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Sample records for ablation fe oxidation

  1. Optical and magnetic properties of Fe2O3 nanoparticles synthesized by laser ablation/fragmentation technique in different liquid media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, B. K.; Shahi, A. K.; Shah, Jyoti; Kotnala, R. K.; Gopal, Ram

    2014-01-01

    Iron oxide (Fe2O3) bulk powder have been ablated/fragmented in different liquid medium by Nd:YAG laser beam using 1064 nm wavelength. Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) and double distilled water (DDW) are used as liquid medium. Crystalline size, lattice strain, phase and structure of ablated particles have been investigated using synchrotron X-ray diffraction. Optical band gap energy of as purchased Fe2O3 found 1.92 eV that increased to 2.03 eV after ablation in CTAB determined by UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. Magnetic properties have been analyzed by hysteresis loops using vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). Crystalline sizes have been found in the range of 29.23-16.54 nm and coercivity tailored in the range of 206.91-298.36 Oe using laser ablation. Saturation magnetization and remanence have been found in the range of 0.013-3.41 emu/g and 0.0023-.0.51 emu/g respectively. Particle shape and size have been examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). CTAB (cationic) and SDS (anionic) surfactants are used as capping agent. CTAB produces phase transformation in ablated iron oxide (Fe2O3). Crystallinity and crystalline size of ablated particles in DDW increased due to presence of rich oxygen in it due to oxidation. Ablated Fe2O3 nanoparticles have been widely used experimentally for numerous in vivo applications such as MRI contrast enhancement agent, tissue repair, immunoassay, detoxification of biological fluids, hyperthermia, drug delivery and cell separation.

  2. The oxidation of Fe(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Robert; Edwards, Dyfan; Gräfe, Joachim; Gilbert, Lee; Davies, Philip; Hutchings, Graham; Bowker, Michael

    2011-09-01

    The oxidation of Fe(111) was studied using Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), low energy electron diffraction (LEED), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), ion scattering spectroscopy (ISS) and scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM). Oxidation of the crystal was found to be a very fast process, even at 200 K, and the Auger O signal saturation level is reached within ~ 50 × 10 - 6 mbar s. Annealing the oxidised surface at 773 K causes a significant decline in apparent surface oxygen concentration and produces a clear (6 × 6) LEED pattern, whereas after oxidation at ambient temperature no pattern was observed. STM results indicate that the oxygen signal was reduced due to the nucleation of large, but sparsely distributed oxide islands, leaving mainly the smooth (6 × 6) structure between the islands. The reactivity of the (6 × 6) layer towards methanol was investigated using temperature programmed desorption (TPD), which showed mainly decomposition to CO and CO 2, due to the production of formate intermediates on the surface. Interestingly, this removes the (6 × 6) structure by reduction, but it can be reformed from the sink of oxygen present in the large oxide islands simply by annealing at 773 K for a few minutes. The (6 × 6) appears to be a relatively stable, pseudo-oxide phase, that may be useful as a model oxide surface.

  3. Characteristics of Fe Ablation Trials Observed During the 1998 Leonid Meteor Shower

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Xin-Zhao; Pan, Wei-Lin; Papen, George; Swenson, Gary; Gardner, Chester S.; Jenniskens, Peter; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Eighteen Fe ablation trails were observed during the 17/18 Nov 1998 Leonid meteor shower with an airborne Fe lidar aboard the National Simulation Facility/National Center for Atmospheric Research (NSF/NCAR) Electra aircraft over Okinawa. The average altitude of the 18 trails from the high velocity (72 km/s) Leonid meteors, 95.67 +/- 0.93 km, is approximately 6.7 km higher than previously observed for slower (approx. 30 km/s) sporadic meteors. This height difference is consistent with the assumption that meteors ablate when the kinetic energy imparted to the atmosphere reaches a critical threshold. The average age of the Fe trails, determined by a diffusion model, is 10.1 min. The youngest ages were observed below 92 km and above 98 km where chemistry and diffusion dominate, respectively. The average abundance of the trails is ten percent of the abundance of the background Fe layer. Observations suggest that the 1998 Leonid shower did not have a significant impact on the abundance of the background Fe layer.

  4. Oxidation of Structural Fe(II) in Biotite by Lithotrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelobolina, E.; Blöthe, M.; Xu, H.; Konishi, H.; Roden, E.

    2008-12-01

    The potential for microbial involvement in the oxidation of Fe(II)-bearing phyllosilicates is an understudied aspect of soil/sediment Fe biogeochemistry. An important property of structural Fe in Fe-bearing smectites is their ability to undergo multiple redox cycles without being mobilized. An obvious choice of mineral substrate for enumeration/isolation of Fe(II)-oxidizing microorganisms would be reduced smectite. But reduced smectite is readily oxidized by air. That is why biotite was chosen as a substrate for this study. In contrast to smectite, biotite is more stable in the presence of air, but incapable of redox cycling. Once Fe(II) is oxidized, biotite is weathered to expendable 2:1 phyllosilicates or kaolinite. First, we evaluated the ability of a neutral-pH lithoautotrophic nitrate-reducing enrichment culture (MPI culture), recovered by Straub et al (Appl. Environ. Microbiol., 1996, 62:1458-1460) from a freshwater ditch, to oxidize two different specimens of biotite. The culture was capable of multiple transfers in anaerobic nitrate-containing biotite suspensions. The growth of MPI culture resulted in decrease of 0.5 N HCl-extractable Fe(II) content and simultaneous nitrate reduction. Cell yields were comparable to those observed for other neutral-pH lithoautotrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria. High resolution TEM examination revealed structural and chemical changes at the edges of oxidized biotite and formation of reddish amorphous precipitates dominated by Si and Fe. To further evaluate efficiency of biotite for recovery of oxygen- and nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidizing cultures microbial enumeration study was performed using subsoil from a site near Madison, WI. The soil is rich in Fe-bearing smectite and shows evidence of redoximorphic features. The enumeration of Fe(II) oxidizing organisms from this sediment showed 10-fold higher efficiency of biotite over soluble Fe(II) for recovery of Fe(II)-oxidizers. Isolation and identification of both aerobic and

  5. Pulsed laser ablation of complex oxides: The role of congruent ablation and preferential scattering for the film stoichiometry

    SciTech Connect

    Wicklein, S.; Koehl, A.; Dittmann, R.; Sambri, A.; Amoruso, S.; Wang, X.; Bruzzese, R.

    2012-09-24

    By combining structural and chemical thin film analysis with detailed plume diagnostics and modeling of the laser plume dynamics, we are able to elucidate the different physical mechanisms determining the stoichiometry of the complex oxides model material SrTiO{sub 3} during pulsed laser deposition. Deviations between thin film and target stoichiometry are basically a result of two effects, namely, incongruent ablation and preferential scattering of lighter ablated species during their motion towards the substrate in the O{sub 2} background gas. On the one hand, a progressive preferential ablation of the Ti species with increasing laser fluence leads to a regime of Ti-rich thin film growth at larger fluences. On the other hand, in the low laser fluence regime, a more effective scattering of the lighter Ti plume species results in Sr rich films.

  6. Deciphering formation processes of banded iron formations from the Transvaal and the Hamersley successions by combined Si and Fe isotope analysis using UV femtosecond laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhoefel, Grit; von Blanckenburg, Friedhelm; Horn, Ingo; Konhauser, Kurt O.; Beukes, Nicolas J.; Gutzmer, Jens

    2010-05-01

    To investigate the genesis of BIFs, we have determined the Fe and Si isotope composition of coexisting mineral phases in samples from the ˜2.5 billion year old Kuruman Iron Formation (Transvaal Supergroup, South Africa) and Dales Gorges Member of the Brockman Iron Formation (Hamersley Group, Australia) by UV femtosecond laser ablation coupled to a MC-ICP-MS. Chert yields a total range of δ 30Si between -1.3‰ and -0.8‰, but the Si isotope compositions are uniform in each core section examined. This uniformity suggests that Si precipitated from well-mixed seawater far removed from its sources such as hydrothermal vents or continental drainage. The Fe isotope composition of Fe-bearing mineral phases is much more heterogeneous compared to Si with δ 56Fe values of -2.2‰ to 0‰. This heterogeneity is likely due to variable degrees of partial Fe(II) oxidation in surface waters, precipitation of different mineral phases and post-depositional Fe redistribution. Magnetite exhibits negative δ 56Fe values, which can be attributed to a variety of diagenetic pathways: the light Fe isotope composition was inherited from the Fe(III) precursor, heavy Fe(II) was lost by abiotic reduction of the Fe(III) precursor or light Fe(II) was gained from external fluids. Micrometer-scale heterogeneities of δ 56Fe in Fe oxides are attributed to variable degrees of Fe(II) oxidation or to isotope exchange upon Fe(II) adsorption within the water column and to Fe redistribution during diagenesis. Diagenetic Fe(III) reduction caused by oxidation of organic matter and Fe redistribution is supported by the C isotope composition of a carbonate-rich sample containing primary siderite. These carbonates yield δ 13C values of ˜-10‰, which hints at a mixed carbon source in the seawater of both organic and inorganic carbon. The ancient seawater composition is estimated to have a minimum range in δ 56Fe of -0.8‰ to 0‰, assuming that hematite and siderite have preserved their primary Fe

  7. Enhanced dechlorination of m-DCB using iron@graphite/palladium (Fe@C/Pd) nanoparticles produced by pulsed laser ablation in liquid.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yiseul; Jung, Hyeon Jin; Je, Mingyu; Choi, Hyun Chul; Choi, Myong Yong

    2016-07-01

    In this work, the zero valent Fe (ZVI) and graphite-encapsulated Fe (Fe@C) nanoparticles (NPs) were easily and selectively prepared by a pulsed laser ablation (PLA) method in an aqueous sodium borohydride solution and ascorbic acid dissolved in methanol, respectively. Here, the Fe@C NPs were uniquely synthesized by PLA in methanol, where the solvent is used as both a carbon source for the graphitic layers and solvent, which is very unique. Furthermore, Pd NPs were loaded onto the surface of the Fe@C NPs to prepare bimetallic (Fe@C/Pd) NPs for the enhancement of the degradation efficiency of m-dichlorobenzene (m-DCB). The morphology, crystallinity, and surface composition of the prepared NPs were carefully characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), energy dispersive x-ray spectrometer (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The degradation rate of m-DCB using single (Fe and Pd) or bimetallic (Fe/Pd and Fe@C/Pd) NPs were compared by using gas chromatography. Among these NPs produced in this work, the Fe@C/Pd NPs with 1.71 wt % of Pd showed an excellent dechlorination efficiency for m-DCB with 100% degradation within 75 min. The graphitic layer on the Fe NPs played as not only an oxidation resistant for the Fe NPs to surroundings, but also a supporter of the Pd NPs for the enhanced degradation efficiency of m-DCB.

  8. Laser Direct Ablation of Indium Tin Oxide Films on Both Sides of Various Substrates.

    PubMed

    Oh, Gi Taek; Kwon, Sang Jik; Han, Jae-Hee; Cho, Eou Sik

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate ablation of indium tin oxide (ITO) films onto both glass and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates, using a Q-switched diode-pumped neodymium-doped yttrium vanadate laser (Nd:YVO4, λ = 1064 nm) incident on both the front and back sides of the substrate. From scanning electron microscope (SEM) images and depth profile data, ITO patterns that were laser-ablated onto glass from the back side showed a larger abrupt change in the ablated line width than those ablated from the front. However, there were only slight differences in ablated line widths due to the direction of the incident laser beam. We provide a possible explanation in terms of several factors: dispersion of laser beam energy through the substrate, overlapping of each laser beam spot due to scanning speed, and the thickness of glass and PET substrates.

  9. Optical and Magnetic properties of Fe nanoparticles fabricated by fs laser ablation in organic and inorganic solvents.

    PubMed

    Santillán, Jesica María José; Muñeton Arboleda, David; Coral, Diego; Fernández van Raap, Marcela; Muraca, Diego; Schinca, Daniel Carlos; Scaffardi, Lucía Beatriz

    2017-03-12

    Magnetic nanoparticles have attracted much interest due to their broad applications in biomedical and pollutant remediation areas. In this paper, we study the optical, magnetic and structural characteristics of colloids produced by ultrashort pulsed laser ablation of a solid Fe target immersed in four different media: HPLC water, trisodium citrate aqueous solution, acetone and ethanol. Optical extinction spectroscopy reveals an absorption band in the UV region for all solvents except acetone, differing from what is obtained with ns lasers. Micro-Raman spectroscopy shows that the samples are heterogeneous in their composition, having hematite, maghemite and magnetite nanoparticles in the four solvents. Similar results are obtained by electron diffraction, where also -Fe was found. Magnetic properties are studied by vibrating sample magnetometer, resulting in nanoparticles in superparamagnetic state. We also show that, under certain experimental conditions, sub-micron sized iron oxide nanoparticles agglomerate following fractal patterns that show self-similar properties. Self-assembled annular structures in the nanometer scale are also observed and reported for the first time.

  10. Similarities and differences in ablative and non-ablative iron oxide nanoparticle hyperthermia cancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petryk, Alicia A.; Misra, Adwiteeya; Kastner, Elliot J.; Mazur, Courtney M.; Petryk, James D.; Hoopes, P. Jack

    2015-03-01

    The use of hyperthermia to treat cancer is well studied and has utilized numerous delivery techniques, including microwaves, radio frequency, focused ultrasound, induction heating, infrared radiation, warmed perfusion liquids (combined with chemotherapy), and recently, metallic nanoparticles (NP) activated by near infrared radiation (NIR) and alternating magnetic field (AMF) based platforms. It has been demonstrated by many research groups that ablative temperatures and cytotoxicity can be produced with locally NP-based hyperthermia. Such ablative NP techniques have demonstrated the potential for success. Much attention has also been given to the fact that NP may be administered systemically, resulting in a broader cancer therapy approach, a lower level of tumor NP content and a different type of NP cancer therapy (most likely in the adjuvant setting). To use NP based hyperthermia successfully as a cancer treatment, the technique and its goal must be understood and utilized in the appropriate clinical context. The parameters include, but are not limited to, NP access to the tumor (large vs. small quantity), cancer cell-specific targeting, drug carrying capacity, potential as an ionizing radiation sensitizer, and the material properties (magnetic characteristics, size and charge). In addition to their potential for cytotoxicity, the material properties of the NP must also be optimized for imaging, detection and direction. In this paper we will discuss the differences between, and potential applications for, ablative and non-ablative magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia.

  11. Oxidation of Fe(II)-EDTA by nitrite and by two nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizing Acidovorax strains.

    PubMed

    Klueglein, N; Picardal, F; Zedda, M; Zwiener, C; Kappler, A

    2015-03-01

    The enzymatic oxidation of Fe(II) by nitrate-reducing bacteria was first suggested about two decades ago. It has since been found that most strains are mixotrophic and need an additional organic co-substrate for complete and prolonged Fe(II) oxidation. Research during the last few years has tried to determine to what extent the observed Fe(II) oxidation is driven enzymatically, or abiotically by nitrite produced during heterotrophic denitrification. A recent study reported that nitrite was not able to oxidize Fe(II)-EDTA abiotically, but the addition of the mixotrophic nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizer, Acidovorax sp. strain 2AN, led to Fe(II) oxidation (Chakraborty & Picardal, 2013). This, along with other results of that study, was used to argue that Fe(II) oxidation in strain 2AN was enzymatically catalyzed. However, the absence of abiotic Fe(II)-EDTA oxidation by nitrite reported in that study contrasts with previously published data. We have repeated the abiotic and biotic experiments and observed rapid abiotic oxidation of Fe(II)-EDTA by nitrite, resulting in the formation of Fe(III)-EDTA and the green Fe(II)-EDTA-NO complex. Additionally, we found that cultivating the Acidovorax strains BoFeN1 and 2AN with 10 mM nitrate, 5 mm acetate, and approximately 10 mM Fe(II)-EDTA resulted only in incomplete Fe(II)-EDTA oxidation of 47-71%. Cultures of strain BoFeN1 turned green (due to the presence of Fe(II)-EDTA-NO) and the green color persisted over the course of the experiments, whereas strain 2AN was able to further oxidize the Fe(II)-EDTA-NO complex. Our work shows that the two used Acidovorax strains behave very differently in their ability to deal with toxic effects of Fe-EDTA species and the further reduction of the Fe(II)-EDTA-NO nitrosyl complex. Although the enzymatic oxidation of Fe(II) cannot be ruled out, this study underlines the importance of nitrite in nitrate-reducing Fe(II)- and Fe(II)-EDTA-oxidizing cultures and demonstrates that Fe(II)-EDTA cannot

  12. Destruction of monocrystalline silicon with nanosecond pulsed fiber laser accompanied by the oxidation of ablation microparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veiko, V. P.; Skvortsov, A. M.; Huynh, C. T.; Petrov, A. A.

    2013-11-01

    In this work, we report an observation of process of local destruction monocrystalline silicon with a scanning beam irradiation of pulse ytterbium fiber laser with a wavelength λ= 1062 nm, accompanied by the oxidation of ablation microparticles. It is shown that depending on the power density of irradiation was observed a large scatter size of the microparticles. From a certain average power density is observed beginning oxidation particulate emitted from the surface of the irradiated area. By varying the parameters of the laser beam such as scanning speed, pulse repetition rate, overlap of laser spot, radiation dose can be achieved almost complete oxidation of all formed during the ablation of microparticles.

  13. Fractionation of Fe isotopes during Fe(II) oxidation by a marine photoferrotroph is controlled by the formation of organic Fe-complexes and colloidal Fe fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanner, Elizabeth D.; Wu, Wenfang; Schoenberg, Ronny; Byrne, James; Michel, F. Marc; Pan, Yongxin; Kappler, Andreas

    2015-09-01

    Much interest exists in finding mineralogical, organic, morphological, or isotopic biosignatures for Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) that are retained in Fe-rich sediments, which could indicate the activity of these organisms in Fe-rich seawater, more common in the Precambrian Era. To date, the effort to establish a clear Fe isotopic signature in Fe minerals produced by Fe(II)-oxidizing metabolisms has been thwarted by the large kinetic fractionation incurred as freshly oxidized aqueous Fe(III) rapidly precipitates as Fe(III) (oxyhydr)oxide minerals at near neutral pH. The Fe(III) (oxyhydr)oxide minerals resulting from abiotic Fe(II) oxidation are isotopically heavy compared to the Fe(II) precursor and are not clearly distinguishable from minerals formed by FeOB isotopically. However, in marine hydrothermal systems and Fe(II)-rich springs the minerals formed are often isotopically lighter than expected considering the fraction of Fe(II) that has been oxidized and experimentally-determined fractionation factors. We measured the Fe isotopic composition of aqueous Fe (Feaq) and the final Fe mineral (Feppt) produced in batch experiment using the marine Fe(II)-oxidizing phototroph Rhodovulum iodosum. The δ56Feaq data are best described by a kinetic fractionation model, while the evolution of δ56Feppt appears to be controlled by a separate fractionation process. We propose that soluble Fe(III), and Fe(II) and Fe(III) extracted from the Feppt may act as intermediates between Fe(II) oxidation and Fe(III) precipitation. Based on 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy, extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, and X-ray total scattering, we suggests these Fe phases, collectively Fe(II/III)interm, may consist of organic-ligand bound, sorbed, and/or colloidal Fe(II) and Fe(III) mineral phases that are isotopically lighter than the final Fe(III) mineral product. Similar intermediate phases, formed in response to organic carbon produced by FeOB and inorganic

  14. Formation of alloy nanoparticles by laser ablation of Au/Fe multilayer films in liquid environment.

    PubMed

    Amendola, Vincenzo; Scaramuzza, Stefano; Carraro, Francesco; Cattaruzza, Elti

    2017-03-01

    Laser ablation in liquids (LAL) emerged as a powerful technique for the synthesis of multielement nanoparticles (NPs) such as metal alloys with thermodynamically forbidden composition. Consequently, there is a great interest in expanding the current knowledge about NPs formation during LAL, in order to improve the control on product structure and to extend the range of compositions accessible by this technique. Here we performed a systematic investigation on alloy NPs formation by nanosecond LAL of Au/Fe/glass multilayers with different thickness and order of deposition. The experiments were carried out in ethanol and water, which have, respectively, favourable and unfavourable effects on alloy formation. Results were analyzed with optical absorption spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and Mie theory for simple and core-shell spheres. Since alloy NPs were obtained in all cases, our findings provide the evidence that the two metals are mixed during particles formation. Besides, our results suggest that the probability of interaction between ablated matter and solution species is higher for the topmost layer of the target, i.e. the one closer to the solid/liquid interface. This provides useful insight for the synthesis of nanoalloys with new compositions, that are of interest in several fields, from catalysis to photonics and nanomedicine.

  15. Incorporation of oxidized uranium into Fe (hydr)oxides during Fe(II) catalyzed remineralization

    SciTech Connect

    Nico, Peter S.; Stewart, Brandy D.; Fendorf, Scott

    2009-07-01

    The form of solid phase U after Fe(II) induced anaerobic remineralization of ferrihydrite in the presence of aqueous and absorbed U(VI) was investigated under both abiotic batch and biotic flow conditions. Experiments were conducted with synthetic ground waters containing 0.168 mM U(VI), 3.8 mM carbonate, and 3.0 mM Ca{sup 2+}. In spite of the high solubility of U(VI) under these conditions, appreciable removal of U(VI) from solution was observed in both the abiotic and biotic systems. The majority of the removed U was determined to be substituted as oxidized U (U(VI) or U(V)) into the octahedral position of the goethite and magnetite formed during ferrihydrite remineralization. It is estimated that between 3% and 6% of octahedral Fe(III) centers in the new Fe minerals were occupied by U(VI). This site specific substitution is distinct from the non-specific U co-precipitation processes in which uranyl compounds, e.g. uranyl hydroxide or carbonate, are entrapped with newly formed Fe oxides. The prevalence of site specific U incorporation under both abiotic and biotic conditions and the fact that the produced solids were shown to be resistant to both extraction (30 mM KHCO{sub 3}) and oxidation (air for 5 days) suggest the potential importance of sequestration in Fe oxides as a stable and immobile form of U in the environment.

  16. Erbium oxide thin films on Si(100) obtained by laser ablation and electron beam evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queralt, X.; Ferrater, C.; Sánchez, F.; Aguiar, R.; Palau, J.; Varela, M.

    1995-02-01

    Erbium oxide thin films have been obtained by laser ablation and electron beam evaporation techniques on Si(100) substrates. The samples were grown under different conditions of oxygen atmosphere and substrate temperature without any oxidation process after deposition. The crystal structure has been studied by X-ray diffraction. Films obtained by laser ablation are highly textured in the [ hhh] direction, although this depends on the conditions of oxygen pressure and substrate temperature. In order to study the depth composition profile of the thin films and the interdiffusion of erbium metal and oxygen towards the silicon substrates, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses have been carried out.

  17. Endometrial ablation

    MedlinePlus

    Hysteroscopy-endometrial ablation; Laser thermal ablation; Endometrial ablation-radiofrequency; Endometrial ablation-thermal balloon ablation; Rollerball ablation; Hydrothermal ablation; Novasure ablation

  18. Biomineralization associated with microbial reduction of Fe3+ and oxidation of Fe2+ in solid minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, G.; Dong, H.; Jiang, H.; Kukkadapu, R.K.; Kim, J.; Eberl, D.; Xu, Z.

    2009-01-01

    Iron-reducing and oxidizing microorganisms gain energy through reduction or oxidation of iron, and by doing so play an important role in the geochemical cycling of iron. This study was undertaken to investigate mineral transformations associated with microbial reduction of Fe3+ and oxidation of Fe2+ in solid minerals. A fluid sample from the 2450 m depth of the Chinese Continental Scientific Drilling project was collected, and Fe3+-reducing and Fe2+-oxidizing microorganisms were enriched. The enrichment cultures displayed reduction of Fe3+ in nontronite and ferric citrate, and oxidation of Fe2+ in vivianite, siderite, and monosulfide (FeS). Additional experiments verified that the iron reduction and oxidation was biological. Oxidation of FeS resulted in the formation of goethite, lepidocrocite, and ferrihydrite as products. Although our molecular microbiological analyses detected Thermoan-aerobacter ethanolicus as a predominant organism in the enrichment culture, Fe3+ reduction and Fe2+ oxidation may be accomplished by a consortia of organisms. Our results have important environmental and ecological implications for iron redox cycling in solid minerals in natural environments, where iron mineral transformations may be related to the mobility and solubility of inorganic and organic contaminants.

  19. Microbial Lithotrophic Oxidation of Structural Fe(II) in Biotite

    SciTech Connect

    Shelobolina, Evgenya S.; Xu, Huifang; Konishi, Hiromi; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Wu, Tao; Blothe, Marco; Roden, Eric E.

    2012-06-08

    Microorganisms are known to participate in the weathering of primary phyllosilicate minerals through production of organic ligands and acids, and through uptake of products of weathering. Here we show that a lithotrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing, nitrate-reducing enrichment culture (Straub, 6 1996) can grow via oxidation of structural Fe(II) in biotite, a Fe(II)-rich trioctahedral mica found in granitic rocks. Oxidation of silt/clay sized biotite particles was detected by a decrease in extractable Fe(II) content and simultaneous nitrate reduction. Moessbauer spectroscopy confirmed structural Fe(II) oxidation. Approximately 107 cells were produced per {micro}mol Fe(II) oxidized, in agreement with previous estimates of the growth yield of lithoautotrophic circumneutral-pH Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria. Microbial oxidation of structural Fe(II) resulted in biotite alterations similar to those found in nature, including decrease in unit cell b-dimension toward dioctahedral levels and iron and potassium release. The demonstration of microbial oxidation of structural Fe(II) suggests that microorganisms may be directly responsible for the initial step in the weathering of biotite in granitic aquifers and the plant rhizosphere.

  20. Effect of Oxidation Rate and Fe(II) State on Microbial Nitrate-Dependent Fe(III) Mineral Formation

    PubMed Central

    Senko, John M.; Dewers, Thomas A.; Krumholz, Lee R.

    2005-01-01

    A nitrate-dependent Fe(II)-oxidizing bacterium was isolated and used to evaluate whether Fe(II) chemical form or oxidation rate had an effect on the mineralogy of biogenic Fe(III) (hydr)oxides resulting from nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation. The isolate (designated FW33AN) had 99% 16S rRNA sequence similarity to Klebsiella oxytoca. FW33AN produced Fe(III) (hydr)oxides by oxidation of soluble Fe(II) [Fe(II)sol] or FeS under nitrate-reducing conditions. Based on X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, Fe(III) (hydr)oxide produced by oxidation of FeS was shown to be amorphous, while oxidation of Fe(II)sol yielded goethite. The rate of Fe(II) oxidation was then manipulated by incubating various cell concentrations of FW33AN with Fe(II)sol and nitrate. Characterization of products revealed that as Fe(II) oxidation rates slowed, a stronger goethite signal was observed by XRD and a larger proportion of Fe(III) was in the crystalline fraction. Since the mineralogy of Fe(III) (hydr)oxides may control the extent of subsequent Fe(III) reduction, the variables we identify here may have an effect on the biogeochemical cycling of Fe in anoxic ecosystems. PMID:16269756

  1. Effect of the oxidation rate and Fe(II) state on microbial nitrate-dependent Fe(III) mineral formation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senko, John M.; Dewers , Thomas A.; Krumholz, Lee R.

    2005-01-01

    A nitrate-dependent Fe(II)-oxidizing bacterium was isolated and used to evaluate whether Fe(II) chemical form or oxidation rate had an effect on the mineralogy of biogenic Fe(III) (hydr)oxides resulting from nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation. The isolate (designated FW33AN) had 99% 16S rRNA sequence similarity to Klebsiella oxytoca. FW33AN produced Fe(III) (hydr)oxides by oxidation of soluble Fe(II) [Fe(II)sol] or FeS under nitrate-reducing conditions. Based on X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, Fe(III) (hydr)oxide produced by oxidation of FeS was shown to be amorphous, while oxidation of Fe(II)sol yielded goethite. The rate of Fe(II) oxidation was then manipulated by incubating various cell concentrations of FW33AN with Fe(II)sol and nitrate. Characterization of products revealed that as Fe(II) oxidation rates slowed, a stronger goethite signal was observed by XRD and a larger proportion of Fe(III) was in the crystalline fraction. Since the mineralogy of Fe(III) (hydr)oxides may control the extent of subsequent Fe(III) reduction, the variables we identify here may have an effect on the biogeochemical cycling of Fe in anoxic ecosystems.

  2. Effects of tillage on the Fe oxides activation in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Guangyu; Chen, Xin; Shi, Yi; Wang, Jun; Zheng, Taihui

    2009-07-01

    Since mid-1950s, the wetland ecosystems in Sanjiang Plain of Northeast China have been experiencing greater changes in land use, which had negative effects on the soil environments. This study assessed the effects of soil tillage on the activation of soil Fe in the region. The test ecosystems included natural wetland, paddy field and upland field converted from wetland. Soil samples at the depths of 0-10 cm, 10-20 cm, 20-30 cm, 30-40 cm, 40-60 cm, 60-90 cm and 90-120 cm were collected from each of the ecosystems for the analysis of vertical distribution of soil pH, organic carbon, chelate Fe oxides and Fe(II). The results showed that the conversion of wetland into paddy field and upland field induced a decrease of organic carbon content in 0-10 cm soil layer by 61.8% (P <0.05) and 70.0% (P < 0.05), respectively. The correlations among iron forms and soil organic carbon showed that chelate Fe oxides and Fe(II) was correlated positively with soil organic carbon and chelate ratio had a more positive relationship with organic carbon than chelate Fe oxides and Fe(II). The results of chelate Fe oxides, Fe(II) and chelate ratio of Fe suggested that reclamation could prevent the Fe activation and organic matter is credited for having an important influence on the process of Fe activation.

  3. Microbial Fe(III) oxide reduction and Fe cycling in iron-rich freshwater wetland sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Roden, E.E.

    1995-12-31

    The dynamics of Fe cycling and the interaction between microbial Fe(III) oxide reduction and other anaerobic microbial respiratory processes were examined in Fe-rich, sulfate-poor freshwater wetland sediments. Sediment incubation experiments demonstrated that reduction of Fe(III) oxides (amorphous, soluble in dilute HCl) dominated anaerobic carbon mineralization at Fe(III) concentrations in excess of 10 mmol per liter wet sediment. The kinetics of Fe(III) reduction were found to be first-order with respect to the concentration of Fe(III) oxide, although estimated first-order rate constants varied in relation to the absolute rates of Fe(III) reduction, suggesting a co-dependency on the concentration of easily degradable organic carbon. High concentrations of amorphous Fe(III) oxides (10-100 mmol L wet sed {sup -1}) were found in surface sediments (0-3 cm) of unvegetated zones of the wetland and in the rhizosphere (0-10 cm) of emergent aquatic plants, sufficient (based on sediment incubation experiments) to allow Fe(III)-reducing bacteria (FeRB) to dominate anaerobic carbon mineralization. A rapid redox cycling of Fe is apparent in these localized zones based on observed rates of Fe(III) reduction and the abundance/depth distribution of Fe(Ill) oxides. Preliminary culture enrichment studies indicate that FeRB present in these sediments are capable of metabolizing a range of both natural and contaminant aromatic hydrocarbons, which suggests a potential for utilization of natural and/or artificial Fe-rich wetland systems for organic contaminant bioremediation.

  4. Ablation behavior of monolayer and multilayer Ir coatings under carburizing and oxidizing oxyacetylene flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wangping; Jiang, Jinjin; Chen, Zhaofeng

    2016-06-01

    Iridium is one of the most promising candidates for protective barrier of refractory materials to endure high service temperature. The multilayer iridium coating was produced by a double glow plasma process on the polished tungsten carbide substrates, compared with monolayer. The ablation behaviors of the monolayer on the unpolished and polished substrates were investigated under carburizing and oxidizing oxyacetylene flames, respectively, at the same time the multilayer coating ablated under oxidizing flames. Multilayer coating was a polycrystalline phase with the preferential (220) orientation. Monolayer on the unpolished substrate had fine coarse grains and some small microcracks were present. Multilayer consisted of columnar grains with some voids between the grains boundaries. The formation of a WIr phase in the as-deposited multilayer was attributed to high deposition temperature. The monolayer could endure high temperature up to 1800 °C in carburizing flame. The substrates could be protected more effectively by multilayer than monolayer at 2000- 2200 °C in oxidizing flame.

  5. Mechanisms for Fe(III) oxide reduction in sedimentary environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nevin, Kelly P.; Lovely, Derek R.

    2002-01-01

    Although it was previously considered that Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms must come into direct contact with Fe(III) oxides in order to reduce them, recent studies have suggested that electron-shuttling compounds and/or Fe(III) chelators, either naturally present or produced by the Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms themselves, may alleviate the need for the Fe(III) reducers to establish direct contact with Fe(III) oxides. Studies with Shewanella alga strain BrY and Fe(III) oxides sequestered within microporous beads demonstrated for the first time that this organism releases a compound(s) that permits electron transfer to Fe(III) oxides which the organism cannot directly contact. Furthermore, as much as 450 w M dissolved Fe(III) was detected in cultures of S. alga growing in Fe(III) oxide medium, suggesting that this organism releases compounds that can solublize Fe(III) from Fe(III) oxide. These results contrast with previous studies, which demonstrated that Geobacter metallireducens does not produce electron-shuttles or Fe(III) chelators. Some freshwater aquatic sediments and groundwaters contained compounds, which could act as electron shuttles by accepting electrons from G. metallireducens and then transferring the electrons to Fe(III). However, other samples lacked significant electron-shuttling capacity. Spectroscopic studies indicated that the electron-shuttling capacity of the waters was not only associated with the presence of humic substances, but water extracts of walnut, oak, and maple leaves contained electron-shuttling compounds did not appear to be humic substances. Porewater from a freshwater aquatic sediment and groundwater from a petroleum-contaminated aquifer contained dissolved Fe(III) (4-16 w M), suggesting that soluble Fe(III) may be available as an electron acceptor in some sedimentary environments. These results demonstrate that in order to accurately model the mechanisms for Fe(III) reduction in sedimentary environments it will be necessary

  6. Determination of the Kinetic Oxidation Constants of Carbon Materials on the Basis of Analysis of Experiments on Their Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorskii, V. V.; Koval‧skii, M. G.; Olenicheva, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    A new approach to the determination of the ablation properties of a heat-shield carbon material on the basis of analysis of the results of an experimental investigation of its ablation in the jet of an electric-arc plant in the nonstationary regime has been formulated. Original data on the kinetic constants of oxidation of carbon by atomic oxygen have been obtained.

  7. Optical properties of tin oxide nanoparticles prepared by laser ablation in water: Influence of laser ablation time duration and laser fluence

    SciTech Connect

    Desarkar, Himadri Sankar; Kumbhakar, P. Mitra, A.K.

    2012-11-15

    Colloidal tin oxide nanoparticles are prepared by laser (having a wavelength of 1064 nm) ablation of tin metallic target immersed in pure deionized water. The influences of laser ablation time and laser fluence on the size and optical properties of the synthesized nanoparticles are studied. Prepared tin oxide nanoparticles are characterized by transmission electron microscope, selected area electron diffraction and UV-Visible absorption spectroscopy. The morphology of prepared tin oxide nanoparticles is found to be mostly spherical and with sizes in the nanometric range (mean radius of 3.2 to 7.3 nm). The measured UV-Visible absorption spectra show the presence of absorption peaks in the ultraviolet region. The band gap energy of samples prepared with different laser ablation time duration is calculated and is found to be increased with decrease in size (radius) of the prepared nanoparticles. Photoluminescence emission measurements at room temperature show that all the samples exhibit photoluminescence in the visible region. The peak photoluminescence emission intensity in the sample prepared with 50 min of laser ablation time is 3.5 times larger than that obtained in the sample prepared with 10 min of laser ablation time. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles (6.4-14.6 nm) are prepared by laser ablation in liquid technique. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The influences of laser ablation time and laser fluence are studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Samples are characterized by TEM and UV-Visible absorption spectroscopy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UV-Visible absorption spectra exhibit quantum confinement effect. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Samples exhibit enhanced photoluminescence emissions in the visible region.

  8. Biomineralization Associated with Microbial Reduction of Fe3+ and Oxidation of Fe2+ in Solid Minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Gengxin; Dong, Hailiang; Jiang, Hongchen; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Kim, Jinwook; Eberl, Dennis D.; Xu, Zhiqin

    2009-07-01

    Iron- reducing and oxidizing microorganisms gain energy through reduction or oxidation of iron, and by doing so they play an important role in geochemical cycling of iron in a wide range of environments. This study was undertaken to investigate iron redox cycling in the deep subsurface by taking an advantage of the Chinese Continental Scientific Deep Drilling project. A fluid sample from 2450 m was collected and Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms were enriched using specific media (pH 6.2). Nontronite, an Fe(III)-rich clay mineral, was used in initial enrichments with lactate and acetate as electron donors under strictly anaerobic condition at the in-situ temperature of the fluid sample (65oC). Instead of a monotonic increase in Fe(II) concentration with time as would have been expected if Fe(III) bioreduction was the sole process, Fe(II) concentration initially increased, reached a peak, but then decreased to a minimum level. Continued incubation revealed an iron cycling with a cycling period of five to ten days. These initial results suggested that there might be Fe(III) reducers and Fe(II) oxidizers in the enrichment culture. Subsequently, multiple transfers were made with an attempt to isolate individual Fe(III) reducers and Fe(II) oxidizers. However, iron cycling persisted after multiple transfers. Additional experiments were conducted to ensure that iron reduction and oxidation was indeed biological. Biological Fe(II) oxidation was further confirmed in a series of roll tubes (with a pH gradient) where FeS and siderite were used as the sole electron donor. The oxidation of FeS occurred only at pH 10, and goethite, lepidocrocite, and ferrihydrite formed as oxidation products. Although molecular evidence (16S rRNA gene analysis) collectively suggested that only a single organism (a strain of Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus) might be responsible for both Fe(III) reduction and Fe(II) oxidation, we could not rule out the possibility that Fe(III) reduction and Fe

  9. Interactions Between Fe(III)-oxides and Fe(III)-phyllosilicates During Microbial Reduction 2: Natural Subsurface Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, T.; Griffin, A. M.; Gorski, C. A.; Shelobolina, E. S.; Xu, H.; Kukkadapu, R. K.; Roden, E. E.

    2016-04-19

    Dissimilatory microbial reduction of solid-phase Fe(III)-oxides and Fe(III)-bearing phyllosilicates (Fe(III)-phyllosilicates) is an important process in anoxic soils, sediments, and subsurface materials. Although various studies have documented the relative extent of microbial reduction of single-phase Fe(III)-oxides and Fe(III)-phyllosilicates, detailed information is not available on interaction between these two processes in situations where both phases are available for microbial reduction. The goal of this research was to use the model dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium (DIRB) Geobacter sulfurreducens to study Fe(III)-oxide vs. Fe(III)-phyllosilicate reduction in a range of subsurface materials and Fe(III)-oxide stripped versions of the materials. Low temperature (12K) Mossbauer spectroscopy was used to infer changes in the relative abundances of Fe(III)-oxide, Fe(III)-phyllosilicate, and phyllosilicate-associated Fe(II) (Fe(II)-phyllosilicate). A Fe partitioning model was employed to analyze the fate of Fe(II) and assess the potential for abiotic Fe(II)-catalyzed reduction of Fe(III)-phyllosilicates. The results showed that in most cases Fe(III)- oxide utilization dominated (70-100 %) bulk Fe(III) reduction activity, and that electron transfer from oxide-derived Fe(II) played only a minor role (ca. 10-20 %) in Fe partitioning. In addition, the extent of Fe(III)-oxide reduction was positively correlated to surface area-normalized cation exchange capacity and the phyllosilicate-Fe(III)/total Fe(III) ratio, which suggests that the phyllosilicates in the natural sediments promoted Fe(III)-oxide reduction by binding of oxide-derived Fe(II), thereby enhancing Fe(III)-oxide reduction by reducing or delaying the inhibitory effect that Fe(II) accumulation on oxide and DIRB cell surfaces has on Fe(III)-oxide reduction. In general our results suggest that although Fe(III)-oxide reduction is likely to dominate bulk Fe(III) reduction in most subsurface sediments, Fe

  10. Structure and properties of iron oxide clusters: From Fe6 to Fe6 O20 and from Fe7 to Fe7 O24.

    PubMed

    Gutsev, Gennady L; Belay, Kalayu G; Gutsev, Lavrenty G; Ramachandran, Bala R

    2016-10-30

    Geometrical and electronic structures of the neutral and singly negatively charged Fe6 On and Fe7 Om clusters in the range of 1 ≤ n ≤ 20 and 1 ≤ m ≤ 24, respectively, are computed using density functional theory with the generalized gradient approximation. The largest clusters in the two series, Fe6 O20 and Fe7 O24 , can be described as Fe(FeO4 )5 and Fe(FeO4 )6 or alternatively as [FeO5 ](FeO3 )5 and [FeO6 ](FeO3 )6 , respectively. The Fe6 O20 and Fe7 O24 clusters possess adiabatic electron affinities (EAad ) of 5.64 eV and 5.80 eV and can be attributed to the class of hyperhalogens since FeO4 is an unique closed-shell superhalogen with the EAad of 3.9 eV. The spin character of the lowest total energy states in both series changes from ferromagnetic to ferrimagnetic or antiferromagnetic when the first FeOFe bridge is formed. Oxidation decreases substantially the polarizability per atom of the initial bare clusters; namely, from 5.98 Å(3) of Fe6 to 2.47 Å(3) of Fe6 O20 and from 5.67 Å(3) of Fe7 to 2.38 Å(3) of Fe7 O24 . The results of our computations pertaining to the binding energies of O, Fe, O2 , and FeO in the Fe7 Om series provide an explanation for the experimentally observed abundance of the iron oxide nanoparticles with stoichiometric compositions. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Fabrication of Fe-Al nanoparticles by selective oxidation of Fe-Al thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Pyungwoo; Shin, Seungchan; Jung, Chip-Sup; Kim, Kwang-Ho; Seomoon, Kyu

    2013-04-01

    The possibility of a new technique for fabricating nanoparticles from thin films using selective oxidation in an atmosphere mixture of water vapor and hydrogen was investigated. Fe-5wt.%Al films were RF-sputtered and annealed in the atmosphere mixture at 900°C for up to 200 min, in order to oxidize aluminum selectively. Thermodynamics simulation showed that temperatures exceeding 800°C are necessary to prevent iron from being oxidized, as confirmed by the depth profile of XPS. As the annealing time increased, the morphology of the 200-nm Fe-Al films changed from the continuous to the discontinuous type; thus, particulate Fe-Al films formed after 100 min. The particulate 10- to 100-nm Fe-Al films showed super-paramagnetic behavior after the oxidation. Thus, a new technique for fabricating nanoparticles was successfully introduced using selective oxidation.

  12. Optical properties of petal-like aggregated nanocrystalline zinc oxide synthesized by laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Jafarkhani, P.; Chehrghani, A.; Torkamany, M.J.

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Petal like ZnO nanocrystals are synthesized by high frequency laser ablation in water. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Optical band gap of ZnO nanocrystals was tunable by changing the laser pulse energy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nonlinear optical properties and limiting threshold were obtained by Z-scan technique. -- Abstract: The results of the investigations carried out on the third-order nonlinearity in zinc oxide (ZnO) nanocrystals (NCs) by Z-scan technique are included in this paper. ZnO NCs show negative nonlinearity and good nonlinear absorption behavior at 532 nm. The third-order optical susceptibility {chi}(3) increases with enlargement of NCs due to the size dependent enhancement of exciton oscillator strength. The synthesis of ZnO NCs was performed by laser ablation from a high-purity metallic target of Zn in distilled water medium. For the ablation process, a high frequency pulsed Nd:YAG laser was employed operating at 532 nm with 100 ns pulse duration. UV-vis absorption spectroscopy illustrated the enhancement of the size of ZnO NCs upon increasing the laser pulse energy applied in ablation process. Accordingly the corresponding optical band gap (E{sub g}) decrease by increasing the size of NCs. X-ray diffraction (XRD) associated with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was utilized to characterize the crystalline phase and also for determining the ZnO NCs morphology.

  13. Graphyne-supported single Fe atom catalysts for CO oxidation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ping; Du, Pan; Zhang, Hui; Cai, Chenxin

    2015-01-14

    Single atom catalysts (SACs) are highly desirable for the effort to maximize the efficiency of metal atom use. However, the synthesis of SACs is a major challenge that largely depends on finding an appropriate supporting substrate to achieve a well-defined and highly dispersed single atom. This work demonstrates that, based on the density functional theory (DFT) calculation, graphyne is a good substrate for single Fe atom catalysts. The Fe atom can be tightly embedded in a graphyne sheet with a high binding energy of ∼4.99 eV and a high diffusion energy barrier of ∼1.0 eV. The graphyne-supported Fe (Fe-graphyne) SAC shows high catalytic activity towards CO oxidation, which is often regarded as a prototype reaction for designing atomic-scale catalysts. We studied the adsorption characteristics of CO and O2 on Fe-graphyne SACs, and simulated the reaction mechanism of CO oxidation involving Fe-graphyne. The simulation results indicate that O2 binding on Fe-graphyne is much stronger than that of CO, and the adsorbed O2 prior to occupy the Fe atoms as the co-existence of O2 and CO. The reaction of CO oxidation by adsorbed O2 on Fe-graphyne SACs favors to proceed via the Eley-Rideal (ER) mechanism with the energy barrier of as low as ∼0.21 eV in the rate-limiting step. Calculation of the electronic density of states (DOS) of each reaction step demonstrates that the strong interaction of the O2 and Fe adatom promotes the CO oxidation on Fe-graphyne SACs. The results presented here suggest that graphyne could provide a unique platform to synthesize SACs, and the Fe-graphyne SACs could find potential use in solving the growing environmental problems caused by CO emission from automobiles and industrial processes, in removing CO contamination from vehicle exhaust and in fuel cells.

  14. Controlling the oxidation processes of Zn nanoparticles produced by pulsed laser ablation in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camarda, P.; Messina, F.; Vaccaro, L.; Buscarino, G.; Agnello, S.; Gelardi, F. M.; Cannas, M.

    2016-09-01

    We used online UV-VIS optical absorption and photoluminescence spectra, acquired during and after pulsed laser ablation of a Zinc plate in aqueous solution, to investigate the effect of the laser repetition rate and liquid environment on the oxidation processes of the produced nanoparticles. A transient Zn/ZnO core-shell structure was revealed by the coexistence of an absorption peak around 5.0 eV due to Zn surface plasmon resonance and of an edge at 3.4 eV coming from wurtzite ZnO. The growth kinetics of ZnO at the various repetition rates, selectively probed by the excitonic emission at 3.3 eV, began immediately at the onset of laser ablation and was largely independent of the repetition rate. In addition, we detected an emission at 2.3 eV related to oxygen vacancies, which began to grow after a number of pulses increasing with the used repetition rate. Optical absorption spectra during and after ablation in a mixture of water and ethanol (0%-100%) revealed that the oxidation kinetics of Zn nanoparticles slows down from about 900 s in pure water to at least one week in pure ethanol.

  15. Growth of Nanostructure of Metal Oxides by Laser Ablation and by SiO2 Assisted Thermal Evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    EL Nadi, Lotfia M.; Mehena, Galila; Omar, Mgdy M.; Moneim, Hussein A.; Taieb, Fakiha H. A.; Rahiem, Faried A.

    2007-02-01

    We report the results of growing nanostructures of gallium oxide and indium oxide by two methods. In the first one we applied laser ablation in air of pure graphite rod filled with Gallium or Indium metals. The ablated plume then deposited on SS substrates in air. In the second method the oxides were synthesized by thermal heating of the Ga or In metals mixed with powder of graphite and covered with SiO2 plates, supported by ceramic, in high temperature oven. The ablation method produced nanowires of Ga2O3 and nano particles of In2O3 developing in nanowires. . The solid carbon ablated from the graphite rod existing in the ablated plum as fine solid particles mixed with metal Ga or In melt in contact with oxygen gas in air, produced the growth of the metal oxide nano structures by solid -liquid-gas mechanism. The silica assisted catalytic growth oxides produce only nano particle of each metal. The reaction of the metals with SiO2 melt and graphite produced Si and carbon. The then formed Si carbide can effectively initiate vapor- liquid-solid growth of nano structure metal oxide. It seems that SiO2 in addition to the atmospheric oxygen provide the oxygen source for forming metal oxide nano dots.

  16. Photoluminescent zinc oxide polymer nanocomposites fabricated using picosecond laser ablation in an organic solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagener, Philipp; Faramarzi, Shamsolzaman; Schwenke, Andreas; Rosenfeld, Rupert; Barcikowski, Stephan

    2011-06-01

    Nanocomposites made of ZnO nanoparticles dispersed in thermoplastic polyurethane were synthesized using picosecond laser ablation of zinc in a polymer-doped solution of tetrahydrofuran. The pre-added polymer stabilizes the ZnO nanoparticles in situ during laser ablation by forming a polymer shell around the nanoparticles. This close-contact polymer shell has a layer thickness up to 30 nm. Analysis of ZnO polyurethane nanocomposites using optical spectroscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction revealed that oxidized and crystalline ZnO nanoparticles were produced. Those nanocomposites showed a green photoluminescence emission centred at 538 nm after excitation at 350 nm, which should be attributed to oxygen defects generated during the laser formation mechanism of the monocrystalline nanoparticles. Further, the influence of pulse energy and polymer concentration on the production rate, laser fluence and energy-specific mass productivity was investigated.

  17. Effects of FeS on Chromium Oxidation Mediated by Manganese Oxidizers

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Youxian; Deng, Baolin

    2004-03-31

    Reductive immobilization of Cr(VI) has been widely explored as a cost-effective approach for Cr-contaminated site remediation. The long-term stability of the immobilized Cr(III), however, is a concern. Cr(III) is known to be oxidized by Mn oxides chemically and Mn-oxides could be produced through microbially mediated Mn(II) oxidation. This study examined the effect of FeS on Cr(III) oxidation mediated by Pseudomonas putida. The results showed that commercial granular FeS did not affect Cr(III) oxidation in the culture of P. putida with Mn(II), but freshly precipitated FeS slurry inhibited Cr(III) oxidation. A 10 mg/l of FeS did not inhibit the microbial growth, but delayed the production of Mn oxides, thus postponing potential Cr(III) oxidation. In the presence of excessive FeS slurry, both Cr(VI) and Mn oxides were reduced rapidly. The reduced Cr(III) could not be re-oxidized as long as freshly formed FeS was present, even in the presence of the manganese oxidizers.

  18. Biostimulation of Iron Reduction and Subsequent Oxidation of Sediment Containing Fe-silicates and Fe-oxides: Effect of Redox Cycling on Fe(III) Bioreduction

    SciTech Connect

    Komlos, John; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Zachara, John M.; Jaffe, Peter R.

    2007-07-01

    Microbial reduction of iron has been shown to be important in the transformation and remediation of contaminated sediments. Re-oxidation of microbially reduced iron may occur in sediments that experience oxidation-reduction cycling and can thus impact the extent of contaminant remediation. The purpose of this research was to quantify iron oxidation in a flow-through column filled with biologically-reduced sediment and to compare the iron phases in the re-oxidized sediment to both the pristine and biologically-reduced sediment. The sediment contained both Fe(III)-oxides (primarily goethite) and silicate Fe (illite/vermiculite) and was biologically reduced in phosphate buffered (PB) medium during a 497 day column experiment with acetate supplied as the electron donor. Long-term iron reduction resulted in partial reduction of silicate Fe(III) without any goethite reduction, based on Mössbauer spectroscopy measurements. This reduced sediment was treated with an oxygenated PB solution in a flow-through column resulting in the oxidation of 38% of the biogenic Fe(II). Additional batch experiments showed that the Fe(III) in the oxidized sediment was more quickly reduced compared to the pristine sediment, indicating that oxidation of the sediment not only regenerated Fe(III) but also enhanced iron reduction compared to the pristine sediment. Oxidation-reduction cycling may be a viable method to extend iron-reducing conditions during in-situ bioremediation.

  19. Interactions Between Fe(III)-Oxides and Fe(III)-Phyllosilicates During Microbial Reduction 1: Synthetic Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Tao; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Griffin, Aron M.; Gorski, Christopher A.; Konishi, Hiromi; Xu, Huifang; Roden, Eric E.

    2015-11-19

    Fe(III)-oxides and Fe(III)-bearing phyllosilicates are the two major iron sources utilized as electron acceptors by dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria (DIRB) in anoxic soils and sediments. Although there have been many studies of microbial Fe(III)-oxide and Fe(III)-phyllosilicate reduction with both natural and specimen materials, no controlled experimental information is available on the interaction between these two phases when both are available for microbial reduction. In this study, the model DIRB Geobacter sulfurreducens was used to examine the pathways of Fe(III) reduction in Fe(III)-oxide stripped subsurface sediment that was coated with different amounts of synthetic high surface area goethite. Cryogenic (12K) 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy was used to determine changes in the relative abundances of Fe(III)-oxide, Fe(III)-phyllosilicate, and phyllosilicate-associated Fe(II) (Fe(II)-phyllosilicate) in bioreduced samples. Analogous Mössbauer analyses were performed on samples from abiotic Fe(II) sorption experiments in which sediments were exposed to a quantity of exogenous soluble Fe(II) (FeCl22H2O) comparable to the amount of Fe(II) produced during microbial reduction. A Fe partitioning model was developed to analyze the fate of Fe(II) and assess the potential for abiotic Fe(II)-catalyzed reduction of Fe(III)-phyllosilicatesilicates. The microbial reduction experiments indicated that although reduction of Fe(III)-oxide accounted for virtually all of the observed bulk Fe(III) reduction activity, there was no significant abiotic electron transfer between oxide-derived Fe(II) and Fe(III)-phyllosilicatesilicates, with 26-87% of biogenic Fe(II) appearing as sorbed Fe(II) in the Fe(II)-phyllosilicate pool. In contrast, the abiotic Fe(II) sorption experiments showed that 41 and 24% of the added Fe(II) engaged in electron transfer to Fe(III)-phyllosilicate surfaces in synthetic goethite-coated and uncoated sediment. Differences in the rate of Fe(II) addition and

  20. CoxFe1-x oxide coatings on metallic interconnects for solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Fengyu; Lu, Kathy

    2016-10-01

    In order to improve the performance of Cr-containing steel as an interconnect material for solid oxide fuel cells, CoFe alloy coatings with Co:Fe ratios of 9:1, 8:2, 7:3, 6:4, and 5:5 are deposited by electrodeposition and then oxidized to CoxFe1-x oxide coatings with a thickness of ∼6 μm as protective layers on the interconnect. The area specific resistance of the coated interconnect increases with the Fe content. Higher Co content oxide coatings are more effective in limiting the growth of the chromia scale while all coatings are effective in inhibiting Cr diffusion and evaporation. With the Co0.8Fe0.2 oxide coated interconnect, the electrochemical performance of the Sm0.5Sr0.5Co0.2Fe0.8O3 cathode is improved. Only 1.54 atomic percentage of Cr is detected on the surface of the Sm0.5Sr0.5Co0.2Fe0.8O3 cathode while no Cr is detected 0.66 μm or more into the cathode. CoxFe1-x oxide coatings are promising candidates for solid oxide fuel cell interconnects with the advantage of using existing cathode species for compatibility and performance enhancement.

  1. Iron isotope fractionation during microbially stimulated Fe(II) oxidation and Fe(III) precipitation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Balci, N.; Bullen, T.D.; Witte-Lien, K.; Shanks, Wayne C.; Motelica, M.; Mandernack, K.W.

    2006-01-01

    Interpretation of the origins of iron-bearing minerals preserved in modern and ancient rocks based on measured iron isotope ratios depends on our ability to distinguish between biological and non-biological iron isotope fractionation processes. In this study, we compared 56Fe/54Fe ratios of coexisting aqueous iron (Fe(II)aq, Fe(III)aq) and iron oxyhydroxide precipitates (Fe(III)ppt) resulting from the oxidation of ferrous iron under experimental conditions at low pH (<3). Experiments were carried out using both pure cultures of Acidothiobacillus ferrooxidans and sterile controls to assess possible biological overprinting of non-biological fractionation, and both SO42- and Cl- salts as Fe(II) sources to determine possible ionic/speciation effects that may be associated with oxidation/precipitation reactions. In addition, a series of ferric iron precipitation experiments were performed at pH ranging from 1.9 to 3.5 to determine if different precipitation rates cause differences in the isotopic composition of the iron oxyhydroxides. During microbially stimulated Fe(II) oxidation in both the sulfate and chloride systems, 56Fe/54Fe ratios of residual Fe(II)aq sampled in a time series evolved along an apparent Rayleigh trend characterized by a fractionation factor ??Fe(III)aq-Fe(II)aq???1.0022. This fractionation factor was significantly less than that measured in our sterile control experiments (???1.0034) and that predicted for isotopic equilibrium between Fe(II)aq and Fe(III)aq (???1.0029), and thus might be interpreted to reflect a biological isotope effect. However, in our biological experiments the measured difference in 56Fe/54Fe ratios between Fe(III)aq, isolated as a solid by the addition of NaOH to the final solution at each time point under N2-atmosphere, and Fe(II)aq was in most cases and on average close to 2.9??? (??Fe(III)aq-Fe(II)aq ???1.0029), consistent with isotopic equilibrium between Fe(II)aq and Fe(III)aq. The ferric iron precipitation experiments

  2. Oxidation behavior of FeAl+Hf,Zr,B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.; Doychak, Joseph

    1988-01-01

    The oxidation behavior of Fe-40Al-1Hf, Fe-40Al-1Hf-0.4B, and Fe-40Al-0.1Zr-0.4B (at. percent) alloys was characterized after 900, 1000, and 100 C exposures. Isothermal tests revealed parabolic kinetics after a period of transitional theta-alumina scale growth. The parabolic growth rates for the subsequent alpha-alumina scales were about five times higher than those for NiAl+0.1Zr alloys. The isothermally grown scales showed a propensity toward massive scale spallation due to both extensive rumpling from growth stresses and to an inner layer of HfO2. Cyclic oxidation for 200 1-hr cycles produced little degradation at 900 or 1000 C, but caused significant spallation at 1100 C in the form of small segments of the outer scale. The major difference in the cyclic oxidation of the three FeAl alloys was increased initial spallation for FeAl+Zr,B. Although these FeAl alloys showed many similarities to NiAl alloys, they were generally less oxidation resistant. It is believed that this resulted from nonoptimal levels of dopants and larger thermal expansion mismatch stresses.

  3. Hollow nanoparticles of metal oxides and sulfides: fast preparation via laser ablation in liquid.

    PubMed

    Niu, K Y; Yang, J; Kulinich, S A; Sun, J; Du, X W

    2010-11-16

    In this work, diverse hollow nanoparticles of metal oxides and sulfides were prepared by simply laser ablating metal targets in properly chosen liquids. The Kirkendall voiding and the selective heating with an infrared laser were shown to work as two independent mechanisms for the formation of such hollow nanoparticles in only one- or two-step synthesis approaches. One of the prepared materials, ZnS hollow nanoparticles, showed high performance in gas sensing. The simple, fast, inexpensive technique that is proposed demonstrates very promising perspectives.

  4. Laser-ablation production of graphene oxide nanostructures: from ribbons to quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Lin, T N; Chih, K H; Yuan, C T; Shen, J L; Lin, C A J; Liu, W R

    2015-02-14

    A new one-step method for the preparation of graphene oxide (GO) nanostructures has been developed by pulsed laser ablation in GO solution. The formation of different shapes of GO nanostructures, such as ribbons, nanoflakes (including nano-squares, nano-rectangles, nano-triangles, nano-hexagons, and nano-disks) and quantum dots, has been demonstrated by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Photoreduction for the GO occurred during irradiation by the pulsed laser. The GO quantum dots exhibit a blue photoluminescence, originating from recombination of the localized carriers in the zigzag-edge states.

  5. The Diverse Microbiology of Anaerobic Fe(II) Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coates, J. D.; Weber, K. A.; Scherer, M.; Achenbach, L. A.

    2007-12-01

    Although anaerobic microbial oxidation of Fe(II) has been know for over a decade there is still a paucity of information available on this important metabolic process or the organisms involved. Recent studies have indicated that the metabolism is ubiquitous and a broad diversity of organisms are capable of oxidizing Fe(II) in the absence of oxygen. Our previous studies demonstrated the existence of geochemical conditions conducive to supporting the activity of nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidizing bacteria (NFoB) in sedimentary environments. As part of these studies we isolated and characterized several novel NFoBs. Three of these organisms, Diaphorobacter sp. strain TPSY, Ferrutens nitratireducens strain 2002 and Azospira suillum strain PS are currently undergoing whole genome shotgun sequencing in an effort to gain insight into the biochemistry and molecular biology of this geochemically important metabolism. These organisms represent diverse genera capable of anaerobically oxidizing Fe(II) using nitrate as the electron acceptor. Two of these organisms, strain 2002 and strain TPSY, are also capable of the anaerobic nitrate-dependent oxidation of U(IV) to U(VI). Diaphorobacter sp. strain TPSY was isolated from uranium and nitrate contaminated groundwater and is a member of the Comamonadaceae family in the beta subclass of the Proteobacteria, closely related to Diaphorobacter nitroreducens. It represents the first example of an anaerobic Fe(II)-oxidizer from the Comamonadaceae family and grows mixotrophically requiring an organic carbon source when growing with Fe(II) and nitrate as the electron donor and acceptor respectively. F. nitratireducens strain 2002 was isolated from aquatic sediment and is the type strain of a new genus, Ferrutens, in the beta class of the Proteobacteria. Its closest relative is Chromobacterium violaceum, a common soil bacterium. In contrast to C. violaceum, F. nitratireducens is non-fermentative and does not produce free cyanide (CN-) or

  6. Effect of phosphate and sulfate on Ni repartitioning during Fe(II)-catalyzed Fe(III) oxide mineral recrystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinkle, Margaret A. G.; Catalano, Jeffrey G.

    2015-09-01

    Dissolved Fe(II) activates coupled oxidative growth and reductive dissolution of Fe(III) oxide minerals, causing recrystallization and the repartitioning of structurally-compatible trace metals. Phosphate and sulfate, two ligands common to natural aquatic systems, alter Fe(II) adsorption onto Fe(III) oxides and affect Fe(III) oxide dissolution and precipitation. However, the effect of these oxoanions on trace metal repartitioning during Fe(II)-catalyzed Fe(III) oxide recrystallization is unclear. The effects of phosphate and sulfate on Ni adsorption and Ni repartitioning during Fe(II)-catalyzed Fe(III) oxide recrystallization were investigated as such repartitioning may be affected by both Fe(II)-oxoanion and metal-oxoanion interactions. In most systems examined, phosphate alters Ni repartitioning during Fe(II)-catalyzed recrystallization to a larger extent than sulfate. Phosphate substantially enhances Ni adsorption onto hematite but decreases (nearly inhibiting) Fe(II)-catalyzed Ni incorporation into and release from this mineral. In the goethite system, however, phosphate suppresses Ni release but enhances Ni incorporation in the presence of aqueous Fe(II). In contrast, sulfate has little effect on macroscopic Ni adsorption and release of Ni from Fe(III) oxides, but substantially enhances Ni incorporation into goethite. This demonstrates that phosphate and sulfate have unique, mineral-specific interactions with Ni during Fe(II)-catalyzed Fe(III) oxide recrystallization. This research suggests that micronutrient bioavailability at redox interfaces in hematite-dominated systems may be especially suppressed by phosphate, while both oxoanions likely have limited effects in goethite-rich soils or sediments. Phosphate may also exert a large control on contaminant fate at redox interfaces, increasing Ni retention on iron oxide surfaces. These results further indicate that trace metal retention by iron oxides during lithification and later repartitioning during

  7. Shewanella putrefaciens produces an Fe(III)-solubilizing organic ligand during anaerobic respiration on insoluble Fe(III) oxides.

    PubMed

    Taillefert, Martial; Beckler, Jordon S; Carey, Elizabeth; Burns, Justin L; Fennessey, Christine M; DiChristina, Thomas J

    2007-11-01

    The mechanism of Fe(III) reduction was investigated using voltammetric techniques in anaerobic incubations of Shewanella putrefaciens strain 200 supplemented with Fe(III) citrate or a suite of Fe(III) oxides as terminal electron acceptor. Results indicate that organic complexes of Fe(III) are produced during the reduction of Fe(III) at rates that correlate with the reactivity of the Fe(III) phase and bacterial cell density. Anaerobic Fe(III) solubilization activity is detected with either Fe(III) oxides or Fe(III) citrate, suggesting that the organic ligand produced is strong enough to destabilize Fe(III) from soluble or solid Fe(III) substrates. Results also demonstrate that Fe(III) oxide dissolution is not controlled by the intrinsic chemical reactivity of the Fe(III) oxides. Instead, the chemical reaction between the endogenous organic ligand is only affected by the number of reactive surface sites available to S. putrefaciens. This report describes the first application of voltammetric techniques to demonstrate production of soluble organic-Fe(III) complexes by any Fe(III)-reducing microorganism and is the first report of a Fe(III)-solubilizing ligand generated by a metal-reducing member of the genus Shewanella.

  8. Bismuth Oxide Thin Films Deposited on Silicon Through Pulsed Laser Ablation, for Infrared Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condurache-Bota, Simona; Constantinescu, Catalin; Tigau, Nicolae; Praisler, Mirela

    2016-12-01

    Infrared detectors are used in many human activities, from industry to military, telecommunications, environmental studies and even medicine. Bismuth oxide thin films have proved their potential for optoelectronic applications, but their uses as infrared sensors have not been thoroughly studied so far. In this paper, pulsed laser ablation of pure bismuth targets within a controlled oxygen atmosphere is proposed for the deposition of bismuth oxide films on Si (100) substrates. Crystalline films were obtained, whose uniformity depends on the deposition conditions (number of laser pulses and the use of a radio-frequency (RF) discharge of the oxygen inside the deposition chamber). The optical analysis proved that the refractive index of the films is higher than 3 and that their optical bandgap is around 1eV, recommending them for infrared applications.

  9. Nanogoethite formation from oxidation of Fe(II) sorbed on aluminum oxide: implications for contaminant reduction.

    PubMed

    Larese-Casanova, Philip; Cwiertny, David M; Scherer, Michelle M

    2010-05-15

    Ferrous iron [Fe(II)] bound to mineral surfaces has been shown to reduce several important groundwater contaminants, but little is known of the nature of the newly formed, insoluble ferric iron [Fe(III)] and whether it influences the heterogeneous contaminant reduction process. To explore how the formation and evolution of the Fe oxidation products influences contaminant reduction, we measured the kinetics of nitrobenzene reduction by Fe(II) sorbed on alpha-Al(2)O(3) while simultaneously characterizing the Fe oxidation product with Mossbauer spectroscopy and electron microscopy. After a brief period of slow kinetics, the onset of nitrobenzene reduction coincided with a change in particle suspension color from white to yellow-ocher due to formation of nanogoethite rods (alpha-FeOOH) from oxidation of sorbed Fe(II). Formation of nanogoethite on the alpha-Al(2)O(3) particles appears to promote the rapid reduction of nitrobenzene. Our results show that nanogoethite crystals can form rapidly by heterogeneous Fe(II) oxidation, and formation of goethite can profoundly influence contaminant reduction rates by Fe(II).

  10. Electronic structure of Mn and Fe oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Walter

    2008-03-01

    We present a clear, simple tight-binding representation of the electronic structure and cohesive energy (energy of atomization) of MnO, Mn2O3, and MnO2, in which the formal charge states Mn^2+, Mn^3+, and Mn^4+, respectively, occur. It is based upon localized cluster orbitals for each Mn and its six oxygen neighbors. This approach is fundamentally different from local-density theory (or LDA+U), and perhaps diametrically opposite to Dynamical Mean Field Theory. Electronic states were calculated self-consistently using existing parameters [1], but it is found that the charge density is quite insensitive to charge state, so that the starting parameters are adequate. The cohesive energy per Mn is dominated by the transfer of two s electrons to oxygen p states, the same for all three compounds. The differing transfer of majority d electrons to oxygen p states, and the coupling between them, accounts for the observed variation in cohesion in the series. The same description applies to the perovskites, such as LaxSr1-xMnO3, and can be used for FeO, Fe2O3 (and FeO2), Because the formulation is local, it is equally applicable to impurities, defects and surfaces. [1] Walter A. Harrison, Elementary Electronic Structure, World Scientific (Singapore, 1999), revised edition (2004).

  11. Room temperature ferromagnetism in liquid-phase pulsed laser ablation synthesized nanoparticles of nonmagnetic oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, S. C. Gopal, R.; Kotnala, R. K.

    2015-08-14

    Intrinsic Room Temperature Ferromagnetism (RTF) has been observed in undoped/uncapped zinc oxide and titanium dioxide spherical nanoparticles (NPs) obtained by a purely green approach of liquid phase pulsed laser ablation of corresponding metal targets in pure water. Saturation magnetization values observed for zinc oxide (average size, 9 ± 1.2 nm) and titanium dioxide (average size, 4.4 ± 0.3 nm) NPs are 62.37 and 42.17 memu/g, respectively, which are several orders of magnitude larger than those of previous reports. In contrast to the previous works, no postprocessing treatments or surface modification is required to induce ferromagnetism in the case of present communication. The most important result, related to the field of intrinsic ferromagnetism in nonmagnetic materials, is the observation of size dependent ferromagnetism. Degree of ferromagnetism in titanium dioxide increases with the increase in particle size, while it is reverse for zinc oxide. Surface and volume defects play significant roles for the origin of RTF in zinc oxide and titanium dioxide NPs, respectively. Single ionized oxygen and neutral zinc vacancies in zinc oxide and oxygen and neutral/ionized titanium vacancies in titanium dioxide are considered as predominant defect centres responsible for observed ferromagnetism. It is expected that origin of ferromagnetism is a consequence of exchange interactions between localized electron spin moments resulting from point defects.

  12. Room temperature ferromagnetism in liquid-phase pulsed laser ablation synthesized nanoparticles of nonmagnetic oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. C.; Kotnala, R. K.; Gopal, R.

    2015-08-01

    Intrinsic Room Temperature Ferromagnetism (RTF) has been observed in undoped/uncapped zinc oxide and titanium dioxide spherical nanoparticles (NPs) obtained by a purely green approach of liquid phase pulsed laser ablation of corresponding metal targets in pure water. Saturation magnetization values observed for zinc oxide (average size, 9 ± 1.2 nm) and titanium dioxide (average size, 4.4 ± 0.3 nm) NPs are 62.37 and 42.17 memu/g, respectively, which are several orders of magnitude larger than those of previous reports. In contrast to the previous works, no postprocessing treatments or surface modification is required to induce ferromagnetism in the case of present communication. The most important result, related to the field of intrinsic ferromagnetism in nonmagnetic materials, is the observation of size dependent ferromagnetism. Degree of ferromagnetism in titanium dioxide increases with the increase in particle size, while it is reverse for zinc oxide. Surface and volume defects play significant roles for the origin of RTF in zinc oxide and titanium dioxide NPs, respectively. Single ionized oxygen and neutral zinc vacancies in zinc oxide and oxygen and neutral/ionized titanium vacancies in titanium dioxide are considered as predominant defect centres responsible for observed ferromagnetism. It is expected that origin of ferromagnetism is a consequence of exchange interactions between localized electron spin moments resulting from point defects.

  13. Heterogeneous oxidation of Fe(II) on iron oxides in aqueous systems: Identification and controls of Fe(III) product formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larese-Casanova, Philip; Kappler, Andreas; Haderlein, Stefan B.

    2012-08-01

    The aqueous Fe(II)-oxide Fe(III) system is a reactant for many classes of redox sensitive compounds via an interfacial Fe(II) sorption and electron transfer process. The poorly soluble Fe(III) products formed as a result of contaminant reduction and Fe(II) oxidation on iron oxides may be capable of modifying iron oxide surfaces and affecting subsequent reduction rates of contaminants such as halogenated ethenes or nitroaromatic compounds. The scope of this study was to identify the secondary Fe(III) mineral phases formed after Fe(II) oxidation on common iron oxides during heterogeneous contaminant reduction by directly targeting the secondary minerals using Mössbauer-active isotopes. Fe(III) mineral characterization was performed using 57Fe-Mössbauer spectroscopy, μ-X-ray diffraction, and electron microscopy after oxidation of dissolved 57Fe(II) using nitrobenzenes as a model oxidant in pH-buffered suspensions of 56hematite, 56goethite, 56magnetite, and 56maghemite. Mössbauer spectra confirmed sorbed 57Fe(II) becomes oxidized by the parent 56Fe(III)-oxide sorbent and assimilated as the sorbent oxide prior to any nitrobenzene reduction, consistent with several reports in the literature. In addition to oxide sorbent growth, Fe(II) sorption and oxidation by nitrobenzene result also in the formation of secondary Fe(III) minerals. Goethite formed on three hematite morphologies (rhombohedra, needles, and hexagonal platelets), and acicular needle shapes typical of goethite appeared on the micron-sized hexagonal platelets, at times aligned in 60° orientations on (0 0 1) faces. The proportion of goethite formation on the three hematites was linked to number of surface sites. Only goethite was observed to form on a goethite sorbent. In contrast, lepidocrocite was observed to form on magnetite and maghemite sorbents (consistent with homogeneous Fe(II) oxidation by O2) and assumed spherulite morphologies. All secondary Fe(III) phases were confirmed within

  14. As(III) removal and speciation of Fe (Oxyhydr)oxides during simultaneous oxidation of As(III) and Fe(II).

    PubMed

    Han, Xu; Song, Jia; Li, Yi-Liang; Jia, Shao-Yi; Wang, Wen-Hui; Huang, Fu-Gen; Wu, Song-Hai

    2016-03-01

    Abiotic oxidation of Fe(II) is an important pathway in the formation of Fe (oxyhydr)oxides. However, how can As(III) affect the oxidation rate of Fe(II) and the speciation of Fe (oxyhydr)oxides, and what's the extent of the newly formed Fe (oxyhydr)oxides on the removal of aqueous arsenic are still poorly understood. Oxidation of Fe(II) under neutral pH conditions was therefore investigated under different molar ratios of As:Fe. Our results suggest that co-existence of aqueous As(III) significantly slows down the oxidation rate of Fe(II). Speciation of Fe (oxyhydr)oxides is dependent on pH and As:Fe ratios. At pH 6.0, formation of lepidocrocite and goethite is apparently inhibited at low As:Fe ratios, and ferric arsenate is favored at high As:Fe ratios. At pH 7.0, lepidocrocite gradually degenerates with the increasing As:Fe ratios. At pH 8.0, arsenite significantly inhibits the development of magnetite and favors a formation of lepidocrocite. XPS analysis further reveals that more than half of As(III) is oxidized to As(V) at pH 6.0 and 7.0, whereas at pH 8.0, the rapid oxidation of Fe(II) as well as the rapid formation of Fe (oxyhydr)oxides facilitate a rapid removal of dissolved As(III) before its further oxidation to As(V).

  15. Single-step synthesis of graphene quantum dots by femtosecond laser ablation of graphene oxide dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Paola; Liang, Robert; Jabari, Elahe; Marzbanrad, Ehsan; Toyserkani, Ehsan; Zhou, Y. Norman

    2016-04-01

    In the last few years, graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have attracted the attention of many research groups for their outstanding properties, which include low toxicity, chemical stability and photoluminescence. One of the challenges of GQD synthesis is finding a single-step, cheap and sustainable approach for synthesizing these promising nanomaterials. In this study, we demonstrate that femtosecond laser ablation of graphene oxide (GO) dispersions could be employed as a facile and environmentally friendly synthesis method for GQDs. With the proper control of laser ablation parameters, such as ablation time and laser power, it is possible to produce GQDs with average sizes of 2-5 nm, emitting a blue luminescence at 410 nm. We tested the feasibility of the synthesized GQDs as materials for electronic devices by aerosol-jet printing of an ink that is a mixture of water dispersion of laser synthesized GQDs and silver nanoparticle dispersion, which resulted in lower resistivity of the final printed patterns. Preliminary results showed that femtosecond laser synthesized GQDs can be mixed with silver nanoparticle dispersion to fabricate a hybrid material, which can be employed in printing electronic devices by either printing patterns that are more conductive and/or reducing costs of the ink by decreasing the concentration of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in the ink.In the last few years, graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have attracted the attention of many research groups for their outstanding properties, which include low toxicity, chemical stability and photoluminescence. One of the challenges of GQD synthesis is finding a single-step, cheap and sustainable approach for synthesizing these promising nanomaterials. In this study, we demonstrate that femtosecond laser ablation of graphene oxide (GO) dispersions could be employed as a facile and environmentally friendly synthesis method for GQDs. With the proper control of laser ablation parameters, such as ablation time and

  16. Fe biomineralization mirrors individual metabolic activity in a nitrate-dependent Fe(II)-oxidizer

    PubMed Central

    Miot, Jennyfer; Remusat, Laurent; Duprat, Elodie; Gonzalez, Adriana; Pont, Sylvain; Poinsot, Mélanie

    2015-01-01

    Microbial biomineralization sometimes leads to periplasmic encrustation, which is predicted to enhance microorganism preservation in the fossil record. Mineral precipitation within the periplasm is, however, thought to induce death, as a result of permeability loss preventing nutrient and waste transit across the cell wall. This hypothesis had, however, never been investigated down to the single cell level. Here, we cultured the nitrate reducing Fe(II) oxidizing bacteria Acidovorax sp. strain BoFeN1 that have been previously shown to promote the precipitation of a diversity of Fe minerals (lepidocrocite, goethite, Fe phosphate) encrusting the periplasm. We investigated the connection of Fe biomineralization with carbon assimilation at the single cell level, using a combination of electron microscopy and Nano-Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry. Our analyses revealed strong individual heterogeneities of Fe biomineralization. Noteworthy, a small proportion of cells remaining free of any precipitate persisted even at advanced stages of biomineralization. Using pulse chase experiments with 13C-acetate, we provide evidence of individual phenotypic heterogeneities of carbon assimilation, correlated with the level of Fe biomineralization. Whereas non- and moderately encrusted cells were able to assimilate acetate, higher levels of periplasmic encrustation prevented any carbon incorporation. Carbon assimilation only depended on the level of Fe encrustation and not on the nature of Fe minerals precipitated in the cell wall. Carbon assimilation decreased exponentially with increasing cell-associated Fe content. Persistence of a small proportion of non-mineralized and metabolically active cells might constitute a survival strategy in highly ferruginous environments. Eventually, our results suggest that periplasmic Fe biomineralization may provide a signature of individual metabolic status, which could be looked for in the fossil record and in modern environmental samples. PMID

  17. Effect of Fe coating of nucleation sites on epitaxial growth of Fe oxide nanocrystals on Si substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishibe, Takafumi; Watanabe, Kentaro; Nakamura, Yoshiaki

    2016-08-01

    We studied the effect of Fe coating on the epitaxial growth of Fe3O4 nanocrystals (NCs) over Fe-coated Ge epitaxial nuclei on Si(111). To completely cover Ge nuclei with Fe, some amount of Fe (>8 monolayers) must be deposited. Such covering is a key to epitaxial growth because an Fe coating layer prevents the oxidation of Ge surfaces during Fe3O4 formation, resulting in the epitaxial growth of Fe3O4 on them. This study demonstrates that an appropriate Fe coating of nucleation sites leads to the epitaxial growth of Fe3O4 NCs on Si substrates, indicating the realization of environmentally friendly and low-cost Fe3O4 NCs as the resistance random access memory material.

  18. Studies of aluminum oxide thin films deposited by laser ablation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Płóciennik, P.; Guichaoua, D.; Korcala, A.; Zawadzka, A.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the structural and optical investigations of the aluminum oxide nanocrystalline thin films. Investigated films were fabricated by laser ablation technique in high vacuum onto quartz substrates. The films were deposited at two different temperatures of the substrates equal to room temperature and 900 K. X-ray Diffraction spectra proved nanocrystalline character and the corundum phase of the film regardless on the substrate temperature during the deposition process. Values of the refractive indices, extinction and absorption coefficients were calculated by using Transmission and Reflection Spectroscopy in the UV-VIS-NIR range of the wavelength. Coupling Prism Method was used for films thickness estimations. Experimental measurements and theoretical calculations of the Third Harmonic Generation were also reported. Obtained results show that the lattice strain may affect obtained values of the third order nonlinear optical susceptibility.

  19. Oxidation of Fe-W Alloy Electrodeposits for Application to Anodes as Lithium Ion Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Changwei; Ye, Mengchao; Zhon, Linxing; Hou, Jianping; Li, Junmin; Guo, Junming

    2016-12-01

    A citrate-ammonia bath was selected to electrodeposit Fe-W alloys, which exhibit a crystalline structure even if the content of W in the Fe-W alloy is up to 37.8wt%. Those alloys could be oxidized partly at 700∘C. Resultant oxides were composed of Fe2O3, Fe3O4 and amorphous products. The composite oxides presented better electrochemical properties than those of the Fe2O3 and Fe3O4 composite formed by oxidation of Fe deposits. For instance, such an electrode demonstrates the reversible capacity of up to 2438.3mAhg-1 (in terms of incremental oxygen) after 100 charge-discharge cycles, while the electrodes of Fe2O3 and Fe3O4 composites formed by oxidation of Fe deposits were of only 667.5mAhg-1.

  20. Tuning the exchange bias in NiFe/Fe-oxide bilayers by way of different Fe-oxide based mixtures made with an ion-beam deposition technique.

    PubMed

    Lin, K W; Kol, P H; Guo, Z Y; Ouyang, H; van Lierop, J

    2007-01-01

    We have investigated the structural and magnetic properties of ion-beam deposited polycrystalline NiFe (25 nm)/Fe-oxide (35 nm) bilayers. A film prepared with an assist beam O2 to Ar gas ratio of 0% during deposition had a bottom layer that consisted of pure b.c.c. Fe (a = 2.87 A) whereas films prepared with 19%O2/Ar and 35%O2/Ar had either Fe3O4 (a = 8.47 angstroms) or alpha-Fe2O3 (a = 5.04 angstroms, c = 13.86 angstroms) bottom layers, respectively. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy revealed a smooth interface between the top nano-columnar NiFe and bottom nano-columnar Fe-oxide layer for all films. At room temperature, the observed coercivity (Hc approximately 25 Oe) for a film prepared with 19% O2/Ar indicates the existence of a magnetically hard ferrimagnetic Fe3O4 phase that is enhancing the plain NiFe (Hc approximately 2 Oe) by way of exchange coupling. A significant amount of exchange bias is observed below 50 K, and at 10 K the size of exchange bias hysteresis loops shift increases with increasing oxygen in the films. Furthermore, the strongest exchange coupling (H(ex) approximately 135 Oe at 10 K) is with alpha-Fe2O3 (35% O2/Ar) as the bottom film layer. This indicates that the pure antiferromagnetic phases work better than ferrimagnetic phases when in contact with ferromagnetic NiFe. H(ex) (T) is well described by an effective AF domain wall energy that creates an exchange field with a (1 - T/T(crit)) temperature dependence. Hc (T) exhibits three distinct regimes of constant temperature that may indicate the existence of different AF spin populations that couple to the FM layer at different temperatures.

  1. Oxide Melt Solution Calorimetry of Fe2+ -bearing Oxides and Application to the Magnetite - Maghemite (Fe3O4-Fe8/3O4) system

    SciTech Connect

    Lilova, Kristina I.; Xu, Fen; Rosso, Kevin M.; Pearce, Carolyn I.; Kamali, Saeed; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    A consistent methodology for obtaining enthalpy of formation of Fe{sup 2+}-containing binary and multicomponent oxides using high temperature oxide melt solution calorimetry has been developed. The enthalpies of wuestite (FeO) and magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) oxidation to hematite (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) were measured using oxidative drop solution calorimetry in which the final product is dissolved ferric oxide. Two methods were applied: drop solution calorimetry at 1073 K in lead borate solvent and at 973 K in sodium molybdate, each under both oxygen flowing over and bubbling through the solvent, giving consistent results in agreement with literature values. The enthalpies of formation of all three iron oxides from the elements were obtained using a thermodynamic cycle involving the directly measured oxidative dissolution enthalpy of iron metal in sodium molybdate at 973 K and gave excellent consistency with literature data. The methodology was then applied to the magnetite - maghemite system. The enthalpy of mixing of the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-Fe{sub 8/3}O{sub 4} spinel solid solution is exothermic and, 2 represented by a subregular (Margules) formalism, {Delta}H{sub mix} = x(1-x)(-63.36 {+-} 8.60(1-x) + 17.65 {+-} 6.40x) kJ/mol, where x is the mole fraction of magnetite. The entropies of mixing of the solid solution were calculated for different assumptions about the distribution of cations, charges, and vacancies in these defect spinels. The different models lead to only small differences in the entropy of mixing. Calculated free energies of mixing show no evidence for a solvus in the magnetite - maghemite system.

  2. Superparamagnetic Fe3O4 particles formed by oxidation of pyrite heated in an anoxic atmosphere

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorpe, A.N.; Senftle, F.E.; Talley, R.; Hetherington, S.; Dulong, F.

    1990-01-01

    As a follow-up to previous gas analysis experiments in which pyrite was heated to 681 K in an anoxic (oxygen starved) atmosphere, the first oxidation product, FeSO4, was studied as a bulk material. No decomposition of FeSO4 to Fe3O4 was observed in the temperature range studied. The lack of decomposition of bulk FeSO4 to Fe3O4 suggests that FeS2 oxidizes directly to Fe3O4, or that FeSO4, FeS2 and O2 react together to form Fe3O4. Magnetic susceptibility and magnetization measurements, along with magnetic hysteresis curves, show that small particles of Fe3O4 form on the pyrite surface, rather than a continuous layer of bulk Fe3O4. A working model describing the oxidation steps is presented. ?? 1990.

  3. Fe(II)EDTA-NO reduction coupled with Fe(II)EDTA oxidation by a nitrate- and Fe(III)-reducing bacterium.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiyang; Zhang, Yu; Zhou, Jiti; Chen, Mingxiang; Wang, Xiaojun; Shi, Zhuang

    2013-06-01

    The nitrate- and Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Paracoccus versutus LYM was characterized in terms of its ability to perform Fe(II)EDTA-NO reduction coupled with Fe(II)EDTA oxidation (NO-dependent Fe(II)EDTA oxidation, NDFO). It experienced a single anaerobic FeEDTA redox cycling through NDFO and dissimilatory Fe(III)EDTA reduction in FeEDTA culture. The increase in the Fe(II)EDTA concentration contributed to the ascending Fe(II)EDTA-NO reduction rate. The amount of glucose controlled the rate and extent of Fe(II) oxidation during NDFO. Without glucose addition, Fe(II)EDTA-NO reduction rate was at a rather slow rate even in presence of relatively sufficient Fe(II)EDTA. Unlike aqueous Fe(2+) and solid-phase Fe(II), Fe(II)EDTA could prevent cells from encrustations. These findings suggested the occurrence of NDFO preferred being beneficial via a mixotrophic physiology in the presence of an organic cosubstrate to being out of consideration for metabolic strategy.

  4. Artificial meteor ablation studies. [for identification of cosmic dust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, M. B.

    1973-01-01

    Artificial meteor ablation was performed on natural minerals, composed predominately of magnetite and hematite, using an arc heated plasma stream of air. Analysis of the ablated debris indicated most was composed of two or more minerals. The more volatile elements were depleted and the relative abundance of Fe increased as a result of both volatile depletion and a reduction in its oxidation state. Hematite was converted to magnetite in the ablation zone, and quartz and apatite minerals were converted to an Fe-rich glass consisting of varying amounts of Si, P, Cl, and Ca, depending upon the accessory minerals available at the time of melting. Artificially created ablation products from iron oxides exhibited unique properties depending on the composition of the original material and the environmental conditions of formation. In addition to the accepted elemental criteria, these properties were morphologic characteristics, textural parameters, and the existence of metastable minerals.

  5. Characterization of the physiology and cell-mineral interactions of the marine anoxygenic phototrophic Fe(II) oxidizer Rhodovulum iodosum--implications for Precambrian Fe(II) oxidation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wenfang; Swanner, Elizabeth D; Hao, Likai; Zeitvogel, Fabian; Obst, Martin; Pan, Yongxin; Kappler, Andreas

    2014-06-01

    Anoxygenic phototrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria (photoferrotrophs) are suggested to have contributed to the deposition of banded iron formations (BIFs) from oxygen-poor seawater. However, most studies evaluating the contribution of photoferrotrophs to Precambrian Fe(II) oxidation have used freshwater and not marine strains. Therefore, we investigated the physiology and mineral products of Fe(II) oxidation by the marine photoferrotroph Rhodovulum iodosum. Poorly crystalline Fe(III) minerals formed initially and transformed to more crystalline goethite over time. During Fe(II) oxidation, cell surfaces were largely free of minerals. Instead, the minerals were co-localized with EPS suggesting that EPS plays a critical role in preventing cell encrustation, likely by binding Fe(III) and directing precipitation away from cell surfaces. Fe(II) oxidation rates increased with increasing initial Fe(II) concentration (0.43-4.07 mM) under a light intensity of 12 μmol quanta m(-2) s(-1). Rates also increased as light intensity increased (from 3 to 20 μmol quanta m(-2) s(-1)), while the addition of Si did not significantly change Fe(II) oxidation rates. These results elaborate on how the physical and chemical conditions present in the Precambrian ocean controlled the activity of marine photoferrotrophs and confirm the possibility that such microorganisms could have oxidized Fe(II), generating the primary Fe(III) minerals that were then deposited to some Precambrian BIFs.

  6. Anaerobic microbial Fe(II) oxidation and Fe(III) reduction in coastal marine sediments controlled by organic carbon content.

    PubMed

    Laufer, Katja; Byrne, James M; Glombitza, Clemens; Schmidt, Caroline; Jørgensen, Bo Barker; Kappler, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    Coastal marine sediments contain varying concentrations of iron, oxygen, nitrate and organic carbon. It is unknown how organic carbon content influences the activity of nitrate-reducing and phototrophic Fe(II)-oxidizers and microbial Fe-redox cycling in such sediments. Therefore, microcosms were prepared with two coastal marine sediments (Kalø Vig and Norsminde Fjord at Aarhus Bay, Denmark) varying in TOC from 0.4 to 3.0 wt%. The microcosms were incubated under light/dark conditions with/without addition of nitrate and/or Fe(II). Although most probable number (MPN) counts of phototrophic Fe(II)-oxidizers were five times lower in the low-TOC sediment, phototrophic Fe(II) oxidation rates were higher compared with the high-TOC sediment. Fe(III)-amended microcosms showed that this lower net Fe(II) oxidation in the high-TOC sediment is caused by concurrent bacterial Fe(III) reduction. In contrast, MPN counts of nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizers and net rates of nitrate-reducing Fe(II) oxidation were comparable in low- and high-TOC sediments. However, the ratio of nitratereduced :iron(II)oxidized was higher in the high-TOC sediment, suggesting that a part of the nitrate was reduced by mixotrophic nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizers and chemoorganoheterotrophic nitrate-reducers. Our results demonstrate that dynamic microbial Fe cycling occurs in these sediments and that the extent of Fe cycling is dependent on organic carbon content.

  7. Formation of iron (hydr)oxides during the abiotic oxidation of Fe(II) in the presence of arsenate.

    PubMed

    Song, Jia; Jia, Shao-Yi; Yu, Bo; Wu, Song-Hai; Han, Xu

    2015-08-30

    Abiotic oxidation of Fe(II) is a common pathway in the formation of Fe (hydr)oxides under natural conditions, however, little is known regarding the presence of arsenate on this process. In hence, the effect of arsenate on the precipitation of Fe (hydr)oxides during the oxidation of Fe(II) is investigated. Formation of arsenic-containing Fe (hydr)oxides is constrained by pH and molar ratios of As:Fe during the oxidation Fe(II). At pH 6.0, arsenate inhibits the formation of lepidocrocite and goethite, while favors the formation of ferric arsenate with the increasing As:Fe ratio. At pH 7.0, arsenate promotes the formation of hollow-structured Fe (hydr)oxides containing arsenate, as the As:Fe ratio reaches 0.07. Arsenate effectively inhibits the formation of magnetite at pH 8.0 even at As:Fe ratio of 0.01, while favors the formation of lepidocrocite and green rust, which can be latterly degenerated and replaced by ferric arsenate with the increasing As:Fe ratio. This study indicates that arsenate and low pH value favor the slow growth of dense-structured Fe (hydr)oxides like spherical ferric arsenate. With the rapid oxidation rate of Fe(II) at high pH, ferric (hydr)oxides prefer to precipitate in the formation of loose-structured Fe (hydr)oxides like lepidocrocite and green rust.

  8. Physiology, Fe(II) oxidation, and Fe mineral formation by a marine planktonic cyanobacterium grown under ferruginous conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanner, Elizabeth; Wu, Wenfang; Hao, Likai; Wuestner, Marina; Obst, Martin; Moran, Dawn; McIlvin, Matthew; Saito, Mak; Kappler, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    Evidence for Fe(II) oxidation and deposition of Fe(III)-bearing minerals from anoxic or redox-stratified Precambrian oceans has received support from decades of sedimentological and geochemical investigation of Banded Iron Formations (BIF). While the exact mechanisms of Fe(II) oxidation remains equivocal, reaction with O2 in the marine water column, produced by cyanobacteria or early oxygenic phototrophs, was likely. In order to understand the role of cyanobacteria in the deposition of Fe(III) minerals to BIF, we must first know how planktonic marine cyanobacteria respond to ferruginous (anoxic and Fe(II)-rich) waters in terms of growth, Fe uptake and homeostasis, and Fe mineral formation. We therefore grew the common marine cyanobacterium Synechococcus PCC 7002 in closed bottles that began anoxic, and contained Fe(II) concentrations that span the range of possible concentrations in Precambrian seawater. These results, along with cell suspension experiments, indicate that Fe(II) is likely oxidized by this strain via chemical oxidation with oxygen produced during photosynthesis, and not via any direct enzymatic or photosynthetic pathway. Imaging of the cell-mineral aggregates with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) are consistent with extracellular precipitation of Fe(III) (oxyhydr)oxide minerals, but that >10% of Fe(III) sorbs to cell surfaces rather than precipitating. Proteomic experiments support the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in Fe(II) toxicity to Synechococcus PCC 7002. The proteome expressed under low Fe conditions included multiple siderophore biosynthesis and siderophore and Fe transporter proteins, but most siderophores are not expressed during growth with Fe(II). These results provide a mechanistic and quantitative framework for evaluating the geochemical consequences of perhaps life’s greatest metabolic innovation, i.e. the evolution and activity of oxygenic photosynthesis, in ferruginous

  9. Thermodynamics of Fe(II)Fe(III) oxide systems I. Hydrothermal Fe3O4

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartel, J.J.; Westrum, E.F.; Haas, J.L.

    1976-01-01

    The heat capacity of a hydrothermally-prepared polycrystalline sample of Fe3O4 was measured from 53 to 350 K, primarily to study the thermophysics of the Verwey transitions. Although the bifurcation of the transition was confirmed, the sample was found to contain traces of manganese. The observed transition temperatures of 117.0 and 123.0 K are 3.7 and 4.2 K higher respectively than those found in pure Fe3O4. Ancillary analytical results are consistent and indicate a stoichiometry of Mn0.008Fe2.992O4 for this material. Characteristics in the transition region are ascribed to dopant effects. ?? 1976.

  10. Experimental Determination of Fe-Mg Interdiffusion Coefficients in Orthopyroxene Using Pulsed Laser Ablation and Nanoscale Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ter Heege, J. H.; Dohmen, R.; Becker, H.; Chakraborty, S.

    2006-12-01

    Fe-Mg interdiffusion in silicate minerals is of interest in petrological studies for determining the closure temperature of geothermometers and for determining cooling rates from compositional profiles. It is also relevant for studies of the physical properties of silicates, such as rheology or electrical conductivity, because knowledge of its dependence on oxygen fugacity can aid in the understanding of point defect chemistry. Compositionally zoned orthopyroxenes are common in meteorites, mantle rocks, lower crustal rocks and a variety of plutonic and volcanic igneous rocks. However, experimental difficulties have precluded direct determination of Fe-Mg diffusion rates in orthopyroxenes so far and the available information comes from (1) Mg tracer diffusion coefficients obtained from isotope tracer studies using enriched ^{25}MgO films [1], (2) calculations of interdiffusion rates based on the (diffusion-controlled) order-disorder kinetics measured in orthopyroxene [2], and (3) indirect estimates from the comparison of diffusion widths in coexisting garnets and olivines, in which Fe-Mg diffusion rates are relatively well known [e.g., 3]. We have directly measured Fe-Mg interdiffusion coefficients parallel to the [001] direction in two natural orthopyroxene single crystals (approximately En95Fs5 and En90Fs10) using diffusion couples consisting of an olivine thin film (Fo30Fa70, typically 20 - 50 nm thick) deposited under vacuum on pre-heated, polished and oriented pyroxene single crystals using a pulsed laser ablation deposition technique. Samples were annealed for 4 - 337 hours at 800 - 1100 °C under atmospheric pressure in a continuous flow of CO + CO2 to control the oxygen fugacity between 10-16 and 10^{-12} bar within the stability field of pyroxene. Film thickness and compositional profiles were measured using Rutherford backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS) on reference and annealed samples, and Fe concentration depth profiles were extracted from the RBS spectra

  11. Fe hydroxyphosphate precipitation and Fe(II) oxidation kinetics upon aeration of Fe(II) and phosphate-containing synthetic and natural solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Grift, B.; Behrends, T.; Osté, L. A.; Schot, P. P.; Wassen, M. J.; Griffioen, J.

    2016-08-01

    Exfiltration of anoxic Fe-rich groundwater into surface water and the concomitant oxidative precipitation of Fe are important processes controlling the transport of phosphate (PO4) from agricultural areas to aquatic systems. Here, we explored the relationship between solution composition, reaction kinetics, and the characteristics of the produced Fe hydroxyphosphate precipitates in a series of aeration experiments with anoxic synthetic water and natural groundwater. A pH stat device was used to maintain constant pH and to record the H+ production during Fe(II) oxidation in the aeration experiments in which the initial aqueous P/Fe ratios ((P/Fe)ini), oxygen concentration and pH were varied. In general, Fe(II) oxidation proceeded slower in the presence of PO4 but the decrease of the PO4 concentration during Fe(II) oxidation due to the formation of Fe hydroxyphosphates caused additional deceleration of the reaction rate. The progress of the reaction could be described using a pseudo-second-order rate law with first-order dependencies on PO4 and Fe(II) concentrations. After PO4 depletion, the Fe(II) oxidation rates increased again and the kinetics followed a pseudo-first-order rate law. The first-order rate constants after PO4 depletion, however, were lower compared to the Fe(II) oxidation in a PO4-free solution. Hence, the initially formed Fe hydroxyphosphates also affect the kinetics of continuing Fe(II) oxidation after PO4 depletion. Presence of aqueous PO4 during oxidation of Fe(II) led to the formation of Fe hydroxyphosphates. The P/Fe ratios of the precipitates ((P/Fe)ppt) and the recorded ratio of H+ production over decrease in dissolved Fe(II) did not change detectably throughout the reaction despite a changing P/Fe ratio in the solution. When (P/Fe)ini was 0.9, precipitates with a (P/Fe)ppt ratio of about 0.6 were formed. In experiments with (P/Fe)ini ratios below 0.6, the (P/Fe)ppt decreased with decreasing (P/Fe)ini and pH value. Aeration experiments with

  12. The role of biogenic Fe-Mn oxides formed in situ for arsenic oxidation and adsorption in aquatic ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yaohui; Yang, Tingting; Liang, Jinsong; Qu, Jiuhui

    2016-07-01

    As(III&V), Mn(II), and Fe(II) may occur simultaneously in some groundwater and surface water. Studying their redox reactions and interactions is essential to unravel the biogeochemical cycles of these metal ions in aquatic ecosystems and to find effective methods to remove them simultaneously in drinking water treatment. Here, the formation of biogenic Fe-Mn oxides (BFMO, defined as a mixture of biogenic Mn oxide (BMO) and Fe oxide) as well as its oxidation and adsorption of As in a Fe(II)-Mn(II)-As(III&V)-Mn-oxidizing microbe (Pseudomonas sp. QJX-1) system were investigated. Batch experiments and structure characterization revealed that the BFMO was formed via a sequential precipitation of Fe oxide and BMO. The first formed Fe oxide was identified as FeOOH (lepidocrocite) and the latter formed BMO was identified as MnO2 (similar to hexagonal birnessite). In the BFMO mixture, the BMO part was mainly responsible for As(III) oxidation, and the Fe oxide part dominated As adsorption. Remarkably, the BMO could oxidize Fe(II) to form FeOOH, which may improve As adsorption. The optimum Mn(II)/Fe(II) ratio for As removal was approximately 1:3 (mol/mol). Taken together, in Fe(II)-Mn(II)-As(III&V)-Mn-oxidizing microbe ecosystems, the in situ formation of BFMO could eliminate or decrease Fe(II), Mn(II), and As(III&V) species simultaneously. Therefore, based on this study, new approaches may be developed for As removal from water containing high concentrations of Fe(II) and Mn(II).

  13. The effect of various oxide dispersions on the oxidation resistance of Fe{sub 3}Al

    SciTech Connect

    Pint, B.A.; Alexander, K.B.; Tortorelli, P.F.

    1996-10-01

    Oxide-dispersed Fe-28at.%Al-2%Cr alloys were produced by a powder metallurgy technique followed by hot extrusion. Yttria and ceria were added to the base alloy to assess the effect of these dopants on the oxidation behavior. The amount of dopant was varied from 0.05-0.5 at.% Y in a series of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-dispersed alloys. isothermal and cyclic oxidation testing was conducted at temperatures from 800{degrees} to 1300{degrees}C. A CeO{sub 2} addition was detrimental to the oxidation behavior. The Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} improved the {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale adhesion relative to an undoped alloy, but was not as effective as similar additions to an oxide-dispersed FeCrAl alloy.

  14. Thermodynamic constraints on the oxidation of biogenic UO2 by Fe(III) (Hydr)oxides.

    PubMed

    Ginder-Vogel, Matthew; Criddle, Craig S; Fendorf, Scott

    2006-06-01

    Uranium mobility in the environment is partially controlled by its oxidation state, where it exists as either U(VI) or U(IV). In aerobic environments, uranium is generally found in the hexavalent form, is quite soluble, and readily forms complexes with carbonate and calcium. Under anaerobic conditions, common metal respiring bacteria can reduce soluble U(VI) species to sparingly soluble UO2 (uraninite); stimulation of these bacteria, in fact, is being explored as an in situ uranium remediation technique. However, the stability of biologically precipitated uraninite within soils and sediments is not well characterized. Here we demonstrate that uraninite oxidation by Fe(III) (hydr)oxides is thermodynamically favorable under limited geochemical conditions. Our analysis reveals that goethite and hematite have a limited capacity to oxidize UO2(biogenic) while ferrihydrite can lead to UO2(biogenic) oxidation. The extent of UO2(biogenic) oxidation by ferrihydrite increases with increasing bicarbonate and calcium concentration, but decreases with elevated Fe(II)(aq) and U(VI)(aq) concentrations. Thus, our results demonstrate that the oxidation of UO2(biogenic) by Fe(III) (hydr)oxides may transpire under mildly reducing conditions when ferrihydrite is present.

  15. Fe2O3/Reduced Graphene Oxide/Fe3O4 Composite in Situ Grown on Fe Foil for High-Performance Supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chongjun; Shao, Xiaoxiao; Zhang, Yuxiao; Qian, Xiuzhen

    2016-11-09

    A Fe2O3/reduced graphene oxide (RGO)/Fe3O4 nanocomposite in situ grown on Fe foil was synthesized via a simple one-step hydrothermal growth process, where the iron foil served as support, reductant of graphene oxide, Fe source of Fe3O4, and also the current collector of the electrode. When it directly acted as the electrode of a supercapacitor, as-synthesized Fe2O3/RGO/Fe3O4@Fe exhibited excellent electrochemical performance with a high capability of 337.5 mF/cm(2) at 20 mA/cm(2) and a superior cyclability with 2.3% capacity loss from the 600th to the 2000th cycle.

  16. Ion irradiation of Fe-Fe oxide core-shell nanocluster films: Effect of interface on stability of magnetic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCloy, John S.; Jiang, Weilin; Droubay, Timothy C.; Varga, Tamas; Kovarik, Libor; Sundararajan, Jennifer A.; Kaur, Maninder; Qiang, You; Burks, Edward C.; Liu, Kai

    2013-08-01

    A cluster deposition method was used to produce films of loosely aggregated nanoclusters (NCs) of Fe core-Fe3O4 shell or fully oxidized Fe3O4. Films of these NC on Si(100) or MgO(100)/Fe3O4(100) were irradiated to 1016 Si2+/cm2 near room temperature using an ion accelerator. Ion irradiation creates structural change in the NC film with corresponding chemical and magnetic changes which depend on the initial oxidation state of the cluster. Films were characterized using magnetometry (hysteresis, first order reversal curves), microscopy (transmission electron, helium ion), and x-ray diffraction. In all cases, the particle sizes increased due to ion irradiation, and when a core of Fe is present, irradiation reduces the oxide shells to lower valent Fe species. These results show that ion irradiated behavior of the NC films depends strongly on the initial nanostructure and chemistry, but in general saturation magnetization decreases slightly.

  17. Electrochemical characterization of Fe-air rechargeable oxide battery in planar solid oxide cell stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Qingping; Berger, Cornelius M.; Menzler, Norbert H.; Bram, Martin; Blum, Ludger

    2016-12-01

    Iron-air rechargeable oxide batteries (ROB) comprising solid oxide cells (SOC) as energy converters and Fe/metal-oxide redox couples were characterized using planar SOC stacks. The charge and discharge of the battery correspond to the operations in the electrolysis and fuel cell modes, respectively, but with a stagnant atmosphere consisting of hydrogen and steam. A novel method was employed to establish the stagnant atmosphere for battery testing during normal SOC operation without complicated modification to the test bench and stack/battery concept. Manipulation of the gas compositions during battery operation was not necessary, but the influence of the leakage current from the testing system had to be considered. Batteries incorporating Fe2O3/8YSZ, Fe2O3/CaO and Fe2O3/ZrO2 storage materials were characterized at 800 °C. A maximum charge capacity of 30.4 Ah per layer (with an 80 cm2 active cell area) with ∼0.5 mol Fe was reached with a current of 12 A. The charge capacity lost 11% after ∼130 ROB cycles due to the increased agglomeration of active materials and formation of a dense oxide layer on the surface. The round trip efficiencies of the tested batteries were ≤84% due to the large internal resistance. With state-of-the-art cells, the round trip efficiency can be further improved.

  18. The oxidation kinetics of Fe(II) in seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millero, Frank J.; Sotolongo, Sara; Izaguirre, Miguel

    1987-04-01

    The oxidation of Fe(II) has been studied as a function of pH (5 to 9), temperature (5 to 45°C), and salinity (0 to 35). The pseudo-first-order rate constant, k1, -d[Fe(II)]/dt = k 1[Fe(II)] in water and seawater was found to be a second degree function of pH over the pH range of 7.5 to 8.5 at 5°C and 6.0 to 8.0 at 25°C. The overall rate constant ( k) -d[Fe(II)]/dt = k[Fe(II)][O 2][OH -] 2 was determined from 5 to 45°C and S = 0 to 35. The results have been fit to an equation of the form ( T = 273.15 + t° C) log k = log k 0 - 3.29I 1/2 + 1.52I where logk0 = 21.56-1545/ T with a standard error = 0.09. The energy of activation for the overall rate constant in water and seawater was 29 ± 2 kJmol-1. The values of the rate constant for pure water ( k0) are in good agreement with literature data. The half times for seawater from some previous studies at a pH = 8.0 were slower than our results for Gulf Stream waters. Measurements on Biscayne Bay waters also yield slower half times apparently due to the presence of organic ligands that can complex Fe(II).

  19. Oxidation behavior of Fe-20Cr steels alloyed with titanium at 1073 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setiawan, Asep Ridwan; Artono, Tri Juni

    2016-02-01

    In this work, the oxidation behavior of Fe-20 wt%Cr steels alloyed with different titanium contents: 0, 0.5, and 1 wt% are studied as a function of time in air atmosphere. The samples were isothermally oxidized at 1073 K for 86.4, 172.8, and 345.6 ks in a muffle furnace. The mass of specimen were recorded before and after oxidation. After the oxidation, phases in the oxide were identified by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Optical microscopy observation on the chromium base alloys show that the microstructure consist only ferritic phases. The addition of titanium in the Fe-20Cr alloys does not alter the microstructure significantly. The oxidation behavior of Fe-20Cr, Fe-20Cr-0.5Ti and Fe-20Cr-1Ti were followed the classical parabolic relationship with time. XRD analysis indicated that the oxide scales developed on the Fe-20Cr alloys surface during oxidation tests consisted mainly of Cr2O3. On the other hand, the oxide scales developed on the surface of Fe-20Cr-0.5Ti and Fe-20Cr-1Ti alloys comprised of Cr2O3 and TiO2 oxide. The formation of TiO2 oxide in the Ti-containing alloys consequently increases the mass gain of the alloys during oxidation compared to that of Fe-20Cr alloys.

  20. Ablation of the Locus Coeruleus Increases Oxidative Stress in Tg-2576 Transgenic but Not Wild-Type Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hurko, Orest; Boudonck, Kurt; Gonzales, Cathleen; Hughes, Zoe A.; Jacobsen, J. Steve; Reinhart, Peter H.; Crowther, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Mice transgenic for production of excessive or mutant forms of beta-amyloid differ from patients with Alzheimer's disease in the degree of inflammation, oxidative damage, and alteration of intermediary metabolism, as well as the paucity or absence of neuronal atrophy and cognitive impairment. Previous observers have suggested that differences in inflammatory response reflect a discrepancy in the state of the locus coeruleus (LC), loss of which is an early change in Alzheimer's disease but which is preserved in the transgenic mice. In this paper, we extend these observations by examining the effects of the LC on markers of oxidative stress and intermediary metabolism. We compare four groups: wild-type or Tg2576 Aβ transgenic mice injected with DSP4 or vehicle. Of greatest interest were metabolites different between ablated and intact transgenics, but not between ablated and intact wild-type animals. The Tg2576_DSP4 mice were distinguished from the other three groups by oxidative stress and altered energy metabolism. These observations provide further support for the hypothesis that Tg2576 Aβ transgenic mice with this ablation may be a more congruent model of Alzheimer's disease than are transgenics with an intact LC. PMID:20981353

  1. Thermodynamic controls on the kinetics of microbial low-pH Fe(II) oxidation.

    PubMed

    Larson, Lance N; Sánchez-España, Javier; Kaley, Bradley; Sheng, Yizhi; Bibby, Kyle; Burgos, William D

    2014-08-19

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) is a major worldwide environmental threat to surface and groundwater quality. Microbial low-pH Fe(II) oxidation could be exploited for cost-effective AMD treatment; however, its use is limited because of uncertainties associated with its rate and ability to remove Fe from solution. We developed a thermodynamic-based framework to evaluate the kinetics of low-pH Fe(II) oxidation. We measured the kinetics of low-pH Fe(II) oxidation at five sites in the Appalachian Coal Basin in the US and three sites in the Iberian Pyrite Belt in Spain and found that the fastest rates of Fe(II) oxidation occurred at the sites with the lowest pH values. Thermodynamic calculations showed that the Gibbs free energy of Fe(II) oxidation (ΔG(oxidation)) was also most negative at the sites with the lowest pH values. We then conducted two series of microbial Fe(II) oxidation experiments in laboratory-scale chemostatic bioreactors operated through a series of pH values (2.1-4.2) and found the same relationships between Fe(II) oxidation kinetics, ΔG(oxidation), and pH. Conditions that favored the fastest rates of Fe(II) oxidation coincided with higher Fe(III) solubility. The solubility of Fe(III) minerals, thus plays an important role on Fe(II) oxidation kinetics. Methods to incorporate microbial low-pH Fe(II) oxidation into active and passive AMD treatment systems are discussed in the context of these findings. This study presents a simplified model that describes the relationship between free energy and microbial kinetics and should be broadly applicable to many biogeochemical systems.

  2. Oxidation resistance of aluminum-coated Fe-20Cr alloys containing rare earths or yttrium

    SciTech Connect

    Sigler, D.R. )

    1993-10-01

    Aluminum-coated Fe-20Cr (rare earth or yttrium) alloy foils were developed with oxidation resistance equivalent or superior to Fe-20Cr-5Al (rare earth or yttrium) alloy foils. The coated foils were made by dipping Fe-20Cr sheet into a salt-covered aluminum bath and then rolling the sheet to foil. Oxidation resistance of the coated foil was enhanced by adding rare earths or yttrium to the Fe-20Cr substrate alloys to insure oxide adherence. Test results indicate that only sufficient addition to tie up sulfur as a stable sulfide is needed in the Fe-20Cr alloy. Aluminum-coated foils show lower oxide growth rates than similar Fe-Cr-Al alloys, most likely the result of fewer impurities (particularly Fe) is the coated foils' growing oxide scale. 31 refs., 18 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Catalytic wet air oxidation with Ni- and Fe-doped mixed oxides derived from hydrotalcites.

    PubMed

    Ovejero, G; Rodríguez, A; Vallet, A; Gómez, P; García, J

    2011-01-01

    Catalytic wet air oxidation of Basic Yellow 11 (BY11), a basic dye, was studied in a batch reactor. Layered double hydroxides with the hydrotalcite-like structure containing nickel or iron cations have been prepared by coprecipitation and subsequently calcined leading to Ni- and Fe-doped mixed oxides, respectively. Compared with the results in the wet air oxidation of BY11, these catalysts showed high activity for total organic carbon (TOC), toxicity and dye removal at 120 degrees C and 50 bars after 120 min. It has been demonstrated that the activity depended strongly on the presence of catalyst. The results show that catalysts containing nickel provide a higher extent of oxidation of the dye whereas the reaction carried out with the iron catalyst is faster. The Ni and Fe dispersion determined from the TPR results was higher for the catalysts with a lower Ni or Fe content and decreased for higher Ni or Fe contents. On the basis of activity and selectivity, the Ni containing catalyst with the medium (3%) Ni content was found to be the best catalyst. Finally, a relationship between metal content of the catalyst and reaction rate has been established.

  4. Preparation of iron oxide nanoparticles-decorated carbon nanotube using laser ablation in liquid and their antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Khashan, Khawla S; Sulaiman, Ghassan M; Mahdi, Rafal

    2017-02-01

    The antimicrobial activity was investigated for iron oxide IO nanoparticles (NPs)-decorated carbon nanotubes CNT prepared successfully by Nd:YAG-pulsed laser ablation in the liquid process. TEM reveals the composite NP and exhibits semispherical of iron oxide NPs, which aggregate around rolled and unrolled graphene sheet. XRD pattern proved the presence of carbon and different phases of IO NPs. Then, the antibacterial activity of the NPs was examined against different bacteria using nutrient broth and nutrient agar methods, which was enhanced using IO. In addition, the wound-healing activity for the best antibacterial concentration is tested by using animal models successfully.

  5. Origin of concretionary Mn-Fe-oxides in stream sediments of Maine, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nowlan, G.A.; McHugh, J.B.; Hessin, T.D.

    1983-01-01

    Studies of stream and sediment-pore waters largely explain the genesis of concretionary Mn-Fe-oxides in Maine. Waters of two small streams near Jackman, Maine, were studied in terms of pH, Eh, dissolved oxygen, dissolved organic carbon, dissolved Mn, total dissolved Fe, and ferrous and ferric Fe. Pyrite Creek has profuse concretions and coatings of Mn-Fe-oxides, whereas West Pyrite Creek has only sparse Mn-Fe-oxide stains. Pyrite Creek drains boggy terrain and West Pyrite Creek drains well-drained terrain. In West Pyrite Creek, stream and subjacent pore waters have chemical characteristics that do not differ greatly. However, dissolved Mn, ferrous Fe, dissolved oxygen, and in situ Eh measurements show that a steep Eh gradient exists between stream and subjacent pore waters of Pyrite Creek. The steep Eh gradient is manifested by the common zonation of coatings and stains on rocks in stream sediment. The bottom zone has no deposition of oxides, the middle zone is red and consists mostly of Fe-oxides, and the upper zone is black or dark-brown and consists of Mn-oxides with varying amounts of Fe-oxides. The zonation agrees with theoretical predictions of oxide stability as one moves from a reducing to an oxidizing environment. At locations where concretionary Mn-Fe-oxides form, pore waters are depleted of oxygen because of abundant decaying organic material in the stream sediment. The pore waters are charged with dissolved Mn and Fe because mechanically deposited Mn-Fe-oxides are remobilized due to the low-Eh conditions. Groundwaters also contribute dissolved Mn and Fe. Stream waters, on the other hand, are oxygenated and the high-Eh conditions result in low concentrations of dissolved Mn and Fe in stream waters because of the insolubility of Mn-Fe-oxides in high-Eh environments. Therefore, concretionary Mn-Fe-oxides form at the interface between pore and stream waters because Mn- and Fe-rich pore waters, which are undersaturated with respect to Mn-Fe-oxides, mix with

  6. Oxidation sulfidation resistance of Fe-Cr-Ni alloys

    DOEpatents

    Natesan, Ken; Baxter, David J.

    1984-01-01

    High temperature resistance of Fe-Cr-Ni alloy compositions to oxidative and/or sulfidative conditions is provided by the incorporation of about 1-8 wt. % of Zr or Nb and results in a two-phase composition having an alloy matrix as the first phase and a fine grained intermetallic composition as the second phase. The presence and location of the intermetallic composition between grains of the matrix provides mechanical strength, enhanced surface scale adhesion, and resistance to corrosive attack between grains of the alloy matrix at temperatures of 500.degree.-1000.degree. C.

  7. Improved oxidation sulfidation resistance of Fe-Cr-Ni alloys

    DOEpatents

    Natesan, K.; Baxter, D.J.

    1983-07-26

    High temperature resistance of Fe-Cr-Ni alloy compositions to oxidative and/or sulfidative conditions is provided by the incorporation of about 1 to 8 wt % of Zr or Nb and results in a two-phase composition having an alloy matrix as the first phase and a fine grained intermetallic composition as the second phase. The presence and location of the intermetallic composition between grains of the matrix provides mechanical strength, enhanced surface scale adhesion, and resistance to corrosive attack between grains of the alloy matrix at temperatures of 500 to 1000/sup 0/C.

  8. A novel route for FePO4 olivine synthesis from sarcopside oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crouzet, Camille; Recham, Nadir; Brunet, Fabrice; Findling, Nathaniel; David, Rénald; Sougrati, Moulay-Tahar

    2016-12-01

    Heterosite FePO4 is synthesized for the first time by direct thermal oxidation of sarcopside Fe3(PO4)2. Both FePO4 and Fe3(PO4)2 have a pseudo olivine structure. Complete isostructural conversion of sarcopside into FePO4 is achieved at a temperature of 450 °C within 3 days according to the reaction Fe3(PO4)2 + ¾ O2 → 2 FePO4 + ½ Fe2O3 which leads to the extraction of iron from the sarcopside structure. Appropriate heating ramp must be applied in order to avoid the crystallization of Fe7(PO4)6. Electrochemical performances of the oxidation product are consistent with those of olivine FePO4.

  9. Outer cell surface components essential for Fe(III) oxide reduction by Geobacter metallireducens.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jessica A; Lovley, Derek R; Tremblay, Pier-Luc

    2013-02-01

    Geobacter species are important Fe(III) reducers in a diversity of soils and sediments. Mechanisms for Fe(III) oxide reduction have been studied in detail in Geobacter sulfurreducens, but a number of the most thoroughly studied outer surface components of G. sulfurreducens, particularly c-type cytochromes, are not well conserved among Geobacter species. In order to identify cellular components potentially important for Fe(III) oxide reduction in Geobacter metallireducens, gene transcript abundance was compared in cells grown on Fe(III) oxide or soluble Fe(III) citrate with whole-genome microarrays. Outer-surface cytochromes were also identified. Deletion of genes for c-type cytochromes that had higher transcript abundance during growth on Fe(III) oxides and/or were detected in the outer-surface protein fraction identified six c-type cytochrome genes, that when deleted removed the capacity for Fe(III) oxide reduction. Several of the c-type cytochromes which were essential for Fe(III) oxide reduction in G. metallireducens have homologs in G. sulfurreducens that are not important for Fe(III) oxide reduction. Other genes essential for Fe(III) oxide reduction included a gene predicted to encode an NHL (Ncl-1-HT2A-Lin-41) repeat-containing protein and a gene potentially involved in pili glycosylation. Genes associated with flagellum-based motility, chemotaxis, and pili had higher transcript abundance during growth on Fe(III) oxide, consistent with the previously proposed importance of these components in Fe(III) oxide reduction. These results demonstrate that there are similarities in extracellular electron transfer between G. metallireducens and G. sulfurreducens but the outer-surface c-type cytochromes involved in Fe(III) oxide reduction are different.

  10. Phototrophic Fe(II) oxidation promotes organic carbon acquisition by Rhodobacter capsulatus SB1003.

    PubMed

    Caiazza, Nicky C; Lies, Douglas P; Newman, Dianne K

    2007-10-01

    Anoxygenic phototrophic Fe(II) oxidation is usually considered to be a lithoautotrophic metabolism that contributes to primary production in Fe-based ecosystems. In this study, we employed Rhodobacter capsulatus SB1003 as a model organism to test the hypothesis that phototrophic Fe(II) oxidation can be coupled to organic carbon acquisition. R. capsulatus SB1003 oxidized Fe(II) under anoxic conditions in a light-dependent manner, but it failed to grow lithoautotrophically on soluble Fe(II). When the strain was provided with Fe(II)-citrate, however, growth was observed that was dependent upon microbially catalyzed Fe(II) oxidation, resulting in the formation of Fe(III)-citrate. Subsequent photochemical breakdown of Fe(III)-citrate yielded acetoacetic acid that supported growth in the light but not the dark. The deletion of genes (RRC00247 and RRC00248) that encode homologs of atoA and atoD, required for acetoacetic acid utilization, severely impaired the ability of R. capsulatus SB1003 to grow on Fe(II)-citrate. The growth yield achieved by R. capsulatus SB1003 in the presence of citrate cannot be explained by lithoautotrophic growth on Fe(II) enabled by indirect effects of the ligand [such as altering the thermodynamics of Fe(II) oxidation or preventing cell encrustation]. Together, these results demonstrate that R. capsulatus SB1003 grows photoheterotrophically on Fe(II)-citrate. Nitrilotriacetic acid also supported light-dependent growth on Fe(II), suggesting that Fe(II) oxidation may be a general mechanism whereby some Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria mine otherwise inaccessible organic carbon sources.

  11. Synthesis of highly efficient α-Fe2O3 catalysts for CO oxidation derived from MIL-100(Fe)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Lifeng; Zhao, Di; Yang, Yang; Wang, Yuxin; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2017-03-01

    Mesoporous hollow α-Fe2O3 bricks were synthesized via a hydrothermal method to create a precursor MIL-100(Fe) and a subsequent calcination process was applied to prepare the Fe2O3 phase. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results showed the morphology of hollow α-Fe2O3 bricks which inherited from the MIL-100(Fe) template. The catalytic activities of hollow α-Fe2O3 bricks for CO oxidation are studied in this work. Due to better low temperature reduction behavior, mesoporous hollow α-Fe2O3 bricks obtained at calcination temperature of 430 °C displayed high catalytic activity and excellent stability with a complete CO conversion temperature (T100) of 255 °C.

  12. Mechanisms for chelator stimulation of microbial Fe(III) -oxide reduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovley, D.R.; Woodward, J.C.

    1996-01-01

    The mechanisms by which nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) stimulated Fe(III) reduction in sediments from a petroleum-contaminated aquifer were investigated in order to gain insight into how added Fe(III) chelators stimulate the activity of hydrocarbon-degrading, Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms in these sediments, and how naturally occurring Fe(III) chelators might promote Fe(III) reduction in aquatic sediments. NTA solubilized Fe(III) from the aquifer sediments. NTA stimulation of microbial Fe(III) reduction did not appear to be the result of making calcium, magnesium, potassium, or trace metals more available to the microorganisms. Stimulation of Fe(III) reduction could not be attributed to NTA serving as a source of carbon or fixed nitrogen for Fe(III)-reducing bacteria as NTA was not degraded in the sediments. Studies with the Fe(III)-reducing microorganism, Geobacter metallireducens, and pure Fe(III)-oxide forms, demonstrated that NTA stimulated the reduction of a variety of Fe(III) forms, including highly crystalline Fe(III)-oxides such as goethite and hematite. The results suggest that NTA solubilization of insoluble Fe(III)-oxide is an important mechanism for the stimulation of Fe(III) reduction by NTA in aquifer sediments.

  13. Reduction of aqueous transition metal species on the surfaces of Fe(II)-containing oxides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, A.F.; Peterson, M.L.

    1996-01-01

    Experimental studies demonstrate that structural Fe(II) in magnetite and ilmenite heterogeneously reduce aqueous ferric, cupric, vanadate, and chromate ions at the oxide surfaces over a pH range of 1-7 at 25??C. For an aqueous transition metal m, such reactions are 3[Fe2+Fe3+2]O4(magnetite) + 2/nmz ??? 4[Fe3+2]O3(maghemite) + Fe2+ + 2/nmz-n and 3[Fe2+Ti]O3(ilmenite) + 2/nmz ??? Fe3+2Ti3O9(pseudorutile) + Fe2+ + 2/nmz-n, where z is the valance state and n is the charge transfer number. The half cell potential range for solid state oxidation [Fe(II)] ??? [Fe(III)] is -0.34 to -0.65 V, making structural Fe(II) a stronger reducing agent than aqueous Fe2+ (-0.77 V). Reduction rates for aqueous metal species are linear with time (up to 36 h), decrease with pH, and have rate constants between 0.1 and 3.3 ?? 10-10 mol m-2 s-1. Iron is released to solution both from the above reactions and from dissolution of the oxide surface. In the presence of chromate, Fe2+ is oxidized homogeneously in solution to Fe3+. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) denotes a Fe(III) oxide surface containing reduced Cr(III) and V(IV) species. Magnetite and ilmenite electrode potentials are insensitive to increases in divalent transition metals including Zn(II), Co(II), Mn(II), and Ni(II) and reduced V(IV) and Cr(III) but exhibit a log-linear concentration-potential response to Fe(III) and Cu(II). Complex positive electrode responses occur with increasing Cr(VI) and V(V) concentrations. Potential dynamic scans indicate that the high oxidation potential of dichromate is capable of suppressing the cathodic reductive dissolution of magnetite. Oxide electrode potentials are determined by the Fe(II)/Fe(III) composition of the oxide surface and respond to aqueous ion potentials which accelerate this oxidation process. Natural magnetite sands weathered under anoxic conditions are electrochemically reactive as demonstrated by rapid chromate reduction and the release of aqueous Fe(III) to experimental

  14. Formation of layered Fe(II)-Al(III)-hydroxides during reaction of Fe(II) with aluminum oxide.

    PubMed

    Elzinga, Evert J

    2012-05-01

    The reactivity of aqueous Fe(II) with aluminum oxide in anoxic solutions was investigated with batch kinetic experiments combined with Fe K edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements to characterize Fe(II) sorption products. Formation of Fe(II)-Al(III)-layered double hydroxides with an octahedral sheet structure similar to nikischerite (NaFe(II)(6) Al(3)(SO(4))(2)(OH)(18) (H(2)O)(12)) was observed within a few hours during sorption at pH 7.5 and aqueous Fe(II) concentrations of 1-3 mM. These Fe(II) phases are composed of brucite-like Fe(II)(OH)(2) sheets with partial substitution of Al(III) for Fe(II), charge balanced by anions coordinated along the basal planes. Their fast rate of formation suggests that these previously unrecognized Fe(II) phases, which are structurally and compositionally similar to green rust, may be an important sink of Fe(II) in suboxic and anoxic geochemical environments, and impact the fate of structurally compatible trace metals, such as Co(II), Ni(II), and Zn(II), as well as redox-reactive species including Cr(VI) and U(VI). Further studies are required to assess the thermodynamics, formation kinetics, and stability of these Fe(II) minerals under field conditions.

  15. Advanced experimental analysis of controls on microbial Fe(III) oxide reduction. First year progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Roden, E.E.; Urrutia, M.M.

    1997-07-01

    'The authors have made considerable progress toward a number of project objectives during the first several months of activity on the project. An exhaustive analysis was made of the growth rate and biomass yield (both derived from measurements of cell protein production) of two representative strains of Fe(III)-reducing bacteria (Shewanellaalga strain BrY and Geobactermetallireducens) growing with different forms of Fe(III) as an electron acceptor. These two fundamentally different types of Fe(III)-reducing bacteria (FeRB) showed comparable rates of Fe(III) reduction, cell growth, and biomass yield during reduction of soluble Fe(III)-citrate and solid-phase amorphous hydrous ferric oxide (HFO). Intrinsic growth rates of the two FeRB were strongly influenced by whether a soluble or a solid-phase source of Fe(III) was provided: growth rates on soluble Fe(III) were 10--20 times higher than those on solid-phase Fe(III) oxide. Intrinsic FeRB growth rates were comparable during reduction of HF0 and a synthetic crystalline Fe(III) oxide (goethite). A distinct lag phase for protein production was observed during the first several days of incubation in solid-phase Fe(III) oxide medium, even though Fe(III) reduction proceeded without any lag. No such lag between protein production and Fe(III) reduction was observed during growth with soluble Fe(III). This result suggested that protein synthesis coupled to solid-phase Fe(III) oxide reduction in batch culture requires an initial investment of energy (generated by Fe(III) reduction), which is probably needed for synthesis of materials (e.g. extracellular polysaccharides) required for attachment of the cells to oxide surfaces. This phenomenon may have important implications for modeling the growth of FeRB in subsurface sedimentary environments, where attachment and continued adhesion to solid-phase materials will be required for maintenance of Fe(III) reduction activity. Despite considerable differences in the rate and pattern

  16. Electrochemical synthesis of nanoparticles of magnetic mixed oxides of Sr-Fe and Sr-Co-Fe.

    PubMed

    Asenjo, J; Amigó, R; Krotenko, E; Torres, F; Tejada, J; Brillas, E; Sardin, G

    2001-12-01

    The electrochemical synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles of new Sr-Fe and Sr-Co-Fe oxides using an undivided cell with two Fe electrodes is reported in this work. These materials are collected as precipitates by electrolyzing acidic solutions containing mixtures of chlorides and nitrates of Sr2+, Fe3+ and, optionally, Co2+ at temperatures between 40 degrees C and 80 degrees C. Sr-Fe oxides are produced with energy costs lower than 2.7 kWh kg-1 in the pH range 2.0-6.0 at 50 mA cm-2, whereas Sr-Co-Fe oxides are obtained with a cost of 3.0 kWh kg-1 at pH 1.5 and at 35 mA cm-2. Inductively coupled plasma analysis of materials and energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis of single particles confirm that they are composed of pure mixed oxides, without metallic Fe impurities. All synthesized compounds crystallize as inverse cubic spinels, with structures similar to those of maghemite and magnetite. They are formed by round-shape nanoparticles with sizes lower than 50 nm, as observed by transmission electron microscopy. Thermal desorption spectrometry allows us to detect the presence of hydrogen and volatiles proceeding from water decomposition in their lattices. After heating the electrogenerated materials at 300 degrees C during 1 h to eliminate such species, Sr-Co-Fe oxides with similar magnetic properties to those of hard ferrites are obtained, but magnetic Sr-Fe oxides only behave as soft ferrites.

  17. Assembling tungsten oxide hydrate nanocrystal colloids formed by laser ablation in liquid into fast-response electrochromic films.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shalong; Dou, Kang; Zou, Yousheng; Dong, Yuhang; Li, Jubin; Ju, Dan; Zeng, Haibo

    2017-03-01

    High-performance electrochromic films based on tungsten oxide hydrate ([WO2(O2)H2O]·1.66H2O) colloidal nanocrystals with fast switching speed were fabricated by laser ablation in a mixture of water and hydrogen peroxide followed by electrophoretic methods. Through electrophoretic deposition, the nanoparticles in the colloids synthesized by laser ablation aggregated onto the FTO coated glass substrate forming a lager cell with a uniform size of around 200nm, which subsequently self-assembled into a porous tungsten oxide hydrate film. By optimizing the electrophoretic time (800s) and voltage (-0.5V), the mesh-like porous tungsten oxide hydrate film achieved a wide optical modulation of 32% at 632nm, fast coloration and bleaching response speed of 7.8 s and 1.7s respectively due to the synergetic effect of the unique atomic structure of [WO2(O2)H2O]·1.66H2O and porous structure with large surface area that facilitates the ion insertion/extraction. Thus the tungsten oxide hydrate can be a promising electrochromic material for practical applications.

  18. The oxidation of Fe-2 and 5 at.% Y alloys at 600--800 C in air

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, C.L. |; Rizzo, F.C.; Monteiro, M.J.; Wu, W.T.

    1999-06-01

    The oxidation of Fe-Y alloys containing 2 and 5 at.% Y and pure iron has been studied at 600--800 C in air. The oxidation of pure iron follows the parabolic rate law at all temperatures. The oxidation of Fe-Y alloys at 600 C approximately follows the parabolic rate law, but not at 700 and 800 C, where the oxidation goes through several stages with quite different rates. The oxide scales on Fe-2Y and Fe-5Y at 700 and 800 C are composed of external pure Fe oxides containing Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, and FeO, with FeO being the main oxide and an inner mixture of FeO and YFeO{sub 3}. The scales on Fe-2Y and Fe-5Y at 600 C consist of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, with a minor amount of FeO. Significant internal oxidation in both Fe-Y alloys occurred at all temperatures. The Y-containing oxides follow the distribution of the original intermetallic compound phase in the alloys. The effects of Y on the oxidation of pure Fe are discussed.

  19. Using metatranscriptomics to understand the roles of Fe(II)-oxidizing microbes in marine hydrothermal vents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glazer, B. T.; Mcallister, S.; Polson, S. W.; Chan, C. S. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Fe(II)-oxidizing microbes (FeOM) are thought to be key players in marine Fe cycling, particularly at hydrothermal vents. However, we do not have tools to track their activity, largely because we do not know the genes involved in neutrophilic chemolithotrophic Fe oxidation. Researchers have used gene homology between FeOM isolates to suggest several genes that may be involved in Fe(II) oxidation, including the Fe oxidase cyc2 found in the Zetaproteobacteria type strain Mariprofundus ferrooxydans, as well as all other known neutrophilic microaerophilic FeOM. Although many Zetaproteobacteria are found within natural Fe mats, close relatives of Fe(II)-oxidizing isolates are rarely present. Therefore, one goal of this study was to determine the activity of putative Fe(II) oxidation genes in dominant OTUs found in natural environments. We collected Fe mats from hydrothermal vents at Loihi Seamount, Hawaii, preserving RNA in situ. By analyzing metatranscriptomes of different Fe mat niches, we were able to determine the OTUs involved and the gene expression patterns associated with Fe(II) oxidation in the marine environment. Analysis of metatranscriptomic data confirms that the Zetaproteobacteria express the various genes necessary to support the Fe mat community through chemoautotrophic growth. Globally ubiquitous and even some rare species of the Zetaproteobacteria were active, with different relative abundances depending on Fe mat niches defined by fluid flow and geochemistry. Initial results show that genes thought to be involved in the electron transport pathway from Fe(II) to O2, including cyc2, are some of the most highly expressed genes in marine Fe microbial mats. Species-specific variants of these genes suggest that many of the Zetaproteobacteria species, spanning the breadth of the diversity of the class, are expressing genes necessary for Fe(II) oxidation within natural Fe mat niches. Understanding the differential expression of these genes in different niches

  20. Acid-tolerant microaerophilic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria promote Fe(III)-accumulation in a fen.

    PubMed

    Lüdecke, Claudia; Reiche, Marco; Eusterhues, Karin; Nietzsche, Sandor; Küsel, Kirsten

    2010-10-01

    The ecological importance of Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) at circumneutral pH is often masked in the presence of O(2) where rapid chemical oxidation of Fe(II) predominates. This study addresses the abundance, diversity and activity of microaerophilic FeOB in an acidic fen (pH ∼ 5) located in northern Bavaria, Germany. Mean O(2) penetration depth reached 16 cm where the highest dissolved Fe(II) concentrations (up to 140 µM) were present in soil water. Acid-tolerant FeOB cultivated in gradient tubes were most abundant (10(6) cells g(-1) peat) at the 10-20 cm depth interval. A stable enrichment culture was active at up to 29% O(2) saturation and Fe(III) accumulated 1.6 times faster than in abiotic controls. An acid-tolerant, microaerophilic isolate (strain CL21) was obtained which was closely related to the neutrophilic, lithoautotrophic FeOB Sideroxydans lithotrophicus strain LD-1. CL21 oxidized Fe(II) between pH 4 and 6.0, and produced nanoscale-goethites with a clearly lower mean coherence length (7 nm) perpendicular to the (110) plane than those formed abiotically (10 nm). Our results suggest that an acid-tolerant population of FeOB is thriving at redox interfaces formed by diffusion-limited O(2) transport in acidic peatlands. Furthermore, this well-adapted population is successfully competing with chemical oxidation and thereby playing an important role in the microbial iron cycle.

  1. Role for Fe(III) minerals in nitrate-dependent microbial U(IV) oxidation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senko, John M.; Mohamed, Yasser; Dewers , Thomas A.; Krumholz, Lee R.

    2005-01-01

    Microbiological reduction of soluble U(VI) to insoluble U(IV) is a means of preventing the migration of that element in groundwater, but the presence of nitrate in U(IV)-containing sediments leads to U(IV) oxidation and remobilizaton. Nitrite or iron(III) oxyhydroxides may oxidize U(IV) under nitrate-reducing conditions, and we determined the rate and extent of U(IV) oxidation by these compounds. Fe(III) oxidized U(IV) at a greater rate than nitrite (130 and 10 μM U(IV)/day, respectively). In aquifer sediments, Fe(III) may be produced during microbial nitrate reduction by oxidation of Fe(II) with nitrite, or by enzymatic Fe(II) oxidation coupled to nitrate reduction. To determine which of these mechanisms was dominant, we isolated a nitrate-dependent acetate- and Fe(II)-oxidizing bacterium from a U(VI)- and nitrate-contaminated aquifer. This organism oxidized U(IV) at a greater rate and to a greater extent under acetate-oxidizing (where nitrite accumulated to 50 mM) than under Fe(II)-oxidizing conditions. We show that the observed differences in rate and extent of U(IV) oxidation are due to mineralogical differences between Fe(III) produced by reaction of Fe(II) with nitrite (amorphous) and Fe(III) produced enzymatically (goethite or lepidocrocite). Our results suggest the mineralogy and surface area of Fe(III) minerals produced under nitrate-reducing conditions affect the rate and extent of U(IV) oxidation. These results may be useful for predicting the stability of U(IV) in aquifers.

  2. Control of the permeability loss-peak frequency of Ni81Fe19 thin films through laser ablation of triangular and square cluster geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimes, C. A.; Lumpp, J. K.

    2000-01-01

    Laser ablation arrays of triangular and square shaped clusters, comprised of 23 micrometers diam circular holes, are defined upon 100 nm thick Ni81Fe19 films used to control the rf permeability spectra. Cluster-to-cluster spacing is varied from 200 to 600 micrometers. For each geometry it is found that the loss peak frequency and permeability magnitude shift lower, in a step-wise fashion, at a cluster-to-cluster spacing between 275 and 300 micrometers. The nonlinear shift in the behavior of the permeability spectra correlates with a dramatic increase in domain wall density. c2000 American Institute of Physics.

  3. Nd:YVO4 laser direct ablation of indium tin oxide films deposited on glass and polyethylene terephthalate substrates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-Xun; Kwon, Sang Jik; Han, Jae-Hee; Cho, Eou Sik

    2013-09-01

    A Q-switched diode-pumped neodymium-doped yttrium vanadate (Nd:YVO4, lambda = 1064 nm) laser was applied to obtain the indium tin oxide (ITO) patterns on flexible polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate by a direct etching method. After the ITO films were deposited on a soda-lime glass and PET substrate, laser ablations were carried out on the ITO films for various conditions and the laser ablated results on the ITO films were investigated and analyzed considering the effects of substrates on the laser etching. The laser ablated widths on ITO deposited on glass were found to be much narrower than those on ITO deposited on PET substrate, especially, at a higher scanning speed of laser beam such as 1000 mm/s and 2000 mm/s. As the thermal conductivity of glass substrate is about 7.5 times higher than that of PET, more thermal energy would be spread and transferred to lateral direction in the ITO film in case of PET substrate.

  4. Reduced graphene oxide decorated with Fe doped SnO2 nanoparticles for humidity sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toloman, D.; Popa, A.; Stan, M.; Socaci, C.; Biris, A. R.; Katona, G.; Tudorache, F.; Petrila, I.; Iacomi, F.

    2017-04-01

    Reduced graphene oxide (rGO) decorated with Fe doped SnO2 nanoparticles were fabricated via the electrostatic interaction between positively charged modified Fe-doped SnO2 oxide and negatively charged graphene oxide (GO) in the presence of poly(allylamine) hydrochloride (PAH). The decoration of rGO layers with SnO2:Fe nanoparticles was highlited by TEM microsopy. For composite sample the diffraction patterns coincide well with those of SnO2:Fe nanoparticles. The reduction of graphene oxide was evidenced using XRD and FT-IR spectroscopy. The formation of SnO2:Fe-PAH-graphene composites was confirmed by FT-IR, Raman and EPR spectroscopy. Sensitivity tests for relative humidity (RH) measurements were carried out at five different concentrations of humid air at room temperature. The prepared composite sensor exhibited a higher sensing response as compared with Fe:SnO2 nanoparticles.

  5. High-valent iron (Fe(VI), Fe(V), and Fe(IV)) species in water: characterization and oxidative transformation of estrogenic hormones.

    PubMed

    MachalováŠišková, Karolína; Jančula, Daniel; Drahoš, Bohuslav; Machala, Libor; Babica, Pavel; Alonso, Paula Godoy; Trávníček, Zdeněk; Tuček, Jiří; Maršálek, Blahoslav; Sharma, Virender K; Zbořil, Radek

    2016-07-28

    This paper presents solid state synthesis and characterization of tetra-oxy iron(iv) and iron(v) species in their salt forms (Na4FeO4-Fe(IV) and K3FeO4-Fe(V)). Stability of the synthesized salts, commonly called ferrates, in water was determined by applying the (57)Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy technique. Within 2 s in water, Fe(IV) converted into Fe(III) while Fe(V) transformed into Fe(VI) and Fe(III) at pH = 8.2. Comparatively, Fe(VI) (bought as K2FeO4) remained stable in aqueous solution during the short time period. The oxidative removal efficiency of the high-valent iron species was then tested against five environmentally important estrogenic hormones (estron (E1), 17-β-estradiol (E2), estriol (E3), 17-α-ethinylestradiol (EE2), and diethylstibestrol (DES)) in effluent water of a wastewater treatment plant. Three dosages of iron species (1, 10, and 100 mg L(-1)) were applied to the effluent water. An increase in the concentration of dosages enhanced the removal of estrogens. Both Fe(V) and Fe(VI) were effective in degrading estrogens, but Fe(IV) showed limited oxidation capacity to transform estrogens. The oxidized products of the estrogens were analyzed using Raman spectroscopy and high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) techniques. Results demonstrated the transformation of estrogens into low molecular weight oxygenated compounds such as quinone-like and opened-aromatic ring species. A detailed study on E1 by using excess Fe(VI) showed the mineralization of the parent compound. The results demonstrate great potential of high-valent iron species in the degradation of endocrine disruptor chemicals like estrogens with several superior aspects including fast reactions, complete degradation and/or formation of benign organic species, and environmentally-acceptable iron oxide by-products.

  6. Growth of Pseudomonas mendocina on Fe(III) (Hydr)Oxides

    PubMed Central

    Hersman, L. E.; Forsythe, J. H.; Ticknor, L. O.; Maurice, P. A.

    2001-01-01

    Although iron (Fe) is an essential element for almost all living organisms, little is known regarding its acquisition from the insoluble Fe(III) (hydr)oxides in aerobic environments. In this study a strict aerobe, Pseudomonas mendocina, was grown in batch culture with hematite, goethite, or ferrihydrite as a source of Fe. P. mendocina obtained Fe from these minerals in the following order: goethite > hematite > ferrihydrite. Furthermore, Fe release from each of the minerals appears to have occurred in excess, as evidenced by the growth of P. mendocina in the medium above that of the insoluble Fe(III) (hydr)oxide aggregates, and this release was independent of the mineral's surface area. These results demonstrate that an aerobic microorganism was able to obtain Fe for growth from several insoluble Fe minerals and did so with various growth rates. PMID:11571141

  7. Oxidation kinetics of Fe(II) in sea water

    SciTech Connect

    Millero, F.J.; Sotolongo, S.; Izaguirre, M.

    1987-04-01

    The oxidation of Fe(II) has been studied as a function of pH (5 to 9), temperature (5 to 45/sup 0/C), and salinity (0 to 35). The pseudo-first-order rate constant, k/sub 1/, in water and sea water was found to be a second degree function of pH over the pH range of 7.5 to 8.5 at 5/sup 0/C and 6.0 to 8.0 at 25/sup 0/C. The overall rate constant (k) was determined from 5 to 45/sup 0/C and S = 0 to 35. The results have been fit to an equation of the form with a standard error = 0.09. The energy of activation for the overall rate constant in water and sea water was 29 +/- 2 kJ mol/sup -1/. The equations are provided with this paper. The values of the rate constant for pure water (k/sub 0/) are in good agreement with literature data. The half times for sea water from some previous studies at a pH = 8.0 were slower than the authors results for Gulf Stream waters. Measurements on Biscayne Bay waters also yield slower half times apparently due to the presence of organic ligands that can complex Fe(II).

  8. Protection of Nitrate-Reducing Fe(II)-Oxidizing Bacteria from UV Radiation by Biogenic Fe(III) Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauger, Tina; Konhauser, Kurt; Kappler, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Due to the lack of an ozone layer in the Archean, ultraviolet radiation (UVR) reached early Earth's surface almost unattenuated; as a consequence, a terrestrial biosphere in the form of biological soil crusts would have been highly susceptible to lethal doses of irradiation. However, a self-produced external screen in the form of nanoparticular Fe(III) minerals could have effectively protected those early microorganisms. In this study, we use viability studies by quantifying colony-forming units (CFUs), as well as Fe(II) oxidation and nitrate reduction rates, to show that encrustation in biogenic and abiogenic Fe(III) minerals can protect a common soil bacteria such as the nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizing microorganisms Acidovorax sp. strain BoFeN1 and strain 2AN from harmful UVC radiation. Analysis of DNA damage by quantifying cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) confirmed the protecting effect by Fe(III) minerals. This study suggests that Fe(II)-oxidizing microorganisms, as would have grown in association with mafic and ultramafic soils/outcrops, would have been able to produce their own UV screen, enabling them to live in terrestrial habitats on early Earth.

  9. Requirement for a microbial consortium to completely oxidize glucose in Fe(III)- reducing sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovley, D.R.; Phillips, E.J.P.

    1989-01-01

    In various sediments in which Fe(III) reduction was the terminal electron-accepting process, [14C]glucose was fermented to 14C-fatty acids in a manner similar to that observed in methanogenic sediments. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that, in Fe(III)-reducing sediments, fermentable substrates are oxidized to carbon dioxide by the combined activity of fermentative bacteria and fatty acid-oxidizing, Fe(III)-reducing bacteria.

  10. Iron oxidation in Mops buffer. Effect of EDTA, hydrogen peroxide and FeCl3.

    PubMed

    Tadolini, B

    1987-01-01

    The effect of EDTA and H2O2 on iron autoxidation in Mops buffer depends on the pH of the solution. At acidic pH, EDTA caused the oxidation of a stoichiometric amount of iron. At neutral and alkaline pH, EDTA and H2O2 not only oxidizes a stoichiometric amount of iron but also causes the oxidation of the Fe2+ exceeding the concentration of these compounds. In the presence of EDTA, oxidation of Fe2+ in exceeding the concentration of these compounds has a shorter lag phase and an increased rate compared with that in the absence. The solution develops a yellow colour whose intensity is proportional to the amount of Fe2+ exceeding the concentration of these compounds in solution. When the reaction is conducted in the presence of NBT, formazan formation is greatly reduced compared to the control without EDTA and H2O2. The Fe3+-EDTA complex and Fe3+ affected iron oxidation, development of the yellow colour and NBT reduction in a similar fashion. In all these experimental conditions, iron oxidation is greatly reduced in the presence of mannitol, sorbitol and catalase. In phosphate buffer, EDTA oxidized a stoichiometric amount of iron without affecting free Fe2+ oxidation. Fe3+ has no effect on iron oxidation in this buffer.

  11. Precious metal enrichment at low-redox in terrestrial native Fe-bearing basalts investigated using laser-ablation ICP-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howarth, Geoffrey H.; Day, James M. D.; Pernet-Fisher, John F.; Goodrich, Cyrena A.; Pearson, D. Graham; Luo, Yan; Ryabov, Viktor V.; Taylor, Lawrence A.

    2017-04-01

    Primary native Fe is a rare crystallizing phase from terrestrial basaltic magmas, requiring highly reducing conditions (fO2 Fe alloy liquid. If this liquid also contains sufficient sulfur, it can undergo further division into conjugate Fe-C-rich and a Fe-S-rich immiscible melts that can effectively scavenge the highly siderophile elements (HSE: Re, Au, and the platinum group elements [PGE], Pd, Pt, Rh, Ru, Ir, Os), as well as Ni and Cu, to economic abundances. Three localities are known globally where native Fe bearing mafic rocks occur: (1) Paleocene basalts of Disko Island, West Greenland; (2) a Miocene lava of the Bühl basalts, Germany; and (3) mafic intrusions associated with the Late Permian Siberian flood basalts. In this contribution, we report major- and minor-element compositions and HSE concentrations for the main alloy phases (FeNi metal and cohenite) and sulfide, for all three known global occurrences of native Fe bearing basalt. Total HSE abundances in metal grains, obtained by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), are lowest in the Bühl basalt, (∼0.05 ppm), intermediate in the Disko Island basalts (4-8 ppm), and highest the Siberian Khungtukun and Dzhaltul intrusions (10-30 ppm). These differences demonstrate that, while native Fe formation is the result of carbonaceous crustal assimilation, HSE enrichment is not ubiquitous during this process. The Siberian occurrences are characterized by Pt PGE (PPGE: Pt, Pd) enrichment relative to the Ir PGE (IPGE: Rh, Ru, Ir, Os), consistent with models of early stage fractionation of olivine, chromite and metallic IPGE in staging magma reservoirs, prior to the addition of C-rich crustal materials in the shallow crust. Relative to Noril'sk Ni-Cu-PGE sulfide ores

  12. Dynamics of Oxidation of a Fe2+-Bearing Aluminosilicate (Basaltic) Melt

    PubMed

    Cooper; Fanselow; Weber; Merkley; Poker

    1996-11-15

    Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) and microscopy demonstrate that the approximately 1400°C oxidation of levitated droplets of a natural Fe2+-bearing aluminosilicate (basalt) melt occurs by chemical diffusion of Fe2+ and Ca2+ to the free surface of the droplet; internal oxidation of the melt results from the required counterflux of electron holes. Diffusion of an oxygen species is not required. Oxidation causes the droplets to go subsolidus; magnetite (Fe3O4) forms at the oxidation-solidification front with a morphology suggestive of a Liesegang-band nucleation process.

  13. Immobilization of Radionuclides and Heavy Metals through Anaerobic Bio-Oxidation of Fe(II)

    PubMed Central

    Lack, Joseph G.; Chaudhuri, Swades K.; Kelly, Shelly D.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; O'Connor, Susan M.; Coates, John D.

    2002-01-01

    Adsorption of heavy metals and radionuclides (HMR) onto iron and manganese oxides has long been recognized as an important reaction for the immobilization of these compounds. However, in environments containing elevated concentrations of these HMR the adsorptive capacity of the iron and manganese oxides may well be exceeded, and the HMR can migrate as soluble compounds in aqueous systems. Here we demonstrate the potential of a bioremediative strategy for HMR stabilization in reducing environments based on the recently described anaerobic nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation by Dechlorosoma species. Bio-oxidation of 10 mM Fe(II) and precipitation of Fe(III) oxides by these organisms resulted in rapid adsorption and removal of 55 μM uranium and 81 μM cobalt from solution. The adsorptive capacity of the biogenic Fe(III) oxides was lower than that of abiotically produced Fe(III) oxides (100 μM for both metals), which may have been a result of steric hindrance by the microbial cells on the iron oxide surfaces. The binding capacity of the biogenic oxides for different heavy metals was indirectly correlated to the atomic radius of the bound element. X-ray absorption spectroscopy indicated that the uranium was bound to the biogenically produced Fe(III) oxides as U(VI) and that the U(VI) formed bidentate and tridentate inner-sphere complexes with the Fe(III) oxide surfaces. Dechlorosoma suillum oxidation was specific for Fe(II), and the organism did not enzymatically oxidize U(IV) or Co(II). Small amounts (less than 2.5 μM) of Cr(III) were reoxidized by D. suillum; however, this appeared to be inversely dependent on the initial concentration of the Cr(III). The results of this study demonstrate the potential of this novel approach for stabilization and immobilization of HMR in the environment. PMID:12039723

  14. Solubilization of Fe(III) oxide-bound trace metals by a dissimilatory Fe(III) reducing bacterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Smith, Steven C.; Gassman, Paul L.

    2001-01-01

    Trace metals associate with Fe(III) oxides as adsorbed or coprecipitated species, and consequently, the biogeochemical cycles of iron and the trace metals are closely linked. This communication investigated the solubilization of coprecipitated Co(III) and Ni(II) from goethite (α-FeOOH) during dissimilatory bacterial iron reduction to provide insights on biogeochemical factors controlling trace-element fluxes in anoxic environments. Suspensions of homogeneously substituted Co-FeOOH (50 mmol/L as Co 0.01Fe 0.99OOH; 57Co-labeled) in eight different buffer/media solutions were inoculated with a facultative, metal-reducing bacteria isolated from groundwater ( Shewanella putrefacians CN32), and incubated under strictly anaerobic conditions for periods up to 32 days. Lactate (30 mmol/L) was provided as an electron donor. Growth and non-growth promoting conditions were established by adding or withholding PO 4 and/or trace metals ( 60Co-labeled) from the incubation media. Anthraquinone disulfonate (AQDS; 100 μmol/L) was added to most suspensions as an electron shuttle to enhance bacterial reduction. Solutions were buffered at circumneutral pH with either PIPES or bicarbonate buffers. Solid and liquid samples were analyzed at intermediate and final time points for aqueous and sorbed/precipitated (by HCl extraction) Fe(II) and Co(II). The bioreduced solids were analyzed by X-ray diffraction and field-emission electron microscopy at experiment termination. Ni-FeOOH (Ni 0.01Fe 0.99OOH) was used for comparison in select experiments. Up to 45% of the metal containing FeOOH was bioreduced; growth-supporting conditions did not enhance reduction. The biogenic Fe(II) strongly associated with the residual Fe(III) oxide as an undefined sorbed phase at low fractional reduction in PIPES buffer, and as siderite (FeCO 3) in bicarbonate buffer or as vivianite [Fe 3(PO 4) 2 · 8H 2O] when P was present. Cobalt(III) was reduced to Co(II) in proportion to its mole ratio in the solid. The

  15. Hydrophilic molybdenum oxide nanomaterials with controlled morphology and strong plasmonic absorption for photothermal ablation of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Guosheng; Shen, Jia; Jiang, Feiran; Hu, Ronggui; Li, Wenyao; An, Lei; Zou, Rujia; Chen, Zhigang; Qin, Zongyi; Hu, Junqing

    2014-03-26

    The molybdenum oxide nanosheets have shown strong localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) absorption in the near-infrared (NIR) region. However, the long alky chains of ligands made them hydrophobic and less biocompatible. To meet the requirements of molybdenum based nanomaterials for use as a future photothermal therapy, a simple hydrothermal route has been developed for hydrophilic molybdenum oxide nanospheres and nanoribbons using a molybdenum precursor and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). First, molybdenum oxide nanomaterials prepared in the presence of PEG exhibit strong localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) absorption in near-infrared (NIR) region, compared with that of no PEG. Second, elevation of synthetic temperature leads to a gradual transformation of molybdenum oxide nanospheres into nanoribbons, entailing the evolution of an intense LSPR absorption in the NIR region. Third, as-prepared molybdenum oxide nanomaterials coated with PEG possess a hydrophilic property and thus can be directly used for biological applications without additional post treatments. Moreover, molybdenum oxide nanoribbons as a model of photothermal materials can efficiently convert the 980 nm wavelength laser energy into heat energy, and this localized hyperthermia produces the effective thermal ablation of cancer cells, meaning a potential photothermal material.

  16. Effect of dissolved organic matter on Fe(II) oxidation in natural and engineered waters.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ying Ping; Fujii, Manabu; Terao, Koumei; Kikuchi, Tetsuro; Yoshimura, Chihiro

    2016-10-15

    Fe(II) oxidation was investigated in samples from the Sagami River basin (Japan) with particular emphasis on the effect of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in an urban river system. Collected samples consisted of main stream and tributary waters impacted to a moderate and minor extent by anthropogenic activities, respectively, and treated effluents from adjacent municipal wastewater treatment plants (MWWTPs: as representative anthropogenic point source). Nanomolar Fe(II) oxidation was measured in air-saturated waters using luminol chemiluminescence in the dark at 25 °C. Second-order rate constant for Fe(II) oxidation (with respect to Fe(II) and O2 concentrations) showed spatial and temporal variation. Annual average of the rate constant was highest for MWWTP effluents, followed by reservoir and river waters, with tributary waters showing the lowest oxidation rate. Manipulation experiments indicated that, in addition to pH (7.8-8.4), DOM characteristics are important explanatory variable for the Fe(II) oxidation. For example, the addition of MWWTP-derived humic-type DOM to anthropogenically less-influenced tributary water resulted in substantial increase in the oxidation rate. Significant negative correlation observed between the specific UV absorbance (SUVA254) and Fe(II) oxidation rate constant (pH 8.0) suggests a potential effect of humic-type DOM with low SUVA254 (high aliphatic content) on Fe(II) oxidation in natural and engineered waters.

  17. Fe(III) oxides accelerate microbial nitrate reduction and electricity generation by Klebsiella pneumoniae L17.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tongxu; Li, Xiaomin; Zhang, Wei; Hu, Min; Li, Fangbai

    2014-06-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae L17 is a fermentative bacterium that can reduce iron oxide and generate electricity under anoxic conditions, as previously reported. This study reveals that K. pneumoniae L17 is also capable of dissimilatory nitrate reduction, producing NO2(-), NH4(+), NO and N2O under anoxic conditions. The presence of Fe(III) oxides (i.e., α-FeOOH, γ-FeOOH, α-Fe2O3 and γ-Fe2O3) significantly accelerates the reduction of nitrate and generation of electricity by K. pneumoniae L17, which is similar to a previous report regarding another fermentative bacterium, Bacillus. No significant nitrate reduction was observed upon treatment with Fe(2+) or α-FeOOH+Fe(2+), but a slight facilitation of nitrate reduction and electricity generation was observed upon treatment with L17+Fe(2+). This result suggests that aqueous Fe(II) or mineral-adsorbed Fe(II) cannot reduce nitrate abiotically but that L17 can catalyze the reduction of nitrate and generation of electricity in the presence of Fe(II) (which might exist as cell surface-bound Fe(II)). To rule out the potential effect of Fe(II) produced by L17 during microbial iron reduction, treatments with the addition of TiO2 or Al2O3 instead of Fe(III) oxides also exhibited accelerated microbial nitrate reduction and electricity generation, indicating that cell-mineral sorption did account for the acceleration effect. However, the acceleration caused by Fe(III) oxides is only partially attributed to the cell surface-bound Fe(II) and cell-mineral sorption but may be driven by the iron oxide conduction band-mediated electron transfer from L17 to nitrate or an electrode, as proposed previously. The current study extends the diversity of bacteria of which nitrate reduction and electricity generation can be facilitated by the presence of iron oxides and confirms the positive role of Fe(III) oxides on microbial nitrate reduction and electricity generation by particular fermentative bacteria in anoxic environments.

  18. Elemental Mercury Oxidation over Fe-Ti-Mn Spinel: Performance, Mechanism, and Reaction Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Shangchao; Xiao, Xin; Huang, Nan; Dang, Hao; Liao, Yong; Zou, Sijie; Yang, Shijian

    2017-01-03

    The design of a high-performance catalyst for Hg(0) oxidation and predicting the extent of Hg(0) oxidation are both extremely limited due to the uncertainties of the reaction mechanism and the reaction kinetics. In this work, Fe-Ti-Mn spinel was developed as a high-performance catalyst for Hg(0) oxidation, and the reaction mechanism and the reaction kinetics of Hg(0) oxidation over Fe-Ti-Mn spinel were studied. The reaction orders of Hg(0) oxidation over Fe-Ti-Mn spinel with respect to gaseous Hg(0) concentration and gaseous HCl concentration were approximately 1 and 0, respectively. Therefore, Hg(0) oxidation over Fe-Ti-Mn spinel mainly followed the Eley-Rideal mechanism (i.e., the reaction of gaseous Hg(0) with adsorbed HCl), and the rate of Hg(0) oxidation mainly depended on Cl(•) concentration on the surface. As H2O, SO2, and NO not only inhibited Cl(•) formation on the surface but also interfered with the interface reaction between gaseous Hg(0) and Cl(•) on the surface, Hg(0) oxidation over Fe-Ti-Mn spinel was obviously inhibited in the presence of H2O, SO2, and NO. Furthermore, the extent of Hg(0) oxidation over Fe-Ti-Mn spinel can be predicted according to the kinetic parameter kE-R, and the predicted result was consistent with the experimental result.

  19. Microstructure and oxygen evolution of Fe-Ce mixed oxides by redox treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kongzhai; Haneda, Masaaki; Ning, Peihong; Wang, Hua; Ozawa, Masakuni

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between structure and reduction/redox properties of Fe-Ce mixed oxides with a Fe content of 5, 10, 20 or 30 mol%, prepared by a coprecipitation method, were investigated by XRD, Raman, TEM, TPR and TPO techniques. It is found that all the iron ions can be incorporated into the ceria lattice to form a solid solution for the FeCe 5 (Fe 5%) sample, but amorphous or crystal Fe2O3 particles were found to be present on the Fe-Ce oxide samples with higher the iron content. The reducibility of single solid solution was much better than the pure CeO2, and the appearance of dispersed Fe2O3 particles improved the surface reducibility of materials. The iron ions incorporated into the CeO2 lattice accelerated the oxygen release from bulk to surface, and surface Fe2O3 particles in close contact to CeO2 acted as a catalyst for the reaction between solid solution and hydrogen. The microstructure of exposed Fe2O3 with Ce-Fe-O solid solution allows the Fe-Ce mixed oxides to own good reducibility and high OSC, which also counteracts the deactivation of the reducibility resulting from the sintering of materials in the redox cycling.

  20. Oxidation Resistant Ti-Al-Fe Diffusion Barrier for FeCrAlY Coatings on Titanium Aluminides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brady, Michael P. (Inventor); Smialke, James L. (Inventor); Brindley, William J. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A diffusion barrier to help protect titanium aluminide alloys, including the coated alloys of the TiAl gamma + Ti3Al (alpha2) class, from oxidative attack and interstitial embrittlement at temperatures up to at least 1000 C is disclosed. The coating may comprise FeCrAlX alloys. The diffusion barrier comprises titanium, aluminum, and iron in the following approximate atomic percent: Ti-(50-55)Al-(9-20)Fe. This alloy is also suitable as an oxidative or structural coating for such substrates.

  1. Zeta-Fe2O3 - A new stable polymorph in iron(III) oxide family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuček, Jiří; Machala, Libor; Ono, Shigeaki; Namai, Asuka; Yoshikiyo, Marie; Imoto, Kenta; Tokoro, Hiroko; Ohkoshi, Shin-Ichi; Zbořil, Radek

    2015-10-01

    Iron(III) oxide shows a polymorphism, characteristic of existence of phases with the same chemical composition but distinct crystal structures and, hence, physical properties. Four crystalline phases of iron(III) oxide have previously been identified: α-Fe2O3 (hematite), β-Fe2O3, γ-Fe2O3 (maghemite), and ɛ-Fe2O3. All four iron(III) oxide phases easily undergo various phase transformations in response to heating or pressure treatment, usually forming hexagonal α-Fe2O3, which is the most thermodynamically stable Fe2O3 polymorph under ambient conditions. Here, from synchrotron X-ray diffraction experiments, we report the formation of a new iron(III) oxide polymorph that we have termed ζ-Fe2O3 and which evolved during pressure treatment of cubic β-Fe2O3 ( space group) at pressures above 30 GPa. Importantly, ζ-Fe2O3 is maintained after pressure release and represents the first monoclinic Fe2O3 polymorph (I2/a space group) that is stable at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. ζ-Fe2O3 behaves as an antiferromagnet with a Néel transition temperature of ~69 K. The complex mechanism of pressure-induced transformation of β-Fe2O3, involving also the formation of Rh2O3-II-type Fe2O3 and post-perovskite-Fe2O3 structure, is suggested and discussed with respect to a bimodal size distribution of precursor nanoparticles.

  2. Influence of Fe(2+)-catalysed iron oxide recrystallization on metal cycling.

    PubMed

    Latta, Drew E; Gorski, Christopher A; Scherer, Michelle M

    2012-12-01

    Recent work has indicated that iron (oxyhydr-)oxides are capable of structurally incorporating and releasing metals and nutrients as a result of Fe2+-induced iron oxide recrystallization. In the present paper, we briefly review the current literature examining the mechanisms by which iron oxides recrystallize and summarize how recrystallization affects metal incorporation and release. We also provide new experimental evidence for the Fe2+-induced release of structural manganese from manganese-doped goethite. Currently, the exact mechanism(s) for Fe2+-induced recrystallization remain elusive, although they are likely to be both oxide-and metal-dependent. We conclude by discussing some future research directions for Fe2+-catalysed iron oxide recrystallization.

  3. Analysis of long-term bacterial vs. chemical Fe(III) oxide reduction kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roden, Eric E.

    2004-08-01

    Data from studies of dissimilatory bacterial (10 8 cells mL -1 of Shewanella putrefaciens strain CN32, pH 6.8) and ascorbate (10 mM, pH 3.0) reduction of two synthetic Fe(III) oxide coated sands and three natural Fe(III) oxide-bearing subsurface materials (all at ca. 10 mmol Fe(III) L -1) were analyzed in relation to a generalized rate law for mineral dissolution (J t/m 0 = k'(m/m 0) γ, where J t is the rate of dissolution and/or reduction at time t, m 0 is the initial mass of oxide, and m/m 0 is the unreduced or undissolved mineral fraction) in order to evaluate changes in the apparent reactivity of Fe(III) oxides during long-term biological vs. chemical reduction. The natural Fe(III) oxide assemblages demonstrated larger changes in reactivity (higher γ values in the generalized rate law) compared to the synthetic oxides during long-term abiotic reductive dissolution. No such relationship was evident in the bacterial reduction experiments, in which temporal changes in the apparent reactivity of the natural and synthetic oxides were far greater (5-10 fold higher γ values) than in the abiotic reduction experiments. Kinetic and thermodynamic considerations indicated that neither the abundance of electron donor (lactate) nor the accumulation of aqueous end-products of oxide reduction (Fe(II), acetate, dissolved inorganic carbon) are likely to have posed significant limitations on the long-term kinetics of oxide reduction. Rather, accumulation of biogenic Fe(II) on residual oxide surfaces appeared to play a dominant role in governing the long-term kinetics of bacterial crystalline Fe(III) oxide reduction. The experimental findings together with numerical simulations support a conceptual model of bacterial Fe(III) oxide reduction kinetics that differs fundamentally from established models of abiotic Fe(III) oxide reductive dissolution, and indicate that information on Fe(III) oxide reactivity gained through abiotic reductive dissolution techniques cannot be used to

  4. Biomineralization by a Newly-Isolated Stalk-Forming Fe-oxidizing Bacterium: Towards Interpretation of Putative Fe Microfossils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krepski, S. T.; Chan, C. S.

    2010-12-01

    Diverse aerobic, lithotrophic Fe-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) produce distinctive extracellular Fe-rich filaments, which resemble putative Fe microfossils dating from recent to 1.7 Ga (Slack et al., 2007, EPSL: 243). The filament morphology, texture, and composition are promising biosignatures for these FeOB; however, somewhat similar morphologies have been shown to result from chemical precipitates. In order to accurately identify and interpret such biosignatures, morphology must described in detail and be linked to physiological function and growth conditions in extant organisms. Towards this goal, we aimed to isolate a novel, stalk-forming microaerophilic FeOB, since there exist few isolates. We successfully obtained a pure strain (named R-1) from a circumneutral, freshwater Fe seep in Christiana Creek, Newark, DE. This strain produces a twisted stalk, similar to Gallionella and Mariprofundus in morphology and in mineralogy. Our work shows that R-1 is a neutrophilic obligate FeOB, unable to oxidize other organic or inorganic substrates. It is a Beta-Proteobacterium in the Gallionellaceae family but is phylogenetically distinct from previously isolated Gallionella sp. and Sideroxydans sp. The closest cultured relative is S. lithotrophicus (97% similar) and the closest environmental clone is 98% similar. We have begun growing R-1 and the marine stalk-forming FeOB Mariprofundus ferrooxydans in microslide cultures, which allow direct microscope observation without disturbing growth. We are monitoring oxygen concentration gradients and FeOB response to oxygen levels. In order to link morphology to biological function and growth conditions, we will observe stalk formation under various conditions and document various morphological and textural parameter (e.g. branching and orientation) to establish criteria for biogenicity. No organisms are known to make stalks under anaerobic conditions, so if these structures are detected in the rock record, they could be used as

  5. oxide and FeNi alloy: product dependence on the reduction ability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jungang; Qin, Yuyang; Li, Minglun; Zhao, Shuyuan; Li, Jianjun

    2014-12-01

    Based on the sol-gel combustion method, stoichiometric Fe3+, Mn2+, Ni2+ ions and citric acid were chosen as the initial reactants for the preparation of magnetic particles. Due to the different reduction ability of metal ions, completely different magnetic products (MnFe2O4 oxide and FeNi alloy) were obtained by heating the flakes at 600 °C under nitrogen atmosphere. MnFe2O4 particles exhibit superparamagnetic behavior at room temperature, and martensitic phase transformation is observed magnetically at 125 K for FeNi alloy particles.

  6. Fabrication of FePt networks by porous anodic aluminum oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yen-Chun; Hsiao, Ju-Cheng; Liu, I.-Yun; Wang, Liang-Wei; Liao, Jung-Wei; Lai, Chih-Huang

    2012-04-01

    It is demonstrated that the large-area FePt network nanostructures with strong perpendicular anisotropy can be obtained by growing the mask of porous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) directly on the L10-FePt films and subsequent plasma etching. The aspect ratio of the AAO mask is critical to achieve well-organized FePt networks. The out-of-plane coercivity of FePt networks is enhanced by 20% compared to that of the FePt film, due to the domain wall pinning effects imposed by the presence of pores.

  7. Microbial Fe(III) oxide reduction potential in Chocolate Pots hot spring, Yellowstone National Park.

    PubMed

    Fortney, N W; He, S; Converse, B J; Beard, B L; Johnson, C M; Boyd, E S; Roden, E E

    2016-05-01

    Chocolate Pots hot springs (CP) is a unique, circumneutral pH, iron-rich, geothermal feature in Yellowstone National Park. Prior research at CP has focused on photosynthetically driven Fe(II) oxidation as a model for mineralization of microbial mats and deposition of Archean banded iron formations. However, geochemical and stable Fe isotopic data have suggested that dissimilatory microbial iron reduction (DIR) may be active within CP deposits. In this study, the potential for microbial reduction of native CP Fe(III) oxides was investigated, using a combination of cultivation dependent and independent approaches, to assess the potential involvement of DIR in Fe redox cycling and associated stable Fe isotope fractionation in the CP hot springs. Endogenous microbial communities were able to reduce native CP Fe(III) oxides, as documented by most probable number enumerations and enrichment culture studies. Enrichment cultures demonstrated sustained DIR driven by oxidation of acetate, lactate, and H2 . Inhibitor studies and molecular analyses indicate that sulfate reduction did not contribute to observed rates of DIR in the enrichment cultures through abiotic reaction pathways. Enrichment cultures produced isotopically light Fe(II) during DIR relative to the bulk solid-phase Fe(III) oxides. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes from enrichment cultures showed dominant sequences closely affiliated with Geobacter metallireducens, a mesophilic Fe(III) oxide reducer. Shotgun metagenomic analysis of enrichment cultures confirmed the presence of a dominant G. metallireducens-like population and other less dominant populations from the phylum Ignavibacteriae, which appear to be capable of DIR. Gene (protein) searches revealed the presence of heat-shock proteins that may be involved in increased thermotolerance in the organisms present in the enrichments as well as porin-cytochrome complexes previously shown to be involved in extracellular electron transport. This analysis offers

  8. High longitudinal relaxivity of ultra-small gadolinium oxide prepared by microsecond laser ablation in diethylene glycol

    SciTech Connect

    Luo Ningqi; Xiao Jun; Hu Wenyong; Chen Dihu; Tian Xiumei; Yang Chuan; Li Li

    2013-04-28

    Ultra-small gadolinium oxide (Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}) can be used as T{sub 1}-weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) contrast agent own to its high longitudinal relaxivity (r{sub 1}) and has attracted intensive attention in these years. In this paper, ultra-small Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles of 3.8 nm in diameter have been successfully synthesized by a microsecond laser ablating a gadolinium (Gd) target in diethylene glycol (DEG). The growth inhibition effect induced by the large viscosity of DEG makes it possible to synthesize ultra-small Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} by laser ablation in DEG. The r{sub 1} value and T{sub 1}-weighted MR images are measured by a 3.0 T MRI spectroscope. The results show these nanoparticles with a high r{sub 1} value of 9.76 s{sup -1} mM{sup -1} to be good MRI contrast agents. We propose an explanation for the high r{sub 1} value of ultra-small Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} by considering the decreasing factor (surface to volume ratio of the nanoparticles, S/V) and the increasing factor (water hydration number of the Gd{sup 3+} on Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} surface, q), which offer a new look into the relaxivity studies of MRI contrast agents. Our research provides a new approach to preparing ultra-small Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} of high r{sub 1} value by laser ablation in DEG and develops the understanding of high relaxivity of ultra-small Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} MRI contrast agents.

  9. Metastable alloy nanoparticles, metal-oxide nanocrescents and nanoshells generated by laser ablation in liquid solution: influence of the chemical environment on structure and composition.

    PubMed

    Scaramuzza, Stefano; Agnoli, Stefano; Amendola, Vincenzo

    2015-11-14

    Alloy nanoparticles are characterized by the combination of multiple interesting properties, which are attractive for technological and scientific purposes. A frontier topic of this field is nanoalloys with compositions not thermodynamically allowed at ordinary temperature and pressure (i.e. metastable), because they require out-of-equilibrium synthetic approaches. Recently, laser ablation synthesis in solution (LASiS) was successfully applied for the realization of metastable nanoalloys because of the fast kinetics of nanoparticle formation. However, the role played by the chemical environment on the final composition and structure of laser generated nanoalloys still has to be fully elucidated. Here, we investigated the influence of different synthetic conditions on the LASiS of metastable nanoalloys composed of Au and Fe, such as the use of water instead of ethanol, the bubbling of inert gases and the addition of a few vol% of H2O2 and H2O. The two elements showed different reactivity when LASiS was performed in water instead of ethanol, while minor effects were observed from bubbling pure gases such as N2, Ar and CO2 in the liquid solution. Moreover, the plasmonic response and the structure of the nanoalloys were sensibly modified by adding H2O2 to water. We also found that nanoparticle production is dramatically influenced just by adding 0.2% of H2O in ethanol. These results suggest that the formation of a cavitation bubble with long lifetime and large size during LASiS is useful for the preservation of the metastable alloy composition, whereas an oxidative environment hampers the formation of metastable alloy nanoparticles. Overall, by acting on the type of solvent and solutes, we were able to switch from a traditional synthetic approach for the composition of Au-Fe nanoalloys to one using a reactive environment, which gives unconventional structures such as metal@iron-oxide nanoshells and nanocrescents of oxide supported on metal nanospheres. These results

  10. The role of microaerophilic Fe-oxidizing micro-organisms in producing banded iron formations.

    PubMed

    Chan, C S; Emerson, D; Luther, G W

    2016-09-01

    Despite the historical and economic significance of banded iron formations (BIFs), we have yet to resolve the formation mechanisms. On modern Earth, neutrophilic microaerophilic Fe-oxidizing micro-organisms (FeOM) produce copious amounts of Fe oxyhydroxides, leading us to wonder whether similar organisms played a role in producing BIFs. To evaluate this, we review the current knowledge of modern microaerophilic FeOM in the context of BIF paleoenvironmental studies. In modern environments wherever Fe(II) and O2 co-exist, microaerophilic FeOM proliferate. These organisms grow in a variety of environments, including the marine water column redoxcline, which is where BIF precursor minerals likely formed. FeOM can grow across a range of O2 concentrations, measured as low as 2 μm to date, although lower concentrations have not been tested. While some extant FeOM can tolerate high O2 concentrations, many FeOM appear to prefer and thrive at low O2 concentrations (~3-25 μm). These are similar to the estimated dissolved O2 concentrations in the few hundred million years prior to the 'Great Oxidation Event' (GOE). We compare biotic and abiotic Fe oxidation kinetics in the presence of varying levels of O2 and show that microaerophilic FeOM contribute substantially to Fe oxidation, at rates fast enough to account for BIF deposition. Based on this synthesis, we propose that microaerophilic FeOM were capable of playing a significant role in depositing the largest, most well-known BIFs associated with the GOE, as well as afterward when global O2 levels increased.

  11. Constructing hierarchical interfaces: TiO2-supported PtFe-FeOx nanowires for room temperature CO oxidation

    DOE PAGES

    Zhu, Huiyuan; Wu, Zili; Dong, Su; ...

    2015-08-05

    This is a report of a facile approach to constructing catalytic active hierarchical interfaces in one-dimensional (1D) nanostructure, exemplified by the synthesis of TiO2-supported PtFe–FeOx nanowires (NWs). The hierarchical interface, constituting atomic level interactions between PtFe and FeOx within each NW and the interactions between NWs and support (TiO2), enables CO oxidation with 100% conversion at room temperature. We identify the role of the two interfaces by probing the CO oxidation reaction with isotopic labeling experiments. Both the oxygen atoms (Os) in FeOx and TiO2 participate in the initial CO oxidation, facilitating the reaction through a redox pathway. Moreover, themore » intact 1D structure leads to the high stability of the catalyst. After 30 h in the reaction stream, the PtFe–FeOx/TiO2 catalyst exhibits no activity decay. These results provide a general approach and new insights into the construction of hierarchical interfaces for advanced catalysis.« less

  12. Oxidation of Fe(110) in oxygen gas at 400 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldemo, Markus; Lundgren, Edvin; Weissenrieder, Jonas

    2016-02-01

    The initial oxidation of Fe(110) in oxygen gas at 400 °C beyond initial adsorbate structures has been studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, low-energy electron diffraction, and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Formation of several ordered phases of surface oxides is observed at oxygen coverages between approximately 2.3 and 3.5 oxygen atoms/Fe(110) surface atom. Initially, a FeO(111)-like film is formed with a parallelogram-shaped moiré pattern. It has two mirror domains that are formed symmetrically around the growth direction of a zigzag-shaped adsorbate structure. With increased local oxygen coverage, the moiré structure transforms into a ball-shaped form. Both these moiré structures have equal atomic stacking at the surface and equal apparent height in STM, suggesting oxygen ions diffusing into the film upon oxidation and that the oxide growth takes place at the iron-iron oxide interface. The FeO(111)-like film turns into a Fe3O4(111)-like film with a triangular bistable surface termination as the oxidation proceeds further. The FeO(111)-like film growth proceeds according to the Frank-van der Merwe mechanism while the Fe3O4(111)-like film grows according to the Stranski-Krastanov mechanism.

  13. Evidence for the Existence of Autotrophic Nitrate-Reducing Fe(II)-Oxidizing Bacteria in Marine Coastal Sediment.

    PubMed

    Laufer, Katja; Røy, Hans; Jørgensen, Bo Barker; Kappler, Andreas

    2016-10-15

    Nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizing microorganisms were described for the first time ca. 20 years ago. Most pure cultures of nitrate-reducing Fe(II) oxidizers can oxidize Fe(II) only under mixotrophic conditions, i.e., when an organic cosubstrate is provided. A small number of nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizing cultures have been proposed to grow autotrophically, but unambiguous evidence for autotrophy has not always been provided. Thus, it is still unclear whether or to what extent Fe(II) oxidation coupled to nitrate reduction is an enzymatically catalyzed and energy-yielding autotrophic process or whether Fe(II) is abiotically oxidized by nitrite from heterotrophic nitrate reduction. The aim of the present study was to find evidence for the existence of autotrophic nitrate-reducing Fe(II) oxidizers in coastal marine sediments. Microcosm incubations showed that with increasing incubation times, the stoichiometric ratio of reduced nitrate/oxidized Fe(II) [NO3(-)reduced/Fe(II)oxidized] decreased, indicating a decreasing contribution of heterotrophic denitrification and/or an increasing contribution of autotrophic nitrate-reducing Fe(II) oxidation over time. After incubations of sediment slurries for >10 weeks, nitrate-reducing activity ceased, although nitrate was still present. This suggests that heterotrophic nitrate reduction had ceased due to the depletion of readily available organic carbon. However, after the addition of Fe(II) to these batch incubation mixtures, the nitrate-reducing activity resumed, and Fe(II) was oxidized, indicating the activity of autotrophic nitrate-reducing Fe(II) oxidizers. The concurrent reduction of (14)C-labeled bicarbonate concentrations unambiguously proved that autotrophic C fixation occurred during Fe(II) oxidation and nitrate reduction. Our results clearly demonstrated that autotrophic nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria were present in the investigated coastal marine sediments.

  14. EPR and ENDOR studies of Fe(II) hemoproteins reduced and oxidized at 77 K.

    PubMed

    Davydov, Roman; Hoffman, Brian M

    2008-03-01

    gamma-irradiation of frozen solutions of Fe(II) hemoproteins at 77 K generates both electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) active singly reduced and oxidized heme centers trapped in the conformation of the Fe(II) precursors. The reduction products of pentacoordinate (S = 2) Fe(II) globins, peroxidases and cytochrome P450cam show EPR and electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) spectra characteristic of (3d 7) Fe(I) species. In addition, cryoreduced Fe(II) alpha-chains of hemoglobin and myoglobin exhibit an S = 3/2 spin state produced by antiferromagnetic coupling between a porphyrin anion radical and pentacoordinate (S = 2) Fe(II). The spectra of cryoreduced forms of Fe(II) hemoglobin alpha-chains and deoxymyoglobin reveal that the Fe(II) precursors adopt multiple conformational substates. Reduction of hexacoordinate Fe(II) cytochrome c and cytochrome b5 as well as carboxy complexes of deoxyglobins produces only Fe(II) porphyrin pi-anion radical species. The low-valent hemoprotein intermediates produced by cryoreduction convert to the Fe(II) states at T > 200 K. Cryogenerated Fe(III) cytochrome c and cytochrome b5 have spectra similar to these for the resting Fe(III) states, whereas the spectra of the products of cryooxidation of pentacoordinate Fe(II) globins and peroxidases are different. Cryooxidation of CO-Fe(II) globins generates Fe(III) hemes with quantum-mechanically admixed S = 3/2, 5/2 ground states. The trapped Fe(III) species relax to the equilibrium ferric states upon annealing at T > 190 K. Both cryooxidized and reduced centers provide very sensitive EPR/ENDOR structure probes of the EPR-silent Fe(II) state.

  15. An advanced Ni-Fe layered double hydroxide electrocatalyst for water oxidation.

    PubMed

    Gong, Ming; Li, Yanguang; Wang, Hailiang; Liang, Yongye; Wu, Justin Z; Zhou, Jigang; Wang, Jian; Regier, Tom; Wei, Fei; Dai, Hongjie

    2013-06-12

    Highly active, durable, and cost-effective electrocatalysts for water oxidation to evolve oxygen gas hold a key to a range of renewable energy solutions, including water-splitting and rechargeable metal-air batteries. Here, we report the synthesis of ultrathin nickel-iron layered double hydroxide (NiFe-LDH) nanoplates on mildly oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Incorporation of Fe into the nickel hydroxide induced the formation of NiFe-LDH. The crystalline NiFe-LDH phase in nanoplate form is found to be highly active for oxygen evolution reaction in alkaline solutions. For NiFe-LDH grown on a network of CNTs, the resulting NiFe-LDH/CNT complex exhibits higher electrocatalytic activity and stability for oxygen evolution than commercial precious metal Ir catalysts.

  16. Molecular orbital (SCF-X-α-SW) theory of Fe2+-Mn3+, Fe3+-Mn2+, and Fe3+-Mn3+ charge transfer and magnetic exchange in oxides and silicates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherman, David M.

    1990-01-01

    Metal-metal charge-transfer and magnetic exchange interactions have important effects on the optical spectra, crystal chemistry, and physics of minerals. Previous molecular orbital calculations have provided insight on the nature of Fe2+-Fe3+ and Fe2+-Ti4+ charge-transfer transitions in oxides and silicates. In this work, spin-unrestricted molecular orbital calculations on (FeMnO10) clusters are used to study the nature of magnetic exchange and electron delocalization (charge transfer) associated with Fe3+-Mn2+, Fe3+-Mn3+, and Fe2+-Mn3+ interactions in oxides and silicates. 

  17. Fe-doped ZnO nanoparticles: the oxidation number and local charge on iron, studied by 57Fe Mößbauer spectroscopy and DFT calculations.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jianping; Kuc, Agnieszka; Pokhrel, Suman; Mädler, Lutz; Pöttgen, Rainer; Winter, Florian; Frauenheim, Thomas; Heine, Thomas

    2013-03-04

    Iron bru: Fe-doped ZnO may contain Fe(2+) and Fe(3+) species. Whilst Mößbauer spectroscopy can distinguish these sites in pure oxides FeO and Fe(2)O(3), it gives very similar shifts for Fe-doped phases. This result is rationalized by electron redistribution from the dopant site to the crystal matrix. Mößbauer shifts correlate with the local charge on the Fe sites and different dopant sites can be identified by the Mößbauer quadrupole splitting (see figure).

  18. Rapid anaerobic benzene oxidation with a variety of chelated Fe(III) forms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovley, D.R.; Woodward, J.C.; Chapelle, F.H.

    1996-01-01

    Fe(III) chelated to such compounds as EDTA, N-methyliminodiacetie acid, ethanol diglycine, humic acids, and phosphates stimulated benzene oxidation coupled to Fe(III) reduction in anaerobic sediments from a petroleum- contaminated aquifer as effectively as or more effectively than nitrilotriacetic acid did in a previously demonstrated stimulation experiment. These results indicate that many forms of chelated Fe(III) might be applicable to aquifer remediation.

  19. Going wireless: Fe(III) oxide reduction without pili by Geobacter sulfurreducens strain JS-1.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jessica A; Tremblay, Pier-Luc; Shrestha, Pravin Malla; Snoeyenbos-West, Oona L; Franks, Ashley E; Nevin, Kelly P; Lovley, Derek R

    2014-07-01

    Previous studies have suggested that the conductive pili of Geobacter sulfurreducens are essential for extracellular electron transfer to Fe(III) oxides and for optimal long-range electron transport through current-producing biofilms. The KN400 strain of G. sulfurreducens reduces poorly crystalline Fe(III) oxide more rapidly than the more extensively studied DL-1 strain. Deletion of the gene encoding PilA, the structural pilin protein, in strain KN400 inhibited Fe(III) oxide reduction. However, low rates of Fe(III) reduction were detected after extended incubation (>30 days) in the presence of Fe(III) oxide. After seven consecutive transfers, the PilA-deficient strain adapted to reduce Fe(III) oxide as fast as the wild type. Microarray, whole-genome resequencing, proteomic, and gene deletion studies indicated that this adaptation was associated with the production of larger amounts of the c-type cytochrome PgcA, which was released into the culture medium. It is proposed that the extracellular cytochrome acts as an electron shuttle, promoting electron transfer from the outer cell surface to Fe(III) oxides. The adapted PilA-deficient strain competed well with the wild-type strain when both were grown together on Fe(III) oxide. However, when 50% of the culture medium was replaced with fresh medium every 3 days, the wild-type strain outcompeted the adapted strain. A possible explanation for this is that the necessity to produce additional PgcA, to replace the PgcA being continually removed, put the adapted strain at a competitive disadvantage, similar to the apparent selection against electron shuttle-producing Fe(III) reducers in many anaerobic soils and sediments. Despite increased extracellular cytochrome production, the adapted PilA-deficient strain produced low levels of current, consistent with the concept that long-range electron transport through G. sulfurreducens biofilms is more effective via pili.

  20. Going Wireless: Fe(III) Oxide Reduction without Pili by Geobacter sulfurreducens Strain JS-1

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Pravin Malla; Snoeyenbos-West, Oona L.; Franks, Ashley E.; Nevin, Kelly P.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that the conductive pili of Geobacter sulfurreducens are essential for extracellular electron transfer to Fe(III) oxides and for optimal long-range electron transport through current-producing biofilms. The KN400 strain of G. sulfurreducens reduces poorly crystalline Fe(III) oxide more rapidly than the more extensively studied DL-1 strain. Deletion of the gene encoding PilA, the structural pilin protein, in strain KN400 inhibited Fe(III) oxide reduction. However, low rates of Fe(III) reduction were detected after extended incubation (>30 days) in the presence of Fe(III) oxide. After seven consecutive transfers, the PilA-deficient strain adapted to reduce Fe(III) oxide as fast as the wild type. Microarray, whole-genome resequencing, proteomic, and gene deletion studies indicated that this adaptation was associated with the production of larger amounts of the c-type cytochrome PgcA, which was released into the culture medium. It is proposed that the extracellular cytochrome acts as an electron shuttle, promoting electron transfer from the outer cell surface to Fe(III) oxides. The adapted PilA-deficient strain competed well with the wild-type strain when both were grown together on Fe(III) oxide. However, when 50% of the culture medium was replaced with fresh medium every 3 days, the wild-type strain outcompeted the adapted strain. A possible explanation for this is that the necessity to produce additional PgcA, to replace the PgcA being continually removed, put the adapted strain at a competitive disadvantage, similar to the apparent selection against electron shuttle-producing Fe(III) reducers in many anaerobic soils and sediments. Despite increased extracellular cytochrome production, the adapted PilA-deficient strain produced low levels of current, consistent with the concept that long-range electron transport through G. sulfurreducens biofilms is more effective via pili. PMID:24814783

  1. Oxidative inactivation of brain ecto-5'-nucleotidase by thiols/Fe2+ system.

    PubMed

    Liu, X W; Sok, D E

    2000-11-01

    5'-Nucleotidase, responsible for the conversion of adenosine-5'-monophosphate into adenosine, was purified from bovine brain membranes, and subjected to oxidative inactivation. The 5'-nucleotidase activity decreased slightly after the exposure to either glutathione or Fe2+. The glutathione-mediated inactivation of 5'-nucleotidase was potentiated remarkably by Fe2+, but not Cu2+, in a concentration-dependent manner. Similarly, glutathione exhibited a concentration-dependent enhancement of the Fe2+-mediated inactivation. In comparison, the glutathione/Fe2+ system was much more effective than the ascorbate/Fe2+ system in inactivating the enzyme. In support of an intermediary role of superoxide ions or H2O2 in the action of glutathione/Fe2+ system, superoxide dismutase and catalase expressed a substantial protection against the inactivation by the glutathione/Fe2+ system. Meanwhile, hydroxyl radical scavengers such as mannitol, benzoate or ethanol were incapable of preventing the inactivation, excluding the participation of extraneous hydroxyl radicals. Whereas adenosine 5'-monophosphate as substrate exhibited a modest protection against the glutathione/Fe2+ action, a remarkable protection was expressed by divalent metal ions such as Zn2+ or Mn2+. Structure-activity study with a variety of thiols indicates that the inactivating action of thiols in combination with Fe2+ resides in the free sulfhydryl group and amino group of thiols. Overall, thiols, expressing more inhibitory effect on the activity of 5'-nucleotidase, were found to be more effective in potentiating the Fe2+-mediated inactivation. Further, kinetic analyses indicate that Fe2+ and thiols inhibit the 5'-nucleotidase in a competitive or uncompetitive manner, respectively. These results suggest that ecto-5'-nucleotidase from brain membrane is one of proteins susceptible to thiols/Fe2+-catalyzed oxidation, and the oxidative inactivation may be related to the selective association of Fe2+ and thiols to the

  2. Measurement of ablation threshold of oxide-film-coated aluminium nanoparticles irradiated by femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chefonov, O. V.; Ovchinnikov, A. V.; Il'ina, I. V.; Agranat, M. B.

    2016-03-01

    We report the results of experiments on estimation of femtosecond laser threshold intensity at which nanoparticles are removed from the substrate surface. The studies are performed with nanoparticles obtained by femtosecond laser ablation of pure aluminium in distilled water. The attenuation (or extinction, i.e. absorption and scattering) spectra of nanoparticles are measured at room temperature in the UV and optical wavelength ranges. The size of nanoparticles is determined using atomic force microscopy. A new method of scanning photoluminescence is proposed to evaluate the threshold of nanoparticle removal from the surface of a glass substrate exposed to IR femtosecond laser pulses with intensities 1011 - 1013 W cm-2.

  3. Switching of the Fe Oxida-tion State in Ferro-cene-Capped Alkanethiols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Fan; Luk, Yan-Yeung; Abbott, Nicholas L.; Himpsel, F. J.

    2005-03-01

    Molecular electronics has been a rapidly-growing area, due to the simplicity of building molecular devices by self-assembly and the promise of extremely low power consumption as a result of pushing the size down to a few molecules per device. A self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of ferrocene-capped alkanethiols is produced in two stable oxidation states of Fe (Fe^2+ and Fe^3+). The oxidation states of Fe are probed with sub-monolayer sensitivity by Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy at the iron L2, 3 edges ^[1]. NEXAFS provides a direct method to distinguish between the oxidation states of submonolayer by comparing with the bulk sample spectrum. The native Fe^2+ layer is converted chemically to Fe^3+, and the Fe^3+ layer can be switched back to Fe^2+ or possibly Fe^0 by irradiation with soft x-rays. The results have implications on switching mechanisms in molecular electronics. [1] Fan Zheng, V. P'erez-Dieste, J. L. McChesney, Yan-Yeung Luk, Nicholas L. Abbott, and F. J. Himpsel, Appl. Phys. Lett, to be submitted.

  4. Reduced aggregation and cytotoxicity of amyloid peptides by graphene oxide/gold nanocomposites prepared by pulsed laser ablation in water.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingying; Han, Qiusen; Wang, Xinhuan; Yu, Ning; Yang, Lin; Yang, Rong; Wang, Chen

    2014-11-12

    A novel and convenient method to synthesize the nanocomposites combining graphene oxides (GO) with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) is reported and their applications to modulate amyloid peptide aggregation are demonstrated. The nanocomposites produced by pulsed laser ablation (PLA) in water show good biocompatibility and solubility. The reduced aggregation of amyloid peptides by the nanocomposites is confirmed by Thioflavin T fluorescence and atomic force microscopy. The cell viability experiments reveals that the presence of the nanocomposites can significantly reduce the cytotoxicity of the amyloid peptides. Furthermore, the depolymerization of peptide fibrils and inhibition of their cellular cytotoxicity by GO/AuNPs is also observed. These observations suggest that the nanocomposites combining GO and AuNPs have a great potential for designing new therapeutic agents and are promising for future treatment of amyloid-related diseases.

  5. Physiology and Mechanism of Phototrophic Fe(II) Oxidation by Rhodopseudomonas palustris TIE-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Y.; Newman, D.

    2007-12-01

    Phototrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria use electrons from ferrous iron [Fe(II)] and energy from light to drive reductive CO2 fixation. This metabolism is thought to be ancient in origin, and plays an important role in environmental iron cycling. It has been implicated in the deposition of Banded Iron Formations, a class of ancient sedimentary iron deposits. Consistent with this hypothesis, we discovered that hydrogen gas, a thermodynamically favorable electron donor to Fe(II), in an Archean atmosphere would not have inhibited phototrophic Fe(II) oxidation. To understand this physiology and the connection to BIF formation at the molecular level, the mechanisms of phototrophic Fe(II) oxidation were examined in a model organism Rhodopseudomonas palustris TIE-1. Increased expression of a putative decaheme c-type cytochrome, encoded by pioA, was observed when cells were grown under Fe(II)-oxidizing conditions. Two genes located immediately downstream of pioA in the same operon, pioB and pioC, encode a putative outer membrane beta-barrel protein and a putative high potential iron-sulfur protein, respectively. Deletion studies demonstrated that all three genes are involved in phototrophic Fe(II) oxidation. This study provides our first insight into the molecular mechanisms of this metabolism, which will be further characterized by in vitro biochemical studies.

  6. Cultivation of an Obligate Fe(II)-Oxidizing Lithoautotrophic Bacterium Using Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Summers, Zarath M.; Gralnick, Jeffrey A.; Bond, Daniel R.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Fe(II)-oxidizing aerobic bacteria are poorly understood, due in part to the difficulties involved in laboratory cultivation. Specific challenges include (i) providing a steady supply of electrons as Fe(II) while (ii) managing rapid formation of insoluble Fe(III) oxide precipitates and (iii) maintaining oxygen concentrations in the micromolar range to minimize abiotic Fe(II) oxidation. Electrochemical approaches offer an opportunity to study bacteria that require problematic electron donors or acceptors in their respiration. In the case of Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria, if the electron transport machinery is able to oxidize metals at the outer cell surface, electrodes poised at potentials near those of natural substrates could serve as electron donors, eliminating concentration issues, side reactions, and mineral end products associated with metal oxidation. To test this hypothesis, the marine isolate Mariprofundus ferrooxydans PV-1, a neutrophilic obligate Fe(II)-oxidizing autotroph, was cultured using a poised electrode as the sole energy source. When cells grown in Fe(II)-containing medium were transferred into a three-electrode electrochemical cell, a cathodic (negative) current representing electron uptake by bacteria was detected, and it increased over a period of weeks. Cultures scraped from a portion of the electrode and transferred into sterile reactors consumed electrons at a similar rate. After three transfers in the absence of Fe(II), electrode-grown biofilms were studied to determine the relationship between donor redox potential and respiration rate. Electron microscopy revealed that under these conditions, M. ferrooxydans PV-1 attaches to electrodes and does not produce characteristic iron oxide stalks but still appears to exhibit bifurcate cell division. PMID:23362318

  7. A redox hydrogel protects the O2 -sensitive [FeFe]-hydrogenase from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii from oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Oughli, Alaa Alsheikh; Conzuelo, Felipe; Winkler, Martin; Happe, Thomas; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Schuhmann, Wolfgang; Rüdiger, Olaf; Plumeré, Nicolas

    2015-10-12

    The integration of sensitive catalysts in redox matrices opens up the possibility for their protection from deactivating molecules such as O2 . [FeFe]-hydrogenases are enzymes catalyzing H2 oxidation/production which are irreversibly deactivated by O2 . Therefore, their use under aerobic conditions has never been achieved. Integration of such hydrogenases in viologen-modified hydrogel films allows the enzyme to maintain catalytic current for H2 oxidation in the presence of O2 , demonstrating a protection mechanism independent of reactivation processes. Within the hydrogel, electrons from the hydrogenase-catalyzed H2 oxidation are shuttled to the hydrogel-solution interface for O2 reduction. Hence, the harmful O2 molecules do not reach the hydrogenase. We illustrate the potential applications of this protection concept with a biofuel cell under H2 /O2 mixed feed.

  8. Microaerophilic Fe(II)-Oxidizing Zetaproteobacteria Isolated from Low-Fe Marine Coastal Sediments: Physiology and Composition of Their Twisted Stalks.

    PubMed

    Laufer, K; Nordhoff, M; Halama, M; Martinez, R E; Obst, M; Nowak, M; Stryhanyuk, H; Richnow, H H; Kappler, A

    2017-04-15

    Microaerophilic Fe(II) oxidizers are commonly found in habitats containing elevated Fe(II) and low O2 concentrations and often produce characteristic Fe mineral structures, so-called twisted stalks or tubular sheaths. Isolates originating from freshwater habitats are all members of the Betaproteobacteria, while isolates from marine habitats belong almost exclusively to the Zetaproteobacteria So far, only a few isolates of marine microaerophilic Fe(II) oxidizers have been described, all of which are obligate microaerophilic Fe(II) oxidizers and have been thought to be restricted to Fe-rich systems. Here, we present two new isolates of marine microaerophilic Fe(II)-oxidizing Zetaproteobacteria that originate from typical coastal marine sediments containing only low Fe concentrations (2 to 11 mg of total Fe/g of sediment [dry weight]; 70 to 100 μM dissolved Fe(2+) in the porewater). The two novel Zetaproteobacteria share characteristic physiological properties of the Zetaproteobacteria group, even though they come from low-Fe environments: the isolates are obligate microaerophilic Fe(II) oxidizers and, like most isolated Zetaproteobacteria, they produce twisted stalks. We found a low organic carbon content in the stalks (∼0.3 wt%), with mostly polysaccharides and saturated aliphatic chains (most likely lipids). The Fe minerals in the stalks were identified as lepidocrocite and possibly ferrihydrite. Immobilization experiments with Ni(2+) showed that the stalks can function as a sink for trace metals. Our findings show that obligate microaerophilic Fe(II) oxidizers belonging to the Zetaproteobacteria group are not restricted to Fe-rich environments but can also be found in low-Fe marine environments, which increases their overall importance for the global biogeochemical Fe cycle.IMPORTANCE So far, only a few isolates of benthic marine microaerophilic Fe(II) oxidizers belonging to the Zetaproteobacteria exist, and most isolates were obtained from habitats containing

  9. Chemical reduction of U(VI) by Fe(II) at the solid-water interface using natural and synthetic Fe(III) oxides.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Byong-Hun; Dempsey, Brian A; Burgos, William D; Barnett, Mark O; Roden, Eric E

    2005-08-01

    Abiotic reduction of 0.1 mM U(VI) by Fe(II) in the presence of synthetic iron oxides (biogenic magnetite, goethite, and hematite) and natural Fe(III) oxide-containing solids was investigated in pH 6.8 artificial groundwater containing 10 mM NaHCO3. In most experiments, more than 95% of added U(VI) was sorbed to solids. U(VI) was rapidly and extensively (> or = 80%) reduced in the presence of synthetic Fe(III) oxides and highly Fe(II) oxide-enriched (18-35 wt % Fe) Atlantic coastal plain sediments. In contrast, long-term (20-60 d) U(VI) reduction was less than 30% in suspensions of six other natural solids with relatively low Fe(III) oxide content (1-5 wt % Fe). Fe(II) sorption site density was severalfold lower on these natural solids (0.2-1.1 Fe(II) nm(-2)) compared tothe synthetic Fe(lII) oxides (1.6-3.2 Fe(II) nm(-2)), which may explain the poor U(VI) reduction in the natural solid-containing systems. Addition of the reduced form of the electron shuttling compound anthrahydroquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AH2DS; final concentration 2.5 mM) to the natural solid suspensions enhanced the rate and extent of U(VI) reduction, suggesting that AH2DS reduced U(VI) at surface sites where reaction of U(VI) with sorbed Fe(II) was limited. This study demonstrates that abiotic, Fe(II)-driven U(VI) reduction is likely to be less efficient in natural soils and sediments than would be inferred from studies with synthetic Fe(III) oxides.

  10. Structure and growth kinetics of the oxidation process of Fe(001) whisker surfaces over a 10-decade pressure range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrer, Salvador; Robach, Odile; Balmes, Olivier; Isern, Helena; Popa, Iona; Ackerman, Marcelo

    2010-10-01

    Fe(001) surfaces of whiskers of good crystalline quality were oxidized in a pressure range from 10 - 7 mbar to 1 bar at different temperatures. Epitaxial Fe 3O 4 and FeO thin films with negligible strain were grown depending on the oxidation temperatures. The kinetics of the oxide thickness growth was measured and compared with the predictions of the Fromhold-Cook theory for oxidation of metals. Some discrepancies were found and a possible explanation is presented.

  11. Oxidation Resistance of Fe80Cr20 Alloys Treated by Rare Earth Element Ion Implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebayang, Darwin; Khaerudini, Deni S.; Saryanto, H.; Hasan, Sulaiman; Othman, M. A.; Untoro, Puji

    2011-10-01

    The oxidation behaviour of newly developed process of Fe80Cr20 alloy was studied as a function of temperature in the range 1173-1273 K for up to 100 h in flowing air, which corresponds to the Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) environment operating conditions. The effects of rare earth element implantation and depth profile on the oxidation behaviour of specimens were analyzed based on oxide morphology and microstructure. Characterisation of the oxide phase products after oxidation was made by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The surface morphology of oxide scales was examined using the scanning electronic microscope (SEM) with energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). The rate constant of thermal oxidation was determined using Wagner method. Experimental results show that the specimens implanted with lanthanum have remarkably enhanced the oxidation resistance. The oxidation test indicates that the newly developed process of Fe80Cr20 implantation with lanthanum ions exhibit considerably greater improvement in the oxidation resistance compared to the specimens implanted with titanium. The newly developed process of Fe80Cr20 milled for 60h show better oxidation resistance compared to specimens milled for 40h.

  12. Rhodobacter capsulatus Catalyzes Light-Dependent Fe(II) Oxidation under Anaerobic Conditions as a Potential Detoxification Mechanism▿

    PubMed Central

    Poulain, Alexandre J.; Newman, Dianne K.

    2009-01-01

    Diverse bacteria are known to oxidize millimolar concentrations of ferrous iron [Fe(II)] under anaerobic conditions, both phototrophically and chemotrophically. Yet whether they can do this under conditions that are relevant to natural systems is understood less well. In this study, we tested how light, Fe(II) speciation, pH, and salinity affected the rate of Fe(II) oxidation by Rhodobacter capsulatus SB1003. Although R. capsulatus cannot grow photoautotrophically on Fe(II), it oxidizes Fe(II) at rates comparable to those of bacteria that do grow photoautotrophically on Fe(II) as soon as it is exposed to light, provided it has a functional photosystem. Chelation of Fe(II) by diverse organic ligands promotes Fe(II) oxidation, and as the pH increases, so does the oxidation rate, except in the presence of nitrilotriacetate; nonchelated forms of Fe(II) are also more rapidly oxidized at higher pH. Salt concentrations typical of marine environments inhibit Fe(II) oxidation. When growing photoheterotrophically on humic substances, R. capsulatus is highly sensitive to low concentrations of Fe(II); it is inhibited in the presence of concentrations as low as 5 μM. The product of Fe(II) oxidation, ferric iron, does not hamper growth under these conditions. When other parameters, such as pH or the presence of chelators, are adjusted to promote Fe(II) oxidation, the growth inhibition effect of Fe(II) is alleviated. Together, these results suggest that Fe(II) is toxic to R. capsulatus growing under strictly anaerobic conditions and that Fe(II) oxidation alleviates this toxicity. PMID:19717624

  13. Coexistence of Microaerophilic, Nitrate-Reducing, and Phototrophic Fe(II) Oxidizers and Fe(III) Reducers in Coastal Marine Sediment

    PubMed Central

    Laufer, Katja; Nordhoff, Mark; Røy, Hans; Schmidt, Caroline; Behrens, Sebastian; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    2015-01-01

    Iron is abundant in sediments, where it can be biogeochemically cycled between its divalent and trivalent redox states. The neutrophilic microbiological Fe cycle involves Fe(III)-reducing and three different physiological groups of Fe(II)-oxidizing microorganisms, i.e., microaerophilic, anoxygenic phototrophic, and nitrate-reducing Fe(II) oxidizers. However, it is unknown whether all three groups coexist in one habitat and how they are spatially distributed in relation to gradients of O2, light, nitrate, and Fe(II). We examined two coastal marine sediments in Aarhus Bay, Denmark, by cultivation and most probable number (MPN) studies for Fe(II) oxidizers and Fe(III) reducers and by quantitative-PCR (qPCR) assays for microaerophilic Fe(II) oxidizers. Our results demonstrate the coexistence of all three metabolic types of Fe(II) oxidizers and Fe(III) reducers. In qPCR, microaerophilic Fe(II) oxidizers (Zetaproteobacteria) were present with up to 3.2 × 106 cells g dry sediment−1. In MPNs, nitrate-reducing Fe(II) oxidizers, anoxygenic phototrophic Fe(II) oxidizers, and Fe(III) reducers reached cell numbers of up to 3.5 × 104, 3.1 × 102, and 4.4 × 104 g dry sediment−1, respectively. O2 and light penetrated only a few millimeters, but the depth distribution of the different iron metabolizers did not correlate with the profile of O2, Fe(II), or light. Instead, abundances were homogeneous within the upper 3 cm of the sediment, probably due to wave-induced sediment reworking and bioturbation. In microaerophilic Fe(II)-oxidizing enrichment cultures, strains belonging to the Zetaproteobacteria were identified. Photoferrotrophic enrichments contained strains related to Chlorobium and Rhodobacter; the nitrate-reducing Fe(II) enrichments contained strains related to Hoeflea and Denitromonas. This study shows the coexistence of all three types of Fe(II) oxidizers in two near-shore marine environments and the potential for competition and interrelationships between them

  14. Coexistence of Microaerophilic, Nitrate-Reducing, and Phototrophic Fe(II) Oxidizers and Fe(III) Reducers in Coastal Marine Sediment.

    PubMed

    Laufer, Katja; Nordhoff, Mark; Røy, Hans; Schmidt, Caroline; Behrens, Sebastian; Jørgensen, Bo Barker; Kappler, Andreas

    2015-12-18

    Iron is abundant in sediments, where it can be biogeochemically cycled between its divalent and trivalent redox states. The neutrophilic microbiological Fe cycle involves Fe(III)-reducing and three different physiological groups of Fe(II)-oxidizing microorganisms, i.e., microaerophilic, anoxygenic phototrophic, and nitrate-reducing Fe(II) oxidizers. However, it is unknown whether all three groups coexist in one habitat and how they are spatially distributed in relation to gradients of O2, light, nitrate, and Fe(II). We examined two coastal marine sediments in Aarhus Bay, Denmark, by cultivation and most probable number (MPN) studies for Fe(II) oxidizers and Fe(III) reducers and by quantitative-PCR (qPCR) assays for microaerophilic Fe(II) oxidizers. Our results demonstrate the coexistence of all three metabolic types of Fe(II) oxidizers and Fe(III) reducers. In qPCR, microaerophilic Fe(II) oxidizers (Zetaproteobacteria) were present with up to 3.2 × 10(6) cells g dry sediment(-1). In MPNs, nitrate-reducing Fe(II) oxidizers, anoxygenic phototrophic Fe(II) oxidizers, and Fe(III) reducers reached cell numbers of up to 3.5 × 10(4), 3.1 × 10(2), and 4.4 × 10(4) g dry sediment(-1), respectively. O2 and light penetrated only a few millimeters, but the depth distribution of the different iron metabolizers did not correlate with the profile of O2, Fe(II), or light. Instead, abundances were homogeneous within the upper 3 cm of the sediment, probably due to wave-induced sediment reworking and bioturbation. In microaerophilic Fe(II)-oxidizing enrichment cultures, strains belonging to the Zetaproteobacteria were identified. Photoferrotrophic enrichments contained strains related to Chlorobium and Rhodobacter; the nitrate-reducing Fe(II) enrichments contained strains related to Hoeflea and Denitromonas. This study shows the coexistence of all three types of Fe(II) oxidizers in two near-shore marine environments and the potential for competition and interrelationships between

  15. Structure and magnetic properties of the cubic oxide fluoride BaFeO{sub 2}F

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, Frank J.; Coomer, Fiona C.; Hancock, Cathryn; Helgason, Orn; Moore, Elaine A.; Slater, Peter R.; Wright, Adrian J.; Thomas, Michael F.

    2011-06-15

    Fluorination of the parent oxide, BaFeO{sub 3-{delta}}, with polyvinylidine fluoride gives rise to a cubic compound with a=4.0603(4) A at 298 K. {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer spectra confirmed that all the iron is present as Fe{sup 3+}. Neutron diffraction data showed complete occupancy of the anion sites, indicating a composition BaFeO{sub 2}F, with a large displacement of the iron off-site. The magnetic ordering temperature was determined as T{sub N}=645{+-}5 K. Neutron diffraction data at 4.2 K established G-type antiferromagnetism with a magnetic moment per Fe{sup 3+} ion of 3.95 {mu}{sub B}. However, magnetisation measurements indicated the presence of a weak ferromagnetic moment that is assigned to the canting of the antiferromagnetic structure. {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer spectra in the temperature range 10-300 K were fitted with a model of fluoride ion distribution that retains charge neutrality of the perovskite unit cell. - Graphical abstract: The cubic oxide fluoride of composition BaFeO{sub 2}F has been synthesised and characterised. Highlights: > Fluorination of BaFeO{sub 3-{delta}} with polyvinylidene fluoride gives a cubic oxide fluoride of composition BaFeO{sub 2}F. > BaFeO{sub 2}F adopts a canted antiferromagnetic structure and is different from the related phase of composition SrFeO{sub 2}F. > A model of fluoride ion distribution about iron in BaFeO{sub 2}F has been explored.

  16. Low Fe3+ in Bridgmanite and Possible Existence of an Oxidizing Layer in the Mid Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, S. H. D.; Grocholski, B.; Ye, Y.; Alp, E. E.; Xu, S.; Morgan, D.; Meng, Y.; Prakapenka, V.

    2015-12-01

    Earlier multi-anvil experiments suggested a large amount of Fe3+ (60-70%) in bridgmanite (Bm) through charge disproportionation of Fe2+ to Fe3+ and metallic iron at the pressure-temperature (P-T) conditions of the topmost lower mantle (<25 GPa). Similar amount of Fe3+ has been recently documented at higher pressures but without redox control. If metallic iron can be stabilized, the lower mantle will have very low oxygen fugacity. However, the inclusions in lower-mantle diamonds suggest large variations in oxygen fugacity to much more oxidizing conditions. We mixed (Mg0.75Fe0.2Al0.05)(Al0.05Si0.95)O3 starting materials with 2-5 wt% metallic iron, in order to ensure reducing conditions during the synthesis of Bm in the laser-heated diamond-anvil cell. X-ray diffraction and Mossbauer spectroscopy were performed at APS. The recovered samples were analyzed using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) at ASU. We found that 60-70% of iron is Fe3+ in Bm at P<40 GPa and P>70 GPa, consistent with previous studies. However, Bm synthesized at 40-70 GPa contains very little Fe3+ (~10%), indicating that charge disproportionation does not occur at depths between 1000 and 1700 km in the lower mantle. The low metallic iron layer (LMIL) can be oxidized in early Earth, because of unbalanced Fe3+ and metallic iron in lower-mantle flow by core formation. The oxidizing nature of the layer may impact the siderophile element partitioning between metal and silicates if magma ocean was sufficiently deep. The layer can be further oxidized through solid mantle convection because of injection of oxidizing surface materials. The elevated oxygen fugacity will potentially make LMIL a distinct geochemical reservoir. Due to oxidizing conditions, carbon will form diamond instead of FeC in the layer. Strong partitioning of Fe2+ into ferropericlase (Fp) and the low content of Fe3+ in Bm will enrich Fp with iron (Fe2+) in LMIL. Because the Fe3+ content

  17. Influence of FeO and sulfur on solid state reaction between MnO-SiO2-FeO oxides and an Fe-Mn-Si solid alloy during heat treatment at 1473 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Cheng-song; Yang, Shu-feng; Kim, Kyung-ho; Li, Jing-she; Shibata, Hiroyuki; Kitamura, Shin-ya

    2015-08-01

    To clarify the influence of FeO and sulfur on solid state reaction between an Fe-Mn-Si alloy and MnO-SiO2-FeO oxides under the restricted oxygen diffusion flux, two diffusion couples with different sulfur contents in the oxides were produced and investigated after heat treatment at 1473 K. The experimental results were also compared with previous work in which the oxides contained higher FeO. It was found that although the FeO content in the oxides decreased from 3wt% to 1wt% which was lower than the content corresponding to the equilibrium with molten steel at 1873 K, excess oxygen still diffused from the oxides to solid steel during heat treatment at 1473 K and formed oxide particles. In addition, increasing the sulfur content in the oxides was observed to suppress the diffusion of oxygen between the alloy and the oxides.

  18. Dissolution of Fe(III)(hydr)oxides by an Aerobic Bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Maurice, P.

    2004-12-13

    This project investigated the effects of an aerobic Pseudomonas mendocina bacterium on the dissolution of Fe(III)(hydr)oxides. The research is important because metals and radionuclides that adsorb to Fe(III)(hydr)oxides could potentially be remobilized by dissolving bacteria. We showed that P. mendocina is capable of dissolving Fe-bearing minerals by a variety of mechanisms, including production of siderophores, pH changes, and formation of reductants. The production of siderophores by P. mendocina was quantified under a variety of growth conditions. Finally, we demonstrated that microbial siderophores may adsorb to and enhance dissolution of clay minerals.

  19. Electrophoretic deposition of graphene oxide as a corrosion inhibitor for sintered NdFeB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Wenting; Zhu, Liqun; Chen, Haining; Nan, Haiyang; Li, Weiping; Liu, Huicong; Wang, Yan

    2013-08-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) was deposited uniformly on the surface of permanent magnet material NdFeB by electrophoretic deposition (EPD). Electrophoretic deposited graphene oxide (EPD-GO) coating was reduced partially after EPD process, owing to the removal of oxygen functional groups. And EPD-GO coating showed excellent adhesion to the NdFeB matrix. According to the results of electrochemical tests, the decrease in corrosion current density and the positive shift in corrosion potential have both demonstrated that EPD-GO coating served as a corrosion inhibitor, protecting NdFeB from NaCl aqueous solution.

  20. Rate law of Fe(II) oxidation under low O2 conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanzaki, Yoshiki; Murakami, Takashi

    2013-12-01

    Despite intensive studies on Fe(II) oxidation kinetics, the oxidation rate law has not been established under low O2 conditions. The importance of Fe(II) oxidation under low O2 conditions has been recently recognized; for instance, the Fe(II)/Fe(III) compositions of paleosols, ancient soils formed by weathering, can produce a quantitative pattern of the atmospheric oxygen increase during the Paleoproterozoic. The effects of partial pressure of atmospheric oxygen (PO2) on the Fe(II) oxidation rate were investigated to establish the Fe(II) oxidation rate - PO2 relationships under low O2 conditions. All oxidation experiments were carried out in a glove box by introducing Ar gas at ∼10-5-∼10-4 atm of PO2, pH 7.57-8.09 and 22 °C. Luminol chemiluminescence was adopted to measure low Fe(II) concentrations (down to ∼2 nM). Combining previous data under higher PO2 conditions (10-3-0.2 atm) with the present data, the rate law for Fe(II) oxidation over a wide range of PO2 (10-5-0.2 atm) was found to be written as: d[Fe(II)]/dt=-k[Fe(II)][[]2 where the exponent of [O2], x, and the rate constant, k, change from x = 0.98 (±0.04) and log k = 15.46 (±0.06) at ∼6 × 10-3-0.2 atm of PO2 to x = 0.58 (±0.02) and log k = 13.41 (±0.03) at 10-5-∼6 × 10-3 atm of PO2. The most plausible mechanism that explains the change in x under low O2 conditions is that, instead of O2, oxygen-derived oxidants, H2O2 and to some extent, O2rad -, dominate the oxidation reactions at <∼10-3 atm of PO2. The rate law found in the present study requires us to reconsider distributions of Fe redox species at low PO2 in natural environments, especially in paleoweathering profiles, and may provide a deeper understanding of the evolution of atmospheric oxygen in the Precambrian.

  1. Oxidation-Induced Surface Roughening of Aluminum Nanoparticles Formed in an Ablation Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Förster, Georg Daniel; Girault, Marie; Menneveux, Jérôme; Lavisse, Luc; Jouvard, Jean-Marie; Marco de Lucas, Maria del Carmen; Potin, Valérie; Ouf, François-Xavier; Kerkar, Moussa; Le Garrec, Jean-Luc; Carvou, Erwann; Carles, Sophie; Rabilloud, Franck; Calvo, Florent; Yu, Jin; Mitchell, James Brian

    2015-12-01

    Nanoparticles formed within an ablation plume produced by the impact of a nanosecond laser pulse on the surface of an aluminum target have been directly measured using small-angle x-ray scattering. The target was immersed in an oxygen-nitrogen gas mixture at atmospheric pressure with the O2/N2 ratio being precisely controlled. The results for an increasing oxygen content reveal remarkable effects on the morphology of the generated particles, which include a decrease in the particle volume but a marked increase in its surface ruggedness. Molecular dynamics simulations using a reactive potential and performed under similar conditions as the experiment reproduce the experimental trends and show in detail how the shape and surface structure of the nanoparticles evolve with increasing oxygen content. This good agreement between in situ observations in the plume and atomistic simulations emphasizes the key role of chemical reactivity together with thermodynamic conditions on the morphology of the particles thus produced.

  2. Oxidation-Induced Surface Roughening of Aluminum Nanoparticles Formed in an Ablation Plume.

    PubMed

    Förster, Georg Daniel; Girault, Marie; Menneveux, Jérôme; Lavisse, Luc; Jouvard, Jean-Marie; Marco de Lucas, Maria Del Carmen; Potin, Valérie; Ouf, François-Xavier; Kerkar, Moussa; Le Garrec, Jean-Luc; Carvou, Erwann; Carles, Sophie; Rabilloud, Franck; Calvo, Florent; Yu, Jin; Mitchell, James Brian

    2015-12-11

    Nanoparticles formed within an ablation plume produced by the impact of a nanosecond laser pulse on the surface of an aluminum target have been directly measured using small-angle x-ray scattering. The target was immersed in an oxygen-nitrogen gas mixture at atmospheric pressure with the O_{2}/N_{2} ratio being precisely controlled. The results for an increasing oxygen content reveal remarkable effects on the morphology of the generated particles, which include a decrease in the particle volume but a marked increase in its surface ruggedness. Molecular dynamics simulations using a reactive potential and performed under similar conditions as the experiment reproduce the experimental trends and show in detail how the shape and surface structure of the nanoparticles evolve with increasing oxygen content. This good agreement between in situ observations in the plume and atomistic simulations emphasizes the key role of chemical reactivity together with thermodynamic conditions on the morphology of the particles thus produced.

  3. Measurement of ablation threshold of oxide-film-coated aluminium nanoparticles irradiated by femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Chefonov, O V; Ovchinnikov, A V; Il'ina, I V; Agranat, M B

    2016-03-31

    We report the results of experiments on estimation of femtosecond laser threshold intensity at which nanoparticles are removed from the substrate surface. The studies are performed with nanoparticles obtained by femtosecond laser ablation of pure aluminium in distilled water. The attenuation (or extinction, i.e. absorption and scattering) spectra of nanoparticles are measured at room temperature in the UV and optical wavelength ranges. The size of nanoparticles is determined using atomic force microscopy. A new method of scanning photoluminescence is proposed to evaluate the threshold of nanoparticle removal from the surface of a glass substrate exposed to IR femtosecond laser pulses with intensities 10{sup 11} – 10{sup 13} W cm{sup -2}. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  4. Oxidative Dissolution of Uraninite in the Presence of Mackinawite (FeS) under Simulated Groundwater Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Y.; Hyun, S.; Hayes, K. F.

    2010-12-01

    Redox conditions can have a strong impact on the fate of a redox-sensitive radionuclide, such as uranium. Field studies have suggested using biogeochemical manipulation of the redox conditions to convert dissolved U(VI) species, stable under oxic conditions, to less soluble reduced U(IV) solids in U-contaminated groundwater. This is one strategy being considered for the long-term sequestration of U in contaminated groundwater environments. However, the re-exposure of reduced U(IV) solids to oxic environments may release U back into the water phase and greatly increase its mobility. Previous work has demonstrated the potential for iron sulfides created under sulfate reducing conditions to retard the re-oxidation of reduced U solids providing the motivation for this study. In this work, the impact of mackinawite (FeS) on the oxidation of nanoscale uraninite (UO2+x(s)) by dissolved oxygen was experimentally studied to investigate its role in slowing the oxidation of the reduced U solid under simulated groundwater conditions. The oxidation kinetic profiles of synthetic uraninite and mackinawite were monitored as a function of time with respect to both aqueous- and solid-phase oxidation products in batch reactors. The solid-phase reaction products were further characterized by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The results show that mackinawite protects uraninite from rapid oxidation by dissolved oxygen for up to 60 hr, keeping dissolved U below 0.4 µM as long as sufficient dissolved Fe(II) is present. Meanwhile, dissolved sulfide is also oxidized to form elemental sulfur, suggesting a role of sulfide in maintaining reducing conditions. As the oxidation proceeds, dissolved Fe(II) concentrations diminish to near the detection limit, along with the formation of mixed-Fe(III) (hydr)oxides of lepidocrocite and goethite. However, when most mackinawite has been converted to Fe(III) oxide solids after significant oxidation

  5. Green synthesis of Fe0 and bimetallic Fe0 for oxidative catalysis and reduction applications

    EPA Science Inventory

    A single-step green approach to the synthesis of nanoscale zero valent iron (nZVI) and nanoscale bimetallic (Fe0/Pd) particles using tea (Camellia sinensis) polyphenols is described. The expedient reaction between polyphenols and ferric chloride (FeCl3) occurs within a minute at ...

  6. Cultivation of an obligate Fe(II)-oxidizing lithoautotrophic bacterium using electrodes.

    PubMed

    Summers, Zarath M; Gralnick, Jeffrey A; Bond, Daniel R

    2013-01-29

    Fe(II)-oxidizing aerobic bacteria are poorly understood, due in part to the difficulties involved in laboratory cultivation. Specific challenges include (i) providing a steady supply of electrons as Fe(II) while (ii) managing rapid formation of insoluble Fe(III) oxide precipitates and (iii) maintaining oxygen concentrations in the micromolar range to minimize abiotic Fe(II) oxidation. Electrochemical approaches offer an opportunity to study bacteria that require problematic electron donors or acceptors in their respiration. In the case of Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria, if the electron transport machinery is able to oxidize metals at the outer cell surface, electrodes poised at potentials near those of natural substrates could serve as electron donors, eliminating concentration issues, side reactions, and mineral end products associated with metal oxidation. To test this hypothesis, the marine isolate Mariprofundus ferrooxydans PV-1, a neutrophilic obligate Fe(II)-oxidizing autotroph, was cultured using a poised electrode as the sole energy source. When cells grown in Fe(II)-containing medium were transferred into a three-electrode electrochemical cell, a cathodic (negative) current representing electron uptake by bacteria was detected, and it increased over a period of weeks. Cultures scraped from a portion of the electrode and transferred into sterile reactors consumed electrons at a similar rate. After three transfers in the absence of Fe(II), electrode-grown biofilms were studied to determine the relationship between donor redox potential and respiration rate. Electron microscopy revealed that under these conditions, M. ferrooxydans PV-1 attaches to electrodes and does not produce characteristic iron oxide stalks but still appears to exhibit bifurcate cell division. IMPORTANCE Electrochemical cultivation, supporting growth of bacteria with a constant supply of electron donors or acceptors, is a promising tool for studying lithotrophic species in the laboratory

  7. Oxidation of CoCrFeMnNi High Entropy Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holcomb, Gordon R.; Tylczak, Joseph; Carney, Casey

    2015-06-01

    Eight model high entropy alloys (HEAs) in the CoCrFeMnNi family (including one alloy each in the CoCrFeNi and CoFeMnNi subfamilies) were made, prepared, and exposed to laboratory air for 1100 h at 650°C and 750°C. Two commercial alloys, nickel-base superalloy 230 (N06230) and austenitic stainless steel 304H (S30409), were simultaneously exposed for comparison. Mass change oxidation kinetics were measured and cross-sections of exposed samples were observed. Seven of these HEAs contained much more Mn (12-24 wt.%) than is found in commercial heat-resistant stainless steels and superalloys. The oxidation resistance of CoCrFeNi was excellent and comparable to 304H at 650°C and only slightly worse at 750°C. The thin oxide scale on CoCrFeNi was primarily Cr oxide (presumably Cr2O3) with some Mn oxide at the outer part of the scale. The CoCrFeMnNi HEAs all experienced more rapid oxidation than CoCrFeNi and, especially at 750°C, experienced oxide scale spallation. The addition of Y in the alloy to lower S improved the oxidation resistance of these HEAs. Alloy CoFeMnNi, without Cr, experienced much higher oxidation rates and scale spallation than the Cr-containing alloys. A linear regression analysis of the log of the parabolic rate constant, log(kp), as functions of wt.% Cr and Mn found a good correlation for the compositional dependence of the oxidation rate constant, especially at 650°C. Mn was found to be more detrimental increasing log(k p) than Cr was helpful reducing log(k p). If CoCrFeMnNi HEAs are to be used in high temperature oxidizing environments, then examining lower levels of Mn, while maintaining Cr levels, should be pursued.

  8. Novel H2-oxidizing [NiFeSe]hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Miyazaki F.

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Kyoshiro; Nguyen, Nga T; Yoon, Ki-Seok; Ogo, Seiji

    2013-04-01

    [NiFeSe]hydrogenases are promising biocatalysts in H2-based technology due to their high catalytic activity and O2-stability. Here, we report purification and characterization of a new membrane-associated [NiFeSe]hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Miyazaki F ([NiFeSe]DvMF). The [NiFeSe]DvMF was composed of two subunits, corresponding to a large subunit of 58.3 kDa and a small subunit of 29.3 kDa determined by SDS-PAGE. Unlike conventional [NiFeSe]hydrogenases having catalytic bias toward H2-production, the [NiFeSe]DvMF showed 11-fold higher specific activity of H2-oxidation (2444 U/mg) than that of H2-production (217 U/mg). At the optimal reaction temperature of the enzyme (65°C), the specific activity of H2-oxidation could reach up to 21,553 U/mg. Amperometric assays of the [NiFeSe]DvMF clearly indicated that the enzyme had a remarkable O2-stability. According to the amino acid sequence alignment, the conserved cysteine residue at position 281 in medial cluster of other [NiFeSe]hydrogenases was specifically replaced by a serine residue (Ser281) in the [NiFeSe]DvMF. These results indicate that the [NiFeSe]DvMF can play as a new H2-oxidizing and O2-stable biocatalyst, along with providing helpful insights into the structure-function relationship of [NiFeSe]hydrogenases.

  9. A quantitative approach for Cd, Cu, Fe and Mn through laser ablation imaging for evaluating the translocation and accumulation of metals in sunflower seeds.

    PubMed

    Pessôa, Gustavo de S; Lopes Júnior, Cícero A; Madrid, Katherine C; Arruda, Marco A Z

    2017-05-15

    The uptake and accumulation of Cd in sunflower seeds represents an important pathway for imputing potentially toxic metals into human and animal food. In this way, bioimaging of Cd and micronutrients (Cu, Fe and Mn) in the seeds of sunflower grown in soil contaminated with Cd are performed. For this task, laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) is used in quantitative approach, considering four groups: precursor, control, Cd-low (50mg) and Cd-high (700mg). For attaining our proposals, ICP-MS (nebulizer and auxiliary flow rates and radiofrequency power) and LA (laser intensity, frequency and spot size) parameters were optimized, and the analytical signal improved to 197%, 217%, 232%, and 283%, for (57)Fe, (112)Cd, (55)Mn and (63)Cu, respectively. The accuracy of proposed method using LA-ICP-MS is evaluated comparing the CRM results (Tomato leaves, NIST SRM 1573a). No difference is found at 95% confidence level. Regarding Cd accumulation in sunflower seeds, the results indicated that cadmium is translocated to seeds, and the cotyledons showed the highest concentration (Cd-high group), ranging from 10 to 20µgg(-1). Considering both total concentration and the distribution in the seeds, Cd uptake is responsible to the homeostasis misbalance of micronutrients, which play an essential role in the sunflower metabolism. Such results highlight the importance of bioimaging evaluation, in the translocation and accumulation of metals, contributing to expand the information available of this culture.

  10. Preparation and biodistribution of 59Fe-radiolabelled iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pospisilova, Martina; Zapotocky, Vojtech; Nesporova, Kristina; Laznicek, Milan; Laznickova, Alice; Zidek, Ondrej; Cepa, Martin; Vagnerova, Hana; Velebny, Vladimir

    2017-02-01

    We report on the 59Fe radiolabelling of iron oxide nanoparticle cores through post-synthetic isotope exchange (59Fe-IONPex) and precursor labelling (59Fe-IONPpre). Scanning electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering measurements showed no impact of radiolabelling on nanoparticle size or morphology. While incorporation efficiencies of these methods are comparable—83 and 90% for precursor labelling and post-synthetic isotope exchange, respectively—59Fe-IONPpre exhibited much higher radiochemical stability in citrated human plasma. Quantitative ex vivo biodistribution study of 59Fe-IONPpre coated with triethylene glycol was performed in Wistar rats. Following the intravenous administration, high 59Fe concentration was observed in the lung and the organs of the reticuloendothelial system such as the liver, the spleen and the femur.

  11. Degradation of Aluminide Coatings in Fe-Al-Cr Alloy on the Isothermal Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juwita, L.; Prajitno, D. H.; Soedarsono, J. W.; Manaf, A.

    2008-03-01

    Fe base superalloy has a good mechanical strength to be used as component operating at high temperature with oxidative environment. Although, the oxidation rate can not be tolerated as it will be oxidized and form oxide scale of un-protective FeO. Coating is a proper solution that this alloy can be used at high temperature. In this research, pack aluminizing on sample was conducted with temperatures of 900 °C, 1000 °C and 1100 °C for 10 hours in inert (argon) environment and then an oxidation test was carried out at temperature of 650 °C by an isothermal method for 10 hours in air environment. It was carried out an analysis for characteristics of coating and oxide scale formed in Fe-Al-Cr super alloy resulted from pack aluminizing. From this experiment, it was indicated by XRD analysis that the coating formed on substrate was a layer of FeAl2 compound, other than coating it was found a diffused zone, where in this area it occurred movement of Fe and Cr atoms from substrate toward coating, while Al atoms moved from coating to substrate. The increase of temperature of pack aluminizing process will affect settling rate of Al and coating growth.

  12. Effects of Fe oxide on N transformations in subtropical acid soils

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xianjun; Xin, Xiaoping; Li, Shiwei; Zhou, Junchao; Zhu, Tongbin; Müller, Christopher; Cai, Zucong; Wright, Alan L.

    2015-01-01

    Subtropical ecosystems are often characterized by high N cycling rates, but net nitrification rates are often low in subtropical acid soils. NO3−-N immobilization into organic N may be a contributing factor to understand the observed low net nitrification rates in these acid soils. The effects of Fe oxide and organic matter on soil N transformations were evaluated using a 15N tracing study. Soil net nitrification was low for highly acidic yellow soil (Ferralsols), but gross ammonia oxidation was 7 times higher than net nitrification. In weakly acidic purple soil (Cambisols), net nitrification was 8 times higher than in Ferralsols. The addition of 5% Fe oxide to Cambisols, reduced the net nitrification rate to a negative rate, while NO3−-N immobilization rate increased 8 fold. NO3−-N immobilization was also observed in Ferralsols which contained high Fe oxides levels. A possible mechanism for these reactions could be stimulation of NO3−-N immobilization by Fe oxide which promoted the abiotic formation of nitrogenous polymers, suggesting that the absence of net nitrification in some highly acid soils may be due to high rates of NO3−-N immobilization caused by high Fe oxide content rather than a low pH. PMID:25722059

  13. Facile synthesis of graphene nanosheets via Fe reduction of exfoliated graphite oxide.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zhuang-Jun; Kai, Wang; Yan, Jun; Wei, Tong; Zhi, Lin-Jie; Feng, Jing; Ren, Yue-Ming; Song, Li-Ping; Wei, Fei

    2011-01-25

    The synthesis of graphene nanosheets from graphite oxide typically involves harmful chemical reductants that are undesirable for most practical applications of graphene. Here, we demonstrate a green and facile approach to the synthesis of graphene nanosheets based on Fe reduction of exfoliated graphite oxide, resulting in a substantial removal of oxygen functionalities of the graphite oxide. More interestingly, the resulting graphene nanosheets with residual Fe show a high adsorption capacity of 111.62 mg/g for methylene blue at room temperature, as well as easy magnetic separation from the solution. This approach offers a potential for cost-effective, environmentally friendly, and large-scale production of graphene nanosheets.

  14. Rapid Mobilization of Noncrystalline U(IV) Coupled with FeS Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Bi, Yuqiang; Stylo, Malgorzata; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan; Hayes, Kim F

    2016-02-02

    The reactivity of disordered, noncrystalline U(IV) species remains poorly characterized despite their prevalence in biostimulated sediments. Because of the lack of crystalline structure, noncrystalline U(IV) may be susceptible to oxidative mobilization under oxic conditions. The present study investigated the mechanism and rate of oxidation of biogenic noncrystalline U(IV) by dissolved oxygen (DO) in the presence of mackinawite (FeS). Previously recognized as an effective reductant and oxygen scavenger, nanoparticulate FeS was evaluated for its role in influencing U release in a flow-through system as a function of pH and carbonate concentration. The results demonstrated that noncrystalline U(IV) was more susceptible to oxidation than uraninite (UO2) in the presence of dissolved carbonate. A rapid release of U occurred immediately after FeS addition without exhibiting a temporary inhibition stage, as was observed during the oxidation of UO2, although FeS still kept DO levels low. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) characterized a transient surface Fe(III) species during the initial FeS oxidation, which was likely responsible for oxidizing noncrystalline U(IV) in addition to oxygen. In the absence of carbonate, however, the release of dissolved U was significantly hindered as a result of U adsorption by FeS oxidation products. This study illustrates the strong interactions between iron sulfide and U(IV) species during redox transformation and implies the lability of biogenic noncrystalline U(IV) species in the subsurface environment when subjected to redox cycling events.

  15. Neodymium isotopic study of rare earth element sources and mobility in hydrothermal Fe oxide (Fe-P-REE) systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gleason, J.D.; Marikos, M.A.; Barton, M.D.; Johnson, D.A.

    2000-03-01

    Rare earth element (REE)-enriched, igneous-related hydrothermal Fe-oxide hosted (Fe-P-REE) systems from four areas in North America have been analyzed for their neodymium iosotopic composition to constrain REE sources and mobility in these systems. The Nd isotopic results evidence a common pattern of REE concentration from igneous sources despite large differences in age (Proterozoic to Tertiary), tectonic setting (subduction vs. intraplate), and magmatic style (mafic vs. felsic). In the Middle Proterozoic St. Francois Mountains terrane of southeastern Missouri, {epsilon}{sub Nd} for Fe-P-REE (apatite, monazite, xenotime) deposits ranges from +3.5 to +5.1, similar to associated felsic to intermediate igneous rocks of the same age ({epsilon}{sub Nd} = +2.6 to +6.2). At the mid-Jurassic Humboldt mafic complex in western Nevada, {epsilon}{sub Nd} for Fe-P-REE (apatite) mineralization varies between +1.1 and +2.4, similar to associated mafic igneous rocks ({minus}1.0 to +3.5). In the nearby Cortez Mountains in central Nevada, mid-Jurassic felsic volcanic and plutonic rocks ({epsilon}{sub Nd} = {minus}2.0 to {minus}4.4) are associated with Fe-P-REE (apatite-monazite) mineralization having similar {epsilon}{sub Nd}({minus}1.7 to {minus}2.4). At Cerro de Mercado, Durango, Mexico, all assemblages analyzed in this Tertiary rhyolite-hosted Fe oxide deposit have identical isotopic compositions with {epsilon}{sub Nd} = {minus}2.5. These data are consistent with coeval igneous host rocks being the primary source of REE in all four regions, and are inconsistent with a significant contribution of REE from other sources. Interpretations of the origin of these hydrothermal systems and their concomitant REE mobility must account for nonspecialized igneous sources and varied tectonic settings.

  16. Magnetic solid-phase extraction of protein by ionic liquid-coated Fe@graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Wen, Qian; Wang, Yuzhi; Xu, Kaijia; Li, Na; Zhang, Hongmei; Yang, Qin; Zhou, Yigang

    2016-11-01

    Amino functional dicationic ionic liquid (AFDCIL) was prepared and then coated on the surface of magnetic graphene oxide (GO) as a new magnetic adsorbent (Fe@GO@AFDCIL) for the magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE) of protein. The Fe@GO@AFDCIL composite was characterized by vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FT-IR), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and zeta-potential nanoparticles. The bovine hemoglobin (BHb) was used as the analyte, and the extraction performance of Fe@GO@AFDCIL was investigated in the MSPE procedure. The concentration of BHb in samples was determined by a UV-vis spectrophotometer. A comparative investigation of Fe@GO@AFDCIL composite and traditional IL-coated Fe@GO composites (Fe@GO@IL) exhibited the benefits of Fe@GO@AFDCIL. The adsorbed BHb could be eluted from the Fe@GO@AFDCIL by 4% sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) solution. The Fe@GO@AFDCIL exhibited favorable stability which could be reused at least 15 times. Under the optimized condition, the real samples were investigated, which demonstrated that the Fe@GO@AFDCIL was able to be applied in extracting bovine hemoglobin (BHb) from real biological samples.

  17. Stable Fe/ZSM-5 Nanosheet Zeolite Catalysts for the Oxidation of Benzene to Phenol

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Fe/ZSM-5 nanosheet zeolites of varying thickness were synthesized with di- and tetraquaternary ammonium structure directing agents and extensively characterized for their textural, structural, and catalytic properties. Introduction of Fe3+ ions in the framework of nanosheet zeolites was slightly less effective than in bulk ZSM-5 zeolite. Steaming was necessary to activate all catalysts for N2O decomposition and benzene oxidation. The higher the Fe content, the higher the degree of Fe aggregation was after catalyst activation. The degree of Fe aggregation was lower when the crystal domain size of the zeolite or the Fe content was decreased. These two parameters had a substantial influence on the catalytic performance. Decreasing the number of Fe sites along the b-direction strongly suppressed secondary reactions of phenol and, accordingly, catalyst deactivation. This together with the absence of diffusional limitations in nanosheet zeolites explains the much higher phenol productivity obtainable with nanostructured Fe/ZSM-5. Steamed Fe/ZSM-5 zeolite nanosheet synthesized using C22-6-3·Br2 (domain size in b-direction ∼3 nm) and containing 0.24 wt % Fe exhibited the highest catalytic performance. During the first 24 h on stream, this catalyst produced 185 mmolphenol g–1. Calcination to remove the coke deposits completely restored the initial activity.

  18. Rapid surficial oxidation of synthetic Fe-Ti oxides at high temperature: Observations and consequences for magnetic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lattard, Dominique; Sauerzapf, Ursula; Kontny, Agnes

    2012-08-01

    Synthetic polycrystalline samples of Fe-Ti oxides (titanomagnetite, Tmtss; ilmenite-hematitess, Ilmss; pseudobrookitess, Psbss) are very sensitive to changes in the redox conditions at high temperatures, either during synthesis experiments or during thermomagnetic measurements. For instance, exposure to air for a few seconds at the end of a synthesis run at 1300°C of a Tmtss-Ilmss sample produces surficial oxidation down to a depth of some 100 μm. This oxidation zone is well visible on backscattered electron images of polished sections through the sample pellet. It is characterized by so-called trellis “oxyexsolution” textures, i.e., fine lamellae of Ilmss within the Tmtss crystals and lamellae of Psbss within the Ilmss crystals. In this oxidation zone the newly grown Ilmss lamellae and the surrounding Tmtss are more Fe rich than the original crystals. The presence of trellis textures in the crystals of both coexisting phases, Tmtss and Ilmss, show that only short-scaled elemental transport within the crystals was involved and that equilibrium was not attained. Even though the oxidation zone is very narrow, the imprint of the new Tmtss compositions is well recognizable in temperature-dependent magnetic susceptibility curves. In temperature-dependent saturation magnetization (MS-T) curves, however, the contribution of more Fe-rich Tmtss from the oxidation zone can be easily overseen. However, surficial oxidation of Tmtss does occur during MS-T measurements with a variable field translation balance, apparently in relation with insufficient Ar flowing around the sample. Further examples of rapid surficial oxidation of Fe-Ti oxide samples are also discussed.

  19. Rapid surficial oxidation of synthetic Fe-Ti oxides at high temperature: Observations and consequences for magnetic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lattard, Dominique; Sauerzapf, Ursula; Kontny, Agnes

    2012-08-01

    Synthetic polycrystalline samples of Fe-Ti oxides (titanomagnetite, Tmtss; ilmenite-hematitess, Ilmss; pseudobrookitess, Psbss) are very sensitive to changes in the redox conditions at high temperatures, either during synthesis experiments or during thermomagnetic measurements. For instance, exposure to air for a few seconds at the end of a synthesis run at 1300°C of a Tmtss-Ilmss sample produces surficial oxidation down to a depth of some 100 μm. This oxidation zone is well visible on backscattered electron images of polished sections through the sample pellet. It is characterized by so-called trellis "oxyexsolution" textures, i.e., fine lamellae of Ilmss within the Tmtss crystals and lamellae of Psbss within the Ilmss crystals. In this oxidation zone the newly grown Ilmss lamellae and the surrounding Tmtss are more Fe rich than the original crystals. The presence of trellis textures in the crystals of both coexisting phases, Tmtss and Ilmss, show that only short-scaled elemental transport within the crystals was involved and that equilibrium was not attained. Even though the oxidation zone is very narrow, the imprint of the new Tmtsscompositions is well recognizable in temperature-dependent magnetic susceptibility curves. In temperature-dependent saturation magnetization (MS-T) curves, however, the contribution of more Fe-rich Tmtss from the oxidation zone can be easily overseen. However, surficial oxidation of Tmtss does occur during MS-T measurements with a variable field translation balance, apparently in relation with insufficient Ar flowing around the sample. Further examples of rapid surficial oxidation of Fe-Ti oxide samples are also discussed.

  20. Effect of cobalt on the oxidation resistance of Pr(Nd)-Dy-Fe-Co-B materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kablov, E. N.; Ospennikova, O. G.; Rezchikova, I. I.; Valeev, R. A.; Piskorskii, V. P.; Sul'yanova, E. A.

    2016-07-01

    The effect of cobalt on the oxidation resistance of (Nd0.85Dy0.15)16.4(Fe0.89Co0.11)74.4Ti1.3B7.9 and (Pr0.56Dy0.39Sm0.05)14.5(Fe0.75Co0.25)78.8B6.7 alloys has been studied. The storage of magnet blanks made from these alloy in air for 200 h does not affect the magnetic properties of the sintered magnets owing to the presence of the phases (Pr, Dy)(Fe, Co)2, (Pr, Dy)(Fe, Co)2B2, (Pr, Dy)(Fe, Co)4B, (Pr, Dy)(Fe, Co)3B2, and (Pr, Dy)(Fe, Co)3, which are resistant to oxidation and ensure liquid-phase sintering of magnets. After 200-h exposure to air, oxidation of the blanks takes place, the rate of which decreases by more than two times at the expense of an increase in the cobalt content in the alloy.

  1. Fe-chlorophyllin promotes the growth of wheat roots associated with nitric oxide generation.

    PubMed

    Tong, Min; Zhang, Liefeng; Wang, Yifan; Jiang, Hui; Ren, Yong

    2010-01-01

    Effects of Fe-chlorophyllin on the growth of wheat root were investigated in this study. We found that Fe-chlorophyllin can promote root growth. The production of nitric oxide in wheat root was detected using DAF-2DA fluorescent emission. The intensity of fluorescent in the presence of 0.1 mg/L Fe-chlorophyllin was near to that observed with the positive control of sodium nitroprusside (SNP), the nitric oxide donor. IAA oxidase activity decreased with all treatments of Fe-chlorophyllin from 0.01 to 10 mg/L. At the relatively lower Fe-chlorophyllin concentration of 0.1 mg/L, the activity of IAA oxidase displayed a remarkable decrease, being 40.1% lower than the control. Meanwhile, Fe-chlorophyllin treatment could increase the activities of reactive oxygen scavenging enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD) and peroxidase (POD), as determined using non-denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. These results indicate that Fe-chlorophyllin contributes to the growth of wheat root associated with nitric oxide generation.

  2. A hydrogen-oxidizing, Fe(III)-reducing microorganism from the Great Bay estuary, New Hampshire

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Caccavo, F.; Blakemore, R.P.; Lovley, D.R.

    1992-01-01

    A dissimilatory Fe(III)- and Mn(IV)-reducing bacterium was isolated from bottom sediments of the Great Bay estuary, New Hampshire. The isolate was a facultatively anaerobic gram-negative rod which did not appear to fit into any previously described genus. It was temporarily designated strain BrY. BrY grew anaerobically in a defined medium with hydrogen or lactate as the electron donor and Fe(III) as the electron acceptor. BrY required citrate, fumarate, or malate as a carbon source for growth on H2 and Fe(III). With Fe(III) as the sole electron acceptor, BrY metabolized hydrogen to a minimum threshold at least 60-fold lower than the threshold reported for pure cultures of sulfate reducers. This finding supports the hypothesis that when Fe(III) is available, Fe(III) reducers can outcompete sulfate reducers for electron donors. Lactate was incompletely oxidized to acetate and carbon dioxide with Fe(III) as the electron acceptor. Lactate oxidation was also coupled to the reduction of Mn(IV), U(VI), fumarate, thiosulfate, or trimethylamine n-oxide under anaerobic conditions. BrY provides a model for how enzymatic metal reduction by respiratory metal-reducing microorganisms has the potential to contribute to the mobilization of iron and trace metals and to the immobilization of uranium in sediments of Great Bay Estuary.

  3. Oxidation State of Nakhlites as inferred from Fe-Ti oxide Equilibria and Augite/Melt Europium Partitioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Makishima, J.; McKay, G.; Le, L.; Miyamoto, M.; Mikouchi, T.

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that Martian magmas had wide range of oxygen fugacities (fO2) and that this variation is correlated with the variation of La/Yb ratio and isotopic characteristics of the Martian basalts, shergottite meteorites. The origin of this correlation must have important information about mantle sources and Martian evolution. In order to understand this correlation, it is necessary to know accurate value of oxidation state of other Martian meteorite groups. Nakhlites, cumulate clinopyroxenites, are another major group of Martian meteorites and have distinctly different trace element and isotopic characteristics from shergottites. Thus, estimates of oxidation state of nakhlites will give us important insight into the mantle source in general. Several workers have estimated oxidation state of nakhlites by using Fe-Ti oxide equilibrium. However, Fe-Ti oxides may not record the oxidation state of the parent melt of the nakhlite because it is a late-stage mineral. Furthermore, there is no comprehensive study which analyzed all nakhlite samples at the same time. Therefore, in this study (1) we reduced the uncertainty of the estimate using the same electron microprobe and the same standards under the same condition for Fe-Ti oxide in 6 nakhlites and (2) we also performed crystallization experiments to measure partition coefficients of Eu into pyroxene in the nakhlite system in order to estimate fO2 when the pyroxene core formed (i.e. Eu oxybarometer [e.g. 2,6]).

  4. Interfacial strain and defects in asymmetric Fe-Mn oxide hybrid nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayence, Arnaud; Wéry, Madeleine; Tran, Dung Trung; Wetterskog, Erik; Svedlindh, Peter; Tai, Cheuk-Wai; Bergström, Lennart

    2016-07-01

    Asymmetric Fe-Mn oxide hybrid nanoparticles have been obtained by a seed-mediated thermal decomposition-based synthesis route. The use of benzyl ether as the solvent was found to promote the orientational growth of Mn1-xO onto the iron oxide nanocube seeds yielding mainly dimers and trimers whereas 1-octadecene yields large nanoparticles. HRTEM imaging and HAADF-STEM tomography performed on dimers show that the growth of Mn1-xO occurs preferentially along the edges of iron oxide nanocubes where both oxides share a common crystallographic orientation. Fourier filtering and geometric phase analysis of dimers reveal a lattice mismatch of 5% and a large interfacial strain together with a significant concentration of defects. The saturation magnetization is lower and the coercivity is higher for the Fe-Mn oxide hybrid nanoparticles compared to the iron oxide nanocube seeds.Asymmetric Fe-Mn oxide hybrid nanoparticles have been obtained by a seed-mediated thermal decomposition-based synthesis route. The use of benzyl ether as the solvent was found to promote the orientational growth of Mn1-xO onto the iron oxide nanocube seeds yielding mainly dimers and trimers whereas 1-octadecene yields large nanoparticles. HRTEM imaging and HAADF-STEM tomography performed on dimers show that the growth of Mn1-xO occurs preferentially along the edges of iron oxide nanocubes where both oxides share a common crystallographic orientation. Fourier filtering and geometric phase analysis of dimers reveal a lattice mismatch of 5% and a large interfacial strain together with a significant concentration of defects. The saturation magnetization is lower and the coercivity is higher for the Fe-Mn oxide hybrid nanoparticles compared to the iron oxide nanocube seeds. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Materials characterization, powder X-ray diffraction, EFTEM images, EELS spectra, HAADF-STEM. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr01373b

  5. Cerebral bioimaging of Cu, Fe, Zn, and Mn in the MPTP mouse model of Parkinson's disease using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS).

    PubMed

    Matusch, Andreas; Depboylu, Candan; Palm, Christoph; Wu, Bei; Höglinger, Günter U; Schäfer, Martin K-H; Becker, J Sabine

    2010-01-01

    Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) has been established as a powerful technique for the determination of metal and nonmetal distributions within biological systems with high sensitivity. An imaging LA-ICP-MS technique for Fe, Cu, Zn, and Mn was developed to produce large series of quantitative element maps in native brain sections of mice subchronically intoxicated with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridin (MPTP) as a model of Parkinson's disease. Images were calibrated using matrix-matched laboratory standards. A software solution allowing a precise delineation of anatomical structures was implemented. Coronal brain sections were analyzed crossing the striatum and the substantia nigra, respectively. Animals sacrificed 2 h, 7 d, or 28 d after the last MPTP injection and controls were investigated. We observed significant decreases of Cu concentrations in the periventricular zone and the fascia dentata at 2 h and 7d and a recovery or overcompensation at 28 d, most pronounced in the rostral periventricular zone (+40%). In the cortex Cu decreased slightly to -10%. Fe increased in the interpeduncular nucleus (+40%) but not in the substantia nigra. This pattern is in line with a differential regulation of periventricular and parenchymal Cu, and with the histochemical localization of Fe, and congruent to regions of preferential MPTP binding described in the rodent brain. The LA-ICP-MS technique yielded valid and statistically robust results in the present study on 39 slices from 19 animals. Our findings underline the value of routine micro-local analytical techniques in the life sciences and affirm a role of Cu availability in Parkinson's disease.

  6. Oxidation of Sulfonamides in Aqueous Solution by UV-TiO2-Fe(VI).

    PubMed

    Ma, Yan; Zhang, Kejia; Li, Cong; Zhang, Tuqiao; Gao, Naiyun

    2015-01-01

    The photocatalytic degradation of sulfonamides in aqueous TiO2 suspension under UV irradiation has been investigated using potassium ferrate as electron acceptors. The results showed that the stability of Fe(VI) is dependent on pH significantly, and the stability reduces obviously in the presence of UV-TiO2. The experiments indicated that Fe(VI) could effectively scavenge the conduction band electrons from the surface of TiO2. The photocatalytic oxidation of sulfonamides with Fe(VI) was found to be much faster than that without Fe(VI). The SD, SM, and SMX concentration was greatly reduced by 89.2%, 83.4%, and 82.0%, respectively, after 10 min with UV-TiO2-Fe(VI), comparing to 65.2%, 66.0%, and 71.9%, respectively, with Fe(VI) only in the dark and 71.3%, 72.7%, and 76.0%, respectively, with UV-TiO2. The pH value of solution significantly influenced the sulfonamides degradation in UV-TiO2-Fe(VI) system. The degradation amount of sulfonamides after 10 min was a maximum at pH 7. The intermediate products of sulfonamides oxidation by UV-TiO2-Fe(VI) were analysed by LC-HESI-MS-MS and the results suggested that a majority of sulfonamides turned into large-molecule products without complete mineralization.

  7. Evidence for the Existence of Autotrophic Nitrate-Reducing Fe(II)-Oxidizing Bacteria in Marine Coastal Sediment

    PubMed Central

    Laufer, Katja; Røy, Hans; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizing microorganisms were described for the first time ca. 20 years ago. Most pure cultures of nitrate-reducing Fe(II) oxidizers can oxidize Fe(II) only under mixotrophic conditions, i.e., when an organic cosubstrate is provided. A small number of nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizing cultures have been proposed to grow autotrophically, but unambiguous evidence for autotrophy has not always been provided. Thus, it is still unclear whether or to what extent Fe(II) oxidation coupled to nitrate reduction is an enzymatically catalyzed and energy-yielding autotrophic process or whether Fe(II) is abiotically oxidized by nitrite from heterotrophic nitrate reduction. The aim of the present study was to find evidence for the existence of autotrophic nitrate-reducing Fe(II) oxidizers in coastal marine sediments. Microcosm incubations showed that with increasing incubation times, the stoichiometric ratio of reduced nitrate/oxidized Fe(II) [NO3−reduced/Fe(II)oxidized] decreased, indicating a decreasing contribution of heterotrophic denitrification and/or an increasing contribution of autotrophic nitrate-reducing Fe(II) oxidation over time. After incubations of sediment slurries for >10 weeks, nitrate-reducing activity ceased, although nitrate was still present. This suggests that heterotrophic nitrate reduction had ceased due to the depletion of readily available organic carbon. However, after the addition of Fe(II) to these batch incubation mixtures, the nitrate-reducing activity resumed, and Fe(II) was oxidized, indicating the activity of autotrophic nitrate-reducing Fe(II) oxidizers. The concurrent reduction of 14C-labeled bicarbonate concentrations unambiguously proved that autotrophic C fixation occurred during Fe(II) oxidation and nitrate reduction. Our results clearly demonstrated that autotrophic nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria were present in the investigated coastal marine sediments. IMPORTANCE Twenty years after the

  8. Oxidizing Impact Induced by Mackinawite (FeS) Nanoparticles at Oxic Conditions due to Production of Hydroxyl Radicals.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Dong; Yuan, Songhu; Liao, Peng; Zhang, Peng

    2016-11-01

    Mackinawite (FeS) nanoparticles have been extensively tested for reducing contaminants under anoxic conditions, while the oxidizing impact induced by FeS under oxic conditions has been largely underestimated. In light of previous findings that hydroxyl radicals (·OH) can be produced from oxygenation of sediment Fe(II), herein we revealed that ·OH can be produced efficiently from FeS oxygenation at circumneutral conditions, yielding 84.7 μmol ·OH per g FeS. Much more ·OH was produced from the oxygenation of FeS compared with siderite, pyrite, and zerovalent iron nanoparticles under the same conditions. The oxidation of FeS was a surface-mediated process, in which O2 was transformed by the structural Fe(II) on FeS surface to ·OH with the generation of H2O2 intermediate. A small proportion of Fe(II) was regenerated from the reduction of Fe(III) by FeS and S(-II), but this proportion did not significantly contribute to ·OH production. We further validated that the ·OH produced from FeS oxygenation considerably contributed to the oxidation of arsenic. As the change of redox conditions from anoxic to oxic is common in both natural and artificial processes, our findings suggest that the oxidizing impact induced by FeS at oxic conditions should be concerned due to ·OH production.

  9. Phototrophic Fe(II)-oxidation in the chemocline of a ferruginous meromictic lake

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Xavier A.; Picazo, Antonio; Miracle, Maria R.; Vicente, Eduardo; Camacho, Antonio; Aragno, Michel; Zopfi, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    Precambrian Banded Iron Formation (BIF) deposition was conventionally attributed to the precipitation of iron-oxides resulting from the abiotic reaction of ferrous iron (Fe(II)) with photosynthetically produced oxygen. Earliest traces of oxygen date from 2.7 Ga, thus raising questions as to what may have caused BIF precipitation before oxygenic photosynthesis evolved. The discovery of anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria thriving through the oxidation of Fe(II) has provided support for a biological origin for some BIFs, but despite reports suggesting that anoxygenic phototrophs may oxidize Fe(II) in the environment, a model ecosystem of an ancient ocean where they are demonstrably active was lacking. Here we show that anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria contribute to Fe(II) oxidation in the water column of the ferruginous sulfate-poor, meromictic lake La Cruz (Spain). We observed in-situ photoferrotrophic activity through stimulation of phototrophic carbon uptake in the presence of Fe(II), and determined light-dependent Fe(II)-oxidation by the natural chemocline microbiota. Moreover, a photoferrotrophic bacterium most closely related to Chlorobium ferrooxidans was enriched from the ferruginous water column. Our study for the first time demonstrates a direct link between anoxygenic photoferrotrophy and the anoxic precipitation of Fe(III)-oxides in a ferruginous water column, providing a plausible mechanism for the bacterial origin of BIFs before the advent of free oxygen. However, photoferrotrophs represent only a minor fraction of the anoxygenic phototrophic community with the majority apparently thriving by sulfur cycling, despite the very low sulfur content in the ferruginous chemocline of Lake La Cruz. PMID:25538702

  10. Use of Walnut Shell Powder to Inhibit Expression of Fe2+-Oxidizing Genes of Acidithiobacillus Ferrooxidans

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuhui; Liu, Yehao; Tan, Huifang; Zhang, Yifeng; Yue, Mei

    2016-01-01

    Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans is a Gram-negative bacterium that obtains energy by oxidizing Fe2+ or reduced sulfur compounds. This bacterium contributes to the formation of acid mine drainage (AMD). This study determined whether walnut shell powder inhibits the growth of A. ferrooxidans. First, the effects of walnut shell powder on Fe2+ oxidization and H+ production were evaluated. Second, the chemical constituents of walnut shell were isolated to determine the active ingredient(s). Third, the expression of Fe2+-oxidizing genes and rus operon genes was investigated using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Finally, growth curves were plotted, and a bioleaching experiment was performed to confirm the active ingredient(s) in walnut shells. The results indicated that both walnut shell powder and the phenolic fraction exert high inhibitory effects on Fe2+ oxidation and H+ production by A. ferrooxidans cultured in standard 9K medium. The phenolic components exert their inhibitory effects by down-regulating the expression of Fe2+-oxidizing genes and rus operon genes, which significantly decreased the growth of A. ferrooxidans. This study revealed walnut shell powder to be a promising substance for controlling AMD. PMID:27144574

  11. Temperature control of the growth of iron oxide nanoislands on Fe(001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazu Yamada, Toyo; Sakaguchi, Yuki; Gerhard, Lukas; Wulfhekel, Wulf

    2016-08-01

    The control of atomically flat interfaces between iron (Fe) and insulating oxide films, such as the Fe/MgO(001) interface, is crucial for tunnel-magnetoresistance (TMR) devices. However, the realization of an ideal atomically flat and clean interface is rather difficult since iron easily binds to impurities such as oxygen. Atomic step defects and iron oxide at the interface could reduce TMR. In this study, the oxidization of an atomically flat and clean Fe(001)-whisker single crystal at different substrate and annealing temperatures was investigated with an ultrahigh-vacuum scanning tunneling microscope (STM). Annealing up to a temperature of 850 K was required to obtain ordered and atomically flat Fe(001)-p(1×1)O terraces after the oxidization with the coexistence of Fe-O nanoislands (˜1 nm in height, ˜50 nm in size). We found that the growth of such nanoislands, which enhances interface roughness, strongly depends on the substrate temperature (T S) during the oxidization. A T S lower than 300 K reduces the coverage by the nanoislands to less than 10%.

  12. Crystal Structures at Atomic Resolution of the Perovskite-Related GdBaMnFeO5 and Its Oxidized GdBaMnFeO6.

    PubMed

    García-Martín, Susana; Manabe, Keisuke; Urones-Garrote, Esteban; Ávila-Brande, David; Ichikawa, Noriya; Shimakawa, Yuichi

    2017-02-06

    Perovskite-related GdBaMnFeO5 and the corresponding oxidized phase GdBaMnFeO6, with long-range layered-type ordering of the Ba and Gd atoms have been synthesized. Oxidation retains the cation ordering but drives a modulation of the crystal structure associated with the incorporation of the oxygen atoms between the Gd layers. Oxidation of GdBaMnFeO5 increases the oxidation state of Mn from 2+ to 4+, while the oxidation state of Fe remains 3+. Determination of the crystal structure of both GdBaMnFeO5 and GdBaMnFeO6 is carried out at atomic resolution by means of a combination of advanced transmission electron microscopy techniques. Crystal structure refinements from synchrotron X-ray diffraction data support the structural models proposed from the TEM data. The oxidation states of the Mn and Fe atoms are evaluated by means of EELS and Mössbauer spectroscopy, which also reveals the different magnetic behavior of these oxides.

  13. The influence of magmatic differentiation on the oxidation state of Fe in a basaltic arc magma

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, Katherine A.; Cottrell, Elizabeth

    2012-05-09

    Subduction zone basalts are more oxidized than basalts from other tectonic settings (e.g., higher Fe{sup 3+}/{Sigma}Fe), and this contrast may play a central role in the unique geochemical processes that generate arc and continental crust. The processes generating oxidized arc magmas, however, are poorly constrained, although they appear inherently linked to subduction. Near-surface differentiation processes unique to arc settings might drive oxidation of magmas that originate in equilibrium with a relatively reduced mantle source. Alternatively, arc magmas could record the oxidation conditions of a relatively oxidized mantle source. Here, we present new measurements of olivine-hosted melt inclusions from a single eruption of Agrigan volcano, Marianas, in order to test the influence of differentiation processes vs. source conditions on the Fe{sup 3+}/{Sigma}Fe ratio, a proxy for system oxygen fugacity (fO{sub 2}). We determined Fe{sup 3+}/{Sigma}Fe ratios in glass inclusions using {mu}-XANES and couple these data with major elements, dissolved volatiles, and trace elements. After correcting for post-entrapment crystallization, Fe{sup 3+}/{Sigma}Fe ratios in the Agrigan melt inclusions (0.219 to 0.282), and their modeled fO{sub 2}s ({Delta}QFM + 1.0 to + 1.8), are uniformly more oxidized than MORB, and preserve a portion of the evolution of this magma from 5.7 to 3.2 wt.% MgO. Fractionation of olivine {+-} clinopyroxene {+-} plagioclase should increase Fe{sup 3+}/{Sigma}Fe as MgO decreases in the melt, but the data show Fe{sup 3+}/{Sigma}Fe ratios decreasing as MgO decreases below 5 wt.% MgO. The major element trajectories, taken in combination with this strong reduction trend, are inconsistent with crystallization of common ferromagnesian phases found in the bulk Agrigan sample, including magnetite. Rather, decreasing Fe{sup 3+}/{Sigma}Fe ratios correlate with decreasing S concentrations, suggesting that electronic exchanges associated with SO{sub 2} degassing may

  14. Discovery of Fe7O9: a new iron oxide with a complex monoclinic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinmyo, Ryosuke; Bykova, Elena; Ovsyannikov, Sergey V.; McCammon, Catherine; Kupenko, Ilya; Ismailova, Leyla; Dubrovinsky, Leonid

    2016-09-01

    Iron oxides are fundamentally important compounds for basic and applied sciences as well as in numerous industrial applications. In this work we report the synthesis and investigation of a new binary iron oxide with the hitherto unknown stoichiometry of Fe7O9. This new oxide was synthesized at high-pressure high-temperature (HP-HT) conditions, and its black single crystals were successfully recovered at ambient conditions. By means of single crystal X-ray diffraction we determined that Fe7O9 adopts a monoclinic C2/m lattice with the most distorted crystal structure among the binary iron oxides known to date. The synthesis of Fe7O9 opens a new portal to exotic iron-rich (M,Fe)7O9 oxides with unusual stoichiometry and distorted crystal structures. Moreover, the crystal structure and phase relations of such new iron oxide groups may provide new insight into the cycling of volatiles in the Earth’s interior.

  15. Discovery of Fe7O9: a new iron oxide with a complex monoclinic structure

    PubMed Central

    Sinmyo, Ryosuke; Bykova, Elena; Ovsyannikov, Sergey V.; McCammon, Catherine; Kupenko, Ilya; Ismailova, Leyla; Dubrovinsky, Leonid

    2016-01-01

    Iron oxides are fundamentally important compounds for basic and applied sciences as well as in numerous industrial applications. In this work we report the synthesis and investigation of a new binary iron oxide with the hitherto unknown stoichiometry of Fe7O9. This new oxide was synthesized at high-pressure high-temperature (HP-HT) conditions, and its black single crystals were successfully recovered at ambient conditions. By means of single crystal X-ray diffraction we determined that Fe7O9 adopts a monoclinic C2/m lattice with the most distorted crystal structure among the binary iron oxides known to date. The synthesis of Fe7O9 opens a new portal to exotic iron-rich (M,Fe)7O9 oxides with unusual stoichiometry and distorted crystal structures. Moreover, the crystal structure and phase relations of such new iron oxide groups may provide new insight into the cycling of volatiles in the Earth’s interior. PMID:27605075

  16. Thin Oxides as a Cu Diffusion Barrier for NIF Be Ablator Capsules

    SciTech Connect

    Youngblood, Kelly P.; Huang, H.; Xu, H. W.; Hayes, J.; Moreno, K. A.; Wu, J. J.; Nikroo, A.; Alford, C. A.; Hamza, A. V.; Kucheyev, S. O.; Wang, Y. M.; Wu, K. J.

    2013-03-01

    The NIF point design uses a five-layer capsule to modify the X-ray absorption in order to achieve optimized shock timing. A stepped copper dopant design defines the layer structure. The production of the capsule involves pyrolysis to remove the inner plastic mandrel. Copper atoms diffuse radially and azimuthally throughout the capsule during pyrolysis. This diffusion significantly diminishes the capsule performance during implosion. Thermal and coated oxide barrier layers employed between layers mitigate the diffusion of copper during the mandrel removal process. The copper atoms do not diffuse through this barrier during pyrolysis. A capsule fabrication method that produces a capsule with a thin oxide layer will be discussed.

  17. [Clinical effect of ultrasound-guided injection of biodegradable poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)-Fe3O4 in situ implant for magnetic thermal ablation in treatment of nude mice with human liver cancer SMMC-7721 cells].

    PubMed

    Liang, B; Zuo, G Q; Zheng, Y Y; He, S; Zuo, D Y

    2016-12-20

    Objective: To prepare the Fe3O4-loaded biodegradable liquid-solid phase inversion poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) in situ implant for ultrasound-guided injection into nude mouse tumor model, and to investigate its clinical effect in thermomagnetic treatment of nude mice with human liver cancer SMMC-7721 cells in an alternating magnetic field. Methods: An in situ implant containing 10% Fe3O4 was prepared, and 50 μl Fe3O4-PLGA-NMP gel was injected into the subcutaneous tissue of Kunming mice. The degradation of this material was observed for 2 consecutive months, and the changes in body weight were recorded. HE staining and Prussian blue staining were performed for the heart, liver, spleen, lung, and kidney of Kunming mice. Fresh ex vivo bovine liver was taken and cut into cubes with a dimension of 2 cm×2 cm×2 cm and then 50 μl Fe3O4-PLGA-NMP gel was injected; after phase inversion, the cubes of ex vivo bovine liver were heated for 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 minutes, respectively, and then cut open for observing the range of ablation; HE staining was also performed. Micro-CT scan was performed after ultrasound-guided injection of 50 μl Fe3O4-PLGA gel into the tumors of the nude mice, and then the nude mice were divided into treatment group and control group. The mice in the treatment group were given thermomagnetic treatment for 3 minutes, and tumor growth was observed daily. Results: The biodegradation of Fe3O4-PLGA-NMP implant showed that the subcutaneously injected material was gradually metabolized at 2 weeks after injection and that the nude mice were in good condition. The bovine liver ablation experiment showed that the range of ablation of 50 μl Fe3O4-PLGA implant reached 1.46 ± 0.11 cm. HE staining showed that part of bovine liver had coagulative necrosis. The phase inversion experiment of Fe3O4-PLGA gel showed quick liquid-solid phase inversion of the material after injection into the tumor, and the process of liquid-solid phase inversion could be

  18. Catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of p-nitrophenol by Fe (III) supported on resin.

    PubMed

    Liou, Rey-May; Chen, Shih-Hsiung; Huang, Cheng-Hsien; Lai, Cheng-Lee; Shih, C Y; Chang, Jing-Song; Hung, Mu-Ya

    2010-01-01

    Fe(III) supported on resin (Fe(III)-resin) as an effective catalyst for peroxide oxidation was prepared and applied for the degradation of p-nitrophenol (PNP). Catalytic wet peroxide oxidation (CWPO) experiments with hydrogen peroxide as oxidant were performed in a batch rector with p-nitrophenol as the model pollutant. Under given conditions (PNP concentration 500 mg/L, H(2)O(2) 0.1 M, 80°C, resin dosage 0.6% g/mL), p-nitrophenol was almost completely removed, corresponding to an 84% of COD removal. It was found that the reaction temperature, oxidant concentration. and initial pH of solution significantly affected both p-nitrophenol conversion and COD removal by oxidation. It can be inferred from the experiments that Fe(III) supported on resin was an effective catalyst in the mineralization of p-nitrophenol. In an acidic environment of oxidation, the leaching test showed that there was only a slight leaching effect on the activity of catalytic oxidation. It was also confirmed by the aging test of catalysts in the oxidation.

  19. Oxidation of synthesized sub-micron pyrite (FeS2) in seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gartman, Amy; Luther, George W.

    2014-11-01

    Synthesized sub-micron pyrite was oxidized in 0.2 μm-filtered Sargasso seawater in order to investigate the rate of oxidation and reaction end-products. Over the initial phase of the reaction, the sub-micron pyrite behaved as a soluble entity as the initial rate of oxidation was determined to be first order with respect to both pyrite and oxygen concentration, where the rate is described as -dFeS2/dt = k[FeS2][O2] and k, the rate constant, is 7.60 × 10-5 + 6.29 × 10-5 μM-1 day-1 at 25 °C. Oxidation proceeds inward from an initial surface oxidation of the pyrite and the formation of an amorphous mixed valence Fe(II)/(III) oxide surrounding the remaining pyrite core. The oxidation rates obtained through this study are up to two orders of magnitude slower than reported in previous pyrite oxidation studies using ground rather than synthesized pyrite at similar pH values. These results may be applied anywhere seawater and sub-micron pyrite are found, including hydrothermal vents, salt marshes and marine sediments.

  20. Role of oxidants in enhancing dewaterability of anaerobically digested sludge through Fe (II) activated oxidation processes: hydrogen peroxide versus persulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Kang; Zhou, Xu; Liu, Yiqi; Gong, Yanyan; Zhou, Beibei; Wang, Dongbo; Wang, Qilin

    2016-04-01

    Improving dewaterability of sludge is important for the disposal of sludge in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). This study, for the first time, investigated the Fe(II) activated oxidization processes in improving anaerobically digested sludge (ADS) dewaterability. The combination of Fe(II) (0–100 mg/g total solids (TS)) and persulfate (0–1,000 mg/g TS) under neutral pH as well as the combination of Fe(II) (0–100 mg/g TS) and hydrogen peroxide (HP) (0–1,000 mg/g TS) under pH 3.0 were used to examine and compare their effect on the ADS dewaterability enhancement. The highest ADS dewaterability enhancement was attained at 25 mg Fe(II)/g TS and 50 mg HP/g TS, when the CST (CST: the capillary suction time, a sludge dewaterability indicator) was reduced by 95%. In contrast, the highest CST reduction in Fe(II)-persulfate conditioning was 90%, which was obtained at 50 mg Fe(II)/g TS and 250 mg persulfate/g TS. The results showed that Fe(II)-HP conditioning was comparable with Fe(II)-persulfate conditioning in terms of highest CST reduction. Economic analysis suggested that the Fe(II)-HP conditioning was more promising for improving ADS dewaterability compared with Fe(II)-persulfate conditioning, with the saving being up to $65,000 per year in a WWTP with a population equivalent of 100,000.

  1. Role of oxidants in enhancing dewaterability of anaerobically digested sludge through Fe (II) activated oxidation processes: hydrogen peroxide versus persulfate

    PubMed Central

    Song, Kang; Zhou, Xu; Liu, Yiqi; Gong, Yanyan; Zhou, Beibei; Wang, Dongbo; Wang, Qilin

    2016-01-01

    Improving dewaterability of sludge is important for the disposal of sludge in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). This study, for the first time, investigated the Fe(II) activated oxidization processes in improving anaerobically digested sludge (ADS) dewaterability. The combination of Fe(II) (0–100 mg/g total solids (TS)) and persulfate (0–1,000 mg/g TS) under neutral pH as well as the combination of Fe(II) (0–100 mg/g TS) and hydrogen peroxide (HP) (0–1,000 mg/g TS) under pH 3.0 were used to examine and compare their effect on the ADS dewaterability enhancement. The highest ADS dewaterability enhancement was attained at 25 mg Fe(II)/g TS and 50 mg HP/g TS, when the CST (CST: the capillary suction time, a sludge dewaterability indicator) was reduced by 95%. In contrast, the highest CST reduction in Fe(II)-persulfate conditioning was 90%, which was obtained at 50 mg Fe(II)/g TS and 250 mg persulfate/g TS. The results showed that Fe(II)-HP conditioning was comparable with Fe(II)-persulfate conditioning in terms of highest CST reduction. Economic analysis suggested that the Fe(II)-HP conditioning was more promising for improving ADS dewaterability compared with Fe(II)-persulfate conditioning, with the saving being up to $65,000 per year in a WWTP with a population equivalent of 100,000. PMID:27109500

  2. Enhanced dewaterability of waste activated sludge by Fe(II)-activated peroxymonosulfate oxidation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Yang, Qi; Wang, Dongbo; Li, Xiaoming; Zhong, Yu; Li, Xin; Deng, Yongchao; Wang, Liqun; Yi, Kaixin; Zeng, Guangming

    2016-04-01

    The effect of Fe(II)-activated peroxymonosulfate (Fe(II)-PMS) oxidation on the waste activated sludge (WAS) dewatering and its mechanisms were investigated in this study. The capillary suction time (CST), specific resistance to filterability (SRF) of sludge and water content (WC) of dewatered sludge cake were chosen as the main parameters to evaluate the sludge dewaterability. Experimental results showed that Fe(II)-PMS effectively disintegrated sludge and improved sludge dewaterability. High CST and SRF reduction (90% and 97%) was achieved at the optimal conditions of PMS (HSO5(-)) 0.9 mmol/gVSS, Fe(II) 0.81 mmol/gVSS, and pH 6.8. Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and three-dimensional excitation-emission matrix (3D-EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy before and after Fe(II)-PMS oxidation were determined to explain the enhanced dewatering mechanism. The release of EPS-bound water induced by the destruction of EPS was the primary reason for the improvement of sludge dewaterability during Fe(II)-PMS oxidation.

  3. Discovery of the recoverable high-pressure iron oxide Fe4O5.

    PubMed

    Lavina, Barbara; Dera, Przemyslaw; Kim, Eunja; Meng, Yue; Downs, Robert T; Weck, Philippe F; Sutton, Stephen R; Zhao, Yusheng

    2011-10-18

    Phases of the iron-oxygen binary system are significant to most scientific disciplines, directly affecting planetary evolution, life, and technology. Iron oxides have unique electronic properties and strongly interact with the environment, particularly through redox reactions. The iron-oxygen phase diagram therefore has been among the most thoroughly investigated, yet it still holds striking findings. Here, we report the discovery of an iron oxide with formula Fe(4)O(5), synthesized at high pressure and temperature. The previously undescribed phase, stable from 5 to at least 30 GPa, is recoverable to ambient conditions. First-principles calculations confirm that the iron oxide here described is energetically more stable than FeO + Fe(3)O(4) at pressure greater than 10 GPa. The calculated lattice constants, equation of states, and atomic coordinates are in excellent agreement with experimental data, confirming the synthesis of Fe(4)O(5). Given the conditions of stability and its composition, Fe(4)O(5) is a plausible accessory mineral of the Earth's upper mantle. The phase has strong ferrimagnetic character comparable to magnetite. The ability to synthesize the material at accessible conditions and recover it at ambient conditions, along with its physical properties, suggests a potential interest in Fe(4)O(5) for technological applications.

  4. EDTA and electricity synergetic catalyzed Fe(3+)/H2O2 process for amoxicillin oxidation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ting-Ting; Li, Xiao-Ming; Tang, Yu-Fang; Wang, Juan; Yue, Xiu; Cao, Jian-Bin; Zheng, Wei; Wang, Dong-Bo; Zeng, Guang-Ming

    2009-01-01

    Three oxidation processes for amoxicillin wastewater pretreatment such as Electro-Fe(3+)(EDTA)/H2O2 (EDTA: ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid), Fe(3+)(EDTA)/H2O2 and Electro-Fe(3+)/H2O2 were simultaneously discussed at pH of 7.0 (+/-0.1). It was found that the above processes could achieve 78%, 64%, 33% chemical oxygen demand (COD(cr)) removal, and 86%, 70%, 47% amoxicillin degradation respectively. Moreover, the results of biodegradability (biological oxygen demand (BOD(5))/COD(cr) ratio) showed that the Electro-Fe(3+)(EDTA)/H2O2 process was a promising way to pretreat antibiotic wastewater due to the biodegradability of the effluent improved to 0.48 compared with the cases of Fe(3+)(EDTA)/H2O2 (0.40) and Electro-Fe(3+)/H2O2 process (0.12). Therefore, it was reasonable to note that EDTA and electricity showed synergetic effect on the oxidation process. Additionally, infrared spectra (IR) were applied to concisely propose a potential degradation way of amoxicillin. The characteristic changes of H2O2 and EDTA in the oxidation process were also investigated in detail.

  5. Oxidized and Reduced [2Fe-2S] Clusters from an Iron(I) Synthon

    PubMed Central

    Reesbeck, Megan E.; Rodriguez, Meghan M.; Brennessel, William W.; Mercado, Brandon Q.; Vinyard, David; Holland, Patrick L.

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic [2Fe-2S] clusters are often used to elucidate ligand effects on the reduction potentials and spectroscopy of natural electron transfer sites, which can have anionic Cys ligands or neutral His ligands. Current synthetic routes to [2Fe-2S] clusters are limited in their feasibility with a range of supporting ligands. Here we report a new synthetic route to synthetic [2Fe-2S] clusters, through oxidation of an iron(I) source with elemental sulfur. This method yields a neutral diketiminate-supported [2Fe-2S] cluster in the diiron(III) oxidized form. The oxidized [2Fe-2S] cluster can be reduced to a mixed valent iron(II)-iron(III) compound. Both the diferric and reduced mixed valent clusters are characterized using X-ray crystallography, Mössbauer spectroscopy, EPR spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. The reduced compound is particularly interesting because its X-ray crystal structure shows a difference in Fe-S bond lengths to one of the iron atoms, consistent with valence localization. The valence localization is also evident from Mössbauer spectroscopy. PMID:26044124

  6. Influence of recrystallization on phase separation kinetics of oxide dispersion strengthened Fe Cr Al alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Capdevila, C.; Miller, Michael K; Pimentel, G.; Chao, J.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of different starting microstructures on the kinetics of Fe-rich ({alpha}) and Cr-rich ({alpha}') phase separation during aging of Fe-Cr-Al oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys has been analyzed with a combination of atom probe tomography and thermoelectric power measurements. The results revealed that the high recrystallization temperature necessary to produce a coarse grained microstructure in Fe-base ODS alloys affects the randomness of Cr-atom distributions and defect density, which consequently affect the phase separation kinetics at low annealing temperatures.

  7. Role of Hydrophobicity in Adhesion of the Dissimilatory Fe(III)-Reducing Bacterium Shewanella alga to Amorphous Fe(III) Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Caccavo, F.; Schamberger, P. C.; Keiding, K.; Nielsen, P. H.

    1997-01-01

    The mechanisms by which the dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Shewanella alga adheres to amorphous Fe(III) oxide were examined through comparative analysis of S. alga BrY and an adhesion-deficient strain of this species, S. alga RAD20. Approximately 100% of S. alga BrY cells typically adhered to amorphous Fe(III) oxide, while less than 50% of S. alga RAD20 cells adhered. Bulk chemical analysis, isoelectric point analysis, and cell surface analysis by time-of-flight secondary-ion mass spectrometry and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis demonstrated that the surfaces of S. alga BrY cells were predominantly protein but that the surfaces of S. alga RAD20 cells were predominantly exopolysaccharide. Physicochemical analyses and hydrophobic interaction assays demonstrated that S. alga BrY cells were more hydrophobic than S. alga RAD20 cells. This study represents the first quantitative analysis of the adhesion of a dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacterium to amorphous Fe(III) oxide, and the results collectively suggest that hydrophobic interactions are a factor in controlling the adhesion of this bacterium to amorphous Fe(III) oxide. Despite having a reduced ability to adhere, S. alga RAD20 reduced Fe(III) oxide at a rate identical to that of S. alga BrY. This result contrasts with results of previous studies by demonstrating that irreversible cell adhesion is not requisite for microbial reduction of amorphous Fe(III) oxide. These results suggest that the interaction between dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacteria and amorphous Fe(III) oxide is more complex than previously believed. PMID:16535706

  8. Comparison study of Cu-Fe-Ti and Co-Fe-Ti oxide catalysts for selective catalytic reduction of NO with NH3 at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lin; Zhong, Zhaoping; Yang, Han; Wang, Chunhua

    2016-09-15

    In this paper, a series of Cu-Fe-Ti and Co-Fe-Ti oxide catalysts were prepared by sol gel method. Cu-Fe-Ti and Co-Fe-Ti oxide catalysts showed the moderate catalytic activity for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO with NH3 at low temperature. The catalysts with the molar ratio as 4:1:10 (M:Fe:Ti) were selected as the representatives for comparison of reaction properties and H2O resistance, which were denoted as Cu-Fe/TiO2 and Co-Fe/TiO2 respectively. The characterization results manifested Co-Fe/TiO2 owned more adsorption capacity of the reactants and Cu-Fe/TiO2 had better redox ability. The in situ DRIFTS experiments indicated that adsorbed NH3 species and nitrate species both exhibited reaction activity for Co-Fe/TiO2, while nitric oxide was only be reduced by adsorbed NH3 species through Eley-Rideal mechanism for Cu-Fe/TiO2 at 150°C. Co-Fe/TiO2 exhibited the better resistance to H2O and its temperature window shifted towards the higher temperature in presence of 10vol% H2O, while the SCR activity of Cu-Fe/TiO2 was inhibited significantly in the whole temperature range investigated. The suppression of adsorption and activation for NH3 and NOx might be the reasons for the reversible inactivation, which was confirmed by the inhibitation of catalytic activities for separation NH3 and NO oxidation under the wet condition. We speculated that different thermal stability of adsorbed species and redox capacity of catalysts leaded to the different SCR behavior in absence and presence of H2O.

  9. Promotion of CO oxidation on the Fe/N X clusters embedded graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ming Yu; Zhao, Ru Meng; Niu, Meng Meng; Li, Wei; Ma, Ya Qiang; Li, Yi; Tang, Ya Nan; Dai, Xian Qi

    2017-03-01

    CO catalytic oxidation on the two-dimensional (2D) Fe/N X clusters embedded graphene (G) (X = 4, 3, 2, 1) with D 4h, C 2v, C 2h, and C S symmetries is investigated using the first-principle method. Fe/N2-G system with C 2h symmetry facilitates the O2 adsorption. The strong interaction between the Fe atom and O2 in Fe/N2-G system can be contributed from the high energy of Fe's d_z^2 orbit. The CO oxidation reaction on Fe/N2-G system has a small energy barrier (0.43 eV) by the Langmuir-Hinshelwood (LH) mechanism (CO + O2 → OOCO → CO2 + Oads), which would be useful in evaluating the reactivity of Fe catalyst and serving as a good candidate for efficient non-noble metal catalyst. The results provide valuable guidance on selecting catalysts of low cost and superior activity to fabricate graphene-based materials.

  10. Stability of uranium incorporated into Fe (hydr)oxides under fluctuating redox conditions.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Brandy D; Nico, Peter S; Fendorf, Scott

    2009-07-01

    Reaction pathways resulting in uranium-bearing solids that are stable (i.e., having limited solubility) under aerobic and anaerobic conditions will limit dissolved concentrations and migration of this toxin. Here, we examine the sorption mechanism and propensity for release of uranium reacted with Fe (hydr)oxides under cyclic oxidizing and reducing conditions. Upon reaction of ferrihydrite with Fe(II) under conditions where aqueous Ca-UO2-CO3 species predominate (3 mM Ca and 3.8 mM total CO3), dissolved uranium concentrations decrease from 0.16 mM to below detection limit (BDL) after 5-15 d, depending on the Fe(II) concentration. In systems undergoing 3 successive redox cycles (14 d of reduction, followed by 5 d of oxidation) and a pulsed decrease to 0.15 mM total CO3, dissolved uranium concentrations varied depending on the Fe(II) concentration during the initial and subsequent reduction phases. U concentrations resulting during the oxic "rebound" varied inversely with the Fe(II) concentration during the reduction cycle. Uranium removed from solution remains in the oxidized form and is found adsorbed onto and incorporated into the structure of newly formed goethite and magnetite. Our results reveal that the fate of uranium is dependent on anaerobic/ aerobic conditions, aqueous uranium speciation, and the fate of iron.

  11. Stability of uranium incorporated into Fe(hydr)oxides under fluctuating redox conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, B.D.; Nico, P.S.; Fendorf, S.

    2009-04-01

    Reaction pathways resulting in uranium bearing solids that are stable (i.e., having limited solubility) under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions will limit dissolved concentrations and migration of this toxin. Here we examine the sorption mechanism and propensity for release of uranium reacted with Fe (hydr)oxides under cyclic oxidizing and reducing conditions. Upon reaction of ferrihydrite with Fe(II) under conditions where aqueous Ca-UO{sub 2}-CO{sub 3} species predominate (3 mM Ca and 3.8 mM CO{sub 3}-total), dissolved uranium concentrations decrease from 0.16 mM to below detection limit (BDL) after 5 to 15 d, depending on the Fe(II) concentration. In systems undergoing 3 successive redox cycles (15 d of reduction followed by 5 d of oxidation) and a pulsed decrease to 0.15 mM CO{sub 3}-total, dissolved uranium concentrations varied depending on the Fe(II) concentration during the initial and subsequent reduction phases - U concentrations resulting during the oxic 'rebound' varied inversely with the Fe(II) concentration during the reduction cycle. Uranium removed from solution remains in the oxidized form and is found both adsorbed on and incorporated into the structure of newly formed goethite and magnetite. Our 15 results reveal that the fate of uranium is dependent on anaerobic/aerobic conditions, aqueous uranium speciation, and the fate of iron.

  12. The Oxidation State of Fe in MORB Glasses and the Oxygen Fugacity of the Upper Mantle

    SciTech Connect

    E Cottrell; K Kelley

    2011-12-31

    Micro-analytical determination of Fe{sup 3+}/{Sigma}Fe ratios in mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) glasses using micro X-ray absorption near edge structure ({mu}-XANES) spectroscopy reveals a substantially more oxidized upper mantle than determined by previous studies. Here, we show that global MORBs yield average Fe{sup 3+}/{Sigma}Fe ratios of 0.16 {+-} 0.01 (n = 103), which trace back to primary MORB melts equilibrated at the conditions of the quartz-fayalite-magnetite (QFM) buffer. Our results necessitate an upward revision of the Fe{sup 3+}/{Sigma}Fe ratios of MORBs, mantle oxygen fugacity, and the ferric iron content of the mantle relative to previous wet chemical determinations. We show that only 0.01 (absolute, or < 10%) of the difference between Fe{sup 3+}/{Sigma}Fe ratios determined by micro-colorimety and XANES can be attributed to the Moessbauer-based XANES calibration. The difference must instead derive from a bias between micro-colorimetry performed on experimental vs. natural basalts. Co-variations of Fe{sup 3+}/{Sigma}Fe ratios in global MORB with indices of low-pressure fractional crystallization are consistent with Fe{sup 3+} behaving incompatibly in shallow MORB magma chambers. MORB Fe{sup 3+}/{Sigma}Fe ratios do not, however, vary with indices of the extent of mantle melting (e.g., Na{sub 2}O(8)) or water concentration. We offer two hypotheses to explain these observations: The bulk partition coefficient of Fe{sup 3+} may be higher during peridotite melting than previously thought, and may vary with temperature, or redox exchange between sulfide and sulfate species could buffer mantle melting at {approx} QFM. Both explanations, in combination with the measured MORB Fe{sup 3+}/{Sigma}Fe ratios, point to a fertile MORB source with greater than 0.3 wt.% Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}.

  13. Enhanced antibacterial activity of copper/copper oxide nanowires prepared by pulsed laser ablation in water medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swarnkar, R. K.; Pandey, J. K.; Soumya, K. K.; Dwivedi, P.; Sundaram, S.; Prasad, Sanjay; Gopal, R.

    2016-07-01

    Copper/copper oxide nanowires (NWs) are well known for its antibacterial activity against various pathogens. In the present study, we have shown the enhanced antibacterial activity of the NWs against gram-negative bacterial strains ( Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Salmonella typhi) and gram-positive bacterial strains ( Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus). The increase in the activity is because of the shape and size of the colloidal NWs which were prepared at room temperature in a one-step process by pulsed laser ablation of copper metal target. The purity, shape and size of the colloidal NWs were well characterized by UV-visible absorption spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The NWs were of diameters in the range of 15-30 nm and lengths ranging from 200 to 600 nm. The dose-dependent antibacterial activity of these NWs was found to be more effective against gram-negative bacteria compared to gram-positive bacteria. As gram-negative bacteria have thinner layer of cell wall made up of peptidoglycan possibly which makes them more susceptible to Cu/Cu2O NWs, Cu/Cu2O NWs can be a potent candidate to be used as bactericidal or as growth inhibitor.

  14. Nano-sized magnetic iron oxides as catalysts for heterogeneous Fenton-like reactions-Influence of Fe(II)/Fe(III) ratio on catalytic performance.

    PubMed

    Rusevova, Klara; Kopinke, Frank-Dieter; Georgi, Anett

    2012-11-30

    Nano-sized Fe(II, III) oxides with various Fe(II)/Fe(III) ratios were characterized and tested as catalysts for the oxidative degradation of phenol via Fenton-like reactions at neutral pH. Under conditions typically applied for wet peroxide oxidation, Fe(II) in magnetite is oxidized to Fe(III), successively converting the mineral into maghemite. The residual Fe(II) content in the catalyst core is of only minor benefit for the catalytic activity in phenol oxidation, i.e. magnetite is not superior to maghemite. Achievable reaction rates for phenol degradation appeared to be rather low, e.g. phenol half-life of about 12 h when 3 g L(-1) magnetite and 5 g L(-1) H(2)O(2) were applied. Preceding surface-reduction of maghemite by NaBH(4), leading to an over-stoichiometric Fe(II) content compared to magnetite, only enhanced the non-productive decomposition of H(2)O(2) rather than the rate of phenol degradation. Reaction rates were shown to be relatively insensitive to catalyst concentration in the range of 1-10 g L(-1), probably resulting from a scavenging of reactive species by the catalyst surface, whereby particle agglomeration seems to play a key role. Degradation experiments with various structurally distinct compounds were carried out, indicating a similar selectivity of the heterogeneous Fenton-like system to that known for oxidation with ·OH.

  15. Tumor Ablation and Nanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Manthe, Rachel L.; Foy, Susan P.; Krishnamurthy, Nishanth; Sharma, Blanka; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2010-01-01

    Next to surgical resection, tumor ablation is a commonly used intervention in the treatment of solid tumors. Tumor ablation methods include thermal therapies, photodynamic therapy, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) producing agents. Thermal therapies induce tumor cell death via thermal energy and include radiofrequency, microwave, high intensity focused ultrasound, and cryoablation. Photodynamic therapy and ROS producing agents cause increased oxidative stress in tumor cells leading to apoptosis. While these therapies are safe and viable alternatives when resection of malignancies is not feasible, they do have associated limitations that prevent their widespread use in clinical applications. To improve the efficacy of these treatments, nanoparticles are being studied in combination with nonsurgical ablation regimens. In addition to better thermal effect on tumor ablation, nanoparticles can deliver anticancer therapeutics that show synergistic anti-tumor effect in the presence of heat and can also be imaged to achieve precision in therapy. Understanding the molecular mechanism of nanoparticle-mediated tumor ablation could further help engineer nanoparticles of appropriate composition and properties to synergize the ablation effect. This review aims to explore the various types of nonsurgical tumor ablation methods currently used in cancer treatment and potential improvements by nanotechnology applications. PMID:20866097

  16. Electronic spectra of Fe3+ oxides and oxide hydroxides in the near IR to near UV.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherman, David M.; Waite, T.D.

    1985-01-01

    Optical absorption and diffuse reflectance spectra of several Fe2O3 and FeOOH polymorphs (hematite, maghemite, goethite, lepidocrocite) in the near-IR to near-UV spectral regions (2000-200 nm) are presented. The spectra consist primarily of Fe3+ ligand field and ligand-to-metal charge-transfer transitions.-J.A.Z.

  17. Thin Oxides as a Cu Diffusion Barrier for NIF Be Ablator Capsules

    DOE PAGES

    Youngblood, Kelly P.; Huang, H.; Xu, H. W.; ...

    2013-03-01

    The NIF point design uses a five-layer capsule to modify the X-ray absorption in order to achieve optimized shock timing. A stepped copper dopant design defines the layer structure. The production of the capsule involves pyrolysis to remove the inner plastic mandrel. Copper atoms diffuse radially and azimuthally throughout the capsule during pyrolysis. This diffusion significantly diminishes the capsule performance during implosion. Thermal and coated oxide barrier layers employed between layers mitigate the diffusion of copper during the mandrel removal process. The copper atoms do not diffuse through this barrier during pyrolysis. A capsule fabrication method that produces a capsulemore » with a thin oxide layer will be discussed.« less

  18. Surface passivation limited UO2 oxidative dissolution in the presence of FeS.

    PubMed

    Bi, Yuqiang; Hayes, Kim F

    2014-11-18

    Iron sulfide minerals produced during in situ bioremediation of U can serve as an oxygen scavenger to retard uraninite (UO2) oxidation upon oxygen intrusion. Under persistent oxygen supply, however, iron sulfides become oxidized and depleted, giving rise to elevated dissolved oxygen (DO) levels and remobilization of U(IV). The present study investigated the mechanism that regulates UO2 oxidative dissolution rate in a flow-through system when oxygen breakthrough occurred as a function of mackinawite (FeS) and carbonate concentrations. The formation and evolution of surface layers on UO2 were characterized using XAS and XPS. During FeS inhibition period, the continuous supply of carbonate and calcium in the influent effectively complexed and removed oxidized U(VI) to preserve an intermediate U4O9 surface. When the FeS became depleted by oxidization, a transient, rapid dissolution of UO2 was observed along with DO breakthrough in the reactor. This rate was greater than during the preceding FeS inhibition period and control experiments in the absence of FeS. With increasing DO, the rate slowed and the rate-limiting step shifted from surface oxidation to U(VI) detachment as U(VI) passivation layers developed. In contrast, increasing the carbonate concentrations facilitated detachment of surface-associated U(VI) complexes and impeded the formation of U(VI) passivation layer. This study demonstrates the critical role of U(VI) surface layer formation versus U(VI) detachment in controlling UO2 oxidative dissolution rate during periods of variable oxygen presence under simulated groundwater conditions.

  19. Role of the NiFe Hydrogenase Hya in Oxidative Stress Defense in Geobacter sulfurreducens

    PubMed Central

    Lovley, Derek R.

    2012-01-01

    Geobacter sulfurreducens, an Fe(III)-reducing deltaproteobacterium found in anoxic subsurface environments, contains 4 NiFe hydrogenases. Hyb, a periplasmically oriented membrane-bound NiFe hydrogenase, is essential for hydrogen-dependent growth. The functions of the three other hydrogenases are unknown. We show here that the other periplasmically oriented membrane-bound NiFe hydrogenase, Hya, is necessary for growth after exposure to oxidative stress when hydrogen or a highly limiting concentration of acetate is the electron source. The beneficial impact of Hya on growth was dependent on the presence of H2 in the atmosphere. Moreover, the Hya-deficient strain was more sensitive to the presence of superoxide or hydrogen peroxide. Hya was also required to safeguard Hyb hydrogen oxidation activity after exposure to O2. Overexpression studies demonstrated that Hya was more resistant to oxidative stress than Hyb. Overexpression of Hya also resulted in the creation of a recombinant strain better fitted for exposure to oxidative stress than wild-type G. sulfurreducens. These results demonstrate that one of the physiological roles of the O2-resistant Hya is to participate in the oxidative stress defense of G. sulfurreducens. PMID:22366414

  20. Influence of the Dithiolate Bridge on the Oxidative Processes of Diiron Models Related to the Active Site of [FeFe] Hydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Arrigoni, Federica; Mohamed Bouh, Salma; De Gioia, Luca; Elleouet, Catherine; Pétillon, François Y; Schollhammer, Philippe; Zampella, Giuseppe

    2017-03-28

    Electrochemical studies of [Fe2 (CO)4 (κ(2) -dmpe)(μ-dithiolate)] (dithiolate=adt(Bn) , pdt) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations reveal the striking influence of an amine functionality in the dithiolate bridge on their oxidative properties. [Fe2 (CO)4 (κ(2) -dmpe)(μ-adt(Bn) )] (1) undergoes two one-electron oxidation steps, with the first being partially reversible and the second irreversible. When the adt(Bn) bridge is replaced with pdt, a shift of 60 mV towards more positive potentials is observed for the first oxidation whereas 290 mV separate the oxidation potentials of the two cations. Under CO, oxidation of azadithiolate compound 1 occurs according to an ECE process whereas an EC mechanism takes place for the propanedithiolate species 2. The dication species [1-CO](2+) resulting from the two-electron oxidation of 1 has been spectroscopically and structurally characterized. The molecular details underlying the reactivity of oxidized species have been explored by DFT calculations. The differences in the behaviors of 1 and 2 are mainly due to the presence, or not, of favored interactions between the dithiolate bridge and the diiron site depending on the redox states, Fe(I) Fe(II) or Fe(II) Fe(II) , of the complexes.

  1. Magnetic phases in lunar fines - Metallic Fe or ferric oxides.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsay, F.-D.; Manatt, S. L.; Chan, S. I.

    1973-01-01

    The ferromagnetic resonance observed for the Apollo 11 and 12 lunar fines is characterized by an asymmetric lineshape with a narrower appearance on the high field side. This asymmetry together with an anisotropy energy which varies from +640 to +500 G over the temperature range of 80 to 298 K indicate that the ferromagnetic resonance arises from metallic Fe having the body-centered cubic structure and not from hematite, magnetite or other Fe(3+) ions in magnetite-like phases. The g-value, the lineshape asymmetry, and the temperature dependence of the linewidth for the Apollo 14 and 15 fines as reported by other workers are found to be essentially similar to those observed for the Apollo 11 and 12 fines.

  2. Synthesis of Zn–Fe layered double hydroxides via an oxidation process and structural analysis of products

    SciTech Connect

    Morimoto, Kazuya; Tamura, Kenji; Anraku, Sohtaro; Sato, Tsutomu; Suzuki, Masaya; Yamada, Hirohisa

    2015-08-15

    The synthesis of Zn–Fe(III) layered double hydroxides was attempted, employing different pathways using either Fe(II) or Fe(III) species together with Zn as the initial reagents. The product derived from the synthesis employing Fe(II) was found to transition to a Zn–Fe(III) layered double hydroxides phase following oxidation process. In contrast, the product obtained with Fe(III) did not contain a layered double hydroxides phase, but rather consisted of simonkolleite and hydrous ferric oxide. It was determined that the valency of the Fe reagent used in the initial synthesis affected the generation of the layered double hydroxides phase. Fe(II) species have ionic radii and electronegativities similar to those of Zn, and therefore are more likely to form trioctahedral hydroxide layers with Zn species. - Graphical abstract: The synthesis of Zn–Fe(III) layered double hydroxides was attempted, employing different pathways using either Fe(II) or Fe(III) species together with Zn as the initial reagents. - Highlights: • Iron valency affected the generation of Zn–Fe layered double hydroxides. • Zn–Fe layered double hydroxides were successfully synthesized using Fe(II). • Fe(II) species were likely to form trioctahedral hydroxide layers with Zn species.

  3. Superparamagnetic mesoporous Mg-Fe bi-metal oxides as efficient magnetic solid-base catalysts for Knoevenagel condensations.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhe; Zhou, Jian; Cui, Fangming; Zhu, Yan; Hua, Zile; Shi, Jianlin

    2010-12-14

    Superparamagnetic mesoporous Mg-Fe bi-metal oxides with varied Mg-Fe atomic ratios have been successfully synthesized as solid base catalysts. The M2F-400 catalyst with Mg/Fe atomic ratio = 2 showed extraordinarily high activities for Knoevenagel reactions even at room temperature. It could be magnetically separated, recycled, and reused for at least five cycles.

  4. Effect Of Inorganic, Synthetic And Naturally Occurring Chelating Agents On Fe(II) Mediated Advanced Oxidation Of Chlorophenols

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study examines the feasibility and application of Advanced Oxidation Technologies (AOTs) for the treatment of chlorophenols that are included in US EPA priority pollutant list. A novel class of sulfate/hydroxyl radical-based homogeneous AOTs (Fe(II)/PS, Fe(II)/PMS, Fe(II)/H...

  5. Schwertmannite and Fe oxides formed by biological low-pH Fe(II) oxidation versus abiotic neutralization: Impact on trace metal sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgos, William D.; Borch, Thomas; Troyer, Lyndsay D.; Luan, Fubo; Larson, Lance N.; Brown, Juliana F.; Lambson, Janna; Shimizu, Masayuki

    2012-01-01

    Three low-pH coal mine drainage (CMD) sites in central Pennsylvania were studied to determine similarities in sediment composition, mineralogy, and morphology. Water from one site was used in discontinuous titration/neutralization experiments to produce Fe(III) minerals by abiotic oxidative hydrolysis for comparison with the field precipitates that were produced by biological low-pH Fe(II) oxidation. Even though the hydrology and concentration of dissolved metals of the CMD varied considerably between the three field sites, the mineralogy of the three iron mounds was very similar. Schwertmannite was the predominant mineral precipitated at low-pH (2.5-4.0) along with lesser amounts of goethite. Trace metals such as Zn, Ni and Co were only detected at μmol/g concentrations in the field sediments, and no metals (other than Fe) were removed from the CMD at any of the field sites. Metal cations were not lost from solution in the field because of unfavorable electrostatic attraction to the iron mound minerals. Ferrihydrite was the predominant mineral formed by abiotic neutralization (pH 4.4-8.4, 4 d aging) with lesser amounts of schwertmannite and goethite. In contrast to low-pH precipitation, substantial metal removal occurred in the neutralized CMD. Al was likely removed as hydrobasaluminite and Al(OH) 3, and as a co-precipitate into schwertmannite or ferrihydrite. Zn, Ni and Co were likely removed via adsorption onto and co-precipitation into the freshly formed Fe and Al solids. Mn was likely removed by co-precipitation and, at the highest final pH values, as a Mn oxide. Biological low-pH Fe(II) oxidation can be cost-effectively used to pre-treat CMD and remove Fe and acidity prior to conventional neutralization techniques. A further benefit is that solids formed under these conditions may be of industrial value because they do not contain trace metal or metalloid contaminants.

  6. Isotopically exchangeable concentrations of elements having multiple oxidation states: the case of Fe(II)/Fe(III) isotope self-exchange in coastal lowland acid sulfate soils.

    PubMed

    Collins, Richard N; Waite, T David

    2009-07-15

    Isotope exchange techniques have been used to probe isotopically exchangeable concentrations of Fe (E value) that are in dynamic equilibrium between the aqueous- and solid-phase of coastal lowland acid sulfate soils. Isotope self-exchange between Fe(II) and Fe(III) was rapid and complete in <1 min (p < 0.05) indicating that this reaction was initially occurring solely in the aqueous-phase and the surface of the soil solid-phase. It is further demonstrated that accurate and valid measurements of isotopically exchangeable concentrations of Fe do not require corrections for Fe speciation. This also holds for any element existing in two or more oxidation states which are completely isotopically self-exchangeable in soils. As isotope self-exchange between Fe(II) and Fe(III) is rapid, the distribution coefficient (Kd) and E value determined via this methodology are, therefore, truly representative of Fe regardless of the relative importance of Fe(II) or Fe(III) to the isotopically exchangeable pool of Fe. In the 21 soil samples examined, isotopically exchangeable concentrations of Fe varied from 90 mg/kg to values as high as 3610 mg/kg in acidic, saturated samples collected below the groundwater table from the transition soil horizon. The combination of low Evalues and extremely high Kd values in the upper oxidized layers of these soils indicate that these soil horizons are a relatively insignificant source of transportable (labile) Fe. As such, given our knowledge on the general rates of microbial Fe(III) reduction in, and the hydraulic properties of, the coastal lowland acid sulfate soils of this region, only those soils adjacent to agricultural drains are likely to contribute to the load of Fe entering surrounding aquatic systems.

  7. Effect of aging on the structure and phosphate retention of Fe(III)-precipitates formed by Fe(II) oxidation in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senn, Anna-Caterina; Kaegi, Ralf; Hug, Stephan J.; Hering, Janet G.; Mangold, Stefan; Voegelin, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Iron(III)-precipitates formed by Fe(II) oxidation in aqueous solutions affect the cycling and impact of Fe and other co-precipitated elements in environmental systems. Fresh Fe(III)-precipitates are metastable and their transformation into more stable phases during aging may result in the release of initially co-precipitated ions. Phosphate, silicate, Mg and Ca play key roles in determining the structure and composition of fresh Fe(III)-precipitates. Here we examine how these ions affect the structure and phosphate retention of Fe(III)-precipitates formed by oxidation of 0.5 mM dissolved Fe(II) at pH 7.0 after aging for 30 days at 40 °C. Iron K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) shows that aged precipitates consist of the same structural units as fresh precipitates: Amorphous Fe(III)- or Ca-Fe(III)-phosphate, ferrihydrite, and poorly crystalline lepidocrocite. Mg, Ca, and dissolved phosphate stabilize (Ca-)Fe(III)-phosphate against transformation into ferrihydrite. Silicate further attenuates (Ca-)Fe(III)-phosphate transformation. The crystallinity of lepidocrocite formed in phosphate- and silicate-free solutions slightly increases during aging. The transformation of Fe(III)- and Ca-Fe(III)-phosphate into ferrihydrite and ongoing ferrihydrite crystallization during aging result in the release of co-precipitated phosphate. Dissolved Ca on the other hand limits phosphate concentrations to values consistent with solubility control by octacalciumphosphate. Owing to the combined effects of Ca and silicate, phosphate is most effectively retained by Fe(III)-precipitates formed and aged in Ca- and silicate-containing solutions. The results from this study contribute to an improved understanding of the formation and transformation of Fe(III)-precipitates and emphasize that the complexity of Fe(III)-precipitate dynamics in the presence of multiple interfering solutes must be considered when addressing their impact on major and trace elements in environmental systems.

  8. Unraveling the complexity of iron oxides at high pressure and temperature: Synthesis of Fe5O6

    DOE PAGES

    Lavina, Barbara; Meng, Yue

    2015-06-26

    The iron-oxygen system is the most important reference of rocks’ redox state. Even as minor components, iron oxides can play a critical role in redox equilibria, which affect the speciation of the fluid phases chemical differentiation, melting, and physical properties. Until our recent finding of Fe4O5, iron oxides were assumed to comprise only the polymorphs of FeO, Fe3O4, and Fe2O3. Combining synthesis at high pressure and temperature with micro- diffraction mapping, we have identified yet another distinct iron oxide, Fe5O6. The new compound, which has an orthorhombic structure, was obtained in the pressure range from 10 to 20 GPa uponmore » laser heating mixtures of iron and hematite at ~2000 K, and is recoverable to ambient conditions. The high-pressure orthorhombic iron oxides Fe5O6, Fe4O5, and h-Fe3O4 display similar iron coordination geometries and structural arrangements, and indeed exhibit coherent systematic behavior of crystallographic parameters and compressibility. Fe5O6, along with FeO and Fe4O5, is a candidate key minor phase of planetary interiors; as such, it is of major petrological and geo- chemical importance. Here, we are revealing an unforeseen complexity in the Fe-O system with four different compounds—FeO, Fe5O6, Fe4O5, and h-Fe3O4—in a narrow compositional range (0.75 < Fe/O < 1.0). New, finely spaced oxygen buffers at conditions of the Earth’s mantle can be defined.« less

  9. Unraveling the complexity of iron oxides at high pressure and temperature: Synthesis of Fe5O6

    PubMed Central

    Lavina, Barbara; Meng, Yue

    2015-01-01

    The iron-oxygen system is the most important reference of rocks’ redox state. Even as minor components, iron oxides can play a critical role in redox equilibria, which affect the speciation of the fluid phases chemical differentiation, melting, and physical properties. Until our recent finding of Fe4O5, iron oxides were assumed to comprise only the polymorphs of FeO, Fe3O4, and Fe2O3. Combining synthesis at high pressure and temperature with microdiffraction mapping, we have identified yet another distinct iron oxide, Fe5O6. The new compound, which has an orthorhombic structure, was obtained in the pressure range from 10 to 20 GPa upon laser heating mixtures of iron and hematite at ~2000 K, and is recoverable to ambient conditions. The high-pressure orthorhombic iron oxides Fe5O6, Fe4O5, and h-Fe3O4 display similar iron coordination geometries and structural arrangements, and indeed exhibit coherent systematic behavior of crystallographic parameters and compressibility. Fe5O6, along with FeO and Fe4O5, is a candidate key minor phase of planetary interiors; as such, it is of major petrological and geochemical importance. We are revealing an unforeseen complexity in the Fe-O system with four different compounds—FeO, Fe5O6, Fe4O5, and h-Fe3O4—in a narrow compositional range (0.75 < Fe/O < 1.0). New, finely spaced oxygen buffers at conditions of the Earth’s mantle can be defined. PMID:26601196

  10. The life cycle of iron Fe(III) oxide: impact of fungi and bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonneville, Steeve

    2014-05-01

    Iron oxides are ubiquitous reactive constituents of soils, sediments and aquifers. They exhibit vast surface areas which bind a large array of trace metals, nutrients and organic molecules hence controlling their mobility/reactivity in the subsurface. In this context, understanding the "life cycle" of iron oxide in soils is paramount to many biogeochemical processes. Soils environments are notorious for their extreme heterogeneity and variability of chemical, physical conditions and biological agents at play. Here, we present studies investigating the role of two biological agents driving iron oxide dynamics in soils, root-associated fungi (mycorrhiza) and bacteria. Mycorrhiza filaments (hypha) grow preferentially around, and on the surface of nutrient-rich minerals, making mineral-fungi contact zones, hot-spots of chemical alteration in soils. However, because of the microscopic nature of hyphae (only ~ 5 µm wide for up to 1 mm long) and their tendency to strongly adhere to mineral surface, in situ observations of this interfacial micro-environment are scarce. In a microcosm, ectomycorrhiza (Paxillus involutus) was grown symbiotically with a pine tree (Pinus sylvestris) in the presence of freshly-cleaved biotite under humid, yet undersaturated, conditions typical of soils. Using spatially-resolved ion milling technique (FIB), transmission electron microscopy and spectroscopy (TEM/STEM-EDS), synchrotron based X-ray microscopy (STXM), we were able to quantify the speciation of Fe at the biotite-hypha interface. The results shows that substantial oxidation of biotite structural-Fe(II) into Fe(III) subdomains occurs at the contact zone between mycorrhiza and biotite. Once formed, iron(III) oxides can reductively dissolve under suboxic conditions via several abiotic and microbial pathways. In particular, they serve as terminal electron acceptors for the oxidation of organic matter by iron reducing bacteria. We aimed here to understand the role of Fe(III) mineral

  11. Mössbauer study of oxide films of Fe-, Sn-, Cr- doped zirconium alloys during corrosion in autoclave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippov, V. P.; Bateev, A. B.; Lauer, Yu. A.

    2016-12-01

    Mössbauer investigations were used to compare iron atom states in oxide films of binary Zr-Fe, ternary Zr-Fe-Cu and quaternary Zr-Fe-Cr-Sn alloys. Oxide films are received in an autoclave at a temperature of 350-360 °C and at pressure of 16.8 MPa. The corrosion process decomposes the intermetallic precipitates in alloys and forms metallic iron with inclusions of chromium atoms α-Fe(Cr), α-Fe(Cu), α-Fe 2O3 and Fe 3O4 compounds. Some iron ions are formed in divalent and in trivalent paramagnetic states. The additional doping influences on corrosion kinetics and concentration of iron compounds and phases formed in oxide films. It was shown the correlation between concentration of iron in different chemical states and corrosion resistance of alloys.

  12. Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation process of two-component Fe-Al alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Przewlocka, H.; Siedlecka, J.

    1982-01-01

    The oxidation process of two-component Fe-Al alloys containing up to 7.2% Al and from 18 to 30% Al was studied. Kinetic measurements were conducted using the isothermal gravimetric method in the range of 1073-1223 K and 1073-1373 K for 50 hours. The methods used in studies of the mechanism of oxidation included: X-ray microanalysis, X-ray structural analysis, metallographic analysis and marker tests.

  13. Wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation of phenol with FeAC (iron-embedded activated carbon) catalysts.

    PubMed

    Liou, Rey-May; Chen, Shih-Hsiung; Huang, Cheng-Hsien; Hung, Mu-Ya; Chang, Jing-Song; Lai, Cheng-Lee

    2010-01-01

    This investigation aims at exploring the catalytic oxidation activity of iron-embedded activated carbon (FeAC) and the application for the degradation of phenol in the wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation (WHPCO). FeAC catalysts were prepared by pre-impregnating iron in coconut shell with various iron loadings in the range of 27.5 to 46.5% before they were activated. The FeAC catalysts were characterised by measuring their surface area, pore distribution, functional groups on the surface, and X-ray diffraction patterns. The effects of iron loading strongly inhibited the pore development of the catalyst but benefited the oxidation activity in WHPCO. It was found that the complete conversion of phenol was observed with all FeAC catalysts in oxidation. High level of chemical oxygen demand (COD) abatement can be achieved within the first 30 minutes of oxidation. The iron embedded in the activated carbon showed good performance in the degradation and mineralisation of phenol during the oxidation due to the active sites as iron oxides formed on the surface of the activated carbon. It was found that the embedding irons were presented in gamma-Fe(2)O(3), alpha-Fe(2)O(3), and alpha-FeCOOH forms on the activated carbon. The aging tests on FeAC catalysts showed less activity loss, and less iron leaching was found after four oxidation runs.

  14. Facile One-pot Transformation of Iron Oxides from Fe2O3 Nanoparticles to Nanostructured Fe3O4@C Core-Shell Composites via Combustion Waves.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jungho; Lee, Kang Yeol; Yeo, Taehan; Choi, Wonjoon

    2016-02-23

    The development of a low-cost, fast, and large-scale process for the synthesis and manipulation of nanostructured metal oxides is essential for incorporating materials with diverse practical applications. Herein, we present a facile one-pot synthesis method using combustion waves that simultaneously achieves fast reduction and direct formation of carbon coating layers on metal oxide nanostructures. Hybrid composites of Fe2O3 nanoparticles and nitrocellulose on the cm scale were fabricated by a wet impregnation process. We demonstrated that self-propagating combustion waves along interfacial boundaries between the surface of the metal oxide and the chemical fuels enabled the release of oxygen from Fe2O3. This accelerated reaction directly transformed Fe2O3 into Fe3O4 nanostructures. The distinctive color change from reddish-brown Fe2O3 to dark-gray Fe3O4 confirmed the transition of oxidation states and the change in the fundamental properties of the material. Furthermore, it simultaneously formed carbon layers of 5-20 nm thickness coating the surfaces of the resulting Fe3O4 nanoparticles, which may aid in maintaining the nanostructures and improving the conductivity of the composites. This newly developed use of combustion waves in hybridized nanostructures may permit the precise manipulation of the chemical compositions of other metal oxide nanostructures, as well as the formation of organic/inorganic hybrid nanostructures.

  15. Facile One-pot Transformation of Iron Oxides from Fe2O3 Nanoparticles to Nanostructured Fe3O4@C Core-Shell Composites via Combustion Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jungho; Lee, Kang Yeol; Yeo, Taehan; Choi, Wonjoon

    2016-02-01

    The development of a low-cost, fast, and large-scale process for the synthesis and manipulation of nanostructured metal oxides is essential for incorporating materials with diverse practical applications. Herein, we present a facile one-pot synthesis method using combustion waves that simultaneously achieves fast reduction and direct formation of carbon coating layers on metal oxide nanostructures. Hybrid composites of Fe2O3 nanoparticles and nitrocellulose on the cm scale were fabricated by a wet impregnation process. We demonstrated that self-propagating combustion waves along interfacial boundaries between the surface of the metal oxide and the chemical fuels enabled the release of oxygen from Fe2O3. This accelerated reaction directly transformed Fe2O3 into Fe3O4 nanostructures. The distinctive color change from reddish-brown Fe2O3 to dark-gray Fe3O4 confirmed the transition of oxidation states and the change in the fundamental properties of the material. Furthermore, it simultaneously formed carbon layers of 5–20 nm thickness coating the surfaces of the resulting Fe3O4 nanoparticles, which may aid in maintaining the nanostructures and improving the conductivity of the composites. This newly developed use of combustion waves in hybridized nanostructures may permit the precise manipulation of the chemical compositions of other metal oxide nanostructures, as well as the formation of organic/inorganic hybrid nanostructures.

  16. Facile One-pot Transformation of Iron Oxides from Fe2O3 Nanoparticles to Nanostructured Fe3O4@C Core-Shell Composites via Combustion Waves

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jungho; Lee, Kang Yeol; Yeo, Taehan; Choi, Wonjoon

    2016-01-01

    The development of a low-cost, fast, and large-scale process for the synthesis and manipulation of nanostructured metal oxides is essential for incorporating materials with diverse practical applications. Herein, we present a facile one-pot synthesis method using combustion waves that simultaneously achieves fast reduction and direct formation of carbon coating layers on metal oxide nanostructures. Hybrid composites of Fe2O3 nanoparticles and nitrocellulose on the cm scale were fabricated by a wet impregnation process. We demonstrated that self-propagating combustion waves along interfacial boundaries between the surface of the metal oxide and the chemical fuels enabled the release of oxygen from Fe2O3. This accelerated reaction directly transformed Fe2O3 into Fe3O4 nanostructures. The distinctive color change from reddish-brown Fe2O3 to dark-gray Fe3O4 confirmed the transition of oxidation states and the change in the fundamental properties of the material. Furthermore, it simultaneously formed carbon layers of 5–20 nm thickness coating the surfaces of the resulting Fe3O4 nanoparticles, which may aid in maintaining the nanostructures and improving the conductivity of the composites. This newly developed use of combustion waves in hybridized nanostructures may permit the precise manipulation of the chemical compositions of other metal oxide nanostructures, as well as the formation of organic/inorganic hybrid nanostructures. PMID:26902260

  17. The synergetic effect of metal oxide support on Fe2O3 for chemical looping combustion: A theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Wu; Wang, Yang; Dong, Changqing; Zhang, Junjiao; Chen, Qiuluan; Yang, Yongping

    2013-10-01

    This study deals with the synergetic effect of Al2O3 on Fe2O3 for chemical-looping combustion (CLC) of CO, in comparison with the synergetic effects of ZrO2 and MgO reported in our previous works. Property analysis of Fe2O3/Al2O3 shows that new bonds form cross the interface making Fe2O3 less prone to agglomerate on Al2O3, and 0.129 e transfers from Al2O3 to Fe2O3 to activate the electronic state of Fe2O3. Al2O3 [ZrO2 and MgO] favors the thermal stability of Fe2O3 by preventing the phase transformation, markedly regulates charge populations on the O-Fe bonds and their overlaps and hence tunes the redox properties of Fe2O3. The reaction mechanism analysis demonstrates that Al2O3 [ZrO2 and MgO] activates Fe2O3 for oxidizing CO into CO2 (accompanied by the reduction of Fe2O3) in the fuel reactor, which decrease the height of barrier energy (Ea), and the Ea follows clearly Fe2O3 > Fe2O3/Al2O3 > Fe2O3/MgO > Fe2O3/ZrO2. However, these supports usually increase the Ea for oxidizing Fe2O2 into Fe2O3 by O2 in the air reactor, and the Ea follows clearly Fe2O3/ZrO2 > Fe2O3/Al2O3 > Fe2O3/MgO > Fe2O3. It is argued that different supports could be applied to a given CLC system of different thermodynamic properties.

  18. Mixed-valence iron minerals on Venus: Fe(2+)-Fe(3+) oxides and oxy-silicates formed by surface-atmosphere interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Roger G.; Straub, Darcy W.

    1992-01-01

    Inferences from these investigations are that Fe(3+)-bearing minerals such as hematite magnesioferrite, acmite, and epidote are thermodynamically unstable, and that magnetite is the predominant mixed-valence iron oxide mineral on venus. Recently, the Fe(2+)-Fe(3+) silicate mineral laihunite was proposed to be a reaction product of olivine with the venusian atmosphere. This possibility is discussed further here. We suggest that other mixed-valence Fe(2+)-Fe(3+)-Oz-OH(-) silicates could also result from surface-atmosphere interactions on Venus. Topics discussed include the following: (1) conversion of hematite to magnetite; (2) stability of laihunite; (3) the possible existence of oxy-amphiboles and oxy-micas on Venus; and (4) other mixed-valence Fe(2+)-Fe(3+) silicates likely to exist on Venus.

  19. Coupled interactions between volatile activity and Fe oxidation state during arc crustal processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Humphreys, Madeleine C.S.; Brooker, R; Fraser, D.C.; Burgisser, A; Mangan, Margaret T.; McCammon, C

    2015-01-01

    Arc magmas erupted at the Earth’s surface are commonly more oxidized than those produced at mid-ocean ridges. Possible explanations for this high oxidation state are that the transfer of fluids during the subduction process results in direct oxidation of the sub-arc mantle wedge, or that oxidation is caused by the effect of later crustal processes, including protracted fractionation and degassing of volatile-rich magmas. This study sets out to investigate the effect of disequilibrium crustal processes that may involve coupled changes in H2O content and Fe oxidation state, by examining the degassing and hydration of sulphur-free rhyolites. We show that experimentally hydrated melts record strong increases in Fe3+/∑Fe with increasing H2O concentration as a result of changes in water activity. This is relevant for the passage of H2O-undersaturated melts from the deep crust towards shallow crustal storage regions, and raises the possibility that vertical variations in fO2 might develop within arc crust. Conversely, degassing experiments produce an increase in Fe3+/∑Fe with decreasing H2O concentration. In this case the oxidation is explained by loss of H2 as well as H2O into bubbles during decompression, consistent with thermodynamic modelling, and is relevant for magmas undergoing shallow degassing en route to the surface. We discuss these results in the context of the possible controls on fO2 during the generation, storage and ascent of magmas in arc settings, in particular considering the timescales of equilibration relative to observation as this affects the quality of the petrological record of magmatic fO2.

  20. Characterization of Bimetallic Fe-Ru Oxide Nanoparticles Prepared by Liquid-Phase Plasma Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sung-Jin; Lee, Heon; Jeon, Ki-Joon; Park, Hyunwoong; Park, Young-Kwon; Jung, Sang-Chul

    2016-07-01

    The bimetallic Fe-Ru oxide nanoparticles were synthesized in the liquid-phase plasma (LPP) method which employed iron chloride and ruthenium chloride as precursors. The active species (OH·, Hα, Hβ, and OI) and the iron and ruthenium ions were observed in the plasma field created by the LPP process. The spherical-shaped bimetallic Fe-Ru oxide nanoparticles were synthesized by the LPP reaction, and the size of the particles was growing along with the progression of the LPP reaction. The synthesized bimetallic Fe-Ru oxide nanoparticles were comprised of Fe2O3, Fe3O4, RuO, and RuO2. Ruthenium had a higher reduction potential than iron and resulted in higher ruthenium composition in the synthesized bimetallic nanoparticles. The control of the molar ratio of the precursors in the reactant solution was found to be employed as a means to control the composition of the elements in bimetallic nanoparticles.

  1. A NiFeCu alloy anode catalyst for direct-methane solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Zhu, Huaiyu; Yang, Guangming; Park, Hee Jung; Jung, Doh Won; Kwak, Chan; Shao, Zongping

    2014-07-01

    In this study, a new anode catalyst based on a NiFeCu alloy is investigated for use in direct-methane solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The influence of the conductive copper introduced into the anode catalyst layer on the performance of the SOFCs is systematically studied. The catalytic activity for partial oxidation of methane and coking resistance tests are proposed with various anode catalyst layer materials prepared using different methods, including glycine nitrate process (GNP), physical mixing (PM) and impregnation (IMP). The surface conductivity tests indicate that the conductivities of the NiFe-ZrO2/Cu (PM) and NiFe-ZrO2/Cu (IMP) catalysts are considerably greater than that of NiFe-ZrO2/Cu (GNP), which is consistent with the SEM results. Among the three preparation methods, the cell containing the NiFe-ZrO2/Cu (IMP) catalyst layer performs best on CH4-O2 fuel, especially under reduced temperatures, because the coking resistance should be considered in real fuel cell conditions. The cell containing the NiFe-ZrO2/Cu (IMP) catalyst layer also delivers an excellent operational stability using CH4-O2 fuel for 100 h without any signs of decay. In summary, this work provides new alternative anode catalytic materials to accelerate the commercialization of SOFC technology.

  2. Cyclic Oxidation of FeCrAlY/Al2O3 Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesbitt, James A.; Draper, Susan L.; Barrett, Charles A.

    1999-01-01

    Three-ply FeCrAlY/Al2O3 composites and FeCrAlY matrix-only samples were cyclically oxidized at 1000 C and 1100 C for up to 1000 1-hr cycles. Fiber ends were exposed at the ends of the composite samples. Following cyclic oxidation, cracks running parallel to and perpendicular to the fibers were observed on the large surface of the composite. In addition, there was evidence of increased scale damage and spallation around the exposed fiber ends, particularly around the middle ply fibers. This damage was more pronounced at the higher temperature. The exposed fiber ends showed cracking between fibers in the outer plies, occasionally with Fe and Cr-rich oxides growing out of the cracks. Large gaps developed at the fiber/matrix interface around many of the fibers, especially those in the outer plies. Oxygen penetrated many of these gaps resulting in significant oxide formation at the fiber/matrix interface far within the composite sample. Around several fibers, the matrix was also internally oxidized showing Al2O3 precipitates in a radial band around the fibers. The results show that these composites have poor cyclic oxidation resistance due to the CTE mismatch and inadequate fiber/matrix bond strength at temperatures of 1000 C and above.

  3. Anoxic and Oxic Oxidation of Rocks Containing Fe(II)Mg-Silicates and Fe(II)-Monosulfides as Source of Fe(III)-Minerals and Hydrogen. Geobiotropy.

    PubMed

    Bassez, Marie-Paule

    2017-03-31

    In this article, anoxic and oxic hydrolyses of rocks containing Fe (II) Mg-silicates and Fe (II)-monosulfides are analyzed at 25 °C and 250-350 °C. A table of the products is drawn. It is shown that magnetite and hydrogen can be produced during low-temperature (25 °C) anoxic hydrolysis/oxidation of ferrous silicates and during high-temperature (250 °C) anoxic hydrolysis/oxidation of ferrous monosulfides. The high-T (350 °C) anoxic hydrolysis of ferrous silicates leads mainly to ferric oxides/hydroxides such as the hydroxide ferric trihydroxide, the oxide hydroxide goethite/lepidocrocite and the oxide hematite, and to Fe(III)-phyllosilicates. Magnetite is not a primary product. While the low-T (25 °C) anoxic hydrolysis of ferrous monosulfides leads to pyrite. Thermodynamic functions are calculated for elementary reactions of hydrolysis and carbonation of olivine and pyroxene and E-pH diagrams are analyzed. It is shown that the hydrolysis of the iron endmember is endothermic and can proceed within the exothermic hydrolysis of the magnesium endmember and also within the exothermic reactions of carbonations. The distinction between three products of the iron hydrolysis, magnetite, goethite and hematite is determined with E-pH diagrams. The hydrolysis/oxidation of the sulfides mackinawite/troilite/pyrrhotite is highly endothermic but can proceed within the heat produced by the exothermic hydrolyses and carbonations of ferromagnesian silicates and also by other sources such as magma, hydrothermal sources, impacts. These theoretical results are confirmed by the products observed in several related laboratory experiments. The case of radiolyzed water is studied. It is shown that magnetite and ferric oxides/hydroxides such as ferric trihydroxide, goethite/lepidocrocite and hematite are formed in oxic hydrolysis of ferromagnesian silicates at 25 °C and 350 °C. Oxic oxidation of ferrous monosulfides at 25 °C leads mainly to pyrite and ferric oxides

  4. Anoxic and Oxic Oxidation of Rocks Containing Fe(II)Mg-Silicates and Fe(II)-Monosulfides as Source of Fe(III)-Minerals and Hydrogen. Geobiotropy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassez, Marie-Paule

    2017-03-01

    In this article, anoxic and oxic hydrolyses of rocks containing Fe (II) Mg-silicates and Fe (II)-monosulfides are analyzed at 25 °C and 250-350 °C. A table of the products is drawn. It is shown that magnetite and hydrogen can be produced during low-temperature (25 °C) anoxic hydrolysis/oxidation of ferrous silicates and during high-temperature (250 °C) anoxic hydrolysis/oxidation of ferrous monosulfides. The high-T (350 °C) anoxic hydrolysis of ferrous silicates leads mainly to ferric oxides/hydroxides such as the hydroxide ferric trihydroxide, the oxide hydroxide goethite/lepidocrocite and the oxide hematite, and to Fe(III)-phyllosilicates. Magnetite is not a primary product. While the low-T (25 °C) anoxic hydrolysis of ferrous monosulfides leads to pyrite. Thermodynamic functions are calculated for elementary reactions of hydrolysis and carbonation of olivine and pyroxene and E-pH diagrams are analyzed. It is shown that the hydrolysis of the iron endmember is endothermic and can proceed within the exothermic hydrolysis of the magnesium endmember and also within the exothermic reactions of carbonations. The distinction between three products of the iron hydrolysis, magnetite, goethite and hematite is determined with E-pH diagrams. The hydrolysis/oxidation of the sulfides mackinawite/troilite/pyrrhotite is highly endothermic but can proceed within the heat produced by the exothermic hydrolyses and carbonations of ferromagnesian silicates and also by other sources such as magma, hydrothermal sources, impacts. These theoretical results are confirmed by the products observed in several related laboratory experiments. The case of radiolyzed water is studied. It is shown that magnetite and ferric oxides/hydroxides such as ferric trihydroxide, goethite/lepidocrocite and hematite are formed in oxic hydrolysis of ferromagnesian silicates at 25 °C and 350 °C. Oxic oxidation of ferrous monosulfides at 25 °C leads mainly to pyrite and ferric oxides/hydroxides such as

  5. Na-ion Storage Performances of FeSex and Fe2O3 Hollow Nanoparticles-Decorated Reduced Graphene Oxide Balls prepared by Nanoscale Kirkendall Diffusion Process

    PubMed Central

    Park, Gi Dae; Cho, Jung Sang; Lee, Jung-Kul; Kang, Yun Chan

    2016-01-01

    Uniquely structured FeSex-reduced graphene oxide (rGO) composite powders, in which hollow FeSex nanoparticles are uniformly distributed throughout the rGO matrix, were prepared by spray pyrolysis applying the nanoscale Kirkendall diffusion process. Iron oxide-rGO composite powders were transformed into FeSex-rGO composite powders by a two-step post-treatment process. Metallic Fe nanocrystals formed during the first-step post-treatment process were transformed into hollow FeSex nanoparticles during the selenization process. The FeSex-rGO composite powders had mixed crystal structures of FeSe and FeSe2 phases. A rGO content of 33% was estimated from the TG analysis of the FeSex-rGO composite powders. The FeSex-rGO composite powders had superior sodium-ion storage properties compared to those of the Fe2O3-rGO composite powders with similar morphological characteristics. The discharge capacities of the FeSex- and Fe2O3-rGO composite powders for the 200th cycle at a constant current density of 0.3 A g−1 were 434 and 174 mA h g−1, respectively. The FeSex-rGO composite powders had a high discharge capacity of 311 mA h g−1 for the 1000th cycle at a high current density of 1 A g−1. PMID:26928312

  6. Constraints on biotic and abiotic role in the formation of Fe-Si oxides from the PACMANUS hydrothermal field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Baoju; Zeng, Zhigang; Qi, Haiyan; Wang, Xiaoyuan; Ma, Yao; Rong, Kunbo

    2015-12-01

    Fe-Si oxide deposits were recovered from the PACMANUS (Papua New Guinea-Australia-Canada-Manus) hydrothermal field in Eastern Manus basin. Samples were loose and fragile. Optical and scanning electron microscopy showed that the samples had abundant rod-like or twisted filamentous and granular structures. Electron probe microanalysis revealed that these filaments and grains were mainly composed of Fe and Si. The presence of spherical grains on the surface of the filaments suggests the intergrowth of biotic and abiotic reactions. Biotic and abiotic kinetics competition always exists in the redox gradient. Based on the physico-chemical conditions of PACMANUS hydrothermal fluids, we calculated a strict abiotic oxidation rate of Fe2+ to Fe3+, which is approximately 0.0123 g/min. If the fluids had been erupting consistently and the concentration of Fe2+ was constant, 3.232 kg per year of Fe would be deposited in this vent. The amount of Fe oxides around the studied vent was larger than the amount determined by strict abiotic kinetic calculation. Bacteria may also play an important role in Fe oxidation. A mesh-like microenvironment constructed by biogenic filaments ensured adequate Fe2+ and low oxygen content for the growth of bacteria. Moreover, this structure promoted the deposition of abiotic Fe-Si oxides.

  7. OXIDATION OF ALCOHOLS OVER FE3+/MONTMORILLONITE-K10 USING HYDROGEN PEROXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oxidation of various primary and secondary alcohols is studied in liquid phase at atmospheric pressure over Fe3+/montmorillonite-K10 catalyst prepared by ion-exchange method at a pH of 4 in an environmentally friendly protocol using hydrogen peroxide. The catalyst and the method ...

  8. Carbon isotope fractionation of chlorinated ethenes during oxidation by Fe2+ activated persulfate.

    PubMed

    Marchesi, Massimo; Aravena, Ramon; Sra, Kanwartej S; Thomson, Neil R; Otero, Neus; Soler, Albert; Mancini, Silvia

    2012-09-01

    The increased use of persulfate (S(2)O(8)(2-)) for in situ chemical oxidation to treat groundwater and soils contaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbon compounds (CHCs) requires unbiased methods to assess treatment performance. Stable carbon isotope analysis offers a potential tool for assessing the in situ treatment performance of persulfate at sites contaminated with CHCs. This study investigated the extent of C isotope fractionation during oxidation of tetrachloroethene (PCE), trichloroethene (TCE) and cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) by persulfate activated by ferrous ion (Fe(2+)). An average carbon isotope enrichment factor ε(bulk) of -4.9‰ for PCE, -3.6‰ for TCE and -7.6‰ for cis-DCE were obtained in batch experiments. Variations in the initial S(2)O(8)(2-)/Fe(2+)/CHC molar ratios did not result in any significant differences in carbon isotope fractionation. The occurrence of carbon isotope fractionation during oxidation and the lack of dependence of enrichment factors upon the S(2)O(8)(2-)/Fe(2+)/CHC molar ratio demonstrate that carbon isotope analysis can potentially be used at contaminated sites as an additional technique to estimate treatment efficacy during oxidation of CHCs by Fe(2+) activated persulfate.

  9. Green and Tunable Decoration of Graphene with Spherical Nanoparticles Based on Laser Ablation in Water: A Case of Ag Nanoparticle/Graphene Oxide Sheet Composites.

    PubMed

    He, Hui; Wang, Haibo; Li, Kai; Zhu, Jun; Liu, Jianshuang; Meng, Xiangdong; Shen, Xiaoshuang; Zeng, Xianghua; Cai, Weiping

    2016-02-23

    A simple and green strategy is presented to decorate graphene with nanoparticles, based on laser ablation of targets in graphene auqeous solution. Ag and graphene oxide (GO) are chosen as model materials. The surface of GO sheets is strongly anchored with spherical Ag nanoparticles. The density and size of the Ag nanoparticles can be easily tuned by laser ablation conditions. Further, the GO sheets can be decorated with other nanoparticles from simple metals or semiconductors to multicomponent hybrids. Additionally, the Ag nanoparticle/GO sheet colloids can be utilized as blocks to build three-dimensional structures, such as sandwich membranes by evaporation-induced self-assembly. These graphene-based composite materials could be very useful in catalysis, sensors, and nanodevices. Particularly, the Ag nanoparticle/GO sheet sandwich composite membranes exhibit excellent surface-enhanced Raman scattering performance and possess the huge potential in trace-detecting persistent organic pollutants in the environment.

  10. The Reduction of Aqueous Metal Species on the Surfaces of Fe(II)-Containing Oxides: The Role of Surface Passivation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, A.F.; Peterson, M.L.

    1998-01-01

    The reduction of aqueous transition metal species at the surfaces of Fe(II)- containing oxides has important ramifications in predicting the transport behavior in ground water aquifers. Experimental studies using mineral suspensions and electrodes demonstrate that structural Fe(II) heterogeneously reduces aqueous ferric, cupric, vanadate and chromate ions on magnetite and ilmenite surfaces. The rates of metal reduction on natural oxides is strongly dependent on the extent of surface passivation and redox conditions in the weathering environment. Synchrotron studies show that surface oxidation of Fe(II)-containing oxide minerals decreases their capacity for Cr(VI) reduction at hazardous waste disposal sites.

  11. Carbohydrate oxidation coupled to Fe(III) reduction, a novel form of anaerobic metabolism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coates, J.D.; Councell, T.; Ellis, D.J.; Lovley, D.R.

    1998-01-01

    An isolate, designated GC-29, that could incompletely oxidize glucose to acetate and carbon dioxide with Fe(III) serving as the electron acceptor was recovered from freshwater sediments of the Potomac River, Maryland. This metabolism yielded energy to support cell growth. Strain GC-29 is a facultatively anaerobic, Gram-negative motile rod which, in addition to glucose, also used sucrose, lactate, pyruvate, yeast extract, casamino acids or H2 as alternative electron donors for Fe(III) reduction. Stain GC-29 could reduce NO-3, Mn(IV), U(VI), fumarate, malate, S2O32-, and colloidal S0 as well as the humics analog, 2,6-anthraquinone disulfonate. Analysis of the almost complete 16S rRNA sequence indicated that strain GC-29 belongs in the Shewanella genus in the epsilon subdivision of the Proteobacteria. The name Shewanella saccharophilia is proposed. Shewanella saccharophilia differs from previously described fermentative microorganisms that metabolize glucose with the reduction of Fe(III) because it transfers significantly more electron equivalents to Fe(III); acetate and carbon dioxide are the only products of glucose metabolism; energy is conserved from Fe(III) reduction; and glucose is not metabolized in the absence of Fe(III). The metabolism of organisms like S. saccharophilia may account for the fact that glucose is metabolized primarily to acetate and carbon dioxide in a variety of sediments in which Fe(III) reduction is the terminal electron accepting process.

  12. Magnetic phase transition of nanocrystalline Fe-doped samarium oxide (Sm1.90Fe0.10O3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, J.; Sarkar, B. J.; Deb, A. K.; Chakrabarti, P. K.

    2014-12-01

    Nanocrystalline Fe3+ doped samarium oxide (Sm1.90Fe0.10O3) has been prepared by the co-precipitation method. The as prepared sample has been annealed at 700 °C for 6 h in an argon atmosphere. The pure crystallographic phase as well as the substitution of Fe3+ ions in the lattice of Sm2O3 is confirmed by Rietveld analysis of the X-ray diffraction patterns. The variation of magnetic susceptibility (χ) with temperature (T) is recorded by a Faraday Magnetometer in the temperature range of 300-14 K. The variation of χ vs. T down to ~50 K was successfully fitted by the Curie-Weiss law and below this temperature, susceptibility increases very rapidly, which suggests the presence of ordering at low temperature. To explore this, magnetic measurements are also carried out at different temperatures down to 2 K by using a SQUID Magnetometer. No hysteretic behavior is observed down to 50 K, but a feeble ferromagnetic behavior is observed in the magnetization vs. field curve recorded at ~30 K. A clear hysteresis loop is observed at 2 K with a comparatively high value of maximum magnetization (~3.32 emu/gm). The observed magnetic phase transition is analyzed by using the dipole-dipole interaction among the magnetic nanoparticles at low temperature.

  13. Uranium(IV) oxidation during anoxic chemical extractions of natural sediment: Importance of Fe(III)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, K. M.; Davis, J. A.; Fuller, C. C.

    2008-12-01

    In situ reduction of soluble U(VI) to insoluble U(IV) precipitates is one promising solution for the remediation of U-contaminated aquifers. U(VI) reduction can occur upon stimulation of the native microbial community by injection of an electron donor or by the presence of natural organic matter. Contamination from a former U mill tailings repository (Rifle, CO) provides a research site to study the effects of in situ and natural bioreduction. An accurate method for determining solid-phase U oxidation state in sediments with elevated amounts of Fe and organic matter is necessary to evaluate the extent of bioreduction. The oxidation state of U in anaerobic sediment is often measured by a two-step bicarbonate/carbonate chemical extraction when spectroscopic methods are infeasible. In this study, anaerobic sediment samples from Rifle were analyzed for labile U(VI) content by extraction in anoxic conditions (pH 9.4, 14mM NaHCO3, 2.8 mM Na2CO3). A subset of each sediment sample was oxidized by exposure to air for 2 weeks. The extraction was repeated in air, and the amount of U(IV) present in the anaerobic sample was calculated by difference between the anoxic and oxidized extractions. For comparison, the U oxidation state was measured in several preserved samples by collecting X-ray absorption spectra (XANES). The XANES measurement indicated that approximately 90% was present as U(IV) prior to the extraction. In contrast, the extractions suggested evidence of substantial oxidation (<5% as U(IV)) even in an anoxic extraction. This discrepancy was eliminated when the anoxic extractions were repeated at pH 12, suggesting that Fe(III) may be an important oxidant for reduced U species during an anoxic extraction at pH 9.4, since the thermodynamic driving force for this reaction decreases at high pH. The results of an investigation of biogenic uraninite (UO2) oxidation by ferrihydrite in the pH range 7-12 under bicarbonate/carbonate extraction concentrations will be presented

  14. Ablation of Protein Kinase CK2β in Skeletal Muscle Fibers Interferes with Their Oxidative Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Eiber, Nane; Simeone, Luca; Hashemolhosseini, Said

    2017-01-01

    The tetrameric protein kinase CK2 was identified playing a role at neuromuscular junctions by studying CK2β-deficient muscle fibers in mice, and in cultured immortalized C2C12 muscle cells after individual knockdown of CK2α and CK2β subunits. In muscle cells, CK2 activity appeared to be at least required for regular aggregation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, which serves as a hallmark for the presence of a postsynaptic apparatus. Here, we set out to determine whether any other feature accompanies CK2β-deficient muscle fibers. Hind limb muscles gastrocnemius, plantaris, and soleus of adult wildtype and CK2β-deficient mice were dissected, cross-sectioned, and stained histochemically by Gomori trichrome and for nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) dehydrogenase and succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) enzymatic activities. A reduction of oxidative enzymatic activity was determined for CK2β-deficient muscle fibers in comparison with wildtype controls. Importantly, the CK2β-deficient fibers, muscle fibers that typically exhibit high NADH dehydrogenase and SDH activities, like slow-type fibers, showed a marked reduction in these activities. Altogether, our data indicate additional impairments in the absence of CK2β in skeletal muscle fibers, pointing to an eventual mitochondrial myopathy. PMID:28106831

  15. Effects of microbial iron reduction and oxidation on the immobilization and mobilization of copper in synthesized Fe(III) minerals and Fe-rich soils.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chaohua; Zhang, Youchi; Zhang, Lei; Luo, Wensui

    2014-04-01

    The effects of microbial iron reduction and oxidation on the immobilization and mobilization of copper were investigated in a high concentration of sulfate with synthesized Fe(III) minerals and red earth soils rich in amorphous Fe (hydr)oxides. Batch microcosm experiments showed that red earth soil inoculated with subsurface sediments had a faster Fe(III) bioreduction rate than pure amorphous Fe(III) minerals and resulted in quicker immobilization of Cu in the aqueous fraction. Coinciding with the decrease of aqueous Cu, SO4(2-) in the inoculated red earth soil decreased acutely after incubation. The shift in the microbial community composite in the inoculated soil was analyzed through denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Results revealed the potential cooperative effect of microbial Fe(III) reduction and sulfate reduction on copper immobilization. After exposure to air for 144 h, more than 50% of the immobilized Cu was remobilized from the anaerobic matrices; aqueous sulfate increased significantly. Sequential extraction analysis demonstrated that the organic matter/sulfide-bound Cu increased by 52% after anaerobic incubation relative to the abiotic treatment but decreased by 32% after oxidation, indicating the generation and oxidation of Cu-sulfide coprecipitates in the inoculated red earth soil. These findings suggest that the immobilization of copper could be enhanced by mediating microbial Fe(III) reduction with sulfate reduction under anaerobic conditions. The findings have an important implication for bioremediation in Cucontaminated and Fe-rich soils, especially in acid-mine-drainage-affected sites.

  16. Catheter ablation.

    PubMed

    Fromer, M; Shenasa, M

    1991-02-01

    Catheter ablation is gaining increasing interest for the therapy of symptomatic, sustained arrhythmias of various origins. The scope of this review is to give an overview of the biophysical aspects and major characteristics of some of the most widely used energy sources in catheter ablation, e.g., the discharge of conventional defibrillators, modified defibrillators, laser light, and radiofrequency current application. Results from animal studies are considered to explain the basic mechanisms of catheter ablation. The recent achievements with the use of radiofrequency current to modify or ablate cardiac conduction properties are outlined in more detail.

  17. Zirconium doped nano-dispersed oxides of Fe, Al and Zn for destruction of warfare agents

    SciTech Connect

    Stengl, Vaclav; Houskova, Vendula; Bakardjieva, Snejana; Murafa, Nataliya; Marikova, Monika; Oplustil, Frantisek; Nemec, Tomas

    2010-11-15

    Zirconium doped nano dispersive oxides of Fe, Al and Zn were prepared by a homogeneous hydrolysis of the respective sulfate salts with urea in aqueous solutions. Synthesized metal oxide hydroxides were characterized using Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area and Barrett-Joiner-Halenda porosity (BJH), X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared spectroscopy (IR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX). These oxides were taken for an experimental evaluation of their reactivity with sulfur mustard (HD or bis(2-chloroethyl)sulfide), soman (GD or (3,3'-Dimethylbutan-2-yl)-methylphosphonofluoridate) and VX agent (S-[2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl]-O-ethyl-methylphosphonothionate). The presence of Zr{sup 4+} dopant can increase both the surface area and the surface hydroxylation of the resulting doped oxides, decreases their crystallites' sizes thereby it may contribute in enabling the substrate adsorption at the oxide surface thus it can accelerate the rate of degradation of warfare agents. Addition of Zr{sup 4+} converts the product of the reaction of ferric sulphate with urea from ferrihydrite to goethite. We found out that doped oxo-hydroxides Zr-FeO(OH) - being prepared by a homogeneous hydrolysis of ferric and zirconium oxo-sulfates mixture in aqueous solutions - exhibit a comparatively higher degradation activity towards chemical warfare agents (CWAs). Degradation of soman or VX agent on Zr-doped FeO(OH) containing ca. 8.3 wt.% of zirconium proceeded to completion within 30 min.

  18. Complexation facilitated reduction of aromatic N-oxides by aqueous Fe(II)-tiron complex: reaction kinetics and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yiling; Zhang, Huichun

    2013-10-01

    Rapid reduction of carbadox (CDX), olaquindox and several other aromatic N-oxides were investigated in aqueous solution containing Fe(II) and tiron. Consistent with previous work, the 1:2 Fe(II)-tiron complex, FeL2(6-), is the dominant reactive species as its concentration linearly correlates with the observed rate constant kobs under various conditions. The N-oxides without any side chains were much less reactive, suggesting direct reduction of the N-oxides is slow. UV-vis spectra suggest FeL2(6-) likely forms 5- or 7-membered rings with CDX and olaquindox through the N and O atoms on the side chain. The formed inner-sphere complexes significantly facilitated electron transfer from FeL2(6-) to the N-oxides. Reduction products of the N-oxides were identified by HPLC/QToF-MS to be the deoxygenated analogs. QSAR analysis indicated neither the first electron transfer nor N-O bond cleavage is the rate-limiting step. Calculations of the atomic spin densities of the anionic N-oxides confirmed the extensive delocalization between the aromatic ring and the side chain, suggesting complex formation can significantly affect the reduction kinetics. Our results suggest the complexation facilitated N-oxide reduction by Fe(II)-tiron involves a free radical mechanism, and the subsequent deoxygenation might also benefit from the weak complexation of Fe(II) with the N-oxide O atom.

  19. Melt inclusions in Fe oxide and phosphate tephra of El Laco volcano, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mungall, J. E.; Naslund, H. R.

    2009-05-01

    The El Laco volcano of northern Chile is noted for its controversial iron ore deposits, which some researchers regard as examples of iron oxide lava flows but others regard as epithermal deposits replacing pre-existing silicate lava flows. Lava flows with textures and structures typical of ordinary silicate lavas are composed entirely of magnetite. Unconsolidated Fe oxide block and ash deposits show fine air-fall stratification and bomb sags. It has always been unclear how Fe-oxide melts could have formed by liquid immiscibility from intermediate silicate magmas. Some kind of fluxing component would seem to be required. We have examined blocks and ash from El Laco in polished grain mounts prepared without water to prevent loss of water-soluble minerals. The ash component of the tephra is composed of black magnetite and hematite crystals and polycrystalline aggregates ranging in size from several micrometres to several millimetres, commonly coated by soft dark olive green material with local orange and yellow crusts. Rare large euhedra of hematite up to one or two cm in size are also observed. Ash particle morphologies include euhedral Fe oxide crystals and crystal fragments as well as irregularly shaped polycrystalline Fe oxide aggregates. Most oxide crystals and aggregates display fenestral textures and locally highly convoluted margins. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) suplemented by standardless semiquantitative energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS) of the grain mounts show that the re-entrant cavities are partially or completely filled by aggregates of Fe phosphate (probably beraunite or dufrenite), Fe-oxide, silica, and monazite. Some ash particles are wholly or partially composed of fine-grained aggregates of the same phosphate-rich material. Ovoid cavities within some of the oxide ash particles are wholly or partially occupied by the same polymineralic assemblage as the external cavities but also include domains interpreted to be finely crystallized

  20. High temperature grain growth and oxidation of Fe-29Ni-17Co (Kovar (tm)) alloy leads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, J. J.; Greulich, F. A.; Beavis, L. C.

    One important application for the Fe-29Ni-17Co (Kovar(trademark)) alloy in wire form is in brazed feed through assemblies which are integral parts of vacuum electronic devices. Since Cu metal brazes are performed at process temperatures of about 1100 C, there is opportunity for significant grain growth to occur during the brazing operation. Additional high temperature exposure includes decarburization of the Fe-29Ni-17Co alloy wire in wet hydrogen for 30 min. at 1000 C prior to the Cu brazing operation. Two approaches were used to characterize grain growth in two lots of Fe-29Ni-17Co alloy: (1) a once-through processing study to study the effect of one-time-only device thermal processing on the resulting grain size, and (2) an isothermal grain growth study involving various times at 800-1100 C. The results of the once-through processing study indicate that acceptable grain sizes are obtained from both cold worked and mill-annealed wire lots following Cu brazing. The isothermal grain growth study indicates that the linear intercept distance for Fe-29Ni-17Co can be described with a power law function of time, and that thermal exposure must be controlled at temperatures in excess of 900 C in order to avoid excessive grain growth. A second study characterized the oxidation kinetics of Fe-29Ni-17Co alloy wire in air at temperatures ranging from 550-700 C. This study indicates the parabolic growth law applies for this material, and between 550 and 700 C, oxidation in this alloy occurs at an activation energy of 27.9 kcal/mole. Other oxidation studies at higher temperatures (greater than 750 C) indicate an activation energy of 52.2 kcal/mole for oxidation of Fe-29Ni-17Co alloy at temperatures greater than 790 C. Quantitative point analyses of the oxide scale formed at 600 C suggest that a significant fraction of the scale is close to the stoichiometry of the Fe2O3-type oxide.

  1. Uranium Immobilization through Fe(II) bio-oxidation: A Column study

    SciTech Connect

    Coates, John D.

    2009-09-14

    Current research on the bioremediation of heavy metals and radionuclides is focused on the ability of reducing organisms to use these metals as alternative electron acceptors in the absence of oxygen and thus precipitate them out of solution. However, many aspects of this proposed scheme need to be resolved, not the least of which is the time frame of the treatment process. Once treatment is complete and the electron donor addition is halted, the system will ultimately revert back to an oxic state and potentially result in the abiotic reoxidation and remobilization of the immobilized metals. In addition, the possibility exists that the presence of more electropositive electron acceptors such as nitrate or oxygen will also stimulate the biological oxidation and remobilization of these contaminants. The selective nitrate-dependent biooxidation of added Fe(II) may offer an effective means of “capping off” and completing the attenuation of these contaminants in a reducing environment making the contaminants less accessible to abiotic and biotic reactions and allowing the system to naturally revert to an oxic state. Our previous DOE-NABIR funded studies demonstrated that radionuclides such as uranium and cobalt are rapidly removed from solution during the biogenic formation of Fe(III)-oxides. In the case of uranium, X-ray spectroscopy analysis indicated that the uranium was in the hexavalent form (normally soluble) and was bound to the precipitated Fe(III)-oxides thus demonstrating the bioremediative potential of this process. We also demonstrated that nitrate-dependent Fe(II)- oxidizing bacteria are prevalent in the sediment and groundwater samples collected from sites 1 and 2 and the background site of the NABIR FRC in Oakridge, TN. However, all of these studies were performed in batch experiments in the laboratory with pure cultures and although a significant amount was learned about the microbiology of nitrate-dependent bio-oxidation of Fe(II), the effects of

  2. Nitric oxide removal by combined urea and Fe(II)EDTA reaction systems.

    PubMed

    He, Feiqiang; Deng, Xianhe; Chen, Min

    2017-02-01

    (NH2)2CO as well as Fe(II)EDTA is an absorbent for simultaneous desulfurization and denitrification. However, they have their own drawbacks, like the oxidation of Fe(II)EDTA and the low solubility of NO in urea solution. To overcome these defects, A mixed absorbent containing both (NH2)2CO and Fe(II)EDTA was employed. The effects of various operating parameters (urea and Fe(II)EDTA concentration, temperature, inlet oxygen concentration, pH value) on NO removal were examined in the packed tower. The results indicated that the NO removal efficiency increased with the decrease of oxygen concentration as well as the increase of Fe(II)EDTA concentration. The NO removal efficiency had little change with a range of 25-45 °C, and sharply decreased at the temperature of above 55 °C. The NO removal efficiency initially increases up to the maximum value and then decreases with the increase of pH value as well as the raise of urea concentration. In addition, the synergistic mechanism of (NH2)2CO and Fe(II)EDTA on NO removal was investigated. Results showed that urea could react with Fe(II)EDTA-NO to produce Fe(II)EDTA, N2, and CO2, and hinder oxidation of Fe(II)EDTA. Finally, to evaluate the effect of SO3(2-) on NO removal, a mixed absorbent containing Fe(II)EDTA, urea, and Na2SO3 was employed to absorb NO. The mixed absorbent could maintain more than 78% for 80 min at 25 °C, pH = 7.0, (NH2)2CO concentration of 5 wt%, Fe(II)EDTA concentration of 0.02 M, O2 concentration of 7% (v/v), and Na2SO3 concentration of 0.2 M.

  3. Reactive Transport Modeling of Microbe-mediated Fe (II) Oxidation for Enhanced Oil Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surasani, V.; Li, L.

    2011-12-01

    Microbially Enhanced Oil Recovery (MEOR) aims to improve the recovery of entrapped heavy oil in depleted reservoirs using microbe-based technology. Reservoir ecosystems often contain diverse microbial communities those can interact with subsurface fluids and minerals through a network of nutrients and energy fluxes. Microbe-mediated reactions products include gases, biosurfactants, biopolymers those can alter the properties of oil and interfacial interactions between oil, brine, and rocks. In addition, the produced biomass and mineral precipitates can change the reservoir permeability profile and increase sweeping efficiency. Under subsurface conditions, the injection of nitrate and Fe (II) as the electron acceptor and donor allows bacteria to grow. The reaction products include minerals such as Fe(OH)3 and nitrogen containing gases. These reaction products can have large impact on oil and reservoir properties and can enhance the recovery of trapped oil. This work aims to understand the Fe(II) oxidation by nitrate under conditions relevant to MEOR. Reactive transport modeling is used to simulate the fluid flow, transport, and reactions involved in this process. Here we developed a complex reactive network for microbial mediated nitrate-dependent Fe (II) oxidation that involves both thermodynamic controlled aqueous reactions and kinetic controlled Fe (II) mineral reaction. Reactive transport modeling is used to understand and quantify the coupling between flow, transport, and reaction processes. Our results identify key parameter controls those are important for the alteration of permeability profile under field conditions.

  4. Nanostructured Fe(III) catalysts for water oxidation assembled with the aid of organic acid salt electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qiang; Li, Dandan; Gao, Guofeng; Yuan, Wen; Hao, Genyan; Li, Jinping

    2016-11-01

    We describe the preparation of three partially ordered iron-based catalyst films (Fe-OAc, Fe-Pro, Fe-But) with nanoporous structure by electrodeposition from organate electrolytes containing Fe2+. The anions of the organic acids assisted the partial ordering of the nanostructured Fe(III) catalysts for water oxidation. A model involving an electrical double layer is invoked to explain the role of the organate electrolyte system in their formation. Analytical results have revealed the main component of the iron-based films to be a β-FeOOH structure. The Fe-But catalyst catalyzed water oxidation in 0.1 m potassium carbonate solution with an average activity of 1.48 mA cm-2 and an overpotential of 433 mV.

  5. Hydrophobic Fe-zeolites for removal of MTBE from water by combination of adsorption and oxidation.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Olmos, Rafael; Kopinke, Frank-Dieter; Mackenzie, Katrin; Georgi, Anett

    2013-03-05

    Several zeolites were evaluated as adsorbents for the removal of MTBE from water in a screening process. It was observed that the SiO2/Al2O3 molar ratio is a decisive factor for the adsorption properties, at least in the case of ZSM5 zeolites. ZSM5 zeolites with SiO2/Al2O3 ratios >200 were found to provide the best sorption properties for MTBE. To design a combined sorption/reaction method, regeneration of the loaded zeolites by selected advanced oxidation processes (AOP) was studied: (1) Fenton treatment using H2O2 with dissolved iron salts and (2) heterogeneous Fenton-like oxidation with Fe immobilized on the zeolites. The first was ineffective in regenerating loaded zeolites. However, heterogeneous catalysis using Fe species immobilized on the zeolite by liquid ion exchange was markedly more effective. Although these hydrophobic zeolites have a low ion exchange capacity, resulting in iron loadings of ≤ 0.09 wt %, it was possible to obtain sufficiently active catalysts. Hydrophobic Fe-zeolites can therefore be regarded as promising materials for the removal of MTBE from water, since they allow the combination of efficient adsorption and oxidative degradation of MTBE by H2O2. In contrast to the homogeneous catalysis by dissolved iron ions, these heterogeneous catalysts work at near-neutral pH and can be easily reused. Fe-zeolites as adsorbents/catalysts showed a good stability in both batch and column experiments.

  6. Inactivation of Aeromonas hydrophila by Fe(II)-related-radical generation in oxidizing groundwaters.

    PubMed Central

    Kersters, I; Verstraete, W

    1996-01-01

    The survival of Aeromonas hydrophila AWWX1 in filter-sterilized phreatic groundwaters was studied by using viable counts. Aeromonas counts rapidly decreased 2 to 3 log units in oxidizing raw groundwaters from Snellegem and Beernem, Belgium (Snellegem-raw and Beernem-raw, respectively), containing high concentrations of Fe2+ (460 to 1,070 microM). The rapid decline in viable counts of Aeromonas cells in the oxidizing raw groundwater of Snellegem was prevented by the addition of an Fe2+ chelator (2,2'-dipyridyl) or compounds (i.e., ascorbic acid and catalase) that act on toxic oxygen species. The results suggest that free radicals, generated spontaneously in oxidizing Fe2+-containing groundwaters, caused the inactivation of A. hydrophila AWWX1. Evidence that free radicals are generated under the given conditions was provided by the observation that propylphosphonic acid, a compound which is very susceptible to radicals, was degraded upon addition to these waters. A. hydrophila PWBS, Pseudomonas fluorescens P17, Spirillum strain NOX, and heterotrophs showed decreases in culturability in filter-sterilized Snellegem-raw water similar to that shown by A. hydrophila AWWX1. These findings indicate that free radicals generated in Fe2+-containing groundwaters upon aeration are capable of inactivating various bacterial species. PMID:8795217

  7. Effect of interfacial iron oxidation on the exchange bias in CoO/Fe bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Młyńczak, E.; Gurgul, J.; Przewoźnik, J.; Wilgocka-Ślęzak, D.; Freindl, K.; Spiridis, N.; Korecki, J.

    2014-06-01

    The relation between the interface structure and the exchange bias was studied in the epitaxial CoO/Fe(0 0 1) bilayers that were grown on MgO(0 0 1) using molecular beam epitaxy. Three samples with different interface structures were prepared. The CoO/Fe bilayer, which was prepared using the reactive evaporation of CoO, served as the reference sample. In the other two samples, the CoO/Fe interfaces were modified prior to the CoO growth using either (i) the deposition of a 2 Å thick Co layer or (ii) an exposure to molecular oxygen, which resulted in under- and over-oxidized CoO/Fe interfaces, respectively. The actual structures of the resulting interfaces were revealed using conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy. For each sample, an iron oxide was found at the interface, and its amount depended on the sample preparation recipe. The exchange bias effect (EB), as a function of the temperature, was experimentally studied in detail using VSM magnetometry. The coercivity showed a distinct peak near the blocking temperature for all samples; however, the peak's location and its width were diverse. The obtained EB values depended on the interface structure. The largest hysteresis loop shift (HEB = 180 Oe at 4 K) was obtained for the sample with the thickest interfacial iron oxide layer.

  8. Electrochemical synthesis of new magnetic mixed oxides of Sr and Fe: Composition, magnetic properties, and microstructure

    SciTech Connect

    Amigo, R.; Asenjo, J.; Krotenko, E.; Torres, F.; Tejada, J.; Brillas, E.

    2000-02-01

    An electrochemical method for the preparation of magnetic nanoparticles of new Sr-Fe oxides is presented in this work. It consists of the electrolysis of nitrate or chloride solutions with Sr{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+} salts using commercial Fe electrodes. Magnetic materials are collected as precipitates from nitrate media in the pH range 1-3 and from chloride media within the pH range 1--12. The presence of 100--300 ppm aniline in acidic nitrate media yields a decrease in energy cost and particle size. Inductively coupled plasma analysis of materials and energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry of single particles confirm that they are composed of mixed oxides of Sr and Fe. All synthesized materials crystallize as inverse cubic spinels, usually with intermediate structures between magnetite and maghemite. They are formed by nanoparticles with average sizes from 2 nm to {approximately} 50 nm, as observed by scanning electron microscopy. The electrogenerated mixed oxides have higher saturation magnetization, but lower remanent magnetization and coercive field, than commercial strontium hexaferrite with micrometric particle size.

  9. Fe, oxidative and nitrosative metabolism in the Antarctic limpet Nacella concinna.

    PubMed

    González, Paula Mariela; Puntarulo, Susana

    2016-10-01

    The hypothesis of this work was that oxidative and nitrosative metabolism in the digestive gland (DG) of two limpet populations (intertidal and subtidal) of the Antarctic species Nacella concinna show different behavior when they were exposed to either intermittent (intertidal) or constant (subtidal) natural Fe. Total Fe content and labile Fe pool were higher in the DG of the subtidal compared to the intertidal population. However, no significant differences between populations were seen on the Fe atoms content of the isolated ferritin. Ascorbyl radical content was 2.0±0.4 and 6.5±0.8pmol/mg FW in the DG of the intertidal and subtidal animals, respectively. Lipid damage, assessed as content of thiobarbituric reactive substances, was different between the tissues of intertidal and subtidal samples, 491±102 and 1242±367pmol/mg FW, respectively. Catalase and superoxide dismutase activities showed no differences between the limpets. Nitric oxide (NO) content was 25±3 and 22±2pmol/mg FW in DG from intertidal and subtidal animals, respectively. NO synthase-like (NOS-like) activity was evaluated supplementing the samples with the enzyme co-factors, and the inhibitory effect of Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride was tested. NO generation rate was 3.4±0.3 and 4.7±0.6pmol/minmg FW in DG from the intertidal and subtidal population, respectively. These results showed that the oxidative condition of the limpet population constantly covered by the Fe enriched water is more affected than the intertidal population. However, the nitrosative metabolism seems to be independent of the environmental high Fe content since similar NO steady state concentration and NOS-like activity were measured in both populations.

  10. Comparative genomics of freshwater Fe-oxidizing bacteria: implications for physiology, ecology, and systematics

    PubMed Central

    Emerson, David; Field, Erin K.; Chertkov, Olga; Davenport, Karen W.; Goodwin, Lynne; Munk, Christine; Nolan, Matt; Woyke, Tanja

    2013-01-01

    The two microaerophilic, Fe-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) Sideroxydans ES-1 and Gallionella ES-2 have single circular chromosomes of 3.00 and 3.16 Mb that encode 3049 and 3006 genes, respectively. Multi-locus sequence analysis (MLSA) confirmed the relationship of these two organisms to one another, and indicated they may form a novel order, the Gallionellalaes, within the Betaproteobacteria. Both are adapted for chemolithoautotropy, including pathways for CO2-fixation, and electron transport pathways adapted for growth at low O2-levels, an important adaptation for growing on Fe(II). Both genomes contain Mto-genes implicated in iron-oxidation, as well as other genes that could be involved in Fe-oxidation. Nearly 10% of their genomes are devoted to environmental sensing, signal transduction, and chemotaxis, consistent with their requirement for growing in narrow redox gradients of Fe(II) and O2. There are important differences as well. Sideroxydans ES-1 is more metabolically flexible, and can utilize reduced S-compounds, including thiosulfate, for lithotrophic growth. It has a suite of genes for nitrogen fixation. Gallionella ES-2 contains additional gene clusters for exopolysaccharide production, and has more capacity to resist heavy metals. Both strains contain genes for hemerythrins and globins, but ES-1 has an especially high numbers of these genes that may be involved in oxygen homeostasis, or storage. The two strains share homology with the marine FeOB Mariprofundus ferrooxydans PV-1 in CO2 fixation genes, and respiratory genes. In addition, ES-1 shares a suite of 20 potentially redox active genes with PV-1, as well as a large prophage. Combined these genetic, morphological, and physiological differences indicate that these are two novel species, Sideroxydans lithotrophicus ES-1T (ATCC 700298T; JCM 14762; DSMZ 22444; NCMA B100), and Gallionella capsiferriformans ES-2T (ATCC 700299T; JCM 14763; DSMZ 22445; NCMA B101). PMID:24062729

  11. Preparation of a novel graphene oxide/Fe-Mn composite and its application for aqueous Hg(II) removal.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jingchun; Huang, Yao; Gong, Yanyan; Lyu, Honghong; Wang, Qilin; Ma, Jianli

    2016-10-05

    A novel graphene oxide/Fe-Mn (GO/Fe-Mn) composite was synthesized (molar ratio of Fe/Mn=3/1 and mass ratio of Fe/GO=1/7.5) and investigated for the sorption characteristics and mechanisms of aqueous mercury (Hg(2+)) as well as the biological effects to wheat and rice. Characterization tests showed that Fe-Mn oxides were impregnated onto GO sheets in an amorphous form through oxygen-containing functional groups (i.e., CO, epoxy COC, carboxyl OCO, and CO) and π-π interactions. GO/Fe-Mn possessed large surface area, surface enhanced Raman scattering with more sp(3) defects, and greater thermal stability than GO. XPS analysis revealed that Fe2O3, FeOOH, MnO2, MnOOH, and MnO were the dominant metal oxides in GO/Fe-Mn. Pseudo-second-order kinetic model and Sips isotherm model fitted well with the sorption kinetic and isotherm data. The maximum sorption capacity for mercury was 32.9mg/g. Ligand exchange and surface complexation were the dominant mechanisms for mercury removal. GO/Fe-Mn greatly reduced the bioavailability of mercury to wheat and rice, even promoted the seedling growth. This work suggests that GO/Fe-Mn can be used as an effective and environmental-friendly adsorbent in heavy metal remediation.

  12. Structure of Oxide Nanoparticles in Fe-16Cr MA/ODS Ferritic Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiung, L; Fluss, M; Kimura, A

    2010-04-06

    Oxide nanoparticles in Fe-16Cr ODS ferritic steel fabricated by mechanical alloying (MA) method have been examined using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) techniques. A partial crystallization of oxide nanoparticles was frequently observed in as-fabricated ODS steel. The crystal structure of crystalline oxide particles is identified to be mainly Y{sub 4}Al{sub 2}O{sub 9} (YAM) with a monoclinic structure. Large nanoparticles with a diameter larger than 20 nm tend to be incoherent and have a nearly spherical shape, whereas small nanoparticles with a diameter smaller than 10 nm tend to be coherent or semi-coherent and have faceted boundaries. The oxide nanoparticles become fully crystallized after prolonged annealing at 900 C. These results lead us to propose a three-stage formation mechanism of oxide nanoparticles in MA/ODS steels.

  13. Fe(VI) as a Possible Oxidant on the Martian Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsapin, A. I.; Goldfeld, M. G.; McDonald, G. D.; Nealson, K. H.

    1999-01-01

    The essential findings of the three biological experiments (Gas Exchange, Labeled Released, and Pyrolitic Release) aboard the Viking Mars landers were the discovery of the presence of one or more strong oxidants on the Martian surface. The Gas Exchange experiments showed that wetting Martian soil leads to the evolution of oxygen, while in the Labeled Release experiment addition of a nutrient solution containing C-14-labeled formate, glycine, lactate, alanine, and glycolic acid induced CO2 evolution. A general consensus was reached that all data taken together pointed to the presence on Martian surface of a strong oxidant, or most probably several different types of oxidants. Several candidates have been proposed as oxidants, including superoxides, hydrogen peroxide, and iron oxides (possibly gamma-Fe2O3). Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  14. Electronic Structure and Chemistry of Iron-Based Metal Oxide Nanostructured Materials: A NEXAFS Investigation of BiFeO3, Bi2Fe4O9, α-Fe2O3, γ-Fe2O3, and Fe/Fe3O4

    SciTech Connect

    Park,T.; Sambasivan, S.; Fischer, D.; Yoon, W.; Misewich, J.; Wong, S.

    2008-01-01

    We present a systematic and detailed near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) experimental investigation of the electronic structure and chemistry of iron-based metal oxide nanostructured (FeMONS) materials including BiFeO3, Bi2Fe4O9, a-Fe2O3, ?-Fe2O3, and Fe/Fe3O4. Correlations of the electronic structure and structural chemistry of these intriguing nanomaterials are presented, ranging from the nano to the bulk scale. In this work, variations in the shape, position, and intensity of the O K-edge and Fe L-edge NEXAFS spectra have been analyzed in terms of electronic structure and surface chemistry of the FeMONS materials as compared with that of the bulk. We hypothesize that surface imperfection and surface strain anisotropies in nanoparticles induce distortion and site inequivalency of the oxygen Oh sites around the Fe ion located close to the surface, resulting in an increase in the degree of multiplicity as well as in nonstoichiometric effects in FeMONS materials.

  15. Mechanosynthesis and magnetic properties of nanocrystalline LaFeO{sub 3} using different iron oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Cristobal, A.A. Botta, P.M.; Bercoff, P.G.; Porto Lopez, J.M.

    2009-05-06

    The synthesis of the orthoferrite LaFeO{sub 3} using high-energy ball-milling of La{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} or {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} oxides and subsequent thermal treatments of resulting powders was studied. The phase evolution during the mechanical treatment was analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential thermal analysis (DTA) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Also, magnetic properties of the obtained materials were measured at room temperature by vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM). From 30 min of mechanochemical activation the gradual disappearance of reactants and the formation of LaFeO{sub 3} were observed. For both reactive mixtures the reaction was completed after 3 h of milling. Magnetic hysteresis loops of these mechanoactivated samples showed a significant ferromagnetic component in LaFeO{sub 3}. This behavior was interpreted on the basis of a spin-canting effect induced by the mechanochemical treatment. Thermal treatments allowed the relaxation of the distorted structure, resulting in the formation of the conventional antiferromagnetic LaFeO{sub 3} phase.

  16. Oxide composite prepared from intermetallic and amorphous Zr67Fe30M3- (M=Au, Pt) alloys and their catalytic activity for CO oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yung-Han; Wang, Sea-Fue; Kameoka, Satoshi; Miyamoto, Kanji; Tsai, An-Pang

    2017-01-01

    In this study, Zr67Fe30M3 (M=Au, Pt) intermetallic compounds and amorphous alloys were prepared and used as precursors for the synthesis of oxides. Oxidation treatment of the intermetallic compounds at 500 °C followed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis indicated that zirconium and iron were oxidized to ZrO2 and Fe2O3, respectively. In the case of Zr67Fe30M3 amorphous alloys, cubic Zr6Fe3O was observed on the surface of the ribbons after heat treatment at 500 °C in vacuum. Addition of 3% of gold or platinum to the alloy resulted in an increase in the lattice constants of the Zr6Fe3O phase. Grounding the treated ribbons into powders followed by an oxidation treatment at 500 °C in air produced Fe2O3 and ZrO2 supports, where Au and Pt are dissolved in the oxides as confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). No matter precursors are intermetallics or amorphous phases, the resultant oxides are the same. Although Pt and Au dissolved in the oxides, catalytic activities for CO oxidation were significant improved.

  17. Transparent ferromagnetic and semiconducting behavior in Fe-Dy-Tb based amorphous oxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taz, H.; Sakthivel, T.; Yamoah, N. K.; Carr, C.; Kumar, D.; Seal, S.; Kalyanaraman, R.

    2016-06-01

    We report a class of amorphous thin film material comprising of transition (Fe) and Lanthanide metals (Dy and Tb) that show unique combination of functional properties. Films were deposited with different atomic weight ratio (R) of Fe to Lanthanide (Dy + Tb) using electron beam co-evaporation at room temperature. The films were found to be amorphous, with grazing incidence x-ray diffraction and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies indicating that the films were largely oxidized with a majority of the metal being in higher oxidation states. Films with R = 0.6 were semiconducting with visible light transmission due to a direct optical band-gap (2.49 eV), had low resistivity and sheet resistance (7.15 × 10‑4 Ω-cm and ~200 Ω/sq respectively), and showed room temperature ferromagnetism. A metal to semiconductor transition with composition (for R < 11.9) also correlated well with the absence of any metallic Fe0 oxidation state in the R = 0.6 case as well as a significantly higher fraction of oxidized Dy. The combination of amorphous microstructure and room temperature electronic and magnetic properties could lead to the use of the material in multiple applications, including as a transparent conductor, active material in thin film transistors for display devices, and in spin-dependent electronics.

  18. Transparent ferromagnetic and semiconducting behavior in Fe-Dy-Tb based amorphous oxide films

    PubMed Central

    Taz, H.; Sakthivel, T.; Yamoah, N. K.; Carr, C.; Kumar, D.; Seal, S.; Kalyanaraman, R.

    2016-01-01

    We report a class of amorphous thin film material comprising of transition (Fe) and Lanthanide metals (Dy and Tb) that show unique combination of functional properties. Films were deposited with different atomic weight ratio (R) of Fe to Lanthanide (Dy + Tb) using electron beam co-evaporation at room temperature. The films were found to be amorphous, with grazing incidence x-ray diffraction and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies indicating that the films were largely oxidized with a majority of the metal being in higher oxidation states. Films with R = 0.6 were semiconducting with visible light transmission due to a direct optical band-gap (2.49 eV), had low resistivity and sheet resistance (7.15 × 10−4 Ω-cm and ~200 Ω/sq respectively), and showed room temperature ferromagnetism. A metal to semiconductor transition with composition (for R < 11.9) also correlated well with the absence of any metallic Fe0 oxidation state in the R = 0.6 case as well as a significantly higher fraction of oxidized Dy. The combination of amorphous microstructure and room temperature electronic and magnetic properties could lead to the use of the material in multiple applications, including as a transparent conductor, active material in thin film transistors for display devices, and in spin-dependent electronics. PMID:27298196

  19. Dissolution of Fe(III)(hydr) oxides by metal-EDTA complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Nowack, B.; Sigg, L. |

    1997-03-01

    The dissolution of Fe(III)(hydr)oxides (goethite and hydrous ferric oxide) by metal-EDTA complexes occurs by ligand-promoted dissolution. The process is initiated by the adsorption of metal-EDTA complexes to the surface and is followed by the dissociation of the complex at the surface and the release of Fe(III)EDTA into solution. The dissolution rate is decreased to a great extent if EDTA is complexed by metals in comparison to the uncomplexed EDTA. The rate decreases in the order EDTA > CaEDTA > PbEDTA > ZnEDTA > CuEDTA > Co(II)EDTA > NiEDTA. Two different rate-limiting steps determine the dissolution process: (1) detachment of Fe(III) from the oxide-structure and (2) dissociation of the metal-EDTA complexes. In the case of goethite, step 1 is slower than step 2 and the dissolution rates by various metals are similar. In the case of hydrous ferric oxide, step 2 is rate-limiting and the effect of the complexed metal is very pronounced. 35 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. Microbial mediated iron redox cycling in Fe (hydr)oxides for nitrite removal.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yongsheng; Xu, Lu; Shu, Weikang; Zhou, Jizhi; Chen, Xueping; Xu, Yunfeng; Qian, Guangren

    2017-01-01

    Nitrite, at an environmentally relevant concentration, was significantly reduced with iron (hydr)oxides mediated by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. The average nitrite removal rates of 1.28±0.08 and 0.65±0.02(mgL(-1))h(-1) were achieved with ferrihydrite and magnetite, respectively. The results showed that nitrite removal was able to undergo multiple redox cycles with iron (hydr)oxides mediated by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. During the bioreduction of the following cycles, biogenic Fe(II) was subsequently chemically oxidized to Fe(III), which is associated with nitrite reduction. There was 11.18±1.26mgL(-1) of NH4(+)-N generated in the process of redox cycling of ferrihydrite. Additionally, results obtained by using X-ray diffraction showed that ferrihydrite and magnetite remained mainly stable in the system. This study indicated that redox cycling of Fe in iron (hydr)oxides was a potential process associated with NO2(-)-N removal from solution, and reduced most nitrite abiotically to gaseous nitrogen species.

  1. Preliminary study of heavy metal pollution from Fe-Al oxides in Peihuang Creek, North Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, B.

    2012-12-01

    Tatun Volcano Group (TVG) is not active since late Pleistocene but the post-volcanic activities, such as hot spring and sulfur gas, still widespread around the volcano province. Peihuang Creek is the main watershed system in TVG. The creek water is characterized by higher temperature, low pH values (3.0-4.5) and high SO4 content (60-400 ppm) due to the mixing of hotspring. This would promote the geochemical interaction between water and andesitic rocks and results in waters with highly enriched iron, aluminum and silica. These elements prefer to form suspended colloidal particles in water and adsorb heavy metals. Once the pH of water increases under oxidation condition, the colloid would precipitate in the form of ochre colored powder on the riverbed. The previous study reports that the arsenic content can reach as high as hundreds ppm. It is very important to evaluate the desorption behavior of heavy metals, especially for the study area with highly developed agriculture. For the preliminary analysis, five samples of ochre colored powder were sampled along the creek. The results of XRF demonstrate that the powder is mainly composed of iron, aluminum and silica, which is Fe-Al hydroxide. The iron content of Fe-Al hydroxide decreases from 63% to 25% while the aluminum and silica contents gradually increase from 5% to 20% and from 9% to 30%, respectively. To evaluate the desorption of heavy metals, the sequential extraction procedure was conducted. In the first step for determining leachable metals, the Fe-Al oxides were extracted with deionized water in the room temperature for one week. All of the metals are in ppb level except copper. For determining reducible phase, Step 2 used reagent solution of 0.5 mol/L hydroxylamine hydrochloride, which was adjusted to pH=2 with ultrapure nitric acid, for one week. The extracted chromium, arsenic, lead and copper are in the dangerous level of tens to hundreds ppm. It is believed that only very small amounts of heavy metals

  2. Mechanism of Alcohol Oxidation by Fe(V)(O) at Room Temperature.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Munmun; Nikhil, Y L K; Dhar, Basab B; Sen Gupta, Sayam

    2015-12-21

    Selective oxidation of alcohol to its corresponding carbonyl compound is an important chemical process in biological as well as industrial reactions. The heme containing enzyme CytP450 has been known to selectively oxidize alcohols to their corresponding carbonyl compounds. The mechanism of this reaction, which involves high-valent Fe(IV)(O)-porphyrin(•+) intermediate with alcohol, has been well-studied extensively both with the native enzyme and with model complexes. In this paper, we report for the first time the mechanistic insight of alcohol oxidation with Fe(V)(O) complex of biuret TAML (bTAML), which is isoelectronic with Fe(IV)(O)-porphyrin(•+) intermediate form in CytP450. The oxidations displayed saturation kinetics, which allowed us to determine both the binding constants and first-order rate constants for the reaction. The K and k values observed for the oxidation of benzyl alcohol by Fe(V)(O) at room temperature (K = 300 M(-1), k = 0.35 s(-1)) is very similar to that obtained by CytP450 compound I at -50 °C (K = 214 M(-1), k = 0.48 s(-1)). Thermodynamic parameters determined from van't Hoff's plot (ΔH∼ -4 kcal/mol) suggest hydrogen bonding interaction between substrate and bTAML ligand framework of the Fe(V)(O) complex. Analysis of H/D KIE (kH/kD ∼ 19 at 303 K), Hammett correlation and linearity in Bell-Evans-Polyanski plot points to the C-H abstraction as the rate determination step. Finally, experiments using Fe(V)(O(18)) for benzyl alcohol oxidation and use of the "radical clock" cyclobutanol as a substrate shows the absence of a rebound mechanism as is observed for CytP450. Instead, an ET/PT process is proposed after C-H abstraction leading to formation of the aldehyde, similar to what has been proposed for the heme and nonheme model compounds.

  3. Oxidation and deprotonation of synthetic Fe{sup II}-Fe{sup III} (oxy)hydroxycarbonate Green Rust: An X-ray photoelectron study

    SciTech Connect

    Mullet, M. Guillemin, Y.; Ruby, C.

    2008-01-15

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to investigate chemical bonding and distribution of iron and oxygen species at the surface of Green Rusts (GRs). GRs with variable composition, i.e. Fe{sup II}{sub 6(1-x)}Fe{sup III}{sub 6x}O{sub 12}H{sub 2(7-3x)} CO{sub 3}.3H{sub 2}O where the Fe{sup III} molar fraction of the positively charged hydroxide sheets, x=[Fe(III)]/[Fe(total)] belongs to [1/3, 1], were synthesised under an inert atmosphere. The broadened Fe(2p{sub 3/2}) spectra were fitted using Gupta and Sen multiplets peaks and additional satellite and surface features. The [Fe(III)]/[Fe(total)] surface atomic ratios closely agree with the x ratios expected from the bulk composition, which gives a high degree of confidence on the validity of the proposed fitting procedure. The valence band spectra are also reported and show dependencies on iron speciation. The O(1s) spectra revealed the presence of O{sup 2-}, OH{sup -} species and adsorbed water. The hydroxyl component decreases with increasing x values, i.e. with the amount of ferric iron, while the oxide component increases. This study provides direct spectroscopic evidence of the deprotonation of hydroxyl groups that occurs simultaneously with the oxidation of ferrous iron within the GR structure. - Graphical abstract: X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is used to investigate chemical bonding and distribution of iron and oxygen species at the surface of Green Rust (GR) compounds. First spectroscopic evidence of the deprotonation of hydroxyls groups occurring simultaneously to the oxidation of Fe(II) into Fe(III) species is provided.

  4. Fe(II) oxidation during acid mine drainage neutralization in a pilot-scale Sequencing Batch Reactor.

    PubMed

    Zvimba, J N; Mathye, M; Vadapalli, V R K; Swanepoel, H; Bologo, L

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated Fe(II) oxidation during acid mine drainage (AMD) neutralization using CaCO3 in a pilot-scale Sequencing Batch Reactor (SBR) of hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 90 min and sludge retention time (SRT) of 360 min in the presence of air. The removal kinetics of Fe(II), of initial concentration 1,033 ± 0 mg/L, from AMD through oxidation to Fe(III) was observed to depend on both pH and suspended solids, resulting in Fe(II) levels of 679 ± 32, 242 ± 64, 46 ± 16 and 28 ± 0 mg/L recorded after cycles 1, 2, 3 and 4 respectively, with complete Fe(II) oxidation only achieved after complete neutralization of AMD. Generally, it takes 30 min to completely oxidize Fe(II) during cycle 4, suggesting that further optimization of SBR operation based on both pH and suspended solids manipulation can result in significant reduction of the number of cycles required to achieve acceptable Fe(II) oxidation for removal as ferric hydroxide. Overall, complete removal of Fe(II) during AMD neutralization is attractive as it promotes recovery of better quality waste gypsum, key to downstream gypsum beneficiation for recovery of valuables, thereby enabling some treatment-cost recovery and prevention of environmental pollution from dumping of sludge into landfills.

  5. Oxidation and magnetic states of chalcopyrite CuFeS2: A first principles calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klekovkina, V. V.; Gainov, R. R.; Vagizov, F. G.; Dooglav, A. V.; Golovanevskiy, V. A.; Pen'kov, I. N.

    2014-06-01

    The ground state band structure, magnetic moments, charges and population numbers of electronic shells of Cu and Fe atoms have been calculated for chalcopyrite CuFeS2 using density functional theory. The comparison between our calculation results and experimental data (X-ray photoemission, X-ray absorption and neutron diffraction spectroscopy) has been made. Our calculations predict a formal oxidation state for chalcopyrite as Cu1+Fe3+S{2/2-}. However, the assignment of formal valence state to transition metal atoms appears to be oversimplified. It is anticipated that the valence state can be confirmed experimentally by nuclear magnetic and nuclear quadrupole resonance and Mössbauer spectroscopy methods.

  6. CaFeAl mixed oxide derived heterogeneous catalysts for transesterification of soybean oil to biodiesel.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yongsheng; Zhang, Zaiwu; Xu, Yunfeng; Liu, Qiang; Qian, Guangren

    2015-08-01

    CaAl layered double oxides (LDO) were prepared by co-precipitation and calcined at 750°C, and then applied to biodiesel production by transesterification reaction between methanol and soybean oil. Compared with characteristics of CaFe/LDO and CaAl/LDO, CaFeAl/LDO had the best performance based on prominent catalytic activity and stability, and achieved over 90% biodiesel yield, which stayed stable (over 85%) even after 8 cycles of reaction. The optimal catalytic reaction condition was 12:1M-ratio of methanol/oil, reaction temperatures of 60°C, 270rpm stirring rate, 60min reaction time, and 6% weight-ratio of catalyst/oil. In addition, the CaFeAl/LDO catalyst is insoluble in both methanol and methyl esters and can be easily separated for further reaction, turning it into an excellent alternative for biodiesel synthesis.

  7. Tunable magnetic properties of monoatomic metal-oxide Fe/MgO multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozioł-Rachwał, A.; Ślezak, T.; Matlak, K.; Kuświk, P.; Urbaniak, M.; Stobiecki, F.; Yao, L. D.; van Dijken, S.; Korecki, J.

    2014-07-01

    Metal-oxide [FeK/(MgO)L]N multilayers were grown on MgO(001) substrates for various integer numbers (K,L) of the Fe(001) and MgO(001) monolayers, respectively, and the number of repetitions N varied from 6 to 30. Room-temperature conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy (CEMS) measurements proved that the magnetic properties of these monoatomic multilayers were extremely sensitive to both the Fe and MgO sublayer thicknesses. A stable ferromagnetic state and a strong perpendicular magnetization component at room temperature were obtained by changing the sublayer thickness and the number of multilayer repetitions. The analysis of the CEMS spectra in correlation with the magneto-optic Kerr effect measurements indicated a complicated domain structure in this special type of metal-insulator material. The vortexlike domain structure was confirmed by micromagnetic simulations.

  8. [Nitrate removal by a strain of nitrate-dependent Fe (II) -oxidizing bacteria].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Yu; Yang, Kai; Zhang, Qian; Ji, Bin; Chen, Dan; Sun, Yu-Chong; Tian, Jun

    2014-04-01

    A nitrate-dependent Fe(II)-oxidizing bacterial strain, named W5, was isolated from the sediment of the East Lake in Wuhan. Strain W5 was studied for its characteristics of denitrification and nitrogen removal. According to its physiological and biochemical characteristics and the analysis of its 16S rRNA gene sequence, strain W5 was identified as Microbacterium sp. The optimal denitrification performance can be obtained under conditions of NO3(-) -N 40 mg x L(-1), Fe2+ 500 mg x L(-1) and pH 6.8-7.0. After one week of cultivation under optimal conditions, nitrate removal percentage reached 87.0%. During the process of the culture, the nitrite nitrogen concentration was no more than 0.31 mg x L(-1) and there was no ammonia nitrogen production. It was indicated that the nitrate was mostly converted into N2. The consumption rate of Fe2+ was 95.2%.

  9. Towards a Predictive Thermodynamic Model of Oxidation States of Uranium Incorporated in Fe (hydr) oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Bagus, Paul S.

    2013-01-01

    The theoretical research in this project has been directed toward the interpretation of core-level spectroscopies for systems relevant to the project. For the initial efforts, the focus of our theoretical simulations has been the interpretation of laboratory and synchrotron X-Ray Photoemission Spectra, XPS. In more recent efforts, an increasing emphasis has been placed on developing transparent understandings of X-Ray Adsorption Spectra, XAS . For the XAS, the principal concern is for the near-edge features, either just below or just above, an ionization limit or edge, which are described as Near-Edge X-Ray Adsorption Fine Structure, NEXAFS. In particular, a priority has involved the analysis and interpretation of XPS and NEXAFS spectra, especially of Fe and U systems, as measured by our PNNL collaborators. The overall objective of our theoretical studies is to establish connections between features of the spectra and their origin in the electronic structure of the materials. The efforts for the analysis of XPS have been reviewed in a paper by the PI, C. J. Nelin, and E. S. Ilton from PNNL on “The interpretation of XPS spectra: Insights into materials properties”, Surf. Sci. Reports, 68, 273 (2013). Two materials properties of special interest have been the degree of ionicity and the character of the covalent bonding in a range of oxides formed with transition metal, lanthanide, and actinide cations. Since the systems treated have electrons in open shells, it has been necessary to determine the energetics and the character of the angular momentum coupling of the open shell electrons. In particular, we have established methods for the treatment of the “intermediate coupling” which arises when the system is between the limit of Russell-Saunders multiplets, and the limit of j-j coupling where the spin-orbit splittings of single electrons dominate. A recent paper by the PI, and M. J. Sassi, and K. M. Rosso, (both at PNNL) “Intermediate Coupling For Core

  10. Microbial Fe(III) Oxide Reduction in Chocolate Pots Hot Springs, Yellowstone National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortney, N. W.; Roden, E. E.; Boyd, E. S.; Converse, B. J.

    2014-12-01

    Previous work on dissimilatory iron reduction (DIR) in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) has focused on high temperature, low pH environments where soluble Fe(III) is utilized as an electron acceptor for respiration. Much less attention has been paid to DIR in lower temperature, circumneutral pH environments, where solid phase Fe(III) oxides are the dominant forms of Fe(III). This study explored the potential for DIR in the warm (ca. 40-50°C), circumneutral pH Chocolate Pots hot springs (CP) in YNP. Most probable number (MPN) enumerations and enrichment culture studies confirmed the presence of endogenous microbial communities that reduced native CP Fe(III) oxides. Enrichment cultures demonstrated sustained DIR coupled to acetate and lactate oxidation through repeated transfers over ca. 450 days. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes indicated that the dominant organisms in the enrichments were closely affiliated with the well known Fe(III) reducer Geobacter metallireducens. Additional taxa included relatives of sulfate reducing bacterial genera Desulfohalobium and Thermodesulfovibrio; however, amendment of enrichments with molybdate, an inhibitor of sulfate reduction, suggested that sulfate reduction was not a primary metabolic pathway involved in DIR in the cultures. A metagenomic analysis of enrichment cultures is underway in anticipation of identifying genes involved in DIR in the less well-characterized dominant organisms. Current studies are aimed at interrogating the in situ microbial community at CP. Core samples were collected along the flow path (Fig. 1) and subdivided into 1 cm depth intervals for geochemical and microbiological analysis. The presence of significant quantities of Fe(II) in the solids indicated that DIR is active in situ. A parallel study investigated in vitro microbial DIR in sediments collected from three of the coring sites. DNA was extracted from samples from both studies for 16S rRNA gene and metagenomic sequencing in order to obtain a

  11. Biological Oxidation of Fe(II) in Reduced Nontronite Coupled with Nitrate Reduction by Pseudogulbenkiania sp. Strain 2002

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Linduo; Dong, Hailiang; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Agrawal, A.; Liu, Deng; Zhang, Jing; Edelmann, Richard E.

    2013-10-15

    Nitrate contamination in soils, sediments, and water bodies is a significant issue. Although much is known about nitrate degradation in these environments, especially via microbial pathways, a complete understanding of all degradation processes, especially in clay mineral-rich soils, is still lacking. The objective of this study was to study the potential of removing nitrate contaminant using structural Fe(II) in clay mineral nontronite. Specifically, the coupled processes of microbial oxidation of Fe(II) in microbially reduced nontronite (NAu-2) and nitrate reduction by Pseudogulbenkiania species strain 2002 was investigated. Bio-oxidation experiments were conducted in bicarbonate-buffered medium under both growth and nongrowth conditions. The extents of Fe(II) oxidation and nitrate reduction were measured by wet chemical methods. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM), and 57Fe-Mössbauer spectroscopy were used to observe mineralogical changes associated with Fe(III) reduction and Fe(II) oxidation in nontronite. The bio-oxidation extent under growth and nongrowth conditions reached 93% and 57%, respectively. Over the same time period, nitrate was completely reduced under both conditions to nitrogen gas (N2), via an intermediate product nitrite. Magnetite was a mineral product of nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation, as evidenced by XRD data and TEM diffraction patterns. The results of this study highlight the importance of iron-bearing clay minerals in the global nitrogen cycle with potential applications in nitrate removal in soils.

  12. Tuning the superconductivity in single-layer FeSe/oxides by interface engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Rui

    2015-03-01

    The discovery of high Tc in single-layer FeSe films has enormous implications for both searching new high Tc superconductors and exploring the important factors for high temperature superconductivity. In this talk, I will show our recent angle-resolved photoemission studies on various FeSe-based heterostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy. We systematically studied the electronic structures and superconducting properties of FeSe with varied strain, different interfacial oxide materials and different thicknesses, and uncover that electronic correlations and superconducting gap-closing temperatures are tuned by interfacial effects. We exclude the direct relation between superconductivity and tensile strain, or the energy of an interfacial phonon mode, and demonstrate the crucial and non-trivial role of FeSe/oxide interface on the high pairing temperature. By tuning the interface, superconducting pairing temperature reaches up to 75K in FeSe/Nb:BaTiO3/KTaO3 with the in-plane lattice of 3.99 Å, which sets a new superconducting-gap-closing temperature record for iron-based superconductors, and may paves the way to more cost-effective applications of ultra-thin superconductors. Besides, in extremely tensile-strained single-layer FeSe films, we found that the Fermi surfaces consist of two elliptical electron pockets at the zone corner, without detectable hybridization. The lifting of degeneracy is clearly observed for the first time for the iron-based superconductors with only electron Fermi surfaces. Intriguingly, the superconducting gap distribution is anisotropic but nodeless around the electron pockets, with minima at the crossings of the two pockets. Our results provide important experimental foundations for understanding the interfacial superconductivity and the pairing symmetry puzzle of iron-based superconductors, and also provide clues for further enhancing Tc through interface engineering.

  13. Molecular Underpinnings of Fe(III) Oxide Reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Liang; Rosso, Kevin M.; Clarke, Thomas A.; Richardson, David J.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2012-02-15

    In the absence of O2 and other electron acceptors, the Gram-negative bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 can use ferric [Fe(III)] (oxy)(hydr)oxide minerals as the terminal electron acceptors for anaerobic respiration. At circumneutral pH and in the absence of strong complexing ligands, Fe(III) oxides are relatively insoluble and thus are external to the bacterial cells. S. oneidensis MR-1 and related strains of metal-reducing Shewanella have evolved the machinery (i.e., metal-reducing or Mtr pathway) for transferring electrons from the inner-membrane, through the periplasm and across the outer-membrane to the surface of extracellular Fe(III) oxides. The protein components identified to date for the Mtr pathway include CymA, MtrA, MtrB, MtrC and OmcA. CymA is an inner-membrane tetraheme c-type cytochrome (c-Cyt) that belongs to the NapC/NrfH family of quinol dehydrogenases. It is proposed that CymA oxidizes the quinol in the inner-membrane and transfers the released electrons to redox proteins in the periplasm. Although the periplasmic proteins receiving electrons from CymA during Fe(III) oxidation have not been identified, they are believed to relay the electrons in the periplasm to MtrA. A decaheme c-Cyt, MtrA is thought to be embedded in the trans outer-membrane and porin-like protein MtrB. Together, MtrAB deliver the electrons through the outer-membrane to the MtrC and OmcA on the outmost bacterial surface. MtrC and OmcA are the outer-membrane decaheme c-Cyts that are translocated across the outer-membrane by the bacterial type II secretion system. Functioning as terminal reductases, MtrC and OmcA can bind the surface of Fe(III) oxides and transfer electrons directly to these minerals via their solvent-exposed hemes. To increase their reaction rates, MtrC and OmcA can use the flavins secreted by S. oneidensis MR-1 cells as diffusible co-factors for reduction of Fe(III) oxides. Because of their extracellular location and broad redox potentials, MtrC and OmcA can

  14. On the effect of the Fe(2+)/Fe(3+) redox couple on oxidation of carbon in hot H3PO4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhar, H. P.; Christner, L. G.; Kush, A. K.

    1986-01-01

    Oxidation studies of graphite:glassy carbon composites have been carried out at 1 and 4.7 atm. pressures in conc. H3PO4 in the presence and absence of iron ions. The concentration of the acid was varied over 85-100 wt pct, and of the iron ions over 30-300 ppm; the temperature varied over 190-210 C. Unlike the effect of Fe, which has been observed to increase the corrosion of carbon in sulphuric acid, the corrosion in phosphoric acid was observed to be slightly decreased or not at all affected. This result arises because of the catalytic reduction of the oxidized surface groups of carbon by Fe(2+) ions. The catalytic reduction is possible because under the experimental conditions the redox potential of the Fe(2+)/Fe(3+) couple is lower than the open-circuit voltage of carbon.

  15. Characterisation of Fe-oxide nanoparticles coated with humic acid and Suwannee River natural organic matter.

    PubMed

    Chekli, Laura; Phuntsho, Sherub; Roy, Maitreyee; Shon, Ho Kyong

    2013-09-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles are becoming increasingly popular for various applications including the treatment of contaminated soil and groundwater; however, their mobility and reactivity in the subsurface environment are significantly affected by their tendency to aggregate. One solution to overcome this issue is to coat the nanoparticles with dissolved organic matter (DOM). The advantages of DOM over conventional surface modifiers are that DOM is naturally abundant in the environment, inexpensive, non-toxic and readily adsorbed onto the surface of metal oxide nanoparticles. In this study, humic acid (HA) and Suwannee River natural organic matter (SRNOM) were tested and compared as surface modifiers for Fe2O3 nanoparticles (NPs). The DOM-coated Fe2O3 NPs were characterised by various analytical methods including: flow field-flow fractionation (FlFFF), high performance size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The stability of the coated NPs was then evaluated by assessing their aggregation and disaggregation behaviour over time. Results showed that both HA and SRNOM were rapidly and readily adsorbed on the surface of Fe2O3 NPs, providing electrosteric stabilisation over a wide range of pH. HPSEC results showed that the higher molecular weight components of DOM were preferentially adsorbed onto the surface of Fe2O3. As SRNOM consists of macromolecules with a higher molecular weight than HA, the measured size of the SRNOM-coated Fe2O3 NPs was 30% larger than the HA-coated Fe2O3 NPs. FTIR results indicated the occurrence of hydrogen bonding arising from electrostatic interaction between the DOM and Fe2O3 NPs. Finally, a stability study showed that after 14 days, small agglomerates and aggregates were formed. The HA-coated Fe2O3 NPs formed agglomerates which were easily disaggregated using a vortex mixer, with the coated NPs returning to their initial size. However, SRNOM-coated Fe2O3 NPs were only partially disaggregated

  16. Electrochemical capacitance of iron oxide nanotube (Fe-NT): effect of annealing atmospheres.

    PubMed

    Sarma, Biplab; Jurovitzki, Abraham L; Ray, Rupashree S; Smith, York R; Mohanty, Swomitra K; Misra, Mano

    2015-07-03

    The effect of annealing atmosphere on the supercapacitance behavior of iron oxide nanotube (Fe-NT) electrodes has been explored and reported here. Iron oxide nanotubes were synthesized on a pure iron substrate through an electrochemical anodization process in an ethylene glycol solution containing 3% H2O and 0.5 wt.% NH4F. Subsequently, the annealing of the nanotubes was carried out at 500 °C for 2 h in various gas atmospheres such as air, oxygen (O2), nitrogen (N2), and argon (Ar). The morphology and crystal phases evolved after the annealing processes were examined via field emission scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The electrochemical capacitance properties of the annealed Fe-NT electrodes were evaluated by conducting cyclic voltammetry (CV), galvanostatic charge-discharge, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy tests in the Li2SO4 electrolyte. Based on these experiments, it was found that the capacitance of the Fe-NT electrodes annealed in air and O2 atmospheres shows mixed behavior comprising both the electric double layer and pseudocapacitance. However, annealing in N2 and Ar environments resulted in well-defined redox peaks in the CV profiles of the Fe-NT electrodes, which are therefore attributed to the relatively higher pseudonature of the capacitance in these electrodes. Based on the galvanostatic charge-discharge studies, the specific capacitance achieved in the Fe-NT electrode after annealing in Ar was about 300 mF cm(-2), which was about twice the value obtained for N2-annealed Fe-NTs and three times higher than those annealed in air and O2. The experiments also demonstrated excellent cycle stability for the Fe-NT electrodes with 83%-85% capacitance retention, even after many charge-discharge cycles, irrespective of the gas atmospheres used during annealing. The increase in the specific capacitance was discussed in terms of increased oxygen vacancies as a result of the

  17. Dissolved and particulate Fe in a hydrothermal plume at 9{degree}45 minutes N, East Pacific Rise: Slow Fe (II) oxidation kinetics in Pacific plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Field, M.P.; Sherrell, R.M.

    2000-02-01

    Production of Fe(III) particles in hydrothermal plumes is of fundamental importance to the long-term effect of hydrothermal circulation on seawater composition. To elucidate the fundamental controls on Fe redox kinetics and solution/particle partitioning in neutrally buoyant plumes, the authors sampled near-field (<3 km) plume particles at 9{degree}45 minutes N on the East Pacific Rise in 1996, returning in 1997 to sample both particulate and dissolved phases (0.40 {micro}m filter). Concentrations of dissolved Fe varied from 320 to 20 nM in proximal (<0.3 km from vent site) to distal samples (1--3 km downfield), constituting {approximately}85--50% of total Fe, respectively. Based on vent fluid dilution factors calculated from dissolved Mn, a mass balance for vent fluid Fe at this site indicates that {approximately}65% of Fe is lost to particulate sulfide settling in the buoyant plume, and that particulate Fe in distal (1--3 km) samples is twice as concentrated as predicted from dilution of particles in proximal plume water. These observations are consistent with a calculated Fe(II) oxidation half-time of 3.3 h, long enough that Fe(III) colloid production and aggregation occurs primarily in the neutrally buoyant plume at relatively high dilutions, preventing generation of high particular Fe concentrations (11--56 nM observed). A general investigation of Fe(II) oxidation rates in plumes worldwide gives Fe(II) oxidation half-lives as short as 17 min at some Atlantic sites, and as long as 6 h at some Pacific sites. The calculations indicate that the distribution of Fe particles in plumes depends chiefly on inter-basin differences in ambient deep water chemistry (primarily pH and dissolved O{sub 2}) and on local currents driving plume dilution, and to a much lesser extent on variations in primary vent fluid composition. Long-term changes in thermohaline circulation or ocean biogeochemistry may therefore alter Fe dynamics and minor element fluxes associated with global

  18. Effect of MgO/Fe Interface Oxidation State on Electric-Field Modulation of Interfacial Magnetic Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, X. W.; Cheng, X. M.; Wang, S.; Huang, T.; Xue, K. H.; Miao, X. S.

    2016-06-01

    The impact of the MgO/Fe interface oxidation state on the electric-field-modified magnetic anisotropy in MgO/Fe has been revealed by density functional calculations. It is shown that the influence of the interface oxidation is strong enough to dominate the effect of the electric field on the magnetic anisotropy of MgO/Fe-based films. The magnetoelectric coefficients are calculated to be positive for the ideal and overoxidized MgO/Fe interface, but an abnormal negative value emerges in the underoxidized case. By analyzing the interface states based on density of states and band structures, we demonstrate that the considerably different electronic structures of the three oxidized MgO/Fe interfaces lead to the strong discrepancy in the electric-field modulation of the interfacial magnetic anisotropy. These results are of considerable interest in the area of electric-field-controlled magnetic anisotropy and switching.

  19. Influence of organics and silica on Fe(II) oxidation rates and cell-mineral aggregate formation by the green-sulfur Fe(II)-oxidizing bacterium Chlorobium ferrooxidans KoFox - Implications for Fe(II) oxidation in ancient oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauger, Tina; Byrne, James M.; Konhauser, Kurt O.; Obst, Martin; Crowe, Sean; Kappler, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    Most studies on microbial phototrophic Fe(II) oxidation (photoferrotrophy) have focused on purple bacteria, but recent evidence points to the importance of green-sulfur bacteria (GSB). Their recovery from modern ferruginous environments suggests that these photoferrotrophs can offer insights into how their ancient counterparts grew in Archean oceans at the time of banded iron formation (BIF) deposition. It is unknown, however, how Fe(II) oxidation rates, cell-mineral aggregate formation, and Fe-mineralogy vary under environmental conditions reminiscent of the geological past. To address this, we studied the Fe(II)-oxidizer Chlorobium ferrooxidans KoFox, a GSB living in co-culture with the heterotrophic Geospirillum strain KoFum. We investigated the mineralogy of Fe(III) metabolic products at low/high light intensity, and in the presence of dissolved silica and/or fumarate. Silica and fumarate influenced the crystallinity and particle size of the produced Fe(III) minerals. The presence of silica also enhanced Fe(II) oxidation rates, especially at high light intensities, potentially by lowering Fe(II)-toxicity to the cells. Electron microscopic imaging showed no encrustation of either KoFox or KoFum cells with Fe(III)-minerals, though weak associations were observed suggesting co-sedimentation of Fe(III) with at least some biomass via these aggregates, which could support diagenetic Fe(III)-reduction. Given that GSB are presumably one of the most ancient photosynthetic organisms, and pre-date cyanobacteria, our findings, on the one hand, strengthen arguments for photoferrotrophic activity as a likely mechanism for BIF deposition on a predominantly anoxic early Earth, but, on the other hand, also suggest that preservation of remnants of Fe(II)-oxidizing GSB as microfossils in the rock record is unlikely.

  20. Abiotic selenium redox transformations in the presence of Fe(II,III) oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Myneni, S.C.B.; Tokunaga, T.K.; Brown, G.E. Jr.

    1997-11-07

    Many suboxic sediments and soils contain an Fe(II,III) oxide called green rust. Spectroscopic evidence showed that selenium reduces from an oxidation state of +VI to 0 in the presence of green rust at rates comparable with those found in sediments. Selenium speciation was different in solid and aqueous phases. These redox reactions represent an abiotic pathway for selenium cycling in natural environments, which has previously been considered to be mediated principally by microorganisms. Similar green rust-mediated abiotic redox reactions are likely to be involved in the mobility of several other trace elements and contaminants in the environment. 27 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Magnetic Properties of Fe Oxide Nanoparticles Produced by Laser Pyrolysis for Biomedical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, M. A.; Bouzas, V.; Costo, R.; Veintemillas, S.; Morales, P.; García-Hernández, M.; Alexandrescu, R.; Morjan, I.; Gasco, P.

    2010-10-01

    We report on the magnetic characterization of Fe oxide nanoparticles by laser pyrolysis and the relationship between the preparation conditions and the magnetic response. It is shown that controlling the preparation conditions during the pyrolisis allows tuning the nanoparticles morphology and structure and consequently the magnetic properties of the nanoparticles. The nanoparticles are loaded into solid lipid nanoparticles without degradation nor significant modification of the magnetic properties.

  2. Role of Fe-Oxidizing Bacteria in Metal Bio-Corrosion in the Marine Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-30

    DATES COVERED (From - To) 01/01/2008-31/03/2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Role of Fe-oxidizing bacteria in metal bio-corrosion in the marine...source, and that steel coupons incubated in natural seawater are rapidly colonized by these bacteria . This is the first demonstration these bacteria ...exist outside of marine hydrothermal vents. These bacteria are early colonizers of steel surfaces and through th&ir fomiatiori of a thick tiufilir

  3. Immobilization of Radionuclides Through Anaerobic Bio-oxidation of Fe(ll)

    SciTech Connect

    Coates, John D.

    2005-06-01

    Over the last year we have focused our efforts on two independent aspects (a) further investigation of the microbiology and geochemistry of nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation and (b) assembling the sequenced genome of Dechloromonas aromatica strain RCB. This work has been performed in a cooperative fashion amongst the independent labs of the three PI's with the UC Berkeley lab taking the lead under the guidance of J.D. Coates.

  4. Water oxidation catalysis: an amorphous quaternary Ba-Sr-Co-Fe oxide as a promising electrocatalyst for the oxygen-evolution reaction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cuijuan; Berlinguette, Curtis P; Trudel, Simon

    2016-01-25

    We present an amorphous quaternary Ba-Sr-Co-Fe oxide (a-BSCF) with a specific stoichiometry, readily fabricated via a photochemical decomposition method. a-BSCF demonstrates high catalytic activity towards the oxygen-evolution reaction (OER).

  5. Development of FeCoB/Graphene Oxide based microwave absorbing materials for X-Band region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sukanta; Chandra Nayak, Ganesh; Sahu, S. K.; Oraon, Ramesh

    2015-06-01

    This work explored the microwave absorption capability of Graphene Oxide and Graphene Oxide coated with FeCoB for stealth technology. Epoxy based microwave absorbing materials were prepared with 30% loading of Graphene Oxide, FeCoB alloy and Graphene Oxide coated with FeCoB. Graphene Oxide and FeCoB were synthesized by Hummer's and Co-precipitation methods, respectively. The filler particles were characterized by FESEM, XRD and Vibrating Sample Magnetometer techniques. Permittivity, permeability and reflection loss values of the composite absorbers were measured with vector network analyzer which showed a reflection loss value of -7.86 dB, at 10.72 GHz, for single layered Graphene Oxide/Epoxy based microwave absorbers which can be correlated to the absorption of about 83.97% of the incident microwave energy. Reflection loss value of FeCoB/Epoxy based microwave absorber showed -13.30 dB at 11.67 GHz, which corresponded to maximum absorption of 93.8%. However, reflection loss values of Graphene Oxide coated with FeCoB/Epoxy based single-layer absorber increased to -22.24 dB at 12.4 GHz which corresponds to an absorption of 99% of the incident microwave energy.

  6. Synthesis of electromagnetic functionalized Fe3O4 microspheres/polyaniline composites by two-step oxidative polymerization.

    PubMed

    Cui, Chenkui; Du, Yunchen; Li, Tianhao; Zheng, Xiaoying; Wang, Xiaohong; Han, Xijiang; Xu, Ping

    2012-08-09

    Composites consisting of Fe(3)O(4) microspheres (FMS) and polyaniline (PANI), FMS/PANI, have been successfully prepared through a two-step oxidative polymerization of aniline monomers in the presence of Fe(3)O(4) microspheres. In our two-step polymerization technique, Fe(3+) and ammonium persulfate (APS) are used as the oxidants in each step. It is discovered that the two-step oxidative process plays a dominant role in the morphology of these composites: aniline oligomers oxidized by Fe(3+) are mainly produced in the first stage, and "egg-like" PANI aggregates are obtained in the second stage. It can be found that embedding Fe(3)O(4) microspheres in the polymer matrixes will not only modulate the complex permittivity but also produce magnetic resonance and loss in the composites. Therefore, the characteristic impedance and reflection loss of these composites are greatly improved. Especially, the composite with equal amount of FMS and PANI, FMS/PANI(50), displays very strong reflection loss over a wide frequency range that can be manipulated by the absorber thickness. More importantly, the composites prepared from the two-step chemical oxidative polymerization using hierarchical magnetic materials have better microwave absorption and environmental stability as compared with those composites from Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles, one-step oxidative polymerization, and physical mixture. We believe the two-step oxidative polymerization technique can be a novel route for the design and preparation of lightweight and highly effective microwave absorbers in the future.

  7. Thermal ablation.

    PubMed

    Webb, Heather; Lubner, Meghan G; Hinshaw, J Louis

    2011-04-01

    Image-guided tumor ablation refers to a group of treatment modalities that have emerged during the past 2 decades as important tools in the treatment of a wide range of tumors throughout the body. Although most widely recognized in the treatment of hepatic and renal malignancies, the role of thermal ablation has expanded to include lesions of the lung, breast, prostate, bone, as well as other organs and its clinical applications continue to increase. In the following article, we discuss the major thermal ablation modalities, their respective strengths and weaknesses, potential complications and how to avoid them, as well as possible future applications.

  8. Evidence of a reduction reaction of oxidized iron/cobalt by boron atoms diffused toward naturally oxidized surface of CoFeB layer during annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Soshi Honjo, Hiroaki; Niwa, Masaaki; Ikeda, Shoji; Ohno, Hideo; Endoh, Tetsuo

    2015-04-06

    We have investigated the redox reaction on the surface of Ta/CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB magnetic tunnel junction stack samples after annealing at 300, 350, and 400 °C for 1 h using angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy for precise analysis of the chemical bonding states. At a capping tantalum layer thickness of 1 nm, both the capping tantalum layer and the surface of the underneath CoFeB layer in the as-deposited stack sample were naturally oxidized. By comparison of the Co 2p and Fe 2p spectra among the as-deposited and annealed samples, reduction of the naturally oxidized cobalt and iron atoms occurred on the surface of the CoFeB layer. The reduction reaction was more significant at higher annealing temperature. Oxidized cobalt and iron were reduced by boron atoms that diffused toward the surface of the top CoFeB layer. A single CoFeB layer was prepared on SiO{sub 2}, and a confirmatory evidence of the redox reaction with boron diffusion was obtained by angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis of the naturally oxidized surface of the CoFeB single layer after annealing. The redox reaction is theoretically reasonable based on the Ellingham diagram.

  9. Monolayer-directed assembly and magnetic properties of FePt nanoparticles on patterned aluminum oxide.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Oktay; Gang, Tian; Kinge, Sachin; Reinhoudt, David N; Blank, Dave H; van der Wiel, Wilfred G; Rijnders, Guus; Huskens, Jurriaan

    2010-03-19

    FePt nanoparticles (NPs) were assembled on aluminum oxide substrates, and their ferromagnetic properties were studied before and after thermal annealing. For the first time, phosph(on)ates were used as an adsorbate to form self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on alumina to direct the assembly of NPs onto the surface. The Al(2)O(3) substrates were functionalized with aminobutylphosphonic acid (ABP) or phosphonoundecanoic acid (PNDA) SAMs or with poly(ethyleneimine) (PEI) as a reference. FePt NPs assembled on all of these monolayers, but much less on unmodified Al(2)O(3), which shows that ligand exchange at the NPs is the most likely mechanism of attachment. Proper modification of the Al(2)O(3) surface and controlling the immersion time of the modified Al(2)O(3) substrates into the FePt NP solution resulted in FePt NPs assembly with controlled NP density. Alumina substrates were patterned by microcontact printing using aminobutylphosphonic acid as the ink, allowing local NP assembly. Thermal annealing under reducing conditions (96%N(2)/4%H(2)) led to a phase change of the FePt NPs from the disordered FCC phase to the ordered FCT phase. This resulted in ferromagnetic behavior at room temperature. Such a process can potentially be applied in the fabrication of spintronic devices.

  10. Monolayer-directed Assembly and Magnetic Properties of FePt Nanoparticles on Patterned Aluminum Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Yildirim, Oktay; Gang, Tian; Kinge, Sachin; Reinhoudt, David N.; Blank, Dave H.A.; van der Wiel, Wilfred G.; Rijnders, Guus; Huskens, Jurriaan

    2010-01-01

    FePt nanoparticles (NPs) were assembled on aluminum oxide substrates, and their ferromagnetic properties were studied before and after thermal annealing. For the first time, phosph(on)ates were used as an adsorbate to form self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on alumina to direct the assembly of NPs onto the surface. The Al2O3 substrates were functionalized with aminobutylphosphonic acid (ABP) or phosphonoundecanoic acid (PNDA) SAMs or with poly(ethyleneimine) (PEI) as a reference. FePt NPs assembled on all of these monolayers, but much less on unmodified Al2O3, which shows that ligand exchange at the NPs is the most likely mechanism of attachment. Proper modification of the Al2O3 surface and controlling the immersion time of the modified Al2O3 substrates into the FePt NP solution resulted in FePt NPs assembly with controlled NP density. Alumina substrates were patterned by microcontact printing using aminobutylphosphonic acid as the ink, allowing local NP assembly. Thermal annealing under reducing conditions (96%N2/4%H2) led to a phase change of the FePt NPs from the disordered FCC phase to the ordered FCT phase. This resulted in ferromagnetic behavior at room temperature. Such a process can potentially be applied in the fabrication of spintronic devices. PMID:20480007

  11. Benzenoid-like CuFeO2@reduced graphene oxide: Facile synthesis and its excellent catalytic performance in selective oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Tingting; He, Guangyu; Zhao, Yitao; Gu, Hanyun; Jiang, Zhengyuan; Chen, Qun; Sun, Xiaoqiang; Chen, Haiqun

    2016-12-01

    A novel flake composite benzenoid-like CuFeO2@reduced graphene oxide (CuFeO2@RGO) was fabricated via a one-step low temperature solvothermal route. The obtained samples were characterized by XRD, FTIR, Raman, SEM, TEM and XPS, which indicated that the hexagonal CuFeO2 nanocrystals sized 150-200 nm were well dispersed on the surface of the RGO sheets. For the first time, we applied such CuFeO2@RGO composite as a Fenton-like catalyst in selective oxidation of phenol to dihydroxybenzenes with H2O2 as oxidant. The results showed that the CuFeO2@RGO composite exhibited remarkably enhanced catalytic ability compared with the previously reported CuFe2O4-RGO system. The introduction of RGO in the composite was propitious to increase the specific surface area and promoted the dispersibility of CuFeO2 nanocrystals, as well as the formation of unique hexagonal CuFeO2 with Cu (I) and Fe (III) as the active sites, which synergistically accounted for the enhancement of catalytic activity. Moreover, the stability of the catalyst was investigated.

  12. Location of nanophase Fe-oxides in palagonitic soils: Implication for Martian pigments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, D. C.; Morris, R. V.; Ming, D. W.; Lauer, H. V., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Palagonitic materials from Mauna Kea, Hawaii, were identified as Mars analogs based on their spectral and magnetic properties. These materials probably resulted from hydrothermal alteration during eruption of the volcano and/or from weathering under ambient conditions. The reflectance spectra of the Mars surface obtained by Earth-based telescopes and the reflectance spectra of analogs obtained in the laboratory show features due to electronic transitions of Fe(III) in oxide particles that range in size from nanometer (nanophase) to micrometer sized or larger. The presence of Fe(III) suggests oxidizing conditions during the alteration process in Mars that may have occurred in the past or during a slow ongoing process. Two naturally altered basaltic samples from Hawaii (HWMK12 and HWMK13) and a laboratory-altered (PH-13-DCGT2) basaltic glass similar in elemental composition to the above two samples was examined. All three samples exhibited spectral characteristics similar to martian bright-region spectra. Chemical and mineralogical changes occurring at the surface of these basalts were studied in order to understand the basis for their Mars-like properties. The spectral properties of the three samples were examined after the removal of Fe oxides by chemical extractants.

  13. Mechanistic studies of mercury adsorption and oxidation by oxygen over spinel-type MnFe2O4.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yingju; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Bingkai; Liu, Feng

    2017-01-05

    MnFe2O4 has been regarded as a very promising sorbent for mercury emission control in coal-fired power plants because of its high adsorption capacity, magnetic, recyclable and regenerable properties. First-principle calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) were used to elucidate the mercury adsorption and oxidation mechanisms on MnFe2O4 surface. DFT calculations show that Mn-terminated MnFe2O4 (1 0 0) surface is much more stable than Fe-terminated surface. Hg(0) is physically adsorbed on Fe-terminated MnFe2O4 (1 0 0) surface. Hg(0) adsorption on Mn-terminated MnFe2O4 (1 0 0) surface is a chemisorption process. The partial density of states (PDOS) analysis indicates that Hg atom interacts strongly with surface Mn atoms through the orbital hybridization. HgO is adsorbed on the MnFe2O4 surface in a chemical adsorption manner. The small HOMO-LUMO energy gap implies that HgO molecular shows high chemical reactivity for HgO adsorption on MnFe2O4 surface. The energy barriers of Hg(0) oxidation by oxygen on Fe- and Mn-terminated MnFe2O4 surfaces are 206.37 and 76.07kJ/mol, respectively. Mn-terminated surface is much more favorable for Hg(0) oxidation than Fe-terminated surface. In the whole Hg(0) oxidation process, the reaction between adsorbed mercury and surface oxygen is the rate-determining step.

  14. Superior anti-CO poisoning capability: Au-decorated PtFe nanocatalysts for high-performance methanol oxidation.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zhao; Lu, Zhiyi; Bi, Yongmin; Li, Yaping; Kuang, Yun; Sun, Xiaoming

    2016-03-11

    Herein we demonstrate a surface engineering strategy, namely, decorating Au on the surface of bimetallic PtFe nanocatalysts, to effectively decrease the adsorption energy of CO on the Pt center, which promotes the electrocatalytic activity towards methanol oxidation, far better than those of PtFe and commercial Pt/C catalysts.

  15. Comparison of characteristics of selected metallic and metal oxide nanoparticles produced by picosecond laser ablation at 532 and 1064 nm wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamad, Abubaker; Li, Lin; Liu, Zhu

    2016-10-01

    Picosecond laser generation of nanoparticles was only recently reported. The effect of laser wavelength in picosecond laser generation of nanoparticles is not yet fully understood. This investigation reports the new findings comparing the characteristics of Au, Ag, Ag-TiO2, TiO2, ZnO and iron oxide nanoparticles generated by picosecond laser ablation in deionised water at 532 and 1064 nm laser wavelengths. The laser ablation was carried out at a fixed pulse width of 10 ps, a repetition rate of 400 kHz and a scan speed of 250 mm/s. The nanoparticles were characterised by UV-Vis optical spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The work shows that there is no noticeable difference in the size of the metal oxide nanoparticles produced at 532 and 1064 nm, especially for the TiO2 and ZnO nanoparticles; however, a considerable size difference can be seen for metallic (e.g. Au) and metallic compound (e.g. Ag-TiO2) nanoparticles at the two wavelengths. It demonstrates that noble metals are more profoundly affected by laser wavelengths. The reasons behind these results are discussed. In addition, the work shows that there are different crystalline structures of the TiO2 nanoparticles at 1064 and 532 nm wavelengths.

  16. Drop shaped zinc oxide quantum dots and their self-assembly into dendritic nanostructures: Liquid assisted pulsed laser ablation and characterizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Subhash C.; Gopal, Ram

    2012-01-01

    Complex nanostructures and nano-assemblies have exhibited their potential application in the fabrication of future molecular machines and molecular devices. Liquid phase pulsed laser ablation is an easy, versatile, environmental friendly and rapidly growing method for the synthesis of nanostructured materials. Nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of zinc rod placed on the bottom of glass vessel containing methanol is used to produce colloidal solution of drop shaped zinc oxide quantum dots and their self-assembly into various dendritic nanostructures. UV-vis absorption, diffuse reflectance, transmission electron microscopy, and photoluminescence spectroscopy techniques are used for the optical, microscopic, structural and defect diagnosis of obtained colloidal quantum dots and their nano-assemblies. The average length, width and aspect ratio of drop shaped zinc oxide quantum dots are 6 ± 2.4 nm, 3.5 ± 1.4 nm and 1.69 ± 0.4 nm, respectively. Careful investigation of assemblies shows that most of them have linear growth, i.e. growth in longitudinal direction is higher as compared to the transverse direction with three types of classifications as (i) linear axis symmetrical branching, (ii) linear axis asymmetrical branching and (iii) curvilinear axis asymmetrical branching. Photoluminescence spectrum has emission peaks in UV, violet, blue and green spectral region corresponding to the excitonic and various defect related emissions.

  17. Enhanced reduction of Fe(III) oxides and methyl orange by Klebsiella oxytoca in presence of anthraquinone-2-disulfonate.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lei; Wang, Shi; Tang, Qing-Wen; Cao, Ming-Yue; Li, Jia; Yuan, Kun; Wang, Ping; Li, Wen-Wei

    2016-05-01

    Klebsiella oxytoca GS-4-08 is capable of azo dye reduction, but its quinone respiration and Fe(III) reduction abilities have not been reported so far. In this study, the abilities of this strain were reported in detail for the first time. As the biotic reduction of Fe(III) plays an important role in the biogeochemical cycles, two amorphous Fe(III) oxides were tested as the sole electron acceptor during the anaerobic respiration of strain GS-4-08. For the reduction of goethite and hematite, the biogenic Fe(II) concentrations reached 0.06 and 0.15 mM, respectively. Humic acid analog anthraquinone-2-disulfonate (AQS) was found to serve as an electron shuttle to increase the reduction of both methyl orange (MO) and amorphous Fe(III) oxides, and improve the dye tolerance of the strain. However, the formation of Fe(II) was not accelerated by biologically reduced AQS (B-AH2QS) because of the high bioavailability of soluble Fe(III). For the K. oxytoca strain, high soluble Fe(III) concentrations (above 1 mM) limit its growth and decolorization ability, while lower soluble Fe(III) concentrations produce an electron competition with MO initially, and then stimulate the decolorization after the electron couples of Fe(III)/Fe(II) are formed. With the ability to respire both soluble Fe(III) and insoluble Fe(III) oxides, this formerly known azo-reducer may be used as a promising model organism for the study of the interaction of these potentially competing processes in contaminated environments.

  18. Catheter Ablation

    MedlinePlus

    ... you during the procedure. Machines will measure your heart’s activity. All types of ablation require cardiac catheterization to place flexible tubes, or catheters, inside your heart to make the scars. Your doctor will clean ...

  19. Controlled assembly of Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles on graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yi; Chen, Biao; Zhang, Liming; Huang, Jie; Chen, Fenghua; Yang, Zupei; Yao, Jianlin; Zhang, Zhijun

    2011-04-01

    We describe a facile approach to controllable assembly of monodisperse Fe3O4nanoparticles (NPs) on chemically reduced graphene oxide (rGO). First, reduction and functionalization of GO by polyetheylenimine (PEI) were achieved simultaneously by simply heating the PEI and GO mixture at 60 °C for 12 h. The process is environmentally friendly and convenient compared with previously reported methods. Meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinnic acid (DMSA)-modified Fe3O4 NPs were then conjugated to the PEI moiety which is located on the periphery of the GO sheets via formation of amide bonds between COOH groups of DMSA molecules bound on the surface of the Fe3O4 NPs and aminegroups of PEI. The magnetic GO composites were characterized by means of TEM, AFM, UV-vis, FTIR, Raman, TGA, and VSM measurements. Finally, preliminary results of using the Fe3O4-rGO composites for efficient removal of tetracycline, an antibiotic that is often found as a contaminant in the environment, are reported.We describe a facile approach to controllable assembly of monodisperse Fe3O4nanoparticles (NPs) on chemically reduced graphene oxide (rGO). First, reduction and functionalization of GO by polyetheylenimine (PEI) were achieved simultaneously by simply heating the PEI and GO mixture at 60 °C for 12 h. The process is environmentally friendly and convenient compared with previously reported methods. Meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinnic acid (DMSA)-modified Fe3O4 NPs were then conjugated to the PEI moiety which is located on the periphery of the GO sheets via formation of amide bonds between COOH groups of DMSA molecules bound on the surface of the Fe3O4 NPs and aminegroups of PEI. The magnetic GO composites were characterized by means of TEM, AFM, UV-vis, FTIR, Raman, TGA, and VSM measurements. Finally, preliminary results of using the Fe3O4-rGO composites for efficient removal of tetracycline, an antibiotic that is often found as a contaminant in the environment, are reported. Electronic supplementary information

  20. The Oxidation State of Fe in Glasses from the Galapagos Archipelago: Variable Oxygen Fugacity as a Function of Mantle Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, M. E.; Kelley, K. A.; Cottrell, E.; Saal, A. E.; Kurz, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    The oxidation state of the mantle plays an intrinsic role in the magmatic evolution of the Earth. Here we present new μ-XANES measurements of Fe3+/ΣFe ratios (a proxy for ƒO2) in a suite of submarine glasses from the Galapagos Archipelago. Using previously presented major, trace, and volatile elements and isotopic data for 4 groups of glass that come from distinct mantle sources (depleted upper mantle, 2 recycled, and a primitive mantle source) we show that Fe3+/ΣFe ratios vary both with the influence of shallow level processes and with variations in mantle source. Fe3+/ΣFe ratios increase with differentiation (i.e. decreasing MgO), but show a large variation at a given MgO. Progressive degassing of sulfur accompanies decreasing Fe3+/ΣFe ratios, while assimilation of hydrothermally altered crust (as indicated by increasing Sr/Sr*) is shown to increase Fe3+/ΣFe ratios. After taking these processes into account, there is still variability in the Fe3+/ΣFe ratios of the isotopically distinct sample suites studied, yielding a magmatic ƒO2 that ranges from ΔQFM = +0.16 to +0.74 (error < 0.5 log units) and showing that oxidation state varies as a function of mantle source composition in the Galapagos hotspot system. After correcting back to a common MgO content = 8.0 wt%, the trace element depleted group similar to MORB (ITD), and the group similar to Pinta (WD = high Th/La, Δ7/4, Δ8/4 ratios) show Fe3+/ΣFe ratios within the range of MORB (average ITD = 0.162 ± 0.003 and WD = 0.164 ± 0.006). Another trace element enriched group similar to Sierra Negra and Cerro Azul (ITE = enriched Sr and Pb isotopes) shows evidence of mixing between oxidized and reduced sources (ITE oxidized end-member = 0.177). This suggests that mantle sources in the Galapagos that are thought to contain recycled components (i.e., WD and ITE groups) have distinct oxidation states. The high 3He/4He Fernandina samples (HHe group) are shown to be the most oxidized (ave. 0.175 ± 0

  1. Mechanisms for Electron Transfer Through Pili to Fe(III) Oxide in Geobacter

    SciTech Connect

    Lovley, Derek R.

    2015-03-09

    The purpose of these studies was to aid the Department of Energy in its goal of understanding how microorganisms involved in the bioremediation of metals and radionuclides sustain their activity in the subsurface. This information is required in order to incorporate biological processes into decision making for environmental remediation and long-term stewardship of contaminated sites. The proposed research was designed to elucidate the mechanisms for electron transfer to Fe(III) oxides in Geobacter species because Geobacter species are abundant dissimilatory metal-reducing microorganisms in a diversity of sites in which uranium is undergoing natural attenuation via the reduction of soluble U(VI) to insoluble U(IV) or when this process is artificially stimulated with the addition of organic electron donors. This study investigated the novel, but highly controversial, concept that the final conduit for electron transfer to Fe(III) oxides are electrically conductive pili. The specific objectives were to: 1) further evaluate the conductivity along the pili of Geobacter sulfurreducens and related organisms; 2) determine the mechanisms for pili conductivity; and 3) investigate the role of pili in Fe(III) oxide reduction. The studies demonstrated that the pili of G. sulfurreducens are conductive along their length. Surprisingly, the pili possess a metallic-like conductivity similar to that observed in synthetic organic conducting polymers such as polyaniline. Detailed physical analysis of the pili, as well as studies in which the structure of the pili was genetically modified, demonstrated that the metallic-like conductivity of the pili could be attributed to overlapping pi-pi orbitals of aromatic amino acids. Other potential mechanisms for conductivity, such as electron hopping between cytochromes associated with the pili were definitively ruled out. Pili were also found to be essential for Fe(III) oxide reduction in G. metallireducens. Ecological studies demonstrated

  2. Magnetic properties of TM-Co-Fe-Ti spinel oxides (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordanengo, B.; de Melo, M. A. C.; Takeuchi, A. Y.; Silva, P. R. J.; Saitovitch, H.; Baggio-Saitovitch, E.; Moyo, T.

    1997-04-01

    Spin glass-like behavior has been recently observed in a ceramic Zn0.5Co0.9Fe1.2Ti0.4O4 spinel oxide.1 This motivated our interest to study how the spin glass-like behavior of magnetic clusters in a diamagnetic matrix correlates to that of nonmagnetic or weakly magnetic clusters in a ferromagnetic matrix, Mössbauer effect, ac susceptibility, field cooled and zero field cooled magnetization, hysteresis loops, and γ-γ perturbed angular correlation (PAC) have been measured for TM0.5-xCo0.9Fe1.2+xTi0.4O4 (x=0.0 and 0.2) spinel oxide with TM=Zn and Cu. The variation of coercive field with temperature has been found to fit a double exponential function form Hc(T)=H1e-β1T+H2e-β2T where Hi and βi are constants for the sample with x=0.0 and TM=Zn. The exponential increase in coercive field can be linked to increased effective clusters arising from ions occupying A and B sites with Fe on both sites. This is in agreement with the Mössbauer measurements which show superparamagnetic fluctuations. The ac susceptibility and Mössbauer spectra for Zn0.5Co0.9Fe1.2Ti0.4O4 show a glass transition temperature (about 320 K). Room temperature PAC measurements on Hf doped samples with TM=Zn showed different interaction frequencies, consistent with magnetic order in the Fe enriched case. Different behavior is observed in the sample with Cu for which the ordering temperature is about 480 K.

  3. Performance of Al-rich Oxidation Resistant Coatings for Fe-Base Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Pint, Bruce A; Zhang, Ying

    2011-01-01

    Aluminum-rich coatings made by chemical vapor deposition and pack cementation on ferritic (e.g. Fe-9Cr-1Mo) and austenitic (Type 304L) substrates are being evaluated at 650-800 C. For oxidation testing, a humid air environment was used to quantify coating performance, as uncoated substrates experience rapid oxidation at these temperatures. A main goal of this work is to demonstrate the potential benefits and problems with alumina-forming coatings. The higher exposure temperatures were selected to accelerate the degradation of the coating by interdiffusion with the substrate. A general conclusion of this testing was that coatings with less Al and a ferritic Fe(Al) structure could be more durable than higher Al content aluminide coatings which have a large thermal expansion mismatch with these substrates. A lifetime model has been developed using diffusion and oxidation observations to predict coating performance as a function of temperature and initial coating composition. To test and improve the model, additional experiments are now being conducted to determine the effect of substrate composition (e.g. Cr content using Fe-12Cr and Fe-9Cr-2W substrates) and exposure temperature on the critical Al content for coating failure. Because of the unexpectedly low level of Al measured at coating failure ({approx}3.5 at.% at 700 C), exposures of specimens with thick ({approx}200 {micro}m) high Al content coatings were stopped after 10kh at 800 C and 20kh at 700 C because extremely long times to failure were predicted. Post-exposure Al concentration profiles for these specimens were measured using electron microprobe.

  4. The effects of Fe-oxidizing microorganisms on post-biostimulation permeability reduction and oxidative processes at the Rifle IFRC site

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Clara Sze-Yue

    2015-07-02

    Fe oxidation and biomineral formation is important in aquifers because the highly-reactive oxides can control the mobility of nutrients (e.g. phosphate, C) and metals (e.g. arsenic, uranium). Mineral formation also has the potential to affect hydrology, depending on the volume and distribution in pore spaces. In this exploratory study, we sought to understand how microbial Fe-oxidizers and their biominerals affect, and are affected by groundwater flow. As part of work at the Rifle aquifer in Colorado, we initially hypothesized that Fe-oxidizers were contributing to aquifer clogging problems associated with enhanced bioremediation. To demonstrate the presence of Fe-oxidizers in the Rifle aquifer, we enriched FeOM from groundwater samples, and isolated two novel chemolithotrophic, microaerophilic Fe-oxidizing Betaproteobacteria, Hydrogenophaga sp. P101 and Curvibacter sp. CD03. To image cells and biominerals in the context of pores, we developed a “micro-aquifer,” a sand-filled flow-through culture chamber that allows for imaging of sediment pore space with multiphoton confocal microscopy. Fe oxide biofilms formed on sand grains, demonstrating that FeOM produce Fe oxide sand coatings. Fe coatings are common on aquifer sands, and tend to sequester contaminants; however, it has never previously been shown that microbes are responsible for their formation. In contrast to our original hypothesis, the biominerals did not clog the mini-aquifer. Instead, Fe biofilm distribution was dynamic: they grew as coatings, then periodically sloughed off sand grains, with some flocs later caught in pore throats. This has implications for physical hydrology, including pore scale architecture, and element transport. The sloughing of coatings likely prevents the biominerals from clogging wells and aquifers, at least initially. Although attached biomineral coatings sequester Fe-associated elements (e.g. P, As, C, U), when biominerals detach, these elements are transported as particles

  5. Synthesis, structure and geometrically frustrated magnetism of the layered oxide-stannide compounds Fe(Fe3-xMnx)Si2Sn7O16.

    PubMed

    Allison, M C; Avdeev, M; Schmid, S; Liu, S; Söhnel, T; Ling, C D

    2016-06-21

    Fe4Si2Sn7O16 has a unique crystal structure that contains alternating layers of Fe(2+) ions octahedrally coordinated by O (oxide layer) and Sn (stannide layer), bridged by SiO4 tetrahedra. The formula can be written as FeFe3Si2Sn7O16 to emphasise the distinction between the layers. Here, we report the changes in structure and properties as iron is selectively replaced by manganese in the oxide layer. Solid-state synthesis was used to produce polycrystalline samples of Fe(Fe3-xMnx)Si2Sn7O16 for x≤ 2.55, the structures of which were characterised using high-resolution synchrotron X-ray and neutron powder diffraction. Single-crystal samples were also grown at x = 0.35, 0.95, 2.60 and characterised by single crystal X-ray diffraction. We show that manganese is doped exclusively into the oxide layer, and that this layer contains exclusively magnetically active high-spin M(2+) transition metal cations; while the stannide layer only accommodates non-magnetic low-spin Fe(2+). All samples show clear evidence of geometrically frustrated magnetism, which we associate with the fact that the topology of the high-spin M(2+) ions in the oxide layer describes a perfect kagomé lattice. Despite this frustration, the x = 0 and x = 2.55 samples undergo long-range antiferromagnetic ordering transitions at 3.0 K and 2.5 K, respectively.

  6. Evaluation of Fe(II) oxidation at an acid mine drainage site using laboratory-scale reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Juliana; Burgos, William

    2010-05-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) is a severe environmental threat to the Appalachian region of the Eastern United States. The Susquehanna and Potomac River basins of Pennsylvania drain to the Chesapeake Bay, which is heavily polluted by acidity and metals from AMD. This study attempted to unravel the complex relationships between AMD geochemistry, microbial communities, hydrodynamic conditions, and the mineral precipitates for low-pH Fe mounds formed downstream of deep mine discharges, such as Lower Red Eyes in Somerset County, PA, USA. This site is contaminated with high concentrations of Fe (550 mg/L), Mn (115 mg/L), and other trace metals. At the site 95% of dissolved Fe(II) and 56% of total dissolved Fe is removed without treatment, across the mound, but there is no change in the concentration of trace metals. Fe(III) oxides were collected across the Red Eyes Fe mound and precipitates were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy and elemental analysis. Schwertmannite was the dominant mineral phase with traces of goethite. The precipitates also contained minor amounts of Al2O3, MgO,and P2O5. Laboratory flow-through reactors were constructed to quantify Fe(II) oxidation and Fe removal over time at terrace and pool depositional facies. Conditions such as residence time, number of reactors in sequence and water column height were varied to determine optimal conditions for Fe removal. Reactors with sediments collected from an upstream terrace oxidized more than 50% of dissolved Fe(II) at a ten hour residence time, while upstream pool sediments only oxidized 40% of dissolved Fe(II). Downstream terrace and pool sediments were only capable of oxidizing 25% and 20% of Fe(II), respectively. Fe(II) oxidation rates measured in the reactors were determined to be between 3.99 x 10-8and 1.94 x 10-7mol L-1s-1. The sediments were not as efficient for total dissolved Fe removal and only 25% was removed under optimal conditions. The removal efficiency for all sediments

  7. Speciation and distribution of P associated with Fe and Al oxides in aggregate-sized fraction of an arable soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, X.; Bol, R.; Willbold, S.; Vereecken, H.; Klumpp, E.

    2015-11-01

    To maximize crop productivity fertilizer P is generally applied to arable soils, a significant proportion of which becomes stabilized by mineral components and in part subsequently becomes unavailable to plants. However, little is known about the relative contributions of the different organic and inorganic P bound to Fe/Al oxides in the smaller soil particles. Alkaline (NaOH-Na2EDTA) extraction with solution 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance (31P-NMR) spectroscopy is considered a reliable method for extracting and quantifying organic P and (some) inorganic P. However, any so-called residual P after the alkaline extraction has remained unidentified. Therefore, in the present study, the amorphous (a) and crystalline (c) Fe/Al oxide minerals and related P in soil aggregate-sized fractions (> 20, 2-20, 0.45-2 and < 0.45 μm) were specifically extracted by oxalate (a-Fe/Al oxides) and dithionite-citrate-bicarbonate (DCB, both a- and c-Fe/Al oxides). These soil aggregate-sized fractions with and without the oxalate and DCB pre-treatments were then sequentially extracted by alkaline extraction prior to solution 31P-NMR spectroscopy. This was done to quantify the P associated with a- and c-Fe/Al oxides in both alkaline extraction and the residual P of different soil aggregate-sized fractions. The results showed that overall P contents increased with decreasing size of the soil aggregate-sized fractions. However, the relative distribution and speciation of varying P forms were found to be independent of soil aggregate-size. The majority of alkaline-extractable P was in the a-Fe/Al oxide fraction (42-47 % of total P), most of which was ortho-phosphate (36-41 % of total P). Furthermore, still significant amounts of particularly monoester P were bound to these oxides. Intriguingly, however, Fe/Al oxides were not the main bonding sites for pyrophosphate. Residual P contained similar amounts of total P associated with both a- (11-15 % of total P) and c-Fe oxides (7-13 % of total P

  8. Speciation and distribution of P associated with Fe and Al oxides in aggregate-sized fraction of an arable soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, X.; Bol, R.; Willbold, S.; Vereecken, H.; Klumpp, E.

    2015-07-01

    To maximize crop productivity fertilizer P is generally applied to arable soils, a significant proportion of which becomes stabilized by mineral components and in part subsequently becomes unavailable to plants. However, little is known about the relative contributions of the different organic and inorganic P bound to Fe/Al oxides in the smaller soil particles. The alkaline (NaOH-Na2EDTA) extraction with solution 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance (31P-NMR) spectroscopy is considered as a reliable method for extracting and quantifying organic P and (some) inorganic P. However, any so-called residual P after the alkaline extraction has remained unidentified. Therefore, in the present study, the amorphous (a) and crystalline (c) Fe/Al oxide minerals and related P in soil aggregate-sized fractions (> 20, 2-20, 0.45-2 and < 0.45 μm) were specifically extracted by oxalate (a-Fe/Al oxides) and dithionite (DCB, both a- and c-Fe/Al oxides). These soil aggregate-sized fractions with and without the oxalate and DCB pre-treatments were then sequentially extracted by alkaline extraction prior to solution 31P-NMR spectroscopy. This was done to quantify the various chemical P forms which were associated with a- and c-Fe/Al oxides both in alkaline extraction and in the residual P of different soil aggregate-sized fractions. The results showed that overall P contents increased with decreasing size of the soil aggregate-sized fractions. However, the relative distribution and speciation of varying P forms were found to be independent of soil aggregate-size. The majority of alkaline extractable P was in the a-Fe/Al oxide fraction (42-47 % of total P), most of which was orthophosphate (36-41 % of total P). Furthermore, still significant amounts of particularly monoester P were bound to the oxides. Intriguingly, however, Fe/Al oxides were not the main bonding sites for pyrophosphate. Residual P contained similar amounts of total P associated with both a- (10-13 % of total P) and c-Fe

  9. Oxidation of benzyl alcohol by K2FeO4 to benzaldehyde over zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuan-Yuan; Song, Hua; Song, Hua-Lin; Jin, Zai-Shun

    2016-10-01

    A novel and green procedure for benzaldehyde synthesis by potassium ferrate oxidation of benzyl alcohol employing zeolite catalysts was studied. The prepared oxidant was characterized by SEM and XRD. The catalytic activity of various solid catalysts was studied using benzyl alcohol as a model compound. USY was found to be a very efficient catalyst for this particular oxidation process. Benzaldehyde yields up to 96.0% could be obtained at the following optimal conditions: 0.2 mL of benzyl alcohol, 4 mmol of K2FeO4, 0.5 g of USY zeolite; 20 mL of cyclohexene, 0.3 mL of acetic acid (36 wt %), 30°C temperature, 4 h reaction time.

  10. Anchoring Fe ions to amorphous and crystalline oxides: a means to tune the degree of Fe coordination.

    PubMed

    Berlier, Gloria; Bonino, Francesca; Zecchina, Adriano; Bordiga, Silvia; Lamberti, Carlo

    2003-10-17

    We report on an IR spectroscopic study on the room-temperature adsorption of NO on different iron(II)-containing siliceous matrices. Fe2+ hosted inside the channels of MFI-type zeolites (Fe-ZSM-5 and Al-free Fe-silicalite) exhibits pronounced coordinative unsaturation, as witnessed by the capability to form, at 300 K, [Fe2-(NO)], [Fe2+(NO)2] and [Fe2+(NO)3] complexes with increasing NO equilibrium pressure. Fe2+ hosted on amorphous supports (high surface area SiO2 and MCM-41) sinks more deeply into the surface of the siliceous support and thus exhibits less pronounced coordinative unsaturation: only [Fe2+(NO)2] complexes were observed, even at the highest investigated NO equilibrium pressures. Activation at higher temperature (1073 K) of the Al-free Fe-silicalite sample resulted in the appearance of Fe2+ species similar to those observed on SiO2 and MCM-41, and this suggests that local (since not detectable by X-ray diffraction) amorphisation of the environment around Fe2+ anchoring sites occurs. The fact that this behaviour is not observed on the Fe-ZSM-5 sample activated at the same temperature suggests that framework Al species (and their negatively charged oxygen environment) have an important role in anchoring extraframework Fe2+ species. Such an anchoring phenomenon will prevent a random migration of iron species, with subsequent aggregation and loss of coordinative unsaturation. These observations can thus explain the higher catalytic activity of the Fe-ZSM-5 system in one-step benzene to phenol conversion when compared with the parent, Al-free, Fe-silicalite system with similar Fe content. The nature of the support and the activation temperature can therefore be used as effective means to tune the degree of Fe coordination.

  11. Novel insights into enhanced dewaterability of waste activated sludge by Fe(II)-activated persulfate oxidation.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Guangyin; Lu, Xueqin; Li, Yuyou; Zhao, Youcai; Wang, Baoying; Song, Yu; Chai, Xiaoli; Niu, Dongjie; Cao, Xianyan

    2012-09-01

    The potential of Fe(II)-activated persulfate (S(2)O(8)(2-)) oxidation on enhancing the dewaterability of sludge flocs from 3-full scale wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) were investigated. Normalized capillary suction time (CST) was applied to evaluate sludge dewaterability. Both extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and metabolic activity of microorganisms were determined to explore the responsible mechanism. Fe(II)-S(2)O(8)(2-) oxidation effectively improved sludge dewaterability. The most important mechanisms were proposed to be the degradation of EPS incorporated in sludge flocs and rupture of microbial cells. Three-dimensional excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy confirmed that the powerful SO(4)(-) from Fe(II)-S(2)O(8)(2-) system destroyed the particular functional groups of fluorescing substances (i.e., aromatic protein-, tryptophan protein-, humic- and fulvic-like substances) in EPS and caused cleavage of linkages in the polymeric backbone and simultaneous destruction of microbial cells, resulting in the release of EPS-bound water, intracellular materials and water of hydration inside cells, and subsequent enhancement of dewaterability.

  12. Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy and magnetization dynamics in oxidized CoFeAl films.

    PubMed

    Wu, Di; Zhang, Zhe; Li, Le; Zhang, Zongzhi; Zhao, H B; Wang, J; Ma, B; Jin, Q Y

    2015-07-20

    Half-metallic Co-based full-Heusler alloys with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA), such as Co2FeAl in contact with MgO, are receiving increased attention recently due to its full spin polarization for high density memory applications. However, the PMA induced by MgO interface can only be realized for very thin magnetic layers (usually below 1.3 nm), which would have strong adverse effects on the material properties of spin polarization, Gilbert damping parameter, and magnetic stability. In order to solve this issue, we fabricated oxidized Co50Fe25Al25 (CFAO) films with proper thicknesses without employing the MgO layer. The samples show controllable PMA by tuning the oxygen pressure (PO2) and CFAO thickness (tCFAO), large perpendicular anisotropy field of ~8.0 kOe can be achieved at PO2 = 12% for the sample of tCFAO = 2.1 nm or at PO2 = 7% for tCFAO = 2.8 nm. The loss of PMA at thick tCFAO or high PO2 results mainly from the formation of large amount of CoFe oxides, which are superparamagnetic at room temperature but become hard magnetic at low temperatures. The magnetic CFAO films, with strong PMA in a relatively wide thickness range and small intrinsic damping parameter below 0.028, would find great applications in developing advanced spintronic devices.

  13. Effects of oxide precursors on superconducting properties of polycrystalline SmFeAsO1-xFx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, F. F.; Ding, Y.; Sun, Y.; Zhuang, J. C.; Zhou, W.; Li, G. Z.; Sumption, M.; Li, X. W.; Shi, Z. X.

    2013-12-01

    A series of polycrystalline SmFeAsO1-xFx samples were synthesized by one-step and two-step method at ambient pressure using different oxide precursors, namely As2O3, Fe2O3 and nano-Fe2O3 powder, as the source of element O. Results of X-ray diffraction and magnetic measurements manifest that starting oxides affected the phase formation and superconducting properties of SmFeAsO1-xFx. As2O3 as oxide precursor contributes to the fast formation of superconducting phase for a short period of sintering time. And samples prepared using As2O3 show higher superconducting transition temperature Tc and more stable fluorine doping level. Compared with Fe2O3, nano-Fe2O3 promotes fluorine doping into the O site. While using Fe2O3 leads to higher level of Fe and SmOF impurities. The critical current density Jcm were derived from magnetic hysteresis loops. Sample prepared using As2O3 shows higher Jcm in low temperature and high magnetic fields.

  14. Constructing hierarchical interfaces: TiO2-supported PtFe-FeOx nanowires for room temperature CO oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Huiyuan; Wu, Zili; Dong, Su; Veith, Gabriel M.; Lu, Hanfeng; Zhang, Pengfei; Chai, Song -Hai; Dai, Sheng

    2015-08-05

    This is a report of a facile approach to constructing catalytic active hierarchical interfaces in one-dimensional (1D) nanostructure, exemplified by the synthesis of TiO2-supported PtFe–FeOx nanowires (NWs). The hierarchical interface, constituting atomic level interactions between PtFe and FeOx within each NW and the interactions between NWs and support (TiO2), enables CO oxidation with 100% conversion at room temperature. We identify the role of the two interfaces by probing the CO oxidation reaction with isotopic labeling experiments. Both the oxygen atoms (Os) in FeOx and TiO2 participate in the initial CO oxidation, facilitating the reaction through a redox pathway. Moreover, the intact 1D structure leads to the high stability of the catalyst. After 30 h in the reaction stream, the PtFe–FeOx/TiO2 catalyst exhibits no activity decay. These results provide a general approach and new insights into the construction of hierarchical interfaces for advanced catalysis.

  15. Characterization of transparent superconductivity Fe-doped CuCrO2 delafossite oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taddee, Chutirat; Kamwanna, Teerasak; Amornkitbamrung, Vittaya

    2016-09-01

    Delafossite CuCr1-xFexO2 (0.0 ≤ x ≤ 0.15) semiconductors were synthesized using a self-combustion urea nitrate process. The effects of Fe concentration on its microstructural, optical, magnetic, and electrical properties were investigated. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis results revealed the delafossite structure in all the samples. The lattice spacing of CuCr1-xFexO2 slightly increased with increasing substitution of Fe at the Cr sites. The optical properties measured at room temperature using UV-visible spectroscopy showed a weak absorbability in the visible light and near IR regions. The corresponding direct optical band gap was about 3.61 eV, exhibiting transparency in the visible region. The magnetic hysteresis loop measurements showed that the Fe-doped CuCrO2 samples exhibited ferromagnetic behavior at room temperature. This indicated that the substitution of Fe3+ for Cr3+ produced a mixed effect on the magnetic properties of CuCrO2 delafossite oxide. The temperature dependent resistivity measurements clearly revealed the presence of superconductivity in the CuCr1-xFexO2 with a superconducting transition up to 118 K.

  16. Applicability of anaerobic nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation to microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR).

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hongbo; Carlson, Han K; Coates, John D

    2013-08-06

    Microbial processes that produce solid-phase minerals could be judiciously applied to modify rock porosity with subsequent alteration and improvement of floodwater sweep in petroleum reservoirs. However, there has been little investigation of the application of this to enhanced oil recovery (EOR). Here, we investigate a unique approach of altering reservoir petrology through the biogenesis of authigenic rock minerals. This process is mediated by anaerobic chemolithotrophic nitrate-dependent Fe(II)-oxidizing microorganisms that precipitate iron minerals from the metabolism of soluble ferrous iron (Fe(2+)) coupled to the reduction of nitrate. This mineral biogenesis can result in pore restriction and reduced pore throat diameter. Advantageously and unlike biomass plugs, these biominerals are not susceptible to pressure or thermal degradation. Furthermore, they do not require continual substrate addition for maintenance. Our studies demonstrate that the biogenesis of insoluble iron minerals in packed-bed columns results in effective hydrology alteration and homogenization of heterogeneous flowpaths upon stimulated microbial Fe(2+) biooxidation. We also demonstrate almost 100% improvement in oil recovery from hydrocarbon-saturated packed-bed columns as a result of this metabolism. These studies represent a novel departure from traditional microbial EOR approaches and indicate the potential for nitrate-dependent Fe(2+) biooxidation to improve volumetric sweep efficiency and enhance both the quality and quantity of oil recovered.

  17. Adsorption mechanism of magnetically separable Fe3O4/graphene oxide hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Ke; Zhu, Chuanhe; Zhao, Ya; Wang, Leichao; Xie, Shan; Wang, Qun

    2015-11-01

    A reclaimable Fe3O4/graphene oxide (GO) magnetic hybrid was successfully synthesized via a facile one-pot polyol approach and employed as a recyclable adsorbent for Bisphenol A (BPA) in aqueous solutions. The maximum adsorption capacity (qm) of the Fe3O4/GO hybrid for BPA was 72.80 mg/g at 273 K. The kinetics of the adsorption process and the adsorption isotherm data were fitted using the Freundlich equation and a pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The results of the thermodynamic parameters ΔH°, ΔS° and ΔG° showed that the adsorption process was exothermic and spontaneous. Furthermore, the reusability of the samples was investigated, and the results indicated that the samples exhibited high stability. The magnetic characterization demonstrated that hybrids were superparamagnetic and could be recovered conveniently by magnetic separation. The strong π-π interaction was determined to be the predominant driving force behind the adsorption of BPA onto the Fe3O4/GO hybrid. Therefore, the Fe3O4/GO hybrid could be regarded as a potential adsorbent for wastewater treatment and purification processes.

  18. Identifying the redox activity of cation-disordered Li-Fe-V-Ti oxide cathodes for Li-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ruiyong; Witte, Ralf; Heinzmann, Ralf; Ren, Shuhua; Mangold, Stefan; Hahn, Horst; Hempelmann, Rolf; Ehrenberg, Helmut; Indris, Sylvio

    2016-03-21

    Cation-disordered oxides have recently shown promising properties on the way to explore high-performance intercalation cathode materials for rechargeable Li-ion batteries. Here, stoichiometric cation-disordered Li2FeVyTi1-yO4 (y = 0, 0.2, 0.5) nanoparticles are studied. The substitution of V for Ti in Li2FeVyTi1-yO4 increases the content of active transition metals (Fe and V) and accordingly the amount of Li(+) (about (1 + y)Li(+) capacity per formula unit) that can be reversibly intercalated. It is found that Fe(3+)/Fe(2+) and V(4+)/V(3+) redox couples contribute to the overall capacity performance, whereas Ti(4+) remains mainly inert. There is no evidence for the presence of Fe(4+) species after charging to 4.8 V, as confirmed from the ex situ(57)Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy and the Fe K-edge absorption spectra. The redox couple reactions for iron and vanadium are examined by performing in situ synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy. During charging/discharging, the spectral evolution of the K-edges for Fe and V confirms the reversible Fe(3+)/Fe(2+) and V(4+)/V(3+) redox reactions during cycling between 1.5 and 4.8 V.

  19. Microbial Oxidation of Fe2+ and Pyrite Exposed to Flux of Micromolar H2O2 in Acidic Media

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yingqun; Lin, Chuxia

    2013-01-01

    At an initial pH of 2, while abiotic oxidation of aqueous Fe2+ was enhanced by a flux of H2O2 at micromolar concentrations, bio-oxidation of aqueous Fe2+ could be impeded due to oxidative stress/damage in Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans caused by Fenton reaction-derived hydroxyl radical, particularly when the molar ratio of Fe2+ to H2O2 was low. When pyrite cubes were intermittently exposed to fluxes of micromolar H2O2, the reduced Fe2+-Fe3+ conversion rate in the solution (due to reduced microbial activity) weakened the Fe3+-catalyzed oxidation of cubic pyrite and added to relative importance of H2O2-driven oxidation in the corrosion of mineral surfaces for the treatments with high H2O2 doses. This had effects on reducing the build-up of a passivating coating layer on the mineral surfaces. Cell attachment to the mineral surfaces was only observed at the later stage of the experiment after the solutions became less favorable for the growth of planktonic bacteria. PMID:23760258

  20. Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles/reduced graphene oxide nanosheets as a novel electrochemical and bioeletrochemical sensing platform.

    PubMed

    Teymourian, Hazhir; Salimi, Abdollah; Khezrian, Somayeh

    2013-11-15

    We have developed Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles/reduced graphene oxide nanosheets modified glassy carbon (Fe3O4/r-GO/GC) electrode as a novel system for the preparation of electrochemical sensing platform. Decorating Fe3O4 nanoparticles on graphene sheets was performed via a facile one-step chemical reaction strategy, where the reduction of GO and the in-situ generation of Fe3O4 nanoparticles occurred simultaneously. Characterization of as-made nanocomposite using X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and alternative gradient force magnetometry (AGFM) clearly demonstrate the successful attachment of monodisperse Fe3O4 nanoparticles to graphene sheets. Electrochemical studies revealed that the Fe3O4/r-GO/GC electrode possess excellent electrocatalytic activities toward the low potential oxidation of NADH (0.05 V vs. Ag/AgCl) as well as the catalytic reduction of O2 and H2O2 at reduced overpotentials. Via immobilization of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) as a model dehydrogenase enzyme onto the Fe3O4/r-GO/GC electrode surface, the ability of modified electrode for biosensing lactate was demonstrated. In addition, using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) to investigate the electrochemical oxidation behavior of ascorbic acid (AA), dopamine (DA) and uric acid (UA) at Fe3O4/r-GO/GC electrode, the high electrocatalytic activity of the modified electrode toward simultaneous detection of these compounds was indicated. Finally, based on the strong electrocatalytic action of Fe3O4/r-GO/GC electrode toward both oxidation and reduction of nitrite, a sensitive amperometric sensor for nitrite determination was proposed. The Fe3O4/r-GO hybrid presented here showing favorable electrochemical features may hold great promise to the development of electrochemical sensors, molecular bioelectronic devices, biosensors and biofuel cells.

  1. Magnetic characterization of iron oxides formed after thermal treatment of nontronite and the formation of three polymorphs of Fe2O3: α-Fe2O3, γ-Fe2O3, ɛ-Fe2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berquo, T. S.; Moskowitz, B. M.

    2011-12-01

    Nontronite is an Fe-rich smectite clay that occurs widely in terrestrial soils, sediments and weathering formations and may also be present in the Martian regolith. The thermal decomposition of nontronite is known to form various magnetic iron oxides but their compositions, magnetic properties, and formation pathways remain poorly understood. The magnetic alteration products of nontronite have been proposed as a source for the magnetic phases in the surface layers and dust on Mars as well as in some archeological fired-bricks and ceramic pottery. One alteration product of nontronite is ɛ-Fe2O3 which is ferrimagnetic with a Curie temperature of ~ 500 K and extremely large coercivity (HC ~ 1-2 T) at 300 K. In this work nontronite samples from eight source localities were heated to 1000°C in air for one hour. The magnetic properties of the alteration products were investigated with low-temperature (LT) magnetization and AC susceptibility curves, hysteresis loops, Mossbauer spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The thermal treatment was effective in converting the nontronite to a combination of different polymorphs of ferric oxide depending on source locality and included: hematite (α-Fe2O3), ɛ-Fe2O3, and a cubic spinel phase that suggest the presence of maghemite (γ-Fe2O3). Mossbauer spectra at 300 K identified hematite and ɛ-Fe2O3 as the main phases in 7 samples with amounts ranging from 26-100% for hematite 0-69% for ɛ-Fe2O3. One sample showed a paramagnetic Fe3+ doublet and a broad sextet characteristic of magnetic relaxation effects. Upon cooling to 4.2 K, the Mossbauer spectrum was consistent with maghemite. In all samples except one, the magnetic hyperfine fields for the hematite phase are slightly reduced as compared with its stoichiometric form indicating some iron substitution with ions such as Al. This is consistent with the observation that all but one sample lacked the characteristic Morin transition for pure hematite on LT-remanence warming curves

  2. Effects of surface crystallization and oxidation in nanocrystalline FeNbCuSiB(P) ribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butvinová, B.; Butvin, P.; Brzózka, K.; Kuzminski, M.; Maťko, I.; Švec, P., Sr.; Chromčíková, M.

    2017-02-01

    Si-poor Fe74Nb3Cu1Si8B14-xPx, (x=0, 3) nanocrystalline ribbon-form alloys often form surfaces, which exert in-plane force on underlying ribbon interior when nanocrystallized in even modest presence of oxygen. Mostly unwanted hard-ribbon-axis magnetic anisotropy is standard result. Essential sources of the surface-caused stress have been sought and influence of P instead of B substitution on this effect was studied too. Preferred surface crystallization (PSC) was found to be the major reason. However P substitution suppresses PSC and promotes Fe-oxide formation, which eases the stress, softens the surfaces and provides different annealing evolution of surface properties.

  3. Magnetic properties of (Zn,Cd,Cu) Co Fe Ti spinel oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyo, T.; Giordanengo, B.; de Melo, M. A. C.; Takeuchi, A. Y.; Silva, P. R. J.; Saitovitch, H.; Baggio-Saitovitch, E.

    1999-09-01

    AC susceptibility, magnetization and Mössbauer spectra have been measured for (Zn,Cd,Cu)0.5Co0.9Fe1.2Ti0.4O4 and Zn0.3Co0.9Fe1.4Ti0.4O4 spinel oxides. The variation of coercive field below the spin glass transition temperature Tsg is found to fit a double exponential function of the form H_c left( T right) = H_{1e} ^{ - β _1 T} + H_{2e} ^{ - β _2 T} , where Hi and βi are constants. Mössbauer spectra and analysis show superparamagnetic fluctuations associated with magnetic clusters. Symmetric doublets above Tsg are decomposed into quadrupole doublets associated with tetrahedral (A) and octahedral (B) sites.

  4. Photoluminescence and Raman Spectroscopy of Jurassic Fe-Mn Oxide Rocks Forming Chimney Systems, Hungary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigh, T.; Polgári, M.; Hein, J. R.; Gucsik, A.; Koós, M.; Veres, M.; Tóth, S.; Tóth, A. L.; Bíró, L.

    2009-08-01

    Three ore samples were collected from an inferred hydrothermal vent site at the Úrkút-Csárdahegy open pit mine. The samples are black with a brown rind, blocky or mound-like with stromatolitic texture, cryptocrystalline, and often with vugs infilled by spherulites. Fe-Mn-oxide stromatolitic mounds grew at the sediment/water interface burying preexisting chimneys containing fluid-flow microchannels. The occurrence of amorphous carbon phases in the samples is variable and their distribution is inhomogeneous, and suggests a possible microbial origin. The occurrence of gypsum may reflect a Fe-S precursor phase. These results provide additional evidence for the existence of a local vent system at Csárdahegy.

  5. Enhanced and Retarded SiO2 Growth on Thermally Oxidized Fe-Contaminated n-Type Si(001) Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Hirofumi; Hagiwara, Hiroyuki

    2013-04-01

    At the beginning of the oxidation of Fe-contaminated n-type Si(001) surfaces, Fe reacted with oxygen (O2) on the silicon (Si) substrate to form Fe2O3 and oxygen-induced point defects (emitted Si + vacancies). SiO2 growth was mainly enhanced by catalytic action of Fe. At 650 °C, SiO2 growth of the contaminated samples was faster than in reference samples rinsed in RCA solution during the first 60 min. However, it substantially slowed and became less than that of the reference samples. As the oxidation advanced, approximately half of the contaminated Fe atoms became concentrated close to the surface area of the SiO2 film layer. This Fe2O3-rich SiO2 layer acted as a diffusion barrier against oxygen species. The diffusion of oxygen atoms toward the SiO2/Si interface may have been reduced, and in turn, the emission of Si self-interstitials owing to oxidation-induced strain may have been decreased at the SiO2/Si interface, resulting in the retarded oxide growth. These results are evidence that emitted Si self-interstitials are oxidized not in the Fe2O3-rich SiO2 layer, but at the SiO2/Si interface in accordance with a previously proposed model. A possible mechanism based on the interfacial Si emission model is discussed. The activation energies for the oxide growth are found to be in accord with the enhanced and reduced growths of the Fe-contaminated samples.

  6. Facile and straightforward synthesis of superparamagnetic reduced graphene oxide-Fe3O4 hybrid composite by a solvothermal reaction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yue-Wen; Guan, Meng-Xue; Feng, Lan; Deng, Shun-Liu; Bao, Jian-Feng; Xie, Su-Yuan; Chen, Zhong; Huang, Rong-Bin; Zheng, Lan-Sun

    2013-01-18

    A superparamagnetic reduced graphene oxide-Fe(3)O(4) hybrid composite (rGO-Fe(3)O(4)) was prepared via a facile and straightforward method through the solvothermal reaction of iron (III) acetylacetonate (Fe(acac)(3)) and graphene oxide (GO) in ethylenediamine (EDA) and water. By this method, chemical reduction of GO as well as the formation of Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles (NPs) can be achieved in one step. The Fe(3)O(4) NPs are firmly deposited on the surfaces of rGO, avoiding their reassembly to graphite. The rGO sheets prevent the agglomeration of Fe(3)O(4) NPs and enable a uniform dispersion of these metal oxide particles. The size distribution and coverage density of Fe(3)O(4) NPs deposited on rGO can be controlled by varying the initial mass ratio of GO and iron precursor, Fe(acac)(3). With an initial mass ratio of GO and Fe(acac)(3) of 5:5, the surfaces of rGO sheets are densely covered by spherical Fe(3)O(4) NPs with an average size of 19.9 nm. The magnetic-functionalized rGO hybrid exhibits a good magnetic property and the specific saturation magnetization (M(s)) is 13.2 emu g(-1). The adsorption test of methylene blue from aqueous solution demonstrates the potential application of this rGO-Fe(3)O(4) hybrid composite in removing organic dyes from polluted water.

  7. Mineralogy and geochemistry of Fe-Ti oxide and apatite (nelsonite) deposits and evaluation of the liquid immiscibility hypothesis.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kolker, A.

    1982-01-01

    The modal mineralogy for 32 Fe-Ti oxides and apatites supports the 2:1 oxide:apatite ratio for these samples from New York, Quebec, Norway and Sweden. Accessory minerals include: biotite, clinoamphibole, spinel, zircon and sulphides, oxygen fugacities range from 10-11 to 10-20, and T 600o to 1000oC. - K.A.R.

  8. Coexistence of Fe(II)- and Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria govern the formation of deep sea umber deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Xiaotong; Ta, Kaiwen; Chen, Shun; Zhang, Lijuan; Xu, Hengchao

    2015-11-01

    The genesis of umber deposits has remained controversial for several decades. Recently, microbial Fe(II) oxidation associated with low-temperature diffuse venting has been identified as a key process for the formation of umber deposits, but the exact biogeochemical mechanisms involved to the precipitation of Mn oxides in umber deposits still remain unknown. Here, we used nano secondary ion mass spectrometer, synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy, electron microscopy, and molecular techniques to demonstrate the coexistence of two types of metal-oxidizing bacteria within deep-sea hydrothermal umber deposits at the South Mid-Atlantic Ridge, where we found unique spheroids composed of biogenic Fe oxyhydroxides and Mn oxides in the deposits. Our data show that Fe oxyhydroxides and Mn oxides are metabolic by-products of lithotrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria and heterotrophic Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria, respectively. The hydrothermal vents fuel lithotrophic microorganisms, which constitute a trophic base that might support the activities of heterogenic Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria. The biological origin of umber deposits shed light on the importance of geomicrobiological interaction in triggering the formation of metalliferous deposits, with important implications for the generation of submarine Mn deposits and crusts.

  9. Mariprofundus ferrooxydans PV-1 the First Genome of a Marine Fe(II) Oxidizing Zetaproteobacterium

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Esther; Emerson, David; Webb, Eric A.; Barco, Roman A.; Kuenen, J. Gijs; Nelson, William C.; Chan, Clara S.; Comolli, Luis R.; Ferriera, Steve; Johnson, Justin; Heidelberg, John F.; Edwards, Katrina J.

    2011-01-01

    Mariprofundus ferrooxydans PV-1 has provided the first genome of the recently discovered Zetaproteobacteria subdivision. Genome analysis reveals a complete TCA cycle, the ability to fix CO2, carbon-storage proteins and a sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS). The latter could facilitate the transport of carbohydrates across the cell membrane and possibly aid in stalk formation, a matrix composed of exopolymers and/or exopolysaccharides, which is used to store oxidized iron minerals outside the cell. Two-component signal transduction system genes, including histidine kinases, GGDEF domain genes, and response regulators containing CheY-like receivers, are abundant and widely distributed across the genome. Most of these are located in close proximity to genes required for cell division, phosphate uptake and transport, exopolymer and heavy metal secretion, flagellar biosynthesis and pilus assembly suggesting that these functions are highly regulated. Similar to many other motile, microaerophilic bacteria, genes encoding aerotaxis as well as antioxidant functionality (e.g., superoxide dismutases and peroxidases) are predicted to sense and respond to oxygen gradients, as would be required to maintain cellular redox balance in the specialized habitat where M. ferrooxydans resides. Comparative genomics with other Fe(II) oxidizing bacteria residing in freshwater and marine environments revealed similar content, synteny, and amino acid similarity of coding sequences potentially involved in Fe(II) oxidation, signal transduction and response regulation, oxygen sensation and detoxification, and heavy metal resistance. This study has provided novel insights into the molecular nature of Zetaproteobacteria. PMID:21966516

  10. Thermodynamic modeling of oxide phases in the Fe-Mn-O system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Youn-Bae; Jung, In-Ho

    2016-11-01

    A critical evaluation and thermodynamic modeling for thermodynamic properties of all oxide phases and phase diagrams in the Fe-Mn-O system are presented. Optimized Gibbs energy parameters for the thermodynamic models of the oxide phases were obtained which reproduce all available and reliable experimental data within error limits from 298 K to above the liquidus temperatures at all compositions covering from known oxide phases, and oxygen partial pressure from metal saturation to 0.21 bar. The optimized thermodynamic properties and phase diagrams are believed to be the best estimates presently available. Two spinel phases (cubic and tetragonal) were modeled using Compound Energy Formalism (CEF) with the use of physically meaningful parameters. The present Fe-Mn spinel solutions can be integrated into a larger spinel solution database, which has been already developed. The database of the model parameters can be used along with a software for Gibbs energy minimization in order to calculate any type of phase diagram section and thermodynamic properties.

  11. [NiFe]Hydrogenase from Citrobacter sp. S-77 surpasses platinum as an electrode for H2 oxidation reaction.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takahiro; Eguchi, Shigenobu; Nakai, Hidetaka; Hibino, Takashi; Yoon, Ki-Seok; Ogo, Seiji

    2014-08-18

    Reported herein is an electrode for dihydrogen (H2) oxidation, and it is based on [NiFe]Hydrogenase from Citrobacter sp. S-77 ([NiFe]S77). It has a 637 times higher mass activity than Pt (calculated based on 1 mg of [NiFe]S77 or Pt) at 50 mV in a hydrogen half-cell. The [NiFe]S77 electrode is also stable in air and, unlike Pt, can be recovered 100 % after poisoning by carbon monoxide. Following characterization of the [NiFe]S77 electrode, a fuel cell comprising a [NiFe]S77 anode and Pt cathode was constructed and shown to have a a higher power density than that achievable by Pt.

  12. Study of cluster anions generated by laser ablation of titanium oxides: a high resolution approach based on Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Barthen, Nicolas; Millon, Eric; Aubriet, Frédéric

    2011-03-01

    Laser ablation of titanium oxides at 355 nm and ion-molecule reactions between [(TiO(2))(x)](-•) cluster anions and H(2)O or O(2) were investigated by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR MS) with an external ion source. The detected anions correspond to [(TiO(2))(x)(H(2)O)(y)OH](-) and [(TiO(2))(x)(H(2)O)(y)O(2)](-•) oxy-hydroxide species with x=1 to 25 and y=1, 2, or 3 and were formed by a two step process: (1) laser ablation, which leads to the formation of [(TiO(2))(x)](-•) cluster anions as was previously reported, and (2) ion-molecule reactions during ion storage. Reactions of some [(TiO(2))(x)](-•) cluster anions with water and dioxygen conducted in the FTICR cell confirm this assessment. Tandem mass spectrometry experiments were also performed in sustained off-resonance irradiation collision-induced dissociation (SORI-CID) mode. Three fragmentation pathways were observed: (1) elimination of water molecules, (2) O(2) loss for radical anions, and (3) fission of the cluster. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed to explain the experimental data.

  13. Catalytic oxidative degradation of 17α-ethinylestradiol by FeIII-TAML/H2O2: estrogenicities of the products of partial, and extensive oxidation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian Lin; Ravindran, Shanthinie; Swift, Simon; Wright, L James; Singhal, Naresh

    2012-12-01

    The oxidative degradation of the oral contraceptive 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE(2)) in water by a new advanced catalytic oxidation process was investigated. The oxidant employed was hydrogen peroxide in aqueous solution and the catalyst was the iron tetra-amido macrocyclic ligand (Fe(III)-TAML) complex that has been designated Na[Fe(H(2)O)(B*)] (Fe(III)-B*). EE(2) (10 μM) was oxidised rapidly by the Fe(III)-B*/H(2)O(2) (5 nM/4 mM) catalytic oxidation system at 25 °C, and for reactions at pH 8.40-11.00, no unchanged EE2 was detected in the reaction mixtures after 60 min. No oxidation of EE(2) was detected in blank reactions using either H(2)O(2) or Fe(III)-B* alone. The maximum rate of EE(2) loss occurred at pH 10.21. At this pH the half-life of EE(2) was 2.1 min and the oxidised products showed around 30% estrogenicity removal, as determined by the yeast estrogen screen (YES) bioassay. At pH 11.00, partial oxidation of EE(2) by Fe(III)-B*/H(2)O(2) (5 nM/4 mM) was studied (half-life of EE(2) was 14.5 min) and in this case the initial intermediates formed were a mixture of the epimers 17α-ethynyl-1,4-estradiene-10α,17β-diol-3-one (1a) and 17α-ethynyl-1,4-estradiene-10β,17β-diol-3-one (1b) (identified by LC-ToF-MS and (1)H NMR spectroscopy). Significantly, this product mixture displayed a slightly higher estrogenicity than EE(2) itself, as determined by the YES bioassay. Upon the addition of further aliquots of Fe(III)-B* (to give a Fe(III)-B* concentration of 500 nM) and H(2)O(2) (to bring the concentration up to 4 mM assuming the final concentration had dropped to zero) to this reaction mixture the amounts of 1a and 1b slowly decreased to zero over a 60 min period as they were oxidised to unidentified products that showed no estrogenicity. Thus, partial oxidation of EE(2) gave products that have slightly increased estrogenicity, whereas more extensive oxidation by the advanced catalytic oxidation system completely removed all estrogenicity. These results

  14. Photo-driven oxidation of water on α-Fe2O3 surfaces: An ab initio study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Manh-Thuong; Seriani, Nicola; Piccinin, Simone; Gebauer, Ralph

    2014-02-01

    Adopting the theoretical scheme developed by the Nørskov group [see, for example, Nørskov et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 108, 17886 (2004)], we conducted a density functional theory study of photo-driven oxidation processes of water on various terminations of the clean hematite (α-Fe2O3) (0001) surface, explicitly taking into account the strong correlation among the 3d states of iron through the Hubbard U parameter. Six best-known terminations, namely, Fe-Fe-O_3- (we call S_1), O-Fe-Fe- (S_2), O_2-Fe-Fe-(S_3), O_3-Fe-Fe- (S_4), Fe-O_3-Fe- (S_5), and O-Fe-O_3-(S_6), are first exposed to water, the stability of resulting surfaces is investigated under photoelectrochemical conditions by considering different chemical reactions (and their reaction free energies) that lead to surfaces covered by O atoms or/and OH groups. Assuming that the water splitting reaction is driven by the redox potential for photogenerated holes with respect to the normal hydrogen electrode, UVB, at voltage larger than UVB, most 3-oxygen terminated substrates are stable. These results thus suggest that the surface, hydroxylated in the dark, should release protons under illumination. Considering the surface free energy of all the possible terminations shows that O_3-S_5 and O_3-S_1 are the most thermodynamically stable. While water oxidation process on the former requires an overpotential of 1.22 V, only 0.84 V is needed on the latter.

  15. The rational designed graphene oxide-Fe2O3 composites with low cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Yan, Dong; Zhao, Haiyan; Pei, Jiayun; Wu, Xin; Liu, Yue

    2017-03-01

    Novel two-dimensional materials with a layered structure are of special interest for a variety of promising applications. In current research, the nanostructured graphene oxide-Fe2O3 composite (GO-Fe2O3) was firstly obtained via a carefully elaborated approach of vacuum freeze-drying. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) images revealed that α-Fe2O3 nanoparticles loaded well on the surfaces of graphene. A series of characterization were performed to further elucidate the as-obtained nanomaterial's physicochemical properties. These results suggested the current route could be further extended to obtain the other kinds of two-dimensional materials based composites. For the sake of extending the potential application of herein achieved graphene composites, its cytotoxicity assessment on HeLa cells was systematically investigated. CCK-8 assay in HeLa cells treated by GO-Fe2O3 showed dose- (1-100μg/ml) and time- (24-48h) dependent cytotoxicity, which was comparable to that of GO. The excess generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by these nanomaterials was responsible for the cytotoxicity. TEM analysis vividly illustrated GO-Fe2O3 internalized by HeLa cells in endomembrane compartments such as lysosomes, and degraded through autophagic pathway. The detrimental biological consequence accompanied by cell internalization was limited. Based on the above results, it expected to render useful information for the development of new and popular strategies to design graphene-based composites, as well as deep insights into the mechanism of graphene-based composites cytotoxicity for further potential application.

  16. Induction and processing of oxidative clustered DNA lesions in 56Fe-ion-irradiated human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Doug; Kalogerinis, Peter; Tabrizi, Isla; Dingfelder, Michael; Stewart, Robert D; Georgakilas, Alexandros G

    2007-07-01

    Space and cosmic radiation is characterized by energetic heavy ions of high linear energy transfer (LET). Although both low- and high-LET radiations can create oxidative clustered DNA lesions and double-strand breaks (DSBs), the local complexity of oxidative clustered DNA lesions tends to increase with increasing LET. We irradiated 28SC human monocytes with doses from 0-10 Gy of (56)Fe ions (1.046 GeV/ nucleon, LET = 148 keV/microm) and determined the induction and processing of prompt DSBs and oxidative clustered DNA lesions using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and Number Average Length Analysis (NALA). The (56)Fe ions produced decreased yields of DSBs (10.9 DSB Gy(-1) Gbp(-1)) and clusters (1 DSB: approximately 0.8 Fpg clusters: approximately 0.7 Endo III clusters: approximately 0.5 Endo IV clusters) compared to previous results with (137)Cs gamma rays. The difference in the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of the measured and predicted DSB yields may be due to the formation of spatially correlated DSBs (regionally multiply damaged sites) which result in small DNA fragments that are difficult to detect with the PFGE assay. The processing data suggest enhanced difficulty compared with gamma rays in the processing of DSBs but not clusters. At the same time, apoptosis is increased compared to that seen with gamma rays. The enhanced levels of apoptosis observed after exposure to (56)Fe ions may be due to the elimination of cells carrying high levels of persistent DNA clusters that are removed only by cell death and/or "splitting" during DNA replication.

  17. Biochemistry and Ecology of Novel Cytochromes Catalyzing Fe(II) Oxidation by an Acidophilic Microbial Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, S. W.; Jeans, C. J.; Thelen, M. P.; Verberkmoes, N. C.; Hettich, R. C.; Chan, C. S.; Banfield, J. F.

    2007-12-01

    An acidophilic microbial community found in the Richmond Mine at Iron Mountain, CA forms abundant biofilms in extremely acidic (pH<1) and toxic metal conditions. In this ecosystem, biological Fe(II) oxidation is critical to the metabolic functioning of the community, and in turn this process generates acid mine drainage, causing an environmental catastrophe. Two conspicuous novel proteins isolated from these biofilms were identified as gene products of Leptospirillum group II and were characterized as cytochromes with unique properties. Sulfuric acid extraction of biofilm samples liberated one of these proteins, a 16 kDa cytochrome with an unusual alpha-band absorption at 579 (Cyt579). Genomic sequencing of multiple biofilms indicated that several variants of Cyt579 were present in Leptospirillum strains. Intact protein MS analysis identified the dominant variants in each biofilm and documented multiple N-terminal cleavage sites for Cyt579. By combining biochemical, geochemical and microbiological data, we established that the sequence variation and N-terminal processing of Cyt579 are selected by ecological conditions. In addition to the soluble Cyt579, the second cytochrome appears as a much larger protein complex of ~210 kDa predominant in the biofilm membrane fraction, and has an alpha-band absorption at 572 nm. The 60 kDa cytochrome subunit, Cyt572, resides in the outer membrane of LeptoII, and readily oxidizes Fe(II) at low pH (0.95 - 3.0). Several genes encoding Cyt572 were localized within a recombination hotspot between two strains of LeptoII, causing a large range of variation in the sequences. Genomic sequencing and MS proteomic studies established that the variants were also selected by ecological conditions. A general mechanistic model for Fe(II) oxidation has been developed from these studies. Initial Fe(II) oxidation by Cyt572 occurs at the outer membrane. Cyt572 then transfers electrons to Cyt579, perhaps representing an initial step in energy flow

  18. A first principles investigation of electron transfer between Fe(II) and U(VI) on insulating Al- vs. semiconducting Fe-oxide surfaces via the proximity effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, S. D.; Marcano, M. C.; Becker, U.

    2017-01-01

    (II) to travel through the hematite surface and reach U(VI). The progression and extent of ET occurring on the semiconducting hematite (0 0 1) surface via the proximity effect depends on the electronic properties of the surface. ET between the spatially separated U(VI) and Fe(II) occurs most readily when orbitals between the Fe and U adsorbates overlap with those of neighboring O and Fe ions at the hematite surface, as shown by calculations without the Hubbard U correction. Analyses of the spins densities confirm that the U and Fe adsorbates were reduced and oxidized, respectively, (acquiring 0.33 μB and 0.11-0.20 μB, respectively), while Fe cations at the hematite surface were reduced (losing ⩽0.6 μB). If electrons are highly localized, the amount of orbital mixing and electronic coupling through the hematite surface decreases and in turn leads to a lower degree of spin transfer, as predicted by calculations with the Hubbard U correction. Thus, the proximity effect is a potential mechanism on semiconducting surfaces facilitating surface-mediated redox reactions, although its significance varies depending on the electronic properties and subsequent charge-carrying ability of the surface. These results provide insight into ET pathways and mechanisms on insulating Al- and semiconducting Fe oxide surfaces influencing the reduction U(VI) by Fe(II) that may subsequently limit uranium's transport in the subsurface.

  19. Tuning the size of aluminum oxide nanoparticles synthesized by laser ablation in water using physical and chemical approaches.

    PubMed

    Al-Mamun, Sharif Abdullah; Nakajima, Reiko; Ishigaki, Takamasa

    2013-02-15

    Colloidal solution of nano-sized spherical Al(2)O(3) particles were produced by nanosecond laser ablation upon irradiation on a corundum target in a distilled water environment. The effects of target inclination along the direction of laser irradiation and defocusing of the laser beam have been investigated in this study. The effect of the pH of the aqueous solution has also been studied. Synthesized particles were analyzed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to investigate particle shape and size distributions. Ablated nanoparticles (NPs) were spherical in shape, with the average particle size ranging from 8 to 18 nm in different operating conditions. Target inclination resulted in a decrease in the average particle size. Laser defocusing at the same power and thus with reduced fluence caused a decrease in the average size and standard deviation (SD), whereas defocusing that maintained the same fluence caused the reverse effect. Phase identification of NPs performed with high resolution TEM lattice images and fast Fourier transform indicated both a metastable γ-Al(2)O(3) phase and a stable α-Al(2)O(3) phase. X-ray diffraction analysis was also performed, which showed peaks of both α-Al(2)O(3) and γ-Al(2)O(3) with the presence of α- and γ-AlO(OH) polymorphs in acidic and alkaline solution, respectively. Surface conditions of the ablated particles representing the acidic and alkaline conditions were found to have a significant influence on both the size and crystallographic phase, which indicates it may be possible to induce size and phase transitions by changing the surface chemistry.

  20. Enhanced magnetization in highly crystalline and atomically mixed bcc Fe-Co nanoalloys prepared by hydrogen reduction of oxide composites.

    PubMed

    Sharif, Md Jafar; Yamauchi, Miho; Toh, Shoichi; Matsumura, Syo; Noro, Shin-ichiro; Kato, Kenichi; Takata, Masaki; Tsukuda, Tatsuya

    2013-02-21

    Fe(x)Co(100-x) nanoalloys (NAs) with 20 ≤ x ≤ 80 were prepared by hydrogen reduction of Fe-Co oxide nano-composites, which were composed of mixed phases (or domains) of Fe(2)O(3) and CoO. In situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements using synchrotron radiation clearly showed development of a solid-solution Fe-Co phase by hydrogen reduction from the oxide composites. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-angle annular dark-field scanning TEM and powder XRD revealed that Fe-Co NAs form a single crystal structure and the two elements are mixed homogeneously. The saturation magnetization depends on the size and metal composition and shows the highest value (250 emu g(-1)) for the Fe(70)Co(30) NA in the size range of 30-55 nm, which is comparable to that of the Fe(70)Co(30) bulk alloy (245 emu g(-1)). This high magnetization is attributable to high crystallinity and homogeneous mixing of constituent atoms, which are attained by thermal treatment of oxide phases under a hydrogen atmosphere.

  1. Comparative imaging of P, S, Fe, Cu, Zn and C in thin sections of rat brain tumor as well as control tissues by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoriy, Myroslav V.; Dehnhardt, Markus; Matusch, Andreas; Becker, J. Sabine

    2008-03-01

    Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) was used for quantitative imaging of selected elements (P, S, Fe, Cu, Zn and C) in thin sections of rat brain samples (thickness 20 μm). The sample surface was scanned (raster area ~ 2 cm 2) with a focused laser beam (wavelength 266 nm, diameter of laser crater 50 μm, and irradiance 1 × 10 9 W cm - 2 ). The laser ablation system was coupled to a double-focusing sector field. The possibility was evaluated of using carbon (via measurement of 13C +) as an internal standard element for imaging element distribution as part of this method. The LA-ICP-MS images obtained for P, S, Fe Cu and Zn were quantified using synthetically prepared matrix-matched laboratory standards. Depending on the sample analyzed, concentrations of Cu and Zn in the control tissue were found to be in the range of 8-10 μg g - 1 and 10-12 μg g - 1 , while in the tumor tissue these concentrations were in the range of 12-15 μg g - 1 and 15-17 μg g - 1 , respectively. The measurements of P, S and Fe distribution revealed the depletion of these elements in tumor tissue. In all the samples, the shape of the tumor could be clearly distinguished from the surrounding healthy tissue by the depletion in carbon. Additional experiments were performed in order to study the influence of the water content of the analyzed tissue on the intensity signal of the analyte. The results of these measurements show the linear correlation ( R2 = 0.9604) between the intensity of analyte and amount of water in the sample. The growth of a brain tumor was thus studied for the first time by imaging mass spectrometry.

  2. Zinc oxide based diluted magnetic semiconductor nanoparticles: Synthesis by laser ablation in liquids, microstructural and optical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Savchuk, Andriy I.; Stolyarchuk, Ihor D.; Savchuk, Oleksandr A.; Makoviy, Vitaliy V.; Smolinsky, Mykhailo M.; Shporta, Oleksandra A.; Perrone, Alessio

    2013-12-04

    Nanoparticles of ZnO and ZnO doped with transition metals (Mn, Co) were synthesized by laser ablation in liquid medium. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed formation of nanostructures with different shapes. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) gives information about surface morphology of the formed nanostructures. Absorption edge of ZnO, ZnO:Mn and ZnO:Co colloidal nanoparticles exhibits blue shift due to confinement effect. In photoluminescence spectra three peaks are attributed to the band-edge transitions and defect states. The Faraday rotation in ZnO:Mn nanoparticles gives evidence for paramagnetic behavior at room temperature.

  3. Ce-Fe-reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite as an efficient catalyst for sulfamethazine degradation in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Wan, Zhong; Wang, Jianlong

    2016-09-01

    A heterogeneous Fenton catalyst Ce(0)-Fe(0)-reduced graphene oxide (Ce-Fe-RGO) was synthesized with chemical reduction methods and used for degradation of sulfamethazine. The introduction of Ce and graphene increased the dispersibility of iron particles which was confirmed by SEM and TEM. The results of VSM analysis showed good magnetism of Ce-Fe-RGO. The catalyst performance was compared with other kinds of catalysts (Fe(0) and Ce(0)-Fe(0)) for degradation of sulfamethazine. The results showed that Ce(0)-Fe-RGO had good catalytic performance and adsorption. X-ray diffraction showed the change of iron oxide on catalyst surface after use. The total sulfur (TS), total nitrogen (TN), total organic carbon (TOC), and intermediates, such as small organic molecular and anion ions, were analyzed by IC under different pH conditions. Finally, the possible catalytic mechanism was tentatively proposed based on inhibitor experimental results and XPS characterization. The main active species was hydroxyl radical on catalyst surface and the transition between Ce(3+) and Ce(4+) which enhanced the reduction from Fe(3+) to Fe(2+) and formation of ·OH and ·O2 (-).

  4. Surface and interface engineering of FePt/C nanocatalysts for electro-catalytic methanol oxidation: enhanced activity and durability.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junmei; Wang, Zhenlei; Li, Shuai; Wang, Rongming; Song, Yujun

    2017-03-23

    A methodology by coupling a microfluidic-batch process with in situ carbon-black mixing, successive annealing and de-alloying post-treatment was developed for engineering surface and interface microstructures of FePt/C nanocomposites. Ultra-small angular FePt nanocrystals rich in vertexes/terraces/steps and with Pt contents gradually increasing from the inner to the outer part can be synthesized at certain Fe/Pt atomic ratios (2/1 or 1.1/1), which can directly grow on carbon-black for enhanced nanocrystal-carbon interface interaction by introducing the in situ carbon-black mixing process. Composition and structure characterization suggests that FePt@(Fe1-xPtx)Oy(OH)z/C nanocomposites with FePt alloy cores and surface Pt-doping hydroxyl iron oxide shells are formed after annealing. After controlled de-alloying of Fe in annealed nanocrystals with a Fe/Pt ratio of 2/1, the finally formed nanocatalysts exhibited excellent electrochemical catalytic performance using the methanol oxidation reaction as a model, preserving an activity of 1610 mA mg(-1) Pt(-1) (12 times the commercial Pt/C catalysts, higher than the best result (7.9 times the commercial Pt/C catalysts) just published in Science (Science, 2016, 354, 1410-1414), enhanced durability and high tolerance to CO poisoning.

  5. Ferroelectric BiFeO3 as an Oxide Dye in Highly Tunable Mesoporous All-Oxide Photovoltaic Heterojunctions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lingfei; Ma, He; Chang, Lei; Ma, Chun; Yuan, Guoliang; Wang, Junling; Wu, Tom

    2017-01-01

    As potential photovoltaic materials, transition-metal oxides such as BiFeO3 (BFO) are capable of absorbing a substantial portion of solar light and incorporating ferroic orders into solar cells with enhanced performance. But the photovoltaic application of BFO has been hindered by low energy-conversion efficiency due to poor carrier transport and collection. In this work, a new approach of utilizing BFO as a light-absorbing sensitizer is developed to interface with charge-transporting TiO2 nanoparticles. This mesoporous all-oxide architecture, similar to that of dye-sensitized solar cells, can effectively facilitate the extraction of photocarriers. Under the standard AM1.5 (100 mW cm(-2) ) irradiation, the optimized cell shows an open-circuit voltage of 0.67 V, which can be enhanced to 1.0 V by tailoring the bias history. A fill factor of 55% is achieved, which is much higher than those in previous reports on BFO-based photovoltaic devices. The results provide here a new viable approach toward developing highly tunable and stable photovoltaic devices based on ferroelectric transition-metal oxides.

  6. Preparation of iron oxide nanoparticles from FeCl3 solid powder using microemulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassar, Nashaat; Husein, Maen

    2006-05-01

    Nanoparticles of iron oxide were prepared by subjecting iron chloride powder to (w/o) microemulsions consisting of sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT), isooctane and water. FeCl3 was first dissolved in the water pools of the microemulsion, and then reacted with NaOH added as an aqueous solution to form iron oxide. The amount of NaOH solution was limited so that single microemulsion phase is obtained. This technique serves as an in-situ nanoparticle preparation technique aimed at minimizing particle aggregation associated with particle transportation to required sites. In this study, the effects of AOT concentration and water to AOT mole ratio on the nanoparticle size were investigated. UV/Vis spectrophotometry and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to measure the particle size distribution.

  7. Reduction Kinetics of Electric Arc Furnace Oxidizing Slag by Al-Fe Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaehong; Oh, Joon Seok; Lee, Joonho

    2016-09-01

    Effects of temperature and slag basicity on the reduction rate of iron oxide in molten synthetic electric arc furnace oxidizing slag by Al-40 wt.%Fe alloy was investigated. An alloy sample was dropped into molten slag in an MgO crucible. When the initial slag temperature was 1723 K, there was no reduction. However, when the initial slag temperature was 1773 K and the slag basicity was 1.1, the reduction was initiated and the temperature of the slag rapidly increased. When the slag basicity was 1.1, increasing the initial slag temperature from 1773 K to 1823 K increases the reaction rate. As the slag basicity increased from 1.1 to 1.4 at 1773 K, the reaction rate increased. From SEM analysis, it was found that an Al2O3 or a spinel phase at the slag-metal interface inhibited the reaction at a lower temperature and a lower slag basicity.

  8. Zircon coronas around Fe-Ti oxides: a physical reference frame for metamorphic and metasomatic reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austrheim, Håkon; Putnis, Christine V.; Engvik, Ane K.; Putnis, Andrew

    2008-10-01

    Ilmenite in coronitic gabbros from the Bamble and Kongsberg sectors, southern Norway, is surrounded by zircons ranging in diameters from a fraction of a micrometer to 10 μm across. The zircons are inert during subsequent metamorphism (amphibolite- to pumpellyite-prehnite facies) and metasomatism (scapolitization and albitization) and can be found as trails in silicates (phlogopite, talc, chlorite, amphibole, albite, and tourmaline) in the altered rocks. The trails link up to form polygons outlining the former oxide grain boundary. This 3-dimensional framework of zircons is used to (a) recognize metasomatic origin of rocks, (b) quantify the mobility of elements during mineral replacement, (c) establish the growth direction of reaction fronts and to identify the reaction mechanism as dissolution-reprecipitation. Zircon coronas on Fe-Ti oxides have been described from a number of terrains and appear to be common in mafic rocks (gabbros and granulites) providing a tool for a better understanding of metasomatic and metamorphic reactions.

  9. Fe-complex of a tetraamido macrocyclic ligand: Spectroscopic characterization and catalytic oxidation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Shane Z.; Ghosh, Anindya; Biris, Alexandru S.; Pulla, Sharon; Brezden, Anna M.; Collom, Samulel L.; Woods, Ross M.; Munshi, Pradip; Schnackenberg, Laura; Pierce, Brad S.; Kannarpady, Ganesh K.

    2010-10-01

    This work presents the spectroscopic characterization and reaction studies of a Fe III-complex (2) of a tetraamido macrocyclic ligand (1, 15,15-dimethyl-5,8,13,17-tetrahydro-5,8,13,17-tetraaza-dibenzo[a,g]cyclotridecene-6,7,14,16-tetraone). 2 was characterized primarily by means of EPR. In agreement with the magnetic moment ( μeff = 3.87 BM), EPR spectroscopy of 2 shows signals consistent with S = 3/2 intermediate-spin ferric-iron. Besides EPR, mass spectrometry, UV/vis spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry were used to further characterize 2. 2 is soluble in water and activates hydrogen peroxide under ambient conditions. 2 catalytically bleaches dyes, pulp and paper effluents and oxidizes several amines to their corresponding N-oxides with high turnover number and good yields.

  10. Evaporatic-source model for igneous-related Fe oxide (REE-Cu-Au-U) mineralization

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, M.D.; Johnson, D.A.

    1996-03-01

    We propose that many igneous-related Fe oxide-rich (REE-Cu-Au-U-bearing) deposits form by hydrothermal processes involving evaporitic ligand sources, either coeval salars or older evaporites. These deposits are abundant in both Phanerozoic and Proterozoic extensional continental and continent-margin settings. They commonly form in global arid zones, but they also occur where magmatism is superimposed upon older evaporites. Magmatic compositions exert only second-order control, mainly on alteration mineralogy and on element abundances. Hot S-poor brines generated by interaction with evaporitic materials are consistent with geologic settings and help rationalize the distinctive element enrichments (siderophile, lithophile) and hydrothermal alteration (sodic, locally alkaline) found in these systems. This model contrasts with immiscible oxide melt and magmatic-hydrothermal origins commonly proposed for these deposits, although all three mechanisms can occur. 31 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Interaction between carbon oxides, hydrogen and Fe2O3 and A n + 1Fe n O3 n + 1 (A = Gd, Sr, n = 1, 2, …, ∞)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheshko, T. F.; Serov, Yu. M.; Kryuchkova, T. A.; Khairullina, I. A.; Chislova, I. V.; Zvereva, I. A.

    2016-06-01

    The interaction between carbon oxides and hydrogen and surfaces of iron(III) oxide and A n + 1Fe n O3 n + 1 (where A = Gd, Sr, and n = 1, 2, …, ∞ is the number of perovskite layers) complex oxides is studied for the first time by means of thermal programmed desorption. It is shown that carbon oxides are adsorbed in molecular form with the formation of carbonate-carboxylate complexes, and in dissociative form. The ratios of the adsorption forms of both oxides are determined by the structure of ferrites, the number of perovskite layers, and the valence state and coordinative saturation of iron. The presence of weakly and strongly bonded hydrogen forms is established, and it is suggested that hydrogen dissolves in the bulk of a perovskite.

  12. [Adsorption of methylene blue from aqueous solution onto magnetic Fe3O4/ graphene oxide nanoparticles].

    PubMed

    Chang, Qing; Jiang, Guo-Dong; Hu, Meng-Xuan; Huang, Jia; Tang, He-Qing

    2014-05-01

    A simple ultrasound-assisted co-precipitation method was developed to prepare magnetic Fe3O4/graphene oxide (Fe3O4/ GO) nanoparticles. The characterization with transmission electron microscope (TEM) indicated that the products possessed small particle size. The hysteresis loop of the dried Fe3O4/GO nanoparticles demonstrated that the sample had typical features of superparamagnetic material. Batch adsorption studies were carried out to investigate the effects of the initial pH of the solution, the dosage of adsorbent, the contact time and temperature on the adsorption of methylene blue. The results indicated that the composites prepared could be used over a broad pH range (pH 6-9). The adsorption process was very fast within the first 25 min and the equilibrium was reached at 180 min. The adsorption equilibrium and kinetics data fitted well with the Langmuir isotherm model and the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The adsorption process was a spontaneous and endothermic process in nature. The composite exhibited fairly high adsorption capacity (196.5 mg.g-1) of methylene blue at 313 K. In addition, the magnetic composite could be effectively and simply separated by using an external magnetic field, and then regenerated by hydrogen peroxide and recycled for further use. The results indicated that the adsorbent had a potential in the application of the dye wastewater treatment.

  13. A New Insight of Graphene oxide-Fe(III) Complex Photochemical Behaviors under Visible Light Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Renlan; Zhu, Xiaoying; Chen, Baoliang

    2017-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) contains not only aromatic carbon lattice but also carboxyl groups which enhanced the aqueous solubility of GO. To study the transformation of GO nanosheets in natural environments, GO aqueous dispersion was mixed with Fe3+ ions to form photoactive complex. Under visible light irradiation, Fe(III) of the complex would be reduced to Fe(II) which could subsequently reduce highly toxic Cr(VI) to Cr3+. The electron of the reduction was contributed by the decarboxylation of carboxyl groups on GO and iron was acting as a catalyst during the photoreduction. On the other hand, the consumption of carboxyl groups may convert GO to rGO which are tend to aggregate since the decreased electrostatic repulsion and the increased π-π attraction. The formed Cr3+ may be electrostatically adsorbed by the rGO sheets and simultaneously precipitated with the aggregated rGO sheets, resulting the effective removal of chromium and GO nanosheets from the aqueous environment. This study may shed a light on understanding the environmental transformation of GO and guide the treatment of Cr(VI).

  14. Immobilization of selenite in soil and groundwater using stabilized Fe-Mn binary oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wenbo; Liang, Qiqi; Qian, Tianwei; Zhao, Dongye

    2015-03-01

    Stabilized Fe-Mn binary oxide nanoparticles were synthesized and tested for removal and in-situ immobilization of Se(IV) in groundwater and soil. A water-soluble starch or food-grade carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) was used as a stabilizer to facilitate in-situ delivery of the particles into contaminated soil. While bare and stabilized nanoparticles showed rapid sorption kinetics, starch-stabilized Fe-Mn offered the greatest capacity for Se(IV). The Langmuir maximum capacity was determined to be 109 and 95 mg-Se/g-Fe for starch- and CMC-stabilized nanoparticles, respectively, and the high Se(IV) uptake was observed over the typical groundwater pH range of 5-8. Column breakthrough tests indicated that the stabilized nanoparticles were deliverable in a model sandy soil while non-stabilized particles were not. When a Se(IV)-spiked soil was treated in situ with the nanoparticles, >90% water leachable Se(IV) was transferred to the nanoparticle phase, and thereby immobilized as the particles were retained in the downstream soil matrix. The nanoparticle amendment reduced the TCLP (toxicity characteristic leaching procedure) leachability and the California WET (waste extraction test) leachability of Se(IV) by 76% and 71%, respectively. The technology holds the potential to fill a major technology gap in remediation of metals-contaminated soil and groundwater.

  15. A New Insight of Graphene oxide-Fe(III) Complex Photochemical Behaviors under Visible Light Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Renlan; Zhu, Xiaoying; Chen, Baoliang

    2017-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) contains not only aromatic carbon lattice but also carboxyl groups which enhanced the aqueous solubility of GO. To study the transformation of GO nanosheets in natural environments, GO aqueous dispersion was mixed with Fe3+ ions to form photoactive complex. Under visible light irradiation, Fe(III) of the complex would be reduced to Fe(II) which could subsequently reduce highly toxic Cr(VI) to Cr3+. The electron of the reduction was contributed by the decarboxylation of carboxyl groups on GO and iron was acting as a catalyst during the photoreduction. On the other hand, the consumption of carboxyl groups may convert GO to rGO which are tend to aggregate since the decreased electrostatic repulsion and the increased π-π attraction. The formed Cr3+ may be electrostatically adsorbed by the rGO sheets and simultaneously precipitated with the aggregated rGO sheets, resulting the effective removal of chromium and GO nanosheets from the aqueous environment. This study may shed a light on understanding the environmental transformation of GO and guide the treatment of Cr(VI). PMID:28084446

  16. Heterotrophic Fe-Oxidizing Bacteria Associated With Basalt Surfaces Supporting Life On Vailulu'u Seamount, American Samoa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haucke, L.; Templeton, A.; Bailey, B.; Tebo, B.; Staudigel, H.

    2005-12-01

    Fe, the fourth-most abundant element in the Earth's crust, is also one of the most biologically essential ones. The reduced form, Fe(II), is often considered to be biologically limiting as a result of its low solubility and rapid chemical oxidation to Fe(III)(hydr)oxides at circumneutral pH. The alteration of basaltic glass, enriched in Fe(II), however, provides an abundant supply of reduced iron and, thus, has a major influence on local ocean chemistry and Fe bioavailability. Despite the fact that chemical Fe(II) oxidation takes place very rapidly, we demonstrate that alteration processes of freshly formed basaltic glass can be crucially enhanced by microbial activity.Cultivation of bacteria from basalt surfaces collected from two active submarine volcanoes, Loihi (Hawaii) and Vailulu'u (American Samoa) show a large number of heterotrophic bacteria capable of oxidizing Fe(II) and that these bacteria. not only enhance basalt dissolution but also play a major role in precipitating large amounts of thick Fe(hydr)oxides mats on Vailulu'u Seamount, particularly in the vicinity of low temperature hydrothermal vents. These mats contain substantial quantities of organic carbon that may serve as food sources for some of the macrobiological life on Vailulu'u Seamount. This very prominently includes a substantial population of eels that is found in close spatial association with up to 1m thick Fe oxide/microbial mat at Nafanua volcano, a recent volcanic cone that grew from the crater floor of the seamount. Microbial community analysis on different substrates ranging from basalt surfaces to microbial mats were performed on specially designed culturing media for detection and isolation of heterotrophic bacteria capable of Fe(II)-oxidation. Clone libraries from microbial mats originating from an eel dominated area of Vailulu'u crater are being compared to libraries made from eel guts in order to provide information to what extent these mats are being used as a food source in

  17. Cs, Sr, and Ba Sorption on Clays and Fe-Oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, H.L.; Brady, P.V.; Cygan, R.T.; Gruenhagen, S.E.; Nagy, K.L.; Westrich, H.R.

    1999-06-16

    Technical guidance for performance assessment (PA) of low-level radioactive waste (LLRW) sites is currently dependent upon experimental retardation factors (K{sub D}'s) to predict radionuclide transport. Accurate predictions of waste transport or retardation will require mechanistic models of radionuclide sorption so as to be applicable to a wide range of soil/groundwater environments. To that end, we have investigated Cs{sup +}, Sr{sup +}, and Ba{sup 2+} sorption on several clay and Fe-oxide minerals. Relative metal binding strengths for montmorillonite clay decrease from Ba{sup 2+} to Sr{sup +}, which is similar to that sorption trend noticed for kaolinite. Molecular dynamics simulations for kaolinite suggest that Cs{sup +} is sorbed at aluminol (010) edge sites as an inner-sphere complex and weakly sorbed as an outer-sphere complex on (001) basal surfaces. Sorption is thought to occur on similar sites for smectite clays, however, the basal plane residual charge and its increased basal plane exposure should have a greater influence on metal sorption. On the other hand, phase transformation kinetics (e.g., ferrihydrite to goethite) is a very important control of metal sorption and resorption for Fe-oxides/hydroxides. These results provide a basis for understanding and predicting metal sorption on complex soil minerals.

  18. Enhanced dewaterability of sewage sludge in the presence of Fe(II)-activated persulfate oxidation.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Guangyin; Lu, Xueqin; Zhao, Youcai; Chai, Xiaoli; Niu, Dongjie

    2012-07-01

    The potential benefits of Fe(II)-activated persulfate oxidation on sludge dewatering and its mechanisms were investigated in this study. Capillary suction time (CST) was used to evaluate sludge dewaterability. Both extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and viscosity were determined in an attempt to explain the observed changes in sludge dewaterability. The optimal conditions to give preferable dewaterability characteristics were found to be persulfate (S(2)O(8)(2-)) 1.2 mmol/gVSS, Fe(II) 1.5 mmol/gVSS, and pH 3.0-8.5, which demonstrated a very high CST reduction efficiency (88.8% reduction within 1 min). It was further observed that both soluble EPS and viscosity played relatively negative roles in sludge dewatering, whereas no correlation was established between sludge dewaterability and bound EPS. Three-dimensional excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectra also revealed that soluble EPS of sludge were degraded and sludge flocs were ruptured by persulfate oxidation, which caused the release of water in the intracellular pace and subsequent improvement of its dewaterability.

  19. Experimental diagenesis of organo-mineral structures formed by microaerophilic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Picard, Aude; Kappler, Andreas; Schmid, Gregor; Quaroni, Luca; Obst, Martin

    2015-02-18

    Twisted stalks are organo-mineral structures produced by some microaerophilic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria at O2 concentrations as low as 3 μM. The presence of these structures in rocks having experienced a diagenetic history could indicate microbial Fe(II)-oxidizing activity as well as localized abundance of oxygen at the time of sediment deposition. Here we use spectroscopy and analytical microscopy to evaluate if--and what kind of--transformations occur in twisted stalks through experimental diagenesis. Unique mineral textures appear on stalks as temperature and pressure conditions increase. Haematite and magnetite form from ferrihydrite at 170 °C-120 MPa. Yet the twisted morphology of the stalks, and the organic matrix, mainly composed of long-chain saturated aliphatic compounds, are preserved at 250 °C-140 MPa. Our results suggest that iron minerals might play a role in maintaining the structural and chemical integrity of stalks under diagenetic conditions and provide spectroscopic signatures for the search of ancient life in the rock record.

  20. Denitrification and Nitrate-Dependent Fe(II) Oxidation in Various Pseudogulbenkiania Strains

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Satoshi; Joikai, Kazuki; Otsuka, Shigeto; Senoo, Keishi; Okabe, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Pseudogulbenkiania is a relatively recently characterized genus within the order Neisseriales, class Betaproteobacteria. This genus contains several strains that are capable of anaerobic, nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation (NDFO), a geochemically important reaction for nitrogen and iron cycles. In the present study, we examined denitrification functional gene diversities within this genus, and clarified whether other Pseudogulbenkiania sp. strains perform denitrification and NDFO. Seventy strains were analyzed, including two type strains, a well-characterized NDFO strain, and 67 denitrifying strains isolated from various rice paddy fields and rice-soybean rotation fields in Japan. We also attempted to identify the genes responsible for NDFO by mutagenesis. Our comprehensive analysis showed that all Pseudogulbenkiania strains tested performed denitrification and NDFO; however, we were unable to obtain NDFO-deficient denitrifying mutants in our mutagenesis experiment. This result suggests that Fe(II) oxidation in these strains is not enzymatic, but is caused by reactive N-species that are formed during nitrate reduction. Based on the results of the comparative genome analysis among Pseudogulbenkiania sp. strains, we identified low sequence similarity within the nos gene as well as different gene arrangements within the nos gene cluster, suggesting that nos genes were horizontally transferred. Since Pseudogulbenkiania sp. strains have been isolated from various locations around the world, their denitrification and NDFO abilities may contribute significantly to nitrogen and iron biogeochemical cycles. PMID:27431373

  1. Pyritic event beds and sulfidized Fe (oxyhydr)oxide aggregates in metalliferous black mudstones of the Paleoproterozoic Talvivaara formation, Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virtasalo, Joonas J.; Laitala, Jaakko J.; Lahtinen, Raimo; Whitehouse, Martin J.

    2015-12-01

    The Paleoproterozoic, 2.0-1.9 Ga Talvivaara formation of Finland was deposited during the Shunga Event, a worldwide episode of enhanced accumulation of organic-rich sediments in the aftermath of the Lomagundi-Jatuli carbon isotope excursion. Sulfidic carbonaceous mudstones in the Talvivaara formation contain one of the largest known shale-hosted nickel deposits. In order to gain new insight into this Shungian sedimentary environment, sedimentological, petrographical and in situ S and Fe isotopic microanalyses were carried out on samples representing depositional and early-diagenetic conditions. The event-bedded lithology with tidal signatures in the organic-rich mudstones strongly indicates deposition from predominantly river-delivered mud on a highly-productive coastal area, below storm-wave base. The riverine supply of phosphorus, sulfate and iron supported high primary productivity and resulted in strong lateral and vertical chemical gradients in the nearshore waters with a shallow oxic surface layer underlain by euxinic water. The stratigraphic upper part of the Talvivaara formation contains banded intervals of thin alternating pyrite beds and carbonaceous mudstone beds. The pyrite beds were deposited by seaward excursions of the concentrated, acidic Fe-rich river plume subsequent to droughts or dry seasons, which led to intense pyrite precipitation upon mixing with euxinic waters. δ34S and δ56Fe values of the bedded pyrite (median δ34S = - 10.3 ‰ and δ56Fe = - 0.79 ‰) are consistent with the reaction of dissolved Fe(II) with H2S from bacterial sulfate reduction. Organic-rich clayey Fe-monosulfide-bearing granules were transported from the muddy estuary, and enclosed in Fe (oxyhydr)oxide aggregates that were forming by wave and current reworking in nearshore accumulations of river-delivered iron. The isotopic composition of these presently pyrrhotitic inclusions (median δ34S = - 3.3 ‰ and δ56Fe = - 1.6 ‰) indicates microbial iron reduction. The Fe

  2. Two-dimensional oxide topological insulator with iron-pnictide superconductor LiFeAs structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qiunan; Song, Zhida; Nie, Simin; Weng, Hongming; Fang, Zhong; Dai, Xi

    2015-11-01

    By using first-principles calculations, we propose that ZrSiO can be looked at as a three-dimensional (3D) oxide weak topological insulator (TI) and its single layer is a long-sought-after 2D oxide TI with a band gap up to 30 meV. Calculated phonon spectrum of the single layer ZrSiO indicates it is dynamically stable and the experimental achievements in growing oxides with atomic precision ensure that it can be readily synthesized. This will lead to novel devices based on TIs, the so-called "topotronic" devices, operating under room temperature and stable when exposed in the air. Thus a new field of "topotronics" will arise. Another intriguing thing is this oxide 2D TI has the similar crystal structure as the well-known iron-pnictide superconductor LiFeAs. This brings great promise in realizing the combination of superconductor and TI, paving the way to various extraordinary quantum phenomena, such as topological superconductor and Majorana modes. We further find that there are many other isostructural compounds hosting the similar electronic structure and forming a W H M family with W being Zr, Hf, or La, H being group IV or group V element, and M being group VI one.

  3. Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy and magnetization dynamics in oxidized CoFeAl films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Di; Zhang, Zhe; Li, Le; Zhang, Zongzhi; Zhao, H. B.; Wang, J.; Ma, B.; Jin, Q. Y.

    2015-07-01

    Half-metallic Co-based full-Heusler alloys with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA), such as Co2FeAl in contact with MgO, are receiving increased attention recently due to its full spin polarization for high density memory applications. However, the PMA induced by MgO interface can only be realized for very thin magnetic layers (usually below 1.3 nm), which would have strong adverse effects on the material properties of spin polarization, Gilbert damping parameter, and magnetic stability. In order to solve this issue, we fabricated oxidized Co50Fe25Al25 (CFAO) films with proper thicknesses without employing the MgO layer. The samples show controllable PMA by tuning the oxygen pressure (PO2) and CFAO thickness (tCFAO), large perpendicular anisotropy field of ~8.0 kOe can be achieved at PO2 = 12% for the sample of tCFAO = 2.1 nm or at PO2 = 7% for tCFAO = 2.8 nm. The loss of PMA at thick tCFAO or high PO2 results mainly from the formation of large amount of CoFe oxides, which are superparamagnetic at room temperature but become hard magnetic at low temperatures. The magnetic CFAO films, with strong PMA in a relatively wide thickness range and small intrinsic damping parameter below 0.028, would find great applications in developing advanced spintronic devices.

  4. Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy and magnetization dynamics in oxidized CoFeAl films

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Di; Zhang, Zhe; Li, Le; Zhang, Zongzhi; Zhao, H. B.; Wang, J.; Ma, B.; Jin, Q. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Half-metallic Co-based full-Heusler alloys with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA), such as Co2FeAl in contact with MgO, are receiving increased attention recently due to its full spin polarization for high density memory applications. However, the PMA induced by MgO interface can only be realized for very thin magnetic layers (usually below 1.3 nm), which would have strong adverse effects on the material properties of spin polarization, Gilbert damping parameter, and magnetic stability. In order to solve this issue, we fabricated oxidized Co50Fe25Al25 (CFAO) films with proper thicknesses without employing the MgO layer. The samples show controllable PMA by tuning the oxygen pressure (PO2) and CFAO thickness (tCFAO), large perpendicular anisotropy field of ~8.0 kOe can be achieved at PO2 = 12% for the sample of tCFAO = 2.1 nm or at PO2 = 7% for tCFAO = 2.8 nm. The loss of PMA at thick tCFAO or high PO2 results mainly from the formation of large amount of CoFe oxides, which are superparamagnetic at room temperature but become hard magnetic at low temperatures. The magnetic CFAO films, with strong PMA in a relatively wide thickness range and small intrinsic damping parameter below 0.028, would find great applications in developing advanced spintronic devices. PMID:26190066

  5. Final Report: Molecular mechanisms and kinetics of microbial anaerobic nitrate-dependent U(IV) and Fe(II) oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    O'Day, Peggy A.; Asta, Maria P.; Kanematsu, Masakazu; Beller, Harry; Zhou, Peng; Steefel, Carl

    2015-02-27

    In this project, we combined molecular genetic, spectroscopic, and microscopic techniques with kinetic and reactive transport studies to describe and quantify biotic and abiotic mechanisms underlying anaerobic, nitrate-dependent U(IV) and Fe(II) oxidation, which influences the long-term efficacy of in situ reductive immobilization of uranium at DOE sites. In these studies, Thiobacillus denitrificans, an autotrophic bacterium that catalyzes anaerobic U(IV) and Fe(II) oxidation, was used to examine coupled oxidation-reduction processes under either biotic (enzymatic) or abiotic conditions in batch and column experiments with biogenically produced UIVO2(s). Synthesis and quantitative analysis of coupled chemical and transport processes were done with the reactive transport modeling code Crunchflow. Research focused on identifying the primary redox proteins that catalyze metal oxidation, environmental factors that influence protein expression, and molecular-scale geochemical factors that control the rates of biotic and abiotic oxidation.

  6. Removal of trace mercury(II) from aqueous solution by in situ formed Mn-Fe (hydr)oxides.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xixin; Huangfu, Xiaoliu; Ma, Jun

    2014-09-15

    The efficiency and mechanism of trace mercury (Hg(II)) removal by in situ formed manganese-ferric (hydr)oxides (in situ Mn-Fe) were investigated by reacting KMnO4 with Fe(II) in simulated solutions and natural water. In the simulated solutions, the impact of coagulant dosage, pH, and temperature on mercury removal was studied. Experimental results showed that in situ Mn-Fe more effectively removed mercury compared with polyaluminum chloride (PAC) and iron(III) chloride (FeCl3), and that mercury existed in the form of uncharged species, namely Hg(OH)2, HgClOH(aq), and HgCl2(aq). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy demonstrated that in situ Mn-Fe contained hydroxyl groups as the surface active sites, while X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements revealed that MnO2 or MnOOH and FeOOH were the dominant species in the precipitates. XPS analysis indicated that an Hg-Mn-Fe mixture was formed in the precipitates, suggesting that mercury was removed from solutions via transfer from the liquid phase to solid phase. These results indicated that the primary mercury removal mechanisms in in situ Mn-Fe were surface complexation and flocculation-precipitation processes. Satisfactory removal efficiency of mercury was also observed following in situ Mn-Fe in natural waters.

  7. Role of a unique population of lithotrophic, Fe-oxidizing bacteria in forming microbial Fe-mats at the Loihi Seamount.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emerson, D.; Rentz, J. A.; Moyer, C. L.

    2005-12-01

    The Loihi Seamount, located 30 km SE of the island of Hawai'i, is among the most active volcanos on Earth. The summit, at a depth of 1100m, includes a 250m deep caldera (Pele's Pit) formed by an eruption in 1996. The summit, and especially Pele's Pit, are the site of extensive low to intermediate temperature (10° to 65°C) hydrothermal venting, emanating both from diffuse fissures and orifices that have substantial flow rates. The vent fluid is characterized by a low sulfide content, high CO2 concentrations and Fe(II) amounts in the 10s to 100s of μM. Associated with all vents are extensive deposits of iron oxyhydroxides that typically have 107 to 108 bacterial cells/cc associated with them. The morphology of the Fe-oxides are indicative of biological origins. We have isolated microaerophilic, obligately lithotrophic Fe-oxidizing bacteria from Loihi and describe here `Mariprofundus ferroxydans' a unique bacterium that forms a filamentous iron oxide mineral. `M. ferroxydans' is the first cultured representative of a novel division of the Proteobacteria, known previously only from clones from different hydrothermal vent sites. Molecular evidence from Loihi mats based on clone libraries and terminal restriction length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis of 16S rRNA genes indicate that this lineage of Fe-oxidizing organisms are common inhabitants at Loihi. We speculate that this organism and its relatives form the basis of an active microbial mat community that owe their existence to the inherent gradients of Fe(II) and O2 that exist at the Loihi vents. In a geological context this is interesting because the Loihi summit and caldera are in an O2-minima zone; O2 concentrations in the bulk seawater are around 0.5 mg/l. In effect, Loihi could serve as a proxy for the late Archaean and early Proterozoic periods when the Earth's atmosphere went from reducing to oxidizing, and it is speculated that abundant Fe(II) in the Earth's oceans served as a major sink for O2 production

  8. Preparation of Pt@Fe2O3 nanowires and their catalysis of selective oxidation of olefins and alcohols.

    PubMed

    Hong, Haiyan; Hu, Lei; Li, Min; Zheng, Junwei; Sun, Xuhui; Lu, Xinhua; Cao, Xueqin; Lu, Jianmei; Gu, Hongwei

    2011-07-25

    Iron oxide coated platinum nanowires (Pt@Fe(2)O(3)NWs) with a diameter of 2.8 nm have been prepared by the oxygen oxidation of FePt NWs in oleylamine. These "cable"-like NWs were characterised by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray absorption fine structure analysis. These Pt@Fe(2)O(3) NWs were used as "non-support" heterogeneous catalysts in oxidation of olefins and alcohols. The results revealed that it is an active and highly selective catalyst. Styrene derivatives were tested with molecular oxygen as the sole oxidant, with benzaldehyde successfully obtained from styrene in an absolute yield of 31%, whereas the use of tert-butyl hydroperoxide as the sole oxidant in the oxidation of alcohols led to yields of more than 80% of the corresponding ketone or aldehyde. This unsupported catalyst was found to be more active (TOF=96.5 h(-1)) than other reported Fe(2)O(3) nanoparticle catalysts and could be recycled multiple times without any notable decrease in activity. Our findings will extend the use of such nanomaterial catalysts to new catalytic systems.

  9. Effect of NaCl, myoglobin, Fe(II), and Fe(III) on lipid oxidation of raw and cooked chicken breast and beef loin.

    PubMed

    Min, Byungrok; Cordray, Joseph C; Ahn, Dong Uk

    2010-01-13

    Chicken breast and beef loin were ground, and no, NaCl, NaCl+myoglobin, NaCl+Fe(II), or NaCl+Fe(III) additions were made; patties were then prepared. Half of the patties were packaged in oxygen-permeable bags and stored at 4 degrees C for 10 days, and the other half were cooked in a 95 degrees C water bath to an internal temperature of 75 degrees C, packaged in oxygen-permeable zipper bags, and stored at 4 degrees C for 7 days. The oxidative stability of raw and cooked chicken breast and beef loin were determined during storage. Chicken breast was more resistant to various exogenous oxidative factors than beef loin: addition of NaCl did not increase TBARS values and nonheme content of raw chicken breast, but significantly increased those of raw beef loin patties during storage. Addition of NaCl+Mb did not affect lipid oxidation in raw chicken breast patties, but decreased the TBARS of beef loin during storage. Addition of NaCl+Fe(III) or NaCl+Fe(II) increased the TBARS values of both raw chicken breast and beef loin during storage, but the increase was greater in beef loin than in chicken breast. The TBARS values of all cooked chicken breast and beef loin increased during 7 days of storage, but the increases in cooked chicken patties were significantly smaller than those of cooked beef loin patties with the same treatments. Addition of NaCl and cooking caused severe degradation of myoglobin, leading to a significant increase in free ionic iron content in beef loin. It is suggested that free ionic iron is the major catalyst for lipid oxidation, and the low "storage-stable and heat-stable" ferric ion reducing capacity in chicken breast were responsible for the high oxidative stability for raw and cooked chicken breast compared with beef loin under prooxidants, cooking, and storage conditions.

  10. Role of "electron shuttles" in the bioreduction of Fe(III) oxides in humid forest tropical soils.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peretyazhko, T.; Sposito, G.

    2004-12-01

    Dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria (DIRB) can reduce Fe(III) oxides either by direct contact between the organisms and the oxide surface or by indirect mechanisms not involving contact. These latter mechanisms can include (i) "electron shuttling" or (ii) soluble Fe(III) complexation with subsequent reduction. In the presence of humic substances, indirect Fe(III) reduction occurs, particularly by mechanism (i). Important electron-accepting groups in humic substances include quinone moieties, complexed Fe(III) and conjugated aromatic moieties. A model compound frequently used to study mechanism (i) is anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), which is believed to function as an "electron shuttle" in a manner similar to humic substances. We are currently investigating Fe(III) reduction in humid tropical forest soils as affected by "electron shuttles," using AQDS and humic substances in our experiments. The soil samples were collected at the bottom of a toposequence in the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico. Development of anaerobic conditions in these soils occurs due to high precipitation and runoff water inputs. Fourteen-day anoxic incubations of soil suspensions amended with AQDS showed enhanced production of both soluble and particulate forms of Fe(II) as compared to non-amended soil suspensions. Our data indicated clearly that DIRB in the soil could utilize added "electron shuttles" effectively to reduce Fe(III). To examine factors controlling Fe(III) reduction by humic acid (HA), three IHSS HA samples (soil, peat and Leonardite) were both abiotically reduced by H2 treatment and microbially reduced by incubation with a filtrate from a soil suspension, then titrated with three different oxidants (iodine, cyanoferrate, and ferric citrate) to provide chemical and biological estimates of electron-accepting capacity at pH 5 and 7. The results will be discussed in terms of the three oxidants used, the properties of the HA samples, pH, and the effects of chemical

  11. Synergetic effect of ZrO2 on the oxidation-reduction reaction of Fe2O3 during chemical looping combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Qinliang; Qin, Wu; Chen, Qiuluan; Dong, Changqing; Li, Wenyan; Yang, Yongping

    2012-10-01

    Fe2O3/ZrO2 model oxygen carrier is constructed at atomic-level precision under ultra-high-vacuum conditions. Based on density functional theory calculations and molecular dynamical simulations, structure and energy analysis suggests that the complex Fe2O3/ZrO2 is stable and more chemically active than the pure Fe2O3, ZrO2 promotes the adsorption of CO, which is chemisorption rather than physisorption on the pure Fe2O3 surface. Interface electronic interaction of Fe2O3/ZrO2 makes Fe2O3 positive to accept electron from CO easily and hence promoting the chemisorption of CO and the formation of carbonate species, while such electronic interaction makes it relatively more difficult in oxidizing Fe2O2 supported on ZrO2. However, all reaction barrier energies are small enough for Fe2O2 oxidation to happen under high temperature in the CLC system. Both CO oxidation by Fe2O3/ZrO2 related to the fuel reactor in the chemical looping combustion (CLC) system and Fe2O2/ZrO2 oxidation by O2 related to the air reactor in CLC system illustrate the synergetic effect of ZrO2 on the CO oxidation and Fe2O2 oxidation.

  12. Bis-Fe(IV): nature's sniper for long-range oxidation.

    PubMed

    Geng, Jiafeng; Davis, Ian; Liu, Fange; Liu, Aimin

    2014-10-01

    Iron-dependent enzymes are prevalent in nature and participate in a wide range of biological redox activities. Frequently, high-valence iron intermediates are involved in the catalytic events of iron-dependent enzymes, especially when the activation of peroxide or molecular oxygen is involved. Building on the fundamental framework of iron-oxygen chemistry, these reactive intermediates constantly attract significant attention from the enzymology community. During the past few decades, tremendous efforts from a number of laboratories have been dedicated to the capture and characterization of these intermediates to improve mechanistic understandings. In 2008, an unprecedented bis-Fe(IV) intermediate was reported in a c-type diheme enzyme, MauG, which is involved in the maturation of a tryptophan tryptophylquinone cofactor of methylamine dehydrogenase. This intermediate, although chemically equivalent to well-characterized high-valence iron intermediates, such as compound I, compound ES, and intermediate Q in methane monooxygenase, as well as the hypothetical Fe(V) species in Rieske non-heme oxygenases, is orders of magnitude more stable than these other high-valence species in the absence of its primary substrate. It has recently been discovered that the bis-Fe(IV) intermediate exhibits a unique near-IR absorption feature which has been attributed to a novel charge-resonance phenomenon. This review compares the properties of MauG with structurally related enzymes, summarizes the current knowledge of this new high-valence iron intermediate, including its chemical origin and structural basis, explores the formation and consequences of charge resonance, and recounts the long-range catalytic mechanism in which bis-Fe(IV) participates. Biological strategies for storing oxidizing equivalents with iron ions are also discussed.

  13. Laser ablation based fuel ignition

    DOEpatents

    Early, James W.; Lester, Charles S.

    1998-01-01

    There is provided a method of fuel/oxidizer ignition comprising: (a) application of laser light to a material surface which is absorptive to the laser radiation; (b) heating of the material surface with the laser light to produce a high temperature ablation plume which emanates from the heated surface as an intensely hot cloud of vaporized surface material; and (c) contacting the fuel/oxidizer mixture with the hot ablation cloud at or near the surface of the material in order to heat the fuel to a temperature sufficient to initiate fuel ignition.

  14. Laser ablation based fuel ignition

    DOEpatents

    Early, J.W.; Lester, C.S.

    1998-06-23

    There is provided a method of fuel/oxidizer ignition comprising: (a) application of laser light to a material surface which is absorptive to the laser radiation; (b) heating of the material surface with the laser light to produce a high temperature ablation plume which emanates from the heated surface as an intensely hot cloud of vaporized surface material; and (c) contacting the fuel/oxidizer mixture with the hot ablation cloud at or near the surface of the material in order to heat the fuel to a temperature sufficient to initiate fuel ignition. 3 figs.

  15. A simple route to improve rate performance of LiFePO4/reduced graphene oxide composite cathode by adding Mg2+ via mechanical mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yuan; Liu, Hao; Gong, Li; Hou, Yanglong; Li, Quan

    2017-04-01

    Introducing Mg2+ to LiFePO4 and reduced graphene oxide composite via mechanical mixing and annealing leads to largely improved rate performance of the cathode (e.g. ∼78 mA h g-1 at 20 C for LiFePO4 and reduced graphene oxide composite with Mg2+ introduction vs. ∼37 mA h g-1 at 20 C for LiFePO4 and reduced graphene oxide composite). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy unravels that the enhanced reduction of Fe2+ to Fe0 occurs in the simultaneous presence of Mg2+ and reduced graphene oxide, which is beneficial for the rate capability of cathode. The simple fabrication process provides a simple and effective means to improve the rate performance of the LiFePO4 and reduced graphene oxide composite cathode.

  16. Coupling of Fe(II) oxidation in illite with nitrate reduction and its role in clay mineral transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Linduo; Dong, Hailiang; Edelmann, Richard E.; Zeng, Qiang; Agrawal, Abinash

    2017-03-01

    In pedogenic and diagenetic processes, clay minerals transform from pre-existing phases to other clay minerals via intermediate interstratified clays. Temperature, pressure, chemical composition of fluids, and time are traditionally considered to be the important geological variables for clay mineral transformations. Nearly ten years ago, the role of microbes was recognized for the first time, where microbial reduction of structural Fe(III) in smectite resulted in formation of illite under ambient conditions within two weeks. However, the opposite process, the oxidation of structural Fe(II) in illite has not been studied and it remains unclear whether or not this process would result in the back reaction, e.g., from illite to smectite. The overall objective of this study was to investigate biological oxidation of structural Fe(II) in illite coupled with nitrate reduction and the effect of this process on clay mineral transformation. Laboratory incubations were set up, where structural Fe(II) in illite served as electron donor, nitrate as electron acceptor, and Pseudogulbenkiania sp. strain 2002 as mediator. Solution chemistry and gas composition were monitored over time. Mineralogical transformation resulting from bio-oxidation was characterized with X-ray diffraction and scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Our results demonstrated that strain 2002 was able to couple oxidation of structural Fe(II) in illite with reduction of nitrate to N2 with nitrite as a transient intermediate. This oxidation reaction resulted in transformation of illite to smectite and ultimately to kaolinite (illite → smectite → kaolinite transformations). This study illustrates the importance of Fe redox process in mediating the smectite-illite mineral cycle with important implications for Fe redox cycling and mineral evolution in surficial earth environments.

  17. Effect of oxide barrier height in spin dependent tunneling in MTJ of FeO-MgO multilayer structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, M.; Nemade, H.; Bandyopadhyay, D.

    2016-10-01

    We study the spin dependent tunneling current properties through oxide multilayers in a magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ). For this purpose, nonequilibrium Green's function approach along-with the density-functional theory have been applied. We employed three structural models of FeO-MgO-FeO multi-layer with three different width of FeO and MgO layer. An atomistic model is considered to describe the effect of oxide multilayers of different heights. Spin dependent study for tunneling reveals that the parallel spin shows higher tunneling current whereas anti-parallel spin conducts very less. Further, the lowest tunneling current is obtained for the case where the FeO and MgO each has 3 atomic layers of height whereas the tunneling current is highest in 4 atomic layers of FeO/1 atomic layers of MgO/4 atomic layers of MgO multilayer structure. Importantly, when the MgO or FeO layers are increased or decreased from this level, the tunneling current decreases significantly. The study reveals that the layer height in the tunneling domain can be important factor for tuning and adjusting tunneling current in the nanoscale regime of oxide layer thickness.

  18. Discovery of the recoverable high-pressure iron oxide Fe[subscript 4]O[subscript 5

    SciTech Connect

    Lavina, Barbara; Dera, Przemyslaw; Kim, Eunja; Meng, Yue; Downs, Robert T.; Weck, Philippe F.; Sutton, Stephen R.; Zhao, Yusheng

    2016-08-15

    Phases of the iron-oxygen binary system are significant to most scientific disciplines, directly affecting planetary evolution, life, and technology. Iron oxides have unique electronic properties and strongly interact with the environment, particularly through redox reactions. The iron-oxygen phase diagram therefore has been among the most thoroughly investigated, yet it still holds striking findings. Here, we report the discovery of an iron oxide with formula Fe{sub 4}O{sub 5}, synthesized at high pressure and temperature. The previously undescribed phase, stable from 5 to at least 30 GPa, is recoverable to ambient conditions. First-principles calculations confirm that the iron oxide here described is energetically more stable than FeO + Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} at pressure greater than 10 GPa. The calculated lattice constants, equation of states, and atomic coordinates are in excellent agreement with experimental data, confirming the synthesis of Fe{sub 4}O{sub 5}. Given the conditions of stability and its composition, Fe{sub 4}O{sub 5} is a plausible accessory mineral of the Earth's upper mantle. The phase has strong ferrimagnetic character comparable to magnetite. The ability to synthesize the material at accessible conditions and recover it at ambient conditions, along with its physical properties, suggests a potential interest in Fe{sub 4}O{sub 5} for technological applications.

  19. Metagenomic insights into Fe(II)-oxidizing Zetaproteobacteria from a biomat at Loi'hi, Hawai'i

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, E.; Dhillon, A.; Barco, R. A.; Edwards, K. J.

    2011-12-01

    Zetaproteobacteria are among the most prevalent Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) that proliferate at deep-sea hydrothermal vents, however, knowledge about the metabolic potential and diversity as well as environmental significance of this class is limited. Additionally, there are only four isolated Zetaproteobacteria to date, none of which represent any of the locally dominant or ubiquitous environmental operational taxonomic units (OTUs) (Mcallister et al., 2011). Understanding the physiology, ecology, and genetics of these FeOB is important for understanding the cycling of Fe and carbon at hydrothermal vents and potentially other marine sedimentary environments.We present the first 454 metagenomic dataset from a biomat isolated from the Lo'ihi Seamount, Hawai'i, dominated by Fe(II)-oxidizing Zetaproteobacteria. Zetaproteobacteria reads are dominated by a strain that is 99.5% identical to OTU1 (uncultured bacterial clone SPL_10), one of two ubiquitous Zetaproteobacteria clades in the Pacific Ocean (Mcallister et al., 2011). Metagenomic analysis revealed candidate genes required for Fe(II)-oxidation, which are homologous and similar in gene synteny to a gene cluster previously identified in the only sequenced Zetaproteobacteria genome from the isolate Mariprofundus ferrooxydans strain PV-1, as well as in the neutrophilic Fe(II) oxidizing organisms Sideroxydans lithotrophicus strain ES-1 and Gallionella ferruginea strain ES-2 (Singer et al., submitted). This gene cluster encodes for various electron transport proteins, including cytochromes and dehydrogenases, as well as a molydopterin oxidoreductase, which was previously extracted from an Fe(II)-oxidizing PV-1 at neutral pH and under microaerobic conditions. Based on comparative genomics and protein extraction results, we propose this gene cluster as a genetic biomarker for neutrophilic, microaerophilic FeOB. In addtion to genes required for iron metabolism, we also found genes required for trans-membrane iron

  20. Tuning the Curie temperature in γ-FeNi nanoparticles for magnetocaloric applications by controlling the oxidation kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ucar, Huseyin; Ipus, John J.; Laughlin, D. E.; McHenry, M. E.

    2013-05-01

    Mechanically alloyed Fe70Ni30 and Fe72Ni28 alloys were characterized in terms of their structural and magnetic properties. Previous studies showed that single phase FCC γ-FeNi alloys with ˜26-30 at. % Ni have Curie temperatures, Tc, near room temperature. Having Tc near room temperatures along with large magnetization makes γ-FeNi alloys attractive for room temperature magnetocaloric cooling technologies. To obtain a single γ-phase, particles were solution annealed in the γ-phase field and water quenched. The preferential oxidation of Fe during ball milling was used as a means to tune the Curie temperature, Tc, of the alloy. Refrigeration capacities, RCFWHM, of the Fe70Ni30 and the Fe72Ni28 alloys were calculated to be ≈470 J/kg and 250 J/kg at 5 T, with peak temperatures ≈363 K and ≈333 K, respectively. The RCFWHM for the Fe70Ni30 is higher than the previously reported Nanoperm (Fe70Ni30)89Zr7B4 type alloy and on the same order of magnitude with other Fe-based alloys. The maximum magnetic entropy change values observed for the Fe70Ni30 and the Fe72Ni28 are 0.65 and 0.5 J kg-1 K-1, respectively, at a field of 5 T. These are smaller than those of rare earth magnetic refrigerants showing first order transformation behavior. The larger RCFWHM value results mainly from the width of the magnetic entropy curve in these types of materials. We discuss the economic advantage of these rare earth free refrigerants.

  1. Phonons and stability of infinite-layer iron oxides SrFeO2 and CaFeO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, M. K.; Mittal, R.; Chaplot, S. L.; Tassel, Cédric; Kageyama, Hiroshi; Tomiyasu, K.; Taylor, Jon

    2016-09-01

    We present detailed ab-initio lattice dynamical analysis of the Fe-O infinite-layer compounds CaFeO2 and SrFeO2 in various magnetic configurations. These indicate strong spin-phonon coupling in SrFeO2 in contrast to that in case of CaFeO2. From our ab-initio calculations in SrFeO2 as a function of volume, we suggest that the distortion in SrFeO2 above 300 K is similar to that in CaFeO2 at ambient conditions. The distortion of the planer structure of CaFeO2 involves doubling of the planer unit cell that may be usually expected to be due to a soft phonon mode at the M-point (1/2 1/2 0). However, our ab-initio calculations show quite unusually that all the M-point (1/2 1/2 0) phonons are stable, but two stable M3+ and M2- modes anharmonically couple with an unstable Bu mode at the zone center and lead to the cell doubling and the distorted structure. Magnetic exchange interactions in both the compounds have been computed on the basis of the ideal planar structure (P4/mmm space group) and with increasing amplitude of the Bu phonon mode. These reveal that the magnetic exchange interactions reduce significantly with increasing distortion. We have extended the ab-initio phonon calculation to high pressures, which reveal that, above 20 GPa of pressure, the undistorted planer CaFeO2 becomes dynamically stable. We also report computed phonon spectra in SrFeO3 that has a cubic structure, which is useful to understand the role of the difference in geometry of oxygen atoms around the Fe atom with respect to planer SrFeO2. Finally, powder neutron inelastic scattering experiments on SrFeO2 have also been performed at temperatures from 5 K to 353 K in the antiferromagnetic phase. The 5-K data are compared to the ab-initio calculations.

  2. Structure and oxidation state of hemitite surfaces reacted with aqueous Fe(II) at acidic and neutral pH.

    SciTech Connect

    Catalano, J. G.; Fenter, P.; Park, C.; Zhang, Z.; Rosso, K. M.; Washington Univ.; PNNL

    2010-01-01

    Structural changes and surface oxidation state were examined following the reaction of hematite (0 0 1), (0 1 2), and (1 1 0) with aqueous Fe(II). X-ray reflectivity measurements indicated that Fe(II) induces changes in the structure of all three surfaces under both acidic (pH 3) and neutral (pH 7) conditions. The structural changes were generally independent of pH although the extent of surface transformation varied slightly between acidic and neutral conditions; no systematic trends with pH were observed. Induced changes on the (1 1 0) and (0 1 2) surfaces include the addition or removal of partial surface layers consistent with either growth or dissolution. In contrast, a <1 nm thick, discontinuous film formed on the (0 0 1) surface that appears to be epitaxial yet is not a perfect extension of the underlying hematite lattice, being either structurally defective, compositionally distinct, or nanoscale in size and highly relaxed. Resonant anomalous X-ray reflectivity measurements determined that the surface concentration of Fe(II) present after reaction at pH 7 was below the detection limit of approximately 0.5-1 {micro}mol/m{sup 2} on all surfaces. These observations are consistent with Fe(II) oxidative adsorption, whereby adsorbed Fe(II) is oxidized by structural Fe(III) in the hematite lattice, with the extent of this reaction controlled by surface structure at the atomic scale. The observed surface transformations at pH 3 show that Fe(II) oxidatively adsorbs on hematite surfaces at pH values where little net adsorption occurs, based on historical macroscopic Fe(II) adsorption behavior on fine-grained hematite powders. This suggests that Fe(II) plays a catalytic role, in which an electron from an adsorbed Fe(II) migrates to and reduces a lattice Fe(III) cation elsewhere, which subsequently desorbs in a scenario with zero net reduction and zero net adsorption. Given the general pH-independence and substantial mass transfer involved, this electron and atom

  3. Structure and oxidation state of hematite surfaces reacted with aqueous Fe(II) at acidic and neutral pH

    SciTech Connect

    Catalano, Jeffrey G.; Fenter, Paul; Park, Changyong; Zhang, Zhan; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2010-03-01

    Structural changes and surface oxidation state were examined following the reaction of hematite (0 0 1), (0 1 2), and (1 1 0) with aqueous Fe(II). X-ray reflectivity measurements indicated that Fe(II) induces changes in the structure of all three surfaces under both acidic (pH 3) and neutral (pH 7) conditions. The structural changes were generally independent of pH although the extent of surface transformation varied slightly between acidic and neutral conditions; no systematic trends with pH were observed. Induced changes on the (1 1 0) and (0 1 2) surfaces include the addition or removal of partial surface layers consistent with either growth or dissolution. In contrast, a <1 nm thick, discontinuous film formed on the (0 0 1) surface that appears to be epitaxial yet is not a perfect extension of the underlying hematite lattice, being either structurally defective, compositionally distinct, or nanoscale in size and highly relaxed. Resonant anomalous X-ray reflectivity measurements determined that the surface concentration of Fe(II) present after reaction at pH 7 was below the detection limit of approximately 0.5–1 μmol/m2 on all surfaces. These observations are consistent with Fe(II) oxidative adsorption, whereby adsorbed Fe(II) is oxidized by structural Fe(III) in the hematite lattice, with the extent of this reaction controlled by surface structure at the atomic scale. The observed surface transformations at pH 3 show that Fe(II) oxidatively adsorbs on hematite surfaces at pH values where little net adsorption occurs, based on historical macroscopic Fe(II) adsorption behavior on fine-grained hematite powders. This suggests that Fe(II) plays a catalytic role, in which an electron from an adsorbed Fe(II) migrates to and reduces a lattice Fe(III) cation elsewhere, which subsequently desorbs in a scenario with zero net reduction and zero net adsorption. Finally, given the general pH-independence and substantial mass transfer involved, this electron and

  4. Fabrication of Fe2O3 nanoflakes-based electrochemical solar cells prepared by facile thermal oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashid, Norhana Mohamed; Kishi, Naoki; Soga, Tetsuo

    2016-06-01

    A Fe2O3 nanoflakes-based solar cell was successfully prepared by thermal oxidation of iron film on FTO glass. The short circuit current density (Jsc) of the cell increased with annealing time while the open circuit voltage was saturated after 1 h. This enhancement was caused by the increased surface area of the nanoflakes and improved electron transfer through the (110) crystal plane in the Fe2O3-based electrochemical solar cell. The overall photovoltaic performance significantly increased with ruthenium dye, which likely suppressed carrier recombination on the Fe2O3 surface.

  5. Spinel type CoFe oxide porous nanosheets as magnetic adsorbents with fast removal ability and facile separation.

    PubMed

    Ge, X; Gu, C D; Wang, X L; Tu, J P

    2015-09-15

    Adsorption is often time consuming due to slow diffusion kinetic. Sizing he adsorbent down might help to accelerate adsorption. For CoFe spinel oxide, a magnetically separable adsorbent, the preparation of nanosheets faces many challenges including phase separation, grain growth and difficulty in preparing two-dimensional materials. In this work, we prepared porous CoFe oxide nanosheet with chemical formula of Co2.698Fe0.302O4 through topochemical transformation of a CoFe precursor, which has a layered double hydroxide (LDH) analogue structure and a large interlayer spacing. The LDH precursor was synthesized from a cheap deep eutectic solvent (DES) system. The calcined Co2.698Fe0.302O4 has small grain size (10-20nm), nanosheet morphology, and porous structure, which contribute to a large specific surface area of 79.5m(2)g(-1). The Co2.698Fe0.302O4 nanosheets show fast removal ability and good adsorption capacity for both organic waste (305mgg(-1) in 5min for Congo red) and toxic heavy metal ion (5.27mgg(-1) in 30min for Cr (VI)). Furthermore, the Co2.698Fe0.302O4 can be separated magnetically. Considering the precursor can be prepared through a fast, simple, surfactant-free and high-yield synthetic strategy, this work should have practical significance in fabricating adsorbents.

  6. Fe-Mn bi-metallic oxides loaded on granular activated carbon to enhance dye removal by catalytic ozonation.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shoufeng; Yuan, Deling; Zhang, Qi; Liu, Yameng; Zhang, Qi; Liu, Zhengquan; Huang, Haiming

    2016-09-01

    A Fe-Mn bi-metallic oxide supported on granular activated carbon (Fe-Mn GAC) has been fabricated by an impregnation-desiccation method and tested in the catalytic ozonation of methyl orange (MO) degradation and mineralization. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy characterizations revealed that Fe-Mn oxides were successfully loaded and uniformly distributed on the GAC, and nitrogen adsorption isotherms showed that the supported GAC retained a large surface area and a high pore volume compared with the pristine GAC. The catalytic activity was systematically assessed by monitoring the MO removal efficiencies at different operational parameters, such as catalyst dosage, initial solution pH, and ozone flow rate. The Fe-Mn GAC exhibited better catalytic activity relative to ozone alone and GAC alone, improving the TOC removal by 24.5 and 11.5 % and COD removal by 13.6 and 7.3 %, respectively. The reusability of the hybrid was examined over five consecutive cyclic treatments. The Fe-Mn GAC catalytic activity was only a slight loss in the cycles, showing good stability. The addition of Na2CO3 as hydroxyl radicals (•OH) scavengers proved that the catalytic ozonation mechanism was the enhanced generation of •OH by the Fe-Mn GAC. The above results render the Fe-Mn GAC an industrially promising candidate for catalytic ozonation of dye contaminant removal.

  7. (Zn,H)-codoped copper oxide nanoparticles via pulsed laser ablation on Cu-Zn alloy in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Bo-Cheng; Chen, Shuei-Yuan; Shen, Pouyan

    2012-05-01

    Nanosized (5 to 10 nm) amorphous and crystalline nanocondensates, i.e., metallic α-phase of Zn-Cu alloy in face-centered cubic structure and (Zn,H)-codoped cuprite (Cu2O) with high-pressure-favored close-packed sublattice, were formed by pulsed laser ablation on bulk Cu65Zn35 in water and characterized by X-ray/electron diffractions and optical spectroscopy. The as-fabricated hybrid nanocondensates are darkish and showed photoluminescence in the whole visible region. Further dwelling of such nanocondensates in water caused progressive formation of a rice-like assembly of (Zn,H)-codoped tenorite (CuO) nanoparticles with (001), (100), and {111} preferred orientations, (111) tilt boundary, yellowish color, and minimum bandgap narrowing down to ca. 2.7 eV for potential photocatalytic applications.

  8. (Zn,H)-codoped copper oxide nanoparticles via pulsed laser ablation on Cu-Zn alloy in water

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Nanosized (5 to 10 nm) amorphous and crystalline nanocondensates, i.e., metallic α-phase of Zn-Cu alloy in face-centered cubic structure and (Zn,H)-codoped cuprite (Cu2O) with high-pressure-favored close-packed sublattice, were formed by pulsed laser ablation on bulk Cu65Zn35 in water and characterized by X-ray/electron diffractions and optical spectroscopy. The as-fabricated hybrid nanocondensates are darkish and showed photoluminescence in the whole visible region. Further dwelling of such nanocondensates in water caused progressive formation of a rice-like assembly of (Zn,H)-codoped tenorite (CuO) nanoparticles with (001), (100), and {111} preferred orientations, (111) tilt boundary, yellowish color, and minimum bandgap narrowing down to ca. 2.7 eV for potential photocatalytic applications. PMID:22647312

  9. Composition and structure of Fe(III)-precipitates formed by Fe(II) oxidation in water at near-neutral pH: Interdependent effects of phosphate, silicate and Ca

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senn, Anna-Caterina; Kaegi, Ralf; Hug, Stephan J.; Hering, Janet G.; Mangold, Stefan; Voegelin, Andreas

    2015-08-01

    We studied the interdependent effects of phosphate, silicate and Ca on the formation of Fe(III)-precipitates by oxidation of 0.5 mM Fe(II) in near-neutral bicarbonate-buffered aqueous solutions at concentrations relevant for natural water resources. Complementary results obtained by a suite of analytical techniques including X-ray absorption spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy showed that the ratio of initially dissolved phosphate over Fe(II) ((P/Fe)init) had a major impact on precipitate formation. At (P/Fe)init above a critical ratio ((P/Fe)crit) of ∼0.5 in 8 mM NaHCO3 and ∼0.8 in 4 mM Ca(HCO3)2 electrolyte, Fe(II) oxidation led to exclusive formation of amorphous basic Fe(III)-phosphate or Ca-Fe(III)-phosphate ((Ca-)Fe(III)-phosphate) with maximum precipitate P/Fe ratios ((P/Fe)ppt) of ∼0.7 in Na and ∼1.1 in Ca electrolyte. Enhanced phosphate uptake in the presence of Ca was due to phosphate-Ca interactions coupled to Fe precipitation, mainly formation of mitridatite-like Ca-Fe(III)-phosphate polymers and Ca-phosphate polymers. At (P/Fe)init < (P/Fe)crit, in the absence of silicate, (Ca-)Fe(III)-phosphate precipitation was followed by the formation of poorly crystalline lepidocrocite and concomitant transformation of the (Ca-)Fe(III)-phosphate into a phosphate-rich ferrihydrite-type precipitate with a (P/Fe)ppt of ∼0.25. In the presence of 0.5 mM silicate, initially formed (Ca-)Fe(III)-phosphate nanoparticles became coated with silicate-rich ferrihydrite during continuing Fe(II) oxidation and only limited transformation of the (Ca-)Fe(III)-phosphate occurred. The results from this study indicate the complexity of Fe(III)-precipitate formation in the presence of interfering solutes and its consequences for precipitate structure and phosphate sequestration. The findings provide a solid basis for further studies of the reactivity of different Fe(III)-precipitate types and for the systematic assessment of their impact on Fe, phosphate and

  10. Enhanced methanol oxidation and oxygen reduction reactions on palladium-decorated FeCo@Fe/C core-shell nanocatalysts in alkaline medium.

    PubMed

    Fashedemi, Omobosede O; Ozoemena, Kenneth I

    2013-12-28

    Palladium based nano-alloys are well known for their unique electrocatalytic properties. In this work, a palladium-decorated FeCo@Fe/C core-shell nanocatalyst has been prepared by a new method called microwave-induced top-down nanostructuring and decoration (MITNAD). This simple, yet efficient technique, resulted in the generation of sub-10 nm sized FeCo@Fe@Pd nanocatalysts (mainly 3-5 nm) from a micron-sized (0.21-1.5 μm) FeCo@Fe/C. The electrocatalytic activities of the core-shell nanocatalysts were explored for methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline medium. A negative shift of 300 mV in the onset potential for MOR was observed, with a current thrice that of the Pd/C catalysts. A very low resistance to electron transfer (Rct) was observed while the ratio of forward-to-backward oxidation current (If/Ib) was doubled. The overpotential of ORR was significantly reduced with a positive shift of about 250 mV and twice the reduction current density was observed in comparison with Pd/C nanocatalysts with the same mass loading. The kinetic parameters (in terms of the Tafel slope (b) = -59.7 mV dec(-1) (Temkin isotherm) and high exchange current density (jo) = 1.26 × 10(-2) mA cm(-2)) provide insights into the favorable electrocatalytic performance of the catalysts in ORR in alkaline media. Importantly, the core-shell nanocatalyst exhibited excellent resistance to possible methanol cross-over during ORR, which shows excellent promise for application in direct alkaline alcohol fuel cells (DAAFCs).

  11. Observation of Oxide Formation for Molten Fe-Cr-C Alloy at a High Carbon Region by Oxygen Top Blowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihara, Ryosuke; Gao, Xu; Kaneko, Shigeru; Kim, Sunjoong; Ueda, Shigeru; Shibata, Hiroyuki; Seok, Min Oh; Kitamura, Shin-ya

    2016-04-01

    The oxide formation behavior during decarburization by top blowing for molten Fe-Cr-C alloy was directly observed. For 11 mass pct Cr alloy at 1673 K to 1723 K (1400 °C to 1450 °C), as well as for 14 mass pct Cr alloy at 1623 K to 1673 K (1350 °C to 1400 °C), oxide particles always formed within several minutes after decarburization started. Also, unstable oxide film followed by stable oxide film formed after C content was decreased to certain levels. For 11 mass pct Cr alloy at 1773 K (1500 °C) and 14 mass pct Cr alloy at 1723 K (1450 °C), only the oxide particle and stable oxide film were observed. For 18 mass pct Cr-5 mass pct C alloy at 1723 K (1450 °C), stable oxide film formed twice. By comparing the critical C and Cr contents of alloy when oxides started to form with the equilibrium relation, the formation of the oxide particle and unstable oxide film was found to be under a nonequilibrium condition, whereas the stable oxide film that formed was near an equilibrium condition. For 11 and 14 mass pct Cr alloy, the decarburization rate stayed constant and was not affected by the formation of the oxide particle or unstable oxide film, but it started to decrease after the formation of the stable oxide film.

  12. In situ iron isotope ratio determination using UV-femtosecond laser ablation with application to hydrothermal ore formation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, Ingo; von Blanckenburg, Friedhelm; Schoenberg, Ronny; Steinhoefel, Grit; Markl, Gregor

    2006-07-01

    immediate close range re-precipitation of the oxidized Fe. Abrupt changes are documented for secondary goethite showing a distinct overgrowth that is 0.4‰ lighter than the core of the grain. If indeed Fe isotopes in secondary minerals from hydrothermal ore deposits record the initial isotopic signatures of their precursor minerals, and these in turn record hydrothermal fluid histories, then the tools are in place for a detailed reconstruction of the deposit's genesis. We expect similar observations from other Fe-rich deposits formed at intermediate and low-temperatures (e.g. banded iron formations). Laser ablation now provides us with the spatial resolution that adds a further dimension to our interpretation of stable Fe-isotope fractionation.

  13. Solid-State Reaction Between Fe-Al-Ca Alloy and Al2O3-CaO-FeO Oxide During Heat Treatment at 1473 K (1200 °C)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chengsong; Yang, Shufeng; Li, Jingshe; Ni, Hongwei; Zhang, Xueliang

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to control the physicochemical characteristics of inclusions in steel through appropriate heat treatment. Using a confocal scanning laser microscope (CSLM) and pipe furnace, the solid-state reactions between Fe-Al-Ca alloy and Al2O3-CaO-FeO oxide during heat treatment at 1473 K (1200 °C) and the influence of these reactions on the compositions of and phases in the alloy and oxide were investigated by the diffusion couple method. Suitable pretreatment of the oxide using a CSLM and production of the diffusion couple of Fe-Al-Ca alloy and Al2O3-CaO-FeO oxide gave good contact between the alloy and oxide. The diffusion couple was then sealed in a quartz tube with a piece of Ti foil to lower oxygen partial pressure and a block of Fe-Al-Ca alloy was introduced to conduct heat treatment experiments. Solid-state reactions between the alloy and oxide during heat treatment at 1473 K (1200 °C) were analyzed and discussed. A dynamic model to calculate the width of the particle precipitation zone based on the Wagner model of internal oxidation of metal was proposed. This model was helpful to understand the solid-state reaction mechanism between Fe-Al-Ca alloy and Al2O3-CaO-FeO oxide.

  14. Solid-State Reaction Between Fe-Al-Ca Alloy and Al2O3-CaO-FeO Oxide During Heat Treatment at 1473 K (1200 °C)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chengsong; Yang, Shufeng; Li, Jingshe; Ni, Hongwei; Zhang, Xueliang

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to control the physicochemical characteristics of inclusions in steel through appropriate heat treatment. Using a confocal scanning laser microscope (CSLM) and pipe furnace, the solid-state reactions between Fe-Al-Ca alloy and Al2O3-CaO-FeO oxide during heat treatment at 1473 K (1200 °C) and the influence of these reactions on the compositions of and phases in the alloy and oxide were investigated by the diffusion couple method. Suitable pretreatment of the oxide using a CSLM and production of the diffusion couple of Fe-Al-Ca alloy and Al2O3-CaO-FeO oxide gave good contact between the alloy and oxide. The diffusion couple was then sealed in a quartz tube with a piece of Ti foil to lower oxygen partial pressure and a block of Fe-Al-Ca alloy was introduced to conduct heat treatment experiments. Solid-state reactions between the alloy and oxide during heat treatment at 1473 K (1200 °C) were analyzed and discussed. A dynamic model to calculate the width of the particle precipitation zone based on the Wagner model of internal oxidation of metal was proposed. This model was helpful to understand the solid-state reaction mechanism between Fe-Al-Ca alloy and Al2O3-CaO-FeO oxide.

  15. Encapsulating tantalum oxide into polypyrrole nanoparticles for X-ray CT/photoacoustic bimodal imaging-guided photothermal ablation of cancer.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yushen; Li, Yanyan; Ma, Xibo; Zha, Zhengbao; Shi, Liangliang; Tian, Jie; Dai, Zhifei

    2014-07-01

    A nanotheranostic agent has been readily fabricated by encapsulating tantalum oxide (TaOx) nanoparticles (NPs) into polypyrrole (PPy) NPs via a facile one-step chemical oxidation polymerization for bimodal imaging guided photothermal ablation of tumor. It was proved that the obtained composite nanoparticles (TaOx@PPy NPs) with an average diameter around 45 nm could operate as an efficient bimodal contrast agent to simultaneously enhance X-ray CT and photoacoustic (PA) imaging greatly in vivo. Systemically administered TaOx@PPy NPs could passively accumulate at the tumor site during the blood circulation, which was proved by both CT and PA imaging. In addition, the in vivo therapeutic examinations showed that TaOx@PPy NPs exhibited significant photothermal cytotoxicity under near infrared laser irradiation. The tumor growth inhibition was evaluated to be 66.5% for intravenously injection and 100% for intratumoral injection, respectively. This versatile agent can be developed as a smart and promising nanoplatform that integrates multiple capabilities for both accurate diagnosing and precise locating of cancerous tissue, as well as effective photoablation of tumor.

  16. An Infrared Spectroscopic and Density Functional Theoretical Investigation of the Reaction Products of Laser-Ablated Scandium and Titanium Atoms with Nitric Oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Kushto, Gary P.; Zhou, Mingfei; Andrews, Lester; Arnold, James (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Laser-ablated Sc and Ti atoms have been reacted with NO during condensation in excess argon. Matrix infrared spectra show that the major products are the side bonded Sc[NO] species and the inserted NScO and NTiO molecules based on isotopic substitution (15NI6O and 15N18O) and DIFT calculations of isotopic frequencies, which provide a match for two modes in three isotopic modifications for each molecule. The NScO and NTiO molecules are nitride/oxides with M-O stretching modes only 46-88/cm below the diatomic metal oxides but M-N stretching modes 314-442/cm lower than the diatomic metal nitride molecules. The ScN, ScO, TiN, and TiO molecules are observed as decomposition products. Evidence is also presented for the nitrosyls ScNO and TiNO, the Sc[NO]+ cation, and the NTiO- anion.

  17. Composites of aminodextran-coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles and graphene oxide for cellular magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weihong; Yi, Peiwei; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Liming; Deng, Zongwu; Zhang, Zhijun

    2011-10-01

    Formation of composites of dextran-coated Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles (NPs) and graphene oxide (Fe(3)O(4)-GO) and their application as T(2)-weighted contrast agent for efficient cellular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are reported. Aminodextran (AMD) was first synthesized by coupling reaction of carboxymethyldextran with butanediamine, which was then chemically conjugated to meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinnic acid-modified Fe(3)O(4) NPs. Next, the AMD-coated Fe(3)O(4) NPs were anchored onto GO sheets via formation of amide bond in the presence of 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethyaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC). It is found that the Fe(3)O(4)-GO composites possess good physiological stability and low cytotoxicity. Prussian Blue staining analysis indicates that the Fe(3)O(4)-GO nanocomposites can be internalized efficiently by HeLa cells, depending on the concentration of the composites incubated with the cells. Furthermore, compared with the isolated Fe(3)O(4) NPs, the Fe(3)O(4)-GO composites show significantly enhanced cellular MRI, being capable of detecting cells at the iron concentration of 5 μg mL(-1) with cell density of 2 × 10(5) cells mL(-1), and at the iron concentration of 20 μg mL(-1) with cell density of 1000 cells mL(-1).

  18. Appropriate Fe (II) Addition Significantly Enhances Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation (Anammox) Activity through Improving the Bacterial Growth Rate

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yiwen; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2015-01-01

    The application of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (Anammox) process is often limited by the slow growth rate of Anammox bacteria. As the essential substrate element that required for culturing Anammox sludge, Fe (II) is expected to affect Anammox bacterial growth. This work systematically studied the effects of Fe (II) addition on Anammox activity based on the kinetic analysis of specific growth rate using data from batch tests with an enriched Anammox sludge at different dosing levels. Results clearly demonstrated that appropriate Fe (II) dosing (i.e., 0.09 mM) significantly enhanced the specific Anammox growth rate up to 0.172 d−1 compared to 0.118 d−1 at regular Fe (II) level (0.03 mM). The relationship between Fe (II) concentration and specific Anammox growth rate was found to be well described by typical substrate inhibition kinetics, which was integrated into currently well-established Anammox model to describe the enhanced Anammox growth with Fe (II) addition. The validity of the integrated Anammox model was verified using long-term experimental data from three independent Anammox reactors with different Fe (II) dosing levels. This Fe (II)-based approach could be potentially implemented to enhance the process rate for possible mainstream application of Anammox technology, in order for an energy autarchic wastewater treatment. PMID:25644239

  19. Micro-arc oxidization fabrication and ethanol sensing performance of Fe-doped TiO2 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Fu-jian; Yu, Xiao-bai; Ling, Yun-han; Feng, Jia-you

    2012-05-01

    In-situ pure TiO2 and Fe-doped TiO2 thin films were synthesized on Ti plates via the micro-arc oxidation (MAO) technique. The as-fabricated anatase TiO2 thin film-based conductometric sensors were employed to measure the gas sensitivity to ethanol. The results showed that Fe ions could be easily introduced into the MAO-TiO2 thin films by adding precursor K4(FeCN)6·3H2O into the Na3PO4 electrolyte. The amount of doped Fe ions increased almost linearly with the concentration of K4(FeCN)6·3H2O increasing, eventually affecting the ethanol sensing performances of TiO2 thin films. It was found that the enhanced sensor signals obtained had an optimal concentration of Fe dopant (1.28at%), by which the maximal gas sensor signal to 1000 ppm ethanol was estimated to be 7.91 at 275°C. The response time was generally reduced by doped Fe ions, which could be ascribed to the increase of oxygen vacancies caused by Fe3+ substituting for Ti4+.

  20. Effects of Ge substitution on the structural and physical properties of CuFeO2 delafossite oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naka-in, Lerdkead; Kamwanna, Teerasak; Srepusharawoot, Pornjuk; Pinitsoontorn, Supree; Amornkitbamrung, Vittaya

    2015-04-01

    Delafossite CuFe1-xGexO2 (0.0 ≤ x ≤ 0.1) semiconductors were synthesized by solid-state reaction. The effects of Ge concentration on microstructural, optical, magnetic and electrical properties were investigated. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis results reveal the delafossite structure of all the samples. The lattice spacing of CuFe1-xGexO2 decreased with increasing substitution of Ge at the Fe site. The optical properties measured at room temperature by UV-visible spectroscopy showed an absorption peak at 283 nm (4.38 eV). The corresponding direct optical band gap was found to decrease with increasing Ge content (from 3.69 eV for x = 0 to 3.61 eV for x = 0.10), exhibiting transparency in the visible region. The magnetic hysteresis loops measured at room temperature showed that the Ge-doped CuFeO2 samples exhibit ferromagnetic behavior. The Curie temperature suggests that ferromagnetism originates from CuFe1-xGexO2 matrices. The substitution of Fe3+ by Ge4+ produces a mixed effect on the magnetic properties of CuFeO2 delafossite oxide. The resistivity of CuFe0.99Ge0.01O2 was observed to be ˜0.1 Ω·cm at room temperature.

  1. Ultrasound assisted ambient temperature synthesis of ternary oxide AgMO{sub 2} (M=Fe, Ga)

    SciTech Connect

    Nagarajan, R.; Tomar, Nobel

    2009-06-15

    The application of ultrasound for the synthesis of ternary oxide AgMO{sub 2} (M=Fe, Ga) was investigated. Crystalline alpha-AgFeO{sub 2} was obtained from the alkaline solutions of silver and iron hydroxides by sonication for 40 minutes. alpha-AgFeO{sub 2} was found to absorb optical radiation in the 300-600 nm range as shown by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. The Raman spectrum of alpha-AgFeO{sub 2} exhibited two bands at 345 and 638 cm{sup -1}. When beta-NaFeO{sub 2} was sonicated with aqueous silver nitrate solution for 60 minutes, beta-AgFeO{sub 2} possessing orthorhombic structure was obtained as the ion-exchanged product. The Raman spectrum of beta-AgFeO{sub 2} showed four strong bands at 295, 432, 630 and 690 cm{sup -1}. Sonication of beta-NaGaO{sub 2} with aqueous silver nitrate solution for 60 minutes resulted in olive green colored, alpha-AgGaO{sub 2}. The diffuse reflectance spectrum and the EDX analysis confirmed that the ion-exchange through sonication was complete. The Raman spectrum of alpha-AgGaO{sub 2} had weak bands at 471 and 650 cm{sup -1}. - Graphical abstract: The application of ultrasound in the formation of alpha and beta-forms of AgMO{sub 2} (M=Fe, Ga) has been demonstrated.

  2. Oxidation of Chlorpromazine by Lipoxygenase Immobilized on Magnetic Fe3O4 Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ding, Wenwu; Hou, Zhaosheng; Che, Zhenming; Li, Mingyuan; Chen, Xianggui; Zhang, Junqing; Zhang, Qikun

    2016-06-01

    In this work, soybean lipoxygenase enzyme was immobilized on the magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles to oxidate chlorpromazine (CPZ). The physicochemical properties of the nanoparticles were characterized with transmission electronic microscopy (TEM), fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), and the magnetic properties were detected by a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The TEM images indicated the surface and the size of the immobilized enzyme were much rougher and thicker than those of the naked particles. The analyses of XRD patterns showed that the structure of the magnetic nanoparticles had no significant change while the nanoparticles also exhibited higher superparamagnetism at room temperature. Compared to free enzyme or the enzyme immobilized with other methods, the optimal pH, temperature and H2O2 concentration for the activity of immobilized enzyme did not have great changes, but the immobilized enzyme was more stable and less sensitive to the change of the influence factors than free counterpart. The immobilized enzyme could be recovered easily by magnetic separation and could be reused for many times in the process of CPZ oxidation. The results obtained by simulating the model of Michaelis-Menten indicated that the reaction of CPZ oxidation followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics and the enzyme still retained its affinity for CPZ while the enzyme was immobilized.

  3. Tumor Thermal Ablation Enhancement by Micromaterials.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fan; Su, Hongying; Han, Xiangjun; Bao, Han; Qi, Ji

    2016-01-07

    Thermal ablation is a minimally invasive therapeutic technique that has shown remarkable potential in treating un resectable tumors. However, clinical applications have stalled, due to safety ambiguities, slow heat induction, lengthy ablation times, and post-therapeutic monitoring issues. To further improve treatment efficacy, an assortment of micro materials (eg, nano particulates of gold, silica, or iron oxide and single-walled carbon nanotubes) are under study as thermal ablative adjuncts.In recent years, the micro material domain has become especially interesting.In vivo and in vitro animal studies have validated the use of microspheres as embolic agents in liver tumors, in advance of radiofrequency ablation. Microcapsules and micro bubbles serving as ultrasound contrast and ablation sensibilizers are strong prospects for clinical applications. This review was conducted to explore benefits of the three aforementioned micro scale technologies, in conjunction with tumor thermal ablation.

  4. Fe-Ti-Cr-Oxides in Martian Meteorite EETA79001 Studied by Point-counting Procedure Using Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Alian; Kuebler, Karla E.; Jolliff, Bradley L.; Haskin, Larry A.

    2003-01-01

    Fe-Ti-Cr-Oxide minerals contain much information about rock petrogenesis and alteration. Among the most important in the petrology of common intrusive and extrusive rocks are those of the FeO-TiO2-Cr2O3 compositional system chromite, ulv spinel-magnetite, and ilmenite-hematite. These minerals retain memories of oxygen fugacity. Their exsolution into companion mineral pairs give constraints on formation temperature and cooling rate. Laser Raman spectroscopy is anticipated to be a powerful technique for characterization of materials on the surface of Mars. A Mars Microbeam Raman Spectrometer (MMRS) is under development. It combines a micro sized laser beam and an automatic point-counting mechanism, and so can detect minor minerals or weak Raman-scattering phases such as Fe- Ti-Cr-oxides in mixtures (rocks & soils), and provide information on grain size and mineral mode. Most Fe-Ti-Cr-oxides produce weaker Raman signals than those from oxyanionic minerals, e.g. carbonates, sulfates, phosphates, and silicates, partly because most of them are intrinsically weaker Raman scatters, and partly because their dark colors limit the penetration depth of the excitation laser beam (visible wavelength) and of the Raman radiation produced. The purpose of this study is to show how well the Fe-Ti-Cr-oxides can be characterized by on-surface planetary exploration using Raman spectroscopy. We studied the basic Raman features of common examples of these minerals using well-characterized individual mineral grains. The knowledge gained was then used to study the Fe-Ti-Cr-oxides in Martian meteorite EETA79001, especially effects of compositional and structural variations on their Raman features.

  5. A Mild Catalytic Oxidation System: FePcOTf/H2O2 Applied for Cyclohexene Dihydroxylation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Baocheng; Chen, Wenxing

    2015-05-11

    Iron (III) phthalocyanine complexes were employed for the first time as a mild and efficient Lewis acid catalyst in the selective oxidation of cyclohexene to cyclohexane-1,2-diol. It was found that the catalyst FePcOTf shown excellent conversion and moderate selectivity relative to other iron (III) phthalocyanine complexes. The optimum conditions of the oxidation reaction catalyzed by FePcOTf/H2O2 have been researched in this paper. Iron (III) phthalocyanine triflate (1 mol %) as catalyst, hydrogen peroxide as oxidant, methanol as solvent, and a mole ratio of substrate and oxidant (H2O2) of 1:1 were used for achieving moderate yields of 1,2-diols under reflux conditions after eight hours.

  6. Progressive Oxidation of Pyrite in Five Bituminous Coal Samples: An As XANES and 57Fe Mossbauer Spectroscopic Study

    SciTech Connect

    Kolker,A.; Huggins, F.

    2007-01-01

    Naturally occurring pyrite commonly contains minor substituted metals and metalloids (As, Se, Hg, Cu, Ni, etc.) that can be released to the environment as a result of its weathering. Arsenic, often the most abundant minor constituent in pyrite, is a sensitive monitor of progressive pyrite oxidation in coal. To test the effect of pyrite composition and environmental parameters on the rate and extent of pyrite oxidation in coal, splits of five bituminous coal samples having differing amounts of pyrite and extents of As substitution in the pyrite, were exposed to a range of simulated weathering conditions over a period of 17 months. Samples investigated include a Springfield coal from Indiana (whole coal pyritic S = 2.13 wt.%; As in pyrite = detection limit (d.l.) to 0.06 wt.%), two Pittsburgh coal samples from West Virginia (pyritic S = 1.32-1.58 wt.%; As in pyrite = d.l. to 0.34 wt.%), and two samples from the Warrior Basin, Alabama (pyritic S = 0.26-0.27 wt.%; As in pyrite = d.l. to 2.72 wt.%). Samples were collected from active mine faces, and expected differences in the concentration of As in pyrite were confirmed by electron microprobe analysis. Experimental weathering conditions in test chambers were maintained as follows: (1) dry Ar atmosphere; (2) dry O{sub 2} atmosphere; (3) room atmosphere (relative humidity {approx}20-60%); and (4) room atmosphere with samples wetted periodically with double-distilled water. Sample splits were removed after one month, nine months, and 17 months to monitor the extent of As and Fe oxidation using As X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and {sup 57}Fe Mossbauer spectroscopy, respectively. Arsenic XANES spectroscopy shows progressive oxidation of pyritic As to arsenate, with wetted samples showing the most rapid oxidation. {sup 57}Fe Mossbauer spectroscopy also shows a much greater proportion of Fe{sup 3+} forms (jarosite, Fe{sup 3+} sulfate, FeOOH) for samples stored under wet conditions, but much less

  7. Progressive oxidation of pyrite in five bituminous coal samples: An As XANES and 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopic study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kolker, Allan; Huggins, Frank E.

    2007-01-01

    Naturally occurring pyrite commonly contains minor substituted metals and metalloids (As, Se, Hg, Cu, Ni, etc.) that can be released to the environment as a result of its weathering. Arsenic, often the most abundant minor constituent in pyrite, is a sensitive monitor of progressive pyrite oxidation in coal. To test the effect of pyrite composition and environmental parameters on the rate and extent of pyrite oxidation in coal, splits of five bituminous coal samples having differing amounts of pyrite and extents of As substitution in the pyrite, were exposed to a range of simulated weathering conditions over a period of 17 months. Samples investigated include a Springfield coal from Indiana (whole coal pyritic S = 2.13 wt.%; As in pyrite = detection limit (d.l.) to 0.06 wt.%), two Pittsburgh coal samples from West Virginia (pyritic S = 1.32–1.58 wt.%; As in pyrite = d.l. to 0.34 wt.%), and two samples from the Warrior Basin, Alabama (pyritic S = 0.26–0.27 wt.%; As in pyrite = d.l. to 2.72 wt.%). Samples were collected from active mine faces, and expected differences in the concentration of As in pyrite were confirmed by electron microprobe analysis. Experimental weathering conditions in test chambers were maintained as follows: (1) dry Ar atmosphere; (2) dry O2 atmosphere; (3) room atmosphere (relative humidity ∼20–60%); and (4) room atmosphere with samples wetted periodically with double-distilled water. Sample splits were removed after one month, nine months, and 17 months to monitor the extent of As and Fe oxidation using As X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy, respectively. Arsenic XANES spectroscopy shows progressive oxidation of pyritic As to arsenate, with wetted samples showing the most rapid oxidation. 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy also shows a much greater proportion of Fe3+ forms (jarosite, Fe3+ sulfate, FeOOH) for samples stored under wet conditions, but much less

  8. Synthesis and Characterization of Nano-Structure Metal Oxides and Peroxides Prepared by Laser Ablation in Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drmosh, Qasem Ahmed Qasem

    Pulsed laser ablation technique was applied for synthesize of ZnO, ZnO 2 and SnO2 nanostructure using metallic target in different liquids. For this purpose, a laser emitting pulsed UV radiations generated by the third harmonic of Nd:YAG (λ= 355 nm) was applied. For the synthesis of ZnO nanoparticles (NPs), a high-purity metallic plate of Zn was fixed at the bottom of a glass cell in the presence of deionized water and was irradiated at different laser energies (80- 100- 120) mJ per pulse. The average sizes and lattice parameters of ZnO produced by this method were estimated by X-ray diffraction (XRD). ZnO nanoparticles were also produced by ablation of zinc target in the presence of deionized water mixed with two types of surfactants: cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) and octaethylene glycol monododecyl (OGM). The results showed that the average grain sizes decreased from 38 nm in the case of deionized water to 27 nm and 19 nm in CTAB and OGM respectively. The PL emission in CTAB and OGM showed two peaks: the sharp UV emission at 380 nm and a broad visible peak ranging from 450 nm to 600 nm. Zinc peroxide (ZnO2) nanoparticles having grain size less than 5 nm were also synthesized using pulsed laser ablation in aqueous solution in the presence of different surfactants and solid zinc target in 3 % hydrogen peroxide H2O2 for the first time. The effect of surfactants on the optical and structure of ZnO2 was studied by applying different spectroscopic techniques. The presence of the cubic phase of zinc peroxide in all samples was confirmed with XRD, and the grain sizes were 4.7 nm, 3.7 nm, 3.3 nm and 2.8 nm in pure H2O2; and H2O 2 mixed with SDS, CTAB and OGM respectively. For optical characterization, FTIR transmittance spectra of ZnO2 nanoparticles prepared with and without surfactants showed characteristic peaks of ZnO2 absorption at 435-445 cm-1. FTIR spectrum also revealed that the adsorbed surfactants on zinc peroxide disappeared in case of CTAB and OGM

  9. Oxygen on an Fe monolayer on W(110): From chemisorption to oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freindl, K.; Partyka-Jankowska, E.; Karaś, W.; Zając, M.; Madej, E.; Spiridis, N.; Ślęzak, M.; Ślęzak, T.; Wiśnios, D.; Korecki, J.

    2013-11-01

    The adsorption of oxygen on a pseudomorphic iron monolayer deposited on a W(110) surface was studied experimentally and theoretically. Standard surface characterization methods, such as Auger electron spectroscopy and low energy electron diffraction, and specific nuclear methods, such as conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy (CEMS) and nuclear resonant scattering of synchrotron radiation, combined with theoretical calculations based on the density functional theory allowed us to determine the structure of the oxygen adsorbate and the electronic properties of iron atoms with different oxygen coordinations. The oxygen-(3 × 2) structure on the iron monolayer was recognized and was interpreted to be a state with oxygen chemisorbed on the non-reconstructed surface with modest electron transfer from iron to oxygen. A transition from chemisorbed oxygen to the onset of Fe-oxidation is revealed by distinct changes in the CEMS spectra.

  10. Oxygen on an Fe monolayer on W(110): From chemisorption to oxidation.

    PubMed

    Freindl, K; Partyka-Jankowska, E; Karaś, W; Zając, M; Madej, E; Spiridis, N; Slęzak, M; Slęzak, T; Wiśnios, D; Korecki, J

    2013-11-01

    The adsorption of oxygen on a pseudomorphic iron monolayer deposited on a W(110) surface was studied experimentally and theoretically. Standard surface characterization methods, such as Auger electron spectroscopy and low energy electron diffraction, and specific nuclear methods, such as conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy (CEMS) and nuclear resonant scattering of synchrotron radiation, combined with theoretical calculations based on the density functional theory allowed us to determine the structure of the oxygen adsorbate and the electronic properties of iron atoms with different oxygen coordinations. The oxygen-(3 × 2) structure on the iron monolayer was recognized and was interpreted to be a state with oxygen chemisorbed on the non-reconstructed surface with modest electron transfer from iron to oxygen. A transition from chemisorbed oxygen to the onset of Fe-oxidation is revealed by distinct changes in the CEMS spectra.

  11. Tailoring the composition of ultrathin, ternary alloy PtRuFe nanowires for the methanol oxidation reaction and formic acid oxidation reaction

    DOE PAGES

    Scofield, Megan E.; Koenigsmann, Christopher; Wang, Lei; ...

    2014-11-25

    In the search for alternatives to conventional Pt electrocatalysts, we have synthesized ultrathin, ternary PtRuFe nanowires (NW), possessing different chemical compositions in order to probe their CO tolerance as well as electrochemical activity as a function of composition for both (i) the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) and (ii) the formic acid oxidation reaction (FAOR). As-prepared ‘multifunctional’ ternary NW catalysts exhibited both higher MOR and FAOR activity as compared with binary Pt₇Ru₃ NW, monometallic Pt NW, and commercial catalyst control samples. In terms of synthetic novelty, we utilized a sustainably mild, ambient wet-synthesis method never previously applied to the fabrication ofmore » crystalline, pure ternary systems in order to fabricate ultrathin, homogeneous alloy PtRuFe NWs with a range of controlled compositions. Thus, these NWs were subsequently characterized using a suite of techniques including XRD, TEM, SAED, and EDAX in order to verify not only the incorporation of Ru and Fe into the Pt lattice but also their chemical homogeneity, morphology, as well as physical structure and integrity. Lastly, these NWs were electrochemically tested in order to deduce the appropriateness of conventional explanations such as (i) the bi-functional mechanism as well as (ii) the ligand effect to account for our MOR and FAOR reaction data. Specifically, methanol oxidation appears to be predominantly influenced by the Ru content, whereas formic acid oxidation is primarily impacted by the corresponding Fe content within the ternary metal alloy catalyst itself.« less

  12. Tailoring the composition of ultrathin, ternary alloy PtRuFe nanowires for the methanol oxidation reaction and formic acid oxidation reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Scofield, Megan E.; Koenigsmann, Christopher; Wang, Lei; Liu, Haiqing; Wong, Stanislaus S.

    2014-11-25

    In the search for alternatives to conventional Pt electrocatalysts, we have synthesized ultrathin, ternary PtRuFe nanowires (NW), possessing different chemical compositions in order to probe their CO tolerance as well as electrochemical activity as a function of composition for both (i) the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) and (ii) the formic acid oxidation reaction (FAOR). As-prepared ‘multifunctional’ ternary NW catalysts exhibited both higher MOR and FAOR activity as compared with binary Pt₇Ru₃ NW, monometallic Pt NW, and commercial catalyst control samples. In terms of synthetic novelty, we utilized a sustainably mild, ambient wet-synthesis method never previously applied to the fabrication of crystalline, pure ternary systems in order to fabricate ultrathin, homogeneous alloy PtRuFe NWs with a range of controlled compositions. Thus, these NWs were subsequently characterized using a suite of techniques including XRD, TEM, SAED, and EDAX in order to verify not only the incorporation of Ru and Fe into the Pt lattice but also their chemical homogeneity, morphology, as well as physical structure and integrity. Lastly, these NWs were electrochemically tested in order to deduce the appropriateness of conventional explanations such as (i) the bi-functional mechanism as well as (ii) the ligand effect to account for our MOR and FAOR reaction data. Specifically, methanol oxidation appears to be predominantly influenced by the Ru content, whereas formic acid oxidation is primarily impacted by the corresponding Fe content within the ternary metal alloy catalyst itself.

  13. Magnetoelasticity in ACr2O4 spinel oxides (A= Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocsis, V.; Bordács, S.; Varjas, D.; Penc, K.; Abouelsayed, A.; Kuntscher, C. A.; Ohgushi, K.; Tokura, Y.; Kézsmárki, I.

    2013-02-01

    Dynamical properties of the lattice structure were studied by optical spectroscopy in ACr2O4 chromium spinel oxide magnetic semiconductors over a broad temperature region of T=10-335 K. The systematic change of the A-site ions (A= Mn, Fe, Co, Ni and Cu) showed that the occupancy of 3d orbitals on the A site has strong impact on the lattice dynamics. For compounds with orbital degeneracy (FeCr2O4, NiCr2O4, and CuCr2O4), clear splitting of infrared-active phonon modes and/or activation of silent vibrational modes have been observed upon the Jahn-Teller transition and at the onset of the subsequent long-range magnetic order. Although MnCr2O4 and CoCr2O4 show multiferroic and magnetoelectric character, no considerable magnetoelasticity was found in spinel compounds without orbital degeneracy as they closely preserve the high-temperature cubic spinel structure even in their magnetic ground state. Aside from lattice vibrations, intra-atomic 3d-3d transitions of the A2+ ions were also investigated to determine the crystal field and Racah parameters and the strength of the spin-orbit coupling.

  14. Fe3O4 nanoparticles on graphene oxide sheets for isolation and ultrasensitive amperometric detection of cancer biomarker proteins.

    PubMed

    Sharafeldin, Mohamed; Bishop, Gregory W; Bhakta, Snehasis; El-Sawy, Abdelhamid; Suib, Steven L; Rusling, James F

    2017-05-15

    Ultrasensitive mediator-free electrochemical detection for biomarker proteins was achieved at low cost using a novel composite of Fe3O4 nanoparticles loaded onto graphene oxide (GO) nano-sheets (Fe3O4@GO). This paramagnetic Fe3O4@GO composite (1µm size range) was decorated with antibodies against prostate specific antigen (PSA) and prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA), and then used to first capture these biomarkers and then deliver them to an 8-sensor detection chamber of a microfluidic immunoarray. Screen-printed carbon sensors coated with electrochemically reduced graphene oxide (ERGO) and a second set of antibodies selectively capture the biomarker-laden Fe3O4@GO particles, which subsequently catalyze hydrogen peroxide reduction to detect PSA and PSMA. Accuracy was confirmed by good correlation between patient serum assays and enzyme-linked immuno-sorbent assays (ELISA). Excellent detection limits (LOD) of 15 fg/mL for PSA and 4.8 fg/mL for PSMA were achieved in serum. The LOD for PSA was 1000-fold better than the only previous report of PSA detection using Fe3O4. Dynamic ranges were easily tunable for concentration ranges encountered in serum samples by adjusting the Fe3O4@GO Concentration. Reagent cost was only $0.85 for a single 2-protein assay.

  15. Effect of oxygen partial pressure and Fe doping on growth and properties of metallic and insulating molybdenum oxide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Shailja; Master, Ridhi; Choudhary, R. J.; Phase, D. M.; Ahuja, B. L.

    2012-04-01

    We report the effect of oxygen partial pressure (OPP) and 5% Fe doping on the structural, electrical, and magnetic properties of MoOx thin films on c-Al2O3 substrate prepared by pulsed laser deposition technique. Detailed analyses of the structural properties suggest that the grown phase of molybdenum oxides and its orientation strongly depend on the OPP as well as Fe doping. Undoped and Fe doped α-MoO3 films formed at 350 mTorr OPP value show insulating character, where as MoO2 films formed at lower OPP values reveal metallic behavior. Resistivity minima are observed in Fe doped MoO2 films, which could be due to weak localization effect or Kondo scattering of the conduction electrons from the Fe impurities. Interestingly, all the Fe doped molybdenum oxide films show magnetic hysteresis at room temperature irrespective of their insulating (MoO3 phase) or metallic (MoO2 phase) behavior.

  16. Doped CeO2-LaFeO3 composite oxide as an active anode for direct hydrocarbon-type solid oxide fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Shin, Tae Ho; Ida, Shintaro; Ishihara, Tatsumi

    2011-12-07

    Direct utilization of hydrocarbon and other renewable fuels is one of the most important issues concerning solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Mixed ionic and electronic conductors (MIECs) have been explored as anode materials for direct hydrocarbon-type SOFCs. However, electrical conductivity of the most often reported MIEC oxide electrodes is still not satisfactory. As a result, mixed-conducting oxides with high electrical conductivity and catalytic activity are attracting considerable interest as an alternative anode material for noncoke depositing anodes. In this study, we examine the oxide composite Ce(Mn,Fe)O(2)-La(Sr)Fe(Mn)O(3) for use as an oxide anode in direct hydrocarbon-type SOFCs. High performance was demonstrated for this composite oxide anode in direct hydrocarbon-type SOFCs, showing high maximum power density of approximately 1 W cm(-2) at 1073 K when propane and butane were used as fuel. The high power density of the cell results from the high electrical conductivity of the composite oxide in hydrocarbon and the high surface activity in relation to direct hydrocarbon oxidation.

  17. Atomic-Scale Structure of Al2O3-ZrO2 Mixed Oxides Prepared by Laser Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Xiuchun; Dubiel, M.; Hofmeister, H.; Riehemann, W.

    2007-02-02

    By means of x-ray diffractometry (XRD) and X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, the phase composition and atomic structure of laser evaporated ZrO2 and ZrO2-Al2O3 nanopowders have been studied. The results indicate that pure ZrO2 exists in the form of tetragonal structure, Al2O3 doped ZrO2 nanoparticles, however, have cubic structure. Compared to bulk tetragonal ZrO2, pure tetragonal ZrO2 nanoparticles have a shorter Zr-O- and Zr-Zr shell, indicating that the lattice contracts with decreasing particle size. For Al2O3 doped ZrO2 solid solution, the distances of first Zr-O and Zr-Zr (Al) coordination decrease with increasing solid solubility. The disorder degree of the ZrO2 lattice increases with increasing solid solubility. The coevaporated ZrO2-Al2O3 is quickly solidified into amorphous phase when it is ablated in a higher pressure. The amorphous phase contains Zr-O-Zr (Al) clusters and has shorter Zr-O distance and tower Zr-O coordination number.

  18. Effect of Ablation Rate on the Microstructure and Electrochromic Properties of Pulsed-Laser-Deposited Molybdenum Oxide Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Santhosh, S; Mathankumar, M; Selva Chandrasekaran, S; Nanda Kumar, A K; Murugan, P; Subramanian, B

    2017-01-10

    Molybdenum trioxide (MoO3) is a well-known electrochromic material. In the present work, n-type α-MoO3 thin films with both direct and indirect band gaps were fabricated by varying the laser repetition (ablation) rate in a pulsed laser deposition (PLD) system at a constant reactive O2 pressure. The electrochromic properties of the films are compared and correlated to the microstructure and molecular-level coordination. Mixed amorphous and textured crystallites evolve at the microstructural level. At the molecular level, using NMR and EPR, we show that the change in the repetition rate results in a variation of the molybdenum coordination with oxygen: at low repetition rates (2 Hz), the larger the octahedral coordination, and greater the texture, whereas at 10 Hz, tetrahedral coordination is significant. The anion vacancies also introduce a large density of defect states into the band gap, as evidenced by XPS studies of the valence band and supported by DFT calculations. The electrochromic contrast improved remarkably by almost 100% at higher repetition rates whereas the switching speed decreased by almost 6-fold. Although the electrochromic contrast and coloration efficiency were better at higher repetition rates, the switching speed, reversibility, and stability were better at low repetition rates. This difference in the electrochromic properties of the two MoO3 films is attributed to the variation in the defect and molecular coordination states of the Mo cation.

  19. [Relationship between Fe, Al oxides and stable organic carbon, nitrogen in the yellow-brown soils].

    PubMed

    Heng, Li-Sha; Wang, Dai-Zhang; Jiang, Xin; Rao, Wei; Zhang, Wen-Hao; Guo, Chun-Yan; Li, Teng

    2010-11-01

    The stable organic carbon and nitrogen of the different particles were gained by oxidation of 6% NaOCl in the yellow-brown soils. The relationships between the contents of selective extractable Fe/Al and the stable organic carbon/nitrogen were investigated. It shown that amounts of dithionite-citrate-(Fe(d)) and oxalate-(Fe(o)) and pyrophosphate extractable (