PMID:26595815

  14. Microwave ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Poggi, Guido; Tosoratti, Nevio; Montagna, Benedetta; Picchi, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    Although surgical resection is still the optimal treatment option for early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients with well compensated cirrhosis, thermal ablation techniques provide a valid non-surgical treatment alternative, thanks to their minimal invasiveness, excellent tolerability and safety profile, proven efficacy in local disease control, virtually unlimited repeatability and cost-effectiveness. Different energy sources are currently employed in clinics as physical agents for percutaneous or intra-surgical thermal ablation of HCC nodules. Among them, radiofrequency (RF) currents are the most used, while microwave ablations (MWA) are becoming increasingly popular. Starting from the 90s’, RF ablation (RFA) rapidly became the standard of care in ablation, especially in the treatment of small HCC nodules; however, RFA exhibits substantial performance limitations in the treatment of large lesions and/or tumors located near major heat sinks. MWA, first introduced in the Far Eastern clinical practice in the 80s’, showing promising results but also severe limitations in the controllability of the emitted field and in the high amount of power employed for the ablation of large tumors, resulting in a poor coagulative performance and a relatively high complication rate, nowadays shows better results both in terms of treatment controllability and of overall coagulative performance, thanks to the improvement of technology. In this review we provide an extensive and detailed overview of the key physical and technical aspects of MWA and of the currently available systems, and we want to discuss the most relevant published data on MWA treatments of HCC nodules in regard to clinical results and to the type and rate of complications, both in absolute terms and in comparison with RFA. PMID:26557950

  15. Surgical Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Ramlawi, Basel; Abu Saleh, Walid K

    2015-01-01

    The Cox-maze procedure for the restoration of normal sinus rhythm, initially developed by Dr. James Cox, underwent several iterations over the years. The main concept consists of creating a series of transmural lesions in the right and left atria that disrupt re-entrant circuits responsible for propagating the abnormal atrial fibrillation rhythm. The left atrial appendage is excluded as a component of the Maze procedure. For the first three iterations of the Cox- maze procedure, these lesions were performed using a surgical cut-and-sew approach that ensured transmurality. The Cox-Maze IV is the most currently accepted iteration. It achieves the same lesion set of the Cox- maze III but uses alternative energy sources to create the transmural lesions, potentially in a minimally invasive approach on the beating heart. High-frequency ultrasound, microwave, and laser energy have all been used with varying success in the past. Today, bipolar radiofrequency heat or cryotherapy cooling are the most accepted sources for creating linear lesions with consistent safety and transmurality. The robust and reliable nature of these energy delivery methods has yielded a success rate reaching 90% freedom from atrial fibrillation at 12 months. Such approaches offer a significant long-term advantage over catheter-based ablation, especially in patients having longstanding, persistent atrial fibrillation with characteristics such as dilated left atrial dimensions, poor ejection fraction, and failed catheter ablation. Based on these improved results, there currently is significant interest in developing a hybrid ablation strategy that incorporates the superior transmural robust lesions of surgical ablation, the reliable stroke prevention potential of epicardial left atrial appendage exclusion, and sophisticated mapping and confirmatory catheter-based ablation technology. Such a minimally invasive hybrid strategy for ablation may lead to the development of multidisciplinary "Afib teams" to

  16. W3 molecular cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Thronson, H.A.,JR.; Lada, C.J.; Hewagama, T.

    1985-10-01

    Extensive J = 1 to 0 (C-12)(O-16) and (C-13)(O-16) observations of the W3 molecular cloud and the surrounding region are presented and discussed. The velocity structure in the region is strongly suggestive of a model of large-scale, externally induced star formation. It is shown that star formation occurred in W3 and the nearby star-forming region W3(OH) after the gas within which they lie was swept up by the expanding W4 ionization front. Two condensations dominate the mass structure of the core of W3, one associated with IRS 4 and the other with IRS 5 and 1. A velocity difference between the two condensations is interpreted as indicating the two sources actually are discrete knots. 31 references.

  17. Transhemangioma Ablation of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Pua, Uei

    2012-12-15

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a well-established treatment modality in the treatment of early hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) [1]. Safe trajectory of the RFA probe is crucial in decreasing collateral tissue damage and unwarranted probe transgression. As a percutaneous technique, however, the trajectory of the needle is sometimes constrained by the available imaging plane. The presence of a hemangioma beside an HCC is uncommon but poses the question of safety related to probe transgression. We hereby describe a case of transhemangioma ablation of a dome HCC.

  18. Fractional ablative laser skin resurfacing: a review.

    PubMed

    Tajirian, Ani L; Tarijian, Ani L; Goldberg, David J

    2011-12-01

    Ablative laser technology has been in use for many years now. The large side effect profile however has limited its use. Fractional ablative technology is a newer development which combines a lesser side effect profile along with similar efficacy. In this paper we review fractional ablative laser skin resurfacing.

  19. Interplanetary dust particles, not wind blown dust, control high altitude ice clouds on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartwick, Victoria; Toon, Owen B.

    2016-10-01

    Water ice clouds on Mars are commonly observed at high altitudes. However, current generation Mars three-dimensional general circulation models (GCM) struggle to reproduce clouds above approximately 20-30 km. On Mars, as on Earth, ice cloud formation likely initiates by heterogeneous nucleation, which requires a population of suspended ice nuclei contiguous with supersaturated atmospheric water vapor. Although supersaturation is observed at high altitudes and has been reproduced in models, models predict very few ice nuclei. The small number of ice nuclei in the upper atmosphere is due to the assumption in Mars GCMs that the only source of ice nuclei is dust from the Martian surface. However, terrestrial mesospheric noctilucent clouds have been shown to form by ice nucleation on particles originating from ablated micrometeroids. Therefore, it is reasonable to assume that a population of micrometeoric ablation biproducts on Mars exists and can act as a site for cloud nucleation at high altitudes. We present simulations using the Community Atmosphere Model for Mars (MarsCAM) based on the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Atmosphere Model for Earth,coupled with a physically based, state-of-the-art cloud and dust physics model, the Community Aerosol and Radiation Model for Atmospheres (CARMA) to show that ablating micrometeoroids can yield abundant ice nuclei throughout the upper atmosphere of Mars. We find that simulations including a constant annual micrometeoroid flux allows us to reproduce the observed properties of high altitude water ice clouds including vertical distribution and particle size. In general, effective radius decreases with increasing altitude. We have additionally explored the impact of variable ablation rates. Preliminary results suggest that relatively high ablation rates, near or greater than 50%, are required to reproduce observed cloud features.

  20. Southern Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03026 Southern Clouds

    This image shows a system of clouds just off the margin of the South Polar cap. Taken during the summer season, these clouds contain both water-ice and dust.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 80.2S, Longitude 57.6E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  1. Linear Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03667 Linear Clouds

    These clouds are located near the edge of the south polar region. The cloud tops are the puffy white features in the bottom half of the image.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -80.1N, Longitude 52.1E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  2. Modeling bimodal vessel effects on radio and microwave frequency ablation zones.

    PubMed

    Brannan, Joseph D; Ladtkow, Casey M

    2009-01-01

    A bench liver model is presented that separates the thermal and electrical effects of large blood vessels within radio and microwave frequency ablation boundaries. The model includes a cylindrical tissue environment with a 5 mm vessel placed parallel to and 15 mm way from either a Covidien Energy-based Devices Evident MW Ablation Percutaneous Antenna or a CoolTip RF Ablation Single Electrode Kit. An array of fiber optic thermal probes is used to monitor radial temperature profile on the vessel and non-vessel sides of the ablation zone. Circulating blood exhibits higher electrical conductivity than surrounding liver tissue and provides a significant means for transport of thermal energy. Data from the thermal probes indicate key performance differentiators between MW and RF ablation modalities when they are used next to large blood vessels clarifying the difference between thermal and electrical energy sink. The results suggest RFA is susceptible to both the thermal and electrical energy sink effects of large vasculature while MWA is only susceptible to thermal sink. Ablation zone boundaries were distorted on both the vessel and non-vessel sides with RFA whereas with MWA only the vessel side is affected.

  3. Dual-energy CT after radiofrequency ablation of liver, kidney, and lung lesions: a review of features.

    PubMed

    Vandenbroucke, Frederik; Van Hedent, Steven; Van Gompel, Gert; Buls, Nico; Craggs, Gordon; Vandemeulebroucke, Jef; Ros, Pablo R; de Mey, Johan

    2015-06-01

    Early detection of residual tumour and local tumour progression (LTP) after radiofrequency (RF) ablation is crucial in the decision whether or not to re-ablate. In general, standard contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) is used to evaluate the technique effectiveness; however, it is difficult to differentiate post-treatment changes from residual tumour. Dual-energy CT (DECT) is a relatively new technique that enables more specific tissue characterisation of iodine-enhanced structures because of the isolation of iodine in the imaging data. Necrotic post-ablation zones can be depicted as avascular regions by DECT on greyscale- and colour-coded iodine images. Synthesised monochromatic images from dual-energy CT with spectral analysis can be used to select the optimal keV to achieve the highest contrast-to-noise ratio between tissues. This facilitates outlining the interface between the ablation zone and surrounding tissue. Post-processing of DECT data can lead to an improved characterisation and delineation of benign post-ablation changes from LTP. Radiologists need to be familiar with typical post-ablation image interpretations when using DECT techniques. Here, we review the spectrum of changes after RF ablation of liver, kidney, and lung lesions using single-source DECT imaging, with the emphasis on the additional information obtained and pitfalls encountered with this relatively new technique. Teaching Points •Technical success of RF ablation means complete destruction of the tumour. •Assessment of residual tumour on contrast-enhanced CT is hindered by post-ablative changes. •DECT improves material differentiation and may improve focal lesion characterisation. •Iodine maps delineate the treated area from the surrounding parenchyma well.

  4. Cloud Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 1 July 2004 The atmosphere of Mars is a dynamic system. Water-ice clouds, fog, and hazes can make imaging the surface from space difficult. Dust storms can grow from local disturbances to global sizes, through which imaging is impossible. Seasonal temperature changes are the usual drivers in cloud and dust storm development and growth.

    Eons of atmospheric dust storm activity has left its mark on the surface of Mars. Dust carried aloft by the wind has settled out on every available surface; sand dunes have been created and moved by centuries of wind; and the effect of continual sand-blasting has modified many regions of Mars, creating yardangs and other unusual surface forms.

    This image was acquired during mid-spring near the North Pole. The linear water-ice clouds are now regional in extent and often interact with neighboring cloud system, as seen in this image. The bottom of the image shows how the interaction can destroy the linear nature. While the surface is still visible through most of the clouds, there is evidence that dust is also starting to enter the atmosphere.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 68.4, Longitude 258.8 East (101.2 West). 38 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration

  5. Modern Advances in Ablative TPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatapathy, Ethiraj

    2013-01-01

    Topics covered include: Physics of Hypersonic Flow and TPS Considerations. Destinations, Missions and Requirements. State of the Art Thermal Protection Systems Capabilities. Modern Advances in Ablative TPS. Entry Systems Concepts. Flexible TPS for Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerators. Conformal TPS for Rigid Aeroshell. 3-D Woven TPS for Extreme Entry Environment. Multi-functional Carbon Fabric for Mechanically Deployable.

  6. Jupiter Clouds in Depth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    bright near the pole. The equatorial band is also very bright in the strong 890-nm (right) image and to a lesser extent in the 727 band (middle image) but is subdued in the weak 619-nm image on the left. These are high, thin, haze layers that are nearly transparent at wavelengths outside the methane absorption bands. Another prominent feature is the Great Red Spot. About a third of it appears at the right-hand edge of the frame. It is a bright feature in methane absorption because it has extensive cloud cover reaching to high altitude. A wisp of high thin cloud can be seen trailing off its western rim in the middle and right images.

    Features mentioned above have been seen from ground-based telescopes, from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope and from NASA's Galileo spacecraft. This is the first high-resolution image in all three methane bands, and a comparison of all three reveals some interesting features. Chief among these is the very dark patch seen in the left (weak methane) image near the top-middle of the frame. It is almost invisible in the right image and it appears to be composed of strands of bright clouds in the middle image. This is a region similar to the hot spot where the Galileo Probe entered Jupiter's atmosphere in 1995. These images indicate that cloud cover is present at the higher altitudes but absent from the lower altitudes. This is also what the Galileo Probe found when it entered Jupiter's atmosphere.

    To the northwest (above and to the left) of the dark feature is a small cloud that is bright in the 619-nm (left) image but has no contrast at the other wavelengths. This is the signature expected for a thick water cloud. Another feature seen only in the weak-methane (left image) ratio is a dark ring near the center of the image. This feature is probably a counter-clockwise rotating, upwelling core surrounded by a sinking perimeter with diminished cloudiness. The fact that it is seen only in the weak methane ratio indicates the effects of a lower

  7. Estimating Cloud Cover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moseley, Christine

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this activity was to help students understand the percentage of cloud cover and make more accurate cloud cover observations. Students estimated the percentage of cloud cover represented by simulated clouds and assigned a cloud cover classification to those simulations. (Contains 2 notes and 3 tables.)

  8. A Study of Geoeffective Magnetic Clouds in the Interplanetary Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lago, Alisson Dal

    1999-01-01

    Magnetic clouds are interplanetary structures whose origins are related to Coronal Mass Ejections (CUE). Their features are: strong magnetic field intensity (typically > 10nT (nano Tesla)), a large rotation in the magnetic field angle as the cloud crosses the spacecraft, low proton temperature and Beta (thermal pressure/magnetic pressure) values (approximately 0.1). For a set of previously published magnetic cloud events and another set of clouds identified in the whole year of 1979 we present a study of plasma and magnetic field parameters. We have shown the existence of a relationship between the peak magnetic field strength and peak velocity value of the cloud, with a tendency that clouds which move at higher speeds also possess higher core magnetic field strengths. There is also an indication that this relationship is peculiar to magnetic clouds, whereas other types of non-cloud driver gas, or ICME , events do not seam to show a similar relationship. Both parameters, velocity and magnetic field strength, are related to Magnetic Storms. It is also addressed the interaction between magnetic clouds and other features in the interplanetary medium by calculating the Total Static Pressure, Magnetic plus Thermal, and the Dynamic Pressure relative to other structures surrounding the cloud, investigating their possible relation to magnetic cloud field enhancement. This work contributes to: (1) Space Weather Forecasting, through the calculation of the magnetic cloud field strengths by knowing their velocities (the latter can be remotely measured by sequences of coronograph images); (2) the study of the relation between magnetic clouds and magnetic storms; and (3) the study of the interaction between magnetic clouds and other interplanetary structures surrounding it.

  9. Ionization nebulae surrounding supersoft X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rappaport, S.; Chiang, E.; Kallman, T.; Malina, R.

    1994-01-01

    In this work we carry out a theoretical investigation of a new type of astrophysical gaseous nebula, viz., ionized regions surrounding supersoft X-ray sources. Supersoft X-ray sources, many of which have characteristic luminosities of approximately 10(exp 37)-(10(exp 38) ergs/s and effective temperatures of approximately 4 x 10(exp 5) K, were first discovered with the Einstein Observatory. These sources have now been shown to constitute a distinct class of X-ray source and are being found in substantial numbers with ROSAT. We predict that these sources should be surrounded by regions of ionized hydrogen and helium with properties that are distinct from other astrophysical gaseous nebulae. We present caluations of the ionization and temperature structure of these ionization nebulae, as well as the expected optical line fluxes. The ionization profiles for both hydrogen and helium exhibit substantially more gradual transitions from the ionized to the unionized state than is the case for conventional H II regions. The calculated optical line intensitites are presented as absolute fluxes from sources in the Large Magellanic Cloud and as fractions of the central source luminosity. We find, in particular, that (O III) lambda 5008 and He II lambda 4686 are especially prominent in these ionization nebulae as compared to other astrophysical nebulae. We propose that searches for supersoft X-rays via their characteristic optical lines may reveal sources in regions where the soft X-rays are nearly completely absorbed by the interstellar medium.

  10. Evidence for Natural Variability in Marine Stratocumulus Cloud Properties Due to Cloud-Aerosol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albrecht, Bruce; Sharon, Tarah; Jonsson, Haf; Minnis, Patrick; Minnis, Patrick; Ayers, J. Kirk; Khaiyer, Mandana M.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, aircraft observations from the Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter are used to characterize the variability in drizzle, cloud, and aerosol properties associated with cloud rifts and the surrounding solid clouds observed off the coast of California. A flight made on 16 July 1999 provided measurements directly across an interface between solid and rift cloud conditions. Aircraft instrumentation allowed for measurements of aerosol, cloud droplet, and drizzle spectra. CCN concentrations were measured in addition to standard thermodynamic variables and the winds. A Forward Scatter Spectrometer Probe (FSSP) measured size distribution of cloud-sized droplets. A Cloud Imaging Probe (CIP) was used to measure distributions of drizzle-sized droplets. Aerosol distributions were obtained from a Cloud Aerosol Scatterprobe (CAS). The CAS probe measured aerosols, cloud droplets and drizzle-sized drops; for this study. The CAS probe was used to measure aerosols in the size range of 0.5 micron - 1 micron. Smaller aerosols were characterized using an Ultrafine Condensation Particle Counter (CPC) sensor. The CPC was used to measure particles with diameters greater than 0.003 micron. By subtracting different count concentrations measured with the CPC, this probe was capable of identifying ultrafine particles those falling in the size range of 3 nanometers - 7 nanometers that are believed to be associated with new particle production.

  11. Global analysis of cloud field coverage and radiative properties, using morphological methods and MODIS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar-Or, R. Z.; Altaratz, O.; Koren, I.

    2011-01-01

    The recently recognized continuous transition zone between detectable clouds and cloud-free atmosphere ("the twilight zone") is affected by undetectable clouds and humidified aerosol. In this study, we suggest to distinguish cloud fields (including the detectable clouds and the surrounding twilight zone) from cloud-free areas, which are not affected by clouds. For this classification, a robust and simple-to-implement cloud field masking algorithm which uses only the spatial distribution of clouds, is presented in detail. A global analysis, estimating Earth's cloud field coverage (50° S-50° N) for 28 July 2008, using the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data, finds that while the declared cloud fraction is 51%, the global cloud field coverage reaches 88%. The results reveal the low likelihood for finding a cloud-free pixel and suggest that this likelihood may decrease as the pixel size becomes larger. A global latitudinal analysis of cloud fields finds that unlike oceans, which are more uniformly covered by cloud fields, land areas located under the subsidence zones of the Hadley cell (the desert belts), contain proper areas for investigating cloud-free atmosphere as there is 40-80% probability to detect clear sky over them. Usually these golden-pixels, with higher likelihood to be free of clouds, are over deserts. Independent global statistical analysis, using MODIS aerosol and cloud products, reveals a sharp exponential decay of the global mean aerosol optical depth (AOD) as a function of the distance from the nearest detectable cloud, both above ocean and land. Similar statistical analysis finds an exponential growth of mean aerosol fine-mode fraction (FMF) over oceans when the distance from the nearest cloud increases. A 30 km scale break clearly appears in several analyses here, suggesting this is a typical natural scale of cloud fields. This work shows different microphysical and optical properties of cloud fields, urging to separately

  12. Global analysis of cloud field coverage and radiative properties, using morphological methods and MODIS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar-Or, R. Z.; Altaratz, O.; Koren, I.

    2010-08-01

    The recently recognized continuous transition zone between detectable clouds and cloud-free atmosphere ("the twilight zone") is affected by undetectable clouds and humidified aerosol. In this study, we suggest to distinguish cloud fields (including the detectable clouds and the surrounding twilight zone) from cloud-free areas, which are not affected by clouds. For this classification, a robust and simple-to-implement cloud field masking algorithm which uses only the spatial distribution of clouds, is presented in detail. A global analysis, estimating Earth's cloud field coverage (50° S-50° N) for 28 July 2008, using the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data, finds that while the declared cloud fraction is 51%, the global cloud field coverage reaches 88%. The results reveal the low likelihood for finding a cloud free pixel and suggest that this likelihood may decrease as the pixel size becomes larger. A global latitudinal analysis of cloud fields finds that unlike oceans, which are more uniformly covered by cloud fields, land areas located under the subsidence zones of the Hadley cell (the desert belts), contain proper areas for investigating cloud free atmosphere as there is 40-80% probability to detect clear sky over them. Usually these golden-pixels, with higher likelihood to be free of clouds, are over deserts. Independent global statistical analysis, using MODIS aerosol and cloud products, reveals a sharp exponential decay of the global mean aerosol optical depth (AOD) as a function of the distance from the nearest detectable cloud, both above ocean and land. Similar statistical analysis finds an exponential growth of mean aerosol fine-mode fraction (FMF) over Oceans when the distance from the nearest cloud increases. A 30 km scale break clearly appears in several analyses here, suggesting this is a typical natural scale of cloud fields. This work shows different microphysical and optical properties of cloud fields, urging to separately

  13. Esophageal papilloma: Flexible endoscopic ablation by radiofrequency

    PubMed Central

    del Genio, Gianmattia; del Genio, Federica; Schettino, Pietro; Limongelli, Paolo; Tolone, Salvatore; Brusciano, Luigi; Avellino, Manuela; Vitiello, Chiara; Docimo, Giovanni; Pezzullo, Angelo; Docimo, Ludovico

    2015-01-01

    Squamous papilloma of the esophagus is a rare benign lesion of the esophagus. Radiofrequency ablation is an established endoscopic technique for the eradication of Barrett esophagus. No cases of endoscopic ablation of esophageal papilloma by radiofrequency ablation (RFA) have been reported. We report a case of esophageal papilloma successfully treated with a single session of radiofrequency ablation. Endoscopic ablation of the lesion was achieved by radiofrequency using a new catheter inserted through the working channel of endoscope. The esophageal ablated tissue was removed by a specifically designed cup. Complete ablation was confirmed at 3 mo by endoscopy with biopsies. This case supports feasibility and safety of as a new potential indication for BarrxTM RFA in patients with esophageal papilloma. PMID:25789102

  14. Percutaneous ablation of benign bone tumors.

    PubMed

    Welch, Brian T; Welch, Timothy J

    2011-09-01

    Percutaneous image-guided ablation has become a standard of practice and one of the primary modalities for treatment of benign bone tumors. Ablation is most commonly used to treat osteoid osteomas but may also be used in the treatment of chondroblastomas, osteoblastomas, and giant cell tumors. Percutaneous image-guided ablation of benign bone tumors carries a high success rate (>90% in case series) and results in decreased morbidity, mortality, and expense compared with traditional surgical methods. The ablation technique most often applied to benign bone lesions is radiofrequency ablation. Because the ablation technique has been extensively applied to osteoid osteomas and because of the uncommon nature of other benign bone tumors, we will primarily focus this discussion on the percutaneous ablation of osteoid osteomas.

  15. Surround-Masking Affects Visual Estimation Ability

    PubMed Central

    Jastrzebski, Nicola R.; Hugrass, Laila E.; Crewther, Sheila G.; Crewther, David P.

    2017-01-01

    Visual estimation of numerosity involves the discrimination of magnitude between two distributions or perceptual sets that vary in number of elements. How performance on such estimation depends on peripheral sensory stimulation is unclear, even in typically developing adults. Here, we varied the central and surround contrast of stimuli that comprised a visual estimation task in order to determine whether mechanisms involved with the removal of unessential visual input functionally contributes toward number acuity. The visual estimation judgments of typically developed adults were significantly impaired for high but not low contrast surround stimulus conditions. The center and surround contrasts of the stimuli also differentially affected the accuracy of numerosity estimation depending on whether fewer or more dots were presented. Remarkably, observers demonstrated the highest mean percentage accuracy across stimulus conditions in the discrimination of more elements when the surround contrast was low and the background luminance of the central region containing the elements was dark (black center). Conversely, accuracy was severely impaired during the discrimination of fewer elements when the surround contrast was high and the background luminance of the central region was mid level (gray center). These findings suggest that estimation ability is functionally related to the quality of low-order filtration of unessential visual information. These surround masking results may help understanding of the poor visual estimation ability commonly observed in developmental dyscalculia. PMID:28360845

  16. Martian Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 28 June 2004 The atmosphere of Mars is a dynamic system. Water-ice clouds, fog, and hazes can make imaging the surface from space difficult. Dust storms can grow from local disturbances to global sizes, through which imaging is impossible. Seasonal temperature changes are the usual drivers in cloud and dust storm development and growth.

    Eons of atmospheric dust storm activity has left its mark on the surface of Mars. Dust carried aloft by the wind has settled out on every available surface; sand dunes have been created and moved by centuries of wind; and the effect of continual sand-blasting has modified many regions of Mars, creating yardangs and other unusual surface forms.

    This image was acquired during early spring near the North Pole. The linear 'ripples' are transparent water-ice clouds. This linear form is typical for polar clouds. The black regions on the margins of this image are areas of saturation caused by the build up of scattered light from the bright polar material during the long image exposure.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 68.1, Longitude 147.9 East (212.1 West). 38 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS

  17. ICF Ablator Physics Experiments on Saturn and Nova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Rick

    1996-11-01

    In indirect drive ICF, the driver energy is absorbed in a high-Z enclosure (or "hohlraum") that surrounds a spherical shell (or "capsule") containing DT fuel. The hohlraum walls are heated by the driver and emit x-rays, which are absorbed by the capsule material (the "ablator") and drive the implosion. We have used the Saturn z-pinch at SNL and the Nova laser at LLNL to explore the behavior of ablator material in x-ray radiation environments comparable in magnitude, spectrum and duration to those that will be experienced in National Ignition Facility (NIF) hohlraums. The large x-ray outputs available from pulsed-power driven z-pinches have enabled us to drive hohlraums of full NIF ignition scale size at radiation temperatures and timescales comparable to those required for the low power "foot" pulse of an ignition capsule. The high intensity of the Nova laser has allowed us to study capsule ablator physics in smaller scale hohlraums at radiation temperatures and timescales relevant to the peak power pulse for an ignition capsule. Taken together, these experiments have allowed us test our radiation-hydrodynamics computer code predictions of ablator opacity, radiation flow, and equation of state over almost the complete range of radiation environments to be encountered in a NIF hohlraum. * in collaboration with J. Porter, G. Chandler, D. Fehl, D. Jobe, R. Leeper, K. Matzen, J. McGurn, D. Noack, L. Ruggles, P. Sawyer, J. Torres, M. Vargas, D. Zagar (SNL), and H. Kornblum, T. Orzechowski, L. Suter, R. Thiessen, R. Wallace (LLNL), and the Saturn and Nova operations and diagnostic crews at SNL and LLNL. +This work was supported by the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  18. Microwave Ablation Compared with Radiofrequency Ablation for Breast Tissue in an Ex Vivo Bovine Udder Model

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Toshihiro; Westphal, Saskia; Isfort, Peter; Braunschweig, Till; Penzkofer, Tobias Bruners, Philipp; Kichikawa, Kimihiko; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas Mahnken, Andreas H.

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: To compare the effectiveness of microwave (MW) ablation with radiofrequency (RF) ablation for treating breast tissue in a nonperfused ex vivo model of healthy bovine udder tissue. Materials and Methods: MW ablations were performed at power outputs of 25W, 35W, and 45W using a 915-MHz frequency generator and a 2-cm active tip antenna. RF ablations were performed with a bipolar RF system with 2- and 3-cm active tip electrodes. Tissue temperatures were continuously monitored during ablation. Results: The mean short-axis diameters of the coagulation zones were 1.34 {+-} 0.14, 1.45 {+-} 0.13, and 1.74 {+-} 0.11 cm for MW ablation at outputs of 25W, 35W, and 45W. For RF ablation, the corresponding values were 1.16 {+-} 0.09 and 1.26 {+-} 0.14 cm with electrodes having 2- and 3-cm active tips, respectively. The mean coagulation volumes were 2.27 {+-} 0.65, 2.85 {+-} 0.72, and 4.45 {+-} 0.47 cm{sup 3} for MW ablation at outputs of 25W, 35W, and 45W and 1.18 {+-} 0.30 and 2.29 {+-} 0.55 cm{sup 3} got RF ablation with 2- and 3-cm electrodes, respectively. MW ablations at 35W and 45W achieved significantly longer short-axis diameters than RF ablations (P < 0.05). The highest tissue temperature was achieved with MW ablation at 45W (P < 0.05). On histological examination, the extent of the ablation zone in MW ablations was less affected by tissue heterogeneity than that in RF ablations. Conclusion: MW ablation appears to be advantageous with respect to the volume of ablation and the shape of the margin of necrosis compared with RF ablation in an ex vivo bovine udder.

  19. Crater Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA06085 Crater Clouds

    The crater on the right side of this image is affecting the local wind regime. Note the bright line of clouds streaming off the north rim of the crater.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -78.8N, Longitude 320.0E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  20. Characterization of excimer laser ablation generated pepsin particles using multi-wavelength photoacoustic instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopp, B.; Kecskeméti, G.; Smausz, T.; Ajtai, T.; Filep, A.; Utry, N.; Kohut, A.; Bozóki, Z.; Szabó, G.

    2012-05-01

    Preparation of organic thin layers on various special substrates using the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique is an important task from the point of view of bioengineering and biosensor technologies. Earlier studies demonstrated that particle ejection starts during the ablating laser pulse resulting in significant shielding effects which can influence the real fluence on the target surface and consequently the efficiency of layer preparation. In this study, we introduce a photoacoustic absorption measurement technique for in-situ characterization of ablated particles during PLD experiments. A KrF excimer laser beam ( λ=248 nm, FWHM=18 ns) was focused onto pepsin targets in a PLD chamber; the applied laser fluences were 440 and 660 mJ/cm2. We determined the wavelength dependence of optical absorption and mass specific absorption coefficient of laser ablation generated pepsin aerosols in the UV-VIS-NIR range. On the basis of our measurements, we calculated the absorbance at the ablating laser wavelength, too. We demonstrated that when the laser ablation generated pepsin aerosols spread through the whole PLD chamber the effect of absorptivity is negligible for the subsequent pulses. However, the interaction of the laser pulse and the just formed particle cloud generated by the same pulse is more significant.

  1. Dentin ablation-rate measurements in endodontics witj HF and CO2 laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makropoulou, Mersini I.; Serafetinides, Alexander A.; Khabbaz, Marouan; Sykaras, Sotirios; Tsikrikas, G. N.

    1996-01-01

    Recent studies focused on the ability of the laser light to enlarge the root canal during the endodontic therapy. The aim of this research is the experimental and theoretical study of the ablation rate of two infrared laser wavelengths on dentin. Thirty freshly extracted human teeth were longitudinally sectioned at thicknesses ranged from 0.5 to 2 mm, and irradiated on the root canal dentin. The measured ablation rates in dentinal wall of the root canal showed that the HF laser at 2.9 micrometer can more effectively penetrate into the tissue, whereas the carbon dioxide laser at 10.6 micrometer leads to high thermal damage of the ablation crater surroundings.

  2. Cloud-Top Entrainment in Stratocumulus Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellado, Juan Pedro

    2017-01-01

    Cloud entrainment, the mixing between cloudy and clear air at the boundary of clouds, constitutes one paradigm for the relevance of small scales in the Earth system: By regulating cloud lifetimes, meter- and submeter-scale processes at cloud boundaries can influence planetary-scale properties. Understanding cloud entrainment is difficult given the complexity and diversity of the associated phenomena, which include turbulence entrainment within a stratified medium, convective instabilities driven by radiative and evaporative cooling, shear instabilities, and cloud microphysics. Obtaining accurate data at the required small scales is also challenging, for both simulations and measurements. During the past few decades, however, high-resolution simulations and measurements have greatly advanced our understanding of the main mechanisms controlling cloud entrainment. This article reviews some of these advances, focusing on stratocumulus clouds, and indicates remaining challenges.

  3. Characterization of tracked radiofrequency ablation in phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chun-Cheng R.; Miga, Michael I.; Galloway, Robert L.

    2007-10-15

    In radiofrequency ablation (RFA), successful therapy requires accurate, image-guided placement of the ablation device in a location selected by a predictive treatment plan. Current planning methods rely on geometric models of ablations that are not sensitive to underlying physical processes in RFA. Implementing plans based on computational models of RFA with image-guided techniques, however, has not been well characterized. To study the use of computational models of RFA in planning needle placement, this work compared ablations performed with an optically tracked RFA device with corresponding models of the ablations. The calibration of the tracked device allowed the positions of distal features of the device, particularly the tips of the needle electrodes, to be determined to within 1.4{+-}0.6 mm of uncertainty. Ablations were then performed using the tracked device in a phantom system based on an agarose-albumin mixture. Images of the sliced phantom obtained from the ablation experiments were then compared with the predictions of a bioheat transfer model of RFA, which used the positional data of the tracked device obtained during ablation. The model was demonstrated to predict 90% of imaged pixels classified as being ablated. The discrepancies between model predictions and observations were analyzed and attributed to needle tracking inaccuracy as well as to uncertainties in model parameters. The results suggest the feasibility of using finite element modeling to plan ablations with predictable outcomes when implemented using tracked RFA.

  4. Distribution of Water Vapor in Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnick, Gary J.; Tolls, Volker; Snell, Ronald L.; Bergin, Edwin A.; Hollenbach, David J.; Kaufman, Michael J.; Li, Di; Neufeld, David A.

    2011-01-01

    We report the results of a large-area study of water vapor along the Orion Molecular Cloud ridge, the purpose of which was to determine the depth-dependent distribution of gas-phase water in dense molecular clouds. We find that the water vapor measured toward 77 spatial positions along the face-on Orion ridge, excluding positions surrounding the outflow associated with BN/KL and IRc2, display integrated intensities that correlate strongly with known cloud surface tracers such as CN, C2H, 13CO J = 5-4, and HCN, and less well with the volume tracer N2H+. Moreover, at total column densities corresponding to A V< 15 mag, the ratio of H2O to C18O integrated intensities shows a clear rise approaching the cloud surface. We show that this behavior cannot be accounted for by either optical depth or excitation effects, but suggests that gas-phase water abundances fall at large A V. These results are important as they affect measures of the true water-vapor abundance in molecular clouds by highlighting the limitations of comparing measured water-vapor column densities with such traditional cloud tracers as 13CO or C18O. These results also support cloud models that incorporate freeze out of molecules as a critical component in determining the depth-dependent abundance of water vapor.

  5. Artificial meteor ablation studies: Olivine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, M. B.; Cunningham, G. G.

    1973-01-01

    Artificial meteor ablation was performed on a Mg-rich olivine sample using an arc-heated plasma of ionized air. Experimental conditions simulated a meteor traveling about 12 km/sec at an altitude of 70 km. The mineral content of the original olivine sample was 98% olivine (including traces of olivine alteration products) and 2% chromite. Forsterite content of the original olivine was Fo-89. After ablation, the forsterite content had increased to Fo-94 in the recrystallized olivine. In addition, lamella-like intergrowths of magnetite were prevalent constituents. Wherever magnetite occurred, there was an increase in Mg and a corresponding decrease in Fe for the recrystallized olivine. The Allende fusion crust consisted of a recrystallized olivine, which was more Mg-rich and Fe-deficient than the original meteorite's olivine, and abundant magnetite grains. Although troilite and pentlandite were the common opaque mineral constituents in this meteorite, magnetite was the principal opaque mineral found in the fusion crust.

  6. Laser Ablation for Medical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Ken-Ichi

    Medical applications of laser are measurement, laser surgery, in-situ monitoring, and processing of medical devices. In this paper, author briefly reviews the trends of medical applications, describes some new applications, and then discuss about the future trends and problems of medical applications. At present, the domestic market of laser equipment for medical applications is nearly 1/10 of that for industrial applications, which has registered significant growth continuously. Laser surgery as a minimum invasive surgery under arthroscope is expected to decrease the pain of patients. Precise processing such as cutting and welding is suitable for manufacturing medical devices. Pulsed laser deposition has been successfully applied to the thin film coating. The corneal refractive surgery by ArF excimer laser has been widely accepted for its highly safe operation. Laser ablation for retinal implant in the visual prosthesis is one of the promising applications of laser ablation in medicine. New applications with femtosecond laser are expected in the near future.

  7. Percutaneous ablation of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    D’Onofrio, Mirko; Ciaravino, Valentina; De Robertis, Riccardo; Barbi, Emilio; Salvia, Roberto; Girelli, Roberto; Paiella, Salvatore; Gasparini, Camilla; Cardobi, Nicolò; Bassi, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is a highly aggressive tumor with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. Prognosis and treatment depend on whether the tumor is resectable or not, which mostly depends on how quickly the diagnosis is made. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy can be both used in cases of non-resectable pancreatic cancer. In cases of pancreatic neoplasm that is locally advanced, non-resectable, but non-metastatic, it is possible to apply percutaneous treatments that are able to induce tumor cytoreduction. The aim of this article will be to describe the multiple currently available treatment techniques (radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation), their results, and their possible complications, with the aid of a literature review. PMID:27956791

  8. Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Richard E.; Bol'shakov, Alexander A.; Mao, Xianglei; McKay, Christopher P.; Perry, Dale L.; Sorkhabi, Osman

    2011-02-01

    A new method of performing optical isotopic analysis of condensed samples in ambient air and at ambient pressure has been developed: Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry (LAMIS). The technique uses radiative transitions from molecular species either directly vaporized from a sample or formed by associative mechanisms of atoms or ions in a laser ablation plume. This method is an advanced modification of a known atomic emission technique called laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The new method — LAMIS — can determine not only chemical composition but also isotopic ratios of elements in the sample. Isotopic measurements are enabled by significantly larger isotopic shifts found in molecular spectra relative to atomic spectra. Analysis can be performed from a distance and in real time. No sample preparation or pre-treatment is required. Detection of the isotopes of hydrogen, boron, carbon, and oxygen are discussed to illustrate the technique.

  9. Percutaneous ablation of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    D'Onofrio, Mirko; Ciaravino, Valentina; De Robertis, Riccardo; Barbi, Emilio; Salvia, Roberto; Girelli, Roberto; Paiella, Salvatore; Gasparini, Camilla; Cardobi, Nicolò; Bassi, Claudio

    2016-11-28

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is a highly aggressive tumor with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. Prognosis and treatment depend on whether the tumor is resectable or not, which mostly depends on how quickly the diagnosis is made. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy can be both used in cases of non-resectable pancreatic cancer. In cases of pancreatic neoplasm that is locally advanced, non-resectable, but non-metastatic, it is possible to apply percutaneous treatments that are able to induce tumor cytoreduction. The aim of this article will be to describe the multiple currently available treatment techniques (radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation), their results, and their possible complications, with the aid of a literature review.

  10. Automatic Cloud Bursting under FermiCloud

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hao; Shangping, Ren; Garzoglio, Gabriele; Timm, Steven; Bernabeu, Gerard; Kim, Hyun Woo; Chadwick, Keith; Jang, Haengjin; Noh, Seo-Young

    2013-01-01

    Cloud computing is changing the infrastructure upon which scientific computing depends from supercomputers and distributed computing clusters to a more elastic cloud-based structure. The service-oriented focus and elasticity of clouds can not only facilitate technology needs of emerging business but also shorten response time and reduce operational costs of traditional scientific applications. Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) is currently in the process of building its own private cloud, FermiCloud, which allows the existing grid infrastructure to use dynamically provisioned resources on FermiCloud to accommodate increased but dynamic computation demand from scientists in the domains of High Energy Physics (HEP) and other research areas. Cloud infrastructure also allows to increase a private cloud’s resource capacity through “bursting” by borrowing or renting resources from other community or commercial clouds when needed. This paper introduces a joint project on building a cloud federation to support HEP applications between Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and Korea Institution of Science and Technology Information, with technical contributions from the Illinois Institute of Technology. In particular, this paper presents two recent accomplishments of the joint project: (a) cloud bursting automation and (b) load balancer. Automatic cloud bursting allows computer resources to be dynamically reconfigured to meet users’ demands. The load balance algorithm which the cloud bursting depends on decides when and where new resources need to be allocated. Our preliminary prototyping and experiments have shown promising success, yet, they also have opened new challenges to be studied

  11. Center-Surround Inhibition in Working Memory.

    PubMed

    Kiyonaga, Anastasia; Egner, Tobias

    2016-01-11

    Directing visual attention toward a particular feature or location in the environment suppresses processing of nearby stimuli [1-4]. Echoing the center-surround organization of retinal ganglion cell receptive fields [5], and biasing of competitive local neuronal dynamics in favor of task-relevant stimuli [6], this "inhibitory surround" attention mechanism accentuates the demarcation between task-relevant and irrelevant items. Here, we show that internally maintaining a color stimulus in working memory (WM), rather than visually attending the stimulus in the external environment, produces an analogous pattern of inhibition for stimuli that are nearby in color space. Replicating a well-known effect of attentional capture by stimuli that match WM content [7], visual attention was biased toward (task-irrelevant) stimuli that exactly matched a WM item. This bias was curtailed, however, for stimuli that were very similar to the WM content (i.e., within the inhibitory zone surrounding the focus of WM) and recovered for less similar stimuli (i.e., beyond the bounds of the inhibitory surround). Moreover, the expression of this inhibition effect was positively associated with WM performance across observers. In a second experiment, inhibition also occurred between two similar items simultaneously held in WM. This suggests that maintenance in WM is characterized by an excitatory peak centered on the focus of (internal) attention, surrounded by an inhibitory zone to limit interference by irrelevant and confusable representations. Here, thus, we show for the first time that the same center-surround selection mechanism that focuses visual attention on sensory stimuli also selectively maintains internally activated representations in WM.

  12. Microwave Ablation Compared to Radiofrequency Ablation for Hepatic Lesions: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Huo, Ya Ruth; Eslick, Guy D

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of microwave (MW) ablation compared with radiofrequency (RF) ablation for hepatic lesions by using meta-analytic techniques. Overall, 16 studies involving 2,062 patients were included. MW ablation was found to have significantly better 6-year overall survival than RF ablation (odds ratio, 1.64, 95% confidence interval, 1.15-2.35), but this was based on a few articles (n = 3 of 16). MW ablation and RF ablation had similar 1-5-year overall survival, disease-free survival, local recurrence rate, and adverse events. Based on similar safety and efficacy outcomes, either MW ablation or RF ablation may be used for effective local hepatic therapy.

  13. Tumor Thermal Ablation Enhancement by Micromaterials.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fan; Su, Hongying; Han, Xiangjun; Bao, Han; Qi, Ji

    2016-01-07

    Thermal ablation is a minimally invasive therapeutic technique that has shown remarkable potential in treating un resectable tumors. However, clinical applications have stalled, due to safety ambiguities, slow heat induction, lengthy ablation times, and post-therapeutic monitoring issues. To further improve treatment efficacy, an assortment of micro materials (eg, nano particulates of gold, silica, or iron oxide and single-walled carbon nanotubes) are under study as thermal ablative adjuncts.In recent years, the micro material domain has become especially interesting.In vivo and in vitro animal studies have validated the use of microspheres as embolic agents in liver tumors, in advance of radiofrequency ablation. Microcapsules and micro bubbles serving as ultrasound contrast and ablation sensibilizers are strong prospects for clinical applications. This review was conducted to explore benefits of the three aforementioned micro scale technologies, in conjunction with tumor thermal ablation.

  14. Percutaneous thermal ablation of primary lung cancer.

    PubMed

    de Baere, T; Tselikas, L; Catena, V; Buy, X; Deschamps, F; Palussière, J

    2016-10-01

    Percutaneous ablation of small-size non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has demonstrated feasibility and safety in nonsurgical candidates. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA), the most commonly used technique, has an 80-90% reported rate of complete ablation, with the best results obtained in tumors less than 2-3cm in diameter. The highest one-, three-, and five-year overall survival rates reported in NSCLC following RFA are 97.7%, 72.9%, and 55.7% respectively. Tumor size, tumor stage, and underlying comorbidities are the main predictors of survival. Other ablation techniques such as microwave or cryoablation may help overcome the limitations of RFA in the future, particularly for large tumors or those close to large vessels. Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) has its own complications and carries the risk of fiducial placement requiring multiple lung punctures. SABR has also demonstrated significant efficacy in treating small-size lung tumors and should be compared to percutaneous ablation.

  15. Image-guided ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lencioni, Riccardo; Crocetti, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Image-guided ablation is accepted as the best therapeutic choice for patients with early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) when surgical options-including resection and transplantation-are precluded. The term image-guided tumor ablation is defined as the direct application of chemical substances or sources of energy to a focal tumor in an attempt to achieve eradication or substantial tumor destruction. Over the past 25 years, several methods for local tumor destruction have been developed and clinically tested. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has shown superior anticancer effect and greater survival benefit with respect to the seminal percutaneous technique, ethanol injection, in meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials, and is currently established as the standard ablative modality. Nevertheless, novel thermal and nonthermal techniques for tumor ablation-including microwave ablation and irreversible electroporation-seem to have potential to improve the efficacy of RFA and are currently undergoing clinical investigation.

  16. ANGULAR MOMENTUM IN GIANT MOLECULAR CLOUDS. I. THE MILKY WAY

    SciTech Connect

    Imara, Nia; Blitz, Leo

    2011-05-10

    We present a detailed analysis comparing the velocity fields in molecular clouds and the atomic gas that surrounds them in order to address the origin of the gradients. To that end, we present first-moment intensity-weighted velocity maps of the molecular clouds and surrounding atomic gas. The maps are made from high-resolution {sup 13}CO observations and 21 cm observations from the Leiden/Argentine/Bonn Galactic H I Survey. We find that (1) the atomic gas associated with each molecular cloud has a substantial velocity gradient-ranging from 0.02 to 0.07 km s{sup -1} pc{sup -1}-whether or not the molecular cloud itself has a substantial linear gradient. (2) If the gradients in the molecular and atomic gas were due to rotation, this would imply that the molecular clouds have less specific angular momentum than the surrounding H I by a factor of 1-6. (3) Most importantly, the velocity gradient position angles in the molecular and atomic gas are generally widely separated-by as much as 130 deg. in the case of the Rosette molecular cloud. This result argues against the hypothesis that molecular clouds formed by simple top-down collapse from atomic gas.

  17. Stable water isotopologue ratios in fog and cloud droplets of liquid clouds are not size-dependent

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spiegel, J.K.; Aemisegger, F.; Scholl, M.; Wienhold, F.G.; Collett, J.L.; Lee, T.; van Pinxteren, D.; Mertes, S.; Tilgner, A.; Herrmann, H.; Werner, Roland A.; Buchmann, N.; Eugster, W.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we present the first observations of stable water isotopologue ratios in cloud droplets of different sizes collected simultaneously. We address the question whether the isotope ratio of droplets in a liquid cloud varies as a function of droplet size. Samples were collected from a ground intercepted cloud (= fog) during the Hill Cap Cloud Thuringia 2010 campaign (HCCT-2010) using a three-stage Caltech Active Strand Cloud water Collector (CASCC). An instrument test revealed that no artificial isotopic fractionation occurs during sample collection with the CASCC. Furthermore, we could experimentally confirm the hypothesis that the δ values of cloud droplets of the relevant droplet sizes (μm-range) were not significantly different and thus can be assumed to be in isotopic equilibrium immediately with the surrounding water vapor. However, during the dissolution period of the cloud, when the supersaturation inside the cloud decreased and the cloud began to clear, differences in isotope ratios of the different droplet sizes tended to be larger. This is likely to result from the cloud's heterogeneity, implying that larger and smaller cloud droplets have been collected at different moments in time, delivering isotope ratios from different collection times.

  18. Imaging polychromator for density measurements of polystyrene pellet cloud on the Large Helical Device.

    PubMed

    Sharov, I A; Sergeev, V Yu; Miroshnikov, I V; Tamura, N; Kuteev, B V; Sudo, S

    2015-04-01

    Experimental data on spatial distributions of a pellet cloud electron density are necessary for the development of many applications of pellet injection, namely, plasma fuelling, discharge control, and plasma diagnostics. An improved approach of electron density measurements inside the cloud of a polystyrene pellet ablating in hot plasma of the large helical device is described. Density values of (1-30) × 10(16) cm(-3) depending on the background plasma parameters and distance from the solid pellet were measured.

  19. Antarctic Mesospheric Clouds Formed From Space Shuttle Exhaust

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-06

    Antarctica identify iron ablated from the shuttle’s main engines. Additional satellite observations of polar mesospheric clouds (PMCs) show a burst...evidence heretofore that a shuttle plume can reach Antarctica . Any significant global-scale impact to PMCs has therefore been unsupported by...ground-based lidar observations of both Fe and PMCs from Antarctica that show rapid inter-hemispheric transport of the plume and its arrival in

  20. Feasibility of ablative fractional laser-assisted drug delivery with optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chih-Hsun; Tsai, Meng-Tsan; Shen, Su-Chin; Ng, Chau Yee; Jung, Shih-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Fractional resurfacing creates hundreds of microscopic wounds in the skin without injuring surrounding tissue. This technique allows rapid wound healing owing to small injury regions, and has been proven as an effective method for repairing photodamaged skin. Recently, ablative fractional laser (AFL) treatment has been demonstrated to facilitate topical drug delivery into skin. However, induced fractional photothermolysis depends on several parameters, such as incident angle, exposure energy, and spot size of the fractional laser. In this study, we used fractional CO2 laser to induce microscopic ablation array on the nail for facilitating drug delivery through the nail. To ensure proper energy delivery without damaging tissue structures beneath the nail plate, optical coherence tomography (OCT) was implemented for quantitative evaluation of induced microscopic ablation zone (MAZ). Moreover, to further study the feasibility of drug delivery, normal saline was dripped on the exposure area of fingernail and the speckle variance in OCT signal was used to observe water diffusion through the ablative channels into the nail plate. In conclusion, this study establishes OCT as an effective tool for the investigation of fractional photothermolysis and water/drug delivery through microscopic ablation channels after nail fractional laser treatment. PMID:25426321

  1. Percutaneous Radiofrequency Lung Ablation Combined with Transbronchial Saline Injection: An Experimental Study in Swine

    SciTech Connect

    Kawai, T. Kaminou, T. Sugiura, K.; Hashimoto, M.; Ohuchi, Y.; Adachi, A.; Fujioka, S.; Ito, H.; Nakamura, K.; Ihaya, T.; Ogawa, T.

    2010-02-15

    To evaluate the efficacy of radiofrequency lung ablation with transbronchial saline injection. The bilateral lungs of eight living swine were used. A 13-gauge bone biopsy needle was inserted percutaneously into the lung, and 1 ml of muscle paste was injected to create a tumor mimic. In total, 21 nodules were ablated. In the saline injection group (group A), radiofrequency ablation (RFA) was performed for 11 nodules after transbronchial saline injection under balloon occlusion with a 2-cm active single internally cooled electrode. In the control group (group B), conventional RFA was performed for 10 nodules as a control. The infused saline liquid showed a wedge-shaped and homogeneous distribution surrounding a tumor mimic. All 21 RFAs were successfully completed. The total ablation time was significantly longer (13.4 {+-} 2.8 min vs. 8.9 {+-} 3.5 min; P = 0.0061) and the tissue impedance was significantly lower in group A compared with group B (73.1 {+-} 8.8 {Omega} vs. 100.6 {+-} 16.6 {Omega}; P = 0.0002). The temperature of the ablated area was not significantly different (69.4 {+-} 9.1{sup o}C vs. 66.0 {+-} 7.9{sup o}C; P = 0.4038). There was no significant difference of tumor mimic volume (769 {+-} 343 mm{sup 3} vs. 625 {+-} 191 mm{sup 3}; P = 0.2783). The volume of the coagulated area was significantly larger in group A than in group B (3886 {+-} 1247 mm{sup 3} vs. 2375 {+-} 1395 mm{sup 3}; P = 0.0221). Percutaneous radiofrequency lung ablation combined with transbronchial saline injection can create an extended area of ablation.

  2. Precisely shaped acoustic ablation of tumors utilizing steerable needle and 3D ultrasound image guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boctor, Emad M.; Stolka, Philipp; Kang, Hyun-Jae; Clarke, Clyde; Rucker, Caleb; Croom, Jordon; Burdette, E. Clif; Webster, Robert J., III

    2010-02-01

    Many recent studies have demonstrated the efficacy of interstitial ablative approaches for the treatment of hepatic tumors. Despite these promising results, current systems remain highly dependent on operator skill, and cannot treat many tumors because there is little control of the size and shape of the zone of necrosis, and no control over ablator trajectory within tissue once insertion has taken place. Additionally, tissue deformation and target motion make it extremely difficult to place the ablator device precisely into the target. Irregularly shaped target volumes typically require multiple insertions and several overlapping (thermal) lesions, which are even more challenging to accomplish in a precise, predictable, and timely manner without causing excessive damage to surrounding normal tissues. In answer to these problems, we have developed a steerable acoustic ablator called the ACUSITT with the ability of directional energy delivery to precisely shape the applied thermal dose . In this paper, we address image guidance for this device, proposing an innovative method for accurate tracking and tool registration with spatially-registered intra-operative three-dimensional US volumes, without relying on an external tracking device. This method is applied to guid-ance of the flexible, snake-like, lightweight, and inexpensive ACUSITT to facilitate precise placement of its ablator tip within the liver, with ablation monitoring via strain imaging. Recent advancements in interstitial high-power ultrasound applicators enable controllable and penetrating heating patterns which can be dynamically altered. This paper summarizes the design and development of the first synergistic system that integrates a novel steerable interstitial acoustic ablation device with a novel trackerless 3DUS guidance strategy.

  3. Plasma-mediated ablation of biofilm contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhixiong; Wang, Xiaoliang; Huang, Huan

    2010-12-01

    Ultra-short pulsed laser removal of thin biofilm contamination on different substrates has been conducted via the use of plasma-mediated ablation. The biofilms were formed using sheep whole blood. The ablation was generated using a 1.2 ps ultra-short pulsed laser with wavelength centered at 1552 nm. The blood contamination was transformed into plasma and collected with a vacuum system. The single line ablation features have been measured. The ablation thresholds of blood contamination and bare substrates were determined. It is found that the ablation threshold of the blood contamination is lower than those of the beneath substrates including the glass slide, PDMS, and human dermal tissues. The ablation effects of different laser parameters (pulse overlap rate and pulse energy) were studied and ablation efficiency was measured. Proper ablation parameters were found to efficiently remove contamination with maximum efficiency and without damage to the substrate surface for the current laser system. Complete removal of blood contaminant from the glass substrate surface and freeze-dried dermis tissue surface was demonstrated by the USP laser ablation with repeated area scanning. No obvious thermal damage was found in the decontaminated glass and tissue samples.

  4. Percutaneous ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma: current status.

    PubMed

    McWilliams, Justin P; Yamamoto, Shota; Raman, Steven S; Loh, Christopher T; Lee, Edward W; Liu, David M; Kee, Stephen T

    2010-08-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is an increasingly common disease with dismal long-term survival. Percutaneous ablation has gained popularity as a minimally invasive, potentially curative therapy for HCC in nonoperative candidates. The seminal technique of percutaneous ethanol injection has been largely supplanted by newer modalities, including radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, cryoablation, and high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation. A review of these modalities, including technical success, survival rates, and complications, will be presented, as well as considerations for treatment planning and follow-up.

  5. Ablation of liver metastases: current status.

    PubMed

    Flanders, Vincent L; Gervais, Debra A

    2010-08-01

    Local ablative therapy for the treatment of metastatic disease to the liver has been evaluated most extensively in colorectal cancer with 5-year survival rates up to 55% after RF ablation. Recent findings suggest selected patients with other malignant processes may benefit as well, but conclusive evidence is limited. This article reviews the available literature regarding the use of radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, and cryoablation in the treatment of metastatic disease to the liver. The published results of each of these modalities in the treatment of metastatic disease to the liver are promising, and outcomes continue to be evaluated.

  6. New methods to detect particle velocity and mass flux in arc-heated ablation/erosion facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brayton, D. B.; Bomar, B. W.; Seibel, B. L.; Elrod, P. D.

    1980-01-01

    Arc-heated flow facilities with injected particles are used to simulate the erosive and ablative/erosive environments encountered by spacecraft re-entry through fog, clouds, thermo-nuclear explosions, etc. Two newly developed particle diagnostic techniques used to calibrate these facilities are discussed. One technique measures particle velocity and is based on the detection of thermal radiation and/or chemiluminescence from the hot seed particles in a model ablation/erosion facility. The second technique measures a local particle rate, which is proportional to local particle mass flux, in a dust erosion facility by photodetecting and counting the interruptions of a focused laser beam by individual particles.

  7. Aerosol-cloud interaction using AATSR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sogacheva, Larisa; Kolmonen, Pekka; Virtanen, Timo H.; Saponaro, Giulia; Kokhanovsky, Alexander; de Leeuw, Gerrit

    2014-05-01

    the presence of clouds. The algorithm was early introduced in Kokhanovsky et al. (2003). It works well for thick clouds. ACDV was successfully tested over Scandinavia and Baltic Sea. Combined aerosols-clouds retrieval gives an opportunity to investigate the cloud properties with respect to aerosol optical depth is surrounding cloud-free areas. Kokhanovsky, A. A., V. V. Rozanov, E. P. Zege, H. Bovensmann, and J. P. Burrows (2003), A semianalytical cloud retrieval algorithm using backscattered radiation in 0.4-2.4 μm spectral region, J. Geophys. Res., 108, 4008, doi:10.1029/2001JD001543. Kokhanovsky, A. and de Leeuw, G. (2009). Satellite aerosol remote sensing over land. Berlin: Springer Kolmonen, P., Sundström, A.-M., Sogacheva, L., Rodriguez, E., Virtanen, T. and de Leeuw, G. (2013). The uncertainty characterization of AOD for the AATSR ADV/ASV retrieval algorithm -Towards the assimilation of the satellite retrieved aerosol properties. Submitted to Atmos. Meas. Tech. Veefkind J.P., de Leeuw G., and Durkee P.A. (1998). Retrieval of aerosol optical depth over land using two-angle view satellite radiometry during TARFOX, Geophys. Res. Lett., 25, 3135-3138.

  8. Charge Exchange and Ablation Rates of a Titanium Wire Plasma Corona

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, Robert E.

    2009-01-21

    Wire ablation rates are important features in any examination of precursors or transparent mode implosions of wire arrays. When ion temperatures in a Ti wire plasma corona exceed a few eV, the process of resonant charge exchange competes with elastic scattering. Ions pushed into the corona from an anode bias wire array can be expected to drive a fast neutral wind into the surrounding volume, while a cathode bias wire array would not show the strong neutral wind.

  9. Radiofrequency Ablation of Liver Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by a circular magnet. You will lie on a moveable examination table that slides into the center of the magnet. Some MRI units, called short-bore systems , are ...

  10. Analysis of iodinated contrast delivered during thermal ablation: is material trapped in the ablation zone?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Po-hung; Brace, Chris L.

    2016-08-01

    Intra-procedural contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) has been proposed to evaluate treatment efficacy of thermal ablation. We hypothesized that contrast material delivered concurrently with thermal ablation may become trapped in the ablation zone, and set out to determine whether such an effect would impact ablation visualization. CECT images were acquired during microwave ablation in normal porcine liver with: (A) normal blood perfusion and no iodinated contrast, (B) normal perfusion and iodinated contrast infusion or (C) no blood perfusion and residual iodinated contrast. Changes in CT attenuation were analyzed from before, during and after ablation to evaluate whether contrast was trapped inside of the ablation zone. Visualization was compared between groups using post-ablation contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Attenuation gradients were calculated at the ablation boundary and background to quantitate ablation conspicuity. In Group A, attenuation decreased during ablation due to thermal expansion of tissue water and water vaporization. The ablation zone was difficult to visualize (CNR  =  1.57  ±  0.73, boundary gradient  =  0.7  ±  0.4 HU mm-1), leading to ablation diameter underestimation compared to gross pathology. Group B ablations saw attenuation increase, suggesting that iodine was trapped inside the ablation zone. However, because the normally perfused liver increased even more, Group B ablations were more visible than Group A (CNR  =  2.04  ±  0.84, boundary gradient  =  6.3  ±  1.1 HU mm-1) and allowed accurate estimation of the ablation zone dimensions compared to gross pathology. Substantial water vaporization led to substantial attenuation changes in Group C, though the ablation zone boundary was not highly visible (boundary gradient  =  3.9  ±  1.1 HU mm-1). Our results demonstrate that despite iodinated contrast being trapped in the ablation zone, ablation visibility was

  11. Jovian clouds and haze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Robert A.; Baines, Kevin H.; Friedson, A. James; Banfield, Don; Ragent, Boris; Taylor, Fred W.

    Tropospheric clouds: thermochemical equilibrium theory and cloud microphysical theory, condensate cloud microphysics, tropospheric cloud and haze distribution - observations, results from the Galileo probe experiments, Galileo NIMS observations and results, Galileo SSE observations and results, recent analyses of ground-based and HST data; Tropospheric clouds and haze: optical and physical properties: partical composition, particle optical properties, size and shape, chromophores; Stratospheric haze: particle distribution, optical properties, size and shape, particle formation.

  12. The Oort cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marochnik, Leonid S.; Mukhin, Lev M.; Sagdeev, Roald Z.

    1991-01-01

    Views of the large-scale structure of the solar system, consisting of the Sun, the nine planets and their satellites, changed when Oort demonstrated that a gigantic cloud of comets (the Oort cloud) is located on the periphery of the solar system. The following subject areas are covered: (1) the Oort cloud's mass; (2) Hill's cloud mass; (3) angular momentum distribution in the solar system; and (4) the cometary cloud around other stars.

  13. INSTABILITY OF MAGNETIZED IONIZATION FRONTS SURROUNDING H II REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jeong-Gyu; Kim, Woong-Tae E-mail: wkim@astro.snu.ac.kr

    2014-12-20

    An ionization front (IF) surrounding an H II region is a sharp interface where a cold neutral gas makes the transition to a warm ionized phase by absorbing UV photons from central stars. We investigate the instability of a plane-parallel D-type IF threaded by parallel magnetic fields, by neglecting the effects of recombination within the ionized gas. We find that weak D-type IFs always have the post-IF magnetosonic Mach number M{sub M2}≤1. For such fronts, magnetic fields increase the maximum propagation speed of the IFs, while reducing the expansion factor α by a factor of 1 + 1/(2β{sub 1}) compared to the unmagnetized case, with β{sub 1} denoting the plasma beta in the pre-IF region. IFs become unstable to distortional perturbations owing to gas expansion across the fronts, exactly analogous to the Darrieus-Landau instability of ablation fronts in terrestrial flames. The growth rate of the IF instability is proportional linearly to the perturbation wavenumber, as well as the upstream flow speed, and approximately to α{sup 1/2}. The IF instability is stabilized by gas compressibility and becomes completely quenched when the front is D-critical. The instability is also stabilized by magnetic pressure when the perturbations propagate in the direction perpendicular to the fields. When the perturbations propagate in the direction parallel to the fields, on the other hand, it is magnetic tension that reduces the growth rate, completely suppressing the instability when M{sub M2}{sup 2}<2/(2β{sub 1}−1). When the front experiences an acceleration, the IF instability cooperates with the Rayleigh-Taylor instability to make the front more unstable.

  14. Ice Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Heavy water ice clouds almost completely obscure the surface in Vastitas Borealis.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 69.5, Longitude 283.6 East (76.4 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

  15. Laser Navigation for Radiofrequency Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Varro, Zoltan; Locklin, Julia K. Wood, Bradford J.

    2004-09-15

    A 45-year-old male with renal cell carcinoma secondary to von-Hippel Lindau (VHL) disease presented for radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of kidney tumors. Due to his prior history of several partial nephrectomies and limited renal reserve, RFA was chosen because of its relatively nephron-sparing nature. A laser guidance device was used to help guide probe placement in an attempt to reduce procedure time and improve targeting accuracy. The device was successful at guiding needle placement, as both tumors were located with a single pass. Follow-up CT scan confirmed accurate needle placement, showing an area of coagulation necrosis covering the previously seen tumor.

  16. Left atrium segmentation for atrial fibrillation ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karim, R.; Mohiaddin, R.; Rueckert, D.

    2008-03-01

    Segmentation of the left atrium is vital for pre-operative assessment of its anatomy in radio-frequency catheter ablation (RFCA) surgery. RFCA is commonly used for treating atrial fibrillation. In this paper we present an semi-automatic approach for segmenting the left atrium and the pulmonary veins from MR angiography (MRA) data sets. We also present an automatic approach for further subdividing the segmented atrium into the atrium body and the pulmonary veins. The segmentation algorithm is based on the notion that in MRA the atrium becomes connected to surrounding structures via partial volume affected voxels and narrow vessels, the atrium can be separated if these regions are characterized and identified. The blood pool, obtained by subtracting the pre- and post-contrast scans, is first segmented using a region-growing approach. The segmented blood pool is then subdivided into disjoint subdivisions based on its Euclidean distance transform. These subdivisions are then merged automatically starting from a seed point and stopping at points where the atrium leaks into a neighbouring structure. The resulting merged subdivisions produce the segmented atrium. Measuring the size of the pulmonary vein ostium is vital for selecting the optimal Lasso catheter diameter. We present a second technique for automatically identifying the atrium body from segmented left atrium images. The separating surface between the atrium body and the pulmonary veins gives the ostia locations and can play an important role in measuring their diameters. The technique relies on evolving interfaces modelled using level sets. Results have been presented on 20 patient MRA datasets.

  17. Persistent Confusion and Controversy Surrounding Gene Patents

    PubMed Central

    Guerrini, Christi J.; Majumder, Mary A.; McGuire, Amy L.

    2016-01-01

    There is persistent confusion and controversy surrounding basic issues of patent law relevant to the genomics industry. Uncertainty and conflict can lead to the adoption of inefficient practices and exposure to liability. The development of patent-specific educational resources for industry members, as well as the prompt resolution of patentability rules unsettled by recent U.S. Supreme Court decisions, are therefore urgently needed. PMID:26849516

  18. Possible role for cryoballoon ablation of right atrial appendage tachycardia when conventional ablation fails.

    PubMed

    Amasyali, Basri; Kilic, Ayhan

    2015-06-01

    Focal atrial tachycardia arising from the right atrial appendage usually responds well to radiofrequency ablation; however, successful ablation in this anatomic region can be challenging. Surgical excision of the right atrial appendage has sometimes been necessary to eliminate the tachycardia and prevent or reverse the resultant cardiomyopathy. We report the case of a 48-year-old man who had right atrial appendage tachycardia resistant to multiple attempts at ablation with use of conventional radiofrequency energy guided by means of a 3-dimensional mapping system. The condition led to cardiomyopathy in 3 months. The arrhythmia was successfully ablated with use of a 28-mm cryoballoon catheter that had originally been developed for catheter ablation of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. To our knowledge, this is the first report of cryoballoon ablation without isolation of the right atrial appendage. It might also be an alternative to epicardial ablation or surgery when refractory atrial tachycardia originates from the right atrial appendage.

  19. Local Ablation for Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shi-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the second commonest cancer in Taiwan. The national surveillance program can detect HCC in its early stages, and various curative modalities (including surgical resection, orthotopic liver transplantation, and local ablation) are employed for the treatment of small HCC. Local ablation therapies are currently advocated for early-stage HCC that is unresectable because of co-morbidities, the need to preserve liver function, or refusal of resection. Among the various local ablation therapies, the most commonly used modalities include percutaneous ethanol injection and radiofrequency ablation (RFA); percutaneous acetic acid injection and microwave ablation are used less often. RFA is more commonly employed than other local ablative modalities in Taiwan because the technique is highly effective, minimally invasive, and requires fewer sessions. RFA is therefore advocated in Taiwan as the first-line curative therapy for unresectable HCC or even for resectable HCC. However, current RFA procedures are less effective against tumors that are in high-risk or difficult-to-ablate locations, are poorly visualized on ultrasonography (US), or are large. Recent advancements in RFA in Taiwan can resolve these issues by the creation of artificial ascites or pleural effusion, application of real-time virtual US assistance, use of combination therapy before RFA, or use of switching RF controllers with multiple electrodes. This review article provides updates on the clinical outcomes and advances in local ablative modalities (mostly RFA) for HCC in Taiwan. PMID:24159599

  20. Testing and evaluation of light ablation decontamination

    SciTech Connect

    Demmer, R.L.; Ferguson, R.L.

    1994-10-01

    This report details the testing and evaluation of light ablation decontamination. It details WINCO contracted research and application of light ablation efforts by Ames Laboratory. Tests were conducted with SIMCON (simulated contamination) coupons and REALCON (actual radioactive metal coupons) under controlled conditions to compare cleaning effectiveness, speed and application to plant process type equipment.

  1. Effective temperatures of polymer laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furzikov, Nickolay P.

    1991-09-01

    Effective temperatures of laser ablation of certain polymers are extracted from experimental dependences of ablation depths on laser fluences. Dependence of these temperatures on laser pulse durations is established. Comparison with the known thermodestruction data shows that the effective temperature corresponds to transient thermodestruction proceeding by the statistically most probable way.

  2. Ablative therapies for small renal tumours.

    PubMed

    Castro, Arturo; Jenkins, Lawrence C; Salas, Nelson; Lorber, Gideon; Leveillee, Raymond J

    2013-05-01

    Improvements in imaging technology have resulted in an increase in detection of small renal masses (SRMs). Minimally invasive ablation modalities, including cryoablation, radiofrequencey ablation, microwave ablation and irreversible electroporation, are currently being used to treat SRMs in select groups of patients. Cryoablation and radiofrequency ablation have been extensively studied. Presently, cryoablation is gaining popularity because the resulting ice ball can be visualized easily using ultrasonography. Tumour size and location are strong predictors of outcome of radiofrequency ablation. One of the main benefits of microwave ablation is that microwaves can propagate through all types of tissue, including desiccated and charred tissue, as well as water vapour, which might be formed during the ablation. Irreversible electroporation has been shown in animal studies to affect only the cell membrane of undesirable target tissues and to spare adjacent structures; however, clinical studies that depict the efficacy and safety of this treatment modality in humans are still sparse. As more experience is gained in the future, ablation modalities might be utilized in all patients with tumours <4 cm in diameter, rather than just as an alternative treatment for high-risk surgical patients.

  3. Evolution of molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sevenster, M.

    1993-01-01

    The evolution of interstellar molecular hydrogen was studied, with a special interest for the formation and evolution of molecular clouds and star formation within them, by a two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulation performed on a rectangular grid of physical sizes on the order of 100 pc. It is filled with an initial density of approx. 1 cm(exp -3), except for one cell (approx. 1 pc(exp 2)) at the center of the grid where an accretion core of 1-10(exp 3) solar masses is placed. The grid is co-moving with the gridcenter that is on a circular orbit around the Galactic center and that also is the guiding center of epicyclic approximation of orbits of the matter surrounding it. The initial radial velocity is zero; to account for differential rotation the initial tangential velocity (i.e. the movement around the galactic center) is proportional to the radial distance to the grid center. The rate is comparable to the rotation rate at the Local Standard of Rest. The influence of galactic rotation is noticed by spiral or elliptical forms, but on much longer time scales than self gravitation and cooling processes. Density and temperature are kept constant at the boundaries and no inflow is allowed along the tangential boundaries.

  4. Identification of Ambient Molecular Clouds Associated with Galactic Supernova Remnant IC 443

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae-Joon; Koo, Bon-Chul; Snell, Ronald L.; Yun, Min S.; Heyer, Mark H.; Burton, Michael G.

    2012-04-01

    The Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) IC 443 is one of the most studied core-collapse SNRs for its interaction with molecular clouds. However, the ambient molecular clouds with which IC 443 is interacting have not been thoroughly studied and remain poorly understood. Using the Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory 14 m telescope, we obtained fully sampled maps of the ~1° × 1° region toward IC 443 in the 12CO J = 1-0 and HCO+ J = 1-0 lines. In addition to the previously known molecular clouds in the velocity range v LSR = -6 to -1 km s-1 (-3 km s-1 clouds), our observations reveal two new ambient molecular cloud components: small (~1') bright clouds in v LSR = -8 to -3 km s-1 (SCs) and diffuse clouds in v LSR = +3 to +10 km s-1 (+5 km s-1 clouds). Our data also reveal the detailed kinematics of the shocked molecular gas in IC 443 however, the focus of this paper is the physical relationship between the shocked clumps and the ambient cloud components. We find strong evidence that the SCs are associated with the shocked clumps. This is supported by the positional coincidence of the SCs with shocked clumps and other tracers of shocks. Furthermore, the kinematic features of some shocked clumps suggest that these are the ablated material from the SCs upon the impact of the SNR shock. The SCs are interpreted as dense cores of parental molecular clouds that survived the destruction by the pre-supernova evolution of the progenitor star or its nearby stars. We propose that the expanding SNR shock is now impacting some of the remaining cores and the gas is being ablated and accelerated, producing the shocked molecular gas. The morphology of the +5 km s-1 clouds suggests an association with IC 443. On the other hand, the -3 km s-1 clouds show no evidence for interaction.

  5. Star Formation around Mid-Infrared Bubble N37: Evidence of Cloud-Cloud Collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baug, T.; Dewangan, L. K.; Ojha, D. K.; Ninan, J. P.

    2016-12-01

    We have performed a multi-wavelength analysis of a mid-infrared (MIR) bubble N37 and its surrounding environment. The selected 15‧ × 15‧ area around the bubble contains two molecular clouds (N37 cloud; {V}{lsr} ˜ 37-43 km s-1, and C25.29+0.31; {V}{lsr} ˜ 43-48 km s-1) along the line of sight. A total of seven OB stars are identified toward the bubble N37 using photometric criteria, and two of them are spectroscopically confirmed as O9V and B0V stars. The spectro-photometric distances of these two sources confirm their physical association with the bubble. The O9V star appears to be the primary ionizing source of the region, which is also in agreement with the desired Lyman continuum flux analysis estimated from the 20 cm data. The presence of the expanding H ii region is revealed in the N37 cloud, which could be responsible for the MIR bubble. Using the 13CO line data and photometric data, several cold molecular condensations as well as clusters of young stellar objects (YSOs) are identified in the N37 cloud, revealing ongoing star formation (SF) activities. However, the analysis of ages of YSOs and the dynamical age of the H ii region do not support the origin of SF due to the influence of OB stars. The position-velocity analysis of 13CO data reveals that two molecular clouds are interconnected by a bridge-like structure, favoring the onset of a cloud-cloud collision process. The SF activities (i.e., the formation of YSO clusters and OB stars) in the N37 cloud are possibly influenced by the cloud-cloud collision.

  6. Lung Cancer Ablation: Technologies and Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Erica S.; Dupuy, Damian E.

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of lung cancers in 2012 is estimated to reach 226,160 new cases, with only a third of patients suitable surgical candidates. Tumor ablation has emerged as an important and efficacious treatment option for nonsurgical lung cancer patients. This localized minimally invasive therapy is best suited for small oligonodular lesions or favorably located metastatic tumors. Radiofrequency ablation has been in use for over a decade, and newer modalities including microwave ablation, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation have emerged as additional treatment options for patients. Ablation therapies can offer patients and clinicians a repeatable and effective therapy for palliation and, in some cases, cure of thoracic malignancies. This article discusses the available technologies and techniques available for tumor ablation of thoracic malignancies including patient selection, basic aspects of procedure technique, imaging follow-up, treatment outcomes, and comparisons between various therapies. PMID:24436530

  7. Lung cancer ablation: technologies and techniques.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Erica S; Dupuy, Damian E

    2013-06-01

    The incidence of lung cancers in 2012 is estimated to reach 226,160 new cases, with only a third of patients suitable surgical candidates. Tumor ablation has emerged as an important and efficacious treatment option for nonsurgical lung cancer patients. This localized minimally invasive therapy is best suited for small oligonodular lesions or favorably located metastatic tumors. Radiofrequency ablation has been in use for over a decade, and newer modalities including microwave ablation, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation have emerged as additional treatment options for patients. Ablation therapies can offer patients and clinicians a repeatable and effective therapy for palliation and, in some cases, cure of thoracic malignancies. This article discusses the available technologies and techniques available for tumor ablation of thoracic malignancies including patient selection, basic aspects of procedure technique, imaging follow-up, treatment outcomes, and comparisons between various therapies.

  8. Femtosecond ablation of ultrahard materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumitru, G.; Romano, V.; Weber, H. P.; Sentis, M.; Marine, W.

    Several ultrahard materials and coatings of definite interest for tribological applications were tested with respect to their response when irradiated with fs laser pulses. Results on cemented tungsten carbide and on titanium carbonitride are reported for the first time and compared with outcomes of investigations on diamond and titanium nitride. The experiments were carried out in air, in a regime of 5-8 J/cm2 fluences, using the beam of a commercial Ti:sapphire laser. The changes induced in the surface morphology were analysed with a Nomarski optical microscope, and with SEM and AFM techniques. From the experimental data and from the calculated incident energy density distributions, the damage and ablation threshold values were determined. As expected, the diamond showed the highest threshold, while the cemented tungsten carbide exhibited typical values for metallic surfaces. The ablation rates determined (under the above-mentioned experimental conditions) were in the range 0.1-0.2 μm per pulse for all the materials investigated.

  9. Ablative shielding for hypervelocity projectiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rucker, Michelle A. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A hypervelocity projectile shield which includes a hollow semi-flexible housing fabricated from a plastic like, or otherwise transparent membrane which is filled with a fluid (gas or liquid) is presented. The housing has a inlet valve, similar to that on a tire or basketball, to introduce an ablating fluid into the housing. The housing is attached by a Velcro mount or double-sided adhesive tape to the outside surface of a structure to be protected. The housings are arrayed in a side-by-side relationship for complete coverage of the surface to be protected. In use, when a hypervelocity projectile penetrates the outer wall of a housing it is broken up and then the projectile is ablated as it travels through the fluid, much like a meteorite 'burns up' as it enters the earth's atmosphere, and the housing is deflated. The deflated housing can be easily spotted for replacement, even from a distance. Replacement is then accomplished by simply pulling a deflated housing off the structure and installing a new housing.

  10. Tumor Ablation with Irreversible Electroporation

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sakere, Bassim; André, Franck; Bernat, Claire; Connault, Elisabeth; Opolon, Paule; Davalos, Rafael V.; Rubinsky, Boris; Mir, Lluis M.

    2007-01-01

    We report the first successful use of irreversible electroporation for the minimally invasive treatment of aggressive cutaneous tumors implanted in mice. Irreversible electroporation is a newly developed non-thermal tissue ablation technique in which certain short duration electrical fields are used to permanently permeabilize the cell membrane, presumably through the formation of nanoscale defects in the cell membrane. Mathematical models of the electrical and thermal fields that develop during the application of the pulses were used to design an efficient treatment protocol with minimal heating of the tissue. Tumor regression was confirmed by histological studies which also revealed that it occurred as a direct result of irreversible cell membrane permeabilization. Parametric studies show that the successful outcome of the procedure is related to the applied electric field strength, the total pulse duration as well as the temporal mode of delivery of the pulses. Our best results were obtained using plate electrodes to deliver across the tumor 80 pulses of 100 µs at 0.3 Hz with an electrical field magnitude of 2500 V/cm. These conditions induced complete regression in 12 out of 13 treated tumors, (92%), in the absence of tissue heating. Irreversible electroporation is thus a new effective modality for non-thermal tumor ablation. PMID:17989772

  11. Simple model for ablative stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikaelian, Karnig O.

    1992-11-01

    We present a simple analytic model for ablative stablization of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. In this model the effect of ablation is to move the peak of the perturbations to the location of peak pressure. This mechanism enhances the density-gradient stabilization, which is effective at short wavelengths, and it also enhances the stabilization of long-wavelength perturbations due to finite shell thickness. We consider the following density profile: exponential blowoff plasma with a density gradient β, followed by a constant-density shell of thickness δt. For perturbations of arbitrary wave number k, we present an explicit expression for the growth rate γ as a function of k, β, and δt. We find that ``thick'' shells defined by β δt>=1 have γ2>=0 for any k, while ``thin'' shells defined by β δt<1 can have γ2<0 for small k, reflecting stability by proximity to the back side of the shell. We also present lasnex simulations that are in good agreement with our analytic formulas.

  12. Stellar Ablation of Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Thomas E.; Horwitz, J. L.

    2007-01-01

    We review observations and theories of the solar ablation of planetary atmospheres, focusing on the terrestrial case where a large magnetosphere holds off the solar wind, so that there is little direct atmospheric impact, but also couples the solar wind electromagnetically to the auroral zones. We consider the photothermal escape flows known as the polar wind or refilling flows, the enhanced mass flux escape flows that result from localized solar wind energy dissipation in the auroral zones, and the resultant enhanced neutral atom escape flows. We term these latter two escape flows the "auroral wind." We review observations and theories of the heating and acceleration of auroral winds, including energy inputs from precipitating particles, electromagnetic energy flux at magnetohydrodynamic and plasma wave frequencies, and acceleration by parallel electric fields and by convection pickup processes also known as "centrifugal acceleration." We consider also the global circulation of ionospheric plasmas within the magnetosphere, their participation in magnetospheric disturbances as absorbers of momentum and energy, and their ultimate loss from the magnetosphere into the downstream solar wind, loading reconnection processes that occur at high altitudes near the magnetospheric boundaries. We consider the role of planetary magnetization and the accumulating evidence of stellar ablation of extrasolar planetary atmospheres. Finally, we suggest and discuss future needs for both the theory and observation of the planetary ionospheres and their role in solar wind interactions, to achieve the generality required for a predictive science of the coupling of stellar and planetary atmospheres over the full range of possible conditions.

  13. Targeted p120-catenin ablation disrupts dental enamel development.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, John D; Dobeck, Justine M; Tye, Coralee E; Perez-Moreno, Mirna; Stokes, Nicole; Reynolds, Albert B; Fuchs, Elaine; Skobe, Ziedonis

    2010-09-16

    Dental enamel development occurs in stages. The ameloblast cell layer is adjacent to, and is responsible for, enamel formation. When rodent pre-ameloblasts become tall columnar secretory-stage ameloblasts, they secrete enamel matrix proteins, and the ameloblasts start moving in rows that slide by one another. This movement is necessary to form the characteristic decussating enamel prism pattern. Thus, a dynamic system of intercellular interactions is required for proper enamel development. Cadherins are components of the adherens junction (AJ), and they span the cell membrane to mediate attachment to adjacent cells. p120 stabilizes cadherins by preventing their internalization and degradation. So, we asked if p120-mediated cadherin stability is important for dental enamel formation. Targeted p120 ablation in the mouse enamel organ had a striking effect. Secretory stage ameloblasts detached from surrounding tissues, lost polarity, flattened, and ameloblast E- and N-cadherin expression became undetectable by immunostaining. The enamel itself was poorly mineralized and appeared to be composed of a thin layer of merged spheres that abraded from the tooth. Significantly, p120 mosaic mouse teeth were capable of forming normal enamel demonstrating that the enamel defects were not a secondary effect of p120 ablation. Surprisingly, blood-filled sinusoids developed in random locations around the developing teeth. This has not been observed in other p120-ablated tissues and may be due to altered p120-mediated cell signaling. These data reveal a critical role for p120 in tooth and dental enamel development and are consistent with p120 directing the attachment and detachment of the secretory stage ameloblasts as they move in rows.

  14. Endovascular Radiofrequency Ablation for Varicose Veins

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    treatment plan. The RFA procedure involves the introduction of a guide wire into the target vein under ultrasound guidance followed by the insertion of an introducer sheath through which the RFA catheter is advanced. Once satisfactory positioning has been confirmed with ultrasound, a tumescent anaesthetic solution is injected into the soft tissue surrounding the target vein along its entire length. This serves to anaesthetize the vein, insulate the heat from damaging adjacent structures, including nerves and skin and compresses the vein increasing optimal contact of the vessel wall with the electrodes or expanded prongs of the RF device. The RF generator is then activated and the catheter is slowly pulled along the length of the vein. At the end of the procedure, hemostasis is then achieved by applying pressure to the vein entry point. Adequate and proper compression stockings and bandages are applied after the procedure to reduce the risk of venous thromboembolism and to reduce postoperative bruising and tenderness. Patients are encouraged to walk immediately after the procedure. Follow-up protocols vary, with most patients returning 1 to 3 weeks later for an initial follow-up visit. At this point, the initial clinical result is assessed and occlusion of the treated vessels is confirmed with ultrasound. Patients often have a second follow-up visit 1 to 3 months following RFA at which time clinical evaluation and ultrasound are repeated. If required, additional procedures such as phlebectomy or sclerotherapy may be performed during the RFA procedure or at any follow-up visits. Regulatory Status The Closure System® radiofrequency generator for endovascular thermal ablation of varicose veins was approved by Health Canada as a class 3 device in March 2005, registered under medical device license 67865. The RFA intravascular catheter was approved by Health Canada in November 2007 for the ClosureFast catheter, registered under medical device license 16574. The Closure System

  15. Selective laser ablation of venous thrombus: implications for a new approach in the treatment of pulmonary embolus

    SciTech Connect

    LaMuraglia, G.M.; Anderson, R.R.; Parrish, J.A.; Zhang, D.Y.; Prince, M.R.

    1988-01-01

    Laser radiation was employed to ablate venous thrombus or emboli with parameters that would not injure endovascular tissues. Output from a 482-nm, 1-microsec pulsed dye laser was delivered through a 320-microns-diameter fiber to in vitro samples of fresh thrombus (T), venous or pulmonary emboli (VE), inferior vena cava (IVC), pulmonary artery (PA), pulmonary valve, and endocardium (atrial and ventricular). The mean threshold fluences for ablation of T and VE were 1.1 and 5.1 J/cm2, respectively. In contrast, the mean threshold fluences for IVC and PA were significantly higher (P less than 0.0001), at 120 and 124 J/cm2, respectively. Ablation efficiency of thrombus was in excess of 100 mg/J, under conditions that caused no histologic injury to the pulmonary artery. To correlate ablation studies with optical absorption by the tissues, optical properties of fresh T, VE, IVC, and PA were studied. Hemoglobin species accounted for the more than 10 times higher 482-nm absorption by T and VE compared to IVC and PA. This explains the differences in ablation thresholds and, thus, the selectivity encountered. These observations demonstrate, more than any other study in the vascular system, that with pulsed optical radiation, efficient laser ablation of venous thrombus is feasible with a wide margin of safety, and without damage to the surrounding vascular tissue.

  16. Identifying true satellites of the Magellanic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sales, Laura V.; Navarro, Julio F.; Kallivayalil, Nitya; Frenk, Carlos S.

    2017-02-01

    The hierarchical nature of ΛCDM suggests that the Magellanic Clouds must have been surrounded by a number of satellites before their infall into the Milky Way halo. Many of those satellites should still be in close proximity to the Clouds, but some could have dispersed ahead/behind the Clouds along their Galactic orbit. Either way, prior association with the Clouds constrains the present-day positions and velocities of candidate Magellanic satellites: they must lie close to the nearly polar orbital plane of the Magellanic Stream, and their distances and radial velocities must follow the latitude dependence expected for a tidal stream with the Clouds near pericentre. We use a cosmological numerical simulation of the disruption of a massive sub-halo in a Milky Way-sized ΛCDM halo to test whether any of the 20 dwarfs recently discovered in the Dark Energy Survey, the Survey of the MAgellanic Stellar History, Pan-STARRS, and ATLAS surveys are truly associated with the Clouds. Of the six systems with kinematic data, only Hor 1 has distance and radial velocities consistent with a Magellanic origin. Of the remaining dwarfs, six (Hor 2, Eri 3, Ret 3, Tuc 4, Tuc 5, and Phx 2) have positions and distances consistent with a Magellanic origin, but kinematic data are needed to substantiate that possibility. Conclusive evidence for association would require proper motions to constrain the orbital angular momentum direction, which, for true Magellanic satellites, must be similar to that of the Clouds. We use this result to predict radial velocities and proper motions for all new dwarfs, assuming that they were Magellanic satellites. Our results are relatively insensitive to the assumption of first or second pericentre for the Clouds.

  17. Humans differ in their personal microbial cloud

    PubMed Central

    Altrichter, Adam E.; Bateman, Ashley C.; Stenson, Jason; Brown, GZ; Green, Jessica L.; Bohannan, Brendan J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Dispersal of microbes between humans and the built environment can occur through direct contact with surfaces or through airborne release; the latter mechanism remains poorly understood. Humans emit upwards of 106 biological particles per hour, and have long been known to transmit pathogens to other individuals and to indoor surfaces. However it has not previously been demonstrated that humans emit a detectible microbial cloud into surrounding indoor air, nor whether such clouds are sufficiently differentiated to allow the identification of individual occupants. We used high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA genes to characterize the airborne bacterial contribution of a single person sitting in a sanitized custom experimental climate chamber. We compared that to air sampled in an adjacent, identical, unoccupied chamber, as well as to supply and exhaust air sources. Additionally, we assessed microbial communities in settled particles surrounding each occupant, to investigate the potential long-term fate of airborne microbial emissions. Most occupants could be clearly detected by their airborne bacterial emissions, as well as their contribution to settled particles, within 1.5–4 h. Bacterial clouds from the occupants were statistically distinct, allowing the identification of some individual occupants. Our results confirm that an occupied space is microbially distinct from an unoccupied one, and demonstrate for the first time that individuals release their own personalized microbial cloud. PMID:26417541

  18. Humans differ in their personal microbial cloud.

    PubMed

    Meadow, James F; Altrichter, Adam E; Bateman, Ashley C; Stenson, Jason; Brown, G Z; Green, Jessica L; Bohannan, Brendan J M

    2015-01-01

    Dispersal of microbes between humans and the built environment can occur through direct contact with surfaces or through airborne release; the latter mechanism remains poorly understood. Humans emit upwards of 10(6) biological particles per hour, and have long been known to transmit pathogens to other individuals and to indoor surfaces. However it has not previously been demonstrated that humans emit a detectible microbial cloud into surrounding indoor air, nor whether such clouds are sufficiently differentiated to allow the identification of individual occupants. We used high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA genes to characterize the airborne bacterial contribution of a single person sitting in a sanitized custom experimental climate chamber. We compared that to air sampled in an adjacent, identical, unoccupied chamber, as well as to supply and exhaust air sources. Additionally, we assessed microbial communities in settled particles surrounding each occupant, to investigate the potential long-term fate of airborne microbial emissions. Most occupants could be clearly detected by their airborne bacterial emissions, as well as their contribution to settled particles, within 1.5-4 h. Bacterial clouds from the occupants were statistically distinct, allowing the identification of some individual occupants. Our results confirm that an occupied space is microbially distinct from an unoccupied one, and demonstrate for the first time that individuals release their own personalized microbial cloud.

  19. Fabrication of pillared PLGA microvessel scaffold using femtosecond laser ablation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hsiao-Wei; Cheng, Chung-Wei; Li, Ching-Wen; Chang, Han-Wei; Wu, Ping-Han; Wang, Gou-Jen

    2012-01-01

    One of the persistent challenges confronting tissue engineering is the lack of intrinsic microvessels for the transportation of nutrients and metabolites. An artificial microvascular system could be a feasible solution to this problem. In this study, the femtosecond laser ablation technique was implemented for the fabrication of pillared microvessel scaffolds of polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA). This novel scaffold facilitates implementation of the conventional cell seeding process. The progress of cell growth can be observed in vitro by optical microscopy. The problems of becoming milky or completely opaque with the conventional PLGA scaffold after cell seeding can be resolved. In this study, PLGA microvessel scaffolds consisting of 47 μm × 80 μm pillared branches were produced. Results of cell culturing of bovine endothelial cells demonstrate that the cells adhere well and grow to surround each branch of the proposed pillared microvessel networks. PMID:22605935

  20. Cloud Processed CCN Affect Cloud Microphysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, J. G.; Noble, S. R., Jr.; Tabor, S. S.

    2015-12-01

    Variations in the bimodality/monomodality of CCN spectra (Hudson et al. 2015) exert opposite effects on cloud microphysics in two aircraft field projects. The figure shows two examples, droplet concentration, Nc, and drizzle liquid water content, Ld, against classification of CCN spectral modality. Low ratings go to balanced separated bimodal spectra, high ratings go to single mode spectra, strictly monomodal 8. Intermediate ratings go merged modes, e.g., one mode a shoulder of another. Bimodality is caused by mass or hygroscopicity increases that go only to CCN that made activated cloud droplets. In the Ice in Clouds Experiment-Tropical (ICE-T) small cumuli with lower Nc, greater droplet mean diameters, MD, effective radii, re, spectral widths, σ, cloud liquid water contents, Lc, and Ld were closer to more bimodal (lower modal ratings) below cloud CCN spectra whereas clouds with higher Nc, smaller MD, re, σ, and Ld were closer to more monomodal CCN (higher modal ratings). In polluted stratus clouds of the MArine Stratus/Stratocumulus Experiment (MASE) clouds that had greater Nc, and smaller MD, re, σ, Lc, and Ld were closer to more bimodal CCN spectra whereas clouds with lower Nc, and greater MD, re, σ, Lc, and Ld were closer to more monomodal CCN. These relationships are opposite because the dominant ICE-T cloud processing was coalescence whereas chemical transformations (e.g., SO2 to SO4) were dominant in MASE. Coalescence reduces Nc and thus also CCN concentrations (NCCN) when droplets evaporate. In subsequent clouds the reduced competition increases MD and σ, which further enhance coalescence and drizzle. Chemical transformations do not change Nc but added sulfate enhances droplet and CCN solubility. Thus, lower critical supersaturation (S) CCN can produce more cloud droplets in subsequent cloud cycles, especially for the low W and effective S of stratus. The increased competition reduces MD, re, and σ, which inhibit coalescence and thus reduce drizzle

  1. Investigations of the Cavitation and Damage Thresholds of Histotripsy and Applications in Targeted Tissue Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlaisavljevich, Eli

    Histotripsy is a noninvasive ultrasound therapy that controls acoustic cavitation to mechanically fractionate soft tissue. This dissertation investigates the physical thresholds to initiate cavitation and produce tissue damage in histotripsy and factors affecting these thresholds in order to develop novel strategies for targeted tissue ablation. In the first part of this dissertation, the effects of tissue properties on histotripsy cavitation thresholds and damage thresholds were investigated. Results demonstrated that the histotripsy shock scattering threshold using multi-cycle pulses increases in stiffer tissues, while the histotripsy intrinsic threshold using single-cycle pulses is independent of tissue stiffness. Further, the intrinsic threshold slightly decreases with lower frequencies and significantly decreases with increasing temperature. The effects of tissue properties on the susceptibility to histotripsy-induced tissue damage were also investigated, demonstrating that stiffer tissues are more resistant to histotripsy. Two strategies were investigated for increasing the effectiveness of histotripsy for the treatment of stiffer tissues, with results showing that thermal preconditioning may be used to alter tissue susceptibility to histotripsy and that lower frequency treatments may increase the efficiency of histotripsy tissue ablation due to enhanced bubble expansion. In the second part of this dissertation, the feasibility of using histotripsy for targeted liver ablation was investigated in an intact in vivo porcine model, with results demonstrating that histotripsy was capable of non-invasively creating precise lesions throughout the entire liver. Additionally, a tissue selective ablation approach was developed, where histotripsy completely fractionated the liver tissue surrounding the major hepatic vessels and gallbladder while being self-limited at the boundaries of these critical structures. Finally, the long-term effects of histotripsy liver

  2. Pulsed infrared laser ablation and clinical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Kin Foong

    Sufficient light energy deposited in tissue can result in ablation and excessive thermal and mechanical damage to adjacent tissues. The goals of this research are to investigate the mechanisms of pulsed infrared laser ablation of tissue, to optimize laser parameters for minimizing unnecessary damage to healthy tissue, and to explore the potential of using pulsed infrared lasers for clinical applications, especially laser lithotripsy. A dual-channel optical low coherence reflectometer was implemented to measure the expansion and collapse velocities of a Q-switched Ho:YAG (λ = 2.12 μm) laser-induced cavitation in water. Cavitation wall velocities up to 11 m/s were measured with this technique, and the results were in fair agreement with those calculated from fast-flash photographic images. The dependence of ablation threshold fluence on calculus absorption was examined. Preliminary results indicated that the product of optical absorption and ablation threshold fluence, which is the heat of ablation, remained constant for a given urinary calculus type and laser pulse duration. An extended study examined the influence of optical absorption on pulsed infrared laser ablation. An analytical photothermal ablation model was applied and compared to experimental ablation results using an infrared free-electron laser at selected wavelengths between 2.12 μm and 6.45 μm Results were in good agreement with the model, and the ablation depths of urinary calculi were highly dependent upon the calculus optical absorption as well as light attenuation within the intrapulse ablation plume. An efficient wavelength for ablation corresponded to the wavelength of the Er:YAG laser (λ = 2.94 μm) suggested this laser should be examined for laser lithotripsy. Schlieren flash photography, acoustic transient measurements with a piezoelectric polyvinylidene-fluoride needle-hydrophone, mass loss measurements, and chemical analyses were employed to study the ablation mechanisms of the free

  3. Spirit's Surroundings on 'West Spur,' Sol 305

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This 360-degree panorama shows the terrain surrounding NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit as of the rover's 305th martian day, or sol, (Nov. 11, 2004). At that point, Spirit was climbing the 'West Spur' of the 'Columbia Hills.' The rover had just finished inspecting a rock called 'Lutefisk' and was heading uphill toward an area called 'Machu Picchu.' Spirit used its navigational camera to take the images combined into this mosaic. The rover's location when the images were taken is catalogued as the mission's site 89, position 205. The view is presented here as a cylindrical projection with geometric seam correction.

  4. Noctilucent Cloud Sightings

    NASA Video Gallery

    Polar Mesospheric Clouds form during each polar region's summer months in the coldest place in the atmosphere, 50 miles above Earth's surface. Noctilucent Clouds were first observed in 1885 by an a...

  5. Cloud Computing for radiologists.

    PubMed

    Kharat, Amit T; Safvi, Amjad; Thind, Ss; Singh, Amarjit

    2012-07-01

    Cloud computing is a concept wherein a computer grid is created using the Internet with the sole purpose of utilizing shared resources such as computer software, hardware, on a pay-per-use model. Using Cloud computing, radiology users can efficiently manage multimodality imaging units by using the latest software and hardware without paying huge upfront costs. Cloud computing systems usually work on public, private, hybrid, or community models. Using the various components of a Cloud, such as applications, client, infrastructure, storage, services, and processing power, Cloud computing can help imaging units rapidly scale and descale operations and avoid huge spending on maintenance of costly applications and storage. Cloud computing allows flexibility in imaging. It sets free radiology from the confines of a hospital and creates a virtual mobile office. The downsides to Cloud computing involve security and privacy issues which need to be addressed to ensure the success of Cloud computing in the future.

  6. Epicardial Atrial Ablation Using a Novel Articulated Robotic Medical Probe Via a Percutaneous Subxiphoid Approach.

    PubMed

    Ota, Takeyoshi; Degani, Amir; Zubiate, Brett; Wolf, Alon; Choset, Howie; Schwartzman, David; Zenati, Marco A

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Minimally invasive epicardial atrial ablation to cure atrial fibrillation through the use of a percutaneous subxiphoid approach currently has a lack of dedicated technology for intrapericardial navigation around the beating heart. We have developed a novel articulated robotic medical probe and performed preliminary experiments in a porcine preparation. METHODS: In five large, healthy pigs, the teleoperated robotic system was introduced inside the pericardial space through a percutaneous subxiphoid approach. Secondary visualization of the left atrium and left atrial appendage was achieved with the use of a 5-mm scope inserted through a left thoracic port. The operator actively controlled the path of the robot by using a master manipulator. The catheter, with an irrigated radiofrequency tip, was guided through the working port of the robot to achieve epicardial ablation of the left atrium. RESULTS: Access to the pericardial space and progression around the left atrium was successful in all cases, with no interference with the beating heart such as a fatal arrhythmia, unexpected bleeding, and hypotension. Epicardial ablation was successfully performed in all five cases. No adverse hemodynamic or electrophysiological events were noted during the trials. When the animals were killed, there was no visually detected injury on the surrounding mediastinal structures caused by ablation. Transmural ablation was confirmed by histopathology of the left atrium. CONCLUSIONS: We have developed a dedicated articulated robotic medical probe and successfully performed epicardial left atrial radiofrequency ablation. Based on the feedback from these preliminary experiments, the radius of curvature and proper visualization of the device are being improved in the next generation prototype.

  7. Microwave Ablation of Pulmonary Malignancies Using a Novel High-energy Antenna System

    SciTech Connect

    Little, Mark W.; Chung, Daniel; Boardman, Philip; Gleeson, Fergus V.; Anderson, Ewan M.

    2013-04-15

    To evaluate the technical success, safety, and imaging follow-up of malignant pulmonary nodules treated with a novel high-energy percutaneous microwave ablation (MWA) system. Between July 2010 and September 2011, a total of 23 patients, 12 men, mean age 68 (range 30-87) years with 29 pulmonary malignancies of median diameter 19 (range 8-57) mm, underwent computed tomography (CT)-guided MWA with a 16G microwave needle antenna enabling power up to 180 W. Technical success was defined as needle placement in the intended lesion without death or serious injury. Adequacy of ablation was assessed at 24 h on contrast-enhanced CT. Circumferential solid or ground glass opacification >5 mm was used to define an ideal ablation. Local tumor recurrence was assessed at 1, 3, and 6 months after ablation on contrast-enhanced CT. MWA was technically successful in 93 % (n = 27). Mean ablation duration was 3.6 (range 1-9) min. Ten patients (43 %) developed a pneumothorax as a result of the MWA; only 3 (13 %) required placement of a chest drain. Thirty-day mortality rate was 0 %. The mean hospital stay was 1.5 (range 1-7) days. A total of 22 lesions (75 %) were surrounded by {>=}5 mm ground glass or solid opacification after the procedure. At a median follow-up of 6 months, local recurrence was identified in 3 out of 26 lesions, giving a local control rate of 88 %. MWA using a high-power antenna of pulmonary malignancies is safe, technically achievable, and enables fast ablation times.

  8. Imaging Features of Radiofrequency Ablation with Heat-Deployed Liposomal Doxorubicin in Hepatic Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Cheng William Chow, Lucy; Turkbey, Evrim B.; Lencioni, Riccardo; Libutti, Steven K.; Wood, Bradford J.

    2016-03-15

    IntroductionThe imaging features of unresectable hepatic malignancies in patients who underwent radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in combination with lyso-thermosensitive liposomal doxorubicin (LTLD) were determined.Materials and MethodsA phase I dose escalation study combining RFA with LTLD was performed with peri- and post- procedural CT and MRI. Imaging features were analyzed and measured in terms of ablative zone size and surrounding penumbra size. The dynamic imaging appearance was described qualitatively immediately following the procedure and at 1-month follow-up. The control group receiving liver RFA without LTLD was compared to the study group in terms of imaging features and post-ablative zone size dynamics at follow-up.ResultsPost-treatment scans of hepatic lesions treated with RFA and LTLD have distinctive imaging characteristics when compared to those treated with RFA alone. The addition of LTLD resulted in a regular or smooth enhancing rim on T1W MRI which often correlated with increased attenuation on CT. The LTLD-treated ablation zones were stable or enlarged at follow-up four weeks later in 69 % of study subjects as opposed to conventional RFA where the ablation zone underwent involution compared to imaging acquired immediately after the procedure.ConclusionThe imaging features following RFA with LTLD were different from those after standard RFA and can mimic residual or recurrent tumor. Knowledge of the subtle findings between the two groups can help avoid misinterpretation and proper identification of treatment failure in this setting. Increased size of the LTLD-treated ablation zone after RFA suggests the ongoing drug-induced biological effects.

  9. Legal issues in clouds: towards a risk inventory.

    PubMed

    Djemame, Karim; Barnitzke, Benno; Corrales, Marcelo; Kiran, Mariam; Jiang, Ming; Armstrong, Django; Forgó, Nikolaus; Nwankwo, Iheanyi

    2013-01-28

    Cloud computing technologies have reached a high level of development, yet a number of obstacles still exist that must be overcome before widespread commercial adoption can become a reality. In a cloud environment, end users requesting services and cloud providers negotiate service-level agreements (SLAs) that provide explicit statements of all expectations and obligations of the participants. If cloud computing is to experience widespread commercial adoption, then incorporating risk assessment techniques is essential during SLA negotiation and service operation. This article focuses on the legal issues surrounding risk assessment in cloud computing. Specifically, it analyses risk regarding data protection and security, and presents the requirements of an inherent risk inventory. The usefulness of such a risk inventory is described in the context of the OPTIMIS project.

  10. Mixing between high velocity clouds and the galactic halo

    SciTech Connect

    Gritton, Jeffrey A.; Shelton, Robin L.; Kwak, Kyujin E-mail: rls@physast.uga.edu

    2014-11-01

    In the Galactic halo, metal-bearing Galactic halo material mixes into high velocity clouds (HVCs) as they hydrodynamically interact. This interaction begins long before the clouds completely dissipate and long before they slow to the velocity of the Galactic material. In order to make quantitative estimates of the mixing efficiency and resulting metal enrichment of HVCs, we made detailed two- and three-dimensional simulations of cloud-interstellar medium interactions. Our simulations track the hydrodynamics and time-dependent ionization levels. They assume that the cloud originally has a warm temperature and extremely low metallicity while the surrounding medium has a high temperature, low density, and substantial metallicity, but our simulations can be generalized to other choices of initial metallicities. In our simulations, mixing between cloud and halo gas noticeably raises the metallicity of the high velocity material. We present plots of the mixing efficiency and metal enrichment as a function of time.

  11. [Indications for catheter ablation of ventricular tachycardia].

    PubMed

    Deneke, T; Israel, C W; Krug, J; Nentwich, K; Müller, P; Mügge, A; Schade, A

    2013-09-01

    Ventricular tachyarrhythmias (VT) can cause sudden cardiac death. This can be prevented by an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) but approximately 25% of patients with an ICD develop electrical storm (≥ 3 VTs within 24 hours) during the course of 4-5 years. This is a life-threatening event even in the presence of an ICD, particularly if incessant VT is present, and may significantly deteriorate the patient's psychological state if multiple shocks are discharged. Catheter ablation of VT has developed into a standard procedure in many specialized electrophysiology centers. Patients with hemodynamically stable and unstable VT are amendable to substrate-based ablation strategies. Catheter ablation can be performed as emergency procedure in patients with electrical storm as well as electively in patients with monomorphic VT stored in ICD memory. In patients with ischemic or non-ischemic cardiomyopathy, VT ablation is complementary to ICD implantation and can reduce the number of ventricular arrhythmia episodes and shocks and should be performed early. In patients with electrical storm, catheter ablation can acutely achieve rhythm stabilization and may improve prognosis in the long term. Further indications for catheter ablation exist in patients with idiopathic VT where catheter ablation represents a curative therapy, and in patients with symptomatic or asymptomatic frequent premature ventricular beats which may improve prognosis in patients with heart failure and cardiac resynchronization therapy.

  12. Analysis of infrared laser tissue ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, Gordon P.; Timmerman, Brenda H.; Bryanston-Cross, Peter J.

    2005-04-01

    The mechanisms involved in infrared laser tissue ablation are studied using a free electron laser (FELIX) in order to clarify whether the increased ablation efficiency reported in literature for certain infrared wavelengths is due to a wavelength effect or to the specific pulse structure of the lasers that are generally used in these studies. Investigations are presented of ablation of vitreous from pigs" eyes using several techniques including protein gel electrophoresis and ablation plume visualization. The ablation effects of three different infrared wavelengths are compared: 3 mm, which is currently in clinical surgical use, and the wavelengths associated with the amide I and amide II bands, i.e. 6.2 mm and 6.45mm, respectively. The results suggest a different ablation mechanism to be in operation for each studied wavelength, thus indicating that the generally reported increased ablation efficiency in the 6-6.5 micron range is due to the wavelength rather than the typical free electron laser pulse structure.

  13. Thermal therapy, Part III: ablation techniques.

    PubMed

    Habash, Riadh W Y; Bansal, Rajeev; Krewski, Daniel; Alhafid, Hafid T

    2007-01-01

    Ablative treatments are gaining increasing attention as an alternative to standard surgical therapies, especially for patients with contraindication or those who refuse open surgery. Thermal ablation is used in clinical applications mainly for treating heart arrhythmias, benign prostate hyperplasia, and nonoperable liver tumors; there is also increasing application to other organ sites, including the kidney, lung, and brain. Potential benefits of thermal ablation include reduced morbidity and mortality in comparison with standard surgical resection and the ability to treat nonsurgical patients. The purpose of this review is to outline and discuss the engineering principles and biological responses by which thermal ablation techniques can provide elevation of temperature in organs within the human body. Because of the individual problems associated with each type of treatment, a wide range of ablation techniques have evolved including cryoablation as well as ultrasound, radiofrequency (RF), microwave, and laser ablation. Aspects of each ablation technique, including mechanisms of action, equipment required, selection of eligible patients, treatment techniques, and patient outcomes are presented, along with a discussion of limitations of the techniques and future research directions.

  14. Computer animation of clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Max, N.

    1994-01-28

    Computer animation of outdoor scenes is enhanced by realistic clouds. I will discuss several different modeling and rendering schemes for clouds, and show how they evolved in my animation work. These include transparency-textured clouds on a 2-D plane, smooth shaded or textured 3-D clouds surfaces, and 3-D volume rendering. For the volume rendering, I will present various illumination schemes, including the density emitter, single scattering, and multiple scattering models.

  15. Comparing Point Clouds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-04-01

    Point clouds are one of the most primitive and fundamental surface representations. A popular source of point clouds are three dimensional shape...acquisition devices such as laser range scanners. Another important field where point clouds are found is in the representation of high-dimensional...framework for comparing manifolds given by point clouds is presented in this paper. The underlying theory is based on Gromov-Hausdorff distances, leading

  16. Experimental simulation of the atmospheric ablation of cosmic dust particles: implications for HPLA radar and lidar observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez Martin, Juan Carlos; Bones, David; Diego Carrillo Sanchez, Juan; James, Alexander; Janches, Diego; Plane, John

    2016-04-01

    The inner solar system is full of interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) originating from cometary trails and collisions between asteroids. The entry and evaporation of IDPs in planetary atmospheres is related to a variety of phenomena including formation of mesospheric metal layers and clouds and stratospheric aerosol chemistry. The estimated mass flux into the Earth's Atmosphere from modelling of Zodiacal Cloud observations combined with results from our chemical ablation model (CABMOD) is consistent with the deposition rate of cosmic spherules on the ice caps. However, the fluxes derived from modelling HPLA radar observations, which also uses CABMOD, are significantly lower. In addition, all models underestimate the observed Na/Fe ratio in metal layers observed by LIDAR, and the radar-based model in particular does not predict differential ablation. In order to address these inconsistencies, we have built a laboratory meteor ablation simulator, which enables us to observe and characterise the ablation of metal atoms from meteoritic IDP analogues. CABMOD can be then benchmarked against the laboratory data. In this presentation, the implications of our experimental results for the interpretation of radar field observations, mass flux estimates and modelling of metal layers will be discussed.

  17. Global CALIPSO Observations of Aerosol Changes Near Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varnai, Tamas; Marshak, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Several recent studies have found that clouds are surrounded by a transition zone of rapidly changing aerosol optical properties and particle size. Characterizing this transition zone is important for better understanding aerosol-cloud interactions and aerosol radiative effects, and also for improving satellite retrievals of aerosol properties. This letter presents a statistical analysis of a monthlong global data set of Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) lidar observations over oceans. The results show that the transition zone is ubiquitous over all oceans and extends up to 15 km away from clouds. They also show that near-cloud enhancements in backscatter and particle size are strongest at low altitudes, slightly below the top of the nearest clouds. Also, the enhancements are similar near illuminated and shadowy cloud sides, which confirms that the asymmetry of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer reflectances found in an earlier study comes from 3-D radiative processes and not from differences in aerosol properties. Finally, the effects of CALIPSO aerosol detection and cloud identification uncertainties are discussed. The findings underline the importance of accounting for the transition zone to avoid potential biases in studies of satellite aerosol products, aerosol-cloud interactions, and aerosol direct radiative effects.

  18. The physical properties of the interstellar cloud around the heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gry, C.

    2015-12-01

    A new interpretation of interstellar absorption lines in the spectra of nearby stars indicates that the medium surrounding the Sun can be regarded as a single, coherent cloud if we relax the assumption that a cloud behaves like a rigid body. This outlook permits us to construct a comprehensive picture of the local interstellar cloud and reveals that it departs from homogeneity in a number of aspects and physical properties: - This local cloud undergoes a deformation related to a compression in the direction of motion and an expansion in perpendicular directions, much like a squashed balloon. - The metal abundances decrease steadily from the rear to the head of the cloud, and this phenomenon does not appear to be related to ionization effects. - The cloud average HI density, estimated toward a number of nearby stars around which an astrophere is detected in Lyman alpha, varies from 0.03 to 0.1 cm-3. The cloud outer boundary inferred from the average density and column densities is very irregular with an average distance to the Sun of 9 +/- 7 pc. - The electron density and the cloud temperature can be derived from the combination of the ionization equilibrium of MgI and the excitation of CII in a restricted number of sightlines where column density is such that MgI and CII* features are strong enough to be detectable without saturating MgII. We present a few additional targets from which we examine the physical conditions inside the cloud.

  19. Two Models of Magnetic Support for Photoevaporated Molecular Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutov, D; Kane, J; Mizuta, A; Pound, M; Remington, B

    2004-05-05

    The thermal pressure inside molecular clouds is insufficient for maintaining the pressure balance at an ablation front at the cloud surface illuminated by nearby UV stars. Most probably, the required stiffness is provided by the magnetic pressure. After surveying existing models of this type, we concentrate on two of them: the model of a quasi-homogeneous magnetic field and the recently proposed model of a ''magnetostatic turbulence''. We discuss observational consequences of the two models, in particular, the structure and the strength of the magnetic field inside the cloud and in the ionized outflow. We comment on the possible role of reconnection events and their observational signatures. We mention laboratory experiments where the most significant features of the models can be tested.

  20. Thermal protection system ablation sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorbunov, Sergey (Inventor); Martinez, Edward R. (Inventor); Scott, James B. (Inventor); Oishi, Tomomi (Inventor); Fu, Johnny (Inventor); Mach, Joseph G. (Inventor); Santos, Jose B. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An isotherm sensor tracks space vehicle temperatures by a thermal protection system (TPS) material during vehicle re-entry as a function of time, and surface recession through calibration, calculation, analysis and exposed surface modeling. Sensor design includes: two resistive conductors, wound around a tube, with a first end of each conductor connected to a constant current source, and second ends electrically insulated from each other by a selected material that becomes an electrically conductive char at higher temperatures to thereby complete an electrical circuit. The sensor conductors become shorter as ablation proceeds and reduced resistance in the completed electrical circuit (proportional to conductor length) is continually monitored, using measured end-to-end voltage change or current in the circuit. Thermocouple and/or piezoelectric measurements provide consistency checks on local temperatures.

  1. Radiofrequency Ablation: A Nursing Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Locklin, Julia K.; Wood, Bradford J.

    2008-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has emerged as a safe and predictable technology for treating certain patients with cancer who otherwise have few treatment options. Nurses need to be familiar with all phases of the RFA procedure to create an optimal environment for patients. This article offers a brief review of the RFA procedure and nurses' responsibilities in caring for these patients. Before RFA, nurses should focus on patient education and aggressive hydration. During the procedure, nurses can prevent injury by placing grounding pads appropriately, monitoring vital signs, and medicating patients as needed. After RFA, nurses should assess the skin puncture site, provide adequate pain relief, and, again, hydrate patients. Nurses who care appropriately for RFA recipients may help to improve patient outcomes and make an otherwise frightening procedure more comfortable. PMID:15973845

  2. Ablation of idiopathic ventricular tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Doreen; Kottkamp, Hans

    2010-09-01

    Idiopathic ventricular arrhythmias occur in patients without structural heart disease. They can arise from a variety of specific areas within both ventricles and in the supravalvular regions of the great arteries. Two main groups need to be differentiated: arrhythmias from the outflow tract (OT) region and idiopathic left ventricular, so-called fascicular, tachycardias (ILVTs). OT tachycardia typically originates in the right ventricular OT, but may also occur in the left ventricular OT, particularly in the sinuses of Valsalva or the anterior epicardium or the great cardiac vein. Activation mapping or pace mapping for the OT regions and mapping of diastolic potentials in ILVTs are the mapping techniques that are typically used. The ablation of idiopathic ventricular arrhythmias is highly successful, associated with only rare complications. Newly recognized entities of idiopathic ventricular tachycardias are those originating in the papillary muscles and in the atrioventricular annular regions.

  3. Cloud Computing Explained

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metz, Rosalyn

    2010-01-01

    While many talk about the cloud, few actually understand it. Three organizations' definitions come to the forefront when defining the cloud: Gartner, Forrester, and the National Institutes of Standards and Technology (NIST). Although both Gartner and Forrester provide definitions of cloud computing, the NIST definition is concise and uses…

  4. Security in the cloud.

    PubMed

    Degaspari, John

    2011-08-01

    As more provider organizations look to the cloud computing model, they face a host of security-related questions. What are the appropriate applications for the cloud, what is the best cloud model, and what do they need to know to choose the best vendor? Hospital CIOs and security experts weigh in.

  5. Clouds Dominate the Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-01-01

    Using the exquisite sensitivity of the National Science Foundation's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT), astronomer Jay Lockman of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Green Bank, W. Va., has produced the best cross-section ever of the Milky Way Galaxy's diffuse halo of hydrogen gas. This image confirms the presence of discrete hydrogen clouds in the halo, and could help astronomers understand the origin and evolution of the rarefied atmosphere that surrounds our Galaxy. Lockman presented his findings at the American Astronomical Society meeting in Seattle, WA. Hydrogen Clouds Graphic Artist's Rendering of the Milky Way (background) with insert showing GBT image of cross-section of neutral atomic Hydrogen Credit: Kirk Woellert/National Science Foundation Patricia Smiley, NRAO. "The first observations with the Green Bank Telescope suggested that the hydrogen in the lower halo, the transition zone between the Milky Way and intergalactic space, is very clumpy," said Lockman. "The latest data confirm these results and show that instead of trailing away smoothly from the Galactic plane, a significant fraction of the hydrogen gas in the halo is concentrated in discrete clouds. There are even some filaments." Beyond the star-filled disk of the Milky Way, there exists an extensive yet diffuse halo of hydrogen gas. For years, astronomers have speculated about the origin and structure of this gas. "Even the existence of neutral hydrogen in the halo has been somewhat of a puzzle," Lockman remarked. "Unlike the Earth's atmosphere, which is hot enough to hold itself up against the force of gravity, the hydrogen in the halo is too cool to support itself against the gravitational pull of the Milky Way." Lockman points out that some additional factor has to be involved to get neutral hydrogen to such large distances from the Galactic plane. "This force could be cosmic rays, a supersonic wind, the blast waves from supernovae, or something we have not thought of

  6. Nanosecond laser ablation of gold nanoparticle films

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, Seung H.; Choi, Yeonho; Hwang, David J.; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Chung, Jaewon; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2006-10-02

    Ablation of self-assembled monolayer protected gold nanoparticle films on polyimide was explored using a nanosecond laser. When the nanoparticle film was ablated and subsequently thermally sintered to a continuous film, the elevated rim structure by the expulsion of molten pool could be avoided and the ablation threshold fluence was reduced to a value at least ten times lower than the reported threshold for the gold film. This could be explained by the unusual properties of nanoparticle film such as low melting temperature, weak bonding between nanoparticles, efficient laser energy deposition, and reduced heat loss. Finally, submicron lines were demonstrated.

  7. IR laser ablation of dental enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fried, Daniel

    2000-03-01

    An overview of the basic mechanisms of IR laser ablation of dental enamel is presented. Enamel is a highly structured tissue consisting of an heterogeneous distribution of water, mineral, protein and lipid. Absorption bands of water and carbonated hydroxyapatite can be selectively targeted from 2.7 to 11-micrometer via several laser wavelengths. Mechanistic differences in the nature of ablation and the varying surface morphology produced can be explained by the microstructure of the tissue. Suggested criteria for the choice of the optimum laser parameters for clinical use, the influence of plasma shielding and the role of exogenous water on the mechanism of ablation are discussed.

  8. Diamond Ablators for Inertial Confinement Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Biener, J; Mirkarimi, P B; Tringe, J W; Baker, S L; Wang, Y M; Kucheyev, S O; Teslich, N E; Wu, K J; Hamza, A V; Wild, C; Woerner, E; Koidl, P; Bruehne, K; Fecht, H

    2005-06-21

    Diamond has a unique combination of physical properties for the inertial confinement fusion ablator application, such as appropriate optical properties, high atomic density, high yield strength, and high thermal conductivity. Here, we present a feasible concept to fabricate diamond ablator shells. The fabrication of diamond capsules is a multi-step process, which involves diamond chemical vapor deposition on silicon mandrels followed by polishing, microfabrication of holes, and removing of the silicon mandrel by an etch process. We also discuss the pros and cons of coarse-grained optical quality and nanocrystalline chemical vapor deposition diamond films for the ablator application.

  9. Radiofrequency Ablation of Persistent Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Hussein, Ayman A.; Saliba, Walid I.; Barakat, Amr; Bassiouny, Mohammed; Chamsi-Pasha, Mohammed; Al-Bawardy, Rasha; Hakim, Ali; Tarakji, Khaldoun; Baranowski, Bryan; Cantillon, Daniel; Dresing, Thomas; Tchou, Patrick; Martin, David O.; Varma, Niraj; Bhargava, Mandeep; Callahan, Thomas; Niebauer, Mark; Kanj, Mohamed; Chung, Mina; Natale, Andrea; Lindsay, Bruce D.; Wazni, Oussama M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Various ablation strategies of persistent atrial fibrillation (PersAF) have had disappointing outcomes, despite concerted clinical and research efforts, which could reflect progressive atrial fibrillation–related atrial remodeling. Methods and Results Two-year outcomes were assessed in 1241 consecutive patients undergoing first-time ablation of PersAF (2005–2012). The time intervals between the first diagnosis of PersAF and the ablation procedures were determined. Patients had echocardiograms and measures of B-type natriuretic peptide and C-reactive protein before the procedures. The median diagnosis-to-ablation time was 3 years (25th–75th percentiles 1–6.5). With longer diagnosis-to-ablation time (based on quartiles), there was a significant increase in recurrence rates in addition to an increase in B-type natriuretic peptide levels (P=0.01), C-reactive protein levels (P<0.0001), and left atrial size (P=0.03). The arrhythmia recurrence rates over 2 years were 33.6%, 52.6%, 57.1%, and 54.6% in the first, second, third, and fourth quartiles, respectively (Pcategorical<0.0001). In Cox Proportional Hazard analyses, B-type natriuretic peptide levels, C-reactive protein levels, and left atrial size were associated with arrhythmia recurrence. The diagnosis-to-ablation time had the strongest association with the ablation outcomes which persisted in multivariable Cox analyzes (hazard ratio for recurrence per +1Log diagnosis-to-ablation time 1.27, 95% confidence interval 1.14–1.43; P<0.0001; hazard ratio fourth versus first quartile 2.44, 95% confidence interval 1.68–3.65; Pcategorical<0.0001). Conclusions In patients with PersAF undergoing ablation, the time interval between the first diagnosis of PersAF and the catheter ablation procedure had a strong association with the ablation outcomes, such as shorter diagnosis-to-ablation times were associated with better outcomes and in direct association with markers of atrial remodeling. PMID:26763227

  10. Ablation of pulmonary malignancy: current status.

    PubMed

    Pua, Bradley B; Thornton, Raymond H; Solomon, Stephen B

    2010-08-01

    Since the first reported use of radiofrequency ablation of the lung in 2000, the field of image-guided lung ablation has received a considerable amount of attention. Survival studies have demonstrated the potential utility of thermal ablation in the treatment of patients with early-stage primary and limited secondary pulmonary tumors with promising results. Diagnostic imaging studies have advanced the understanding of the expected immediate postablation appearance of treated lesions, leading the way for early detection of local tumor progression. These survival studies and the expected imaging follow-up of these patients are reviewed herein.

  11. Light pollution in the surroundings of Valencia. Anthropic and natural factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marco, E.; Morales Rubio, A.; Giner-Montañez, M.; Segura, R.; Bonet, C.; Ruíz, I.

    2015-05-01

    Although the conservation of a dark sky at first only concerned astronomers, biologists and conservationists soon realized the effects exerted by light pollution on nocturnal wildlife. This degradation increases with cloud coverage, so, as some recent studies have highlighted, it is also necessary to evaluate the influence of clouds on increasing the brightness of the night sky. Furthermore, the effect of the lunar cycle on flora and nocturnal animals may be affected due to excessive lighting. The variation of the luminance of the sky has been measured at different locations of the city of Valencia and its surroundings, especially in the Turia Natural Park, where we have studied these influences. Moreover we have also evaluated how the Fallas festival lighting is affecting the increase of light pollution.

  12. Validation of Satellite-Based Objective Overshooting Cloud-Top Detection Methods Using CloudSat Cloud Profiling Radar Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bedka, Kristopher M.; Dworak, Richard; Brunner, Jason; Feltz, Wayne

    2012-01-01

    Two satellite infrared-based overshooting convective cloud-top (OT) detection methods have recently been described in the literature: 1) the 11-mm infrared window channel texture (IRW texture) method, which uses IRW channel brightness temperature (BT) spatial gradients and thresholds, and 2) the water vapor minus IRW BT difference (WV-IRW BTD). While both methods show good performance in published case study examples, it is important to quantitatively validate these methods relative to overshooting top events across the globe. Unfortunately, no overshooting top database currently exists that could be used in such study. This study examines National Aeronautics and Space Administration CloudSat Cloud Profiling Radar data to develop an OT detection validation database that is used to evaluate the IRW-texture and WV-IRW BTD OT detection methods. CloudSat data were manually examined over a 1.5-yr period to identify cases in which the cloud top penetrates above the tropopause height defined by a numerical weather prediction model and the surrounding cirrus anvil cloud top, producing 111 confirmed overshooting top events. When applied to Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)-based Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-R Series (GOES-R) Advanced Baseline Imager proxy data, the IRW-texture (WV-IRW BTD) method offered a 76% (96%) probability of OT detection (POD) and 16% (81%) false-alarm ratio. Case study examples show that WV-IRW BTD.0 K identifies much of the deep convective cloud top, while the IRW-texture method focuses only on regions with a spatial scale near that of commonly observed OTs. The POD decreases by 20% when IRW-texture is applied to current geostationary imager data, highlighting the importance of imager spatial resolution for observing and detecting OT regions.

  13. ASCA Observations of the T Tauri Star SU Aurigae and the Surrounding L1517 Dark Cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, Stephen L.; Walter, Frederick M.

    1998-01-01

    We present the results of a approximately equals 40 ks pointed Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA) observation of the L1517 star-forming region, centered on the X-ray-bright T Tauri star SU Aurigae. This star has the highest X-ray luminosity of any classical T Tauri star in the Taurus-Auriga region, and its optical spectra show evidence for both mass inflow and outflow. Strong X-ray emission was detected from SU Aur (L(sub x) = 10(exp 30.9) ergs s(exp -1)) as well as weaker emission from five other pre-main-sequence stars. Although no large-amplitude flares were detected, the X-ray emission of SU Aur showed clear variability in the form of a slow decline in count rate during the 1.3 day observation. We provide the first direct comparison of the coronal differential emission measure (DEM) distribution of a classical T Tauri star with that of a young main-sequence star of similar spectral type. The DEM distributions of SU Aur (G2; age 3 Myr) and the young solar-like star EK Draconis (GO V; age 70 Myr) are qualitatively similar, with both showing a bimodal temperature distribution characterized by a cool plasma component peaking at approximately 8-9 MK and a hot component peaking at approximately 20-21 MK. However, there is a striking difference in the relative proportion of plasma at high temperatures in the two stars, with hot plasma (>20 MK) accounting for approximately equals 80% of the volume emission measure of SU Aur, compared to only approximately equals 40% in EK Dra. These results provide new insight into the changes that will occur in the corona of a T Tauri star as it descends onto the main sequence. A sharp decline in the fraction of coronal plasma at flarelike temperatures will occur during the late-T Tauri and post-T Tauri phases, and other recent X-ray studies have shown that this decline will continue after the young solar-like star reaches the main sequence.

  14. Structure and kinematics of the clouds surrounding the Galactic mini-starburst W43 MM1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacq, T.; Braine, J.; Herpin, F.; van der Tak, F.; Wyrowski, F.

    2016-10-01

    Massive stars have a major influence on their environment, yet their formation is difficult to study as they form quickly in highly obscured regions and are rare, hence more distant than lower mass stars. Westerhout 43 (W43) is a highly luminous galactic massive star-forming region at a distance of 5.5 kpc and the MM1 part hosts a particularly massive dense core (1000 M⊙ within 0.05 pc). We present new Herschel HIFI maps of the W43 MM1 region covering the main low-energy water lines at 557, 987, and 1113 GHz; their HO counterparts; and other lines such as 13CO (10-9) and C18O (9-8), which trace warm gas. These water lines are, with the exception of line wings, observed in absorption. Herschel SPIRE and JCMT 450 μm data have been used to make a model of the continuum emission at the HIFI wavelengths. Analysis of the maps, and in particular the optical depth maps of each line and feature, shows that a velocity gradient, possibly due to rotation, is present in both the envelope (r ≳ 0.5 pc) and the protostellar core (r ≲ 0.2 pc). Velocities increase in both components from SW to NE, following the general source orientation. While the H2O lines trace essentially the cool envelope, we show that the envelope cannot account for the HO absorption, which traces motions close to the protostar. The core has rapid infall, 2.9 km s-1, as manifested by the HO absorption features which are systematically redshifted with respect to the 13CO (10-9) emission line which also traces the inner material with the same angular resolution. Some HO absorption is detected outside the central core and thus outside the regions expected (from a spherical model) to be above 100 K; we attribute this to warm gas associated with the other massive dense cores in W43 MM1. Using the maps to identify absorption from cool gas on large scales, we subtract this component to model spectra for the inner envelope. Modeling the new, presumably corrected, spectra results in a lower water abundance, decreased from 8 × 10-8 to 8 × 10-9, with no change in infall rate.

  15. Use of a circular mapping and ablation catheter for ablation of atypical right ventricular outflow tract arrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Katritsis, Demosthenes G; Giazitzoglou, Eleftherios; Paxinos, George

    2010-02-01

    A new technique for ablation of persistent ectopic activity with atypical electrocardiographic characteristics at the vicinity of the right ventricular outflow tract is described. A new circular mapping and ablation catheter initially designed for pulmonary vein ablation was used. Abolition of ectopic activity was achieved with minimal fluoroscopy and ablation times.

  16. Cloud microstructure studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blau, H. H., Jr.; Fowler, M. G.; Chang, D. T.; Ryan, R. T.

    1972-01-01

    Over two thousand individual cloud droplet size distributions were measured with an optical cloud particle spectrometer flown on the NASA Convair 990 aircraft. Representative droplet spectra and liquid water content, L (gm/cu m) were obtained for oceanic stratiform and cumuliform clouds. For non-precipitating clouds, values of L range from 0.1 gm/cu m to 0.5 gm/cu m; with precipitation, L is often greater than 1 gm/cu m. Measurements were also made in a newly formed contrail and in cirrus clouds.

  17. Infrared spectroscopic measurements of carbon monoxide within a high temperature ablative boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, S. D.; Tibère-Inglesse, A. C.; Laux, C. O.

    2016-12-01

    Theoretical studies have indicated that the formation of carbon monoxide within a high temperature ablative boundary layer can significantly alter the afterbody radiative heat transfer to the surface of a reentry capsule. This paper represents a first attempt to experimentally measure the concentration of carbon monoxide within the high temperature boundary layer surrounding an ablative material exposed to an atmospheric pressure air plasma. A plasma torch facility was used to produce the high temperature flow and a sample of ASTERM ablative material was inserted into the flow. At the stagnation point, the heat flux to the surface was estimated at 8 MW m-2 and the surface temperature at 2900  ±  100 K. Both emission and absorption spectroscopy techniques were used to measure the distribution of carbon monoxide within the flow. Emission spectroscopy yielded better signal-to-noise measurements, but the absorption spectroscopy measurements were used to validate emission measurements. In the cases examined, both emission and absorption measurements were consistent and in agreement with one another. Estimates of carbon monoxide temperature and mole fraction were deduced from the spectra taken within the boundary layer downstream of the stagnation point. No carbon monoxide was observed at the stagnation point. These measurements provide a test case for numerical simulations of plasma-ablator interactions.

  18. Liquid-assisted laser ablation of advanced ceramics and glass-ceramic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Giron, A.; Sola, D.; Peña, J. I.

    2016-02-01

    In this work, results obtained by laser ablation of advanced ceramics and glass-ceramic materials assisted by liquids are reported. A Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at its fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm with pulse-width in the nanosecond range was used to machine the materials, which were immersed in water and ethylene glycol. Variation in geometrical parameters, morphology, and ablation yields were studied by using the same laser working conditions. It was observed that machined depth and removed volume depended on the thermal, optical, and mechanical features of the processed materials as well as on the properties of the surrounding medium in which the laser processing was carried out. Variation in ablation yields was studied in function of the liquid used to assist the laser process and related to refractive index and viscosity. Material features and working conditions were also related to the obtained results in order to correlate ablation parameters with respect to the hardness of the processed materials.

  19. A Bichromator for High Time Resolution Measurements of Stark Broadened Pellet Ablation Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, G. L.; Baylor, L. R.; Fehling, D. T.; Jernigan, T. C.; Brooks, N. H.; Parks, P. B.

    2004-11-01

    Details of the pellet/plasma interaction are important for modeling of local pellet source rates and cross field transport of pellet mass. Understanding these processes is critical for projection of current fueling experiments to future devices such as ITER. Measurement of the Stark broadened deuterium emission lines provides the electron density and temperature of the pellet cloud for comparison with modeling details. Stark broadening measurements on JET for low field launch pellets at moderate time resolution indicate a slow variation in the cloud parameters. Observations of ablation light suggest changes in cloud parameters may occur on faster time scales. We report on the possible application of a multiple interference filter technique[1]to allow monitoring of cloud parameters at time resolution sufficient to study both the slow and rapid variations in cloud parameters. Application of the bichromator to line widths and temporal evolution typical of DIII-D pellet injection cases will be discussed.[1]McNeill,D.H.,RSI 73 (2002) 3193.

  20. Opportunity's Surroundings on Sol 1818 (Vertical)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this full-circle view of the rover's surroundings during the 1,818th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's surface mission (March 5, 2009). South is at the center; north at both ends.

    This view is presented as a vertical projection with geometric seam correction. North is at the top.

    The rover had driven 80.3 meters (263 feet) southward earlier on that sol. Tracks from the drive recede northward in this view.

    The terrain in this portion of Mars' Meridiani Planum region includes dark-toned sand ripples and lighter-toned bedrock.

  1. Opportunity's Surroundings After Sol 1820 Drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this full-circle view of the rover's surroundings during the 1,820th to 1,822nd Martian days, or sols, of Opportunity's surface mission (March 7 to 9, 2009). South is at the center; north at both ends.

    The rover had driven 20.6 meters toward the northwest on Sol 1820 before beginning to take the frames in this view. Tracks from that drive recede southwestward. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about 1 meter (about 40 inches).

    The terrain in this portion of Mars' Meridiani Planum region includes dark-toned sand ripples and small exposures of lighter-toned bedrock.

    This view is presented as a cylindrical projection with geometric seam correction.

  2. Opportunity's Surroundings on Sol 1687 (Vertical)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this 360-degree view of the rover's surroundings on the 1,687th Martian day, or sol, of its surface mission (Oct. 22, 2008).

    Opportunity had driven 133 meters (436 feet) that sol, crossing sand ripples up to about 10 centimeters (4 inches) tall. The tracks visible in the foreground are in the east-northeast direction.

    Opportunity's position on Sol 1687 was about 300 meters southwest of Victoria Crater. The rover was beginning a long trek toward a much larger crater, Endeavour, about 12 kilometers (7 miles) to the southeast.

    This view is presented as a vertical projection with geometric seam correction.

  3. Opportunity's Surroundings on Sol 1798 (Vertical)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this 180-degree view of the rover's surroundings during the 1,798th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's surface mission (Feb. 13, 2009). North is on top.

    This view is presented as a vertical projection with geometric seam correction.

    The rover had driven 111 meters (364 feet) southward on the preceding sol. Tracks from that drive recede northward in this view. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about 1 meter (about 40 inches).

    The terrain in this portion of Mars' Meridiani Planum region includes dark-toned sand ripples and lighter-toned bedrock.

  4. Opportunity's Surroundings After Sol 1820 Drive (Polar)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this full-circle view of the rover's surroundings during the 1,820th to 1,822nd Martian days, or sols, of Opportunity's surface mission (March 7 to 9, 2009).

    This view is presented as a polar projection with geometric seam correction. North is at the top.

    The rover had driven 20.6 meters toward the northwest on Sol 1820 before beginning to take the frames in this view. Tracks from that drive recede southwestward. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about 1 meter (about 40 inches).

    The terrain in this portion of Mars' Meridiani Planum region includes dark-toned sand ripples and small exposures of lighter-toned bedrock.

  5. Opportunity's Surroundings After Sol 1820 Drive (Vertical)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this full-circle view of the rover's surroundings during the 1,820th to 1,822nd Martian days, or sols, of Opportunity's surface mission (March 7 to 9, 2009).

    This view is presented as a vertical projection with geometric seam correction. North is at the top.

    The rover had driven 20.6 meters toward the northwest on Sol 1820 before beginning to take the frames in this view. Tracks from that drive recede southwestward. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about 1 meter (about 40 inches).

    The terrain in this portion of Mars' Meridiani Planum region includes dark-toned sand ripples and small exposures of lighter-toned bedrock.

  6. Opportunity's Surroundings on Sol 1687 (Polar)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this 360-degree view of the rover's surroundings on the 1,687th Martian day, or sol, of its surface mission (Oct. 22, 2008).

    Opportunity had driven 133 meters (436 feet) that sol, crossing sand ripples up to about 10 centimeters (4 inches) tall. The tracks visible in the foreground are in the east-northeast direction.

    Opportunity's position on Sol 1687 was about 300 meters southwest of Victoria Crater. The rover was beginning a long trek toward a much larger crater, Endeavour, about 12 kilometers (7 miles) to the southeast.

    This view is presented as a polar projection with geometric seam correction.

  7. Opportunity's Surroundings on Sol 1818 (Polar)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this full-circle view of the rover's surroundings during the 1,818th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's surface mission (March 5, 2009). South is at the center; north at both ends.

    This view is presented as a polar projection with geometric seam correction. North is at the top.

    The rover had driven 80.3 meters (263 feet) southward earlier on that sol. Tracks from the drive recede northward in this view.

    The terrain in this portion of Mars' Meridiani Planum region includes dark-toned sand ripples and lighter-toned bedrock.

  8. Opportunity's Surroundings on Sol 1798 (Polar)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this 180-degree view of the rover's surroundings during the 1,798th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's surface mission (Feb. 13, 2009). North is on top.

    This view is presented as a polar projection with geometric seam correction.

    The rover had driven 111 meters (364 feet) southward on the preceding sol. Tracks from that drive recede northward in this view. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about 1 meter (about 40 inches).

    The terrain in this portion of Mars' Meridiani Planum region includes dark-toned sand ripples and lighter-toned bedrock.

  9. The Cluster of Galaxies Surrounding Cygnus A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, Frazer N.; Ledlow, Michael J.; Morrison, Glenn E.; Hill, John M.

    1997-10-01

    We report optical imaging and spectroscopy of 41 galaxies in a 22' square region surrounding Cygnus A. The results show that there is an extensive rich cluster associated with Cyg A of Abell richness of at least 1 and possibly as high as 4. The velocity histogram has two peaks, one centered on Cyg A and a more significant peak redshifted by about 2060 km s-1 from the velocity of Cyg A. The dynamical centroid of the spatial distribution is also shifted somewhat to the northwest. However, statistical tests show only weak evidence that there are two distinct clusters. The entire system has a velocity dispersion of 1581 km s-1, which is slightly larger than other, well-studied examples of rich clusters.

  10. Black holes surrounded by uniformly rotating rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansorg, Marcus; Petroff, David

    2005-07-01

    Highly accurate numerical solutions to the problem of black holes surrounded by uniformly rotating rings in axially symmetric, stationary spacetimes are presented. The numerical methods developed to handle the problem are discussed in some detail. Related Newtonian problems are described and numerical results provided, which show that configurations can reach an inner mass-shedding limit as the mass of the central object increases. Exemplary results for the full relativistic problem for rings of constant density are given and the deformation of the event horizon due to the presence of the ring is demonstrated. Finally, we provide an example of a system for which the angular momentum of the central black hole divided by the square of its mass exceeds one (Jc/M2c>1).

  11. Large Eddy Simulation of a Forced Round Turbulent Buoyant Plume in Neutral Surroundings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basu, A. J.; Mansour, N. N.; Koga, Dennis (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Buoyant flows play an important role in various technological and environmental issues. For example, dispersal of pollutants, smoke, or volcano exhaust in the atmosphere, vertical motion of air, formation of clouds and other weather systems, and flows in cooling towers and fires are all determined primarily by buoyancy effects. The buoyancy force in such flows can originate from either a heat source or due to different densities between a fluid and its surroundings. Whatever the cause, the flow can be understood by studying the effects of the tight coupling between the thermal and the velocity fields since density differences can be characterized as temperature differences.

  12. Parameters of the luminous region surrounding deuterium pellets in the PLT tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    McNeill, D.H.; Greene, G.J.; Schuresko, D.D.

    1985-08-01

    The luminous region of the plasma cloud surrounding deuterium pellets injected into a tokamak is studied spectroscopically. At the time of peak luminosity the average electron density is 2.4 x 10/sup 17/ cm/sup -3/ to within 30% and the temperature is at most 2.0 eV. The intensity ratio of the Balmer alpha and beta light from the pellets, the total number of emitted photons, and the apparent size of the radiating region are consistent with local thermodynamic equilibrium at this temperature and density.

  13. Aerosol-Cloud-Drizzle-Turbulence Interactions in Boundary Layer Clouds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    and cloud observations in trade wind cumulus clouds using the CIRPAS aircraft with the cloud radar was designed and carried out. The observational...gradients in cloud properties off the coast. Further from the South Florida area of fair-weather cumulus clouds (Jan. 2008) where clouds with both...marine and continental characteristics were observed. This was followed by a set of observations made in 2010 of cumulus clouds in off of Barbados

  14. Laser ablation in analytical chemistry - A review

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, Richard E.; Mao, Xianglei; Liu, Haichen; Gonzalez, Jhanis; Mao, Samuel S.

    2001-10-10

    Laser ablation is becoming a dominant technology for direct solid sampling in analytical chemistry. Laser ablation refers to the process in which an intense burst of energy delivered by a short laser pulse is used to sample (remove a portion of) a material. The advantages of laser ablation chemical analysis include direct characterization of solids, no chemical procedures for dissolution, reduced risk of contamination or sample loss, analysis of very small samples not separable for solution analysis, and determination of spatial distributions of elemental composition. This review describes recent research to understand and utilize laser ablation for direct solid sampling, with emphasis on sample introduction to an inductively coupled plasma (ICP). Current research related to contemporary experimental systems, calibration and optimization, and fractionation is discussed, with a summary of applications in several areas.

  15. Nanoscale ablation through optically trapped microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fardel, Romain; McLeod, Euan; Tsai, Yu-Cheng; Arnold, Craig B.

    2010-10-01

    The ability to directly create patterns with size scales below 100 nm is important for many applications where the production or repair of high resolution and density features is needed. Laser-based direct-write methods have the benefit of being able to quickly and easily modify and create structures on existing devices, but ablation can negatively impact the overall technique. In this paper we show that self-positioning of near-field objectives through the optical trap assisted nanopatterning (OTAN) method allows for ablation without harming the objective elements. Small microbeads are positioned in close proximity to a substrate where ablation is initiated. Upon ablation, these beads are temporarily displaced from the trap but rapidly return to the initial position. We analyze the range of fluence values for which this process occurs and find that there exists a critical threshold beyond which the beads are permanently ejected.

  16. Evolving Ablative Therapies for Hepatic Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Hochwald, Steven N.

    2014-01-01

    The liver is a common site for both primary and secondary malignancy. Hepatic resection and transplantation are the two treatment modalities that have been shown to achieve complete cure, but only 10 to 20% of patients are candidates for these treatments. For the remaining patients, tumor ablation has emerged as the most promising alternative modality. In addition to providing local control and improving survival outcomes, tumor ablation also helps to down stage patients for potential curative treatments, both alone as well as in combination with other treatments. While tumor ablation can be achieved in multiple ways, the introduction of newer ablative techniques has shifted the focus from palliation to potentially curative treatment. Because the long-term safety and survival benefits are not substantive at present, it is important that we strive to evaluate the results from these studies using appropriate comparative outcome methodologies. PMID:24877069

  17. Thermal Ablation Modeling for Silicate Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yih-Kanq

    2016-01-01

    A general thermal ablation model for silicates is proposed. The model includes the mass losses through the balance between evaporation and condensation, and through the moving molten layer driven by surface shear force and pressure gradient. This model can be applied in the ablation simulation of the meteoroid and the glassy ablator for spacecraft Thermal Protection Systems. Time-dependent axisymmetric computations are performed by coupling the fluid dynamics code, Data-Parallel Line Relaxation program, with the material response code, Two-dimensional Implicit Thermal Ablation simulation program, to predict the mass lost rates and shape change. The predicted mass loss rates will be compared with available data for model validation, and parametric studies will also be performed for meteoroid earth entry conditions.

  18. Pharmacological Tests in Atrial Fibrillation Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Gourraud, Jean-Baptiste; Andrade, Jason G; Macle, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    The invasive management of atrial fibrillation (AF) has been considerably changed by the identification of major sites of AF initiation and/or maintenance within the pulmonary vein antra. Percutaneous catheter ablation of these targets has become the standard of care for sustained maintenance of sinus rhythm. Long-term failure of ablation is related to an inability to create a durable transmural lesion or to identify all of the non-pulmonary vein arrhythmia triggers. Pharmacological challenges during catheter ablation have been suggested to improve outcomes in both paroxysmal and persistent AF. Herein we review the mechanism and evidence for the use of pharmacological adjuncts during the catheter ablation of AF. PMID:28116081

  19. Microwave Tissue Ablation: Biophysics, Technology and Applications

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Microwave ablation is an emerging treatment option for many cancers, cardiac arrhythmias and other medical conditions. During treatment, microwaves are applied directly to tissues to produce rapid temperature elevations sufficient to produce immediate coagulative necrosis. The engineering design criteria for each application differ, with individual consideration for factors such as desired ablation zone size, treatment duration, and procedural invasiveness. Recent technological developments in applicator cooling, power control and system optimization for specific applications promise to increase the utilization of microwave ablation in the future. This article will review the basic biophysics of microwave tissue heating, provide an overview of the design and operation of current equipment, and outline areas for future research for microwave ablation. PMID:21175404

  20. Indications and options for endometrial ablation.

    PubMed

    2008-11-01

    Endometrial ablation is an effective therapeutic option for the management of menorrhagia in properly selected patients. Hysteroscopic and non-hysteroscopic techniques offer similar rates of symptom relief and patient satisfaction.

  1. Percutaneous ablation of malignant thoracic tumors.

    PubMed

    Ghaye, B

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of death related to cancer. Fifteen to thirty percent of patients with a localized lung cancer are actually inoperable as they present with poor general condition, limited cardiopulmonary function, or a too high surgical risk. Therefore, minimally invasive treatments are needed and percutaneous ablation seems an attractive option. Thermal ablation can be performed by delivering heat (radiofrequency, microwave, laser) or cold (cryotherapy) through a needle inserted into the tumor under CT guidance. The ideal lesion is less than 2 or 3 cm in diameter. Success of percutaneous thermal ablation appears to be close to those of surgery for localized lung cancer. Nevertheless studies are still needed to definitely assess the role of ablation compared to other emerging techniques, as stereotactic radiotherapy as well as potential synergy with other treatments.

  2. The role of focal liver ablation in the treatment of unresectable primary and secondary malignant liver tumors.

    PubMed

    Gannon, Christopher J; Curley, Steven A

    2005-10-01

    Surgical resection is often the first-line treatment option for primary and select metastatic hepatic malignancies. A minority of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma undergo potentially curative resection. Similarly, patients with liver-only metastasis are candidates for resection less than 15% of the time because of bilobar disease in which resection would sacrifice too great a volume of hepatic parenchyma, tumor proximity to major vascular or biliary structures thus preventing adequate margins, or unfavorable tumor biology. Ablative techniques directed at tumor elimination while minimizing injury to the surrounding functional hepatic parenchyma may be offered to select patients with unresectable cancers. Radiofrequency ablation, percutaneous ethanol injection, transarterial chemoembolization, cryoablation, microwave coagulation, and laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy all offer potential local tumor control and occasionally achieve long-term disease-free survival. This review focuses on the indications, anticipated benefits, and limitations of these ablative techniques.

  3. Flexible Ablators: Applications and Arcjet Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, James O.; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Beck, Robin A S.; Mcguire, Kathy; Prabhu, Dinesh K.; Gorbunov, Sergey

    2011-01-01

    Flexible ablators were conceived in 2009 to meet the technology pull for large, human Mars Exploration Class, 23 m diameter hypersonic inflatable aerodynamic decelerators. As described elsewhere, they have been recently undergoing initial technical readiness (TRL) advancement by NASA. The performance limits of flexible ablators in terms of maximum heat rates, pressure and shear remain to be defined. Further, it is hoped that this emerging technology will vastly expand the capability of future NASA missions involving atmospheric entry systems. This paper considers four topics of relevance to flexible ablators: (1) Their potential applications to near/far term human and robotic missions (2) Brief consideration of the balance between heat shield diameter, flexible ablator performance limits, entry vehicle controllability and aft-body shear layer impingement of interest to designers of very large entry vehicles, (3) The approach for developing bonding processes of flexible ablators for use on rigid entry bodies and (4) Design of large arcjet test articles that will enable the testing of flexible ablators in flight-like, combined environments (heat flux, pressure, shear and structural tensile loading). Based on a review of thermal protection system performance requirements for future entry vehicles, it is concluded that flexible ablators have broad applications to conventional, rigid entry body systems and are enabling to large deployable (both inflatable and mechanical) heat shields. Because of the game-changing nature of flexible ablators, it appears that NASA's Office of the Chief Technologist (OCT) will fund a focused, 3-year TRL advancement of the new materials capable of performance in heat fluxes in the range of 200-600 W/sq. cm. This support will enable the manufacture and use of the large-scale arcjet test designs that will be a key element of this OCT funded activity.

  4. Resonant laser ablation: mechanisms and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.E.; Allen, T.M.; Garrett, A.W.; Gill, C.G.; Hemberger, P.H.; Kelly, P.B.; Nogar, N.S.

    1996-10-01

    We report on aspects of resonant laser ablation (RLA) behavior for a number of sample types: metals, alloys, thin films, zeolites and soil. The versatility of RLA is demonstrated, with results on a variety of samples and in several mass spectrometers. In addition, the application to depth profiling of thin films is described; absolute removal rates and detection limits are also displayed. A discussion of possible mechanisms for low-power ablation is presented.

  5. Percutaneous ablation of colorectal lung metastases

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Stephen B.

    2015-01-01

    Lung metastasectomy can prolong survival in patients with metastatic colorectal carcinoma. Thermal ablation offers a potential solution with similar reported survival outcomes. It has minimal effect on pulmonary function, or quality of life, can be repeated, and may be considered more acceptable to patients because of the associated shorter hospital stay and recovery. This review describes the indications, technique, reported outcomes, complications and radiologic appearances after thermal ablation of colorectal lung metastases. PMID:26697202

  6. The W3 molecular cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thronson, H. A., Jr.; Lada, C. J.; Hewagama, T.

    1985-01-01

    Extensive J = 1 to 0 (C-12)(O-16) and (C-13)(O-16) observations of the W3 molecular cloud and the surrounding region are presented and discussed. The velocity structure in the region is strongly suggestive of a model of large-scale, externally induced star formation. It is shown that star formation occurred in W3 and the nearby star-forming region W3(OH) after the gas within which they lie was swept up by the expanding W4 ionization front. Two condensations dominate the mass structure of the core of W3, one associated with IRS 4 and the other with IRS 5 and 1. A velocity difference between the two condensations is interpreted as indicating the two sources actually are discrete knots.

  7. High-intensity interstitial ultrasound for thermal ablation of focal cancer targets in prostate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salgaonkar, Vasant A.; Scott, Serena; Kurhanewicz, John; Diederich, Chris J.

    2017-03-01

    Recent advances in image based techniques such as multi-parametric MRI (MP-MRI) can provide precise targeting of focal disease in the prostate. Thermal ablation of such cancer targets while avoiding rectum, urethra, neurovascular bundles (NVB) and sphincter is clinically challenging. The approach described here employs multi-element ultrasound linear arrays designed for transperineal placement within prostate. They consist of independently powered sectored tubular transducers (6.5 - 8.0 MHz) that provide spatial control of energy deposition in angle and length. Volumetric ablation strategies were investigated through patient-specific biothermal models based on Pennes bioheat transfer equation. The acoustic and heat transfer models used here have been validated in several previous simulation and experimental studies. Focal disease sites in prostate were identified through multi-parametric MR images of representative patient cases (n=3). Focal cancer lesions and critical anatomy (prostate, urethra, rectum, bladder, seminal vesicles) were manually segmented (Mimics, Materialise) and converted to 3D finite element meshes (3-Matic, Materialise). The chosen test cases consisted of patients with medium and large sized glands and models of bulk tissue ablation covered volumes in a single quadrant in posterior prostate, hemi-gland targets and "hockey-stick" targets (lesions in three quadrants). Ultrasound applicator placement was determined such that devices were positioned along the prostate periphery while avoiding surrounding anatomy. Transducer sector angles were chosen based on applicator location within limits of fabrication practicability. Thermal models were numerically solved using finite element methods (FEM) in COMSOL Multiphysics. Temperature and thermal dose distributions were calculated to determine treated volumes (> 240 CEM43C, >52 °C) and safety profiles (<10 CEM43C, <45 °C) for nerve, rectal and urethral sparing. Modeling studies indicated that focal

  8. Laser Ablated Carbon Nanodots for Light Emission.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Delfino; Camacho, Marco; Camacho, Miguel; Mayorga, Miguel; Weathers, Duncan; Salamo, Greg; Wang, Zhiming; Neogi, Arup

    2016-12-01

    The synthesis of fluorescent carbon dots-like nanostructures (CNDs) obtained through the laser ablation of a carbon solid target in liquid environment is reported. The ablation process was induced in acetone with laser pulses of 1064, 532, and 355 nm under different irradiation times. Close-spherical amorphous CNDs with sizes between 5 and 20 nm, whose abundance strongly depends on the ablation parameters were investigated using electron microscopy and was confirmed using absorption and emission spectroscopies. The π- π* electronic transition at 3.76 eV dominates the absorption for all the CNDs species synthesized under different irradiation conditions. The light emission is most efficient due to excitation at 3.54 eV with the photoluminescence intensity centered at 3.23 eV. The light emission from the CNDs is most efficient due to ablation at 355 nm. The emission wavelength of the CNDs can be tuned from the near-UV to the green wavelength region by controlling the ablation time and modifying the ablation and excitation laser wavelength.

  9. Pulsed HF laser ablation of dentin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papagiakoumou, Eirini I.; Papadopoulos, Dimitris N.; Makropoulou, Mersini I.; Khabbaz, Maruan G.; Serafetinides, Alexander A.

    2005-03-01

    The interaction of a TEA (Transversally Excited Atmospheric pressure) corona preionized oscillator double amplifier HF (hydrogen fluoride) laser beam with dentin tissue is reported. Pulses of 39 ns in the wavelength range of 2.65-3.35 μm and output energies in the range of 10-45 mJ, in a predominantly TEM00 beam were used to interact with dentin tissue. Ablation experiments were conducted with the laser beam directly focused on the tissue. Several samples of freshly extracted human teeth were used, cut longitudinally in facets of about 1mm thick and stored in phosphate buffered saline after being cleaned from the soft tissue remains. The experimental data (ablation thresholds, ablation rates) are discussed with respect to the ablation mechanism(s). Adequate tissue removal was observed and the ablation behavior was, in the greates part of the available fluences, almost linear. From the microscopic examination of teh samples, in a scanning electron microscope (SEM), the irradiated surfaces displayed oval craters (reflecting the laser beam shape) with absence of any melting or carbonization zone. It is suggested that the specific laser removes hard tissue by a combined photothermal and plasma mediated ablation mechanism, leaving a surface free from thermal damage and with a well-shaped crater.

  10. Nucleon Form Factor Experiments and the Pion Cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Kees de Jager

    2006-04-27

    The experimental and theoretical status of elastic electron scattering from the nucleon is reviewed. A wealth of new data of unprecedented precision, especially at small values of the momentum transfer, in parallel to new theoretical insights, has allowed sensitive tests of the influence of the pionic cloud surrounding the nucleon.

  11. HUBBLE FINDS THOUSANDS OF GASEOUS FRAGMENTS SURROUNDING DYING STAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    the Hubble images reveal an underlying population of many more smaller objects. O'Dell made the observation because he was curious if these objects were the result of the star's final outburst which would bring comets out of 'cold storage' by boiling off the icy, solid comet nuclei. This is how comets behave as they swing near our Sun. The knots have just the right appearance and are at just the right distance from the dying star to be a long-sought comet cloud -- much like the hypothesized Oort cloud encircling our solar system. However, each gaseous cometary 'head' is at least twice the diameter of our solar system -- far too large for the gaseous shell, called a coma, that surrounds an active comet as we know it. The most likely explanation is the objects have been formed during the final years of a star's life when it ejects shells of gas into space. This 'planetary nebula' formation happens in stages where, toward the end of the process, a faster moving shell of gas ejected off the doomed star collides with slower moving gas released ten thousand years before. This collision of hot, lower density gas with cooler, higher density gas forms an unstable condition where the two gases intermix and fragment the previously smooth cloud. This process, called a Rayleigh-Taylor instability, breaks the cloud into smaller and denser finger-like droplets, like dripping paint. Standard models predict that the knots should expand and dissipate within a few hundred thousand years. However, dust particles inside each gas ball might collide and stick together, snowballing to planet- sized bodies over time. The resulting objects would be like Earth- sized copies of the frigid, icy planet Pluto. These icy worlds would escape the dead star and presumably roam interstellar space forever. If this phenomena is common among stars, then our galaxy could be littered with trillions of these objects, O'Dell concludes. 'Planetary nebulae have been formed in our galaxy for billions of years and

  12. HUBBLE FINDS THOUSANDS OF GASEOUS FRAGMENTS SURROUNDING DYING STAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    the Hubble images reveal an underlying population of many more smaller objects. O'Dell made the observation because he was curious if these objects were the result of the star's final outburst which would bring comets out of 'cold storage' by boiling off the icy, solid comet nuclei. This is how comets behave as they swing near our Sun. The knots have just the right appearance and are at just the right distance from the dying star to be a long-sought comet cloud -- much like the hypothesized Oort cloud encircling our solar system. However, each gaseous cometary 'head' is at least twice the diameter of our solar system -- far too large for the gaseous shell, called a coma, that surrounds an active comet as we know it. The most likely explanation is the objects have been formed during the final years of a star's life when it ejects shells of gas into space. This 'planetary nebula' formation happens in stages where, toward the end of the process, a faster moving shell of gas ejected off the doomed star collides with slower moving gas released ten thousand years before. This collision of hot, lower density gas with cooler, higher density gas forms an unstable condition where the two gases intermix and fragment the previously smooth cloud. This process, called a Rayleigh-Taylor instability, breaks the cloud into smaller and denser finger-like droplets, like dripping paint. Standard models predict that the knots should expand and dissipate within a few hundred thousand years. However, dust particles inside each gas ball might collide and stick together, snowballing to planet- sized bodies over time. The resulting objects would be like Earth- sized copies of the frigid, icy planet Pluto. These icy worlds would escape the dead star and presumably roam interstellar space forever. If this phenomena is common among stars, then our galaxy could be littered with trillions of these objects, O'Dell concludes. 'Planetary nebulae have been formed in our galaxy for billions of years and

  13. Interpretation of MODIS Cloud Images by CloudSat/CALIPSO Cloud Vertical Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, T.; Fetzer, E. J.; Wong, S.; Yue, Q.

    2015-12-01

    Clouds observed by passive remote-sensing imager (Aqua-MODIS) are collocated to cloud vertical profiles observed by active profiling sensors (CloudSat radar and CALIPSO lidar) at the pixel-scale. By comparing different layers of cloud types classified in the 2B-CLDCLASS-LIDAR product from CloudSat+CALIPSO to those cloud properties observed by MODIS, we evaluate the occurrence frequencies of cloud types and cloud-overlap in CloudSat+CALIPSO for each MODIS cloud regime defined by cloud optical depth (τ) and cloud-top pressure (P) histograms. We find that about 70% of MODIS clear sky agrees with the clear category in CloudSat+CALIPSO; whereas the remainder is either single layer (~25%) cirrus (Ci), low-level cumulus (Cu), stratocumulus (Sc), or multi-layer (<5%) clouds in CloudSat+CALIPSO. Under MODIS cloudy conditions, 60%, 28%, and 8% of the occurrences show single-, double-, and triple-layer clouds, respectively in CloudSat+CALIPSO. When MODIS identifies single-layer clouds, 50-60% of the MODIS low-level clouds are categorized as stratus (Sc) in CloudSat+CALIPSO. Over the tropics, ~70% of MODIS high and optically thin clouds (considered as cirrus in the histogram) is also identified as Ci in CloudSat+CALIPSO, and ~40% of MODIS high and optically thick clouds (considered as convective in the histogram) agrees with CloudSat+CALIPSO deep convections (DC). Over mid-latitudes these numbers drop to 45% and 10%, respectively. The best agreement occurs in tropical single-layer cloud regimes, where 90% of MODIS high-thin clouds are identified as Ci by CloudSat+CALIPSO and 60% of MODIS high-thick clouds are identified as DC. Worst agreement is found for multi-layer clouds, where cirrus on top of low- and mid-level clouds in MODIS are frequently categorized as high-thick clouds by passive imaging - among these only 5-12% are DC in CloudSat+CALIPSO. It is encouraging that both MODIS low-level clouds (regardless of optical thickness) and high-level thin clouds are consistently

  14. THE CALIFORNIA MOLECULAR CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Lada, Charles J.; Lombardi, Marco; Alves, Joao F. E-mail: mlombard@eso.or

    2009-09-20

    We present an analysis of wide-field infrared extinction maps of a region in Perseus just north of the Taurus-Auriga dark cloud complex. From this analysis we have identified a massive, nearby, but previously unrecognized, giant molecular cloud (GMC). Both a uniform foreground star density and measurements of the cloud's velocity field from CO observations indicate that this cloud is likely a coherent structure at a single distance. From comparison of foreground star counts with Galactic models, we derive a distance of 450 +- 23 pc to the cloud. At this distance the cloud extends over roughly 80 pc and has a mass of {approx} 10{sup 5} M{sub sun}, rivaling the Orion (A) molecular cloud as the largest and most massive GMC in the solar neighborhood. Although surprisingly similar in mass and size to the more famous Orion molecular cloud (OMC) the newly recognized cloud displays significantly less star formation activity with more than an order of magnitude fewer young stellar objects than found in the OMC, suggesting that both the level of star formation and perhaps the star formation rate in this cloud are an order of magnitude or more lower than in the OMC. Analysis of extinction maps of both clouds shows that the new cloud contains only 10% the amount of high extinction (A{sub K} > 1.0 mag) material as is found in the OMC. This, in turn, suggests that the level of star formation activity and perhaps the star formation rate in these two clouds may be directly proportional to the total amount of high extinction material and presumably high density gas within them and that there might be a density threshold for star formation on the order of n(H{sub 2}) {approx} a few x 10{sup 4} cm{sup -3}.

  15. Numerical study of the effect of blood vessel on the microwave ablation shape.

    PubMed

    Nie, Xiaohui; Nan, Qun; Guo, Xuemei; Tian, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    The existence of large blood vessels seriously impacts the results of microwave ablation on heat transfer of surrounding tissue, and the research of influences about large blood vessels could be essential and significant. The temperature distribution in the tissue was analyzed with a microwave heating source by finite element method. The model, where the blood vessel is parallel to antenna, has different distances from antenna to blood vessel. As distance was greater than 20mm, the effect of blood vessel that was parallel to antenna was ignored and the ablation area was elliptical-like. When distance was less than 10mm, the part of asymmetrical coagulated area was on the right side of blood vessel. Therefore, the temperature contour by different conditions could provide numerical references, which is whether to block blood vessel or not, to achieve the aim of guiding the clinical practice, according to the locations of tumor and blood vessel.

  16. Silicon photonics cloud (SiCloud)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeVore, Peter T. S.; Jiang, Yunshan; Lynch, Michael; Miyatake, Taira; Carmona, Christopher; Chan, Andrew C.; Muniam, Kuhan; Jalali, Bahram

    2015-02-01

    We present SiCloud (Silicon Photonics Cloud), the first free, instructional web-based research and education tool for silicon photonics. SiCloud's vision is to provide a host of instructional and research web-based tools. Such interactive learning tools enhance traditional teaching methods by extending access to a very large audience, resulting in very high impact. Interactive tools engage the brain in a way different from merely reading, and so enhance and reinforce the learning experience. Understanding silicon photonics is challenging as the topic involves a wide range of disciplines, including material science, semiconductor physics, electronics and waveguide optics. This web-based calculator is an interactive analysis tool for optical properties of silicon and related material (SiO2, Si3N4, Al2O3, etc.). It is designed to be a one stop resource for students, researchers and design engineers. The first and most basic aspect of Silicon Photonics is the Material Parameters, which provides the foundation for the Device, Sub-System and System levels. SiCloud includes the common dielectrics and semiconductors for waveguide core, cladding, and photodetection, as well as metals for electrical contacts. SiCloud is a work in progress and its capability is being expanded. SiCloud is being developed at UCLA with funding from the National Science Foundation's Center for Integrated Access Networks (CIAN) Engineering Research Center.

  17. Dust ablation in Pluto's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horanyi, Mihaly; Poppe, Andrew; Sternovsky, Zoltan

    2016-04-01

    Based on measurements by dust detectors onboard the Pioneer 10/11 and New Horizons spacecraft the total production rate of dust particles born in the Edgeworth Kuiper Belt (EKB) has been be estimated to be on the order of 5 ṡ 103 kg/s in the approximate size range of 1 - 10 μm. Dust particles are produced by collisions between EKB objects and their bombardment by both interplanetary and interstellar dust particles. Dust particles of EKB origin, in general, migrate towards the Sun due to Poynting-Robertson drag but their distributions are further sculpted by mean-motion resonances as they first approach the orbit of Neptune and later the other planets, as well as mutual collisions. Subsequently, Jupiter will eject the vast majority of them before they reach the inner solar system. The expected mass influx into Pluto atmosphere is on the order of 200 kg/day, and the arrival speed of the incoming particles is on the order of 3 - 4 km/s. We have followed the ablation history as function of speed and size of dust particles in Pluto's atmosphere, and found that volatile rich particles can fully sublimate due to drag heating and deposit their mass in narrow layers. This deposition might promote the formation of the haze layers observed by the New Horizons spacecraft. This talk will explore the constraints on the composition of the dust particles by comparing the altitude of the deposition layers to the observed haze layers.

  18. Radiofrequency Ablation Beyond the Liver

    PubMed Central

    Neeman, Ziv; Wood, Bradford J.

    2008-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has begun to show promise for extrahepatic indications. Although much of the reported work on image-guided RFA of liver neoplasms is quite promising, it is even earlier in the evaluation and validation process for extrahepatic RFA, with few short-term and no long-term studies reported. Although there are much more data for liver RFA with almost 3,000 cases reported in the literature, there are a number of ongoing investigations of RFA for tumors in the kidney, lung, bone, breast, bone, and adrenal gland. Debulking and pain control with RFA present palliative options becoming increasingly popular weapons in the interventionalist's oncology arsenal. Metastatic disease with a wide variety of primary histologies in a myriad of locations may be treated with RFA after a careful consideration of the risk-to-benefit ratio balance. The RFA technique can be slightly different outside the liver. Specifically, differing dielectric tissue characteristics may markedly alter the RFA treatment. Each different RFA system has a unique risk and advantage profile. Extrahepatic indications and contraindications will be suggested. Treatment tips and the unique complications and considerations will be introduced for some of the more common extrahepatic locations. PMID:12524646

  19. Plans and status of the Beryllium ablator campaign on NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kline, J. L.; Yi, S. A.; Simakov, A. N.; Wilson, D. C.; Olson, R. E.; Krasheninnikova, N. S.; Kyrala, G. A.; Perry, T. S.; Batha, S. H.; Dewald, E. L.; Edwards, M. J.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Meezan, N. B.

    2014-10-01

    Beryllium has long been known to have excellent properties for indirectly driven ICF implosions including enhanced ablation pressure, implosion velocity, and mass ablation rate. The high ablation velocity leads to stabilization of ablative hydrodynamic instabilities and higher ablation pressures. Recent ``high foot'' experiments have shown ablative Rayleigh-Taylor to be a leading cause of degraded performance for ICF implosions. While Beryllium ablators have these advantages, there are also risks associated with Beryllium target designs. A campaign is underway to design and to test these advantages for comparison with other ablator options and determine which provides the best path forward for ICF. Experiments using Beryllium ablators are expected to start in the late summer of 2014. This presentation will discuss the status of the experiments and layout the plans/goals for the campaign. This work is supported by the US DOE.

  20. Percutaneous Microwave Ablation of Renal Angiomyolipomas

    SciTech Connect

    Cristescu, Mircea; Abel, E. Jason; Wells, Shane Ziemlewicz, Timothy J.; Hedican, Sean P.; Lubner, Megan G. Hinshaw, J. Louis Brace, Christopher L. Lee, Fred T.

    2016-03-15

    PurposeTo evaluate the safety and efficacy of US-guided percutaneous microwave (MW) ablation in the treatment of renal angiomyolipoma (AML).Materials and MethodsFrom January 2011 to April 2014, seven patients (5 females and 2 males; mean age 51.4) with 11 renal AMLs (9 sporadic type and 2 tuberous sclerosis associated) with a mean size of 3.4 ± 0.7 cm (range 2.4–4.9 cm) were treated with high-powered, gas-cooled percutaneous MW ablation under US guidance. Tumoral diameter, volume, and CT/MR enhancement were measured on pre-treatment, immediate post-ablation, and delayed post-ablation imaging. Clinical symptoms and creatinine were assessed on follow-up visits.ResultsAll ablations were technically successful and no major complications were encountered. Mean ablation parameters were ablation power of 65 W (range 60–70 W), using 456 mL of hydrodissection fluid per patient, over 4.7 min (range 3–8 min). Immediate post-ablation imaging demonstrated mean tumor diameter and volume decreases of 1.8 % (3.4–3.3 cm) and 1.7 % (27.5–26.3 cm{sup 3}), respectively. Delayed imaging follow-up obtained at a mean interval of 23.1 months (median 17.6; range 9–47) demonstrated mean tumor diameter and volume decreases of 29 % (3.4–2.4 cm) and 47 % (27.5–12.1 cm{sup 3}), respectively. Tumoral enhancement decreased on immediate post-procedure and delayed imaging by CT/MR parameters, indicating decreased tumor vascularity. No patients required additional intervention and no patients experienced spontaneous bleeding post-ablation.ConclusionOur early experience with high-powered, gas-cooled percutaneous MW ablation demonstrates it to be a safe and effective modality to devascularize and decrease the size of renal AMLs.

  1. Opportunity's Surroundings After Sol 1820 Drive (Stereo)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left-eye view of a color stereo pair for PIA11841 [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right-eye view of a color stereo pair for PIA11841

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this full-circle view of the rover's surroundings during the 1,820th to 1,822nd Martian days, or sols, of Opportunity's surface mission (March 7 to 9, 2009).

    This view combines images from the left-eye and right-eye sides of the navigation camera. It appears three-dimensional when viewed through red-blue glasses with the red lens on the left.

    The rover had driven 20.6 meters toward the northwest on Sol 1820 before beginning to take the frames in this view. Tracks from that drive recede southwestward. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about 1 meter (about 40 inches).

    The terrain in this portion of Mars' Meridiani Planum region includes dark-toned sand ripples and small exposures of lighter-toned bedrock.

    This view is presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

  2. Opportunity's Surroundings on Sol 1687 (Stereo)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left-eye view of a color stereo pair for PIA11739 [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right-eye view of a color stereo pair for PIA11739

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this stereo, 360-degree view of the rover's surroundings on the 1,687th Martian day, or sol, of its surface mission (Oct. 22, 2008). The view appears three-dimensional when viewed through red-blue glasses.

    Opportunity had driven 133 meters (436 feet) that sol, crossing sand ripples up to about 10 centimeters (4 inches) tall. The tracks visible in the foreground are in the east-northeast direction.

    Opportunity's position on Sol 1687 was about 300 meters southwest of Victoria Crater. The rover was beginning a long trek toward a much larger crater, Endeavour, about 12 kilometers (7 miles) to the southeast.

    This panorama combines right-eye and left-eye views presented as cylindrical-perspective projections with geometric seam correction.

  3. Opportunity's Surroundings on Sol 1798 (Stereo)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left-eye view of a color stereo pair for PIA11850 [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right-eye view of a color stereo pair for PIA11850

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this stereo 180-degree view of the rover's surroundings during the 1,798th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's surface mission (Feb. 13, 2009). North is on top.

    This view combines images from the left-eye and right-eye sides of the navigation camera. It appears three-dimensional when viewed through red-blue glasses with the red lens on the left.

    The rover had driven 111 meters (364 feet) southward on the preceding sol. Tracks from that drive recede northward in this view. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about 1 meter (about 40 inches).

    The terrain in this portion of Mars' Meridiani Planum region includes dark-toned sand ripples and lighter-toned bedrock.

    This view is presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

  4. Ultrastructure of mitochondrial nucleoid and its surroundings.

    PubMed

    Prachař, Jarmil

    2016-07-01

    Mitochondrial nucleoids (hereafter nucleoids) contain genetic information, mitochondrial DNA, prerequisite for mitochondrial functioning, particularly information required for mitochondrial electron transport. To understand nucleoid functioning, it is imperative to know its ultrastructure and dynamics in the context of the actual mitochondrial state. In this study, we document the internal structure, different positions of nucleoids inside the mitochondrial tube and their different morphology. The nucleoid cores appear in section as circular or slightly oval objects ranging from 50 to 100 nm in diameter. They are mainly located in the matrix between cristae inside the mitochondrial tube but they are also frequently found close to the inner mitochondrial surface. In tightly packed form, their interior exhibits sophisticated nucleoprotein regularity. The core surroundings form an electron-lucent thick layer which is probably partitioned into separate chambers. We suggest that the morphology of nucleoids mirrors the mode of energy production, glycolysis versus oxidative phosphorylation. The new high resolution transmission electron microscopy method enabled us to obtain morphological characteristics on yet unpublished level.

  5. Opportunity's Surroundings on Sol 1818 (Stereo)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left-eye view of a color stereo pair for PIA11846 [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right-eye view of a color stereo pair for PIA11846

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this full-circle view of the rover's surroundings during the 1,818th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's surface mission (March 5, 2009). South is at the center; north at both ends.

    This view combines images from the left-eye and right-eye sides of the navigation camera. It appears three-dimensional when viewed through red-blue glasses with the red lens on the left.

    The rover had driven 80.3 meters (263 feet) southward earlier on that sol. Tracks from the drive recede northward in this view.

    The terrain in this portion of Mars' Meridiani Planum region includes dark-toned sand ripples and lighter-toned bedrock.

    This view is presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

  6. INTERSTELLAR MAGNETIC FIELD SURROUNDING THE HELIOPAUSE

    SciTech Connect

    Whang, Y. C.

    2010-02-20

    This paper presents a three-dimensional analytical solution, in the limit of very low plasma beta-ratio, for the distortion of the interstellar magnetic field surrounding the heliopause. The solution is obtained using a line dipole method that is the integration of point dipole along a semi-infinite line; it represents the magnetic field caused by the presence of the heliopause. The solution allows the variation of the undisturbed magnetic field at any inclination angle. The heliosphere is considered as having blunt-nosed geometry on the upwind side and it asymptotically approaches a cylindrical geometry having an open exit for the continuous outflow of the solar wind on the downwind side. The heliopause is treated as a magnetohydrodynamic tangential discontinuity; the interstellar magnetic field lines at the boundary are tangential to the heliopause. The interstellar magnetic field is substantially distorted due to the presence of the heliopause. The solution shows the draping of the field lines around the heliopause. The magnetic field strength varies substantially near the surface of the heliopause. The effect on the magnetic field due to the presence of the heliopause penetrates very deep into the interstellar space; the depth of penetration is of the same order of magnitude as the scale length of the heliosphere.

  7. Identification of Dust and Ice Cloud Formation from A-Train Datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, D. S.; Liou, K. N.

    2014-12-01

    Dust aerosols are effective ice nuclei for clouds and instances of nucleation have been well studied in laboratory experiments. We used CALIOP/CALIPSO, MODIS/Aqua, and CloudSat on the A-Train to find collocated instances of clouds characterized as water by MODIS, but contain ice water as indicated by CloudSat. The vertical profiles of CALIPSO detect the presence of dust and polluted dust near clouds. This study concentrates on high dust aerosol areas including the regions surrounding the Sahara Desert as well as South Asia including the Tibetan Plateau. These cases display the effects of dust acting as ice nuclei in the time frame between MODIS overpass and CloudSat overpass (~45 seconds). Utilizing available datasets, we then carried out radiative transfer calculations to understand spectral radiative forcing differences between water and ice clouds, particularly over snow surfaces at the Tibetan Plateau.

  8. A systematic review of surgical ablation versus catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Kearney, Katherine; Stephenson, Rowan; Phan, Kevin; Chan, Wei Yen; Huang, Min Yin

    2014-01-01

    Background Atrial fibrillation (AF) is an increasingly prevalent condition in the ageing population, with significantly associated morbidity and mortality. Surgical and catheter ablative strategies both aim to reduce mortality and morbidity through freedom from AF. This review consolidates all currently available comparative data to evaluate these two interventions. Methods A systematic search was conducted across MEDLINE, PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews from January 2000 until August 2013. All studies were critically appraised and only those directly comparing surgical and catheter ablation were included. Results Seven studies were deemed suitable for analysis according to the inclusion criteria. Freedom from AF was significantly higher in the surgical ablation group versus the catheter ablation group at 6-month, 12-month and study endpoint follow-up periods. Subgroup analysis demonstrated similar trends, with higher freedom from AF in the surgical ablation group for paroxysmal AF patients. The incidence of pacemaker implantation was higher, while no difference in stroke or cardiac tamponade was demonstrated for the surgical versus catheter ablation groups. Conclusions Current evidence suggests that epicardial ablative strategies are associated with higher freedom from AF, higher pacemaker implantation rates and comparable neurological complications and cardiac tamponade incidence to catheter ablative treatment. Other complications and risks were poorly reported, which warrants further randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of adequate power and follow-up duration. PMID:24516794

  9. What is a Cloud?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, C. N.; Wu, W.

    2013-12-01

    There are multiple factors that cause disagreements between differing methods using differing instruments to infer cloud amounts. But along with these issues is a fundamental concern that has permeated all comparisons and supersedes such questions as what are the uncertainty estimates of a given retrieval. To wit: what is a cloud? How can uncertainty of a cloud amount measurement be determined when there is no absolute 'truth' on what defines a cloud, as opposed to cloud-free? Recent research comparing a decade of surface- and satellite-based retrievals of cloud amount for the ARM Southern Great Plains site shows significant disagreements. While Total Sky Imager 100-degree FOV, Shortwave (SW) Radiative Flux Analysis, GOES satellite and PATMOS-x satellite amounts agree relatively well, ISCCP satellite and ARSCL time-series cloud amounts are significantly greater, 15% (ISCCP) and 8% (ARSCL) larger in average diurnal variations. In both cases, it appears that optically thin high ice is counted as 'cloud' in ARSCL and ISCCP that is not categorized as cloud by all the others. Additionally, cloud amounts from three methods (ISCCP, ARSCL, and GOES) show an overall increase of 8%-10% in the annually averaged cloud fractions from 1998 to 2009, while those from the other three (TSI, SWFA, PATMOS-x) show little trend for this period. So one wonders: are cloud amounts increasing or not over this period? The SW Flux Analysis used sky imager retrievals as 'truth' in development of the methodology (Long et al, 2006a), where sky imagery itself used human observations as the model (Long et al., 2006b). Min et al. (2008) then used SW Flux Analysis retrievals as 'truth' to develop an MFRSR-based spectral SW retrieval method. Dupont et al. (2008) show that the SW-based retrievals allow up to a visible optical depth of 0.15 (95% of occurrences) under the 'clear-sky' category which primarily consists of sub-visual cirrus, which by ancestry applies to spectral SW, sky imager and human

  10. Online monitoring of nanoparticles formed during nanosecond laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nováková, Hana; Holá, Markéta; Vojtíšek-Lom, Michal; Ondráček, Jakub; Kanický, Viktor

    2016-11-01

    The particle size distribution of dry aerosol originating from laser ablation of glass material was monitored simultaneously with Laser Ablation - Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) analysis and two aerosol spectrometers - Fast Mobility Particle Sizer (FMPS) and Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (APS). The unique combination of LA-ICP-MS and FMPS offers the possibility of measuring the particle size distribution every 1 s of the ablation process in the size range of 5.6-560 nm. APS extends the information about particle concentration in the size range 0.54-17 μm. Online monitoring of the dry aerosol was performed for two ablation modes (spot and line with a duration of 80 s) with a 193 nm excimer laser system, using the glass reference material NIST 610 as a sample. Different sizes of laser spot for spot ablation and different scan speeds for line ablation were tested. It was found that the FMPS device is capable of detecting changes in particle size distribution at the first pulses of spot laser ablation and is suitable for laser ablation control simultaneously with LA-ICP-MS analysis. The studied parameters of laser ablation have an influence on the resulting particle size distribution. The line mode of laser ablation produces larger particles during the whole ablation process, while spot ablation produces larger particles only at the beginning, during the ablation of the intact layer of the ablated material. Moreover, spot ablation produces more primary nano-particles (in ultrafine mode size range < 100 nm) than line ablation. This effect is most probably caused by a reduced amount of large particles released from the spot ablation crater. The larger particles scavenge the ultrafine particles during the line ablation mode.

  11. Contact pulsed Nd:YAG ablation of human dentin: ablation rates and tissue effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, David M.; Yessik, Michael J.

    1994-09-01

    Dentin from freshly extracted human teeth was exposed to flashlamp pumped Nd:YAG pulses (100 microsecond(s) duration, 50 - 200 mJ/pulse) delivered through a flat cut fiberoptic in contact with the dentin surface. Ablation depth and volume were measured optically and confirmed with electron microscope morphometrics. Ablation depth increased with force applied at the fiber tip up to 5 - 10 g. Above this ablation depths were insensitive to applied force. Craters made in dental stone were deeper and narrower than those made in normal dentin. Ablation depths per pulse and volumes per pulse decrease as the number of pulses increase. This is more prominent for 200 mJ pulses. At 60 mJ the ablation depths are the same from 10 to 100 Hz repetition rates, although qualitative changes (collateral damage) are greater at higher repetition rates. A progressive increase in collateral damage is seen from the 1st through the 200th pulse.

  12. Hydrodynamic Mixing of Ablator Material into the Compressed Fuel and Hot Spot of Direct-Drive DT Cryogenic Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regan, S. P.; Goncharov, V. N.; Epstein, R.; Betti, R.; Bonino, M. J.; Cao, D.; Collins, T. J. B.; Campbell, E. M.; Forrest, C. J.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Harding, D. R.; Marozas, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; McKenty, P. W.; Sangster, T. C.; Stoeckl, C.; Luo, R. W.; Schoff, M. E.; Farrell, M.

    2016-10-01

    Hydrodynamic mixing of ablator material into the compressed fuel and hot spot of direct-drive DT cryogenic implosions is diagnosed using time-integrated, spatially resolved xray spectroscopy. The laser drive ablates most of the 8- μm-thick CH ablator, which is doped with trace amounts of Ge ( 0.5 at.) and surrounds the cryogenic DT layer. A small fraction of the ablator material is mixed into the compressed shell and the hot spot by the ablation-front Rayleigh-Taylor hydrodynamic instability seeded by laser imprint, the target mounting stalk, and surface debris. The amount of mix mass inferred from spectroscopic analysis of the Ge K-shell emission will be presented. This material is based upon work supported by the Department Of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944. Part of this work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  13. Radioiodine Remnant Ablation: A Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Bal, Chandra Sekhar; Padhy, Ajit Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Radioiodine remnant ablation (RRA) is considered a safe and effective method for eliminating residual thyroid tissue, as well as microscopic disease if at all present in thyroid bed following thyroidectomy. The rationale of RRA is that in the absence of thyroid tissue, serum thyroglobulin (Tg) measurement can be used as an excellent tumor marker. Other considerations are like the presence of significant remnant thyroid tissue makes detection and treatment of nodal or distant metastases difficult. Rarely, microscopic disease in the thyroid bed if not ablated, in the future, could be a source of anaplastic transformation. On the other hand, microscopic tumor emboli in distant sites could be the cause of distant metastasis too. The ablation of remnant tissue would in all probability eliminate these theoretical risks. It may be noted that all these are unproven contentious issues except postablation serum Tg estimation that could be a good tumor marker for detecting early biochemical recurrence in long-term follow-up strategy. Radioactive iodine is administered as a form of “adjuvant therapy” for remnant ablation. There have been several reports with regard to the administered dose for remnant ablation. The first report of a prospective randomized clinical trial was published from India by a prospective randomized study conducted at the All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi in the year 1996. The study reported that increasing the empirical 131I initial dose to more than 50 mCi results in plateauing of the dose-response curve and thus, conventional high-dose remnant ablation needs critical evaluation. Recently, two important studies were published: One from French group and the other from UK on a similar line. Interestingly, all three studies conducted in three different geographical regions of the world showed exactly similar conclusion. The new era of low-dose remnant ablation has taken a firm scientific footing across the continents. PMID:26420983

  14. Photoacoustic characterization of radiofrequency ablation lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchard, Richard; Dana, Nicholas; Di Biase, Luigi; Natale, Andrea; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2012-02-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) procedures are used to destroy abnormal electrical pathways in the heart that can cause cardiac arrhythmias. Current methods relying on fluoroscopy, echocardiography and electrical conduction mapping are unable to accurately assess ablation lesion size. In an effort to better visualize RFA lesions, photoacoustic (PA) and ultrasonic (US) imaging were utilized to obtain co-registered images of ablated porcine cardiac tissue. The left ventricular free wall of fresh (i.e., never frozen) porcine hearts was harvested within 24 hours of the animals' sacrifice. A THERMOCOOLR Ablation System (Biosense Webster, Inc.) operating at 40 W for 30-60 s was used to induce lesions through the endocardial and epicardial walls of the cardiac samples. Following lesion creation, the ablated tissue samples were placed in 25 °C saline to allow for multi-wavelength PA imaging. Samples were imaged with a VevoR 2100 ultrasound system (VisualSonics, Inc.) using a modified 20-MHz array that could provide laser irradiation to the sample from a pulsed tunable laser (Newport Corp.) to allow for co-registered photoacoustic-ultrasound (PAUS) imaging. PA imaging was conducted from 750-1064 nm, with a surface fluence of approximately 15 mJ/cm2 maintained during imaging. In this preliminary study with PA imaging, the ablated region could be well visualized on the surface of the sample, with contrasts of 6-10 dB achieved at 750 nm. Although imaging penetration depth is a concern, PA imaging shows promise in being able to reliably visualize RF ablation lesions.

  15. Catheter Ablation of Fascicular Ventricular Tachycardia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yaowu; Fang, Zhen; Yang, Bing; Kojodjojo, Pipin; Chen, Hongwu; Ju, Weizhu; Cao, Kejiang; Chen, Minglong

    2015-01-01

    Background— Fascicular ventricular tachycardia (FVT) is a common form of sustained idiopathic left ventricular tachycardia with an Asian preponderance. This study aimed to prospectively investigate long-term clinical outcomes of patients undergoing ablation of FVT and identify predictors of arrhythmia recurrence. Methods and Results— Consecutive patients undergoing FVT ablation at a single tertiary center were enrolled. Activation mapping was performed to identify the earliest presystolic Purkinje potential during FVT that was targeted by radiofrequency ablation. Follow-up with clinic visits, ECG, and Holter monitoring was performed at least every 6 months. A total of 120 consecutive patients (mean age, 29.3±12.7 years; 82% men; all patients with normal ejection fraction) were enrolled. FVT involved left posterior fascicle and left anterior fascicle in 118 and 2 subjects, respectively. VT was noninducible in 3 patients, and ablation was acutely successful in 117 patients. With a median follow-up of 55.7 months, VT of a similar ECG morphology recurred in 17 patients, and repeat procedure confirmed FVT recurrence involving the same fascicle. Shorter VT cycle length was the only significant predictor of FVT recurrence (P=0.03). Six other patients developed new-onset upper septal FVT that was successfully ablated. Conclusions— Ablation of FVT guided by activation mapping is associated with a single procedural success rate without the use of antiarrhythmic drugs of 80.3%. Arrhythmia recurrences after an initially successful ablation were caused by recurrent FVT involving the same fascicle in two thirds of patients or new onset of upper septal FVT in the remainder. PMID:26386017

  16. Cloud Forensics Issues

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    I N S T I T U T E F O R D E F E N S E A N A L Y S E S Cloud Forensics Issues William R. Simpson Coimbatore Chandersekaran 1 July 2014 IDA...252.227-7013 (a)(16) [Sep 2011]. Cloud Forensics Issues William R Simpson and Coimbatore Chandersekaran Abstract— Forensics is...offerings of cloud capabilities have not provided security, monitoring or attribution that would allow an effective forensics investigation. The high

  17. Cryptographic Cloud Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamara, Seny; Lauter, Kristin

    We consider the problem of building a secure cloud storage service on top of a public cloud infrastructure where the service provider is not completely trusted by the customer. We describe, at a high level, several architectures that combine recent and non-standard cryptographic primitives in order to achieve our goal. We survey the benefits such an architecture would provide to both customers and service providers and give an overview of recent advances in cryptography motivated specifically by cloud storage.

  18. Ammonia Clouds on Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for movie of Ammonia Ice Clouds on Jupiter

    In this movie, put together from false-color images taken by the New Horizons Ralph instrument as the spacecraft flew past Jupiter in early 2007, show ammonia clouds (appearing as bright blue areas) as they form and disperse over five successive Jupiter 'days.' Scientists noted how the larger cloud travels along with a small, local deep hole.

  19. Subsurface ablation of atherosclerotic plaque using ultrafast laser pulses

    PubMed Central

    Lanvin, Thomas; Conkey, Donald B.; Frobert, Aurelien; Valentin, Jeremy; Goy, Jean-Jacques; Cook, Stéphane; Giraud, Marie-Noelle; Psaltis, Demetri

    2015-01-01

    We perform subsurface ablation of atherosclerotic plaque using ultrafast pulses. Excised mouse aortas containing atherosclerotic plaque were ablated with ultrafast near-infrared (NIR) laser pulses. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) was used to observe the ablation result, while the physical damage was inspected in histological sections. We characterize the effects of incident pulse energy on surface damage, ablation hole size, and filament propagation. We find that it is possible to ablate plaque just below the surface without causing surface damage, which motivates further investigation of ultrafast ablation for subsurface atherosclerotic plaque removal. PMID:26203381

  20. Subsurface ablation of atherosclerotic plaque using ultrafast laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Lanvin, Thomas; Conkey, Donald B; Frobert, Aurelien; Valentin, Jeremy; Goy, Jean-Jacques; Cook, Stéphane; Giraud, Marie-Noelle; Psaltis, Demetri

    2015-07-01

    We perform subsurface ablation of atherosclerotic plaque using ultrafast pulses. Excised mouse aortas containing atherosclerotic plaque were ablated with ultrafast near-infrared (NIR) laser pulses. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) was used to observe the ablation result, while the physical damage was inspected in histological sections. We characterize the effects of incident pulse energy on surface damage, ablation hole size, and filament propagation. We find that it is possible to ablate plaque just below the surface without causing surface damage, which motivates further investigation of ultrafast ablation for subsurface atherosclerotic plaque removal.

  1. New tumor ablation techniques for cancer treatment (microwave, electroporation).

    PubMed

    de Baere, T; Deschamps, F

    2014-01-01

    Since the introduction of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for the treatment of liver tumors at the end of the 1990s, indications for local ablation techniques have been extended to other organs, in particular, the lungs, kidneys and bones. These techniques have also been improved, in particular to try and overcome the limitations of radiofrequency techniques, especially the significant decrease in complete ablation rates for tumors larger than 3cm and tumors that are contiguous to vessels larger than 3mm. Microwave ablation is a rapidly developing thermal ablation technique similar to RFA but with numerous differences. Electroporation, a non-thermal ablation technique with other possibilities, is in earlier stages of clinical development.

  2. SparkClouds: visualizing trends in tag clouds.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bongshin; Riche, Nathalie Henry; Karlson, Amy K; Carpendale, Sheelash

    2010-01-01

    Tag clouds have proliferated over the web over the last decade. They provide a visual summary of a collection of texts by visually depicting the tag frequency by font size. In use, tag clouds can evolve as the associated data source changes over time. Interesting discussions around tag clouds often include a series of tag clouds and consider how they evolve over time. However, since tag clouds do not explicitly represent trends or support comparisons, the cognitive demands placed on the person for perceiving trends in multiple tag clouds are high. In this paper, we introduce SparkClouds, which integrate sparklines into a tag cloud to convey trends between multiple tag clouds. We present results from a controlled study that compares SparkClouds with two traditional trend visualizations—multiple line graphs and stacked bar charts—as well as Parallel Tag Clouds. Results show that SparkClouds ability to show trends compares favourably to the alternative visualizations.

  3. Ablative Focused Ultrasound Synergistically Enhances Thermally Triggered Chemotherapy for Prostate Cancer in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Arora, Jaspreet S; Murad, Hakm Y; Ashe, Stephen; Halliburton, Gray; Yu, Heng; He, Jibao; John, Vijay T; Khismatullin, Damir B

    2016-09-06

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) can locally ablate biological tissues such as tumors, i.e., induce their rapid heating and coagulative necrosis without causing damage to surrounding healthy structures. It is widely used in clinical practice for minimally invasive treatment of prostate cancer. Nonablative, low-power HIFU was established as a promising tool for triggering the release of chemotherapeutic drugs from temperature-sensitive liposomes (TSLs). In this study, we combine ablative HIFU and thermally triggered chemotherapy to address the lack of safe and effective treatment options for elderly patients with high-risk localized prostate cancer. DU145 prostate cancer cells were exposed to chemotherapy (free and liposomal Sorafenib) and ablative HIFU, alone or in combination. Prior to cell viability assessment by trypan blue exclusion and flow cytometry, the uptake of TSLs by DU145 cells was verified by confocal microscopy and cryogenic scanning electron microscopy (cryo-SEM). The combination of TSLs encapsulating 10 μM Sorafenib and 8.7W HIFU resulted in a viability of less than 10% at 72 h post-treatment, which was significant less than the viability of the cells treated with free Sorafenib (76%), Sorafenib-loaded TSLs (63%), or HIFU alone (44%). This synergy was not observed on cells treated with Sorafenib-loaded nontemperature sensitive liposomes and HIFU. According to cryo-SEM analysis, cells exposed to ablative HIFU exhibited significant mechanical disruption. Water bath immersion experiments also showed an important role of mechanical effects in the synergistic enhancement of TSL-mediated chemotherapy by ablative HIFU. This combination therapy can be an effective strategy for treatment of geriatric prostate cancer patients.

  4. Cavitation-enhanced nonthermal ablation in deep brain targets: feasibility in a large animal model.

    PubMed

    Arvanitis, Costas D; Vykhodtseva, Natalia; Jolesz, Ferenc; Livingstone, Margaret; McDannold, Nathan

    2016-05-01

    OBJECT Transcranial MRI-guided focused ultrasound (TcMRgFUS) is an emerging noninvasive alternative to surgery and radiosurgery that is undergoing testing for tumor ablation and functional neurosurgery. The method is currently limited to central brain targets due to skull heating and other factors. An alternative ablative approach combines very low intensity ultrasound bursts and an intravenously administered microbubble agent to locally destroy the vasculature. The objective of this work was to investigate whether it is feasible to use this approach at deep brain targets near the skull base in nonhuman primates. METHODS In 4 rhesus macaques, targets near the skull base were ablated using a clinical TcMRgFUS system operating at 220 kHz. Low-duty-cycle ultrasound exposures (sonications) were applied for 5 minutes in conjunction with the ultrasound contrast agent Definity, which was administered as a bolus injection or continuous infusion. The acoustic power level was set to be near the inertial cavitation threshold, which was measured using passive monitoring of the acoustic emissions. The resulting tissue effects were investigated with MRI and with histological analysis performed 3 hours to 1 week after sonication. RESULTS Thirteen targets were sonicated in regions next to the optic tract in the 4 animals. Inertial cavitation, indicated by broadband acoustic emissions, occurred at acoustic pressure amplitudes ranging from 340 to 540 kPa. MRI analysis suggested that the lesions had a central region containing red blood cell extravasations that was surrounded by edema. Blood-brain barrier disruption was observed on contrast-enhanced MRI in the lesions and in a surrounding region corresponding to the prefocal area of the FUS system. In histology, lesions consisting of tissue undergoing ischemic necrosis were found in all regions that were sonicated above the inertial cavitation threshold. Tissue damage in prefocal areas was found in several cases, suggesting that in

  5. Cloud Computing: An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Ling; Luo, Zhiguo; Du, Yujian; Guo, Leitao

    In order to support the maximum number of user and elastic service with the minimum resource, the Internet service provider invented the cloud computing. within a few years, emerging cloud computing has became the hottest technology. From the publication of core papers by Google since 2003 to the commercialization of Amazon EC2 in 2006, and to the service offering of AT&T Synaptic Hosting, the cloud computing has been evolved from internal IT system to public service, from cost-saving tools to revenue generator, and from ISP to telecom. This paper introduces the concept, history, pros and cons of cloud computing as well as the value chain and standardization effort.

  6. JINR cloud infrastructure evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, A. V.; Balashov, N. A.; Kutovskiy, N. A.; Semenov, R. N.

    2016-09-01

    To fulfil JINR commitments in different national and international projects related to the use of modern information technologies such as cloud and grid computing as well as to provide a modern tool for JINR users for their scientific research a cloud infrastructure was deployed at Laboratory of Information Technologies of Joint Institute for Nuclear Research. OpenNebula software was chosen as a cloud platform. Initially it was set up in simple configuration with single front-end host and a few cloud nodes. Some custom development was done to tune JINR cloud installation to fit local needs: web form in the cloud web-interface for resources request, a menu item with cloud utilization statistics, user authentication via Kerberos, custom driver for OpenVZ containers. Because of high demand in that cloud service and its resources over-utilization it was re-designed to cover increasing users' needs in capacity, availability and reliability. Recently a new cloud instance has been deployed in high-availability configuration with distributed network file system and additional computing power.

  7. Overhead View of Area Surrounding Pathfinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Overhead view of the area surrounding the Pathfinder lander illustrating the Sojourner traverse. Red rectangles are rover positions at the end of sols 1-30. Locations of soil mechanics experiments, wheel abrasion experiments, and APXS measurements are shown. The A numbers refer to APXS measurements as discussed in the paper by Rieder et al. (p. 1770, Science Magazine, see image note). Coordinates are given in the LL frame.

    The photorealistic, interactive, three-dimensional virtual reality (VR) terrain models were created from IMP images using a software package developed for Pathfinder by C. Stoker et al. as a participating science project. By matching features in the left and right camera, an automated machine vision algorithm produced dense range maps of the nearfield, which were projected into a three-dimensional model as a connected polygonal mesh. Distance and angle measurements can be made on features viewed in the model using a mouse-driven three-dimensional cursor and a point-and-click interface. The VR model also incorporates graphical representations of the lander and rover and the sequence and spatial locations at which rover data were taken. As the rover moved, graphical models of the rover were added for each position that could be uniquely determined using stereo images of the rover taken by the IMP. Images taken by the rover were projected into the model as two-dimensional 'billboards' to show the proper perspective of these images.

    NOTE: original caption as published in Science Magazine

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  8. Circumstellar Surroundings of Young Stellar Objectse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malbet, Fabien

    1992-12-01

    The close surroundings of young low mass stars hold a multitude of physical phenomena related to star formation. This thesis presents a set of works on theoretical, experimental, and observational issues connected with these phenomena. After a description of the properties of T Tauri, FU Orionis and Ae/Be Herbig stars, with a particular emphasis on their accretion disks, I study the vertical structure of such disks which results from the radiative transfer and the hydrostatic equilibrium. The energy dissipation comes from both the viscous friction of disk particles accreting onto the star and from the absorption of the stellar radiation. A disk ``chromosphere'' is shown to result from the grazing stellar radiation. In the following I study the possibility of detecting directly the circumstellar features (disk, binarity, planets, jets,...) thanks to the high angular resolution techniques (adaptive optics and interferometry). I then present the prototype of a coronagraph at high spatial resolution that I designed, modelized, built and tested for that kind of observations. Finally I describe the observations of the young stellar system Z Canis Majoris, which I obtained at the diffraction limit of the 3.6 meter ESO telescope in the near infrared. This object is shown to be composed of a binary system in addition to an elongated disk-like structure perpendicular to the known jet and illuminated not by the central source but by the infrared companion. [A copy of this thesis (which is mostly in french) can be obtained in binary mode by ftp. There is a file 'these_malbet.tar' in the directory '/pub/publications/' at the FTP node 'gag.observ-gr.fr (IP 130.190.200.11)'. By doing 'tar -xvf these_malbet.tar', you create a directory 'these_malbet/' where there is a 'readme' which gives all information.

  9. Liability issues surrounding oil drilling mud sumps

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, J.J.

    1994-04-01

    This presentation examines liability issues surrounding oil drilling mud sumps and discusses them in relation to two recent cases that arose in Ventura County, California. Following a brief history of regulatory interest in oil drilling mud and its common hazardous substances, various cause of action arising from oil drilling mud deposits are enumerated, followed by defenses to these causes of action. Section 8002 (m) of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act is mentioned, as are constituents of oil and gas waste not inherent in petroleum and therefore not exempt from regulation under the petroleum exclusion in the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Recovery Act. Key legal words such as hazardous substance, release, public and private nuisance, trespass, responsible parties, joint and several liability, negligence, and strict liability are explained. The effects on liability of knowledge of the deposits, duty to restore land to its original condition, consent to the deposit of oil drilling mud, and noncompliance and compliance with permit conditions are analyzed. The state-of-the-art defense and research to establish this defense are mentioned. The newly created cause of action for fear of increased risk of cancer is discussed. Issues on transfer of property where oil drilling mud has been deposited are explored, such as knowledge of prior owners being imputed to later owners, claims of fraudulent concealment, and as is' clauses. The effects on the oil and gas industry of the California Court of Appeals for the Second District rulings in Dolan v. Humacid-MacLeod and Stevens v. McQueen are speculated.

  10. How hydrophobic buckminsterfullerene affects surrounding water structure.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Dahlia R; Raschke, Tanya M; Levitt, Michael

    2008-03-13

    The hydrophobic hydration of fullerenes in water is of significant interest as the most common Buckminsterfullerene (C60) is a mesoscale sphere; C60 also has potential in pharmaceutical and nanomaterial applications. We use an all-atom molecular dynamics simulation lasting hundreds of nanoseconds to determine the behavior of a single molecule of C60 in a periodic box of water, and compare this to methane. A C60 molecule does not induce drying at the surface; however, unlike a hard sphere methane, a hard sphere C60 solute does. This is due to a larger number of attractive Lennard-Jones interactions between the carbon atom centers in C60 and the surrounding waters. In these simulations, water is not uniformly arranged but rather adopts a range of orientations in the first hydration shell despite the spherical symmetry of both solutes. There is a clear effect of solute size on the orientation of the first hydration shell waters. There is a large increase in hydrogen-bonding contacts between waters in the C60 first hydration shell. There is also a disruption of hydrogen bonds between waters in the first and second hydration shells. Water molecules in the first hydration shell preferentially create triangular structures that minimize the net water dipole near the surface near both the methane and C60 surface, reducing the total energy of the system. Additionally, in the first and second hydration shells, the water dipoles are ordered to a distance of 8 A from the solute surface. We conclude that, with a diameter of approximately 1 nm, C60 behaves as a large hydrophobic solute.

  11. THE EMISSION NEBULA Sh 2-174: A RADIO INVESTIGATION OF THE SURROUNDING REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Ransom, R. R.; Kothes, R.; Geisbuesch, J.; Landecker, T. L.; Reich, W.

    2015-02-01

    Sh 2-174 is believed to be either a planetary nebula (PN) or ionized, ambient interstellar medium (ISM). We present in this paper 1420 MHz polarization, 1420 MHz total intensity (Stokes-I), and neutral hydrogen (H I) images of the region around Sh 2-174. The radio images address not only the nature of the object, but also the history of the relationship between Sh 2-174 and its surrounding environment. The H I images show that Sh 2-174 sits presently at the center of a ∼1.°2 × ∼0.°4 cloud (with peak hydrogen density n {sub H} = 4 ± 2 cm{sup –3}). The Stokes-I image shows thermal-emission peaks (with electron densities n{sub e} = 11 ± 3 cm{sup –3}) coincident with the R-band optical nebula, as well as low-surface-brightness emission from an ionized ''halo'' around Sh 2-174 and from an ionized ''plateau'' extending southeast from the cloud. The polarization images reveal Faraday-rotation structures along the projected trajectory of Sh 2-174, including a high-contrast structure with ''arms'' that run precisely along the eastern edge of the H I cloud and a wide central region that merges with the downstream edge of Sh 2-174. The high-contrast structure is consistent with an ionized tail that has both early-epoch (before Sh 2-174 entered the cloud) and present-epoch (after Sh 2-174 entered the cloud) components. Furthermore, our rotation-measure analysis indicates that the ISM magnetic field is deflected at the leading edge of Sh 2-174. The downstream tail and upstream field deflection point to a PN-ISM interaction. Our estimated space velocity for the host white dwarf (GD 561) demonstrates that Sh 2-174 entered the cloud ∼27,000 yr ago, and gives a PN-ISM interaction timescale ≲ 2.0 × 10{sup 5} yr. We estimate an ambient magnetic field in the cloud of 11 ± 3 μG.

  12. IR Spectroscopy of PAHs in Dense Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allamandola, Louis; Bernstein, Max; Mattioda, Andrew; Sandford, Scott

    2007-05-01

    Interstellar PAHs are likely to be a component of the ice mantles that form on dust grains in dense molecular clouds. PAHs frozen in grain mantles will produce IR absorption bands, not IR emission features. A couple of very weak absorption features in ground based spectra of a few objects embedded in dense clouds may be due to PAHs. Additionally spaceborne observations in the 5 to 8 ?m region, the region in which PAH spectroscopy is rich, reveal unidentified new bands and significant variation from object to object. It has not been possible to properly evaluate the contribution of PAH bands to these IR observations because the laboratory absorption spectra of PAHs condensed in realistic interstellar mixed-molecular ice analogs is lacking. This experimental data is necessary to interpret observations because, in ice mantles, the interaction of PAHs with the surrounding molecules effects PAH IR band positions, widths, profiles, and intrinsic strengths. Furthermore, PAHs are readily ionized in pure H2O ice, further altering the PAH spectrum. This laboratory proposal aims to remedy the situation by studying the IR spectroscopy of PAHs frozen in laboratory ice analogs that realistically reflect the composition of the interstellar ices observed in dense clouds. The purpose is to provide laboratory spectra which can be used to interpret IR observations. We will measure the spectra of these mixed molecular ices containing PAHs before and after ionization and determine the intrinsic band strengths of neutral and ionized PAHs in these ice analogs. This will enable a quantitative assessment of the role that PAHs can play in determining the 5-8 ?m spectrum of dense clouds and will directly address the following two fundamental questions associated with dense cloud spectroscopy and chemistry: 1- Can PAHs be detected in dense clouds? 2- Are PAH ions components of interstellar ice?

  13. HUBBLE FINDS MANY BRIGHT CLOUDS ON URANUS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A recent Hubble Space Telescope view reveals Uranus surrounded by its four major rings and by 10 of its 17 known satellites. This false-color image was generated by Erich Karkoschka using data taken on August 8, 1998, with Hubble's Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer. Hubble recently found about 20 clouds - nearly as many clouds on Uranus as the previous total in the history of modern observations. The orange-colored clouds near the prominent bright band circle the planet at more than 300 mph (500 km/h), according to team member Heidi Hammel (MIT). One of the clouds on the right-hand side is brighter than any other cloud ever seen on Uranus. The colors in the image indicate altitude. Team member Mark Marley (New Mexico State University) reports that green and blue regions show where the atmosphere is clear and sunlight can penetrate deep into Uranus. In yellow and grey regions the sunlight reflects from a higher haze or cloud layer. Orange and red colors indicate very high clouds, such as cirrus clouds on Earth. The Hubble image is one of the first images revealing the precession of the brightest ring with respect to a previous image [LINK to PRC97-36a]. Precession makes the fainter part of the ring (currently on the upper right-hand side) slide around Uranus once every nine months. The fading is caused by ring particles crowding and hiding each other on one side of their eight-hour orbit around Uranus. The blue, green and red components of this false-color image correspond to exposures taken at near-infrared wavelengths of 0.9, 1.1, and 1.7 micrometers. Thus, regions on Uranus appearing blue, for example, reflect more sunlight at 0.9 micrometer than at the longer wavelengths. Apparent colors on Uranus are caused by absorption of methane gas in its atmosphere, an effect comparable to absorption in our atmosphere which can make distant clouds appear red. Credit: Erich Karkoschka (University of Arizona) and NASA

  14. Approximate model for laser ablation of carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shusser, Michael

    2010-08-01

    The paper presents an approximate kinetic theory model of ablation of carbon by a nanosecond laser pulse. The model approximates the process as sublimation and combines conduction heat transfer in the target with the gas dynamics of the ablated plume which are coupled through the boundary conditions at the interface. The ablated mass flux and the temperature of the ablating material are obtained from the assumption that the ablation rate is restricted by the kinetic theory limitation on the maximum mass flux that can be attained in a phase-change process. To account for non-uniform distribution of the laser intensity while keeping the calculation simple the quasi-one-dimensional approximation is used in both gas and solid phases. The results are compared with the predictions of the exact axisymmetric model that uses the conservation relations at the interface derived from the momentum solution of the Boltzmann equation for arbitrary strong evaporation. It is seen that the simpler approximate model provides good accuracy.

  15. Design Calculations for NIF Convergent Ablator Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, R. E.; Callahan, D. A.; Hicks, D. G.; Landen, O. L.; Langer, S. H.; Meezan, N. B.; Spears, B. K.; Widmann, K.; Kline, J. L.; Wilson, D. C.; Petrasso, R. D.; Leeper, R. J.

    2010-11-01

    Design calculations for NIF convergent ablator experiments will be described. The convergent ablator experiments measure the implosion trajectory, velocity, and ablation rate of an x-ray driven capsule and are a important component of the U. S. National Ignition Campaign at NIF. The design calculations are post-processed to provide simulations of the key diagnostics -- 1) Dante measurements of hohlraum x-ray flux and spectrum, 2) streaked radiographs of the imploding ablator shell, 3) wedge range filter measurements of D-He3 proton output spectra, and 4) GXD measurements of the imploded core. The simulated diagnostics will be compared to the experimental measurements to provide an assessment of the accuracy of the design code predictions of hohlraum radiation temperature, capsule ablation rate, implosion velocity, shock flash areal density, and x-ray bang time. Post-shot versions of the design calculations are used to enhance the understanding of the experimental measurements and will assist in choosing parameters for subsequent shots and the path towards optimal ignition capsule tuning. *SNL, LLNL, and LANL are operated under US DOE contracts DE-AC04-94AL85000. DE-AC52-07NA27344, and DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  16. Fracture in Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, Parul; Chavez-Garcia, Jose; Pham, John

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a novel technique to understand the failure mechanisms inside thermal protection materials. The focus of this research is on the class of materials known as phenolic impregnated carbon ablators. It has successfully flown on the Stardust spacecraft and is the thermal protection system material chosen for the Mars Science Laboratory and SpaceX Dragon spacecraft. Although it has good thermal properties, structurally, it is a weak material. To understand failure mechanisms in carbon ablators, fracture tests were performed on FiberForm(Registered TradeMark) (precursor), virgin, and charred ablator materials. Several samples of these materials were tested to investigate failure mechanisms at a microstructural scale. Stress-strain data were obtained simultaneously to estimate the tensile strength and toughness. It was observed that cracks initiated and grew in the FiberForm when a critical stress limit was reached such that the carbon fibers separated from the binder. However, both for virgin and charred carbon ablators, crack initiation and growth occurred in the matrix (phenolic) phase. Both virgin and charred carbon ablators showed greater strength values compared with FiberForm samples, confirming that the presence of the porous matrix helps in absorbing the fracture energy.

  17. HI clouds in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.

    We present HI and Halpha surveys of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) with the Australia Telescope Compact Array, the Parkes multibeam receiver, and the 16 inch optical telescope at the Siding Spring Observatory (SSO). Using a Fourier-plane technique, we have merged both ATCA and Parkes observations, providing an accurate set of images of the LMC sensitive to structure on scales of 9 pc upward. The spatial dynamic range (2.8 orders of magnitude), velocity resolution (1.649 km/sec per channel) allow for studies of phenomena ranging from the galaxy-wide interaction of the LMC with its close neighbors to the small-scale injection of energy from supernovae and stellar associations into the ISM of the LMC. On the large scale, the HI disk appears to be remarkably symmetric and to have a well-organized and orderly, if somewhat complex, rotational field. The bulk of the HI resides in a disk of 7.3 kpc in diameter. The mass of disk component of the LMC is 2.5 x10^9 M[sun ]and the mass within a radius of 4 kpc is about 3.5 x 10^9 M[sun ]. The structure of the neutral atomic ISM in the LMC is dominated by HI filaments combined with numerous shell, holes, and HI clouds. 23 HI supergiant shells and 103 giant shells are catalogued. Supergiant shells are defined as those regions whose extent is much larger than the HI scale height. The size distribution of HI shells follows a crude power law, N(log R) =AR^-1.5 . The HI clouds have been identified by defining a cloud to be an object composed of all pixels in right ascension, declination, and velocity that are connected and that lie above the threshold brightness temperature. The size spectrum of HI clouds is similar to the typical size spectrum of holes and shells in the HI distribution. The relationship between the size and the velocity dispersion of HI cloud is found to have the power law relationship so called as Larson's scaling law. A slope of the power law varies from 1.2 to 1.6. The virial masses of HI clouds range from 10

  18. Carbon recombination line observations of the sharpless 140 region. [of early stars in dark clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knapp, G. R.; Brown, R. L.; Kuiper, T. B. H.; Kakar, R. K.

    1976-01-01

    Carbon recombination-line emission has been detected at two frequencies from a dark cloud contiguous with the small H II region Sharpless 140. The observations show the dark cloud to be of unusually low temperature and to have a markedly inhomogeneous density distribution, with localized region of high density surrounding one or more embedded stars. The carbon is probably ionized by photons from both the exciting star of S140 and the embedded stars. The dark cloud and S140 apparently represent two stages of star formation which have occurred over a period of at least 500,000 years in adjacent regions of the same dark cloud.

  19. Electrophysiologic basis of catheter ablation in atrial flutter.

    PubMed

    Touboul, P; Saoudi, N; Atallah, G; Kirkorian, G

    1989-12-05

    A reentrant mechanism is believed to be responsible for atrial flutter. The recent development of the entrainment criteria further supports this theory, and there is a general consensus that circus movement is the underlying abnormality that supports this arrhythmia. In most clinical studies, abnormal fragmented (or double spike) electrograms, suggesting the presence of areas of localized slowing of conduction or block, have been reported. They are almost always recorded in the lower and posterior portion of the right interatrial septum, but also frequently in the high lateral portion of the right atrium. The determination of their involvement in the reentry pathway is important for designing curative procedures such as surgery or ablation. The low atrial septal area surrounding the mouth of the coronary sinus was suspected as being the critical area of slow conduction in atrial flutter. Rapid pacing at that site can yield a surface electrocardiographic pattern similar to the clinically occurring arrhythmias. Additionally, the flutter circuit can be accelerated during atrial pacing at fixed and slightly faster rates than the intrinsic tachycardia rate--the so-called entrainment phenomenon. When entrainment criteria are fulfilled, tachycardia termination being by definition ruled out, any concomitant recorded local type II block identifies an area that must be outside the circuit. Such local block may be recorded either spontaneously or during entrainment and therefore helps in identifying atrial slow conduction areas that do not belong to the reentrant path. This approach was applied to identify the optimal ablation site in 8 patients with long-standing drug resistant atrial flutter. In 7 of 8 patients, we were able to identify a fragmented potential in the low posteroseptal area during sustained atrial flutter.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. OB associations and giant molecular clouds in the galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Jonathan; Mckee, Chris

    1993-01-01

    Giant molecular clouds (GMC's) are the sites of all OB star formation in the Galaxy. These OB stars typically form in large associations and photoionize the surrounding gas, eventually destroying the clouds from which they were born. CO surveys have revealed the distribution of GMC's in the Galaxy, and radio observations provide data on the distribution of associations. These results are extrapolated to determine Galactic mean distribution functions of each and then combined to determine how GMC's and OB associations are correlated. The resulting probability distribution of luminosity given cloud mass implies that although most of the molecular mass of the Galaxy is in massive star forming complexes, a large number of clouds above which massive star formation is extremely likely and abundant and below which it is almost certainly absent.

  1. The IC 5146 star forming complex and its surroundings with 2MASS, WISE and Spitzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, N. A.; Bonatto, C.; Bica, E.

    2016-02-01

    Throughout the last decade sensitive infrared observations obtained by the Spitzer Space Telescope significantly increased the known population of YSOs associated with nearby molecular clouds. With such a census recent studies have characterized pre-main sequence stars (PMS) and determined parameters from different wavelengths. Given the restricted Spitzer coverage of some of these clouds, relative to their extended regions, these YSO populations may represent a limited view of star formation in these regions. We are taking advantage of mid-infrared observations from the NASA Wide Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), which provides an all sky view and therefore full coverage of the nearby clouds, to assess the degree to which their currently known YSO population may be representative of a more complete population. We extend the well established classification method of the Spitzer Legacy teams to archived WISE observations. We have adopted 2MASS photometry as a "standard catalogue" for comparisons. Besides the massive embedded cluster IC 5146 we provide a multiband view of five new embedded clusters in its surroundings that we discovered with WISE. In short, the analysis involves the following for the presently studied cluster sample: (i) extraction of 2MASS/WISE/Spitzer photometry in a wide circular region; (ii) field-star decontamination to enhance the intrinsic Colour-magnitude diagram (CMD) morphology (essential for a proper derivation of reddening, age, and distance from the Sun); and (iii) construction of Colour-magnitude filters, for more contrasted stellar radial density profiles (RDPs).

  2. Lost in Cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maluf, David A.; Shetye, Sandeep D.; Chilukuri, Sri; Sturken, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Cloud computing can reduce cost significantly because businesses can share computing resources. In recent years Small and Medium Businesses (SMB) have used Cloud effectively for cost saving and for sharing IT expenses. With the success of SMBs, many perceive that the larger enterprises ought to move into Cloud environment as well. Government agency s stove-piped environments are being considered as candidates for potential use of Cloud either as an enterprise entity or pockets of small communities. Cloud Computing is the delivery of computing as a service rather than as a product, whereby shared resources, software, and information are provided to computers and other devices as a utility over a network. Underneath the offered services, there exists a modern infrastructure cost of which is often spread across its services or its investors. As NASA is considered as an Enterprise class organization, like other enterprises, a shift has been occurring in perceiving its IT services as candidates for Cloud services. This paper discusses market trends in cloud computing from an enterprise angle and then addresses the topic of Cloud Computing for NASA in two possible forms. First, in the form of a public Cloud to support it as an enterprise, as well as to share it with the commercial and public at large. Second, as a private Cloud wherein the infrastructure is operated solely for NASA, whether managed internally or by a third-party and hosted internally or externally. The paper addresses the strengths and weaknesses of both paradigms of public and private Clouds, in both internally and externally operated settings. The content of the paper is from a NASA perspective but is applicable to any large enterprise with thousands of employees and contractors.

  3. Hubble Finds Many Bright Clouds on Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    A recent Hubble Space Telescope view reveals Uranus surrounded by its four major rings and by 10 of its 17 known satellites. This false-color image was generated by Erich Karkoschka using data taken on August 8, 1998, with Hubble's Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer. Hubble recently found about 20 clouds - nearly as many clouds on Uranus as the previous total in the history of modern observations.

    The Wide Field/Planetary Camera 2 was developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and managed by the Goddard Spaced Flight Center for NASA's Office of Space Science.

    This image and other images and data received from the Hubble Space Telescope are posted on the World Wide Web on the Space Telescope Science Institute home page at URL http://oposite.stsci.edu/pubinfo/

  4. Microwave ablation versus laser ablation in occluding lateral veins in goats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu-hong; Wang, Xiao-ping; Su, Wen-juan; Yuan, Yuan

    2016-02-01

    Increasing number of endovenous techniques are available for the treatment of saphenous vein reflux and endovenous laser ablation (EVLA) is a frequently used method. A newly developed alternative, based on thermal therapy, is endovenous microwave ablation (EMA). This study evaluated the effect of the two procedures, in terms of coagulation and histological changes, in occluding lateral veins in goats. Twelve animals were randomized into two group, with 6 treated with EMA (EMA group), and the rest 6 with EVLA (EVLA group). Results of coagulation, including coagulation, fibrinolysis and platelet activation, were assessed at three or four different time points: before, immediately after, 24 h (and 48 h) after ablation. The diameter change, a measure of efficacy, was ultrasonographically measured before and 1 month after the ablation. Histological changes were grossly and microscopically evaluated immediately, 1 and 3 month(s) after the ablation. The length of the ablated vein and preoperative average diameter were comparable between the two groups. In both EMA and EVLA groups, several coagulation parameters, fibrinolysis and platelet activation parameters only underwent slight changes. Ultrasound imaging displayed that the diameter reduction of the veins treated by EMA was significantly larger than by EVLA, in consistent with the results of macroscopic examination. Microscopic examination revealed necrosis and thickening of the vein wall, and occlusion of the lumen within 3 months after ablation in both EMA and EVLA groups. It is concluded that EMA is a minimally invasive therapy, which appears to be safe and effective for treatment of lateral veins in goats.

  5. Effects of material composition on the ablation performance of low density elastomeric ablators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tompkins, S. S.; Kabana, W. P.

    1973-01-01

    The ablation performance of materials composed of various concentrations of nylon, hollow silica spheres, hollow phenolic spheres, and four elastomeric resins was determined. Both blunt-body and flat-panel specimens were used, the cold-wall heating-rate ranges being 0.11 to 0.8 MW/sq m, respectively. The corresponding surface pressure ranges for these tests were 0.017 to 0.037 atmosphere and 0.004 to 0.005 atmosphere. Some of the results show that (1) the addition of nylon significantly improved the ablation performance, but the nylon was not compatible with one resin system; (2) panel and blunt-body specimen data do not show the same effect of phenolic sphere content on ablation effectiveness; and (3) there appears to be an optimum concentration of hollow silica spheres for good ablation performance. The composition of an efficient, nonproprietary ablator for lifting body application is identified and the ablation performance of this ablator is compared with the performance of three commercially available materials.

  6. On the growth mechanism of nanoparticles in plasma during pulsed laser ablation in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taccogna, F.; Dell’Aglio, M.; Rutigliano, M.; Valenza, G.; De Giacomo, A.

    2017-04-01

    Particle-in-cell methodology is applied to study the simultaneous charging and coagulation of a nanoparticle, taking into account the self-consistent dynamics of surrounding plasma induced by laser ablation in liquid. The model uses, as an input, plasma temperature and electron number density which are experimentally obtained by high temporally resolved optical emission spectroscopy of the laser-induced plasma in water. Results show the important role of ions in the growth process and of the atom-induced evaporation process for the final nanoparticle size. The competition between different mechanisms of nanoparticle formation in the laser-induced plasma is finally discussed.

  7. Thermal Ablation Modeling for Silicate Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yih-Kanq

    2016-01-01

    A thermal ablation model for silicates is proposed. The model includes the mass losses through the balance between evaporation and condensation, and through the moving molten layer driven by surface shear force and pressure gradient. This model can be applied in ablation simulations of the meteoroid or glassy Thermal Protection Systems for spacecraft. Time-dependent axi-symmetric computations are performed by coupling the fluid dynamics code, Data-Parallel Line Relaxation program, with the material response code, Two-dimensional Implicit Thermal Ablation simulation program, to predict the mass lost rates and shape change. For model validation, the surface recession of fused amorphous quartz rod is computed, and the recession predictions reasonably agree with available data. The present parametric studies for two groups of meteoroid earth entry conditions indicate that the mass loss through moving molten layer is negligibly small for heat-flux conditions at around 1 MW/cm(exp. 2).

  8. Deep Dive Topic: Choosing between ablators

    SciTech Connect

    Hurricane, O. A.; Thomas, C.; Olson, R.

    2015-07-14

    Recent data on implosions using identical hohlraums and very similar laser drives underscores the conundrum of making a clear choice of one ablator over another. Table I shows a comparison of Be and CH in a nominal length, gold, 575 μm-diameter, 1.6 mg/cc He gas-fill hohlraum while Table II shows a comparison of undoped HDC and CH in a +700 length, gold, 575 μm diameter, 1.6 mg/cc He gas fill hohlraum. As can be seen in the tables, the net integrated fusion performance of these ablators is the same to within error bars. In the case of the undoped HDC and CH ablators, the hot spot shapes of the implosions were nearly indistinguishable for the experiments listed in Table II.

  9. Numerical Modeling of Ablation Heat Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewing, Mark E.; Laker, Travis S.; Walker, David T.

    2013-01-01

    A unique numerical method has been developed for solving one-dimensional ablation heat transfer problems. This paper provides a comprehensive description of the method, along with detailed derivations of the governing equations. This methodology supports solutions for traditional ablation modeling including such effects as heat transfer, material decomposition, pyrolysis gas permeation and heat exchange, and thermochemical surface erosion. The numerical scheme utilizes a control-volume approach with a variable grid to account for surface movement. This method directly supports implementation of nontraditional models such as material swelling and mechanical erosion, extending capabilities for modeling complex ablation phenomena. Verifications of the numerical implementation are provided using analytical solutions, code comparisons, and the method of manufactured solutions. These verifications are used to demonstrate solution accuracy and proper error convergence rates. A simple demonstration of a mechanical erosion (spallation) model is also provided to illustrate the unique capabilities of the method.

  10. Laser ablated hard coating for microtools

    DOEpatents

    McLean, W. II; Balooch, M.; Siekhaus, W.J.

    1998-05-05

    Wear-resistant coatings composed of laser ablated hard carbon films, are deposited by pulsed laser ablation using visible light, on instruments such as microscope tips and micro-surgical tools. Hard carbon, known as diamond-like carbon (DLC), films produced by pulsed laser ablation using visible light enhances the abrasion resistance, wear characteristics, and lifetimes of small tools or instruments, such as small, sharp silicon tips used in atomic probe microscopy without significantly affecting the sharpness or size of these devices. For example, a 10--20 nm layer of diamond-like carbon on a standard silicon atomic force microscope (AFM) tip, enables the useful operating life of the tip to be increased by at least twofold. Moreover, the low inherent friction coefficient of the DLC coating leads to higher resolution for AFM tips operating in the contact mode. 12 figs.

  11. Specific Impulse Definition for Ablative Laser Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herren, Kenneth A.; Gregory, Don A.

    2004-01-01

    The term "specific impulse" is so ingrained in the field of rocket propulsion that it is unlikely that any fundamental argument would be taken seriously for its removal. It is not an ideal measure but it does give an indication of the amount of mass flow (mass loss/time), as in fuel rate, required to produce a measured thrust over some time period This investigation explores the implications of being able to accurately measure the ablation rate and how the language used to describe the specific impulse results may have to change slightly, and recasts the specific impulse as something that is not a time average. It is not currently possible to measure the ablation rate accurately in real time so it is generally just assumed that a constant amount of material will be removed for each laser pulse delivered The specific impulse dependence on the ablation rate is determined here as a correction to the classical textbook definition.

  12. Caries-selective ablation: the second threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennig, Thomas; Rechmann, Peter; Jeitner, Peter; Kaufmann, Raimund

    1993-07-01

    The aim of the study was to describe the appropriate fluence necessary for the effective removal of dental decay by ablation processes without or with at least minimal removal of healthy dentin. The experiments were conducted at two wavelengths [355 nm (frequency tripled, Q-switched Nd:YAG-laser) and 377 nm (frequency doubled, gain-switched Alexandrite-laser)] found to be close to the maximum of preferential absorption of carious dentin over healthy dentin. Optoacoustic techniques were applied to determine the ablation thresholds of healthy and carious dentin. The ablation efficiencies at characteristic fluences were determined using non-tactile microtopography. During all experiments a fiber optic delivery system was engaged.

  13. Performance of Conformable Ablators in Aerothermal Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, J.; Fan, W.; Skokova, K.; Stackpoole, M.; Beck, R.; Chavez-Garcia, J.

    2012-01-01

    Conformable Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator, a cousin of Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA), was developed at NASA Ames Research Center as a lightweight thermal protection system under the Fundamental Aeronautics Program. PICA is made using a brittle carbon substrate, which has a very low strain to failure. Conformable PICA is made using a flexible carbon substrate, a felt in this case. The flexible felt significantly increases the strain to failure of the ablator. PICA is limited by its thermal mechanical properties. Future NASA missions will require heatshields that are more fracture resistant than PICA and, as a result, NASA Ames is working to improve PICAs performance by developing conformable PICA to meet these needs. Research efforts include tailoring the chemistry of conformable PICA with varying amounts of additives to enhance mechanical properties and testing them in aerothermal environments. This poster shows the performance of conformable PICA variants in arc jets tests. Some mechanical and thermal properties will also be presented.

  14. Laser ablated hard coating for microtools

    DOEpatents

    McLean, II, William; Balooch, Mehdi; Siekhaus, Wigbert J.

    1998-05-05

    Wear-resistant coatings composed of laser ablated hard carbon films, are deposited by pulsed laser ablation using visible light, on instruments such as microscope tips and micro-surgical tools. Hard carbon, known as diamond-like carbon (DLC), films produced by pulsed laser ablation using visible light enhances the abrasion resistance, wear characteristics, and lifetimes of small tools or instruments, such as small, sharp silicon tips used in atomic probe microscopy without significantly affecting the sharpness or size of these devices. For example, a 10-20 nm layer of diamond-like carbon on a standard silicon atomic force microscope (AFM) tip, enables the useful operating life of the tip to be increased by at least twofold. Moreover, the low inherent friction coefficient of the DLC coating leads to higher resolution for AFM tips operating in the contact mode.

  15. Effects of endocardial microwave energy ablation

    PubMed Central

    Climent, Vicente; Hurlé, Aquilino; Ho, Siew Yen; Sánchez-Quintana, Damián

    2005-01-01

    Until recently the treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF) consisted primarily of palliation, mostly in the form of pharmacological intervention. However because of recent advances in nonpharmacologic therapies, the current expectation of patients and referring physicians is that AF will be cured, rather than palliated. In recent years there has been a rapid expansion in the availability and variety of energy sources and devices for ablation. One of these energies, microwave, has been applied clinically only in the last few years, and may be a promising technique that is potentially capable of treating a wide range of ventricular and supraventricular arrhythmias. The purpose of this study was to review microwave energy ablation in surgical treatment of AF with special interest in histology and ultrastructure of lesions produced by this endocardial ablation procedure. PMID:16943871

  16. Laser Thermal Ablation of Thyroid Benign Nodules

    PubMed Central

    Shahrzad, Mohammad Karim

    2015-01-01

    Thermal ablation therapies for benign thyroid nodules have been introduced in recent years to avoid the complications of traditional methods such as surgery. Despite the little complications and the reportedly acceptable efficacy of thermal ablation methods, quite few medical centers have sought the potential benefits of employing them. This paper provides an introduction to the literature, principles and advances of Percutaneous Laser Ablation therapy of thyroid benign nodules, as well as a discussion on its efficacy, complications and future. Several clinical research papers evaluating the thermal effect of laser on the alleviation of thyroid nodules have been reviewed to illuminate the important points. The results of this research can help researchers to advance the approach and medical centers to decide on investing in these novel therapies. PMID:26705459

  17. Catheter ablation of fascicular ventricular tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Ramprakash, B; Jaishankar, S; Rao, Hygriv B; Narasimhan, C

    2008-08-01

    Fascicular ventricular tachycardia (VT) is an idiopathic VT with right bundle branch block morphology and left-axis deviation occuring predominantly in young males. Fascicular tachycardia has been classified into three subtypes namely, left posterior fascicular VT, left anterior fascicular VT and upper septal fascicular VT. The mechanism of this tachycardia is believed to be localized reentry close to the fascicle of the left bundle branch. The reentrant circuit is composed of a verapamil sensitive zone, activated antegradely during tachycardia and the fast conduction Purkinje fibers activated retrogradely during tachycardia recorded as the pre Purkinje and the Purkinje potentials respectively. Catheter ablation is the preferred choice of therapy in patients with fascicular VT. Ablation is carried out during tachycardia, using conventional mapping techniques in majority of the patients, while three dimensional mapping and sinus rhythm ablation is reserved for patients with nonmappable tachycardia.

  18. Thermal Response Simulation of Ultra Light Weight Phenolic Carbon Ablator by the Use of the Ablation Analysis Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Sumio; Okuyama, Keiichi; Gibo, Kenta; Miyagi, Takuma; Suzuki, Toshiyuki; Fujita, Kazuhisa; Sakai, Takeharu; Nishio, Seiji; Watanabe, Akihiro

    A space vehicle which undergoes the atmospheric re-entry or a planetary entry needs the heat shield system to protect inner equipments against severe aerodynamic heating environments. Charring ablator is usually used for the heat shield system. In order to design the heat shield system, it is necessary to predict the thermal behavior under aerodynamic heating by ablation analysis. A computer code for charring ablation and thermal response analysis is newly developed for simulation of one-dimensional transient thermal behavior of charring ablation materials. The mathematical model for the charring ablation including basic equation and computational method of ablation analysis is briefly described. A new ultra light weight phenolic carbon ablator called LATS (Lightweight Ablator series for Transfer vehicle) was recently developed. Arc-heated tests of the LATS ablator were carried out and measured results of the temperature response and surface mass loss are compared with the simulation results of the ablation analysis program. The agreement between the results of simulation and measurement is found to be good. It is also found that the mathematical model used in the ablation code can be applied to the ablation analysis of the low density LATS ablator.

  19. Depth Profiling of Polymer Composites by Ultrafast Laser Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Christopher; Clayton, Clive; Longtin, Jon

    2009-03-01

    Past work has shown femtosecond laser ablation to be an athermal process at low fluences in polymer systems. The ablation rate in this low fluence regime is very low, allowing for micro-scale removal of material. We have taken advantage of this fact to perform shallow depth profiling ablation on carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites. Neat composite and resin samples were studied to establish reference ablation profiles. These profiles and the effects of the heterogeneous distribution of carbon fibers were observed through confocal laser profilometry and optical and scanning electron microscopy. Weathered materials that have been subjected to accelerated tests in artificial sunlight or water conditions were ablated to determine the correlation between exposure and change in ablation characteristics. Preliminary Raman and micro-ATR analysis performed before and after ablation shows no chemical changes indicative of thermal effects. The low-volume-ablation property was utilized in an attempt to expose the sizing-matrix interphase for analysis.

  20. Thermal ablation of liver metastases from colorectal cancer: radiofrequency, microwave and laser ablation therapies.

    PubMed

    Vogl, Thomas J; Farshid, Parviz; Naguib, Nagy N N; Darvishi, Abbas; Bazrafshan, Babak; Mbalisike, Emmanuel; Burkhard, Thorsten; Zangos, Stephan

    2014-07-01

    Surgery is currently considered the treatment of choice for patients with colorectal cancer liver metastases (CRLM) when resectable. The majority of these patients can also benefit from systemic chemotherapy. Recently, local or regional therapies such as thermal ablations have been used with acceptable outcomes. We searched the medical literature to identify studies and reviews relevant to radiofrequency (RF) ablation, microwave (MW) ablation and laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT) in terms of local progression, survival indexes and major complications in patients with CRLM. Reviewed literature showed a local progression rate between 2.8 and 29.7 % of RF-ablated liver lesions at 12-49 months follow-up, 2.7-12.5 % of MW ablated lesions at 5-19 months follow-up and 5.2 % of lesions treated with LITT at 6-month follow-up. Major complications were observed in 4-33 % of patients treated with RF ablation, 0-19 % of patients treated with MW ablation and 0.1-3.5 % of lesions treated with LITT. Although not significantly different, the mean of 1-, 3- and 5-year survival rates for RF-, MW- and laser ablated lesions was (92.6, 44.7, 31.1 %), (79, 38.6, 21 %) and (94.2, 61.5, 29.2 %), respectively. The median survival in these methods was 33.2, 29.5 and 33.7 months, respectively. Thermal ablation may be an appropriate alternative in patients with CRLM who have inoperable liver lesions or have operable lesions as an adjunct to resection. However, further competitive evaluation should clarify the efficacy and priority of these therapies in patients with colorectal cancer liver metastases.

  1. Learning in the Clouds?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butin, Dan W.

    2013-01-01

    Engaged learning--the type that happens outside textbooks and beyond the four walls of the classroom--moves beyond right and wrong answers to grappling with the uncertainties and contradictions of a complex world. iPhones back up to the "cloud." GoogleDocs is all about "cloud computing." Facebook is as ubiquitous as the sky.…

  2. Weather Fundamentals: Clouds. [Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1998

    The videos in this educational series, for grades 4-7, help students understand the science behind weather phenomena through dramatic live-action footage, vivid animated graphics, detailed weather maps, and hands-on experiments. This episode (23 minutes) discusses how clouds form, the different types of clouds, and the important role they play in…

  3. On Cloud Nine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCrea, Bridget; Weil, Marty

    2011-01-01

    Across the U.S., innovative collaboration practices are happening in the cloud: Sixth-graders participate in literary salons. Fourth-graders mentor kindergarteners. And teachers use virtual Post-it notes to advise students as they create their own television shows. In other words, cloud computing is no longer just used to manage administrative…

  4. Cloud Resolving Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2007-01-01

    One of the most promising methods to test the representation of cloud processes used in climate models is to use observations together with cloud-resolving models (CRMs). CRMs use more sophisticated and realistic representations of cloud microphysical processes, and they can reasonably well resolve the time evolution, structure, and life cycles of clouds and cloud systems (with sizes ranging from about 2-200 km). CRMs also allow for explicit interaction between clouds, outgoing longwave (cooling) and incoming solar (heating) radiation, and ocean and land surface processes. Observations are required to initialize CRMs and to validate their results. This paper provides a brief discussion and review of the main characteristics of CRMs as well as some of their major applications. These include the use of CRMs to improve our understanding of: (1) convective organization, (2) cloud temperature and water vapor budgets, and convective momentum transport, (3) diurnal variation of precipitation processes, (4) radiative-convective quasi-equilibrium states, (5) cloud-chemistry interaction, (6) aerosol-precipitation interaction, and (7) improving moist processes in large-scale models. In addition, current and future developments and applications of CRMs will be presented.

  5. Clouds in Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, R.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    What are clouds? The answer to that question is both obvious and subtle. In the terrestrial atmosphere clouds are familiar as vast collections of small water drops or ice crystals suspended in the air. In the atmospheres of Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Saturn's moon Titan, Uranus, Neptune, and possibly Pluto, they are composed of several other substances including sulfuric acid, ammonia, hydroge...

  6. Relationship between cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction and cloud albedo, and new surface-based approach for determining cloud albedo

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Wu, W.; Jensen, M. P.; Toto, T.

    2011-07-21

    This paper focuses on three interconnected topics: (1) quantitative relationship between surface shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo; (2) surface-based approach for measuring cloud albedo; (3) multiscale (diurnal, annual and inter-annual) variations and covariations of surface shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo. An analytical expression is first derived to quantify the relationship between cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo. The analytical expression is then used to deduce a new approach for inferring cloud albedo from concurrent surface-based measurements of downwelling surface shortwave radiation and cloud fraction. High-resolution decade-long data on cloud albedos are obtained by use of this surface-based approach over the US Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiaton Measurement (ARM) Program at the Great Southern Plains (SGP) site. The surface-based cloud albedos are further compared against those derived from the coincident GOES satellite measurements. The three long-term (1997-2009) sets of hourly data on shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction and cloud albedo collected over the SGP site are analyzed to explore the multiscale (diurnal, annual and inter-annual) variations and covariations. The analytical formulation is useful for diagnosing deficiencies of cloud-radiation parameterizations in climate models.

  7. EUS-Guided Ethanol Ablation of Insulinomas

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Shan-yu; Lu, Xiu-ping; Jiang, Hai-xing

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Surgical resection is a standard treatment for insulinomas; however, it is associated with a high risk of complications and limited to specific suitable candidates. In recent years, endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided ethanol ablation of insulinomas has emerged as a new therapeutic option, especially for elderly patients and candidates unfit for surgery. We aimed to evaluate the feasibility and safety of this technique for insulinomas. Four patients diagnosed with insulinomas based on EUS–fine-needle aspiration and immunohistochemistry results underwent EUS-guided 95% ethanol ablation. A comprehensive literature review was performed to understand the current status of the feasibility, safety, and effects of EUS-guided ethanol ablation of insulinomas. EUS-guided ethanol ablation of insulinomas was successfully completed in all the 4 patients. There were no perioperative or postoperative complications. The patients were discharged at 3 days after the procedure. No recurrence of hypoglycemia or tumors was noted during follow-up (range, 3–6 months). Literature review showed 8 patients with insulinomas who underwent EUS-guided ethanol ablation. All the procedures were successful, with no need for further surgical treatment. Among these reviewed cases, 6 patients had no post-procedural complications, while other 2 patients showed a mild increase in the serum levels of lipase and/or pancreatic enzymes within 48 h post-procedure; furthermore, 1 of these 2 patients presented at a later date with medically controllable hematoma and ulceration. During follow-up, 6 patients remained asymptomatic and normoglycemic, while the 2 patients who presented post-procedural complications developed occasional mild confusion. EUS-guided ethanol ablation of insulinomas is an effective and safe modality, with an acceptable level of post-procedural complications. However, the long-term effects of this new therapeutic option need to be validated in a large randomized controlled

  8. Polarization of clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goloub, Philippe; Herman, Maurice; Parol, Frederic

    1995-12-01

    This paper reports the main results concerning polarization by clouds derived from POLDER (polarization and directionality of earth's reflectances) airborne version. These results tend to confirm the high information content in the polarization (phase, altimetry). The preliminary results of EUCREX'94 (European Cloud Radiation Experiment) evidenced the drastically different polarized signatures for ice crystals and water droplets. Here we report systematic and statistically significative observations over the whole EUCREX data set. The results show that the cirrus exhibit their own signature. Preliminary observations performed during CLEOPATRA'91 (Cloud Experiment Ober Pfaffenhofen And Transport) and EUCREX'94 campaigns have shown the feasibility of cloud altimetry using spectral information (443 nm and 865 nm) of the polarized light over liquid water droplets clouds. Altimetry technique has been generalized on ASTEX-SOFIA'92 and EUCREX'94 data sets. All these results are presented and discussed in this paper.

  9. Prebiotic chemistry in clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberbeck, Verne R.; Marshall, John; Shen, Thomas

    1991-01-01

    The chemical evolution hypothesis of Woese (1979), according to which prebiotic reactions occurred rapidly in droplets in giant atmospheric reflux columns was criticized by Scherer (1985). This paper proposes a mechanism for prebiotic chemistry in clouds that answers Scherer's concerns and supports Woese's hypothesis. According to this mechanism, rapid prebiotic chemical evolution was facilitated on the primordial earth by cycles of condensation and evaporation of cloud drops containing clay condensation nuclei and nonvolatile monomers. For example, amino acids supplied by, or synthesized during entry of meteorites, comets, and interplanetary dust, would have been scavenged by cloud drops containing clay condensation nuclei and would be polymerized within cloud systems during cycles of condensation, freezing, melting, and evaporation of cloud drops.

  10. Cloud computing security.

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Dongwan; Claycomb, William R.; Urias, Vincent E.

    2010-10-01

    Cloud computing is a paradigm rapidly being embraced by government and industry as a solution for cost-savings, scalability, and collaboration. While a multitude of applications and services are available commercially for cloud-based solutions, research in this area has yet to fully embrace the full spectrum of potential challenges facing cloud computing. This tutorial aims to provide researchers with a fundamental understanding of cloud computing, with the goals of identifying a broad range of potential research topics, and inspiring a new surge in research to address current issues. We will also discuss real implementations of research-oriented cloud computing systems for both academia and government, including configuration options, hardware issues, challenges, and solutions.

  11. Broken-cloud enhancement of solar radiation absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Byrne, R.N.; Somerville, R.C.; Subasilar, B.

    1996-04-01

    Two papers recently published in Science have shown that there is more absorption of solar radiation than estimated by current atmospheric general circulation models (GCMs) and that the discrepancy is associated with cloudy scenes. We have devised a simple model which explains this as an artifact of stochastic radiative transport. We first give a heuristic description, unencumbered by mathematical detail. Consider a simple case with clouds distributed at random within a single level whose upper and lower boundaries are fixed. The solar zenith angle is small to moderate; this is therefore an energetically important case. Fix the average areal liquid water content of the cloud layer, and take the statistics of the cloud distribution to be homogeneous within the layer. Furthermore, assume that all the clouds in the layer have the same liquid water content, constant throughout the cloud, and that apart from their droplet content they are identical to the surrounding clear sky. Let the clouds occupy on the average a fraction p{sub cld} of the volume of the cloudy layer, and let them have a prescribed distribution of sizes about some mean. This is not a fractal distribution, because it has a scale. Cloud shape is unimportant so long as cloud aspect ratios are not far from unity. Take the single-scattering albedo to be unity for the droplets in the clouds. All of the absorption is due to atmospheric gases, so the absorption coefficient at a point is the same for cloud and clear sky. Absorption by droplets is less than 10% effect in the numerical stochastic radiation calculations described below, so it is reasonable to neglect it at this level of idealization.

  12. Revisiting the interplay between ablation, collisional, and radiative processes during ns-laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Autrique, D.; Gornushkin, I.; Alexiades, V.; Chen, Z.; Bogaerts, A.; Rethfeld, B.

    2013-10-01

    A study of ns-laser ablation is presented, which focuses on the transient behavior of the physical processes that act in and above a copper sample. A dimensionless multiphase collisional radiative model describes the interplay between the ablation, collisional, and radiative mechanisms. Calculations are done for a 6 ns-Nd:YAG laser pulse operating at 532 nm and fluences up to 15 J/cm2. Temporal intensity profiles as well as transmissivities are in good agreement with experimental results. It is found that volumetric ablation mechanisms and photo-processes both play an essential role in the onset of ns-laser induced breakdown.

  13. Subcellular analysis by laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A; Shrestha, Bindesh

    2014-12-02

    In various embodiments, a method of laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LAESI-MS) may generally comprise micro-dissecting a cell comprising at least one of a cell wall and a cell membrane to expose at least one subcellular component therein, ablating the at least one subcellular component by an infrared laser pulse to form an ablation plume, intercepting the ablation plume by an electrospray plume to form ions, and detecting the ions by mass spectrometry.

  14. Ablation of carbide materials with femtosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumitru, Gabriel; Romano, Valerio; Weber, Heinz P.; Sentis, Marc; Marine, Wladimir

    2003-01-01

    The response of cemented tungsten carbide and of titanium carbonitride was investigated with respect to damage and ablation properties, under interaction with ultrashort laser pulses. These carbide materials present high microhardness and are of significant interest for tribological applications. The experiments were carried out in air with a commercial Ti:sapphire laser at energy densities on the target up to 6.5 J/cm 2. The irradiated target surfaces were analyzed with optical, SEM and AFM techniques and the damage and ablation threshold values were determined using the measured spot diameters and the calculated incident energy density distributions.

  15. High throughput solar cell ablation system

    SciTech Connect

    Harley, Gabriel; Pass, Thomas; Cousins, Peter John; Viatella, John

    2014-10-14

    A solar cell is formed using a solar cell ablation system. The ablation system includes a single laser source and several laser scanners. The laser scanners include a master laser scanner, with the rest of the laser scanners being slaved to the master laser scanner. A laser beam from the laser source is split into several laser beams, with the laser beams being scanned onto corresponding wafers using the laser scanners in accordance with one or more patterns. The laser beams may be scanned on the wafers using the same or different power levels of the laser source.

  16. General Model for Multicomponent Ablation Thermochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milos, Frank S.; Marschall, Jochen; Rasky, Daniel J. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    A previous paper (AIAA 94-2042) presented equations and numerical procedures for modeling the thermochemical ablation and pyrolysis of thermal protection materials which contain multiple surface species. This work describes modifications and enhancements to the Multicomponent Ablation Thermochemistry (MAT) theory and code for application to the general case which includes surface area constraints, rate limited surface reactions, and non-thermochemical mass loss (failure). Detailed results and comparisons with data are presented for the Shuttle Orbiter reinforced carbon-carbon oxidation protection system which contains a mixture of sodium silicate (Na2SiO3), silica (SiO2), silicon carbide (SiC), and carbon (C).

  17. Testing of Advanced Conformal Ablative TPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasch, Matthew; Agrawal, Parul; Beck, Robin

    2013-01-01

    In support of the CA250 project, this paper details the results of a test campaign that was conducted at the Ames Arcjet Facility, wherein several novel low density thermal protection (TPS) materials were evaluated in an entry like environment. The motivation for these tests was to investigate whether novel conformal ablative TPS materials can perform under high heat flux and shear environment as a viable alternative to rigid ablators like PICA or Avcoat for missions like MSL and beyond. A conformable TPS over a rigid aeroshell has the potential to solve a number of challenges faced by traditional rigid TPS materials (such as tiled Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) system on MSL, and honeycomb-based Avcoat on the Orion Multi Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV)). The compliant (high strain to failure) nature of the conformable ablative materials will allow better integration of the TPS with the underlying aeroshell structure and enable monolithic-like configuration and larger segments to be used in fabrication.A novel SPRITE1 architecture, developed by the researchers at NASA Ames was used for arcjet testing. This small probe like configuration with 450 spherecone, enabled us to test the materials in a combination of high heat flux, pressure and shear environment. The heat flux near the nose were in the range of 500-1000 W/sq cm whereas in the flank section of the test article the magnitudes were about 50 of the nose, 250-500W/sq cm range. There were two candidate conformable materials under consideration for this test series. Both test materials are low density (0.28 g/cu cm) similar to Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) or Silicone Impregnated Refractory Ceramic Ablator (SIRCA) and are comprised of: A flexible carbon substrate (Carbon felt) infiltrated with an ablative resin system: phenolic (Conformal-PICA) or silicone (Conformal-SICA). The test demonstrated a successful performance of both the conformable ablators for heat flux conditions between 50

  18. Effects of Laser Wavelength on Ablator Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    Wavelength-dependent or spectral radiation effects are potentially significant for thermal protection materials. NASA atmospheric entry simulations include trajectories with significant levels of shock layer radiation which is concentrated in narrow spectral lines. Tests using two different high powered lasers, the 10.6 micron LHMEL I CO2 laser and the near-infrared 1.07 micron fiber laser, on low density ablative thermal protection materials offer a unique opportunity to evaluate spectral effects. Test results indicated that the laser wavelength can impact the thermal response of an ablative material, in terms of bond-line temperatures, penetration times, mass losses, and char layer thicknesses.

  19. Thermal tumor ablation in clinical use.

    PubMed

    Brace, C

    2011-01-01

    Although a surgical procedure is performed by visual inspection with histopathological assessment of the excised tumor and margins, percutaneous and noninvasive thermal ablation is performed strictly with the aid of imaging. Applicator guidance into the target zone, treatment monitoring and verification, and clinical follow-up rely on effective imaging. Detailed discussion of imaging is beyond the scope of this article, but the influence of imaging on the choice of thermal ablation or procedural approach will be discussed as needed. More information on imaging for interventional therapies can be found in other articles in this issue of IEEE Pulse.

  20. High throughput solar cell ablation system

    DOEpatents

    Harley, Gabriel; Pass, Thomas; Cousins, Peter John; Viatella, John

    2012-09-11

    A solar cell is formed using a solar cell ablation system. The ablation system includes a single laser source and several laser scanners. The laser scanners include a master laser scanner, with the rest of the laser scanners being slaved to the master laser scanner. A laser beam from the laser source is split into several laser beams, with the laser beams being scanned onto corresponding wafers using the laser scanners in accordance with one or more patterns. The laser beams may be scanned on the wafers using the same or different power levels of the laser source.

  1. MODIS Observations of Enhanced Clear Sky Reflectance Near Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varnai, Tamas; Marshak, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    Several recent studies have found that the brightness of clear sky systematically increases near clouds. Understanding this increase is important both for a correct interpretation of observations and for improving our knowledge of aerosol-cloud interactions. However, while the studies suggested several processes to explain the increase, the significance of each process is yet to be determined. This study examines one of the suggested processes three-dimensional (3-D) radiative interactions between clouds and their surroundings by analyzing a large dataset of MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) observations over the Northeast Atlantic Ocean. The results indicate that 3-D effects are responsible for a large portion of the observed increase, which extends to about 15 km away from clouds and is stronger (i) at shorter wavelengths (ii) near optically thicker clouds and (iii) near illuminated cloud sides. This implies that it is important to account for 3-D radiative effects in the interpretation of solar reflectance measurements over clear regions in the vicinity of clouds.

  2. Experimental measurement of ablation effects in plasma armature railguns

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, J.V.; Parsons, W.M.

    1986-01-01

    Experimental evidence supporting the importance of ablation in plasma armature railguns is presented. Experiments conducted using the HYVAX and MIDI-2 railguns are described. Several indirect effects of ablation are identified from the experimental results. An improved ablation model of plasma armature dynamics is proposed which incorporates the restrike process.

  3. Ablation techniques for primary and metastatic liver tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Michael J; Willatt, Jonathon; Majdalany, Bill S; Kielar, Ania Z; Chong, Suzanne; Ruma, Julie A; Pandya, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Ablative treatment methods have emerged as safe and effective therapies for patients with primary and secondary liver tumors who are not surgical candidates at the time of diagnosis. This article reviews the current literature and describes the techniques, complications and results for radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation. PMID:26839642

  4. Perivascular parenchymal extension of the ablation zone following liver microwave ablation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Saurabh; Siriwardana, Pulathis Nilantha; Johnston, Edward William; Bandula, Steven; Davidson, Brian Ritchie; Illing, Rowland Oliver

    2016-03-31

    A 69-year-old man who presented with abdominal discomfort was, on examination, found to have a palpable abdominal mass. Contrast-enhanced CT showed a mass arising from the inferior vena cava, which biopsy confirmed to be a leiomyosarcoma. One month after chemoradiotherapy, CT demonstrated a new 15 mm solitary central right liver metastasis. Microwave ablation (MWA) of the metastasis was performed using an Acculis Sulis V system (Angiodynamics, USA) at a power of 140 Watts for 4 min, with no immediate complications. After 1 month, MRI with gadolinium was performed to assess the liver ablation zone. The MRI demonstrated thrombosis of a right inferior hepatic vein branch leading to the ablation zone and extension of the ablation zone 1 cm into the tissue around the thrombosed vessel.

  5. Modeling of plasma distortions by laser-induced ablation spectroscopy (LIAS) and implications for the interpretation of LIAS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokar, M. Z.; Gierse, N.; Philipps, V.; Samm, U.

    2015-09-01

    For the interpretation of the line radiation observed from laser induced ablation spectroscopy (LIAS) such parameters as the density and temperature of electrons within very compact clouds of atoms and singly charged ions of ablated material have to be known. Compared to the local plasma conditions prior to the laser pulse, these can be strongly changed during LIAS since new electrons are generated by the ionisation of particles ejected from the irradiated target. Because of their transience and spatial inhomogeneity it is technically difficult to measure disturbances induced in the plasma by LIAS. To overcome this uncertainty a numerical model has been elaborated, providing a self-consistent description for the spreading of ablated particles and accompanying modifications in the plasma. The results of calculations for LIAS performed on carbon-containing targets in Ohmic and additionally heated discharges in the tokamak TEXTOR are presented. Due to the increase in the electron density the ‘ionisation per photon’ ratio, S/XB factor, is significantly enhanced compared to unperturbed plasma conditions. The impact of the amount of material ablated and of the plasma conditions before LIAS on the level of the S/XB-enhancement is investigated.

  6. Imaging polychromator for density measurements of polystyrene pellet cloud on the Large Helical Device

    SciTech Connect

    Sharov, I. A. Sergeev, V. Yu.; Miroshnikov, I. V.; Tamura, N.; Sudo, S.; Kuteev, B. V.

    2015-04-15

    Experimental data on spatial distributions of a pellet cloud electron density are necessary for the development of many applications of pellet injection, namely, plasma fuelling, discharge control, and plasma diagnostics. An improved approach of electron density measurements inside the cloud of a polystyrene pellet ablating in hot plasma of the large helical device is described. Density values of (1-30) × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −3} depending on the background plasma parameters and distance from the solid pellet were measured.

  7. Community Cloud Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinos, Alexandros; Briscoe, Gerard

    Cloud Computing is rising fast, with its data centres growing at an unprecedented rate. However, this has come with concerns over privacy, efficiency at the expense of resilience, and environmental sustainability, because of the dependence on Cloud vendors such as Google, Amazon and Microsoft. Our response is an alternative model for the Cloud conceptualisation, providing a paradigm for Clouds in the community, utilising networked personal computers for liberation from the centralised vendor model. Community Cloud Computing (C3) offers an alternative architecture, created by combing the Cloud with paradigms from Grid Computing, principles from Digital Ecosystems, and sustainability from Green Computing, while remaining true to the original vision of the Internet. It is more technically challenging than Cloud Computing, having to deal with distributed computing issues, including heterogeneous nodes, varying quality of service, and additional security constraints. However, these are not insurmountable challenges, and with the need to retain control over our digital lives and the potential environmental consequences, it is a challenge we must pursue.

  8. Interstellar molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bally, J.

    1986-04-01

    The physical properties of the molecular phase of the interstellar medium are studied with regard to star formation and the structure of the Galaxy. Most observations of molecular clouds are made with single-dish, high-surface precision radio telescopes, with the best resolution attainable at 0.2 to 1 arcmin; the smallest structures that can be resolved are of order 10 to the 17th cm in diameter. It is now believed that: (1) most of the mass of the Galaxy is in the form of giant molecular clouds; (2) the largest clouds and those responsible for most massive star formation are concentrated in spiral arms; (3) the molecular clouds are the sites of perpetual star formation, and are significant in the chemical evolution of the Galaxy; (4) giant molecular clouds determine the evolution of the kinematic properties of galactic disk stars; (5) the total gas content is diminishing with time; and (6) most clouds have supersonic internal motions and do not form stars on a free-fall time scale. It is concluded that though progress has been made, more advanced instruments are needed to inspect the processes operating within stellar nurseries and to study the distribution of the molecular clouds in more distant galaxies. Instruments presently under construction which are designed to meet these ends are presented.

  9. Method for Selective Thermal Ablation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Carl, James (Inventor); Ngo, Phong (Inventor); Raffoul, George W. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A method, simulation, and apparatus are provided that are highly suitable for treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). A catheter is disclosed that includes a small diameter disk loaded monopole antenna surrounded by fusion material having a high heat of fusion and a melting point preferably at or near body temperature. Microwaves from the antenna heat prostatic tissue to promote necrosing of the prostatic tissue that relieves the pressure of the prostatic tissue against the urethra as the body reabsorbs the necrosed or dead tissue. The fusion material keeps the urethra cool by means of the heat of fusion of the fusion material. This prevents damage to the urethra while the prostatic tissue is necrosed. A computer simulation is provided that can be used to predict the resulting temperature profile produced in the prostatic tissue. By changing the various control features of the catheter and method of applying microwave energy a temperature profile can be predicted and produced that is similar to the temperature profile desired for the particular patient.

  10. Method for selective thermal ablation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Carl, James (Inventor); Ngo, Phong (Inventor); Raffoul, George W. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A method, simulation, and apparatus are provided that are highly suitable for treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). A catheter is disclosed that includes a small diameter disk loaded monopole antenna surrounded by fusion material having a high heat of fusion and a melting point preferably at or near body temperature. Microwaves from the antenna heat prostatic tissue to promote necrosing of the prostatic tissue that relieves the pressure of the prostatic tissue against the urethra as the body reabsorbs the necrosed or dead tissue. The fusion material keeps the urethra cool by means of the heat of fusion of the fusion material. This prevents damage to the urethra while the prostatic tissue is necrosed. A computer simulation is provided that can be used to predict the resulting temperature profile produced in the prostatic tissue. By changing the various control features of the catheter and method of applying microwave energy a temperature profile can be predicted and produced that is similar to the temperature profile desired for the particular patient.

  11. UV laser ablation patterns in intraocular lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagiou, D. P.; Evangelatos, Ch.; Apostolopoulos, A.; Spyratou, E.; Bacharis, C.; Makropoulou, M.; Serafetinides, A. A.

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate the effect of UV solid state laser radiation on intraocular lens (IOL) polymer surfaces as an alternative method to conventional surface shaping techniques for IOLs customization. Laser ablation experiments were performed on PMMA plates and commercially available hydrophobic and hydrophilic acrylic IOLs with the 5th harmonic of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (λ=213 nm). Circular arrays of holes were drilled on the polymer surface, covering the centre and the peripheries of the IOL. The morphology of the ablated IOL surface was examined with a conventional optical microscope (Leitz GMBH Wetzlar) and with a scanning electron microscope (SEM, Fei - Innova Nanoscope) at various laser parameters. Quantitative measurements of ablation rates were performed with a contact profilometer (Dektak-150), in which a mechanical stylus scanned across the surface of gold-coated IOLs (after SEM imaging) to measure variationsF in surface height. Laser interaction with IOLs depends on optical and mechanical material properties, in addition to laser radiation parameters. The exact ablation mechanism is discussed. Some polymer materials, depending on their properties, are more susceptible to the photothermal mechanism than the photochemical one or vice versa. In summary, every IOL polymer exhibits specific attributes in its interaction with the 5th harmonic of Nd:YAG laser.

  12. Organized Atrial Tachycardias after Atrial Fibrillation Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Castrejón-Castrejón, Sergio; Ortega, Marta; Pérez-Silva, Armando; Doiny, David; Estrada, Alejandro; Filgueiras, David; López-Sendón, José L.; Merino, José L.

    2011-01-01

    The efficacy of catheter-based ablation techniques to treat atrial fibrillation is limited not only by recurrences of this arrhythmia but also, and not less importantly, by new-onset organized atrial tachycardias. The incidence of such tachycardias depends on the type and duration of the baseline atrial fibrillation and specially on the ablation technique which was used during the index procedure. It has been repeatedly reported that the more extensive the left atrial surface ablated, the higher the incidence of organized atrial tachycardias. The exact origin of the pathologic substrate of these trachycardias is not fully understood and may result from the interaction between preexistent regions with abnormal electrical properties and the new ones resultant from radiofrequency delivery. From a clinical point of view these atrial tachycardias tend to remit after a variable time but in some cases are responsible for significant symptoms. A precise knowledge of the most frequent types of these arrhythmias, of their mechanisms and components is necessary for a thorough electrophysiologic characterization if a new ablation procedure is required. PMID:21941669

  13. Outpatient laser tonsillar ablation under local anaesthetic.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Peter J; Latif, Abdul

    2004-11-01

    Outpatient laser ablation of the palatine tonsils under local anaesthetic is an alternative technique to capsular tonsillectomy for recurrent tonsillitis under general anaesthetic. Laser tonsillotomy ablates up to 70% of the tonsillar tissue and is performed when patients choose not to have a conventional tonsillectomy, or are unfit for a general anaesthetic. The technique described here is an adaptation of Krespis' laser-assisted serial tonsillectomy (LAST) whereby only one sitting is required. Krespis' technique effectively eliminates recurrent tonsillitis in 96% of the cases over a 4-year follow-up period and represents the only substantial study looking at treating recurrent tonsillitis with outpatient laser ablation. This study is a retrospective postal survey of 19 patients who underwent laser tonsillar ablation under local anaesthetic for recurrent chronic tonsillitis from 1997 to 2001 and was performed in liaison with the clinical audit department at Basildon Hospital. We had a response rate of 74% and an admission rate of 0%, which compares favourably with day case tonsillectomy surgery. Of the patients, 75% did not experience further episodes of tonsillitis 12 months after the procedure and 77% of the patients were glad they had the operation. Although this technique does not completely eliminate tonsillitis, it offers an alternative for those patients who prefer a procedure that is done quickly in an outpatient setting without the additional problems of general anaesthesia, overnight hospital admission and long waiting lists.

  14. Highspeed laser ablation cutting of metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullmann, F.; Loeschner, U.; Hartwig, L.; Szczepanski, D.; Schille, J.; Gronau, S.; Knebel, T.; Drechsel, J.; Ebert, R.; Exner, H.

    2013-02-01

    In laser ablation cutting, irradiation of high-intense laser beams causes ejection of molten and evaporated material out of the cutting zone as a result of high pressure gradients, induced by expanding plasma plumes. This paper investigates highspeed laser ablation cutting of industrial grade metal sheets using high-brilliant continuous wave fiber lasers with output powers up to 5 kW. The laser beam was deflected with scan speeds up to 2700 m/min utilizing both a fast galvanometer scan system and a polygon scan system. By sharp laser beam focusing using different objectives with focal lengths ranging between 160 mm and 500 mm, small laser spot diameters between 16.5 μm and 60 μm were obtained, respectively. As a result high peak intensities between 3*108 W/cm² and 2.5*109 W/cm² were irradiated on the sample surface, and cutting kerfs with a maximum depth of 1.4 mm have been produced. In this study the impact of the processing parameters laser power, laser spot diameter, cutting speed, and number of scans on both the achievable cutting depth and the cutting edge quality was investigated. The ablation depths, the heights of the cutting burr, as well as the removed material volumes were evaluated by means of optical microscope images and cross section photographs. Finally highspeed laser ablation cutting was studied using an intensified ultra highspeed camera in order to get useful insights into the cutting process.

  15. Intumescent-ablator coatings using endothermic fillers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawko, P. M.; Riccitiello, S. R. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An intumescent-ablator coating composition which contains the ammonium salt of 1,4-nitroaniline-2-sulfonic acid or 4,4 dinitrosul fanilide, a polymeric binder system and about 5 to 30% weight of an endothermic filler is reported. The filler has a decomposition temperature about or within the exothermic region of the intumescent agent.

  16. Microwave ablation devices for interventional oncology.

    PubMed

    Ward, Robert C; Healey, Terrance T; Dupuy, Damian E

    2013-03-01

    Microwave ablation is one of the several options in the ablation armamentarium for the treatment of malignancy, offering several potential benefits when compared with other ablation, radiation, surgical and medical treatment modalities. The basic microwave system consists of the generator, power distribution system and antennas. Often under image (computed tomography or ultrasound) guidance, a needle-like antenna is inserted percutaneously into the tumor, where local microwave electromagnetic radiation is emitted from the probe's active tip, producing frictional tissue heating, capable of causing cell death by coagulation necrosis. Half of the microwave ablation systems use a 915 MHz generator and the other half use a 2450 MHz generator. To date, there are no completed clinical trials comparing microwave devices head-to-head. Prospective comparisons of microwave technology with other treatment alternatives, as well as head-to-head comparison with each microwave device, is needed if this promising field will garner more widespread support and use in the oncology community.

  17. Ablation Resistant Zirconium and Hafnium Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, Jeffrey (Inventor); White, Michael J. (Inventor); Kaufman, Larry (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    High temperature ablation resistant ceramic composites have been made. These ceramics are composites of zirconium diboride and zirconium carbide with silicon carbide, hafnium diboride and hafnium carbide with silicon carbide and ceramic composites which contain mixed diborides and/or carbides of zirconium and hafnium. along with silicon carbide.

  18. Combining Electrolysis and Electroporation for Tissue Ablation.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Mary; Rubinsky, Liel; Meir, Arie; Raju, Narayan; Rubinsky, Boris

    2015-08-01

    Electrolytic ablation is a method that operates by delivering low magnitude direct current to the target region over long periods of time, generating electrolytic products that destroy cells. This study was designed to explore the hypothesis stating that electrolytic ablation can be made more effective when the electrolysis-producing electric charges are delivered using electric pulses with field strength typical in reversible electroporation protocols. (For brevity we will refer to tissue ablation protocols that combine electroporation and electrolysis as E(2).) The mechanistic explanation of this hypothesis is related to the idea that products of electrolysis generated by E(2) protocols can gain access to the interior of the cell through the electroporation permeabilized cell membrane and therefore cause more effective cell death than from the exterior of an intact cell. The goal of this study is to provide a first-order examination of this hypothesis by comparing the charge dosage required to cause a comparable level of damage to a rat liver, in vivo, when using either conventional electrolysis or E(2) approaches. Our results show that E(2) protocols produce tissue damage that is consistent with electrolytic ablation. Furthermore, E(2) protocols cause damage comparable to that produced by conventional electrolytic protocols while delivering orders of magnitude less charge to the target tissue over much shorter periods of time.

  19. Atmospheric Profile Imprint in Firewall Ablation Coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ceplecha, Z.; Pecina, P.

    1984-01-01

    A general formula which expresses the distance along the meteoric fireball trajectory 1 as a function of t is discussed. Differential equations which include the motion and ablation of a single nonfragmenting meteor body are presented. The importance of the atmospheric density profile in the meteor formula is emphasized.

  20. [Application of TB type thermal balloon endometrial ablation for the treatment of abnormal uterine bleeding].

    PubMed

    Wang, W; Zhai, Y; Zhang, Z H; Li, Y; Zhang, Z Y

    2016-11-08

    Objective: To investigate the clinical efficacy, safety and promotion value of TB type thermal balloon endometrial ablation in the treatment of abnormal uterine bleeding. Methods: Fourty three patients who had received TB type endometrial ablation system for treatment of abnormal uterine bleeding from January, 2015 to January, 2016 in theDepartment of gynecology, Beijing Chaoyang Hospital were enrolled in this study. The intra-operative and post-operative complications and improvement of abnormal uterine bleeding and dysmenorrhea were observed. Results: There were nointra-operative complication occurred, such as uterine perforation, massive hemorrhage or surrounding organ damage. At 6 months after operation, 32 patients developed amenorrhea, 6 developed menstrual spotting, 3 developed menstruation with a small volume and 1 had a normal menstruation. No menstruation with an increased volume occurred. The occurrence of amenorrhea was 76.19% and the response rate was 97.62%.At 6 months after operation, 1 case had no response, 2 cases had partial response and 11 cases had complete response among the 14 cases of pre-operative dysmenorrhea; only 3 cases still had anemia among the 23 cases of pre-operative anemia. Compared with before treatment, patients with dysmenorrhea and anemia both significantly reduced with a statistically significant difference(P<0.01). Conclusion: TB type thermal balloon endometrial ablation has a significant efficacy with high safety for the treatment of abnormal uterine bleeding, which could have clinical promotion practice.

  1. The mechanism of lesion formation by focused ultrasound ablation catheter for treatment of atrial fibrillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinelnikov, Y. D.; Fjield, T.; Sapozhnikov, O. A.

    2009-10-01

    The application of therapeutic ultrasound for the treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF) is investigated. The results of theoretical and experimental investigation of ultrasound ablation catheter are presented. The major components of the catheter are the high power cylindrical piezoelectric element and parabolic balloon reflector. Thermal elevation in the ostia of pulmonary veins is achieved by focusing the ultrasound beam in shape of a torus that transverses the myocardial tissue. High intensity ultrasound heating in the focal zone results in a lesion surrounding the pulmonary veins that creates an electrical conduction blocks and relief from AF symptoms. The success of the ablation procedure largely depends on the correct choice of reflector geometry and ultrasonic power. We present a theoretical model of the catheter’s acoustic field and bioheat transfer modeling of cardiac lesions. The application of an empirically derived relation between lesion formation and acoustic power is shown to correlate with the experimental data. Developed control methods combine the knowledge of theoretical acoustics and the thermal lesion formation simulations with experiment and thereby establish dosimetry that contributes to a safe and effective ultrasound ablation procedure.

  2. Effects of varying argon ion laser intensity and exposure time on the ablation of atherosclerotic plaque.

    PubMed

    Strikwerda, S; Bott-Silverman, C; Ratliff, N B; Goormastic, M; Cothren, R M; Costello, B; Kittrell, C; Feld, M S; Kramer, J R

    1988-01-01

    Using continuous wave (CW) argon ion laser light, a total of 253 laser exposures of varying power (1.5, 3, 5, 8 or 10 W) and duration (20-1,333 ms) were delivered to four segments of human atheromatous aorta obtained at autopsy. Exposure conditions were controlled by using an optically shielded laser catheter that provided a 500 micron spot of light of known power. Two thresholds for consistently reproducible ablation could be defined-an intensity threshold at 25.5 W/mm2 and a fluence threshold at 3.2 J/mm2. Above threshold, a fluence of 5.1 J/mm2 was found to produce the most efficient ablation, ie, removed the greatest volume (mm3) per energy delivered (J) compared to other fluence levels employed (p less than 0.0001). Between aortic segments, however, considerable variability in efficiency (mm3/J) was observed, possibly owing to different optical properties and/or plaque composition. Low-intensity laser radiation produced inconsistent ablation and extensive coagulation effects to surrounding tissue. When a fluence of 5.1 J/mm2 was constructed with a high-intensity laser beam and a short exposure time, consistent and efficient tissue removal resulted without histologic evidence of coagulation necrosis.

  3. Maximum available flux of charged particles from the laser ablation plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Yasuo; Itagaki, Tomonobu; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2016-12-01

    The laser ablation plasma was characterized for high-flux sources of ion and electron beams. An ablation plasma was biased to a positive or a negative high voltage, and the fluxes of charged particles through a pair of extraction electrodes were measured as a function of the laser intensity IL. Maximum available fluxes and the ratios of electron and ion beam currents Je/Ji were evaluated as a function of the laser irradiance. The ion and the electron fluxes increased with a laser intensity and the current ratio was around 40 at IL = 1.3 × 108 W/cm2 which monotonically decreased with an increase of the laser intensity. The current ratios Je/Ji were correlated to the parameters of ablation plasma measured by the electrostatic probes. The results showed that the ion fluxes are basically enhanced by super-sonically drifting ions in the plasma and the electron fluxes are also enhanced by the drift motion together with a reduction of the sheath potential due to the enhanced ion flux to the surrounding wall.

  4. Microwave tumors ablation: principles, clinical applications and review of preliminary experiences.

    PubMed

    Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Laganà, Domenico; Mangini, Monica; Fontana, Federico; Dionigi, Gianlorenzo; Boni, Luigi; Rovera, Francesca; Cuffari, Salvatore; Fugazzola, Carlo

    2008-01-01

    Local ablative techniques have been developed to enable local control of unresectable tumors. Ablation has been performed with several modalities including ethanol ablation, laser ablation, cryoablation, and radiofrequency ablation. Microwave technology is a new thermal ablation technique for different types of tumors, providing all the benefits of radiofrequency and substantial advantages. Microwave ablation has been applied to liver, lung, kidney and more rarely to bone, pancreas and adrenal glands. Preliminary works show that microwave ablation may be a viable alternative to other ablation techniques in selected patients. However further studies are necessary to confirm short- and long-term effectiveness of the methods and to compare it with other ablative techniques, especially RF.

  5. Fascicular ventricular tachycardia: experience with radiofrequency ablation.

    PubMed

    Magalhaes, Sónia; Gonçalves, Helena; Primo, João; Sá, Ana Paula; Silva, Paula; Rosas, Rui; Gama, Vasco

    2006-05-01

    Fascicular ventricular tachycardia (VT), the commonest form of idiopathic left VT, occurs more frequently in young males without structural heart disease and usually presents as paroxysmal palpitations. It is subdivided into two more common subtypes, posterior and anterior. A macro-reentrant circuit involving a considerable and variable extent of the left interventricular septum is presumed to be the underlying arrhythmogenic mechanism. A slow conduction zone with particular sensitivity to verapamil participates in the circuit and it seems that diastolic potentials (DP) represent the electrical activity in or near this zone. The fascicles of the left bundle appear to constitute part of the retrograde pathway and Purkinje potentials (PP) are assumed to represent their activation. In the present retrospective study, the authors review twelve cases of fascicular VT (ten posterior and two anterior) evaluated in the electrophysiology laboratory. Although initial induction was obtained in all patients, reproducibility was poor as a consequence of frequent contact inhibition during endocardial mapping of the left ventricle and this meant that ablation was not possible in two cases. Two cases of associated atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia (AVNRT) and a case of associated atrioventricular reentrant tachycardia by a right posterior accessory pathway were documented, which suggest a correlated anatomic substrate. After ablation of the slow nodal pathway in one of the AVNRTs, fascicular VT was no longer inducible. Ablation of the fascicular VT was attempted in nine patients, at the tachycardia exit site (characterized by an early ventricular electrogram fused with a Purkinje potential) in two patients with anterior fascicular VT and in five patients with the posterior subtype, and near the slow conduction pathway (site with simultaneous recording of DP and PP) in the other two patients. The initial success rate with a single procedure was 78%, two of the ablations

  6. Aluminum X-ray mass-ablation rate measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Kline, John L.; Hager, Jonathan D.

    2016-10-15

    Measurements of the mass ablation rate of aluminum (Al) have been completed at the Omega Laser Facility. Measurements of the mass-ablation rate show Al is higher than plastic (CH), comparable to high density carbon (HDC), and lower than beryllium. The mass-ablation rate is consistent with predictions using a 1D Lagrangian code, Helios. Lastly, the results suggest Al capsules have a reasonable ablation pressure even with a higher albedo than beryllium or carbon ablators warranting further investigation into the viability of Al capsules for ignition should be pursued.

  7. Plume collimation for laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A.

    2016-06-07

    In various embodiments, a device may generally comprise a capillary having a first end and a second end; a laser to emit energy at a sample in the capillary to ablate the sample and generate an ablation plume in the capillary; an electrospray apparatus to generate an electrospray plume to intercept the ablation plume to produce ions; and a mass spectrometer having an ion transfer inlet to capture the ions. The ablation plume may comprise a collimated ablation plume. The device may comprise a flow cytometer. Methods of making and using the same are also described.

  8. Plume collimation for laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A.

    2014-09-09

    In various embodiments, a device may generally comprise a capillary having a first end and a second end; a laser to emit energy at a sample in the capillary to ablate the sample and generate an ablation plume in the capillary; an electrospray apparatus to generate an electrospray plume to intercept the ablation plume to produce ions; and a mass spectrometer having an ion transfer inlet to capture the ions. The ablation plume may comprise a collimated ablation plume. The device may comprise a flow cytometer. Methods of making and using the same are also described.

  9. Contemporary Status of Percutaneous Ablation for the Small Renal Mass.

    PubMed

    Shin, Benjamin J; Chick, Jeffrey Forris Beecham; Stavropoulos, S William

    2016-03-01

    Renal cell carcinoma is the tenth most common malignancy in the USA, with upwards of 61,000 new cases and resulting in more than 14,000 deaths annually. Although partial nephrectomy remains the standard treatment, image-guided nephron-sparing ablative techniques including cryoablation, radiofrequency ablation, and microwave ablation have emerged as treatment options in certain patient populations. Ablative therapies have high technical successes, low tumor recurrence rates, and preserve renal parenchymal volume. The purpose of this article is to provide an update on ablation therapies for small renal masses.

  10. Aerosol-Cloud-Drizzle-Turbulence Interactions in Boundary Layer Clouds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    understanding of the effects of aerosol-cloud interactions and drizzle and entrainment processes in boundary layer clouds for the purpose of developing...thickness, cloud turbulence intensity, and aerosols on precipitation production; 4) study the processing of aerosols by cloud processes ; 5) explore mass...drizzle processes to the artificial introduction of CCN and giant nuclei under differing aerosol backgrounds. In addition, a set of aerosol and cloud

  11. Burn, freeze, or photo-ablate?: comparative symptom profile in Barrett's dysplasia patients undergoing endoscopic ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Kanwar Rupinder S.; Gross, Seth A.; Greenwald, Bruce D.; Hemminger, Lois L.; Wolfsen, Herbert C.

    2009-06-01

    Background: There are few data available comparing endoscopic ablation methods for Barrett's esophagus with high-grade dysplasia (BE-HGD). Objective: To determine differences in symptoms and complications associated with endoscopic ablation. Design: Prospective observational study. Setting: Two tertiary care centers in USA. Patients: Consecutive patients with BE-HGD Interventions: In this pilot study, symptoms profile data were collected for BE-HGD patients among 3 endoscopic ablation methods: porfimer sodium photodynamic therapy, radiofrequency ablation and low-pressure liquid nitrogen spray cryotherapy. Main Outcome Measurements: Symptom profiles and complications from the procedures were assessed 1-8 weeks after treatment. Results: Ten BE-HGD patients were treated with each ablation modality (30 patients total; 25 men, median age: 69 years (range 53-81). All procedures were performed in the clinic setting and none required subsequent hospitalization. The most common symptoms among all therapies were chest pain, dysphagia and odynophagia. More patients (n=8) in the porfimer sodium photodynamic therapy group reported weight loss compared to radio-frequency ablactation (n=2) and cryotherapy (n=0). Four patients in the porfimer sodium photodynamic therapy group developed phototoxicity requiring medical treatment. Strictures, each requiring a single dilation, were found in radiofrequency ablactation (n=1) and porfimer sodium photodynamic therapy (n=2) patients. Limitations: Small sample size, non-randomized study. Conclusions: These three endoscopic therapies are associated with different types and severity of post-ablation symptoms and complications.

  12. Experimental methods for improved spatial control of thermal lesions in magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound ablation.

    PubMed

    Viallon, Magalie; Petrusca, Lorena; Auboiroux, Vincent; Goget, Thomas; Baboi, Loredana; Becker, Christoph D; Salomir, Rares

    2013-09-01

    Magnetic resonance-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MRgHIFU, or MRgFUS) is a hybrid technology that was developed to provide efficient and tolerable thermal ablation of targeted tumors or other pathologic tissues, while preserving the normal surrounding structures. Fast 3-D ablation strategies are feasible with the newly available phased-array HIFU transducers. However, unlike fixed heating sources for interstitial ablation (radiofrequency electrode, microwave applicator, infra-red laser applicator), HIFU uses propagating waves. Therefore, the main challenge is to avoid thermo-acoustical adverse effects, such as energy deposition at reflecting interfaces and thermal drift of the focal lesion toward the near field. We report here our investigations on some novel experimental solutions to solve, or at least to alleviate, these generally known tolerability problems in HIFU-based therapy. Online multiplanar MR thermometry was the main investigational tool extensively used in this study to identify the problems and to assess the efficacy of the tested solutions. We present an improved method to cancel the beam reflection at the exit window (i.e., tissue-to-air interface) by creating a multilayer protection, to dissipate the residual HIFU beam by bulk scattering. This study evaluates selective de-activation of transducer elements to reduce the collateral heating at bone surfaces in the far field, mainly during automatically controlled volumetric ablation. We also explore, using hybrid US/MR simultaneous imaging, the feasibility of using disruptive boiling at the focus, both as a far-field self-shielding technique and as an enhanced ablation strategy (i.e., boiling core controlled HIFU ablation).

  13. Cloud computing basics for librarians.

    PubMed

    Hoy, Matthew B

    2012-01-01

    "Cloud computing" is the name for the recent trend of moving software and computing resources to an online, shared-service model. This article briefly defines cloud computing, discusses different models, explores the advantages and disadvantages, and describes some of the ways cloud computing can be used in libraries. Examples of cloud services are included at the end of the article.

  14. Cloud Distribution Statistics from LITE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winker, David M.

    1998-01-01

    The Lidar In-Space Technology Experiment (LITE) mission has demonstrated the utility of spaceborne lidar in observing multilayer clouds and has provided a dataset showing the distribution of tropospheric clouds and aerosols. These unambiguous observations of the vertical distribution of clouds will allow improved verification of current cloud climatologies and GCM cloud parameterizations. Although there is now great interest in cloud profiling radar, operating in the mm-wave region, for the spacebased observation of cloud heights the results of the LITE mission have shown that satellite lidars can also make significant contributions in this area.

  15. Direct Pulmonary Vein Ablation with Stenosis Prevention Therapy

    PubMed Central

    DeSimone, Christopher V.; Holmes, David R.; Ebrille, Elisa; Syed, Faisal F.; Ladewig, Dorothy J.; Mikell, Susan B.; Powers, Joanne; Suddendorf, Scott H.; Gilles, Emily J.; Danielsen, Andrew J.; Hodge, David O.; Kapa, Suraj; Asirvatham, Samuel J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The dominant location of electrical triggers for initiating atrial fibrillation (AF) originates from the muscle sleeves inside pulmonary veins (PVs). Currently, radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is performed outside of the PVs to isolate, rather than directly ablate these tissues, due to the risk of intraluminal PV stenosis. Methods In 4 chronic canine experiments, we performed direct PV muscle sleeve RFA ± post-ablation drug-coated balloon (DCB) treatment with paclitaxel/everolimus. Of the 4 PVs, 2 PVs were ablated and treated with DCB, 1 PV was ablated without DCB treatment (positive control), and 1 PV was left as a negative control. Local electrograms were assessed in PVs for near-field signals and were targeted for ablation. After 12-14 weeks survival, PVs were interrogated for absence of near-field PV potentials, and each PV was assessed for stenosis. Results All canines survived the study period without cardiorespiratory complications, and remained ambulatory. In all canines, PVs that were ablated and treated with DCB remained without any significant intraluminal stenosis. In contrast, PVs that were ablated and not treated with DCB showed near or complete intraluminal stenosis. At terminal study, PV potentials remained undetectable. A blinded, histologic analysis demonstrated that ablated PVs without DCB treatment had extensive thrombus, fibrin, mineralization, and elastin disruption. Conclusion Our chronic canine data suggest that direct PV tissue ablation without subsequent stenosis is feasible with the use of post-ablation DCBs. PMID:26075706

  16. Electromagnetic measurement and modeling techniques for microwave ablation probes.

    PubMed

    Brannan, Joseph D

    2009-01-01

    Broadband scattering parameter measurement of a commercially available microwave ablation probe over the course of a 10 minute 45 Watt ablation cycle within ex-vivo bovine liver tissue is performed. Measurement results are compared to finite difference time domain simulation of the probe in non-ablated and fully ablated tissue geometries. Measurement and simulation results agree well from 0-3 GHz demonstrating the accuracy of a multi-compartmental ablation geometry modeling technique. The electromagnetic modeling technique presented in this paper introduces a useful design tool for optimizing microwave ablation probes without the need for multi-physics simulation packages. The relevance of tissue complex permittivity change with temperature to microwave ablation probe performance is discussed.

  17. Current status of thermal ablation treatments for lung malignancies.

    PubMed

    Dupuy, Damian E; Shulman, Maria

    2010-09-01

    About 75% of lung cancer patients are not surgical candidates, either due to advanced disease or medical comorbidities. Furthermore, conventional treatments that can be offered to these patients are beneficial only to a small percentage of them. Thermal ablation is a minimally invasive treatment that is commonly used in this group of patients, and which has shown promising results. Currently, the most widely used ablation techniques in the treatment of lung malignancies are radiofrequency ablation (RFA), microwave ablation, and cryoablation. Although the most studied technique is RFA, recent studies with microwave ablation and cryoablation have shown some advantages over RFA. This article reviews the application of thermal ablation in the thorax, including patient selection, basic aspects of procedure technique, imaging follow-up, treatment outcomes, and comparison of ablation techniques.

  18. OH 18 cm TRANSITION AS A THERMOMETER FOR MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Ebisawa, Yuji; Inokuma, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Sakai, Nami; Menten, Karl M.; Maezawa, Hiroyuki

    2015-12-10

    We have observed the four hyperfine components of the 18 cm OH transition toward the translucent cloud eastward of Heiles Cloud 2 (HCL2E), the cold dark cloud L134N, and the photodissociation region of the ρ-Ophiuchi molecular cloud with the Effelsberg 100 m telescope. We have found intensity anomalies among the hyperfine components in all three regions. In particular, an absorption feature of the 1612 MHz satellite line against the cosmic microwave background has been detected toward HCL2E and two positions of the ρ-Ophiuchi molecular cloud. On the basis of statistical equilibrium calculations, we find that the hyperfine anomalies originate from the non-LTE population of the hyperfine levels, and can be used to determine the kinetic temperature of the gas over a wide range of H{sub 2} densities (10{sup 2}–10{sup 7} cm{sup −3}). Toward the center of HCL2E, the gas kinetic temperature is determined to be 53 ± 1 K, and it increases toward the cloud peripheries (∼60 K). The ortho-to-para ratio of H{sub 2} is determined to be 3.5 ± 0.9 from the averaged spectrum for the eight positions. In L134N, a similar increase of the temperature is also seen toward the periphery. In the ρ-Ophiuchi molecular cloud, the gas kinetic temperature decreases as a function of the distance from the exciting star HD 147889. These results demonstrate a new aspect of the OH 18 cm line that can be used as a good thermometer of molecular cloud envelopes. The OH 18 cm line can be used to trace a new class of warm molecular gas surrounding a molecular cloud, which is not well traced by the emission of CO and its isotopologues.

  19. OH 18 cm Transition as a Thermometer for Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebisawa, Yuji; Inokuma, Hiroshi; Sakai, Nami; Menten, Karl M.; Maezawa, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Satoshi

    2015-12-01

    We have observed the four hyperfine components of the 18 cm OH transition toward the translucent cloud eastward of Heiles Cloud 2 (HCL2E), the cold dark cloud L134N, and the photodissociation region of the ρ-Ophiuchi molecular cloud with the Effelsberg 100 m telescope. We have found intensity anomalies among the hyperfine components in all three regions. In particular, an absorption feature of the 1612 MHz satellite line against the cosmic microwave background has been detected toward HCL2E and two positions of the ρ-Ophiuchi molecular cloud. On the basis of statistical equilibrium calculations, we find that the hyperfine anomalies originate from the non-LTE population of the hyperfine levels, and can be used to determine the kinetic temperature of the gas over a wide range of H2 densities (102-107 cm-3). Toward the center of HCL2E, the gas kinetic temperature is determined to be 53 ± 1 K, and it increases toward the cloud peripheries (˜60 K). The ortho-to-para ratio of H2 is determined to be 3.5 ± 0.9 from the averaged spectrum for the eight positions. In L134N, a similar increase of the temperature is also seen toward the periphery. In the ρ-Ophiuchi molecular cloud, the gas kinetic temperature decreases as a function of the distance from the exciting star HD 147889. These results demonstrate a new aspect of the OH 18 cm line that can be used as a good thermometer of molecular cloud envelopes. The OH 18 cm line can be used to trace a new class of warm molecular gas surrounding a molecular cloud, which is not well traced by the emission of CO and its isotopologues.

  20. My NASA Data Clouds

    NASA Video Gallery

    This lesson has two activities that help students develop a basic understanding of the relationship between cloud type and the form of precipitation and the relationship between the amount of water...

  1. Methanol in dark clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friberg, P.; Hjalmarson, A.; Madden, S. C.; Irvine, W. M.

    1988-01-01

    The first observation of methanol in cold dark clouds TMC 1, L 134 N, and B 335 is reported. In all three clouds, the relative abundance of methanol was found to be in the range of 10 to the -9th (i.e., almost an order of magnitude more abundant than acetaldehyde), with no observable variation between the clouds. Methanol emission showed a complex velocity structure; in TMC 1, clear indications of non-LTE were observed. Dimethyl ether was searched for in L 134 N; the upper limit of the column density of dimethyl ether in L 134 N was estimated to be 4 x 10 to the 12th/sq cm, assuming 5 K rotation temperature and LTE. This limit makes the abundance ratio (CH3)2O/CH3OH not higher than 1/5, indicating that dimethyl ether is not overabundant in this dark cloud.

  2. Noctilucent Clouds in Motion

    NASA Video Gallery

    Swedish photographer Peter Rosén took this close-up, time-lapse movieof Noctilucent Clouds (NLCs) over Stockholm, Sweden on the evening ofJuly 16, 2012. "What looked like a serene view from a di...

  3. GEOS-5 Modeled Clouds

    NASA Video Gallery

    This visualization shows clouds from a simulation using the Goddard Earth Observing System Model, Verison 5 (GEOS-5). The global atmospheric simulation covers a period from Feb 3, 2010 through Feb ...

  4. Cloud Types and Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Hai; Ibrahim, Shadi; Bell, Tim; Gao, Wei; Huang, Dachuan; Wu, Song

    The increasing popularity of Internet services such as the Amazon Web Services, Google App Engine and Microsoft Azure have drawn a lot of attention to the Cloud Computing paradigm. Although the term "Cloud Computing" is new, the technology is an extension of the remarkable achievements of grid, virtualization, Web 2.0 and Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) technologies, and the convergence of these technologies. Moreover, interest in Cloud Computing has been motivated by many factors such as the prevalence of multi-core processors and the low cost of system hardware, as well as the increasing cost of the energy needed to operate them. As a result, Cloud Computing, in just three years, has risen to the top of the IT revolutionary technologies, and has been announced as the top technology to watch in the year 2010.

  5. Closed Large Cell Clouds

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    article title:  Closed Large Cell Clouds in the South Pacific     ... unperturbed by cyclonic or frontal activity. When the cell centers are cloudy and the main sinking motion is concentrated at cell ...

  6. Electromagnetic scattering in clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solakiewicz, Richard

    1992-01-01

    Techniques used to explain the nature of the optical effects of clouds on the light produced by lightning include a Monte Carlo simulation, an equivalent medium approach, and methods based on Boltzmann transport theory. A cuboidal cloud has been considered using transform methods and a diffusion approximation. Many simplifying assumptions have been used by authors to make this problem tractable. In this report, the cloud will have a spherical shape and its interior will consist of a uniform distribution of identical spherical water droplets. The source will be modeled as a Hertz dipole, electric or magnetic, inside or outside the cloud. An impulsive source is used. Superposition may be employed to obtain a sinusoid within an envelope which describes a lightning event. The problem is investigated by transforming to the frequency domain, obtaining Green's functions, and then using the Cagniard-DeHoop method to symbolically recover the time domain solution.

  7. Reconfigurable Martian Data Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheldon, D. J.; Moeller, R. C.; Pingree, P.; Lay, N.; Reeves, G.

    2012-06-01

    The objective is to develop a constellation of small satellites in orbit around Mars that would provide a highly scalable and dynamically allocatable high performance computing resource. Key is use of Field Programmable Gate Arrays for the cloud.

  8. Marine Cloud Brightening

    SciTech Connect

    Latham, John; Bower, Keith; Choularton, Tom; Coe, H.; Connolly, P.; Cooper, Gary; Craft, Tim; Foster, Jack; Gadian, Alan; Galbraith, Lee; Iacovides, Hector; Johnston, David; Launder, Brian; Leslie, Brian; Meyer, John; Neukermans, Armand; Ormond, Bob; Parkes, Ben; Rasch, Philip J.; Rush, John; Salter, Stephen; Stevenson, Tom; Wang, Hailong; Wang, Qin; Wood, Robert

    2012-09-07

    The idea behind the marine cloud-brightening (MCB) geoengineering technique is that seeding marine stratocumulus clouds with copious quantities of roughly monodisperse sub-micrometre sea water particles might significantly enhance the cloud droplet number concentration, and thereby the cloud albedo and possibly longevity. This would produce a cooling, which general circulation model (GCM) computations suggest could - subject to satisfactory resolution of technical and scientific problems identified herein - have the capacity to balance global warming up to the carbon dioxide-doubling point. We describe herein an account of our recent research on a number of critical issues associated with MCB. This involves (i) GCM studies, which are our primary tools for evaluating globally the effectiveness of MCB, and assessing its climate impacts on rainfall amounts and distribution, and also polar sea-ice cover and thickness; (ii) high-resolution modelling of the effects of seeding on marine stratocumulus, which are required to understand the complex array of interacting processes involved in cloud brightening; (iii) microphysical modelling sensitivity studies, examining the influence of seeding amount, seedparticle salt-mass, air-mass characteristics, updraught speed and other parameters on cloud-albedo change; (iv) sea water spray-production techniques; (v) computational fluid dynamics studies of possible large-scale periodicities in Flettner rotors; and (vi) the planning of a three-stage limited-area field research experiment, with the primary objectives of technology testing and determining to what extent, if any, cloud albedo might be enhanced by seeding marine stratocumulus clouds on a spatial scale of around 100 km. We stress that there would be no justification for deployment of MCB unless it was clearly established that no significant adverse consequences would result. There would also need to be an international agreement firmly in favour of such action.

  9. Marine cloud brightening.

    PubMed

    Latham, John; Bower, Keith; Choularton, Tom; Coe, Hugh; Connolly, Paul; Cooper, Gary; Craft, Tim; Foster, Jack; Gadian, Alan; Galbraith, Lee; Iacovides, Hector; Johnston, David; Launder, Brian; Leslie, Brian; Meyer, John; Neukermans, Armand; Ormond, Bob; Parkes, Ben; Rasch, Phillip; Rush, John; Salter, Stephen; Stevenson, Tom; Wang, Hailong; Wang, Qin; Wood, Rob

    2012-09-13

    The idea behind the marine cloud-brightening (MCB) geoengineering technique is that seeding marine stratocumulus clouds with copious quantities of roughly monodisperse sub-micrometre sea water particles might significantly enhance the cloud droplet number concentration, and thereby the cloud albedo and possibly longevity. This would produce a cooling, which general circulation model (GCM) computations suggest could-subject to satisfactory resolution of technical and scientific problems identified herein-have the capacity to balance global warming up to the carbon dioxide-doubling point. We describe herein an account of our recent research on a number of critical issues associated with MCB. This involves (i) GCM studies, which are our primary tools for evaluating globally the effectiveness of MCB, and assessing its climate impacts on rainfall amounts and distribution, and also polar sea-ice cover and thickness; (ii) high-resolution modelling of the effects of seeding on marine stratocumulus, which are required to understand the complex array of interacting processes involved in cloud brightening; (iii) microphysical modelling sensitivity studies, examining the influence of seeding amount, seed-particle salt-mass, air-mass characteristics, updraught speed and other parameters on cloud-albedo change; (iv) sea water spray-production techniques; (v) computational fluid dynamics studies of possible large-scale periodicities in Flettner rotors; and (vi) the planning of a three-stage limited-area field research experiment, with the primary objectives of technology testing and determining to what extent, if any, cloud albedo might be enhanced by seeding marine stratocumulus clouds on a spatial scale of around 100×100 km. We stress that there would be no justification for deployment of MCB unless it was clearly established that no significant adverse consequences would result. There would also need to be an international agreement firmly in favour of such action.

  10. Cloud Inhomogeneity from MODIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oreopoulos, Lazaros; Cahalan, Robert F.

    2004-01-01

    Two full months (July 2003 and January 2004) of MODIS Atmosphere Level-3 data from the Terra and Aqua satellites are analyzed in order to characterize the horizontal variability of cloud optical thickness and water path at global scales. Various options to derive cloud variability parameters are discussed. The climatology of cloud inhomogeneity is built by first calculating daily parameter values at spatial scales of l degree x 1 degree, and then at zonal and global scales, followed by averaging over monthly time scales. Geographical, diurnal, and seasonal changes of inhomogeneity parameters are examined separately for the two cloud phases, and separately over land and ocean. We find that cloud inhomogeneity is weaker in summer than in winter, weaker over land than ocean for liquid clouds, weaker for local morning than local afternoon, about the same for liquid and ice clouds on a global scale, but with wider probability distribution functions (PDFs) and larger latitudinal variations for ice, and relatively insensitive to whether water path or optical thickness products are used. Typical mean values at hemispheric and global scales of the inhomogeneity parameter nu (roughly the mean over the standard deviation of water path or optical thickness), range from approximately 2.5 to 3, while for the inhomogeneity parameter chi (the ratio of the logarithmic to linear mean) from approximately 0.7 to 0.8. Values of chi for zonal averages can occasionally fall below 0.6 and for individual gridpoints below 0.5. Our results demonstrate that MODIS is capable of revealing significant fluctuations in cloud horizontal inhomogenity and stress the need to model their global radiative effect in future studies.

  11. Prostate tissue ablation with MRI guided transurethral therapeutic ultrasound and intraoperative assessment of the integrity of the neurovascular bundle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sammet, Steffen; Partanen, Ari; Yousuf, Ambereen; Wardrip, Craig; Niekrasz, Marek; Antic, Tatjana; Razmaria, Aria; Sokka, Sham; Karczmar, Gregory; Oto, Aytekin

    2017-03-01

    OBJECTIVES: Evaluation of the precision of prostate tissue ablation with MRI guided therapeuticultrasound by intraoperative objective assessment of the neurovascular bundle in canines in-vivo. METHODS: In this ongoing IACUC approved study, eight male canines were scanned in a clinical 3T Achieva MRI scanner (Philips) before, during, and after ultrasound therapy with a prototype MR-guided ultrasound therapy system (Philips). The system includes a therapy console to plan treatment, to calculate real-time temperature maps, and to control ultrasound exposures with temperature feedback. Atransurethral ultrasound applicator with eight transducer elements was used to ablate canine prostate tissue in-vivo. Ablated prostate tissue volumes were compared to the prescribed target volumes to evaluate technical effectiveness. The ablated volumes determined by MRI (T1, T2, diffusion, dynamic contrast enhanced and 240 CEM43 thermal dose maps) were compared to H&E stained histological slides afterprostatectomy. Potential nerve damage of the neurovascular bundle was objectively assessed intraoperativelyduring prostatectomy with a CaverMap Surgical Aid nerve stimulator (Blue Torch Medical Technologies). RESULTS: Transurethral MRI -guided ultrasound therapy can effectively ablate canine prostate tissue invivo. Coronal MR-imaging confirmed the correct placement of the HIFU transducer. MRI temperature maps were acquired during HIFU treatment, and subsequently used for calculating thermal dose. Prescribed target volumes corresponded to the 240 CEM43 thermal dose maps during HIFU treatment in all canines. Ablated volumes on high resolution anatomical, diffusion weighted, and contrast enhanced MR images matched corresponding histological slides after prostatectomy. MRI guidance with realtime temperature monitoring showed no damage to surrounding tissues, especially to the neurovascular bundle (assessed intra-operatively with a nerve stimulator) or to the rectum wall. CONCLUSIONS: Our study

  12. FIRE Arctic Clouds Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curry, J. A.; Hobbs, P. V.; King, M. D.; Randall, D. A.; Minnis, P.; Issac, G. A.; Pinto, J. O.; Uttal, T.; Bucholtz, A.; Cripe, D. G.; Gerber, H.; Fairall, C. W.; Garrett, T. J.; Hudson, J.; Intrieri, J. M.; Jakob, C.; Jensen, T.; Lawson, P.; Marcotte, D.; Nguyen, L.

    1998-01-01

    An overview is given of the First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE) Arctic Clouds Experiment that was conducted in the Arctic during April through July, 1998. The principal goal of the field experiment was to gather the data needed to examine the impact of arctic clouds on the radiation exchange between the surface, atmosphere, and space, and to study how the surface influences the evolution of boundary layer clouds. The observations will be used to evaluate and improve climate model parameterizations of cloud and radiation processes, satellite remote sensing of cloud and surface characteristics, and understanding of cloud-radiation feedbacks in the Arctic. The experiment utilized four research aircraft that flew over surface-based observational sites in the Arctic Ocean and Barrow, Alaska. In this paper we describe the programmatic and science objectives of the project, the experimental design (including research platforms and instrumentation), conditions that were encountered during the field experiment, and some highlights of preliminary observations, modelling, and satellite remote sensing studies.

  13. Absorption in Extended Inhomogeneous Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joiner, Joanna; Vasilkov, Alexander; Spurr, Robert; Bhartia, P. K.; Krotkov, Nick

    2008-01-01

    The launch of several different sensors, including CloudSat, into the A-train constellation of satellites allows us for the first time to compute absorption that can occur in realistic vertically inhomogeneous clouds including multiple cloud decks. CloudSat data show that these situations are common. Therefore, understanding vertically inhomogeneous clouds is important from both climate and satellite atmospheric composition remote sensing perspectives. Satellite passive sensors that operate from the near IR to the UV often rely on radiative cloud pressures derived from absorption in oxygen bands (A, B, gamma, or O2-O2 bands) or from rotational-Raman scattering in order to retrieve information about atmospheric trace gases. The radiative cloud pressure is distinct from the physical cloud top derived from thermal infrared measurements. Therefore, the combination of information from different passive sensors yields some information about the cloud vertical profile. When either or both the clouds or atmospheric absorbers (trace gases and aerosols) are vertically inhomogeneous, the use of an effective cloud pressure derived from these approaches may lead to errors. Here, we focus on several scenarios (deep convective clouds and distinct two layer clouds) based on realistic cloud optical depth vertical profiles derived from the CloudSatfMODIS combination. We focus on implications for trace-gas column amount retrievals (specifically ozone and NO2) and derived surface UV irradiance from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on the Atrain Aura platform.

  14. Analysis of excimer laser radiant exposure effect toward corneal ablation volume at LASIK procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adiati, Rima Fitria; Rini Rizki, Artha Bona; Kusumawardhani, Apriani; Setijono, Heru; Rahmadiansah, Andi

    2016-11-01

    LASIK (Laser Asissted In Situ Interlamelar Keratomilieusis) is a technique for correcting refractive disorders of the eye such as myopia and astigmatism using an excimer laser. This procedure use photoablation technique to decompose corneal tissues. Although preferred due to its efficiency, permanency, and accuracy, the inappropriate amount radiant exposure often cause side effects like under-over correction, irregular astigmatism and problems on surrounding tissues. In this study, the radiant exposure effect toward corneal ablation volume has been modelled through several processes. Data collecting results is laser data specifications with 193 nm wavelength, beam diameter of 0.065 - 0.65 cm, and fluence of 160 mJ/cm2. For the medical data, the myopia-astigmatism value, cornea size, corneal ablation thickness, and flap data are taken. The first modelling step is determining the laser diameter between 0.065 - 0.65 cm with 0.45 cm increment. The energy, power, and intensity of laser determined from laser beam area. Number of pulse and total energy is calculated before the radiant exposure of laser is obtained. Next is to determine the parameters influence the ablation volume. Regression method used to create the equation, and then the spot size is substituted to the model. The validation used is statistic correlation method to both experimental data and theory. By the model created, it is expected that any potential complications can be prevented during LASIK procedures. The recommendations can give the users clearer picture to determine the appropriate amount of radiant exposure with the corneal ablation volume necessary.

  15. In Vivo Evaluations of a Phased Ultrasound Array for Transesophageal Cardiac Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, Devina; Werner, Jacob; Park, Eun-Joo; Francischelli, David; Smith, Nadine Barrie

    2010-03-01

    Atrial fibrillation is one of the most common arrhythmias that affects over 2.2 million Americans each year. Catheter ablation, one of the effective treatments, has shown high rate of success in treating paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. Currently, radiofrequency which is being used for catheter ablation is an invasive procedure. Measurable morbidity and significant costs and time are associated with this modality of treatment of permanent or persistent atrial fibrillation. In order to address these issues, a transesophageal ultrasound applicator for noninvasive cardiac ablation was designed, developed and evaluated. The ultrasound energy delivered by the phased array was used to create a lesion in the myocardial tissue. Various factors, simulation results of transducer arrays, current transesophageal medical devices, and throat anatomy, were considered while designing a phased ultrasound transducer that can be inserted into the esophagus. For this research, a two-dimensional sparse phased array with flat tapered elements was fabricated and evaluated in in vivo experiments. Five pigs were anesthetized; the array was passed transesophagealy and positioned over the heart. An operating frequency of 1.6 MHz and 8˜15 minutes of array operation resulted in both single and multiple lesions on atrial and ventricular myocardium. The average size of lesions was 5.1±2.1 mm in diameter and 7.8±2.5 mm in length. Experimental results indicate that the array delivered sufficient power to produce ablation at the focal point while not grossly damaging the tissue surrounding the area of interest. These results demonstrate a potential application of the ultrasound applicator for noninvasive transesophageal cardiac surgery in atrial fibrillation treatment.

  16. Speed of sound estimation with active PZT element for thermal monitoring during ablation therapy: feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Younsu; Guo, Xiaoyu; Cheng, Alexis; Boctor, Emad M.

    2016-04-01

    Controlling the thermal dose during ablation therapy is instrumental to successfully removing the tumor while preserving the surrounding healthy tissue. In the practical scenario, surgeons must be able to determine the ablation completeness in the tumor region. Various methods have been proposed to monitor it, one of which uses ultrasound since it is a common intraoperative imaging modality due to its non-invasive, cost-effective, and convenient natures. In our approach, we propose to use time of flight (ToF) information to estimate speed of sound changes. Accurate speed of sound estimation is crucial because it is directly correlated with temperature change and subsequent determination of ablation completeness. We divide the region of interest in a circular fashion with a variable radius from the ablator tip. We introduce the concept of effective speed of sound in each of the sub-regions. Our active PZT element control system facilitates this unique approach by allowing us to acquire one-way ToF information between the PZT element and each of the ultrasound elements. We performed a simulation and an experiment to verify feasibility of this method. The simulation result showed that we could compute the effective speed of sound within 0.02m/s error in our discrete model. We also perform a sensitivity analysis for this model. Most of the experimental results had less than 1% error. Simulation using a Gaussian continuous model with multiple PZT elements is also demonstrated. We simulate the effect of the element location one the optimization result.

  17. FORMATION OF MASSIVE MOLECULAR CLOUD CORES BY CLOUD-CLOUD COLLISION

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Fukui, Yasuo

    2013-09-10

    Recent observations of molecular clouds around rich massive star clusters including NGC 3603, Westerlund 2, and M20 revealed that the formation of massive stars could be triggered by a cloud-cloud collision. By using three-dimensional, isothermal, magnetohydrodynamics simulations with the effect of self-gravity, we demonstrate that massive, gravitationally unstable, molecular cloud cores are formed behind the strong shock waves induced by cloud-cloud collision. We find that the massive molecular cloud cores have large effective Jeans mass owing to the enhancement of the magnetic field strength by shock compression and turbulence in the compressed layer. Our results predict that massive molecular cloud cores formed by the cloud-cloud collision are filamentary and threaded by magnetic fields perpendicular to the filament.

  18. First observations of tracking clouds using scanning ARM cloud radars

    SciTech Connect

    Borque, Paloma; Giangrande, Scott; Kollias, Pavlos

    2014-12-01

    Tracking clouds using scanning cloud radars can help to document the temporal evolution of cloud properties well before large drop formation (‘‘first echo’’). These measurements complement cloud and precipitation tracking using geostationary satellites and weather radars. Here, two-dimensional (2-D) Along-Wind Range Height Indicator (AW-RHI) observations of a population of shallow cumuli (with and without precipitation) from the 35-GHz scanning ARM cloud radar (SACR) at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program Southern Great Plains (SGP) site are presented. Observations from the ARM SGP network of scanning precipitation radars are used to provide the larger scale context of the cloud field and to highlight the advantages of the SACR to detect the numerous, small, non-precipitating cloud elements. A new Cloud Identification and Tracking Algorithm (CITA) is developed to track cloud elements. In CITA, a cloud element is identified as a region having a contiguous set of pixels exceeding a preset reflectivity and size threshold. The high temporal resolution of the SACR 2-D observations (30 sec) allows for an area superposition criteria algorithm to match cloud elements at consecutive times. Following CITA, the temporal evolution of cloud element properties (number, size, and maximum reflectivity) is presented. The vast majority of the designated elements during this cumulus event were short-lived non-precipitating clouds having an apparent life cycle shorter than 15 minutes. The advantages and disadvantages of cloud tracking using an SACR are discussed.

  19. SUPERGIANT SHELLS AND MOLECULAR CLOUD FORMATION IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, J. R.; Dickey, John M.; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.; Wong, T.; Hughes, A.; Fukui, Y.; Kawamura, A.

    2013-01-20

    We investigate the influence of large-scale stellar feedback on the formation of molecular clouds in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Examining the relationship between H I and {sup 12}CO(J = 1-0) in supergiant shells (SGSs), we find that the molecular fraction in the total volume occupied by SGSs is not enhanced with respect to the rest of the LMC disk. However, the majority of objects ({approx}70% by mass) are more molecular than their local surroundings, implying that the presence of a supergiant shell does on average have a positive effect on the molecular gas fraction. Averaged over the full SGS sample, our results suggest that {approx}12%-25% of the molecular mass in supergiant shell systems was formed as a direct result of the stellar feedback that created the shells. This corresponds to {approx}4%-11% of the total molecular mass of the galaxy. These figures are an approximate lower limit to the total contribution of stellar feedback to molecular cloud formation in the LMC, and constitute one of the first quantitative measurements of feedback-triggered molecular cloud formation in a galactic system.

  20. ISO-[CII]-Investigation of Cool HI Clouds in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marx-Zimmer, M.; Zimmer, F.; Herbstmeier, U.; Dickey, J. M.

    Despite a strong UV radiation field the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) shows a relatively large abundance of cool HI gas (Dickey et al. 1994, Marx-Zimmer et al. 1998 in prep.). Neither CO- nor [CII]-emission lines have been detected in most of these regions in previous surveys (Marx-Zimmer et al. 1998 in prep., Mochizuki et al. 1994). The energy balance of these cool clouds, some of which are located in warm surroundings, is still an open question. The improved resolution and sensitivity of the ISO telescope compared to previous measurements offers the unique opportunity to study the heating and cooling of these clouds in the LMC. Here we present first results of an investigation of the dominant cooling line, [CII] (158 microns), toward cool HI clouds. The ISO-[CII]-observations reveal emission of ionized carbon toward 6 out of the 13 lines of sight showing cool atomic hydrogen. No CO emission has been detected in direction of the [CII] emitting gas. The high fraction of cool HI gas in the LMC compared to the Milky Way and the non-detection of the dominant cooling lines CO and [CII] in most directions of the cool HI suggest that the low temperature of the atomic phase is not the result of a high cooling rate, but a consequence of a low heating rate of the gas.

  1. Changes in the dielectric properties of ex vivo bovine liver during microwave thermal ablation at 2.45 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopresto, Vanni; Pinto, Rosanna; Lovisolo, Giorgio A.; Cavagnaro, Marta

    2012-04-01

    In microwave thermal ablation (MTA) therapy, the dielectric properties of the target tissue play an important role in determining the radiation properties of the microwave ablation antenna. In this work, the ex vivo dielectric properties of bovine liver were experimentally characterized as a function of the temperature during MTA at the frequency of 2.45 GHz. The obtained data were compared with measurements performed at the end of the MTA treatment, and considering the heating achieved with a temperature-controlled water bath. Finally, measured data were used to perform a numerical study evaluating the effects of changes in tissue's dielectric properties during the MTA treatment on the radiation properties of a microwave interstitial ablation antenna, as well as on the obtained thermal lesion. Results evidenced a significant decrease of both relative permittivity (about 38%) and electric conductivity (about 33%) in the tissue during treatment as the temperature increased to over 60 °C, with a dramatic drop when the temperature approached 100 °C. Moreover, the numerical study evidenced that changes in tissue's dielectric properties during the MTA treatment affect the distribution of the power absorbed by the tissue (specific absorption rate—SAR, W kg-1) surrounding the microwave interstitial ablation antenna, leading to a peak SAR up to 20% lower, as well as to a thermal lesion up to 8% longer. This work may represent a preliminary step towards the future development of a procedure for MTA treatment planning.

  2. Radiative ablation of disks around massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kee, Nathaniel Dylan

    Hot, massive stars (spectral types O and B) have extreme luminosities (10. 4 -10. 6 L?) that drive strong stellar winds through UV line-scattering.Some massive stars also have disks, formed by either decretion from the star (as in the rapidly rotating "Classical Be stars"), or accretion during the star's formation. This dissertation examines the role of stellar radiation in driving (ablating) material away from these circumstellar disks. A key result is that the observed month to year decay of Classical Be disks can be explained by line-driven ablation without, as previously done, appealing to anomalously strong viscous diffusion. Moreover, the higher luminosity of O stars leads to ablation of optically thin disks on dynamical timescales of order a day, providing a natural explanation for the lack of observed Oe stars. In addition to the destruction of Be disks, this dissertation also introduces a model for their formation by coupling observationally inferred non-radial pulsation modes and rapid stellar rotation to launch material into orbiting Keplerian disks of Be-like densities. In contrast to such Be decretion disks, star-forming accretion disks are much denser and so are generally optically thick to continuum processes. To circumvent the computational challenges associated with radiation hydrodynamics through optically thick media, we develop an approximate method for treating continuum absorption in the limit of geometrically thin disks. The comparison of ablation with and without continuum absorption shows that accounting for disk optical thickness leads to less than a 50% reduction in ablation rate, implying that ablation rate depends mainly on stellar properties like luminosity. Finally, we discuss the role of "thin-shell mixing" in reducing X-rays from colliding wind binaries. Laminar, adiabatic shocks produce well understood X-ray emission, but the emission from radiatively cooled shocks is more complex due to thin-shell instabilities. The parameter

  3. Temperature profiles of 980- and 1,470-nm endovenous laser ablation, endovenous radiofrequency ablation and endovenous steam ablation.

    PubMed

    Malskat, W S J; Stokbroekx, M A L; van der Geld, C W M; Nijsten, T E C; van den Bos, R R

    2014-03-01

    Endovenous thermal ablation (EVTA) techniques are very effective for the treatment of varicose veins, but their exact working mechanism is still not well documented. The lack of knowledge of mechanistic properties has led to a variety of EVTA protocols and a commercially driven dissemination of new or modified techniques without robust scientific evidence. The aim of this study is to compare temperature profiles of 980-and 1,470-nm endovenous laser ablation (EVLA), segmental radiofrequency ablation (RFA), and endovenous steam ablation (EVSA). In an experimental setting, temperature measurements were performed using thermocouples; raw potato was used to mimic a vein wall. Two laser wavelengths (980 and 1,470 nm) were used with tulip-tip fibers and 1,470 nm also with a radial-emitting fiber. Different powers and pullback speeds were used to achieve fluences of 30, 60, and 90 J/cm. For segmental RFA, 1 cycle of 20 s was analyzed. EVSA was performed with two and three pulses of steam per centimeter. Maximum temperature increase, time span of relevant temperature increase, and area under the curve of the time of relevant temperature increase were measured. In all EVLA settings, temperatures increased and decreased rapidly. High fluence is associated with significantly higher temperatures and increased time span of temperature rise. Temperature profiles of 980- and 1,470-nm EVLA with tulip-tip fibers did not differ significantly. Radial EVLA showed significantly higher maximum temperatures than tulip-tip EVLA. EVSA resulted in mild peak temperatures for longer durations than EVLA. Maximum temperatures with three pulses per centimeter were significantly higher than with two pulses. RFA temperature rises were relatively mild, resulting in a plateau-shaped temperature profile, similar to EVSA. Temperature increase during EVLA is fast with a high-peak temperature for a short time, where EVSA and RFA have longer plateau phases and lower maximum temperatures.

  4. Connecting diverse molecular cloud environments with nascent protostars in Orion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutz, Amelia M.; Megeath, S.; Fischer, W. J.; Ali, B.; Furlan, E.; Tobin, J. J.; Stanke, T.; Henning, T.; Krause, O.; Manoj, P.; Osorio, M.; Robitaille, T.; HOPS Team

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how the gas environment within molecular clouds influences the properties of protostars is a key step towards understanding the physical factors that control star formation. We report on an analysis of the connection between molecular cloud environment and protostellar properties using the Herschel Orion Protostar Survey (HOPS), a large multi-observatory survey of protostars in the Orion molecular clouds. HOPS has produced well sampled 1 um to 870 um SEDs of over 300 protostars in the Orion molecular clouds using images and spectra from 2MASS, Spitzer, Herschel and APEX. Furthermore, the combination of APEX 870 um continuum observations with the HOPS/PACS 160 um data over the same area allows for a determination of the temperatures and column densities in the often filamentary dense gas surrounding the Orion protostars. Based on these data, we link the protostellar properties with their environmental properties. Utilizing the diverse environments present within the Orion molecular clouds, we show how the luminosity and spacing of protostars in Orion depends on the local gas column density. Furthermore, we report an unusual concentration of the youngest known protostars (the Herschel identified PBRS, PACS Bright Red Sources) in the Orion B cloud, and we discuss possible reasons for this concentration.

  5. CO depletion in the Gould Belt clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christie, H.; Viti, S.; Yates, J.; Hatchell, J.; Fuller, G. A.; Duarte-Cabral, A.; Sadavoy, S.; Buckle, J. V.; Graves, S.; Roberts, J.; Nutter, D.; Davis, C.; White, G. J.; Hogerheijde, M.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Butner, H.; Richer, J.; Di Francesco, J.

    2012-05-01

    We present a statistical comparison of CO depletion in a set of local molecular clouds within the Gould Belt using Sub-millimetre Common User Bolometer Array (SCUBA) and Heterodyne Array Receiver Programme (HARP) data. This is the most wide-ranging study of depletion thus far within the Gould Belt. We estimate CO column densities assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium and, for a selection of sources, using the radiative transfer code RADEX in order to compare the two column density estimation methods. High levels of depletion are seen in the centres of several dust cores in all the clouds. We find that in the gas surrounding protostars, levels of depletion are somewhat lower than for starless cores with the exception of a few highly depleted protostellar cores in Serpens and NGC 2024. There is a tentative correlation between core mass and core depletion, particularly in Taurus and Serpens. Taurus has, on average, the highest levels of depletion. Ophiuchus has low average levels of depletion which could perhaps be related to the anomalous dust grain size distribution observed in this cloud. High levels of depletion are often seen around the edges of regions of optical emission (Orion) or in more evolved or less dynamic regions such as the bowl of L1495 in Taurus and the north-western region of Serpens.

  6. Time-resolved microscopy reveals the driving mechanism of particle formation during ultrashort pulse laser ablation of dentin-like ivory.

    PubMed

    Domke, Matthias; Gavrilova, Anna; Rapp, Stephan; Frentzen, Matthias; Meister, Joerg; Huber, Heinz P

    2015-07-01

    In dental health care, the application of ultrashort laser pulses enables dental tissue ablation free from thermal side effects, such as melting and cracking. However, these laser types create undesired micro- and nanoparticles, which might cause a health risk for the patient or surgeon. The aim of this study was to investigate the driving mechanisms of micro- and nanoparticle formation during ultrashort pulse laser ablation of dental tissue. Time-resolved microscopy was chosen to observe the ablation dynamics of mammoth ivory after irradiation with 660 fs laser pulses. The results suggest that nanoparticles might arise in the excited region. The thermal expansion of the excited material induces high pressure in the surrounding bulk tissue, generating a pressure wave. The rarefaction wave behind this pressure wave causes spallation, leading to ejection of microparticles.

  7. Time-resolved microscopy reveals the driving mechanism of particle formation during ultrashort pulse laser ablation of dentin-like ivory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domke, Matthias; Gavrilova, Anna; Rapp, Stephan; Frentzen, Matthias; Meister, Joerg; Huber, Heinz P.

    2015-07-01

    In dental health care, the application of ultrashort laser pulses enables dental tissue ablation free from thermal side effects, such as melting and cracking. However, these laser types create undesired micro- and nanoparticles, which might cause a health risk for the patient or surgeon. The aim of this study was to investigate the driving mechanisms of micro- and nanoparticle formation during ultrashort pulse laser ablation of dental tissue. Time-resolved microscopy was chosen to observe the ablation dynamics of mammoth ivory after irradiation with 660 fs laser pulses. The results suggest that nanoparticles might arise in the excited region. The thermal expansion of the excited material induces high pressure in the surrounding bulk tissue, generating a pressure wave. The rarefaction wave behind this pressure wave causes spallation, leading to ejection of microparticles.

  8. Ablation of steel using picosecond laser pulses in burst mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lickschat, Peter; Demba, Alexander; Weissmantel, Steffen

    2017-02-01

    Results obtained in picosecond laser processing of steel applying the burst mode are presented. Using the burst mode, pulse trains, i.e., bursts, consisting of a number of picosecond pulses with an inter-pulse delay of 12.5 ns and 10 ps pulse duration are applied for material processing. Small cavities with sizes in the range of the laser beam diameter made by single-burst ablation are compared to quadratic cavities of 0.5 × 0.5 mm² produced by multiburst ablation and simultaneous scanning of the laser beam across the steel sample surface. The ablated volume per pulse within the burst was calculated either from the ablated volume per burst or from the ablation depth of the quadratic cavities. With the second to fourth pulses in the bursts, a reduction of the ablated volume per pulse in comparison with the first pulse in the bursts (i.e., to the use of single pulses) was found for both single- and multiburst ablation, which is assumed to be due to plasma shielding. By contrast, the ablated volume per pulse within the bursts increases for the fifth to eighth pulses. Heat accumulation effect and the influence of the heated plasma can be assumed to be the reason for these higher ablation rates. SEM micrographs also show that there is a higher melt ejection out of the laser processed area. This is indicated by the formation of bulges about the ablated area.

  9. GEWEX Cloud Systems Study (GCSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moncrieff, Mitch

    1993-01-01

    The Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) Cloud Systems Study (GCSS) program seeks to improve the physical understanding of sub-grid scale cloud processes and their representation in parameterization schemes. By improving the description and understanding of key cloud system processes, GCSS aims to develop the necessary parameterizations in climate and numerical weather prediction (NWP) models. GCSS will address these issues mainly through the development and use of cloud-resolving or cumulus ensemble models to generate realizations of a set of archetypal cloud systems. The focus of GCSS is on mesoscale cloud systems, including precipitating convectively-driven cloud systems like MCS's and boundary layer clouds, rather than individual clouds, and on their large-scale effects. Some of the key scientific issues confronting GCSS that particularly relate to research activities in the central U.S. are presented.

  10. Automated planning of ablation targets in atrial fibrillation treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keustermans, Johannes; De Buck, Stijn; Heidbüchel, Hein; Suetens, Paul

    2011-03-01

    Catheter based radio-frequency ablation is used as an invasive treatment of atrial fibrillation. This procedure is often guided by the use of 3D anatomical models obtained from CT, MRI or rotational angiography. During the intervention the operator accurately guides the catheter to prespecified target ablation lines. The planning stage, however, can be time consuming and operator dependent which is suboptimal both from a cost and health perspective. Therefore, we present a novel statistical model-based algorithm for locating ablation targets from 3D rotational angiography images. Based on a training data set of 20 patients, consisting of 3D rotational angiography images with 30 manually indicated ablation points, a statistical local appearance and shape model is built. The local appearance model is based on local image descriptors to capture the intensity patterns around each ablation point. The local shape model is constructed by embedding the ablation points in an undirected graph and imposing that each ablation point only interacts with its neighbors. Identifying the ablation points on a new 3D rotational angiography image is performed by proposing a set of possible candidate locations for each ablation point, as such, converting the problem into a labeling problem. The algorithm is validated using a leave-one-out-approach on the training data set, by computing the distance between the ablation lines obtained by the algorithm and the manually identified ablation points. The distance error is equal to 3.8+/-2.9 mm. As ablation lesion size is around 5-7 mm, automated planning of ablation targets by the presented approach is sufficiently accurate.

  11. Marine cloud brightening

    PubMed Central

    Latham, John; Bower, Keith; Choularton, Tom; Coe, Hugh; Connolly, Paul; Cooper, Gary; Craft, Tim; Foster, Jack; Gadian, Alan; Galbraith, Lee; Iacovides, Hector; Johnston, David; Launder, Brian; Leslie, Brian; Meyer, John; Neukermans, Armand; Ormond, Bob; Parkes, Ben; Rasch, Phillip; Rush, John; Salter, Stephen; Stevenson, Tom; Wang, Hailong; Wang, Qin; Wood, Rob

    2012-01-01

    The idea behind the marine cloud-brightening (MCB) geoengineering technique is that seeding marine stratocumulus clouds with copious quantities of roughly monodisperse sub-micrometre sea water particles might significantly enhance the cloud droplet number concentration, and thereby the cloud albedo and possibly longevity. This would produce a cooling, which general circulation model (GCM) computations suggest could—subject to satisfactory resolution of technical and scientific problems identified herein—have the capacity to balance global warming up to the carbon dioxide-doubling point. We describe herein an account of our recent research on a number of critical issues associated with MCB. This involves (i) GCM studies, which are our primary tools for evaluating globally the effectiveness of MCB, and assessing its climate impacts on rainfall amounts and distribution, and also polar sea-ice cover and thickness; (ii) high-resolution modelling of the effects of seeding on marine stratocumulus, which are required to understand the complex array of interacting processes involved in cloud brightening; (iii) microphysical modelling sensitivity studies, examining the influence of seeding amount, seed-particle salt-mass, air-mass characteristics, updraught speed and other parameters on cloud–albedo change; (iv) sea water spray-production techniques; (v) computational fluid dynamics studies of possible large-scale periodicities in Flettner rotors; and (vi) the planning of a three-stage limited-area field research experiment, with the primary objectives of technology testing and determining to what extent, if any, cloud albedo might be enhanced by seeding marine stratocumulus clouds on a spatial scale of around 100×100 km. We stress that there would be no justification for deployment of MCB unless it was clearly established that no significant adverse consequences would result. There would also need to be an international agreement firmly in favour of such action

  12. Stratocumulus cloud evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, X.; Rogers, D.P.; Norris, P.M.; Johnson, D.W.; Martin, G.M.

    1994-12-31

    The structure and evolution of the extra-tropical marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL) depends largely on the variability of stratus and stratocumulus clouds. The typical boundary-layer is capped by a temperature inversion that limits exchange with the free atmosphere. Cloud-top is usually coincident with the base of the inversion. Stratus clouds are generally associated with a well-mixed MABL, whereas daytime observations of stratocumulus-topped boundary-layers indicate that the cloud and subcloud layers are often decoupled due to shortwave radiative heating of the cloud layer. In this case the surface-based mixed layer is separated from the base of the stratocumulus (Sc) by a layer that is stable to dry turbulent mixing. This is sometimes referred to as the transition layer. Often cumulus clouds (Cu) develop in the transition layer. The cumulus tops may remain below the Sc base or they may penetrate into the Sc layer and occasionally through the capping temperature inversion. While this cloud structure is characteristic of the daytime MABL, it may persist at night also. The Cu play an important role in connecting the mixed layer to the Sc layer. If the Cu are active they transport water vapor from the sea surface that maintains the Sc against the dissipating effects of shortwave heating. The Cu, however, are very sensitive to small changes in the heat and moisture in the boundary-layer and are transient features. Here the authors discuss the effect of these small Cu on the turbulent structure of the MABL.

  13. Printable Nanophotonic Devices via Holographic Laser Ablation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qiancheng; Yetisen, Ali K; Sabouri, Aydin; Yun, Seok Hyun; Butt, Haider

    2015-09-22

    Holography plays a significant role in applications such as data storage, light trapping, security, and biosensors. However, conventional fabrication methods remain time-consuming, costly, and complex, limiting the fabrication of holograms and their extensive use. Here, we demonstrate a single-pulse laser ablation technique to write parallel surface gratings and Fresnel zone plates. We utilized a 6 ns high-energy green laser pulse to form interference patterns to record a surface grating with 820 nm periodicity and asymmetric zone plate holograms on 4.5 nm gold-coated substrates. The holographic recording process was completed within seconds. The optical characteristics of the interference patterns have been computationally modeled, and well-ordered polychromatic diffraction was observed from the fabricated holograms. The zone plate showed a significant diffraction angle of 32° from the normal incident for the focal point. The nanosecond laser interference ablation for rapid hologram fabrication holds great potential in a vast range of optical devices.

  14. Radiofrequency thermal ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Allgaier, H P; Galandi, D; Zuber, I; Blum, H E

    2001-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the major malignancies worldwide. Due to advanced or decompensated liver cirrhosis, comorbidity and multicentricity of the tumor lesions, 70-80% of HCC patients are inoperable at the time of diagnosis. Radiofrequency thermal ablation (RFTA) is a new minimally invasive and sage technique for the nonsurgical treatment of HCCs. Similar to other ablation techniques, the treatment strategy depends on several factors, including the patient's clinical status, the stage of liver cirrhosis and of the HCC. RFTA can be performed percutaneously, laparoscopically or after laparotomy. Advanced RFTA equipment, refined techniques of modifying tumor tissue response to RFTA, and combined treatment strategies should lead to better response rates even in larger HCCs.

  15. 3D Multifunctional Ablative Thermal Protection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, Jay; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Wilkinson, Curt; Mercer, Ken

    2015-01-01

    NASA is developing the Orion spacecraft to carry astronauts farther into the solar system than ever before, with human exploration of Mars as its ultimate goal. One of the technologies required to enable this advanced, Apollo-shaped capsule is a 3-dimensional quartz fiber composite for the vehicle's compression pad. During its mission, the compression pad serves first as a structural component and later as an ablative heat shield, partially consumed on Earth re-entry. This presentation will summarize the development of a new 3D quartz cyanate ester composite material, 3-Dimensional Multifunctional Ablative Thermal Protection System (3D-MAT), designed to meet the mission requirements for the Orion compression pad. Manufacturing development, aerothermal (arc-jet) testing, structural performance, and the overall status of material development for the 2018 EM-1 flight test will be discussed.

  16. Wire ablation scaling in Z pinches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Edmund; Sinars, Daniel; Mehlhorn, Tom; Oliver, Bryan

    2004-11-01

    We investigate the physical processes involved in wire ablation in Z pinches, using a combination of simple 1D steady-state analytic theory (similar in approach to that described in [1]) and simulations of the Z pinch under constant current drive conditions (using the radiation-MHD code ALEGRA-MHD). Of particular interest is the dependence of mass ablation rate on wire mass and drive current. We benchmark our scaling trends against simulations of a recently conducted series of experiments on Sandia National Laboratories' Z accelerator (Albuquerque, NM), in which only the mass of the wire array was varied. [1] V.V. Aleksandrov et al., Plasma Phys. Reports 27, 89 (2001) *Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockhead Martin Company for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  17. Nozzle designs with pitch precursor ablatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blevins, H. R.; Bedard, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    Recent developments in carbon phenolic ablatives for solid rocket motor nozzles have yielded a pitch precursor carbon fiber offering significant raw material availability and cost saving advantages as compared to conventional rayon precursor material. This paper discusses the results of an experimental program conducted to assess the thermal performance and characterize the thermal properties of pitch precursor carbon phenolic ablatives. The end result of this program is the complete thermal characterization of pitch fabric, pitch mat, hybrid pitch/rayon fabric and pitch mat molding compound. With these properties determined an analytic capability now exists for predicting the thermal performance of these materials in rocket nozzle liner applications. Further planned efforts to verify material performance and analytical prediction procedures through actual rocket motor firings are also discussed.

  18. Ablation of neoplasia by direct current.

    PubMed

    Taylor, T V; Engler, P; Pullan, B R; Holt, S

    1994-08-01

    The application of low-voltage direct electrical current (DEC) has been studied in animals and humans for the ablation of anal condylomata, oesophageal cancer and Kaposi's sarcoma. Twenty milliamps of DEC passed through multiple 6 cm x 1 cm, flat-plate longitudinal electrodes into the squamous mucosa of the oesophagus of healthy dogs for periods ranging from 10 min to 2 h resulted in denudation and necrosis of the oesophageal mucosa at the site of application of the current. In humans, the application of DEC to two patients with benign anal condyloma acuminata, three patients with inoperable obstructing oesophageal cancer and one patient with disseminated Kaposi sarcoma resulted in striking necrosis of tumour tissue that was confirmed by macroscopic and microscopic studies. These initial findings imply promising therapeutic potential for the use of DEC as a simple, effective, safe, low-cost alternative for ablation of neoplasia.

  19. Palliative Radiofrequency Ablation for Recurrent Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jindal, Gaurav; Friedman, Marc; Locklin, Julia Wood, Bradford J.

    2006-06-15

    Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive local therapy for cancer. Its efficacy is now becoming well documented in many different organs, including liver, kidney, and lung. The goal of RFA is typically complete eradication of a tumor in lieu of an invasive surgical procedure. However, RFA can also play an important role in the palliative care of cancer patients. Tumors which are surgically unresectable and incompatible for complete ablation present the opportunity for RFA to be used in a new paradigm. Cancer pain runs the gamut from minor discomfort relieved with mild pain medication to unrelenting suffering for the patient, poorly controlled by conventional means. RFA is a tool which can potentially palliate intractable cancer pain. We present here a case in which RFA provided pain relief in a patient with metastatic prostate cancer with pain uncontrolled by conventional methods.

  20. Particle analysis using laser ablation mass spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Parker, Eric P.; Rosenthal, Stephen E.; Trahan, Michael W.; Wagner, John S.

    2003-09-09

    The present invention provides a method of quickly identifying bioaerosols by class, even if the subject bioaerosol has not been previously encountered. The method begins by collecting laser ablation mass spectra from known particles. The spectra are correlated with the known particles, including the species of particle and the classification (e.g., bacteria). The spectra can then be used to train a neural network, for example using genetic algorithm-based training, to recognize each spectra and to recognize characteristics of the classifications. The spectra can also be used in a multivariate patch algorithm. Laser ablation mass specta from unknown particles can be presented as inputs to the trained neural net for identification as to classification. The description below first describes suitable intelligent algorithms and multivariate patch algorithms, then presents an example of the present invention including results.

  1. [Atrial fibrillation ablation: application of nurse methodology].

    PubMed

    Ramos-González-Serna, Amelia; Mateos-García, M Dolores

    2011-01-01

    Ablation of pulmonary veins for treatment of atrial fibrillation involves applying radiofrequency energy wave by a catheter that causes a circumferential lesion to achieve electrical isolation and voltage drop in the interior. It is mainly applied when there is resistance to treatment and recurrence of symptoms affecting the quality of life of patients. The nurse is an important part of the multidisciplinary team who care for patients who undergo this procedure. The provision of comprehensive nursing care should include nursing procedures prior to, during, and after treatment to ensure the careful and systematic quality required. The aims of this article are: to provide specialised knowledge on the procedure of atrial fibrillation ablation, to describe the preparation of the electrophysiology laboratory, analyse nursing care and develop a standardized care plan for patients on whom this procedure is performed using the NANDA (North American Nursing Association) taxonomy and NIC (Nursing Intervention Classification).

  2. Monopole antennas for microwave catheter ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Labonte, S.; Blais, A.; Legault, S.R.; Ali, H.O.; Roy, L.

    1996-10-01

    The authors study the characteristics of various monopole antennas for microwave catheter ablation of the endocardium. The investigation is done with a computer model based on the finite-element method in the frequency domain. Three monopole geometries are considered: open-tip, dielectric-tip, and metal-tip. Calculations are made for the magnetic field, the reflection coefficient and the power deposition pattern of the antennas immersed in normal saline. The theoretical results are compared with measurements performed on prototypes and good agreement is obtained. The antenna characteristics suggest that the metal-tip monopole best fulfills the requirements of catheter ablation. The computer model is then used to compare metal-tip monopoles of different dimensions and to determine design trade-offs.

  3. Pulmonary radiofrequency ablation (Part 1): current state.

    PubMed

    Plasencia Martínez, J M

    2015-01-01

    The risks involved in surgical treatment and conventional radiotherapy in patients with early lung cancer or lung metastases often make these treatments difficult to justify. However, on the other hand, it is also unacceptable to allow these lesions to evolve freely because, left untreated, these neoplasms will usually lead to the death of the patient. In recent years, alternative local therapies have been developed, such as pulmonary radiofrequency ablation, which has proven to increase survival with a minimal risk of complications. There are common recommendations for these treatments, and although the specific indications for using one technique or another have yet to be established, there are clearly defined situations that will determine the outcome of the treatment. It is important to know these situations, because appropriate patient selection is essential for therapeutic success. This article aims to describe the characteristics and constraints of pulmonary radiofrequency ablation and to outline its role in thoracic oncology in light of the current evidence.

  4. Steady State Pyrolysis and Ablation Investigation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-31

    and cracking of pyrolysable materials), black box models are used, based on wind tunnel and plasma jet experiments. In particular, interactions between...outgassing species coming from the in-depth decomposition of the organic resin (in the case of pyrolysable materials), carbon species coming from...multiplicity of physical phenomena involved and their potential non-linearities. Pyrolyse and ablation are efficient processes for aerothermal heat

  5. A Review of Laser Ablation Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phipps, Claude; Bohn, Willy; Lippert, Thomas; Sasoh, Akihiro; Schall, Wolfgang; Sinko, John

    2010-10-01

    Laser Ablation Propulsion is a broad field with a wide range of applications. We review the 30-year history of laser ablation propulsion from the transition from earlier pure photon propulsion concepts of Oberth and Sänger through Kantrowitz's original laser ablation propulsion idea to the development of air-breathing "Lightcraft" and advanced spacecraft propulsion engines. The polymers POM and GAP have played an important rôle in experiments and liquid ablation fuels show great promise. Some applications use a laser system which is distant from the propelled object, for example, on another spacecraft, the Earth or a planet. Others use a laser that is part of the spacecraft propulsion system on the spacecraft. Propulsion is produced when an intense laser beam strikes a condensed matter surface and produces a vapor or plasma jet. The advantages of this idea are that exhaust velocity of the propulsion engine covers a broader range than is available from chemistry, that it can be varied to meet the instantaneous demands of the particular mission, and that practical realizations give lower mass and greater simplicity for a payload delivery system. We review the underlying theory, buttressed by extensive experimental data. The primary problem in laser space propulsion theory has been the absence of a way to predict thrust and specific impulse over the transition from the vapor to the plasma regimes. We briefly discuss a method for combining two new vapor regime treatments with plasma regime theory, giving a smooth transition from one regime to the other. We conclude with a section on future directions.

  6. Stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betti, R.; McCrory, R. L.; Verdon, C. P.

    1993-08-01

    The linear stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts is carried out for a semi-infinite uniform medium. For a laser accelerated target, it is shown that a properly selected modulation of the laser intensity can lead to the dynamic stabilization or growth-rate reduction of a large portion of the unstable spectrum. The theory is in qualitative agreement with the numerical results obtained by using the two-dimensional hydrodynamic code ORCHID.

  7. Stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Betti, R.; McCrory, R.L.; Verdon, C.P. )

    1993-11-08

    The linear stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts is carried out for a semi-infinite uniform medium. For a laser accelerated target, it is shown that a properly selected modulation of the laser intensity can lead to the dynamic stabilization or growth-rate reduction of a large portion of the unstable spectrum. The theory is in qualitative agreement with the numerical results obtained by using the two-dimensional hydrodynamic code ORCHID.

  8. Stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betti, R.; McCrory, R. L.; Verdon, C. P.

    1993-11-01

    The linear stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts is carried out for a semi-infinite uniform medium. For a laser accelerated target, it is shown that a properly selected modulation of the laser intensity can lead to the dynamic stabilization or growth-rate reduction of a large portion of the unstable spectrum. The theory is in qualitative agreement with the numerical results obtained by using the two-dimensional hydrodynamic code orchid.

  9. Stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Betti, R.; McCrory, R.L.; Verdon, C.P.

    1993-08-01

    The linear stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts, is carried out for a semi-infinite uniform medium. For a laser accelerated target, it is shown that a properly selected modulation of the laser intensity can lead to the dynamic stabilization or growth-rate reduction of a large portion of the unstable spectrum. The theory is in qualitative agreement with the numerical results obtained by using the two-dimensional hydrodynamic code ORCHID.

  10. A Review of Laser Ablation Propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Phipps, Claude; Bohn, Willy; Lippert, Thomas; Sasoh, Akihiro; Schall, Wolfgang; Sinko, John

    2010-10-08

    Laser Ablation Propulsion is a broad field with a wide range of applications. We review the 30-year history of laser ablation propulsion from the transition from earlier pure photon propulsion concepts of Oberth and Saenger through Kantrowitz's original laser ablation propulsion idea to the development of air-breathing 'Lightcraft' and advanced spacecraft propulsion engines. The polymers POM and GAP have played an important role in experiments and liquid ablation fuels show great promise. Some applications use a laser system which is distant from the propelled object, for example, on another spacecraft, the Earth or a planet. Others use a laser that is part of the spacecraft propulsion system on the spacecraft. Propulsion is produced when an intense laser beam strikes a condensed matter surface and produces a vapor or plasma jet. The advantages of this idea are that exhaust velocity of the propulsion engine covers a broader range than is available from chemistry, that it can be varied to meet the instantaneous demands of the particular mission, and that practical realizations give lower mass and greater simplicity for a payload delivery system. We review the underlying theory, buttressed by extensive experimental data. The primary problem in laser space propulsion theory has been the absence of a way to predict thrust and specific impulse over the transition from the vapor to the plasma regimes. We briefly discuss a method for combining two new vapor regime treatments with plasma regime theory, giving a smooth transition from one regime to the other. We conclude with a section on future directions.

  11. Liver tumor ablation: percutaneous and open approaches.

    PubMed

    Padma, Srikanth; Martinie, John B; Iannitti, David A

    2009-12-15

    The global incidence of liver cancer is greater than a million cases a year. Surgical resection where applicable is still the standard of care for these patients. Various liver-directed regional therapies have been developed in an effort to treat the vast majority of unresectable liver tumors. This article reviews the principles behind various ablation therapies currently available for malignant liver tumors and their outcomes.

  12. Anatomical Ablation Strategy for Noninducible Fascicular Tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Talib, Ahmed Karim; Nogami, Akihiko

    2016-03-01

    The presence of structural heart disease does not exclude fascicular ventricular tachycardia (VT), especially if the VT is verapamil sensitive. An empirical anatomic approach is effective when fascicular VT is noninducible or if diastolic Purkinje potential (P1) cannot be recorded during VT mapping. Pace mapping at the successful ablation site is usually not effective because selective pacing of P1 is difficult and there is an antidromic activation of the proximal P1 potential.

  13. Design Calculations For NIF Convergent Ablator Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, R E; Hicks, D G; Meezan, N B; Callahan, D A; Landen, O L; Jones, O S; Langer, S H; Kline, J L; Wilson, D C; Rinderknecht, H; Zylstra, A; Petrasso, R D

    2011-10-25

    The NIF convergent ablation tuning effort is underway. In the early experiments, we have discovered that the design code simulations over-predict the capsule implosion velocity and shock flash rhor, but under-predict the hohlraum x-ray flux measurements. The apparent inconsistency between the x-ray flux and radiography data implies that there are important unexplained aspects of the hohlraum and/or capsule behavior.

  14. AKARI AND BLAST OBSERVATIONS OF THE CASSIOPEIA A SUPERNOVA REMNANT AND SURROUNDING INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Sibthorpe, B.; Ade, P. A. R.; Griffin, M.; Hargrave, P. C.; Mauskopf, P.; Bock, J. J.; Chapin, E. L.; Halpern, M.; Marsden, G.; Devlin, M. J.; Dicker, S.; Klein, J.; Gundersen, J. O.; Hughes, D. H.; Jeong, W.-S.; Kaneda, H.; Koo, B.-C.; Lee, H.-G.; Martin, P. G.; Moon, D.-S.

    2010-08-20

    We use new large area far infrared maps ranging from 65 to 500 {mu}m obtained with the AKARI and the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope missions to characterize the dust emission toward the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant (SNR). Using the AKARI high-resolution data we find a new 'tepid' dust grain population at a temperature of {approx}35 K and with an estimated mass of 0.06 M{sub sun}. This component is confined to the central area of the SNR and may represent newly formed dust in the unshocked supernova ejecta. While the mass of tepid dust that we measure is insufficient by itself to account for the dust observed at high redshift, it does constitute an additional dust population to contribute to those previously reported. We fit our maps at 65, 90, 140, 250, 350, and 500 {mu}m to obtain maps of the column density and temperature of 'cold' dust (near 16 K) distributed throughout the region. The large column density of cold dust associated with clouds seen in molecular emission extends continuously from the surrounding interstellar medium to project on the SNR, where the foreground component of the clouds is also detectable through optical, X-ray, and molecular extinction. At the resolution available here, there is no morphological signature to isolate any cold dust associated only with the SNR from this confusing interstellar emission. Our fit also recovers the previously detected 'hot' dust in the remnant, with characteristic temperature 100 K.

  15. Surround suppression and sparse coding in visual and barrel cortices

    PubMed Central

    Sachdev, Robert N. S.; Krause, Matthew R.; Mazer, James A.

    2012-01-01

    During natural vision the entire retina is stimulated. Likewise, during natural tactile behaviors, spatially extensive regions of the somatosensory surface are co-activated. The large spatial extent of naturalistic stimulation means that surround suppression, a phenomenon whose neural mechanisms remain a matter of debate, must arise during natural behavior. To identify common neural motifs that might instantiate surround suppression across modalities, we review models of surround suppression and compare the evidence supporting the competing ideas that surround suppression has either cortical or sub-cortical origins in visual and barrel cortex. In the visual system there is general agreement lateral inhibitory mechanisms contribute to surround suppression, but little direct experimental evidence that intracortical inhibition plays a major role. Two intracellular recording studies of V1, one using naturalistic stimuli (Haider et al., 2010), the other sinusoidal gratings (Ozeki et al., 2009), sought to identify the causes of reduced activity in V1 with increasing stimulus size, a hallmark of surround suppression. The former attributed this effect to increased inhibition, the latter to largely balanced withdrawal of excitation and inhibition. In rodent primary somatosensory barrel cortex, multi-whisker responses are generally weaker than single whisker responses, suggesting multi-whisker stimulation engages similar surround suppressive mechanisms. The origins of suppression in S1 remain elusive: studies have implicated brainstem lateral/internuclear interactions and both thalamic and cortical inhibition. Although the anatomical organization and instantiation of surround suppression in the visual and somatosensory systems differ, we consider the idea that one common function of surround suppression, in both modalities, is to remove the statistical redundancies associated with natural stimuli by increasing the sparseness or selectivity of sensory responses. PMID:22783169

  16. Orientation-tuned surround suppression in mouse visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Self, Matthew W; Lorteije, Jeannette A M; Vangeneugden, Joris; van Beest, Enny H; Grigore, Mihaela E; Levelt, Christiaan N; Heimel, J Alexander; Roelfsema, Pieter R

    2014-07-09

    The firing rates of neurons in primary visual cortex (V1) are suppressed by large stimuli, an effect known as surround suppression. In cats and monkeys, the strength of suppression is sensitive to orientation; responses to regions containing uniform orientations are more suppressed than those containing orientation contrast. This effect is thought to be important for scene segmentation, but the underlying neural mechanisms are poorly understood. We asked whether it is possible to study these mechanisms in the visual cortex of mice, because of recent advances in technology for studying the cortical circuitry in mice. It is unknown whether neurons in mouse V1 are sensitive to orientation contrast. We measured the orientation selectivity of surround suppression in the different layers of mouse V1. We found strong surround suppression in layer 4 and the superficial layers, part of which was orientation tuned: iso-oriented surrounds caused more suppression than cross-oriented surrounds. Surround suppression was delayed relative to the visual response and orientation-tuned suppression was delayed further, suggesting two separate suppressive mechanisms. Previous studies proposed that surround suppression depends on the activity of inhibitory somatostatin-positive interneurons in the superficial layers. To test the involvement of the superficial layers we topically applied lidocaine. Silencing of the superficial layers did not prevent orientation-tuned suppression in layer 4. These results show that neurons in mouse V1, which lacks orientation columns, show orientation-dependent surround suppression in layer 4 and the superficial layers and that surround suppression in layer 4 does not require contributions from neurons in the superficial layers.

  17. Interactive Volumetry Of Liver Ablation Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egger, Jan; Busse, Harald; Brandmaier, Philipp; Seider, Daniel; Gawlitza, Matthias; Strocka, Steffen; Voglreiter, Philip; Dokter, Mark; Hofmann, Michael; Kainz, Bernhard; Hann, Alexander; Chen, Xiaojun; Alhonnoro, Tuomas; Pollari, Mika; Schmalstieg, Dieter; Moche, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive technique that destroys cancer cells by heat. The heat results from focusing energy in the radiofrequency spectrum through a needle. Amongst others, this can enable the treatment of patients who are not eligible for an open surgery. However, the possibility of recurrent liver cancer due to incomplete ablation of the tumor makes post-interventional monitoring via regular follow-up scans mandatory. These scans have to be carefully inspected for any conspicuousness. Within this study, the RF ablation zones from twelve post-interventional CT acquisitions have been segmented semi-automatically to support the visual inspection. An interactive, graph-based contouring approach, which prefers spherically shaped regions, has been applied. For the quantitative and qualitative analysis of the algorithm’s results, manual slice-by-slice segmentations produced by clinical experts have been used as the gold standard (which have also been compared among each other). As evaluation metric for the statistical validation, the Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) has been calculated. The results show that the proposed tool provides lesion segmentation with sufficient accuracy much faster than manual segmentation. The visual feedback and interactivity make the proposed tool well suitable for the clinical workflow.

  18. Calcified lesion modeling for excimer laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Holly A.; Archuleta, Andrew; Splinter, Robert

    2009-06-01

    Objective: Develop a representative calcium target model to evaluate penetration of calcified plaque lesions during atherectomy procedures using 308 nm Excimer laser ablation. Materials and Methods: An in-vitro model representing human calcified plaque was analyzed using Plaster-of-Paris and cement based composite materials as well as a fibrinogen model. The materials were tested for mechanical consistency. The most likely candidate(s) resulting from initial mechanical and chemical screening was submitted for ablation testing. The penetration rate of specific multi-fiber catheter designs and a single fiber probe was obtained and compared to that in human cadaver calcified plaque. The effects of lasing parameters and catheter tip design on penetration speed in a representative calcified model were verified against the results in human cadaver specimens. Results: In Plaster of Paris, the best penetration was obtained using the single fiber tip configuration operating at 100 Fluence, 120 Hz. Calcified human lesions are twice as hard, twice as elastic as and much more complex than Plaster of Paris. Penetration of human calcified specimens was highly inconsistent and varied significantly from specimen to specimen and within individual specimens. Conclusions: Although Plaster of Paris demonstrated predictable increases in penetration with higher energy density and repetition rate, it can not be considered a totally representative laser ablation model for calcified lesions. This is in part due to the more heterogeneous nature and higher density composition of cadaver intravascular human calcified occlusions. Further testing will require a more representative model of human calcified lesions.

  19. Interactive Volumetry Of Liver Ablation Zones

    PubMed Central

    Egger, Jan; Busse, Harald; Brandmaier, Philipp; Seider, Daniel; Gawlitza, Matthias; Strocka, Steffen; Voglreiter, Philip; Dokter, Mark; Hofmann, Michael; Kainz, Bernhard; Hann, Alexander; Chen, Xiaojun; Alhonnoro, Tuomas; Pollari, Mika; Schmalstieg, Dieter; Moche, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive technique that destroys cancer cells by heat. The heat results from focusing energy in the radiofrequency spectrum through a needle. Amongst others, this can enable the treatment of patients who are not eligible for an open surgery. However, the possibility of recurrent liver cancer due to incomplete ablation of the tumor makes post-interventional monitoring via regular follow-up scans mandatory. These scans have to be carefully inspected for any conspicuousness. Within this study, the RF ablation zones from twelve post-interventional CT acquisitions have been segmented semi-automatically to support the visual inspection. An interactive, graph-based contouring approach, which prefers spherically shaped regions, has been applied. For the quantitative and qualitative analysis of the algorithm’s results, manual slice-by-slice segmentations produced by clinical experts have been used as the gold standard (which have also been compared among each other). As evaluation metric for the statistical validation, the Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) has been calculated. The results show that the proposed tool provides lesion segmentation with sufficient accuracy much faster than manual segmentation. The visual feedback and interactivity make the proposed tool well suitable for the clinical workflow. PMID:26482818

  20. Thermal Convection on an Ablating Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehmedagic, Igbal; Thangam, Siva

    2015-11-01

    Modeling and analysis of thermal convection of a metallic targets subject to radiative flux is of relevance to various manufacturing processes as well as for the development of protective shields. The present work involves the computational modeling of metallic targets subject to high heat fluxes that are both steady and pulsed. Modeling of the ablation and associated fluid dynamics when metallic surfaces are exposed to high intensity pulsed laser fluence at normal atmospheric conditions is considered. The incident energy from the laser is partly absorbed and partly reflected by the surface during ablation and subsequent vaporization of the convecting melt also participates in the radiative exchange. The energy distribution during the process between the bulk and vapor phase strongly depends on optical and thermodynamic properties of the irradiated material, radiation wavelength, and laser pulse intensity and duration. Computational findings based on effective representation and prediction of the heat transfer, melting and vaporization of the targeting material as well as plume formation and expansion are presented and discussed in the context of various ablation mechanisms, variable thermo-physical and optical properties, plume expansion and surface geometry. Funded in part by U. S. Army ARDEC, Picatinny Arsenal, NJ.

  1. Status of the Ablative Laser Propulsion Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herren, Kenneth A.; Lin, Jun; Cohen, Tinothy; Pakhomov, Andrew V.; Thompson, M. Shane

    2004-01-01

    We present a short review of our laser-propulsion research as well as some of the current results of the Ablative Laser Propulsion (ALP) studies currently underway at the University of Alabama in Huntsville. It has been shown that direct surface ablation of a solid material produces high specific impulse (Isp) at relatively high energy conversion efficiency (20 - 40%). We detail measurements of specific impulse, thrust and coupling coefficients for elemental target materials both with single and with double pulse laser shots. We also present measurements taken using three independent methods for determination of Isp. The three methods produce consistent values from ion time-of-flight technique, impulse measurements and imaging of the expansion front of plasma plume. We present a demonstration of our ALP lightcraft, a small free-flying micro-vehicle that is propelled by ablation. For ALP lightcraft we use a subscale thin shell of nickel replicated over a diamond turned mandrel that produces a highly polished self-focusing, truncated at the focus parabolic mirror. The mass of the lightcraft is 54 mg and it is driven by 100-ps wide, 35-mJ laser pulses at 532 nm wavelength. This is an ongoing research. We also present the latest work on laserdriven micro-thrusters and detail some the near term goals of our program.

  2. Microwave soft tissue ablation (Invited Paper)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clegg, Peter J.; Cronin, Nigel J.

    2005-04-01

    Microsulis, in conjunction with the University of Bath have developed a set of novel microwave applicators for the ablation of soft tissues. These interstitial applicators have been designed for use in open surgical, laparoscopic and percutaneous settings and range in diameter from 2.4 to 7 mm. A 20 mm diameter flat faced interface applicator was developed as an adjunct to the open surgical interstitial applicator and has been applied to the treatment of surface breaking lesions in hepatobiliary surgery. Taken as a complete tool set the applicators are capable of treating a wide range of conditions in a safe and efficacious manner. The modality employs a radiated electromagnetic field at the allocated medical frequency of 2.45 GHz and powers between 30 and 150 Watts. Computer simulations, bench testing, safety and efficacy testing, ex-vivo and in-vivo work plus clinical trials have demonstrated that these systems are capable of generating large volumes of ablation in short times with favourable ablation geometries. Clinical studies have shown very low complication rates with minimal local recurrence. It is considered that this modality offers major advantages over currently marketed products. The technique is considered to be particularly safe as it is quick and there is no passage of current obviating the requirement for grounding pads. Since the microwave field operates primarily on water and all soft tissues with the exception of fat are made up of approximately 70% water the heating pattern is highly predictable making repeatability a key factor for this modality.

  3. Cryosurgery and needle ablation of renal lesions.

    PubMed

    Johnson, D B; Nakada, S Y

    2001-05-01

    Laparoscopic renal cryoablation is a minimally invasive alternative for treating renal tumors utilizing narrow probes cooled with a compressed gas such as argon or carbon dioxide. At this time, cryotherapy has shown the most promise as an alternative to partial nephrectomy as a nephron-sparing treatment for renal tumors. Radiofrequency ablation employs needle electrodes placed percutaneously directly into renal lesions to deliver energy, creating high temperatures leading to cell death. High-intensity focused ultrasound is a noninvasive technique in which focused ultrasound energy is applied to cause cell death within the focal zone. Microwave thermotherapy uses small applicators to deliver microwave energy to tissues, resulting in the generation of heat. Although RF, HIFU, and microwave thermotherapy show promise as energy sources for tumor ablation, they are in the early stages of development. Little is known about their acute and chronic histologic effects and long-term efficacy as a treatment for malignant disease. Further work is needed to develop cryosurgery and needle ablation in order to delineate what role these techniques will ultimately play in the management of RCC.

  4. [Ablation of idiopathic fascicular ventricular tachycardia].

    PubMed

    Gellér, László; Szilágyi, Szabolcs; Solymossy, Katalin; Srej, Marianna; Zima, Endre; Tahin, Tamás; Merkely, Béla

    2009-08-02

    Idiopathic fascicular ventricular tachycardia is an important and not very rare cardiac arrhythmia with specific electrocardiographic features and therapeutic options. Ventricular tachycardia is characterized by relatively narrow QRS complex and right bundle branch block pattern. The QRS axis depends on which fascicle is involved in the re-entry. Left axis deviation is noted with left posterior fascicular tachycardia and right axis deviation with left anterior fascicular tachycardia. A left septal fascicular tachycardia with normal QRS axis is also possible. Idiopathic fascicular tachycardia is usually seen in individuals without structural heart disease. Response to verapamil is an important feature of fascicular tachycardia. In some cases intravenous adenosine may also terminate the arrhythmia. During electrophysiology study, presystolic or diastolic potentials precede the QRS, presumed to originate from the Purkinje fibers. The potentials can be recorded during sinus rhythm and ventricular tachycardia in many patients with fascicular tachycardia. This potential (so-called Purkinje potential) has been used as a guide to catheter ablation. Correct diagnosis of fascicular tachycardia is very important because catheter ablation is very effective in the treatment of this type of ventricular tachycardia. In this review, we describe three patients with idiopathic ventricular tachycardia and their successful catheter ablation, and summarize the actual knowledge of the diagnosis and management of this special ventricular tachycardia.

  5. Dust clouds in Orion and the interstellar neutral hydrogen distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bystrova, N. V.

    1989-01-01

    According to published examples of the far IR observations in the Orion and its surroundings, several well defined dust clouds of different sizes and structure are present. For comparison of these clouds with the neutral hydrogen distribution on the area of approx. 1000 sq degs, the data from Pulkovo Sky Survey in the interstellar neutral Hydrogen Radio Line as well as special observations with the RATAN-600 telescope in 21 cm line were used. From the materials of Pulkovo HI Survey, the data were taken near the line emission at ten velocities between -21.8 and +25.6 km/s LSR for the structural component of the interstellar hydrogen emission. The results given concern mainly the Orion's Great Dust Cloud and the Lambda Orionis region where the information about the situation with the dust and interstellar hydrogen is very essential for interpretation.

  6. A Flexible Cloud Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benassi, A.; Deguy, S.; Szczap, F.

    2001-05-01

    In this work we propose a flexible cloud generating model as well as a software. This model depends upon 5 quantities: -the cloud fractional coverage -the spectral slope -the mean value -the variance -the internal heterogeneity (intermittency). All these quantities are independantly identifiable on the base of mathematical proofs. This model also depends on a given function, called "morphlet", and on the law of a random variables family. In order to get a positive water contain inside the cloud,we ask the morphlet and the random variables to be positives. The structure of the model is hierarchycal. The vertebral column of this model is a tree: the basic encoding tree of the space where the cloud lives. At each edge of the tree is attached: -a Bernoulli random variable,this for tuning the fractional cover and the intermittency, -a rate of energy loose,giving the spectral slope, -a dilated morphlet. The word flexible is justified by the fact that we can choose to modify some objets on the basic tree in order to adjust the caracteristics of the desired cloud.

  7. Microphysics of Pyrocumulonimbus Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Eric; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Fridlind, Ann

    2004-01-01

    The intense heat from forest fires can generate explosive deep convective cloud systems that inject pollutants to high altitudes. Both satellite and high-altitude aircraft measurements have documented cases in which these pyrocumulonimbus clouds inject large amounts of smoke well into the stratosphere (Fromm and Servranckx 2003; Jost et al. 2004). This smoke can remain in the stratosphere, be transported large distances, and affect lower stratospheric chemistry. In addition recent in situ measurements in pyrocumulus updrafts have shown that the high concentrations of smoke particles have significant impacts on cloud microphysical properties. Very high droplet number densities result in delayed precipitation and may enhance lightning (Andrew et al. 2004). Presumably, the smoke particles will also lead to changes in the properties of anvil cirrus produces by the deep convection, with resulting influences on cloud radiative forcing. In situ sampling near the tops of mature pyrocumulonimbus is difficult due to the high altitude and violence of the storms. In this study, we use large eddy simulations (LES) with size-resolved microphysics to elucidate physical processes in pyrocumulonimbus clouds.

  8. Cloud top entrainment instability and cloud top distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boers, Reinout; Spinhirne, James D.

    1990-01-01

    Classical cloud-top entrainment instability condition formulation is discussed. A saturation point diagram is used to investigate the details of mixing in cases where the cloud-top entrainment instability criterion is satisfied.

  9. Cloud condensation nucleus-sulfate mass relationship and cloud albedo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hegg, Dean A.

    1994-01-01

    Analysis of previously published, simultaneous measurements of cloud condensation nucleus number concentration and sulfate mass concentration suggest a nonlinear relationship between the two variables. This nonlinearity reduces the sensitivity of cloud albedo to changes in the sulfur cycle.

  10. The Evolving Structure of Young Volcanic Eruption Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carn, S. A.; Bursik, M. I.

    2015-12-01

    Processes acting in nascent volcanic clouds within seconds to hours of eruption (e.g., ash aggregation, ice nucleation, gravity waves) set the stage for subsequent advection and diffusion of volcanic ash, hence strongly influence aviation hazards and atmospheric impacts, but are very difficult to observe. Young plumes initially spread by gravity in the crosswind direction due to density differences with the surrounding stratified atmosphere. Subsequently, plumes lose their density contrast with the atmosphere and are advected as lenses of aerosol and gas, slowly thinning, spreading and dispersing as shearing and small scale turbulence act at their margins, and as fine ash settles out. Since 2006, satellite observations from NASA's A-Train constellation, including the CALIOP lidar and CloudSat radar, have provided tantalizing glimpses of young volcanic clouds in the first few hours of atmospheric residence. These unique observations, although spatially limited, provide insight into the evolving structure of young volcanic clouds from an optically thick, vertically extensive initial state to thin layers confined to a limited altitude range. Layered volcanic clouds may develop due to the existence of alternating turbulent and stable layers in the free troposphere and stratosphere. Turbulent layers retain particles longer than do quiescent layers because the turbulence retains particles in suspension. Particles fall more rapidly through the quiescent layers by single particle settling, or more rapidly because of convective sedimentation. The result is a distinct, banded ash cloud structure. We present A-Train satellite observations of volcanic clouds at various stages of evolution from several recent eruptions (including Kelut, Redoubt, Chaitén, Eyjafjallajökull, Okmok and Kasatochi) and also show the results of preliminary model simulations of the development of volcanic cloud layering.

  11. Plasma confinement to enhance the momentum coupling coefficient in ablative laser micro-propulsion: a novel approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Muhammad Raza; Jamil, Yasir; Qaiser Zakaria, M.; Hussain, Tousif; Ahmad, Riaz

    2015-07-01

    We introduce for the first time the novel idea of manipulating the momentum coupling coefficient using plasma confinement and shock wave reflection from the cavity walls. The plasma was confined using cylindrical geometries of various cavity aspect ratios to manipulate the momentum coupling coefficient (C m ). The Nd: YAG laser (532 nm, 5 ns pulse duration) was focused on the ferrite sample surface to produce plasma in a region surrounded by cylindrical cavity walls. The multiple reflections of the shockwaves from the cavity walls confined the laser-induced plasma to the central region of the cavity that subsequently resulted in a significant enhancement of the momentum coupling coefficient values. The plasma shielding effect has also been observed for particular values of laser fluencies and cavity aspect ratios. Compared with the direct ablation, the confined ablation provides an effective way to obtain high C m values.

  12. Influence of picosecond multiple/single line ablation on copper nanoparticles fabricated for surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy and photonics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamad, Syed; Krishna Podagatlapalli, G.; Tewari, Surya P.; Venugopal Rao, S.

    2013-12-01

    A comprehensive study comprising fabrication of copper nanoparticles (NPs) using picosecond (ps) multiple/single line ablation in various solvents such as acetone, dichloromethane (DCM), acetonitrile (ACN) and chloroform followed by optical, nonlinear optical (NLO), and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) characterization was performed. The influence of surrounding liquid media and the writing conditions resulted in fabrication of Cu NPs in acetone, CuCl NPs in DCM, CuO NPs in ACN and CuCl2 NPs in chloroform. Prepared colloids were characterized through transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectra, selected area electron diffraction and UV-visible absorption spectra. A detailed investigation of the surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) activity and the ps NLO properties of the colloids prepared through multiple/single line ablation techniques revealed that the best performance was achieved by Cu NPs for SERS applications and CuCl2 NPs for NLO applications.

  13. Comparison of cloud residual and background aerosol particle composition during the hill cap cloud experiment HCCT 2010 in Central Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, A.; Mertes, S.; van Pinxteren, D.; Klimach, T.; Herrmann, H.; Schneider, J.; Borrmann, S.

    2013-12-01

    Physical and chemical characterization of cloud residual and background aerosol particles as well as aerosol-cloud interactions were investigated during the Hill Cap Cloud Thuringia (HCCT) experiment in September and October 2010 on the mountain site Schmücke (938m a.s.l.) in Germany. Background aerosol particles were sampled by an interstitial inlet whereas cloud droplets from orographic clouds were collected by a counter flow virtual impactor (CVI). Chemical composition analysis and sizing of the particles was done by single particle mass spectrometry using the bipolar Aircraft-based Laser Ablation Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (ALABAMA, particle diameter range 150 nm - 900 nm; Brands et al., 2011) and by two Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometers (C-ToF, HR-ToF). Supplementary, the particle size distribution was measured with an optical particle counter (OPC, size range 0.25 μm - 32 μm). During the field campaign about 21000 positive and negative single particle mass spectra could be obtained from cloud residual particles and about 239000 from background aerosol particles. The data were clustered by means of the fuzzy c-means algorithm. The resulting clusters consisting of mass spectra with similar fragmentation patterns were, dependent on presence and combination of peaks, assigned to certain particle types. For both sampled particle types a large portion is internally mixed with nitrate and/or sulfate. This might be an explanation, why a comparison of the composition shows a higher fraction of soot particles and amine-containing particles among cloud residuals. Furthermore cloud residuals show a decreased fraction of particles being internally mixed only with nitrate (10%) compared to background aerosol particles (19%) of the same air masses, whereas the fraction of particles containing both nitrate and sulfate increases from 39% to 63% indicating cloud processing by uptake and oxidation of SO2 (Harris et al, 2013). Brands, M., Kamphus, M., Böttger, T., Schneider

  14. A study of ablation effects for an axisymmetric electromagnetic accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Ikuta, K. . Inst. of Plasma Physics)

    1989-01-01

    In order to give the additional forward thrust to the projectile other than the electromagnetic force, the axial symmetric launcher called ablation mass driver (AMD) has been proposed using sequential z pinches in a cylindrical electrode array. The additional driving force originates from the reaction of ablating hot gas from the ablator on the rear of the projectile, since the Joule heating by the high electric current for electromagnetic acceleration is not negligiblly small. The ablated gas becomes plasma which propagates along the field-null line of z pinch, giving the forward thrust to the projectile. A proto type AMD has been built at Texas Tech University in order to see the capabilities of AMD as a launcher, although a study on the effect of ablation will remain as a future work. This paper describes a device of accelerating water blob for the study of ablation effect during acceleration together with the experimental results.

  15. Modeling CO{sub 2} Laser Ablative Impulse with Polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Sinko, John E.; Phipps, Claude R.; Sasoh, Akihiro

    2010-10-08

    Laser ablation vaporization models have usually ignored the spatial dependence of the laser beam. Here, we consider effects from modeling using a Gaussian beam for both photochemical and photothermal conditions. The modeling results are compared to experimental and literature data for CO{sub 2} laser ablation of the polymer polyoxymethylene under vacuum, and discussed in terms of the ablated mass areal density and momentum coupling coefficient. Extending the scope of discussion, laser ablative impulse generation research has lacked a cohesive strategy for linking the vaporization and plasma regimes. Existing models, mostly formulated for ultraviolet laser systems or metal targets, appear to be inappropriate or impractical for applications requiring CO{sub 2} laser ablation of polymers. A recently proposed method for linking the vaporization and plasma regimes for analytical modeling is addressed here along with the implications of its use. Key control parameters are considered, along with the major propulsion parameters needed for laser ablation propulsion modeling.

  16. Influence of the Liquid on Femtosecond Laser Ablation of Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanitz, A.; Hoppius, J. S.; Gurevich, E. L.; Ostendorf, A.

    Ultrashort pulse laser ablation has become a very important industrial method for highly precise material removal ranging from sensitive thin film processing to drilling and cutting of metals. Over the last decade, a new method to produce pure nanoparticles emerged from this technique: Pulsed Laser Ablation in Liquids (PLAL). By this method, the ablation of material by a laser beam is used to generate a metal vapor within the liquid in order to obtain nanoparticles from its recondensation process. It is well known that the liquid significantly alters the ablation properties of the substrate, in our case iron. For example, the ablation rate and crater morphology differ depending on the used liquid. We present our studies on the efficiency and quality of ablated grooves in water, methanol, acetone, ethanol and toluene. The produced grooves are investigated by means of white-light interferometry, EDX and SEM.

  17. Reconstruction of cloud geometry using a scanning cloud radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewald, F.; Winkler, C.; Zinner, T.

    2015-06-01

    Clouds are one of the main reasons of uncertainties in the forecasts of weather and climate. In part, this is due to limitations of remote sensing of cloud microphysics. Present approaches often use passive spectral measurements for the remote sensing of cloud microphysical parameters. Large uncertainties are introduced by three-dimensional (3-D) radiative transfer effects and cloud inhomogeneities. Such effects are largely caused by unknown orientation of cloud sides or by shadowed areas on the cloud. Passive ground-based remote sensing of cloud properties at high spatial resolution could be crucially improved with this kind of additional knowledge of cloud geometry. To this end, a method for the accurate reconstruction of 3-D cloud geometry from cloud radar measurements is developed in this work. Using a radar simulator and simulated passive measurements of model clouds based on a large eddy simulation (LES), the effects of different radar scan resolutions and varying interpolation methods are evaluated. In reality, a trade-off between scan resolution and scan duration has to be found as clouds change quickly. A reasonable choice is a scan resolution of 1 to 2°. The most suitable interpolation procedure identified is the barycentric interpolation method. The 3-D reconstruction method is demonstrated using radar scans of convective cloud cases with the Munich miraMACS, a 35 GHz scanning cloud radar. As a successful proof of concept, camera imagery collected at the radar location is reproduced for the observed cloud cases via 3-D volume reconstruction and 3-D radiative transfer simulation. Data sets provided by the presented reconstruction method will aid passive spectral ground-based measurements of cloud sides to retrieve microphysical parameters.

  18. Formation of Pillars at the Boundaries between HII Regions and Molecular Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuta, A; Kane, J O; Pound, M W; Remington, B A; Ryutov, D D; Takabe, H

    2006-04-20

    We investigate numerically the hydrodynamic instability of an ionization front (IF) accelerating into a molecular cloud, with imposed initial perturbations of different amplitudes. When the initial amplitude is small, the imposed perturbation is completely stabilized and does not grow. When the initial perturbation amplitude is large enough, roughly the ratio of the initial amplitude to wavelength is greater than 0.02, portions of the IF temporarily separate from the molecular cloud surface, locally decreasing the ablation pressure. This causes the appearance of a large, warm HI region and triggers nonlinear dynamics of the IF. The local difference of the ablation pressure and acceleration enhances the appearance and growth of a multimode perturbation. The stabilization usually seen at the IF in the linear regimes does not work due to the mismatch of the modes of the perturbations at the cloud surface and in density in HII region above the cloud surface. Molecular pillars are observed in the late stages of the large amplitude perturbation case. The velocity gradient in the pillars is in reasonably good agreement with that observed in the Eagle Nebula. The initial perturbation is imposed in three different ways: in density, in incident photon number flux, and in the surface shape. All cases show both stabilization for a small initial perturbation and large growth of the second harmonic by increasing amplitude of the initial perturbation above a critical value.

  19. Ablation by ultrashort laser pulses: Atomistic and thermodynamic analysis of the processes at the ablation threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhyay, Arun K.; Inogamov, Nail A.; Rethfeld, Baerbel; Urbassek, Herbert M.

    2008-07-15

    Ultrafast laser irradiation of solids may ablate material off the surface. We study this process for thin films using molecular-dynamics simulation and thermodynamic analysis. Both metals and Lennard-Jones (LJ) materials are studied. We find that despite the large difference in thermodynamical properties between these two classes of materials--e.g., for aluminum versus LJ the ratio T{sub c}/T{sub tr} of critical to triple-point temperature differs by more than a factor of 4--the values of the ablation threshold energy E{sub abl} normalized to the cohesion energy, {epsilon}{sub abl}=E{sub abl}/E{sub coh}, are surprisingly universal: all are near 0.3 with {+-}30% scattering. The difference in the ratio T{sub c}/T{sub tr} means that for metals the melting threshold {epsilon}{sub m} is low, {epsilon}{sub m}<{epsilon}{sub abl}, while for LJ it is high, {epsilon}{sub m}>{epsilon}{sub abl}. This thermodynamical consideration gives a simple explanation for the difference between metals and LJ. It explains why despite the universality in {epsilon}{sub abl}, metals thermomechanically ablate always from the liquid state. This is opposite to LJ materials, which (near threshold) ablate from the solid state. Furthermore, we find that immediately below the ablation threshold, the formation of large voids (cavitation) in the irradiated material leads to a strong temporary expansion on a very slow time scale. This feature is easily distinguished from the acoustic oscillations governing the material response at smaller intensities, on the one hand, and the ablation occurring at larger intensities, on the other hand. This finding allows us to explain the puzzle of huge surface excursions found in experiments at near-threshold laser irradiation.

  20. Making clouds in Spacelab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, C.

    1978-01-01

    Improvements in the accuracy of weather predictions and possibilities for changing the weather might depend on a better understanding of the microphysical processes which take place within clouds. A study of these processes on the surface of the earth is difficult in connection with gravitational disturbances. An Atmospheric Cloud Physics Laboratory (ACPL), which is currently being developed, is to be carried into space in the Spacelab in the early 1980's. This facility will provide scientists, for the first time, with the opportunity to study cloud physics without the disturbing gravitational effects. In the ACPL facility, a microscopic element can be suspended without support. The processes of freezing, thawing, collision, electric charging, and temperature changes can be observed and photographed as many times and for as long as necessary.