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Sample records for ablation molecular beam

  1. Formation of atomic clusters through the laser ablation of refractory materials in a supersonic molecular beam source

    SciTech Connect

    Haufler, R.E.; Compton, R.N.; Puretzky, A.A. |

    1993-12-31

    Concepts which guide the design of atomic cluster supersonic beam sources have been developed. These ideas are founded on the knowledge of laser ablation dynamics and are structured in order to take advantage of certain features of the ablation event. Some of the drawbacks of previous cluster source designs become apparent when the sequence of events following laser ablation are clarified. Key features of the new cluster source design include control of the cluster size distribution, uniform performance with a variety of solid materials and elements, high beam intensity, and significant removal of internal energy during the supersonic expansion.

  2. Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Richard E.; Bol'shakov, Alexander A.; Mao, Xianglei; McKay, Christopher P.; Perry, Dale L.; Sorkhabi, Osman

    2011-02-01

    A new method of performing optical isotopic analysis of condensed samples in ambient air and at ambient pressure has been developed: Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry (LAMIS). The technique uses radiative transitions from molecular species either directly vaporized from a sample or formed by associative mechanisms of atoms or ions in a laser ablation plume. This method is an advanced modification of a known atomic emission technique called laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The new method — LAMIS — can determine not only chemical composition but also isotopic ratios of elements in the sample. Isotopic measurements are enabled by significantly larger isotopic shifts found in molecular spectra relative to atomic spectra. Analysis can be performed from a distance and in real time. No sample preparation or pre-treatment is required. Detection of the isotopes of hydrogen, boron, carbon, and oxygen are discussed to illustrate the technique.

  3. Molecular dynamics investigation of mechanisms of femtosecond laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Changrui

    Laser micro-machining has been widely applied for material processing in many industries. A phenomenon called "laser ablation" is usually involved in the laser micro-machining process. Laser ablation is the process of material removal after the irradiation of a laser beam onto the material. It is commonly characterized by small temporal and spatial scales, extremely high material temperature and pressure, and strong non-equilibrium thermodynamic state. In this work, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is conducted to study the femtosecond laser ablation of metals (nickel and copper) and dielectrics (fused silica, or glass). The laser heating and the ablation processes are numerically modeled, and the computation is accelerated by parallel processing technique. Both the pair-wise Morse potential and the many-body EAM (Embedded-Atom Method) potential are employed for metals. In the simulation of fused silica, the BKS (van Beest, Kramer and van Santen) potential is used, and the generation of free electrons, the energy transport from laser beam to free electrons and energy coupling between electrons and the lattice are considered. The main goal of this work is to illustrate the detailed processes of femtosecond laser ablation and to study its mechanisms. From the MD results, it is found that the mechanism of femtosecond laser ablation is strongly dependent on the laser fluences. For metals, low fluence laser ablation is mainly through phase explosion (homogeneous gas bubble nucleation), while spinodal decomposition is responsible for high fluence ablation. Ablation mechanism is determined by whether or not the material (liquid) temperature exceeds the critical temperature. For fused silica, the generation and existence of free electrons are found to affect ablation significantly, especially at low fluence, where Coulomb explosion is found to play an important role in material separation.

  4. Hydrodynamic Efficiency of Ablation Propulsion with Pulsed Ion Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Buttapeng, Chainarong; Yazawa, Masaru; Harada, Nobuhiro; Suematsu, Hisayuki; Jiang Weihua; Yatsui, Kiyoshi

    2006-05-02

    This paper presents the hydrodynamic efficiency of ablation plasma produced by pulsed ion beam on the basis of the ion beam-target interaction. We used a one-dimensional hydrodynamic fluid compressible to study the physics involved namely an ablation acceleration behavior and analyzed it as a rocketlike model in order to investigate its hydrodynamic variables for propulsion applications. These variables were estimated by the concept of ablation driven implosion in terms of ablated mass fraction, implosion efficiency, and hydrodynamic energy conversion. Herein, the energy conversion efficiency of 17.5% was achieved. In addition, the results show maximum energy efficiency of the ablation process (ablation efficiency) of 67% meaning the efficiency with which pulsed ion beam energy-ablation plasma conversion. The effects of ion beam energy deposition depth to hydrodynamic efficiency were briefly discussed. Further, an evaluation of propulsive force with high specific impulse of 4000s, total impulse of 34mN and momentum to energy ratio in the range of {mu}N/W was also analyzed.

  5. Performance and Controllability of Pulsed Ion Beam Ablation Propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Yazawa, Masaru; Buttapeng, Chainarong; Harada, Nobuhiro; Suematsu, Hisayuki; Jiang Weihua; Yatsui, Kiyoshi

    2006-05-02

    We propose novel propulsion driven by ablation plasma pressures produced by the irradiation of pulsed ion beams onto a propellant. The ion beam ablation propulsion demonstrates by a thin foil (50 {mu}mt), and the flyer velocity of 7.7 km/s at the ion beam energy density of 2 kJ/cm2 adopted by using the Time-of-flight method is observed numerically and experimentally. We estimate the performance of the ion beam ablation propulsion as specific impulse of 3600 s and impulse bit density of 1700 Ns/m2 obtained from the demonstration results. In the numerical analysis, a one-dimensional hydrodynamic model with ion beam energy depositions is used. The control of the ion beam kinetic energy is only improvement of the performance but also propellant consumption. The spacecraft driven by the ion beam ablation provides high performance efficiency with short-pulsed ion beam irradiation. The numerical results of the advanced model explained latent heat and real gas equation of state agreed well with experimental ones over a wide range of the incident ion beam energy density.

  6. Modeling of beam-target interaction during pulsed electron beam ablation of graphite: Case of melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Muddassir; Henda, Redhouane

    2017-02-01

    A one-dimensional thermal model based on a two-stage heat conduction equation is employed to investigate the ablation of graphite target during nanosecond pulsed electron beam ablation. This comprehensive model accounts for the complex physical phenomena comprised of target heating, melting and vaporization upon irradiation with a polyenergetic electron beam. Melting and vaporization effects induced during ablation are taken into account by introducing moving phase boundaries. Phase transition induced during ablation is considered through the temperature dependent thermodynamic properties of graphite. The effect of electron beam efficiency, power density, and accelerating voltage on ablation is analyzed. For an electron beam operating at an accelerating voltage of 15 kV and efficiency of 0.6, the model findings show that the target surface temperature can reach up to 7500 K at the end of the pulse. The surface begins to melt within 25 ns from the pulse start. For the same process conditions, the estimated ablation depth and ablated mass per unit area are about 0.60 μm and 1.05 μg/mm2, respectively. Model results indicate that ablation takes place primarily in the regime of normal vaporization from the surface. The results obtained at an accelerating voltage of 15 kV and efficiency factor of 0.6 are satisfactorily in good accordance with available experimental data in the literature.

  7. CT thermometry for cone-beam CT guided ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeStefano, Zachary; Abi-Jaoudeh, Nadine; Li, Ming; Wood, Bradford J.; Summers, Ronald M.; Yao, Jianhua

    2016-03-01

    Monitoring temperature during a cone-beam CT (CBCT) guided ablation procedure is important for prevention of over-treatment and under-treatment. In order to accomplish ideal temperature monitoring, a thermometry map must be generated. Previously, this was attempted using CBCT scans of a pig shoulder undergoing ablation.1 We are extending this work by using CBCT scans of real patients and incorporating more processing steps. We register the scans before comparing them due to the movement and deformation of organs. We then automatically locate the needle tip and the ablation zone. We employ a robust change metric due to image noise and artifacts. This change metric takes windows around each pixel and uses an equation inspired by Time Delay Analysis to calculate the error between windows with the assumption that there is an ideal spatial offset. Once the change map is generated, we correlate change data with measured temperature data at the key points in the region. This allows us to transform our change map into a thermal map. This thermal map is then able to provide an estimate as to the size and temperature of the ablation zone. We evaluated our procedure on a data set of 12 patients who had a total of 24 ablation procedures performed. We were able to generate reasonable thermal maps with varying degrees of accuracy. The average error ranged from 2.7 to 16.2 degrees Celsius. In addition to providing estimates of the size of the ablation zone for surgical guidance, 3D visualizations of the ablation zone and needle are also produced.

  8. CO{sub 2} Laser Ablation Propulsion Tractor Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Sinko, John E.; Schlecht, Clifford A.

    2010-05-06

    Manipulation of objects at a distance has already been achieved with no small measure of success in the realm of microscopic objects on the scale size of nanometers to micrometers in applications including laser trapping and laser tweezers. However, there has been relatively little effort to apply such remote control to macroscopic systems. A space tractor beam could be applied to a wide range of applications, including removal of orbital debris, facilitation of spacecraft docking, adjustment of satellite attitude or orbital position, etc. In this paper, an ablative laser propulsion tractor beam is demonstrated based on radiation from a CO{sub 2} laser. Cooperative, layered polymer targets were used for remote impulse generation using a CO{sub 2} laser. The use of a structured ablatant enabling switching between thrust directional parity (i.e., forward or reverse) and imparting torque to a remote target. Fluence-dependent results are presented in the context of polymer ablation modeling work and with consideration of confined ablation effects.

  9. Molecular-beam scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Vernon, M.F.

    1983-07-01

    The molecular-beam technique has been used in three different experimental arrangements to study a wide range of inter-atomic and molecular forces. Chapter 1 reports results of a low-energy (0.2 kcal/mole) elastic-scattering study of the He-Ar pair potential. The purpose of the study was to accurately characterize the shape of the potential in the well region, by scattering slow He atoms produced by expanding a mixture of He in N/sub 2/ from a cooled nozzle. Chapter 2 contains measurements of the vibrational predissociation spectra and product translational energy for clusters of water, benzene, and ammonia. The experiments show that most of the product energy remains in the internal molecular motions. Chapter 3 presents measurements of the reaction Na + HCl ..-->.. NaCl + H at collision energies of 5.38 and 19.4 kcal/mole. This is the first study to resolve both scattering angle and velocity for the reaction of a short lived (16 nsec) electronic excited state. Descriptions are given of computer programs written to analyze molecular-beam expansions to extract information characterizing their velocity distributions, and to calculate accurate laboratory elastic-scattering differential cross sections accounting for the finite apparatus resolution. Experimental results which attempted to determine the efficiency of optically pumping the Li(2/sup 2/P/sub 3/2/) and Na(3/sup 2/P/sub 3/2/) excited states are given. A simple three-level model for predicting the steady-state fraction of atoms in the excited state is included.

  10. Photoelectron photoion molecular beam spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Trevor, D.J.

    1980-12-01

    The use of supersonic molecular beams in photoionization mass spectroscopy and photoelectron spectroscopy to assist in the understanding of photoexcitation in the vacuum ultraviolet is described. Rotational relaxation and condensation due to supersonic expansion were shown to offer new possibilities for molecular photoionization studies. Molecular beam photoionization mass spectroscopy has been extended above 21 eV photon energy by the use of Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) facilities. Design considerations are discussed that have advanced the state-of-the-art in high resolution vuv photoelectron spectroscopy. To extend gas-phase studies to 160 eV photon energy, a windowless vuv-xuv beam line design is proposed.

  11. Molecular dynamics simulations studies of laser ablation in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, Johannes; Sonntag, Steffen; Karlin, Johannes; Paredes, Carolina Trichet; Sartison, Marc; Krauss, Armin; Trebin, Hans-Rainer

    2012-07-30

    An overview of several aspects of our recent molecular dynamics simulations of femtosecond laser ablation is presented. This includes the study of phase diagrams for suitable interactions, analysis of ablated material and bubble formation below threshold, study of two-pulse ablation and the classification of materials with respect to electron properties and electron-phonon coupling in the two-temperature model. A treatment of boundary conditions and of an extended twotemperature model is also included. Most of the results apply to aluminum, others also to copper and iron, and to metals in general.

  12. Chopped molecular beam multiplexing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Billy R. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    The integration of a chopped molecular beam mass spectrometer with a time multiplexing system is described. The chopping of the molecular beam is synchronized with the time intervals by a phase detector and a synchronous motor. Arithmetic means are generated for phase shifting the chopper with respect to the multiplexer. A four channel amplifier provides the capacity to independently vary the baseline and amplitude in each channel of the multiplexing system.

  13. Molecular Beam Epitaxy of

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Kuan Hsiung

    Ga(,0.48)In(,0.52)As recently emerges as a promising material for high speed applications. It also has a direct bandgap with gap energy suitable for optical applications. It is the purpose of this thesis to grow high quality Ga(,0.47)In(,0.53)As, lattice-matched Al(,0.48)In(,0.52)As and heterojunction structures by molecular beam epitaxy technique for applications in the areas of modulation-doped high mobility devices and internal photoemission Schottky diodes for infrared detection. Single crystal Al metal deposition on GaInAs by MBE is also studied for its electrical properties. Mobility enhancement has been demonstrated in modulation-doped structures at low temperatures. Very high mobilities were obtained: 10,900 cm('2)/Vs at room temperature, 55,500 cm('2)/Vs at 77K and 70,200 cm('2)/Vs at 10K with corresponding two-dimensional electron gas densities greater than 1 x 10('12) l/cm('2). The quality of Ga(,0.47)In(,0.53)As and the parallel conduction in this material are the limiting factors in its mobility. A new ohmic contact phenomenon has been observed in the MBE single crystal Al metal on Ga(,0.47)In(,0.53)AS samples. Its contact resistivity is measured to be as small as 1 x 10('-6) (OMEGA)-cm('2). The Fermi-level pinning near the conduction band edge might be caused by the interface defects. A planar doping technique has been employed to enhance the built-in barrier height to a value of about 0.5 eV in the single crystal Al on n-p('+)-n-Ga(,0.47)In(,0.52)As structures. This novel quasi-Schottky diode also shows a forward ideal factor of 1.03. As for optical detectors, four kinds of diodes were made for internal photoemission studies: Au Schottky on Ga(,0.47)In(,0.53)As in the wavelength range of 1.9 (mu)m to 2.5 (mu)m, Au Schottky on Al(,0.48)In(,0.52)As in 1.1 (mu)m to 2.0 (mu)m range, single crystal Al on (Al(,0.8)Ga(,0.2))(,0.48)In(,0.52)As with improved quantum yields and lastly a Ga(,0.47)In(,0.53)As/Al(,0.48)In(,0.52)As heterojunction with a measured

  14. Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry: Strontium and its isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Xianglei; Bol'shakov, Alexander A.; Choi, Inhee; McKay, Christopher P.; Perry, Dale L.; Sorkhabi, Osman; Russo, Richard E.

    2011-11-01

    The experimental details are reported of Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry (LAMIS) and its application for performing optical isotopic analysis of solid strontium-containing samples in ambient atmospheric air at normal pressure. The LAMIS detection method is described for strontium isotopes from samples of various chemical and isotopic compositions. The results demonstrate spectrally resolved measurements of the three individual 86Sr, 87Sr, and 88Sr isotopes that are quantified using multivariate calibration of spectra. The observed isotopic shifts are consistent with those calculated theoretically. The measured spectra of diatomic oxide and halides of strontium generated in laser ablation plasmas demonstrate the isotopic resolution and capability of LAMIS. In particular, emission spectra of SrO and SrF molecular radicals provided clean and well resolved spectral signatures for the naturally occurring strontium isotopes. A possibility is discussed of using LAMIS of strontium isotopes for radiogenic age determination.

  15. The TriBeam system: Femtosecond laser ablation in situ SEM

    SciTech Connect

    Echlin, McLean P.; Straw, Marcus; Randolph, Steven; Filevich, Jorge; Pollock, Tresa M.

    2015-02-15

    Femtosecond laser ablation offers the unique ability to remove material at rates that are orders of magnitude faster than existing ion beam technologies with little or no associated damage. By combining ultrafast lasers with state-of-the-art electron microscopy equipment, we have developed a TriBeam system capable of targeted, in-situ tomography providing chemical, structural, and topographical information in three dimensions of near mm{sup 3} sized volumes. The origins, development, physics, current uses, and future potential for the TriBeam system are described in this tutorial review. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • An emerging tool, the TriBeam, for in situ femtosecond (fs) laser ablation is presented. • Fs laser ablation aided tomography at the mm{sup 3}-scale is demonstrated. • Fs laser induced deposition of Pt is demonstrated at sub-diffraction limit resolution. • Fs laser surface structuring is reviewed as well as micromachining applications.

  16. Molecular-Beam-Epitaxy Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparks, Patricia D.

    1988-01-01

    Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) computer program developed to aid in design of single- and double-junction cascade cells made of silicon. Cascade cell has efficiency 1 or 2 percent higher than single cell, with twice the open-circuit voltage. Input parameters include doping density, diffusion lengths, thicknesses of regions, solar spectrum, absorption coefficients of silicon (data included for 101 wavelengths), and surface recombination velocities. Results include maximum power, short-circuit current, and open-circuit voltage. Program written in FORTRAN IV.

  17. Flyer Acceleration by Pulsed Ion Beam Ablation and Application for Space Propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Harada, Nobuhiro; Buttapeng, Chainarong; Yazawa, Masaru; Kashine, Kenji; Jiang Weihua; Yatsui, Kiyoshi

    2004-02-04

    Flyer acceleration by ablation plasma pressure produced by irradiation of intense pulsed ion beam has been studied. Acceleration process including expansion of ablation plasma was simulated based on fluid model. And interaction between incident pulsed ion beam and a flyer target was considered as accounting stopping power of it. In experiments, we used ETIGO-II intense pulsed ion beam generator with two kinds of diodes; 1) Magnetically Insulated Diode (MID, power densities of <100 J/cm2) and 2) Spherical-focused Plasma Focus Diode (SPFD, power densities of up to 4.3 kJ/cm2). Numerical results of accelerated flyer velocity agreed well with measured one over wide range of incident ion beam energy density. Flyer velocity of 5.6 km/s and ablation plasma pressure of 15 GPa was demonstrated by the present experiments. Acceleration of double-layer target consists of gold/aluminum was studied. For adequate layer thickness, such a flyer target could be much more accelerated than a single layer. Effect of waveform of ion beam was also examined. Parabolic waveform could accelerate more efficiently than rectangular waveform. Applicability of ablation propulsion was discussed. Specific impulse of 7000{approx}8000 seconds and time averaged thrust of up to 5000{approx}6000N can be expected. Their values can be controllable by changing power density of incident ion beam and pulse duration.

  18. 14th international symposium on molecular beams

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    This report discusses research being conducted with molecular beams. The general topic areas are as follows: Clusters I; reaction dynamics; atomic and molecular spectroscopy; clusters II; new techniques; photodissociation & dynamics; and surfaces.

  19. 14th international symposium on molecular beams

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses research being conducted with molecular beams. The general topic areas are as follows: Clusters I; reaction dynamics; atomic and molecular spectroscopy; clusters II; new techniques; photodissociation dynamics; and surfaces.

  20. Laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry of carbon isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bol‧shakov, Alexander A.; Mao, Xianglei; Jain, Jinesh; McIntyre, Dustin L.; Russo, Richard E.

    2015-11-01

    Quantitative determination of carbon isotopes using Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry (LAMIS) is described. Optical emission of diatomic molecules CN and C2 is used in these measurements. Two quantification approaches are presented: empirical calibration of spectra using a set of reference standards and numerical fitting of a simulated spectrum to the experimental one. Formation mechanisms of C2 and CN in laser ablation plasma are briefly reviewed to provide insights for implementation of LAMIS measurements. A simulated spectrum of the 12C2 Swan system was synthesized using four constituents within 473.5-476.5 nm. Simulation included three branches of 12C2 (1-0), branches R(0-0) and R(1-1), and branch P(9-8) of 12C2. Spectral positions of the tail lines in R(0-0) and R(1-1) were experimentally measured, since they were not accurately known before. The Swan band (1-0) of the isotopologue 13C12C was also simulated. Fitting to the experimental spectrum yielded the ratio 13C/12C = 1.08% in a good agreement with measurements by isotope ratio mass spectrometry. LAMIS promises to be useful in coal, oil and shale exploration, carbon sequestration monitoring, and agronomy studies.

  1. Population Inversions in Ablation Plasmas Generated by Intense Electron Beams.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-11-30

    beam driven carbon anode plasmas. Diode closure results ..,.in three phases of beam-plasma evolution which are summarized below: Stage I: Deposited...enough for anode plasma forma- tion before the diode shorts. Spectroscopic data for noncrowbarred shots (dose 1 500-800 J/g) indicate the presence of CII...inconsistent with previously proposed kinetic mechanisms for the N2 laser pumped by helium. With a simple- model of the chemical kinetics, we have shown

  2. Population Inversions in Ablation Plasmas Generated by Intense Electron Beams.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-11-01

    light weight design, and moderate cost. The Soviets have investigated intense proton beam pumped plasma lasers , however, the University of Michigan...interpretations have been verified by moving the position of the probe laser beam away from the surface of the anode (from 0.1 cm to 0.4 cm) and noting the changes...Properties Effects on Ultraviolet Laser induced Flashover of Angled Plastic insulators in Vacuum", C.L. Ensloe and R. M. Gilgenbach, IEEE 3 Trans. on

  3. Erbium oxide thin films on Si(100) obtained by laser ablation and electron beam evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queralt, X.; Ferrater, C.; Sánchez, F.; Aguiar, R.; Palau, J.; Varela, M.

    1995-02-01

    Erbium oxide thin films have been obtained by laser ablation and electron beam evaporation techniques on Si(100) substrates. The samples were grown under different conditions of oxygen atmosphere and substrate temperature without any oxidation process after deposition. The crystal structure has been studied by X-ray diffraction. Films obtained by laser ablation are highly textured in the [ hhh] direction, although this depends on the conditions of oxygen pressure and substrate temperature. In order to study the depth composition profile of the thin films and the interdiffusion of erbium metal and oxygen towards the silicon substrates, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses have been carried out.

  4. Molecular beams: our legacy from Otto Stern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsey, N. F.

    1988-06-01

    It is an honor to contribute to this celebration of the hundredth anniversary of the birth of Otto Stern, who developed molecular beams to become one of the most nowerful and fruitful physics research methods.

  5. Mid-IR enhanced laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Staci; Ford, Alan; Akpovo, Codjo A.; Johnson, Lewis

    2016-08-01

    A double-pulsed laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (DP-LIBS) technique utilizing wavelengths in the mid-infrared (MIR) for the second pulse, referred to as double-pulse LAMIS (DP-LAMIS), was examined for its effect on detection limits compared to single-pulse laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry (LAMIS). A MIR carbon dioxide (CO2) laser pulse at 10.6 μm was employed to enhance spectral emissions from nanosecond-laser-induced plasma via mid-IR reheating and in turn, improve the determination of the relative abundance of isotopes in a sample. This technique was demonstrated on a collection of 10BO and 11BO molecular spectra created from enriched boric acid (H3BO3) isotopologues in varying concentrations. Effects on the overall ability of both LAMIS and DP-LAMIS to detect the relative abundance of boron isotopes in a starting sample were considered. Least-squares fitting to theoretical models was used to deduce plasma parameters and understand reproducibility of results. Furthermore, some optimization for conditions of the enhanced emission was achieved, along with a comparison of the overall emission intensity, plasma density, and plasma temperature generated by the two techniques.

  6. Silicon Holder For Molecular-Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoenk, Michael E.; Grunthaner, Paula J.; Grunthaner, Frank J.

    1993-01-01

    Simple assembly of silicon wafers holds silicon-based charge-coupled device (CCD) during postprocessing in which silicon deposited by molecular-beam epitaxy. Attains temperatures similar to CCD, so hotspots suppressed. Coefficients of thermal expansion of holder and CCD equal, so thermal stresses caused by differential thermal expansion and contraction do not develop. Holder readily fabricated, by standard silicon processing techniques, to accommodate various CCD geometries. Silicon does not contaminate CCD or molecular-beam-epitaxy vacuum chamber.

  7. Beamed Energy Propulsion by Means of Target Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, Benjamin A.

    2004-03-01

    This paper describes hundreds of pendulum tests examining the beamed energy conversion efficiency of different metal targets coated with multiple liquid enhancers. Preliminary testing used a local laser with photographic paper targets, with no liquid, water, canola oil, or methanol additives. Laboratory experimentation was completed at Wright-Patterson AFB using a high-powered laser, and ballistic pendulums of aluminum, titanium, or copper. Dry targets, and those coated with water, methanol and oil were repeatedly tested in laboratory conditions. Results were recorded on several high-speed digital video cameras, and the conversion efficiency was calculated. Paper airplanes successfully launched using BEP were likewise recorded.

  8. Beamed Energy Propulsion by Means of Target Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, Benjamin A.

    2004-03-30

    This paper describes hundreds of pendulum tests examining the beamed energy conversion efficiency of different metal targets coated with multiple liquid enhancers. Preliminary testing used a local laser with photographic paper targets, with no liquid, water, canola oil, or methanol additives. Laboratory experimentation was completed at Wright-Patterson AFB using a high-powered laser, and ballistic pendulums of aluminum, titanium, or copper. Dry targets, and those coated with water, methanol and oil were repeatedly tested in laboratory conditions. Results were recorded on several high-speed digital video cameras, and the conversion efficiency was calculated. Paper airplanes successfully launched using BEP were likewise recorded.

  9. Molecular dynamic simulation of tungsten ablation under transient high heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Sha; Zhu, Yizhou; Xue, Jianming; Zhang, Jie; Qu, Miao; Le, Xiaoyun

    2015-08-01

    Molecular dynamic (MD) method is used to simulation the tungsten ablation under transient high heat flux generated by energetic ions. A model including 363,600 W atoms was built based on Finnis-Sinclair potential. The results show that the ablation threshold is much lower than the one of boiling. So the ablation effects might be underestimated if using energy threshold of boiling instead of that of ablation. Particle size distribution of ablation products follows a power decay law with an exponent around -2.5, which does not affect by the incident heat flux. The transverse velocities of particles obey normal distribution, and a stream speed is added to the random movement for the longitudinal velocity. As the ablation start up, the recoiled impulse can induce shock wave in remained target, which is supported by experimental pressure wave measurements.

  10. Fifty-five years of molecular beams

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, N.F.

    1993-05-01

    The history of molecular beams since the invention of molecular beam magnetic resonance is discussed. Rabi`s 1937 theoretical paper on resonance transitions led Rabi, Zacharias, Millman and Kusch to measure various nuclear magnetic moments by magnetic resonance. Kellogg, Rabi, Ramsey and Zacharias found a multiple line radio frequency spectrum in H{sub 2}, D{sub 2}, and HD which enabled them to measure not only the nuclear magnetic moments but also internal molecular interactions including that of the deuteron electric quadrupole moment. The method was successfully extended to atoms. In 1947 Nafe, Nelson and Rabi found that the observed hyperfine separations in atomic hydrogen and deuterium differed from theoretical predictions and Lamb and Retherford soon thereafter observed the large Lamb shift in the atomic fine structures; these two discoveries were the principal incentives for the development of QED, which was confirmed by Kusch`s measurement of the electron magnetic moment. Ramsey`s separated oscillatory field method increased the accuracy and frequency range of the resonance method and provided the basis for accurate atomic clocks. Townes and his associates used a molecular beam for the first Maser as did Goldenberg, Klepper and Ramsey for the atomic hydrogen maser. Many nuclear, atomic and molecular properties have been measured with the molecular beam magnetic resonance. Van der Waal`s molecules and highly excited Rydberg atoms have been examined. Laser spectroscopy has been extensively studied with atomic beams and lasers have been used for state selection and excitation. Wieman and others used atomic beams to study parity and time reversal symmetry. Atomic beams have been slowed by laser cooling and Phillips and others have shown that the atoms can be cooled to about one micro-Kelvin, well below the Doppler limit. Collision experiments between two beams, often from jet sources, provided extensive and detailed information about molecular interactions.

  11. Simple Validation of Transient Plume Models Using Molecular Beam-Related Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Woronowicz, M. S.

    2008-12-31

    A simple effort using molecular beam data to compare the results of two different transient free molecule point source models was performed, motivated by a desire to determine the utility of such formulations for a variety of time-dependent applications. These models are evaluated against effusive molecular beam time-of-flight data, as well as behavior observed in pulsed laser ablation experiments and high-fidelity direct simulation Monte Carlo results. Such comparisons indicate that the physical behavior of these time-dependent expansions require taking a surface-enforced directional bias into account. This bias has been absent in a number of investigative formulations, both historical and current.

  12. Investigation of effect of solenoid magnet on emittances of ion beam from laser ablation plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Shunsuke; Romanelli, Mark; Cinquegrani, David; Sekine, Megumi; Kumaki, Masafumi; Fuwa, Yasuhiro; Kanesue, Takeshi; Okamura, Masahiro; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2014-02-01

    A magnetic field can increase an ion current of a laser ablation plasma and is expected to control the change of the plasma ion current. However, the magnetic field can also make some fluctuations of the plasma and the effect on the beam emittance and the emission surface is not clear. To investigate the effect of a magnetic field, we extracted the ion beams under three conditions where without magnetic field, with magnetic field, and without magnetic field with higher laser energy to measure the beam distribution in phase space. Then we compared the relations between the plasma ion current density into the extraction gap and the Twiss parameters with each condition. We observed the effect of the magnetic field on the emission surface.

  13. Investigation of effect of solenoid magnet on emittances of ion beam from laser ablation plasma.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Shunsuke; Romanelli, Mark; Cinquegrani, David; Sekine, Megumi; Kumaki, Masafumi; Fuwa, Yasuhiro; Kanesue, Takeshi; Okamura, Masahiro; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2014-02-01

    A magnetic field can increase an ion current of a laser ablation plasma and is expected to control the change of the plasma ion current. However, the magnetic field can also make some fluctuations of the plasma and the effect on the beam emittance and the emission surface is not clear. To investigate the effect of a magnetic field, we extracted the ion beams under three conditions where without magnetic field, with magnetic field, and without magnetic field with higher laser energy to measure the beam distribution in phase space. Then we compared the relations between the plasma ion current density into the extraction gap and the Twiss parameters with each condition. We observed the effect of the magnetic field on the emission surface.

  14. Molecular-beam spectroscopy of interhalogen molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Sherrow, S.A.

    1983-08-01

    A molecular-beam electric-resonance spectrometer employing a supersonic nozzle source has been used to obtain hyperfine spectra of /sup 79/Br/sup 35/Cl. Analyses of these spectra and of microwave spectra published by other authors have yielded new values for the electric dipole moment and for the nuclear quadrupole coupling constants in this molecule. The new constants are significantly different from the currently accepted values. Van der Waals clusters containing chlorine monofluoride have been studied under various expansion conditions by the molecular-beam electric-deflection method. The structural possibilities indicated by the results are discussed, and cluster geometries are proposed.

  15. Feasibility Study on Cardiac Arrhythmia Ablation Using High-Energy Heavy Ion Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, H. Immo; Graeff, Christian; Simoniello, Palma; Constantinescu, Anna; Takami, Mitsuru; Lugenbiel, Patrick; Richter, Daniel; Eichhorn, Anna; Prall, Matthias; Kaderka, Robert; Fiedler, Fine; Helmbrecht, Stephan; Fournier, Claudia; Erbeldinger, Nadine; Rahm, Ann-Kathrin; Rivinius, Rasmus; Thomas, Dierk; Katus, Hugo A.; Johnson, Susan B.; Parker, Kay D.; Debus, Jürgen; Asirvatham, Samuel J.; Bert, Christoph; Durante, Marco; Packer, Douglas L.

    2016-12-01

    High-energy ion beams are successfully used in cancer therapy and precisely deliver high doses of ionizing radiation to small deep-seated target volumes. A similar noninvasive treatment modality for cardiac arrhythmias was tested here. This study used high-energy carbon ions for ablation of cardiac tissue in pigs. Doses of 25, 40, and 55 Gy were applied in forced-breath-hold to the atrioventricular junction, left atrial pulmonary vein junction, and freewall left ventricle of intact animals. Procedural success was tracked by (1.) in-beam positron-emission tomography (PET) imaging; (2.) intracardiac voltage mapping with visible lesion on ultrasound; (3.) lesion outcomes in pathohistolgy. High doses (40–55 Gy) caused slowing and interruption of cardiac impulse propagation. Target fibrosis was the main mediator of the ablation effect. In irradiated tissue, apoptosis was present after 3, but not 6 months. Our study shows feasibility to use high-energy ion beams for creation of cardiac lesions that chronically interrupt cardiac conduction.

  16. Feasibility Study on Cardiac Arrhythmia Ablation Using High-Energy Heavy Ion Beams

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, H. Immo; Graeff, Christian; Simoniello, Palma; Constantinescu, Anna; Takami, Mitsuru; Lugenbiel, Patrick; Richter, Daniel; Eichhorn, Anna; Prall, Matthias; Kaderka, Robert; Fiedler, Fine; Helmbrecht, Stephan; Fournier, Claudia; Erbeldinger, Nadine; Rahm, Ann-Kathrin; Rivinius, Rasmus; Thomas, Dierk; Katus, Hugo A.; Johnson, Susan B.; Parker, Kay D.; Debus, Jürgen; Asirvatham, Samuel J.; Bert, Christoph; Durante, Marco; Packer, Douglas L.

    2016-01-01

    High-energy ion beams are successfully used in cancer therapy and precisely deliver high doses of ionizing radiation to small deep-seated target volumes. A similar noninvasive treatment modality for cardiac arrhythmias was tested here. This study used high-energy carbon ions for ablation of cardiac tissue in pigs. Doses of 25, 40, and 55 Gy were applied in forced-breath-hold to the atrioventricular junction, left atrial pulmonary vein junction, and freewall left ventricle of intact animals. Procedural success was tracked by (1.) in-beam positron-emission tomography (PET) imaging; (2.) intracardiac voltage mapping with visible lesion on ultrasound; (3.) lesion outcomes in pathohistolgy. High doses (40–55 Gy) caused slowing and interruption of cardiac impulse propagation. Target fibrosis was the main mediator of the ablation effect. In irradiated tissue, apoptosis was present after 3, but not 6 months. Our study shows feasibility to use high-energy ion beams for creation of cardiac lesions that chronically interrupt cardiac conduction. PMID:27996023

  17. Focused ion beam imaging of laser ablation sub-surface effects on layered materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Téllez, Helena; Vadillo, José M.; Chater, Richard J.; Laserna, J. Javier; McPhail, David S.

    2008-12-01

    The focussed ion beam (FIB) represents a useful and versatile tool to allow visualization of sub-surface features related to the thermal effects of laser-target interaction with high spatial resolution. The possibility of performing a contamination-free milling process on specific sample locations provides significant advantage over conventional metallurgical procedures involving cutting and polishing. In particular, the direct visualization of the thermal features occurring at fluences below the phase explosion allows a deeper understanding of the extension of the laser heat-affected zone, the sub-surface alloying processes and additional features related to the photo-thermal mechanism of laser ablation.

  18. An autoneutralizing neutral molecular beam gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delmore, J. E.; Appelhans, A. D.; Dahl, D. A.

    1990-01-01

    A high-energy (up to 28 keV) neutral molecular beam gun has been developed and put into routine use that takes advantage of the autoneutralization properties of the sulfur hexafluoride anion for the production of high-energy sulfur hexafluoride neutral molecules. The anions are produced in an electron-capture source, accelerated, and focused in a lens assembly designed to minimize residence time, allowed to drift at their terminal velocity for a suitable distance during which up to 30% auto-eject an electron, and all remaining charged particles are electrostatically skimmed, resulting in a focused neutral beam. Rasterable neutral beams focused to a 5-mm spot size up to 3 m from the source have been produced with beam currents up to 40 pA equivalent. Spot sizes of 1 mm can be produced with intensity levels of a few picoamperes equivalent.

  19. Zeeman-Sisyphus Deceleration of Molecular Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitch, Noah; Tarbutt, Mike

    2016-05-01

    Ultracold molecules are useful for testing fundamental physics and studying strongly-interacting quantum systems. One production method is via direct laser cooling in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). In this endeavor, one major challenge is to produce molecules below the MOT capture velocity. Established molecular beam deceleration techniques are poorly suited because they decelerate only a small fraction of a typical molecular pulse. Direct laser cooling is a natural choice, but is also problematic due to transverse heating and the associated molecule loss. I will present a new technique that we are developing, which we call Zeeman-Sisyphus deceleration and which shows great promise for preparing molecular beams for MOT loading. This technique decelerates molecules using a linear array of permanent magnets, along with lasers that periodically optically pump molecules between weak and strong-field seeking quantum states. Being time-independent, this method is well-suited for temporally extended molecular beams. Simultaneous deceleration and transverse guiding makes this approach attractive as an alternative to direct laser cooling. I will present our development of the Zeeman-Sisyphus decelerator and its application to a molecular MOT of CaF and an ultracold fountain of YbF.

  20. Physics with fast molecular-ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Kanter, E.P.

    1980-01-01

    Fast (MeV) molecular-ion beams provide a unique source of energetic projectile nuclei which are correlated in space and time. The recognition of this property has prompted several recent investigations of various aspects of the interactions of these ions with matter. High-resolution measurements on the fragments resulting from these interactions have already yielded a wealth of new information on such diverse topics as plasma oscillations in solids and stereochemical structures of molecular ions as well as a variety of atomic collision phenomena. The general features of several such experiments will be discussed and recent results will be presented.

  1. Molecular-beam gas-sampling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, W. S.; Knuth, E. L.

    1972-01-01

    A molecular beam mass spectrometer system for rocket motor combustion chamber sampling is described. The history of the sampling system is reviewed. The problems associated with rocket motor combustion chamber sampling are reported. Several design equations are presented. The results of the experiments include the effects of cooling water flow rates, the optimum separation gap between the end plate and sampling nozzle, and preliminary data on compositions in a rocket motor combustion chamber.

  2. Molecular Dynamics Investigations of the Ablator/Fuel Interface during Early Stages of Inertial Confinement Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanton, Liam; Glosli, James; Murillo, Michael

    2016-10-01

    At the National Ignition Facility, high-powered laser beams are used to compress a small target to generate fusion reactions. A critical issue in achieving this is the understanding of mix at the ablator/fuel interface. Mixing occurs at various length scales, ranging from atomic inter-species diffusion to hydrodynamic instabilities. Because the interface is preheated by energy from the incoming shock, it is important to understand the dynamics before the shock arrives. The interface is in the warm dense matter phase with a deuterium/tritium fuel mixture on one side and a plastic mixture on the other. We would like to understand various aspects of the evolution, including the state of the interface when the main shock arrives, the role of electric field generation at the interface, and the character and time scales for diffusion. We present a multiscale approach to model these processes, which combines molecular dynamics to simulate the ionic degrees of freedom with orbital-free density functional theory to calculate the electronic structure. Simulation results are presented and connections to hydrodynamic models are discussed. This work is performed under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  3. Endometrial ablation

    MedlinePlus

    Hysteroscopy-endometrial ablation; Laser thermal ablation; Endometrial ablation-radiofrequency; Endometrial ablation-thermal balloon ablation; Rollerball ablation; Hydrothermal ablation; Novasure ablation

  4. Flow speed of the ablation vapors generated during laser drilling of CFRP with a continuous-wave laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faas, S.; Freitag, C.; Boley, S.; Berger, P.; Weber, R.; Graf, T.

    2017-03-01

    The hot plume of ablation products generated during the laser drilling process of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) with a continuous-wave laser beam was analyzed by means of high-speed imaging. The formation of compression shocks was observed within the flow of the evaporated material, which is an indication of flow speeds well above the local speed of sound. The flow speed of the hot ablation products can be estimated by analyzing the position of these compression shocks. We investigated the temporal evolution of the flow speed during the drilling process and the influence of the average laser power on the flow speed. The flow speed increases with increasing average laser powers. The moment of drilling through the material changes the conditions for the drilling process and was confirmed to influence the flow speed of the ablated material. Compression shocks can also be observed during laser cutting of CFRP with a moving laser beam.

  5. Dynamics of Molecular Emission Features from Nanosecond, Femtosecond Laser and Filament Ablation Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Yeak, J.; Brumfield, Brian E.; Suter, Jonathan D.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2016-06-15

    The evolutionary paths of molecular species and nanoparticles in laser ablation plumes are not well understood due to the complexity of numerous physical processes that occur simultaneously in a transient laser-plasma system. It is well known that the emission features of ions, atoms, molecules and nanoparticles in a laser ablation plume strongly depend on the laser irradiation conditions. In this letter we report the temporal emission features of AlO molecules in plasmas generated using a nanosecond laser, a femtosecond laser and filaments generated from a femtosecond laser. Our results show that, at a fixed laser energy, the persistence of AlO is found to be highest and lowest in ns and filament laser plasmas respectively while molecular species are formed at early times for both ultrashort pulse (fs and filament) generated plasmas. Analysis of the AlO emission band features show that the vibrational temperature of AlO decays rapidly in filament assisted laser ablation plumes.

  6. Molecular dynamics simulation of heat-affected zone of copper metal ablated with femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirayama, Yoichi; Obara, Minoru

    2005-03-01

    Femtosecond laser ablation of materials with high thermal conductivity is of paramount importance, because the chemical composition and properties of the area ablated with femtosecond laser are kept unchanged. The material processing by femtosecond laser can well control the heat-affected zone, compared to nanosecond laser ablation. We report on the heat-affected zone of crystalline copper (Cu) by use of femtosecond laser experimentally and theoretically. Laser ablation of Cu is investigated theoretically by two temperature model and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The MD simulation takes into account of electron temperature and thermal diffusion length calculated by two temperature model. The dependence of lattice temperature on time and depth is calculated by the MD simulation and two temperature model. The heat-affected zone estimated from the temperature is mainly studied and calculated to be 3 nm at 0.02 J/cm2 which is below the threshold fluence of 0.137 J/cm2. In addition, the thickness of heat-affected zone of copper crystal ablated with femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser is experimentally studied. As a result of X-ray diffraction (XRD) of the ablated surface, the surface crystallinity is partially changed into disordered structure from crystal form. The residual energy left in the metal, which is not used for ablation, will induce liquid phase, leading to the amorphous phase of the metal during resolidification. The thickness of heat-affected zone depends on laser fluence and is experimentally measured to be less than 1 μm at higher laser fluences than the ablation threshold.

  7. Perspective: Oxide molecular-beam epitaxy rocks!

    SciTech Connect

    Schlom, Darrell G.

    2015-06-01

    Molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE) is the “gold standard” synthesis technique for preparing semiconductor heterostructures with high purity, high mobility, and exquisite control of layer thickness at the atomic-layer level. Its use for the growth of multicomponent oxides got off to a rocky start 30 yr ago, but in the ensuing decades, it has become the definitive method for the preparation of oxide heterostructures too, particularly when it is desired to explore their intrinsic properties. Examples illustrating the unparalleled achievements of oxide MBE are given; these motivate its expanding use for exploring the potentially revolutionary states of matter possessed by oxide systems.

  8. Molecular beam studies of reaction dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.T.

    1987-03-01

    Purpose of this research project is two-fold: (1) to elucidate detailed dynamics of simple elementary reactions which are theoretically important and to unravel the mechanism of complex chemical reactions or photo chemical processes which play an important role in many macroscopic processes and (2) to determine the energetics of polyatomic free radicals using microscopic experimental methods. Most of the information is derived from measurement of the product fragment translational energy and angular distributions using unique molecular beam apparati designed for these purposes.

  9. Enhancing ablation efficiency in micro structuring using a deformable mirror for beam shaping of ultra-short laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smarra, M.; Dickmann, K.

    2016-03-01

    Using ultra-short laser pulses for the generation of microstructures results in a high flexible tool for free form geometries in the micro range. Increasing laser power and repetition rates increase as well the demand of high flexible and efficient process strategies. To increase the ablation efficiency the optimal fluency can be determined, which is a material specific value. By varying the beam shape, the ablation efficiency can be enhanced. In this study a deformable mirror was used to vary the beam shape. This mirror is built by combining a piezo-electric ceramic and a mirror substrate. The ceramic is divided into several segments, which can be controlled independently. This results in a high flexible deformable mirror which influences the beam shape and can be used to vary the spot size or generate line geometries. The ablation efficiency and roughness of small generated cavities were analyzed in this study as well as the dimensions of the cavity. This can be used to optimize process strategies to combine high volume ablation and fine detail generation.

  10. A correction factor for ablation algorithms assuming deviations of Lambert-Beer's law with a Gaussian-profile beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Marín, Francisco; Anera, Rosario G.; Alarcón, Aixa; Hita, E.; Jiménez, J. R.

    2012-04-01

    In this work, we propose an adjustment factor to be considered in ablation algorithms used in refractive surgery. This adjustment factor takes into account potential deviations of Lambert-Beer's law and the characteristics of a Gaussian-profile beam. To check whether the adjustment factor deduced is significant for visual function, we applied it to the paraxial Munnerlyn formula and found that it significantly influences the post-surgical corneal radius and p-factor. The use of the adjustment factor can help reduce the discrepancies in corneal shape between the real data and corneal shape expected when applying laser ablation algorithms.

  11. Studies on the Application of High Voltage Discharge Ionization and Ablation in Supersonic-Jets for the Generation of Intense Cluster Ion Beams.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brock, Ansgar

    Glow discharge and pulsed capacitor discharge ionization in supersonic expansions were investigated for the production of intense beams of molecular cluster ions from seeded and ablated compounds. A low cost high voltage high current pulser based on a triggered spark gap switch is described as a mean for ionization and ablation. Besides, details of the molecular beam apparatus and modified pulsed valve are given. Cluster cations rm (Ar)_ {n}^+, rm (CO_2) _{n}^{+}, rm (C_6H_6)_{n}^+ and rm (H_2O)_{n }^+ were produced by pulsed capacitor discharge ionization in the expansion region of a seeded free-jet. The observed cluster mass spectra (CMS) for Ar, rm C_6H_6 and H _2O show the characteristic features (magic numbers) of electron beam and photo ionized clusters under molecular flow conditions. Indications for the presence of magic numbers in the CMS of {(CO _2)_{n}^+} cluster ions at n = 20, 26, 30 and 34 similar to those found for rare gas clusters have been found. Cationic metal ligand complexes Cu(Toluene) _{rm n}^+, Cu(Acetone) _{rm n}^+, Cu(Methanol)_{rm n}^+ , Cu(Ethylether)_{rm n }^+, Cu(Water)_{ rm n}^+, Al(Water)_ {rm n}^+ were synthesized by ablation of the metal from metallic discharge electrodes in a discharge gas mixture of helium seeded with the ligand of choice. The CMS of the expanded plasmas show little background ion signal besides the metal-ligand species. Charge exchange processes in the expansion guarantee high ionization yields of the desired species and account for low backgrounds. Changes in the successive binding energy of Cu(Water)_ {rm n}^+ clusters n = 1-4 are clearly observed in the CMS as step formation. A similar pattern found in the Cu(Acetone)_{ rm n}^+ CMS suggests the same trend in the successive binding energy as known for water. Ablation from a Cr(acac)_3 in a copper matrix was employed for the synthesis of Cr(Acetone) _{rm n}^+ and Cr(Benzene)^+ complexes demonstrating the ability to use nonconducting compounds as a metal source

  12. Damage in materials following ablation by ultrashort laser pulses: A molecular-dynamics study

    SciTech Connect

    Bouilly, Delphine; Perez, Danny; Lewis, Laurent J.

    2007-11-01

    The formation of craters following femtosecond- and picosecond-pulse laser ablation in the thermal regime is studied using a generic two-dimensional numerical model based on molecular-dynamics simulations and the Lennard-Jones potential. Femtosecond pulses are found to produce very clean craters through a combination of etching of the walls and the formation of a very thin heat affected zone. Our simulations also indicate that dislocations are emitted continuously during all of the ablation process (i.e., for hundreds of ps). For picosecond pulses, we observe much thicker heat affected zones which result from melting and recrystallization following the absorption of the light. In this case also, continuous emission of dislocations--though fewer in number--takes place throughout the ablation process.

  13. Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) Versus CT in Lung Ablation Procedure: Which is Faster?

    SciTech Connect

    Cazzato, Roberto Luigi Battistuzzi, Jean-Benoit Catena, Vittorio; Grasso, Rosario Francesco Zobel, Bruno Beomonte; Schena, Emiliano; Buy, Xavier Palussiere, Jean

    2015-10-15

    AimTo compare cone-beam CT (CBCT) versus computed tomography (CT) guidance in terms of time needed to target and place the radiofrequency ablation (RFA) electrode on lung tumours.Materials and MethodsPatients at our institution who received CBCT- or CT-guided RFA for primary or metastatic lung tumours were retrospectively included. Time required to target and place the RFA electrode within the lesion was registered and compared across the two groups. Lesions were stratified into three groups according to their size (<10, 10–20, >20 mm). Occurrences of electrode repositioning, repositioning time, RFA complications, and local recurrence after RFA were also reported.ResultsForty tumours (22 under CT, 18 under CBCT guidance) were treated in 27 patients (19 male, 8 female, median age 67.25 ± 9.13 years). Thirty RFA sessions (16 under CBCT and 14 under CT guidance) were performed. Multivariable linear regression analysis showed that CBCT was faster than CT to target and place the electrode within the tumour independently from its size (β = −9.45, t = −3.09, p = 0.004). Electrode repositioning was required in 10/22 (45.4 %) tumours under CT guidance and 5/18 (27.8 %) tumours under CBCT guidance. Pneumothoraces occurred in 6/14 (42.8 %) sessions under CT guidance and in 6/16 (37.5 %) sessions under CBCT guidance. Two recurrences were noted for tumours receiving CBCT-guided RFA (2/17, 11.7 %) and three after CT-guided RFA (3/19, 15.8 %).ConclusionCBCT with live 3D needle guidance is a useful technique for percutaneous lung ablation. Despite lesion size, CBCT allows faster lung RFA than CT.

  14. Delayed Shutters For Dual-Beam Molecular Epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grunthaner, Frank J.; Liu, John L.; Hancock, Bruce

    1989-01-01

    System of shutters for dual-molecular-beam epitaxy apparatus delays start of one beam with respect to another. Used in pulsed-beam equipment for deposition of low-dislocation layers of InAs on GaAs substrates, system delays application of arsenic beam with respect to indium beam to assure proper stoichiometric proportions on newly forming InAs surface. Reflectance high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) instrument used to monitor condition of evolving surface of deposit. RHEED signal used to time pulsing of molecular beams in way that minimizes density of defects and holds lattice constant of InAs to that of GaAs substrate.

  15. Infrared Rugates by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rona, M.

    1993-01-01

    Rugates are optical structures that have a sinusoidal index of refraction (harmonic gradient-index field). As their discrete high/ low index filter counterparts, they can be used as narrow rejection band filters. However, since rugates do not have abrupt interfaces, they tend to have a smaller absorption, hence deliver a higher in band reflectivity. The absence of sharp interfaces makes rugates even more desirable for high-energy narrow band reflectors. In this application, the lack of a sharp interface at the maximum internal standing wave electric field results in higher breakdown strengths. Our method involves fabricating rugates, with molecular beam epitaxy, on GaAs wafers as an Al(x)Ga(1-x)As single-crystal film.

  16. Interaction of a converging laser beam with a Ag colloidal solution during the ablation of a Ag target in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resano-Garcia, Amandine; Battie, Yann; Naciri, Aotmane En; Chaoui, Nouari

    2016-05-01

    We studied the nanosecond laser-induced shape modifications of Ag colloids exposed to a converging laser beam during the ablation of a Ag target in water. To this end, we performed a series of laser ablation experiments in which the laser energy was varied while all other parameters were kept constant. In addition to transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the shape distribution of the Ag nanoparticles was determined by modelling the extinction spectra of the final colloidal solutions using theoretical calculations based on shape distributed effective medium theory (SDEMT). From these calculations, two physical parameters named sphericity and dispersity were introduced and used to gauge the evolution of the shape distribution of the particles. As the laser energy on the target was increased from 5 to 20 mJ/pulse, an apparently abrupt modification of the shape distribution of the particles was evidenced by both TEM and SDEMT calculations. This change is explained in terms of competitive fragmentation, growth and reshaping processes. On the basis the heating-melting-vaporization model, we demonstrate how the competition between these processes, occurring at different locations of the converging beam, determines the shape distribution of the final product. We highlight the relevance of the fluence gradient along the beam path and the laser interaction volume on the laser-induced modifications of the suspended particles during the ablation process.

  17. Molecular contamination study by interaction of a molecular beam with a platinum surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuss, H. E.

    1976-01-01

    The capability of molecular beam scattering from a solid surface is analyzed for identification of molecular contamination of the surface. The design and setup of the molecular beam source and the measuring setup for the application of a phase sensitive measuring technique for the determination of the scattered beam intensity are described. The scattering distributions of helium and nitrogen molecular beams interacting with a platinum surface were measured for different amounts of contamination from diffusion pump oil for surface temperatures ranging from 30 to 400 C. The results indicate the scattering of molecular beams from a platinum surface is a very sensitive method for detecting surface contamination.

  18. Note: High density pulsed molecular beam for cold ion chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Kokish, M. G.; Rajagopal, V.; Marler, J. P.; Odom, B. C.

    2014-08-15

    A recent expansion of cold and ultracold molecule applications has led to renewed focus on molecular species preparation under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Meanwhile, molecular beams have been used to study gas phase chemical reactions for decades. In this paper, we describe an apparatus that uses pulsed molecular beam technology to achieve high local gas densities, leading to faster reaction rates with cold trapped ions. We characterize the beam's spatial profile using the trapped ions themselves. This apparatus could be used for preparation of molecular species by reactions requiring excitation of trapped ion precursors to states with short lifetimes or for obtaining a high reaction rate with minimal increase of background chamber pressure.

  19. Shock wave mediated plume chemistry for molecular formation in laser ablation plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Brumfield, Brian E.; Cannon, Bret D.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2016-02-16

    Laser ablation is used in a variety of applications albeit formation mechanisms of molecules and nanoclusters are not well understood. We investigated the formation mechanisms of AlO molecules during complex interactions between an Al laser plume expanding into ambient air at atmospheric pressure levels. To produce the plasma a high-purity Al target was ablated using 1064 nm, 6 ns laser pulses. Our results show that the plasma chemistry leading to the formation of AlO is mediated by shock waves. During the early times of plasma expansion, the generated shock waves at the plume edges act as a barrier for the combustion process and the molecular formation is prevalent after the shockwave collapse. The temporally and spatially resolved contour mapping of Al and AlO highlight the formation routes and persistence of species in the plasma and its relation to plume hydrodynamics.

  20. Molecular beam studies of reaction dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.T.

    1993-12-01

    The major thrust of this research project is to elucidate detailed dynamics of simple elementary reactions that are theoretically important and to unravel the mechanism of complex chemical reactions or photochemical processes that play important roles in many macroscopic processes. Molecular beams of reactants are used to study individual reactive encounters between molecules or to monitor photodissociation events in a collision-free environment. Most of the information is derived from measurement of the product fragment energy, angular, and state distributions. Recent activities are centered on the mechanisms of elementary chemical reactions involving oxygen atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons, the dynamics of endothermic substitution reactions, the dependence of the chemical reactivity of electronically excited atoms on the alignment of excited orbitals, the primary photochemical processes of polyatomic molecules, intramolecular energy transfer of chemically activated and locally excited molecules, the energetics of free radicals that are important to combustion processes, the infrared-absorption spectra of carbonium ions and hydrated hydronium ions, and bond-selective photodissociation through electric excitation.

  1. Molecular beam surface analysis. 1993 Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Appelhans, A.D.; Ingram, J.C.; Groenewold, G.S.; Dahl, D.A.; Delmore, J.E.

    1993-09-01

    The Molecular Beam Surface Analysis (MBSA) program is developing both laboratory-based and potentially field-portable chemical analyses systems taking advantage of new surface analysis technology developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The objective is to develop the means to rapidly detect and identify, with high specificity and high sensitivity, nonvolatile and low volatile organics found in Chemical Weapons (CW) and High Explosives (HE) feedstocks, agents, and decomposition products on surfaces of plants, rocks, paint chips, filters, smears of buildings, vehicles, equipment, etc.. Ideally, the method would involve no sample preparation and no waste generation, and would have the potential for being implemented as a field-portable instrument. In contrast to existing analytical methods that rely on sample volatility, MBSA is optimized for nonvolatile and low volatile compounds. This makes it amenable for rapidly screening field samples for CW agent decomposition products and feedstock chemicals and perhaps actual agents. In its final configuration (benchtop size) it could be operated in a non-laboratory environment (such as an office building) requiring no sample preparation chemistry or chemical supplies. It could also be included in a mobile laboratory used in on-site, ore remote site cooperative surveys, or in a standard laboratory, where it would provide fast screening of samples at minimal cost.

  2. Molecular beam studies of reaction dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Yuan T.

    1991-03-01

    The major thrust of this research project is to elucidate detailed dynamics of simple elementary reactions that are theoretically important and to unravel the mechanism of complex chemical reactions or photochemical processes that play important roles in many macroscopic processes. Molecular beams of reactants are used to study individual reactive encounters between molecules or to monitor photodissociation events in a collision-free environment. Most of the information is derived from measurement of the product fragment energy, angular, and state distributions. Recent activities are centered on the mechanisms of elementary chemical reactions involving oxygen atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons, the dynamics of endothermic substitution reactions, the dependence of the chemical reactivity of electronically excited atoms on the alignment of excited orbitals, the primary photochemical processes of polyatomic molecules, intramolecular energy transfer of chemically activated and locally excited molecules, the energetics of free radicals that are important to combustion processes, the infrared-absorption spectra of carbonium ions and hydrated hydronium ions, and bond-selective photodissociation through electric excitation.

  3. Carbon isotope separation and molecular formation in laser-induced plasmas by laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dong, Meirong; Mao, Xianglei; Gonzalez, Jhanis J; Lu, Jidong; Russo, Richard E

    2013-03-05

    Laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry (LAMIS) recently was reported for rapid isotopic analysis by measuring molecular emission from laser-induced plasmas at atmospheric pressure. This research utilized the LAMIS approach to study C2 molecular formation from laser ablation of carbon isotopic samples in a neon gas environment at 0.1 MPa. The isotopic shift for the Swan system of the C2 Δν = 1 band was chosen for carbon isotope analysis. Temporal and spatial resolved measurements of (12)C2, (12)C(13)C, and (13)C2 show that C2 forms from recombination reactions in the plasma. A theoretical simulation was used to determine the temperature from the molecular bands and to extract the isotopic ratio of (12)C/(13)C derived from (12)C2, (12)C(13)C, and (13)C2. Our data show that the ratio of (12)C/(13)C varies with time after the laser pulse and with distance above the sample. (12)C/(13)C deviates from the nominal ratio (2:1) at early times and closest to the sample surface. These measurements provide understanding of the chemical processes in the laser plasma and analytical improvement using LAMIS.

  4. Investigation Into the Optimum Beam Shape and Fluence for Selective Ablation of Dental Calculus at lambda = 400 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenly, J.E.; Seka. W.; Rechmann, P.

    2010-02-25

    A frequency-doubled Ti:sapphire laser is shown to selectively ablate dental calculus. The optimal transverse shape of the laser beam, including its variability under water-cooling, is determined for selective ablation of dental calculus. Intensity profiles under various water-cooling conditions were optically observed. The 400-nm laser was coupled into a multimode optical fiber using an f = 2.5-cm lens and light-shaping diffuser. Water-cooling was supplied coaxially around the fiber. Five human tooth samples (four with calculus and one pristine) were irradiated perpendicular to the tooth surface while the tooth was moved back and forth at 0.3 mm/second, varying between 20 and 180 iterations. The teeth were imaged before and after irradiation using light microscopy with a flashing blue light-emitting diode (LED). An environmental scanning electron microscope imaged each tooth after irradiation. High-order super-Gaussian intensity profiles are observed at the output of a fiber coiled around a 4-in. diameter drum. Super-Gaussian beams have a morehomogenous fluence distribution than Gaussian beams and have a higher energy efficiency for selective ablation. Coaxial water-cooling does not noticeably distort the intensity distribution within 1 mm from the optical fiber. In contrast, lasers focused to a Gaussian cross section (<=50-mm diameter) without fiber propagation and cooled by a water spray are heavily distorted and may lead to variable ablation. Calculus is preferentially ablated at high fluences (>= 2 J/cm^2); below this fluence, stalling occurs because of photo-bleaching of the calculus. Healthy dental hard tissue is not removed at fluences <=3 J/cm^2. Supplying laser light to a tooth using an optical fiber with coaxial water-cooling is determined to be the most appropriate method when selectively removing calculus with a frequency-doubled Ti:sapphire laser. Fluences over 2 J/cm^2 are required to remove calculus efficiently since photo-bleaching stalls calculus

  5. Probing mesoscopic process of laser ablation in liquid by integrated method of optical beam deflection and time-resolved shadowgraphy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Li, Xiaoming; Gu, Yu; Wang, Hao; Song, Xiufeng; Zeng, Haibo

    2017-03-01

    For nanomaterial fabrication by laser ablation in liquid (LAL), it is very important to understand the mesoscopic process of laser interaction with materials in liquid. We proposed a method combining time-resolved shadowgraphy and optical beam deflection method to study the LAL process in both pure water and water with nanoparticles (colloids). As the laser was focused on the target in pure water, the laser energy was absorbed by the target and plasma, shockwaves and bubbles were produced, along with the generation of nanoparticles. While in case of colloid, laser beam first passed through the solution, interacted with nanoparticles and induced plenty of sporadic shadows (small bubbles) on the beam path which were captured by shadowgraphy. Then, the laser arrived at the target and induced breakdown accompanied by the emergence of plasma, shockwave and bubbles. Meanwhile, the concentration of nanoparticle increased and the sizes of nanoparticle were modified. The radius and oscillation time of bubbles are much smaller in the colloid than that in pure water, mainly due to laser energy loss by breakdown of the nanoparticles and generation of small bubbles before reaching the target. Moreover, we found the maximum bubble radius and bubble oscillation time decrease quickly with laser irradiation times at the beginning, and then reach a plateau, because of laser energy lost on the way to the target. In addition, we used the ablation process to explain a bimodal size distribution of nanoparticles. This work will deepen our understanding on the mechanism of both laser ablation of bulk targets in liquid and laser irradiation of particles in liquid.

  6. Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry (MBMS) (Revised) (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-07-01

    This fact sheet provides information about Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry (MBMS) capabilities and applications at NREL's National Bioenergy Center. NREL has six MBMS systems that researchers and industry partners can use to understand thermochemical biomass conversion and biomass composition recalcitrance.

  7. Experimental Investigation of Molecular Species Formation in Metal Plasmas During Laser Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radousky, H.; Crowhurst, J.; Rose, T.; Armstrong, M.; Stavrou, E.; Zaug, J.; Weisz, D.; Azer, M.; Finko, M.; Curreli, D.

    2016-10-01

    Atomic and molecular spectra on metal plasmas generated by laser ablation have been measured using single, nominally 6-7 ns pulses at 1064 nm, and with energies less than 50 mJ. The primary goal for these studies is to constrain the physical and chemical mechanisms that control the distribution of radionuclides in fallout after a nuclear detonation. In this work, laser emission spectroscopy was used to obtain in situdata for vapor phase molecular species as they form in a controlled oxygen atmosphere for a variety of metals such as Fe, Al, as well as preliminary results for U. In particular, the ablation plumes created from these metals have been imaged with a resolution of 10 ns, and it is possible to observe the expansion of the plume out to 0.5 us. These data serve as one set of inputs for a semi-empirical model to describe the chemical fractionation of uranium during fallout formation. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. This project was sponsored by the Department of the Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency, under Grant Number HDTRA1-16-1-0020.

  8. CO2 TEA Laser-Enhanced Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry (TELLAMIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Staci R.; Akpovo, Charlemagne A.; Ford, Alan; Herbert, Kenley; Johnson, Lewis

    2014-03-01

    Recently, it has been shown that the relative abundance of isotopes in enriched materials can be determined via laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) in a technique known as laser-ablation molecular isotopic spectroscopy (LAMIS). The original LAMIS work has focused on single-pulse (SP) LIBS for the excitation. However, dual-pulse (DP) LIBS reduces shot-to-shot variation and can lower detection limits of an element by about an order of magnitude or more. It also has the potential to improve the accuracy of the determination of the relative abundances of isotopes in LAMIS by minimizing the signal-to-noise ratio. In this work, a DP-LIBS technique for improving LAMIS relative-abundance information from a sample is presented. The new technique, called (TEA) Transverse-Excited breakdown in Atmosphere Laser-Enhanced Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry (TELLAMIS), uses a carbon dioxide (CO2) laser to increase the breakdown emission from LIBS in the LAMIS method. This technique is demonstrated on a collection of relative abundance isotopes of boron- 10 and boron-11 in varying concentrations in boric acid. Least-squares fitting to theoretical models are used to deduce plasma parameters and understand reproducibility of results. DTRA.

  9. Direct periodic patterning of GaN-based light-emitting diodes by three-beam interference laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jeomoh; Ji, Mi-Hee; Detchprohm, Theeradetch; Yuan, Dajun; Guo, Rui; Liu, Jianping; Asadirad, Mojtaba; Kwon, Min-Ki; Dupuis, Russell D.; Das, Suman; Ryou, Jae-Hyun

    2014-04-07

    We report on the direct patterning of two-dimensional periodic structures in GaN-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) through laser interference ablation for the fast and reliable fabrication of periodic micro- and nano-structures aimed at enhancing light output. Holes arranged in a two-dimensional hexagonal lattice array having an opening size of 500 nm, depth of 50 nm, and a periodicity of 1 μm were directly formed by three-beam laser interference without photolithography or electron-beam lithography processes. The laser-patterned LEDs exhibit an enhancement in light output power of 20% compared to conventional LEDs having a flat top surface without degradation of electrical and optical properties of the top p-GaN layer and the active region, respectively.

  10. Hyperthermal Pulsed-Laser Ablation Beams for Film Deposition and Surface Microstructural Engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Lowndes, D.H.

    1999-11-08

    This paper presents an overview of pulsed-laser ablation for film deposition and surface microstructure formation. By changing the ambient gas pressure from high vacuum to several Torr (several hundred Pa) and by selecting the pulsed-laser wavelength, the kinetic energy of ablated atoms/ions can be varied from several hundred eV down to {approximately}0.1 eV and films ranging from superhard to nanocrystalline may be deposited. Furthermore, cumulative (multi-pulse) irradiation of a semiconductor surface (e.g. silicon) in an oxidizing gas (0{sub 2}, SF{sub 6}) et atmospheric pressure can produce dense, self-organized arrays of high-aspect-ratio microcolumns or microcones. Thus, a wide range of materials synthesis and processing opportunities result from the hyperthermal flux and reactive growth conditions provided by pulsed-laser ablation.

  11. Molecular dynamics investigation of desorption and ion separation following picosecond infrared laser (PIRL) ablation of an ionic aqueous protein solution.

    PubMed

    Zou, J; Wu, C; Robertson, W D; Zhigilei, L V; Miller, R J D

    2016-11-28

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to characterize the ablation process induced by a picosecond infrared laser (PIRL) operating in the regime of desorption by impulsive vibrational excitation (DIVE) of a model peptide (lysozyme)/counter-ion system in aqueous solution. The simulations were performed for ablation under typical experimental conditions found within a time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS), that is in vacuum with an applied electric field (E = ± 10(7) V/m), for up to 2 ns post-ablation and compared to the standard PIRL-DIVE ablation condition (E = 0 V/m). Further, a simulation of ablation under an extreme field condition (E = 10(10) V/m) was performed for comparison to extend the effective dynamic range of the effect of the field on charge separation. The results show that the plume dynamics were retained under a typical TOF-MS condition within the first 1 ns of ablation. Efficient desorption was observed with more than 90% of water molecules interacting with lysozyme stripped off within 1 ns post-ablation. The processes of ablation and desolvation of analytes were shown to be independent of the applied electric field and thus decoupled from the ion separation process. Unlike under the extreme field conditions, the electric field inside a typical TOF-MS was shown to modify the ions' motion over a longer time and in a soft manner with no enhancement to fragmentation observed as compared to the standard PIRL-DIVE. The study indicates that the PIRL-DIVE ablation mechanism could be used as a new, intrinsically versatile, and highly sensitive ion source for quantitative mass spectrometry.

  12. Molecular dynamics investigation of desorption and ion separation following picosecond infrared laser (PIRL) ablation of an ionic aqueous protein solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, J.; Wu, C.; Robertson, W. D.; Zhigilei, L. V.; Miller, R. J. D.

    2016-11-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to characterize the ablation process induced by a picosecond infrared laser (PIRL) operating in the regime of desorption by impulsive vibrational excitation (DIVE) of a model peptide (lysozyme)/counter-ion system in aqueous solution. The simulations were performed for ablation under typical experimental conditions found within a time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS), that is in vacuum with an applied electric field (E = ± 107 V/m), for up to 2 ns post-ablation and compared to the standard PIRL-DIVE ablation condition (E = 0 V/m). Further, a simulation of ablation under an extreme field condition (E = 1010 V/m) was performed for comparison to extend the effective dynamic range of the effect of the field on charge separation. The results show that the plume dynamics were retained under a typical TOF-MS condition within the first 1 ns of ablation. Efficient desorption was observed with more than 90% of water molecules interacting with lysozyme stripped off within 1 ns post-ablation. The processes of ablation and desolvation of analytes were shown to be independent of the applied electric field and thus decoupled from the ion separation process. Unlike under the extreme field conditions, the electric field inside a typical TOF-MS was shown to modify the ions' motion over a longer time and in a soft manner with no enhancement to fragmentation observed as compared to the standard PIRL-DIVE. The study indicates that the PIRL-DIVE ablation mechanism could be used as a new, intrinsically versatile, and highly sensitive ion source for quantitative mass spectrometry.

  13. Femtosecond laser ablation of CuxZr1-x bulk metallic glasses: A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinier, Sébastien; Lewis, Laurent J.

    2015-11-01

    Molecular-dynamics simulations combined with a two-temperature model are used to study laser ablation in CuxZr1-x (x =0.33 ,0.50 ,0.67 ) metallic glasses as well as crystalline CuZr2 in the C11b (MoSi2) structure. Ablation thresholds are found to be 430 ±10 ,450 ±10 ,510 ±10 , and 470 ±10 J/m 2 for a-Cu2Zr , a-CuZr, a-CuZr2, and c-CuZr2, respectively. The larger threshold in amorphous CuZr2 results from a weaker electron-phonon coupling and thus longer electron-ion equilibration time. We observe that the velocity of the pressure waves in the amorphous samples is not affected by the fluence, in contrast to the crystal; this is due to differences in the behavior of the shear modulus with increasing pressure. The heat-affected zone in the different systems is characterized in terms of the melting depth as well as inelastic deformations. The melting depth is found to be smaller in the crystal than in the amorphous targets because of its higher melting temperature. The inelastic deformations are investigated in terms of the von Mises shear strain invariant ηMises; the homogeneous nucleation of shear transformation zones is observed in the glass as reported in previous theoretical and experimental studies. The coalescence of the shear transformation zones is also found at higher fluence.

  14. Matrix Effects on Boron Containing Materials due to Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry (LAMIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Staci R.; Akpovo, Charlemagne A.; Martinez, Jorge; Ford, Alan; Herbert, Kenley; Johnson, Lewis

    2014-03-01

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is a spectroscopic technique that is used for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of materials in the liquid, solid, or gas phase. LIBS can also be used for the detection of isotopic shifts in atomic and diatomic species via Laser-Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectroscopy (LAMIS). However, any additional elements that are entrained into the plasma other than the element of interest, can affect the extent of ablation and quality of spectra and hence, potentially obscure or aid in the relative abundance assessment for a given element. To address the importance of matrix effects, the isotopic analysis of boron obtained from boron oxide (BO) emission originating from different boron-containing compounds, such as boron nitride (BN), boric acid (H3BO3) , and borax (Na2B4O710H2O), via LIBS has been performed here. Each of these materials has different physical properties and elemental composition in order to illustrate possible challenges for the LAMIS method. A calibration-free model similar to that for the original LAMIS work is used to determine properties of the plasma as the matrix is changed. DTRA

  15. Supersonic molecular beam experiments on surface chemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Okada, Michio

    2014-10-01

    The interaction of a molecule and a surface is important in various fields, and in particular in complex systems like biomaterials and their related chemistry. However, the detailed understanding of the elementary steps in the surface chemistry, for example, stereodynamics, is still insufficient even for simple model systems. In this Personal Account, I review our recent studies of chemical reactions on single-crystalline Cu and Si surfaces induced by hyperthermal oxygen molecular beams and by oriented molecular beams, respectively. Studies of oxide formation on Cu induced by hyperthermal molecular beams demonstrate a significant role of the translational energy of the incident molecules. The use of hyperthermal molecular beams enables us to open up new chemical reaction paths specific for the hyperthermal energy region, and to develop new methods for the fabrication of thin films. On the other hand, oriented molecular beams also demonstrate the possibility of understanding surface chemical reactions in detail by varying the orientation of the incident molecules. The steric effects found on Si surfaces hint at new ways of material fabrication on Si surfaces. Controlling the initial conditions of incoming molecules is a powerful tool for finely monitoring the elementary step of the surface chemical reactions and creating new materials on surfaces.

  16. Reactive Collisions in Crossed Molecular Beams

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Herschbach, D. R.

    1962-02-01

    The distribution of velocity vectors of reaction products is discussed with emphasis on the restrictions imposed by the conservation laws. The recoil velocity that carries the products away from the center of mass shows how the energy of reaction is divided between internal excitation and translation. Similarly, the angular distributions, as viewed from the center of mass, reflect the partitioning of the total angular momentum between angular momenta of individual molecules and orbital angular momentum associated with their relative motion. Crossed-beam studies of several reactions of the type M + RI yields R + MI are described, where M = K, Rb, Cs, and R = CH{sub 3}, C{sub 3}H{sub 5}, etc. The results show that most of the energy of reaction goes into internal excitation of the products and that the angular distribution is quite anisotropic, with most of the MI recoiling backward (and R forward) with respect to the incoming K beam. (auth)

  17. Molecular-beam Studies of Primary Photochemical Processes

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Lee, Y. T.

    1982-12-01

    Application of the method of molecular-beam photofragmentation translational spectroscopy to the investigation of primary photochemical processes of polyatomic molecules is described. Examples will be given to illustrate how information concerning the energetics, dynamics, and mechanism of dissociation processes can be obtained from the precise measurements of angular and velocity distributions of products in an experiment in which a well-defined beam of molecules is crossed with a laser.

  18. Ion beam sculpting molecular scale devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Derek Martin

    We envision solid-state nanopores at the heart of a device capable of detecting, manipulating, and ultimately sequencing individual DNA molecules. To reliably fabricate holes whose diameter is commensurate with that of the DNA molecule (˜2nm), low energy ion beams are employed to tailor the size of holes in solid-state membranes by a new technique we call "ion beam sculpting". The transmission rate of ions through the hole is monitored to provide a direct, real-time measure of the hole area that is used as a feedback signal to trigger the termination of the ion irradiation process when the desired hole size is obtained. The sensitivity of the transmitted ion count rate to atomic-scale material rearrangements at the perimeter of a hole led to a surprising discovery: Low-energy ion beams stimulate the lateral transport of matter when incident on a surface, resulting in the growth of a thin film from the boundary of a hole that closes the hole. The net flow of matter is determined by a competition between sputter erosion, which opens the hole, and a hole closing process that dominates at high temperature and low flux. The timescale for lateral matter transport under ion irradiation is surprisingly long---on the order of a second. Two physical models are proposed to account for the surprising ion-stimulated transport of matter. One model is based on the viscous flow of a stressed surface layer, while the other is based on the diffusion of mobile, ion-stimulated species at the surface of the material into the hole. The predictions of the latter are compared to ion beam sculpting experiments. We exploit ion beam sculpting to fabricate solid-state nanopores used as electronic detectors of individual DNA molecules. In ionic solution, negatively charged DNA molecules are drawn to the nanopore by an applied electrochemical potential, resulting in a detectable characteristic ionic current blockade when a molecules occludes the nanopore. The applicability of the ion sculpting

  19. A low Earth orbit molecular beam space simulation facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, J. B.

    1984-01-01

    A brief synopsis of the low Earth orbit (LEO) satellite environment is presented including neutral and ionic species. Two ground based atomic and molecular beam instruments are described which are capable of simulating the interaction of spacecraft surfaces with the LEO environment and detecting the results of these interactions. The first detects mass spectrometrically low level fluxes of reactively and nonreactively surface scattered species as a function of scattering angle and velocity while the second ultrahigh velocity (UHV) molecular beam, laser induced fluorescence apparatus is capable of measuring chemiluminescence produced by either gas phase or gas-surface interactions. A number of proposed experiments are described.

  20. Compression and ablation of the photo-irradiated molecular cloud the Orion Bar

    PubMed Central

    Goicoechea, Javier R.; Pety, Jérôme; Cuadrado, Sara; Cernicharo, José; Chapillon, Edwige; Fuente, Asunción; Gerin, Maryvonne; Joblin, Christine; Marcelino, Nuria; Pilleri, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    The Orion Bar is the archetypal edge-on molecular cloud surface illuminated by strong ultraviolet radiation from nearby massive stars. Owing to the close distance to Orion (about 1,350 light-year), the effects of stellar feedback on the parental cloud can be studied in detail. Visible-light observations of the Bar1 show that the transition between the hot ionised gas and the warm neutral atomic gas (the ionisation front) is spatially well separated from the transition from atomic to molecular gas (the dissociation front): about 15 arcseconds or 6,200 astronomical units. (One astronomical unit is the Earth-Sun distance.) Static equilibrium models2,3 used to interpret previous far-infrared and radio observations of the neutral gas in the Bar4,5,6 (typically at 10-20 arcsecond resolution) predict an inhomogeneous cloud structure consisting of dense clumps embedded in a lower density extended gas component. Here we report 1 arcsecond resolution millimetre-wave images that allow us to resolve the molecular cloud surface and constrain the gas density and temperature structures at small spatial scales. In contrast to stationary model predictions7,8,9, there is no appreciable offset between the peak of the H2 vibrational emission (delineating the H/H2 transition) and the edge of the observed CO and HCO+ emission. This implies that the H/H2 and C+/C/CO transition zones are very close. These observations reveal a fragmented ridge of high-density substructures, photo-ablative gas flows and instabilities at the molecular cloud surface. They suggest that the cloud edge has been compressed by a high-pressure wave that currently moves into the molecular cloud. The images demonstrate that dynamical and nonequilibrium effects are important. Thus, they should be included in any realistic description of irradiated interstellar matter. PMID:27509859

  1. Molecular brakes regulating mTORC1 activation in skeletal muscle following synergist ablation.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, D Lee; Philp, Andrew; MacKenzie, Matthew G; Patton, Amy; Towler, Mhairi C; Gallagher, Iain J; Bodine, Sue C; Baar, Keith

    2014-08-15

    The goal of the current work was to profile positive (mTORC1 activation, autocrine/paracrine growth factors) and negative [AMPK, unfolded protein response (UPR)] pathways that might regulate overload-induced mTORC1 (mTOR complex 1) activation with the hypothesis that a number of negative regulators of mTORC1 will be engaged during a supraphysiological model of hypertrophy. To achieve this, mTORC1-IRS-1/2 signaling, BiP/CHOP/IRE1α, and AMPK activation were determined in rat plantaris muscle following synergist ablation (SA). SA resulted in significant increases in muscle mass of ~4% per day throughout the 21 days of the experiment. The expression of the insulin-like growth factors (IGF) were high throughout the 21st day of overload. However, IGF signaling was limited, since IRS-1 and -2 were undetectable in the overloaded muscle from day 3 to day 9. The decreases in IRS-1/2 protein were paralleled by increases in GRB10 Ser(501/503) and S6K1 Thr(389) phosphorylation, two mTORC1 targets that can destabilize IRS proteins. PKB Ser(473) phosphorylation was higher from 3-6 days, and this was associated with increased TSC2 Thr(939) phosphorylation. The phosphorylation of TSC2 (Thr1345) (an AMPK site) was also elevated, whereas phosphorylation at the other PKB site, Thr(1462), was unchanged at 6 days. In agreement with the phosphorylation of Thr(1345), SA led to activation of AMPKα1 during the initial growth phase, lasting the first 9 days before returning to baseline by day 12. The UPR markers CHOP and BiP were elevated over the first 12 days following ablation, whereas IRE1α levels decreased. These data suggest that during supraphysiological muscle loading at least three potential molecular brakes engage to downregulate mTORC1.

  2. Molecular beam source for high vapor pressure materials

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, T.H.; Schetzina, J.F.

    1982-02-01

    A molecular beam source for deposition of high vapor pressure materials in MBE systems is described. The source consists of a collimating effusion cell of original design which is heated by a temperature-controlled Radak II oven (Luxel Corporation). Construction details of the source are given along with calibration and performance data.

  3. Standoff Detection of Uranium and its Isotopes by Femtosecond Filament Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Hartig, Kyle C.; Ghebregziabher, Isaac; Jovanovic, Igor

    2017-01-01

    The ability to perform not only elementally but also isotopically sensitive detection and analysis at standoff distances is impor-tant for remote sensing applications in diverse ares, such as nuclear nonproliferation, environmental monitoring, geophysics, and planetary science. We demonstrate isotopically sensitive real-time standoff detection of uranium by the use of femtosecond filament-induced laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry. A uranium oxide molecular emission isotope shift of 0.05 ± 0.007 nm is reported at 593.6 nm. We implement both spectroscopic and acoustic diagnostics to characterize the properties of uranium plasma generated at different filament-uranium interaction points. The resulting uranium oxide emis-sion exhibits a nearly constant signal-to-background ratio over the length of the filament, unlike the uranium atomic and ionic emission, for which the signal-to-background ratio varies significantly along the filament propagation. This is explained by the different rates of increase of plasma density and uranium oxide density along the filament length resulting from spectral and temporal evolution of the filament along its propagation. The results provide a basis for the optimal use of filaments for standoff detection and analysis of uranium isotopes and indicate the potential of the technique for a wider range of remote sensing applications that require isotopic sensitivity. PMID:28272450

  4. Standoff Detection of Uranium and its Isotopes by Femtosecond Filament Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartig, Kyle C.; Ghebregziabher, Isaac; Jovanovic, Igor

    2017-03-01

    The ability to perform not only elementally but also isotopically sensitive detection and analysis at standoff distances is impor-tant for remote sensing applications in diverse ares, such as nuclear nonproliferation, environmental monitoring, geophysics, and planetary science. We demonstrate isotopically sensitive real-time standoff detection of uranium by the use of femtosecond filament-induced laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry. A uranium oxide molecular emission isotope shift of 0.05 ± 0.007 nm is reported at 593.6 nm. We implement both spectroscopic and acoustic diagnostics to characterize the properties of uranium plasma generated at different filament-uranium interaction points. The resulting uranium oxide emis-sion exhibits a nearly constant signal-to-background ratio over the length of the filament, unlike the uranium atomic and ionic emission, for which the signal-to-background ratio varies significantly along the filament propagation. This is explained by the different rates of increase of plasma density and uranium oxide density along the filament length resulting from spectral and temporal evolution of the filament along its propagation. The results provide a basis for the optimal use of filaments for standoff detection and analysis of uranium isotopes and indicate the potential of the technique for a wider range of remote sensing applications that require isotopic sensitivity.

  5. Standoff Detection of Uranium and its Isotopes by Femtosecond Filament Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hartig, Kyle C; Ghebregziabher, Isaac; Jovanovic, Igor

    2017-03-08

    The ability to perform not only elementally but also isotopically sensitive detection and analysis at standoff distances is impor-tant for remote sensing applications in diverse ares, such as nuclear nonproliferation, environmental monitoring, geophysics, and planetary science. We demonstrate isotopically sensitive real-time standoff detection of uranium by the use of femtosecond filament-induced laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry. A uranium oxide molecular emission isotope shift of 0.05 ± 0.007 nm is reported at 593.6 nm. We implement both spectroscopic and acoustic diagnostics to characterize the properties of uranium plasma generated at different filament-uranium interaction points. The resulting uranium oxide emis-sion exhibits a nearly constant signal-to-background ratio over the length of the filament, unlike the uranium atomic and ionic emission, for which the signal-to-background ratio varies significantly along the filament propagation. This is explained by the different rates of increase of plasma density and uranium oxide density along the filament length resulting from spectral and temporal evolution of the filament along its propagation. The results provide a basis for the optimal use of filaments for standoff detection and analysis of uranium isotopes and indicate the potential of the technique for a wider range of remote sensing applications that require isotopic sensitivity.

  6. Molecular beam brightening by shock-wave suppression

    PubMed Central

    Segev, Yair; Bibelnik, Natan; Akerman, Nitzan; Shagam, Yuval; Luski, Alon; Karpov, Michael; Narevicius, Julia; Narevicius, Edvardas

    2017-01-01

    Supersonic beams are a prevalent source of cold molecules used in the study of chemical reactions, atom interferometry, gas-surface interactions, precision spectroscopy, molecular cooling, and more. The triumph of this method emanates from the high densities produced in relation to other methods; however, beam density remains fundamentally limited by interference with shock waves reflected from collimating surfaces. We show experimentally that this shock interaction can be reduced or even eliminated by cryocooling the interacting surface. An increase of nearly an order of magnitude in beam density was measured at the lowest surface temperature, with no further fundamental limitation reached. Visualization of the shock waves by plasma discharge and reproduction with direct simulation Monte Carlo calculations both indicate that the suppression of the shock structure is partially caused by lowering the momentum flux of reflected particles and significantly enhanced by the adsorption of particles to the surface. We observe that the scaling of beam density with source pressure is recovered, paving the way to order-of-magnitude brighter, cold molecular beams. PMID:28345047

  7. Resistively Heated SiC Nozzle for Generating Molecular Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cagiano, Steven; Abell, Robert; Patrick, Edward; Bendt, Miri; Gundersen, Cynthia

    2007-01-01

    An improved nozzle has been developed to replace nozzles used previously in an apparatus that generates a substantially unidirectional beam of molecules passing through a vacuum at speeds of several kilometers per second. The basic principle of operation of the apparatus is the same for both the previous and the present nozzle designs. The main working part of the nozzle is essentially a cylinder that is closed except that there is an inlet for a pressurized gas and, at one end, the cylinder is closed by a disk that contains a narrow central hole that serves as an outlet. The cylinder is heated to increase the thermal speeds of the gas molecules into the desired high-speed range. Heated, pressurized gas escapes through the outlet into a portion of the vacuum chamber that is separated, by a wall, from the rest of the vacuum chamber. In this portion of the vacuum chamber, the gas undergoes a free jet expansion. Most of the expanded gas is evacuated and thus does not become part of the molecular beam. A small fraction of the expanded beam passes through a narrow central orifice in the wall and thereby becomes a needle- thin molecular beam in the portion of the vacuum on the downstream side of the wall.

  8. Ablation of graphene film by direct Nd:YVO4 laser under various beaming conditions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeongmin; Han, Jae-Hee; Lee, Jung-Hun; Yoo, Ji-Beom; Cho, Seongjae; Kwon, Sang Jik; Cho, Eou Sik

    2014-12-01

    Recently, graphene is gaining increasing popularity as one of the most functional materials for advanced electronic and optical devices owing to its high carrier mobility and optical transparency. Patterning the graphene calls for particular cares in line definition without carbon (C)-based residues that might be working as a leakage path. Thus, realization and processing of the graphene monolayer are very complicated and need to be stringently controlled. For this reason, in accordance, processing technology should be evolved with higher reliability and accuracy, and compatibility with the conventional unit processes including electron beam (e-beam) lithography, plasma etching, and nano-dimensional optical lithography. In this work, a reliable, simple, and cost-effective technique for patterning the graphene is proposed. Graphene film transferred on glass substrate is directly patterned by a quality factor (Q)-switched neodymium-doped yttrium vanadate (Nd:YVO4, λ = 1064 nm) pumped laser diode (LD). In order to optimize the process condition, various beaming conditions of repetition rate and scanning speed are experimented. From the optical microscope images, it has been shown that graphene film was more easily etched by direct laser patterning technique at higher repetition and faster scanning speed. It was confirmed by Raman spectrum where 2-dimensional (2-D) and graphite (G) peaks were closely investigated that graphene residue was also completely removed after the proposed processing technique.

  9. Fundamental Study of Antimonide Nanostructures by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-04

    to conduct experimental work in molecular beam epitaxial growth of GaSb/GaAs and InSb/GaAs quantum dots (QDs) are conducted and compared with...Nanoelectronics, Quantum Nanostructures 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT SAR 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 10 19a.  NAME OF...September 2014 to July 2015 being conducted at Chulalongkorn University in Thailand. Following the research work on InAs quantum dots (QDs) and quantum

  10. Ambient molecular imaging and depth profiling of live tissue by infrared laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nemes, Peter; Barton, Alexis A; Li, Yue; Vertes, Akos

    2008-06-15

    Mass spectrometry in conjunction with atmospheric pressure ionization methods enables the in vivo investigation of biochemical changes with high specificity and sensitivity. Laser ablation electrospray ionization (LAESI) is a recently introduced ambient ionization method suited for the analysis of biological samples with sufficient water content. With LAESI mass spectrometric analysis of chimeric Aphelandra squarrosa leaf tissue, we identify the metabolites characteristic for the green and yellow sectors of variegation. Significant parts of the related biosynthetic pathways (e.g., kaempferol biosynthesis) are ascertained from the detected metabolites and metabolomic databases. Scanning electron microscopy of the ablated areas indicates the feasibility of both two-dimensional imaging and depth profiling with a approximately 350 microm lateral and approximately 50 microm depth resolution. Molecular distributions of some endogenous metabolites show chemical contrast between the sectors of variegation and quantitative changes as the ablation reaches the epidermal and mesophyll layers. Our results demonstrate that LAESI mass spectrometry opens a new way for ambient molecular imaging and depth profiling of metabolites in biological tissues and live organisms.

  11. An all-optical velocity filter and beam splitter for generating cold molecular beams: a proposal and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xingjia; Liu, Runqin; Yin, Jianping

    2015-12-01

    In order to generate one or two cold molecular beams that have neither a permanent electric dipole moment nor a magnetic dipole one, a controllable scheme to form an all-optical velocity filter and molecular beam splitter by using two red-detuned, crossing and cavity-enhanced guiding laser beams is proposed, and both the dynamic velocity filtering and beam splitting processes of the guided cold I2 molecular beam are studied by using the three-dimensional Monte Carlo method. Our study shows that by adjusting the laser power difference between the two guiding laser beams from -124 W to 124 W, a splitting ratio of the two-arm output molecular beams from about 10.3% to 89.7% can be obtained. Also, by adjusting the intersection angle between the two standing wave cavities from 80° to 10°, an adjustable splitting ratio from about 1.6% to 98.4% can be obtained. If the intersection angle between the guided oblique beam and the guided straight beam is set to 80°, a cold I2 molecular beam with a full-width at half-maximum longitudinal velocity of 1 m s-1 and a longitudinal temperature of 8 mK can be generated by using an all-optical velocity filter.

  12. Applying CLIPS to control of molecular beam epitaxy processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabeau, Arthur A.; Bensaoula, Abdelhak; Jamison, Keith D.; Horton, Charles; Ignatiev, Alex; Glover, John R.

    1990-01-01

    A key element of U.S. industrial competitiveness in the 1990's will be the exploitation of advanced technologies which involve low-volume, high-profit manufacturing. The demands of such manufacture limit participation to a few major entities in the U.S. and elsewhere, and offset the lower manufacturing costs of other countries which have, for example, captured much of the consumer electronics market. One such technology is thin-film epitaxy, a technology which encompasses several techniques such as Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE), Chemical Beam Epitaxy (CBE), and Vapor-Phase Epitaxy (VPE). Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) is a technology for creating a variety of electronic and electro-optical materials. Compared to standard microelectronic production techniques (including gaseous diffusion, ion implantation, and chemical vapor deposition), MBE is much more exact, though much slower. Although newer than the standard technologies, MBE is the technology of choice for fabrication of ultraprecise materials for cutting-edge microelectronic devices and for research into the properties of new materials.

  13. Stereotactic Ablative Radiosurgery for Locally Advanced or Recurrent Skull Base Malignancies with Prior External Beam Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Karen M.; Quan, Kimmen; Clump, David A.; Ferris, Robert L.; Heron, Dwight E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) is an attractive modality to treat malignancies invading the skull base as it can deliver a highly conformal dose with minimal toxicity. However, variation exists in the prescribed dose and fractionation. The purpose of our study is to examine the local control, survival, and toxicities in SABR for the treatment of previously irradiated malignant skull base tumors. Materials and methods: A total of 31 patients and 40 locally advanced or recurrent head and neck malignancies involving the skull base treated with a common SABR regimen, which delivers a radiation dose of 44 Gy in 5 fractions from January 1st, 2004 to December 31st, 2013, were retrospectively reviewed. The local control rate (LC), progression-free survival rate, overall survival (OS) rate, and toxicities were reported. Results: The median follow-up time of all patients was 11.4 months (range: 0.6–67.2 months). The median tumor volume was 27 cm3 (range: 2.4–205 cm3). All patients received prior external beam radiation therapy with a median radiation dose of 64 Gy (range: 24–75.6 Gy) delivered in 12–42 fractions. Twenty patients had surgeries prior to SABR. Nineteen patients received chemotherapy. Specifically, eight patients received concurrent cetuximab (Erbitux™) with SABR. The median time-to-progression (TTP) was 3.3 months (range: 0–16.9 months). For the 29 patients (93.5%) who died, the median time from the end of first SABR to death was 10.3 months (range: 0.5–41.4 months). The estimated 1-year OS rate was 35%. The estimated 2-year OS rate was 12%. Treatment was well-tolerated without grade 4 or 5 treatment-related toxicities. Conclusion: Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy has been shown to achieve low toxicities in locally advanced or recurrent, previously irradiated head and neck malignancies invading the skull base. PMID:25853093

  14. Molecular-Beam Epitaxy Of IrSi3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, True-Lon

    1991-01-01

    Molecular-beam epitaxy grows layers of iridium silicide (IrSi3) on silicon at temperatures of 630 to 800 degrees C. Particularly useful as photodetector material because it forms Schottky diodes having potential barriers of only 0.12 to 0.15 eV - lowest of any metal on silicon. Photodiodes sensitive to infrared radiation at wavelengths as large as 8 to 10 micrometers. New, lower formation temperature expected to enable growth of arrays of IrSi3/Si infrared detectors on Si wafers without thermally damaging image-processing circuitry integrated on wafers.

  15. Chemical reactions on solid surfaces using molecular beam techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, R. L.

    1980-07-01

    Thermal energy molecular beams have been used to study chemical interactions with metal surfaces. Chemisorption of simple molecules such as H2, O2, CH4, C2Hx and CO was investigated on single and polycrystalline surfaces of Pt, Ni, Co, and Ag. Kinetic parameters and reaction mechanisms were determined for model catalytic reactions including CO and C2Hx oxidation and methanation from H2/CO mixtures. Chemical reactions of NOx with CO and D2 on Pt(111) and other surfaces have been surveyed and the kinetics of NO and O2 chemisorption have been measured. The theory of adsorption/desorption kinetics is reviewed and certain deficiencies identified.

  16. Note: A helical velocity selector for continuous molecular beams.

    PubMed

    Szewc, Carola; Collier, James D; Ulbricht, Hendrik

    2010-10-01

    We report on a modern realization of the classic helical velocity selector for gas phase particle beams. The device operates stably under high vacuum conditions at rotational frequencies limited only by commercial dc motor capabilities. Tuning the rotational frequency allows selective scanning over a broad velocity band. The width of the selected velocity distributions at full-width-half-maximum is as narrow as a few percent of the selected mean velocity and independent of the rotational speed of the selector. The selector generates low vibrational noise amplitudes comparable to mechanically damped state-of-the-art turbo-molecular pumps and is therefore compatible with vibration sensitive experiments like molecule interferometry.

  17. Note: A helical velocity selector for continuous molecular beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szewc, Carola; Collier, James D.; Ulbricht, Hendrik

    2010-10-01

    We report on a modern realization of the classic helical velocity selector for gas phase particle beams. The device operates stably under high vacuum conditions at rotational frequencies limited only by commercial dc motor capabilities. Tuning the rotational frequency allows selective scanning over a broad velocity band. The width of the selected velocity distributions at full-width-half-maximum is as narrow as a few percent of the selected mean velocity and independent of the rotational speed of the selector. The selector generates low vibrational noise amplitudes comparable to mechanically damped state-of-the-art turbo-molecular pumps and is therefore compatible with vibration sensitive experiments like molecule interferometry.

  18. Coupled molecular dynamics-Monte Carlo model to study the role of chemical processes during laser ablation of polymeric materials.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Manish; Conforti, Patrick F; Garrison, Barbara J

    2007-08-28

    The coarse grained chemical reaction model is enhanced to build a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation framework with an embedded Monte Carlo (MC) based reaction scheme. The MC scheme utilizes predetermined reaction chemistry, energetics, and rate kinetics of materials to incorporate chemical reactions occurring in a substrate into the MD simulation. The kinetics information is utilized to set the probabilities for the types of reactions to perform based on radical survival times and reaction rates. Implementing a reaction involves changing the reactants species types which alters their interaction potentials and thus produces the required energy change. We discuss the application of this method to study the initiation of ultraviolet laser ablation in poly(methyl methacrylate). The use of this scheme enables the modeling of all possible photoexcitation pathways in the polymer. It also permits a direct study of the role of thermal, mechanical, and chemical processes that can set off ablation. We demonstrate that the role of laser induced heating, thermomechanical stresses, pressure wave formation and relaxation, and thermochemical decomposition of the polymer substrate can be investigated directly by suitably choosing the potential energy and chemical reaction energy landscape. The results highlight the usefulness of such a modeling approach by showing that various processes in polymer ablation are intricately linked leading to the transformation of the substrate and its ejection. The method, in principle, can be utilized to study systems where chemical reactions are expected to play a dominant role or interact strongly with other physical processes.

  19. Molecular Imaging of Growth, Metabolism, and Antibiotic Inhibition in Bacterial Colonies by Laser Ablation Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Hang; Balan, Pranav; Vertes, Akos

    2016-11-21

    Metabolism in microbial colonies responds to competing species, rapidly evolving genetic makeup, and sometimes dramatic environmental changes. Conventional characterization of the existing and emerging microbial strains and their interactions with antimicrobial agents, e.g., the Kirby-Bauer susceptibility test, relies on time consuming methods with limited ability to discern the molecular mechanism and the minimum inhibitory concentration. Assessing the metabolic adaptation of microbial colonies requires their non-targeted molecular imaging in a native environment. Laser ablation electrospray ionization (LAESI) is an ambient ionization technique that in combination with mass spectrometry (MS) enables the analysis and imaging of numerous metabolites and lipids. In this contribution, we report on the application of LAESI-MS imaging to gain deeper molecular insight into microbe-antibiotic interactions, and enhance the quantitative nature of antibiotic susceptibility testing while significantly reducing the required incubation time.

  20. Hyperthermal molecular beam source using a non-diaphragm-type small shock tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimoto, Yuta; Osuka, Kenichi; Miyoshi, Nobuya; Kinefuchi, Ikuya; Takagi, Shu; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2016-10-01

    We have developed a hyperthermal molecular beam source employing a non-diaphragm-type small shock tube for gas-surface interaction studies. Unlike conventional shock-heated beam sources, the capability of repetitive beam generation without the need for replacing a diaphragm makes our beam source suitable for scattering experiments, which require signal accumulation for a large number of beam pulses. The short duration of shock heating alleviates the usual temperature limit due to the nozzle material, enabling the generation of a molecular beam with higher translational energy or that containing dissociated species. The shock-heated beam is substantially free from surface-contaminating impurities that are pronounced in arc-heated beams. We characterize the properties of nitrogen and oxygen molecular beams using the time-of-flight method. When both the timing of beam extraction and the supply quantity of nitrogen gas are appropriately regulated, our beam source can generate a nitrogen molecular beam with translational energy of approximately 1 eV, which corresponds to the typical activation energy of surface reactions. Furthermore, our beam source can generate an oxygen molecular beam containing dissociated oxygen atoms, which can be a useful probe for surface oxidation. The dissociation fraction along with the translational energy can be adjusted through the supply quantity of oxygen gas.

  1. Molecular sputter depth profiling using carbon cluster beams.

    PubMed

    Wucher, Andreas; Winograd, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    Sputter depth profiling of organic films while maintaining the molecular integrity of the sample has long been deemed impossible because of the accumulation of ion bombardment-induced chemical damage. Only recently, it was found that this problem can be greatly reduced if cluster ion beams are used for sputter erosion. For organic samples, carbon cluster ions appear to be particularly well suited for such a task. Analysis of available data reveals that a projectile appears to be more effective as the number of carbon atoms in the cluster is increased, leaving fullerene ions as the most promising candidates to date. Using a commercially available, highly focused C (60) (q+) cluster ion beam, we demonstrate the versatility of the technique for depth profiling various organic films deposited on a silicon substrate and elucidate the dependence of the results on properties such as projectile ion impact energy and angle, and sample temperature. Moreover, examples are shown where the technique is applied to organic multilayer structures in order to investigate the depth resolution across film-film interfaces. These model experiments allow collection of valuable information on how cluster impact molecular depth profiling works and how to understand and optimize the depth resolution achieved using this technique.

  2. A molecular beam/quadrupole mass spectrometer system with synchronized beam modulation and digital waveform analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, G. L.; Adams, B. R.

    1983-01-01

    A performance evaluation is conducted for a molecular beam/mass spectrometer (MB/MS) system, as applied to a 1-30 torr microwave-discharge flow reactor (MWFR) used in the formation of the methylperoxy radical and a study of its subsequent destruction in the presence or absence of NO(x). The modulated MB/MS system is four-staged and differentially pumped. The results obtained by the MWFR study is illustrative of overall system performance, including digital waveform analysis; significant improvements over previous designs are noted in attainable S/N ratio, detection limit, and accuracy.

  3. On the correlation between the photoexcitation pathways and the critical energies required for ablation of poly(methyl methacrylate): A molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect

    Conforti, Patrick F.; Prasad, Manish; Garrison, Barbara J.

    2008-05-15

    The energetics initiating ablation in poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) are studied using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The critical energy to initiate ablation in PMMA following the absorption of photons is investigated for two penetration depths along a range of fluences using a coarse-grained, hybrid Monte Carlo-MD scheme. Both heating and direct bond scission are simulated separately after photon absorption with additional transformation of material occurring via chemical reactions following the photochemical bond cleavage. For a given type of absorption and reaction channel, a critical energy can well describe the amount of energy required to initiate ablation. The simulations show a decrease in the critical energy when a greater amount of photochemistry is introduced in the system. The simulations complement experimental studies and elucidate how enhanced photochemistry lowers ablation thresholds in polymer substrates.

  4. Analysis of KrF excimer laser beam modification resulting from ablation under closed thick film flowing filtered water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowding, Colin; Lawrence, Jonathan

    2011-09-01

    The application of a closed thick film flowing filtered water to immerse the ablation etching mechanism of an excimer laser poses interesting possibilities concerning debris control, modification of machined feature topography and modification of the ablation rate. Furthermore, these parameters have been shown to be dependent on flow velocity; hence, offering further user control of machining characteristics. However, the impact of this technique requires investigation. This contribution offers comparison of the calculated ablation pressure and the effect on feature surface characteristics given for laser ablation of bisphenol A polycarbonate using KrF excimer laser radiation in ambient air against laser ablation of the same substrate under closed thick film flowing filtered water immersion. Also, an impact of such immersion equipment on the optical performance of the micromachining centre used is quantified and reviewed. The pressure is calculated to have risen by a magnitude of 48, when using the liquid immersed ablation technique. This increase in pressure is proposed to have an increased surface roughness, promoting the number of asperities with a surface area lower than 16 μm 2; resulting in a diffuse reflection of light and an apparent darkening of features. The focal length of the optical system was accurately predicted to increase by 2.958 mm, when using the closed flowing liquid immersion equipment. This equipment is predicted to have increased the optical depth of focus via reduction in the angle of convergence of the two defining image rays; yet the perceived focus, measured discretely by mean feature wall angle, was found to be 25% smaller when using the closed thick film flowing filtered water immersion technique instead of similar laser ablation in ambient air. A compressed plume interaction is proposed as a contributing factor in this change.

  5. Production and all-optical deceleration of molecular beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Gary; Jayich, Andrew; Long, Xueping; Ransford, Anthony; Campbell, Wesley

    2015-05-01

    Ultracold molecules open up new opportunities in many areas of study, including many-body physics, quantum chemistry, quantum information, and precision measurements. Current methods cannot easily address the spontaneous decay of molecules into dark states without an amalgam of repump lasers. We present an alternative method to produce cold molecules. A cryogenic buffer gas beam (CBGB) is used to create an intense, slow, cold source of molecules. By using a CBGB for the production, we can quench vibrational modes that cannot be addressed with optical methods. This is then followed by an all-optical scheme using a single ultra-fast laser to decelerate the molecules and a continuous wave laser to cool the species. We have started experiments with strontium monohydride (SrH), but the proposed method should be applicable to a wide range of molecular species.

  6. Silicon surface preparation for III-V molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madiomanana, K.; Bahri, M.; Rodriguez, J. B.; Largeau, L.; Cerutti, L.; Mauguin, O.; Castellano, A.; Patriarche, G.; Tournié, E.

    2015-03-01

    We report on a silicon substrate preparation for III-V molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE). It combines sequences of ex situ and in situ treatments. The ex situ process is composed of cycles of HF dip and O2 plasma treatments. Ellipsometry and atomic force microscopy performed after each step during the substrate preparation reveal surface cleaning and de-oxidation. The in situ treatment consists in flash annealing the substrate in the MBE chamber prior to epitaxial growth. GaSb-based multiple quantum well heterostructures emitting at 1.55 μm were grown by MBE on Si substrates prepared by different methods. Structural characterizations using XRD and TEM coupled with photoluminescence spectroscopy demonstrates the efficiency of our preparation process. This study thus unravels a simple and reproducible protocol to prepare the Si surface prior to III-V MBE.

  7. InPBi single crystals grown by molecular beam epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Wang, K; Gu, Y; Zhou, H F; Zhang, L Y; Kang, C Z; Wu, M J; Pan, W W; Lu, P F; Gong, Q; Wang, S M

    2014-06-26

    InPBi was predicted to be the most robust infrared optoelectronic material but also the most difficult to synthesize within In-VBi (V = P, As and Sb) 25 years ago. We report the first successful growth of InPBi single crystals with Bi concentration far beyond the doping level by gas source molecular beam epitaxy. The InPBi thin films reveal excellent surface, structural and optical qualities making it a promising new III-V compound family member for heterostructures. The Bi concentration is found to be 2.4 ± 0.4% with 94 ± 5% Bi atoms at substitutional sites. Optical absorption indicates a band gap of 1.23 eV at room temperature while photoluminescence shows unexpectedly strong and broad light emission at 1.4-2.7 μm which can't be explained by the existing theory.

  8. Graphitic carbon grown on fluorides by molecular beam epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Jerng, Sahng-Kyoon; Lee, Jae Hong; Kim, Yong Seung; Chun, Seung-Hyun

    2013-01-03

    We study the growth mechanism of carbon molecules supplied by molecular beam epitaxy on fluoride substrates (MgF2, CaF2, and BaF2). All the carbon layers form graphitic carbon with different crystallinities depending on the cation. Especially, the growth on MgF2 results in the formation of nanocrystalline graphite (NCG). Such dependence on the cation is a new observation and calls for further systematic studies with other series of substrates. At the same growth temperature, the NCG on MgF2 has larger clusters than those on oxides. This is contrary to the general expectation because the bond strength of the carbon-fluorine bond is larger than that of the carbon-oxygen bond. Our results show that the growth of graphitic carbon does not simply depend on the chemical bonding between the carbon and the anion in the substrate.

  9. Effects of shutter transients in molecular beam epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Gozu, Shin-Ichiro; Mozume, Teruo; Kuwatsuka, Haruhiko; Ishikawa, Hiroshi

    2012-11-12

    : We have studied the effects of shutter transients (STs) in molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Two series of samples were grown by MBE and evaluated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray reflectivity (XRR) measurements. The effects of STs were evaluated by growth rate (GR) analysis using a combination of growth time (GT) and thickness evaluated by XRD and XRR measurements. We revealed two opposite effects of STs: (1) overshoot of GR and (2) increase in GR with GT and subsequent saturation. Each effect was consistent with the previous studies; however, the previous studies showed no relationships between these two effects. By considering closing time of the shutter, the two opposite effects were well understood.

  10. Molecular beam-thermal hydrogen desorption from palladium

    SciTech Connect

    Lobo, R. F. M.; Berardo, F. M. V.; Ribeiro, J. H. F.

    2010-04-15

    Among the most efficient techniques for hydrogen desorption monitoring, thermal desorption mass spectrometry is a very sensitive one, but in certain cases can give rise to uptake misleading results due to residual hydrogen partial pressure background variations. In this work one develops a novel thermal desorption variant based on the effusive molecular beam technique that represents a significant improvement in the accurate determination of hydrogen mass absorbed on a solid sample. The enhancement in the signal-to-noise ratio for trace hydrogen is on the order of 20%, and no previous calibration with a chemical standard is required. The kinetic information obtained from the hydrogen desorption mass spectra (at a constant heating rate of 1 deg. C/min) accounts for the consistency of the technique.

  11. Crossed-molecular-beams reactive scattering of oxygen atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Baseman, R.J.

    1982-11-01

    The reactions of O(/sup 3/P) with six prototypical unsaturated hydrocarbons, and the reaction of O(/sup 1/D) with HD, have been studied in high-resolution crossed-molecular-beams scattering experiments with mass-spectrometric detection. The observed laboratory-product angular and velocity distributions unambiguously identify parent-daughter ion pairs, distinguish different neutral sources of the same ion, and have been used to identify the primary products of the reactions. The derived center-of-mass product angular and translational energy distributions have been used to elucidate the detailed reaction dynamics. These results demonstrate that O(/sup 3/P)-unsaturated hydrocarbon chemistry is dominated by single bond cleavages, leading to radical products exclusively.

  12. Indium antimonide doped with manganese grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partin, D. L.; Heremans, J.; Thrush, C. M.

    1997-05-01

    Indium antimonide is of interest for infrared detecting and emitting devices and for magnetic field sensors. In this study, indium antimonide doped with manganese and grown by molecular beam epitaxy was investigated. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) was used to show that the incorporation of managenese is near unity over a wide range of manganese concentrations. Manganese is observed to be an acceptor with a dopant efficiency which follows a power law in which the hole density is proportional to the manganese concentration raised to the power α. The power α depends on the growth temperature; at 300°C, α = 0.86 and at 360°C, α = 0.78. Lightly manganese doped samples have transport dominated by electrons at low temperatures due to hole freeze out, followed by holes at intermediate temperatures and finally by intrinsic electrons at high temperatures. Additional SIMS studies showed that manganese diffuses relatively slowly in indium antimonide.

  13. Porous ZnO nanonetworks grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, W. C. T.; Kendrick, C. E.; Millane, R. P.; Liu, Z.; Ringer, S. P.; Washburn, K.; Callaghan, P. T.; Durbin, S. M.

    2012-04-01

    Plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy was employed to create porous nanonetworks of ZnO directly on GaN epilayers without the use of catalysts or templates. Detailed analysis of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of both as-grown and etched samples reveals that the typical porous nanonetwork structure is multilayered, and suggests that dislocations originating at the GaN/sapphire heterointerface and/or defects characterizing an unusually rough GaN surface are responsible. The pore size distribution of the nanonetwork was measured using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) cryoporometry. A bimodal pore size distribution centred at 4 nm and 70 nm, respectively, was observed, consistent with the existence of small nanoscale pores in the bulk of the sample, and large open pores on the surface of the porous nanonetwork as observed by SEM.

  14. A high pressure modulated molecular beam mass spectrometric sampling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stearns, C. A.; Kohl, F. J.; Fryburg, G. C.; Miller, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    The current state of understanding of free-jet high pressure sampling is critically reviewed and modifications of certain theoretical and empirical considerations are presented. A high pressure, free-jet expansion, modulated molecular beam, mass spectrometric sampling apparatus was constructed and this apparatus is described in detail. Experimental studies have demonstrated that the apparatus can be used to sample high temperature systems at pressures up to one atmosphere. Condensible high temperature gaseous species have been routinely sampled and the mass spectrometric detector has provided direct identification of sampled species. System sensitivity is better than one tenth of a part per million. Experimental results obtained with argon and nitrogen beams are presented and compared to theoretical predictions. These results and the respective comparison are taken to indicate acceptable performance of the sampling apparatus. Results are also given for two groups of experiments related to hot corrosion studies. The formation of gaseous sodium sulfate in doped methane-oxygen flames was characterized and the oxidative vaporization of metals was studied in an atmospheric pressure flowing gas system to which gaseous salt partial pressures were added.

  15. Production of molecular ion beams using an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Draganić, I. N.; Bannister, M. E.; Meyer, F. W.; Vane, C. R.; Havener, C. C.

    2011-06-01

    An all-permanent magnet electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source is tuned to create a variety of intense molecular ion beams for basic energy research. Based on simultaneous injection of several gases with spectroscopic high purity or enriched isotope content (e.g., H2, D2, N2, O2, or CO) and lower power microwave heating, the ECR ion source produces diatomic molecular ion beams of H2+, D2+, HD+, HO+, DO+, NH+, ND+, and more complex polyatomic molecular ions such as H3+, D3+, HD2+, H2O+, D2O+, H3O+, D3O+, and NHn+, NDn+ with n=2,3,4 and possibly higher. Molecular ion beams have been produced with very high current intensities compared to other molecular beam sources. The recorded molecular ion beam spectra are discussed.

  16. Development of Ultra Small Shock Tube for High Energy Molecular Beam Source

    SciTech Connect

    Miyoshi, Nobuya; Nagata, Shuhei; Kinefuchi, Ikuya; Shimizu, Kazuya; Matsumoto, Yoichiro; Takagi, Shu

    2008-12-31

    A molecular beam source exploiting a small shock tube is described for potential generation of high energy beam in a range of 1-5 eV without any undesirable impurities. The performance of a non-diaphragm type shock tube with an inner diameter of 2 mm was evaluated by measuring the acceleration and attenuation process of shock waves. With this shock tube installed in a molecular beam source, we measured the time-of-flight distributions of shock-heated beams, which demonstrated the ability of controlling the beam energy with the initial pressure ratio of the shock tube.

  17. Dosimetric comparison of a 6-MV flattening-filter and a flattening-filter-free beam for lung stereotactic ablative radiotherapy treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yon-Lae; Chung, Jin-Beom; Kim, Jae-Sung; Lee, Jeong-Woo; Kim, Jin-Young; Kang, Sang-Won; Suh, Tae-Suk

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility of clinical usage of a flattening-filter-free (FFF) beam for treatment with lung stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR). Ten patients were treated with SABR and a 6-MV FFF beam for this study. All plans using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) were optimized in the Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS) by using the Acuros XB (AXB) dose calculation algorithm and were delivered by using a Varian TrueBeam ™ linear accelerator equipped with a high-definition (HD) multi-leaf collimator. The prescription dose used was 48 Gy in 4 fractions. In order to compare the plan using a conventional 6-MV flattening-filter (FF) beam, the SABR plan was recalculated under the condition of the same beam settings used in the plan employing the 6-MV FFF beam. All dose distributions were calculated by using Acuros XB (AXB, version 11) and a 2.5-mm isotropic dose grid. The cumulative dosevolume histograms (DVH) for the planning target volume (PTV) and all organs at risk (OARs) were analyzed. Technical parameters, such as total monitor units (MUs) and the delivery time, were also recorded and assessed. All plans for target volumes met the planning objectives for the PTV ( i.e., V95% > 95%) and the maximum dose ( i.e., Dmax < 110%) revealing adequate target coverage for the 6-MV FF and FFF beams. Differences in DVH for target volumes (PTV and clinical target volume (CTV)) and OARs on the lung SABR plans from the interchange of the treatment beams were small, but showed a marked reduction (52.97%) in the treatment delivery time. The SABR plan with a FFF beam required a larger number of MUs than the plan with the FF beam, and the mean difference in MUs was 4.65%. This study demonstrated that the use of the FFF beam for lung SABR plan provided better treatment efficiency relative to 6-MV FF beam. This strategy should be particularly beneficial for high dose conformity to the lung and decreased intra-fraction movements because of

  18. Dependence of ultraviolet nanosecond laser polymer ablation on polymer molecular weight: Poly(methyl methacrylate) at 248 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bounos, Giannis; Selimis, Alexandros; Georgiou, Savas; Rebollar, Esther; Castillejo, Marta; Bityurin, Nikita

    2006-12-01

    We rely on a methodology demonstrated previously for assessing the temperature evolution and polymer viscosity changes in the 248nm irradiation of poly(methyl methacrylate)s (PMMAs) with molecular weights (Mw) ranging from 2.5to996kDa. Briefly, this methodology [G. Bounos et al., J. Appl. Phys. 98, 084317 (2005)] relies on monitoring the formation of aryl products in the irradiation of polymer doped with iodonaphthalene or iodophenanthrene. The results demonstrate that higher temperatures are attained with increasing Mw. The surface temperatures at the corresponding ablation thresholds are estimated to be ˜850-900K for Mw⩾120kDa vs ˜600K for 2.5kDa PMMA. In addition, for all Mw's, melting is demonstrated (viscosity values of ≈101Pas), but it lasts longer for high Mw PMMAs. We ascribe these differences to the fact that low Mw PMMAs dissociate efficiently to desorbing monomers/oligomers, thereby resulting in more efficient energy removal. Even so, the ablation threshold of the high Mw PMMAs is attained at higher fluences. This can be ascribed to the higher fraction of bonds that is required to be broken, and also plausibly to the higher gaseous product pressures that must be attained, for material ejection to be effected. The results are overall well accounted by the bulk photothermal model.

  19. Dependence of ultraviolet nanosecond laser polymer ablation on polymer molecular weight: Poly(methyl methacrylate) at 248 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Bounos, Giannis; Selimis, Alexandros; Georgiou, Savas; Rebollar, Esther; Castillejo, Marta; Bityurin, Nikita

    2006-12-01

    We rely on a methodology demonstrated previously for assessing the temperature evolution and polymer viscosity changes in the 248 nm irradiation of poly(methyl methacrylate)s (PMMAs) with molecular weights (M{sub w}) ranging from 2.5 to 996 kDa. Briefly, this methodology [G. Bounos et al., J. Appl. Phys. 98, 084317 (2005)] relies on monitoring the formation of aryl products in the irradiation of polymer doped with iodonaphthalene or iodophenanthrene. The results demonstrate that higher temperatures are attained with increasing M{sub w}. The surface temperatures at the corresponding ablation thresholds are estimated to be {approx}850-900 K for M{sub w}{>=}120 kDa vs {approx}600 K for 2.5 kDa PMMA. In addition, for all M{sub w}'s, melting is demonstrated (viscosity values of {approx_equal}10{sup 1} Pa s), but it lasts longer for high M{sub w} PMMAs. We ascribe these differences to the fact that low M{sub w} PMMAs dissociate efficiently to desorbing monomers/oligomers, thereby resulting in more efficient energy removal. Even so, the ablation threshold of the high M{sub w} PMMAs is attained at higher fluences. This can be ascribed to the higher fraction of bonds that is required to be broken, and also plausibly to the higher gaseous product pressures that must be attained, for material ejection to be effected. The results are overall well accounted by the bulk photothermal model.

  20. Crossed Molecular Beam Studies of the Reactions of Oxygen and Fluorine Atoms.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-11-09

    Spectroscopy , Western Spectroscopy Association Conference, Asilomar, Pacific Grove, California, January 28-30, 1981. 96. Y. T. Lee, Dynamics of Infared ...reverse side If neceasary and Identify by block number) Molecular Beam Dynamics; Photofragmentation Translational Spectroscopy ; Unimolecular Decay...we initiated molecular beam photofragmentation translational spectroscopy experiments to study for the dissociation of ozone and other molecules

  1. Investigations of ice nanoparticles and aerosols in molecular beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farnik, Michal

    2015-03-01

    We have recently set up a versatile experiment which allows for different experiments with molecular clusters and nanoparticles in molecular beams. Here we concentrate on the experiments with ice nanoparticles (large water clusters (H2O)N, N ~ 102-103) doped with atmospherically relevant molecules, e.g., hydrogen halides, CFCs, nitric acid, NxOy, etc. Such species are relevant to ozone depletion and other atmospheric processes. We investigate (1) the UV-photochemistry using velocity map imaging techniques, and (2) the uptake cross section for the molecules on the ice nanoparticles from velocity measurements. In addition, we record (3) mass spectra of the particles implementing different ionization methods: electron ionization (EI) at variable electron energies, photoionization, and special method of electron photodetachment after Na-doping (NaPI). The unique combination of all these different methods performed with the same nanoparticles provides detailed molecular level information about the studied species and their (photo)physics and chemistry. In particular, an investigation of mixed water-nitric acid particles by means of EI and NaPI revealed the prominent role of the HNO3 molecule as the condensation nuclei. The uptake of atmospheric molecules by ice nanoparticles has been studied, and the pickup cross sections for some molecules exceed significantly the geometrical sizes of the ice nanoparticles. It has been argued that the large particles composed of several hundred water molecules which grow in the supersonic expansions tend to have highly irregular shapes -nanosnowflakes. Photodissociation of hydrogen halides on ice nanoparticles has been investigated, and shown to proceed via excitation of acidically dissociated ion pair and subsequent biradical generation and H3O dissociation. The photodissociation of CF2Cl2 molecules in clusters leads to efficient Cl-fragment caging caused by formation of halogen bond. Grant agency of the Czech Republic, Grant No.: 14

  2. Effects of endovenous laser ablation on vascular tissue: molecular genetics approach

    PubMed Central

    Alur, İhsan; Dodurga, Yavuz; Güneş, Tevfik; Eroglu, Canan; Durna, Fırat; Türk, Nilay Şen; Adıgüzel, Esat; Emrecan, Bilgin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Endovenous laser ablation (EVLA) is a treatment option for lower extremity varicose veins. In the present study, we investigate to the genetic changes and possibility of living tissue in the saphenous vein wall after the EVLA procedure. Methods: Eleven saphenous vein grafts were randomized in two groups: (1) 4 cm SVG segments of performed EVLA procedure in study group, (2) 4 cm segments of SVG none performed EVLA procedure in control group. SVG were taken from the remnants of distal saphenous vein grafts prepared for the bypass procedure but not used. SVG was approximately 8 cm in length and was divided into two parts 4 cm in length. One half was exposed to laser energy, while the other half of the same vein graft was untreated as a control. EVLA was performed on complete saphenous veins in the study group. Abnormal genetic changes of the SVG were observed with a Tri-Reagent method and quantified with a Nanodrop™ spectrophotometer. Results: Histopathological changes indicated that the intima including the endothelium was completely necrotized in the study group. It was observed that intimal thermal-energy-induced injury did not reach the media. Histopathological examination showed that homogenous eosinophilic discoloration and coagulation necrosis characterized the laser related thermal damage as well. Conclusions: In this preliminary study, we found that living tissue remained in the SVG wall after application of laser ablation, and we also detected abnormal genetic changes in the study group compared with the control group. PMID:26379903

  3. Global Modeling of Uranium Molecular Species Formation Using Laser-Ablated Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curreli, Davide; Finko, Mikhail; Azer, Magdi; Armstrong, Mike; Crowhurst, Jonathan; Radousky, Harry; Rose, Timothy; Stavrou, Elissaios; Weisz, David; Zaug, Joseph

    2016-10-01

    Uranium is chemically fractionated from other refractory elements in post-detonation nuclear debris but the mechanism is poorly understood. Fractionation alters the chemistry of the nuclear debris so that it no longer reflects the chemistry of the source weapon. The conditions of a condensing fireball can be simulated by a low-temperature plasma formed by vaporizing a uranium sample via laser heating. We have developed a global plasma kinetic model in order to model the chemical evolution of U/UOx species within an ablated plasma plume. The model allows to track the time evolution of the density and energy of an uranium plasma plume moving through an oxygen atmosphere of given fugacity, as well as other relevant quantities such as average electron and gas temperature. Comparison of model predictions with absorption spectroscopy of uranium-ablated plasmas provide preliminary insights on the key chemical species and evolution pathways involved during the fractionation process. This project was sponsored by the DoD, Defense Threat Reduction Agency, Grant HDTRA1-16-1-0020. This work was performed in part under the auspices of the U.S. DoE by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  4. III-nitride ultraviolet emitters produced by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Anirban

    In this dissertation, the growth of III-Nitride based ultraviolet (UV) emitters by molecular beam epitaxy has been addressed. These devices can find applications in optical data storage, solid-state lighting, and in biological detection. A significant part of the research involved materials development, as there are several major scientific and technological hurdles that must be overcome in order to produce commercially viable devices. For emission in the wavelength region 330 nm to 350 nm, the devices were designed as electrically-injected light emitting diodes (LEDs). Each layer of this structure was individually optimized to improve the materials properties. To overcome the difficulties in p-type doping, a new growth regime has been explored which led to films with hole concentrations of up to 2 x 10 18/cm3. Multiple quantum wells (MQWs) were grown along polar and non-polar directions to understand the effects of the presence of built-in polarization fields. It was found that these detrimental effects are minimized for ultra thin wells. Use of an Indium flux as a surfactant was found to substantially improve the luminescence properties of bulk Aluminum Gallium Nitride (AlGaN) alloys and MQWs. UV-LEDs grown under these optimized conditions show an optical power output of 0.75 mW at 340 nm and 4.5 mW at 350nm. For emission in the wavelength region below 270 nm, due to the difficulty of doping AlGaN alloys with high Aluminum Nitride (AlN) mole fraction, edge or vertical emitting electron beam-pumped laser structures have been developed. Since it is difficult to cleave III-Nitrides deposited onto C-plane sapphire, edge emitting laser structures using a Graded-Index Separate Confinement Heterostructure (GRINSCH) based geometry have been deposited onto A-plane sapphire using a novel AlN buffer layer. An AlGaN bulk film or a set of AlN/AlGaN MQWs is used as the active region. For use in these devices, the growth of high Al content AlGaN was optimized to reduce the deep

  5. Modulated molecular beam scattering of disilane on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, S. K.; Gates, S. M.; Scott, B. A.; Sawin, H. H.

    1990-12-01

    Decomposition and scattering of disilane on Si(111) has been studied by modulated molecular beam spectrometry over the temperature range of 50-850°C and with beam fluxes from 10 15-10 16 cm -2 s -1. Disilane exhibits a surface residence time as an intact molecule of ˜ 50 micros at room temperature, which we attribute to a molecular precursor (physisorbed) state. The residence time decreases with increasing temperature and cannot be experimentally observed (< 20 micros) above 250 ° C. The reactive sticking coefficient increases with surface temperature ( Ts) from 0% at room temperature on a surface passivated with SiH x species (no reactivity) to 30% at 850 °C. Rapid evolution of monosilane occurs for Ts > 500 °C. Unusually slow desorption of H 2 is observed (time constant ˜ 1 s) at temperatures as high as 850 ° C. The rate of hydrogen evolution increases with the incident disilane flux and the substrate temperature. A model is used to fit the experimental data. The model is based on a surface reaction mechanism developed in the next paper (S.K. Kulkarni et al., Surf. Sci. 239 (1990) 26, ref. [1]). According to this model, adsorbed disilane decomposes producing SiH 4 and chemisorbed SiH. The SiH migrates to active sites on the surface where hydrogen is produced by a second-order mechanism which has an activation energy of about 20 kcal/mol. Si film growth rates are predicted from the proposed model and these agree reasonably well with experimental growth rate data in the literature. The main channel of Si growth from Si 2H 6 at high T s (500-900 °C) is predicted to be by decomposition of disilane emitting SiH 4 and chemisorbing SiH 2, which rapidly decomposes to SiH . The chemisorbed SiH can react with incident disilane emitting SiH 4. This process is more active at H removal from the surface than is the recombination of 2 SiH to desorb H 2. Both SiH species and bare Si sites are proposed to be active sites for Si 2H 6 decomposition.

  6. Compact laser molecular beam epitaxy system using laser heating of substrate for oxide film growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohashi, S.; Lippmaa, M.; Nakagawa, N.; Nagasawa, H.; Koinuma, H.; Kawasaki, M.

    1999-01-01

    A high-temperature, oxygen compatible, and compact laser molecular beam epitaxy (laser MBE) system has been developed. The 1.06 μm infrared light from a continuous wave neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser was used to achieve a wide range and rapid control of substrate temperature in ultrahigh vacuum and at up to 1 atm oxygen pressure. The maximum usable temperature was limited to 1453 °C by the melting point of the nickel sample holder. To our knowledge, this is the highest temperature reported for pulsed laser deposition of oxide films. The efficient laser heating combined with temperature monitoring by a pyrometer and feedback control of the Nd:YAG laser power by a personal computer made it possible to regulate the substrate temperature accurately and to achieve high sample heating and cooling rates. The oxygen pressure and ablation laser triggering were also controlled by the computer. The accurate growth parameter control was combined with real-time in situ surface structure monitoring by reflection high energy electron diffraction to investigate oxide thin film growth in detail over a wide range of temperatures, oxygen partial pressures, and deposition rates. We have demonstrated the performance of this system by the fabrication of homoepitaxial SrTiO3 films as well as heteroepitaxial Sr2RuO4, and SrRuO3 films on SrTiO3 substrates at temperatures of up to 1300 °C. This temperature was high enough to change the film growth mode from layer by layer to step flow.

  7. Creating Ruddlesden-Popper phases by hybrid molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haislmaier, Ryan C.; Stone, Greg; Alem, Nasim; Engel-Herbert, Roman

    2016-07-01

    The synthesis of a 50 unit cell thick n = 4 Srn+1TinO3n+1 (Sr5Ti4O13) Ruddlesden-Popper (RP) phase film is demonstrated by sequentially depositing SrO and TiO2 layers in an alternating fashion using hybrid molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), where Ti was supplied using titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP). A detailed calibration procedure is outlined for determining the shuttering times to deposit SrO and TiO2 layers with precise monolayer doses using in-situ reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) as feedback. Using optimized Sr and TTIP shuttering times, a fully automated growth of the n = 4 RP phase was carried out over a period of >4.5 h. Very stable RHEED intensity oscillations were observed over the entire growth period. The structural characterization by X-ray diffraction and high resolution transmission electron microscopy revealed that a constant periodicity of four SrTiO3 perovskite unit cell blocks separating the double SrO rocksalt layer was maintained throughout the entire film thickness with a very little amount of planar faults oriented perpendicular to the growth front direction. These results illustrate that hybrid MBE is capable of layer-by-layer growth with atomic level precision and excellent flux stability.

  8. On the Growth of Complex Oxides by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fong, Dillon

    Functional materials based on complex oxides in thin film form offer new and exciting strategies for meeting many of our outstanding energy challenges through systematic control of layer sequencing, strain, etc. However, the synthesis of such oxide films can be a major challenge even when utilizing reactive molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE), a powerful deposition technique that allows the construction of materials atomic plane by atomic plane. To understand the fundamental physics of oxide growth by reactive MBE, we present in situ surface x-ray diffraction results on the growth of SrTiO3 and SrO-SrTiO3 thin films on (001)-oriented SrTiO3 substrates. For homoepitaxy, we compare sequential deposition (alternating Sr and Ti monolayer doses) with that of co-deposition of Sr and Ti, both in a background of oxygen pressure, and observe drastically different growth pathways due to the presence of a TiO2 double layer. For heteroepitaxial growth of Ruddlesden-Popper SrO-SrTiO3 films, we find that layers rearrange dynamically, resulting in layer sequences distinct from the shutter sequence. In general, the starting surface structure and composition, in combination with local thermodynamic considerations, strongly influence our ability to atomically construct new complex oxides.

  9. Growth of Atomically Flat DBCO Films Using Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrus, Aaron E.; Oh, Seongshik; Davidson, Bruce A.; O'Donnell, Jim; Eckstein, James N.

    2000-03-01

    We have grown atomically flat a-axis dysprosium barium copper oxide (DBCO) films by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) using a pure ozone source. Such films can be used, for example, to exploit the inherent anisotropy of DBCO in spin injection devices using ferromagnetic polarized electron sources or all-superconducting Josephson junctions. The a-axis films are grown on a strontium titanate (STO) substrate using a low temperature DBCO template to achieve a-axis orientation. During growth, we use reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) to observe the emergence of one-third order streaks in the diffraction pattern and a reduction in the surface roughness as we increase the growth temperature. Subsequent x-ray diffraction shows complete a-axis normal orientation with pseudomorphic growth (in-plane lattice constants identical to the substrate) and a slightly larger out of plane lattice constant than bulk crystals. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) shows an RMS roughness of 4 Å over several millimeters of the film surface, sufficient to construct tunnel junction devices.

  10. Molecular beam epitaxial growth of tin oxide semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, Gabriel A.

    In an effort to develop a method to utilize SnO in transparent electronic and optoelectronic applications, the molecular beam epitaxy method was used to grow a thin film SnO sample. Five samples were grown and studied using various conventional techniques. X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy was used to identify the composition of the samples. The quality and thickness of the samples was studied using Scanning Electron Microscopy. This data was used to determine which samples were successful growths of SnO and how the growth conditions of each may have affected the outcomes. From the compiled data, single phase SnO was identified and selected for further study of it electrical properties. Previous studies have not been able to accurately identify the band gap energy of SnO due to its instability as an oxide. A bandgap energy of 2.56 eV was determined by photoluminescence analysis. This is consistent with reported estimates of between 2.5 to 3 eV for SnO.

  11. Molecular beam epitaxy for advanced gate stack materials and processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Locquet, Jean-Pierre

    2005-03-01

    The material requirements for future CMOS generations - as given by the ITRS roadmap - are very challenging. This includes a high K dielectric without a low K interfacial layer, a high mobility channel and the appropriate metal gate. With the help of two projects INVEST and ET4US, we are building up a molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) infrastructure to grow this material set on large area wafers that can be further processed into small scale devices. In the INVEST project, we have developed an MBE system for the growth of complex oxides on semiconductors. The system follows the overall design of a production tool and is equipped with an RF atomic oxygen source, effusion cells, e-beam evaporators and a differential pumping stage. The oxide growth process starts with desorbing the initial surface oxide on the Si wafers in ultra-high vacuum and high temperature to create a clean reconstructed 2x1 surface. Using the atomic oxygen it is possible to oxidize the surface in a well controlled manner at low temperature and to grow very thin and dense SiOx layers, followed by the growth of 2-6 nm amorphous high K dielectrics. The process parameters permit to tune the interface layer from a SiOx rich to a silicide rich interface with a significant impact on the capacitance and the leakage. Initial focus is on developing an optimized growth recipe for high quality amorphous HfO2 and LaHfO3.5 films. This recipe was subsequently used to make wafers for a transistor batch that gave us the first N short channel MBE MOSFET's (100 nm) using an etched gate process flow. Some highlights of the first batch for 3nm HfO2 MOSFET are a high mobility (> 270 cm^2/Vs) with a corresponding low leakage current of 2 mA/cm^2). While there were some process issues for LaHfO3.5, the 3 nm MOSFET showed very low leakage currents below 10-6 A/cm^2. Interestingly all the LaHFO3.5 MOSFETs showed very low threshold voltage instabilities. In collaboration with C. Marchiori, M. Sousa, A.Guiller, H. Siegwart, D

  12. Time-of-flight velocity analysis of atomic and molecular beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagena, O. F.; Varma, A. K.

    1968-01-01

    Conditions required for resolving a given beam speed distribution were evaluated by calculating the time-of-flight (TOF) signal for a finite open time of the beam shutter. Design criteria for a beam chopper and detection system are discussed in terms of the resolution, the range of speeds to be measured, and the optimum signal to noise ratio. A TOF system for detection of high intensity molecular beams with large speed ratios, as well as for low intensity scattered beams, is described. Experimental results are presented.

  13. Perspective: Rapid synthesis of complex oxides by combinatorial molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    A. T. Bollinger; Wu, J.; Bozovic, I.

    2016-03-15

    In this study, the molecular beam epitaxy(MBE) technique is well known for producing atomically smooth thin films as well as impeccable interfaces in multilayers of many different materials. In particular, molecular beam epitaxy is well suited to the growth of complex oxides, materials that hold promise for many applications. Rapid synthesis and high throughput characterization techniques are needed to tap into that potential most efficiently. We discuss our approach to doing that, leaving behind the traditional one-growth-one-compound scheme and instead implementing combinatorial oxide molecular beam epitaxy in a custom built system.

  14. Three-dimensional nanoscale molecular imaging by extreme ultraviolet laser ablation mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsov, Ilya; Filevich, Jorge; Dong, Feng; Woolston, Mark; Chao, Weilun; Anderson, Erik H.; Bernstein, Elliot R.; Crick, Dean C.; Rocca, Jorge J.; Menoni, Carmen S.

    2015-01-01

    Analytical probes capable of mapping molecular composition at the nanoscale are of critical importance to materials research, biology and medicine. Mass spectral imaging makes it possible to visualize the spatial organization of multiple molecular components at a sample's surface. However, it is challenging for mass spectral imaging to map molecular composition in three dimensions (3D) with submicron resolution. Here we describe a mass spectral imaging method that exploits the high 3D localization of absorbed extreme ultraviolet laser light and its fundamentally distinct interaction with matter to determine molecular composition from a volume as small as 50 zl in a single laser shot. Molecular imaging with a lateral resolution of 75 nm and a depth resolution of 20 nm is demonstrated. These results open opportunities to visualize chemical composition and chemical changes in 3D at the nanoscale. PMID:25903827

  15. Metallic impurities in gallium nitride grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    McHugo, S.A.; Krueger, J.; Kisielowski, C.

    1997-04-01

    Transition metals are often encountered in trace amounts in semiconductors. They have been extensively studied in most elemental and compound systems, since they form deep donor and/or acceptor levels which usually degrade the electronic and optical material properties. Only very little is known about transition metals in recent III-V semiconducting materials, such as GaN, AlN and InN. These few studies have been done exclusively on Metal-Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD) or Hybrid Vapor Phase Epitaxy HVPE-grown GaN. Preliminary x-ray fluorescence studies at the Advanced Light Source, beamline 10.3.1, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have revealed that GaN materials grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) have Fe, Ni and Cr as the dominant transition metal contaminants. This finding is commensurate with the extremely high concentrations of hydrogen, carbon and oxygen (up to 10{sup 20} cm{sup {minus}3}) measured by Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS). Preliminary work using the mapping capabilities of the x-ray fluorescence microprobe revealed the metal impurities were inhomogeneously distributed over the film. Future work of this collaboration will be to find a correlation between the existence of transition metals in MBE films, as revealed by x-ray fluorescence, and Photoluminescence (PL) spectra taken in the infrared region. Also, the authors will make use of the 1 {mu}m spatial resolution of x-ray microprobe to locate the contaminants in relation to structural defects in the GaN films. Because of the large strain caused by the lattice mismatch between the GaN films and the substrates, the films grow in a columnar order with high densities of grain boundaries and dislocations. These structural defects offer preferential sites for metal precipitation or agglomeration which could degrade the optical properties of this material more so than if the impurities were left dissolved in the GaN.

  16. Selective ablation of Xe from silicon surfaces: molecular dynamics simulations and experimental laser patterning.

    PubMed

    Stein, Ori; Lin, Zhibin; Zhigilei, Leonid V; Asscher, Micha

    2011-06-16

    The mechanism of laser-induced removal of Xe overlayers from a Si substrate has been investigated employing MD simulations and evaluated by buffer layer assisted laser patterning experiments. Two distinct regimes of overlayer removal are identified in the simulations of a uniform heating of the Si substrate by a 5 ns laser pulse: The intensive evaporation from the surface of the Xe overlayer and the detachment of the entire Xe overlayer driven by explosive boiling in the vicinity of the hot substrate. Simulations of selective heating of only a fraction of the silicon substrate suggest that the lateral heat transfer and bonding to the unheated, colder regions of the Xe overlayer is very efficient and suppresses the separation of a fraction of the overlayer from the substrate. Interaction with surrounding cold Xe is responsible for significant increase in the substrate temperature required for achieving the spatially selective ablation of the overlayer. The predictions of the MD simulations are found to be in a qualitative agreement with the results of experimental measurements of the threshold laser power required for the removal of Xe overlayers of different thickness and the shapes of metallic stripes generated by buffer-assisted laser patterning.

  17. Measurement of the density profile of pure and seeded molecular beams by femtosecond ion imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Congsen; Janssen, Maurice H. M.

    2015-02-15

    Here, we report on femtosecond ion imaging experiments to measure the density profile of a pulsed supersonic molecular beam. Ion images are measured for both a molecular beam and bulk gas under identical experimental conditions via femtosecond multiphoton ionization of Xe atoms. We report the density profile of the molecular beam, and the measured absolute density is compared with theoretical calculations of the centre line beam density. Subsequently, we discuss reasons accounting for the differences between measurements and calculations and propose that strong skimmer interference is the most probable cause for the differences. Furthermore, we report on experiments measuring the centre line density of seeded supersonic beams. The femtosecond ion images show that seeding the heavy Xe atom at low relative seed fractions (1%-10%) in a light carrier gas like Ne results in strong relative enhancements of up to two orders of magnitude.

  18. A new crossed molecular beam apparatus using time-sliced ion velocity imaging technique

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Guorong; Zhang Weiqing; Pan Huilin; Shuai Quan; Jiang Bo; Dai Dongxu; Yang Xueming

    2008-09-15

    A new crossed molecular beam apparatus has been constructed for investigating polyatomic chemical reactions using the time-sliced ion velocity map imaging technique. A unique design is adopted for one of the two beam sources and allows us to set up the molecular beam source either horizontally or vertically. This can be conveniently used to produce versatile atomic or radical beams from photodissociation and as well as electric discharge. Intensive H-atom beam source with high speed ratio was produced by photodissociation of the HI molecule and was reacted with the CD{sub 4} molecule. Vibrational-state resolved HD product distribution was measured by detecting the CD{sub 3} product. Preliminary results were also reported on the F+SiH{sub 4} reaction using the discharged F atom beam. These results demonstrate that this new instrument is a powerful tool for investigating chemical dynamics of polyatomic reactions.

  19. Fabrication of precision high quality facets on molecular beam epitaxy material

    DOEpatents

    Petersen, Holly E.; Goward, William D.; Dijaili, Sol P.

    2001-01-01

    Fabricating mirrored vertical surfaces on semiconductor layered material grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Low energy chemically assisted ion beam etching (CAIBE) is employed to prepare mirrored vertical surfaces on MBE-grown III-V materials under unusually low concentrations of oxygen in evacuated etching atmospheres of chlorine and xenon ion beams. UV-stabilized smooth-surfaced photoresist materials contribute to highly vertical, high quality mirrored surfaces during the etching.

  20. Unraveling Cold Molecular Collisions: Stark Decelerators in Crossed-Beam Experiments.

    PubMed

    Onvlee, Jolijn; Vogels, Sjoerd N; van de Meerakker, Sebastiaan Y T

    2016-11-18

    In the last two decades, enormous progress has been made in the manipulation of molecular beams. In particular, molecular decelerators have been developed with which advanced control over neutral molecules in a beam can be achieved. By using arrays of inhomogeneous and time-varying electric (or magnetic) fields, bunches of molecules can be produced with a tunable velocity, narrow velocity spreads, and almost perfect quantum-state purity. These monochromatic or "tamed" molecular beams are ideally suited to be used in crossed-molecular-beam scattering experiments. Here, we review the first generation of these "cold and controlled" scattering experiments that have been conducted in the last decade and discuss the prospects for this emerging field of research in the years to come.

  1. Non-ablative radio-frequency rejuvenation: a histological and bio-molecular report.

    PubMed

    Avantaggiato, A; Andreasi Bassi, M; Cura, F; Pascali, M; Carinci, F

    2016-01-01

    Radiofrequency machines for medical use are known to produce moderate clinical improvement of skin laxity without invasive procedures. Numerous equipment with different characteristics have been proposed after the introduction in 2002 of the first FDA approved device. This report is aimed to test if RF treatment is effective when performed at low frequency and low energy level. Two RF treatments were performed unilaterally 7 and 2 days before a planned eyebrow lifting surgery, with a radiofrequency device with 0.52 to 0.7 MHz frequencies, maximum energy of 200 W, used at 40% of its power. A bipolar handpiece with a diameter of 30 mm and a maximum power of 9-9.5 W was massaged along the temporal area for 10 min. Skin samples of treated and untreated sides were collected during surgery and processed for histologic examination and RT-PCR analysis, to test differences in gene activation in a panel of proteins that are relevant in extracellular matrix of dermal connective tissue. The histological examination of the samples showed that the treatment induced a loss of the typical oriented structure in the reticular dermis. The study through RT-PCR evidenced that ELN, the gene codifying for Elastine was strongly enhanced. Some collagen-tested genes (COL1A1, COL3A1 and COL9A1) were inhibited by the treatment, whereas COL2A1 and COL11 were activated. The genes responsible for Metallo-proteases (MMP) 2, 3 and 13 were depressed, while the MMP9 was stimulated. Gene codifying for Hyaluronic synthase 1 (HAS1), Hyluronidase 1 (HYAL1), Neutrophyl elastase (Elane), Desmoplakin (DSP) and GDF6 were inhibited. Insulin like growth factor (IGF1) gene activity was enhanced. RF treatment, with the tested non-ablative equipment, produced histological effects and change in DNA expression of some extracellular matrix related genes, confirming the biostimulatory role of this procedure.

  2. Molecular Beam Epitaxy Growth and Characterization of Thin Layers of Semiconductor Tin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    heating. The α-Sn layers were also characterized with high-resolution X-ray diffraction, Hall, and atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements...ARL-TR-7838 ● SEP 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Molecular Beam Epitaxy Growth and Characterization of Thin Layers of...Laboratory Molecular Beam Epitaxy Growth and Characterization of Thin Layers of Semiconductor Tin by P Folkes, P Taylor, C Rong, B Nichols

  3. Preparation of nanostructured Bi-modified TiO2 thin films by crossed-beam laser ablation plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobar-Alarcon, L.; Solís-Casados, D. A.; González-Zavala, F.; Romero, S.; Fernandez, M.; Haro-Poniatowski, E.

    2017-01-01

    The preparation and characterization of titanium dioxide thin films modified with different amounts of bismuth using a two laser ablation plasmas configuration is reported. The plasmas were produced ablating simultaneously two different targets, one of bismuth and other of titanium dioxide, using a Nd:YAG laser with emission in the fundamental line. The elemental composition, together with the vibrational and optical properties of the deposited films were investigated as a function of the parameters of the bismuth plasma. The composition of the thin films was determined from measurements of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) as well as by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS). The structural modification of the deposited material, due to the incorporation of Bi, was characterized by Raman spectroscopy. The optical properties were determined from UV-Vis spectroscopy measurements. It is found that bismuth incorporation has an important effect on the optical properties of TiO2 narrowing the band gap from 3.2 to 2.5 eV.

  4. Taming molecular beams; towards a gas-phase molecular laboratory on a chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meek, Samuel A.; Santambrogio, Gabriele; Conrad, Horst; Meijer, Gerard

    2009-11-01

    The manipulation of gas-phase molecules with electric and magnetic fields above a chip is an emerging field of research. Miniaturization of the electric and magnetic field structures allows for the creation of large field gradients and tight traps above the chip. Present-day microelectronics technology enables the integration of complicated tools and devices on a compact surface area. The molecules can be positioned extremely accurately and reproducibly above the chip where they can be held isolated from their environment and where there is excellent access to them. It is expected that several of the gas-phase molecular beam experiments that are currently being done in machines that are up to several meters in length can in the future be performed on a surface area of a few cm2 and that many new experiments will become possible.

  5. Internal Energy Dependence of Molecular Condensation Coefficients Determined from Molecular Beam Surface Scattering Experiments

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Sibener, S. J.; Lee, Y. T.

    1978-05-01

    An experiment was performed which confirms the existence of an internal mode dependence of molecular sticking probabilities for collisions of molecules with a cold surface. The scattering of a velocity selected effusive beam of CCl{sub 4} from a 90 K CC1{sub 4} ice surface has been studied at five translational velocities and for two different internal temperatures. At a surface temperature of 90 K (approx. 99% sticking probability) a four fold increase in reflected intensity was observed for the internally excited (560 K) CC1{sub 4} relative to the room temperature (298 K) CC1{sub 4} at a translational velocity of 2.5 X 10{sup 4} cm/sec. For a surface temperature of 90 K all angular distributions were found to peak 15{sup 0} superspecularly independent of incident velocity.

  6. Crossed molecular beam studies of atmospheric chemical reaction dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jingsong

    1993-04-01

    The dynamics of several elementary chemical reactions that are important in atmospheric chemistry are investigated. The reactive scattering of ground state chlorine or bromine atoms with ozone molecules and ground state chlorine atoms with nitrogen dioxide molecules is studied using a crossed molecular beams apparatus with a rotatable mass spectrometer detector. The Cl + O3 → ClO + O2 reaction has been studied at four collision energies ranging from 6 kcal/mole to 32 kcal/mole. The derived product center-of-mass angular and translational energy distributions show that the reaction has a direct reaction mechanism and that there is a strong repulsion on the exit channel. The ClO product is sideways and forward scattered with respect to the Cl atom, and the translational energy release is large. The Cl atom is most likely to attack the terminal oxygen atom of the ozone molecule. The Br + O3 → ClO + O2 reaction has been studied at five collision energies ranging from 5 kcal/mole to 26 kcal/mole. The derived product center-of-mass angular and translational energy distributions are quite similar to those in the Cl + O3 reaction. The Br + O3 reaction has a direct reaction mechanism similar to that of the Cl + O3 reaction. The electronic structure of the ozone molecule seems to play the central role in determining the reaction mechanism in atomic radical reactions with the ozone molecule. The Cl + NO2 → ClO + NO reaction has been studied at three collision energies ranging from 10.6 kcal/mole to 22.4 kcal/mole. The center-of-mass angular distribution has some forward-backward symmetry, and the product translational energy release is quite large. The reaction proceeds through a short-lived complex whose lifetime is less than one rotational period. The experimental results seem to show that the Cl atom mainly attacks the oxygen atom instead of the nitrogen atom of the NO2

  7. Reactions of carbon atoms in pulsed molecular beams

    SciTech Connect

    Reisler, H.

    1993-12-01

    This research program consists of a broad scope of experiments designed to unravel the chemistry of atomic carbon in its two spin states, P and D, by using well-controlled initial conditions and state-resolved detection of products. Prerequisite to the proposed studies (and the reason why so little is known about carbon atom reactions), is the development of clean sources of carbon atoms. Therefore, in parallel with the studies of its chemistry and reaction dynamics, the authors continuously explore new, state-specific and efficient ways of producing atomic carbon. In the current program, C({sup 3}P) is produced via laser ablation of graphite, and three areas of study are being pursued: (i) exothermic reactions with small inorganic molecules (e.g., O{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O, NO{sub 2}) that can proceed via multiple pathways; (ii) the influence of vibrational and translational energy on endothermic reactions involving H-containing reactants that yield CH products (e.g., H{sub 2}O H{sub 2}CO); (iii) reactions of C({sup 3}P) with free radicals (e.g., HCO, CH{sub 3}O). In addition, the authors plan to develop a source of C({sup 1}D) atoms by exploiting the pyrolysis of diazotetrazole and its salts in the ablation source. Another important goal involves collaboration with theoreticians in order to obtain relevant potential energy surfaces, rationalize the experimental results and predict the roles of translational and vibrational energies.

  8. Compression and ablation of the photo-irradiated molecular cloud the Orion Bar.

    PubMed

    Goicoechea, Javier R; Pety, Jérôme; Cuadrado, Sara; Cernicharo, José; Chapillon, Edwige; Fuente, Asunción; Gerin, Maryvonne; Joblin, Christine; Marcelino, Nuria; Pilleri, Paolo

    2016-09-08

    The Orion Bar is the archetypal edge-on molecular cloud surface illuminated by strong ultraviolet radiation from nearby massive stars. Our relative closeness to the Orion nebula (about 1,350 light years away from Earth) means that we can study the effects of stellar feedback on the parental cloud in detail. Visible-light observations of the Orion Bar show that the transition between the hot ionized gas and the warm neutral atomic gas (the ionization front) is spatially well separated from the transition between atomic and molecular gas (the dissociation front), by about 15 arcseconds or 6,200 astronomical units (one astronomical unit is the Earth-Sun distance). Static equilibrium models used to interpret previous far-infrared and radio observations of the neutral gas in the Orion Bar (typically at 10-20 arcsecond resolution) predict an inhomogeneous cloud structure comprised of dense clumps embedded in a lower-density extended gas component. Here we report one-arcsecond-resolution millimetre-wave images that allow us to resolve the molecular cloud surface. In contrast to stationary model predictions, there is no appreciable offset between the peak of the H2 vibrational emission (delineating the H/H2 transition) and the edge of the observed CO and HCO(+) emission. This implies that the H/H2 and C(+)/C/CO transition zones are very close. We find a fragmented ridge of high-density substructures, photoablative gas flows and instabilities at the molecular cloud surface. The results suggest that the cloud edge has been compressed by a high-pressure wave that is moving into the molecular cloud, demonstrating that dynamical and non-equilibrium effects are important for the cloud evolution.

  9. Compression and ablation of the photo-irradiated molecular cloud the Orion Bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goicoechea, Javier R.; Pety, Jérôme; Cuadrado, Sara; Cernicharo, José; Chapillon, Edwige; Fuente, Asunción; Gerin, Maryvonne; Joblin, Christine; Marcelino, Nuria; Pilleri, Paolo

    2016-09-01

    The Orion Bar is the archetypal edge-on molecular cloud surface illuminated by strong ultraviolet radiation from nearby massive stars. Our relative closeness to the Orion nebula (about 1,350 light years away from Earth) means that we can study the effects of stellar feedback on the parental cloud in detail. Visible-light observations of the Orion Bar show that the transition between the hot ionized gas and the warm neutral atomic gas (the ionization front) is spatially well separated from the transition between atomic and molecular gas (the dissociation front), by about 15 arcseconds or 6,200 astronomical units (one astronomical unit is the Earth-Sun distance). Static equilibrium models used to interpret previous far-infrared and radio observations of the neutral gas in the Orion Bar (typically at 10-20 arcsecond resolution) predict an inhomogeneous cloud structure comprised of dense clumps embedded in a lower-density extended gas component. Here we report one-arcsecond-resolution millimetre-wave images that allow us to resolve the molecular cloud surface. In contrast to stationary model predictions, there is no appreciable offset between the peak of the H2 vibrational emission (delineating the H/H2 transition) and the edge of the observed CO and HCO+ emission. This implies that the H/H2 and C+/C/CO transition zones are very close. We find a fragmented ridge of high-density substructures, photoablative gas flows and instabilities at the molecular cloud surface. The results suggest that the cloud edge has been compressed by a high-pressure wave that is moving into the molecular cloud, demonstrating that dynamical and non-equilibrium effects are important for the cloud evolution.

  10. Considerations on the Design of a Molecular Frequency Standard Based on the Molecular Beam Electric Resonance Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Vernon W.

    1959-01-01

    The use of a rotational state transition as observed by the molecular beam electric resonance method is discussed as a possible frequency standard particularly in the millimeter wavelength range. As a promising example the 100 kMc transition between the J = 0 and J = 1 rotational states of Li 6F19 is considered. The relative insensitivity of the transition frequency to external electric and magnetic fields and the low microwave power requirements appear favorable; the small fraction of the molecular beam that is in a single rotational state is a limiting factor.

  11. Tumor Ablation and Nanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Manthe, Rachel L.; Foy, Susan P.; Krishnamurthy, Nishanth; Sharma, Blanka; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2010-01-01

    Next to surgical resection, tumor ablation is a commonly used intervention in the treatment of solid tumors. Tumor ablation methods include thermal therapies, photodynamic therapy, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) producing agents. Thermal therapies induce tumor cell death via thermal energy and include radiofrequency, microwave, high intensity focused ultrasound, and cryoablation. Photodynamic therapy and ROS producing agents cause increased oxidative stress in tumor cells leading to apoptosis. While these therapies are safe and viable alternatives when resection of malignancies is not feasible, they do have associated limitations that prevent their widespread use in clinical applications. To improve the efficacy of these treatments, nanoparticles are being studied in combination with nonsurgical ablation regimens. In addition to better thermal effect on tumor ablation, nanoparticles can deliver anticancer therapeutics that show synergistic anti-tumor effect in the presence of heat and can also be imaged to achieve precision in therapy. Understanding the molecular mechanism of nanoparticle-mediated tumor ablation could further help engineer nanoparticles of appropriate composition and properties to synergize the ablation effect. This review aims to explore the various types of nonsurgical tumor ablation methods currently used in cancer treatment and potential improvements by nanotechnology applications. PMID:20866097

  12. Use of molecular beams to support microspheres during plasma coating

    SciTech Connect

    Crane, J.K.; Smith, R.D.; Johnson, W.L.; Jordan, C.W.; Letts, S.A.; Korbel, G.R.; Krenik, R.M.

    1980-08-26

    Spherical targets can be levitated on beams of Ar or other gas atoms. This is an especially useful technique for supporting microspheres during plasma coating and processing. Measurements of gas flow and pressure indicate that the levitation device operates in the regime of Knudsen's flow. This device is currently being used in the development of future generation laser targets.

  13. Measuring Incorporation Of Arsenic In Molecular-Beam Expitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Blair F.; Fernandez, Rouel F.; Madhukar, Anupam; Grunthaner, Frank J.

    1988-01-01

    Changes in surface layers cause oscillations in RHEED measurements. Specular RHEED Beam intensity measured before, during, and after deposition of seven to eight monomolecular layers of gallium during 1.5 seconds. Arsenic pressure was 1.7x10 to the negative seventh power torr (2.3x10 to the negative fifth power Pa) throughout measurements.

  14. Measurement and Analysis of Rotational Energy of Nitrogen Molecular Beam by REMPI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, H.; Yamaguchi, H.; Kataoka, K.; Sugiyama, N.; Ide, K.; Niimi, T.

    2008-12-01

    Molecular beams are powerful tools for diagnoses of solid surfaces and gas-surface interaction tests. Unfortunately, there are very few reports about experimental analysis of internal energy distribution (e.g. rotational energy) of molecular beams of diatomic or polyatomic molecules, because measurement of internal energy distribution is very difficult. Spectroscopic measurement techniques based on resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) is very powerful for measurement in highly rarefied gas flows. In this study, the REMPI method is applied to measurement of rotational energy distribution of nitrogen molecular beams. The REMPI spectrum of the molecular beam indicates the rotational temperature higher than the translational temperature of 7.2 K estimated by assuming isentropic flows. The O and P branches of the REMPI spectrum correspond to the rotational temperature of 30 K, but the S branch of the spectrum deviates from that at 30 K. It seems to be because the non-equilibrium rotational energy distribution of the molecular beam deviates from the Boltzmann distribution.

  15. Measurement and Analysis of Rotational Energy of Nitrogen Molecular Beam by REMPI

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, H.; Yamaguchi, H.; Kataoka, K.; Sugiyama, N.; Ide, K.; Niimi, T.

    2008-12-31

    Molecular beams are powerful tools for diagnoses of solid surfaces and gas-surface interaction tests. Unfortunately, there are very few reports about experimental analysis of internal energy distribution (e.g. rotational energy) of molecular beams of diatomic or polyatomic molecules, because measurement of internal energy distribution is very difficult. Spectroscopic measurement techniques based on resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) is very powerful for measurement in highly rarefied gas flows. In this study, the REMPI method is applied to measurement of rotational energy distribution of nitrogen molecular beams. The REMPI spectrum of the molecular beam indicates the rotational temperature higher than the translational temperature of 7.2 K estimated by assuming isentropic flows. The O and P branches of the REMPI spectrum correspond to the rotational temperature of 30 K, but the S branch of the spectrum deviates from that at 30 K. It seems to be because the non-equilibrium rotational energy distribution of the molecular beam deviates from the Boltzmann distribution.

  16. Effects of high source flow and high pumping speed on gas source molecular beam epitaxy / chemical beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCollum, M. J.; Jackson, S. L.; Szafranek, I.; Stillman, G. E.

    1990-10-01

    We report the growth of GaAs by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), gas source molecular beam epitaxy (GSMBE), and chemical beam epitaxy (CBE) in an epitaxial III-V reactor which features high pumping speed. The system is comprised of a modified Perkin-Elmer 430P molecular beam epitaxy system and a custom gas source panel from Emcore. The growth chamber is pumped with a 7000 1/s (He) diffusion pump (Varian VHS-10 with Monsanto Santovac 5 oil). The gas source panel includes pressure based flow controllers (MKS 1150) allowing triethylaluminum (TEA), triethylgallium (TEG), and trimethylindium (TMI) to be supplied without the use of hydrogen. All source lines, including arsine and phosphine, are maintained below atmospheric pressure. The high pumping speed allows total system flow rates as high as 100 SCCM and V/III ratios as high as 100. The purity of GaAs grown by MBE in this system increases with pumping speed. GaAs layers grown by GSMBE with arsine flows of 10 and 20 SCCM have electron concentrations of 1 × 10 15 cm -3 (μ 77=48,000 cm 2/V·) and 2 × 10 14 cm -3 (μ 77=78,000 cm 2/V·s) respectively. El ectron concentration varies with hydride injector temperature such that the minimum in electron concentration occurs for less than complete cracking. The effect of V/III ratio and the use of a metal eutectic bubbler on residual carrier concentration in GaAs grown by CBE is presented. Intentional Si and Be doping of CBE grown GaAs is demonstrated at a high growth rate of 5.4 μm/h.

  17. Dosimetric comparison of flattened and unflattened beams for stereotactic ablative radiotherapy of stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hrbacek, Jan; Lang, Stephanie; Graydon, Shaun N.; Klöck, Stephan; Riesterer, Oliver

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To compare contribution and accuracy of delivery for two flattening filter free (FFF) beams of the nominal energy 6 and 10 MV and a 6 MV flattened beam for early stage lung cancer. Methods: For each of 11 patients with stage I nonsmall cell lung cancer three volumetric modulated arc therapy plans were prepared utilizing a 6 MV flattened photon beam (X6FF) and two nonflattened beams of nominal energy 6 and 10 MV (X6FFF, X10FFF). Optimization constraints were set to produce dose distributions that meet the criteria of the RTOG-0915 protocol. The radiation schedule used for plan comparison in all patients was 50 Gy in five fractions. Dosimetric parameters of planning target volume (PTV) and organs-at-risk and delivery times were assessed and compared. All plans were subject to verification using Delta{sup 4} unit (Scandidos, Sweden) and absolutely calibrated gafchromic films in a thorax phantom. Results: All plans had a qualitatively comparable outcome. Obtained dose distributions were conformal (CI < 1.17) and exhibited a steep dose fall-off outside the PTV. The ratio of monitor units for FFF versus FF plans in the authors' study ranged from 0.95 to 1.21 and from 0.93 to 1.25 for X6FFF/X6FF and X10FFF/X6FF comparisons, respectively. The ratio systematically increased with increasing size of the PTV (up to +25% for 150 cm{sup 3} PTV). Yet the integral dose to healthy tissue did not follow this trend. Comparison of cumulative dose volume histograms for a patient's body showed that X6FFF plans exhibit improved conformity and reduced the volume of tissue that received more than 50% of the prescription dose. Parameters related to dose gradient showed statistically significant improvement. CI{sub 50%}, CI{sub 60%}, CI{sub 80%}, and CI{sub 100%} were on average reduced by 4.6% (p < 0.001), 4.6% (p = 0.002), 3.1% (p = 0.002), and 1.2% (p = 0.039), respectively. Gradient measure was on average reduced by 4.2% (p < 0.001). Due to dose reduction in the surrounding lung

  18. Quantum state specific reactant preparation in a molecular beam by rapid adiabatic passage

    SciTech Connect

    Chadwick, Helen Hundt, P. Morten; Reijzen, Maarten E. van; Yoder, Bruce L.; Beck, Rainer D.

    2014-01-21

    Highly efficient preparation of molecules in a specific rovibrationally excited state for gas/surface reactivity measurements is achieved in a molecular beam using tunable infrared (IR) radiation from a single mode continuous wave optical parametric oscillator (cw-OPO). We demonstrate that with appropriate focusing of the IR radiation, molecules in the molecular beam crossing the fixed frequency IR field experience a Doppler tuning that can be adjusted to achieve complete population inversion of a two-level system by rapid adiabatic passage (RAP). A room temperature pyroelectric detector is used to monitor the excited fraction in the molecular beam and the population inversion is detected and quantified using IR bleaching by a second IR-OPO. The second OPO is also used for complete population transfer to an overtone or combination vibration via double resonance excitation using two spatially separated RAP processes.

  19. Quantum state specific reactant preparation in a molecular beam by rapid adiabatic passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwick, Helen; Hundt, P. Morten; van Reijzen, Maarten E.; Yoder, Bruce L.; Beck, Rainer D.

    2014-01-01

    Highly efficient preparation of molecules in a specific rovibrationally excited state for gas/surface reactivity measurements is achieved in a molecular beam using tunable infrared (IR) radiation from a single mode continuous wave optical parametric oscillator (cw-OPO). We demonstrate that with appropriate focusing of the IR radiation, molecules in the molecular beam crossing the fixed frequency IR field experience a Doppler tuning that can be adjusted to achieve complete population inversion of a two-level system by rapid adiabatic passage (RAP). A room temperature pyroelectric detector is used to monitor the excited fraction in the molecular beam and the population inversion is detected and quantified using IR bleaching by a second IR-OPO. The second OPO is also used for complete population transfer to an overtone or combination vibration via double resonance excitation using two spatially separated RAP processes.

  20. Surface chemistry on semiconductors studied by molecular-beam reactive scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Ming L.; DeLouise, Lisa A.

    1994-01-01

    This Report reviews the use of molecular-beam reactive scattering to study the surface reactions of gas molecules on semiconductors which have relevance to microelectronic technologies. Modern semiconductor fabrication techniques rely heavily on dry processes where gas-surface reactions are the basic premise. This article focuses on the use of supersonic molecular-beam-surface scattering to study the dynamics and kinetics of surface reactions connected with the growth and etching processes on semiconductor surfaces. The discussion on growth processes covers the oxidation of silicon and germanium, the tungsten-hexafluoride-based tungsten deposition, and the organometallic chemical vapor deposition of gallium arsenide. The discussion on etching processes covers the halogen-based etching of gallium arsenide and silicon. An overview of the experimental technique and the underlying principles in surface-reaction dynamics and kinetics is included for readers in the technology area. The potential use of the molecular beams for actual semiconductor materials processing is also discussed.

  1. A non-diaphragm type small shock tube for application to a molecular beam source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimoto, Yuta; Osuka, Kenichi; Miyoshi, Nobuya; Kinefuchi, Ikuya; Takagi, Shu; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2013-07-01

    A non-diaphragm type small shock tube was developed for application to a molecular beam source, which can generate beams in the energy range from 1 to several electron volts and beams containing dissociated species such as atomic oxygen. Since repetitive high-frequency operation is indispensable for rapid signal acquisition in beam scattering experiments, the dimensions of the shock tube were miniaturized to reduce the evacuation time between shots. The designed shock tube is 2-4 mm in diameter and can operate at 0.5 Hz. Moreover, a high shock Mach number at the tube end is required for high-energy molecular beam generation. To reduce the shock attenuation caused by the wall boundary layer, which becomes significant in small-diameter tubes, we developed a high-speed response valve employing the current-loop mechanism. The response time of this mechanism is about 100 μs, which is shorter than the rupture time of conventional diaphragms. We show that the current-loop valve generates shock waves with shorter formation distances (about 200-300 mm) than those of conventional shock tubes. In addition, the converging geometry efficiently accelerates shock wave in the small-diameter tubes. The optimal geometry of the shock tube yields shock Mach number around 7, which indicates that the translation energy of molecular beams can exceed 1 eV even in the presence of the real gas effect.

  2. Catheter ablation.

    PubMed

    Fromer, M; Shenasa, M

    1991-02-01

    Catheter ablation is gaining increasing interest for the therapy of symptomatic, sustained arrhythmias of various origins. The scope of this review is to give an overview of the biophysical aspects and major characteristics of some of the most widely used energy sources in catheter ablation, e.g., the discharge of conventional defibrillators, modified defibrillators, laser light, and radiofrequency current application. Results from animal studies are considered to explain the basic mechanisms of catheter ablation. The recent achievements with the use of radiofrequency current to modify or ablate cardiac conduction properties are outlined in more detail.

  3. ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS: A Novel Mirror for Cold Molecules with a Semi-Gaussian Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Ya-Ling; Zhou, Qi; Xia, Yong; Yin, Jian-Ping

    2008-09-01

    We propose a novel mirror for cold molecules with a blue-detuned semi-Gaussian beam and study the dynamic reflection process of cold molecules by Monte Carlo simulation. Our study shows that this mirror can realize a specular reflection of cold iodine molecular beam with a temperature of 30 mK by a reflectivity of 58.2% when the semi-Gaussian laser power is 1.0kW. When a semi-Gaussian CO2 laser beam with a power of 5.8 kW is used, the reflectivity of this mirror can reach about 100%.

  4. Condensed-Phase Mass Fraction in a Supersonic Molecular Beam Containing Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knuth, Eldon L.; Toennies, J. Peter

    2008-12-01

    For a supersonic molecular beam containing clusters, a relatively general and simple conservation-of-energy procedure for deducing from time-of-flight measurements the fraction of the beam in the condensed phase is developed. The procedure is applied to measurements for 4He beams formed by expansions which approach the two-phase region either near the critical point or to the liquid side of the critical point. The deduced values of the mass fraction are correlated using a scaling parameter which was used previously for correlating mean values of cluster sizes formed via fragmentation in free-jet expansions of liquid 4He.

  5. Three-dimensional imaging of the ultracold plasma formed in a supersonic molecular beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz-Weiling, Markus; Grant, Edward

    2015-06-01

    Double-resonant excitation of nitric oxide in a seeded supersonic molecular beam forms a state-selected Rydberg gas that evolves to form an ultracold plasma. This plasma travels with the propagation of the molecular beam in z over a variable distance as great as 600 mm to strike an imaging detector, which records the charge distribution in the dimensions, x and y. The ω1 + ω2 laser crossed molecular beam excitation geometry convolutes the axial Gaussian distribution of NO in the molecular beam with the Gaussian intensity distribution of the perpendicularly aligned laser beam to create an ellipsoidal volume of Rydberg gas. Detected images describe the evolution of this initial density as a function of selected Rydberg gas initial principal quantum number, n0, ω1 laser pulse energy (linearly related to Rydberg gas density, ρ0) and flight time. Low-density Rydberg gases of lower principal quantum number produce uniformly expanding, ellipsoidal charge-density distributions. Increase either of n0 or ρ0 breaks the ellipsoidal symmetry of plasma expansion. The volume bifurcates to form repelling plasma volumes. The velocity of separation depends on n0 and ρ0 in a way that scales uniformly with ρe, the density of electrons formed in the core of the Rydberg gas by prompt Penning ionization. Conditions under which this electron gas drives expansion in the long axis dimension of the ellipsoid favours the formation of counter-propagating shock waves.

  6. Ex Situ Thermal Cycle Annealing of Molecular Beam Epitaxy Grown HgCdTe/Si Layers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    during the growth process itself, is an effective means to reduce etch pit den- sity (EPD) and improve overall crystal quality. Subjecting CdTe /Si...results of ex situ thermal cycle annealing (TCA) of molecular beam epitaxy grown mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe) on Cd (Se)Te/ Si(211) composite...present the results of ex situ thermal cycle annealing (TCA) of molecular beam epitaxy grown mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe) on Cd (Se)Te/ Si(211

  7. Molecular Beam Studies of Hot Atom Chemical Reactions: Reactive Scattering of Energetic Deuterium Atoms

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Continetti, R. E.; Balko, B. A.; Lee, Y. T.

    1989-02-01

    A brief review of the application of the crossed molecular beams technique to the study of hot atom chemical reactions in the last twenty years is given. Specific emphasis is placed on recent advances in the use of photolytically produced energetic deuterium atoms in the study of the fundamental elementary reactions D + H{sub 2} -> DH + H and the substitution reaction D + C{sub 2}H{sub 2} -> C{sub 2}HD + H. Recent advances in uv laser and pulsed molecular beam techniques have made the detailed study of hydrogen atom reactions under single collision conditions possible.

  8. Single-crystal cubic boron nitride thin films grown by ion-beam-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Hirama, Kazuyuki Taniyasu, Yoshitaka; Karimoto, Shin-ichi; Krockenberger, Yoshiharu; Yamamoto, Hideki

    2014-03-03

    We investigated the formation of cubic boron nitride (c-BN) thin films on diamond (001) and (111) substrates by ion-beam-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The metastable c-BN (sp{sup 3}-bonded BN) phase can be epitaxially grown as a result of the interplay between competitive phase formation and selective etching. We show that a proper adjustment of acceleration voltage for N{sub 2}{sup +} and Ar{sup +} ions is a key to selectively discriminate non-sp{sup 3} BN phases. At low acceleration voltage values, the sp{sup 2}-bonded BN is dominantly formed, while at high acceleration voltages, etching dominates irrespective of the bonding characteristics of BN.

  9. Expansion Discharge Source for Ion Beam Laser Spectroscopy of Cold Molecular Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porambo, Michael; Pearson, Jessica; Riccardo, Craig; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2013-06-01

    Molecular ions are important in several fields of research, and spectroscopy acts as a key tool in the study of these ions. However, problems such as low ion abundance, ion-neutral confusion, and spectral congestion due to high internal temperatures can hinder effective spectroscopic studies. To circumvent these problems, we are developing a technique called Sensitive, Cooled, Resolved, Ion BEam Spectroscopy (SCRIBES). This ion beam spectrometer will feature a continuous supersonic expansion discharge source to produce cold molecular ions, electrostatic ion optics to focus the ions into an ion beam and bend the beam away from co-produced neutral molecules, an overlap region for cavity enhanced spectroscopy, and a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. When completed, SCRIBES will be an effective tool for the study of large, fluxional, and complex molecular ions that are difficult to study with other means. The ion beam spectrometer has been successfully implemented with a hot ion source. This talk will focus on the work of integrating a supersonic expansion discharge source into the instrument. To better understand how the source would work in the whole ion beam instrument, characterization studies are being performed with spectroscopy of HN_2^+ in a section of the system to ascertain the rotational temperature of the ion expansion. Attempts are also underway to measure the ion current from a beam formed from the expansion. Once the source in this environment is properly understood, we will reintegrate it to the rest of the ion beam system, completing SCRIBES. A. A. Mills, B. M. Siller, M. W. Porambo, M. Perera, H. Kreckel and B. J. McCall J. Chem. Phys., 135, 224201, (2011). K. N. Crabtree, C. A. Kauffman and B. J. McCall Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 086103, (2010).

  10. Formation of diatomic molecular radicals in reactive nitrogen-carbon plasma generated by electron cyclotron resonance discharge and pulsed laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Peipei; Li, Yanli; You, Qinghu; Cai, Hua; Yang, Xu; Sun, Jian; Xu, Ning; Wu, Jiada

    2014-04-15

    The reactive nitrogen-carbon plasma generated by electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) microwave discharge of N{sub 2} gas and pulsed laser ablation of a graphite target was characterized spectroscopically by time-integrated and time-resolved optical emission spectroscopy with space resolution for a study of gas-phase reactions and molecular radical formation in the plasma. The plasma exhibits very high reactivity compared with the plasma generated solely by ECR discharge or by pulsed laser ablation and contains highly excited species originally present in the ambient gaseous environment and directly ablated from the target as well as formed as the products of gas-phase reactions occurring in the plasma. The space distribution and the time evolution of the plasma emission give an access to the gas-phase reactions for the formation of C{sub 2} and CN radicals, revealing that C{sub 2} radicals are formed mainly in the region near the target while CN radicals can be formed in a much larger region not only in the vicinity of the target, but especially in the region near a substrate far away from the target.

  11. Formation of diatomic molecular radicals in reactive nitrogen-carbon plasma generated by electron cyclotron resonance discharge and pulsed laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Peipei; Li, Yanli; You, Qinghu; Cai, Hua; Yang, Xu; Sun, Jian; Xu, Ning; Wu, Jiada

    2014-04-01

    The reactive nitrogen-carbon plasma generated by electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) microwave discharge of N2 gas and pulsed laser ablation of a graphite target was characterized spectroscopically by time-integrated and time-resolved optical emission spectroscopy with space resolution for a study of gas-phase reactions and molecular radical formation in the plasma. The plasma exhibits very high reactivity compared with the plasma generated solely by ECR discharge or by pulsed laser ablation and contains highly excited species originally present in the ambient gaseous environment and directly ablated from the target as well as formed as the products of gas-phase reactions occurring in the plasma. The space distribution and the time evolution of the plasma emission give an access to the gas-phase reactions for the formation of C2 and CN radicals, revealing that C2 radicals are formed mainly in the region near the target while CN radicals can be formed in a much larger region not only in the vicinity of the target, but especially in the region near a substrate far away from the target.

  12. Radii broadening due to molecular collision in focused ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komuro, Masanori

    1988-01-01

    Point exposures of poly(methyl methacrylate) resist are carried out with focused ion beams of Si++ and Au++ from a liquid AuSi ion source in order to obtain a current density distribution in the probe. All the distributions are composed of a main Gaussian distribution and a long tail dependent on r-3.3 (r means radial distance). The magnitude of this tail increases with the increase in ambient pressure of the ion-drifting space. When the probe is steered at the corner of deflection field, two types of clear ghost patterns appear: (1) circular patterns and (2) lines trailing from the main spot toward the deflection center. It is revealed that they are produced by exposures to ions or energetic neutrals generated with charge transfer collision of the primary ions with residual gas molecules. It is shown that the long tail in the current density distribution is also due to scattering with the residual gas molecules.

  13. Collision dynamics of methyl radicals and highly vibrationally excited molecules using crossed molecular beams

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, P.M.Y.

    1991-10-01

    The vibrational to translational (V{yields}T) energy transfer in collisions between large highly vibrationally excited polyatomics and rare gases was investigated by time-of-flight techniques. Two different methods, UV excitation followed by intemal conversion and infrared multiphoton excitation (IRMPE), were used to form vibrationally excited molecular beams of hexafluorobenzene and sulfur hexafluoride, respectively. The product translational energy was found to be independent of the vibrational excitation. These results indicate that the probability distribution function for V{yields}T energy transfer is peaked at zero. The collisional relaxation of large polyatomic molecules with rare gases most likely occurs through a rotationally mediated process. Photodissociation of nitrobenzene in a molecular beam was studied at 266 nm. Two primary dissociation channels were identified including simple bond rupture to produce nitrogen dioxide and phenyl radical and isomerization to form nitric oxide and phenoxy radical. The time-of-flight spectra indicate that simple bond rupture and isomerization occurs via two different mechanisms. Secondary dissociation of the phenoxy radicals to carbon monoxide and cyclopentadienyl radicals was observed as well as secondary photodissociation of phenyl radical to give H atom and benzyne. A supersonic methyl radical beam source is developed. The beam source configuration and conditions were optimized for CH{sub 3} production from the thermal decomposition of azomethane. Elastic scattering of methyl radical and neon was used to differentiate between the methyl radicals and the residual azomethane in the molecular beam.

  14. Mn-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy growth (Ga,Mn)As nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reznik, R. R.; Samsonenko, Yu B.; Khrebtov, A. I.; Bouravleuv, A. D.; Werner, P.; Cirlin, G. E.

    2016-11-01

    Arrays of (Ga,Mn)As crystal nanowires on a GaAs (100) substrate were obtained using molecular-beam epitaxy at the substrate temperature 485°C. From the high energy electron diffraction patterns, the crystallographic phase of the nanowires is detected to be cubic which is supporting by ex situ microscopy study.

  15. Growth of (111) GaAs on (111) Si using molecular-beam epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, G.; Liu, J.; Grunthaner, F.; Katz, J.; Morkoc, H.

    1988-01-01

    (111) GaAs layers have been grown epitaxially on (111) Si wafers, both on-axis as well as 3-deg off-axis towards the 1 -1 0 direction, using molecular-beam epitaxy. The grown layers have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy.

  16. Large Area Synthesis of 1D-MoSe2 Using Molecular Beam Epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Poh, Sock Mui; Tan, Sherman J R; Zhao, Xiaoxu; Chen, Zhongxin; Abdelwahab, Ibrahim; Fu, Deyi; Xu, Hai; Bao, Yang; Zhou, Wu; Loh, Kian Ping

    2017-01-23

    Large area synthesis of 1D-MoSe2 nanoribbons on both insulating and conducting substrates via molecular beam epitaxy is presented. Dimensional controlled growth of 2D, 1D-MoSe2 , and 1D-2D-MoSe2 hybrid heterostructure is achieved by tuning the growth temperature or Mo:Se precursor ratio.

  17. Crossed Molecular Beam Studies and Dynamics of Decomposition of Chemically Activated Radicals

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Lee, Y. T.

    1973-09-01

    The power of the crossed molecular beams method in the investigation of the dynamics of chemical reactions lies mainly in the direct observation of the consequences of single collisions of well controlled reactant molecules. The primary experimental observations which provide information on reaction dynamics are the measurements of angular and velocity distributions of reaction products.

  18. History of Molecular Beam Research: Personal Reminiscences of the Important Evolutionary Period 1919-1933

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estermann, Immanuel

    1975-01-01

    Describes the early historical period of the molecular beam method, including the Stern-Gerlach experiment, the work of Davisson and Germer, and the magnetic moment determinations for the proton, neutron, and deuteron. Contains some amusing historical sidelights on the research personalities that dominated that period. (MLH)

  19. Ultra-sensitive high-precision spectroscopy of a fast molecular ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, Andrew A.; Siller, Brian M.; Porambo, Michael W.; Perera, Manori; Kreckel, Holger; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2011-12-14

    Direct spectroscopy of a fast molecular ion beam offers many advantages over competing techniques, including the generality of the approach to any molecular ion, the complete elimination of spectral confusion due to neutral molecules, and the mass identification of individual spectral lines. The major challenge is the intrinsic weakness of absorption or dispersion signals resulting from the relatively low number density of ions in the beam. Direct spectroscopy of an ion beam was pioneered by Saykally and co-workers in the late 1980s, but has not been attempted since that time. Here, we present the design and construction of an ion beam spectrometer with several improvements over the Saykally design. The ion beam and its characterization have been improved by adopting recent advances in electrostatic optics, along with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer that can be used simultaneously with optical spectroscopy. As a proof of concept, a noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical heterodyne molecular spectroscopy (NICE-OHMS) setup with a noise equivalent absorption of {approx}2 x 10{sup -11} cm{sup -1} Hz{sup -1/2} has been used to observe several transitions of the Meinel 1-0 band of N{sub 2}{sup +} with linewidths of {approx}120 MHz. An optical frequency comb has been used for absolute frequency calibration of transition frequencies to within {approx}8 MHz. This work represents the first direct spectroscopy of an electronic transition in an ion beam, and also represents a major step toward the development of routine infrared spectroscopy of rotationally cooled molecular ions.

  20. Molecular Beam Optical Zeeman Spectroscopy of Vanadium Monoxide, VO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Trung; Zhang, Ruohan; Steimle, Timothy

    2016-06-01

    Like almost all astronomical studies, exoplanet investigations are observational endeavors that rely primarily on remote spectroscopic sensing to infer the physical properties of planets. Most exoplanet related information is inferred from to temporal variation of luminosity of the parent star. An effective method of monitoring this variation is via Magnetic Doppler Imaging (MDI), which uses optical polarimetry of paramagnetic molecules or atoms. One promising paramagnetic stellar absorption is the near infrared spectrum of VO. With this in mind, we have begun a project to record and analyze the field-free and Zeeman spectrum of the band. A cold (approx. 20 K) beam of VO was probed with a single frequency laser and detected using laser induced fluorescence. The determined spectral parameters will be discussed and compared to those extracted from the analysis of a hot spectrum. Supported by the National Science Foundation under the Grant No. CHE-1265885. O. Kochukhov, N. Rusomarov, J. A. Valenti, H. C. Stempels, F. Snik, M. Rodenhuis, N. Piskunov, V. Makaganiuk, C. U. Keller and C. M. Johns-Krull, Astron. Astrophys. 574 (Pt. 2), A79/71-A79/12 (2015). S. V. Berdyugina, Astron. Soc. Pac. Conf. Ser. 437 (Solar Polarization 6), 219-235 (2011). S. V. Berdyugina, P. A. Braun, D. M. Fluri and S. K. Solanki, Astron. Astrophys. 444 (3), 947-960 (2005). A. S. C. Cheung, P. G. Hajigeorgiou, G. Huang, S. Z. Huang and A. J. Merer, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 163 (2), 443-458 (1994)

  1. The nanoscale implications of a molecular gas beam during electron beam induced deposition.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Robert; Fowlkes, Jason; Szkudlarek, Aleksandra; Utke, Ivo; Rack, Philip D; Plank, Harald

    2014-02-26

    The gas flux direction in focused electron beam induced processes can strongly destabilize the morphology on the nanometer scale. We demonstrate how pattern parameters such as position relative to the gas nozzle, axial rotation, scanning direction, and patterning sequence result in different growth modes for identical structures. This is mainly caused by nanoscale geometric shadowing, particularly when shadowing distances are comparable to surface diffusion lengths of (CH3)3-Pt-CpCH3 adsorbates. Furthermore, two different adsorbate replenishment mechanisms exist and are governed by either surface diffusion or directional gas flux adsorption. The experimental study is complemented by calculations and dynamic growth simulations which successfully emulate the observed morphology instabilities and support the proposed growth model.

  2. Ultra high resolution molecular beam cars spectroscopy with application to planetary atmospheric molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    The measurement of high resolution pulsed and continuous wave (CW) coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) measurements in pulsed and steady state supersonic expansions were demonstrated. Pulsed molecular beam sources were characterized, and saturation of a Raman transition and, for the first time, the Raman spectrum of a complex molecular cluster were observed. The observation of CW CARS spectra in a molecular expansion and the effects of transit time broadening is described. Supersonic expansion is established as a viable technique for high resolution Raman spectroscopy of cold molecules with resolutions of 100 MH2.

  3. Reflection mass spectrometry technique for monitoring and controlling composition during molecular beam epitaxy

    DOEpatents

    Brennan, Thomas M.; Hammons, B. Eugene; Tsao, Jeffrey Y.

    1992-01-01

    A method for on-line accurate monitoring and precise control of molecular beam epitaxial growth of Groups III-III-V or Groups III-V-V layers in an advanced semiconductor device incorporates reflection mass spectrometry. The reflection mass spectrometry is responsive to intentional perturbations in molecular fluxes incident on a substrate by accurately measuring the molecular fluxes reflected from the substrate. The reflected flux is extremely sensitive to the state of the growing surface and the measurements obtained enable control of newly forming surfaces that are dynamically changing as a result of growth.

  4. Reflection mass spectrometry technique for monitoring and controlling composition during molecular beam epitaxy

    DOEpatents

    Brennan, T.M.; Hammons, B.E.; Tsao, J.Y.

    1992-12-15

    A method for on-line accurate monitoring and precise control of molecular beam epitaxial growth of Groups III-III-V or Groups III-V-V layers in an advanced semiconductor device incorporates reflection mass spectrometry. The reflection mass spectrometry is responsive to intentional perturbations in molecular fluxes incident on a substrate by accurately measuring the molecular fluxes reflected from the substrate. The reflected flux is extremely sensitive to the state of the growing surface and the measurements obtained enable control of newly forming surfaces that are dynamically changing as a result of growth. 3 figs.

  5. Thermal ablation.

    PubMed

    Webb, Heather; Lubner, Meghan G; Hinshaw, J Louis

    2011-04-01

    Image-guided tumor ablation refers to a group of treatment modalities that have emerged during the past 2 decades as important tools in the treatment of a wide range of tumors throughout the body. Although most widely recognized in the treatment of hepatic and renal malignancies, the role of thermal ablation has expanded to include lesions of the lung, breast, prostate, bone, as well as other organs and its clinical applications continue to increase. In the following article, we discuss the major thermal ablation modalities, their respective strengths and weaknesses, potential complications and how to avoid them, as well as possible future applications.

  6. Fast atom diffraction inside a molecular beam epitaxy chamber, a rich combination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debiossac, M.; Atkinson, P.; Zugarramurdi, A.; Eddrief, M.; Finocchi, F.; Etgens, V. H.; Momeni, A.; Khemliche, H.; Borisov, A. G.; Roncin, P.

    2017-01-01

    Two aspects of the contribution of grazing incidence fast atom diffraction (GIFAD) to molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) are reviewed here: the ability of GIFAD to provide in-situ a precise description of the atomic-scale surface topology, and its ability to follow larger-scale changes in surface roughness during layer-by-layer growth. Recent experimental and theoretical results obtained for the He atom beam incident along the highly corrugated [ 1 1 bar 0 ] direction of the β2(2 × 4) reconstructed GaAs(001) surface are summarized. We also discuss the measurements and calculations for the beam incidence along the weakly corrugated [010] direction where a periodicity twice smaller than expected is observed. The combination of the experiment, quantum scattering matrix calculations, and semiclassical analysis allows structural characteristics of the surface to be revealed. For the in situ measurements of GIFAD during molecular beam epitaxy of GaAs on GaAs surface we analyze the change in elastic and inelastic contributions in the scattered beam, and the variation of the diffraction pattern in polar angle scattering. This analysis outlines the robustness, the simplicity and the richness of the GIFAD as a technique to monitor the layer-by-layer epitaxial growth.

  7. Controlled reshaping of the front surface of the cornea through its full-area ablation outside of the optical zone with a Gaussian ArF excimer laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semchishen, A. V.; Semchishen, V. A.

    2014-01-01

    We studied in vitro the response of the topography of the cornea to its full-area laser ablation (the laser beam spot diameter is commensurable with the size of the interface) outside of the central zone with an excimer laser having a Gaussian fluence distribution across the beam. Subject to investigation were the topographically controlled surface changes of the anterior cornea in 60 porcine eyes with a 5 ± 1.25-diopter artificially induced astigmatism, the changes being caused by laser ablation of the stromal collagen in two 3.5-mm-dia. circular areas along the weaker astigmatism axis. Experimental relationships are presented between the actual astigmatism correction and the expected correction for the intact optical zones 1, 2, 3, and 4 mm in diameter. The data for each zone were approximated by the least-squares method with the function d = a + bx. The coefficient b is given with the root-mean-square error. The statistical processing of the data yielded the following results: d = (0.14 ± 0.037)x for the 1-mm-dia. optical zone, (1.10 ± 0.036)x for the 2-mm-dia. optical zone, (1.04 ± 0.020)x for the 3-mm-dia. optical zone, and (0.55 ± 0.04)x for the 4-mm-dia. optical zone. Full astigmatism correction was achieved with ablation effected outside of the 3-mm-dia. optical zone. The surface changes of the cornea are shown to be due not only to the removal of the corneal tissue, but also to the biomechanical topographic response of the cornea to its strain caused by the formation of a dense pseudomembrane in the ablation area.

  8. Catheter Ablation

    MedlinePlus

    ... you during the procedure. Machines will measure your heart’s activity. All types of ablation require cardiac catheterization to place flexible tubes, or catheters, inside your heart to make the scars. Your doctor will clean ...

  9. Three-dimensional imaging of the ultracold plasma formed in a supersonic molecular beam

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz-Weiling, Markus; Grant, Edward

    2015-06-29

    Double-resonant excitation of nitric oxide in a seeded supersonic molecular beam forms a state-selected Rydberg gas that evolves to form an ultracold plasma. This plasma travels with the propagation of the molecular beam in z over a variable distance as great as 600 mm to strike an imaging detector, which records the charge distribution in the dimensions, x and y. The ω{sub 1} + ω{sub 2} laser crossed molecular beam excitation geometry convolutes the axial Gaussian distribution of NO in the molecular beam with the Gaussian intensity distribution of the perpendicularly aligned laser beam to create an ellipsoidal volume of Rydberg gas. Detected images describe the evolution of this initial density as a function of selected Rydberg gas initial principal quantum number, n{sub 0}, ω{sub 1} laser pulse energy (linearly related to Rydberg gas density, ρ{sub 0}) and flight time. Low-density Rydberg gases of lower principal quantum number produce uniformly expanding, ellipsoidal charge-density distributions. Increase either of n{sub 0} or ρ{sub 0} breaks the ellipsoidal symmetry of plasma expansion. The volume bifurcates to form repelling plasma volumes. The velocity of separation depends on n{sub 0} and ρ{sub 0} in a way that scales uniformly with ρ{sub e}, the density of electrons formed in the core of the Rydberg gas by prompt Penning ionization. Conditions under which this electron gas drives expansion in the long axis dimension of the ellipsoid favours the formation of counter-propagating shock waves.

  10. Proposed Molecular Beam Determination of Energy Partition in the Photodissociation of Polyatomic Molecules

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Zare, P. N.; Herschbach, D. R.

    1964-01-29

    Conventional photochemical experiments give no information about the partitioning of energy between translational recoil and internal excitation of the fragment molecules formed in photodissociation of a polyatomic molecule. In a molecular beam experiment, it becomes possible to determine the energy partition from the form of the laboratory angular distribution of one of the photodissociation products. A general kinematic analysis is worked out in detail, and the uncertainty introduced by the finite angular resolution of the apparatus and the velocity spread in the parent beam is examined. The experimental requirements are evaluated for he photolysis of methyl iodide by the 2537 angstrom Hg line.

  11. Electrical properties of nominally undoped silicon nanowires grown by molecular-beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Jan; Fleischer, Frank; Breitenstein, Otwin; Schubert, Luise; Werner, Peter; Gösele, Ulrich; Zacharias, Margit

    2007-01-01

    Single undoped Si nanowires were electrically characterized. The nanowires were grown by molecular-beam epitaxy on n+ silicon substrates and were contacted by platinum/iridium tips. I-V curves were measured and electron beam induced current investigations were performed on single nanowires. It was found that the nanowires have an apparent resistivity of 0.85Ωcm, which is much smaller than expected for undoped Si nanowires. The conductance is explained by hopping conductivity at the Si -SiO2 interface of the nanowire surface.

  12. Upgrading the sensitivity of spectroscopy gas analysis with application of supersonic molecular beams

    SciTech Connect

    Vaks, V.; Domracheva, E.; Sobakinskaya, E.; Chernyaeva, M.

    2012-04-01

    We propose an approach to increase a sensitivity of microwave and THz spectroscopy, that involves application of supersonic molecular beams. The key advantage offered by such an approach is that a gas temperature can be decreased along with an increase in the gas density, which results in a much greater number of molecules interacting with radiation and, hence, in a higher absorption coefficient. This effect has been demonstrated experimentally on supersonic CO and NO beams, using a phase manipulation microwave spectrometer. The absorption coefficient was found to be three orders of magnitude higher than the value of gas absorption coefficient in a standard 1-m long cell at room temperature.

  13. Molecular Beam Optical Study of Gold Sulfide and Gold Oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ruohan; Yu, Yuanqin; Steimle, Timothy

    2016-06-01

    Gold-sulfur and gold-oxygen bonds are key components to numerous established and emerging technologies that have applications as far ranging as medical imaging, catalysis, electronics, and material science. A major theoretical challenge for describing this bonding is correctly accounting for the large relativistic and electron correlation effects. Such effects are best studied in diatomic, AuX, molecules. Recently, the observed AuS electronic state energy ordering was measured and compared to a simple molecular orbital diagram prediction. Here we more thoroughly investigate the nature of the electronic states of both AuS and AuO from the analysis of high-resolution (FWHM\\cong35MHz) optical Zeeman spectroscopy of the (0,0){B}2Σ--{X}2Π3/2 bands. The determined fine and hyperfine parameters for the {B}2Σ- state of AuO differ from those extracted from the analysis of a hot, Doppler-limited, spectrum. It is demonstrated that the nature of the {B}2Σ- states of AuO and AuS are radically different. The magnetic tuning of AuO and AuS indicates that the {B}2Σ- states are heavily contaminated. Supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No.1265885. D. L. Kokkin, R. Zhang, T. C. Steimle, I. A. Wyse, B. W. Pearlman and T. D. Varberg, J. Phys. Chem. A., 119(48), 4412, 2015. L. C. O'Brien, B. A. Borchert, A. Farquhar, S. Shaji, J. J. O'Brien and R. W. Field, J. Mol. Spectrosc., 252(2), 136, 2008

  14. LC-MS with electron ionization of cold molecules in supersonic molecular beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granot, Ori; Amirav, Aviv

    2005-06-01

    A new approach is described for the combination of electron ionization and LC-MS based on sample ionization as vibrationally cold molecules in a supersonic molecular beam (Cold EI). Cold EI of sample compounds in liquid solutions (methanol, acetonitrile, water, etc.) is achieved through spray formation, followed by soft thermal vaporization of the sample particles prior to their supersonic expansion and direct electron ionization of the sample compounds while they are contained in a supersonic molecular beam (SMB). Cold EI mass spectra were demonstrated to combine an enhanced molecular ion and improved mass spectral information (in comparison with standard EI), plus all the library searchable fragments. Cold EI enables the ionization of a broad range of compounds, including the full range of non-polar samples. Four orders of magnitude linear dynamic range is demonstrated and a detection limit of 2 pg was achieved for a 774 amu compound in single ion monitoring mode at m/z = 774. The method and apparatus are under continuous development and we feel that it can excel particularly in the analysis of unknown samples, while enabling fast LC-MS analysis through automated mass spectral deconvolution of coeluting LC peaks. In addition, the same MS system can also serve as an advanced GC-MS with supersonic molecular beams.

  15. Principles and Design of a Zeeman–Sisyphus Decelerator for Molecular Beams

    PubMed Central

    Tarbutt, M. R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We explore a technique for decelerating molecules using a static magnetic field and optical pumping. Molecules travel through a spatially varying magnetic field and are repeatedly pumped into a weak‐field seeking state as they move towards each strong field region, and into a strong‐field seeking state as they move towards weak field. The method is time‐independent and so is suitable for decelerating both pulsed and continuous molecular beams. By using guiding magnets at each weak field region, the beam can be simultaneously guided and decelerated. By tapering the magnetic field strength in the strong field regions, and exploiting the Doppler shift, the velocity distribution can be compressed during deceleration. We develop the principles of this deceleration technique, provide a realistic design, use numerical simulations to evaluate its performance for a beam of CaF, and compare this performance to other deceleration methods. PMID:27629547

  16. Molecular Beam Epitaxy on Gas Cluster Ion Beam Prepared GaSb Substrates: Towards Improved Surfaces and Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnaswami, Kannan; Shivashankar, Vangala; Dauplaise, Helen; Allen, Lisa; Dallas, Gordon; Bakken, Daniel; Bliss, David; Goodhue, William

    2008-04-01

    A key problem in producing mid-infrared optoelectronic and low-power electronic devices in the GaSb material system is the lack of substrates with appropriate surfaces for epitaxial growth. Chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) of GaSb results in surface damage accompanied by tenacious oxides that do not easily desorb. To overcome this, we have developed a process using gas cluster ion beams (GCIB) to remove surface damage and produce engineered surface oxides. In this paper, we present surface modification results on GaSb substrates using O2-, CF4/O2-, and HBr-GCIB processes. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of GCIB produced surface layers showed the presence of mixed Ga- and Sb-oxides, with mostly Ga-oxides at the interface, desorbing at temperatures ranging 530°C to 560°C. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy of molecular beam epitaxy grown GaSb/AlGaSb layers showed that GCIB surfaces yielded smooth defect free substrate to epi transitions as compared to CMP surfaces. Furthermore, HBr-GCIB surfaces exhibited neither dislocation layers nor discernable interfaces, indicating complete oxide desorbtion prior to epigrowth on a clean single crystal template. Atomic force microscopy of GCIB epilayers exhibited smooth surfaces with characteristic step-terrace formations comprising monatomic steps and wide terraces. The HBr-GCIB process can be easily adapted to a large scale manufacturing process for epi-ready GaSb.

  17. ZnTe nanowires grown catalytically on GaAs (001) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janik, E.; Sadowski, J.; DłuŻewski, P.; Kret, S.; Presz, A.; Baczewski, L. T.; Łusakowska, E.; Wróbel, J.; Karczewski, G.; Wojtowicz, T.

    2007-04-01

    We report on the first successful growth of ZnTe nanowires and on their basic structural properties. The nanowires were produced by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) with the use of mechanism of catalytically enhanced growth. A thin layer of gold layer (3 to 20 Å thick) annealed in high vacuum prior to the nanowires growth was used as a source of catalytic nanoparticles. Annealing of GaAs substrate with gold layer, performed prior to the MBE growth, leads to formation of Au-Ga eutectic droplets. The presence of Au-Ga droplets on GaAs substrate surface induce the ZnTe nanowire growth via vapor-liquid-solid mechanism, in growth conditions differing form those used in the molecular beam epitaxial growth of ZnTe layers only in the substrate temperature.

  18. Determination of molecular-ion structures through the use of accelerated beams

    SciTech Connect

    Gemmell, D.S.

    1987-01-01

    In this talk we report on recent research on molecular-ion structures using fast molecular-ion beams provided by Argonne's 5-MV Dynamitron accelerator. The method has become known as the ''Coulomb-explosion'' technique. When molecular-ion projectiles travelling at velocities of a few percent of the velocity of light strike a foil, the electrons that bind the molecular projectiles are almost always totally stripped off within the first few Angstroms of penetration into the solid target. This leaves a cluster of bare (or nearly bare) nuclei which separate rapidly as a result of their mutual Coulomb repulsion. This violent dissociation process in which the initial electrostatic potential energy is converted into kinetic energy of relative motion in the center-of-mass, has been termed a ''Coulomb explosion.'' 4 refs., 2 figs.

  19. High Resolution Spectroscopy of 1,2-Difluoroethane in a Molecular Beam: A Case Study of Vibrational Mode-Coupling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-29

    Spectroscopy of 1,2- Difluoroethane in a Molecular Beam: A Case Study of Vibrational Mode-Coupling by Steven W. Mork, C. Cameron Miller, and Laura A...and sale; its distribution is unlimited. 92-14657 l9lll l l l , II a HIGH RESOLUTION SPECTROSCOPY OF 1,2- DIFLUOROETHANE IN A MOLECULAR BEAM: A CASE...14853-1301 Abstract The high resolution infrared spectrum of 1,2- difluoroethane (DFE) in a molecular beam has been obtained over the 2978-2996 cm-1

  20. Molecular Depth Profiling using a C(60) Cluster Beam: the Role of Impact Energy.

    PubMed

    Wucher, Andreas; Cheng, Juan; Winograd, Nicholas

    2008-10-23

    Molecular depth profiling of organic overlayers was performed using a mass selected C(60) ion beam in conjunction with time-of-flight (TOF-SIMS) mass spectrometry. The characteristics of sputter depth profiles acquired for a 300-nm Trehalose film on silicon were studied as a function of the kinetic impact energy of the projectile ions. The results are interpreted in terms of a simple model describing the balance between sputter erosion and ion induced chemical damage. It is shown that the efficiency of the projectile to clean up the fragmentation debris produced by its own impact represents a key parameter governing the success of molecular depth profile analysis.

  1. Gas-phase reactions in extraterrestrial environments: laboratory investigations by crossed molecular beams.

    PubMed

    Balucani, Nadia; Casavecchia, Piergiorgio

    2006-12-01

    We have investigated gas-phase reactions of N((2)D) with the most abundant hydrocarbons in the atmosphere of Titan by the crossed molecular beam technique. In all cases, molecular products containing a novel CN bond are formed, thus suggesting possible routes of formation of gas-phase nitriles in the atmosphere of Titan and primordial Earth. The same approach has been recently extended to the study of radical-radical reactions, such as the reaction of atomic oxygen with the CH(3) and C(3)H(5) radicals. Products other than those already considered in the modeling of planetary atmospheres and interstellar medium have been identified.

  2. Molecular beams entwined with quantum theory: A bouquet for Max Planck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herschbach, D.

    2001-01-01

    In an era when the fledgling quantum theory was uncertain and even gave contradictory answers, Otto Stern undertook to employ molecular beams to test directly fundamental aspects of the theory. During 1921-1935, this led to five decisive experiments reviewed here, resulting in the discovery or demonstration of space quantization, de Broglie matter waves, anomalous magnetic moments of the proton and neutron, recoil of an atom on emission of a photon, and the limitation of scattering cross-sections for molecular collisions imposed by the uncertainty principle.

  3. Antimony-assisted carbonization of Si(111) with solid source molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Hackley, Justin; Richardson, Christopher J. K.; Sarney, Wendy L.

    2013-11-15

    The carbonization of an antimony-terminated Si (111) surface in a solid source molecular beam epitaxy system is presented. Reflection high-energy electron diffraction, atomic force microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy are used to characterize samples grown with and without antimony termination. It is shown that the antimony-terminated surface promotes the formation of thin, smooth and continuous SiC films at a relatively low temperature of 800 °C.

  4. Mn2Au: body-centered-tetragonal bimetallic antiferromagnets grown by molecular beam epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Han-Chun; Liao, Zhi-Min; Sofin, R G Sumesh; Feng, Gen; Ma, Xiu-Mei; Shick, Alexander B; Mryasov, Oleg N; Shvets, Igor V

    2012-12-11

    Mn(2)Au, a layered bimetal, is successfully grown using molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The experiments and theoretical calculations presented suggest that Mn(2)Au film is antiferromagnetic with a very low critical temperature. The antiferromagnetic nature is demonstrated by measuring the exchange-bias effect of Mn(2)Au/Fe bilayers. This study establishes a primary basis for further research of this new antiferromagnet in spin-electronic device applications.

  5. Pure electron-electron dephasing in percolative aluminum ultrathin film grown by molecular beam epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shih-Wei; Wu, Yue-Han; Chang, Li; Liang, Chi-Te; Lin, Sheng-Di

    2015-01-01

    We have successfully grown ultrathin continuous aluminum film by molecular beam epitaxy. This percolative aluminum film is single crystalline and strain free as characterized by transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The weak anti-localization effect is observed in the temperature range of 1.4 to 10 K with this sample, and it reveals that, for the first time, the dephasing is purely caused by electron-electron inelastic scattering in aluminum.

  6. Molecular beam epitaxial growth and structural characterization of ZnS on (001) GaAs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, R. G., II; Huang, P. C.; Stock, S. R.; Summers, C. J.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of surface nucleation processes on the quality of ZnS layers grown on (001) GaAs substrates by molecular beam epitaxy is reported. Reflection high energy electron diffraction indicated that nucleation at high temperatures produced more planar surfaces than nucleation at low temperatures, but the crystalline quality as assessed by X-ray double crystal diffractometry is relatively independent of nucleation temperature. A critical factor in layer quality was the initial roughness of the GaAs surfaces.

  7. UV ozone cleaning of silicon substrates in silicon molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabe, Michiharu

    1984-11-01

    This letter reports UV ozone cleaning of Si substrates for obtaining defect-free molecular beam epitaxial films by low-temperature in vacuum preheating. By using UV ozone cleaning, the high temperatures above 1200 °C required for removing surface carbon in the conventional method can be significantly lowered to below 1000 °C, since the UV ozone cleaning functions to remove carbon.

  8. Onset of stacking faults in InP nanowires grown by gas source molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornet, D. M.; Mazzetti, V. G. M.; LaPierre, R. R.

    2007-01-01

    InP nanowires (NWs) were grown by gas source molecular beam epitaxy on InP (111)B substrates, using Au nanoparticles as a growth catalyst. The rod-shaped NWs exhibited hexagonal sidewall facets oriented along the {-211} family of crystal planes for all NW diameters, indicating minimal sidewall growth. Stacking faults, when present, were concentrated near the NW tips, while NWs with lengths less than 300nm were completely free of stacking faults.

  9. Collapse of a composite beam made from ultra high molecular-weight polyethylene fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, G.; Thouless, M. D.; Deshpande, V. S.; Fleck, N. A.

    2014-02-01

    Hot-pressed laminates with a [0/90]48 lay-up, consisting of 83% by volume of ultra high molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) fibres, and 17% by volume of polyurethane (PU) matrix, were cut into cantilever beams and subjected to transverse end-loading. The collapse mechanisms were observed both visually and by X-ray scans. Short beams deform elastically and collapse plastically in longitudinal shear, with a shear strength comparable to that observed in double notch, interlaminar shear tests. In contrast, long cantilever beams deform in bending and collapse via a plastic hinge at the built-in end of the beam. The plastic hinge is formed by two wedge-shaped microbuckle zones that grow in size and in intensity with increasing hinge rotation. This new mode of microbuckling under macroscopic bending involves both elastic bending and shearing of the plies, and plastic shear of the interface between each ply. The double-wedge pattern contrasts with the more usual parallel-sided plastic microbuckle that occurs in uniaxial compression. Finite element simulations and analytical models give additional insight into the dominant material and geometric parameters that dictate the collapse response of the UHMWPE composite beam in bending. Detailed comparisons between the observed and predicted collapse responses are used in order to construct a constitutive model for laminated UHMWPE composites.

  10. A novel gas-vacuum interface for environmental molecular beam studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Sofia M.; Kong, Xiangrui; Papagiannakopoulos, Panos; Thomson, Erik S.; Pettersson, Jan B. C.

    2017-03-01

    Molecular beam techniques are commonly used to obtain detailed information about reaction dynamics and kinetics of gas-surface interactions. These experiments are traditionally performed in vacuum and the dynamic state of surfaces under ambient conditions is thereby excluded from detailed studies. Herein we describe the development and demonstration of a new vacuum-gas interface that increases the accessible pressure range in environmental molecular beam (EMB) experiments. The interface consists of a grating close to a macroscopically flat surface, which allows for experiments at pressures above 1 Pa including angularly resolved measurements of the emitted flux. The technique is successfully demonstrated using key molecular beam experiments including elastic helium and inelastic water scattering from graphite, helium and light scattering from condensed adlayers, and water interactions with a liquid 1-butanol surface. The method is concluded to extend the pressure range and flexibility in EMB studies with implications for investigations of high pressure interface phenomena in diverse fields including catalysis, nanotechnology, environmental science, and life science. Potential further improvements of the technique are discussed.

  11. Thermometry of Guided Molecular Beams from a Cryogenic Buffer-Gas Cell.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xing; Gantner, Thomas; Zeppenfeld, Martin; Chervenkov, Sotir; Rempe, Gerhard

    2016-11-18

    A comprehensive characterisation of cold molecular beams from a cryogenic buffer-gas cell, providing insight into the physics of buffer-gas cooling, is presented. Cold molecular beams are extracted from a cryogenic cell by electrostatic guiding, which is also used to measure their velocity distribution. The rotational-state distribution of the molecules is probed by radio-frequency resonant depletion spectroscopy. With the help of complete trajectory simulations, yielding the guiding efficiency for all of the thermally populated states, it is possible to determine both the rotational and the translational temperature of the molecules at the output of the buffer-gas cell. This thermometry method is demonstrated for various regimes of buffer-gas cooling and beam formation as well as for molecular species of different sizes (CH3 F and CF3 CCH). Comparison of the rotational and translational temperatures provides evidence of faster rotational thermalisation for the CH3 F/He system in the limit of low He density. In addition, the relaxation rates for different rotational states appear to be different.

  12. The Molecular Mechanism of the Supra-Additive Response of Prostate Cancer to Androgen Ablation and Radiotherapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-02-01

    Biol. Phys., 43: 607-616, 1999. wild-type p53 gene and induction of apoptosis in cervical cancer . 29. Lang, F. F., Yung, W. K. A., Raju, U., Libunao... cervical cancer . Cancer Res 1996;56:3047- 25. Li JH, Lax SA, Kim J, et al. The effects of ionizing radiation 3054. and adenoviral p53 therapy in...Mechanism of the Supra-Additive Response of Prostate Cancer to Androgen Ablation and Radiotherapy PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Alan Pollack, M.D., Ph.D

  13. High throughput solar cell ablation system

    SciTech Connect

    Harley, Gabriel; Pass, Thomas; Cousins, Peter John; Viatella, John

    2014-10-14

    A solar cell is formed using a solar cell ablation system. The ablation system includes a single laser source and several laser scanners. The laser scanners include a master laser scanner, with the rest of the laser scanners being slaved to the master laser scanner. A laser beam from the laser source is split into several laser beams, with the laser beams being scanned onto corresponding wafers using the laser scanners in accordance with one or more patterns. The laser beams may be scanned on the wafers using the same or different power levels of the laser source.

  14. High throughput solar cell ablation system

    DOEpatents

    Harley, Gabriel; Pass, Thomas; Cousins, Peter John; Viatella, John

    2012-09-11

    A solar cell is formed using a solar cell ablation system. The ablation system includes a single laser source and several laser scanners. The laser scanners include a master laser scanner, with the rest of the laser scanners being slaved to the master laser scanner. A laser beam from the laser source is split into several laser beams, with the laser beams being scanned onto corresponding wafers using the laser scanners in accordance with one or more patterns. The laser beams may be scanned on the wafers using the same or different power levels of the laser source.

  15. Molecular beam epitaxy and properties of GaAsBi/GaAs quantum wells grown by molecular beam epitaxy: effect of thermal annealing.

    PubMed

    Makhloufi, Hajer; Boonpeng, Poonyasiri; Mazzucato, Simone; Nicolai, Julien; Arnoult, Alexandre; Hungria, Teresa; Lacoste, Guy; Gatel, Christophe; Ponchet, Anne; Carrère, Hélène; Marie, Xavier; Fontaine, Chantal

    2014-03-17

    We have grown GaAsBi quantum wells by molecular beam epitaxy. We have studied the properties of a 7% Bi GaAsBi quantum well and their variation with thermal annealing. High-resolution X-ray diffraction, secondary ion mass spectrometry, and transmission electron microscopy have been employed to get some insight into its structural properties. Stationary and time-resolved photoluminescence shows that the quantum well emission, peaking at 1.23 μm at room temperature, can be improved by a rapid annealing at 650°C, while the use of a higher annealing temperature leads to emission degradation and blue-shifting due to the activation of non-radiative centers and bismuth diffusion from the quantum well.

  16. The Cl + O3 reaction: a detailed QCT simulation of molecular beam experiments.

    PubMed

    Menéndez, M; Castillo, J F; Martínez-Haya, B; Aoiz, F J

    2015-10-14

    We have studied in detail the dynamics of the Cl + O3 reaction in the 1-56 kcal mol(-1) collision energy range using quasi-classical trajectory (QCT) calculations on a recent potential energy surface (PES) [J. F. Castillo et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2011, 13, 8537]. The main goal of this work has been to assess the accuracy of the PES and the reliability of the QCT method by comparison with the existing crossed molecular beam results [J. Zhang and Y. T. Lee J. Phys. Chem. A, 1997, 101, 6485]. For this purpose, we have developed a methodology that allows us to determine the experimental observables in crossed molecular beam experiments (integral and differential cross sections, recoil velocity distributions, scattering angle-recoil velocity polar maps, etc.) as continuous functions of the collision energy. Using these distributions, raw experimental data in the laboratory frame (angular distributions and time-of-flight spectra) have been simulated from first principles with the sole information on the instrumental parameters and taking into account the energy spread. A general good agreement with the experimental data has been found, thereby demonstrating the adequacy of the QCT method and the quality of the PES to describe the dynamics of this reaction at the level of resolution of the existing crossed beam experiments. Some features which are apparent in the differential cross sections have also been analysed in terms of the dynamics of the reaction and its evolution with the collision energy.

  17. Genetic Ablation of Calcium-independent Phospholipase A2γ Leads to Alterations in Hippocampal Cardiolipin Content and Molecular Species Distribution, Mitochondrial Degeneration, Autophagy, and Cognitive Dysfunction*

    PubMed Central

    Mancuso, David J.; Kotzbauer, Paul; Wozniak, David F.; Sims, Harold F.; Jenkins, Christopher M.; Guan, Shaoping; Han, Xianlin; Yang, Kui; Sun, Gang; Malik, Ibrahim; Conyers, Sara; Green, Karen G.; Schmidt, Robert E.; Gross, Richard W.

    2009-01-01

    Genetic ablation of calcium-independent phospholipase A2γ (iPLA2γ) results in profound alterations in hippocampal phospholipid metabolism and mitochondrial phospholipid homeostasis resulting in enlarged and degenerating mitochondria leading to autophagy and cognitive dysfunction. Shotgun lipidomics demonstrated multiple alterations in hippocampal lipid metabolism in iPLA2γ−/− mice including: 1) a markedly elevated hippocampal cardiolipin content with an altered molecular species composition characterized by a shift to shorter chain length molecular species; 2) alterations in both choline and ethanolamine glycerophospholipids, including a decreased plasmenylethanolamine content; 3) increased oxidized phosphatidylethanolamine molecular species; and 4) an increased content of ceramides. Electron microscopic examination demonstrated the presence of enlarged heteromorphic lamellar structures undergoing degeneration accompanied by the presence of ubiquitin positive spheroid inclusion bodies. Purification of these enlarged heteromorphic lamellar structures by buoyant density centrifugation and subsequent SDS-PAGE and proteomics identified them as degenerating mitochondria. Collectively, these results identify the obligatory role of iPLA2γ in neuronal mitochondrial lipid metabolism and membrane structure demonstrating that iPLA2γ loss of function results in a mitochondrial neurodegenerative disorder characterized by degenerating mitochondria, autophagy, and cognitive dysfunction. PMID:19840936

  18. Study of electrical properties of single GaN nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozharov, A. M.; Komissarenko, F. E.; Vasiliev, A. A.; Bolshakov, A. D.; Moiseev, E. I.; Mukhin, M. S.; Cirlin, G. E.; Mukhin, I. S.

    2016-08-01

    Electrical properties of single GaN nanowires grown by means of molecular beam epitaxy with N-plasma source were studied. Ohmic contacts connected to single n-type GaN wires were produced by the combination of electron beam lithography, metal vacuum evaporation and rapid thermal annealing technique. The optimal annealing temperature to produce ohmic contacts implemented in the form of Ti/Al/Ti/Au stack has been determined. By means of 2-terminal measurement wiring diagram the conductivity of single NW has been obtained for NWs with different growth parameters. The method of MESFET measurement circuit layout of single GaN nanowires (NWs) has been developed. In accordance with performed numerical calculation, free carriers' concentration and mobility of single NWs could be independently estimated using MESFET structure.

  19. Total synthesis of interstellar chemical compounds by high energy molecular beam bombardment on pure graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devienne, F. M.; Teisseire, M.

    1985-06-01

    The objective of this paper is to show a possibility of forming interstellar molecules detected in the interstellar space by bombarding a carbon target or graphite grains with high energy neutrals. The authors have bombarded pure graphite in the ultra-vacuum with high energy molecular beams (from 2 to 10 keV) obtained by charge exchange from ion beams of hydrogen, oxygen, or nitrogen. They have observed many organic compounds: binary compounds like hydrogen carbides, ternary compounds containing carbon, nitrogen, oxygen or hydrogen, and finally, quaternary compounds. They also have obtained cyanopolyynes and organic molecules which had previously been observed in the interstellar space. So far, they have identified thirty-two compounds corresponding to molecules observed in the interstellar space and about forty containing only carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and oxygen.

  20. An intense, cold, velocity-controlled molecular beam by frequency-chirped laser slowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truppe, S.; Williams, H. J.; Fitch, N. J.; Hambach, M.; Wall, T. E.; Hinds, E. A.; Sauer, B. E.; Tarbutt, M. R.

    2017-02-01

    Using frequency-chirped radiation pressure slowing, we precisely control the velocity of a pulsed CaF molecular beam down to a few m s–1, compressing its velocity spread by a factor of 10 while retaining high intensity: at a velocity of 15 m s–1 the flux, measured 1.3 m from the source, is 7 × 105 molecules per cm2 per shot in a single rovibrational state. The beam is suitable for loading a magneto-optical trap or, when combined with transverse laser cooling, improving the precision of spectroscopic measurements that test fundamental physics. We compare the frequency-chirped slowing method with the more commonly used frequency-broadened slowing method.

  1. Molecular beam epitaxial growth of CdZnS using elemental sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, B. J.; Cheng, H.; Guha, S.; Haase, M. A.; De Puydt, J. M.; Meis-Haugen, G.; Qiu, J.

    1993-11-01

    We report on the first molecular beam epitaxial (MBE) growth of CdZnS on (100) GaAs substrates using elemental Zn, Cd, and S sources. Single crystal cubic CdZnS layers lattice matched to GaAs have been successfully prepared. The competition in incorporation between Cd and Zn under different sulfur flux conditions is investigated. Under appropriate growth conditions, the Cd1-xZnxS composition is directly related only to the ratio of the group II beam equivalent pressures. The background sulfur in the MBE growth chamber is found to etch the freshly thermally cleaned GaAs substrates and generate high density of pits on the surfaces. Methods to prevent the sulfur etching are also discussed.

  2. Three-dimensional ordering of cold ion beams in a storage ring: A molecular-dynamics simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Yuri, Yosuke

    2015-06-29

    Three-dimensional (3D) ordering of a charged-particle beams circulating in a storage ring is systematically studied with a molecular-dynamics simulation code. An ion beam can exhibit a 3D ordered configuration at ultralow temperature as a result of powerful 3D laser cooling. Various unique characteristics of the ordered beams, different from those of crystalline beams, are revealed in detail, such as the single-particle motion in the transverse and longitudinal directions, and the dependence of the tune depression and the Coulomb coupling constant on the operating points.

  3. A modified time-of-flight method for precise determination of high speed ratios in molecular beams

    SciTech Connect

    Salvador Palau, A.; Eder, S. D. Kaltenbacher, T.; Samelin, B.; Holst, B.; Bracco, G.

    2016-02-15

    Time-of-flight (TOF) is a standard experimental technique for determining, among others, the speed ratio S (velocity spread) of a molecular beam. The speed ratio is a measure for the monochromaticity of the beam and an accurate determination of S is crucial for various applications, for example, for characterising chromatic aberrations in focussing experiments related to helium microscopy or for precise measurements of surface phonons and surface structures in molecular beam scattering experiments. For both of these applications, it is desirable to have as high a speed ratio as possible. Molecular beam TOF measurements are typically performed by chopping the beam using a rotating chopper with one or more slit openings. The TOF spectra are evaluated using a standard deconvolution method. However, for higher speed ratios, this method is very sensitive to errors related to the determination of the slit width and the beam diameter. The exact sensitivity depends on the beam diameter, the number of slits, the chopper radius, and the chopper rotation frequency. We present a modified method suitable for the evaluation of TOF measurements of high speed ratio beams. The modified method is based on a systematic variation of the chopper convolution parameters so that a set of independent measurements that can be fitted with an appropriate function are obtained. We show that with this modified method, it is possible to reduce the error by typically one order of magnitude compared to the standard method.

  4. A modified time-of-flight method for precise determination of high speed ratios in molecular beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvador Palau, A.; Eder, S. D.; Kaltenbacher, T.; Samelin, B.; Bracco, G.; Holst, B.

    2016-02-01

    Time-of-flight (TOF) is a standard experimental technique for determining, among others, the speed ratio S (velocity spread) of a molecular beam. The speed ratio is a measure for the monochromaticity of the beam and an accurate determination of S is crucial for various applications, for example, for characterising chromatic aberrations in focussing experiments related to helium microscopy or for precise measurements of surface phonons and surface structures in molecular beam scattering experiments. For both of these applications, it is desirable to have as high a speed ratio as possible. Molecular beam TOF measurements are typically performed by chopping the beam using a rotating chopper with one or more slit openings. The TOF spectra are evaluated using a standard deconvolution method. However, for higher speed ratios, this method is very sensitive to errors related to the determination of the slit width and the beam diameter. The exact sensitivity depends on the beam diameter, the number of slits, the chopper radius, and the chopper rotation frequency. We present a modified method suitable for the evaluation of TOF measurements of high speed ratio beams. The modified method is based on a systematic variation of the chopper convolution parameters so that a set of independent measurements that can be fitted with an appropriate function are obtained. We show that with this modified method, it is possible to reduce the error by typically one order of magnitude compared to the standard method.

  5. An effusive molecular beam technique for studies of polyatomic gas-surface reactivity and energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Cushing, G W; Navin, J K; Valadez, L; Johánek, V; Harrison, I

    2011-04-01

    An effusive molecular beam technique is described to measure alkane dissociative sticking coefficients, S(T(g), T(s); ϑ), on metal surfaces for which the impinging gas temperature, T(g), and surface temperature, T(s), can be independently varied, along with the angle of incidence, ϑ, of the impinging gas. Effusive beam experiments with T(g) = T(s) = T allow for determination of angle-resolved dissociative sticking coefficients, S(T; ϑ), which when averaged over the cos (ϑ)/π angular distribution appropriate to the impinging flux from a thermal ambient gas yield the thermal dissociative sticking coefficient, S(T). Nonequilibrium S(T(g), T(s); ϑ) measurements for which T(g) ≠ T(s) provide additional opportunities to characterize the transition state and gas-surface energy transfer at reactive energies. A resistively heated effusive molecular beam doser controls the T(g) of the impinging gas striking the surface. The flux of molecules striking the surface from the effusive beam is determined from knowledge of the dosing geometry, chamber pressure, and pumping speed. Separate experiments with a calibrated leak serve to fix the chamber pumping speed. Postdosing Auger electron spectroscopy is used to measure the carbon of the alkyl radical reaction product that is deposited on the surface as a result of alkane dissociative sticking. As implemented in a typical ultrahigh vacuum chamber for surface analysis, the technique has provided access to a dynamic range of roughly 6 orders of magnitude in the initial dissociative sticking coefficient for small alkanes on Pt(111).

  6. Molecular beam mass spectrometry with tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Golan, Amir; Ahmed, Musahid

    2012-01-01

    Tunable soft ionization coupled to mass spectroscopy is a powerful method to investigate isolated molecules, complexes and clusters and their spectroscopy and dynamics.[1-4] Fundamental studies of photoionization processes of biomolecules provide information about electronic structure of these systems. Furthermore determinations of ionization energies and other properties of biomolecules in the gas phase are not trivial, and these experiments provide a platform to generate these data. We have developed a thermal vaporization technique coupled with supersonic molecular beams that provides a gentle way to transport these species into the gas phase. Judicious combination of source gas and temperature allows for formation of dimers and higher clusters of the DNA bases. The focus of this particular work is on the effects of non-covalent interactions, i.e., hydrogen bonding, stacking, and electrostatic interactions, on the ionization energies and proton transfer of individual biomolecules, their complexes and upon micro-hydration by water.[1, 5-9] We have performed experimental and theoretical characterization of the photoionization dynamics of gas-phase uracil and 1,3-methyluracil dimers using molecular beams coupled with synchrotron radiation at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline[10] located at the Advanced Light Source and the experimental details are visualized here. This allowed us to observe the proton transfer in 1,3-dimethyluracil dimers, a system with pi stacking geometry and with no hydrogen bonds[1]. Molecular beams provide a very convenient and efficient way to isolate the sample of interest from environmental perturbations which in return allows accurate comparison with electronic structure calculations[11, 12]. By tuning the photon energy from the synchrotron, a photoionization efficiency (PIE) curve can be plotted which informs us about the cationic electronic states. These values can then be compared to theoretical models and calculations and in turn, explain

  7. Molecular beams studies of the energetics and dynamics of elementary chemical reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Hayden, C.C.

    1982-05-01

    Quantum mechanical effects on the angular distribution of HF products from the F + H/sub 2/ reaction were studied using crossed atomic and molecular beams with a rotatable mass spectrometer detector and time-of-flight velocity analysis. Measurement of the singlet-triplet splitting of CH/sub 2/ from the recoil velocities of fragments from ketene photodissociation in a molecular beam is also reported. Partial center-of-mass angular distributions, and velocity flux contour maps have been derived for individual vibrational states of the HF product from the F + H/sub 2/ reaction at collision energies of 2 and 3 kcal/mole. The center-of-mass distributions were obtained by analysis of laboratory angular and time-of-flight measurements of the reactive scattering. The results are consistent with recent three dimensional quantum mechanical scattering calculations, which predict that resonance effects should appear in the product angular distributions in this energy range. The photofragmentation of ketene in a molecular beam was used to measure the singlet-triplet splitting in CH/sub 2/. A rare gas halide excimer laser operating at 351 nm (XeF) and 308 nm (XeCl) dissociated the ketene. Time-of-flight measurements of the fragment velocities allowed determination of the energetics of the dissociation. The /sup 1/A/sub 1/ - /sup 3/B/sub 1/ splitting in CH/sub 2/ was found to be 8.5 +- 0.8 kcal/mole. This agrees with many experimental results, but not with the value of 19.5 kcal/mole derived from recent photodetachment experiments on CH/sub 2//sup -/.

  8. Molecular characterization and developmental expression of vitellogenin in the oriental river prawn Macrobrachium nipponense and the effects of RNA interference and eyestalk ablation on ovarian maturation.

    PubMed

    Bai, Hongkun; Qiao, Hui; Li, Fajun; Fu, Hongtuo; Sun, Shengming; Zhang, Wenyi; Jin, Shubo; Gong, Yongsheng; Jiang, Sufei; Xiong, Yiwei

    2015-05-10

    Vitellogenin (Vg) is the precursor of yolk protein, which functions as a nutritive resource that is important for embryonic growth and gonad development. In this study, the cDNA encoding the Vg gene from the oriental river prawn Macrobrachium nipponense was cloned using expressed sequence tag (EST) analysis and the rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) approach. The transcript encoded 2536 amino acids with an estimated molecular mass of 286.810 kDa. Quantitative real-time PCR indicated high expression of Mn-Vg in the female ovary, hemocytes, and hepatopancreas. As ovaries developed, the expression level of Mn-Vg increased in both the hepatopancreas and ovary. In the hepatopancreas, the expression level rose more slowly at the early stage of vitellogenesis and reached the peak more rapidly compared to the expression pattern in ovary. The observed changes in Mn-Vg expression level at different development stages suggest the role of nutrient source in embryonic and larval development. Eyestalk ablation caused the Mn-Vg expression level to increase significantly compared to eyestalk-intact groups during the ovary development stages. Ablation accelerated ovary maturation by removing hormone inhibition of Mn-Vg in the hepatopancreas and ovary. In adult females, Mn-Vg dsRNA injection resulted in decreased expression of Mn-Vg in both the hepatopancreas and ovary, and two injection treatment dramatically delayed ovary maturation. Vg RNA interference down-regulated the vitellogenin receptor (VgR) expression level in the ovary, which illustrates the close relationship between Vg and VgR in the process of vitellogenesis.

  9. Growth of layered superconductor β-PdBi2 films using molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisov, N. V.; Matetskiy, A. V.; Tupkalo, A. V.; Zotov, A. V.; Saranin, A. A.

    2017-04-01

    Bulk β-PdBi2 layered material exhibits advanced properties and is supposed to be probable topological superconductor. We present a method based on molecular beam epitaxy that allows us to grow β-PdBi2 films from a single β-PdBi2 triple layer up to the dozens of triple layers, using Bi(111) film on Si(111) as a template. The grown films demonstrate structural, electronic and superconducting properties similar to those of bulk β-PdBi2 crystals. Ability to grow the β-PdBi2 films of desired thickness opens the promising possibilities to explore fascinating properties of this advanced material.

  10. Lutetium-doped EuO films grown by molecular-beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Melville, A.; Heeg, T.; Mairoser, T.; Schmehl, A.; Shai, D. E.; Monkman, E. J.; Harter, J. W.; Hollaender, B.; Schubert, J.; Shen, K. M.; Mannhart, J.; Schlom, D. G.

    2012-05-28

    The effect of lutetium doping on the structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of epitaxial EuO thin films grown by reactive molecular-beam epitaxy is experimentally investigated. The behavior of Lu-doped EuO is contrasted with doping by lanthanum and gadolinium. All three dopants are found to behave similarly despite differences in electronic configuration and ionic size. Andreev reflection measurements on Lu-doped EuO reveal a spin-polarization of 96% in the conduction band, despite non-magnetic carriers introduced by 5% lutetium doping.

  11. Characterization of GaN microstructures grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, Ikai; Pang, Wen-Yuan; Hsu, Yu-Chi; Hsieh, Chia-Ho; Shih, Cheng-Hung; Chou, Mitch M. C.; Chen, Wen-Yen; Hsu, Tzu-Min; Hsu, Gary Z. L.

    2013-06-15

    The characterization of GaN microstructures grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy on LiAlO{sub 2} substrate was studied by cathodoluminescence and photoluminescence measurements. We demonstrated that the cathodoluminescence from oblique semi-polar surfaces of mushroom-shaped GaN was much brighter than that from top polar surface due to the reduction of polarization field on the oblique semi-polar surfaces. It implies that the oblique semi-polar surface is superior for the light-emitting surface of wurtzite nano-devices.

  12. Molecular-Beam Epitaxial Growth and Device Potential of Polar/Nonpolar Semiconductor Heterostructures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE(Wlam Doa ntered) ?0. ABSTRACT "echniques for the molecular beam epitaxial growth of GaP and GaAs substrates were...of both GaAs and GaP was found to be the problem of avoiding antiphase domains (APDs) in the growing film, that is, of random domains containing...even better properties. Lattice-mismatched (4%) growth of GaAs on Si was achieved, using the clean Si surface technology and the (211) orientation

  13. A portable molecular beam epitaxy system for in situ x-ray investigations at synchrotron beamlines

    SciTech Connect

    Slobodskyy, T.; Schroth, P.; Grigoriev, D.; Minkevich, A. A.; Baumbach, T.; Hu, D. Z.; Schaadt, D. M.

    2012-10-15

    A portable synchrotron molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) system is designed and applied for in situ investigations. The growth chamber is equipped with all the standard MBE components such as effusion cells with shutters, main shutter, cooling shroud, manipulator, reflection high energy electron diffraction setup, and pressure gauges. The characteristic feature of the system is the beryllium windows which are used for in situ x-ray measurements. An UHV sample transfer case allows in vacuo transfer of samples prepared elsewhere. We describe the system design and demonstrate its performance by investigating the annealing process of buried InGaAs self-organized quantum dots.

  14. A portable molecular beam epitaxy system for in situ x-ray investigations at synchrotron beamlines.

    PubMed

    Slobodskyy, T; Schroth, P; Grigoriev, D; Minkevich, A A; Hu, D Z; Schaadt, D M; Baumbach, T

    2012-10-01

    A portable synchrotron molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) system is designed and applied for in situ investigations. The growth chamber is equipped with all the standard MBE components such as effusion cells with shutters, main shutter, cooling shroud, manipulator, reflection high energy electron diffraction setup, and pressure gauges. The characteristic feature of the system is the beryllium windows which are used for in situ x-ray measurements. An UHV sample transfer case allows in vacuo transfer of samples prepared elsewhere. We describe the system design and demonstrate its performance by investigating the annealing process of buried InGaAs self-organized quantum dots.

  15. Crystallographic dependence of photocatalytic activity of WO3 thin films prepared by molecular beam epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Li, Guoqiang; Varga, Tamas; Yan, Pengfei; Wang, Zhiguo; Wang, Chongmin; Chambers, Scott A; Du, Yingge

    2015-06-21

    We investigated the impact of crystallographic orientation on the photocatalytic activity of single crystalline WO3 thin films prepared by molecular beam epitaxy on the photodegradation of rhodamine B (RhB). A clear effect is observed, with (111) being the most reactive surface, followed by (110) and (001). Photoreactivity is directly correlated with the surface free energy determined by density functional theory calculations. The RhB photodegradation mechanism is found to involve hydroxyl radicals in solution formed from photo-generated holes and differs from previous studies performed on nanoparticles and composites.

  16. Molecular-Beam Epitaxy Of CrSi2 on Si(111)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fathauer, Robert W.; Grunthaner, Paula J.; Lin, True-Lon; Jamieson, David N.; Mazur, Jurek H.

    1989-01-01

    Crystalline layers grown in commercial apparatus. Experiments show CrSi2 grown on (111) face of single-crystal Si substrate by molecular-beam epitaxy. Epitaxial CrSi2 produced thus far not in desired single-crystal form. Because CrSi2 semiconductor with band gap of 0.3 eV, experimental process potential for monolitic integration of microelectronic devices based on CrSi2 (e.g., infrared detectors) with signal-processing circuitry based on Si.

  17. Growth behaviors of ultrathin ZnSe nanowires by Au-catalyzed molecular-beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Wong, T. L.; Chan, S. K.; Sou, I. K.; Wang, N.; Su, D. S.

    2008-12-08

    Ultrathin ZnSe nanowires grown by Au-catalyzed molecular-beam epitaxy show an interesting growth behavior of diameter dependence of growth rates. The smaller the nanowire diameter, the faster is its growth rate. This growth behavior is totally different from that of the nanowires with diameters greater than 60 nm and cannot be interpreted by the classical theories of the vapor-liquid-solid mechanism. For the Au-catalyzed nanowire growth at low temperatures, we found that the surface and interface incorporation and diffusion of the source atoms at the nanowire tips controlled the growth of ultrathin ZnSe nanowires.

  18. Silicon dioxide embedded germanium nanocrystals grown using molecular beam epitaxy for floating gate memory devices.

    PubMed

    Das, S; Singha, R K; Das, K; Dhar, A; Ray, S K

    2009-09-01

    SiO2/Ge nanocrystals/SiO2 trilayer memory structure has been fabricated by oxidizing and subsequent annealing of self assembled SiGe nanoislands grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The optical and charge storage characteristics of trilayer structures have been studied through Raman spectroscopy and capacitance-voltage measurements, respectively. An anti-clockwise hysteresis in the C-V characteristics indicated the net electron trapping in the floating gate containing Ge nanocrystals. Frequency dependent measurements of device characteristics indicate that neither interface defects nor deep traps are dominant for the charging or discharging processes of nanocrystal floating gates.

  19. Demonstration of molecular beam epitaxy and a semiconducting band structure for I-Mn-V compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Jungwirth, T.; Novak, V.; Cukr, M.; Zemek, J.; Marti, X.; Horodyska, P.; Nemec, P.; Holy, V.; Maca, F.; Shick, A. B.; Masek, J.; Kuzel, P.; Nemec, I.; Gallagher, B. L.; Campion, R. P.; Foxon, C. T.; Wunderlich, J.

    2011-01-15

    Our ab initio theory calculations predict a semiconducting band structure of I-Mn-V compounds. We demonstrate on LiMnAs that high-quality materials with group-I alkali metals in the crystal structure can be grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Optical measurements on the LiMnAs epilayers are consistent with the theoretical electronic structure. Our calculations also reproduce earlier reports of high antiferromagnetic ordering temperature and predict large, spin-orbit-coupling-induced magnetic anisotropy effects. We propose a strategy for employing antiferromagnetic semiconductors in high-temperature semiconductor spintronics.

  20. Advanced Techniques to Decrease Defect Density in Molecular Beam Epitaxial Silicon Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatsumi, Toru; Aizaki, Naoaki; Tsuya, Hideki

    1985-04-01

    Defect density dependence on various surface cleaning conditions for molecular beam epitaxial (MBE) silicon films was investigated. Defect-free films were obtained on (100) and (511) wafers, using a combination of ozone cleaning and predeposition process after the usual wet cleaning. On the (111) wafer, the defect density dependence on growth rate was examined. The two-step growth-rate procedure was effective in decreasing stacking faults on the (111) wafer. The difference in defect density between (100) and (111) wafers is also discussed.

  1. Hybrid semiconductor quantum dot-metal nanocrystal structures prepared by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbańczyk, A.; Hamhuis, G. J.; Nötzel, R.

    2011-05-01

    We report the formation of In nanocrystals and their alignment near dilute InAs quantum dots (QDs) on GaAs (0 0 1) by molecular beam epitaxy. The In nanocrystals exhibit surface plasmon resonances in the near-infrared range, which can be matched with the emission wavelength of In(Ga)As QDs. The alignment of the In nanocrystals near the InAs QDs is due to the strain-driven migration yielding single isolated QD-metal nanocrystal pairs and isolated QD-metal nanocrystal dimer structures, representing the basic hybrid QD-metal nanocrystal plasmonic nanostructures.

  2. A laser and molecular beam mass spectrometer study of low-pressure dimethyl ether flames

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew McIlroy; Toby D. Hain; Hope A. Michelsen; Terrill A. Cool

    2000-12-15

    The oxidation of dimethyl ether (DME) is studied in low-pressure flames using new molecular beam mass spectrometer and laser diagnostics. Two 30.0-Torr, premixed DME/oxygen/argon flames are investigated with stoichiometries of 0.98 and 1.20. The height above burner profiles of nine stable species and two radicals are measured. These results are compared to the detailed chemical reaction mechanism of Curran and coworkers. Generally good agreement is found between the model and data. The largest discrepancies are found for the methyl radical profiles where the model predicts qualitatively different trends in the methyl concentration with stoichiometry than observed in the experiment.

  3. Silicon sheet with molecular beam epitaxy for high efficiency solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, F. G.

    1983-01-01

    The capabilities of the new technique of Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) are applied to the growth of high efficiency silicon solar cells. Because MBE can provide well controlled doping profiles of any desired arbitrary design, including doping profiles of such complexity as built-in surface fields or tandem junction cells, it would appear to be the ideal method for development of high efficiency solar cells. It was proposed that UCLA grow and characterize silicon films and p-n junctions of MBE to determine whether the high crystal quality needed for solar cells could be achieved.

  4. Controlled in situ boron doping of short silicon nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das Kanungo, Pratyush; Zakharov, Nikolai; Bauer, Jan; Breitenstein, Otwin; Werner, Peter; Goesele, Ulrich

    2008-06-01

    Epitaxial silicon nanowires (NWs) of short heights (˜280nm) on Si ⟨111⟩ substrate were grown and doped in situ with boron on a concentration range of 1015-1019cm-3 by coevaporation of atomic Si and B by molecular beam epitaxy. Transmission electron microscopy revealed a single-crystalline structure of the NWs. Electrical measurements of the individual NWs confirmed the doping. However, the low doped (1015cm-3) and medium doped (3×1016 and 1×1017cm-3) NWs were heavily depleted by the surface states while the high doped (1018 and 1019cm-3) ones showed volume conductivities expected for the corresponding intended doping levels.

  5. Note: A versatile mass spectrometer chamber for molecular beam and temperature programmed desorption experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonks, James P.; Galloway, Ewan C.; King, Martin O.; Kerherve, Gwilherm; Watts, John F.

    2016-08-01

    A dual purpose mass spectrometer chamber capable of performing molecular beam scattering (MBS) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) is detailed. Two simple features of this design allow it to perform these techniques. First, the diameter of entrance aperture to the mass spectrometer can be varied to maximize signal for TPD or to maximize angular resolution for MBS. Second, the mass spectrometer chamber can be radially translated so that it can be positioned close to the sample to maximize signal or far from the sample to maximize angular resolution. The performance of this system is described and compares well with systems designed for only one of these techniques.

  6. Supersonic Molecular Beam Injection Effects on Tokamak Plasma Applied Non-axisymmetric Magnetic Perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Hyunsun; in, Y.; Jeon, Y. M.; Hahn, S. H.; Lee, K. D.; Nam, Y. U.; Yoon, S. W.

    2016-10-01

    In KSTAR experiments, the change of tokamak plasma behavior by supersonic molecular beam injection (SMBI) was investigated by applying resonant magnetic perturbations(RMP) that could suppress edge localized modes (ELMs). When the SMBI is applied, the symptom representing ELM suppression by RMP is disappeared. The SMBI acts as a cold pulse on the plasma keeping the total confinement engergy constant. However, it makes plasma density increase and change the plasama collisionality which can play a role in the edge-pedestal build-up processing. This work was supported by Project PG1201-2 and the KSTAR research project funded by Korea Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning.

  7. Quality of epitaxial InAs nanowires controlled by catalyst size in molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhi; Lu, Zhen-Yu; Chen, Ping-Ping; Xu, Hong-Yi; Guo, Ya-Nan; Liao, Zhi-Ming; Shi, Sui-Xing; Lu, Wei; Zou, Jin

    2013-08-01

    In this study, the structural quality of Au-catalyzed InAs nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy is investigated. Through detailed electron microscopy characterizations and analysis of binary Au-In phase diagram, it is found that defect-free InAs nanowires can be induced by smaller catalysts with a high In concentration, while comparatively larger catalysts containing less In induce defected InAs nanowires. This study indicates that the structural quality of InAs nanowires can be controlled by the size of Au catalysts when other growth conditions remain as constants.

  8. Mechanism of molecular beam epitaxy growth of GaN nanowires on Si(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debnath, R. K.; Meijers, R.; Richter, T.; Stoica, T.; Calarco, R.; Lüth, H.

    2007-03-01

    GaN nanowires have been grown without external catalyst on Si(111) substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Nanowire aspect ratios (length/diameter) of about 250 have been achieved. During the initial stage of the growth, there is a nucleation process in which the number of wires increases and the most probable nucleation diameter of about 10nm has been observed, which slowly increases with deposition time. For deposition time longer than the nucleation stage, the nanowire length as a function of diameter monotonically decreases. This phenomenon can be explained by adatom diffusion on the nanowire lateral surface towards the tip.

  9. Molecular beam epitaxy growth and optical properties of AlN nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landré, O.; Fellmann, V.; Jaffrennou, P.; Bougerol, C.; Renevier, H.; Cros, A.; Daudin, B.

    2010-02-01

    Growth of catalyst-free AlN nanowires has been achieved by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy on SiO2/Si (100), by taking advantage of Volmer-Weber growth mode of AlN on amorphous SiO2. Using a combination of high resolution transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy, it is found that AlN nanowires are completely relaxed, which has been assigned to the compliant character of SiO2. Elastic strain relaxation of AlN nanowires has been further confirmed by photoluminescence experiments, showing in addition that spectra are dominated by near-band edge emission.

  10. Structural and optoelectronic properties of germanium-rich islands grown on silicon using molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Nataraj, L.; Sustersic, N.; Coppinger, M.; Gerlein, L. F.; Kolodzey, J.; Cloutier, S. G.

    2010-03-22

    We report on the structural and optoelectronic properties of self-assembled germanium-rich islands grown on silicon using molecular beam epitaxy. Raman, photocurrent, photoluminescence, and transient optical spectroscopy measurements suggest significant built-in strains and a well-defined interface with little intermixing between the islands and the silicon. The shape of these islands depends on the growth conditions and includes pyramid, dome, barn-shaped, and superdome islands. Most importantly, we demonstrate that these germanium-rich islands provide efficient light emission at telecommunication wavelengths on a complementary metal-oxide semiconductor-compatible platform.

  11. Graphene growth by molecular beam epitaxy on the carbon-face of SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Moreau, E.; Godey, S.; Ferrer, F. J.; Vignaud, D.; Wallart, X.; Avila, J.; Asensio, M. C.; Bournel, F.; Gallet, J.-J.

    2010-12-13

    Graphene layers have been grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on the (0001) C-face of SiC and have been characterized by atomic force microscopy, low energy electron diffraction (LEED), and UV photoelectron spectroscopy. Contrary to the graphitization process, the step-terrace structure of SiC is fully preserved during the MBE growth. LEED patterns show multiple orientation domains which are characteristic of graphene on SiC (0001), indicating non-Bernal rotated graphene planes. Well-defined Dirac cones, typical of single-layer graphene, have been observed in the valence band for few graphene layers by synchrotron spectroscopy, confirming the electronic decoupling of graphene layers.

  12. Site-controlled Ag nanocrystals grown by molecular beam epitaxy-Towards plasmonic integration technology

    SciTech Connect

    Urbanczyk, Adam; Noetzel, Richard

    2012-12-15

    We demonstrate site-controlled growth of epitaxial Ag nanocrystals on patterned GaAs substrates by molecular beam epitaxy with high degree of long-range uniformity. The alignment is based on lithographically defined holes in which position controlled InAs quantum dots are grown. The Ag nanocrystals self-align preferentially on top of the InAs quantum dots. No such ordering is observed in the absence of InAs quantum dots, proving that the ordering is strain-driven. The presented technique facilitates the placement of active plasmonic nanostructures at arbitrarily defined positions enabling their integration into complex devices and plasmonic circuits.

  13. Supersonic molecular beam injection effects on tokamak plasma applied non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Hyunsun; In, Y.; Jeon, Y. M.; Lee, H. Y.; Hahn, S. H.; Lee, K. D.; Nam, Y. U.; Yoon, S. W.

    2016-08-01

    The change of tokamak plasma behavior by supersonic molecular beam injection (SMBI) was investigated by applying a three-dimensional magnetic perturbation that could suppress edge localized modes (ELMs). From the time trace of decreasing electron temperature and with increasing plasma density keeping the total confined energy constant, the SMBI seems to act as a cold pulse on the plasma. However, the ELM behaviors were changed drastically (i.e., the symptom of ELM suppression has disappeared). The plasma collisionality in the edge-pedestal region could play a role in the change of the ELM behaviors.

  14. Reaction Mechanism of Oxygen Atoms with Unsaturated Hydrocarbons by the Crossed-Molecular-Beams Method

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Buss, R. J.; Baseman, R. J.; Guozhong, H.; Lee, Y. T.

    1982-04-01

    From a series of studies of the reaction of oxygen atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons using the crossed molecular beam method, the dominant reaction mechanisms were found to be the simple substitution reactions with oxygen atoms replacing H, Cl, Br atom or alkyl groups. Complication due to secondary reaction was avoided by carrying out experiments under single collisions and observing primary products directly. Primary products were identified by measuring the angular and velocity distributions of products at all the mass numbers which could be detected by the mass spectrometer, and from comparison of these distributions, applying the requirement of energy and momentum conservation.

  15. Perspective: Extremely fine tuning of doping enabled by combinatorial molecular-beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.; Božović, I.

    2015-06-01

    Chemical doping provides an effective method to control the electric properties of complex oxides. However, the state-of-art accuracy in controlling doping is limited to about 1%. This hampers elucidation of the precise doping dependences of physical properties and phenomena of interest, such as quantum phase transitions. Using the combinatorial molecular beam epitaxy, we improve the accuracy in tuning the doping level by two orders of magnitude. We illustrate this novel method by two examples: a systematic investigation of the doping dependence of interface superconductivity, and a study of the competing ground states in the vicinity of the insulator-to-superconductor transition.

  16. Low defect densities in molecular beam epitaxial GaAs achieved by isoelectronic In doping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharya, P. K.; Dhar, S.; Berger, P.; Juang, F.-Y.

    1986-01-01

    A study has been made of the effects of adding small amounts of In (0.2-1.2 pct) to GaAs grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The density of four electron traps decreases in concentration by an order of magnitude, and the peak intensities of prominent emissions in the excitonic spectra are reduced with increase in In content. Based on the higher surface migration rate of In, compared to Ga, at the growth temperatures it is apparent that the traps and the excitonic transitions are related to point defects. This agrees with earlier observations by Briones and Collins (1982) and Skromme et al. (1985).

  17. A simple and compact mechanical velocity selector of use to analyze/select molecular alignment in supersonic seeded beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirani, F.; Cappelletti, D.; Vecchiocattivi, F.; Vattuone, L.; Gerbi, A.; Rocca, M.; Valbusa, U.

    2004-02-01

    A light and compact mechanical velocity selector, of novel design, for applications in supersonic molecular-beam studies has been developed. It represents a simplified version of the traditional, 50 year old, slotted disks velocity selector. Taking advantage of new materials and improved machining techniques, the new version has been realized with only two rotating slotted disks, driven by an electrical motor with adjustable frequency of rotation, and thus has a much smaller weight and size with respect to the original design, which may allow easier implementation in most of the available molecular-beam apparatuses. This new type of selector, which maintains a sufficiently high velocity resolution, has been developed for sampling molecules with different degrees of rotational alignment, like those emerging from a seeded supersonic expansion. This sampling is the crucial step to realize new molecular-beam experiments to study the effect of molecular alignment in collisional processes.

  18. Measuring the Density of a Molecular Cluster Injector via Visible Emission from an Electron Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Lundberg, D. P.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R. M.; Stotler, D. P.

    2010-06-28

    A method to measure the density distribution of a dense hydrogen gas jet is pre- sented. A Mach 5.5 nozzle is cooled to 80K to form a flow capable of molecular cluster formation. A 250V, 10mA electron beam collides with the jet and produces Hα emission that is viewed by a fast camera. The high density of the jet, several 1016cm-3, results in substantial electron depletion, which attenuates the Hα emission. The attenuated emission measurement, combined with a simplified electron-molecule collision model, allows us to determine the molecular density profile via a simple iterative calculation.

  19. An ultra-compact, high-throughput molecular beam epitaxy growth system

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, A. A.; Hesjedal, T.; Braun, W. E-mail: fischer@createc.de; Rembold, S.; Fischer, A. E-mail: fischer@createc.de; Gassler, G.

    2015-04-15

    We present a miniaturized molecular beam epitaxy (miniMBE) system with an outer diameter of 206 mm, optimized for flexible and high-throughput operation. The three-chamber system, used here for oxide growth, consists of a sample loading chamber, a storage chamber, and a growth chamber. The growth chamber is equipped with eight identical effusion cell ports with linear shutters, one larger port for either a multi-pocket electron beam evaporator or an oxygen plasma source, an integrated cryoshroud, retractable beam-flux monitor or quartz-crystal microbalance, reflection high energy electron diffraction, substrate manipulator, main shutter, and quadrupole mass spectrometer. The system can be combined with ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) end stations on synchrotron and neutron beamlines, or equivalently with other complex surface analysis systems, including low-temperature scanning probe microscopy systems. Substrate handling is compatible with most UHV surface characterization systems, as the miniMBE can accommodate standard surface science sample holders. We introduce the design of the system, and its specific capabilities and operational parameters, and we demonstrate the epitaxial thin film growth of magnetoelectric Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} on c-plane sapphire and ferrimagnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} on MgO (001)

  20. An ultra-compact, high-throughput molecular beam epitaxy growth system.

    PubMed

    Baker, A A; Braun, W; Gassler, G; Rembold, S; Fischer, A; Hesjedal, T

    2015-04-01

    We present a miniaturized molecular beam epitaxy (miniMBE) system with an outer diameter of 206 mm, optimized for flexible and high-throughput operation. The three-chamber system, used here for oxide growth, consists of a sample loading chamber, a storage chamber, and a growth chamber. The growth chamber is equipped with eight identical effusion cell ports with linear shutters, one larger port for either a multi-pocket electron beam evaporator or an oxygen plasma source, an integrated cryoshroud, retractable beam-flux monitor or quartz-crystal microbalance, reflection high energy electron diffraction, substrate manipulator, main shutter, and quadrupole mass spectrometer. The system can be combined with ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) end stations on synchrotron and neutron beamlines, or equivalently with other complex surface analysis systems, including low-temperature scanning probe microscopy systems. Substrate handling is compatible with most UHV surface characterization systems, as the miniMBE can accommodate standard surface science sample holders. We introduce the design of the system, and its specific capabilities and operational parameters, and we demonstrate the epitaxial thin film growth of magnetoelectric Cr2O3 on c-plane sapphire and ferrimagnetic Fe3O4 on MgO (001).

  1. Pulsed HF laser ablation of dentin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papagiakoumou, Eirini I.; Papadopoulos, Dimitris N.; Makropoulou, Mersini I.; Khabbaz, Maruan G.; Serafetinides, Alexander A.

    2005-03-01

    The interaction of a TEA (Transversally Excited Atmospheric pressure) corona preionized oscillator double amplifier HF (hydrogen fluoride) laser beam with dentin tissue is reported. Pulses of 39 ns in the wavelength range of 2.65-3.35 μm and output energies in the range of 10-45 mJ, in a predominantly TEM00 beam were used to interact with dentin tissue. Ablation experiments were conducted with the laser beam directly focused on the tissue. Several samples of freshly extracted human teeth were used, cut longitudinally in facets of about 1mm thick and stored in phosphate buffered saline after being cleaned from the soft tissue remains. The experimental data (ablation thresholds, ablation rates) are discussed with respect to the ablation mechanism(s). Adequate tissue removal was observed and the ablation behavior was, in the greates part of the available fluences, almost linear. From the microscopic examination of teh samples, in a scanning electron microscope (SEM), the irradiated surfaces displayed oval craters (reflecting the laser beam shape) with absence of any melting or carbonization zone. It is suggested that the specific laser removes hard tissue by a combined photothermal and plasma mediated ablation mechanism, leaving a surface free from thermal damage and with a well-shaped crater.

  2. High-efficiency AlGaInP solar cells grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faucher, J.; Sun, Y.; Jung, D.; Martin, D.; Masuda, T.; Lee, M. L.

    2016-10-01

    AlGaInP is an ideal material for ultra-high efficiency, lattice-matched multi-junction solar cells grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) because it can be grown lattice-matched to GaAs with a wide 1.9-2.2 eV bandgap. Despite this potential, AlGaInP grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) has yet to be fully explored, with the initial 2.0 eV devices suffering from poor performance due to low minority carrier diffusion lengths in both the emitter and base regions of the solar cell. In this work, we show that implementing an AlGaInP graded layer to introduce a drift field near the front surface of the device enabled greatly improved internal quantum efficiency (IQE) across all wavelengths. In addition, optimizing growth conditions and post-growth annealing improved the long-wavelength IQE and the open-circuit voltage of the cells, corresponding to a 3× increase in diffusion length in the base. Taken together, this work demonstrates greatly improved IQE, attaining peak values of 95%, combined with an uncoated AM1.5G efficiency of 10.9%, double that of previously reported MBE-grown devices.

  3. In situ surface/interface x-ray diffractometer for oxide molecular beam epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Lee, J H; Tung, I C; Chang, S-H; Bhattacharya, A; Fong, D D; Freeland, J W; Hong, Hawoong

    2016-01-01

    In situ studies of oxide molecular beam epitaxy by synchrotron x-ray scattering has been made possible by upgrading an existing UHV/molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) six-circle diffractometer system. For oxide MBE growth, pure ozone delivery to the chamber has been made available, and several new deposition sources have been made available on a new 12 in. CF (ConFlat, a registered trademark of Varian, Inc.) flange. X-ray diffraction has been used as a major probe for film growth and structures for the system. In the original design, electron diffraction was intended for the secondary diagnostics available without the necessity of the x-ray and located at separate positions. Deposition of films was made possible at the two diagnostic positions. And, the aiming of the evaporation sources is fixed to the point between two locations. Ozone can be supplied through two separate nozzles for each location. Also two separate thickness monitors are installed. Additional features of the equipment are also presented together with the data taken during typical oxide film growth to illustrate the depth of information available via in situ x-ray techniques.

  4. Wurtzite Al xGa 1- xN bulk crystals grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, S. V.; Staddon, C. R.; Powell, R. E. L.; Akimov, A. V.; Luckert, F.; Edwards, P. R.; Martin, R. W.; Kent, A. J.; Foxon, C. T.

    2011-05-01

    We have studied the growth of wurtzite GaN and Al xGa 1- xN layers and bulk crystals by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). MBE is normally regarded as an epitaxial technique for the growth of very thin layers with monolayer control of their thickness. However, we have used the MBE technique for bulk crystal growth and have produced 2 in diameter wurtzite Al xGa 1- xN layers up to 10 μm in thickness. Undoped wurtzite Al xGa 1- xN films were grown on GaAs (1 1 1)B substrates by a plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PA-MBE) method and were removed from the GaAs substrate after the growth. The fact that free-standing ternary Al xGa 1- xN wafers can be grown is very significant for the potential future production of wurtzite Al xGa 1- xN substrates optimized for AlGaN-based device structures.

  5. In situ surface/interface x-ray diffractometer for oxide molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J. H.; Tung, I. C.; Chang, S. -H.; Bhattacharya, A.; Fong, D. D.; Freeland, J. W.; Hong, Hawoong

    2016-01-01

    In situ studies of oxide molecular beam epitaxy by synchrotron x-ray scattering has been made possible by upgrading an existing UHV/molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) six-circle diffractometer system. For oxide MBE growth, pure ozone delivery to the chamber has been made available, and several new deposition sources have been made available on a new 12 in. CF (ConFlat, a registered trademark of Varian, Inc.) flange. X-ray diffraction has been used as a major probe for film growth and structures for the system. In the original design, electron diffraction was intended for the secondary diagnostics available without the necessity of the x-ray and located at separate positions. Deposition of films was made possible at the two diagnostic positions. And, the aiming of the evaporation sources is fixed to the point between two locations. Ozone can be supplied through two separate nozzles for each location. Also two separate thickness monitors are installed. Additional features of the equipment are also presented together with the data taken during typical oxide film growth to illustrate the depth of information available via in situ x-ray techniques.

  6. In situ surface/interface x-ray diffractometer for oxide molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J. H.; Freeland, J. W.; Hong, Hawoong; Tung, I. C.; Chang, S.-H.; Bhattacharya, A.; Fong, D. D.

    2016-01-15

    In situ studies of oxide molecular beam epitaxy by synchrotron x-ray scattering has been made possible by upgrading an existing UHV/molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) six-circle diffractometer system. For oxide MBE growth, pure ozone delivery to the chamber has been made available, and several new deposition sources have been made available on a new 12 in. CF (ConFlat, a registered trademark of Varian, Inc.) flange. X-ray diffraction has been used as a major probe for film growth and structures for the system. In the original design, electron diffraction was intended for the secondary diagnostics available without the necessity of the x-ray and located at separate positions. Deposition of films was made possible at the two diagnostic positions. And, the aiming of the evaporation sources is fixed to the point between two locations. Ozone can be supplied through two separate nozzles for each location. Also two separate thickness monitors are installed. Additional features of the equipment are also presented together with the data taken during typical oxide film growth to illustrate the depth of information available via in situ x-ray techniques.

  7. Detection of Fatty Acids from Intact Microorganisms by Molecular Beam Static Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ingram, Jani Cheri; Lehman, Richard Michael; Bauer, William Francis; O'Connell, Sean Patrick; Colwell, Frederick Scott; Shaw, Andrew D.

    2003-06-01

    We report the use of a surface analysis approach, static secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) equipped with a molecular (ReO4-) ion primary beam, to analyze the surface of intact microbial cells. SIMS spectra of 28 microorganisms were compared to fatty acid profiles determined by gas chromatographic analysis of transesterfied fatty acids extracted from the same organisms. The results indicate that surface bombardment using the molecular primary beam cleaved the ester linkage characteristic of bacteria at the glycerophosphate backbone of the phospholipid components of the cell membrane. This cleavage enables direct detection of the fatty acid conjugate base of intact microorganisms by static SIMS. The limit of detection for this approach is approximately 107 bacterial cells/cm2. Multivariate statistical methods were applied in a graded approach to the SIMS microbial data. The results showed that the full data set could initially be statistically grouped based upon major differences in biochemical composition of the cell wall. The gram-positive bacteria were further statistically analyzed, followed by final analysis of a specific bacterial genus that was successfully grouped by species. Additionally, the use of SIMS to detect microbes on mineral surfaces is demonstrated by an analysis of Shewanella oneidensis on crushed hematite. The results of this study provide evidence for the potential of static SIMS to rapidly detect bacterial species based on ion fragments originating from cell membrane lipids directly from sample surfaces.

  8. Molecular Beam Epitaxy Growth of GaBi, InBi and InGaBi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keen, B.; Makin, R.; Stampe, P. A.; Kennedy, R. J.; Piper, L. F. J.; McCombe, B.; McConville, C. F.; Durbin, S. M.

    2014-03-01

    Recent interest in bismuth alloys of III-V semiconductors for infrared and far-infrared device applications, specifically GaAsBi and InAsBi, has indicated that further study of the III-Bi family of binary compounds would be of great help in improving the quality of these material systems. While immiscibility issues have so far frustrated the growth of GaBi and AlBi, InBi is less problematic, and we have grown it by molecular beam epitaxy on (001) GaAs substrates. However, regions of varying composition exist across the substrate due to poor wetting of the surface. In an effort to improve film quality we have continued to refine the growth parameters by adjusting substrate temperature, beam flux ratio, and deposition rate. Characterization of these films has been performed by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Additionally, we have explored growth of GaBi and In1-xGaxBi at low Ga mole fractions, and modeled this using molecular dynamics simulations. This work is supported by the Research Foundation of the State University of New York Collaborations Fund.

  9. Investigation of the silicon ion density during molecular beam epitaxy growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eifler, G.; Kasper, E.; Ashurov, Kh.; Morozov, S.

    2002-05-01

    Ions impinging on a surface during molecular beam epitaxy influence the growth and the properties of the growing layer, for example, suppression of dopant segregation and the generation of crystal defects. The silicon electron gun in the molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) equipment is used as a source for silicon ions. To use the effect of ion bombardment the mechanism of generation and distribution of ions was investigated. A monitoring system was developed and attached at the substrate position in the MBE growth chamber to measure the ion and electron densities towards the substrate. A negative voltage was applied to the substrate to modify the ion energy and density. Furthermore the current caused by charge carriers impinging on the substrate was measured and compared with the results of the monitoring system. The electron and ion densities were measured by varying the emission current of the e-gun achieving silicon growth rates between 0.07 and 0.45 nm/s and by changing the voltage applied to the substrate between 0 to -1000 V. The dependencies of ion and electron densities were shown and discussed within the framework of a simple model. The charged carrier densities measured with the monitoring system enable to separate the ion part of the substrate current and show its correlation to the generation rate. Comparing the ion density on the whole substrate and in the center gives a hint to the ion beam focusing effect. The maximum ion and electron current densities obtained were 0.40 and 0.61 μA/cm2, respectively.

  10. Near-field infrared imaging of molecular changes in cholesteryl oleate by free electron laser infrared ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masaki, Tatsuhiro; Goto, Kazuya; Inouye, Yasushi; Kawata, Satoshi

    2004-01-01

    We have applied infrared near-field scanning optical microscopy (IR-NSOM) to enable evaluation of detailed molecular changes in cholesteryl oleate, a primary cause of arteriosclerosis. In our IR-NSOM, a wide wavelength range of 2.9-6.7 μm is achieved by use of an optical parametric amplifier and an apertured cantilever. IR irradiation from a free-electron laser (FEL) tuned to a 5.75 μm wavelength induced molecular structural changes and caused cholesteryl oleate to decompose to cholesterol and fatty acids in the FEL irradiated areas. The IR-NSOM images at two different wavelengths, 5.75 and 5.3 μm, with a 2 μm apertured cantilever probe successfully identified areas of molecular change in cholesteryl oleate beyond the diffraction limit of IR microspectroscopy. In-depth molecular structure changes were also evaluated by the IR-NSOM and we demonstrated that the FEL irradiation induced subsurface molecular structure changes throughout cholesteryl oleate in the irradiated areas.

  11. Development of a Silicon Carbide Molecular Beam Nozzle for Simulation Planetary Flybys and Low-Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patrick, E. L.; Earle, G. D.; Kasprzak, W. T.; Mahaffy, Paul R.

    2008-01-01

    From commercial origins as a molybdenum molecular beam nozzle, a ceramic nozzle of silicon carbide (SiC) was developed for space environment simulation. The nozzle is mechanically stable under extreme conditions of temperature and pressure. A heated, continuous, supersonically-expanded hydrogen beam with a 1% argon seed produced an argon beam component of nearly 4 km/s, with an argon flux exceeding 1x1014 /cm2.s. This nozzle was part of a molecular beam machine used in the Atmospheric Experiments Branch at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center to characterize the performance of the University of Texas at Dallas Ram Wind Sensor (RWS) aboard the Air Force Communications/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) launched in the Spring of 2008.

  12. SU-E-T-131: Dosimetric Impact and Evaluation of Different Heterogenity Algorithm in Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Plan for Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy Lung Treatment with the Flattening Filter Free Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, J; Kim, J; Lee, J; Kim, Y

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The present study aimed to investigate the dosimetric impacts of the anisotropic analytic algorithm (AAA) and the Acuros XB (AXB) plan for lung stereotactic ablative radiation therapy using flattening filter-free (FFF) beam. We retrospectively analyzed 10 patients. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 10 patients. The dosimetric parameters for the target and organs at risk (OARs) from the treatment plans calculated with these dose calculation algorithms were compared. The technical parameters, such as the computation times and the total monitor units (MUs), were also evaluated. Results: A comparison of DVHs from AXB and AAA showed that the AXB plan produced a high maximum PTV dose by average 4.40% with a statistical significance but slightly lower mean PTV dose by average 5.20% compared to the AAA plans. The maximum dose to the lung was slightly higher in the AXB compared to the AAA. For both algorithms, the values of V5, V10 and V20 for ipsilateral lung were higher in the AXB plan more than those of AAA. However, these parameters for contralateral lung were comparable. The differences of maximum dose for the spinal cord and heart were also small. The computation time of AXB was found fast with the relative difference of 13.7% than those of AAA. The average of monitor units (MUs) for all patients was higher in AXB plans than in the AAA plans. These results indicated that the difference between AXB and AAA are large in heterogeneous region with low density. Conclusion: The AXB provided the advantages such as the accuracy of calculations and the reduction of the computation time in lung stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) with using FFF beam, especially for VMAT planning. In dose calculation with the media of different density, therefore, the careful attention should be taken regarding the impacts of different heterogeneity correction algorithms. The authors report no conflicts of interest.

  13. Laser ablation studies of concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Savina, M.; Xu, Z.; Wang, Y.; Reed, C.; Pellin, M.

    1999-10-20

    Laser ablation was studied as a means of removing radioactive contaminants from the surface and near-surface regions of concrete. The authors present the results of ablation tests on cement and concrete samples using a 1.6 kW pulsed Nd:YAG laser with fiber optic beam delivery. The laser-surface interaction was studied using cement and high density concrete as targets. Ablation efficiency and material removal rates were determined as functions of irradiance and pulse overlap. Doped samples were also ablated to determine the efficiency with which surface contaminants were removed and captured in the effluent. The results show that the cement phase of the material melts and vaporizes, but the aggregate portion (sand and rock) fragments. The effluent consists of both micron-size aerosol particles and chunks of fragmented aggregate material. Laser-induced optical emission spectroscopy was used to analyze the surface during ablation. Analysis of the effluent showed that contaminants such as cesium and strontium were strongly segregated into different regions of the particle size distribution of the aerosol.

  14. InGaAsP-based uni-travelling carrier photodiode structure grown by solid source molecular beam epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Natrella, Michele; Rouvalis, Efthymios; Liu, Chin-Pang; Liu, Huiyun; Renaud, Cyril C; Seeds, Alwyn J

    2012-08-13

    We report the first InGaAsP-based uni-travelling carrier photodiode structure grown by Solid Source Molecular Beam Epitaxy; the material contains layers of InGaAsP as thick as 300 nm and a 120 nm thick InGaAs absorber. Large area vertically illuminated test devices have been fabricated and characterised; the devices exhibited 0.1 A/W responsivity at 1550 nm, 12.5 GHz -3 dB bandwidth and -5.8 dBm output power at 10 GHz for a photocurrent of 4.8 mA. The use of Solid Source Molecular Beam Epitaxy enables the major issue associated with the unintentional diffusion of zinc in Metal Organic Vapour Phase Epitaxy to be overcome and gives the benefit of the superior control provided by MBE growth techniques without the costs and the risks of handling toxic gases of Gas Source Molecular Beam Epitaxy.

  15. Development of an apparatus for obtaining molecular beams in the energy range from 2 to 200 eV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clapier, R.; Devienne, F. M.; Roustan, A.; Roustan, J. C.

    1985-01-01

    The formation and detection of molecular beams obtained by charge exchange from a low-energy ion source is discussed. Dispersion in energy of the ion source was measured and problems concerning detection of neutral beams were studied. Various methods were used, specifically secondary electron emissivity of a metallic surface and ionization of a gas target with a low ionization voltage. The intensities of neutral beams as low as 10 eV are measured by a tubular electron multiplier and a lock-in amplifier.

  16. Low molecular weight heparin in patients undergoing free tissue transfer following head and neck ablative surgery: review of efficacy and associated complications.

    PubMed

    Eley, Karen A; Parker, Rachel J; Watt-Smith, Stephen R

    2013-10-01

    Most microsurgeons report the use of anticoagulants in their routine practice. Anti-Xa concentrations are preferentially used to monitor treatment with low molecular weight heparin (LMWH). The aim of this retrospective study was to measure the therapeutic response to standard dosing with LMWH (using anti-Xa) in patients after ablative and reconstructive surgery for head and neck cancer, and to review the associated risk of bleeding. We retrospectively reviewed 153 patients who had undergone resection of primary or recurrent tumours of the head and neck with free flap reconstruction. In total, 173 free flap procedures were completed. Medical records were reviewed to find the anticoagulation regimen used, anti-Xa result, patients' weight, and any associated complications. Fourteen patients returned to theatre because of bleeding; of these no cause was identified in 6 and a haematoma was evacuated. The distribution of unexplained haematoma was similar for all dose regimens of dalteparin. Anti-Xa results were available in 47 cases, and of these, 22 (47%) were within the prophylactic range (0.2 IU/ml or more). Our results highlight the high incidence of inadequate response to standard prophylactic doses of LMWH in patients with head and neck cancer. Increasing the dose of dalteparin does not seem to increase the risk of bleeding or formation of a haematoma. These findings may be transferable to other surgical specialties.

  17. Fast, high temperature and thermolabile GC--MS in supersonic molecular beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagan, Shai; Amirav, Aviv

    1994-05-01

    This work describes and evaluates the coupling of a fast gas chromatograph (GC) based on a short column and high carrier gas flow rate to a supersonic molecular beam mass spectrometer (MS). A 50 cm long megabore column serves for fast GC separation and connects the injector to the supersonic nozzle source. Sampling is achieved with a conventional syringe based splitless sample injection. The injector contains no septum and is open to the atmosphere. The linear velocity of the carrier gas is controlled by a by-pass (make-up) gas flow introduced after the column and prior to the supersonic nozzle. The supersonic expansion serves as a jet separator and the skimmed supersonic molecular beam (SMB) is highly enriched with the heavier organic molecules. The supersonic molecular beam constituents are ionized either by electron impact (EI) or hyperthermal surface ionization (HSI) and mass analyzed. A 1 s fast GC--MS of four aromatic molecules in methanol is demonstrated and some fundamental aspects of fast GC--MS with time limit constraints are outlined. The flow control (programming) of the speed of analysis is shown and the analysis of thermolabile and relatively non-volatile molecules is demonstrated and discussed. The tail-free, fast GC--MS of several mixtures is shown and peak tailing of caffeine is compared with that of conventional GC--MS. The improvement of the peak shapes with the SMB--MS is analyzed with the respect to the elimination of thermal vacuum chamber background. The extrapolated minimum detected amount was about 400 ag of anthracence-d10, with an elution time which was shorter than 2s. Repetitive injections could be performed within less than 10 s. The fast GC--MS in SMB seems to be ideal for fast target compound analysis even in real world, complex mixtures. The few seconds GC--MS separation and quantification of lead (as tetraethyllead) in gasoline, caffeine in coffee, and codeine in a drug is demonstrated. Controlled HSI selectivity is demonstrated in

  18. Molecular beam scattering from C-13 enriched Kapton and correlation with the EOIM-3 carousel experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minton, Timothy K.; Moore, Teresa A.

    1995-01-01

    Mass spectra of products emerging from identical samples of a C-13-enriched polyimide polymer (chemically equivalent to Kapton) under atomic oxygen bombardment in space and in the laboratory were collected. Reaction products unambiguously detected in space were CO-13, NO, (12)CO2, and (13)CO2. These reaction products and two others, H2O and CO-12, were detected in the laboratory, along with inelastically scattered atomic and molecular oxygen. Qualitative agreement was seen in the mass spectra taken in space and in the laboratory; the agreement may be improved by reducing the fraction of O2 in the laboratory molecular beam. Both laboratory and space data indicated that CO and CO2 products come preferentially from reaction with the imide component of the polymer chain, raising the possibility that the either component may degrade in part by the 'evaporation' of higher molecular weight fragments. Laboratory time-of-flight distributions showed: (1) incomplete energy accommodation of impinging O and O2 species that do not react with the surface; and (2) both hyperthermal and thermal CO and CO2 products, suggesting two distinct reaction mechanisms with the surface.

  19. Control of the stacking fault areas in pseudomorphic ZnSe layers by photo-molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, Y.; Taishi, T.; Yonenaga, I.; Ichikawa, S.; Hirai, R.; Takeda, S.

    2007-12-01

    Pseudomorphic ZnSe layers on GaAs(0 0 1) were grown by molecular beam epitaxy under the light illumination with photon energy of about 1.8 eV. In the layers, isolated Shockley-type stacking faults on (1 1 1), bordering not on the ZnSe/GaAs interface but on the ZnSe surface, as well as the well-known stacking fault pairs, were formed. The sum of the stacking fault areas was small in comparison with the layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy without light illumination.

  20. Deposition of epitaxial Cu 2O films on (100) MgO by laser ablation and their processing using ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogale, S. B.; Bilurkar, P. G.; Mate, Nitant; Parikh, Nalin; Patnaik, B.

    1993-03-01

    Epitaxial thin films of Cu2O have been deposited on (100) MgO substrates by pulsed excimer laser ablation technique. Chemical polishing of the substrates by etching them in hot phosphoric acid prior to film deposition is found to be a critical step in realizing epitaxy. A KrF excimer laser operating at 248 nm wavelengths was used for ablation. The depositions were carried out at the laser energy density of 2 J/cm2 and the pulse repetition rate of 5 Hz. The substrate temperature was held at 700°C and the oxygen partial pressure during deposition and cooling was 10-3 Torr. The epitaxial nature of the deposited films was established via X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Rutherford back-scattering (RBS) channelling measurements. The epitaxial films thus obtained were then subjected to ion bombardment for studies of damage formation. Implantations were carried out using 110 keV Ar+ ions over a dose range between 5 x 1014 and 1.5 x 1016 ions/cmz. The as-grown and implanted samples were subjected to resistivity versus temperature measurements in view of the importance of the Cu-O system in the context of the phenomenon of high temperature superconductivity.

  1. Formation of GeSn alloy on Si(100) by low-temperature molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Talochkin, A. B.; Mashanov, V. I.

    2014-12-29

    GeSn alloys grown on Si(100) by the low-temperature (100 °C) molecular beam epitaxy are studied using scanning tunneling microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. It is found that the effect of Sn as a surfactant modifies substantially the low-temperature growth mechanism of Ge on Si. Instead of the formation of small Ge islands surrounded by amorphous Ge, in the presence of Sn, the growth of pure Ge islands appears via the Stranski-Krastanov growth mode, and a partially relaxed Ge{sub 1−x}Sn{sub x} alloy layer with the high Sn-fraction up to 40 at. % is formed in the area between them. It is shown that the observed growth mode induced by high surface mobility of Sn and the large strain of the pseudomorphic state of Ge to Si ensures the minimum elastic-strain energy of the structure.

  2. Self-regulated radius of spontaneously formed GaN nanowires in molecular beam epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Garrido, Sergio; Kaganer, Vladimir M; Sabelfeld, Karl K; Gotschke, Tobias; Grandal, Javier; Calleja, Enrique; Geelhaar, Lutz; Brandt, Oliver

    2013-07-10

    We investigate the axial and radial growth of GaN nanowires upon a variation of the Ga flux during molecular beam epitaxial growth. An increase in the Ga flux promotes radial growth without affecting the axial growth rate. In contrast, a decrease in the Ga flux reduces the axial growth rate without any change in the radius. These results are explained by a kinetic growth model that accounts for both the diffusion of Ga adatoms along the side facets toward the nanowire tip and the finite amount of active N available for the growth. The model explains the formation of a new equilibrium nanowire radius after increasing the Ga flux and provides an explanation for two well-known but so far not understood experimental facts: the necessity of effectively N-rich conditions for the spontaneous growth of GaN nanowires and the increase in nanowire radius with increasing III/V flux ratio.

  3. Raman measurements of substrate temperature in a molecular beam epitaxy growth chamber.

    PubMed

    Hutchins, T; Nazari, M; Eridisoorya, M; Myers, T M; Holtz, M

    2015-01-01

    A method is described for directly measuring the temperature of a substrate in a molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE) growth system. The approach relies on the establishment of the temperature dependence of Raman-active phonons of the substrate material using independently known calibration points across the range of interest. An unknown temperature in this range is then determined based on the Raman peak position with the substrate in situ the MBE chamber. The apparatus relies on conventional optics and Raman components. Shifting and broadening of the Raman spectrum are described based on the effects of thermal expansion and anharmonic decay. The choice of reference temperature is discussed. The method is qualified by examining the substrate temperature dependence, relative to that of a standard thermocouple, during a commonly used ramp procedure. Both temperature difference and time lag are obtained.

  4. Controlled in situ boron doping of short silicon nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Das Kanungo, Pratyush; Zakharov, Nikolai; Bauer, Jan; Breitenstein, Otwin; Werner, Peter; Goesele, Ulrich

    2008-06-30

    Epitaxial silicon nanowires (NWs) of short heights ({approx}280 nm) on Si <111> substrate were grown and doped in situ with boron on a concentration range of 10{sup 15}-10{sup 19} cm{sup -3} by coevaporation of atomic Si and B by molecular beam epitaxy. Transmission electron microscopy revealed a single-crystalline structure of the NWs. Electrical measurements of the individual NWs confirmed the doping. However, the low doped (10{sup 15} cm{sup -3}) and medium doped (3x10{sup 16} and 1x10{sup 17} cm{sup -3}) NWs were heavily depleted by the surface states while the high doped (10{sup 18} and 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}) ones showed volume conductivities expected for the corresponding intended doping levels.

  5. High breakdown single-crystal GaN p-n diodes by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Meng; Zhao, Yuning; Yan, Xiaodong; Li, Guowang; Verma, Jai; Fay, Patrick; Nomoto, Kazuki; Zhu, Mingda; Hu, Zongyang; Protasenko, Vladimir; Song, Bo; Xing, Huili Grace; Jena, Debdeep; Bader, Samuel

    2015-12-07

    Molecular beam epitaxy grown GaN p-n vertical diodes are demonstrated on single-crystal GaN substrates. A low leakage current <3 nA/cm{sup 2} is obtained with reverse bias voltage up to −20 V. With a 400 nm thick n-drift region, an on-resistance of 0.23 mΩ cm{sup 2} is achieved, with a breakdown voltage corresponding to a peak electric field of ∼3.1 MV/cm in GaN. Single-crystal GaN substrates with very low dislocation densities enable the low leakage current and the high breakdown field in the diodes, showing significant potential for MBE growth to attain near-intrinsic performance when the density of dislocations is low.

  6. GaAs Core/SrTiO3 Shell Nanowires Grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Guan, X; Becdelievre, J; Meunier, B; Benali, A; Saint-Girons, G; Bachelet, R; Regreny, P; Botella, C; Grenet, G; Blanchard, N P; Jaurand, X; Silly, M G; Sirotti, F; Chauvin, N; Gendry, M; Penuelas, J

    2016-04-13

    We have studied the growth of a SrTiO3 shell on self-catalyzed GaAs nanowires grown by vapor-liquid-solid assisted molecular beam epitaxy on Si(111) substrates. To control the growth of the SrTiO3 shell, the GaAs nanowires were protected using an arsenic capping/decapping procedure in order to prevent uncontrolled oxidation and/or contamination of the nanowire facets. Reflection high energy electron diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were performed to determine the structural, chemical, and morphological properties of the heterostructured nanowires. Using adapted oxide growth conditions, it is shown that most of the perovskite structure SrTiO3 shell appears to be oriented with respect to the GaAs lattice. These results are promising for achieving one-dimensional epitaxial semiconductor core/functional oxide shell nanostructures.

  7. Raman measurements of substrate temperature in a molecular beam epitaxy growth chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchins, T.; Nazari, M.; Eridisoorya, M.; Myers, T. M.; Holtz, M.

    2015-01-15

    A method is described for directly measuring the temperature of a substrate in a molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE) growth system. The approach relies on the establishment of the temperature dependence of Raman-active phonons of the substrate material using independently known calibration points across the range of interest. An unknown temperature in this range is then determined based on the Raman peak position with the substrate in situ the MBE chamber. The apparatus relies on conventional optics and Raman components. Shifting and broadening of the Raman spectrum are described based on the effects of thermal expansion and anharmonic decay. The choice of reference temperature is discussed. The method is qualified by examining the substrate temperature dependence, relative to that of a standard thermocouple, during a commonly used ramp procedure. Both temperature difference and time lag are obtained.

  8. High electron mobility in Ga(In)NAs films grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Miyashita, Naoya; Ahsan, Nazmul; Monirul Islam, Muhammad; Okada, Yoshitaka; Inagaki, Makoto; Yamaguchi, Masafumi

    2012-11-26

    We report the highest mobility values above 2000 cm{sup 2}/Vs in Si doped GaNAs film grown by molecular beam epitaxy. To understand the feature of the origin which limits the electron mobility in GaNAs, temperature dependences of mobility were measured for high mobility GaNAs and referential low mobility GaInNAs. Temperature dependent mobility for high mobility GaNAs is similar to the GaAs case, while that for low mobility GaInNAs shows large decrease in lower temperature region. The electron mobility of high quality GaNAs can be explained by intrinsic limiting factor of random alloy scattering and extrinsic factor of ionized impurity scattering.

  9. Molecular beam epitaxy growth and scanning tunneling microscopy study of TiSe2 ultrathin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Jun-Ping; Guan, Jia-Qi; Zhang, Hui-Min; Song, Can-Li; Wang, Lili; He, Ke; Xue, Qi-Kun; Ma, Xu-Cun

    2015-03-01

    Molecular beam epitaxy is used to grow TiSe2 ultrathin films on a graphitized SiC(0001) substrate. TiSe2 films proceed via a nearly layer-by-layer growth mode and exhibit two dominant types of defects, identified as Se vacancy and interstitial, respectively. By means of scanning tunneling microscopy, we demonstrate that the well-established charge density waves can survive in a single unit-cell (one triple-layer) regime, and find a gradual reduction in their correlation length as the density of surface defects in TiSe2 ultrathin films increases. Our findings offer important insights into the nature of charge density waves in TiSe2, and also pave a material foundation for potential applications based on the collective electronic states.

  10. Improved tunneling magnetoresistance at low temperature in manganite junctions grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, R.; Kleiner, R.; Koelle, D.; Petrov, A. Yu.; Davidson, B. A.; Mino, L. Alvarez

    2011-04-18

    We report resistance versus magnetic field measurements for a La{sub 0.65}Sr{sub 0.35}MnO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3}/La{sub 0.65}Sr{sub 0.35}MnO{sub 3} tunnel junction grown by molecular-beam epitaxy, that show a large field window of extremely high tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) at low temperature. Scanning the in-plane applied field orientation through 360 deg., the TMR shows fourfold symmetry, i.e., biaxial anisotropy, aligned with the crystalline axis but not the junction geometrical long axis. The TMR reaches {approx}1900% at 4 K, corresponding to an interfacial spin polarization of >95% assuming identical interfaces. These results show that uniaxial anisotropy is not necessary for large TMR, and lay the groundwork for future improvements in TMR in manganite junctions.

  11. Ge/GeSn heterostructures grown on Si (100) by molecular-beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Sadofyev, Yu. G. Martovitsky, V. P.; Bazalevsky, M. A.; Klekovkin, A. V.; Averyanov, D. V.; Vasil’evskii, I. S.

    2015-01-15

    The growth of GeSn layers by molecular-beam epitaxy on Si (100) wafers coated with a germanium buffer layer is investigated. The properties of the fabricated structures are controlled by reflection high-energy electron diffraction, atomic-force microscopy, X-ray diffractometry, Rutherford backscattering, and Raman scattering. It is shown that GeSn layers with thicknesses up to 0.5 μm and Sn molar fractions up to 0.073 manifest no sign of plastic relaxation upon epitaxy. The lattice constant of the GeSn layers within the growth plane is precisely the same as that of Ge. The effect of rapid thermal annealing on the conversion of metastable elastically strained GeSn layers into a plastically relaxed state is examined. Ge/GeSn quantum wells with Sn molar fraction up to 0.11 are obtained.

  12. Effects of substrate orientation on the growth of InSb nanostructures by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, C. Y.; Torfi, A.; Pei, C.; Wang, W. I.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, the effects of substrate orientation on InSb quantum structure growth by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) are presented. Motivated by the observation that (411) evolves naturally as a stable facet during MBE crystal growth, comparison studies have been carried out to investigate the effects of the crystal orientation of the underlying GaSb substrate on the growth of InSb by MBE. By depositing InSb on a number of different substrate orientations, namely: (100), (311), (411), and (511), a higher nanostructure density was observed on the (411) surface compared with the other orientations. This result suggests that the (411) orientation presents a superior surface in MBE growth to develop a super-flat GaSb buffer surface, naturally favorable for nanostructure growth.

  13. InAs nanowire growth modes on Si (111) by gas source molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robson, M. T.; LaPierre, R. R.

    2016-02-01

    InAs nanowires (NWs) were grown on silicon substrates by gas source molecular beam epitaxy using five different growth modes: (1) Au-assisted growth, (2) positioned (patterned) Au-assisted growth, (3) Au-free growth, (4) positioned Au-assisted growth using a patterned oxide mask, and (5) Au-free selective-area epitaxy (SAE) using a patterned oxide mask. Optimal growth conditions (temperature, V/III flux ratio) were identified for each growth mode for control of NW morphology and vertical NW yield. The highest yield (72%) was achieved with the SAE method at a growth temperature of 440 °C and a V/III flux ratio of 4. Growth mechanisms are discussed for each of the growth modes.

  14. Photoluminescence properties of MgxZn1-xO films grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, T. Y.; Huang, Y. S.; Hu, S. Y.; Lee, Y. C.; Tiong, K. K.; Chang, C. C.; Chou, W. C.; Shen, J. L.

    2017-02-01

    The optical properties of MgxZn1-xO films with x=0.03, 0.06, 0.08, and 0.11 grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) have been studied by temperature-dependent photoluminescence (PL) measurement. It is presented that the full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the 12 K PL spectrum of MgZnO films increases with increasing Mg concentration and would deviate significantly from the simulation curve of Schubert model with higher Mg contents. The abnormal broader PL FWHM is inferred from larger compositional fluctuation by incorporating higher Mg contents, which results in larger effect of excitonic localization to induce more significant S-shaped behavior of the PL peak energy with temperature dependence. Additionally, the degree of localization increases as the linear proportion of the PL FWHM, indicating that the excitonic behavior in MgZnO films belong to the strong localization effect.

  15. Bismuth-induced phase control of GaAs nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Zhenyu; Chen, Pingping E-mail: luwei@mail.sitp.ac.cn; Shi, Suixing; Yao, Luchi; Zhou, Xiaohao; Lu, Wei E-mail: luwei@mail.sitp.ac.cn; Zhang, Zhi; Zhou, Chen; Zou, Jin

    2014-10-20

    In this work, the crystal structure of GaAs nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy has been tailored only by bismuth without changing the growth temperature and V/III flux ratio. The introduction of bismuth can lead to the formation of zinc-blende GaAs nanowires, while the removal of bismuth changes the structure into a 4H polytypism before it turns back to the wurtzite phase eventually. The theoretical calculation shows that it is the steadiest for bismuth to adsorb on the GaAs(111){sub B} surface compared to the liquid gold catalyst surface and the interface between the gold catalyst droplet and the nanowire, and these adsorbed bismuth could decrease the diffusion length of adsorbed Ga and hence the supersaturation of Ga in the gold catalyst droplet.

  16. High-mobility BaSnO{sub 3} grown by oxide molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Raghavan, Santosh; Schumann, Timo; Kim, Honggyu; Zhang, Jack Y.; Cain, Tyler A.; Stemmer, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    High-mobility perovskite BaSnO{sub 3} films are of significant interest as new wide bandgap semiconductors for power electronics, transparent conductors, and as high mobility channels for epitaxial integration with functional perovskites. Despite promising results for single crystals, high-mobility BaSnO{sub 3} films have been challenging to grow. Here, we demonstrate a modified oxide molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) approach, which supplies pre-oxidized SnO{sub x}. This technique addresses issues in the MBE of ternary stannates related to volatile SnO formation and enables growth of epitaxial, stoichiometric BaSnO{sub 3}. We demonstrate room temperature electron mobilities of 150 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1} in films grown on PrScO{sub 3}. The results open up a wide range of opportunities for future electronic devices.

  17. AlN Nanowall Structures Grown on Si (111) Substrate by Molecular Beam Epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Yosuke; Hane, Kazuhiro

    2015-12-01

    AlN nanowall structures were grown on Si (111) substrate using molecular beam epitaxy at substrate temperature of 700 °C with N/Al flux ratios ranging from 50 to 660. A few types of other AlN nanostructures were also grown under the nitrogen-rich conditions. The AlN nanowalls were ranged typically 60-120 nm in width and from 190 to 470 nm in length by changing N/Al flux ratio. The AlN nanowall structures grown along the c-plane consisted of AlN (0002) crystal with full-width at half maximum of the rocking curve about 5000 arcsec.

  18. Investigation of Localized States in GaAsSb Epilayers Grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xian; Wei, Zhipeng; Zhao, Fenghuan; Yang, Yahui; Chen, Rui; Fang, Xuan; Tang, Jilong; Fang, Dan; Wang, Dengkui; Li, Ruixue; Ge, Xiaotian; Ma, Xiaohui; Wang, Xiaohua

    2016-07-06

    We report the carrier dynamics in GaAsSb ternary alloy grown by molecular beam epitaxy through comprehensive spectroscopic characterization over a wide temperature range. A detailed analysis of the experimental data reveals a complex carrier relaxation process involving both localized and delocalized states. At low temperature, the localized degree shows linear relationship with the increase of Sb component. The existence of localized states is also confirmed by the temperature dependence of peak position and band width of the emission. At temperature higher than 60 K, emissions related to localized states are quenched while the band to band transition dominates the whole spectrum. This study indicates that the localized states are related to the Sb component in the GaAsSb alloy, while it leads to the poor crystal quality of the material, and the application of GaAsSb alloy would be limited by this deterioration.

  19. Structural and optical characterizations of InPBi thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yi; Wang, Kai; Zhou, Haifei; Li, Yaoyao; Cao, Chunfang; Zhang, Liyao; Zhang, Yonggang; Gong, Qian; Wang, Shumin

    2014-01-13

    InPBi thin films have been grown on InP by gas source molecular beam epitaxy. A maximum Bi composition of 2.4% is determined by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. X-ray diffraction measurements show good structural quality for Bi composition up to 1.4% and a partially relaxed structure for higher Bi contents. The bandgap was measured by optical absorption, and the bandgap reduction caused by the Bi incorporation was estimated to be about 56 meV/Bi%. Strong and broad photoluminescence signals were observed at room temperature for samples with xBi < 2.4%. The PL peak position varies from 1.4 to 1.9 μm, far below the measured InPBi bandgap.

  20. Universality and dependence on initial conditions in the class of the nonlinear molecular beam epitaxy equation.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, I S S; Oliveira, T J

    2016-11-01

    We report extensive numerical simulations of growth models belonging to the nonlinear molecular beam epitaxy (nMBE) class, on flat (fixed-size) and expanding substrates (ES). In both d=1+1 and 2+1, we find that growth regime height distributions (HDs), and spatial and temporal covariances are universal, but are dependent on the initial conditions, while the critical exponents are the same for flat and ES systems. Thus, the nMBE class does split into subclasses, as does the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang (KPZ) class. Applying the "KPZ ansatz" to nMBE models, we estimate the cumulants of the 1+1 HDs. Spatial covariance for the flat subclass is hallmarked by a minimum, which is not present in the ES one. Temporal correlations are shown to decay following well-known conjectures.

  1. Thin film phase diagram of iron nitrides grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gölden, D.; Hildebrandt, E.; Alff, L.

    2017-01-01

    A low-temperature thin film phase diagram of the iron nitride system is established for the case of thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy and nitrided by a nitrogen radical source. A fine-tuning of the nitridation conditions allows for growth of α ‧ -Fe8Nx with increasing c / a -ratio and magnetic anisotropy with increasing x until almost phase pure α ‧ -Fe8N1 thin films are obtained. A further increase of nitrogen content below the phase decomposition temperature of α ‧ -Fe8N (180 °C) leads to a mixture of several phases that is also affected by the choice of substrate material and symmetry. At higher temperatures (350 °C), phase pure γ ‧ -Fe4N is the most stable phase.

  2. Photoluminescence studies of ZnO nanorods grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Su; Nam, Giwoong; Leem, Jae-Young

    2013-05-01

    Metal catalyst-free ZnO nanorods were grown on PS with buffer layers grown at 450 degrees C by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Room temperature and temperature-dependent photoluminescence were carried out to investigate the optical properties of the ZnO nanorods with the average diameter of 120 nm and length of 300 nm. Three emission peaks, free excition, neutral-donor exciton, and free electron-to-neutral acceptor, were observed at 10 K. Huang-Rhys factor S of the ZnO nanorods was 0.978, which is much higher than that of ZnO thin films. The values of Varshni's empirical equation fitting parameters were alpha = 4 x 10(-3) eV/K, beta = 4.1 x 10(4) K, and E9(0) = 3.388 eV and the activation energy was about 96 meV.

  3. Antimony segregation in stressed SiGe heterostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Drozdov, M. N.; Novikov, A. V.; Yurasov, D. V.

    2013-11-15

    The effects of the growth temperature, composition, and elastic strains in separate layers on the segregation of antimony are studied experimentally for stressed SiGe structures grown by molecular beam epitaxy. It is established that the growth conditions and parameters of the structures exert an interrelated influence on the segregation of Sb: the degree of the influence of the composition and elastic stresses in the SiGe layers on Sb segregation depends on the growth temperature. It is shown that usage of a method previously proposed by us for the selective doping of silicon structures with consideration for the obtained dependences of Sb segregation on the growth conditions and parameters of the SiGe layers makes it possible to form SiGe structures selectively doped with antimony.

  4. Studies of molecular-beam epitaxy growth of GaAs on porous Si substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mii, Y. J.; Kao, Y. C.; Wu, B. J.; Wang, K. L.; Lin, T. L.; Liu, J. K.

    1988-01-01

    GaAs has been grown on porous Si directly and on Si buffer layer-porous Si substrates by molecular-beam epitaxy. In the case of GaAs growth on porous Si, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) reveals that the dominant defects in GaAs layers grown on porous Si are microtwins and stacking faults, which originate from the GaAs/porous Si interface. GaAs is found to penetrate into the porous Si layers. By using a thin Si buffer layer (50 nm), GaAs penetration diminishes and the density of microtwins and stacking faults is largely reduced and localized at the GaAs/Si buffer interface. However, there is a high density of threading dislocations remaining. Both Si (100) aligned and four degree tilted substrates have been examined in this study. TEM results show no observable effect of the tilted substrates on the quality of the GaAs epitaxial layer.

  5. Infrared photoresponse of GeSn/n-Ge heterojunctions grown by molecular beam epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sangcheol; Bhargava, Nupur; Gupta, Jay; Coppinger, Matthew; Kolodzey, James

    2014-05-05

    Heterojunction devices of Ge(1-x)Sn(x) / n-Ge were grown by solid source molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), and the mid-infrared (IR) photocurrent response was measured. With increasing Sn composition from 4% to 12%, the photocurrent spectra became red-shifted, suggesting that the bandgap of Ge(1-x)Sn(x) alloys was lowered compared to pure Ge. At a temperature of 100 K, the wavelengths of peak photocurrent were shifted from 1.42 µm for pure Ge (0% Sn) to 2.0 µm for 12% Sn. The bias dependence of the device response showed that the optimum reverse bias was > 0.5 volts for saturated photocurrent. The responsivity of the Ge(1-x)Sn(x) devices was estimated to be 0.17 A/W for 4% Sn. These results suggest that Ge(1-x)Sn(x) photodetectors may have practical applications in the near/mid IR wavelength regime.

  6. Cleaning chemistry of InSb(100) molecular beam epitaxy substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, R. P.; Lewis, B. F.; Grunthaner, F. J.

    1983-01-01

    InSb has been used as a substrate for molecular beam epitaxy. For good epitaxial growth, a substrate surface which is smooth and clean on an atomic scale is required. Chemical cleaning procedures provide an oxide film to passivate the surface. This film is then desorbed by in situ heating. The material forming the film should, therefore, have a high vapor pressure at some temperature less than the substrate melting temperature. A chloride film appears to satisfy the latter requirement. The present investigation is, therefore, concerned with the formation of a chloride film rather than an oxide film. Carbon contamination has been found to cause problems in chemical cleaning procedures. The level of carbon contamination found in the case of chloride film formation, is therefore compared with the corresponding level observed in procedures using oxide films. It appears that a chloride film grown in connection with a short exposure time to a Cl2 plasma is preferable to other passivation films studied.

  7. Hexagonal Boron Nitride Tunnel Barriers Grown on Graphite by High Temperature Molecular Beam Epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yong-Jin; Summerfield, Alex; Davies, Andrew; Cheng, Tin S; Smith, Emily F; Mellor, Christopher J; Khlobystov, Andrei N; Foxon, C Thomas; Eaves, Laurence; Beton, Peter H; Novikov, Sergei V

    2016-09-29

    We demonstrate direct epitaxial growth of high-quality hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) layers on graphite using high-temperature plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Atomic force microscopy reveals mono- and few-layer island growth, while conducting atomic force microscopy shows that the grown hBN has a resistance which increases exponentially with the number of layers, and has electrical properties comparable to exfoliated hBN. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman microscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements on hBN confirm the formation of sp(2)-bonded hBN and a band gap of 5.9 ± 0.1 eV with no chemical intermixing with graphite. We also observe hexagonal moiré patterns with a period of 15 nm, consistent with the alignment of the hBN lattice and the graphite substrate.

  8. Controlling crystal phases in GaAs nanowires grown by Au-assisted molecular beam epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Dheeraj, D L; Munshi, A M; Scheffler, M; van Helvoort, A T J; Weman, H; Fimland, B O

    2013-01-11

    Control of the crystal phases of GaAs nanowires (NWs) is essential to eliminate the formation of stacking faults which deteriorate the optical and electronic properties of the NWs. In addition, the ability to control the crystal phase of NWs provides an opportunity to engineer the band gap without changing the crystal material. We show that the crystal phase of GaAs NWs grown on GaAs(111)B substrates by molecular beam epitaxy using the Au-assisted vapor-liquid-solid growth mechanism can be tuned between wurtzite (WZ) and zinc blende (ZB) by changing the V/III flux ratio. As an example we demonstrate the realization of WZ GaAs NWs with a ZB GaAs insert that has been grown without changing the substrate temperature.

  9. HfSe2 thin films: 2D transition metal dichalcogenides grown by molecular beam epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Yue, Ruoyu; Barton, Adam T; Zhu, Hui; Azcatl, Angelica; Pena, Luis F; Wang, Jian; Peng, Xin; Lu, Ning; Cheng, Lanxia; Addou, Rafik; McDonnell, Stephen; Colombo, Luigi; Hsu, Julia W P; Kim, Jiyoung; Kim, Moon J; Wallace, Robert M; Hinkle, Christopher L

    2015-01-27

    In this work, we demonstrate the growth of HfSe2 thin films using molecular beam epitaxy. The relaxed growth criteria have allowed us to demonstrate layered, crystalline growth without misfit dislocations on other 2D substrates such as highly ordered pyrolytic graphite and MoS2. The HfSe2 thin films exhibit an atomically sharp interface with the substrates used, followed by flat, 2D layers with octahedral (1T) coordination. The resulting HfSe2 is slightly n-type with an indirect band gap of ∼ 1.1 eV and a measured energy band alignment significantly different from recent DFT calculations. These results demonstrate the feasibility and significant potential of fabricating 2D material based heterostructures with tunable band alignments for a variety of nanoelectronic and optoelectronic applications.

  10. High resolution Raman spectroscopy of complexes and clusters in molecular beams. Performance report

    SciTech Connect

    Felker, P.M.

    1991-12-31

    The DOE-sponsored project in this laboratory has two facets. The first is the development of methods of nonlinear Raman spectroscopy for application in studies of sparse samples. The second is the application of such methods to structural and dynamical studies of species in supersonic molecular beams. The progress we have made in both of these areas is described in this paper. The report is divided into five remaining sections. The first pertains to theoretical and experimental developments in Fourier transform stimulated emission spectroscopy and Fourier transform hole-burning spectroscopy. The second deals with progress in the development of ionization-detected stimulated Raman spectroscopies (IDSRS). The third describes results from the application of IDSRS methods to studies of jet-cooled benzene clusters. The fourth describes IDSRS results from studies of hydrogen-bonded complexes containing phenols. The fifth relates to studies of carbazole-(Ar){sub n} clusters.

  11. High resolution Raman spectroscopy of complexes and clusters in molecular beams

    SciTech Connect

    Felker, P.M.

    1991-01-01

    The DOE-sponsored project in this laboratory has two facets. The first is the development of methods of nonlinear Raman spectroscopy for application in studies of sparse samples. The second is the application of such methods to structural and dynamical studies of species in supersonic molecular beams. The progress we have made in both of these areas is described in this paper. The report is divided into five remaining sections. The first pertains to theoretical and experimental developments in Fourier transform stimulated emission spectroscopy and Fourier transform hole-burning spectroscopy. The second deals with progress in the development of ionization-detected stimulated Raman spectroscopies (IDSRS). The third describes results from the application of IDSRS methods to studies of jet-cooled benzene clusters. The fourth describes IDSRS results from studies of hydrogen-bonded complexes containing phenols. The fifth relates to studies of carbazole-(Ar){sub n} clusters.

  12. The impact of substrate selection for the controlled growth of graphene by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumann, T.; Lopes, J. M. J.; Wofford, J. M.; Oliveira, M. H.; Dubslaff, M.; Hanke, M.; Jahn, U.; Geelhaar, L.; Riechert, H.

    2015-09-01

    We examine how substrate selection impacts the resulting film properties in graphene growth by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Graphene growth on metallic as well as dielectric templates was investigated. We find that MBE offers control over the number of atomic graphene layers regardless of the substrate used. High structural quality could be achieved for graphene prepared on Ni (111) films which were epitaxially grown on MgO (111). For growth either on Al2O3 (0001) or on (6√3×6√3)R30°-reconstructed SiC (0001) surfaces, graphene with a higher density of defects is obtained. Interestingly, despite their defective nature, the layers possess a well defined epitaxial relation to the underlying substrate. These results demonstrate the feasibility of MBE as a technique for realizing the scalable synthesis of this two-dimensional crystal on a variety of substrates.

  13. Development of molecular beam epitaxy technology for III–V compound semiconductor heterostructure devices

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, K. Y.

    2013-09-15

    Molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) is a versatile ultrahigh vacuum technique for growing multiple epitaxial layers of semiconductor crystals with high precision. The extreme control of the MBE technique over composition variation, interface sharpness, impurity doping profiles, and epitaxial layer thickness to the atomic level makes it possible to demonstrate a wide variety of novel semiconductor structures. Since its invention nearly 40 years ago, the MBE technique has evolved from a laboratory apparatus for exploring new materials and novel devices to a favored tool for the mass production of III–V high-speed devices. This paper will review some of the past developments in this technology and propose an outlook of future developments.

  14. Growth and characterization of molecular beam epitaxial GaAs layers on porous silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, T. L.; Liu, J. K.; Sadwick, L.; Wang, K. L.; Kao, Y. C.

    1987-01-01

    GaAs layers have been grown on porous silicon (PS) substrates with good crystallinity by molecular beam epitaxy. In spite of the surface irregularity of PS substrates, no surface morphology deterioration was observed on epitaxial GaAs overlayers. A 10-percent Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy minimum channeling yield for GaAs-on-PS layers as compared to 16 percent for GaAs-on-Si layers grown under the same condition indicates a possible improvement of crystallinity when GaAs is grown on PS. Transmission electron microscopy reveals that the dominant defects in the GaAs-on-PS layers are microtwins and stacking faults, which originate from the GaAs/PS interface. GaAs is found to penetrate into the PS layers. n-type GaAs/p-type PS heterojunction diodes were fabricated with good rectifying characteristics.

  15. Molecular-beam epitaxial regrowth on oxygen-implanted GaAs substrates for device integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. L.; Mahoney, L. J.; Calawa, S. D.; Molvar, K. M.; Maki, P. A.; Mathews, R. H.; Sage, J. P.; Sollner, T. C. L. G.

    1999-06-01

    Device-quality layers were regrown on GaAs wafers by molecular-beam epitaxy over conductive pregrown areas and on selectively patterned high-resistivity areas formed by oxygen implantation. The regrowth over both areas resulted in comparable device-quality GaAs. The high resistivity of the oxygen-implanted area was maintained after the regrowth and no oxygen incorporation was observed in the regrown layer. The cutoff frequency of a 1.5-μm-gate metal-semiconductor field-effect transistor fabricated on the regrown layer over the high-resistivity areas is 7 GHz. This demonstration shows that planar technology can be used in epitaxial regrowth, simplifying the integration of vastly different devices into monolithic circuits.

  16. Nucleation mechanism of gallium-assisted molecular beam epitaxy growth of gallium arsenide nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Fontcuberta i Morral, A.; Colombo, C.; Abstreiter, G.; Arbiol, J.; Morante, J. R.

    2008-02-11

    Molecular beam epitaxy Ga-assisted synthesis of GaAs nanowires is demonstrated. The nucleation and growth are seen to be related to the presence of a SiO{sub 2} layer previously deposited on the GaAs wafer. The interaction of the reactive gallium with the SiO{sub 2} pinholes induces the formation of nanocraters, found to be the key for the nucleation of the nanowires. With SiO{sub 2} thicknesses up to 30 nm, nanocraters reach the underlying substrate, resulting into a preferential growth orientation of the nanowires. Possibly related to the formation of nanocraters, we observe an incubation period of 258 s before the nanowires growth is initiated.

  17. Accommodation mechanism of InN nanocolumns grown on Si(111) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Grandal, J.; Sanchez-Garcia, M. A.; Calleja, E.; Luna, E.; Trampert, A.

    2007-07-09

    High quality InN nanocolumns have been grown by molecular beam epitaxy on bare and AlN-buffered Si(111) substrates. The accommodation mechanism of the InN nanocolumns to the substrate was studied by transmission electron microscopy. Samples grown on AlN-buffered Si(111) show abrupt interfaces between the nanocolumns and the buffer layer, where an array of periodically spaced misfit dislocations develops. Samples grown on bare Si(111) exhibit a thin Si{sub x}N{sub y} at the InN nanocolumn/substrate interface because of Si nitridation. The Si{sub x}N{sub y} thickness and roughness may affect the nanocolumn relative alignment to the substrate. In all cases, InN nanocolumns grow strain- and defect-free.

  18. Cyan laser diode grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Turski, H. Muziol, G.; Wolny, P.; Cywiński, G.

    2014-01-13

    We demonstrate AlGaN-cladding-free laser diodes (LDs), operating in continuous wave (CW) mode at 482 nm grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE). The maximum CW output power was 230 mW. LDs were grown on c-plane GaN substrates obtained by hydride vapor phase epitaxy. The PAMBE process was carried out in metal-rich conditions, supplying high nitrogen flux (Φ{sub N}) during quantum wells (QWs) growth. We found that high Φ{sub N} improves quality of high In content InGaN QWs. The role of nitrogen in the growth of InGaN on (0001) GaN surface as well as the influence of LDs design on threshold current density are discussed.

  19. Growth regimes during homoepitaxial growth of GaN by ammonia molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corrion, A. L.; Wu, F.; Speck, J. S.

    2012-09-01

    c-plane GaN films were grown by ammonia molecular beam epitaxy on metal-organic chemical vapor deposition templates for a wide range of NH3:Ga flux ratios and growth temperatures, and the resulting films were characterized using atomic force microscopy, reflection high-energy electron diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. Three distinct nitrogen-rich growth regimes—unstable layer-by-layer, quasi-stable step flow, and dislocation-mediated pitting—were identified based on the growth mode and film properties. In addition, step flow growth was observed under conditions of gallium droplet accumulation. The results indicate the existence of two regimes for step-flow growth of GaN by ammonia MBE—both gallium-rich and nitrogen-rich. Growth mode instabilities and mound formation were observed and are discussed in the context of a step-edge energy barrier to adatom diffusion over a terrace.

  20. Microstructure of In x Ga1-x N nanorods grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, R. F.; Soundararajah, Q. Y.; Griffiths, I. J.; Cherns, D.; Novikov, S. V.; Foxon, C. T.

    2015-11-01

    Transmission electron microscopy is used to examine the structure and composition of In x Ga1-x N nanorods grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The results confirm a core-shell structure with an In-rich core and In-poor shell resulting from axial and lateral growth sectors respectively. Atomic resolution mapping by energy-dispersive x-ray microanalysis and high angle annular dark field imaging show that both the core and the shell are decomposed into Ga-rich and In-rich platelets parallel to their respective growth surfaces. It is argued that platelet formation occurs at the surfaces, through the lateral expansion of surface steps. Studies of nanorods with graded composition show that decomposition ceases for x ≥ 0.8 and the ratio of growth rates, shell:core, decreases with increasing In concentration.

  1. Intense terahertz emission from molecular beam epitaxy-grown GaAs/GaSb(001)

    SciTech Connect

    Sadia, Cyril P.; Laganapan, Aleena Maria; Agatha Tumanguil, Mae; Estacio, Elmer; Somintac, Armando; Salvador, Arnel; Que, Christopher T.; Yamamoto, Kohji; Tani, Masahiko

    2012-12-15

    Intense terahertz (THz) electromagnetic wave emission was observed in undoped GaAs thin films deposited on (100) n-GaSb substrates via molecular beam epitaxy. GaAs/n-GaSb heterostructures were found to be viable THz sources having signal amplitude 75% that of bulk p-InAs. The GaAs films were grown by interruption method during the growth initiation and using various metamorphic buffer layers. Reciprocal space maps revealed that the GaAs epilayers are tensile relaxed. Defects at the i-GaAs/n-GaSb interface were confirmed by scanning electron microscope images. Band calculations were performed to infer the depletion region and electric field at the i-GaAs/n-GaSb and the air-GaAs interfaces. However, the resulting band calculations were found to be insufficient to explain the THz emission. The enhanced THz emission is currently attributed to a piezoelectric field induced by incoherent strain and defects.

  2. Femtosecond observation of benzyne intermediates in a molecular beam: Bergman rearrangement in the isolated molecule

    PubMed Central

    Diau, Eric W.-G.; Casanova, Joseph; Roberts, John D.; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2000-01-01

    In this communication, we report our femtosecond real-time observation of the dynamics for the three didehydrobenzene molecules (p-, m-, and o-benzyne) generated from 1,4-, 1,3-, and 1,2-dibromobenzene, respectively, in a molecular beam, by using femtosecond time-resolved mass spectrometry. The time required for the first and the second C-Br bond breakage is less than 100 fs; the benzyne molecules are produced within 100 fs and then decay with a lifetime of 400 ps or more. Density functional theory and high-level ab initio calculations are also reported herein to elucidate the energetics along the reaction path. We discuss the dynamics and possible reaction mechanisms for the disappearance of benzyne intermediates. Our effort focuses on the isolated molecule dynamics of the three isomers on the femtosecond time scale. PMID:10660684

  3. Femtosecond observation of benzyne intermediates in a molecular beam: Bergman rearrangement in the isolated molecule.

    PubMed

    Diau, E W; Casanova, J; Roberts, J D; Zewail, A H

    2000-02-15

    In this communication, we report our femtosecond real-time observation of the dynamics for the three didehydrobenzene molecules (p-, m-, and o-benzyne) generated from 1,4-, 1,3-, and 1, 2-dibromobenzene, respectively, in a molecular beam, by using femtosecond time-resolved mass spectrometry. The time required for the first and the second C-Br bond breakage is less than 100 fs; the benzyne molecules are produced within 100 fs and then decay with a lifetime of 400 ps or more. Density functional theory and high-level ab initio calculations are also reported herein to elucidate the energetics along the reaction path. We discuss the dynamics and possible reaction mechanisms for the disappearance of benzyne intermediates. Our effort focuses on the isolated molecule dynamics of the three isomers on the femtosecond time scale.

  4. Synthesis of long group IV semiconductor nanowires by molecular beam epitaxy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    We report the growth of Si and Ge nanowires (NWs) on a Si(111) surface by molecular beam epitaxy. While Si NWs grow perpendicular to the surface, two types of growth axes are found for the Ge NWs. Structural studies of both types of NWs performed with electron microscopies reveal a marked difference between the roughnesses of their respective sidewalls. As the investigation of their length dependence on their diameter indicates that the growth of the NWs predominantly proceeds through the diffusion of adatoms from the substrate up along the sidewalls, difference in the sidewall roughness qualitatively explains the length variation measured between both types of NWs. The formation of atomically flat {111} sidewalls on the <110>-oriented Ge NWs accounts for a larger diffusion length. PMID:21711645

  5. Acceptor states in heteroepitaxial CdHgTe films grown by molecular-beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Mynbaev, K. D.; Shilyaev, A. V. Bazhenov, N. L.; Izhnin, A. I.; Izhnin, I. I.; Mikhailov, N. N.; Varavin, V. S.; Dvoretsky, S. A.

    2015-03-15

    The photoluminescence method is used to study acceptor states in CdHgTe heteroepitaxial films (HEFs) grown by molecular-beam epitaxy. A comparison of the photoluminescence spectra of HEFs grown on GaAs substrates (CdHgTe/GaAs) with the spectra of CdHgTe/Si HEFs demonstrates that acceptor states with energy depths of about 18 and 27 meV are specific to CdHgTe/GaAs HEFs. The possible nature of these states and its relation to the HEF synthesis conditions and, in particular, to the vacancy doping occurring under conditions of a mercury deficiency during the course of epitaxy and postgrowth processing are discussed.

  6. Cracking of Saturated Hydrocarbon Gas Molecular Beam for Carbonization of Si(001) Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshinobu, Tatsuo; Mitsui, Hideaki; Tarui, Yoichiro; Fuyuki, Takashi; Matsunami, Hiroyuki

    1992-11-01

    Carbonization of Si(001) surfaces by saturated hydrocarbon gas molecular beams in a high vacuum was carried out employing a thermal cracking technique. In the case of C3H8 and C2H6, the Si surfaces were carbonized at 750°C with a cracking temperature of 1300°C, and 3C-SiC layers were obtained. Decomposition of C3H8 by cracking was observed in quadrupole mass analyzer (QMA) measurements. In the case of C2H6, the effect of cracking was less obvious, and decomposed species were not observed except for H2 in QMA measurements. In the case of CH4, no effect of cracking was observed. This result seems to be related to the difference in the bond strengths of molecules.

  7. Controllable growth of layered selenide and telluride heterostructures and superlattices using molecular beam epitaxy

    DOE PAGES

    Vishwanath, Suresh; Liu, Xinyu; Rouvimov, Sergei; ...

    2016-01-06

    Layered materials are an actively pursued area of research for realizing highly scaled technologies involving both traditional device structures as well as new physics. Lately, non-equilibrium growth of 2D materials using molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) is gathering traction in the scientific community and here we aim to highlight one of its strengths, growth of abrupt heterostructures, and superlattices (SLs). In this work we present several of the firsts: first growth of MoTe2 by MBE, MoSe2 on Bi2Se3 SLs, transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) SLs, and lateral junction between a quintuple atomic layer of Bi2Te3 and a triple atomic layer of MoTe2.more » In conclusion, reflected high electron energy diffraction oscillations presented during the growth of TMD SLs strengthen our claim that ultrathin heterostructures with monolayer layer control is within reach.« less

  8. Investigation of Localized States in GaAsSb Epilayers Grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xian; Wei, Zhipeng; Zhao, Fenghuan; Yang, Yahui; Chen, Rui; Fang, Xuan; Tang, Jilong; Fang, Dan; Wang, Dengkui; Li, Ruixue; Ge, Xiaotian; Ma, Xiaohui; Wang, Xiaohua

    2016-01-01

    We report the carrier dynamics in GaAsSb ternary alloy grown by molecular beam epitaxy through comprehensive spectroscopic characterization over a wide temperature range. A detailed analysis of the experimental data reveals a complex carrier relaxation process involving both localized and delocalized states. At low temperature, the localized degree shows linear relationship with the increase of Sb component. The existence of localized states is also confirmed by the temperature dependence of peak position and band width of the emission. At temperature higher than 60 K, emissions related to localized states are quenched while the band to band transition dominates the whole spectrum. This study indicates that the localized states are related to the Sb component in the GaAsSb alloy, while it leads to the poor crystal quality of the material, and the application of GaAsSb alloy would be limited by this deterioration. PMID:27381641

  9. Growth of MoO3 films by oxygen plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Altman, Eric I.; Droubay, Timothy C.; Chambers, Scott A.

    2002-07-22

    The growth of MoO₃ films on SrLaAlO₄(0 0 1), a substrate lattice-matched to b-MoO , by oxygen plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy was characterized using reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Xray diffraction (XRD), and atomic force and scanning tunneling microscopies (AFM and STM).It was found that the flux of reactive oxygen species to the surface was not high enough to maintain the proper stoichiometry, even at the lowest measurable deposition rates. Therefore, the films were grown by depositing Mo in small increments and then allowing the Mo to oxidize. At 675 K, the films grew epitaxially but in a three-dimensional manner. XRD of films grown under these conditions revealed atetragonal structure that has not been previously observed in bulk MoO₃ samples.

  10. Concentration transient analysis of antimony surface segregation during Si(100) molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markert, L. C.; Greene, J. E.; Ni, W.-X.; Hansson, G. V.; Sundgren, J.-E.

    1991-01-01

    Antimony surface segregation during Si(100) molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) was investigated at temperatures T(sub s) = 515 - 800 C using concentration transient analysis (CTA). The dopant surface coverage Theta, bulk fraction gamma, and incorporation probability sigma during MBE were determined from secondary-ion mass spectrometry depth profiles of modulation-doped films. Programmed T(sub s) changes during growth were used to trap the surface-segregated dopant overlayer, producing concentration spikes whose integrated area corresponds to Theta. Thermal antimony doping by coevaporation was found to result in segregation strongly dependent on T(sub s) with Theta(sub Sb) values up to 0.9 monolayers (ML): in films doped with Sb(+) ions accelerated by 100 V, Theta(sub Sb) was less than or equal to 4 x 10(exp -3) ML. Surface segregation of coevaporated antimony was kinematically limited for the film growth conditions in these experiments.

  11. Molecular beam epitaxy of SrTiO3 with a growth window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalan, Bharat; Moetakef, Pouya; Stemmer, Susanne

    2009-07-01

    Many complex oxides with only nonvolatile constituents do not have a wide growth window in conventional molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) approaches, which makes it difficult to obtain stoichiometric films. Here it is shown that a growth window in which the stoichiometry is self-regulating can be achieved for SrTiO3 films by using a hybrid MBE approach that uses a volatile metal-organic source for Ti, titanium tetra isopropoxide (TTIP). The growth window widens and shifts to higher TTIP/Sr flux ratios with increasing temperature, showing that it is related to the desorption of the volatile TTIP. We demonstrate stoichiometric, highly perfect, insulating SrTiO3 films. The approach can be adapted for the growth of other complex oxides that previously were believed to have no wide MBE growth window.

  12. Molecular beam epitaxy of SrTiO{sub 3} with a growth window

    SciTech Connect

    Jalan, Bharat; Moetakef, Pouya; Stemmer, Susanne

    2009-07-20

    Many complex oxides with only nonvolatile constituents do not have a wide growth window in conventional molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) approaches, which makes it difficult to obtain stoichiometric films. Here it is shown that a growth window in which the stoichiometry is self-regulating can be achieved for SrTiO{sub 3} films by using a hybrid MBE approach that uses a volatile metal-organic source for Ti, titanium tetra isopropoxide (TTIP). The growth window widens and shifts to higher TTIP/Sr flux ratios with increasing temperature, showing that it is related to the desorption of the volatile TTIP. We demonstrate stoichiometric, highly perfect, insulating SrTiO{sub 3} films. The approach can be adapted for the growth of other complex oxides that previously were believed to have no wide MBE growth window.

  13. Real-time reflectance-difference spectroscopy of GaAs molecular beam epitaxy homoepitaxial growth

    SciTech Connect

    Lastras-Martínez, A. E-mail: alastras@gmail.com; Ortega-Gallegos, J.; Guevara-Macías, L. E.; Nuñez-Olvera, O.; Balderas-Navarro, R. E.; Lastras-Martínez, L. F.; Lastras-Montaño, L. A.; Lastras-Montaño, M. A.

    2014-03-01

    We report on real time-resolved Reflectance-difference (RD) spectroscopy of GaAs(001) grown by molecular beam epitaxy, with a time-resolution of 500 ms per spectrum within the 2.3–4.0 eV photon energy range. Through the analysis of transient RD spectra we demonstrated that RD line shapes are comprised of two components with different physical origins and determined their evolution during growth. Such components were ascribed to the subsurface strain induced by surface reconstruction and to surface stoichiometry. Results reported in this paper render RD spectroscopy as a powerful tool for the study of fundamental processes during the epitaxial growth of zincblende semiconductors.

  14. Metalorganic molecular beam epitaxy growth of GaAs on patterned GaAs substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marx, D.; Asahi, H.; Liu, X. F.; Okuno, Y.; Inoue, K.; Gonda, S.; Shimomura, S.; Hiyamizu, S.

    1994-03-01

    GaAs layers were grown on etch-patterned (100) GaAs substrates by MOMBE (metalorganic molecular beam epitaxy) using TEGa (triethylgallium) and thermally cracked TEAs (triethylarsine). Morphology and orientation dependencies of the grown facets on the growth temperature (400-630°C) and V/III ratio (2-4) are investigated. Good morphology of grown layers was obtained on (111)A side facets at a low V/III ratio of 3 and low growth temperatures of 450-500°C. We also found strong evidence that the formation of facets is not only governed by the migration of Ga precursors and/or Ga atoms, but also by a preferential catalytic decomposition of Ga precursors on the facet edges.

  15. Structural evolution of dilute magnetic (Sn,Mn)Se films grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanzyuba, Vasily; Dong, Sining; Liu, Xinyu; Li, Xiang; Rouvimov, Sergei; Okuno, Hanako; Mariette, Henri; Zhang, Xueqiang; Ptasinska, Sylwia; Tracy, Brian D.; Smith, David J.; Dobrowolska, Margaret; Furdyna, Jacek K.

    2017-02-01

    We describe the structural evolution of dilute magnetic (Sn,Mn)Se films grown by molecular beam epitaxy on GaAs (111) substrates, as revealed by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. When the Mn concentration is increased, the lattice of the ternary (Sn,Mn)Se films evolves quasi-coherently from a SnSe2 two-dimensional (2D) crystal structure into a more complex quasi-2D lattice rearrangement, ultimately transforming into the magnetically concentrated antiferromagnetic MnSe 3D rock-salt structure as Mn approaches 50 at. % of this material. These structural transformations are expected to underlie the evolution of magnetic properties of this ternary system reported earlier in the literature.

  16. Indium antimonide doped with lead telluride grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partin, D. L.; Heremans, J.; Trush, C. M.

    1991-05-01

    A PbTe dopant source has been used to grow n-type InSb using the molecular beam epitaxy growth technique. From Auger electron spectroscopy studies, no surface segregation of tellurium or lead is observed up to ∽ 10 19 cm -3 doping levels. The correlation between the PbTe flux used during growth and the electron density in the grown films is very good, suggesting that the incorporation of tellurium is near unity. Six-probe Hall measurements of carrier transport gave room temperature mobilities as high as 51,300 cm 2 V -1 s -1 at an electron density of 2.9×10 16 cm -3 (54,300 at an electron density of 1.9×10 16 cm -3 at 110 K) for a film of 4.0 μm thickness on an InP substrate.

  17. n{sup +}-GaN grown by ammonia molecular beam epitaxy: Application to regrown contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Lugani, L.; Malinverni, M.; Giraud, E.; Carlin, J.-F.; Grandjean, N.; Tirelli, S.; Marti, D.; Bolognesi, C. R.

    2014-11-17

    We report on the low-temperature growth of heavily Si-doped (>10{sup 20 }cm{sup −3}) n{sup +}-type GaN by N-rich ammonia molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) with very low bulk resistivity (<4 × 10{sup −4} Ω·cm). This is applied to the realization of regrown ohmic contacts on InAlN/GaN high electron mobility transistors. A low n{sup +}-GaN/2 dimensional electron gas contact resistivity of 0.11 Ω·mm is measured, provided an optimized surface preparation procedure, which is shown to be critical. This proves the great potentials of ammonia MBE for the realization of high performance electronic devices.

  18. Communication: Global minimum search of Ag{sub 10}{sup +} with molecular beam optical spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Shayeghi, A. Schäfer, R.; Johnston, R. L.

    2014-11-14

    The present study is focused on the optical properties of the Ag{sub 10}{sup +} cluster in the photon energy range ℏω = 1.9–4.4 eV. Absorption spectra are recorded by longitudinal molecular beam depletion spectroscopy and compared to optical response calculations using time-dependent density functional theory. Several cluster isomers obtained by the new pool-based parallel implementation of the Birmingham Cluster Genetic Algorithm, coupled with density functional theory, are used in excited state calculations. The experimental observations, together with additional simulations of ion mobilities for the several geometries found within this work using different models, clearly identify the ground state isomer of Ag{sub 10}{sup +} to be composed of two orthogonal interpenetrating pentagonal bipyramids, having overall D{sub 2d} symmetry.

  19. Mechanism of Charge Transport in Cobalt and Iron Phthalocyanine Thin Films Grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Arvind; Samanta, Soumen; Singh, Ajay; Debnath, A. K.; Aswal, D. K.; Gupta, S. K.

    2011-12-12

    Cobalt phthalocyanine (CoPc), iron phthalocyanine (FePc) and their composite (CoPc-FePc) films have been grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) studies showed that composite films has better structural ordering compared to individual CoPc and FePc films. The temperature dependence of resistivity (in the temperature range 25 K- 100 K) showed that composite films are metallic, while individual CoPc and FePc films are in the critical regime of metal-to-insulator (M-I) transition The composite films show very high mobility of 110 cm{sup 2} V{sup -1} s{sup -1} at room temperature i.e. nearly two order of magnitude higher compared to pure CoPc and FePc films.

  20. Molecular beam epitaxy of single crystalline GaN nanowires on a flexible Ti foil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calabrese, Gabriele; Corfdir, Pierre; Gao, Guanhui; Pfüller, Carsten; Trampert, Achim; Brandt, Oliver; Geelhaar, Lutz; Fernández-Garrido, Sergio

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate the self-assembled growth of vertically aligned GaN nanowire ensembles on a flexible Ti foil by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The analysis of single nanowires by transmission electron microscopy reveals that they are single crystalline. Low-temperature photoluminescence spectroscopy demonstrates that in comparison to standard GaN nanowires grown on Si, the nanowires prepared on the Ti foil exhibit an equivalent crystalline perfection, a higher density of basal-plane stacking faults, but a reduced density of inversion domain boundaries. The room-temperature photoluminescence spectrum of the nanowire ensemble is not influenced or degraded by the bending of the substrate. The present results pave the way for the fabrication of flexible optoelectronic devices based on GaN nanowires on metal foils.

  1. GaAs nanowires on Si substrates grown by a solid source molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihn, Soo-Ghang; Song, Jong-In; Kim, Young-Hun; Lee, Jeong Yong

    2006-07-01

    High-quality Au-catalyzed GaAs nanowires were grown on Si substrates by vapor-liquid-solid growth in a solid source molecular beam epitaxy system. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy reveal that the GaAs nanowires were epitaxially grown on Si substrates with uniform diameters along the nanowires. While GaAs nanowires on Si(111) and (001) substrates were mainly grown along the ⟨111⟩ direction with zinc-blende and wurtzite structures, unusual GaAs nanowires grown along ⟨001⟩ with a pure zinc-blende structure were also observed. Strong photoluminescence was observed from GaAs nanowires grown on a Si(001) substrate at room temperature.

  2. Ferromagnet-semiconductor nanowire coaxial heterostructures grown by molecular-beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilse, M.; Takagaki, Y.; Herfort, J.; Ramsteiner, M.; Herrmann, C.; Breuer, S.; Geelhaar, L.; Riechert, H.

    2009-09-01

    GaAs-MnAs core-shell structures are grown by molecular-beam epitaxy using wurtzite GaAs nanowires on GaAs(111)B. The nanowire structures curve due to the strain at the heterointerface when the substrate is not rotated during the growth, evidencing the diffusion length in the MnAs overgrowth being less than the perimeter of the columns. The MnAs growth is thus demonstrated to take place by direct deposition on the sidewall. The MnAs envelope is m-plane-oriented with the c-axis along the nanowire axis. The magnetic easy axis hence lies in the surface plane of the substrate, which is confirmed by magnetization measurements and magnetic-force microscopy.

  3. Ferromagnetic (Ga,Mn)As nanowires grown by Mn-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouravleuv, Alexei; Cirlin, George; Sapega, Victor; Werner, Peter; Savin, Alexander; Lipsanen, Harri

    2013-04-01

    (Ga,Mn)As nanowires were grown by molecular beam epitaxy using Mn as a growth catalyst on GaAs(001) substrates at 485 °C, i.e., at intermediate temperatures higher than ones used for the growth of (Ga,Mn)As thin films, but lower than the ordinary temperatures of Au-assisted growth of GaAs nanowires. (Ga,Mn)As nanowires obtained with typical lengths between 0.8 and 4 μm and diameters 50-90 nm do not have defects, such as dislocations or precipitates, except for the stacking faults lying parallel to the growth direction. The investigation of magnetic and optical properties has been carried out not only for as-grown samples with nanowires but also for peeled off nanowires from the host substrate. The results obtained demonstrate that (Ga,Mn)As nanowires exhibit ferromagnetic ordering around 70 K.

  4. Electrical characterization of ensemble of GaN nanowires grown by the molecular beam epitaxy technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolkovsky, Vl.; Zytkiewicz, Z. R.; Sobanska, M.; Klosek, K.

    2013-08-01

    High quality Schottky contacts are formed on GaN nanowires (NWs) structures grown by the molecular beam epitaxy technique on Si(111) substrate. The current-voltage characteristics show the rectification ratio of about 103 and the leakage current of about 10-4 A/cm2 at room temperature. From the capacitance-voltage measurements the free carrier concentration in GaN NWs is determined as about 1016 cm-3. Two deep levels (H200 and E280) are found in the structures containing GaN NWs. H200 is attributed to an extended defect located at the interface between the substrate and SiNx or near the sidewalls at the bottom of the NWs whereas E280 is tentatively assigned to a gallium-vacancy- or nitrogen interstitials-related defect.

  5. Towards precise defect control in layered oxide structures by using oxide molecular beam epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Baiutti, Federico; Christiani, Georg; Logvenov, Gennady

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present the atomic-layer-by-layer oxide molecular beam epitaxy (ALL-oxide MBE) which has been recently installed in the Max-Planck Institute for Solid State Research and we report on its present status, providing some examples that demonstrate its successful application in the synthesis of different layered oxides, with particular reference to superconducting La2CuO4 and insulator-to-metal La2- x Sr x NiO4. We briefly review the ALL-oxide MBE technique and its unique capabilities in the deposition of atomically smooth single-crystal thin films of various complex oxides, artificial compounds and heterostructures, introducing our goal of pursuing a deep investigation of such systems with particular emphasis on structural defects, with the aim of tailoring their functional properties by precise defects control.

  6. Wurtzite GaAs/AlGaAs core-shell nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, H L; Hoang, T B; Dheeraj, D L; van Helvoort, A T J; Liu, L; Harmand, J C; Fimland, B O; Weman, H

    2009-10-14

    We report the growth of GaAs/AlGaAs core-shell nanowires (NWs) on GaAs(111)B substrates by Au-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Electron microscopy shows the formation of a wurtzite AlGaAs shell structure both in the radial and the axial directions outside a wurtzite GaAs core. With higher Al content, a lower axial and a higher radial growth rate of the AlGaAs shell were observed. Room temperature and low temperature (4.4 K) micro-photoluminescence measurements show a much higher radiative efficiency from the GaAs core after the NW is overgrown with a radial AlGaAs shell.

  7. Copper-coated laser-fusion targets using molecular-beam levitation

    SciTech Connect

    Rocke, M.J.

    1981-09-08

    A series of diagnostic experiments at the Shiva laser fusion facility required targets of glass microspheres coated with 1.5 to 3.0 ..mu..m of copper. Previous batch coating efforts using vibration techniques gave poor results due to microsphere sticking and vacuum welding. Molecular Beam Levitation (MBL) represented a noncontact method to produce a sputtered copper coating on a single glassmicrosphere. The coating specifications that were achieved resulted in a copper layer up to 3 ..mu..m thick with the allowance of a maximum variation of 10 nm in surface finish and thickness. These techniques developed with the MBL may be applied to sputter coat many soft metals for fusion target applications.

  8. GaNAsP: An intermediate band semiconductor grown by gas-source molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Kuang, Y. J.; Yu, K. M.; Walukiewicz, W.; Kudrawiec, R.; Luce, A. V.; Ting, M.; Tu, C. W.

    2013-03-18

    Dilute nitride GaNAsP thin films were grown via a GaAsP metamorphic buffer on GaP(100) substrate with gas-source molecular beam epitaxy. The compositions of this III-V-V-V compound were determined by channeling Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and nuclear reaction analysis. Photoreflectance shows two distinctive transitions from the valence band to the split conduction bands due to N incorporation. Photoluminescence and optical absorption show the fundamental bandgap of Ga(N)AsP is largely tailored by the small amount of N. The observed multiband characteristics and the bandgap tunability of GaNAsP are two merits that fit into the intermediate-band solar cell roadmap, and GaNAsP of high crystal quality provides a strong candidate for intermediate band solar cell materials.

  9. Low temperature growth of crystalline magnesium oxide on hexagonal silicon carbide (0001) by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Goodrich, T. L.; Parisi, J.; Cai, Z.; Ziemer, K. S.

    2007-01-22

    Magnesium oxide (111) was grown epitaxially on hexagonal silicon carbide (6H-SiC) (0001) substrates at low temperatures by molecular beam epitaxy and a remote oxygen plasma source. The films were characterized by reflection high-energy electron diffraction, Auger electron spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy. Crystal structure, morphology, and growth rate of the magnesium oxide (MgO) films were found to be dependent on the magnesium flux, indicating a magnesium adsorption controlled growth mechanism. The single crystalline MgO thin films had an epitaxial relationship where MgO (111) parallel 6H-SiC (0001) and were stable in both air and 10{sup -9} Torr up to 1023 K.

  10. Synthesis of atomically thin hexagonal boron nitride films on nickel foils by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Nakhaie, S.; Wofford, J. M.; Schumann, T.; Jahn, U.; Ramsteiner, M.; Hanke, M.; Lopes, J. M. J. Riechert, H.

    2015-05-25

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is a layered two-dimensional material with properties that make it promising as a dielectric in various applications. We report the growth of h-BN films on Ni foils from elemental B and N using molecular beam epitaxy. The presence of crystalline h-BN over the entire substrate is confirmed by Raman spectroscopy. Atomic force microscopy is used to examine the morphology and continuity of the synthesized films. A scanning electron microscopy study of films obtained using shorter depositions offers insight into the nucleation and growth behavior of h-BN on the Ni substrate. The morphology of h-BN was found to evolve from dendritic, star-shaped islands to larger, smooth triangular ones with increasing growth temperature.

  11. Hexagonal Boron Nitride Tunnel Barriers Grown on Graphite by High Temperature Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Yong-Jin; Summerfield, Alex; Davies, Andrew; Cheng, Tin S.; Smith, Emily F.; Mellor, Christopher J.; Khlobystov, Andrei N.; Foxon, C. Thomas; Eaves, Laurence; Beton, Peter H.; Novikov, Sergei V.

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate direct epitaxial growth of high-quality hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) layers on graphite using high-temperature plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Atomic force microscopy reveals mono- and few-layer island growth, while conducting atomic force microscopy shows that the grown hBN has a resistance which increases exponentially with the number of layers, and has electrical properties comparable to exfoliated hBN. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman microscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements on hBN confirm the formation of sp2-bonded hBN and a band gap of 5.9 ± 0.1 eV with no chemical intermixing with graphite. We also observe hexagonal moiré patterns with a period of 15 nm, consistent with the alignment of the hBN lattice and the graphite substrate.

  12. Hexagonal Boron Nitride Tunnel Barriers Grown on Graphite by High Temperature Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yong-Jin; Summerfield, Alex; Davies, Andrew; Cheng, Tin S.; Smith, Emily F.; Mellor, Christopher J.; Khlobystov, Andrei N.; Foxon, C. Thomas; Eaves, Laurence; Beton, Peter H.; Novikov, Sergei V.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate direct epitaxial growth of high-quality hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) layers on graphite using high-temperature plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Atomic force microscopy reveals mono- and few-layer island growth, while conducting atomic force microscopy shows that the grown hBN has a resistance which increases exponentially with the number of layers, and has electrical properties comparable to exfoliated hBN. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman microscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements on hBN confirm the formation of sp2-bonded hBN and a band gap of 5.9 ± 0.1 eV with no chemical intermixing with graphite. We also observe hexagonal moiré patterns with a period of 15 nm, consistent with the alignment of the hBN lattice and the graphite substrate. PMID:27681943

  13. Surface reconstructions in molecular beam epitaxy of SrTiO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Kajdos, Adam P.; Stemmer, Susanne

    2014-11-10

    We show that reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) can be used as a highly sensitive tool to track surface and resulting film stoichiometry in adsorption-limited molecular beam epitaxy of (001) SrTiO{sub 3} thin films. Even under growth conditions that yield films with a lattice parameter that is identical to that of stoichiometric bulk crystals within the detection limit of high-resolution x-ray diffraction (XRD), changes in surface reconstruction occur from (1 × 1) to (2 × 1) to c(4 × 4) as the equivalent beam pressure of the Ti metalorganic source is increased. These surface reconstructions are correlated with a shift from mixed SrO/TiO{sub 2} termination to pure TiO{sub 2} termination. The crossover to TiO{sub 2} surface termination is also apparent in a phase shift in RHEED oscillations observed at the beginning of growth. Comparison with prior results for carrier mobilities of doped films shows that the best films are grown under conditions of a TiO{sub 2}-saturated surface [c(4 × 4) reconstruction] within the XRD growth window.

  14. Molecular beam epitaxy growth of SnO{sub 2} using a tin chemical precursor

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Tianqi; Prakash, Abhinav; Jalan, Bharat; Warner, Ellis; Gladfelter, Wayne L.

    2015-03-15

    The authors report on the development of a molecular beam epitaxy approach for atomic layer controlled growth of phase-pure, single-crystalline epitaxial SnO{sub 2} films with scalable growth rates using a highly volatile precursor (tetraethyltin) for tin and rf-oxygen plasma for oxygen. Smooth, epitaxial SnO{sub 2} (101) films on r-sapphire (101{sup ¯}2) substrates were grown as a function of tin precursor flux and substrate temperatures between 300 and 900 °C. Three distinct growth regimes were identified where SnO{sub 2} films grew in a reaction-, flux-, and desorption-limited mode, respectively, with increasing substrate temperature. In particular, with increasing tin flux, the growth rates were found to increase and then saturate indicating any excess tin precursor desorbs above a critical beam equivalent pressure of tin precursor. Important implications of growth kinetic behaviors on the self-regulating stoichiometric growth of perovskite stannates are discussed.

  15. Positron annihilation studies of defects in molecular beam epitaxy grown III-V layers

    SciTech Connect

    Umlor, M.T.; Keeble, D.J.; Asoka-Kumar, P.; Lynn, K.G.; Cooke, P.W.

    1994-08-01

    A summary of recent positron annihilation experiments on molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) grown III-V layers is Presented. Variable energy positron beam measurements on Al{sub 0.32}Ga{sub 0.68}As undoped and Si doped have been completed. Positron trapping at a open volume defect in Al{sub 0.32}Ga{sub 0.68}:Si for temperatures from 300 to 25 K in the dark was observed. The positron trap was lost after 1.3 eV illumination at 25K. These results indicate an open volume defect is associated with the local structure of the deep donor state of the DX center. Stability of MBE GaAs to thermal annealing war, investigated over the temperature range of 230 to 700{degrees}C, Proximity wafer furnace anneals in flowing argon were used, Samples grown above 450{degrees}C were shown to be stable but for sample below this temperature an anneal induced vacancy related defect was produced for anneals between 400 and 500{degrees}C. The nature of the defect was shown to be different for material grown at 350 and 230{degrees}C. Activation energies of 2.5 eV to 2.3 eV were obtained from isochronal anneal experiments for samples grown at 350 and 230{degrees}C, respectively.

  16. Pellet ablation and ablation model development

    SciTech Connect

    Houlberg, W.A.

    1989-01-01

    A broad survey of pellet ablation is given, based primarily on information presented at this meeting. The implications of various experimental observations for ablation theory are derived from qualitative arguments of the physics involved. The major elements of a more complete ablation theory are then outlined in terms of these observations. This is followed by a few suggestions on improving the connections between theory and experimental results through examination of ablation data. Although this is a rather aggressive undertaking for such a brief (and undoubtedly incomplete) assessment, some of the discussion may help us advance the understanding of pellet ablation. 17 refs.

  17. Modeling CO{sub 2} Laser Ablative Impulse with Polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Sinko, John E.; Phipps, Claude R.; Sasoh, Akihiro

    2010-10-08

    Laser ablation vaporization models have usually ignored the spatial dependence of the laser beam. Here, we consider effects from modeling using a Gaussian beam for both photochemical and photothermal conditions. The modeling results are compared to experimental and literature data for CO{sub 2} laser ablation of the polymer polyoxymethylene under vacuum, and discussed in terms of the ablated mass areal density and momentum coupling coefficient. Extending the scope of discussion, laser ablative impulse generation research has lacked a cohesive strategy for linking the vaporization and plasma regimes. Existing models, mostly formulated for ultraviolet laser systems or metal targets, appear to be inappropriate or impractical for applications requiring CO{sub 2} laser ablation of polymers. A recently proposed method for linking the vaporization and plasma regimes for analytical modeling is addressed here along with the implications of its use. Key control parameters are considered, along with the major propulsion parameters needed for laser ablation propulsion modeling.

  18. Growth of SrVO{sub 3} thin films by hybrid molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, Craig; Brahlek, Matthew; Engel-Herbert, Roman; Moyer, Jarrett A.; Alipour, Hamideh M.; Grimley, Everett D.; LeBeau, James M.

    2015-11-15

    The authors report the growth of stoichiometric SrVO{sub 3} thin films on (LaAlO{sub 3}){sub 0.3}(Sr{sub 2}AlTaO{sub 6}){sub 0.7} (001) substrates using hybrid molecular beam epitaxy. This growth approach employs a conventional effusion cell to supply elemental A-site Sr and the metalorganic precursor vanadium oxytriisopropoxide (VTIP) to supply vanadium. Oxygen is supplied in its molecular form through a gas inlet. An optimal VTIP:Sr flux ratio has been identified using reflection high-energy electron-diffraction, x-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and scanning transmission electron microscopy, demonstrating stoichiometric SrVO{sub 3} films with atomically flat surface morphology. Away from the optimal VTIP:Sr flux, characteristic changes in the crystalline structure and surface morphology of the films were found, enabling identification of the type of nonstoichiometry. For optimal VTIP:Sr flux ratios, high quality SrVO{sub 3} thin films were obtained with smallest deviation of the lattice parameter from the ideal value and with atomically smooth surfaces, indicative of the good cation stoichiometry achieved by this growth technique.

  19. Beam finite-element model of a molecular motor for the simulation of active fibre networks

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Kei W.; Birzle, Anna M.; Wall, Wolfgang A.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular motors are proteins that excessively increase the efficiency of subcellular transport processes. They allow for cell division, nutrient transport and even macroscopic muscle movement. In order to understand the effect of motors in large biopolymer networks, e.g. the cytoskeleton, we require a suitable model of a molecular motor. In this contribution, we present such a model based on a geometrically exact beam finite-element formulation. We discuss the numerical model of a non-processive motor such as myosin II, which interacts with actin filaments. Based on experimental data and inspired by the theoretical understanding offered by the power-stroke model and the swinging-cross-bridge model, we parametrize our numerical model in order to achieve the effect that a physiological motor has on its cargo. To this end, we introduce the mechanical and mathematical foundations of the model, then discuss its calibration, prove its usefulness by conducting finite-element simulations of actin–myosin motility assays and assess the influence of motors on the rheology of semi-flexible biopolymer networks. PMID:26997891

  20. Growth of EuO/Si and EuO/SrO/Si heteroepitaxial structures by molecular-beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Teterin, P. E. Averyanov, D. V.; Sadofyev, Yu. G. Parfenov, O. E.; Likhachev, I. A.; Storchak, V. G.

    2015-01-15

    Epitaxial EuO thin films with thickness up to 60 nm have been grown by molecular beam epitaxy both on SrO sublayers and directly on Si (001) substrates. Crystal structure has been controlled in situ by reflection high energy electron diffraction. Ex situ studies by X-ray diffraction and Rutherford backscattering have confirmed high crystalline quality of the films.

  1. Pyrolysis-Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry to Characterize Soil Organic Matter Composition in Chemically Isolated Fractions from Differing Land Uses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Questions concerning the role of soil organic matter (SOM) in soil fertility, ecosystem functioning and global change requires knowledge of the controls on SOM stabilization and their interactions. Pyrolysis molecular beam mass spectrometry (py-MBMS) provides a powerful and rapid means of characteri...

  2. Reduction of spectral interferences and noise effects in laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry with partial least square regression - a computer simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Xianglei; Chan, George C.-Y.; Zorba, Vassilia; Russo, Richard E.

    2016-08-01

    The fundamental analytical accuracies and precisions attainable by laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry (LAMIS), with emphasis on the impacts from spectral interferences and measurement noise, were investigated by means of computer simulation. The study focused on the analysis of a minor isotope at sub- to single-percentage abundance level. With a natural abundance about 1.1% for 13C, the C2 Swan band (d3Πg-a3Πu) with Δν = + 1 was selected as a representative system. The characteristics (e.g., noise amplitude and distribution, signal strength, and signal-to-background ratio) of the simulated spectra were experimentally characterized. Partial least square (PLS) regression was used to extract isotopic information from the simulated molecular spectra. In the absence of any spectral interference and with the use of a calibration set consisting of eleven isotopic standards, the theoretical accuracies and precisions with signal accumulation from 100 laser shots are about 0.002% and 0.001%, respectively, in absolute percentage abundance of 13C. The theoretical analytical accuracies slightly degrade, but are adequate for many applications, to 0.004% and 0.008% respectively, for calibrations involving only three and two isotopic standards. It was found that PLS regression is not only immune to both source-flicker and photon-shot noise, but is also effective in differentiating the spectral patterns from the analyte against those from spectral interferences. The influences of spectral interference from single or multiple atomic emission lines were simulated, and new ways to minimize their impacts were formulated and demonstrated. It was found that the wavelength range selected for the computation of the normalization factor should not contain any spectral-interfering peak, and a properly chosen wavelength range increases the tolerance of spectral interference by at least one order of magnitude. With matrix-matched calibration standards, the precisions (expressed

  3. Flat-Panel Cone-Beam Ct-Guided Radiofrequency Ablation of Very Small (≤1.5 cm) Liver Tumors: Technical Note on a Preliminary Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Cazzato, Roberto Luigi Buy, Xavier Alberti, Nicolas Fonck, Mariane; Grasso, Rosario Francesco; Palussière, Jean

    2015-02-15

    PurposeThe aim of the present study was to investigate the technical feasibility of flat-panel cone-beam CT (CBCT)-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of very small (<1.5 cm) liver tumors.Materials and MethodsPatients included were candidates for hepatic percutaneous RFA as they had single biopsy-proven hepatic tumors sized ≤1.5 cm and poorly defined on ultrasonography. Following apnea induction, unenhanced CBCT scans were acquired and used to deploy the RF electrode with the aid of a virtual navigation system. If the tumor was not clearly identified on the unenhanced CBCT scan, a right retrograde arterial femoral access was established to carry out hepatic angiography and localize the tumor. Patients’ lesions and procedural variables were recorded and analyzed.ResultsThree patients (2 male and 1 female), aged 68, 76, and 87 years were included; 3 lesions (2 hepato-cellular carcinoma and 1 metastasis from colorectal cancer) were treated. One patient required hepatic angiography. Cycles of apnea used to acquire CBCT images and to deploy the electrode lasted <120 s. Mean fluoroscopic time needed to deploy the electrode was 36.6 ± 5.7 min. Mean overall procedural time was 66.0 ± 22.9 min. No peri- or post-procedural complications were noted. No cases of incomplete ablation were noted at 1-month follow-up.ConclusionPercutaneous CBCT-guided liver RFA with or without arterial hepatic angiography is technically feasible.

  4. Ablation of steel using picosecond laser pulses in burst mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lickschat, Peter; Demba, Alexander; Weissmantel, Steffen

    2017-02-01

    Results obtained in picosecond laser processing of steel applying the burst mode are presented. Using the burst mode, pulse trains, i.e., bursts, consisting of a number of picosecond pulses with an inter-pulse delay of 12.5 ns and 10 ps pulse duration are applied for material processing. Small cavities with sizes in the range of the laser beam diameter made by single-burst ablation are compared to quadratic cavities of 0.5 × 0.5 mm² produced by multiburst ablation and simultaneous scanning of the laser beam across the steel sample surface. The ablated volume per pulse within the burst was calculated either from the ablated volume per burst or from the ablation depth of the quadratic cavities. With the second to fourth pulses in the bursts, a reduction of the ablated volume per pulse in comparison with the first pulse in the bursts (i.e., to the use of single pulses) was found for both single- and multiburst ablation, which is assumed to be due to plasma shielding. By contrast, the ablated volume per pulse within the bursts increases for the fifth to eighth pulses. Heat accumulation effect and the influence of the heated plasma can be assumed to be the reason for these higher ablation rates. SEM micrographs also show that there is a higher melt ejection out of the laser processed area. This is indicated by the formation of bulges about the ablated area.

  5. Chemical and molecular beam epitaxy of III-V nanowires on silicon for photovoltaic application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhakrishnan, Gokul

    Nanowires, due to their unique structure and carrier transport abilities, have sparked huge interest in the semiconductor industry. An array of nanometric size wires inserted between the p and n conductivity regions of a conventional solar cell or core shell type p-n junction nanowires synergized with semiconductor nanocrystals can lead to faster carrier collection, thereby improving device performance. This work investigates the growth of GaAs and InP semiconductor nanowires on silicon (111) using Chemical Beam Epitaxy (CBE) and Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE). Uniform gold nanoparticles acting as growth centers in the Vapor Liquid Solid mode of growth were generated by using the cheap and rapid technique called Nanosphere Lithography (NSL). Variation of the experimental parameters during NSL resulted in honeycomb and hexagonal patterns of gold nanoparticles. A high degree of selectivity was obtained for CBE grown nanowires whereas the MBE grown GaAs nanowires revealed the formation of a thick polycrystalline wetting layer at the interface. The CBE grown InP nanowires mostly maintained the honeycomb structure although they were found to be oriented contrary to the expected <111> direction. SEM analysis of GaAs nanowires grown by CBE showed that during growth, the nanowires may coalesce with each other resulting in unique structures such as bipods, tripods and multipods. High resolution TEM analysis of single GaAs nanowires revealed periodic formation of contrasting materials. Diffraction patterns recorded at these dark contrast areas confirmed the formation of hexagonal wurtzite single crystal structures interspaced with cubic zincblende single crystal structures. These nanowires can be used for photovoltaic applications or as light emitting devices. In addition, the formation of superlattices of different crystal structures can pave the way for novel quantum confined optoelectronic devices.

  6. The supersonic molecular beam injector as a reliable tool for plasma fueling and physics experiment on HL-2A.

    PubMed

    Chen, C Y; Yu, D L; Feng, B B; Yao, L H; Song, X M; Zang, L G; Gao, X Y; Yang, Q W; Duan, X R

    2016-09-01

    On HL-2A tokamak, supersonic molecular beam injection (SMBI) has been developed as a routine refueling method. The key components of the system are an electromagnetic valve and a conic nozzle. The valve and conic nozzle are assembled to compose the simplified Laval nozzle for generating the pulsed beam. The appurtenance of the system includes the cooling system serving the cooled SMBI generation and the in situ calibration component for quantitative injection. Compared with the conventional gas puffing, the SMBI features prompt response and larger fueling flux. These merits devote the SMBI a good fueling method, an excellent plasma density feedback control tool, and an edge localized mode mitigation resource.

  7. The supersonic molecular beam injector as a reliable tool for plasma fueling and physics experiment on HL-2A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. Y.; Yu, D. L.; Feng, B. B.; Yao, L. H.; Song, X. M.; Zang, L. G.; Gao, X. Y.; Yang, Q. W.; Duan, X. R.

    2016-09-01

    On HL-2A tokamak, supersonic molecular beam injection (SMBI) has been developed as a routine refueling method. The key components of the system are an electromagnetic valve and a conic nozzle. The valve and conic nozzle are assembled to compose the simplified Laval nozzle for generating the pulsed beam. The appurtenance of the system includes the cooling system serving the cooled SMBI generation and the in situ calibration component for quantitative injection. Compared with the conventional gas puffing, the SMBI features prompt response and larger fueling flux. These merits devote the SMBI a good fueling method, an excellent plasma density feedback control tool, and an edge localized mode mitigation resource.

  8. Radiofrequency Ablation of Liver Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Site Index A-Z Radiofrequency Ablation (RFA) of Liver Tumors Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a treatment that ... of Liver Tumors? What is Radiofrequency Ablation of Liver Tumors? Radiofrequency ablation, sometimes referred to as RFA, ...

  9. InAlN/GaN Bragg reflectors grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Gacevic, Z.; Fernandez-Garrido, S.; Calleja, E.; Estrade, S.

    2010-12-01

    We report on molecular beam epitaxy growth and characterization of ten-period lattice-matched InAlN/GaN distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs), with peak reflectivity centered around 400 nm. Thanks to the well tuned ternary alloy composition, crack-free surfaces have been obtained, as confirmed by both optical and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Their good periodicity and well-defined interfaces have been confirmed by both x-ray diffraction and TEM measurements. Peak reflectivity values as high as 60% with stop bands of 30 nm have been demonstrated. Optical measurements revealed that discrepancy between the obtained (60%) and the theoretically expected ({approx}75%) reflectivity is a consequence of significant residual absorption ({approx}35%). TEM measurements revealed the coexistence of zinc-blende and wurtzite phases, as well as planar defects, mainly in GaN. These defects are suggested as the potential source of the undesired absorption and/or scattering effects that lowered the DBRs' peak reflectivity.

  10. Water accommodation on ice and organic surfaces: insights from environmental molecular beam experiments.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xiangrui; Thomson, Erik S; Papagiannakopoulos, Panos; Johansson, Sofia M; Pettersson, Jan B C

    2014-11-26

    Water uptake on aerosol and cloud particles in the atmosphere modifies their chemistry and microphysics with important implications for climate on Earth. Here, we apply an environmental molecular beam (EMB) method to characterize water accommodation on ice and organic surfaces. The adsorption of surface-active compounds including short-chain alcohols, nitric acid, and acetic acid significantly affects accommodation of D2O on ice. n-Hexanol and n-butanol adlayers reduce water uptake by facilitating rapid desorption and function as inefficient barriers for accommodation as well as desorption of water, while the effect of adsorbed methanol is small. Water accommodation is close to unity on nitric-acid- and acetic-acid-covered ice, and accommodation is significantly more efficient than that on the bare ice surface. Water uptake is inefficient on solid alcohols and acetic acid but strongly enhanced on liquid phases including a quasi-liquid layer on solid n-butanol. The EMB method provides unique information on accommodation and rapid kinetics on volatile surfaces, and these studies suggest that adsorbed organic and acidic compounds need to be taken into account when describing water at environmental interfaces.

  11. Thermodynamic analysis of molecular beam epitaxy of compounds in the In-Se system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatillon, Christian; Emery, Jean-Yves

    1993-03-01

    The molecular beam epitaxy of the compounds In4Se3(s), InSe(s) and In2Se3(s) is analysed using thermodynamics of vaporization and condensation phenomena. The growth conditions are studied as referred to equilibrium conditions in order to identify the main gaseous species that compete in the condensation and evaporation processes and to indicate the species which may have a low sticking coefficient. The general behaviour of MBE growth parameters is well described by thermodynamics, the domains of existence of In4Se3(s), InSe(s) and In2Se3(s) being directly correlated to the experimental results. The sticking or condensation coefficient of selenium is determined to be 0.52 on InSe(s) and 0.41 to 0.28 on In2Se3(s). The origin of this coefficient value is analysed and discussed in terms of thermal accommodation of the polymeric Sen(g) incident gaseous species.

  12. Silicon sample holder for molecular beam epitaxy on pre-fabricated integrated circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoenk, Michael E. (Inventor); Grunthaner, Paula J. (Inventor); Grunthaner, Frank J. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The sample holder of the invention is formed of the same semiconductor crystal as the integrated circuit on which the molecular beam expitaxial process is to be performed. In the preferred embodiment, the sample holder comprises three stacked micro-machined silicon wafers: a silicon base wafer having a square micro-machined center opening corresponding in size and shape to the active area of a CCD imager chip, a silicon center wafer micro-machined as an annulus having radially inwardly pointing fingers whose ends abut the edges of and center the CCD imager chip within the annulus, and a silicon top wafer micro-machined as an annulus having cantilevered membranes which extend over the top of the CCD imager chip. The micro-machined silicon wafers are stacked in the order given above with the CCD imager chip centered in the center wafer and sandwiched between the base and top wafers. The thickness of the center wafer is about 20% less than the thickness of the CCD imager chip. Preferably, four titanium wires, each grasping the edges of the top and base wafers, compress all three wafers together, flexing the cantilever fingers of the top wafer to accommodate the thickness of the CCD imager chip, acting as a spring holding the CCD imager chip in place.

  13. Comparisons between tokamak fueling of gas puffing and supersonic molecular beam injection in 2D simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Y. L.; Wang, Z. H.; Xu, X. Q.; Li, H. D.; Feng, H.; Sun, W. G.

    2015-01-09

    Plasma fueling with high efficiency and deep injection is very important to enable fusion power performance requirements. It is a powerful and efficient way to study neutral transport dynamics and find methods of improving the fueling performance by doing large scale simulations. Furthermore, two basic fueling methods, gas puffing (GP) and supersonic molecular beam injection (SMBI), are simulated and compared in realistic divertor geometry of the HL-2A tokamak with a newly developed module, named trans-neut, within the framework of BOUT++ boundary plasma turbulence code [Z. H. Wang et al., Nucl. Fusion 54, 043019 (2014)]. The physical model includes plasma density, heat and momentum transport equations along with neutral density, and momentum transport equations. In transport dynamics and profile evolutions of both plasma and neutrals are simulated and compared between GP and SMBI in both poloidal and radial directions, which are quite different from one and the other. It finds that the neutrals can penetrate about four centimeters inside the last closed (magnetic) flux surface during SMBI, while they are all deposited outside of the LCF during GP. Moreover, it is the radial convection and larger inflowing flux which lead to the deeper penetration depth of SMBI and higher fueling efficiency compared to GP.

  14. Numerical approximations for the molecular beam epitaxial growth model based on the invariant energy quadratization method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Zhao, Jia; Wang, Qi

    2017-03-01

    The Molecular Beam Epitaxial model is derived from the variation of a free energy, that consists of either a fourth order Ginzburg-Landau double well potential or a nonlinear logarithmic potential in terms of the gradient of a height function. One challenge in solving the MBE model numerically is how to develop proper temporal discretization for the nonlinear terms in order to preserve energy stability at the time-discrete level. In this paper, we resolve this issue by developing a first and second order time-stepping scheme based on the "Invariant Energy Quadratization" (IEQ) method. The novelty is that all nonlinear terms are treated semi-explicitly, and the resulted semi-discrete equations form a linear system at each time step. Moreover, the linear operator is symmetric positive definite and thus can be solved efficiently. We then prove that all proposed schemes are unconditionally energy stable. The semi-discrete schemes are further discretized in space using finite difference methods and implemented on GPUs for high-performance computing. Various 2D and 3D numerical examples are presented to demonstrate stability and accuracy of the proposed schemes.

  15. Comparisons between tokamak fueling of gas puffing and supersonic molecular beam injection in 2D simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Y. L.; Wang, Z. H.; Xu, X. Q.; Li, H. D.; Feng, H.; Sun, W. G.

    2015-01-15

    Plasma fueling with high efficiency and deep injection is very important to enable fusion power performance requirements. It is a powerful and efficient way to study neutral transport dynamics and find methods of improving the fueling performance by doing large scale simulations. Two basic fueling methods, gas puffing (GP) and supersonic molecular beam injection (SMBI), are simulated and compared in realistic divertor geometry of the HL-2A tokamak with a newly developed module, named trans-neut, within the framework of BOUT++ boundary plasma turbulence code [Z. H. Wang et al., Nucl. Fusion 54, 043019 (2014)]. The physical model includes plasma density, heat and momentum transport equations along with neutral density, and momentum transport equations. Transport dynamics and profile evolutions of both plasma and neutrals are simulated and compared between GP and SMBI in both poloidal and radial directions, which are quite different from one and the other. It finds that the neutrals can penetrate about four centimeters inside the last closed (magnetic) flux surface during SMBI, while they are all deposited outside of the LCF during GP. It is the radial convection and larger inflowing flux which lead to the deeper penetration depth of SMBI and higher fueling efficiency compared to GP.

  16. Molecular-beam sampling study of extinguishment of methane-air flames by dry chemicals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knuth, E. L.; Ni, W.-F.; Seeger, C.

    1982-01-01

    The use of Al2O3, NaHCO3, KHCO3, NH4H2PO4 and KCl powders for the inhibition of a methane/oxygen diffusion flame is studied through measurement of composition and temperature profiles, using a molecular beam mass spectrometer sampling system. In order to obtain significant inhibition without extinguishing the flame, a powder feeding rate of 2 mg/liter of gas was used for KCl and Al2O3, and of 3 mg/liter of gas for the remaining powders. CH4, O2, N2, H2O and CO2 concentrations were measured by the mass spectrometer, while temperature was measured by the time-of-flight technique. For the powder feeding rates used, Al2O3 was the least and KCl and NH2H4PO2 the most effective in reducing temperature; in reaction-inhibition effectiveness, Al2O3 was again lowest while KCl was superior to all others. Because the KCl concentration was only 2/3 that of NH4H2PO4, it is recommended as the most effective temperature reducer and reaction inhibitor.

  17. Molecular-beam-epitaxy-grown ZnMgS ultraviolet photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sou, I. K.; Wu, Marcus C. W.; Sun, T.; Wong, K. S.; Wong, G. K. L.

    2001-03-01

    Epitaxial growth of Zn1-xMgxS alloy thin films on GaP(100) substrates was carried out using the molecular-beam-epitaxy technique. In situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction studies show that the alloys can be grown with a stable zinc-blende structure up to x around 30%. For x>30%, a structural transition will occur at a critical thickness which is sensitively dependent on the x composition. A near-band-edge peak with a full width at half maximum of about 10 nm was observed in room-temperature photoluminescence measurements made on as-grown alloy thin films. Several Zn1-xMgxS-based Schottky barrier photodetectors were fabricated. Room-temperature photoresponse measurements were performed on these detectors and abrupt long-wavelength cutoffs covering 325, 305, 295, and 270 nm were achieved for devices with Mg composition of 16%, 44%, 57%, and 75%, respectively. The response curve of the Zn0.43Mg0.57S device offers a close match to the erythemal action spectrum that describes human skin sensitivity to UV radiation.

  18. Mapping growth windows in quaternary perovskite oxide systems by hybrid molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brahlek, Matthew; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Hai-Tian; Lapano, Jason; Dedon, Liv R.; Martin, Lane W.; Engel-Herbert, Roman

    2016-09-01

    Requisite to growing stoichiometric perovskite thin films of the solid-solution A'1-xAxBO3 by hybrid molecular beam epitaxy is understanding how the growth conditions interpolate between the end members A'BO3 and ABO3, which can be grown in a self-regulated fashion, but under different conditions. Using the example of La1-xSrxVO3, the two-dimensional growth parameter space that is spanned by the flux of the metal-organic precursor vanadium oxytriisopropoxide and composition, x, was mapped out. The evolution of the adsorption-controlled growth window was obtained using a combination of X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, reflection high-energy electron-diffraction (RHEED), and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. It is found that the stoichiometric growth conditions can be mapped out quickly with a single calibration sample using RHEED. Once stoichiometric conditions have been identified, the out-of-plane lattice parameter can be utilized to precisely determine the composition x. This strategy enables the identification of growth conditions that allow the deposition of stoichiometric perovskite oxide films with random A-site cation mixing, which is relevant to a large number of perovskite materials with interesting properties, e.g., high-temperature superconductivity and colossal magnetoresistance, that emerge in solid solution A'1-xAxBO3.

  19. Thermal Stability of Annealed Germanium-Tin Alloys Grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhargava, Nupur; Gupta, Jay Prakash; Faleev, Nikolai; Wielunski, Leszek; Kolodzey, James

    2017-03-01

    The thermal stability of undoped and boron-doped germanium tin (Ge1- x Sn x ) alloys grown by molecular beam epitaxy with varying composition and layer thickness was investigated. The alloys were annealed in forming gas at various temperatures up to 800°C for 1 min using rapid thermal processing, and were characterized using high-resolution x-ray diffraction and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. It was found that the Ge1- x Sn x alloys were stable to well above the growth temperature, but the stability decreased with increasing thickness, Sn content, and doping. Ge1- x Sn x alloys with low Sn composition ( x ˜ 0.025) were stable up to 700°C, and for a given Sn composition, the undoped alloys were more thermally stable than the doped alloys. As the thickness of the Ge0.975Sn0.025 alloys increased to about 950 nm, the temperature of thermal stability dropped to 500°C. As the Sn composition of the 90 nm-Ge1- x Sn x alloys increased up to x = 0.08, the temperature of thermal stability dropped to 300°C. At higher annealing temperatures, the Ge1- x Sn x alloy degraded with lower crystal quality, and a gradient in the Sn composition appeared, which may be due to Sn diffusion or segregation.

  20. Impact of extended defects on recombination in CdTe heterostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Zaunbrecher, Katherine N.; Kuciauskas, Darius; Swartz, Craig H.; Dippo, Pat; Edirisooriya, Madhavie; Ogedengbe, Olanrewaju S.; Sohal, Sandeep; Hancock, Bobby L.; LeBlanc, Elizabeth G.; Jayathilaka, Pathiraja A. R. D.; Barnes, Teresa M.; Myers, Thomas H.

    2016-08-29

    Heterostructures with CdTe and CdTe 1-xSex (x ~ 0.01) absorbers between two wider-band-gap Cd1-xMgxTe barriers (x ~ 0.25-0.3) were grown by molecular beam epitaxy to study carrier generation and recombination in bulk materials with passivated interfaces. Using a combination of confocal photoluminescence (PL), time-resolved PL, and low-temperature PL emission spectroscopy, two extended defect types were identified and the impact of these defects on charge-carrier recombination was analyzed. The dominant defects identified by confocal PL were dislocations in samples grown on (211)B CdTe substrates and crystallographic twinning-related defects in samples on (100)-oriented InSb substrates. Low-temperature PL shows that twin-related defects have a zero-phonon energy of 1.460 eV and a Huang-Rhys factor of 1.50, while dislocation-dominated samples have a 1.473-eV zero-phonon energy and a Huang-Rhys factor of 1.22. The charge carrier diffusion length near both types of defects is ~6 um, suggesting that recombination is limited by diffusion dynamics. For heterostructures with a low concentration of extended defects, the bulk lifetime was determined to be 2.2 us with an interface recombination velocity of 160 cm/s and an estimated radiative lifetime of 91 us.

  1. Molecular beam epitaxy growth of germanium junctions for multi-junction solar cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, T.; Faucher, J.; Lee, M. L.

    2016-11-01

    We report on the molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) growth and device characteristics of Ge solar cells. Integrating a Ge bottom cell beneath a lattice-matched triple junction stack grown by MBE could enable ultra-high efficiencies without metamorphic growth or wafer bonding. However, a diffused junction cannot be readily formed in Ge by MBE due to the low sticking coefficient of group-V molecules on Ge surfaces. We therefore realized Ge junctions by growth of homo-epitaxial n-Ge on p-Ge wafers within a standard III-V MBE system. We then fabricated Ge solar cells, finding growth temperature and post-growth annealing to be key factors for achieving high efficiency. Open-circuit voltage and fill factor values of ~0.175 V and ~0.59 without a window layer were obtained, both of which are comparable to diffused Ge junctions formed by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy. We also demonstrate growth of high-quality, single-domain GaAs on the Ge junction, as needed for subsequent growth of III-V subcells, and that the surface passivation afforded by the GaAs layer slightly improves the Ge cell performance.

  2. Growth of uniform CaGe2 films by alternating layer molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jinsong; Katoch, Jyoti; Ahmed, Adam S.; Pinchuk, Igor V.; Young, Justin R.; Johnston-Halperin, Ezekiel; Pelz, Jonathan; Kawakami, Roland K.

    2017-02-01

    Layered Zintl phase van der Waals (vdW) materials are of interest due to their strong spin-orbit coupling and potential for high mobility. Here, we report the successful growth of large area CaGe2 films, as a model of layered Zintl phase materials, on atomically flat Ge(111) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) using an alternating layer growth (ALG) protocol. Reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) patterns of the Ge buffer layer and CaGe2 indicate high quality two dimensional surfaces, which is further confirmed by atomic force microscopy (AFM), showing atomically flat and uniform CaGe2 films. The appearance of Laue oscillations in X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Kiessig fringes in the X-ray reflectivity (XRR), which are absent in co-deposited CaGe2, confirms the uniformity of the CaGe2 film and the smoothness of the interface. These results demonstrate a novel method of deposition of CaGe2 that could be also applied to other layered Zintl phase vdW materials. Also, the high quality of the CaGe2 film is promising for the exploration of novel properties of germanane.

  3. Temperature stabilized effusion cell evaporation source for thin film deposition and molecular-beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiedje, H. F.; Brodie, D. E.

    2000-05-01

    A simple effusion cell evaporation source for thin film deposition and molecular-beam epitaxy is described. The source consists of a crucible with a thermocouple temperature sensor heated by a resistive crucible heater. Radiation heat transfer from the crucible to the thermocouple produces a consistent and reproducible thermocouple temperature for a given crucible temperature, without direct contact between the thermocouple and the crucible. The thermocouple temperature is somewhat less than the actual crucible temperature because of heat flow from the thermocouple junction along the thermocouple lead wires. In a typical case, the thermocouple temperature is 1007 °C while the crucible is at 1083 °C. The crucible temperature stability is estimated from the measured sensitivity of the evaporation rate of indium to temperature, and the observed variations in the evaporation rate for a fixed thermocouple temperature. The crucible temperature peak-to-peak variation over a one hour period is 1.2 °C. Machined molybdenum crucibles were used in the indium and copper sources for depositing CuInSe2 thin films for solar cells.

  4. Magneto-Transport Studies of Molecular Beam Epitaxial Grown Osmium Silicides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottier, Ryan; Zhao, Wei; Amir, Fatima; Hossain, Khalid; Anibou, Noureddine; Donner, Wolfgang; Golding, Terry

    2006-03-01

    Semiconducting transition metal silicides present a possible solution to on-chip integration of optical and electronic Si-based circuitry. Two phases of osmium silicide (OsSi2 and Os2Si3) are predicted to have promising optical characteristics but require additional development to fully determine their feasibility for high-quality devices. This study has been motivated by reports that OsSi2 has a bandgap between 1.4--1.8eV [1, 2] and Os2Si3 may have a direct bandgap of 0.95 eV [3] or 2.3 eV [1]. In this paper we will present temperature dependent (20 < T < 300 K) magneto Hall measurements of molecular beam epitaxial grown osmium silicide thin films. Os and Si were coevaporated onto Si(100) substrates at varying growth rates and temperatures. XRD was performed in order to identify the silicide phases present. We will discuss our results in relation to the known phase diagrams and our growth parameters. [1] L. Schellenberg et al., J. Less-Common Met. 144, 341 (1988). [2] K. Mason and G. Müller-Vogt, J. Appl. Phys. 63, 34 (1983). [3] A. B. Filonov et al., Phys. Rev. B 60(24), 16494 (1999).

  5. Strain-Engineered Graphene Grown on Hexagonal Boron Nitride by Molecular Beam Epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Summerfield, Alex; Davies, Andrew; Cheng, Tin S; Korolkov, Vladimir V; Cho, YongJin; Mellor, Christopher J; Foxon, C Thomas; Khlobystov, Andrei N; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Eaves, Laurence; Novikov, Sergei V; Beton, Peter H

    2016-03-01

    Graphene grown by high temperature molecular beam epitaxy on hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) forms continuous domains with dimensions of order 20 μm, and exhibits moiré patterns with large periodicities, up to ~30 nm, indicating that the layers are highly strained. Topological defects in the moiré patterns are observed and attributed to the relaxation of graphene islands which nucleate at different sites and subsequently coalesce. In addition, cracks are formed leading to strain relaxation, highly anisotropic strain fields, and abrupt boundaries between regions with different moiré periods. These cracks can also be formed by modification of the layers with a local probe resulting in the contraction and physical displacement of graphene layers. The Raman spectra of regions with a large moiré period reveal split and shifted G and 2D peaks confirming the presence of strain. Our work demonstrates a new approach to the growth of epitaxial graphene and a means of generating and modifying strain in graphene.

  6. Graphitic platform for self-catalysed InAs nanowires growth by molecular beam epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Qian D; Anyebe, Ezekiel A; Sanchez, Ana M; Rajpalke, Mohana K; Veal, Tim D; Zhukov, Alexander; Robinson, Benjamin J; Anderson, Frazer; Kolosov, Oleg; Fal'ko, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    We report the self-catalysed growth of InAs nanowires (NWs) on graphite thin films using molecular beam epitaxy via a droplet-assisted technique. Through optimising metal droplets, we obtained vertically aligned InAs NWs with highly uniform diameter along their entire length. In comparison with conventional InAs NWs grown on Si (111), the graphite surface led to significant effects on the NWs geometry grown on it, i.e. larger diameter, shorter length with lower number density, which were ascribed to the absence of dangling bonds on the graphite surface. The axial growth rate of the NWs has a strong dependence on growth time, which increases quickly in the beginning then slows down after the NWs reach a length of approximately 0.8 μm. This is attributed to the combined axial growth contributions from the surface impingement and sidewall impingement together with the desorption of adatoms during the diffusion. The growth of InAs NWs on graphite was proposed following a vapour-solid mechanism. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy reveals that the NW has a mixture of pure zinc-blende and wurtzite insertions.

  7. Growth of GaN nanowall network on Si (111) substrate by molecular beam epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Aihua; Hane, Kazuhiro

    2012-12-27

    GaN nanowall network was epitaxially grown on Si (111) substrate by molecular beam epitaxy. GaN nanowalls overlap and interlace with one another, together with large numbers of holes, forming a continuous porous GaN nanowall network. The width of the GaN nanowall can be controlled, ranging from 30 to 200 nm by adjusting the N/Ga ratio. Characterization results of a transmission electron microscope and X-ray diffraction show that the GaN nanowall is well oriented along the C axis. Strong band edge emission centered at 363 nm is observed in the spectrum of room temperature photoluminescence, indicating that the GaN nanowall network is of high quality. The sheet resistance of the Si-doped GaN nanowall network along the lateral direction was 58 Ω/. The conductive porous nanowall network can be useful for integrated gas sensors due to the large surface area-to-volume ratio and electrical conductivity along the lateral direction by combining with Si micromachining.

  8. Dynamic layer rearrangement during growth of layered oxide films by molecular beam epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Lee, J H; Luo, G; Tung, I C; Chang, S H; Luo, Z; Malshe, M; Gadre, M; Bhattacharya, A; Nakhmanson, S M; Eastman, J A; Hong, H; Jellinek, J; Morgan, D; Fong, D D; Freeland, J W

    2014-09-01

    The A(n+1)B(n)O(3n+1) Ruddlesden-Popper homologous series offers a wide variety of functionalities including dielectric, ferroelectric, magnetic and catalytic properties. Unfortunately, the synthesis of such layered oxides has been a major challenge owing to the occurrence of growth defects that result in poor materials behaviour in the higher-order members. To understand the fundamental physics of layered oxide growth, we have developed an oxide molecular beam epitaxy system with in situ synchrotron X-ray scattering capability. We present results demonstrating that layered oxide films can dynamically rearrange during growth, leading to structures that are highly unexpected on the basis of the intended layer sequencing. Theoretical calculations indicate that rearrangement can occur in many layered oxide systems and suggest a general approach that may be essential for the construction of metastable Ruddlesden-Popper phases. We demonstrate the utility of the new-found growth strategy by performing the first atomically controlled synthesis of single-crystalline La3Ni2O7.

  9. Formation of Ga droplets on patterned GaAs (100) by molecular beam epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming-Yu; Hirono, Yusuke; Koukourinkova, Sabina D; Sui, Mao; Song, Sangmin; Kim, Eun-Soo; Lee, Jihoon; Salamo, Gregory J

    2012-10-03

    In this paper, the formation of Ga droplets on photo-lithographically patterned GaAs (100) and the control of the size and density of Ga droplets by droplet epitaxy using molecular beam epitaxy are demonstrated. In extension of our previous result from the journal Physical Status Solidi A, volume 209 in 2012, the sharp contrast of the size and density of Ga droplets is clearly observed by high-resolution scanning electron microscope, atomic force microscope, and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry. Also, additional monolayer (ML) coverage is added to strength the result. The density of droplets is an order of magnitude higher on the trench area (etched area), while the size of droplets is much larger on the strip top area (un-etched area). A systematic variation of ML coverage results in an establishment of the control of size and density of Ga droplets. The cross-sectional line profile analysis and root mean square roughness analysis show that the trench area (etched area) is approximately six times rougher. The atomic surface roughness is suggested to be the main cause of the sharp contrast of the size and density of Ga droplets and is discussed in terms of surface diffusion.

  10. NO-assisted molecular-beam epitaxial growth of nitrogen substituted EuO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wicks, R.; Altendorf, S. G.; Caspers, C.; Kierspel, H.; Sutarto, R.; Tjeng, L. H.; Damascelli, A.

    2012-04-01

    We have investigated a method for substituting oxygen with nitrogen in EuO thin films, which is based on molecular beam epitaxy distillation with NO gas as the oxidizer. By varying the NO gas pressure, we produce crystalline, epitaxial EuO1 -xNx films with good control over the films' nitrogen concentration. In situ x-ray photoemission spectroscopy reveals that nitrogen substitution is connected to the formation Eu3+4f6 and a corresponding decrease in the number of Eu2+4f7, indicating that nitrogen is being incorporated in its 3- oxidation state. While small amounts of Eu3+ in over-oxidized Eu1-δO thin films lead to a drastic suppression of the ferromagnetism, the formation of Eu3+ in EuO1-xNx still allows the ferromagnetic phase to exist with an unaffected Tc, thus providing an ideal model system to study the interplay between the magnetic f7 (J = 7/2) and the non-magnetic f6 (J = 0) states close to the Fermi level.

  11. Plasma Response to Supersonic Molecular Beam Injection in J-TEXT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Jinshui; Yang, Zhoujun; Zhuang, Ge; Hu, Qiming; Feng, Xiande; Liu, Minghai

    2014-01-01

    Recently, hydrogen fueling experiments with supersonic molecular beam injection (SMBI) system have been performed in the J-TEXT tokamak. To evaluate the effects of the injection amount of SMBI on plasma behaviors, moderate and intensive SMBs have been separately injected and compared with each other in Ohmic discharges. With moderate SMBs, electron density increases about twice as before, the size of magnetic island slightly decreases, and the edge toroidal rotation speed in a counter-current direction, measured by a high resolution spectrometer (Carbon V ion, 227.09 nm, r/a = 0.7-0.8), is accelerated from 8 km/s to 12 km/s. The state of higher electron density with moderate SMBI can be maintained for a long period, which indicates that plasma confinement is improved. However, with intensive SMBs, the accompanied magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activities are triggered, and the electron density increases moderately. The edge toroidal velocity is decreased, in certain cases even reversed in the co-current direction. The statistical result of experimental data for moderate and intensive SMBs suggests a preferred fueling amount (less than 3.2×1019) to improve the SMBI fueling efficiency in experiments.

  12. Comparisons between tokamak fueling of gas puffing and supersonic molecular beam injection in 2D simulations

    DOE PAGES

    Zhou, Y. L.; Wang, Z. H.; Xu, X. Q.; ...

    2015-01-09

    Plasma fueling with high efficiency and deep injection is very important to enable fusion power performance requirements. It is a powerful and efficient way to study neutral transport dynamics and find methods of improving the fueling performance by doing large scale simulations. Furthermore, two basic fueling methods, gas puffing (GP) and supersonic molecular beam injection (SMBI), are simulated and compared in realistic divertor geometry of the HL-2A tokamak with a newly developed module, named trans-neut, within the framework of BOUT++ boundary plasma turbulence code [Z. H. Wang et al., Nucl. Fusion 54, 043019 (2014)]. The physical model includes plasma density,more » heat and momentum transport equations along with neutral density, and momentum transport equations. In transport dynamics and profile evolutions of both plasma and neutrals are simulated and compared between GP and SMBI in both poloidal and radial directions, which are quite different from one and the other. It finds that the neutrals can penetrate about four centimeters inside the last closed (magnetic) flux surface during SMBI, while they are all deposited outside of the LCF during GP. Moreover, it is the radial convection and larger inflowing flux which lead to the deeper penetration depth of SMBI and higher fueling efficiency compared to GP.« less

  13. Molecular beam epitaxy control of the structural, optical, and electronic properties of ScN(001)

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Arthur R.; AL-Brithen, Hamad A. H.; Ingram, David C.; Gall, Daniel

    2001-08-15

    Scandium nitride (001) oriented layers have been grown on magnesium oxide (001) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy using a rf-plasma source and a scandium effusion cell. The Sc/N flux ratio is found to be critical in determining the structural, optical, and electronic properties of the grown epitaxial layers. A distinct transition occurs at the point where the Sc/N flux ratio equals 1, which defines the line between N-rich and Sc-rich growth. Under N-rich conditions, the growth is epitaxial, and the surface morphology is characterized by a densely packed array of square-shaped plateaus and four-faced pyramids with the terraces between steps being atomically smooth. The films are stoichiometric and transparent with a direct optical transition at 2.15 eV. Under Sc-rich conditions, the growth is also epitaxial, but the morphology is dominated by spiral growth mounds. The morphology change is consistent with increased surface diffusion due to a Sc-rich surface. Excess Sc leads to understoichiometric layers with N vacancies which act as donors. The increased carrier density results in an optical reflection edge at 1 eV, absorption below the 2.15 eV band gap, and a drop in electrical resistivity. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  14. Impact of extended defects on recombination in CdTe heterostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaunbrecher, Katherine N.; Kuciauskas, Darius; Swartz, Craig H.; Dippo, Pat; Edirisooriya, Madhavie; Ogedengbe, Olanrewaju S.; Sohal, Sandeep; Hancock, Bobby L.; LeBlanc, Elizabeth G.; Jayathilaka, Pathiraja A. R. D.; Barnes, Teresa M.; Myers, Thomas H.

    2016-08-01

    Heterostructures with CdTe and CdTe1-xSex (x ˜ 0.01) absorbers between two wider-band-gap Cd1-xMgxTe barriers (x ˜ 0.25-0.3) were grown by molecular beam epitaxy to study carrier generation and recombination in bulk materials with passivated interfaces. Using a combination of confocal photoluminescence (PL), time-resolved PL, and low-temperature PL emission spectroscopy, two extended defect types were identified and the impact of these defects on charge-carrier recombination was analyzed. The dominant defects identified by confocal PL were dislocations in samples grown on (211)B CdTe substrates and crystallographic twinning-related defects in samples on (100)-oriented InSb substrates. Low-temperature PL shows that twin-related defects have a zero-phonon energy of 1.460 eV and a Huang-Rhys factor of 1.50, while dislocation-dominated samples have a 1.473-eV zero-phonon energy and a Huang-Rhys factor of 1.22. The charge carrier diffusion length near both types of defects is ˜6 μm, suggesting that recombination is limited by diffusion dynamics. For heterostructures with a low concentration of extended defects, the bulk lifetime was determined to be 2.2 μs with an interface recombination velocity of 160 cm/s and an estimated radiative lifetime of 91 μs.

  15. Growth of (110) GaAs/GaAs by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parechanian, L. T.; Weber, E. R.; Hierl, T. L.

    1985-04-01

    The simultaneous molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) growth of (100) and (110) GaAs/GaAs intentionally doped with Si(-1E16/cu cm) was studied as a function of substrate temperature, arsenic overpressure, and epitaxial growth rate. The films were analyzed by scanning electron and optical microscopy, liquid helium photoluminescence (PL), and electronic characterization. For the (110) epitaxial layers, an increase in morphological defect density and degradation of PL signal was observed with a lowering of the substrate temperature from 570 C. Capacitance-voltage (CV) and Hall effect measurements yield room temperature donor concentrations for the (100) films of n-7E15/ cu cm while the (110) layers exhibit electron concentrations of n-2E17/cu cm. Hall measuremtns at 77k on the (100) films show the expected mobility enhancement of Si donors, whereas the (110) epi layers become insulating or greatly compensated. This behavior suggests that room temperature conduction in the (110) films is due to a deeper donor partially compensated by an acceptor level whose concentration is of the smae order of magnitude as that of any electrically active Si. Temperature dependent Hall effect indicates that the activation energy of the deeper donor level lies -145 meV from the conduction band.

  16. The competing oxide and sub-oxide formation in metal-oxide molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, Patrick; Bierwagen, Oliver

    2015-02-23

    The hetero-epitaxial growth of the n-type semiconducting oxides β-Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3}, In{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and SnO{sub 2} on c- and r-plane sapphire was performed by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The growth-rate and desorbing flux from the substrate were measured in-situ under various oxygen to metal ratios by laser reflectometry and quadrupole mass spectrometry, respectively. These measurements clarified the role of volatile sub-oxide formation (Ga{sub 2}O, In{sub 2}O, and SnO) during growth, the sub-oxide stoichiometry, and the efficiency of oxide formation for the three oxides. As a result, the formation of the sub-oxides decreased the growth-rate under metal-rich growth conditions and resulted in etching of the oxide film by supplying only metal flux. The flux ratio for the exclusive formation of the sub-oxide (e.g., the p-type semiconductor SnO) was determined, and the efficiency of oxide formation was found to be the highest for SnO{sub 2}, somewhat lower for In{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and the lowest for Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Our findings can be generalized to further oxides that possess related sub-oxides.

  17. Single orientation graphene synthesized on iridium thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dangwal Pandey, A.; Krausert, K.; Franz, D.; Grânäs, E.; Shayduk, R.; Müller, P.; Keller, T. F.; Noei, H.; Vonk, V.; Stierle, A.

    2016-08-01

    Heteroepitaxial iridium thin films were deposited on (0001) sapphire substrates by means of molecular beam epitaxy, and subsequently, one monolayer of graphene was synthesized by chemical vapor deposition. The influence of the growth parameters on the quality of the Ir films, as well as of graphene, was investigated systematically by means of low energy electron diffraction, x-ray reflectivity, x-ray diffraction, Auger electron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. Our study reveals (111) oriented iridium films with high crystalline quality and extremely low surface roughness, on which the formation of large-area epitaxial graphene is achieved. The presence of defects, like dislocations, twins, and 30° rotated domains in the iridium films is also discussed. The coverage of graphene was found to be influenced by the presence of 30° rotated domains in the Ir films. Low iridium deposition rates suppress these rotated domains and an almost complete coverage of graphene was obtained. This synthesis route yields inexpensive, air-stable, and large-area graphene with a well-defined orientation, making it accessible to a wider community of researchers for numerous experiments or applications, including those which use destructive analysis techniques or irreversible processes. Moreover, this approach can be used to tune the structural quality of graphene, allowing a systematic study of the influence of defects in various processes like intercalation below graphene.

  18. High response solar-blind MgZnO photodetectors grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenfeld, Winston V.; Wei, Ming; Boutwell, R. Casey; Liu, Huiyong

    2014-03-01

    High quality w-MgxZn1-xO thin films were grown epitaxially on c-plane sapphire substrates by plasma-assisted Molecular Beam Epitaxy. ZnO thin films with high crystalline quality, low defect and dislocation densities, and subnanometer surface roughness were achieved by applying a low temperature nucleation layer. By tuning Mg/Zn flux ratio, wurtzite MgxZn1-xO thin films with Mg composition as high as x=0.46 were obtained without phase segregation. Metal- Semiconductor-Metal (MSM) photoconductive and Schottky barrier devices with interdigitated electrode geometry and active surface area of 1 mm2 were fabricated and characterized. Resultant devices showed ~100 A/W peak responsivity at wavelength of ~260nm. We also report on cubic rock salt c-MgxZn1-xO thin films, following a non-traditional approach on MgO substrates, to demonstrate solar-blind photoresponse in MSM photodetectors, realizing a peak responsivity of 460 A/W (@ 250 nm) and 12.6 mA/W (@ 240nm) for mixed phase and single crystal films, respectively. A specific focus of the work is on identifying the impact of various growth parameters on the performance of the c- MgZnO detectors.

  19. Multiferroic fluoride BaCoF4 Thin Films Grown Via Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, Pavel; Johnson, Trent; García-Castro, Camilo; Kc, Amit; Schrecongost, Dustin; Cen, Cheng; Romero, Aldo; Lederman, David

    Multiferroic materials exhibit exciting physics related to the simultaneous presence of multiple long-range orders, in many cases consisting of antiferromagnetic (AF) and ferroelectric (FE) orderings. In order to provide a new, promising route for fluoride-based multiferroic material engineering, we grew multiferroic fluoride BaCoF4 in thin film form on Al2O3 (0001) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. The films grow with the orthorhombic b-axis out-of-plane and with three in-plane structural twin domains along the polar c-axis directions. The FE ordering in thin films was verified by FE remanent hysteresis loops measurements at T = 14 K and by room temperature piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM). An AF behavior was found below Neel temperature TN ~ 80 K, which is in agreement with the bulk properties. At lower temperatures two additional magnetic phase transitions at 19 K and 41 K were found. First-principles calculations demonstrated that the growth strain applied to the bulk BaCoF4 indeed favors two canted spin orders, along the b- and a-axes, respectively, in addition to the main AF spin order along the c-axis. Supported by FAME (Contract 2013-MA-2382), WV Research Challenge Grant (HEPC.dsr.12.29), and DMREF-NSF 1434897.

  20. Thin film growth of CaFe2As2 by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatano, T.; Kawaguchi, T.; Fujimoto, R.; Nakamura, I.; Mori, Y.; Harada, S.; Ujihara, T.; Ikuta, H.

    2016-01-01

    Film growth of CaFe2As2 was realized by molecular beam epitaxy on six different substrates that have a wide variation in the lattice mismatch to the target compound. By carefully adjusting the Ca-to-Fe flux ratio, we obtained single-phase thin films for most of the substrates. Interestingly, an expansion of the CaFe2As2 lattice to the out-of-plane direction was observed for all films, even when an opposite strain was expected. A detailed microstructure observation of the thin film grown on MgO by transmission electron microscope revealed that it consists of cube-on-cube and 45°-rotated domains. The latter domains were compressively strained in plane, which caused a stretching along the c-axis direction. Because the domains were well connected across the boundary with no appreciable discontinuity, we think that the out-of-plane expansion in the 45°-rotated domains exerted a tensile stress on the other domains, resulting in the unexpectedly large c-axis lattice parameter, despite the apparently opposite lattice mismatch.

  1. Molecular Beam Epitaxy Growth of High Crystalline Quality LiNbO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tellekamp, M. Brooks; Shank, Joshua C.; Goorsky, Mark S.; Doolittle, W. Alan

    2016-12-01

    Lithium niobate is a multi-functional material with wide reaching applications in acoustics, optics, and electronics. Commercial applications for lithium niobate require high crystalline quality currently limited to bulk and ion sliced material. Thin film lithium niobate is an attractive option for a variety of integrated devices, but the research effort has been stagnant due to poor material quality. Both lattice matched and mismatched lithium niobate are grown by molecular beam epitaxy and studied to understand the role of substrate and temperature on nucleation conditions and material quality. Growth on sapphire produces partially coalesced columnar grains with atomically flat plateaus and no twin planes. A symmetric rocking curve shows a narrow linewidth with a full width at half-maximum (FWHM) of 8.6 arcsec (0.0024°), which is comparable to the 5.8 arcsec rocking curve FWHM of the substrate, while the film asymmetric rocking curve is 510 arcsec FWHM. These values indicate that the individual grains are relatively free of long-range disorder detectable by x-ray diffraction with minimal measurable tilt and twist and represents the highest structural quality epitaxial material grown on lattice mismatched sapphire without twin planes. Lithium niobate is also grown on lithium tantalate producing high quality coalesced material without twin planes and with a symmetric rocking curve of 193 arcsec, which is nearly equal to the substrate rocking curve of 194 arcsec. The surface morphology of lithium niobate on lithium tantalate is shown to be atomically flat by atomic force microscopy.

  2. Molecular beam epitaxy growth and magnetic properties of Cr-Co-Ga Heusler alloy films

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Wuwei Wang, Weihua; Zhao, Chenglong; Van Quang, Nguyen; Cho, Sunglae; Dung, Dang Duc

    2015-11-15

    We have re-investigated growth and magnetic properties of Cr{sub 2}CoGa films using molecular beam epitaxy technique. Phase separation and precipitate formation were observed experimentally again in agreement with observation of multiple phases separation in sputtered Cr{sub 2}CoGa films by M. Meinert et al. However, significant phase separation could be suppressed by proper control of growth conditions. We showed that Cr{sub 2}CoGa Heusler phase, rather than Co{sub 2}CrGa phase, constitutes the majority of the sample grown on GaAs(001) at 450 {sup o}C. The measured small spin moment of Cr{sub 2}CoGa is in agreement with predicted HM-FCF nature; however, its Curie temperature is not as high as expected from the theoretical prediction probably due to the off-stoichiometry of Cr{sub 2}CoGa and the existence of the disorders and phase separation.

  3. Molecular beam epitaxial growth of graphene and ridge-structure networks of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Fumihiko; Hibino, Hiroki

    2011-11-01

    By gas-source molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) using cracked ethanol, we grew graphene at substrate temperatures between 600 and 915 °C on graphene formed on SiC(0 0 0 1) by thermal decomposition. To investigate the substrate temperature dependence of graphene growth we analysed the MBE-grown graphene by Raman spectroscopy and in situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and observed it by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Analyses using the G-band peak and the peak intensity ratio between D- and G-band peaks in the Raman spectra revealed that growth at higher temperatures improved the crystallinity and increased the domain size. Although the growth rate decreased at higher temperatures, as revealed by XPS, these results indicated that growth at a higher temperature is effective in obtaining graphene of higher quality. Furthermore, the AFM and TEM observations revealed a network of fin-like ridge structures of graphene sticking out from the surface. The presence of these 'graphene nanofins' indicated that two-dimensional islands of graphene are surrounded by the nanofins, and the island size was estimated to be 67 nm using the average distance between the nanofins.

  4. Controllable growth of layered selenide and telluride heterostructures and superlattices using molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Vishwanath, Suresh; Liu, Xinyu; Rouvimov, Sergei; Basile, Leonardo; Lu, Ning; Azcatl, Angelica; Magno, Katrina; Wallace, Robert M.; Kim, Moon; Idrobo, Juan -Carlos; Furdyna, Jacek K.; Jena, Debdeep; Xing, Huili Grace

    2016-01-06

    Layered materials are an actively pursued area of research for realizing highly scaled technologies involving both traditional device structures as well as new physics. Lately, non-equilibrium growth of 2D materials using molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) is gathering traction in the scientific community and here we aim to highlight one of its strengths, growth of abrupt heterostructures, and superlattices (SLs). In this work we present several of the firsts: first growth of MoTe2 by MBE, MoSe2 on Bi2Se3 SLs, transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) SLs, and lateral junction between a quintuple atomic layer of Bi2Te3 and a triple atomic layer of MoTe2. In conclusion, reflected high electron energy diffraction oscillations presented during the growth of TMD SLs strengthen our claim that ultrathin heterostructures with monolayer layer control is within reach.

  5. Usage of antimony segregation for selective doping of Si in molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Yurasov, D. V.; Drozdov, M. N.; Murel, A. V.; Shaleev, M. V.; Novikov, A. V.; Zakharov, N. D.

    2011-06-01

    An original approach to selective doping of Si by antimony (Sb) in molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) is proposed and verified experimentally. This approach is based on controllable utilization of the effect of Sb segregation. In particular, the sharp dependence of Sb segregation on growth temperature in the range of 300-550 deg. C is exploited. The growth temperature variations between the kinetically limited and maximum segregation regimes are suggested to be utilized in order to obtain selectively doped structures with abrupt doping profiles. It is demonstrated that the proposed technique allows formation of selectively doped Si:Sb layers, including delta ({delta}-)doped layers in which Sb concentrations can be varied from 5 x 10{sup 15} to 10{sup 20} cm{sup -3}. The obtained doped structures are shown to have a high crystalline quality and the short-term growth interruptions, which are needed to change the substrate temperature, do not lead to any significant accumulation of background impurities in grown samples. Realization of the proposed approach requires neither too low (<300 deg. C), nor too high (>600 deg. C) growth temperatures or any special equipment for the MBE machines.

  6. Lattice-registered growth of GaSb on Si (211) with molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Hosseini Vajargah, S.; Botton, G. A.; Ghanad-Tavakoli, S.; Preston, J. S.; Kleiman, R. N.

    2012-11-01

    A GaSb film was grown on a Si(211) substrate using molecular beam epitaxy indicating full lattice relaxation as well as full lattice registration and dislocation-free growth in the plane perpendicular to the [01 - 1]-direction. Heteroepitaxy of GaSb on a Si(211) substrate is dominated by numerous first order and multiple higher order micro-twins. The atomic-resolved structural study of GaSb films by high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy reveals that slight tilt, along with twinning, favors the lattice registry to Si(211) substrates. Preferential bonding of impinging Ga and Sb atoms at the interface due to two distinctive bonding sites on the Si(211) surface enables growth that is sublattice-ordered and free of anti-phase boundaries. The role of the substrate orientation on the strain distribution of GaSb epilayers is further elucidated by investigating the local change in the lattice parameter using the geometric phase analysis method and hence effectiveness of the lattice tilting in reducing the interfacial strain was confirmed further.

  7. A CROSSED MOLECULAR BEAMS STUDY ON THE FORMATION OF THE EXOTIC CYANOETHYNYL RADICAL IN TITAN'S ATMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, X.; Kaiser, R. I.; Mebel, A. M.; Kislov, V. V.; Klippenstein, S. J.; Harding, L. B.; Liang, M. C.; Yung, Y. L.

    2009-08-20

    The reaction of the dicarbon molecule (C{sub 2}) in its {sup 1}{sigma}{sub g} {sup +} electronic ground state with hydrogen cyanide HCN(X{sup 1}{sigma}{sup +}) is investigated in a crossed molecular beam setup to untangle the formation of the cyanoethynyl radical CCCN(X{sup 2}{sigma}{sup +}) in hydrocarbon-rich atmospheres of planets and their moons such as Titan. Combined with electronic structure and rate theory calculations, we show that this elementary reaction is rapid, has no entrance barriers, and yields CCCN via successive rearrangements of the initial HC{sub 3}N collision complex to the cyanoacetylene intermediate (HCCCN) followed by unimolecular decomposition of the latter without exit barrier. New photochemical models imply that this radical could serve as a key building block to form more complex molecules as observed in situ by the Cassini spacecraft, ultimately leading to organic aerosol particles, which make up the orange-brownish haze layers in Titan's atmosphere.

  8. A crossed molecular beams study on the formation of the exotic cyanoethynyl radical in Titan's atmosphere.

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, X.; Kaiser, R. I.; Mebel, A. M.; Kislov, V. V.; Klippenstein, S. J.; Harding, L. B.; Liang, M. C.; Yung, Y. L.

    2009-08-01

    The reaction of the dicarbon molecule (C{sub 2}) in its {sup 1}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup +} electronic ground state with hydrogen cyanide HCN(X{sup 1}{Sigma}{sup +}) is investigated in a crossed molecular beam setup to untangle the formation of the cyanoethynyl radical CCCN(X{sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +}) in hydrocarbon-rich atmospheres of planets and their moons such as Titan. Combined with electronic structure and rate theory calculations, we show that this elementary reaction is rapid, has no entrance barriers, and yields CCCN via successive rearrangements of the initial HC{sub 3}N collision complex to the cyanoacetylene intermediate (HCCCN) followed by unimolecular decomposition of the latter without exit barrier. New photochemical models imply that this radical could serve as a key building block to form more complex molecules as observed in situ by the Cassini spacecraft, ultimately leading to organic aerosol particles, which make up the orange-brownish haze layers in Titan's atmosphere.

  9. Hybrid molecular beam epitaxy for the growth of stoichiometric BaSnO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Prakash, Abhinav Dewey, John; Yun, Hwanhui; Jeong, Jong Seok; Mkhoyan, K. Andre; Jalan, Bharat

    2015-11-15

    Owing to its high room-temperature electron mobility and wide bandgap, BaSnO{sub 3} has recently become of significant interest for potential room-temperature oxide electronics. A hybrid molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) approach for the growth of high-quality BaSnO{sub 3} films is developed in this work. This approach employs hexamethylditin as a chemical precursor for tin, an effusion cell for barium, and a radio frequency plasma source for oxygen. BaSnO{sub 3} films were thus grown on SrTiO{sub 3} (001) and LaAlO{sub 3} (001) substrates. Growth conditions for stoichiometric BaSnO{sub 3} were identified. Reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) intensity oscillations, characteristic of a layer-by-layer growth mode were observed. A critical thickness of ∼1 nm for strain relaxation was determined for films grown on SrTiO{sub 3} using in situ RHEED. Scanning transmission electron microscopy combined with electron energy-loss spectroscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy confirmed the cube-on-cube epitaxy and composition. The importance of precursor chemistry is discussed in the context of the MBE growth of BaSnO{sub 3}.

  10. Cyclotron resonance in epitaxial Bi1-xSbx films grown by molecular-beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heremans, J.; Partin, D. L.; Thrush, C. M.; Karczewski, G.; Richardson, M. S.; Furdyna, J. K.

    1993-10-01

    The far-infrared magnetotransmission of thin films of semiconducting and semimetallic Bi1-xSbx alloys grown by molecular-beam epitaxy has been measured at fixed photon energies between 2.5 and 21.4 meV in magnetic fields up to 6 T, at T=1.8 K. The samples, grown on BaF2 substrates with composition 0<=x<=22.5%, were monocrystalline, with the trigonal axis perpendicular to the surface plane. The measurements were carried out in Faraday and Voigt geometries, with the magnetic field oriented parallel to binary, bisectrix, and trigonal axes of the films. Cyclotron-resonance lines of both electrons and holes were observed. From them, we establish the composition dependence of the effective-mass tensor, of the direct L-point band gap, and of the energy overlap in the semimetallic samples. We conclude that all band-structure parameters are the same in the films as in bulk Bi1-xSbx alloys, except for the energy overlap, which is increased by 16 meV independently of composition, possibly because of the strain induced by the substrate.

  11. Quantum state resolved molecular beam reflectivity measurements: CH4 dissociation on Pt(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwick, Helen; Gutiérrez-González, Ana; Beck, Rainer D.

    2016-11-01

    The King and Wells molecular beam reflectivity method has been used for a quantum state resolved study of the dissociative chemisorption of CH4 on Pt(111) at several surface temperatures. Initial sticking coefficients S0 were measured for incident CH4 prepared both with a single quantum of ν3 antisymmetric stretch vibration by infrared laser pumping and without laser excitation. Vibrational excitation of the ν3 mode is observed to be less efficient than incident translational energy in promoting the dissociation reaction with a vibrational efficacy ην3 = 0.65. The initial state resolved sticking coefficient S0 ν 3 was found to be independent of the surface temperature over the 50 kJ/mol to 120 kJ/mol translational energy range studied here. However, the surface temperature dependence of the King and Wells data reveals the migration of adsorbed carbon formed by CH4 dissociation on the Pt(111) surface leading to the growth of carbon particles.

  12. Hopping conduction and its photoquenching in molecular beam epitaxial GaAs grown at low temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Z.Q.; Look, D.C.

    1993-12-01

    As the growth temperature of molecular beam epitaxial GaAs is increased from 250 to 400{degrees}C, the dominant conduction changes from hopping conduction to band conduction with a donor activation energy of 0.65 eV. A 300{degrees}C grown layer is especially interesting because each conduction mechanism is dominant in a particular temperature range, hopping below 300K and band conduction above. Below 140K, the hopping conduction is greatly diminished (quenched) by irradiation with either infrared (hv {le} 1.12 eV) or 1.46 eV light, but then recovers above 140K with exactly the same thermal kinetics as are found for the famous EL2. Thus, the 0.65 eV donor, which is responsible for both the hopping and band conduction, is very similar to EL2, but not identical because of the different activation energy (0.65 eV vs 0.75 eV for EL2). 12 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Growth mechanisms of GaAs nanowires by gas source molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plante, M. C.; LaPierre, R. R.

    2006-01-01

    GaAs nanowires were grown on GaAs (1 1 1)B substrates in a gas source molecular beam epitaxy system, using self-assembled Au particles with diameters between 20 and 800 nm as catalytic agents. The growth kinetics of the wires was investigated for substrate temperatures between 500 and 600 °C, and V/III flux ratios of 1.5 and 2.3. The broad distribution of Au particles enabled the first observation of two distinct growth regimes related to the size of the catalyst. The origins of this transition are discussed in terms of the various mass transport mechanisms that drive the wire growth. Diffusion of the growth species on the 2-D surface and up the wire sidewalls dominates for catalyst diameters smaller than ˜130 nm on average, while direct impingement on the catalyst followed by bulk diffusion through the Au particle appears to sustain the wire growth for larger catalyst diameters. A change in wire sidewall facets, indicating a probable transition in the crystal structure, is found to be primarily dependent on the V/III flux ratio.

  14. Green luminescence of InGaN nanowires grown on silicon substrates by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, Kevin D.; Protasenko, Vladimir V.; Verma, Jai; Kosel, Thomas H.; Xing, Huili G.; Jena, Debdeep

    2011-04-15

    Indium gallium nitride nanowires show promise as being prime candidates for optical devices since they can be grown with band gaps spanning the visible spectra, while at the same time can be composed of stress free material. The goal of the work presented here was to obtain InGaN nanowires producing green emission at room temperature. Two growth recipes were found to yield InGaN nanowire growth on silicon substrates using plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. At room temperature the photoluminescence (PL) of wire ensembles indeed peaked at 530 nm but, in addition, it was discovered that at low temperatures the emission often covered a broader (360-700 nm) spectrum. This broad optical range indicated indium content fluctuations in individual wires, wire-to-wire fluctuations, or a combination of the two. EDX measurements performed on single wires confirmed this hypothesis and correlated well with PL data. Low temperature PL studies of InGaN individual wires also revealed interwire and intrawire inhomogeneity of emission spectra stemming from a nonuniform indium distribution. The emission quantum yield for bright single wires was extracted to be more than 50% at 4 K. The findings suggest that the wire surfaces do not efficiently quench optical emission at low temperatures. These defect-free wires offer not only a potential path for green emitters, but also as integrated phosphors for broad spectral emission.

  15. Graphitic platform for self-catalysed InAs nanowires growth by molecular beam epitaxy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We report the self-catalysed growth of InAs nanowires (NWs) on graphite thin films using molecular beam epitaxy via a droplet-assisted technique. Through optimising metal droplets, we obtained vertically aligned InAs NWs with highly uniform diameter along their entire length. In comparison with conventional InAs NWs grown on Si (111), the graphite surface led to significant effects on the NWs geometry grown on it, i.e. larger diameter, shorter length with lower number density, which were ascribed to the absence of dangling bonds on the graphite surface. The axial growth rate of the NWs has a strong dependence on growth time, which increases quickly in the beginning then slows down after the NWs reach a length of approximately 0.8 μm. This is attributed to the combined axial growth contributions from the surface impingement and sidewall impingement together with the desorption of adatoms during the diffusion. The growth of InAs NWs on graphite was proposed following a vapour-solid mechanism. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy reveals that the NW has a mixture of pure zinc-blende and wurtzite insertions. PMID:25024683

  16. Au-assisted molecular beam epitaxy of InAs nanowires: Growth and theoretical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchernycheva, Maria; Travers, Laurent; Patriarche, Gilles; Glas, Frank; Harmand, Jean-Christophe; Cirlin, George E.; Dubrovskii, Vladimir G.

    2007-11-01

    The Au-assisted molecular beam epitaxial growth of InAs nanowires is discussed. In situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction observations of phase transitions of the catalyst particles indicate that they can be liquid below the eutectic point of the Au-In alloy. The temperature range where the catalyst can be liquid covers the range where we observed nanowire formation (380-430 °C). The variation of nanowire growth rate with temperature is investigated. Pure axial nanowire growth is observed at high temperature while mixed axial/lateral growth occurs at low temperature. The change of the InAs nanowire shape with growth duration is studied. It is shown that significant lateral growth of the lower part of the nanowire starts when its length exceeds a critical value, so that their shape presents a steplike profile along their axis. A theoretical model is proposed to explain the nanowire morphology as a result of the axial and lateral contributions of the nanowire growth.

  17. Green luminescence of InGaN nanowires grown on silicon substrates by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, Kevin D.; Protasenko, Vladimir V.; Verma, Jai; Kosel, Thomas H.; Xing, Huili G.; Jena, Debdeep

    2011-04-01

    Indium gallium nitride nanowires show promise as being prime candidates for optical devices since they can be grown with band gaps spanning the visible spectra, while at the same time can be composed of stress free material. The goal of the work presented here was to obtain InGaN nanowires producing green emission at room temperature. Two growth recipes were found to yield InGaN nanowire growth on silicon substrates using plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. At room temperature the photoluminescence (PL) of wire ensembles indeed peaked at 530 nm but, in addition, it was discovered that at low temperatures the emission often covered a broader (360-700 nm) spectrum. This broad optical range indicated indium content fluctuations in individual wires, wire-to-wire fluctuations, or a combination of the two. EDX measurements performed on single wires confirmed this hypothesis and correlated well with PL data. Low temperature PL studies of InGaN individual wires also revealed interwire and intrawire inhomogeneity of emission spectra stemming from a nonuniform indium distribution. The emission quantum yield for bright single wires was extracted to be more than 50% at 4 K. The findings suggest that the wire surfaces do not efficiently quench optical emission at low temperatures. These defect-free wires offer not only a potential path for green emitters, but also as integrated phosphors for broad spectral emission.

  18. Thermal Stability of Annealed Germanium-Tin Alloys Grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhargava, Nupur; Gupta, Jay Prakash; Faleev, Nikolai; Wielunski, Leszek; Kolodzey, James

    2017-01-01

    The thermal stability of undoped and boron-doped germanium tin (Ge1-x Sn x ) alloys grown by molecular beam epitaxy with varying composition and layer thickness was investigated. The alloys were annealed in forming gas at various temperatures up to 800°C for 1 min using rapid thermal processing, and were characterized using high-resolution x-ray diffraction and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. It was found that the Ge1-x Sn x alloys were stable to well above the growth temperature, but the stability decreased with increasing thickness, Sn content, and doping. Ge1-x Sn x alloys with low Sn composition (x ˜ 0.025) were stable up to 700°C, and for a given Sn composition, the undoped alloys were more thermally stable than the doped alloys. As the thickness of the Ge0.975Sn0.025 alloys increased to about 950 nm, the temperature of thermal stability dropped to 500°C. As the Sn composition of the 90 nm-Ge1-x Sn x alloys increased up to x = 0.08, the temperature of thermal stability dropped to 300°C. At higher annealing temperatures, the Ge1-x Sn x alloy degraded with lower crystal quality, and a gradient in the Sn composition appeared, which may be due to Sn diffusion or segregation.

  19. Growth Parameters for Thin Film InBi Grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keen, B.; Makin, R.; Stampe, P. A.; Kennedy, R. J.; Sallis, S.; Piper, L. J.; McCombe, B.; Durbin, S. M.

    2014-04-01

    The alloying of bismuth with III-V semiconductors, in particular GaAs and InAs thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), has attracted considerable interest due to the accompanying changes in band structure and lattice constant. Specifically, bismuth incorporation in these compounds results in both a reduction in band gap (through shifting of the valence band) and an increase in the lattice constant of the alloy. To fully understand the composition of these alloys, a better understanding of the binary endpoints is needed. At present, a limited amount of literature exists on the III-Bi family of materials, most of which is theoretical work based on density functional theory calculations. The only III-Bi material known to exist (in bulk crystal form) is InBi, but its electrical properties have not been sufficiently studied and, to date, the material has not been fabricated as a thin film. We have successfully deposited crystalline InBi on (100) GaAs substrates using MBE. Wetting of the substrate is poor, and regions of varying composition exist across the substrate. To obtain InBi, the growth temperature had to be below 100 °C. It was found that film crystallinity improved with reduced Bi flux, into an In-rich regime. Additionally, attempts were made to grow AlBi and GaBi.

  20. Growth of ZnSnN2 by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldberg, N.; Aldous, J. D.; Stampe, P. A.; Kennedy, R. J.; Veal, T. D.; Durbin, S. M.

    2014-04-01

    The Zn-IV-N2 family of materials represents a potential earth abundant element alternative to conventional compound semiconductor materials that are based on gallium and indium. While both ZnSiN2 and ZnGeN2 have been studied to some degree, very little is known about the narrow-gap member ZnSnN2. Here, we investigate the growth dynamics of crystalline ZnSnN2 through plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. All films exhibit some degree of crystalline order regardless of growth conditions, although significant tin coverage was observed for films grown with low Zn:Sn flux ratio; Zn flux in particular became increasingly problematic at increased substrate temperatures designed to improve crystallinity. Single-crystal material was achieved through careful optimization of growth parameters. Regardless of deposition conditions or substrate choice, however, all films exhibit a monoclinic structure as opposed to the predicted orthorhombic lattice; this can be directly attributed to sublattice disorder.

  1. Plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy growth of ZnSnN2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldberg, Nathaniel; Aldous, James; Yao, Yuan; Tanveer, Imtiaz; Keen, Benjamin; Linhart, Wojciech; Veal, Tim; Song, Young-Wook; Reeves, Roger; Durbin, Steve

    2012-02-01

    The Zn-IV-nitrides are a promising series of ``earth abundant element'' semiconductors with a predicted band gap range of 0.6 eV to 5.4 eV, which, like the (Al,Ga,In)N family, spans the entire visible solar spectrum. Considering this alternative family has a number of advantages, including the avoidance of indium, the price of which has varied almost an order of magnitude over the past decade, and surface electron accumulation which is present in the In-rich alloys. Not all members of this family have yet been synthesized, in particular ZnSnN2, the most important member for PV with its predicted band gap of approximately 2 eV. We have successfully grown a series of these films using plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy using elemental Zn and Sn sources. In this report, we discuss the relationship between process parameters and microstructure, as well as stoichiometry as determined by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. Additionally, we provide preliminary estimates for its bandgap energy based on photoluminescence and optical absorption.

  2. Growth of very large InN microcrystals by molecular beam epitaxy using epitaxial lateral overgrowth

    SciTech Connect

    Kamimura, J.; Kishino, K.; Kikuchi, A.

    2015-02-28

    Very thick InN (∼40 μm) was grown by molecular beam epitaxy using the epitaxial lateral overgrowth (ELO) technique. In some regions, the ELO of InN was observed as expected, indicating an important step toward fabricating quasi-bulk InN substrates. Interestingly, most parts of the sample consist of large flat-topped microcrystals and well-faceted microstructures. This is likely due to local growth condition variations during ELO, which is supported by an experiment where ELO of InN was performed on a substrate with various stripe mask patterns. TEM characterization of a flat top InN microcrystal revealed few stacking faults and only related threading dislocations. Defect-free small faceted microcrystals were also observed. The thick InN crystals show a narrow photoluminescence spectrum with a peak at 0.679 eV and linewidth of 16.8 meV at 4 K.

  3. Molecular beam epitaxy of 2D-layered gallium selenide on GaN substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Choong Hee; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; O'Hara, Dante J.; Brenner, Mark R.; Johnson, Jared M.; Jamison, John S.; Myers, Roberto C.; Kawakami, Roland K.; Hwang, Jinwoo; Rajan, Siddharth

    2017-03-01

    Large area epitaxy of two-dimensional (2D) layered materials with high material quality is a crucial step in realizing novel device applications based on 2D materials. In this work, we report high-quality, crystalline, large-area gallium selenide (GaSe) films grown on bulk substrates such as c-plane sapphire and gallium nitride (GaN) using a valved cracker source for Se. (002)-Oriented GaSe with random in-plane orientation of domains was grown on sapphire and GaN substrates at a substrate temperature of 350-450 °C with complete surface coverage. Higher growth temperature (575 °C) resulted in the formation of single-crystalline ɛ-GaSe triangular domains with six-fold symmetry confirmed by in-situ reflection high electron energy diffraction and off-axis x-ray diffraction. A two-step growth method involving high temperature nucleation of single crystalline domains and low temperature growth to enhance coalescence was adopted to obtain continuous (002)-oriented GaSe with an epitaxial relationship with the substrate. While six-fold symmetry was maintained in the two step growth, β-GaSe phase was observed in addition to the dominant ɛ-GaSe in cross-sectional scanning transmission electron microscopy images. This work demonstrates the potential of growing high quality 2D-layered materials using molecular beam epitaxy and can be extended to the growth of other transition metal chalcogenides.

  4. In-situ spectral reflectance for improving molecular beam epitaxy device growth

    SciTech Connect

    Breiland, W.G.; Hammons, B.E.; Hou, H.Q.; Killeen, K.P.; Klem, J.F.; Reno, J.L.; Sherwin, M.

    1997-05-01

    This report summarizes the development of in situ spectral reflectance as a tool for improving the quality, reproducibility, and yield of device structures grown from compound semiconductors. Although initially targeted at MBE (Molecular Beam Epitaxy) machines, equipment difficulties forced the authors to test most of their ideas on a MOCVD (Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition) reactor. A pre-growth control strategy using in situ reflectance has led to an unprecedented demonstration of process control on one of the most difficult device structures that can be grown with compound semiconductor materials. Hundreds of vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSEL`s) were grown with only {+-} 0.3% deviations in the Fabry-Perot cavity wavelength--a nearly ten-fold improvement over current calibration methods. The success of the ADVISOR (Analysis of Deposition using Virtual Interfaces and Spectroscopic Optical Reflectance) method has led to a great deal of interest from the commercial sector, including use by Hewlett Packard and Honeywell. The algorithms, software and reflectance design are being evaluated for patents and/or license agreements. A small company, Filmetrics, Inc., is incorporating the ADVISOR analysis method in its reflectometer product.

  5. The gas density measurement of one long distance supersonic molecular beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, D.; Han, J. F.; Chen, Z. Y.; Bai, L. X.; Zhou, J. X.

    2016-12-01

    The gas density of the supersonic molecular beam (SMB) is a crucial parameter for the fueling or diagnostic process in the tokamak experiments. Using the microphone, one improved method of gas density measurement is proposed, which can greatly improve the measurement capacity by about 3 orders of magnitude by studying the pulsed signal characteristic of the microphone when it is pushed by the SMB. The gas density of the SMB is measured within the axial range of 20-2000 mm, and the axial central density at 2000 mm is about 100 times less than that at 20 mm. It is also found that the radial density distribution follows the Gaussian function in both free expansion (where the SMB can expand freely without any influence from the vacuum chamber) and restricted expansion (where the expansion of the SMB is restricted inside the flight tube of the vacuum system). And the axial central density decreases with the axial distance, which follows the inverse square law in the free expansion, but it deviates from this law in the restricted expansion.

  6. Raman spectroscopic study of surfactant-mediated molecular beam epitaxially grown germanium/silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brill, Gregory Nelson

    The epitaxial growth of Ge on Si substrates was carried out using surfactant-mediated epitaxy and standard growth procedures to study the effects of Si surface passivation prior to Ge nucleation. The growth experiments were conducted in a molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) chamber equipped with reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) to monitor the nucleation process. Arsenic was chosen as the surfactant material and Ge nucleation was conducted on both Si(001) and Si(211) orientated substrates. Post-growth experiments were conducted primarily utilizing Raman Spectroscopy, however scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray diffraction were also employed to gather information about the grown material. From these experiments, it was determined that passivating the Si surface prior to Ge deposition with a monolayer of As yields higher quality 2-dimensional material. Additionally, As acts as a suppressant to Ge - Si intermixing resulting in a highly ordered epilayer/substrate interface. If Ge is deposited directly on a clean Si substrate without As passivation, the resultant growth follows the theoretically predicted Stranski-Krastanov growth mode. A growth model is suggested that successfully describes the differences between surfactant-mediated and non-surfactant-mediated nucleation through a site-exchange mechanism between Ge and As atoms. Additionally, surfactant-mediated nucleation results as a function of substrate orientation are highlighted and a model for surface reconstruction of the As passivated Si(211) surface is proposed.

  7. Important role of pedestal ion temperature in the ELM mitigation by supersonic molecular beam injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Q.; Yu, D. L.; Chen, C. Y.; Wei, Y. L.; Zhong, W. L.; Zou, X. L.; Zuo, H. Y.; Du, J. L.; Liu, L.; Dong, C. F.; Shi, Z. B.; Zhao, K. J.; Feng, B. B.; Zhou, Y.; Wang, Z. H.; Xu, M.; Liu, Yi; Yan, L. W.; Yang, Q. W.; Yao, L. H.; Ding, X. T.; Dong, J. Q.; Duan, X. R.; Liu, Yong; HL-2A Team

    2016-12-01

    Edge localized mode (ELM) is successfully mitigated by helium and deuterium supersonic molecular beam injections (SMBIs) on HL-2A. During the ELM mitigation by SMBIs, gradients of ion temperature (T i) and electron density are softened in the pedestal. It has been observed that the averaged gradient of the T i decreases around 44% and the well depth of radial electric field (E r) is reduced by the SMBI during ELM mitigation. Furthermore, at least 20% decrements of T i have to be attained to achieve a noticeable increase (decrease) of the ELM frequency (amplitude). In addition, the duration of ELM mitigation with helium SMBI is much longer than that with deuterium, likely due to the higher level of recycling neutral gas compared to that of deuterium; in the case of ELM mitigation by helium SMBI, the recovery duration of the density gradient is much shorter (10-20 ms) than that of T i (up to 40 ms or longer), indicating the importance of the T i in the ELM mitigation by SMBI. Finally, it has been observed that the T i is reduced before the beginning of the ELM mitigation, suggesting that the mechanism of the ELM mitigation by SMBI is closely related to the cooling effect.

  8. Formation of Ge-Sn nanodots on Si(100) surfaces by molecular beam epitaxy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The surface morphology of Ge0.96Sn0.04/Si(100) heterostructures grown at temperatures from 250 to 450°C by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning tunnel microscopy (STM) ex situ has been studied. The statistical data for the density of Ge0.96Sn0.04 nanodots (ND) depending on their lateral size have been obtained. Maximum density of ND (6 × 1011 cm-2) with the average lateral size of 7 nm can be obtained at 250°C. Relying on the reflection of high energy electron diffraction, AFM, and STM, it is concluded that molecular beam growth of Ge1-xSnx heterostructures with the small concentrations of Sn in the range of substrate temperatures from 250 to 450°C follows the Stranski-Krastanow mechanism. Based on the technique of recording diffractometry of high energy electrons during the process of epitaxy, the wetting layer thickness of Ge0.96Sn0.04 films is found to depend on the temperature of the substrate. PMID:21711584

  9. Magnetotransport in MgO-based magnetic tunnel junctions grown by molecular beam epitaxy (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Andrieu, S. Bonell, F.; Hauet, T.; Montaigne, F.; Lefevre, P.; Bertran, F.

    2014-05-07

    The strong impact of molecular beam epitaxy growth and Synchrotron Radiation characterization tools in the understanding of fundamental issues in nanomagnetism and spintronics is illustrated through the example of fully epitaxial MgO-based Magnetic Tunnel Junctions (MTJs). If ab initio calculations predict very high tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) in such devices, some discrepancy between theory and experiments still exists. The influence of imperfections in real systems has thus to be considered like surface contaminations, structural defects, unexpected electronic states, etc. The influence of possible oxygen contamination at the Fe/MgO(001) interface is thus studied, and is shown to be not so detrimental to TMR as predicted by ab initio calculations. On the contrary, the decrease of dislocations density in the MgO barrier of MTJs using Fe{sub 1−x}V{sub x} electrodes is shown to significantly increase TMR. Finally, unexpected transport properties in Fe{sub 1−X}Co{sub x}/MgO/Fe{sub 1−X}Co{sub x} (001) are presented. With the help of spin and symmetry resolved photoemission and ab initio calculation, the TMR decrease for Co content higher than 25% is shown to come from the existence of an interface state and the shift of the empty Δ1 minority spin state towards the Fermi level.

  10. Carbon doping in molecular beam epitaxy of GaAs from a heated graphite filament

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malik, R. J.; Nottenberg, R. N.; Schubert, E. F.; Walker, J. F.; Ryan, R. W.

    1988-01-01

    Carbon doping of GaAs grown by molecular beam epitaxy has been obtained for the first time by use of a heated graphite filament. Controlled carbon acceptor concentrations over the range of 10 to the 17th-10 to the 20th/cu cm were achieved by resistively heating a graphite filament with a direct current power supply. Capacitance-voltage, p/n junction and secondary-ion mass spectrometry measurements indicate that there is negligible diffusion of carbon during growth and with postgrowth rapid thermal annealing. Carbon was used for p-type doping in the base of Npn AlGaAs/GaAs heterojunction bipolar transistors. Current gains greater than 100 and near-ideal emitter heterojunctions were obtained in transistors with a carbon base doping of 1 x 10 to the 19th/cu cm. These preliminary results indicate that carbon doping from a solid graphite source may be an attractive substitute for beryllium, which is known to have a relatively high diffusion coefficient in GaAs.

  11. Molecular beam epitaxy of Cd3As2 on a III-V substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumann, Timo; Goyal, Manik; Kim, Honggyu; Stemmer, Susanne

    2016-12-01

    Epitaxial, strain-engineered Dirac semimetal heterostructures promise tuning of the unique properties of these materials. In this study, we investigate the growth of thin films of the recently discovered Dirac semimetal Cd3As2 by molecular beam epitaxy. We show that epitaxial Cd3As2 layers can be grown at low temperatures (110 °C-220 °C), in situ, on (111) GaSb buffer layers deposited on (111) GaAs substrates. The orientation relationship is described by ( 112 ) Cd3 As 2 || (111) GaSb and [ 1 1 ¯ 0 ] Cd3 As 2 || [ 1 ¯ 01 ] GaSb . The films are shown to grow in the low-temperature, vacancy ordered, tetragonal Dirac semimetal phase. They exhibit high room temperature mobilities of up to 19300 cm2/Vs, despite a three-dimensional surface morphology indicative of island growth and the presence of twin variants. The results indicate that epitaxial growth on more closely lattice matched buffer layers, such as InGaSb or InAlSb, which allow for imposing different degrees of epitaxial coherency strains, should be possible.

  12. Ablative skin resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Chwalek, Jennifer; Goldberg, David J

    2011-01-01

    Ablative skin resurfacing has remained the gold standard for treating photodamage and acne scars since the development of the first CO(2) lasers. CO(2) and Er:YAG lasers emit infrared light, which targets water resulting in tissue contraction and collagen formation. The first ablative laser systems created significant thermal damage resulting in unacceptably high rates of scarring and prolonged healing. Newer devices, such as high-energy pulsed lasers and fractional ablative lasers, are capable of achieving significant improvements with fewer side effects and shorter recovery times. While ablative resurfacing has become safer, careful patient selection is still important to avoid post-treatment scarring, dyspigmentation, and infections. Clinicians utilizing ablative devices need to be aware of possible side effects in order to maximize results and patient satisfaction. This chapter reviews the background of ablative lasers including the types of ablative lasers, mechanism of action, indications for ablative resurfacing, and possible side effects.

  13. Sci—Sat AM: Stereo — 08: Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR) for low, intermediate and high risk prostate cancer using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) with a 10x Flattening Filter Free (FFF) beam

    SciTech Connect

    Mestrovic, A; Fortin, D; Alexander, A

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility of using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) with a 10x Flattening Filter Free (FFF) beam for Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR) for low, intermediate and high risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Ten anonymized patient CT data sets were used in this planning study. For each patient CT data set, three sets of contours were generated: 1) low risk, 2) intermediate risk, and 3) high risk scenarios. For each scenario, a single-arc and a double-arc VMAT treatment plans were created. Plans were generated with the Varian Eclipse™ treatment planning system for a Varian TrueBeam™ linac equipped with Millenium 120 MLC. Plans were created using a 10x-FFF beam with a maximum dose rate of 2400 MU/min. Dose prescription was 36.25Gy/5 fractions with the planning objective of covering 99% of the Planning Target Volume with the 95% of the prescription dose. Normal tissue constraints were based on provincial prostate SABR planning guidelines, derived from national and international prostate SABR protocols. Plans were evaluated and compared in terms of: 1) dosimetric plan quality, and 2) treatment delivery efficiency. Results: Both single-arc and double-arc VMAT plans were able to meet the planning goals for low, intermediate and high risk scenarios. No significant dosimetric differences were observed between the plans. However, the treatment time was significantly lower for a single-arc VMAT plans. Conclusions: Prostate SABR treatments are feasible with 10x-FFF VMAT technique. A single-arc VMAT offers equivalent dosimetric plan quality and a superior treatment delivery efficiency, compared to a double-arc VMAT.

  14. Self-corrected sensors based on atomic absorption spectroscopy for atom flux measurements in molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Y. E-mail: scott.chambers@pnnl.gov; Liyu, A. V.; Droubay, T. C.; Chambers, S. A. E-mail: scott.chambers@pnnl.gov; Li, G.

    2014-04-21

    A high sensitivity atom flux sensor based on atomic absorption spectroscopy has been designed and implemented to control electron beam evaporators and effusion cells in a molecular beam epitaxy system. Using a high-resolution spectrometer and a two-dimensional charge coupled device detector in a double-beam configuration, we employ either a non-resonant line or a resonant line with low cross section from the same hollow cathode lamp as the reference for nearly perfect background correction and baseline drift removal. This setup also significantly shortens the warm-up time needed compared to other sensor technologies and drastically reduces the noise coming from the surrounding environment. In addition, the high-resolution spectrometer allows the most sensitive resonant line to be isolated and used to provide excellent signal-to-noise ratio.

  15. Self-corrected sensors based on atomic absorption spectroscopy for atom flux measurements in molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Y.; Droubay, T. C.; Liyu, A. V.; Li, G.; Chambers, S. A.

    2014-04-01

    A high sensitivity atom flux sensor based on atomic absorption spectroscopy has been designed and implemented to control electron beam evaporators and effusion cells in a molecular beam epitaxy system. Using a high-resolution spectrometer and a two-dimensional charge coupled device detector in a double-beam configuration, we employ either a non-resonant line or a resonant line with low cross section from the same hollow cathode lamp as the reference for nearly perfect background correction and baseline drift removal. This setup also significantly shortens the warm-up time needed compared to other sensor technologies and drastically reduces the noise coming from the surrounding environment. In addition, the high-resolution spectrometer allows the most sensitive resonant line to be isolated and used to provide excellent signal-to-noise ratio.

  16. Molecular-beam heteroepitaxial growth and characterization of wide-band-gap semiconductor films and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piquette, Eric Charles

    The thesis consists of two parts. Part I describes work on the molecular beam epitaxial (MBE) growth of GaN, AlN, and AlxGa 1-xN alloys, as well as efforts in the initial technical development and demonstration of nitride-based high power electronic devices. The major issues pertaining to MBE growth are discussed, including special requirements of the growth system, substrates, film nucleation, n - and p-type doping, and the dependence of film quality on growth parameters. The GaN films were characterized by a variety of methods, including high resolution x-ray diffraction, photoluminescence, and Hall effect measurement. It is found that the film polarity and extended defect density as well as quality of photoluminescence and electrical transport properties depend crucially on how the nitride layer is nucleated on the substrate and how the subsequent film surface morphology evolves, which can be controlled by the growth conditions. A technique is proposed and demonstrated that utilizes the control of morphology evolution to reduce defect density and improve the structural quality of MBE GaN films. In addition to growth, the design and processing of high voltage GaN Schottky diodes is presented, as well as an experimental study of sputter-deposited ohmic and rectifying metal contacts to GaN. Simple models for high power devices, based on materials properties such as minority carrier diffusion length and critical electric breakdown field, are used to estimate the voltage standoff capability, current carrying capacity, and maximum operating frequency of unipolar and bipolar GaN power devices. The materials and transport properties of GaN pertinent to high power device design were measured experimentally. High voltage Schottky rectifiers were fabricated which verify the impressive electric breakdown field of GaN (2--5 MV/cm). Electron beam induced current (EBIC) experiments were also conducted to measure the minority carrier diffusion length for both electrons and

  17. Scaling Approach to Anomalous Surface Roughening of the (d+1)-DIMENSIONAL Molecular-Beam Epitaxy Growth Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Hui; Tang, Gang; Han, Kui; Hao, Da-Peng; Chen, Hua; Zhang, Lei-Ming

    To determine anomalous dynamic scaling of continuum growth equations, López12 proposed an analytical approach, which is based on the scaling analysis introduced by Hentschel and Family.15 In this work, we generalize this scaling analysis to the (d+1)-dimensional molecular-beam epitaxy equations to determine their anomalous dynamic scaling. The growth equations studied here include the linear molecular-beam epitaxy (LMBE) and Lai-Das Sarma-Villain (LDV). We find that both the LMBE and LDV equations, when the substrate dimension d>2, correspond to a standard Family-Vicsek scaling, however, when d<2, exhibit anomalous dynamic roughening of the local fluctuations of the growth height. When the growth equations exhibit anomalous dynamic scaling, we obtain the local roughness exponents by using scaling relation αloc=α-zκ, which are consistent with the corresponding numerical results.

  18. High mobility n-type organic thin-film transistors deposited at room temperature by supersonic molecular beam deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Chiarella, F. Barra, M.; Ciccullo, F.; Cassinese, A.; Toccoli, T.; Aversa, L.; Tatti, R.; Verucchi, R.

    2014-04-07

    In this paper, we report on the fabrication of N,N′-1H,1H-perfluorobutil dicyanoperylenediimide (PDIF-CN{sub 2}) organic thin-film transistors by Supersonic Molecular Beam Deposition. The devices exhibit mobility up to 0.2 cm{sup 2}/V s even if the substrate is kept at room temperature during the organic film growth, exceeding by three orders of magnitude the electrical performance of those grown at the same temperature by conventional Organic Molecular Beam Deposition. The possibility to get high-mobility n-type transistors avoiding thermal treatments during or after the deposition could significantly extend the number of substrates suitable to the fabrication of flexible high-performance complementary circuits by using this compound.

  19. Note: A short-pulse high-intensity molecular beam valve based on a piezoelectric stack actuator

    SciTech Connect

    Abeysekera, Chamara; Joalland, Baptiste; Shi, Yuanyuan; Kamasah, Alexander; Oldham, James M.; Suits, Arthur G.

    2014-11-15

    Solenoid and piezoelectric disk valves, which are widely used to generate molecular beam pulses, still suffer from significant restrictions, such as pulse durations typically >50 μs, low repetition rates, and limited gas flows and operational times. Much of this arises owing to the limited forces these actuators can achieve. To overcome these limitations, we have developed a new pulsed valve based on a high-force piezoelectric stack actuator. We show here that operation with pulse durations as low as 20 μs and repetition rates up to 100 Hz can be easily achieved by operating the valve in conjunction with a commercial fast high-voltage switch. We outline our design and demonstrate its performance with molecular beam characterization via velocity map ion imaging.

  20. Effect of molecular adsorption on the electrical conductance of single au nanowires fabricated by electron-beam lithography and focused ion beam etching.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ping; Zhang, Jingying; Lin, Hsin-Yu; Bohn, Paul W

    2010-11-22

    Metal nanowires are one of the potential candidates for nanostructured sensing elements used in future portable devices for chemical detection; however, the optimal methods for fabrication have yet to be fully explored. Two routes to nanowire fabrication, electron-beam lithography (EBL) and focused ion beam (FIB) etching, are studied, and their electrical and chemical sensing properties are compared. Although nanowires fabricated by both techniques exhibit ohmic conductance, I-V characterization indicates that nanowires fabricated by FIB etching exhibit abnormally high resistivity. In addition, the resistivity of nanowires fabricated by FIB etching shows very low sensitivity toward molecular adsorption, while those fabricated by EBL exhibit sensitive resistance change upon exposure to solution-phase adsorbates. The mean grain sizes of nanowires prepared by FIB etching are much smaller than those fabricated by EBL, so their resistance is dominated by grain-boundary scattering. As a result, these nanowires are much less sensitive to molecular adsorption, which mediates nanowire conduction through surface scattering. The much reduced mean grain sizes of these nanowires correlate with Ga ion damage caused during the ion milling process. Thus, even though the nanowires prepared by FIB etching can be smaller than their EBL counterparts, their reduced sensitivity to adsorption suggests that nanowires produced by EBL are preferred for chemical and biochemical sensing applications.

  1. Cu-doped AlN: A possible spinaligner at room-temperature grown by molecular beam epitaxy?

    SciTech Connect

    Ganz, P. R.; Schaadt, D. M.

    2011-12-23

    Cu-doped AlN was prepared by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy on C-plane sapphire substrates. The growth conditions were investigated for different Cu to Al flux ratios from 1.0% to 4.0%. The formation of Cu-Al alloys on the surface was observed for all doping level. In contrast to Cu-doped GaN, all samples showed diamagnetic behavior determined by SQUID measurements.

  2. Influence of the Liquid on Femtosecond Laser Ablation of Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanitz, A.; Hoppius, J. S.; Gurevich, E. L.; Ostendorf, A.

    Ultrashort pulse laser ablation has become a very important industrial method for highly precise material removal ranging from sensitive thin film processing to drilling and cutting of metals. Over the last decade, a new method to produce pure nanoparticles emerged from this technique: Pulsed Laser Ablation in Liquids (PLAL). By this method, the ablation of material by a laser beam is used to generate a metal vapor within the liquid in order to obtain nanoparticles from its recondensation process. It is well known that the liquid significantly alters the ablation properties of the substrate, in our case iron. For example, the ablation rate and crater morphology differ depending on the used liquid. We present our studies on the efficiency and quality of ablated grooves in water, methanol, acetone, ethanol and toluene. The produced grooves are investigated by means of white-light interferometry, EDX and SEM.

  3. Comparison of Cherenkov excited fluorescence and phosphorescence molecular sensing from tissue with external beam irradiation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Huiyun; Zhang, Rongxiao; Gunn, Jason R; Esipova, Tatiana V; Vinogradov, Sergei; Gladstone, David J; Jarvis, Lesley A; Pogue, Brian W

    2016-05-21

    Ionizing radiation delivered by a medical linear accelerator (LINAC) generates Cherenkov emission within the treated tissue. A fraction of this light, in the 600-900 nm wavelength region, propagates through centimeters of tissue and can be used to excite optical probes in vivo, enabling molecular sensing of tissue analytes. The success of isolating the emission signal from this Cherenkov excitation background is dependent on key factors such as: (i) the Stokes shift of the probe spectra; (ii) the excited state lifetime; (iii) the probe concentration; (iv) the depth below the tissue surface; and (v) the radiation dose used. Previous studies have exclusively focused on imaging phosphorescent dyes, rather than fluorescent dyes. However there are only a few biologically important phosphorescent dyes and yet in comparison there are thousands of biologically relevant fluorescent dyes. So in this study the focus was a study of efficacy of Cherenkov-excited luminescence using fluorescent commercial near-infrared probes, IRDye 680RD, IRDye 700DX, and IRDye 800CW, and comparing them to the well characterized phosphorescent probe Oxyphor PtG4, an oxygen sensitive dye. Each probe was excited by Cherenkov light from a 6 MV external radiation beam, and measured in continuous wave or time-gated modes. The detection was performed by spectrally resolving the luminescence signals, and measuring them with spectrometer-based separation on an ICCD detector. The results demonstrate that IRDye 700DX and PtG4 allowed for the maximal signal to noise ratio. In the case of the phosphorescent probe, PtG4, with emission decays on the microsecond (μs) time scale, time-gated acquisition was possible, and it allowed for higher efficacy in terms of the probe concentration and detection depth. Phantoms containing the probe at 5 mm depth could be detected at concentrations down to the nanoMolar range, and at depths into the tissue simulating phantom near 3 cm. In vivo studies showed that 5

  4. Comparison of Cherenkov excited fluorescence and phosphorescence molecular sensing from tissue with external beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Huiyun; Zhang, Rongxiao; Gunn, Jason R.; Esipova, Tatiana V.; Vinogradov, Sergei; Gladstone, David J.; Jarvis, Lesley A.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2016-05-01

    Ionizing radiation delivered by a medical linear accelerator (LINAC) generates Cherenkov emission within the treated tissue. A fraction of this light, in the 600-900 nm wavelength region, propagates through centimeters of tissue and can be used to excite optical probes in vivo, enabling molecular sensing of tissue analytes. The success of isolating the emission signal from this Cherenkov excitation background is dependent on key factors such as: (i) the Stokes shift of the probe spectra; (ii) the excited state lifetime; (iii) the probe concentration; (iv) the depth below the tissue surface; and (v) the radiation dose used. Previous studies have exclusively focused on imaging phosphorescent dyes, rather than fluorescent dyes. However there are only a few biologically important phosphorescent dyes and yet in comparison there are thousands of biologically relevant fluorescent dyes. So in this study the focus was a study of efficacy of Cherenkov-excited luminescence using fluorescent commercial near-infrared probes, IRDye 680RD, IRDye 700DX, and IRDye 800CW, and comparing them to the well characterized phosphorescent probe Oxyphor PtG4, an oxygen sensitive dye. Each probe was excited by Cherenkov light from a 6 MV external radiation beam, and measured in continuous wave or time-gated modes. The detection was performed by spectrally resolving the luminescence signals, and measuring them with spectrometer-based separation on an ICCD detector. The results demonstrate that IRDye 700DX and PtG4 allowed for the maximal signal to noise ratio. In the case of the phosphorescent probe, PtG4, with emission decays on the microsecond (μs) time scale, time-gated acquisition was possible, and it allowed for higher efficacy in terms of the probe concentration and detection depth. Phantoms containing the probe at 5 mm depth could be detected at concentrations down to the nanoMolar range, and at depths into the tissue simulating phantom near 3 cm. In vivo studies showed that 5

  5. Development of the Hybrid Molecular Beam Epitaxy Approach for Stannate Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tianqi; Jalan, Bharat

    2014-03-01

    Among many leading oxide candidates with s-band physics, stannate family with perovskite structure where conduction band is derived mainly from tin 5s-band has generated resurgence of interest in creating them in thin film form due to the recent demonstration of high room temperature electron mobility, largely attributable to their low electron effective mass. We employ the hybrid molecular beam epitaxy approach utilizing elemental solid source for Sr and Ba, a chemical precursor source for Sn and a rf plasma source for oxygen, for the growth of SrSnO3 and BaSnO3. In this talk, we will present a detailed MBE growth study of SnO2 films on r-plane sapphire as a function of tin precursor flux, oxygen pressure and substrate temperature. High-resolution x-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy revealed single phase, epitaxial (101) SnO2 films and atomically smooth surfaces (rms roughness value between 0.3 - 0.9 nm) respectively between substrate temperatures of 300 to 900 °C. Three growth regimes were identified as a function of temperature where films grew in reaction- flux- and desorption-limited regime with increasing temperature. Further growth exploration at constant substrate temperature reveled that the growth rate first increases and then becomes constant with increasing tin precursor flux (i.e. any excess tin flux desorbs). We will discuss its implication on the growth, and structural quality of ternary stannate oxides by presenting a comprehensive growth study of SrSnO3.

  6. Incorporation of manganese into semiconducting ScN using radio frequency molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    AL-Brithen, Hamad A.; Yang Haiqiang; Smith, Arthur R.

    2004-10-01

    The incorporation of manganese into semiconducting ScN, using radio frequency molecular beam epitaxy, has been investigated. X-ray diffraction and reflection high energy electron diffraction measurements show the face-centered tetragonal rocksalt-type crystal structure with Sc and Mn cations and N anions. In addition to the solute incorporation into the lattice, which is clear from the positions of the diffraction peaks, atomic force microscopy images show that the surface of the alloy grown at T{sub S}{<=}518 deg. C contains dot-like features, indicating surface accumulation. The areal dot density is found to decrease as the growth temperature increases, whereas the Mn incorporation increases at 518 deg. C. This behavior is suggestive of a thermally activated process, and it is well explained by an Arrhenius law, giving an activation energy (diffusion barrier) of 0.67 eV. Increasing the growth temperature to 612 deg. C leads to an increased desorption rate, resulting in little Mn incorporation. It has been found that the growth is nearly optimized at T{sub S}=518 deg. C for high Mn incorporation, smooth growth, and small accumulate density. The alloy is found to have lattice parameters which depend on the Mn/(Mn+Sc) bulk ratio. The alloy lattice constants follow Vegard's law depending on the Mn bulk fraction and the lattice constants of ScN and {theta}-phase MnN. The Mn incorporation and Mn incorporation coefficient for films grown at T{sub S}=518 deg. C increase as the Mn/(Mn+Sc) flux ratio increases.

  7. Minority carrier lifetime in iodine-doped molecular beam epitaxy-grown HgCdTe

    SciTech Connect

    Madni, I.; Umana-Membreno, G. A.; Lei, W.; Gu, R.; Antoszewski, J.; Faraone, L.

    2015-11-02

    The minority carrier lifetime in molecular beam epitaxy grown layers of iodine-doped Hg{sub 1−x}Cd{sub x}Te (x ∼ 0.3) on CdZnTe substrates has been studied. The samples demonstrated extrinsic donor behavior for carrier concentrations in the range from 2 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −3} to 6 × 10{sup 17} cm{sup −3} without any post-growth annealing. At a temperature of 77 K, the electron mobility was found to vary from 10{sup 4} cm{sup 2}/V s to 7 × 10{sup 3} cm{sup 2}/V s and minority carrier lifetime from 1.6 μs to 790 ns, respectively, as the carrier concentration was increased from 2 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −3} to 6 × 10{sup 17} cm{sup −3}. The diffusion of iodine is much lower than that of indium and hence a better alternative in heterostructures such as nBn devices. The influence of carrier concentration and temperature on the minority carrier lifetime was studied in order to characterize the carrier recombination mechanisms. Measured lifetimes were also analyzed and compared with the theoretical models of the various recombination processes occurring in these materials, indicating that Auger-1 recombination was predominant at higher doping levels. An increase in deep-level generation-recombination centers was observed with increasing doping level, which suggests that the increase in deep-level trap density is associated with the incorporation of higher concentrations of iodine into the HgCdTe.

  8. Study of optical properties of GaAsN layers prepared by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulzara-Mora, A.; Cruz-Hernández, E.; Rojas-Ramirez, J.; Contreras-Guerrero, R.; Meléndez-Lira, M.; Falcony-Guajardo, C.; Aguilar-Frutis, M. A.; López-López, M.

    2007-04-01

    We have grown GaAsN layers (with nitrogen concentration between 1.2% and 3.2%) on GaAs(1 0 0) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) using a radio frequency (RF) plasma nitrogen source, and solid sources for Ga and As. The growth temperature was varied from 420 to 600 °C, and the GaAsN growth mode was in situ monitored by reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED). The optical properties of the layers were studied by photoreflectance spectroscopy (PR) and phase modulated ellipsometry (PME). For the growth temperature of 420 °C the films grew in a three-dimensional (3D) mode as indicated by the appearance of transmission spots in the RHEED patterns. In contrast, GaAsN layers grown at higher temperatures presented a two-dimensional (2D) growth mode. These GaAsN layers are pseudomorphic according to high-resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD). The PR spectra of all samples exhibited Franz-Keldysh oscillations (FKO) above of the GaAs band gap energy. From these oscillations we obtained the built-in internal electric field intensity ( Fint) at the GaAsN/GaAs interface. In the low-energy region of the PR spectra we observed the transitions associated to fundamental band gap of the GaAsN layers. The variation of the GaAsN fundamental band gap obtained by PR as a function of the N content was explained according the band anti-crossing model (BAC). On the other hand, the E1 and E1+Δ E1 critical points were obtained from the analysis of spectra of the imaginary part of the dielectric function obtained by PME. We observed a shift of these critical points to higher energies with the increase of N content, which was explained by a combination of strain and alloying effects.

  9. Isotype InGaN/GaN heterobarrier diodes by ammonia molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Fireman, Micha N.; Browne, David A.; Speck, James S.; Mishra, Umesh K.

    2016-02-07

    The design of isotype InGaN/GaN heterobarrier diode structures grown by ammonia molecular beam epitaxy is presented. On the (0001) Ga-polar plane, a structure consisting of a surface n{sup +} GaN contact layer, followed by a thin InGaN layer, followed by a thick unintentionally doped (UID) GaN layer, and atop a buried n{sup +} GaN contact layer induces a large conduction band barrier via a depleted UID GaN layer. Suppression of reverse and subthreshold current in such isotype barrier devices under applied bias depends on the quality of this composite layer polarization. Sample series were grown under fixed InGaN growth conditions that varied either the UID GaN NH{sub 3} flow rate or the UID GaN thickness, and under fixed UID GaN growth conditions that varied InGaN growth conditions. Decreases in subthreshold current and reverse bias current were measured for thicker UID GaN layers and increasing InGaN growth rates. Temperature-dependent analysis indicated that although extracted barrier heights were lower than those predicted by 1D Schrödinger Poisson simulations (0.9 eV–1.4 eV for In compositions from 10% to 15%), optimized growth conditions increased the extracted barrier height from ∼11% to nearly 85% of the simulated values. Potential subthreshold mechanisms are discussed, along with those growth factors which might affect their prevalence.

  10. Combustion of butanol isomers - A detailed molecular beam mass spectrometry investigation of their flame chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Osswald, Patrick; Gueldenberg, Hanna; Kohse-Hoeinghaus, Katharina; Yang, Bin; Yuan, Tao; Qi, Fei

    2011-01-15

    The combustion chemistry of the four butanol isomers, 1-, 2-, iso- and tert-butanol was studied in flat, premixed, laminar low-pressure (40 mbar) flames of the respective alcohols. Fuel-rich ({phi} = 1.7) butanol-oxygen-(25%)argon flames were investigated using different molecular beam mass spectrometry (MBMS) techniques. Quantitative mole fraction profiles are reported as a function of burner distance. In total, 57 chemical compounds, including radical and isomeric species, have been unambiguously assigned and detected quantitatively in each flame using a combination of vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization (PI) and electron ionization (EI) MBMS. Synchrotron-based PI-MBMS allowed to separate isomeric combustion intermediates according to their different ionization thresholds. Complementary measurements in the same flames with a high mass-resolution EI-MBMS system provided the exact elementary composition of the involved species. Resulting mole fraction profiles from both instruments are generally in good quantitative agreement. In these flames of the four butanol isomers, temperature, measured by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of seeded nitric oxide, and major species profiles are strikingly similar, indicating seemingly analog global combustion behavior. However, significant variations in the intermediate species pool are observed between the fuels and discussed with respect to fuel-specific destruction pathways. As a consequence, different, fuel-specific pollutant emissions may be expected, by both their chemical nature and concentrations. The results reported here are the first of their kind from premixed isomeric butanol flames and are thought to be valuable for improving existing kinetic combustion models. (author)

  11. Universal threshold for femtosecond laser ablation with oblique illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao-Long; Cheng, Weibo; Petrarca, Massimo; Polynkin, Pavel

    2016-10-01

    We quantify the dependence of the single-shot ablation threshold on the angle of incidence and polarization of a femtosecond laser beam, for three dissimilar solid-state materials: a metal, a dielectric, and a semiconductor. Using the constant, linear value of the index of refraction, we calculate the laser fluence transmitted through the air-material interface at the point of ablation threshold. We show that, in spite of the highly nonlinear ionization dynamics involved in the ablation process, the so defined transmitted threshold fluence is universally independent of the angle of incidence and polarization of the laser beam for all three material types. We suggest that angular dependence of ablation threshold can be utilized for profiling fluence distributions in ultra-intense femtosecond laser beams.

  12. Recent Advances in Tumor Ablation for Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kang, Tae Wook; Rhim, Hyunchul

    2015-09-01

    Image-guided tumor ablation for early stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is an accepted non-surgical treatment that provides excellent local tumor control and favorable survival benefit. This review summarizes the recent advances in tumor ablation for HCC. Diagnostic imaging and molecular biology of HCC has recently undergone marked improvements. Second-generation ultrasonography (US) contrast agents, new computed tomography (CT) techniques, and liver-specific contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have enabled the early detection of smaller and inconspicuous HCC lesions. Various imaging-guidance tools that incorporate imaging-fusion between real-time US and CT/MRI, that are now common for percutaneous tumor ablation, have increased operator confidence in the accurate targeting of technically difficult tumors. In addition to radiofrequency ablation (RFA), various therapeutic modalities including microwave ablation, irreversible electroporation, and high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation have attracted attention as alternative energy sources for effective locoregional treatment of HCC. In addition, combined treatment with RFA and chemoembolization or molecular agents may be able to overcome the limitation of advanced or large tumors. Finally, understanding of the biological mechanisms and advances in therapy associated with tumor ablation will be important for successful tumor control. All these advances in tumor ablation for HCC will result in significant improvement in the prognosis of HCC patients. In this review, we primarily focus on recent advances in molecular tumor biology, diagnosis, imaging-guidance tools, and therapeutic modalities, and refer to the current status and future perspectives for tumor ablation for HCC.

  13. Highspeed laser ablation cutting of metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullmann, F.; Loeschner, U.; Hartwig, L.; Szczepanski, D.; Schille, J.; Gronau, S.; Knebel, T.; Drechsel, J.; Ebert, R.; Exner, H.

    2013-02-01

    In laser ablation cutting, irradiation of high-intense laser beams causes ejection of molten and evaporated material out of the cutting zone as a result of high pressure gradients, induced by expanding plasma plumes. This paper investigates highspeed laser ablation cutting of industrial grade metal sheets using high-brilliant continuous wave fiber lasers with output powers up to 5 kW. The laser beam was deflected with scan speeds up to 2700 m/min utilizing both a fast galvanometer scan system and a polygon scan system. By sharp laser beam focusing using different objectives with focal lengths ranging between 160 mm and 500 mm, small laser spot diameters between 16.5 μm and 60 μm were obtained, respectively. As a result high peak intensities between 3*108 W/cm² and 2.5*109 W/cm² were irradiated on the sample surface, and cutting kerfs with a maximum depth of 1.4 mm have been produced. In this study the impact of the processing parameters laser power, laser spot diameter, cutting speed, and number of scans on both the achievable cutting depth and the cutting edge quality was investigated. The ablation depths, the heights of the cutting burr, as well as the removed material volumes were evaluated by means of optical microscope images and cross section photographs. Finally highspeed laser ablation cutting was studied using an intensified ultra highspeed camera in order to get useful insights into the cutting process.

  14. Optimization of the Nonradiative Lifetime of Molecular-Beam-Epitaxy (MBE)-Grown Undoped GaAs/AlGaAs Double Heterostructures (DH)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    Optimization of the Nonradiative Lifetime of Molecular- Beam-Epitaxy (MBE)-Grown Undoped GaAs/AlGaAs Double Heterostructures (DH) by P...it to the originator. Army Research Laboratory Adelphi, MD 20783-1197 ARL-TR-6660 September 2013 Optimization of the Nonradiative ...REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) FY2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Optimization of the Nonradiative Lifetime of Molecular-Beam-Epitaxy

  15. Nonequilibrium Ablation of Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milos, Frank S.; Chen, Yih K.; Gokcen, Tahir

    2012-01-01

    In previous work, an equilibrium ablation and thermal response model for Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator was developed. In general, over a wide range of test conditions, model predictions compared well with arcjet data for surface recession, surface temperature, in-depth temperature at multiple thermocouples, and char depth. In this work, additional arcjet tests were conducted at stagnation conditions down to 40 W/sq cm and 1.6 kPa. The new data suggest that nonequilibrium effects become important for ablation predictions at heat flux or pressure below about 80 W/sq cm or 10 kPa, respectively. Modifications to the ablation model to account for nonequilibrium effects are investigated. Predictions of the equilibrium and nonequilibrium models are compared with the arcjet data.

  16. Crossed molecular beams study of O(1D) reactions with H2 molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Miau, Tzong -Tsong

    1995-05-01

    Reaction dynamics of O(1D) atoms with H2 molecules was reinvestigated using the crossed molecular beams technique with pulsed beams. The O(1D) beam was generated by photodissociating O3 molecules at 248 nm. Time-of-flight spectra and the laboratory angular distribution of the OH products were measured. The derived OH product center-of-mass flux-velocity contour diagram shows more backward scattered intensity with respect to the O(1D) beam. In contrast to previous studies which show that the insertion mechanism is the dominant process, our results indicate that the contribution from the collinear approach of the O(1D) atom to the H2 molecule on the first excited state potential energy surface is significant and the energy barrier for the collinear approach is therefore minimal. Despite the increased time resolution in this experiment, no vibrational structure in the OH product time-of-flight spectra was resolved. This is in agreement with LIF studies, which have shown that the rotational distributions of the OH products in all vibrational states are broad and highly inverted.

  17. Effect of surface roughness and size of beam on squeeze-film damping—Molecular dynamics simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hojin; Strachan, Alejandro

    2015-11-28

    We use large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) to characterize fluid damping between a substrate and an approaching beam. We focus on the near contact regime where squeeze film (where fluid gap is comparable to the mean free path of the gas molecules) and many-body effects in the fluid become dominant. The MD simulations provide explicit description of many-body and non-equilibrium processes in the fluid as well as the surface topography. We study how surface roughness and beam width increases the damping coefficient due to their effect on fluid mobility. We find that the explicit simulations are in good agreement with prior direct simulation Monte Carlo results except at near-contact conditions where many-body effects in the compressed fluid lead the increased damping and weaker dependence on beam width. We also show that velocity distributions near the beam edges and for short gaps deviate from the Boltzmann distribution indicating a degree of local non-equilibrium. These results will be useful to parameterize compact models used for microsystem device-level simulations and provide insight into mesoscale simulations of near-contact damping.

  18. The growth of strontium titanate and lutetium ferrite thin films by molecular-beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Charles M.

    Included in this work is a range of studies on films of homoeptaxial and heteroepitaxial films of SrTiO3 and the first reported phase-pure films of LuFe2O4. We report the structural properties of homoepitaxial (100) SrTiO3 films grown by reactive molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE). The lattice spacing and x-ray diffraction (XRD) rocking curves of stoichiometric MBEgrown SrTiO3 films are indistinguishable from the underlying SrTiO3 substrates. The effect of off-stoichiometry for both strontium-rich and strontium-poor compositions results in lattice expansion with significant changes to the shuttered reflection high-energy electron diffraction oscillations, XRD, film microstructure, and thermal conductivity. Up to an 80% reduction in Sr(1+x)TiO3 film thermal conductivity is measured for x = -0.1 to 0.5. Significant reduction, from 11.5 to ˜2 W˙m-1K-1, occurs through the formation of Ruddlesden-Popper planar faults. The ability to deposit films with a reduction in thermal conductivity is applicable to thermal barrier coatings and thermoelectrics. Scanning transmission electron microscopy is used to examine the formation of Ruddlesden-Popper planar faults in films with strontium excess. We also show that the band gap of SrTiO3 can be altered by >10% (0.3 eV) by using experimentally realizable biaxial strains providing a new means to accomplish band gap engineering of SrTiO3 and related perovskites. Such band gap manipulation is relevant to applications in solar cells water splitting, transparent conducting oxides, superconductivity, two-dimensional electron liquids, and other emerging oxide electronics. This work also presents the adsorption-controlled growth of single-phase (0001)-oriented epitaxial films of charge ordered multiferroic, LuFe2O4, on (111) MgAl2O4, (111) MgO, and (0001) 6H-SiC substrates in an iron-rich environment at pressures and temperatures where excess iron desorbs from the film surface during growth. Scanning transmission electron microscopy reveals

  19. Structural and magnetic properties of magnetoelectric oxide heterostructures deposited by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterbinsky, George Evan

    There is considerable interest in incorporating magnetic materials into electronic devices to achieve new functions such as nonvolatile memories. Electric field control of magnetism is of much interest for new low power electronic devices because it eliminates the need to apply magnetic fields. One approach to achieving electrical control of magnetism is to exploit magnetoelastic effects in composites of ferromagnetic and ferroelectric materials. Application of an electric field to the composite will induce a strain through the piezo-electric effect, and the strain will alter the magnetization of the ferromagnetic constituent through the magnetoelastic effect. In this work, we examine the relationships between growth, strain, and magnetic properties of epitaxial ferrimagnetic Fe3O4 (magnetite) and ferroelectric BaTiO3 thin film heterostructures. We find that altering the strain state of a magnetite layer deposited on a BaTiO3 substrate has a profound effect on its magnetization. Here, we demonstrate the interaction between strain and magnetization is mediated by magnetic anisotropy and the magnetic domains structure of the films. Epitaxial magnetite films were deposited on MgO, BaTiO3, and SrTiO3 substrates by molecular beam epitaxy between temperatures of 573 and 723 K. Examination of the morphologies of Fe3O 4 films indicates that island growth is favored. Films exhibit in-plane magnetic isotropy and reduced saturation magnetizations with respect to the bulk material, as demonstrated by superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry. Magnetic hysteresis measurements suggest that these differences originate from antiphase boundary defects within the films. The strain in magnetite films deposited on BaTiO3 single crystal substrates was measured by x-ray diffraction. Measurements reveal a dependence of magnetization (M) on strain (epsilon) with discontinuities in magnetization versus temperature curves resulting from changes in the domain structure of the

  20. High active nitrogen flux growth of GaN by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    McSkimming, Brian M. Speck, James S.; Chaix, Catherine

    2015-09-15

    In the present study, the authors report on a modified Riber radio frequency (RF) nitrogen plasma source that provides active nitrogen fluxes more than 30 times higher than those commonly used for plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE) growth of gallium nitride (GaN) and thus a significantly higher growth rate than has been previously reported. GaN films were grown using N{sub 2} gas flow rates between 5 and 25 sccm while varying the plasma source's RF forward power from 200 to 600 W. The highest growth rate, and therefore the highest active nitrogen flux, achieved was ∼7.6 μm/h. For optimized growth conditions, the surfaces displayed a clear step-terrace structure with an average RMS roughness (3 × 3 μm) on the order of 1 nm. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy impurity analysis demonstrates oxygen and hydrogen incorporation of 1 × 10{sup 16} and ∼5 × 10{sup 17}, respectively. In addition, the authors have achieved PAMBE growth of GaN at a substrate temperature more than 150 °C greater than our standard Ga rich GaN growth regime and ∼100 °C greater than any previously reported PAMBE growth of GaN. This growth temperature corresponds to GaN decomposition in vacuum of more than 20 nm/min; a regime previously unattainable with conventional nitrogen plasma sources. Arrhenius analysis of the decomposition rate shows that samples with a flux ratio below stoichiometry have an activation energy greater than decomposition of GaN in vacuum while samples grown at or above stoichiometry have decreased activation energy. The activation energy of decomposition for GaN in vacuum was previously determined to be ∼3.1 eV. For a Ga/N flux ratio of ∼1.5, this activation energy was found to be ∼2.8 eV, while for a Ga/N flux ratio of ∼0.5, it was found to be ∼7.9 eV.

  1. Dynamics of Rovibrational Energy Transfer from Excited Molecular - Crossed Beam Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Hong

    1990-01-01

    Rovibrational inelastic scattering has been studied for the collisions between helium and excited molecular iodine (I_2) in a crossed beam apparatus. I _2 was initially prepared in two vibrational states, upsilon' = 15 and 35, in the B O_{rm u }^ + electronic state. Dispersed single vibrational level fluorescence spectra revealed the vibrational inelastic scattering. The collision energy (Ecm) was varied from 35meV to 190meV. Vibrational state changes up to | Deltaupsilon| = 6 in upsilon' = 35 and | Deltaupsilon| = 3 in upsilon' = 15 were observed. Nearly 200 relative vibrational state-to-state inelastic scattering cross sections were measured. At each Ecm, all the cross sections for both upsilon' = 15 and 35 can be fitted by a single exponential function sigma ~ exp(-| Delta rm E|/beta). At high Ecm, beta_{rm Vto T} is equal to beta_{rm Tto V}. At low ECM, beta _{rm Vto T} is larger than beta_{rm Tto V}. However, all beta's are linear functions of Ecm. Also the cross sections for the Deltaupsilon = +/-1 scattering are nearly independent of Ecm. Considering that the collisions are not adiabatic, these results are not consistent with the well-known Landau-Teller theory. Using the empirical dependence of the cross sections on Ecm, we calculated the thermal rate constants. The calculation at 300K agrees with the bulb experiment for V to T but not for T to V transitions. The calculation also shows that the bulb energy transfer is mainly induced by collisions with velocities ~2 times larger than the most probable velocity. From the cross sections, mean energy transfer per vibrationally inelastic collision, < Deltarm E>, was also obtained. The results show that < Deltarm E> increases linearly with Ecm and levels off to near-zero at high collision energy. At low Ecm, < Deltarm E> in upsilon' = 15 is larger than that in upsilon' = 35. The average rotational energy transfered increases almost linearly with Ecm but is small, only ~ 2% of the Ecm. This is a direct result of

  2. Topological insulator engineering of Bi2Se3 through molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Seongshik

    2013-03-01

    Despite numerous reports proving the presence of the surface states on various topological insulator (TI) materials, all existing TI materials suffer from the bulk conductance problem at various levels. Therefore, achieving a truly insulating bulk state without degrading the surface state in their transport properties is one of the most important tasks of the TI materials research. In this talk, I will present how we address this problem by utilizing various molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) schemes with focus on Bi2Se3 family of materials. Considering that the bulk conductance problem originates mostly from the selenium vacancies in Bi2Se3, the typical MBE growth condition characterized by low growth temperature and high selenium vapor pressure is ideal for solving this bulk conductance problem. Moreover, thin films have another advantage of naturally reduced bulk effect due to the enhanced surface-to-bulk ratio. These intrinsic advantages of MBE-grown TI thin films recently led to a number of new findings. High quality Bi2Se3 thin films did show the expected dominant surface transport characters with negligible bulk conductance. However, the strong tendency toward downward band bending in undoped Bi2Se3 introduces trivial surface transport channels in addition to the topological surface states, leading to complications in the interpretations of transport results. Furthermore, even if reducing the thickness of TI samples helps reveal the surface transport channels by reducing the bulk contribution, it does not really solve the bulk conductance problem because regardless of how small it may be, the bulk state still remains metallic, shorting the top and bottom surfaces. According to the Mott-criterion of metal-insulator transition, in order to implement a truly insulating bulk state in the current generation TI materials, it is necessary to suppress the defect density below ~ 1014 cm-3, which might be fundamentally impossible considering the weak Van der Waals bonding

  3. Quantum Devices and Structures Using Si-Based Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-15

    Torr. The system has electron-beam evaporators for silicon and germanium , and a RHEED for in situ characterization of films. The accelera- tion voltage...The system has two electron beam evaporators for silicon and germanium deposition, and several effusion cells for doping. For this experiment, (100...negative resistance ( NDR ). As the temperature of the sample decreased, the peak- to-valley ratio of the peak at 2.5 V increases and the peak at 1.1 V

  4. Pulmonary ablation: a primer.

    PubMed

    Roberton, Benjamin J; Liu, David; Power, Mark; Wan, John M C; Stuart, Sam; Klass, Darren; Yee, John

    2014-05-01

    Percutaneous image-guided thermal ablation is safe and efficacious in achieving local control and improving outcome in the treatment of both early stage non-small-cell lung cancer and pulmonary metastatic disease, in which surgical treatment is precluded by comorbidity, poor cardiorespiratory reserve, or unfavorable disease distribution. Radiofrequency ablation is the most established technology, but new thermal ablation technologies such as microwave ablation and cryoablation may offer some advantages. The use of advanced techniques, such as induced pneumothorax and the popsicle stick technique, or combining thermal ablation with radiotherapy, widens the treatment options available to the multidisciplinary team. The intent of this article is to provide the reader with a practical knowledge base of pulmonary ablation by concentrating on indications, techniques, and follow-up.

  5. Renal Ablation Update

    PubMed Central

    Khiatani, Vishal; Dixon, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    Thermal ablative technologies have evolved considerably in the recent past and are now an important component of current clinical guidelines for the treatment of small renal masses. Both radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation have intermediate-term oncologic control that rivals surgical options, with favorable complication profiles. Studies comparing cryoablation and radiofrequency ablation show no significant difference in oncologic control or complication profile between the two modalities. Early data from small series with microwave ablation have shown similar promising results. Newer technologies including irreversible electroporation and high-intensity–focused ultrasound have theoretical advantages, but will require further research before becoming a routine part of the ablation armamentarium. The purpose of this review article is to discuss the current ablative technologies available, briefly review their mechanisms of action, discuss technical aspects of each, and provide current data supporting their use. PMID:25049445

  6. Radiation-induced second primary cancer risks from modern external beam radiotherapy for early prostate cancer: impact of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and flattening filter free (FFF) radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Louise J.; Thompson, Christopher M.; Lilley, John; Cosgrove, Vivian; Franks, Kevin; Sebag-Montefiore, David; Henry, Ann M.

    2015-02-01

    Risks of radiation-induced second primary cancer following prostate radiotherapy using 3D-conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), flattening filter free (FFF) and stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) were evaluated. Prostate plans were created using 10 MV 3D-CRT (78 Gy in 39 fractions) and 6 MV 5-field IMRT (78 Gy in 39 fractions), VMAT (78 Gy in 39 fractions, with standard flattened and energy-matched FFF beams) and SABR (42.7 Gy in 7 fractions with standard flattened and energy-matched FFF beams). Dose-volume histograms from pelvic planning CT scans of three prostate patients, each planned using all 6 techniques, were used to calculate organ equivalent doses (OED) and excess absolute risks (EAR) of second rectal and bladder cancers, and pelvic bone and soft tissue sarcomas, using mechanistic, bell-shaped and plateau models. For organs distant to the treatment field, chamber measurements recorded in an anthropomorphic phantom were used to calculate OEDs and EARs using a linear model. Ratios of OED give relative radiation-induced second cancer risks. SABR resulted in lower second cancer risks at all sites relative to 3D-CRT. FFF resulted in lower second cancer risks in out-of-field tissues relative to equivalent flattened techniques, with increasing impact in organs at greater distances from the field. For example, FFF reduced second cancer risk by up to 20% in the stomach and up to 56% in the brain, relative to the equivalent flattened technique. Relative to 10 MV 3D-CRT, 6 MV IMRT or VMAT with flattening filter increased second cancer risks in several out-of-field organs, by up to 26% and 55%, respectively. For all techniques, EARs were consistently low. The observed large relative differences between techniques, in absolute terms, were very low, highlighting the importance of considering absolute risks alongside the corresponding relative risks, since when absolute

  7. On the phase shift of reflection high energy electron diffraction intensity oscillations during Ge(001) homoepitaxy by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Shin Byungha; Leonard, John P.; McCamy, James W.; Aziz, Michael J.

    2007-03-15

    The authors have conducted a systematic investigation of the phase shift of the reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) intensity oscillations during homoepitaxy of Ge(001) by molecular beam epitaxy for a wide range of diffraction conditions. Their results show that for small incidence angles with a beam azimuth several degrees away from the <110> crystallographic symmetry direction, the phase is independent of incidence angle; however, it starts to shift once the incidence angle is high enough that the (004) Kikuchi line appears in the RHEED pattern. Moreover, under some conditions they observe the oscillations from only the Kikuchi feature and not from the specular spot, and the oscillatory behavior of the Kikuchi feature is almost out of phase with that of the specular spot. They conclude that the phase shift is caused by the overlap of the specular spot and the Kikuchi features, in contrast to models involving dynamical scattering theory for the phase shift. They discuss necessary conditions for avoiding interference.

  8. Radiofrequency Ablation of Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Marc; Mikityansky, Igor; Kam, Anthony; Libutti, Steven K.; Walther, McClellan M.; Neeman, Ziv; Locklin, Julia K.; Wood, Bradford J.

    2004-09-15

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has been used for over 18 years for treatment of nerve-related chronic pain and cardiac arrhythmias. In the last 10 years, technical developments have increased ablation volumes in a controllable, versatile, and relatively inexpensive manner. The host of clinical applications for RFA have similarly expanded. Current RFA equipment, techniques, applications, results, complications, and research avenues for local tumor ablation are summarized.

  9. Self-regulated growth of LaVO{sub 3} thin films by hybrid molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hai-Tian; Engel-Herbert, Roman; Dedon, Liv R.; Martin, Lane W.

    2015-06-08

    LaVO{sub 3} thin films were grown on SrTiO{sub 3} (001) by hybrid molecular beam epitaxy. A volatile metalorganic precursor, vanadium oxytriisopropoxide (VTIP), and elemental La were co-supplied in the presence of a molecular oxygen flux. By keeping the La flux fixed and varying the VTIP flux, stoichiometric LaVO{sub 3} films were obtained for a range of cation flux ratios, indicating the presence of a self-regulated growth window. Films grown under stoichiometric conditions were found to have the largest lattice parameter, which decreased monotonically with increasing amounts of excess La or V. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering measurements were carried out to confirm film compositions. Stoichiometric growth of complex vanadate thin films independent of cation flux ratios expands upon the previously reported self-regulated growth of perovskite titanates using hybrid molecular beam epitaxy, thus demonstrating the general applicability of this growth approach to other complex oxide materials, where a precise control over film stoichiometry is demanded by the application.

  10. Lung Ablation: Whats New?

    PubMed

    Xiong, Lillian; Dupuy, Damian E

    2016-07-01

    Lung cancer had an estimated incidence of 221,200 in 2015, making up 13% of all cancer diagnoses. Tumor ablation is an important treatment option for nonsurgical lung cancer and pulmonary metastatic patients. Radiofrequency ablation has been used for over a decade with newer modalities, microwave ablation, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation presenting as additional and possibly improved treatment options for patients. This minimally invasive therapy is best for small primary lesions or favorably located metastatic tumors. These technologies can offer palliation and sometimes cure of thoracic malignancies. This article discusses the current available technologies and techniques available for tumor ablation.

  11. Molecular beam mass spectrometer equipped with a catalytic wall reactor for in situ studies in high temperature catalysis research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, R.; Ihmann, K.; Ihmann, J.; Jentoft, F. C.; Geske, M.; Taha, A.; Pelzer, K.; Schlögl, R.

    2006-05-01

    A newly developed apparatus combining a molecular beam mass spectrometer and a catalytic wall reactor is described. The setup has been developed for in situ studies of high temperature catalytic reactions (>1000°C), which involve besides surface reactions also gas phase reactions in their mechanism. The goal is to identify gas phase radicals by threshold ionization. A tubular reactor, made from the catalytic material, is positioned in a vacuum chamber. Expansion of the gas through a 100μm sampling orifice in the reactor wall into differentially pumped nozzle, skimmer, and collimator chambers leads to the formation of a molecular beam. A quadrupole mass spectrometer with electron impact ion source designed for molecular beam inlet and threshold ionization measurements is used as the analyzer. The sampling time from nozzle to detector is estimated to be less than 10ms. A detection time resolution of up to 20ms can be reached. The temperature of the reactor is measured by pyrometry. Besides a detailed description of the setup components and the physical background of the method, this article presents measurements showing the performance of the apparatus. After deriving the shape and width of the energy spread of the ionizing electrons from measurements on N2 and He we estimated the detection limit in threshold ionization measurements using binary mixtures of CO in N2 to be in the range of several hundreds of ppm. Mass spectra and threshold ionization measurements recorded during catalytic partial oxidation of methane at 1250°C on a Pt catalyst are presented. The detection of CH3• radicals is successfully demonstrated.

  12. Molecular beam mass spectrometer equipped with a catalytic wall reactor for in situ studies in high temperature catalysis research

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, R.; Ihmann, K.; Ihmann, J.; Jentoft, F.C.; Geske, M.; Taha, A.; Pelzer, K.; Schloegl, R.

    2006-05-15

    A newly developed apparatus combining a molecular beam mass spectrometer and a catalytic wall reactor is described. The setup has been developed for in situ studies of high temperature catalytic reactions (>1000 deg. C), which involve besides surface reactions also gas phase reactions in their mechanism. The goal is to identify gas phase radicals by threshold ionization. A tubular reactor, made from the catalytic material, is positioned in a vacuum chamber. Expansion of the gas through a 100 {mu}m sampling orifice in the reactor wall into differentially pumped nozzle, skimmer, and collimator chambers leads to the formation of a molecular beam. A quadrupole mass spectrometer with electron impact ion source designed for molecular beam inlet and threshold ionization measurements is used as the analyzer. The sampling time from nozzle to detector is estimated to be less than 10 ms. A detection time resolution of up to 20 ms can be reached. The temperature of the reactor is measured by pyrometry. Besides a detailed description of the setup components and the physical background of the method, this article presents measurements showing the performance of the apparatus. After deriving the shape and width of the energy spread of the ionizing electrons from measurements on N{sub 2} and He we estimated the detection limit in threshold ionization measurements using binary mixtures of CO in N{sub 2} to be in the range of several hundreds of ppm. Mass spectra and threshold ionization measurements recorded during catalytic partial oxidation of methane at 1250 deg. C on a Pt catalyst are presented. The detection of CH{sub 3}{center_dot} radicals is successfully demonstrated.

  13. Ablative Thermal Protection System Fundamentals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, Robin A. S.

    2013-01-01

    This is the presentation for a short course on the fundamentals of ablative thermal protection systems. It covers the definition of ablation, description of ablative materials, how they work, how to analyze them and how to model them.

  14. Focused ion beam source method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Pellin, Michael J.; Lykke, Keith R.; Lill, Thorsten B.

    2000-01-01

    A focused ion beam having a cross section of submicron diameter, a high ion current, and a narrow energy range is generated from a target comprised of particle source material by laser ablation. The method involves directing a laser beam having a cross section of critical diameter onto the target, producing a cloud of laser ablated particles having unique characteristics, and extracting and focusing a charged particle beam from the laser ablated cloud. The method is especially suited for producing focused ion beams for semiconductor device analysis and modification.

  15. A buffer gas cooled beam of barium monohydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, Geoffrey; Tarallo, Marco; Zelevinsky, Tanya

    2016-05-01

    Significant advances in direct laser cooling of diatomic molecules have opened up a wide array of molecular species to precision studies spanning many-body physics, quantum collisions and ultracold dissociation. We present a cryogenic beam source of barium monohydride (BaH), and study laser ablation of solid precursor targets as well as helium buffer gas cooling dynamics. Additionally, we cover progress towards a molecular magneto-optical trap, with spectroscopic studies of relevant cooling transitions in the B2 Σ <--X2 Σ manifold in laser ablated molecules, including resolution of hyperfine structure and precision measurements of the vibrational Frank-Condon factors. Finally, we examine the feasibility of photo dissociation of trapped BaH molecules to yield optically accessible samples of ultracold hydrogen.

  16. Influence of thickness on crystallinity in wafer-scale GaTe nanolayers grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Che Jin; McMahon, Jonathan; Detz, Hermann; Strasser, Gottfried; Park, Junsung; Einarsson, Erik; Eason, D. B.

    2017-03-01

    We grew wafer-scale, uniform nanolayers of gallium telluride (GaTe) on gallium arsenide (GaAs) substrates using molecular beam epitaxy. These films initially formed in a hexagonal close-packed structure (h-GaTe), but monoclinic (m-GaTe) crystalline elements began to form as the film thicknesses increased to more than approximately 90 nm. We confirmed the coexistence of these two crystalline forms using x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy, and we attribute the thickness-dependent structural change to internal stress induced by lattice mismatch with the substrate and to natural lattice relaxation at the growth conditions.

  17. Improving stability of photoluminescence of ZnSe thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy by incorporating Cl dopant

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J. S.; Shen, J. L.; Chen, W. J.; Tsai, Y. H.; Wang, H. H.; Yang, C. S.; Chen, R. H.; Tsai, C. D.

    2011-01-10

    This investigation studies the effect of chlorine (Cl) dopant in ZnSe thin films that were grown by molecular beam epitaxy on their photoluminescence (PL) and the stability thereof. Free excitonic emission was observed at room-temperature in the Cl-doped sample. Photon irradiation with a wavelength of 404 nm and a power density of 9.1 W/cm{sup 2} has a much stronger effect on PL degradation than does thermal heating to a temperature of 150 deg. C. Additionally, this study shows that the generation of nonradiative centers by both photon irradiation and thermal heating can be greatly inhibited by incorporating Cl dopant.

  18. Heavily boron-doped Si layers grown below 700 C by molecular beam epitaxy using a HBO2 source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, T. L.; Fathauer, R. W.; Grunthaner, P. J.

    1989-01-01

    Boron doping in Si layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) at 500-700 C using an HBO2 source has been studied. The maximum boron concentration without detectable oxygen incorporation for a given substrate temperature and Si growth rate has been determined using secondary-ion mass spectrometry analysis. Boron present in the Si MBE layers grown at 550-700 C was found to be electrically active, independent of the amount of oxygen incorporation. By reducing the Si growth rate, highly boron-doped layers have been grown at 600 C without detectable oxygen incorporation.

  19. In-situ epitaxial growth of graphene/h-BN van der Waals heterostructures by molecular beam epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Zheng; Xu, Zhongguang; Zheng, Renjing; Khanaki, Alireza; Zheng, Jian-Guo; Liu, Jianlin

    2015-10-07

    Van der Waals materials have received a great deal of attention for their exceptional layered structures and exotic properties, which can open up various device applications in nanoelectronics. However, in situ epitaxial growth of dissimilar van der Waals materials remains challenging. Here we demonstrate a solution for fabricating van der Waals heterostructures. Graphene/hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) heterostructures were synthesized on cobalt substrates by using molecular beam epitaxy. Various characterizations were carried out to evaluate the heterostructures. Wafer-scale heterostructures consisting of single-layer/bilayer graphene and multilayer h-BN were achieved. The mismatch angle between graphene and h-BN is below 1°.

  20. Catalyst-free growth of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanostructures by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, S. E.; Schönherr, P.; Hesjedal, T.; Huo, Y.; Harris, J. S.

    2014-10-13

    We present the catalyst-free growth of binary Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} topological insulator nanostructures on c-plane sapphire substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. Dense arrays of single-crystalline nanostructures, growing along the [110] direction, are obtained for substrate temperatures ranging from ∼180 °C to 260 °C. The growth rate and shape of the nanostructures are highly temperature-dependent. The microscopic study of the nanostructures and their relationship to the underlying Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} thin film gives an insight into the growth mechanism.

  1. Nucleation, Growth, and Bundling of GaN Nanowires in Molecular Beam Epitaxy: Disentangling the Origin of Nanowire Coalescence.

    PubMed

    Kaganer, Vladimir M; Fernández-Garrido, Sergio; Dogan, Pinar; Sabelfeld, Karl K; Brandt, Oliver

    2016-06-08

    We investigate the nucleation, growth, and coalescence of spontaneously formed GaN nanowires in molecular beam epitaxy combining the statistical analysis of scanning electron micrographs with Monte Carlo growth models. We find that (i) the nanowire density is limited by the shadowing of the substrate from the impinging fluxes by already existing nanowires, (ii) shortly after the nucleation stage, nanowire radial growth becomes negligible, and (iii) coalescence is caused by bundling of nanowires. The latter phenomenon is driven by the gain of surface energy at the expense of the elastic energy of bending and becomes energetically favorable once the nanowires exceed a certain critical length.

  2. Optical properties of strain-free AlN nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy on Si substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Q.; Zhao, S.; Connie, A. T.; Shih, I.; Mi, Z.; Gonzalez, T.; Andrews, M. P.; Du, X. Z.; Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X.

    2014-06-02

    The optical properties of catalyst-free AlN nanowires grown on Si substrates by molecular beam epitaxy were investigated. Such nanowires are nearly free of strain, with strong free exciton emission measured at room temperature. The photoluminescence intensity is significantly enhanced, compared to previously reported AlN epilayer. Moreover, the presence of phonon replicas with an energy separation of ∼100 meV was identified to be associated with the surface-optical phonon rather than the commonly reported longitudinal-optical phonon, which is further supported by the micro-Raman scattering experiments.

  3. Influence of substrate orientation on the structural quality of GaAs nanowires in molecular beam epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi; Shi, Sui-Xing; Chen, Ping-Ping; Lu, Wei; Zou, Jin

    2015-01-26

    In this study, the effect of substrate orientation on the structural quality of Au-catalyzed epitaxial GaAs nanowires grown by a molecular beam epitaxy reactor has been investigated. It was found that the substrate orientations can be used to manipulate the nanowire catalyst composition and the catalyst surface energy and, therefore, to alter the structural quality of GaAs nanowires grown on different substrates. Defect-free wurtzite-structured GaAs nanowires grown on the GaAs (110) substrate have been achieved under our growth conditions.

  4. Fabrication of IrSi(3)/p-Si Schottky diodes by a molecular beam epitaxy technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, T. L.; Iannelli, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    IrSi(3)/p-Si Schottky diodes have been fabricated by a molecular beam epitaxy technique at 630 C. Good surface morphology was observed for IrSi(3) layers grown at temperatures below 680 C, and an increasing tendency to form islands is observed in samples grown at higher temperatures. Good diode current-voltage characteristics were observed and Schottky barrier heights of 0.14-0.18 eV were determined by activation energy analysis and spectral response measurement.

  5. Growth and characterization of GaAs layers on Si substrates by migration-enhanced molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jae-Hoon; Liu, John K.; Radhakrishnan, Gouri; Katz, Joseph; Sakai, Shiro

    1988-01-01

    Migration-enhanced molecular beam epitaxial (MEMBE) growth and characterization of the GaAs layer on Si substrates (GaAs/Si) are reported. The MEMBE growth method is described, and material properties are compared with those of normal two-step MBE-grown or in situ annealed layers. Micrographs of cross-section view transmission electron microscopy and scanning surface electron microscopy of MEMBE-grown GaAs/Si showed dislocation densities of 10 to the 7th/sq cm. AlGaAs/GaAs double heterostructures have been successfully grown on MEMBE GaAs/Si by both metalorganic chemical vapor deposition and liquid phase epitaxy.

  6. Molecular beam epitaxy growth of Al-rich AlGaN nanowires for deep ultraviolet optoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, S.; Woo, S. Y.; Sadaf, S. M.; Wu, Y.; Pofelski, A.; Laleyan, D. A.; Rashid, R. T.; Wang, Y.; Botton, G. A.; Mi, Z.

    2016-08-01

    Self-organized AlGaN nanowires by molecular beam epitaxy have attracted significant attention for deep ultraviolet optoelectronics. However, due to the strong compositional modulations under conventional nitrogen rich growth conditions, emission wavelengths less than 250 nm have remained inaccessible. Here we show that Al-rich AlGaN nanowires with much improved compositional uniformity can be achieved in a new growth paradigm, wherein a precise control on the optical bandgap of ternary AlGaN nanowires can be achieved by varying the substrate temperature. AlGaN nanowire LEDs, with emission wavelengths spanning from 236 to 280 nm, are also demonstrated.

  7. Emission control of InGaN nanocolumns grown by molecular-beam epitaxy on Si(111) substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, S.; Bengoechea-Encabo, A.; Sanchez-Garcia, M. A.; Calleja, E.; Jahn, U.; Trampert, A.

    2011-09-26

    This work studies the effect of the growth temperature on the morphology and emission characteristics of self-assembled InGaN nanocolumns grown by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Morphology changes are assessed by scanning electron microscopy, while emission is measured by photoluminescence. Within the growth temperature range of 750 to 650 deg. C, an increase in In incorporation for decreasing temperature is observed. This effect allows tailoring the InGaN nanocolumns emission line shape by using temperature gradients during growth. Depending on the gradient rate, span, and sign, broad emission line shapes are obtained, covering the yellow to green range, even yielding white emission.

  8. High electron mobility GaN grown under N-rich conditions by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Koblmueller, G.; Wu, F.; Mates, T.; Speck, J. S.; Fernandez-Garrido, S.; Calleja, E.

    2007-11-26

    An alternative approach is presented for the plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy of high-quality GaN. Under N-rich growth conditions, an unexpected layer-by-layer growth mode was found for a wide range of growth temperatures in the GaN thermal decomposition regime (>750 deg. C). Consequently, superior surface morphologies with roughness of less than 1 nm (rms) have been achieved. For lightly Si-doped GaN films, room-temperature electron mobilities exceeding 1100 cm{sup 2}/V s were measured, surpassing the commonly insulating nature of GaN grown under N-rich conditions at low temperature.

  9. A growth diagram for plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy of GaN nanocolumns on Si(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Garrido, S.; Grandal, J.; Calleja, E.; Sanchez-Garcia, M. A.; Lopez-Romero, D.

    2009-12-15

    The morphology of GaN samples grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy on Si(111) was systematically studied as a function of impinging Ga/N flux ratio and growth temperature (730-850 deg. C). Two different growth regimes were identified: compact and nanocolumnar. A growth diagram was established as a function of growth parameters, exhibiting the transition between growth regimes, and showing under which growth conditions GaN cannot be grown due to thermal decomposition and Ga desorption. Present results indicate that adatoms diffusion length and the actual Ga/N ratio on the growing surface are key factors to achieve nanocolumnar growth.

  10. Chirped-pulse manipulated carrier dynamics in low-temperature molecular-beam-epitaxy grown GaAs

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chao-Kuei; Lin, Yuan-Yao; Lin, Sung-Hui; Lin, Gong-Ru; Pan, Ci-Ling

    2014-04-28

    Chirped pulse controlled carrier dynamics in low-temperature molecular-beam-epitaxy grown GaAs are investigated by degenerate pump-probe technique. Varying the chirped condition of excited pulse from negative to positive increases the carrier relaxation time so as to modify the dispersion and reshape current pulse in time domain. The spectral dependence of carrier dynamics is analytically derived and explained by Shockley-Read Hall model. This observation enables the new feasibility of controlling carrier dynamics in ultrafast optical devices via the chirped pulse excitations.

  11. Insights in High-Temperature Superconductivity from the Study of Films and Heterostructures Synthesized by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Bozovic,I.

    2009-01-09

    Using molecular beam epitaxy, we synthesize atomically smooth thin films, multilayers and superlattices of cuprate high-temperature superconductors (HTS). Such heterostructures enable novel experiments that probe the basicphysics of HTS. For example, we have established that HTS and antiferromagnetic phases separate on Ångstrom scale, while the pseudo-gap state apparently mixes with HTS over an anomalously large length scale ('Giant Proximity Effect'). Here, we briefly review our most recent experiments on such films and superlattices. The new results include an unambiguous demonstration of strong coupling of in-plane charge excitations to out-of-plane lattice vibrations and the discovery of interface HTS.

  12. Electrical properties of InAs1-xSbx and InSb nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thelander, Claes; Caroff, Philippe; Plissard, Sébastien; Dick, Kimberly A.

    2012-06-01

    Results of electrical characterization of Au nucleated InAs1-xSbx nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy are reported. An almost doubling of the extracted field effect mobility compared to reference InAs nanowires is observed for a Sb content of x = 0.13. Pure InSb nanowires on the other hand show considerably lower, and strongly diameter dependent, mobility values. Finally, InAs of wurtzite crystal phase overgrown with an InAs1-xSbx shell is found to have a substantial positive shift in threshold voltage compared to reference nanowires.

  13. Inhomogeneous Si-doping of gold-seeded InAs nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolland, Chloé; Caroff, Philippe; Coinon, Christophe; Wallart, Xavier; Leturcq, Renaud

    2013-06-01

    We have investigated in situ Si doping of InAs nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy from gold seeds. The effectiveness of n-type doping is confirmed by electrical measurements showing an increase of the electron density with the Si flux. We also observe an increase of the electron density along the nanowires from the tip to the base, attributed to the dopant incorporation on the nanowire facets whereas no detectable incorporation occurs through the seed. Furthermore, the Si incorporation strongly influences the lateral growth of the nanowires without giving rise to significant tapering, revealing the complex interplay between axial and lateral growth.

  14. Ultraviolet light-emitting diodes grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy on semipolar GaN (2021) substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Sawicka, M.; Grzanka, S.; Skierbiszewski, C.; Turski, H.; Muziol, G.; Krysko, M.; Grzanka, E.; Sochacki, T.; Siekacz, M.; Kucharski, R.

    2013-03-18

    Multi-quantum well (MQW) structures and light emitting diodes (LEDs) were grown on semipolar (2021) and polar (0001) GaN substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The In incorporation efficiency was found to be significantly lower for the semipolar plane as compared to the polar one. The semipolar MQWs exhibit a smooth surface morphology, abrupt interfaces, and a high photoluminescence intensity. The electroluminescence of semipolar (2021) and polar (0001) LEDs fabricated in the same growth run peaks at 387 and 462 nm, respectively. Semipolar LEDs with additional (Al,Ga)N cladding layers exhibit a higher optical output power but simultaneously a higher turn-on voltage.

  15. In-situ epitaxial growth of graphene/h-BN van der Waals heterostructures by molecular beam epitaxy

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Zheng; Xu, Zhongguang; Zheng, Renjing; Khanaki, Alireza; Zheng, Jian-Guo; Liu, Jianlin

    2015-01-01

    Van der Waals materials have received a great deal of attention for their exceptional layered structures and exotic properties, which can open up various device applications in nanoelectronics. However, in situ epitaxial growth of dissimilar van der Waals materials remains challenging. Here we demonstrate a solution for fabricating van der Waals heterostructures. Graphene/hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) heterostructures were synthesized on cobalt substrates by using molecular beam epitaxy. Various characterizations were carried out to evaluate the heterostructures. Wafer-scale heterostructures consisting of single-layer/bilayer graphene and multilayer h-BN were achieved. The mismatch angle between graphene and h-BN is below 1°. PMID:26442629

  16. Effect of Growth Pause on Indium Gallium Phosphorus/gallium Arsenic Heterointerfaces during Gas-Source Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyong Yong

    Molecular beam epitaxial (MBE) growth of InGaP/GaAs quantum-well structures requires switching of the arsenic and phosphorus beams at each heterointerface. Using in -situ reflection high energy electron diffraction, double crystal X-ray (DCXR) diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy, the effects of a growth pause on the interfacial structure and composition of lattice-matched InGaP/GaAs multiple quantum well structures were studied. For the purpose of this study growth pause at each interface was divided into two time periods: the interval (denoted by t_1) after stopping growth by closing the group-III shutters but before switching the group-V beams, and the interval (t_2) after switching the group-V beams but before recommencing growth. The effect of the As_2 beam on the GaAs growth front and the P_2 beam on the InGaP growth front was first studied. An atomically smooth GaAs surface was obtained with about 30 sec of pause in an As_2 beam. With the experimental methods used, the InGaP growth front did not show any major structural changes with increasing growth pause time. The GaAs-to-InGaP interface is found to be composed of one to two monolayers of GaAs_ {y}P_{1-y} (0 < y < 0.05) and the InGaP-to-GaAs interface is composed of one to two monolayers of In_{.5}Ga_ {.5}As_{y}P _{1-y} (0 < y < 0.05). This requires an exchange of As and P in the uppermost group-V atoms. The effect of an As_2 beam on the InGaP surface and an P_2 beam on the GaAs surface was next studied. For t _2 < 20 sec, atomically flat heterointerfaces were obtained and both the GaAs-to-InGaP and the InGaP -to-GaAs interfaces were found to be composed of group-V exchange strained layers. For t_2 >=q 60 sec a wavy interface was obtained. The irregularities of the interface may be the result of the As and P exchange mechanism. The experimental results show that a combination of an As_2 beam on the InGaP surface and a P_2 beam on the GaAs surface lasting 2 min produces rougher growth fronts

  17. Laser ablation of a turbid medium: Modeling and experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Brygo, F.; Semerok, A.; Weulersse, J.-M.; Thro, P.-Y.; Oltra, R.

    2006-08-01

    Q-switched Nd:YAG laser ablation of a turbid medium (paint) is studied. The optical properties (absorption coefficient, scattering coefficient, and its anisotropy) of a paint are determined with a multiple scattering model (three-flux model), and from measurements of reflection-transmission of light through thin layers. The energy deposition profiles are calculated at wavelengths of 532 nm and 1.064 {mu}m. They are different from those described by a Lambert-Beer law. In particular, the energy deposition of the laser beam is not maximum on the surface but at some depth inside the medium. The ablated rate was measured for the two wavelengths and compared with the energy deposition profile predicted by the model. This allows us to understand the evolution of the ablated depth with the wavelength: the more the scattering coefficient is higher, the more the ablated depth and the threshold fluence of ablation decrease.

  18. Gas source molecular beam epitaxy of scandium nitride on silicon carbide and gallium nitride surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    King, Sean W. Davis, Robert F.; Nemanich, Robert J.

    2014-11-01

    Scandium nitride (ScN) is a group IIIB transition metal nitride semiconductor with numerous potential applications in electronic and optoelectronic devices due to close lattice matching with gallium nitride (GaN). However, prior investigations of ScN have focused primarily on heteroepitaxial growth on substrates with a high lattice mismatch of 7%–20%. In this study, the authors have investigated ammonia (NH{sub 3}) gas source molecular beam epitaxy (NH{sub 3}-GSMBE) of ScN on more closely lattice matched silicon carbide (SiC) and GaN surfaces (<3% mismatch). Based on a thermodynamic analysis of the ScN phase stability window, NH{sub 3}-GSMBE conditions of 10{sup −5}–10{sup −4} Torr NH{sub 3} and 800–1050 °C where selected for initial investigation. In-situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and ex-situ Rutherford backscattering measurements showed all ScN films grown using these conditions were stoichiometric. For ScN growth on 3C-SiC (111)-(√3 × √3)R30° carbon rich surfaces, the observed attenuation of the XPS Si 2p and C 1s substrate core levels with increasing ScN thickness indicated growth initiated in a layer-by-layer fashion. This was consistent with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of 100–200 nm thick films that revealed featureless surfaces. In contrast, ScN films grown on 3C-SiC (111)-(3 × 3) and 3C-SiC (100)-(3 × 2) silicon rich surfaces were found to exhibit extremely rough surfaces in SEM. ScN films grown on both 3C-SiC (111)-(√3 × √3)R30° and 2H-GaN (0001)-(1 × 1) epilayer surfaces exhibited hexagonal (1 × 1) low energy electron diffraction patterns indicative of (111) oriented ScN. X-ray diffraction ω-2θ rocking curve scans for these same films showed a large full width half maximum of 0.29° (1047 arc sec) consistent with transmission electron microscopy images that revealed the films to be poly-crystalline with columnar grains oriented at ≈15° to the [0001] direction of the

  19. Molecular Beam Epitaxial Growth and Characterization of the Modulated Structures for Detector Applications.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piao, Jie

    Motivated by potential 8-12 μm IR detector applications as alternatives to the Hg _{rm x}Cd_ {rm 1-x}Te system, we have studied two types of material systems. One is the GeSn alloy, the other is the (Al,Ga)Sb system. The results of the GeSn study shows that substrate-stabilized, metastable, single-crystal Ge_{rm 1-x} Sn_{rm x} alloy can be grown by molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE). We have grown for the first time single crystal Ge _{rm 1-x}Sn_ {rm x} alloys on lattice matched GaSb (with x = 0.5) and InP (with x = 0.26) substrates up to a thickness of 0.3 mum. Our x-ray result suggests that the critical thickness of Grey Tin and Ge_{rm 1-x}Sn _{rm x} single crystal film is mainly determined by a phase transition mechanism, and that the dislocation generation equivalent critical thickness is an overestimate. We have shown theoretically that under practical MBE growth conditions, it is very difficult to grow thick film, due to the sensitivity of the critical thickness to composition fluctuations. The study of the (Al,Ga)Sb system shows the following results: (A) Above 540^circC, the Sb-stabilized surface (1 x 3) pattern changes to c(8 x 2), a Ga-stabilized surface. Because the c(8 x 2) surface has been observed on all other III-V arsenides, phosphides, and antimonides, the c(8 x 2) metal-stabilized surface is common to all III-V compounds, and this finding suggests that bond pairing is the universal reconstruction mechanism. (B) We have formulated/calculated under the envelope function approximation the oscillator strength and finite temperature absorption coefficient of indirect conduction band intersubband transition in L-like Al_{rm x }Ga_{rm 1-x} Sb/AlSb multiple quantum well (MQW), and proposed the indirect intersubband transition infrared detector based on L-like Al_{.3}Ga _{.7}Sb/AlSb MQW. Our calculations show that Al_{.3} Ga_{.7}Sb/AlSb system is superior than GaAs/AlGaAS system for potential 8-12mum infrared detector applications. (C) We have for the first

  20. Electrical transport studies of molecular beam epitaxy grown gallium manganese arsenide epilayers and heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Meng

    2008-10-01

    Diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMS) grown by molecular beam epitaxy have been drawing attention in the context of emerging spintronics, which utilizes electron spins to develop devices with new functionalities. The canonical DMS---(Ga,Mn)As---has been on center stage for almost a decade, and extensive efforts have been dedicated to understanding its hole-mediated ferromagnetism, optimizing growth and annealing conditions to achieve higher-Tc, studying the magneto-transport, exploiting its abundant magnetic anisotropy, and so on. This dissertation focuses on three aspects of the study of (Ga,Mn)As: (1) Magneto-transport under hard magnetization reversal; (2) Electrical noise properties; and (3) Exchange-biasing and spin-dependent transport in (Ga,Mn)As/MnAs hybrid structures. The first chapter provides the motivation for this dissertation and introduces several aspects of the current understanding of (Ga,Mn)As. Both the theoretical models and experimentally established observations are reviewed, focusing on the magnetic and transport properties of (Ga,Mn)As epilayers. Next, the hybrid ferromagnetic metal/semiconductor heterostructures are introduced. As an excellent candidate for making these heterostructures, the semi-metal MnAs is reviewed in terms of its structural and magnetic properties, which are essential for making the exchange-biased devices described in Chapter 5 and Chapter 6. The second chapter describes the experimental techniques encompassed in the scope of this dissertation. Several important techniques, such as MBE growth, device patterning, magnetometry and transport measurements are discussed. The third chapter reports the first experiment in this dissertation, which describes the longitudinal magnetoresistance (MR) anomalies of a (Ga,Mn)As epilayer experiencing hard axis magnetization reversal in an perpendicular magnetic field. By probing the MRs for currents running along different crystallographic directions, the origins of these anomalies