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Sample records for ablation fe oxidation

  1. Ablation of crystalline oxides by infrared femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Fumiya; Cahill, David G.; Gundrum, Bryan; Averback, R. S.

    2006-10-15

    We use focused laser pulses with duration of 180 fs and wavelength of 800 nm to study the interactions of high power near-infrared light with the surfaces of single-crystal transparent oxides (sapphire, LaAlO{sub 3}, SrTiO{sub 3}, yttria-stabilized ZrO{sub 2}, and MgO); the morphologies of the ablation craters are studied by atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. With the exception of LaAlO{sub 3}, the high temperature annealing of these oxide crystals produces atomically flat starting surfaces that enable studies of the morphology of ablation craters with subnanometer precision. The threshold fluence for ablation is determined directly from atomic-force microscopy images and increases approximately linearly with the band gap of the oxide. For all oxides except sapphire, the depth of the ablation crater increases approximately as the square root of the difference between the peak laser fluence and the threshold fluence for ablation. Sapphire shows unique behavior: (i) at laser fluences within 1 J/cm{sup 2} of the threshold for ablation, the depth of the ablation crater increases gradually instead of abruptly with laser fluence, and (ii) the rms roughness of the ablation crater shows a pronounced minimum of <0.2 nm at a laser fluence of 1 J/cm{sup 2} above the threshold.

  2. Moessbauer Study of Electrodeposited Fe/Fe-Oxide Multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzmann, E.; Homonnay, Z.; Klencsar, Z.; Vertes, A.; Lakatos-Varsanyi, M.; Miko, A.; Varga, L.K.; Kalman, E.; Nagy, F.

    2005-04-26

    Iron has been deposited electrochemically by short current pulses in Na-saccharin containing FeII-chloride and sulphate solution electrolytes. Combined electrochemical techniques with initial pulse plating of iron nanolayer and its subsequent anodic oxidation under potential control have been used for production of Fe/Fe-oxide multilayers. 57Fe CEM spectra of pulse plated iron revealed the presence of a minor doublet attributed mainly to {gamma}-FeOOH in addition to the dominant sextet of {alpha}-iron. In the case of anodically oxidized pulse plated iron and of samples after repeated deposition of anodically oxidized pulse plated iron an additional minor doublet, assigned to ferrous chloride, also appears in the Moessbauer spectra. A significant change in the magnetic anisotropy of {alpha}-iron was observed with the anodic oxidation. The thickness of the layers were estimated from the CEM spectrum data by a modified computer program of the Liljequist method. The coercive field and the power loss versus frequency data showed that the pulse plated iron cores are good inductive elements up to several kHz frequencies.

  3. Oxidation of uranium nanoparticles produced via pulsed laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Trelenberg, T W; Glade, S C; Tobin, J G; Felter, T E; Hamza, A V

    2005-12-07

    An experimental apparatus designed for the synthesis, via pulsed laser deposition, and analysis of metallic nanoparticles and thin films of plutonium and other actinides was tested on depleted uranium samples. Five nanosecond pulses from a Nd:YAG laser produced films of {approx}1600 {angstrom} thickness that were deposited showing an angular distribution typical thermal ablation. The films remained contiguous for many months in vacuum but blistered due to induced tensile stresses several days after exposure to air. The films were allowed to oxidize from the residual water vapor within the chamber (2 x 10{sup -10} Torr base pressure). The oxidation was monitored by in-situ analysis techniques including x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and followed Langmuir kinetics.

  4. Characteristics of Fe Ablation Trials Observed During the 1998 Leonid Meteor Shower

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Xin-Zhao; Pan, Wei-Lin; Papen, George; Swenson, Gary; Gardner, Chester S.; Jenniskens, Peter; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Eighteen Fe ablation trails were observed during the 17/18 Nov 1998 Leonid meteor shower with an airborne Fe lidar aboard the National Simulation Facility/National Center for Atmospheric Research (NSF/NCAR) Electra aircraft over Okinawa. The average altitude of the 18 trails from the high velocity (72 km/s) Leonid meteors, 95.67 +/- 0.93 km, is approximately 6.7 km higher than previously observed for slower (approx. 30 km/s) sporadic meteors. This height difference is consistent with the assumption that meteors ablate when the kinetic energy imparted to the atmosphere reaches a critical threshold. The average age of the Fe trails, determined by a diffusion model, is 10.1 min. The youngest ages were observed below 92 km and above 98 km where chemistry and diffusion dominate, respectively. The average abundance of the trails is ten percent of the abundance of the background Fe layer. Observations suggest that the 1998 Leonid shower did not have a significant impact on the abundance of the background Fe layer.

  5. Pulsed laser ablation of complex oxides: The role of congruent ablation and preferential scattering for the film stoichiometry

    SciTech Connect

    Wicklein, S.; Koehl, A.; Dittmann, R.; Sambri, A.; Amoruso, S.; Wang, X.; Bruzzese, R.

    2012-09-24

    By combining structural and chemical thin film analysis with detailed plume diagnostics and modeling of the laser plume dynamics, we are able to elucidate the different physical mechanisms determining the stoichiometry of the complex oxides model material SrTiO{sub 3} during pulsed laser deposition. Deviations between thin film and target stoichiometry are basically a result of two effects, namely, incongruent ablation and preferential scattering of lighter ablated species during their motion towards the substrate in the O{sub 2} background gas. On the one hand, a progressive preferential ablation of the Ti species with increasing laser fluence leads to a regime of Ti-rich thin film growth at larger fluences. On the other hand, in the low laser fluence regime, a more effective scattering of the lighter Ti plume species results in Sr rich films.

  6. Ablation studies of Y-Ba-Cu-oxide in oxygen using a pulsed CO 2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyer, P. E.; Key, P. H.; Monk, P.

    1992-01-01

    The depth of ablation of Y-Ba-Cu-oxide pellets as a function of pulsed CO 2 laser fluence has been measured. Up to fluences of ˜ 5 J cm -2 the data can be well fitted to a Beer's law dependence with absorption coefficient ∝ = 10 4 cm -1 and threshold fluence for ablation of 0.85 J cm -2. At higher fluences a self-regulating ablation rate regime, due to plasma formation, is encountered. Particulate deposits from 10.6 μm laser ablation are found to be much greater than with shorter wavelenghts and evidence of large particle formation by accretion of smaller ablation products is observed. The range of the ablation plume in low pressure oxygen has been studied as a function of laser fluence, irradiation spot size and ambient gas pressure and is compared with modelling.

  7. Gas Effect On Plasma Dynamics Of Laser Ablation Zinc Oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Abdelli-Messaci, S.; Kerdja, T.; Lafane, S.; Malek, S.

    2008-09-23

    In order to synthesis zinc oxide thin films and nanostructures, laser ablation of ZnO target into both vacuum and oxygen atmosphere was performed. The gas effect on the plume dynamics was studied for O{sub 2} pressures varied between 10{sup -2} to 70 mbar. Plasma plume evolution was investigated by ICCD camera fast imaging. The plasma was created by a KrF excimer laser ({lambda} = 248 nm, {tau} = 25 ns) at a fluence of 2 J/cm{sup 2}. The light emitted by the plume was observed along the perpendicular to the ejection direction through a fast intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD). We have found that the plasma dynamics is very affected by the gas pressures. The photographs reveal the stratification of plasma into slow and fast components for 0.5 mbar O{sub 2} pressures and beyond. The photographs also show the apparition of hydrodynamic instabilities which are related to chemical reactions between the plasma and the surrounding gas for a certain range of pressures.

  8. Fe Oxidation State in Microtektites from the Transantarctic Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuli, G.; Cicconi, M. R.; Eeckhout, S. G.; Paris, E.; Pratesi, G.; Folco, L.

    2012-03-01

    Fe oxidation state of microtektites from the Transantarctic mountains is consistent with that of Australasian tektites and microtektites. Despite the long distance from the presumed impact site, the Fe oxidation state does not show appreciable variation.

  9. Enhanced dechlorination of m-DCB using iron@graphite/palladium (Fe@C/Pd) nanoparticles produced by pulsed laser ablation in liquid.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yiseul; Jung, Hyeon Jin; Je, Mingyu; Choi, Hyun Chul; Choi, Myong Yong

    2016-07-01

    In this work, the zero valent Fe (ZVI) and graphite-encapsulated Fe (Fe@C) nanoparticles (NPs) were easily and selectively prepared by a pulsed laser ablation (PLA) method in an aqueous sodium borohydride solution and ascorbic acid dissolved in methanol, respectively. Here, the Fe@C NPs were uniquely synthesized by PLA in methanol, where the solvent is used as both a carbon source for the graphitic layers and solvent, which is very unique. Furthermore, Pd NPs were loaded onto the surface of the Fe@C NPs to prepare bimetallic (Fe@C/Pd) NPs for the enhancement of the degradation efficiency of m-dichlorobenzene (m-DCB). The morphology, crystallinity, and surface composition of the prepared NPs were carefully characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), energy dispersive x-ray spectrometer (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The degradation rate of m-DCB using single (Fe and Pd) or bimetallic (Fe/Pd and Fe@C/Pd) NPs were compared by using gas chromatography. Among these NPs produced in this work, the Fe@C/Pd NPs with 1.71 wt % of Pd showed an excellent dechlorination efficiency for m-DCB with 100% degradation within 75 min. The graphitic layer on the Fe NPs played as not only an oxidation resistant for the Fe NPs to surroundings, but also a supporter of the Pd NPs for the enhanced degradation efficiency of m-DCB. PMID:27129061

  10. Enhanced dechlorination of m-DCB using iron@graphite/palladium (Fe@C/Pd) nanoparticles produced by pulsed laser ablation in liquid.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yiseul; Jung, Hyeon Jin; Je, Mingyu; Choi, Hyun Chul; Choi, Myong Yong

    2016-07-01

    In this work, the zero valent Fe (ZVI) and graphite-encapsulated Fe (Fe@C) nanoparticles (NPs) were easily and selectively prepared by a pulsed laser ablation (PLA) method in an aqueous sodium borohydride solution and ascorbic acid dissolved in methanol, respectively. Here, the Fe@C NPs were uniquely synthesized by PLA in methanol, where the solvent is used as both a carbon source for the graphitic layers and solvent, which is very unique. Furthermore, Pd NPs were loaded onto the surface of the Fe@C NPs to prepare bimetallic (Fe@C/Pd) NPs for the enhancement of the degradation efficiency of m-dichlorobenzene (m-DCB). The morphology, crystallinity, and surface composition of the prepared NPs were carefully characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), energy dispersive x-ray spectrometer (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The degradation rate of m-DCB using single (Fe and Pd) or bimetallic (Fe/Pd and Fe@C/Pd) NPs were compared by using gas chromatography. Among these NPs produced in this work, the Fe@C/Pd NPs with 1.71 wt % of Pd showed an excellent dechlorination efficiency for m-DCB with 100% degradation within 75 min. The graphitic layer on the Fe NPs played as not only an oxidation resistant for the Fe NPs to surroundings, but also a supporter of the Pd NPs for the enhanced degradation efficiency of m-DCB.

  11. Laser Direct Ablation of Indium Tin Oxide Films on Both Sides of Various Substrates.

    PubMed

    Oh, Gi Taek; Kwon, Sang Jik; Han, Jae-Hee; Cho, Eou Sik

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate ablation of indium tin oxide (ITO) films onto both glass and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates, using a Q-switched diode-pumped neodymium-doped yttrium vanadate laser (Nd:YVO4, λ = 1064 nm) incident on both the front and back sides of the substrate. From scanning electron microscope (SEM) images and depth profile data, ITO patterns that were laser-ablated onto glass from the back side showed a larger abrupt change in the ablated line width than those ablated from the front. However, there were only slight differences in ablated line widths due to the direction of the incident laser beam. We provide a possible explanation in terms of several factors: dispersion of laser beam energy through the substrate, overlapping of each laser beam spot due to scanning speed, and the thickness of glass and PET substrates. PMID:26413678

  12. Similarities and differences in ablative and non-ablative iron oxide nanoparticle hyperthermia cancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petryk, Alicia A.; Misra, Adwiteeya; Kastner, Elliot J.; Mazur, Courtney M.; Petryk, James D.; Hoopes, P. Jack

    2015-03-01

    The use of hyperthermia to treat cancer is well studied and has utilized numerous delivery techniques, including microwaves, radio frequency, focused ultrasound, induction heating, infrared radiation, warmed perfusion liquids (combined with chemotherapy), and recently, metallic nanoparticles (NP) activated by near infrared radiation (NIR) and alternating magnetic field (AMF) based platforms. It has been demonstrated by many research groups that ablative temperatures and cytotoxicity can be produced with locally NP-based hyperthermia. Such ablative NP techniques have demonstrated the potential for success. Much attention has also been given to the fact that NP may be administered systemically, resulting in a broader cancer therapy approach, a lower level of tumor NP content and a different type of NP cancer therapy (most likely in the adjuvant setting). To use NP based hyperthermia successfully as a cancer treatment, the technique and its goal must be understood and utilized in the appropriate clinical context. The parameters include, but are not limited to, NP access to the tumor (large vs. small quantity), cancer cell-specific targeting, drug carrying capacity, potential as an ionizing radiation sensitizer, and the material properties (magnetic characteristics, size and charge). In addition to their potential for cytotoxicity, the material properties of the NP must also be optimized for imaging, detection and direction. In this paper we will discuss the differences between, and potential applications for, ablative and non-ablative magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia.

  13. Oxidation of Fe(II)-EDTA by nitrite and by two nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizing Acidovorax strains.

    PubMed

    Klueglein, N; Picardal, F; Zedda, M; Zwiener, C; Kappler, A

    2015-03-01

    The enzymatic oxidation of Fe(II) by nitrate-reducing bacteria was first suggested about two decades ago. It has since been found that most strains are mixotrophic and need an additional organic co-substrate for complete and prolonged Fe(II) oxidation. Research during the last few years has tried to determine to what extent the observed Fe(II) oxidation is driven enzymatically, or abiotically by nitrite produced during heterotrophic denitrification. A recent study reported that nitrite was not able to oxidize Fe(II)-EDTA abiotically, but the addition of the mixotrophic nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizer, Acidovorax sp. strain 2AN, led to Fe(II) oxidation (Chakraborty & Picardal, 2013). This, along with other results of that study, was used to argue that Fe(II) oxidation in strain 2AN was enzymatically catalyzed. However, the absence of abiotic Fe(II)-EDTA oxidation by nitrite reported in that study contrasts with previously published data. We have repeated the abiotic and biotic experiments and observed rapid abiotic oxidation of Fe(II)-EDTA by nitrite, resulting in the formation of Fe(III)-EDTA and the green Fe(II)-EDTA-NO complex. Additionally, we found that cultivating the Acidovorax strains BoFeN1 and 2AN with 10 mM nitrate, 5 mm acetate, and approximately 10 mM Fe(II)-EDTA resulted only in incomplete Fe(II)-EDTA oxidation of 47-71%. Cultures of strain BoFeN1 turned green (due to the presence of Fe(II)-EDTA-NO) and the green color persisted over the course of the experiments, whereas strain 2AN was able to further oxidize the Fe(II)-EDTA-NO complex. Our work shows that the two used Acidovorax strains behave very differently in their ability to deal with toxic effects of Fe-EDTA species and the further reduction of the Fe(II)-EDTA-NO nitrosyl complex. Although the enzymatic oxidation of Fe(II) cannot be ruled out, this study underlines the importance of nitrite in nitrate-reducing Fe(II)- and Fe(II)-EDTA-oxidizing cultures and demonstrates that Fe(II)-EDTA cannot

  14. Destruction of monocrystalline silicon with nanosecond pulsed fiber laser accompanied by the oxidation of ablation microparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veiko, V. P.; Skvortsov, A. M.; Huynh, C. T.; Petrov, A. A.

    2013-11-01

    In this work, we report an observation of process of local destruction monocrystalline silicon with a scanning beam irradiation of pulse ytterbium fiber laser with a wavelength λ= 1062 nm, accompanied by the oxidation of ablation microparticles. It is shown that depending on the power density of irradiation was observed a large scatter size of the microparticles. From a certain average power density is observed beginning oxidation particulate emitted from the surface of the irradiated area. By varying the parameters of the laser beam such as scanning speed, pulse repetition rate, overlap of laser spot, radiation dose can be achieved almost complete oxidation of all formed during the ablation of microparticles.

  15. Microbial Lithotrophic Oxidation of Structural Fe(II) in Biotite

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Huifang; Konishi, Hiromi; Kukkadapu, Ravi; Wu, Tao; Blöthe, Marco; Roden, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Microorganisms are known to participate in the weathering of primary phyllosilicate minerals through the production of organic ligands and acids and through the uptake of products of weathering. Here we show that the lithotrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing, nitrate-reducing enrichment culture described by Straub et al. (K. L. Straub, M. Benz, B. Schink, and F. Widdel, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 62:1458–1460, 1996) can grow via oxidation of structural Fe(II) in biotite, a Fe(II)-rich trioctahedral mica found in granitic rocks. Oxidation of silt/clay-sized biotite particles was detected by a decrease in extractable Fe(II) content and simultaneous nitrate reduction. Mössbauer spectroscopy confirmed structural Fe(II) oxidation. Approximately 1.5 × 107 cells were produced per μmol of Fe(II) oxidized, in agreement with previous estimates of the growth yield of lithoautotrophic circumneutral-pH Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria. Microbial oxidation of structural Fe(II) resulted in biotite alterations similar to those found in nature, including a decrease in the unit cell b dimension toward dioctahedral levels and Fe and K release. Structural Fe(II) oxidation may involve either direct enzymatic oxidation, followed by solid-state mineral transformation, or indirect oxidation as a result of the formation of aqueous Fe, followed by electron transfer from Fe(II) in the mineral to Fe(III) in solution. Although it is not possible to distinguish between these two mechanisms with available data, the complete absence of aqueous Fe in oxidation experiments favors the former alternative. The demonstration of microbial oxidation of structural Fe(II) suggests that microorganisms are directly responsible for the initial step in the weathering of biotite in granitic aquifers and the plant rhizosphere. PMID:22685132

  16. Abiotic oxidation of Fe(II) by reactive nitrogen species in cultures of the nitrate-reducing Fe(II) oxidizer Acidovorax sp. BoFeN1 - questioning the existence of enzymatic Fe(II) oxidation.

    PubMed

    Klueglein, N; Kappler, A

    2013-03-01

    Nitrate-reducing, Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria were suggested to couple with enzymatic Fe(II) oxidation to nitrate reduction. Denitrification proceeds via intermediates (NO2 -, NO) that can oxidize Fe(II) abiotically at neutral and particularly at acidic pH. Here, we present a revised Fe(II) quantification protocol preventing artifacts during acidic Fe extraction and evaluate the contribution of abiotic vs. enzymatic Fe(II) oxidation in cultures of the nitrate-reducing, Fe(II) oxidizer Acidovorax sp. BoFeN1. Sulfamic acid used instead of HCl reacts with nitrite and prevents abiotic Fe(II) oxidation during Fe extraction. Abiotic experiments without sulfamic acid showed that acidification of oxic Fe(II) nitrite samples leads to 5.6-fold more Fe(II) oxidation than in anoxic samples because the formed NO becomes rapidly reoxidized by O(2) , therefore leading to abiotic oxidation and underestimation of Fe(II). With our revised protocol using sulfamic acid, we quantified oxidation of approximately 7 mm of Fe(II) by BoFeN1 within 4 days. Without addition of sulfamic acid, the same oxidation was detected within only 2 days. Additionally, abiotic incubation of Fe(II) with nitrite in the presence of goethite as surface catalyst led to similar abiotic Fe(II) oxidation rates as observed in growing BoFeN1 cultures. BoFeN1 growth was observed on acetate with N(2) O as electron acceptor. When adding Fe(II), no Fe(II) oxidation was observed, suggesting that the absence of reactive N intermediates (NO2 -, NO) precludes Fe(II) oxidation. The addition of ferrihydrite [Fe(OH)(3) ] to acetate/nitrate BoFeN1 cultures led to growth stimulation equivalent to previously described effects on growth by adding Fe(II). This suggests that elevated iron concentrations might provide a nutritional effect rather than energy-yielding Fe(II) oxidation. Our findings therefore suggest that although enzymatic Fe(II) oxidation by denitrifiers cannot be fully ruled out, its contribution to the observed Fe

  17. Fractionation of Fe isotopes during Fe(II) oxidation by a marine photoferrotroph is controlled by the formation of organic Fe-complexes and colloidal Fe fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanner, Elizabeth D.; Wu, Wenfang; Schoenberg, Ronny; Byrne, James; Michel, F. Marc; Pan, Yongxin; Kappler, Andreas

    2015-09-01

    Much interest exists in finding mineralogical, organic, morphological, or isotopic biosignatures for Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) that are retained in Fe-rich sediments, which could indicate the activity of these organisms in Fe-rich seawater, more common in the Precambrian Era. To date, the effort to establish a clear Fe isotopic signature in Fe minerals produced by Fe(II)-oxidizing metabolisms has been thwarted by the large kinetic fractionation incurred as freshly oxidized aqueous Fe(III) rapidly precipitates as Fe(III) (oxyhydr)oxide minerals at near neutral pH. The Fe(III) (oxyhydr)oxide minerals resulting from abiotic Fe(II) oxidation are isotopically heavy compared to the Fe(II) precursor and are not clearly distinguishable from minerals formed by FeOB isotopically. However, in marine hydrothermal systems and Fe(II)-rich springs the minerals formed are often isotopically lighter than expected considering the fraction of Fe(II) that has been oxidized and experimentally-determined fractionation factors. We measured the Fe isotopic composition of aqueous Fe (Feaq) and the final Fe mineral (Feppt) produced in batch experiment using the marine Fe(II)-oxidizing phototroph Rhodovulum iodosum. The δ56Feaq data are best described by a kinetic fractionation model, while the evolution of δ56Feppt appears to be controlled by a separate fractionation process. We propose that soluble Fe(III), and Fe(II) and Fe(III) extracted from the Feppt may act as intermediates between Fe(II) oxidation and Fe(III) precipitation. Based on 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy, extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, and X-ray total scattering, we suggests these Fe phases, collectively Fe(II/III)interm, may consist of organic-ligand bound, sorbed, and/or colloidal Fe(II) and Fe(III) mineral phases that are isotopically lighter than the final Fe(III) mineral product. Similar intermediate phases, formed in response to organic carbon produced by FeOB and inorganic

  18. Fe-Oxides in Water Remediation Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaclavikova, M.; Stefusova, K.; Gallios, G. P.

    Water is essential for life, a strategic resource for every country and population. Its availability and sanitary safety is highly connected with the health and economic status of a population. The burden of disease due to polluted water is a major public health problem throughout the world. Many pollutants in water streams have been identified as toxic and harmful to the environment and human health, and among them arsenic, mercury and cadmium are considered those with the highest priority. Iron is the fourth most abundant element in the Earth's crust, and reactions involving iron play a major role in the environmental cycling of a range of important contaminants. Our earlier research has shown that Fe oxides/oxyhydroxides are particularly effective adsorbents of a range of contaminants (toxic metals), due to their high (reactive) specific surface area. It has been proven that Fe is particularly effective in As removal as a chemical bond is created on Fe surface and As is stabilised and can be safely deposited. Removal of contaminants from waste streams through precipitation with (hydrous) ferric oxides is an established methodology in a number of industrial processes (high density sludge systems for arsenic control in effluents from the mining industry, and in the treatment of textile dye effluent).

  19. Incorporation of oxidized uranium into Fe (hydr)oxides during Fe(II) catalyzed remineralization

    SciTech Connect

    Nico, Peter S.; Stewart, Brandy D.; Fendorf, Scott

    2009-07-01

    The form of solid phase U after Fe(II) induced anaerobic remineralization of ferrihydrite in the presence of aqueous and absorbed U(VI) was investigated under both abiotic batch and biotic flow conditions. Experiments were conducted with synthetic ground waters containing 0.168 mM U(VI), 3.8 mM carbonate, and 3.0 mM Ca{sup 2+}. In spite of the high solubility of U(VI) under these conditions, appreciable removal of U(VI) from solution was observed in both the abiotic and biotic systems. The majority of the removed U was determined to be substituted as oxidized U (U(VI) or U(V)) into the octahedral position of the goethite and magnetite formed during ferrihydrite remineralization. It is estimated that between 3% and 6% of octahedral Fe(III) centers in the new Fe minerals were occupied by U(VI). This site specific substitution is distinct from the non-specific U co-precipitation processes in which uranyl compounds, e.g. uranyl hydroxide or carbonate, are entrapped with newly formed Fe oxides. The prevalence of site specific U incorporation under both abiotic and biotic conditions and the fact that the produced solids were shown to be resistant to both extraction (30 mM KHCO{sub 3}) and oxidation (air for 5 days) suggest the potential importance of sequestration in Fe oxides as a stable and immobile form of U in the environment.

  20. Influence of film thickness on laser ablation threshold of transparent conducting oxide thin-films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rung, S.; Christiansen, A.; Hellmann, R.

    2014-06-01

    We report on a comprehensive study of the laser ablation threshold of transparent conductive oxide thin films. The ablation threshold is determined for both indium tin oxide and gallium zinc oxide as a function of film thickness and for different laser wavelengths. By using a pulsed diode pumped solid state laser at 1064 nm, 532 nm, 355 nm and 266 nm, respectively, the relationship between optical absorption length and film thickness is studied. We find that the ablation threshold decreases with increasing film thickness in a regime where the absorption length is larger than the film thickness. In turn, the ablation threshold increases in case the absorption length is smaller than the film thickness. In particular, we observe a minimum of the ablation threshold in a region where the film thickness is comparable to the absorption length. To the best of our knowledge, this behaviour previously predicted for thin metal films, has been unreported for all three regimes in case of transparent conductive oxides, yet. For industrial laser scribing processes, these results imply that the efficiency can be optimized by using a laser where the optical absorption length is close to the film thickness.

  1. Erbium oxide thin films on Si(100) obtained by laser ablation and electron beam evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queralt, X.; Ferrater, C.; Sánchez, F.; Aguiar, R.; Palau, J.; Varela, M.

    1995-02-01

    Erbium oxide thin films have been obtained by laser ablation and electron beam evaporation techniques on Si(100) substrates. The samples were grown under different conditions of oxygen atmosphere and substrate temperature without any oxidation process after deposition. The crystal structure has been studied by X-ray diffraction. Films obtained by laser ablation are highly textured in the [ hhh] direction, although this depends on the conditions of oxygen pressure and substrate temperature. In order to study the depth composition profile of the thin films and the interdiffusion of erbium metal and oxygen towards the silicon substrates, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses have been carried out.

  2. Endometrial ablation

    MedlinePlus

    Hysteroscopy-endometrial ablation; Laser thermal ablation; Endometrial ablation-radiofrequency; Endometrial ablation-thermal balloon ablation; Rollerball ablation; Hydrothermal ablation; Novasure ablation

  3. Biomineralization associated with microbial reduction of Fe3+ and oxidation of Fe2+ in solid minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, G.; Dong, H.; Jiang, H.; Kukkadapu, R.K.; Kim, J.; Eberl, D.; Xu, Z.

    2009-01-01

    Iron-reducing and oxidizing microorganisms gain energy through reduction or oxidation of iron, and by doing so play an important role in the geochemical cycling of iron. This study was undertaken to investigate mineral transformations associated with microbial reduction of Fe3+ and oxidation of Fe2+ in solid minerals. A fluid sample from the 2450 m depth of the Chinese Continental Scientific Drilling project was collected, and Fe3+-reducing and Fe2+-oxidizing microorganisms were enriched. The enrichment cultures displayed reduction of Fe3+ in nontronite and ferric citrate, and oxidation of Fe2+ in vivianite, siderite, and monosulfide (FeS). Additional experiments verified that the iron reduction and oxidation was biological. Oxidation of FeS resulted in the formation of goethite, lepidocrocite, and ferrihydrite as products. Although our molecular microbiological analyses detected Thermoan-aerobacter ethanolicus as a predominant organism in the enrichment culture, Fe3+ reduction and Fe2+ oxidation may be accomplished by a consortia of organisms. Our results have important environmental and ecological implications for iron redox cycling in solid minerals in natural environments, where iron mineral transformations may be related to the mobility and solubility of inorganic and organic contaminants.

  4. Rear-side picosecond laser ablation of indium tin oxide micro-grooves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Peng; Wang, Wenjun; Mei, Xuesong; Liu, Bin; Zhao, Wanqin

    2015-06-01

    A comparative study of the fabrication of micro-grooves in indium tin oxide films by picosecond laser ablation for application in thin film solar cells is presented, evaluating the variation of different process parameters. Compared with traditional front-side ablation, rear-side ablation results in thinner grooves with varying laser power at a certain scan speed. In particular, and in contrast to front-side ablation, the width of the micro-grooves remains unchanged when the scan speed was changed. Thus, the micro-groove quality can be optimized by adjusting the scan speed while the groove width would not be affected. Furthermore, high-quality micro-grooves with ripple free surfaces and steep sidewalls could only be achieved when applying rear-side ablation. Finally, the formation mechanism of micro-cracks on the groove rims during rear-side ablation is analyzed and the cracks can be almost entirely eliminated by an optimization of the scan speed.

  5. Biostimulation of iron reduction and subsequent oxidation of sediment containing Fe-silicates and Fe-oxides: effect of redox cycling on Fe(III) bioreduction.

    PubMed

    Komlos, John; Kukkadapu, Ravi K; Zachara, John M; Jaffé, Peter R

    2007-07-01

    Sediment containing a mixture of iron (Fe)-phases, including Fe-oxides (mostly Al-goethite) and Fe-silicates (illites and vermiculite) was bioreduced in a long-term flow through column experiment followed by re-oxidation with dissolved oxygen. The objective of this study was (a) to determine the nature of the re-oxidized Fe(III), and (b) to determine how redox cycling of Fe would affect subsequent Fe(III)-bioavailability. In addition, the effect of Mn on Fe(III) reduction was explored.(57)Fe-Mössbauer spectroscopy measurements showed that biostimulation resulted in partial reduction (20%) of silicate Fe(III) to silicate Fe(II) while the reduction of goethite was negligible. Furthermore, the reduction of Fe in the sediment was uniform throughout the column. When, after biostimulation, 3900 pore volumes of a solution containing dissolved oxygen was pumped through the column over a period of 81 days, approximately 46% of the reduced silicate Fe(II) was re-oxidized to silicate Fe(III). The Mössbauer spectra of the re-oxidized sample were similar to that of pristine sediment implying that Fe-mineralogy of the re-oxidized sediment was mineralogically similar to that of the pristine sediment. In accordance to this, batch experiments showed that Fe(III) reduction occurred at a similar rate although time until Fe(II) buildup started was longer in the pristine sediment than re-oxidized sediment under identical seeding conditions. This was attributed to oxidized Mn that acted as a temporary redox buffer in the pristine sediment. The oxidized Mn was transformed to Mn(II) during bioreduction but, unlike silicate Fe(II), was not re-oxidized when exposed to oxygen.

  6. Microbial Lithotrophic Oxidation of Structural Fe(II) in Biotite

    SciTech Connect

    Shelobolina, Evgenya S.; Xu, Huifang; Konishi, Hiromi; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Wu, Tao; Blothe, Marco; Roden, Eric E.

    2012-06-08

    Microorganisms are known to participate in the weathering of primary phyllosilicate minerals through production of organic ligands and acids, and through uptake of products of weathering. Here we show that a lithotrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing, nitrate-reducing enrichment culture (Straub, 6 1996) can grow via oxidation of structural Fe(II) in biotite, a Fe(II)-rich trioctahedral mica found in granitic rocks. Oxidation of silt/clay sized biotite particles was detected by a decrease in extractable Fe(II) content and simultaneous nitrate reduction. Moessbauer spectroscopy confirmed structural Fe(II) oxidation. Approximately 107 cells were produced per {micro}mol Fe(II) oxidized, in agreement with previous estimates of the growth yield of lithoautotrophic circumneutral-pH Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria. Microbial oxidation of structural Fe(II) resulted in biotite alterations similar to those found in nature, including decrease in unit cell b-dimension toward dioctahedral levels and iron and potassium release. The demonstration of microbial oxidation of structural Fe(II) suggests that microorganisms may be directly responsible for the initial step in the weathering of biotite in granitic aquifers and the plant rhizosphere.

  7. Effect of Oxidation Rate and Fe(II) State on Microbial Nitrate-Dependent Fe(III) Mineral Formation

    PubMed Central

    Senko, John M.; Dewers, Thomas A.; Krumholz, Lee R.

    2005-01-01

    A nitrate-dependent Fe(II)-oxidizing bacterium was isolated and used to evaluate whether Fe(II) chemical form or oxidation rate had an effect on the mineralogy of biogenic Fe(III) (hydr)oxides resulting from nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation. The isolate (designated FW33AN) had 99% 16S rRNA sequence similarity to Klebsiella oxytoca. FW33AN produced Fe(III) (hydr)oxides by oxidation of soluble Fe(II) [Fe(II)sol] or FeS under nitrate-reducing conditions. Based on X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, Fe(III) (hydr)oxide produced by oxidation of FeS was shown to be amorphous, while oxidation of Fe(II)sol yielded goethite. The rate of Fe(II) oxidation was then manipulated by incubating various cell concentrations of FW33AN with Fe(II)sol and nitrate. Characterization of products revealed that as Fe(II) oxidation rates slowed, a stronger goethite signal was observed by XRD and a larger proportion of Fe(III) was in the crystalline fraction. Since the mineralogy of Fe(III) (hydr)oxides may control the extent of subsequent Fe(III) reduction, the variables we identify here may have an effect on the biogeochemical cycling of Fe in anoxic ecosystems. PMID:16269756

  8. Oxidation of silicon nanoparticles produced by nanosecond laser ablation in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaccaro, L.; Camarda, P.; Messina, F.; Buscarino, G.; Agnello, S.; Gelardi, F. M.; Cannas, M.; Boscaino, R.

    2014-10-01

    We investigated nanoparticles produced by laser ablation of silicon in water by the fundamental harmonic (1064 nm) of a ns pulsed Nd:YAG. The silicon oxidation is evidenced by IR absorption features characteristic of amorphous SiO2 (silica). This oxide is highly defective and manifests a luminescence activity under UV excitation: two emission bands at 2.7 eV and 4.4 eV are associated with the twofold coordinated silicon, =SiO••.

  9. Short-term Fe cycling during Fe(II) oxidation: exploring joint oxidation and precipitation with a combinatorial system.

    PubMed

    Burns, Justina M; Craig, Preston S; Shaw, Timothy J; Ferry, John L

    2011-04-01

    The net oxidation of Fe(II)aq by dioxygen initiates a suite of reactions including the oxidation of multiple Fe(II) complexes, generation of secondary oxidants, Fe(III) reduction, and precipitation of insoluble products. This work reports application of a multifactorial strategy to describe the oxidation of Fe(II) under conditions that correspond to those found where Fe(II)-rich groundwaters mix rapidly with overlying oxygenated waters. Response surfaces were constructed describing the relationship of the net oxidation process with mixtures of the common ligands chloride (Cl-), bromide (Br-), total carbonate (CO3(2-)), Fe(II), and Suwannee River natural organic matter (SRNOM) at pH 8.00. Response surfaces were generated in the presence and absence of added phosphate, representing conditional end members corresponding to geographical locations where Fe(III) precipitation is respectively forced and unconstrained. Comparison of net Fe(II) oxidation rates in the presence and absence of phosphate then enabled resolution of the relative contributions of Fe(II) oxidation and Fe(III) reduction to the overall process. The differences between the two surfaces demonstrated the importance of Fe(II) regeneration on the rapid (min) time scale during net oxidation. The minimum Fe(II) concentration necessary to initiate measurable cycling is reported. The presence of reactive oxygen species was evaluated through the use of probes added to the center point condition of the experimental matrix. Analysis of the statistical significance of the Fe(II)-factor relationships demonstrated that over the conditional scale of the experiments complexation of Fe(II) by the selected ligands did not correlate to the experimental outcome.

  10. Self-limiting and complete oxidation of silicon nanostructures produced by laser ablation in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaccaro, L.; Popescu, R.; Messina, F.; Camarda, P.; Schneider, R.; Gerthsen, D.; Gelardi, F. M.; Cannas, M.

    2016-07-01

    Oxidized Silicon nanomaterials produced by 1064 nm pulsed laser ablation in deionized water are investigated. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy allows to characterize the structural and chemical properties at a sub-nanometric scale. This analysis clarifies that laser ablation induces both self-limiting and complete oxidation processes which produce polycrystalline Si surrounded by a layer of SiO2 and amorphous fully oxidized SiO2, respectively. These nanostructures exhibit a composite luminescence spectrum which is investigated by time-resolved spectroscopy with a tunable laser excitation. The origin of the observed luminescence bands agrees with the two structural typologies: Si nanocrystals emit a μs-decaying red band; defects of SiO2 give rise to a ns-decaying UV band and two overlapping blue bands with lifetime in the ns and ms timescale.

  11. Fabrication of oxide base nanostructures using pulsed laser ablation in aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, T.; Liang, C.; Nichols, W. T.; Shimizu, Y.; Koshizaki, N.

    Nanoparticles of TiO2 and SnO2 were obtained by laser ablation of Ti and Sn targets in both deionized water and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) solutions. The crystallinity of the nanoparticles strongly depended on the SDS concentration in the solution. Well-crystallized oxide nanoparticles were most abundantly fabricated in SDS solution with around the critical micelle concentration. An inorganic/organic layered nanocomposite consisting of a zinc hydroxide layer and a SDS lamellar interlayer was obtained by the ablation of Zn in SDS solutions. The oxide and/or hydroxide can be formed by the rapid reactive quenching with water in the liquid-plasma interface, where ablated species can be oxidized by aqueous oxidation. The surfactant in the liquid medium could affect the aggregation and growth of nuclei after the oxidation. The preparation of Pt/TiO2 nanocomposite particles by PLA of the bi-combinant target of Pt and TiO2 is also reported.

  12. Biomineralization Associated with Microbial Reduction of Fe3+ and Oxidation of Fe2+ in Solid Minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Gengxin; Dong, Hailiang; Jiang, Hongchen; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Kim, Jinwook; Eberl, Dennis D.; Xu, Zhiqin

    2009-07-01

    Iron- reducing and oxidizing microorganisms gain energy through reduction or oxidation of iron, and by doing so they play an important role in geochemical cycling of iron in a wide range of environments. This study was undertaken to investigate iron redox cycling in the deep subsurface by taking an advantage of the Chinese Continental Scientific Deep Drilling project. A fluid sample from 2450 m was collected and Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms were enriched using specific media (pH 6.2). Nontronite, an Fe(III)-rich clay mineral, was used in initial enrichments with lactate and acetate as electron donors under strictly anaerobic condition at the in-situ temperature of the fluid sample (65oC). Instead of a monotonic increase in Fe(II) concentration with time as would have been expected if Fe(III) bioreduction was the sole process, Fe(II) concentration initially increased, reached a peak, but then decreased to a minimum level. Continued incubation revealed an iron cycling with a cycling period of five to ten days. These initial results suggested that there might be Fe(III) reducers and Fe(II) oxidizers in the enrichment culture. Subsequently, multiple transfers were made with an attempt to isolate individual Fe(III) reducers and Fe(II) oxidizers. However, iron cycling persisted after multiple transfers. Additional experiments were conducted to ensure that iron reduction and oxidation was indeed biological. Biological Fe(II) oxidation was further confirmed in a series of roll tubes (with a pH gradient) where FeS and siderite were used as the sole electron donor. The oxidation of FeS occurred only at pH 10, and goethite, lepidocrocite, and ferrihydrite formed as oxidation products. Although molecular evidence (16S rRNA gene analysis) collectively suggested that only a single organism (a strain of Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus) might be responsible for both Fe(III) reduction and Fe(II) oxidation, we could not rule out the possibility that Fe(III) reduction and Fe

  13. Synthesis and magnetic study of carbon coated iron oxide nanoparticles by laser ablation in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prajapat, C. L.; Sharma, P.; Gonal, M. R.; Vatsa, R. K.; Singh, M. R.; Ravikumar, G.

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic Iron oxides nanoparticles (NPs) were prepared by Laser Ablation in Solution method. Formation and average size of iron oxide NPs (~8 nm) is confirmed by XRD pattern and magnetization studies. Detailed magnetic studies have been carried out using SQUID magnetometer. The saturation magnetization for the iron oxide NPs was found to be 60.07 emu/g. Below the blocking temperature of 150 K the hysteresis loop shows ferromagnetic nature, whereas it shows superparamagnetic behavior at 300 K, for the synthesized NPs.

  14. Evaluating the Oxidation State of Fe in Oxide Minerals using Fe K-edge XANES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcus, M. A.

    2006-12-01

    Synchrotron based X-ray absorption spectroscopy has proven to be a useful tool for examining the chemical state of various elements in earth and space materials, ranging from soils to ferromanganese ocean nodules to meteorites. Iron is the most common redox-active element in the Earth's crust, and determining its oxidation state in-situ is vital in many applications. XANES (X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy) promises to provide the sought-for information, but it is surprisingly difficult to inspect a spectrum and read off the average oxidation state. In general, even for oxide minerals, the energy or shape of a single feature isn't enough to yield a reliable figure. Methods have been proposed in the past for the interpretation of Fe XANES spectra (1-3), but they tend to rely either on a detailed analysis of the weak pre-edge features, or on very accurate measurements of the energies of features. These requirements often make it impossible to use data of ordinary quality to determine the oxidation state of an unknown. Therefore, a new method is proposed which is usable with only ordinary levels of energy resolution, signal/noise, and energy calibration accuracy. The inflection point of the pre-edge feature is taken as the energy zero, thus rendering the method self-calibrating. Then, the energy positions of the "white-line" maximum and the halfway-up points are plotted. When this procedure is done with a variety of Fe2+, Fe3+ and mixed-valent standards, it becomes clear that contours of constant valence can be drawn. A polynomial fit of valence to these energy coordinates is done, which can then be applied to any unknown. This method is accurate to about 0.25 valence units for all available divalent, trivalent and mixed- valent oxide standards. We found that the Fe sulfides such as pyrite occupy a different area on the graph than do the oxides. Examples of the use of this method with unknowns will be presented. 1) M. Wilke, F. Farges, P.-E. Petit, G. E. Brown

  15. Fe@Fe2O3 core-shell nanowires enhanced Fenton oxidation by accelerating the Fe(III)/Fe(II) cycles.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jingu; Ai, Zhihui; Zhang, Lizhi

    2014-08-01

    In this study we demonstrate Fe@Fe2O3 core-shell nanowires can improve Fenton oxidation efficiency by two times with rhodamine B as a model pollutant at pH > 4. Active species trapping experiments revealed that the rhodamine B oxidation enhancement was attributed to molecular oxygen activation induced by Fe@Fe2O3 core-shell nanowires. The molecular oxygen activation process could generate superoxide radicals to assist iron core for the reduction of ferric ions to accelerate the Fe(III)/Fe(II) cycles, which favored the H2O2 decomposition to produce more hydroxyl radicals for the rhodamine B oxidation. The combination of Fe@Fe2O3 core-shell nanowires and ferrous ions (Fe@Fe2O3/Fe(2+)) offered a superior Fenton catalyst to decompose H2O2 for producing OH. We employed benzoic acid as a probe reagent to check the generation of OH and found the OH generation rate of Fe@Fe2O3/Fe(2+) was 2-4 orders of magnitude larger than those of commonly used iron based Fenton catalysts and 38 times that of Fe(2+). The reusability and the stability of Fe@Fe2O3 core-shell nanowires were studied. Total organic carbon and ion chromatography analyses revealed the mineralization of rhodamine B and the releasing of nitrate ions. Gas chromatograph-mass spectrometry was used to investigate the degradation intermediates to propose the possible rhodamine B Fenton oxidation pathway in the presence of Fe@Fe2O3 nanowires. This study not only provides a new Fenton oxidation system for pollutant control, but also widen the application of molecular oxygen activation induced by nanoscale zero valent iron.

  16. Fe 3O 4 films grown by laser ablation on mica with and without MgO buffer layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, R. J.; Stampe, P. A.

    1999-05-01

    Fe 3O 4 and MgO films have been grown on (0 0 1) mica substrates by ablation of an Fe or Mg metal target in an oxygen atmosphere using the fundamental frequency of a Nd : YAG laser. X-ray measurements show that the MgO films are epitaxial and (1 1 1) oriented. The Fe 3O 4 films grown on bare mica substrates are (1 1 1) oriented and random in plane. The introduction of an MgO buffer layer between the mica and the Fe 3O 4 films results in epitaxial (1 1 1) growth of Fe 3O 4. Room temperature high-field magnetization measurements of the random in plane Fe 3O 4/mica films are the same as for the epitaxial Fe 3O 4/MgO/mica films. The out of plane coercivities are almost twice as large as the in-plane coercivities, in contrast to ferrite films grown on Si and GaAs for which Hc|| ˜ Hc⊥ .

  17. Structure and properties of iron oxide clusters: From Fe6 to Fe6 O20 and from Fe7 to Fe7 O24.

    PubMed

    Gutsev, Gennady L; Belay, Kalayu G; Gutsev, Lavrenty G; Ramachandran, Bala R

    2016-10-30

    Geometrical and electronic structures of the neutral and singly negatively charged Fe6 On and Fe7 Om clusters in the range of 1 ≤ n ≤ 20 and 1 ≤ m ≤ 24, respectively, are computed using density functional theory with the generalized gradient approximation. The largest clusters in the two series, Fe6 O20 and Fe7 O24 , can be described as Fe(FeO4 )5 and Fe(FeO4 )6 or alternatively as [FeO5 ](FeO3 )5 and [FeO6 ](FeO3 )6 , respectively. The Fe6 O20 and Fe7 O24 clusters possess adiabatic electron affinities (EAad ) of 5.64 eV and 5.80 eV and can be attributed to the class of hyperhalogens since FeO4 is an unique closed-shell superhalogen with the EAad of 3.9 eV. The spin character of the lowest total energy states in both series changes from ferromagnetic to ferrimagnetic or antiferromagnetic when the first FeOFe bridge is formed. Oxidation decreases substantially the polarizability per atom of the initial bare clusters; namely, from 5.98 Å(3) of Fe6 to 2.47 Å(3) of Fe6 O20 and from 5.67 Å(3) of Fe7 to 2.38 Å(3) of Fe7 O24 . The results of our computations pertaining to the binding energies of O, Fe, O2 , and FeO in the Fe7 Om series provide an explanation for the experimentally observed abundance of the iron oxide nanoparticles with stoichiometric compositions. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27557091

  18. Preparation of iron oxide nanoparticles by laser ablation in DMF under effect of external magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Raid A.; Sulaiman, Ghassan M.; Abdulrahman, Safa A.

    2016-05-01

    We have studied the effect of applying an external magnetic field on the characteristics of iron oxide (IO) nanoparticles (NPs) synthesized by pulsed laser ablation in dimethylformamide (DMF). The NPs synthesized with and without applying of magnetic field were characterized by Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), UV-Vis absorption, scanning electron microscope (SEM), atomic force microscope (AFM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). SEM results confirmed that the particle size was decreased after applying magnetic field.

  19. Fabrication of Fe-Al nanoparticles by selective oxidation of Fe-Al thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Pyungwoo; Shin, Seungchan; Jung, Chip-Sup; Kim, Kwang-Ho; Seomoon, Kyu

    2013-04-01

    The possibility of a new technique for fabricating nanoparticles from thin films using selective oxidation in an atmosphere mixture of water vapor and hydrogen was investigated. Fe-5wt.%Al films were RF-sputtered and annealed in the atmosphere mixture at 900°C for up to 200 min, in order to oxidize aluminum selectively. Thermodynamics simulation showed that temperatures exceeding 800°C are necessary to prevent iron from being oxidized, as confirmed by the depth profile of XPS. As the annealing time increased, the morphology of the 200-nm Fe-Al films changed from the continuous to the discontinuous type; thus, particulate Fe-Al films formed after 100 min. The particulate 10- to 100-nm Fe-Al films showed super-paramagnetic behavior after the oxidation. Thus, a new technique for fabricating nanoparticles was successfully introduced using selective oxidation.

  20. Synthesis of oxidation resistant lead nanoparticle films by modified pulsed laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Eunsung; Murray, P. Terrence; Subramanyam, Guru; Malik, Hans K.; Schwartz, Kenneth L.

    2012-07-30

    Thin layers of lead nanoparticles have been produced by a modified pulsed laser ablation (PLA) process in which smaller nanoparticles were swept out of the ablation chamber by a stream of flowing Ar. Large ({mu}m-sized) particles, which are usually deposited during the standard PLA process, were successfully eliminated from the deposit. The nanoparticles deposited on room temperature substrates were well distributed, and the most probable particle diameter was in the order of 30 nm. Since lead is highly reactive, the nanoparticles formed in Ar were quickly oxidized upon exposure to air. A small partial pressure of H{sub 2}S gas was subsequently added to the effluent, downstream from the ablation chamber, and this resulted in the formation of nanoparticle deposits that were surprisingly oxidation resistant. The properties of the nanoparticle films (as determined by transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and conductivity measurements) are reported, and the mechanism of the oxidation retardation process is discussed.

  1. Sustaining reactivity of Fe(0) for nitrate reduction via electron transfer between dissolved Fe(2+) and surface iron oxides.

    PubMed

    Han, Luchao; yang, Li; Wang, Haibo; Hu, Xuexiang; Chen, Zhan; Hu, Chun

    2016-05-01

    The mechanism of the effects of Fe(2+)(aq) on the reduction of NO3(-) by Fe(0) was investigated. The effects of initial pH on the rate of NO3(-) reduction and the Fe(0) surface characteristics revealed Fe(2+)(aq) and the characteristics of minerals on the surface of Fe(0) played an important role in NO3(-) reduction. Both NO3(-) reduction and the decrease of Fe(2+)(aq) exhibited similar kinetics and were promoted by each other. This promotion was associated with the types of the surface iron oxides of Fe(0). Additionally, further reduction of NO3(-) produced more surface iron oxides, supplying more active sites for Fe(2+)(aq), resulting in more electron transfer between Fe(2+) and surface iron oxides and a higher reaction rate. Using the isotope specificity of (57)Fe Mossbauer spectroscopy, it was verified that the Fe(2+)(aq) was continuously converted into Fe(3+) oxides on the surface of Fe(0) and then converted into Fe3O4 via electron transfer between Fe(2+) and the pre-existing surface Fe(3+) oxides. Electrochemistry measurements confirmed that the spontaneous electron transfer between the Fe(2+) and structural Fe(3+) species accelerated the interfacial electron transfer between the Fe species and NO3(-). This study provides a new insight into the interaction between Fe species and contaminants and interface electron transfer.

  2. Graphyne-supported single Fe atom catalysts for CO oxidation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ping; Du, Pan; Zhang, Hui; Cai, Chenxin

    2015-01-14

    Single atom catalysts (SACs) are highly desirable for the effort to maximize the efficiency of metal atom use. However, the synthesis of SACs is a major challenge that largely depends on finding an appropriate supporting substrate to achieve a well-defined and highly dispersed single atom. This work demonstrates that, based on the density functional theory (DFT) calculation, graphyne is a good substrate for single Fe atom catalysts. The Fe atom can be tightly embedded in a graphyne sheet with a high binding energy of ∼4.99 eV and a high diffusion energy barrier of ∼1.0 eV. The graphyne-supported Fe (Fe-graphyne) SAC shows high catalytic activity towards CO oxidation, which is often regarded as a prototype reaction for designing atomic-scale catalysts. We studied the adsorption characteristics of CO and O2 on Fe-graphyne SACs, and simulated the reaction mechanism of CO oxidation involving Fe-graphyne. The simulation results indicate that O2 binding on Fe-graphyne is much stronger than that of CO, and the adsorbed O2 prior to occupy the Fe atoms as the co-existence of O2 and CO. The reaction of CO oxidation by adsorbed O2 on Fe-graphyne SACs favors to proceed via the Eley-Rideal (ER) mechanism with the energy barrier of as low as ∼0.21 eV in the rate-limiting step. Calculation of the electronic density of states (DOS) of each reaction step demonstrates that the strong interaction of the O2 and Fe adatom promotes the CO oxidation on Fe-graphyne SACs. The results presented here suggest that graphyne could provide a unique platform to synthesize SACs, and the Fe-graphyne SACs could find potential use in solving the growing environmental problems caused by CO emission from automobiles and industrial processes, in removing CO contamination from vehicle exhaust and in fuel cells.

  3. Graphene oxide-based micropatterns via high-throughput multiphoton-induced reduction and ablation.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi-Cheng; Yeh, Te-Fu; Huang, Hsin-Chieh; Chang, Hsin-Yu; Lin, Chun-Yu; Cheng, Li-Chung; Chang, Chia-Yuan; Teng, Hsisheng; Chen, Shean-Jen

    2014-08-11

    In this study, a developed temporal focusing-based femtosecond laser system provides high-throughput multiphoton-induced reduction and ablation of graphene oxide (GO) films. Integrated with a digital micromirror device to locally control the laser pulse numbers, GO-based micropatterns can be quickly achieved instantly. Furthermore, the degree of reduction and ablation can be precisely adjusted via controlling the laser wavelength, power, and pulse number. Compared to point-by-point scanning laser direct writing, this approach offers a high-throughput and multiple-function approach to accomplish a large area of micro-scale patterns on GO films. The high-throughput micropatterning of GO via the temporal focusing-based femtosecond laser system fulfills the requirement of mass production for GO-based applications in microelectronic devices. PMID:25321055

  4. Effects of FeS on Chromium Oxidation Mediated by Manganese Oxidizers

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Youxian; Deng, Baolin

    2004-03-31

    Reductive immobilization of Cr(VI) has been widely explored as a cost-effective approach for Cr-contaminated site remediation. The long-term stability of the immobilized Cr(III), however, is a concern. Cr(III) is known to be oxidized by Mn oxides chemically and Mn-oxides could be produced through microbially mediated Mn(II) oxidation. This study examined the effect of FeS on Cr(III) oxidation mediated by Pseudomonas putida. The results showed that commercial granular FeS did not affect Cr(III) oxidation in the culture of P. putida with Mn(II), but freshly precipitated FeS slurry inhibited Cr(III) oxidation. A 10 mg/l of FeS did not inhibit the microbial growth, but delayed the production of Mn oxides, thus postponing potential Cr(III) oxidation. In the presence of excessive FeS slurry, both Cr(VI) and Mn oxides were reduced rapidly. The reduced Cr(III) could not be re-oxidized as long as freshly formed FeS was present, even in the presence of the manganese oxidizers.

  5. Iron isotope fractionation during microbially stimulated Fe(II) oxidation and Fe(III) precipitation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Balci, N.; Bullen, T.D.; Witte-Lien, K.; Shanks, Wayne C.; Motelica, M.; Mandernack, K.W.

    2006-01-01

    Interpretation of the origins of iron-bearing minerals preserved in modern and ancient rocks based on measured iron isotope ratios depends on our ability to distinguish between biological and non-biological iron isotope fractionation processes. In this study, we compared 56Fe/54Fe ratios of coexisting aqueous iron (Fe(II)aq, Fe(III)aq) and iron oxyhydroxide precipitates (Fe(III)ppt) resulting from the oxidation of ferrous iron under experimental conditions at low pH (<3). Experiments were carried out using both pure cultures of Acidothiobacillus ferrooxidans and sterile controls to assess possible biological overprinting of non-biological fractionation, and both SO42- and Cl- salts as Fe(II) sources to determine possible ionic/speciation effects that may be associated with oxidation/precipitation reactions. In addition, a series of ferric iron precipitation experiments were performed at pH ranging from 1.9 to 3.5 to determine if different precipitation rates cause differences in the isotopic composition of the iron oxyhydroxides. During microbially stimulated Fe(II) oxidation in both the sulfate and chloride systems, 56Fe/54Fe ratios of residual Fe(II)aq sampled in a time series evolved along an apparent Rayleigh trend characterized by a fractionation factor ??Fe(III)aq-Fe(II)aq???1.0022. This fractionation factor was significantly less than that measured in our sterile control experiments (???1.0034) and that predicted for isotopic equilibrium between Fe(II)aq and Fe(III)aq (???1.0029), and thus might be interpreted to reflect a biological isotope effect. However, in our biological experiments the measured difference in 56Fe/54Fe ratios between Fe(III)aq, isolated as a solid by the addition of NaOH to the final solution at each time point under N2-atmosphere, and Fe(II)aq was in most cases and on average close to 2.9??? (??Fe(III)aq-Fe(II)aq ???1.0029), consistent with isotopic equilibrium between Fe(II)aq and Fe(III)aq. The ferric iron precipitation experiments

  6. CoxFe1-x oxide coatings on metallic interconnects for solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Fengyu; Lu, Kathy

    2016-10-01

    In order to improve the performance of Cr-containing steel as an interconnect material for solid oxide fuel cells, CoFe alloy coatings with Co:Fe ratios of 9:1, 8:2, 7:3, 6:4, and 5:5 are deposited by electrodeposition and then oxidized to CoxFe1-x oxide coatings with a thickness of ∼6 μm as protective layers on the interconnect. The area specific resistance of the coated interconnect increases with the Fe content. Higher Co content oxide coatings are more effective in limiting the growth of the chromia scale while all coatings are effective in inhibiting Cr diffusion and evaporation. With the Co0.8Fe0.2 oxide coated interconnect, the electrochemical performance of the Sm0.5Sr0.5Co0.2Fe0.8O3 cathode is improved. Only 1.54 atomic percentage of Cr is detected on the surface of the Sm0.5Sr0.5Co0.2Fe0.8O3 cathode while no Cr is detected 0.66 μm or more into the cathode. CoxFe1-x oxide coatings are promising candidates for solid oxide fuel cell interconnects with the advantage of using existing cathode species for compatibility and performance enhancement.

  7. Oxidation behavior of FeAl+Hf,Zr,B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.; Doychak, Joseph

    1988-01-01

    The oxidation behavior of Fe-40Al-1Hf, Fe-40Al-1Hf-0.4B, and Fe-40Al-0.1Zr-0.4B (at. percent) alloys was characterized after 900, 1000, and 100 C exposures. Isothermal tests revealed parabolic kinetics after a period of transitional theta-alumina scale growth. The parabolic growth rates for the subsequent alpha-alumina scales were about five times higher than those for NiAl+0.1Zr alloys. The isothermally grown scales showed a propensity toward massive scale spallation due to both extensive rumpling from growth stresses and to an inner layer of HfO2. Cyclic oxidation for 200 1-hr cycles produced little degradation at 900 or 1000 C, but caused significant spallation at 1100 C in the form of small segments of the outer scale. The major difference in the cyclic oxidation of the three FeAl alloys was increased initial spallation for FeAl+Zr,B. Although these FeAl alloys showed many similarities to NiAl alloys, they were generally less oxidation resistant. It is believed that this resulted from nonoptimal levels of dopants and larger thermal expansion mismatch stresses.

  8. Single-step synthesis of graphene quantum dots by femtosecond laser ablation of graphene oxide dispersions.

    PubMed

    Russo, Paola; Liang, Robert; Jabari, Elahe; Marzbanrad, Ehsan; Toyserkani, Ehsan; Zhou, Y Norman

    2016-04-28

    In the last few years, graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have attracted the attention of many research groups for their outstanding properties, which include low toxicity, chemical stability and photoluminescence. One of the challenges of GQD synthesis is finding a single-step, cheap and sustainable approach for synthesizing these promising nanomaterials. In this study, we demonstrate that femtosecond laser ablation of graphene oxide (GO) dispersions could be employed as a facile and environmentally friendly synthesis method for GQDs. With the proper control of laser ablation parameters, such as ablation time and laser power, it is possible to produce GQDs with average sizes of 2-5 nm, emitting a blue luminescence at 410 nm. We tested the feasibility of the synthesized GQDs as materials for electronic devices by aerosol-jet printing of an ink that is a mixture of water dispersion of laser synthesized GQDs and silver nanoparticle dispersion, which resulted in lower resistivity of the final printed patterns. Preliminary results showed that femtosecond laser synthesized GQDs can be mixed with silver nanoparticle dispersion to fabricate a hybrid material, which can be employed in printing electronic devices by either printing patterns that are more conductive and/or reducing costs of the ink by decreasing the concentration of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in the ink. PMID:27071944

  9. Ablation of ALCAT1 Mitigates Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy through Effects on Oxidative Stress and Mitophagy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaolei; Ye, Benlan; Miller, Shane; Yuan, Huijuan; Zhang, Hongxiu; Tian, Liang; Nie, Jia; Imae, Rieko; Arai, Hiroyuki; Li, Yuanjian; Cheng, Zeneng

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress causes mitochondrial dysfunction and heart failure through unknown mechanisms. Cardiolipin (CL), a mitochondrial membrane phospholipid required for oxidative phosphorylation, plays a pivotal role in cardiac function. The onset of age-related heart diseases is characterized by aberrant CL acyl composition that is highly sensitive to oxidative damage, leading to CL peroxidation and mitochondrial dysfunction. Here we report a key role of ALCAT1, a lysocardiolipin acyltransferase that catalyzes the synthesis of CL with a high peroxidation index, in mitochondrial dysfunction associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. We show that ALCAT1 expression was potently upregulated by the onset of hyperthyroid cardiomyopathy, leading to oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Accordingly, overexpression of ALCAT1 in H9c2 cardiac cells caused severe oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation, and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion. Conversely, ablation of ALCAT1 prevented the onset of T4-induced cardiomyopathy and cardiac dysfunction. ALCAT1 deficiency also mitigated oxidative stress, insulin resistance, and mitochondrial dysfunction by improving mitochondrial quality control through upregulation of PINK1, a mitochondrial GTPase required for mitochondrial autophagy. Together, these findings implicate a key role of ALCAT1 as the missing link between oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in the etiology of age-related heart diseases. PMID:22949503

  10. Mössbauer Study of Electrodeposited Fe/Fe-Oxide Multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmann, E.; Lakatos-Varsányi, M.; Varga, L. K.; Mikó, A.; Kálmán, E.; Homonnay, Z.; Klencsár, Z.; Nagy, F.; Vértes, A.

    2005-04-01

    Iron has been deposited electrochemically by short current pulses in Na-saccharin containing FeII-chloride and sulphate solution electrolytes. Combined electrochemical techniques with initial pulse plating of iron nanolayer and its subsequent anodic oxidation under potential control have been used for production of Fe/Fe-oxide multilayers. 57Fe CEM spectra of pulse plated iron revealed the presence of a minor doublet attributed mainly to γ-FeOOH in addition to the dominant sextet of α-iron. In the case of anodically oxidized pulse plated iron and of samples after repeated deposition of anodically oxidized pulse plated iron an additional minor doublet, assigned to ferrous chloride, also appears in the Mössbauer spectra. A significant change in the magnetic anisotropy of α-iron was observed with the anodic oxidation. The thickness of the layers were estimated from the CEM spectrum data by a modified computer program of the Liljequist method. The coercive field and the power loss versus frequency data showed that the pulse plated iron cores are good inductive elements up to several kHz frequencies.

  11. Effect of phosphate and sulfate on Ni repartitioning during Fe(II)-catalyzed Fe(III) oxide mineral recrystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinkle, Margaret A. G.; Catalano, Jeffrey G.

    2015-09-01

    Dissolved Fe(II) activates coupled oxidative growth and reductive dissolution of Fe(III) oxide minerals, causing recrystallization and the repartitioning of structurally-compatible trace metals. Phosphate and sulfate, two ligands common to natural aquatic systems, alter Fe(II) adsorption onto Fe(III) oxides and affect Fe(III) oxide dissolution and precipitation. However, the effect of these oxoanions on trace metal repartitioning during Fe(II)-catalyzed Fe(III) oxide recrystallization is unclear. The effects of phosphate and sulfate on Ni adsorption and Ni repartitioning during Fe(II)-catalyzed Fe(III) oxide recrystallization were investigated as such repartitioning may be affected by both Fe(II)-oxoanion and metal-oxoanion interactions. In most systems examined, phosphate alters Ni repartitioning during Fe(II)-catalyzed recrystallization to a larger extent than sulfate. Phosphate substantially enhances Ni adsorption onto hematite but decreases (nearly inhibiting) Fe(II)-catalyzed Ni incorporation into and release from this mineral. In the goethite system, however, phosphate suppresses Ni release but enhances Ni incorporation in the presence of aqueous Fe(II). In contrast, sulfate has little effect on macroscopic Ni adsorption and release of Ni from Fe(III) oxides, but substantially enhances Ni incorporation into goethite. This demonstrates that phosphate and sulfate have unique, mineral-specific interactions with Ni during Fe(II)-catalyzed Fe(III) oxide recrystallization. This research suggests that micronutrient bioavailability at redox interfaces in hematite-dominated systems may be especially suppressed by phosphate, while both oxoanions likely have limited effects in goethite-rich soils or sediments. Phosphate may also exert a large control on contaminant fate at redox interfaces, increasing Ni retention on iron oxide surfaces. These results further indicate that trace metal retention by iron oxides during lithification and later repartitioning during

  12. Shewanella putrefaciens produces an Fe(III)-solubilizing organic ligand during anaerobic respiration on insoluble Fe(III) oxides.

    PubMed

    Taillefert, Martial; Beckler, Jordon S; Carey, Elizabeth; Burns, Justin L; Fennessey, Christine M; DiChristina, Thomas J

    2007-11-01

    The mechanism of Fe(III) reduction was investigated using voltammetric techniques in anaerobic incubations of Shewanella putrefaciens strain 200 supplemented with Fe(III) citrate or a suite of Fe(III) oxides as terminal electron acceptor. Results indicate that organic complexes of Fe(III) are produced during the reduction of Fe(III) at rates that correlate with the reactivity of the Fe(III) phase and bacterial cell density. Anaerobic Fe(III) solubilization activity is detected with either Fe(III) oxides or Fe(III) citrate, suggesting that the organic ligand produced is strong enough to destabilize Fe(III) from soluble or solid Fe(III) substrates. Results also demonstrate that Fe(III) oxide dissolution is not controlled by the intrinsic chemical reactivity of the Fe(III) oxides. Instead, the chemical reaction between the endogenous organic ligand is only affected by the number of reactive surface sites available to S. putrefaciens. This report describes the first application of voltammetric techniques to demonstrate production of soluble organic-Fe(III) complexes by any Fe(III)-reducing microorganism and is the first report of a Fe(III)-solubilizing ligand generated by a metal-reducing member of the genus Shewanella.

  13. Proteome of Geobacter sulfurreducens grown with Fe(III) oxide or Fe(III) citrate as the electron acceptor.

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Y-H R.; Hixson, Kim K.; Aklujkar, Ma; Lipton, Mary S.; Smith, Richard D.; Lovley, Derek R.; Mester, Tunde

    2008-12-01

    e(III) oxides are the most abundant source of reducible Fe(III) by microorganisms in most soils and sediments, yet few studies on the physiology of Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms during growth on Fe(III) oxide have been conducted because of the technical difficulties in working with cell growth and harvest in the presence of Fe(III) oxides. Geobacter sulfurreducens is a representative of the Geobacter species that predominate in a variety of subsurface environments in which Fe(III) oxide is important. In order to better understand the physiology of Geobacter species during growth on Fe(III) oxide, the proteome of G. sulfurreducens grown on Fe(III) oxide was compared with the proteome of cells grown with soluble Fe(III) citrate. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE) revealed 19 proteins that were more abundant during growth on Fe(III) oxide than on soluble Fe(III). These included proteins related to protein synthesis, electron transfer and energy production, oxidative stress, protein folding, outer membrane proteins, nitrogen metabolism and hypothetical proteins. Further analysis of the proteome with the accurate mass and time (AMT) tag method revealed additional proteins associated with growth on Fe(III) oxide. These included the outer-membrane c-type cytochrome, OmcS and OmcG, which genetic studies have suggested are required for Fe(III) oxide reduction. Furthermore, several other cytochromes, as yet unstudied, were detected to be significantly up regulated during growth on Fe(III) oxide and other proteins of unknown function were more abundant during growth on Fe(III) oxide than on soluble Fe(III). PilA, the structural protein for pili, which is required for Fe(III) oxide reduction, and other pilin-associated proteins were also more abundant during growth on Fe(III) oxide. Confirmation of the differential expression of proteins known to be important in Fe(III) oxide reduction was observed, and an additional number of previously

  14. Characterization of Tungsten Oxide Thin Films Produced by Spark Ablation for NO2 Gas Sensing.

    PubMed

    Isaac, Nishchay A; Valenti, Marco; Schmidt-Ott, Andreas; Biskos, George

    2016-02-17

    Tungsten oxides (WOx) thin films are currently used in electro-chromic devices, solar-cells and gas sensors as a result of their versatile and unique characteristics. In this study, we produce nanoparticulate WOx films by spark ablation and focused inertial deposition, and demonstrate their application for NO2 sensing. The primary particles in the as-deposited film samples are amorphous with sizes ranging from 10 to 15 nm. To crystallize the samples, the as-deposited films are annealed at 500 °C in air. This also caused the primary particles to grow to 30-50 nm by sintering. The morphologies and crystal structures of the resulting materials are studied using scanning and transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction, whereas information on composition and oxidation states are determined by X-ray photoemission spectroscopy. The observed sensitivity of the resistance of the annealed films is ∼100 when exposed to 1 ppm of NO2 in air at 200 °C, which provides a considerable margin for employing them in gas sensors for measuring even lower concentrations. The films show a stable and repeatable response pattern. Considering the numerous advantages of spark ablation for fabricating nanoparticulate thin films, the results reported here provide a promising first step toward the production of high sensitivity and high accuracy sensors. PMID:26796099

  15. Characterization of Tungsten Oxide Thin Films Produced by Spark Ablation for NO2 Gas Sensing.

    PubMed

    Isaac, Nishchay A; Valenti, Marco; Schmidt-Ott, Andreas; Biskos, George

    2016-02-17

    Tungsten oxides (WOx) thin films are currently used in electro-chromic devices, solar-cells and gas sensors as a result of their versatile and unique characteristics. In this study, we produce nanoparticulate WOx films by spark ablation and focused inertial deposition, and demonstrate their application for NO2 sensing. The primary particles in the as-deposited film samples are amorphous with sizes ranging from 10 to 15 nm. To crystallize the samples, the as-deposited films are annealed at 500 °C in air. This also caused the primary particles to grow to 30-50 nm by sintering. The morphologies and crystal structures of the resulting materials are studied using scanning and transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction, whereas information on composition and oxidation states are determined by X-ray photoemission spectroscopy. The observed sensitivity of the resistance of the annealed films is ∼100 when exposed to 1 ppm of NO2 in air at 200 °C, which provides a considerable margin for employing them in gas sensors for measuring even lower concentrations. The films show a stable and repeatable response pattern. Considering the numerous advantages of spark ablation for fabricating nanoparticulate thin films, the results reported here provide a promising first step toward the production of high sensitivity and high accuracy sensors.

  16. Coupled Fe(II)-Fe(III) electron and atom exchange as a mechanism for Fe isotope fractionation during dissimilatory iron oxide reduction.

    PubMed

    Crosby, Heidi A; Johnson, Clark M; Roden, Eric E; Beard, Brian L

    2005-09-01

    Microbial dissimilatory iron reduction (DIR) is an important pathway for carbon oxidation in anoxic sediments, and iron isotopes may distinguish between iron produced by DIR and other sources of aqueous Fe(II). Previous studies have shown that aqueous Fe(II) produced during the earliest stages of DIR has delta56Fe values that are 0.5-2.0%o lowerthan the initial Fe(III) substrate. The new experiments reported here suggest that this fractionation is controlled by coupled electron and Fe atom exchange between Fe(II) and Fe(III) at iron oxide surfaces. In hematite and goethite reduction experiments with Geobacter sulfurreducens, the 56Fe/54Fe isotopic fractionation between aqueous Fe(II) and the outermost layers of Fe(III) on the oxide surface is approximately -3%o and can be explained by equilibrium Fe isotope partitioning between reactive Fe(II) and Fe(III) pools that coexist during DIR. The results indicate that sorption of Fe(II) to Fe(III) substrates cannot account for production of low-delta56Fe values for aqueous Fe(II) during DIR.

  17. As(III) removal and speciation of Fe (Oxyhydr)oxides during simultaneous oxidation of As(III) and Fe(II).

    PubMed

    Han, Xu; Song, Jia; Li, Yi-Liang; Jia, Shao-Yi; Wang, Wen-Hui; Huang, Fu-Gen; Wu, Song-Hai

    2016-03-01

    Abiotic oxidation of Fe(II) is an important pathway in the formation of Fe (oxyhydr)oxides. However, how can As(III) affect the oxidation rate of Fe(II) and the speciation of Fe (oxyhydr)oxides, and what's the extent of the newly formed Fe (oxyhydr)oxides on the removal of aqueous arsenic are still poorly understood. Oxidation of Fe(II) under neutral pH conditions was therefore investigated under different molar ratios of As:Fe. Our results suggest that co-existence of aqueous As(III) significantly slows down the oxidation rate of Fe(II). Speciation of Fe (oxyhydr)oxides is dependent on pH and As:Fe ratios. At pH 6.0, formation of lepidocrocite and goethite is apparently inhibited at low As:Fe ratios, and ferric arsenate is favored at high As:Fe ratios. At pH 7.0, lepidocrocite gradually degenerates with the increasing As:Fe ratios. At pH 8.0, arsenite significantly inhibits the development of magnetite and favors a formation of lepidocrocite. XPS analysis further reveals that more than half of As(III) is oxidized to As(V) at pH 6.0 and 7.0, whereas at pH 8.0, the rapid oxidation of Fe(II) as well as the rapid formation of Fe (oxyhydr)oxides facilitate a rapid removal of dissolved As(III) before its further oxidation to As(V).

  18. Room temperature ferromagnetism in liquid-phase pulsed laser ablation synthesized nanoparticles of nonmagnetic oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, S. C. Gopal, R.; Kotnala, R. K.

    2015-08-14

    Intrinsic Room Temperature Ferromagnetism (RTF) has been observed in undoped/uncapped zinc oxide and titanium dioxide spherical nanoparticles (NPs) obtained by a purely green approach of liquid phase pulsed laser ablation of corresponding metal targets in pure water. Saturation magnetization values observed for zinc oxide (average size, 9 ± 1.2 nm) and titanium dioxide (average size, 4.4 ± 0.3 nm) NPs are 62.37 and 42.17 memu/g, respectively, which are several orders of magnitude larger than those of previous reports. In contrast to the previous works, no postprocessing treatments or surface modification is required to induce ferromagnetism in the case of present communication. The most important result, related to the field of intrinsic ferromagnetism in nonmagnetic materials, is the observation of size dependent ferromagnetism. Degree of ferromagnetism in titanium dioxide increases with the increase in particle size, while it is reverse for zinc oxide. Surface and volume defects play significant roles for the origin of RTF in zinc oxide and titanium dioxide NPs, respectively. Single ionized oxygen and neutral zinc vacancies in zinc oxide and oxygen and neutral/ionized titanium vacancies in titanium dioxide are considered as predominant defect centres responsible for observed ferromagnetism. It is expected that origin of ferromagnetism is a consequence of exchange interactions between localized electron spin moments resulting from point defects.

  19. Room temperature ferromagnetism in liquid-phase pulsed laser ablation synthesized nanoparticles of nonmagnetic oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. C.; Kotnala, R. K.; Gopal, R.

    2015-08-01

    Intrinsic Room Temperature Ferromagnetism (RTF) has been observed in undoped/uncapped zinc oxide and titanium dioxide spherical nanoparticles (NPs) obtained by a purely green approach of liquid phase pulsed laser ablation of corresponding metal targets in pure water. Saturation magnetization values observed for zinc oxide (average size, 9 ± 1.2 nm) and titanium dioxide (average size, 4.4 ± 0.3 nm) NPs are 62.37 and 42.17 memu/g, respectively, which are several orders of magnitude larger than those of previous reports. In contrast to the previous works, no postprocessing treatments or surface modification is required to induce ferromagnetism in the case of present communication. The most important result, related to the field of intrinsic ferromagnetism in nonmagnetic materials, is the observation of size dependent ferromagnetism. Degree of ferromagnetism in titanium dioxide increases with the increase in particle size, while it is reverse for zinc oxide. Surface and volume defects play significant roles for the origin of RTF in zinc oxide and titanium dioxide NPs, respectively. Single ionized oxygen and neutral zinc vacancies in zinc oxide and oxygen and neutral/ionized titanium vacancies in titanium dioxide are considered as predominant defect centres responsible for observed ferromagnetism. It is expected that origin of ferromagnetism is a consequence of exchange interactions between localized electron spin moments resulting from point defects.

  20. Fe biomineralization mirrors individual metabolic activity in a nitrate-dependent Fe(II)-oxidizer

    PubMed Central

    Miot, Jennyfer; Remusat, Laurent; Duprat, Elodie; Gonzalez, Adriana; Pont, Sylvain; Poinsot, Mélanie

    2015-01-01

    Microbial biomineralization sometimes leads to periplasmic encrustation, which is predicted to enhance microorganism preservation in the fossil record. Mineral precipitation within the periplasm is, however, thought to induce death, as a result of permeability loss preventing nutrient and waste transit across the cell wall. This hypothesis had, however, never been investigated down to the single cell level. Here, we cultured the nitrate reducing Fe(II) oxidizing bacteria Acidovorax sp. strain BoFeN1 that have been previously shown to promote the precipitation of a diversity of Fe minerals (lepidocrocite, goethite, Fe phosphate) encrusting the periplasm. We investigated the connection of Fe biomineralization with carbon assimilation at the single cell level, using a combination of electron microscopy and Nano-Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry. Our analyses revealed strong individual heterogeneities of Fe biomineralization. Noteworthy, a small proportion of cells remaining free of any precipitate persisted even at advanced stages of biomineralization. Using pulse chase experiments with 13C-acetate, we provide evidence of individual phenotypic heterogeneities of carbon assimilation, correlated with the level of Fe biomineralization. Whereas non- and moderately encrusted cells were able to assimilate acetate, higher levels of periplasmic encrustation prevented any carbon incorporation. Carbon assimilation only depended on the level of Fe encrustation and not on the nature of Fe minerals precipitated in the cell wall. Carbon assimilation decreased exponentially with increasing cell-associated Fe content. Persistence of a small proportion of non-mineralized and metabolically active cells might constitute a survival strategy in highly ferruginous environments. Eventually, our results suggest that periplasmic Fe biomineralization may provide a signature of individual metabolic status, which could be looked for in the fossil record and in modern environmental samples. PMID

  1. Single-step synthesis of graphene quantum dots by femtosecond laser ablation of graphene oxide dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Paola; Liang, Robert; Jabari, Elahe; Marzbanrad, Ehsan; Toyserkani, Ehsan; Zhou, Y. Norman

    2016-04-01

    In the last few years, graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have attracted the attention of many research groups for their outstanding properties, which include low toxicity, chemical stability and photoluminescence. One of the challenges of GQD synthesis is finding a single-step, cheap and sustainable approach for synthesizing these promising nanomaterials. In this study, we demonstrate that femtosecond laser ablation of graphene oxide (GO) dispersions could be employed as a facile and environmentally friendly synthesis method for GQDs. With the proper control of laser ablation parameters, such as ablation time and laser power, it is possible to produce GQDs with average sizes of 2-5 nm, emitting a blue luminescence at 410 nm. We tested the feasibility of the synthesized GQDs as materials for electronic devices by aerosol-jet printing of an ink that is a mixture of water dispersion of laser synthesized GQDs and silver nanoparticle dispersion, which resulted in lower resistivity of the final printed patterns. Preliminary results showed that femtosecond laser synthesized GQDs can be mixed with silver nanoparticle dispersion to fabricate a hybrid material, which can be employed in printing electronic devices by either printing patterns that are more conductive and/or reducing costs of the ink by decreasing the concentration of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in the ink.In the last few years, graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have attracted the attention of many research groups for their outstanding properties, which include low toxicity, chemical stability and photoluminescence. One of the challenges of GQD synthesis is finding a single-step, cheap and sustainable approach for synthesizing these promising nanomaterials. In this study, we demonstrate that femtosecond laser ablation of graphene oxide (GO) dispersions could be employed as a facile and environmentally friendly synthesis method for GQDs. With the proper control of laser ablation parameters, such as ablation time and

  2. Study on the process of Fe (III) oxide fluorination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sophronov, V. L.; Kalaev, M. E.; Makaseev, Yu N.; Sachkov, V. I.; Verkhoturova, V. V.

    2016-02-01

    The article deals with a fundamentally new fluoride technology for obtaining fluoride materials, provides data on the kinetics of the process of fluorination of Fe oxide with fluorine, fluoride and ammonium bifluoride. The physical and chemical properties of obtained fluorides are shown: a study of the elemental composition, grain-size composition using the method of scanning electron microscopy and laser diffraction.

  3. Discovery of New Iron Oxide Fe7O9 and its Solid Solution, (Mg,Fe2+)3Fe3+4O9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinmyo, R.; Bykova, E.; Ovsyannikov, S. V.; McCammon, C. A.; Kupenko, I.; Ismailova, L.; Dubrovinsky, L. S.

    2015-12-01

    Iron oxides are fundamentally important compounds for Earth science. Particularly, the stability and properties of iron oxides are essential information to understand the structure and chemistry of the mantle. Here we report new high-pressure polymorphs of iron oxide Fe7O9 (Fe3+/Fe2+ = 4/3) and its Fe2+-Mg solid solution (Mg,Fe2+)3Fe3+4O9 that can be recovered at ambient conditions. We synthesized single crystals of the both compounds at about 24-26 GPa using a multi-anvil press. Single crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies showed that the crystal structures of both Fe7O9 and (Mg,Fe2+)3Fe3+4O9 have monoclinic C2/m space groups, that differ from any other known lattices of iron oxides. Mössbauer spectra are in agreement with the crystal structure refined from single crystal XRD. This newly found Fe7O9 polymorph suggests that iron oxides may have more variable mixed valence state under high-pressure condition than previously thought. Based on analogy with Fe2+1+nFe3+2O4+n group, a Fe2+3±nFe3+4O9±n group might be also stable at certain high pressures and temperatures and oxygen fugacity.

  4. Iron isotope composition of particles produced by UV-femtosecond laser ablation of natural oxides, sulfides, and carbonates.

    PubMed

    d'Abzac, Francois-Xavier; Beard, Brian L; Czaja, Andrew D; Konishi, Hiromi; Schauer, James J; Johnson, Clark M

    2013-12-17

    The need for femtosecond laser ablation (fs-LA) systems coupled to MC-ICP-MS to accurately perform in situ stable isotope analyses remains an open question, because of the lack of knowledge concerning ablation-related isotopic fractionation in this regime. We report the first iron isotope analysis of size-resolved, laser-induced particles of natural magnetite, siderite, pyrrhotite, and pyrite, collected through cascade impaction, followed by analysis by solution nebulization MC-ICP-MS, as well as imaging using electron microscopy. Iron mass distributions are independent of mineralogy, and particle morphology includes both spheres and agglomerates for all ablated phases. X-ray spectroscopy shows elemental fractionation in siderite (C-rich agglomerates) and pyrrhotite/pyrite (S-rich spheres). We find an increase in (56)Fe/(54)Fe ratios of +2‰, +1.2‰, and +0.8‰ with increasing particle size for magnetite, siderite, and pyrrhotite, respectively. Fe isotope differences in size-sorted aerosols from pyrite ablation are not analytically resolvable. Experimental data are discussed using models of particles generation by Hergenröder and elemental/isotopic fractionation by Richter. We interpret the isotopic fractionation to be related to the iron condensation time scale, dependent on its saturation in the gas phase, as a function of mineral composition. Despite the isotopic variations across aerosol size fractions, total aerosol composition, as calculated from mass balance, confirms that fs-LA produces a stoichiometric sampling in terms of isotopic composition. Specifically, both elemental and isotopic fractionation are produced by particle generation processes and not by femtosecond laser-matter interactions. These results provide critical insights into the analytical requirements for laser-ablation-based stable isotope measurements of high-precision and accuracy in geological samples, including the importance of quantitative aerosol transport to the ICP. PMID

  5. Features of the synthesis of nanocolloid oxides by laser ablation of bulk metal targets in solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapin, Ivan N.; Svetlichnyi, Valery A.

    2015-12-01

    Laser ablation of bulk targets in a fluid -- a promising new method for the synthesis of "pure" nanocolloids. Nanocrystalline materials produced by laser ablation are widely used in biology, medicine, and catalysis. High local temperature during ablation and large surface area of the particles promote chemical reactions and the formation of a complex composition of nanoparticles. In this paper the characteristics of the process of ablation and the obtaining of nanoparticles in a liquid by laser ablation of active materials (Zn, Ce, Ti, Si) were studied. Ways of increasing the productivity of laser ablation were discussed. Characterization of nanocolloids and nanocrystalline powders were performed.

  6. Immobilization of Radionuclides Through Anaerobic Bio-oxidation of Fe(ll)

    SciTech Connect

    Coates, John D.

    2006-06-01

    Anaerobic, Nitrate-Dependent Fe(II) Bio-Oxidation: A Column Study Report FY 2005/2006 Previous studies have demonstrated that nitrate-dependent bio-oxidation of Fe(II) by Azospira suillium strain PS results in the formation of crystalline mixed Fe(II)/Fe(III) mineral phases which results in the subsequent immobilization of heavy metals and radionuclides.

  7. Dynamic Fe-precipitate formation induced by Fe(II) oxidation in aerated phosphate-containing water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voegelin, Andreas; Senn, Anna-Caterina; Kaegi, Ralf; Hug, Stephan J.; Mangold, Stefan

    2013-09-01

    We studied the effect of phosphate on the precipitation of Fe during the oxidation of 1 mM Fe(II) in aerated 8 mM NaHCO3-CO2 buffered aqueous solutions at near-neutral pH. The structure and morphology of the precipitates were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy at the Fe K-edge, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Up to an initial dissolved P/Fe ratio of ˜0.55, most phosphate was incorporated into the fresh Fe(III)-precipitates. At dissolved P/Fe ratios from 0.55 to 1.91, the precipitate P/Fe ratios only exhibited a minor increase from 0.56 to 0.72. XRD patterns and Fe EXAFS spectra indicated a shift in precipitate type from mostly poorly-crystalline lepidocrocite in the absence of phosphate to amorphous Fe(III)-phosphate (mostly monomeric and oligomeric Fe(III) coordinated with phosphate) at dissolved P/Fe ratios >0.55. A time-resolved oxidation experiment at an initial dissolved P/Fe ratio of 0.29 revealed that amorphous Fe(III)-phosphate formed during Fe(II) oxidation until phosphate was nearly depleted from solution. During continuing Fe(II) oxidation, about half of the newly formed Fe(III) contributed to the polymerization of Fe-phosphate into phosphate-rich hydrous ferric oxide with a maximum P/Fe ratio of 0.25 (HFO-P; edge-sharing linkage of Fe(III) octahedra) and about half precipitated as poorly-crystalline lepidocrocite in the phosphate-depleted solution. At initial P/Fe ratios <0.2, initially formed Fe(III)-phosphate was fully transformed into HFO-P during continuing Fe(II) oxidation. The dynamic interactions between phosphate and Fe described in this study impact the structure of fresh Fe(III)-precipitates at redox transitions in environmental and technical systems. The modulating effects of other dissolved species such as silicate and Ca on Fe precipitate formation and implications for co-transformed trace elements require further study.

  8. Effect of Fe coating of nucleation sites on epitaxial growth of Fe oxide nanocrystals on Si substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishibe, Takafumi; Watanabe, Kentaro; Nakamura, Yoshiaki

    2016-08-01

    We studied the effect of Fe coating on the epitaxial growth of Fe3O4 nanocrystals (NCs) over Fe-coated Ge epitaxial nuclei on Si(111). To completely cover Ge nuclei with Fe, some amount of Fe (>8 monolayers) must be deposited. Such covering is a key to epitaxial growth because an Fe coating layer prevents the oxidation of Ge surfaces during Fe3O4 formation, resulting in the epitaxial growth of Fe3O4 on them. This study demonstrates that an appropriate Fe coating of nucleation sites leads to the epitaxial growth of Fe3O4 NCs on Si substrates, indicating the realization of environmentally friendly and low-cost Fe3O4 NCs as the resistance random access memory material.

  9. Effect of oxidation on interlayer exchange coupling in Fe|MgO|Fe tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, H.-X.; Chshiev, M.; Kalitsov, A.; Schuhl, A.; Butler, W. H.

    2010-03-01

    The interlayer exchange coupling (IEC) in MgO-based magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJ) is a subject of major interest for spintronics community [1,2]. Recent experiments demonstrated that oxydation conditions strongly affect the character of the IEC in Fe/MgO/Fe(001) MTJs [3]. In order to elucidate the effect of over- and under-oxidation on the nature of the IEC in Fe|MgO|Fe MTJs, we performed systematic studies of the influence of O impurities and vacancies on the IEC using ab-initio and tight-binding approaches. We found that the O vacancies cause strong AF IEC in agreement with previous studies [2-4]. Furthermore, an additional O atom at the Fe|MgO interface makes the IEC ferromagnetic in for 3ML and above MgO thicknesses in agreement with experiment [3]. We demonstrate also that the full structural relaxation of ideal Fe|MgO|Fe MTJs may lead to the antiferromagnetic IEC. Tight-binding calculations of the IEC in the framework of the Keldysh formalism were also performed. The results obtained support our first principles calculations. [1] J. Faure-Vincent et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 107206 (2002); [2] T. Katayama et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 89, 112503 (2006); [3] Y.F. Chiang et al, Phys. Rev. B 79, 184410 (2009); [4] M.Y. Zhuravlev et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 026806 (2005).

  10. Oxide Melt Solution Calorimetry of Fe2+ -bearing Oxides and Application to the Magnetite - Maghemite (Fe3O4-Fe8/3O4) system

    SciTech Connect

    Lilova, Kristina I.; Xu, Fen; Rosso, Kevin M.; Pearce, Carolyn I.; Kamali, Saeed; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    A consistent methodology for obtaining enthalpy of formation of Fe{sup 2+}-containing binary and multicomponent oxides using high temperature oxide melt solution calorimetry has been developed. The enthalpies of wuestite (FeO) and magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) oxidation to hematite (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) were measured using oxidative drop solution calorimetry in which the final product is dissolved ferric oxide. Two methods were applied: drop solution calorimetry at 1073 K in lead borate solvent and at 973 K in sodium molybdate, each under both oxygen flowing over and bubbling through the solvent, giving consistent results in agreement with literature values. The enthalpies of formation of all three iron oxides from the elements were obtained using a thermodynamic cycle involving the directly measured oxidative dissolution enthalpy of iron metal in sodium molybdate at 973 K and gave excellent consistency with literature data. The methodology was then applied to the magnetite - maghemite system. The enthalpy of mixing of the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-Fe{sub 8/3}O{sub 4} spinel solid solution is exothermic and, 2 represented by a subregular (Margules) formalism, {Delta}H{sub mix} = x(1-x)(-63.36 {+-} 8.60(1-x) + 17.65 {+-} 6.40x) kJ/mol, where x is the mole fraction of magnetite. The entropies of mixing of the solid solution were calculated for different assumptions about the distribution of cations, charges, and vacancies in these defect spinels. The different models lead to only small differences in the entropy of mixing. Calculated free energies of mixing show no evidence for a solvus in the magnetite - maghemite system.

  11. Uptake and release of cerium during Fe-oxide formation and transformation in Fe(II) solutions.

    PubMed

    Nedel, S; Dideriksen, K; Christiansen, B C; Bovet, N; Stipp, S L S

    2010-06-15

    Fe-oxides are ubiquitous in soils and sediments and form during Fe(0) corrosion. Depending on redox conditions and solution composition, Fe-oxides such as ferrihydrite, goethite, magnetite, and green rust (GR) may form. These phases typically have high surface area and large affinity for adsorption of trace components. Further, Fe(II)-Fe(III) (hydr)oxides are redox active. Cerium, a member of the lanthanide family, can be used as an analogue for the tri- and tetra-valent actinides found in radioactive waste, expected to be stored in subsurface repositories. In experiments with ferrihydrite, Ce(III) was effectively scavenged from Fe(II)-bearing solutions within 5 min at pH 7. During transformation of ferrihydrite to green rust, however, all Ce(III) was released to solution. By varying initial solution Fe(II):Fe(III) ratio, magnetite and goethite formed together with GR(Na,SO(4)), resulting in decreased Ce(III) release. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed Ce(III) adsorbed on magnetite. When Fe-oxides were synthesized by air oxidation of Fe(II) solutions at pH 7, GR(Na,SO(4)) played a catalytic role in the oxidation of Ce(III) to Ce(IV) by O(2), removing more than 90% of the dissolved Ce. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that it formed discrete nanocrystals of CeO(2(s)). These results demonstrate that Fe-oxide interaction with radionuclides is likely to depend strongly on the local redox conditions. By analogy with Ce, the trivalent actinides are not expected to be sequestered by preformed GR in anoxic environments. Our results also suggest that trivalent actinides and lanthanides are released when dissimilatory iron reduction of Fe(III)-oxides leads to GR formation However, under oxidizing conditions, GR may influence radionuclide mobility by catalyzing their transformation to a higher oxidation state. PMID:20496931

  12. Formation of the Titanium Oxide Surface by the Laser Ablation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermakov, V. V.; Leitman, A. G.; Reimer, I. V.; Sheikin, V. V.; Chuchalin, V. S.; Osipov, A. N.; Vusovich, O. V.; Gol'tsova, P. A.

    2014-03-01

    It is demonstrated that the antibiotic therapy is the main therapy of infectious complications after surgical operations whose efficiency multiply increases due to the application of the mechanical suture in the form of Π-shaped titanium alloy staples with medicinal coating comprising various groups of medical preparations. The medical preparation immobilized by the corresponding method possesses programmed kinetics of release and provides the optimal concentration during the required time in the region of its application. The laser ablation method of forming the surface of Π-shaped titanium oxide staples is considered that allows a pit with a preset profile to be formed and its adhesive properties to be improved to obtain the required kinetics of medical preparation release.

  13. Studies of aluminum oxide thin films deposited by laser ablation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Płóciennik, P.; Guichaoua, D.; Korcala, A.; Zawadzka, A.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the structural and optical investigations of the aluminum oxide nanocrystalline thin films. Investigated films were fabricated by laser ablation technique in high vacuum onto quartz substrates. The films were deposited at two different temperatures of the substrates equal to room temperature and 900 K. X-ray Diffraction spectra proved nanocrystalline character and the corundum phase of the film regardless on the substrate temperature during the deposition process. Values of the refractive indices, extinction and absorption coefficients were calculated by using Transmission and Reflection Spectroscopy in the UV-VIS-NIR range of the wavelength. Coupling Prism Method was used for films thickness estimations. Experimental measurements and theoretical calculations of the Third Harmonic Generation were also reported. Obtained results show that the lattice strain may affect obtained values of the third order nonlinear optical susceptibility.

  14. Fe /Fe oxide nanocomposite particles with large specific absorption rate for hyperthermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Q.; Baker, I.; Loudis, J. A.; Liao, Y.; Hoopes, P. J.; Weaver, J. B.

    2007-06-01

    Using a water-in-oil microemulsion with cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide as the surfactant, iron was reduced to form a metallic core on which a passivating oxide shell was grown. Transmission electron microscopy, vibrating sample magnetometry, and heating measurements were used to characterize these monodispersed magnetic Fe /Fe3O4 composite nanoparticles with respect to the possible application for magnetic hyperthermia treatments of cancer. The aim is to utilize the fact that an iron core (high saturation magnetization) will give a greater heating effect than iron oxide, while the iron oxide coating will allow the nanoparticles to be observed using magnetic resonance imaging so that therapy can be effectively monitored and targeted. The largest specific absorption rate obtained was 345W/g under an alternating magnetic field of 150Oe at 250kHz.

  15. Superparamagnetic Fe3O4 particles formed by oxidation of pyrite heated in an anoxic atmosphere

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorpe, A.N.; Senftle, F.E.; Talley, R.; Hetherington, S.; Dulong, F.

    1990-01-01

    As a follow-up to previous gas analysis experiments in which pyrite was heated to 681 K in an anoxic (oxygen starved) atmosphere, the first oxidation product, FeSO4, was studied as a bulk material. No decomposition of FeSO4 to Fe3O4 was observed in the temperature range studied. The lack of decomposition of bulk FeSO4 to Fe3O4 suggests that FeS2 oxidizes directly to Fe3O4, or that FeSO4, FeS2 and O2 react together to form Fe3O4. Magnetic susceptibility and magnetization measurements, along with magnetic hysteresis curves, show that small particles of Fe3O4 form on the pyrite surface, rather than a continuous layer of bulk Fe3O4. A working model describing the oxidation steps is presented. ?? 1990.

  16. Fe(II)EDTA-NO reduction coupled with Fe(II)EDTA oxidation by a nitrate- and Fe(III)-reducing bacterium.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiyang; Zhang, Yu; Zhou, Jiti; Chen, Mingxiang; Wang, Xiaojun; Shi, Zhuang

    2013-06-01

    The nitrate- and Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Paracoccus versutus LYM was characterized in terms of its ability to perform Fe(II)EDTA-NO reduction coupled with Fe(II)EDTA oxidation (NO-dependent Fe(II)EDTA oxidation, NDFO). It experienced a single anaerobic FeEDTA redox cycling through NDFO and dissimilatory Fe(III)EDTA reduction in FeEDTA culture. The increase in the Fe(II)EDTA concentration contributed to the ascending Fe(II)EDTA-NO reduction rate. The amount of glucose controlled the rate and extent of Fe(II) oxidation during NDFO. Without glucose addition, Fe(II)EDTA-NO reduction rate was at a rather slow rate even in presence of relatively sufficient Fe(II)EDTA. Unlike aqueous Fe(2+) and solid-phase Fe(II), Fe(II)EDTA could prevent cells from encrustations. These findings suggested the occurrence of NDFO preferred being beneficial via a mixotrophic physiology in the presence of an organic cosubstrate to being out of consideration for metabolic strategy.

  17. Oxidation states of Fe and Ti in blue sapphire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wongrawang, P.; Monarumit, N.; Thammajak, N.; Wathanakul, P.; Wongkokua, W.

    2016-02-01

    X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) can be used to study the oxidation state of a dilute system such as transition metal defects in solid-state samples. In blue sapphire, Fe and Ti are defects that cause the blue color. Inter-valence charge transfer (IVCT) between Fe2+ and Ti4+ has been proposed to describe the optical color’s origin. However, the existence of divalent iron cations has not been thoroughly investigated. Fluorescent XANES is therefore employed to study K-edge absorptions of Fe and Ti cations in various blue sapphire samples including natural, synthetic, diffused and heat-treated sapphires. All the samples showed an Fe absorption edge at 7124 eV, corresponding to the Fe3+ state; and Ti at 4984 eV, corresponding to Ti4+. From these results, we propose Fe3+-Ti4+ mixed acceptor states located at 1.75 eV and 2.14 eV above the valence band of corundum, that correspond to 710 nm and 580 nm bands of UV-vis absorption spectra, to describe the cause of the color of blue sapphire.

  18. Characterization of the physiology and cell-mineral interactions of the marine anoxygenic phototrophic Fe(II) oxidizer Rhodovulum iodosum--implications for Precambrian Fe(II) oxidation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wenfang; Swanner, Elizabeth D; Hao, Likai; Zeitvogel, Fabian; Obst, Martin; Pan, Yongxin; Kappler, Andreas

    2014-06-01

    Anoxygenic phototrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria (photoferrotrophs) are suggested to have contributed to the deposition of banded iron formations (BIFs) from oxygen-poor seawater. However, most studies evaluating the contribution of photoferrotrophs to Precambrian Fe(II) oxidation have used freshwater and not marine strains. Therefore, we investigated the physiology and mineral products of Fe(II) oxidation by the marine photoferrotroph Rhodovulum iodosum. Poorly crystalline Fe(III) minerals formed initially and transformed to more crystalline goethite over time. During Fe(II) oxidation, cell surfaces were largely free of minerals. Instead, the minerals were co-localized with EPS suggesting that EPS plays a critical role in preventing cell encrustation, likely by binding Fe(III) and directing precipitation away from cell surfaces. Fe(II) oxidation rates increased with increasing initial Fe(II) concentration (0.43-4.07 mM) under a light intensity of 12 μmol quanta m(-2) s(-1). Rates also increased as light intensity increased (from 3 to 20 μmol quanta m(-2) s(-1)), while the addition of Si did not significantly change Fe(II) oxidation rates. These results elaborate on how the physical and chemical conditions present in the Precambrian ocean controlled the activity of marine photoferrotrophs and confirm the possibility that such microorganisms could have oxidized Fe(II), generating the primary Fe(III) minerals that were then deposited to some Precambrian BIFs.

  19. Characterization of the physiology and cell-mineral interactions of the marine anoxygenic phototrophic Fe(II) oxidizer Rhodovulum iodosum--implications for Precambrian Fe(II) oxidation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wenfang; Swanner, Elizabeth D; Hao, Likai; Zeitvogel, Fabian; Obst, Martin; Pan, Yongxin; Kappler, Andreas

    2014-06-01

    Anoxygenic phototrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria (photoferrotrophs) are suggested to have contributed to the deposition of banded iron formations (BIFs) from oxygen-poor seawater. However, most studies evaluating the contribution of photoferrotrophs to Precambrian Fe(II) oxidation have used freshwater and not marine strains. Therefore, we investigated the physiology and mineral products of Fe(II) oxidation by the marine photoferrotroph Rhodovulum iodosum. Poorly crystalline Fe(III) minerals formed initially and transformed to more crystalline goethite over time. During Fe(II) oxidation, cell surfaces were largely free of minerals. Instead, the minerals were co-localized with EPS suggesting that EPS plays a critical role in preventing cell encrustation, likely by binding Fe(III) and directing precipitation away from cell surfaces. Fe(II) oxidation rates increased with increasing initial Fe(II) concentration (0.43-4.07 mM) under a light intensity of 12 μmol quanta m(-2) s(-1). Rates also increased as light intensity increased (from 3 to 20 μmol quanta m(-2) s(-1)), while the addition of Si did not significantly change Fe(II) oxidation rates. These results elaborate on how the physical and chemical conditions present in the Precambrian ocean controlled the activity of marine photoferrotrophs and confirm the possibility that such microorganisms could have oxidized Fe(II), generating the primary Fe(III) minerals that were then deposited to some Precambrian BIFs. PMID:24606418

  20. Effects of natural oxidation on the photoluminescence properties of Si nanocrystals prepared by pulsed laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yanmei; Han, Yinghui

    2014-07-01

    In this work, Si nanocrystals (Si-NCs) have been prepared by pulsed laser ablation technique in dichloromethane, and the microstructure and photoluminescence (PL) properties of the Si-NCs before and after natural oxidation were investigated. Transmission electron microscopy and Raman results show that the average diameter of the Si-NCs is 2.42 nm in the dichloromethane solution. Blue-violet PL with a lifetime of 4.6 ns is observed at room temperature, and the PL peak shifts toward longer wavelength with the red shift of excitation wavelength. The PL excitation spectrum indicates that the bandgap of the Si-NCs in solution is 2.64 eV, which confirms that the blue-violet PL originates from interband transition of Si-NCs caused by quantum confinement effect. The PL peak red shifts to 607 nm after natural oxidation, and the peak lifetime of which is slow down to 13.1 μs. The fixed PL peak excited by different wavelengths and the slow PL decay time indicate that interface defects become the main PL mechanism after natural oxidation. The results will add new information for understanding the PL mechanism of Si-NCs in different environments.

  1. Anaerobic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria show as resistance and immobilize as during Fe(III) mineral precipitation.

    PubMed

    Hohmann, Claudia; Winkler, Eva; Morin, Guillaume; Kappler, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    More than 100 million individuals worldwide are exposed to arsenic-contaminated water, making the investigation of arsenic mobility in aquatic systems of utmost importance. Iron (hydr)oxides play a key role in preventing arsenic release in aquifers and soils due to their strong arsenic sorption and are even used to remove arsenic in water treatment. Neutrophilic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria produce Fe(III) minerals and therefore have the potential to affect arsenic mobility. In the present study, we demonstrate that the metabolism of anaerobic nitrate-reducing and phototrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria is not significantly affected by arsenate concentrations of up to 500 muM (37.5 mg/L). Even in the presence of the more toxic arsenic species, arsenite, cell metabolism was significantly impaired only at the highest arsenite concentration (500 muM) for one of the Fe(II)-oxidizers. All Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria tested effectively immobilized arsenic during Fe(II) oxidation (>96%), lowering the remaining dissolved arsenic concentrations to values close to or even lower than the current drinking water limit of 10 microg/L. Since the minerals formed by these bacteria included highly crystalline Fe(III) minerals that are hardly reducible by Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, stimulation of arsenic immobilization by Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria can potentially support water treatment systems or even be applied as an effective remediation strategy. PMID:20039738

  2. Arsenate uptake and arsenite simultaneous sorption and oxidation by Fe-Mn binary oxides: influence of Mn/Fe ratio, pH, Ca2+, and humic acid.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gaosheng; Liu, Huijuan; Qu, Jiuhui; Jefferson, William

    2012-01-15

    Arsenate retention, arsenite sorption and oxidation on the surfaces of Fe-Mn binary oxides may play an important role in the mobilization and transformation of arsenic, due to the common occurrence of these oxides in the environment. However, no sufficient information on the sorption behaviors of arsenic on Fe-Mn binary oxides is available. This study investigated the influences of Mn/Fe molar ratio, solution pH, coexisting calcium ions, and humic acids have on arsenic sorption by Fe-Mn binary oxides. To create Fe-Mn binary oxides, simultaneous oxidation and co-precipitation methods were employed. The Fe-Mn binary oxides exhibited a porous crystalline structure similar to 2-line ferrihydrite at Mn/Fe ratios 1:3 and below, whereas exhibited similar structures to δ-MnO(2) at higher ratios. The As(V) sorption maximum was observed at a Mn/Fe ratio of 1:6, but As(III) uptake maximum was at Mn/Fe ratio 1:3. However, As(III) adsorption capacity was much higher than that of As(V) at each Mn/Fe ratio. As(V) sorption was found to decrease with increasing pH, while As(III) sorption edge was different, depending on the content of MnO(2) in the binary oxides. The presence of Ca(2+) enhanced the As(V) uptake under alkaline pH, but did not significantly influence the As(III) sorption by 1:9 Fe-Mn binary oxide; whereas the presence of humic acid slightly reduced both As(V) and As(III) uptake. These results indicate that As(III) is more easily immobilized than As(V) in the environment, where Fe-Mn binary oxides are available as sorbents and they represent attractive adsorbents for both As(V) and As(III) removal from water and groundwater.

  3. Formation of iron (hydr)oxides during the abiotic oxidation of Fe(II) in the presence of arsenate.

    PubMed

    Song, Jia; Jia, Shao-Yi; Yu, Bo; Wu, Song-Hai; Han, Xu

    2015-08-30

    Abiotic oxidation of Fe(II) is a common pathway in the formation of Fe (hydr)oxides under natural conditions, however, little is known regarding the presence of arsenate on this process. In hence, the effect of arsenate on the precipitation of Fe (hydr)oxides during the oxidation of Fe(II) is investigated. Formation of arsenic-containing Fe (hydr)oxides is constrained by pH and molar ratios of As:Fe during the oxidation Fe(II). At pH 6.0, arsenate inhibits the formation of lepidocrocite and goethite, while favors the formation of ferric arsenate with the increasing As:Fe ratio. At pH 7.0, arsenate promotes the formation of hollow-structured Fe (hydr)oxides containing arsenate, as the As:Fe ratio reaches 0.07. Arsenate effectively inhibits the formation of magnetite at pH 8.0 even at As:Fe ratio of 0.01, while favors the formation of lepidocrocite and green rust, which can be latterly degenerated and replaced by ferric arsenate with the increasing As:Fe ratio. This study indicates that arsenate and low pH value favor the slow growth of dense-structured Fe (hydr)oxides like spherical ferric arsenate. With the rapid oxidation rate of Fe(II) at high pH, ferric (hydr)oxides prefer to precipitate in the formation of loose-structured Fe (hydr)oxides like lepidocrocite and green rust.

  4. Formation of iron (hydr)oxides during the abiotic oxidation of Fe(II) in the presence of arsenate.

    PubMed

    Song, Jia; Jia, Shao-Yi; Yu, Bo; Wu, Song-Hai; Han, Xu

    2015-08-30

    Abiotic oxidation of Fe(II) is a common pathway in the formation of Fe (hydr)oxides under natural conditions, however, little is known regarding the presence of arsenate on this process. In hence, the effect of arsenate on the precipitation of Fe (hydr)oxides during the oxidation of Fe(II) is investigated. Formation of arsenic-containing Fe (hydr)oxides is constrained by pH and molar ratios of As:Fe during the oxidation Fe(II). At pH 6.0, arsenate inhibits the formation of lepidocrocite and goethite, while favors the formation of ferric arsenate with the increasing As:Fe ratio. At pH 7.0, arsenate promotes the formation of hollow-structured Fe (hydr)oxides containing arsenate, as the As:Fe ratio reaches 0.07. Arsenate effectively inhibits the formation of magnetite at pH 8.0 even at As:Fe ratio of 0.01, while favors the formation of lepidocrocite and green rust, which can be latterly degenerated and replaced by ferric arsenate with the increasing As:Fe ratio. This study indicates that arsenate and low pH value favor the slow growth of dense-structured Fe (hydr)oxides like spherical ferric arsenate. With the rapid oxidation rate of Fe(II) at high pH, ferric (hydr)oxides prefer to precipitate in the formation of loose-structured Fe (hydr)oxides like lepidocrocite and green rust. PMID:25855615

  5. Physiology, Fe(II) oxidation, and Fe mineral formation by a marine planktonic cyanobacterium grown under ferruginous conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanner, Elizabeth; Wu, Wenfang; Hao, Likai; Wuestner, Marina; Obst, Martin; Moran, Dawn; McIlvin, Matthew; Saito, Mak; Kappler, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    Evidence for Fe(II) oxidation and deposition of Fe(III)-bearing minerals from anoxic or redox-stratified Precambrian oceans has received support from decades of sedimentological and geochemical investigation of Banded Iron Formations (BIF). While the exact mechanisms of Fe(II) oxidation remains equivocal, reaction with O2 in the marine water column, produced by cyanobacteria or early oxygenic phototrophs, was likely. In order to understand the role of cyanobacteria in the deposition of Fe(III) minerals to BIF, we must first know how planktonic marine cyanobacteria respond to ferruginous (anoxic and Fe(II)-rich) waters in terms of growth, Fe uptake and homeostasis, and Fe mineral formation. We therefore grew the common marine cyanobacterium Synechococcus PCC 7002 in closed bottles that began anoxic, and contained Fe(II) concentrations that span the range of possible concentrations in Precambrian seawater. These results, along with cell suspension experiments, indicate that Fe(II) is likely oxidized by this strain via chemical oxidation with oxygen produced during photosynthesis, and not via any direct enzymatic or photosynthetic pathway. Imaging of the cell-mineral aggregates with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) are consistent with extracellular precipitation of Fe(III) (oxyhydr)oxide minerals, but that >10% of Fe(III) sorbs to cell surfaces rather than precipitating. Proteomic experiments support the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in Fe(II) toxicity to Synechococcus PCC 7002. The proteome expressed under low Fe conditions included multiple siderophore biosynthesis and siderophore and Fe transporter proteins, but most siderophores are not expressed during growth with Fe(II). These results provide a mechanistic and quantitative framework for evaluating the geochemical consequences of perhaps life’s greatest metabolic innovation, i.e. the evolution and activity of oxygenic photosynthesis, in ferruginous

  6. Biological Fe oxidation controlled deposition of banded iron formation in the ca. 3770 Ma Isua Supracrustal Belt (West Greenland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czaja, Andrew D.; Johnson, Clark M.; Beard, Brian L.; Roden, Eric E.; Li, Weiqiang; Moorbath, Stephen

    2013-02-01

    The redox balance of the Archean atmosphere-ocean system is among the most significant uncertainties in our understanding of the earliest history of Earth's surface zone. Most workers agree that oxygen did not constitute a significant proportion of the atmosphere until after ca. 2.45 Ga, after the Great Oxidation Event, but there is less agreement on when O2 production began, and how this may have been consumed by reduced species such as Fe(II) in the oceans. The Fe redox cycle through time has been traced using banded iron formations (BIFs), and Fe isotopes are increasingly used to constrain the conditions of Earth's paleoenvironments, including the pathways of formation of BIFs. Iron isotope analyses of BIFs from the 3.7 to 3.8 Ga Isua Supracrustal Belt (ISB), obtained by micro-sampling of magnetite-rich layers and conventional analysis, as well as by in situ femtosecond laser ablation (fs-LA-ICP-MS), indicate a consistently narrow range of non-zero δ56Fe values. Analysis of magnetite by fs-LA-ICP-MS allows for precise and accurate micron-scale analyses without the problems of orientation effects that are associated with secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) analyses. Magnetite δ56Fe values range from +0.4‰ to +1.1‰ among different bands, but within individual layers magnetite grains are mostly homogeneous. Although these BIFs have been metamorphosed to amphibolite-facies, the metamorphism can neither explain the range in Fe isotope compositions across bands, nor that between hand samples. The isotopic compositions therefore reflect “primary”, low-temperature sedimentary values. The positive δ56Fe values measured from the ISB magnetites are best explained by deposition of Fe(III)-oxides produced by partial oxidation of Fe(II)-rich ocean water. A dispersion/reaction model, which accounts for rates of hydrothermal Fe(II)aq input, rates of oxidation, and rates of Fe(OH)3 settling suggests exceptionally low O2 contents, <0.001% of modern O2 contents in

  7. Influence of Oxidation Behavior of Feedstock on Microstructure and Ablation Resistance of Plasma-Sprayed Zirconium Carbide Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Cui; Ge, Xuelian; Niu, Yaran; Li, Hong; Huang, Liping; Zheng, Xuebin; Sun, Jinliang

    2015-10-01

    Plasma spray is one of the suitable technologies to deposit carbide coatings with high melting point, such as ZrC. However, in the spray processes performed under atmosphere, oxidation of the carbide powder is inevitable. To investigate the influence of the oxidation behavior of feedstock on microstructure and ablation resistance of the deposited coating, ZrC coatings were prepared by atmospheric and vacuum plasma spray (APS and VPS) technologies, respectively. SiC-coated graphite was applied as the substrate. The obtained results showed that the oxidation of ZrC powder in APS process resulted in the formation of ZrO and Zr2O phases. Pores and cracks were more likely to be formed in the as-sprayed APS-ZrC coating. The VPS-ZrC coating without oxides possessed denser microstructure, higher thermal diffusivity, and lower coefficients of thermal expansion as compared with the APS-ZrC coating. A dense ZrO2 layer would be formed on the surface of the VPS-ZrC-coated sample during the ablation process and the substrate can be protected sufficiently after being ablated in high temperature plasma jet. However, the ZrO2 layer, formed by oxidation of the APS-ZrC coating having loose structure, was easy to be washed away by the shearing action of the plasma jet.

  8. Thermodynamics of Fe(II)Fe(III) oxide systems I. Hydrothermal Fe3O4

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartel, J.J.; Westrum, E.F.; Haas, J.L.

    1976-01-01

    The heat capacity of a hydrothermally-prepared polycrystalline sample of Fe3O4 was measured from 53 to 350 K, primarily to study the thermophysics of the Verwey transitions. Although the bifurcation of the transition was confirmed, the sample was found to contain traces of manganese. The observed transition temperatures of 117.0 and 123.0 K are 3.7 and 4.2 K higher respectively than those found in pure Fe3O4. Ancillary analytical results are consistent and indicate a stoichiometry of Mn0.008Fe2.992O4 for this material. Characteristics in the transition region are ascribed to dopant effects. ?? 1976.

  9. Sulphur mustard degradation on zirconium doped Ti-Fe oxides.

    PubMed

    Štengla, Václav; Grygar, Tomáš Matys; Opluštil, František; Němec, Tomáš

    2011-09-15

    Zirconium doped mixed nanodispersive oxides of Ti and Fe were prepared by homogeneous hydrolysis of sulphate salts with urea in aqueous solutions. Synthesized nanodispersive metal oxide hydroxides were characterised as the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area and Barrett-Joiner-Halenda porosity (BJH), X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared (IR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) microanalysis, and acid-base titration. These oxides were taken for an experimental evaluation of their reactivity with sulphur mustard (chemical warfare agent HD or bis(2-chloroethyl)sulphide). The presence of Zr(4+) dopant tends to increase both the surface area and the surface hydroxylation of the resulting doped oxides in such a manner that it can contribute to enabling the substrate adsorption at the oxide surface and thus accelerate the rate of degradation of warfare agents. The addition of Zr(4+) to the hydrolysis of ferric sulphate with urea shifts the reaction route and promotes formation of goethite at the expense of ferrihydrite. We discovered that Zr(4+) doped oxo-hydroxides of Ti and Fe exhibit a higher degradation activity towards sulphur mustard than any other yet reported reactive sorbents. The reaction rate constant of the slower parallel reaction of the most efficient reactive sorbents is increased with the increasing amount of surface base sites.

  10. Reductive biotransformation of Fe in shale limestone saprolite containing Fe(III) oxides and Fe(II)/Fe(III) phyllosilicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, James K.; McKinley, James P.; Kennedy, David W.; Smith, Steven C.; Dong, Hailiang

    2006-07-01

    A <2.0-mm fraction of a mineralogically complex subsurface sediment containing goethite and Fe(II)/Fe(III) phyllosilicates was incubated with Shewanella putrefaciens (strain CN32) and lactate at circumneutral pH under anoxic conditions to investigate electron acceptor preference and the nature of the resulting biogenic Fe(II) fraction. Anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), an electron shuttle, was included in select treatments to enhance bioreduction and subsequent biomineralization. The sediment was highly aggregated and contained two distinct clast populations: (i) a highly weathered one with "sponge-like" internal porosity, large mineral crystallites, and Fe-containing micas, and (ii) a dense, compact one with fine-textured Fe-containing illite and nano-sized goethite, as revealed by various forms of electron microscopic analyses. Approximately 10-15% of the Fe(III) TOT was bioreduced by CN32 over 60 d in media without AQDS, whereas 24% and 35% of the Fe(III) TOT was bioreduced by CN32 after 40 and 95 d in media with AQDS. Little or no Fe 2+, Mn, Si, Al, and Mg were evident in aqueous filtrates after reductive incubation. Mössbauer measurements on the bioreduced sediments indicated that both goethite and phyllosilicate Fe(III) were partly reduced without bacterial preference. Goethite was more extensively reduced in the presence of AQDS whereas phyllosilicate Fe(III) reduction was not influenced by AQDS. Biogenic Fe(II) resulting from phyllosilicate Fe(III) reduction remained in a layer-silicate environment that displayed enhanced solubility in weak acid. The mineralogic nature of the goethite biotransformation product was not determined. Chemical and cryogenic Mössbauer measurements, however, indicated that the transformation product was not siderite, green rust, magnetite, Fe(OH) 2, or Fe(II) adsorbed on phyllosilicate or bacterial surfaces. Several lines of evidence suggested that biogenic Fe(II) existed as surface associated phase on the residual goethite

  11. Fe hydroxyphosphate precipitation and Fe(II) oxidation kinetics upon aeration of Fe(II) and phosphate-containing synthetic and natural solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Grift, B.; Behrends, T.; Osté, L. A.; Schot, P. P.; Wassen, M. J.; Griffioen, J.

    2016-08-01

    Exfiltration of anoxic Fe-rich groundwater into surface water and the concomitant oxidative precipitation of Fe are important processes controlling the transport of phosphate (PO4) from agricultural areas to aquatic systems. Here, we explored the relationship between solution composition, reaction kinetics, and the characteristics of the produced Fe hydroxyphosphate precipitates in a series of aeration experiments with anoxic synthetic water and natural groundwater. A pH stat device was used to maintain constant pH and to record the H+ production during Fe(II) oxidation in the aeration experiments in which the initial aqueous P/Fe ratios ((P/Fe)ini), oxygen concentration and pH were varied. In general, Fe(II) oxidation proceeded slower in the presence of PO4 but the decrease of the PO4 concentration during Fe(II) oxidation due to the formation of Fe hydroxyphosphates caused additional deceleration of the reaction rate. The progress of the reaction could be described using a pseudo-second-order rate law with first-order dependencies on PO4 and Fe(II) concentrations. After PO4 depletion, the Fe(II) oxidation rates increased again and the kinetics followed a pseudo-first-order rate law. The first-order rate constants after PO4 depletion, however, were lower compared to the Fe(II) oxidation in a PO4-free solution. Hence, the initially formed Fe hydroxyphosphates also affect the kinetics of continuing Fe(II) oxidation after PO4 depletion. Presence of aqueous PO4 during oxidation of Fe(II) led to the formation of Fe hydroxyphosphates. The P/Fe ratios of the precipitates ((P/Fe)ppt) and the recorded ratio of H+ production over decrease in dissolved Fe(II) did not change detectably throughout the reaction despite a changing P/Fe ratio in the solution. When (P/Fe)ini was 0.9, precipitates with a (P/Fe)ppt ratio of about 0.6 were formed. In experiments with (P/Fe)ini ratios below 0.6, the (P/Fe)ppt decreased with decreasing (P/Fe)ini and pH value. Aeration experiments with

  12. The role of biogenic Fe-Mn oxides formed in situ for arsenic oxidation and adsorption in aquatic ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yaohui; Yang, Tingting; Liang, Jinsong; Qu, Jiuhui

    2016-07-01

    As(III&V), Mn(II), and Fe(II) may occur simultaneously in some groundwater and surface water. Studying their redox reactions and interactions is essential to unravel the biogeochemical cycles of these metal ions in aquatic ecosystems and to find effective methods to remove them simultaneously in drinking water treatment. Here, the formation of biogenic Fe-Mn oxides (BFMO, defined as a mixture of biogenic Mn oxide (BMO) and Fe oxide) as well as its oxidation and adsorption of As in a Fe(II)-Mn(II)-As(III&V)-Mn-oxidizing microbe (Pseudomonas sp. QJX-1) system were investigated. Batch experiments and structure characterization revealed that the BFMO was formed via a sequential precipitation of Fe oxide and BMO. The first formed Fe oxide was identified as FeOOH (lepidocrocite) and the latter formed BMO was identified as MnO2 (similar to hexagonal birnessite). In the BFMO mixture, the BMO part was mainly responsible for As(III) oxidation, and the Fe oxide part dominated As adsorption. Remarkably, the BMO could oxidize Fe(II) to form FeOOH, which may improve As adsorption. The optimum Mn(II)/Fe(II) ratio for As removal was approximately 1:3 (mol/mol). Taken together, in Fe(II)-Mn(II)-As(III&V)-Mn-oxidizing microbe ecosystems, the in situ formation of BFMO could eliminate or decrease Fe(II), Mn(II), and As(III&V) species simultaneously. Therefore, based on this study, new approaches may be developed for As removal from water containing high concentrations of Fe(II) and Mn(II). PMID:27088246

  13. The role of biogenic Fe-Mn oxides formed in situ for arsenic oxidation and adsorption in aquatic ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yaohui; Yang, Tingting; Liang, Jinsong; Qu, Jiuhui

    2016-07-01

    As(III&V), Mn(II), and Fe(II) may occur simultaneously in some groundwater and surface water. Studying their redox reactions and interactions is essential to unravel the biogeochemical cycles of these metal ions in aquatic ecosystems and to find effective methods to remove them simultaneously in drinking water treatment. Here, the formation of biogenic Fe-Mn oxides (BFMO, defined as a mixture of biogenic Mn oxide (BMO) and Fe oxide) as well as its oxidation and adsorption of As in a Fe(II)-Mn(II)-As(III&V)-Mn-oxidizing microbe (Pseudomonas sp. QJX-1) system were investigated. Batch experiments and structure characterization revealed that the BFMO was formed via a sequential precipitation of Fe oxide and BMO. The first formed Fe oxide was identified as FeOOH (lepidocrocite) and the latter formed BMO was identified as MnO2 (similar to hexagonal birnessite). In the BFMO mixture, the BMO part was mainly responsible for As(III) oxidation, and the Fe oxide part dominated As adsorption. Remarkably, the BMO could oxidize Fe(II) to form FeOOH, which may improve As adsorption. The optimum Mn(II)/Fe(II) ratio for As removal was approximately 1:3 (mol/mol). Taken together, in Fe(II)-Mn(II)-As(III&V)-Mn-oxidizing microbe ecosystems, the in situ formation of BFMO could eliminate or decrease Fe(II), Mn(II), and As(III&V) species simultaneously. Therefore, based on this study, new approaches may be developed for As removal from water containing high concentrations of Fe(II) and Mn(II).

  14. The effect of various oxide dispersions on the oxidation resistance of Fe{sub 3}Al

    SciTech Connect

    Pint, B.A.; Alexander, K.B.; Tortorelli, P.F.

    1996-10-01

    Oxide-dispersed Fe-28at.%Al-2%Cr alloys were produced by a powder metallurgy technique followed by hot extrusion. Yttria and ceria were added to the base alloy to assess the effect of these dopants on the oxidation behavior. The amount of dopant was varied from 0.05-0.5 at.% Y in a series of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-dispersed alloys. isothermal and cyclic oxidation testing was conducted at temperatures from 800{degrees} to 1300{degrees}C. A CeO{sub 2} addition was detrimental to the oxidation behavior. The Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} improved the {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale adhesion relative to an undoped alloy, but was not as effective as similar additions to an oxide-dispersed FeCrAl alloy.

  15. Oxidation of Fe-Cr-Al and Fe-Cr-Al-Y Single Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabke, H. J.; Siegers, M.; Tolpygo, V. K.

    1995-03-01

    Single crystal samples of the alloy Fe-20%Cr-5%Al with and without Y-doping were used to study the "reactive element" (RE) effect, which causes improved oxidation behaviour and formation of a protective Al2O3 layer on this alloy. The oxidation was followed by AES at 10-7 mbar O2 up to about 1000 °C. Most observations were peculiar for this low pO2 environment, but yttrium clearly favors the formation of Al-oxide and stabilizes it also under these conditions, probably by favoring its nucleation. The oxides formed are surface compounds of about monolayer thickness, not clearly related to bulk oxides. Furthermore, the morphologies of oxide scales were investigated by SEM, after oxidation at 1000°C for 100 h at 133 mbar O2. On Fe-Cr-Al the scale is strongly convoluted and tends to spalling, whereas the presence of Y leads to flat scales which are well adherent. This difference is explained by a change in growth mechanism. The tendency for separation of oxide and metal was highest for the samples with low energy metal surface, i.e. (100) and (110), the scale was better adherent on the (111) oriented surface and on the polycrystalline specimen, since in the latter cases the overall energy for scale/metal separation is higher. All observations, from the low and from the high pO2 experiments, are discussed in relation to the approximately ten mechanisms proposed in the literature for explanation of the RE effects.

  16. Structure and magnetic properties of irradiated Fe/Fe oxide core-shell nanoclusters

    SciTech Connect

    McCloy, John S.; Jiang, Weilin; Sundararajan, Jennifer A.; Qiang, You; Burks, Edward; Liu, Kai

    2013-04-25

    A cluster deposition method was used to produce a film of loosely aggregated particles of Fe-Fe3O4 core-shell nanoclusters with an 8 nm iron core size and 2 nm oxide shell thickness. The film of particles on a silicon substrate was irradiated with 5.5 MeV Si2+ ions to a fluence of 1016 cm-2 near room temperature, and computer simulations based on the SRIM (Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter) code show that the implanted Si species stops near the film-substrate interface. The ion irradiation creates a structural change in the film with corresponding chemical and magnetic changes. X-ray diffraction shows that the core size and chemistry stay the same but the shell becomes FeO that grows to a thickness of 17 nm. Helium ion microscopy shows that the previously separate particles have densified into a nearly continuous film. Major loop magnetic hysteresis measurements show a decrease in saturation magnetization that we attribute to the presence of the antiferromagnetic (AFM) FeO shell. First-order reversal curve measurements on the irradiated film performed with a vibrating sample magnetometer show that the AFM shell prevents the particles from interacting magnetically, leading to low coercivity from the iron core and little bias field from the core interactions. These results, and others reported previously on different compositions (Fe3O4 or FeO+Fe3N nanoclusters), show that the ion irradiation behavior of nanocluster films such as these depends strongly on the initial nanostructure and chemistry.

  17. Oxidation behavior of Fe-20Cr steels alloyed with titanium at 1073 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setiawan, Asep Ridwan; Artono, Tri Juni

    2016-02-01

    In this work, the oxidation behavior of Fe-20 wt%Cr steels alloyed with different titanium contents: 0, 0.5, and 1 wt% are studied as a function of time in air atmosphere. The samples were isothermally oxidized at 1073 K for 86.4, 172.8, and 345.6 ks in a muffle furnace. The mass of specimen were recorded before and after oxidation. After the oxidation, phases in the oxide were identified by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Optical microscopy observation on the chromium base alloys show that the microstructure consist only ferritic phases. The addition of titanium in the Fe-20Cr alloys does not alter the microstructure significantly. The oxidation behavior of Fe-20Cr, Fe-20Cr-0.5Ti and Fe-20Cr-1Ti were followed the classical parabolic relationship with time. XRD analysis indicated that the oxide scales developed on the Fe-20Cr alloys surface during oxidation tests consisted mainly of Cr2O3. On the other hand, the oxide scales developed on the surface of Fe-20Cr-0.5Ti and Fe-20Cr-1Ti alloys comprised of Cr2O3 and TiO2 oxide. The formation of TiO2 oxide in the Ti-containing alloys consequently increases the mass gain of the alloys during oxidation compared to that of Fe-20Cr alloys.

  18. Bacterial nanometric amorphous Fe-based oxide: a potential lithium-ion battery anode material.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Hideki; Kobayashi, Genki; Sakuma, Ryo; Fujii, Tatsuo; Hayashi, Naoaki; Suzuki, Tomoko; Kanno, Ryoji; Takano, Mikio; Takada, Jun

    2014-04-23

    Amorphous Fe(3+)-based oxide nanoparticles produced by Leptothrix ochracea, aquatic bacteria living worldwide, show a potential as an Fe(3+)/Fe(0) conversion anode material for lithium-ion batteries. The presence of minor components, Si and P, in the original nanoparticles leads to a specific electrode architecture with Fe-based electrochemical centers embedded in a Si, P-based amorphous matrix.

  19. Thermodynamic controls on the kinetics of microbial low-pH Fe(II) oxidation.

    PubMed

    Larson, Lance N; Sánchez-España, Javier; Kaley, Bradley; Sheng, Yizhi; Bibby, Kyle; Burgos, William D

    2014-08-19

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) is a major worldwide environmental threat to surface and groundwater quality. Microbial low-pH Fe(II) oxidation could be exploited for cost-effective AMD treatment; however, its use is limited because of uncertainties associated with its rate and ability to remove Fe from solution. We developed a thermodynamic-based framework to evaluate the kinetics of low-pH Fe(II) oxidation. We measured the kinetics of low-pH Fe(II) oxidation at five sites in the Appalachian Coal Basin in the US and three sites in the Iberian Pyrite Belt in Spain and found that the fastest rates of Fe(II) oxidation occurred at the sites with the lowest pH values. Thermodynamic calculations showed that the Gibbs free energy of Fe(II) oxidation (ΔG(oxidation)) was also most negative at the sites with the lowest pH values. We then conducted two series of microbial Fe(II) oxidation experiments in laboratory-scale chemostatic bioreactors operated through a series of pH values (2.1-4.2) and found the same relationships between Fe(II) oxidation kinetics, ΔG(oxidation), and pH. Conditions that favored the fastest rates of Fe(II) oxidation coincided with higher Fe(III) solubility. The solubility of Fe(III) minerals, thus plays an important role on Fe(II) oxidation kinetics. Methods to incorporate microbial low-pH Fe(II) oxidation into active and passive AMD treatment systems are discussed in the context of these findings. This study presents a simplified model that describes the relationship between free energy and microbial kinetics and should be broadly applicable to many biogeochemical systems. PMID:25072394

  20. Enhanced magnetic properties of Fe soft magnetic composites by surface oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Guoliang; Wu, Chen; Yan, Mi

    2016-02-01

    Fe soft magnetic composites (SMCs) with low core loss were fabricated via surface oxidation of the Fe powders by H2O and O2 at elevated temperatures. Surface oxidation prevents magnetic dilution due to the formation of the ferromagnetic iron oxide coating layer, giving rise to high magnetic flux density and effective permeability of the SMCs compared with those fabricated with traditional phosphate coating. Mechanism of the oxidation process has been investigated where Fe3O4 forms by reactions of Fe with H2O and O2. The Fe3O4 coating layer tends to convert into γ-Fe2O3 with increased oxidation temperature and time. By controlling composition of the coating layer, low core loss of 688.9 mW/cm3 (measured at 50 mT and 100 kHz) and higher effective permeability of 88.3 can be achieved for the Fe SMCs.

  1. Observation of a Spot Diameter Dependency in Confined Laser Ablation of Zinc Oxide on Copper-Indium-Diselenide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, Regina; Seiler, Daniel; Huber, Heinz P.; Marowsky, Gerd

    Confined laser ablation with ultra-short laser pulses, also referred to as laser "lift-off", is initiated at the interface of transparent thin films and underlying absorbing substrates. The energy per ablated volume at confined laser ablation (<10J/mm3) is higher than at direct laser ablation (about 100 J/mm3). In this paper the selective laser structuring of a zinc oxide (ZnO) / copper-indium-diselenid (CIS) layer system is investigated with 10 ps and 460 fs long laser pulses. Spot diameters between 14 μm and 100 μm were selected to show the relation between the spot diameter and the so called punching fluence. This value describes the lowest fluence at which the laser "lift-off" takes place. For both pulse durations the punching fluence depends on the spot diameter. The punching fluence increases from about 0.4 J/cm2 at spot diameters ≥40 μm to about 1.1 J/cm2 for decreasing spot diameters <40 μm.

  2. Oxidation sulfidation resistance of Fe-Cr-Ni alloys

    DOEpatents

    Natesan, Ken; Baxter, David J.

    1984-01-01

    High temperature resistance of Fe-Cr-Ni alloy compositions to oxidative and/or sulfidative conditions is provided by the incorporation of about 1-8 wt. % of Zr or Nb and results in a two-phase composition having an alloy matrix as the first phase and a fine grained intermetallic composition as the second phase. The presence and location of the intermetallic composition between grains of the matrix provides mechanical strength, enhanced surface scale adhesion, and resistance to corrosive attack between grains of the alloy matrix at temperatures of 500.degree.-1000.degree. C.

  3. Improved oxidation sulfidation resistance of Fe-Cr-Ni alloys

    DOEpatents

    Natesan, K.; Baxter, D.J.

    1983-07-26

    High temperature resistance of Fe-Cr-Ni alloy compositions to oxidative and/or sulfidative conditions is provided by the incorporation of about 1 to 8 wt % of Zr or Nb and results in a two-phase composition having an alloy matrix as the first phase and a fine grained intermetallic composition as the second phase. The presence and location of the intermetallic composition between grains of the matrix provides mechanical strength, enhanced surface scale adhesion, and resistance to corrosive attack between grains of the alloy matrix at temperatures of 500 to 1000/sup 0/C.

  4. Origin of concretionary Mn-Fe-oxides in stream sediments of Maine, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nowlan, G.A.; McHugh, J.B.; Hessin, T.D.

    1983-01-01

    Studies of stream and sediment-pore waters largely explain the genesis of concretionary Mn-Fe-oxides in Maine. Waters of two small streams near Jackman, Maine, were studied in terms of pH, Eh, dissolved oxygen, dissolved organic carbon, dissolved Mn, total dissolved Fe, and ferrous and ferric Fe. Pyrite Creek has profuse concretions and coatings of Mn-Fe-oxides, whereas West Pyrite Creek has only sparse Mn-Fe-oxide stains. Pyrite Creek drains boggy terrain and West Pyrite Creek drains well-drained terrain. In West Pyrite Creek, stream and subjacent pore waters have chemical characteristics that do not differ greatly. However, dissolved Mn, ferrous Fe, dissolved oxygen, and in situ Eh measurements show that a steep Eh gradient exists between stream and subjacent pore waters of Pyrite Creek. The steep Eh gradient is manifested by the common zonation of coatings and stains on rocks in stream sediment. The bottom zone has no deposition of oxides, the middle zone is red and consists mostly of Fe-oxides, and the upper zone is black or dark-brown and consists of Mn-oxides with varying amounts of Fe-oxides. The zonation agrees with theoretical predictions of oxide stability as one moves from a reducing to an oxidizing environment. At locations where concretionary Mn-Fe-oxides form, pore waters are depleted of oxygen because of abundant decaying organic material in the stream sediment. The pore waters are charged with dissolved Mn and Fe because mechanically deposited Mn-Fe-oxides are remobilized due to the low-Eh conditions. Groundwaters also contribute dissolved Mn and Fe. Stream waters, on the other hand, are oxygenated and the high-Eh conditions result in low concentrations of dissolved Mn and Fe in stream waters because of the insolubility of Mn-Fe-oxides in high-Eh environments. Therefore, concretionary Mn-Fe-oxides form at the interface between pore and stream waters because Mn- and Fe-rich pore waters, which are undersaturated with respect to Mn-Fe-oxides, mix with

  5. Sphaerotilus natans encrusted with nanoball-shaped Fe(III) oxide minerals formed by nitrate-reducing mixotrophic Fe(II) oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sunhwa; Kim, Dong-Hun; Lee, Ji-Hoon; Hur, Hor-Gil

    2014-01-01

    Ferrous iron has been known to function as an electron source for iron-oxidizing microorganisms in both anoxic and oxic environments. A diversity of bacteria has been known to oxidize both soluble and solid-phase Fe(II) forms coupled to the reduction of nitrate. Here, we show for the first time Fe(II) oxidation by Sphaerotilus natans strain DSM 6575T under mixotrophic condition. Sphaerotilus natans has been known to form a sheath structure enclosing long chains of rod-shaped cells, resulting in a thick biofilm formation under oxic conditions. Here, we also demonstrate that strain DSM 6575T grows mixotrophically with pyruvate, Fe(II) as electron donors and nitrate as an electron acceptor and single cells of strain DSM 6575T are dominant under anoxic conditions. Furthermore, strain DSM 6575T forms nanoball-shaped amorphous Fe(III) oxide minerals encrusting on the cell surfaces through the mixotrophic iron oxidation reaction under anoxic conditions. We propose that cell encrustation results from the indirect Fe(II) oxidation by biogenic nitrite during nitrate reduction and that causes the bacterial morphological change to individual rod-shaped single cells from filamentous sheath structures. This study extends the group of existing microorganisms capable of mixotrophic Fe(II) oxidation by a new strain, S. natans strain DSM 6575T, and could contribute to biogeochemical cycles of Fe and N in the environment. PMID:24965827

  6. Phototrophic Fe(II) oxidation promotes organic carbon acquisition by Rhodobacter capsulatus SB1003.

    PubMed

    Caiazza, Nicky C; Lies, Douglas P; Newman, Dianne K

    2007-10-01

    Anoxygenic phototrophic Fe(II) oxidation is usually considered to be a lithoautotrophic metabolism that contributes to primary production in Fe-based ecosystems. In this study, we employed Rhodobacter capsulatus SB1003 as a model organism to test the hypothesis that phototrophic Fe(II) oxidation can be coupled to organic carbon acquisition. R. capsulatus SB1003 oxidized Fe(II) under anoxic conditions in a light-dependent manner, but it failed to grow lithoautotrophically on soluble Fe(II). When the strain was provided with Fe(II)-citrate, however, growth was observed that was dependent upon microbially catalyzed Fe(II) oxidation, resulting in the formation of Fe(III)-citrate. Subsequent photochemical breakdown of Fe(III)-citrate yielded acetoacetic acid that supported growth in the light but not the dark. The deletion of genes (RRC00247 and RRC00248) that encode homologs of atoA and atoD, required for acetoacetic acid utilization, severely impaired the ability of R. capsulatus SB1003 to grow on Fe(II)-citrate. The growth yield achieved by R. capsulatus SB1003 in the presence of citrate cannot be explained by lithoautotrophic growth on Fe(II) enabled by indirect effects of the ligand [such as altering the thermodynamics of Fe(II) oxidation or preventing cell encrustation]. Together, these results demonstrate that R. capsulatus SB1003 grows photoheterotrophically on Fe(II)-citrate. Nitrilotriacetic acid also supported light-dependent growth on Fe(II), suggesting that Fe(II) oxidation may be a general mechanism whereby some Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria mine otherwise inaccessible organic carbon sources. PMID:17693559

  7. Formation of layered Fe(II)-Al(III)-hydroxides during reaction of Fe(II) with aluminum oxide.

    PubMed

    Elzinga, Evert J

    2012-05-01

    The reactivity of aqueous Fe(II) with aluminum oxide in anoxic solutions was investigated with batch kinetic experiments combined with Fe K edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements to characterize Fe(II) sorption products. Formation of Fe(II)-Al(III)-layered double hydroxides with an octahedral sheet structure similar to nikischerite (NaFe(II)(6) Al(3)(SO(4))(2)(OH)(18) (H(2)O)(12)) was observed within a few hours during sorption at pH 7.5 and aqueous Fe(II) concentrations of 1-3 mM. These Fe(II) phases are composed of brucite-like Fe(II)(OH)(2) sheets with partial substitution of Al(III) for Fe(II), charge balanced by anions coordinated along the basal planes. Their fast rate of formation suggests that these previously unrecognized Fe(II) phases, which are structurally and compositionally similar to green rust, may be an important sink of Fe(II) in suboxic and anoxic geochemical environments, and impact the fate of structurally compatible trace metals, such as Co(II), Ni(II), and Zn(II), as well as redox-reactive species including Cr(VI) and U(VI). Further studies are required to assess the thermodynamics, formation kinetics, and stability of these Fe(II) minerals under field conditions. PMID:22409244

  8. Reduction of aqueous transition metal species on the surfaces of Fe(II)-containing oxides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, A.F.; Peterson, M.L.

    1996-01-01

    Experimental studies demonstrate that structural Fe(II) in magnetite and ilmenite heterogeneously reduce aqueous ferric, cupric, vanadate, and chromate ions at the oxide surfaces over a pH range of 1-7 at 25??C. For an aqueous transition metal m, such reactions are 3[Fe2+Fe3+2]O4(magnetite) + 2/nmz ??? 4[Fe3+2]O3(maghemite) + Fe2+ + 2/nmz-n and 3[Fe2+Ti]O3(ilmenite) + 2/nmz ??? Fe3+2Ti3O9(pseudorutile) + Fe2+ + 2/nmz-n, where z is the valance state and n is the charge transfer number. The half cell potential range for solid state oxidation [Fe(II)] ??? [Fe(III)] is -0.34 to -0.65 V, making structural Fe(II) a stronger reducing agent than aqueous Fe2+ (-0.77 V). Reduction rates for aqueous metal species are linear with time (up to 36 h), decrease with pH, and have rate constants between 0.1 and 3.3 ?? 10-10 mol m-2 s-1. Iron is released to solution both from the above reactions and from dissolution of the oxide surface. In the presence of chromate, Fe2+ is oxidized homogeneously in solution to Fe3+. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) denotes a Fe(III) oxide surface containing reduced Cr(III) and V(IV) species. Magnetite and ilmenite electrode potentials are insensitive to increases in divalent transition metals including Zn(II), Co(II), Mn(II), and Ni(II) and reduced V(IV) and Cr(III) but exhibit a log-linear concentration-potential response to Fe(III) and Cu(II). Complex positive electrode responses occur with increasing Cr(VI) and V(V) concentrations. Potential dynamic scans indicate that the high oxidation potential of dichromate is capable of suppressing the cathodic reductive dissolution of magnetite. Oxide electrode potentials are determined by the Fe(II)/Fe(III) composition of the oxide surface and respond to aqueous ion potentials which accelerate this oxidation process. Natural magnetite sands weathered under anoxic conditions are electrochemically reactive as demonstrated by rapid chromate reduction and the release of aqueous Fe(III) to experimental

  9. Mechanisms for chelator stimulation of microbial Fe(III) -oxide reduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovley, D.R.; Woodward, J.C.

    1996-01-01

    The mechanisms by which nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) stimulated Fe(III) reduction in sediments from a petroleum-contaminated aquifer were investigated in order to gain insight into how added Fe(III) chelators stimulate the activity of hydrocarbon-degrading, Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms in these sediments, and how naturally occurring Fe(III) chelators might promote Fe(III) reduction in aquatic sediments. NTA solubilized Fe(III) from the aquifer sediments. NTA stimulation of microbial Fe(III) reduction did not appear to be the result of making calcium, magnesium, potassium, or trace metals more available to the microorganisms. Stimulation of Fe(III) reduction could not be attributed to NTA serving as a source of carbon or fixed nitrogen for Fe(III)-reducing bacteria as NTA was not degraded in the sediments. Studies with the Fe(III)-reducing microorganism, Geobacter metallireducens, and pure Fe(III)-oxide forms, demonstrated that NTA stimulated the reduction of a variety of Fe(III) forms, including highly crystalline Fe(III)-oxides such as goethite and hematite. The results suggest that NTA solubilization of insoluble Fe(III)-oxide is an important mechanism for the stimulation of Fe(III) reduction by NTA in aquifer sediments.

  10. Reactions of [FeFe]-hydrogenase models involving the formation of hydrides related to proton reduction and hydrogen oxidation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning; Wang, Mei; Chen, Lin; Sun, Licheng

    2013-09-14

    [FeFe]-hydrogenases are enzymes in nature that catalyze the reduction of protons and the oxidation of H2 at neutral pH with remarkably high activities and incredibly low overpotential. Structural and functional biomimicking of the active site of [FeFe]-hydrogenases can provide helpful hints for elucidating the mechanism of H2 evolution and uptake at the [FeFe]-hydrogenase active site and for designing bioinspired catalysts to replace the expensive noble metal catalysts for H2 generation and uptake. This perspective focuses on the recent progress in the formation and reactivity of iron hydrides closely related to the processes of proton reduction and hydrogen oxidation mediated by diiron dithiolate complexes. The second section surveys the bridging and terminal hydride species formed from various diiron complexes as well as the intramolecular proton transfer. The very recent progress in H2 activation by diiron dithiolate models are reviewed in the third section. In the concluding remarks and outlook, the differences in structure and catalytic mechanism between the synthetic models and the native [FeFe]-H2ase active site are compared and analyzed, which may cause the need for a significantly larger driving force and may lead to lower activities of synthetic models than the [FeFe]-H2ases for H2 generation and uptake.

  11. Advanced experimental analysis of controls on microbial Fe(III) oxide reduction. First year progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Roden, E.E.; Urrutia, M.M.

    1997-07-01

    'The authors have made considerable progress toward a number of project objectives during the first several months of activity on the project. An exhaustive analysis was made of the growth rate and biomass yield (both derived from measurements of cell protein production) of two representative strains of Fe(III)-reducing bacteria (Shewanellaalga strain BrY and Geobactermetallireducens) growing with different forms of Fe(III) as an electron acceptor. These two fundamentally different types of Fe(III)-reducing bacteria (FeRB) showed comparable rates of Fe(III) reduction, cell growth, and biomass yield during reduction of soluble Fe(III)-citrate and solid-phase amorphous hydrous ferric oxide (HFO). Intrinsic growth rates of the two FeRB were strongly influenced by whether a soluble or a solid-phase source of Fe(III) was provided: growth rates on soluble Fe(III) were 10--20 times higher than those on solid-phase Fe(III) oxide. Intrinsic FeRB growth rates were comparable during reduction of HF0 and a synthetic crystalline Fe(III) oxide (goethite). A distinct lag phase for protein production was observed during the first several days of incubation in solid-phase Fe(III) oxide medium, even though Fe(III) reduction proceeded without any lag. No such lag between protein production and Fe(III) reduction was observed during growth with soluble Fe(III). This result suggested that protein synthesis coupled to solid-phase Fe(III) oxide reduction in batch culture requires an initial investment of energy (generated by Fe(III) reduction), which is probably needed for synthesis of materials (e.g. extracellular polysaccharides) required for attachment of the cells to oxide surfaces. This phenomenon may have important implications for modeling the growth of FeRB in subsurface sedimentary environments, where attachment and continued adhesion to solid-phase materials will be required for maintenance of Fe(III) reduction activity. Despite considerable differences in the rate and pattern

  12. The oxidation state of nanophase Fe particles in lunar soil: Implications for space weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Michelle S.; Zega, Thomas J.; Becerra, Patricio; Keane, James T.; Byrne, Shane

    2016-06-01

    We report measurements of the oxidation state of Fe nanoparticles within lunar soils that experienced varied degrees of space weathering. We measured >100 particles from immature, submature, and mature lunar samples using electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) coupled to an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope. The EELS measurements show that the nanoparticles are composed of a mixture of Fe0, Fe2+, and Fe3+ oxidation states, and exhibit a trend of increasing oxidation state with higher maturity. We hypothesize that the oxidation is driven by the diffusion of O atoms to the surface of the Fe nanoparticles from the oxygen-rich matrix that surrounds them. The oxidation state of Fe in the nanoparticles has an effect on modeled reflectance properties of lunar soil. These results are relevant to remote sensing data for the Moon and to the remote determination of relative soil maturities for various regions of the lunar surface.

  13. Antioxidant properties of S-adenosyl-L-methionine in Fe(2+)-initiated oxidations.

    PubMed

    Caro, Andres A; Cederbaum, Arthur I

    2004-05-15

    S-Adenosylmethionine (SAM) is protective against a variety of toxic agents that promote oxidative stress. One mechanism for this protective effect of SAM is increased synthesis of glutathione. We evaluated whether SAM is protective via possible antioxidant-like activities. Aerobic Hepes-buffered solutions of Fe2+ spontaneously oxidize and consume O2 with concomitant production of reactive oxygen species and oxidation of substrates to radical products, e.g., ethanol to hydroxyethyl radical. SAM inhibited this oxidation of ethanol and inhibited aerobic Fe2+ oxidation and consumption of O2. SAM did not regenerate Fe2+ from Fe3+ and was not consumed after incubation with Fe2+. SAM less effectively inhibited aerobic Fe2+ oxidation in the presence of competing chelating agents such as EDTA, citrate, and ADP. The effects of SAM were mimicked by S-adenosylhomocysteine, but not by methionine or methylthioadenosine. SAM did not inhibit Fe2+ oxidation by H2O2 and was a relatively poor inhibitor of the Fenton reaction. Lipid peroxidation initiated by Fe2+ in liposomes was associated with Fe2+ oxidation; these two processes were inhibited by SAM. However, SAM did not show significant peroxyl radical scavenging activity. SAM also inhibited the nonenzymatic lipid peroxidation initiated by Fe2+ + ascorbate in rat liver microsomes. These results suggest that SAM inhibits alcohol and lipid oxidation mainly by Fe2+ chelation and inhibition of Fe2+ autoxidation. This could represent an important mechanism by which SAM exerts cellular protective actions and reduces oxidative stress in biological systems. PMID:15110395

  14. Acid-tolerant microaerophilic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria promote Fe(III)-accumulation in a fen.

    PubMed

    Lüdecke, Claudia; Reiche, Marco; Eusterhues, Karin; Nietzsche, Sandor; Küsel, Kirsten

    2010-10-01

    The ecological importance of Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) at circumneutral pH is often masked in the presence of O(2) where rapid chemical oxidation of Fe(II) predominates. This study addresses the abundance, diversity and activity of microaerophilic FeOB in an acidic fen (pH ∼ 5) located in northern Bavaria, Germany. Mean O(2) penetration depth reached 16 cm where the highest dissolved Fe(II) concentrations (up to 140 µM) were present in soil water. Acid-tolerant FeOB cultivated in gradient tubes were most abundant (10(6) cells g(-1) peat) at the 10-20 cm depth interval. A stable enrichment culture was active at up to 29% O(2) saturation and Fe(III) accumulated 1.6 times faster than in abiotic controls. An acid-tolerant, microaerophilic isolate (strain CL21) was obtained which was closely related to the neutrophilic, lithoautotrophic FeOB Sideroxydans lithotrophicus strain LD-1. CL21 oxidized Fe(II) between pH 4 and 6.0, and produced nanoscale-goethites with a clearly lower mean coherence length (7 nm) perpendicular to the (110) plane than those formed abiotically (10 nm). Our results suggest that an acid-tolerant population of FeOB is thriving at redox interfaces formed by diffusion-limited O(2) transport in acidic peatlands. Furthermore, this well-adapted population is successfully competing with chemical oxidation and thereby playing an important role in the microbial iron cycle.

  15. Using metatranscriptomics to understand the roles of Fe(II)-oxidizing microbes in marine hydrothermal vents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glazer, B. T.; Mcallister, S.; Polson, S. W.; Chan, C. S. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Fe(II)-oxidizing microbes (FeOM) are thought to be key players in marine Fe cycling, particularly at hydrothermal vents. However, we do not have tools to track their activity, largely because we do not know the genes involved in neutrophilic chemolithotrophic Fe oxidation. Researchers have used gene homology between FeOM isolates to suggest several genes that may be involved in Fe(II) oxidation, including the Fe oxidase cyc2 found in the Zetaproteobacteria type strain Mariprofundus ferrooxydans, as well as all other known neutrophilic microaerophilic FeOM. Although many Zetaproteobacteria are found within natural Fe mats, close relatives of Fe(II)-oxidizing isolates are rarely present. Therefore, one goal of this study was to determine the activity of putative Fe(II) oxidation genes in dominant OTUs found in natural environments. We collected Fe mats from hydrothermal vents at Loihi Seamount, Hawaii, preserving RNA in situ. By analyzing metatranscriptomes of different Fe mat niches, we were able to determine the OTUs involved and the gene expression patterns associated with Fe(II) oxidation in the marine environment. Analysis of metatranscriptomic data confirms that the Zetaproteobacteria express the various genes necessary to support the Fe mat community through chemoautotrophic growth. Globally ubiquitous and even some rare species of the Zetaproteobacteria were active, with different relative abundances depending on Fe mat niches defined by fluid flow and geochemistry. Initial results show that genes thought to be involved in the electron transport pathway from Fe(II) to O2, including cyc2, are some of the most highly expressed genes in marine Fe microbial mats. Species-specific variants of these genes suggest that many of the Zetaproteobacteria species, spanning the breadth of the diversity of the class, are expressing genes necessary for Fe(II) oxidation within natural Fe mat niches. Understanding the differential expression of these genes in different niches

  16. Induction of Nitrate-Dependent Fe(II) Oxidation by Fe(II) in Dechloromonas sp. Strain UWNR4 and Acidovorax sp. Strain 2AN

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Anirban

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the inducibility of nitrate-dependent Fe(II)-EDTA oxidation (NDFO) in non-growth, chloramphenicol-amended, resting-cell suspensions of Dechloromonas sp. strain UWNR4 and Acidovorax sp. strain 2AN. Cells previously incubated with Fe(II)-EDTA oxidized ca. 6-fold more Fe(II)-EDTA than cells previously incubated with Fe(III)-EDTA. This is the first report of induction of NDFO by Fe(II). PMID:23144134

  17. Control of the permeability loss-peak frequency of Ni81Fe19 thin films through laser ablation of triangular and square cluster geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimes, C. A.; Lumpp, J. K.

    2000-01-01

    Laser ablation arrays of triangular and square shaped clusters, comprised of 23 micrometers diam circular holes, are defined upon 100 nm thick Ni81Fe19 films used to control the rf permeability spectra. Cluster-to-cluster spacing is varied from 200 to 600 micrometers. For each geometry it is found that the loss peak frequency and permeability magnitude shift lower, in a step-wise fashion, at a cluster-to-cluster spacing between 275 and 300 micrometers. The nonlinear shift in the behavior of the permeability spectra correlates with a dramatic increase in domain wall density. c2000 American Institute of Physics.

  18. Electrochemically induced oxidative precipitation of Fe(II) for As(III) oxidation and removal in synthetic groundwater.

    PubMed

    Tong, Man; Yuan, Songhu; Zhang, Peng; Liao, Peng; Alshawabkeh, Akram N; Xie, Xianjun; Wang, Yanxin

    2014-05-01

    Mobilization of Arsenic in groundwater is primarily induced by reductive dissolution of As-rich Fe(III) oxyhydroxides under anoxic conditions. Creating a well-controlled artificial environment that favors oxidative precipitation of Fe(II) and subsequent oxidation and uptake of aqueous As can serve as a remediation strategy. We reported a proof of concept study of a novel iron-based dual anode system for As(III) oxidation and removal in synthetic groundwater. An iron anode was used to produce Fe(II) under iron-deficient conditions, and another inert anode was used to generate O2 for oxidative precipitation of Fe(II). For 30 min's treatment, 6.67 μM (500 μg/L) of As(III) was completely oxidized and removed from the solution during the oxidative precipitation process when a total current of 60 mA was equally partitioned between the two anodes. The current on the inert anode determined the rate of O2 generation and was linearly related to the rates of Fe(II) oxidation and of As oxidation and removal, suggesting that the process could be manipulated electrochemically. The composition of Fe precipitates transformed from carbonate green rust to amorphous iron oxyhydroxide as the inert anode current increased. A conceptual model was proposed for the in situ application of the electrochemically induced oxidative precipitation process for As(III) remediation.

  19. High longitudinal relaxivity of ultra-small gadolinium oxide prepared by microsecond laser ablation in diethylene glycol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Ningqi; Tian, Xiumei; Xiao, Jun; Hu, Wenyong; Yang, Chuan; Li, Li; Chen, Dihu

    2013-04-01

    Ultra-small gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) can be used as T1-weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) contrast agent own to its high longitudinal relaxivity (r1) and has attracted intensive attention in these years. In this paper, ultra-small Gd2O3 nanoparticles of 3.8 nm in diameter have been successfully synthesized by a microsecond laser ablating a gadolinium (Gd) target in diethylene glycol (DEG). The growth inhibition effect induced by the large viscosity of DEG makes it possible to synthesize ultra-small Gd2O3 by laser ablation in DEG. The r1 value and T1-weighted MR images are measured by a 3.0 T MRI spectroscope. The results show these nanoparticles with a high r1 value of 9.76 s-1 mM-1 to be good MRI contrast agents. We propose an explanation for the high r1 value of ultra-small Gd2O3 by considering the decreasing factor (surface to volume ratio of the nanoparticles, S/V) and the increasing factor (water hydration number of the Gd3+ on Gd2O3 surface, q), which offer a new look into the relaxivity studies of MRI contrast agents. Our research provides a new approach to preparing ultra-small Gd2O3 of high r1 value by laser ablation in DEG and develops the understanding of high relaxivity of ultra-small Gd2O3 MRI contrast agents.

  20. Nd:YVO4 laser direct ablation of indium tin oxide films deposited on glass and polyethylene terephthalate substrates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-Xun; Kwon, Sang Jik; Han, Jae-Hee; Cho, Eou Sik

    2013-09-01

    A Q-switched diode-pumped neodymium-doped yttrium vanadate (Nd:YVO4, lambda = 1064 nm) laser was applied to obtain the indium tin oxide (ITO) patterns on flexible polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate by a direct etching method. After the ITO films were deposited on a soda-lime glass and PET substrate, laser ablations were carried out on the ITO films for various conditions and the laser ablated results on the ITO films were investigated and analyzed considering the effects of substrates on the laser etching. The laser ablated widths on ITO deposited on glass were found to be much narrower than those on ITO deposited on PET substrate, especially, at a higher scanning speed of laser beam such as 1000 mm/s and 2000 mm/s. As the thermal conductivity of glass substrate is about 7.5 times higher than that of PET, more thermal energy would be spread and transferred to lateral direction in the ITO film in case of PET substrate. PMID:24205645

  1. High-valent iron (Fe(VI), Fe(V), and Fe(IV)) species in water: characterization and oxidative transformation of estrogenic hormones.

    PubMed

    MachalováŠišková, Karolína; Jančula, Daniel; Drahoš, Bohuslav; Machala, Libor; Babica, Pavel; Alonso, Paula Godoy; Trávníček, Zdeněk; Tuček, Jiří; Maršálek, Blahoslav; Sharma, Virender K; Zbořil, Radek

    2016-07-28

    This paper presents solid state synthesis and characterization of tetra-oxy iron(iv) and iron(v) species in their salt forms (Na4FeO4-Fe(IV) and K3FeO4-Fe(V)). Stability of the synthesized salts, commonly called ferrates, in water was determined by applying the (57)Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy technique. Within 2 s in water, Fe(IV) converted into Fe(III) while Fe(V) transformed into Fe(VI) and Fe(III) at pH = 8.2. Comparatively, Fe(VI) (bought as K2FeO4) remained stable in aqueous solution during the short time period. The oxidative removal efficiency of the high-valent iron species was then tested against five environmentally important estrogenic hormones (estron (E1), 17-β-estradiol (E2), estriol (E3), 17-α-ethinylestradiol (EE2), and diethylstibestrol (DES)) in effluent water of a wastewater treatment plant. Three dosages of iron species (1, 10, and 100 mg L(-1)) were applied to the effluent water. An increase in the concentration of dosages enhanced the removal of estrogens. Both Fe(V) and Fe(VI) were effective in degrading estrogens, but Fe(IV) showed limited oxidation capacity to transform estrogens. The oxidized products of the estrogens were analyzed using Raman spectroscopy and high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) techniques. Results demonstrated the transformation of estrogens into low molecular weight oxygenated compounds such as quinone-like and opened-aromatic ring species. A detailed study on E1 by using excess Fe(VI) showed the mineralization of the parent compound. The results demonstrate great potential of high-valent iron species in the degradation of endocrine disruptor chemicals like estrogens with several superior aspects including fast reactions, complete degradation and/or formation of benign organic species, and environmentally-acceptable iron oxide by-products. PMID:27344983

  2. Silver-silver oxide core-shell nanoparticles by femtosecond laser ablation: core and shell sizing by extinction spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schinca, D. C.; Scaffardi, L. B.; Videla, F. A.; Torchia, G. A.; Moreno, P.; Roso, L.

    2009-11-01

    The generation of small silver metal nanoparticles (Nps) by ultrashort pulsed laser ablation has been an active area of research in recent years due to their interest in several fields of applied research such as biotechnology and material research, in particular those with sizes smaller than 10 nm. In general, laser ablation tends to produce environmentally clean metal Nps compared with wet chemical methods. However, since silver may be oxidized in the presence of water or ethanol, core-shell silver-silver oxide (Ag-Ag2O) Nps can be formed, whose size and thickness must be determined and characterized for functionalization related to future applications. This work analyses the size characteristics of core-shell Ag-Ag2O colloid nanostructures (smaller than 10 nm) obtained by femtosecond laser ablation of solid silver targets in different liquid media (water or ethanol) through the study of their optical extinction spectra. A fit of full experimental spectrum using Mie theory allows the determination of core size and shell thickness distributions as a function of fluence. The red-shift of the plasmon peak wavelength with respect to the bare-core peak wavelength at 400 nm, produced by the oxide shell, may be easily measured even for very small thicknesses. It was found that the dominant Ag2O effective thickness is inversely proportional to the fluence, reaching a maximum of 0.2 nm for a fluence of 60 J cm-2 and a minimum of 0.04 nm for a fluence of 1000 J cm-2.

  3. Neutrophilic Fe-oxidizing bacteria are abundant at the Loihi Seamount hydrothermal vents and play a major role in Fe oxide deposition.

    PubMed

    Emerson, David; Moyer, Craig L

    2002-06-01

    A number of hydrothermal vent sites exist on the summit of the Loihi Seamount, a shield volcano that is part of the Hawaiian archipelago. The vents are 1,100 to 1,325 m below the surface and range in temperature from slightly above ambient (10 degrees C) to high temperature (167 degrees C). The vent fluid is characterized by high concentrations of CO2 (up to 17 mM) and Fe(II) (up to 268 microM), but there is a general paucity of H2S. Most of the vents are surrounded by microbial mats that have a gelatinous texture and are heavily encrusted with rust-colored Fe oxides. Visually, the Fe oxides appeared homogeneous. However, light microscopy revealed that the oxides had different morphologies, which fell into three classes: (i) sheaths, (ii) twisted or irregular filaments, and (iii) amorphous oxides. A morphological analysis of eight different samples indicated that the amorphous oxides were overall the most abundant; however, five sites had >50% sheaths and filamentous oxides. These latter morphologies are most likely the direct result of microbial deposition. Direct cell counts revealed that all of the oxides had abundant microbial populations associated with them, from 6.9 x 10(7) to 5.3 x 10(8) cells per ml of mat material. At most sites, end point dilution series for lithotrophic Fe oxidizers were successful out to dilutions of 10(-6) and 10(-7). A pure culture was obtained from a 10(-7) dilution tube; this strain, JV-1, was an obligate, microaerophilic Fe oxidizer that grew at 25 to 30 degrees C. A non-cultivation-based molecular approach with terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism also indicated the common presence of Fe-oxidizing bacteria at Loihi. Together, these results indicate that Fe-oxidizing bacteria are common at the Loihi Seamount and probably play a major role in Fe oxidation. A review of the literature suggests that microbially mediated Fe oxidation at hydrothermal vents may be important globally.

  4. Neutrophilic Fe-Oxidizing Bacteria Are Abundant at the Loihi Seamount Hydrothermal Vents and Play a Major Role in Fe Oxide Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Emerson, David; Moyer, Craig L.

    2002-01-01

    A number of hydrothermal vent sites exist on the summit of the Loihi Seamount, a shield volcano that is part of the Hawaiian archipelago. The vents are 1,100 to 1,325 m below the surface and range in temperature from slightly above ambient (10°C) to high temperature (167°C). The vent fluid is characterized by high concentrations of CO2 (up to 17 mM) and Fe(II) (up to 268 μM), but there is a general paucity of H2S. Most of the vents are surrounded by microbial mats that have a gelatinous texture and are heavily encrusted with rust-colored Fe oxides. Visually, the Fe oxides appeared homogeneous. However, light microscopy revealed that the oxides had different morphologies, which fell into three classes: (i) sheaths, (ii) twisted or irregular filaments, and (iii) amorphous oxides. A morphological analysis of eight different samples indicated that the amorphous oxides were overall the most abundant; however, five sites had >50% sheaths and filamentous oxides. These latter morphologies are most likely the direct result of microbial deposition. Direct cell counts revealed that all of the oxides had abundant microbial populations associated with them, from 6.9 × 107 to 5.3 × 108 cells per ml of mat material. At most sites, end point dilution series for lithotrophic Fe oxidizers were successful out to dilutions of 10−6 and 10−7. A pure culture was obtained from a 10−7 dilution tube; this strain, JV-1, was an obligate, microaerophilic Fe oxidizer that grew at 25 to 30°C. A non-cultivation-based molecular approach with terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism also indicated the common presence of Fe-oxidizing bacteria at Loihi. Together, these results indicate that Fe-oxidizing bacteria are common at the Loihi Seamount and probably play a major role in Fe oxidation. A review of the literature suggests that microbially mediated Fe oxidation at hydrothermal vents may be important globally. PMID:12039770

  5. Protection of Nitrate-Reducing Fe(II)-Oxidizing Bacteria from UV Radiation by Biogenic Fe(III) Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauger, Tina; Konhauser, Kurt; Kappler, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Due to the lack of an ozone layer in the Archean, ultraviolet radiation (UVR) reached early Earth's surface almost unattenuated; as a consequence, a terrestrial biosphere in the form of biological soil crusts would have been highly susceptible to lethal doses of irradiation. However, a self-produced external screen in the form of nanoparticular Fe(III) minerals could have effectively protected those early microorganisms. In this study, we use viability studies by quantifying colony-forming units (CFUs), as well as Fe(II) oxidation and nitrate reduction rates, to show that encrustation in biogenic and abiogenic Fe(III) minerals can protect a common soil bacteria such as the nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizing microorganisms Acidovorax sp. strain BoFeN1 and strain 2AN from harmful UVC radiation. Analysis of DNA damage by quantifying cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) confirmed the protecting effect by Fe(III) minerals. This study suggests that Fe(II)-oxidizing microorganisms, as would have grown in association with mafic and ultramafic soils/outcrops, would have been able to produce their own UV screen, enabling them to live in terrestrial habitats on early Earth.

  6. Protection of Nitrate-Reducing Fe(II)-Oxidizing Bacteria from UV Radiation by Biogenic Fe(III) Minerals.

    PubMed

    Gauger, Tina; Konhauser, Kurt; Kappler, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Due to the lack of an ozone layer in the Archean, ultraviolet radiation (UVR) reached early Earth's surface almost unattenuated; as a consequence, a terrestrial biosphere in the form of biological soil crusts would have been highly susceptible to lethal doses of irradiation. However, a self-produced external screen in the form of nanoparticular Fe(III) minerals could have effectively protected those early microorganisms. In this study, we use viability studies by quantifying colony-forming units (CFUs), as well as Fe(II) oxidation and nitrate reduction rates, to show that encrustation in biogenic and abiogenic Fe(III) minerals can protect a common soil bacteria such as the nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizing microorganisms Acidovorax sp. strain BoFeN1 and strain 2AN from harmful UVC radiation. Analysis of DNA damage by quantifying cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) confirmed the protecting effect by Fe(III) minerals. This study suggests that Fe(II)-oxidizing microorganisms, as would have grown in association with mafic and ultramafic soils/outcrops, would have been able to produce their own UV screen, enabling them to live in terrestrial habitats on early Earth. PMID:27027418

  7. Protection of Nitrate-Reducing Fe(II)-Oxidizing Bacteria from UV Radiation by Biogenic Fe(III) Minerals.

    PubMed

    Gauger, Tina; Konhauser, Kurt; Kappler, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Due to the lack of an ozone layer in the Archean, ultraviolet radiation (UVR) reached early Earth's surface almost unattenuated; as a consequence, a terrestrial biosphere in the form of biological soil crusts would have been highly susceptible to lethal doses of irradiation. However, a self-produced external screen in the form of nanoparticular Fe(III) minerals could have effectively protected those early microorganisms. In this study, we use viability studies by quantifying colony-forming units (CFUs), as well as Fe(II) oxidation and nitrate reduction rates, to show that encrustation in biogenic and abiogenic Fe(III) minerals can protect a common soil bacteria such as the nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizing microorganisms Acidovorax sp. strain BoFeN1 and strain 2AN from harmful UVC radiation. Analysis of DNA damage by quantifying cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) confirmed the protecting effect by Fe(III) minerals. This study suggests that Fe(II)-oxidizing microorganisms, as would have grown in association with mafic and ultramafic soils/outcrops, would have been able to produce their own UV screen, enabling them to live in terrestrial habitats on early Earth.

  8. Oxidation and Ablation Resistance of Low Pressure Plasma-Sprayed ZrB2-Si Composite Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Yaran; Wang, Hongyan; Huang, Liping; Li, Hong; Liu, Xuanyong; Zheng, Xuebin; Ding, Chuanxian

    2014-02-01

    In the present work, ZrB2-based coating containing Si additive was prepared by low pressure plasma spray process. The chemical composition and microstructure of the ZrB2-Si coating were characterized by XRD, EDS and SEM. The oxidation behavior of the coating was investigated in ambient air for different duration time. The ablation-resistant property of the coating was carried out using a plasma flame. The results obtained indicate that the ZrB2-Si composite coating exhibited compact lamellar microstructure with a porosity less than 5%. The silicon phase was uniformly distributed in the ZrB2 matrix. The composite coating presented excellent oxidation-resistance at high temperature of 1500 °C, which resulted from the formed continuous and dense glassy silicon oxide film on its surface. The ablation resistance of the ZrB2-Si coating has been proved to be excellent, which could withstand the plasma flame (above 2000 °C, atmosphere) for 10 min.

  9. Requirement for a microbial consortium to completely oxidize glucose in Fe(III)- reducing sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovley, D.R.; Phillips, E.J.P.

    1989-01-01

    In various sediments in which Fe(III) reduction was the terminal electron-accepting process, [14C]glucose was fermented to 14C-fatty acids in a manner similar to that observed in methanogenic sediments. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that, in Fe(III)-reducing sediments, fermentable substrates are oxidized to carbon dioxide by the combined activity of fermentative bacteria and fatty acid-oxidizing, Fe(III)-reducing bacteria.

  10. Oxidation of FeS by oxygen-bearing acidic solutions.

    PubMed

    Chiriţă, Paul; Descostes, Michaël; Schlegel, Michel L

    2008-05-01

    Oxidation of FeS in oxygen-bearing acidic solutions was investigated at different temperatures (25 to 45 degrees C) and pH (2.75 to 3.45). The rate of the oxidative dissolution of FeS is strongly dependent on pH. The reaction order with respect to hydrogen ions has been found to be 1.03+/-0.02 at 25 degrees C, and the apparent activation energy (E(a)) is 41.6 +/- 10.7 kJ mol(-1) at initial pH 3.00, suggesting that the FeS oxidative dissolution is controlled by the diffusion of oxidant species across a sulfur-rich layer (SRL) that undergoes chemical transformations leading to an increase in the mean number of sulfur atoms in polysulfide chains and the rearrangement of these chains. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction results obtained for the FeS samples reacted for 72 h at 25 degrees C and pH between 2.75 and 3.45 indicate the formation of goethite, of lepidocrocite, and of poorly ordered solid phases (assigned as SRL) on initial surfaces. The experimental data suggest a mechanism based on the protonation of FeS surfaces followed by oxidation of FeS by dissolved oxygen to produce Fe(2+), S(0), and S(2-)(n). Fe(2+) is unstable under oxidative conditions and transforms into Fe(OH)(3(s)), goethite and lepidocrocite.

  11. Immobilization of Radionuclides and Heavy Metals through Anaerobic Bio-Oxidation of Fe(II)

    PubMed Central

    Lack, Joseph G.; Chaudhuri, Swades K.; Kelly, Shelly D.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; O'Connor, Susan M.; Coates, John D.

    2002-01-01

    Adsorption of heavy metals and radionuclides (HMR) onto iron and manganese oxides has long been recognized as an important reaction for the immobilization of these compounds. However, in environments containing elevated concentrations of these HMR the adsorptive capacity of the iron and manganese oxides may well be exceeded, and the HMR can migrate as soluble compounds in aqueous systems. Here we demonstrate the potential of a bioremediative strategy for HMR stabilization in reducing environments based on the recently described anaerobic nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation by Dechlorosoma species. Bio-oxidation of 10 mM Fe(II) and precipitation of Fe(III) oxides by these organisms resulted in rapid adsorption and removal of 55 μM uranium and 81 μM cobalt from solution. The adsorptive capacity of the biogenic Fe(III) oxides was lower than that of abiotically produced Fe(III) oxides (100 μM for both metals), which may have been a result of steric hindrance by the microbial cells on the iron oxide surfaces. The binding capacity of the biogenic oxides for different heavy metals was indirectly correlated to the atomic radius of the bound element. X-ray absorption spectroscopy indicated that the uranium was bound to the biogenically produced Fe(III) oxides as U(VI) and that the U(VI) formed bidentate and tridentate inner-sphere complexes with the Fe(III) oxide surfaces. Dechlorosoma suillum oxidation was specific for Fe(II), and the organism did not enzymatically oxidize U(IV) or Co(II). Small amounts (less than 2.5 μM) of Cr(III) were reoxidized by D. suillum; however, this appeared to be inversely dependent on the initial concentration of the Cr(III). The results of this study demonstrate the potential of this novel approach for stabilization and immobilization of HMR in the environment. PMID:12039723

  12. Solubilization of Fe(III) oxide-bound trace metals by a dissimilatory Fe(III) reducing bacterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Smith, Steven C.; Gassman, Paul L.

    2001-01-01

    Trace metals associate with Fe(III) oxides as adsorbed or coprecipitated species, and consequently, the biogeochemical cycles of iron and the trace metals are closely linked. This communication investigated the solubilization of coprecipitated Co(III) and Ni(II) from goethite (α-FeOOH) during dissimilatory bacterial iron reduction to provide insights on biogeochemical factors controlling trace-element fluxes in anoxic environments. Suspensions of homogeneously substituted Co-FeOOH (50 mmol/L as Co 0.01Fe 0.99OOH; 57Co-labeled) in eight different buffer/media solutions were inoculated with a facultative, metal-reducing bacteria isolated from groundwater ( Shewanella putrefacians CN32), and incubated under strictly anaerobic conditions for periods up to 32 days. Lactate (30 mmol/L) was provided as an electron donor. Growth and non-growth promoting conditions were established by adding or withholding PO 4 and/or trace metals ( 60Co-labeled) from the incubation media. Anthraquinone disulfonate (AQDS; 100 μmol/L) was added to most suspensions as an electron shuttle to enhance bacterial reduction. Solutions were buffered at circumneutral pH with either PIPES or bicarbonate buffers. Solid and liquid samples were analyzed at intermediate and final time points for aqueous and sorbed/precipitated (by HCl extraction) Fe(II) and Co(II). The bioreduced solids were analyzed by X-ray diffraction and field-emission electron microscopy at experiment termination. Ni-FeOOH (Ni 0.01Fe 0.99OOH) was used for comparison in select experiments. Up to 45% of the metal containing FeOOH was bioreduced; growth-supporting conditions did not enhance reduction. The biogenic Fe(II) strongly associated with the residual Fe(III) oxide as an undefined sorbed phase at low fractional reduction in PIPES buffer, and as siderite (FeCO 3) in bicarbonate buffer or as vivianite [Fe 3(PO 4) 2 · 8H 2O] when P was present. Cobalt(III) was reduced to Co(II) in proportion to its mole ratio in the solid. The

  13. Discovery of Fe7O9: a new iron oxide with a complex monoclinic structure.

    PubMed

    Sinmyo, Ryosuke; Bykova, Elena; Ovsyannikov, Sergey V; McCammon, Catherine; Kupenko, Ilya; Ismailova, Leyla; Dubrovinsky, Leonid

    2016-01-01

    Iron oxides are fundamentally important compounds for basic and applied sciences as well as in numerous industrial applications. In this work we report the synthesis and investigation of a new binary iron oxide with the hitherto unknown stoichiometry of Fe7O9. This new oxide was synthesized at high-pressure high-temperature (HP-HT) conditions, and its black single crystals were successfully recovered at ambient conditions. By means of single crystal X-ray diffraction we determined that Fe7O9 adopts a monoclinic C2/m lattice with the most distorted crystal structure among the binary iron oxides known to date. The synthesis of Fe7O9 opens a new portal to exotic iron-rich (M,Fe)7O9 oxides with unusual stoichiometry and distorted crystal structures. Moreover, the crystal structure and phase relations of such new iron oxide groups may provide new insight into the cycling of volatiles in the Earth's interior.

  14. Effect of electric field on Fe2O3 nanowire growth during thermal oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chunwang; Xue, Yannan; Jin, Yongjun

    2016-02-01

    A direct current of 5 A was applied to narrow strips of iron foil in air to synthesize iron oxide nanowires (NWs) via thermal oxidation route of resistive heating. Transverse electric fields of 0-4000 V/m were applied perpendicularly to the surface of the iron foil during thermal oxidations. Results showed that the Fe2O3 NW array can grow perpendicularly on that surface by using this kind of thermal oxidation method. Transverse electric fields applied during thermal oxidation significantly affected the morphology of the Fe2O3 NW array. With increasing strength of the transverse electric fields, the Fe2O3 NWs became much longer, thinner and denser in distribution, and the diameters became more uniform. Furthermore, solid state based-up diffusion growth mechanism for the Fe2O3 NW array was confirmed by thermal oxidation.

  15. Effect of dissolved organic matter on Fe(II) oxidation in natural and engineered waters.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ying Ping; Fujii, Manabu; Terao, Koumei; Kikuchi, Tetsuro; Yoshimura, Chihiro

    2016-10-15

    Fe(II) oxidation was investigated in samples from the Sagami River basin (Japan) with particular emphasis on the effect of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in an urban river system. Collected samples consisted of main stream and tributary waters impacted to a moderate and minor extent by anthropogenic activities, respectively, and treated effluents from adjacent municipal wastewater treatment plants (MWWTPs: as representative anthropogenic point source). Nanomolar Fe(II) oxidation was measured in air-saturated waters using luminol chemiluminescence in the dark at 25 °C. Second-order rate constant for Fe(II) oxidation (with respect to Fe(II) and O2 concentrations) showed spatial and temporal variation. Annual average of the rate constant was highest for MWWTP effluents, followed by reservoir and river waters, with tributary waters showing the lowest oxidation rate. Manipulation experiments indicated that, in addition to pH (7.8-8.4), DOM characteristics are important explanatory variable for the Fe(II) oxidation. For example, the addition of MWWTP-derived humic-type DOM to anthropogenically less-influenced tributary water resulted in substantial increase in the oxidation rate. Significant negative correlation observed between the specific UV absorbance (SUVA254) and Fe(II) oxidation rate constant (pH 8.0) suggests a potential effect of humic-type DOM with low SUVA254 (high aliphatic content) on Fe(II) oxidation in natural and engineered waters.

  16. Effect of dissolved organic matter on Fe(II) oxidation in natural and engineered waters.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ying Ping; Fujii, Manabu; Terao, Koumei; Kikuchi, Tetsuro; Yoshimura, Chihiro

    2016-10-15

    Fe(II) oxidation was investigated in samples from the Sagami River basin (Japan) with particular emphasis on the effect of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in an urban river system. Collected samples consisted of main stream and tributary waters impacted to a moderate and minor extent by anthropogenic activities, respectively, and treated effluents from adjacent municipal wastewater treatment plants (MWWTPs: as representative anthropogenic point source). Nanomolar Fe(II) oxidation was measured in air-saturated waters using luminol chemiluminescence in the dark at 25 °C. Second-order rate constant for Fe(II) oxidation (with respect to Fe(II) and O2 concentrations) showed spatial and temporal variation. Annual average of the rate constant was highest for MWWTP effluents, followed by reservoir and river waters, with tributary waters showing the lowest oxidation rate. Manipulation experiments indicated that, in addition to pH (7.8-8.4), DOM characteristics are important explanatory variable for the Fe(II) oxidation. For example, the addition of MWWTP-derived humic-type DOM to anthropogenically less-influenced tributary water resulted in substantial increase in the oxidation rate. Significant negative correlation observed between the specific UV absorbance (SUVA254) and Fe(II) oxidation rate constant (pH 8.0) suggests a potential effect of humic-type DOM with low SUVA254 (high aliphatic content) on Fe(II) oxidation in natural and engineered waters. PMID:27450354

  17. Reactions of synthetic [2Fe-2S] and [4Fe-4S] clusters with nitric oxide and nitrosothiols.

    PubMed

    Harrop, Todd C; Tonzetich, Zachary J; Reisner, Erwin; Lippard, Stephen J

    2008-11-19

    The interaction of nitric oxide (NO) with iron-sulfur cluster proteins results in degradation and breakdown of the cluster to generate dinitrosyl iron complexes (DNICs). In some cases the formation of DNICs from such cluster systems can lead to activation of a regulatory pathway or the loss of enzyme activity. In order to understand the basic chemistry underlying these processes, we have investigated the reactions of NO with synthetic [2Fe-2S] and [4Fe-4S] clusters. Reaction of excess NO(g) with solutions of [Fe2S2(SR)4](2-) (R = Ph, p-tolyl (4-MeC6H4), or 1/2 (CH2)2-o-C6H4) cleanly affords the respective DNIC, [Fe(NO)2(SR)2](-), with concomitant reductive elimination of the bridging sulfide ligands as elemental sulfur. The structure of (Et4N)[Fe(NO)2(S-p-tolyl)2] was verified by X-ray crystallography. Reactions of the [4Fe-4S] clusters, [Fe4S4(SR)4](2-) (R = Ph, CH2Ph, (t)Bu, or 1/2 (CH2)-m-C6H4) proceed in the absence of added thiolate to yield Roussin's black salt, [Fe4S3(NO)7](-). In contrast, (Et4N)2[Fe4S4(SPh)4] reacts with NO(g) in the presence of 4 equiv of (Et4N)(SPh) to yield the expected DNIC. For all reactions, we could reproduce the chemistry effected by NO(g) with the use of trityl-S-nitrosothiol (Ph3CSNO) as the nitric oxide source. These results demonstrate possible pathways for the reaction of iron-sulfur clusters with nitric oxide in biological systems and highlight the importance of thiolate-to-iron ratios in stabilizing DNICs.

  18. Hydrophilic molybdenum oxide nanomaterials with controlled morphology and strong plasmonic absorption for photothermal ablation of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Guosheng; Shen, Jia; Jiang, Feiran; Hu, Ronggui; Li, Wenyao; An, Lei; Zou, Rujia; Chen, Zhigang; Qin, Zongyi; Hu, Junqing

    2014-03-26

    The molybdenum oxide nanosheets have shown strong localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) absorption in the near-infrared (NIR) region. However, the long alky chains of ligands made them hydrophobic and less biocompatible. To meet the requirements of molybdenum based nanomaterials for use as a future photothermal therapy, a simple hydrothermal route has been developed for hydrophilic molybdenum oxide nanospheres and nanoribbons using a molybdenum precursor and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). First, molybdenum oxide nanomaterials prepared in the presence of PEG exhibit strong localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) absorption in near-infrared (NIR) region, compared with that of no PEG. Second, elevation of synthetic temperature leads to a gradual transformation of molybdenum oxide nanospheres into nanoribbons, entailing the evolution of an intense LSPR absorption in the NIR region. Third, as-prepared molybdenum oxide nanomaterials coated with PEG possess a hydrophilic property and thus can be directly used for biological applications without additional post treatments. Moreover, molybdenum oxide nanoribbons as a model of photothermal materials can efficiently convert the 980 nm wavelength laser energy into heat energy, and this localized hyperthermia produces the effective thermal ablation of cancer cells, meaning a potential photothermal material.

  19. Oxidation Control of Atmospheric Plasma Sprayed FeAl Intermetallic Coatings Using Dry-Ice Blasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Bo; Dong, Shujuan; Coddet, Pierre; Hansz, Bernard; Grosdidier, Thierry; Liao, Hanlin; Coddet, Christian

    2013-03-01

    The performance of atmospheric plasma sprayed FeAl coatings has been remarkably limited because of oxidation and phase transformation during the high-temperature process of preparation. In the present work, FeAl intermetallic coatings were prepared by atmospheric plasma spraying combined with dry-ice blasting. The microstructure, oxidation, porosity, and surface roughness of FeAl intermetallic coatings were investigated. The results show that a denser FeAl coating with a lower content of oxide and lower degree of phase transformation can be achieved because of the cryogenic, the cleaning, and the mechanical effects of dry-ice blasting. The surface roughness value decreased, and the adhesive strength of FeAl coating increased after the application of dry-ice blasting during the atmospheric plasma spraying process. Moreover, the microhardness of the FeAl coating increased by 72%, due to the lower porosity and higher dislocation density.

  20. Fe(III) oxides accelerate microbial nitrate reduction and electricity generation by Klebsiella pneumoniae L17.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tongxu; Li, Xiaomin; Zhang, Wei; Hu, Min; Li, Fangbai

    2014-06-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae L17 is a fermentative bacterium that can reduce iron oxide and generate electricity under anoxic conditions, as previously reported. This study reveals that K. pneumoniae L17 is also capable of dissimilatory nitrate reduction, producing NO2(-), NH4(+), NO and N2O under anoxic conditions. The presence of Fe(III) oxides (i.e., α-FeOOH, γ-FeOOH, α-Fe2O3 and γ-Fe2O3) significantly accelerates the reduction of nitrate and generation of electricity by K. pneumoniae L17, which is similar to a previous report regarding another fermentative bacterium, Bacillus. No significant nitrate reduction was observed upon treatment with Fe(2+) or α-FeOOH+Fe(2+), but a slight facilitation of nitrate reduction and electricity generation was observed upon treatment with L17+Fe(2+). This result suggests that aqueous Fe(II) or mineral-adsorbed Fe(II) cannot reduce nitrate abiotically but that L17 can catalyze the reduction of nitrate and generation of electricity in the presence of Fe(II) (which might exist as cell surface-bound Fe(II)). To rule out the potential effect of Fe(II) produced by L17 during microbial iron reduction, treatments with the addition of TiO2 or Al2O3 instead of Fe(III) oxides also exhibited accelerated microbial nitrate reduction and electricity generation, indicating that cell-mineral sorption did account for the acceleration effect. However, the acceleration caused by Fe(III) oxides is only partially attributed to the cell surface-bound Fe(II) and cell-mineral sorption but may be driven by the iron oxide conduction band-mediated electron transfer from L17 to nitrate or an electrode, as proposed previously. The current study extends the diversity of bacteria of which nitrate reduction and electricity generation can be facilitated by the presence of iron oxides and confirms the positive role of Fe(III) oxides on microbial nitrate reduction and electricity generation by particular fermentative bacteria in anoxic environments.

  1. Influence of Fe3O4/Fe-phthalocyanine decorated graphene oxide on the microwave absorbing performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jingwei; Wei, Junji; Pu, Zejun; Xu, Mingzhen; Jia, Kun; Liu, Xiaobo

    2016-02-01

    Novel graphene oxide@Fe3O4/iron phthalocyanine (GO@Fe3O4/FePc) hybrid materials were prepared through a facile one-step solvothermal method with graphene oxide (GO) sheets as template in ethylene glycol. The morphology and structure of the hybrid materials were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. The results indicated that the monodispersed Fe3O4/FePc hybrid microspheres were uniformly self-assembled along the surface of GO sheets through electrostatic attraction and the morphology can be tuned by controlling the amount of 4,4‧-bis(3,4-dicyanophenoxy)biphenyl (BPH). As the BPH content increases, magnetization measurement of the GO@Fe3O4/FePc hybrid materials showed that the coercivity increased, while saturation magnetizations decreased. Electromagnetic properties of the hybrid materials were measured in the range of 0.5-18.0 GHz. The microwave absorbing performance enhanced with the increase of BPH content and a maximum reflection loss of -27.92 dB was obtained at 10.8 GHz when the matching thickness was 2.5 mm. Therefore, the novel electromagnetic hybrid materials can be considered as potential materials in the microwave absorbing field.

  2. Reduction and persulfate oxidation of nitro explosives in contaminated soils using Fe-bearing materials.

    PubMed

    Oh, Seok-Young; Yoon, Hyun-Su; Jeong, Tae-Yong; Kim, Sang Don; Kim, Dong-Wook

    2016-07-13

    The oxidative and reductive transformation of nitro explosives in contaminated soils with Fe-bearing materials and persulfate (S2O8(2-)) was examined via batch experiments. Zero-valent cast iron [Fe(0)], steel dust from a steel manufacturing plant, and FeS rapidly reduced 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) in soil under anaerobic conditions as long as a sufficient amount of water was present. The Fe-bearing materials also effectively activated persulfate to enhance the oxidative transformation of TNT and RDX in soil-water systems. Kinetically, reductive and oxidative transformations removed more than 90% of the explosives from a soil-water system within 5 h under the given conditions. Pseudo-first-order rates in the range of 0.7-23.4 h(-1) were observed. By increasing the concentration of persulfate or Fe-bearing materials, the oxidative transformation could be promoted. Treated soils via redox reactions using the Fe-bearing materials did not show significant toxicity, except for the case of TNT-contaminated soils oxidized by FeS-assisted persulfate. Considering the kinetics of explosive degradation and the toxicity of treated wastewaters and soils, Fe(0) or steel dust-assisted persulfate oxidation may be a safe option as an ex situ remediation process for the treatment of explosive-contaminated soils.

  3. Reduction and persulfate oxidation of nitro explosives in contaminated soils using Fe-bearing materials.

    PubMed

    Oh, Seok-Young; Yoon, Hyun-Su; Jeong, Tae-Yong; Kim, Sang Don; Kim, Dong-Wook

    2016-07-13

    The oxidative and reductive transformation of nitro explosives in contaminated soils with Fe-bearing materials and persulfate (S2O8(2-)) was examined via batch experiments. Zero-valent cast iron [Fe(0)], steel dust from a steel manufacturing plant, and FeS rapidly reduced 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) in soil under anaerobic conditions as long as a sufficient amount of water was present. The Fe-bearing materials also effectively activated persulfate to enhance the oxidative transformation of TNT and RDX in soil-water systems. Kinetically, reductive and oxidative transformations removed more than 90% of the explosives from a soil-water system within 5 h under the given conditions. Pseudo-first-order rates in the range of 0.7-23.4 h(-1) were observed. By increasing the concentration of persulfate or Fe-bearing materials, the oxidative transformation could be promoted. Treated soils via redox reactions using the Fe-bearing materials did not show significant toxicity, except for the case of TNT-contaminated soils oxidized by FeS-assisted persulfate. Considering the kinetics of explosive degradation and the toxicity of treated wastewaters and soils, Fe(0) or steel dust-assisted persulfate oxidation may be a safe option as an ex situ remediation process for the treatment of explosive-contaminated soils. PMID:27327861

  4. Microstructure and oxygen evolution of Fe-Ce mixed oxides by redox treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kongzhai; Haneda, Masaaki; Ning, Peihong; Wang, Hua; Ozawa, Masakuni

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between structure and reduction/redox properties of Fe-Ce mixed oxides with a Fe content of 5, 10, 20 or 30 mol%, prepared by a coprecipitation method, were investigated by XRD, Raman, TEM, TPR and TPO techniques. It is found that all the iron ions can be incorporated into the ceria lattice to form a solid solution for the FeCe 5 (Fe 5%) sample, but amorphous or crystal Fe2O3 particles were found to be present on the Fe-Ce oxide samples with higher the iron content. The reducibility of single solid solution was much better than the pure CeO2, and the appearance of dispersed Fe2O3 particles improved the surface reducibility of materials. The iron ions incorporated into the CeO2 lattice accelerated the oxygen release from bulk to surface, and surface Fe2O3 particles in close contact to CeO2 acted as a catalyst for the reaction between solid solution and hydrogen. The microstructure of exposed Fe2O3 with Ce-Fe-O solid solution allows the Fe-Ce mixed oxides to own good reducibility and high OSC, which also counteracts the deactivation of the reducibility resulting from the sintering of materials in the redox cycling.

  5. Oxidation Resistant Ti-Al-Fe Diffusion Barrier for FeCrAlY Coatings on Titanium Aluminides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brady, Michael P. (Inventor); Smialke, James L. (Inventor); Brindley, William J. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A diffusion barrier to help protect titanium aluminide alloys, including the coated alloys of the TiAl gamma + Ti3Al (alpha2) class, from oxidative attack and interstitial embrittlement at temperatures up to at least 1000 C is disclosed. The coating may comprise FeCrAlX alloys. The diffusion barrier comprises titanium, aluminum, and iron in the following approximate atomic percent: Ti-(50-55)Al-(9-20)Fe. This alloy is also suitable as an oxidative or structural coating for such substrates.

  6. Relationship Between Iron Whisker Growth and Doping Amount of Oxide During Fe2O3 Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Xuzhong; Zhao, Zhilong; Wang, Zhi; Zhang, Ben; Guo, Lei; Guo, Zhancheng

    2016-04-01

    Iron whisker growth during Fe2O3 doped with oxide reduced by CO was investigated by using in situ observation and scanning electron microscopy. The results indicated that the minimum doping amount (MDA) of various oxides, hindering the iron whisker growth, was different. The MDA of Al2O3, Li2O, Na2O, and K2O was 0.5, 0.4, 4, and 12 pct, respectively. From the reduction rate, it was found that Li2O, MgO, and Al2O3 had some suppressive effects on the Fe2O3 reduction process, thus, confining the growth of iron whisker. However, other oxides had some catalytic effects on the Fe2O3 reduction process (Fe2O3-Fe3O4-FeO-Fe), such as CaO, SrO, BaO, Na2O, and K2O. As long as their doping amount was enough, these oxides could inhibit the diffusion of the Fe atom. When the metal ionic radius in doped oxide was bigger than that of Fe3+, such as Ca2+, Sr2+, Ba2+, Na+, and K+, there were lots of spaces left in Fe2O3 doped with oxide after reduction, improving Fe atom diffusion. Consequently, their MDA was more than that of small radius to restrain the growth of iron whisker. Finally, the relationship between corresponding metal ionic radius, electron layer number, valence electron number, and MDA of oxide was expressed by using data fitting as follows: N_{{{{A}}y {{O}}x }} = 1.3 × 10^{ - 5} × {r_{{{{A}}^{x + } }}2 × √{n_{{{{A}}^{x + } }} } }/{f_{q }}

  7. Zeta-Fe2O3--A new stable polymorph in iron(III) oxide family.

    PubMed

    Tuček, Jiří; Machala, Libor; Ono, Shigeaki; Namai, Asuka; Yoshikiyo, Marie; Imoto, Kenta; Tokoro, Hiroko; Ohkoshi, Shin-ichi; Zbořil, Radek

    2015-10-15

    Iron(III) oxide shows a polymorphism, characteristic of existence of phases with the same chemical composition but distinct crystal structures and, hence, physical properties. Four crystalline phases of iron(III) oxide have previously been identified: α-Fe2O3 (hematite), β-Fe2O3, γ-Fe2O3 (maghemite), and ε-Fe2O3. All four iron(III) oxide phases easily undergo various phase transformations in response to heating or pressure treatment, usually forming hexagonal α-Fe2O3, which is the most thermodynamically stable Fe2O3 polymorph under ambient conditions. Here, from synchrotron X-ray diffraction experiments, we report the formation of a new iron(III) oxide polymorph that we have termed ζ-Fe2O3 and which evolved during pressure treatment of cubic β-Fe2O3 (Ia3 space group) at pressures above 30 GPa. Importantly, ζ-Fe2O3 is maintained after pressure release and represents the first monoclinic Fe2O3 polymorph (I2/a space group) that is stable at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. ζ-Fe2O3 behaves as an antiferromagnet with a Néel transition temperature of ~69 K. The complex mechanism of pressure-induced transformation of β-Fe2O3, involving also the formation of Rh2O3-II-type Fe2O3 and post-perovskite-Fe2O3 structure, is suggested and discussed with respect to a bimodal size distribution of precursor nanoparticles.

  8. Influence of Fe(2+)-catalysed iron oxide recrystallization on metal cycling.

    PubMed

    Latta, Drew E; Gorski, Christopher A; Scherer, Michelle M

    2012-12-01

    Recent work has indicated that iron (oxyhydr-)oxides are capable of structurally incorporating and releasing metals and nutrients as a result of Fe2+-induced iron oxide recrystallization. In the present paper, we briefly review the current literature examining the mechanisms by which iron oxides recrystallize and summarize how recrystallization affects metal incorporation and release. We also provide new experimental evidence for the Fe2+-induced release of structural manganese from manganese-doped goethite. Currently, the exact mechanism(s) for Fe2+-induced recrystallization remain elusive, although they are likely to be both oxide-and metal-dependent. We conclude by discussing some future research directions for Fe2+-catalysed iron oxide recrystallization.

  9. Removal of tetracycline from water by Fe-Mn binary oxide.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huijuan; Yang, Yang; Kang, Jin; Fan, Maohong; Qu, Jiuhui

    2012-01-01

    Significant concerns have been raised over the presence of antibiotics including tetracyclines in aquatic environments. A series of Fe-Mn binary oxide with different Fe:Mn molar ratios was synthesized by a simultaneous oxidation and coprecipitation process for TC removal. Results showed that Fe-Mn binary oxide had higher removal efficiency than that of hydrous iron oxide and hydrous manganese oxide, and that the oxide with a Fe:Mn molar ratio of 5:1 was the best in removal than other molar ratios. The tetracycline removal was highly pH dependent. The removal of tetracycline decreased with the increase of initial concentration, but the absolute removal quantity was more at high concentration. The presence of cations and anions such as Ca2+, Mg2+, CO3(2-) and SO4(2-) had no significant effect on the tetracycline removal in our experimental conditions, while SiO3(2-) and PO4(3-) had hindered the adsorption of tetracycline. The mechanism investigation found that tetracycline removal was mainly achieved by the replacement of surface hydroxyl groups by the tetracycline species and formation of surface complexes at the water/oxide interface. This primary study suggests that Fe-Mn binary oxide with a proper Fe:Mn molar ratio will be a very promising material for the removal of tetracycline from aqueous solutions. PMID:22655383

  10. Influence of Oxygen and Nitrate on Fe (Hydr)oxide Mineral Transformation and Soil Microbial Communities during Redox Cycling.

    PubMed

    Mejia, Jacqueline; Roden, Eric E; Ginder-Vogel, Matthew

    2016-04-01

    Oscillations between reducing and oxidizing conditions are observed at the interface of anaerobic/oxic and anaerobic/anoxic environments, and are often stimulated by an alternating flux of electron donors (e.g., organic carbon) and electron acceptors (e.g., O2 and NO3(-)). In iron (Fe) rich soils and sediments, these oscillations may stimulate the growth of both Fe-reducing bacteria (FeRB) and Fe-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB), and their metabolism may induce cycling between Fe(II) and Fe(III), promoting the transformation of Fe (hydr)oxide minerals. Here, we examine the mineralogical evolution of lepidocrocite and ferrihydrite, and the adaptation of a natural microbial community to alternating Fe-reducing (anaerobic with addition of glucose) and Fe-oxidizing (with addition of nitrate or air) conditions. The growth of FeRB (e.g., Geobacter) is stimulated under anaerobic conditions in the presence of glucose. However, the abundance of these organisms depends on the availability of Fe(III) (hydr)oxides. Redox cycling with nitrate results in decreased Fe(II) oxidation thereby decreasing the availability of Fe(III) for FeRB. Additionally, magnetite is detected as the main product of both lepidocrocite and ferrihydrite reduction. In contrast, introduction of air results in increased Fe(II) oxidation, increasing the availability of Fe(III) and the abundance of Geobacter. In the lepidocrocite reactors, Fe(II) oxidation by dissolved O2 promotes the formation of ferrihydrite and lepidocrocite, whereas in the ferrihydrite reactors we observe a decrease in magnetite stoichiometry (e.g., oxidation). Understanding Fe (hydr)oxide transformation under environmentally relevant redox cycling conditions provides insight into nutrient availability and transport, contaminant mobility, and microbial metabolism in soils and sediments. PMID:26949922

  11. oxide and FeNi alloy: product dependence on the reduction ability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jungang; Qin, Yuyang; Li, Minglun; Zhao, Shuyuan; Li, Jianjun

    2014-12-01

    Based on the sol-gel combustion method, stoichiometric Fe3+, Mn2+, Ni2+ ions and citric acid were chosen as the initial reactants for the preparation of magnetic particles. Due to the different reduction ability of metal ions, completely different magnetic products (MnFe2O4 oxide and FeNi alloy) were obtained by heating the flakes at 600 °C under nitrogen atmosphere. MnFe2O4 particles exhibit superparamagnetic behavior at room temperature, and martensitic phase transformation is observed magnetically at 125 K for FeNi alloy particles.

  12. Zinc in the prevention of Fe2+-initiated lipid and protein oxidation.

    PubMed

    Zago, M P; Verstraeten, S V; Oteiza, P I

    2000-01-01

    In the present study we characterized the capacity of zinc to protect lipids and proteins from Fe2+-initiated oxidative damage. The effects of zinc on lipid oxidation were investigated in liposomes composed of brain phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylserine (PS) at a molar relationship of 60:40 (PC:PS, 60:40). Lipid oxidation was evaluated as the oxidation of cis-parinaric acid or as the formation of 2-thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS). Zinc protected liposomes from Fe2+ (2.5-50 microM)-supported lipid oxidation. However, zinc (50 microM) did not prevent the oxidative inactivation of glutamine synthetase and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase when rat brain supernatants were oxidized in the presence of 5 microM Fe2+ and 0.5 mM H2O2. We also studied the interactions of zinc with epicatechin in the prevention of lipid oxidation in liposomes. The simultaneous addition of 0.5 microM epicatechin (EC) and 50 microM zinc increased the protection of liposomes from oxidation compared to that observed in the presence of zinc or EC separately. Zinc (50 microM) also protected liposomes from the stimulatory effect of aluminum on Fe2+-initiated lipid oxidation. Zinc could play an important role as an antioxidant in biological systems, replacing iron and other metals with pro-oxidant activity from binding sites and interacting with other components of the oxidant defense system. PMID:15693281

  13. Microbial Fe(III) oxide reduction potential in Chocolate Pots hot spring, Yellowstone National Park.

    PubMed

    Fortney, N W; He, S; Converse, B J; Beard, B L; Johnson, C M; Boyd, E S; Roden, E E

    2016-05-01

    Chocolate Pots hot springs (CP) is a unique, circumneutral pH, iron-rich, geothermal feature in Yellowstone National Park. Prior research at CP has focused on photosynthetically driven Fe(II) oxidation as a model for mineralization of microbial mats and deposition of Archean banded iron formations. However, geochemical and stable Fe isotopic data have suggested that dissimilatory microbial iron reduction (DIR) may be active within CP deposits. In this study, the potential for microbial reduction of native CP Fe(III) oxides was investigated, using a combination of cultivation dependent and independent approaches, to assess the potential involvement of DIR in Fe redox cycling and associated stable Fe isotope fractionation in the CP hot springs. Endogenous microbial communities were able to reduce native CP Fe(III) oxides, as documented by most probable number enumerations and enrichment culture studies. Enrichment cultures demonstrated sustained DIR driven by oxidation of acetate, lactate, and H2 . Inhibitor studies and molecular analyses indicate that sulfate reduction did not contribute to observed rates of DIR in the enrichment cultures through abiotic reaction pathways. Enrichment cultures produced isotopically light Fe(II) during DIR relative to the bulk solid-phase Fe(III) oxides. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes from enrichment cultures showed dominant sequences closely affiliated with Geobacter metallireducens, a mesophilic Fe(III) oxide reducer. Shotgun metagenomic analysis of enrichment cultures confirmed the presence of a dominant G. metallireducens-like population and other less dominant populations from the phylum Ignavibacteriae, which appear to be capable of DIR. Gene (protein) searches revealed the presence of heat-shock proteins that may be involved in increased thermotolerance in the organisms present in the enrichments as well as porin-cytochrome complexes previously shown to be involved in extracellular electron transport. This analysis offers

  14. The role of microaerophilic Fe-oxidizing micro-organisms in producing banded iron formations.

    PubMed

    Chan, C S; Emerson, D; Luther, G W

    2016-09-01

    Despite the historical and economic significance of banded iron formations (BIFs), we have yet to resolve the formation mechanisms. On modern Earth, neutrophilic microaerophilic Fe-oxidizing micro-organisms (FeOM) produce copious amounts of Fe oxyhydroxides, leading us to wonder whether similar organisms played a role in producing BIFs. To evaluate this, we review the current knowledge of modern microaerophilic FeOM in the context of BIF paleoenvironmental studies. In modern environments wherever Fe(II) and O2 co-exist, microaerophilic FeOM proliferate. These organisms grow in a variety of environments, including the marine water column redoxcline, which is where BIF precursor minerals likely formed. FeOM can grow across a range of O2 concentrations, measured as low as 2 μm to date, although lower concentrations have not been tested. While some extant FeOM can tolerate high O2 concentrations, many FeOM appear to prefer and thrive at low O2 concentrations (~3-25 μm). These are similar to the estimated dissolved O2 concentrations in the few hundred million years prior to the 'Great Oxidation Event' (GOE). We compare biotic and abiotic Fe oxidation kinetics in the presence of varying levels of O2 and show that microaerophilic FeOM contribute substantially to Fe oxidation, at rates fast enough to account for BIF deposition. Based on this synthesis, we propose that microaerophilic FeOM were capable of playing a significant role in depositing the largest, most well-known BIFs associated with the GOE, as well as afterward when global O2 levels increased. PMID:27392195

  15. Structural Fe(II) Oxidation in Biotite by an Ectomycorrhizal Fungi Drives Mechanical Forcing.

    PubMed

    Bonneville, Steeve; Bray, Andrew W; Benning, Liane G

    2016-06-01

    Microorganisms are essential agents of Earth's soil weathering engine who help transform primary rock-forming minerals into soils. Mycorrhizal fungi, with their vast filamentous networks in symbiosis with the roots of most plants can alter a large number of minerals via local acidification, targeted excretion of ligands, submicron-scale biomechanical forcing, and mobilization of Mg, Fe, Al, and K at the hypha-biotite interface. Here, we present experimental evidence that Paxillus involutus-a basidiomycete fungus-in ectomycorrhizal symbiosis with Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris), is able to oxidize a substantial amount of structural Fe(II) in biotite. Iron redox chemistry, quantified by X-ray absorption near edge spectra on 13 fungi-biotite sections along three distinct hypha colonizing the [001] basal plane of biotite, revealed variable but extensive Fe(II) oxidation up to ∼2 μm in depth and a Fe(III)/Fetotal ratio of up to ∼0.8. The growth of Fe(III) hydroxide implies a volumetric change and a strain within the biotite lattice potentially large enough to induce microcrack formation, which are abundant below the hypha-biotite interface. This Fe(II) oxidation also leads to the formation of a large pool of Fe(III) (i.e., structural Fe(III) and Fe(III) oxyhydroxides) within biotite that could participate in the Fe redox cycling in soils. PMID:27128742

  16. Green rust formation during Fe(II) oxidation by the nitrate-reducing Acidovorax sp. strain BoFeN1.

    PubMed

    Pantke, Claudia; Obst, Martin; Benzerara, Karim; Morin, Guillaume; Ona-Nguema, Georges; Dippon, Urs; Kappler, Andreas

    2012-02-01

    Green rust (GR) as highly reactive iron mineral potentially plays a key role for the fate of (in)organic contaminants, such as chromium or arsenic, and nitroaromatic compounds functioning both as sorbent and reductant. GR forms as corrosion product of steel but is also naturally present in hydromorphic soils and sediments forming as metastable intermediate during microbial Fe(III) reduction. Although already suggested to form during microbial Fe(II) oxidation, clear evidence for GR formation during microbial Fe(II) oxidation was lacking. In the present study, powder XRD, synchrotron-based XAS, Mössbauer spectroscopy, and TEM demonstrated unambiguously the formation of GR as an intermediate product during Fe(II) oxidation by the nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizer Acidovorax sp. strain BoFeN1. The spatial distribution and Fe redox-state of the precipitates associated with the cells were visualized by STXM. It showed the presence of extracellular Fe(III), which can be explained by Fe(III) export from the cells or extracellular Fe(II) oxidation by an oxidant diffusing from the cells. Moreover, GR can be oxidized by nitrate/nitrite and is known as a catalyst for oxidation of dissolved Fe(II) by nitrite/nitrate and may thus contribute to the production of extracellular Fe(III). As a result, strain BoFeN1 may contribute to Fe(II) oxidation and nitrate reduction both by an direct enzymatic pathway and an indirect GR-mediated process. PMID:22201257

  17. Green rust formation during Fe(II) oxidation by the nitrate-reducing Acidovorax sp. strain BoFeN1.

    PubMed

    Pantke, Claudia; Obst, Martin; Benzerara, Karim; Morin, Guillaume; Ona-Nguema, Georges; Dippon, Urs; Kappler, Andreas

    2012-02-01

    Green rust (GR) as highly reactive iron mineral potentially plays a key role for the fate of (in)organic contaminants, such as chromium or arsenic, and nitroaromatic compounds functioning both as sorbent and reductant. GR forms as corrosion product of steel but is also naturally present in hydromorphic soils and sediments forming as metastable intermediate during microbial Fe(III) reduction. Although already suggested to form during microbial Fe(II) oxidation, clear evidence for GR formation during microbial Fe(II) oxidation was lacking. In the present study, powder XRD, synchrotron-based XAS, Mössbauer spectroscopy, and TEM demonstrated unambiguously the formation of GR as an intermediate product during Fe(II) oxidation by the nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizer Acidovorax sp. strain BoFeN1. The spatial distribution and Fe redox-state of the precipitates associated with the cells were visualized by STXM. It showed the presence of extracellular Fe(III), which can be explained by Fe(III) export from the cells or extracellular Fe(II) oxidation by an oxidant diffusing from the cells. Moreover, GR can be oxidized by nitrate/nitrite and is known as a catalyst for oxidation of dissolved Fe(II) by nitrite/nitrate and may thus contribute to the production of extracellular Fe(III). As a result, strain BoFeN1 may contribute to Fe(II) oxidation and nitrate reduction both by an direct enzymatic pathway and an indirect GR-mediated process.

  18. Constructing hierarchical interfaces: TiO2-supported PtFe-FeOx nanowires for room temperature CO oxidation

    DOE PAGES

    Zhu, Huiyuan; Wu, Zili; Dong, Su; Veith, Gabriel M.; Lu, Hanfeng; Zhang, Pengfei; Chai, Song -Hai; Dai, Sheng

    2015-08-05

    This is a report of a facile approach to constructing catalytic active hierarchical interfaces in one-dimensional (1D) nanostructure, exemplified by the synthesis of TiO2-supported PtFe–FeOx nanowires (NWs). The hierarchical interface, constituting atomic level interactions between PtFe and FeOx within each NW and the interactions between NWs and support (TiO2), enables CO oxidation with 100% conversion at room temperature. We identify the role of the two interfaces by probing the CO oxidation reaction with isotopic labeling experiments. Both the oxygen atoms (Os) in FeOx and TiO2 participate in the initial CO oxidation, facilitating the reaction through a redox pathway. Moreover, themore » intact 1D structure leads to the high stability of the catalyst. After 30 h in the reaction stream, the PtFe–FeOx/TiO2 catalyst exhibits no activity decay. These results provide a general approach and new insights into the construction of hierarchical interfaces for advanced catalysis.« less

  19. Mtr Extracellular Electron Transfer Pathways in Fe(III)-reducing or Fe(II)-oxidizing Bacteria: A Genomic Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Liang; Rosso, Kevin M.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2012-12-01

    Originally discovered in the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 (MR-1), the Mtr (i.e., metal-reducing) pathway exists in all characterized strains of metal-reducing Shewanella. The protein components identified to date for the Mtr pathway of MR-1 include four multi-heme c-type cytochromes (c-Cyts), CymA, MtrA, MtrC and OmcA, and a porin-like, outer membrane protein MtrB. They are strategically positioned along the width of the MR-1 cell envelope to mediate electron transfer from the quinone/quinol pool in the inner-membrane to the Fe(III)-containing minerals external to the bacterial cells. A survey of microbial genomes revealed homologues of the Mtr pathway in other dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, including Aeromonas hydrophila, Ferrimonas balearica and Rhodoferax ferrireducens, and in the Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria Dechloromonas aromatica RCB, Gallionella capsiferriformans ES-2 and Sideroxydans lithotrophicus ES-1. The widespread distribution of Mtr pathways in Fe(III)-reducing or Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria emphasizes the importance of this type of extracellular electron transfer pathway in microbial redox transformation of Fe. Their distribution in these two different functional groups of bacteria also emphasizes the bi-directional nature of electron transfer reactions carried out by the Mtr pathways. The characteristics of the Mtr pathways may be shared by other pathways used by microorganisms for exchanging electrons with their extracellular environments.

  20. Oxidation of Fe(110) in oxygen gas at 400 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldemo, Markus; Lundgren, Edvin; Weissenrieder, Jonas

    2016-02-01

    The initial oxidation of Fe(110) in oxygen gas at 400 °C beyond initial adsorbate structures has been studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, low-energy electron diffraction, and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Formation of several ordered phases of surface oxides is observed at oxygen coverages between approximately 2.3 and 3.5 oxygen atoms/Fe(110) surface atom. Initially, a FeO(111)-like film is formed with a parallelogram-shaped moiré pattern. It has two mirror domains that are formed symmetrically around the growth direction of a zigzag-shaped adsorbate structure. With increased local oxygen coverage, the moiré structure transforms into a ball-shaped form. Both these moiré structures have equal atomic stacking at the surface and equal apparent height in STM, suggesting oxygen ions diffusing into the film upon oxidation and that the oxide growth takes place at the iron-iron oxide interface. The FeO(111)-like film turns into a Fe3O4(111)-like film with a triangular bistable surface termination as the oxidation proceeds further. The FeO(111)-like film growth proceeds according to the Frank-van der Merwe mechanism while the Fe3O4(111)-like film grows according to the Stranski-Krastanov mechanism.

  1. High longitudinal relaxivity of ultra-small gadolinium oxide prepared by microsecond laser ablation in diethylene glycol

    SciTech Connect

    Luo Ningqi; Xiao Jun; Hu Wenyong; Chen Dihu; Tian Xiumei; Yang Chuan; Li Li

    2013-04-28

    Ultra-small gadolinium oxide (Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}) can be used as T{sub 1}-weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) contrast agent own to its high longitudinal relaxivity (r{sub 1}) and has attracted intensive attention in these years. In this paper, ultra-small Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles of 3.8 nm in diameter have been successfully synthesized by a microsecond laser ablating a gadolinium (Gd) target in diethylene glycol (DEG). The growth inhibition effect induced by the large viscosity of DEG makes it possible to synthesize ultra-small Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} by laser ablation in DEG. The r{sub 1} value and T{sub 1}-weighted MR images are measured by a 3.0 T MRI spectroscope. The results show these nanoparticles with a high r{sub 1} value of 9.76 s{sup -1} mM{sup -1} to be good MRI contrast agents. We propose an explanation for the high r{sub 1} value of ultra-small Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} by considering the decreasing factor (surface to volume ratio of the nanoparticles, S/V) and the increasing factor (water hydration number of the Gd{sup 3+} on Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} surface, q), which offer a new look into the relaxivity studies of MRI contrast agents. Our research provides a new approach to preparing ultra-small Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} of high r{sub 1} value by laser ablation in DEG and develops the understanding of high relaxivity of ultra-small Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} MRI contrast agents.

  2. Metastable alloy nanoparticles, metal-oxide nanocrescents and nanoshells generated by laser ablation in liquid solution: influence of the chemical environment on structure and composition.

    PubMed

    Scaramuzza, Stefano; Agnoli, Stefano; Amendola, Vincenzo

    2015-11-14

    Alloy nanoparticles are characterized by the combination of multiple interesting properties, which are attractive for technological and scientific purposes. A frontier topic of this field is nanoalloys with compositions not thermodynamically allowed at ordinary temperature and pressure (i.e. metastable), because they require out-of-equilibrium synthetic approaches. Recently, laser ablation synthesis in solution (LASiS) was successfully applied for the realization of metastable nanoalloys because of the fast kinetics of nanoparticle formation. However, the role played by the chemical environment on the final composition and structure of laser generated nanoalloys still has to be fully elucidated. Here, we investigated the influence of different synthetic conditions on the LASiS of metastable nanoalloys composed of Au and Fe, such as the use of water instead of ethanol, the bubbling of inert gases and the addition of a few vol% of H2O2 and H2O. The two elements showed different reactivity when LASiS was performed in water instead of ethanol, while minor effects were observed from bubbling pure gases such as N2, Ar and CO2 in the liquid solution. Moreover, the plasmonic response and the structure of the nanoalloys were sensibly modified by adding H2O2 to water. We also found that nanoparticle production is dramatically influenced just by adding 0.2% of H2O in ethanol. These results suggest that the formation of a cavitation bubble with long lifetime and large size during LASiS is useful for the preservation of the metastable alloy composition, whereas an oxidative environment hampers the formation of metastable alloy nanoparticles. Overall, by acting on the type of solvent and solutes, we were able to switch from a traditional synthetic approach for the composition of Au-Fe nanoalloys to one using a reactive environment, which gives unconventional structures such as metal@iron-oxide nanoshells and nanocrescents of oxide supported on metal nanospheres. These results

  3. Influence of Oxygen Supply on Oxide Coarsening During the Internal Oxidation of Two-Phase Fe-Y Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kachur, Stephen J.; Webler, Bryan A.

    2016-09-01

    Fe-Y binary alloys underwent thermogravimetric analysis while exposed to low oxidant partial pressures using a mixture of 5 pct H2-95 pct Ar gas at two flow rates. The alloys experienced in situ internal oxidation of Y-rich intermetallic phases. Kinetics and microstructures were both affected by flowrate. Lower flow rates resulted in coarser oxides and decreased oxidation rates. Results show the possible impacts of rate-controlling processes in the gas phase on internal oxidation with dilute oxidants.

  4. Oxide shell reduction and magnetic property changes in core-shell Fe nanoclusters under ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sundararajan, Jennifer A.; Kaur, Maninder; Qiang, You; Jiang, Weilin; McCloy, John S.

    2014-05-07

    Ion irradiation effects are studied on the Fe-based core-shell nanocluster (NC) films with core as Fe and shell as Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/Fe{sub 3}N. These NC films were deposited on Si substrates to thickness of ∼0.5 μm using a NC deposition system. The films were irradiated at room temperature with 5.5 MeV Si{sup 2+} ions to ion fluences of 10{sup 15} and 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}. It is found that the irradiation induces grain growth, Fe valence reduction in the shell, and crystallization or growth of Fe{sub 3}N. The film retained its Fe-core and its ferromagnetic properties after irradiation. The nature and mechanism of oxide shell reduction and composition dependence after irradiation were studied by synthesizing additional NC films of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and FeO + Fe{sub 3}N and irradiating them under the same conditions. The presence of nanocrystalline Fe is found to be a major factor for the oxide shell reduction. The surface morphologies of these films show dramatic changes in the microstructures due to cluster growth and agglomeration as a result of ion irradiation.

  5. Interactions at the Al-S-Fe interface: S inhibition of aluminum oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Addepalli, S.G.; Lin, J.S.; Ekstrom, B.; Kelber, J.A.

    1999-08-01

    The deposition of aluminum on S/Fe(111) (1 x 1) at 300 K in UHV results in the formation of a disordered S-modified Al adlayer. Insertion of Al between the sulfur atoms and the Fe substrate is indicated by an increase of the S Auger signal with increasing Al deposition. Room-temperature oxidation of AlS/Fe(111) in UHV is inhibited compared to the oxidation of aluminum deposited on the sulfur-free Fe(111). The oxygen-uptake curves and variations in the S(LVV), Fe(MVV) intensities with oxygen exposure are also consistent with the insertion of the aluminum atoms between the S overlayer and the Fe substrate.

  6. Molecular orbital (SCF-X-α-SW) theory of Fe2+-Mn3+, Fe3+-Mn2+, and Fe3+-Mn3+ charge transfer and magnetic exchange in oxides and silicates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherman, David M.

    1990-01-01

    Metal-metal charge-transfer and magnetic exchange interactions have important effects on the optical spectra, crystal chemistry, and physics of minerals. Previous molecular orbital calculations have provided insight on the nature of Fe2+-Fe3+ and Fe2+-Ti4+ charge-transfer transitions in oxides and silicates. In this work, spin-unrestricted molecular orbital calculations on (FeMnO10) clusters are used to study the nature of magnetic exchange and electron delocalization (charge transfer) associated with Fe3+-Mn2+, Fe3+-Mn3+, and Fe2+-Mn3+ interactions in oxides and silicates. 

  7. An XPS, TEM, and TPD study of the oxidation and ammoxidation of propene using mixed Fe-Sb oxide catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.D.; Poulston, S.; Bowker, M.

    1996-09-15

    Two mixed Fe-Sb oxide catalysts were investigated for the selective oxidation of propene to acrolein and the ammoxidation of propene in the presence of ammonia to acrylonitrile. The techniques used were chiefly X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), temperature deprogrammed desorption (TPD), X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. After propene dosing TPD experiments were carried out in the absence of gas phase oxygen utilising lattice oxygen for oxidation. The samples contained a 1:1 and 2:1 atomic ratio of Sb:Fe (referred to as SbFe and Sb2Fe, respectively). XPS data indicate that the surface has an antimony oxide enriched selvedge which favours the selective ammoxidation of propene. The Sb enriched surface of SbFe was found to be highly reducible in low pressures of ammonia, yielding a metallic antimony overlayer. Subsequent thermal desorption of this metal coating revealed a surface with an increased iron (III) oxide content which was not so easily reduced and found to be of a lower selectivity to partial ammoxidation products. The Sb2Fe sample was more stable towards reduction. 28 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Fe-doped ZnO nanoparticles: the oxidation number and local charge on iron, studied by 57Fe Mößbauer spectroscopy and DFT calculations.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jianping; Kuc, Agnieszka; Pokhrel, Suman; Mädler, Lutz; Pöttgen, Rainer; Winter, Florian; Frauenheim, Thomas; Heine, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Iron bru: Fe-doped ZnO may contain Fe(2+) and Fe(3+) species. Whilst Mößbauer spectroscopy can distinguish these sites in pure oxides FeO and Fe(2)O(3), it gives very similar shifts for Fe-doped phases. This result is rationalized by electron redistribution from the dopant site to the crystal matrix. Mößbauer shifts correlate with the local charge on the Fe sites and different dopant sites can be identified by the Mößbauer quadrupole splitting (see figure). PMID:23400908

  9. Inhibition of the Fe(III)-catalyzed dopamine oxidation by ATP and its relevance to oxidative stress in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Dianlu; Shi, Shuyun; Zhang, Lin; Liu, Lin; Ding, Bingrong; Zhao, Bingqing; Yagnik, Gargey; Zhou, Feimeng

    2013-09-18

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by the progressive degeneration of dopaminergic cells, which implicates a role of dopamine (DA) in the etiology of PD. A possible DA degradation pathway is the Fe(III)-catalyzed oxidation of DA by oxygen, which produces neuronal toxins as side products. We investigated how ATP, an abundant and ubiquitous molecule in cellular milieu, affects the catalytic oxidation reaction of dopamine. For the first time, a unique, highly stable DA-Fe(III)-ATP ternary complex was formed and characterized in vitro. ATP as a ligand shifts the catecholate-Fe(III) ligand metal charge transfer (LMCT) band to a longer wavelength and the redox potentials of both DA and the Fe(III) center in the ternary complex. Remarkably, the additional ligation by ATP was found to significantly reverse the catalytic effect of the Fe(III) center on the DA oxidation. The reversal is attributed to the full occupation of the Fe(III) coordination sites by ATP and DA, which blocks O2 from accessing the Fe(III) center and its further reaction with DA. The biological relevance of this complex is strongly implicated by the identification of the ternary complex in the substantia nigra of rat brain and its attenuation of cytotoxicity of the Fe(III)-DA complex. Since ATP deficiency accompanies PD and neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+)) induced PD, deficiency of ATP and the resultant impairment toward the inhibition of the Fe(III)-catalyzed DA oxidation may contribute to the pathogenesis of PD. Our finding provides new insight into the pathways of DA oxidation and its relationship with synaptic activity. PMID:23823941

  10. Iron oxidation chemistry in ferritin. Increasing Fe/O2 stoichiometry during core formation.

    PubMed

    Xu, B; Chasteen, N D

    1991-10-25

    The origin of previously observed variations in stoichiometry of iron oxidation during the oxidative deposition of iron in ferritin has been poorly understood. Knowledge of the stoichiometry of Fe(II) oxidation by O2 is essential to establishing the mechanism of iron core formation. In the present work, the amount of Fe(II) oxidized was measured by Mössbauer spectrometry and the O2 consumed by mass spectrometry. The number of protons produced in the reaction was measured by "pH stat" titration and hydrogen peroxide production by the effect of the enzyme catalase on the measured stoichiometry. For protein samples containing low levels of iron (24 Fe(II)/protein) the stoichiometry was found to be 1.95 +/- 0.18 Fe(II)/O2 with H2O2 being a product, viz. Equation 1. 2Fe2+ + O2 + 4H2O----2FeOOH + H2O2 + 4H+ (1) EPR spin trapping experiments showed no evidence of superoxide radical formation. The stoichiometry markedly increased with additional iron (240-960 Fe/protein), to a value of 4 Fe(II)/O2 as in Equation 2. 4Fe2+ + O2 + 6H2O----4FeOOH + 8H+ (2) As the iron core is progressively laid down, the mechanism of iron oxidation changes from a protein dominated process with H2O2 being the primary product of O2 reduction to a mineral surface dominated process where H2O is the primary product. These results emphasize the importance of the apoferritin shell in facilitating iron oxidation in the early stage of iron deposition prior to significant development of the polynuclear iron core.

  11. Rapid anaerobic benzene oxidation with a variety of chelated Fe(III) forms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovley, D.R.; Woodward, J.C.; Chapelle, F.H.

    1996-01-01

    Fe(III) chelated to such compounds as EDTA, N-methyliminodiacetie acid, ethanol diglycine, humic acids, and phosphates stimulated benzene oxidation coupled to Fe(III) reduction in anaerobic sediments from a petroleum- contaminated aquifer as effectively as or more effectively than nitrilotriacetic acid did in a previously demonstrated stimulation experiment. These results indicate that many forms of chelated Fe(III) might be applicable to aquifer remediation.

  12. Rapid Anaerobic Benzene Oxidation with a Variety of Chelated Fe(III) Forms.

    PubMed

    Lovley, D R; Woodward, J C; Chapelle, F H

    1996-01-01

    Fe(III) chelated to such compounds as EDTA, N-methyliminodiacetic acid, ethanol diglycine, humic acids, and phosphates stimulated benzene oxidation coupled to Fe(III) reduction in anaerobic sediments from a petroleum-contaminated aquifer as effectively as or more effectively than nitrilotriacetic acid did in a previously demonstrated stimulation experiment. These results indicate that many forms of chelated Fe(III) might be applicable to aquifer remediation.

  13. The oxidation state of Fe in MORB glasses and the oxygen fugacity of the upper mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottrell, Elizabeth; Kelley, Katherine A.

    2011-05-01

    Micro-analytical determination of Fe3+/∑Fe ratios in mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) glasses using micro X-ray absorption near edge structure (μ-XANES) spectroscopy reveals a substantially more oxidized upper mantle than determined by previous studies. Here, we show that global MORBs yield average Fe3+/∑Fe ratios of 0.16 ± 0.01 (n = 103), which trace back to primary MORB melts equilibrated at the conditions of the quartz-fayalite-magnetite (QFM) buffer. Our results necessitate an upward revision of the Fe3+/∑Fe ratios of MORBs, mantle oxygen fugacity, and the ferric iron content of the mantle relative to previous wet chemical determinations. We show that only 0.01 (absolute, or < 10%) of the difference between Fe3+/∑Fe ratios determined by micro-colorimety and XANES can be attributed to the Mössbauer-based XANES calibration. The difference must instead derive from a bias between micro-colorimetry performed on experimental vs. natural basalts. Co-variations of Fe3+/∑Fe ratios in global MORB with indices of low-pressure fractional crystallization are consistent with Fe3+ behaving incompatibly in shallow MORB magma chambers. MORB Fe3+/∑Fe ratios do not, however, vary with indices of the extent of mantle melting (e.g., Na2O(8)) or water concentration. We offer two hypotheses to explain these observations: The bulk partition coefficient of Fe3+ may be higher during peridotite melting than previously thought, and may vary with temperature, or redox exchange between sulfide and sulfate species could buffer mantle melting at ~ QFM. Both explanations, in combination with the measured MORB Fe3+/∑Fe ratios, point to a fertile MORB source with greater than 0.3 wt.% Fe2O3.

  14. Catalytic combustion of methane on La1-xCexFeO3 oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Xian-Ping; Zhao, Lei-Hong; Teng, Bo-Tao; Lang, Jia-Jian; Hu, Xin; Li, Tie; Fang, Yi-An; Luo, Meng-Fei; Lin, Jian-Jun

    2013-07-01

    A series of La1-xCexFeO3 (x = 0-0.5) perovskite oxides were prepared by a sol-gel method. X-ray diffraction spectrometer (XRD), BET surface area measurements, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images, and temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) were used to characterize their physical structures and redox properties. Catalytic methane combustion tests for La1-xCexFeO3 (x = 0-0.5) perovskite oxides show that the activity of LaFeO3 was highly improved due to the introduction of Ce in the A-site of the perovskite catalysts. Among all the catalysts, La0.7Ce0.3FeO3 has the maximum oxidative performance with the corresponding T90 as low as 510 °C. Combining with density functional theory calculation, it was suggested that the electrons of Fe ions increase in La0.875Ce0.125FeO3 due to the introduction of Ce4+ ion, which leads to stronger interactions with adsorbed O2. Correspondingly, the adsorption energy of O2 on La0.875Ce0.125FeO3 increases and the Osbnd O bond is activated. Thus, the Ce doped perovskite has higher oxidative activity than pure LaFeO3.

  15. Towards alternatives to anodic water oxidation: basket-handle thiolate Fe(III) porphyrins for electrocatalytic hydrocarbon oxidation.

    PubMed

    Li, Peiyi; Alenezi, Khalaf; Ibrahim, Saad K; Wright, Joseph A; Hughes, David L; Pickett, Christopher J

    2012-12-01

    Selective electrocatalytic oxidation of hydrocarbons to alcohols, epoxides or other (higher value) oxygenates should in principal present a useful complementary anodic half-cell reaction to cathodic generation of fuels from water or CO(2) viz. an alternative to oxygen evolution. A series of new basket-handle thiolate Fe(III) porphyrins have been synthesised and shown to mediate anodic oxidation of hydrocarbons, specifically adamantane hydroxylation and cyclooctene epoxidation. We compare yields obtained by electrochemical and chemical oxidation of the thiolate porphyrins and benchmark their behaviour against that of Fe(III) tetraphenyl porphyrin chloride and its tetrapentafluorophenyl analogue. PMID:22945754

  16. Cultivation of an Obligate Fe(II)-Oxidizing Lithoautotrophic Bacterium Using Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Summers, Zarath M.; Gralnick, Jeffrey A.; Bond, Daniel R.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Fe(II)-oxidizing aerobic bacteria are poorly understood, due in part to the difficulties involved in laboratory cultivation. Specific challenges include (i) providing a steady supply of electrons as Fe(II) while (ii) managing rapid formation of insoluble Fe(III) oxide precipitates and (iii) maintaining oxygen concentrations in the micromolar range to minimize abiotic Fe(II) oxidation. Electrochemical approaches offer an opportunity to study bacteria that require problematic electron donors or acceptors in their respiration. In the case of Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria, if the electron transport machinery is able to oxidize metals at the outer cell surface, electrodes poised at potentials near those of natural substrates could serve as electron donors, eliminating concentration issues, side reactions, and mineral end products associated with metal oxidation. To test this hypothesis, the marine isolate Mariprofundus ferrooxydans PV-1, a neutrophilic obligate Fe(II)-oxidizing autotroph, was cultured using a poised electrode as the sole energy source. When cells grown in Fe(II)-containing medium were transferred into a three-electrode electrochemical cell, a cathodic (negative) current representing electron uptake by bacteria was detected, and it increased over a period of weeks. Cultures scraped from a portion of the electrode and transferred into sterile reactors consumed electrons at a similar rate. After three transfers in the absence of Fe(II), electrode-grown biofilms were studied to determine the relationship between donor redox potential and respiration rate. Electron microscopy revealed that under these conditions, M. ferrooxydans PV-1 attaches to electrodes and does not produce characteristic iron oxide stalks but still appears to exhibit bifurcate cell division. PMID:23362318

  17. A redox hydrogel protects the O2 -sensitive [FeFe]-hydrogenase from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii from oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Oughli, Alaa Alsheikh; Conzuelo, Felipe; Winkler, Martin; Happe, Thomas; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Schuhmann, Wolfgang; Rüdiger, Olaf; Plumeré, Nicolas

    2015-10-12

    The integration of sensitive catalysts in redox matrices opens up the possibility for their protection from deactivating molecules such as O2 . [FeFe]-hydrogenases are enzymes catalyzing H2 oxidation/production which are irreversibly deactivated by O2 . Therefore, their use under aerobic conditions has never been achieved. Integration of such hydrogenases in viologen-modified hydrogel films allows the enzyme to maintain catalytic current for H2 oxidation in the presence of O2 , demonstrating a protection mechanism independent of reactivation processes. Within the hydrogel, electrons from the hydrogenase-catalyzed H2 oxidation are shuttled to the hydrogel-solution interface for O2 reduction. Hence, the harmful O2 molecules do not reach the hydrogenase. We illustrate the potential applications of this protection concept with a biofuel cell under H2 /O2 mixed feed.

  18. Measurement of ablation threshold of oxide-film-coated aluminium nanoparticles irradiated by femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chefonov, O. V.; Ovchinnikov, A. V.; Il'ina, I. V.; Agranat, M. B.

    2016-03-01

    We report the results of experiments on estimation of femtosecond laser threshold intensity at which nanoparticles are removed from the substrate surface. The studies are performed with nanoparticles obtained by femtosecond laser ablation of pure aluminium in distilled water. The attenuation (or extinction, i.e. absorption and scattering) spectra of nanoparticles are measured at room temperature in the UV and optical wavelength ranges. The size of nanoparticles is determined using atomic force microscopy. A new method of scanning photoluminescence is proposed to evaluate the threshold of nanoparticle removal from the surface of a glass substrate exposed to IR femtosecond laser pulses with intensities 1011 - 1013 W cm-2.

  19. Reduced aggregation and cytotoxicity of amyloid peptides by graphene oxide/gold nanocomposites prepared by pulsed laser ablation in water.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingying; Han, Qiusen; Wang, Xinhuan; Yu, Ning; Yang, Lin; Yang, Rong; Wang, Chen

    2014-11-12

    A novel and convenient method to synthesize the nanocomposites combining graphene oxides (GO) with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) is reported and their applications to modulate amyloid peptide aggregation are demonstrated. The nanocomposites produced by pulsed laser ablation (PLA) in water show good biocompatibility and solubility. The reduced aggregation of amyloid peptides by the nanocomposites is confirmed by Thioflavin T fluorescence and atomic force microscopy. The cell viability experiments reveals that the presence of the nanocomposites can significantly reduce the cytotoxicity of the amyloid peptides. Furthermore, the depolymerization of peptide fibrils and inhibition of their cellular cytotoxicity by GO/AuNPs is also observed. These observations suggest that the nanocomposites combining GO and AuNPs have a great potential for designing new therapeutic agents and are promising for future treatment of amyloid-related diseases.

  20. Fe3-xTixO4 Nanoparticles as Tunable Probes of Microbial Metal Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Juan; Pearce, Carolyn I.; Liu, Chongxuan; Wang, Zheming; Shi, Liang; Arenholz, Elke; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2013-05-14

    Present and emerging biotechnological applications for iron (oxyhydr)oxide nanomaterials depend on their interaction with microorganisms, as do their toxicity, transport, and fate in biological and environmental systems. However, mass or electron transfer along key molecular pathways at microbe-nanomaterial interfaces is extremely difficult to quantify because of system complexity. Inspired by Fe(II)-oxidizing microbes widespread in nature, we isolate and characterize one such pathway by examining the oxidation of Fe3-xTixO4 (magnetite-titanomagnetite) nanoparticles by the bacterial electron transfer enzyme MtoA, a decaheme c-type cytochrome. Oxidation by MtoA was studied as a function of the thermodynamic driving force for electron transfer by controlling the Ti(IV) doping content (x), which tunes the solid-state Fe(II)/Fe(III) ratio built into the nanoparticles. A higher Fe(II)/Fe(III) ratio appears to proportionally increase the electron transfer kinetics to the cytochrome. In situ x-ray diffraction indicated that during oxidation the spinel ferrite lattice remains intact while structural Fe(II) is progressively depleted. Surface and atomic site specific Fe L2,3-edge x-ray magnetic circular dichroism indicated that MtoA directly accesses magnetically-ordered B-sublattice Fe(II) at the interface. This study provides first quantitative insights into an isolated molecular pathway for biotransformation of iron (oxyhydr)oxide nanomaterials. And, more generally, it also illustrates new techniques for probing these pathways in detail, featuring use of tailored nanoparticles, purified metalloenzyme, and synchrotron x-ray absorption spectroscopies.

  1. [Kinetics of the catalytic oxidation of catechol in aqueous solutions of ceruloplasmin in the presence of Fe3+].

    PubMed

    Vorotyntsev, V M; Biriukovich, O K; Piatnitskiĭ, Iu I; Golodets, G I; Kachorovskiĭ, B V

    1982-03-01

    The kinetics of oxidation of catechol in aqueous solutions containing ceruloplasmin and Fe3+, were studied. It was found that Fe3+ at low concentrations accelerate the reaction. The inhibiting effect of high concentrations of Fe3+ is due to the formation of catalytically inactive enzyme complexes with catechol oxidation products. A mechanism of this process is proposed.

  2. Coexistence of Microaerophilic, Nitrate-Reducing, and Phototrophic Fe(II) Oxidizers and Fe(III) Reducers in Coastal Marine Sediment

    PubMed Central

    Laufer, Katja; Nordhoff, Mark; Røy, Hans; Schmidt, Caroline; Behrens, Sebastian; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    2015-01-01

    Iron is abundant in sediments, where it can be biogeochemically cycled between its divalent and trivalent redox states. The neutrophilic microbiological Fe cycle involves Fe(III)-reducing and three different physiological groups of Fe(II)-oxidizing microorganisms, i.e., microaerophilic, anoxygenic phototrophic, and nitrate-reducing Fe(II) oxidizers. However, it is unknown whether all three groups coexist in one habitat and how they are spatially distributed in relation to gradients of O2, light, nitrate, and Fe(II). We examined two coastal marine sediments in Aarhus Bay, Denmark, by cultivation and most probable number (MPN) studies for Fe(II) oxidizers and Fe(III) reducers and by quantitative-PCR (qPCR) assays for microaerophilic Fe(II) oxidizers. Our results demonstrate the coexistence of all three metabolic types of Fe(II) oxidizers and Fe(III) reducers. In qPCR, microaerophilic Fe(II) oxidizers (Zetaproteobacteria) were present with up to 3.2 × 106 cells g dry sediment−1. In MPNs, nitrate-reducing Fe(II) oxidizers, anoxygenic phototrophic Fe(II) oxidizers, and Fe(III) reducers reached cell numbers of up to 3.5 × 104, 3.1 × 102, and 4.4 × 104 g dry sediment−1, respectively. O2 and light penetrated only a few millimeters, but the depth distribution of the different iron metabolizers did not correlate with the profile of O2, Fe(II), or light. Instead, abundances were homogeneous within the upper 3 cm of the sediment, probably due to wave-induced sediment reworking and bioturbation. In microaerophilic Fe(II)-oxidizing enrichment cultures, strains belonging to the Zetaproteobacteria were identified. Photoferrotrophic enrichments contained strains related to Chlorobium and Rhodobacter; the nitrate-reducing Fe(II) enrichments contained strains related to Hoeflea and Denitromonas. This study shows the coexistence of all three types of Fe(II) oxidizers in two near-shore marine environments and the potential for competition and interrelationships between them

  3. Structure and magnetic properties of the cubic oxide fluoride BaFeO{sub 2}F

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, Frank J.; Coomer, Fiona C.; Hancock, Cathryn; Helgason, Orn; Moore, Elaine A.; Slater, Peter R.; Wright, Adrian J.; Thomas, Michael F.

    2011-06-15

    Fluorination of the parent oxide, BaFeO{sub 3-{delta}}, with polyvinylidine fluoride gives rise to a cubic compound with a=4.0603(4) A at 298 K. {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer spectra confirmed that all the iron is present as Fe{sup 3+}. Neutron diffraction data showed complete occupancy of the anion sites, indicating a composition BaFeO{sub 2}F, with a large displacement of the iron off-site. The magnetic ordering temperature was determined as T{sub N}=645{+-}5 K. Neutron diffraction data at 4.2 K established G-type antiferromagnetism with a magnetic moment per Fe{sup 3+} ion of 3.95 {mu}{sub B}. However, magnetisation measurements indicated the presence of a weak ferromagnetic moment that is assigned to the canting of the antiferromagnetic structure. {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer spectra in the temperature range 10-300 K were fitted with a model of fluoride ion distribution that retains charge neutrality of the perovskite unit cell. - Graphical abstract: The cubic oxide fluoride of composition BaFeO{sub 2}F has been synthesised and characterised. Highlights: > Fluorination of BaFeO{sub 3-{delta}} with polyvinylidene fluoride gives a cubic oxide fluoride of composition BaFeO{sub 2}F. > BaFeO{sub 2}F adopts a canted antiferromagnetic structure and is different from the related phase of composition SrFeO{sub 2}F. > A model of fluoride ion distribution about iron in BaFeO{sub 2}F has been explored.

  4. Influence of FeO and sulfur on solid state reaction between MnO-SiO2-FeO oxides and an Fe-Mn-Si solid alloy during heat treatment at 1473 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Cheng-song; Yang, Shu-feng; Kim, Kyung-ho; Li, Jing-she; Shibata, Hiroyuki; Kitamura, Shin-ya

    2015-08-01

    To clarify the influence of FeO and sulfur on solid state reaction between an Fe-Mn-Si alloy and MnO-SiO2-FeO oxides under the restricted oxygen diffusion flux, two diffusion couples with different sulfur contents in the oxides were produced and investigated after heat treatment at 1473 K. The experimental results were also compared with previous work in which the oxides contained higher FeO. It was found that although the FeO content in the oxides decreased from 3wt% to 1wt% which was lower than the content corresponding to the equilibrium with molten steel at 1873 K, excess oxygen still diffused from the oxides to solid steel during heat treatment at 1473 K and formed oxide particles. In addition, increasing the sulfur content in the oxides was observed to suppress the diffusion of oxygen between the alloy and the oxides.

  5. Discovery of free-living Fe-oxidizing Zetaproteobacteria at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emerson, D.; Scott, J.; MacDonald, D.; Findlay, A.; Luther, G. W.

    2013-12-01

    Chemolithoautotrophic Fe-oxidizing bacteria play an essential role in the iron cycle on the Earth. Thus far, the majority of marine Fe-oxidizers have been associated with a novel class, Zetaproteobacteria, within the phylum Proteobacteria. Fe-oxidizing communities have been found at volcanically-active seamounts, crustal spreading centers, and in coastal waters. One conspicuous absence is at hydrothermal systems associated with the slow-crustal spreading center along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR). We used the DSV Jason to visit three well-known hydrothermal vents at the MAR: Rainbow, TAG, and Snakepit, to determine if Fe-oxidizing Zetaproteobacteria were present. Small, diffuse flow venting areas with high Fe(II) concentrations, and rust-colored microbial mats were observed at all three sites proximal to black smoker chimneys. A novel, syringe-based precision sampler was used to collect multiple, individual microbial iron mats at all three sites. Morphologically, sheath-forming Fe-oxidizers were observed at all sites, although the degree of mineralization varied substantially between the samples. Tagged pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene from these samples revealed that Zetaproteobacteria were the most abundant class of any bacterial group in all the samples (5.1-92.0%; m=55.2%). Beta diversity estimates showed that there was as much variability between microbial mats at a specific vent site as there was between different vent fields. Principal component analysis revealed two distinct clusters of samples dominated by five different Zeta operational taxonomic units (OTUs). Single cell genome analysis of two representative samples was also dominated by Zetas, and confirmed the pyrosequencing results. We are in the process of associating community diversity data with in situ geochemical analysis to determine what geochemical factor(s) might be driving these patterns of diversity and community assembly. Together these data confirm that Fe-oxidizing Zetaproteobacteria

  6. Dissolution of Fe(III)(hydr)oxides by an Aerobic Bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Maurice, P.

    2004-12-13

    This project investigated the effects of an aerobic Pseudomonas mendocina bacterium on the dissolution of Fe(III)(hydr)oxides. The research is important because metals and radionuclides that adsorb to Fe(III)(hydr)oxides could potentially be remobilized by dissolving bacteria. We showed that P. mendocina is capable of dissolving Fe-bearing minerals by a variety of mechanisms, including production of siderophores, pH changes, and formation of reductants. The production of siderophores by P. mendocina was quantified under a variety of growth conditions. Finally, we demonstrated that microbial siderophores may adsorb to and enhance dissolution of clay minerals.

  7. Rate law of Fe(II) oxidation under low O2 conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanzaki, Yoshiki; Murakami, Takashi

    2013-12-01

    Despite intensive studies on Fe(II) oxidation kinetics, the oxidation rate law has not been established under low O2 conditions. The importance of Fe(II) oxidation under low O2 conditions has been recently recognized; for instance, the Fe(II)/Fe(III) compositions of paleosols, ancient soils formed by weathering, can produce a quantitative pattern of the atmospheric oxygen increase during the Paleoproterozoic. The effects of partial pressure of atmospheric oxygen (PO2) on the Fe(II) oxidation rate were investigated to establish the Fe(II) oxidation rate - PO2 relationships under low O2 conditions. All oxidation experiments were carried out in a glove box by introducing Ar gas at ∼10-5-∼10-4 atm of PO2, pH 7.57-8.09 and 22 °C. Luminol chemiluminescence was adopted to measure low Fe(II) concentrations (down to ∼2 nM). Combining previous data under higher PO2 conditions (10-3-0.2 atm) with the present data, the rate law for Fe(II) oxidation over a wide range of PO2 (10-5-0.2 atm) was found to be written as: d[Fe(II)]/dt=-k[Fe(II)][[]2 where the exponent of [O2], x, and the rate constant, k, change from x = 0.98 (±0.04) and log k = 15.46 (±0.06) at ∼6 × 10-3-0.2 atm of PO2 to x = 0.58 (±0.02) and log k = 13.41 (±0.03) at 10-5-∼6 × 10-3 atm of PO2. The most plausible mechanism that explains the change in x under low O2 conditions is that, instead of O2, oxygen-derived oxidants, H2O2 and to some extent, O2rad -, dominate the oxidation reactions at <∼10-3 atm of PO2. The rate law found in the present study requires us to reconsider distributions of Fe redox species at low PO2 in natural environments, especially in paleoweathering profiles, and may provide a deeper understanding of the evolution of atmospheric oxygen in the Precambrian.

  8. Efficient removal of trace arsenite through oxidation and adsorption by magnetic nanoparticles modified with Fe-Mn binary oxide.

    PubMed

    Shan, Chao; Tong, Meiping

    2013-06-15

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) modified simultaneously with amorphous Fe and Mn oxides (Mag-Fe-Mn) were synthesized to remove arsenite [As(III)] from water. Mag-Fe-Mn particles were fabricated through heterogeneous nucleation technique by employing the maghemite as the magnetic core and Fe-Mn binary oxide (FMBO) as the coating materials. Powder X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy were utilized to characterize the hybrid material. With a saturation magnetization of 23.2 emu/g, Mag-Fe-Mn particles with size of 20-50 nm could be easily separated from solutions with a simple magnetic process in short time (within 5 min). At pH 7.0, 200 μg/L of As(III) could be easily decreased to below 10 μg/L by Mag-Fe-Mn particles (0.1 g/L) within 20 min. As(III) could be effectively removed by Mag-Fe-Mn particles at initial pH range from 4 to 8 and the residual As was completely oxidized to less toxic arsenate [As(V)]. The co-occurring redox reactions between Mn oxide and As(III) was confirmed by XPS analysis. Chloride, sulfate, bicarbonate, and nitrate at common concentration range had negligible influence on As(III) removal, whereas, silicate and phosphate reduced the As(III) removal by competing with arsenic species for adsorption sites. As(III) removal was not obviously affected by natural organic matter (up to 8 mg/L as TOC). Mag-Fe-Mn could be regenerated with ternary solution of NaOH, NaCl, and NaClO. Throughout five consecutive cycles, the adsorption and desorption efficiencies maintained above 98% and 87%, respectively. Mag-Fe-Mn had a larger adsorption capacity for As(III) (47.76 mg/g) and could remove trace As(III) more thoroughly than MNPs modified solely with either Fe or Mn oxide due to the synergistic effect of the coating Fe and Mn oxides. This research extended the potential applicability of FMBO to a great extent and provided a convenient approach to efficiently remove trace As

  9. Perchloroethylene (PCE) oxidation by percarbonate in Fe(2+)-catalyzed aqueous solution: PCE performance and its removal mechanism.

    PubMed

    Miao, Zhouwei; Gu, Xiaogang; Lu, Shuguang; Zang, Xuke; Wu, Xiaoliang; Xu, Minhui; Ndong, Landry Biyoghe Bi; Qiu, Zhaofu; Sui, Qian; Fu, George Yuzhu

    2015-01-01

    The performance of Fe(2+)-catalyzed sodium percarbonate (SPC) stimulating the oxidation of perchloroethylene (PCE) in groundwater remediation was investigated. The experimental results showed that PCE could be completely oxidized in 5 min at 20 °C with a Fe(2+)/SPC/PCE molar ratio of 8/8/1, indicating the effectiveness of Fe(2+)-catalyzed SPC oxidation for PCE degradation. Fe(2+)-catalyzed SPC oxidation was suitable for the nearly neutral pH condition, which was superior to the conventional Fenton oxidation in acidic condition. In addition, the investigations by using hydroxyl radical scavengers and free radical probe compounds elucidated that PCE was degraded mainly by hydroxyl radical (HO) oxidation in Fe(2+)/SPC system. In conclusion, Fe(2+)-catalyzed SPC oxidation is a highly promising technique for PCE-contaminated groundwater remediation, but more complex constituents in groundwater should be carefully considered for its practical application.

  10. Kinetics and mechanisms for reactions of Fe(II) with iron(III) oxides.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Byong-Hun; Dempsey, Brian A; Burgos, William D

    2003-08-01

    Uptake of Fe(II) onto hematite (alpha-Fe2O3), corundum (alpha-Al2O3), amorphous ferric oxide (AFO), and a mixture of hematite and AFO was measured. Uptake was operationally divided into adsorption (extractable by 0.5 N HCl within 20 h) and fixation (extractable by 3.0 N HCl within 7 d). For 0.25 mM Fe(II) onto 25 mM iron(III) hematite at pH 6.8: (i) 10% of Fe(II) was adsorbed within 1 min; (ii) 20% of Fe(II) was adsorbed within 1 d; (iii) uptake slowly increased to 24% of Fe(II) during the next 24 d, almost all adsorbed; (iv) at 30 d, the uptake increased to 28% of Fe(II) with 6% of total Fe(II) fixed; and (v) uptake slowly increased to 30% of Fe(II) by 45 d with 10% of total Fe(II) fixed. Similar results were observed for 0.125 mM Fe(II) onto 25 mM iron(III) hematite, except that percent of adsorption and fixation were increased. There was adsorption but no fixation for 0.25 mM Fe(II) onto corundum [196.2 mM Al(III)] at pH 6.8, for 0.125 mM Fe(II) onto 25 mM iron(III) hematite at pH 4.5, and for 0.25 mM Zn(II) onto 25 mM iron(III) hematite at pH 6.8. A small addition of AFO to the hematite suspension increased Fe(II) fixation when 0.25 mM Fe(II) was reacted with 25 mM iron(III) hematite and 0.025 mM Fe(III) AFO at pH 6.8. Reaction of 0.125 mM Fe(II) with 2.5 mM Fe(III) AFO resulted in rapid adsorption of 30% of added Fe(II), followed by conversion of AFO to goethite and a decrease in adsorption without Fe(II) fixation. The fixation of Fe(II) by hematite at pH 6.8 is consistent with interfacial electron transfer and the formation of new mineral phases. We propose that electron transfer from adsorbed Fe(II) to structural Fe(III) in hematite results in oxidation of Fe(II) to AFO on the surface of hematite and that solid-phase contact among hematite, AFO, and structural Fe(II) produces magnetite (Fe3O4). The unique interactions of Fe(II) with iron(III) oxides would be environmentally important to understand the fate of redox-sensitive chemicals.

  11. Green synthesis of Fe0 and bimetallic Fe0 for oxidative catalysis and reduction applications

    EPA Science Inventory

    A single-step green approach to the synthesis of nanoscale zero valent iron (nZVI) and nanoscale bimetallic (Fe0/Pd) particles using tea (Camellia sinensis) polyphenols is described. The expedient reaction between polyphenols and ferric chloride (FeCl3) occurs within a minute at ...

  12. Na-ion Storage Performances of FeSex and Fe2O3 Hollow Nanoparticles-Decorated Reduced Graphene Oxide Balls prepared by Nanoscale Kirkendall Diffusion Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Gi Dae; Cho, Jung Sang; Lee, Jung-Kul; Kang, Yun Chan

    2016-02-01

    Uniquely structured FeSex-reduced graphene oxide (rGO) composite powders, in which hollow FeSex nanoparticles are uniformly distributed throughout the rGO matrix, were prepared by spray pyrolysis applying the nanoscale Kirkendall diffusion process. Iron oxide-rGO composite powders were transformed into FeSex-rGO composite powders by a two-step post-treatment process. Metallic Fe nanocrystals formed during the first-step post-treatment process were transformed into hollow FeSex nanoparticles during the selenization process. The FeSex-rGO composite powders had mixed crystal structures of FeSe and FeSe2 phases. A rGO content of 33% was estimated from the TG analysis of the FeSex-rGO composite powders. The FeSex-rGO composite powders had superior sodium-ion storage properties compared to those of the Fe2O3-rGO composite powders with similar morphological characteristics. The discharge capacities of the FeSex- and Fe2O3-rGO composite powders for the 200th cycle at a constant current density of 0.3 A g‑1 were 434 and 174 mA h g‑1, respectively. The FeSex-rGO composite powders had a high discharge capacity of 311 mA h g‑1 for the 1000th cycle at a high current density of 1 A g‑1.

  13. Cultivation of an obligate Fe(II)-oxidizing lithoautotrophic bacterium using electrodes.

    PubMed

    Summers, Zarath M; Gralnick, Jeffrey A; Bond, Daniel R

    2013-01-29

    Fe(II)-oxidizing aerobic bacteria are poorly understood, due in part to the difficulties involved in laboratory cultivation. Specific challenges include (i) providing a steady supply of electrons as Fe(II) while (ii) managing rapid formation of insoluble Fe(III) oxide precipitates and (iii) maintaining oxygen concentrations in the micromolar range to minimize abiotic Fe(II) oxidation. Electrochemical approaches offer an opportunity to study bacteria that require problematic electron donors or acceptors in their respiration. In the case of Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria, if the electron transport machinery is able to oxidize metals at the outer cell surface, electrodes poised at potentials near those of natural substrates could serve as electron donors, eliminating concentration issues, side reactions, and mineral end products associated with metal oxidation. To test this hypothesis, the marine isolate Mariprofundus ferrooxydans PV-1, a neutrophilic obligate Fe(II)-oxidizing autotroph, was cultured using a poised electrode as the sole energy source. When cells grown in Fe(II)-containing medium were transferred into a three-electrode electrochemical cell, a cathodic (negative) current representing electron uptake by bacteria was detected, and it increased over a period of weeks. Cultures scraped from a portion of the electrode and transferred into sterile reactors consumed electrons at a similar rate. After three transfers in the absence of Fe(II), electrode-grown biofilms were studied to determine the relationship between donor redox potential and respiration rate. Electron microscopy revealed that under these conditions, M. ferrooxydans PV-1 attaches to electrodes and does not produce characteristic iron oxide stalks but still appears to exhibit bifurcate cell division. IMPORTANCE Electrochemical cultivation, supporting growth of bacteria with a constant supply of electron donors or acceptors, is a promising tool for studying lithotrophic species in the laboratory

  14. Complexity of High-Pressure Orthorhombic Iron Oxides, the Characterization of Fe5O6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavina, B.; Meng, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Occurring as accessory minerals in most rocks and forming large deposits of considerable economical importance, iron oxides have a major petrological importance. Their role as oxygen buffers, in differentiation processes and as magnetic phases summarize the critical importance of iron oxides in most petrological contexts, independently of their abundance.The discovery of a new compound in the Fe-O system, Fe4O5[1], reshaped our assumptions on the behavior of iron oxides in the Earth's deep interior, where phases of FeO and Fe3O4 were considered the sole plausible players. Further studies found that Fe4O5 is stable in a wide compositional range[2] and can accept a wide extent of isomorphic substitutions[3].We used laser heating synthesis in diamond anvil cell and microdiffraction mapping with high brilliance synchrotron x-ray[4] to explore the complexity of the Fe-O system at high pressure and temperature. We found coexistence of two to three oxides in most of the samples we investigated. By means of a careful exploration of diffraction effects in the reciprocal space, we singled-out the diffraction peaks of a few grains in multiphase diffraction patterns. These allowed a reliable characterization of yet a new iron oxide, Fe5O6. This compound, synthesized between 10 and 20 GPa, is also orthorhombic and can be described with the same building blocks of the other known orthorhombic iron oxides. A comparison of compressibility and lattice parameters of the latest iron oxides will be presented. [1] Lavina, B. et al. Discovery of the recoverable high-pressure iron oxide Fe4O5. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 108, 17281-5 (2011).[2] Woodland, A. B., Frost, D. J., Trots, D. M., Klimm, K. & Mezouar, M. In situ observation of the breakdown of magnetite (Fe3O4) to Fe4O5 and hematite at high pressures and temperatures. Am Mineral 97, 1808-1811 (2012).[3] Woodland, A. B. et al. Fe4O5 and its solid solutions in several simple systems. Cotrib Mineral Petrol 166, 1677-1686 (2013

  15. Thermodynamic Versus Surface Area Control of Microbial Fe(III) Oxide Reduction Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roden, E. E.

    2003-12-01

    Recent experimental studies of synthetic and natural Fe(III) oxide reduction permit development of conceptual and quantitative models of enzymatic Fe(III) oxide reduction at circumneutral pH that can be compared to and contrasted with established models of abiotic mineral dissolution. The findings collectively support a model for controls on enzymatic reduction that differs fundamentally from those applied to abiotic reductive dissolution as a result of two basic phenomena: (1) the relatively minor influence of oxide mineralogical and thermodynamic properties on surface area-normalized rates of enzymatic reduction compared to abiotic reductive dissolution; and (2) the major limitation which sorption and/or surface precipitation of biogenic Fe(II) on residual oxide and Fe(III)-reducing bacterial cell surfaces poses to enzymatic electron transfer in the presence of excess electron donor. Parallel studies with two major Fe(III)-reducing bacteria genera (Shewanella and Geobacter) lead to common conclusions regarding the importance of these phenomena in regulating the rate and long-term extent of Fe(III) oxide reduction. Although the extent to which these phenomena can be traced to underlying kinetic vs. thermodynamic effects cannot be resolved with current information, models in which rates of enzymatic reduction are limited kinetically by the abundance of "available" oxide surface sites (as controlled by oxide surface area and the abundance of surface-bound Fe(II)) provide an adequate macroscopic description of controls on the initial rate and long-term extent of oxide reduction. In some instances, thermodynamic limitation posed by the accumulation of aqueous reaction end-products (i.e. Fe(II) and alkalinity) must also be invoked to explain observed long-term patterns of reduction. In addition, the abundance of Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms plays an important role in governing rates of reduction and needs to be considered in models of Fe(III) reduction in nonsteady

  16. Successive preparation of decorated zinc oxide organic sol by pulsed laser ablation and their luminescence characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qian-Huo; Zhang, Wen-Gong

    2007-02-01

    Nano-ZnO organic sols which were modified in situ were successively produced through focused pulsed laser ablation of ZnO target in interface of solid and flowing liquid which contained modification agents or polymer. It is found that the ZnO ethanol sol decorated by Q (8-hydroxylquinoline) radiates intense green light under ultraviolet radiation and has a broad emission band centered at 555 nm in the emission fluorescence spectrum. The influence of factors including different modification agents and their added methods, laser fluence, aging time after preparation, compositions of flowing liquid and their velocity on luminescence characteristics of nano-ZnO organic sol was characterized by TEM, UV-vis and fluorescence spectrum.

  17. Zinc oxide porous nano-cages fabricated by laser ablation of Zn in ammonium hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuang; Chen, Ming; Liu, XiangDong

    2014-07-28

    We report the successful synthesis of ZnO porous nano-cages with controllable hollow spaces by simply using laser ablation of Zn target in liquid medium containing deionized water and ammonia (V(water):V(ammonia) = 7:1~5:1). In addition to the porous surface, the created interior space of the ZnO nano-cage substantially increases with the ammonia concentration. The related growth mechanism has been illustrated based on the ultra-rapid alkaline etching process. Moreover, numerous Zn(NH3)(4)(2+) clusters generated by the selective etching route readily penetrate into the ZnO porous structures and can be embedded in these unique nano-cages. It is envisaged that these composite ions/ ZnO porous nano-cages have significant implications for gas sensing and catalytic applications. The synthetic scheme used here should also be applicable to other semiconductors.

  18. Easy and quantitative access to Fe(II) and Fe(III) di(aryl)alkynylphosphine oxides featuring [Fe(dppe)Cp*] endgroups: terminal P=O functionality blocks the dimerisation of the Fe(III) derivatives.

    PubMed

    Tohmé, Ayham; Hagen, Charles T; Essafi, Stéphanie; Bondon, Arnaud; Roisnel, Thierry; Carmichael, Duncan; Paul, Frédéric

    2015-01-25

    A series of paramagnetic di(aryl)alkynylphosphine oxides [PF6] featuring an open-shell [Fe(κ(2)-dppe)(η(5)-C5Me5)](+) endgroup were obtained by oxidation of their neutral Fe(II) parents 3a-c, themselves obtained in a simple and nearly quantitative fashion from the corresponding Fe(II) metallophosphines 1a-c. The new organometallic radicals were characterised by NMR and ESR and were shown to be perfectly stable in solution, in contrast to species such as 1a-b[PF6] which readily dimerise. PMID:25483340

  19. Interpreting nanoscale size-effects in aggregated Fe-oxide suspensions: Reaction of Fe(II) with Goethite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cwiertny, David M.; Handler, Robert M.; Schaefer, Michael V.; Grassian, Vicki H.; Scherer, Michelle M.

    2008-03-01

    The Fe(II)/Fe(III) redox couple plays an important role in both the subsurface fate and transport of groundwater pollutants and the global cycling of carbon and nitrogen in iron-limited marine environments. Iron oxide particles involved in these redox processes exhibit broad size distributions, and the recent demonstrations of dramatic nanoscale size-effects with various metal oxides has compelled us, as well as many others, to consider whether the rate and extent of Fe(II)/Fe(III) cycling depends upon oxide particle size in natural systems. Here, we investigated the reaction of Fe(II) with three different goethite particle sizes in pH 7.5 suspensions. Acicular goethite rods with primary particle dimensions ranging from 7 by 80 nm to 25 by 670 nm were studied. Similar behavior with respect to Fe(II) sorption, electron transfer and nitrobenzene reduction was observed on a mass-normalized basis despite almost a threefold difference in goethite specific surface areas. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images, dynamic light scattering (DLS) and sedimentation measurements all indicated that, at pH 7.5, significant aggregation occurred with all three sizes of goethite particles. SEM images further revealed that nanoscale particles formed dense aggregates on the order of several microns in diameter. The clear formation of particle aggregates in solution raises questions regarding the use of primary particle surface area as a basis for assessing nanoscale size-effects in iron oxide suspensions at circum-neutral pH values. In our case, normalizing the Fe(II) sorption densities and rate constants for nitrobenzene reduction by BET surface area implies that goethite nanoparticles are less reactive than larger particles. We suspect, however, that aggregation is responsible for this observed size-dependence, and argue that BET values should not be used to assess differences in surface site density or intrinsic surface reactivity in aggregated particle suspensions. In order to

  20. Effects of Fe oxide on N transformations in subtropical acid soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xianjun; Xin, Xiaoping; Li, Shiwei; Zhou, Junchao; Zhu, Tongbin; Müller, Christopher; Cai, Zucong; Wright, Alan L.

    2015-02-01

    Subtropical ecosystems are often characterized by high N cycling rates, but net nitrification rates are often low in subtropical acid soils. NO3--N immobilization into organic N may be a contributing factor to understand the observed low net nitrification rates in these acid soils. The effects of Fe oxide and organic matter on soil N transformations were evaluated using a 15N tracing study. Soil net nitrification was low for highly acidic yellow soil (Ferralsols), but gross ammonia oxidation was 7 times higher than net nitrification. In weakly acidic purple soil (Cambisols), net nitrification was 8 times higher than in Ferralsols. The addition of 5% Fe oxide to Cambisols, reduced the net nitrification rate to a negative rate, while NO3--N immobilization rate increased 8 fold. NO3--N immobilization was also observed in Ferralsols which contained high Fe oxides levels. A possible mechanism for these reactions could be stimulation of NO3--N immobilization by Fe oxide which promoted the abiotic formation of nitrogenous polymers, suggesting that the absence of net nitrification in some highly acid soils may be due to high rates of NO3--N immobilization caused by high Fe oxide content rather than a low pH.

  1. Effects of Fe oxide on N transformations in subtropical acid soils

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xianjun; Xin, Xiaoping; Li, Shiwei; Zhou, Junchao; Zhu, Tongbin; Müller, Christopher; Cai, Zucong; Wright, Alan L.

    2015-01-01

    Subtropical ecosystems are often characterized by high N cycling rates, but net nitrification rates are often low in subtropical acid soils. NO3−-N immobilization into organic N may be a contributing factor to understand the observed low net nitrification rates in these acid soils. The effects of Fe oxide and organic matter on soil N transformations were evaluated using a 15N tracing study. Soil net nitrification was low for highly acidic yellow soil (Ferralsols), but gross ammonia oxidation was 7 times higher than net nitrification. In weakly acidic purple soil (Cambisols), net nitrification was 8 times higher than in Ferralsols. The addition of 5% Fe oxide to Cambisols, reduced the net nitrification rate to a negative rate, while NO3−-N immobilization rate increased 8 fold. NO3−-N immobilization was also observed in Ferralsols which contained high Fe oxides levels. A possible mechanism for these reactions could be stimulation of NO3−-N immobilization by Fe oxide which promoted the abiotic formation of nitrogenous polymers, suggesting that the absence of net nitrification in some highly acid soils may be due to high rates of NO3−-N immobilization caused by high Fe oxide content rather than a low pH. PMID:25722059

  2. Discovery of Fe-Ce Oxide/BiVO4 Photoanodes through Combinatorial Exploration of Ni-Fe-Co-Ce Oxide Coatings.

    PubMed

    Shinde, Aniketa; Guevarra, Dan; Liu, Guiji; Sharp, Ian D; Toma, Francesca M; Gregoire, John M; Haber, Joel A

    2016-09-14

    An efficient photoanode is a prerequisite for a viable solar fuels technology. The challenges to realizing an efficient photoanode include the integration of a semiconductor light absorber and a metal oxide electrocatalyst to optimize corrosion protection, light trapping, hole transport, and photocarrier recombination sites. To efficiently explore metal oxide coatings, we employ a high-throughput methodology wherein a uniform BiVO4 film is coated with 858 unique metal oxide coatings covering a range of metal oxide loadings and the full (Ni-Fe-Co-Ce)Ox pseudoquaternary composition space. Photoelectrochemical characterization of the photoanodes reveals that specific combinations of metal oxide composition and loading provide up to a 13-fold increase in the maximum photoelectrochemical power generation for oxygen evolution in pH 13 electrolyte. Through mining of the high-throughput data we identify composition regions that form improved interfaces with BiVO4. Of particular note, integrated photoanodes with catalyst compositions in the range Fe(0.4-0.6)Ce(0.6-0.4)Ox exhibit high interface quality and excellent photoelectrochemical power conversion. Scaled-up inkjet-printed electrodes and photoanodic electrodeposition of this composition on BiVO4 confirms the discovery and the synthesis-independent interface improvement of (Fe-Ce)Ox coatings on BiVO4.

  3. Discovery of Fe-Ce Oxide/BiVO4 Photoanodes through Combinatorial Exploration of Ni-Fe-Co-Ce Oxide Coatings.

    PubMed

    Shinde, Aniketa; Guevarra, Dan; Liu, Guiji; Sharp, Ian D; Toma, Francesca M; Gregoire, John M; Haber, Joel A

    2016-09-14

    An efficient photoanode is a prerequisite for a viable solar fuels technology. The challenges to realizing an efficient photoanode include the integration of a semiconductor light absorber and a metal oxide electrocatalyst to optimize corrosion protection, light trapping, hole transport, and photocarrier recombination sites. To efficiently explore metal oxide coatings, we employ a high-throughput methodology wherein a uniform BiVO4 film is coated with 858 unique metal oxide coatings covering a range of metal oxide loadings and the full (Ni-Fe-Co-Ce)Ox pseudoquaternary composition space. Photoelectrochemical characterization of the photoanodes reveals that specific combinations of metal oxide composition and loading provide up to a 13-fold increase in the maximum photoelectrochemical power generation for oxygen evolution in pH 13 electrolyte. Through mining of the high-throughput data we identify composition regions that form improved interfaces with BiVO4. Of particular note, integrated photoanodes with catalyst compositions in the range Fe(0.4-0.6)Ce(0.6-0.4)Ox exhibit high interface quality and excellent photoelectrochemical power conversion. Scaled-up inkjet-printed electrodes and photoanodic electrodeposition of this composition on BiVO4 confirms the discovery and the synthesis-independent interface improvement of (Fe-Ce)Ox coatings on BiVO4. PMID:27549019

  4. Neodymium isotopic study of rare earth element sources and mobility in hydrothermal Fe oxide (Fe-P-REE) systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gleason, J.D.; Marikos, M.A.; Barton, M.D.; Johnson, D.A.

    2000-03-01

    Rare earth element (REE)-enriched, igneous-related hydrothermal Fe-oxide hosted (Fe-P-REE) systems from four areas in North America have been analyzed for their neodymium iosotopic composition to constrain REE sources and mobility in these systems. The Nd isotopic results evidence a common pattern of REE concentration from igneous sources despite large differences in age (Proterozoic to Tertiary), tectonic setting (subduction vs. intraplate), and magmatic style (mafic vs. felsic). In the Middle Proterozoic St. Francois Mountains terrane of southeastern Missouri, {epsilon}{sub Nd} for Fe-P-REE (apatite, monazite, xenotime) deposits ranges from +3.5 to +5.1, similar to associated felsic to intermediate igneous rocks of the same age ({epsilon}{sub Nd} = +2.6 to +6.2). At the mid-Jurassic Humboldt mafic complex in western Nevada, {epsilon}{sub Nd} for Fe-P-REE (apatite) mineralization varies between +1.1 and +2.4, similar to associated mafic igneous rocks ({minus}1.0 to +3.5). In the nearby Cortez Mountains in central Nevada, mid-Jurassic felsic volcanic and plutonic rocks ({epsilon}{sub Nd} = {minus}2.0 to {minus}4.4) are associated with Fe-P-REE (apatite-monazite) mineralization having similar {epsilon}{sub Nd}({minus}1.7 to {minus}2.4). At Cerro de Mercado, Durango, Mexico, all assemblages analyzed in this Tertiary rhyolite-hosted Fe oxide deposit have identical isotopic compositions with {epsilon}{sub Nd} = {minus}2.5. These data are consistent with coeval igneous host rocks being the primary source of REE in all four regions, and are inconsistent with a significant contribution of REE from other sources. Interpretations of the origin of these hydrothermal systems and their concomitant REE mobility must account for nonspecialized igneous sources and varied tectonic settings.

  5. Neodymium isotopic study of rare earth element sources and mobility in hydrothermal Fe-oxide (Fe-P-REE) systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleason, James D.; Marikos, Mark A.; Barton, Mark D.; Johnson, David A.

    2000-03-01

    Rare earth element (REE)-enriched, igneous-related hydrothermal Fe-oxide hosted (Fe-P-REE) systems from four areas in North America have been analyzed for their neodymium isotopic composition to constrain REE sources and mobility in these systems. The Nd isotopic results evidence a common pattern of REE concentration from igneous sources despite large differences in age (Proterozoic to Tertiary), tectonic setting (subduction vs. intraplate), and magmatic style (mafic vs. felsic). In the Middle Proterozoic St. Francois Mountains terrane of southeastern Missouri, ɛ Nd for Fe-P-REE (apatite, monazite, xenotime) deposits ranges from +3.5 to +5.1, similar to associated felsic to intermediate igneous rocks of the same age (ɛ Nd = +2.6 to +6.2). At the mid-Jurassic Humboldt mafic complex in western Nevada, ɛ Nd for Fe-P-REE (apatite) mineralization varies between +1.1 and +2.4, similar to associated mafic igneous rocks (-1.0 to +3.5). In the nearby Cortez Mountains in central Nevada, mid-Jurassic felsic volcanic and plutonic rocks (ɛ Nd = -2.0 to -4.4) are associated with Fe-P-REE (apatite-monazite) mineralization having similar ɛ Nd (-1.7 to -2.4). At Cerro de Mercado, Durango, Mexico, all assemblages analyzed in this Tertiary rhyolite-hosted Fe oxide deposit have identical isotopic compositions with ɛ Nd = -2.5. These data are consistent with coeval igneous host rocks being the primary source of REE in all four regions, and are inconsistent with a significant contribution of REE from other sources. Interpretations of the origin of these hydrothermal systems and their concomitant REE mobility must account for nonspecialized igneous sources and varied tectonic settings.

  6. Rapid Mobilization of Noncrystalline U(IV) Coupled with FeS Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Bi, Yuqiang; Stylo, Malgorzata; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan; Hayes, Kim F

    2016-02-01

    The reactivity of disordered, noncrystalline U(IV) species remains poorly characterized despite their prevalence in biostimulated sediments. Because of the lack of crystalline structure, noncrystalline U(IV) may be susceptible to oxidative mobilization under oxic conditions. The present study investigated the mechanism and rate of oxidation of biogenic noncrystalline U(IV) by dissolved oxygen (DO) in the presence of mackinawite (FeS). Previously recognized as an effective reductant and oxygen scavenger, nanoparticulate FeS was evaluated for its role in influencing U release in a flow-through system as a function of pH and carbonate concentration. The results demonstrated that noncrystalline U(IV) was more susceptible to oxidation than uraninite (UO2) in the presence of dissolved carbonate. A rapid release of U occurred immediately after FeS addition without exhibiting a temporary inhibition stage, as was observed during the oxidation of UO2, although FeS still kept DO levels low. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) characterized a transient surface Fe(III) species during the initial FeS oxidation, which was likely responsible for oxidizing noncrystalline U(IV) in addition to oxygen. In the absence of carbonate, however, the release of dissolved U was significantly hindered as a result of U adsorption by FeS oxidation products. This study illustrates the strong interactions between iron sulfide and U(IV) species during redox transformation and implies the lability of biogenic noncrystalline U(IV) species in the subsurface environment when subjected to redox cycling events.

  7. Proton reduction and dihydrogen oxidation on models of the [2Fe]H cluster of [Fe] hydrogenases. A density functional theory investigation.

    PubMed

    Zampella, Giuseppe; Greco, Claudio; Fantucci, Piercarlo; De Gioia, Luca

    2006-05-15

    Density functional theory was used to compare reaction pathways for H2 formation and H+ reduction catalyzed by models of the binuclear cluster found in the active site of [Fe] hydrogenases. Terminal H+ binding to an Fe(I)-Fe(I) form, followed by monoelectron reduction and protonation of the di(thiomethyl)amine ligand, can conveniently lead to H2 formation and release, suggesting that this mechanism could be operative within the enzyme active site. However, a pathway that implies the initial formation of Fe(II)-Fe(II) mu-H species and release of H2 from an Fe(II)-Fe(I) form is characterized by only slightly less favored energy profiles. In both cases, H2 formation becomes less favored when taking into account the competition between CN and amine groups for H+ binding, an observation that can be relevant for the design of novel synthetic catalysts. H2 cleavage can take place on Fe(II)-Fe(II) redox species, in agreement with previous proposals [Fan, H.-J.; Hall, M. B. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2001, 123, 3828] and, in complexes characterized by terminal CO groups, does not need the involvement of an external base. The step in H2 oxidation characterized by larger energy barriers corresponds to the second H+ extraction from the cluster, both considering Fe(II)-Fe(II) and Fe(II)-Fe(III) species. A comparison of the different reaction pathways reveals that H2 formation could involve only Fe(I)-Fe(I), Fe(II)-Fe(I), and Fe(II)-Fe(II) species, whereas Fe(III)-Fe(II) species might be relevant in H2 cleavage.

  8. Magnetic solid-phase extraction of protein by ionic liquid-coated Fe@graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Wen, Qian; Wang, Yuzhi; Xu, Kaijia; Li, Na; Zhang, Hongmei; Yang, Qin; Zhou, Yigang

    2016-11-01

    Amino functional dicationic ionic liquid (AFDCIL) was prepared and then coated on the surface of magnetic graphene oxide (GO) as a new magnetic adsorbent (Fe@GO@AFDCIL) for the magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE) of protein. The Fe@GO@AFDCIL composite was characterized by vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FT-IR), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and zeta-potential nanoparticles. The bovine hemoglobin (BHb) was used as the analyte, and the extraction performance of Fe@GO@AFDCIL was investigated in the MSPE procedure. The concentration of BHb in samples was determined by a UV-vis spectrophotometer. A comparative investigation of Fe@GO@AFDCIL composite and traditional IL-coated Fe@GO composites (Fe@GO@IL) exhibited the benefits of Fe@GO@AFDCIL. The adsorbed BHb could be eluted from the Fe@GO@AFDCIL by 4% sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) solution. The Fe@GO@AFDCIL exhibited favorable stability which could be reused at least 15 times. Under the optimized condition, the real samples were investigated, which demonstrated that the Fe@GO@AFDCIL was able to be applied in extracting bovine hemoglobin (BHb) from real biological samples.

  9. Magnetic solid-phase extraction of protein by ionic liquid-coated Fe@graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Wen, Qian; Wang, Yuzhi; Xu, Kaijia; Li, Na; Zhang, Hongmei; Yang, Qin; Zhou, Yigang

    2016-11-01

    Amino functional dicationic ionic liquid (AFDCIL) was prepared and then coated on the surface of magnetic graphene oxide (GO) as a new magnetic adsorbent (Fe@GO@AFDCIL) for the magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE) of protein. The Fe@GO@AFDCIL composite was characterized by vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FT-IR), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and zeta-potential nanoparticles. The bovine hemoglobin (BHb) was used as the analyte, and the extraction performance of Fe@GO@AFDCIL was investigated in the MSPE procedure. The concentration of BHb in samples was determined by a UV-vis spectrophotometer. A comparative investigation of Fe@GO@AFDCIL composite and traditional IL-coated Fe@GO composites (Fe@GO@IL) exhibited the benefits of Fe@GO@AFDCIL. The adsorbed BHb could be eluted from the Fe@GO@AFDCIL by 4% sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) solution. The Fe@GO@AFDCIL exhibited favorable stability which could be reused at least 15 times. Under the optimized condition, the real samples were investigated, which demonstrated that the Fe@GO@AFDCIL was able to be applied in extracting bovine hemoglobin (BHb) from real biological samples. PMID:27591642

  10. Potential Role of Nitrite for Abiotic Fe(II) Oxidation and Cell Encrustation during Nitrate Reduction by Denitrifying Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Klueglein, Nicole; Zeitvogel, Fabian; Stierhof, York-Dieter; Floetenmeyer, Matthias; Konhauser, Kurt O.; Obst, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Microorganisms have been observed to oxidize Fe(II) at neutral pH under anoxic and microoxic conditions. While most of the mixotrophic nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria become encrusted with Fe(III)-rich minerals, photoautotrophic and microaerophilic Fe(II) oxidizers avoid cell encrustation. The Fe(II) oxidation mechanisms and the reasons for encrustation remain largely unresolved. Here we used cultivation-based methods and electron microscopy to compare two previously described nitrate-reducing Fe(II) oxidizers ( Acidovorax sp. strain BoFeN1 and Pseudogulbenkiania sp. strain 2002) and two heterotrophic nitrate reducers (Paracoccus denitrificans ATCC 19367 and P. denitrificans Pd 1222). All four strains oxidized ∼8 mM Fe(II) within 5 days in the presence of 5 mM acetate and accumulated nitrite (maximum concentrations of 0.8 to 1.0 mM) in the culture media. Iron(III) minerals, mainly goethite, formed and precipitated extracellularly in close proximity to the cell surface. Interestingly, mineral formation was also observed within the periplasm and cytoplasm; intracellular mineralization is expected to be physiologically disadvantageous, yet acetate consumption continued to be observed even at an advanced stage of Fe(II) oxidation. Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) were detected by lectin staining with fluorescence microscopy, particularly in the presence of Fe(II), suggesting that EPS production is a response to Fe(II) toxicity or a strategy to decrease encrustation. Based on the data presented here, we propose a nitrite-driven, indirect mechanism of cell encrustation whereby nitrite forms during heterotrophic denitrification and abiotically oxidizes Fe(II). This work adds to the known assemblage of Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria in nature and complicates our ability to delineate microbial Fe(II) oxidation in ancient microbes preserved as fossils in the geological record. PMID:24271182

  11. A hydrogen-oxidizing, Fe(III)-reducing microorganism from the Great Bay estuary, New Hampshire

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Caccavo, F.; Blakemore, R.P.; Lovley, D.R.

    1992-01-01

    A dissimilatory Fe(III)- and Mn(IV)-reducing bacterium was isolated from bottom sediments of the Great Bay estuary, New Hampshire. The isolate was a facultatively anaerobic gram-negative rod which did not appear to fit into any previously described genus. It was temporarily designated strain BrY. BrY grew anaerobically in a defined medium with hydrogen or lactate as the electron donor and Fe(III) as the electron acceptor. BrY required citrate, fumarate, or malate as a carbon source for growth on H2 and Fe(III). With Fe(III) as the sole electron acceptor, BrY metabolized hydrogen to a minimum threshold at least 60-fold lower than the threshold reported for pure cultures of sulfate reducers. This finding supports the hypothesis that when Fe(III) is available, Fe(III) reducers can outcompete sulfate reducers for electron donors. Lactate was incompletely oxidized to acetate and carbon dioxide with Fe(III) as the electron acceptor. Lactate oxidation was also coupled to the reduction of Mn(IV), U(VI), fumarate, thiosulfate, or trimethylamine n-oxide under anaerobic conditions. BrY provides a model for how enzymatic metal reduction by respiratory metal-reducing microorganisms has the potential to contribute to the mobilization of iron and trace metals and to the immobilization of uranium in sediments of Great Bay Estuary.

  12. Fe-chlorophyllin promotes the growth of wheat roots associated with nitric oxide generation.

    PubMed

    Tong, Min; Zhang, Liefeng; Wang, Yifan; Jiang, Hui; Ren, Yong

    2010-01-01

    Effects of Fe-chlorophyllin on the growth of wheat root were investigated in this study. We found that Fe-chlorophyllin can promote root growth. The production of nitric oxide in wheat root was detected using DAF-2DA fluorescent emission. The intensity of fluorescent in the presence of 0.1 mg/L Fe-chlorophyllin was near to that observed with the positive control of sodium nitroprusside (SNP), the nitric oxide donor. IAA oxidase activity decreased with all treatments of Fe-chlorophyllin from 0.01 to 10 mg/L. At the relatively lower Fe-chlorophyllin concentration of 0.1 mg/L, the activity of IAA oxidase displayed a remarkable decrease, being 40.1% lower than the control. Meanwhile, Fe-chlorophyllin treatment could increase the activities of reactive oxygen scavenging enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD) and peroxidase (POD), as determined using non-denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. These results indicate that Fe-chlorophyllin contributes to the growth of wheat root associated with nitric oxide generation.

  13. Fe-Chlorophyllin Promotes the Growth of Wheat Roots Associated with Nitric Oxide Generation

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Min; Zhang, Liefeng; Wang, Yifan; Jiang, Hui; Ren, Yong

    2010-01-01

    Effects of Fe-chlorophyllin on the growth of wheat root were investigated in this study. We found that Fe-chlorophyllin can promote root growth. The production of nitric oxide in wheat root was detected using DAF-2DA fluorescent emission. The intensity of fluorescent in the presence of 0.1 mg/L Fe-chlorophyllin was near to that observed with the positive control of sodium nitroprusside (SNP), the nitric oxide donor. IAA oxidase activity decreased with all treatments of Fe-chlorophyllin from 0.01 to 10 mg/L. At the relatively lower Fe-chlorophyllin concentration of 0.1 mg/L, the activity of IAA oxidase displayed a remarkable decrease, being 40.1% lower than the control. Meanwhile, Fe-chlorophyllin treatment could increase the activities of reactive oxygen scavenging enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD) and peroxidase (POD), as determined using non-denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. These results indicate that Fe-chlorophyllin contributes to the growth of wheat root associated with nitric oxide generation. PMID:21614205

  14. Interfacial strain and defects in asymmetric Fe-Mn oxide hybrid nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayence, Arnaud; Wéry, Madeleine; Tran, Dung Trung; Wetterskog, Erik; Svedlindh, Peter; Tai, Cheuk-Wai; Bergström, Lennart

    2016-07-01

    Asymmetric Fe-Mn oxide hybrid nanoparticles have been obtained by a seed-mediated thermal decomposition-based synthesis route. The use of benzyl ether as the solvent was found to promote the orientational growth of Mn1-xO onto the iron oxide nanocube seeds yielding mainly dimers and trimers whereas 1-octadecene yields large nanoparticles. HRTEM imaging and HAADF-STEM tomography performed on dimers show that the growth of Mn1-xO occurs preferentially along the edges of iron oxide nanocubes where both oxides share a common crystallographic orientation. Fourier filtering and geometric phase analysis of dimers reveal a lattice mismatch of 5% and a large interfacial strain together with a significant concentration of defects. The saturation magnetization is lower and the coercivity is higher for the Fe-Mn oxide hybrid nanoparticles compared to the iron oxide nanocube seeds.Asymmetric Fe-Mn oxide hybrid nanoparticles have been obtained by a seed-mediated thermal decomposition-based synthesis route. The use of benzyl ether as the solvent was found to promote the orientational growth of Mn1-xO onto the iron oxide nanocube seeds yielding mainly dimers and trimers whereas 1-octadecene yields large nanoparticles. HRTEM imaging and HAADF-STEM tomography performed on dimers show that the growth of Mn1-xO occurs preferentially along the edges of iron oxide nanocubes where both oxides share a common crystallographic orientation. Fourier filtering and geometric phase analysis of dimers reveal a lattice mismatch of 5% and a large interfacial strain together with a significant concentration of defects. The saturation magnetization is lower and the coercivity is higher for the Fe-Mn oxide hybrid nanoparticles compared to the iron oxide nanocube seeds. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Materials characterization, powder X-ray diffraction, EFTEM images, EELS spectra, HAADF-STEM. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr01373b

  15. Oxidation State of Nakhlites as inferred from Fe-Ti oxide Equilibria and Augite/Melt Europium Partitioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Makishima, J.; McKay, G.; Le, L.; Miyamoto, M.; Mikouchi, T.

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that Martian magmas had wide range of oxygen fugacities (fO2) and that this variation is correlated with the variation of La/Yb ratio and isotopic characteristics of the Martian basalts, shergottite meteorites. The origin of this correlation must have important information about mantle sources and Martian evolution. In order to understand this correlation, it is necessary to know accurate value of oxidation state of other Martian meteorite groups. Nakhlites, cumulate clinopyroxenites, are another major group of Martian meteorites and have distinctly different trace element and isotopic characteristics from shergottites. Thus, estimates of oxidation state of nakhlites will give us important insight into the mantle source in general. Several workers have estimated oxidation state of nakhlites by using Fe-Ti oxide equilibrium. However, Fe-Ti oxides may not record the oxidation state of the parent melt of the nakhlite because it is a late-stage mineral. Furthermore, there is no comprehensive study which analyzed all nakhlite samples at the same time. Therefore, in this study (1) we reduced the uncertainty of the estimate using the same electron microprobe and the same standards under the same condition for Fe-Ti oxide in 6 nakhlites and (2) we also performed crystallization experiments to measure partition coefficients of Eu into pyroxene in the nakhlite system in order to estimate fO2 when the pyroxene core formed (i.e. Eu oxybarometer [e.g. 2,6]).

  16. Bacterial Fe(II) oxidation distinguished by long-range correlation in redox potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enright, Allison M. L.; Ferris, F. Grant

    2016-05-01

    The kinetics of bacterial Fe(II) oxidation was investigated 297 m underground at the Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory (near Oskarshamn, Sweden) under steady state groundwater flow conditions in a flow-through cell containing well-developed flocculent mats of bacteriogenic iron oxides (BIOS). Pseudo first-order rate constants of 0.004 min-1 and 0.009 min-1 were obtained for chemical and bacterial Fe(II) oxidation, respectively, based on the 104 min retention time of groundwater in the flow cell, inlet Fe(II) concentration of 21.0 ± 0.5 µm, outlet Fe(II) concentration of 8.5 ± 0.7 µm, as well as constant pH = - log H+ of 7.42 ± 0.01, dissolved O2 concentration of 0.11 ± 0.01 mg/L, and groundwater temperature of 12.4 ± 0.1°C. Redox potential was lower at the BIOS-free inlet (-135.4 ± 1.16 mV) compared to inside BIOS within the flow cell (-112.6 ± 1.91 mV), consistent with the Nernst relationship and oxidation of Fe(II) to Fe(III). Further evaluation of the redox potential time series data using detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) revealed power law scaling in the amplitude of fluctuations over increasing intervals of time with significantly different (p < 0.01) DFA α scaling exponents of 1.89 ± 0.03 for BIOS and 1.67 ± 0.06 at the inlet. These α values not only signal the presence of long-range correlation in the redox potential time series measurements but also distinguish between the slower rate of chemical Fe(II) oxidation at the inlet and faster rate accelerated by FeOB in BIOS.

  17. Oxidation of Fe(II) in natural waters at high nutrient concentrations.

    PubMed

    González, Aridane G; Santana-Casiano, J Magdalena; Pérez, Norma; González-Dávila, Melchor

    2010-11-01

    The Fe(II) oxidation kinetic was studied in seawater enriched with nutrients as a function of pH (7.2-8.2), temperature (5-35 °C), and salinity (10-36.72) and compared with the same parameters in seawater media. The effect of nitrate (0-1.77 × 10(-3) M), phosphate (0-5.80 × 10(-5) M) and silicate (0-2.84 × 10(-4) M) was studied at pH 8.0 and 25 °C. The experimental results demonstrated that Fe(II) oxidation was faster in high nutrient concentrations affecting the lifetime of Fe(II) in nutrient rich waters. Silicate displayed the most significant effects on the Fe(II) oxidation rate with values similar to those determined in seawater enriched with all the nutrients. A kinetic model was applied to the experimental results in order to account for changes in the speciation and to compute the fractional contribution of each Fe(II) species to the total rate constant as a function of pH. FeH(3)SiO(4)(+) played a key role in the Fe(II) speciation, dominating the process at pH over 8.4. At pH 8.0, FeH(3)SiO(4)(+) represented 18% of the total Fe(II) species. Model results show that when the concentration of silicate is 3 × 10(-5) M as in high nutrient low chlorophyll areas, FeH(3)SiO(4)(+) contributed at pH 8.0 by 4% increasing the rate to 11% at 1.4 × 10(-4) M. The effect of nutrients, especially silicate, must be considered in any further study in seawater media cultures and eutrophic oceanic areas.

  18. Oxidation of Sulfonamides in Aqueous Solution by UV-TiO2-Fe(VI)

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yan; Zhang, Kejia; Li, Cong; Zhang, Tuqiao; Gao, Naiyun

    2015-01-01

    The photocatalytic degradation of sulfonamides in aqueous TiO2 suspension under UV irradiation has been investigated using potassium ferrate as electron acceptors. The results showed that the stability of Fe(VI) is dependent on pH significantly, and the stability reduces obviously in the presence of UV-TiO2. The experiments indicated that Fe(VI) could effectively scavenge the conduction band electrons from the surface of TiO2. The photocatalytic oxidation of sulfonamides with Fe(VI) was found to be much faster than that without Fe(VI). The SD, SM, and SMX concentration was greatly reduced by 89.2%, 83.4%, and 82.0%, respectively, after 10 min with UV-TiO2-Fe(VI), comparing to 65.2%, 66.0%, and 71.9%, respectively, with Fe(VI) only in the dark and 71.3%, 72.7%, and 76.0%, respectively, with UV-TiO2. The pH value of solution significantly influenced the sulfonamides degradation in UV-TiO2-Fe(VI) system. The degradation amount of sulfonamides after 10 min was a maximum at pH 7. The intermediate products of sulfonamides oxidation by UV-TiO2-Fe(VI) were analysed by LC-HESI-MS-MS and the results suggested that a majority of sulfonamides turned into large-molecule products without complete mineralization. PMID:26347888

  19. Evidence for the Existence of Autotrophic Nitrate-Reducing Fe(II)-Oxidizing Bacteria in Marine Coastal Sediment

    PubMed Central

    Laufer, Katja; Røy, Hans; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizing microorganisms were described for the first time ca. 20 years ago. Most pure cultures of nitrate-reducing Fe(II) oxidizers can oxidize Fe(II) only under mixotrophic conditions, i.e., when an organic cosubstrate is provided. A small number of nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizing cultures have been proposed to grow autotrophically, but unambiguous evidence for autotrophy has not always been provided. Thus, it is still unclear whether or to what extent Fe(II) oxidation coupled to nitrate reduction is an enzymatically catalyzed and energy-yielding autotrophic process or whether Fe(II) is abiotically oxidized by nitrite from heterotrophic nitrate reduction. The aim of the present study was to find evidence for the existence of autotrophic nitrate-reducing Fe(II) oxidizers in coastal marine sediments. Microcosm incubations showed that with increasing incubation times, the stoichiometric ratio of reduced nitrate/oxidized Fe(II) [NO3−reduced/Fe(II)oxidized] decreased, indicating a decreasing contribution of heterotrophic denitrification and/or an increasing contribution of autotrophic nitrate-reducing Fe(II) oxidation over time. After incubations of sediment slurries for >10 weeks, nitrate-reducing activity ceased, although nitrate was still present. This suggests that heterotrophic nitrate reduction had ceased due to the depletion of readily available organic carbon. However, after the addition of Fe(II) to these batch incubation mixtures, the nitrate-reducing activity resumed, and Fe(II) was oxidized, indicating the activity of autotrophic nitrate-reducing Fe(II) oxidizers. The concurrent reduction of 14C-labeled bicarbonate concentrations unambiguously proved that autotrophic C fixation occurred during Fe(II) oxidation and nitrate reduction. Our results clearly demonstrated that autotrophic nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria were present in the investigated coastal marine sediments. IMPORTANCE Twenty years after the

  20. Decoupling photochemical Fe(II) oxidation from shallow-water BIF deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konhauser, Kurt O.; Amskold, Larry; Lalonde, Stefan V.; Posth, Nicole R.; Kappler, Andreas; Anbar, Ariel

    2007-06-01

    Oxidized Fe minerals in Archean-Paleoproterozoic banded iron formations (BIFs) are commonly taken to indicate the presence of biogenic O 2 or photosynthetic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria in the oceans' photic zone. However, at least one viable abiogenic oxidation mechanism has been proposed. Prior to the rise of atmospheric oxygen and the development of a protective ozone layer, the Earth's surface was subjected to high levels of ultraviolet radiation. Bulk ocean waters that were anoxic at this time could have supported high concentrations of dissolved Fe(II). Under such conditions, dissolved ferrous iron species, such as Fe 2+ and Fe(OH) +, would have absorbed radiation in the 200-400 nm range, leading to the formation of dissolved ferric iron [Fe(III)], which in turn, would have hydrolyzed to form ferric hydroxide [Fe(OH) 3] at circumneutral pH [Cairns-Smith, A.G., 1978, Precambrian solution photochemistry, inverse segregation, and banded iron formations. Nature 76, 807-808; Braterman, P.S., Cairns-Smith, A.G., and Sloper, R.W., 1983, Photo-oxidation of hydrated Fe 2-Significance for banded iron formations. Nature 303, 163-164]. This process has been invoked to account for BIF deposition without need for biology [François, L.M., 1986, Extensive deposition of banded iron formations was possible without photosynthesis. Nature 320, 352-354]. Here, we evaluate the potential importance of photochemical oxidation using a combination of experiments and thermodynamic models. The experiments simulate the chemistry of ambient Precambrian seawater mixing with Fe(II)-rich hydrothermal fluids with, and without, UV irradiation. We find that if Fe(II) was effused from relatively shallow seamount-type vent systems directly into an anoxic photic zone, the photochemical contribution to solid-phase precipitation would have been negligible. Instead, most of the Fe(II) would have precipitated rapidly as an amorphous precursor phase to the ferrous silicate mineral greenalite ((Fe) 3Si 2O

  1. Phototrophic Fe(II)-oxidation in the chemocline of a ferruginous meromictic lake.

    PubMed

    Walter, Xavier A; Picazo, Antonio; Miracle, Maria R; Vicente, Eduardo; Camacho, Antonio; Aragno, Michel; Zopfi, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    Precambrian Banded Iron Formation (BIF) deposition was conventionally attributed to the precipitation of iron-oxides resulting from the abiotic reaction of ferrous iron (Fe(II)) with photosynthetically produced oxygen. Earliest traces of oxygen date from 2.7 Ga, thus raising questions as to what may have caused BIF precipitation before oxygenic photosynthesis evolved. The discovery of anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria thriving through the oxidation of Fe(II) has provided support for a biological origin for some BIFs, but despite reports suggesting that anoxygenic phototrophs may oxidize Fe(II) in the environment, a model ecosystem of an ancient ocean where they are demonstrably active was lacking. Here we show that anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria contribute to Fe(II) oxidation in the water column of the ferruginous sulfate-poor, meromictic lake La Cruz (Spain). We observed in-situ photoferrotrophic activity through stimulation of phototrophic carbon uptake in the presence of Fe(II), and determined light-dependent Fe(II)-oxidation by the natural chemocline microbiota. Moreover, a photoferrotrophic bacterium most closely related to Chlorobium ferrooxidans was enriched from the ferruginous water column. Our study for the first time demonstrates a direct link between anoxygenic photoferrotrophy and the anoxic precipitation of Fe(III)-oxides in a ferruginous water column, providing a plausible mechanism for the bacterial origin of BIFs before the advent of free oxygen. However, photoferrotrophs represent only a minor fraction of the anoxygenic phototrophic community with the majority apparently thriving by sulfur cycling, despite the very low sulfur content in the ferruginous chemocline of Lake La Cruz.

  2. Phototrophic Fe(II)-oxidation in the chemocline of a ferruginous meromictic lake

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Xavier A.; Picazo, Antonio; Miracle, Maria R.; Vicente, Eduardo; Camacho, Antonio; Aragno, Michel; Zopfi, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    Precambrian Banded Iron Formation (BIF) deposition was conventionally attributed to the precipitation of iron-oxides resulting from the abiotic reaction of ferrous iron (Fe(II)) with photosynthetically produced oxygen. Earliest traces of oxygen date from 2.7 Ga, thus raising questions as to what may have caused BIF precipitation before oxygenic photosynthesis evolved. The discovery of anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria thriving through the oxidation of Fe(II) has provided support for a biological origin for some BIFs, but despite reports suggesting that anoxygenic phototrophs may oxidize Fe(II) in the environment, a model ecosystem of an ancient ocean where they are demonstrably active was lacking. Here we show that anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria contribute to Fe(II) oxidation in the water column of the ferruginous sulfate-poor, meromictic lake La Cruz (Spain). We observed in-situ photoferrotrophic activity through stimulation of phototrophic carbon uptake in the presence of Fe(II), and determined light-dependent Fe(II)-oxidation by the natural chemocline microbiota. Moreover, a photoferrotrophic bacterium most closely related to Chlorobium ferrooxidans was enriched from the ferruginous water column. Our study for the first time demonstrates a direct link between anoxygenic photoferrotrophy and the anoxic precipitation of Fe(III)-oxides in a ferruginous water column, providing a plausible mechanism for the bacterial origin of BIFs before the advent of free oxygen. However, photoferrotrophs represent only a minor fraction of the anoxygenic phototrophic community with the majority apparently thriving by sulfur cycling, despite the very low sulfur content in the ferruginous chemocline of Lake La Cruz. PMID:25538702

  3. Phototrophic Fe(II)-oxidation in the chemocline of a ferruginous meromictic lake.

    PubMed

    Walter, Xavier A; Picazo, Antonio; Miracle, Maria R; Vicente, Eduardo; Camacho, Antonio; Aragno, Michel; Zopfi, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    Precambrian Banded Iron Formation (BIF) deposition was conventionally attributed to the precipitation of iron-oxides resulting from the abiotic reaction of ferrous iron (Fe(II)) with photosynthetically produced oxygen. Earliest traces of oxygen date from 2.7 Ga, thus raising questions as to what may have caused BIF precipitation before oxygenic photosynthesis evolved. The discovery of anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria thriving through the oxidation of Fe(II) has provided support for a biological origin for some BIFs, but despite reports suggesting that anoxygenic phototrophs may oxidize Fe(II) in the environment, a model ecosystem of an ancient ocean where they are demonstrably active was lacking. Here we show that anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria contribute to Fe(II) oxidation in the water column of the ferruginous sulfate-poor, meromictic lake La Cruz (Spain). We observed in-situ photoferrotrophic activity through stimulation of phototrophic carbon uptake in the presence of Fe(II), and determined light-dependent Fe(II)-oxidation by the natural chemocline microbiota. Moreover, a photoferrotrophic bacterium most closely related to Chlorobium ferrooxidans was enriched from the ferruginous water column. Our study for the first time demonstrates a direct link between anoxygenic photoferrotrophy and the anoxic precipitation of Fe(III)-oxides in a ferruginous water column, providing a plausible mechanism for the bacterial origin of BIFs before the advent of free oxygen. However, photoferrotrophs represent only a minor fraction of the anoxygenic phototrophic community with the majority apparently thriving by sulfur cycling, despite the very low sulfur content in the ferruginous chemocline of Lake La Cruz. PMID:25538702

  4. Use of Walnut Shell Powder to Inhibit Expression of Fe2+-Oxidizing Genes of Acidithiobacillus Ferrooxidans

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuhui; Liu, Yehao; Tan, Huifang; Zhang, Yifeng; Yue, Mei

    2016-01-01

    Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans is a Gram-negative bacterium that obtains energy by oxidizing Fe2+ or reduced sulfur compounds. This bacterium contributes to the formation of acid mine drainage (AMD). This study determined whether walnut shell powder inhibits the growth of A. ferrooxidans. First, the effects of walnut shell powder on Fe2+ oxidization and H+ production were evaluated. Second, the chemical constituents of walnut shell were isolated to determine the active ingredient(s). Third, the expression of Fe2+-oxidizing genes and rus operon genes was investigated using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Finally, growth curves were plotted, and a bioleaching experiment was performed to confirm the active ingredient(s) in walnut shells. The results indicated that both walnut shell powder and the phenolic fraction exert high inhibitory effects on Fe2+ oxidation and H+ production by A. ferrooxidans cultured in standard 9K medium. The phenolic components exert their inhibitory effects by down-regulating the expression of Fe2+-oxidizing genes and rus operon genes, which significantly decreased the growth of A. ferrooxidans. This study revealed walnut shell powder to be a promising substance for controlling AMD. PMID:27144574

  5. Microbial Fe(III) oxide reduction potential in Chocolate Pots hot spring, Yellowstone National Park.

    PubMed

    Fortney, N W; He, S; Converse, B J; Beard, B L; Johnson, C M; Boyd, E S; Roden, E E

    2016-05-01

    Chocolate Pots hot springs (CP) is a unique, circumneutral pH, iron-rich, geothermal feature in Yellowstone National Park. Prior research at CP has focused on photosynthetically driven Fe(II) oxidation as a model for mineralization of microbial mats and deposition of Archean banded iron formations. However, geochemical and stable Fe isotopic data have suggested that dissimilatory microbial iron reduction (DIR) may be active within CP deposits. In this study, the potential for microbial reduction of native CP Fe(III) oxides was investigated, using a combination of cultivation dependent and independent approaches, to assess the potential involvement of DIR in Fe redox cycling and associated stable Fe isotope fractionation in the CP hot springs. Endogenous microbial communities were able to reduce native CP Fe(III) oxides, as documented by most probable number enumerations and enrichment culture studies. Enrichment cultures demonstrated sustained DIR driven by oxidation of acetate, lactate, and H2 . Inhibitor studies and molecular analyses indicate that sulfate reduction did not contribute to observed rates of DIR in the enrichment cultures through abiotic reaction pathways. Enrichment cultures produced isotopically light Fe(II) during DIR relative to the bulk solid-phase Fe(III) oxides. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes from enrichment cultures showed dominant sequences closely affiliated with Geobacter metallireducens, a mesophilic Fe(III) oxide reducer. Shotgun metagenomic analysis of enrichment cultures confirmed the presence of a dominant G. metallireducens-like population and other less dominant populations from the phylum Ignavibacteriae, which appear to be capable of DIR. Gene (protein) searches revealed the presence of heat-shock proteins that may be involved in increased thermotolerance in the organisms present in the enrichments as well as porin-cytochrome complexes previously shown to be involved in extracellular electron transport. This analysis offers

  6. Oxygen sensitivity of zinc oxide nanoparticles produced via laser-ablated plasma in pressurized liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Taku; Shimizu, Yoshiki; Ito, Tsuyohito

    2015-09-01

    While traditional semiconductor oxygen sensor operate only with elevated temperature (= 700 K), the room-temperature operation of the ZnO oxygen sensors have been demonstrated with the help of UV light irradiation. Especially, ZnO nanotubes and nanoparticles have attracted much attentions as highly sensitive oxygen sensors and photodetectors. To the best of our knowledge, the reported works of gas sensors with ZnO nanostructures have been mostly intended for revealing effects of the morphology/shape and the size of the nanostructures. For further improvements of the ZnO-based gas sensors, it is probably required to understand effects of microscopic structures, such as densities of various defects. In this study, we synthesized the ZnO nanoparticles with various defects by means of laser-ablated plasma in pressurized water-ethanol mixture. The results indicate that the defects in ZnO affect oxygen sensitivity, and especially VO + defects seem to be mostly responsible for the resistance change of ZnO nanoparticles. We demonstrate that partial oxygen pressure can be measured with high sensitivity.

  7. 3D Visualization of the Iron Oxidation State in FeO/Fe3O4 Core-Shell Nanocubes from Electron Energy Loss Tomography.

    PubMed

    Torruella, Pau; Arenal, Raúl; de la Peña, Francisco; Saghi, Zineb; Yedra, Lluís; Eljarrat, Alberto; López-Conesa, Lluís; Estrader, Marta; López-Ortega, Alberto; Salazar-Alvarez, Germán; Nogués, Josep; Ducati, Caterina; Midgley, Paul A; Peiró, Francesca; Estradé, Sonia

    2016-08-10

    The physicochemical properties used in numerous advanced nanostructured devices are directly controlled by the oxidation states of their constituents. In this work we combine electron energy-loss spectroscopy, blind source separation, and computed tomography to reconstruct in three dimensions the distribution of Fe(2+) and Fe(3+) ions in a FeO/Fe3O4 core/shell cube-shaped nanoparticle with nanometric resolution. The results highlight the sharpness of the interface between both oxides and provide an average shell thickness, core volume, and average cube edge length measurements in agreement with the magnetic characterization of the sample. PMID:27383904

  8. 3D Visualization of the Iron Oxidation State in FeO/Fe3O4 Core-Shell Nanocubes from Electron Energy Loss Tomography.

    PubMed

    Torruella, Pau; Arenal, Raúl; de la Peña, Francisco; Saghi, Zineb; Yedra, Lluís; Eljarrat, Alberto; López-Conesa, Lluís; Estrader, Marta; López-Ortega, Alberto; Salazar-Alvarez, Germán; Nogués, Josep; Ducati, Caterina; Midgley, Paul A; Peiró, Francesca; Estradé, Sonia

    2016-08-10

    The physicochemical properties used in numerous advanced nanostructured devices are directly controlled by the oxidation states of their constituents. In this work we combine electron energy-loss spectroscopy, blind source separation, and computed tomography to reconstruct in three dimensions the distribution of Fe(2+) and Fe(3+) ions in a FeO/Fe3O4 core/shell cube-shaped nanoparticle with nanometric resolution. The results highlight the sharpness of the interface between both oxides and provide an average shell thickness, core volume, and average cube edge length measurements in agreement with the magnetic characterization of the sample.

  9. The influence of magmatic differentiation on the oxidation state of Fe in a basaltic arc magma

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, Katherine A.; Cottrell, Elizabeth

    2012-05-09

    Subduction zone basalts are more oxidized than basalts from other tectonic settings (e.g., higher Fe{sup 3+}/{Sigma}Fe), and this contrast may play a central role in the unique geochemical processes that generate arc and continental crust. The processes generating oxidized arc magmas, however, are poorly constrained, although they appear inherently linked to subduction. Near-surface differentiation processes unique to arc settings might drive oxidation of magmas that originate in equilibrium with a relatively reduced mantle source. Alternatively, arc magmas could record the oxidation conditions of a relatively oxidized mantle source. Here, we present new measurements of olivine-hosted melt inclusions from a single eruption of Agrigan volcano, Marianas, in order to test the influence of differentiation processes vs. source conditions on the Fe{sup 3+}/{Sigma}Fe ratio, a proxy for system oxygen fugacity (fO{sub 2}). We determined Fe{sup 3+}/{Sigma}Fe ratios in glass inclusions using {mu}-XANES and couple these data with major elements, dissolved volatiles, and trace elements. After correcting for post-entrapment crystallization, Fe{sup 3+}/{Sigma}Fe ratios in the Agrigan melt inclusions (0.219 to 0.282), and their modeled fO{sub 2}s ({Delta}QFM + 1.0 to + 1.8), are uniformly more oxidized than MORB, and preserve a portion of the evolution of this magma from 5.7 to 3.2 wt.% MgO. Fractionation of olivine {+-} clinopyroxene {+-} plagioclase should increase Fe{sup 3+}/{Sigma}Fe as MgO decreases in the melt, but the data show Fe{sup 3+}/{Sigma}Fe ratios decreasing as MgO decreases below 5 wt.% MgO. The major element trajectories, taken in combination with this strong reduction trend, are inconsistent with crystallization of common ferromagnesian phases found in the bulk Agrigan sample, including magnetite. Rather, decreasing Fe{sup 3+}/{Sigma}Fe ratios correlate with decreasing S concentrations, suggesting that electronic exchanges associated with SO{sub 2} degassing may

  10. Biological oxidation of Fe(II) in reduced nontronite coupled with nitrate reduction by Pseudogulbenkiania sp. Strain 2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Linduo; Dong, Hailiang; Kukkadapu, Ravi; Agrawal, Abinash; Liu, Deng; Zhang, Jing; Edelmann, Richard E.

    2013-10-01

    The importance of microbial nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation to iron biogeochemistry is well recognized. Past research has focused on oxidation of aqueous Fe2+ and structural Fe(II) in oxides, carbonates, and phosphate, but the importance of structural Fe(II) in phyllosilicates in this reaction is only recently studied. However, the effect of clay mineralogy on the rate and the mechanism of the reaction, and subsequent mineralogical end products are still poorly known. The objective of this research was to study the coupled process of microbial oxidation of Fe(II) in clay mineral nontronite (NAu-2), and nitrate reduction by Pseudogulbenkiania species strain 2002, and to determine mineralogical changes associated with this process. Bio-oxidation experiments were conducted using Fe(II) in microbially reduced nontronite as electron donor and nitrate as electron acceptor in bicarbonate-buffered medium under both growth and nongrowth conditions to investigate cell growth on this process. The extents of Fe(II) oxidation and nitrate reduction were measured by wet chemical methods. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM), and 57Fe-Mössbauer spectroscopy were used to observe mineralogical changes associated with Fe(III) reduction and Fe(II) oxidation in NAu-2. The bio-oxidation extent under growth and nongrowth conditions reached 67% and 57%, respectively. Over the same time period, nitrate was completely reduced under both conditions to nitrogen gas (N2), via an intermediate product nitrite. Abiotic oxidation by nitrite partly accelerated Fe(II) oxidation rate under the growth condition. The oxidized Fe(III) largely remained in the nontronite structure, but secondary minerals such as vivianite, ferrihydrite, and magnetite formed depending on specific experimental conditions. The results of this study highlight the importance of iron-bearing clay minerals in the global nitrogen cycle with potential applications in nitrate

  11. Catalytic oxidation of formaldehyde over Pt/Fe2O3 catalysts prepared by different method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Nihong; Wu, Ping; Li, Suying; Jia, Mingjun; Zhang, Wenxiang

    2013-11-01

    Iron oxide supported platinum catalysts were prepared by different methods, including co-precipitation, impregnation and colloid deposition methods. The catalytic properties of these catalysts were investigated for the complete oxidation of formaldehyde. It is found that the catalyst prepared by colloid deposition method (Pt/Fe2O3-CD) exhibited relatively high catalytic activity, which could completely oxidize HCHO even at room temperature. Based on a variety of physical-chemical characterization results, it is proposed that the presence of suitable interaction between Pt particles and iron oxide supports (i.e., PtOFe), which would influence the structure and properties of iron oxide supports, should play a positive role in determining the catalytic activity of Pt/Fe2O3-CD catalyst.

  12. Ultrafine FePd Nanoalloys Decorated Multiwalled Cabon Nanotubes toward Enhanced Ethanol Oxidation Reaction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yiran; He, Qingliang; Guo, Jiang; Wang, Jinmin; Luo, Zhiping; Shen, Tong D; Ding, Keqiang; Khasanov, Airat; Wei, Suying; Guo, Zhanhu

    2015-11-01

    Ultrafine iron-palladium (FePd) nanoalloys deposited on γ-Fe2O3, FePd-Fe2O3, further anchored on carboxyl multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs-COOH), FePd-Fe2O3/MWNTs, were successfully synthesized by a facile one-pot solution based method as thermally decomposing palladium acetylacetonate (Pd(acac)2) and iron pentacarbonyl (Fe(CO)5) in a refluxing dimethylformamide solution in the presence of MWNTs-COOH. A 3.65 fold increase of peak current density was observed in cyclic voltammetry (CV) for ethanol oxidation reaction (EOR) compared with that of Pd/MWNTs after normalizing to Pd mass. The greatly enhanced tolerance stability toward poisoning species and largely reduced charge transfer resistance were also obtained in chronoamperometry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy due to the downward shifted d-band center of FePd alloy, easily formed oxygen containing species on Fe2O3, and the stabilizing role of the MWNTs. PMID:26435327

  13. Discovery of Fe7O9: a new iron oxide with a complex monoclinic structure

    PubMed Central

    Sinmyo, Ryosuke; Bykova, Elena; Ovsyannikov, Sergey V.; McCammon, Catherine; Kupenko, Ilya; Ismailova, Leyla; Dubrovinsky, Leonid

    2016-01-01

    Iron oxides are fundamentally important compounds for basic and applied sciences as well as in numerous industrial applications. In this work we report the synthesis and investigation of a new binary iron oxide with the hitherto unknown stoichiometry of Fe7O9. This new oxide was synthesized at high-pressure high-temperature (HP-HT) conditions, and its black single crystals were successfully recovered at ambient conditions. By means of single crystal X-ray diffraction we determined that Fe7O9 adopts a monoclinic C2/m lattice with the most distorted crystal structure among the binary iron oxides known to date. The synthesis of Fe7O9 opens a new portal to exotic iron-rich (M,Fe)7O9 oxides with unusual stoichiometry and distorted crystal structures. Moreover, the crystal structure and phase relations of such new iron oxide groups may provide new insight into the cycling of volatiles in the Earth’s interior. PMID:27605075

  14. Discovery of Fe7O9: a new iron oxide with a complex monoclinic structure.

    PubMed

    Sinmyo, Ryosuke; Bykova, Elena; Ovsyannikov, Sergey V; McCammon, Catherine; Kupenko, Ilya; Ismailova, Leyla; Dubrovinsky, Leonid

    2016-01-01

    Iron oxides are fundamentally important compounds for basic and applied sciences as well as in numerous industrial applications. In this work we report the synthesis and investigation of a new binary iron oxide with the hitherto unknown stoichiometry of Fe7O9. This new oxide was synthesized at high-pressure high-temperature (HP-HT) conditions, and its black single crystals were successfully recovered at ambient conditions. By means of single crystal X-ray diffraction we determined that Fe7O9 adopts a monoclinic C2/m lattice with the most distorted crystal structure among the binary iron oxides known to date. The synthesis of Fe7O9 opens a new portal to exotic iron-rich (M,Fe)7O9 oxides with unusual stoichiometry and distorted crystal structures. Moreover, the crystal structure and phase relations of such new iron oxide groups may provide new insight into the cycling of volatiles in the Earth's interior. PMID:27605075

  15. Oxidation of synthesized sub-micron pyrite (FeS2) in seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gartman, Amy; Luther, George W.

    2014-11-01

    Synthesized sub-micron pyrite was oxidized in 0.2 μm-filtered Sargasso seawater in order to investigate the rate of oxidation and reaction end-products. Over the initial phase of the reaction, the sub-micron pyrite behaved as a soluble entity as the initial rate of oxidation was determined to be first order with respect to both pyrite and oxygen concentration, where the rate is described as -dFeS2/dt = k[FeS2][O2] and k, the rate constant, is 7.60 × 10-5 + 6.29 × 10-5 μM-1 day-1 at 25 °C. Oxidation proceeds inward from an initial surface oxidation of the pyrite and the formation of an amorphous mixed valence Fe(II)/(III) oxide surrounding the remaining pyrite core. The oxidation rates obtained through this study are up to two orders of magnitude slower than reported in previous pyrite oxidation studies using ground rather than synthesized pyrite at similar pH values. These results may be applied anywhere seawater and sub-micron pyrite are found, including hydrothermal vents, salt marshes and marine sediments.

  16. Molecular Underpinnings of Fe(III) Oxide Reduction by Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Liang; Rosso, Kevin M.; Clarke, Tomas A.; Richardson, David J.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, James K.

    2012-01-01

    In the absence of O2 and other electron acceptors, the Gram-negative bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 can use ferric [Fe(III)] (oxy)(hydr)oxide minerals as the terminal electron acceptors for anaerobic respiration. At circumneutral pH and in the absence of strong complexing ligands, Fe(III) oxides are relatively insoluble and thus are external to the bacterial cells. S. oneidensis MR-1 and related strains of metal-reducing Shewanella have evolved machinery (i.e., metal-reducing or Mtr pathway) for transferring electrons from the inner-membrane, through the periplasm and across the outer-membrane to the surface of extracellular Fe(III) oxides. The protein components identified to date for the Mtr pathway include CymA, MtrA, MtrB, MtrC, and OmcA. CymA is an inner-membrane tetraheme c-type cytochrome (c-Cyt) that belongs to the NapC/NrfH family of quinol dehydrogenases. It is proposed that CymA oxidizes the quinol in the inner-membrane and transfers the released electrons to MtrA either directly or indirectly through other periplasmic proteins. A decaheme c-Cyt, MtrA is thought to be embedded in the trans outer-membrane and porin-like protein MtrB. Together, MtrAB deliver the electrons through the outer-membrane to the MtrC and OmcA on the outmost bacterial surface. MtrC and OmcA are the outer-membrane decaheme c-Cyts that are translocated across the outer-membrane by the bacterial type II secretion system. Functioning as terminal reductases, MtrC and OmcA can bind the surface of Fe(III) oxides and transfer electrons directly to these minerals via their solvent-exposed hemes. To increase their reaction rates, MtrC and OmcA can use the flavins secreted by S. oneidensis MR-1 cells as diffusible co-factors for reduction of Fe(III) oxides. Because of their extracellular location and broad redox potentials, MtrC and OmcA can also serve as the terminal reductases for soluble forms of Fe(III). In addition to Fe(III) oxides, Mtr pathway is also involved in reduction of

  17. Tuning the Reactivity of Ultrathin Oxides: NO Adsorption on Monolayer FeO(111).

    PubMed

    Merte, Lindsay R; Heard, Christopher J; Zhang, Feng; Choi, Juhee; Shipilin, Mikhail; Gustafson, Johan; Weaver, Jason F; Grönbeck, Henrik; Lundgren, Edvin

    2016-08-01

    Ultrathin metal oxides exhibit unique chemical properties and show promise for applications in heterogeneous catalysis. Monolayer FeO films supported on metal surfaces show large differences in reactivity depending on the metal substrate, potentially enabling tuning of the catalytic properties of these materials. Nitric oxide (NO) adsorption is facile on silver-supported FeO, whereas a similar film grown on platinum is inert to NO under similar conditions. Ab initio calculations link this substrate-dependent behavior to steric hindrance caused by substrate-induced rumpling of the FeO surface, which is stronger for the platinum-supported film. Calculations show that the size of the activation barrier to adsorption caused by the rumpling is dictated by the strength of the metal-oxide interaction, offering a straightforward method for tailoring the adsorption properties of ultrathin films. PMID:27346455

  18. Role of oxidants in enhancing dewaterability of anaerobically digested sludge through Fe (II) activated oxidation processes: hydrogen peroxide versus persulfate

    PubMed Central

    Song, Kang; Zhou, Xu; Liu, Yiqi; Gong, Yanyan; Zhou, Beibei; Wang, Dongbo; Wang, Qilin

    2016-01-01

    Improving dewaterability of sludge is important for the disposal of sludge in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). This study, for the first time, investigated the Fe(II) activated oxidization processes in improving anaerobically digested sludge (ADS) dewaterability. The combination of Fe(II) (0–100 mg/g total solids (TS)) and persulfate (0–1,000 mg/g TS) under neutral pH as well as the combination of Fe(II) (0–100 mg/g TS) and hydrogen peroxide (HP) (0–1,000 mg/g TS) under pH 3.0 were used to examine and compare their effect on the ADS dewaterability enhancement. The highest ADS dewaterability enhancement was attained at 25 mg Fe(II)/g TS and 50 mg HP/g TS, when the CST (CST: the capillary suction time, a sludge dewaterability indicator) was reduced by 95%. In contrast, the highest CST reduction in Fe(II)-persulfate conditioning was 90%, which was obtained at 50 mg Fe(II)/g TS and 250 mg persulfate/g TS. The results showed that Fe(II)-HP conditioning was comparable with Fe(II)-persulfate conditioning in terms of highest CST reduction. Economic analysis suggested that the Fe(II)-HP conditioning was more promising for improving ADS dewaterability compared with Fe(II)-persulfate conditioning, with the saving being up to $65,000 per year in a WWTP with a population equivalent of 100,000. PMID:27109500

  19. Influence of recrystallization on phase separation kinetics of oxide dispersion strengthened Fe Cr Al alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Capdevila, C.; Miller, Michael K; Pimentel, G.; Chao, J.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of different starting microstructures on the kinetics of Fe-rich ({alpha}) and Cr-rich ({alpha}') phase separation during aging of Fe-Cr-Al oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys has been analyzed with a combination of atom probe tomography and thermoelectric power measurements. The results revealed that the high recrystallization temperature necessary to produce a coarse grained microstructure in Fe-base ODS alloys affects the randomness of Cr-atom distributions and defect density, which consequently affect the phase separation kinetics at low annealing temperatures.

  20. Thin Oxides as a Cu Diffusion Barrier for NIF Be Ablator Capsules

    SciTech Connect

    Youngblood, Kelly P.; Huang, H.; Xu, H. W.; Hayes, J.; Moreno, K. A.; Wu, J. J.; Nikroo, A.; Alford, C. A.; Hamza, A. V.; Kucheyev, S. O.; Wang, Y. M.; Wu, K. J.

    2013-03-01

    The NIF point design uses a five-layer capsule to modify the X-ray absorption in order to achieve optimized shock timing. A stepped copper dopant design defines the layer structure. The production of the capsule involves pyrolysis to remove the inner plastic mandrel. Copper atoms diffuse radially and azimuthally throughout the capsule during pyrolysis. This diffusion significantly diminishes the capsule performance during implosion. Thermal and coated oxide barrier layers employed between layers mitigate the diffusion of copper during the mandrel removal process. The copper atoms do not diffuse through this barrier during pyrolysis. A capsule fabrication method that produces a capsule with a thin oxide layer will be discussed.

  1. Comparison study of Cu-Fe-Ti and Co-Fe-Ti oxide catalysts for selective catalytic reduction of NO with NH3 at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lin; Zhong, Zhaoping; Yang, Han; Wang, Chunhua

    2016-09-15

    In this paper, a series of Cu-Fe-Ti and Co-Fe-Ti oxide catalysts were prepared by sol gel method. Cu-Fe-Ti and Co-Fe-Ti oxide catalysts showed the moderate catalytic activity for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO with NH3 at low temperature. The catalysts with the molar ratio as 4:1:10 (M:Fe:Ti) were selected as the representatives for comparison of reaction properties and H2O resistance, which were denoted as Cu-Fe/TiO2 and Co-Fe/TiO2 respectively. The characterization results manifested Co-Fe/TiO2 owned more adsorption capacity of the reactants and Cu-Fe/TiO2 had better redox ability. The in situ DRIFTS experiments indicated that adsorbed NH3 species and nitrate species both exhibited reaction activity for Co-Fe/TiO2, while nitric oxide was only be reduced by adsorbed NH3 species through Eley-Rideal mechanism for Cu-Fe/TiO2 at 150°C. Co-Fe/TiO2 exhibited the better resistance to H2O and its temperature window shifted towards the higher temperature in presence of 10vol% H2O, while the SCR activity of Cu-Fe/TiO2 was inhibited significantly in the whole temperature range investigated. The suppression of adsorption and activation for NH3 and NOx might be the reasons for the reversible inactivation, which was confirmed by the inhibitation of catalytic activities for separation NH3 and NO oxidation under the wet condition. We speculated that different thermal stability of adsorbed species and redox capacity of catalysts leaded to the different SCR behavior in absence and presence of H2O. PMID:27280535

  2. Comparison study of Cu-Fe-Ti and Co-Fe-Ti oxide catalysts for selective catalytic reduction of NO with NH3 at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lin; Zhong, Zhaoping; Yang, Han; Wang, Chunhua

    2016-09-15

    In this paper, a series of Cu-Fe-Ti and Co-Fe-Ti oxide catalysts were prepared by sol gel method. Cu-Fe-Ti and Co-Fe-Ti oxide catalysts showed the moderate catalytic activity for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO with NH3 at low temperature. The catalysts with the molar ratio as 4:1:10 (M:Fe:Ti) were selected as the representatives for comparison of reaction properties and H2O resistance, which were denoted as Cu-Fe/TiO2 and Co-Fe/TiO2 respectively. The characterization results manifested Co-Fe/TiO2 owned more adsorption capacity of the reactants and Cu-Fe/TiO2 had better redox ability. The in situ DRIFTS experiments indicated that adsorbed NH3 species and nitrate species both exhibited reaction activity for Co-Fe/TiO2, while nitric oxide was only be reduced by adsorbed NH3 species through Eley-Rideal mechanism for Cu-Fe/TiO2 at 150°C. Co-Fe/TiO2 exhibited the better resistance to H2O and its temperature window shifted towards the higher temperature in presence of 10vol% H2O, while the SCR activity of Cu-Fe/TiO2 was inhibited significantly in the whole temperature range investigated. The suppression of adsorption and activation for NH3 and NOx might be the reasons for the reversible inactivation, which was confirmed by the inhibitation of catalytic activities for separation NH3 and NO oxidation under the wet condition. We speculated that different thermal stability of adsorbed species and redox capacity of catalysts leaded to the different SCR behavior in absence and presence of H2O.

  3. Trichloroethylene oxidation performance in sodium percarbonate (SPC)/Fe2+ system.

    PubMed

    Zang, Xueke; Gu, Xiaogang; Lu, Shuguang; Qiu, Zhaofu; Sui, Qian; Lin, Kuangfei; Du, Xiaoming

    2014-01-01

    In this study, in-situ chemical oxidation technique employing Fe(II) catalytic sodium percarbonate (SPC) to stimulate the oxidation of trichloroethylene (TCE) in contaminated groundwater remediation was investigated. The effects of various factors including the SPC/TCE/Fe2+ molar ratio, the initial solution pH and the widely found constituents in groundwater matrix such as Cl(-), HCO3(-), SO4(2-) and NO3(-) anions and natural organic matters were evaluated. The experimental results showed that TCE could be completely oxidized in 5 min at 20 degrees C with a SPC/TCE/Fe2+ molar ratio of 5:1:10, indicating the significant effectiveness of the SPC/Fe2+ system for TCE removal. The initial solution pH value (from 3 to 11) has less influence on TCE oxidation rate. In contrast, Cl(-) and HCO3(-) anions had a negative effect on TCE removal in which HCO3(-) possesses a stronger influence than Cl(-), whereas the effects of both SO4(2-) and NO3(-) anions appeared to be negligible. With the 1.0-10 mg/L concentrations of humic acid in solution, slightly inhibitive effect was observed, suggesting that dissolved organic matters consumed less SPC and had a negligible effect on the oxidation of TCE in SPC/Fe2+ system. From the intermediate products' analyses and the released Cl(-) contents from TCE parent contaminant in solution, all the decomposed TCE had completely dechlorinated and led to carbon dioxide and hydrocarbon. In conclusion, Fe(II) catalytic SPC oxidation is a highly promising technique for TCE-contaminated groundwater remediation, but some complex constituents such as HCO3(-), in in-situ groundwater matrix should be carefully considered for its practical application.

  4. Stability of uranium incorporated into Fe(hydr)oxides under fluctuating redox conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, B.D.; Nico, P.S.; Fendorf, S.

    2009-04-01

    Reaction pathways resulting in uranium bearing solids that are stable (i.e., having limited solubility) under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions will limit dissolved concentrations and migration of this toxin. Here we examine the sorption mechanism and propensity for release of uranium reacted with Fe (hydr)oxides under cyclic oxidizing and reducing conditions. Upon reaction of ferrihydrite with Fe(II) under conditions where aqueous Ca-UO{sub 2}-CO{sub 3} species predominate (3 mM Ca and 3.8 mM CO{sub 3}-total), dissolved uranium concentrations decrease from 0.16 mM to below detection limit (BDL) after 5 to 15 d, depending on the Fe(II) concentration. In systems undergoing 3 successive redox cycles (15 d of reduction followed by 5 d of oxidation) and a pulsed decrease to 0.15 mM CO{sub 3}-total, dissolved uranium concentrations varied depending on the Fe(II) concentration during the initial and subsequent reduction phases - U concentrations resulting during the oxic 'rebound' varied inversely with the Fe(II) concentration during the reduction cycle. Uranium removed from solution remains in the oxidized form and is found both adsorbed on and incorporated into the structure of newly formed goethite and magnetite. Our 15 results reveal that the fate of uranium is dependent on anaerobic/aerobic conditions, aqueous uranium speciation, and the fate of iron.

  5. The Oxidation State of Fe in MORB Glasses and the Oxygen Fugacity of the Upper Mantle

    SciTech Connect

    E Cottrell; K Kelley

    2011-12-31

    Micro-analytical determination of Fe{sup 3+}/{Sigma}Fe ratios in mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) glasses using micro X-ray absorption near edge structure ({mu}-XANES) spectroscopy reveals a substantially more oxidized upper mantle than determined by previous studies. Here, we show that global MORBs yield average Fe{sup 3+}/{Sigma}Fe ratios of 0.16 {+-} 0.01 (n = 103), which trace back to primary MORB melts equilibrated at the conditions of the quartz-fayalite-magnetite (QFM) buffer. Our results necessitate an upward revision of the Fe{sup 3+}/{Sigma}Fe ratios of MORBs, mantle oxygen fugacity, and the ferric iron content of the mantle relative to previous wet chemical determinations. We show that only 0.01 (absolute, or < 10%) of the difference between Fe{sup 3+}/{Sigma}Fe ratios determined by micro-colorimety and XANES can be attributed to the Moessbauer-based XANES calibration. The difference must instead derive from a bias between micro-colorimetry performed on experimental vs. natural basalts. Co-variations of Fe{sup 3+}/{Sigma}Fe ratios in global MORB with indices of low-pressure fractional crystallization are consistent with Fe{sup 3+} behaving incompatibly in shallow MORB magma chambers. MORB Fe{sup 3+}/{Sigma}Fe ratios do not, however, vary with indices of the extent of mantle melting (e.g., Na{sub 2}O(8)) or water concentration. We offer two hypotheses to explain these observations: The bulk partition coefficient of Fe{sup 3+} may be higher during peridotite melting than previously thought, and may vary with temperature, or redox exchange between sulfide and sulfate species could buffer mantle melting at {approx} QFM. Both explanations, in combination with the measured MORB Fe{sup 3+}/{Sigma}Fe ratios, point to a fertile MORB source with greater than 0.3 wt.% Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}.

  6. Nano-sized magnetic iron oxides as catalysts for heterogeneous Fenton-like reactions-Influence of Fe(II)/Fe(III) ratio on catalytic performance.

    PubMed

    Rusevova, Klara; Kopinke, Frank-Dieter; Georgi, Anett

    2012-11-30

    Nano-sized Fe(II, III) oxides with various Fe(II)/Fe(III) ratios were characterized and tested as catalysts for the oxidative degradation of phenol via Fenton-like reactions at neutral pH. Under conditions typically applied for wet peroxide oxidation, Fe(II) in magnetite is oxidized to Fe(III), successively converting the mineral into maghemite. The residual Fe(II) content in the catalyst core is of only minor benefit for the catalytic activity in phenol oxidation, i.e. magnetite is not superior to maghemite. Achievable reaction rates for phenol degradation appeared to be rather low, e.g. phenol half-life of about 12 h when 3 g L(-1) magnetite and 5 g L(-1) H(2)O(2) were applied. Preceding surface-reduction of maghemite by NaBH(4), leading to an over-stoichiometric Fe(II) content compared to magnetite, only enhanced the non-productive decomposition of H(2)O(2) rather than the rate of phenol degradation. Reaction rates were shown to be relatively insensitive to catalyst concentration in the range of 1-10 g L(-1), probably resulting from a scavenging of reactive species by the catalyst surface, whereby particle agglomeration seems to play a key role. Degradation experiments with various structurally distinct compounds were carried out, indicating a similar selectivity of the heterogeneous Fenton-like system to that known for oxidation with ·OH.

  7. Electronic spectra of Fe3+ oxides and oxide hydroxides in the near IR to near UV.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherman, David M.; Waite, T.D.

    1985-01-01

    Optical absorption and diffuse reflectance spectra of several Fe2O3 and FeOOH polymorphs (hematite, maghemite, goethite, lepidocrocite) in the near-IR to near-UV spectral regions (2000-200 nm) are presented. The spectra consist primarily of Fe3+ ligand field and ligand-to-metal charge-transfer transitions.-J.A.Z.

  8. Nanostructured europium oxide thin films deposited by pulsed laser ablation of a metallic target in a He buffer atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Luna, H.; Franceschini, D. F.; Prioli, R.; Guimaraes, R. B.; Sanchez, C. M.; Canal, G. P.; Barbosa, M. D. L.; Galvao, R. M. O.

    2010-09-15

    Nanostrucured europium oxide and hydroxide films were obtained by pulsed Nd:YAG (532 nm) laser ablation of a europium metallic target, in the presence of a 1 mbar helium buffer atmosphere. Both the produced film and the ambient plasma were characterized. The plasma was monitored by an electrostatic probe, for plume expansion in vacuum or in the presence of the buffer atmosphere. The time evolution of the ion saturation current was obtained for several probe to substrate distances. The results show the splitting of the plume into two velocity groups, being the lower velocity profile associated with metal cluster formation within the plume. The films were obtained in the presence of helium atmosphere, for several target-to-substrate distances. They were analyzed by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, x-ray diffraction, and atomic force microscopy, for as-deposited and 600 deg. C treated-in-air samples. The results show that the as-deposited samples are amorphous and have chemical composition compatible with europium hydroxide. The thermally treated samples show x-ray diffraction peaks of Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3}, with chemical composition showing excess oxygen. Film nanostructuring was shown to be strongly correlated with cluster formation, as shown by velocity splitting in probe current versus time plots.

  9. Enhanced antibacterial activity of copper/copper oxide nanowires prepared by pulsed laser ablation in water medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swarnkar, R. K.; Pandey, J. K.; Soumya, K. K.; Dwivedi, P.; Sundaram, S.; Prasad, Sanjay; Gopal, R.

    2016-07-01

    Copper/copper oxide nanowires (NWs) are well known for its antibacterial activity against various pathogens. In the present study, we have shown the enhanced antibacterial activity of the NWs against gram-negative bacterial strains ( Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Salmonella typhi) and gram-positive bacterial strains ( Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus). The increase in the activity is because of the shape and size of the colloidal NWs which were prepared at room temperature in a one-step process by pulsed laser ablation of copper metal target. The purity, shape and size of the colloidal NWs were well characterized by UV-visible absorption spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The NWs were of diameters in the range of 15-30 nm and lengths ranging from 200 to 600 nm. The dose-dependent antibacterial activity of these NWs was found to be more effective against gram-negative bacteria compared to gram-positive bacteria. As gram-negative bacteria have thinner layer of cell wall made up of peptidoglycan possibly which makes them more susceptible to Cu/Cu2O NWs, Cu/Cu2O NWs can be a potent candidate to be used as bactericidal or as growth inhibitor.

  10. Surface passivation limited UO2 oxidative dissolution in the presence of FeS.

    PubMed

    Bi, Yuqiang; Hayes, Kim F

    2014-11-18

    Iron sulfide minerals produced during in situ bioremediation of U can serve as an oxygen scavenger to retard uraninite (UO2) oxidation upon oxygen intrusion. Under persistent oxygen supply, however, iron sulfides become oxidized and depleted, giving rise to elevated dissolved oxygen (DO) levels and remobilization of U(IV). The present study investigated the mechanism that regulates UO2 oxidative dissolution rate in a flow-through system when oxygen breakthrough occurred as a function of mackinawite (FeS) and carbonate concentrations. The formation and evolution of surface layers on UO2 were characterized using XAS and XPS. During FeS inhibition period, the continuous supply of carbonate and calcium in the influent effectively complexed and removed oxidized U(VI) to preserve an intermediate U4O9 surface. When the FeS became depleted by oxidization, a transient, rapid dissolution of UO2 was observed along with DO breakthrough in the reactor. This rate was greater than during the preceding FeS inhibition period and control experiments in the absence of FeS. With increasing DO, the rate slowed and the rate-limiting step shifted from surface oxidation to U(VI) detachment as U(VI) passivation layers developed. In contrast, increasing the carbonate concentrations facilitated detachment of surface-associated U(VI) complexes and impeded the formation of U(VI) passivation layer. This study demonstrates the critical role of U(VI) surface layer formation versus U(VI) detachment in controlling UO2 oxidative dissolution rate during periods of variable oxygen presence under simulated groundwater conditions.

  11. The influence of oxidation process on exchange bias in egg-shaped FeO/Fe3O4 core/shell nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leszczyński, Błażej; Hadjipanayis, George C.; El-Gendy, Ahmed A.; Załęski, Karol; Śniadecki, Zbigniew; Musiał, Andrzej; Jarek, Marcin; Jurga, Stefan; Skumiel, Andrzej

    2016-10-01

    Egg-shaped nanoparticles with a core-shell morphology were synthesized by thermal decomposition of an iron oleate complex. XRD and M(T) magnetic measurements confirmed the presence of FeO (wustite) and Fe3O4 (magnetite) phases in the nanoparticles. Oxidation of FeO to Fe3O4 was found to be the mechanism for the shell formation. As-made nanoparticles exhibited high values of exchange bias at 2 K. Oxidation led to decrease of exchange field from 2880 Oe (in as-made sample) to 330 Oe (in oxidized sample). At temperatures higher than the Néel temperature of FeO (200 K) there was no exchange bias. An interesting observation was made showing the exchange field to be higher than the coercive field at temperatures close to magnetite's Verwey transition.

  12. Tumor Ablation and Nanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Manthe, Rachel L.; Foy, Susan P.; Krishnamurthy, Nishanth; Sharma, Blanka; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2010-01-01

    Next to surgical resection, tumor ablation is a commonly used intervention in the treatment of solid tumors. Tumor ablation methods include thermal therapies, photodynamic therapy, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) producing agents. Thermal therapies induce tumor cell death via thermal energy and include radiofrequency, microwave, high intensity focused ultrasound, and cryoablation. Photodynamic therapy and ROS producing agents cause increased oxidative stress in tumor cells leading to apoptosis. While these therapies are safe and viable alternatives when resection of malignancies is not feasible, they do have associated limitations that prevent their widespread use in clinical applications. To improve the efficacy of these treatments, nanoparticles are being studied in combination with nonsurgical ablation regimens. In addition to better thermal effect on tumor ablation, nanoparticles can deliver anticancer therapeutics that show synergistic anti-tumor effect in the presence of heat and can also be imaged to achieve precision in therapy. Understanding the molecular mechanism of nanoparticle-mediated tumor ablation could further help engineer nanoparticles of appropriate composition and properties to synergize the ablation effect. This review aims to explore the various types of nonsurgical tumor ablation methods currently used in cancer treatment and potential improvements by nanotechnology applications. PMID:20866097

  13. Local structure and magneto-transport in Sr 2FeMoO 6 oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liscio, F.; Bardelli, F.; Meneghini, C.; Mobilio, S.; Ray, Sugata; Sarma, D. D.

    2006-05-01

    Double perovskite oxides Sr 2FeMoO 6 have attracted a great interest for their peculiar magneto-transport properties, and, in particular, for the large values of low-field magneto-resistance (MR) which remains elevated even at room temperature, thanks to their high Curie temperature ( Tc > 400 K). These properties are strongly influenced by chemical cation disorder, that is by the relative arrangement of Fe and Mo on their sublattices: the regular alternation of Fe and Mo enhances the MR and saturation magnetization. On the contrary the disorder generally depresses the magnetization and worsen the MR response. In this work the X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) technique has been employed in order to probe the cation order from a local point of view. XAFS spectra were collected at the Fe and Mo K edges on Sr 2FeMoO 6 samples with different degree of long-range chemical order. The XAFS results prove that a high degree of short-range cation order is preserved, despite the different long-range order: the Fe-Mo correlations are always preferred over the Fe-Fe and Mo-Mo ones in the perfectly ordered as well as in highly disordered samples.

  14. Synthesis of Zn–Fe layered double hydroxides via an oxidation process and structural analysis of products

    SciTech Connect

    Morimoto, Kazuya; Tamura, Kenji; Anraku, Sohtaro; Sato, Tsutomu; Suzuki, Masaya; Yamada, Hirohisa

    2015-08-15

    The synthesis of Zn–Fe(III) layered double hydroxides was attempted, employing different pathways using either Fe(II) or Fe(III) species together with Zn as the initial reagents. The product derived from the synthesis employing Fe(II) was found to transition to a Zn–Fe(III) layered double hydroxides phase following oxidation process. In contrast, the product obtained with Fe(III) did not contain a layered double hydroxides phase, but rather consisted of simonkolleite and hydrous ferric oxide. It was determined that the valency of the Fe reagent used in the initial synthesis affected the generation of the layered double hydroxides phase. Fe(II) species have ionic radii and electronegativities similar to those of Zn, and therefore are more likely to form trioctahedral hydroxide layers with Zn species. - Graphical abstract: The synthesis of Zn–Fe(III) layered double hydroxides was attempted, employing different pathways using either Fe(II) or Fe(III) species together with Zn as the initial reagents. - Highlights: • Iron valency affected the generation of Zn–Fe layered double hydroxides. • Zn–Fe layered double hydroxides were successfully synthesized using Fe(II). • Fe(II) species were likely to form trioctahedral hydroxide layers with Zn species.

  15. Schwertmannite and Fe oxides formed by biological low-pH Fe(II) oxidation versus abiotic neutralization: Impact on trace metal sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgos, William D.; Borch, Thomas; Troyer, Lyndsay D.; Luan, Fubo; Larson, Lance N.; Brown, Juliana F.; Lambson, Janna; Shimizu, Masayuki

    2012-01-01

    Three low-pH coal mine drainage (CMD) sites in central Pennsylvania were studied to determine similarities in sediment composition, mineralogy, and morphology. Water from one site was used in discontinuous titration/neutralization experiments to produce Fe(III) minerals by abiotic oxidative hydrolysis for comparison with the field precipitates that were produced by biological low-pH Fe(II) oxidation. Even though the hydrology and concentration of dissolved metals of the CMD varied considerably between the three field sites, the mineralogy of the three iron mounds was very similar. Schwertmannite was the predominant mineral precipitated at low-pH (2.5-4.0) along with lesser amounts of goethite. Trace metals such as Zn, Ni and Co were only detected at μmol/g concentrations in the field sediments, and no metals (other than Fe) were removed from the CMD at any of the field sites. Metal cations were not lost from solution in the field because of unfavorable electrostatic attraction to the iron mound minerals. Ferrihydrite was the predominant mineral formed by abiotic neutralization (pH 4.4-8.4, 4 d aging) with lesser amounts of schwertmannite and goethite. In contrast to low-pH precipitation, substantial metal removal occurred in the neutralized CMD. Al was likely removed as hydrobasaluminite and Al(OH) 3, and as a co-precipitate into schwertmannite or ferrihydrite. Zn, Ni and Co were likely removed via adsorption onto and co-precipitation into the freshly formed Fe and Al solids. Mn was likely removed by co-precipitation and, at the highest final pH values, as a Mn oxide. Biological low-pH Fe(II) oxidation can be cost-effectively used to pre-treat CMD and remove Fe and acidity prior to conventional neutralization techniques. A further benefit is that solids formed under these conditions may be of industrial value because they do not contain trace metal or metalloid contaminants.

  16. Superparamagnetic mesoporous Mg-Fe bi-metal oxides as efficient magnetic solid-base catalysts for Knoevenagel condensations.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhe; Zhou, Jian; Cui, Fangming; Zhu, Yan; Hua, Zile; Shi, Jianlin

    2010-12-14

    Superparamagnetic mesoporous Mg-Fe bi-metal oxides with varied Mg-Fe atomic ratios have been successfully synthesized as solid base catalysts. The M2F-400 catalyst with Mg/Fe atomic ratio = 2 showed extraordinarily high activities for Knoevenagel reactions even at room temperature. It could be magnetically separated, recycled, and reused for at least five cycles.

  17. Effect Of Inorganic, Synthetic And Naturally Occurring Chelating Agents On Fe(II) Mediated Advanced Oxidation Of Chlorophenols

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study examines the feasibility and application of Advanced Oxidation Technologies (AOTs) for the treatment of chlorophenols that are included in US EPA priority pollutant list. A novel class of sulfate/hydroxyl radical-based homogeneous AOTs (Fe(II)/PS, Fe(II)/PMS, Fe(II)/H...

  18. Thin Oxides as a Cu Diffusion Barrier for NIF Be Ablator Capsules

    DOE PAGES

    Youngblood, Kelly P.; Huang, H.; Xu, H. W.; Hayes, J.; Moreno, K. A.; Wu, J. J.; Nikroo, A.; Alford, C. A.; Hamza, A. V.; Kucheyev, S. O.; et al

    2013-03-01

    The NIF point design uses a five-layer capsule to modify the X-ray absorption in order to achieve optimized shock timing. A stepped copper dopant design defines the layer structure. The production of the capsule involves pyrolysis to remove the inner plastic mandrel. Copper atoms diffuse radially and azimuthally throughout the capsule during pyrolysis. This diffusion significantly diminishes the capsule performance during implosion. Thermal and coated oxide barrier layers employed between layers mitigate the diffusion of copper during the mandrel removal process. The copper atoms do not diffuse through this barrier during pyrolysis. A capsule fabrication method that produces a capsulemore » with a thin oxide layer will be discussed.« less

  19. Micro/nanostructured porous Fe-Ni binary oxide and its enhanced arsenic adsorption performances.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shengwen; Kang, Shenghong; Wang, Guozhong; Zhao, Huijun; Cai, Weiping

    2015-11-15

    A simple method is presented to synthesize micro/nano-structured Fe-Ni binary oxides based on co-precipitation and subsequent calcination. It has been found that the Fe-Ni binary oxides are composed of the porous microsized aggregates built with nanoparticles. When the atomic ratio of Fe to Ni is 2 to 1 the binary oxide is the micro-scaled aggregates consisting of the ultrafine NiFe2O4 nanoparticles with 3-6nm in size, and shows porous structure with pore diameter of 3nm and a specific surface area of 245m(2)g(-1). Such material is of abundant surface functional groups and has exhibited high adsorption performance to As(III) and As(V). The kinetic adsorption can be described by pseudo-second order model and the isothermal adsorption is subject to Langmuir model. The maximum adsorption capacity on such Fe-Ni porous binary oxide is up to 168.6mgg(-1) and 90.1mgg(-1) for As(III) and As(V), respectively, which are much higher than the arsenic adsorption capacity for most commercial adsorbents. Such enhanced adsorption ability for this material is mainly attributed to its porous structure and high specific surface area as well as the abundant surface functional groups. Further experiments have revealed that the influence of the anions such as sulfate, carbonate, and phosphate, which commonly co-exist in water, on the arsenic adsorption is insignificant, exhibiting strong adsorption selectivity to arsenic. This micro/nano-structured porous Fe-Ni binary oxide is hence of good practicability to be used as a highly efficient adsorbent for arsenic removal from the real arsenic-contaminated waters.

  20. Doped LaFeO3 as SOFC Catalysts: Control of Oxygen Mobility Oxidation Activity

    SciTech Connect

    N Lakshminarayanan; J Kuhn; S Rykov; J Millet; U Ozkan; T Rao; J Smedley; E Wang; E Muller; et al.

    2011-12-31

    The bulk structure and surface properties of Fe-based perovskite-type oxides with the formula La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}Co{sub y}Fe{sub 1-y}O{sub 3-{delta}} for y = 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3 have been investigated. The properties were found to strongly depend upon Co content, temperature, and environment. The materials were selected due to their potential use as solid oxide fuel cell cathodes. The intermediate Co loading formed oxygen vacancies most easily and several other properties including oxidation activity and surface sites showed a similar non-linear trend. Trends are related to a possible transition in electronic structure. Activity for oxidation of methane, oxygen storage and chemical compatibility was shown to be superior to that of the La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}MnO{sub 3}.

  1. The life cycle of iron Fe(III) oxide: impact of fungi and bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonneville, Steeve

    2014-05-01

    Iron oxides are ubiquitous reactive constituents of soils, sediments and aquifers. They exhibit vast surface areas which bind a large array of trace metals, nutrients and organic molecules hence controlling their mobility/reactivity in the subsurface. In this context, understanding the "life cycle" of iron oxide in soils is paramount to many biogeochemical processes. Soils environments are notorious for their extreme heterogeneity and variability of chemical, physical conditions and biological agents at play. Here, we present studies investigating the role of two biological agents driving iron oxide dynamics in soils, root-associated fungi (mycorrhiza) and bacteria. Mycorrhiza filaments (hypha) grow preferentially around, and on the surface of nutrient-rich minerals, making mineral-fungi contact zones, hot-spots of chemical alteration in soils. However, because of the microscopic nature of hyphae (only ~ 5 µm wide for up to 1 mm long) and their tendency to strongly adhere to mineral surface, in situ observations of this interfacial micro-environment are scarce. In a microcosm, ectomycorrhiza (Paxillus involutus) was grown symbiotically with a pine tree (Pinus sylvestris) in the presence of freshly-cleaved biotite under humid, yet undersaturated, conditions typical of soils. Using spatially-resolved ion milling technique (FIB), transmission electron microscopy and spectroscopy (TEM/STEM-EDS), synchrotron based X-ray microscopy (STXM), we were able to quantify the speciation of Fe at the biotite-hypha interface. The results shows that substantial oxidation of biotite structural-Fe(II) into Fe(III) subdomains occurs at the contact zone between mycorrhiza and biotite. Once formed, iron(III) oxides can reductively dissolve under suboxic conditions via several abiotic and microbial pathways. In particular, they serve as terminal electron acceptors for the oxidation of organic matter by iron reducing bacteria. We aimed here to understand the role of Fe(III) mineral

  2. Unraveling the complexity of iron oxides at high pressure and temperature: Synthesis of Fe5O6.

    PubMed

    Lavina, Barbara; Meng, Yue

    2015-06-01

    The iron-oxygen system is the most important reference of rocks' redox state. Even as minor components, iron oxides can play a critical role in redox equilibria, which affect the speciation of the fluid phases chemical differentiation, melting, and physical properties. Until our recent finding of Fe4O5, iron oxides were assumed to comprise only the polymorphs of FeO, Fe3O4, and Fe2O3. Combining synthesis at high pressure and temperature with microdiffraction mapping, we have identified yet another distinct iron oxide, Fe5O6. The new compound, which has an orthorhombic structure, was obtained in the pressure range from 10 to 20 GPa upon laser heating mixtures of iron and hematite at ~2000 K, and is recoverable to ambient conditions. The high-pressure orthorhombic iron oxides Fe5O6, Fe4O5, and h-Fe3O4 display similar iron coordination geometries and structural arrangements, and indeed exhibit coherent systematic behavior of crystallographic parameters and compressibility. Fe5O6, along with FeO and Fe4O5, is a candidate key minor phase of planetary interiors; as such, it is of major petrological and geochemical importance. We are revealing an unforeseen complexity in the Fe-O system with four different compounds-FeO, Fe5O6, Fe4O5, and h-Fe3O4-in a narrow compositional range (0.75 < Fe/O < 1.0). New, finely spaced oxygen buffers at conditions of the Earth's mantle can be defined. PMID:26601196

  3. Unraveling the complexity of iron oxides at high pressure and temperature: Synthesis of Fe5O6.

    PubMed

    Lavina, Barbara; Meng, Yue

    2015-06-01

    The iron-oxygen system is the most important reference of rocks' redox state. Even as minor components, iron oxides can play a critical role in redox equilibria, which affect the speciation of the fluid phases chemical differentiation, melting, and physical properties. Until our recent finding of Fe4O5, iron oxides were assumed to comprise only the polymorphs of FeO, Fe3O4, and Fe2O3. Combining synthesis at high pressure and temperature with microdiffraction mapping, we have identified yet another distinct iron oxide, Fe5O6. The new compound, which has an orthorhombic structure, was obtained in the pressure range from 10 to 20 GPa upon laser heating mixtures of iron and hematite at ~2000 K, and is recoverable to ambient conditions. The high-pressure orthorhombic iron oxides Fe5O6, Fe4O5, and h-Fe3O4 display similar iron coordination geometries and structural arrangements, and indeed exhibit coherent systematic behavior of crystallographic parameters and compressibility. Fe5O6, along with FeO and Fe4O5, is a candidate key minor phase of planetary interiors; as such, it is of major petrological and geochemical importance. We are revealing an unforeseen complexity in the Fe-O system with four different compounds-FeO, Fe5O6, Fe4O5, and h-Fe3O4-in a narrow compositional range (0.75 < Fe/O < 1.0). New, finely spaced oxygen buffers at conditions of the Earth's mantle can be defined.

  4. Unraveling the complexity of iron oxides at high pressure and temperature: Synthesis of Fe5O6

    PubMed Central

    Lavina, Barbara; Meng, Yue

    2015-01-01

    The iron-oxygen system is the most important reference of rocks’ redox state. Even as minor components, iron oxides can play a critical role in redox equilibria, which affect the speciation of the fluid phases chemical differentiation, melting, and physical properties. Until our recent finding of Fe4O5, iron oxides were assumed to comprise only the polymorphs of FeO, Fe3O4, and Fe2O3. Combining synthesis at high pressure and temperature with microdiffraction mapping, we have identified yet another distinct iron oxide, Fe5O6. The new compound, which has an orthorhombic structure, was obtained in the pressure range from 10 to 20 GPa upon laser heating mixtures of iron and hematite at ~2000 K, and is recoverable to ambient conditions. The high-pressure orthorhombic iron oxides Fe5O6, Fe4O5, and h-Fe3O4 display similar iron coordination geometries and structural arrangements, and indeed exhibit coherent systematic behavior of crystallographic parameters and compressibility. Fe5O6, along with FeO and Fe4O5, is a candidate key minor phase of planetary interiors; as such, it is of major petrological and geochemical importance. We are revealing an unforeseen complexity in the Fe-O system with four different compounds—FeO, Fe5O6, Fe4O5, and h-Fe3O4—in a narrow compositional range (0.75 < Fe/O < 1.0). New, finely spaced oxygen buffers at conditions of the Earth’s mantle can be defined. PMID:26601196

  5. Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation process of two-component Fe-Al alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Przewlocka, H.; Siedlecka, J.

    1982-01-01

    The oxidation process of two-component Fe-Al alloys containing up to 7.2% Al and from 18 to 30% Al was studied. Kinetic measurements were conducted using the isothermal gravimetric method in the range of 1073-1223 K and 1073-1373 K for 50 hours. The methods used in studies of the mechanism of oxidation included: X-ray microanalysis, X-ray structural analysis, metallographic analysis and marker tests.

  6. Facile One-pot Transformation of Iron Oxides from Fe2O3 Nanoparticles to Nanostructured Fe3O4@C Core-Shell Composites via Combustion Waves

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jungho; Lee, Kang Yeol; Yeo, Taehan; Choi, Wonjoon

    2016-01-01

    The development of a low-cost, fast, and large-scale process for the synthesis and manipulation of nanostructured metal oxides is essential for incorporating materials with diverse practical applications. Herein, we present a facile one-pot synthesis method using combustion waves that simultaneously achieves fast reduction and direct formation of carbon coating layers on metal oxide nanostructures. Hybrid composites of Fe2O3 nanoparticles and nitrocellulose on the cm scale were fabricated by a wet impregnation process. We demonstrated that self-propagating combustion waves along interfacial boundaries between the surface of the metal oxide and the chemical fuels enabled the release of oxygen from Fe2O3. This accelerated reaction directly transformed Fe2O3 into Fe3O4 nanostructures. The distinctive color change from reddish-brown Fe2O3 to dark-gray Fe3O4 confirmed the transition of oxidation states and the change in the fundamental properties of the material. Furthermore, it simultaneously formed carbon layers of 5–20 nm thickness coating the surfaces of the resulting Fe3O4 nanoparticles, which may aid in maintaining the nanostructures and improving the conductivity of the composites. This newly developed use of combustion waves in hybridized nanostructures may permit the precise manipulation of the chemical compositions of other metal oxide nanostructures, as well as the formation of organic/inorganic hybrid nanostructures. PMID:26902260

  7. Facile One-pot Transformation of Iron Oxides from Fe2O3 Nanoparticles to Nanostructured Fe3O4@C Core-Shell Composites via Combustion Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jungho; Lee, Kang Yeol; Yeo, Taehan; Choi, Wonjoon

    2016-02-01

    The development of a low-cost, fast, and large-scale process for the synthesis and manipulation of nanostructured metal oxides is essential for incorporating materials with diverse practical applications. Herein, we present a facile one-pot synthesis method using combustion waves that simultaneously achieves fast reduction and direct formation of carbon coating layers on metal oxide nanostructures. Hybrid composites of Fe2O3 nanoparticles and nitrocellulose on the cm scale were fabricated by a wet impregnation process. We demonstrated that self-propagating combustion waves along interfacial boundaries between the surface of the metal oxide and the chemical fuels enabled the release of oxygen from Fe2O3. This accelerated reaction directly transformed Fe2O3 into Fe3O4 nanostructures. The distinctive color change from reddish-brown Fe2O3 to dark-gray Fe3O4 confirmed the transition of oxidation states and the change in the fundamental properties of the material. Furthermore, it simultaneously formed carbon layers of 5–20 nm thickness coating the surfaces of the resulting Fe3O4 nanoparticles, which may aid in maintaining the nanostructures and improving the conductivity of the composites. This newly developed use of combustion waves in hybridized nanostructures may permit the precise manipulation of the chemical compositions of other metal oxide nanostructures, as well as the formation of organic/inorganic hybrid nanostructures.

  8. Facile One-pot Transformation of Iron Oxides from Fe2O3 Nanoparticles to Nanostructured Fe3O4@C Core-Shell Composites via Combustion Waves.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jungho; Lee, Kang Yeol; Yeo, Taehan; Choi, Wonjoon

    2016-01-01

    The development of a low-cost, fast, and large-scale process for the synthesis and manipulation of nanostructured metal oxides is essential for incorporating materials with diverse practical applications. Herein, we present a facile one-pot synthesis method using combustion waves that simultaneously achieves fast reduction and direct formation of carbon coating layers on metal oxide nanostructures. Hybrid composites of Fe2O3 nanoparticles and nitrocellulose on the cm scale were fabricated by a wet impregnation process. We demonstrated that self-propagating combustion waves along interfacial boundaries between the surface of the metal oxide and the chemical fuels enabled the release of oxygen from Fe2O3. This accelerated reaction directly transformed Fe2O3 into Fe3O4 nanostructures. The distinctive color change from reddish-brown Fe2O3 to dark-gray Fe3O4 confirmed the transition of oxidation states and the change in the fundamental properties of the material. Furthermore, it simultaneously formed carbon layers of 5-20 nm thickness coating the surfaces of the resulting Fe3O4 nanoparticles, which may aid in maintaining the nanostructures and improving the conductivity of the composites. This newly developed use of combustion waves in hybridized nanostructures may permit the precise manipulation of the chemical compositions of other metal oxide nanostructures, as well as the formation of organic/inorganic hybrid nanostructures.

  9. The synergetic effect of metal oxide support on Fe2O3 for chemical looping combustion: A theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Wu; Wang, Yang; Dong, Changqing; Zhang, Junjiao; Chen, Qiuluan; Yang, Yongping

    2013-10-01

    This study deals with the synergetic effect of Al2O3 on Fe2O3 for chemical-looping combustion (CLC) of CO, in comparison with the synergetic effects of ZrO2 and MgO reported in our previous works. Property analysis of Fe2O3/Al2O3 shows that new bonds form cross the interface making Fe2O3 less prone to agglomerate on Al2O3, and 0.129 e transfers from Al2O3 to Fe2O3 to activate the electronic state of Fe2O3. Al2O3 [ZrO2 and MgO] favors the thermal stability of Fe2O3 by preventing the phase transformation, markedly regulates charge populations on the O-Fe bonds and their overlaps and hence tunes the redox properties of Fe2O3. The reaction mechanism analysis demonstrates that Al2O3 [ZrO2 and MgO] activates Fe2O3 for oxidizing CO into CO2 (accompanied by the reduction of Fe2O3) in the fuel reactor, which decrease the height of barrier energy (Ea), and the Ea follows clearly Fe2O3 > Fe2O3/Al2O3 > Fe2O3/MgO > Fe2O3/ZrO2. However, these supports usually increase the Ea for oxidizing Fe2O2 into Fe2O3 by O2 in the air reactor, and the Ea follows clearly Fe2O3/ZrO2 > Fe2O3/Al2O3 > Fe2O3/MgO > Fe2O3. It is argued that different supports could be applied to a given CLC system of different thermodynamic properties.

  10. Mixed-valence iron minerals on Venus: Fe(2+)-Fe(3+) oxides and oxy-silicates formed by surface-atmosphere interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Roger G.; Straub, Darcy W.

    1992-01-01

    Inferences from these investigations are that Fe(3+)-bearing minerals such as hematite magnesioferrite, acmite, and epidote are thermodynamically unstable, and that magnetite is the predominant mixed-valence iron oxide mineral on venus. Recently, the Fe(2+)-Fe(3+) silicate mineral laihunite was proposed to be a reaction product of olivine with the venusian atmosphere. This possibility is discussed further here. We suggest that other mixed-valence Fe(2+)-Fe(3+)-Oz-OH(-) silicates could also result from surface-atmosphere interactions on Venus. Topics discussed include the following: (1) conversion of hematite to magnetite; (2) stability of laihunite; (3) the possible existence of oxy-amphiboles and oxy-micas on Venus; and (4) other mixed-valence Fe(2+)-Fe(3+) silicates likely to exist on Venus.

  11. Coupled interactions between volatile activity and Fe oxidation state during arc crustal processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Humphreys, Madeleine C.S.; Brooker, R; Fraser, D.C.; Burgisser, A; Mangan, Margaret T.; McCammon, C

    2015-01-01

    Arc magmas erupted at the Earth’s surface are commonly more oxidized than those produced at mid-ocean ridges. Possible explanations for this high oxidation state are that the transfer of fluids during the subduction process results in direct oxidation of the sub-arc mantle wedge, or that oxidation is caused by the effect of later crustal processes, including protracted fractionation and degassing of volatile-rich magmas. This study sets out to investigate the effect of disequilibrium crustal processes that may involve coupled changes in H2O content and Fe oxidation state, by examining the degassing and hydration of sulphur-free rhyolites. We show that experimentally hydrated melts record strong increases in Fe3+/∑Fe with increasing H2O concentration as a result of changes in water activity. This is relevant for the passage of H2O-undersaturated melts from the deep crust towards shallow crustal storage regions, and raises the possibility that vertical variations in fO2 might develop within arc crust. Conversely, degassing experiments produce an increase in Fe3+/∑Fe with decreasing H2O concentration. In this case the oxidation is explained by loss of H2 as well as H2O into bubbles during decompression, consistent with thermodynamic modelling, and is relevant for magmas undergoing shallow degassing en route to the surface. We discuss these results in the context of the possible controls on fO2 during the generation, storage and ascent of magmas in arc settings, in particular considering the timescales of equilibration relative to observation as this affects the quality of the petrological record of magmatic fO2.

  12. Characterization of Bimetallic Fe-Ru Oxide Nanoparticles Prepared by Liquid-Phase Plasma Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sung-Jin; Lee, Heon; Jeon, Ki-Joon; Park, Hyunwoong; Park, Young-Kwon; Jung, Sang-Chul

    2016-07-01

    The bimetallic Fe-Ru oxide nanoparticles were synthesized in the liquid-phase plasma (LPP) method which employed iron chloride and ruthenium chloride as precursors. The active species (OH·, Hα, Hβ, and OI) and the iron and ruthenium ions were observed in the plasma field created by the LPP process. The spherical-shaped bimetallic Fe-Ru oxide nanoparticles were synthesized by the LPP reaction, and the size of the particles was growing along with the progression of the LPP reaction. The synthesized bimetallic Fe-Ru oxide nanoparticles were comprised of Fe2O3, Fe3O4, RuO, and RuO2. Ruthenium had a higher reduction potential than iron and resulted in higher ruthenium composition in the synthesized bimetallic nanoparticles. The control of the molar ratio of the precursors in the reactant solution was found to be employed as a means to control the composition of the elements in bimetallic nanoparticles.

  13. A NiFeCu alloy anode catalyst for direct-methane solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Zhu, Huaiyu; Yang, Guangming; Park, Hee Jung; Jung, Doh Won; Kwak, Chan; Shao, Zongping

    2014-07-01

    In this study, a new anode catalyst based on a NiFeCu alloy is investigated for use in direct-methane solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The influence of the conductive copper introduced into the anode catalyst layer on the performance of the SOFCs is systematically studied. The catalytic activity for partial oxidation of methane and coking resistance tests are proposed with various anode catalyst layer materials prepared using different methods, including glycine nitrate process (GNP), physical mixing (PM) and impregnation (IMP). The surface conductivity tests indicate that the conductivities of the NiFe-ZrO2/Cu (PM) and NiFe-ZrO2/Cu (IMP) catalysts are considerably greater than that of NiFe-ZrO2/Cu (GNP), which is consistent with the SEM results. Among the three preparation methods, the cell containing the NiFe-ZrO2/Cu (IMP) catalyst layer performs best on CH4-O2 fuel, especially under reduced temperatures, because the coking resistance should be considered in real fuel cell conditions. The cell containing the NiFe-ZrO2/Cu (IMP) catalyst layer also delivers an excellent operational stability using CH4-O2 fuel for 100 h without any signs of decay. In summary, this work provides new alternative anode catalytic materials to accelerate the commercialization of SOFC technology.

  14. Cyclic Oxidation of FeCrAlY/Al2O3 Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesbitt, James A.; Draper, Susan L.; Barrett, Charles A.

    1999-01-01

    Three-ply FeCrAlY/Al2O3 composites and FeCrAlY matrix-only samples were cyclically oxidized at 1000 C and 1100 C for up to 1000 1-hr cycles. Fiber ends were exposed at the ends of the composite samples. Following cyclic oxidation, cracks running parallel to and perpendicular to the fibers were observed on the large surface of the composite. In addition, there was evidence of increased scale damage and spallation around the exposed fiber ends, particularly around the middle ply fibers. This damage was more pronounced at the higher temperature. The exposed fiber ends showed cracking between fibers in the outer plies, occasionally with Fe and Cr-rich oxides growing out of the cracks. Large gaps developed at the fiber/matrix interface around many of the fibers, especially those in the outer plies. Oxygen penetrated many of these gaps resulting in significant oxide formation at the fiber/matrix interface far within the composite sample. Around several fibers, the matrix was also internally oxidized showing Al2O3 precipitates in a radial band around the fibers. The results show that these composites have poor cyclic oxidation resistance due to the CTE mismatch and inadequate fiber/matrix bond strength at temperatures of 1000 C and above.

  15. Na-ion Storage Performances of FeSex and Fe2O3 Hollow Nanoparticles-Decorated Reduced Graphene Oxide Balls prepared by Nanoscale Kirkendall Diffusion Process

    PubMed Central

    Park, Gi Dae; Cho, Jung Sang; Lee, Jung-Kul; Kang, Yun Chan

    2016-01-01

    Uniquely structured FeSex-reduced graphene oxide (rGO) composite powders, in which hollow FeSex nanoparticles are uniformly distributed throughout the rGO matrix, were prepared by spray pyrolysis applying the nanoscale Kirkendall diffusion process. Iron oxide-rGO composite powders were transformed into FeSex-rGO composite powders by a two-step post-treatment process. Metallic Fe nanocrystals formed during the first-step post-treatment process were transformed into hollow FeSex nanoparticles during the selenization process. The FeSex-rGO composite powders had mixed crystal structures of FeSe and FeSe2 phases. A rGO content of 33% was estimated from the TG analysis of the FeSex-rGO composite powders. The FeSex-rGO composite powders had superior sodium-ion storage properties compared to those of the Fe2O3-rGO composite powders with similar morphological characteristics. The discharge capacities of the FeSex- and Fe2O3-rGO composite powders for the 200th cycle at a constant current density of 0.3 A g−1 were 434 and 174 mA h g−1, respectively. The FeSex-rGO composite powders had a high discharge capacity of 311 mA h g−1 for the 1000th cycle at a high current density of 1 A g−1. PMID:26928312

  16. Nondestructive covalent functionalization of carbon nanotubes by selective oxidation of the original defects with K2FeO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhao-yang; Xu, Xue-cheng

    2015-08-01

    Chemical oxidation is still the major approach to the covalent functionalization of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Theoretically, the defects on CNTs are more reactive than skeletal hexagons and should be preferentially oxidized, but conventional oxidation methods, e.g., HNO3/H2SO4 treatment, have poor reaction selectivity and inevitably consume the Cdbnd C bonds in the hexagonal lattices, leading to structural damage, π-electrons loss and weight decrease. In this work, we realized the nondestructive covalent functionalization of CNTs by selective oxidation of the defects. In our method, potassium ferrate K2FeVIO4 was employed as an oxidant for CNTs in H2SO4 medium. The CNT samples, before and after K2FeO4/H2SO4 treatment, were characterized with colloid dispersibility, IR, Raman spectroscopy, FESEM and XPS. The results indicated that (i) CNTs could be effectively oxidized by Fe (VI) under mild condition (60 °C, 3 h), and hydrophilic CNTs with abundant surface sbnd COOH groups were produced; and (ii) Fe (VI) oxidation of CNTs followed a defect-specific oxidation process, that is, only the sp3-hybridized carbon atoms on CNT surface were oxidized while the Cdbnd C bonds remained unaffected. This selective/nondestructive oxidation afforded oxidized CNTs in yields of above 100 wt%. This paper shows that K2FeO4/H2SO4 is an effective, nondestructive and green oxidation system for oxidative functionalization of CNTs and probably other carbon materials as well.

  17. Reduced graphene oxide wrapped FeS nanocomposite for lithium-ion battery anode with improved performance.

    PubMed

    Fei, Ling; Lin, Qianglu; Yuan, Bin; Chen, Gen; Xie, Pu; Li, Yuling; Xu, Yun; Deng, Shuguang; Smirnov, Sergei; Luo, Hongmei

    2013-06-12

    A new nanocomposite formulation of the FeS-based anode for lithium-ion batteries is proposed, where FeS nanoparticles wrapped in reduced graphene oxide (RGO) are produced via a facile direct-precipitation approach. The resulting nanocomposite FeS@RGO structure has better lithium ion storage properties, exceeding those of FeS prepared without RGO sheets. The enhanced electrochemical performance is attributed to the robust sheet-wrapped structure with smaller FeS nanoparticles and synergetic effects between FeS and RGO sheets, such as increased conductivity, shortened lithium ion diffusion path, and the effective prevention of polysulfide dissolution.

  18. OXIDATION OF ALCOHOLS OVER FE3+/MONTMORILLONITE-K10 USING HYDROGEN PEROXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oxidation of various primary and secondary alcohols is studied in liquid phase at atmospheric pressure over Fe3+/montmorillonite-K10 catalyst prepared by ion-exchange method at a pH of 4 in an environmentally friendly protocol using hydrogen peroxide. The catalyst and the method ...

  19. Constraints on biotic and abiotic role in the formation of Fe-Si oxides from the PACMANUS hydrothermal field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Baoju; Zeng, Zhigang; Qi, Haiyan; Wang, Xiaoyuan; Ma, Yao; Rong, Kunbo

    2015-12-01

    Fe-Si oxide deposits were recovered from the PACMANUS (Papua New Guinea-Australia-Canada-Manus) hydrothermal field in Eastern Manus basin. Samples were loose and fragile. Optical and scanning electron microscopy showed that the samples had abundant rod-like or twisted filamentous and granular structures. Electron probe microanalysis revealed that these filaments and grains were mainly composed of Fe and Si. The presence of spherical grains on the surface of the filaments suggests the intergrowth of biotic and abiotic reactions. Biotic and abiotic kinetics competition always exists in the redox gradient. Based on the physico-chemical conditions of PACMANUS hydrothermal fluids, we calculated a strict abiotic oxidation rate of Fe2+ to Fe3+, which is approximately 0.0123 g/min. If the fluids had been erupting consistently and the concentration of Fe2+ was constant, 3.232 kg per year of Fe would be deposited in this vent. The amount of Fe oxides around the studied vent was larger than the amount determined by strict abiotic kinetic calculation. Bacteria may also play an important role in Fe oxidation. A mesh-like microenvironment constructed by biogenic filaments ensured adequate Fe2+ and low oxygen content for the growth of bacteria. Moreover, this structure promoted the deposition of abiotic Fe-Si oxides.

  20. Mechanism of inhibition of NiFe hydrogenase by nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Ceccaldi, Pierre; Etienne, Emilien; Dementin, Sébastien; Guigliarelli, Bruno; Léger, Christophe; Burlat, Bénédicte

    2016-04-01

    Hydrogenases reversibly catalyze the oxidation of molecular hydrogen and are inhibited by several small molecules including O2, CO and NO. In the present work, we investigate the mechanism of inhibition by NO of the oxygen-sensitive NiFe hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio fructosovorans by coupling site-directed mutagenesis, protein film voltammetry (PFV) and EPR spectroscopy. We show that micromolar NO strongly inhibits NiFe hydrogenase and that the mechanism of inhibition is complex, with NO targeting several metallic sites in the protein. NO reacts readily at the NiFe active site according to a two-step mechanism. The first and faster step is the reversible binding of NO to the active site followed by a slower and irreversible transformation at the active site. NO also induces irreversible damage of the iron-sulfur centers chain. We give direct evidence of preferential nitrosylation of the medial [3Fe-4S] to form dinitrosyl-iron complexes. PMID:26827939

  1. Australasian microtektites from Antarctica: XAS determination of the Fe oxidation state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuli, Gabriele; Cicconi, Maria Rita; Eeckhout, Sigrid Griet; Pratesi, Giovanni; Paris, Eleonora; Folco, Luigi

    2014-04-01

    The Fe oxidation state and coordination number of 29 impact glass spherules recently recovered from the Transantarctic Mountains (Antarctica) have been determined by X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. Based on geochemical, isotopic, and fission track data, these spherules are considered as microtektites from the Australasian tektite/microtektite strewn field. Their find location is the farthest so far discovered from the possible source crater region, and their alkali content is the lowest compared with other published data on Australasian microtektite glasses. The Fe3+/(Fe2++Fe3+) ratio, determined from the analysis of the pre-edge peak energy position and integrated intensity, is below 0.1 (±0.04) for all the samples, and is comparable to that of most tektites and microtektites from the Australasian strewn field. Also, the pre-edge peak integrated intensity, which is sensitive to the average Fe coordination geometry, is comparable to that of other Australasian microtektites reported in the literature. The agreement of the Fe oxidation state and coordination number, between the Transantarctic Mountain microtektites (TAM) and the Australasian tektites and microtektites, further confirms the impact origin of these glass spherules and provides an independent suggestion that they represent a major extension southeastward of the Australasian strewn field. The fact that similar redox conditions are observed in tektites and microtektites within the Australasian strewn field regardless of the distance from the source crater area (up to approximately 11000 km) could be an important constraint for better understanding the different processes affecting microtektite formation and transport. The fact that the Fe oxidation state of microtektites does not increase with distance, as in the case of North American microtektites, means that thermal and redox histories of Australasian and TAM microtektites could differ significantly from those of North

  2. Free energies of (Co, Fe, Ni, Zn)Fe2O4 spinels and oxides in water at high temperatures and pressure from density functional theory: results for stoichiometric NiO and NiFe2O4 surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, C. J.; Rák, Z.; Brenner, D. W.

    2013-11-01

    A set of effective chemical potentials (ECPs) are derived that connect energies of (Co, Fe, Ni, Zn)Fe2O4 spinels and oxides calculated at 0 K from density functional theory (DFT) to free energies in high temperature and pressure water. The ECPs are derived and validated by solving a system of linear equations that combine DFT and experimental free energies for NiO, ZnO, Fe2O3, Fe3O4, FeO(OH), CoFe2O4, ZnFe2O4, NiFe2O4 and H2O. To connect to solution phase chemistry, a set of ECPs are also derived for solvated Ni2+, Zn2+, Fe2+ and Fe3+ ions using an analogous set of linear equations and the solid ECPs. The ECPs are used to calculate free energies of low index stoichiometric surfaces of nickel oxide (NiO) and nickel ferrite (NiFe2O4) in water as a function of temperature from 300 to 600 K at a pressure of 155 bar. Surface denuding at high temperatures is predicted, the implications of which for the formation of oxide corrosion products on heat transfer surfaces in light-water nuclear reactors are discussed.

  3. Carbohydrate oxidation coupled to Fe(III) reduction, a novel form of anaerobic metabolism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coates, J.D.; Councell, T.; Ellis, D.J.; Lovley, D.R.

    1998-01-01

    An isolate, designated GC-29, that could incompletely oxidize glucose to acetate and carbon dioxide with Fe(III) serving as the electron acceptor was recovered from freshwater sediments of the Potomac River, Maryland. This metabolism yielded energy to support cell growth. Strain GC-29 is a facultatively anaerobic, Gram-negative motile rod which, in addition to glucose, also used sucrose, lactate, pyruvate, yeast extract, casamino acids or H2 as alternative electron donors for Fe(III) reduction. Stain GC-29 could reduce NO-3, Mn(IV), U(VI), fumarate, malate, S2O32-, and colloidal S0 as well as the humics analog, 2,6-anthraquinone disulfonate. Analysis of the almost complete 16S rRNA sequence indicated that strain GC-29 belongs in the Shewanella genus in the epsilon subdivision of the Proteobacteria. The name Shewanella saccharophilia is proposed. Shewanella saccharophilia differs from previously described fermentative microorganisms that metabolize glucose with the reduction of Fe(III) because it transfers significantly more electron equivalents to Fe(III); acetate and carbon dioxide are the only products of glucose metabolism; energy is conserved from Fe(III) reduction; and glucose is not metabolized in the absence of Fe(III). The metabolism of organisms like S. saccharophilia may account for the fact that glucose is metabolized primarily to acetate and carbon dioxide in a variety of sediments in which Fe(III) reduction is the terminal electron accepting process.

  4. Aluminum Coprecipitates with Fe (hydr)oxides: Does Isomorphous Substitution of Al3plus for Fe3plus in Goethite Occur

    SciTech Connect

    E Bazilevskaya; D Archibald; M Aryanpour; J Kubicki; C Martinez

    2011-12-31

    Iron (hydr)oxides are common in natural environments and typically contain large amounts of impurities, presumably the result of coprecipitation processes. Coprecipitation of Al with Fe (hydr)oxides occurs, for example, during alternating reduction-oxidation cycles that promote dissolution of Fe from Fe-containing phases and its re-precipitation as Fe-Al (hydr)oxides. We used chemical and spectroscopic analyses to study the formation and transformation of Al coprecipitates with Fe (hydr)oxides. In addition, periodic density functional theory (DFT) computations were performed to assess the structural and energetic effects of isolated or clustered Al atoms at 8 and 25 mol% Al substitution in the goethite structure. Coprecipitates were synthesized by raising the pH of dilute homogeneous solutions containing a range of Fe and Al concentrations (100% Fe to 100% Al) to 5. The formation of ferrihydrite in initial suspensions with {<=}20 mol% Al, and of ferrihydrite and gibbsite in initial suspensions with {>=}25 mol% Al was confirmed by infrared spectroscopic and synchrotron-based X-ray diffraction analyses. While base titrations showed a buffer region that corresponded to the hydrolysis of Fe in initial solutions with {<=}25 mol% Al, all of the Al present in these solutions was retained by the solid phases at pH 5, thus indicating Al coprecipitation with the primary Fe hydroxide precipitate. In contrast, two buffer regions were observed in solutions with 30 mol% Al (at pH {approx}2.25 for Fe{sup 3+} and at pH {approx}4 for Al{sup 3+}), suggesting the formation of Fe and Al (hydr)oxides as two separate phases. The Al content of initial coprecipitates influenced the extent of ferrihydrite transformation and of its transformation products as indicated by the presence of goethite, hematite and/or ferrihydrite in aged suspensions. DFT experiments showed that: (i) optimized unit cell parameters for Al-substituted goethites (8 and 25 Mol% Al) in clustered arrangement (i.e., the

  5. The Reduction of Aqueous Metal Species on the Surfaces of Fe(II)-Containing Oxides: The Role of Surface Passivation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, A.F.; Peterson, M.L.

    1998-01-01

    The reduction of aqueous transition metal species at the surfaces of Fe(II)- containing oxides has important ramifications in predicting the transport behavior in ground water aquifers. Experimental studies using mineral suspensions and electrodes demonstrate that structural Fe(II) heterogeneously reduces aqueous ferric, cupric, vanadate and chromate ions on magnetite and ilmenite surfaces. The rates of metal reduction on natural oxides is strongly dependent on the extent of surface passivation and redox conditions in the weathering environment. Synchrotron studies show that surface oxidation of Fe(II)-containing oxide minerals decreases their capacity for Cr(VI) reduction at hazardous waste disposal sites.

  6. Magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticle catalyzed chemiluminescence for detection of nitric oxide in living cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huiliang; Li, Mei; Wang, Bing; Wang, Meng; Kurash, Ibrahim; Zhang, Xiangzhi; Feng, Weiyue

    2016-08-01

    Direct and real-time measurement of nitric oxide (NO) in biological media is very difficult due to its transient nature. Fe3O4 nanoparticles (nanoFe3O4) because of their unique catalytic activities have attracted much attention as catalysts in a variety of organic and inorganic reactions. In this work, we have developed a magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticle-based rapid-capture system for real-time detection of cellular NO. The basic principle is that the nanoFe3O4 can catalyze the decomposition of H2O2 in the system to generate superoxide anion (O2 (·-)) and the O2 (·-) can serve as an effective NO(·) trapping agent yielding peroxynitrite oxide anion, ONOO(-). Then the concentration of NO in cells can be facilely determined via peroxynitrite-induced luminol chemiluminescence. The linear range of the method is from 10(-4) to 10(-8) mol/L, and the detection of limit (3σ, n = 11) is as low as 3.16 × 10(-9) mol/L. By using this method, the NO concentration in 0.1 and 0.5 mg/L LPS-stimulated BV2 cells was measured as 4.9 and 11.3 μM, respectively. Surface measurements by synchrotron X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (SRXPS) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) demonstrate the catalytic mechanism of the nanoFe3O4-based system is that the significantly excess Fe(II) exists on the surface of nanoFe3O4 and mediates the rapid heterogeneous electron transfer, thus presenting a new Fe2O3 phase on the surface.

  7. Magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticle catalyzed chemiluminescence for detection of nitric oxide in living cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huiliang; Li, Mei; Wang, Bing; Wang, Meng; Kurash, Ibrahim; Zhang, Xiangzhi; Feng, Weiyue

    2016-08-01

    Direct and real-time measurement of nitric oxide (NO) in biological media is very difficult due to its transient nature. Fe3O4 nanoparticles (nanoFe3O4) because of their unique catalytic activities have attracted much attention as catalysts in a variety of organic and inorganic reactions. In this work, we have developed a magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticle-based rapid-capture system for real-time detection of cellular NO. The basic principle is that the nanoFe3O4 can catalyze the decomposition of H2O2 in the system to generate superoxide anion (O2 (·-)) and the O2 (·-) can serve as an effective NO(·) trapping agent yielding peroxynitrite oxide anion, ONOO(-). Then the concentration of NO in cells can be facilely determined via peroxynitrite-induced luminol chemiluminescence. The linear range of the method is from 10(-4) to 10(-8) mol/L, and the detection of limit (3σ, n = 11) is as low as 3.16 × 10(-9) mol/L. By using this method, the NO concentration in 0.1 and 0.5 mg/L LPS-stimulated BV2 cells was measured as 4.9 and 11.3 μM, respectively. Surface measurements by synchrotron X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (SRXPS) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) demonstrate the catalytic mechanism of the nanoFe3O4-based system is that the significantly excess Fe(II) exists on the surface of nanoFe3O4 and mediates the rapid heterogeneous electron transfer, thus presenting a new Fe2O3 phase on the surface. PMID:27289465

  8. Stimulation of Fe(II) Oxidation, Biogenic Lepidocrocite Formation, and Arsenic Immobilization by Pseudogulbenkiania Sp. Strain 2002.

    PubMed

    Xiu, Wei; Guo, Huaming; Shen, Jiaxing; Liu, Shuai; Ding, Susu; Hou, Weiguo; Ma, Jie; Dong, Hailiang

    2016-06-21

    An anaerobic nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizing bacterium, Pseudogulbenkiania sp. strain 2002, was used to investigate As immobilization by biogenic Fe oxyhydroxides under different initial molar ratios of Fe/As in solutions. Results showed that Fe(II) was effectively oxidized, mainly forming lepidocrocite, which immobilized more As(III) than As(V) without changing the redox state of As. When the initial Fe/As ratios were kept constant, higher initial Fe(II) concentrations immobilized more As with higher Asimmobilized/Feprecipitated in biogenic lepidocrocite. EXAFS analysis showed that variations of initial Fe(II) concentrations did not change the As-Fe complexes (bidentate binuclear complexes ((2)C)) with a fixed As(III) or As(V) initial concentration of 13.3 μM. On the other hand, variations in initial As concentrations but fixed Fe(II) initial concentration induced the co-occurrence of bidentate binuclear and bidentate mononuclear complexes ((2)E) and bidentate binuclear and monodentate mononuclear complexes ((1)V) for As(III) and As(V)-treated series, respectively. The coexistence of (2)C and (2)E complexes (or (2)C and (1)V complexes) could contribute to higher As removal in experimental series with higher initial Fe(II) concentrations at the same initial Fe/As ratio. Simultaneous removal of soluble As and nitrate by anaerobic nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria provides a feasible approach for in situ remediation of As-nitrate cocontaminated groundwater.

  9. Oxidation behavior of Mn and Mo alloyed Fe-16Ni-(5-8)Cr-3. 2Si-1. 0Al

    SciTech Connect

    Rawers, J.C.; Oh, J.M.; Dunning, J. )

    1990-02-01

    Oxidation tests were conducted on a master alloy, Fe-16Ni-(5-8)Cr-3Si-1Al, to which (0-4) wt/o pct Mn and/or Mo were added. Tests were conducted at temperatures ranging from 1,073-1,273 K for times up to 1,000 hr. Additions of Mn resulted in formation of a dual oxide structure and decreased oxidation protection. Addition of Mo significantly improved oxidation protection by formation of an intermetallic Fe(Mo)Si precipitate that eventually formed a protective SiO{sub 2} oxide sublayer. The oxidation protection was related to the alloy components and concentration.

  10. Green and Tunable Decoration of Graphene with Spherical Nanoparticles Based on Laser Ablation in Water: A Case of Ag Nanoparticle/Graphene Oxide Sheet Composites.

    PubMed

    He, Hui; Wang, Haibo; Li, Kai; Zhu, Jun; Liu, Jianshuang; Meng, Xiangdong; Shen, Xiaoshuang; Zeng, Xianghua; Cai, Weiping

    2016-02-23

    A simple and green strategy is presented to decorate graphene with nanoparticles, based on laser ablation of targets in graphene auqeous solution. Ag and graphene oxide (GO) are chosen as model materials. The surface of GO sheets is strongly anchored with spherical Ag nanoparticles. The density and size of the Ag nanoparticles can be easily tuned by laser ablation conditions. Further, the GO sheets can be decorated with other nanoparticles from simple metals or semiconductors to multicomponent hybrids. Additionally, the Ag nanoparticle/GO sheet colloids can be utilized as blocks to build three-dimensional structures, such as sandwich membranes by evaporation-induced self-assembly. These graphene-based composite materials could be very useful in catalysis, sensors, and nanodevices. Particularly, the Ag nanoparticle/GO sheet sandwich composite membranes exhibit excellent surface-enhanced Raman scattering performance and possess the huge potential in trace-detecting persistent organic pollutants in the environment.

  11. Fe-Ca-phosphate, Fe-silicate, and Mn-oxide minerals in concretions from the Monterey Formation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Medrano, M.D.; Piper, D.Z.

    1997-01-01

    Concentrically zoned phosphatic-enriched concretions were collected at three sites from the Monterey Formation. The following minerals were identified: vivianite, lipscombite, rockbridgeite, leucophosphite, mitridatite, carbonate fluorapatite, nontronite, todorokite, and barite. The mineralogy of the concretions was slightly different at each of the three collection sites. None of the concretions contains all of the minerals, but the spatial distribution of minerals in individual concretions, overlapping mineralogies between different concretions, and the geochemical properties of the separate minerals suggest a paragenesis represented by the above order. Eh increased from the precipitation of vivianite to that of rockbridgeite/lipscombite. The precipitation of leucophosphite, then mitridatite, carbonate fluorapatite and todorokite/Fe-oxide indicates increasing pH. Concretion growth culminated with the precipitation of todorokite, a Mn oxide, and minor amounts of barite along microfractures. Conspicuously absent are Fe-sulfide and Mn-phosphate minerals. The concretions are hosted by finely laminated diatomite. The laminations exhibit little to no deformation around the concretions, requiring that the concretions formed after compaction. We interpret this sediment feature and the paragenesis as recording the evolving pore-water chemistry as the formation was uplifted into the fresh-ground-water zone.

  12. Fe-Catalyzed Aerobic Oxidative C-CN Bond Cleavage of Arylacetonitriles Leading to Various Esters.

    PubMed

    Kong, Weiguang; Li, Bingnan; Xu, Xuezhao; Song, Qiuling

    2016-09-16

    Fe-catalyzed aerobic oxidative esterifications of arylacetonitriles with alcohols, tri alkoxsilanes, silicate esters, or borate esters have been developed. The acyl groups which were in situ generated via chemoselective C(CO)-CN bond cleavage were directly used as electrophiles, leading to corresponding aryl esters in good to excellent yields under molecular oxygen when attacked by alcohols or alcohol surrogates. Dioxygen serves as both oxidant and reactant in this protocol. The reaction has a very broad substrate scope. Cheap starting materials as well as environmentally benign and inexpensive iron catalyst and ideal oxidant O2 feature this transformation and make it a practical and sustainable protocol to afford esters. PMID:27555329

  13. Effects of microbial iron reduction and oxidation on the immobilization and mobilization of copper in synthesized Fe(III) minerals and Fe-rich soils.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chaohua; Zhang, Youchi; Zhang, Lei; Luo, Wensui

    2014-04-01

    The effects of microbial iron reduction and oxidation on the immobilization and mobilization of copper were investigated in a high concentration of sulfate with synthesized Fe(III) minerals and red earth soils rich in amorphous Fe (hydr)oxides. Batch microcosm experiments showed that red earth soil inoculated with subsurface sediments had a faster Fe(III) bioreduction rate than pure amorphous Fe(III) minerals and resulted in quicker immobilization of Cu in the aqueous fraction. Coinciding with the decrease of aqueous Cu, SO4(2-) in the inoculated red earth soil decreased acutely after incubation. The shift in the microbial community composite in the inoculated soil was analyzed through denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Results revealed the potential cooperative effect of microbial Fe(III) reduction and sulfate reduction on copper immobilization. After exposure to air for 144 h, more than 50% of the immobilized Cu was remobilized from the anaerobic matrices; aqueous sulfate increased significantly. Sequential extraction analysis demonstrated that the organic matter/sulfide-bound Cu increased by 52% after anaerobic incubation relative to the abiotic treatment but decreased by 32% after oxidation, indicating the generation and oxidation of Cu-sulfide coprecipitates in the inoculated red earth soil. These findings suggest that the immobilization of copper could be enhanced by mediating microbial Fe(III) reduction with sulfate reduction under anaerobic conditions. The findings have an important implication for bioremediation in Cucontaminated and Fe-rich soils, especially in acid-mine-drainage-affected sites.

  14. Metal Oxide Thin Film Growth by Laser Ablation and Its Applications in High Surface Area Photoanodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Rudresh

    Thin films are widely used in various applications, including but not limited to simple reflective coatings for mirrors, electrodes for lithium batteries, conducting substrates for electronic circuits, gas sensors and solar cells. As the scope of their applications has widened over the years so has the need to obtain different structural motifs for thin films. A large variety of fabrication techniques are commonly employed to obtain these structures. Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) can be used to obtain films varying from extremely compact and only a few angstroms thick to micron thick porous structures. In this dissertation I introduce a model for predicting different structures as a function of laser parameters and deposition environments in a pulsed laser deposition system. This is followed by a comparison of simulated and experimentally obtained structures. I then use this model to obtain tailored structures suited for individual applications. One of the unique structures obtained using the PLD consists of vertically-aligned structures with nanoparticles as their building blocks. I investigate the superiority of this unique structure over random nanoparticle networks as photoanodes for titanium dioxide (TiO 2)-based dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC). UV-Vis studies show that there is a 1.4 x enhancement of surface area for PLD-TiO2 photoanodes compared to the best sol-gel films. PLD-TiO2 incident photon to current efficiency (IPCE) values are comparable to 3 x thicker sol-gel films and nearly 92% absorbed photon to current efficiency (APCE) values have been observed for optimized structures. I also examine the suitability of PLD-synthesized niobium oxide (Nb2O5) and tantalum-doped titanium oxide (Ta: TiO2) as photoanode materials. For optimized PLD-Nb2 O5 based DSSCs IPCE values up to 40%, APCE values around 90% and power conversion efficiency of 2.41% were obtained. DSSCs made of PLD-Ta:TiO2 show enhanced photocurrents as well photo efficiency over those based

  15. Zirconium doped nano-dispersed oxides of Fe, Al and Zn for destruction of warfare agents

    SciTech Connect

    Stengl, Vaclav; Houskova, Vendula; Bakardjieva, Snejana; Murafa, Nataliya; Marikova, Monika; Oplustil, Frantisek; Nemec, Tomas

    2010-11-15

    Zirconium doped nano dispersive oxides of Fe, Al and Zn were prepared by a homogeneous hydrolysis of the respective sulfate salts with urea in aqueous solutions. Synthesized metal oxide hydroxides were characterized using Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area and Barrett-Joiner-Halenda porosity (BJH), X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared spectroscopy (IR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX). These oxides were taken for an experimental evaluation of their reactivity with sulfur mustard (HD or bis(2-chloroethyl)sulfide), soman (GD or (3,3'-Dimethylbutan-2-yl)-methylphosphonofluoridate) and VX agent (S-[2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl]-O-ethyl-methylphosphonothionate). The presence of Zr{sup 4+} dopant can increase both the surface area and the surface hydroxylation of the resulting doped oxides, decreases their crystallites' sizes thereby it may contribute in enabling the substrate adsorption at the oxide surface thus it can accelerate the rate of degradation of warfare agents. Addition of Zr{sup 4+} converts the product of the reaction of ferric sulphate with urea from ferrihydrite to goethite. We found out that doped oxo-hydroxides Zr-FeO(OH) - being prepared by a homogeneous hydrolysis of ferric and zirconium oxo-sulfates mixture in aqueous solutions - exhibit a comparatively higher degradation activity towards chemical warfare agents (CWAs). Degradation of soman or VX agent on Zr-doped FeO(OH) containing ca. 8.3 wt.% of zirconium proceeded to completion within 30 min.

  16. Complexation facilitated reduction of aromatic N-oxides by aqueous Fe(II)-tiron complex: reaction kinetics and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yiling; Zhang, Huichun

    2013-10-01

    Rapid reduction of carbadox (CDX), olaquindox and several other aromatic N-oxides were investigated in aqueous solution containing Fe(II) and tiron. Consistent with previous work, the 1:2 Fe(II)-tiron complex, FeL2(6-), is the dominant reactive species as its concentration linearly correlates with the observed rate constant kobs under various conditions. The N-oxides without any side chains were much less reactive, suggesting direct reduction of the N-oxides is slow. UV-vis spectra suggest FeL2(6-) likely forms 5- or 7-membered rings with CDX and olaquindox through the N and O atoms on the side chain. The formed inner-sphere complexes significantly facilitated electron transfer from FeL2(6-) to the N-oxides. Reduction products of the N-oxides were identified by HPLC/QToF-MS to be the deoxygenated analogs. QSAR analysis indicated neither the first electron transfer nor N-O bond cleavage is the rate-limiting step. Calculations of the atomic spin densities of the anionic N-oxides confirmed the extensive delocalization between the aromatic ring and the side chain, suggesting complex formation can significantly affect the reduction kinetics. Our results suggest the complexation facilitated N-oxide reduction by Fe(II)-tiron involves a free radical mechanism, and the subsequent deoxygenation might also benefit from the weak complexation of Fe(II) with the N-oxide O atom.

  17. Complexation facilitated reduction of aromatic N-oxides by aqueous Fe(II)-tiron complex: reaction kinetics and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yiling; Zhang, Huichun

    2013-10-01

    Rapid reduction of carbadox (CDX), olaquindox and several other aromatic N-oxides were investigated in aqueous solution containing Fe(II) and tiron. Consistent with previous work, the 1:2 Fe(II)-tiron complex, FeL2(6-), is the dominant reactive species as its concentration linearly correlates with the observed rate constant kobs under various conditions. The N-oxides without any side chains were much less reactive, suggesting direct reduction of the N-oxides is slow. UV-vis spectra suggest FeL2(6-) likely forms 5- or 7-membered rings with CDX and olaquindox through the N and O atoms on the side chain. The formed inner-sphere complexes significantly facilitated electron transfer from FeL2(6-) to the N-oxides. Reduction products of the N-oxides were identified by HPLC/QToF-MS to be the deoxygenated analogs. QSAR analysis indicated neither the first electron transfer nor N-O bond cleavage is the rate-limiting step. Calculations of the atomic spin densities of the anionic N-oxides confirmed the extensive delocalization between the aromatic ring and the side chain, suggesting complex formation can significantly affect the reduction kinetics. Our results suggest the complexation facilitated N-oxide reduction by Fe(II)-tiron involves a free radical mechanism, and the subsequent deoxygenation might also benefit from the weak complexation of Fe(II) with the N-oxide O atom. PMID:23957215

  18. Creep behavior of commercial FeCrAl foils: beneficial and detrimental effect of oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Dryepondt, Sebastien N; Pint, Bruce A; Lara-Curzio, Edgar

    2012-01-01

    Creep tests were performed at 875 and 1050 C on commercially available FeCrAl foils (~50 m, 2 mil thickness) over a wide range of stress and duration to characterize their creep behavior. The oxide scales formed on the creep specimens were analyzed and compared to those that formed on unstressed specimens to assess the effect of stress and strain on oxide growth mechanisms. Below a specific stress threshold, creep rate and lifetime become independent of the applied load and rupture occurs due to the onset of breakaway oxidation. A creep rate model based on the strengthening of the FeCrAl foils due to load-bearing by the thermally-grown alumina scale was observed to be in good agreement with the experimental results.

  19. Oxidation of Fe-C alloys in the temperature range 600-852/sup 0/C

    SciTech Connect

    Malik, A.U.; Whittle, D.P.

    1981-12-01

    The oxidation behavior of Fe-C alloys in the temperature range 600-850/sup 0/C has been studied. CO/sub 2/ evolved during oxidation was measured using an infrared gas analyzer. The presence of C lowers the oxidation rate relative to that of pure Fe and this has been related to the rejection of carbon at the alloy-scale interface causing poor contact between scale and alloy. As a result, the scale contains a higher proportion of magnetite, which reduces its overall growth rate. Very little carbon is lost to the atmosphere. The ease with which the rejected carbon is incorporated into the alloy depends on the alloy structure.

  20. Phase transition of Fe oxides under reducing condition and its relation with the As behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, S. H.; Kim, S. H.; Jeong, G. Y.; Kim, K.

    2014-12-01

    Fe oxides are very common in the earth's crust and easily transform into other minerals such as magnetite and siderite under reducing conditions by microbial reactions. It is well known that As concentrations in groundwater is strongly regulated by adsorption onto Fe oxides. Even though some studies have suggested that the formation of siderite can also control the As concentration, direct evidences are not sufficient. In this study, we performed microbial incubation experiments to see the phase transition of As-rich Fe oxides under anoxic condition and to see how the water As concentrations are controlled accordingly. Three experiments were performed by changing organic carbon concentrations. Natural groundwaters and yeast extracts were used for the sources of microorganisms and organic carbon. Seven reactors were prepared for each experiment and opened one by one to observe the changes of the water chemistry and solid phases for 60 days. The formation of magnetite was observed at the early stage of each experiment. Siderite was formed at the later stage only when the dissolved organic carbon concentrations were high (donor/accepter molar ratio = 1.5). Goethite and hematite, instead of siderite, were formed from the experiment using low organic carbon concentration (donor/accepter molar ratio = 0.75). It is likely that dissolved ferrous ion adsorbs onto the Fe oxides and recrystallizes into hematite and goethite when the DOC concentration was low. As concentrations were generally very low in the water (normally 10 ug/L) and we could not find any relations with the Fe minerals formed by anoxic microbial reactions, maybe due to high Fe oxide/water ratio of our experiments. The sequential extraction analysis indicated that most of the As in solids are mostly associated with Fe-oxides and organic matters. The As bound to carbonates were very low even in the precipitates containing siderite due to low As concentrations in the water where the siderite formed. Further

  1. Uranium Immobilization through Fe(II) bio-oxidation: A Column study

    SciTech Connect

    Coates, John D.

    2009-09-14

    Current research on the bioremediation of heavy metals and radionuclides is focused on the ability of reducing organisms to use these metals as alternative electron acceptors in the absence of oxygen and thus precipitate them out of solution. However, many aspects of this proposed scheme need to be resolved, not the least of which is the time frame of the treatment process. Once treatment is complete and the electron donor addition is halted, the system will ultimately revert back to an oxic state and potentially result in the abiotic reoxidation and remobilization of the immobilized metals. In addition, the possibility exists that the presence of more electropositive electron acceptors such as nitrate or oxygen will also stimulate the biological oxidation and remobilization of these contaminants. The selective nitrate-dependent biooxidation of added Fe(II) may offer an effective means of “capping off” and completing the attenuation of these contaminants in a reducing environment making the contaminants less accessible to abiotic and biotic reactions and allowing the system to naturally revert to an oxic state. Our previous DOE-NABIR funded studies demonstrated that radionuclides such as uranium and cobalt are rapidly removed from solution during the biogenic formation of Fe(III)-oxides. In the case of uranium, X-ray spectroscopy analysis indicated that the uranium was in the hexavalent form (normally soluble) and was bound to the precipitated Fe(III)-oxides thus demonstrating the bioremediative potential of this process. We also demonstrated that nitrate-dependent Fe(II)- oxidizing bacteria are prevalent in the sediment and groundwater samples collected from sites 1 and 2 and the background site of the NABIR FRC in Oakridge, TN. However, all of these studies were performed in batch experiments in the laboratory with pure cultures and although a significant amount was learned about the microbiology of nitrate-dependent bio-oxidation of Fe(II), the effects of

  2. Metagenomic Analyses of the Autotrophic Fe(II)-Oxidizing, Nitrate-Reducing Enrichment Culture KS

    PubMed Central

    Tominski, Claudia; Kappler, Andreas; Behrens, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Nitrate-dependent ferrous iron [Fe(II)] oxidation (NDFO) is a well-recognized chemolithotrophic pathway in anoxic sediments. The neutrophilic chemolithoautotrophic enrichment culture KS originally obtained from a freshwater sediment (K. L. Straub, M. Benz, B. Schink, and F. Widdel, Appl Environ Microbiol 62:1458–1460, 1996) has been used as a model system to study NDFO. However, the primary Fe(II) oxidizer in this culture has not been isolated, despite extensive efforts to do so. Here, we present a metagenomic analysis of this enrichment culture in order to gain insight into electron transfer pathways and the roles of different bacteria in the culture. We obtained a near-complete genome of the primary Fe(II) oxidizer, a species in the family Gallionellaceae, and draft genomes from its flanking community members. A search of the putative extracellular electron transfer pathways in these genomes led to the identification of a homolog of the MtoAB complex [a porin-multiheme cytochrome c system identified in neutrophilic microaerobic Fe(II)-oxidizing Sideroxydans lithotrophicus ES-1] in a Gallionellaceae sp., and findings of other putative genes involving cytochrome c and multicopper oxidases, such as Cyc2 and OmpB. Genome-enabled metabolic reconstruction revealed that this Gallionellaceae sp. lacks nitric oxide and nitrous oxide reductase genes and may partner with flanking populations capable of complete denitrification to avoid toxic metabolite accumulation, which may explain its resistance to growth in pure culture. This and other revealed interspecies interactions and metabolic interdependencies in nitrogen and carbon metabolisms may allow these organisms to cooperate effectively to achieve robust chemolithoautotrophic NDFO. Overall, the results significantly expand our knowledge of NDFO and suggest a range of genetic targets for further exploration. PMID:26896135

  3. Metagenomic Analyses of the Autotrophic Fe(II)-Oxidizing, Nitrate-Reducing Enrichment Culture KS.

    PubMed

    He, Shaomei; Tominski, Claudia; Kappler, Andreas; Behrens, Sebastian; Roden, Eric E

    2016-05-01

    Nitrate-dependent ferrous iron [Fe(II)] oxidation (NDFO) is a well-recognized chemolithotrophic pathway in anoxic sediments. The neutrophilic chemolithoautotrophic enrichment culture KS originally obtained from a freshwater sediment (K. L. Straub, M. Benz, B. Schink, and F. Widdel, Appl Environ Microbiol 62:1458-1460, 1996) has been used as a model system to study NDFO. However, the primary Fe(II) oxidizer in this culture has not been isolated, despite extensive efforts to do so. Here, we present a metagenomic analysis of this enrichment culture in order to gain insight into electron transfer pathways and the roles of different bacteria in the culture. We obtained a near-complete genome of the primary Fe(II) oxidizer, a species in the family Gallionellaceae, and draft genomes from its flanking community members. A search of the putative extracellular electron transfer pathways in these genomes led to the identification of a homolog of the MtoAB complex [a porin-multiheme cytochromec system identified in neutrophilic microaerobic Fe(II)-oxidizing Sideroxydans lithotrophicus ES-1] in a Gallionellaceae sp., and findings of other putative genes involving cytochromecand multicopper oxidases, such as Cyc2 and OmpB. Genome-enabled metabolic reconstruction revealed that this Gallionellaceae sp. lacks nitric oxide and nitrous oxide reductase genes and may partner with flanking populations capable of complete denitrification to avoid toxic metabolite accumulation, which may explain its resistance to growth in pure culture. This and other revealed interspecies interactions and metabolic interdependencies in nitrogen and carbon metabolisms may allow these organisms to cooperate effectively to achieve robust chemolithoautotrophic NDFO. Overall, the results significantly expand our knowledge of NDFO and suggest a range of genetic targets for further exploration. PMID:26896135

  4. Reactive Transport Modeling of Microbe-mediated Fe (II) Oxidation for Enhanced Oil Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surasani, V.; Li, L.

    2011-12-01

    Microbially Enhanced Oil Recovery (MEOR) aims to improve the recovery of entrapped heavy oil in depleted reservoirs using microbe-based technology. Reservoir ecosystems often contain diverse microbial communities those can interact with subsurface fluids and minerals through a network of nutrients and energy fluxes. Microbe-mediated reactions products include gases, biosurfactants, biopolymers those can alter the properties of oil and interfacial interactions between oil, brine, and rocks. In addition, the produced biomass and mineral precipitates can change the reservoir permeability profile and increase sweeping efficiency. Under subsurface conditions, the injection of nitrate and Fe (II) as the electron acceptor and donor allows bacteria to grow. The reaction products include minerals such as Fe(OH)3 and nitrogen containing gases. These reaction products can have large impact on oil and reservoir properties and can enhance the recovery of trapped oil. This work aims to understand the Fe(II) oxidation by nitrate under conditions relevant to MEOR. Reactive transport modeling is used to simulate the fluid flow, transport, and reactions involved in this process. Here we developed a complex reactive network for microbial mediated nitrate-dependent Fe (II) oxidation that involves both thermodynamic controlled aqueous reactions and kinetic controlled Fe (II) mineral reaction. Reactive transport modeling is used to understand and quantify the coupling between flow, transport, and reaction processes. Our results identify key parameter controls those are important for the alteration of permeability profile under field conditions.

  5. Nanostructured Fe(III) catalysts for water oxidation assembled with the aid of organic acid salt electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qiang; Li, Dandan; Gao, Guofeng; Yuan, Wen; Hao, Genyan; Li, Jinping

    2016-11-01

    We describe the preparation of three partially ordered iron-based catalyst films (Fe-OAc, Fe-Pro, Fe-But) with nanoporous structure by electrodeposition from organate electrolytes containing Fe2+. The anions of the organic acids assisted the partial ordering of the nanostructured Fe(III) catalysts for water oxidation. A model involving an electrical double layer is invoked to explain the role of the organate electrolyte system in their formation. Analytical results have revealed the main component of the iron-based films to be a β-FeOOH structure. The Fe-But catalyst catalyzed water oxidation in 0.1 m potassium carbonate solution with an average activity of 1.48 mA cm-2 and an overpotential of 433 mV.

  6. Inactivation of Aeromonas hydrophila by Fe(II)-related-radical generation in oxidizing groundwaters.

    PubMed Central

    Kersters, I; Verstraete, W

    1996-01-01

    The survival of Aeromonas hydrophila AWWX1 in filter-sterilized phreatic groundwaters was studied by using viable counts. Aeromonas counts rapidly decreased 2 to 3 log units in oxidizing raw groundwaters from Snellegem and Beernem, Belgium (Snellegem-raw and Beernem-raw, respectively), containing high concentrations of Fe2+ (460 to 1,070 microM). The rapid decline in viable counts of Aeromonas cells in the oxidizing raw groundwater of Snellegem was prevented by the addition of an Fe2+ chelator (2,2'-dipyridyl) or compounds (i.e., ascorbic acid and catalase) that act on toxic oxygen species. The results suggest that free radicals, generated spontaneously in oxidizing Fe2+-containing groundwaters, caused the inactivation of A. hydrophila AWWX1. Evidence that free radicals are generated under the given conditions was provided by the observation that propylphosphonic acid, a compound which is very susceptible to radicals, was degraded upon addition to these waters. A. hydrophila PWBS, Pseudomonas fluorescens P17, Spirillum strain NOX, and heterotrophs showed decreases in culturability in filter-sterilized Snellegem-raw water similar to that shown by A. hydrophila AWWX1. These findings indicate that free radicals generated in Fe2+-containing groundwaters upon aeration are capable of inactivating various bacterial species. PMID:8795217

  7. Comparative genomics of freshwater Fe-oxidizing bacteria: implications for physiology, ecology, and systematics

    PubMed Central

    Emerson, David; Field, Erin K.; Chertkov, Olga; Davenport, Karen W.; Goodwin, Lynne; Munk, Christine; Nolan, Matt; Woyke, Tanja

    2013-01-01

    The two microaerophilic, Fe-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) Sideroxydans ES-1 and Gallionella ES-2 have single circular chromosomes of 3.00 and 3.16 Mb that encode 3049 and 3006 genes, respectively. Multi-locus sequence analysis (MLSA) confirmed the relationship of these two organisms to one another, and indicated they may form a novel order, the Gallionellalaes, within the Betaproteobacteria. Both are adapted for chemolithoautotropy, including pathways for CO2-fixation, and electron transport pathways adapted for growth at low O2-levels, an important adaptation for growing on Fe(II). Both genomes contain Mto-genes implicated in iron-oxidation, as well as other genes that could be involved in Fe-oxidation. Nearly 10% of their genomes are devoted to environmental sensing, signal transduction, and chemotaxis, consistent with their requirement for growing in narrow redox gradients of Fe(II) and O2. There are important differences as well. Sideroxydans ES-1 is more metabolically flexible, and can utilize reduced S-compounds, including thiosulfate, for lithotrophic growth. It has a suite of genes for nitrogen fixation. Gallionella ES-2 contains additional gene clusters for exopolysaccharide production, and has more capacity to resist heavy metals. Both strains contain genes for hemerythrins and globins, but ES-1 has an especially high numbers of these genes that may be involved in oxygen homeostasis, or storage. The two strains share homology with the marine FeOB Mariprofundus ferrooxydans PV-1 in CO2 fixation genes, and respiratory genes. In addition, ES-1 shares a suite of 20 potentially redox active genes with PV-1, as well as a large prophage. Combined these genetic, morphological, and physiological differences indicate that these are two novel species, Sideroxydans lithotrophicus ES-1T (ATCC 700298T; JCM 14762; DSMZ 22444; NCMA B100), and Gallionella capsiferriformans ES-2T (ATCC 700299T; JCM 14763; DSMZ 22445; NCMA B101). PMID:24062729

  8. Preparation of a novel graphene oxide/Fe-Mn composite and its application for aqueous Hg(II) removal.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jingchun; Huang, Yao; Gong, Yanyan; Lyu, Honghong; Wang, Qilin; Ma, Jianli

    2016-10-01

    A novel graphene oxide/Fe-Mn (GO/Fe-Mn) composite was synthesized (molar ratio of Fe/Mn=3/1 and mass ratio of Fe/GO=1/7.5) and investigated for the sorption characteristics and mechanisms of aqueous mercury (Hg(2+)) as well as the biological effects to wheat and rice. Characterization tests showed that Fe-Mn oxides were impregnated onto GO sheets in an amorphous form through oxygen-containing functional groups (i.e., CO, epoxy COC, carboxyl OCO, and CO) and π-π interactions. GO/Fe-Mn possessed large surface area, surface enhanced Raman scattering with more sp(3) defects, and greater thermal stability than GO. XPS analysis revealed that Fe2O3, FeOOH, MnO2, MnOOH, and MnO were the dominant metal oxides in GO/Fe-Mn. Pseudo-second-order kinetic model and Sips isotherm model fitted well with the sorption kinetic and isotherm data. The maximum sorption capacity for mercury was 32.9mg/g. Ligand exchange and surface complexation were the dominant mechanisms for mercury removal. GO/Fe-Mn greatly reduced the bioavailability of mercury to wheat and rice, even promoted the seedling growth. This work suggests that GO/Fe-Mn can be used as an effective and environmental-friendly adsorbent in heavy metal remediation. PMID:27232726

  9. Preparation of a novel graphene oxide/Fe-Mn composite and its application for aqueous Hg(II) removal.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jingchun; Huang, Yao; Gong, Yanyan; Lyu, Honghong; Wang, Qilin; Ma, Jianli

    2016-10-01

    A novel graphene oxide/Fe-Mn (GO/Fe-Mn) composite was synthesized (molar ratio of Fe/Mn=3/1 and mass ratio of Fe/GO=1/7.5) and investigated for the sorption characteristics and mechanisms of aqueous mercury (Hg(2+)) as well as the biological effects to wheat and rice. Characterization tests showed that Fe-Mn oxides were impregnated onto GO sheets in an amorphous form through oxygen-containing functional groups (i.e., CO, epoxy COC, carboxyl OCO, and CO) and π-π interactions. GO/Fe-Mn possessed large surface area, surface enhanced Raman scattering with more sp(3) defects, and greater thermal stability than GO. XPS analysis revealed that Fe2O3, FeOOH, MnO2, MnOOH, and MnO were the dominant metal oxides in GO/Fe-Mn. Pseudo-second-order kinetic model and Sips isotherm model fitted well with the sorption kinetic and isotherm data. The maximum sorption capacity for mercury was 32.9mg/g. Ligand exchange and surface complexation were the dominant mechanisms for mercury removal. GO/Fe-Mn greatly reduced the bioavailability of mercury to wheat and rice, even promoted the seedling growth. This work suggests that GO/Fe-Mn can be used as an effective and environmental-friendly adsorbent in heavy metal remediation.

  10. Electronic Structure and Chemistry of Iron-Based Metal Oxide Nanostructured Materials: A NEXAFS Investigation of BiFeO3, Bi2Fe4O9, α-Fe2O3, γ-Fe2O3, and Fe/Fe3O4

    SciTech Connect

    Park,T.; Sambasivan, S.; Fischer, D.; Yoon, W.; Misewich, J.; Wong, S.

    2008-01-01

    We present a systematic and detailed near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) experimental investigation of the electronic structure and chemistry of iron-based metal oxide nanostructured (FeMONS) materials including BiFeO3, Bi2Fe4O9, a-Fe2O3, ?-Fe2O3, and Fe/Fe3O4. Correlations of the electronic structure and structural chemistry of these intriguing nanomaterials are presented, ranging from the nano to the bulk scale. In this work, variations in the shape, position, and intensity of the O K-edge and Fe L-edge NEXAFS spectra have been analyzed in terms of electronic structure and surface chemistry of the FeMONS materials as compared with that of the bulk. We hypothesize that surface imperfection and surface strain anisotropies in nanoparticles induce distortion and site inequivalency of the oxygen Oh sites around the Fe ion located close to the surface, resulting in an increase in the degree of multiplicity as well as in nonstoichiometric effects in FeMONS materials.

  11. A microstructural study of the oxide scale formation on ODS Fe?13Cr steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoelzer, D. T.; Pint, B. A.; Wright, I. G.

    2000-12-01

    The high-temperature oxidation behavior of a Y 2O 3-dispersed Fe-13Cr steel was investigated in air at temperatures of 700°C, 800°C, and 900°C for 10 000 h. The kinetic data showed that oxide scale formation obeyed a parabolic rate law at each temperature and that the oxidation rate was lower than in other studies based on shorter test times. Microstructural analysis of the oxide scales formed at 700°C and 800°C was conducted using cross-sectional specimens and analytical electron microscopy (AEM). This analysis showed that the main scale was a continuous Cr-oxide and that an underlying amorphous silica layer formed at both temperatures, despite the low Si content (0.05 wt%) in the alloy.

  12. Structure of Oxide Nanoparticles in Fe-16Cr MA/ODS Ferritic Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiung, L; Fluss, M; Kimura, A

    2010-04-06

    Oxide nanoparticles in Fe-16Cr ODS ferritic steel fabricated by mechanical alloying (MA) method have been examined using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) techniques. A partial crystallization of oxide nanoparticles was frequently observed in as-fabricated ODS steel. The crystal structure of crystalline oxide particles is identified to be mainly Y{sub 4}Al{sub 2}O{sub 9} (YAM) with a monoclinic structure. Large nanoparticles with a diameter larger than 20 nm tend to be incoherent and have a nearly spherical shape, whereas small nanoparticles with a diameter smaller than 10 nm tend to be coherent or semi-coherent and have faceted boundaries. The oxide nanoparticles become fully crystallized after prolonged annealing at 900 C. These results lead us to propose a three-stage formation mechanism of oxide nanoparticles in MA/ODS steels.

  13. Fe(VI) as a Possible Oxidant on the Martian Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsapin, A. I.; Goldfeld, M. G.; McDonald, G. D.; Nealson, K. H.

    1999-01-01

    The essential findings of the three biological experiments (Gas Exchange, Labeled Released, and Pyrolitic Release) aboard the Viking Mars landers were the discovery of the presence of one or more strong oxidants on the Martian surface. The Gas Exchange experiments showed that wetting Martian soil leads to the evolution of oxygen, while in the Labeled Release experiment addition of a nutrient solution containing C-14-labeled formate, glycine, lactate, alanine, and glycolic acid induced CO2 evolution. A general consensus was reached that all data taken together pointed to the presence on Martian surface of a strong oxidant, or most probably several different types of oxidants. Several candidates have been proposed as oxidants, including superoxides, hydrogen peroxide, and iron oxides (possibly gamma-Fe2O3). Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  14. Fe(II)-mediated reduction and repartitioning of structurally incorporated Cu, Co, and Mn in iron oxides.

    PubMed

    Frierdich, Andrew J; Catalano, Jeffrey G

    2012-10-16

    The reduction of trace elements and contaminants by Fe(II) at Fe(III) oxide surfaces is well documented. However, the effect of aqueous Fe(II) on the fate of redox-active trace elements structurally incorporated into iron oxides is unknown. Here, we investigate the fate of redox-active elements during Fe(II)-activated recrystallization of Cu-, Co-, and Mn-substituted goethite and hematite. Enhanced release of Cu, Co, and Mn to solution occurs upon exposure of all materials to aqueous Fe(II) relative to reactions in Fe(II)-free fluids. The quantity of trace element release increases with pH when Fe(II) is present but decreases with increasing pH in the absence of Fe(II). Co and Mn release from goethite is predicted well using a second-order kinetic model, consistent with the release of redox-inactive elements such as Ni and Zn. However, Cu release and Co and Mn release from hematite require the sum of two rates to adequately model the kinetic data. Greater uptake of Fe(II) by Cu-, Co-, and Mn-substituted iron oxides relative to analogues containing only redox-inactive elements suggests that net Fe(II) oxidation occurs. Reduction of Cu, Co, and Mn in all materials following reaction with Fe(II) at pHs 7.0-7.5 is confirmed by X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy. This work shows that redox-sensitive elements structurally incorporated within iron oxides are reduced and repartitioned into fluids during Fe(II)-mediated recrystallization. Such abiotic reactions likely operate in tandem with partial microbial and abiotic iron reduction or during the migration of Fe(II)-containing fluids, mobilizing structurally bound contaminants and micronutrients in aquatic systems.

  15. Effects of Nickel on the Oxide/Metal Interface Morphology and Oxidation Rate During High-Temperature Oxidation of Fe-Cu-Ni Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Lan; Balaji, Sukumar; Sridhar, Seetharaman

    2010-06-01

    Steel produced in an electric arc furnace (EAF) contains a high amount of Cu that causes a surface-cracking phenomenon called surface hot shortness. Ni reduces the risk for surface hot shortness, and this work focuses on investigating the following two phenomena caused by Ni during oxidation at 1150 °C for Fe-Cu-Ni alloys: (1) the decrease in oxidation rate and (2) the formation of a wavy liquid-Cu/oxide and of liquid-Cu/γ-iron (γFe) interfaces, which promote Cu occlusion into the scale. Thermogravimetry, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectroscopy techniques were applied. A numerical model also was developed to explain the experimental results. High Ni contents cause higher liquid-Cu/γFe interface nickel concentrations and more potential for an interface breakdown. The decrease in oxidation rate by adding nickel can be explained qualitatively by the decrease in Fe cation transport through the wüstite layer.

  16. Zeta-Fe2O3 – A new stable polymorph in iron(III) oxide family

    PubMed Central

    Tuček, Jiří; Machala, Libor; Ono, Shigeaki; Namai, Asuka; Yoshikiyo, Marie; Imoto, Kenta; Tokoro, Hiroko; Ohkoshi, Shin-ichi; Zbořil, Radek

    2015-01-01

    Iron(III) oxide shows a polymorphism, characteristic of existence of phases with the same chemical composition but distinct crystal structures and, hence, physical properties. Four crystalline phases of iron(III) oxide have previously been identified: α-Fe2O3 (hematite), β-Fe2O3, γ-Fe2O3 (maghemite), and ε-Fe2O3. All four iron(III) oxide phases easily undergo various phase transformations in response to heating or pressure treatment, usually forming hexagonal α-Fe2O3, which is the most thermodynamically stable Fe2O3 polymorph under ambient conditions. Here, from synchrotron X-ray diffraction experiments, we report the formation of a new iron(III) oxide polymorph that we have termed ζ-Fe2O3 and which evolved during pressure treatment of cubic β-Fe2O3 ( space group) at pressures above 30 GPa. Importantly, ζ-Fe2O3 is maintained after pressure release and represents the first monoclinic Fe2O3 polymorph (I2/a space group) that is stable at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. ζ-Fe2O3 behaves as an antiferromagnet with a Néel transition temperature of ~69 K. The complex mechanism of pressure-induced transformation of β-Fe2O3, involving also the formation of Rh2O3-II-type Fe2O3 and post-perovskite-Fe2O3 structure, is suggested and discussed with respect to a bimodal size distribution of precursor nanoparticles. PMID:26469883

  17. Mechanosynthesis and magnetic properties of nanocrystalline LaFeO{sub 3} using different iron oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Cristobal, A.A. Botta, P.M.; Bercoff, P.G.; Porto Lopez, J.M.

    2009-05-06

    The synthesis of the orthoferrite LaFeO{sub 3} using high-energy ball-milling of La{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} or {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} oxides and subsequent thermal treatments of resulting powders was studied. The phase evolution during the mechanical treatment was analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential thermal analysis (DTA) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Also, magnetic properties of the obtained materials were measured at room temperature by vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM). From 30 min of mechanochemical activation the gradual disappearance of reactants and the formation of LaFeO{sub 3} were observed. For both reactive mixtures the reaction was completed after 3 h of milling. Magnetic hysteresis loops of these mechanoactivated samples showed a significant ferromagnetic component in LaFeO{sub 3}. This behavior was interpreted on the basis of a spin-canting effect induced by the mechanochemical treatment. Thermal treatments allowed the relaxation of the distorted structure, resulting in the formation of the conventional antiferromagnetic LaFeO{sub 3} phase.

  18. Retention of tannic acid and condensed tannin by Fe-oxide-coated quartz sand.

    PubMed

    Kaal, J; Nierop, K G J; Verstraten, J M

    2005-07-01

    This paper intends to shed light on the interactions between tannin and mineral soil particles. For that purpose, aqueous solution of condensed tannin (CT) (derived from Black pine (Pinus nigra var. maritima)) and commercially available tannic acid (TA) were added to purified quartz (Qtz) sand and quartz sand coated with either goethite (Gt) or ferrihydrite (Fh). After solvent removal by evaporation the samples were extracted by water. The extracts were analysed for organic carbon, total phenolics and CT. The extractability of the two tannins was small and increased in the order Qtz-Fh < Qtz-Gt < Qtz. For all mineral samples, TA was more extractable than CT. Bonding of tannins to the mineral samples and the partial peptisation of the Fe oxide coatings upon the binding resulted in complex tannin release curves. Our results suggest that the inextractability of tannins from natural soils and the absence of tannins in soil leachates might be caused by strong adsorption on soil minerals such as Qtz and Fe (oxy)(hydr)oxides. The results of competition experiments with mixtures of both tannins demonstrate that the CTs, and TA in particular, can release large amounts of Fe (oxides), suggesting that the tannins are excellent metal-mobilising agents. We therefore suggest that the fate of tannins in the mineral soil environment is highly dependent on the abundance of weakly bonded secondary oxides.

  19. Retention of tannic acid and condensed tannin by Fe-oxide-coated quartz sand.

    PubMed

    Kaal, J; Nierop, K G J; Verstraten, J M

    2005-07-01

    This paper intends to shed light on the interactions between tannin and mineral soil particles. For that purpose, aqueous solution of condensed tannin (CT) (derived from Black pine (Pinus nigra var. maritima)) and commercially available tannic acid (TA) were added to purified quartz (Qtz) sand and quartz sand coated with either goethite (Gt) or ferrihydrite (Fh). After solvent removal by evaporation the samples were extracted by water. The extracts were analysed for organic carbon, total phenolics and CT. The extractability of the two tannins was small and increased in the order Qtz-Fh < Qtz-Gt < Qtz. For all mineral samples, TA was more extractable than CT. Bonding of tannins to the mineral samples and the partial peptisation of the Fe oxide coatings upon the binding resulted in complex tannin release curves. Our results suggest that the inextractability of tannins from natural soils and the absence of tannins in soil leachates might be caused by strong adsorption on soil minerals such as Qtz and Fe (oxy)(hydr)oxides. The results of competition experiments with mixtures of both tannins demonstrate that the CTs, and TA in particular, can release large amounts of Fe (oxides), suggesting that the tannins are excellent metal-mobilising agents. We therefore suggest that the fate of tannins in the mineral soil environment is highly dependent on the abundance of weakly bonded secondary oxides. PMID:15914150

  20. Transparent ferromagnetic and semiconducting behavior in Fe-Dy-Tb based amorphous oxide films

    PubMed Central

    Taz, H.; Sakthivel, T.; Yamoah, N. K.; Carr, C.; Kumar, D.; Seal, S.; Kalyanaraman, R.

    2016-01-01

    We report a class of amorphous thin film material comprising of transition (Fe) and Lanthanide metals (Dy and Tb) that show unique combination of functional properties. Films were deposited with different atomic weight ratio (R) of Fe to Lanthanide (Dy + Tb) using electron beam co-evaporation at room temperature. The films were found to be amorphous, with grazing incidence x-ray diffraction and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies indicating that the films were largely oxidized with a majority of the metal being in higher oxidation states. Films with R = 0.6 were semiconducting with visible light transmission due to a direct optical band-gap (2.49 eV), had low resistivity and sheet resistance (7.15 × 10−4 Ω-cm and ~200 Ω/sq respectively), and showed room temperature ferromagnetism. A metal to semiconductor transition with composition (for R < 11.9) also correlated well with the absence of any metallic Fe0 oxidation state in the R = 0.6 case as well as a significantly higher fraction of oxidized Dy. The combination of amorphous microstructure and room temperature electronic and magnetic properties could lead to the use of the material in multiple applications, including as a transparent conductor, active material in thin film transistors for display devices, and in spin-dependent electronics. PMID:27298196

  1. Transparent ferromagnetic and semiconducting behavior in Fe-Dy-Tb based amorphous oxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taz, H.; Sakthivel, T.; Yamoah, N. K.; Carr, C.; Kumar, D.; Seal, S.; Kalyanaraman, R.

    2016-06-01

    We report a class of amorphous thin film material comprising of transition (Fe) and Lanthanide metals (Dy and Tb) that show unique combination of functional properties. Films were deposited with different atomic weight ratio (R) of Fe to Lanthanide (Dy + Tb) using electron beam co-evaporation at room temperature. The films were found to be amorphous, with grazing incidence x-ray diffraction and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies indicating that the films were largely oxidized with a majority of the metal being in higher oxidation states. Films with R = 0.6 were semiconducting with visible light transmission due to a direct optical band-gap (2.49 eV), had low resistivity and sheet resistance (7.15 × 10‑4 Ω-cm and ~200 Ω/sq respectively), and showed room temperature ferromagnetism. A metal to semiconductor transition with composition (for R < 11.9) also correlated well with the absence of any metallic Fe0 oxidation state in the R = 0.6 case as well as a significantly higher fraction of oxidized Dy. The combination of amorphous microstructure and room temperature electronic and magnetic properties could lead to the use of the material in multiple applications, including as a transparent conductor, active material in thin film transistors for display devices, and in spin-dependent electronics.

  2. Dissolution of Fe(III)(hydr) oxides by metal-EDTA complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Nowack, B.; Sigg, L. |

    1997-03-01

    The dissolution of Fe(III)(hydr)oxides (goethite and hydrous ferric oxide) by metal-EDTA complexes occurs by ligand-promoted dissolution. The process is initiated by the adsorption of metal-EDTA complexes to the surface and is followed by the dissociation of the complex at the surface and the release of Fe(III)EDTA into solution. The dissolution rate is decreased to a great extent if EDTA is complexed by metals in comparison to the uncomplexed EDTA. The rate decreases in the order EDTA > CaEDTA > PbEDTA > ZnEDTA > CuEDTA > Co(II)EDTA > NiEDTA. Two different rate-limiting steps determine the dissolution process: (1) detachment of Fe(III) from the oxide-structure and (2) dissociation of the metal-EDTA complexes. In the case of goethite, step 1 is slower than step 2 and the dissolution rates by various metals are similar. In the case of hydrous ferric oxide, step 2 is rate-limiting and the effect of the complexed metal is very pronounced. 35 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Transparent ferromagnetic and semiconducting behavior in Fe-Dy-Tb based amorphous oxide films.

    PubMed

    Taz, H; Sakthivel, T; Yamoah, N K; Carr, C; Kumar, D; Seal, S; Kalyanaraman, R

    2016-01-01

    We report a class of amorphous thin film material comprising of transition (Fe) and Lanthanide metals (Dy and Tb) that show unique combination of functional properties. Films were deposited with different atomic weight ratio (R) of Fe to Lanthanide (Dy + Tb) using electron beam co-evaporation at room temperature. The films were found to be amorphous, with grazing incidence x-ray diffraction and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies indicating that the films were largely oxidized with a majority of the metal being in higher oxidation states. Films with R = 0.6 were semiconducting with visible light transmission due to a direct optical band-gap (2.49 eV), had low resistivity and sheet resistance (7.15 × 10(-4) Ω-cm and ~200 Ω/sq respectively), and showed room temperature ferromagnetism. A metal to semiconductor transition with composition (for R < 11.9) also correlated well with the absence of any metallic Fe(0) oxidation state in the R = 0.6 case as well as a significantly higher fraction of oxidized Dy. The combination of amorphous microstructure and room temperature electronic and magnetic properties could lead to the use of the material in multiple applications, including as a transparent conductor, active material in thin film transistors for display devices, and in spin-dependent electronics. PMID:27298196

  4. Preliminary study of heavy metal pollution from Fe-Al oxides in Peihuang Creek, North Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, B.

    2012-12-01

    Tatun Volcano Group (TVG) is not active since late Pleistocene but the post-volcanic activities, such as hot spring and sulfur gas, still widespread around the volcano province. Peihuang Creek is the main watershed system in TVG. The creek water is characterized by higher temperature, low pH values (3.0-4.5) and high SO4 content (60-400 ppm) due to the mixing of hotspring. This would promote the geochemical interaction between water and andesitic rocks and results in waters with highly enriched iron, aluminum and silica. These elements prefer to form suspended colloidal particles in water and adsorb heavy metals. Once the pH of water increases under oxidation condition, the colloid would precipitate in the form of ochre colored powder on the riverbed. The previous study reports that the arsenic content can reach as high as hundreds ppm. It is very important to evaluate the desorption behavior of heavy metals, especially for the study area with highly developed agriculture. For the preliminary analysis, five samples of ochre colored powder were sampled along the creek. The results of XRF demonstrate that the powder is mainly composed of iron, aluminum and silica, which is Fe-Al hydroxide. The iron content of Fe-Al hydroxide decreases from 63% to 25% while the aluminum and silica contents gradually increase from 5% to 20% and from 9% to 30%, respectively. To evaluate the desorption of heavy metals, the sequential extraction procedure was conducted. In the first step for determining leachable metals, the Fe-Al oxides were extracted with deionized water in the room temperature for one week. All of the metals are in ppb level except copper. For determining reducible phase, Step 2 used reagent solution of 0.5 mol/L hydroxylamine hydrochloride, which was adjusted to pH=2 with ultrapure nitric acid, for one week. The extracted chromium, arsenic, lead and copper are in the dangerous level of tens to hundreds ppm. It is believed that only very small amounts of heavy metals

  5. Mechanism of β-FeSi{sub 2} precipitates growth-and-dissolution and pyramidal defects' formation during oxidation of Fe-contaminated silicon wafers

    SciTech Connect

    De Luca, Anthony; Texier, Michaël Portavoce, Alain; Burle, Nelly; Grosjean, Catherine; Morata, Stéphane; Michel, Fabrice

    2015-03-21

    Fe-implanted Si-wafers have been oxidized at 900 °C and 1100 °C in order to investigate the behaviour of Fe atoms at the growing SiO{sub 2}/Si interface and the impact on the integrity of microelectronic devices of an involuntary Fe contamination before or during the oxidation process. As-implanted and oxidized wafers have been characterized using secondary ion mass spectroscopy, atom probe tomography, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Experimental results were compared to calculated implantation profiles and simulated images. Successive steps of iron disilicide precipitation and oxidation were evidenced during the silicon oxidation process. The formation of characteristic pyramidal-shaped defects, at the SiO{sub 2}/Si interface, was notably found to correlate with the presence of β-FeSi{sub 2} precipitates. Taking into account the competitive oxidation of these precipitates and of the surrounding silicon matrix, dynamic mechanisms are proposed to model the observed microstructural evolution of the SiO{sub 2}/Si interface, during the growth of the silicon oxide layer.

  6. Oxidation and deprotonation of synthetic Fe{sup II}-Fe{sup III} (oxy)hydroxycarbonate Green Rust: An X-ray photoelectron study

    SciTech Connect

    Mullet, M. Guillemin, Y.; Ruby, C.

    2008-01-15

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to investigate chemical bonding and distribution of iron and oxygen species at the surface of Green Rusts (GRs). GRs with variable composition, i.e. Fe{sup II}{sub 6(1-x)}Fe{sup III}{sub 6x}O{sub 12}H{sub 2(7-3x)} CO{sub 3}.3H{sub 2}O where the Fe{sup III} molar fraction of the positively charged hydroxide sheets, x=[Fe(III)]/[Fe(total)] belongs to [1/3, 1], were synthesised under an inert atmosphere. The broadened Fe(2p{sub 3/2}) spectra were fitted using Gupta and Sen multiplets peaks and additional satellite and surface features. The [Fe(III)]/[Fe(total)] surface atomic ratios closely agree with the x ratios expected from the bulk composition, which gives a high degree of confidence on the validity of the proposed fitting procedure. The valence band spectra are also reported and show dependencies on iron speciation. The O(1s) spectra revealed the presence of O{sup 2-}, OH{sup -} species and adsorbed water. The hydroxyl component decreases with increasing x values, i.e. with the amount of ferric iron, while the oxide component increases. This study provides direct spectroscopic evidence of the deprotonation of hydroxyl groups that occurs simultaneously with the oxidation of ferrous iron within the GR structure. - Graphical abstract: X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is used to investigate chemical bonding and distribution of iron and oxygen species at the surface of Green Rust (GR) compounds. First spectroscopic evidence of the deprotonation of hydroxyls groups occurring simultaneously to the oxidation of Fe(II) into Fe(III) species is provided.

  7. Effects of temperature on rates and mineral products of microbial Fe(II) oxidation by Leptothrix cholodnii at microaerobic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollrath, Susann; Behrends, Thilo; Koch, Christian Bender; Cappellen, Philippe Van

    2013-05-01

    Oxygen concentrations are important in constraining the geochemical niche of neutrophilic iron oxidizers. However, other factors like temperature may affect the competition between microbial and abiotic Fe(II) oxidation and may cause community changes. Here, rates and mineral products of Fe(II) oxidation (initial concentration 150 μmol Fe(II)/l) by the Fe(II) oxidizing bacterial strain Leptothrix cholodnii Appels were compared to those of abiotic oxidation in the temperature range 11-37 °C. Experiments were carried out in a batch reactor at 12-13 μmol O2/l (0.92-1% O2 saturation), pH 7 and, for the microbial experiments, a cell density of around 108 cells/ml. The iron precipitates formed at the different temperatures were characterized by SEM, XRD, FTIR and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Abiotic and microbial Fe(II) oxidation proceeded in two stages. During the initial stage, rates of microbial oxidation exhibited a temperature optimum curve. In contrast, the temperature dependency of abiotic Fe(II) oxidation rate followed the Arrhenius equation. As a consequence, microbial oxidation rates were about 10 times higher compared to the abiotic oxidation at 30 °C. During the second stage, microbial and abiotic rates and their temperature dependencies were similar. Independent of temperature or presence of bacteria, lepidocrocite and ferrihydrite were identified as reaction products, but the characteristics of the precipitates differed. At 37 °C, less lepidocrocite was precipitated in microbial and abiotic experiments due to high oxidation rates. Abiotic oxidation produced larger lepidocrocite crystals mixed with smaller, less crystalline oxides. Large crystals were absent in the microbial products, possibly due to growth inhibition of the minerals by EPS substances. Nevertheless, Mössbauer spectra revealed a better crystal structure of the smaller, microbial precipitates compared to the abiotically formed oxides.

  8. JNK1 ablation in mice confers long-term metabolic protection from diet-induced obesity at the cost of moderate skin oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Becattini, Barbara; Zani, Fabio; Breasson, Ludovic; Sardi, Claudia; D'Agostino, Vito Giuseppe; Choo, Min-Kyung; Provenzani, Alessandro; Park, Jin Mo; Solinas, Giovanni

    2016-09-01

    Obesity and insulin resistance are associated with oxidative stress, which may be implicated in the progression of obesity-related diseases. The kinase JNK1 has emerged as a promising drug target for the treatment of obesity and type 2 diabetes. JNK1 is also a key mediator of the oxidative stress response, which can promote cell death or survival, depending on the magnitude and context of its activation. In this article, we describe a study in which the long-term effects of JNK1 inactivation on glucose homeostasis and oxidative stress in obese mice were investigated for the first time. Mice lacking JNK1 (JNK1(-/-)) were fed an obesogenic high-fat diet (HFD) for a long period. JNK1(-/-) mice fed an HFD for the long term had reduced expression of antioxidant genes in their skin, more skin oxidative damage, and increased epidermal thickness and inflammation compared with the effects in control wild-type mice. However, we also observed that the protection from obesity, adipose tissue inflammation, steatosis, and insulin resistance, conferred by JNK1 ablation, was sustained over a long period and was paralleled by decreased oxidative damage in fat and liver. We conclude that compounds targeting JNK1 activity in brain and adipose tissue, which do not accumulate in the skin, may be safer and most effective.-Becattini, B., Zani, F., Breasson, L., Sardi, C., D'Agostino, V. G., Choo, M.-K., Provenzani, A., Park, J. M., Solinas, G. JNK1 ablation in mice confers long-term metabolic protection from diet-induced obesity at the cost of moderate skin oxidative damage. PMID:27230858

  9. Towards a Predictive Thermodynamic Model of Oxidation States of Uranium Incorporated in Fe (hydr) oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Bagus, Paul S.

    2013-01-01

    The theoretical research in this project has been directed toward the interpretation of core-level spectroscopies for systems relevant to the project. For the initial efforts, the focus of our theoretical simulations has been the interpretation of laboratory and synchrotron X-Ray Photoemission Spectra, XPS. In more recent efforts, an increasing emphasis has been placed on developing transparent understandings of X-Ray Adsorption Spectra, XAS . For the XAS, the principal concern is for the near-edge features, either just below or just above, an ionization limit or edge, which are described as Near-Edge X-Ray Adsorption Fine Structure, NEXAFS. In particular, a priority has involved the analysis and interpretation of XPS and NEXAFS spectra, especially of Fe and U systems, as measured by our PNNL collaborators. The overall objective of our theoretical studies is to establish connections between features of the spectra and their origin in the electronic structure of the materials. The efforts for the analysis of XPS have been reviewed in a paper by the PI, C. J. Nelin, and E. S. Ilton from PNNL on “The interpretation of XPS spectra: Insights into materials properties”, Surf. Sci. Reports, 68, 273 (2013). Two materials properties of special interest have been the degree of ionicity and the character of the covalent bonding in a range of oxides formed with transition metal, lanthanide, and actinide cations. Since the systems treated have electrons in open shells, it has been necessary to determine the energetics and the character of the angular momentum coupling of the open shell electrons. In particular, we have established methods for the treatment of the “intermediate coupling” which arises when the system is between the limit of Russell-Saunders multiplets, and the limit of j-j coupling where the spin-orbit splittings of single electrons dominate. A recent paper by the PI, and M. J. Sassi, and K. M. Rosso, (both at PNNL) “Intermediate Coupling For Core

  10. Isolation and Characterization of a Genetically Tractable Photoautotrophic Fe(II)-Oxidizing Bacterium, Rhodopseudomonas palustris Strain TIE-1

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Yongqin; Kappler, Andreas; Croal, Laura R.; Newman, Dianne K.

    2005-01-01

    We report the isolation and characterization of a phototrophic ferrous iron [Fe(II)]-oxidizing bacterium named TIE-1 that differs from other Fe(II)-oxidizing phototrophs in that it is genetically tractable. Under anaerobic conditions, TIE-1 grows photoautotrophically with Fe(II), H2, or thiosulfate as the electron donor and photoheterotrophically with a variety of organic carbon sources. TIE-1 also grows chemoheterotrophically in the dark. This isolate appears to be a new strain of the purple nonsulfur bacterial species Rhodopseudomonas palustris, based on physiological and phylogenetic analysis. Fe(II) oxidation is optimal at pH 6.5 to 6.9. The mineral products of Fe(II) oxidation are pH dependent: below pH 7.0 goethite (α-FeOOH) forms, and above pH 7.2 magnetite (Fe3O4) forms. TIE-1 forms colonies on agar plates and is sensitive to a variety of antibiotics. A hyperactive mariner transposon is capable of random insertion into the chromosome with a transposition frequency of ∼10−5. To identify components involved in phototrophic Fe(II) oxidation, mutants of TIE-1 were generated by transposon mutagenesis and screened for defects in Fe(II) oxidation in a cell suspension assay. Among approximately 12,000 mutants screened, 6 were identified that are specifically impaired in Fe(II) oxidation. Five of these mutants have independent disruptions in a gene that is predicted to encode an integral membrane protein that appears to be part of an ABC transport system; the sixth mutant has an insertion in a gene that is a homolog of CobS, an enzyme involved in cobalamin (vitamin B12) biosynthesis. PMID:16085840

  11. CaFeAl mixed oxide derived heterogeneous catalysts for transesterification of soybean oil to biodiesel.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yongsheng; Zhang, Zaiwu; Xu, Yunfeng; Liu, Qiang; Qian, Guangren

    2015-08-01

    CaAl layered double oxides (LDO) were prepared by co-precipitation and calcined at 750°C, and then applied to biodiesel production by transesterification reaction between methanol and soybean oil. Compared with characteristics of CaFe/LDO and CaAl/LDO, CaFeAl/LDO had the best performance based on prominent catalytic activity and stability, and achieved over 90% biodiesel yield, which stayed stable (over 85%) even after 8 cycles of reaction. The optimal catalytic reaction condition was 12:1M-ratio of methanol/oil, reaction temperatures of 60°C, 270rpm stirring rate, 60min reaction time, and 6% weight-ratio of catalyst/oil. In addition, the CaFeAl/LDO catalyst is insoluble in both methanol and methyl esters and can be easily separated for further reaction, turning it into an excellent alternative for biodiesel synthesis.

  12. Analysis of surface potential and magnetic properties of Fe3O4/graphene oxide nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Amodini; Mohanty, Tanuja

    2016-05-01

    Nanocomposite of magnetite/graphene oxide (Fe3O4/GO) has been synthesized by co-precipitation method. The phase formation of the magnetite nanoparticles (Fe3O4 NPs) was confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. Effect of Fe3O4 NPs on the Raman spectra and on the surface potential of GO has been analyzed. Due to incorporation of NPs, change in the characteristic Raman peaks and also on the surface potential of GO is observed. Transmission electron microscopic (TEM) study has been carried out for surface morphology. Magnetic property measurement was carried out by using physical property measurement system (PPMS) at two different temperatures (30 K and 300K).

  13. CaFeAl mixed oxide derived heterogeneous catalysts for transesterification of soybean oil to biodiesel.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yongsheng; Zhang, Zaiwu; Xu, Yunfeng; Liu, Qiang; Qian, Guangren

    2015-08-01

    CaAl layered double oxides (LDO) were prepared by co-precipitation and calcined at 750°C, and then applied to biodiesel production by transesterification reaction between methanol and soybean oil. Compared with characteristics of CaFe/LDO and CaAl/LDO, CaFeAl/LDO had the best performance based on prominent catalytic activity and stability, and achieved over 90% biodiesel yield, which stayed stable (over 85%) even after 8 cycles of reaction. The optimal catalytic reaction condition was 12:1M-ratio of methanol/oil, reaction temperatures of 60°C, 270rpm stirring rate, 60min reaction time, and 6% weight-ratio of catalyst/oil. In addition, the CaFeAl/LDO catalyst is insoluble in both methanol and methyl esters and can be easily separated for further reaction, turning it into an excellent alternative for biodiesel synthesis. PMID:25740001

  14. Biogeochemistry of Fe and Tc Reduction and Oxidation in FRC Sediment

    SciTech Connect

    John M. Zachara; James K. Fredrickson; Ravi K. Kukkadapu; Steven C. Smith; David W. Kennedy

    2004-03-17

    The objectives are: (1) To rigorously characterize the distribution of Fe(II) and Fe(III) in FRC sediment. (2) To identify changes to Fe(II)/Fe(III) distribution and concentration resulting from DIRB activity. (3) To determine the dependence of Tc(VII) reduction rate on biogenic Fe(II) and it's forms. (4) To establish tendency of Tc(IV) and biogenic Fe(II) to oxidize and their effects on Tc immobilization. The mineralogic and chemical properties of the pristine, bioreduced, and chemically extracted FRC sediments were characterized by X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray microscopy (XRM, at the PNC-CAT beamline at APS), Moessbauer spectroscopy, and scanning and transmission electron microscopy with lattice fringe imaging. Chemical extraction included dithionite-citrate-bicarbonate (DCB), acid ammonium oxalate (AAO), and hydroxylamine hydrochloride (HAH). The FRC sediment was incubated under anoxic conditions with the facultative dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens, strain CN32 in defined aqueous solutions/media with bicarbonate and PIPES buffers for time periods exceeding 75 d. Lactate was used as the electron donor. Aqueous and sorbed Fe(II) (ferrozine assay and 0.5 N HCl extraction) and Mn(II) (ICP-MS and 10 mM CuSO{sub 4} extraction), and pH were monitored to define the reduction progress and extent. The bioreduced materials were characterized using the abovementioned techniques. Bioreduced (pasteurized) sediment or chemically extracted/reduced sediment spiked with Fe(II) was washed with a PIPES buffer/electrolyte solution, and spiked with NaTc(VII)O{sub 4} to yield a concentration of 20 {micro}M. The Tc(VII)-spiked samples were agitated and equilibrated at 25 C and sampled over time to assess the Tc(VII) reduction rate. Selected sediment samples containing 20 {micro}M of reduced Tc [Tc(IV)] were subjected to oxidation by: (1) successive headspace replacements of air, and (2) open system equilibration with air

  15. Microbial Fe(III) Oxide Reduction in Chocolate Pots Hot Springs, Yellowstone National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortney, N. W.; Roden, E. E.; Boyd, E. S.; Converse, B. J.

    2014-12-01

    Previous work on dissimilatory iron reduction (DIR) in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) has focused on high temperature, low pH environments where soluble Fe(III) is utilized as an electron acceptor for respiration. Much less attention has been paid to DIR in lower temperature, circumneutral pH environments, where solid phase Fe(III) oxides are the dominant forms of Fe(III). This study explored the potential for DIR in the warm (ca. 40-50°C), circumneutral pH Chocolate Pots hot springs (CP) in YNP. Most probable number (MPN) enumerations and enrichment culture studies confirmed the presence of endogenous microbial communities that reduced native CP Fe(III) oxides. Enrichment cultures demonstrated sustained DIR coupled to acetate and lactate oxidation through repeated transfers over ca. 450 days. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes indicated that the dominant organisms in the enrichments were closely affiliated with the well known Fe(III) reducer Geobacter metallireducens. Additional taxa included relatives of sulfate reducing bacterial genera Desulfohalobium and Thermodesulfovibrio; however, amendment of enrichments with molybdate, an inhibitor of sulfate reduction, suggested that sulfate reduction was not a primary metabolic pathway involved in DIR in the cultures. A metagenomic analysis of enrichment cultures is underway in anticipation of identifying genes involved in DIR in the less well-characterized dominant organisms. Current studies are aimed at interrogating the in situ microbial community at CP. Core samples were collected along the flow path (Fig. 1) and subdivided into 1 cm depth intervals for geochemical and microbiological analysis. The presence of significant quantities of Fe(II) in the solids indicated that DIR is active in situ. A parallel study investigated in vitro microbial DIR in sediments collected from three of the coring sites. DNA was extracted from samples from both studies for 16S rRNA gene and metagenomic sequencing in order to obtain a

  16. Outer membrane-associated serine protease involved in adhesion of Shewanella oneidensis to Fe(III) oxides.

    PubMed

    Burns, Justin L; Ginn, Brian R; Bates, David J; Dublin, Steven N; Taylor, Jeanette V; Apkarian, Robert P; Amaro-Garcia, Samary; Neal, Andrew L; Dichristina, Thomas J

    2010-01-01

    The facultative anaerobe Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 respires a variety of anaerobic electron acceptors, including insoluble Fe(III) oxides. S. oneidensis employs a number of novel strategies for respiration of insoluble Fe(III) oxides, including localization of respiratory proteins to the cell outer membrane (OM). The molecular mechanism by which S. oneidensis adheres to and respires Fe(III) oxides, however, remains poorly understood. In the present study, whole cell fractionation and MALDI-TOF-MS/MS techniques were combined to identify a serine protease (SO3800) associated with the S. oneidensis OM. SO3800 contained predicted structural motifs similar to cell surface-associated serine proteases that function as bacterial adhesins in other gram-negative bacteria. The gene encoding SO3800 was deleted from the S. oneidensis genome, and the resulting mutant strain (DeltaSO3800) was tested for its ability to adhere to and respire Fe(III) oxides. DeltaSO3800 was severely impaired in its ability to adhere to Fe(III) oxides, yet retained wild-type Fe(III) respiratory capability. Laser Doppler velocimetry and cryoetch high-resolution SEM experiments indicated that DeltaSO3800 displayed a lower cell surface charge and higher amount of surface-associated exopolysaccharides. Results of this study indicate that S. oneidensis may respire insoluble Fe(III) oxides at a distance, negating the requirement for attachment prior to electron transfer.

  17. Biological Oxidation of Fe(II) in Reduced Nontronite Coupled with Nitrate Reduction by Pseudogulbenkiania sp. Strain 2002

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Linduo; Dong, Hailiang; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Agrawal, A.; Liu, Deng; Zhang, Jing; Edelmann, Richard E.

    2013-10-15

    Nitrate contamination in soils, sediments, and water bodies is a significant issue. Although much is known about nitrate degradation in these environments, especially via microbial pathways, a complete understanding of all degradation processes, especially in clay mineral-rich soils, is still lacking. The objective of this study was to study the potential of removing nitrate contaminant using structural Fe(II) in clay mineral nontronite. Specifically, the coupled processes of microbial oxidation of Fe(II) in microbially reduced nontronite (NAu-2) and nitrate reduction by Pseudogulbenkiania species strain 2002 was investigated. Bio-oxidation experiments were conducted in bicarbonate-buffered medium under both growth and nongrowth conditions. The extents of Fe(II) oxidation and nitrate reduction were measured by wet chemical methods. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM), and 57Fe-Mössbauer spectroscopy were used to observe mineralogical changes associated with Fe(III) reduction and Fe(II) oxidation in nontronite. The bio-oxidation extent under growth and nongrowth conditions reached 93% and 57%, respectively. Over the same time period, nitrate was completely reduced under both conditions to nitrogen gas (N2), via an intermediate product nitrite. Magnetite was a mineral product of nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation, as evidenced by XRD data and TEM diffraction patterns. The results of this study highlight the importance of iron-bearing clay minerals in the global nitrogen cycle with potential applications in nitrate removal in soils.

  18. One-pot synthesis of NiFe layered double hydroxide/reduced graphene oxide composite as an efficient electrocatalyst for electrochemical and photoelectrochemical water oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youn, Duck Hyun; Park, Yoon Bin; Kim, Jae Young; Magesh, Ganesan; Jang, Youn Jeong; Lee, Jae Sung

    2015-10-01

    As an efficient non-precious metal catalyst for oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in electrochemical and photoelectrochemical water splitting, NiFe layered double hydroxide (LDH)/reduced graphene oxide (NiFe/RGO) composite is synthesized by a simple solvothermal method in one-pot. NiFe LDHs are uniformly deposited on RGO layers of high electrical conductivity and large surface area. In electrochemical water splitting, NiFe/RGO shows superior OER performance compared to bare NiFe and reference IrO2 with a lower benchmark η10 value (required overpotential to drive 10 mA cm-2) of 0.245 V. Furthermore, NiFe/RGO substantially increases the performance of a hematite photoanode in photoelectrochemical water oxidation, demonstrating its potential as an OER co-catalyst for photoelectrodes.

  19. MS title: Catalytic oxidation and removal of arsenite in the presence of Fe ions and zero-valent Al metals.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Liang-Ching; Chen, Kai-Yue; Chan, Ya-Ting; Deng, Youjun; Hwang, Che-En; Liu, Yu-Ting; Wang, Shan-Li; Kuan, Wen-Hui; Tzou, Yu-Min

    2016-11-01

    Arsenic immobilization in acid mine drainage (AMD) is required prior to its discharge to safeguard aquatic organisms. Zero-valent aluminum (ZVAl) such as aluminum beverage cans (AlBC) was used to induce the oxidation of As(III) to As(V) and enhance the subsequent As removal from an artificially prepared AMD. While indiscernible As(III) oxidation was found in aerated ZVAl systems, the addition of 0.10-0.55mM Fe(II) or Fe(III) into the AMD significantly promoted the As(V) production. Reactions between Fe(II) and H2O2, which was produced through an oxidative reaction of ZVAl with dissolved oxygen, generated OH radicals. Such OH radicals subsequently induced the As(III) oxidation. Over the course of the Fenton like reaction, ZVAl not only directly generated the H2O2, but indirectly enhanced the OH radical production by replenishing Fe(II). Arsenite oxidation in the aerated ZVAl/Fe and AlBC/Fe systems followed zero- and first-order kinetics. Differences in the kinetic reactions of ZVAl and AlBC with respect to As(III) oxidation were attributed to higher productive efficiency of the oxidant in the AlBC systems. After the completion of As(III) oxidation, As(V) could be removed simultaneously with Al(III) and Fe(III) by increasing solution's pH to 6 to produce Al/Fe hydroxides as As(V) scavengers or to form Al/Fe/As co-precipitates. PMID:27285595

  20. Tuning the superconductivity in single-layer FeSe/oxides by interface engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Rui

    2015-03-01

    The discovery of high Tc in single-layer FeSe films has enormous implications for both searching new high Tc superconductors and exploring the important factors for high temperature superconductivity. In this talk, I will show our recent angle-resolved photoemission studies on various FeSe-based heterostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy. We systematically studied the electronic structures and superconducting properties of FeSe with varied strain, different interfacial oxide materials and different thicknesses, and uncover that electronic correlations and superconducting gap-closing temperatures are tuned by interfacial effects. We exclude the direct relation between superconductivity and tensile strain, or the energy of an interfacial phonon mode, and demonstrate the crucial and non-trivial role of FeSe/oxide interface on the high pairing temperature. By tuning the interface, superconducting pairing temperature reaches up to 75K in FeSe/Nb:BaTiO3/KTaO3 with the in-plane lattice of 3.99 Å, which sets a new superconducting-gap-closing temperature record for iron-based superconductors, and may paves the way to more cost-effective applications of ultra-thin superconductors. Besides, in extremely tensile-strained single-layer FeSe films, we found that the Fermi surfaces consist of two elliptical electron pockets at the zone corner, without detectable hybridization. The lifting of degeneracy is clearly observed for the first time for the iron-based superconductors with only electron Fermi surfaces. Intriguingly, the superconducting gap distribution is anisotropic but nodeless around the electron pockets, with minima at the crossings of the two pockets. Our results provide important experimental foundations for understanding the interfacial superconductivity and the pairing symmetry puzzle of iron-based superconductors, and also provide clues for further enhancing Tc through interface engineering.

  1. Molecular Underpinnings of Fe(III) Oxide Reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Liang; Rosso, Kevin M.; Clarke, Thomas A.; Richardson, David J.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2012-02-15

    In the absence of O2 and other electron acceptors, the Gram-negative bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 can use ferric [Fe(III)] (oxy)(hydr)oxide minerals as the terminal electron acceptors for anaerobic respiration. At circumneutral pH and in the absence of strong complexing ligands, Fe(III) oxides are relatively insoluble and thus are external to the bacterial cells. S. oneidensis MR-1 and related strains of metal-reducing Shewanella have evolved the machinery (i.e., metal-reducing or Mtr pathway) for transferring electrons from the inner-membrane, through the periplasm and across the outer-membrane to the surface of extracellular Fe(III) oxides. The protein components identified to date for the Mtr pathway include CymA, MtrA, MtrB, MtrC and OmcA. CymA is an inner-membrane tetraheme c-type cytochrome (c-Cyt) that belongs to the NapC/NrfH family of quinol dehydrogenases. It is proposed that CymA oxidizes the quinol in the inner-membrane and transfers the released electrons to redox proteins in the periplasm. Although the periplasmic proteins receiving electrons from CymA during Fe(III) oxidation have not been identified, they are believed to relay the electrons in the periplasm to MtrA. A decaheme c-Cyt, MtrA is thought to be embedded in the trans outer-membrane and porin-like protein MtrB. Together, MtrAB deliver the electrons through the outer-membrane to the MtrC and OmcA on the outmost bacterial surface. MtrC and OmcA are the outer-membrane decaheme c-Cyts that are translocated across the outer-membrane by the bacterial type II secretion system. Functioning as terminal reductases, MtrC and OmcA can bind the surface of Fe(III) oxides and transfer electrons directly to these minerals via their solvent-exposed hemes. To increase their reaction rates, MtrC and OmcA can use the flavins secreted by S. oneidensis MR-1 cells as diffusible co-factors for reduction of Fe(III) oxides. Because of their extracellular location and broad redox potentials, MtrC and OmcA can

  2. Secondary Fe- and Mn-Oxides Associated with Faults Near Moab, Utah: Records of Past Fluid Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, V. H.; Reiners, P. W.

    2015-12-01

    Secondary Fe- and Mn-oxides are locally common near faults and fractures, and as cements within sandstones of the Colorado Plateau, and provide evidence of past fluid-flow. Here we describe textural, mineralogic, and geochronologic observations from fault-zone Fe- and Mn-oxide mineralization in Flat Iron Mesa, near Moab, Utah. Several hypotheses have been proposed for their origin, including reactions associated with the mixing of deep reduced and near-surface oxygenated waters. We integrate field observations, detailed SEM and petrographic observations, geochemical models, (U-Th)/He and Ar/Ar dating, and other data to develop interpretations of the formation of these deposits. SEM imaging shows that sandstone matrix cement adjacent to the faults follows two precipitation sequences: Fe-oxide followed by barite and Fe-oxide followed by Mn-oxide. Dense oxide layers also accumulated in cm-scale fractures near faults, and show the following precipitation sequence: Fe-oxide, barite, Ba rich Mn-oxide, and pure Mn-oxide. The latter sequence is observed at larger scale across faults in one site in Flat Iron Mesa. Our new He dates for Mn-oxides are 1.7-2.9 Ma while Fe-oxide dates are 2.7-3.0 Ma. If these dates represent formation ages, they are consistent with the interpreted precipitation sequence but would require protracted mineralization over Ma-timescales. Alternatively, they may represent varying degrees of He retentivity in earlier formed deposits. Previous Ar/Ar dates have been interpreted as a 20-25 Ma formation age. Ongoing Ar/Ar and He diffusion studies will resolve this discordance. Assuming the previous Ar dates do not reflect contamination by detrital K-bearing phases and do reflect oxide formation, potential interpretations for the younger He ages include recent U-Th addition, recrystallization, later oxide growth, or large diffusive He loss at low temperatures.

  3. On the effect of the Fe(2+)/Fe(3+) redox couple on oxidation of carbon in hot H3PO4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhar, H. P.; Christner, L. G.; Kush, A. K.

    1986-01-01

    Oxidation studies of graphite:glassy carbon composites have been carried out at 1 and 4.7 atm. pressures in conc. H3PO4 in the presence and absence of iron ions. The concentration of the acid was varied over 85-100 wt pct, and of the iron ions over 30-300 ppm; the temperature varied over 190-210 C. Unlike the effect of Fe, which has been observed to increase the corrosion of carbon in sulphuric acid, the corrosion in phosphoric acid was observed to be slightly decreased or not at all affected. This result arises because of the catalytic reduction of the oxidized surface groups of carbon by Fe(2+) ions. The catalytic reduction is possible because under the experimental conditions the redox potential of the Fe(2+)/Fe(3+) couple is lower than the open-circuit voltage of carbon.

  4. Electrochemical capacitance of iron oxide nanotube (Fe-NT): effect of annealing atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarma, Biplab; Jurovitzki, Abraham L.; Ray, Rupashree S.; Smith, York R.; Mohanty, Swomitra K.; Misra, Mano

    2015-07-01

    The effect of annealing atmosphere on the supercapacitance behavior of iron oxide nanotube (Fe-NT) electrodes has been explored and reported here. Iron oxide nanotubes were synthesized on a pure iron substrate through an electrochemical anodization process in an ethylene glycol solution containing 3% H2O and 0.5 wt.% NH4F. Subsequently, the annealing of the nanotubes was carried out at 500 °C for 2 h in various gas atmospheres such as air, oxygen (O2), nitrogen (N2), and argon (Ar). The morphology and crystal phases evolved after the annealing processes were examined via field emission scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The electrochemical capacitance properties of the annealed Fe-NT electrodes were evaluated by conducting cyclic voltammetry (CV), galvanostatic charge-discharge, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy tests in the Li2SO4 electrolyte. Based on these experiments, it was found that the capacitance of the Fe-NT electrodes annealed in air and O2 atmospheres shows mixed behavior comprising both the electric double layer and pseudocapacitance. However, annealing in N2 and Ar environments resulted in well-defined redox peaks in the CV profiles of the Fe-NT electrodes, which are therefore attributed to the relatively higher pseudonature of the capacitance in these electrodes. Based on the galvanostatic charge-discharge studies, the specific capacitance achieved in the Fe-NT electrode after annealing in Ar was about 300 mF cm-2, which was about twice the value obtained for N2-annealed Fe-NTs and three times higher than those annealed in air and O2. The experiments also demonstrated excellent cycle stability for the Fe-NT electrodes with 83%-85% capacitance retention, even after many charge-discharge cycles, irrespective of the gas atmospheres used during annealing. The increase in the specific capacitance was discussed in terms of increased oxygen vacancies as a result of the

  5. Characterisation of Fe-oxide nanoparticles coated with humic acid and Suwannee River natural organic matter.

    PubMed

    Chekli, Laura; Phuntsho, Sherub; Roy, Maitreyee; Shon, Ho Kyong

    2013-09-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles are becoming increasingly popular for various applications including the treatment of contaminated soil and groundwater; however, their mobility and reactivity in the subsurface environment are significantly affected by their tendency to aggregate. One solution to overcome this issue is to coat the nanoparticles with dissolved organic matter (DOM). The advantages of DOM over conventional surface modifiers are that DOM is naturally abundant in the environment, inexpensive, non-toxic and readily adsorbed onto the surface of metal oxide nanoparticles. In this study, humic acid (HA) and Suwannee River natural organic matter (SRNOM) were tested and compared as surface modifiers for Fe2O3 nanoparticles (NPs). The DOM-coated Fe2O3 NPs were characterised by various analytical methods including: flow field-flow fractionation (FlFFF), high performance size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The stability of the coated NPs was then evaluated by assessing their aggregation and disaggregation behaviour over time. Results showed that both HA and SRNOM were rapidly and readily adsorbed on the surface of Fe2O3 NPs, providing electrosteric stabilisation over a wide range of pH. HPSEC results showed that the higher molecular weight components of DOM were preferentially adsorbed onto the surface of Fe2O3. As SRNOM consists of macromolecules with a higher molecular weight than HA, the measured size of the SRNOM-coated Fe2O3 NPs was 30% larger than the HA-coated Fe2O3 NPs. FTIR results indicated the occurrence of hydrogen bonding arising from electrostatic interaction between the DOM and Fe2O3 NPs. Finally, a stability study showed that after 14 days, small agglomerates and aggregates were formed. The HA-coated Fe2O3 NPs formed agglomerates which were easily disaggregated using a vortex mixer, with the coated NPs returning to their initial size. However, SRNOM-coated Fe2O3 NPs were only partially disaggregated

  6. Enhanced Piezoelectric Energy Harvesting Performance of Flexible PVDF-TrFE Bilayer Films with Graphene Oxide.

    PubMed

    Bhavanasi, Venkateswarlu; Kumar, Vipin; Parida, Kaushik; Wang, Jiangxin; Lee, Pooi See

    2016-01-13

    Ferroelectric materials have attracted interest in recent years due to their application in energy harvesting owing to its piezoelectric nature. Ferroelectric polymers are flexible and can sustain larger strains compared to inorganic counterparts, making them attractive for harvesting energy from mechanical vibrations. Herein, we report, for the first time, the enhanced piezoelectric energy harvesting performance of the bilayer films of poled poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) [PVDF-TrFE] and graphene oxide (GO). The bilayer film exhibits superior energy harvesting performance with a voltage output of 4 V and power output of 4.41 μWcm(-2) compared to poled PVDF-TrFE films alone (voltage output of 1.9 V and power output of 1.77 μWcm(-2)). The enhanced voltage and power output in the presence of GO film is due to the combined effect of electrostatic contribution from graphene oxide, residual tensile stress, enhanced Young's modulus of the bilayer films, and the presence of space charge at the interface of the PVDF-TrFE and GO films, arising from the uncompensated polarization of PVDF-TrFE. Higher Young's modulus and dielectric constant of GO led to the efficient transfer of mechanical and electrical energy.

  7. Enhanced Piezoelectric Energy Harvesting Performance of Flexible PVDF-TrFE Bilayer Films with Graphene Oxide.

    PubMed

    Bhavanasi, Venkateswarlu; Kumar, Vipin; Parida, Kaushik; Wang, Jiangxin; Lee, Pooi See

    2016-01-13

    Ferroelectric materials have attracted interest in recent years due to their application in energy harvesting owing to its piezoelectric nature. Ferroelectric polymers are flexible and can sustain larger strains compared to inorganic counterparts, making them attractive for harvesting energy from mechanical vibrations. Herein, we report, for the first time, the enhanced piezoelectric energy harvesting performance of the bilayer films of poled poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) [PVDF-TrFE] and graphene oxide (GO). The bilayer film exhibits superior energy harvesting performance with a voltage output of 4 V and power output of 4.41 μWcm(-2) compared to poled PVDF-TrFE films alone (voltage output of 1.9 V and power output of 1.77 μWcm(-2)). The enhanced voltage and power output in the presence of GO film is due to the combined effect of electrostatic contribution from graphene oxide, residual tensile stress, enhanced Young's modulus of the bilayer films, and the presence of space charge at the interface of the PVDF-TrFE and GO films, arising from the uncompensated polarization of PVDF-TrFE. Higher Young's modulus and dielectric constant of GO led to the efficient transfer of mechanical and electrical energy. PMID:26693844

  8. Dissolved and particulate Fe in a hydrothermal plume at 9{degree}45 minutes N, East Pacific Rise: Slow Fe (II) oxidation kinetics in Pacific plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Field, M.P.; Sherrell, R.M.

    2000-02-01

    Production of Fe(III) particles in hydrothermal plumes is of fundamental importance to the long-term effect of hydrothermal circulation on seawater composition. To elucidate the fundamental controls on Fe redox kinetics and solution/particle partitioning in neutrally buoyant plumes, the authors sampled near-field (<3 km) plume particles at 9{degree}45 minutes N on the East Pacific Rise in 1996, returning in 1997 to sample both particulate and dissolved phases (0.40 {micro}m filter). Concentrations of dissolved Fe varied from 320 to 20 nM in proximal (<0.3 km from vent site) to distal samples (1--3 km downfield), constituting {approximately}85--50% of total Fe, respectively. Based on vent fluid dilution factors calculated from dissolved Mn, a mass balance for vent fluid Fe at this site indicates that {approximately}65% of Fe is lost to particulate sulfide settling in the buoyant plume, and that particulate Fe in distal (1--3 km) samples is twice as concentrated as predicted from dilution of particles in proximal plume water. These observations are consistent with a calculated Fe(II) oxidation half-time of 3.3 h, long enough that Fe(III) colloid production and aggregation occurs primarily in the neutrally buoyant plume at relatively high dilutions, preventing generation of high particular Fe concentrations (11--56 nM observed). A general investigation of Fe(II) oxidation rates in plumes worldwide gives Fe(II) oxidation half-lives as short as 17 min at some Atlantic sites, and as long as 6 h at some Pacific sites. The calculations indicate that the distribution of Fe particles in plumes depends chiefly on inter-basin differences in ambient deep water chemistry (primarily pH and dissolved O{sub 2}) and on local currents driving plume dilution, and to a much lesser extent on variations in primary vent fluid composition. Long-term changes in thermohaline circulation or ocean biogeochemistry may therefore alter Fe dynamics and minor element fluxes associated with global

  9. Sodium-Ion Storage Properties of FeS-Reduced Graphene Oxide Composite Powder with a Crumpled Structure.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Yeon; Kang, Yun Chan

    2016-02-18

    The sodium-ion storage properties of FeS-reduced graphene oxide (rGO) and Fe3O4 -rGO composite powders with crumpled structures have been studied. The Fe3 O4 -rGO composite powder, prepared by one-pot spray pyrolysis, could be transformed to an FeS-rGO composite powder through a simple sulfidation treatment. The mean size of the Fe3O4 nanocrystals in the Fe3O4 -rGO composite powder was 4.4 nm. After sulfidation, FeS nanocrystals of size several hundred nanometers were confined within the crumpled structure of the rGO matrix. The initial discharge capacities of the FeS-rGO and Fe3O4 -rGO composite powders were 740 and 442 mA h g(-1), and their initial charge capacities were 530 and 165 mA h g(-1), respectively. The discharge capacities of the FeS-rGO and Fe3O4 -rGO composite powders at the 50th cycle were 547 and 150 mA h g(-1), respectively. The FeS-rGO composite powder showed superior sodium-ion storage performance compared to the Fe3O4 -rGO composite powder.

  10. Abiotic selenium redox transformations in the presence of Fe(II,III) oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Myneni, S.C.B.; Tokunaga, T.K.; Brown, G.E. Jr.

    1997-11-07

    Many suboxic sediments and soils contain an Fe(II,III) oxide called green rust. Spectroscopic evidence showed that selenium reduces from an oxidation state of +VI to 0 in the presence of green rust at rates comparable with those found in sediments. Selenium speciation was different in solid and aqueous phases. These redox reactions represent an abiotic pathway for selenium cycling in natural environments, which has previously been considered to be mediated principally by microorganisms. Similar green rust-mediated abiotic redox reactions are likely to be involved in the mobility of several other trace elements and contaminants in the environment. 27 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Effect of MgO/Fe Interface Oxidation State on Electric-Field Modulation of Interfacial Magnetic Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, X. W.; Cheng, X. M.; Wang, S.; Huang, T.; Xue, K. H.; Miao, X. S.

    2016-06-01

    The impact of the MgO/Fe interface oxidation state on the electric-field-modified magnetic anisotropy in MgO/Fe has been revealed by density functional calculations. It is shown that the influence of the interface oxidation is strong enough to dominate the effect of the electric field on the magnetic anisotropy of MgO/Fe-based films. The magnetoelectric coefficients are calculated to be positive for the ideal and overoxidized MgO/Fe interface, but an abnormal negative value emerges in the underoxidized case. By analyzing the interface states based on density of states and band structures, we demonstrate that the considerably different electronic structures of the three oxidized MgO/Fe interfaces lead to the strong discrepancy in the electric-field modulation of the interfacial magnetic anisotropy. These results are of considerable interest in the area of electric-field-controlled magnetic anisotropy and switching.

  12. Immobilization of Radionuclides Through Anaerobic Bio-oxidation of Fe(ll)

    SciTech Connect

    Coates, John D.

    2005-06-01

    Over the last year we have focused our efforts on two independent aspects (a) further investigation of the microbiology and geochemistry of nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation and (b) assembling the sequenced genome of Dechloromonas aromatica strain RCB. This work has been performed in a cooperative fashion amongst the independent labs of the three PI's with the UC Berkeley lab taking the lead under the guidance of J.D. Coates.

  13. Oxidative degradation of nalidixic acid by nano-magnetite via Fe2+/O2-mediated reactions.

    PubMed

    Ardo, Sandy G; Nélieu, Sylvie; Ona-Nguema, Georges; Delarue, Ghislaine; Brest, Jessica; Pironin, Elsa; Morin, Guillaume

    2015-04-01

    Organic pollution has become a critical issue worldwide due to the increasing input and persistence of organic compounds in the environment. Iron minerals are potentially able to degrade efficiently organic pollutants sorbed to their surfaces via oxidative or reductive transformation processes. Here, we explored the oxidative capacity of nano-magnetite (Fe3O4) having ∼ 12 nm particle size, to promote heterogeneous Fenton-like reactions for the removal of nalidixic acid (NAL), a recalcitrant quinolone antibacterial agent. Results show that NAL was adsorbed at the surface of magnetite and was efficiently degraded under oxic conditions. Nearly 60% of this organic contaminant was eliminated after 30 min exposure to air bubbling in solution in the presence of an excess of nano-magnetite. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fe K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XANES and EXAFS) showed a partial oxidation of magnetite to maghemite during the reaction, and four byproducts of NAL were identified by liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy (UHPLC-MS/MS). We also provide evidence that hydroxyl radicals (HO(•)) were involved in the oxidative degradation of NAL, as indicated by the quenching of the degradation reaction in the presence of ethanol. This study points out the promising potentialities of mixed valence iron oxides for the treatment of soils and wastewater contaminated by organic pollutants.

  14. Influence of organics and silica on Fe(II) oxidation rates and cell-mineral aggregate formation by the green-sulfur Fe(II)-oxidizing bacterium Chlorobium ferrooxidans KoFox - Implications for Fe(II) oxidation in ancient oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauger, Tina; Byrne, James M.; Konhauser, Kurt O.; Obst, Martin; Crowe, Sean; Kappler, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    Most studies on microbial phototrophic Fe(II) oxidation (photoferrotrophy) have focused on purple bacteria, but recent evidence points to the importance of green-sulfur bacteria (GSB). Their recovery from modern ferruginous environments suggests that these photoferrotrophs can offer insights into how their ancient counterparts grew in Archean oceans at the time of banded iron formation (BIF) deposition. It is unknown, however, how Fe(II) oxidation rates, cell-mineral aggregate formation, and Fe-mineralogy vary under environmental conditions reminiscent of the geological past. To address this, we studied the Fe(II)-oxidizer Chlorobium ferrooxidans KoFox, a GSB living in co-culture with the heterotrophic Geospirillum strain KoFum. We investigated the mineralogy of Fe(III) metabolic products at low/high light intensity, and in the presence of dissolved silica and/or fumarate. Silica and fumarate influenced the crystallinity and particle size of the produced Fe(III) minerals. The presence of silica also enhanced Fe(II) oxidation rates, especially at high light intensities, potentially by lowering Fe(II)-toxicity to the cells. Electron microscopic imaging showed no encrustation of either KoFox or KoFum cells with Fe(III)-minerals, though weak associations were observed suggesting co-sedimentation of Fe(III) with at least some biomass via these aggregates, which could support diagenetic Fe(III)-reduction. Given that GSB are presumably one of the most ancient photosynthetic organisms, and pre-date cyanobacteria, our findings, on the one hand, strengthen arguments for photoferrotrophic activity as a likely mechanism for BIF deposition on a predominantly anoxic early Earth, but, on the other hand, also suggest that preservation of remnants of Fe(II)-oxidizing GSB as microfossils in the rock record is unlikely.

  15. Modeling of oxidation kinetics of Y-doped Fe-Cr-Al alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Z.; Gao, W.; He, Y.

    2000-04-01

    Studies using advanced analytical techniques indicated that the reactive elements (RE) segregate along the oxide grain boundaries and at the oxide-alloy interface during oxidation of {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} forming alloys. The segregation results in inward oxygen diffusion along the oxide grain boundaries as the predominant transport process in the oxide growth. The present work establishes a mathematical model based on the mechanisms of inward oxygen diffusion along the grain boundaries and oxide grain coarsening. This model has been used to describe the oxidation kinetics of Y-doped Fe-Cr-Al alloys. The results showed a much better agreement with the experimental data than the parabolic rate law. By using this model, the exponential number for the grain coarsening of alumina scales during oxidation was calculated to be {approximately}3. The activation energy for oxygen diffusing along the grain boundaries was 450 kJ/mol. They are also in good agreement with values reported in the literatures.

  16. Selective Internal Oxidation as a Mechanism for Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking of Ni-Cr-Fe Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capell, Brent M.; Was, Gary S.

    2007-06-01

    The mechanism of selective internal oxidation (SIO) for intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of nickel-base alloys has been investigated through a series of experiments using high-purity alloys and a steam environment to control the formation of NiO on the surface. Five alloys (Ni-9Fe, Ni-5Cr, Ni-5Cr-9Fe, Ni-16Cr-9Fe, and Ni-30Cr-9Fe) were used to investigate oxidation and intergranular cracking behavior for hydrogen-to-water vapor partial pressure ratios (PPRs) between 0.001 and 0.9. The Ni-9Fe, Ni-5Cr, and Ni-5Cr-9Fe alloys formed a uniform Ni(OH)2 film at PPRs less than 0.09, and the higher chromium alloys formed chromium-rich oxide films over the entire PPR range studied. Corrosion coupon results show that grain boundary oxides extended for significant depths (>150 nm) below the sample surface for all but the highest Cr containing alloy. Constant extension rate tensile (CERT) test results showed that intergranular cracking varied with PPR and cracking was more pronounced at a PPR value where nonprotective Ni(OH)2 was able to form and a link between the nonprotective Ni(OH)2 film and the formation of grain boundary oxides is suggested. The observation of grain boundary oxides in stressed and unstressed samples as well as the influence of alloy content on IG cracking and oxidation support SIO as a mechanism for IGSCC.

  17. Development of FeCoB/Graphene Oxide based microwave absorbing materials for X-Band region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sukanta; Chandra Nayak, Ganesh; Sahu, S. K.; Oraon, Ramesh

    2015-06-01

    This work explored the microwave absorption capability of Graphene Oxide and Graphene Oxide coated with FeCoB for stealth technology. Epoxy based microwave absorbing materials were prepared with 30% loading of Graphene Oxide, FeCoB alloy and Graphene Oxide coated with FeCoB. Graphene Oxide and FeCoB were synthesized by Hummer's and Co-precipitation methods, respectively. The filler particles were characterized by FESEM, XRD and Vibrating Sample Magnetometer techniques. Permittivity, permeability and reflection loss values of the composite absorbers were measured with vector network analyzer which showed a reflection loss value of -7.86 dB, at 10.72 GHz, for single layered Graphene Oxide/Epoxy based microwave absorbers which can be correlated to the absorption of about 83.97% of the incident microwave energy. Reflection loss value of FeCoB/Epoxy based microwave absorber showed -13.30 dB at 11.67 GHz, which corresponded to maximum absorption of 93.8%. However, reflection loss values of Graphene Oxide coated with FeCoB/Epoxy based single-layer absorber increased to -22.24 dB at 12.4 GHz which corresponds to an absorption of 99% of the incident microwave energy.

  18. Evidence of a reduction reaction of oxidized iron/cobalt by boron atoms diffused toward naturally oxidized surface of CoFeB layer during annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Soshi Honjo, Hiroaki; Niwa, Masaaki; Ikeda, Shoji; Ohno, Hideo; Endoh, Tetsuo

    2015-04-06

    We have investigated the redox reaction on the surface of Ta/CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB magnetic tunnel junction stack samples after annealing at 300, 350, and 400 °C for 1 h using angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy for precise analysis of the chemical bonding states. At a capping tantalum layer thickness of 1 nm, both the capping tantalum layer and the surface of the underneath CoFeB layer in the as-deposited stack sample were naturally oxidized. By comparison of the Co 2p and Fe 2p spectra among the as-deposited and annealed samples, reduction of the naturally oxidized cobalt and iron atoms occurred on the surface of the CoFeB layer. The reduction reaction was more significant at higher annealing temperature. Oxidized cobalt and iron were reduced by boron atoms that diffused toward the surface of the top CoFeB layer. A single CoFeB layer was prepared on SiO{sub 2}, and a confirmatory evidence of the redox reaction with boron diffusion was obtained by angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis of the naturally oxidized surface of the CoFeB single layer after annealing. The redox reaction is theoretically reasonable based on the Ellingham diagram.

  19. Optoelectronic properties of Fe impurities in delafossite oxide materials. A high-throughput investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haycock, Barry; Lewis, James P.

    2014-03-01

    A group of materials that shows promise in optoelectronic applications is the family of oxide materials (delafossites), of the form ABO2, where the A site is a monovalent cation (e . g . , Cu, Ag, or Au) and the B site is a trivalent cation (e . g ., Ga, Y, Al, or In). The bandgap of some delafossites can be tailored for specific purposes, such as in photocatalysis applications, with B-site doping. We report on our recent investigations of the properties of CuGaO2, CuInO2, CuAlO2 and NaInO2 and predict the relative disorder of Fe impurities by comparing crystallographic metrics resulting from Fe doping. We performed approximately 10K calculations, in parallel on the Titan platform (Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility), of possible Fe-impurity permutations to determine the most-likely configurations of Fe impurities relative to each another. Our computational approach allows us to study large supercells, consisting of 432 atoms, which enable us to examine the properties of these materials in increments of 1% for the B-site doping of Fe. We will present results from our energetically-preferred supercells and discuss further applications of our techniques applied for characterization of new reconstructions via derived metrics.

  20. Density functional theory study of nitrous oxide decomposition over Fe- and Co-ZSM-5

    SciTech Connect

    Ryder, Jason A.; Chakraborty, Arup K.; Bell, Alexis T.

    2001-12-19

    Iron- and cobalt-exchanged ZSM-5 are active catalysts for the dissociation of nitrous oxide. In this study, density functional theory was used to assess a possible reaction pathway for the catalytic dissociation of N2O. The active center was taken to be mononuclear [FeO]+ or [CoO]+, and the surrounding portion of the zeolite was represented by a 24-atom cluster. The first step of N2O decomposition involves the formation of [FeO2]+ or [CoO2]+ and the release of N2. The metal-oxo species produced in this step then reacts with N2O again, to release N2 and O2. The apparent activation energies for N2O dissociation in Fe-ZSM-5 and Co-ZSM-5 are 39.4 and 34.6 kcal/mol, respectively. The preexponential factor for the apparent first-order rate coefficient is estimated to be of the order 107 s-1 Pa-1. While the calculated activation energy for Fe-ZSM-5 is in good agreement with that measured experimentally, the value of the preexponential factor is an order of magnitude smaller than that observed . The calculated activation energy for Co-ZSM-5 is higher than that reported experimentally. However, consistent with experiment, the rate of N2O decomposition on Co-ZSM-5 is predicted to be significantly higher than that on Fe-ZSM-5.

  1. Monolayer-directed Assembly and Magnetic Properties of FePt Nanoparticles on Patterned Aluminum Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Yildirim, Oktay; Gang, Tian; Kinge, Sachin; Reinhoudt, David N.; Blank, Dave H.A.; van der Wiel, Wilfred G.; Rijnders, Guus; Huskens, Jurriaan

    2010-01-01

    FePt nanoparticles (NPs) were assembled on aluminum oxide substrates, and their ferromagnetic properties were studied before and after thermal annealing. For the first time, phosph(on)ates were used as an adsorbate to form self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on alumina to direct the assembly of NPs onto the surface. The Al2O3 substrates were functionalized with aminobutylphosphonic acid (ABP) or phosphonoundecanoic acid (PNDA) SAMs or with poly(ethyleneimine) (PEI) as a reference. FePt NPs assembled on all of these monolayers, but much less on unmodified Al2O3, which shows that ligand exchange at the NPs is the most likely mechanism of attachment. Proper modification of the Al2O3 surface and controlling the immersion time of the modified Al2O3 substrates into the FePt NP solution resulted in FePt NPs assembly with controlled NP density. Alumina substrates were patterned by microcontact printing using aminobutylphosphonic acid as the ink, allowing local NP assembly. Thermal annealing under reducing conditions (96%N2/4%H2) led to a phase change of the FePt NPs from the disordered FCC phase to the ordered FCT phase. This resulted in ferromagnetic behavior at room temperature. Such a process can potentially be applied in the fabrication of spintronic devices. PMID:20480007

  2. [Nitric Oxide Removal with a Fe-TiO₂/PSF Hybrid Catalytic Membrane Bioreactor].

    PubMed

    Li, Bao-ren; Chen, Zhou-yang; Wang, Jian-bin; Zhang, Zai-li; Fan, Qing-juan; Wei, Zai-shan

    2016-03-15

    The Fe-doped titanium dioxide (Fe-TiO₂) was prepared by the sol-gel method and was loaded on polysulfone (PSF) hollow fiber membrane. A novel Fe-TiO₂/PSF hybrid catalytic membrane biofilm reactor (HCMBfR) was investigated for nitric oxide removal, to further improve the elimination capacity. HCMBfR exhibited a good stability in the 180-day operation period, the NO removal efficiency was up to 93.2% and the maximum elimination capacity reached 167.1 g · (m³ · h)⁻1. The additional use of the biofilm to wet Fe-TiO₂/PSF membrane catalysis reactor led to the enhancement of NO removal efficiency from 59. 5% to 66% . The NO removal efficiency in the intimate coupling of Fe-TiO₂/PSF hybrid catalytic membrane and biofilm reactor ( HCMBfR) increased from 1.4% to 13% as compared to that of the membrane biofilm reactor (MBfR) only. The optimal illumination intensity, gas residence time, pH and nC/nN were 670 lx, 9 a, 6.8-7.2 and 3.7, respectively. PMID:27337874

  3. Location of nanophase Fe-oxides in palagonitic soils: Implication for Martian pigments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, D. C.; Morris, R. V.; Ming, D. W.; Lauer, H. V., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Palagonitic materials from Mauna Kea, Hawaii, were identified as Mars analogs based on their spectral and magnetic properties. These materials probably resulted from hydrothermal alteration during eruption of the volcano and/or from weathering under ambient conditions. The reflectance spectra of the Mars surface obtained by Earth-based telescopes and the reflectance spectra of analogs obtained in the laboratory show features due to electronic transitions of Fe(III) in oxide particles that range in size from nanometer (nanophase) to micrometer sized or larger. The presence of Fe(III) suggests oxidizing conditions during the alteration process in Mars that may have occurred in the past or during a slow ongoing process. Two naturally altered basaltic samples from Hawaii (HWMK12 and HWMK13) and a laboratory-altered (PH-13-DCGT2) basaltic glass similar in elemental composition to the above two samples was examined. All three samples exhibited spectral characteristics similar to martian bright-region spectra. Chemical and mineralogical changes occurring at the surface of these basalts were studied in order to understand the basis for their Mars-like properties. The spectral properties of the three samples were examined after the removal of Fe oxides by chemical extractants.

  4. Extracellular Electron Transfer to Fe(III) Oxides by the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Geoglobus ahangari via a Direct Contact Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Manzella, Michael P.; Reguera, Gemma

    2013-01-01

    The microbial reduction of Fe(III) plays an important role in the geochemistry of hydrothermal systems, yet it is poorly understood at the mechanistic level. Here we show that the obligate Fe(III)-reducing archaeon Geoglobus ahangari uses a direct-contact mechanism for the reduction of Fe(III) oxides to magnetite at 85°C. Alleviating the need to directly contact the mineral with the addition of a chelator or the electron shuttle anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) stimulated Fe(III) reduction. In contrast, entrapment of the oxides within alginate beads to prevent cell contact with the electron acceptor prevented Fe(III) reduction and cell growth unless AQDS was provided. Furthermore, filtered culture supernatant fluids had no effect on Fe(III) reduction, ruling out the secretion of an endogenous mediator too large to permeate the alginate beads. Consistent with a direct contact mechanism, electron micrographs showed cells in intimate association with the Fe(III) mineral particles, which once dissolved revealed abundant curled appendages. The cells also produced several heme-containing proteins. Some of them were detected among proteins sheared from the cell's outer surface and were required for the reduction of insoluble Fe(III) oxides but not for the reduction of the soluble electron acceptor Fe(III) citrate. The results thus support a mechanism in which the cells directly attach and transfer electrons to the Fe(III) oxides using redox-active proteins exposed on the cell surface. This strategy confers on G. ahangari a competitive advantage for accessing and reducing Fe(III) oxides under the extreme physical and chemical conditions of hot ecosystems. PMID:23728807

  5. Inventory of H2O in the ancient Martian regolith from Northwest Africa 7034: The important role of Fe oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muttik, Nele; McCubbin, Francis M.; Keller, Lindsay P.; Santos, Alison R.; McCutcheon, Whitney A.; Provencio, Paula P.; Rahman, Zia; Shearer, Charles K.; Boyce, Jeremy W.; Agee, Carl B.

    2014-12-01

    Water-rich Martian regolith breccia Northwest Africa (NWA) 7034 was analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy to determine the inventory and phase distribution of H2O (used herein to refer to both molecular H2O and OH- structural components in hydrous minerals). Hydrous Fe oxide phases (hydromaghemite and an unidentified nanocrystalline Fe-bearing oxide phase observed with hydromaghemite) and phyllosilicates (saponite) were identified as the primary mineralogic hosts for H2O with a minor contribution from Cl-rich apatite. Based on mass balance calculations and modal abundances of minerals constrained by powder X-ray diffraction and petrography, we can account for the entire 6000 ppm H2O measured in bulk rock analyses of NWA 7034. This H2O is distributed evenly between hydrous Fe-rich oxides and phyllosilicates, indicating that Fe oxides could be as important as phyllosilicates for H2O storage in Martian surface material.

  6. Oxidation of nitrogen oxide in hybrid plasma-catalytic reactors based on DBD and Fe2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jõgi, Indrek; Erme, Kalev; Haljaste, Ants; Laan, Matti

    2013-02-01

    In the present study, Fe2O3 was used as catalyst for the removal of NO in a hybrid plasma- catalytic reactor. The catalyst was located either directly inside the hybrid plasma-catalytic reactor or in a separate catalytic reactor, which followed ozone producing and injecting plasma reactor. Ozone production in such a reactor was dependent on the state of the electrode surface. The fresh catalyst ensured an order of magnitude smaller ozone concentration in the outlet of the hybrid reactor. After a short treatment of the catalyst with NO2, its ability to destroy ozone diminished but was regained after heating of the reactor up to 100 °C. Similarly to earlier results obtained with TiO2, the removal of NO in the hybrid reactor with Fe2O3 was enhanced compared to that in an ordinary plasma reactor. In the ozone injection reactor, oxidation of NO to NO2 took place with considerably higher efficiency compared to the hybrid reactor. The use of catalyst in the ozonation stage further improved the oxidation of NO2 to N2O5. The time-dependence effects of NO removal during plasma and ozone oxidation were explained by reactions between NO2 adsorbed on surface, with surface-bound NO3 and gas phase NO as the reaction product. Contribution to the Topical Issue "13th International Symposium on High Pressure Low Temperature Plasma Chemistry (Hakone XIII)", Edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Henryca Danuta Stryczewska and Yvan Ségui.

  7. Enhanced reduction of Fe(III) oxides and methyl orange by Klebsiella oxytoca in presence of anthraquinone-2-disulfonate.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lei; Wang, Shi; Tang, Qing-Wen; Cao, Ming-Yue; Li, Jia; Yuan, Kun; Wang, Ping; Li, Wen-Wei

    2016-05-01

    Klebsiella oxytoca GS-4-08 is capable of azo dye reduction, but its quinone respiration and Fe(III) reduction abilities have not been reported so far. In this study, the abilities of this strain were reported in detail for the first time. As the biotic reduction of Fe(III) plays an important role in the biogeochemical cycles, two amorphous Fe(III) oxides were tested as the sole electron acceptor during the anaerobic respiration of strain GS-4-08. For the reduction of goethite and hematite, the biogenic Fe(II) concentrations reached 0.06 and 0.15 mM, respectively. Humic acid analog anthraquinone-2-disulfonate (AQS) was found to serve as an electron shuttle to increase the reduction of both methyl orange (MO) and amorphous Fe(III) oxides, and improve the dye tolerance of the strain. However, the formation of Fe(II) was not accelerated by biologically reduced AQS (B-AH2QS) because of the high bioavailability of soluble Fe(III). For the K. oxytoca strain, high soluble Fe(III) concentrations (above 1 mM) limit its growth and decolorization ability, while lower soluble Fe(III) concentrations produce an electron competition with MO initially, and then stimulate the decolorization after the electron couples of Fe(III)/Fe(II) are formed. With the ability to respire both soluble Fe(III) and insoluble Fe(III) oxides, this formerly known azo-reducer may be used as a promising model organism for the study of the interaction of these potentially competing processes in contaminated environments. PMID:26762391

  8. Controlled assembly of Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles on graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yi; Chen, Biao; Zhang, Liming; Huang, Jie; Chen, Fenghua; Yang, Zupei; Yao, Jianlin; Zhang, Zhijun

    2011-04-01

    We describe a facile approach to controllable assembly of monodisperse Fe3O4nanoparticles (NPs) on chemically reduced graphene oxide (rGO). First, reduction and functionalization of GO by polyetheylenimine (PEI) were achieved simultaneously by simply heating the PEI and GO mixture at 60 °C for 12 h. The process is environmentally friendly and convenient compared with previously reported methods. Meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinnic acid (DMSA)-modified Fe3O4 NPs were then conjugated to the PEI moiety which is located on the periphery of the GO sheets via formation of amide bonds between COOH groups of DMSA molecules bound on the surface of the Fe3O4 NPs and aminegroups of PEI. The magnetic GO composites were characterized by means of TEM, AFM, UV-vis, FTIR, Raman, TGA, and VSM measurements. Finally, preliminary results of using the Fe3O4-rGO composites for efficient removal of tetracycline, an antibiotic that is often found as a contaminant in the environment, are reported.We describe a facile approach to controllable assembly of monodisperse Fe3O4nanoparticles (NPs) on chemically reduced graphene oxide (rGO). First, reduction and functionalization of GO by polyetheylenimine (PEI) were achieved simultaneously by simply heating the PEI and GO mixture at 60 °C for 12 h. The process is environmentally friendly and convenient compared with previously reported methods. Meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinnic acid (DMSA)-modified Fe3O4 NPs were then conjugated to the PEI moiety which is located on the periphery of the GO sheets via formation of amide bonds between COOH groups of DMSA molecules bound on the surface of the Fe3O4 NPs and aminegroups of PEI. The magnetic GO composites were characterized by means of TEM, AFM, UV-vis, FTIR, Raman, TGA, and VSM measurements. Finally, preliminary results of using the Fe3O4-rGO composites for efficient removal of tetracycline, an antibiotic that is often found as a contaminant in the environment, are reported. Electronic supplementary information

  9. The Oxidation State of Fe in Glasses from the Galapagos Archipelago: Variable Oxygen Fugacity as a Function of Mantle Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, M. E.; Kelley, K. A.; Cottrell, E.; Saal, A. E.; Kurz, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    The oxidation state of the mantle plays an intrinsic role in the magmatic evolution of the Earth. Here we present new μ-XANES measurements of Fe3+/ΣFe ratios (a proxy for ƒO2) in a suite of submarine glasses from the Galapagos Archipelago. Using previously presented major, trace, and volatile elements and isotopic data for 4 groups of glass that come from distinct mantle sources (depleted upper mantle, 2 recycled, and a primitive mantle source) we show that Fe3+/ΣFe ratios vary both with the influence of shallow level processes and with variations in mantle source. Fe3+/ΣFe ratios increase with differentiation (i.e. decreasing MgO), but show a large variation at a given MgO. Progressive degassing of sulfur accompanies decreasing Fe3+/ΣFe ratios, while assimilation of hydrothermally altered crust (as indicated by increasing Sr/Sr*) is shown to increase Fe3+/ΣFe ratios. After taking these processes into account, there is still variability in the Fe3+/ΣFe ratios of the isotopically distinct sample suites studied, yielding a magmatic ƒO2 that ranges from ΔQFM = +0.16 to +0.74 (error < 0.5 log units) and showing that oxidation state varies as a function of mantle source composition in the Galapagos hotspot system. After correcting back to a common MgO content = 8.0 wt%, the trace element depleted group similar to MORB (ITD), and the group similar to Pinta (WD = high Th/La, Δ7/4, Δ8/4 ratios) show Fe3+/ΣFe ratios within the range of MORB (average ITD = 0.162 ± 0.003 and WD = 0.164 ± 0.006). Another trace element enriched group similar to Sierra Negra and Cerro Azul (ITE = enriched Sr and Pb isotopes) shows evidence of mixing between oxidized and reduced sources (ITE oxidized end-member = 0.177). This suggests that mantle sources in the Galapagos that are thought to contain recycled components (i.e., WD and ITE groups) have distinct oxidation states. The high 3He/4He Fernandina samples (HHe group) are shown to be the most oxidized (ave. 0.175 ± 0

  10. Comparison of characteristics of selected metallic and metal oxide nanoparticles produced by picosecond laser ablation at 532 and 1064 nm wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamad, Abubaker; Li, Lin; Liu, Zhu

    2016-10-01

    Picosecond laser generation of nanoparticles was only recently reported. The effect of laser wavelength in picosecond laser generation of nanoparticles is not yet fully understood. This investigation reports the new findings comparing the characteristics of Au, Ag, Ag-TiO2, TiO2, ZnO and iron oxide nanoparticles generated by picosecond laser ablation in deionised water at 532 and 1064 nm laser wavelengths. The laser ablation was carried out at a fixed pulse width of 10 ps, a repetition rate of 400 kHz and a scan speed of 250 mm/s. The nanoparticles were characterised by UV-Vis optical spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The work shows that there is no noticeable difference in the size of the metal oxide nanoparticles produced at 532 and 1064 nm, especially for the TiO2 and ZnO nanoparticles; however, a considerable size difference can be seen for metallic (e.g. Au) and metallic compound (e.g. Ag-TiO2) nanoparticles at the two wavelengths. It demonstrates that noble metals are more profoundly affected by laser wavelengths. The reasons behind these results are discussed. In addition, the work shows that there are different crystalline structures of the TiO2 nanoparticles at 1064 and 532 nm wavelengths.

  11. Mechanisms for Electron Transfer Through Pili to Fe(III) Oxide in Geobacter

    SciTech Connect

    Lovley, Derek R.

    2015-03-09

    The purpose of these studies was to aid the Department of Energy in its goal of understanding how microorganisms involved in the bioremediation of metals and radionuclides sustain their activity in the subsurface. This information is required in order to incorporate biological processes into decision making for environmental remediation and long-term stewardship of contaminated sites. The proposed research was designed to elucidate the mechanisms for electron transfer to Fe(III) oxides in Geobacter species because Geobacter species are abundant dissimilatory metal-reducing microorganisms in a diversity of sites in which uranium is undergoing natural attenuation via the reduction of soluble U(VI) to insoluble U(IV) or when this process is artificially stimulated with the addition of organic electron donors. This study investigated the novel, but highly controversial, concept that the final conduit for electron transfer to Fe(III) oxides are electrically conductive pili. The specific objectives were to: 1) further evaluate the conductivity along the pili of Geobacter sulfurreducens and related organisms; 2) determine the mechanisms for pili conductivity; and 3) investigate the role of pili in Fe(III) oxide reduction. The studies demonstrated that the pili of G. sulfurreducens are conductive along their length. Surprisingly, the pili possess a metallic-like conductivity similar to that observed in synthetic organic conducting polymers such as polyaniline. Detailed physical analysis of the pili, as well as studies in which the structure of the pili was genetically modified, demonstrated that the metallic-like conductivity of the pili could be attributed to overlapping pi-pi orbitals of aromatic amino acids. Other potential mechanisms for conductivity, such as electron hopping between cytochromes associated with the pili were definitively ruled out. Pili were also found to be essential for Fe(III) oxide reduction in G. metallireducens. Ecological studies demonstrated

  12. Ferrovibrio denitrificans gen. nov., sp. nov., a novel neutrophilic facultative anaerobic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacterium.

    PubMed

    Sorokina, Anna Y; Chernousova, Elena Y; Dubinina, Galina A

    2012-10-01

    A neutrophilic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacterium was isolated from the redox zone of a low-salinity spring in Krasnodar krai (Russia), at the FeS-Fe(OH)(3) interface deposited at the sediment surface. The cells of strain Sp-1 were short, thin motile vibrioids with one polar flagellum dividing by binary fission. The optimal values and ranges for pH and temperature were pH 6.2 (5.5-8) and 35 °C (5-45 °C), respectively. The organism was a facultative anaerobe. Strain Sp-1 was capable of organotrophic, lithoheterotrophic and mixotrophic growth with Fe(II) as an electron donor. The denitrification chain was 'disrupted'. Oxidation of Fe(II) was coupled to reduction of NO3 - to NO2 - or of N(2) O to N(2) , as well as under microaerobic conditions, with O(2) as an electron acceptor. The DNA G+C content was 64.2 mol%. According to the results of phylogenetic analysis, the strain was 10.6-12% remote from the closest relatives, members of the genera Sneathiella, Inquilinus, Oceanibaculum and Phaeospirillum within the Alphaproteobacteria. Based on its morphological, physiological and taxonomic characteristics, together with the results of phylogenetic analysis, strain Sp-1 is described as a member of a new genus Ferrovibrio gen. nov., with the type species Ferrovibrio denitrificans sp. nov. and the type strain Sp-1(T) (= LMG 25817(T)  = VKM B-2673(T) ). PMID:22765162

  13. Synthesis of porous Fe3O4 hollow microspheres/graphene oxide composite for Cr(vi) removal.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mancheng; Wen, Tao; Wu, Xilin; Chen, Changlun; Hu, Jun; Li, Jie; Wang, Xiangke

    2013-10-01

    A composite of porous Fe3O4 hollow microspheres/graphene oxide (Fe3O4/GO) has been fabricated through a facile self-assembly approach. Driven by the mutual electrostatic interactions, the amine-functionalized Fe3O4 microspheres prepared by a hydrothermal method and then modified by 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane were decorated with negatively-charged GO sheets. The Fe3O4 microspheres were hollow with porous surfaces and the surfaces were successfully modified with the amine, which was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The specific saturation magnetization of Fe3O4/GO was 37.8 emu g(-1). The sorption performance of Fe3O4/GO for Cr(vi) was evaluated. The maximum sorption capacity for Cr(vi) on Fe3O4/GO was 32.33 mg g(-1), which was much higher than that of Fe3O4 microspheres. The GO sheets could not only prevent agglomeration of the Fe3O4 microspheres and enable a good dispersion of these oxide microspheres, but also substantially enhance the specific surface area of the composite. The Fe3O4/GO composite may be a promising sorption material for the separation and preconcentration of heavy metal ions from aqueous solutions in environmental pollution cleanup. PMID:23743481

  14. Size- and composition-dependent toxicity of synthetic and soil-derived Fe oxide colloids for the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Höss, Sebastian; Fritzsche, Andreas; Meyer, Carolin; Bosch, Julian; Meckenstock, Rainer U; Totsche, Kai Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Colloidal iron oxides (FeOx) are increasingly released to the environment due to their use in environmental remediation and biomedical applications, potentially harming living organisms. Size and composition could affect the bioavailability and toxicity of such colloids. Therefore, we investigated the toxicity of selected FeOx with variable aggregate size and variably composed FeOx-associated organic matter (OM) toward the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Ferrihydrite colloids containing citrate were taken up by C. elegans with the food and accumulated inside their body. The toxicity of ferrihydrite, goethite, and akaganeite was dependent on aggregate size and specific surface area, with EC50 values for reproduction ranging from 4 to 29 mg Fe L(-1). Experiments with mutant strains lacking mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (sod-2) showed oxidative stress for two FeOx and Fe(3+)-ions, however, revealed that it was not the predominant mechanism of toxicity. The OM composition determined the toxicity of mixed OM-FeOx phases on C. elegans. FeOx associated with humic acids or citrate were less toxic than OM-free FeOx. In contrast, soil-derived ferrihydrite, containing proteins and polysaccharides from mobile OM, was even more toxic than OM-free Fh of similar aggregate size. Consequently, the careful choice of the type of FeOx and the type of associated OM may help in reducing the ecological risks if actively applied to the subsurface.

  15. Size- and composition-dependent toxicity of synthetic and soil-derived Fe oxide colloids for the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Höss, Sebastian; Fritzsche, Andreas; Meyer, Carolin; Bosch, Julian; Meckenstock, Rainer U; Totsche, Kai Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Colloidal iron oxides (FeOx) are increasingly released to the environment due to their use in environmental remediation and biomedical applications, potentially harming living organisms. Size and composition could affect the bioavailability and toxicity of such colloids. Therefore, we investigated the toxicity of selected FeOx with variable aggregate size and variably composed FeOx-associated organic matter (OM) toward the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Ferrihydrite colloids containing citrate were taken up by C. elegans with the food and accumulated inside their body. The toxicity of ferrihydrite, goethite, and akaganeite was dependent on aggregate size and specific surface area, with EC50 values for reproduction ranging from 4 to 29 mg Fe L(-1). Experiments with mutant strains lacking mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (sod-2) showed oxidative stress for two FeOx and Fe(3+)-ions, however, revealed that it was not the predominant mechanism of toxicity. The OM composition determined the toxicity of mixed OM-FeOx phases on C. elegans. FeOx associated with humic acids or citrate were less toxic than OM-free FeOx. In contrast, soil-derived ferrihydrite, containing proteins and polysaccharides from mobile OM, was even more toxic than OM-free Fh of similar aggregate size. Consequently, the careful choice of the type of FeOx and the type of associated OM may help in reducing the ecological risks if actively applied to the subsurface. PMID:25438192

  16. Fe(II)-catalyzed Transformation of OM-ferrihydrite Complexes: Impacts on C Dynamics and As Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C.

    2015-12-01

    Aqueous Fe(II) is known to catalyze the abiotic transformation of ferrihydrite to more stable Fe minerals. While ferrihydrite within most natural environments contains high contents of adsorbed or coprecipitated organic matter (OM), little is known regarding the impact of OM on Fe(II)-catalyzed transformation of ferrihydrite and its consequences for C and metal(oid) dynamics. In this study, we investigated the impacts of adsorbed and coprecipitated OM on the extent and the secondary mineral profiles of Fe(II)-induced ferrihydrite transformation and subsequent C dynamics and As(III) oxidation. The effects of OM types (dissolved organic matter (DOM) vs. polysaccharides) were also compared. Regardless of OM types, both adsorbed and coprecipitated OM resulted in a linear decrease in ferrihydrite transformation with increasing C/Fe ratios. At similar C/Fe ratios, a greater degree of ferrihydrite transformation was observed for the presence of EPS than DOM. Regardless of OM types, the difference in the Fe(II)-catalyzed ferrihydrite was small between adsorbed and coprecipitated OM. DOM impeded goethite and magnetite formation and stimulated lepidocrocite formation, whereas EPS did not alter the secondary Fe minerals formed from transformation of ferrihydrite and goethite was the major secondary Fe minerals in the presence of EPS. Adsorption of As(III) impeded goethite formation and increased the formation of lepidocrcote. The solid-phase C content remained unchanged after reaction, suggesting that OM remains associated with Fe minerals following ferrihydrite transformation to more stable Fe minerals. However, C desorbability by H2PO4- from the resulting Fe minerals following reaction was enhanced implying that Fe(II)-catalyzed transformation of ferrihydrite may decrease the stability of OM in natural environments under moderately reducing conditions. In addition, regardless of DOM or EPS, the presence of OM decreased the degree of As(III) oxidation following Fe

  17. Performance of Al-Rich Oxidation Resistant Coatings For Fe-Base Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Pint, Bruce A

    2010-01-01

    Aluminum-rich coatings made by chemical vapor deposition and pack cementation on ferritic (e.g. Fe-9Cr-1Mo) and austenitic (Type 304L) substrates are being evaluated at 650-800 C. For oxidation testing, a humid air environment was used to quantify coating performance, as uncoated substrates experience rapid oxidation at these temperatures. A main goal of this work is to demonstrate the potential benefits and problems with alumina-forming coatings. The higher exposure temperatures were selected to accelerate the degradation of the coating by interdiffusion with the substrate. A general conclusion of this testing was that coatings with less Al and a ferritic Fe(Al) structure could be more durable than higher Al content aluminide coatings which have a large thermal expansion mismatch with these substrates. A lifetime model has been developed using diffusion and oxidation observations to predict coating performance as a function of temperature and initial coating composition. To test and improve the model, additional experiments are now being conducted to determine the effect of substrate composition (e.g. Cr content using Fe-12Cr and Fe-9Cr-2W substrates) and exposure temperature on the critical Al content for coating failure. Because of the unexpectedly low level of Al measured at coating failure ({approx}3.5at.% at 700 C), exposures of specimens with thick ({approx}200 {mu}m) high Al content coatings were stopped after 10kh at 800 C and 20kh at 700 C because extremely long times to failure were predicted. Post-exposure Al concentration profiles for these specimens were measured using electron microprobe.

  18. Performance of Al-rich Oxidation Resistant Coatings for Fe-Base Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Pint, Bruce A; Zhang, Ying

    2011-01-01

    Aluminum-rich coatings made by chemical vapor deposition and pack cementation on ferritic (e.g. Fe-9Cr-1Mo) and austenitic (Type 304L) substrates are being evaluated at 650-800 C. For oxidation testing, a humid air environment was used to quantify coating performance, as uncoated substrates experience rapid oxidation at these temperatures. A main goal of this work is to demonstrate the potential benefits and problems with alumina-forming coatings. The higher exposure temperatures were selected to accelerate the degradation of the coating by interdiffusion with the substrate. A general conclusion of this testing was that coatings with less Al and a ferritic Fe(Al) structure could be more durable than higher Al content aluminide coatings which have a large thermal expansion mismatch with these substrates. A lifetime model has been developed using diffusion and oxidation observations to predict coating performance as a function of temperature and initial coating composition. To test and improve the model, additional experiments are now being conducted to determine the effect of substrate composition (e.g. Cr content using Fe-12Cr and Fe-9Cr-2W substrates) and exposure temperature on the critical Al content for coating failure. Because of the unexpectedly low level of Al measured at coating failure ({approx}3.5 at.% at 700 C), exposures of specimens with thick ({approx}200 {micro}m) high Al content coatings were stopped after 10kh at 800 C and 20kh at 700 C because extremely long times to failure were predicted. Post-exposure Al concentration profiles for these specimens were measured using electron microprobe.

  19. Effect of metal oxides on the reactivity of persulfate/Fe(II) in the remediation of diesel-contaminated soil and sand.

    PubMed

    Do, Si-Hyun; Kwon, Yong-Jae; Kong, Sung-Ho

    2010-10-15

    The effect of metal oxides on the ability of persulfate (PS) with Fe(II) to remediate diesel-contaminated soil was investigated. In both natural soil and purchased sand, the highest diesel degradation occurred at pH 3 and the optimum molar ratio of PS/Fe(II) was 100:1 (i.e. 500 mM PS to 5 mM Fe(II)). Moreover, adding Fe(II) increased PS reactivity more in soil than it did in sand, indicating the involvement of metal oxides in the soil matrix. Evaluating the effects of metal oxides (i.e. goethite, hematite, magnetite, and manganese oxide) on the reactivity of PS with/without Fe(II) in a system containing diesel-contaminated sand revealed that manganese oxide increased PS activity the most and that the highest diesel degradation by PS occurred when both manganese oxide and Fe(II) were used as activators. XRD did not show the transformation of manganese oxide in the presence of Fe(II). SEM-EDS showed the association of Fe(II) on the surface of manganese oxide, and ICP analysis revealed that almost all the added Fe(II) adsorbed to manganese oxide but almost none adsorbed to iron oxides under acidic conditions. Therefore, the high reactivity of PS could be due to the high density of Fe(II) over the surface of manganese oxide.

  20. Synthesis, structure and geometrically frustrated magnetism of the layered oxide-stannide compounds Fe(Fe3-xMnx)Si2Sn7O16.

    PubMed

    Allison, M C; Avdeev, M; Schmid, S; Liu, S; Söhnel, T; Ling, C D

    2016-06-21

    Fe4Si2Sn7O16 has a unique crystal structure that contains alternating layers of Fe(2+) ions octahedrally coordinated by O (oxide layer) and Sn (stannide layer), bridged by SiO4 tetrahedra. The formula can be written as FeFe3Si2Sn7O16 to emphasise the distinction between the layers. Here, we report the changes in structure and properties as iron is selectively replaced by manganese in the oxide layer. Solid-state synthesis was used to produce polycrystalline samples of Fe(Fe3-xMnx)Si2Sn7O16 for x≤ 2.55, the structures of which were characterised using high-resolution synchrotron X-ray and neutron powder diffraction. Single-crystal samples were also grown at x = 0.35, 0.95, 2.60 and characterised by single crystal X-ray diffraction. We show that manganese is doped exclusively into the oxide layer, and that this layer contains exclusively magnetically active high-spin M(2+) transition metal cations; while the stannide layer only accommodates non-magnetic low-spin Fe(2+). All samples show clear evidence of geometrically frustrated magnetism, which we associate with the fact that the topology of the high-spin M(2+) ions in the oxide layer describes a perfect kagomé lattice. Despite this frustration, the x = 0 and x = 2.55 samples undergo long-range antiferromagnetic ordering transitions at 3.0 K and 2.5 K, respectively.

  1. The effects of Fe-oxidizing microorganisms on post-biostimulation permeability reduction and oxidative processes at the Rifle IFRC site

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Clara Sze-Yue

    2015-07-02

    Fe oxidation and biomineral formation is important in aquifers because the highly-reactive oxides can control the mobility of nutrients (e.g. phosphate, C) and metals (e.g. arsenic, uranium). Mineral formation also has the potential to affect hydrology, depending on the volume and distribution in pore spaces. In this exploratory study, we sought to understand how microbial Fe-oxidizers and their biominerals affect, and are affected by groundwater flow. As part of work at the Rifle aquifer in Colorado, we initially hypothesized that Fe-oxidizers were contributing to aquifer clogging problems associated with enhanced bioremediation. To demonstrate the presence of Fe-oxidizers in the Rifle aquifer, we enriched FeOM from groundwater samples, and isolated two novel chemolithotrophic, microaerophilic Fe-oxidizing Betaproteobacteria, Hydrogenophaga sp. P101 and Curvibacter sp. CD03. To image cells and biominerals in the context of pores, we developed a “micro-aquifer,” a sand-filled flow-through culture chamber that allows for imaging of sediment pore space with multiphoton confocal microscopy. Fe oxide biofilms formed on sand grains, demonstrating that FeOM produce Fe oxide sand coatings. Fe coatings are common on aquifer sands, and tend to sequester contaminants; however, it has never previously been shown that microbes are responsible for their formation. In contrast to our original hypothesis, the biominerals did not clog the mini-aquifer. Instead, Fe biofilm distribution was dynamic: they grew as coatings, then periodically sloughed off sand grains, with some flocs later caught in pore throats. This has implications for physical hydrology, including pore scale architecture, and element transport. The sloughing of coatings likely prevents the biominerals from clogging wells and aquifers, at least initially. Although attached biomineral coatings sequester Fe-associated elements (e.g. P, As, C, U), when biominerals detach, these elements are transported as particles

  2. Behavior of Ni, Zn and Cr during low temperature aqueous Fe oxidation processes on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yu-Yan S.; McLennan, Scott M.

    2013-05-01

    The behavior of Ni(II), Zn(II) and Cr(III) during the melanterite (FeSO4·7H2O) to hematite (α-Fe2O3) oxidative transformations involving evolution pathways via jarosite ((H3O,K)Fe3(OH)6(SO4)2), schwertmannite (Fe8O8(OH)6(SO4)) and goethite (α-FeOOH) were investigated in an acidic saturated MgSO4 matrix. Results provide important clues about how elevated levels of trace elements are incorporated into the secondary Fe mineralogy assemblages found on Mars and the mechanism for formation of hematitic concretions at Meridiani Planum on Mars. Our results demonstrate that starting at the same concentrations in the initial solution, final amounts of Ni, Zn and Cr in hematite via different pathways are very different. In Path 1 (melanterite → jarosite → hematite), partitioning of Ni, Zn and Cr into jarosite and hematite (formed through dissolution of jarosite) is most likely in the order: Cr > Zn > Ni. In Path 2 (melanterite → schwertmannite → goethite → hematite), schwertmannite and goethite exhibited strong affinities for divalent Ni and Zn. During such a pathway, Ni should accumulate more than Zn by at least a factor of two, and partitioning of Ni, Zn and Cr to the hematite is most likely in the order: Cr > Ni > Zn. Therefore, our results suggest that the high Ni and moderate Zn distribution pattern observed in Meridiani hematitic spherule-bearing samples can be explained best by the schwertmannite-goethite to hematite pathway (Path 2), without need for an additional high Ni source in this region. Although the lack of goethite at Meridiani renders it uncertain if goethite ever served as a precursor to facilitate hematite formation, dehydration of nano-crystalline goethite is thermodynamically favored and cannot be ruled out. On the other hand, if hematitic concretions were formed by dissolution of jarosite (Path 1), then much higher initial Ni/Zn ratios than 1 in initial diagenetic fluids may be necessary to explain the elevated levels of Ni in the spherules

  3. Determination of sorbed metals, amorphic Fe, oxidic Mn, and reactive particulate organic carbon in sediments and soils

    SciTech Connect

    Jenne, E.A.; Crecelius, E.A.

    1988-10-01

    A current approach to evaluating the potential toxicity of metal pollutants (MP) in sediments requires using methods for estimating sorbed metals, amorphic Fe oxide, Mn oxides, and reactive particulate organic carbon (RPOC). Methods for estimating these variables are reevaluated and extraction conditions optimized. The hydroxylamine hydrochloride method, used to estimate the quantities of sorbed metals and amorphic Fe oxide and oxidic Mn adsorbents, was found to yield excellent recovery of MP spikes added at the beginning of the extraction, and adequate precision and selectivity for amorphic over crystalline Fe oxides. Hot KOH was tentatively selected over NH/sub 4/OH for estimating RPOC because of its greater convenience; correlations with laboratory sorption experiments will be required to provide an adequate basis for selection. Determination of both sorbed metals and RPOC are relatively insensitive to solid-to-extractant ratio. Metal pollutants and RPOC extraction are also relatively insensitive to normality of HCl and KOH, respectively. 10 refs., 2 figs.

  4. Speciation and distribution of P associated with Fe and Al oxides in aggregate-sized fraction of an arable soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, X.; Bol, R.; Willbold, S.; Vereecken, H.; Klumpp, E.

    2015-07-01

    To maximize crop productivity fertilizer P is generally applied to arable soils, a significant proportion of which becomes stabilized by mineral components and in part subsequently becomes unavailable to plants. However, little is known about the relative contributions of the different organic and inorganic P bound to Fe/Al oxides in the smaller soil particles. The alkaline (NaOH-Na2EDTA) extraction with solution 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance (31P-NMR) spectroscopy is considered as a reliable method for extracting and quantifying organic P and (some) inorganic P. However, any so-called residual P after the alkaline extraction has remained unidentified. Therefore, in the present study, the amorphous (a) and crystalline (c) Fe/Al oxide minerals and related P in soil aggregate-sized fractions (> 20, 2-20, 0.45-2 and < 0.45 μm) were specifically extracted by oxalate (a-Fe/Al oxides) and dithionite (DCB, both a- and c-Fe/Al oxides). These soil aggregate-sized fractions with and without the oxalate and DCB pre-treatments were then sequentially extracted by alkaline extraction prior to solution 31P-NMR spectroscopy. This was done to quantify the various chemical P forms which were associated with a- and c-Fe/Al oxides both in alkaline extraction and in the residual P of different soil aggregate-sized fractions. The results showed that overall P contents increased with decreasing size of the soil aggregate-sized fractions. However, the relative distribution and speciation of varying P forms were found to be independent of soil aggregate-size. The majority of alkaline extractable P was in the a-Fe/Al oxide fraction (42-47 % of total P), most of which was orthophosphate (36-41 % of total P). Furthermore, still significant amounts of particularly monoester P were bound to the oxides. Intriguingly, however, Fe/Al oxides were not the main bonding sites for pyrophosphate. Residual P contained similar amounts of total P associated with both a- (10-13 % of total P) and c-Fe

  5. Speciation and distribution of P associated with Fe and Al oxides in aggregate-sized fraction of an arable soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, X.; Bol, R.; Willbold, S.; Vereecken, H.; Klumpp, E.

    2015-11-01

    To maximize crop productivity fertilizer P is generally applied to arable soils, a significant proportion of which becomes stabilized by mineral components and in part subsequently becomes unavailable to plants. However, little is known about the relative contributions of the different organic and inorganic P bound to Fe/Al oxides in the smaller soil particles. Alkaline (NaOH-Na2EDTA) extraction with solution 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance (31P-NMR) spectroscopy is considered a reliable method for extracting and quantifying organic P and (some) inorganic P. However, any so-called residual P after the alkaline extraction has remained unidentified. Therefore, in the present study, the amorphous (a) and crystalline (c) Fe/Al oxide minerals and related P in soil aggregate-sized fractions (> 20, 2-20, 0.45-2 and < 0.45 μm) were specifically extracted by oxalate (a-Fe/Al oxides) and dithionite-citrate-bicarbonate (DCB, both a- and c-Fe/Al oxides). These soil aggregate-sized fractions with and without the oxalate and DCB pre-treatments were then sequentially extracted by alkaline extraction prior to solution 31P-NMR spectroscopy. This was done to quantify the P associated with a- and c-Fe/Al oxides in both alkaline extraction and the residual P of different soil aggregate-sized fractions. The results showed that overall P contents increased with decreasing size of the soil aggregate-sized fractions. However, the relative distribution and speciation of varying P forms were found to be independent of soil aggregate-size. The majority of alkaline-extractable P was in the a-Fe/Al oxide fraction (42-47 % of total P), most of which was ortho-phosphate (36-41 % of total P). Furthermore, still significant amounts of particularly monoester P were bound to these oxides. Intriguingly, however, Fe/Al oxides were not the main bonding sites for pyrophosphate. Residual P contained similar amounts of total P associated with both a- (11-15 % of total P) and c-Fe oxides (7-13 % of total P

  6. Oxidation of benzyl alcohol by K2FeO4 to benzaldehyde over zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuan-Yuan; Song, Hua; Song, Hua-Lin; Jin, Zai-Shun

    2016-10-01

    A novel and green procedure for benzaldehyde synthesis by potassium ferrate oxidation of benzyl alcohol employing zeolite catalysts was studied. The prepared oxidant was characterized by SEM and XRD. The catalytic activity of various solid catalysts was studied using benzyl alcohol as a model compound. USY was found to be a very efficient catalyst for this particular oxidation process. Benzaldehyde yields up to 96.0% could be obtained at the following optimal conditions: 0.2 mL of benzyl alcohol, 4 mmol of K2FeO4, 0.5 g of USY zeolite; 20 mL of cyclohexene, 0.3 mL of acetic acid (36 wt %), 30°C temperature, 4 h reaction time.

  7. Microstructural evolution, oxidation and wear of Al-Cu-Fe quasicrystalline coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Sordelet, D.J.; Kramer, M.J.; Anderson, I.E.; Besser, M.F.

    1995-10-01

    Plasma arc sprayed coatings were prepared with two different size fraction starting powders having a nominal composition of Al{sub 63}Cu{sub 25}Fe{sub 12}. Powders were obtained by crushing a cast ingot and by gas atomization. Coatings were characterized by electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and chemical analysis. Oxidation tests were performed in dry oxygen at 500 and 700 C. Finer powders produced coatings with more of the cubic phase than coatings formed with coarser powders. The as-sprayed coatings developed different phases during oxidation. Wear tests of as-sprayed coatings were performed over a range of temperatures in a pin-on-disc arrangement against aluminum oxide. The coefficient of friction increased from around 0.44 at room temperature to near 0.60 at 600 C. Differences in wear behavior of the coatings were seen as a function of temperature.

  8. Controlled growth of LaFeO3 nanoparticles on reduced graphene oxide for highly efficient photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiao; Yang, Haitao; Gen, Sai; Zhou, Jun; Yang, Tianzhong; Zhang, Xiangqun; Cheng, Zhaohua; Sun, Shouheng

    2016-01-14

    Using reduced graphene oxide (rGO) as a template and high temperature sol-gel chemistry, we have prepared LaFeO3 nanoparticles (NPs). The 15 nm LaFeO3 NPs have a bandgap of 1.86 eV and the LaFeO3-rGO can function as an efficient catalyst for degradation of methylene blue (MB) or Rhodamine B (RhB) under visible-light irradiation with the electron transfer from the dye to hole dominating the oxidation process. The reported synthesis offers a general approach to perovskite-type NPs for efficient photocatalytic applications.

  9. Oxidation of Refractory Benzothiazoles with PMS/CuFe2O4: Kinetics and Transformation Intermediates.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Chen, Yin; Leiknes, TorOve

    2016-06-01

    Benzothiazole (BTH) and its derivatives 2-(methylthio)bezothiazole (MTBT), 2-benzothiazolsulfonate (BTSA), and 2-hydroxybenzothiazole (OHBT) are refractory pollutants ubiquitously existing in urban runoff at relatively high concentrations. Here, we report their oxidation by CuFe2O4-activated peroxomonosulfate (PMS/CuFe2O4), focusing on kinetics and transformation intermediates. These benzothiazoles can be efficiently degraded by this oxidation process, which is confirmed to generate mainly sulfate radicals (with negligible hydroxyl-radical formation) under slightly acidic to neutral pH conditions. The molar exposure ratio of sulfate radical to residual PMS (i.e., Rct) for this process is a constant that is related to the reaction condition and can be easily determined. The reaction rate constants of these benzothiazoles toward sulfate radical are (3.3 ± 0.3) × 10(9), (1.4 ± 0.3) × 10(9), (1.5 ± 0.1) × 10(9), and (4.7 ± 0.5) × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1), respectively (pH 7 and 20 °C). On the basis of Rct and these rate constants, their degradation in the presence of organic matter can be well-predicted. A number of transformation products were detected and tentatively identified using triple-quadruple/linear ion trap MS/MS and high-resolution MS. It appears that sulfate radicals attack BTH, MTBT, and BTSA on their benzo ring via electron transfer, generating multiple hydroxylated intermediates that are reactive toward common oxidants. For OHBT oxidation, the thiazole ring is preferentially broken down. Due to competitions of the transformation intermediates, a minimum PMS/pollutant molar ratio of 10-20 is required for effective degradation. The flexible PMS/CuFe2O4 could be a useful process to remove the benzothiazoles from low dissolved organic carbon waters like urban runoff or polluted groundwater. PMID:27144396

  10. Oxidation of Refractory Benzothiazoles with PMS/CuFe2O4: Kinetics and Transformation Intermediates.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Chen, Yin; Leiknes, TorOve

    2016-06-01

    Benzothiazole (BTH) and its derivatives 2-(methylthio)bezothiazole (MTBT), 2-benzothiazolsulfonate (BTSA), and 2-hydroxybenzothiazole (OHBT) are refractory pollutants ubiquitously existing in urban runoff at relatively high concentrations. Here, we report their oxidation by CuFe2O4-activated peroxomonosulfate (PMS/CuFe2O4), focusing on kinetics and transformation intermediates. These benzothiazoles can be efficiently degraded by this oxidation process, which is confirmed to generate mainly sulfate radicals (with negligible hydroxyl-radical formation) under slightly acidic to neutral pH conditions. The molar exposure ratio of sulfate radical to residual PMS (i.e., Rct) for this process is a constant that is related to the reaction condition and can be easily determined. The reaction rate constants of these benzothiazoles toward sulfate radical are (3.3 ± 0.3) × 10(9), (1.4 ± 0.3) × 10(9), (1.5 ± 0.1) × 10(9), and (4.7 ± 0.5) × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1), respectively (pH 7 and 20 °C). On the basis of Rct and these rate constants, their degradation in the presence of organic matter can be well-predicted. A number of transformation products were detected and tentatively identified using triple-quadruple/linear ion trap MS/MS and high-resolution MS. It appears that sulfate radicals attack BTH, MTBT, and BTSA on their benzo ring via electron transfer, generating multiple hydroxylated intermediates that are reactive toward common oxidants. For OHBT oxidation, the thiazole ring is preferentially broken down. Due to competitions of the transformation intermediates, a minimum PMS/pollutant molar ratio of 10-20 is required for effective degradation. The flexible PMS/CuFe2O4 could be a useful process to remove the benzothiazoles from low dissolved organic carbon waters like urban runoff or polluted groundwater.

  11. A Novel Lineage of Proteobacteria Involved in Formation of Marine Fe-Oxidizing Microbial Mat Communities

    PubMed Central

    Emerson, David; Rentz, Jeremy A.; Lilburn, Timothy G.; Davis, Richard E.; Chan, Clara; Moyer, Craig L.

    2007-01-01

    Background For decades it has been recognized that neutrophilic Fe-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) are associated with hydrothermal venting of Fe(II)-rich fluids associated with seamounts in the world's oceans. The evidence was based almost entirely on the mineralogical remains of the microbes, which themselves had neither been brought into culture or been assigned to a specific phylogenetic clade. We have used both cultivation and cultivation-independent techniques to study Fe-rich microbial mats associated with hydrothermal venting at Loihi Seamount, a submarine volcano. Methodology/Principle Findings Using gradient enrichment techniques, two iron-oxidizing bacteria, strains PV-1 and JV-1, were isolated. Chemolithotrophic growth was observed under microaerobic conditions; Fe(II) and Fe0 were the only energy sources that supported growth. Both strains produced filamentous stalk-like structures composed of multiple nanometer sized fibrils of Fe-oxyhydroxide. These were consistent with mineralogical structures found in the iron mats. Phylogenetic analysis of the small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene demonstrated that strains PV-1 and JV-1 were identical and formed a monophyletic group deeply rooted within the Proteobacteria. The most similar sequence (85.3% similarity) from a cultivated isolate came from Methylophaga marina. Phylogenetic analysis of the RecA and GyrB protein sequences confirmed that these strains are distantly related to other members of the Proteobacteria. A cultivation-independent analysis of the SSU rRNA gene by terminal-restriction fragment (T-RF) profiling showed that this phylotype was most common in a variety of microbial mats collected at different times and locations at Loihi. Conclusions On the basis of phylogenetic and physiological data, it is proposed that isolate PV-1T ( = ATCC BAA-1019: JCM 14766) represents the type strain of a novel species in a new genus, Mariprofundus ferrooxydans gen. nov., sp. nov. Furthermore, the strain is the first

  12. Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy and magnetization dynamics in oxidized CoFeAl films.

    PubMed

    Wu, Di; Zhang, Zhe; Li, Le; Zhang, Zongzhi; Zhao, H B; Wang, J; Ma, B; Jin, Q Y

    2015-01-01

    Half-metallic Co-based full-Heusler alloys with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA), such as Co2FeAl in contact with MgO, are receiving increased attention recently due to its full spin polarization for high density memory applications. However, the PMA induced by MgO interface can only be realized for very thin magnetic layers (usually below 1.3 nm), which would have strong adverse effects on the material properties of spin polarization, Gilbert damping parameter, and magnetic stability. In order to solve this issue, we fabricated oxidized Co50Fe25Al25 (CFAO) films with proper thicknesses without employing the MgO layer. The samples show controllable PMA by tuning the oxygen pressure (PO2) and CFAO thickness (tCFAO), large perpendicular anisotropy field of ~8.0 kOe can be achieved at PO2 = 12% for the sample of tCFAO = 2.1 nm or at PO2 = 7% for tCFAO = 2.8 nm. The loss of PMA at thick tCFAO or high PO2 results mainly from the formation of large amount of CoFe oxides, which are superparamagnetic at room temperature but become hard magnetic at low temperatures. The magnetic CFAO films, with strong PMA in a relatively wide thickness range and small intrinsic damping parameter below 0.028, would find great applications in developing advanced spintronic devices. PMID:26190066

  13. Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy and magnetization dynamics in oxidized CoFeAl films.

    PubMed

    Wu, Di; Zhang, Zhe; Li, Le; Zhang, Zongzhi; Zhao, H B; Wang, J; Ma, B; Jin, Q Y

    2015-01-01

    Half-metallic Co-based full-Heusler alloys with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA), such as Co2FeAl in contact with MgO, are receiving increased attention recently due to its full spin polarization for high density memory applications. However, the PMA induced by MgO interface can only be realized for very thin magnetic layers (usually below 1.3 nm), which would have strong adverse effects on the material properties of spin polarization, Gilbert damping parameter, and magnetic stability. In order to solve this issue, we fabricated oxidized Co50Fe25Al25 (CFAO) films with proper thicknesses without employing the MgO layer. The samples show controllable PMA by tuning the oxygen pressure (PO2) and CFAO thickness (tCFAO), large perpendicular anisotropy field of ~8.0 kOe can be achieved at PO2 = 12% for the sample of tCFAO = 2.1 nm or at PO2 = 7% for tCFAO = 2.8 nm. The loss of PMA at thick tCFAO or high PO2 results mainly from the formation of large amount of CoFe oxides, which are superparamagnetic at room temperature but become hard magnetic at low temperatures. The magnetic CFAO films, with strong PMA in a relatively wide thickness range and small intrinsic damping parameter below 0.028, would find great applications in developing advanced spintronic devices.

  14. Structural differences between the ready and unready oxidized states of [NiFe] hydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Volbeda, Anne; Martin, Lydie; Cavazza, Christine; Matho, Michaël; Faber, Bart W; Roseboom, Winfried; Albracht, Simon P J; Garcin, Elsa; Rousset, Marc; Fontecilla-Camps, Juan C

    2005-05-01

    [NiFe] hydrogenases catalyze the reversible heterolytic cleavage of molecular hydrogen. Several oxidized, inactive states of these enzymes are known that are distinguishable by their very different activation properties. So far, the structural basis for this difference has not been understood because of lack of relevant crystallographic data. Here, we present the crystal structure of the ready Ni-B state of Desulfovibrio fructosovorans [NiFe] hydrogenase and show it to have a putative mu-hydroxo Ni-Fe bridging ligand at the active site. On the other hand, a new, improved refinement procedure of the X-ray diffraction data obtained for putative unready Ni-A/Ni-SU states resulted in a more elongated electron density for the bridging ligand, suggesting that it is a diatomic species. The slow activation of the Ni-A state, compared with the rapid activation of the Ni-B state, is therefore proposed to result from the different chemical nature of the ligands in the two oxidized species. Our results along with very recent electrochemical studies suggest that the diatomic ligand could be hydro-peroxide. PMID:15803334

  15. Chemistry of arsenic removal during coagulation and Fe-Mn oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, M. . Dept. of Civil Engineering)

    1994-09-01

    Arsenic removal during coagulation or Fe-Mn oxidation is examined to aid utilities that desire to improve arsenic removal. Fundamental mechanisms of arsenic removal are discussed, optimization strategies are forwarded, and some new insights are provided to guide future research. Specifically, As(III) removals by coagulation are primarily controlled by coagulant dose and relatively unaffected by solution pH, whereas the converse is true for As(V). When compared on the basis of moles iron or aluminum hydroxide solid formed during coagulation, iron and aluminum coagulants are of demonstrably equal effectiveness in removing As(V) at pH < 7.5. However, iron-based coagulants are advantageous if soluble metal residuals are problematic, if pH is > 7.5, or if the raw water contains As(III). Arsenic removal during Fe-Mn oxidation is controlled by the quantity of iron removed [Fe(OH)[sub 3] formed] and is relatively independent of the quantity of manganese removed (MnOOH formed). 63 refs.

  16. Oxide scales formed on Fe-Cr-Al-based model alloys exposed to oxygen containing molten lead

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisenburger, A.; Jianu, A.; Doyle, S.; Bruns, M.; Fetzer, R.; Heinzel, A.; DelGiacco, M.; An, W.; Müller, G.

    2013-06-01

    Based on the state of the art oxide maps concerning oxidation behavior of Fe-Cr-Al model alloys at 800 and 1000 °C in oxygen atmosphere, ten compositions, belonging to this alloy system, were designed in order to tap the borders of the alumina stability domain, during their exposure to oxygen (10-6 wt.%) containing lead, at 400, 500 and 600 °C. Eight alloys, Fe-6Cr-6Al, Fe-8Cr-6Al, Fe-10Cr-5Al, Fe-14Cr-4Al, Fe-16Cr-4Al, Fe-6Cr-8Al, Fe-10Cr-7Al and Fe-12Cr-5Al, were found to be protected against corrosion in oxygen containing lead, either by a duplex layer (Fe3O4 + (Fe1-x-yCrxAly)3O4) or by (Fe1-x-yCrxAly)3O4, depending on the temperature at which they were exposed. Two alloys namely Fe-12Cr-7Al and Fe-16Cr-6Al were found to form transient aluminas, κ-Al2O3 (at 400 and 500 °C) and θ-Al2O3 (at 600 °C), as protective oxide scale against corrosion in oxygen containing lead. An oxide map illustrating the stability domain of alumina, grown on Fe-Cr-Al alloys when exposed to molten, oxygen containing lead, was drawn. The map includes also additional points, extracted from literature and corresponding to alumina forming alloys, when exposed to HLMs, which fit very well with our findings. Chromium and aluminium contents of 12.5-17 wt.% and 6-7.5 wt.%, respectively, are high enough to obtain thin, stable and protective alumina scales on Fe-Cr-Al-based alloys exposed to oxygen containing lead at 400, 500 and 600 °C. For the temperature range and exposure times used during the current evaluation, the growth rate of the alumina scale was low. No area with detached scale was observed and no trace of α-Al2O3 was detected.

  17. Inhibition of the Fe(III)-Catalyzed Dopamine Oxidation by ATP and Its Relevance to Oxidative Stress in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is characterized by the progressive degeneration of dopaminergic cells, which implicates a role of dopamine (DA) in the etiology of PD. A possible DA degradation pathway is the Fe(III)-catalyzed oxidation of DA by oxygen, which produces neuronal toxins as side products. We investigated how ATP, an abundant and ubiquitous molecule in cellular milieu, affects the catalytic oxidation reaction of dopamine. For the first time, a unique, highly stable DA–Fe(III)–ATP ternary complex was formed and characterized in vitro. ATP as a ligand shifts the catecholate–Fe(III) ligand metal charge transfer (LMCT) band to a longer wavelength and the redox potentials of both DA and the Fe(III) center in the ternary complex. Remarkably, the additional ligation by ATP was found to significantly reverse the catalytic effect of the Fe(III) center on the DA oxidation. The reversal is attributed to the full occupation of the Fe(III) coordination sites by ATP and DA, which blocks O2 from accessing the Fe(III) center and its further reaction with DA. The biological relevance of this complex is strongly implicated by the identification of the ternary complex in the substantia nigra of rat brain and its attenuation of cytotoxicity of the Fe(III)–DA complex. Since ATP deficiency accompanies PD and neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+) induced PD, deficiency of ATP and the resultant impairment toward the inhibition of the Fe(III)-catalyzed DA oxidation may contribute to the pathogenesis of PD. Our finding provides new insight into the pathways of DA oxidation and its relationship with synaptic activity. PMID:23823941

  18. Constructing hierarchical interfaces: TiO2-supported PtFe-FeOx nanowires for room temperature CO oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Huiyuan; Wu, Zili; Dong, Su; Veith, Gabriel M.; Lu, Hanfeng; Zhang, Pengfei; Chai, Song -Hai; Dai, Sheng

    2015-08-05

    This is a report of a facile approach to constructing catalytic active hierarchical interfaces in one-dimensional (1D) nanostructure, exemplified by the synthesis of TiO2-supported PtFe–FeOx nanowires (NWs). The hierarchical interface, constituting atomic level interactions between PtFe and FeOx within each NW and the interactions between NWs and support (TiO2), enables CO oxidation with 100% conversion at room temperature. We identify the role of the two interfaces by probing the CO oxidation reaction with isotopic labeling experiments. Both the oxygen atoms (Os) in FeOx and TiO2 participate in the initial CO oxidation, facilitating the reaction through a redox pathway. Moreover, the intact 1D structure leads to the high stability of the catalyst. After 30 h in the reaction stream, the PtFe–FeOx/TiO2 catalyst exhibits no activity decay. These results provide a general approach and new insights into the construction of hierarchical interfaces for advanced catalysis.

  19. Characterization of transparent superconductivity Fe-doped CuCrO2 delafossite oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taddee, Chutirat; Kamwanna, Teerasak; Amornkitbamrung, Vittaya

    2016-09-01

    Delafossite CuCr1-xFexO2 (0.0 ≤ x ≤ 0.15) semiconductors were synthesized using a self-combustion urea nitrate process. The effects of Fe concentration on its microstructural, optical, magnetic, and electrical properties were investigated. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis results revealed the delafossite structure in all the samples. The lattice spacing of CuCr1-xFexO2 slightly increased with increasing substitution of Fe at the Cr sites. The optical properties measured at room temperature using UV-visible spectroscopy showed a weak absorbability in the visible light and near IR regions. The corresponding direct optical band gap was about 3.61 eV, exhibiting transparency in the visible region. The magnetic hysteresis loop measurements showed that the Fe-doped CuCrO2 samples exhibited ferromagnetic behavior at room temperature. This indicated that the substitution of Fe3+ for Cr3+ produced a mixed effect on the magnetic properties of CuCrO2 delafossite oxide. The temperature dependent resistivity measurements clearly revealed the presence of superconductivity in the CuCr1-xFexO2 with a superconducting transition up to 118 K.

  20. Adsorption mechanism of magnetically separable Fe3O4/graphene oxide hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Ke; Zhu, Chuanhe; Zhao, Ya; Wang, Leichao; Xie, Shan; Wang, Qun

    2015-11-01

    A reclaimable Fe3O4/graphene oxide (GO) magnetic hybrid was successfully synthesized via a facile one-pot polyol approach and employed as a recyclable adsorbent for Bisphenol A (BPA) in aqueous solutions. The maximum adsorption capacity (qm) of the Fe3O4/GO hybrid for BPA was 72.80 mg/g at 273 K. The kinetics of the adsorption process and the adsorption isotherm data were fitted using the Freundlich equation and a pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The results of the thermodynamic parameters ΔH°, ΔS° and ΔG° showed that the adsorption process was exothermic and spontaneous. Furthermore, the reusability of the samples was investigated, and the results indicated that the samples exhibited high stability. The magnetic characterization demonstrated that hybrids were superparamagnetic and could be recovered conveniently by magnetic separation. The strong π-π interaction was determined to be the predominant driving force behind the adsorption of BPA onto the Fe3O4/GO hybrid. Therefore, the Fe3O4/GO hybrid could be regarded as a potential adsorbent for wastewater treatment and purification processes.

  1. Adsorption of Mn2+ from aqueous solution using Fe and Mn oxide-coated sand.

    PubMed

    Kan, Chi-Chuan; Aganon, Mannie C; Futalan, Cybelle Morales; Dalida, Maria Lourdes P

    2013-07-01

    The adsorption of Mn2+ onto immobilized Mn-oxide and Fe-oxide adsorbent such as manganese oxide-coated sandl (MOCS1), manganese oxide-coated sand2 (MOCS2), iron oxide-coated sand2 (IOCS2), and manganese and iron oxide-coated sand (MIOCS) was investigated. The effects of pH (5.5 to 8.0) and temperature (25 to 45 degrees C) on the equilibrium capacity were examined. Equilibrium studies showed that there is a good fit with both Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm, which indicates surface heterogeneity and monolayer adsorption of the adsorbents. Kinetic data showed high correlation with the pseudo second-order model, which signifies a chemisorption-controlled mechanism. The activation energies, activation parameters (deltaG, deltaH, deltaS), and thermodynamic parameters (deltaG0, deltaH0, deltaS0) confirmed that adsorption with MIOCS was endothermic and more spontaneous at higher temperature while an opposite trend was observed for the other adsorbents. Thermodynamic studies showed that adsorption involved formation of activated complex, where MOCS 1 and MIOCS follow a physical-chemical mechanism, while MOCS2 and IOCS2 follows purely chemical mechanism. PMID:24218863

  2. Identifying the redox activity of cation-disordered Li-Fe-V-Ti oxide cathodes for Li-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ruiyong; Witte, Ralf; Heinzmann, Ralf; Ren, Shuhua; Mangold, Stefan; Hahn, Horst; Hempelmann, Rolf; Ehrenberg, Helmut; Indris, Sylvio

    2016-03-21

    Cation-disordered oxides have recently shown promising properties on the way to explore high-performance intercalation cathode materials for rechargeable Li-ion batteries. Here, stoichiometric cation-disordered Li2FeVyTi1-yO4 (y = 0, 0.2, 0.5) nanoparticles are studied. The substitution of V for Ti in Li2FeVyTi1-yO4 increases the content of active transition metals (Fe and V) and accordingly the amount of Li(+) (about (1 + y)Li(+) capacity per formula unit) that can be reversibly intercalated. It is found that Fe(3+)/Fe(2+) and V(4+)/V(3+) redox couples contribute to the overall capacity performance, whereas Ti(4+) remains mainly inert. There is no evidence for the presence of Fe(4+) species after charging to 4.8 V, as confirmed from the ex situ(57)Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy and the Fe K-edge absorption spectra. The redox couple reactions for iron and vanadium are examined by performing in situ synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy. During charging/discharging, the spectral evolution of the K-edges for Fe and V confirms the reversible Fe(3+)/Fe(2+) and V(4+)/V(3+) redox reactions during cycling between 1.5 and 4.8 V.

  3. Microbial Oxidation of Fe2+ and Pyrite Exposed to Flux of Micromolar H2O2 in Acidic Media

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yingqun; Lin, Chuxia

    2013-01-01

    At an initial pH of 2, while abiotic oxidation of aqueous Fe2+ was enhanced by a flux of H2O2 at micromolar concentrations, bio-oxidation of aqueous Fe2+ could be impeded due to oxidative stress/damage in Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans caused by Fenton reaction-derived hydroxyl radical, particularly when the molar ratio of Fe2+ to H2O2 was low. When pyrite cubes were intermittently exposed to fluxes of micromolar H2O2, the reduced Fe2+-Fe3+ conversion rate in the solution (due to reduced microbial activity) weakened the Fe3+-catalyzed oxidation of cubic pyrite and added to relative importance of H2O2-driven oxidation in the corrosion of mineral surfaces for the treatments with high H2O2 doses. This had effects on reducing the build-up of a passivating coating layer on the mineral surfaces. Cell attachment to the mineral surfaces was only observed at the later stage of the experiment after the solutions became less favorable for the growth of planktonic bacteria. PMID:23760258

  4. Magnetic characterization of iron oxides formed after thermal treatment of nontronite and the formation of three polymorphs of Fe2O3: α-Fe2O3, γ-Fe2O3, ɛ-Fe2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berquo, T. S.; Moskowitz, B. M.

    2011-12-01

    Nontronite is an Fe-rich smectite clay that occurs widely in terrestrial soils, sediments and weathering formations and may also be present in the Martian regolith. The thermal decomposition of nontronite is known to form various magnetic iron oxides but their compositions, magnetic properties, and formation pathways remain poorly understood. The magnetic alteration products of nontronite have been proposed as a source for the magnetic phases in the surface layers and dust on Mars as well as in some archeological fired-bricks and ceramic pottery. One alteration product of nontronite is ɛ-Fe2O3 which is ferrimagnetic with a Curie temperature of ~ 500 K and extremely large coercivity (HC ~ 1-2 T) at 300 K. In this work nontronite samples from eight source localities were heated to 1000°C in air for one hour. The magnetic properties of the alteration products were investigated with low-temperature (LT) magnetization and AC susceptibility curves, hysteresis loops, Mossbauer spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The thermal treatment was effective in converting the nontronite to a combination of different polymorphs of ferric oxide depending on source locality and included: hematite (α-Fe2O3), ɛ-Fe2O3, and a cubic spinel phase that suggest the presence of maghemite (γ-Fe2O3). Mossbauer spectra at 300 K identified hematite and ɛ-Fe2O3 as the main phases in 7 samples with amounts ranging from 26-100% for hematite 0-69% for ɛ-Fe2O3. One sample showed a paramagnetic Fe3+ doublet and a broad sextet characteristic of magnetic relaxation effects. Upon cooling to 4.2 K, the Mossbauer spectrum was consistent with maghemite. In all samples except one, the magnetic hyperfine fields for the hematite phase are slightly reduced as compared with its stoichiometric form indicating some iron substitution with ions such as Al. This is consistent with the observation that all but one sample lacked the characteristic Morin transition for pure hematite on LT-remanence warming curves

  5. Room temperature ferromagnetism in Mn- and Fe-doped indium tin oxide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatesan, M.; Gunning, R. D.; Stamenov, P.; Coey, J. M. D.

    2008-04-01

    Undoped and transition-metal doped indium tin oxide films have been grown by pulsed laser deposition technique, on single crystalline c-plane (0001) and r-plane (1102) sapphire substrates maintained at 500-850°C. Magnetization measurements of films deposited at different temperatures indicate that ferromagnetism appears for deposition temperatures, Tdep>600°C, with the highest moment for films deposited around 750°C. Qualitative different ferromagnetic behavior has been observed at room temperature in Fe- and Mn-doped thin films. The stable, hysteretic ferromagnetism of the Fe-doped films is due to the presence of magnetite, as seen in transmission Mössbauer spectra. The Mn-doped films show anhysteretic ferromagnetism which decays over time. It is somehow intrinsic, but not due to the Mn ions, which remains paramagnetic down to 4K. No anomalous Hall effect is observed.

  6. Enhanced and Retarded SiO2 Growth on Thermally Oxidized Fe-Contaminated n-Type Si(001) Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Hirofumi; Hagiwara, Hiroyuki

    2013-04-01

    At the beginning of the oxidation of Fe-contaminated n-type Si(001) surfaces, Fe reacted with oxygen (O2) on the silicon (Si) substrate to form Fe2O3 and oxygen-induced point defects (emitted Si + vacancies). SiO2 growth was mainly enhanced by catalytic action of Fe. At 650 °C, SiO2 growth of the contaminated samples was faster than in reference samples rinsed in RCA solution during the first 60 min. However, it substantially slowed and became less than that of the reference samples. As the oxidation advanced, approximately half of the contaminated Fe atoms became concentrated close to the surface area of the SiO2 film layer. This Fe2O3-rich SiO2 layer acted as a diffusion barrier against oxygen species. The diffusion of oxygen atoms toward the SiO2/Si interface may have been reduced, and in turn, the emission of Si self-interstitials owing to oxidation-induced strain may have been decreased at the SiO2/Si interface, resulting in the retarded oxide growth. These results are evidence that emitted Si self-interstitials are oxidized not in the Fe2O3-rich SiO2 layer, but at the SiO2/Si interface in accordance with a previously proposed model. A possible mechanism based on the interfacial Si emission model is discussed. The activation energies for the oxide growth are found to be in accord with the enhanced and reduced growths of the Fe-contaminated samples.

  7. Coexistence of Fe(II)- and Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria govern the formation of deep sea umber deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Xiaotong; Ta, Kaiwen; Chen, Shun; Zhang, Lijuan; Xu, Hengchao

    2015-11-01

    The genesis of umber deposits has remained controversial for several decades. Recently, microbial Fe(II) oxidation associated with low-temperature diffuse venting has been identified as a key process for the formation of umber deposits, but the exact biogeochemical mechanisms involved to the precipitation of Mn oxides in umber deposits still remain unknown. Here, we used nano secondary ion mass spectrometer, synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy, electron microscopy, and molecular techniques to demonstrate the coexistence of two types of metal-oxidizing bacteria within deep-sea hydrothermal umber deposits at the South Mid-Atlantic Ridge, where we found unique spheroids composed of biogenic Fe oxyhydroxides and Mn oxides in the deposits. Our data show that Fe oxyhydroxides and Mn oxides are metabolic by-products of lithotrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria and heterotrophic Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria, respectively. The hydrothermal vents fuel lithotrophic microorganisms, which constitute a trophic base that might support the activities of heterogenic Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria. The biological origin of umber deposits shed light on the importance of geomicrobiological interaction in triggering the formation of metalliferous deposits, with important implications for the generation of submarine Mn deposits and crusts.

  8. Mineralogy and geochemistry of Fe-Ti oxide and apatite (nelsonite) deposits and evaluation of the liquid immiscibility hypothesis.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kolker, A.

    1982-01-01

    The modal mineralogy for 32 Fe-Ti oxides and apatites supports the 2:1 oxide:apatite ratio for these samples from New York, Quebec, Norway and Sweden. Accessory minerals include: biotite, clinoamphibole, spinel, zircon and sulphides, oxygen fugacities range from 10-11 to 10-20, and T 600o to 1000oC. - K.A.R.

  9. Mariprofundus ferrooxydans PV-1 the First Genome of a Marine Fe(II) Oxidizing Zetaproteobacterium

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Esther; Emerson, David; Webb, Eric A.; Barco, Roman A.; Kuenen, J. Gijs; Nelson, William C.; Chan, Clara S.; Comolli, Luis R.; Ferriera, Steve; Johnson, Justin; Heidelberg, John F.; Edwards, Katrina J.

    2011-01-01

    Mariprofundus ferrooxydans PV-1 has provided the first genome of the recently discovered Zetaproteobacteria subdivision. Genome analysis reveals a complete TCA cycle, the ability to fix CO2, carbon-storage proteins and a sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS). The latter could facilitate the transport of carbohydrates across the cell membrane and possibly aid in stalk formation, a matrix composed of exopolymers and/or exopolysaccharides, which is used to store oxidized iron minerals outside the cell. Two-component signal transduction system genes, including histidine kinases, GGDEF domain genes, and response regulators containing CheY-like receivers, are abundant and widely distributed across the genome. Most of these are located in close proximity to genes required for cell division, phosphate uptake and transport, exopolymer and heavy metal secretion, flagellar biosynthesis and pilus assembly suggesting that these functions are highly regulated. Similar to many other motile, microaerophilic bacteria, genes encoding aerotaxis as well as antioxidant functionality (e.g., superoxide dismutases and peroxidases) are predicted to sense and respond to oxygen gradients, as would be required to maintain cellular redox balance in the specialized habitat where M. ferrooxydans resides. Comparative genomics with other Fe(II) oxidizing bacteria residing in freshwater and marine environments revealed similar content, synteny, and amino acid similarity of coding sequences potentially involved in Fe(II) oxidation, signal transduction and response regulation, oxygen sensation and detoxification, and heavy metal resistance. This study has provided novel insights into the molecular nature of Zetaproteobacteria. PMID:21966516

  10. Thermodynamic modeling of oxide phases in the Fe-Mn-O system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Youn-Bae; Jung, In-Ho

    2016-11-01

    A critical evaluation and thermodynamic modeling for thermodynamic properties of all oxide phases and phase diagrams in the Fe-Mn-O system are presented. Optimized Gibbs energy parameters for the thermodynamic models of the oxide phases were obtained which reproduce all available and reliable experimental data within error limits from 298 K to above the liquidus temperatures at all compositions covering from known oxide phases, and oxygen partial pressure from metal saturation to 0.21 bar. The optimized thermodynamic properties and phase diagrams are believed to be the best estimates presently available. Two spinel phases (cubic and tetragonal) were modeled using Compound Energy Formalism (CEF) with the use of physically meaningful parameters. The present Fe-Mn spinel solutions can be integrated into a larger spinel solution database, which has been already developed. The database of the model parameters can be used along with a software for Gibbs energy minimization in order to calculate any type of phase diagram section and thermodynamic properties.

  11. Polyaniline/reduced graphene oxide/Fe3O4 nano-composite for aqueous Hg(II) removal.

    PubMed

    Li, Renjie; Liu, Lifen; Yang, Fenglin

    2015-01-01

    To ease the adsorbent recovery and to increase the adsorption capacity of polyaniline (PANI), aniline was polymerized in the presence of a solvothermally prepared nano-composite of reduced graphene oxide and Fe3O4 (RGO/Fe3O4). The polyaniline was formed along the RGO/Fe3O4 composite in transmission electron microscope (TEM). The thus formed PANI/RGO/Fe3O4 adsorbent was tested and applied in removing Hg(II) in aqueous solution. The initial adsorption rate as well as the adsorption capacity increases with the incorporation of RGO/Fe3O4. The magnetic separation of PANI/RGO/Fe3O4 was easy, and its regeneration can be carried out at the optimal pH of 2. Test results proved the competence of the prepared adsorbent in pollution remediation applications for safer water quality and environmental protection. PMID:26606101

  12. [NiFe]Hydrogenase from Citrobacter sp. S-77 surpasses platinum as an electrode for H2 oxidation reaction.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takahiro; Eguchi, Shigenobu; Nakai, Hidetaka; Hibino, Takashi; Yoon, Ki-Seok; Ogo, Seiji

    2014-08-18

    Reported herein is an electrode for dihydrogen (H2) oxidation, and it is based on [NiFe]Hydrogenase from Citrobacter sp. S-77 ([NiFe]S77). It has a 637 times higher mass activity than Pt (calculated based on 1 mg of [NiFe]S77 or Pt) at 50 mV in a hydrogen half-cell. The [NiFe]S77 electrode is also stable in air and, unlike Pt, can be recovered 100 % after poisoning by carbon monoxide. Following characterization of the [NiFe]S77 electrode, a fuel cell comprising a [NiFe]S77 anode and Pt cathode was constructed and shown to have a a higher power density than that achievable by Pt. PMID:24895095

  13. [NiFe]Hydrogenase from Citrobacter sp. S-77 surpasses platinum as an electrode for H2 oxidation reaction.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takahiro; Eguchi, Shigenobu; Nakai, Hidetaka; Hibino, Takashi; Yoon, Ki-Seok; Ogo, Seiji

    2014-08-18

    Reported herein is an electrode for dihydrogen (H2) oxidation, and it is based on [NiFe]Hydrogenase from Citrobacter sp. S-77 ([NiFe]S77). It has a 637 times higher mass activity than Pt (calculated based on 1 mg of [NiFe]S77 or Pt) at 50 mV in a hydrogen half-cell. The [NiFe]S77 electrode is also stable in air and, unlike Pt, can be recovered 100 % after poisoning by carbon monoxide. Following characterization of the [NiFe]S77 electrode, a fuel cell comprising a [NiFe]S77 anode and Pt cathode was constructed and shown to have a a higher power density than that achievable by Pt.

  14. Carbon adsorption onto Fe oxyhydroxide stalks produced by a lithotrophic iron-oxidizing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Bennett, S A; Toner, B M; Barco, R; Edwards, K J

    2014-03-01

    Iron (Fe)-oxidizing bacteria have the potential to produce morphologically unique structures that may be used as biosignatures in geological deposits. One particular example is Mariprofundus ferrooxydans, which produces extracellular twisted ribbon-like stalks consisting of ferrihydrite, co-located with organic and inorganic elements. It is currently thought that M. ferrooxydans excrete and co-precipitate polysaccharides and Fe simultaneously; however, the cellular production of these polysaccharides has yet to be confirmed. Here, we report on a time-series study that used scanning transmission X-ray microscopy and C 1s and Ca 2p near-edge X-ray adsorption fine structure spectroscopy to investigate production of polysaccharides over the growth cycle of M. ferrooxydans. The production and morphology of twisted iron stalks were consistent with previous observations, but unexpectedly, in the log phase, the carbon content of the stalks was extremely low. It was not until stationary growth phase that a significant component of carbon was detected on the stalks. During the log phase, low levels of carbon, only detectable when the stalks were thin, suggested that M. ferrooxydans produce an extracellular polysaccharide template onto which the Fe precipitates. By stationary phase, the increased carbon association with the stalks was a result of adsorption of organic compounds that were released during osmotic shock post-stalk production. In the environment, elevated concentrations of DOC could adsorb onto the Fe stalks as well as a number of other elements, for example, Si, P, Ca, which, by preventing chemical interactions between the Fe nanoparticles, will prevent structural deformation during recrystallization and preserve the structure of these filaments in the rock record. PMID:24428517

  15. Carbon adsorption onto Fe oxyhydroxide stalks produced by a lithotrophic iron-oxidizing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Bennett, S A; Toner, B M; Barco, R; Edwards, K J

    2014-03-01

    Iron (Fe)-oxidizing bacteria have the potential to produce morphologically unique structures that may be used as biosignatures in geological deposits. One particular example is Mariprofundus ferrooxydans, which produces extracellular twisted ribbon-like stalks consisting of ferrihydrite, co-located with organic and inorganic elements. It is currently thought that M. ferrooxydans excrete and co-precipitate polysaccharides and Fe simultaneously; however, the cellular production of these polysaccharides has yet to be confirmed. Here, we report on a time-series study that used scanning transmission X-ray microscopy and C 1s and Ca 2p near-edge X-ray adsorption fine structure spectroscopy to investigate production of polysaccharides over the growth cycle of M. ferrooxydans. The production and morphology of twisted iron stalks were consistent with previous observations, but unexpectedly, in the log phase, the carbon content of the stalks was extremely low. It was not until stationary growth phase that a significant component of carbon was detected on the stalks. During the log phase, low levels of carbon, only detectable when the stalks were thin, suggested that M. ferrooxydans produce an extracellular polysaccharide template onto which the Fe precipitates. By stationary phase, the increased carbon association with the stalks was a result of adsorption of organic compounds that were released during osmotic shock post-stalk production. In the environment, elevated concentrations of DOC could adsorb onto the Fe stalks as well as a number of other elements, for example, Si, P, Ca, which, by preventing chemical interactions between the Fe nanoparticles, will prevent structural deformation during recrystallization and preserve the structure of these filaments in the rock record.

  16. Study of cluster anions generated by laser ablation of titanium oxides: a high resolution approach based on Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Barthen, Nicolas; Millon, Eric; Aubriet, Frédéric

    2011-03-01

    Laser ablation of titanium oxides at 355 nm and ion-molecule reactions between [(TiO(2))(x)](-•) cluster anions and H(2)O or O(2) were investigated by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR MS) with an external ion source. The detected anions correspond to [(TiO(2))(x)(H(2)O)(y)OH](-) and [(TiO(2))(x)(H(2)O)(y)O(2)](-•) oxy-hydroxide species with x=1 to 25 and y=1, 2, or 3 and were formed by a two step process: (1) laser ablation, which leads to the formation of [(TiO(2))(x)](-•) cluster anions as was previously reported, and (2) ion-molecule reactions during ion storage. Reactions of some [(TiO(2))(x)](-•) cluster anions with water and dioxygen conducted in the FTICR cell confirm this assessment. Tandem mass spectrometry experiments were also performed in sustained off-resonance irradiation collision-induced dissociation (SORI-CID) mode. Three fragmentation pathways were observed: (1) elimination of water molecules, (2) O(2) loss for radical anions, and (3) fission of the cluster. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed to explain the experimental data.

  17. Biochemistry and Ecology of Novel Cytochromes Catalyzing Fe(II) Oxidation by an Acidophilic Microbial Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, S. W.; Jeans, C. J.; Thelen, M. P.; Verberkmoes, N. C.; Hettich, R. C.; Chan, C. S.; Banfield, J. F.

    2007-12-01

    An acidophilic microbial community found in the Richmond Mine at Iron Mountain, CA forms abundant biofilms in extremely acidic (pH<1) and toxic metal conditions. In this ecosystem, biological Fe(II) oxidation is critical to the metabolic functioning of the community, and in turn this process generates acid mine drainage, causing an environmental catastrophe. Two conspicuous novel proteins isolated from these biofilms were identified as gene products of Leptospirillum group II and were characterized as cytochromes with unique properties. Sulfuric acid extraction of biofilm samples liberated one of these proteins, a 16 kDa cytochrome with an unusual alpha-band absorption at 579 (Cyt579). Genomic sequencing of multiple biofilms indicated that several variants of Cyt579 were present in Leptospirillum strains. Intact protein MS analysis identified the dominant variants in each biofilm and documented multiple N-terminal cleavage sites for Cyt579. By combining biochemical, geochemical and microbiological data, we established that the sequence variation and N-terminal processing of Cyt579 are selected by ecological conditions. In addition to the soluble Cyt579, the second cytochrome appears as a much larger protein complex of ~210 kDa predominant in the biofilm membrane fraction, and has an alpha-band absorption at 572 nm. The 60 kDa cytochrome subunit, Cyt572, resides in the outer membrane of LeptoII, and readily oxidizes Fe(II) at low pH (0.95 - 3.0). Several genes encoding Cyt572 were localized within a recombination hotspot between two strains of LeptoII, causing a large range of variation in the sequences. Genomic sequencing and MS proteomic studies established that the variants were also selected by ecological conditions. A general mechanistic model for Fe(II) oxidation has been developed from these studies. Initial Fe(II) oxidation by Cyt572 occurs at the outer membrane. Cyt572 then transfers electrons to Cyt579, perhaps representing an initial step in energy flow

  18. Systems Ln-Fe-O ( Ln=Eu, Gd): thermodynamic properties of ternary oxides using solid-state electrochemical cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parida, S. C.; Rakshit, S. K.; Dash, S.; Singh, Ziley; Prasad, R.; Venugopal, V.

    2003-05-01

    The standard molar Gibbs energies of formation of LnFeO 3(s) and Ln3Fe 5O 12(s) where Ln=Eu and Gd have been determined using solid-state electrochemical technique employing different solid electrolytes. The reversible e.m.f.s of the following solid-state electrochemical cells have been measured in the temperature range from 1050 to 1255 K. Cell (I): (-)Pt / { LnFeO 3(s)+ Ln2O 3(s)+Fe(s)} // YDT/CSZ // {Fe(s)+Fe 0.95O(s)} / Pt(+); Cell (II): (-)Pt/{Fe(s)+Fe 0.95O(s)}//CSZ//{ LnFeO 3(s)+ Ln3Fe 5O 12(s)+Fe 3O 4(s)}/Pt(+); Cell (III): (-)Pt/{ LnFeO 3(s)+ Ln3Fe 5O 12(s)+Fe 3O 4(s)}//YSZ//{Ni(s)+NiO(s)}/Pt(+); and Cell(IV):(-)Pt/{Fe(s)+Fe 0.95O(s)}//YDT/CSZ//{ LnFeO 3(s)+ Ln3Fe 5O 12(s)+Fe 3O 4(s)}/Pt(+). The oxygen chemical potentials corresponding to the three-phase equilibria involving the ternary oxides have been computed from the e.m.f. data. The standard Gibbs energies of formation of solid EuFeO 3, Eu 3Fe 5O 12, GdFeO 3 and Gd 3Fe 5O 12 calculated by the least-squares regression analysis of the data obtained in the present study are given by Δ fG°m(EuFeO 3, s) /kJ mol -1 (± 3.2)=-1265.5+0.2687( T/K) (1050 ⩽ T/K ⩽ 1570), Δ fG°m(Eu 3Fe 5O 12, s)/kJ mol -1 (± 3.5)=-4626.2+1.0474( T/K) (1050 ⩽ T/K ⩽ 1255), Δ fG°m(GdFeO 3, s) /kJ mol -1 (± 3.2)=-1342.5+0.2539( T/K) (1050 ⩽ T/K ⩽ 1570), and Δ fG°m(Gd 3Fe 5O 12, s)/kJ·mol -1 (± 3.5)=-4856.0+1.0021( T/K) (1050 ⩽ T/K ⩽ 1255). The uncertainty estimates for Δ fG°m include the standard deviation in the e.m.f. and uncertainty in the data taken from the literature. Based on the thermodynamic information, oxygen potential diagrams for the systems Eu-Fe-O and Gd-Fe-O and chemical potential diagrams for the system Gd-Fe-O were computed at 1250 K.

  19. Respective role of Fe and Mn oxide contents for arsenic sorption in iron and manganese binary oxide: an X-ray absorption spectroscopy investigation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gaosheng; Liu, Fudong; Liu, Huijuan; Qu, Jiuhui; Liu, Ruiping

    2014-09-01

    In our previous studies, a synthesized Fe-Mn binary oxide was found to be very effective for both As(V) and As(III) removal in aqueous phase, because As(III) could be easily oxidized to As(V). As(III) oxidation and As(V) sorption by the Fe-Mn binary oxide may also play an important role in the natural cycling of As, because of its common occurrence in the environment. In the present study, the respective role of Fe and Mn contents present in the Fe-Mn binary oxide on As(III) removal was investigated via a direct in situ determination of arsenic speciation using X-ray absorption spectroscopy. X-ray absorption near edge structure results indicate that Mn atoms exist in a mixed valence state of +3 and +4 and further confirm that MnOx (1.5 < x < 2) content is mainly responsible for oxidizing As(III) to As(V) through a two-step pathway [reduction of Mn(IV) to Mn(III) and subsequent Mn(III) to Mn(II)] and FeOOH content is dominant for adsorbing the formed As(V). No significant As(III) oxidation by pure FeOOH had been observed during its sorption, when the system was exposed to air. The extended X-ray absorption fine structure results reveal that the As surface complex on both the As(V)- and As(III)-treated sample surfaces is an inner-sphere bidentate binuclear corner-sharing complex with an As-M (M = Fe or Mn) interatomic distance of 3.22-3.24 Å. In addition, the MnOx and FeOOH contents exist only as a mixture, and no solid solution is formed. Because of its high effectiveness, low cost, and environmental friendliness, the Fe-Mn binary oxide would play a beneficial role as both an efficient oxidant of As(III) and a sorbent for As(V) in drinking water treatment and environmental remediation.

  20. Isolation and Characterization of Novel Psychrophilic, Neutrophilic, Fe-Oxidizing, Chemolithoautotrophic α- and γ-Proteobacteria from the Deep Sea†

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, K. J.; Rogers, D. R.; Wirsen, C. O.; McCollom, T. M.

    2003-01-01

    We report the isolation and physiological characterization of novel, psychrophilic, iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) from low-temperature weathering habitats in the vicinity of the Juan de Fuca deep-sea hydrothermal area. The FeOB were cultured from the surfaces of weathered rock and metalliferous sediments. They are capable of growth on a variety of natural and synthetic solid rock and mineral substrates, such as pyrite (FeS2), basalt glass (∼10 wt% FeO), and siderite (FeCO3), as their sole energy source, as well as numerous aqueous Fe substrates. Growth temperature characteristics correspond to the in situ environmental conditions of sample origin; the FeOB grow optimally at 3 to 10°C and at generation times ranging from 57 to 74 h. They are obligate chemolithoautotrophs and grow optimally under microaerobic conditions in the presence of an oxygen gradient or anaerobically in the presence of nitrate. None of the strains are capable of using any organic or alternate inorganic substrates tested. The bacteria are phylogenetically diverse and have no close Fe-oxidizing or autotrophic relatives represented in pure culture. One group of isolates are γ-Proteobacteria most closely related to the heterotrophic bacterium Marinobacter aquaeolei (87 to 94% sequence similarity). A second group of isolates are α-Proteobacteria most closely related to the deep-sea heterotrophic bacterium Hyphomonas jannaschiana (81 to 89% sequence similarity). This study provides further evidence for the evolutionarily widespread capacity for Fe oxidation among bacteria and suggests that FeOB may play an unrecognized geomicrobiological role in rock weathering in the deep sea. PMID:12732565

  1. Ce-Fe-reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite as an efficient catalyst for sulfamethazine degradation in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Wan, Zhong; Wang, Jianlong

    2016-09-01

    A heterogeneous Fenton catalyst Ce(0)-Fe(0)-reduced graphene oxide (Ce-Fe-RGO) was synthesized with chemical reduction methods and used for degradation of sulfamethazine. The introduction of Ce and graphene increased the dispersibility of iron particles which was confirmed by SEM and TEM. The results of VSM analysis showed good magnetism of Ce-Fe-RGO. The catalyst performance was compared with other kinds of catalysts (Fe(0) and Ce(0)-Fe(0)) for degradation of sulfamethazine. The results showed that Ce(0)-Fe-RGO had good catalytic performance and adsorption. X-ray diffraction showed the change of iron oxide on catalyst surface after use. The total sulfur (TS), total nitrogen (TN), total organic carbon (TOC), and intermediates, such as small organic molecular and anion ions, were analyzed by IC under different pH conditions. Finally, the possible catalytic mechanism was tentatively proposed based on inhibitor experimental results and XPS characterization. The main active species was hydroxyl radical on catalyst surface and the transition between Ce(3+) and Ce(4+) which enhanced the reduction from Fe(3+) to Fe(2+) and formation of ·OH and ·O2 (-). PMID:27294699

  2. Reduction Kinetics of Electric Arc Furnace Oxidizing Slag by Al-Fe Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaehong; Oh, Joon Seok; Lee, Joonho

    2016-07-01

    Effects of temperature and slag basicity on the reduction rate of iron oxide in molten synthetic electric arc furnace oxidizing slag by Al-40 wt.%Fe alloy was investigated. An alloy sample was dropped into molten slag in an MgO crucible. When the initial slag temperature was 1723 K, there was no reduction. However, when the initial slag temperature was 1773 K and the slag basicity was 1.1, the reduction was initiated and the temperature of the slag rapidly increased. When the slag basicity was 1.1, increasing the initial slag temperature from 1773 K to 1823 K increases the reaction rate. As the slag basicity increased from 1.1 to 1.4 at 1773 K, the reaction rate increased. From SEM analysis, it was found that an Al2O3 or a spinel phase at the slag-metal interface inhibited the reaction at a lower temperature and a lower slag basicity.

  3. Preparation of iron oxide nanoparticles from FeCl3 solid powder using microemulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassar, Nashaat; Husein, Maen

    2006-05-01

    Nanoparticles of iron oxide were prepared by subjecting iron chloride powder to (w/o) microemulsions consisting of sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT), isooctane and water. FeCl3 was first dissolved in the water pools of the microemulsion, and then reacted with NaOH added as an aqueous solution to form iron oxide. The amount of NaOH solution was limited so that single microemulsion phase is obtained. This technique serves as an in-situ nanoparticle preparation technique aimed at minimizing particle aggregation associated with particle transportation to required sites. In this study, the effects of AOT concentration and water to AOT mole ratio on the nanoparticle size were investigated. UV/Vis spectrophotometry and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to measure the particle size distribution.

  4. Structure and mechanical properties of Fe-Ni-Zr oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darling, K. A.; Kapoor, M.; Kotan, H.; Hornbuckle, B. C.; Walck, S. D.; Thompson, G. B.; Tschopp, M. A.; Kecskes, L. J.

    2015-12-01

    A series of bulk nanostructured Fe-Ni-Zr oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloys were synthesized using high energy mechanical alloying and consolidated using high temperature equal channel angular extrusion. The resultant microstructures are composed of nano/ultrafine or micrometer-sized grains with larger intermetallic precipitates and small Zr oxide clusters (<10 nm diameter, measured and confirmed by atom probe tomography). The ODS alloys possess elevated compression properties, e.g., 1.2 and 2.4 GPa compressive yield stress at room temperature for samples consolidated at 700 °C and 1000 °C, respectively. This work highlights the relationship between processing, microstructure, and properties for this class of ferritic ODS alloys.

  5. Reduction Kinetics of Electric Arc Furnace Oxidizing Slag by Al-Fe Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaehong; Oh, Joon Seok; Lee, Joonho

    2016-09-01

    Effects of temperature and slag basicity on the reduction rate of iron oxide in molten synthetic electric arc furnace oxidizing slag by Al-40 wt.%Fe alloy was investigated. An alloy sample was dropped into molten slag in an MgO crucible. When the initial slag temperature was 1723 K, there was no reduction. However, when the initial slag temperature was 1773 K and the slag basicity was 1.1, the reduction was initiated and the temperature of the slag rapidly increased. When the slag basicity was 1.1, increasing the initial slag temperature from 1773 K to 1823 K increases the reaction rate. As the slag basicity increased from 1.1 to 1.4 at 1773 K, the reaction rate increased. From SEM analysis, it was found that an Al2O3 or a spinel phase at the slag-metal interface inhibited the reaction at a lower temperature and a lower slag basicity.

  6. Fe-complex of a tetraamido macrocyclic ligand: Spectroscopic characterization and catalytic oxidation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Shane Z.; Ghosh, Anindya; Biris, Alexandru S.; Pulla, Sharon; Brezden, Anna M.; Collom, Samulel L.; Woods, Ross M.; Munshi, Pradip; Schnackenberg, Laura; Pierce, Brad S.; Kannarpady, Ganesh K.

    2010-10-01

    This work presents the spectroscopic characterization and reaction studies of a Fe III-complex (2) of a tetraamido macrocyclic ligand (1, 15,15-dimethyl-5,8,13,17-tetrahydro-5,8,13,17-tetraaza-dibenzo[a,g]cyclotridecene-6,7,14,16-tetraone). 2 was characterized primarily by means of EPR. In agreement with the magnetic moment ( μeff = 3.87 BM), EPR spectroscopy of 2 shows signals consistent with S = 3/2 intermediate-spin ferric-iron. Besides EPR, mass spectrometry, UV/vis spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry were used to further characterize 2. 2 is soluble in water and activates hydrogen peroxide under ambient conditions. 2 catalytically bleaches dyes, pulp and paper effluents and oxidizes several amines to their corresponding N-oxides with high turnover number and good yields.

  7. Evaporatic-source model for igneous-related Fe oxide (REE-Cu-Au-U) mineralization

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, M.D.; Johnson, D.A.

    1996-03-01

    We propose that many igneous-related Fe oxide-rich (REE-Cu-Au-U-bearing) deposits form by hydrothermal processes involving evaporitic ligand sources, either coeval salars or older evaporites. These deposits are abundant in both Phanerozoic and Proterozoic extensional continental and continent-margin settings. They commonly form in global arid zones, but they also occur where magmatism is superimposed upon older evaporites. Magmatic compositions exert only second-order control, mainly on alteration mineralogy and on element abundances. Hot S-poor brines generated by interaction with evaporitic materials are consistent with geologic settings and help rationalize the distinctive element enrichments (siderophile, lithophile) and hydrothermal alteration (sodic, locally alkaline) found in these systems. This model contrasts with immiscible oxide melt and magmatic-hydrothermal origins commonly proposed for these deposits, although all three mechanisms can occur. 31 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Computation of emission characteristics of Ar-Fe arc plasma column during the synthesis of nano particles of Fe-oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, I.; Sahasrabudhe, S. N.; Bhoraskar, S. V.; Das, A. K.

    2006-08-01

    The article reports the results of the computationally determined radiative emission characteristics of a transferred arc argon plasma source used in plasma-assisted nano particles synthesis of Fe-oxides. A thermodynamic code uses a spectroscopic database to compute internal partition functions and densities of various charged states in argon-iron vapor plasma system during the synthesis of Fe-oxides. The net amount of radiation emitted by the plasma at different axial positions along the column has been monitored by optical emission spectroscopy. It was also used to determine the amount of metal vapors mixing inside the plasma column during the synthesis process. The net emission coefficient estimated along a certain line of sight shows an effective increase even for a small inclusion of Fe vapors (0.11%) inside the column. It has been noticed that the radiations emitted by the plasma inside the reactor chamber might also be one of the factors, controlling the crystalline phase of Fe-oxide particles.

  9. Interaction between carbon oxides, hydrogen and Fe2O3 and A n + 1Fe n O3 n + 1 (A = Gd, Sr, n = 1, 2, …, ∞)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheshko, T. F.; Serov, Yu. M.; Kryuchkova, T. A.; Khairullina, I. A.; Chislova, I. V.; Zvereva, I. A.

    2016-06-01

    The interaction between carbon oxides and hydrogen and surfaces of iron(III) oxide and A n + 1Fe n O3 n + 1 (where A = Gd, Sr, and n = 1, 2, …, ∞ is the number of perovskite layers) complex oxides is studied for the first time by means of thermal programmed desorption. It is shown that carbon oxides are adsorbed in molecular form with the formation of carbonate-carboxylate complexes, and in dissociative form. The ratios of the adsorption forms of both oxides are determined by the structure of ferrites, the number of perovskite layers, and the valence state and coordinative saturation of iron. The presence of weakly and strongly bonded hydrogen forms is established, and it is suggested that hydrogen dissolves in the bulk of a perovskite.

  10. [Adsorption of methylene blue from aqueous solution onto magnetic Fe3O4/ graphene oxide nanoparticles].

    PubMed

    Chang, Qing; Jiang, Guo-Dong; Hu, Meng-Xuan; Huang, Jia; Tang, He-Qing

    2014-05-01

    A simple ultrasound-assisted co-precipitation method was developed to prepare magnetic Fe3O4/graphene oxide (Fe3O4/ GO) nanoparticles. The characterization with transmission electron microscope (TEM) indicated that the products possessed small particle size. The hysteresis loop of the dried Fe3O4/GO nanoparticles demonstrated that the sample had typical features of superparamagnetic material. Batch adsorption studies were carried out to investigate the effects of the initial pH of the solution, the dosage of adsorbent, the contact time and temperature on the adsorption of methylene blue. The results indicated that the composites prepared could be used over a broad pH range (pH 6-9). The adsorption process was very fast within the first 25 min and the equilibrium was reached at 180 min. The adsorption equilibrium and kinetics data fitted well with the Langmuir isotherm model and the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The adsorption process was a spontaneous and endothermic process in nature. The composite exhibited fairly high adsorption capacity (196.5 mg.g-1) of methylene blue at 313 K. In addition, the magnetic composite could be effectively and simply separated by using an external magnetic field, and then regenerated by hydrogen peroxide and recycled for further use. The results indicated that the adsorbent had a potential in the application of the dye wastewater treatment.

  11. Immobilization of selenite in soil and groundwater using stabilized Fe-Mn binary oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wenbo; Liang, Qiqi; Qian, Tianwei; Zhao, Dongye

    2015-03-01

    Stabilized Fe-Mn binary oxide nanoparticles were synthesized and tested for removal and in-situ immobilization of Se(IV) in groundwater and soil. A water-soluble starch or food-grade carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) was used as a stabilizer to facilitate in-situ delivery of the particles into contaminated soil. While bare and stabilized nanoparticles showed rapid sorption kinetics, starch-stabilized Fe-Mn offered the greatest capacity for Se(IV). The Langmuir maximum capacity was determined to be 109 and 95 mg-Se/g-Fe for starch- and CMC-stabilized nanoparticles, respectively, and the high Se(IV) uptake was observed over the typical groundwater pH range of 5-8. Column breakthrough tests indicated that the stabilized nanoparticles were deliverable in a model sandy soil while non-stabilized particles were not. When a Se(IV)-spiked soil was treated in situ with the nanoparticles, >90% water leachable Se(IV) was transferred to the nanoparticle phase, and thereby immobilized as the particles were retained in the downstream soil matrix. The nanoparticle amendment reduced the TCLP (toxicity characteristic leaching procedure) leachability and the California WET (waste extraction test) leachability of Se(IV) by 76% and 71%, respectively. The technology holds the potential to fill a major technology gap in remediation of metals-contaminated soil and groundwater.

  12. Micrometeoroid ablation: metal abundances and fate of mesospheric metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rietmeijer, Frans

    Extraterrestrial materials ~20 micometer to ~1 cm in size entering the Earth's atmosphere include aggregate interplanetary dust particles (IDPs), cluster IDPs, CI and CM type micro-meteorites from periodic comets, the asteroid belt and near-Earth asteroids. This dust interacts with the atmosphere, ablation and evaporation, and causes steady-state mesospheric metal abundances that can be locally perturbed by meteor storms and (meteorite-producing) bolides. Solar system accretion was hierarchical and involved a few recycled non-chondritic dust types, viz. principal components (PCs), Fe,Ni-sulfides, Fe-oxides, (Mg,Fe)-olivine, (Mg,Fe,Ca)-pyroxenes, anorthite, and refractory Al,Ti-rich minerals. The PCs (0.1 - 2.0 micrometer) are carbonaceous units, C-bearing ferro-magnesiosilica, and Ca,Al-bearing ferromagnesiosilica units (i.e. CHON, mixed and silicate dust in comet Halley). Liberation from the parent body by ice sublimation, fragmentation, impact and others, will! disrupt this accretion hierarchy at the weakest textural bond. Micrometeoroid compositions are thus a function of size (the smallest dust is non-chondritic), the nature of their accretion environments and post-accretion textural modification. Collectively Zodiacal dust has the average composition of the combined accretion environments of the contributing sources. Within variations caused by the ablation process itself, mesospheric metals have almost chondritic abundances. I will discuss the mesospheric sodium abundance and Fe/Ni ratio. Sodium is difficult to analyze but there are indications that cometary Na-abundances exceed the cosmic value. Extraterrestrial matter has a unique Fe/Ni ratio. Despite its range due to natural variations among micrometeoroids, it is a diagnostic signature. The first tentative observation of condensed and coagulated meteoric matter included Fe/Ni-dust that was adhered to terrestrial dust in the upper stratosphere at ~35 km altitude along with Ti-oxides, Fe-oxides, silica and

  13. Heterotrophic Fe-Oxidizing Bacteria Associated With Basalt Surfaces Supporting Life On Vailulu'u Seamount, American Samoa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haucke, L.; Templeton, A.; Bailey, B.; Tebo, B.; Staudigel, H.

    2005-12-01

    Fe, the fourth-most abundant element in the Earth's crust, is also one of the most biologically essential ones. The reduced form, Fe(II), is often considered to be biologically limiting as a result of its low solubility and rapid chemical oxidation to Fe(III)(hydr)oxides at circumneutral pH. The alteration of basaltic glass, enriched in Fe(II), however, provides an abundant supply of reduced iron and, thus, has a major influence on local ocean chemistry and Fe bioavailability. Despite the fact that chemical Fe(II) oxidation takes place very rapidly, we demonstrate that alteration processes of freshly formed basaltic glass can be crucially enhanced by microbial activity.Cultivation of bacteria from basalt surfaces collected from two active submarine volcanoes, Loihi (Hawaii) and Vailulu'u (American Samoa) show a large number of heterotrophic bacteria capable of oxidizing Fe(II) and that these bacteria. not only enhance basalt dissolution but also play a major role in precipitating large amounts of thick Fe(hydr)oxides mats on Vailulu'u Seamount, particularly in the vicinity of low temperature hydrothermal vents. These mats contain substantial quantities of organic carbon that may serve as food sources for some of the macrobiological life on Vailulu'u Seamount. This very prominently includes a substantial population of eels that is found in close spatial association with up to 1m thick Fe oxide/microbial mat at Nafanua volcano, a recent volcanic cone that grew from the crater floor of the seamount. Microbial community analysis on different substrates ranging from basalt surfaces to microbial mats were performed on specially designed culturing media for detection and isolation of heterotrophic bacteria capable of Fe(II)-oxidation. Clone libraries from microbial mats originating from an eel dominated area of Vailulu'u crater are being compared to libraries made from eel guts in order to provide information to what extent these mats are being used as a food source in

  14. Nanowires, Capacitors, and Other Novel Outer-Surface Components Involved in Electron Transfer to Fe(III) Oxides in Geobacter Species

    SciTech Connect

    Lovley, Derek R.

    2005-06-01

    In the past year studies have primarily focused on elucidating the role of pili in electron transport to Fe(III) oxide in Geobacter sulfurreducens. As summarized in last year's report, it was previously found that pili are specifically expressed during growth on Fe(III) oxide and that Fe(III) oxide reduction is inhibited if the gene for the structural pilin protein is deleted. However, it was also found that a pilin-deficient mutant of G. sulfurreducens could attached to Fe(III) oxide as well as wild type.

  15. CoFe 2O 4 spinel protection coating thermally converted from the electroplated Co-Fe alloy for solid oxide fuel cell interconnect application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Z. H.; Zhu, J. H.; Batey, J. L.

    CoFe 2O 4 has been demonstrated as a potential spinel coating for protecting the Cr-containing ferritic interconnects. This spinel had an electrical conductivity of 0.85 S cm -1 at 800 °C in air and an average coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of 11.80 × 10 -6 K -1 from room temperature to 800 °C. A series of Co-Fe alloys were co-deposited onto the Crofer 22 APU ferritic steel via electroplating with an acidic chloride solution. After thermal oxidation in air at 800 °C, a CoFe 2O 4 spinel layer was attained from the plated Co 0.40Fe 0.60 film. Furthermore, a channeled Crofer 22 APU interconnect electrodeposited with a 40-μm Co 0.40Fe 0.60 alloy film as a protective coating was evaluated in a single-cell configuration. The presence of the dense, Cr-free CoFe 2O 4 spinel layer was effective in blocking the Cr migration/transport and thus contributed to the improvement in cell performance stability.

  16. Denitrification and Nitrate-Dependent Fe(II) Oxidation in Various Pseudogulbenkiania Strains

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Satoshi; Joikai, Kazuki; Otsuka, Shigeto; Senoo, Keishi; Okabe, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Pseudogulbenkiania is a relatively recently characterized genus within the order Neisseriales, class Betaproteobacteria. This genus contains several strains that are capable of anaerobic, nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation (NDFO), a geochemically important reaction for nitrogen and iron cycles. In the present study, we examined denitrification functional gene diversities within this genus, and clarified whether other Pseudogulbenkiania sp. strains perform denitrification and NDFO. Seventy strains were analyzed, including two type strains, a well-characterized NDFO strain, and 67 denitrifying strains isolated from various rice paddy fields and rice-soybean rotation fields in Japan. We also attempted to identify the genes responsible for NDFO by mutagenesis. Our comprehensive analysis showed that all Pseudogulbenkiania strains tested performed denitrification and NDFO; however, we were unable to obtain NDFO-deficient denitrifying mutants in our mutagenesis experiment. This result suggests that Fe(II) oxidation in these strains is not enzymatic, but is caused by reactive N-species that are formed during nitrate reduction. Based on the results of the comparative genome analysis among Pseudogulbenkiania sp. strains, we identified low sequence similarity within the nos gene as well as different gene arrangements within the nos gene cluster, suggesting that nos genes were horizontally transferred. Since Pseudogulbenkiania sp. strains have been isolated from various locations around the world, their denitrification and NDFO abilities may contribute significantly to nitrogen and iron biogeochemical cycles. PMID:27431373

  17. Experimental diagenesis of organo-mineral structures formed by microaerophilic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Picard, Aude; Kappler, Andreas; Schmid, Gregor; Quaroni, Luca; Obst, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Twisted stalks are organo-mineral structures produced by some microaerophilic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria at O2 concentrations as low as 3 μM. The presence of these structures in rocks having experienced a diagenetic history could indicate microbial Fe(II)-oxidizing activity as well as localized abundance of oxygen at the time of sediment deposition. Here we use spectroscopy and analytical microscopy to evaluate if--and what kind of--transformations occur in twisted stalks through experimental diagenesis. Unique mineral textures appear on stalks as temperature and pressure conditions increase. Haematite and magnetite form from ferrihydrite at 170 °C-120 MPa. Yet the twisted morphology of the stalks, and the organic matrix, mainly composed of long-chain saturated aliphatic compounds, are preserved at 250 °C-140 MPa. Our results suggest that iron minerals might play a role in maintaining the structural and chemical integrity of stalks under diagenetic conditions and provide spectroscopic signatures for the search of ancient life in the rock record. PMID:25692888

  18. Two-dimensional oxide topological insulator with iron-pnictide superconductor LiFeAs structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qiunan; Song, Zhida; Nie, Simin; Weng, Hongming; Fang, Zhong; Dai, Xi

    2015-11-01

    By using first-principles calculations, we propose that ZrSiO can be looked at as a three-dimensional (3D) oxide weak topological insulator (TI) and its single layer is a long-sought-after 2D oxide TI with a band gap up to 30 meV. Calculated phonon spectrum of the single layer ZrSiO indicates it is dynamically stable and the experimental achievements in growing oxides with atomic precision ensure that it can be readily synthesized. This will lead to novel devices based on TIs, the so-called "topotronic" devices, operating under room temperature and stable when exposed in the air. Thus a new field of "topotronics" will arise. Another intriguing thing is this oxide 2D TI has the similar crystal structure as the well-known iron-pnictide superconductor LiFeAs. This brings great promise in realizing the combination of superconductor and TI, paving the way to various extraordinary quantum phenomena, such as topological superconductor and Majorana modes. We further find that there are many other isostructural compounds hosting the similar electronic structure and forming a W H M family with W being Zr, Hf, or La, H being group IV or group V element, and M being group VI one.

  19. Pyritic event beds and sulfidized Fe (oxyhydr)oxide aggregates in metalliferous black mudstones of the Paleoproterozoic Talvivaara formation, Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virtasalo, Joonas J.; Laitala, Jaakko J.; Lahtinen, Raimo; Whitehouse, Martin J.

    2015-12-01

    The Paleoproterozoic, 2.0-1.9 Ga Talvivaara formation of Finland was deposited during the Shunga Event, a worldwide episode of enhanced accumulation of organic-rich sediments in the aftermath of the Lomagundi-Jatuli carbon isotope excursion. Sulfidic carbonaceous mudstones in the Talvivaara formation contain one of the largest known shale-hosted nickel deposits. In order to gain new insight into this Shungian sedimentary environment, sedimentological, petrographical and in situ S and Fe isotopic microanalyses were carried out on samples representing depositional and early-diagenetic conditions. The event-bedded lithology with tidal signatures in the organic-rich mudstones strongly indicates deposition from predominantly river-delivered mud on a highly-productive coastal area, below storm-wave base. The riverine supply of phosphorus, sulfate and iron supported high primary productivity and resulted in strong lateral and vertical chemical gradients in the nearshore waters with a shallow oxic surface layer underlain by euxinic water. The stratigraphic upper part of the Talvivaara formation contains banded intervals of thin alternating pyrite beds and carbonaceous mudstone beds. The pyrite beds were deposited by seaward excursions of the concentrated, acidic Fe-rich river plume subsequent to droughts or dry seasons, which led to intense pyrite precipitation upon mixing with euxinic waters. δ34S and δ56Fe values of the bedded pyrite (median δ34S = - 10.3 ‰ and δ56Fe = - 0.79 ‰) are consistent with the reaction of dissolved Fe(II) with H2S from bacterial sulfate reduction. Organic-rich clayey Fe-monosulfide-bearing granules were transported from the muddy estuary, and enclosed in Fe (oxyhydr)oxide aggregates that were forming by wave and current reworking in nearshore accumulations of river-delivered iron. The isotopic composition of these presently pyrrhotitic inclusions (median δ34S = - 3.3 ‰ and δ56Fe = - 1.6 ‰) indicates microbial iron reduction. The Fe

  20. Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy and magnetization dynamics in oxidized CoFeAl films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Di; Zhang, Zhe; Li, Le; Zhang, Zongzhi; Zhao, H. B.; Wang, J.; Ma, B.; Jin, Q. Y.

    2015-07-01

    Half-metallic Co-based full-Heusler alloys with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA), such as Co2FeAl in contact with MgO, are receiving increased attention recently due to its full spin polarization for high density memory applications. However, the PMA induced by MgO interface can only be realized for very thin magnetic layers (usually below 1.3 nm), which would have strong adverse effects on the material properties of spin polarization, Gilbert damping parameter, and magnetic stability. In order to solve this issue, we fabricated oxidized Co50Fe25Al25 (CFAO) films with proper thicknesses without employing the MgO layer. The samples show controllable PMA by tuning the oxygen pressure (PO2) and CFAO thickness (tCFAO), large perpendicular anisotropy field of ~8.0 kOe can be achieved at PO2 = 12% for the sample of tCFAO = 2.1 nm or at PO2 = 7% for tCFAO = 2.8 nm. The loss of PMA at thick tCFAO or high PO2 results mainly from the formation of large amount of CoFe oxides, which are superparamagnetic at room temperature but become hard magnetic at low temperatures. The magnetic CFAO films, with strong PMA in a relatively wide thickness range and small intrinsic damping parameter below 0.028, would find great applications in developing advanced spintronic devices.

  1. Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy and magnetization dynamics in oxidized CoFeAl films

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Di; Zhang, Zhe; Li, Le; Zhang, Zongzhi; Zhao, H. B.; Wang, J.; Ma, B.; Jin, Q. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Half-metallic Co-based full-Heusler alloys with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA), such as Co2FeAl in contact with MgO, are receiving increased attention recently due to its full spin polarization for high density memory applications. However, the PMA induced by MgO interface can only be realized for very thin magnetic layers (usually below 1.3 nm), which would have strong adverse effects on the material properties of spin polarization, Gilbert damping parameter, and magnetic stability. In order to solve this issue, we fabricated oxidized Co50Fe25Al25 (CFAO) films with proper thicknesses without employing the MgO layer. The samples show controllable PMA by tuning the oxygen pressure (PO2) and CFAO thickness (tCFAO), large perpendicular anisotropy field of ~8.0 kOe can be achieved at PO2 = 12% for the sample of tCFAO = 2.1 nm or at PO2 = 7% for tCFAO = 2.8 nm. The loss of PMA at thick tCFAO or high PO2 results mainly from the formation of large amount of CoFe oxides, which are superparamagnetic at room temperature but become hard magnetic at low temperatures. The magnetic CFAO films, with strong PMA in a relatively wide thickness range and small intrinsic damping parameter below 0.028, would find great applications in developing advanced spintronic devices. PMID:26190066

  2. Role of a unique population of lithotrophic, Fe-oxidizing bacteria in forming microbial Fe-mats at the Loihi Seamount.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emerson, D.; Rentz, J. A.; Moyer, C. L.

    2005-12-01

    The Loihi Seamount, located 30 km SE of the island of Hawai'i, is among the most active volcanos on Earth. The summit, at a depth of 1100m, includes a 250m deep caldera (Pele's Pit) formed by an eruption in 1996. The summit, and especially Pele's Pit, are the site of extensive low to intermediate temperature (10° to 65°C) hydrothermal venting, emanating both from diffuse fissures and orifices that have substantial flow rates. The vent fluid is characterized by a low sulfide content, high CO2 concentrations and Fe(II) amounts in the 10s to 100s of μM. Associated with all vents are extensive deposits of iron oxyhydroxides that typically have 107 to 108 bacterial cells/cc associated with them. The morphology of the Fe-oxides are indicative of biological origins. We have isolated microaerophilic, obligately lithotrophic Fe-oxidizing bacteria from Loihi and describe here `Mariprofundus ferroxydans' a unique bacterium that forms a filamentous iron oxide mineral. `M. ferroxydans' is the first cultured representative of a novel division of the Proteobacteria, known previously only from clones from different hydrothermal vent sites. Molecular evidence from Loihi mats based on clone libraries and terminal restriction length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis of 16S rRNA genes indicate that this lineage of Fe-oxidizing organisms are common inhabitants at Loihi. We speculate that this organism and its relatives form the basis of an active microbial mat community that owe their existence to the inherent gradients of Fe(II) and O2 that exist at the Loihi vents. In a geological context this is interesting because the Loihi summit and caldera are in an O2-minima zone; O2 concentrations in the bulk seawater are around 0.5 mg/l. In effect, Loihi could serve as a proxy for the late Archaean and early Proterozoic periods when the Earth's atmosphere went from reducing to oxidizing, and it is speculated that abundant Fe(II) in the Earth's oceans served as a major sink for O2 production

  3. Final Report: Molecular mechanisms and kinetics of microbial anaerobic nitrate-dependent U(IV) and Fe(II) oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    O'Day, Peggy A.; Asta, Maria P.; Kanematsu, Masakazu; Beller, Harry; Zhou, Peng; Steefel, Carl

    2015-02-27

    In this project, we combined molecular genetic, spectroscopic, and microscopic techniques with kinetic and reactive transport studies to describe and quantify biotic and abiotic mechanisms underlying anaerobic, nitrate-dependent U(IV) and Fe(II) oxidation, which influences the long-term efficacy of in situ reductive immobilization of uranium at DOE sites. In these studies, Thiobacillus denitrificans, an autotrophic bacterium that catalyzes anaerobic U(IV) and Fe(II) oxidation, was used to examine coupled oxidation-reduction processes under either biotic (enzymatic) or abiotic conditions in batch and column experiments with biogenically produced UIVO2(s). Synthesis and quantitative analysis of coupled chemical and transport processes were done with the reactive transport modeling code Crunchflow. Research focused on identifying the primary redox proteins that catalyze metal oxidation, environmental factors that influence protein expression, and molecular-scale geochemical factors that control the rates of biotic and abiotic oxidation.

  4. Order of Activity of Nitrogen, Iron Oxide, and FeNx Complexes towards Oxygen Reduction in Alkaline Medium.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yansong; Zhang, Bingsen; Wang, Da-Wei; Su, Dang Sheng

    2015-12-01

    In alkaline medium, it seems that both metal-free and iron-containing carbon-based catalysts, such as nitrogen-doped nanocarbon materials, FeOx -doped carbon, and Fe/N/C catalysts, are active for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). However, the order of activity of these different active compositions has not been clearly determined. Herein, we synthesized nitrogen-doped carbon black (NCB), Fe3 O4 /CB, Fe3 O4 /NCB, and FeN4 /CB. Through the systematic study of the ORR catalytic activity of these four catalysts in alkaline solution, we confirmed the difference in the catalytic activity and catalytic mechanism for nitrogen, iron oxides, and Fe-N complexes, respectively. In metal-free NCB, nitrogen can improve the ORR catalytic activity with a four-electron pathway. Fe3 O4 /CB catalyst did not exhibit improved activity over that of NCB owing to the poor conductivity and spinel structure of Fe3 O4 . However, FeN4 coordination compounds as the active sites showed excellent ORR catalytic activity.

  5. Bis-Fe(IV): nature's sniper for long-range oxidation.

    PubMed

    Geng, Jiafeng; Davis, Ian; Liu, Fange; Liu, Aimin

    2014-10-01

    Iron-dependent enzymes are prevalent in nature and participate in a wide range of biological redox activities. Frequently, high-valence iron intermediates are involved in the catalytic events of iron-dependent enzymes, especially when the activation of peroxide or molecular oxygen is involved. Building on the fundamental framework of iron-oxygen chemistry, these reactive intermediates constantly attract significant attention from the enzymology community. During the past few decades, tremendous efforts from a number of laboratories have been dedicated to the capture and characterization of these intermediates to improve mechanistic understandings. In 2008, an unprecedented bis-Fe(IV) intermediate was reported in a c-type diheme enzyme, MauG, which is involved in the maturation of a tryptophan tryptophylquinone cofactor of methylamine dehydrogenase. This intermediate, although chemically equivalent to well-characterized high-valence iron intermediates, such as compound I, compound ES, and intermediate Q in methane monooxygenase, as well as the hypothetical Fe(V) species in Rieske non-heme oxygenases, is orders of magnitude more stable than these other high-valence species in the absence of its primary substrate. It has recently been discovered that the bis-Fe(IV) intermediate exhibits a unique near-IR absorption feature which has been attributed to a novel charge-resonance phenomenon. This review compares the properties of MauG with structurally related enzymes, summarizes the current knowledge of this new high-valence iron intermediate, including its chemical origin and structural basis, explores the formation and consequences of charge resonance, and recounts the long-range catalytic mechanism in which bis-Fe(IV) participates. Biological strategies for storing oxidizing equivalents with iron ions are also discussed.

  6. Controlling phosphate releasing from poultry litter using stabilized Fe-Mn binary oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wenbo; Zhao, Dongye

    2016-01-15

    Animal wastes contain high concentrations of phosphorus (P), most of which is lost into the environment due to uncontrolled release rates. Polysaccharide stabilized Fe-Mn binary oxide nanoparticles were prepared and tested for phosphate adsorption from water and for controlling leachability of P from poultry litter. A water soluble starch and carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) were used as a stabilizer. Both the Freundlich and Langmuir models were able to adequately interpret the isotherm data. The Langmuir maximum capacity was determined at 252, 298 and 313 mg-P/g for bare, CMC- and starch-stabilized nanoparticles, respectively. The presence of the stabilizers not only enhanced the sorption capacity, but facilitated delivery and dispersion of the nanoparticles in poultry litter (PL) and in soil. High phosphate sorption capacity was observed over a broad pH range of 4-9. FTIR analyses indicated that inner sphere surface complexation (Fe-O-P) was the key mechanism for the enhanced uptake of P. When applied to poultry litter, the stabilized nanoparticles reduced water leachable phosphate by >86% at a dose of 0.2 g/L as Fe, and simultaneously, water leachable arsenic by >87-95%. Under conditions of simulated land application of PL, the nanoparticle amendment of PL reduced the water soluble P from 66% (for untreated PL) to 4.4%, and lowered the peak soluble P concentration from 300 to <20 mg/L. By transferring the peak soluble P to the nanoparticle-bound P, the nanoparticles not only greatly reduce the potential runoff loss of P from PL, but also provide a long-term slow-releasing nutrient source. Fortuitously, the nanoparticle treatment was able to immobilize arsenic from PL. With excellent adsorption capacity, easy deliverability, low cost and environmental innocuousness, the stabilized Fe-Mn nanoparticles appear promising for controlling P releases from poultry litter or other animal wastes and for phosphate recovery from water. PMID:26442720

  7. Role of "electron shuttles" in the bioreduction of Fe(III) oxides in humid forest tropical soils.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peretyazhko, T.; Sposito, G.

    2004-12-01

    Dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria (DIRB) can reduce Fe(III) oxides either by direct contact between the organisms and the oxide surface or by indirect mechanisms not involving contact. These latter mechanisms can include (i) "electron shuttling" or (ii) soluble Fe(III) complexation with subsequent reduction. In the presence of humic substances, indirect Fe(III) reduction occurs, particularly by mechanism (i). Important electron-accepting groups in humic substances include quinone moieties, complexed Fe(III) and conjugated aromatic moieties. A model compound frequently used to study mechanism (i) is anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), which is believed to function as an "electron shuttle" in a manner similar to humic substances. We are currently investigating Fe(III) reduction in humid tropical forest soils as affected by "electron shuttles," using AQDS and humic substances in our experiments. The soil samples were collected at the bottom of a toposequence in the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico. Development of anaerobic conditions in these soils occurs due to high precipitation and runoff water inputs. Fourteen-day anoxic incubations of soil suspensions amended with AQDS showed enhanced production of both soluble and particulate forms of Fe(II) as compared to non-amended soil suspensions. Our data indicated clearly that DIRB in the soil could utilize added "electron shuttles" effectively to reduce Fe(III). To examine factors controlling Fe(III) reduction by humic acid (HA), three IHSS HA samples (soil, peat and Leonardite) were both abiotically reduced by H2 treatment and microbially reduced by incubation with a filtrate from a soil suspension, then titrated with three different oxidants (iodine, cyanoferrate, and ferric citrate) to provide chemical and biological estimates of electron-accepting capacity at pH 5 and 7. The results will be discussed in terms of the three oxidants used, the properties of the HA samples, pH, and the effects of chemical

  8. Catalytic properties of Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3//Sb/sub 2/O/sub 4/ mixed oxides--1. Mechanism of propene oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Aso, I.; Furukawa, S.; Yamazoe, N.; Seiyama, T.

    1980-07-01

    On a catalyst containing a 1:1 antimony-iron ratio (Sb/Fe) and consisting entirely of FeSbO/sub 4/, and on a catalyst containing a 2:1 ant