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Sample records for ablation molecular beam

  1. Electron Beam Ablation of Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovaleski, S. D.; Gilgenbach, R. M.; Rintamaki, J. I.; Ang, L. K.; Spindler, H. L.; Cohen, W. E.; Lau, Y. Y.; Lash, J. S.

    1996-10-01

    An experiment has recently been devised for material ablation using a channelspark electron beam. The ultimate goal of this experiment is to deposit thin films by electron beam ablation. The channelspark is a pseudospark device developed by Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (G. Muller, C. Schultheiss, Proc. of Beams, 2, 833(1994)) for production of high current, low energy electron beams. The channelspark has the following operating parameters: a 15-20kV accelerating potential and measured source current of <2000A. Initial experiments have concentrated on characterizing ion-focused electron beam current transport through the necessary background fill gas (typically 5-50 mTorr of Argon). Ablation of Al, Fe, and Ti is being studied with spectroscopy and electron beam current diagnostics. Physical beam target damage is also being investigated and compared to laser ablated targets. Simulations of electron transport and energy deposition are being conducted via the ITS-TIGER code (Sandia Report No. SAND 91-1634) developed at Sandia National Laboratory.

  2. Electron Beam Ablation and Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovaleski, S. D.; Gilgenbach, R. M.; Ang, L. K.; Lau, Y. Y.

    1997-11-01

    Ablation of fused silica, titanium nitride, and boron nitride with a channel spark electron beam is being studied. The channel spark is a low energy (15-20kV), high current (1600A) electron beam source developed at KFK(G. Muller and C. Schultheiss, Proc. of Beams `94, Vol. II, p833). This is a pseudospark device which operates in the ion focused regime of electron beam transport. For this reason, a low pressure (10-15mTorr of Ar) background gas is used to provide electron beam focusing. Plume composition and excitation has been studied via optical emission spectroscopy. Ablation has also been imaged photographically. Electron density gradients and densities are being studied through laser deflection. Film deposition experiments are also being performed. Electron transport and energy deposition in metals are being simulated in the ITS-TIGER code(Sandia Report No. SAND 91-1634).

  3. Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Richard E.; Bol'shakov, Alexander A.; Mao, Xianglei; McKay, Christopher P.; Perry, Dale L.; Sorkhabi, Osman

    2011-02-01

    A new method of performing optical isotopic analysis of condensed samples in ambient air and at ambient pressure has been developed: Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry (LAMIS). The technique uses radiative transitions from molecular species either directly vaporized from a sample or formed by associative mechanisms of atoms or ions in a laser ablation plume. This method is an advanced modification of a known atomic emission technique called laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The new method — LAMIS — can determine not only chemical composition but also isotopic ratios of elements in the sample. Isotopic measurements are enabled by significantly larger isotopic shifts found in molecular spectra relative to atomic spectra. Analysis can be performed from a distance and in real time. No sample preparation or pre-treatment is required. Detection of the isotopes of hydrogen, boron, carbon, and oxygen are discussed to illustrate the technique.

  4. Dual beam optical system for pulsed laser ablation film deposition

    DOEpatents

    Mashburn, D.N.

    1996-09-24

    A laser ablation apparatus having a laser source outputting a laser ablation beam includes an ablation chamber having a sidewall, a beam divider for dividing the laser ablation beam into two substantially equal halves, and a pair of mirrors for converging the two halves on a surface of the target from complementary angles relative to the target surface normal, thereby generating a plume of ablated material emanating from the target. 3 figs.

  5. Hydrodynamic Efficiency of Ablation Propulsion with Pulsed Ion Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Buttapeng, Chainarong; Yazawa, Masaru; Harada, Nobuhiro; Suematsu, Hisayuki; Jiang Weihua; Yatsui, Kiyoshi

    2006-05-02

    This paper presents the hydrodynamic efficiency of ablation plasma produced by pulsed ion beam on the basis of the ion beam-target interaction. We used a one-dimensional hydrodynamic fluid compressible to study the physics involved namely an ablation acceleration behavior and analyzed it as a rocketlike model in order to investigate its hydrodynamic variables for propulsion applications. These variables were estimated by the concept of ablation driven implosion in terms of ablated mass fraction, implosion efficiency, and hydrodynamic energy conversion. Herein, the energy conversion efficiency of 17.5% was achieved. In addition, the results show maximum energy efficiency of the ablation process (ablation efficiency) of 67% meaning the efficiency with which pulsed ion beam energy-ablation plasma conversion. The effects of ion beam energy deposition depth to hydrodynamic efficiency were briefly discussed. Further, an evaluation of propulsive force with high specific impulse of 4000s, total impulse of 34mN and momentum to energy ratio in the range of {mu}N/W was also analyzed.

  6. Performance and Controllability of Pulsed Ion Beam Ablation Propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Yazawa, Masaru; Buttapeng, Chainarong; Harada, Nobuhiro; Suematsu, Hisayuki; Jiang Weihua; Yatsui, Kiyoshi

    2006-05-02

    We propose novel propulsion driven by ablation plasma pressures produced by the irradiation of pulsed ion beams onto a propellant. The ion beam ablation propulsion demonstrates by a thin foil (50 {mu}mt), and the flyer velocity of 7.7 km/s at the ion beam energy density of 2 kJ/cm2 adopted by using the Time-of-flight method is observed numerically and experimentally. We estimate the performance of the ion beam ablation propulsion as specific impulse of 3600 s and impulse bit density of 1700 Ns/m2 obtained from the demonstration results. In the numerical analysis, a one-dimensional hydrodynamic model with ion beam energy depositions is used. The control of the ion beam kinetic energy is only improvement of the performance but also propellant consumption. The spacecraft driven by the ion beam ablation provides high performance efficiency with short-pulsed ion beam irradiation. The numerical results of the advanced model explained latent heat and real gas equation of state agreed well with experimental ones over a wide range of the incident ion beam energy density.

  7. Clinical Experience with Cone Beam CT Navigation for Tumor Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Abi-Jaoudeh, Nadine; Venkatesan, Aradhana M.; Van der Sterren, William; Radaelli, Alessandro; Carelsen, Bart; Wood, Bradford J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To describe clinical use and potential benefits of Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) navigation to perform image guided percutaneous tumor ablations. Materials and Methods All ablations performed between February 2011 and February 2013 using CBCT navigation, were included. Sixteen patients underwent 20 ablations for 29 lesions. CBCT ablation planning capabilities include multimodality image fusion and tumor segmentation for visualization, depiction of the predicted ablation zones for intra-procedural planning and segmentation of the ablated area for immediate post-treatment verification. Number and purpose of CBCT were examined. The initial ablation plan defined as number of probes and duration of energy delivery was recorded for 20/29 lesions. Technical success and local recurrences were recorded. Primary and secondary effectiveness rates were calculated. Results Image fusion was utilized for 16 lesions and intra-procedural ultrasound for 4. Of the 20/29 lesions, where the ablation plans were recorded, there was no deviation from the plan in 14. In the remaining 6/20, iterative planning was needed for complete tumor coverage. An average of 8.7 ± 3.2 CBCT were performed per procedure, including 1.3 ± 0.5 for tumor segmentation and planning, 1.7 ± 0.7 for probe position confirmation, 3.9 ± 2 to ensure complete coverage. Mean follow-up was 18.6 ± 6.5 months. 28/29 ablations were technically successful (96.5%). Of ablations performed with curative intent, technical effectiveness at one-month was 25/26 (96.1%) and 22/26 (84.6%) at last follow-up. Local tumor progression was observed in 11.5% (3/26). Conclusion CBCT navigation may add information to assist and improve ablation guidance and monitoring. PMID:25645409

  8. Assessment of liver ablation using cone beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Rehim, Mohamed; Ronot, Maxime; Sibert, Annie; Vilgrain, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the feasibility and accuracy of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in assessing the ablation zone after liver tumor ablation. METHODS: Twenty-three patients (17 men and 6 women, range: 45-85 years old, mean age 65 years) with malignant liver tumors underwent ultrasound-guided percutaneous tumor ablation [radiofrequency (n = 14), microwave (n = 9)] followed by intravenous contrast-enhanced CBCT. Baseline multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and peri-procedural CBCT images were compared. CBCT image quality was assessed as poor, good, or excellent. Image fusion was performed to assess tumor coverage, and quality of fusion was rated as bad, good, or excellent. Ablation zone volumes on peri-procedural CBCT and post-procedural MDCT were compared using the non-parametric paired Wilcoxon t-test. RESULTS: Rate of primary ablation effectiveness was 100%. There were no complications related to ablation. Local tumor recurrence and new liver tumors were found 3 mo after initial treatment in one patient (4%). The ablation zone was identified in 21/23 (91.3%) patients on CBCT. The fusion of baseline MDCT and peri-procedural CBCT images was feasible in all patients and showed satisfactory tumor coverage (at least 5-mm margin). CBCT image quality was poor, good, and excellent in 2 (9%), 8 (35%), and 13 (56%), patients respectively. Registration quality between peri-procedural CBCT and post-procedural MDCT images was good to excellent in 17/23 (74%) patients. The median ablation volume on peri-procedural CBCT and post-procedural MDCT was 30 cm3 (range: 4-95 cm3) and 30 cm3 (range: 4-124 cm3), respectively (P-value > 0.2). There was a good correlation (r = 0.79) between the volumes of the two techniques. CONCLUSION: Contrast-enhanced CBCT after tumor ablation of the liver allows early assessment of the ablation zone. PMID:25593467

  9. Molecular-beam scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Vernon, M.F.

    1983-07-01

    The molecular-beam technique has been used in three different experimental arrangements to study a wide range of inter-atomic and molecular forces. Chapter 1 reports results of a low-energy (0.2 kcal/mole) elastic-scattering study of the He-Ar pair potential. The purpose of the study was to accurately characterize the shape of the potential in the well region, by scattering slow He atoms produced by expanding a mixture of He in N/sub 2/ from a cooled nozzle. Chapter 2 contains measurements of the vibrational predissociation spectra and product translational energy for clusters of water, benzene, and ammonia. The experiments show that most of the product energy remains in the internal molecular motions. Chapter 3 presents measurements of the reaction Na + HCl ..-->.. NaCl + H at collision energies of 5.38 and 19.4 kcal/mole. This is the first study to resolve both scattering angle and velocity for the reaction of a short lived (16 nsec) electronic excited state. Descriptions are given of computer programs written to analyze molecular-beam expansions to extract information characterizing their velocity distributions, and to calculate accurate laboratory elastic-scattering differential cross sections accounting for the finite apparatus resolution. Experimental results which attempted to determine the efficiency of optically pumping the Li(2/sup 2/P/sub 3/2/) and Na(3/sup 2/P/sub 3/2/) excited states are given. A simple three-level model for predicting the steady-state fraction of atoms in the excited state is included.

  10. CO{sub 2} Laser Ablation Propulsion Tractor Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Sinko, John E.; Schlecht, Clifford A.

    2010-05-06

    Manipulation of objects at a distance has already been achieved with no small measure of success in the realm of microscopic objects on the scale size of nanometers to micrometers in applications including laser trapping and laser tweezers. However, there has been relatively little effort to apply such remote control to macroscopic systems. A space tractor beam could be applied to a wide range of applications, including removal of orbital debris, facilitation of spacecraft docking, adjustment of satellite attitude or orbital position, etc. In this paper, an ablative laser propulsion tractor beam is demonstrated based on radiation from a CO{sub 2} laser. Cooperative, layered polymer targets were used for remote impulse generation using a CO{sub 2} laser. The use of a structured ablatant enabling switching between thrust directional parity (i.e., forward or reverse) and imparting torque to a remote target. Fluence-dependent results are presented in the context of polymer ablation modeling work and with consideration of confined ablation effects.

  11. Photoelectron photoion molecular beam spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Trevor, D.J.

    1980-12-01

    The use of supersonic molecular beams in photoionization mass spectroscopy and photoelectron spectroscopy to assist in the understanding of photoexcitation in the vacuum ultraviolet is described. Rotational relaxation and condensation due to supersonic expansion were shown to offer new possibilities for molecular photoionization studies. Molecular beam photoionization mass spectroscopy has been extended above 21 eV photon energy by the use of Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) facilities. Design considerations are discussed that have advanced the state-of-the-art in high resolution vuv photoelectron spectroscopy. To extend gas-phase studies to 160 eV photon energy, a windowless vuv-xuv beam line design is proposed.

  12. An experimental investigation of the damping contribution of an elastomeric ablator on aluminum beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, W. E.

    1974-01-01

    Damping results are presented for an elastometric ablation material bonded to an aluminum alloy substrate. Tests were conducted on aluminum beams 0.159, 0.318, and 0.476 cm thick, and with and without an ablator. Ablation-material thickness varied from 0.159 to 0.953 cm. Comparative damping data were obtained by using variations of the free-free beam technique with strain gages and piezoelectric transducers. Of the two test arrangements employed, the technique using strain gages produced results that indicated less restraint of the beams. Ablation material, in thicknesses less than 1 cm, substantially increased the damping parameter of the aluminum beams.

  13. Ablation of Metals for Materials Processing via a Channelspark Electron Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovaleski, S. D.; Gilgenbach, R. M.; Rintamaki, J. I.; Ang, L. K.; Spindler, H. L.; Cohen, W. E.; Lau, Y. Y.; Lash, J. S.

    1996-11-01

    Channelspark driven ablation experiments have been designed to characterize ablated species of materials suitable for thin film deposition. The channelspark is a pseudospark device, developed by KFK footnote G. Muller, C. Schultheiss, Proc. of Beams, 2, 833(1994), capable of producing high current, low energy electron beams. The source operates with a 15-20kV accelerating potential and measured e-beam source current less than 2000A. Beam transport through the 5 to 20 mTorr argon background gas has been investigated. Al, Fe, and Ti ablation is being studied through spectroscopy and beam current techniques. Electron beam induced target damage is being compared to laser beam damaged targets. Electron transport and energy deposition in metals are being simulated in the ITS-TIGER code (Sandia Report No. SAND 91-1634) developed at Sandia National Laboratory. The thermodynamics of electron beam ablation of metals is compared to lasers.

  14. Ablation of metal thin films using femtosecond laser Bessel vortex beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahin, Ramazan; Ersoy, Tansu; Akturk, Selcuk

    2015-01-01

    Femtosecond lasers can provide submicron ablation resolution, making them suitable and attractive for various micro/nanofabrication applications. Laser beam shaping lends further advantages and increases the versatility of these sources. In this work, we report on the use of femtosecond laser pulses with first-order Bessel function (Bessel vortex) beam profiles in ablation of metal thin films. The diffraction-free nature of Bessel beams provides significant convenience regarding alignment and repeatability. Ablation profiles with Bessel vortex beams generally consist of single or multiple concentric rings, determined by pulse fluence on target. We investigate single-pulse ablation behavior with two laser wavelengths (1,030 and 515 nm) and three different Bessel beam cone angles. For each case, we measure inner and outer ring diameters and compare our results with theoretical calculations.

  15. Molecular thermometers for potential applications in thermal ablation procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhegalova, Natalia G.; Aydt, Alex; Wang, Steven T.; Berezin, Mikhail Y.

    2013-02-01

    Thermal ablation is a promising minimally invasive method for treating tumors without surgical intervention. Thermal ablation uses thermal sources such as lasers, radiowaves or focused ultrasound to increase the temperature of the tumor to levels lethal to cancer cells. This treatment based on heat therapy may be problematic as the temperature of the operation site is unknown. To address this problem, we developed optical molecular thermometers that can potentially measure the temperature on a molecular scale and be compatible with in vivo measurements. The thermometers are centered on a combination of two fluorophores emitting in two distinct spectral ranges and having different temperature-dependent emission properties. In this design, a fluorophore with relatively insensitive temperature-dependent fluorescence serves as a reference while another sensitive fluorophore serves as a sensor. We have demonstrated the feasibility of this approach using a coumarin-rhodamine conjugate. The sensitivity of the construct to the clinically relevant ablation temperatures (20-85 °C) was demonstrated in vitro.

  16. Population inversions in ablation plasmas generated by intense electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilgenbach, R. M.; Kammash, T.; Brake, M. L.

    1988-11-01

    Experiments during the past three years have concerned the generation and spectroscopic study of electron beam-driven carbon plasmas in order to explore the production of optical and ultraviolet radiation from nonequilibrium populations. The output of MELBA (Michigan Electron Long Beam Accelerator), has been connected to an electron beam diode consisting of an aluminum (or brass) cathode stalk and a carbon anode. Magnetic field coils have been designed, procured, and utilized to focus the electron beam. A side viewing port permitted spectroscopic diagnostics to view across the surface of the anode. Spectroscopic diagnosis has been performed using a 1 m spectrograph capable of operation from the vacuum ultraviolet through the visible. This spectrograph is coupled to a 1024 channel optical multichannel analyzer. Spectra taken during the initial 400 ns period of the e-beam pulse showed a low effective charge plasma with primarily molecular components (C2, CH) as well as atomic hydrogen and singly ionized carbon (CII). When the generator pulse was crowbarred after the first 400 ns, the spectra revealed a continuation of the low charge state plasma.

  17. Laser ablation of silicon induced by a femtosecond optical vortex beam.

    PubMed

    Nivas, Jijil J J; Shutong, He; Anoop, K K; Rubano, A; Fittipaldi, R; Vecchione, A; Paparo, D; Marrucci, L; Bruzzese, R; Amoruso, S

    2015-10-15

    We investigate laser ablation of crystalline silicon induced by a femtosecond optical vortex beam, addressing how beam properties can be obtained by analyzing the ablation crater. The morphology of the surface structures formed in the annular crater surface allows direct visualization of the beam polarization, while analysis of the crater size provides beam spot parameters. We also determine the diverse threshold fluences for the formation of various complex microstructures generated within the annular laser spot on the silicon sample. Our analysis indicates an incubation behavior of the threshold fluence as a function of the number of laser pulses, independent of the optical vortex polarization, in weak focusing conditions. PMID:26469576

  18. Tracing the plasma interactions for pulsed reactive crossed-beam laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jikun; Stender, Dieter; Pichler, Markus; Pergolesi, Daniele; Schneider, Christof W.; Wokaun, Alexander; Lippert, Thomas; Döbeli, Max

    2015-10-28

    Pulsed reactive crossed-beam laser ablation is an effective technique to govern the chemical activity of plasma species and background molecules during pulsed laser deposition. Instead of using a constant background pressure, a gas pulse with a reactive gas, synchronized with the laser beam, is injected into vacuum or a low background pressure near the ablated area of the target. It intercepts the initially generated plasma plume, thereby enhancing the physicochemical interactions between the gaseous environment and the plasma species. For this study, kinetic energy resolved mass-spectrometry and time-resolved plasma imaging were used to study the physicochemical processes occurring during the reactive crossed beam laser ablation of a partially {sup 18}O substituted La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}MnO{sub 3} target using oxygen as gas pulse. The characteristics of the ablated plasma are compared with those observed during pulsed laser deposition in different oxygen background pressures.

  19. Tracing the plasma interactions for pulsed reactive crossed-beam laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jikun; Stender, Dieter; Pichler, Markus; Döbeli, Max; Pergolesi, Daniele; Schneider, Christof W.; Wokaun, Alexander; Lippert, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    Pulsed reactive crossed-beam laser ablation is an effective technique to govern the chemical activity of plasma species and background molecules during pulsed laser deposition. Instead of using a constant background pressure, a gas pulse with a reactive gas, synchronized with the laser beam, is injected into vacuum or a low background pressure near the ablated area of the target. It intercepts the initially generated plasma plume, thereby enhancing the physicochemical interactions between the gaseous environment and the plasma species. For this study, kinetic energy resolved mass-spectrometry and time-resolved plasma imaging were used to study the physicochemical processes occurring during the reactive crossed beam laser ablation of a partially 18O substituted La0.6Sr0.4MnO3 target using oxygen as gas pulse. The characteristics of the ablated plasma are compared with those observed during pulsed laser deposition in different oxygen background pressures.

  20. The TriBeam system: Femtosecond laser ablation in situ SEM

    SciTech Connect

    Echlin, McLean P.; Straw, Marcus; Randolph, Steven; Filevich, Jorge; Pollock, Tresa M.

    2015-02-15

    Femtosecond laser ablation offers the unique ability to remove material at rates that are orders of magnitude faster than existing ion beam technologies with little or no associated damage. By combining ultrafast lasers with state-of-the-art electron microscopy equipment, we have developed a TriBeam system capable of targeted, in-situ tomography providing chemical, structural, and topographical information in three dimensions of near mm{sup 3} sized volumes. The origins, development, physics, current uses, and future potential for the TriBeam system are described in this tutorial review. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • An emerging tool, the TriBeam, for in situ femtosecond (fs) laser ablation is presented. • Fs laser ablation aided tomography at the mm{sup 3}-scale is demonstrated. • Fs laser induced deposition of Pt is demonstrated at sub-diffraction limit resolution. • Fs laser surface structuring is reviewed as well as micromachining applications.

  1. Laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry of carbon isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bol‧shakov, Alexander A.; Mao, Xianglei; Jain, Jinesh; McIntyre, Dustin L.; Russo, Richard E.

    2015-11-01

    Quantitative determination of carbon isotopes using Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry (LAMIS) is described. Optical emission of diatomic molecules CN and C2 is used in these measurements. Two quantification approaches are presented: empirical calibration of spectra using a set of reference standards and numerical fitting of a simulated spectrum to the experimental one. Formation mechanisms of C2 and CN in laser ablation plasma are briefly reviewed to provide insights for implementation of LAMIS measurements. A simulated spectrum of the 12C2 Swan system was synthesized using four constituents within 473.5-476.5 nm. Simulation included three branches of 12C2 (1-0), branches R(0-0) and R(1-1), and branch P(9-8) of 12C2. Spectral positions of the tail lines in R(0-0) and R(1-1) were experimentally measured, since they were not accurately known before. The Swan band (1-0) of the isotopologue 13C12C was also simulated. Fitting to the experimental spectrum yielded the ratio 13C/12C = 1.08% in a good agreement with measurements by isotope ratio mass spectrometry. LAMIS promises to be useful in coal, oil and shale exploration, carbon sequestration monitoring, and agronomy studies.

  2. Laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry of carbon isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Bol'shakov, Alexander A.; Jain, Jinesh; Russo, Richard E.; McIntyre, Dustin; Mao, Xianglei

    2015-08-28

    Quantitative determination of carbon isotopes using Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry (LAMIS) is described. Optical emission of diatomic molecules CN and C2 is used in these measurements. Two quantification approaches are presented:empirical calibration of spectra using a set of reference standards and numerical fitting of a simulated spectrum to the experimental one. Formation mechanisms of C2 and CN in laser ablation plasma are briefly reviewed to provide insights for implementation of LAMIS measurements. A simulated spectrum of the 12C2 Swan system was synthesized using four constituents within 473.5–476.5 nm. Simulation included three branches of 12C2 (1-0), branches R(0-0) and R(1-1), and branch P(9-8) of 12C2. Spectral positions of the tail lines in R(0-0) and R(1-1) were experimentally measured, since they were not accurately known before. The Swan band (1-0) of the isotopologue 13C12C was also simulated. Fitting to the experimental spectrumyielded the ratio 13C/12C = 1.08% in a good agreement with measurements by isotope ratio mass spectrometry. LAMIS promises to be useful in coal, oil and shale exploration, carbon sequestration monitoring, and agronomy studies

  3. 14th international symposium on molecular beams

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    This report discusses research being conducted with molecular beams. The general topic areas are as follows: Clusters I; reaction dynamics; atomic and molecular spectroscopy; clusters II; new techniques; photodissociation & dynamics; and surfaces.

  4. 14th international symposium on molecular beams

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses research being conducted with molecular beams. The general topic areas are as follows: Clusters I; reaction dynamics; atomic and molecular spectroscopy; clusters II; new techniques; photodissociation dynamics; and surfaces.

  5. Flyer Acceleration by Pulsed Ion Beam Ablation and Application for Space Propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Harada, Nobuhiro; Buttapeng, Chainarong; Yazawa, Masaru; Kashine, Kenji; Jiang Weihua; Yatsui, Kiyoshi

    2004-02-04

    Flyer acceleration by ablation plasma pressure produced by irradiation of intense pulsed ion beam has been studied. Acceleration process including expansion of ablation plasma was simulated based on fluid model. And interaction between incident pulsed ion beam and a flyer target was considered as accounting stopping power of it. In experiments, we used ETIGO-II intense pulsed ion beam generator with two kinds of diodes; 1) Magnetically Insulated Diode (MID, power densities of <100 J/cm2) and 2) Spherical-focused Plasma Focus Diode (SPFD, power densities of up to 4.3 kJ/cm2). Numerical results of accelerated flyer velocity agreed well with measured one over wide range of incident ion beam energy density. Flyer velocity of 5.6 km/s and ablation plasma pressure of 15 GPa was demonstrated by the present experiments. Acceleration of double-layer target consists of gold/aluminum was studied. For adequate layer thickness, such a flyer target could be much more accelerated than a single layer. Effect of waveform of ion beam was also examined. Parabolic waveform could accelerate more efficiently than rectangular waveform. Applicability of ablation propulsion was discussed. Specific impulse of 7000{approx}8000 seconds and time averaged thrust of up to 5000{approx}6000N can be expected. Their values can be controllable by changing power density of incident ion beam and pulse duration.

  6. Utilizing ablation of solids to characterize a focused soft X-ray laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalupský, J.; Juha, L.; Kuba, J.; Hájková, V.; Cihelka, J.; Homer, P.; Kozlová, M.; Mocek, T.; Polan, J.; Rus, B.; Krzywinsky, J.; Sobierajski, R.; Wabnitz, H.; Feldhaus, J.; Tiedtke, K.; the, And

    2007-05-01

    An advanced time integrated method has been developed for soft X-ray pulsed laser beam characterization. A technique based on poly (methyl methacrylate) - PMMA laser induced ablation has been used for beam investigations of soft X-ray laser sources like FLASH (Free-electron LASer in Hamburg; formerly known as VUV FEL and/or TTF2 FEL) and plasma-based Ne-like Zn laser performed at PALS (Prague Asterix Laser System). For the interaction experiments reported here, the FLASH system provided ultra-short pulses (~10-fs) of 21.7-nm radiation. The PMMA ablation was also induced by plasma-based Ne-like Zn soft X-ray laser pumped by NIR beams at the PALS facility. This quasi-steady-state (QSS) soft X-ray laser provides 100-ps pulses of 21.2-nm radiation, i.e. at a wavelength very close to that of FLASH but with about 5,000 times longer pulses. In both cases, the PMMA samples were irradiated by a single shot with a focused beam under normal incidence conditions. Characteristics of ablated craters obtained with AFM (Atomic Force Microscope) and Nomarski microscopes were utilized for profile reconstruction and diameter determination of the focused laser beams ablating the PMMA surface.

  7. Mid-IR enhanced laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Staci; Ford, Alan; Akpovo, Codjo A.; Johnson, Lewis

    2016-08-01

    A double-pulsed laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (DP-LIBS) technique utilizing wavelengths in the mid-infrared (MIR) for the second pulse, referred to as double-pulse LAMIS (DP-LAMIS), was examined for its effect on detection limits compared to single-pulse laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry (LAMIS). A MIR carbon dioxide (CO2) laser pulse at 10.6 μm was employed to enhance spectral emissions from nanosecond-laser-induced plasma via mid-IR reheating and in turn, improve the determination of the relative abundance of isotopes in a sample. This technique was demonstrated on a collection of 10BO and 11BO molecular spectra created from enriched boric acid (H3BO3) isotopologues in varying concentrations. Effects on the overall ability of both LAMIS and DP-LAMIS to detect the relative abundance of boron isotopes in a starting sample were considered. Least-squares fitting to theoretical models was used to deduce plasma parameters and understand reproducibility of results. Furthermore, some optimization for conditions of the enhanced emission was achieved, along with a comparison of the overall emission intensity, plasma density, and plasma temperature generated by the two techniques.

  8. Synthesis of Ag-deionized water nanofluids using multi-beam laser ablation in liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, P.X.; Soong, Yee; Chyu, M.K.

    2007-12-01

    Multi-pulse laser ablation of silver in deionized water was studied. The laser beams were arranged in a cross-beam configuration. In our experiments, two single-mode, Q-switched Nd-Yag lasers operating at 1064 nm, pulse duration of 5.5 ns and 10 Hz rep rate were used. The laser fluence of the second beam was 0.265 J/cm2 for all tests. Two levels of the laser fluences were used for the ablating beam: 0.09 and 0.265 J/cm2 (11,014 and 33,042 J/cm2 at the focal point, respectively). The silver target was at 50mm from the cell window and 10mm deep. The second beam was aligned parallelly with the silver target and focused at 2mm in front of the focal point of the ablating beam. For all cases, the delay time between the ablating beam and the cross-beam was 40 ms. In general, the ablated particles were almost all spherical. For fluence of 0.09 J/cm 2 and single-beam approach, the mean particle size was about 29 nm. The majority of the particles, however, were in 19–35nm range and there were some big ones as large as 50–60nm in size. For double-beam approach, the particles were smaller with the average size of about 18nm and the majority of the particles were in 9–21nm range with few big one as large as 40 nm. For the beam fluence of 0.265 J/cm2 and single-beam configuration, the particle sizes were smaller, the mean particles size was about 18nm and the majority of the particles were in the range of 10–22nm with some big one as large as 40 nm. For double-beam approach, the mean particle size was larger (24.2 nm) and the majority of the particle were distributed from 14 to 35nm with some big particles can be found with sizes as big as 70 nm. Preliminary measurements of the thermal conductivity and viscosity of the produced samples showed that the thermal conductivity increased about 3–5% and the viscosity increased 3.7% above the base fluid viscosity even with the particle volume concentration as low as 0.01%.

  9. Molecular beams: our legacy from Otto Stern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsey, N. F.

    1988-06-01

    It is an honor to contribute to this celebration of the hundredth anniversary of the birth of Otto Stern, who developed molecular beams to become one of the most nowerful and fruitful physics research methods.

  10. Silicon Holder For Molecular-Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoenk, Michael E.; Grunthaner, Paula J.; Grunthaner, Frank J.

    1993-01-01

    Simple assembly of silicon wafers holds silicon-based charge-coupled device (CCD) during postprocessing in which silicon deposited by molecular-beam epitaxy. Attains temperatures similar to CCD, so hotspots suppressed. Coefficients of thermal expansion of holder and CCD equal, so thermal stresses caused by differential thermal expansion and contraction do not develop. Holder readily fabricated, by standard silicon processing techniques, to accommodate various CCD geometries. Silicon does not contaminate CCD or molecular-beam-epitaxy vacuum chamber.

  11. Direct femtosecond laser ablation of copper with an optical vortex beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anoop, K. K.; Fittipaldi, R.; Rubano, A.; Wang, X.; Paparo, D.; Vecchione, A.; Marrucci, L.; Bruzzese, R.; Amoruso, S.

    2014-09-01

    Laser surface structuring of copper is induced by laser ablation with a femtosecond optical vortex beam generated via spin-to-orbital conversion of the angular momentum of light by using a q-plate. The variation of the produced surface structures is studied as a function of the number of pulses, N, and laser fluence, F. After the first laser pulse (N = 1), the irradiated surface presents an annular region characterized by a corrugated morphology made by a rather complex network of nanometer-scale ridges, wrinkles, pores, and cavities. Increasing the number of pulses (2 < N < 100), the surface texture progressively evolves towards larger structures, while the central, non-ablated area is gradually decorated by nanoparticles produced during laser ablation. At large number of pulses (200 < N < 1000), a micro-tip with a nanostructured surface forms in the center of the irradiated area, which eventually disappears at still larger number of pulses (N > 1000) and a deep crater is formed. The nanostructure variation with the laser fluence, F, also evidences an interesting dependence, with a coarsening of the structure morphology as F increases. Our experimental findings demonstrate that direct femtosecond laser ablation with optical vortex beams produces interesting patterns not achievable by the more standard beams with a Gaussian intensity profile. They also suggest that appropriate tuning of the experimental conditions (F, N) can allow generating micro- and/or nano-structured surface for any specific application.

  12. Direct femtosecond laser ablation of copper with an optical vortex beam

    SciTech Connect

    Anoop, K. K.; Rubano, A.; Marrucci, L.; Bruzzese, R.; Amoruso, S.; Fittipaldi, R.; Vecchione, A.; Wang, X.; Paparo, D.

    2014-09-21

    Laser surface structuring of copper is induced by laser ablation with a femtosecond optical vortex beam generated via spin-to-orbital conversion of the angular momentum of light by using a q-plate. The variation of the produced surface structures is studied as a function of the number of pulses, N, and laser fluence, F. After the first laser pulse (N=1), the irradiated surface presents an annular region characterized by a corrugated morphology made by a rather complex network of nanometer-scale ridges, wrinkles, pores, and cavities. Increasing the number of pulses (2ablated area is gradually decorated by nanoparticles produced during laser ablation. At large number of pulses (2001000) and a deep crater is formed. The nanostructure variation with the laser fluence, F, also evidences an interesting dependence, with a coarsening of the structure morphology as F increases. Our experimental findings demonstrate that direct femtosecond laser ablation with optical vortex beams produces interesting patterns not achievable by the more standard beams with a Gaussian intensity profile. They also suggest that appropriate tuning of the experimental conditions (F, N) can allow generating micro- and/or nano-structured surface for any specific application.

  13. Correction factor for ablation algorithms used in corneal refractive surgery with gaussian-profile beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez, Jose Ramón; González Anera, Rosario; Jiménez del Barco, Luis; Hita, Enrique; Pérez-Ocón, Francisco

    2005-01-01

    We provide a correction factor to be added in ablation algorithms when a Gaussian beam is used in photorefractive laser surgery. This factor, which quantifies the effect of pulse overlapping, depends on beam radius and spot size. We also deduce the expected post-surgical corneal radius and asphericity when considering this factor. Data on 141 eyes operated on LASIK (laser in situ keratomileusis) with a Gaussian profile show that the discrepancy between experimental and expected data on corneal power is significantly lower when using the correction factor. For an effective improvement of post-surgical visual quality, this factor should be applied in ablation algorithms that do not consider the effects of pulse overlapping with a Gaussian beam.

  14. Molecular Alterations in Primary Prostate Cancer After Androgen Ablation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Best, Carolyn J. M.; Gillespie, John W.; Yi, Yajun; Chandramouli, G.V. R.; Perlmutter, Mark A.; Gathright, Yvonne; Erickson, Heidi S.; Georgevich, Lauren; Tangrea, Michael A.; Duray, Paul H.; González, Sergio; Velasco, Alfredo; Linehan, W. Marston; Matusik, Robert J.; Price, Douglas K.; Figg, William D.; Emmert-Buck, Michael R.; Chuaqui, Rodrigo F.

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE After an initial response to androgen ablation, most prostate tumors recur, ultimately progressing to highly aggressive androgen independent (AI) cancer. The molecular mechanisms underlying progression are not well known, in part due to the rarity of AI samples from primary and metastatic sites. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN We compared the gene expression profiles of ten AI primary prostate tumor biopsies with ten primary, untreated androgen-dependent (AD) tumors. Samples were laser capture microdissected, the RNA was amplified, and gene expression was assessed using Affymetrix Human Genome U133A Gene Chips. Differential expression was examined with principle component analysis (PCA) and Student t testing. Analysis of gene ontology was performed with Expression Analysis Systematic Explorer (EASE) and gene expression data were integrated with genomic alterations with DIfferential Gene locus MAPping (DIGMAP). RESULTS Unsupervised PCA showed that the AD and AI tumors segregated from one another. After filtering the data, 239 differentially expressed genes were identified. Two main gene ontologies were found discordant between AI and AD tumors: macromolecule biosynthesis was down-regulated and cell adhesion up-regulated in AI tumors. Other differentially expressed genes were related to IL-6 signaling, as well as angiogenesis, cell adhesion, apoptosis, oxidative stress, and hormone response. The DIGMAP analysis identified nine regions of potential chromosomal deletion in the AI tumors including 1p36, 3p21, 6p21, 8p21, 11p15, 11q12, 12q23, 16q12, and 16q21. CONCLUSIONS Taken together, these data identify several unique characteristics of AI prostate cancer that may hold potential for the development of targeted therapeutic intervention. PMID:16203770

  15. Laser ablation of hard tissue: correlation between the laser beam parameters and the post-ablative tissue characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafetinides, Alexandros A.; Makropoulou, Mersini I.; Khabbaz, Maruan

    2003-11-01

    Hard dental tissue laser applications, such as preventive treatment, laser diagnosis of caries, laser etching of enamel, laser decay removal and cavity preparation, and more recently use of the laser light to enlarge the root canal during the endodontic therapy, have been investigated for in vitro and in vivo applications. Post-ablative surface characteristics, e.g. degree of charring, cracks and other surface deformation, can be evaluated using scanning electron microscopy. The experimental data are discussed in relevance with the laser beam characteristics, e.g. pulse duration, beam profile, and the beam delivery systems employed. Techniques based on the laser illumination of the dental tissues and the subsequent evaluation of the scattered fluorescent light will be a valuable tool in early diagnosis of tooth diseases, as carious dentin or enamel. The laser induced autofluorescence signal of healthy dentin is much stronger than that of the carious dentin. However, a better understanding of the transmission patterns of laser light in teeth, for both diagnosis and therapy is needed, before the laser procedures can be used in a clinical environment.

  16. Ultra-short pulsed laser tissue ablation using focused laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaunich, Megan K.; Raje, Shreya; Mitra, Kunal; Grace, Michael S.; Fahey, Molly; Spooner, Greg

    2008-02-01

    Short pulse lasers are used for a variety of therapeutic applications in medicine. Recently ultra-short pulse lasers have gained prominence due to the reduction in collateral thermal damage to surrounding healthy tissue during tissue ablation. In this paper, ultra-short pulsed laser ablation of mouse skin tissue is analyzed by assessing the extent of damage produced due to focused laser beam irradiation. The laser used for this study is a fiber-based desktop laser (Raydiance, Inc.) having a wavelength of 1552 nm and a pulse width of 1.3 ps. The laser beam is focused on the sample surface to a spot size on the order of 10 microns, thus producing high peak intensity necessary for precise clean ablation. A parametric study is performed on in vitro mouse tissue specimens and live anaesthetized mice with mammary tumors through variation of laser parameters such as time-averaged laser power, repetition rate, laser scanning rate and irradiation time. Radial temperature distribution is measured using thermal camera to analyze the heat affected zone. Temperature measurements are performed to assess the peak temperature rise attained during ablation. A detailed histological study is performed using frozen section technique to observe the nature and extent of laser-induced damages.

  17. Spatiotemporal evolution of plasma molecular emission following laser ablation of explosive analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merten, Jonathan; Jones, Matthew; Sheppard, Cheyenne; Parigger, Christian; Allen, Susan

    2013-05-01

    The spatial and temporal evolution of the CN molecular emission following laser ablation of a TNT analog (3- nitrobenzoic acid) has been studied along with ablation of targets that contain neither nitro groups nor C-N bonds. At a fluence of ~104 J/cm2, behavior indicative of the ablation of native CN bonds has been observed in samples containing no native CN bonds. The recorded data show significant plasma background emissions that pose difficulties for direct spectral imaging. Spatially resolved images suggest that some of the observed phenomena are simply the result of the interaction of the plasma and the observation volume of the collection optics.

  18. Simple Validation of Transient Plume Models Using Molecular Beam-Related Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Woronowicz, M. S.

    2008-12-31

    A simple effort using molecular beam data to compare the results of two different transient free molecule point source models was performed, motivated by a desire to determine the utility of such formulations for a variety of time-dependent applications. These models are evaluated against effusive molecular beam time-of-flight data, as well as behavior observed in pulsed laser ablation experiments and high-fidelity direct simulation Monte Carlo results. Such comparisons indicate that the physical behavior of these time-dependent expansions require taking a surface-enforced directional bias into account. This bias has been absent in a number of investigative formulations, both historical and current.

  19. Beamed Energy Propulsion by Means of Target Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, Benjamin A.

    2004-03-01

    This paper describes hundreds of pendulum tests examining the beamed energy conversion efficiency of different metal targets coated with multiple liquid enhancers. Preliminary testing used a local laser with photographic paper targets, with no liquid, water, canola oil, or methanol additives. Laboratory experimentation was completed at Wright-Patterson AFB using a high-powered laser, and ballistic pendulums of aluminum, titanium, or copper. Dry targets, and those coated with water, methanol and oil were repeatedly tested in laboratory conditions. Results were recorded on several high-speed digital video cameras, and the conversion efficiency was calculated. Paper airplanes successfully launched using BEP were likewise recorded.

  20. Beamed Energy Propulsion by Means of Target Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, Benjamin A.

    2004-03-30

    This paper describes hundreds of pendulum tests examining the beamed energy conversion efficiency of different metal targets coated with multiple liquid enhancers. Preliminary testing used a local laser with photographic paper targets, with no liquid, water, canola oil, or methanol additives. Laboratory experimentation was completed at Wright-Patterson AFB using a high-powered laser, and ballistic pendulums of aluminum, titanium, or copper. Dry targets, and those coated with water, methanol and oil were repeatedly tested in laboratory conditions. Results were recorded on several high-speed digital video cameras, and the conversion efficiency was calculated. Paper airplanes successfully launched using BEP were likewise recorded.

  1. Molecular-beam spectroscopy of interhalogen molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Sherrow, S.A.

    1983-08-01

    A molecular-beam electric-resonance spectrometer employing a supersonic nozzle source has been used to obtain hyperfine spectra of /sup 79/Br/sup 35/Cl. Analyses of these spectra and of microwave spectra published by other authors have yielded new values for the electric dipole moment and for the nuclear quadrupole coupling constants in this molecule. The new constants are significantly different from the currently accepted values. Van der Waals clusters containing chlorine monofluoride have been studied under various expansion conditions by the molecular-beam electric-deflection method. The structural possibilities indicated by the results are discussed, and cluster geometries are proposed.

  2. Molecular beam mass spectrometer development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brock, F. J.; Hueser, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    An analytical model, based on the kinetics theory of a drifting Maxwellian gas is used to determine the nonequilibrium molecular density distribution within a hemispherical shell open aft with its axis parallel to its velocity. The concept of a molecular shield in terrestrial orbit above 200 km is also analyzed using the kinetic theory of a drifting Maxwellian gas. Data are presented for the components of the gas density within the shield due to the free stream atmosphere, outgassing from the shield and enclosed experiments, and atmospheric gas scattered off a shield orbiter system. A description is given of a FORTRAN program for computating the three dimensional transition flow regime past the space shuttle orbiter that employs the Monte Carlo simulation method to model real flow by some thousands of simulated molecules.

  3. An autoneutralizing neutral molecular beam gun

    SciTech Connect

    Delmore, J.E.; Appelhans, A.D.; Dahl, D.A. )

    1990-01-01

    A high-energy (up to 28 keV) neutral molecular beam gun has been developed and put into routine use that takes advantage of the autoneutralization properties of the sulfur hexafluoride anion for the production of high-energy sulfur hexafluoride neutral molecules. The anions are produced in an electron-capture source, accelerated, and focused in a lens assembly designed to minimize residence time, allowed to drift at their terminal velocity for a suitable distance during which up to 30% auto-eject an electron, and all remaining charged particles are electrostatically skimmed, resulting in a focused neutral beam. Rasterable neutral beams focused to a 5-mm spot size up to 3 m from the source have been produced with beam currents up to 40 pA equivalent. Spot sizes of 1 mm can be produced with intensity levels of a few picoamperes equivalent.

  4. Zeeman-Sisyphus Deceleration of Molecular Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitch, Noah; Tarbutt, Mike

    2016-05-01

    Ultracold molecules are useful for testing fundamental physics and studying strongly-interacting quantum systems. One production method is via direct laser cooling in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). In this endeavor, one major challenge is to produce molecules below the MOT capture velocity. Established molecular beam deceleration techniques are poorly suited because they decelerate only a small fraction of a typical molecular pulse. Direct laser cooling is a natural choice, but is also problematic due to transverse heating and the associated molecule loss. I will present a new technique that we are developing, which we call Zeeman-Sisyphus deceleration and which shows great promise for preparing molecular beams for MOT loading. This technique decelerates molecules using a linear array of permanent magnets, along with lasers that periodically optically pump molecules between weak and strong-field seeking quantum states. Being time-independent, this method is well-suited for temporally extended molecular beams. Simultaneous deceleration and transverse guiding makes this approach attractive as an alternative to direct laser cooling. I will present our development of the Zeeman-Sisyphus decelerator and its application to a molecular MOT of CaF and an ultracold fountain of YbF.

  5. Investigation of effect of solenoid magnet on emittances of ion beam from laser ablation plasma.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Shunsuke; Romanelli, Mark; Cinquegrani, David; Sekine, Megumi; Kumaki, Masafumi; Fuwa, Yasuhiro; Kanesue, Takeshi; Okamura, Masahiro; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2014-02-01

    A magnetic field can increase an ion current of a laser ablation plasma and is expected to control the change of the plasma ion current. However, the magnetic field can also make some fluctuations of the plasma and the effect on the beam emittance and the emission surface is not clear. To investigate the effect of a magnetic field, we extracted the ion beams under three conditions where without magnetic field, with magnetic field, and without magnetic field with higher laser energy to measure the beam distribution in phase space. Then we compared the relations between the plasma ion current density into the extraction gap and the Twiss parameters with each condition. We observed the effect of the magnetic field on the emission surface. PMID:24593624

  6. Investigation of effect of solenoid magnet on emittances of ion beam from laser ablation plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Shunsuke; Romanelli, Mark; Cinquegrani, David; Sekine, Megumi; Kumaki, Masafumi; Fuwa, Yasuhiro; Kanesue, Takeshi; Okamura, Masahiro; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2014-02-01

    A magnetic field can increase an ion current of a laser ablation plasma and is expected to control the change of the plasma ion current. However, the magnetic field can also make some fluctuations of the plasma and the effect on the beam emittance and the emission surface is not clear. To investigate the effect of a magnetic field, we extracted the ion beams under three conditions where without magnetic field, with magnetic field, and without magnetic field with higher laser energy to measure the beam distribution in phase space. Then we compared the relations between the plasma ion current density into the extraction gap and the Twiss parameters with each condition. We observed the effect of the magnetic field on the emission surface.

  7. Ablation pressure driven by an energetic electron beam in a dense plasma.

    PubMed

    Gus'kov, S; Ribeyre, X; Touati, M; Feugeas, J-L; Nicolaï, Ph; Tikhonchuk, V

    2012-12-21

    An intense beam of high energy electrons may create extremely high pressures in solid density materials. An analytical model of ablation pressure formation and shock wave propagation driven by an energetic electron beam is developed and confirmed with numerical simulations. In application to the shock-ignition approach in inertial confinement fusion, the energy transfer by fast electrons may be a dominant mechanism of creation of the igniting shock wave. An electron beam with an energy of 30 keV and energy flux 2-5 PW/cm(2) can create a pressure amplitude more than 300 Mbar for a duration of 200-300 ps in a precompressed solid material. PMID:23368476

  8. Molecular Dynamics Investigations of the Ablator/Fuel Interface during Early Stages of Inertial Confinement Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanton, Liam; Murillo, Michael; Glosli, James

    2014-10-01

    At the National Ignition Facility, high-powered laser beams are used to compress a small target to generate fusion reactions. A critical issue in achieving this is the understanding of mix at the ablator/fuel interface. Mixing occurs at various length scales, ranging from atomic inter-species diffusion to hydrodynamic instabilities. Because the interface is preheated by energy from the incoming shock, it is important to understand the dynamics before the shock arrives. The interface is in the warm dense matter phase with a deuterium/tritium fuel mixture on one side and a plastic mixture on the other. We would like to understand various aspects of the evolution, including the state of the interface when the main shock arrives, the role of electric field generation at the interface, and the character and time scales for diffusion. We present a molecular dynamics approach to model these processes, in which the ions are treated as classical point particles. Because we must reach extremely large length and time scales, we have also developed a simplified electronic structure model, which includes time- and space-dependent ionization levels, external heating and electron-ion energy exchange. Simulation results are presented and compared with other models and experiments. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  9. Damage and ablation of large band gap dielectrics induced by a 46.9 nm laser beam

    SciTech Connect

    Ritucci, A; Tomassetti, G; Reale, A; Arrizza, L; Zuppella, P; Reale, L; Palladino, L; Flora, F; Bonfigli, F; Faenov, A; Pikuz, T; Kaiser, J; Nilsen, J; Jankowski, A F

    2006-03-08

    We applied a 0.3 mJ, 1.7 ns, 46.9 nm soft X-ray Argon laser to ablate the surface of large band gap dielectrics: CaF{sub 2} and LiF crystals. The ablation versus the fluence of the soft X-ray beam has been studied varying the fluence in the range of 0.05-3 J/cm{sup 2}. An ablation threshold of 0.06 and 0.1 J/cm{sup 2} and an ablation depth of 14 and 20 nm have been found for CaF{sub 2} and LiF, respectively. These results define new ablation conditions for these large band gap dielectrics, which can be of interest for the fine processing of these materials.

  10. Physics with fast molecular-ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Kanter, E.P.

    1980-01-01

    Fast (MeV) molecular-ion beams provide a unique source of energetic projectile nuclei which are correlated in space and time. The recognition of this property has prompted several recent investigations of various aspects of the interactions of these ions with matter. High-resolution measurements on the fragments resulting from these interactions have already yielded a wealth of new information on such diverse topics as plasma oscillations in solids and stereochemical structures of molecular ions as well as a variety of atomic collision phenomena. The general features of several such experiments will be discussed and recent results will be presented.

  11. Molecular-beam gas-sampling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, W. S.; Knuth, E. L.

    1972-01-01

    A molecular beam mass spectrometer system for rocket motor combustion chamber sampling is described. The history of the sampling system is reviewed. The problems associated with rocket motor combustion chamber sampling are reported. Several design equations are presented. The results of the experiments include the effects of cooling water flow rates, the optimum separation gap between the end plate and sampling nozzle, and preliminary data on compositions in a rocket motor combustion chamber.

  12. Endometrial ablation

    MedlinePlus

    Hysteroscopy-endometrial ablation; Laser thermal ablation; Endometrial ablation-radiofrequency; Endometrial ablation-thermal balloon ablation; Rollerball ablation; Hydrothermal ablation; Novasure ablation

  13. Mechanism of Protein Molecule Isolation by IR Laser Ablation of Droplet Beam.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Kensuke; Nirasawa, Takuya; Hoshino-Nagasaka, Mariko; Kohno, Jun-ya

    2016-03-10

    Gas-phase isolation of bovine serum albumin (BSA) from aqueous solutions is performed by IR laser ablation of a droplet beam. Multiply charged BSA ions (positive and negative) were produced by the IR laser irradiation onto a droplet beam of aqueous BSA solutions with various pH values prepared by addition of hydrochloric acid or sodium hydroxide to the solution. The isolation mechanism was discussed based on the charge state of the isolated BSA ions. A nanodroplet model explains the gas-phase charge distribution of the BSA ions. This study provides a fundamental basis for further studies of a wide variety of biomolecules in the gas phase isolated directly from solution. PMID:26903000

  14. Microstructural and molecular considerations in the treatment of scars with ablative fractional lasers.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Cerrene N; Ozog, David

    2015-03-01

    Fractional ablative lasers have recently proven to be an effective modality for improving the clinical appearance and minimizing the morbidity associated with restrictivetype scars. Their tolerable safety profile on nonfacial sites and darker Fitzpatrick skin types provides an advantage over its fully ablative counterpart in treating facial rhytides, photodamaged skin, and acne scars. However, despite its increasing usage in clinical practice, the mechanism behind the observed clinical benefit remains complex and has yet to be fully elucidated. This paper reviews the work on the histological mechanism of action of ablative fractional lasers, and the molecular changes that occur posttreatment on restrictive scars, with an emphasis on mature burn and postsurgical scars. As the majority of research has been on the carbon dioxide laser, a natural focus on this wavelength is presented. PMID:25922951

  15. Supersonic Molecular Beam Optical Stark Spectroscopy of MnH.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gengler, Jamie; Ma, Tongmei; Harrison, Jeremy; Steimle, Timothy

    2006-03-01

    The large moment of inertia, large magnetic moment, and possible large permanent electric dipole moment of manganese monohydride, MnH, makes it a prime candidate for ultra-cold molecule production via Stark deceleration and magnetic trapping. Here we report the first molecular beam production of MnH and the analysis of the Stark effect in the (0,0) A^7 π -- X^ 7σ^+ band. The sample was prepared by laser ablation of solid Mn in an H2 supersonic expansion. The low rotational temperature (<50 K) and near natural linewidth resolution (˜50 MHz) facilitated analysis of the ^55Mn (I=5/2) and ^1H (I=1/2) hyperfine structure. A comparison of the derived field-free parameters with those obtained from sub- Doppler optical measurements will be made. Progress on the analysis of the Stark effect will be given. J.R. Bochinski, E.R. Hudson, H.J. Lewandowski, and J. Ye, Phys. Rev. A 70, 043410 (2004). S.Y.T. van de Meerakker, R.T. Jongma, H.L. Bethlem, and G. Meijer, Phys. Rev. A 64, 041401(R) (2001) report the first molecular beam production of MnH and the analysis of T.D. Varberg, J.A. Gray, R.W. Field, and A.J. Merer, J. Mol. Spec. 156, 296-318 (1992). I.E. Gordon, D.R.T. Appadoo, A. Shayesteh, K.A. Walker, and P.F. Bernath, J. Mol. Spec., 229, 145-149 (2005).

  16. Perspective: Oxide molecular-beam epitaxy rocks!

    SciTech Connect

    Schlom, Darrell G.

    2015-06-01

    Molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE) is the “gold standard” synthesis technique for preparing semiconductor heterostructures with high purity, high mobility, and exquisite control of layer thickness at the atomic-layer level. Its use for the growth of multicomponent oxides got off to a rocky start 30 yr ago, but in the ensuing decades, it has become the definitive method for the preparation of oxide heterostructures too, particularly when it is desired to explore their intrinsic properties. Examples illustrating the unparalleled achievements of oxide MBE are given; these motivate its expanding use for exploring the potentially revolutionary states of matter possessed by oxide systems.

  17. Materials issues in molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Tsao, J.Y.

    1993-12-31

    The technology of crystal growth has advanced enormously during the past two decades; among those advances, the development and refinement of molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) has been among the most important. Crystals grown by MBE are more precisely controlled than those grown by any other method, and today form the basis for many of the most advanced device structures in solid-state physics, electronics and optoelectronics. In addition to its numerous device applications, MBE is also an enormously rich and interesting area of materials science in and of itself. This paper, discusses a few examples of some of these materials issues, organized according to whether they involve bulk, thin films, or surfaces.

  18. Molecular beam studies of reaction dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.T.

    1987-03-01

    Purpose of this research project is two-fold: (1) to elucidate detailed dynamics of simple elementary reactions which are theoretically important and to unravel the mechanism of complex chemical reactions or photo chemical processes which play an important role in many macroscopic processes and (2) to determine the energetics of polyatomic free radicals using microscopic experimental methods. Most of the information is derived from measurement of the product fragment translational energy and angular distributions using unique molecular beam apparati designed for these purposes.

  19. Perspective: Oxide molecular-beam epitaxy rocks!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlom, Darrell G.

    2015-06-01

    Molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE) is the "gold standard" synthesis technique for preparing semiconductor heterostructures with high purity, high mobility, and exquisite control of layer thickness at the atomic-layer level. Its use for the growth of multicomponent oxides got off to a rocky start 30 yr ago, but in the ensuing decades, it has become the definitive method for the preparation of oxide heterostructures too, particularly when it is desired to explore their intrinsic properties. Examples illustrating the unparalleled achievements of oxide MBE are given; these motivate its expanding use for exploring the potentially revolutionary states of matter possessed by oxide systems.

  20. Molecular signatures in femtosecond laser-induced organic plasmas: comparison with nanosecond laser ablation.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Jorge; Moros, Javier; Laserna, J Javier

    2016-01-28

    During the last few years, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has evolved significantly in the molecular sensing area through the optical monitoring of emissions from organic plasmas. Large efforts have been made to study the formation pathways of diatomic radicals as well as their connections with the bonding framework of molecular solids. Together with the structural and chemical-physical properties of molecules, laser ablation parameters seem to be closely tied to the observed spectral signatures. This research focuses on evaluating the impact of laser pulse duration on the production of diatomic species that populate plasmas of organic materials. Differences in relative intensities of spectral signatures from the plasmas of several organic molecules induced in femtosecond (fs) and nanosecond (ns) ablation regimes have been studied. Beyond the abundance and origin of diatomic radicals that seed the plasma, findings reveal the crucial role of the ablation regime in the breakage pattern of the molecule. The laser pulse duration dictates the fragments and atoms resulting from the vaporized molecules, promoting some formation routes at the expense of other paths. The larger amount of fragments formed by fs pulses advocates a direct release of native bonds and a subsequent seeding of the plasma with diatomic species. In contrast, in the ns ablation regime, the atomic recombinations and single displacement processes dominate the contribution to diatomic radicals, as long as atomization of molecules prevails over their progressive decomposition. Consequently, fs-LIBS better reflects correlations between strengths of emissions from diatomic species and molecular structure as compared to ns-LIBS. These new results entail a further step towards the specificity in the analysis of molecular solids by fs-LIBS. PMID:26695078

  1. PHOTOELECTRON SPECTROSCOPY OF SUPERSONIC MOLECULAR BEAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Pollard, J.E.; Trevor, D.J.; Lee, Y.T.; Shirley, D.A.

    1981-06-01

    We report the development of an instrument for gas-phase ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy which opens several new areas for study through use of the supersonic molecular beam technique. The key features in which we have sought an improvement on earlier spectrometer designs are (1) the optimization of electron energy resolution and sensitivity, (2) vacuum isolation, and (3) the capability for mass spectrometric analysis. Our principal interests are in the high resolution spectroscopy of small molecules and in studies of weakly bound complexes formed under collisionless conditions. As shown in Fig. 1 the apparatus is essentially a molecular beam chamber with allowance for access by a beam source, an electron energy analyzer, and a quadrupole mass spectrometer. These three plug-in units are equipped with individual differential pumping systems. The photon source is a rare-gas resonance lamp which may be directed toward the molecular beam either 90{sup o} or 54.7{sup o} from the direction of electron collection. Electrons which pass through entrance aperture are transported by a series of electrostatic lenses to a 90{sup o} spherical sector pre-analyzer (R{sub 0} = 3.8 cm) and then on to a 180{sup o} hemispherical analyzer (R{sub 0} = 10.2 cm). The detector consists of a microchannel plate electron multiplier (40 mm diam.) with a resistive-anode position encoder. The function of the pre-analyzer is to improve the signal-to-noise ratio by reducing the background of scattered electrons incident upon the microchannel plate. The electron optical system is designed such that the energy bandpass (FWHN) leaving the pre-analyzer just fills the energy window presented by the multichannel detector. The multichannel capability of this analyzer is very advantageous for working with the rather low number density (< 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3}) of molecular beam samples, since the data collection rate is improved by more than an order of magnitude over single channel operation. To

  2. Comment on ''Generation of cold low divergent atomic beam of indium by laser ablation'' [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 76, 113302 (2005)

    SciTech Connect

    Denning, A.; Booth, A.; Lee, S.; Amonson, M.; Bergeson, S. D.

    2009-04-15

    We present measurements of the velocity distribution of calcium atoms in an atomic beam generated using a dual-stage laser back-ablation apparatus. Distributions are measured using a velocity selective Doppler time-of-flight technique. They are Boltzmann-like with rms velocities corresponding to temperatures above the melting point for calcium. Contrary to a recent report in the literature, this method does not generate a subthermal atomic beam.

  3. Features of silicon-containing coatings deposition from ablation plasma formed by a powerful ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazonov, R.; Kholodnaya, G.; Ponomarev, D.; Remnev, G.; Khailov, I.

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents the research of features of silicon-containing coatings deposition from ablation plasma, which is formed by a powerful ion beam at the influence on a microsized pressed powder of SiO2. Experimental research have been conducted with a laboratory setup based on a TEMP-4M pulsed ion accelerator in a double-pulse forming mode; the first is negative (300-500 ns, 100-150 kV), and the second is positive (150 ns, 250-300 kV). A beam composition: C+ ions (60-70 %) and protons, the ion current density on the target is 25±5 A/cm2. An electron self-magnetically insulated diode has been used to generate the ion beam in the TEMP-4M accelerator. The properties of obtained silicon-containing films have been analyzed with the help of IR spectroscopy. A surface structure has been studied by the method of scanning electron microscopy.

  4. Emittance dependence on anode morphology of an ion beam provided by laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velardi, L.; Delle Side, D.; Nassisi, V.

    2014-07-01

    In this work, we studied the characteristics of ion beams generated by Platone accelerator in different anode configurations. The accelerator is a laser ion source with two gaps which accelerate the ions in cascade. The laser is a ns pulsed KrF able to apply irradiances of 109-1010 W/cm2. The target ablated was pure disk of Cu. The accelerating voltage applied in this work was 60 kV. The emittance evaluation was performed by the pepper pot method utilizing radio-chromic films, EBT Gafchromic, as sensible targets. The study was performed by varying the geometric configuration of the anode (the extracting electrode), modifying the hole morphology, e.g. a plane and curved grid were mounted in order to change the extraction configuration. The results were compared with the ones obtained with the extraction hole without any grid. For the normalized emittance the lowest value was 0.20π mm mrad.

  5. Molecular dynamics simulations of ablation and spallation of gold irradiated by femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demaske, Brian; Zhakhovsky, Vasily; Inogamov, Nail; Oleynik, Ivan

    2010-03-01

    The dynamics of material response to irradiation of thin gold foils by a femtosecond laser pulse is examined by molecular dynamics simulations. The major physical phenomena include ablation - the removal of material from irradiated surface and spallation - the ejection of a thin layer of material from the rear of the film. In order to reproduce the physical processes that occur under experimental conditions, we simulated 1 μm thick foils containing up to 170,000,000 atoms. Such thick foils are also needed to prevent the ablation and spallation zones from overlapping. In this presentation, we discuss the major physics of laser ablation and spallation observed in MD simulations: heating of a narrow region beneath the surface of the foil, its transformation to a metastable stress-confined state, and the rapid decomposition of this state into a strong rarefaction and compression wave. At some critical absorbed laser fluence, the rarefaction wave results in nucleation and growth of voids leading to ablation of the frontal surface. At higher absorbed fluences, the compression wave causes rear-side spallation of crystalline gold. Quantitative data such as the absorbed fluence thresholds, crater depths, and cavitation strength of gold are obtained from simulation and compared to experimental data.

  6. Studies on the Application of High Voltage Discharge Ionization and Ablation in Supersonic-Jets for the Generation of Intense Cluster Ion Beams.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brock, Ansgar

    Glow discharge and pulsed capacitor discharge ionization in supersonic expansions were investigated for the production of intense beams of molecular cluster ions from seeded and ablated compounds. A low cost high voltage high current pulser based on a triggered spark gap switch is described as a mean for ionization and ablation. Besides, details of the molecular beam apparatus and modified pulsed valve are given. Cluster cations rm (Ar)_ {n}^+, rm (CO_2) _{n}^{+}, rm (C_6H_6)_{n}^+ and rm (H_2O)_{n }^+ were produced by pulsed capacitor discharge ionization in the expansion region of a seeded free-jet. The observed cluster mass spectra (CMS) for Ar, rm C_6H_6 and H _2O show the characteristic features (magic numbers) of electron beam and photo ionized clusters under molecular flow conditions. Indications for the presence of magic numbers in the CMS of {(CO _2)_{n}^+} cluster ions at n = 20, 26, 30 and 34 similar to those found for rare gas clusters have been found. Cationic metal ligand complexes Cu(Toluene) _{rm n}^+, Cu(Acetone) _{rm n}^+, Cu(Methanol)_{rm n}^+ , Cu(Ethylether)_{rm n }^+, Cu(Water)_{ rm n}^+, Al(Water)_ {rm n}^+ were synthesized by ablation of the metal from metallic discharge electrodes in a discharge gas mixture of helium seeded with the ligand of choice. The CMS of the expanded plasmas show little background ion signal besides the metal-ligand species. Charge exchange processes in the expansion guarantee high ionization yields of the desired species and account for low backgrounds. Changes in the successive binding energy of Cu(Water)_ {rm n}^+ clusters n = 1-4 are clearly observed in the CMS as step formation. A similar pattern found in the Cu(Acetone)_{ rm n}^+ CMS suggests the same trend in the successive binding energy as known for water. Ablation from a Cr(acac)_3 in a copper matrix was employed for the synthesis of Cr(Acetone) _{rm n}^+ and Cr(Benzene)^+ complexes demonstrating the ability to use nonconducting compounds as a metal source

  7. Delayed Shutters For Dual-Beam Molecular Epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grunthaner, Frank J.; Liu, John L.; Hancock, Bruce

    1989-01-01

    System of shutters for dual-molecular-beam epitaxy apparatus delays start of one beam with respect to another. Used in pulsed-beam equipment for deposition of low-dislocation layers of InAs on GaAs substrates, system delays application of arsenic beam with respect to indium beam to assure proper stoichiometric proportions on newly forming InAs surface. Reflectance high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) instrument used to monitor condition of evolving surface of deposit. RHEED signal used to time pulsing of molecular beams in way that minimizes density of defects and holds lattice constant of InAs to that of GaAs substrate.

  8. Shock Wave Mediated Plume Chemistry for Molecular Formation in Laser Ablation Plasmas.

    PubMed

    Harilal, Sivanandan S; Brumfield, Brian E; Cannon, Bret D; Phillips, Mark C

    2016-02-16

    Although it is relatively straightforward to measure the ionic, atomic, molecular, and particle emission features from laser ablation plumes, the associated kinetic and thermodynamic development leading to molecular and nanocluster formation remain one of the most important topics of analytical chemistry and material science. Very little is known, for instance, about the evolutionary paths of molecular and nanocluster formation and its relation to laser plume hydrodynamics. This is, to a large extent; due to the complexity of numerous physical processes that coexist in a transient laser-plasma system. Here, we report the formation mechanisms of molecules during complex interactions of a laser-produced plasma plume expanding from a high purity aluminum metal target into ambient air. It is found that the plume hydrodynamics plays a great role in redefining the plasma thermodynamics and molecular formation. Early in the plasma expansion, the generated shock wave at the plume edge acts as a barrier for the combustion process and molecular formation is prevalent after the shock wave collapse. The temporally and spatially resolved contour mapping of atoms and molecules in laser ablation plumes highlight the formation routes and persistence of species in the plasma and their relation to plume hydrodynamics. PMID:26732866

  9. Twenty years of molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, A. Y.

    1995-05-01

    The term "molecular beam epitaxy" (MBE) was first used in one of our crystal growth papers in 1970, after having conducted extensive surface physics studies in the late 1960's of the interaction of atomic and molecular beams with solid surfaces. The unique feature of MBE is the ability to prepare single crystal layers with atomic dimensional precision. MBE sets the standard for epitaxial growth and has made possible semiconductor structures that could not be fabricated with either naturally existing materials or by other crystal growth techniques. MBE led the crystal growth technologies when it prepared the first semiconductor quantum well and superlattice structures that gave unexpected and exciting electrical and optical properties. For example, the discovery of the fractional quantized Hall effect. It brought experimental quantum physics to the classroom, and practically all major universities throughout the world are now equipped with MBE systems. The fundamental principles demonstrated by the MBE growth of III-V compound semiconductors have also been applied to the growth of group IV, II-VI, metal, and insulating materials. For manufacturing, the most important criteria are uniformity, precise control of the device structure, and reproducibility. MBE has produced more lasers (3 to 5 million per month for compact disc application) than any other crystal growth technique in the world. New directions for MBE are to incorporate in-situ, real-time monitoring capabilities so that complex structures can be precisely "engineered". In the future, as environmental concerns increase, the use of toxic arsine and phosphine may be limited. Successful use of valved cracker cells for solid arsenic and phosphorus has already produced InP based injection lasers.

  10. Molecular contamination study by interaction of a molecular beam with a platinum surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuss, H. E.

    1976-01-01

    The capability of molecular beam scattering from a solid surface is analyzed for identification of molecular contamination of the surface. The design and setup of the molecular beam source and the measuring setup for the application of a phase sensitive measuring technique for the determination of the scattered beam intensity are described. The scattering distributions of helium and nitrogen molecular beams interacting with a platinum surface were measured for different amounts of contamination from diffusion pump oil for surface temperatures ranging from 30 to 400 C. The results indicate the scattering of molecular beams from a platinum surface is a very sensitive method for detecting surface contamination.

  11. Molecular beam studies of stratospheric photochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Teresa Anne

    1998-12-01

    Photochemistry of chlorine oxide containing species plays a major role in stratospheric ozone depletion. This thesis discusses two photodissociation studies of the key molecules ClONO2 and ClOOCl which were previously thought to only produce Cl-atom (ozone depleting) products at wavelengths relevant to the stratosphere. The development of a molecular beam source of ClOOCl and the photodissociation dynamics of the model system Cl2O are also discussed. In the first chapter, the photochemistry of ClONO2 is examined at 308 nm using the technique of photofragment translational spectroscopy. Two primary decomposition pathways, leading to Cl + NO3 and ClO + NO2, were observed, with a lower limit of 0.33 for the relative yield of ClO. The angular distributions for both channels were anisotropic, indicating that the dissociation occurs within a rotational period. Chapter two revisits the photodissociation dynamics of Cl2O at 248 and 308 nm, on which we had previously reported preliminary findings. At 248 nm, three distinct dissociation pathways leading to Cl + ClO products were resolved. At 308 nm, the angular distribution was slightly more isotropic that previously reported, leaving open the possibility that Cl2O excited at 308 nm lives longer than a rotational period. Chapter three describes the development and optimization of a molecular beam source of ClOOCl. We utilized pulsed laser photolysis of ClA2O to generate ClO radicals, and cooled the cell to promote three body recombination to form ClOOCl. The principal components in the beam were Cl2, Cl2O, and ClOOCl. In the fourth chapter, the photodissociation dynamics of ClOOCl are investigated at 248 and 308 nm. We observed multiple dissociation pathways which produced ClO + ClO and 2Cl + O2 products. The relative Cl:ClO product yields are 1.0:0.13 and 1.0:0.20 for ClOOCl photolysis at 248 and 308 nm, respectively. The upper limit for the relative yield of the ClO + ClO channel was 0.19 at 248 nm and 0.31 at 308 nm

  12. Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) Versus CT in Lung Ablation Procedure: Which is Faster?

    SciTech Connect

    Cazzato, Roberto Luigi Battistuzzi, Jean-Benoit Catena, Vittorio; Grasso, Rosario Francesco Zobel, Bruno Beomonte; Schena, Emiliano; Buy, Xavier Palussiere, Jean

    2015-10-15

    AimTo compare cone-beam CT (CBCT) versus computed tomography (CT) guidance in terms of time needed to target and place the radiofrequency ablation (RFA) electrode on lung tumours.Materials and MethodsPatients at our institution who received CBCT- or CT-guided RFA for primary or metastatic lung tumours were retrospectively included. Time required to target and place the RFA electrode within the lesion was registered and compared across the two groups. Lesions were stratified into three groups according to their size (<10, 10–20, >20 mm). Occurrences of electrode repositioning, repositioning time, RFA complications, and local recurrence after RFA were also reported.ResultsForty tumours (22 under CT, 18 under CBCT guidance) were treated in 27 patients (19 male, 8 female, median age 67.25 ± 9.13 years). Thirty RFA sessions (16 under CBCT and 14 under CT guidance) were performed. Multivariable linear regression analysis showed that CBCT was faster than CT to target and place the electrode within the tumour independently from its size (β = −9.45, t = −3.09, p = 0.004). Electrode repositioning was required in 10/22 (45.4 %) tumours under CT guidance and 5/18 (27.8 %) tumours under CBCT guidance. Pneumothoraces occurred in 6/14 (42.8 %) sessions under CT guidance and in 6/16 (37.5 %) sessions under CBCT guidance. Two recurrences were noted for tumours receiving CBCT-guided RFA (2/17, 11.7 %) and three after CT-guided RFA (3/19, 15.8 %).ConclusionCBCT with live 3D needle guidance is a useful technique for percutaneous lung ablation. Despite lesion size, CBCT allows faster lung RFA than CT.

  13. Note: High density pulsed molecular beam for cold ion chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Kokish, M. G.; Rajagopal, V.; Marler, J. P.; Odom, B. C.

    2014-08-15

    A recent expansion of cold and ultracold molecule applications has led to renewed focus on molecular species preparation under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Meanwhile, molecular beams have been used to study gas phase chemical reactions for decades. In this paper, we describe an apparatus that uses pulsed molecular beam technology to achieve high local gas densities, leading to faster reaction rates with cold trapped ions. We characterize the beam's spatial profile using the trapped ions themselves. This apparatus could be used for preparation of molecular species by reactions requiring excitation of trapped ion precursors to states with short lifetimes or for obtaining a high reaction rate with minimal increase of background chamber pressure.

  14. A source of translationally cold molecular beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkozy, Laszlo C.

    Currently the fields studying or using molecules with low kinetic energies are experiencing an unprecedented growth. Astronomers and chemists are interested in chemical reactions taking place at temperatures below or around 20 K, spectroscopists could make very precise measurements on slow molecules and molecular physicists could chart the potential energy surfaces more accurately. And the list continues. All of these experiments need slow molecules, with kinetic energies from around 10 cm-1 down to 0. Several designs of cold sources have already been made. The most interesting ones are presented. This work describes the design and the testing of a cold source based on the collisional cooling technique: the molecules of interest are cooled well below their freezing point by a precooled buffer gas. This way condensation is avoided. The source is a copper cell cooled to 4.2 K by an external liquid helium bath. The cell is filled with cold buffer gas (helium). The molecules of choice (ammonia) are injected through a narrow tube in the middle of the cell. The cold molecules leave the cell through a 1 millimeter hole. Two versions of pulsing techniques have been employed: a shutter blade which covers the source hole and opens it only for short moments, and a chopper that modulates the beam further downstream. Both produced pulse lengths around 1 millisecond. The source is tested in an experiment in which the emerging molecules are focused and detected. Time of flight technique is used to measure the kinetic energies. Two detectors have been employed: a microwave cavity to analyze the state of the molecules in the beam, and a mass spectrometer to measure the number density of the particles. The molecules coming out of the source hole are formed into a beam by an electrostatic quadrupole state selector. The quantum mechanical aspects and the elements of electrodynamics involved in the focusing are described. A computer simulation program is presented, which helped

  15. Molecular beam studies of reaction dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.T.

    1993-12-01

    The major thrust of this research project is to elucidate detailed dynamics of simple elementary reactions that are theoretically important and to unravel the mechanism of complex chemical reactions or photochemical processes that play important roles in many macroscopic processes. Molecular beams of reactants are used to study individual reactive encounters between molecules or to monitor photodissociation events in a collision-free environment. Most of the information is derived from measurement of the product fragment energy, angular, and state distributions. Recent activities are centered on the mechanisms of elementary chemical reactions involving oxygen atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons, the dynamics of endothermic substitution reactions, the dependence of the chemical reactivity of electronically excited atoms on the alignment of excited orbitals, the primary photochemical processes of polyatomic molecules, intramolecular energy transfer of chemically activated and locally excited molecules, the energetics of free radicals that are important to combustion processes, the infrared-absorption spectra of carbonium ions and hydrated hydronium ions, and bond-selective photodissociation through electric excitation.

  16. Molecular beam studies of reaction dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Yuan T.

    1991-03-01

    The major thrust of this research project is to elucidate detailed dynamics of simple elementary reactions that are theoretically important and to unravel the mechanism of complex chemical reactions or photochemical processes that play important roles in many macroscopic processes. Molecular beams of reactants are used to study individual reactive encounters between molecules or to monitor photodissociation events in a collision-free environment. Most of the information is derived from measurement of the product fragment energy, angular, and state distributions. Recent activities are centered on the mechanisms of elementary chemical reactions involving oxygen atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons, the dynamics of endothermic substitution reactions, the dependence of the chemical reactivity of electronically excited atoms on the alignment of excited orbitals, the primary photochemical processes of polyatomic molecules, intramolecular energy transfer of chemically activated and locally excited molecules, the energetics of free radicals that are important to combustion processes, the infrared-absorption spectra of carbonium ions and hydrated hydronium ions, and bond-selective photodissociation through electric excitation.

  17. Molecular beam surface analysis. 1993 Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Appelhans, A.D.; Ingram, J.C.; Groenewold, G.S.; Dahl, D.A.; Delmore, J.E.

    1993-09-01

    The Molecular Beam Surface Analysis (MBSA) program is developing both laboratory-based and potentially field-portable chemical analyses systems taking advantage of new surface analysis technology developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The objective is to develop the means to rapidly detect and identify, with high specificity and high sensitivity, nonvolatile and low volatile organics found in Chemical Weapons (CW) and High Explosives (HE) feedstocks, agents, and decomposition products on surfaces of plants, rocks, paint chips, filters, smears of buildings, vehicles, equipment, etc.. Ideally, the method would involve no sample preparation and no waste generation, and would have the potential for being implemented as a field-portable instrument. In contrast to existing analytical methods that rely on sample volatility, MBSA is optimized for nonvolatile and low volatile compounds. This makes it amenable for rapidly screening field samples for CW agent decomposition products and feedstock chemicals and perhaps actual agents. In its final configuration (benchtop size) it could be operated in a non-laboratory environment (such as an office building) requiring no sample preparation chemistry or chemical supplies. It could also be included in a mobile laboratory used in on-site, ore remote site cooperative surveys, or in a standard laboratory, where it would provide fast screening of samples at minimal cost.

  18. Interaction of a converging laser beam with a Ag colloidal solution during the ablation of a Ag target in water.

    PubMed

    Resano-Garcia, Amandine; Battie, Yann; Naciri, Aotmane En; Chaoui, Nouari

    2016-05-27

    We studied the nanosecond laser-induced shape modifications of Ag colloids exposed to a converging laser beam during the ablation of a Ag target in water. To this end, we performed a series of laser ablation experiments in which the laser energy was varied while all other parameters were kept constant. In addition to transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the shape distribution of the Ag nanoparticles was determined by modelling the extinction spectra of the final colloidal solutions using theoretical calculations based on shape distributed effective medium theory (SDEMT). From these calculations, two physical parameters named sphericity and dispersity were introduced and used to gauge the evolution of the shape distribution of the particles. As the laser energy on the target was increased from 5 to 20 mJ/pulse, an apparently abrupt modification of the shape distribution of the particles was evidenced by both TEM and SDEMT calculations. This change is explained in terms of competitive fragmentation, growth and reshaping processes. On the basis the heating-melting-vaporization model, we demonstrate how the competition between these processes, occurring at different locations of the converging beam, determines the shape distribution of the final product. We highlight the relevance of the fluence gradient along the beam path and the laser interaction volume on the laser-induced modifications of the suspended particles during the ablation process. PMID:27095289

  19. Interaction of a converging laser beam with a Ag colloidal solution during the ablation of a Ag target in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resano-Garcia, Amandine; Battie, Yann; Naciri, Aotmane En; Chaoui, Nouari

    2016-05-01

    We studied the nanosecond laser-induced shape modifications of Ag colloids exposed to a converging laser beam during the ablation of a Ag target in water. To this end, we performed a series of laser ablation experiments in which the laser energy was varied while all other parameters were kept constant. In addition to transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the shape distribution of the Ag nanoparticles was determined by modelling the extinction spectra of the final colloidal solutions using theoretical calculations based on shape distributed effective medium theory (SDEMT). From these calculations, two physical parameters named sphericity and dispersity were introduced and used to gauge the evolution of the shape distribution of the particles. As the laser energy on the target was increased from 5 to 20 mJ/pulse, an apparently abrupt modification of the shape distribution of the particles was evidenced by both TEM and SDEMT calculations. This change is explained in terms of competitive fragmentation, growth and reshaping processes. On the basis the heating–melting–vaporization model, we demonstrate how the competition between these processes, occurring at different locations of the converging beam, determines the shape distribution of the final product. We highlight the relevance of the fluence gradient along the beam path and the laser interaction volume on the laser-induced modifications of the suspended particles during the ablation process.

  20. Ablation depth control with 40 nm resolution on ITO thin films using a square, flat top beam shaped femtosecond NIR laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hoon-Young; Yoon, Ji-Wook; Choi, Won-Suk; Kim, Kwang-Ryul; Cho, Sung-Hak

    2016-09-01

    We reported on the ablation depth control with a resolution of 40 nm on indium tin oxide (ITO) thin film using a square beam shaped femtosecond (190 fs) laser (λp=1030 nm). A slit is used to make the square, flat top beam shaped from the Gaussian spatial profile of the femtosecond laser. An ablation depth of 40 nm was obtained using the single pulse irradiation at a peak intensity of 2.8 TW/cm2. The morphologies of the ablated area were characterized using an optical microscope, atomic force microscope (AFM), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Ablations with square and rectangular types with various sizes were demonstrated on ITO thin film using slits with varying x-y axes. The stereo structure of the ablation with the depth resolution of approximately 40 nm was also fabricated successfully using the irradiation of single pulses with different shaped sizes of femtosecond laser.

  1. CO2 TEA Laser-Enhanced Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry (TELLAMIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Staci R.; Akpovo, Charlemagne A.; Ford, Alan; Herbert, Kenley; Johnson, Lewis

    2014-03-01

    Recently, it has been shown that the relative abundance of isotopes in enriched materials can be determined via laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) in a technique known as laser-ablation molecular isotopic spectroscopy (LAMIS). The original LAMIS work has focused on single-pulse (SP) LIBS for the excitation. However, dual-pulse (DP) LIBS reduces shot-to-shot variation and can lower detection limits of an element by about an order of magnitude or more. It also has the potential to improve the accuracy of the determination of the relative abundances of isotopes in LAMIS by minimizing the signal-to-noise ratio. In this work, a DP-LIBS technique for improving LAMIS relative-abundance information from a sample is presented. The new technique, called (TEA) Transverse-Excited breakdown in Atmosphere Laser-Enhanced Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry (TELLAMIS), uses a carbon dioxide (CO2) laser to increase the breakdown emission from LIBS in the LAMIS method. This technique is demonstrated on a collection of relative abundance isotopes of boron- 10 and boron-11 in varying concentrations in boric acid. Least-squares fitting to theoretical models are used to deduce plasma parameters and understand reproducibility of results. DTRA.

  2. Effect of molecular weight on the physicochemical modifications induced in the UV laser ablation of doped polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebollar, E.; Bounos, G.; Oujja, M.; Georgiou, S.; Castillejo, M.

    2007-04-01

    This work investigates the effect of polymer molecular weight MW on the UV ablation of iodo-naphthalene- and iodo-phenanthrene-doped poly(methyl methacrylate) PMMA, and polystyrene PS films following irradiation at 248 nm. For irradiation at weakly absorbed wavelengths, the ablation threshold increases with increasing MW. However, at strongly absorbed wavelengths, the difference in the ablation thresholds is much smaller, or minimal. In parallel, bubble formation due to accumulation of gas produced by polymer and dopant decomposition differs depending on MW. For highly absorbing PS, the differences of behaviour show a less dramatic dependence on MW. These results are explained within the framework of the bulk photothermal model, according to which ejection requires that a critical number of bonds is broken. In all, they are of direct importance for the optimisation of laser processing schemes and applications and provide the first indication of explosive boiling in UV ablation of polymers.

  3. Microfabricated cantilever-based detector for molecular beam experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachels, T.; Schäfer, R.

    1998-11-01

    A low cost detector for particles in molecular beam experiments is presented which can easily be mounted in a molecular beam apparatus. The detector is based on microfabricated cantilevers, which can be employed either as single sensors or as sensor arrays. The single cantilever technique has been used to measure the absolute number of atoms coming out of a pulsed laser vaporization cluster source. The particles are detected by the shift of the thermally excited resonance frequency of the cantilever due to the cluster deposition. We have determined with the single cantilever the ratio of neutral to ionized clusters and we have investigated the cluster generation at different source conditions. In addition to this, a microfabricated cantilever array has been used to measure molecular beam profiles, which opens new possibilities for molecular beam deflection experiments.

  4. Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry (MBMS) (Revised) (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-07-01

    This fact sheet provides information about Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry (MBMS) capabilities and applications at NREL's National Bioenergy Center. NREL has six MBMS systems that researchers and industry partners can use to understand thermochemical biomass conversion and biomass composition recalcitrance.

  5. Clinical Implementation of Intrafraction Cone Beam Computed Tomography Imaging During Lung Tumor Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ruijiang; Han, Bin; Meng, Bowen; Maxim, Peter G.; Xing, Lei; Koong, Albert C.; Diehn, Maximilian; Loo, Billy W.

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To develop and clinically evaluate a volumetric imaging technique for assessing intrafraction geometric and dosimetric accuracy of stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR). Methods and Materials: Twenty patients received SABR for lung tumors using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). At the beginning of each fraction, pretreatment cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) was used to align the soft-tissue tumor position with that in the planning CT. Concurrent with dose delivery, we acquired fluoroscopic radiograph projections during VMAT using the Varian on-board imaging system. Those kilovolt projections acquired during millivolt beam-on were automatically extracted, and intrafraction CBCT images were reconstructed using the filtered backprojection technique. We determined the time-averaged target shift during VMAT by calculating the center of mass of the tumor target in the intrafraction CBCT relative to the planning CT. To estimate the dosimetric impact of the target shift during treatment, we recalculated the dose to the GTV after shifting the entire patient anatomy according to the time-averaged target shift determined earlier. Results: The mean target shift from intrafraction CBCT to planning CT was 1.6, 1.0, and 1.5 mm; the 95th percentile shift was 5.2, 3.1, 3.6 mm; and the maximum shift was 5.7, 3.6, and 4.9 mm along the anterior-posterior, left-right, and superior-inferior directions. Thus, the time-averaged intrafraction gross tumor volume (GTV) position was always within the planning target volume. We observed some degree of target blurring in the intrafraction CBCT, indicating imperfect breath-hold reproducibility or residual motion of the GTV during treatment. By our estimated dose recalculation, the GTV was consistently covered by the prescription dose (PD), that is, V100% above 0.97 for all patients, and minimum dose to GTV >100% PD for 18 patients and >95% PD for all patients. Conclusions: Intrafraction CBCT during VMAT can provide

  6. Clinical Implementation of Intrafraction Cone Beam Computed Tomography Imaging During Lung Tumor Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ruijiang; Han, Bin; Meng, Bowen; Maxim, Peter G.; Xing, Lei; Koong, Albert C.; Diehn, Maximilian; Loo, Billy W.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To develop and clinically evaluate a volumetric imaging technique for assessing intrafraction geometric and dosimetric accuracy of stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR). Methods and Materials Twenty patients received SABR for lung tumors using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). At the beginning of each fraction, pretreatment cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) was used to align the soft-tissue tumor position with that in the planning CT. Concurrent with dose delivery, we acquired fluoroscopic radiograph projections during VMAT using the Varian on-board imaging system. Those kilovolt projections acquired during megavolt beam-on were automatically extracted, and intrafraction CBCT images were reconstructed using the filtered backprojection technique. We determined the time-averaged target shift during VMAT by calculating the center of mass of the tumor target in the intrafraction CBCT relative to the planning CT. To estimate the dosimetric impact of the target shift during treatment, we recalculated the dose to the GTV after shifting the entire patient anatomy according to the time-averaged target shift determined earlier. Results The mean target shift from intrafraction CBCT to planning CT was 1.6, 1.0, and 1.5 mm; the 95th percentile shift was 5.2, 3.1, 3.6 mm; and the maximum shift was 5.7, 3.6, and 4.9 mm along the anterior-posterior, left-right, and superior-inferior directions. Thus, the time-averaged intrafraction gross tumor volume (GTV) position was always within the planning target volume. We observed some degree of target blurring in the intrafraction CBCT, indicating imperfect breath-hold reproducibility or residual motion of the GTV during treatment. By our estimated dose recalculation, the GTV was consistently covered by the prescription dose (PD), that is, V100% above 0.97 for all patients, and minimum dose to GTV >100% PD for 18 patients and >95% PD for all patients. Conclusions Intrafraction CBCT during VMAT can provide

  7. Matrix Effects on Boron Containing Materials due to Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry (LAMIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Staci R.; Akpovo, Charlemagne A.; Martinez, Jorge; Ford, Alan; Herbert, Kenley; Johnson, Lewis

    2014-03-01

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is a spectroscopic technique that is used for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of materials in the liquid, solid, or gas phase. LIBS can also be used for the detection of isotopic shifts in atomic and diatomic species via Laser-Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectroscopy (LAMIS). However, any additional elements that are entrained into the plasma other than the element of interest, can affect the extent of ablation and quality of spectra and hence, potentially obscure or aid in the relative abundance assessment for a given element. To address the importance of matrix effects, the isotopic analysis of boron obtained from boron oxide (BO) emission originating from different boron-containing compounds, such as boron nitride (BN), boric acid (H3BO3) , and borax (Na2B4O710H2O), via LIBS has been performed here. Each of these materials has different physical properties and elemental composition in order to illustrate possible challenges for the LAMIS method. A calibration-free model similar to that for the original LAMIS work is used to determine properties of the plasma as the matrix is changed. DTRA

  8. Investigation Into the Optimum Beam Shape and Fluence for Selective Ablation of Dental Calculus at lambda = 400 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenly, J.E.; Seka. W.; Rechmann, P.

    2010-02-25

    A frequency-doubled Ti:sapphire laser is shown to selectively ablate dental calculus. The optimal transverse shape of the laser beam, including its variability under water-cooling, is determined for selective ablation of dental calculus. Intensity profiles under various water-cooling conditions were optically observed. The 400-nm laser was coupled into a multimode optical fiber using an f = 2.5-cm lens and light-shaping diffuser. Water-cooling was supplied coaxially around the fiber. Five human tooth samples (four with calculus and one pristine) were irradiated perpendicular to the tooth surface while the tooth was moved back and forth at 0.3 mm/second, varying between 20 and 180 iterations. The teeth were imaged before and after irradiation using light microscopy with a flashing blue light-emitting diode (LED). An environmental scanning electron microscope imaged each tooth after irradiation. High-order super-Gaussian intensity profiles are observed at the output of a fiber coiled around a 4-in. diameter drum. Super-Gaussian beams have a morehomogenous fluence distribution than Gaussian beams and have a higher energy efficiency for selective ablation. Coaxial water-cooling does not noticeably distort the intensity distribution within 1 mm from the optical fiber. In contrast, lasers focused to a Gaussian cross section (<=50-mm diameter) without fiber propagation and cooled by a water spray are heavily distorted and may lead to variable ablation. Calculus is preferentially ablated at high fluences (>= 2 J/cm^2); below this fluence, stalling occurs because of photo-bleaching of the calculus. Healthy dental hard tissue is not removed at fluences <=3 J/cm^2. Supplying laser light to a tooth using an optical fiber with coaxial water-cooling is determined to be the most appropriate method when selectively removing calculus with a frequency-doubled Ti:sapphire laser. Fluences over 2 J/cm^2 are required to remove calculus efficiently since photo-bleaching stalls calculus

  9. Reactive Collisions in Crossed Molecular Beams

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Herschbach, D. R.

    1962-02-01

    The distribution of velocity vectors of reaction products is discussed with emphasis on the restrictions imposed by the conservation laws. The recoil velocity that carries the products away from the center of mass shows how the energy of reaction is divided between internal excitation and translation. Similarly, the angular distributions, as viewed from the center of mass, reflect the partitioning of the total angular momentum between angular momenta of individual molecules and orbital angular momentum associated with their relative motion. Crossed-beam studies of several reactions of the type M + RI yields R + MI are described, where M = K, Rb, Cs, and R = CH{sub 3}, C{sub 3}H{sub 5}, etc. The results show that most of the energy of reaction goes into internal excitation of the products and that the angular distribution is quite anisotropic, with most of the MI recoiling backward (and R forward) with respect to the incoming K beam. (auth)

  10. Molecular changes in bone marrow, tumor and serum after conductive ablation of murine 4T1 breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Przybyla, Beata D; Shafirstein, Gal; Vishal, Sagar J; Dennis, Richard A; Griffin, Robert J

    2014-02-01

    Thermal ablation of solid tumors using conductive interstitial thermal therapy (CITT) produces coagulative necrosis in the center of ablation. Local changes in homeostasis for surviving tumor and systemic changes in circulation and distant organs must be understood and monitored in order to prevent tumor re-growth and metastasis. The purpose of this study was to use a mouse carcinoma model to evaluate molecular changes in the bone marrow and surviving tumor after CITT treatment by quantification of transcripts associated with cancer progression and hyperthermia, serum cytokines, stress proteins and the marrow/tumor cross-talk regulator stromal-derived factor 1. Analysis of 27 genes and 22 proteins with quantitative PCR, ELISA, immunoblotting and multiplex antibody assays revealed that the gene and protein expression in tissue and serum was significantly different between ablated and control mice. The transcripts of four genes (Cxcl12, Sele, Fgf2, Lifr) were significantly higher in the bone marrow of treated mice. Tumors surviving ablation showed significantly lower levels of the Lifr and Sele transcripts. Similarly, the majority of transcripts measured in tumors decreased with treatment. Surviving tumors also contained lower levels of SDF-1α and HIF-1α proteins whereas HSP27 and HSP70 were higher. Of 16 serum chemokines, IFNγ and GM-CSF levels were lower with treatment. These results indicate that CITT ablation causes molecular changes which may slow cancer cell proliferation. However, inhibition of HSP27 may be necessary to control aggressiveness of surviving cancer stem cells. The changes in bone marrow are suggestive of possible increased recruitment of circulatory cancer cells. Therefore, the possibility of heightened bone metastasis after thermal ablation needs to be further investigated and inhibition strategies developed, if warranted. PMID:24270800

  11. Direct periodic patterning of GaN-based light-emitting diodes by three-beam interference laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeomoh; Ji, Mi-Hee; Yuan, Dajun; Guo, Rui; Liu, Jianping; Asadirad, Mojtaba; Detchprohm, Theeradetch; Kwon, Min-Ki; Dupuis, Russell D.; Das, Suman; Ryou, Jae-Hyun

    2014-04-01

    We report on the direct patterning of two-dimensional periodic structures in GaN-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) through laser interference ablation for the fast and reliable fabrication of periodic micro- and nano-structures aimed at enhancing light output. Holes arranged in a two-dimensional hexagonal lattice array having an opening size of 500 nm, depth of 50 nm, and a periodicity of 1 μm were directly formed by three-beam laser interference without photolithography or electron-beam lithography processes. The laser-patterned LEDs exhibit an enhancement in light output power of 20% compared to conventional LEDs having a flat top surface without degradation of electrical and optical properties of the top p-GaN layer and the active region, respectively.

  12. Direct periodic patterning of GaN-based light-emitting diodes by three-beam interference laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jeomoh; Ji, Mi-Hee; Detchprohm, Theeradetch; Yuan, Dajun; Guo, Rui; Liu, Jianping; Asadirad, Mojtaba; Kwon, Min-Ki; Dupuis, Russell D.; Das, Suman; Ryou, Jae-Hyun

    2014-04-07

    We report on the direct patterning of two-dimensional periodic structures in GaN-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) through laser interference ablation for the fast and reliable fabrication of periodic micro- and nano-structures aimed at enhancing light output. Holes arranged in a two-dimensional hexagonal lattice array having an opening size of 500 nm, depth of 50 nm, and a periodicity of 1 μm were directly formed by three-beam laser interference without photolithography or electron-beam lithography processes. The laser-patterned LEDs exhibit an enhancement in light output power of 20% compared to conventional LEDs having a flat top surface without degradation of electrical and optical properties of the top p-GaN layer and the active region, respectively.

  13. Molecular-beam Studies of Primary Photochemical Processes

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Lee, Y. T.

    1982-12-01

    Application of the method of molecular-beam photofragmentation translational spectroscopy to the investigation of primary photochemical processes of polyatomic molecules is described. Examples will be given to illustrate how information concerning the energetics, dynamics, and mechanism of dissociation processes can be obtained from the precise measurements of angular and velocity distributions of products in an experiment in which a well-defined beam of molecules is crossed with a laser.

  14. A low Earth orbit molecular beam space simulation facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, J. B.

    1984-01-01

    A brief synopsis of the low Earth orbit (LEO) satellite environment is presented including neutral and ionic species. Two ground based atomic and molecular beam instruments are described which are capable of simulating the interaction of spacecraft surfaces with the LEO environment and detecting the results of these interactions. The first detects mass spectrometrically low level fluxes of reactively and nonreactively surface scattered species as a function of scattering angle and velocity while the second ultrahigh velocity (UHV) molecular beam, laser induced fluorescence apparatus is capable of measuring chemiluminescence produced by either gas phase or gas-surface interactions. A number of proposed experiments are described.

  15. An Introduction to the Supersonic Molecular Beam Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, En-yao

    2001-04-01

    Recently a new fuelling method with supersonic molecular beam injection (MBI) has been developed and used in the tokamaks experiments successfully. It is economical to develop and maintain. The advantages of supersonic MBI compared with the conventional of gas-puffing method are as follows: Deep deposition of fuel, better fuelling efficiency, reduced recycling and pure plasma. Particle and energy confinement can be improved and density limit extended. This review described the Laval nozzle molecular beam and a simple collective model for the injection of a supersonic MBI into the tokamak plasma.

  16. Production of high density molecular beams with wide velocity scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheffield, L. S.; Woo, S. O.; Rathnayaka, K. D. D.; Lyuksyutov, I. F.; Herschbach, D. R.

    2016-06-01

    We describe modifications of a pulsed rotating supersonic beam source that improve performance, particularly increasing the beam density and sharpening the pulse profiles. As well as providing the familiar virtues of a supersonic molecular beam (high intensity, narrowed velocity distribution, and drastic cooling of rotation and vibration), the rotating source enables scanning the translational velocity over a wide range. Thereby, beams of any atom or molecule available as a gas can be slowed or speeded. Using Xe beams in the slowing mode, we have obtained lab speeds down to about 40 ± 5 m/s with density near 1011 cm-3 and in the speeding mode lab speeds up to about 660 m/s and density near 1014 cm-3. We discuss some congenial applications. Providing low lab speeds can markedly enhance experiments using electric or magnetic fields to deflect, steer, or further slow polar or paramagnetic molecules. The capability to scan molecular speeds facilitates merging velocities with a codirectional partner beam, enabling study of collisions at very low relative kinetic energies, without requiring either beam to be slow.

  17. Pulsed rotating supersonic source for merged molecular beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheffield, L.; Hickey, M. S.; Krasovitskiy, V.; Rathnayaka, K. D. D.; Lyuksyutov, I. F.; Herschbach, D. R.

    2012-06-01

    We describe a pulsed rotating supersonic beam source, evolved from an ancestral device [M. Gupta and D. Herschbach, J. Phys. Chem. A 105, 1626 (2001)]. The beam emerges from a nozzle near the tip of a hollow rotor which can be spun at high-speed to shift the molecular velocity distribution downward or upward over a wide range. Here we consider mostly the slowing mode. Introducing a pulsed gas inlet system, cryocooling, and a shutter gate eliminated the main handicap of the original device in which continuous gas flow imposed high background pressure. The new version provides intense pulses, of duration 0.1-0.6 ms (depending on rotor speed) and containing ˜1012 molecules at lab speeds as low as 35 m/s and ˜1015 molecules at 400 m/s. Beams of any molecule available as a gas can be slowed (or speeded); e.g., we have produced slow and fast beams of rare gases, O2, Cl2, NO2, NH3, and SF6. For collision experiments, the ability to scan the beam speed by merely adjusting the rotor is especially advantageous when using two merged beams. By closely matching the beam speeds, very low relative collision energies can be attained without making either beam very slow.

  18. Pulsed rotating supersonic source for merged molecular beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheffield, Les; Hickey, Mark; Krasovitskiy, Vitaliy; Rathnayaka, Daya; Lyuksyutov, Igor; Herschbach, Dudley

    2012-10-01

    We continue the characterization of a pulsed rotating supersonic beam source. The original device was described by M. Gupta and D. Herschbach, J. Phys. Chem. A 105, 1626 (2001). The beam emerges from a nozzle near the tip of a hollow rotor which can be spun at high-speed to shift the molecular velocity distribution downward or upward over a wide range. Here we consider mostly the slowing mode. Introducing a pulsed gas inlet system, and a shutter gate eliminate the main handicap of the original device in which continuous gas flow imposed high background pressure. The new version provides intense pulses, of duration 0.1--0.6 ms (depending on rotor speed) and containing ˜10^12 molecules at lab speeds as low as 35 m/s and ˜10^15 molecules at 400 m/s. Beams of any molecule available as a gas can be slowed (or speeded); e.g., we have produced slow and fast beams of rare gases, O2, NO2, NH3, and SF6. For collision experiments, the ability to scan the beam speed by merely adjusting the rotor is especially advantageous when using two merged beams. By closely matching the beam speeds, very low relative collision energies can be attained without making either beam very slow.

  19. Nanoparticle generation and transport resulting from femtosecond laser ablation of ultrathin metal films: Time-resolved measurements and molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Rouleau, C. M. Puretzky, A. A.; Geohegan, D. B.; Shih, C.-Y.; Wu, C.; Zhigilei, L. V.

    2014-05-12

    The synthesis of metal nanoparticles by ultrafast laser ablation of nanometers-thick metal films has been studied experimentally and computationally. Near-threshold backside laser ablation of 2–20 nm-thick Pt films deposited on fused silica substrates was found to produce nanoparticles with size distributions that were bimodal for the thicker films, but collapsed into a single mode distribution for the thinnest film. Time-resolved imaging of blackbody emission from the Pt nanoparticles was used to reveal the nanoparticle propagation dynamics and estimate their temperatures. The observed nanoparticle plume was compact and highly forward-directed with a well-defined collective velocity that permitted multiple rebounds with substrates to be revealed. Large-scale molecular dynamics simulations were used to understand the evolution of compressive and tensile stresses in the thicker melted liquid films that lead to their breakup and ejection of two groups of nanoparticles with different velocity and size distributions. Ultrafast laser irradiation of ultrathin (few nm) metal films avoids the splitting of the film and appears to be a method well-suited to cleanly synthesize and deposit nanoparticles from semitransparent thin film targets in highly directed beams.

  20. Full characterization of an intense pulsed hyperthermal molecular beam

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, D.; Che, D.-C.; Fukuyama, T.; Hashinokuchi, M.; Teraoka, Y.; Kasai, T.

    2005-05-15

    A molecular beam technique for generating an intense pulsed hyperthermal molecular beam (pulsed HTMB) was developed. The beam source consists of a pulse valve, a cooling-water bottle that protects the pulse valve from heat transfer of the high temperature nozzle, and a nozzle with a heater. The point was a pulse-valve operation with the high temperature nozzle which was 30-mm long and was made of pyrolytic boron nitride. The pulsed HTMB of HCl was practically generated. The total beam intensity of the pulsed HTMB was measured by a quadrupole mass spectrometer. It was determined that the beam intensity of the pulsed HTMB was two orders of magnitude larger than that obtained in continuous-HTMB conditions. The pulsed HTMB of HCl was fully characterized by means of (2+1) resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization and ion time-of-flight techniques. We found that the velocity distribution of the pulsed HTMB was well expressed as supersonic molecular beams. At the highest nozzle temperature of 1400 K, the mean translational energy value of HCl molecules was 1.38 eV. The translational energy distribution of the pulsed HTMB covered a range from 0.8 to 1.6 eV. The fraction of higher translational energy molecules greater than 1.0 eV was 80% in the 1400 K nozzle. The rotational state distributions of HCl molecules in the pulsed HTMB were expressed as the Boltzmann distribution. While the rotational temperature decreased by an adiabatic expansion of the beam, the vibrational temperature, which was determined by the ratio of the ground-state population to the excited state one, almost equaled the nozzle temperature.

  1. Synthesis, characterization, and pulsed laser ablation of molecular sieves for thin film applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz, Trinidad, Jr.

    1998-12-01

    Molecular sieves are one class of crystalline low density metal oxides which are made up of one-, two-, and three dimensional pores and/or cages. We have investigated the synthesis and characterization of metal substituted aluminophosphates and all silica molecular sieves for thin film applications. A new copper substituted aluminophosphate, CuAPO-5 has been synthesized and characterized using x-ray powder diffraction, FT-IR spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Electron spin resonance and electron spin echo modulation provided supporting evidence of framework incorporation of Cu(II) ions. Thus, an exciting addition has been added to the family of metal substituted aluminophosphates where substitution of the metal has been demonstrated as framework species. Also presented here is the synthesis and characterization of an iron substituted aluminophosphate, FeAPO-5, and an all silica zeolite, UTD-1 for thin film applications. Pulsed laser ablation has been employed as the technique to generate thin films. Here an excimer laser (KrFsp*, 248 nm) was used to deposit the molecular sieves on a variety of substrates including polished silicon, titanium nitride, and porous stainless steel disks. The crystallinity of the deposited films was enhanced by a post hydrothermal treatment. A vapor phase treatment of the laser deposited FeAPO-5 films has been shown to increase the crystallinity of the film without increasing film thickness. Thin films of the FeAPO-5 molecular sieves were subsequently used as the dielectric phase in capacitive type chemical sensors. The capacitance change of the FeAPO-5 devices to the relative moisture makes them potential humidity sensors. The all silica zeolite UTD-1 thin films were deposited on polished silicon and porous supports. A brief post hydrothermal treatment of the laser deposited films deposited on polished silicon and porous metal supports resulted in oriented film growth lending these films to applications in gas separations

  2. Laser wakefield acceleration of electron beams beyond 1 GeV from an ablative capillary discharge waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Haiyang; Liu, Mingwei; Wang, Wentao; Wang, Cheng; Liu, Jiansheng; Deng, Aihua; Xu, Jiancai; Xia, Changquan; Li, Wentao; Zhang, Hui; Lu, Xiaoming; Wang, Cheng; Wang, Jianzhou; Liang, Xiaoyan; Leng, Yuxin; Shen, Baifei; Nakajima, Kazuhisa; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2011-08-01

    Laser wakefield acceleration of electrons well beyond 1 GeV and optical guiding of ultraintense laser pulses of peak powers up to 160 TW over a 4-cm long ablative capillary discharge plasma channel were experimentally demonstrated. Electron beams, with energies up to 1.8 GeV, were generated by using the 130 TW, 55 fs driving laser pulses. A comparison of oxygen-containing acrylic resin (C:O:H = 4:2:7) capillary and no oxygen-containing polyethylene (C:O:H = 1:0:2) capillary measurements suggests that the injection of electron into the laser wakefield is assisted by the ionization of oxygen K-shell electrons.

  3. Laser wakefield acceleration of electron beams beyond 1 GeV from an ablative capillary discharge waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Haiyang; Liu Mingwei; Wang Wentao; Wang Cheng; Liu Jiansheng; Deng Aihua; Xu Jiancai; Xia Changquan; Li Wentao; Zhang Hui; Lu Xiaoming; Wang Cheng; Wang Jianzhou; Liang Xiaoyan; Leng Yuxin; Shen Baifei; Li Ruxin; Xu Zhizhan; Nakajima, Kazuhisa

    2011-08-29

    Laser wakefield acceleration of electrons well beyond 1 GeV and optical guiding of ultraintense laser pulses of peak powers up to 160 TW over a 4-cm long ablative capillary discharge plasma channel were experimentally demonstrated. Electron beams, with energies up to 1.8 GeV, were generated by using the 130 TW, 55 fs driving laser pulses. A comparison of oxygen-containing acrylic resin (C:O:H = 4:2:7) capillary and no oxygen-containing polyethylene (C:O:H = 1:0:2) capillary measurements suggests that the injection of electron into the laser wakefield is assisted by the ionization of oxygen K-shell electrons.

  4. The influence of the Q-switched and free-running Er:YAG laser beam characteristics on the ablation of root canal dentine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papagiakoumou, Eirini; Papadopoulos, Dimitrios N.; Khabbaz, Marouan G.; Makropoulou, Mersini I.; Serafetinides, Alexander A.

    2004-06-01

    Laser based dental treatment is attractive to many researchers. Lasers in the 3 μm region, as the Er:YAG, are suitable especially for endodontic applications. In this study a pulsed free-running and Q-switched laser was used for the ablation experiments of root canal dentine. The laser beam was either directly focused on the dental tissue or delivered to it through an infrared fiber. For different spatial beam distributions, energies, number of pulses and both laser operations the quality characteristics (crater's shape formation, ablation efficiency and surface characteristics modification) were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The craters produced, generally, reflect the relevant beam profile. Inhomogeneous spatial beam profiles and short pulse duration result in cracks formation and lower tissue removal efficiency, while longer pulse durations cause hard dentine fusion. Any beam profile modification, due to laser characteristics variations and the specific delivering system properties, is directly reflected in the ablation crater shape and the tissue removal efficiency. Therefore, the laser parameters, as fluence, pulse repetition rate and number of pulses, have to be carefully adjusted in relation to the desirable result.

  5. Induced base transistor fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, C.-Y.; Liu, W. C.; Jame, M. S.; Wang, Y. H.; Luryi, S.

    1986-09-01

    A novel three-terminal hot-electron device, the induced base transistor (IBT), has been fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy. Two-dimensional electron gas induced by the applied collector field in an undoped GaAs quantum well is used as the base of the IBT. The common-base current gain alpha has been achieved as high as 0.96 under a collector bias of 2.5 V and an emitter current of 3 mA.

  6. Resistively Heated SiC Nozzle for Generating Molecular Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cagiano, Steven; Abell, Robert; Patrick, Edward; Bendt, Miri; Gundersen, Cynthia

    2007-01-01

    An improved nozzle has been developed to replace nozzles used previously in an apparatus that generates a substantially unidirectional beam of molecules passing through a vacuum at speeds of several kilometers per second. The basic principle of operation of the apparatus is the same for both the previous and the present nozzle designs. The main working part of the nozzle is essentially a cylinder that is closed except that there is an inlet for a pressurized gas and, at one end, the cylinder is closed by a disk that contains a narrow central hole that serves as an outlet. The cylinder is heated to increase the thermal speeds of the gas molecules into the desired high-speed range. Heated, pressurized gas escapes through the outlet into a portion of the vacuum chamber that is separated, by a wall, from the rest of the vacuum chamber. In this portion of the vacuum chamber, the gas undergoes a free jet expansion. Most of the expanded gas is evacuated and thus does not become part of the molecular beam. A small fraction of the expanded beam passes through a narrow central orifice in the wall and thereby becomes a needle- thin molecular beam in the portion of the vacuum on the downstream side of the wall.

  7. In vitro investigation of intra-canal dentine-laser beam interaction aspects: I. Evaluation of ablation capability (ablation rate and efficiency).

    PubMed

    Minas, Nova Hambersom; Meister, Joerg; Franzen, Rene; Gutknecht, Norbert; Lampert, Friedrich

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the amount of intra-canal dentine removed with an erbium, chromium:yttrium-scandium-gallium-garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) laser using different endodontic tips and different power settings. Ninety intact extracted bovine teeth were selected as samples. After sectioning the roots and preparing the testing cylinders, we divided the samples into three main groups (A, B, C), with further subdivision of each group to be irradiated with three different powers (1500 mW, 1750 mW and 2000 mW). An Er,Cr:YSGG laser system (2.78 microm, 140 micros, 20 Hz and 65% water to 35% air ratio) was used for irradiation, and the loss of intra-canal dentine mass was calculated by the difference between the initial and final sample masses. Data were analysed with Kolmogorov-Smirnov, analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey tests. At a significance level of alpha = 1%, the results showed statistically significant differences (P < 0.0001) between different tip groups, regarding both the ablation rate and the ablation efficiency criteria. With regard to the three irradiation power settings, statistically significant difference were recorded only between groups C and A, for the ablation rate criteria. The intra-canal ablation ability of the Er,Cr:YSGG laser improved with increasing power and/or tip diameter. The latter exhibited a stronger influence on ablation rate and efficiency. Laser intra-canal ablation is an important addition to the field of endodontics; nevertheless, further investigations and system improvements are required. PMID:19636663

  8. Electromagnetic and geometric characterization of accelerated ion beams by laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassisi, V.; Velardi, L.; Side, D. Delle

    2013-05-01

    Laser ion sources offer the possibility to get ion beam useful to improve particle accelerators. Pulsed lasers at intensities of the order of 108 W/cm2 and of ns pulse duration, interacting with solid matter in vacuum, produce plasma of high temperature and density. The charge state distribution of the plasma generates high electric fields which accelerate ions along the normal to the target surface. The energy of emitted ions has a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution which depends on the ion charge state. To increase the ion energy, a post-acceleration system can be employed by means of high voltage power supplies of about 100 kV. The post acceleration system results to be a good method to obtain high ion currents by a not expensive system and the final ion beams find interesting applications in the field of the ion implantation, scientific applications and industrial use. In this work we compare the electromagnetic and geometric properties, like emittance, of the beams delivered by pure Cu, Y and Ag targets. The characterization of the plasma was performed by a Faraday cup for the electromagnetic characteristics, whereas a pepper pot system was used for the geometric ones. At 60 kV accelerating voltage the three examined ion bunches get a current peak of 5.5, 7.3 and 15 mA, with a normalized beam emittance of 0.22, 0.12 and 0.09 π mm mrad for the targets of Cu, Y, and Ag, respectively.

  9. Applying CLIPS to control of molecular beam epitaxy processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabeau, Arthur A.; Bensaoula, Abdelhak; Jamison, Keith D.; Horton, Charles; Ignatiev, Alex; Glover, John R.

    1990-01-01

    A key element of U.S. industrial competitiveness in the 1990's will be the exploitation of advanced technologies which involve low-volume, high-profit manufacturing. The demands of such manufacture limit participation to a few major entities in the U.S. and elsewhere, and offset the lower manufacturing costs of other countries which have, for example, captured much of the consumer electronics market. One such technology is thin-film epitaxy, a technology which encompasses several techniques such as Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE), Chemical Beam Epitaxy (CBE), and Vapor-Phase Epitaxy (VPE). Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) is a technology for creating a variety of electronic and electro-optical materials. Compared to standard microelectronic production techniques (including gaseous diffusion, ion implantation, and chemical vapor deposition), MBE is much more exact, though much slower. Although newer than the standard technologies, MBE is the technology of choice for fabrication of ultraprecise materials for cutting-edge microelectronic devices and for research into the properties of new materials.

  10. Molecular Beam Optical Stark Spectroscopy of Magnesium Deuteride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steimle, Timothy; Zhang, Ruohan; Wang, Hailing

    2014-06-01

    Light polar, paramagnetic molecules, such as magnesium hydride, MgH, are attractive for slowing and trapping experiments because these molecules have both non-zero permanent electric dipole, μel, and magnetic dipole, μm moments. The permanent electric dipole moment is particularly relevant to Stark deceleration which depends on the ratio of the Stark shift to molecular mass. Here we report on the Stark effect in the (0,0) A2Π - X 2Σ+ band system of a cold molecular beam sample of magnesium deuteride, MgD. The lines associated with the lowest rotational levels are detected for the first time. The field-free spectrum was analyzed to produce an improved set of fine structure parameters for the A2Π(v = 0) state. The observed electric field induced splittings and shifts were analyzed to produce permanent electric dipole moments, μel,of 2.561(10)D and 1.34(8)D for A2Π(v = 0) and X2Σ+(v=0)states, respectively. This is the first molecular beam study of MgD.

  11. Note: A helical velocity selector for continuous molecular beams

    SciTech Connect

    Szewc, Carola; Collier, James D.; Ulbricht, Hendrik

    2010-10-15

    We report on a modern realization of the classic helical velocity selector for gas phase particle beams. The device operates stably under high vacuum conditions at rotational frequencies limited only by commercial dc motor capabilities. Tuning the rotational frequency allows selective scanning over a broad velocity band. The width of the selected velocity distributions at full-width-half-maximum is as narrow as a few percent of the selected mean velocity and independent of the rotational speed of the selector. The selector generates low vibrational noise amplitudes comparable to mechanically damped state-of-the-art turbo-molecular pumps and is therefore compatible with vibration sensitive experiments like molecule interferometry.

  12. Microscopic mechanisms of laser spallation and ablation of metal targets from large-scale molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chengping; Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    2014-01-01

    The microscopic mechanisms of femtosecond laser ablation of an Al target are investigated in large-scale massively parallel atomistic simulations performed with a computational model combining classical molecular dynamics technique with a continuum description of the laser excitation and subsequent relaxation of conduction band electrons. The relatively large lateral size of the computational systems used in the simulations enables a detailed analysis of the evolution of multiple voids generated in a sub-surface region of the irradiated target in the spallation regime, when the material ejection is driven by the relaxation of laser-induced stresses. The nucleation, growth, and coalescence of voids take place within a broad (100 nm) region of the target, leading to the formation of a transient foamy structure of interconnected liquid regions and eventual separation (or spallation) of a thin liquid layer from the bulk of the target. The thickness of the spalled layer is decreasing from the maximum of 50 nm while the temperature and ejection velocity are increasing with increasing fluence. At a fluence of 2.5 times the spallation threshold, the top part of the target reaches the conditions for an explosive decomposition into vapor and small clusters/droplets, marking the transition to the phase explosion regime of laser ablation. This transition is signified by a change in the composition of the ablation plume from large liquid droplets to a mixture of vapor-phase atoms and clusters/droplets of different sizes. The clusters of different sizes are spatially segregated in the expanding ablation plume, where small/medium size clusters present in the middle of the plume are followed by slower (velocities of less than 3 km/s) large droplets consisting of more than 10,000 atoms. The similarity of some of the characteristics of laser ablation of Al targets (e.g., evolution of voids in the spallation regime and cluster size distributions in the phase explosion regime) to the

  13. On the correlation between the photoexcitation pathways and the critical energies required for ablation of poly(methyl methacrylate): A molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect

    Conforti, Patrick F.; Prasad, Manish; Garrison, Barbara J.

    2008-05-15

    The energetics initiating ablation in poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) are studied using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The critical energy to initiate ablation in PMMA following the absorption of photons is investigated for two penetration depths along a range of fluences using a coarse-grained, hybrid Monte Carlo-MD scheme. Both heating and direct bond scission are simulated separately after photon absorption with additional transformation of material occurring via chemical reactions following the photochemical bond cleavage. For a given type of absorption and reaction channel, a critical energy can well describe the amount of energy required to initiate ablation. The simulations show a decrease in the critical energy when a greater amount of photochemistry is introduced in the system. The simulations complement experimental studies and elucidate how enhanced photochemistry lowers ablation thresholds in polymer substrates.

  14. Population inversions in ablation plasmas generated by intense electron beams. Final report, 1 November 1985-31 October 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Gilgenbach, R.M.; Kammash, T.; Brake, M.L.

    1988-11-01

    Experiments during the past three years have concerned the generation and spectroscopic study of electron beam-driven carbon plasmas in order to explore the production of optical and ultraviolet radiation from nonequilibrium populations. The output of MELBA (Michigan Electron Long Beam Accelerator), has been connected to an electron-beam diode consisting of an aluminum (or brass) cathode stalk and a carbon anode. Magnetic-field coils were designed, procured, and utilized to focus the electron beam. A side viewing port permitted spectroscopic diagnostics to view across the surface of the anode. Spectroscopic diagnosis was performed using a 1-m spectrograph capable of operation from the vacuum-ultraviolet through the visible. This spectrograph is coupled to a 1024-channel optical multichannel analyzer. Spectra taken during the initial 400-ns period of the e-beam pulse showed a low effective-charge plasma with primarily molecular components (C/sub 2/, CH) as well as atomic hydrogen and singly ionized carbon (CII). When the generator pulse was crowbarred after the first 400 ns, the spectra revealed a continuation of the low-charge-state plasma. At times greater than 400 ns in non-crowbarred shots, the spectra revealed a highly ionized plasma with a very large intensity line at 2530 Angstroms due to CIV (5g-4f), and lower-intensity lines due to CIII and CII. This CIV line emission increased with time, peaking sharply between 750 and 900 ns, and decayed rapidly in less than 100 ns. Emission from these high ionization states may be due to electron beam-plasma instabilities, as this emission was accompanied by high levels of radio frequency and microwave emission.

  15. Molecular sputter depth profiling using carbon cluster beams

    PubMed Central

    Winograd, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    Sputter depth profiling of organic films while maintaining the molecular integrity of the sample has long been deemed impossible because of the accumulation of ion bombardment-induced chemical damage. Only recently, it was found that this problem can be greatly reduced if cluster ion beams are used for sputter erosion. For organic samples, carbon cluster ions appear to be particularly well suited for such a task. Analysis of available data reveals that a projectile appears to be more effective as the number of carbon atoms in the cluster is increased, leaving fullerene ions as the most promising candidates to date. Using a commercially available, highly focused C60q+ cluster ion beam, we demonstrate the versatility of the technique for depth profiling various organic films deposited on a silicon substrate and elucidate the dependence of the results on properties such as projectile ion impact energy and angle, and sample temperature. Moreover, examples are shown where the technique is applied to organic multilayer structures in order to investigate the depth resolution across film-film interfaces. These model experiments allow collection of valuable information on how cluster impact molecular depth profiling works and how to understand and optimize the depth resolution achieved using this technique. PMID:19649771

  16. Stereotactic Ablative Radiosurgery for Locally Advanced or Recurrent Skull Base Malignancies with Prior External Beam Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Karen M.; Quan, Kimmen; Clump, David A.; Ferris, Robert L.; Heron, Dwight E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) is an attractive modality to treat malignancies invading the skull base as it can deliver a highly conformal dose with minimal toxicity. However, variation exists in the prescribed dose and fractionation. The purpose of our study is to examine the local control, survival, and toxicities in SABR for the treatment of previously irradiated malignant skull base tumors. Materials and methods: A total of 31 patients and 40 locally advanced or recurrent head and neck malignancies involving the skull base treated with a common SABR regimen, which delivers a radiation dose of 44 Gy in 5 fractions from January 1st, 2004 to December 31st, 2013, were retrospectively reviewed. The local control rate (LC), progression-free survival rate, overall survival (OS) rate, and toxicities were reported. Results: The median follow-up time of all patients was 11.4 months (range: 0.6–67.2 months). The median tumor volume was 27 cm3 (range: 2.4–205 cm3). All patients received prior external beam radiation therapy with a median radiation dose of 64 Gy (range: 24–75.6 Gy) delivered in 12–42 fractions. Twenty patients had surgeries prior to SABR. Nineteen patients received chemotherapy. Specifically, eight patients received concurrent cetuximab (Erbitux™) with SABR. The median time-to-progression (TTP) was 3.3 months (range: 0–16.9 months). For the 29 patients (93.5%) who died, the median time from the end of first SABR to death was 10.3 months (range: 0.5–41.4 months). The estimated 1-year OS rate was 35%. The estimated 2-year OS rate was 12%. Treatment was well-tolerated without grade 4 or 5 treatment-related toxicities. Conclusion: Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy has been shown to achieve low toxicities in locally advanced or recurrent, previously irradiated head and neck malignancies invading the skull base. PMID:25853093

  17. A molecular beam/quadrupole mass spectrometer system with synchronized beam modulation and digital waveform analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, G. L.; Adams, B. R.

    1983-01-01

    A performance evaluation is conducted for a molecular beam/mass spectrometer (MB/MS) system, as applied to a 1-30 torr microwave-discharge flow reactor (MWFR) used in the formation of the methylperoxy radical and a study of its subsequent destruction in the presence or absence of NO(x). The modulated MB/MS system is four-staged and differentially pumped. The results obtained by the MWFR study is illustrative of overall system performance, including digital waveform analysis; significant improvements over previous designs are noted in attainable S/N ratio, detection limit, and accuracy.

  18. Angular emission distributions of neutrals and ions in laser ablated particle beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thum-Jager, Andrea; Rohr, Klaus

    1999-11-01

    The present work represents investigations of angular emission distributions in laser-produced particle beams resolved for the different ion groups (up to q=4) and the neutral particle component. The measurements are for a spectrum of target masses: 12 C, 27Al, 48 Ti, 59Ni, 96Mo and 181Ta. The plasma was produced by obliquely incident Q-switched pulses (TAU=5~ns and LAMBDA=1.06~MU m) of a Nd-YAG laser focused to energy densities ranging from about 20 to 180~J~cm-2. For the first time the results reveal in detail that the emission distributions systematically depend on the degree of ionization of the particles in the cloud. While for the neutral particles the angular emission is always dominated by a broad background with an additional, but less pronounced, peaked component, the background component rapidly but continuously diminishes with the increasing charge state of the ions. If, in the usual way, the emission distribution is approximated by the superposition of a cosine and a cosn fit function, the distribution of ions with qgeq 2 can already be well fitted by a cosn function alone. It seems highly probable, that this behaviour essentially is a result of the recombination dynamics during the expansion. It was found that the effect holds for all atomic masses investigated, whereby the mass dependence of the exponent n for all species behaves alike, approximately following a A3/4 law.

  19. Dependence of ultraviolet nanosecond laser polymer ablation on polymer molecular weight: Poly(methyl methacrylate) at 248 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Bounos, Giannis; Selimis, Alexandros; Georgiou, Savas; Rebollar, Esther; Castillejo, Marta; Bityurin, Nikita

    2006-12-01

    We rely on a methodology demonstrated previously for assessing the temperature evolution and polymer viscosity changes in the 248 nm irradiation of poly(methyl methacrylate)s (PMMAs) with molecular weights (M{sub w}) ranging from 2.5 to 996 kDa. Briefly, this methodology [G. Bounos et al., J. Appl. Phys. 98, 084317 (2005)] relies on monitoring the formation of aryl products in the irradiation of polymer doped with iodonaphthalene or iodophenanthrene. The results demonstrate that higher temperatures are attained with increasing M{sub w}. The surface temperatures at the corresponding ablation thresholds are estimated to be {approx}850-900 K for M{sub w}{>=}120 kDa vs {approx}600 K for 2.5 kDa PMMA. In addition, for all M{sub w}'s, melting is demonstrated (viscosity values of {approx_equal}10{sup 1} Pa s), but it lasts longer for high M{sub w} PMMAs. We ascribe these differences to the fact that low M{sub w} PMMAs dissociate efficiently to desorbing monomers/oligomers, thereby resulting in more efficient energy removal. Even so, the ablation threshold of the high M{sub w} PMMAs is attained at higher fluences. This can be ascribed to the higher fraction of bonds that is required to be broken, and also plausibly to the higher gaseous product pressures that must be attained, for material ejection to be effected. The results are overall well accounted by the bulk photothermal model.

  20. Crossed-molecular-beams reactive scattering of oxygen atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Baseman, R.J.

    1982-11-01

    The reactions of O(/sup 3/P) with six prototypical unsaturated hydrocarbons, and the reaction of O(/sup 1/D) with HD, have been studied in high-resolution crossed-molecular-beams scattering experiments with mass-spectrometric detection. The observed laboratory-product angular and velocity distributions unambiguously identify parent-daughter ion pairs, distinguish different neutral sources of the same ion, and have been used to identify the primary products of the reactions. The derived center-of-mass product angular and translational energy distributions have been used to elucidate the detailed reaction dynamics. These results demonstrate that O(/sup 3/P)-unsaturated hydrocarbon chemistry is dominated by single bond cleavages, leading to radical products exclusively.

  1. Molecular beam-thermal hydrogen desorption from palladium

    SciTech Connect

    Lobo, R. F. M.; Berardo, F. M. V.; Ribeiro, J. H. F.

    2010-04-15

    Among the most efficient techniques for hydrogen desorption monitoring, thermal desorption mass spectrometry is a very sensitive one, but in certain cases can give rise to uptake misleading results due to residual hydrogen partial pressure background variations. In this work one develops a novel thermal desorption variant based on the effusive molecular beam technique that represents a significant improvement in the accurate determination of hydrogen mass absorbed on a solid sample. The enhancement in the signal-to-noise ratio for trace hydrogen is on the order of 20%, and no previous calibration with a chemical standard is required. The kinetic information obtained from the hydrogen desorption mass spectra (at a constant heating rate of 1 deg. C/min) accounts for the consistency of the technique.

  2. Atmospheric processes on ice nanoparticles in molecular beams

    PubMed Central

    Fárník, Michal; Poterya, Viktoriya

    2014-01-01

    This review summarizes some recent experiments with ice nanoparticles (large water clusters) in molecular beams and outlines their atmospheric relevance: (1) Investigation of mixed water–nitric acid particles by means of the electron ionization and sodium doping combined with photoionization revealed the prominent role of HNO3 molecule as the condensation nuclei. (2) The uptake of atmospheric molecules by water ice nanoparticles has been studied, and the pickup cross sections for some molecules exceed significantly the geometrical sizes of the ice nanoparticles. (3) Photodissociation of hydrogen halides on water ice particles has been shown to proceed via excitation of acidically dissociated ion pair and subsequent biradical generation and H3O dissociation. The photodissociation of CF2Cl2 molecules in clusters is also mentioned. Possible atmospheric consequences of all these results are briefly discussed. PMID:24790973

  3. Production and all-optical deceleration of molecular beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Gary; Jayich, Andrew; Long, Xueping; Ransford, Anthony; Campbell, Wesley

    2015-05-01

    Ultracold molecules open up new opportunities in many areas of study, including many-body physics, quantum chemistry, quantum information, and precision measurements. Current methods cannot easily address the spontaneous decay of molecules into dark states without an amalgam of repump lasers. We present an alternative method to produce cold molecules. A cryogenic buffer gas beam (CBGB) is used to create an intense, slow, cold source of molecules. By using a CBGB for the production, we can quench vibrational modes that cannot be addressed with optical methods. This is then followed by an all-optical scheme using a single ultra-fast laser to decelerate the molecules and a continuous wave laser to cool the species. We have started experiments with strontium monohydride (SrH), but the proposed method should be applicable to a wide range of molecular species.

  4. InPBi Single Crystals Grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, K.; Gu, Y.; Zhou, H. F.; Zhang, L. Y.; Kang, C. Z.; Wu, M. J.; Pan, W. W.; Lu, P. F.; Gong, Q.; Wang, S. M.

    2014-01-01

    InPBi was predicted to be the most robust infrared optoelectronic material but also the most difficult to synthesize within In-VBi (V = P, As and Sb) 25 years ago. We report the first successful growth of InPBi single crystals with Bi concentration far beyond the doping level by gas source molecular beam epitaxy. The InPBi thin films reveal excellent surface, structural and optical qualities making it a promising new III–V compound family member for heterostructures. The Bi concentration is found to be 2.4 ± 0.4% with 94 ± 5% Bi atoms at substitutional sites. Optical absorption indicates a band gap of 1.23 eV at room temperature while photoluminescence shows unexpectedly strong and broad light emission at 1.4–2.7 μm which can't be explained by the existing theory. PMID:24965260

  5. Molecular Beam Epitaxy Growth of Iron Phthalocyanine Nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Debnath, A. K.; Samanta, S.; Singh, Ajay; Aswal, D. K.; Gupta, S. K.; Yakhmi, J. V.

    2009-06-29

    FePc films of different thickness have been deposited by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) as a function of substrate temperature (25-300 deg. C) and deposition rate (0.02-0.07 nm/s). The morphology of a 60 nm alpha-phase film has been tuned from nanobrush (nearly parallel nanorods aligned normal to the substrate plane) to nanoweb (nanowires forming a web-like structure in the plane of the substrate) by changing the deposition rate from 0.02 to 0.07 nm/s. We propose growth mechanisms of nanoweb and nanobrush morphology based on the van der Waals (vdW) epitaxy. For air exposed FePc films I-V hysteresis was observed at 300 K and it is attributed to surface traps created by chemisorbed oxygen.

  6. Effects of endovenous laser ablation on vascular tissue: molecular genetics approach

    PubMed Central

    Alur, İhsan; Dodurga, Yavuz; Güneş, Tevfik; Eroglu, Canan; Durna, Fırat; Türk, Nilay Şen; Adıgüzel, Esat; Emrecan, Bilgin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Endovenous laser ablation (EVLA) is a treatment option for lower extremity varicose veins. In the present study, we investigate to the genetic changes and possibility of living tissue in the saphenous vein wall after the EVLA procedure. Methods: Eleven saphenous vein grafts were randomized in two groups: (1) 4 cm SVG segments of performed EVLA procedure in study group, (2) 4 cm segments of SVG none performed EVLA procedure in control group. SVG were taken from the remnants of distal saphenous vein grafts prepared for the bypass procedure but not used. SVG was approximately 8 cm in length and was divided into two parts 4 cm in length. One half was exposed to laser energy, while the other half of the same vein graft was untreated as a control. EVLA was performed on complete saphenous veins in the study group. Abnormal genetic changes of the SVG were observed with a Tri-Reagent method and quantified with a Nanodrop™ spectrophotometer. Results: Histopathological changes indicated that the intima including the endothelium was completely necrotized in the study group. It was observed that intimal thermal-energy-induced injury did not reach the media. Histopathological examination showed that homogenous eosinophilic discoloration and coagulation necrosis characterized the laser related thermal damage as well. Conclusions: In this preliminary study, we found that living tissue remained in the SVG wall after application of laser ablation, and we also detected abnormal genetic changes in the study group compared with the control group. PMID:26379903

  7. A high pressure modulated molecular beam mass spectrometric sampling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stearns, C. A.; Kohl, F. J.; Fryburg, G. C.; Miller, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    The current state of understanding of free-jet high pressure sampling is critically reviewed and modifications of certain theoretical and empirical considerations are presented. A high pressure, free-jet expansion, modulated molecular beam, mass spectrometric sampling apparatus was constructed and this apparatus is described in detail. Experimental studies have demonstrated that the apparatus can be used to sample high temperature systems at pressures up to one atmosphere. Condensible high temperature gaseous species have been routinely sampled and the mass spectrometric detector has provided direct identification of sampled species. System sensitivity is better than one tenth of a part per million. Experimental results obtained with argon and nitrogen beams are presented and compared to theoretical predictions. These results and the respective comparison are taken to indicate acceptable performance of the sampling apparatus. Results are also given for two groups of experiments related to hot corrosion studies. The formation of gaseous sodium sulfate in doped methane-oxygen flames was characterized and the oxidative vaporization of metals was studied in an atmospheric pressure flowing gas system to which gaseous salt partial pressures were added.

  8. Development of Crystal Al MKIDs by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naruse, M.; Sekimoto, Y.; Noguchi, T.; Miyachi, A.; Nitta, T.; Uzawa, Y.

    2011-11-01

    We report here the effect of film qualities in superconductors on the properties of Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKIDs). The sensitivity of MKIDs between crystal aluminum films and amorphous aluminum films is compared. The good quality and crystallized aluminum films have been prepared by using molecular beam epitaxy. We have confirmed that epitaxial Al(111) films were grown on Si(111) substrates with X-ray diffraction and in-situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction measurements. The amorphous aluminum films on the Si(111) wafers have been deposited by electron beam evaporation. We have measured transmission losses of MKIDs, noise spectrum and relaxation time against optical pulses, changing MKIDs' bath temperature from 0.11 K to 0.55 K in a dilution refrigerator. Despite of the improvement in normal resistivity, the quasiparticle decay time of both films are equivalent and 450 μs at 0.11 K. The electrical noise equivalent power of the both MKIDs are also comparable and around 10^{-17} W/sqrt{Hz}. Fabrication details and performance data of both films are presented.

  9. Cerenkov emission induced by external beam radiation stimulates molecular fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Axelsson, Johan; Davis, Scott C.; Gladstone, David J.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Cerenkov emission is induced when a charged particle moves faster than the speed of light in a given medium. Both x-ray photons and electrons produce optical Cerenkov photons in everyday radiation therapy of tissue; yet, this phenomenon has never been fully documented. This study quantifies the emissions and also demonstrates that the Cerenkov emission can excite a fluorophore, protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), embedded in biological phantoms. Methods: In this study, Cerenkov emission induced by radiation from a clinical linear accelerator is investigated. Biological mimicking phantoms were irradiated with x-ray photons, with energies of 6 or 18 MV, or electrons at energies 6, 9, 12, 15, or 18 MeV. The Cerenkov emission and the induced molecular fluorescence were detected by a camera or a spectrometer equipped with a fiber optic cable. Results: It is shown that both x-ray photons and electrons, at MeV energies, produce optical Cerenkov photons in tissue mimicking media. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the Cerenkov emission can excite a fluorophore, protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), embedded in biological phantoms. Conclusions: The results here indicate that molecular fluorescence monitoring during external beam radiotherapy is possible.

  10. Development of Ultra Small Shock Tube for High Energy Molecular Beam Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyoshi, Nobuya; Nagata, Shuhei; Kinefuchi, Ikuya; Shimizu, Kazuya; Takagi, Shu; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2008-12-01

    A molecular beam source exploiting a small shock tube is described for potential generation of high energy beam in a range of 1-5 eV without any undesirable impurities. The performance of a non-diaphragm type shock tube with an inner diameter of 2 mm was evaluated by measuring the acceleration and attenuation process of shock waves. With this shock tube installed in a molecular beam source, we measured the time-of-flight distributions of shock-heated beams, which demonstrated the ability of controlling the beam energy with the initial pressure ratio of the shock tube.

  11. Development of Ultra Small Shock Tube for High Energy Molecular Beam Source

    SciTech Connect

    Miyoshi, Nobuya; Nagata, Shuhei; Kinefuchi, Ikuya; Shimizu, Kazuya; Matsumoto, Yoichiro; Takagi, Shu

    2008-12-31

    A molecular beam source exploiting a small shock tube is described for potential generation of high energy beam in a range of 1-5 eV without any undesirable impurities. The performance of a non-diaphragm type shock tube with an inner diameter of 2 mm was evaluated by measuring the acceleration and attenuation process of shock waves. With this shock tube installed in a molecular beam source, we measured the time-of-flight distributions of shock-heated beams, which demonstrated the ability of controlling the beam energy with the initial pressure ratio of the shock tube.

  12. In-plane aligned YBCO film on textured YSZ buffer layer deposited on NiCr alloy tape by laser ablation with only O+ ion beam assistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang Huang, Xin; Qing Wang, You; Wang, Qiu Liang; Chen, Qing Ming

    2000-02-01

    High critical current density and in-plane aligned YBa2 Cu3 O7-x (YBCO) film on a textured yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) buffer layer deposited on NiCr alloy (Hastelloy c-275) tape by laser ablation with only O+ ion beam assistance was fabricated. The values of the x-ray phi-scan full width at half-maximum (FWHM) for YSZ(202) and YBCO(103) are 18° and 11°, respectively. The critical current density of YBCO film is 7.9 × 105 A cm-2 at liquid nitrogen temperature and zero field, and its critical temperature is 90 K.

  13. Three-dimensional nanoscale molecular imaging by extreme ultraviolet laser ablation mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsov, Ilya; Filevich, Jorge; Dong, Feng; Woolston, Mark; Chao, Weilun; Anderson, Erik H.; Bernstein, Elliot R.; Crick, Dean C.; Rocca, Jorge J.; Menoni, Carmen S.

    2015-01-01

    Analytical probes capable of mapping molecular composition at the nanoscale are of critical importance to materials research, biology and medicine. Mass spectral imaging makes it possible to visualize the spatial organization of multiple molecular components at a sample's surface. However, it is challenging for mass spectral imaging to map molecular composition in three dimensions (3D) with submicron resolution. Here we describe a mass spectral imaging method that exploits the high 3D localization of absorbed extreme ultraviolet laser light and its fundamentally distinct interaction with matter to determine molecular composition from a volume as small as 50 zl in a single laser shot. Molecular imaging with a lateral resolution of 75 nm and a depth resolution of 20 nm is demonstrated. These results open opportunities to visualize chemical composition and chemical changes in 3D at the nanoscale. PMID:25903827

  14. Molecular collision studies with Stark-decelerated beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meijer, Gerard

    2008-03-01

    Molecular scattering behaviour has generally proven difficult to study at low collision energies. We formed a molecular beam of OH radicals with a narrow velocity distribution and a tunable velocity by passing the beam through a Stark decelerator [1]. The transition probabilities for inelastic scattering of the OH radicals with Xe atoms were measured as a function of the collision energy in the range of 50 to 400 wavenumbers. The behaviour of the cross-sections for inelastic scattering near the energetic thresholds was accurately measured, and excellent agreement was obtained with cross-sections derived from coupled- channel calculations on ab initio computed potential energy surfaces [2]. For collision studies at lower energies, the decelerated beams of molecules can be loaded into a variety of traps. In these traps, electric fields are used to keep the molecules confined in a region of space where they can be studied in complete isolation from the (hot) environment. Typically, 10^5 state- selected molecules can be trapped for times up to several seconds at a density of 10^7 mol/cm^3 and at a temperature of several tens of mK [3]. The long interaction time afforded by the trap has been exploited to measure the infrared radiative lifetime of vibrationally excited OH radicals, for instance, as well as to study the far-infrared optical pumping of these polar molecules due to blackbody radiation [4]. As an alternative to these traps, we have demonstrated an electrostatic storage ring for neutral molecules. In its simplest form, a storage ring is a trap in which the molecules - rather than having a minimum potential energy at a single location in space - have a minimum potential energy on a circle. To fully exploit the possibilities offered by a ring structure, it is imperative that the molecules remain in a bunch as they revolve around the ring. This ensures a high density of stored molecules, moreover, this makes it possible to inject multiple - either co-linear or

  15. Molecular targeting agents associated with transarterial chemoembolization or radiofrequency ablation in hepatocarcinoma treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ranieri, Girolamo; Marech, Ilaria; Lorusso, Vito; Goffredo, Veronica; Paradiso, Angelo; Ribatti, Domenico; Gadaleta, Cosmo Damiano

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common cause of cancer in the world. According to Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer modified criteria, patients with early stage disease are candidate to radiofrequency ablation (RFA), while patients with intermediate stage HCC are usually treated by transarterial chemoembolization (TACE). TACE and RFA induce a transient devascularisation effect followed by strong neo-angiogenic stimulus. In fact, after these procedures, it has been demonstrated an up-regulation of pro-angiogenic and growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor-A, which might contribute to accelerated progression in patients with incomplete response. Several studies have demonstrated that MAP-kinase and AKT pathways, in addition to neo-angiogenesis, have an important role in the development of HCC. In advanced HCC, anti-angiogenic therapy and tyrosine kinases inhibitors showed potential clinical benefit. Actually, a number of clinical studies are ongoing testing these agents in combination with TACE or RFA. In this paper, we have reviewed the most recent preclinical and clinical results of such trials. PMID:24574717

  16. Creating Ruddlesden-Popper phases by hybrid molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haislmaier, Ryan C.; Stone, Greg; Alem, Nasim; Engel-Herbert, Roman

    2016-07-01

    The synthesis of a 50 unit cell thick n = 4 Srn+1TinO3n+1 (Sr5Ti4O13) Ruddlesden-Popper (RP) phase film is demonstrated by sequentially depositing SrO and TiO2 layers in an alternating fashion using hybrid molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), where Ti was supplied using titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP). A detailed calibration procedure is outlined for determining the shuttering times to deposit SrO and TiO2 layers with precise monolayer doses using in-situ reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) as feedback. Using optimized Sr and TTIP shuttering times, a fully automated growth of the n = 4 RP phase was carried out over a period of >4.5 h. Very stable RHEED intensity oscillations were observed over the entire growth period. The structural characterization by X-ray diffraction and high resolution transmission electron microscopy revealed that a constant periodicity of four SrTiO3 perovskite unit cell blocks separating the double SrO rocksalt layer was maintained throughout the entire film thickness with a very little amount of planar faults oriented perpendicular to the growth front direction. These results illustrate that hybrid MBE is capable of layer-by-layer growth with atomic level precision and excellent flux stability.

  17. On the Growth of Complex Oxides by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fong, Dillon

    Functional materials based on complex oxides in thin film form offer new and exciting strategies for meeting many of our outstanding energy challenges through systematic control of layer sequencing, strain, etc. However, the synthesis of such oxide films can be a major challenge even when utilizing reactive molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE), a powerful deposition technique that allows the construction of materials atomic plane by atomic plane. To understand the fundamental physics of oxide growth by reactive MBE, we present in situ surface x-ray diffraction results on the growth of SrTiO3 and SrO-SrTiO3 thin films on (001)-oriented SrTiO3 substrates. For homoepitaxy, we compare sequential deposition (alternating Sr and Ti monolayer doses) with that of co-deposition of Sr and Ti, both in a background of oxygen pressure, and observe drastically different growth pathways due to the presence of a TiO2 double layer. For heteroepitaxial growth of Ruddlesden-Popper SrO-SrTiO3 films, we find that layers rearrange dynamically, resulting in layer sequences distinct from the shutter sequence. In general, the starting surface structure and composition, in combination with local thermodynamic considerations, strongly influence our ability to atomically construct new complex oxides.

  18. A safety system for gas source molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Dhrubes; Morkoç, Hadis

    1991-08-01

    Gas source molecular beam epitaxy (GSMBE) is one of the newest developments in epitaxial growth technology wherein the group V sources such as arsine and phosphine are gaseous and in the form of hydrides, while the Group III sources such as indium, aluminum, gallium are all solids. However, the gases involved are very hazardous, extremely toxic, highly inflammable and explosive at elevated temperatures. Adequate care must be taken for the safe use of these gases so that this attractive technique can be properly utilized. This paper discusses the salient safety features of one such GSMBE system (installed in the Epicenter at the University of Illinois) consisting of a gas delivery system with its robust piping assembly, gas manifold and a scrubber. The system is integrated with a Multiple Point Toxic Gas Monitor (MPTGM) acting as the central alarm command system based on the concept of fail safe total safety. This alarm system is equipped with audio-visual alarms for a variety of monitored conditions and interlocks for automatic shutdown. A well-designed air flow pattern has been incorporated to provide good air quality in the laboratory and in the gas storage facility. Additionally a set of good laboratory practices ensured by administrative and personal control are instituted to reduce the hazards to an acceptable risk level.

  19. Molecular Beam Epitaxy of Layered Material Superlattices and Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishwanath, Suresh; Liu, Xinyu; Rouvimov, Sergei; Furdyna, Jacek K.; Jena, Debdeep; Xing, Huili Grace

    2014-03-01

    Stacking of various layered materials is being pursued widely to realize various devices and observe novel physics. Mostly, these have been limited to exfoliation and stacking either manually or in solution, where control on rotational alignment or order of stacking is lost. We have demonstrated molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) growth of Bi2Se3/MoSe2 superlatticeand Bi2Se3/MoSe2/SnSe2 heterostructure on sapphire. We have achieved a better control on the order of stacking and number of layers as compared to the solution technique. We have characterized these structures using RHEED, Raman spectroscopy, XPS, AFM, X-ray reflectometry, cross-section (cs) and in-plane (ip) TEM. The rotational alignment is dictated by thermodynamics and is understood using ip-TEM diffraction patterns. Layered growth and long range order is evident from the streaky RHEED pattern. Abrupt change in RHEED pattern, clear demarcation of boundary between layers seen using cs-TEM and observation of Raman peaks corresponding to all the layers suggest van-der-waals epitaxy. In our knowledge this is a first demonstration of as grown superlattices and heterostuctures involving transition metal dichalcogenides and is an important step towards the goal of stacking of 2D crystals like lego blocks.

  20. Non-ablative radio-frequency rejuvenation: a histological and bio-molecular report.

    PubMed

    Avantaggiato, A; Andreasi Bassi, M; Cura, F; Pascali, M; Carinci, F

    2016-01-01

    Radiofrequency machines for medical use are known to produce moderate clinical improvement of skin laxity without invasive procedures. Numerous equipment with different characteristics have been proposed after the introduction in 2002 of the first FDA approved device. This report is aimed to test if RF treatment is effective when performed at low frequency and low energy level. Two RF treatments were performed unilaterally 7 and 2 days before a planned eyebrow lifting surgery, with a radiofrequency device with 0.52 to 0.7 MHz frequencies, maximum energy of 200 W, used at 40% of its power. A bipolar handpiece with a diameter of 30 mm and a maximum power of 9-9.5 W was massaged along the temporal area for 10 min. Skin samples of treated and untreated sides were collected during surgery and processed for histologic examination and RT-PCR analysis, to test differences in gene activation in a panel of proteins that are relevant in extracellular matrix of dermal connective tissue. The histological examination of the samples showed that the treatment induced a loss of the typical oriented structure in the reticular dermis. The study through RT-PCR evidenced that ELN, the gene codifying for Elastine was strongly enhanced. Some collagen-tested genes (COL1A1, COL3A1 and COL9A1) were inhibited by the treatment, whereas COL2A1 and COL11 were activated. The genes responsible for Metallo-proteases (MMP) 2, 3 and 13 were depressed, while the MMP9 was stimulated. Gene codifying for Hyaluronic synthase 1 (HAS1), Hyluronidase 1 (HYAL1), Neutrophyl elastase (Elane), Desmoplakin (DSP) and GDF6 were inhibited. Insulin like growth factor (IGF1) gene activity was enhanced. RF treatment, with the tested non-ablative equipment, produced histological effects and change in DNA expression of some extracellular matrix related genes, confirming the biostimulatory role of this procedure. PMID:27469572

  1. Dosimetric comparison of a 6-MV flattening-filter and a flattening-filter-free beam for lung stereotactic ablative radiotherapy treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yon-Lae; Chung, Jin-Beom; Kim, Jae-Sung; Lee, Jeong-Woo; Kim, Jin-Young; Kang, Sang-Won; Suh, Tae-Suk

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility of clinical usage of a flattening-filter-free (FFF) beam for treatment with lung stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR). Ten patients were treated with SABR and a 6-MV FFF beam for this study. All plans using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) were optimized in the Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS) by using the Acuros XB (AXB) dose calculation algorithm and were delivered by using a Varian TrueBeam ™ linear accelerator equipped with a high-definition (HD) multi-leaf collimator. The prescription dose used was 48 Gy in 4 fractions. In order to compare the plan using a conventional 6-MV flattening-filter (FF) beam, the SABR plan was recalculated under the condition of the same beam settings used in the plan employing the 6-MV FFF beam. All dose distributions were calculated by using Acuros XB (AXB, version 11) and a 2.5-mm isotropic dose grid. The cumulative dosevolume histograms (DVH) for the planning target volume (PTV) and all organs at risk (OARs) were analyzed. Technical parameters, such as total monitor units (MUs) and the delivery time, were also recorded and assessed. All plans for target volumes met the planning objectives for the PTV ( i.e., V95% > 95%) and the maximum dose ( i.e., Dmax < 110%) revealing adequate target coverage for the 6-MV FF and FFF beams. Differences in DVH for target volumes (PTV and clinical target volume (CTV)) and OARs on the lung SABR plans from the interchange of the treatment beams were small, but showed a marked reduction (52.97%) in the treatment delivery time. The SABR plan with a FFF beam required a larger number of MUs than the plan with the FF beam, and the mean difference in MUs was 4.65%. This study demonstrated that the use of the FFF beam for lung SABR plan provided better treatment efficiency relative to 6-MV FF beam. This strategy should be particularly beneficial for high dose conformity to the lung and decreased intra-fraction movements because of

  2. Perspective: Rapid synthesis of complex oxides by combinatorial molecular beam epitaxy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    A. T. Bollinger; Wu, J.; Bozovic, I.

    2016-03-15

    In this study, the molecular beam epitaxy(MBE) technique is well known for producing atomically smooth thin films as well as impeccable interfaces in multilayers of many different materials. In particular, molecular beam epitaxy is well suited to the growth of complex oxides, materials that hold promise for many applications. Rapid synthesis and high throughput characterization techniques are needed to tap into that potential most efficiently. We discuss our approach to doing that, leaving behind the traditional one-growth-one-compound scheme and instead implementing combinatorial oxide molecular beam epitaxy in a custom built system.

  3. Perspective: Rapid synthesis of complex oxides by combinatorial molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bollinger, A. T.; Wu, J.; Božović, I.

    2016-05-01

    The molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) technique is well known for producing atomically smooth thin films as well as impeccable interfaces in multilayers of many different materials. In particular, molecular beam epitaxy is well suited to the growth of complex oxides, materials that hold promise for many applications. Rapid synthesis and high throughput characterization techniques are needed to tap into that potential most efficiently. We discuss our approach to doing that, leaving behind the traditional one-growth-one-compound scheme and instead implementing combinatorial oxide molecular beam epitaxy in a custom built system.

  4. Metallic impurities in gallium nitride grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    McHugo, S.A.; Krueger, J.; Kisielowski, C.

    1997-04-01

    Transition metals are often encountered in trace amounts in semiconductors. They have been extensively studied in most elemental and compound systems, since they form deep donor and/or acceptor levels which usually degrade the electronic and optical material properties. Only very little is known about transition metals in recent III-V semiconducting materials, such as GaN, AlN and InN. These few studies have been done exclusively on Metal-Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD) or Hybrid Vapor Phase Epitaxy HVPE-grown GaN. Preliminary x-ray fluorescence studies at the Advanced Light Source, beamline 10.3.1, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have revealed that GaN materials grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) have Fe, Ni and Cr as the dominant transition metal contaminants. This finding is commensurate with the extremely high concentrations of hydrogen, carbon and oxygen (up to 10{sup 20} cm{sup {minus}3}) measured by Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS). Preliminary work using the mapping capabilities of the x-ray fluorescence microprobe revealed the metal impurities were inhomogeneously distributed over the film. Future work of this collaboration will be to find a correlation between the existence of transition metals in MBE films, as revealed by x-ray fluorescence, and Photoluminescence (PL) spectra taken in the infrared region. Also, the authors will make use of the 1 {mu}m spatial resolution of x-ray microprobe to locate the contaminants in relation to structural defects in the GaN films. Because of the large strain caused by the lattice mismatch between the GaN films and the substrates, the films grow in a columnar order with high densities of grain boundaries and dislocations. These structural defects offer preferential sites for metal precipitation or agglomeration which could degrade the optical properties of this material more so than if the impurities were left dissolved in the GaN.

  5. Molecular Ion Beam Transportation for Low Energy Ion Implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Kulevoy, T. V.; Kropachev, G. N.; Seleznev, D. N.; Yakushin, P. E.; Kuibeda, R. P.; Kozlov, A. V.; Koshelev, V. A.; Hershcovitch, A.; Johnson, B. M.; Gushenets, V. I.; Oks, E. M.; Polozov, S. M.; Poole, H. J.

    2011-01-07

    A joint research and development of steady state intense boron ion sources for 100's of electron-volt ion implanters has been in progress for the past five years. Current density limitation associated with extracting and transporting low energy ion beams result in lower beam currents that in turn adversely affects the process throughput. The transport channel with electrostatic lenses for decaborane (B{sub 10}H{sub 14}) and carborane (C{sub 2}B{sub 10}H{sub 12}) ion beams transportation was developed and investigated. The significant increase of ion beam intensity at the beam transport channel output is demonstrated. The transport channel simulation, construction and experimental results of ion beam transportation are presented.

  6. Multiple target laser ablation system

    DOEpatents

    Mashburn, Douglas N.

    1996-01-01

    A laser ablation apparatus and method are provided in which multiple targets consisting of material to be ablated are mounted on a movable support. The material transfer rate is determined for each target material, and these rates are stored in a controller. A position detector determines which target material is in a position to be ablated, and then the controller controls the beam trigger timing and energy level to achieve a desired proportion of each constituent material in the resulting film.

  7. Multiple target laser ablation system

    DOEpatents

    Mashburn, D.N.

    1996-01-09

    A laser ablation apparatus and method are provided in which multiple targets consisting of material to be ablated are mounted on a movable support. The material transfer rate is determined for each target material, and these rates are stored in a controller. A position detector determines which target material is in a position to be ablated, and then the controller controls the beam trigger timing and energy level to achieve a desired proportion of each constituent material in the resulting film. 3 figs.

  8. Internal Energy Dependence of Molecular Condensation Coefficients Determined from Molecular Beam Surface Scattering Experiments

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Sibener, S. J.; Lee, Y. T.

    1978-05-01

    An experiment was performed which confirms the existence of an internal mode dependence of molecular sticking probabilities for collisions of molecules with a cold surface. The scattering of a velocity selected effusive beam of CCl{sub 4} from a 90 K CC1{sub 4} ice surface has been studied at five translational velocities and for two different internal temperatures. At a surface temperature of 90 K (approx. 99% sticking probability) a four fold increase in reflected intensity was observed for the internally excited (560 K) CC1{sub 4} relative to the room temperature (298 K) CC1{sub 4} at a translational velocity of 2.5 X 10{sup 4} cm/sec. For a surface temperature of 90 K all angular distributions were found to peak 15{sup 0} superspecularly independent of incident velocity.

  9. Time-of-flight velocity analysis of atomic and molecular beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagena, O. F.; Varma, A. K.

    1968-01-01

    Conditions required for resolving a given beam speed distribution were evaluated by calculating the time-of-flight (TOF) signal for a finite open time of the beam shutter. Design criteria for a beam chopper and detection system are discussed in terms of the resolution, the range of speeds to be measured, and the optimum signal to noise ratio. A TOF system for detection of high intensity molecular beams with large speed ratios, as well as for low intensity scattered beams, is described. Experimental results are presented.

  10. Formation of slow molecules in chemical reactions in crossed molecular beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tscherbul, T. V.; Barinovs, Ğ.; Kłos, J.; Krems, R. V.

    2008-08-01

    We demonstrate that chemical reactions in collisions of molecular beams can generally produce low-velocity molecules in the laboratory-fixed frame. Our analysis shows that collisions of beams may simultaneously yield slow reactant molecules and slow products. The reaction products are formed in selected rovibrational states and scattered in a specific direction, which can be controlled by tuning the kinetic energies of the incident beams and the angle between the beams. Our calculations indicate that chemical reactions of polar alkali-metal dimers are barrierless and we suggest that chemical reactions involving alkali-metal dimers may be particularly suitable for producing slow molecules in crossed beams.

  11. Measurement of the density profile of pure and seeded molecular beams by femtosecond ion imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Congsen; Janssen, Maurice H. M.

    2015-02-15

    Here, we report on femtosecond ion imaging experiments to measure the density profile of a pulsed supersonic molecular beam. Ion images are measured for both a molecular beam and bulk gas under identical experimental conditions via femtosecond multiphoton ionization of Xe atoms. We report the density profile of the molecular beam, and the measured absolute density is compared with theoretical calculations of the centre line beam density. Subsequently, we discuss reasons accounting for the differences between measurements and calculations and propose that strong skimmer interference is the most probable cause for the differences. Furthermore, we report on experiments measuring the centre line density of seeded supersonic beams. The femtosecond ion images show that seeding the heavy Xe atom at low relative seed fractions (1%-10%) in a light carrier gas like Ne results in strong relative enhancements of up to two orders of magnitude.

  12. Measurement of the density profile of pure and seeded molecular beams by femtosecond ion imaging.

    PubMed

    Meng, Congsen; Janssen, Maurice H M

    2015-02-01

    Here, we report on femtosecond ion imaging experiments to measure the density profile of a pulsed supersonic molecular beam. Ion images are measured for both a molecular beam and bulk gas under identical experimental conditions via femtosecond multiphoton ionization of Xe atoms. We report the density profile of the molecular beam, and the measured absolute density is compared with theoretical calculations of the centre line beam density. Subsequently, we discuss reasons accounting for the differences between measurements and calculations and propose that strong skimmer interference is the most probable cause for the differences. Furthermore, we report on experiments measuring the centre line density of seeded supersonic beams. The femtosecond ion images show that seeding the heavy Xe atom at low relative seed fractions (1%-10%) in a light carrier gas like Ne results in strong relative enhancements of up to two orders of magnitude. PMID:25725826

  13. LASER ABLATION STUDIES OF CONCRETE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laser ablation was studied as a means of removing radioactive contaminants from the surface and near-surface regions of concrete. We present the results of ablation tests on cement and concrete samples using a 1.6 kW pulsed Nd:YAG laser with fiber optic beam delivery. The laser-s...

  14. Reactions of carbon atoms in pulsed molecular beams

    SciTech Connect

    Reisler, H.

    1993-12-01

    This research program consists of a broad scope of experiments designed to unravel the chemistry of atomic carbon in its two spin states, P and D, by using well-controlled initial conditions and state-resolved detection of products. Prerequisite to the proposed studies (and the reason why so little is known about carbon atom reactions), is the development of clean sources of carbon atoms. Therefore, in parallel with the studies of its chemistry and reaction dynamics, the authors continuously explore new, state-specific and efficient ways of producing atomic carbon. In the current program, C({sup 3}P) is produced via laser ablation of graphite, and three areas of study are being pursued: (i) exothermic reactions with small inorganic molecules (e.g., O{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O, NO{sub 2}) that can proceed via multiple pathways; (ii) the influence of vibrational and translational energy on endothermic reactions involving H-containing reactants that yield CH products (e.g., H{sub 2}O H{sub 2}CO); (iii) reactions of C({sup 3}P) with free radicals (e.g., HCO, CH{sub 3}O). In addition, the authors plan to develop a source of C({sup 1}D) atoms by exploiting the pyrolysis of diazotetrazole and its salts in the ablation source. Another important goal involves collaboration with theoreticians in order to obtain relevant potential energy surfaces, rationalize the experimental results and predict the roles of translational and vibrational energies.

  15. Fabrication of precision high quality facets on molecular beam epitaxy material

    DOEpatents

    Petersen, Holly E.; Goward, William D.; Dijaili, Sol P.

    2001-01-01

    Fabricating mirrored vertical surfaces on semiconductor layered material grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Low energy chemically assisted ion beam etching (CAIBE) is employed to prepare mirrored vertical surfaces on MBE-grown III-V materials under unusually low concentrations of oxygen in evacuated etching atmospheres of chlorine and xenon ion beams. UV-stabilized smooth-surfaced photoresist materials contribute to highly vertical, high quality mirrored surfaces during the etching.

  16. Molecular dynamics study of nanoparticle evolution in a background gas under laser ablation conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouriet, K.; Zhigilei, L. V.; Itina, T. E.

    2009-03-01

    Long-time evolution of nanoparticles produced by short laser interactions is investigated for different materials. To better understand the mechanisms of the nanoparticle formation at a microscopic level, we use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to analyse the evolution of a cluster in the presence of a background gas with different parameters (density and temperature). In particular, we compare the simulation results obtained for materials with different interaction potentials (Morse, Lennard-Jones, and Embedded Atom Model). Attention is focused on the evaporation and condensation processes of a cluster with different size and initial temperature. As a result of the MD calculations, we determinate the influence of both cluster properties and background gas parameters on the nanoparticle evolution. The role of the interaction potential is discussed based on the results of the simulations.

  17. Laser Probing of Molecular Beam Epitaxy on SILICON(100) Surface.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smilgys, Russell Victor

    The work presented here investigates the desorption kinetics of Ga and In from films of Ga, In, GaAs, and InAs on Si(100). Films a few monolayers (ML) thick are deposited from molecular beams under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Laser induced fluorescence (LIF) is used to detect Ga and In in the gas phase. Using the techniques of temperature programmed desorption and isothermal desorption the desorption kinetics of each species are measured. The variation in the kinetic order and rate constant with temperature and coverage reflect the morphology and energetics of the film growth. Individually, Ga, In, and As each interact strongly with Si(100) at low coverages to form a two dimensional film. Above 1 ML for Ga and {1over2 } ML for In three dimensional islands form. For temperatures above 550 K, As coverage saturates at 1 ML. When As is codeposited with either Ga or In, As occupies the interfacial sites bound to Si. Ga and In atoms form three dimensional islands on top of the two dimensional As film. When the As coverage is below 1 ML, Ga and As strongly interact, probably to form a GaAs structure. Under the same conditions no comparable InAs structure is evident. The much larger lattice mismatch between InAs and Si(100) is proposed to explain this difference. The desorption kinetics and dynamics of the interfacial As film are also investigated. To measure As_2 desorption rates and vibrational populations, LIF detection of As_2 is developed. A result is that As_4 dissociates on Si(100) to yield chemisorbed As atoms. During desorption As atoms recombine to yield As_2. The vibrational populations of desorbed As_2 suggest a direct desorption mechanism in which the directionality of the covalent bonding to the substrate strongly influences the dynamics. To expand the detection capabilities to species not readily detected by LIF, a time-of-flight mass spectrometer is built. In the first studies nonresonant multiphoton ionization is used. As_4 is detected using 266 nm

  18. Crossed molecular beam studies of atmospheric chemical reaction dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jingsong

    1993-04-01

    The dynamics of several elementary chemical reactions that are important in atmospheric chemistry are investigated. The reactive scattering of ground state chlorine or bromine atoms with ozone molecules and ground state chlorine atoms with nitrogen dioxide molecules is studied using a crossed molecular beams apparatus with a rotatable mass spectrometer detector. The Cl + O{sub 3} {yields} ClO + O{sub 2} reaction has been studied at four collision energies ranging from 6 kcal/mole to 32 kcal/mole. The derived product center-of-mass angular and translational energy distributions show that the reaction has a direct reaction mechanism and that there is a strong repulsion on the exit channel. The ClO product is sideways and forward scattered with respect to the Cl atom, and the translational energy release is large. The Cl atom is most likely to attack the terminal oxygen atom of the ozone molecule. The Br + O{sub 3} {yields} ClO + O{sub 2} reaction has been studied at five collision energies ranging from 5 kcal/mole to 26 kcal/mole. The derived product center-of-mass angular and translational energy distributions are quite similar to those in the Cl + O{sub 3} reaction. The Br + O{sub 3} reaction has a direct reaction mechanism similar to that of the Cl + O{sub 3} reaction. The electronic structure of the ozone molecule seems to play the central role in determining the reaction mechanism in atomic radical reactions with the ozone molecule. The Cl + NO{sub 2} {yields} ClO + NO reaction has been studied at three collision energies ranging from 10.6 kcal/mole to 22.4 kcal/mole. The center-of-mass angular distribution has some forward-backward symmetry, and the product translational energy release is quite large. The reaction proceeds through a short-lived complex whose lifetime is less than one rotational period. The experimental results seem to show that the Cl atom mainly attacks the oxygen atom instead of the nitrogen atom of the NO{sub 2} molecule.

  19. SHG microscopy excited by polarization controlled beam for three-dimensional molecular orientation measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshiki, K.; Hashimoto, M.; Araki, T.

    2006-08-01

    We have developed a second-harmonic-generation (SGH) microscope to observe the three-dimensional molecular orientation with three-dimensional high spatial resolution using a polarization mode converter. The mode converter consists of a parallel-aligned nematic-liquid-crystal spatial-light-modulator (PAL-SLM) and quarter-waveplates, and converts a incident linearly polarized beam to orthogonal linearly polarized beams or radially polarized beam. We combined the mode converter with SHG microscope to obtain the local information of the three-dimensional molecular orientation. We demonstrated the detection of three-dimensional molecular orientation of collagen fiber in human Achilles' tendon. For high precision three-dimensional molecular orientation measurement, we propose a technique to calibrate the dependence of SHG detection efficiencies on molecular orientation using a liposome.

  20. Analysis of plume following ultraviolet laser ablation of doped polymers: Dependence on polymer molecular weight

    SciTech Connect

    Rebollar, Esther; Oujja, Mohamed; Bounos, Giannis; Kolloch, Andreas; Georgiou, Savas; Castillejo, Marta

    2007-02-01

    This work investigates the effect of polymer molecular weight M{sub W} on the plume characteristics of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and polystyrene (PS) films doped with iodonaphthalene (NapI) and iodophenanthrene (PhenI) following irradiation in vacuum at 248 nm. Laser-induced fluorescence probing of the plume reveals the presence of ArH products (NapH and PhenH from, respectively, NapI- and PhenI-doped films). While a bimodal translational distribution of these products is observed in all cases, on average, a slower translational distribution is observed in the low M{sub W} system. The extent of the observed dependence is reduced as the optical absorption coefficient of the film increases, i.e., in the sequence NapI/PMMA, PhenI/PMMA, and PS-doped films. Further confirmation of the bimodal translational distributions is provided by monitoring in situ the temporally resolved attenuation by the plume as it expands in vacuum of a continuous wave helium-neon laser propagating parallel to the substrate. Results are discussed in the framework of the bulk photothermal model, according to which ejection requires that a critical number of bonds are broken.

  1. Considerations on the Design of a Molecular Frequency Standard Based on the Molecular Beam Electric Resonance Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Vernon W.

    1959-01-01

    The use of a rotational state transition as observed by the molecular beam electric resonance method is discussed as a possible frequency standard particularly in the millimeter wavelength range. As a promising example the 100 kMc transition between the J = 0 and J = 1 rotational states of Li 6F19 is considered. The relative insensitivity of the transition frequency to external electric and magnetic fields and the low microwave power requirements appear favorable; the small fraction of the molecular beam that is in a single rotational state is a limiting factor.

  2. Tumor Ablation and Nanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Manthe, Rachel L.; Foy, Susan P.; Krishnamurthy, Nishanth; Sharma, Blanka; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2010-01-01

    Next to surgical resection, tumor ablation is a commonly used intervention in the treatment of solid tumors. Tumor ablation methods include thermal therapies, photodynamic therapy, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) producing agents. Thermal therapies induce tumor cell death via thermal energy and include radiofrequency, microwave, high intensity focused ultrasound, and cryoablation. Photodynamic therapy and ROS producing agents cause increased oxidative stress in tumor cells leading to apoptosis. While these therapies are safe and viable alternatives when resection of malignancies is not feasible, they do have associated limitations that prevent their widespread use in clinical applications. To improve the efficacy of these treatments, nanoparticles are being studied in combination with nonsurgical ablation regimens. In addition to better thermal effect on tumor ablation, nanoparticles can deliver anticancer therapeutics that show synergistic anti-tumor effect in the presence of heat and can also be imaged to achieve precision in therapy. Understanding the molecular mechanism of nanoparticle-mediated tumor ablation could further help engineer nanoparticles of appropriate composition and properties to synergize the ablation effect. This review aims to explore the various types of nonsurgical tumor ablation methods currently used in cancer treatment and potential improvements by nanotechnology applications. PMID:20866097

  3. Nanoengineering of Ruddlesden-Popper phases using molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haeni, Jeffrey Hewlett

    Epitaxial films including superlattices of the A n+1BnO3 n+1 Ruddlesden-Popper homologous series with A=Sr and Ba and B=Ti and Ru have been grown by reactive molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on (LaAlO3)0.3--(SrAl0.5Ta 0.5O3)0.7 (LSAT), SrTiO3, DyScO 3 and Si substrates. The strict composition control necessary for the synthesis of these phases was achieved through the use of reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) intensity oscillations. The first five members of the Srn+1 TinO3n+1 and the Sr n+1RunO3 n+1 Ruddlesden-Popper homologous series, i.e., Sr 2TiO4, Sr3Ti2O7, Sr 4Ti3O10, Sr5Ti4O13 , and Sr6Ti5O16, and Sr2RuO 4, Sr3Ru2O7, Sr4Ru 3O10, Sr5Ru4O13, and Sr 6Ru5O16, respectively, were grown with layer-by-layer deposition. Dielectric measurements indicate that the dielectric constant tensor coefficient epsilon33 of the Srn +1TinO3n +1 series increases from a minimum of 44 +/- 4 in the n = 1 (Sr2TiO4) film to a maximum of 263 +/- 2 in the n = infinity (SrTiO3) film. XPS measurements on Sr2TiO4/SrTiO3 heterostructures indicate a type II interface between the two materials, with a valence band offset of -0.40 +/- 0.1 eV, and a conduction band offset of -0.2 +/- 0.1 eV. Epitaxial SrTiO3 thin films grown on DyScO3 and LSAT substrates show dramatically different dielectric properties, as measured with interdigitated electrodes. The film on DyScO3 is under biaxial tensile strain and shows significant room temperature tunability and a sharp Curie-Weiss peak at 293 K. Under biaxial compressive strain, the SrTiO 3 exhibits negligible room temperature tunability. Epitaxial SrTiO3/BaTiO3 short period superlattices were grown with nearly atomically-abrupt interfaces that are maintained even after annealing to high temperature. In addition, cross-sectional TEM reveals that all superlattice periods grown are coherently strained to the underlying (001) SrTiO3 and (001) LSAT substrates. Epitaxial SrRuO3 layers were grown on Si (100) on which a thin epitaxial (Ba,Sr)O/SrSi2

  4. Superconductivity in oxygen doped iron telluride by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Mao

    Iron base superconductor have gained much attention in the research community. They offer great potentials to improve our understanding of the subject of superconductivity by having another family of high temperature superconductors to compare and contrast to the cuprates. Practically, the iron based superconductors seems to be even better candidates for applications in power generation and power transmission. Iron telluride is regarded as the parent compound of the "11" family, the family of iron chalcogenide that has the simplest structure. Iron telluride itself is not a superconductor, by can become one when doped with oxygen. In this investigation, we developed the growth recipe of thin film iron telluride by Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE). We found the growth to be self-regulated, similar to that of GaAs. The initial layers of growth seem to experience a spontaneous crystallization, as the film quickly go from the initial polycrystalline phase to highly crystalline in just a few unit cells. We studied oxygen doping to the iron telluride thin films and the resultant superconductivity. We characterized the sample with AFM, XRD, transport, and STEM-EELS, and we found that interfacial strain is not an essential ingredient of superconductivity in this particular case. We investigated the doping conditions for two candidate oxygen doping modes: substitution and interstitial. We found that substitution occurs when the film grown in oxygen, while interstitial oxygen is primarily incorporated during annealing after growth. The substitutional oxygen are concentrated in small local regions where substitution is around 100%, but does not contribute to superconductivity. We estimated substitutional oxygen to be about 5%, and is the proximate cause of superconductivity. Hall experiment on our sample showed a shift of dominant carrier type from holes to electrons around 35 K, but the transition was set in motion as early as the structural phase transition around 70 K. We

  5. Measuring Incorporation Of Arsenic In Molecular-Beam Expitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Blair F.; Fernandez, Rouel F.; Madhukar, Anupam; Grunthaner, Frank J.

    1988-01-01

    Changes in surface layers cause oscillations in RHEED measurements. Specular RHEED Beam intensity measured before, during, and after deposition of seven to eight monomolecular layers of gallium during 1.5 seconds. Arsenic pressure was 1.7x10 to the negative seventh power torr (2.3x10 to the negative fifth power Pa) throughout measurements.

  6. Electron beam evaporated carbon doping of InGaAs layers grown by gas source molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Salokatve, A.; Toivonen, M.; Asonen, H.; Pessa, M.; Likonen, J.

    1996-12-31

    The authors have studied carbon doping of GaInAs grown by gas-source molecular beam epitaxy. Graphite was used as a source material for carbon evaporation. GaInAs was studied due to its importance as a base layer in InP-based heterojunction bipolar transistors. They show that useful p-type acceptor concentrations can be achieved by evaporation from graphite source for GaInAs grown by gas-source molecular beam epitaxy. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy and Van der Pauw Hall measurements were used to characterize the carbon and net acceptor concentrations of their GaInAs layers. The effect of rapid thermal annealing on acceptor concentrations and Hall mobilities was also studied.

  7. Measurement and Analysis of Rotational Energy of Nitrogen Molecular Beam by REMPI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, H.; Yamaguchi, H.; Kataoka, K.; Sugiyama, N.; Ide, K.; Niimi, T.

    2008-12-01

    Molecular beams are powerful tools for diagnoses of solid surfaces and gas-surface interaction tests. Unfortunately, there are very few reports about experimental analysis of internal energy distribution (e.g. rotational energy) of molecular beams of diatomic or polyatomic molecules, because measurement of internal energy distribution is very difficult. Spectroscopic measurement techniques based on resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) is very powerful for measurement in highly rarefied gas flows. In this study, the REMPI method is applied to measurement of rotational energy distribution of nitrogen molecular beams. The REMPI spectrum of the molecular beam indicates the rotational temperature higher than the translational temperature of 7.2 K estimated by assuming isentropic flows. The O and P branches of the REMPI spectrum correspond to the rotational temperature of 30 K, but the S branch of the spectrum deviates from that at 30 K. It seems to be because the non-equilibrium rotational energy distribution of the molecular beam deviates from the Boltzmann distribution.

  8. Measurement and Analysis of Rotational Energy of Nitrogen Molecular Beam by REMPI

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, H.; Yamaguchi, H.; Kataoka, K.; Sugiyama, N.; Ide, K.; Niimi, T.

    2008-12-31

    Molecular beams are powerful tools for diagnoses of solid surfaces and gas-surface interaction tests. Unfortunately, there are very few reports about experimental analysis of internal energy distribution (e.g. rotational energy) of molecular beams of diatomic or polyatomic molecules, because measurement of internal energy distribution is very difficult. Spectroscopic measurement techniques based on resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) is very powerful for measurement in highly rarefied gas flows. In this study, the REMPI method is applied to measurement of rotational energy distribution of nitrogen molecular beams. The REMPI spectrum of the molecular beam indicates the rotational temperature higher than the translational temperature of 7.2 K estimated by assuming isentropic flows. The O and P branches of the REMPI spectrum correspond to the rotational temperature of 30 K, but the S branch of the spectrum deviates from that at 30 K. It seems to be because the non-equilibrium rotational energy distribution of the molecular beam deviates from the Boltzmann distribution.

  9. Formation of diatomic molecular radicals in reactive nitrogen-carbon plasma generated by electron cyclotron resonance discharge and pulsed laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Peipei; Li, Yanli; You, Qinghu; Cai, Hua; Yang, Xu; Sun, Jian; Xu, Ning; Wu, Jiada

    2014-04-15

    The reactive nitrogen-carbon plasma generated by electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) microwave discharge of N{sub 2} gas and pulsed laser ablation of a graphite target was characterized spectroscopically by time-integrated and time-resolved optical emission spectroscopy with space resolution for a study of gas-phase reactions and molecular radical formation in the plasma. The plasma exhibits very high reactivity compared with the plasma generated solely by ECR discharge or by pulsed laser ablation and contains highly excited species originally present in the ambient gaseous environment and directly ablated from the target as well as formed as the products of gas-phase reactions occurring in the plasma. The space distribution and the time evolution of the plasma emission give an access to the gas-phase reactions for the formation of C{sub 2} and CN radicals, revealing that C{sub 2} radicals are formed mainly in the region near the target while CN radicals can be formed in a much larger region not only in the vicinity of the target, but especially in the region near a substrate far away from the target.

  10. Laser ablation of concrete.

    SciTech Connect

    Savina, M.

    1998-10-05

    Laser ablation is effective both as an analytical tool and as a means of removing surface coatings. The elemental composition of surfaces can be determined by either mass spectrometry or atomic emission spectroscopy of the atomized effluent. Paint can be removed from aircraft without damage to the underlying aluminum substrate, and environmentally damaged buildings and sculptures can be restored by ablating away deposited grime. A recent application of laser ablation is the removal of radioactive contaminants from the surface and near-surface regions of concrete. We present the results of ablation tests on concrete samples using a high power pulsed Nd:YAG laser with fiber optic beam delivery. The laser-surface interaction was studied on various model systems consisting of Type I Portland cement with varying amounts of either fine silica or sand in an effort to understand the effect of substrate composition on ablation rates and mechanisms. A sample of non-contaminated concrete from a nuclear power plant was also studied. In addition, cement and concrete samples were doped with non-radioactive isotopes of elements representative of cooling waterspills, such as cesium and strontium, and analyzed by laser-resorption mass spectrometry to determine the contamination pathways. These samples were also ablated at high power to determine the efficiency with which surface contaminants are removed and captured. The results show that the neat cement matrix melts and vaporizes when little or no sand or aggregate is present. Surface flows of liquid material are readily apparent on the ablated surface and the captured aerosol takes the form of glassy beads up to a few tens of microns in diameter. The presence of sand and aggregate particles causes the material to disaggregate on ablation, with intact particles on the millimeter size scale leaving the surface. Laser resorption mass spectrometric analysis showed that cesium and potassium have similar chemical environments in the

  11. Molecular analysis of the androgen receptor in ten prostate cancer specimens obtained before and after androgen ablation.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Dolores J; Puxeddu, Efisio; Malik, Nusrat; Stenoien, David L; Nigam, Rajni; Saleh, George Y; Mancini, Michael; Weigel, Nancy L; Marcelli, Marco

    2003-01-01

    Hormonal or androgen-ablation (AA) therapy is the predominant form of systemic treatment for metastatic prostate cancer. Although an initial response to AA is observed in 70%-80% of patients with advanced disease, most tumors eventually progress to androgen-independent growth, and only a minority of affected individuals are alive 5 years following initiation of treatment. Because AA induces a dramatic change in the hormonal milieu of the patient and because these tumors maintain the ability to proliferate, it is possible that this treatment selects a population of cells with mutated androgen receptors (ARs) that sustain growth despite the absence of circulating androgen. To test this hypothesis we investigated the molecular structure of the AR in 10 prostate cancer specimens obtained before and after AA. Tumors (coded A through L) were microdissected to uniquely enrich genomic DNA from cancer cells. Exons 1-8 of the AR were screened by polymerase chain reaction, single-stranded conformational polymorphism, and sequence analysis. A mutation consisting of an expansion of the polyglutamine (poly-Q) repeat from 20 (found in 100% of the sequences of specimens obtained before AA) to 26 (found in 70% of the sequences of specimens obtained after AA) was detected in patient F. The 26 glutamine (Q26) AR readily translocated to the nucleus upon addition of androgen, and did not show significant differences in its ability to bind (3)[H]-dihydrotestosterone compared to its wild-type counterpart. Nevertheless, analysis of transcriptional activity showed that the Q66 AR was transcriptionally 30%-50% less active than the wild-type molecule. Because clones of AR with an expanded poly-Q tract were detected only in the specimen from patient F obtained after AA, we conclude that in specific circumstances, AA treatments can select variant forms of the AR in the prostate of patients affected by prostate cancer. Further experiments are needed to conclusively determine whether the Q26

  12. Plasma behaviour with hydrogen supersonic molecular beam and cluster jet injection in the HL-2A tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Lianghua; Feng, Beibing; Chen, Chengyuan; Shi, Zhongbin; Yuan, Baoshan; Zhou, Yan; Duan, Xuru; Sun, Hongjuan; Lu, Jie; Jiao, Yiming; Ni, Guoquan; Lu, Haiyang; Xiao, Weiwen; Li, Wei; Pan, Yudong; Hong, Wenyu; Ran, Hong; Ding, Xuantong; Liu, Yong

    2007-11-01

    The experimental results of low pressure supersonic molecular beam injection (SMBI) fuelling on the HL-2A closed divertor indicate that during the period of pulsed SMBI the power density convected at the target plate surfaces was 0.4 times of that before or after the beam injection. An empirical scaling law used for the SMBI penetration depth for the HL-2A plasma was obtained. The cluster jet injection (CJI) is a new fuelling method which is based on and developed from the experiments of SMBI in the HL-1M tokamak. The hydrogen clusters are produced at liquid nitrogen temperature in a supersonic adiabatic expansion of moderate backing pressure gases into vacuum through a Laval nozzle and are measured by Rayleigh scattering. The measurement results have shown that the averaged cluster size of as large as hundreds of atoms was found at the backing pressures of more than 0.1 MPa. Multifold diagnostics gave coincidental evidence that when there was hydrogen CJI in the HL-2A plasma, a great deal of particles from the jet were deposited at a terminal area rather than uniformly ablated along the injecting path. SMB with clusters, which are like micro-pellets, will be of benefit for deeper fuelling, and its injection behaviour was somewhat similar to that of pellet injection. Both the particle penetration depth and the fuelling efficiency of the CJI were distinctly better than that of the normal SMBI under similar discharge operation. During hydrogen CJI or high-pressure SMBI, a combination of collision and radiative stopping forced the runaway electrons to cool down to thermal velocity due to such a massive fuelling.

  13. Quantum state specific reactant preparation in a molecular beam by rapid adiabatic passage

    SciTech Connect

    Chadwick, Helen Hundt, P. Morten; Reijzen, Maarten E. van; Yoder, Bruce L.; Beck, Rainer D.

    2014-01-21

    Highly efficient preparation of molecules in a specific rovibrationally excited state for gas/surface reactivity measurements is achieved in a molecular beam using tunable infrared (IR) radiation from a single mode continuous wave optical parametric oscillator (cw-OPO). We demonstrate that with appropriate focusing of the IR radiation, molecules in the molecular beam crossing the fixed frequency IR field experience a Doppler tuning that can be adjusted to achieve complete population inversion of a two-level system by rapid adiabatic passage (RAP). A room temperature pyroelectric detector is used to monitor the excited fraction in the molecular beam and the population inversion is detected and quantified using IR bleaching by a second IR-OPO. The second OPO is also used for complete population transfer to an overtone or combination vibration via double resonance excitation using two spatially separated RAP processes.

  14. Quantum state specific reactant preparation in a molecular beam by rapid adiabatic passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwick, Helen; Hundt, P. Morten; van Reijzen, Maarten E.; Yoder, Bruce L.; Beck, Rainer D.

    2014-01-01

    Highly efficient preparation of molecules in a specific rovibrationally excited state for gas/surface reactivity measurements is achieved in a molecular beam using tunable infrared (IR) radiation from a single mode continuous wave optical parametric oscillator (cw-OPO). We demonstrate that with appropriate focusing of the IR radiation, molecules in the molecular beam crossing the fixed frequency IR field experience a Doppler tuning that can be adjusted to achieve complete population inversion of a two-level system by rapid adiabatic passage (RAP). A room temperature pyroelectric detector is used to monitor the excited fraction in the molecular beam and the population inversion is detected and quantified using IR bleaching by a second IR-OPO. The second OPO is also used for complete population transfer to an overtone or combination vibration via double resonance excitation using two spatially separated RAP processes.

  15. Quantum state specific reactant preparation in a molecular beam by rapid adiabatic passage.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, Helen; Hundt, P Morten; van Reijzen, Maarten E; Yoder, Bruce L; Beck, Rainer D

    2014-01-21

    Highly efficient preparation of molecules in a specific rovibrationally excited state for gas/surface reactivity measurements is achieved in a molecular beam using tunable infrared (IR) radiation from a single mode continuous wave optical parametric oscillator (cw-OPO). We demonstrate that with appropriate focusing of the IR radiation, molecules in the molecular beam crossing the fixed frequency IR field experience a Doppler tuning that can be adjusted to achieve complete population inversion of a two-level system by rapid adiabatic passage (RAP). A room temperature pyroelectric detector is used to monitor the excited fraction in the molecular beam and the population inversion is detected and quantified using IR bleaching by a second IR-OPO. The second OPO is also used for complete population transfer to an overtone or combination vibration via double resonance excitation using two spatially separated RAP processes. PMID:25669393

  16. Stopping supersonic beams with atomic and molecular coilguns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narevicius, Edvardas

    2008-05-01

    We report a method that enables the stopping and trapping of any paramagnetic atom or molecule using a series of pulsed electromagnetic coils. Results of stopping metastable neon and molecular oxygen with a 64 stage coilgun will be presented and applications to fundamental problems in physics and chemistry discussed.

  17. A non-diaphragm type small shock tube for application to a molecular beam source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimoto, Yuta; Osuka, Kenichi; Miyoshi, Nobuya; Kinefuchi, Ikuya; Takagi, Shu; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2013-07-01

    A non-diaphragm type small shock tube was developed for application to a molecular beam source, which can generate beams in the energy range from 1 to several electron volts and beams containing dissociated species such as atomic oxygen. Since repetitive high-frequency operation is indispensable for rapid signal acquisition in beam scattering experiments, the dimensions of the shock tube were miniaturized to reduce the evacuation time between shots. The designed shock tube is 2-4 mm in diameter and can operate at 0.5 Hz. Moreover, a high shock Mach number at the tube end is required for high-energy molecular beam generation. To reduce the shock attenuation caused by the wall boundary layer, which becomes significant in small-diameter tubes, we developed a high-speed response valve employing the current-loop mechanism. The response time of this mechanism is about 100 μs, which is shorter than the rupture time of conventional diaphragms. We show that the current-loop valve generates shock waves with shorter formation distances (about 200-300 mm) than those of conventional shock tubes. In addition, the converging geometry efficiently accelerates shock wave in the small-diameter tubes. The optimal geometry of the shock tube yields shock Mach number around 7, which indicates that the translation energy of molecular beams can exceed 1 eV even in the presence of the real gas effect.

  18. Ablative system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, V. H. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A carrier liquid containing ablative material bodies is connected to a plenum chamber wall with openings to a high temperature environment. The liquid and bodies pass through the openings of the wall to form a self replacing ablative surface. The wall is composed of honeycomb layers, spheres containing ablative whiskers or wads, and a hardening catalyst for the carrier liquid. The wall also has woven wicks of ablative material fibers that extend through the wall openings and into plenum chamber which contains the liquid.

  19. Effects of high source flow and high pumping speed on gas source molecular beam epitaxy / chemical beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCollum, M. J.; Jackson, S. L.; Szafranek, I.; Stillman, G. E.

    1990-10-01

    We report the growth of GaAs by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), gas source molecular beam epitaxy (GSMBE), and chemical beam epitaxy (CBE) in an epitaxial III-V reactor which features high pumping speed. The system is comprised of a modified Perkin-Elmer 430P molecular beam epitaxy system and a custom gas source panel from Emcore. The growth chamber is pumped with a 7000 1/s (He) diffusion pump (Varian VHS-10 with Monsanto Santovac 5 oil). The gas source panel includes pressure based flow controllers (MKS 1150) allowing triethylaluminum (TEA), triethylgallium (TEG), and trimethylindium (TMI) to be supplied without the use of hydrogen. All source lines, including arsine and phosphine, are maintained below atmospheric pressure. The high pumping speed allows total system flow rates as high as 100 SCCM and V/III ratios as high as 100. The purity of GaAs grown by MBE in this system increases with pumping speed. GaAs layers grown by GSMBE with arsine flows of 10 and 20 SCCM have electron concentrations of 1 × 10 15 cm -3 (μ 77=48,000 cm 2/V·) and 2 × 10 14 cm -3 (μ 77=78,000 cm 2/V·s) respectively. El ectron concentration varies with hydride injector temperature such that the minimum in electron concentration occurs for less than complete cracking. The effect of V/III ratio and the use of a metal eutectic bubbler on residual carrier concentration in GaAs grown by CBE is presented. Intentional Si and Be doping of CBE grown GaAs is demonstrated at a high growth rate of 5.4 μm/h.

  20. Use of molecular beams to support microspheres during plasma coating

    SciTech Connect

    Crane, J.K.; Smith, R.D.; Johnson, W.L.; Letts, S.A.; Korbel, G.R.; Krenick, R.M.

    1980-08-26

    Spherical laser fusion targets can be levitated on beams of Ar or other gas atoms. This is an especially useful and reliable technique for supporting microspheres during plasma coating or plasma etching. The reliability of this technique is principally the result of two things: the success of a special centering device which provides a lateral, stabilizing force on the levitated microspheres; and a gas handling system which is capable of controlling levitation gas flow in the microtorr liter/sec range. We have determined that the operational regime of this device is that of Knudsen's flow. This knowledge of the flow characteristics has been important in developing this device.

  1. Molecular Beam Studies of Hot Atom Chemical Reactions: Reactive Scattering of Energetic Deuterium Atoms

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Continetti, R. E.; Balko, B. A.; Lee, Y. T.

    1989-02-01

    A brief review of the application of the crossed molecular beams technique to the study of hot atom chemical reactions in the last twenty years is given. Specific emphasis is placed on recent advances in the use of photolytically produced energetic deuterium atoms in the study of the fundamental elementary reactions D + H{sub 2} -> DH + H and the substitution reaction D + C{sub 2}H{sub 2} -> C{sub 2}HD + H. Recent advances in uv laser and pulsed molecular beam techniques have made the detailed study of hydrogen atom reactions under single collision conditions possible.

  2. DESIGN OF A MOLECULAR BEAM SURFACE SCATTERING APPARATUS FOR VELOCITY AND ANGULAR DISTRIBUTION MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Ceyer, S. T.; Siekhaus, W. J.; Somorjai, G. A.

    1980-11-01

    A molecular beam surface scattering apparatus designed for the study of corrosion and catalyticsurfacereactions is described. The apparatus incorporates two molecular or atomic beams aimed at a surface characterized by low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), a rotatable, differentially pumped quadrupole mass spectrometer, and a versatile manipulator. Angular distributions and energy distributions as a funcion of angle and independent of the surface residence time can be measured. Typical data for the oxidation of deuterium to D{sub 2}O on a Pt(lll) crystal surface are presented.

  3. Molecular beam studies of hot atom chemical reactions: Reactive scattering of energetic deuterium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Continetti, R.E.; Balko, B.A.; Lee, Y.T.

    1989-02-01

    A brief review of the application of the crossed molecular beams technique to the study of hot atom chemical reactions in the last twenty years is given. Specific emphasis is placed on recent advances in the use of photolytically produced energetic deuterium atoms in the study of the fundamental elementary reactions D + H/sub 2/ /minus/> DH + H and the substitution reaction D + C/sub 2/H/sub 2/ /minus/> C/sub 2/HD + H. Recent advances in uv laser and pulsed molecular beam techniques have made the detailed study of hydrogen atom reactions under single collision conditions possible. 18 refs., 9 figs.

  4. Expansion Discharge Source for Ion Beam Laser Spectroscopy of Cold Molecular Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porambo, Michael; Pearson, Jessica; Riccardo, Craig; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2013-06-01

    Molecular ions are important in several fields of research, and spectroscopy acts as a key tool in the study of these ions. However, problems such as low ion abundance, ion-neutral confusion, and spectral congestion due to high internal temperatures can hinder effective spectroscopic studies. To circumvent these problems, we are developing a technique called Sensitive, Cooled, Resolved, Ion BEam Spectroscopy (SCRIBES). This ion beam spectrometer will feature a continuous supersonic expansion discharge source to produce cold molecular ions, electrostatic ion optics to focus the ions into an ion beam and bend the beam away from co-produced neutral molecules, an overlap region for cavity enhanced spectroscopy, and a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. When completed, SCRIBES will be an effective tool for the study of large, fluxional, and complex molecular ions that are difficult to study with other means. The ion beam spectrometer has been successfully implemented with a hot ion source. This talk will focus on the work of integrating a supersonic expansion discharge source into the instrument. To better understand how the source would work in the whole ion beam instrument, characterization studies are being performed with spectroscopy of HN_2^+ in a section of the system to ascertain the rotational temperature of the ion expansion. Attempts are also underway to measure the ion current from a beam formed from the expansion. Once the source in this environment is properly understood, we will reintegrate it to the rest of the ion beam system, completing SCRIBES. A. A. Mills, B. M. Siller, M. W. Porambo, M. Perera, H. Kreckel and B. J. McCall J. Chem. Phys., 135, 224201, (2011). K. N. Crabtree, C. A. Kauffman and B. J. McCall Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 086103, (2010).

  5. Collision dynamics of methyl radicals and highly vibrationally excited molecules using crossed molecular beams

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, P.M.Y.

    1991-10-01

    The vibrational to translational (V{yields}T) energy transfer in collisions between large highly vibrationally excited polyatomics and rare gases was investigated by time-of-flight techniques. Two different methods, UV excitation followed by intemal conversion and infrared multiphoton excitation (IRMPE), were used to form vibrationally excited molecular beams of hexafluorobenzene and sulfur hexafluoride, respectively. The product translational energy was found to be independent of the vibrational excitation. These results indicate that the probability distribution function for V{yields}T energy transfer is peaked at zero. The collisional relaxation of large polyatomic molecules with rare gases most likely occurs through a rotationally mediated process. Photodissociation of nitrobenzene in a molecular beam was studied at 266 nm. Two primary dissociation channels were identified including simple bond rupture to produce nitrogen dioxide and phenyl radical and isomerization to form nitric oxide and phenoxy radical. The time-of-flight spectra indicate that simple bond rupture and isomerization occurs via two different mechanisms. Secondary dissociation of the phenoxy radicals to carbon monoxide and cyclopentadienyl radicals was observed as well as secondary photodissociation of phenyl radical to give H atom and benzyne. A supersonic methyl radical beam source is developed. The beam source configuration and conditions were optimized for CH{sub 3} production from the thermal decomposition of azomethane. Elastic scattering of methyl radical and neon was used to differentiate between the methyl radicals and the residual azomethane in the molecular beam.

  6. Using Pyrolysis Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry to Characterize Soil Organic Carbon in Native Prairie Soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to characterize soil organic carbon (SOC) with pyrolysis molecular beam mass spectrometry (py-MBMS) and then to determine correlations between the mass spectra and associated soil characterization data. Both soil carbon chemistry and the organic forms in which SOC is...

  7. Crossed Molecular Beam Studies and Dynamics of Decomposition of Chemically Activated Radicals

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Lee, Y. T.

    1973-09-01

    The power of the crossed molecular beams method in the investigation of the dynamics of chemical reactions lies mainly in the direct observation of the consequences of single collisions of well controlled reactant molecules. The primary experimental observations which provide information on reaction dynamics are the measurements of angular and velocity distributions of reaction products.

  8. History of Molecular Beam Research: Personal Reminiscences of the Important Evolutionary Period 1919-1933

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estermann, Immanuel

    1975-01-01

    Describes the early historical period of the molecular beam method, including the Stern-Gerlach experiment, the work of Davisson and Germer, and the magnetic moment determinations for the proton, neutron, and deuteron. Contains some amusing historical sidelights on the research personalities that dominated that period. (MLH)

  9. Substrate temperature changes during molecular beam epitaxy growth of GaMnAs

    SciTech Connect

    Novak, V.; Olejnik, K.; Cukr, M.; Smrcka, L.; Remes, Z.; Oswald, J.

    2007-10-15

    Our band gap spectroscopy measurements reveal a remarkably big increase of the substrate temperature during the low-temperature molecular beam epitaxy growth of GaMnAs layers. With the help of numerical simulations we explain the effect as a consequence of changing absorption/emission characteristics of the growing epilayer. We discuss possibilities for reducing the substrate temperature variations during the growth.

  10. Dosimetric comparison of flattened and unflattened beams for stereotactic ablative radiotherapy of stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hrbacek, Jan; Lang, Stephanie; Graydon, Shaun N.; Klöck, Stephan; Riesterer, Oliver

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To compare contribution and accuracy of delivery for two flattening filter free (FFF) beams of the nominal energy 6 and 10 MV and a 6 MV flattened beam for early stage lung cancer. Methods: For each of 11 patients with stage I nonsmall cell lung cancer three volumetric modulated arc therapy plans were prepared utilizing a 6 MV flattened photon beam (X6FF) and two nonflattened beams of nominal energy 6 and 10 MV (X6FFF, X10FFF). Optimization constraints were set to produce dose distributions that meet the criteria of the RTOG-0915 protocol. The radiation schedule used for plan comparison in all patients was 50 Gy in five fractions. Dosimetric parameters of planning target volume (PTV) and organs-at-risk and delivery times were assessed and compared. All plans were subject to verification using Delta{sup 4} unit (Scandidos, Sweden) and absolutely calibrated gafchromic films in a thorax phantom. Results: All plans had a qualitatively comparable outcome. Obtained dose distributions were conformal (CI < 1.17) and exhibited a steep dose fall-off outside the PTV. The ratio of monitor units for FFF versus FF plans in the authors' study ranged from 0.95 to 1.21 and from 0.93 to 1.25 for X6FFF/X6FF and X10FFF/X6FF comparisons, respectively. The ratio systematically increased with increasing size of the PTV (up to +25% for 150 cm{sup 3} PTV). Yet the integral dose to healthy tissue did not follow this trend. Comparison of cumulative dose volume histograms for a patient's body showed that X6FFF plans exhibit improved conformity and reduced the volume of tissue that received more than 50% of the prescription dose. Parameters related to dose gradient showed statistically significant improvement. CI{sub 50%}, CI{sub 60%}, CI{sub 80%}, and CI{sub 100%} were on average reduced by 4.6% (p < 0.001), 4.6% (p = 0.002), 3.1% (p = 0.002), and 1.2% (p = 0.039), respectively. Gradient measure was on average reduced by 4.2% (p < 0.001). Due to dose reduction in the surrounding lung

  11. Ultra high resolution molecular beam cars spectroscopy with application to planetary atmospheric molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    The measurement of high resolution pulsed and continuous wave (CW) coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) measurements in pulsed and steady state supersonic expansions were demonstrated. Pulsed molecular beam sources were characterized, and saturation of a Raman transition and, for the first time, the Raman spectrum of a complex molecular cluster were observed. The observation of CW CARS spectra in a molecular expansion and the effects of transit time broadening is described. Supersonic expansion is established as a viable technique for high resolution Raman spectroscopy of cold molecules with resolutions of 100 MH2.

  12. Reflection mass spectrometry technique for monitoring and controlling composition during molecular beam epitaxy

    DOEpatents

    Brennan, T.M.; Hammons, B.E.; Tsao, J.Y.

    1992-12-15

    A method for on-line accurate monitoring and precise control of molecular beam epitaxial growth of Groups III-III-V or Groups III-V-V layers in an advanced semiconductor device incorporates reflection mass spectrometry. The reflection mass spectrometry is responsive to intentional perturbations in molecular fluxes incident on a substrate by accurately measuring the molecular fluxes reflected from the substrate. The reflected flux is extremely sensitive to the state of the growing surface and the measurements obtained enable control of newly forming surfaces that are dynamically changing as a result of growth. 3 figs.

  13. Reflection mass spectrometry technique for monitoring and controlling composition during molecular beam epitaxy

    DOEpatents

    Brennan, Thomas M.; Hammons, B. Eugene; Tsao, Jeffrey Y.

    1992-01-01

    A method for on-line accurate monitoring and precise control of molecular beam epitaxial growth of Groups III-III-V or Groups III-V-V layers in an advanced semiconductor device incorporates reflection mass spectrometry. The reflection mass spectrometry is responsive to intentional perturbations in molecular fluxes incident on a substrate by accurately measuring the molecular fluxes reflected from the substrate. The reflected flux is extremely sensitive to the state of the growing surface and the measurements obtained enable control of newly forming surfaces that are dynamically changing as a result of growth.

  14. Ultra-sensitive high-precision spectroscopy of a fast molecular ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, Andrew A.; Siller, Brian M.; Porambo, Michael W.; Perera, Manori; Kreckel, Holger; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2011-12-14

    Direct spectroscopy of a fast molecular ion beam offers many advantages over competing techniques, including the generality of the approach to any molecular ion, the complete elimination of spectral confusion due to neutral molecules, and the mass identification of individual spectral lines. The major challenge is the intrinsic weakness of absorption or dispersion signals resulting from the relatively low number density of ions in the beam. Direct spectroscopy of an ion beam was pioneered by Saykally and co-workers in the late 1980s, but has not been attempted since that time. Here, we present the design and construction of an ion beam spectrometer with several improvements over the Saykally design. The ion beam and its characterization have been improved by adopting recent advances in electrostatic optics, along with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer that can be used simultaneously with optical spectroscopy. As a proof of concept, a noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical heterodyne molecular spectroscopy (NICE-OHMS) setup with a noise equivalent absorption of {approx}2 x 10{sup -11} cm{sup -1} Hz{sup -1/2} has been used to observe several transitions of the Meinel 1-0 band of N{sub 2}{sup +} with linewidths of {approx}120 MHz. An optical frequency comb has been used for absolute frequency calibration of transition frequencies to within {approx}8 MHz. This work represents the first direct spectroscopy of an electronic transition in an ion beam, and also represents a major step toward the development of routine infrared spectroscopy of rotationally cooled molecular ions.

  15. Laser ablation of Al-Ni alloys and multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Johannes; Trebin, Hans-Rainer; Kiselev, Alexander; Rapp, Dennis-Michael

    2016-05-01

    Laser ablation of Al-Ni alloys and multilayers has been studied by molecular dynamics simulations. The method was combined with a two-temperature model to describe the interaction between the laser beam, the electrons, and the atoms. As a first step, electronic parameters for the alloys had to be found and the model developed originally for pure metals had to be generalized to multilayers. The modifications were verified by computing melting depths and ablation thresholds for pure Al and Ni. Here known data could be reproduced. The improved model was applied to the alloys Al_3Ni, AlNi and AlNi_3. While melting depths and ablation thresholds for AlNi behave unspectacular, sharp drops at high fluences are observed for Al_3Ni and AlNi_3. In both cases, the reason is a change in ablation mechanism from phase explosion to vaporization. Furthermore, a phase transition occurs in Al_3Ni. Finally, Al layers of various thicknesses on a Ni substrate have been simulated. Above threshold, 8 nm Al films are ablated as a whole while 24 nm Al films are only partially removed. Below threshold, alloying with a mixture gradient has been observed in the thin layer system.

  16. Tunable diode lasers and their application in cold molecular beam spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharpe, Steven W.; Xu, Songlin; McDowell, Robin; Blake, Thomas A.

    1996-10-01

    Supersonic molecular expansions provide a unique environment in which to acquire the infrared spectra of many molecular systems. Tunable diode lasers offer high spectral brightness, low noise, rapid tuning, and contiguous spectral coverage in the infrared, from 3000 to 500 cm-1. Molecular beams combined with tunable diode lasers represents a powerful tool for reducing or removing spectral congestion arising from both pressure broadening and rotational excitation. Depending on expansion conditions, rotational temperatures on the order of 10K can be routinely obtained. With the appropriate pulsed slit nozzle, Doppler broadening is reduced six-fold or more over that of room temperature, static cells. In addition, by employing modified White cell optics, effective optical path lengths of 3 meters can be realized. A description of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's beam-diode laser spectrometer will be given along with recent results for studies involving the fully rotationally resolved spectra of several molecules of atmospheric interest including chlorine nitrate and carbon tetrachloride.

  17. Improved electron ionization ion source for the detection of supersonic molecular beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirav, Aviv; Fialkov, Alexander; Gordin, Alexander

    2002-08-01

    An improved electron ionization (EI) ion source is described, based on the modification of a Brink-type EI ion source through the addition of a second cage with a fine mesh outside the ion chamber. The added outer cage shields the inner ion cage (ionization zone) against the penetration of the filament and electron repeller potentials, and thus results in the provision of ions with narrower ion energy distribution, hence improved ion-beam quality. The closer to zero electrical field inside the ion cage enables improved filtration (rejection) of ions that are produced from vacuum background compounds, based on difference in ion energies of beam and background species. The improved background ion filtration and ion-beam quality resulted in 2.6 times higher mass spectrometric ion signal, combined with 6.4 times better signal to noise ratio, in comparison with the same ion source having a single cage. The dual cage ion source further provides a smaller or no reduction of the electron emission current upon lowering the electron energy for achieving softer EI and/or electron attachment ionization. It also improves the long-term mass spectral and signal reproducibility and enables fast, automated change of the electron energy. Consequently, the dual cage EI ion source is especially effective for use with gas chromatography mass spectrometry with supersonic molecular beams (SMB), liquid chromatography mass spectrometry with SMB, ion guns with SMB, and any other experimental systems with SMB or nonthermal molecular beams.

  18. Effect of molecular weight distribution on e-beam exposure properties of polystyrene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Ripon Kumar; Cui, Bo

    2013-06-01

    Polystyrene is a negative electron beam resist whose exposure properties can be tuned simply by using different molecular weights (Mw). Most previous studies have used monodisperse polystyrene with a polydispersity index (PDI) of less than 1.1 in order to avoid any uncertainties. Here we show that despite the fact that polystyrene’s sensitivity is inversely proportional to its Mw, no noticeable effect of very broad molecular weight distribution on sensitivity, contrast and achievable resolution is observed. It is thus unnecessary to use the costly monodisperse polystyrene for electron beam lithography. Since the polydispersity is unknown for general purpose polystyrene, we simulated a high PDI polystyrene by mixing in a 1:1 weight ratio two polystyrene samples with Mw of 170 and 900 kg mol-1 for the high Mw range, and 2.5 and 13 kg mol-1 for the low Mw range. The exposure property of the mixture resembles that of a monodisperse polystyrene with similar number averaged molecular weight \\overline{{Mn}}, which indicates that it is \\overline{{Mn}} rather than \\overline{{Mw}} (weight averaged molecular weight) that dominates the exposure properties of polystyrene resist. This also implies that polystyrene of a certain molecular weight can be simulated by a mixture of two polystyrenes having different molecular weights.

  19. Three-dimensional imaging of the ultracold plasma formed in a supersonic molecular beam

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz-Weiling, Markus; Grant, Edward

    2015-06-29

    Double-resonant excitation of nitric oxide in a seeded supersonic molecular beam forms a state-selected Rydberg gas that evolves to form an ultracold plasma. This plasma travels with the propagation of the molecular beam in z over a variable distance as great as 600 mm to strike an imaging detector, which records the charge distribution in the dimensions, x and y. The ω{sub 1} + ω{sub 2} laser crossed molecular beam excitation geometry convolutes the axial Gaussian distribution of NO in the molecular beam with the Gaussian intensity distribution of the perpendicularly aligned laser beam to create an ellipsoidal volume of Rydberg gas. Detected images describe the evolution of this initial density as a function of selected Rydberg gas initial principal quantum number, n{sub 0}, ω{sub 1} laser pulse energy (linearly related to Rydberg gas density, ρ{sub 0}) and flight time. Low-density Rydberg gases of lower principal quantum number produce uniformly expanding, ellipsoidal charge-density distributions. Increase either of n{sub 0} or ρ{sub 0} breaks the ellipsoidal symmetry of plasma expansion. The volume bifurcates to form repelling plasma volumes. The velocity of separation depends on n{sub 0} and ρ{sub 0} in a way that scales uniformly with ρ{sub e}, the density of electrons formed in the core of the Rydberg gas by prompt Penning ionization. Conditions under which this electron gas drives expansion in the long axis dimension of the ellipsoid favours the formation of counter-propagating shock waves.

  20. Pulsed supersonic molecular beam for characterization of chemically active metal-organic complexes at surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lear, Amanda M.

    Metal-organic coordination networks (MOCNs) at surfaces consist of a complex of organic ligands bound to an atomic metal center. The MOCNs, when chosen appropriately, can form highly-ordered arrays at surfaces. Ultra-high vacuum surface studies allow control of surface composition and provide 2D growth restrictions, which lead to under-coordinated metal centers. These systems provide an opportunity to tailor the chemical function of the metal centers due to the steric restrictions imposed by the surface. Tuning the adsorption/desorption energy at a metal center and developing a cooperative environment for catalysis are the key scientific questions that motivate the construction of a molecular beam surface analysis system. Characterization of the created systems can be performed utilizing a pulsed supersonic molecular beam (PSMB) in unison with a quadrupole mass spectrometer. A PSMB allows for the highly controlled delivery of reactants with well-defined energy to a given platform making it possible to elucidate detailed chemical tuning information. In this thesis, a summary of prior theoretical molecular beam derivations is provided. Design considerations and an overview of the construction procedure for the current molecular beam apparatus, including initial characterization experiments, are presented. By impinging an Ar beam on a Ag(111) surface, the location of the specular angle (˜65°) and rough sample perimeter coordinates were determined. Additionally, surface analysis experiments, mainly Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES), were performed to investigate the oxidation of epitaxial graphene on the SiC(0001) surface utilizing an oxygen cracking method. The AES experiments are described in detail and highlight the challenges that were faced when several different graphene samples were used for the oxygen adsorption/desorption experiments.

  1. Endometrial ablation

    MedlinePlus

    ... can be seen on the video screen. Small tools can be used through the scope to remove abnormal growths or tissue for examination. Ablation uses heat, cold, or electricity to destroy the lining of the womb. The ...

  2. Proposed Molecular Beam Determination of Energy Partition in the Photodissociation of Polyatomic Molecules

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Zare, P. N.; Herschbach, D. R.

    1964-01-29

    Conventional photochemical experiments give no information about the partitioning of energy between translational recoil and internal excitation of the fragment molecules formed in photodissociation of a polyatomic molecule. In a molecular beam experiment, it becomes possible to determine the energy partition from the form of the laboratory angular distribution of one of the photodissociation products. A general kinematic analysis is worked out in detail, and the uncertainty introduced by the finite angular resolution of the apparatus and the velocity spread in the parent beam is examined. The experimental requirements are evaluated for he photolysis of methyl iodide by the 2537 angstrom Hg line.

  3. New MBE (molecular beam epitaxy) buffer used to eliminate backgating in gaas mesfets

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, F.W.; Calawa, A.R.; Chen, C.L.; Manfra, M.J.; Mahoney, L.J.

    1988-02-01

    A new buffer layer has been developed that eliminates backgating between MESFET's fabricated in active layers grown upon it. The new buffer is grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) at low substrate temperatures (150-300 C) using Ga and As4 beam fluxes. It is highly resistive, optically inactive, and crystalline, and high-quality GaAs active layers can be grown on top of the new buffer. MESFET's fabricated in active layers grown on top of this new buffer show improved output resistance and breakdown voltages; the dc and Rf characteristics are otherwise comparable to MESFET's fabricated by alternative means and with other buffer layers.

  4. Electrical properties of nominally undoped silicon nanowires grown by molecular-beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Jan; Fleischer, Frank; Breitenstein, Otwin; Schubert, Luise; Werner, Peter; Gösele, Ulrich; Zacharias, Margit

    2007-01-01

    Single undoped Si nanowires were electrically characterized. The nanowires were grown by molecular-beam epitaxy on n+ silicon substrates and were contacted by platinum/iridium tips. I-V curves were measured and electron beam induced current investigations were performed on single nanowires. It was found that the nanowires have an apparent resistivity of 0.85Ωcm, which is much smaller than expected for undoped Si nanowires. The conductance is explained by hopping conductivity at the Si -SiO2 interface of the nanowire surface.

  5. LC-MS with electron ionization of cold molecules in supersonic molecular beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granot, Ori; Amirav, Aviv

    2005-06-01

    A new approach is described for the combination of electron ionization and LC-MS based on sample ionization as vibrationally cold molecules in a supersonic molecular beam (Cold EI). Cold EI of sample compounds in liquid solutions (methanol, acetonitrile, water, etc.) is achieved through spray formation, followed by soft thermal vaporization of the sample particles prior to their supersonic expansion and direct electron ionization of the sample compounds while they are contained in a supersonic molecular beam (SMB). Cold EI mass spectra were demonstrated to combine an enhanced molecular ion and improved mass spectral information (in comparison with standard EI), plus all the library searchable fragments. Cold EI enables the ionization of a broad range of compounds, including the full range of non-polar samples. Four orders of magnitude linear dynamic range is demonstrated and a detection limit of 2 pg was achieved for a 774 amu compound in single ion monitoring mode at m/z = 774. The method and apparatus are under continuous development and we feel that it can excel particularly in the analysis of unknown samples, while enabling fast LC-MS analysis through automated mass spectral deconvolution of coeluting LC peaks. In addition, the same MS system can also serve as an advanced GC-MS with supersonic molecular beams.

  6. Ablation article and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, W. D.; Sullivan, E. M. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An ablation article, such as a conical heat shield, having an ablating surface is provided with at least one discrete area of at least one seed material, such as aluminum. When subjected to ablation conditions, the seed material is ablated. Radiation emanating from the ablated seed material is detected to analyze ablation effects without disturbing the ablation surface. By providing different seed materials having different radiation characteristics, the ablating effects on various areas of the ablating surface can be analyzed under any prevailing ablation conditions. The ablating article can be provided with means for detecting the radiation characteristics of the ablated seed material to provide a self-contained analysis unit.

  7. Determination of molecular-ion structures through the use of accelerated beams

    SciTech Connect

    Gemmell, D.S.

    1987-01-01

    In this talk we report on recent research on molecular-ion structures using fast molecular-ion beams provided by Argonne's 5-MV Dynamitron accelerator. The method has become known as the ''Coulomb-explosion'' technique. When molecular-ion projectiles travelling at velocities of a few percent of the velocity of light strike a foil, the electrons that bind the molecular projectiles are almost always totally stripped off within the first few Angstroms of penetration into the solid target. This leaves a cluster of bare (or nearly bare) nuclei which separate rapidly as a result of their mutual Coulomb repulsion. This violent dissociation process in which the initial electrostatic potential energy is converted into kinetic energy of relative motion in the center-of-mass, has been termed a ''Coulomb explosion.'' 4 refs., 2 figs.

  8. Molecular beams entwined with quantum theory: A bouquet for Max Planck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herschbach, D.

    2001-01-01

    In an era when the fledgling quantum theory was uncertain and even gave contradictory answers, Otto Stern undertook to employ molecular beams to test directly fundamental aspects of the theory. During 1921-1935, this led to five decisive experiments reviewed here, resulting in the discovery or demonstration of space quantization, de Broglie matter waves, anomalous magnetic moments of the proton and neutron, recoil of an atom on emission of a photon, and the limitation of scattering cross-sections for molecular collisions imposed by the uncertainty principle.

  9. High temperature and high resolution uv photoelectron spectroscopy using supersonic molecular beams

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lai-Sheng; Reutt-Robey, J.E.; Niu, B.; Lee, Y.T.; Shirley, D.A.; Maryland Univ., College Park, MD . Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry; Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1989-07-01

    A high temperature molecular beam source with electron bombardment heating has been built for high resolution photoelectron spectroscopic studies of high temperature species and clusters. This source has the advantages of: producing an intense, continuous, seeded molecular beam, eliminating the interference of the heating mechanism from the photoelectron measurement. Coupling the source with our hemispherical electron energy analyzer, we can obtain very high resolution HeI{alpha} (584{angstrom}) photoelectron spectra of high temperature species. Vibrationally-resolved photoelectron spectra of PbSe, As{sub 2}, As{sub 4}, and ZnCl{sub 2} are shown to demonstrate the performance of the new source. 25 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Comb-assisted cavity ring-down spectroscopy of a buffer-gas-cooled molecular beam.

    PubMed

    Santamaria, Luigi; Sarno, Valentina Di; Natale, Paolo De; Rosa, Maurizio De; Inguscio, Massimo; Mosca, Simona; Ricciardi, Iolanda; Calonico, Davide; Levi, Filippo; Maddaloni, Pasquale

    2016-06-22

    We demonstrate continuous-wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy of a partially hydrodynamic molecular beam emerging from a buffer-gas-cooling source. Specifically, the (ν1 + ν3) vibrational overtone band of acetylene (C2H2) around 1.5 μm is accessed using a narrow-linewidth diode laser stabilized against a GPS-disciplined rubidium clock via an optical frequency comb synthesizer. As an example, the absolute frequency of the R(1) component is measured with a fractional accuracy of ∼1 × 10(-9). Our approach represents the first step towards the extension of more sophisticated cavity-enhanced interrogation schemes, including saturated absorption cavity ring-down or two-photon excitation, to buffer-gas-cooled molecular beams. PMID:27273337

  11. Genetic Ablation of Calcium-independent Phospholipase A2γ Leads to Alterations in Hippocampal Cardiolipin Content and Molecular Species Distribution, Mitochondrial Degeneration, Autophagy, and Cognitive Dysfunction*

    PubMed Central

    Mancuso, David J.; Kotzbauer, Paul; Wozniak, David F.; Sims, Harold F.; Jenkins, Christopher M.; Guan, Shaoping; Han, Xianlin; Yang, Kui; Sun, Gang; Malik, Ibrahim; Conyers, Sara; Green, Karen G.; Schmidt, Robert E.; Gross, Richard W.

    2009-01-01

    Genetic ablation of calcium-independent phospholipase A2γ (iPLA2γ) results in profound alterations in hippocampal phospholipid metabolism and mitochondrial phospholipid homeostasis resulting in enlarged and degenerating mitochondria leading to autophagy and cognitive dysfunction. Shotgun lipidomics demonstrated multiple alterations in hippocampal lipid metabolism in iPLA2γ−/− mice including: 1) a markedly elevated hippocampal cardiolipin content with an altered molecular species composition characterized by a shift to shorter chain length molecular species; 2) alterations in both choline and ethanolamine glycerophospholipids, including a decreased plasmenylethanolamine content; 3) increased oxidized phosphatidylethanolamine molecular species; and 4) an increased content of ceramides. Electron microscopic examination demonstrated the presence of enlarged heteromorphic lamellar structures undergoing degeneration accompanied by the presence of ubiquitin positive spheroid inclusion bodies. Purification of these enlarged heteromorphic lamellar structures by buoyant density centrifugation and subsequent SDS-PAGE and proteomics identified them as degenerating mitochondria. Collectively, these results identify the obligatory role of iPLA2γ in neuronal mitochondrial lipid metabolism and membrane structure demonstrating that iPLA2γ loss of function results in a mitochondrial neurodegenerative disorder characterized by degenerating mitochondria, autophagy, and cognitive dysfunction. PMID:19840936

  12. A new high intensity and short-pulse molecular beam valve.

    PubMed

    Yan, B; Claus, P F H; van Oorschot, B G M; Gerritsen, L; Eppink, A T J B; van de Meerakker, S Y T; Parker, D H

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, we report on the design and performance of a new home-built pulsed gas valve, which we refer to as the Nijmegen Pulsed Valve (NPV). The main output characteristics include a short pulse width (as short as 20 μs) combined with operating rates up to 30 Hz. The operation principle of the NPV is based on the Lorentz force created by a pulsed current passing through an aluminum strip located within a magnetic field, which opens the nozzle periodically. The amplitude of displacement of the opening mechanism is sufficient to allow the use of nozzles with up to 1.0 mm diameter. To investigate the performance of the valve, several characterizations were performed with different experimental methods. First, a fast ionization gauge was used to measure the beam intensity of the free jet emanating from the NPV. We compare free jets from the NPV with those from several other pulsed valves in current use in our laboratory. Results showed that a high intensity and short pulse-length beam could be generated by the new valve. Second, the NPV was tested in combination with a skimmer, where resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization combined with velocity map imaging was used to show that the NPV was able to produce a pulsed molecular beam with short pulse duration (~20 μs using 0.1% NO/He at 6 bars) and low rotational temperature (~1 K using 0.5% NO/Ar at 6 bars). Third, a novel two-point pump-probe method was employed which we label double delay scan. This method allows a full kinematic characterization of the molecular beam, including accurate speed ratios at different temporal positions. It was found that the speed ratio was maximum (S = 50 using 0.1% NO/He at 3 bars) at the peak position of the molecular beam and decreased when it was on the leading or falling edge. PMID:23464190

  13. PULSED LASER ABLATION OF CEMENT AND CONCRETE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laser ablation was investigated as a means of removing radioactive contaminants from the surface and near-surface regions of concrete from nuclear facilities. We present the results of ablation tests on cement and concrete samples using a pulsed Nd:YAG laser with fiber optic beam...

  14. Carrier dynamics in ZnxCd1-xO films grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, F. J.; Lee, Y. C.; Hu, S. Y.; Lin, Y. C.; Tiong, K. K.; Chou, W. C.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, the carrier dynamics in Zn1-xCdxO thin films with different Cd contents grown by molecular beam epitaxy system have been investigated using photoluminescence and time-resolved photoluminescence measurements. The carrier lifetime can be estimated from the PL decay curve fitted by triple exponential function. The emission energy dependence and temperature dependence of the PL decay time indicate that carrier localization dominate the luminescence mechanism of the ZnCdO alloy semiconductor.

  15. Mn2Au: body-centered-tetragonal bimetallic antiferromagnets grown by molecular beam epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Han-Chun; Liao, Zhi-Min; Sofin, R G Sumesh; Feng, Gen; Ma, Xiu-Mei; Shick, Alexander B; Mryasov, Oleg N; Shvets, Igor V

    2012-12-11

    Mn(2)Au, a layered bimetal, is successfully grown using molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The experiments and theoretical calculations presented suggest that Mn(2)Au film is antiferromagnetic with a very low critical temperature. The antiferromagnetic nature is demonstrated by measuring the exchange-bias effect of Mn(2)Au/Fe bilayers. This study establishes a primary basis for further research of this new antiferromagnet in spin-electronic device applications. PMID:22996352

  16. Gas source molecular beam epitaxy of GaN with hydrazine on spinel substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikishin, S. A.; Temkin, H.; Antipov, V. G.; Guriev, A. I.; Zubrilov, A. S.; Elyukhin, V. A.; Faleev, N. N.; Kyutt, R. N.; Chin, A. K.

    1998-05-01

    Growth of high quality wurtzite-structure GaN layers on (111) MgAl2O4 by gas source molecular beam epitaxy is described. Hydrazine was used as a source of active nitrogen. In situ reflection high energy electron diffraction was used to monitor the growth mode. Two-dimensional growth was obtained at temperatures above 750 °C on multi-step GaN buffer layers. The resulting GaN films show excellent luminescence properties.

  17. Molecular Beam Epitaxial Growth of GaAs on (631) Oriented Substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Cruz Hernandez, Esteban; Rojas Ramirez, Juan-Salvador; Contreras Hernandez, Rocio; Lopez Lopez, Maximo; Pulzara Mora, Alvaro; Mendez Garcia, Victor H.

    2007-02-09

    In this work, we report the study of the homoepitaxial growth of GaAs on (631) oriented substrates by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). We observed the spontaneous formation of a high density of large scale features on the surface. The hilly like features are elongated towards the [-5, 9, 3] direction. We show the dependence of these structures with the growth conditions and we present the possibility of to create quantum wires structures on this surface.

  18. (In,Mn)As quantum dots: Molecular-beam epitaxy and optical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Bouravleuv, A. D. Nevedomskii, V. N.; Ubyivovk, E. V.; Sapega, V. F.; Khrebtov, A. I.; Samsonenko, Yu. B.; Cirlin, G. E.; Ustinov, V. M.

    2013-08-15

    Self-assembled (In,Mn)As quantum dots are synthesized by molecular-beam epitaxy on GaAs (001) substrates. The experimental results obtained by transmission electron microscopy show that doping of the central part of the quantum dots with Mn does not bring about the formation of structural defects. The optical properties of the samples, including those in external magnetic fields, are studied.

  19. Antimony-assisted carbonization of Si(111) with solid source molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Hackley, Justin; Richardson, Christopher J. K.; Sarney, Wendy L.

    2013-11-15

    The carbonization of an antimony-terminated Si (111) surface in a solid source molecular beam epitaxy system is presented. Reflection high-energy electron diffraction, atomic force microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy are used to characterize samples grown with and without antimony termination. It is shown that the antimony-terminated surface promotes the formation of thin, smooth and continuous SiC films at a relatively low temperature of 800 °C.

  20. An effusive molecular beam technique for studies of polyatomic gas-surface reactivity and energy transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cushing, G. W.; Navin, J. K.; Valadez, L.; Johánek, V.; Harrison, I.

    2011-04-01

    An effusive molecular beam technique is described to measure alkane dissociative sticking coefficients, S(Tg, Ts; ϑ), on metal surfaces for which the impinging gas temperature, Tg, and surface temperature, Ts, can be independently varied, along with the angle of incidence, ϑ, of the impinging gas. Effusive beam experiments with Tg = Ts = T allow for determination of angle-resolved dissociative sticking coefficients, S(T; ϑ), which when averaged over the cos (ϑ)/π angular distribution appropriate to the impinging flux from a thermal ambient gas yield the thermal dissociative sticking coefficient, S(T). Nonequilibrium S(Tg, Ts; ϑ) measurements for which Tg ≠ Ts provide additional opportunities to characterize the transition state and gas-surface energy transfer at reactive energies. A resistively heated effusive molecular beam doser controls the Tg of the impinging gas striking the surface. The flux of molecules striking the surface from the effusive beam is determined from knowledge of the dosing geometry, chamber pressure, and pumping speed. Separate experiments with a calibrated leak serve to fix the chamber pumping speed. Postdosing Auger electron spectroscopy is used to measure the carbon of the alkyl radical reaction product that is deposited on the surface as a result of alkane dissociative sticking. As implemented in a typical ultrahigh vacuum chamber for surface analysis, the technique has provided access to a dynamic range of roughly 6 orders of magnitude in the initial dissociative sticking coefficient for small alkanes on Pt(111).

  1. Very slow expansion of an ultracold plasma formed in a seeded supersonic molecular beam of NO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, J. P.; Rennick, C. J.; Grant, E. R.

    2009-06-01

    The double-resonant laser excitation of nitric oxide, cooled to 1 K in a seeded supersonic molecular beam, yields a gas of ≈1012 molecules per cubic centimeter in a single selected Rydberg state. This population evolves to produce prompt free electrons, and a durable cold plasma of electrons and intact NO+ ions. This plasma travels with the molecular beam through a field-free region to encounter a grid. The atomic weight of the expansion gas controls the beam velocity and hence the flight time from the interaction region to the grid. Monitoring electron production as the plasma traverses this grid measures its longitudinal width as a function of flight time. Comparing these widths to the width of the laser beam that defines the initial size of the illuminated volume allows us to gauge the rate of expansion of the plasma. We find that the plasma created from the evolution of a Rydberg gas of NO expands at a small but measurable rate, and that this rate of expansion accords with the Vlasov equations for an initial electron temperature of Te≈7K .

  2. Controlled reshaping of the front surface of the cornea through its full-area ablation outside of the optical zone with a Gaussian ArF excimer laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semchishen, A. V.; Semchishen, V. A.

    2014-01-01

    We studied in vitro the response of the topography of the cornea to its full-area laser ablation (the laser beam spot diameter is commensurable with the size of the interface) outside of the central zone with an excimer laser having a Gaussian fluence distribution across the beam. Subject to investigation were the topographically controlled surface changes of the anterior cornea in 60 porcine eyes with a 5 ± 1.25-diopter artificially induced astigmatism, the changes being caused by laser ablation of the stromal collagen in two 3.5-mm-dia. circular areas along the weaker astigmatism axis. Experimental relationships are presented between the actual astigmatism correction and the expected correction for the intact optical zones 1, 2, 3, and 4 mm in diameter. The data for each zone were approximated by the least-squares method with the function d = a + bx. The coefficient b is given with the root-mean-square error. The statistical processing of the data yielded the following results: d = (0.14 ± 0.037)x for the 1-mm-dia. optical zone, (1.10 ± 0.036)x for the 2-mm-dia. optical zone, (1.04 ± 0.020)x for the 3-mm-dia. optical zone, and (0.55 ± 0.04)x for the 4-mm-dia. optical zone. Full astigmatism correction was achieved with ablation effected outside of the 3-mm-dia. optical zone. The surface changes of the cornea are shown to be due not only to the removal of the corneal tissue, but also to the biomechanical topographic response of the cornea to its strain caused by the formation of a dense pseudomembrane in the ablation area.

  3. Rubidium beam flux dependence of film properties of Ba1 - xRbxBiO3 deposited by molecular-beam epitaxy using distilled ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogihara, M.; Toda, F.; Makita, T.; Abe, H.

    1993-10-01

    We have focused our attention on the dependence of Ba1-xRbxBiO3 (BRBO) film composition ratio and film properties on rubidium-beam-flux intensity. BRBO films were deposited on MgO(100) substrates by molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE) using distilled ozone. Systematic measurements showed that the rubidium content was nearly independent of rubidium-beam-flux intensity in a wide beam-flux range. Therefore, it can be concluded that some degree of self-control of rubidium stoichiometry is actually possible in BRBO film growth by MBE. This study also revealed that the BRBO film properties had strong dependences on rubidium-beam-flux intensity even in the range for self-control of rubudium stoichiometry. Our study also clarified that rubidium-beam flux affects the barium content in the BRBO film.

  4. Electron ionization LC-MS with supersonic molecular beams--the new concept, benefits and applications.

    PubMed

    Seemann, Boaz; Alon, Tal; Tsizin, Svetlana; Fialkov, Alexander B; Amirav, Aviv

    2015-11-01

    A new type of electron ionization LC-MS with supersonic molecular beams (EI-LC-MS with SMB) is described. This system and its operational methods are based on pneumatic spray formation of the LC liquid flow in a heated spray vaporization chamber, full sample thermal vaporization and subsequent electron ionization of vibrationally cold molecules in supersonic molecular beams. The vaporized sample compounds are transferred into a supersonic nozzle via a flow restrictor capillary. Consequently, while the pneumatic spray is formed and vaporized at above atmospheric pressure the supersonic nozzle backing pressure is about 0.15 Bar for the formation of supersonic molecular beams with vibrationally cold sample molecules without cluster formation with the solvent vapor. The sample compounds are ionized in a fly-though EI ion source as vibrationally cold molecules in the SMB, resulting in 'Cold EI' (EI of vibrationally cold molecules) mass spectra that exhibit the standard EI fragments combined with enhanced molecular ions. We evaluated the EI-LC-MS with SMB system and demonstrated its effectiveness in NIST library sample identification which is complemented with the availability of enhanced molecular ions. The EI-LC-MS with SMB system is characterized by linear response of five orders of magnitude and uniform compound independent response including for non-polar compounds. This feature improves sample quantitation that can be approximated without compound specific calibration. Cold EI, like EI, is free from ion suppression and/or enhancement effects (that plague ESI and/or APCI) which facilitate faster LC separation because full separation is not essential. The absence of ion suppression effects enables the exploration of fast flow injection MS-MS as an alternative to lengthy LC-MS analysis. These features are demonstrated in a few examples, and the analysis of the main ingredients of Cannabis on a few Cannabis flower extracts is demonstrated. Finally, the advantages of

  5. Collapse of a composite beam made from ultra high molecular-weight polyethylene fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, G.; Thouless, M. D.; Deshpande, V. S.; Fleck, N. A.

    2014-02-01

    Hot-pressed laminates with a [0/90]48 lay-up, consisting of 83% by volume of ultra high molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) fibres, and 17% by volume of polyurethane (PU) matrix, were cut into cantilever beams and subjected to transverse end-loading. The collapse mechanisms were observed both visually and by X-ray scans. Short beams deform elastically and collapse plastically in longitudinal shear, with a shear strength comparable to that observed in double notch, interlaminar shear tests. In contrast, long cantilever beams deform in bending and collapse via a plastic hinge at the built-in end of the beam. The plastic hinge is formed by two wedge-shaped microbuckle zones that grow in size and in intensity with increasing hinge rotation. This new mode of microbuckling under macroscopic bending involves both elastic bending and shearing of the plies, and plastic shear of the interface between each ply. The double-wedge pattern contrasts with the more usual parallel-sided plastic microbuckle that occurs in uniaxial compression. Finite element simulations and analytical models give additional insight into the dominant material and geometric parameters that dictate the collapse response of the UHMWPE composite beam in bending. Detailed comparisons between the observed and predicted collapse responses are used in order to construct a constitutive model for laminated UHMWPE composites.

  6. Molecular beam epitaxy and properties of GaAsBi/GaAs quantum wells grown by molecular beam epitaxy: effect of thermal annealing.

    PubMed

    Makhloufi, Hajer; Boonpeng, Poonyasiri; Mazzucato, Simone; Nicolai, Julien; Arnoult, Alexandre; Hungria, Teresa; Lacoste, Guy; Gatel, Christophe; Ponchet, Anne; Carrère, Hélène; Marie, Xavier; Fontaine, Chantal

    2014-01-01

    We have grown GaAsBi quantum wells by molecular beam epitaxy. We have studied the properties of a 7% Bi GaAsBi quantum well and their variation with thermal annealing. High-resolution X-ray diffraction, secondary ion mass spectrometry, and transmission electron microscopy have been employed to get some insight into its structural properties. Stationary and time-resolved photoluminescence shows that the quantum well emission, peaking at 1.23 μm at room temperature, can be improved by a rapid annealing at 650°C, while the use of a higher annealing temperature leads to emission degradation and blue-shifting due to the activation of non-radiative centers and bismuth diffusion from the quantum well. PMID:24636335

  7. Molecular beam epitaxy and properties of GaAsBi/GaAs quantum wells grown by molecular beam epitaxy: effect of thermal annealing

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We have grown GaAsBi quantum wells by molecular beam epitaxy. We have studied the properties of a 7% Bi GaAsBi quantum well and their variation with thermal annealing. High-resolution X-ray diffraction, secondary ion mass spectrometry, and transmission electron microscopy have been employed to get some insight into its structural properties. Stationary and time-resolved photoluminescence shows that the quantum well emission, peaking at 1.23 μm at room temperature, can be improved by a rapid annealing at 650°C, while the use of a higher annealing temperature leads to emission degradation and blue-shifting due to the activation of non-radiative centers and bismuth diffusion from the quantum well. PMID:24636335

  8. Molecular characterization and developmental expression of vitellogenin in the oriental river prawn Macrobrachium nipponense and the effects of RNA interference and eyestalk ablation on ovarian maturation.

    PubMed

    Bai, Hongkun; Qiao, Hui; Li, Fajun; Fu, Hongtuo; Sun, Shengming; Zhang, Wenyi; Jin, Shubo; Gong, Yongsheng; Jiang, Sufei; Xiong, Yiwei

    2015-05-10

    Vitellogenin (Vg) is the precursor of yolk protein, which functions as a nutritive resource that is important for embryonic growth and gonad development. In this study, the cDNA encoding the Vg gene from the oriental river prawn Macrobrachium nipponense was cloned using expressed sequence tag (EST) analysis and the rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) approach. The transcript encoded 2536 amino acids with an estimated molecular mass of 286.810 kDa. Quantitative real-time PCR indicated high expression of Mn-Vg in the female ovary, hemocytes, and hepatopancreas. As ovaries developed, the expression level of Mn-Vg increased in both the hepatopancreas and ovary. In the hepatopancreas, the expression level rose more slowly at the early stage of vitellogenesis and reached the peak more rapidly compared to the expression pattern in ovary. The observed changes in Mn-Vg expression level at different development stages suggest the role of nutrient source in embryonic and larval development. Eyestalk ablation caused the Mn-Vg expression level to increase significantly compared to eyestalk-intact groups during the ovary development stages. Ablation accelerated ovary maturation by removing hormone inhibition of Mn-Vg in the hepatopancreas and ovary. In adult females, Mn-Vg dsRNA injection resulted in decreased expression of Mn-Vg in both the hepatopancreas and ovary, and two injection treatment dramatically delayed ovary maturation. Vg RNA interference down-regulated the vitellogenin receptor (VgR) expression level in the ovary, which illustrates the close relationship between Vg and VgR in the process of vitellogenesis. PMID:25499697

  9. Development of a molecular beam technique to study early solar system silicon reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dong, Q. W.; Thiemens, M. H.

    1993-01-01

    Silicon monoxide is one of the major gas phase silicon bearing components observed in astronomical environments. Silicon oxide serves as the major rock forming material for terrestrial and meteoritic bodies. It is known that several gas phase reactions produce mass independent isotopic fractionations which possess the same delta(O-17)/delta(O-18) ratio observed in Allende inclusions. The general symmetry dependence of the chemically produced mass independent isotopic fractionation process suggests that there are several plausible reactions which could occur in the early solar system which may lead to production of the observed meteoritic oxygen isotopic anomalies. An important component in exploring the role of such processes is the need to experimentally determine the isotopic fractionations for specific reactions of relevance to the early solar system. It has already been demonstrated that atomic oxygen reaction with CO, a major nebular oxygen bearing species, produces a large (approximately 90 percent), mass independent isotopic fractionation. The next hurdle regarding assessing the involvement of symmetry dependent isotopic fractionation processes in the pre-solar nebula is to determine isotopic fractionation factors associated with gas phase reactions of metallic oxides. In particular, a reaction such as O + SiO yields SiO2 is a plausible nebular reaction which could produce a delta(O-17) is approximately delta(O-18) fractionation based upon molecular symmetry considerations. While the isotopic fractionations during silicate evaporation and condensation have been determined, there are no isotopic studies of controlled, gas phase nucleation processes. In order to carefully control the reaction kinetics, a molecular beam apparatus has been constructed. This system produces a supersonic, collimated beam of SiO molecules which is reacted with a second beam of oxygen atoms. An important feature of molecular beams is that they operate at sufficiently low pressures

  10. Preparation and Characterization of CuInSe2 Thin Films by Molecular-Beam Deposition Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishitani, Mikihiko; Negami, Takayuki; Terauchi, Masaharu; Hirao, Takashi

    1992-02-01

    Polycrystalline CuInSe2 films were prepared by coevaporation of the elements under an ultrahigh vacuum by a molecular-beam deposition method. The composition of the film was controlled by changing the In molecular-beam flux intensity while the other elements remained at a constant value. It is shown, at the substrate temperature of 500°C, that there is a critical In molecular-beam flux intensity for the fabrication of stoichiometric films. At the In molecular-beam intensities higher than the critical value, single-phase CuInSe2 films with nearly constant compositions are obtained as a result of the removal effects of excess In. It is shown that the present coevaporation process is suitable for the fabrication of stoichiometric or slightly In-rich composition films. Furthermore, the structural and electrical properties of the films were investigated and discussed in relation to film composition.

  11. Ultrasonic characterization of laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J. A.; Telschow, K. L.

    When a pulsed laser beam strikes the surface of an absorbing material, ultrasonic waves are generated due to thermoelectric expansion and, at higher laser power densities, ablation of the material. These sound generation mechanisms have been the subject of numerous theoretical and experimental studies and are now fairly well understood. In particular, it has been established that at low power densities the thermoelastic mechanism is well described by a surface center of expansion. This mechanism produces a characteristic waveform whose amplitude is proportional to the energy absorbed from the laser pulse and also dependent on the thermal and elastic properties of the material. The ablation ultrasonic source can be described by a point normal force acting on the material surface. For laser power densities near the ablation onset, the time dependence of the source is that of the laser pulse. The resultant waveform recorded on epicenter (source and detector collinear) has a sharp peak determined by the momentum impulse delivered to the material by the ablation process. Particularly in the near ablation onset region, this ultrasonic displacement peak can be used to characterize the ablation process occurring at the material surface. The onset power density for ablation and subsequent ablation dependence on power density are material dependent and thought to be a function of the heat capacity and thermal conductivity of the material. With this in mind, it is possible that these ablation signals could be used to characterize material microstructures, and perhaps material mechanical properties such as hardness, through microstructural changes of the material thermal parameters. This paper explores this question for samples of Type 304 stainless steel with microstructures controlled through work hardening and annealing.

  12. Semiconductor-based heterostructure formation using low energy ion beams: Ion beam deposition (IBD) and combined ion and molecular beam deposition (CIMD)

    SciTech Connect

    Herbots, N.; Hellman, O.C.; Cullen, P.A.; Vancauwenberghe, O.

    1988-09-15

    In our previous work, we investigated the use of ion beam deposition (IBD) to grow epitaxial films at temperatures lower than those used in thermal processing (less than 500/sup 0/C). Presently, we have applied IBD to the growth of dense (6.4 x 10/sup 22/ atom/cm/sup 3/) silicon dioxide thin films at 400/sup 0/C. Through these experiments we have found several clues to the microscopic processes leading to the formation of thin film phases by low energy ions. Using Monte-Carlo simulations, we have found that low energy collision cascades in silicon have unique features such as a high probability of relocation events that refill vacancies as they are created. Our results show that the combination of a low defect density in low energy collision cascades with the high mobility of interstitials in covalent materials can be used to athermally generate atomic displacements tha can lead to ordering. These displacements can lead to epitaxial ordering at substrate temperatures below the minimum temperature necessary for molecular beam epitaxy (550/sup 0/C). It can also lead to the formation of high quality silicon dioxide at temperatures well below that of thermal oxidation in silicon (i.e. <850/sup 0/C). A growth model which we derive from these observations provides a fundamental understanding of how atomic collisions can be used to induce epitaxy or compound formation at low temperatures.

  13. Tunable diode lasers and their application in cold molecular beam spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpe, S.W.; Xu, S.; McDowell, R.; Blake, T.

    1996-12-31

    Supersonic molecular expansions provide a unique environment in which to acquire the infrared spectra of many molecular systems. Tunable diode lasers offer high spectral brightness, low noise, rapid tuning, and contiguous spectral coverage in the infrared, from 3,000 to 500 cm{sup {minus}1}. Molecular beams combined with tunable diode lasers represent a powerful tool for reducing or removing spectral congestion arising from both pressure broadening and rotational excitation. Depending on expansion conditions, rotational temperatures on the order of 10 K can be routinely obtained. With the appropriate pulsed slit nozzle (12 cm x 50 microns), Doppler broadening is reduced six-fold or more over that of room temperature, static cells. In addition, by employing modified White cell optics, effective optical path lengths of 3 meters can be realized. A description of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory`s beam-diode laser spectrometer will be given along with recent results for studies involving the fully rotationally resolved spectra of several molecules of atmospheric interest including chlorine nitrate and carbon tetrachloride.

  14. High throughput solar cell ablation system

    SciTech Connect

    Harley, Gabriel; Pass, Thomas; Cousins, Peter John; Viatella, John

    2014-10-14

    A solar cell is formed using a solar cell ablation system. The ablation system includes a single laser source and several laser scanners. The laser scanners include a master laser scanner, with the rest of the laser scanners being slaved to the master laser scanner. A laser beam from the laser source is split into several laser beams, with the laser beams being scanned onto corresponding wafers using the laser scanners in accordance with one or more patterns. The laser beams may be scanned on the wafers using the same or different power levels of the laser source.

  15. High throughput solar cell ablation system

    SciTech Connect

    Harley, Gabriel; Pass, Thomas; Cousins, Peter John; Viatella, John

    2012-09-11

    A solar cell is formed using a solar cell ablation system. The ablation system includes a single laser source and several laser scanners. The laser scanners include a master laser scanner, with the rest of the laser scanners being slaved to the master laser scanner. A laser beam from the laser source is split into several laser beams, with the laser beams being scanned onto corresponding wafers using the laser scanners in accordance with one or more patterns. The laser beams may be scanned on the wafers using the same or different power levels of the laser source.

  16. Energy spreading and angular distribution of a beam of electrons in molecular hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, M. G.; Green, A. E. S.

    1975-01-01

    A Monte Carlo approach is used to obtain the energy spreading and angular distribution of initially monoenergetic and monodirectional beams of electron incident on a gas of molecular hydrogen. Several beams of primary electrons and the resultant secondaries are degraded in a step-by-step procedure which utilizes a detailed set of cross sections, together with reasonable approximations for the creation of secondary electrons. Particular attention is paid to the initial angular distribution of secondary electrons. An analytic function which characterizes current experimental differential cross-section data is used to provide realistic inputs into our calculations. The results for energy distribution as a function of distance and angular distribution at selected energies and distances are illustrated.

  17. Residual stress in AlN films grown on sapphire substrates by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, Xin; Wang, Xinqiang; Chen, Guang; Pan, Jianhai; Wang, Ping; Liu, Huapeng; Xu, Fujun; Tan, Pingheng; Shen, Bo

    2016-05-01

    Residual stress in AlN films grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) has been studied by Raman scattering spectroscopy. A strain-free Raman frequency and a biaxial stress coefficient for E2(high) mode are experimentally determined to be 657.8 ± 0.3 cm-1 and 2.4 ± 0.2 cm-1 / GPa, respectively. By using these parameters, the residual stress of a series of AlN layers grown under different buffer layer conditions has been investigated. The residual compressive stress is found to be obviously decreased by increasing the Al/N beam flux ratio of the buffer layer, indicating the generation of tensile stress due to stronger coalescence of AlN grains, as also confirmed by the in-situ reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) monitoring observation. The stronger coalescence does lead to improved quality of AlN films as expected.

  18. Bone and Soft Tissue Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Ryan C.B.; Stavas, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    Bone and soft tissue tumor ablation has reached widespread acceptance in the locoregional treatment of various benign and malignant musculoskeletal (MSK) lesions. Many principles of ablation learned elsewhere in the body are easily adapted to the MSK system, particularly the various technical aspects of probe/antenna design, tumoricidal effects, selection of image guidance, and methods to reduce complications. Despite the common use of thermal and chemical ablation procedures in bone and soft tissues, there are few large clinical series that show longitudinal benefit and cost-effectiveness compared with conventional methods, namely, surgery, external beam radiation, and chemotherapy. Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation of osteoid osteomas has been evaluated the most and is considered a first-line treatment choice for many lesions. Palliation of painful metastatic bone disease with thermal ablation is considered safe and has been shown to reduce pain and analgesic use while improving quality of life for cancer patients. Procedure-related complications are rare and are typically easily managed. Similar to all interventional procedures, bone and soft tissue lesions require an integrated approach to disease management to determine the optimum type of and timing for ablation techniques within the context of the patient care plan. PMID:25053865

  19. Bone and soft tissue ablation.

    PubMed

    Foster, Ryan C B; Stavas, Joseph M

    2014-06-01

    Bone and soft tissue tumor ablation has reached widespread acceptance in the locoregional treatment of various benign and malignant musculoskeletal (MSK) lesions. Many principles of ablation learned elsewhere in the body are easily adapted to the MSK system, particularly the various technical aspects of probe/antenna design, tumoricidal effects, selection of image guidance, and methods to reduce complications. Despite the common use of thermal and chemical ablation procedures in bone and soft tissues, there are few large clinical series that show longitudinal benefit and cost-effectiveness compared with conventional methods, namely, surgery, external beam radiation, and chemotherapy. Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation of osteoid osteomas has been evaluated the most and is considered a first-line treatment choice for many lesions. Palliation of painful metastatic bone disease with thermal ablation is considered safe and has been shown to reduce pain and analgesic use while improving quality of life for cancer patients. Procedure-related complications are rare and are typically easily managed. Similar to all interventional procedures, bone and soft tissue lesions require an integrated approach to disease management to determine the optimum type of and timing for ablation techniques within the context of the patient care plan. PMID:25053865

  20. Molecular beam mass spectrometry with tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Golan, Amir; Ahmed, Musahid

    2012-01-01

    Tunable soft ionization coupled to mass spectroscopy is a powerful method to investigate isolated molecules, complexes and clusters and their spectroscopy and dynamics.[1-4] Fundamental studies of photoionization processes of biomolecules provide information about electronic structure of these systems. Furthermore determinations of ionization energies and other properties of biomolecules in the gas phase are not trivial, and these experiments provide a platform to generate these data. We have developed a thermal vaporization technique coupled with supersonic molecular beams that provides a gentle way to transport these species into the gas phase. Judicious combination of source gas and temperature allows for formation of dimers and higher clusters of the DNA bases. The focus of this particular work is on the effects of non-covalent interactions, i.e., hydrogen bonding, stacking, and electrostatic interactions, on the ionization energies and proton transfer of individual biomolecules, their complexes and upon micro-hydration by water.[1, 5-9] We have performed experimental and theoretical characterization of the photoionization dynamics of gas-phase uracil and 1,3-methyluracil dimers using molecular beams coupled with synchrotron radiation at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline[10] located at the Advanced Light Source and the experimental details are visualized here. This allowed us to observe the proton transfer in 1,3-dimethyluracil dimers, a system with pi stacking geometry and with no hydrogen bonds[1]. Molecular beams provide a very convenient and efficient way to isolate the sample of interest from environmental perturbations which in return allows accurate comparison with electronic structure calculations[11, 12]. By tuning the photon energy from the synchrotron, a photoionization efficiency (PIE) curve can be plotted which informs us about the cationic electronic states. These values can then be compared to theoretical models and calculations and in turn, explain

  1. Molecular beams studies of the energetics and dynamics of elementary chemical reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Hayden, C.C.

    1982-05-01

    Quantum mechanical effects on the angular distribution of HF products from the F + H/sub 2/ reaction were studied using crossed atomic and molecular beams with a rotatable mass spectrometer detector and time-of-flight velocity analysis. Measurement of the singlet-triplet splitting of CH/sub 2/ from the recoil velocities of fragments from ketene photodissociation in a molecular beam is also reported. Partial center-of-mass angular distributions, and velocity flux contour maps have been derived for individual vibrational states of the HF product from the F + H/sub 2/ reaction at collision energies of 2 and 3 kcal/mole. The center-of-mass distributions were obtained by analysis of laboratory angular and time-of-flight measurements of the reactive scattering. The results are consistent with recent three dimensional quantum mechanical scattering calculations, which predict that resonance effects should appear in the product angular distributions in this energy range. The photofragmentation of ketene in a molecular beam was used to measure the singlet-triplet splitting in CH/sub 2/. A rare gas halide excimer laser operating at 351 nm (XeF) and 308 nm (XeCl) dissociated the ketene. Time-of-flight measurements of the fragment velocities allowed determination of the energetics of the dissociation. The /sup 1/A/sub 1/ - /sup 3/B/sub 1/ splitting in CH/sub 2/ was found to be 8.5 +- 0.8 kcal/mole. This agrees with many experimental results, but not with the value of 19.5 kcal/mole derived from recent photodetachment experiments on CH/sub 2//sup -/.

  2. Reaction Mechanism of Oxygen Atoms with Unsaturated Hydrocarbons by the Crossed-Molecular-Beams Method

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Buss, R. J.; Baseman, R. J.; Guozhong, H.; Lee, Y. T.

    1982-04-01

    From a series of studies of the reaction of oxygen atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons using the crossed molecular beam method, the dominant reaction mechanisms were found to be the simple substitution reactions with oxygen atoms replacing H, Cl, Br atom or alkyl groups. Complication due to secondary reaction was avoided by carrying out experiments under single collisions and observing primary products directly. Primary products were identified by measuring the angular and velocity distributions of products at all the mass numbers which could be detected by the mass spectrometer, and from comparison of these distributions, applying the requirement of energy and momentum conservation.

  3. Note: A versatile mass spectrometer chamber for molecular beam and temperature programmed desorption experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonks, James P.; Galloway, Ewan C.; King, Martin O.; Kerherve, Gwilherm; Watts, John F.

    2016-08-01

    A dual purpose mass spectrometer chamber capable of performing molecular beam scattering (MBS) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) is detailed. Two simple features of this design allow it to perform these techniques. First, the diameter of entrance aperture to the mass spectrometer can be varied to maximize signal for TPD or to maximize angular resolution for MBS. Second, the mass spectrometer chamber can be radially translated so that it can be positioned close to the sample to maximize signal or far from the sample to maximize angular resolution. The performance of this system is described and compares well with systems designed for only one of these techniques.

  4. Ion-beam assisted deposition of thin molybdenum films studied by molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robbemond, Arie; Thijsse, Barend J.

    1997-05-01

    We report results obtained by molecular dynamics simulation of low energy argon-ion assisted growth of thin molybdenum films (≈ 20 Å). The effects of a single ion impact are discussed, but more particularly we consider film growth from a manufacturing viewpoint and examine the properties of the completed films. Results for ion-beam assisted deposition are compared with those for unassisted growth (i.e. physical vapor deposition). Surface orientation, atomic displacements, surface roughness, sputtering, point defects, and the influence of off-normal atom incidence are discussed.

  5. Importance of dewetting in organic molecular-beam deposition: Pentacene on gold

    SciTech Connect

    Beernink, G.; Strunskus, T.; Witte, G.; Woell, Ch.

    2004-07-19

    Organic molecular-beam deposition of pentacene on gold substrates has been investigated using a multitechnique approach. The morphology of the organic thin films depends strongly on the substrate temperature. Pronounced dewetting and island formation are observed at room temperature. Whereas pentacene molecules adopt a planar monolayer structure, they continue to grow in an upright orientation in multilayer films as inferred from x-ray absorption spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. These results are in pronounced contrast to a recent scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) study by Kang and Zhu [Appl. Phys. Lett. 82, 3248 (2003)] and indicate fundamental problems in the interpretation of STM measurements for organic thin films.

  6. Characterization of GaN microstructures grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, Ikai; Pang, Wen-Yuan; Hsu, Yu-Chi; Hsieh, Chia-Ho; Shih, Cheng-Hung; Chou, Mitch M. C.; Chen, Wen-Yen; Hsu, Tzu-Min; Hsu, Gary Z. L.

    2013-06-15

    The characterization of GaN microstructures grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy on LiAlO{sub 2} substrate was studied by cathodoluminescence and photoluminescence measurements. We demonstrated that the cathodoluminescence from oblique semi-polar surfaces of mushroom-shaped GaN was much brighter than that from top polar surface due to the reduction of polarization field on the oblique semi-polar surfaces. It implies that the oblique semi-polar surface is superior for the light-emitting surface of wurtzite nano-devices.

  7. Analysis of atomic force microscopic results of InAs islands formed by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Q.; Liang, J. B.; Xu, B.; Ding, D.; Li, H. X.; Jiang, C.; Zhou, W.; Liu, F. Q.; Wang, Z. G.; Qiu, X. H.; Shang, G. Y.; Bai, C. L.

    1998-09-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements of nanometer-sized islands formed by 2 monolayers of InAs by molecular beam epitaxy have been carried out and the scan line of individual islands was extracted from raw AFM data for investigation. It is found that the base widths of nanometer-sized islands obtained by AFM are not reliable due to the finite size and shape of the contacting probe. A simple model is proposed to analyze the deviation of the measured value from the real value of the base width of InAs islands.

  8. Luminescence characterization of CdTe:In grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassani, F.; Tatarenko, S.; Saminadayar, K.; Bleuse, J.; Magnea, N.; Pautrat, J. L.

    1991-06-01

    We report on the incorporation of indium as a shallow donor in CdTe by molecular beam epitaxy. Using proper surface stoichiometry conditions, we demonstrate that it is possible to incorporate and activate up to 1018 cm-3 indium impurities. The doped layers have been characterized by secondary-ion mass spectroscopy, capacitance-voltage and Hall-effect measurements. Photoluminescence (PL) and resonant excitation of the PL clearly identify indium as the chemical dopant, acting as an effective mass donor with an energy of 14 meV. Incorrect stoichiometry conditions lead to a poor dopant activity and to complex centers formation.

  9. Growth of GaN with warm ammonia by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaharazuka, A.; Yoshizaki, T.; Ploog, K. H.; Horikoshi, Y.

    2009-03-01

    We demonstrate the growth of GaN by molecular beam epitaxy with warm ammonia as a nitrogen source. Ammonia gas is heated by the tungsten filament located at the open end of the gas-tube installed in the growth chamber. By using this simple structure, the multiple collisions of molecules within the heater, thus the generation of nitrogen molecule, can be suppressed. The crystalline quality of the grown GaN layer is significantly improved by introducing the warm ammonia. This effect can be explained by the enhancement of the two-dimensional growth due to the active nitrogen species such as radical NH2* generated by cracking ammonia molecule.

  10. Metastable GaAsBi Alloy Grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimoto, Masahiro; Murata, Satoshi; Chayahara, Akiyoshi; Horino, Yuji; Saraie, Junji; Oe, Kunishige

    2003-10-01

    GaAs1-xBix has been grown at a substrate temperature (Tsub) between 350 and 410°C by molecular beam epitaxy. The relationship between GaBi molar fraction (x) evaluated by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and the lattice constant showed good linearity. To achieve Bi incorporation into the epilayer, As flux was adjusted in a limited range on the brink of As shortage on the growing surface. The Bi incorporation was saturated at a large Bi flux, probably due to a low miscibility of Bi with GaAs. The value of x increased up to 4.5% with decreasing Tsub to 350°C.

  11. Molecular beam epitaxy of GaBiAs on (311)B GaAs substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Henini, M.; Ibanez, J.; Schmidbauer, M.; Shafi, M.; Novikov, S. V.; Turyanska, L.; Molina, S. I.; Sales, D. L.; Chisholm, M. F.; Misiewicz, J.

    2007-12-17

    We report the growth by molecular beam epitaxy of GaBi{sub x}As{sub 1-x} epilayers on (311)B GaAs substrates. We use high-resolution x-ray diffraction (HRXRD), transmission electron microscopy, and Z-contrast imaging to characterize the structural properties of the as-grown material. We find that the incorporation of Bi into the GaBiAs alloy, as determined by HRXRD, is sizably larger in the (311)B epilayers than in (001) epilayers, giving rise to reduced band-gap energies as obtained by optical transmission spectroscopy.

  12. Molecular beam epitaxy of GaBiAs on (311)B GaAs substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henini, M.; Ibáñez, J.; Schmidbauer, M.; Shafi, M.; Novikov, S. V.; Turyanska, L.; Molina, S. I.; Sales, D. L.; Chisholm, M. F.; Misiewicz, J.

    2007-12-01

    We report the growth by molecular beam epitaxy of GaBixAs1-x epilayers on (311)B GaAs substrates. We use high-resolution x-ray diffraction (HRXRD), transmission electron microscopy, and Z-contrast imaging to characterize the structural properties of the as-grown material. We find that the incorporation of Bi into the GaBiAs alloy, as determined by HRXRD, is sizably larger in the (311)B epilayers than in (001) epilayers, giving rise to reduced band-gap energies as obtained by optical transmission spectroscopy.

  13. Ultrasensitive detection of atmospheric constituents by supersonic molecular beam, multiphoton ionization, mass spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Syage, J A; Pollard, J E; Cohen, R B

    1987-09-01

    An ultrasensitive detection method for atmospheric monitoring has been developed based on the technique of supersonic molecular beam, resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization, and time-of-flight mass spectroscopy (MB/REMPI/TOFMS). Several organophosphonate and organosulfide compounds, representing simulants to a class of toxic compounds, were studied. Detection levels as low as 300 ppt (dimethyl sulfide) were obtained. Single-vibronic-level REMPI of the cooled molecules in conjunction with TOFMS provided selectivity of ~10(4) against chemically similar compounds in humid air expansions. The fragment ions formed by REMPI excitation are shown for diisopropyl methylphosphonate to depend strongly on the resonant intermediate state of the neutral molecule. PMID:20490096

  14. Lutetium-doped EuO films grown by molecular-beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Melville, A.; Heeg, T.; Mairoser, T.; Schmehl, A.; Shai, D. E.; Monkman, E. J.; Harter, J. W.; Hollaender, B.; Schubert, J.; Shen, K. M.; Mannhart, J.; Schlom, D. G.

    2012-05-28

    The effect of lutetium doping on the structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of epitaxial EuO thin films grown by reactive molecular-beam epitaxy is experimentally investigated. The behavior of Lu-doped EuO is contrasted with doping by lanthanum and gadolinium. All three dopants are found to behave similarly despite differences in electronic configuration and ionic size. Andreev reflection measurements on Lu-doped EuO reveal a spin-polarization of 96% in the conduction band, despite non-magnetic carriers introduced by 5% lutetium doping.

  15. Growth of atomically smooth MgO films on graphene by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W. H.; Han, W.; Pi, K.; McCreary, K. M.; Miao, F.; Bao, W.; Lau, C. N.; Kawakami, R. K.

    2008-11-03

    We investigate the growth of MgO films on graphene by molecular beam epitaxy and find that surface diffusion promotes a rough morphology. To reduce the mobility of surface atoms, the graphene surface is dressed by Ti atoms prior to MgO deposition. With as little as 0.5 ML (monolayer) of Ti, the MgO overlayer becomes atomically smooth. Furthermore, no aggregation of MgO is observed at the edges of the graphene sheet. These results are important for the fabrication of nanoscale electronic and spintronic devices.

  16. Low defect densities in molecular beam epitaxial GaAs achieved by isoelectronic In doping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharya, P. K.; Dhar, S.; Berger, P.; Juang, F.-Y.

    1986-01-01

    A study has been made of the effects of adding small amounts of In (0.2-1.2 pct) to GaAs grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The density of four electron traps decreases in concentration by an order of magnitude, and the peak intensities of prominent emissions in the excitonic spectra are reduced with increase in In content. Based on the higher surface migration rate of In, compared to Ga, at the growth temperatures it is apparent that the traps and the excitonic transitions are related to point defects. This agrees with earlier observations by Briones and Collins (1982) and Skromme et al. (1985).

  17. A laser and molecular beam mass spectrometer study of low-pressure dimethyl ether flames

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew McIlroy; Toby D. Hain; Hope A. Michelsen; Terrill A. Cool

    2000-12-15

    The oxidation of dimethyl ether (DME) is studied in low-pressure flames using new molecular beam mass spectrometer and laser diagnostics. Two 30.0-Torr, premixed DME/oxygen/argon flames are investigated with stoichiometries of 0.98 and 1.20. The height above burner profiles of nine stable species and two radicals are measured. These results are compared to the detailed chemical reaction mechanism of Curran and coworkers. Generally good agreement is found between the model and data. The largest discrepancies are found for the methyl radical profiles where the model predicts qualitatively different trends in the methyl concentration with stoichiometry than observed in the experiment.

  18. Note: A versatile mass spectrometer chamber for molecular beam and temperature programmed desorption experiments.

    PubMed

    Tonks, James P; Galloway, Ewan C; King, Martin O; Kerherve, Gwilherm; Watts, John F

    2016-08-01

    A dual purpose mass spectrometer chamber capable of performing molecular beam scattering (MBS) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) is detailed. Two simple features of this design allow it to perform these techniques. First, the diameter of entrance aperture to the mass spectrometer can be varied to maximize signal for TPD or to maximize angular resolution for MBS. Second, the mass spectrometer chamber can be radially translated so that it can be positioned close to the sample to maximize signal or far from the sample to maximize angular resolution. The performance of this system is described and compares well with systems designed for only one of these techniques. PMID:27587173

  19. Silicon sheet with molecular beam epitaxy for high efficiency solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, F. G.

    1983-01-01

    The capabilities of the new technique of Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) are applied to the growth of high efficiency silicon solar cells. Because MBE can provide well controlled doping profiles of any desired arbitrary design, including doping profiles of such complexity as built-in surface fields or tandem junction cells, it would appear to be the ideal method for development of high efficiency solar cells. It was proposed that UCLA grow and characterize silicon films and p-n junctions of MBE to determine whether the high crystal quality needed for solar cells could be achieved.

  20. Molecular-beam epitaxy of (Zn,Mn)Se on Si(100)

    SciTech Connect

    Slobodskyy, T.; Ruester, C.; Fiederling, R.; Keller, D.; Gould, C.; Ossau, W.; Schmidt, G.; Molenkamp, L.W.

    2004-12-20

    We have investigated the growth by molecular-beam epitaxy of the II-VI diluted magnetic semiconductor (Zn,Mn)Se on As-passivated Si(100) substrates. The growth start has been optimized by using low-temperature epitaxy. Surface properties were assessed by Nomarski and scanning electron microscopy. Optical properties of (Zn,Mn)Se have been studied by photoluminescence and a giant Zeeman splitting of up to 30 meV has been observed. Our observations indicate a high crystalline quality of the epitaxial films.

  1. Perspective: Extremely fine tuning of doping enabled by combinatorial molecular-beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.; Božović, I.

    2015-06-01

    Chemical doping provides an effective method to control the electric properties of complex oxides. However, the state-of-art accuracy in controlling doping is limited to about 1%. This hampers elucidation of the precise doping dependences of physical properties and phenomena of interest, such as quantum phase transitions. Using the combinatorial molecular beam epitaxy, we improve the accuracy in tuning the doping level by two orders of magnitude. We illustrate this novel method by two examples: a systematic investigation of the doping dependence of interface superconductivity, and a study of the competing ground states in the vicinity of the insulator-to-superconductor transition.

  2. Demonstration of molecular beam epitaxy and a semiconducting band structure for I-Mn-V compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Jungwirth, T.; Novak, V.; Cukr, M.; Zemek, J.; Marti, X.; Horodyska, P.; Nemec, P.; Holy, V.; Maca, F.; Shick, A. B.; Masek, J.; Kuzel, P.; Nemec, I.; Gallagher, B. L.; Campion, R. P.; Foxon, C. T.; Wunderlich, J.

    2011-01-15

    Our ab initio theory calculations predict a semiconducting band structure of I-Mn-V compounds. We demonstrate on LiMnAs that high-quality materials with group-I alkali metals in the crystal structure can be grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Optical measurements on the LiMnAs epilayers are consistent with the theoretical electronic structure. Our calculations also reproduce earlier reports of high antiferromagnetic ordering temperature and predict large, spin-orbit-coupling-induced magnetic anisotropy effects. We propose a strategy for employing antiferromagnetic semiconductors in high-temperature semiconductor spintronics.

  3. Gallium Arsenide Layers Grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy on Single Crystalline Germanium Islands on Insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takai, Mikio; Tanigawa, Takaho; Minamisono, Tadanori; Gamo, Kenji; Namba, Susumu

    1984-05-01

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs) layers have successfully been grown by molecular beam epitaxy on single crystalline germanium (Ge) islands, recrystallized by zone melting with SiO2 capping layers, on thermally-oxidized Si-wafers. The GaAs layers, grown on the single crystalline Ge islands, show smooth surfaces without any grain-boundaries, while those, grown on the Ge islands with grain-boundaries and on the SiO2, have grain-boundaries. The GaAs layers on the single crystalline Ge islands emit photoluminescence, the intensity of which is almost comparable to that of GaAs layers on bulk Ge crystals.

  4. Site-controlled Ag nanocrystals grown by molecular beam epitaxy-Towards plasmonic integration technology

    SciTech Connect

    Urbanczyk, Adam; Noetzel, Richard

    2012-12-15

    We demonstrate site-controlled growth of epitaxial Ag nanocrystals on patterned GaAs substrates by molecular beam epitaxy with high degree of long-range uniformity. The alignment is based on lithographically defined holes in which position controlled InAs quantum dots are grown. The Ag nanocrystals self-align preferentially on top of the InAs quantum dots. No such ordering is observed in the absence of InAs quantum dots, proving that the ordering is strain-driven. The presented technique facilitates the placement of active plasmonic nanostructures at arbitrarily defined positions enabling their integration into complex devices and plasmonic circuits.

  5. Pulsed Molecular Beams For Growth Of InAs On GaAs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grunthaner, Frank J.

    1989-01-01

    Pauses for annealing reduce number of defects. Deposition process that includes pulsed molecular beams produces high-quality epitaxial layers of indium arsenide on gallium arsenide substrates. Layers made as much as 30 atoms thick without introducing excessive numbers of dislocations, despite 7.4-percent mismatch between InAs and GaAs crystal lattices. Layers offer superior electrical properties in such devices as optically addressed light modulators, infrared sensors, semiconductor lasers, and high-electron-mobility transistors. Technique applicable to other epitaxial systems in which lattices highly mismatched.

  6. Quality of epitaxial InAs nanowires controlled by catalyst size in molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zhi; Xu, Hong-Yi; Guo, Ya-Nan; Liao, Zhi-Ming; Lu, Zhen-Yu; Chen, Ping-Ping; Shi, Sui-Xing; Lu, Wei; Zou, Jin

    2013-08-12

    In this study, the structural quality of Au-catalyzed InAs nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy is investigated. Through detailed electron microscopy characterizations and analysis of binary Au-In phase diagram, it is found that defect-free InAs nanowires can be induced by smaller catalysts with a high In concentration, while comparatively larger catalysts containing less In induce defected InAs nanowires. This study indicates that the structural quality of InAs nanowires can be controlled by the size of Au catalysts when other growth conditions remain as constants.

  7. Molecular-beam epitaxy of monolayer MoSe2: growth characteristics and domain boundary formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, L.; Liu, H. J.; Chen, J. L.; Yi, Y.; Chen, W. G.; Cai, Y.; Wang, J. N.; Dai, X. Q.; Wang, N.; Ho, W. K.; Xie, M. H.

    2015-05-01

    Monolayer (ML) transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are of great research interest due to their potential use in ultrathin electronic and optoelectronic applications. They show promise in new concept devices in spintronics and valleytronics. Here we present a growth study by molecular-beam epitaxy of ML and sub-ML MoSe2, an important member of TMDs, revealing its unique growth characteristics as well as the formation processes of domain boundary (DB) defects. A dramatic effect of growth temperature and post-growth annealing on DB formation is uncovered.

  8. Application of ellipsometry to crystal growth by organometallic molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aspnes, D. E.; Quinn, W. E.; Gregory, S.

    1990-06-01

    We report the first use of ellipsometry as a real-time monitor of III-V semiconductor crystal growth by molecular beam epitaxy, specifically growth of GaAs and AlGaAs from arsine, triethylgallium, and triethylaluminum sources. Our results provide new insight into the oxide desorption process and show a sensitivity of ±0.03 in compositions x>0.2 for 10 Å thickness increments of AlxGa1-xAs during initial deposition on GaAs.

  9. The growth of high-quality AlGaAs by metalorganic molecular-beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hersee, S. D.; Martin, P. A.; Chin, A.; Ballingall, J. M.

    1991-07-01

    The electrical and optical properties of AlGaAs grown by metalorganic molecular-beam epitaxy using triethylaluminum, tri-isobutylaluminum, and trimethylamine-alane are compared. It is found that tri-isobutylaluminum yields the lowest residual carbon incorporation in the layers (Na - Nd = 4 × 1015 cm-3) and the highest electron and hole mobilities. Photoluminescence spectra for the higher-quality AlGaAs, grown using TiBAl, show excitonic luminescence. However, this luminescence appears to be defect related.

  10. Near-bandgap optical properties of pseudomorphic GeSn alloys grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Costa, Vijay Richard; Wang, Wei; Yeo, Yee-Chia

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the compositional dependence of the near-bandgap dielectric function and the E0 critical point in pseudomorphic Ge1-xSnx alloys grown on Ge (100) substrate by molecular beam epitaxy. The complex dielectric functions were obtained using spectroscopic ellipsometry from 0.5 to 4.5 eV at room temperature. Analogous to the E1 and E1+Δ1 transitions, a model consisting of the compositional dependence of relaxed alloys along with the strain contribution predicted by the deformation potential theory fully accounts for the observed compositional dependence in pseudomorphic alloys.

  11. Bismuth nano-droplets for group-V based molecular-beam droplet epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C.; Zeng, Z. Q.; Fan, D. S.; Hirono, Y.; Wu, J.; Morgan, T. A.; Hu, X.; Yu, S. Q.; Wang, Zh. M.; Salamo, G. J.

    2011-12-01

    Self-assembly of bismuth droplets at nanoscale on GaAs(100) surface using molecular beam epitaxy was demonstrated. Fine control of density and size was achieved by varying growth temperature and total bismuth deposition. Droplet density was tuned by roughly 3 orders of magnitude, and the density-temperature dependence was found to be consistent with classical nucleation theory. These results may extend the flexibility of droplet epitaxy by serving as templates for group V based droplet epitaxy, which is in contrast to conventional group III based droplet epitaxy and may encourage nanostructure formation of bismuth-containing materials.

  12. Quality of epitaxial InAs nanowires controlled by catalyst size in molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhi; Lu, Zhen-Yu; Chen, Ping-Ping; Xu, Hong-Yi; Guo, Ya-Nan; Liao, Zhi-Ming; Shi, Sui-Xing; Lu, Wei; Zou, Jin

    2013-08-01

    In this study, the structural quality of Au-catalyzed InAs nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy is investigated. Through detailed electron microscopy characterizations and analysis of binary Au-In phase diagram, it is found that defect-free InAs nanowires can be induced by smaller catalysts with a high In concentration, while comparatively larger catalysts containing less In induce defected InAs nanowires. This study indicates that the structural quality of InAs nanowires can be controlled by the size of Au catalysts when other growth conditions remain as constants.

  13. Three-dimensional ordering of cold ion beams in a storage ring: A molecular-dynamics simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Yuri, Yosuke

    2015-06-29

    Three-dimensional (3D) ordering of a charged-particle beams circulating in a storage ring is systematically studied with a molecular-dynamics simulation code. An ion beam can exhibit a 3D ordered configuration at ultralow temperature as a result of powerful 3D laser cooling. Various unique characteristics of the ordered beams, different from those of crystalline beams, are revealed in detail, such as the single-particle motion in the transverse and longitudinal directions, and the dependence of the tune depression and the Coulomb coupling constant on the operating points.

  14. Measuring the Density of a Molecular Cluster Injector via Visible Emission from an Electron Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Lundberg, D. P.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R. M.; Stotler, D. P.

    2010-06-28

    A method to measure the density distribution of a dense hydrogen gas jet is pre- sented. A Mach 5.5 nozzle is cooled to 80K to form a flow capable of molecular cluster formation. A 250V, 10mA electron beam collides with the jet and produces Hα emission that is viewed by a fast camera. The high density of the jet, several 1016cm-3, results in substantial electron depletion, which attenuates the Hα emission. The attenuated emission measurement, combined with a simplified electron-molecule collision model, allows us to determine the molecular density profile via a simple iterative calculation.

  15. Laser ablation of human tooth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franklin, Sushmita R.; Chauhan, P.; Mitra, A.; Thareja, R. K.

    2005-05-01

    We report the measurements of ablation threshold of human tooth in air using photo-thermal deflection technique. A third harmonic (355nm) of Nd:YAG (yttrium aluminum garnet) laser was used for irradiation and a low power helium neon laser as a probe beam. The experimental observations of ablation threshold in conjunction with theoretical model based on heat conduction equations for simulating the interaction of a laser radiation with a calcified tissue are used to estimate the absorption coefficient of human tooth.

  16. Junction silicon solar cells made with molecular beam glow discharge bombardment

    SciTech Connect

    Caine, E.J.

    1982-01-01

    The fabrication of silicon PN junction solar cells with molecular implanted emitter regions is described. A simple, economical high current (0.5 mA/cm/sup 2/), low voltage (4-6 kV) glow discharge apparatus without any ion mass separation is used for implantation. The discharge beam is characterized with a current-voltage conduction curve, radial profile of target sheet resistance and operating temperature of implant target. Molecular implantation compounds discussed include: boron trifluoride, trimethyl borate, boron trichloride, trimethyl phosphite, arsenic trifluoride, phosphorus trichloride, phosphorus oxychloride and arsenic trichloride. Annealing is accomplished with a Q-switched ruby laser and with a standard diffusion furnace. Solar cell performance parameters (conversion efficiency, quantum efficiency and junction ideality) are compared with cells conventionally implanted at 30 keV with /sup 11/B and /sup 31/P and cells made with a standard open tube phosphorus oxychloride diffusion. Cell substrate thickness was found to limit short circuit current. Total area simulated AM1 power conversion efficiencies of molecular cells without antireflection coatings or backsurface fields are at best 8.2% as compared to 9.0% for conventional implanted or diffused devices. To achieve optimum performance, laser light had to be incorporated in the molecular implant annealing procedure.

  17. Molecular Beam Epitaxy Growth of GaBi, InBi and InGaBi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keen, B.; Makin, R.; Stampe, P. A.; Kennedy, R. J.; Piper, L. F. J.; McCombe, B.; McConville, C. F.; Durbin, S. M.

    2014-03-01

    Recent interest in bismuth alloys of III-V semiconductors for infrared and far-infrared device applications, specifically GaAsBi and InAsBi, has indicated that further study of the III-Bi family of binary compounds would be of great help in improving the quality of these material systems. While immiscibility issues have so far frustrated the growth of GaBi and AlBi, InBi is less problematic, and we have grown it by molecular beam epitaxy on (001) GaAs substrates. However, regions of varying composition exist across the substrate due to poor wetting of the surface. In an effort to improve film quality we have continued to refine the growth parameters by adjusting substrate temperature, beam flux ratio, and deposition rate. Characterization of these films has been performed by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Additionally, we have explored growth of GaBi and In1-xGaxBi at low Ga mole fractions, and modeled this using molecular dynamics simulations. This work is supported by the Research Foundation of the State University of New York Collaborations Fund.

  18. In situ surface/interface x-ray diffractometer for oxide molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J. H.; Tung, I. C.; Chang, S. -H.; Bhattacharya, A.; Fong, D. D.; Freeland, J. W.; Hong, Hawoong

    2016-01-01

    In situ studies of oxide molecular beam epitaxy by synchrotron x-ray scattering has been made possible by upgrading an existing UHV/molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) six-circle diffractometer system. For oxide MBE growth, pure ozone delivery to the chamber has been made available, and several new deposition sources have been made available on a new 12 in. CF (ConFlat, a registered trademark of Varian, Inc.) flange. X-ray diffraction has been used as a major probe for film growth and structures for the system. In the original design, electron diffraction was intended for the secondary diagnostics available without the necessity of the x-ray and located at separate positions. Deposition of films was made possible at the two diagnostic positions. And, the aiming of the evaporation sources is fixed to the point between two locations. Ozone can be supplied through two separate nozzles for each location. Also two separate thickness monitors are installed. Additional features of the equipment are also presented together with the data taken during typical oxide film growth to illustrate the depth of information available via in situ x-ray techniques.

  19. In situ surface/interface x-ray diffractometer for oxide molecular beam epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Lee, J H; Tung, I C; Chang, S-H; Bhattacharya, A; Fong, D D; Freeland, J W; Hong, Hawoong

    2016-01-01

    In situ studies of oxide molecular beam epitaxy by synchrotron x-ray scattering has been made possible by upgrading an existing UHV/molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) six-circle diffractometer system. For oxide MBE growth, pure ozone delivery to the chamber has been made available, and several new deposition sources have been made available on a new 12 in. CF (ConFlat, a registered trademark of Varian, Inc.) flange. X-ray diffraction has been used as a major probe for film growth and structures for the system. In the original design, electron diffraction was intended for the secondary diagnostics available without the necessity of the x-ray and located at separate positions. Deposition of films was made possible at the two diagnostic positions. And, the aiming of the evaporation sources is fixed to the point between two locations. Ozone can be supplied through two separate nozzles for each location. Also two separate thickness monitors are installed. Additional features of the equipment are also presented together with the data taken during typical oxide film growth to illustrate the depth of information available via in situ x-ray techniques. PMID:26827327

  20. An ultra-compact, high-throughput molecular beam epitaxy growth system

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, A. A.; Hesjedal, T.; Braun, W. E-mail: fischer@createc.de; Rembold, S.; Fischer, A. E-mail: fischer@createc.de; Gassler, G.

    2015-04-15

    We present a miniaturized molecular beam epitaxy (miniMBE) system with an outer diameter of 206 mm, optimized for flexible and high-throughput operation. The three-chamber system, used here for oxide growth, consists of a sample loading chamber, a storage chamber, and a growth chamber. The growth chamber is equipped with eight identical effusion cell ports with linear shutters, one larger port for either a multi-pocket electron beam evaporator or an oxygen plasma source, an integrated cryoshroud, retractable beam-flux monitor or quartz-crystal microbalance, reflection high energy electron diffraction, substrate manipulator, main shutter, and quadrupole mass spectrometer. The system can be combined with ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) end stations on synchrotron and neutron beamlines, or equivalently with other complex surface analysis systems, including low-temperature scanning probe microscopy systems. Substrate handling is compatible with most UHV surface characterization systems, as the miniMBE can accommodate standard surface science sample holders. We introduce the design of the system, and its specific capabilities and operational parameters, and we demonstrate the epitaxial thin film growth of magnetoelectric Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} on c-plane sapphire and ferrimagnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} on MgO (001)

  1. An ultra-compact, high-throughput molecular beam epitaxy growth system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, A. A.; Braun, W.; Gassler, G.; Rembold, S.; Fischer, A.; Hesjedal, T.

    2015-04-01

    We present a miniaturized molecular beam epitaxy (miniMBE) system with an outer diameter of 206 mm, optimized for flexible and high-throughput operation. The three-chamber system, used here for oxide growth, consists of a sample loading chamber, a storage chamber, and a growth chamber. The growth chamber is equipped with eight identical effusion cell ports with linear shutters, one larger port for either a multi-pocket electron beam evaporator or an oxygen plasma source, an integrated cryoshroud, retractable beam-flux monitor or quartz-crystal microbalance, reflection high energy electron diffraction, substrate manipulator, main shutter, and quadrupole mass spectrometer. The system can be combined with ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) end stations on synchrotron and neutron beamlines, or equivalently with other complex surface analysis systems, including low-temperature scanning probe microscopy systems. Substrate handling is compatible with most UHV surface characterization systems, as the miniMBE can accommodate standard surface science sample holders. We introduce the design of the system, and its specific capabilities and operational parameters, and we demonstrate the epitaxial thin film growth of magnetoelectric Cr2O3 on c-plane sapphire and ferrimagnetic Fe3O4 on MgO (001).

  2. Plasma behaviour with molecular beam injection in the HL-1M tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Lianghua; Tang, Nianyi; Cui, Zhengying; Xu, Deming; Deng, Zhongchao; Ding, Xuantong; Luo, Junlin; Dong, Jiafu; Guo, Gancheng; Yang, Shikun; Cui, Chenghe; Xiao, Zhenggui; Liu, Dequan; Chen, Xiaoping; Yan, Longwen; Yan, Donghai; Wang, Enyao; Deng, Xiwen

    1998-04-01

    A new method of gas fuelling has been introduced in the HL-1M tokamak. The method consists of a pulsed high speed molecular beam formed by a Laval type nozzle. The velocity of the well collimated hydrogen beam is about 500 m/s. About 6 × 1019 molecules pass through the nozzle and into the vacuum chamber in each pulse. A series of helium pulses was injected into the HL-1M low density (bar ne = 4 × 1018 m-3) hydrogen plasma. With penetration depth up to 12 cm, the ramp-up rate of the electron density, dbar ne/dt, was as high as 3.1 × 1020 m-3·s-1 at steady state, and the resulting plasma density reached bar ne = 5.6 × 1019 m-3. The profile peaking factor of the electron density, Qn = ne(0)/langlenerangle of about 100 ms after helium molecular beam injection (MBI) reached a maximum value of more than 1.51. The energy confinement time τE measured by diamagnetism is 26 ms, which is over 30% longer than that of the gas puffing (GP) results under the same operational conditions. The improvement of τE and increase of Qn for MBI were comparable to those of small pellet injection (PI) in HL-1M, as well as those of slow PI in ASDEX (Kaufmann, M., et al., Nucl. Fusion 28 (1988) 827). It is argued that the peaked density profile induced by the deepened particle injection is a factor essential for the confinement improvement apart from the isotope effect of helium particles, because the density peaking factor Qn is normally less than 1.4 for GP plasma in HL-1M. The particle confinement time with MBI increased sixfold in comparison with that before injection.

  3. Development of a Silicon Carbide Molecular Beam Nozzle for Simulation Planetary Flybys and Low-Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patrick, E. L.; Earle, G. D.; Kasprzak, W. T.; Mahaffy, Paul R.

    2008-01-01

    From commercial origins as a molybdenum molecular beam nozzle, a ceramic nozzle of silicon carbide (SiC) was developed for space environment simulation. The nozzle is mechanically stable under extreme conditions of temperature and pressure. A heated, continuous, supersonically-expanded hydrogen beam with a 1% argon seed produced an argon beam component of nearly 4 km/s, with an argon flux exceeding 1x1014 /cm2.s. This nozzle was part of a molecular beam machine used in the Atmospheric Experiments Branch at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center to characterize the performance of the University of Texas at Dallas Ram Wind Sensor (RWS) aboard the Air Force Communications/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) launched in the Spring of 2008.

  4. Molecular beam scattering from C-13 enriched Kapton and correlation with the EOIM-3 carousel experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minton, Timothy K.; Moore, Teresa A.

    1995-01-01

    Mass spectra of products emerging from identical samples of a C-13-enriched polyimide polymer (chemically equivalent to Kapton) under atomic oxygen bombardment in space and in the laboratory were collected. Reaction products unambiguously detected in space were CO-13, NO, (12)CO2, and (13)CO2. These reaction products and two others, H2O and CO-12, were detected in the laboratory, along with inelastically scattered atomic and molecular oxygen. Qualitative agreement was seen in the mass spectra taken in space and in the laboratory; the agreement may be improved by reducing the fraction of O2 in the laboratory molecular beam. Both laboratory and space data indicated that CO and CO2 products come preferentially from reaction with the imide component of the polymer chain, raising the possibility that the either component may degrade in part by the 'evaporation' of higher molecular weight fragments. Laboratory time-of-flight distributions showed: (1) incomplete energy accommodation of impinging O and O2 species that do not react with the surface; and (2) both hyperthermal and thermal CO and CO2 products, suggesting two distinct reaction mechanisms with the surface.

  5. Reduction of spectral interferences and noise effects in laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry with partial least square regression - a computer simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Xianglei; Chan, George C.-Y.; Zorba, Vassilia; Russo, Richard E.

    2016-08-01

    The fundamental analytical accuracies and precisions attainable by laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry (LAMIS), with emphasis on the impacts from spectral interferences and measurement noise, were investigated by means of computer simulation. The study focused on the analysis of a minor isotope at sub- to single-percentage abundance level. With a natural abundance about 1.1% for 13C, the C2 Swan band (d3Πg-a3Πu) with Δν = + 1 was selected as a representative system. The characteristics (e.g., noise amplitude and distribution, signal strength, and signal-to-background ratio) of the simulated spectra were experimentally characterized. Partial least square (PLS) regression was used to extract isotopic information from the simulated molecular spectra. In the absence of any spectral interference and with the use of a calibration set consisting of eleven isotopic standards, the theoretical accuracies and precisions with signal accumulation from 100 laser shots are about 0.002% and 0.001%, respectively, in absolute percentage abundance of 13C. The theoretical analytical accuracies slightly degrade, but are adequate for many applications, to 0.004% and 0.008% respectively, for calibrations involving only three and two isotopic standards. It was found that PLS regression is not only immune to both source-flicker and photon-shot noise, but is also effective in differentiating the spectral patterns from the analyte against those from spectral interferences. The influences of spectral interference from single or multiple atomic emission lines were simulated, and new ways to minimize their impacts were formulated and demonstrated. It was found that the wavelength range selected for the computation of the normalization factor should not contain any spectral-interfering peak, and a properly chosen wavelength range increases the tolerance of spectral interference by at least one order of magnitude. With matrix-matched calibration standards, the precisions (expressed

  6. Fast, high temperature and thermolabile GC--MS in supersonic molecular beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagan, Shai; Amirav, Aviv

    1994-05-01

    This work describes and evaluates the coupling of a fast gas chromatograph (GC) based on a short column and high carrier gas flow rate to a supersonic molecular beam mass spectrometer (MS). A 50 cm long megabore column serves for fast GC separation and connects the injector to the supersonic nozzle source. Sampling is achieved with a conventional syringe based splitless sample injection. The injector contains no septum and is open to the atmosphere. The linear velocity of the carrier gas is controlled by a by-pass (make-up) gas flow introduced after the column and prior to the supersonic nozzle. The supersonic expansion serves as a jet separator and the skimmed supersonic molecular beam (SMB) is highly enriched with the heavier organic molecules. The supersonic molecular beam constituents are ionized either by electron impact (EI) or hyperthermal surface ionization (HSI) and mass analyzed. A 1 s fast GC--MS of four aromatic molecules in methanol is demonstrated and some fundamental aspects of fast GC--MS with time limit constraints are outlined. The flow control (programming) of the speed of analysis is shown and the analysis of thermolabile and relatively non-volatile molecules is demonstrated and discussed. The tail-free, fast GC--MS of several mixtures is shown and peak tailing of caffeine is compared with that of conventional GC--MS. The improvement of the peak shapes with the SMB--MS is analyzed with the respect to the elimination of thermal vacuum chamber background. The extrapolated minimum detected amount was about 400 ag of anthracence-d10, with an elution time which was shorter than 2s. Repetitive injections could be performed within less than 10 s. The fast GC--MS in SMB seems to be ideal for fast target compound analysis even in real world, complex mixtures. The few seconds GC--MS separation and quantification of lead (as tetraethyllead) in gasoline, caffeine in coffee, and codeine in a drug is demonstrated. Controlled HSI selectivity is demonstrated in

  7. Laser ablation studies of concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Savina, M.; Xu, Z.; Wang, Y.; Reed, C.; Pellin, M.

    1999-10-20

    Laser ablation was studied as a means of removing radioactive contaminants from the surface and near-surface regions of concrete. The authors present the results of ablation tests on cement and concrete samples using a 1.6 kW pulsed Nd:YAG laser with fiber optic beam delivery. The laser-surface interaction was studied using cement and high density concrete as targets. Ablation efficiency and material removal rates were determined as functions of irradiance and pulse overlap. Doped samples were also ablated to determine the efficiency with which surface contaminants were removed and captured in the effluent. The results show that the cement phase of the material melts and vaporizes, but the aggregate portion (sand and rock) fragments. The effluent consists of both micron-size aerosol particles and chunks of fragmented aggregate material. Laser-induced optical emission spectroscopy was used to analyze the surface during ablation. Analysis of the effluent showed that contaminants such as cesium and strontium were strongly segregated into different regions of the particle size distribution of the aerosol.

  8. Development of an apparatus for obtaining molecular beams in the energy range from 2 to 200 eV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clapier, R.; Devienne, F. M.; Roustan, A.; Roustan, J. C.

    1985-01-01

    The formation and detection of molecular beams obtained by charge exchange from a low-energy ion source is discussed. Dispersion in energy of the ion source was measured and problems concerning detection of neutral beams were studied. Various methods were used, specifically secondary electron emissivity of a metallic surface and ionization of a gas target with a low ionization voltage. The intensities of neutral beams as low as 10 eV are measured by a tubular electron multiplier and a lock-in amplifier.

  9. A Simulation of Laser Ablation During the Laser Pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Motoyuki; Ventzek, Peter L. G.; Sakai, Y.; Date, H.; Tagashira, H.; Kitamori, K.

    1996-10-01

    Charge damage considerations in plasma assisted etching are prompting the development of neutral beam sources. Already, anisotropic etching of has been demonstrated by neutral beams generated by exhausting heated ecthing gases into vacuum via a nozzle. Laser ablation of condensed etching gases may also be an attractive alternative means of generating neutral beams. Laser ablation coupled with electrical breakdown of the ablation plume may afford some degree of control over a neutral beam's dissociation fraction and ion content. Results from a Monte Carlo simulation of the laser ablation plume as it expands into vacuum at time-scales during the laser pulse will be presented. The model includes both heavy particle interactions and photochemistry. In particular, the influence of the initial particle angular distribution on the beam spread will be demonstrated as will the relationship between laser beam energy and initial ionization and dissociation fraction.

  10. Bismuth-induced phase control of GaAs nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Zhenyu; Chen, Pingping E-mail: luwei@mail.sitp.ac.cn; Shi, Suixing; Yao, Luchi; Zhou, Xiaohao; Lu, Wei E-mail: luwei@mail.sitp.ac.cn; Zhang, Zhi; Zhou, Chen; Zou, Jin

    2014-10-20

    In this work, the crystal structure of GaAs nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy has been tailored only by bismuth without changing the growth temperature and V/III flux ratio. The introduction of bismuth can lead to the formation of zinc-blende GaAs nanowires, while the removal of bismuth changes the structure into a 4H polytypism before it turns back to the wurtzite phase eventually. The theoretical calculation shows that it is the steadiest for bismuth to adsorb on the GaAs(111){sub B} surface compared to the liquid gold catalyst surface and the interface between the gold catalyst droplet and the nanowire, and these adsorbed bismuth could decrease the diffusion length of adsorbed Ga and hence the supersaturation of Ga in the gold catalyst droplet.

  11. Fe-doped InN layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xinqiang; Liu Shitao; Ma Dingyu; Zheng Xiantong; Chen Guang; Xu Fujun; Tang Ning; Shen Bo; Zhang Peng; Cao Xingzhong; Wang Baoyi; Huang Sen; Chen, Kevin J.; Zhou Shengqiang; Yoshikawa, Akihiko

    2012-10-22

    Iron(Fe)-doped InN (InN:Fe) layers have been grown by molecular beam epitaxy. It is found that Fe-doping leads to drastic increase of residual electron concentration, which is different from the semi-insulating property of Fe-doped GaN. However, this heavy n-type doping cannot be fully explained by doped Fe-concentration ([Fe]). Further analysis shows that more unintentionally doped impurities such as hydrogen and oxygen are incorporated with increasing [Fe] and the surface is degraded with high density pits, which probably are the main reasons for electron generation and mobility reduction. Photoluminescence of InN is gradually quenched by Fe-doping. This work shows that Fe-doping is one of good choices to control electron density in InN.

  12. Acceptor states in heteroepitaxial CdHgTe films grown by molecular-beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Mynbaev, K. D.; Shilyaev, A. V. Bazhenov, N. L.; Izhnin, A. I.; Izhnin, I. I.; Mikhailov, N. N.; Varavin, V. S.; Dvoretsky, S. A.

    2015-03-15

    The photoluminescence method is used to study acceptor states in CdHgTe heteroepitaxial films (HEFs) grown by molecular-beam epitaxy. A comparison of the photoluminescence spectra of HEFs grown on GaAs substrates (CdHgTe/GaAs) with the spectra of CdHgTe/Si HEFs demonstrates that acceptor states with energy depths of about 18 and 27 meV are specific to CdHgTe/GaAs HEFs. The possible nature of these states and its relation to the HEF synthesis conditions and, in particular, to the vacancy doping occurring under conditions of a mercury deficiency during the course of epitaxy and postgrowth processing are discussed.

  13. High resolution Raman spectroscopy of complexes and clusters in molecular beams

    SciTech Connect

    Felker, P.M.

    1991-01-01

    The DOE-sponsored project in this laboratory has two facets. The first is the development of methods of nonlinear Raman spectroscopy for application in studies of sparse samples. The second is the application of such methods to structural and dynamical studies of species in supersonic molecular beams. The progress we have made in both of these areas is described in this paper. The report is divided into five remaining sections. The first pertains to theoretical and experimental developments in Fourier transform stimulated emission spectroscopy and Fourier transform hole-burning spectroscopy. The second deals with progress in the development of ionization-detected stimulated Raman spectroscopies (IDSRS). The third describes results from the application of IDSRS methods to studies of jet-cooled benzene clusters. The fourth describes IDSRS results from studies of hydrogen-bonded complexes containing phenols. The fifth relates to studies of carbazole-(Ar){sub n} clusters.

  14. Formation of GeSn alloy on Si(100) by low-temperature molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Talochkin, A. B.; Mashanov, V. I.

    2014-12-29

    GeSn alloys grown on Si(100) by the low-temperature (100 °C) molecular beam epitaxy are studied using scanning tunneling microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. It is found that the effect of Sn as a surfactant modifies substantially the low-temperature growth mechanism of Ge on Si. Instead of the formation of small Ge islands surrounded by amorphous Ge, in the presence of Sn, the growth of pure Ge islands appears via the Stranski-Krastanov growth mode, and a partially relaxed Ge{sub 1−x}Sn{sub x} alloy layer with the high Sn-fraction up to 40 at. % is formed in the area between them. It is shown that the observed growth mode induced by high surface mobility of Sn and the large strain of the pseudomorphic state of Ge to Si ensures the minimum elastic-strain energy of the structure.

  15. Molecular beam epitaxy growth of free-standing plane-parallel InAs nanoplates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aagesen, Martin; Johnson, Erik; Sørensen, Claus B.; Mariager, Simon O.; Feidenhans'l, Robert; Spiecker, Erdmann; Nygård, Jesper; Lindelof, Poul Erik

    2007-12-01

    Free-standing nanostructures such as suspended carbon nanotubes, graphene layers, III-V nanorod photonic crystals and three-dimensional structures have recently attracted attention because they could form the basis of devices with unique electronic, optoelectronic and electromechanical characteristics. Here we report the growth by molecular beam epitaxy of free-standing nanoplates of InAs that are close to being atomically plane. The structural and transport properties of these semiconducting nanoplates have been examined with scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and low-temperature electron transport measurements. The carrier density of the nanoplates can be reduced to zero by applying a voltage to a nearby gate electrode, creating a new type of suspended quantum well that can be used to explore low-dimensional electron transport. The electronic and optical properties of such systems also make them potentially attractive for photovoltaic and sensing applications.

  16. Microstructure of In x Ga1-x N nanorods grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, R. F.; Soundararajah, Q. Y.; Griffiths, I. J.; Cherns, D.; Novikov, S. V.; Foxon, C. T.

    2015-11-01

    Transmission electron microscopy is used to examine the structure and composition of In x Ga1-x N nanorods grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The results confirm a core-shell structure with an In-rich core and In-poor shell resulting from axial and lateral growth sectors respectively. Atomic resolution mapping by energy-dispersive x-ray microanalysis and high angle annular dark field imaging show that both the core and the shell are decomposed into Ga-rich and In-rich platelets parallel to their respective growth surfaces. It is argued that platelet formation occurs at the surfaces, through the lateral expansion of surface steps. Studies of nanorods with graded composition show that decomposition ceases for x ≥ 0.8 and the ratio of growth rates, shell:core, decreases with increasing In concentration.

  17. GaNAsP: An intermediate band semiconductor grown by gas-source molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Kuang, Y. J.; Yu, K. M.; Walukiewicz, W.; Kudrawiec, R.; Luce, A. V.; Ting, M.; Tu, C. W.

    2013-03-18

    Dilute nitride GaNAsP thin films were grown via a GaAsP metamorphic buffer on GaP(100) substrate with gas-source molecular beam epitaxy. The compositions of this III-V-V-V compound were determined by channeling Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and nuclear reaction analysis. Photoreflectance shows two distinctive transitions from the valence band to the split conduction bands due to N incorporation. Photoluminescence and optical absorption show the fundamental bandgap of Ga(N)AsP is largely tailored by the small amount of N. The observed multiband characteristics and the bandgap tunability of GaNAsP are two merits that fit into the intermediate-band solar cell roadmap, and GaNAsP of high crystal quality provides a strong candidate for intermediate band solar cell materials.

  18. Ge/GeSn heterostructures grown on Si (100) by molecular-beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Sadofyev, Yu. G. Martovitsky, V. P.; Bazalevsky, M. A.; Klekovkin, A. V.; Averyanov, D. V.; Vasil’evskii, I. S.

    2015-01-15

    The growth of GeSn layers by molecular-beam epitaxy on Si (100) wafers coated with a germanium buffer layer is investigated. The properties of the fabricated structures are controlled by reflection high-energy electron diffraction, atomic-force microscopy, X-ray diffractometry, Rutherford backscattering, and Raman scattering. It is shown that GeSn layers with thicknesses up to 0.5 μm and Sn molar fractions up to 0.073 manifest no sign of plastic relaxation upon epitaxy. The lattice constant of the GeSn layers within the growth plane is precisely the same as that of Ge. The effect of rapid thermal annealing on the conversion of metastable elastically strained GeSn layers into a plastically relaxed state is examined. Ge/GeSn quantum wells with Sn molar fraction up to 0.11 are obtained.

  19. GaAs Core/SrTiO3 Shell Nanowires Grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Guan, X; Becdelievre, J; Meunier, B; Benali, A; Saint-Girons, G; Bachelet, R; Regreny, P; Botella, C; Grenet, G; Blanchard, N P; Jaurand, X; Silly, M G; Sirotti, F; Chauvin, N; Gendry, M; Penuelas, J

    2016-04-13

    We have studied the growth of a SrTiO3 shell on self-catalyzed GaAs nanowires grown by vapor-liquid-solid assisted molecular beam epitaxy on Si(111) substrates. To control the growth of the SrTiO3 shell, the GaAs nanowires were protected using an arsenic capping/decapping procedure in order to prevent uncontrolled oxidation and/or contamination of the nanowire facets. Reflection high energy electron diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were performed to determine the structural, chemical, and morphological properties of the heterostructured nanowires. Using adapted oxide growth conditions, it is shown that most of the perovskite structure SrTiO3 shell appears to be oriented with respect to the GaAs lattice. These results are promising for achieving one-dimensional epitaxial semiconductor core/functional oxide shell nanostructures. PMID:27008537

  20. Investigation of Localized States in GaAsSb Epilayers Grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xian; Wei, Zhipeng; Zhao, Fenghuan; Yang, Yahui; Chen, Rui; Fang, Xuan; Tang, Jilong; Fang, Dan; Wang, Dengkui; Li, Ruixue; Ge, Xiaotian; Ma, Xiaohui; Wang, Xiaohua

    2016-01-01

    We report the carrier dynamics in GaAsSb ternary alloy grown by molecular beam epitaxy through comprehensive spectroscopic characterization over a wide temperature range. A detailed analysis of the experimental data reveals a complex carrier relaxation process involving both localized and delocalized states. At low temperature, the localized degree shows linear relationship with the increase of Sb component. The existence of localized states is also confirmed by the temperature dependence of peak position and band width of the emission. At temperature higher than 60 K, emissions related to localized states are quenched while the band to band transition dominates the whole spectrum. This study indicates that the localized states are related to the Sb component in the GaAsSb alloy, while it leads to the poor crystal quality of the material, and the application of GaAsSb alloy would be limited by this deterioration. PMID:27381641

  1. Ferromagnetic (Ga,Mn)As nanowires grown by Mn-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Bouravleuv, Alexei; Cirlin, George; Sapega, Victor; Werner, Peter; Savin, Alexander; Lipsanen, Harri

    2013-04-14

    (Ga,Mn)As nanowires were grown by molecular beam epitaxy using Mn as a growth catalyst on GaAs(001) substrates at 485 Degree-Sign C, i.e., at intermediate temperatures higher than ones used for the growth of (Ga,Mn)As thin films, but lower than the ordinary temperatures of Au-assisted growth of GaAs nanowires. (Ga,Mn)As nanowires obtained with typical lengths between 0.8 and 4 {mu}m and diameters 50-90 nm do not have defects, such as dislocations or precipitates, except for the stacking faults lying parallel to the growth direction. The investigation of magnetic and optical properties has been carried out not only for as-grown samples with nanowires but also for peeled off nanowires from the host substrate. The results obtained demonstrate that (Ga,Mn)As nanowires exhibit ferromagnetic ordering around 70 K.

  2. Low temperature growth of crystalline magnesium oxide on hexagonal silicon carbide (0001) by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Goodrich, T. L.; Parisi, J.; Cai, Z.; Ziemer, K. S.

    2007-01-22

    Magnesium oxide (111) was grown epitaxially on hexagonal silicon carbide (6H-SiC) (0001) substrates at low temperatures by molecular beam epitaxy and a remote oxygen plasma source. The films were characterized by reflection high-energy electron diffraction, Auger electron spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy. Crystal structure, morphology, and growth rate of the magnesium oxide (MgO) films were found to be dependent on the magnesium flux, indicating a magnesium adsorption controlled growth mechanism. The single crystalline MgO thin films had an epitaxial relationship where MgO (111) parallel 6H-SiC (0001) and were stable in both air and 10{sup -9} Torr up to 1023 K.

  3. Observations of the pulse perturbation during multi-pulse molecular beam injection on HL-2A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhongbing, Shi; Xuantong, Ding; Lianghua, Yao; Zetian, Liu; Chengyuan, Chen; Qingwei, Yang; Beibin, Feng; Yan, Zhou; Longwen, Yan; Yi, Liu; Yong, Liu

    2005-11-01

    Asymmetric cold pulse perturbation has been observed by means of electron-cyclotron emission (ECE) and soft-x-ray array during pulse-modulated molecular beam injection (MBI) experiments on HL-2A. The perturbation depth is about 30 cm from the low field side and only about 10 cm from the high field side. The cold pulses cannot propagate to the plasma centre from either the low or high field side. The electron temperature in the plasma centre does not change during MBI, but electron density pulse perturbations can be observed in the plasma centre from the ECE 3rd harmonic measurements, which corresponds to the results of the far-infra-red laser interferometer. The experimental results indirectly provide evidence of the shielding mechanisms of the MBI physics.

  4. Infrared electroluminescence from GeSn heterojunction diodes grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Jay Prakash; Bhargava, Nupur; Kim, Sangcheol; Adam, Thomas; Kolodzey, James

    2013-06-01

    Infrared electroluminescence was observed from GeSn/Ge p-n heterojunction diodes with 8% Sn, grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The GeSn layers were boron doped, compressively strained, and pseudomorphic on Ge substrates. Spectral measurements indicated an emission peak at 0.57 eV, about 50 meV wide, increasing in intensity with applied pulsed current, and with reducing device temperatures. The total integrated emitted power from a single edge facet was 54 μW at an applied peak current of 100 mA at 100 K. These results suggest that GeSn-based materials maybe useful for practical light emitting diodes operating in the infrared wavelength range near 2 μm.

  5. Lattice constant and substitutional composition of GeSn alloys grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhargava, Nupur; Coppinger, Matthew; Prakash Gupta, Jay; Wielunski, Leszek; Kolodzey, James

    2013-07-01

    Single crystal epitaxial Ge1-xSnx alloys with atomic fractions of tin up to x = 0.145 were grown by solid source molecular beam epitaxy on Ge (001) substrates. The Ge1-xSnx alloys formed high quality, coherent, strained layers at growth temperatures below 250 °C, as shown by high resolution X-ray diffraction. The amount of Sn that was on lattice sites, as determined by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry channeling, was found to be above 90% substitutional in all alloys. The degree of strain and the dependence of the effective unstrained bulk lattice constant of Ge1-xSnx alloys versus the composition of Sn have been determined.

  6. Formation of GeSn alloy on Si(100) by low-temperature molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talochkin, A. B.; Mashanov, V. I.

    2014-12-01

    GeSn alloys grown on Si(100) by the low-temperature (100 °C) molecular beam epitaxy are studied using scanning tunneling microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. It is found that the effect of Sn as a surfactant modifies substantially the low-temperature growth mechanism of Ge on Si. Instead of the formation of small Ge islands surrounded by amorphous Ge, in the presence of Sn, the growth of pure Ge islands appears via the Stranski-Krastanov growth mode, and a partially relaxed Ge1-xSnx alloy layer with the high Sn-fraction up to 40 at. % is formed in the area between them. It is shown that the observed growth mode induced by high surface mobility of Sn and the large strain of the pseudomorphic state of Ge to Si ensures the minimum elastic-strain energy of the structure.

  7. Molecular beam epitaxy of SrTiO3 with a growth window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalan, Bharat; Moetakef, Pouya; Stemmer, Susanne

    2009-07-01

    Many complex oxides with only nonvolatile constituents do not have a wide growth window in conventional molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) approaches, which makes it difficult to obtain stoichiometric films. Here it is shown that a growth window in which the stoichiometry is self-regulating can be achieved for SrTiO3 films by using a hybrid MBE approach that uses a volatile metal-organic source for Ti, titanium tetra isopropoxide (TTIP). The growth window widens and shifts to higher TTIP/Sr flux ratios with increasing temperature, showing that it is related to the desorption of the volatile TTIP. We demonstrate stoichiometric, highly perfect, insulating SrTiO3 films. The approach can be adapted for the growth of other complex oxides that previously were believed to have no wide MBE growth window.

  8. Investigation of Localized States in GaAsSb Epilayers Grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xian; Wei, Zhipeng; Zhao, Fenghuan; Yang, Yahui; Chen, Rui; Fang, Xuan; Tang, Jilong; Fang, Dan; Wang, Dengkui; Li, Ruixue; Ge, Xiaotian; Ma, Xiaohui; Wang, Xiaohua

    2016-01-01

    We report the carrier dynamics in GaAsSb ternary alloy grown by molecular beam epitaxy through comprehensive spectroscopic characterization over a wide temperature range. A detailed analysis of the experimental data reveals a complex carrier relaxation process involving both localized and delocalized states. At low temperature, the localized degree shows linear relationship with the increase of Sb component. The existence of localized states is also confirmed by the temperature dependence of peak position and band width of the emission. At temperature higher than 60 K, emissions related to localized states are quenched while the band to band transition dominates the whole spectrum. This study indicates that the localized states are related to the Sb component in the GaAsSb alloy, while it leads to the poor crystal quality of the material, and the application of GaAsSb alloy would be limited by this deterioration. PMID:27381641

  9. Towards precise defect control in layered oxide structures by using oxide molecular beam epitaxy

    PubMed Central

    Baiutti, Federico; Christiani, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Summary In this paper we present the atomic-layer-by-layer oxide molecular beam epitaxy (ALL-oxide MBE) which has been recently installed in the Max-Planck Institute for Solid State Research and we report on its present status, providing some examples that demonstrate its successful application in the synthesis of different layered oxides, with particular reference to superconducting La2CuO4 and insulator-to-metal La2− xSrxNiO4. We briefly review the ALL-oxide MBE technique and its unique capabilities in the deposition of atomically smooth single-crystal thin films of various complex oxides, artificial compounds and heterostructures, introducing our goal of pursuing a deep investigation of such systems with particular emphasis on structural defects, with the aim of tailoring their functional properties by precise defects control. PMID:24995148

  10. Analysis of carbon in SrTiO{sub 3} grown by hybrid molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Jalan, Bharat; Cagnon, Joeel; Mates, Thomas E.; Stemmer, Susanne

    2009-11-15

    Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) was used to investigate carbon impurity concentrations in stoichiometric SrTiO{sub 3} films grown by a hybrid molecular beam epitaxy approach that uses an effusion cell to supply strontium, a rf plasma source for oxygen and a metal organic titanium source (titanium tetra isopropoxide). The carbon concentration in the films was measured as a function of growth parameters. At sufficiently high growth temperatures (>800 degree sign C), the films contain a few ppm of carbon. The challenges in accurately quantifying low carbon concentrations are discussed. A carbon-containing contamination layer is detected on the surfaces of SrTiO{sub 3} substrates and air-exposed films by SIMS and in scanning transmission electron microscopy. The contamination layer could be removed by high-temperature predeposition oxygen plasma cleaning.

  11. Surface energies for molecular beam epitaxy growth of HgTe and CdTe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berding, M. A.; Krishnamurthy, Srinivasan; Sher, A.

    1991-10-01

    We present results for the surface binding energies for HgTe and CdTe that will serve as input for molecular beam epitaxy growth models. We have found that the surface binding energies are surface orientation dependent and are not simply proportional to the number of first-neighbor bonds being made to the underlying layer. Moreover, because of the possibility of charge transfer between cation and anion surface states, one may have large differences between the binding energy for the first and the last atom in a given layer, and these differences will be different for the narrow-gap, less ionic materials than for the wide gap, ionic materials. We also find that the surface states associated with an isolated surface atom or vacancy are extended in materials with small gaps and small effective masses, and thus call into question the modeling of surface binding by simple pair interactions.

  12. Raman measurements of substrate temperature in a molecular beam epitaxy growth chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchins, T.; Nazari, M.; Eridisoorya, M.; Myers, T. M.; Holtz, M.

    2015-01-01

    A method is described for directly measuring the temperature of a substrate in a molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE) growth system. The approach relies on the establishment of the temperature dependence of Raman-active phonons of the substrate material using independently known calibration points across the range of interest. An unknown temperature in this range is then determined based on the Raman peak position with the substrate in situ the MBE chamber. The apparatus relies on conventional optics and Raman components. Shifting and broadening of the Raman spectrum are described based on the effects of thermal expansion and anharmonic decay. The choice of reference temperature is discussed. The method is qualified by examining the substrate temperature dependence, relative to that of a standard thermocouple, during a commonly used ramp procedure. Both temperature difference and time lag are obtained.

  13. Synthesis of atomically thin hexagonal boron nitride films on nickel foils by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Nakhaie, S.; Wofford, J. M.; Schumann, T.; Jahn, U.; Ramsteiner, M.; Hanke, M.; Lopes, J. M. J. Riechert, H.

    2015-05-25

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is a layered two-dimensional material with properties that make it promising as a dielectric in various applications. We report the growth of h-BN films on Ni foils from elemental B and N using molecular beam epitaxy. The presence of crystalline h-BN over the entire substrate is confirmed by Raman spectroscopy. Atomic force microscopy is used to examine the morphology and continuity of the synthesized films. A scanning electron microscopy study of films obtained using shorter depositions offers insight into the nucleation and growth behavior of h-BN on the Ni substrate. The morphology of h-BN was found to evolve from dendritic, star-shaped islands to larger, smooth triangular ones with increasing growth temperature.

  14. Growth and characterization of molecular beam epitaxial GaAs layers on porous silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, T. L.; Liu, J. K.; Sadwick, L.; Wang, K. L.; Kao, Y. C.

    1987-01-01

    GaAs layers have been grown on porous silicon (PS) substrates with good crystallinity by molecular beam epitaxy. In spite of the surface irregularity of PS substrates, no surface morphology deterioration was observed on epitaxial GaAs overlayers. A 10-percent Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy minimum channeling yield for GaAs-on-PS layers as compared to 16 percent for GaAs-on-Si layers grown under the same condition indicates a possible improvement of crystallinity when GaAs is grown on PS. Transmission electron microscopy reveals that the dominant defects in the GaAs-on-PS layers are microtwins and stacking faults, which originate from the GaAs/PS interface. GaAs is found to penetrate into the PS layers. n-type GaAs/p-type PS heterojunction diodes were fabricated with good rectifying characteristics.

  15. Molecular beam epitaxy growth of GaAs1-xBix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tixier, S.; Adamcyk, M.; Tiedje, T.; Francoeur, S.; Mascarenhas, A.; Wei, Peng; Schiettekatte, F.

    2003-04-01

    GaAs1-xBix epilayers with bismuth concentrations up to x=3.1% were grown on GaAs by molecular beam epitaxy. The Bi content in the films was measured by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction shows that GaAsBi is pseudomorphically strained to GaAs but that some structural disorder is present in the thick films. The extrapolation of the lattice constant of GaAsBi to the hypothetical zincblende GaBi alloy gives 6.33±0.06 Å. Room-temperature photoluminescence of the GaAsBi epilayers is obtained and a significant redshift in the emission of GaAsBi of ˜84 meV per percent Bi is observed.

  16. Novel InGaPBi single crystal grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Li; Wang, Peng; Wang, Kai; Wu, Xiaoyan; Pan, Wenwu; Li, Yaoyao; Song, Yuxin; Gu, Yi; Gong, Qian; Wang, Shumin; Ning, Jiqian; Xu, Shijie

    2015-04-01

    InGaPBi crystalline thin films with up to 2.1% bismuth concentration have been grown on GaAs substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry confirms that the majority of Bi atoms are located at substitutional lattice sites. The films exhibit good surface, structural, and interface quality, and their strains can be tuned from tensile to compressive by increasing the Bi content. InBi LO and GaBi LO vibrational modes in Raman spectroscopy were observed, and their intensities increased with Bi concentration. A weak photoluminescence signal was observed at 1.78 eV at room temperature for the sample with a Bi content of 0.5%.

  17. New Semiconductor GaNAsBi Alloy Grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimoto, Masahiro; Huang, Wei; Takehara, Yuji; Saraie, Junji; Chayahara, Akiyoshi; Horino, Yuji; Oe, Kunishige

    2004-07-01

    GaNyAs1-x-yBix epilayers were grown on GaAs by molecular beam epitaxy for the first time. Multilayered samples consisting of GaAs1-xBix, GaNyAs1-y and GaNyAs1-x-yBix showed distinct X-ray diffraction (XRD) peaks ascribed to each layer. The GaBi molar fraction, x, estimated by the combination of Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and XRD was controlled in a range up to 4.0%. The GaN molar fraction estimated from the angular spacing of the XRD peak between GaAs1-xBix and GaNyAs1-x-yBix increased up to 8.0% with increasing supply of activated nitrogen generated in rf plasma.

  18. InAs nanowire growth modes on Si (111) by gas source molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robson, M. T.; LaPierre, R. R.

    2016-02-01

    InAs nanowires (NWs) were grown on silicon substrates by gas source molecular beam epitaxy using five different growth modes: (1) Au-assisted growth, (2) positioned (patterned) Au-assisted growth, (3) Au-free growth, (4) positioned Au-assisted growth using a patterned oxide mask, and (5) Au-free selective-area epitaxy (SAE) using a patterned oxide mask. Optimal growth conditions (temperature, V/III flux ratio) were identified for each growth mode for control of NW morphology and vertical NW yield. The highest yield (72%) was achieved with the SAE method at a growth temperature of 440 °C and a V/III flux ratio of 4. Growth mechanisms are discussed for each of the growth modes.

  19. Intense terahertz emission from molecular beam epitaxy-grown GaAs/GaSb(001)

    SciTech Connect

    Sadia, Cyril P.; Laganapan, Aleena Maria; Agatha Tumanguil, Mae; Estacio, Elmer; Somintac, Armando; Salvador, Arnel; Que, Christopher T.; Yamamoto, Kohji; Tani, Masahiko

    2012-12-15

    Intense terahertz (THz) electromagnetic wave emission was observed in undoped GaAs thin films deposited on (100) n-GaSb substrates via molecular beam epitaxy. GaAs/n-GaSb heterostructures were found to be viable THz sources having signal amplitude 75% that of bulk p-InAs. The GaAs films were grown by interruption method during the growth initiation and using various metamorphic buffer layers. Reciprocal space maps revealed that the GaAs epilayers are tensile relaxed. Defects at the i-GaAs/n-GaSb interface were confirmed by scanning electron microscope images. Band calculations were performed to infer the depletion region and electric field at the i-GaAs/n-GaSb and the air-GaAs interfaces. However, the resulting band calculations were found to be insufficient to explain the THz emission. The enhanced THz emission is currently attributed to a piezoelectric field induced by incoherent strain and defects.

  20. Cyan laser diode grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Turski, H. Muziol, G.; Wolny, P.; Cywiński, G.

    2014-01-13

    We demonstrate AlGaN-cladding-free laser diodes (LDs), operating in continuous wave (CW) mode at 482 nm grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE). The maximum CW output power was 230 mW. LDs were grown on c-plane GaN substrates obtained by hydride vapor phase epitaxy. The PAMBE process was carried out in metal-rich conditions, supplying high nitrogen flux (Φ{sub N}) during quantum wells (QWs) growth. We found that high Φ{sub N} improves quality of high In content InGaN QWs. The role of nitrogen in the growth of InGaN on (0001) GaN surface as well as the influence of LDs design on threshold current density are discussed.

  1. Nucleation mechanism of gallium-assisted molecular beam epitaxy growth of gallium arsenide nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Fontcuberta i Morral, A.; Colombo, C.; Abstreiter, G.; Arbiol, J.; Morante, J. R.

    2008-02-11

    Molecular beam epitaxy Ga-assisted synthesis of GaAs nanowires is demonstrated. The nucleation and growth are seen to be related to the presence of a SiO{sub 2} layer previously deposited on the GaAs wafer. The interaction of the reactive gallium with the SiO{sub 2} pinholes induces the formation of nanocraters, found to be the key for the nucleation of the nanowires. With SiO{sub 2} thicknesses up to 30 nm, nanocraters reach the underlying substrate, resulting into a preferential growth orientation of the nanowires. Possibly related to the formation of nanocraters, we observe an incubation period of 258 s before the nanowires growth is initiated.

  2. Investigation of Localized States in GaAsSb Epilayers Grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xian; Wei, Zhipeng; Zhao, Fenghuan; Yang, Yahui; Chen, Rui; Fang, Xuan; Tang, Jilong; Fang, Dan; Wang, Dengkui; Li, Ruixue; Ge, Xiaotian; Ma, Xiaohui; Wang, Xiaohua

    2016-07-01

    We report the carrier dynamics in GaAsSb ternary alloy grown by molecular beam epitaxy through comprehensive spectroscopic characterization over a wide temperature range. A detailed analysis of the experimental data reveals a complex carrier relaxation process involving both localized and delocalized states. At low temperature, the localized degree shows linear relationship with the increase of Sb component. The existence of localized states is also confirmed by the temperature dependence of peak position and band width of the emission. At temperature higher than 60 K, emissions related to localized states are quenched while the band to band transition dominates the whole spectrum. This study indicates that the localized states are related to the Sb component in the GaAsSb alloy, while it leads to the poor crystal quality of the material, and the application of GaAsSb alloy would be limited by this deterioration.

  3. Antimony segregation in stressed SiGe heterostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Drozdov, M. N.; Novikov, A. V.; Yurasov, D. V.

    2013-11-15

    The effects of the growth temperature, composition, and elastic strains in separate layers on the segregation of antimony are studied experimentally for stressed SiGe structures grown by molecular beam epitaxy. It is established that the growth conditions and parameters of the structures exert an interrelated influence on the segregation of Sb: the degree of the influence of the composition and elastic stresses in the SiGe layers on Sb segregation depends on the growth temperature. It is shown that usage of a method previously proposed by us for the selective doping of silicon structures with consideration for the obtained dependences of Sb segregation on the growth conditions and parameters of the SiGe layers makes it possible to form SiGe structures selectively doped with antimony.

  4. GaInP and AlInP grown by elemental source molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varriano, J. A.; Koch, M. W.; Johnson, F. G.; Wicks, G. W.

    1992-02-01

    We report on the use of a new, valved, solid phosphorus cracker source for the growth of phosphides by molecular beam epitaxy. The source avoids the relatively high expense and high level of toxicity associated with the use of phosphine gas and eliminates the problems commonly encountered in using conventional solid phosphorus sources. The source has been used to grow GaInP and AlInP lattice-matched to GaAs substrates. The quality of the materials reported here is comparable to the best materials grown by other techniques. Photoluminescence and Raman scattering measurements indicate that the resulting material has a high degree of disorder on the group III sublattice. The new source is shown to be a reliable and attractive alternative for the growth of these phosphide materials.

  5. GaNAsP: An intermediate band semiconductor grown by gas-source molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, Y. J.; Yu, K. M.; Kudrawiec, R.; Luce, A. V.; Ting, M.; Walukiewicz, W.; Tu, C. W.

    2013-03-01

    Dilute nitride GaNAsP thin films were grown via a GaAsP metamorphic buffer on GaP(100) substrate with gas-source molecular beam epitaxy. The compositions of this III-V-V-V compound were determined by channeling Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and nuclear reaction analysis. Photoreflectance shows two distinctive transitions from the valence band to the split conduction bands due to N incorporation. Photoluminescence and optical absorption show the fundamental bandgap of Ga(N)AsP is largely tailored by the small amount of N. The observed multiband characteristics and the bandgap tunability of GaNAsP are two merits that fit into the intermediate-band solar cell roadmap, and GaNAsP of high crystal quality provides a strong candidate for intermediate band solar cell materials.

  6. High breakdown single-crystal GaN p-n diodes by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Meng; Zhao, Yuning; Yan, Xiaodong; Li, Guowang; Verma, Jai; Fay, Patrick; Nomoto, Kazuki; Zhu, Mingda; Hu, Zongyang; Protasenko, Vladimir; Song, Bo; Xing, Huili Grace; Jena, Debdeep; Bader, Samuel

    2015-12-07

    Molecular beam epitaxy grown GaN p-n vertical diodes are demonstrated on single-crystal GaN substrates. A low leakage current <3 nA/cm{sup 2} is obtained with reverse bias voltage up to −20 V. With a 400 nm thick n-drift region, an on-resistance of 0.23 mΩ cm{sup 2} is achieved, with a breakdown voltage corresponding to a peak electric field of ∼3.1 MV/cm in GaN. Single-crystal GaN substrates with very low dislocation densities enable the low leakage current and the high breakdown field in the diodes, showing significant potential for MBE growth to attain near-intrinsic performance when the density of dislocations is low.

  7. High resolution Raman spectroscopy of complexes and clusters in molecular beams. Performance report

    SciTech Connect

    Felker, P.M.

    1991-12-31

    The DOE-sponsored project in this laboratory has two facets. The first is the development of methods of nonlinear Raman spectroscopy for application in studies of sparse samples. The second is the application of such methods to structural and dynamical studies of species in supersonic molecular beams. The progress we have made in both of these areas is described in this paper. The report is divided into five remaining sections. The first pertains to theoretical and experimental developments in Fourier transform stimulated emission spectroscopy and Fourier transform hole-burning spectroscopy. The second deals with progress in the development of ionization-detected stimulated Raman spectroscopies (IDSRS). The third describes results from the application of IDSRS methods to studies of jet-cooled benzene clusters. The fourth describes IDSRS results from studies of hydrogen-bonded complexes containing phenols. The fifth relates to studies of carbazole-(Ar){sub n} clusters.

  8. Towards precise defect control in layered oxide structures by using oxide molecular beam epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Baiutti, Federico; Christiani, Georg; Logvenov, Gennady

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present the atomic-layer-by-layer oxide molecular beam epitaxy (ALL-oxide MBE) which has been recently installed in the Max-Planck Institute for Solid State Research and we report on its present status, providing some examples that demonstrate its successful application in the synthesis of different layered oxides, with particular reference to superconducting La2CuO4 and insulator-to-metal La2- x Sr x NiO4. We briefly review the ALL-oxide MBE technique and its unique capabilities in the deposition of atomically smooth single-crystal thin films of various complex oxides, artificial compounds and heterostructures, introducing our goal of pursuing a deep investigation of such systems with particular emphasis on structural defects, with the aim of tailoring their functional properties by precise defects control. PMID:24995148

  9. Optical properties of plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy grown InN/sapphire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talwar, Devki N.; Liao, Ying Chieh; Chen, Li Chyong; Chen, Kuei Hsien; Feng, Zhe Chuan

    2014-11-01

    The optical properties of as-grown InN/sapphire films prepared by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PA-MBE) are characterized by photoluminescence (PL), Raman scattering (RS) and infrared (IR) reflectance techniques. The PL measurements have consistently exhibited lower values of InN band gaps providing clear indications of electron concentration dependent peak energy shifts and widths. The phonon modes identified by RS are found to be in good agreement with the grazing inelastic X-ray scattering measurements and ab initio lattice dynamical calculations. An effective medium theory used to analyze IR reflectance spectra of InN/sapphire films has provided reasonable estimates of free charge carrier concentrations.

  10. Raman measurements of substrate temperature in a molecular beam epitaxy growth chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchins, T.; Nazari, M.; Eridisoorya, M.; Myers, T. M.; Holtz, M.

    2015-01-15

    A method is described for directly measuring the temperature of a substrate in a molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE) growth system. The approach relies on the establishment of the temperature dependence of Raman-active phonons of the substrate material using independently known calibration points across the range of interest. An unknown temperature in this range is then determined based on the Raman peak position with the substrate in situ the MBE chamber. The apparatus relies on conventional optics and Raman components. Shifting and broadening of the Raman spectrum are described based on the effects of thermal expansion and anharmonic decay. The choice of reference temperature is discussed. The method is qualified by examining the substrate temperature dependence, relative to that of a standard thermocouple, during a commonly used ramp procedure. Both temperature difference and time lag are obtained.

  11. High-mobility BaSnO{sub 3} grown by oxide molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Raghavan, Santosh; Schumann, Timo; Kim, Honggyu; Zhang, Jack Y.; Cain, Tyler A.; Stemmer, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    High-mobility perovskite BaSnO{sub 3} films are of significant interest as new wide bandgap semiconductors for power electronics, transparent conductors, and as high mobility channels for epitaxial integration with functional perovskites. Despite promising results for single crystals, high-mobility BaSnO{sub 3} films have been challenging to grow. Here, we demonstrate a modified oxide molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) approach, which supplies pre-oxidized SnO{sub x}. This technique addresses issues in the MBE of ternary stannates related to volatile SnO formation and enables growth of epitaxial, stoichiometric BaSnO{sub 3}. We demonstrate room temperature electron mobilities of 150 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1} in films grown on PrScO{sub 3}. The results open up a wide range of opportunities for future electronic devices.

  12. GaN grown on (1 1 1) single crystal diamond substrate by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dussaigne, A.; Malinverni, M.; Martin, D.; Castiglia, A.; Grandjean, N.

    2009-10-01

    GaN epilayers are grown on (1 1 1) oriented single crystal diamond substrate by ammonia-source molecular beam epitaxy. Each step of the growth is monitored in situ by reflection high energy electron diffraction. It is found that a two-dimensional epitaxial wurtzite GaN film is obtained. The surface morphology is smooth: the rms roughness is as low as 1.3 nm for 2×2 μm 2 scan. Photoluminescence measurements reveal pretty good optical properties. The GaN band edge is centred at 3.469 eV with a linewidth of 5 meV. These results demonstrate that GaN heteroepitaxially grown on diamond opens new rooms for high power electronic applications.

  13. n{sup +}-GaN grown by ammonia molecular beam epitaxy: Application to regrown contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Lugani, L.; Malinverni, M.; Giraud, E.; Carlin, J.-F.; Grandjean, N.; Tirelli, S.; Marti, D.; Bolognesi, C. R.

    2014-11-17

    We report on the low-temperature growth of heavily Si-doped (>10{sup 20 }cm{sup −3}) n{sup +}-type GaN by N-rich ammonia molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) with very low bulk resistivity (<4 × 10{sup −4} Ω·cm). This is applied to the realization of regrown ohmic contacts on InAlN/GaN high electron mobility transistors. A low n{sup +}-GaN/2 dimensional electron gas contact resistivity of 0.11 Ω·mm is measured, provided an optimized surface preparation procedure, which is shown to be critical. This proves the great potentials of ammonia MBE for the realization of high performance electronic devices.

  14. Growth regimes during homoepitaxial growth of GaN by ammonia molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Corrion, A. L.; Wu, F.; Speck, J. S.

    2012-09-01

    c-plane GaN films were grown by ammonia molecular beam epitaxy on metal-organic chemical vapor deposition templates for a wide range of NH{sub 3}:Ga flux ratios and growth temperatures, and the resulting films were characterized using atomic force microscopy, reflection high-energy electron diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. Three distinct nitrogen-rich growth regimes - unstable layer-by-layer, quasi-stable step flow, and dislocation-mediated pitting - were identified based on the growth mode and film properties. In addition, step flow growth was observed under conditions of gallium droplet accumulation. The results indicate the existence of two regimes for step-flow growth of GaN by ammonia MBE - both gallium-rich and nitrogen-rich. Growth mode instabilities and mound formation were observed and are discussed in the context of a step-edge energy barrier to adatom diffusion over a terrace.

  15. Real-time control of the molecular beam epitaxy of nitrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massies, J.; Grandjean, N.

    1999-05-01

    Due to the peculiarities of the growth process of GaN and related alloys on sapphire substrates, reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) is not sufficient to correctly monitor all the different steps of molecular beam epitaxy growth (MBE). It is shown that laser reflectivity, which is a very simple method, is highly complementary to RHEED. However, RHEED remains an unrivaled tool for the precise control of the growth. In particular, the observation of RHEED intensity oscillations can be used, as for classical semiconductors, to determine the growth rate with monolayer precision and also the composition of ternary alloys such as Al xGa 1- xN. The accuracy of such a RHEED based control of MBE growth of nitrides is exemplified by the optical properties of GaN/Al xGa 1- xN quantum well structures.

  16. High reflectance III-nitride Bragg reflectors grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, H.M.; Moustakas, T.D.

    2000-07-01

    Distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) structures based on AlN/GaN have been grown on (0001) sapphire by electron-cyclotron-resonance plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy (ECR-MBE). The design of the structures was predetermined by simulations using the transmission matrix method. A number of structures have been grown with 20.5--25.5 periods showing peak reflectance ranging form the near-UV to the green wavelength regions. For the best sample, peak reflectance up to 99% was observed centered at 467 nm with a bandwidth of 45 nm. The experimental reflectance data were compared with the simulations and show excellent agreement with respect to peak reflectance, bandwidth of high reflectance and the locations of the sidelobes.

  17. Growth of Inclined GaAs Nanowires by Molecular Beam Epitaxy: Theory and Experiment

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The growth of inclined GaAs nanowires (NWs) during molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on the rotating substrates is studied. The growth model provides explicitly the NW length as a function of radius, supersaturations, diffusion lengths and the tilt angle. Growth experiments are carried out on the GaAs(211)A and GaAs(111)B substrates. It is found that 20° inclined NWs are two times longer in average, which is explained by a larger impingement rate on their sidewalls. We find that the effective diffusion length at 550°C amounts to 12 nm for the surface adatoms and is more than 5,000 nm for the sidewall adatoms. Supersaturations of surface and sidewall adatoms are also estimated. The obtained results show the importance of sidewall adatoms in the MBE growth of NWs, neglected in a number of earlier studies. PMID:21076695

  18. Real-time reflectance-difference spectroscopy of GaAs molecular beam epitaxy homoepitaxial growth

    SciTech Connect

    Lastras-Martínez, A. E-mail: alastras@gmail.com; Ortega-Gallegos, J.; Guevara-Macías, L. E.; Nuñez-Olvera, O.; Balderas-Navarro, R. E.; Lastras-Martínez, L. F.; Lastras-Montaño, L. A.; Lastras-Montaño, M. A.

    2014-03-01

    We report on real time-resolved Reflectance-difference (RD) spectroscopy of GaAs(001) grown by molecular beam epitaxy, with a time-resolution of 500 ms per spectrum within the 2.3–4.0 eV photon energy range. Through the analysis of transient RD spectra we demonstrated that RD line shapes are comprised of two components with different physical origins and determined their evolution during growth. Such components were ascribed to the subsurface strain induced by surface reconstruction and to surface stoichiometry. Results reported in this paper render RD spectroscopy as a powerful tool for the study of fundamental processes during the epitaxial growth of zincblende semiconductors.

  19. Controlled in situ boron doping of short silicon nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Das Kanungo, Pratyush; Zakharov, Nikolai; Bauer, Jan; Breitenstein, Otwin; Werner, Peter; Goesele, Ulrich

    2008-06-30

    Epitaxial silicon nanowires (NWs) of short heights ({approx}280 nm) on Si <111> substrate were grown and doped in situ with boron on a concentration range of 10{sup 15}-10{sup 19} cm{sup -3} by coevaporation of atomic Si and B by molecular beam epitaxy. Transmission electron microscopy revealed a single-crystalline structure of the NWs. Electrical measurements of the individual NWs confirmed the doping. However, the low doped (10{sup 15} cm{sup -3}) and medium doped (3x10{sup 16} and 1x10{sup 17} cm{sup -3}) NWs were heavily depleted by the surface states while the high doped (10{sup 18} and 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}) ones showed volume conductivities expected for the corresponding intended doping levels.

  20. Improved tunneling magnetoresistance at low temperature in manganite junctions grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, R.; Kleiner, R.; Koelle, D.; Petrov, A. Yu.; Davidson, B. A.; Mino, L. Alvarez

    2011-04-18

    We report resistance versus magnetic field measurements for a La{sub 0.65}Sr{sub 0.35}MnO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3}/La{sub 0.65}Sr{sub 0.35}MnO{sub 3} tunnel junction grown by molecular-beam epitaxy, that show a large field window of extremely high tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) at low temperature. Scanning the in-plane applied field orientation through 360 deg., the TMR shows fourfold symmetry, i.e., biaxial anisotropy, aligned with the crystalline axis but not the junction geometrical long axis. The TMR reaches {approx}1900% at 4 K, corresponding to an interfacial spin polarization of >95% assuming identical interfaces. These results show that uniaxial anisotropy is not necessary for large TMR, and lay the groundwork for future improvements in TMR in manganite junctions.

  1. Concentration transient analysis of antimony surface segregation during Si(100) molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markert, L. C.; Greene, J. E.; Ni, W.-X.; Hansson, G. V.; Sundgren, J.-E.

    1991-01-01

    Antimony surface segregation during Si(100) molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) was investigated at temperatures T(sub s) = 515 - 800 C using concentration transient analysis (CTA). The dopant surface coverage Theta, bulk fraction gamma, and incorporation probability sigma during MBE were determined from secondary-ion mass spectrometry depth profiles of modulation-doped films. Programmed T(sub s) changes during growth were used to trap the surface-segregated dopant overlayer, producing concentration spikes whose integrated area corresponds to Theta. Thermal antimony doping by coevaporation was found to result in segregation strongly dependent on T(sub s) with Theta(sub Sb) values up to 0.9 monolayers (ML): in films doped with Sb(+) ions accelerated by 100 V, Theta(sub Sb) was less than or equal to 4 x 10(exp -3) ML. Surface segregation of coevaporated antimony was kinematically limited for the film growth conditions in these experiments.

  2. High electron mobility in Ga(In)NAs films grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Miyashita, Naoya; Ahsan, Nazmul; Monirul Islam, Muhammad; Okada, Yoshitaka; Inagaki, Makoto; Yamaguchi, Masafumi

    2012-11-26

    We report the highest mobility values above 2000 cm{sup 2}/Vs in Si doped GaNAs film grown by molecular beam epitaxy. To understand the feature of the origin which limits the electron mobility in GaNAs, temperature dependences of mobility were measured for high mobility GaNAs and referential low mobility GaInNAs. Temperature dependent mobility for high mobility GaNAs is similar to the GaAs case, while that for low mobility GaInNAs shows large decrease in lower temperature region. The electron mobility of high quality GaNAs can be explained by intrinsic limiting factor of random alloy scattering and extrinsic factor of ionized impurity scattering.

  3. Accommodation mechanism of InN nanocolumns grown on Si(111) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Grandal, J.; Sanchez-Garcia, M. A.; Calleja, E.; Luna, E.; Trampert, A.

    2007-07-09

    High quality InN nanocolumns have been grown by molecular beam epitaxy on bare and AlN-buffered Si(111) substrates. The accommodation mechanism of the InN nanocolumns to the substrate was studied by transmission electron microscopy. Samples grown on AlN-buffered Si(111) show abrupt interfaces between the nanocolumns and the buffer layer, where an array of periodically spaced misfit dislocations develops. Samples grown on bare Si(111) exhibit a thin Si{sub x}N{sub y} at the InN nanocolumn/substrate interface because of Si nitridation. The Si{sub x}N{sub y} thickness and roughness may affect the nanocolumn relative alignment to the substrate. In all cases, InN nanocolumns grow strain- and defect-free.

  4. Molecular beam epitaxial growth of a three-dimensional topological Dirac semimetal Na3Bi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yi; Liu, Zhongkai; Zhou, Bo; Kim, Yeongkwan; Hussain, Zahid; Shen, Zhi-Xun; Chen, Yulin; Mo, Sung-Kwan

    2014-07-01

    We report a molecular beam epitaxial growth of Na3Bi single-crystal thin films on two different substrates—epitaxial bilayer graphene terminated 6H-SiC(0001) and Si(111). Using reflection high-energy electron diffraction, we found that the lattice orientation of the grown Na3Bi thin film was rotated by 30° respect to the surface lattice orientations of these two substrates. An in-situ angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy clearly revealed the 3-dimensional Dirac-cone band structure in such thin films. Our approach of growing Na3Bi thin film provides a potential route for further studying its intriguing electronic properties and for fabricating it into practical devices in future.

  5. Molecular beam epitaxy of SrTiO{sub 3} with a growth window

    SciTech Connect

    Jalan, Bharat; Moetakef, Pouya; Stemmer, Susanne

    2009-07-20

    Many complex oxides with only nonvolatile constituents do not have a wide growth window in conventional molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) approaches, which makes it difficult to obtain stoichiometric films. Here it is shown that a growth window in which the stoichiometry is self-regulating can be achieved for SrTiO{sub 3} films by using a hybrid MBE approach that uses a volatile metal-organic source for Ti, titanium tetra isopropoxide (TTIP). The growth window widens and shifts to higher TTIP/Sr flux ratios with increasing temperature, showing that it is related to the desorption of the volatile TTIP. We demonstrate stoichiometric, highly perfect, insulating SrTiO{sub 3} films. The approach can be adapted for the growth of other complex oxides that previously were believed to have no wide MBE growth window.

  6. Characterization of homoepitaxial p-type ZnO grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Look, D. C.; Reynolds, D. C.; Litton, C. W.; Jones, R. L.; Eason, D. B.; Cantwell, G.

    2002-09-01

    An N-doped, p-type ZnO layer has been grown by molecular beam epitaxy on an Li-diffused, bulk, semi-insulating ZnO substrate. Hall-effect and conductivity measurements on the layer give: resistivity=4 x101 Omega cm; hole mobility=2 cm2/V s; and hole concentration=9 x1016 cm-3. Photoluminescence measurements in this N-doped layer show a much stronger peak near 3.32 eV (probably due to neutral acceptor bound excitons), than at 3.36 eV (neutral donor bound excitons), whereas the opposite is true in undoped ZnO. Calibrated, secondary-ion mass spectroscopy measurements show an N surface concentration of about 1019 cm-3 in the N-doped sample, but only about 1017 cm-3 in the undoped sample.

  7. Growth of high quality AlGaAs by metalorganic molecular beam epitaxy using trimethylamine alane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abernathy, C. R.; Jordan, A. S.; Pearton, S. J.; Hobson, W. S.; Bohling, D. A.; Muhr, G. T.

    1990-06-01

    AlGaAs grown by metalorganic molecular beam epitaxy (MOMBE) has been problematic due to oxygen and carbon contamination, particularly when triethylaluminum (TEAl) has been used as the aluminum source. Consequently, we have investigated trimethylamine alane (TMAAl) as a potential replacement for the conventional metalorganic Al sources. AlGaAs films with excellent structural and optical properties have been grown with this source. Photoluminescence intensities from AlGaAs grown by MOMBE at 500 °C using TMAAl are comparable to those from material grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition at 675 °C using triethylaluminum (TMAl). Carbon and oxygen levels in MOMBE-grown AlGaAs are drastically reduced in comparison to similar films grown with TEAl.

  8. Controlling field-effect mobility in pentacene-based transistors by supersonic molecular-beam deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Toccoli, T.; Pallaoro, A.; Coppede, N.; Iannotta, S.; De Angelis, F.; Mariucci, L.; Fortunato, G.

    2006-03-27

    We show that pentacene field-effect transistors, fabricated by supersonic molecular beams, have a performance strongly depending on the precursor's kinetic energy (K{sub E}). The major role played by K{sub E} is in achieving highly ordered and flat films. In the range K{sub E}{approx_equal}3.5-6.5 eV, the organic field effect transistor linear mobility increases of a factor {approx}5. The highest value (1.0 cm{sup 2} V{sup -1} s{sup -1}) corresponds to very uniform and flat films (layer-by-layer type growth). The temperature dependence of mobility for films grown at K{sub E}>6 eV recalls that of single crystals (bandlike) and shows an opposite trend for films grown at K{sub E}{<=}5.5 eV.

  9. ELM mitigation by means of supersonic molecular beam and pellet injection on the EAST superconducting tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, J. S.; Sun, Z.; Li, C. Z.; Zhen, X. W.; Li, J. G.; Guo, H. Y.; Li, J. H.; Wang, L.; Gan, K. F.; Chen, Y.; Ren, J.; Zuo, G. Z.; Yao, X. J.; Hu, L. Q.; Gong, X. Z.; Wan, B. N.; Zou, X. L.; Mansfield, D. K.; Liang, Y. F.; Vinyar, I.

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we will present experimental results from EAST on the mitigation of edge localized modes (ELMs) using recently developed deuterium/lithium pellet injections as well as supersonic molecular beam injections (SMBI). Using a Laval nozzle, ELM mitigation with SMBI has been demonstrated in EAST in quasi-steady state. Using a D2 pellet injector, a giant ELM appears followed by a burst of high frequency ELMs at ∼300 Hz with duration of a few tens of milliseconds. Furthermore, for the first time, a novel technology using a simple rotating impeller to inject sub-millimeter size lithium (Li) granules at speeds of a few tens of meters per second was successfully used to pace ELMs. These experiments indicate that, on EAST, several technologies can contribute to the database supporting ELMs control in future fusion devices, such as ITER.

  10. Preface of the 18th International Conference on Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, April S.; Ptak, Aaron J.

    2015-09-01

    The first International Conference on Molecular Beam Epitaxy (IC-MBE) was held in Paris in 1978, chaired by Alfred Y. Cho. Every other year since, with the exception of a four-year break after the initial meeting, the IC-MBE has been held in European, Asian, and North American venues. The 18th and latest IC-MBE was held in Flagstaff, Arizona, USA, September 7-12, 2014, and was chaired by Yong-Hang Zhang (Arizona State University). MBE is an advanced crystal growth method that benefits areas from the study of fundamental physics, all the way through the production of devices used in countless fields. IC-MBE brings together researchers from all over the world, and is the premier forum for scientific and technological exchange among researchers investigating all types of materials growth using the MBE technique.

  11. Effects of substrate orientation on the growth of InSb nanostructures by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, C. Y.; Torfi, A.; Pei, C.; Wang, W. I.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, the effects of substrate orientation on InSb quantum structure growth by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) are presented. Motivated by the observation that (411) evolves naturally as a stable facet during MBE crystal growth, comparison studies have been carried out to investigate the effects of the crystal orientation of the underlying GaSb substrate on the growth of InSb by MBE. By depositing InSb on a number of different substrate orientations, namely: (100), (311), (411), and (511), a higher nanostructure density was observed on the (411) surface compared with the other orientations. This result suggests that the (411) orientation presents a superior surface in MBE growth to develop a super-flat GaSb buffer surface, naturally favorable for nanostructure growth.

  12. AlN Nanowall Structures Grown on Si (111) Substrate by Molecular Beam Epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Yosuke; Hane, Kazuhiro

    2015-12-01

    AlN nanowall structures were grown on Si (111) substrate using molecular beam epitaxy at substrate temperature of 700 °C with N/Al flux ratios ranging from 50 to 660. A few types of other AlN nanostructures were also grown under the nitrogen-rich conditions. The AlN nanowalls were ranged typically 60-120 nm in width and from 190 to 470 nm in length by changing N/Al flux ratio. The AlN nanowall structures grown along the c-plane consisted of AlN (0002) crystal with full-width at half maximum of the rocking curve about 5000 arcsec. PMID:26625884

  13. Communication: Global minimum search of Ag{sub 10}{sup +} with molecular beam optical spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Shayeghi, A. Schäfer, R.; Johnston, R. L.

    2014-11-14

    The present study is focused on the optical properties of the Ag{sub 10}{sup +} cluster in the photon energy range ℏω = 1.9–4.4 eV. Absorption spectra are recorded by longitudinal molecular beam depletion spectroscopy and compared to optical response calculations using time-dependent density functional theory. Several cluster isomers obtained by the new pool-based parallel implementation of the Birmingham Cluster Genetic Algorithm, coupled with density functional theory, are used in excited state calculations. The experimental observations, together with additional simulations of ion mobilities for the several geometries found within this work using different models, clearly identify the ground state isomer of Ag{sub 10}{sup +} to be composed of two orthogonal interpenetrating pentagonal bipyramids, having overall D{sub 2d} symmetry.

  14. Laser desorption fast gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in supersonic molecular beams.

    PubMed

    Shahar, T; Dagan, S; Amirav, A

    1998-06-01

    A novel method for fast analysis is presented. It is based on laser desorption injection followed by fast gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in supersonic molecular beams. The sample was placed in an open air or purged laser desorption compartment, held at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature conditions. Desorption was performed with a XeCl Excimer pulsed laser with pulse energy of typically 3 mJ on the surface. About 20 pulses at 50 Hz were applied for sample injection, resulting in about 0.4 s injection time and one or a few micrograms sample vapor or small particles. The laser desorbed sample was further thermally vaporized at a heated frit glass filter located at the fast GC inlet. Ultrafast GC separation and quantification was achieved with a 50-cm-long megabore column operated with a high carrier gas flow rate of up to 240 mL/min. The high carrier gas flow rate provided effective and efficient entrainment of the laser desorbed species in the sweeping gas. Following the fast GC separation, the sample was analyzed by mass spectrometry in supersonic molecular beams. Both electron ionization and hyperthermal surface ionization were employed for enhanced selectivity and sensitivity. Typical laser desorption analysis time was under 10 s. The laser desorption fast GC-MS was studied and demonstrated with the following sample/matrices combinations, all without sample preparation or extraction: (a) traces of dioctylphthalate plasticizer oil on stainless steel surface and the efficiency of its cleaning; (b) the detection of methylparathion and aldicarb pesticides on orange leaves; (c) water surface analysis for the presence of methylparathion pesticide; (d) caffeine analysis in regular and decaffeinated coffee powder; (e) paracetamol and codeine drug analysis in pain relieving drug tablets; (f) caffeine trace analysis in raw urine; (g) blood analysis for the presence of 1 ppm lidocaine drug. The features and advantages of the laser desorption fast GC

  15. Molecular Dynamics simulation of Ru flattening by Gas Cluster Ion Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsukuma, Masaaki; Matsuzaki, Kazuyoshi; Inaba, Kenji; Miura, Ryuji; Suzuki, Ai; Hatakeyama, Nozomu; Miyamoto, Akira

    2014-10-01

    Noble metals such as platinum or ruthenium have been hardly used in the semiconductor devices in spite of their physical and electrical properties, because they were hard to process. High energy monomer ion beams which can cut hard materials may induce structural damages. A gas cluster ion beam (GCIB) consists of a few thousands of atoms or molecules and is accelerated up to several tens keV. GCIB is able to realize localized high energy deposition with low energy per components in the cluster. This means that each component in clusters cannot have enough energy to react with surface. On the other hand, the clusters with tens keV of kinetic energy may make a high reactive field at the hypocenter areas. In consequence it is expected that the GCIB irradiation should achieve the metal processing with low damage. Recently flattening of Ru thin films using GCIB is reported. We conducted molecular dynamics simulation of GCIB incident to Ru surface with the in-house interatomic potential models obtained based on the quantum chemical calculations and found that the internal degree of freedom of a cluster played important roles during the GCIB bombardment.

  16. Positron annihilation studies of defects in molecular beam epitaxy grown III-V layers

    SciTech Connect

    Umlor, M.T.; Keeble, D.J.; Asoka-Kumar, P.; Lynn, K.G.; Cooke, P.W.

    1994-08-01

    A summary of recent positron annihilation experiments on molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) grown III-V layers is Presented. Variable energy positron beam measurements on Al{sub 0.32}Ga{sub 0.68}As undoped and Si doped have been completed. Positron trapping at a open volume defect in Al{sub 0.32}Ga{sub 0.68}:Si for temperatures from 300 to 25 K in the dark was observed. The positron trap was lost after 1.3 eV illumination at 25K. These results indicate an open volume defect is associated with the local structure of the deep donor state of the DX center. Stability of MBE GaAs to thermal annealing war, investigated over the temperature range of 230 to 700{degrees}C, Proximity wafer furnace anneals in flowing argon were used, Samples grown above 450{degrees}C were shown to be stable but for sample below this temperature an anneal induced vacancy related defect was produced for anneals between 400 and 500{degrees}C. The nature of the defect was shown to be different for material grown at 350 and 230{degrees}C. Activation energies of 2.5 eV to 2.3 eV were obtained from isochronal anneal experiments for samples grown at 350 and 230{degrees}C, respectively.

  17. Polarity inversion of N-face GaN by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, M.H.; Mishra, Umesh K.; Wu Feng; Mates, Thomas E.; Speck, James S.

    2008-11-01

    The polarity of GaN grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy was inverted from N-face to Ga-face by simultaneously exposing the surface to Mg and activated N fluxes during a growth interruption at a reduced substrate temperature. Growth studies suggested that a Mg{sub x}N{sub y} compound was responsible for inverting the crystal. The change in polarity was verified in situ by reflection high energy electron diffraction via GaN surface reconstructions, and ex situ by convergent beam electron diffraction and KOH etch studies. The surface of the inverted material showed smooth step flow features. Ga-face high electron mobility transistors with good dc and small signal performance were fabricated on the inverted epilayers. A drain-source current of 0.84 A/mm was measured at a gate-source voltage of +1 V. Current-gain cutoff and maximum oscillation frequencies of 22 and 53 GHz, respectively, were measured in these devices. The device performance is similar to that of Ga-face transistors with comparable dimensions.

  18. State-to-state inelastic and reactive molecular beam scattering from surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Lykke, K.R. ); Kay, B.D. )

    1990-01-01

    Resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) laser spectroscopic and molecular beam-surface scattering techniques are coupled to study inelastic and reactive gas-surface scattering with state-to-state specificity. Rotational, vibrational, translational and angular distributions have been measured for the inelastic scattering of HCI and N {sub 2} from Au(111). In both cases the scattering is direct-inelastic in nature and exhibits interesting dynamical features such as rotational rainbow scattering. In an effort to elucidate the dynamics of chemical reactions occurring on surfaces we have extended our quantum-resolved scattering studies to include the reactive scattering of a beam of gas phase H-atoms from a chlorinated metal surface M-CI. The nascent rotational and vibrational distributions of the HCI product are determined using REMPI. The thermochemistry for this reaction on Au indicates that the product formation proceeding through chemisorbed H-atoms is slightly endothermic while direct reaction of a has phase H-atom with M-CI is highly exothermic (ca. 50 kcal/mole). Details of the experimental techniques, results and implications regarding the scattering dynamics are discussed. 55 ref., 8 fig.

  19. Surface diffusion during shadow-mask-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy of III-V compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Schallenberg, T.; Brunner, K.; Borzenko, T.; Molenkamp, L.W.; Karczewski, G.

    2005-07-01

    We present a comprehensive discussion of molecular-beam epitaxy of III-V compound semiconductors through shadow masks. Based on model calculations and growth experiments, we examine how the surface diffusion and the incorporation of group-III adatoms depend on the growth configuration, group-III and group-V fluxes, and the crystal orientation. According to a macroscopic diffusion model, gradients of the group-V flux drive the unidirectional migration of group-III adatoms. Although this effect is generally observed in the experiments, the different growth profiles obtained for [110]- and [110]-oriented samples reflect the different roles of A-type and B-type steps in the incorporation of group-III adatoms. We also demonstrate that during the heteroepitaxial growth of InAs, the dissociation of the GaAs substrate is locally enhanced by the incidence of the In beam. This effect can be exploited for shadow-mask-assisted etching on selected areas. In addition, we show how the positions and sizes of III-V nanostructures can be controlled with high precision on a planar substrate by the usage of shadow masks with multiple nanoscale apertures.

  20. Surface reconstructions in molecular beam epitaxy of SrTiO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Kajdos, Adam P.; Stemmer, Susanne

    2014-11-10

    We show that reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) can be used as a highly sensitive tool to track surface and resulting film stoichiometry in adsorption-limited molecular beam epitaxy of (001) SrTiO{sub 3} thin films. Even under growth conditions that yield films with a lattice parameter that is identical to that of stoichiometric bulk crystals within the detection limit of high-resolution x-ray diffraction (XRD), changes in surface reconstruction occur from (1 × 1) to (2 × 1) to c(4 × 4) as the equivalent beam pressure of the Ti metalorganic source is increased. These surface reconstructions are correlated with a shift from mixed SrO/TiO{sub 2} termination to pure TiO{sub 2} termination. The crossover to TiO{sub 2} surface termination is also apparent in a phase shift in RHEED oscillations observed at the beginning of growth. Comparison with prior results for carrier mobilities of doped films shows that the best films are grown under conditions of a TiO{sub 2}-saturated surface [c(4 × 4) reconstruction] within the XRD growth window.

  1. Molecular beam epitaxy growth of SnO{sub 2} using a tin chemical precursor

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Tianqi; Prakash, Abhinav; Jalan, Bharat; Warner, Ellis; Gladfelter, Wayne L.

    2015-03-15

    The authors report on the development of a molecular beam epitaxy approach for atomic layer controlled growth of phase-pure, single-crystalline epitaxial SnO{sub 2} films with scalable growth rates using a highly volatile precursor (tetraethyltin) for tin and rf-oxygen plasma for oxygen. Smooth, epitaxial SnO{sub 2} (101) films on r-sapphire (101{sup ¯}2) substrates were grown as a function of tin precursor flux and substrate temperatures between 300 and 900 °C. Three distinct growth regimes were identified where SnO{sub 2} films grew in a reaction-, flux-, and desorption-limited mode, respectively, with increasing substrate temperature. In particular, with increasing tin flux, the growth rates were found to increase and then saturate indicating any excess tin precursor desorbs above a critical beam equivalent pressure of tin precursor. Important implications of growth kinetic behaviors on the self-regulating stoichiometric growth of perovskite stannates are discussed.

  2. Molecular Beam and Surface Science Studies of Heterogeneous Reaction Kinetics Including Combustion Dynamics. Final Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Sibener, S. J.

    2006-06-23

    This research program examined the heterogeneous reaction kinetics and reaction dynamics of surface chemical processes which are of direct relevance to efficient energy production, condensed phase reactions, and mateials growth including nanoscience objectives. We have had several notable scientific and technical successes. Illustrative highlights include: (1) a thorough study of how one can efficiently produce synthesis gas (SynGas) at relatively low Rh(111) catalyst temperatures via the reaction CH{sub4}+1/2 O{sub2} {r_arrow} CO+2H{sub2}. In these studies methane activation is accomplished utilizing high-kinetic energy reagents generated via supersonic molecular beams, (2) experiments which have incisively probed the partial oxidation chemistry of adsorbed 1- and 2- butene on Rh and ice, as well as partial oxidation of propene on Au; (3) investigation of structural changes which occur to the reconstructed (23x{radical}3)-Au(111) surface upon exposure to atomic oxygen, (4) a combined experimental and theoretical examination of the fundamental atomic-level rules which govern defect minimization during the formation of self-organizing stepped nanostructures, (5) the use of these relatively defect-free nanotemplates for growing silicon nanowires having atomically-dimensioned widths, (6) a combined scanning probe and atomic beam scattering study of how the presence of self-assembling organic overlayers interact with metallic supports substrates - this work hs led to revision of the currently held view of how such adsorbates reconfigure surface structure at the atomic level, (7) an inelastic He atom scattering study in which we examined the effect of chain length on the low-energy vibrations of alkanethiol striped phase self-assembled monolayers on Au(111), yielding information on the forces that govern interfacial self-assembly, (8) a study of the vibrational properties of disordered films of SF{sub6} adsorbed on Au(111), and (9) a study of the activated chemistry and

  3. SU-E-T-131: Dosimetric Impact and Evaluation of Different Heterogenity Algorithm in Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Plan for Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy Lung Treatment with the Flattening Filter Free Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, J; Kim, J; Lee, J; Kim, Y

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The present study aimed to investigate the dosimetric impacts of the anisotropic analytic algorithm (AAA) and the Acuros XB (AXB) plan for lung stereotactic ablative radiation therapy using flattening filter-free (FFF) beam. We retrospectively analyzed 10 patients. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 10 patients. The dosimetric parameters for the target and organs at risk (OARs) from the treatment plans calculated with these dose calculation algorithms were compared. The technical parameters, such as the computation times and the total monitor units (MUs), were also evaluated. Results: A comparison of DVHs from AXB and AAA showed that the AXB plan produced a high maximum PTV dose by average 4.40% with a statistical significance but slightly lower mean PTV dose by average 5.20% compared to the AAA plans. The maximum dose to the lung was slightly higher in the AXB compared to the AAA. For both algorithms, the values of V5, V10 and V20 for ipsilateral lung were higher in the AXB plan more than those of AAA. However, these parameters for contralateral lung were comparable. The differences of maximum dose for the spinal cord and heart were also small. The computation time of AXB was found fast with the relative difference of 13.7% than those of AAA. The average of monitor units (MUs) for all patients was higher in AXB plans than in the AAA plans. These results indicated that the difference between AXB and AAA are large in heterogeneous region with low density. Conclusion: The AXB provided the advantages such as the accuracy of calculations and the reduction of the computation time in lung stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) with using FFF beam, especially for VMAT planning. In dose calculation with the media of different density, therefore, the careful attention should be taken regarding the impacts of different heterogeneity correction algorithms. The authors report no conflicts of interest.

  4. Growth of SrVO{sub 3} thin films by hybrid molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, Craig; Brahlek, Matthew; Engel-Herbert, Roman; Moyer, Jarrett A.; Alipour, Hamideh M.; Grimley, Everett D.; LeBeau, James M.

    2015-11-15

    The authors report the growth of stoichiometric SrVO{sub 3} thin films on (LaAlO{sub 3}){sub 0.3}(Sr{sub 2}AlTaO{sub 6}){sub 0.7} (001) substrates using hybrid molecular beam epitaxy. This growth approach employs a conventional effusion cell to supply elemental A-site Sr and the metalorganic precursor vanadium oxytriisopropoxide (VTIP) to supply vanadium. Oxygen is supplied in its molecular form through a gas inlet. An optimal VTIP:Sr flux ratio has been identified using reflection high-energy electron-diffraction, x-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and scanning transmission electron microscopy, demonstrating stoichiometric SrVO{sub 3} films with atomically flat surface morphology. Away from the optimal VTIP:Sr flux, characteristic changes in the crystalline structure and surface morphology of the films were found, enabling identification of the type of nonstoichiometry. For optimal VTIP:Sr flux ratios, high quality SrVO{sub 3} thin films were obtained with smallest deviation of the lattice parameter from the ideal value and with atomically smooth surfaces, indicative of the good cation stoichiometry achieved by this growth technique.

  5. Diffusion-driven growth of nanowires by low-temperature molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rueda-Fonseca, P.; Orrò, M.; Bellet-Amalric, E.; Robin, E.; Den Hertog, M.; Genuist, Y.; André, R.; Tatarenko, S.; Cibert, J.

    2016-04-01

    With ZnTe as an example, we use two different methods to unravel the characteristics of the growth of nanowires (NWs) by gold-catalyzed molecular beam epitaxy at low temperature. In the first approach, CdTe insertions have been used as markers, and the nanowires have been characterized by scanning transmission electron microscopy, including geometrical phase analysis and energy dispersive electron spectrometry; the second approach uses scanning electron microscopy and the statistics of the relationship between the length of the tapered nanowires and their base diameter. Axial and radial growth are quantified using a diffusion-limited model adapted to the growth conditions; analytical expressions describe well the relationship between the NW length and the total molecular flux (taking into account the orientation of the effusion cells), and the catalyst-nanowire contact area. A long incubation time is observed. This analysis allows us to assess the evolution of the diffusion lengths on the substrate and along the nanowire sidewalls, as a function of temperature and deviation from stoichiometric flux.

  6. Pyrolysis-Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry to Characterize Soil Organic Matter Composition in Chemically Isolated Fractions from Differing Land Uses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Questions concerning the role of soil organic matter (SOM) in soil fertility, ecosystem functioning and global change requires knowledge of the controls on SOM stabilization and their interactions. Pyrolysis molecular beam mass spectrometry (py-MBMS) provides a powerful and rapid means of characteri...

  7. Growth of EuO/Si and EuO/SrO/Si heteroepitaxial structures by molecular-beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Teterin, P. E. Averyanov, D. V.; Sadofyev, Yu. G. Parfenov, O. E.; Likhachev, I. A.; Storchak, V. G.

    2015-01-15

    Epitaxial EuO thin films with thickness up to 60 nm have been grown by molecular beam epitaxy both on SrO sublayers and directly on Si (001) substrates. Crystal structure has been controlled in situ by reflection high energy electron diffraction. Ex situ studies by X-ray diffraction and Rutherford backscattering have confirmed high crystalline quality of the films.

  8. Modeling CO{sub 2} Laser Ablative Impulse with Polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Sinko, John E.; Phipps, Claude R.; Sasoh, Akihiro

    2010-10-08

    Laser ablation vaporization models have usually ignored the spatial dependence of the laser beam. Here, we consider effects from modeling using a Gaussian beam for both photochemical and photothermal conditions. The modeling results are compared to experimental and literature data for CO{sub 2} laser ablation of the polymer polyoxymethylene under vacuum, and discussed in terms of the ablated mass areal density and momentum coupling coefficient. Extending the scope of discussion, laser ablative impulse generation research has lacked a cohesive strategy for linking the vaporization and plasma regimes. Existing models, mostly formulated for ultraviolet laser systems or metal targets, appear to be inappropriate or impractical for applications requiring CO{sub 2} laser ablation of polymers. A recently proposed method for linking the vaporization and plasma regimes for analytical modeling is addressed here along with the implications of its use. Key control parameters are considered, along with the major propulsion parameters needed for laser ablation propulsion modeling.

  9. Thermal Ablation of Lung Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sonntag, P. David; Hinshaw, J. Louis; Lubner, Meghan G.; Brace, Christopher L.; Lee, Fred T.

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer death in the United States, accounting for an estimated 29% of cancer deaths in 2009.1 Pneumonectomy or lobectomy with hilar and mediastinal lymph node sampling is the gold standard treatment and offers the best option for cure of stage 1/2 nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC).2 Unfortunately, only 15% of patients present with stage 1/2 disease, and many of these patients do not meet the pulmonary physiologic guidelines for lobar resection.3 In addition to lung cancer, pulmonary metastases are present in 25% to 30% of patients dying from all types of cancer.4 For some patients with oligometastatic pulmonary disease, metastectomy is associated with an improvement in survival.5 External beam radiation traditionally has been offered as the alternative to surgical resection for NSCLC or pulmonary metastatic disease. Unfortunately, the 5-year survival following radiation for stage 1 and 2 NSCLC remains low at 15% to 20%, with local recurrence being the most common mode of failure.6,7 Thermal ablation offers an intriguing therapeutic option to increase local tumor control and survival in patients with early stage NSCLC or with limited metastatic disease from nonlung primaries who are not surgical candidates because of poor cardiopulmonary reserve, anatomic constraints limiting resection, failure of traditional therapies, or refusal of operative approaches. Thermal ablation has been shown to be effective in treating tumors in bone, kidney, and liver.8–11 Most preclinical and clinical trials have focused on demonstrating the feasibility of three modalities for pulmonary thermal ablation, namely radiofrequency (RF) ablation, microwave (MW) ablation, and cryoablation. This article discusses the unique challenges of performing thermal ablation in lung tissue and reviews the current literature regarding RF, MW, and cryoablation in the lung. PMID:21377589

  10. In vitro investigation of intra-canal dentine-laser beam interaction aspects: II. Evaluation of ablation zone extent and morphology.

    PubMed

    Minas, Nova Hambersom; Gutknecht, Norbert; Lampert, Friedrich

    2010-11-01

    Laser endodontic tips appear to provide a promising alternative to available treatment modalities in the field of endodontology. With the shortcomings in published results regarding the intra-canal behavioural aspects of those tips, it was the aim of this study to investigate the extent of the intra-canal ablation zone and the pattern associated with those tips. Ninety intact extracted bovine teeth were used to prepare mid-root testing cylinders. The samples were divided into three groups (A, B, C), corresponding to the tip diameters. Each group was further subdivided to be irradiated at three different power settings (1500 mW, 1750 mW, 2000 mW) with an erbium, chromium:yttrium-scandium-gallium-garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) laser with a 65% water to 35% air ratio. Collected data were subjected to analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Tukey test. At a chosen significance level of alpha = 1%, no statistical difference was found among the groups (P > 0.01). The results suggest that shortening of the estimated working length is mandatory for the use of those tips within the canal, and that, provided that certain measurements are used for intra-canal laser ablation, this is a secure mode of treatment. Further investigation and system improvement will be required for more satisfactory results. PMID:19727921

  11. Chemical and molecular beam epitaxy of III-V nanowires on silicon for photovoltaic application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhakrishnan, Gokul

    Nanowires, due to their unique structure and carrier transport abilities, have sparked huge interest in the semiconductor industry. An array of nanometric size wires inserted between the p and n conductivity regions of a conventional solar cell or core shell type p-n junction nanowires synergized with semiconductor nanocrystals can lead to faster carrier collection, thereby improving device performance. This work investigates the growth of GaAs and InP semiconductor nanowires on silicon (111) using Chemical Beam Epitaxy (CBE) and Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE). Uniform gold nanoparticles acting as growth centers in the Vapor Liquid Solid mode of growth were generated by using the cheap and rapid technique called Nanosphere Lithography (NSL). Variation of the experimental parameters during NSL resulted in honeycomb and hexagonal patterns of gold nanoparticles. A high degree of selectivity was obtained for CBE grown nanowires whereas the MBE grown GaAs nanowires revealed the formation of a thick polycrystalline wetting layer at the interface. The CBE grown InP nanowires mostly maintained the honeycomb structure although they were found to be oriented contrary to the expected <111> direction. SEM analysis of GaAs nanowires grown by CBE showed that during growth, the nanowires may coalesce with each other resulting in unique structures such as bipods, tripods and multipods. High resolution TEM analysis of single GaAs nanowires revealed periodic formation of contrasting materials. Diffraction patterns recorded at these dark contrast areas confirmed the formation of hexagonal wurtzite single crystal structures interspaced with cubic zincblende single crystal structures. These nanowires can be used for photovoltaic applications or as light emitting devices. In addition, the formation of superlattices of different crystal structures can pave the way for novel quantum confined optoelectronic devices.

  12. INFRARED VIBRATIONAL PREDISSOCIATION SPECTROSCOPY OF WATER CLUSTERS BY THE CROSSED LASER MOLECULAR BEAM TECHNIQUE

    SciTech Connect

    Vernon, M.F.; Krajnovich, D.J.; Kwok, H.S.; Lisy, J.M.; Shen, Y.R.; Lee, Y.T.

    1981-11-01

    Water clusters formed in a molecular beam are predissociated by tunable, pulsed, infrared radiation in the frequency range 2900~3750 cm{sup -1}. The recoiling fragments are detected off axis from the molecular beam using a rotatable mass spectrometer. Arguments are presented which show that the measured frequency dependent signal at a fixed detector angle is proportional to the absorption spectrum of the clusters. It is found that the spectra of clusters containing three or more water molecules are remarkably similar to the liquid phase spectrum. Dynamical information on the predissociation process is obtained from the velocity distribution of the fragments. An upper limit to the excited vibrational state lifetime of ~1 microsecond is observed for the results reported here. The most probable dissociation process concentrates the available excess energy into the internal motions of the fragment molecules. Both the time scale and translational energy distribution are consistent with the qualitative predictions of current theoretical models for cluster predissociation. From adiabatic dissociation trajectories and Monte Carlo simulations it is seen that the strong coupling present in the water polymers probably invalidates the simpler "diatomic" picture formulations of cluster predissociation. Instead, the energy can be extensively shared among the intermolecular motions in the polymer before dissociation. Comparison between current intermolecular potentials describing liquid water and the observed frequencies is made in the normal mode approximation. The inability of any potential to predict the gross spectral features (the number of bands and their observed frequency shift from the gas phase monomer) suggests that substantial improvement in the potential energy functions are possible, but that more accurate methods of solving the vibrational wave equation are necessary before a proper explanation of the spectral fine structure is possible. The observed differences

  13. Ultraviolet femtosecond and nanosecond laser ablation of silicon: Ablation efficiency and laser-induced plasma expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Xianzhong; Mao, Xianglei; Greif, Ralph; Russo, Richard E.

    2004-03-23

    Femtosecond laser ablation of silicon in air was studied and compared with nanosecond laser ablation at ultraviolet wavelength (266 nm). Laser ablation efficiency was studied by measuring crater depth as a function of pulse number. For the same number of laser pulses, the fs-ablated crater was about two times deeper than the ns-crater. The temperature and electron number density of the pulsed laser-induced plasma were determined from spectroscopic measurements. The electron number density and temperature of fs-pulse plasmas decreased faster than ns-pulse plasmas due to different energy deposition mechanisms. Images of the laser-induced plasma were obtained with femtosecond time-resolved laser shadowgraph imaging. Plasma expansion in both the perpendicular and the lateral directions to the laser beam were compared for femtosecond and nanosecond laser ablation.

  14. Dynamic grazing incidence fast atom diffraction during molecular beam epitaxial growth of GaAs

    SciTech Connect

    Atkinson, P. Eddrief, M.; Etgens, V. H.; Khemliche, H. Debiossac, M.; Mulier, M.; Lalmi, B.; Roncin, P.; Momeni, A.

    2014-07-14

    A Grazing Incidence Fast Atom Diffraction (GIFAD) system has been mounted on a commercial molecular beam epitaxy chamber and used to monitor GaAs growth in real-time. In contrast to the conventionally used Reflection High Energy Electron Diffraction, all the GIFAD diffraction orders oscillate in phase, with the change in intensity related to diffuse scattering at step edges. We show that the scattered intensity integrated over the Laue circle is a robust method to monitor the periodic change in surface roughness during layer-by-layer growth, with oscillation phase and amplitude independent of incidence angle and crystal orientation. When there is a change in surface reconstruction at the start of growth, GIFAD intensity oscillations show that there is a corresponding delay in the onset of layer-by-layer growth. In addition, changes in the relative intensity of different diffraction orders have been observed during growth showing that GIFAD has the potential to provide insight into the preferential adatom attachment sites on the surface reconstruction during growth.

  15. In-situ spectral reflectance for improving molecular beam epitaxy device growth

    SciTech Connect

    Breiland, W.G.; Hammons, B.E.; Hou, H.Q.; Killeen, K.P.; Klem, J.F.; Reno, J.L.; Sherwin, M.

    1997-05-01

    This report summarizes the development of in situ spectral reflectance as a tool for improving the quality, reproducibility, and yield of device structures grown from compound semiconductors. Although initially targeted at MBE (Molecular Beam Epitaxy) machines, equipment difficulties forced the authors to test most of their ideas on a MOCVD (Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition) reactor. A pre-growth control strategy using in situ reflectance has led to an unprecedented demonstration of process control on one of the most difficult device structures that can be grown with compound semiconductor materials. Hundreds of vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSEL`s) were grown with only {+-} 0.3% deviations in the Fabry-Perot cavity wavelength--a nearly ten-fold improvement over current calibration methods. The success of the ADVISOR (Analysis of Deposition using Virtual Interfaces and Spectroscopic Optical Reflectance) method has led to a great deal of interest from the commercial sector, including use by Hewlett Packard and Honeywell. The algorithms, software and reflectance design are being evaluated for patents and/or license agreements. A small company, Filmetrics, Inc., is incorporating the ADVISOR analysis method in its reflectometer product.

  16. Magnetotransport in MgO-based magnetic tunnel junctions grown by molecular beam epitaxy (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Andrieu, S. Bonell, F.; Hauet, T.; Montaigne, F.; Lefevre, P.; Bertran, F.

    2014-05-07

    The strong impact of molecular beam epitaxy growth and Synchrotron Radiation characterization tools in the understanding of fundamental issues in nanomagnetism and spintronics is illustrated through the example of fully epitaxial MgO-based Magnetic Tunnel Junctions (MTJs). If ab initio calculations predict very high tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) in such devices, some discrepancy between theory and experiments still exists. The influence of imperfections in real systems has thus to be considered like surface contaminations, structural defects, unexpected electronic states, etc. The influence of possible oxygen contamination at the Fe/MgO(001) interface is thus studied, and is shown to be not so detrimental to TMR as predicted by ab initio calculations. On the contrary, the decrease of dislocations density in the MgO barrier of MTJs using Fe{sub 1−x}V{sub x} electrodes is shown to significantly increase TMR. Finally, unexpected transport properties in Fe{sub 1−X}Co{sub x}/MgO/Fe{sub 1−X}Co{sub x} (001) are presented. With the help of spin and symmetry resolved photoemission and ab initio calculation, the TMR decrease for Co content higher than 25% is shown to come from the existence of an interface state and the shift of the empty Δ1 minority spin state towards the Fermi level.

  17. Relevant characteristics of undoped GaMnN grown by using molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. W.; Shon, Yoon; Subramaniam, N. G.; Park, C. S.; Kim, E. K.; Im, Hyunsik; Kim, H. S.

    2015-08-01

    GaN:Mn epilayers were grown on Al2O3 substrate by using molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Xray diffraction (XRD) data showed intrinsic GaMnN and precipitates including MnGa and MnN. PL transitions (e, Mn) and (D, Mn) related to Mn were remarkably activated. Clear ferromagnetic hysteresis loops were obtained in both samples, which means a good formation of ferromagnetic coupling. The M-T curves revealed a curie temperature ( T c ) of 140 ~ 170 K which is intrinsic to GaMnN and a Tc of above 300 K which is due to the MnGa and the MnN precipitates. The samples clearly displayed a magnetic resonance at a field of around 200 - 400 mT. Electron spin resonance (ESR) data showed that the shift of (H center ) ( i. e., H center = 337 - H center [mT]) were greater than 20 mT for samples, and the appearance of a Hcenter with a positive H center is indicative of the samples having obvious ferromagnetism. The incorporated Mn ions are in a 2+ ionic state ( i. e., Mn2+) because Mn2+ with a spin state of S = 5/2 typically exhibits a magnetic resonance with g ≈ 2 when Mn is doped into semiconductors.

  18. Laser-assisted metalorganic molecular beam epitaxy of GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, V. M.; Tu, C. W.; Beggy, J. C.; McCrary, V. R.; Lamont, M. G.; Harris, T. D.; Baiocchi, F. A.; Farrow, R. C.

    1988-03-01

    We report preliminary studies of the growth of homoepitaxial GaAs by laser-assisted metalorganic molecular beam epitaxy, using triethylgallium (TEGa) and As4 sources and a 193 nm ArF excimer laser. Laser irradiation results in a high, selective-area growth rate at temperatures below 450 °C, where pyrolytic growth is very slow. The process is extremely efficient, with roughly unit probability for impinging TEGa molecules sticking and being dissociated by laser radiation to form GaAs. From the strong dependence on laser fluence, the growth enhancement process appears to be pyrolytic in nature (because of transient heating by the pulsed laser) and not photolytic. The cross section for photolysis must be at least ten times lower than the gas-phase value (9×10-18 cm2). The surface morphology of films grown at 400 °C is rough at threshold fluences (˜0.10 J/cm2), but becomes smooth at higher fluences (˜0.13 J/cm2). These regions with relatively smooth surfaces exhibit enhanced photoluminescence yields compared to areas receiving less intense laser radiation.

  19. High response solar-blind MgZnO photodetectors grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenfeld, Winston V.; Wei, Ming; Boutwell, R. Casey; Liu, Huiyong

    2014-03-01

    High quality w-MgxZn1-xO thin films were grown epitaxially on c-plane sapphire substrates by plasma-assisted Molecular Beam Epitaxy. ZnO thin films with high crystalline quality, low defect and dislocation densities, and subnanometer surface roughness were achieved by applying a low temperature nucleation layer. By tuning Mg/Zn flux ratio, wurtzite MgxZn1-xO thin films with Mg composition as high as x=0.46 were obtained without phase segregation. Metal- Semiconductor-Metal (MSM) photoconductive and Schottky barrier devices with interdigitated electrode geometry and active surface area of 1 mm2 were fabricated and characterized. Resultant devices showed ~100 A/W peak responsivity at wavelength of ~260nm. We also report on cubic rock salt c-MgxZn1-xO thin films, following a non-traditional approach on MgO substrates, to demonstrate solar-blind photoresponse in MSM photodetectors, realizing a peak responsivity of 460 A/W (@ 250 nm) and 12.6 mA/W (@ 240nm) for mixed phase and single crystal films, respectively. A specific focus of the work is on identifying the impact of various growth parameters on the performance of the c- MgZnO detectors.

  20. Electrical and optical properties of Fe doped AlGaN grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Polyakov, A. Y.; Smirnov, N. B.; Govorkov, A. V.; Kozhukhova, E. A.; Dabiran, A. M.; Chow, P. P.; Wowchak, A. M.; Pearton, S. J.

    2010-01-15

    Electrical and optical properties of AlGaN grown by molecular beam epitaxy were studied in the Al composition range 15%-45%. Undoped films were semi-insulating, with the Fermi level pinned near E{sub c}-0.6-0.7 eV. Si doping to (5-7)x10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} rendered the 15% Al films conducting n-type, but a large portion of the donors were relatively deep (activation energy 95 meV), with a 0.15 eV barrier for capture of electrons giving rise to strong persistent photoconductivity (PPC) effects. The optical threshold of this effect was {approx}1 eV. Doping with Fe to a concentration of {approx}10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} led to decrease in concentration of uncompensated donors, suggesting compensation by Fe acceptors. Addition of Fe strongly suppressed the formation of PPC-active centers in favor of ordinary shallow donors. For higher Al compositions, Si doping of (5-7)x10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} did not lead to n-type conductivity. Fe doping shifted the bandedge luminescence by 25-50 meV depending on Al composition. The dominant defect band in microcathodoluminescence spectra was the blue band near 3 eV, with the energy weakly dependent on composition.

  1. Hollow-anode plasma source for molecular beam epitaxy of gallium nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, A.; Newman, N.; Rubin, M.; Dickinson, M.; Thomson, A.; Jones, E.; Phatak, P.; Gassmann, A.

    1995-09-01

    GaN films have been grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) using a hollow-anode nitrogen plasma source. The source was developed to minimize defect formation as a result of contamination and ion damage. The hollow-anode discharge is a special form of glow discharge with very small anode area. A positive anode voltage drop of 30--40 V and an increased anode sheath thickness leads to ignition of a relatively dense plasma in front of the anode hole. Driven by the pressure gradient, the ``anode`` plasma forms a bright plasma jet streaming with supersonic velocity towards the substrate. Films of GaN have been grown on (0001) SiC and (0001) Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} at a temperature from 600--800 C. The films were investigated by photoluminescence, cathodoluminescence, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray fluorescence. The film with the highest structural quality had a rocking curve with 5 arcmin, the lowest reported value for MBE growth to date.

  2. Molecular beam epitaxy of single phase GeMnTe with high ferromagnetic transition temperature.

    PubMed

    Hassan, M; Springholz, G; Lechner, R T; Groiss, H; Kirchschlager, R; Bauer, G

    2011-05-15

    Ferromagnetic Ge(1-x)Mn(x)Te is a promising candidate for diluted magnetic semiconductors because solid solutions exist over a wide range of compositions up to x(Mn)≈0.5, where a maximum in the total magnetization occurs. In this work, a systematic study of molecular beam epitaxy of GeMnTe on (1 1 1) BaF(2) substrates is presented, in which the Mn concentration as well as growth conditions were varied over a wide range. The results demonstrate that single phase growth of GeMnTe can be achieved only in a narrow window of growth conditions, whereas at low as well as high temperatures secondary phases or even phase separation occurs. The formation of secondary phases strongly reduces the layer magnetization as well as the Curie temperatures. Under optimized conditions, single phase GeMnTe layers are obtained with Curie temperatures as high as 200 K for Mn concentrations close to the solubility limit of x(Mn)=50%. PMID:21776175

  3. Strain-Engineered Graphene Grown on Hexagonal Boron Nitride by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    PubMed Central

    Summerfield, Alex; Davies, Andrew; Cheng, Tin S.; Korolkov, Vladimir V.; Cho, YongJin; Mellor, Christopher J.; Foxon, C. Thomas; Khlobystov, Andrei N.; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Eaves, Laurence; Novikov, Sergei V.; Beton, Peter H.

    2016-01-01

    Graphene grown by high temperature molecular beam epitaxy on hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) forms continuous domains with dimensions of order 20 μm, and exhibits moiré patterns with large periodicities, up to ~30 nm, indicating that the layers are highly strained. Topological defects in the moiré patterns are observed and attributed to the relaxation of graphene islands which nucleate at different sites and subsequently coalesce. In addition, cracks are formed leading to strain relaxation, highly anisotropic strain fields, and abrupt boundaries between regions with different moiré periods. These cracks can also be formed by modification of the layers with a local probe resulting in the contraction and physical displacement of graphene layers. The Raman spectra of regions with a large moiré period reveal split and shifted G and 2D peaks confirming the presence of strain. Our work demonstrates a new approach to the growth of epitaxial graphene and a means of generating and modifying strain in graphene. PMID:26928710

  4. Structural and Magnetic Characterization of EuTe/SnTe Superlattices Grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, B.; Abramof, E.; Rappl, P. H. O.; Granado, E.; Chitta, V. A.; Henriques, A. B.; Oliveira, N. F. Jr.

    2010-01-04

    Here we investigate the structural and magnetic properties of 24 repetitions EuTe/SnTe superlattices (SLs), with 3 monolayers (ML) EuTe films and SnTe thicknesses between 13 and 36 ML. The SLs were grown by molecular beam epitaxy on 3 {mu}m SnTe buffer layers, grown on top of (111)BaF{sub 2} substrates. High resolution x-ray diffraction measurements indicated that the SLs with thicker SnTe layers have higher structural quality. This is due to the SnTe growth mode on EuTe, which starts in islands and evolves to layer-by-layer. The magnetic diffraction peak observed for the higher quality SLs proved the existence of antiferromagnetic order within the individual EuTe layers. Decreasing the width of the non-magnetic SnTe layers resulted in rougher interfaces, and the fading of the magnetic peak signal. The magnetization versus applied field curves indicated that the magnetic moments of SLs with thinner SnTe layers were also harder to align along the field direction. We interpret our results considering the loss of Eu neighbors, related with the increasing roughness of the SL interfaces.

  5. Growth kinetics and island evolution during double-pulsed molecular beam epitaxy of InN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, A.; Hein, C.; Bremers, H.; Rossow, U.; Hangleiter, A.

    2016-06-01

    The kinetic processes of InN growth using alternating source fluxes with sub-monolayer In pulses in plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy have been investigated. Growth at various temperatures reveals the existence of two growth regimes. While growth at low temperatures is solely governed by surface diffusion, a combination of decomposition, desorption, and diffusion becomes decisive at growth temperatures of 470 °C and above. At this critical temperature, the surface morphology changes from a grainy structure to a structure made of huge islands. The formation of those islands is attributed to the development of an indium adlayer, which can be observed via reflection high energy electron diffraction monitoring. Based on the growth experiments conducted at temperatures below TGrowth = 470 °C, an activation energy for diffusion of 0.54 ± 0.02 eV has been determined from the decreasing InN island density. A comparison between growth on metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy GaN templates and pseudo bulk GaN indicates that step edges and dislocations are favorable nucleation sites. Based on the results, we developed a growth model, which describes the main mechanisms of the growth.

  6. Strain-Engineered Graphene Grown on Hexagonal Boron Nitride by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summerfield, Alex; Davies, Andrew; Cheng, Tin S.; Korolkov, Vladimir V.; Cho, Yongjin; Mellor, Christopher J.; Foxon, C. Thomas; Khlobystov, Andrei N.; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Eaves, Laurence; Novikov, Sergei V.; Beton, Peter H.

    2016-03-01

    Graphene grown by high temperature molecular beam epitaxy on hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) forms continuous domains with dimensions of order 20 μm, and exhibits moiré patterns with large periodicities, up to ~30 nm, indicating that the layers are highly strained. Topological defects in the moiré patterns are observed and attributed to the relaxation of graphene islands which nucleate at different sites and subsequently coalesce. In addition, cracks are formed leading to strain relaxation, highly anisotropic strain fields, and abrupt boundaries between regions with different moiré periods. These cracks can also be formed by modification of the layers with a local probe resulting in the contraction and physical displacement of graphene layers. The Raman spectra of regions with a large moiré period reveal split and shifted G and 2D peaks confirming the presence of strain. Our work demonstrates a new approach to the growth of epitaxial graphene and a means of generating and modifying strain in graphene.

  7. Molecular-beam epitaxy of CdTe on large area Si(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sporken, R.; Lange, M. D.; Faurie, J. P.; Petruzzello, J.

    1991-10-01

    We have grown CdTe directly on 2- and 5-in. diam Si(100) by molecular-beam epitaxy and characterized the layers by in situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction, double crystal x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and low-temperature photoluminescence. The films are up to 10-μm thick and mirror-like over their entire surface. Even on 5-in. diam wafers, the structural and thickness uniformity is excellent. Two domains, oriented 90° apart, are observed in the CdTe films on oriented Si(100) substrates, whereas single-domain films are grown on Si(100) titled 6° or 8° toward [011]. The layers on misoriented substrates have better morphology than those on oriented Si(100), and the substrate tilt also eliminates twinning in the CdTe layers. First attempts to grow HgCdTe on Si(100 with a CdTe buffer layer have produced up to 10-μm thick layers with cutoff wavelengths between 5 and 10-μm and with an average full width at half-maximum of the double-crystal x-ray diffraction peaks of 200 arc s.

  8. Magnetotransport in MgO-based magnetic tunnel junctions grown by molecular beam epitaxy (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrieu, S.; Bonell, F.; Hauet, T.; Montaigne, F.; Calmels, L.; Snoeck, E.; Lefevre, P.; Bertran, F.

    2014-05-01

    The strong impact of molecular beam epitaxy growth and Synchrotron Radiation characterization tools in the understanding of fundamental issues in nanomagnetism and spintronics is illustrated through the example of fully epitaxial MgO-based Magnetic Tunnel Junctions (MTJs). If ab initio calculations predict very high tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) in such devices, some discrepancy between theory and experiments still exists. The influence of imperfections in real systems has thus to be considered like surface contaminations, structural defects, unexpected electronic states, etc. The influence of possible oxygen contamination at the Fe/MgO(001) interface is thus studied, and is shown to be not so detrimental to TMR as predicted by ab initio calculations. On the contrary, the decrease of dislocations density in the MgO barrier of MTJs using Fe1-xVx electrodes is shown to significantly increase TMR. Finally, unexpected transport properties in Fe1-XCox/MgO/Fe1-XCox (001) are presented. With the help of spin and symmetry resolved photoemission and ab initio calculation, the TMR decrease for Co content higher than 25% is shown to come from the existence of an interface state and the shift of the empty Δ1 minority spin state towards the Fermi level.

  9. Coherent growth of superconducting TiN thin films by plasma enhanced molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Krockenberger, Yoshiharu; Karimoto, Shin-ichi; Yamamoto, Hideki; Semba, Kouich

    2012-10-15

    We have investigated the formation of titanium nitride (TiN) thin films on (001) MgO substrates by molecular beam epitaxy and radio frequency acitvated nitrogen plasma. Although cubic TiN is stabile over a wide temperature range, superconducting TiN films are exclusively obtained when the substrate temperature exceeds 710 Degree-Sign C. TiN films grown at 720 Degree-Sign C show a high residual resistivity ratio of approximately 11 and the superconducting transition temperature (T{sub c}) is well above 5 K. Superconductivity has been confirmed also by magnetiztion measurements. In addition, we determined the upper critical magnetic field ({mu}{sub 0}H{sub c2}) as well as the corresponding coherence length ({xi}{sub GL}) by transport measurements under high magnetic fields. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy data revealed full in plane coherency to the substrate as well as a low defect density in the film, in agreement with a mean-free path length Script-Small-L Almost-Equal-To 106 nm, which is estimated from the residual resistivity value. The observations of reflection high energy electron diffraction intensity oscillations during the growth, distinct Laue fringes around the main Bragg peaks, and higher order diffraction spots in the reciprocal space map suggest the full controlability of the thickness of high quality superconducting TiN thin films.

  10. Structural and optical properties of dilute InAsN grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibáñez, J.; Oliva, R.; De la Mare, M.; Schmidbauer, M.; Hernández, S.; Pellegrino, P.; Scurr, D. J.; Cuscó, R.; Artús, L.; Shafi, M.; Mari, R. H.; Henini, M.; Zhuang, Q.; Godenir, A.; Krier, A.

    2010-11-01

    We perform a structural and optical characterization of InAs1-xNx epilayers grown by molecular beam epitaxy on InAs substrates (x ≲2.2%). High-resolution x-ray diffraction (HRXRD) is used to obtain information about the crystal quality and the strain state of the samples and to determine the N content of the films. The composition of two of the samples investigated is also obtained with time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (ToF-SIMS) measurements. The combined analysis of the HRXRD and ToF-SIMS data suggests that the lattice parameter of InAsN might significantly deviate from Vegard's law. Raman scattering and far-infrared reflectivity measurements have been carried out to investigate the incorporation of N into the InAsN alloy. N-related local vibrational modes are detected in the samples with higher N content. The origin of the observed features is discussed. We study the compositional dependence of the room-temperature band gap energy of the InAsN alloy. For this purpose, photoluminescence and optical absorption measurements are presented. The results are analyzed in terms of the band-anticrossing (BAC) model. We find that the room-temperature coupling parameter for InAsN within the BAC model is CNM=2.0±0.1 eV.

  11. Growth Parameters for Thin Film InBi Grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keen, B.; Makin, R.; Stampe, P. A.; Kennedy, R. J.; Sallis, S.; Piper, L. J.; McCombe, B.; Durbin, S. M.

    2014-04-01

    The alloying of bismuth with III-V semiconductors, in particular GaAs and InAs thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), has attracted considerable interest due to the accompanying changes in band structure and lattice constant. Specifically, bismuth incorporation in these compounds results in both a reduction in band gap (through shifting of the valence band) and an increase in the lattice constant of the alloy. To fully understand the composition of these alloys, a better understanding of the binary endpoints is needed. At present, a limited amount of literature exists on the III-Bi family of materials, most of which is theoretical work based on density functional theory calculations. The only III-Bi material known to exist (in bulk crystal form) is InBi, but its electrical properties have not been sufficiently studied and, to date, the material has not been fabricated as a thin film. We have successfully deposited crystalline InBi on (100) GaAs substrates using MBE. Wetting of the substrate is poor, and regions of varying composition exist across the substrate. To obtain InBi, the growth temperature had to be below 100 °C. It was found that film crystallinity improved with reduced Bi flux, into an In-rich regime. Additionally, attempts were made to grow AlBi and GaBi.

  12. A Molecular Beam Study of the Helium Absorption by Amorphous and Crystalline Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayotte, Patrick; Daschbach, John L.; Kimmel, Greg A.; Dohnálek, Zdenek; Smith, R. Scott; Kay, Bruce D.

    2001-03-01

    Molecular beam and thermal desorption techniques are employed to study the absorption of He atoms by thin amorphous and crystalline ice films at low temperatures. The He absorption probability increases strongly with increasing translational energy and decreases dramatically as the incident angle is moved away from the surface normal. These findings are indicative of a large activation barrier and a strong steric effect for the insertion of the He atoms into the bulk. Comparison between crystalline and amorphous ice suggests that absorption into the bulk occurs through hexagonal ring structures existing at the ice surface. We also observe significant diffusion of the absorbed He atoms deeper into the bulk at temperatures as low as 20 K. This diffusion occurs at a rate several orders of magnitude greater than expected classically from the known barrier of 12 kJ/mole and is consistent with a low-temperature transport mechanism involving thermally assisted tunneling. The details of the experimental findings and their implications will be presented. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for the U.S. Department of Energy by Battelle Memorial Institute under contract DE-AC06-76RLO 1830.

  13. The competing oxide and sub-oxide formation in metal-oxide molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Patrick; Bierwagen, Oliver

    2015-02-01

    The hetero-epitaxial growth of the n-type semiconducting oxides β-Ga2O3, In2O3, and SnO2 on c- and r-plane sapphire was performed by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The growth-rate and desorbing flux from the substrate were measured in-situ under various oxygen to metal ratios by laser reflectometry and quadrupole mass spectrometry, respectively. These measurements clarified the role of volatile sub-oxide formation (Ga2O, In2O, and SnO) during growth, the sub-oxide stoichiometry, and the efficiency of oxide formation for the three oxides. As a result, the formation of the sub-oxides decreased the growth-rate under metal-rich growth conditions and resulted in etching of the oxide film by supplying only metal flux. The flux ratio for the exclusive formation of the sub-oxide (e.g., the p-type semiconductor SnO) was determined, and the efficiency of oxide formation was found to be the highest for SnO2, somewhat lower for In2O3, and the lowest for Ga2O3. Our findings can be generalized to further oxides that possess related sub-oxides.

  14. InGaP grown on Ge (100) by molecular beam epitaxy: a spectroscopic ellipsometry study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Costa, Vijay Richard; Khai Loke, Wan; Zhou, Qian; Fatt Yoon, Soon; Yeo, Yee-Chia

    2016-03-01

    We investigated the optical properties of disordered In0.52Ga0.48P alloys by spectroscopic ellipsometry in the far-infrared to ultraviolet energy range (0.037-5.1 eV). The alloys were grown on Ge (100) substrate by solid-source molecular beam epitaxy. The far-infrared dielectric function reveals two absorption peaks that can be attributed to InP- and GaP-like vibrational modes. The visible-UV dielectric function of In0.52Ga0.48P alloys nearly lattice-matched to Ge shows the critical points E 0, E 1, and E 2, energies of which are determined using a derivative analysis. A weak transition that can be identified as the E 1 + Δ1 critical point is revealed. The vibrational frequencies and the transition energies in In0.52Ga0.48P are lower relative to In0.49Ga0.51P lattice-matched to GaAs. The downward shifts in E 0 and phonons can be estimated using the compositional dependence of E 0 and phonons of bulk alloys.

  15. Usage of antimony segregation for selective doping of Si in molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Yurasov, D. V.; Drozdov, M. N.; Murel, A. V.; Shaleev, M. V.; Novikov, A. V.; Zakharov, N. D.

    2011-06-01

    An original approach to selective doping of Si by antimony (Sb) in molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) is proposed and verified experimentally. This approach is based on controllable utilization of the effect of Sb segregation. In particular, the sharp dependence of Sb segregation on growth temperature in the range of 300-550 deg. C is exploited. The growth temperature variations between the kinetically limited and maximum segregation regimes are suggested to be utilized in order to obtain selectively doped structures with abrupt doping profiles. It is demonstrated that the proposed technique allows formation of selectively doped Si:Sb layers, including delta ({delta}-)doped layers in which Sb concentrations can be varied from 5 x 10{sup 15} to 10{sup 20} cm{sup -3}. The obtained doped structures are shown to have a high crystalline quality and the short-term growth interruptions, which are needed to change the substrate temperature, do not lead to any significant accumulation of background impurities in grown samples. Realization of the proposed approach requires neither too low (<300 deg. C), nor too high (>600 deg. C) growth temperatures or any special equipment for the MBE machines.

  16. Growth of epitaxial ZnO films on sapphire substrates by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyndman, Adam R.; Allen, Martin W.; Reeves, Roger J.

    2014-03-01

    Epitaxial layers of ZnO have been grown on c-plane, (0001) sapphire substrates by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The oxygen:zinc flux ratio was found to be crucial in obtaining a film with a smooth surface and good crystallinity. When increasing film thickness from ~80 to 220 nm we observed an increase in the streakiness of RHEED images, and XRD revealed a reduction in crystal strain and increase in crystal alignment. A film with surface roughness of 0.5 nm and a XRD rocking curve FWHM of 0.1 for the main ZnO peak (0002) was achieved by depositing a low temperature ZnO buffer layer at 450 °C and then growing for 120 minutes at 700 °C with a Zn-cell temperature of 320 °C and an oxygen partial pressure of 7e-7 Torr. We found novel structures on two samples grown outside of our ideal oxygen:zinc flux ratio. SEM images of a sample believed to have been grown in a Zn-rich environment showed flower like structures up to 150 um in diameter which appear to have formed during growth. Another sample believed to have been deposited in a Zn-deficient environment had rings approximately 1.5 um in diameter scattered on its surface.

  17. Multiferroic fluoride BaCoF4 Thin Films Grown Via Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, Pavel; Johnson, Trent; García-Castro, Camilo; Kc, Amit; Schrecongost, Dustin; Cen, Cheng; Romero, Aldo; Lederman, David

    Multiferroic materials exhibit exciting physics related to the simultaneous presence of multiple long-range orders, in many cases consisting of antiferromagnetic (AF) and ferroelectric (FE) orderings. In order to provide a new, promising route for fluoride-based multiferroic material engineering, we grew multiferroic fluoride BaCoF4 in thin film form on Al2O3 (0001) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. The films grow with the orthorhombic b-axis out-of-plane and with three in-plane structural twin domains along the polar c-axis directions. The FE ordering in thin films was verified by FE remanent hysteresis loops measurements at T = 14 K and by room temperature piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM). An AF behavior was found below Neel temperature TN ~ 80 K, which is in agreement with the bulk properties. At lower temperatures two additional magnetic phase transitions at 19 K and 41 K were found. First-principles calculations demonstrated that the growth strain applied to the bulk BaCoF4 indeed favors two canted spin orders, along the b- and a-axes, respectively, in addition to the main AF spin order along the c-axis. Supported by FAME (Contract 2013-MA-2382), WV Research Challenge Grant (HEPC.dsr.12.29), and DMREF-NSF 1434897.

  18. Photodiode properties of molecular beam epitaxial InSb on a heavily doped substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Weiguo; Fan, Huitao; Peng, Zhenyu; Zhang, Liang; Zhang, Xiaolei; Zhang, Lei; Lu, Zhengxiong; Si, Junjie; Emelyanov, E.; Putyato, M.; Semyagin, B.; Pchelyakov, O.; Preobrazhenskii, V.

    2014-01-01

    Photodiodes of InSb were fabricated on an epitaxial layer grown using molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Thermal cleaning of the InSb (0 0 1) substrate surface, 2° towards the (1 1 1) B plane, was performed to remove the oxide. Photodiode properties of МВЕ-formed epitaxial InSb were demonstrated. Zero-bias resistance area product (R0A) measurements were taken at 80 K under room temperature background for a pixel size of 100 μm × 100 μm. Values were as high as 4.36 × 104 Ω/cm2, and the average value of R0A was 1.66 × 104 Ω/cm2. The peak response was 2.44 (A/W). The epitaxial InSb photodiodes were fabricated using the same process as bulk crystal InSb diodes with the exception of the junction formation method. These values are comparable to the properties of bulk crystal InSb photodiodes.

  19. Carbon doping in molecular beam epitaxy of GaAs from a heated graphite filament

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malik, R. J.; Nottenberg, R. N.; Schubert, E. F.; Walker, J. F.; Ryan, R. W.

    1988-01-01

    Carbon doping of GaAs grown by molecular beam epitaxy has been obtained for the first time by use of a heated graphite filament. Controlled carbon acceptor concentrations over the range of 10 to the 17th-10 to the 20th/cu cm were achieved by resistively heating a graphite filament with a direct current power supply. Capacitance-voltage, p/n junction and secondary-ion mass spectrometry measurements indicate that there is negligible diffusion of carbon during growth and with postgrowth rapid thermal annealing. Carbon was used for p-type doping in the base of Npn AlGaAs/GaAs heterojunction bipolar transistors. Current gains greater than 100 and near-ideal emitter heterojunctions were obtained in transistors with a carbon base doping of 1 x 10 to the 19th/cu cm. These preliminary results indicate that carbon doping from a solid graphite source may be an attractive substitute for beryllium, which is known to have a relatively high diffusion coefficient in GaAs.

  20. The competing oxide and sub-oxide formation in metal-oxide molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, Patrick; Bierwagen, Oliver

    2015-02-23

    The hetero-epitaxial growth of the n-type semiconducting oxides β-Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3}, In{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and SnO{sub 2} on c- and r-plane sapphire was performed by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The growth-rate and desorbing flux from the substrate were measured in-situ under various oxygen to metal ratios by laser reflectometry and quadrupole mass spectrometry, respectively. These measurements clarified the role of volatile sub-oxide formation (Ga{sub 2}O, In{sub 2}O, and SnO) during growth, the sub-oxide stoichiometry, and the efficiency of oxide formation for the three oxides. As a result, the formation of the sub-oxides decreased the growth-rate under metal-rich growth conditions and resulted in etching of the oxide film by supplying only metal flux. The flux ratio for the exclusive formation of the sub-oxide (e.g., the p-type semiconductor SnO) was determined, and the efficiency of oxide formation was found to be the highest for SnO{sub 2}, somewhat lower for In{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and the lowest for Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Our findings can be generalized to further oxides that possess related sub-oxides.

  1. Growth of very large InN microcrystals by molecular beam epitaxy using epitaxial lateral overgrowth

    SciTech Connect

    Kamimura, J.; Kishino, K.; Kikuchi, A.

    2015-02-28

    Very thick InN (∼40 μm) was grown by molecular beam epitaxy using the epitaxial lateral overgrowth (ELO) technique. In some regions, the ELO of InN was observed as expected, indicating an important step toward fabricating quasi-bulk InN substrates. Interestingly, most parts of the sample consist of large flat-topped microcrystals and well-faceted microstructures. This is likely due to local growth condition variations during ELO, which is supported by an experiment where ELO of InN was performed on a substrate with various stripe mask patterns. TEM characterization of a flat top InN microcrystal revealed few stacking faults and only related threading dislocations. Defect-free small faceted microcrystals were also observed. The thick InN crystals show a narrow photoluminescence spectrum with a peak at 0.679 eV and linewidth of 16.8 meV at 4 K.

  2. Comparisons between tokamak fueling of gas puffing and supersonic molecular beam injection in 2D simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Y. L.; Wang, Z. H.; Xu, X. Q.; Li, H. D.; Feng, H.; Sun, W. G.

    2015-01-15

    Plasma fueling with high efficiency and deep injection is very important to enable fusion power performance requirements. It is a powerful and efficient way to study neutral transport dynamics and find methods of improving the fueling performance by doing large scale simulations. Two basic fueling methods, gas puffing (GP) and supersonic molecular beam injection (SMBI), are simulated and compared in realistic divertor geometry of the HL-2A tokamak with a newly developed module, named trans-neut, within the framework of BOUT++ boundary plasma turbulence code [Z. H. Wang et al., Nucl. Fusion 54, 043019 (2014)]. The physical model includes plasma density, heat and momentum transport equations along with neutral density, and momentum transport equations. Transport dynamics and profile evolutions of both plasma and neutrals are simulated and compared between GP and SMBI in both poloidal and radial directions, which are quite different from one and the other. It finds that the neutrals can penetrate about four centimeters inside the last closed (magnetic) flux surface during SMBI, while they are all deposited outside of the LCF during GP. It is the radial convection and larger inflowing flux which lead to the deeper penetration depth of SMBI and higher fueling efficiency compared to GP.

  3. Photoluminescence of localized excitons in ZnCdO thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, T. Y.; Huang, Y. S.; Hu, S. Y.; Lee, Y. C.; Tiong, K. K.; Chang, C. C.; Shen, J. L.; Chou, W. C.

    2016-07-01

    We have investigated the luminescence characteristics of Zn1-xCdxO thin films with different Cd contents grown by molecular beam epitaxy system. The temperature-dependent photoluminescence (PL) and excitation power-dependent PL spectra were measured to clarify the luminescence mechanisms of the Zn1-xCdxO thin films. The peak energy of the Zn1-xCdxO thin films with increasing the Cd concentration is observed as redshift and can be fitted by the quadratic function of alloy content. The broadened full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) estimated from the 15 K PL spectra as a function of Cd content shows a larger deviation between the experimental values and theoretical curve, which indicates that experimental FWHM values are affected not only by alloy compositional disorder but also by localized excitons occupying states in the tail of the density of states. The Urbach energy determined from an analysis of the lineshape of the low-energy side of the PL spectrum and the degree of localization effect estimated from the temperature-induced S-shaped PL peak position described an increasing mean exciton-localization effects in ZnCdO films with increasing the Cd content. In addition, the PL intensity and peak position as a function of excitation power are carried out to clarify the types of radiative recombination and the effects of localized exciton in the ZnCdO films with different Cd contents.

  4. Influence of growth conditions on tin incorporation in GaAs grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandre, F.; Raisin, C.; Abdalla, M.I.; Brenac, A.; Masson, J.M.

    1980-08-01

    Intentional perturbations applied to the growth parameters of Sn-doped GaAs layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy have been performed in order to investigate the tin incorporation mechanism. The start, the interruption, and the end of growth as well as a variation of fluxes or substrate temperature have been studied, using either the Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) measurement of tin accumulation on the surface, or C-V derived free-carrier concentration profile versus any of these growth parameters. The theoretical model proposed by Wood and Joyce, based on a time-delayed incorporation mechanism, has been found to fit the observed results, especially for As-rich surface, provided that an incorporation mechanism of second order is assumed. For Ga-rich conditions (T/sub s/>580 /sup 0/C), a new result has been recognized, i.e., a significant reduction of carrier concentration as T/sub s/ is increased. The assumption of a partially acceptor nature of tin incident atoms under these growth conditions does not seem to fully explain this result. On the other hand, this may be better understood assuming a certain amount of tin atoms being re-evaporated in the high substrate temperature range. This behavior induces a temporarily weaker accumulation at the surface, and hence a relatively smaller incorporation rate.

  5. Molecular beam epitaxy growth and magnetic properties of Cr-Co-Ga Heusler alloy films

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Wuwei Wang, Weihua; Zhao, Chenglong; Van Quang, Nguyen; Cho, Sunglae; Dung, Dang Duc

    2015-11-15

    We have re-investigated growth and magnetic properties of Cr{sub 2}CoGa films using molecular beam epitaxy technique. Phase separation and precipitate formation were observed experimentally again in agreement with observation of multiple phases separation in sputtered Cr{sub 2}CoGa films by M. Meinert et al. However, significant phase separation could be suppressed by proper control of growth conditions. We showed that Cr{sub 2}CoGa Heusler phase, rather than Co{sub 2}CrGa phase, constitutes the majority of the sample grown on GaAs(001) at 450 {sup o}C. The measured small spin moment of Cr{sub 2}CoGa is in agreement with predicted HM-FCF nature; however, its Curie temperature is not as high as expected from the theoretical prediction probably due to the off-stoichiometry of Cr{sub 2}CoGa and the existence of the disorders and phase separation.

  6. Strain-Engineered Graphene Grown on Hexagonal Boron Nitride by Molecular Beam Epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Summerfield, Alex; Davies, Andrew; Cheng, Tin S; Korolkov, Vladimir V; Cho, YongJin; Mellor, Christopher J; Foxon, C Thomas; Khlobystov, Andrei N; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Eaves, Laurence; Novikov, Sergei V; Beton, Peter H

    2016-01-01

    Graphene grown by high temperature molecular beam epitaxy on hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) forms continuous domains with dimensions of order 20 μm, and exhibits moiré patterns with large periodicities, up to ~30 nm, indicating that the layers are highly strained. Topological defects in the moiré patterns are observed and attributed to the relaxation of graphene islands which nucleate at different sites and subsequently coalesce. In addition, cracks are formed leading to strain relaxation, highly anisotropic strain fields, and abrupt boundaries between regions with different moiré periods. These cracks can also be formed by modification of the layers with a local probe resulting in the contraction and physical displacement of graphene layers. The Raman spectra of regions with a large moiré period reveal split and shifted G and 2D peaks confirming the presence of strain. Our work demonstrates a new approach to the growth of epitaxial graphene and a means of generating and modifying strain in graphene. PMID:26928710

  7. Plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy of SnO 2 on TiO 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, M. Y.; White, M. E.; Speck, J. S.

    2008-08-01

    Epitaxial growth of SnO 2 on TiO 2 (1 1 0) substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy was studied under various growth conditions to explore the potential for high-quality single crystalline growth. Phase-pure (1 1 0)-oriented SnO 2 films with an optimum on-axis X-ray rocking curve scan full-width at half-maximum equal to 0.612° were grown. The film epitaxy proceeded in the Volmer-Weber growth mode. We identified different growth regimes by measuring growth rate variations correlated with increasing tin fluxes at a fixed oxygen pressure. Beginning in the oxygen-rich growth regime, growth rates increased linearly as the tin flux increased. Atomically flat surfaces were observed in the oxygen-rich regime. Continued tin flux increases resulted in a maximum growth rate of 470 nm/h. Further tin flux increases prevented SnO 2 formation on the growth surface and acted as a nucleation barrier of SnO 2 on the TiO 2 substrates identifying a metal-rich growth regime.

  8. Hybrid molecular beam epitaxy for the growth of stoichiometric BaSnO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Prakash, Abhinav Dewey, John; Yun, Hwanhui; Jeong, Jong Seok; Mkhoyan, K. Andre; Jalan, Bharat

    2015-11-15

    Owing to its high room-temperature electron mobility and wide bandgap, BaSnO{sub 3} has recently become of significant interest for potential room-temperature oxide electronics. A hybrid molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) approach for the growth of high-quality BaSnO{sub 3} films is developed in this work. This approach employs hexamethylditin as a chemical precursor for tin, an effusion cell for barium, and a radio frequency plasma source for oxygen. BaSnO{sub 3} films were thus grown on SrTiO{sub 3} (001) and LaAlO{sub 3} (001) substrates. Growth conditions for stoichiometric BaSnO{sub 3} were identified. Reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) intensity oscillations, characteristic of a layer-by-layer growth mode were observed. A critical thickness of ∼1 nm for strain relaxation was determined for films grown on SrTiO{sub 3} using in situ RHEED. Scanning transmission electron microscopy combined with electron energy-loss spectroscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy confirmed the cube-on-cube epitaxy and composition. The importance of precursor chemistry is discussed in the context of the MBE growth of BaSnO{sub 3}.

  9. Angular intensity distribution of a molecular oxygen beam scattered from a graphite surface.

    PubMed

    Oh, Junepyo; Kondo, Takahiro; Arakawa, Keitaro; Saito, Yoshihiko; Hayes, W W; Manson, J R; Nakamura, Junji

    2011-06-30

    The scattering of the oxygen molecule from a graphite surface has been studied using a molecular beam scattering technique. The angular intensity distributions of scattered oxygen molecules were measured at incident energies from 291 to 614 meV with surface temperatures from 150 to 500 K. Every observed distribution has a single peak at a larger final angle than the specular angle of 45° which indicates that the normal component of the translation energy of the oxygen molecule is lost by the collision with the graphite surface. The amount of the energy loss by the collision has been roughly estimated as about 30-41% based on the assumption of the tangential momentum conservation during the collision. The distributions have also been analyzed with two theoretical models, the hard cubes model and the smooth surface model. These results indicate that the scattering is dominated by a single collision event of the particle with a flat surface having a large effective mass. The derived effective mass of the graphite surface for the incoming oxygen is 9-12 times heavier than that of a single carbon atom, suggesting a large cooperative motion of the carbon atoms in the topmost graphene layer. PMID:21446680

  10. Growth of GaN nanowall network on Si (111) substrate by molecular beam epitaxy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    GaN nanowall network was epitaxially grown on Si (111) substrate by molecular beam epitaxy. GaN nanowalls overlap and interlace with one another, together with large numbers of holes, forming a continuous porous GaN nanowall network. The width of the GaN nanowall can be controlled, ranging from 30 to 200 nm by adjusting the N/Ga ratio. Characterization results of a transmission electron microscope and X-ray diffraction show that the GaN nanowall is well oriented along the C axis. Strong band edge emission centered at 363 nm is observed in the spectrum of room temperature photoluminescence, indicating that the GaN nanowall network is of high quality. The sheet resistance of the Si-doped GaN nanowall network along the lateral direction was 58 Ω/. The conductive porous nanowall network can be useful for integrated gas sensors due to the large surface area-to-volume ratio and electrical conductivity along the lateral direction by combining with Si micromachining. PMID:23270331

  11. Formation of Ga droplets on patterned GaAs (100) by molecular beam epitaxy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the formation of Ga droplets on photo-lithographically patterned GaAs (100) and the control of the size and density of Ga droplets by droplet epitaxy using molecular beam epitaxy are demonstrated. In extension of our previous result from the journal Physical Status Solidi A, volume 209 in 2012, the sharp contrast of the size and density of Ga droplets is clearly observed by high-resolution scanning electron microscope, atomic force microscope, and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry. Also, additional monolayer (ML) coverage is added to strength the result. The density of droplets is an order of magnitude higher on the trench area (etched area), while the size of droplets is much larger on the strip top area (un-etched area). A systematic variation of ML coverage results in an establishment of the control of size and density of Ga droplets. The cross-sectional line profile analysis and root mean square roughness analysis show that the trench area (etched area) is approximately six times rougher. The atomic surface roughness is suggested to be the main cause of the sharp contrast of the size and density of Ga droplets and is discussed in terms of surface diffusion. PMID:23033893

  12. GaAs surface cleaning by thermal oxidation and sublimation in molecular-beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Junji; Nanbu, Kazuo; Ishikawa, Tomonori; Kondo, Kazuo

    1988-01-01

    GaAs surface cleaning by thermal oxidation and sublimation prior to molecular-beam-epitaxial growth has been investigated as a means of reducing the carrier depletion at the substrate and epitaxial layer interface. The carrier depletion between the substrate and epitaxial films, measured by a C-V carrier profiling technique, was shown to decrease significantly with an increase in the thickness of the thermal oxidation. The concentration of carbon contamination near the substrate-epitaxial interface was measured using secondary ion mass spectroscopy. The carbon concentration correlated very well with the carrier depletion. Therefore, the main origin of the carrier depletion is believed to be the carbon concentration of the initial growth surface. Based on these results, the thermal oxidation and sublimation of a semi-insulating GaAs substrate was successfully applied to improve the mobility and sheet concentration of the two-dimensional electron gas in selectively doped GaAs/N-Al0.3Ga0.7As heterostructures with very thin GaAs buffer layers.

  13. Study on Oxidation of Cu and Cu3Au Surfaces with Hyperthermal Oxygen Molecular Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Michio; Teraoka, Yuden

    Corrosion wastes more than a few percent of the world's GDP every year. The initial stage of the corrosion is one of the central topics in material science. The oxidation is one of the major corrosion processes of metals. Thus, the study of the oxidation process on metal surfaces is generally interesting in various fields of science and technology. The growth of a protective thin surface layer, which prevents further oxidation into bulk of a metal, requires the formation of a homogeneous film. One simple way for the protection of underlying metals is surface alloying, combining different substances to form multi-component surfaces. The surface alloying leads to the formation of a protective oxide layer due to the preferential oxidation of one component, possibly with surface segregation. Copper and copper alloys have wide industrial applications, and therefore are of interest for studies of oxidation mechanism, especially in the Cu2O formation. Cu forms the stable Cu2O, while Au does not form a stable oxide and is not soluble into stable Cu2O. Thus, the Cu-Au alloy system is ideal for investigating the effect of alloying on the formation of protective layer against further oxidation into bulk. Here, we introduce our recent comparative studies of the oxidation of Cu(100) and Cu3Au(100) with hyperthermal O2 molecular beam and discuss why Cu3Au(100) is protective against the oxidation.

  14. Comparisons between tokamak fueling of gas puffing and supersonic molecular beam injection in 2D simulations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhou, Y. L.; Wang, Z. H.; Xu, X. Q.; Li, H. D.; Feng, H.; Sun, W. G.

    2015-01-09

    Plasma fueling with high efficiency and deep injection is very important to enable fusion power performance requirements. It is a powerful and efficient way to study neutral transport dynamics and find methods of improving the fueling performance by doing large scale simulations. Furthermore, two basic fueling methods, gas puffing (GP) and supersonic molecular beam injection (SMBI), are simulated and compared in realistic divertor geometry of the HL-2A tokamak with a newly developed module, named trans-neut, within the framework of BOUT++ boundary plasma turbulence code [Z. H. Wang et al., Nucl. Fusion 54, 043019 (2014)]. The physical model includes plasma density,more » heat and momentum transport equations along with neutral density, and momentum transport equations. In transport dynamics and profile evolutions of both plasma and neutrals are simulated and compared between GP and SMBI in both poloidal and radial directions, which are quite different from one and the other. It finds that the neutrals can penetrate about four centimeters inside the last closed (magnetic) flux surface during SMBI, while they are all deposited outside of the LCF during GP. Moreover, it is the radial convection and larger inflowing flux which lead to the deeper penetration depth of SMBI and higher fueling efficiency compared to GP.« less

  15. Growth and magnetic property of antiperovskite manganese nitride films doped with Cu by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Fengmei; Ren, Lizhu; Meng, Meng; Wang, Yunjia; Yang, Mei; Wu, Shuxiang; Li, Shuwei

    2014-04-07

    Manganese nitrides thin films on MgO (100) substrates with and without Cu-doping have been fabricated by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Antiperovskite compounds Mn{sub 3.6}Cu{sub 0.4}N have been grown in the case of Cu-doping, and the pure Mn{sub 3}N{sub 2} single crystal has been obtained without Cu-doping. The Mn{sub 3.6}Cu{sub 0.4}N exhibits ferrimagnetism, and the magnetization of Mn{sub 3.6}Cu{sub 0.4}N increases upon the temperature decreasing from 300 K to 5 K, similar to Mn{sub 4}N. The exchange bias (EB) effects emerge in the Mn{sub 3.6}Cu{sub 0.4}N films. The EB behavior is originated from the interfaces between ferrimagnetic Mn{sub 3.6}Cu{sub 0.4}N and antiferromagnetic metal Mn, which is verified to be formed by the data of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The present results not only provide a strategy for producing functional antiperovskite manganese nitrides, but also shed promising light on fabricating the exchange bias part of spintronic devices.

  16. Growth and properties of GdTiO3 films prepared by hybrid molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moetakef, Pouya; Ouellette, Daniel G.; Zhang, Jack Y.; Cain, Tyler A.; Allen, S. James; Stemmer, Susanne

    2012-09-01

    The paper reports on the thin film growth of a protoptype Mott insulator, ferrimagnetic GdTiO3, using shuttered molecular beam epitaxy. Substrates were (001) (LaAlO3)0.3(Sr2AlTaO6)0.7 (LSAT), with and without epitaxial SrTiO3 buffer layers, respectively. It was found that on bare LSAT, the starting monolayer was crucial for stabilizing the GdTiO3 perovskite phase. The quality of the films was evaluated using structural, electric, optical and magnetic characterization. Structural characterization showed that the GdTiO3 layers were free of pyrochlore impurity phases and that the lattice parameter was close to what was expected for coherently strained, stoichiometric GdTiO3. The room temperature film resistivity was 7 Ωcm and increased with decreasing temperature, consistent with Mott insulating characteristics. The Curie temperature was 30 K and a small coercivity was observed at 2 K, in good agreement with bulk GdTiO3 properties reported in the literature.

  17. Molecular beam epitaxial growth of Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} nanowires and nanoflakes

    SciTech Connect

    Knebl, G. M. Gessler, J. R.; Kamp, M.; Höfling, S.

    2014-09-29

    Topological Insulators are in focus of immense research efforts and rapid scientific progress is obtained in that field. Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} has proven to be a topological insulator material that provides a large band gap and a band structure with a single Dirac cone at the Γ-point. This makes Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} one of the most promising three dimensional topological insulator materials. While Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} nanowires and nanoflakes so far were fabricated with different methods and for different purposes, we here present the first Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} nanowires as well as nanoflakes grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The nanostructures were nucleated on pretreated, silicon (100) wafers. Altering the growth conditions nanoflakes could be fabricated instead of nanowires; both with high crystalline quality, confirmed by scanning electron microscopy as well as transmission electron microscopy. These nanostructures have promise for spintronic devices and Majorana fermion observation in contact to superconductor materials.

  18. Silicon sample holder for molecular beam epitaxy on pre-fabricated integrated circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoenk, Michael E. (Inventor); Grunthaner, Paula J. (Inventor); Grunthaner, Frank J. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The sample holder of the invention is formed of the same semiconductor crystal as the integrated circuit on which the molecular beam expitaxial process is to be performed. In the preferred embodiment, the sample holder comprises three stacked micro-machined silicon wafers: a silicon base wafer having a square micro-machined center opening corresponding in size and shape to the active area of a CCD imager chip, a silicon center wafer micro-machined as an annulus having radially inwardly pointing fingers whose ends abut the edges of and center the CCD imager chip within the annulus, and a silicon top wafer micro-machined as an annulus having cantilevered membranes which extend over the top of the CCD imager chip. The micro-machined silicon wafers are stacked in the order given above with the CCD imager chip centered in the center wafer and sandwiched between the base and top wafers. The thickness of the center wafer is about 20% less than the thickness of the CCD imager chip. Preferably, four titanium wires, each grasping the edges of the top and base wafers, compress all three wafers together, flexing the cantilever fingers of the top wafer to accommodate the thickness of the CCD imager chip, acting as a spring holding the CCD imager chip in place.

  19. Epitaxial Cd3As2 Thin Films Synthesized by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumann, Timo; Goyal, Manik; Stemmer, Susanne

    Cd3As2 is a three-dimensional (3D) Dirac semimetal, i.e. it possesses Dirac cones in a 3D bulk state where the band dispersion relation is linear near the Fermi energy. Cd3As2 is has raised considerable interest due to its high electron mobilities in bulk crystals and for novel quantum phenomena, such as chiral anomalies. However, few studies have been performed using thin films of Cd3As2. In this presentation, we report on the synthesis of Cd3As2 thin films by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Single phase, epitaxial films were grown on undoped GaSb(111)B substrates with the (112) facet of Cd3As2 parallel to the GaSb(111) surface. We report on the structural quality and orientation variants in the films. Electrical transport properties indicate electron mobilities exceeding 6000 cm2V-1s-1. We discuss the impact of the MBE growth parameters and substrate preparation on the structural and electrical properties of the films.

  20. InAlN/GaN Bragg reflectors grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Gacevic, Z.; Fernandez-Garrido, S.; Calleja, E.; Estrade, S.

    2010-12-01

    We report on molecular beam epitaxy growth and characterization of ten-period lattice-matched InAlN/GaN distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs), with peak reflectivity centered around 400 nm. Thanks to the well tuned ternary alloy composition, crack-free surfaces have been obtained, as confirmed by both optical and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Their good periodicity and well-defined interfaces have been confirmed by both x-ray diffraction and TEM measurements. Peak reflectivity values as high as 60% with stop bands of 30 nm have been demonstrated. Optical measurements revealed that discrepancy between the obtained (60%) and the theoretically expected ({approx}75%) reflectivity is a consequence of significant residual absorption ({approx}35%). TEM measurements revealed the coexistence of zinc-blende and wurtzite phases, as well as planar defects, mainly in GaN. These defects are suggested as the potential source of the undesired absorption and/or scattering effects that lowered the DBRs' peak reflectivity.

  1. Structural and optical properties of dilute InAsN grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Ibanez, J.; Oliva, R.; De la Mare, M.; Zhuang, Q.; Godenir, A.; Krier, A.; Schmidbauer, M.; Hernandez, S.; Pellegrino, P.; Scurr, D. J.; Cusco, R.; Artus, L.; Shafi, M.; Mari, R. H.; Henini, M.

    2010-11-15

    We perform a structural and optical characterization of InAs{sub 1-x}N{sub x} epilayers grown by molecular beam epitaxy on InAs substrates (x < or approx. 2.2%). High-resolution x-ray diffraction (HRXRD) is used to obtain information about the crystal quality and the strain state of the samples and to determine the N content of the films. The composition of two of the samples investigated is also obtained with time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (ToF-SIMS) measurements. The combined analysis of the HRXRD and ToF-SIMS data suggests that the lattice parameter of InAsN might significantly deviate from Vegard's law. Raman scattering and far-infrared reflectivity measurements have been carried out to investigate the incorporation of N into the InAsN alloy. N-related local vibrational modes are detected in the samples with higher N content. The origin of the observed features is discussed. We study the compositional dependence of the room-temperature band gap energy of the InAsN alloy. For this purpose, photoluminescence and optical absorption measurements are presented. The results are analyzed in terms of the band-anticrossing (BAC) model. We find that the room-temperature coupling parameter for InAsN within the BAC model is C{sub NM}=2.0{+-}0.1 eV.

  2. Molecular beam epitaxy control of the structural, optical, and electronic properties of ScN(001)

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Arthur R.; AL-Brithen, Hamad A. H.; Ingram, David C.; Gall, Daniel

    2001-08-15

    Scandium nitride (001) oriented layers have been grown on magnesium oxide (001) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy using a rf-plasma source and a scandium effusion cell. The Sc/N flux ratio is found to be critical in determining the structural, optical, and electronic properties of the grown epitaxial layers. A distinct transition occurs at the point where the Sc/N flux ratio equals 1, which defines the line between N-rich and Sc-rich growth. Under N-rich conditions, the growth is epitaxial, and the surface morphology is characterized by a densely packed array of square-shaped plateaus and four-faced pyramids with the terraces between steps being atomically smooth. The films are stoichiometric and transparent with a direct optical transition at 2.15 eV. Under Sc-rich conditions, the growth is also epitaxial, but the morphology is dominated by spiral growth mounds. The morphology change is consistent with increased surface diffusion due to a Sc-rich surface. Excess Sc leads to understoichiometric layers with N vacancies which act as donors. The increased carrier density results in an optical reflection edge at 1 eV, absorption below the 2.15 eV band gap, and a drop in electrical resistivity. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  3. A CROSSED MOLECULAR BEAMS STUDY ON THE FORMATION OF THE EXOTIC CYANOETHYNYL RADICAL IN TITAN'S ATMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, X.; Kaiser, R. I.; Mebel, A. M.; Kislov, V. V.; Klippenstein, S. J.; Harding, L. B.; Liang, M. C.; Yung, Y. L.

    2009-08-20

    The reaction of the dicarbon molecule (C{sub 2}) in its {sup 1}{sigma}{sub g} {sup +} electronic ground state with hydrogen cyanide HCN(X{sup 1}{sigma}{sup +}) is investigated in a crossed molecular beam setup to untangle the formation of the cyanoethynyl radical CCCN(X{sup 2}{sigma}{sup +}) in hydrocarbon-rich atmospheres of planets and their moons such as Titan. Combined with electronic structure and rate theory calculations, we show that this elementary reaction is rapid, has no entrance barriers, and yields CCCN via successive rearrangements of the initial HC{sub 3}N collision complex to the cyanoacetylene intermediate (HCCCN) followed by unimolecular decomposition of the latter without exit barrier. New photochemical models imply that this radical could serve as a key building block to form more complex molecules as observed in situ by the Cassini spacecraft, ultimately leading to organic aerosol particles, which make up the orange-brownish haze layers in Titan's atmosphere.

  4. A crossed molecular beams study on the formation of the exotic cyanoethynyl radical in Titan's atmosphere.

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, X.; Kaiser, R. I.; Mebel, A. M.; Kislov, V. V.; Klippenstein, S. J.; Harding, L. B.; Liang, M. C.; Yung, Y. L.

    2009-08-01

    The reaction of the dicarbon molecule (C{sub 2}) in its {sup 1}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup +} electronic ground state with hydrogen cyanide HCN(X{sup 1}{Sigma}{sup +}) is investigated in a crossed molecular beam setup to untangle the formation of the cyanoethynyl radical CCCN(X{sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +}) in hydrocarbon-rich atmospheres of planets and their moons such as Titan. Combined with electronic structure and rate theory calculations, we show that this elementary reaction is rapid, has no entrance barriers, and yields CCCN via successive rearrangements of the initial HC{sub 3}N collision complex to the cyanoacetylene intermediate (HCCCN) followed by unimolecular decomposition of the latter without exit barrier. New photochemical models imply that this radical could serve as a key building block to form more complex molecules as observed in situ by the Cassini spacecraft, ultimately leading to organic aerosol particles, which make up the orange-brownish haze layers in Titan's atmosphere.

  5. Magneto-Transport Studies of Molecular Beam Epitaxial Grown Osmium Silicides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottier, Ryan; Zhao, Wei; Amir, Fatima; Hossain, Khalid; Anibou, Noureddine; Donner, Wolfgang; Golding, Terry

    2006-03-01

    Semiconducting transition metal silicides present a possible solution to on-chip integration of optical and electronic Si-based circuitry. Two phases of osmium silicide (OsSi2 and Os2Si3) are predicted to have promising optical characteristics but require additional development to fully determine their feasibility for high-quality devices. This study has been motivated by reports that OsSi2 has a bandgap between 1.4--1.8eV [1, 2] and Os2Si3 may have a direct bandgap of 0.95 eV [3] or 2.3 eV [1]. In this paper we will present temperature dependent (20 < T < 300 K) magneto Hall measurements of molecular beam epitaxial grown osmium silicide thin films. Os and Si were coevaporated onto Si(100) substrates at varying growth rates and temperatures. XRD was performed in order to identify the silicide phases present. We will discuss our results in relation to the known phase diagrams and our growth parameters. [1] L. Schellenberg et al., J. Less-Common Met. 144, 341 (1988). [2] K. Mason and G. Müller-Vogt, J. Appl. Phys. 63, 34 (1983). [3] A. B. Filonov et al., Phys. Rev. B 60(24), 16494 (1999).

  6. Molecular-beam-epitaxy-grown ZnMgS ultraviolet photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sou, I. K.; Wu, Marcus C. W.; Sun, T.; Wong, K. S.; Wong, G. K. L.

    2001-03-01

    Epitaxial growth of Zn1-xMgxS alloy thin films on GaP(100) substrates was carried out using the molecular-beam-epitaxy technique. In situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction studies show that the alloys can be grown with a stable zinc-blende structure up to x around 30%. For x>30%, a structural transition will occur at a critical thickness which is sensitively dependent on the x composition. A near-band-edge peak with a full width at half maximum of about 10 nm was observed in room-temperature photoluminescence measurements made on as-grown alloy thin films. Several Zn1-xMgxS-based Schottky barrier photodetectors were fabricated. Room-temperature photoresponse measurements were performed on these detectors and abrupt long-wavelength cutoffs covering 325, 305, 295, and 270 nm were achieved for devices with Mg composition of 16%, 44%, 57%, and 75%, respectively. The response curve of the Zn0.43Mg0.57S device offers a close match to the erythemal action spectrum that describes human skin sensitivity to UV radiation.

  7. Thin film growth of CaFe2As2 by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatano, T.; Kawaguchi, T.; Fujimoto, R.; Nakamura, I.; Mori, Y.; Harada, S.; Ujihara, T.; Ikuta, H.

    2016-01-01

    Film growth of CaFe2As2 was realized by molecular beam epitaxy on six different substrates that have a wide variation in the lattice mismatch to the target compound. By carefully adjusting the Ca-to-Fe flux ratio, we obtained single-phase thin films for most of the substrates. Interestingly, an expansion of the CaFe2As2 lattice to the out-of-plane direction was observed for all films, even when an opposite strain was expected. A detailed microstructure observation of the thin film grown on MgO by transmission electron microscope revealed that it consists of cube-on-cube and 45°-rotated domains. The latter domains were compressively strained in plane, which caused a stretching along the c-axis direction. Because the domains were well connected across the boundary with no appreciable discontinuity, we think that the out-of-plane expansion in the 45°-rotated domains exerted a tensile stress on the other domains, resulting in the unexpectedly large c-axis lattice parameter, despite the apparently opposite lattice mismatch.

  8. A study of mixed group-V nitrides grown by gas-source molecular beam epitaxy using a nitrogen radical beam source

    SciTech Connect

    Bi, W.G.; Tu, C.W.; Mathes, D.; Hull, R.

    1997-12-31

    The authors report a study of N incorporation in GaAs and InP by gas-source molecular beam epitaxy using a N radical beam source. For GaNAs grown at high temperatures, phase separation was observed, as evidenced from the formation of cubic GaN aside from GaNAs. By lowering the growth temperature, however, GaNAs alloys with N as high as 14.8% have been obtained without showing any phase separation. For InNP, no phase separation was observed in the temperature range studied (310--420 C). Contrary to GaNAs, incorporating N in InP is very difficult, with only less than 1% N being achieved. Optical absorption measurement reveals strong red shift of bandgap energy with direct-bandgap absorption. However, no semimetallic region seems to exist for GaNAs and a composition, dependent bowing parameter has been observed.

  9. Flat-Panel Cone-Beam Ct-Guided Radiofrequency Ablation of Very Small (≤1.5 cm) Liver Tumors: Technical Note on a Preliminary Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Cazzato, Roberto Luigi Buy, Xavier Alberti, Nicolas Fonck, Mariane; Grasso, Rosario Francesco; Palussière, Jean

    2015-02-15

    PurposeThe aim of the present study was to investigate the technical feasibility of flat-panel cone-beam CT (CBCT)-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of very small (<1.5 cm) liver tumors.Materials and MethodsPatients included were candidates for hepatic percutaneous RFA as they had single biopsy-proven hepatic tumors sized ≤1.5 cm and poorly defined on ultrasonography. Following apnea induction, unenhanced CBCT scans were acquired and used to deploy the RF electrode with the aid of a virtual navigation system. If the tumor was not clearly identified on the unenhanced CBCT scan, a right retrograde arterial femoral access was established to carry out hepatic angiography and localize the tumor. Patients’ lesions and procedural variables were recorded and analyzed.ResultsThree patients (2 male and 1 female), aged 68, 76, and 87 years were included; 3 lesions (2 hepato-cellular carcinoma and 1 metastasis from colorectal cancer) were treated. One patient required hepatic angiography. Cycles of apnea used to acquire CBCT images and to deploy the electrode lasted <120 s. Mean fluoroscopic time needed to deploy the electrode was 36.6 ± 5.7 min. Mean overall procedural time was 66.0 ± 22.9 min. No peri- or post-procedural complications were noted. No cases of incomplete ablation were noted at 1-month follow-up.ConclusionPercutaneous CBCT-guided liver RFA with or without arterial hepatic angiography is technically feasible.

  10. Laser-ablation processes

    SciTech Connect

    Dingus, R.S.

    1992-01-01

    The various mechanisms by which ablation of materials can be induced with lasers are discussed in this paper. The various ablation processes and potential applications are reviewed from the threshold for ablation up to fluxes of about 10{sup 13} W/cm{sup 2}, with emphasis on three particular processes; namely, front-surface spallation, two-dimensional blowoff, and contained vaporization.

  11. Note: A short-pulse high-intensity molecular beam valve based on a piezoelectric stack actuator

    SciTech Connect

    Abeysekera, Chamara; Joalland, Baptiste; Shi, Yuanyuan; Kamasah, Alexander; Oldham, James M.; Suits, Arthur G.

    2014-11-15

    Solenoid and piezoelectric disk valves, which are widely used to generate molecular beam pulses, still suffer from significant restrictions, such as pulse durations typically >50 μs, low repetition rates, and limited gas flows and operational times. Much of this arises owing to the limited forces these actuators can achieve. To overcome these limitations, we have developed a new pulsed valve based on a high-force piezoelectric stack actuator. We show here that operation with pulse durations as low as 20 μs and repetition rates up to 100 Hz can be easily achieved by operating the valve in conjunction with a commercial fast high-voltage switch. We outline our design and demonstrate its performance with molecular beam characterization via velocity map ion imaging.

  12. High mobility n-type organic thin-film transistors deposited at room temperature by supersonic molecular beam deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Chiarella, F. Barra, M.; Ciccullo, F.; Cassinese, A.; Toccoli, T.; Aversa, L.; Tatti, R.; Verucchi, R.

    2014-04-07

    In this paper, we report on the fabrication of N,N′-1H,1H-perfluorobutil dicyanoperylenediimide (PDIF-CN{sub 2}) organic thin-film transistors by Supersonic Molecular Beam Deposition. The devices exhibit mobility up to 0.2 cm{sup 2}/V s even if the substrate is kept at room temperature during the organic film growth, exceeding by three orders of magnitude the electrical performance of those grown at the same temperature by conventional Organic Molecular Beam Deposition. The possibility to get high-mobility n-type transistors avoiding thermal treatments during or after the deposition could significantly extend the number of substrates suitable to the fabrication of flexible high-performance complementary circuits by using this compound.

  13. Growth of SrTiO{sub 3}(110) film by oxide molecular beam epitaxy with feedback control

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Jiagui; Yang Fang; Yang Yang; Gu Lin; Guo Jiandong; Wang Zhiming

    2012-12-15

    By controlling the growth of complex oxide films with atomic precision, emergent phenomena and fascinating properties have been discovered, and even been manipulated. With oxide molecular beam epitaxy (OMBE) we grow high-quality SrTiO{sub 3}(110) films by evaporating Sr and Ti metals with separate controls of the open/close timing of the shutters. The incident electron beam angle of the reflective high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) is adjusted to make the (01) beam sensitive to surface chemical concentration. By monitoring such an intensity, we tune the shutter timing to synchronize the evaporation amount of Sr and Ti in real-time. The intensity is further used as a feedback control signal for automatic growth optimization to fully compensate the possible fluctuation of the source flux rates upon extended growth. A 22 nm-thick film is obtained with the precision of metal cation stoichiometry better than 0.5%.

  14. Self-corrected Sensors Based On Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy For Atom Flux Measurements In Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Yingge; Droubay, Timothy C.; Liyu, Andrey V.; Li, Guosheng; Chambers, Scott A.

    2014-04-24

    A high sensitivity atom flux sensor based on atomic absorption spectroscopy has been designed and implemented to control electron beam evaporators and effusion cells in a molecular beam epitaxy system. Using a high-resolution spectrometer and a two-dimensional charge coupled device (CCD) detector in a double-beam configuration, we employ a non-resonant line or a resonant line with lower absorbance from the same hollow cathode lamp as the reference for nearly perfect background correction and baseline drift removal. This setup also significantly shortens the warm-up time needed compared to other sensor technologies and drastically reduces the noise coming from the surrounding environment. In addition, the high-resolution spectrometer allows the most sensitive resonant line to be isolated and used to provide excellent signal-to-noise ratio.

  15. Self-corrected sensors based on atomic absorption spectroscopy for atom flux measurements in molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Y. E-mail: scott.chambers@pnnl.gov; Liyu, A. V.; Droubay, T. C.; Chambers, S. A. E-mail: scott.chambers@pnnl.gov; Li, G.

    2014-04-21

    A high sensitivity atom flux sensor based on atomic absorption spectroscopy has been designed and implemented to control electron beam evaporators and effusion cells in a molecular beam epitaxy system. Using a high-resolution spectrometer and a two-dimensional charge coupled device detector in a double-beam configuration, we employ either a non-resonant line or a resonant line with low cross section from the same hollow cathode lamp as the reference for nearly perfect background correction and baseline drift removal. This setup also significantly shortens the warm-up time needed compared to other sensor technologies and drastically reduces the noise coming from the surrounding environment. In addition, the high-resolution spectrometer allows the most sensitive resonant line to be isolated and used to provide excellent signal-to-noise ratio.

  16. Photochemical Ablation of Organic Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrison, Barbara

    2004-03-01

    As discovered by Srinivasan in 1982, irradiation of materials by far UV laser light can lead to photochemical ablation, a process distinct from normal thermal ablation in which the laser primarily heats the material. A versatile mesoscopic model for molecular dynamics simulations of the laser ablation phenomena is presented. The model incorporates both the thermal and photochemical events, that is, both heating of the system and UV induced bond-cleavage followed by abstraction and radical-radical recombination reactions. The results from the simulations are compared to experimental data and the basic physics and chemistry for each irradiation regime are discussed. Initial results from polymer ablation simulations will be presented. L. V. Zhigilei, P. B. S. Kodali and B. J. Garrison, J. Phys. Chem. B, 102, 2845-2853 (1998); L. V. Zhigilei and B. J. Garrison, Journal of Applied Physics, 88, 1281-1298 (2000). Y. G. Yingling, L. V. Zhigilei and B. J. Garrison, J. Photochemistry and Photobiology A: Chemistry, 145, 173-181 (2001); Y. G. Yingling and B. J. Garrison, Chem. Phys. Lett., 364, 237-243 (2002).

  17. Modeling laser beam-rock interaction.

    SciTech Connect

    Leong, K. H.

    2003-07-23

    The optimal use of lasers requires the understanding of the primary parameters pertinent to laser beam-material interactions. Basically, the laser beam is a heat source that can be controlled to deliver a wide range in intensities and power. When interacting with a material, reflection at the surface, and transmission and absorption through the material occur. The material interaction process is governed by the irradiance (power/unit area) of the incident beam and the interaction time resulting in an amount of heat/energy applied to the material per unit area. The laser beam is a flexible heat source where its intensity and interaction with materials can be controlled by varying the power and size of the beam or the interaction time. For any material, a minimum amount of energy has to be absorbed for the material to be ablated by the laser beam, i.e., a solid has to be heated to liquefy and then vaporize. Under certain conditions, the photon energy may be able to break the molecular bonds of the material directly. In general, the energy absorbed is needed to vaporize the material and account for any heat that may be conducted away. Consequently, the interaction is a heat transfer problem. The relevant parameters are the heat flux and total heat input to the material. The corresponding parameters for the laser beam- material interaction are the irradiance of the beam and the interaction time. The product of these two parameters is the energy applied per unit area. A high irradiance beam may be able to ablate a material rapidly without significant heat transfer to surrounding areas. For drilling or cutting materials, a high intensity beam is required for laser ablation with minimal heat lost to the surrounding areas. However, at high beam irradiance (>1 GW cm{sup -2} for Nd:YAG beams), plasma formed from ionization of gases and vapor will partially absorb or diffract the beam. Reduced penetration of the material results. Similarly, in welding using CO2 lasers where

  18. Cu-doped AlN: A possible spinaligner at room-temperature grown by molecular beam epitaxy?

    SciTech Connect

    Ganz, P. R.; Schaadt, D. M.

    2011-12-23

    Cu-doped AlN was prepared by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy on C-plane sapphire substrates. The growth conditions were investigated for different Cu to Al flux ratios from 1.0% to 4.0%. The formation of Cu-Al alloys on the surface was observed for all doping level. In contrast to Cu-doped GaN, all samples showed diamagnetic behavior determined by SQUID measurements.

  19. Mass transport and alloying during InN growth on GaN by molecular-beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Xie, M.H.; Wu, H.S.; Tong, S.Y.

    2006-05-29

    During Stranski-Krastanov (SK) growth of InN on GaN by molecular-beam epitaxy, a mass transport is noted from the two-dimensional wetting layer and/or the surface excess metal adlayers to the SK islands when the excess nitrogen flux is used for deposition. The extent of mass transport depends on the material coverage. For growth under the excess indium flux condition, no such mass transport is observed.

  20. Apparatus for producing ultraclean bicrystals by the molecular beam epitaxy growth and ultrahigh vacuum bonding of thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Amiri-Hezaveh, A.; Balluffi, R.W. )

    1993-10-01

    An apparatus has been designed and constructed which is capable of growing single-crystal thin films and then bonding them together face-to-face to produce bicrystals under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions. The films are grown in molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) system capable of growing well-characterized single-crystal thin films of metals, semiconductors, and high [ital T][sub [ital c

  1. Comparison of Cherenkov excited fluorescence and phosphorescence molecular sensing from tissue with external beam irradiation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Huiyun; Zhang, Rongxiao; Gunn, Jason R; Esipova, Tatiana V; Vinogradov, Sergei; Gladstone, David J; Jarvis, Lesley A; Pogue, Brian W

    2016-05-21

    Ionizing radiation delivered by a medical linear accelerator (LINAC) generates Cherenkov emission within the treated tissue. A fraction of this light, in the 600-900 nm wavelength region, propagates through centimeters of tissue and can be used to excite optical probes in vivo, enabling molecular sensing of tissue analytes. The success of isolating the emission signal from this Cherenkov excitation background is dependent on key factors such as: (i) the Stokes shift of the probe spectra; (ii) the excited state lifetime; (iii) the probe concentration; (iv) the depth below the tissue surface; and (v) the radiation dose used. Previous studies have exclusively focused on imaging phosphorescent dyes, rather than fluorescent dyes. However there are only a few biologically important phosphorescent dyes and yet in comparison there are thousands of biologically relevant fluorescent dyes. So in this study the focus was a study of efficacy of Cherenkov-excited luminescence using fluorescent commercial near-infrared probes, IRDye 680RD, IRDye 700DX, and IRDye 800CW, and comparing them to the well characterized phosphorescent probe Oxyphor PtG4, an oxygen sensitive dye. Each probe was excited by Cherenkov light from a 6 MV external radiation beam, and measured in continuous wave or time-gated modes. The detection was performed by spectrally resolving the luminescence signals, and measuring them with spectrometer-based separation on an ICCD detector. The results demonstrate that IRDye 700DX and PtG4 allowed for the maximal signal to noise ratio. In the case of the phosphorescent probe, PtG4, with emission decays on the microsecond (μs) time scale, time-gated acquisition was possible, and it allowed for higher efficacy in terms of the probe concentration and detection depth. Phantoms containing the probe at 5 mm depth could be detected at concentrations down to the nanoMolar range, and at depths into the tissue simulating phantom near 3 cm. In vivo studies showed that 5

  2. Comparison of Cherenkov excited fluorescence and phosphorescence molecular sensing from tissue with external beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Huiyun; Zhang, Rongxiao; Gunn, Jason R.; Esipova, Tatiana V.; Vinogradov, Sergei; Gladstone, David J.; Jarvis, Lesley A.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2016-05-01

    Ionizing radiation delivered by a medical linear accelerator (LINAC) generates Cherenkov emission within the treated tissue. A fraction of this light, in the 600–900 nm wavelength region, propagates through centimeters of tissue and can be used to excite optical probes in vivo, enabling molecular sensing of tissue analytes. The success of isolating the emission signal from this Cherenkov excitation background is dependent on key factors such as: (i) the Stokes shift of the probe spectra; (ii) the excited state lifetime; (iii) the probe concentration; (iv) the depth below the tissue surface; and (v) the radiation dose used. Previous studies have exclusively focused on imaging phosphorescent dyes, rather than fluorescent dyes. However there are only a few biologically important phosphorescent dyes and yet in comparison there are thousands of biologically relevant fluorescent dyes. So in this study the focus was a study of efficacy of Cherenkov-excited luminescence using fluorescent commercial near-infrared probes, IRDye 680RD, IRDye 700DX, and IRDye 800CW, and comparing them to the well characterized phosphorescent probe Oxyphor PtG4, an oxygen sensitive dye. Each probe was excited by Cherenkov light from a 6 MV external radiation beam, and measured in continuous wave or time-gated modes. The detection was performed by spectrally resolving the luminescence signals, and measuring them with spectrometer-based separation on an ICCD detector. The results demonstrate that IRDye 700DX and PtG4 allowed for the maximal signal to noise ratio. In the case of the phosphorescent probe, PtG4, with emission decays on the microsecond (μs) time scale, time-gated acquisition was possible, and it allowed for higher efficacy in terms of the probe concentration and detection depth. Phantoms containing the probe at 5 mm depth could be detected at concentrations down to the nanoMolar range, and at depths into the tissue simulating phantom near 3 cm. In vivo studies showed that 5

  3. Effect of supersonic molecular-beam injection on edge fluctuation and particle transport in Heliotron J

    SciTech Connect

    Zang, L. Kasajima, K.; Hashimoto, K.; Kenmochi, N.; Ohshima, S.; Mizuuchi, T.; Yamamoto, S.; Sha, M.; Nagasaki, K.; Kado, S.; Okada, H.; Minami, T.; Kobayashi, S.; Shi, N.; Konoshima, S.; Nakamura, Y.; Sano, F.; Nishino, N.; Takeuchi, M.; Mukai, K.; and others

    2014-04-15

    Edge fluctuation in a supersonic molecular-beam injection (SMBI) fueled plasma has been measured using an electrostatic probe array. After SMBI, the plasma stored energy (W{sub p}) temporarily decreased then started to increase. The local plasma fluctuation and fluctuation induced particle transport before and after SMBI have been analyzed. In a short duration (∼4 ms) just after SMBI, the density fluctuation of broad-band low frequency increased, and the probability density function (PDF) changed from a nearly Gaussian to a positively skewed non-Gaussian one. This suggests that intermittent structures were produced due to SMBI. Also the fluctuation induced particle transport was greatly enhanced during this short duration. About 4 ms after SMBI, the low frequency broad-band density fluctuation decreased, and the PDF returned to a nearly Gaussian shape. Also the fluctuation induced particle transport was reduced. Compared with conventional gas puff, W{sub p} degradation window is very short due to the short injection period of SMBI. After this short degradation window, fluctuation induced particle transport was reduced and W{sub p} started the climbing phase. Therefore, the short period of the influence to the edge fluctuation might be an advantage of this novel fueling technique. On the other hand, although their roles are not identified at present, coherent MHD modes are also suppressed as well by the application of SMBI. These MHD modes are thought to be de-exited due to a sudden change of the edge density and/or excitation conditions.

  4. Ultrafast structural dynamics of LaVO3 thin films grown by hybrid molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brahlek, Matthew; Lapano, Jason; Stoica, Vladimir; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Hai-Tian; Akamatsu, Hirofumi; Eaton, Craig; Gopalan, Venkatraman; Freeland, John; Wen, Haidan; Engel-Herbert, Roman

    LaVO3, with a partially full d-shell is expected to be metallic, but due to electron-electron interactions a gap emerges and the ground state is a Mott insulator. Such effects are a strong function of the bonding geometry, and particularly the V-O-V bond angle. Controlling these structural effects on the ultrafast time scale can lead to control over the underlying electronic ground state. Here we report the ultrafast structural dynamics of 25 and 50 nm thick LaVO3 thin films grown by the hybrid molecular beam epitaxy technique on SrTiO3 when excited across the bandgap by 800 nm light. Using time-resolved x-ray diffraction on the 100 ps time scale at Sector 7 of the Advanced Photon Source, we directly measured the structural changes with atomic accuracy by monitoring integer Bragg diffraction peaks and find a large out-of-plane strain of 0.18% upon optical excitation; the recovery time is ~1 ns for the 25 nm film and ~2 ns for the 50 nm film, consistent with the thermal transport from the film to the substrate. Further, we will discuss the response of the oxygen octahedral rotation patterns indicated by changes of the half-order diffraction peaks. Understanding such ultrafast structural deformation is important for optimizing optical excitations to create new metastable phases starting from a Mott insulator. This work was supported by the Department of Energy under Grant DE-SC0012375, and DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  5. Study of optical properties of GaAsN layers prepared by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulzara-Mora, A.; Cruz-Hernández, E.; Rojas-Ramirez, J.; Contreras-Guerrero, R.; Meléndez-Lira, M.; Falcony-Guajardo, C.; Aguilar-Frutis, M. A.; López-López, M.

    2007-04-01

    We have grown GaAsN layers (with nitrogen concentration between 1.2% and 3.2%) on GaAs(1 0 0) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) using a radio frequency (RF) plasma nitrogen source, and solid sources for Ga and As. The growth temperature was varied from 420 to 600 °C, and the GaAsN growth mode was in situ monitored by reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED). The optical properties of the layers were studied by photoreflectance spectroscopy (PR) and phase modulated ellipsometry (PME). For the growth temperature of 420 °C the films grew in a three-dimensional (3D) mode as indicated by the appearance of transmission spots in the RHEED patterns. In contrast, GaAsN layers grown at higher temperatures presented a two-dimensional (2D) growth mode. These GaAsN layers are pseudomorphic according to high-resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD). The PR spectra of all samples exhibited Franz-Keldysh oscillations (FKO) above of the GaAs band gap energy. From these oscillations we obtained the built-in internal electric field intensity ( Fint) at the GaAsN/GaAs interface. In the low-energy region of the PR spectra we observed the transitions associated to fundamental band gap of the GaAsN layers. The variation of the GaAsN fundamental band gap obtained by PR as a function of the N content was explained according the band anti-crossing model (BAC). On the other hand, the E1 and E1+Δ E1 critical points were obtained from the analysis of spectra of the imaginary part of the dielectric function obtained by PME. We observed a shift of these critical points to higher energies with the increase of N content, which was explained by a combination of strain and alloying effects.

  6. HgCdTe Molecular Beam Epitaxy Growth Temperature Calibration Using Spectroscopic Ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilela, M. F.; Pribil, G. K.; Olsson, K. R.; Lofgreen, D. D.

    2012-10-01

    In this work, spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) is demonstrated as a technique to calibrate growth temperature measurement devices (thermocouples and pyrometers) prior to real mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe) growth. A pyrometer is used to control the substrate temperature in molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) for the growth of HgCdTe-based material. It is known that a very narrow optimal growth temperature range exists for HgCdTe, typically ±5°C. A nonoptimal growth temperature will negatively impact on material quality by inducing growth defects, reducing composition uniformity, causing difficulty in controlling doping incorporation, promoting poor electronic properties, and having other adverse effects. Herein, we present a method for measuring and calibrating substrate temperature measurement equipment by using spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) prior to real HgCdTe growth. This method is easy to implement, nondestructive, and reliable. The proposed method requires one substrate with a surface material with optical properties well known in the temperature range of interest, but not necessarily the same base material as the material to be grown. In the specific case of this work, we use epitaxial CdTe material on top of a Si substrate. This wafer was used to create a database of its optical properties as a function of temperature by using SE. From the collected optical parameters, a model is built and a fit is generated from the SE data collected. The temperature can then be determined by fitting the temperature-dependent SE measurements from this specific CdTe material. The angle offset and surface roughness parameters are also included in the model to account for changes in the average run-to-run angle variations and surface conditions over time. This work does not attempt to obtain an absolute temperature, but rather a reliable and repeatable relative temperature measurement.

  7. Molecular-beam epitaxy and characteristics of GaNyAs1-x-yBix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei; Oe, Kunishige; Feng, Gan; Yoshimoto, Masahiro

    2005-09-01

    GaNyAs1-x-yBix alloys were grown by molecular-beam epitaxy using solid Ga, Bi, and As sources and nitrogen radicals generated from nitrogen gas in rf plasma. Changing the growth temperature is found to be a convenient method for controlling the GaBi molar fraction in the alloy reproducibly. The photoluminescence (PL) spectra show that the PL peak energy of GaNyAs1-x-yBix alloy decreased with increasing GaBi and GaN molar fractions. The redshift coefficients of ~62 meV/%Bi and ~130 meV/%N at the PL peak energy of GaNyAs1-x-yBix were observed at room temperature. The temperature dependence of the PL peak energy in the temperature range of 150-300 K is much smaller than the temperature dependence of the band gap of InGaAsP. The temperature coefficients of GaAs1-xBix and GaNyAs1-x-yBix band gaps are governed by the GaBi molar fraction and they decrease with increasing GaBi molar fraction. GaNyAs1-x-yBix alloys with different PL peak energies and lattice matched to GaAs substrates were obtained. The photoluminescence peak energy was located at a predicted wavelength for the sample lattice matched to GaAs which was found to have the structure of Ga(N0.33Bi0.67)zAs1-z.

  8. High Active Nitrogen Flux Growth of (Indium) Gallium Nitride by Plasma Assisted Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McSkimming, Brian Matthew

    Plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE) growth of gallium nitride (GaN) has evolved over the past two decades due to progress in growth science and in the active nitrogen plasma source hardware. The transition from electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) microwave plasma sources to radio frequency (RF) plasma sources has enabled higher growth rates, reduced ion damage and improved operation at higher growth chamber pressures. Even with further improvements in RF plasma sources, PAMBE has remained primarily a research tool partially due to limitations in material growth rates. This dissertation presents results based upon two modifications of a commercially available nitrogen plasma source. These modifications have resulted in record active nitrogen fluxes, and therefore record growth rates of more than 7.6 mum/h. For optimized growth conditions in the standard metal-rich growth regime, the surfaces displayed a clear step-terrace structure with an average RMS roughness (3 mumx3 mum) on the order of 1 nm. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) impurity analysis demonstrates unintentional oxygen incorporation of ˜1x1016, comparable to the metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) grown template layer. Additionally, a revised universal growth diagram is proposed allowing the rapid determination of the metal flux needed to grow in a specific growth regime for any and all active nitrogen fluxes available. High temperature nitrogen rich PAMBE growth of GaN has been previously demonstrated as a viable alternative to the challenges presented in maintaining the Ga bilayer required by metal rich growth of GaN. This dissertation also present results demonstrating PAMBE growth of GaN at a substrate temperature more than 150 °C greater than our standard Ga rich GaN growth regime and ˜100 °C greater than any previously reported PAMBE growth of GaN. Finally, a revised growth diagram is proposed highlighting a large growth window available at high temperatures.

  9. Minority carrier lifetime in iodine-doped molecular beam epitaxy-grown HgCdTe

    SciTech Connect

    Madni, I.; Umana-Membreno, G. A.; Lei, W.; Gu, R.; Antoszewski, J.; Faraone, L.

    2015-11-02

    The minority carrier lifetime in molecular beam epitaxy grown layers of iodine-doped Hg{sub 1−x}Cd{sub x}Te (x ∼ 0.3) on CdZnTe substrates has been studied. The samples demonstrated extrinsic donor behavior for carrier concentrations in the range from 2 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −3} to 6 × 10{sup 17} cm{sup −3} without any post-growth annealing. At a temperature of 77 K, the electron mobility was found to vary from 10{sup 4} cm{sup 2}/V s to 7 × 10{sup 3} cm{sup 2}/V s and minority carrier lifetime from 1.6 μs to 790 ns, respectively, as the carrier concentration was increased from 2 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −3} to 6 × 10{sup 17} cm{sup −3}. The diffusion of iodine is much lower than that of indium and hence a better alternative in heterostructures such as nBn devices. The influence of carrier concentration and temperature on the minority carrier lifetime was studied in order to characterize the carrier recombination mechanisms. Measured lifetimes were also analyzed and compared with the theoretical models of the various recombination processes occurring in these materials, indicating that Auger-1 recombination was predominant at higher doping levels. An increase in deep-level generation-recombination centers was observed with increasing doping level, which suggests that the increase in deep-level trap density is associated with the incorporation of higher concentrations of iodine into the HgCdTe.

  10. Atom probe tomography characterisation of a laser diode structure grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, Samantha E.; Humphreys, Colin J.; Oliver, Rachel A.; Smeeton, Tim M.; Hooper, Stewart E.; Heffernan, Jonathan; Saxey, David W.; Smith, George D. W.

    2012-03-01

    Atom probe tomography (APT) has been used to achieve three-dimensional characterization of a III-nitride laser diode (LD) structure grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Four APT data sets have been obtained, with fields of view up to 400 nm in depth and 120 nm in diameter. These data sets contain material from the InGaN quantum well (QW) active region, as well as the surrounding p- and n-doped waveguide and cladding layers, enabling comprehensive study of the structure and composition of the LD structure. Two regions of the same sample, with different average indium contents (18% and 16%) in the QW region, were studied. The APT data are shown to provide easy access to the p-type dopant levels, and the composition of a thin AlGaN barrier layer. Next, the distribution of indium within the InGaN QW was analyzed, to assess any possible inhomogeneity of the distribution of indium (''indium clustering''). No evidence for a statistically significant deviation from a random distribution was found, indicating that these MBE-grown InGaN QWs do not require indium clusters for carrier localization. However, the APT data show steps in the QW interfaces, leading to well-width fluctuations, which may act to localize carriers. Additionally, the unexpected presence of a small amount (x = 0.005) of indium in a layer grown intentionally as GaN was revealed. Finally, the same statistical method applied to the QW was used to show that the indium distribution within a thick InGaN waveguide layer in the n-doped region did not show any deviation from randomness.

  11. Growth mechanism of CuZnInSe2 thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Ya Hsin; Yang, Chu Shou; Wu, Chia Hsing; Chiu, Jai Wei; Yang, Min De; Wu, Chih-Hung

    2013-09-01

    CuZnInSe2 (CZIS) has potential application in solar cell for absorption layer, and give an advantage to change the band gap from CuInSe2 (1.02 eV) to ZnSe (2.67 eV). Using molecular beam epitaxy technology, the CZIS thin films were grown via CuInSe (CIS) and ZnSe base. In the case of CIS, thin films were grown on Mo-coated soda lime glass with various zinc flux. CIS was transformed into chalcopyrite and sphalerite coexisting CZIS easily but it is difficult to transform into the pure sphalerite CZIS. Zn/(Zn+In+Cu) ratio has limited to approximate 36 at% and the excess-Zn played a catalyst role. In the case of ZnSe base, which was grown on GaAs (001), various In and Cu flux defined as the TIn series and TCu series, respectively. There are four types of compound in the TIn series and TCu series, including ZnSe, InxSey, ZnIn2Se4 (ZIS) and CZIS. In the TIn series under the lowest In and Cu flux, selenium (Se) were randomly combined with cations to form the CZIS. When TIn is increased in this moment, the CZIS was transformed into ZIS. In the TCu series, CZIS demonstrated via In-rich ZIS (Zn(In, Cu)Se) and InxSey base ((Zn, Cu)InSe). It is chalcopyrite and sphalerite coexisting structure in the medium TCu region. In the high TCu region, it is transformed into the Zn-poor and Cu-rich CZIS.

  12. Molecular beam epitaxy of free-standing wurtzite AlxGa1-xN layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, S. V.; Staddon, C. R.; Martin, R. W.; Kent, A. J.; Foxon, C. T.

    2015-09-01

    Recent developments with group III nitrides present AlxGa1-xN based LEDs as realistic devices for new alternative deep ultra-violet light sources. Because there is a significant difference in the lattice parameters of GaN and AlN, AlxGa1-xN substrates would be preferable to either GaN or AlN for ultraviolet device applications. We have studied the growth of free-standing wurtzite AlxGa1-xN bulk crystals by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PA-MBE). Thick wurtzite AlxGa1-xN films were grown by PA-MBE on 2-in. GaAs (111)B substrates and were removed from the GaAs substrate after growth to provide free standing AlxGa1-xN samples. X-ray microanalysis measurements confirm that the AlN fraction is uniform across the wafer and mass spectroscopy measurements show that the composition is also uniform in depth. We have demonstrated that free-standing wurtzite AlxGa1-xN wafers can be achieved by PA-MBE for a wide range of AlN fractions. In order to develop a commercially viable process for the growth of wurtzite AlxGa1-xN substrates, we have used a novel Riber plasma source and have demonstrated growth rates of GaN up to 1.8 μm/h on 2-in. diameter GaAs and sapphire wafers.

  13. Lead strontium telluride and lead barium telluride grown by molecular-beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Partin, D.L.; Thrush, C.M.; Clemens, B.M.

    1987-05-01

    Long wavelength diode lasers operating in the 3--10-..mu..m wavelength range are of interest as optical sources for future fiber optics communications and sensor systems. PbEuSeTe large optical cavity single quantum well diode lasers have so far attained the highest operating temperatures (174 K cw, 280 K pulsed) in this wavelength range. Two alternative materials systems PbSrTe and PbBaTe have now been grown for the first time by molecular-beam epitaxy. The choice of these ternaries was motivated by the fact that SrTe and BaTe have the same face-centered-cubic crystal structure as PbTe and roughly comparable lattice constants, but much larger energy band gaps. In the Pb/sub 1-//sub x/Sr/sub x/Te system, x-ray diffraction studies show clear evidence of phase segregation for x>0.15. The carrier mobilities decrease monotonically with strontium concentration in the single phase region, which suggests that disorder-related scattering is dominant. The energy band gap increases approximately as dEg/dx = 3.2 eV for small x, and the index of refraction decreases monotonically with increasing x. In the Pb/sub 1-//sub x/Sr/sub x/Te system, a combination of x-ray diffraction, energy band gap and other data clearly demonstrate that the solubility of BaTe in PbTe is limited to about 4%, possibly because of the relatively large difference in lattice constants between PbTe (6.460 A) and BaTe (7.001 A). These results imply that PbSrSeTe grown lattice matched to PbTe is a promising material system for long wavelength diode lasers and light emitting diodes.

  14. Lattice mismatched InGaAs on silicon photodetectors grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papanicolaou, N. A.; Anderson, G. W.; Iliadis, A. A.; Christou, A.

    1993-02-01

    In0.5Ga0.5As on silicon photodetectors, including three types of interdigitated-finger devices as well as linear photoconductors, were fabricated and measured. The InGaAs/Si structure was grown by molecular beam epitaxy and utilized a 100 Å GaAs intervening nucleation layer between the silicon substrate and the InGaAs layers, step-graded InxGa1-xAs layers, and an in-situ grown 40 Å thick GaAs surface layer, which substantially enhanced the metal-semiconductor barrier height (Φb = 0.67 V) for the InGaAs. Schottky diodes fabricated independently of the photodetectors had nearly ideal characteristics with an ideality factor (n) of 1.02 and a reverse breakdown voltage of 40 V. The interdigitated Schottky photodetectors showed dark currents between <3nA and 54 μA at a 3 V bias and initial photoresponse rise times in the range of 600 to 725 ps, comparable to similar InGaAs metal-semiconductor-metal photodetectors grown lattice matched on InP. The photoconductors fabricated in the same material had rise times in the range of 575 to 1300 ps, thus being slightly slower, and had dark currents of 7 to 80 mA. The responsivity of the photoconductors was typically greater than that of the diodes by a factor of five to fifteen. The results show potential for monolithic integration of InGaAs photodetectors on silicon substrates.

  15. Neural Ablation and Regeneration in Pain Practice.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun Ji; Choi, Yun Mi; Jang, Eun Jung; Kim, Ju Yeon; Kim, Tae Kyun; Kim, Kyung Hoon

    2016-01-01

    A nerve block is an effective tool for diagnostic and therapeutic methods. If a diagnostic nerve block is successful for pain relief and the subsequent therapeutic nerve block is effective for only a limited duration, the next step that should be considered is a nerve ablation or modulation. The nerve ablation causes iatrogenic neural degeneration aiming only for sensory or sympathetic denervation without motor deficits. Nerve ablation produces the interruption of axonal continuity, degeneration of nerve fibers distal to the lesion (Wallerian degeneration), and the eventual death of axotomized neurons. The nerve ablation methods currently available for resection/removal of innervation are performed by either chemical or thermal ablation. Meanwhile, the nerve modulation method for interruption of innervation is performed using an electromagnetic field of pulsed radiofrequency. According to Sunderland's classification, it is first and foremost suggested that current neural ablations produce third degree peripheral nerve injury (PNI) to the myelin, axon, and endoneurium without any disruption of the fascicular arrangement, perineurium, and epineurium. The merit of Sunderland's third degree PNI is to produce a reversible injury. However, its shortcoming is the recurrence of pain and the necessity of repeated ablative procedures. The molecular mechanisms related to axonal regeneration after injury include cross-talk between axons and glial cells, neurotrophic factors, extracellular matrix molecules, and their receptors. It is essential to establish a safe, long-standing denervation method without any complications in future practices based on the mechanisms of nerve degeneration as well as following regeneration. PMID:26839664

  16. Neural Ablation and Regeneration in Pain Practice

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Eun Ji; Choi, Yun Mi; Jang, Eun Jung; Kim, Ju Yeon; Kim, Tae Kyun

    2016-01-01

    A nerve block is an effective tool for diagnostic and therapeutic methods. If a diagnostic nerve block is successful for pain relief and the subsequent therapeutic nerve block is effective for only a limited duration, the next step that should be considered is a nerve ablation or modulation. The nerve ablation causes iatrogenic neural degeneration aiming only for sensory or sympathetic denervation without motor deficits. Nerve ablation produces the interruption of axonal continuity, degeneration of nerve fibers distal to the lesion (Wallerian degeneration), and the eventual death of axotomized neurons. The nerve ablation methods currently available for resection/removal of innervation are performed by either chemical or thermal ablation. Meanwhile, the nerve modulation method for interruption of innervation is performed using an electromagnetic field of pulsed radiofrequency. According to Sunderland's classification, it is first and foremost suggested that current neural ablations produce third degree peripheral nerve injury (PNI) to the myelin, axon, and endoneurium without any disruption of the fascicular arrangement, perineurium, and epineurium. The merit of Sunderland's third degree PNI is to produce a reversible injury. However, its shortcoming is the recurrence of pain and the necessity of repeated ablative procedures. The molecular mechanisms related to axonal regeneration after injury include cross-talk between axons and glial cells, neurotrophic factors, extracellular matrix molecules, and their receptors. It is essential to establish a safe, long-standing denervation method without any complications in future practices based on the mechanisms of nerve degeneration as well as following regeneration. PMID:26839664

  17. Laser ablation of blepharopigmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Tanenbaum, M.; Karas, S.; McCord, C.D. Jr. )

    1988-01-01

    This article discusses laser ablation of blepharopigmentation in four stages: first, experimentally, where pigment vaporization is readily achieved with the argon blue-green laser; second, in the rabbit animal model, where eyelid blepharopigmentation markings are ablated with the laser; third, in human subjects, where the argon blue-green laser is effective in the ablation of implanted eyelid pigment; and fourth, in a case report, where, in a patient with improper pigment placement in the eyelid, the laser is used to safely and effectively ablate the undesired pigment markings. This article describes in detail the new technique of laser ablation of blepharopigmentation. Potential complications associated with the technique are discussed.

  18. Sci—Sat AM: Stereo — 08: Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR) for low, intermediate and high risk prostate cancer using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) with a 10x Flattening Filter Free (FFF) beam

    SciTech Connect

    Mestrovic, A; Fortin, D; Alexander, A

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility of using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) with a 10x Flattening Filter Free (FFF) beam for Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR) for low, intermediate and high risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Ten anonymized patient CT data sets were used in this planning study. For each patient CT data set, three sets of contours were generated: 1) low risk, 2) intermediate risk, and 3) high risk scenarios. For each scenario, a single-arc and a double-arc VMAT treatment plans were created. Plans were generated with the Varian Eclipse™ treatment planning system for a Varian TrueBeam™ linac equipped with Millenium 120 MLC. Plans were created using a 10x-FFF beam with a maximum dose rate of 2400 MU/min. Dose prescription was 36.25Gy/5 fractions with the planning objective of covering 99% of the Planning Target Volume with the 95% of the prescription dose. Normal tissue constraints were based on provincial prostate SABR planning guidelines, derived from national and international prostate SABR protocols. Plans were evaluated and compared in terms of: 1) dosimetric plan quality, and 2) treatment delivery efficiency. Results: Both single-arc and double-arc VMAT plans were able to meet the planning goals for low, intermediate and high risk scenarios. No significant dosimetric differences were observed between the plans. However, the treatment time was significantly lower for a single-arc VMAT plans. Conclusions: Prostate SABR treatments are feasible with 10x-FFF VMAT technique. A single-arc VMAT offers equivalent dosimetric plan quality and a superior treatment delivery efficiency, compared to a double-arc VMAT.

  19. Indium Gallium Arsenic Phosphide-Based Optoelectronics Grown by Gas Source Molecular Beam Epitaxy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiau, Guang-Jye

    We have demonstrated the gas-source molecular beam epitaxy (GSMBE) growth of high purity rm In_{1-x}Ga_{x}As_ {y}P_{1-y.} with a background doping level as low as 5times10^{15 } {rm cm}^{-3}, and the precise lattice-matching control to within +/-5times10^{-4}. We found that exposure of freshly-grown InP to an As flux during growth interruption between layers of different compositions results in the substitution of surface P atoms by As atoms, thereby generating a strained transition layer at each interface. By assuring a group-III stabilized surface during interruption, As/P substitution can be avoided. Heterointerface abruptness was examined by double-crystal x-ray diffraction and photoluminescence. The results show that the interfaces grown with the modified sequence are considerably more abrupt than those obtained using conventional sequences where As/P interdiffusion extends over several monolayers. We have demonstrated the GSMBE growth of low-threshold 1.3mum and 1.55 mu m strained-layer rm In_{1 -x}Ga_{x}As_{y1}P _{1-y1}/ In_{1-x}Ga_ {x}As_{y2}P_{1-y2 } SCHMQW lasers. For 1.3mum lasers, threshold currents as low as 16mA were measured for 390times5mum ridge lasers, and a threshold current density of 370A/cm^2 was achieved for a 2000times50mu m broad-area device consisting of five 0.84% compressively strained QWs. To the best of our knowledge, these are the lowest values reported to date for GSMBE-grown 1.3 μm lasers, and are comparable to the best devices grown by other techniques such as chemical beam epitaxy and metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy. As for 1.55mum lasers, a threshold current density as low as 320A/cm^2 was achieved for a 2250times50mum broad-area device consisting of four 1.2% compressively strained QWs. This low threshold current density is apparently the same as the lowest reported value for 1.55 μm lasers with four QWs. We have demonstrated a 1.3mum wavelength, GSMBE-grown, strained InGaAsP MQW, folded-cavity surface emitting laser using a

  20. Nonequilibrium Ablation of Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milos, Frank S.; Chen, Yih K.; Gokcen, Tahir

    2012-01-01

    In previous work, an equilibrium ablation and thermal response model for Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator was developed. In general, over a wide range of test conditions, model predictions compared well with arcjet data for surface recession, surface temperature, in-depth temperature at multiple thermocouples, and char depth. In this work, additional arcjet tests were conducted at stagnation conditions down to 40 W/sq cm and 1.6 kPa. The new data suggest that nonequilibrium effects become important for ablation predictions at heat flux or pressure below about 80 W/sq cm or 10 kPa, respectively. Modifications to the ablation model to account for nonequilibrium effects are investigated. Predictions of the equilibrium and nonequilibrium models are compared with the arcjet data.

  1. High active nitrogen flux growth of GaN by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    McSkimming, Brian M. Speck, James S.; Chaix, Catherine

    2015-09-15

    In the present study, the authors report on a modified Riber radio frequency (RF) nitrogen plasma source that provides active nitrogen fluxes more than 30 times higher than those commonly used for plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE) growth of gallium nitride (GaN) and thus a significantly higher growth rate than has been previously reported. GaN films were grown using N{sub 2} gas flow rates between 5 and 25 sccm while varying the plasma source's RF forward power from 200 to 600 W. The highest growth rate, and therefore the highest active nitrogen flux, achieved was ∼7.6 μm/h. For optimized growth conditions, the surfaces displayed a clear step-terrace structure with an average RMS roughness (3 × 3 μm) on the order of 1 nm. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy impurity analysis demonstrates oxygen and hydrogen incorporation of 1 × 10{sup 16} and ∼5 × 10{sup 17}, respectively. In addition, the authors have achieved PAMBE growth of GaN at a substrate temperature more than 150 °C greater than our standard Ga rich GaN growth regime and ∼100 °C greater than any previously reported PAMBE growth of GaN. This growth temperature corresponds to GaN decomposition in vacuum of more than 20 nm/min; a regime previously unattainable with conventional nitrogen plasma sources. Arrhenius analysis of the decomposition rate shows that samples with a flux ratio below stoichiometry have an activation energy greater than decomposition of GaN in vacuum while samples grown at or above stoichiometry have decreased activation energy. The activation energy of decomposition for GaN in vacuum was previously determined to be ∼3.1 eV. For a Ga/N flux ratio of ∼1.5, this activation energy was found to be ∼2.8 eV, while for a Ga/N flux ratio of ∼0.5, it was found to be ∼7.9 eV.

  2. Critical issues of complex, epitaxial oxide growth and integration with silicon by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lettieri, James

    Molecular beam epitaxy was used to grow epitaxial oxides on silicon substrates. The growth of BaO, SrO, EuO, and SrTiO3 are discussed with a focus on the general theme of integration of functional, epitaxial oxides into a silicon environment. Oxidation studies of various metal systems relevant for oxide on silicon epitaxy and integration are reported. Results demonstrate the catalytic nature of an alkaline earth metal at small concentrations to enable the oxidation of the poorly oxidizing metals at pressures lower than during deposition of the pure metal alone. Results from the deposition of various elements are presented. The aspects of the growth of alkaline earth oxides on silicon are explained. The transition from the silicon to the alkaline earth oxide as described through reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) is presented and used to understand issues related to each stage of the growth. High quality, commensurate alkaline earth oxides are grown on silicon at room temperature and P O2 background ˜ 3 x 10-8 Torr. The growth of alkaline earth and rare earth oxide solid solutions and rare earth oxides (EuO) are described. The first reported epitaxial EuO on silicon is reported, enabled by the use of a thin buffer layer (13 A) of SrO. Using a strategy of transition from simple structures to the more complex, the growth of a perovskite (SrTiO3) on silicon is demonstrated. Growth of a structurally optimized perovskite structure entails the transformation of a thin interfacial alkaline earth oxide layer into the initial perovskite cells. SrTiO3 and La-doped SrTiO3 on silicon are used to integrate a piezoelectric relevant for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) applications and a ferroelectric relevant for a ferroelectric random access memory (FRAM) architecture. A d33 value of over 400 pm/V under bias is measured for the piezoelectric (Pb(Mn1/3Nb 2/3)O3 -PbTiO3) and a remanent polarization of 25 muC/cm2 and fatigue free behavior (>1012 cycles) for a

  3. Visible and Near-Infrared Quantum Well Laser Diodes Grown by Solid Source Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varriano, John A.

    1993-01-01

    The growth of near infrared quantum well (QW) laser diodes in the AlGaAs material system and visible QW laser diodes in the AlGaInP material system by solid source molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) is investigated. Procedures for fabrication, measurement, and analysis are developed on the more easily grown GaAs QW lasers. Several studies are performed on the GaAs QW lasers. Doping of the laser core with a p-i-n profile improves laser performance. Low growth temperatures result in lasers with high threshold current densities due to the formation of traps caused by interface states and a deep level near the QW interface region. High growth temperatures also cause increases in threshold currents due to the effects of Ga desorption. Threshold current is not observed to depend strongly on the width of the laser waveguide core. Fabrication of lasers with tilted facets is facilitated by using misoriented substrates. The lasers exhibit higher threshold current densities due to decreased facet reflectivity. The benefits of compressively strained active layers are demonstrated in a GaInAs QW laser. Growth of visible AlGaInP lasers lattice matched to GaAs substrates is performed using a novel valved cracker cell for solid phosphorus. The cell avoids the expense and possible toxicity associated with the use of phosphine common in other growth techniques. It also alleviates the problems encountered when using solid phosphorus in a conventional effusion cell. High quality AlGaInP material is grown using the cell. The quality of the AlInP and GaInP ternaries is comparable to or better than that grown by other techniques based on photoluminescence and Raman spectroscopy measurements. The material is found to be highly disordered. Adequate doping levels for laser operation are obtained in the AlGaInP quaternary. Growth stops at the QW/barrier interfaces are proven to be detrimental to laser performance. Appropriate choices of barrier Al composition and QW Ga composition allow for the

  4. Conducting (Si-doped) aluminum nitride epitaxial films grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.G.; Moorthy, M.; Park, R.M.

    1999-07-01

    As a member of the III-V nitride semiconductor family, AlN, which has a direct energy-gap of 6.2eV, has received much attention as a promising material for many applications. However, despite the promising attributes of AlN for various semiconductor devices, research on AlN has been limited and n-type conducting AlN has not been reported. The objective of this research was to understand the factors impacting the conductivity of AlN and to control the conductivity of this material through intentional doping. Prior to the intentional doping study, growth of undoped AlN epilayers was investigated. Through careful selection of substrate preparation methods and growth parameters, relatively low-temperature molecular beam epitaxial growth of AlN films was established which resulted in insulating material. Intentional Si doping during epilayer growth was found to result in conducting films under specific growth conditions. Above a growth temperature of 900 C, AlN films were insulating, however, below a growth temperature of 900 C, the AlN films were conducting. The magnitude of the conductivity and the growth temperature range over which conducting AlN films could be grown were strongly influenced by the presence of a Ga flux during growth. For instance, conducting, Si-doped, AlN films were grown at a growth temperature of 940 C in the presence of a Ga flux while the films were insulating when grown in the absence of a Ga flux at this particular growth temperature. Also, by appropriate selection of the growth parameters, epilayers with n-type conductivity values as large as 0.2 {Omega}{sup {minus}1} cm{sup {minus}1} for AlN and 17 {Omega}{sup {minus}1} cm{sup {minus}1} for Al{sub 0.75}Ga{sub 0.25}N were grown in this work for the first time.

  5. Reaction dynamics of phenyl radicals in extreme environments: a crossed molecular beam study.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xibin; Kaiser, Ralf I

    2009-02-17

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)organic compounds that consist of fused benzene ringsand their hydrogen-deficient precursors have attracted extensive interest from combustion scientists, organic chemists, astronomers, and planetary scientists. On Earth, PAHs are toxic combustion products and a source of air pollution. In the interstellar medium, research suggests that PAHs play a role in unidentified infrared emission bands, diffuse interstellar bands, and the synthesis of precursor molecules to life. To build clean combustion devices and to understand the astrochemical evolution of the interstellar medium, it will be critical to understand the elementary reaction mechanisms under single collision conditions by which these molecules form in the gas phase. Until recently, this work had been hampered by the difficulty in preparing a large concentration of phenyl radicals, but the phenyl radical represents one of the most important radical species to trigger PAH formation in high-temperature environments. However, we have developed a method for producing these radical species and have undertaken a systematic experimental investigation. In this Account, we report on the chemical dynamics of the phenyl radical (C(6)H(5)) reactions with the unsaturated hydrocarbons acetylene (C(2)H(2)), ethylene (C(2)H(4)), methylacetylene (CH(3)CCH), allene (H(2)CCCH(2)), propylene (CH(3)CHCH(2)), and benzene (C(6)H(6)) utilizing the crossed molecular beams approach. For nonsymmetric reactants such as methylacetylene and propylene, steric effects and the larger cones of acceptance drive the addition of the phenyl radical to the nonsubstituted carbon atom of the hydrocarbon reactant. Reaction intermediates decomposed via atomic hydrogen loss pathways. In the phenyl-propylene system, the longer lifetime of the reaction intermediate yielded a more efficient energy randomization compared with the phenyl-methylacetylene system. Therefore, two reaction channels were open: hydrogen

  6. Caries selective ablation: the handpiece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennig, Thomas; Rechmann, Peter; Holtermann, Andreas

    1995-05-01

    Caries selective ablation is fixed to a window of fluences predicted by the ablation thresholds of carious and healthy dentin, respectively. The aim of the study was to develop a dental handpiece which guarantees homogeneous fluence at the irradiated tooth surface. Furthermore the point of treatment should be cooled down without energy losses due to the cooling system. We suggest the direct coupling of the laser radiation into a laminar stream of liquid, which acts in turn as a lengthened beam guide. The impacts of the laser radiation and of the cooling medium fall exactly into the same point. Hot ablation debris is removed out of the crater by the flush of the water jet. Fluences are constant if the handpiece is used in contact mode or at a distance. Normally the surface of a bare fiber working in contact mode is destroyed after a few shots. Coupling the laser radiation into a stream of liquid prevents this destruction. Putting together the benefits of this special handpiece short overall treatment times seem to be possible. High average power can be applied to the tooth without the threat of thermal damage. Furthermore no time consuming cutting of the fiber prolongs the treatment time.

  7. Excimer laser ablation of ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, A. C.; Leung, W. P.; Krajnovich, D.

    1991-02-01

    Laser etching of ferrites was previously done by scanning a focused continuous-wave laser beam on a ferrite sample in a chemical environment. We study the phenomenon of photo-ablation of Ni-Zn or Mn-Zn ferrites by pulsed 248-nm KrF excimer laser irradiation. A transfer lens system is used to project a grating pattern of a mask irradiated by the pulsed KrF laser onto the ferrite sample. The threshold fluence for ablation at the ferrite surface is about 0.3 J/cm2. A typical fluence of 1 J/cm2 is used. The etched grooves produced are typically 20-50 μm wide, with depths achieved as deep as 70 μm . Groove straightness is good as long as a sharp image is projected onto the sample surface. The wall angle is steeper than 60 degrees. Scanning electron microscopy of the etched area shows a ``glassy'' skin with extensive microcracks and solidified droplets being ejected that is frozen in action. We found that this skin can be entirely removed by ultrasonic cleaning. A fairly efficient etching rate of about 10 nm/pulse for a patterned area of about 2 mm×2 mm is obtained at a fluence of 1 J/cm2. This study shows that projection excimer laser ablation is useful for micromachining of ferrite ceramics, and indicates that a hydrodynamic sputtering mechanism involving droplet emission is a cause of material removal.

  8. Effect of surface roughness and size of beam on squeeze-film damping—Molecular dynamics simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hojin; Strachan, Alejandro

    2015-11-28

    We use large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) to characterize fluid damping between a substrate and an approaching beam. We focus on the near contact regime where squeeze film (where fluid gap is comparable to the mean free path of the gas molecules) and many-body effects in the fluid become dominant. The MD simulations provide explicit description of many-body and non-equilibrium processes in the fluid as well as the surface topography. We study how surface roughness and beam width increases the damping coefficient due to their effect on fluid mobility. We find that the explicit simulations are in good agreement with prior direct simulation Monte Carlo results except at near-contact conditions where many-body effects in the compressed fluid lead the increased damping and weaker dependence on beam width. We also show that velocity distributions near the beam edges and for short gaps deviate from the Boltzmann distribution indicating a degree of local non-equilibrium. These results will be useful to parameterize compact models used for microsystem device-level simulations and provide insight into mesoscale simulations of near-contact damping.

  9. Effect of surface roughness and size of beam on squeeze-film damping—Molecular dynamics simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hojin; Strachan, Alejandro

    2015-11-01

    We use large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) to characterize fluid damping between a substrate and an approaching beam. We focus on the near contact regime where squeeze film (where fluid gap is comparable to the mean free path of the gas molecules) and many-body effects in the fluid become dominant. The MD simulations provide explicit description of many-body and non-equilibrium processes in the fluid as well as the surface topography. We study how surface roughness and beam width increases the damping coefficient due to their effect on fluid mobility. We find that the explicit simulations are in good agreement with prior direct simulation Monte Carlo results except at near-contact conditions where many-body effects in the compressed fluid lead the increased damping and weaker dependence on beam width. We also show that velocity distributions near the beam edges and for short gaps deviate from the Boltzmann distribution indicating a degree of local non-equilibrium. These results will be useful to parameterize compact models used for microsystem device-level simulations and provide insight into mesoscale simulations of near-contact damping.

  10. Crossed molecular beams study of O({sup 1}D) reactions with H{sub 2} molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Miau, T.T.

    1995-05-01

    Reaction dynamics of O({sup 1}D) atoms with H{sub 2} molecules was reinvestigated using the crossed molecular beams technique with pulsed beams. The O({sup 1}D) beam was generated by photodissociating O{sub 3} molecules at 248 nm. Time-of-flight spectra and the laboratory angular distribution of the OH products were measured. The derived OH product center-of-mass flux-velocity contour diagram shows more backward scattered intensity with respect to the O({sup 1}D) beam. In contrast to previous studies which show that the insertion mechanism is the dominant process, our results indicate that the contribution from the collinear approach of the O({sup 1}D) atom to the H{sub 2} molecule on the first excited state potential energy surface is significant and the energy barrier for the collinear approach is therefore minimal. Despite the increased time resolution in this experiment, no vibrational structure in the OH product time-of-flight spectra was resolved. This is in agreement with LIF studies, which have shown that the rotational distributions of the OH products in all vibrational states are broad and highly inverted.

  11. Growth Optimization of III-N Electronic Devices by Plasma-Assisted Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, Elaheh

    InAlN has received significant attention due to its great potential for electronic and optoelectronic applications. In particular, In 0.18Al0.82N presents the advantage of being lattice-matched to GaN and simultaneously exhibiting a high spontaneous polarization charge, making In0.18 Al0.82N attractive for use as the barrier layer in high-electron-mobility transistors (HEMTs). However, in the case of InAlN growth by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE), a strong non-uniformity in the in-plane In distribution was observed for both N-face and metal-face In0.18Al 0.82N. This compositional inhomogeneity manifests itself as a columnar microstructure with AlN-rich cores (5-10 nm in width) and InN-rich intercolumn boundaries. Because of the large differences between the bandgaps and polarization of InN and AlN, this non-uniformity in InAlN composition could be a source of scattering, leading to mobility degradation in HEMTs. In this work, the growth conditions for high quality lattice-matched InAlN layers on free-standing GaN substrates were explored by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE) in the N-rich regime. The microstructure of N-face InAlN layers, lattice-matched to GaN, was investigated by scanning transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. Microstructural analysis showed an absence of the lateral composition modulation that was previously observed in InAlN films grown by PAMBE. Using same growth conditions for InAlN layer, N-face GaN/AlN/GaN/InAlN high-electron-mobility transistors with lattice-matched InAlN back barriers were grown directly on SiC. A room temperature two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) mobility of 1100cm2 V-1s-1 and 2DEG sheet charge density of 1.9 x1013 cm 2 was measured on these devices. However, the threading dislocation density (TDD) of GaN grown directly on SiC by PAMBE (≈2 x10 10 cm-2 ) is two orders of magnitude higher than GaN grown by MOCVD on SiC or sapphire (≈5 x10 8 cm-2). This high TDD can

  12. Ion and electron beam processing of condensed molecular solids to form thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Ruckman, M.W.; Strongin, M.; Mowlem, J.K.; Moore, J.F.; Strongin, D.R.

    1992-12-31

    Electron and ion beams can be used to deposit thin films and etch surfaces using gas phase precursors. However, the generation of undesirable gas phase products and the diffusion of the reactive species beyond the region irradiated by the electron or ion beam can limit selectivity. In this paper, the feasibility of processing condensed precursors such as diborane, tri-methyl aluminum, ammonia and water at 78 K with low energy ( 100--1000 eV) electron and ion beams (Ar{sup +}, N{sub 2}{sup +} and H{sub 2}{sup +}) ranging in current density from 50 nA to several {mu}a per cm{sup 2} is examined. It was found that boron, boron nitride and stoichiometric aluminum oxide films could be deposited from the condensed volatile; species using charged particle beams and some of the physical and chemical aspects and limitations of this new technique are discussed.

  13. Ion and electron beam processing of condensed molecular solids to form thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Ruckman, M.W.; Strongin, M. ); Mowlem, J.K.; Moore, J.F.; Strongin, D.R. . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1992-01-01

    Electron and ion beams can be used to deposit thin films and etch surfaces using gas phase precursors. However, the generation of undesirable gas phase products and the diffusion of the reactive species beyond the region irradiated by the electron or ion beam can limit selectivity. In this paper, the feasibility of processing condensed precursors such as diborane, tri-methyl aluminum, ammonia and water at 78 K with low energy ( 100--1000 eV) electron and ion beams (Ar[sup +], N[sub 2][sup +] and H[sub 2][sup +]) ranging in current density from 50 nA to several [mu]a per cm[sup 2] is examined. It was found that boron, boron nitride and stoichiometric aluminum oxide films could be deposited from the condensed volatile; species using charged particle beams and some of the physical and chemical aspects and limitations of this new technique are discussed.

  14. Self-regulated growth of LaVO{sub 3} thin films by hybrid molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hai-Tian; Engel-Herbert, Roman; Dedon, Liv R.; Martin, Lane W.

    2015-06-08

    LaVO{sub 3} thin films were grown on SrTiO{sub 3} (001) by hybrid molecular beam epitaxy. A volatile metalorganic precursor, vanadium oxytriisopropoxide (VTIP), and elemental La were co-supplied in the presence of a molecular oxygen flux. By keeping the La flux fixed and varying the VTIP flux, stoichiometric LaVO{sub 3} films were obtained for a range of cation flux ratios, indicating the presence of a self-regulated growth window. Films grown under stoichiometric conditions were found to have the largest lattice parameter, which decreased monotonically with increasing amounts of excess La or V. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering measurements were carried out to confirm film compositions. Stoichiometric growth of complex vanadate thin films independent of cation flux ratios expands upon the previously reported self-regulated growth of perovskite titanates using hybrid molecular beam epitaxy, thus demonstrating the general applicability of this growth approach to other complex oxide materials, where a precise control over film stoichiometry is demanded by the application.

  15. Renal Ablation Update

    PubMed Central

    Khiatani, Vishal; Dixon, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    Thermal ablative technologies have evolved considerably in the recent past and are now an important component of current clinical guidelines for the treatment of small renal masses. Both radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation have intermediate-term oncologic control that rivals surgical options, with favorable complication profiles. Studies comparing cryoablation and radiofrequency ablation show no significant difference in oncologic control or complication profile between the two modalities. Early data from small series with microwave ablation have shown similar promising results. Newer technologies including irreversible electroporation and high-intensity–focused ultrasound have theoretical advantages, but will require further research before becoming a routine part of the ablation armamentarium. The purpose of this review article is to discuss the current ablative technologies available, briefly review their mechanisms of action, discuss technical aspects of each, and provide current data supporting their use. PMID:25049445

  16. Renal ablation update.

    PubMed

    Khiatani, Vishal; Dixon, Robert G

    2014-06-01

    Thermal ablative technologies have evolved considerably in the recent past and are now an important component of current clinical guidelines for the treatment of small renal masses. Both radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation have intermediate-term oncologic control that rivals surgical options, with favorable complication profiles. Studies comparing cryoablation and radiofrequency ablation show no significant difference in oncologic control or complication profile between the two modalities. Early data from small series with microwave ablation have shown similar promising results. Newer technologies including irreversible electroporation and high-intensity-focused ultrasound have theoretical advantages, but will require further research before becoming a routine part of the ablation armamentarium. The purpose of this review article is to discuss the current ablative technologies available, briefly review their mechanisms of action, discuss technical aspects of each, and provide current data supporting their use. PMID:25049445

  17. Studies on electron-beam irradiation and plastic deformation of medical-grade ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czaja, Krystyna; SudoŁ, Marek

    2011-03-01

    Separated and combined electron-beam irradiation and plastic deformation effects on the structures of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) were studied. It was found that the concentration of carbonyl (ketones, esters and peresters), hydroxyl and vinyl groups increases with the growing dose of adsorbed electrons. It also tends to exhibit a slight increase in the melting point and crystallinity of the samples. A mechanical stress in the polymer was found to accelerate radiation-induced degradation. It was concluded that each of the factors studied (i.e. electron beam sterilization and plastic deformation) had a different impact on the polymer structure. The change in the sequence of action of these factors can dramatically influence the process of UHMWPE destruction. Some effects may be limited or enhanced by the action of other factors. Therefore, the resulting effects of destructive factors depend qualitatively and quantitatively on their intensity and order.

  18. Radiofrequency Ablation of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Marc; Mikityansky, Igor; Kam, Anthony; Libutti, Steven K.; Walther, McClellan M.; Neeman, Ziv; Locklin, Julia K.; Wood, Bradford J.

    2008-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has been used for over 18 years for treatment of nerve-related chronic pain and cardiac arrhythmias. In the last 10 years, technical developments have increased ablation volumes in a controllable, versatile, and relatively inexpensive manner. The host of clinical applications for RFA have similarly expanded. Current RFA equipment, techniques, applications, results, complications, and research avenues for local tumor ablation are summarized. PMID:15383844

  19. Radiofrequency Ablation of Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Marc; Mikityansky, Igor; Kam, Anthony; Libutti, Steven K.; Walther, McClellan M.; Neeman, Ziv; Locklin, Julia K.; Wood, Bradford J.

    2004-09-15

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has been used for over 18 years for treatment of nerve-related chronic pain and cardiac arrhythmias. In the last 10 years, technical developments have increased ablation volumes in a controllable, versatile, and relatively inexpensive manner. The host of clinical applications for RFA have similarly expanded. Current RFA equipment, techniques, applications, results, complications, and research avenues for local tumor ablation are summarized.

  20. Vacancy-type defects in Mg-doped GaN grown by ammonia-based molecular beam epitaxy probed using a monoenergetic positron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uedono, Akira; Malinverni, Marco; Martin, Denis; Okumura, Hironori; Ishibashi, Shoji; Grandjean, Nicolas

    2016-06-01

    Vacancy-type defects in Mg-doped GaN were probed using a monoenergetic positron beam. GaN films with a thickness of 0.5-0.7 μm were grown on GaN/sapphire templates using ammonia-based molecular beam epitaxy and characterized by measuring Doppler broadening spectra. Although no vacancies were detected in samples with a Mg concentration [Mg] below 7 × 1019 cm-3, vacancy-type defects were introduced starting at above [Mg] = 1 × 1020 cm-3. The major defect species was identified as a complex between Ga vacancy (VGa) and multiple nitrogen vacancies (VNs). The introduction of vacancy complexes was found to correlate with a decrease in the net acceptor concentration, suggesting that the defect introduction is closely related to the carrier compensation. We also investigated Mg-doped GaN layers grown using In as the surfactant. The formation of vacancy complexes was suppressed in the subsurface region (≤80 nm). The observed depth distribution of defects was attributed to the thermal instability of the defects, which resulted in the introduction of vacancy complexes during the deposition process.

  1. Lung Ablation: Whats New?

    PubMed

    Xiong, Lillian; Dupuy, Damian E

    2016-07-01

    Lung cancer had an estimated incidence of 221,200 in 2015, making up 13% of all cancer diagnoses. Tumor ablation is an important treatment option for nonsurgical lung cancer and pulmonary metastatic patients. Radiofrequency ablation has been used for over a decade with newer modalities, microwave ablation, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation presenting as additional and possibly improved treatment options for patients. This minimally invasive therapy is best for small primary lesions or favorably located metastatic tumors. These technologies can offer palliation and sometimes cure of thoracic malignancies. This article discusses the current available technologies and techniques available for tumor ablation. PMID:27050331

  2. Kinetics and gas-surface dynamics of GaN homoepitaxial growth using NH 3-seeded supersonic molecular beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGinnis, A. J.; Thomson, D.; Davis, R. F.; Chen, E.; Michel, A.; Lamb, H. H.

    2001-11-01

    The kinetics of homoepitaxial growth of GaN thin films on metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD)-grown GaN(0 0 0 1)/AlN/6H-SiC substrates was probed using NH 3-seeded supersonic molecular beams. NH 3 was seeded in H 2 and He and antiseeded in N 2 and Ar in order to obtain incident kinetic energies of 0.08-1.8 eV. Nozzle temperatures of 35-600 °C were used to adjust the NH 3 internal energy. Intense NH 3 beams (fluxes >2×10 15 cm-2 s-1 at the substrate) are produced for low seeding percentages (<5%) in the lighter carrier gases, because the heavier species (NH 3) is focused along the centerline of the beam. The NH 3 flux is proportional to the ratio of its molecular weight to the average molecular weight of the binary gas mixture. A steady-state Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetics model was used to extract zero-coverage NH 3 sticking coefficient ( αNH 30) values from GaN growth kinetics data. An αNH 30 value of 0.14 at 750 °C was determined using seeded supersonic beams of NH 3 in He with incident kinetic energies of 0.4-0.5 eV. In comparison, GaN growth rates using low-energy NH 3 molecules (0.03 eV) from a leak valve indicate an αNH 30 of 0.29. Growth rate measurements using NH 3 beams with kinetic energies of 0.08-1.8 eV confirmed that αNH 30 generally decreases with increasing incident kinetic energy, leading us to conclude that NH 3 chemisorption on GaN(0 0 0 1) is unactivated and occurs via a precursor-mediated mechanism. Internal energy enhancement of NH 3 chemisorption via a precursor-mediated channel is proposed to explain the effects of nozzle temperature on GaN growth kinetics. The effects of NH 3 incident kinetic energy on film morphology are indirect. Rough, highly faceted films are observed under Ga-limited growth conditions. The surface morphology of films grown under NH 3-limited conditions changes from rough to smooth as the effective V/III ratio is decreased.

  3. Simulation of crystalline beams in storage rings using molecular dynamics technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshkov, I.; Katayama, T.; Sidorin, A.; Smirnov, A.; Syresin, E.; Trubnikov, G.; Tsutsui, H.

    2006-03-01

    Achieving very low temperatures in the beam rest frame can present new possibilities in accelerator physics. Increasing luminosity in the collider and in experiments with targets is a very important asset for investigating rare radioactive isotopes. The ordered state of circulating ion beams was observed at several storage rings: NAP-M [Budker, et al., in: Proceedings of the 4th All-Union Conference on Charged-Particle Accelerators [in Russian], vol. 2, Nauka, Moscow, 1975, p. 309; Budker et al., Part. Accel. 7 (1976) 197; Budker et al., At. Energ. 40 (1976) 49. E. Dementev, N. Dykansky, A. Medvedko et al., Prep. CERN/PS/AA 79-41, Geneva, 1979] (Novosibirsk), ESR [M. Steck et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 77 (1996) 3803] and SIS [Hasse and Steck, Ordered ion beams, in: Proceeding of EPAC '2000] (Darmstadt), CRYRING [Danared et al., Observation of ordered ion beams in CRYRING, in: Proceeding of PAC '2001] (Stockholm) and PALLAS [Schramm et al., in: J.L. Duggan (Eds.), Proceedings of the Conference on Appl. of Acc. in Research and Industry AIP Conference Proceedings, p. 576 (to be published)] (Munich). In this report, the simulation of 1D crystalline beams with BETACOOL code is presented. The sudden reduction of momentum spread in the ESR experiment is described with this code. Simulation shows good agreement with experimental results and also with the intrabeam scattering (IBS) theory [Martini, Intrabeam scattering in the ACOOL-AA machines, CERN PS/84-9 AA, Geneva, 1984]. The code was used to calculate characteristics of the ordered state of ion beams for the TARN-II [Katayama, TARN II project, in: Proceedings of the IUCF workshop on nuclear physics with stored cooled beams, Spencer, IN, USA, 1984].

  4. Ablative Thermal Protection System Fundamentals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, Robin A. S.

    2013-01-01

    This is the presentation for a short course on the fundamentals of ablative thermal protection systems. It covers the definition of ablation, description of ablative materials, how they work, how to analyze them and how to model them.

  5. The thickness-dependent dynamic magnetic property of Co2FeAl films grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Shuang; Nie, Shuaihua; Zhao, Jianhua; Zhang, Xinhui

    2014-10-01

    Co2FeAl films with different thickness were prepared at different temperature by molecular beam epitaxy. Their dynamic magnetic property was studied by the time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr effect measurements. It is observed that the intrinsic damping factor of Co2FeAl for [100] orientation is not related to the film's thickness and magnetic anisotropy as well as temperature at high-field regime, but increases with structural disorder of Co2FeAl. The dominant contribution from the inhomogeneous magnetic anisotropy is revealed to be responsible for the observed extremely nonlinear and drastic field-dependent damping factors at low-field regime.

  6. (GaMn)As: GaAs-based III?V diluted magnetic semiconductors grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, T.; Tanaka, M.; Nishinaga, T.; Shimada, H.; Tsuchiya, H.; Otuka, Y.

    1997-05-01

    We have grown novel III-V diluted magnetic semiconductors, (Ga 1 - xMn x)As, on GaAs substrates by low-temperature molecular beam epitaxy using strong nonequilibrium growth conditions. When the Mn concentration x is relatively low (≲0.08), homogeneous alloy semiconductors, GaMnAs, are grown with zincblende structure and slightly larger lattice constants than that of GaAs, whereas inhomogeneous structures with zincblende GaMnAs (or GaAs) plus hexagonal MnAs are formed when x is relatively high. Magnetization measurements indicate that the homogeneous GaMnAs films have ferromagnetic ordering at low temperature.

  7. Effect of substrate growth temperatures on H diffusion in hydrogenated Si/Si homoepitaxial structures grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Lin; Lee, J. K.; Wang, Y. Q.; Nastasi, M.; Thompson, Phillip E.; David Theodore, N.; Alford, T. L.; Mayer, J. W.; Chen, Peng; Lau, S. S.

    2006-06-01

    We have investigated hydrogen diffusion in hydrogenated <100> Si/Si homoepitaxial structures, which were grown by molecular beam epitaxy at various temperatures. The substrate growth temperature can significantly affect the H diffusion behavior, with higher growth temperatures resulting in deeper H diffusion. For the Si/Si structure grown at the highest temperature of 800 °C, H trapping occurs at the epitaxial Si/Si substrate interface, which results in the formation of (100) oriented microcracks at the interface. The mechanism of H trapping and the potential application of these findings for the development of a method of transferring ultrathin Si layers are discussed.

  8. Improving stability of photoluminescence of ZnSe thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy by incorporating Cl dopant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. S.; Chen, W. J.; Yang, C. S.; Tsai, Y. H.; Wang, H. H.; Chen, R. H.; Shen, J. L.; Tsai, C. D.

    2011-01-01

    This investigation studies the effect of chlorine (Cl) dopant in ZnSe thin films that were grown by molecular beam epitaxy on their photoluminescence (PL) and the stability thereof. Free excitonic emission was observed at room-temperature in the Cl-doped sample. Photon irradiation with a wavelength of 404 nm and a power density of 9.1 W/cm2 has a much stronger effect on PL degradation than does thermal heating to a temperature of 150 °C. Additionally, this study shows that the generation of nonradiative centers by both photon irradiation and thermal heating can be greatly inhibited by incorporating Cl dopant.

  9. Transition between wurtzite and zinc-blende GaN: An effect of deposition condition of molecular-beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, B. M.; Xie, M. H.; Wu, H. S.; Wang, N.; Tong, S. Y.

    2006-10-09

    GaN exists in both wurtzite and zinc-blende phases and the growths of the two on its (0001) or (111) surfaces are achieved by choosing proper deposition conditions of molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE). At low substrate temperatures but high gallium fluxes, metastable zinc-blende GaN films are obtained, whereas at high temperatures and/or using high nitrogen fluxes, equilibrium wurtzite phase GaN epilayers resulted. This dependence of crystal structure on substrate temperature and source flux is not affected by deposition rate. Rather, the initial stage nucleation kinetics plays a primary role in determining the crystallographic structures of epitaxial GaN by MBE.

  10. High electron mobility GaN grown under N-rich conditions by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Koblmueller, G.; Wu, F.; Mates, T.; Speck, J. S.; Fernandez-Garrido, S.; Calleja, E.

    2007-11-26

    An alternative approach is presented for the plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy of high-quality GaN. Under N-rich growth conditions, an unexpected layer-by-layer growth mode was found for a wide range of growth temperatures in the GaN thermal decomposition regime (>750 deg. C). Consequently, superior surface morphologies with roughness of less than 1 nm (rms) have been achieved. For lightly Si-doped GaN films, room-temperature electron mobilities exceeding 1100 cm{sup 2}/V s were measured, surpassing the commonly insulating nature of GaN grown under N-rich conditions at low temperature.

  11. Nucleation, Growth, and Bundling of GaN Nanowires in Molecular Beam Epitaxy: Disentangling the Origin of Nanowire Coalescence.

    PubMed

    Kaganer, Vladimir M; Fernández-Garrido, Sergio; Dogan, Pinar; Sabelfeld, Karl K; Brandt, Oliver

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the nucleation, growth, and coalescence of spontaneously formed GaN nanowires in molecular beam epitaxy combining the statistical analysis of scanning electron micrographs with Monte Carlo growth models. We find that (i) the nanowire density is limited by the shadowing of the substrate from the impinging fluxes by already existing nanowires, (ii) shortly after the nucleation stage, nanowire radial growth becomes negligible, and (iii) coalescence is caused by bundling of nanowires. The latter phenomenon is driven by the gain of surface energy at the expense of the elastic energy of bending and becomes energetically favorable once the nanowires exceed a certain critical length. PMID:27168127

  12. Heavily boron-doped Si layers grown below 700 C by molecular beam epitaxy using a HBO2 source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, T. L.; Fathauer, R. W.; Grunthaner, P. J.

    1989-01-01

    Boron doping in Si layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) at 500-700 C using an HBO2 source has been studied. The maximum boron concentration without detectable oxygen incorporation for a given substrate temperature and Si growth rate has been determined using secondary-ion mass spectrometry analysis. Boron present in the Si MBE layers grown at 550-700 C was found to be electrically active, independent of the amount of oxygen incorporation. By reducing the Si growth rate, highly boron-doped layers have been grown at 600 C without detectable oxygen incorporation.

  13. Lattice Distortion of GaAsBi Alloy Grown on GaAs by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takehara, Yuji; Yoshimoto, Masahiro; Huang, Wei; Saraie, Junji; Oe, Kunishige; Chayahara, Akiyoshi; Horino, Yuji

    2006-01-01

    GaAs1-xBix alloys were grown on GaAs by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The lattice constants perpendicular and parallel to the surface of epilayers were estimated by high-resolution X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The GaBi molar fraction was estimated by the Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS). GaAs1-xBix epilayers with GaBi molar fractions less than 5% were almost coherently grown on GaAs substrate with compressive strain. The lattice mismatch between GaAs1-xBix (x=5%) and GaAs was estimated to be approximately 0.5%.

  14. Insights in High-Temperature Superconductivity from the Study of Films and Heterostructures Synthesized by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Bozovic,I.

    2009-01-09

    Using molecular beam epitaxy, we synthesize atomically smooth thin films, multilayers and superlattices of cuprate high-temperature superconductors (HTS). Such heterostructures enable novel experiments that probe the basicphysics of HTS. For example, we have established that HTS and antiferromagnetic phases separate on Ångstrom scale, while the pseudo-gap state apparently mixes with HTS over an anomalously large length scale ('Giant Proximity Effect'). Here, we briefly review our most recent experiments on such films and superlattices. The new results include an unambiguous demonstration of strong coupling of in-plane charge excitations to out-of-plane lattice vibrations and the discovery of interface HTS.

  15. In-situ epitaxial growth of graphene/h-BN van der Waals heterostructures by molecular beam epitaxy

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Zheng; Xu, Zhongguang; Zheng, Renjing; Khanaki, Alireza; Zheng, Jian-Guo; Liu, Jianlin

    2015-01-01

    Van der Waals materials have received a great deal of attention for their exceptional layered structures and exotic properties, which can open up various device applications in nanoelectronics. However, in situ epitaxial growth of dissimilar van der Waals materials remains challenging. Here we demonstrate a solution for fabricating van der Waals heterostructures. Graphene/hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) heterostructures were synthesized on cobalt substrates by using molecular beam epitaxy. Various characterizations were carried out to evaluate the heterostructures. Wafer-scale heterostructures consisting of single-layer/bilayer graphene and multilayer h-BN were achieved. The mismatch angle between graphene and h-BN is below 1°. PMID:26442629

  16. Room temperature weak ferromagnetism in Sn1-xMnxSe2 2D films grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Sining; Liu, Xinyu; Li, Xiang; Kanzyuba, Vasily; Yoo, Taehee; Rouvimov, Sergei; Vishwanath, Suresh; Xing, Huili G.; Jena, Debdeep; Dobrowolska, Margaret; Furdyna, Jacek K.

    2016-03-01

    We discuss growth and magnetic properties of high-quality two dimensional (2D) Sn1-xMnxSe2 films. Thin films of this 2D ternary alloy with a wide range of Mn concentrations were successfully grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Mn concentrations up to x ≈ 0.60 were achieved without destroying the crystal structure of the parent SnSe2 2D system. Most important, the specimens show clear weak ferromagnetic behavior above room temperature, which should be of interest for 2D spintronic applications.

  17. Chirped-pulse manipulated carrier dynamics in low-temperature molecular-beam-epitaxy grown GaAs

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chao-Kuei; Lin, Yuan-Yao; Lin, Sung-Hui; Lin, Gong-Ru; Pan, Ci-Ling

    2014-04-28

    Chirped pulse controlled carrier dynamics in low-temperature molecular-beam-epitaxy grown GaAs are investigated by degenerate pump-probe technique. Varying the chirped condition of excited pulse from negative to positive increases the carrier relaxation time so as to modify the dispersion and reshape current pulse in time domain. The spectral dependence of carrier dynamics is analytically derived and explained by Shockley-Read Hall model. This observation enables the new feasibility of controlling carrier dynamics in ultrafast optical devices via the chirped pulse excitations.

  18. Emission control of InGaN nanocolumns grown by molecular-beam epitaxy on Si(111) substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, S.; Bengoechea-Encabo, A.; Sanchez-Garcia, M. A.; Calleja, E.; Jahn, U.; Trampert, A.

    2011-09-26

    This work studies the effect of the growth temperature on the morphology and emission characteristics of self-assembled InGaN nanocolumns grown by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Morphology changes are assessed by scanning electron microscopy, while emission is measured by photoluminescence. Within the growth temperature range of 750 to 650 deg. C, an increase in In incorporation for decreasing temperature is observed. This effect allows tailoring the InGaN nanocolumns emission line shape by using temperature gradients during growth. Depending on the gradient rate, span, and sign, broad emission line shapes are obtained, covering the yellow to green range, even yielding white emission.

  19. X-ray diffractometry of AlN/c-sapphire templates obtained by plasma-activated molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratnikov, V. V.; Nechaev, D. V.; Jmerik, V. N.; Ivanov, S. V.

    2016-04-01

    The structure of AlN/c-sapphire templates obtained by plasma-activated molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE) has been studied by X-ray diffractometry techniques. The results show the advantages of using coarse-grained AlN nucleation layers prepared by high-temperature (780°C) adatom-migration-enhanced epitaxy. Using 3.5-nm-thick GaN inserts (obtained by three-dimensional growth under N-rich conditions), it is possible to obtain templates with insignificant residual macrostresses and relatively narrow widths (FWHM) of 0002 and 10bar 15 diffraction reflections.

  20. Molecular Beam Epitaxy of BaSi2 Films with Grain Size over 4 µm on Si(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baba, Masakazu; Nakamura, Kotaro; Du, Weijie; Ajmal Khan, M.; Koike, Shintaro; Toko, Kaoru; Usami, Noritaka; Saito, Noriyuki; Yoshizawa, Noriko; Suemasu, Takashi

    2012-09-01

    100-nm-thick BaSi2 epitaxial films were grown on Si(111) substrates by a two-step growth method including reactive deposition epitaxy (RDE) and molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The Ba deposition rate and duration were varied from 0.25 to 1.0 nm/min and from 5 to 120 min during RDE, respectively. Plan-view transmission electron micrographs indicated that the grain size in the MBE-grown BaSi2 was significantly dependent on the RDE growth conditions and was varied from approximately 0.2 to more than 4 µm.