Science.gov

Sample records for ablation plasma plume

  1. Synchronized videography of plasma plume expansion during femtosecond laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paolasini, Steven; Kietzig, Anne

    2014-03-01

    Femtosecond lasers are gaining industrial interest for surface patterning and structuring because of the reduced heat effects to the surrounding material, resulting in a good quality product with a high aspect ratio. Analysis of the plasma plume generated during ablation can provide useful information about the laser-material interactions and thereby the quality of the resulting surface patterns. As a low-cost alternative to rather complicated ICCD camera setups, presented here is an approach based on filming the laser machining process with a high speed camera and tuning the frame rate of the camera to slightly lower than the laser pulse frequency. The delay in frequency between the laser and camera results in frames taken from sequential pulses. Each frame represents a later phase of plume expansion although taken from different pulses. Assuming equal plume evolution processes from pulse to pulse, the sequence of images obtained completes a plume expansion video. To test the assumption of homogeneity between sequential plumes, the camera can be tuned to the frequency of the laser, as to capture consecutive plumes at the same phase in their evolution. This approach enables a relatively low-cost, high resolution visualization of plasma plume evolution suitable for industrial micromachining applications with femtosecond lasers. Using this approach we illustrate differences in plume expansion at the example of machining homogeneous surface patterns in different liquid and gaseous processing environments.

  2. Optical Emission Spectroscopy of the Laser Ablation Plume Controled by RF Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suda, Yoshiyuki; Nishimura, Takuma; Mizuno, Manabu; Bratescu, Maria Antoaneta; Sakai, Yosuke

    1999-10-01

    Recently, film deposition has been investigated using laser ablation methods which have a lot of advantages. For the purpose of control of the laser ablation plume, we introduced a radio frequency (RF) plasma. In this report we present position resolved optical emission spectra of the plume observed by an OMA (optical multichannel analyzer). The plume current is also measured. The RF plasma is generated in a helical coil installed between the substrate and the target. An ArF excimer laser (wavelength 193 nm, pulse duration time 20 ns) is used as a light source, and the target material is sintered carbon graphite. The laser fluence on the target surface is changed in a range from 1.2 to 6.4 J/cm^2. Ar gas is introduced to sustain the RF plasma. When the plume goes through the RF plasma, interaction of the plume with the plasma is expected. The possibility of control of the plume behavior is discussed.

  3. Plume dynamics and cluster formation in laser-ablated copper plasma in a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, Pramod K.; Thareja, R. K.

    2011-04-01

    Laser-ablated copper plasma plume expanding in a nonuniform magnetic field and ambient gas is investigated to understand plume dynamics using optical emission spectroscopy and fast imaging of the plume. A peculiar oscillatory behavior of the plume observed in magnetic field is discussed. The appearance and enhancement of Cu{sub 2} (A-X) band in ambient gas and in the presence of magnetic field is reported. The presence of magnetic field favors the formation of copper clusters in the expanding plumes.

  4. Shock Wave Mediated Plume Chemistry for Molecular Formation in Laser Ablation Plasmas.

    PubMed

    Harilal, Sivanandan S; Brumfield, Brian E; Cannon, Bret D; Phillips, Mark C

    2016-02-16

    Although it is relatively straightforward to measure the ionic, atomic, molecular, and particle emission features from laser ablation plumes, the associated kinetic and thermodynamic development leading to molecular and nanocluster formation remain one of the most important topics of analytical chemistry and material science. Very little is known, for instance, about the evolutionary paths of molecular and nanocluster formation and its relation to laser plume hydrodynamics. This is, to a large extent; due to the complexity of numerous physical processes that coexist in a transient laser-plasma system. Here, we report the formation mechanisms of molecules during complex interactions of a laser-produced plasma plume expanding from a high purity aluminum metal target into ambient air. It is found that the plume hydrodynamics plays a great role in redefining the plasma thermodynamics and molecular formation. Early in the plasma expansion, the generated shock wave at the plume edge acts as a barrier for the combustion process and molecular formation is prevalent after the shock wave collapse. The temporally and spatially resolved contour mapping of atoms and molecules in laser ablation plumes highlight the formation routes and persistence of species in the plasma and their relation to plume hydrodynamics. PMID:26732866

  5. On the plume splitting of pulsed laser ablated Fe and Al plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmood, S.; Rawat, R. S.; Darby, M. S. B.; Zakaullah, M.; Springham, S. V.; Tan, T. L.; Lee, P.

    2010-10-01

    A time resolved imaging study of pulsed laser ablated Fe and Al plasma plumes with specific interest in the splitting of plumes into the slow and fast moving components as they expand through the background argon gas at different pressures is reported. The material ablation was achieved using a Q-switched Nd:YAG (yttrium aluminum garnet) laser operating at 532 nm with a pulse duration of ˜8 ns full width at half maximum and a fluence of 30 Jcm-2 at the target surface. Typical time resolved images with low magnification show that the splitting occurs at moderate background gas pressures (0.5 and 1.0 mbar for Fe, and 0.2 mbar for Al plasma plumes). The plume splitting did not occur for higher background gas pressures.

  6. On the plume splitting of pulsed laser ablated Fe and Al plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmood, S.; Rawat, R. S.; Springham, S. V.; Tan, T. L.; Lee, P.; Darby, M. S. B.; Zakaullah, M.

    2010-10-15

    A time resolved imaging study of pulsed laser ablated Fe and Al plasma plumes with specific interest in the splitting of plumes into the slow and fast moving components as they expand through the background argon gas at different pressures is reported. The material ablation was achieved using a Q-switched Nd:YAG (yttrium aluminum garnet) laser operating at 532 nm with a pulse duration of {approx}8 ns full width at half maximum and a fluence of 30 Jcm{sup -2} at the target surface. Typical time resolved images with low magnification show that the splitting occurs at moderate background gas pressures (0.5 and 1.0 mbar for Fe, and 0.2 mbar for Al plasma plumes). The plume splitting did not occur for higher background gas pressures.

  7. The role of laser wavelength on plasma generation and expansion of ablation plumes in air

    SciTech Connect

    Hussein, A. E.; Diwakar, P. K.; Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A.

    2013-04-14

    We investigated the role of excitation laser wavelength on plasma generation and the expansion and confinement of ablation plumes at early times (0-500 ns) in the presence of atmospheric pressure. Fundamental, second, and fourth harmonic radiation from Nd:YAG laser was focused on Al target to produce plasma. Shadowgraphy, fast photography, and optical emission spectroscopy were employed to analyze the plasma plumes, and white light interferometry was used to characterize the laser ablation craters. Our results indicated that excitation wavelength plays a crucial role in laser-target and laser-plasma coupling, which in turn affects plasma plume morphology and radiation emission. Fast photography and shadowgraphy images showed that plasmas generated by 1064 nm are more cylindrical compared to plasmas generated by shorter wavelengths, indicating the role of inverse bremsstrahlung absorption at longer laser wavelength excitation. Electron density estimates using Stark broadening showed higher densities for shorter wavelength laser generated plasmas, demonstrating the significance of absorption caused by photoionization. Crater depth analysis showed that ablated mass is significantly higher for UV wavelengths compared to IR laser radiation. In this experimental study, the use of multiple diagnostic tools provided a comprehensive picture of the differing roles of laser absorption mechanisms during ablation.

  8. The role of laser wavelength on plasma generation and expansion of ablation plumes in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, A. E.; Diwakar, P. K.; Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A.

    2013-04-01

    We investigated the role of excitation laser wavelength on plasma generation and the expansion and confinement of ablation plumes at early times (0-500 ns) in the presence of atmospheric pressure. Fundamental, second, and fourth harmonic radiation from Nd:YAG laser was focused on Al target to produce plasma. Shadowgraphy, fast photography, and optical emission spectroscopy were employed to analyze the plasma plumes, and white light interferometry was used to characterize the laser ablation craters. Our results indicated that excitation wavelength plays a crucial role in laser-target and laser-plasma coupling, which in turn affects plasma plume morphology and radiation emission. Fast photography and shadowgraphy images showed that plasmas generated by 1064 nm are more cylindrical compared to plasmas generated by shorter wavelengths, indicating the role of inverse bremsstrahlung absorption at longer laser wavelength excitation. Electron density estimates using Stark broadening showed higher densities for shorter wavelength laser generated plasmas, demonstrating the significance of absorption caused by photoionization. Crater depth analysis showed that ablated mass is significantly higher for UV wavelengths compared to IR laser radiation. In this experimental study, the use of multiple diagnostic tools provided a comprehensive picture of the differing roles of laser absorption mechanisms during ablation.

  9. Optical probe investigation of laser ablated carbon plasma plume in nitrogen ambient

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Ravi Pratap; Gupta, Shyam L.; Thareja, Raj K.

    2013-12-15

    We report the study of carbon plasma produced using 1064 nm laser in nitrogen ambient at atmospheric pressure using 2-dimensional fast imaging of ablated plume, optical emission spectroscopy, and optical probe at 532 nm for interferometry and shadowgraphy. The dominance of C{sub 2} and CN molecules over ionic species at later stages of expanding carbon plasma plume is reported. The observed ring structure in shadowgrams and change in the direction of fringe shift from positive to negative in recorded interferograms are correlated with the relative abundance of different species in the plasma plume as function of time delay with respect to ablating pulse. An agreement in observed onset time of formation of clusters/atomic species or low ionic species using different diagnostic techniques has been reported.

  10. The absorption and radiation of a tungsten plasma plume during nanosecond laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Moscicki, T. Hoffman, J.; Chrzanowska, J.

    2015-10-15

    In this paper, the effect of absorption of the laser beam and subsequent radiation on the dynamics of a tungsten plasma plume during pulsed laser ablation is analyzed. Different laser wavelengths are taken into consideration. The absorption and emission coefficients of tungsten plasma in a pressure range of 0.1–100 MPa and temperature up to 70 000 K are presented. The shielding effects due to the absorption and radiation of plasma may have an impact on the course of ablation. The numerical model that describes the tungsten target heating and the formation of the plasma and its expansion were made for 355 nm and 1064 nm wavelengths of a Nd:YAG laser. The laser beam with a Gaussian profile was focused to a spot size of 0.055 mm{sup 2} with a power density of 1 × 10{sup 9 }W/cm{sup 2} (10 ns full width half maximum pulse duration). The plasma expands into air at ambient pressure of 1 mPa. The use of the shorter wavelength causes faster heating of the target, thus the higher ablation rate. The consequences of a higher ablation rate are slower expansion and smaller dimensions of the plasma plume. The higher plasma temperature in the case of 1064 nm is due to the lower density and lower plasma radiation. In the initial phase of propagation of the plasma plume, when both the temperature and pressure are very high, the dominant radiation is emission due to photo-recombination. However, for a 1064 nm laser wavelength after 100 ns of plasma expansion, the radiation of the spectral lines is up to 46.5% of the total plasma radiation and should not be neglected.

  11. Characterization of Ultrafast Laser-Ablation Plasma Plumes at Various Ar Ambient Pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Diwakar, P. K.; Harilal, S. S.; Phillips, Mark C.; Hassanein, A.

    2015-07-28

    Expansion dynamics and internal plume structures of fs laser ablated brass plasma in Ar at various pressure levels ranging from vacuum to atmospheric were studied using multitude of diagnostic tools including time resolved and time integrated 2-dimensional imaging, optical time of flight measurements and visible emission spectroscopy. Temporal evolution of excited Cu and Zn species in the plume were imaged using band pass interference filters and compared its hydrodynamic expansion features with spectrally integrated images of the plume. 2D imaging coupled with monochromatic line selection showed several interesting features at various pressure levels which include velocity differences among the plume species, emission intensity distribution, plasma temperature, electron density etc. Plume confinement, enhanced signal intensity, and dual peak structures in time-of-flight profiles were observed at intermediate pressure range of ~10 Torr. Optimum signal to background ratio was also observed in this pressure range. Possible mechanisms for observed changes in plume shape, optical emission intensity and dual peak structures in time-of-flight profiles were discussed.

  12. Mapping neutral, ion, and electron number densities within laser-ablated plasma plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, I.; Doyle, Liam A.; Martin, G. W.; Riley, Dave; Lamb, M. J.; Graham, William G.; Morrow, Tom; Lewis, Ciaran L. S.

    1998-05-01

    Spatially and temporally varying neutral, ion and electron number densities have been mapped out within laser ablated plasma plumes expanding into vacuum. Ablation of a magnesium target was performed using a KrF laser, 30 ns pulse duration and 248 nm wavelength. During the initial stage of plasma expansion (t plasma expansion (t equals 1 microsecond(s) ) simultaneous absorption and laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy has been used to determine 3D neutral and ion number densities, for a power density equal to 6.7 X 107 W/cm2. Two distinct regions within the plume were identified. One is a fast component (approximately 106 cm-1) consisting of ions and neutrals with maximum number densities observed to be approximately 30 and 4 X 1012 cm-3 respectively, and the second consists of slow moving neutral material at a number density of up to 1015 cm-3. Additionally a Langmuir probe has been used to obtain ion and electron number densities at very late times in the plasma expansion (1 microsecond(s) ablated using a Nd:YAG laser, 7.5 ns duration and 532 nm (2 (omega) ) wavelength, with a power density on target equal to 6 X 108 W/cm2. Two regions within the plume with different velocities were observed. Within a fast component (approximately 3 X 106 cms-1) electron and ion number densities of the order 5 X 1012 cm-3 were observed and within the second slower component (approximately 106 cms-1) electron and ion number densities of the order 1 - 2 X 1013 cm-3 were determined.

  13. Spectroscopic modeling and characterization of a laser-ablated lithium-silver plasma plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherrill, Manolo Edgar

    In this dissertation, the modeling and spectroscopic analysis of optical line emission recorded during the laser ablation of plasma plumes from a solid Li-Ag alloy target is discussed. The spectral model considers the effects of multi-element collisional-radiative atomic kinetics, detailed Stark-broadened line profiles, and radiation transport. To compute the atomic data of neutrals and low-charge ions a semi-empirical procedure was implemented in a Hartree-Fock atomic structure code, that produces a set of wavefunctions consistent with measured energy levels. This procedure is critical to obtain spectroscopic quality atomic data for a transition element like silver. A large database of atomic cross sections and rates was computed to input the atomic kinetics calculations. Detailed line shapes were calculated for the Li and Ag line transitions observed in the experimental spectra taking into account the effects of natural, Doppler, Stark and resonance broadening. The radiation transport equation was solved to calculate the transport of the lines through the plasma and the emitted line intensity distribution. The final synthetic spectra self-consistently includes the Li and Ag line emissions. The temperature and density sensitivity of these spectra is discussed for the case of uniform and non-uniform plasmas. The spectral model was implemented in a versatile and efficient parallel processing code, and applied to the analysis of data recorded in laser ablation experiments performed at Sandia National Laboratories. First, raw data images recorded with a gated, space-resolving spectrograph were corrected for instrument efficiency, and the wavelength and space axes calibrated. Then, a collection of time- and space-resolved spectra lineouts was extracted for analysis. The results of the analysis indicate that early in time and close to the target's surface a dense plasma is formed with electron temperatures in the 1 eV to 2 eV range, and electron densities in the 1 x

  14. Dynamics of plasma expansion and shockwave formation in femtosecond laser-ablated aluminum plumes in argon gas at atmospheric pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Miloshevsky, Alexander; Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Miloshevsky, Gennady Hassanein, Ahmed

    2014-04-15

    Plasma expansion with shockwave formation during laser ablation of materials in a background gasses is a complex process. The spatial and temporal evolution of pressure, temperature, density, and velocity fields is needed for its complete understanding. We have studied the expansion of femtosecond (fs) laser-ablated aluminum (Al) plumes in Argon (Ar) gas at 0.5 and 1 atmosphere (atm). The expansion of the plume is investigated experimentally using shadowgraphy and fast-gated imaging. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling is also carried out. The position of the shock front measured by shadowgraphy and fast-gated imaging is then compared to that obtained from the CFD modeling. The results from the three methods are found to be in good agreement, especially during the initial stage of plasma expansion. The computed time- and space-resolved fields of gas-dynamic parameters have provided valuable insights into the dynamics of plasma expansion and shockwave formation in fs-pulse ablated Al plumes in Ar gas at 0.5 and 1 atm. These results are compared to our previous data on nanosecond (ns) laser ablation of Al [S. S. Harilal et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 083504 (2012)]. It is observed that both fs and ns plumes acquire a nearly spherical shape at the end of expansion in Ar gas at 1 atm. However, due to significantly lower pulse energy of the fs laser (5 mJ) compared to pulse energy of the ns laser (100 mJ) used in our studies, the values of pressure, temperature, mass density, and velocity are found to be smaller in the fs laser plume, and their time evolution occurs much faster on the same time scale. The oscillatory shock waves clearly visible in the ns plume are not observed in the internal region of the fs plume. These experimental and computational results provide a quantitative understanding of plasma expansion and shockwave formation in fs-pulse and ns-pulse laser ablated Al plumes in an ambient gas at atmospheric pressures.

  15. Dynamics of plasma expansion and shockwave formation in femtosecond laser-ablated aluminum plumes in argon gas at atmospheric pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miloshevsky, Alexander; Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Miloshevsky, Gennady; Hassanein, Ahmed

    2014-04-01

    Plasma expansion with shockwave formation during laser ablation of materials in a background gasses is a complex process. The spatial and temporal evolution of pressure, temperature, density, and velocity fields is needed for its complete understanding. We have studied the expansion of femtosecond (fs) laser-ablated aluminum (Al) plumes in Argon (Ar) gas at 0.5 and 1 atmosphere (atm). The expansion of the plume is investigated experimentally using shadowgraphy and fast-gated imaging. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling is also carried out. The position of the shock front measured by shadowgraphy and fast-gated imaging is then compared to that obtained from the CFD modeling. The results from the three methods are found to be in good agreement, especially during the initial stage of plasma expansion. The computed time- and space-resolved fields of gas-dynamic parameters have provided valuable insights into the dynamics of plasma expansion and shockwave formation in fs-pulse ablated Al plumes in Ar gas at 0.5 and 1 atm. These results are compared to our previous data on nanosecond (ns) laser ablation of Al [S. S. Harilal et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 083504 (2012)]. It is observed that both fs and ns plumes acquire a nearly spherical shape at the end of expansion in Ar gas at 1 atm. However, due to significantly lower pulse energy of the fs laser (5 mJ) compared to pulse energy of the ns laser (100 mJ) used in our studies, the values of pressure, temperature, mass density, and velocity are found to be smaller in the fs laser plume, and their time evolution occurs much faster on the same time scale. The oscillatory shock waves clearly visible in the ns plume are not observed in the internal region of the fs plume. These experimental and computational results provide a quantitative understanding of plasma expansion and shockwave formation in fs-pulse and ns-pulse laser ablated Al plumes in an ambient gas at atmospheric pressures.

  16. Dynamics of laser ablated colliding plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Shyam L.; Pandey, Pramod K.; Thareja, Raj K.

    2013-01-15

    We report the dynamics of single and two collinearly colliding laser ablated plumes of ZnO studied using fast imaging and the spectroscopic measurements. Two dimensional imaging of expanding plume and temporal evolution of various species in interacting zones of plumes are used to calculate plume front velocity, electron temperature, and density of plasma. The two expanding plumes interact with each other at early stage of expansion ({approx}20 ns) resulting in an interaction zone that propagates further leading to the formation of stagnation layer at later times (>150 ns) at the lateral collision front of two plumes. Colliding plumes have larger concentration of higher ionic species, higher temperature, and increased electron density in the stagnation region. A one-to-one correlation between the imaging and optical emission spectroscopic observations in interaction zone of the colliding plumes is reported.

  17. Experimental studies of laser-ablated zirconium carbide plasma plumes: Fuel corrosion diagnostic development

    SciTech Connect

    Wantuck, P.J.; Butt, D.P.; Sappey, A.D.

    1992-01-01

    Understanding the corrosion behavior of nuclear fuel materials, such as refractory carbides, in a high temperature hydrogen environment is critical for several proposed nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) concepts. Monitoring the fuel corrosion products is important not only for understanding corrosion characteristics, but to assess the performance of an actual, operating nuclear propulsion system as well. In this paper, we describe an experimental study initiated to develop, test, and subsequently utilize non-intrusive, laser-based diagnostics to characterize the gaseous product species which are expected to evolve during the exposure of representative fuel samples to hydrogen. Laser ablation is used to produce high temperature, vapor plumes from solid solution, uranium-free, zirconium carbide (ZrC) forms for probing by other laser diagnostic methods; predominantly laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). We discuss the laser ablation technique, results of plume emission measurements, as well as the use of planar LIF to image both the ZrC plumes and actual NTP fuel corrosion constituents.

  18. Atomic Processes in Emission Characteristics of a Lithium Plasma Plume Formed by Double-Pulse Laser Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivakumaran, V.; Ajai, Kumar; K. Singh, R.; Prahlad, V.; C. Joshi, H.

    2013-03-01

    High resolution spectral analysis of lithium plasma formed by single and double laser ablation has been undertaken to understand the plume-laser interaction, especially at the early stages of the plasma plume. In order to identify different atomic processes in evolving plasma, time resolved spectral emission studies at different inter-pulse delays have been performed for ionic and neutral lithium lines emitting from different levels. Along with the enhancement in emission intensity, a large line broadening and spectral shift, especially in the case of excited state transition Li I 610.3 nm have been observed in the presence of the second pulse. This broadening and shift gradually decrease with increasing time delay. Another interesting feature is the appearance of a multi-component structure in the ionic line at 548.4 nm and these components change conversely into a single structure at the later stages of the plasma. The multi-component structures are correlated with the presence of different velocity (temperature) distributions in non-LTE conditions. Atomic analyses by computing photon emissivity coefficients with an ADAS code have been used to identify the above processes.

  19. Time-resolved study of the plasma-plume emission during the nanosecond ablation of lithium fluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camacho, J. J.; Diaz, L.; Cid, J. P.; Poyato, J. M. L.

    2013-10-01

    The properties of the plasma-plume accompanying the pulsed laser ablation of lithium fluoride (LiF) at medium-vacuum conditions (4 Pa) were studied by a combination of spatially and temporally resolved optical emission spectroscopy. The laser-induced plasma at CO2 laser intensities ranging from 0.18 to 4.7 GW × cm- 2 was found strongly ionized in F+, Li+, F2 +, and F3 + species and rich in neutral lithium and fluorine atoms. The temporal behavior of excited Li atoms and ionized excited species F+, Li+, F2 +, and F3 + is reported. The results show a faster decay of the continuum emission and Li+, F3 +, and F2 + ionic species than in the case of F+ and neutral Li atoms. The velocity distributions of atomic and ionic species are obtained from time-of-flight measurements. Electron density and excitation temperature in the laser-induced plasma were estimated from the analysis of spectral data at various delay times from the CO2 laser pulse incidence. From the intensity decay of Li+, F+, F2 + and F3 + with the delay time, we have estimated the three-body electron-ion recombination rate constants for these species.

  20. Time evolution of the infrared laser ablation plasma plume of SiO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, L.; Camacho, J. J.; Cid, J. P.; Martin, M.; Poyato, J. M. L.

    2014-10-01

    The spatio-temporal evolution of the silicon monoxide SiO plasma produced by a high-power CO2 pulsed laser has been investigated using optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and imaging methods. The formed plasma was found to be strongly ionized, yielding Si+, O+, Si2+, O2+ and Si3+ species, rich in neutral silicon and oxygen atoms, and very weak molecular bands of SiO time-integrated and time-resolved two-dimensional OES plasma profiles were recorded as a function of emitted wavelength and distance from the target. The temporal behavior of specific emission lines of Si, Si+, O+, Si2+ and O2+ was characterized. The results show a faster decay of O2+ and Si2+ than that of O+, Si+ and Si. The Stark broadening of isolated single-ionized silicon emission lines was employed for deducing the electron density during the plasma expansion. The relative intensities of two Si2+ lines were used to calculate the time evolution of the plasma temperature.

  1. Resonant holographic measurements of laser ablation plume expansion in vacuum and argon gas backgrounds

    SciTech Connect

    Lindley, R.A.

    1993-10-01

    This thesis discusses the following on resonant holographic measurements of laser ablation plume expansion: Introduction to laser ablation; applications of laser ablation; The study of plume expansion; holographic interferometry; resonant holographic interferometry; accounting for finite laser bandwidth; The solution for doppler broadening and finite bandwidth; the main optical table; the lumonics laser spot shape; developing and reconstructing the holograms; plume expansion in RF/Plasma Environments; Determining {lambda}{sub o}; resonant refraction effects; fringe shift interpretation; shot-to-shot consistency; laser ablation in vacuum and low pressure, inert, background gas; theoretically modeling plume expansion in vacuum and low pressure, inert, background gas; and laser ablation in higher pressure, inert, background gas.

  2. Plume collimation for laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A.

    2016-06-07

    In various embodiments, a device may generally comprise a capillary having a first end and a second end; a laser to emit energy at a sample in the capillary to ablate the sample and generate an ablation plume in the capillary; an electrospray apparatus to generate an electrospray plume to intercept the ablation plume to produce ions; and a mass spectrometer having an ion transfer inlet to capture the ions. The ablation plume may comprise a collimated ablation plume. The device may comprise a flow cytometer. Methods of making and using the same are also described.

  3. Plume collimation for laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A.

    2014-09-09

    In various embodiments, a device may generally comprise a capillary having a first end and a second end; a laser to emit energy at a sample in the capillary to ablate the sample and generate an ablation plume in the capillary; an electrospray apparatus to generate an electrospray plume to intercept the ablation plume to produce ions; and a mass spectrometer having an ion transfer inlet to capture the ions. The ablation plume may comprise a collimated ablation plume. The device may comprise a flow cytometer. Methods of making and using the same are also described.

  4. Spectroscopic studies of laser ablation plumes of artwork materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oujja, M.; Rebollar, E.; Castillejo, M.

    2003-04-01

    Studies on the plasma plume created during KrF laser (248 nm) ablation of dosimeter tempera samples in vacuum have been carried out to investigate the basic interactions of the laser with paint materials. Time resolved optical emission spectroscopy (OES) was used to measure the translational velocity of electronically excited transients in the plasma plume. Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) studies using a probe dye laser, allowed to determine the velocities of non-emitting species. The propagation velocities of C 2 in the a 3π u and d 3π g electronic states and of excited atomic species are indicative of a high translational temperature. Differences between the velocities of organic and inorganic species and between emissions from the tempera systems and from the pigments as pellets allow to discuss the participation of photochemical mechanisms in the laser irradiation of the paint systems.

  5. Spectroscopic diagnostics of plume rebound and shockwave dynamics of confined aluminum laser plasma plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Yeates, P.; Kennedy, E. T.

    2011-06-15

    Generation and expansion dynamics of aluminum laser plasma plumes generated between parallel plates of varying separation ({Delta}Z = 2.0, 3.2, 4.0, and 5.6 mm), which confined plume expansion normal to the ablation surface, were diagnosed. Space and time resolved visible emission spectroscopy in the spectral range {lambda} = 355-470 nm and time gated visible imaging were employed to record emission spectra and plume dynamics. Space and time resolved profiles of N{sub e} (the electron density), T{sub e} (the electron temperature), and T{sub ionz} (the ionization temperature) were compared for different positions in the plasma plume. Significant modifications of the profiles of the above parameters were observed for plasma-surface collisions at the inner surface of the front plate, which formed a barrier to the free expansion of the plasma plume generated by the laser light on the surface of the back plate. Shockwave generation at the collision interface resulted in delayed compression of the low-density plasma plume near the inner ablation surface, at late stages in the plasma history. Upon exiting the cavity formed by the two plates, through an aperture in the front plate, the plasma plume underwent a second phase of free expansion.

  6. Modeling of plume dynamics in laser ablation processes for thin film deposition of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Leboeuf, J.N.; Chen, K.R.; Donato, J.M.; Geohegan, D.B.; Liu, C.L.; Puretzky, A.A.; Wood, R.F.

    1995-12-31

    The transport dynamics of laser-ablated neutral/plasma plumes are of significant interest for film growth by pulsed-laser deposition of materials since the magnitude and kinetic energy of the species arriving at the deposition substrate are key processing parameters. Dynamical calculations of plume propagation in vacuum and in background gas have been performed using particle-in-cell hydrodynamics, continuum gas dynamics, and scattering models. Results from these calculations are presented and compared with experimental observations.

  7. Experimental and computational study of complex shockwave dynamics in laser ablation plumes in argon atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Harilal, S. S.; Miloshevsky, G. V.; Diwakar, P. K.; LaHaye, N. L.; Hassanein, A.

    2012-08-15

    We investigated spatio-temporal evolution of ns laser ablation plumes at atmospheric pressure, a favored condition for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and laser-ablation inductively coupled plasma mass-spectrometry. The 1064 nm, 6 ns pulses from a Nd:YAG laser were focused on to an Al target and the generated plasma was allowed to expand in 1 atm Ar. The hydrodynamic expansion features were studied using focused shadowgraphy and gated 2 ns self-emission visible imaging. Shadowgram images showed material ejection and generation of shock fronts. A secondary shock is observed behind the primary shock during the time window of 100-500 ns with instabilities near the laser cone angle. By comparing the self-emission images obtained using fast photography, it is concluded that the secondary shocks observed in the shadowgraphy were generated by fast moving target material. The plume front estimates using fast photography exhibited reasonable agreement with data obtained from shadowgraphy at early times {<=}400 ns. However, at later times, fast photography images showed plume confinement while the shadowgraphic images showed propagation of the plume front even at greater times. The structure and dynamics of the plume obtained from optical diagnostic tools were compared to numerical simulations. We have shown that the main features of plume expansion in ambient Ar observed in the experiments can be reproduced using a continuum hydrodynamics model which provided valuable insight into the expansion dynamics and shock structure of the plasma plume.

  8. High-order harmonic generation in carbon-nanotube-containing plasma plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Ganeev, R. A.; Naik, P. A.; Singhal, H.; Chakera, J. A.; Kumar, M.; Joshi, M. P.; Srivastava, A. K.; Gupta, P. D.

    2011-01-15

    High-order harmonic generation (HHG) in carbon-nanotube (CNT)-containing plasma plumes has been demonstrated. Various targets were ablated to produce the plasma plumes containing nanotubes for the HHG in these media. Harmonics up to the 29th order were generated. Odd and even harmonics were generated using a two-color pump. The integrity of CNTs within the plasma plume, indicating nanotubes as the source of high-order harmonics, was confirmed by structural studies of plasma debris.

  9. Stationary Plasma Thruster Plume Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Roger M.; Manzella, David H.

    1994-01-01

    Stationary Plasma Thrusters (SPT's) are being investigated for application to a variety of near-term missions. This paper presents the results of a preliminary study of the thruster plume characteristics which are needed to assess spacecraft integration requirements. Langmuir probes, planar probes, Faraday cups, and a retarding potential analyzer were used to measure plume properties. For the design operating voltage of 300 V the centerline electron density was found to decrease from approximately 1.8 x 10 exp 17 cubic meters at a distance of 0.3 m to 1.8 X 10 exp 14 cubic meters at a distance of 4 m from the thruster. The electron temperature over the same region was between 1.7 and 3.5 eV. Ion current density measurements showed that the plume was sharply peaked, dropping by a factor of 2.6 within 22 degrees of centerline. The ion energy 4 m from the thruster and 15 degrees off-centerline was approximately 270 V. The thruster cathode flow rate and facility pressure were found to strongly affect the plume properties. In addition to the plume measurements, the data from the various probe types were used to assess the impact of probe design criteria

  10. Plasma plume MHD power generator and method

    DOEpatents

    Hammer, James H.

    1993-01-01

    Highly-conducting plasma plumes are ejected across the interplanetary magnetic field from a situs that is moving relative to the solar wind, such as a spacecraft or an astral body, such as the moon, having no magnetosphere that excludes the solar wind. Discrete plasma plumes are generated by plasma guns at the situs extending in opposite directions to one another and at an angle, preferably orthogonal, to the magnetic field direction of the solar wind plasma. The opposed plumes are separately electrically connected to their source by a low impedance connection. The relative movement between the plasma plumes and the solar wind plasma creates a voltage drop across the plumes which is tapped by placing the desired electrical load between the electrical connections of the plumes to their sources. A portion of the energy produced may be used in generating the plasma plumes for sustained operation.

  11. Propagation of an atmospheric pressure plasma plume

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, X.; Xiong, Q.; Xiong, Z.; Hu, J.; Zhou, F.; Gong, W.; Xian, Y.; Zou, C.; Tang, Z.; Jiang, Z.; Pan, Y.

    2009-02-15

    The ''plasma bullet'' behavior of atmospheric pressure plasma plumes has recently attracted significant interest. In this paper, a specially designed plasma jet device is used to study this phenomenon. It is found that a helium primary plasma can propagate through the wall of a dielectric tube and keep propagating inside the dielectric tube (secondary plasma). High-speed photographs show that the primary plasma disappears before the secondary plasma starts to propagate. Both plumes propagate at a hypersonic speed. Detailed studies on the dynamics of the plasma plumes show that the local electric field induced by the charges on the surface of the dielectric tube plays an important role in the ignition of the secondary plasma. This indicates that the propagation of the plasma plumes may be attributed to the local electric field induced by the charges in the bulletlike plasma volume.

  12. Plasma plume MHD power generator and method

    DOEpatents

    Hammer, J.H.

    1993-08-10

    A method is described of generating power at a situs exposed to the solar wind which comprises creating at separate sources at the situs discrete plasma plumes extending in opposed directions, providing electrical communication between the plumes at their source and interposing a desired electrical load in the said electrical communication between the plumes.

  13. Evolution and imaging of nanoparticles observed in laser ablated carbon plume

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, Dheerendra; Gupta, Varun; Thareja, Raj K.

    2009-09-15

    We report evidence of nanoparticles formation in laser ablated carbon plasma created by irradiating a graphite target with nanosecond neodymium doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser. The temporal evolution and spatial distribution of C{sub 2} molecules in the plasma is studied using optical emission spectroscopy, dynamic imaging and laser induced fluorescence techniques. The laser induced fluorescence spectrum and imaging of C{sub 2} fluorescence corresponding to transition d {sup 3}PI{sub g}-a {sup 3}PI{sub u} (0, 1) (lambda=563.5 nm) is investigated by probing the expanding plume using a dye laser. The temporal evolution of ground state number density of C{sub 2} shows density varying from 2.6x10{sup 20}/m{sup 3} to 1.2x10{sup 22}/m{sup 3} on varying delay between the ablating and probe pulse from 200 to 600 ns. A peculiar bifurcation of carbon plume into two parts at approx270 ns after the formation of plasma is attributed to recombination of carbon species and formation of nanoparticles. This study may help in quantitatively understanding of formation of carbon molecular species and the nanoparticles produced in laser ablated carbon plume.

  14. Plume Dynamics of Laser-Produced Swine Muscle Tissue Plasma.

    PubMed

    Camacho, Joaquin J; Diaz, Luis; Marin-Roldan, Alicia; Moncayo, Samuel; Caceres, Jorge O

    2016-07-01

    We report on the plume dynamics of the plasma induced by laser ablation of a swine skeletal muscle tissue sample in different vacuum conditions. Pulses from a transversely excited atmospheric CO2 laser were focused onto a target sample and the induced plasma was allowed to expand in different air pressures. The expansion features were studied using fast photography of the overall visible emission by using a gated intensified charged coupled device. Free expansion and plume splitting were observed at different pressure levels. The expansion of the plasma plume front was analyzed using various expansion models and the velocity of the plume front was estimated. The effect of the number of accumulated laser shots on the crater volume at different ambient air pressures and an elemental analysis of the sample were performed using scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analysis. The surface morphology of the irradiated surface showed that increasing the pressure of the ambient gas decreased the ablated mass, or in other words it reduced significantly the laser-target coupling. PMID:27301327

  15. Internal structure and expansion dynamics of laser ablation plumes into ambient gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harilal, S. S.; Bindhu, C. V.; Tillack, M. S.; Najmabadi, F.; Gaeris, A. C.

    2003-03-01

    The effect of ambient gas on the expansion dynamics of the plasma generated by laser ablation of an aluminum target has been investigated using frequency doubled radiation from a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. The diagnostic tools include fast photography of overall visible plume emission using a 2 ns gated intensified charged coupled device and space and time resolved emission spectroscopy using a 50 cm monochromator/spectrograph and photomultiplier tube. The expansion behavior of the plasma was studied with ambient air pressure ranging from 10-6 to 100 Torr. Free expansion, plume splitting and sharpening, hydrodynamic instability, and stagnation of the plume were observed at different pressure levels. Space and time resolved emission spectroscopic studies showed a twin peak distribution for Al and Al+ species at farther distances illustrating plume splitting at pressures higher than 100 mTorr. Combining imaging together with time resolved emission diagnostics, a triple structure of the plume was observed. The expansion of the plume front was compared with various expansion models and found to be generally in good agreement.

  16. ZnO thin film deposition using colliding plasma plumes and single plasma plume: Structural and optical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Shyam L. Thareja, Raj K.

    2013-12-14

    We report the comparative study on synthesis of thin films of ZnO on glass substrates using IR laser ablated colliding plasma plumes and conventional pulsed laser deposition using 355 nm in oxygen ambient. The optical properties of deposited films are characterized using optical transmission in the UV-visible range of spectrum and photoluminescence measurements. X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy are used to investigate the surface morphology of synthesized ZnO films. The films synthesized using colliding plumes created with 1064 nm are non-polar a-plane ZnO with transmission in UV-visible (300–800 nm) region ∼60% compared to polycrystalline thin film deposited using single plume which has chunk deposition and poor optical response. However, deposition with 355 nm single plume shows polar c-axis oriented thin film with average roughness (∼thickness) of ∼86 nm (∼850 nm) compared to ∼2 nm (∼3 μm) for 1064 nm colliding plumes. These observed differences in the quality and properties of thin films are attributed to the flux of mono-energetic plasma species with almost uniform kinetic energy and higher thermal velocity reaching the substrate from interaction/stagnation zone of colliding plasma plumes.

  17. Experiments and Theory of Ablation Plasma Ion Implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilgenbach, R. M.; Qi, B.; Lau, Y. Y.; Johnston, M. D.; Doll, G. L.; Lazarides, A.

    2000-10-01

    Research is underway to accelerate laser ablation plume ions for implantation into substrates. Ablation plasma ion implantation (APII) biases the deposition substrate to a large negative voltage. APII has the advantages of direct acceleration and implantation of ions from metals or any other solid targets. This process is environmentally friendly because it avoids the use of toxic gaseous precursors. Initial experiments are directed towards the implantation of iron ions into silicon substrates at negative voltages from 2-10 kV. A KrF laser ablates iron targets at pulse energies up to 600 mJ and typical repetition rates of 10 Hz. Parameters which can be varied include laser fluence, relative timing of laser and high voltage pulse, and target-to-substrate distance. Spectroscopic diagnostics yield Fe plasma plume electron temperatures up to about 10 eV. Analysis of films will compare surface morphology, hardness and adhesion between deposited Vs accelerated-implanted plumes. A simple one dimensional theory is developed [1] to calculate the implanted ion current, extracted from the ion matrix sheath, as a function of time for various substrate-plume separations. This model accurately recovers Lieberman's classic results when the plume front is initially in contact with the substrate. [1] B. Qi, Y. Y. Lau, and R. M. Gilgenbach, Appl. Phys. Lett. (to be published). * This research is supported by the National Science Foundation.

  18. Time resolved optical diagnostics of ZnO plasma plumes in air

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Shyam L.; Singh, Ravi Pratap; Thareja, Raj K.

    2013-10-15

    We report dynamical evolution of laser ablated ZnO plasma plumes using interferometry and shadowgraphy; 2-D fast imaging and optical emission spectroscopy in air ambient at atmospheric pressure. Recorded interferograms using Nomarski interferometer and shadowgram images at various time delays show the presence of electrons and neutrals in the ablated plumes. The inference drawn from sign change of fringe shifts is consistent with two dimensional images of the plume and optical emission spectra at varying time delays with respect to ablating pulse. Zinc oxide plasma plumes are created by focusing 1.06 μm radiation on to ZnO target in air and 532 nm is used as probe beam.

  19. Spatial coherence measurements of non-resonant and resonant high harmonics generated in laser ablation plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Ganeev, R. A.; Abdelrahman, Z. Frank, F.; Witting, T.; Okell, W. A.; Fabris, D.; Hutchison, C.; Marangos, J. P.; Tisch, J. W. G.

    2014-01-13

    We present measurements of the spatial coherence of the high-order harmonics generated in laser-produced ablation plumes. Harmonics were generated using 4 fs, 775 nm pulses with peak intensity 3 × 10{sup 14} W cm{sup −2}. Double-slit fringe visibilities in the range of ≈0.6–0.75 were measured for non-resonant harmonics in carbon and resonantly enhanced harmonics in zinc and indium. These are somewhat higher than the visibility obtained for harmonics generated in argon gas under similar conditions. This is attributed to lower time-dependent ionization of the plasma ablation targets compared to argon during the high harmonics generation process.

  20. Laser ablated copper plasmas in liquid and gas ambient

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Bhupesh; Thareja, Raj K.

    2013-05-15

    The dynamics of copper ablated plasma plumes generated using laser ablation of copper targets in both liquid (de-ionized water) and gas (air) ambients is reported. Using time and space resolved visible emission spectroscopy (450-650 nm), the plasma plumes parameters are investigated. The electron density (n{sub e}) determined using Stark broadening of the Cu I (3d{sup 10}4d{sup 1} {sup 2}D{sub 3/2}-3d{sup 10}4p{sup 1} {sup 2}P{sub 3/2} at 521.8 nm) line is estimated and compared for both plasma plumes. The electron temperature (T{sub e}) was estimated using the relative line emission intensities of the neutral copper transitions. Field emission scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectral analysis of the ablated copper surface indicated abundance of spherical nanoparticles in liquid while those in air are amalgamates of irregular shapes. The nanoparticles suspended in the confining liquid form aggregates and exhibit a surface plasmon resonance at ∼590 nm.

  1. A collisionless plasma thruster plume expansion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merino, Mario; Cichocki, Filippo; Ahedo, Eduardo

    2015-06-01

    A two-fluid model of the unmagnetized, collisionless far region expansion of the plasma plume for gridded ion thrusters and Hall effect thrusters is presented. The model is integrated into two semi-analytical solutions valid in the hypersonic case. These solutions are discussed and compared against the results from the (exact) method of characteristics; the relative errors in density and velocity increase slowly axially and radially and are of the order of 10-2-10-3 in the cases studied. The plasma density, ion flux and ambipolar electric field are investigated. A sensitivity analysis of the problem parameters and initial conditions is carried out in order to characterize the far plume divergence angle in the range of interest for space electric propulsion. A qualitative discussion of the physics of the secondary plasma plume is also provided.

  2. Dynamics of femto- and nanosecond laser ablation plumes investigated using optical emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Verhoff, B.; Harilal, S. S.; Freeman, J. R.; Diwakar, P. K.; Hassanein, A.

    2012-11-01

    We investigated the spatial and temporal evolution of temperature and electron density associated with femto- and nanosecond laser-produced plasmas (LPP) from brass under similar laser fluence conditions. For producing plasmas, brass targets were ablated in vacuum employing pulses either from a Ti:Sapphire ultrafast laser (40 fs, 800 nm) or from a Nd:YAG laser (6 ns, 1064 nm). Optical emission spectroscopy is used to infer the density and temperature of the plasmas. The electron density (n{sub e}) was estimated using Stark broadened profiles of isolated lines while the excitation temperature (T{sub exc}) was estimated using the Boltzmann plot method. At similar fluence levels, continuum and ion emission are dominant in ns LPP at early times (<50 ns) followed by atomic emission, while the fs LPP provided an atomic plume throughout its visible emission lifetime. Though both ns and fs laser-plasmas showed similar temperatures ({approx}1 eV), the fs LPP is found to be significantly denser at shorter distances from the target surface as well as at early phases of its evolution compared to ns LPP. Moreover, the spatial extension of the plume emission in the visible region along the target normal is larger for fs LPP in comparison with ns LPP.

  3. CaF{sub 2} ablation plumes as a source of CaF molecules for harmonic generation

    SciTech Connect

    Oujja, M.; Nalda, R. de; Castillejo, M.; Lopez-Arias, M.; Torres, R.; Marangos, J. P.

    2010-04-15

    Generation of low-order harmonics (third and fifth) of the fundamental radiation of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm, pulse 15 ns) was observed in a CaF{sub 2} laser ablation plume. The ablation process is triggered by a second Q-switched Nd:YAG laser operating at 532 or 266 nm. In the scheme employed, the fundamental laser beam propagates parallel to the target surface at controllable distance and temporal delay, allowing to the probing of different regions of the freely expanding plume. The intensity of the harmonics is shown to decrease rapidly as the distance to the target is increased, and for each distance, an optimum time delay between the ablating laser pulse and the fundamental beam is found. In situ diagnosis of the plume by optical emission spectroscopy and laser-induced fluorescence serves to correlate the observed harmonic behavior with the temporally and spatially resolved composition and velocity of flight of species in the plume. It is concluded that harmonics are selectively generated by CaF species through a two-photon resonantly enhanced sum-mixing process exploiting the (B {sup 2{Sigma}+}-X {sup 2{Sigma}+}, {Delta}{nu}=0) transition of the molecule in the region of 530 nm. In this work polar molecules have been shown to be the dominating species for harmonic generation in an ablation plume. Implications of these results for the generation of high harmonics in strongly polar molecules which can be aligned in the ablation plasma are discussed.

  4. Comment on "Laser ablation of Cu and plume expansion into 1 atm ambient gas" [J. Appl. Phys. 97, 063305 (2005)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Autrique, D.; Alexiades, V.

    2014-04-01

    A hydrodynamic model used for the study of ns-laser ablation in an ambient environment [Z. Chen and A. Bogaerts, J. Appl. Phys. 97, 063305 (2005)] was investigated and compared with an in-house developed code. After a detailed analysis of the source code and the underlying theoretical framework, significant flaws were detected in the model. It was found that the respective model as well as the ones presented in some earlier and later manuscripts is not able to simulate the ablation process, i.e., target heating, material removal, breakdown, plasma formation, and plume expansion, self-consistently. The present findings indicate that their use should be discontinued when modeling the overall ablation process. Based on existing models in the literature, alternative theoretical pathways are proposed to facilitate future computational studies of ns-laser ablation.

  5. Laser Ablation Plume Expansion In The Presence Of Charged Impurities

    SciTech Connect

    Djebli, M.

    2008-09-23

    The expansion of plasma created by laser ablation is investigated using the fluid model. At the first stage of the expansion, electrons are considered in thermal equilibrium. The presence of highly charged impurities is considered through Poisson's equation. The set of nonlinear differential equations is solved using a moving boundary and taken into account the charge separation effect. The uniformly distributed impurities can accelerate or decelerate the ion motion depending on their charge and concentration. It is also found that the separation of the charge is valid for a specific time which depends on the impurities parameters.

  6. Higher Order Chemistry Models in the CFD Simulation of Laser-Ablated Carbon Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greendyke, R. B.; Creel, J. R.; Payne, B. T.; Scott, C. D.

    2005-01-01

    Production of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) has taken place for a number of years and by a variety of methods such as laser ablation, chemical vapor deposition, and arc-jet ablation. Yet, little is actually understood about the exact chemical kinetics and processes that occur in SWNT formation. In recent time, NASA Johnson Space Center has devoted a considerable effort to the experimental evaluation of the laser ablation production process for SWNT originally developed at Rice University. To fully understand the nature of the laser ablation process it is necessary to understand the development of the carbon plume dynamics within the laser ablation oven. The present work is a continuation of previous studies into the efforts to model plume dynamics using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The ultimate goal of the work is to improve understanding of the laser ablation process, and through that improved understanding, refine the laser ablation production of SWNT.

  7. Ablation plume structure and dynamics in ambient gas observed by laser-induced fluorescence imaging spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyabe, M.; Oba, M.; Iimura, H.; Akaoka, K.; Khumaeni, A.; Kato, M.; Wakaida, I.

    2015-08-01

    The dynamic behavior of an ablation plume in ambient gas has been investigated by laser-induced fluorescence imaging spectroscopy. The second harmonic beam from an Nd:YAG laser (0.5-6 J/cm2) was focused on a sintered oxide pellet or a metal chip of gadolinium. The produced plume was subsequently intersected with a sheet-shaped UV beam from a dye laser so that time-resolved fluorescence images were acquired with an intensified CCD camera at various delay times. The obtained cross-sectional images of the plume indicate that the ablated ground state atoms and ions of gadolinium accumulate in a hemispherical contact layer between the plume and the ambient gas, and a cavity containing a smaller density of ablated species is formed near the center of the plume. At earlier expansion stage, another luminous component also expands in the cavity so that it coalesces into the hemispherical layer. The splitting and coalescence for atomic plume occur later than those for ionic plume. Furthermore, the hemispherical layer of neutral atoms appears later than that of ions; however, the locations of the layers are nearly identical. This coincidence of the appearance locations of the layers strongly suggests that the neutral atoms in the hemispherical layer are produced as a consequence of three-body recombination of ions through collisions with gas atoms. The obtained knowledge regarding plume expansion dynamics and detailed plume structure is useful for optimizing the experimental conditions for ablation-based spectroscopic analysis.

  8. Laser plasma plume structure and dynamics in the ambient air: The early stage of expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirisan, M.; Jouvard, J. M.; Lavisse, L.; Hallo, L.; Oltra, R.

    2011-05-01

    Laser ablation plasma plume expanding into the ambient atmosphere may be an efficient way to produce nanoparticles. From that reason it would be interesting to study the properties of these laser induced plasmas formed under conditions that are known to be favorable for nanoparticles production. In general, plume behavior can be described as a two-stage process: a "violent" plume expansion due to the absorption of the laser beam energy (during the laser pulse) followed by a fast adiabatic expansion in the ambient gas (after the end of the laser pulse). Plasma plume may last a few microseconds and may have densities 10-6 times lower than the solid densities at temperatures close to the ambient temperature. Expansion of the plasma plume induced by the impact of a nanosecond laser beam (λ = 1064 nm) on the surface of metallic samples in the open air has been investigated by means of fast photography. Spatio-temporal evolution of the plume at the early stage of its expansion (first 330 ns) has been recorded. Structure and dynamics of the plasma plume have been investigated and compared to numerical simulations obtained with a hydro-code, as well as some scaling laws. In addition, measurements using different sample materials (Al, Fe, and Ti) have been performed in order to analyze the influence of target material on plume expansion.

  9. Method of hybrid plume plasma propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Franklin R. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A technique for producing thrust by generating a hybrid plume plasma exhaust is disclosed. A plasma flow is generated and introduced into a nozzle which features one or more inlets positioned to direct a flow of neutral gas about the interior of the nozzle. When such a neutral gas flow is combined with the plasma flow within the nozzle, a hybrid plume is constructed including a flow of hot plasma along the center of the nozzle surrounded by a generally annular flow of neutral gas, with an annular transition region between the pure plasma and the neutral gas. The temperature of the outer gas layer is below that of the pure plasma and generally separates the pure plasma from the interior surfaces of the nozzle. The neutral gas flow both insulates the nozzle walls from the high temperatures of the plasma flow and adds to the mass flow rate of the hybrid exhaust. The rate of flow of neutral gas into the interior of the nozzle may be selectively adjusted to control the thrust and specific impulse of the device.

  10. Stationary Plasma Thruster Plume Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manzella, David H.

    1994-01-01

    The emission spectrum from a xenon plasma produced by a Stationary Plasma Thruster provided by the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization (BMDO) was measured. Approximately 270 individual Xe I, Xe II, and XE III transitions were identified. A total of 250 mW of radiated optical emission was estimated from measurements taken at the thruster exit plane. There was no evidence of erosion products in the emission signature. Ingestion and ionization of background gas at elevated background pressure was detected. The distribution of excited states could be described by temperatures ranging from fractions of 1 eV to 4 eV with a high degree of uncertainty due to the nonequilibrium nature of this plasma. The plasma was over 95 percent ionized at the thruster exit plane. Between 10 and 20 percent of the ions were doubly charged. Two modes of operation were identified. The intensity of plasma emission increased by a factor of two during operation in an oscillatory mode. The transfer between the two modes of operation was likely related to unidentified phenomena occurring on a time scale of minutes.

  11. High Current Hollow Cathode Plasma Plume Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Robert E.; Kamhawi, Hani; Williams, George J., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    Plasma plume measurements are reported for a hollow cathode assembly (HCA) operated at discharge currents of 50, 70, and 100 A at xenon flow rates between 19 - 46 standard cubic centimeter per minute. The HCA was centrally mounted in the NASA-300MS Hall Thruster and was operated in the "spot" and "plume" modes with additional data taken with an applied magnetic field. Langmuir probes, retarding potential analyzers, and optical emission spectroscopy were employed to measure plasma properties near the orifice of the HCA and to assess the charge state of the near-field plasma. Electron temperatures (2-6 electron volt) and plasma potentials are consistent with probe-measured values in previous investigations. Operation with an applied-field yields higher discharge voltages, increased Xe III production, and increased signals from the 833.5 nm C I line. While operating in plume mode and with an applied field, ion energy distribution measurements yield ions with energies significantly exceeding the applied discharge voltage. These findings are correlated with high-frequency oscillations associated with each mode.

  12. Plasma effects during ablation and drilling using pulsed solid-state lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitling, Detlef; Ruf, Andreas; Berger, Peter W.; Dausinger, Friedrich H.; Klimentov, Sergei M.; Pivovarov, Paval A.; Kononenko, Taras V.; Konov, Vitali I.

    2003-09-01

    Plasma and vapor plumes generated by ultrashort laser pulses have been studied by various optical methods for both single pulse ablation as well as high-repetition rate drilling. Time-resolved shadow and resonance absorption photographs enable to determine the plume and vapor expansion behavior and, by means of an analytical shock wave model, allow to estimate an energy balance that can be refined by plasma transmission measurements. The results furthermore suggest that several types of laser-induced plasmas can be distinguished according to their origin: the material vapor plasma originating at the ablated surface even at moderate intensities, a breakdown plasma at increased power densities occurring in cold vapor or dust particles left from previous ablations during repetitively-pulsed processing and, finally, the optical breakdown in the pure atmosphere at high intensities. The latter also gives rise to nonlinear scattering phenomena resulting in a strong redistribution of the energy density in the beam profile.

  13. High Current Hollow Cathode Plasma Plume Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Robert E.; Kamhawi, Hani; Williams, George J., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Plasma plume measurements are reported for a hollow cathode assembly (HCA) oper-ated at discharge currents of 50, 70, and 100 A at xenon ow rates between 19 - 46 sccm.The HCA was centrally mounted in the annulus of the NASA-300MS Hall Thruster andwas operated in the spot and plume modes with additional data taken with an appliedmagnetic eld. Langmuir probes, retarding potential analyzers, and optical emission spec-troscopy were employed to measure plasma properties near the orice of the HCA and toassess the charge state of the near-eld plasma. Electron temperatures (2-6 eV) and plasmapotentials are consistent with probe-measured values in previous investigations. Operationwith an applied-eld yields higher discharge voltages, increased Xe III production, andincreased signals from the 833.5 nm C I line. While operating in plume mode and with anapplied eld, ion energy distribution measurements yield ions with energies signicantlyexceeding the applied discharge voltage. These ndings are correlated with high-frequencyoscillations associated with each mode.

  14. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Durrant, S.F.

    1996-07-01

    Laser ablation for solid sample introduction to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for bulk and spatially-resolved elemental analysis is briefly reviewed. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Gas Effect On Plasma Dynamics Of Laser Ablation Zinc Oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelli-Messaci, S.; Kerdja, T.; Lafane, S.; Malek, S.

    2008-09-01

    In order to synthesis zinc oxide thin films and nanostructures, laser ablation of ZnO target into both vacuum and oxygen atmosphere was performed. The gas effect on the plume dynamics was studied for O2 pressures varied between 10-2 to 70 mbar. Plasma plume evolution was investigated by ICCD camera fast imaging. The plasma was created by a KrF excimer laser (λ = 248 nm, τ = 25 ns) at a fluence of 2 J/cm2. The light emitted by the plume was observed along the perpendicular to the ejection direction through a fast intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD). We have found that the plasma dynamics is very affected by the gas pressures. The photographs reveal the stratification of plasma into slow and fast components for 0.5 mbar O2 pressures and beyond. The photographs also show the apparition of hydrodynamic instabilities which are related to chemical reactions between the plasma and the surrounding gas for a certain range of pressures.

  16. Gas Effect On Plasma Dynamics Of Laser Ablation Zinc Oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Abdelli-Messaci, S.; Kerdja, T.; Lafane, S.; Malek, S.

    2008-09-23

    In order to synthesis zinc oxide thin films and nanostructures, laser ablation of ZnO target into both vacuum and oxygen atmosphere was performed. The gas effect on the plume dynamics was studied for O{sub 2} pressures varied between 10{sup -2} to 70 mbar. Plasma plume evolution was investigated by ICCD camera fast imaging. The plasma was created by a KrF excimer laser ({lambda} = 248 nm, {tau} = 25 ns) at a fluence of 2 J/cm{sup 2}. The light emitted by the plume was observed along the perpendicular to the ejection direction through a fast intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD). We have found that the plasma dynamics is very affected by the gas pressures. The photographs reveal the stratification of plasma into slow and fast components for 0.5 mbar O{sub 2} pressures and beyond. The photographs also show the apparition of hydrodynamic instabilities which are related to chemical reactions between the plasma and the surrounding gas for a certain range of pressures.

  17. Plasma-mediated ablation of biofilm contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhixiong; Wang, Xiaoliang; Huang, Huan

    2010-12-01

    Ultra-short pulsed laser removal of thin biofilm contamination on different substrates has been conducted via the use of plasma-mediated ablation. The biofilms were formed using sheep whole blood. The ablation was generated using a 1.2 ps ultra-short pulsed laser with wavelength centered at 1552 nm. The blood contamination was transformed into plasma and collected with a vacuum system. The single line ablation features have been measured. The ablation thresholds of blood contamination and bare substrates were determined. It is found that the ablation threshold of the blood contamination is lower than those of the beneath substrates including the glass slide, PDMS, and human dermal tissues. The ablation effects of different laser parameters (pulse overlap rate and pulse energy) were studied and ablation efficiency was measured. Proper ablation parameters were found to efficiently remove contamination with maximum efficiency and without damage to the substrate surface for the current laser system. Complete removal of blood contaminant from the glass substrate surface and freeze-dried dermis tissue surface was demonstrated by the USP laser ablation with repeated area scanning. No obvious thermal damage was found in the decontaminated glass and tissue samples.

  18. Study of the luminous plasma and plume produced on interaction of a XeCl laser and biological tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Andrea K.; Dickinson, Mark R.

    2001-07-01

    Above the ablation threshold the removal of tissue is characterized by a luminous plasma, followed by a plume of non-luminous debris. Both the plasma and the plume are capable of shielding the ablation site, attenuating the beam and decreasing the ablation rate significantly at high numbers of pulses (n) and high fluence. The ablation of several biological tissues by a XeCl excimer laser at 308 nm has been studied. The laser pulse length is 200 ns, around a factor of 10 longer than previously reported studies. In order to study the plume's effect on the ablation rate is has been captured using an Imacon 468 camera capable of 1x108 frames per second. We have calculated the evolutionary speed and the extent of the plasma and ensuing debris with respect to pulse repetition rate (PRR), n and energy for a range of tissues. Probe beam experiments have also been carried out to confirm these results. With this data we can determine the amount of time that the tissue is shielded on the time scale of the incoming pulses and use the results to help explain the ablation rate measurements. A maximum velocity of 2.58x104 ms/s was found for dentine and the tissue was found to be shielded for a maximum of 120 microsecond(s) by the luminous plasma and 10 ms by the non-luminous plume.

  19. Pulsed IR laser ablation of organic polymers in air: shielding effects and plasma pipe formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchenko, A. N.; Shulepov, M. A.; Tel'minov, A. E.; Zakharov, L. A.; Paletsky, A. A.; Bulgakova, N. M.

    2011-09-01

    We report the effect of 'plasma pipe' formation on pulsed laser ablation of organic polymers in air under normal conditions. Ablation of polymers (PMMA, polyimide) is carried out in a wide range of CO2 laser fluences with special attention to plasma formation in the ablation products. Evolution of laser ablation plumes in air under different pressures is investigated with simultaneous registration of radiation spectra of the ablation products. An analysis based on thermo-chemical modelling is performed to elucidate the effects of laser light attenuation upon ablation, including plasma and chemical processes in a near-target space. The analysis has shown that the experimental observations of plume development in air can be explained by a combination of processes including formation of a pre-ionized channel along the laser beam propagation, laser-supported detonation wave and effective combustion of the polymer ablation products. A scenario of a streamer-like polymer plasma flow within an air plasma pipe created via laser-induced breakdown is proposed.

  20. Dusty plasma of the Enceladus plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaroshenko, Victoria; Lühr, Hermann

    2016-01-01

    Geological active south-pole fractures of the icy moon Enceladus produce a specific region, a so-called plume that extends up to 1000 km into space. The main constituents of the plume are electrons, ions, water molecules, and charged nanograins, which are responsible for the unusual properties of this kind of low-temperature dusty plasma. The examples discussed represent our results in this field within the last few years, and mostly such cases were chosen, in which measurements of different Cassini instruments could be compared with theory or where the phenomenon has a diagnostic application. Dust charging, role of dust size distributions and dust charge fluctuations are discussed. The findings are used for interpretations of the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer data and improve constraints on the dust characteristics. Then the main forces and dust dynamics are discussed in conditions relevant for the near-Enceladus plasma. It is also examined how the charged dust can affect the plasma shielding length which is of importance for the reliable Cassini Langmuir probe measurements. Considering the dust grains as heavy negative ion species, the electric conductivity tensor is modified, whose elements are the key quantities for understanding the magnetic field perturbations registered by the Cassini Magnetometer during Enceladus flybys.

  1. Emission analysis of a laser-produced barium plasma plume.

    PubMed

    Singh, R K; Joshi, H C; Kumar, Ajai

    2015-09-01

    In the present work we report the characteristic emission features of a laser-produced barium plasma plume. The time-resolved analysis for the different spectral lines of neutral and singly charged ionic barium has been carried out. It has been observed that the temporal evolution of electron temperature and density shows a peculiar behavior which is significantly different from the reported results of laser ablation of materials. The electron density increases with increase in delay time but the temperature does not change to any significant extent. Strong self-reversal in the emission of a resonant singly charged barium ionic line (455.4 nm) with time delay indicates the increase of population of singly charged barium ion with time. The results are explained on the basis of the increased population of barium metastables and subsequent ionization (Penning type). PMID:26368891

  2. Low-order harmonic generation in metal ablation plasmas in nanosecond and picosecond laser regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-Arias, M.; Oujja, M.; Sanz, M.; Castillejo, M.; Ganeev, R. A.; Boltaev, G. S.; Satlikov, N. Kh.; Tugushev, R. I.; Usmanov, T.

    2012-02-15

    Low-order harmonics, third and fifth, of IR (1064 nm) laser emission have been produced in laser ablation plasmas of the metals manganese, copper and silver. The harmonics were generated in a process triggered by laser ablation followed by frequency up-conversion of a fundamental laser beam that propagates parallel to the target surface. These studies were carried out in two temporal regimes by creating the ablation plasma using either nanosecond or picosecond pulses and then probing the plasma plume with pulses of the same duration. The spatiotemporal behavior of the generated harmonics was characterized and reveals the distinct composition and dynamics of the plasma species that act as nonlinear media, allowing the comparison of different processes that control the generation efficiency. These results serve to guide the choice of laser ablation plasmas to be used for efficient high harmonic generation of laser radiation.

  3. Tracing the plasma interactions for pulsed reactive crossed-beam laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jikun; Stender, Dieter; Pichler, Markus; Pergolesi, Daniele; Schneider, Christof W.; Wokaun, Alexander; Lippert, Thomas; Döbeli, Max

    2015-10-28

    Pulsed reactive crossed-beam laser ablation is an effective technique to govern the chemical activity of plasma species and background molecules during pulsed laser deposition. Instead of using a constant background pressure, a gas pulse with a reactive gas, synchronized with the laser beam, is injected into vacuum or a low background pressure near the ablated area of the target. It intercepts the initially generated plasma plume, thereby enhancing the physicochemical interactions between the gaseous environment and the plasma species. For this study, kinetic energy resolved mass-spectrometry and time-resolved plasma imaging were used to study the physicochemical processes occurring during the reactive crossed beam laser ablation of a partially {sup 18}O substituted La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}MnO{sub 3} target using oxygen as gas pulse. The characteristics of the ablated plasma are compared with those observed during pulsed laser deposition in different oxygen background pressures.

  4. Tracing the plasma interactions for pulsed reactive crossed-beam laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jikun; Stender, Dieter; Pichler, Markus; Döbeli, Max; Pergolesi, Daniele; Schneider, Christof W.; Wokaun, Alexander; Lippert, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    Pulsed reactive crossed-beam laser ablation is an effective technique to govern the chemical activity of plasma species and background molecules during pulsed laser deposition. Instead of using a constant background pressure, a gas pulse with a reactive gas, synchronized with the laser beam, is injected into vacuum or a low background pressure near the ablated area of the target. It intercepts the initially generated plasma plume, thereby enhancing the physicochemical interactions between the gaseous environment and the plasma species. For this study, kinetic energy resolved mass-spectrometry and time-resolved plasma imaging were used to study the physicochemical processes occurring during the reactive crossed beam laser ablation of a partially 18O substituted La0.6Sr0.4MnO3 target using oxygen as gas pulse. The characteristics of the ablated plasma are compared with those observed during pulsed laser deposition in different oxygen background pressures.

  5. Nucleation and growth of nanoparticles in a plasma by laser ablation in liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taccogna, Francesco

    2015-10-01

    > Modelling the nucleation and growth of nanoparticles in liquid-phase laser ablation is very important to optimize and control the size and the structure of nanoparticles. However, the detailed formation process of nanoparticles after laser ablation is still unclear. In the present study we investigated for the first time the kinetic growth of nanoparticles synthesized by laser ablation in water, emphasizing the leading role of the plasma medium and in particular the electrostatic agglomeration due to the charging of the nanoparticle in the plasma plume. The importance of the confining role of the liquid medium on the plasma plume is revealed, showing how an isothermal expansion is able to produce smaller nanoparticles compared to an adiabatic cooling.

  6. Gas-dynamic acceleration of laser-ablation plumes: Hyperthermal particle energies under thermal vaporization

    SciTech Connect

    Morozov, A. A.; Evtushenko, A. B.; Bulgakov, A. V.

    2015-02-02

    The expansion of a plume produced by low-fluence laser ablation of graphite in vacuum is investigated experimentally and by direct Monte Carlo simulations in an attempt to explain hyperthermal particle energies for thermally vaporized materials. We demonstrate that the translation energy of neutral particles, ∼2 times higher than classical expectations, is due to two effects, hydrodynamic plume acceleration into the forward direction and kinetic selection of fast particles in the on-axis region. Both effects depend on the collision number within the plume and on the particles internal degrees of freedom. The simulations allow ablation properties to be evaluated, such as ablation rate and surface temperature, based on time-of-flight measurements. Available experimental data on kinetic energies of various laser-produced particles are well described by the presented model.

  7. Gas-dynamic acceleration of laser-ablation plumes: Hyperthermal particle energies under thermal vaporization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, A. A.; Evtushenko, A. B.; Bulgakov, A. V.

    2015-02-01

    The expansion of a plume produced by low-fluence laser ablation of graphite in vacuum is investigated experimentally and by direct Monte Carlo simulations in an attempt to explain hyperthermal particle energies for thermally vaporized materials. We demonstrate that the translation energy of neutral particles, ˜2 times higher than classical expectations, is due to two effects, hydrodynamic plume acceleration into the forward direction and kinetic selection of fast particles in the on-axis region. Both effects depend on the collision number within the plume and on the particles internal degrees of freedom. The simulations allow ablation properties to be evaluated, such as ablation rate and surface temperature, based on time-of-flight measurements. Available experimental data on kinetic energies of various laser-produced particles are well described by the presented model.

  8. Formation of AlN in laser ablated plasma of Al in nitrogen ambient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thareja, Raj K.; Sharma, A. K.

    2005-05-01

    We report on spectroscopic investigations of interaction of an expanding laser ablated plume of aluminum and graphite with nitrogen gas and the formation of AlN and CN. AlN and CN bands are formed by reactive process of ablated aluminum and graphite in ambient nitrogen pressures of 70 and 0.1 Torr and laser fluence of 500 and 12 Jcm-2 respectively. Images of the expanding plasma plume were captured using ICCD to understand the role of vapor and shock temperature in the formation of AlN. Instability observed in laser ablated plume at later times attributed to Rayleigh-Taylor instability could be the cause for weak AlN band observed in the emission spectrum.

  9. Dynamics of Femtosecond Laser Ablation Plume Studied With Ultrafast X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Oguri, Katsuya; Okano, Yasuaki; Nishikawa, Tadashi; Nakano, Hidetoshi

    2010-10-08

    We investigated the dynamic process of an expanding femtosecond laser ablation plume of aluminum generated in an irradiation intensity range of 10{sup 13}-10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2} with the ultrafast x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) imaging technique. The XAFS spectra of the aluminum L{sub II,III} edge of the plume revealed that the plume consists of doubly and singly charged ions, neutral atoms, liquid particles, and possible atomic clusters. Scanning electron microscopy of deposited ablation particles confirmed that the liquid particles corresponds to the spherical nanoparticles with a size ranging from several tens nanometers to approximately 200 nm. The spatiotemporal evolution of the XAFS image of the plume shows the sequential appearance of each ablation particle from aluminum surface according to its ejection velocity. The result suggests that the photomechanical fragmentation process, which was theoretically proposed, is dominant mechanism for the nanoparticle ejection under the irradiation intensity far from the ablation threshold of aluminum. This study clearly demonstrates the potential of our technique for measuring the ultrafast dynamics of femtosecond laser ablation process.

  10. Time-resolved diagnostics of excimer laser-generated ablation plasmas used for pulsed laser deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Geohegan, D.B.

    1994-09-01

    Characteristics of laser plasmas used for pulsed laser deposition (PLD) of thin films are examined with four in situ diagnostic techniques: Optical emission spectroscopy, optical absorption spectroscopy, ion probe studies, and gated ICCD (intensified charge-coupled-device array) fast photography. These four techniques are complementary and permit simultaneous views of the transport of ions, excited states, ground state neutrals and ions, and hot particulates following KrF laser ablation of YBCO, BN, graphite and Si in vacuum and background gases. The implementation and advantages of the four techniques are first described in order to introduce the key features of laser plasmas for pulsed laser deposition. Aspects of the interaction of the ablation plume with background gases (i.e., thermalization, attenuation, shock formation) and the collision of the plasma plume with the substrate heater are then summarized. The techniques of fast ICCD photography and gated photon counting are then applied to investigate the temperature, velocity, and spatial distribution of hot particles generated during KrF ablation of YBCO, BN, Si and graphite. Finally, key features of fast imaging of the laser ablation of graphite into high pressure rare gases are presented in order to elucidate internal reflected shocks within the plume, redeposition of material on a surface, and formation of hot nanoparticles within the plume.

  11. Ablation Plasma Ion Implantation Optimization and Deposition of Compound Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, M. C.; Qi, B.; Gilgenbach, R. M.; Johnston, M. D.; Lau, Y. Y.; Doll, G. L.; Lazarides, A.

    2002-10-01

    Ablation Plasma Ion Implantation (APII) utilizes KrF laser ablation plasma plumes to implant ions into pulsed, negatively-biased substrates [1]. Ablation targets are Ti foils and TiN disks. Substrates are Si wafers and Al, biased from 0 to -10 kV. Optimization experiments address: 1) configurations that reduce arcing, 2) reduction of particulate, and 3) deposition/implantation of compounds (e.g. TiN). Arcing is suppressed by positioning the target perpendicular (previously parallel) to the substrate. Thus, bias voltage can be applied at the same time as the KrF laser, resulting in higher ion current. This geometry also yields lower particulate. APII with TiN has the goal of hardened coatings with excellent adhesion. SEM, AFM, XPS, TEM, and scratch tests characterize properties of the thin films. Ti APII films at - 4kV are smoother with lower friction. 1. B. Qi, R.M. Gilgenbach, Y.Y. Lau, M.D. Johnston, J. Lian, L.M. Wang, G. L. Doll and A. Lazarides, APL, 78, 3785 (2001) * Research funded by NSF

  12. Langmuir probe measurements and mass spectrometry of plasma plumes generated by laser ablation of La{sub 0.4}Ca{sub 0.6}MnO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jikun; Lippert, Thomas Ojeda-G-P, Alejandro; Stender, Dieter; Schneider, Christof W.; Wokaun, Alexander; Lunney, James G.

    2014-08-21

    The plasma formed in vacuum by UV nanosecond laser ablation of La{sub 0.4}Ca{sub 0.6}MnO{sub 3} in the fluence range of 0.8 to 1.9 J cm{sup −2} using both Langmuir probe analysis and energy-resolved mass spectrometry has been studied. Mass spectrometry shows that the main positive ion species are Ca{sup +}, Mn{sup +}, La{sup +}, and LaO{sup +}. The Ca{sup +} and Mn{sup +} energy distributions are quite broad and lie in the 0–100 eV region, with the average energies increasing with laser fluence. In contrast, the La{sup +} and LaO{sup +} distributions are strongly peaked around 10 eV. The net time-of-arrival signal derived from the measured positive ion energy distributions is broadly consistent with the positive ion signal measured by the Langmuir probe. We also detected a significant number of O{sup −} ions with energies in the range of 0 to 10 eV. The Langmuir probe was also used to measure the temporal variation of the electron density and temperature at 6 cm from the ablation target. In the period when O{sup −} ions are found at this position, the plasma conditions are consistent with those required for significant negative oxygen ion formation, as revealed by studies on radio frequency excited oxygen plasma.

  13. Influence of surrounding gas, composition and pressure on plasma plume dynamics of nanosecond pulsed laser-induced aluminum plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawood, Mahmoud S.; Hamdan, Ahmad; Margot, Joëlle

    2015-10-01

    In this article, we present a comprehensive study of the plume dynamics of plasmas generated by laser ablation of an aluminum target. The effect of both ambient gas composition (helium, nitrogen or argon) and pressure (from ˜5 × 10-7 Torr up to atmosphere) is studied. The time- and space- resolved observation of the plasma plume are performed from spectrally integrated images using an intensified Charge Coupled Device (iCCD) camera. The iCCD images show that the ambient gas does not significantly influence the plume as long as the gas pressure is lower than 20 Torr and the time delay below 300 ns. However, for pressures higher than 20 Torr, the effect of the ambient gas becomes important, the shortest plasma plume length being observed when the gas mass species is highest. On the other hand, space- and time- resolved emission spectroscopy of aluminum ions at λ = 281.6 nm are used to determine the Time-Of-Flight (TOF) profiles. The effect of the ambient gas on the TOF profiles and therefore on the propagation velocity of Al ions is discussed. A correlation between the plasma plume expansion velocity deduced from the iCCD images and that estimated from the TOF profiles is presented. The observed differences are attributed mainly to the different physical mechanisms governing the two diagnostic techniques.

  14. Efficiency and Plume Dynamics for Mid-IR Laser Ablation of Cornea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayasinghe, Aroshan; Ivanov, Borislav; Hutson, M. Shane

    2009-03-01

    This paper reports ablation experiments on porcine corneal tissue using the Vanderbilt Mark III Free Electron Laser (FEL) and a tabletop Raman-shifted Alexandrite laser. These experiments were designed to test previous models that suggested wavelength and intensity dependent ablation mechanisms. In one test, we compare ablation efficiency and plume dynamics for two FEL wavelengths (λ=2.77, 6.45 μm) chosen such that different components of the tissue matrix act as the primary chromophore (water or protein respectively), while keeping the total absorption constant. We find small differences in ablation efficiency (with slightly more efficient ablation at 2.77 μm); no difference in shockwave propagation; and slightly more particulate matter in the plume at 6.45 μm. In a second test, we find that the Raman-shifted Alexandrite laser has similar ablation efficiency to the FEL in the 6-7 μm range -- despite a ˜500-fold higher intensity. Although these results do not confirm the previous model predictions, the findings do suggest that the Raman-shifted laser can be a viable alternative to the FEL for surgical applications.

  15. Optical time of flight studies of lithium plasma in double pulse laser ablation: Evidence of inverse Bremsstrahlung absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Sivakumaran, V.; Joshi, H. C.; Singh, R. K.; Kumar, Ajai

    2014-06-15

    The early stage of formation of lithium plasma in a collinear—double pulse laser ablation mode has been studied using optical time of flight (OTOF) spectroscopy as a function of inter-pulse delay time, the distance from the target surface and the fluence of the ablation lasers. The experimental TOF measurements were carried out for lithium neutral (670.8 nm and 610.3 nm), and ionic (548.4 nm and 478.8 nm) lines. These experimental observations have been compared with that for single pulse laser ablation mode. It is found that depending on the fluence and laser pulse shape of the first pre-ablation laser and the second main ablation laser, the plasma plume formation and its characteristic features can be described in terms of plume-plume or laser-plume interaction processes. Moreover, the enhancement in the intensity of Li neutral and ionic lines is observed when the laser-plume interaction is the dominant process. Here, we see the evidence of the role of inverse Bremsstrahlung absorption process in the initial stage of formation of lithium plasma in this case.

  16. Magnetic Detachment and Plume Control in Escaping Magnetized Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    P. F. Schmit and N. J. Fisch

    2008-11-05

    The model of two-fluid, axisymmetric, ambipolar magnetized plasma detachment from thruster guide fields is extended to include plasmas with non-zero injection angular velocity profiles. Certain plasma injection angular velocity profiles are shown to narrow the plasma plume, thereby increasing exhaust efficiency. As an example, we consider a magnetic guide field arising from a simple current ring and demonstrate plasma injection schemes that more than double the fraction of useful exhaust aperture area, more than halve the exhaust plume angle, and enhance magnetized plasma detachment.

  17. Toward single-cell analysis by plume collimation in laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Stolee, Jessica A; Vertes, Akos

    2013-04-01

    Ambient ionization methods for mass spectrometry have enabled the in situ and in vivo analysis of biological tissues and cells. When an etched optical fiber is used to deliver laser energy to a sample in laser ablation electrospray ionization (LAESI) mass spectrometry, the analysis of large single cells becomes possible. However, because in this arrangement the ablation plume expands in three dimensions, only a small portion of it is ionized by the electrospray. Here we show that sample ablation within a capillary helps to confine the radial expansion of the plume. Plume collimation, due to the altered expansion dynamics, leads to greater interaction with the electrospray plume resulting in increased ionization efficiency, reduced limit of detection (by a factor of ~13, reaching 600 amol for verapamil), and extended dynamic range (6 orders of magnitude) compared to conventional LAESI. This enhanced sensitivity enables the analysis of a range of metabolites from small cell populations and single cells in the ambient environment. This technique has the potential to be integrated with flow cytometry for high-throughput metabolite analysis of sorted cells. PMID:23445532

  18. Experimental measurement of ablation effects in plasma armature railguns

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, J.V.; Parsons, W.M.

    1986-01-01

    Experimental evidence supporting the importance of ablation in plasma armature railguns is presented. Experiments conducted using the HYVAX and MIDI-2 railguns are described. Several indirect effects of ablation are identified from the experimental results. An improved ablation model of plasma armature dynamics is proposed which incorporates the restrike process.

  19. Experimental measurement of ablation effects in plasma armature railguns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, J. V.; Parsons, W. M.

    Experimental evidence supporting the importance of ablation in plasma armature railguns is presented. Experiments conducted using the HYVAX and MIDI-2 railguns are described. Several indirect effects of ablation are identified from the experimental results. An improved ablation model of plasma armature dynamics is proposed which incorporates the restrike process.

  20. Control of laser-ablation plasma potential with external electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Isono, Fumika Nakajima, Mitsuo; Hasegawa, Jun; Kawamura, Tohru; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2015-08-15

    The potential of a laser-ablation plasma was controlled stably up to +2 kV by using external ring electrodes. A stable electron sheath was formed between the plasma and the external electrodes by placing the ring electrodes away from the boundary of the drifting plasma. The plasma kept the potential for a few μs regardless of the flux change of the ablation plasma. We also found that the plasma potential changed with the expansion angle of the plasma from the target. By changing the distance between the plasma boundary and the external electrodes, we succeeded in controlling the potential of laser-ablation plasma.

  1. Rail gun performance and plasma characteristics due to wall ablation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, P. K.

    1986-01-01

    The experiment of Bauer, et al. (1982) is analyzed by considering wall ablation and viscous drag in the plasma. Plasma characteristics are evaluated through a simple fluid-mechanical analysis considering only wall ablation. By equating the energy dissipated in the plasma with the radiation heat loss, the average properties of the plasma are determined as a function of time.

  2. Higher Order Chemistry Models in the CFD Simulation of Laser-Ablated Carbon Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, C. D.; Greendyke, R. B.; Creel, J. R.; Payne, B. T.

    2005-01-01

    Production of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) has taken place for a number of years and by a variety of methods such-as laser ablation, chemical vapor deposition, and arc-jet ablation. Yet, little is actually understood about the exact chemical kinetics and processes that occur in SWNT formation. In recent time, NASA Johnson Space Center has devoted a considerable effort to the experimental evaluation of the laser ablation production process for SWNT originally developed at Rice University. To fully understand the nature of the laser ablation process it is necessary to understand the development of the carbon plume dynamics within the laser ablation oven. The present work is a continuation of previous studies into the efforts to model plume dynamics using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The ultimate goal of the work is to improve understanding of the laser ablation process, and through that improved understanding, refine the laser ablation production of SWNT. Fig. 1 shows a basic schematic of the laser-ablation oven at NASA-JSC. Construction of the facility is simple in concept. Two concentric quartz tubes of 1.5 mm thickness form the inner and outer tubes with inside diameters of 2.2 and 5.08 cm respectively. At one end of the inner tube are located two 60 Hz pulsed lasers operating at 1064 nm and 532 nm wavelength with beam diameters of 5 mm aligned coaxially with the longitudinal axis of the inner quartz tube. For standard nanotube production runs, a 10 ns 532 nm pulse is followed 50 ns later by a 10 ns 1064 nm pulse. Each pulse is of 300 mJ energy. A target of carbon graphite with approximately 1% nickel and cobalt catalysts is located at the other end of the inner quartz tube. In the ordinary processing of SWNT, a base flow of 100 sccm of argon is maintained from the laser location and exits past the carbon target at a pressure of 66.7 kPa. These conditions yield a baseline mass flow through the chamber of 2.723x10(exp -6)kg/s of argon. The whole

  3. Charge resolved electrostatic diagnostic of colliding copper laser plasma plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Yeates, P.; Fallon, C.; Kennedy, E. T.; Costello, J. T.

    2011-10-15

    The collision of two laser generated plasma plumes can result, under appropriate conditions, in the formation of a ''stagnation layer.'' The processes underlying this phenomenon are complex and time dependent. The majority of experiments over the last few decades have focused upon spectroscopic diagnostic of colliding plasmas. We have performed electrostatic diagnosis of multiply charged copper ions (Cu{sup +} to Cu{sup 5+}) generated via Q-switched pulsed laser ({lambda} = 1.06 {mu}m, {tau} = 6 ns, and E{sub L} = 52-525 mJ) generation of copper plasma plumes from a planar target. Time dependent current traces, charge yields, and kinetic energy (K{sub e}) distributions are obtained for single plasma plumes (S{sub p}) and colliding plasma plumes (C{sub p}). The charge yield from a C{sub p} relative to twice that from a S{sub p} is characterized by a charge yield ratio (CYR) parameter. Superior ion yields for all charge states occur for a discrete range of fluences (F) from colliding plasma plumes leading to a CYR parameter exceeding unity. The kinetic energy distributions from colliding plasma plumes display well defined energy compression via narrowing of the distributions for all fluences and charge states. The extent of this energy compression is charge dependent. Space charge forces within the stagnation layer and the resulting charge dependent acceleration of ions are proposed to account for the transfer of ion kinetic energy in favour of collisional ionization mechanisms.

  4. Characteristics of plasma plume expansion from Al target induced by oblique incidence of 1064 and 355 nm nanosecond Nd : YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tianhang; Gao, Xun; Hao, Zuoqiang; Liu, Zehao; Lin, Jingquan

    2013-12-01

    Evolution of a plasma plume from an Al target ablated with a nanosecond 1064 and 355 nm laser respectively under oblique incidence in air is studied using the time-resolved shadowgraph imaging technique. The characteristics of plasma plume expansion with different focusing conditions (focal point on, ahead of and after the target surface) are experimentally investigated. Experimental results show that the evolution of the plasma plume is strongly influenced by air breakdown which occurs prior to the laser beam reaching the target. Without the occurrence of air breakdown, the temporal evolution of the Al plasma plume with both UV and IR ablation laser wavelengths shows the plume expansion with an ellipsoid-shaped plume front travelling mainly against the incoming laser beam due to the formation of a laser-supported detonation wave at the initial stage of laser ablation, and then the shape of the plume front turns into a sphere. Experimental results also show that a higher portion of the laser pulse energy reaches the target surface at UV laser wavelength than that of an IR laser due to the higher penetrating ability of the UV laser wavelength to the plasma.

  5. Modeling of Heat Transfer and Ablation of Refractory Material Due to Rocket Plume Impingement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Michael F.; Vu, Bruce T.

    2012-01-01

    CR Tech's Thermal Desktop-SINDA/FLUINT software was used in the thermal analysis of a flame deflector design for Launch Complex 39B at Kennedy Space Center, Florida. The analysis of the flame deflector takes into account heat transfer due to plume impingement from expected vehicles to be launched at KSC. The heat flux from the plume was computed using computational fluid dynamics provided by Ames Research Center in Moffet Field, California. The results from the CFD solutions were mapped onto a 3-D Thermal Desktop model of the flame deflector using the boundary condition mapping capabilities in Thermal Desktop. The ablation subroutine in SINDA/FLUINT was then used to model the ablation of the refractory material.

  6. Spectroscopic characterization of laser ablated silicon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakeel, Hira; Mumtaz, M.; Shahzada, S.; Nadeem, A.; Haq, S. U.

    2014-06-01

    We report plasma parameters of laser ablated silicon plasma using the fundamental (1064 nm) and second harmonics (532 nm) of a Nd : YAG laser. The electron temperature and electron number density are evaluated using the Boltzmann plot method and Stark broadened line profile, respectively. The electron temperature and electron number density are deduced using the same laser irradiance 2-16 GW cm-2 for 1064 nm and 532 nm as 6350-7000 K and (3.42-4.44) × 1016 cm-3 and 6000-6400 K and (4.20-5.72) × 1016 cm-3, respectively. The spatial distribution of plasma parameters shows a decreasing trend of 8200-6300 K and (4.00-3.60) × 1016 cm-3 for 1064 nm and 6400-5500 K and (5.10-4.50) × 1016 cm-3 for 532 nm laser ablation. Furthermore, plasma parameters are also investigated at low pressure from 45 to 550 mbar, yielding the electron temperature as 4580-5535 K and electron number density as (1.51-2.12) × 1016 cm-3. The trend of the above-mentioned results is in good agreement with previous investigations. However, wavelength-dependent studies and the spatial evolution of plasma parameters have been reported for the first time.

  7. Plasma acceleration processes in an ablative pulsed plasma thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Koizumi, Hiroyuki; Noji, Ryosuke; Komurasaki, Kimiya; Arakawa, Yoshihiro

    2007-03-15

    Plasma acceleration processes in an ablative pulsed plasma thruster (APPT) were investigated. APPTs are space propulsion options suitable for microspacecraft, and have recently attracted much attention because of their low electric power requirements and simple, compact propellant system. The plasma acceleration mechanism, however, has not been well understood. In the present work, emission spectroscopy, high speed photography, and magnetic field measurements are conducted inside the electrode channel of an APPT with rectangular geometry. The successive images of neutral particles and ions give us a comprehensive understanding of their behavior under electromagnetic acceleration. The magnetic field profile clarifies the location where the electromagnetic force takes effect. As a result, it is shown that high density, ablated neutral gas stays near the propellant surface, and only a fraction of the neutrals is converted into plasma and electromagnetically accelerated, leaving the residual neutrals behind.

  8. High-quality electron beam from laser wake-field acceleration in laser produced plasma plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Sanyasi Rao, Bobbili; Moorti, Anand; Rathore, Ranjana; Ali Chakera, Juzer; Anant Naik, Prasad; Dass Gupta, Parshotam

    2013-06-10

    Generation of highly collimated ({theta}{sub div}{approx}10 mrad), quasi-monoenergetic electron beam with peak energy 12 MeV and charge {approx}50 pC has been experimentally demonstrated from self-guided laser wake-field acceleration (LWFA) in a plasma plume produced by laser ablation of solid nylon (C{sub 12}H{sub 22}N{sub 2}O{sub 2}){sub n} target. A 7 TW, 45 fs Ti:sapphire laser system was used for LWFA, and the plasma plume forming pulse was derived from the Nd:YAG pump laser of the same system. The results show that a reproducible, high quality electron beam could be produced from this scheme which is simple, low cost and has the capability for high repetition rate operation.

  9. Fractal hydrodynamic model of high-fluence laser ablation plasma expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Agop, M.; Nica, P.; Gurlui, S.; Focsa, C.

    2010-10-08

    Optical/electrical characterization of transient plasmas generated by high-fluence (up to 1 kJ/cm{sup 2}) laser ablation of various targets revealed as a general feature the splitting of the plume in two structures. In order to account for this behavior, a new fractal hydrodynamic model has been developed in a non-differentiable space-time. The model successfully retrieves the kinetics of the two structures.

  10. Effects of oxygen background pressure on the stoichiometry of a LaGaO3 laser ablation plume investigated by time and spectrally resolved two-dimensional imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sambri, A.; Aruta, C.; Di Gennaro, E.; Wang, X.; Scotti di Uccio, U.; Miletto Granozio, F.; Amoruso, S.

    2016-03-01

    The plume expansion dynamics strongly affects the growth and the chemistry of pulsed laser deposited thin films. The interaction with the background gas determines the kinetic energy of the species impinging on the substrate, their angular broadening, the plasma chemistry, and eventually the cations stoichiometric ratio in oxide films. Here, we exploit two-dimensional, spectrally resolved plume imaging to characterize the diverse effects of the oxygen background pressure on the expansion dynamics of La, Ga, and LaO species during pulsed laser deposition of LaGaO3. The propagation of the ablated species towards the substrate is studied for background oxygen pressures ranging from high vacuum up to ≈10-1 mbar. Our experimental results show specie-dependent effects of the background gas on the angular distribution of the precursors within the plume. These findings suggest that even in the presence of a stoichiometric ablation and of a globally stoichiometric plume, cations off-stoichiometry can take place in the forefront portion of the plume impinging on the substrate. We show that such effect can be compensated by a proper choice of process parameters.

  11. Emission features and expansion dynamics of nanosecond laser ablation plumes at different ambient pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Farid, N.; Harilal, S. S. Hassanein, A.; Ding, H.

    2014-01-21

    The influence of ambient pressure on the spectral emission features and expansion dynamics of a plasma plume generated on a metal target has been investigated. The plasma plumes were generated by irradiating Cu targets using 6 ns, 1064 nm pulses from a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. The emission and expansion dynamics of the plasma plumes were studied by varying air ambient pressure levels ranging from vacuum to atmospheric pressure. The ambient pressure levels were found to affect both the line intensities and broadening along with the signal to background and signal to noise ratios and the optimum pressure conditions for analytical applications were evaluated. The characteristic plume parameters were estimated using emission spectroscopy means and noticed that the excitation temperature peaked ∼300 Torr, while the electron density showed a maximum ∼100 Torr. Fast-gated images showed a complex interaction between the plume and background air leading to changes in the plume geometry with pressure as well as time. Surface morphology of irradiated surface showed that the pressure of the ambient gas affects the laser-target coupling significantly.

  12. Instability of plasma plume of micro-hollow cathode discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Levko, D.; Bliokh, Y. P.; Gurovich, V. Tz.; Krasik, Ya. E.

    2015-11-15

    The micro-hollow cathode gas discharge driven by thermionic emission is studied using the two-dimensional particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collisions simulation. The electron current is extracted from the plasma plume penetrating into the keeper–anode space through a small keeper orifice from the cathode-keeper space. The results of simulations and a simplified analytical model showed that the plasma density and extracted current can exhibit deep modulation in the range of frequencies of tens of MHz. This modulation appears when the space-charge limited current between the plume boundary and the anode exceeds the plasma thermal electron current through the orifice.

  13. Laboratory experiments on cluster/aerosol formation by colliding ablation plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirooka, Y.; Tanaka, K. A.; Sato, H.; Ishihara, K.; Sunahara, A.

    2010-08-01

    First-of-a-kind experiments on cluster/aerosol formation by colliding ablation plumes have been conducted, radiating Al, Cu and C with 3ω-YAG laser at power densities between 2~30 J/cm2/pulse. Visible spectroscopy indicates that the excitation light intensities of Cu and Al plumes are not necessarily be doubled in collision, but can rather be weakened due to atomic and molecular reactions. For colliding C plumes, Swan band radiation has been observed, indicative of C2 and/or C2+ formation, and ion mass spectrometry has identified Cn+-clusters, including C+, C2+, C3+, C4+ and C5+. From ICCD camera observations, C plumes generated at power densities above ~15 J/cm2/pulse tend to split into two components with respective velocities, only the slow component of which appears to be interactive to form clusters. Nano structures like CNT have been identified in deposits from colliding C plumes.

  14. Dynamics of Laser-Ablation Plume and Ambient Gas Visualized by Laser-Induced Fluorescence Imaging Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Koichi; Watarai, Hiroshi

    2006-04-01

    The dynamics of both a laser-ablation plume and ambient gas were studied by visualizing their density distributions by laser-induced fluorescence imaging spectroscopy. A deep dip was formed in the density distribution of the ambient gas. The depth of the dip was almost 100% immediately after irradiation of the ablation laser pulse. The size of the dip expanded with time. At a long delay time after the irradiation of the ablation laser pulse, the ambient gas returned to the dip and slowly filled it. The location of the dip corresponded to that of the plume ejected from the target. This means that the high pressure of the plume removed the ambient gas, and the plume and the ambient gas located exclusively. In addition, we observed the formation and propagation of a compressed layer around the dip.

  15. EM Modelling of RF Propagation Through Plasma Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandolfo, L.; Bandinelli, M.; Araque Quijano, J. L.; Vecchi, G.; Pawlak, H.; Marliani, F.

    2012-05-01

    Electric propulsion is a commercially attractive solution for attitude and position control of geostationary satellites. Hall-effect ion thrusters generate a localized plasma flow in the surrounding of the satellite, whose impact on the communication system needs to be qualitatively and quantitatively assessed. An electromagnetic modelling tool has been developed and integrated into the Antenna Design Framework- ElectroMagnetic Satellite (ADF-EMS). The system is able to guide the user from the plume definition phases through plume installation and simulation. A validation activity has been carried out and the system has been applied to the plume modulation analysis of SGEO/Hispasat mission.

  16. Ultraviolet femtosecond and nanosecond laser ablation of silicon: Ablation efficiency and laser-induced plasma expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Xianzhong; Mao, Xianglei; Greif, Ralph; Russo, Richard E.

    2004-03-23

    Femtosecond laser ablation of silicon in air was studied and compared with nanosecond laser ablation at ultraviolet wavelength (266 nm). Laser ablation efficiency was studied by measuring crater depth as a function of pulse number. For the same number of laser pulses, the fs-ablated crater was about two times deeper than the ns-crater. The temperature and electron number density of the pulsed laser-induced plasma were determined from spectroscopic measurements. The electron number density and temperature of fs-pulse plasmas decreased faster than ns-pulse plasmas due to different energy deposition mechanisms. Images of the laser-induced plasma were obtained with femtosecond time-resolved laser shadowgraph imaging. Plasma expansion in both the perpendicular and the lateral directions to the laser beam were compared for femtosecond and nanosecond laser ablation.

  17. Observation of femtosecond-laser-induced ablation plumes of aluminum using space- and time-resolved soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Okano, Yasuaki; Oguri, Katsuya; Nishikawa, Tadashi; Nakano, Hidetoshi

    2006-11-27

    The dynamics of the laser ablation plume expansion of aluminum was investigated by using space- and time-resolved soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy. Blueshifts of the Al L-shell photoabsorption edge indicating the state of aluminum were observed in the plumes, which were generated by irradiating an aluminum target with 120 fs near-infrared pulses at an intensity of 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}. The spatiotemporal evolution of the plumes exhibited a multilayer structure consisting of vaporized aluminum and condensed aluminum particles, following the expansion of plasma, with expansion velocities of 10{sup 4} m/s for the atomic state and 10{sup 3} m/s for the condensed state.

  18. Spectroscopic Analysis of a Low Fluence Li-Ag Laser Driven Plasma Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherrill, M. E.; Mancini, R. C.; Bailey, J. E.; Filuk, A.; Clark, B.; Lake, P.; Abdallah, J.

    2002-10-01

    Low fluence laser produced plasmas are used in many applications: from ion sources to material synthesis. Our work focuses on developing a quantitative description of these ablation plasmas through the interpretation and analysis of time- and spatially-resolved spectroscopic measurements with detailed spectral modeling. To this end, in a series of experiments performed at Sandia National Laboratories, laser generated Li-Ag plasma plumes were produced by irradiation of solid targets using a Nd pulsed laser. Time- and spatially-resolved optical spectra were recorded with a framing spectrograph. In order to limit the gradients along a direction perpendicular to the target's normal, targets with strips of Li-Ag coated on top of Pt were used. The Pt plume collisionally confines the Li-Ag, thus reducing the Li-Ag lateral expansion. The spectra display line transitions in Li and Ag atoms. A spectroscopic model based on time-dependent collisional-radiative atomic kinetics, detailed line shapes, and radiation transport was used to describe plasma parameters both spatially and temporally. In particular, this analysis has revealed that level populations in laser-ablated plumes may behave in a time-dependent manner, i.e. not in Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE). The time-scales associated with these phenomena and the interpretation of spectral data critically depends on the details of the atomic kinetic model and the quality of the rate coefficients. In order to generate accurate atomic data for atoms present in the plasma, a semi-empirical technique has been implemented in the Los Alamos suite of atomic structure and electron scattering codes. Details of the spectral model and analysis results will be discussed.

  19. Relation between plasma plume density and gas flow velocity in atmospheric pressure plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Yambe, Kiyoyuki; Taka, Shogo; Ogura, Kazuo

    2014-04-15

    We have studied atmospheric pressure plasma generated using a quartz tube, helium gas, and copper foil electrode by applying RF high voltage. The atmospheric pressure plasma in the form of a bullet is released as a plume into the atmosphere. To study the properties of the plasma plume, the plasma plume current is estimated from the difference in currents on the circuit, and the drift velocity is measured using a photodetector. The relation of the plasma plume density n{sub plu}, which is estimated from the current and the drift velocity, and the gas flow velocity v{sub gas} is examined. It is found that the dependence of the density on the gas flow velocity has relations of n{sub plu} ∝ log(v{sub gas}). However, the plasma plume density in the laminar flow is higher than that in the turbulent flow. Consequently, in the laminar flow, the density increases with increasing the gas flow velocity.

  20. Hydrogen alpha laser ablation plasma diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Parigger, C G; Surmick, D M; Gautam, G; El Sherbini, A M

    2015-08-01

    Spectral measurements of the H(α) Balmer series line and the continuum radiation are applied to draw inferences of electron density, temperature, and the level of self-absorption in laser ablation of a solid ice target in ambient air. Electron densities of 17 to 3.2×10(24) m(-3) are determined from absolute calibrated emission coefficients for time delays of 100-650 ns after generation of laser plasma using Q-switched Nd:YAG radiation. The corresponding temperatures of 4.5-0.95 eV were evaluated from the absolute spectral radiance of the continuum at the longer wavelengths. The redshifted, Stark-broadened hydrogen alpha line emerges from the continuum radiation after a time delay of 300 ns. The electron densities inferred from power law formulas agree with the values obtained from the plasma emission coefficients. PMID:26258326

  1. CO2 Laser Absorption in Ablation Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Eckel, Hans-Albert; Tegel, Jochen; Schall, Wolfgang O.

    2006-05-02

    The impulse formation by laser ablation is limited by the premature absorption of the incident laser radiation in the initially produced cloud of ablation products. The power fraction of a CO2 laser pulse transmitted through a small hole in a POM sample for pulse energies of 35 to 150 J focused on a spot of 2 cm2 has been compared with the incident power. The plasma formation in vacuum and in air of 3500 Pa and the spread of the shock wave with velocities of 1.6 to 2.4 km/s in the low pressure air was observed by Schlieren photography. A sharp edged dark zone with a maximum extension of 10 to 12 mm away from the target surface develops within 5 {mu}s independently of the pressure and is assumed to be a plasma. In order to find out, if this is also the zone where the majority of the incident laser radiation is absorbed, a CO2 probe laser beam was directed through the expansion cloud parallel to and at various distances from the sample surface. The time behavior of the absorption signal of the probe beam has been measured and an absorption wave could be observed.

  2. Two counter-propagating He plasma plumes and ignition of a third plasma plume without external applied voltage

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, S.; Lu, X.

    2014-02-15

    In this work, the interaction of the two counter-propagating helium plasma plume inside a dielectric tube is investigated. When voltages applied to the two electrodes are the same, a dark zone always occurs no matter if the electrodes are symmetric or not. The length of the dark zone decreases from 6 mm to 2 mm when the voltages applied to the two electrodes are increased from 5.5 kV to 7.5 kV. Then with the increase of the applied voltage up to 9 kV, the length of the dark zone becomes stable and approaches to a const value of 1.8 mm. On the other hand, when the voltages applied to the two electrodes are different, instead of a dark zone, a third plasma plume is generated between the upstream and downstream plasma plumes. Detailed studies found that the third plasma plume is ignited more than 300 ns after the voltage is off, it is the difference of the local space charges of the heads of the downstream plasma and the upstream plasma induces the local electric field, which ignites the plasma rather than the external applied voltages.

  3. Plasma lens and plume divergence in the Hall thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Fruchtman, A.; Cohen-Zur, A.

    2006-09-11

    The effect of magnetic field curvature on the plume divergence in the Hall thruster is analyzed. The two-dimensional plasma flow and electric field are determined self-consistently within the paraxial approximation in this plasma lens, a nearly axial electric field perpendicular to the curved magnetic field lines. The ion radial velocity along the thruster is described analytically. The authors suggest positioning the ionization layer near the zero of the magnetic field in a reversing-direction field configuration for a minimal beam divergence. They also show that an additional emitting electrode can reduce plume divergence.

  4. Oxidation-Induced Surface Roughening of Aluminum Nanoparticles Formed in an Ablation Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Förster, Georg Daniel; Girault, Marie; Menneveux, Jérôme; Lavisse, Luc; Jouvard, Jean-Marie; Marco de Lucas, Maria del Carmen; Potin, Valérie; Ouf, François-Xavier; Kerkar, Moussa; Le Garrec, Jean-Luc; Carvou, Erwann; Carles, Sophie; Rabilloud, Franck; Calvo, Florent; Yu, Jin; Mitchell, James Brian

    2015-12-01

    Nanoparticles formed within an ablation plume produced by the impact of a nanosecond laser pulse on the surface of an aluminum target have been directly measured using small-angle x-ray scattering. The target was immersed in an oxygen-nitrogen gas mixture at atmospheric pressure with the O2/N2 ratio being precisely controlled. The results for an increasing oxygen content reveal remarkable effects on the morphology of the generated particles, which include a decrease in the particle volume but a marked increase in its surface ruggedness. Molecular dynamics simulations using a reactive potential and performed under similar conditions as the experiment reproduce the experimental trends and show in detail how the shape and surface structure of the nanoparticles evolve with increasing oxygen content. This good agreement between in situ observations in the plume and atomistic simulations emphasizes the key role of chemical reactivity together with thermodynamic conditions on the morphology of the particles thus produced.

  5. Plume expansion and stoichiometry in the growth of multi-component thin films using dual-laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Pritish; Cuff, John B.; Witanachchi, Sarath

    1998-05-01

    The application of dual-laser ablation for the growth of ZnO and multi-component films of CuIn 0.75.Ga 0.25Se 2 is presented. Comparison of the optical emission from the ZnO plume under dual-laser and single excimer laser ablation reveals that the coupling of the CO 2 laser into the excimer laser-ablated plume causes both significant ionic excitation as well as lateral plume expansion. The cos 21( θ) thickness profile of the single laser film transforms to a more uniform cos 6( θ) for dual-laser ablation. A comparison of the enhancement of film uniformity at different CO 2 laser fluences shows that increasing the CO 2 laser energy leads to greater film uniformity in dual-laser ablation. The advantages of the growth of multi-component materials using dual-laser ablation are demonstrated by optical plume analysis and the deposition of CuIn 0.75Ga 0.25Se 2 films.

  6. Spatial investigations of ion and electron time of flight in laser ablated ZnO plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshy, N. V.; Jayaraj, M. K.

    2010-02-01

    The time of flight (TOF) spectra of ions and electrons of laser ablated ZnO:Ga plasma plume were recorded. The laser fluence was varied from 2.55 Jcm-2 to 17.85 Jcm-2 and the ablation was carried out in vacuum and N2O ambient pressure ranging from 0.0001 mbar to 0.1 mbar. The TOF spectra were recorded at positions 10 mm to 50 mm from the target surface along the direction normal to the surface. Ion acceleration and corresponding electron deceleration were detected in the plasma due to the formation of electric double layer during plasma expansion. Twin peaks were recorded in the ion TOF spectra-corresponding to accelerated and thermal ions, while two categories of thermal electrons were detected in electron TOF spectra. The behaviour of these ions and electrons is studied as a function of laser fluence, ambient gas pressure and distance from the target surface.

  7. Diagnostics of Carbon Nanotube Formation in a Laser Produced Plume: An Investigation of the Metal Catalyst by Laser Ablation Atomic Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deBoer, Gary; Scott, Carl

    2003-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes, elongated molecular tubes with diameters of nanometers and lengths in microns, hold great promise for material science. Hopes for super strong light-weight material to be used in spacecraft design is the driving force behind nanotube work at JSC. The molecular nature of these materials requires the appropriate tools for investigation of their structure, properties, and formation. The mechanism of nanotube formation is of particular interest because it may hold keys to controlling the formation of different types of nanotubes and allow them to be produced in much greater quantities at less cost than is currently available. This summer's work involved the interpretation of data taken last summer and analyzed over the academic year. The work involved diagnostic studies of carbon nanotube formation processes occurring in a laser-produced plume. Laser ablation of metal doped graphite to produce a plasma plume in which carbon nanotubes self assemble is one method of making carbon nanotube. The laser ablation method is amenable to applying the techniques of laser spectroscopy, a powerful tool for probing the energies and dynamics of atomic and molecular species. The experimental work performed last summer involved probing one of the metal catalysts, nickel, by laser induced fluorescence. The nickel atom was studied as a function of oven temperature, probe laser wavelength, time after ablation, and position in the laser produced plume. This data along with previously obtained data on carbon was analyzed over the academic year. Interpretations of the data were developed this summer along with discussions of future work. The temperature of the oven in which the target is ablated greatly influences the amount of material ablated and the propagation of the plume. The ablation conditions and the time scale of atomic and molecular lifetimes suggest that initial ablation of the metal doped carbon target results in atomic and small molecular species. The metal

  8. Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, Robert W.; McLachlin, Katherine M.; Riquelme, Paloma; Haarer, Jan; Broichhausen, Christiane; Ritter, Uwe; Geissler, Edward K.; Hutchinson, James A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT New analytical techniques for multiparametric characterisation of individual cells are likely to reveal important information about the heterogeneity of immunological responses at the single-cell level. In this proof-of-principle study, laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) was applied to the problem of concurrently detecting 24 lineage and activation markers expressed by human leucocytes. This approach was sufficiently sensitive and specific to identify subpopulations of isolated T, B, and natural killer cells. Leucocyte subsets were also accurately detected within unfractionated peripheral blood mononuclear cells preparations. Accordingly, we judge LA-ICP-MS to be a suitable method for assessing expression of multiple tissue antigens in solid-phase biological specimens, such as tissue sections, cytospins, or cells grown on slides. These results augur well for future development of LA-ICP-MS–based bioimaging instruments for general users. PMID:27500232

  9. Magnetic Field Effects on Plasma Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebersohn, F.; Shebalin, J.; Girimaji, S.; Staack, D.

    2012-01-01

    Here, we will discuss our numerical studies of plasma jets and loops, of basic interest for plasma propulsion and plasma astrophysics. Space plasma propulsion systems require strong guiding magnetic fields known as magnetic nozzles to control plasma flow and produce thrust. Propulsion methods currently being developed that require magnetic nozzles include the VAriable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR) [1] and magnetoplasmadynamic thrusters. Magnetic nozzles are functionally similar to de Laval nozzles, but are inherently more complex due to electromagnetic field interactions. The two crucial physical phenomenon are thrust production and plasma detachment. Thrust production encompasses the energy conversion within the nozzle and momentum transfer to a spacecraft. Plasma detachment through magnetic reconnection addresses the problem of the fluid separating efficiently from the magnetic field lines to produce maximum thrust. Plasma jets similar to those of VASIMR will be studied with particular interest in dual jet configurations, which begin as a plasma loops between two nozzles. This research strives to fulfill a need for computational study of these systems and should culminate with a greater understanding of the crucial physics of magnetic nozzles with dual jet plasma thrusters, as well as astrophysics problems such as magnetic reconnection and dynamics of coronal loops.[2] To study this problem a novel, hybrid kinetic theory and single fluid magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) solver known as the Magneto-Gas Kinetic Method is used.[3] The solver is comprised of a "hydrodynamic" portion based on the Gas Kinetic Method and a "magnetic" portion that accounts for the electromagnetic behaviour of the fluid through source terms based on the resistive MHD equations. This method is being further developed to include additional physics such as the Hall effect. Here, we will discuss the current level of code development, as well as numerical simulation results

  10. Laser Paint Interactions Studied by Optical Emission Spectroscopy and Pump and Probe Analysis of the Ablation Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebollar, E.; Oujja, M.; Martín, M.; Castillejo, M.

    The ablation plumes resulting from the laser irradiation of pigments in the form of pellets and as tempera paints were studied by optical spectroscopic methods including optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and laser induced fluorescence (LIF), using a probe laser, delayed with respect to the ablation laser. The differences observed between emissions from pellets and from tempera paints of a given pigment, and between organic and inorganic pigments, serve to discuss the mechanisms operating in the laser irradiation of the paint systems.

  11. Classification of plastic materials by imaging laser-induced ablation plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negre, Erwan; Motto-Ros, Vincent; Pelascini, Frederic; Yu, Jin

    2016-08-01

    A method of rapid classification and identification of plastic materials has been studied in this work. Such method is based on fast spectroscopic imagery of laser-induced ablation plume on plastics to be analyzed. More specifically, a classification schema has been developed first according to the nature of the CC bonds which characterize the polymer matrix. Our results show that the spatial distribution and the evolution of the molecular species in the ablation plume, such as C2 and CN, exhibit clear different behaviors for polymers without any native CC bond, with CC single bonds or with CC double bonds respectively. Therefore the morphological parameters of the populations of the molecular species extracted from the time-resolved spectroscopic images of the plumes provide efficient indicators to classify the polymers characterized by the above mentioned different kinds of CC bonds. When dealing with different polymers with the same kind of CC bond, CC single bond for instance, other indicators should be introduced to provide the further discrimination. Such indicators can be for example a specific native molecular bond other than CC bonds, CN for example, the total emission intensity of which may exhibit specific time evolution. The robustness of the developed classification schema has been then studied with respect to two of the most frequently used additives in plastics fabrication, graphite and titanium. Our results show a negligible influence of these additives in the morphology of the populations of the molecular species when such additives are mixed into the polymer matrix with the percentages usually used in plastics productions, which demonstrates the validity of the developed classification schema for plastics.

  12. Electrical conductivity of the dusty plasma in the Enceladus plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaroshenko, V. V.; Lühr, H.

    2016-11-01

    The plasma conductivity is an important issue for understanding the magnetic field structure registered by Cassini in the Enceladus proximity. We have revise the conductivity mechanism to incorporate the plume nanograins as a new plasma species and take into account the relevant collisional processes including those accounting for the momentum exchange between the charged dust and co-rotating ions. It is concluded that in the Enceladus plume the dust dynamics affects the Pedersen and Hall conductivity more efficiently than the electron depletion associated with the presence of the negatively charged dust as has been suggested by Simon et al. (Simon, S., Saur, J., Kriegel, H., Neubauer, F. M., Motschmann, U., and Dougherty, U. [2011] J. Geophys. Res., 116, A04221, doi:10.1029/2010JA016338). The electron depletion remains a decisive factor for only the parallel conductivity. In the parameter regime relevant for the Enceladus plume, one finds increase of the Pedersen and decrease of the parallel components, whereas for the Hall conductivity the charged dust changes both - its value and the sign. The associated reversed Hall effect depends significantly upon the local dust-to-plasma density ratio. An onset of the reversed Hall effect appears to be restricted to outer parts of the Enceladus plume. The results obtained can significantly modify Enceladus' Alfvén wing structure and thus be useful for interpretations of the magnetic field perturbations registered by the Cassini Magnetometer during the close Enceladus flybys.

  13. Influence of flowing helium gas on plasma plume formation in atmospheric pressure plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Yambe, Kiyoyuki; Konda, Kohmei; Ogura, Kazuo

    2015-05-15

    We have studied atmospheric pressure plasma generated using a quartz tube, helium gas, and a foil electrode by applying RF high voltage. The atmospheric pressure plasma in the form of a bullet is released as a plume into the atmosphere. The helium gas flowing out of quartz tube mixes with air, and the flow channel is composed of the regions of flowing helium gas and air. The plasma plume length is equivalent to the reachable distance of flowing helium gas. Although the amount of helium gas on the flow channel increases by increasing the inner diameter of quartz tube at the same gas flow velocity, the plasma plume length peaks at around 8 m/s of gas flow velocity, which is the result that a flow of helium gas is balanced with the amount of gas. The plasma plume is formed at the boundary region where the flow of helium gas is kept to the wall of the air.

  14. Confinement effect of laser ablation plume in liquids probed by self-absorption of C{sub 2} Swan band emission

    SciTech Connect

    Sakka, Tetsuo; Saito, Kotaro; Ogata, Yukio H.

    2005-01-01

    The (0,0) Swan band of the C{sub 2} molecules in a laser ablation plume produced on the surface of graphite target submerged in water was used as a probe to estimate the density of C{sub 2} molecules in the plume. Observed emission spectra were reproduced excellently by introducing a self-absorption parameter to the theoretical spectral profile expected by a rotational population distribution at a certain temperature. The optical density of the ablation plume as a function of time was determined as a best-fit parameter by the quantitative fitting of the whole spectral profile. The results show high optical densities for the laser ablation plume in water compared with that in air. It is related to the plume confinement or the expansion, which are the important phenomena influencing the characteristics of laser ablation plumes in liquids.

  15. Third harmonic generation in air ambient and laser ablated carbon plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Ravi Pratap Gupta, Shyam L.; Thareja, Raj K.

    2015-12-15

    We report the third harmonic generation of a nanosecond laser pulse (1.06 μm) in air ambient and in the presence of nanoparticles from laser ablated carbon plasma. Significant decrease in the threshold of third harmonic generation and multi-fold increment in the intensity of generated third harmonic is observed in presence of carbon plasma. The third harmonic in air is due to the quasi-resonant four photon process involving vibrationally excited states of molecular ion of nitrogen due to electron impact ionization and laser pulse. Following optical emission spectroscopic observations we conclude that the presence of C{sub 2} and CN in the ablated plume play a vital role in the observed third harmonic signals.

  16. Emission features of femtosecond laser ablated carbon plasma in ambient helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Shboul, K. F.; Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A.

    2013-04-01

    We investigated the optical emission features of plasmas produced by 800 nm, 40 fs ultrafast laser pulses on a carbon target in the presence of ambient helium or nitrogen gases at varied pressures. Fast photography employing intensified charge coupled device, optical emission spectroscopy, and temporally spatially resolved optical time of flight emission spectroscopy were used as diagnostic tools. Spatio-temporal contours of excited neutral, ionic, as well as molecular carbon species in the plume were obtained using time of flight emission spectroscopy. These contours provided detailed account of molecular species evolution and expansion dynamics and indicate that three-body recombination is a major mechanism for carbon dimers generation in ultrafast laser ablation plumes in the presence of ambient gas. A systematic comparison of the emission features from ns and fs laser ablation carbon plumes as well as their expansion in ambient helium is also given. C2 vibrational temperatures were estimated during carbon plasma expansion with lower values in ambient helium compared to nitrogen and showed decreasing values with respect to space and ambient gas pressure.

  17. Atomic mass dependent electrostatic diagnostics of colliding laser plasma plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Yeates, P.; Fallon, C.; Kennedy, E. T.; Costello, J. T.; School of Physical Sciences, Dublin City University , Dublin 7

    2013-09-15

    The behaviours of colliding laser plasma plumes (C{sub p}) compared with single plasma plumes (S{sub p}) are investigated for 14 different atomic mass targets. A Faraday cup, situated at the end of a drift tube (L = 0.99 m), is employed to record the time-of-flight (TOF) current traces for all elements and both plume configurations, for a fixed laser intensity of I{sub p} = 4.2 × 10{sup 10} W cm{sup −2} (F = 0.25 kJ cm{sup −2}). The ratio of the peak current from the C{sub p} relative to twice that from the S{sub p} is designated as the peak current ratio while the ratio of the integrated charge yield from the C{sub p} relative to twice that from the S{sub p} is designated as the charge yield ratio. Variation of the position of the Faraday cup within the drift tube (L = 0.33, 0.55, and 0.99 m) in conjunction with a lower laser fluence (F = 0.14 kJ cm{sup −2}) facilitated direct comparison of the changing TOF traces from both plasma configurations for the five lightest elements studied (C, Al, Si, Ti, and Mn). The results are discussed in the frame of laser plasma hydrodynamic modelling to approximate the critical recombination distance L{sub CR}. The dynamics of colliding laser plasma plumes and the atomic mass dependence trends observed are presented and discussed.

  18. Plume expansion of a laser-induced plasma studied with the particle-in-cell method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellegaard, O.; Nedelea, T.; Schou, J.; Urbassek, H. M.

    2002-09-01

    The initial stage of laser-induced plasma plume expansion from a solid in vacuum and the effect of the Coulomb field have been studied. We have performed a one-dimensional numerical calculation by mapping the charge on a computational grid according to the particle-in-cell (PIC) method of Birdsall et al. It is assumed that the particle ablation from a surface with a fixed temperature takes place as a pulse, i.e. within a finite period of time. A number of characteristic quantities for the plasma plume are compared with similar data for expansion of neutrals as well as fluid models: Density profiles n( x, t), velocity distributions of ions u( x, t), distribution functions for velocities F( vx) of ions or electrons as well as the time dependence of kinetic energy Ekin( t) for both type of particles. We found a significant increase in the velocities of the ions at the expense of field potential energy as well as electron energy. We have estimated the time constant for energy transfer between the electrons and the ions. The scaling of these processes is given by a single parameter determined by the Debye length obtained from the electron density in the plasma outside the surface.

  19. Multi-Pulse DARHT Machine-Plasma Plume Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Lauer, E J

    2004-07-01

    The plasma current decay time constant is predicted to be short compared to the pulse length and so self-focusing is predicted for most of the beam pulse. Four- pulse beam envelopes for a high dose case require mitigation, those for a low dose case do not. Methods of mitigation are summarized. Hose instability growth in the plume length is predicted to be minimal.

  20. A tandem mirror hybrid plume plasma propulsion facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang-Diaz, F. R.; Yang, T. F.; Krueger, W. A.; Peng, S.; Urbahn, J.; Yao, X.; Griffin, D.

    1988-01-01

    A concept in electrodeless plasma propulsion, which is also capable of delivering a variable Isp, is presented. The concept involves a three-stage system of plasma injection, heating, and subsequent ejection through a magnetic nozzle. The nozzle produces the hybrid plume by the coaxial injection of hypersonic neutral gas. The gas layer, thus formed, protects the material walls from the hot plasma and, through increased collisions, helps detach it from the diverging magnetic field. The physics of this concept is evaluated numerically through full spatial and temporal simulations; these explore the operating characteristics of such a device over a wide region of parameter space. An experimental facility to study the plasma dynamics in the hybrid plume was built. The device consists of a tandem mirror operating in an asymmetric mode. A later upgrade of this system will incorporate a cold plasma injector at one end of the machine. Initial experiments involve the full characterization of the operating envelope, as well as extensive measurements of plasma properties at the exhaust. The results of the numerical simulations are described.

  1. Ultraviolet versus infrared: Effects of ablation laser wavelength on the expansion of laser-induced plasma into one-atmosphere argon gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Qianli; Motto-Ros, Vincent; Laye, Fabrice; Yu, Jin; Lei, Wenqi; Bai, Xueshi; Zheng, Lijuan; Zeng, Heping

    2012-03-01

    Laser-induced plasma from an aluminum target in one-atmosphere argon background has been investigated with ablation using nanosecond ultraviolet (UV: 355 nm) or infrared (IR: 1064 nm) laser pulses. Time- and space-resolved emission spectroscopy was used as a diagnostics tool to have access to the plasma parameters during its propagation into the background, such as optical emission intensity, electron density, and temperature. The specific feature of nanosecond laser ablation is that the pulse duration is significantly longer than the initiation time of the plasma. Laser-supported absorption wave due to post-ablation absorption of the laser radiation by the vapor plume and the shocked background gas plays a dominant role in the propagation and subsequently the behavior of the plasma. We demonstrate that the difference in absorption rate between UV and IR radiations leads to different propagation behaviors of the plasma produced with these radiations. The consequence is that higher electron density and temperature are observed for UV ablation. While for IR ablation, the plasma is found with lower electron density and temperature in a larger and more homogenous axial profile. The difference is also that for UV ablation, the background gas is principally evacuated by the expansion of the vapor plume as predicted by the standard piston model. While for IR ablation, the background gas is effectively mixed to the ejected vapor at least hundreds of nanoseconds after the initiation of the plasma. Our observations suggest a description by laser-supported combustion wave for the propagation of the plasma produced by UV laser, while that by laser-supported detonation wave for the propagation of the plasma produced by IR laser. Finally, practical consequences of specific expansion behavior for UV or IR ablation are discussed in terms of analytical performance promised by corresponding plasmas for application with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

  2. A tandem mirror hybrid plume plasma propulsion facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T. F.; Krueger, W. A.; Peng, S.; Urbahn, J.; Chang-Diaz, F. R.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses a novel concept in electrodeless plasma propulsion, in which the materials problems are ameliorated by an electrodeless magnetic confinement scheme borrowed from the tandem mirror approach to controlled thermonuclear fusion. The concept also features a two-stage magnetic nozzle with an annular hypersonic coaxial gas injector near the throat. The nozzle produces hybrid plume by the coaxial injection of hypersonic neutral gas, and the gas layer thus formed protects the material walls from the hot plasma and, through increased collisions, helps detach it from the diverging magnetic field. The tandem mirror plasma propulsion facility is capable of delivering a variable I(sp). The results of numerical simulation of this concept are presented together with those from an experimental tandem-mirror plasma propulsion device.

  3. Plasma Characteristics Measured in the Plume of a NEXT Multi-Thruster Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E.; Patterson, Michael; Pencil, Eric; McEwen, Heather; Diaz, Esther

    2006-01-01

    Plasma properties in the plume produced by a 3+1 NEXT thruster array operating at full power were mapped using a series of planar Langmuir probes. The Langmuir probes were swept across the diameters of each thruster as well as the centerline of the array at multiple downstream axial locations to produce a plasma map of the plume produced by the array. Such maps yielded the spatial distribution of the plasma density, the electron temperature and the plasma potential in the near field of the array. This spatial information provides insight into local plasma particle flow. Flow direction is particularly important from both an array lifetime and spacecraft-plume plasma interaction standpoint. The variation in the plume plasma parameters tended to vary in a manner consistent with both plume shape and overlap of adjacent plumes.

  4. Ion extraction from positively biased laser-ablation plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isono, Fumika; Nakajima, Mitsuo; Hasegawa, Jun; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2016-07-01

    Ions were extracted through a grounded grid from a positively biased laser-ablation plasma and the behaviors were investigated. Since the plasma was positively biased against the grounded wall, we could extract the ions without insulated gap. We confirmed formation of a virtual anode when we increased the distance between the grid and the ion collector. Results also indicated that when the ion flux from the ablation plasma exceeded a critical value, the current was strongly suppressed to the space charge limited level due to the formation of virtual anode.

  5. Effects of collision between two plumes on plume expansion dynamics during pulsed laser ablation in background gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umezu, Ikurou; Sakamoto, Naomichi; Fukuoka, Hiroshi; Yokoyama, Yasuhiro; Nobuzawa, Koichiro; Sugimura, Akira

    2013-03-01

    Si and Ge targets were simultaneously irradiated by individual two pulsed lasers, and two plumes from the targets were collided head-on with expectation to prepare hybrid nanoparticles. We investigate effects of He background gas pressure on plume collision dynamics. Three characteristic behaviors of plume expansion dynamics are observed at low, middle, and high background gas pressure regions. Interaction between the two atomic species during plume expansion was small and the effect of collision was hardly observed at a low background gas pressure, 130 Pa, while spatial evolution of the plume was suppressed at middle pressure, 270 Pa, due to collision of the two plumes. At high pressure, 2700 Pa, plume expansion is suppressed by background gas and the effect of a direct collision of two plumes was small. These results indicate that plume collision dynamics, which governs nanoparticle formation, and the mixture of Si and Ge species can be varied by background gas pressure. The deposit near the center of two targets was nanoparticles that were composed of Si and Ge.

  6. Spatial characterization of the laser-induced plasma plumes generated by IR CO2 pulsed laser on carbon targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camacho, J. J.; Santos, M.; Díaz, L.; Poyato, J. M. L.

    2009-02-01

    Spatially resolved optical emission analysis was carried out for the plasma plume, produced by high-power tunable IR CO2 pulsed laser ablation of graphite, at λ=9.621 μm and with laser fluence of 342 J cm-2. Wavelength-dispersed spectra of the plume, at medium vacuum conditions ( P air=4 Pa) and concentrated close to the target, reveal C, C+, C2+, C3+, C4+, N, H, O, and molecular emissions between different electronic states of C2, CN, OH, CH, and NH. The characteristics of the spectral emission intensities from different species have been investigated as functions of the distance (up to 20 cm) from the sample surface. Vibrational temperatures in the laser-induced plasma have been estimated at various distances from the target surface.

  7. Numerical modeling of plasma plume evolution against ambient background gas in laser blow off experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Bhavesh G.; Das, Amita; Kaw, Predhiman; Singh, Rajesh; Kumar, Ajai

    2012-07-15

    Two dimensional numerical modelling based on simplified hydrodynamic evolution for an expanding plasma plume (created by laser blow off) against an ambient background gas has been carried out. A comparison with experimental observations shows that these simulations capture most features of the plasma plume expansion. The plume location and other gross features are reproduced as per the experimental observation in quantitative detail. The plume shape evolution and its dependence on the ambient background gas are in good qualitative agreement with the experiment. This suggests that a simplified hydrodynamic expansion model is adequate for the description of plasma plume expansion.

  8. Observation and analysis of flow field in laser ablation plume of POM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kefei; Ye, Jifei

    2015-04-01

    When using YAG laser emit strong laser pulses to bombardment solid POM, in the areas of interaction will produce a plume. A shadowgraph photography technique was employed for visualizing temporal evolution of plume. The experiment results show that in the plume flow field, multi-density discontinuities were observed. The plume has a high speed towards laser source, and plume uneven expansion makes the shape and position of discontinuities change. Plume velocity affect the propulsive efficiency, enhance the pulse laser energy can speed up the plume, energy increase to a certain degree of plume speed will reach a steady-state value.

  9. Collision dynamics of laser produced carbon plasma plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favre, M.; Ruiz, H. M.; Cortés, D.; Merello, F.; Bhuyan, H.; Veloso, F.; Wyndham, E.

    2016-05-01

    We present preliminary experimental observations of the collision processes between two orthogonal laser produced plasmas in a low pressure neutral gas background. A Nd:YAG laser, 340 mJ, 3.5 ns, at 1.06 μm, operating at 10 Hz, is used in the experiments. The main laser beam is divided in two beams by a 50% beam splitter, and then focused over two rotating graphite targets, with characteristic fluence 3.5 J/cm2. Experiments are conducted in a range from a base pressure of 0.3 mTorr, up to 50 mTorr argon. The dynamics of the laser plasmas is characterized by time resolved and time integrated optical emission spectroscopy (OES), with 20 ns and 10 ms time resolution, and 50 ns time resolved plasma imaging of visible plasma emission. Clear effects of the neutral gas background on the postcollision plasma dynamics are identified. The overall dynamics of the post-collision plasma is found to be consistent with high collisionality of the carbon plasma plumes, which results in full stagnation on collisioning.

  10. Resonant laser ablation of metals detected by atomic emission in a microwave plasma and by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cleveland, Danielle; Stchur, Peter; Hou, Xiandeng; Yang, Karl X; Zhou, Jack; Michel, Robert G

    2005-12-01

    It has been shown that an increase in sensitivity and selectivity of detection of an analyte can be achieved by tuning the ablation laser wavelength to match that of a resonant gas-phase transition of that analyte. This has been termed resonant laser ablation (RLA). For a pulsed tunable nanosecond laser, the data presented here illustrate the resonant enhancement effect in pure copper and aluminum samples, chromium oxide thin films, and for trace molybdenum in stainless steel samples, and indicate two main characteristics of the RLA phenomenon. The first is that there is an increase in the number of atoms ablated from the surface. The second is that the bandwidth of the wavelength dependence of the ablation is on the order of 1 nm. The effect was found to be virtually identical whether the atoms were detected by use of a microwave-induced plasma with atomic emission detection, by an inductively coupled plasma with mass spectrometric detection, or by observation of the number of laser pulses required to penetrate through thin films. The data indicate that a distinct ablation laser wavelength dependence exists, probably initiated via resonant radiation trapping, and accompanied by collisional broadening. Desorption contributions through radiation trapping are substantiated by changes in crater morphology as a function of wavelength and by the relatively broad linewidth of the ablation laser wavelength scans, compared to gas-phase excitation spectra. Also, other experiments with thin films demonstrate the existence of a distinct laser-material interaction and suggest that a combination of desorption induced by electronic transition (DIET) with resonant radiation trapping could assist in the enhancement of desorption yields. These results were obtained by a detailed inspection of the effect of the wavelength of the ablation laser over a narrow range of energy densities that lie between the threshold of laser-induced desorption of species and the usual analytical

  11. Plasma plume circulation and impact in an MHD substorm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, T. E.; Fok, M.-C.; Delcourt, D. C.; Slinker, S. P.; Fedder, J. A.

    2008-06-01

    We investigate the fate of a plasmaspheric plume generated by a discrete period of southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) to assess its contribution to plasma sheet and ring current pressure and compare with that for other sources. We use test particle motions in Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry (LFM) global circulation model fields. The inner magnetosphere is simulated with the Comprehensive Ring Current Model (CRCM) model of Fok and Wolf, driven by the transpolar potential developed by the LFM magnetosphere. A variant of the Ober plasmasphere model is embedded within the models and driven by them. Global circulation is stimulated by a period of southward IMF embedded within a long interval of northward IMF. This leads to the production of a well-defined plasmaspheric plume, enhancing the plasma density sunward of the plasmasphere. Test particles are launched with the properties of plasmaspheric ions on the L = 6.6 RE shell and weighted with densities as specified by the Ober model, as it responds to convection imposed by CRCM. Particles are tracked until they are lost from the system downstream or into the atmosphere, using the Delcourt full equations of motion, implemented for finite element fields. Results are compared with earlier computations of polar and auroral wind outflows. The plume produces an enhanced flow of plasma ˜10 times the normal polar wind global fluence. However, we find that most of the "plasmaspheric wind" is lost from the magnetosphere such that its contribution to the ring current energy density is comparable to that of the normal polar wind for this type of event.

  12. Calcium detection of human hair and nail by the nanosecond time-gated spectroscopy of laser-ablation plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haruna, Masamitsu; Ohmi, Masato; Nakamura, Mitsuo; Morimoto, Shigeto

    2000-04-01

    We demonstrate the nanosecond time-gated spectroscopy of plume in laser ablation of biological tissue, which allows us to detect calcium (Ca) with high sensitivity by the use of either a UV or a near-IR laser pulse. Clear and sharp peaks of Ca+ appear in the luminescence spectrum of laser-ablation plume although the Ca content is only 0.1 percent in human hair and nail. Luminescence peaks of sodium atom (Na) and ionized carbon are also detectable. This specific spectroscopy is low invasive because a single low-energy laser pulse illuminates the tissue sample, and it does not require any poisonous sensititizers like fluorescence dye. This method, therefore, is a promising candidate for optical biopsy in the near future. In particular, Ca detection of human hair may lead to new diagnosis, including monitor of daily intake of Ca and a screening diagnosis of osteoporosis.

  13. Species-resolved imaging and gated photon counting spectroscopy of laser ablation plume dynamics during KrF- and ArF-laser PLD of amorphous diamond films

    SciTech Connect

    Geohegan, D.B.; Puretzky, A.A.

    1995-12-01

    Gated photon counting spectroscopy and species-resolved ICCD photography were used to study the weak plasma luminescence following the propagation of the initial ablation plume in vacuum and during the rebound of the plume with a substrate during pulsed laser deposition of amorphous diamond. These methods techniques were required in order to investigate notable differences between amorphous diamond-like carbon films formed by pulsed laser deposition from ArF (193 nm) and KrF (248 nm) irradiation of pyrolytic graphite in vacuum. Three principal regions of plume emission were found: (1) a bright luminescent ball (v {approximately}3--5 cm/{mu}s) displaying nearly entirely C{sup +} emission which appears to result from laser interaction with the initial ejecta, (2) a spherical ball of emission (v {approximately} 1 cm/{mu}s) displaying neutral carbon atomic emission lines and, at early times, jets of excited C{sub 2}, and (3) a well-defined region of broadband emission (v {approximately} 0.3 cm/{mu}s) near the target surface first containing emission bands from C{sub 2}, then weak, continuum emission thought to result from C{sub 3} and higher clusters and/or blackbody emission from hot clusters or nanoparticles.

  14. [Research on cells ablation characters by laser plasma].

    PubMed

    Han, Jing-hua; Zhang, Xin-gang; Cai, Xiao-tang; Duan, Tao; Feng, Guo-ying; Yang, Li-ming; Zhang, Ya-jun; Wang, Shao-peng; Li, Shi-wen

    2012-08-01

    The study on the mechanism of laser ablated cells is of importance to laser surgery and killing harmful cells. Three radiation modes were researched on the ablation characteristics of onion epidermal cells under: laser direct irradiation, focused irradiation and the laser plasma radiation. Based on the thermodynamic properties of the laser irradiation, the cell temperature rise and phase change have been analyzed. The experiments show that the cells damage under direct irradiation is not obvious at all, but the focused irradiation can cause cells to split and moisture removal. The removal shape is circular with larger area and rough fracture edges. The theoretical analysis found out that the laser plasma effects play a key role in the laser ablation. The thermal effects, radiation ionization and shock waves can increase the deposition of laser pulses energy and impact peeling of the cells, which will greatly increase the scope and efficiency of cell killing and is suitable for the cell destruction. PMID:23156745

  15. Propellant surface temperature and plume characteristics of micro-pulsed plasma thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonsen, Erik Lawrence

    The micro-Pulsed Plasma Thruster is a device capable of supplying discrete impulses for propulsive maneuvering of small satellites. These devices suffer from low propellant utilization related to late-time propellant ablation, causing a drop in specific impulse and thruster efficiency. The exhaust of these thrusters can also contaminate critical spacecraft surfaces. In this work, the microPPT is investigated to experimentally characterize both the ablation physics and plume characteristics. The defining parameter for propellant ablation is the surface temperature of the solid Teflon(TM) propellant. All downstream plasma and neutral properties are dependent on this parameter. Infrared photovoltaic detectors using a p-n junction are used to measure the surface temperature of the Teflon propellant in real time. The detector material is Mercury Cadmium Telluride (HgCdTe), chosen because the maximum detector response occurs in wavelengths where a Carbon-Fluorine stretching mode in the solid propellant emits strongly in the infrared. This paper outlines the design, calibration and construction of the infrared thermographic diagnostic. A theoretical treatment of the expected detector output is proposed and validated allowing an estimate of the wavelength dependent emissivity of Teflon in the IR. This diagnostic is applied to an operating microPPT and real-time surface temperature measurements are made after the current pulse ends. This allows analysis of the expected vapor pressure and therefore performance parameters such as thrust, mass loss, and exhaust velocity associated with late-time vaporization. The microPPT plume is characterized using two-color interferometry to simultaneously measure electron and neutral densities during the discharge. As the microPPT operates, the solid propellant recesses into the outer electrode tube, possibly changing thruster performance. Recession shape and depths are measured and electron density measurements as a function of recession

  16. Comparative study of laser produced Li plasma plumes from thin film and solid target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ajai; Singh, R. K.; Prahlad, V.; Joshi, H. C.

    2008-11-01

    The evolution features of lithium ions and neutrals generated by two different schemes viz. the laser-blow-off (LBO) of multicomponent LiF-C thin film and conventional laser ablation (referred here as LPP) from solid lithium have been studied using optical emission spectroscopic technique. The optical signal emitted by Li I (at 670.8 nm) and Li II (548.4 nm) was monitored as a function of laser fluence, ambient gas pressure, and distance "z" from the target. Apart from their similarities, some interesting differences were noticed in temporal profiles of the plumes generated by LPP and LBO both in vacuum as well as in the presence of the ambient gas. A comparative analysis of experimental results indicates that the ablation mechanism and subsequent laser-plume interaction were responsible for the observed differences in LPP and LBO plumes. Expansion features of the plume are discussed in the light of two different models.

  17. Performance loss due to wall ablation in plasma armature railguns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, J. V.; Parsons, W. M.; Cummings, C. E.; Fox, W. E.

    1985-07-01

    Parametric measurements have been performed on a plasma armature railgun at Los Alamos. The railgun is extensively instrumented for studies of the projectile motion and its interaction with the plasma armature. The most important parameter, driving current, was varied from 100 kA to 400 kA. Additional parameters investigated include current waveform, injection velocity, injection gas, wall insulation material, and initial pressure. For all combinations of parameters investigated, the measured performance was substantially below theoretical predictions. A strong correlation was found between performance loss and abnormal plasma armature features such as multiple arc formation, or separation of the armature from the projectile. In extreme cases, the plasma armature was observed to come to rest inside the railgun. A plasma armature model has been developed which successfully accounts for the measured performance loss and for many of the abnormal plasma armature features. By incorporating the ablation of wall material into the armature plasma this model predicts two parasitic forces that dominate the motion of the armature at high velocity. One force is the inertial drag term m dot sub a v. The other is frictional drag between the hot, turbulent plasma and the walls, which increases M sub a v squared. Simple scaling relations, which incorporate the plasma armature model, show that velocities less than 10 km/s will be extremely difficult to achieve with plasma armature railguns unless the effects of ablation are eliminated or carefully controlled.

  18. Characterization of Carbon Plasma Evolution Using Laser Ablation TOF Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Feng, Chunlei; Xiao, Qingmei; Hai, Ran; Ding, Hongbin

    2015-11-01

    In this work, a time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer has been used to investigate the distribution of intermediate species and formation process of carbon clusters. The graphite sample was ablated by Nd:YAG laser (532 nm and 1064 nm). The results indicate that the maximum size distribution shifted towards small cluster ions as the laser fluence increased, which happened because of the fragmentation of larger clusters in the hot plume. The temporal evolution of ions was measured by varying the delay time of the ion extraction pulse with respect to the laser irradiation, which was used to provide distribution information of the species in the ablated plasma plume. When the laser fluence decreased, the yield of all of the clusters obviously dropped. supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (No. 2013GB109005) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11175035), Chinesisch-Deutsches Forschungs Project (GZ768), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China (Nos. DUT12ZD(G)01, DUT14ZD(G)04) and MMLab Research Project (DP1051208)

  19. Plasma mediated ablation of biological tissues with ultrashort laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Oraevsky, A.A. |; DaSilva, L.B.; Feit, M.D.

    1995-03-08

    Plasma mediated ablation of collagen gels and porcine cornea was studied at various laser pulse durations in the range from 350 fs to 1 ns at 1,053 nm wavelength. A time resolved stress detection technique was employed to measure transient stress profiles and amplitudes. Optical microscopy was used to characterize ablation craters qualitatively, while a wide band acoustic transducer helped to quantify tissue mechanical response and the ablation threshold. The ablation threshold was measured as a function of laser pulse duration and linear absorption coefficient. For nanosecond pulses the ablation threshold was found to have a strong dependence on the linear absorption coefficient of the material. As the pulse length decreased into the subpicosecond regime the ablation threshold became insensitive to the linear absorption coefficient. The ablation efficiency was found to be insensitive to both the laser pulse duration and the linear absorption coefficient. High quality ablation craters with no thermal or mechanical damage to surrounding material were obtained with 350 fs laser pulses. The mechanism of optical breakdown at the tissue surface was theoretically investigated. In the nanosecond regime, optical breakdown proceeds as an electron collisional avalanche ionization initiated by thermal seed electrons. These seed electrons are created by heating of the tissue by linear absorption. In the ultrashort pulse range, optical breakdown is initiated by the multiphoton ionization of the irradiated medium (6 photons in case of tissue irradiated at 1,053 nm wavelength), and becomes less sensitive to the linear absorption coefficient. The energy deposition profile is insensitive to both the laser pulse duration and the linear absorption coefficient.

  20. Early plume and shock wave dynamics in atmospheric-pressure ultraviolet-laser ablation of different matrix-assisted laser ablation matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, Thomas A.; Koch, Joachim; Guenther, Detlef; Zenobi, Renato

    2011-06-15

    Pulsed laser ablation of molecular solids is important for identification and quantification in (bio-)organic mass spectrometry, for example using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI). Recently, there has been a major shift to using MALDI and related laser ablation/post-ionization methods at atmospheric pressure. However, the underlying laser ablation processes, in particular early plume formation and expansion, are still poorly understood. Here, we present a study of the early ablation processes on the ns-time scale in atmospheric pressure UV-laser ablation of anthracene as well as of different common MALDI matrices such as 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (2,5-DHB), {alpha}-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid and sinapinic acid. Material release as well as the formation and expansion of hemi-spherical shock waves were studied by shadowgraphy with high temporal resolution ({approx}5 ns). The applicability of the classical Taylor-Sedov model for expansion of strong shock waves ('point-blast model'), as well as the drag force model, were evaluated to mathematically describe the observed shock wave propagation. The time- and energy-dependent expansion of the shock waves could be described using a Taylor-Sedov scaling law of the form R {proportional_to} t{sup q}, when a q-exponent of {approx}0.5 instead of the theoretical value of q 0.4 was found, indicating a faster expansion than expected. The deviations from the ideal value of q were attributed to the non-negligible influence of ambient pressure, a weak versus strong shock regime, and additional acceleration processes present in laser ablation that surpass the limit of the point-blast model. The onset of shock wave formation at a fluence of {approx}15-30 mJ/cm{sup 2} for the compounds investigated coincides with the onset of bulk material release, whereas, pure desorption below this fluence threshold did not lead to features visible in shadowgraphy.

  1. Metallic targets ablation by laser plasma production in a vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beilis, I. I.

    2016-03-01

    A model of metallic target ablation and metallic plasma production by laser irradiation is reported. The model considers laser energy absorption by the plasma, electron emission from hot targets and ion flux to the target from the plasma as well as an electric sheath produced at the target-plasma interface. The proposed approach takes into account that the plasma, partially shields the laser radiation from the target, and also converts absorbed laser energy to kinetic and potential energies of the charged plasma particles, which they transport not only through the ambient vacuum but also through the electrostatic sheath to the solid surface. Therefore additional plasma heating by the accelerated emitted electrons and target heating caused by bombardment of it by the accelerated ions are considered. A system of equations, including equations for solid heat conduction, plasma generation, and plasma expansion, is solved self-consistently. The results of calculations explain the measured dependencies of ablation yield (μ g/pulse) for Al, Ni, and Ti targets on laser fluence in range of (5-21)J/cm2 published previously by Torrisi et al.

  2. Plasma plume characterization of a vacuum arc thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekerak, Michael James

    A Vacuum Arc Thruster (VAT) is a thruster that uses the plasma created in a vacuum arc, an electrical discharge in a vacuum that creates high velocity and highly ionized plasmas, as the propellant without additional acceleration. A VAT would be a small and inexpensive low thrust ion thruster, ideal for small satellites and formation flying spacecraft. The purpose of this thesis was to quantitatively and qualitatively examine the VAT plasma plume to determine operating characteristics and limitations. A VAT with a titanium cathode was operated in two regimes: (A) single ˜100mus pulse, discharge current JD=510A, and (B) multiple ˜1500mus pulses at f=40.8Hz, JD=14A. The cathode was 3.18mm diameter Ti rod, surrounded by a 0.80mm thick alumina insulator, set in a molybdenum anode. Three Configurations were tested: Cfg1 (Regime A, cathode recessed 3.00mm from anode), Cfg2 (Regime A, cathode and anode flush), Cfg3 (Regime B, cathode recessed 3.00mm). A semi-empirical model was derived for VAT performance based on the MHD equation of motion using data for ion velocity, ion charge state distribution, ion current fraction (F), and ion current density distribution (ICDD). Additional performance parameters were a2, the peak ion current density angular offset from the cathode normal, and a3, the width of the ion current distribution. Measurements were taken at 162 points on a plane in the plasma plume using a custom faraday probe, and the ICDD empirical form was determined to be a Gaussian. The discharge voltage (VD) and F were Cfg1: VD=25.5V, F=0.025-0.035; Cfg2: VD=40.7V, F=0.08-0.10; Cfg3: VD=14.9V, F=0.006-0.021. For Cfg1, a2 started 15° off-axis while a2˜0 for Cfg2 and 3. In Cfg1, a 3=0.7-0.6, and in Cfg2 a3=1.0-1.1, so the recessed cathode focused the plasma more. However, F is more important for VAT performance because upper and lower bounds for thrust, specific impulse, thrust-to-power, and efficiency were calculated and Cfg2 had the highest performance. High

  3. Modeling the plasma plume of a hollow cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Iain D.; Crofton, Mark W.

    2004-04-01

    In this study, a numerical model is developed to simulate the xenon plasma plume from a thermionic hollow cathode employing an orifice plate used for propellant ionization and beam neutralization in an electrostatic space propulsion system. The model uses a detailed fluid model to describe the electrons and a particle-based kinetic approach is used to model the heavy xenon ions and atoms. A number of key assumptions in terms of physical modeling and boundary conditions of the simulations are assessed through direct comparisons with experimental measurements. For two of the three cathode operating conditions considered, good agreement with the measured data is obtained. The third condition appears to lie in a different physical regime where elevated electron and ion temperatures and decreased transport coefficients are required in the simulation to provide agreement between the model and the measured data.

  4. Stark broadening measurements in plasmas produced by laser ablation of hydrogen containing compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burger, Miloš; Hermann, Jörg

    2016-08-01

    We present a method for the measurement of Stark broadening parameters of atomic and ionic spectral lines based on laser ablation of hydrogen containing compounds. Therefore, plume emission spectra, recorded with an echelle spectrometer coupled to a gated detector, were compared to the spectral radiance of a plasma in local thermal equilibrium. Producing material ablation with ultraviolet nanosecond laser pulses in argon at near atmospheric pressure, the recordings take advantage of the spatially uniform distributions of electron density and temperature within the ablated vapor. By changing the delay between laser pulse and detector gate, the electron density could be varied by more than two orders of magnitude while the temperature was altered in the range from 6,000 to 14,000 K. The Stark broadening parameters of transitions were derived from their simultaneous observation with the hydrogen Balmer alpha line. In addition, assuming a linear increase of Stark widths and shifts with electron density for non-hydrogenic lines, our measurements indicate a change of the Stark broadening-dependence of Hα over the considered electron density range. The presented results obtained for hydrated calcium sulfate (CaSO4ṡ2H2O) can be extended to any kind of hydrogen containing compounds.

  5. Spacecraft plume interactions with the magnetosphere plasma environment in geostationary Earth orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephani, K. A.; Boyd, I. D.

    2016-02-01

    Particle-based kinetic simulations of steady and unsteady hydrazine chemical rocket plumes are presented in a study of plume interactions with the ambient magnetosphere in geostationary Earth orbit. The hydrazine chemical rocket plume expands into a near-vacuum plasma environment, requiring the use of a combined direct simulation Monte Carlo/particle-in-cell methodology for the rarefied plasma conditions. Detailed total and differential cross sections are employed to characterize the charge exchange reactions between the neutral hydrazine plume mixture and the ambient hydrogen ions, and ion production is also modeled for photoionization processes. These ionization processes lead to an increase in local plasma density surrounding the spacecraft owing to a partial ionization of the relatively high-density hydrazine plume. Results from the steady plume simulations indicate that the formation of the hydrazine ion plume are driven by several competing mechanisms, including (1) local depletion and (2) replenishing of ambient H+ ions by charge exchange and thermal motion of 1 keV H+ from the ambient reservoir, respectively, and (3) photoionization processes. The self-consistent electrostatic field forces and the geostationary magnetic field have only a small influence on the dynamics of the ion plume. The unsteady plume simulations show a variation in neutral and ion plume dissipation times consistent with the variation in relative diffusion rates of the chemical species, with full H2 dissipation (below the ambient number density levels) approximately 33 s after a 2 s thruster burn.

  6. Ablation of high-Z material dust grains in edge plasmas of magnetic fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Marenkov, E. D.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.

    2014-12-15

    The model, including shielding effects of high-Z dust grain ablation in tokamak edge plasma, is presented. In a contrast to shielding models developed for pellets ablation in a hot plasma core, this model deals with the dust grain ablation in relatively cold edge plasma. Using some simplifications, a closed set of equations determining the grain ablation rate Γ is derived and analyzed both analytically and numerically. The scaling law for Γ versus grain radius and ambient plasma parameters is obtained and confirmed by the results of numerical solutions. The results obtained are compared with both dust grain models containing no shielding effects and the pellet ablation models.

  7. Ablation of high-Z material dust grains in edge plasmas of magnetic fusion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marenkov, E. D.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.

    2014-12-01

    The model, including shielding effects of high-Z dust grain ablation in tokamak edge plasma, is presented. In a contrast to shielding models developed for pellets ablation in a hot plasma core, this model deals with the dust grain ablation in relatively cold edge plasma. Using some simplifications, a closed set of equations determining the grain ablation rate Γ is derived and analyzed both analytically and numerically. The scaling law for Γ versus grain radius and ambient plasma parameters is obtained and confirmed by the results of numerical solutions. The results obtained are compared with both dust grain models containing no shielding effects and the pellet ablation models.

  8. Characterization of Vapour Plume Species and Deposition Residues Resulting from Pulsed Laser Ablation of a Graphite/Epoxy Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roybal, R. E.; Miglionico, C. J.; Stein, C.; Murr, L. E.; Lincoln, K. A.

    1995-01-01

    A modified time-of-flight mass spectrometer fitted with a special collection stage for carbon-coated transmission electron microscope specimen grids is used to monitor laser-pulse ablation products from graphite/epoxy composite targets. Scanning electron microscopy observations show ablation damage to consist of matrix pyrolysis, fibre fracture and spallation of fragments which include elemental hydrogen, carbon epoxide and acetylene groups. Transmission electron microscope examination of specimen grids showed a variety of crystals and polycrystalline hexagonal graphites having a wide range of shapes including spheres and faceted polyhedra and platelets, textured flake structures, microrosettes. These observations lend some credibility to a model for laser-shock and pyrolysis effects which create molecular plume fragments and deposition fragments of hexagonal graphite.

  9. Near field interaction of microwave signals with a bounded plasma plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ling, Hao; Hallock, Gary A.; Kim, Hyeongdong; Birkner, Bjorn

    1991-01-01

    The objective was to study the effect of the arcjet thruster plume on the performance of an onboard satellite reflector antenna. A project summary is presented along with sections on plasma and electromagnetic modeling. The plasma modeling section includes the following topics: wave propagation; plasma analysis; plume electron density model; and the proposed experimental program. The section on electromagnetic modeling includes new developments in ray modeling and the validation of three dimensional ray results.

  10. Study of breakdown in an ablative pulsed plasma thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Tiankun; Wu, Zhiwen; Liu, Xiangyang; Xie, Kan; Wang, Ningfei; Cheng, Yue

    2015-10-01

    Breakdown in ablative pulsed plasma thrusters (APPTs) must be studied in order to design new types of APPTs and measure particular parameters. In this paper, we studied a parallel-plate ablative pulsed plasma thruster that used a coaxial semiconductor spark plug. By operating the APPT about 500 times with various capacitor voltages and electrode gaps, we measured and analyzed the voltage of the spark plug, the voltage between the electrodes, and the discharge current. These experiments revealed a time delay (˜1-10 μs) between spark plug ignition and capacitor discharge, which may affect the performance of high-pulsing-rate (>10 kHz) and double-discharge APPTs, and the measurements of some of the APPT parameters. The delay time decreased as the capacitor voltage increased, and it increased with an increasing electrode gap and increasing number of ignitions. We explain our results through a simple theoretical analysis.

  11. Study of breakdown in an ablative pulsed plasma thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Tiankun; Wu, Zhiwen; Liu, Xiangyang; Xie, Kan; Wang, Ningfei; Cheng, Yue

    2015-10-15

    Breakdown in ablative pulsed plasma thrusters (APPTs) must be studied in order to design new types of APPTs and measure particular parameters. In this paper, we studied a parallel-plate ablative pulsed plasma thruster that used a coaxial semiconductor spark plug. By operating the APPT about 500 times with various capacitor voltages and electrode gaps, we measured and analyzed the voltage of the spark plug, the voltage between the electrodes, and the discharge current. These experiments revealed a time delay (∼1–10 μs) between spark plug ignition and capacitor discharge, which may affect the performance of high-pulsing-rate (>10 kHz) and double-discharge APPTs, and the measurements of some of the APPT parameters. The delay time decreased as the capacitor voltage increased, and it increased with an increasing electrode gap and increasing number of ignitions. We explain our results through a simple theoretical analysis.

  12. A tandem mirror plasma source for a hybrid plume plasma propulsion concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T. F.; Miller, R. H.; Wenzel, K. W.; Krueger, W. A.; Chang, F. R.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes a tandem mirror magnetic plasma confinement device to be considered as a hot plasma source for the hybrid plume rocket concept. The hot plasma from this device is injected into an exhaust duct, which will interact with an annular layer of hypersonic neutral gas. Such a device can be used to study the dynamics of the hybrid plume and to experimentally verify the numerical predictions obtained with computer codes. The basic system design is also geared toward being lightweight and compact, as well as having high power density (i.e., several kW/sq cm) at the exhaust. This feature is aimed toward the feasibility of 'space testing'. The plasma is heated by microwaves. A 50 percent heating efficiency can be obtained by using two half-circle antennas. The preliminary Monte Carlo modeling of test particles result reported here indicates that interaction does take place in the exhaust duct. Neutrals gain energy from the ion, which confirms the hybrid plume concept.

  13. Image guided thermal ablation of tumors increases the plasma level of IL-6 and IL-10

    PubMed Central

    Erinjeri, Joseph P; Thomas, Contessa T; Samoila, Alaiksandra; Fleisher, Martin; Gonen, Mithat; Sofocleous, Constantinos T.; Thornton, Raymond H; Siegelbaum, Robert H.; Covey, Anne M.; Brody, Lynn A.; Alago, William; Maybody, Majid; Brown, Karen T.; Getrajdman, George; Solomon, Stephen B.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE To identify changes in plasma cytokine levels following image-guided thermal ablation of human tumors and to identify the factors that independently predict changes in plasma cytokine levels. MATERIALS AND METHODS Whole blood samples were collected from 36 patients at 3 time points: pre-ablation, post-ablation (within 48 hours), and in follow-up (1–5 weeks after ablation). Plasma levels of IL-1a, IL-2, IL-6, IL-10 and TNFa were measured using a multiplex immunoassay. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed using cytokine level as the dependent variable and sample collection, time, age, sex, primary diagnosis, metastatic status, ablation site, and ablation type as the independent variables. RESULTS There was a significant increase in the plasma level of IL-6 post-ablation when compared to pre-ablation (9.6+/−31 fold, p<0.002). IL-10 also showed a significant increase postablation (1.9 +/−2.8 fold, p<0.02). Plasma levels of IL-1a, IL-2, and TNFa were not significantly changed after ablation. Cryoablation resulted in the largest change in IL-6 level (>54 fold), while radiofrequency and microwave ablation showed 3.6 and 3.4-fold changes, respectively. Ablation of melanomas showed the largest change in IL-6 48 hours after ablation (92×), followed by ablation of kidney (26×), liver (8×), and lung (6×) cancers. Multivariate analysis revealed that ablation type (p<0.0003), and primary diagnosis (p<0.03) were independent predictors of changes to IL-6 following ablation. Age was the only independent predictor of IL-10 levels following ablation (p<0.019). CONCLUSION Image guided thermal ablation of tumors increases the plasma level of IL-6 and IL-10, without increasing the plasma level of IL-1a, IL-2, or TNFa. PMID:23582441

  14. Characteristics of the ablation plume induced on glasses for analysis purposes with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Ye; Sokolova, Ekaterina B.; Zheng, Ronger; Ma, Qianli; Chen, Yanping; Yu, Jin

    2015-12-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been demonstrated as an efficient tool for elemental analyses of transparent dielectric materials such as glasses or crystals for more than ten years. The induced plasma is however much less studied compared to that induced on the surface of a metal. The purpose of this work is therefore to characterize the plasma induced on the surface of a glass sample for analytical purpose as a function of the ablation laser wavelength, infrared (IR) or ultraviolet (UV), and the ambient gas, air or argon. The surface damage of the samples was also observed for ablation with IR or UV laser pulse when the sample was a float glass or a frosted one. Optimized ablation fluence was then determined. The morphology of the plasma was observed with time-resolved spectroscopic imaging, while the profiles of the electron density and temperature were extracted from time- and space-resolved emission spectroscopy. The analytical performance of the plasmas was then studied in terms of the signal-to-noise ratio for several emission lines from some minor elements, Al, Fe, contained in glasses, and of the behavior of self-absorption for another minor element, Ca, in the different ablation conditions.

  15. Diagnosing on plasma plume from xenon Hall thruster with collisional-radiative model

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Juan; Yokota, Shigeru; Kaneko, Ryotaro; Komurasaki, Kimiya

    2010-10-15

    The collisional-radiative model for xenon is used to calculate the electron density and temperature, and the atom population distribution in the plasma plume from a xenon Hall thruster. In the calculation, 173 levels of atom population are considered; only the processes of electron induced excitation and deexcitation, and spontaneous decay are simulated. The plasma plume is assumed to be optically thin. Consequently, the reasonable parameters of plasma plume along the outside center line of the thruster channel are obtained by making the calculated emission spectrum corresponding to measured ones and based on the atomic data available on site and by codes.

  16. Simulation of laser interaction with ablative plasma and hydrodynamic behavior of laser supported plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Huifeng; Yuan, Hong; Tang, Zhiping

    2013-01-01

    When an intense laser beam irradiates on a solid target, ambient air ionizes and becomes plasma, while part of the target rises in temperature, melts, vaporizes, ionizes, and yet becomes plasma. A general Godunov finite difference scheme WENO (Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory Scheme) with fifth-order accuracy is used to simulate 2-dimensional axis symmetrical laser-supported plasma flow field in the process of laser ablation. The model of the calculation of ionization degree of plasma and the interaction between laser beam and plasma are considered in the simulation. The numerical simulations obtain the profiles of temperature, density, and velocity at different times which show the evolvement of the ablative plasma. The simulated results show that the laser energy is strongly absorbed by plasma on target surface and that the velocity of laser supported detonation (LSD) wave is half of the ideal LSD value derived from Chapman-Jouguet detonation theory.

  17. Simulation of laser interaction with ablative plasma and hydrodynamic behavior of laser supported plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Tong Huifeng; Yuan Hong; Tang Zhiping

    2013-01-28

    When an intense laser beam irradiates on a solid target, ambient air ionizes and becomes plasma, while part of the target rises in temperature, melts, vaporizes, ionizes, and yet becomes plasma. A general Godunov finite difference scheme WENO (Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory Scheme) with fifth-order accuracy is used to simulate 2-dimensional axis symmetrical laser-supported plasma flow field in the process of laser ablation. The model of the calculation of ionization degree of plasma and the interaction between laser beam and plasma are considered in the simulation. The numerical simulations obtain the profiles of temperature, density, and velocity at different times which show the evolvement of the ablative plasma. The simulated results show that the laser energy is strongly absorbed by plasma on target surface and that the velocity of laser supported detonation (LSD) wave is half of the ideal LSD value derived from Chapman-Jouguet detonation theory.

  18. A unified model to determine the energy partitioning between target and plasma in nanosecond laser ablation of silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Galasso, G.; Kaltenbacher, M.; Tomaselli, A.; Scarpa, D.

    2015-03-28

    In semiconductor industry, pulsed nanosecond lasers are widely applied for the separation of silicon wafers. Here, the high intensities employed activate a cascade of complex multi-physical and multi-phase mechanisms, which finally result in the formation of a laser induced plasma, shielding the target from the incoming laser beam. Such induced plasma plume, by preventing the laser to effectively reach the target, reduces the overall efficiency and controllability of the ablation process. Modelling can be a useful tool in the optimization of industrial laser applications, allowing a deeper understanding of the way the laser energy distributes between target and induced plasma. Nevertheless, the highly multi-physical character of laser ablation poses serious challenges on the implementation of the various mechanisms underlying the process within a common modelling framework. A novel strategy is here proposed in order to simulate in a simplified, yet physically consistent way, a typical industrial application as laser ablation of silicon wafers. Reasonable agreement with experimental findings is obtained. Three fundamental mechanisms have been identified as the main factors influencing the accuracy of the numerical predictions: the transition from evaporative to volumetric mass removal occurring at critical temperature, the collisional and radiative processes underlying the initial plasma formation stage and the increased impact of the liquid ejection mechanism when a sub-millimeter laser footprint is used.

  19. A unified model to determine the energy partitioning between target and plasma in nanosecond laser ablation of silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galasso, G.; Kaltenbacher, M.; Tomaselli, A.; Scarpa, D.

    2015-03-01

    In semiconductor industry, pulsed nanosecond lasers are widely applied for the separation of silicon wafers. Here, the high intensities employed activate a cascade of complex multi-physical and multi-phase mechanisms, which finally result in the formation of a laser induced plasma, shielding the target from the incoming laser beam. Such induced plasma plume, by preventing the laser to effectively reach the target, reduces the overall efficiency and controllability of the ablation process. Modelling can be a useful tool in the optimization of industrial laser applications, allowing a deeper understanding of the way the laser energy distributes between target and induced plasma. Nevertheless, the highly multi-physical character of laser ablation poses serious challenges on the implementation of the various mechanisms underlying the process within a common modelling framework. A novel strategy is here proposed in order to simulate in a simplified, yet physically consistent way, a typical industrial application as laser ablation of silicon wafers. Reasonable agreement with experimental findings is obtained. Three fundamental mechanisms have been identified as the main factors influencing the accuracy of the numerical predictions: the transition from evaporative to volumetric mass removal occurring at critical temperature, the collisional and radiative processes underlying the initial plasma formation stage and the increased impact of the liquid ejection mechanism when a sub-millimeter laser footprint is used.

  20. Ablation plasma transport using multicusp magnetic field for laser ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, K.; Umezawa, M.; Uchino, T.; Ikegami, K.; Sasaki, T.; Kikuchi, T.; Harada, N.

    2016-05-01

    We propose a plasma guiding method using multicusp magnetic field to transport the ablation plasma keeping the density for developing laser ion sources. To investigate the effect of guiding using the magnetic field on the ablation plasma, we demonstrated the transport of the laser ablation plasma in the multicusp magnetic field. The magnetic field was formed with eight permanent magnets and arranged to limit the plasma expansion in the radial direction. We investigated the variation of the plasma ion current density and charge distribution during transport in the magnetic field. The results indicate that the plasma is confined in the radial direction during the transport in the multicusp magnetic field.

  1. Plume splitting and rebounding in a high-intensity CO{sub 2} laser induced air plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Anmin; Jiang Yuanfei; Liu Hang; Jin Mingxing; Ding Dajun

    2012-07-15

    The dynamics of plasma plume formed by high-intensity CO{sub 2} laser induced breakdown of air at atmospheric pressure is investigated. The laser wavelength is 10.6 {mu}m. Measurements were made using 3 ns gated fast photography as well as space and time resolved optical emission spectroscopy. The behavior of the plasma plume was studied with a laser energy of 3 J and 10 J. The results show that the evolution of the plasma plume is very complicated. The splitting and rebounding of the plasma plume is observed to occur early in the plumes history.

  2. Spectroscopic measurements of ablation plasma generated with laser-driven intense extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, N.; Hane, K.; Shikata, H.; Masuda, M.; Nagatomi, K.; Sunahara, A.; Yoshida, M.; Fujioka, S.; Nishimura, H.

    2016-03-01

    Material ablation by a focused Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light is studied by comparing expanding ion properties and plasma parameters with laser ablation. The kinetic energy distributions of expanding ions from EUV and laser ablation showed different spectra implying different geometries of plasma expansion. The calculation results of plasma parameters showed that EUV energy is mostly deposited in high electron density region close to the solid density, while laser energy is deposited in low energy density region. Plasma parameters experimentally obtained from visible spectra did not show noticeable difference between EUV and laser ablation due to the corresponding low cut off density.

  3. Developing the model of laser ablation by considering the interplay between emission and expansion of aluminum plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Rezaei, F.; Tavassoli, S. H.

    2013-01-15

    In the present study, the ablation behavior of aluminum target and its plasma radiation in noble ambient gases by a laser pulse with wavelength of 266 nm and pulse duration of 10 ns are numerically studied. A thermal model of laser ablation considering heat conduction, Euler equations, Saha-Eggert equations, Knudsen layer, mass and energy balance relations and optical shielding effects are used for calculation of plasma parameters. Effects of excitation energy on plasma expansion and its emissivity are investigated. Time and spatial-resolved plasma emission including bremsstrahlung, recombination and spectral emission at early delay times after laser irradiation is obtained. Effects of two ambient gases (He and Ar) as well as different gas pressures of 100, 300, 500, and 760 Torr on plasma expansion and its spectrum are studied. Results illustrate that at initial delay times, especially at high noble gas pressures, ionic lines have the maximum intensities, while at later times neutral lines dominate. When the pressure of ambient gas increases, a confinement of the plasma plume is predicted and the intensity of neutral lines decreases. Continuous emission increases with wavelength in both ambient gases. Spatially resolved analysis shows that an intense continuous emission is predicted next to the sample surface decreasing with distance from the latter.

  4. Numerical studies of wall-plasma interactions and ionization phenomena in an ablative pulsed plasma thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lei; Zeng, Guangshang; Tang, Haibin; Huang, Yuping; Liu, Xiangyang

    2016-07-01

    Wall-plasma interactions excited by ablation controlled arcs are very critical physical processes in pulsed plasma thrusters (PPTs). Their effects on the ionization processes of ablated vapor into discharge plasma directly determine PPT performances. To reveal the physics governing the ionization phenomena in PPT discharge, a modified model taking into account the pyrolysis effect of heated polytetrafluoroethylene propellant on the wall-plasma interactions was developed. The feasibility of the modified model was analyzed by creating a one-dimensional simulation of a rectangular ablative PPT. The wall-plasma interaction results based on this modified model were found to be more realistic than for the unmodified model; this reflects the dynamic changes of the inflow parameters during discharge in our model. Furthermore, the temporal and spatial variations of the different plasma species in the discharge chamber were numerically studied. The numerical studies showed that polytetrafluoroethylene plasma was mainly composed of monovalent ions; carbon and fluorine ions were concentrated in the upstream and downstream discharge chamber, respectively. The results based on this modified model were in good agreement with the experimental formation times of the various plasma species. A large number of short-lived and highly ionized carbon and fluorine species (divalent and trivalent ions) were created during initial discharge. These highly ionized species reached their peak density earlier than the singly ionized species.

  5. Laser ablated zirconium plasma: A source of neutral zirconium

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, Dheerendra; Thareja, Raj K.

    2010-10-15

    The authors report spectroscopic investigations of laser produced zirconium (Zr) plasma at moderate laser fluence. At low laser fluence the neutral zirconium species are observed to dominate over the higher species of zirconium. Laser induced fluorescence technique is used to study the velocity distribution of ground state neutral zirconium species. Two-dimensional time-resolved density distributions of ground state zirconium is mapped using planner laser induced fluorescence imaging and total ablated mass of neutral zirconium atoms is estimated. Temporal and spatial evolutions of electron density and temperature are discussed by measuring Stark broadened profile and ratio of intensity of emission lines, respectively.

  6. Simulation of nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of copper samples: A focus on laser induced plasma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghaei, M.; Mehrabian, S.; Tavassoli, S. H.

    2008-09-01

    A thermal model for nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of Cu in one dimension and in ambient gas, He at 1 atm, is proposed in which equations concerning heat conduction in the target and gas dynamics in the plume are solved. These equations are coupled to each other through the energy and mass balances at interface between the target and the vapor and also Knudsen layer conditions. By assumption of local thermal equilibrium, Saha-Eggert equations are used to investigate plasma formation. The shielding effect of the plasma, due to photoionization and inverse bremsstrahlung processes, is considered. Bremsstrahlung and blackbody radiation and spectral emissions of the plasma are also investigated. Spatial and temporal distribution of the target temperature, number densities of Cu and He, pressure and temperature of the plume, bremsstrahlung and blackbody radiation, and also spectral emissions of Cu at three wavelengths (510, 516, and 521 nm) are obtained. Results show that the spectral power of Cu lines has the same pattern as CuI relative intensities from National Institute of Standard and Technology. Investigation of spatially integrated bremsstrahlung and blackbody radiation, and also Cu spectral emissions indicates that although in early times the bremsstrahlung radiation dominates the two other radiations, the Copper spectral emission is the dominant radiation in later times. It should be mentioned that the blackbody radiation has the least values in both time intervals. The results can be used for prediction of the optimum time and position of the spectral line emission, which is applicable in some time resolved spectroscopic techniques such as laser induced breakdown spectroscopy. Furthermore, the results suggest that for distinguishing between the spectral emission and the bremsstrahlung radiation, a spatially resolved spectroscopy can be used instead of the time resolved one.

  7. Ablation with a single micropatterned KrF laser pulse: quantitative evidence of transient liquid microflow driven by the plume pressure gradient at the surface of polyesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisbuch, F.; Tokarev, V. N.; Lazare, S.; Débarre, D.

    A microscopic flow of a transient liquid film produced by KrF laser ablation is evidenced on targets of PET and PEN. Experiments were done by using single pulses of the excimer laser beam micropatterned with the aid of submicron projection optics and grating masks. The samples of various crystalline states, ablated with a grating-forming beam (period Λ=3.7 μm), were precisely measured by atomic force microscopy, in order to evidence any deviation from the ablation behavior predicted by the current theory (combination of ablation curve and beam profile). This was confirmed by comparing various behaviors dependent on the polymer nature (PC, PET and PEN). PC is a normally ablating polymer in the sense that the ablated profile can be predicted with previous theory neglecting liquid-flow effects. This case is called `dry' ablation and PC is used as a reference material. But, for some particular samples like crystalline PET, it is revealed that during ablation a film of transient liquid, composed of various components, which are discussed, can flow under the transient action of the gradient of the pressure of the ablation plume and resolidify at the border of the spot after the end of the pulse. This mechanism is further supported by a hydrodynamics theoretical model in which a laser-induced viscosity drop and the gradient of the plume pressure play an important role. The volume of displaced liquid increases with fluence (0.5 to 2 J/cm2) and satisfactory quantitative agreement is obtained with the present model. The same experiment done on the same PET polymer but prepared in the amorphous state does not show microflow, and such an amorphous sample behaves like the reference PC (`dry' ablation). The reasons for this surprising result are discussed.

  8. Plasma-mediated ablation: An optical tool for submicrometer surgery on neuronal and vascular systems

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Philbert S.; Blinder, Pablo; Migliori, Benjamin J.; Neev, Joseph; Jin, Yishi; Squier, Jeffrey A.; Kleinfeld, David

    2009-01-01

    Plasma-mediated ablation makes use of high energy laser pulses to ionize molecules within the first few femtoseconds of the pulse. This process leads to a submicrometer-sized bubble of plasma that can ablate tissue with negligible heat transfer and collateral damage to neighboring tissue. We review the physics of plasma-mediated ablation and its use as a tool to generate targeted insults at the subcellular level to neurons and blood vessels deep within nervous tissue. Illustrative examples from axon regeneration and microvascular research illustrate the utility of this tool. We further discuss the use of ablation as an integral part of automated histology. PMID:19269159

  9. Characteristics of plasma plume and effect mechanism of lateral restraint during high power CO2 laser welding process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yue; Cai, Yan; Sun, Dawei; Zhu, Junjie; Wu, Yixiong

    2014-12-01

    A novel lateral restraint method was proposed to suppress plasma plume of high power CO2 laser welding using a pair of copper blocks with cooling water. The plasma plume was observed with a high-speed camera, and its core zone and periphery zone were investigated based on the specific processing algorithm. With the specially designed shifting unit, the spectrum of plasma plume was scanned both in 1-D and 2-D mode. Based on the selected spectral lines, electron temperature and electron number density of plasma plume were calculated. The characteristics of plasma plume, as well as the restraint mechanism, were discussed both in 1-D and 2-D mode. Results showed that the cooling effect, blowing effect and the static pressure were enhanced by the lateral restraint, and the restraint effect of the near-wall low-temperature area limited the expansion of plasma plume greatly.

  10. Collective behavior of silver plasma during pulsed laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dildar, I. M.; Rehman, S.; Khaleeq-ur-Rahman, M.; Bhatti, K. A.; Shuaib, A.

    2015-07-01

    The present work reports an electrical investigation of silver plasma using a self-fabricated Langmuir probe in air and under a low vacuum (~10-3 torr). A silver target was irradiated with a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser with the wavelength 1.064 µm, energy 10 mJ, pulse duration 9-14 ns and power 1.1 MW. The collective behavior of a silver plasma plume is studied using a Langmuir probe as an electrical diagnostic technique. By applying different positive and negative voltages to the probe, the respective signals are collected on a four channels digital storage oscilloscope having a frequency of 500 MHz. An I-V curve helps to measure electron temperature and electron density directly and plasma frequency, response time, Debye length and number of particles in ‘Debye’s sphere’ indirectly using the theory of Langmuir probe and mathematical formulas. The floating potential is measured as negative for laser induced silver plasma in air and vacuum, following the theory of plasma.

  11. Characteristics of plasma properties in an ablative pulsed plasma thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenherr, Tony; Nees, Frank; Arakawa, Yoshihiro; Komurasaki, Kimiya; Herdrich, Georg

    2013-03-15

    Pulsed plasma thrusters are electric space propulsion devices which create a highly transient plasma bulk in a short-time arc discharge that is expelled to create thrust. The transitional character and the dependency on the discharge properties are yet to be elucidated. In this study, optical emission spectroscopy and Mach-Zehnder interferometry are applied to investigate the plasma properties in variation of time, space, and discharge energy. Electron temperature, electron density, and Knudsen numbers are derived for the plasma bulk and discussed. Temperatures were found to be in the order of 1.7 to 3.1 eV, whereas electron densities showed maximum values of more than 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3}. Both values showed strong dependency on the discharge voltage and were typically higher closer to the electrodes. Capacitance and time showed less influence. Knudsen numbers were derived to be in the order of 10{sup -3}-10{sup -2}, thus, indicating a continuum flow behavior in the main plasma bulk.

  12. Cold Atmospheric Plasma for Selectively Ablating Metastatic Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mian; Holmes, Benjamin; Cheng, Xiaoqian; Zhu, Wei; Keidar, Michael; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2013-01-01

    Traditional breast cancer treatments such as surgery and radiotherapy contain many inherent limitations with regards to incomplete and nonselective tumor ablation. Cold atomospheric plasma (CAP) is an ionized gas where the ion temperature is close to room temperature. It contains electrons, charged particles, radicals, various excited molecules, UV photons and transient electric fields. These various compositional elements have the potential to either enhance and promote cellular activity, or disrupt and destroy them. In particular, based on this unique composition, CAP could offer a minimally-invasive surgical approach allowing for specific cancer cell or tumor tissue removal without influencing healthy cells. Thus, the objective of this research is to investigate a novel CAP-based therapy for selectively bone metastatic breast cancer treatment. For this purpose, human metastatic breast cancer (BrCa) cells and bone marrow derived human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were separately treated with CAP, and behavioral changes were evaluated after 1, 3, and 5 days of culture. With different treatment times, different BrCa and MSC cell responses were observed. Our results showed that BrCa cells were more sensitive to these CAP treatments than MSCs under plasma dose conditions tested. It demonstrated that CAP can selectively ablate metastatic BrCa cells in vitro without damaging healthy MSCs at the metastatic bone site. In addition, our study showed that CAP treatment can significantly inhibit the migration and invasion of BrCa cells. The results suggest the great potential of CAP for breast cancer therapy. PMID:24040051

  13. Investigation of the vapour-plasma plume in the welding of titanium by high-power ytterbium fibre laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykovskiy, D. P.; Petrovskii, V. N.; Uspenskiy, S. A.

    2015-03-01

    The vapour-plasma plume produced in the welding of 6-mm thick VT-23 titanium alloy plates by ytterbium fibre laser radiation of up to 10 kW power is studied in the protective Ar gas medium. High-speed video filming of the vapour-plasma plume is used to visualise the processes occurring during laser welding. The coefficient of inverse bremsstrahlung by the welding plasma plume is calculated from the data of the spectrometric study.

  14. Hybrid Model for Plasma Thruster Plume Simulation Including PIC-MCC Electrons Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandrov, A. L.; Bondar, Ye. A.; Schweigert, I. V.

    2008-12-31

    The simulation of stationary plasma thruster plume is important for spacecraft design due to possible interaction plume with spacecraft surface. Such simulations are successfully performed using the particle-in-cell technique for describing the motion of charged particles, namely the propellant ions. In conventional plume models the electrons are treated using various fluid approaches. In this work, we suggest an alternative approach, where the electron kinetics is considered 'ab initio', using the particle-in-cell--Monte Carlo collision method. To avoid the large computational expenses due to small time steps, the relaxation of simulated plume plasma is split into the fast relaxation of the electrons distribution function and the slow one of the ions. The model is self-consistent but hybrid, since the simultaneous electron and ion motion is not really modeled. The obtained electron temperature profile is in good agreement with experiment.

  15. Nanosecond optical imaging spectroscopy of an electrothermal radiofrequency plasma thruster plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, C.; Dedrick, J.; Boswell, R. W.; O'Connell, D.; Gans, T.

    2013-09-01

    Nanosecond optical imaging spectroscopy is employed to investigate the spatio-temporal dynamics of the plasma plume expanding from a 4.2 mm-diameter, 20 mm-long cylindrical capacitively coupled electrothermal radiofrequency (rf) driven thruster using 10 W of power at 12.50 MHz and an argon pressure of 1.5 Torr. On-axis, the plume exhibits four distinct peaks of optical emission intensity within the rf period. The plume has a spherical shape with a transient radial extension (during half of the rf cycle) at the thruster exit plane due to an rf current to ground when the grounded electrode acts as an anode.

  16. Low- and high-order harmonic generation in the extended plasmas produced by laser ablation of zinc and manganese targets

    SciTech Connect

    Ganeev, R. A.; Baba, M.; Suzuki, M.; Yoneya, S.; Kuroda, H.

    2014-12-28

    The systematic studies of the harmonic generation of ultrashort laser pulses in the 5-mm-long Zn and Mn plasmas (i.e., application of nanosecond, picosecond, and femtosecond pulses for ablation, comparison of harmonic generation from atomic, ionic, and cluster-contained species of plasma, variation of plasma length, two-color pump of plasmas, etc.) are presented. The conversion efficiency of the 11th–19th harmonics generated in the Zn plasma was ∼5 × 10{sup −5}. The role of the ionic resonances of Zn near the 9th and 10th harmonics on the enhancement of harmonics is discussed. The enhancement of harmonics was also analyzed using the two-color pump of extended plasmas, which showed similar intensities of the odd and even harmonics along the whole range of generation. The harmonics up to the 107th order were demonstrated in the case of manganese plasma. The comparison of harmonic generation in the 5-mm-long and commonly used short (≤0.5 mm) plasma plumes showed the advanced properties of extended media.

  17. Analysis of plume following ultraviolet laser ablation of doped polymers: Dependence on polymer molecular weight

    SciTech Connect

    Rebollar, Esther; Oujja, Mohamed; Bounos, Giannis; Kolloch, Andreas; Georgiou, Savas; Castillejo, Marta

    2007-02-01

    This work investigates the effect of polymer molecular weight M{sub W} on the plume characteristics of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and polystyrene (PS) films doped with iodonaphthalene (NapI) and iodophenanthrene (PhenI) following irradiation in vacuum at 248 nm. Laser-induced fluorescence probing of the plume reveals the presence of ArH products (NapH and PhenH from, respectively, NapI- and PhenI-doped films). While a bimodal translational distribution of these products is observed in all cases, on average, a slower translational distribution is observed in the low M{sub W} system. The extent of the observed dependence is reduced as the optical absorption coefficient of the film increases, i.e., in the sequence NapI/PMMA, PhenI/PMMA, and PS-doped films. Further confirmation of the bimodal translational distributions is provided by monitoring in situ the temporally resolved attenuation by the plume as it expands in vacuum of a continuous wave helium-neon laser propagating parallel to the substrate. Results are discussed in the framework of the bulk photothermal model, according to which ejection requires that a critical number of bonds are broken.

  18. Optimizing the synthesis of vanadium-oxygen nanostructures by plasma plume dynamics using optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masina, Bathusile N.; Lafane, Slimane; Wu, Lorinda; Abdelli-Messaci, Samira; Kerdja, Tahar; Forbes, Andrew

    2015-03-01

    The effect of an oxygen atmosphere on the expansion dynamics of a laser-produced vanadium-oxygen plasma has been investigated using a fast intensified charged-coupled device camera. We find regimes of the plasma plume expansion ranging from a free plume at vacuum and low oxygen pressures, through collisional and shock-wave-like hydrodynamic regimes at intermediate oxygen pressure, finally reaching a confined plume with subsequent thermalization of the plume particles at the highest pressure of the oxygen gas. Vanadium oxide nanostructures thin films were synthesized from this plasma and the resulting vanadium oxide phases studied as a function of the plume dynamics. We found monoclinic vanadium dioxide (VO2) (M1) and VO2 (B) nanoparticles in thin films deposited at 0.05 mbar. Pure phases of vanadium trioxide (V2O3) smooth and pentoxide (V2O5) nanorods thin films were detected at 0.01 and 0.1 to 0.2 mbar, respectively. Thin films containing VO2 (M1) were found to have a reversible metal-to-insulator transition at 61°C. This work paves the way to VO phase control by judicious choice of laser and plasma conditions.

  19. Diagnostics of laser plasma plume dynamics within an electrically biased confining cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Yeates, P.; Kennedy, E. T.

    2011-09-15

    The dynamics of laser generated plasma plumes expanding within confining surfaces display a two-phase nature. Early phase enhancement due to hydrodynamic containment results in higher temperatures, densities, and average charges states in comparison to freely expanding plasma plumes. Later phase dynamics result in rapid decay of the plasma plume due to lossy plasma--surface interactions. This paper examines laser plasma generation and expansion within rectangular aluminium cavities biased to high voltages (V{sub bias} = {+-}9 kV). ''Hydro-electro-dynamic'' confinement of the laser plasma plumes and the expansion dynamics were studied via space and time resolved visible emission spectroscopy. The charged confining cavities displayed enhanced emission, higher electron densities (N{sub e}) and longer emission durations compared to those of an unbiased cavity. This behavior is attributed to the influence of the electric fields in the cavity on the charged particle dynamics within the cavity volume. The degree of enhancement depended strongly on the applied polarity.

  20. Propagation dynamics of laterally colliding plasma plumes in laser-blow-off of thin film

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Bhupesh; Singh, R. K.; Sengupta, Sudip; Kaw, P. K.; Kumar, Ajai

    2014-08-15

    We report a systematic investigation of two plume interactions at different spatial separation (3-7 mm) in laser-blow-off. The plasmas plumes are created using Laser-blow-off (LBO) scheme of a thin film. The fast imaging technique is used to record the evolution of seed plasmas and the interaction zone which is formed as a result of interaction of the two seed plasmas. Time resolved optical emission spectroscopy is used to study evolution of optical emissions of the species present in the different regions of the plasmas. Neutral Li emissions (Li I 670.8 nm (2s {sup 2}S{sub 1/2} ← 2p {sup 2}P{sub 3/2,1/2}) and Li I 610.3 nm (2p {sup 2}P{sub 3/2,1/2} ← 3d {sup 2}D{sub 3/2,5/2})) are dominant in the plasmas but significant differences are observed in the emission and estimated plasma parameters of the seed and the interaction zone. The transport of plasma species from the seed plasmas to the interaction zone is discussed in the terms of plume divergence, kinetic energy of particles, and ion acoustic speed. An attempt is made to understand the formation and dynamics of the interaction zone in the colliding LBO seed plasmas.

  1. Long-lived plasmaspheric plumes: What is the source of the plasma?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denton, M.; Borovsky, J.; Thomsen, M. F.; Welling, D. T.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetospheric Plasma Analyzer (MPA) instruments on-board Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) satellites regularly measures cold ions in the plasmasphere, and in plasmaspheric plumes. Following periods of calm geomagnetic conditions, the plasmasphere fills to ion number densities in excess of 100 cm-3 - these ions corotate with the Earth. During enhanced convection the outer plasmasphere is eroded - these ions are convected to the dayside magnetopause. LANL/MPA instruments regularly measure plumes which last for many days. On occasion, plumes can last more than two weeks. Such observations raise questions as to the production mechanisms that can continually supply high-number-density material to geosynchronous orbit, and onwards to the magnetopause. We will discuss the plume observations by LANL/MPA, improvements in theoretical modeling of the refilling process, and the need for in-situ observations (from TEC, satellites, etc.) required to address this problem.

  2. Plasma-assisted laser ablation of tungsten: Reduction in ablation power threshold due to bursting of holes/bubbles

    SciTech Connect

    Kajita, Shin; Ohno, Noriyasu; Takamura, Shuichi; Sakaguchi, Wataru; Nishijima, Dai

    2007-12-24

    Nanosecond laser ablation of tungsten (W) exposed to helium plasma is investigated using optical emission spectroscopy. Submicrometer-sized holes/bubbles are formed on the surface of W when it was exposed to the helium plasma at a sufficiently high temperature (> or approx. 1500-1600 K). The emissions from a virgin W (before the helium plasma irradiation) cannot be detected when the fluence is <1 J/cm{sup 2}; however, the threshold fluence for the detection of neutral W emission after it was exposed to the helium plasma is {approx}0.2 J/cm{sup 2}. The physical mechanism of laser-induced bursting of holes/bubbles is proposed for achieving a significant reduction in ablation power threshold.

  3. A study of ablation, spatial, and temporal characteristics of laser-induced plasmas generated by multiple collinear pulses.

    PubMed

    Galbács, G; Jedlinszki, N; Herrera, K; Omenetto, N; Smith, B W; Winefordner, J D

    2010-02-01

    Multi-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) in the collinear pulse configuration with time-integrating detection was performed on metallic samples in ambient air in an effort to clarify the contributing processes responsible for the signal enhancement observed in comparison with single-pulse excitation. Complementary experiments were also carried out on another LIBS setup using detection by an imaging spectrograph with high time resolution. The effects of laser bursts consisting of up to seven ns-range pulses from Nd-doped solid-state lasers operating at their fundamental wavelength and separated by 8.5-50 micros time gaps was studied. The ablation and emission characteristics of the generated plasmas were investigated using light profilometry, microscopy, plasma imaging, emission distribution mapping, time-resolved line emission monitoring, and plasma temperature calculations. The experimental data suggest that the two contributing processes mainly responsible for the signal enhancement effect are the plume reheating caused by the sequential laser pulses and, more dominantly, the increased material ablation attributed to the lower breakdown threshold for the preheated (molten) sample surface and/or the reduced background gas pressure behind the shockwave of preceding pulses. PMID:20149277

  4. Coblation technology: plasma-mediated ablation for otolaryngology applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woloszko, Jean; Gilbride, Charles

    2000-05-01

    Coblation is a unique method of delivering radio frequency energy to soft tissue for applications in Otolaryngology (ENT). Using radio frequency in a bipolar mode with a conductive solution, such as saline, Coblation energizes the ions in the saline to form a small plasma field. The plasma has enough energy to break the tissue's molecular bonds, creating an ablative path. The thermal effect of this process is approximately 45 - 85 degrees Celsius, significantly lower than traditional radio-frequency techniques. Coblation has been used for Otolaryngological applications such as Uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP), tonsillectomy, turbinate reduction, palate reduction, base of tongue reduction and various Head and Neck cancer procedures. The decreased thermal effect of Coblation anecdotally has led to less pain and faster recovery for cases where tissue is excised. In cases where Coblation is applied submucosally to reduce tissue volume (inferior turbinate, soft palate), the immediate volume reduction may lead to immediate clinical benefits for the patient. Coblation is currently being tested in various clinical studies to document the benefits for otolaryngological applications.

  5. Modeling CO{sub 2} laser ablation impulse of polymers in vapor and plasma regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Sinko, John E.; Phipps, Claude R.

    2009-09-28

    An improved model for CO{sub 2} laser ablation impulse in polyoxymethylene and similar polymers is presented that describes the transition effects from the onset of vaporization to the plasma regime in a continuous fashion. Several predictions are made for ablation behavior.

  6. Plasma luminescence feedback control system for precise ultrashort pulse laser tissue ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Beop-Min; Feit, Michael D.; Rubenchik, Alexander M.; Gold, David M.; Darrow, Christopher B.; Marion, John E., II; Da Silva, Luiz B.

    1998-05-01

    Plasma luminescence spectroscopy was used for precise ablation of bone tissue without damaging nearby soft tissue using an ultrashort pulse laser. Strong contrast of the luminescence spectra between bone marrow and spinal cord provided the real time feedback control so bone tissue is selectively ablated while preserving the spinal cord.

  7. Plasma luminescence feedback control system for precise ultrashort pulse laser tissue ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, B.M.; Feit, M.D.; Rubenchick, A.M.; Gold, D.M.; Darrown, C.B.; Da Silva, L.B.

    1998-01-01

    Plasma luminescence spectroscopy was used for precise ablation of bone tissue without damaging nearby soft tissue using ultrashort pulse laser (USPL). Strong contrast of the luminescence spectra between bone marrow and spinal cord provided the real time feedback control so that only bone tissue can be selectively ablated while preserving the spinal cord.

  8. Thruster Plume Plasma Diagnostics: A Ground Chamber Experiment for a 2-Kilowatt Arcjet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galofaro, Joel T.; Vayner, Boris V.; Hillard, G. Barry; Chornak, Michael T.

    2005-01-01

    Although detailed near field (0 to 3 cm) information regarding the exhaust plume of a two kilowatt arc jet is available (refs. 1 to 6), there is virtually little or no information (outside of theoretical extrapolations) available concerning the far field (2.6 to 6.1 m). Furthermore real information about the plasma at distances between (3 to 6 m) is of critical importance to high technology satellite companies in understanding the effect of arc jet plume exhausts on space based power systems. It is therefore of utmost importance that one understands the exact nature of the interaction between the arc jet plume, the spacecraft power system and the surrounding electrical plasma environment. A good first step in understanding the nature of the interactions lies in making the needed plume parameter measurements in the far field. All diagnostic measurements are performed inside a large vacuum system (12 m diameter by 18 m high) with a full scale arc jet and solar array panel in the required flight configuration geometry. Thus, necessary information regarding the plume plasma parameters in the far field is obtained. Measurements of the floating potential, the plasma potential, the electron temperature, number density, density distribution, debye length, and plasma frequency are obtained at various locations about the array (at vertical distances from the arc jet nozzle: 2.6, 2.7, 2.8, 3.2, 3.6, 4.0, 4.9, 5.0, 5.4, 5.75, and 6.14 m). Plasma diagnostic parameters are measured for both the floating and grounded configurations of the arc jet anode and array. Spectroscopic optical measurements are then acquired in close proximity to the nozzle, and contamination measurements are made in the vicinity of the array utilizing a mass spectrometer and two Quartz Crystal Microbalances (QCM's).

  9. Dynamics of Laser Ablation Plasmas in Vacuum and Background Gases: Effects of Scattering and Interplume Collisions on Velocity Distributions used for PLD Film Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geohegan, David

    1996-10-01

    Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) uses laser ablation of a solid target to accelerate atoms and ions in a high-density plasma to superthermal kinetic energies (typically 10-100 eV). These high kinetic energies have proven essential for the nonequilibrium formation of thin films of new ultrahard metastable phases, such as the synthesis of amorphous diamond (ta-C, tetrahedrally-coordinated, amorphous carbon) from the laser ablation of pyrolytic graphite in vacuum. However in low-pressure background gases ( < 200 mTorr, often employed during PLD), the kinetic energy of the plume atoms is moderated by collisions with the background gas. In this talk, fundamental collisional phenomena relevant to PLD film growth in vacuum and background gases will be described using a combination of fast plasma diagnostics. Optical emission spectroscopy, optical absorption spectroscopy, fast Langmuir probe analysis, and species-resolved gated-ICCD fast photography are combined to permit an understanding of the importance of gas dynamic effects on the time-of-flight distributions of species arriving during the deposition of thin films in both vacuum and background gases. Comparative diagnostics of the ArF- and KrF-laser ablation of pyrolytic graphite will be presented to illustrate the role of laser wavelength and intensity on the species and kinetic energies responsible for optimized ultrahard amorphous diamond thin films. Evidence for interplume collisions and clustering during propagation of the graphite plume in vacuum will be shown. When penetrating a background gas, diagnostics indicate that the plume flux arriving for film growth divides into distinct "fast" and "slow"velocity distributions at certain distances. The fast component is target material which penetrates the background gas in accordance with a scattering model, while the slow component is material which has undergone momentum-changing collisions with the background gas, or with other plume atoms. This 'plume

  10. Lasing effects in a laser-induced plasma plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagli, Lev; Gaft, Michael

    2015-11-01

    We have studied coherent emission from optically pumped preliminarily created laser induced plasma and demonstrate the possibility to create laser sources based on laser plasma as an active medium. The effect was studied in detail with Al plasma, and preliminary but promising results were also obtained with other atoms from the 13th and 14th groups of the periodic table. These lasers may be used as coherent light sources in a variety of optical applications.

  11. On Predtechensky and Mayorov model for the plume expansion dynamics study into an ambient gas during thin film deposition by laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafane, S.; Kerdja, T.; Abdelli-Messaci, S.; Malek, S.; Kechouane, M.

    2013-01-01

    The plume expansion dynamics for the Sm1- x Nd x NiO3 thin films deposition by a KrF excimer laser into oxygen atmosphere has been investigated using fast imaging. The study was carried out at 0.2 and 0.3 mbar of oxygen pressure and for different laser fluences. The plasma plume dynamics was analysed in the framework of Predtechensky and Mayorov (PM) model. It was found that PM model gives a general description of the plume expansion by using parameters (laser fluence and oxygen pressure) that ensure a hemispherical expansion of the plume. The latter was discussed in the framework of the shock-wave model and the plume dimensions.

  12. A linear-field plasma jet for generating a brush-shaped laminar plume at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuechen; Li, Jiyuan; Chu, Jingdi; Zhang, Panpan; Jia, Pengying

    2016-06-01

    A linear-field plasma jet composed of line-to-plate electrodes is used to generate a large-scale brush-shaped plasma plume with flowing argon used as working gas. Through electrical measurement and fast photography, it is found that the plasma plume bridges the two electrodes for the discharge in the positive voltage half-cycle, which behaves like fast moving plasma bullets directed from the anode to the cathode. Compared with the positive discharge, the negative discharge only develops inside the nozzle and propagates much slower. Results also indicate that the gas temperature of the plume is close to room temperature, which is promising for biomedical application.

  13. Plasma observations during the Mars atmospheric "plume" event of March-April 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, D. J.; Barabash, S.; Edberg, N. J. T.; Gurnett, D. A.; Hall, B. E. S.; Holmström, M.; Lester, M.; Morgan, D. D.; Opgenoorth, H. J.; Ramstad, R.; Sanchez-Cano, B.; Way, M.; Witasse, O.

    2016-04-01

    We present initial analyses and conclusions from plasma observations made during the reported "Mars plume event" of March-April 2012. During this period, multiple independent amateur observers detected a localized, high-altitude "plume" over the Martian dawn terminator, the cause of which remains to be explained. The estimated brightness of the plume exceeds that expected for auroral emissions, and its projected altitude greatly exceeds that at which clouds are expected to form. We report on in situ measurements of ionospheric plasma density and solar wind parameters throughout this interval made by Mars Express, obtained over the same surface region but at the opposing terminator. Measurements in the ionosphere at the corresponding location frequently show a disturbed structure, though this is not atypical for such regions with intense crustal magnetic fields. We tentatively conclude that the formation and/or transport of this plume to the altitudes where it was observed could be due in part to the result of a large interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME) encountering the Martian system. Interestingly, we note that the only similar plume detection in May 1997 may also have been associated with a large ICME impact at Mars.

  14. Optical Effects on Laser Ablated Polymer Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhu, R. D.; Govinthasamy, R.; Murthy, N. S.

    2006-03-01

    Laser ablation of poly (ethylene terephthalate) and polyimide films were investigated using Excimer-UV laser. SEM analyses indicate the presence of rings for a wide range of ablation parameters (fluence, frequency and number of pulses). It is proposed that the particles present in the plasma plume could cause the incident laser light to diffract, similar to the optical effects observed in the femtosecond laser ablation of solids. The polymer surface provides a perfect medium to register the optical signatures as seen in the SEM images. The fringe-spacings observed in the images are compared with the theoretical diffraction patterns and the height of the plasma particles above the surface is estimated using an optimization scheme. The results of the analysis are consistent with experimentally observed dynamics of the plasma plume. It is proposed that such optical effects could be a routine feature in the laser ablation of polymers. The significance of such artifacts for lithography is discussed.

  15. Laser ablation plasma-assisted stabilization of premixed methane/air flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaohui; Yu, Yang; Peng, Jiangbo; Yu, Xin; Fan, Rongwei; Sun, Rui; Chen, Deying

    2016-01-01

    Laser ablation plasma has been applied to assist stabilization of premixed methane/air flames with a flow speed up to 15.3 m/s. The ablation plasma was generated using the 50 Hz, 1064 nm output of a Nd:YAG laser onto a tantalum slab. With the ablation plasma, the stabilization equivalence ratio has been extended to the fuel-leaner end and the blow off limits have been enhanced by from 3.6- to 14.8-folds for flames which can stabilize without the plasma. The laser pulse energy required for flameholding was reduced to 10 mJ, a 64 % reduction compared with that of gas breakdown plasma, which will ease the demand for high-power lasers for high-frequency plasma generation. The temporal evolutions of the flame kernels following the ablation plasma were investigated using the OH* chemiluminescence imaging approach, and the flame propagation speed ( v f) was measured from the flame kernel evolutions. With the ablation plasma, the v f with flow speed of 4.7-9.0 m/s and equivalence ratio of 1.4 has been enhanced from 0.175 m/s of laminar premixed methane/air flame to 2.79-4.52 and 1.59-5.46 m/s, respectively, in the early and late time following the ablation plasma. The increase in the combustion radical concentrations by the ablation plasma was thought to be responsible for the v f enhancement and the resulted flame stabilization.

  16. Fortuitous Plasma Observations During the Mars Atmospheric "Plume" Event of March-April 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, David; Barabash, Stas; Edberg, Niklas; Gurnett, Donald; Hall, Ben; Holmström, Mats; Lester, Mark; Opgenoorth, Hermann; Ramstad, Robin; Sanchez-Cano, Beatriz; Way, Michael; Witasse, Olivier; Morgan, David

    2016-04-01

    We present initial analysis and conclusions from plasma observations made during the reported `Mars Dust plume event' of March - April 2012.During this period, multiple independent amateur observers detected a localized, high-altitude feature over the Martian terminator [Sanchez-Lavega et al., Nature, 2015, doi:10.1038/nature14162], the explanation for which remains incomplete. The brightness of the feature in visible light is too extreme for auroral emissions to explain, despite its occurrence at a location where these have been previously reported. Likewise, the (projected) altitude of the feature is significantly too high to allow for the local formation of clouds. Fortuitously, the orbit of ESA's Mars Express allowed the measurement of ionospheric plasma density and solar wind parameters over the precise location of the plume sighting at multiple points during this interval. Based on these observations, we tentatively conclude that the formation and/or transport of this plume to the altitudes where it was observed was in part the result of a large Coronal Mass Ejection encountering the Martian system. However, while measurements of ionospheric plasma density at the corresponding altitudes indicate a disturbed structure, this is not a-typical of this location over Mars. Finally, we briefly discuss some possible mechanisms that may lead to the formation of this plume.

  17. Plume and Discharge Plasma Measurements of an NSTAR-type Ion Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E; Soulas, George C.; Patterson, Michael J.

    2000-01-01

    The success of the NASA Deep Space I spacecraft has demonstrated that ion propulsion is a viable option for deep space science missions. More aggressive missions such as Comet Nuclear Sample Return and Europa lander will require higher power, higher propellant throughput and longer thruster lifetime than the NASA Solar Electric Propulsion Technology Application Readiness (NSTAR) engine. Presented here are thruster plume and discharge plasma measurements of an NSTAR-type thruster operated from 0.5 kW to 5 kW. From Faraday plume sweeps, beam divergence was determined. From Langmuir probe plume measurements on centerline, low energy ion production on axis due to charge-exchange and direct ionization was assessed. Additionally, plume plasma potential measurements made on axis were used to determine the upper energy limits at which ions created on centerline could be radially accelerated. Wall probes flush-mounted to the thruster discharge chamber anode were used to assess plasma conditions. Langmuir probe measurements at the wall indicated significant differences in the electron temperature in the cylindrical and conical sections of the discharge chamber.

  18. Spatiotemporal evolution of plasma molecular emission following laser ablation of explosive analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merten, Jonathan; Jones, Matthew; Sheppard, Cheyenne; Parigger, Christian; Allen, Susan

    2013-05-01

    The spatial and temporal evolution of the CN molecular emission following laser ablation of a TNT analog (3- nitrobenzoic acid) has been studied along with ablation of targets that contain neither nitro groups nor C-N bonds. At a fluence of ~104 J/cm2, behavior indicative of the ablation of native CN bonds has been observed in samples containing no native CN bonds. The recorded data show significant plasma background emissions that pose difficulties for direct spectral imaging. Spatially resolved images suggest that some of the observed phenomena are simply the result of the interaction of the plasma and the observation volume of the collection optics.

  19. Dynamical modeling of laser ablation processes

    SciTech Connect

    Leboeuf, J.N.; Chen, K.R.; Donato, J.M.; Geohegan, D.B.; Liu, C.L.; Puretzky, A.A.; Wood, R.F.

    1995-09-01

    Several physics and computational approaches have been developed to globally characterize phenomena important for film growth by pulsed laser deposition of materials. These include thermal models of laser-solid target interactions that initiate the vapor plume; plume ionization and heating through laser absorption beyond local thermodynamic equilibrium mechanisms; gas dynamic, hydrodynamic, and collisional descriptions of plume transport; and molecular dynamics models of the interaction of plume particles with the deposition substrate. The complexity of the phenomena involved in the laser ablation process is matched by the diversity of the modeling task, which combines materials science, atomic physics, and plasma physics.

  20. Gold fingerprinting by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watling, R. John; Herbert, Hugh K.; Delev, Dianne; Abell, Ian D.

    1994-02-01

    Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) has been applied to the characterization of the trace element composition "fingerprint" of selected gold samples from Western Australia and South Africa. By comparison of the elemental associations it is possible to relate gold to a specific mineralizing event, mine or bullion sample. This methodology facilitates identification of the provenance of stolen gold or gold used in salting activities. In this latter case, it is common for gold from a number of sources to be used in the salting process. Consequently, gold in the prospect being salted will not come from a single source and identification of multiple sources for this gold will establish that salting has occurred. Preliminary results also indicate that specific elemental associations could be used to identify the country of origin of gold. The technique has already been applied in 17 cases involving gold theft in Western Australia, where it is estimated that up to 2% of gold production is "relocated" each year as a result of criminal activities.

  1. Spectral diagnostics of a vapor-plasma plume produced during welding titanium with a high-power ytterbium fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uspenskiy, S. A.; Petrovskiy, V. N.; Bykovskiy, D. P.; Mironov, V. D.; Prokopova, N. M.; Tret'yakov, E. V.

    2015-03-01

    This work is devoted to the research of welding plume during high power ytterbium fiber laser welding of a titanium alloy in the Ar shielding gas environment. High speed video observation of a vapor-plasma plume for visualization of processes occurring at laser welding was carried out. The coefficient of the inverse Bremsstrahlung absorption of laser radiation is calculated for a plasma welding plume by results of spectrometer researches. The conclusion deals with the impact of plasma on a high-power fiber laser radiation.

  2. Contribution of material's surface layer on charge state distribution in laser ablation plasma.

    PubMed

    Kumaki, Masafumi; Steski, Dannie; Ikeda, Shunsuke; Kanesue, Takeshi; Okamura, Masahiro; Washio, Masakazu

    2016-02-01

    To generate laser ablation plasma, a pulse laser is focused onto a solid target making a crater on the surface. However, not all the evaporated material is efficiently converted to hot plasma. Some portion of the evaporated material could be turned to low temperature plasma or just vapor. To investigate the mechanism, we prepared an aluminum target coated by thin carbon layers. Then, we measured the ablation plasma properties with different carbon thicknesses on the aluminum plate. The results showed that C(6+) ions were generated only from the surface layer. The deep layers (over 250 nm from the surface) did not provide high charge state ions. On the other hand, low charge state ions were mainly produced by the deeper layers of the target. Atoms deeper than 1000 nm did not contribute to the ablation plasma formation. PMID:26931982

  3. Plume Characterization of a One-Millipound Solid Teflon Pulsed Plasma Thruster, Phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudolph, L. K.; Harstad, K. G.; Pless, L. C.; Jones, R. M.

    1979-01-01

    Measurements of the pulsed plasma thruster (PPT) plume upstream mass flux were made in the Molecular Sink (MOLSINK) vacuum facility in order to minimize the plume-tank wall reflected mass flux. Using specially designed collimators on 4 rows of Quartz Crystal Microbalanced (QCMs) mounted on a support extending radially away from the plume axis, measurements were made of the mass flux originating in a thin slice of the PPT primary plume at an arbitrary dip angle with respect to the thruster axis. The measured and analytically corrected mass flux from particles reflected from the MOLSINK walls was substracted from the collimated QCM measurements to improve their accuracy. These data were then analytically summed over dip angle to estimate the total plume backflow upstream of the thruster nozzle. The results indicate that the PPT backflow is of order 10 to the minus 10th power g/square cm/pulse in the region from 38 to 86 cm from the PPT axis in the nozzle exit plane. This flux drops with the square of the radial distance from the PPT axis and is comparable to the backflow of an 8 cm ion thruster, which has performance characteristics similar to those of the PPT.

  4. Evaluation of physical parameters during the plasma-induced ablation of teeth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemz, Markolf H.

    1995-01-01

    The physical parameters of the plasma-induced ablation mechanism were investigated using a picosecond Nd:YLF laser system. The laser consists of a diode-pumped oscillator and a lamp- pumped regenerative amplifier. It operates at a wavelength of 1.053 micrometers with pulse durations of 30 ps and pulse energies up to 1 mJ. The laser beam was expanded to a diameter of 4 mm and focussed to spot sizes of about 30 micrometers . At these high power densities a localized plasma was induced at the focal spot. Surfaces of extracted human teeth were used as target material. In order to study the effect of accompanying shock waves, dye penetration tests, hardness tests and polarized microscopy were performed. At moderate pulse energies no significant impact of shock waves was observed. Because of this result, the terms `plasma- induced ablation' or `plasma-mediated ablation' are more appropriate for ablations solely induced by plasma ionization, and should be distinguished from photodisruptive ablations. In another series of experiments the generated plasma sparks were spectroscopically analyzed. From the measured spectra, mean plasma temperatures of about 5 eV and mean electron densities of about 1018/cm3 were estimated.

  5. Laser ablation of electronic materials including the effects of energy coupling and plasma interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Xianzhong

    2004-12-10

    Many laser ablation applications such as laser drilling and micromachining generate cavity structures. The study of laser ablation inside a cavity is of both fundamental and practical significance. In this dissertation, cavities with different aspect ratios (depth/diameter) were fabricated in fused silica by laser micromachining. Pulsed laser ablation in the cavities was studied and compared with laser ablation on a flat surface. The formation of laser-induced plasmas in the cavities and the effects of the cavities on the ablation processes were investigated. The temperatures and electron number densities of the resulting laser-induced plasmas in the cavities were determined from spectroscopic measurements. Reflection and confinement effects by the cavity walls and plasma shielding were discussed to explain the increased temperature and electron number density with respect to increasing cavity aspect ratio. The temporal variations of the plasma temperature and electron number density inside the cavity decreased more rapidly than outside the cavity. The effect of laser energy on formation of a plasma inside a cavity was also investigated. Propagation of the shock wave generated during pulsed laser ablation in cavities was measured using laser shadowgraph imaging and compared with laser ablation on a flat surface. It is found that outside the cavity, after about 30 ns the radius of the expanding shock wave was proportional to t2/5, which corresponds to a spherical blast wave. The calculated pressures and temperatures of the shocked air outside of the cavities were higher than those obtained on the flat surface. Lasers with femtosecond pulse duration are receiving much attention for direct fabrication of microstructures due to their capabilities of high-precision ablation with minimal damage to the sample. We have also performed experimental studies of pulsed femtosecond laser ablation on the flat surface of silicon samples and compared results with pulsed nanosecond

  6. Electric propulsion plasma plume interaction with “Phobos-Soil” spacecraft structural components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadiradze, Andrey B.; Obukhov, Vladimir A.; Popov, Garri A.

    2009-05-01

    Assessment was made by calculations for the possible consequences of the effect of plasma plume injected by the solar electric propulsion system (SEPS) on the structural components of "Phobos-Soil" spacecraft (SC). Propulsion system comprises three SPT-140 thrusters, two of which should secure the required total thrust impulse during 8000 hours of operation approximately. Variation of the solar panel (SP) properties as a result of their surface contamination with the products of erosion of thruster and SC structural components is the primary negative consequence of plasma plume effect on the SC. Calculation study for the processes of erosion, particle flow distribution, and contaminating coating formation on the SP surface was made for different SEPS arrangements. It is shown that power reduction for the landing module SP sections, which are subjected to the contaminating coating deposition to the most extent, will not exceed 5% of the nominal level.

  7. Spatial distribution characteristics of plasma plume on attenuation of laser radiation under subatmospheric pressure.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yan; Tang, Xinhua; Lu, Fenggui; Chen, Qintao; Cui, Haichao

    2015-02-10

    The attenuation of a laser by plasma plume can be restrained for laser welding under subatmospheric pressure. Based on the experimental obtained spectra, the extinctions of a probe laser under different subatmospheric pressures and the spatial distribution of probe laser extinction were measured. The role of subatmospheric pressure on plasma plume was analyzed. The results show that, with decreasing ambient pressure, the extinction of a probe laser decreases, and the welding penetration depth increases. The maximum attainable value of extinction gets far away from the keyhole in the transversal and vertical directions. The attenuation of a fiber laser is about 10% under normal atmosphere, and it reaches only about 1% when the ambient pressure is reduced to 3 kPa. PMID:25968026

  8. Study of polymer ablation products obtained by ultraviolet laser ablation — inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todolí, J.-L.; Mermet, J.-M.

    1998-10-01

    A study of the nature of aerosols following polymer laser ablation was performed. A glass sample was used for comparison. Aerosol fractions were analyzed by using simple methods based on transport efficiency and filters. Three different tube lengths, i.e. 4, 29 and 54 m, were inserted between the ablation cell and the inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) injector. For the glass sample, 10 elements were studied. Only Na and K exhibited different results as the particle size, i.e. tube length, was varied. The polymers used were poly(vinyl chloride), PVC, and poly(ethylene), PE. Three elements (Ca, Ti and Sn) under different chemical forms were measured. Unlike Ti and Sn the ablated aerosol particle size (mass) seemed to depend on the Ca chemical form. Another PVC sample containing 11 elements was also studied. Na, Al and C exhibited a different behavior with particle size with respect to the remaining elements. Then, the carbon signal was studied after a 0.3 μm pore size filter had been placed between the ablation cell and the ICP torch. The results indicated that carbon was mainly present under gaseous form and particles smaller than 0.3 μm size. The analysis of the aerosol gaseous phase by thermal desorption GC-MS confirmed the presence of polymer volatile thermal degradation products. These results explained why carbon could not be applied as an efficient internal standard.

  9. Enhanced filament ablation of metals based on plasma grating in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Di; Yuan, Shuai; Liu, Fengjiang; Ding, Liangen; Zeng, Heping

    2015-09-01

    We demonstrate efficient ablation of metals with filamentary plasma grating generated by two intense blue femtosecond filaments and a third focused infrared pulse. This scheme leads to significant promotion of ablation efficiency on metal targets in air in comparison with single infrared or blue filament with equal pulse energy. The reason is that the blue plasma grating firstly provides stronger intensity and a higher density of background electrons, then the delayed infrared pulse accelerates local electrons inside the plasma grating. These two processes finally results in robustly increased electron density and highly ionized metallic atoms.

  10. Enhanced filament ablation of metals based on plasma grating in air

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Di; Liu, Fengjiang; Ding, Liangen; Yuan, Shuai; Zeng, Heping

    2015-09-15

    We demonstrate efficient ablation of metals with filamentary plasma grating generated by two intense blue femtosecond filaments and a third focused infrared pulse. This scheme leads to significant promotion of ablation efficiency on metal targets in air in comparison with single infrared or blue filament with equal pulse energy. The reason is that the blue plasma grating firstly provides stronger intensity and a higher density of background electrons, then the delayed infrared pulse accelerates local electrons inside the plasma grating. These two processes finally results in robustly increased electron density and highly ionized metallic atoms.

  11. A uniform laminar air plasma plume with large volume excited by an alternating current voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuechen; Bao, Wenting; Chu, Jingdi; Zhang, Panpan; Jia, Pengying

    2015-12-01

    Using a plasma jet composed of two needle electrodes, a laminar plasma plume with large volume is generated in air through an alternating current voltage excitation. Based on high-speed photography, a train of filaments is observed to propagate periodically away from their birth place along the gas flow. The laminar plume is in fact a temporal superposition of the arched filament train. The filament consists of a negative glow near the real time cathode, a positive column near the real time anode, and a Faraday dark space between them. It has been found that the propagation velocity of the filament increases with increasing the gas flow rate. Furthermore, the filament lifetime tends to follow a normal distribution (Gaussian distribution). The most probable lifetime decreases with increasing the gas flow rate or decreasing the averaged peak voltage. Results also indicate that the real time peak current decreases and the real time peak voltage increases with the propagation of the filament along the gas flow. The voltage-current curve indicates that, in every discharge cycle, the filament evolves from a Townsend discharge to a glow one and then the discharge quenches. Characteristic regions including a negative glow, a Faraday dark space, and a positive column can be discerned from the discharge filament. Furthermore, the plasma parameters such as the electron density, the vibrational temperature and the gas temperature are investigated based on the optical spectrum emitted from the laminar plume.

  12. DETERMINATION OF PROMINENCE PLASMA {beta} FROM THE DYNAMICS OF RISING PLUMES

    SciTech Connect

    Hillier, Andrew; Hillier, Richard; Tripathi, Durgesh

    2012-12-20

    Observations by the Hinode satellite show in great detail the dynamics of rising plumes, dark in chromospheric lines, in quiescent prominences that propagate from large ({approx}10 Mm) bubbles that form at the base of the prominences. These plumes present a very interesting opportunity to study magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) phenomena in quiescent prominences, but obstacles still remain. One of the biggest issues is that of the magnetic field strength, which is not easily measurable in prominences. In this paper we present a method that may be used to determine a prominence's plasma {beta} when rising plumes are observed. Using the classic fluid dynamic solution for flow around a circular cylinder with an MHD correction, the compression of the prominence material can be estimated. This has been successfully confirmed through simulations; application to a prominence gave an estimate of the plasma {beta} as {beta} = 0.47 {+-} 0.079 to 1.13 {+-} 0.080 for the range {gamma} = 1.4-1.7. Using this method it may be possible to estimate the plasma {beta} of observed prominences, therefore helping our understanding of a prominence's dynamics in terms of MHD phenomena.

  13. Model of the Plasma Potential Distribution in the Plume of a Hollow Cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Ira; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Goebel, Dan M.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we present results from a new model of the plasma potentials in the plume just downstream of the hollow cathode keeper. We examine the electron drift velocity as the hollow cathode plasma and neutral gas expand downstream of the keeper. If the drift velocity exceeds the thermal velocity a double layer potential structure develops that is the source of hot electrons. Ions are accelerated upstream through the double layer. The locations of the double layers are calculated using a simple model. It is shown that as the cathode gas flow increases, the location of the double layer moves farther downstream.

  14. The impact of Enceladus' dust plume on the magnetic field and plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriegel, H.

    2012-12-01

    The interaction of Enceladus' plume with Saturn's magnetic field and plasma provides a unique natural laboratory for dust-plasma interactions. In this presentation, we will give an overview on recent modeling and measurements of dust-plasma interactions within the plume. By means of the hybrid simulation code A.I.K.E.F. (adaptive ion kinetic electron fluid), we study the effect of charged dust on the plasma and magnetic field structures. A sophisticated three-dimensional distribution of the dust and the neutral particles is obtained by Monte-Carlo simulations which are adjusted to CDA and INMS data, respectively. These profiles are then used as input for the plasma simulations. The implications of our results for the interpretation of Cassini MAG, CAPS and RPWS measurements for the various Enceladus flybys are discussed. While our preceding results [Kriegel et al. 2011] suggest electron absorption by dust grains to determine the orientation of the magnetic field within the Alfven wing, we also propose that the charged nanograins detected by CAPS [Hill et al., 2012] may play a crucial role for the apparent lack of a magnetic field decrease at Enceladus.

  15. Evaluation of the analytical capability of NIR femtosecond laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Takafumi; Kon, Yoshiaki

    2008-03-01

    A laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometric (LA-ICPMS) technique utilizing a titanium-sapphire (TiS) femtosecond laser (fs-laser) has been developed for elemental and isotopic analysis. The signal intensity profile, depth of the ablation pit and level of elemental fractionation were investigated in order to evaluate the analytical capability of the present fs-laser ablation-ICPMS technique. The signal intensity profile of (57)Fe, obtained from iron sulfide (FeS(2)), demonstrated that the resulting signal intensity of (57)Fe achieved by the fs-laser ablation was almost 4-times higher than that obtained by ArF excimer laser ablation under a similar energy fluence (5 J/cm(2)). In fs-laser ablation, there is no significant difference in a depth of the ablation pit between glass and zircon material, while in ArF laser ablation, the resulting crater depth on the zircon crystal was almost half the level than that obtained for glass material. Both the thermal-induced and particle size-related elemental fractionations, which have been thought to be main sources of analytical error in the LA-ICPMS analysis, were measured on a Harvard 91500 zircon crystal. The resulting fractionation indexes on the (206)Pb/(238)U (f(Pb/U)) and (238)U/(232)Th (f(U/Th)) ratios obtained by the present fs-laser ablation system were significantly smaller than those obtained by a conventional ArF excimer laser ablation system, demonstrative of smaller elemental fractionation. Using the present fs-laser ablation technique, the time profile of the signal intensity of (56)Fe and the isotopic ratios ((57)Fe/(54)Fe and (56)Fe/(54)Fe) have been measured on a natural pyrite (FeS(2)) sample. Repeatability in signal intensity of (56)Fe achieved by the fs-laser ablation system was significantly better than that obtained by ArF excimer laser ablation. Moreover, the resulting precision in (57)Fe/(54)Fe and (56)Fe/(54)Fe ratio measurements could be improved by the fs-laser ablation system

  16. Study of the spatial coherence of high order harmonic radiation generated from pre-formed plasma plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, M.; Singhal, H.; Chakera, J. A.; Naik, P. A.; Khan, R. A.; Gupta, P. D.

    2013-07-21

    A study of the spatial coherence of the high order harmonic radiation generated by the interaction of 45 fs Ti:sapphire laser beam with carbon (graphite) plasma plume has been carried out using Young's double slit interferometry. It is observed that the spatial coherence varies with harmonic order, laser focal spot size in plasma plume, and peaks at an optimal spot size. It is also observed that the spatial coherence is higher when the laser pulse is focused before the plasma plume than when focused after the plume, and it decreases with increase in the harmonic order. The optimum laser parameters and the focusing conditions to achieve good spatial coherence with high harmonic conversion have been identified, which is desirable for practical applications of the harmonic radiation.

  17. Laboratory Magnetic Reconnection Experiments with Colliding, Magnetized Laser-Produced Plasma Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, W. R., II; Bhattacharjee, A.; Deng, W.; Moissard, C.; Germaschewski, K.; Fiksel, G.; Barnak, D.; Chang, P. Y.; Hu, S.; Nilson, P.

    2014-12-01

    We present results from experiments and simulations of magnetic reconnection between colliding plumes of laser-produced plasma. In the experiments, which open up a new experimental regime for reconnection study, bubbles of high-temperature, high-density plasma are created by focusing lasers down to sub-millimeter-scale spots on a plastic or metal foil, ionizing the foil into hemispherical bubbles that expand supersonically off the surface of the foil. If multiple bubbles are created at small separation, the bubbles expand into one another, and the embedded magnetic fields (either self-generated or externally imposed) are squeezed together and reconnect. We will review recent experiments, which have observed magnetic field annihilation, outflow jets, particle energization, and the formation of elongated current sheets. We compare the results against experiments with unmagnetized plumes, which observe the Weibel instability as the two plumes collide and interact. Particle-in-cell simulations of the strongly driven reconnection in these experiments show fast reconnection due to two-fluid effects, flux pile-up, and plasmoid formation, and show particle energization by reconnection.

  18. Faraday cup measurements of the plasma plume produced at an x-ray converter

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, M; Houck, T L; Sampayan, S E

    1998-08-17

    The next generation of radiographic machines based on induction accelerators is expected to generate multiple, small diameter x-ray spots of high intensity. Experiments to study the interaction of the electron beam with the x-ray converter are being performed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) using the 6-MeV, 2-kA Experimental Test Accelerator (ETA) electron beam. The physics issues of greatest concern can be separated into two categories. The multiple pulse issue involves the interaction of subsequent beam pulses with the expanding plasma plume generated by earlier pulses striking the x-ray converter. The plume expands at several millimeters per microsecond and defines the minimum transverse spacing of the pulses. The single pulse issue is more subtle and involves the extraction of light ions by the head of the beam pulse. These light ions might propagate at velocities of several millimeters per nanosecond through the body of the incoming pulse resulting in a moving focus prior to the converter. In this paper we describe Faraday cup measurements performed to quantify the plasma plume expansion and velocities of light ions.

  19. The Nature of the Enceladus Plasma Cloud From the Cassini Plume Radio Occultation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kliore, A. J.; Nagy, A. F.; Marouf, E. A.

    2010-12-01

    The Cassini orbiter spacecraft flew behind the Enceladus plume, as observed from the Earth, on 26 January, 2010. At that time, Cassini was about 577,000 km behind Enceladus, and the radio line of sight passed through the plume about 52 km from the South pole. The occultation was observed by two Deep Space Net tracking stations near Canberra, Australia, one(DSS 43) instrumented for S-band (13.04 cm) and X-band (3.56 cm), and the other (DSS 34) with X-band and Ka-band (0.94 cm). Having two different coherent frequencies at two stations enabled us to obtain two independent measurements. The measurements were made well away from solar conjunction (Earth-Cassini-Sun angle of 122 deg.), where the effects of solar wind plasma were small, and the excellent stability of the Cassini USO (Ultra Stable Oscillator) of 10-13 could be fully exploited. The preliminary results reveal the presence of a plasma cloud around Enceladus,extending to a distance of about 7,000 km., and having an columnar electron content of about 0.2 hexem (1016 m-2 ). From this measurement, the radial distribution of electron density can be determined assuming a geometrical configuration, i.e. cylindrical symmetry.Using this assumption, and using the Abel transform to invert the observed frequency residuals, a nearly symmetrical electron density distribution is obtained, havind a density of about 500 cm-3 within about 2,500 km of the plume centerline, and gradually decreasibg to zero at 7,000 km. In the immediate vicinity of the plume the electron density decreases to almost zero. This work was performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology; The University of Michigan;, and San Jose State University under NASA contracts.

  20. Temporal and spatial effects of ablation plume on number density distribution of droplets in an aerosol measured by laser-induced breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yashiro, H.; Kakehata, M.

    2013-05-01

    We proposed and experimentally demonstrated a novel method of evaluating the number density of droplets in an aerosol by laser-induced breakdown. The number density of droplets is evaluated from the volume in which the laser intensity exceeds the breakdown threshold intensity for droplets, and the number of droplets in this volume, which is evaluated by the experimentally observed breakdown probability. This measurement method requires a large number of laser shots for not only precise measurement but also highly temporally and spatially resolved density distribution in aerosol. Laser ablation plumes ejected from liquid droplets generated by breakdown disturb the density around the measurement points. Therefore, the recovery time of the density determines the maximum repetition rate of the probe laser irradiating a fixed point. The expansion range of the ablation plume determines the minimum distance at which the measurement points are unaffected by a neighboring breakdown when multiple laser beams are simultaneously irradiated. These laser irradiation procedures enable the measurement of the number density distribution of droplets in an aerosol at a large number of points within a short measurement time.

  1. Temporal and spatial effects of ablation plume on number density distribution of droplets in an aerosol measured by laser-induced breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Yashiro, H.; Kakehata, M.

    2013-05-07

    We proposed and experimentally demonstrated a novel method of evaluating the number density of droplets in an aerosol by laser-induced breakdown. The number density of droplets is evaluated from the volume in which the laser intensity exceeds the breakdown threshold intensity for droplets, and the number of droplets in this volume, which is evaluated by the experimentally observed breakdown probability. This measurement method requires a large number of laser shots for not only precise measurement but also highly temporally and spatially resolved density distribution in aerosol. Laser ablation plumes ejected from liquid droplets generated by breakdown disturb the density around the measurement points. Therefore, the recovery time of the density determines the maximum repetition rate of the probe laser irradiating a fixed point. The expansion range of the ablation plume determines the minimum distance at which the measurement points are unaffected by a neighboring breakdown when multiple laser beams are simultaneously irradiated. These laser irradiation procedures enable the measurement of the number density distribution of droplets in an aerosol at a large number of points within a short measurement time.

  2. Modelling Europa's interaction with Jupiter's magnetosphere: Influence of plumes in Europa's atmosphere on the plasma environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloecker, A.; Saur, J.; Roth, L.

    2015-12-01

    We study the influence of plumes in Europa's atmosphere on the interaction with Jupiter's magnetosphere and the plasma environment. We apply a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model, which includes plasma production and loss due to electron impact ionization and dissociative recombination, and electromagnetic induction in a subsurface water ocean.The model considers the magnetospheric and ionospheric electrons separately. We show that an atmospherical inhomogeneity, such as a plume, affects the plasma interaction in the way that a pronounced north-south asymmetry in the near and the Alfvénic far field develops. Furthermore, a "small Alfvén winglet" within Europa's Alfvén wing forms. We also investigate if such signatures of atmospherical inhomogeneities are visible in magnetic field measurements of the Galileo magnetometer. In addition to our MHD model we apply an analytical approach based on the model by Saur et al. (2007) for our studies. We compare the model results with the observed magnetic field data from three flybys of Europa that occurred during the Alfvén wing crossing.

  3. A new dynamic fluid-kinetic model for plasma transport within the plasmaspheric plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Tu, J.; Song, P.

    2011-12-01

    A new dynamic fluid-kinetic (DyFk) model is proposed and developed for investigating the plasma transport from the plasmasphere to the dayside magnetopause through the plasmaspheric plume. This model treats a closed flux tube in a local sense, in contrast to the global sense. The flux tube is allowed to move both radially from near the Earth to the magnetopause, which may result in expansion in its volume, and azimuthally around the Earth. Plasma may flow along the flux tube. The numerical simulation model couples a truncated version of the field line interhemispheric plasma (FLIP) model at altitudes below 800 km and a generalized semi-kinetic (GSK) model above it with an overlapped boundary region in each of the hemispheres. A self-consistently treatment of the ionospheric losses and production with possible heat sinks couples to a kinetic treatment of the multiple ion species (O+/ H+/ He+) and electrons in the plasmasphere. This model includes the effects of the convection of the plasmaspheric flux tube, parallel electric field, magnetic mirror force, centrifugal force, changing ionospheric conditions, Coulomb and ion-neutral collisions, and anisotropic temperatures, as well as the wave-particle interaction. The preliminary simulation results of the multi-species ion transport within a plasmaspheric plume will be presented.

  4. Quantitative Analysis of Plasma Ablation Using Inverse Wire Array Z-pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Lebedev, S. V.; Bland, S. N.; Chittenden, J. P.; Hall, G. N.; Ning, C.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Bott, S. C.

    2009-01-21

    An inverse (exploding) wire array configuration, in which the wires form a cylinder around a current carrying electrode on axis, was used to study the ablation phase of the pinch. This configuration allows the parameters of the plasma from individual wires of the array to be measured as the ablated plasma streams propagate in the outward radial direction. The density distribution and the evolution of the natural mode of modulation of the ablation was measured with interferometry and soft x-ray imaging. Measurements of the voltage across the array, which in this configuration is determined by the private magnetic flux around the individual wires, allows information on the localisation of the current to be obtained.

  5. Determination of the force transmitted by an ion thruster plasma plume to an orbital object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpatov, A.; Cichocki, F.; Fokov, A.; Khoroshylov, S.; Merino, M.; Zakrzhevskii, A.

    2016-02-01

    An approach to determine the force transmitted by the plasma plume of an ion thruster to an orbital object immersed in it using its central projection on a selected plane is proposed. A photo camera is used to obtain the image of the object central projection. The algorithms for the calculation of the transmission of momentum by the impacting ion beam are developed including the determination of the object contour and the correction of the error due to a camera offset from the ion beam axis, and the computation of the fraction of the ion beam that impinges on the object surface.

  6. Modification of modulated plasma plumes for the quasi-phase-matching of high-order harmonics in different spectral ranges

    SciTech Connect

    Ganeev, R. A.; Boltaev, G. S.; Sobirov, B.; Reyimbaev, S.; Sherniyozov, H.; Usmanov, T.; Suzuki, M.; Yoneya, S.; Kuroda, H.

    2015-01-15

    We demonstrate the technique allowing the fine tuning of the distance between the laser-produced plasma plumes on the surfaces of different materials, as well as the variation of the sizes of these plumes. The modification of plasma formations is based on the tilting of the multi-slit mask placed between the heating laser beam and target surface, as well as the positioning of this mask in the telescope placed on the path of heating radiation. The modulated plasma plumes with the sizes of single plume ranging between 0.1 and 1 mm were produced on the manganese and silver targets. Modification of the geometrical parameters of plasma plumes proved to be useful for the fine tuning of the quasi-phase-matched high-order harmonics generated in such structures during propagation of the ultrashort laser pulses. We show the enhancement of some groups of harmonics along the plateau range and the tuning of maximally enhanced harmonic by variable modulation of the plasma.

  7. Compensated Langmuir Probe Measurement of the Near-keeper Plasma of a Hollow Cathode Operating in Plume Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taillefer, Zachary; Blandin, John; Szabo, James

    2014-10-01

    It has been reported that oscillations of the plasma potential, over a range of frequencies (<=1 kHz--2 MHz) are related to high energy ion production in the plume of a neutralizer hollow cathode when operating in plume mode. Impact of these high energy ions with the keeper electrode face is the dominant mechanism by which electrode erosion occurs over long periods of operation (~10,000 hours). Reliable measurement of the plasma properties in this operating mode is critical to development of computational models and efforts to mitigate the erosion and maximize lifetime of these cathodes. In this work, both plume and spot mode operating conditions of a low current (<=5 A), dispenser hollow cathode have been quantitatively identified. An emissive probe was used to characterize the plasma potential oscillations in the near-keeper plasma during plume mode operation. Large amplitude fluctuations (exceeding 70 V) of the plasma potential were observed, at a fundamental frequency of 55 kHz, along with 2nd and 3rd harmonics. In order to measure the local electron energy distribution function (EEDF) during plume mode operation, a compensated Langmuir probe was constructed, using RF chokes, to allow accurate measurement of the EEDF and calculation of the electron temperature.

  8. Ablation of carbon-doped liquid propellant in laser plasma propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Z. Y.; Liang, T.; Zhang, S. Q.; Gao, L.; Gao, H.; Zhang, Z. L.

    2016-04-01

    Carbon-doped liquid glycerol ablated by nanosecond pulse laser is investigated in laser plasma propulsion. It is found that the propulsion is much more correlated with the carbon content. The doped carbon can change the laser intensity and laser focal position so as to reduce the splashing quantity of the glycerol. Less consumption of the liquid volume results in a high specific impulse.

  9. Filamentation due to the Weibel Instability in two counterstreaming laser ablated plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Quan-Li; Yuan, Dawei; Gao, Lan; Liu, Xun; Chen, Yangao; Jia, Qing; Hua, Neng; Qiao, Zhanfeng; Chen, Ming; Zhu, Baoqiang; Zhu, Jianqiang; Zhao, Gang; Ji, Hantao; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Zhang, Jie

    2016-05-01

    Weibel-type filamentation instability was observed in the interaction of two counter streaming laser ablated plasma flows, which were supersonic, collisionless, and closely relevant to astrophysical conditions. The plasma flows were created by irradiating a pair of oppositely standing plastic (CH) foils with 1ns-pulsed laser beams of total energy of 1.7 kJ in two laser spots. With characteristics diagnosed in experiments, the calculated features of Weibel-type filaments are in good agreement with measurements.

  10. The role of residual charges in the repeatability of the dynamics of atmospheric pressure room temperature plasma plume

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, S.; Lu, X.

    2014-12-15

    To better understand the role of residual electrons in the repeatability of an atmospheric pressure plasma plume, the characteristics of a helium plasma jet from the 1st, 2nd,… until the repeatable discharge pulse are investigated for the first time. It's found that the longest plasma plume is achieved in the 1st discharge pulse. The length of the plasma plume becomes shorter and shorter and reaches a constant value in the 3rd discharge pulse and keeps the same for the following pulses. The dynamics of the 1st discharge pulse show that the plasma bullet appears random in nature. Two photomultiplier tubes are used to distinguish the two potential factors that could result in the stochastic dynamics of the plasma bullet, i.e., stochastic ignition of the plasma and the stochastic propagation velocity. The results show that the stochastic propagation velocity occurs only in the 1st and the 2nd discharge pulses, while the stochastic ignition of the plasma presents until the 100th pulse. The dynamics of the plasma propagation become repeatable after about 100 pulses. Detail analysis shows that the repeatability of plasma bullet is due to the residual electrons density. The residual electron density of 10{sup 9 }cm{sup −3} or higher is needed for repeatable discharges mode.

  11. The role of residual charges in the repeatability of the dynamics of atmospheric pressure room temperature plasma plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, S.; Lu, X.

    2014-12-01

    To better understand the role of residual electrons in the repeatability of an atmospheric pressure plasma plume, the characteristics of a helium plasma jet from the 1st, 2nd,… until the repeatable discharge pulse are investigated for the first time. It's found that the longest plasma plume is achieved in the 1st discharge pulse. The length of the plasma plume becomes shorter and shorter and reaches a constant value in the 3rd discharge pulse and keeps the same for the following pulses. The dynamics of the 1st discharge pulse show that the plasma bullet appears random in nature. Two photomultiplier tubes are used to distinguish the two potential factors that could result in the stochastic dynamics of the plasma bullet, i.e., stochastic ignition of the plasma and the stochastic propagation velocity. The results show that the stochastic propagation velocity occurs only in the 1st and the 2nd discharge pulses, while the stochastic ignition of the plasma presents until the 100th pulse. The dynamics of the plasma propagation become repeatable after about 100 pulses. Detail analysis shows that the repeatability of plasma bullet is due to the residual electrons density. The residual electron density of 109 cm-3 or higher is needed for repeatable discharges mode.

  12. In situ mechanical spectroscopy of laser deposited films using plasma plume excited reed

    SciTech Connect

    Scharf, Thorsten; Krebs, Hans-Ulrich

    2006-09-15

    We show a new approach to in situ measure the mechanical properties of pulsed laser deposited thin films by plasma plume excited reed with high accuracy. A vibrating reed, consisting of a Si substrate, is mounted into a pulsed laser deposition chamber. After deposition of the polymer film for investigation, the Si substrate is excited by the energy of the expanding laser plasma coming from a Ag target. The oscillations of the reed and their damping are measured using a diode laser reflected at the back side of the substrate, by observing the reflections with a position sensitive detector. Data collection as well as the coordination with the deposition setup are done computer controlled. Temperature dependent measurements of the damping of the reed oscillations then allow us to perform mechanical spectroscopy investigations of laser deposited polymer films.

  13. The plasma environment of Enceladue from the Cassini plume radio occultation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kliore, Arvydas; Marouf, Essam; Nagy, Andrew; Asmar, Sami; Flasar, F. Michael; Anabtawi, A.; Barbinis, E.; Fleischman, D.; Kahan, D.; Klose, J.

    The Cassini orbiter spacecraft flew behind the Enceladus plume, as observed from the Earth, on 26 January, 2010. At that time, Cassini was abut 577000 km behind Enceladus, and the radio line of sight passed through the plume about 52 km from the South pole. The occultation was observed by two Deep Space Net tracking stations near Canberra, Australia, one(DSS 43) instrumented for S-band (13.04 cm) and X-band (3.56 cm), and the other (DSS 34) with X-band and Ka-band (0.94 cm). Having two different coherent frequencies at two stations enabled us to obtain two independent measurements. The measurements were made well away from solar conjunction (Earth-Cassini-Sun angle 122 deg.), where the effects of solar wind plasma were small, and the excellent stability of the Cassini USO (Ultra Stable Oscillator) of 10-13 could be fully exploited. The very preliminary results reveal the presence of a plasma cloud around Enceladus, extending to a distance of about 7000 km., and having an columnar electron content of 0.2 hexem (1016 m-2 . From this measurement, the radial distribution of electron density can be determined assuming a geometrical configuration, i.e. cylindrical symmetry. This work was performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology; San Jose State University;, and The University of Michigan under NASA contracts.

  14. Systematic studies of two-color pump-induced high-order harmonic generation in plasma plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Ganeev, R. A.; Singhal, H.; Naik, P. A.; Chakera, J. A.; Vora, H. S.; Khan, R. A.; Gupta, P. D.

    2010-11-15

    High-order harmonic generation (HHG) has been studied in various laser-produced plasma plumes using a two-color orthogonally polarized beam with a 12:1 energy ratio between the fundamental and second-harmonic (SH) components. The influence of the relative phase between the fundamental and SH waves on the HHG efficiency has been investigated. Odd and even harmonic generation in plasma plumes containing nanoparticles, fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, and other samples was optimized. The effect of the variation in the SH intensity on the HHG conversion efficiency in carbon aerogel and silver plasma plumes has also been studied. It is shown that by increasing the SH intensity, one can generate only even harmonics by suppressing the odd harmonics.

  15. High-order harmonic generation in a plasma plume of in situ laser-produced silver nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Singhal, H.; Naik, P. A.; Chakera, J. A.; Chakravarty, U.; Vora, H. S.; Srivastava, A. K.; Mukherjee, C.; Navathe, C. P.; Deb, S. K.; Gupta, P. D.; Ganeev, R. A.

    2010-10-15

    The results of the experimental study of high-order harmonic generation (HHG) from the interaction of 45-fs Ti:sapphire laser pulses with plasma plumes of Ag nanoparticles produced in situ are presented in this article. The nanoparticles were generated by the interaction of 300-ps, 20-mJ laser pulses with bulk silver targets at an intensity of {approx}1x10{sup 13} W/cm{sup 2}. The spectral characteristics of the HHG from nanoparticles produced in situ are compared with the HHG from monoparticle plasma plumes and with the HHG from preformed nanoparticle-containing plasma plumes. The cutoff harmonic order generated using the in situ silver nanoparticles is at the 21st harmonic order.

  16. The role of the gas/plasma plume and self-focusing in a gas-filled capillary discharge waveguide for high-power laser-plasma applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ciocarlan, C.; Wiggins, S. M.; Islam, M. R.; Ersfeld, B.; Abuazoum, S.; Wilson, R.; Aniculaesei, C.; Welsh, G. H.; Vieux, G.; Jaroszynski, D. A.

    2013-09-15

    The role of the gas/plasma plume at the entrance of a gas-filled capillary discharge plasma waveguide in increasing the laser intensity has been investigated. Distinction is made between neutral gas and hot plasma plumes that, respectively, develop before and after discharge breakdown. Time-averaged measurements show that the on-axis plasma density of a fully expanded plasma plume over this region is similar to that inside the waveguide. Above the critical power, relativistic and ponderomotive self-focusing lead to an increase in the intensity, which can be nearly a factor of 2 compared with the case without a plume. When used as a laser plasma wakefield accelerator, the enhancement of intensity can lead to prompt electron injection very close to the entrance of the waveguide. Self-focusing occurs within two Rayleigh lengths of the waveguide entrance plane in the region, where the laser beam is converging. Analytical theory and numerical simulations show that, for a density of 3.0 × 10{sup 18} cm{sup −3}, the peak normalized laser vector potential, a{sub 0}, increases from 1.0 to 1.85 close to the entrance plane of the capillary compared with a{sub 0} = 1.41 when the plume is neglected.

  17. Dynamics of pulsed laser ablation plasmas in high-density CO2 near the critical point investigated by time-resolved shadowgraph imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urabe, Keiichiro; Kato, Toru; Himeno, Shohei; Kato, Satoshi; Stauss, Sven; Baba, Motoyoshi; Suemoto, Tohru; Terashima, Kazuo

    2013-09-01

    Pulsed laser ablation (PLA) plasmas generated in high-density gases and liquids are promising for the synthesis of nanomaterials. However, the characteristics of such plasmas are still not well understood. In order to improve the understandings of PLA plasmas in high-density fluids including gases, liquids, and supercritical fluids (SCFs), we have investigated the dynamics of PLA plasmas in high-density carbon dioxide (CO2) . We report on experimental results of time-resolved shadowgraph imaging, from the generation of plasma plume to the extinction of cavitation bubbles. Shadowgraph images revealed that the PLA plasma dynamics showed two distinct behaviors. These are divided by gas-liquid coexistence curve and the so-called Widom line, which separates gas-like and liquid-like SCF domains. Furthermore, cavitation bubble observed in liquid CO2 near the critical point showed peculiar characteristics, the formation of an inner bubble and an outer shell structure, which so far has never been reported. The experiments indicate that thermophysical properties of PLA plasmas can be tuned by controlling solvent temperature and pressure around the critical point, which may be useful for materials processing. This work was supported financially in part by a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research on Innovative Areas (No. 21110002) from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology of Japan.

  18. High-Speed, Integrated Ablation Cell and Dual Concentric Injector Plasma Torch for Laser Ablation-Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Douglas, David N; Managh, Amy J; Reid, Helen J; Sharp, Barry L

    2015-11-17

    In recent years, laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS) has gained increasing importance for biological analysis, where ultratrace imaging at micrometer resolution is required. However, while undoubtedly a valuable research tool, the washout times and sensitivity of current technology have restricted its routine and clinical application. Long periods between sampling points are required to maintain adequate spatial resolution. Additionally, temporal signal dispersion reduces the signal-to-noise ratio, which is a particular concern when analyzing discrete samples, such as individual particles or cells. This paper describes a novel, two-volume laser ablation cell and integrated ICP torch designed to minimize aerosol dispersion for fast, efficient sample transport. The holistic design utilizes a short, continuous diameter fused silica conduit, which extends from the point of ablation, through the ICP torch, and into the base of the plasma. This arrangement removes the requirement for a dispersive component for argon addition, and helps to keep the sample on axis with the ICP cone orifice. Hence, deposition of sample on the cones is theoretically reduced with a resulting improvement in the absolute sensitivity (counts per unit mole). The system described here achieved washouts of 1.5, 3.2, and 4.9 ms for NIST 612 glass, at full width half, 10%, and 1% maximum, respectively, with an 8-14-fold improvement in absolute sensitivity, compared to a single volume ablation cell. To illustrate the benefits of this performance, the system was applied to a contemporary bioanalytical challenge, specifically the analysis of individual biological cells, demonstrating similar improvements in performance. PMID:26460246

  19. Time-resolved studies of particle effects in laser ablation inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Perdian, D.; Bajic, S.; Baldwin, D.; Houk, R.

    2007-11-13

    Time resolved signals in laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) are studied to determine the influence of experimental parameters on ICP-induced fractionation effects. Differences in sample composition and morphology, i.e., ablating brass, glass, or dust pellets, have a profound effect on the time resolved signal. Helium transport gas significantly decreases large positive signal spikes arising from large particles in the ICP. A binder for pellets also reduces the abundance and amplitude of spikes in the signal. MO{sup +} ions also yield signal spikes, but these MO{sup +} spikes generally occur at different times from their atomic ion counterparts.

  20. Infrared nanosecond laser-metal ablation in atmosphere: Initial plasma during laser pulse and further expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jian; Wei, Wenfu; Li, Xingwen; Jia, Shenli; Qiu, Aici

    2013-04-22

    We have investigated the dynamics of the nanosecond laser ablated plasma within and after the laser pulse irradiation using fast photography. A 1064 nm, 15 ns laser beam was focused onto a target made from various materials with an energy density in the order of J/mm{sup 2} in atmosphere. The plasma dynamics during the nanosecond laser pulse were observed, which could be divided into three stages: fast expansion, division into the primary plasma and the front plasma, and stagnation. After the laser terminated, a critical moment when the primary plasma expansion transited from the shock model to the drag model was resolved, and this phenomenon could be understood in terms of interactions between the primary and the front plasmas.

  1. Representative sampling using single-pulse laser ablation withinductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Haichen; Mao, Xianglei; Russo, Richard E.

    2001-04-02

    Single pulse laser ablation sampling with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was assessed for accurate chemical analysis. Elemental fractionation (e.g. Pb/U), the quantity of ablated mass (crater volume), ICP-MS intensity and the particle contribution (spike signal) during single pulse ablation of NIST 610 glass were investigated. Pb/U fractionation significantly changed between the first and second laser pulse and showed strong irradiance dependence. The Pb/U ratio obtained by the first pulse was usually higher than that of the second pulse, with the average value close to the representative level. Segregation during laser ablation is proposed to explain the composition change between the first and second pulse. Crater volume measurements showed that the second pulse produced significantly more ablated mass. A roll-off of the crater depth occurred at {approx}750 GW/cm{sup 2}. The absolute ICP-MS intensity from the second pulse showed no correlation with crater depth. Particle induced spikes on the transit signal showed irradiance and elemental species dependence.

  2. On the structure of quasi-stationary laser ablation fronts in strongly radiating plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Basko, M. M. Novikov, V. G.; Grushin, A. S.

    2015-05-15

    The effect of strong thermal radiation on the structure of quasi-stationary laser ablation fronts is investigated under the assumption that all the laser flux is absorbed at the critical surface. Special attention is paid to adequate formulation of the boundary-value problem for a steady-state planar ablation flow. The dependence of the laser-to-x-ray conversion efficiency ϕ{sub r} on the laser intensity I{sub L} and wavelength λ{sub L} is analyzed within the non-equilibrium diffusion approximation for radiation transfer. The scaling of the main ablation parameters with I{sub L} and λ{sub L} in the strongly radiative regime 1−ϕ{sub r}≪1 is derived. It is demonstrated that strongly radiating ablation fronts develop a characteristic extended cushion of “radiation-soaked” plasma between the condensed ablated material and the critical surface, which can efficiently suppress perturbations from the instabilities at the critical surface.

  3. Density profile of a line plasma generated by laser ablation for laser wakefield acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; Hwangbo, Y.; Ryu, W.-J.; Kim, K. N.; Park, S. H.

    2016-03-01

    An elongated line plasma generated by a laser ablation of an aluminum target was investigated, which can be used in the laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) by employing ultra-intense laser pulse through the longitudinal direction of the plasma. To generate a uniform and long plasma channel along the propagation of ultra-intense laser pulse (main pulse), a cylindrical lens combined with a biprism was used to shape the intensity of a ns Nd:YAG laser (pre-pulse) on the Al target. A uniformity of laser intensity can be manipulated by changing the distance between the biprism and the target. The density profile of the plasma generated by laser ablation was measured using two interferometers, indicating that a 3-mm long uniform line plasma with a density of 6 × 1017 cm-3 could be generated. The density with main pulse was also measured and the results indicated that the density would increase further due to additional ionization of the plasma by the main ultra-intense laser pulse. The resulting plasma density, which is a crucial parameter for the LWFA, can be controlled by the intensity of the pre-pulse, the time delay between the pre- and main pulse, and the distance of the main pulse from the target surface.

  4. Molecular signatures in femtosecond laser-induced organic plasmas: comparison with nanosecond laser ablation.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Jorge; Moros, Javier; Laserna, J Javier

    2016-01-28

    During the last few years, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has evolved significantly in the molecular sensing area through the optical monitoring of emissions from organic plasmas. Large efforts have been made to study the formation pathways of diatomic radicals as well as their connections with the bonding framework of molecular solids. Together with the structural and chemical-physical properties of molecules, laser ablation parameters seem to be closely tied to the observed spectral signatures. This research focuses on evaluating the impact of laser pulse duration on the production of diatomic species that populate plasmas of organic materials. Differences in relative intensities of spectral signatures from the plasmas of several organic molecules induced in femtosecond (fs) and nanosecond (ns) ablation regimes have been studied. Beyond the abundance and origin of diatomic radicals that seed the plasma, findings reveal the crucial role of the ablation regime in the breakage pattern of the molecule. The laser pulse duration dictates the fragments and atoms resulting from the vaporized molecules, promoting some formation routes at the expense of other paths. The larger amount of fragments formed by fs pulses advocates a direct release of native bonds and a subsequent seeding of the plasma with diatomic species. In contrast, in the ns ablation regime, the atomic recombinations and single displacement processes dominate the contribution to diatomic radicals, as long as atomization of molecules prevails over their progressive decomposition. Consequently, fs-LIBS better reflects correlations between strengths of emissions from diatomic species and molecular structure as compared to ns-LIBS. These new results entail a further step towards the specificity in the analysis of molecular solids by fs-LIBS. PMID:26695078

  5. The effects of plasma physics target shrapnel and debris plumes arising from early operations of the Orion laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrew, J.; Egan, D.; Miller, S.; Pearce, A.; Penman, R.; Scott, D.

    2014-10-01

    When lasers are used to produce high temperature, high density plasmas from solid targets it is inevitable that the targets are turned into a variety of products [gas, liquid, solid, sub-atomic particles and electromagnetic radiation] that are distributed around the surfaces of the vacuum chamber used to field such experiments. These by products are produced in plumes of debris and shrapnel that depend on the irradiation conditions, target materials and target geometry. We have monitored the distribution of such plumes by witness plates and used microscopy, photography and spectrophotometry to determine the physical state of material in the plumes and the spatial distribution from various target geometries. The impact of this material on the operations of laser optics and plasma physics diagnostics is discussed.

  6. Dynamics of a laser-produced silver plume in an oxygen background gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schou, Jorgen; Toftmann, Bo; Amoruso, Salvatore

    2004-09-01

    The expansion of a plasma plume in a background gas is a key problem for film deposition and laser ablation studies. Combined diagnostic measurements of deposition rates and ion time-of-flight (TOF) signals have been used to study the dynamics of a laser ablation plume in an oxygen gas. This study is similar to our previous work on an argon background gas and shows essentially the same trend. At an enhanced gas pressure, the angular distribution of collected ablated atoms becomes comparatively broad, while the total collected yield decreases strongly. The total collected yield exhibits three separate regimes with increasing pressure, a vacuum-like regime, a transition regime with increasing plume broadening and splitting of the ion signal, and at the highest pressures a diffusion-like regime with a broad angular distribution. In the high pressure regime, the expansion can be described by a simple model based on diffusion from a confined plume.

  7. Pulsed Plasma Thruster Plume Study: Symmetry and Impact on Spacecraft Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arrington, Lynn A.; Marrese, Colleen M.; Blandino, John J.

    2000-01-01

    Twenty-four witness plates were positioned on perpendicular arrays near a breadboard Pulsed Plasma Thruster (PPT) to collect plume constituents for analysis. Over one million shots were fired during the experiment at 43 J using fluorocarbon polymer propellant. The asymmetry of the film deposition on the witness plates was investigated with mass and thickness measurements and correlated with off-axis thrust vector measurements. The composition of the films was determined. The transmittance and reflectance of the films were measured and the absorption coefficients were calculated in the wavelength range from 350 to 1200 mn. These data were applied to calculate the loss in signal intensity through the films, which will impact the visibility of spaceborne interferometer systems positioned by these thrusters.

  8. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry measurement of isotope ratios in depleted uranium contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Seltzer, Michael D

    2003-09-01

    Laser ablation of pressed soil pellets was examined as a means of direct sample introduction to enable inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) screening of soils for residual depleted uranium (DU) contamination. Differentiation between depleted uranium, an anthropogenic contaminant, and naturally occurring uranium was accomplished on the basis of measured 235U/238U isotope ratios. The amount of sample preparation required for laser ablation is considerably less than that typically required for aqueous sample introduction. The amount of hazardous laboratory waste generated is diminished accordingly. During the present investigation, 235U/238U isotope ratios measured for field samples were in good agreement with those derived from gamma spectrometry measurements. However, substantial compensation was required to mitigate the effects of impaired pulse counting attributed to sample inhomogeneity and sporadic introduction of uranium analyte into the plasma. PMID:14611049

  9. Experimental scaling law for mass ablation rate from a Sn plasma generated by a 1064 nm laser

    SciTech Connect

    Burdt, Russell A.; Yuspeh, Sam; Najmabadi, Farrokh; Sequoia, Kevin L.; Tao Yezheng; Tillack, Mark S.

    2009-08-01

    The ablation depth in planar Sn targets irradiated with a pulsed 1064 nm laser was investigated over laser intensities from 3x10{sup 11} to 2x10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2}. The ablation depth was measured by irradiating a thin layer of Sn evaporated onto a Si wafer, and looking for signatures of Si ions in the expanding plasma with spectroscopic and particle diagnostics. It was found that ablation depth scales with laser intensity to the (5/9)th power, which is consistent with analytical models of steady-state laser ablation, as well as empirical formulae from previous studies of mass ablation rate in overlapping parameter space. In addition, the scaling of mass ablation rate with atomic number of the target as given by empirical formulae in previous studies using targets such as C and Al, are shown to remain valid for the higher atomic number of the target (Z=50) used in these experiments.

  10. Charge Exchange and Ablation Rates of a Titanium Wire Plasma Corona

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, Robert E.

    2009-01-21

    Wire ablation rates are important features in any examination of precursors or transparent mode implosions of wire arrays. When ion temperatures in a Ti wire plasma corona exceed a few eV, the process of resonant charge exchange competes with elastic scattering. Ions pushed into the corona from an anode bias wire array can be expected to drive a fast neutral wind into the surrounding volume, while a cathode bias wire array would not show the strong neutral wind.

  11. Endometrial ablation

    MedlinePlus

    Hysteroscopy-endometrial ablation; Laser thermal ablation; Endometrial ablation-radiofrequency; Endometrial ablation-thermal balloon ablation; Rollerball ablation; Hydrothermal ablation; Novasure ablation

  12. Investigation and spectral analysis of the plasma-induced ablation mechanism of dental hydroxyapatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemz, M. H.

    1994-04-01

    Experiments on the ablation of dental substance performed with picosecond laser pulses are reported for the first time. A mode locked Nd:YLF oscillator laser was used to generate 25 ps pulses at a wavelength of 1.053 µm. These were seeded and amplified to pulse energies up to 1 mJ in a regenerative amplifier laser at repetition rates up to 1 kHz. Very precise cavities were ablated in the enamel of extracted human teeth by mounting the probes onto a computer controlled 3D translation stage. Scanning electron microscopy and dye penetration tests were performed there-after. In contrast to longer pulse durations, picosecond pulses ablate with no signs of thermal damage, if the laser pulses are spatially distributed over the target. Definitions of the physical mechanisms “plasma-induced ablation” and “photodisruption” are given. Furthermore, the generated plasma spark has been spectroscopically analyzed. Excitations of calcium and sodium have been observed. From the spectra, the plasma temperature and free electron density could be estimated. By converting part of the laser energy into the second harmonic using a LiNbO3 crystal, a reference amplitude was achieved for the spectra. With this reference signal, a clear distinction could be made between spectra obtained from healthy and caries infected teeth, thus enabling a better control of caries removal in the near future.

  13. Critical Fluences And Modeling Of CO{sub 2} Laser Ablation Of Polyoxymethylene From Vaporization To The Plasma Regime

    SciTech Connect

    Sinko, John E.; Phipps, Claude R.; Tsukiyama, Yosuke; Ogita, Naoya; Sasoh, Akihiro; Umehara, Noritsugu; Gregory, Don A.

    2010-05-06

    A CO{sub 2} laser was operated at pulse energies up to 10 J to ablate polyoxymethylene targets in air and vacuum conditions. Critical effects predicted by ablation models are discussed in relation to the experimental data, including specifically the threshold fluences for vaporization and critical plasma formation, and the fluence at which the optimal momentum coupling coefficient is found. Finally, we discuss a new approach for modeling polymers at long wavelengths, including a connection formula that links the vaporization and plasma regimes for laser ablation propulsion.

  14. Time resolved interferometric study of the plasma plume induced shock wave in confined geometry: Two-dimensional mapping of the ambient and plasma density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Kaushik; Singh, R. K.; Narayan, Surya; Srivastava, Atul; Kumar, Ajai

    2016-04-01

    An experimental investigation of the laser produced plasma induced shock wave in the presence of confining walls placed along the axial as well as the lateral direction has been performed. A time resolved Mach Zehnder interferometer is set up to track the primary as well as the reflected shock waves and its effect on the evolving plasma plume has been studied. An attempt has been made to discriminate the electronic and medium density contributions towards the changes in the refractive index of the medium. Two dimensional spatial distributions for both ambient medium density and plasma density (electron density) have been obtained by employing customised inversion technique and algorithm on the recorded interferograms. The observed density pattern of the surrounding medium in the presence of confining walls is correlated with the reflected shock wave propagation in the medium. Further, the shock wave plasma interaction and the subsequent changes in the shape and density of the plasma plume in confined geometry are briefly described.

  15. Experimental and Computational Studies of High Energy Density Plasma Streams Ablated from Fine Wires

    SciTech Connect

    Greenly, John B.; Seyler, Charles

    2014-03-30

    Experimental and computational studies of high energy density plasma streams ablated from fine wires. Laboratory of Plasma Studies, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Cornell University. Principal Investigators: Dr. John B. Greenly and Dr. Charles E. Seyler. This report summarizes progress during the final year of this project to study the physics of high energy density (HED) plasma streams of 10^17-10^20/cm3 density and high velocity (~100-500 km/s). Such streams are produced from 5-250 micrometer diameter wires heated and ionized by a 1 MA, 250 ns current pulse on the COBRA pulsed power facility at Cornell University. Plasma is ablated from the wires and is driven away to high velocity by unbalanced JxB force. A wire, or an array of wires, can persist as an essentially stationary, continuous source of this streaming plasma for >200 ns, even with driving magnetic fields of many Tesla and peak current densities in the plasma of many MA/cm2. At the heart of the ablation stream generation is the continuous transport of mass from the relatively cold, near-solid-density wire "core" into current-carrying plasma within 1 mm of the wire, followed by the magnetic acceleration of that plasma and its trapped flux to form a directed stream. In the first two years of this program, an advancing understanding of ablation physics led to the discovery of several novel wire ablation experimental regimes. In the final year, one of these new HED plasma regimes has been studied in quantitative detail. This regime studies highly reproducible magnetic reconnection in strongly radiating plasma with supersonic and superalfvenic flow, and shock structures in the outflow. The key discovery is that very heavy wires, e.g. 250 micrometer diameter Al or 150 micrometer Cu, behave in a qualitatively different way than the lighter wires typically used in wire-array Z-pinches. Such wires can be configured to produce a static magnetic X-point null geometry that stores magnetic and

  16. Population inversions in ablation plasmas generated by intense electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilgenbach, R. M.; Kammash, T.; Brake, M. L.

    1988-11-01

    Experiments during the past three years have concerned the generation and spectroscopic study of electron beam-driven carbon plasmas in order to explore the production of optical and ultraviolet radiation from nonequilibrium populations. The output of MELBA (Michigan Electron Long Beam Accelerator), has been connected to an electron beam diode consisting of an aluminum (or brass) cathode stalk and a carbon anode. Magnetic field coils have been designed, procured, and utilized to focus the electron beam. A side viewing port permitted spectroscopic diagnostics to view across the surface of the anode. Spectroscopic diagnosis has been performed using a 1 m spectrograph capable of operation from the vacuum ultraviolet through the visible. This spectrograph is coupled to a 1024 channel optical multichannel analyzer. Spectra taken during the initial 400 ns period of the e-beam pulse showed a low effective charge plasma with primarily molecular components (C2, CH) as well as atomic hydrogen and singly ionized carbon (CII). When the generator pulse was crowbarred after the first 400 ns, the spectra revealed a continuation of the low charge state plasma.

  17. Note: Low density and long plasma channels generated by laser transversely ignited ablative capillary discharges.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mingwei; Deng, Aihua; Liu, Jiansheng; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Jiancai; Xia, Changquan; Wang, Cheng; Shen, Baifei; Xu, Zhizhan; Nakajima, K

    2010-03-01

    A technique is developed to reduce the jitter associated with ablative capillary discharges. A laser pulse propagating perpendicularly to the axis of the capillary and focused onto a copper wire creates a plasma that initiates the discharge. This transverse laser ignition method has several advantages over previous techniques employing a laser pulse collinear with the capillary, including increased capillary lifetime and simpler arrangement of the igniting and the driving pulses for laser-wakefield acceleration. Using this technique long, low density plasma channels are produced with low jitter. PMID:20370230

  18. Investigation of effect of solenoid magnet on emittances of ion beam from laser ablation plasma.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Shunsuke; Romanelli, Mark; Cinquegrani, David; Sekine, Megumi; Kumaki, Masafumi; Fuwa, Yasuhiro; Kanesue, Takeshi; Okamura, Masahiro; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2014-02-01

    A magnetic field can increase an ion current of a laser ablation plasma and is expected to control the change of the plasma ion current. However, the magnetic field can also make some fluctuations of the plasma and the effect on the beam emittance and the emission surface is not clear. To investigate the effect of a magnetic field, we extracted the ion beams under three conditions where without magnetic field, with magnetic field, and without magnetic field with higher laser energy to measure the beam distribution in phase space. Then we compared the relations between the plasma ion current density into the extraction gap and the Twiss parameters with each condition. We observed the effect of the magnetic field on the emission surface. PMID:24593624

  19. Investigation of effect of solenoid magnet on emittances of ion beam from laser ablation plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Shunsuke; Romanelli, Mark; Cinquegrani, David; Sekine, Megumi; Kumaki, Masafumi; Fuwa, Yasuhiro; Kanesue, Takeshi; Okamura, Masahiro; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2014-02-01

    A magnetic field can increase an ion current of a laser ablation plasma and is expected to control the change of the plasma ion current. However, the magnetic field can also make some fluctuations of the plasma and the effect on the beam emittance and the emission surface is not clear. To investigate the effect of a magnetic field, we extracted the ion beams under three conditions where without magnetic field, with magnetic field, and without magnetic field with higher laser energy to measure the beam distribution in phase space. Then we compared the relations between the plasma ion current density into the extraction gap and the Twiss parameters with each condition. We observed the effect of the magnetic field on the emission surface.

  20. A feasibility study and mission analysis for the Hybrid Plume Plasma Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Daniel J.; Micci, Michael M.

    1990-01-01

    The Hybrid Plume Plasma Rocket (HPPR) is a high power electric propulsion concept which is being developed at the MIT Plasma Fusion Center. This paper presents a theoretical overview of the concept as well as the results and conclusions of an independent study which has been conducted to identify and categorize those technologies which require significant development before the HPPR can be considered a viable electric propulsion device. It has been determined that the technologies which require the most development are high power radio-frequency and microwave generation for space applications and the associated power processing units, low mass superconducting magnets, a reliable, long duration, multi-megawatt space nuclear power source, and long term storage of liquid hydrogen propellant. In addition to this, a mission analysis of a one-way transfer from low earth orbit (LEO) to Mars indicates that a constant acceleration thrust profile, which can be obtained using the HPPR, results in faster trip times and greater payload capacities than those afforded by more conventional constant thrust profiles.

  1. Dynamics of femtosecond laser produced tungsten nanoparticle plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A.; Farid, N.; Kozhevin, V. M.

    2013-11-28

    We investigated the expansion features of femtosecond laser generated tungsten nanoparticle plumes in vacuum. Fast gated images showed distinct two components expansion features, viz., plasma and nanoparticle plumes, separated by time of appearance. The persistence of plasma and nanoparticle plumes are ∼500 ns and ∼100 μs, respectively, and propagating with velocities differed by 25 times. The estimated temperature of the nanoparticles showed a decreasing trend with increasing time and space. Compared to low-Z materials (e.g., Si), ultrafast laser ablation of high-Z materials like W provides significantly higher nanoparticle yield. A comparison between the nanoparticle plumes generated by W and Si is also discussed along with other metals.

  2. Observation of High Density Plasma in the Vicinity of Europa and its Potential Relationship with Plume Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paterson, W. R.; Sittler, E. C., Jr.; Cooper, J. F.; Hartle, R. E.; Lipatov, A. S.

    2014-12-01

    During the course of the Galileo Mission at Jupiter, the spacecraft obtained high-resolution observations of plasmas during 8 near encounters with Europa. Most typically, these encounters provided evidence of modest production of plasma within Europa's exosphere, with ion densities comparable to that of the plasma sheet. However, plasma densities significantly greater than those of the surrounding plasma sheet were seen during two encounters. Once, as the spacecraft traversed the moon's near-downstream wake with respect to the prevailing flow of Jupiter's plasma sheet/plasma torus. Densities were several times higher than those of the plasma sheet, and entrainment of Europa's ionosphere accounts for this observation. The other encounter occurred in the upstream region. Densities were an order of magnitude higher than usual, and this has been interpreted as potential evidence of ionization within a water plume. However, the usual signatures of fresh ion production that would be expected in a plume are not found in the ion energy-angle spectra. The observations and possible explanations are presented in this report.

  3. Surface modification of biomaterials by pulsed laser ablation deposition and plasma/gamma polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rau, Kaustubh R.

    Surface modification of stainless-steel was carried out by two different methods: pulsed laser ablation deposition (PLAD) and a combined plasma/gamma process. A potential application was the surface modification of endovascular stents, to enhance biocompatibility. The pulsed laser ablation deposition process, had not been previously reported for modifying stents and represented a unique and potentially important method for surface modification of biomaterials. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elatomer was studied using the PLAD technique. Cross- linked PDMS was deemed important because of its general use for biomedical implants and devices as well as in other fields. Furthermore, PDMS deposition using PLAD had not been previously studied and any information gained on its ablation characteristics could be important scientifically and technologically. The studies reported here showed that the deposited silicone film properties had a dependence on the laser energy density incident on the target. Smooth, hydrophobic, silicone-like films were deposited at low energy densities (100-150 mJ/cm2). At high energy densities (>200 mJ/cm2), the films had an higher oxygen content than PDMS, were hydrophilic and tended to show a more particulate morphology. It was also determined that (1)the deposited films were stable and extremely adherent to the substrate, (2)silicone deposition exhibited an `incubation effect' which led to the film properties changing with laser pulse number and (3)films deposited under high vacuum were similar to films deposited at low vacuum levels. The mechanical properties of the PLAD films were determined by nanomechanical measurements which are based on the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). From these measurements, it was possible to determine the modulus of the films and also study their scratch resistance. Such measurement techniques represent a significant advance over current state-of-the-art thin film characterization methods. An empirical model for

  4. Emission spectroscopy analysis during Nopal cladodes dethorning by laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peña-Díaz, M.; Ponce, L.; Arronte, M.; Flores, T.

    2007-04-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy of the pulsed laser ablation of spines and glochids from Opuntia (Nopal) cladodes was performed. Nopal cladodes were irradiated with Nd:YAG free-running laser pulses on their body, glochids and spines. Emission spectroscopy analyses in the 350-1000 nm region of the laser induced plasma were made. Plasma plume evolution characterization, theoretical calculations of plasma plume temperature and experiments varying the processing atmosphere showed that the process is dominated by a thermally activated combustion reaction which increases the dethorning process efficiency. Therefore, appropriate laser pulse energy for minimal damage of cladodes body and in the area beneath glochids and spines can be obtained.

  5. Emission spectroscopy of laser ablation plasma with time gating by acousto-optic modulator

    SciTech Connect

    Sakka, Tetsuo; Irie, Kyohei; Fukami, Kazuhiro; Ogata, Yukio H.

    2011-02-15

    The capability of acousto-optic modulator (AOM) to perform time-gated measurements for laser ablation plasma spectroscopy has been examined. Especially, we focused on the capability of the ''AOM gating'' to exclude the continuum and extremely broadened spectra usually observed immediately after the laser ablation. Final goal of the use of the AOM is to achieve considerable downsizing of the system for in situ and on-site analyses. In the present paper, it is shown that narrow and clear spectral lines can be obtained with the AOM gating even if the target is submerged in water. Also, application of this technique to the targets in air is demonstrated. It has been revealed that the AOM gating is fast enough to exclude the continuum and broadened lines, while effectively acquiring sufficiently narrow atomic lines lasting slightly longer than the continuum.

  6. Inductively Coupled Plasma: Fundamental Particle Investigations with Laser Ablation and Applications in Magnetic Sector Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Saetveit, Nathan Joe

    2008-01-01

    Particle size effects and elemental fractionation in laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) are investigated with nanosecond and femtosecond laser ablation, differential mobility analysis, and magnetic sector ICP-MS. Laser pulse width was found to have a significant influence on the LA particle size distribution and the elemental composition of the aerosol and thus fractionation. Emission from individual particles from solution nebulization, glass, and a pressed powder pellet are observed with high speed digital photography. The presence of intact particles in an ICP is shown to be a likely source of fractionation. A technique for the online detection of stimulated elemental release from neural tissue using magnetic sector ICP-MS is described. Detection limits of 1 μg L-1 or better were found for P, Mn, Fe, Cu, and Zn in a 60 μL injection in a physiological saline matrix.

  7. A numerical algorithm for magnetohydrodynamics of ablated materials.

    PubMed

    Lu, Tianshi; Du, Jian; Samulyak, Roman

    2008-07-01

    A numerical algorithm for the simulation of magnetohydrodynamics in partially ionized ablated material is described. For the hydro part, the hyperbolic conservation laws with electromagnetic terms is solved using techniques developed for free surface flows; for the electromagnetic part, the electrostatic approximation is applied and an elliptic equation for electric potential is solved. The algorithm has been implemented in the frame of front tracking, which explicitly tracks geometrically complex evolving interfaces. An elliptic solver based on the embedded boundary method were implemented for both two- and three-dimensional simulations. A surface model on the interface between the solid target and the ablated vapor has also been developed as well as a numerical model for the equation of state which accounts for atomic processes in the ablated material. The code has been applied to simulations of the pellet ablation in a magnetically confined plasma and the laser-ablated plasma plume expansion in magnetic fields. PMID:19051925

  8. A Simulation of Laser Ablation During the Laser Pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Motoyuki; Ventzek, Peter L. G.; Sakai, Y.; Date, H.; Tagashira, H.; Kitamori, K.

    1996-10-01

    Charge damage considerations in plasma assisted etching are prompting the development of neutral beam sources. Already, anisotropic etching of has been demonstrated by neutral beams generated by exhausting heated ecthing gases into vacuum via a nozzle. Laser ablation of condensed etching gases may also be an attractive alternative means of generating neutral beams. Laser ablation coupled with electrical breakdown of the ablation plume may afford some degree of control over a neutral beam's dissociation fraction and ion content. Results from a Monte Carlo simulation of the laser ablation plume as it expands into vacuum at time-scales during the laser pulse will be presented. The model includes both heavy particle interactions and photochemistry. In particular, the influence of the initial particle angular distribution on the beam spread will be demonstrated as will the relationship between laser beam energy and initial ionization and dissociation fraction.

  9. Pulsed laser ablation plasmas generated in CO2 under high-pressure conditions up to supercritical fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Toru; Stauss, Sven; Kato, Satoshi; Urabe, Keiichiro; Baba, Motoyoshi; Suemoto, Tohru; Terashima, Kazuo

    2012-11-01

    Pulsed laser ablation of solids in supercritical media has a large potential for nanomaterials fabrication. We investigated plasmas generated by pulsed laser ablation of Ni targets in CO2 at pressures ranging from 0.1 to 16 MPa at 304.5 K. Plasma species were characterized by optical emission spectroscopy, and the evolution of cavitation bubbles and shockwaves were observed by time-resolved shadowgraph imaging. Ni and O atomic emissions decreased with increasing gas pressure; however, near the critical point the intensities reached local maxima, probably due to the enhancement of the plasma excitation and effective quenching resulting from the large density fluctuation.

  10. Pulsed laser ablation plasmas generated in CO{sub 2} under high-pressure conditions up to supercritical fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Toru; Stauss, Sven; Kato, Satoshi; Urabe, Keiichiro; Terashima, Kazuo; Baba, Motoyoshi; Suemoto, Tohru

    2012-11-26

    Pulsed laser ablation of solids in supercritical media has a large potential for nanomaterials fabrication. We investigated plasmas generated by pulsed laser ablation of Ni targets in CO{sub 2} at pressures ranging from 0.1 to 16 MPa at 304.5 K. Plasma species were characterized by optical emission spectroscopy, and the evolution of cavitation bubbles and shockwaves were observed by time-resolved shadowgraph imaging. Ni and O atomic emissions decreased with increasing gas pressure; however, near the critical point the intensities reached local maxima, probably due to the enhancement of the plasma excitation and effective quenching resulting from the large density fluctuation.

  11. On-line isotope dilution in laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry using a microflow nebulizer inserted in the laser ablation chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickhardt, Carola; Izmer, Andrej V.; Zoriy, Miroslav V.; Schaumlöffel, D.; Sabine Becker, J.

    2006-02-01

    Laser ablation ICP-MS (inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry) is becoming one of the most important analytical techniques for fast determination of trace impurities in solid samples. Quantification of analytical results requires matrix-matched standards, which are in some cases (e.g., high-purity metals, proteins separated by 2D gel electrophoresis) difficult to obtain or prepare. In order to overcome the quantification problem a special arrangement for on-line solution-based calibration has been proposed in laser ablation ICP-MS by the insertion of a microflow nebulizer in the laser ablation chamber. This arrangement allows an easy, accurate and precise quantification by on-line isotope dilution using a defined standard solution with an isotope enriched tracer nebulized to the laser-ablated sample material. An ideal matrix matching in LA-ICP-MS is therefore obtained during the measurement. The figures of merit of this arrangement with a microflow nebulizer inserted in the laser ablation chamber and applications of on-line isotope dilution in LA-ICP-MS on two different types of sample material (NIST glass SRM 612 and NIST apple leaves SRM 1515) will be described.

  12. Plasma-mediated ablation for the management of obstructive sleep apnea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puchalski, Robert; Shah, Udayan K.

    2000-05-01

    Plasma-mediated ablation (PMA) removes tissue by developing an electrically induced plasma layer between the instrument and target tissue. Charged particles within the plasma field then accelerate toward the tissue, breaking the molecular bonds within the top layer of tissue. Thermal damage to collateral tissue is minimal, resulting in the moniker, 'cold' ablation, for this method. Recently, instrumentation has been developed to permit application for soft tissue resection in Otolaryngology. Presentation of the theory, as well as the benefits and disadvantages associated with CoblationTM technology will be followed by examples of its use. A brief videotape will demonstrate the application of PMA for UPPP, tonsillectomy and nasal turbinate reduction. Preliminary experience from our institution, including eighteen children treated with tonsillectomy and followed for at least one month post-operatively, has provided an initial cohort for comparing the risks and benefits of the approach. The advantage of CoblationTM technology identified thus far, that of less thermal damage, is balanced against a decreased level of hemostasis (compared to MES) and an increased cost.

  13. Evaluation of Inductively Couple Plasma-time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry for Laser Ablation Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    S.J. Bajic; D.B. Aeschliman; D.P. Baldwin; R.S. Houk

    2003-09-30

    The purpose of this trip to LECO Corporation was to test the non-matrix matched calibration method and the principal component analysis (PCA) method on a laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-time of flight mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-TOFMS) system. An LA-ICP-TOFMS system allows for multielement single-shot analysis as well as spatial analysis on small samples, because the TOFMS acquires an entire mass spectrum for all ions extracted simultaneously from the ICP. The TOFMS system differs from the double-focusing mass spectrometer, on which the above methods were developed, by having lower sensitivity and lower mass resolution.

  14. Measurement of electron density by Stark broadening in an ablative pulsed plasma thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Feng; Nie Zongfu; Xu Xu; Zhou Qianhong; Li Linsen; Liang Rongqing

    2008-09-15

    Electron density was measured by Stark broadening in an ablative pulsed plasma thruster. The asymmetrical deconvolution is used to obtain Stark broadening. The result shows that the electron density in the discharge channel is 2.534x10{sup 22} m{sup -3} when the discharge energy is 5 J and the measured electron temperature is 18 000 K, and it is in excellent agreement with other experimental and theoretical data. The electron density in the discharge channel increases very minimally with increasing discharge energy.

  15. A new stage in the development of ablative pulsed plasma thrusters at the RIAME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antropov, N. N.; Bogatyy, A. V.; Dyakonov, G. A.; Lyubinskaya, N. V.; Popov, G. A.; Semenikhin, S. A.; Tyutin, V. K.; Khrustalev, M. M.; Yakovlev, V. N.

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents an overview of the works on ablative pulsed plasma thrusters (APPTs) carried out at the Research Institute of Applied Mechanics and Electrodynamics (RIAME). The main features of next generation thrusters developed at the RIAME in the 2000s are discussed together with the optimization criteria for APPTs intended for use in correction propulsion systems of small spacecraft, e.g., MKA-FKI (developed by the Lavochkin Association) and Soyuz-Sat-O (developed by Maksimov Space Systems Research Institute and the Production Corporation Polyot).

  16. Quantitative images of metals in plant tissues measured by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, J. S.; Dietrich, R. C.; Matusch, A.; Pozebon, D.; Dressler, V. L.

    2008-11-01

    Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) was used for quantitative imaging of toxic and essential elements in thin sections (thickness of 30 or 40 μm) of tobacco plant tissues. Two-dimensional images of Mg, Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Cd, Rh, Pt and Pb in leaves, shoots and roots of tobacco were produced. Sections of the plant tissues (fixed onto glass slides) were scanned by a focused beam of a Nd:YAG laser in a laser ablation chamber. The ablated material was transported with argon as carrier gas to the ICP ion source at a quadrupole ICP-MS instrument. Ion intensities of the investigated elements were measured together with 13C +, 33S + and 34S + within the entire plant tissue section. Matrix matching standards (prepared using powder of dried tobacco leaves) were used to constitute calibration curves, whereas the regression coefficient of the attained calibration curves was typically 0.99. The variability of LA-ICP-MS process, sample heterogeneity and water content in the sample were corrected by using 13C + as internal standard. Quantitative imaging of the selected elements revealed their inhomogeneous distribution in leaves, shoots and roots.

  17. Performance of an ablator for Space Shuttle inorbit repair in an arc-plasma airstream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, D. A.; Cuellar, M.; Flowers, O.

    1983-01-01

    An ablator patch material performed well in an arc plasma environment simulating nominal Earth entry conditions for the Space Shuttle. Ablation tests using vacuum molded cones provided data to optimize the formulation of a two part polymer system for application under space conditions. The blunt cones were made using a Teflon mold and a state of the art caulking gun. Char stability of formulations with various amounts of catalyst and diluent were investigated. The char was found to be unstable in formulations with low amounts of catalyst and high amounts of diluent. The best polymer system determined by these tests was evaluated using a half tile patch in a multiple High Temperature Reusable surface Insulation tile model. It was demonstrated that this ablator could be applied in a space environment using a state of the art caulking gun, would maintain the outer mold line of the thermal protection system during entry, and would keep the bond line temperature at the aluminum tile interface below the design limit.

  18. Investigating the Response and Expansion of Plasma Plumes in a Mesosonic Plasma Using the Situational Awareness Sensor Suite for the ISS (SASSI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilchrist, Brian E.; Hoegy, W. R.; Krause, L. Habash; Minow, J. I.; Coffey, V. N.

    2014-01-01

    To study the complex interactions between the space environment surrounding the International Space Station (ISS) and the ISS space vehicle, we are exploring a specialized suite of plasma sensors, manipulated by the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) to probe the near-ISS mesosonic plasma ionosphere moving past the ISS. It is proposed that SASSI consists of the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC's) Thermal Ion Capped Hemispherical Spectrometer (TICHS), Thermal Electron Capped Hemispherical Spectrometer (TECHS), Charge Analyzer Responsive to Local Oscillations (CARLO), the Collimated PhotoElectron Gun (CPEG), and the University of Michigan Advanced Langmuir Probe (ALP). There are multiple expected applications for SASSI. Here, we will discuss the study of fundamental plasma physics questions associated with how an emitted plasma plume (such as from the ISS Plasma Contactor Unit (PCU)) responds and expands in a mesosonic magnetoplasma as well as emit and collect current. The ISS PCU Xe plasma plume drifts through the ionosphere and across the Earth's magnetic field, resulting in complex dynamics. This is of practical and theoretical interest pertaining to contamination concerns (e.g. energetic ion scattering) and the ability to collect and emit current between the spacecraft and the ambient plasma ionosphere. This impacts, for example, predictions of electrodynamic tether current performance using plasma contactors as well as decisions about placing high-energy electric propulsion thrusters on ISS. We will discuss the required measurements and connection to proposed instruments for this study.

  19. The effect of laser wavelength on laser-induced carbon plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Moscicki, T.; Hoffman, J.; Szymanski, Z.

    2013-08-28

    The effect of laser wavelength on parameters of laser-ablated carbon plume is studied. A theoretical model is applied, which describes the target heating and formation of the plasma and its expansion, and calculations are made for the fundamental and third harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser. The calculated distributions of plasma temperature and electron density in the early phase of expansion show that plasma temperatures are higher in the case of 1064 nm but the electron densities are higher in the case of 355 nm, which is in agreement with experimental findings. It has been shown that while a higher plasma temperature in the case of 1064 nm is the result of stronger plasma absorption, the greater ablation rate in the case of 355 nm results in larger mass density of the ablated plume and hence, in higher electron densities. An additional consequence of a higher ablation rate is slower expansion and smaller dimensions of the plume.

  20. Plasma Conditions in Polar Plumes and Interplume Regions in Polar Coronal Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cranmer, S. R.; Kohl, J. L.; Miralles, M.; Panasyuk, A. V.

    2001-05-01

    During times of low solar activity, large polar coronal holes are observed to contain bright raylike polar plumes that appear to follow open magnetic field lines. Plumes are believed to be flux tubes that are heated impulsively at their base, which leads to a higher density, a lower outflow speed, and a lower overall temperature in the extended corona, compared to the surrounding interplume regions. Despite years of white light and spectroscopic observations, though, the differences in mass, momentum, and energy flux in plumes and between plumes are not known precisely. This poster presents an updated survey of data from the Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS), aboard SOHO, that attempts to sort out the local plume and interplume conditions. These results will be compared with previous analyses that characterized the ``mean'' plume/interplume coronal hole, averaged over many lines of sight through varying concentrations of plumes. Limits on the relative contributions of plumes and interplume regions to the high-speed solar wind will be determined, with emphasis on the proton outflow speed in the corona and at 1 AU. Implications for theoretical models of coronal heating and solar wind acceleration will be discussed. This work is supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration under grant NAG5-10093 to the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, by Agenzia Spaziale Italiana, and by the Swiss contribution to the ESA PRODEX program.

  1. The Effect of an External Magnetic Field on the Plume Expansion Dynamics of Laser-Induced Aluminum Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atif, Hussain; Li, Qi; Hao, Zuoqiang; Gao, Xun; Lin, Jingquan

    2015-08-01

    In this work, we investigated the plasma morphology induced by a Nd:YAG laser with the aim of improving the understanding of the formation and dynamics of the plasma in two cases, with and without a magnetic field. Single laser pulse production of a plasma in the absence and presence of a magnetic field was performed with an aluminum target in air. A fast photography technique was employed to obtain information about the expansion dynamics and confinement of the aluminum plasma in each case. The generation of the laser plasma was allowed to expand at two locations with different magnetic field strengths, which correspond to the strength 0.58 T in the center of two magnetic poles and 0.83 T at a distance of 4 mm from the upper pole (N). The plume showed lateral confinement at longer delays when the target was placed at the center of the two poles. When the target was placed at a distance of 4 mm from the upper pole it was observed that the plume was divided into two lobes at the initial stage and traveled towards the center of the magnetic field with further elapse of time. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61178022), the Research Foundation for Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Nos. 20112216120006, 20122216120009 and 20122216110007) and also the Project of 14KP007

  2. Feasibility study of in-situ measurements of Europa's neutral and plasma plumes with JUICE/PEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huybrighs, Hans; Futaana, Yoshifumi; Barabash, Stas; Wieser, Martin; Wurz, Peter; Krupp, Norbert; Glassmeier, Karl-Heinz; Vermeersen, Bert

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the spatial distribution of the neutral and plasma particles originating from the Europa plume [1] by simulating their trajectories in order to evaluate their in-situ detection by the PEP (Particle Environment Package) instrument, a part of the JUICE scientific payload. We first produced neutral test particles by assuming source characteristics (temperature and mass flux) of the water plume. Subsequently these particles were traced under Europa's gravity field to obtain the density distribution of the plume gas. Then test particles representing water molecule ions were produced by combining the neutral density distribution and a time constant for electron impact reactions. Subsequently the trajectories of the produced water molecule ions were traced under the Jovian corotational electromagnetic field. Finally, from the calculated neutral density and the plasma velocity distributions, we emulated the observations of the neutrals and ions along the two Europa flybys planned for the JUICE mission. We did this specifically for the PEP/NIM (Neutral gas and Ion Mass Spectrometer) and PEP/JDC (Jovian plasma Dynamics and Composition analyser) sensor. The derived signal to noise ratios are well above the detection limits of NIM and JDC (S/N>100 and >10, respectively), even if we assume a rather low-mass-flux plume (˜0.7 kg/s, which is 104 times less than what was reported in [1]). The flux is significantly asymmetrical between the inbound and outbound trajectory, because the charged particles are flowing downtail (leading hemisphere direction) due to the Jovian co-rotation flow. [1] Roth, L., J. Saur, K. D. Retherford, D. F. Strobel, P. D. Feldman, M. A. McGrath, and F. Nimmo, Transient water vapor at europa's south pole, Science, 343(6167), 171-174, doi:10.1126/science.1247051, 2014.

  3. Non-contact acoustic tests based on nanosecond laser ablation: Generation of a pulse sound source with a small amplitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosoya, Naoki; Kajiwara, Itsuro; Inoue, Tatsuo; Umenai, Koh

    2014-09-01

    A method to generate a pulse sound source for acoustic tests based on nanosecond laser ablation with a plasma plume is discussed. Irradiating a solid surface with a laser beam expands a high-temperature plasma plume composed of free electrons, ionized atoms, etc. at a high velocity throughout ambient air. The shockwave generated by the plasma plume becomes the pulse sound source. A laser ablation sound source has two features. Because laser ablation is induced when the laser fluence reaches 1012-1014 W/m2, which is less than that for laser-induced breakdown (1015 W/m2), laser ablation can generate a lower sound pressure, and the sound source has a hemispherical radiation pattern on the surface where laser ablation is generated. Additionally, another feature is that laser-induced breakdown sound sources can fluctuate, whereas laser ablation sound sources do not because laser ablation is produced at a laser beam-irradiation point. We validate this laser ablation method for acoustic tests by comparing the measured and theoretical resonant frequencies of an impedance tube.

  4. Biomonitoring of hair samples by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sela, H.; Karpas, Z.; Zoriy, M.; Pickhardt, C.; Becker, J. S.

    2007-03-01

    An analytical method for determining essential elements (Zn, Fe and Cu) and toxic elements (Cr, Pb and U) on single hair strands by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-SFMS) using a double focusing sector field mass spectrometer was developed. Results obtained directly using LA-ICP-SFMS of hair were compared with those measured by inductively coupled plasma quadrupole mass spectrometry (ICP-QMS) of solutions of digested hair samples and the analytical methods were found to agree well. Different quantification strategies for trace element determination in hair samples such as external calibration, standard addition and isotope dilution were compared and demonstrated for uranium. For uranium determination in powdered hair by LA-ICP-MS solution-based calibration was applied by coupling the laser ablation chamber to an ultrasonic nebulizer. The significance of single hair analysis by LA-ICP-SFMS was demonstrated by a case study of a person who changed living environment. Differences in the uranium content observed along the single hair strand correlated with the changes in the level of uranium in drinking water. The uranium concentration in a single hair decreased from 212 to 18 ng g-1 with a change in the uranium concentration in drinking water from 2000 to 30 ng l-1. In addition, measurements of uranium isotope ratios showed a natural isotopic composition throughout the whole period in the drinking water, as well as in the hair samples. This paper demonstrates the potential use of laser ablation ICP-MS to provide measurements on a single hair strand and its potential to become a very powerful tool in hair analysis for biological monitoring.

  5. Non-Spitzer heat flow in a steadily ablating laser-produced plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, A.R.

    1985-06-01

    Electron energy transport in a laser-produced ablating plasma is modeled by the Vlasov--Fokker--Planck equation for electrons and the fluid equations for cold ions. These equations are solved using approximations which maintain good accuracy but allow faster computational solution than was previously possible. It is found that the spatial profiles for temperature and density in planar geometry differ very little from those calculated from the Spitzer conductivity. At high laser intensities, the plasma flow diverges as it flows away from the solid target and the effects of nonplanar flow are important. This is modeled by the adoption of spherical geometry, and it is found that the Spitzer conductivity breaks down and the temperature and density profiles differ significantly from those calculated using the Spitzer conductivity.

  6. Correlation of laser ablation plasma emission with ICP-AES signal intensity

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, A.J.; Mao, X.L.; Shannon, M.A.

    1994-12-31

    Laser ablation offers many favorable characteristics for direct solid sample chemical analysis. However, the technique usually provides poor precision in comparison to solution nebulization. The primary contributor to this imprecision is the irreproducibility of the laser material interaction. This paper describes a technique for monitoring changes in the laser material interaction directly, and using these data to improve inductively coupled atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). Simultaneous measurements of the spectral emission intensity in the laser-induced plasma (LIP) and the ICP-AES were made under different power density conditions. The LIP spatial profile and excitation temperature was measured. The data from the LIP show a strong correlation with ICP-AES signal intensity. Both emission signals increase linearly with the laser power density (log-log) and show a change in the slope for different spot sizes and laser powers. These results support the occurrence of two different ablation mechanisms, a less efficient interaction dominating at the higher power densities (> 1 GW/cm2) and a more efficient interaction in the lower power density regimes. The benefits of using simultaneous monitoring of the laser induced plasma for chemical analysis by ICP-AES will be discussed.

  7. Femtosecond laser ablation of carbon: From spallation to formation of hot critical plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryashov, S. I.; Ionin, A. A.; Makarov, S. V.; Mel'nik, N. N.; Seleznev, L. V.; Sinitsyn, D. V.

    2012-07-01

    Strong ablative shock waves were generated on a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite surface by intense IR femtosecond laser pulses in a broad fluence range and their basic parameters (pressure, velocity) were acquired by means of a non-contact broadband ultrasonic technique. At moderate laser fluences (F ≥ 0.3 J/cm2), ultrafast formation of a dense, strongly-heated (supercritical) carbon phase is expected, which expands on a fluence-dependent picosecond timescale in the form of a point-like three-dimensional explosion, driving a multi-GPa shock wave both in ambient air and the graphite target. At higher laser fluences (F > 5 J/cm2), critical electron-ion plasma is formed instantaneously during the exciting femtosecond laser pulse, with its strong plasma absorption initiating a TPa-level shock wave (the maximum shock wave pressure ≈ 3 TPa is more than twice the previous maximum for carbon). Because of the ablative removal of the laser-heated surface carbon layer, the following time-integrated structural studies indicate the formation of a mixture of diamond and graphite nanocrystallites or, in other words, glassy carbon only in the redeposition products.

  8. Observation of hydrodynamic processes of radiation-ablated plasma in a small hole

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hang; Kuang, Longyu; Jiang, Shaoen Ding, Yongkun; Song, Tianming; Yang, Jiamin Zhu, Tuo; Lin, Zhiwei; Zheng, Jianhua; Zhang, Haiying; Yu, Ruizhen; Liu, Shenye; Hu, Guangyue; Zhao, Bin; Zheng, Jian

    2015-07-15

    In the hohlraum used in laser indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion experiments, hydrodynamic processes of radiation-ablated high-Z plasma have a great effect on laser injection efficiency, radiation uniformity, and diagnosis of hohlraum radiation field from diagnostic windows (DW). To study plasma filling in the DWs, a laser-irradiated Ti disk was used to generate 2–5 keV narrow energy band X-ray as the intense backlighter source, and laser-produced X-ray in a hohlraum with low-Z foam tamper was used to heat a small hole surrounded by gold wall with 150 μm in diameter and 100 μm deep. The hydrodynamic movement of the gold plasma in the small hole was measured by an X-ray framing camera and the results are analyzed. Quantitative measurement of the plasma areal density distribution and evolution in the small hole can be used to assess the effect of plasma filling on the diagnosis from the DWs.

  9. Observation of hydrodynamic processes of radiation-ablated plasma in a small hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hang; Song, Tianming; Yang, Jiamin; Zhu, Tuo; Lin, Zhiwei; Zheng, Jianhua; Kuang, Longyu; Zhang, Haiying; Yu, Ruizhen; Liu, Shenye; Jiang, Shaoen; Ding, Yongkun; Hu, Guangyue; Zhao, Bin; Zheng, Jian

    2015-07-01

    In the hohlraum used in laser indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion experiments, hydrodynamic processes of radiation-ablated high-Z plasma have a great effect on laser injection efficiency, radiation uniformity, and diagnosis of hohlraum radiation field from diagnostic windows (DW). To study plasma filling in the DWs, a laser-irradiated Ti disk was used to generate 2-5 keV narrow energy band X-ray as the intense backlighter source, and laser-produced X-ray in a hohlraum with low-Z foam tamper was used to heat a small hole surrounded by gold wall with 150 μm in diameter and 100 μm deep. The hydrodynamic movement of the gold plasma in the small hole was measured by an X-ray framing camera and the results are analyzed. Quantitative measurement of the plasma areal density distribution and evolution in the small hole can be used to assess the effect of plasma filling on the diagnosis from the DWs.

  10. Ablation of polymers by focused EUV radiation from a table-top laser-produced plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkusky, Frank; Bayer, Armin; Mann, Klaus

    2011-10-01

    We have investigated ablation of polymers with radiation of 13.5 nm wavelength, using a table-top laser produced plasma source based on solid gold as target material. A Schwarzschild objective with Mo/Si multilayer coatings was adapted to the source, generating an EUV spot of 5 μm diameter with a maximum energy density of ˜1.3 J/cm2. In combination with a Zirconium transmission filter, radiation of high spectral purity (2% bandwidth) can be provided on the irradiated spot. Ablation experiments were performed on PMMA, PTFE and PC. Ablation rates were determined for varying fluences using atomic force microscopy and white light interferometry. The slopes of these curves are discussed with respect to the chemical structure of the polymers. Additionally, the ablation behavior in terms of effective penetration depths, threshold fluences and incubation effects is compared to literature data for higher UV wavelength.

  11. Modeling of plasma distortions by laser-induced ablation spectroscopy (LIAS) and implications for the interpretation of LIAS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokar, M. Z.; Gierse, N.; Philipps, V.; Samm, U.

    2015-09-01

    For the interpretation of the line radiation observed from laser induced ablation spectroscopy (LIAS) such parameters as the density and temperature of electrons within very compact clouds of atoms and singly charged ions of ablated material have to be known. Compared to the local plasma conditions prior to the laser pulse, these can be strongly changed during LIAS since new electrons are generated by the ionisation of particles ejected from the irradiated target. Because of their transience and spatial inhomogeneity it is technically difficult to measure disturbances induced in the plasma by LIAS. To overcome this uncertainty a numerical model has been elaborated, providing a self-consistent description for the spreading of ablated particles and accompanying modifications in the plasma. The results of calculations for LIAS performed on carbon-containing targets in Ohmic and additionally heated discharges in the tokamak TEXTOR are presented. Due to the increase in the electron density the ‘ionisation per photon’ ratio, S/XB factor, is significantly enhanced compared to unperturbed plasma conditions. The impact of the amount of material ablated and of the plasma conditions before LIAS on the level of the S/XB-enhancement is investigated.

  12. An experimental setup to study the expansion dynamics of laser blow-off plasma plume in variable transverse magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ajai; Chaudhari, Vishnu; Patel, Kiran; George, Sony; Sunil, S.; Singh, R. K.; Singh, Ranjeet

    2009-03-01

    In the present work we report generation of uniform and variable pulsed magnetic field in synchronization with pulsed plasma for the study of the expansion dynamics of laser blow-off (LBO) plasma plume. The experimental procedure for optimizing various parameters of the setup, e.g., the production of pulsed field and its synchronization with pulsed plasma and diagnostics system, is also reported. Until now the effect of magnetic field was studied using fixed field. The present setup, however, provides variable and uniform field in synchronization with the setup. A low cost time sequencing control module has been developed for the above purpose. Although the main emphasis is on the technical aspect of the setup, salient features of the effect of transverse magnetic field on the evolution features of the neutral and ionic species are also reported briefly. It is observed that LBO generated plume have a stronger correlation with the magnetic field in comparison to the conventional laser produced plasma experiments as reported earlier.

  13. Effect of magnetic field configuration on the multiply charged ion and plume characteristics in Hall thruster plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Holak; Lim, Youbong; Choe, Wonho Park, Sanghoo; Seon, Jongho

    2015-04-13

    Multiply charged ions and plume characteristics in Hall thruster plasmas are investigated with regard to magnetic field configuration. Differences in the plume shape and the fraction of ions with different charge states are demonstrated by the counter-current and co-current magnetic field configurations, respectively. The significantly larger number of multiply charged and higher charge state ions including Xe{sup 4+} are observed in the co-current configuration than in the counter-current configuration. The large fraction of multiply charged ions and high ion currents in this experiment may be related to the strong electron confinement, which is due to the strong magnetic mirror effect in the co-current magnetic field configuration.

  14. Effect of magnetic field configuration on the multiply charged ion and plume characteristics in Hall thruster plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Holak; Lim, Youbong; Choe, Wonho; Park, Sanghoo; Seon, Jongho

    2015-04-01

    Multiply charged ions and plume characteristics in Hall thruster plasmas are investigated with regard to magnetic field configuration. Differences in the plume shape and the fraction of ions with different charge states are demonstrated by the counter-current and co-current magnetic field configurations, respectively. The significantly larger number of multiply charged and higher charge state ions including Xe4+ are observed in the co-current configuration than in the counter-current configuration. The large fraction of multiply charged ions and high ion currents in this experiment may be related to the strong electron confinement, which is due to the strong magnetic mirror effect in the co-current magnetic field configuration.

  15. Time resolved diagnostics of ions in colliding carbon plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Ravi Pratap; Gupta, Shyam L.; Thareja, Raj K.

    2014-11-14

    We report a comparative study of the dynamic behaviour of ions at different pressures in laser ablated colliding and single plasma plumes using 2D imaging, optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and a retarding field analyser (RFA). 2D imaging shows the splitting of plasma plumes due to different velocities of various plasma species. OES shows enhancement in abundance of ionic species with their presence for a longer time in colliding plume. C{sub 2} molecular formation is seen at later time in colliding plume compared to single plume and is attributed to dominating collisional processes in the colliding region of the plumes. The time of flight distribution of ions traced by the RFA shows the variation with change in fluence as well as ambient pressure for both colliding and single plume. Time of flight analysis of ions also shows the appearance of a fast peak in ion signal due to acceleration of ions at larger fluence.

  16. Role of ambient gas and laser fluence in governing the dynamics of the plasma plumes produced by laser blow off of LiF-C thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, R. K.; Kumar, Ajai; Patel, B. G.; Subramanian, K. P.

    2007-05-01

    The time- and space-resolved emission profiles of Li mathsize="8pt">I and Li mathsize="8pt">II emission lines from the laser-blow-off plumes of a multilayered LiF-C thin film have been studied using spectroscopic technique. The evolution features were analyzed in different ambient environments ranging from high vacuum to 3mbars of argon pressures and at various fluences of the ablating laser. During the evolution of the plume, a transition region was found to exist between 4 and 6mm. Here, the plume dynamics changed from free expansion to collisional regime, where the plume experienced viscous force of the medium. The enhancement observed in neutral lines, in comparison with ionic lines, is explained in terms of the yield difference in electron impact excitation and ionization processes. Substantial difference in the arrival time distribution of the plume species was observed for Li mathsize="8pt">I and Li mathsize="8pt">II lines at high ambient pressures. Three expansion models are invoked to explain the evolution of the plume in different ambient conditions. The laser fluence was found to control the ratio of ions and neutrals.

  17. Studies of the ablated plasma from experimental plasma gun disruption simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Rockett, P.D.; Hunter, J.A.; Bradley, J.T.

    1994-07-01

    Extensive simulations of Tokamak disruptions have provided a picture of material erosion that is limited by the transfer of energy from the incident plasma to the armor solid surface through a dense vapor shield. Radiation spectra were recorded in the VUV and in the visible at the Efremov Laboratories on VIKA using graphite targets. The VUV data were recorded with a Sandia Labs transmission grating spectrograph, covering 1--40 nm. Plasma parameters were evaluated with incident plasma energy densities varying from 1--10 kJ/cm{sup 2}. A second transmission grating spectrograph was taken to 2MK-200 at TRINITI to study the plasma-material interface in magnetic cusp plasma. Target materials included POCO graphite, ATJ graphite, boron nitride, and plasma-sprayed tungsten. Detailed spectra were recorded with a spatial resolution of {approximately}1 mm resolution. Time-resolved data with 40--200 ns resolution was also recorded. The data from both plasma gun facilities demonstrated that the hottest plasma region was sitting several millimeters above the armor tile surface.

  18. A Langmuir Probe Diagnostic for Use in Inhomogeneous, Time-Varying Plasmas Produced by High-Energy Laser Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, J R; Emig, J A; Fournier, K B; Jenkins, P P; Trautz, K M; Seiler, S W; Davis, J F

    2012-05-01

    Langmuir probes (LP) are used extensively to characterize plasma environments produced by radio frequency, pulsed plasma thrusters, and laser ablation. We discuss here the development of a LP diagnostic to examine high-density, high-temperature inhomogeneous plasmas such as those that can be created at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics OMEGA facility. We have configured our diagnostic to examine the velocity of the plasma expanding from the target. We observe velocities of approximately 16-17 cm/{micro}s, with individual LP currents displaying complex structures, perhaps due to the multiple atomic species and ionization states that exist.

  19. Elemental Bioimaging by Means of Fast Scanning Laser Ablation-Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehe, Christoph A.; Thyssen, Georgina M.; Herdering, Christina; Raj, Indra; Ciarimboli, Giuliano; Sperling, Michael; Karst, Uwe

    2015-08-01

    One of the most common setups for elemental bioimaging, the hyphenation of a laser ablation (LA) system and an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS), was expanded by adding full scan mass spectrometric information as another dimension of information. While most studies deal with the analysis of typically not more than up to 10 isotopes per scan cycle, a fast scanning quadrupole mass analyzer was utilized to record the full mass spectrum of interest in this work. Mass-to-charge ratios from 6 to 250 were observed within one cycle. Besides the x- and y-position on the ablated sample and the intensity, the m/z-ratio served as fourth variable for each pixel of the obtained data, closing thereby the gap between "inorganic" and "organic" mass spectrometric imaging techniques. The benefits of this approach include an improved control of interferences, the discovery of unexpected elemental distributions, the possibility to plot isotopic ratios, and to integrate the intensities of a certain number of mass channels recorded for each isotope, thus virtually increasing sensitivity. The respective data are presented for dried droplets as well as embedded animal and human tissue slices. Limits of detection were calculated and found to be in accordance with counting statistics. A dedicated software macro was developed for data manipulation prior to common evaluation and image creation.

  20. Spark ablation-inductively coupled plasma spectrometry for analysis of geologic materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Golightly, D.W.; Montaser, A.; Smith, B.L.; Dorrzapf, A.F., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Spark ablation-inductively coupled plasma (SA-ICP) spectrometry is applied to the measurement of hafnium-zirconium ratios in zircons and to the determination of cerium, cobalt, iron, lead, nickel and phosphorus in ferromanganese nodules. Six operating parameters used for the high-voltage spark and argon-ICP combination are established by sequential simplex optimization of both signal-to-background ratio and signal-to-noise ratio. The time-dependences of the atomic emission signals of analytes and matrix elements ablated from a finely pulverized sample embedded in a pressed disk of copper demonstrate selective sampling by the spark. Concentration ratios of hafnium to zirconium in zircons are measured with a precision of 4% (relative standard deviation, RSD). For ferromanganese nodules, spectral measurements based on intensity ratios of analyte line to the Mn(II) 257.610 nm line provide precisions of analysis in the range from 7 to 14% RSD. The accuracy of analysis depends on use of standard additions of the reference material USGS Nod P-1, and an independent measurement of the Mn concentration. ?? 1989.

  1. Elemental Bioimaging by Means of Fast Scanning Laser Ablation-Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wehe, Christoph A; Thyssen, Georgina M; Herdering, Christina; Raj, Indra; Ciarimboli, Giuliano; Sperling, Michael; Karst, Uwe

    2015-08-01

    One of the most common setups for elemental bioimaging, the hyphenation of a laser ablation (LA) system and an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS), was expanded by adding full scan mass spectrometric information as another dimension of information. While most studies deal with the analysis of typically not more than up to 10 isotopes per scan cycle, a fast scanning quadrupole mass analyzer was utilized to record the full mass spectrum of interest in this work. Mass-to-charge ratios from 6 to 250 were observed within one cycle. Besides the x- and y-position on the ablated sample and the intensity, the m/z-ratio served as fourth variable for each pixel of the obtained data, closing thereby the gap between "inorganic" and "organic" mass spectrometric imaging techniques. The benefits of this approach include an improved control of interferences, the discovery of unexpected elemental distributions, the possibility to plot isotopic ratios, and to integrate the intensities of a certain number of mass channels recorded for each isotope, thus virtually increasing sensitivity. The respective data are presented for dried droplets as well as embedded animal and human tissue slices. Limits of detection were calculated and found to be in accordance with counting statistics. A dedicated software macro was developed for data manipulation prior to common evaluation and image creation. PMID:25947196

  2. Determination of elemental content off rocks by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lichte, F.E.

    1995-01-01

    A new method of analysis for rocks and soils is presented using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. It is based on a lithium borate fusion and the free-running mode of a Nd/YAG laser. An Ar/N2 sample gas improves sensitivity 7 ?? for most elements. Sixty-three elements are characterized for the fusion, and 49 elements can be quantified. Internal standards and isotopic spikes ensure accurate results. Limits of detection are 0.01 ??g/g for many trace elements. Accuracy approaches 5% for all elements. A new quality assurance procedure is presented that uses fundamental parameters to test relative response factors for the calibration.

  3. Laser ablation- and plasma etching-based patterning of graphene on silicon-on-insulator waveguides.

    PubMed

    Van Erps, Jürgen; Ciuk, Tymoteusz; Pasternak, Iwona; Krajewska, Aleksandra; Strupinski, Wlodek; Van Put, Steven; Van Steenberge, Geert; Baert, Kitty; Terryn, Herman; Thienpont, Hugo; Vermeulen, Nathalie

    2015-10-01

    We present a new approach to remove monolayer graphene transferred on top of a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) photonic integrated chip. Femtosecond laser ablation is used for the first time to remove graphene from SOI waveguides, whereas oxygen plasma etching through a metal mask is employed to peel off graphene from the grating couplers attached to the waveguides. We show by means of Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy that the removal of graphene is successful with minimal damage to the underlying SOI waveguides. Finally, we employ both removal techniques to measure the contribution of graphene to the loss of grating-coupled graphene-covered SOI waveguides using the cut-back method. PMID:26480176

  4. The effect of relative plasma plume delay on the properties of complex oxide films grown by multi-laser, multi-target combinatorial pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sloyan, Katherine A.; May-Smith, Timothy C.; Eason, Robert W.; Lunney, James G.

    2009-08-01

    We report the effects of relative time delay of plasma plumes on thin garnet crystal films fabricated by dual-beam, combinatorial pulsed laser deposition. Relative plume delay was found to affect both the lattice constant and elemental composition of mixed Gd 3Ga 5O 12 (GGG) and Gd 3Sc 2Ga 3O 12 (GSGG) films. Further analysis of the plasmas was undertaken using a Langmuir probe, which revealed that for relative plume delays shorter than ˜200 μs, the second plume travels through a partial vacuum created by the first plume, leading to higher energy ion bombardment of the growing film. The resulting in-plane stresses are consistent with the transition to a higher value of lattice constant normal to the film plane that was observed around this delay value. At delays shorter than ˜10 μs, plume propagation was found to overlap, leading to scattering of lighter ions from the plume and a change in stoichiometry of the resultant films.

  5. Preliminary far-field plume sputtering characterization of the Stationary Plasma Thruster (SPT-100)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pencil, Eric J.

    1994-01-01

    For electric propulsion devices to be considered for use on communications satellites, integration impacts must be examined in detail. Two phenomena of concern associated with highly energetic plumes are contamination via sputtered material from the thruster and sputter erosion of downstream surfaces. In order to characterize the net effect of both phenomena, an array of witness plates were mounted in several types of holders and were exposed to the SPT-100 thruster plume for 50 hours. Surface analysis of the witness plates revealed that in the most energetic regions of the plume, there was a net removal of material from the samples facing the thruster. In the peripheral regions, net deposits were observed and characterized by the changes in optical properties of these samples. Changes in surface properties of samples located in collimators were within experimental uncertainty.

  6. INFN - P.L.A.I.A. PROJECT (Plasma Laser Ablation for Ion Acceleration)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrisi, L.; Gammino, S.; Andò, L.; Ciavola, G.; Mezzasalma, A. M.; Nassisi, V.; Wolowski, J.; Parys, P.; Laska, L.; Krasa, J.; Boody, F. P.

    2004-10-01

    The INFN-Gr.V PLAIA (Plasma Laser Ablation for Ion Acceleration) Project is presented and discussed. The project is developing at LNS of Catania, Messina and Lecce Laboratories as Italian centers of research and it see as European partners the PALS Laboratory of Prague and the group of researchers coordinated by Prof. Wolowsky from IPPLM of Warsaw. PLAIA concerns the study of pulsed plasma produced by pulsed lasers and some special applications of this physics to the new generation of ion sources. Different lasers are employed at LNS of Catania, LEA of Lecce and PALS of Prague. Their fluences range from about 10 J/cm2 for the excimer lasers of LEA up to about 100 kj/cm2 for the iodine laser of PALS. The Nd:Yag laser of LNS, operating at 1064 nm, 9 ns pulse width and 900 mJ maximum pulse energy shows peculiar properties, specially if it is employed at 30 Hz repetition rate, at which it may produce stabile current of ions ejected from a dense plasma. Such laser has the optimum compromise between power density and repetition rate to be used as injector of ions in ECR sources or as source of a new generation of ion implanters which can be employed to accelerate multi-energetic ion beams useful to treat the surface of different materials. Results and projects are discussed in detail.

  7. Ablation of NIF Targets and Diagnostic Components by High Power Lasers and X-Rays from High Temperature Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Eder, D.C; Anderson, A.T.; Braun, D.G; Tobin, M.T.

    2000-04-19

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) will consist of 192 laser beams that have a total energy of up to 1.8 MJ in the 3rd harmonic ({lambda} = 0.35 {micro}m) with the amount of 2nd harmonic and fundamental light depending on the pulse shape. Material near best focus of the 3rd harmonic light will be vaporized/ablated very rapidly, with a significant fraction of the laser energy converted into plasma x rays. Additional plasma x rays can come from imploding/igniting capsule inside Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) hohlraums. Material from outer portions of the target, diagnostic components, first-wall material, and optical components, are ablated by the plasma x rays. Material out to a radius of order 3 cm from target center is also exposed to a significant flux of 2nd harmonic and fundamental laser light. Ablation can accelerate the remaining material to high velocities if it has been fragmented or melted. In addition, the high velocity debris wind of the initially vaporized material pushes on the fragments/droplets and increases their velocity. The high velocity shrapnel fragments/droplets can damage the fused silica shields protecting the final optics in NIF. We discuss modeling efforts to calculate vaporization/ablation, x-ray generation, shrapnel production, and ways to mitigate damage to the shields.

  8. Prompt response and durability of polymer ablation from synthetic fibers irradiated by thermal plasmas for arc resistant clothes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Masahiro; Shinsei, Naoki; Tanaka, Yasunori; Uesugi, Yoshihiko; Ishijima, Tatsuo; Mio, Wataru; Hagi, Hiroyasu; Uchibori, Keita

    2013-06-01

    Interactions between thermal plasmas and synthetic fibers such as polyamide, polyester, phenol and aramid were investigated by thermal plasma irradiation technique. Understanding the above interactions is crucial to design effective flame retardant synthetic fiber clothes with arc resistance to protect a human from arc flash accidents. To investigate the interactions, an Ar inductively coupled thermal plasma (ICTP) was used instead of the arc discharge because the ICTP has high controllability and no contamination. The ICTP irradiation raises polymer ablation in case of polyamide and polyester. Two features of the polymer ablation such as prompt response and durability were fundamentally investigated from viewpoint of shielding the heat flux. It was found that polyamide fiber has both a high prompt response and a long durability.

  9. Laser plasma of poly (methyl methacrylate) in air: modeling and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, L. A.; Bulgakova, N. M.; Tel'Minov, A. E.; Panchenko, A. N.; Shulepov, M. A.

    2010-09-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies on laser ablation of polymers (PMMA, polyimide) have been performed in a wide range of CO2-laser fluences. Evolution of polymer laser plume in air has been investigated with simultaneous registration of radiation spectra of the ablation products, spatial dynamics of plasma flare, and temporal behavior of plasma emission on separate spectral lines. It has been found that spectral lines have intensity peak after laser pulse termination while plasma emission spectra are similar to those of organic material combusting. The results confirm that combustion of the laser-vaporized polymers occurs in the plasma plume. A thermo-chemical model of heating and ablation of organic polymers by CO2 laser pulses has been developed which takes into account attenuation of radiation in laser plasmas and chemical processes leading to heating the plume of the ablation products. Temperature evolution in the irradiated sample, ablation dynamics, and laser beam attenuation are analyzed. The modeling results are compared with the experimental data on high-speed imaging of the plasma plume. The effect of the formation of a "plasma pipe" is revealed under polymer ablation in air under normal conditions.

  10. Numerical studies of ablated-plasma dynamics and precursor current of wire-array Z-pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Jun; Sun Shunkai; Ding Ning; Ning Cheng; Xiao Delong; Zhang Yang; Xue Chuang

    2011-04-15

    The dynamics of ablated plasmas of wire-array Z-pinches are studied numerically in (r,{theta}) geometry by using the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation model in which the mass injection boundary conditions are presented, and two-dimensional spatio-temporal distributions of magnetic field and precursor current during the ablation phase are obtained. The ablated-plasma dynamics contains four processes: drifting toward the axis, arriving at the axis and forming the precursor column, and contraction and expansion of the precursor column. The relationship among the maximum inward velocity of ablated plasma streams and the initial wire array parameters is analyzed and it is found that this velocity is relatively sensitive to the change of inter-wire separation but weakly depends on the original array radius. The results are in reasonable agreement with the experiments on MAGPIE facility. The origin of the current flow in the precursor plasmas is analyzed from the point of view of the B-field convection in (r,{theta}) plane. The dynamics of ablation streams determine the distribution of magnetic field and the current density J{sub z} inside the wire array. The precursor current can be approximately calculated by the integral of J{sub z} inside the region of a radius near to the column. In this model, the fraction of precursor current is less than 10% of the total current, which is close to the experimental results. When the current waveform is fixed, the increase of the inter-wire gap or decrease of the initial radius will lead to the increase of the precursor current.

  11. Simultaneous observation of nascent plasma and bubble induced by laser ablation in water with various pulse durations

    SciTech Connect

    Tamura, Ayaka Matsumoto, Ayumu; Nishi, Naoya; Sakka, Tetsuo; Fukami, Kazuhiro

    2015-05-07

    We investigate the effects of pulse duration on the dynamics of the nascent plasma and bubble induced by laser ablation in water. To examine the relationship between the nascent plasma and the bubble without disturbed by shot-to-shot fluctuation, we observe the images of the plasma and the bubble simultaneously by using two intensified charge coupled device detectors. We successfully observe the images of the plasma and bubble during the pulsed-irradiation, when the bubble size is as small as 20 μm. The light-emitting region of the plasma during the laser irradiation seems to exceed the bubble boundary in the case of the short-pulse (30-ns pulse) irradiation, while the size of the plasma is significantly smaller than that of the bubble in the case of the long-pulse (100-ns pulse) irradiation. The results suggest that the extent of the plasma quenching in the initial stage significantly depends on the pulse duration. Also, we investigate how the plasma-bubble relationship in the very early stage affects the shape of the atomic spectral lines observed at the later delay time of 600 ns. The present work gives important information to obtain high quality spectra in the application of underwater laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, as well as to clarify the mechanism of liquid-phase laser ablation.

  12. Plasma Potential and Langmuir Probe Measurements in the Near-field Plume of the NASA 300M Hall Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, Daniel A; Shastry, Rohit; Huang, Wensheng; Soulas, George C.; KamHawi, Hani

    2012-01-01

    In order to aid in the design of high-power Hall thrusters and provide experimental validation for existing modeling efforts, plasma potential and Langmuir probe measurements were performed in the near-field plume of the NASA 300M Hall thruster. A probe array consisting of a Faraday probe, Langmuir probe, and emissive probe was used to interrogate the plume from approximately 0.1 - 2.0 DT,m downstream of the thruster exit plane at four operating conditions: 300 V, 400 V, and 500 V at 20 kW as well as 300 V at 10 kW. Results show that the acceleration zone and high-temperature region were contained within 0.3 DT,m from the exit plane at all operating conditions. Isothermal lines were shown to strongly follow magnetic field lines in the nearfield, with maximum temperatures ranging from 19 - 27 eV. The electron temperature spatial distribution created large drops in measured floating potentials in front of the magnetic pole surfaces where the plasma density was small, which suggests strong sheaths at these surfaces. The data taken have provided valuable information for future design and modeling validation, and complements ongoing internal measurement efforts on the NASA 300 M.

  13. Plasma Potential and Langmuir Probe Measurements in the Near-field Plume of the NASA-300M Hall Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, Daniel A.; Shastry, Rohit; Huang, Wensheng; Soulas, George C.; Kamhawi, Hani

    2012-01-01

    In order to aid in the design of high-power Hall thrusters and provide experimental validation for existing modeling efforts, plasma potential and Langmuir probe measurements were performed in the near-field plume of the NASA-300M Hall thruster. A probe array consisting of a Faraday probe, Langmuir probe, and emissive probe was used to interrogate the plume from approximately 0.1 - 2.0 mean thruster diameters downstream of the thruster exit plane at four operating conditions: 300 V, 400 V, and 500 V at 20 kW as well as 300 V at 10 kW. Results show that the acceleration zone and high-temperature region were contained within 0.3 mean thruster diameters from the exit plane at all operating conditions. Isothermal lines were shown to strongly follow magnetic field lines in the near-field, with maximum temperatures ranging from 19 - 27 eV. The electron temperature spatial distribution created large drops in measured floating potentials in front of the magnetic pole surfaces where the plasma density was low, which suggests strong sheaths at these surfaces. The data taken have provided valuable information for future design and modeling validation, and complements ongoing internal measurement efforts on the NASA-300M.

  14. Plasma characterization and room temperature growth of carbon nanotubes and nano-onions by excimer laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhakrishnan, G.; Adams, P. M.; Bernstein, L. S.

    2007-07-01

    The deposition of carbon nanotubes and carbon nano-onions at room temperature using excimer laser radiation to ablate mixed graphite-metal targets is described. Our deposition conditions are in contrast to other investigations on the pulsed laser deposition of carbon nanotubes that have employed high temperatures and high pressures. We find that the formation of these carbon nanostructures is dependent on the ambient gas employed during ablation. In the presence of O 2 gas, carbon nanotubes and nano-onions are produced, while inert atmospheres such as Ar yield amorphous carbon. High-resolution, in situ, time-resolved emission spectroscopy has been used to track the evolution of species (C 2, C 3, Ni/Co) in the ablation plume. Spectral fits on low and high-resolution spectra reveal that the vibrational-rotational temperatures for C 2 produced in O 2 remain at ˜5000 K for nearly 20 μs but drop rapidly in Ar. Details of the formation of carbon nanotubes and nano-onions, and in situ time-resolved optical emission spectroscopy are described.

  15. The effect of magnetic fields on the products of laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musaev, O. R.; Sutter, E. A.; Wrobel, J. M.; Kruger, M. B.

    2016-02-01

    Structures of gold nanoparticles were formed by laser ablation of bulk gold immersed in water. An excimer laser with a wavelength of 351 nm and a pulse energy of 7 mJ was used. Ablation was performed in two configurations: without and with an external 0.2 T magnetic field parallel to the ablation plume. Both configurations result in structures that include chains of aggregated nanoparticles, but to different degrees. Ablation in a magnetic field results in a higher fraction of spherical nanoparticles and shorter nanowires, compared to the nanowire networks formed in the absence of the field. This can be explained by magnetic confinement of the plasma during plume expansion. A model explaining nanowire formation and dependence on fluence and magnetic field is proposed.

  16. Plasma microRNAs are associated with atrial fibrillation and change after catheter-ablation (the miRhythm Study)

    PubMed Central

    McManus, David D.; Tanriverdi, Kahraman; Lin, Honghuang; Esa, Nada; Kinno, Menhel; Mandapati, Divakar; Tam, Stanley; Okike, Okike N.; Ellinor, Patrick T.; Keaney, John F.; Donahue, J, Kevin; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Freedman, Jane E.

    2014-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD), control gene expression, and are detectable in the circulation. Objective To test the hypothesis that circulating miRNAs would be associated with atrial fibrillation (AF). Methods Using a prospective study design powered to detect subtle differences in miRNAs, we quantified plasma expression of 86 miRNAs by high-throughput quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) in 112 participants with AF and 99 without AF. To examine parallels between cardiac and plasma miRNA profiles, we quantified atrial tissue and plasma miRNA expression using qRT-PCR in 31 participants undergoing surgery. We also explored the hypothesis that lower AF burden after ablation would be reflected in the circulating blood pool by examining change in plasma miRNAs after AF ablation (n=47). Results The mean age of the cohort was 59 years. 58% of participants were men. Plasma miRs-21 and 150 were 2-fold lower in participants with AF than in those without AF after adjustment (p ≤ 0.0006). Plasma levels of miRs-21 and 150 were also lower in participants with paroxysmal AF than in those with persistent AF (p <0.05). Expression of miR-21, but not miR-150, was lower in atrial tissue from patients with AF compared to no AF (p<0.05). Plasma levels of miRs-21 and 150 increased 3-fold after AF ablation (p ≤ 0.0006). Conclusions Cardiac miRs-21 and 150 are known to regulate genes implicated in atrial remodeling. Our findings show associations between plasma miRs-21 and 150 and AF, suggesting that circulating miRNAs provide insights into cardiac gene regulation. PMID:25257092

  17. Thermal Shock and Ablation Behavior of Tungsten Nozzle Produced by Plasma Spray Forming and Hot Isostatic Pressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. M.; Xiong, X.; Zhao, Z. W.; Xie, L.; Min, X. B.; Yan, J. H.; Xia, G. M.; Zheng, F.

    2015-08-01

    Tungsten nozzle was produced by plasma spray forming (PSF, relative density of 86 ± 2%) followed by hot isostatic pressing (HIPing, 97 ± 2%) at 2000 °C and 180 MPa for 180 min. Scanning electron microscope, x-ray diffractometer, Archimedes method, Vickers hardness, and tensile tests have been employed to study microstructure, phase composition, density, micro-hardness, and mechanical properties of the parts. Resistance of thermal shock and ablation behavior of W nozzle were investigated by hot-firing test on solid rocket motor (SRM). Comparing with PSF nozzle, less damage was observed for HIPed sample after SRM test. Linear ablation rate of nozzle made by PSF was (0.120 ± 0.048) mm/s, while that after HIPing reduced to (0.0075 ± 0.0025) mm/s. Three types of ablation mechanisms including mechanical erosion, thermophysical erosion, and thermochemical ablation took place during hot-firing test. The order of degree of ablation was nozzle throat > convergence > dilation inside W nozzle.

  18. The effect of ultrafast laser wavelength on ablation properties and implications on sample introduction in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    LaHaye, N. L.; Harilal, S. S.; Diwakar, P. K.; Hassanein, A.; Kulkarni, P.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the role of femtosecond (fs) laser wavelength on laser ablation (LA) and its relation to laser generated aerosol counts and particle distribution, inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) signal intensity, detection limits, and elemental fractionation. Four different NIST standard reference materials (610, 613, 615, and 616) were ablated using 400 nm and 800 nm fs laser pulses to study the effect of wavelength on laser ablation rate, accuracy, precision, and fractionation. Our results show that the detection limits are lower for 400 nm laser excitation than 800 nm laser excitation at lower laser energies but approximately equal at higher energies. Ablation threshold was also found to be lower for 400 nm than 800 nm laser excitation. Particle size distributions are very similar for 400 nm and 800 nm wavelengths; however, they differ significantly in counts at similar laser fluence levels. This study concludes that 400 nm LA is more beneficial for sample introduction in ICP-MS, particularly when lower laser energies are to be used for ablation. PMID:26640294

  19. The effect of ultrafast laser wavelength on ablation properties and implications on sample introduction in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    LaHaye, N. L.; Harilal, S. S.; Diwakar, P. K.; Hassanein, A.; Kulkarni, P.

    2013-07-14

    We investigated the role of femtosecond (fs) laser wavelength on laser ablation (LA) and its relation to laser generated aerosol counts and particle distribution, inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) signal intensity, detection limits, and elemental fractionation. Four different NIST standard reference materials (610, 613, 615, and 616) were ablated using 400 nm and 800 nm fs laser pulses to study the effect of wavelength on laser ablation rate, accuracy, precision, and fractionation. Our results show that the detection limits are lower for 400 nm laser excitation than 800 nm laser excitation at lower laser energies but approximately equal at higher energies. Ablation threshold was also found to be lower for 400 nm than 800 nm laser excitation. Particle size distributions are very similar for 400 nm and 800 nm wavelengths; however, they differ significantly in counts at similar laser fluence levels. This study concludes that 400 nm LA is more beneficial for sample introduction in ICP-MS, particularly when lower laser energies are to be used for ablation.

  20. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry for analysis of pellets of plant materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, Marcos S.; Schenk, Emily R.; Santos, Dário; Krug, Francisco José; Almirall, José R.

    An evaluation of laser ablation inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (LAICP OES) for the direct analysis of pelleted plant material is reported. Ground leaves of orange citrus, soy and sugarcane were comminuted using a high-speed ball mill, pressed into pellets and sampled directly with laser ablation and analyzed by ICP OES. The limits of detection (LODs) for the method ranged from as low as 0.1 mg kg- 1 for Zn to as high as 94 mg kg- 1 for K but were generally below 6 mg kg- 1 for most of the elements of interest. A certified reference material consisting of a similar matrix (NIST SRM 1547 peach leaves) was used to check the accuracy of the calibration and the reported method resulted in an average bias of ~ 5% for all the elements of interest. The precision for the reported method ranged from as low as 4% relative standard deviation (RSD) for Mn to as high as 17% RSD for Zn but averaged ~ 6.5% RSD for all the elements (n = 10). The proposed method was tested for the determination of Ca, Mg, P, K, Fe, Mn, Zn and B, and the results were in good agreement with those obtained for the corresponding acid digests by ICP-OES, no differences being observed by applying a paired t-test at the 95% confidence level. The reported direct solid sampling method provides a fast alternative to acid digestion that results in similar and appropriate analytical figures of merit with regard to sensitivity, accuracy and precision for plant material analysis.

  1. Influence of Oxidation Behavior of Feedstock on Microstructure and Ablation Resistance of Plasma-Sprayed Zirconium Carbide Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Cui; Ge, Xuelian; Niu, Yaran; Li, Hong; Huang, Liping; Zheng, Xuebin; Sun, Jinliang

    2015-10-01

    Plasma spray is one of the suitable technologies to deposit carbide coatings with high melting point, such as ZrC. However, in the spray processes performed under atmosphere, oxidation of the carbide powder is inevitable. To investigate the influence of the oxidation behavior of feedstock on microstructure and ablation resistance of the deposited coating, ZrC coatings were prepared by atmospheric and vacuum plasma spray (APS and VPS) technologies, respectively. SiC-coated graphite was applied as the substrate. The obtained results showed that the oxidation of ZrC powder in APS process resulted in the formation of ZrO and Zr2O phases. Pores and cracks were more likely to be formed in the as-sprayed APS-ZrC coating. The VPS-ZrC coating without oxides possessed denser microstructure, higher thermal diffusivity, and lower coefficients of thermal expansion as compared with the APS-ZrC coating. A dense ZrO2 layer would be formed on the surface of the VPS-ZrC-coated sample during the ablation process and the substrate can be protected sufficiently after being ablated in high temperature plasma jet. However, the ZrO2 layer, formed by oxidation of the APS-ZrC coating having loose structure, was easy to be washed away by the shearing action of the plasma jet.

  2. Laser ablation plasmas for diagnostics of structured electronic and optical materials during or after laser processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Richard E.; Bol'shakov, Alexander A.; Yoo, Jong H.; González, Jhanis J.

    2012-03-01

    Laser induced plasma can be used for rapid optical diagnostics of electronic, optical, electro-optical, electromechanical and other structures. Plasma monitoring and diagnostics can be realized during laser processing in real time by means of measuring optical emission that originates from the pulsed laser-material interaction. In post-process applications, e.g., quality assurance and quality control, surface raster scanning and depth profiling can be realized with high spatial resolution (~10 nm in depth and ~3 μm lateral). Commercial instruments based on laser induced breakdown spectrometry (LIBS) are available for these purposes. Since only a laser beam comes in direct contact with the sample, such diagnostics are sterile and non-disruptive, and can be performed at a distance, e.g. through a window. The technique enables rapid micro-localized chemical analysis without a need for sample preparation, dissolution or evacuation of samples, thus it is particularly beneficial in fabrication of thin films and structures, such as electronic, photovoltaic and electro-optical devices or circuits of devices. Spectrum acquisition from a single laser shot provides detection limits for metal traces of ~10 μg/g, which can be further improved by accumulating signal from multiple laser pulses. LIBS detection limit for Br in polyethylene is 90 μg/g using 50-shot spectral accumulation (halogen detection is a requirement for semiconductor package materials). Three to four orders of magnitude lower detection limits can be obtained with a femtosecond laser ablation - inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (LA-ICP-MS), which is also provided on commercial basis. Laser repetition rate is currently up to 20 Hz in LIBS instruments and up to 100 kHz in LA-ICP-MS.

  3. A Mass Spectrometry Study of Isotope Separation in the Laser Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suen, Timothy Wu

    Accurate quantification of isotope ratios is critical for both preventing the development of illicit weapons programs in nuclear safeguards and identifying the source of smuggled material in nuclear forensics. While isotope analysis has traditionally been performed by mass spectrometry, the need for in situ measurements has prompted the development of optical techniques, such as laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry (LAMIS). These optical measurements rely on laser ablation for direct solid sampling, but several past studies have suggested that the distribution of isotopes in the ablation plume is not uniform. This study seeks to characterize isotope separation in the laser plume through the use of orthogonal-acceleration time-of-flight mass spectrometry. A silver foil was ablated with a Nd:YAG at 355 nm at an energy of 50 muJ with a spot size of 71 mum, for a fluence of 1.3 J/cm2 and an irradiance of 250 MW/cm2. Flat-plate repellers were used to sample the plume, and a temporal profile of the ions was obtained by varying the time delay on the high-voltage pulse. A spatial profile along the axis of the plume was generated by changing the position of the sample, which yielded snapshots of the isotopic composition with time. In addition, the reflectron time-of-flight system was used as an energy filter in conjunction with the repellers to sample slices of the laser plasma orthogonal to the plume axis. Mass spectrometry of the plume revealed a fast ion distribution and a slow ion distribution. Measurements taken across the entire plume showed the fast 109Ag ions slightly ahead in both space and time, causing the 107Ag fraction to drop to 0.34 at 3 mus, 4 mm from the sample surface. Although measurements centered on the near side of the plume did not show isotope separation, the slow ions on the far side of the plume included much more 109Ag than 107Ag. In addition to examining the isotope content of the ablation

  4. Subcellular analysis by laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A; Shrestha, Bindesh

    2014-12-02

    In various embodiments, a method of laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LAESI-MS) may generally comprise micro-dissecting a cell comprising at least one of a cell wall and a cell membrane to expose at least one subcellular component therein, ablating the at least one subcellular component by an infrared laser pulse to form an ablation plume, intercepting the ablation plume by an electrospray plume to form ions, and detecting the ions by mass spectrometry.

  5. Characterization of the aerosol produced by infrared femtosecond laser ablation of polyacrylamide gels for the sensitive inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry detection of selenoproteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claverie, Fanny; Pécheyran, Christophe; Mounicou, Sandra; Ballihaut, Guillaume; Fernandez, Beatriz; Alexis, Joël; Lobinski, Ryszard; Donard, Olivier F. X.

    2009-07-01

    A 2D high repetition rate femtosecond laser ablation strategy (2-mm wide lane) previously developed for the detection of selenoproteins in gel electrophoresis by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was found to increase signal sensitivity by a factor of 40 compared to conventional nanosecond ablation (0.12-mm wide lane) [G. Ballihaut, F. Claverie, C. Pécheyran, S. Mounicou, R. Grimaud and R. Lobinski, Sensitive Detection of Selenoproteins in Gel Electrophoresis by High Repetition Rate Femtosecond Laser Ablation-Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry, Anal. Chem. 79 (2007) 6874-6880]. Such improvement couldn't be explained solely by the difference of amount of material ablated, and then, was attributed to the aerosol properties. In order to validate this hypothesis, the characterization of the aerosol produced by nanosecond and high repetition rate femtosecond laser ablation of polyacrylamide gels was investigated. Our 2D high repetition rate femtosecond laser ablation strategy of 2-mm wide lane was found to produce aerosols of similar particle size distribution compared to nanosecond laser ablation of 0.12-mm wide lane, with 38% mass of particles < 1 µm. However, at high repetition rate, when the ablated surface was reduced, the particle size distribution was shifted toward thinner particle diameter (up to 77% for a 0.12-mm wide lane at 285 µm depth). Meanwhile, scanning electron microscopy was employed to visualize the morphology of the aerosol. In the case of larger ablation, the fine particles ejected from the sample were found to form agglomerates due to higher ablation rate and then higher collision probability. Additionally, investigations of the plasma temperature changes during the ablation demonstrated that the introduction of such amount of polyacrylamide gel particles had very limited impact on the ICP source (Δ T~ 25 ± 5 K). This suggests that the cohesion forces between the thin particles composing these large aggregates were weak

  6. Critical assessment of the issues in the modeling of ablation and plasma expansion processes in the pulsed laser deposition of metals

    SciTech Connect

    Marla, Deepak; Bhandarkar, Upendra V.; Joshi, Suhas S.

    2011-01-15

    This paper presents a review on the modeling of ablation and plasma expansion processes in the pulsed laser deposition of metals. The ablation of a target is the key process that determines the amount of material to be deposited; while, the plasma expansion governs the characteristics of the deposited material. The modeling of ablation process involves a study of two complex phenomena: (i) laser-target interaction and (ii) plasma formation and subsequent shielding of the incoming radiation. The laser-target interaction is a function of pulse duration, which is captured by various models that are described in this paper. The plasma produced as a result of laser-target interaction, further interacts with the incoming radiation, causing the shielding of the target. The shielding process has been modeled by considering the various photon absorption mechanisms operative inside the plasma, namely: inverse Bremsstrahlung, photoionization, and Mie absorption. Concurrently, the plasma expands freely until the ablated material gets deposited on the substrate. Various models describing the plasma expansion process have been presented. The ability of the theoretical models in predicting various ablation and plasma characteristics has also been compared with the relevant experimental data from the literature. The paper concludes with identification of critical issues and recommendations for future modeling endeavors.

  7. Laser-ablation sampling for inductively coupled plasma distance-of-flight mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Gundlach-Graham, Alexander W.; Dennis, Elise; Ray, Steven J.; Enke, Christie G.; Barinaga, Charles J.; Koppenaal, David W.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2015-01-01

    An inductively coupled plasma distance-of-flight mass spectrometer (ICP-DOFMS) has been coupled with laser-ablation (LA) sample introduction for the elemental analysis of solids. ICP-DOFMS is well suited for the analysis of laser-generated aerosols because it offers both high-speed mass analysis and simultaneous multi-elemental detection. Here, we evaluate the analytical performance of the LA-ICP-DOFMS instrument, equipped with a microchannel plate-based imaging detector, for the measurement of steady-state LA signals, as well as transient signals produced from single LA events. Steady-state detection limits are 1 mg g1, and absolute single-pulse LA detection limits are 200 fg for uranium; the system is shown capable of performing time-resolved single-pulse LA analysis. By leveraging the benefits of simultaneous multi-elemental detection, we also attain a good shot-to-shot reproducibility of 6% relative standard deviation (RSD) and isotope-ratio precision of 0.3% RSD with a 10 s integration time.

  8. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer with laser ablation metal ions release detection in the human mouth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kueerova, Hana; Dostalova, Tatjana; Prochazkova, J.

    2002-06-01

    Presence of more dental alloys in oral cavity often causes pathological symptoms. Due to various and multi-faced symptomatology, they tend to be a source of significant problems not only for the patient but also for the dentist. Metal ions released from alloys can cause subjective and objective symptoms in mouth. The aim of this study was detection of metal elements presence in saliva. There were 4 groups of examined persons: with intact teeth (15 individuals) with metallic restorations, pathological currents 5-30 (mu) A, multi-faced subjective symptomatology and uncharacteristic objective diagnosis (32 patients), with metallic restorations and no subjective symptoms (14 persons) and with metallic restorations, without pathological currents and with problems related to galvanism (13 patients). Presence of 14 metal elements was checked by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer with laser ablation. Nd:YAG laser detector was used. There were significant differences in content of silver, gold and mercury between persons with intact teeth and other three groups. There were no differences found between subjects with and without galvanic currents, and presence of subjective and objective symptoms.

  9. Dynamic materials evaluation by confined plasma ablation and laser-generated shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paisley, Dennis L.; Swift, D. C.; Forsman, A. C.; Kyrala, George A.; Johnson, Randall P.; Kopp, Roger A.; Hauer, Allan A.; Wark, Justin S.; Loveridge, A.; Allen, A. M.; Kalantar, Daniel H.

    2000-08-01

    Laser-generated shocks can and have been used to study their effects on single crystal materials during shock compression. While a crystal undergoes shock compression and release, the transient x- ray diffraction (TXD) of the Bragg and Laue signals is indicative of the change in the crystal lattice spacing. The lattice spacing directly relates to the strain in the crystal. From the dynamic lattice data, strain, strain rate, and/or phase change in a material may be determined. Confined ablation plasmas can efficiently launch a flyer plate for direct impact on a target material imparting a well-characterized shock input and generate kilobar to megabar pressure pulses over a wide range of pulse duration (= 20 ns). The laser-launched flyer plates are analogous to those launched by gas guns, but the smaller size provides an experimental method not easily accessible by larger gas gun experiments. With lasers, diagnostic equipment can be easily synchronized to study dynamic material parameters, i.e., single crystal shock dynamics, interfacial bond strengths of thin coatings, grain-interfaces, texture, and high strain rates (106 - 109 sec-1).

  10. Oxygen sensitivity of zinc oxide nanoparticles produced via laser-ablated plasma in pressurized liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Taku; Shimizu, Yoshiki; Ito, Tsuyohito

    2015-09-01

    While traditional semiconductor oxygen sensor operate only with elevated temperature (= 700 K), the room-temperature operation of the ZnO oxygen sensors have been demonstrated with the help of UV light irradiation. Especially, ZnO nanotubes and nanoparticles have attracted much attentions as highly sensitive oxygen sensors and photodetectors. To the best of our knowledge, the reported works of gas sensors with ZnO nanostructures have been mostly intended for revealing effects of the morphology/shape and the size of the nanostructures. For further improvements of the ZnO-based gas sensors, it is probably required to understand effects of microscopic structures, such as densities of various defects. In this study, we synthesized the ZnO nanoparticles with various defects by means of laser-ablated plasma in pressurized water-ethanol mixture. The results indicate that the defects in ZnO affect oxygen sensitivity, and especially VO + defects seem to be mostly responsible for the resistance change of ZnO nanoparticles. We demonstrate that partial oxygen pressure can be measured with high sensitivity.

  11. Imaging mass spectrometry in biological tissues by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Becker, J S; Becker, J Su; Zoriy, M V; Dobrowolska, J; Matucsh, A

    2007-01-01

    Of all the inorganic mass spectrometric techniques, laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) plays a key role as a powerful and sensitive microanalytical technique enabling multi- element trace analysis and isotope ratio measurements at trace and ultratrace level. LA-ICP-MS was used to produce images of detailed regionally-specific element distribution in 20 microm thin sections of different parts of the human brain. The quantitative determination of copper, zinc, lead and uranium distribution in thin slices of human brain samples was performed using matrix-matched laboratory standards via external calibration procedures. Imaging mass spectrometry provides new information on the spatially inhomogeneous element distribution in thin sections of human tissues, for example, of different brain regions (the insular region) or brain tumor tissues. The detection limits obtained for Cu, Zn, Pb and U were in the ng g(-1) range. Possible strategies of LA-ICP-MS in brain research and life sciences include the elemental imaging of thin slices of brain tissue or applications in proteome analysis by combination with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization MS to study phospho- and metal- containing proteins will be discussed. PMID:17885277

  12. Features of silicon-containing coatings deposition from ablation plasma formed by a powerful ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazonov, R.; Kholodnaya, G.; Ponomarev, D.; Remnev, G.; Khailov, I.

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents the research of features of silicon-containing coatings deposition from ablation plasma, which is formed by a powerful ion beam at the influence on a microsized pressed powder of SiO2. Experimental research have been conducted with a laboratory setup based on a TEMP-4M pulsed ion accelerator in a double-pulse forming mode; the first is negative (300-500 ns, 100-150 kV), and the second is positive (150 ns, 250-300 kV). A beam composition: C+ ions (60-70 %) and protons, the ion current density on the target is 25±5 A/cm2. An electron self-magnetically insulated diode has been used to generate the ion beam in the TEMP-4M accelerator. The properties of obtained silicon-containing films have been analyzed with the help of IR spectroscopy. A surface structure has been studied by the method of scanning electron microscopy.

  13. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry imaging of metals in experimental and clinical Wilson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Boaru, Sorina Georgiana; Merle, Uta; Uerlings, Ricarda; Zimmermann, Astrid; Flechtenmacher, Christa; Willheim, Claudia; Eder, Elisabeth; Ferenci, Peter; Stremmel, Wolfgang; Weiskirchen, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Wilson's disease is an autosomal recessive disorder in which the liver does not properly release copper into bile, resulting in prominent copper accumulation in various tissues. Affected patients suffer from hepatic disorders and severe neurological defects. Experimental studies in mutant mice in which the copper-transporting ATPase gene (Atp7b) is disrupted revealed a drastic, time-dependent accumulation of hepatic copper that is accompanied by formation of regenerative nodes resembling cirrhosis. Therefore, these mice represent an excellent exploratory model for Wilson's disease. However, the precise time course in hepatic copper accumulation and its impact on other trace metals within the liver is yet poorly understood. We have recently established novel laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry protocols allowing quantitative metal imaging in human and murine liver tissue with high sensitivity, spatial resolution, specificity and quantification ability. By use of these techniques, we here aimed to comparatively analyse hepatic metal content in wild-type and Atp7b deficient mice during ageing. We demonstrate that the age-dependent accumulation of hepatic copper is strictly associated with a simultaneous increase in iron and zinc, while the intrahepatic concentration and distribution of other metals or metalloids is not affected. The same findings were obtained in well-defined human liver samples that were obtained from patients suffering from Wilson's disease. We conclude that in Wilson's disease the imbalances of hepatic copper during ageing are closely correlated with alterations in intrahepatic iron and zinc content. PMID:25704483

  14. Enhancement of conversion efficiency and spatial coherence of high order harmonics generated from pre-formed plasma plumes using an apertured laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, M.; Chakravarty, U.; Rathore, R.; Chakera, J. A.; Naik, P. A.; Gupta, P. D.

    2016-04-01

    The effect of laser beam aperturing (Ti: sapphire laser; 800 nm, 45 fs) on the conversion efficiency (CE), harmonic yield and spatial coherence of high order harmonics generated from a low excited plasma plume of carbon (neutral and singly charged ions) is studied. The optimization of CE by varying the aperture size in combination with different laser and plasma plume parameters was carried out. The CE of the 15th harmonic is enhanced from ˜10-7 for an unapertured laser beam to ˜10-6 for ˜¼ times the unapertured beam diameter, at same laser energy in both cases. Further, it was found that, at a given aperture size, there is an optimum prepulse intensity for maximum CE. The results are explained by taking into account the theoretical consideration of phase matching issues in plasma plumes. The study shows that tuning the prepulse intensity and aperture size gives an easy handle to increase the harmonic conversion along with its coherence properties. The study will be useful for producing an intense source of harmonics with high spatial coherence from plasmas plumes for applications.

  15. Highly ionized plasma plume generation by long-pulse CO/sub 2/ laser irradiation of solid targets in strong axial magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, A L; Crawford, E A

    1982-01-01

    The present work utilizes high f number optics and is directed primarily at controlling the conditions in the magnetically confined plume. Typically, fully ionized carbon plasmas have been produced with 10/sup 18/ cm/sup -3/ electron densities and 100 to 150 eV electron temperatures. These carbon plasmas have been doped with high Z atoms in order to study ionization and emission rates at the above conditions.

  16. The effects of He on ablation and inductively coupled plasma environment in ultra-violet, nanosecond laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, Lance M.; Farnsworth, Paul B.

    2015-11-01

    The effects of helium gas on ablation and ICP processes were investigated. Differences in the size, shape, and abundance of aerosol particles generated in argon and helium atmosphere were studied off-line using SEM imaging of aerosol particles impacted on polycarbonate filter disks. In general, ablation in helium generated fewer large particles, and larger, more densely-packed soft agglomerates. However, corresponding changes in the ion densities in the ICP, observed in high-resolution images obtained using LIF, were not always predictable. In all cases, higher He/Ar ratios led to lower ion densities in the ICP. This effect was attributed to increased rates of off-axis diffusion at higher He/Ar ratios. Differences in the ion densities produced during ablation in argon vs helium were highly dependent on sample type, the axial position of vaporization, and the He/Ar ratio. There was evidence that vaporization efficiencies of soft agglomerates were less affected than micron-sized particles by particle acceleration at higher He/Ar ratios.

  17. Strong Field-Induced Frequency Conversion of Laser Radiation in Plasma Plumes: Recent Achievements

    PubMed Central

    Ganeev, R. A.

    2013-01-01

    New findings in plasma harmonics studies using strong laser fields are reviewed. We discuss recent achievements in the growth of the efficiency of coherent extreme ultraviolet (XUV) radiation sources based on frequency conversion of the ultrashort pulses in the laser-produced plasmas, which allowed for the spectral and structural studies of matter through the high-order harmonic generation (HHG) spectroscopy. These studies showed that plasma HHG can open new opportunities in many unexpected areas of laser-matter interaction. Besides being considered as an alternative method for generation of coherent XUV radiation, it can be used as a powerful tool for various spectroscopic and analytical applications. PMID:23864818

  18. Fast pressure probe measurements of a high-velocity plasma plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messer, S.; Case, A.; Bomgardner, R.; Phillips, M.; Witherspoon, F. D.

    2009-06-01

    This article reports measurements of stagnation pressure on a contoured coaxial gun, now installed at the Maryland Centrifugal Experiment [R. Ellis et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 055704 (2005)]. The impact of the plasma on the stationary probe is consistent with adiabatic compression and supersonic flow. Measured pressure signals are consistent with a shock traveling at 110 km/s and a following flow with speed of 90 km/s. At late times, the pressure profile is consistent with an adiabatically expanding plasma that fills the vacuum chamber.

  19. Deposition and composition-control of Mn-doped ZnO thin films by combinatorial pulsed laser deposition using two delayed plasma plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Ake, C.; Camacho, R.; Moreno, L.

    2012-08-15

    Thin films of ZnO doped with manganese were deposited by double-beam, combinatorial pulsed laser deposition. The laser-induced plasmas were studied by means of fast photography and using a Langmuir probe, whereas the films were analyzed by x-ray-diffraction and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. The effect of the relative delay between plasma plumes on the characteristics of the films was analyzed. It was found that using this parameter, it is possible to control the dopant content keeping the oriented wurtzite structure of the films. The minimum content of Mn was found for plume delays between 0 and 10 {mu}s as the interaction between plasmas scatters the dopant species away from the substrate, thus reducing the incorporation of Mn into the films. Results suggest that for delays shorter than {approx}100 {mu}s, the expansion of the second plume through the region behind the first plume affects the composition of the film.

  20. Current-driven ion-acoustic and potential-relaxation instabilities excited in plasma plume during electron beam welding

    SciTech Connect

    Trushnikov, D. N.; Mladenov, G. M. Koleva, E. G.; Belenkiy, V. Ya. Varushkin, S. V.

    2014-04-15

    Many papers have sought correlations between the parameters of secondary particles generated above the beam/work piece interaction zone, dynamics of processes in the keyhole, and technological processes. Low- and high-frequency oscillations of the current, collected by plasma have been observed above the welding zone during electron beam welding. Low-frequency oscillations of secondary signals are related to capillary instabilities of the keyhole, however; the physical mechanisms responsible for the high-frequency oscillations (>10 kHz) of the collected current are not fully understood. This paper shows that peak frequencies in the spectra of the collected high-frequency signal are dependent on the reciprocal distance between the welding zone and collector electrode. From the relationship between current harmonics frequency and distance of the collector/welding zone, it can be estimated that the draft velocity of electrons or phase velocity of excited waves is about 1600 m/s. The dispersion relation with the properties of ion-acoustic waves is related to electron temperature 10 000 K, ion temperature 2 400 K and plasma density 10{sup 16} m{sup −3}, which is analogues to the parameters of potential-relaxation instabilities, observed in similar conditions. The estimated critical density of the transported current for creating the anomalous resistance state of plasma is of the order of 3 A·m{sup −2}, i.e. 8 mA for a 3–10 cm{sup 2} collector electrode. Thus, it is assumed that the observed high-frequency oscillations of the current collected by the positive collector electrode are caused by relaxation processes in the plasma plume above the welding zone, and not a direct demonstration of oscillations in the keyhole.

  1. Characterization of binary silver based alloys by nanosecond-infrared-laser-ablation-inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Márquez, Ciro; Sobral, Hugo

    2013-11-01

    A nanosecond infrared laser ablation (LA) system was examined to determine the composition of several silver-copper alloys through an inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES). Samples with different concentrations were prepared and analyzed by atomic absorption, and ICP-OES after sample digestion, and compared with an energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometer-scanning electron microscopy (EDX-SEM). Elemental fractionation during the ablation process and within the ICP was investigated for different laser frequencies and fluences. Samples were used for optimizing and calibrating the coupling between LA to the ICP-OES system. Results obtained from the samples analysis were in agreement with those obtained by atomic absorption spectroscopy, ICP-OES and EDX-SEM, showing that fractionation was not significant for laser fluences higher than 55 J cm-2.

  2. Multimodal Vacuum-Assisted Plasma Ion (VaPI) Source with Transmission Mode and Laser Ablation Sampling Capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keelor, Joel D.; Farnsworth, Paul B.; Weber, Arthur L.; Abbott-Lyon, Heather; Fernández, Facundo M.

    2016-05-01

    We have developed a multimodal ion source design that can be configured on the fly for various analysis modes, designed for more efficient and reproducible sampling at the mass spectrometer atmospheric pressure (AP) interface in a number of different applications. This vacuum-assisted plasma ionization (VaPI) source features interchangeable transmission mode and laser ablation sampling geometries. Operating in both AC and DC power regimes with similar results, the ion source was optimized for parameters including helium flow rate and gas temperature using transmission mode to analyze volatile standards and drug tablets. Using laser ablation, matrix effects were studied, and the source was used to monitor the products of model prebiotic synthetic reactions.

  3. Multimodal Vacuum-Assisted Plasma Ion (VaPI) Source with Transmission Mode and Laser Ablation Sampling Capabilities.

    PubMed

    Keelor, Joel D; Farnsworth, Paul B; L Weber, Arthur; Abbott-Lyon, Heather; Fernández, Facundo M

    2016-05-01

    We have developed a multimodal ion source design that can be configured on the fly for various analysis modes, designed for more efficient and reproducible sampling at the mass spectrometer atmospheric pressure (AP) interface in a number of different applications. This vacuum-assisted plasma ionization (VaPI) source features interchangeable transmission mode and laser ablation sampling geometries. Operating in both AC and DC power regimes with similar results, the ion source was optimized for parameters including helium flow rate and gas temperature using transmission mode to analyze volatile standards and drug tablets. Using laser ablation, matrix effects were studied, and the source was used to monitor the products of model prebiotic synthetic reactions. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26883531

  4. Experimental investigation of solid hydrogen pellet ablation in high-temperature plasmas using holographic interferometry and other diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Jr., C. E.

    1981-03-01

    The technology currently most favored for the refueling of fusion reactors is the high-velocity injection of solid hydrogen pellets. Design details are presented for a holographic interferometer/shadowgraph used to study the microscopic characteristics of a solid hydrogen pellet ablating in an approx. 1-keV plasma. Experimental data are presented for two sets of experiments in which the interferometer/shadowgraph was used to study approx. 1-mm-diam solid hydrogen pellets injected into the Impurity Study Experiment (ISX-B) tokamak at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) at velocities of 1000 m/s. In addition to the use of the holographic interferometer, the pellet ablation process is diagnosed by studying the emission of Balmer-alpha photons and by using the available tokamak diagnostics (Thomson scattering, microwave/far-infrared interferometer, pyroelectric radiometer, hard x-ray detector).

  5. Simulation of laser-driven, ablated plasma flows in collisionless shock experiments on OMEGA and the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosskopf, M. J.; Drake, R. P.; Kuranz, C. C.; Rutter, E. M.; Ross, J. S.; Kugland, N. L.; Plechaty, C.; Remington, B. A.; Spitkovsky, A.; Gargate, L.; Gregori, G.; Bell, A.; Murphy, C. D.; Meinecke, J.; Reville, B.; Sakawa, Y.; Kuramitsu, Y.; Takabe, H.; Froula, D. H.; Fiksel, G.; Miniati, F.; Koenig, M.; Ravasio, A.; Liang, E.; Fu, W.; Woolsey, N.; Park, H.-S.

    2013-03-01

    Experiments investigating the physics of interpenetrating, collisionless, ablated plasma flows have become an important area of research in the high-energy-density field. In order to evaluate the feasibility of designing experiments that will generate a collisionless shock mediated by the Weibel instability on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser, computer simulations using the Center for Radiative Shock Hydrodynamics (CRASH) radiation-hydrodynamics model have been carried out. This paper reports assessment of whether the experiment can reach the required scale size while maintaining the low interflow collisionality necessary for the collisionless shock to form. Comparison of simulation results with data from Omega experiments shows the ability of the CRASH code to model these ablated systems. The combined results indicate that experiments on the NIF are capable of reaching the regimes necessary for the formation of a collisionless shock in a laboratory experiment.

  6. Secondary plasma formation after single pulse laser ablation underwater and its advantages for laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS).

    PubMed

    Gavrilović, M R; Cvejić, M; Lazic, V; Jovićević, S

    2016-06-01

    In this work we present studies of spatial and temporal plasma evolution after single pulse ablation of an aluminium target in water. The laser ablation was performed using 20 ns long pulses emitted at 1064 nm. The plasma characterization was performed by fast photography, the Schlieren technique, shadowgraphy and optical emission spectroscopy. The experimental results indicate the existence of two distinct plasma stages: the first stage has a duration of approximately 500 ns from the laser pulse, and is followed by a new plasma growth starting from the crater center. The secondary plasma slowly evolves inside the growing vapor bubble, and its optical emission lasts over several tens of microseconds. Later, the hot glowing particles, trapped inside the vapor cavity, were detected during the whole cycle of the bubble, where the first collapse occurs after 475 μs from the laser pulse. Differences in the plasma properties during the two evolution phases are discussed, with an accent on the optical emission since its detection is of primary importance for LIBS. Here we demonstrate that the LIBS signal quality in single pulse excitation underwater can be greatly enhanced by detecting only the secondary plasma emission, and also by applying long acquisition gates (in the order of 10-100 μs). The presented results are of great importance for LIBS measurements inside a liquid environment, since they prove that a good analytical signal can be obtained by using nanosecond pulses from a single commercial laser source and by employing cost effective, not gated detectors. PMID:27180875

  7. Plasma Potential and Langmuir Probe Measurements in the Near-field Plume of the NASA-457Mv2 Hall Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shastry, Rohit; Huang, Wensheng; Herman, Daniel A.; Soulas, George C.; Kamhawi, Hani

    2012-01-01

    In order to further the design of future high-power Hall thrusters and provide experimental validation for ongoing modeling efforts, plasma potential and Langmuir probe measurements were performed on the 50-kW NASA-457Mv2. An electrostatic probe array comprised of a near-field Faraday probe, single Langmuir probe, and emissive probe was used to interrogate the near-field plume from approximately 0.1 - 2.0 mean thruster diameters downstream of the thruster exit plane at the following operating conditions: 300 V, 400 V and 500 V at 30 kW and 500 V at 50 kW. Results have shown that the acceleration zone is limited to within 0.4 mean thruster diameters of the exit plane while the high-temperature region is limited to 0.25 mean thruster diameters from the exit plane at all four operating conditions. Maximum plasma potentials in the near-field at 300 and 400 V were approximately 50 V with respect to cathode potential, while maximum electron temperatures varied from 24 - 32 eV, depending on operating condition. Isothermal lines at all operating conditions were found to strongly resemble the magnetic field topology in the high-temperature regions. This distribution was found to create regions of high temperature and low density near the magnetic poles, indicating strong, thick sheath formation along these surfaces. The data taken from this study are considered valuable for future design as well as modeling validation.

  8. Plasma Potential and Langmuir Probe Measurements in the Near-Field Plume of the NASA-457Mv2 Hall Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shastry, Rohit; Huang, Wensheng; Herman, Daniel A.; Soulas, George C.; Kamhawi, Hani

    2012-01-01

    In order to further the design of future high-power Hall thrusters and provide experimental validation for ongoing modeling efforts, plasma potential and Langmuir probe measurements were performed on the 50-kW NASA-457Mv2. An electrostatic probe array comprised of a near-field Faraday probe, single Langmuir probe, and emissive probe was used to interrogate the near-field plume from approximately 0.1 ? 2.0 mean thruster diameters downstream of the thruster exit plane at the following operating conditions: 300 V, 400 V and 500 V at 30 kW and 500 V at 50 kW. Results have shown that the acceleration zone is limited to within 0.4 mean thruster diameters of the exit plane while the high-temperature region is limited to 0.25 mean thruster diameters from the exit plane at all four operating conditions. Maximum plasma potentials in the near-field at 300 and 400 V were approximately 50 V with respect to cathode potential, while maximum electron temperatures varied from 24 ? 32 eV, depending on operating condition. Isothermal lines at all operating conditions were found to strongly resemble the magnetic field topology in the high-temperature regions. This distribution was found to create regions of high temperature and low density near the magnetic poles, indicating strong, thick sheath formation along these surfaces. The data taken from this study are considered valuable for future design as well as modeling validation.

  9. Multi-element analysis of compost by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, María S; Gómez, María T; Castillo, Juan R

    2007-05-15

    Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) has been applied to multi-element determination in compost samples. Since compost is a heterogeneous mixture of organic and inorganic materials, the influence of sample heterogeneity on the accuracy and precision of analysis was investigated. Several parameters related to the following were studied: laser (energy, laser-beam diameter, preablation. rastering speed, carrier-gas flow rate), sample preparation (use of compacted pellets, grinding time, particle size, sample amount, length of hydraulic press treatment, position of line scan), and the ICP-MS system (quantitative versus semiquantitative analysis, matrix-matched standards and liquid standards calibration). The main causes of imprecision in sample preparation were determined to be particle size and grinding time. The effect of sample heterogeneity on precision was also evaluated by using different test samples (pellets). For Ni, Zn and Pb, the greatest contribution to the total relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) was related to analyte determination. For Mn and Cu, sample heterogeneity and analyte determination contributed equally to the total R.S.D., whereas for Cr, Co, Cd and Hg sample heterogeneity accounted for most of the total R.S.D. A comparison of semiquantitative and quantitative analysis modes showed that better precision and very good agreement with certified reference material was obtained with the latter, but semiquantitative analysis could be a practical alternative. Although accuracy of results was improved with matrix-matched standards calibration the use of standard addition calibration with aqueous standards could be another possibility. PMID:19071737

  10. Determination of minor elements in steelmaking flue dusts using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Coedo, A G; Padilla, I; Dorado, M T

    2005-07-15

    Element determination in solid waste products from the steel industry usually involves the time-consuming step of preparing a solution of the solid. Laser ablation (LA) inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) has been applied to the analysis of Cr, Ni, Cu, As, Cd and Sn, elements of importance from the point of view of their impact on the environment, in electric arc furnace flue dust (EAFD). A simple method of sample preparation as pressed pellets using a mixture of cellulose and paraffin as binder material was applied. Calibration standards were prepared spiking multielement solution standards to a 1:1 ZnO+Fe(2)O(3) synthetic matrix. The wet powder was dried and mechanically homogenised. Quantitative analysis were based on external calibration using a set of matrix matched calibration standards with Rh as a internal standard. Results obtained using only one-point for calibration without matrix matched, needing less time for standardization and data processing, are also presented. Data are calculated for flue dust reference materials: CRM 876-1 (EAFD), AG-6203 (EAFD), AG-6201 (cupola dust) and AG-SX3705 (coke ashes), and for two representative electrical arc furnace flue dusts samples from Spanish steelmaking companies: MS-1 and MS-2. For the reference materials, an acceptable agreement with certificate values was achieved, and the results for the MS samples matched with those obtained from conventional nebulization solutions (CN). The analytical precision was found to be better than 7% R.S.D. both within a single pellet and between several pellets of the same sample for all the elements. PMID:18970147

  11. Calibration of laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for quantitative measurements of lead in bone.

    PubMed

    Bellis, David J; Hetter, Katherine M; Jones, Joseph; Amarasiriwardena, Dula; Parsons, Patrick J

    2006-01-01

    Lead accumulates in bone over many years or decades. Accordingly, the study of lead in bone is important in determining the fate of ingested lead, the potential for remobilization, and for the application of bone lead measurements as a biomarker of lead exposure. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) was used to measure the spatial distribution of lead in bone on the micrometer scale. In general, LA-ICP-MS studies are somewhat limited by the lack of matrix-matched standards and/or reference materials for calibration and validation purposes. Here we describe the application of pressed pellets prepared from New York State Department of Health candidate Reference Materials for Lead in Bone (levels 1 through 4), to provide a linear calibration for (208)Pb/(43)Ca in the concentration range <1 to 30 μg g(-1). The limit of detection was estimated as 0.2 μg g(-1). The measured lead values for pelletized NIST SRM 1486 Bone Meal and SRM 1400 Bone Ash were in good agreement with certified reference values. Using this approach, we quantitatively measured the spatial distribution of lead in a cross-section of goat metacarpal from a lead-dosed animal. The lead content was spatially variable in the range of 2 to 30 μg g(-1) with a complex distribution. In some sections, lead appeared to be enriched in the center of the bone relative to peripheral areas, indicating preferential accumulation in trabecular (spongy) rather than cortical bone. In addition, there were discrete areas of lead enrichment, or hot spots, of 100 to 200 μm in width. PMID:22833692

  12. Calibration of laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for quantitative measurements of lead in bone

    PubMed Central

    Bellis, David J.; Hetter, Katherine M.; Jones, Joseph; Amarasiriwardena, Dula

    2012-01-01

    Summary Lead accumulates in bone over many years or decades. Accordingly, the study of lead in bone is important in determining the fate of ingested lead, the potential for remobilization, and for the application of bone lead measurements as a biomarker of lead exposure. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) was used to measure the spatial distribution of lead in bone on the micrometer scale. In general, LA-ICP-MS studies are somewhat limited by the lack of matrix-matched standards and/or reference materials for calibration and validation purposes. Here we describe the application of pressed pellets prepared from New York State Department of Health candidate Reference Materials for Lead in Bone (levels 1 through 4), to provide a linear calibration for 208Pb/43Ca in the concentration range <1 to 30 μg g−1. The limit of detection was estimated as 0.2 μg g−1. The measured lead values for pelletized NIST SRM 1486 Bone Meal and SRM 1400 Bone Ash were in good agreement with certified reference values. Using this approach, we quantitatively measured the spatial distribution of lead in a cross-section of goat metacarpal from a lead-dosed animal. The lead content was spatially variable in the range of 2 to 30 μg g−1 with a complex distribution. In some sections, lead appeared to be enriched in the center of the bone relative to peripheral areas, indicating preferential accumulation in trabecular (spongy) rather than cortical bone. In addition, there were discrete areas of lead enrichment, or hot spots, of 100 to 200 μm in width. PMID:22833692

  13. Comparison of plasma temperature and electron density on nanosecond laser ablation of Cu and nano-Cu

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Anmin; Jiang, Yuanfei; Wang, Tingfeng; Shao, Junfeng; Jin, Mingxing

    2015-03-15

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy is performed through the collection of spectra by spectral detection equipment at different delay times and distances from targets composed of Cu and nano-Cu, which are ablated using a Nd:YAG laser (532 nm, 10 ns, 10 Hz) in our experiments. The measured wavelength range is from 475 nm to 525 nm. Using the local thermodynamic equilibrium model, we analyze the characteristics of the plasma temperature and the electron number density for different distances between the target surface and the lens. The results show that when compared with the nano-Cu plasma case, the temperature of the Cu plasma is higher, while its electron number density is lower.

  14. Computational fluid dynamics and frequency-dependent finite-difference time-domain method coupling for the interaction between microwaves and plasma in rocket plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Kinefuchi, K.; Funaki, I.; Shimada, T.; Abe, T.

    2012-10-15

    Under certain conditions during rocket flights, ionized exhaust plumes from solid rocket motors may interfere with radio frequency transmissions. To understand the relevant physical processes involved in this phenomenon and establish a prediction process for in-flight attenuation levels, we attempted to measure microwave attenuation caused by rocket exhaust plumes in a sea-level static firing test for a full-scale solid propellant rocket motor. The microwave attenuation level was calculated by a coupling simulation of the inviscid-frozen-flow computational fluid dynamics of an exhaust plume and detailed analysis of microwave transmissions by applying a frequency-dependent finite-difference time-domain method with the Drude dispersion model. The calculated microwave attenuation level agreed well with the experimental results, except in the case of interference downstream the Mach disk in the exhaust plume. It was concluded that the coupling estimation method based on the physics of the frozen plasma flow with Drude dispersion would be suitable for actual flight conditions, although the mixing and afterburning in the plume should be considered depending on the flow condition.

  15. Neutral atomic jet generation by laser ablation of copper targets

    SciTech Connect

    Matos, J. B. de; Rodrigues, N. A. S.

    2014-08-15

    This work aimed the obtainment of a neutral atomic jet departing from a plume generated by laser ablation of copper targets. A pair of electrodes together with a transducer pressure sensor was used to study the ablated plume charge composition and also to measure the ion extraction from the plasma plume. The neutral beam was produced with this setup and the relative abundance of neutrals in the plasma was measured, it decreases from 30% to 8% when the laser fluence is varied from 20 J/cm{sup 2} to 32 J/cm{sup 2}. The necessary voltage to completely remove the ions from the plume varied from 10 V to 230 V in the same fluence range. TOF analysis resulted in center of mass velocities between 3.4 and 4.6 km/s, longitudinal temperature in the range from 1 × 10{sup 4} K to 2.4 × 10{sup 4} K and a Mach number of M = 2.36, calculated using purely hydrodynamic expansion approximation.

  16. Laser-Ablated Plasma Dynamics Study For Sm{sub 1-x}Nd{sub x}NiO{sub 3} Thin Films Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Lafane, S.; Kerdja, T.; Abdelli-Messaci, S.; Malek, S.; Maaza, M.

    2008-09-23

    The expansion dynamics of Sm{sub 1-x}Nd{sub x}NiO{sub 3} excimer laser ablation plume in background oxygen atmosphere has been investigated using a fast ICCD imaging. The laser fluence was fixed at 2 J{center_dot}cm{sup -2} and the surrounding ambient gas pressure was varied from vacuum to 50 mbars. The imaging data is used to create position--time plots of the luminous front at several background oxygen pressures. The plume behaviour is found influenced by the gas pressure. In earlier time, the expansion is almost linear independently of the background gas pressure used, and then as time evolves, the plume expansion is well characterized by a spherical shock wave model and at later times, the plume is decelerated and comes to rest, so the drag force model is a good approximation to this regime of expansion. Plume splitting into fast and slow components was another feature observed at some distances depending on the oxygen background pressure. The optimal target-substrate distance for thin film deposition has been estimated.

  17. Determination of rare earth element in carbonate using laser-ablation inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry: an examination of the influence of the matrix on laser-ablation inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kazuya; Takahashi, Yoshio; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2007-02-01

    In this study, we examined the influence of the matrix on rare earth element (REE) analyses of carbonate with laser-ablation inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) using carbonate and NIST glass standards. A UV 213 nm Nd:YAG laser system was coupled to an ICP-MS. Laser-ablation was carried out in both He and Ar atmospheres to investigate the influence of ablation gas on the analytical results. A small amount of N2 gas was added to the carrier gas to enhance the signal intensities. Synthetic CaCO3 standards, doped with REEs, as well as NIST glasses (NIST SRM 610 and 612) were used as calibration standards. Carbonatite, which is composed of pure calcite, was analyzed as carbonate samples. The degree of the influence of the matrix on the results was evaluated by comparing the results, which were calibrated by the synthetic CaCO3 and NIST glass standards. With laser-ablation in a He atmosphere, the differences between the results calibrated by the synthetic CaCO3 and NIST glass standards were less than 10% across the REE series, except for those of La which were 25%. In contrast, for the measurements made in an Ar atmosphere, the results calibrated by the synthetic CaCO3 and NIST glass standards differed by 25-40%. It was demonstrated that the LA-ICP-MS system can provide quantitative analysis of REE concentrations in carbonate samples using non matrix-matched standards of NIST glasses. PMID:17386560

  18. Laser ablation and ionisation by laser plasma radiation in the atmospheric-pressure mass spectrometry of organic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Pento, A V; Nikiforov, S M; Simanovsky, Ya O; Grechnikov, A A; Alimpiev, S S

    2013-01-31

    A new method was developed for the mass spectrometric analysis of organic and bioorganic compounds, which involves laser ablation with the ionisation of its products by laser-plasma radiation and enables analysing gaseous, liquid, and solid substances at atmospheric pressure without sample preparation. The capabilities of this method were demonstrated by the examples of fast pharmaceutical composition screening, real-time atmosphere composition analysis, and construction of the mass spectrometric images of organic compound distributions in biological materials. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  19. Final Report for completed IPP Project:"Development of Plasma Ablation for Soft Tissue and Bone Surgery"

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Ian

    2009-09-01

    ArthroCare is a medical device company that develops, manufactures, and markets an advanced surgical tool, a plasma electro-surgical system for cutting and removing tissue. The hand-held electrical discharge device produces plasma in a biocompatible conductive fluid and tissue to which it is applied during surgery. Its products allow surgeons to operate with increased precision and accuracy, limiting damage to surrounding tissue thereby reducing pain and speeding recovery for the patient. In the past, the design of ArthfoCare's plasma wands has been an empirical undertaking. One goal of this R&D program was to put the phenomena involved on a sound scientific footing, allowing optimization of existing plasma based electro-surgery system technology, and the design and manufacture of new and improved kinds of scalpels, in particular for the surgical cutting of bone. Another important related goal of the program was to develop, through an experimental approach, new plasma wand approaches to the cutting ('shaving') of hard bone tissue. The goals of the CRADA were accomplished - computer models were used to predict important parameters of the plasma discharge and the bone environment, and several different approaches to bone-shaving were developed and demonstrated. The primary goal of the project was to develop and demonstrate an atmospheric-pressure plasma tool that is suitable for surgical use for shaving bone in humans. This goal was accomplished, in fact with several different alternative plasma approaches. High bone ablation speeds were measured. The use of probes ('plasma wand' - the surgical tool) with moving active electrodes was also explored, and there are advantages to this method. Another important feature is that the newly-exposed bone surface have only a very thin necrosis layer; this feature was demonstrated. This CRADA has greatly advanced our understanding of bone removal by atmospheric pressure plasmas in liquid, and puts ArthroCare in a good position

  20. Observational evidence for dust-plasma interactions in the Enceladus' plume, Saturn E-ring, in Titan's ionosphere, and near comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahlund, J. E.; Holmberg, M. K. G.; Engelhardt, I. A. D.; Eriksson, A. I.; Shebanits, O.; Morooka, M. W.; Farrell, W. M.; Gurnett, D. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Ye, S.

    2014-12-01

    The Cassini mission has identified dust-plasma interactions in at least three different regions in the Saturn system. These are the dusty plasma environment near Enceladus, in particular within its plume the dusty plasma environment in the Saturn inner plasma disk enveloping the E-ring the aerosol-plasma environment in Titan's deep ionosphere. It is also believed to affect the dynamics substantially in a comet coma, now studied by Rosetta. The motion of plasma is changed considerably by the presence of substantial amounts of charged dust due to the added effect of gravity and radiation pressure forces on the dust component, thereby affecting the dynamics of the magnetosphere. Conversely the Lorentz force affects the charged dust through electric and magnetic fields that normally govern the motion of the plasma. Part of the dust size distribution should be considered a component of the plasma collective ensemble. The Cassini RPWS Langmuir Probe clearly detects a difference between the electron and ion number densities in all these regions, from which the total charge density of the negatively charged dust can be estimated. Moreover, the Cassini electron spectrometer (CAPS/ELS) detects negatively charged nanometer sized particles both in Titan's ionosphere as well as in Enceladus' plume. The inferred number densities are consistent with the Langmuir probe measurements. Here, the dust absorption of electrons is so strong that an ion-dust plasma is created with few free electrons. In the case of Titan's ionosphere this triggers the formation of aerosols that then diffuse to the ground. We show here new measurements from the E-ring showing electron density depletions due to dust absorption, a dust tail region of Enceladus, and confirm the consistency between measurements of negative ions by CAPS/ELS and the Radio and Plasma Wave Science Langmuir Probe (RPWS/LP) in Titan's ionosphere. We will also show initial hints regarding dust-plasma interaction near comets from the

  1. Automated in situ trace element analysis of silicate materials by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Z; Canil, D; Longerich, H P

    2000-09-01

    This paper describes the automated in situ trace element analysis of solid materials by laser ablation (LA) inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). A compact computer-controlled solid state Nd:YAG Merchantek EO UV laser ablation (LA) system has been coupled with the high sensitivity VG PQII S ICP-MS. A two-directional communication was interfaced in-house between the ICP-MS and the LA via serial RS-232 port. Each LA-ICP-MS analysis at a defined point includes a 60 s pre-ablation delay, a 60 s ablation, and a 90 s flush delay. The execution of each defined time setting by LA was corresponding to the ICP-MS data acquisition allowing samples to be run in automated cycle sequences like solution auto-sampler ICP-MS analysis. Each analytical cycle consists of four standards, one control reference material, and 15 samples, and requires about 70 min. Data produced by Time Resolved Analysis (TRA) from ICP-MS were later reduced off-line by in-house written software. Twenty-two trace elements from four reference materials (NIST SRM 613, and fused glass chips of BCR-2, SY-4, and G-2) were determined by the automated LA-ICP-MS method. NIST SRM 610 or NIST SRM 613 was used as an external calibration standard, and Ca as an internal standard to correct for drift, differences in transport efficiency and sampling yield. Except for Zr and Hf in G-2, relative standard deviations for all other elements are less than 10%. Results compare well with the data reported from literature with average limits of detection from 1 ng x g(-1) to 455 ng x g(-1) and less than 100 ng x g(-1) for most trace elements. PMID:11220835

  2. Plasma Plume Oscillations Monitoring during Laser Welding of Stainless Steel by Discrete Wavelet Transform Application

    PubMed Central

    Sibillano, Teresa; Ancona, Antonio; Rizzi, Domenico; Lupo, Valentina; Tricarico, Luigi; Lugarà, Pietro Mario

    2010-01-01

    The plasma optical radiation emitted during CO2 laser welding of stainless steel samples has been detected with a Si-PIN photodiode and analyzed under different process conditions. The discrete wavelet transform (DWT) has been used to decompose the optical signal into various discrete series of sequences over different frequency bands. The results show that changes of the process settings may yield different signal features in the range of frequencies between 200 Hz and 30 kHz. Potential applications of this method to monitor in real time the laser welding processes are also discussed. PMID:22319311

  3. Synthesis of higher diamondoids by pulsed laser ablation plasmas in supercritical CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakahara, Sho; Stauss, Sven; Kato, Toru; Sasaki, Takehiko; Terashima, Kazuo

    2011-06-01

    Pulsed laser ablation (wavelength 532 nm; fluence 18 J/cm2; pulse width 7 ns; repetition rate 10 Hz) of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite was conducted in adamantane-dissolved supercritical CO2 with and without cyclohexane as a cosolvent. Micro-Raman spectroscopy of the products revealed the presence of hydrocarbons possessing sp3-hybridized carbons similar to diamond structures. The synthesis of diamantane and other possible diamondoids consisting of up to 12 cages was confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Furthermore, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry measurements of samples before and after pyrolysis treatment indicate the synthesis of the most compact decamantane, namely, superadamantane. It is thought that oxidant species originating from CO2 during pulsed laser ablation might lead to the selective dissociation of C-H bonds, enabling the synthesis of low H/C ratio molecules. Therefore, laser ablation in supercritical CO2 is proposed as a practical method for synthesizing diamondoids.

  4. Multielemental analysis of prehistoric animal teeth by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Galiova, Michaela; Kaiser, Jozef; Fortes, Francisco J.; Novotny, Karel; Malina, Radomir; Prokes, Lubomir; Hrdlicka, Ales; Vaculovic, Tomas; Nyvltova Fisakova, Miriam; Svoboda, Jiri; Kanicky, Viktor; Laserna, Javier J.

    2010-05-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and laser ablation (LA) inductively coupled plasma (ICP) mass spectrometry (MS) were utilized for microspatial analyses of a prehistoric bear (Ursus arctos) tooth dentine. The distribution of selected trace elements (Sr, Ba, Fe) was measured on a 26 mmx15 mm large and 3 mm thick transverse cross section of a canine tooth. The Na and Mg content together with the distribution of matrix elements (Ca, P) was also monitored within this area. The depth of the LIBS craters was measured with an optical profilometer. As shown, both LIBS and LA-ICP-MS can be successfully used for the fast, spatially resolved analysis of prehistoric teeth samples. In addition to microchemical analysis, the sample hardness was calculated using LIBS plasma ionic-to-atomic line intensity ratios of Mg (or Ca). To validate the sample hardness calculations, the hardness was also measured with a Vickers microhardness tester.

  5. Resonant high-order harmonic generation from plasma ablation: Laser intensity dependence of the harmonic intensity and phase

    SciTech Connect

    Milosevic, D. B.

    2010-02-15

    Experimentally observed strong enhancement of a single high-order harmonic in harmonic generation from low-ionized laser plasma ablation is explained as resonant harmonic generation. The resonant harmonic intensity increases regularly with the increase of the laser intensity, while the phase of the resonant harmonic is almost independent of the laser intensity. This is in sharp contrast with the usual plateau and cutoff harmonics, the intensity of which exhibits wild oscillations while its phase changes rapidly with the laser intensity. The temporal profile of a group of harmonics, which includes the resonant harmonic, has the form of a broad peak in each laser-field half cycle. These characteristics of resonant harmonics can have an important application in attoscience. We illustrate our results using examples of Sn and Sb plasmas.

  6. Calibration of laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry using dried solution aerosols for the quantitative analysis of solid samples

    SciTech Connect

    Leach, J.

    1999-02-12

    Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) has become the method of choice for elemental and isotopic analysis. Several factors contribute to its success. Modern instruments are capable of routine analysis at part per trillion levels with relative detection limits in part per quadrillion levels. Sensitivities in these instruments can be as high as 200 million counts per second per part per million with linear dynamic ranges up to eight orders of magnitude. With standards for only a few elements, rapid semiquantitative analysis of over 70 elements in an individual sample can be performed. Less than 20 years after its inception ICP-MS has shown to be applicable to several areas of science. These include geochemistry, the nuclear industry, environmental chemistry, clinical chemistry, the semiconductor industry, and forensic chemistry. In this introduction, the general attributes of ICP-MS will be discussed in terms of instrumentation and sample introduction. The advantages and disadvantages of current systems are presented. A detailed description of one method of sample introduction, laser ablation, is given. The paper also gives conclusions and suggestions for future work. Chapter 2, Quantitative analysis of solids by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry using dried solution aerosols for calibration, has been removed for separate processing.

  7. Electron temperature measurements inside the ablating plasma of gas-filled hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrios, M. A.; Liedahl, D. A.; Schneider, M. B.; Jones, O.; Brown, G. V.; Regan, S. P.; Fournier, K. B.; Moore, A. S.; Ross, J. S.; Landen, O.; Kauffman, R. L.; Nikroo, A.; Kroll, J.; Jaquez, J.; Huang, H.; Hansen, S. B.; Callahan, D. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Bradley, D.; Moody, J. D.

    2016-05-01

    The first measurement of the electron temperature (Te) inside a National Ignition Facility hohlraum is obtained using temporally resolved K-shell X-ray spectroscopy of a mid-Z tracer dot. Both isoelectronic- and interstage-line ratios are used to calculate the local Te via the collisional-radiative atomic physics code SCRAM [Hansen et al., High Energy Density Phys 3, 109 (2007)]. The trajectory of the mid-Z dot as it is ablated from the capsule surface and moves toward the laser entrance hole (LEH) is measured using side-on x-ray imaging, characterizing the plasma flow of the ablating capsule. Data show that the measured dot location is farther away from the LEH in comparison to the radiation-hydrodynamics simulation prediction using HYDRA [Marinak et al., Phys. Plasmas 3, 2070 (1996)]. To account for this discrepancy, the predicted simulation Te is evaluated at the measured dot trajectory. The peak Te, measured to be 4.2 keV ± 0.2 keV, is ˜0.5 keV hotter than the simulation prediction.

  8. Effect of dielectric wall temperature on plasma plume in an argon atmospheric pressure discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Jian; Huo, Yuxin; Wang, Youyin; Yu, Daren; Tang, Jingfeng; Wei, Liqiu

    2014-10-15

    In this letter, the effect of the dielectric wall temperature on the length and volume of an atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) is investigated using a single-electrode configuration driven with an AC power supply. To distinguish the APPJ status from the argon flow rate, the three modes, laminar, transition, and turbulent, are separated. When the dielectric wall is heated, the APPJ length and volume are enhanced. Also, the transition regions remarkably expand over a large range of flow rates. The results indicate that different factors contribute to the expansion of the transition region. The increase in the radial and axial velocities is the main cause of the expansion of the transition region to the low-velocity region. The expansion to the high-velocity region is dominantly induced by a change in the viscosity.

  9. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Comparative study of the ablation of materials by femtosecond and pico- or nanosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kononenko, Taras V.; Konov, Vitalii I.; Garnov, Sergei V.; Danielius, R.; Piskarskas, A.; Tamosauskas, G.; Dausinger, F.

    1999-08-01

    A series of studies was carried out on the ablation of steel, Si3N4 ceramic, and diamond in air by femtosecond (200 and 900 fs) pulses of different wavelengths (532 and 266 nm) and in a wide energy density range (1 — 103 J cm-2 ). The ablation rates were measured for different geometries of the irradiation surface [a shallow crater and a channel with a high (up to 10) aspect ratio]. The ablation rates (in a shallow crater) and the morphologies of the irradiated surface were compared for femtosecond and longer (220 ps, 7 ns) pulses. The role of the laser-generated plasma in the ablation of materials by subpicosecond pulses as well as the prospects for the practical application of ultrashort laser pulses in the processing of materials are analysed.

  10. Advantages of dual-laser ablation in the growth of multicomponent thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Devajyoti; Hyde, Robert; Mukherjee, Pritish; Witanachchi, Sarath

    2012-07-01

    We report the use of a dual-laser deposition process to grow stoichiometric films of the piezoelectric material PbZr0.52Ti0.48O3 (PZT) and the thermoelectric material Ba8Ga16Ge30. High volatility of Pb and Ba in these materials leads to non-stoichiometric growth in conventional PLD processes. Dual-laser ablation process preserves the Pb and Ba stoichiometry while significantly reducing the thickness variation and particulate density on the deposited films. This lead to the growth of smooth uniform films with enhanced ferroelectric and electrical properties. The dual-laser ablation combines the pulses of a KrF excimer laser (248 nm wavelength, 30 ns pulse width) and a CO2 laser (10.6 μm wavelength, 250 ns pulse width) where the beams are spatially overlapped on the ablation target and temporally delayed. At an optimum delay that is dependent on the physical properties of the material, CO2 pulse energy is coupled into the plume, generating a high temperature plasma (>25,000K). Laser-target interaction studies have shown the evaporation to be stoichiometric. Emission spectroscopy studies have shown ten-fold increase in emission intensities in dual-laser ablation while time-gated 2D ICCD imaging studies revealed the plume expansion to be stoichiometric over a large cone-angle of the plume under these conditions. Time-of-flight investigations in concert with hydrodynamic modeling provided a clear understanding of the mechanism of dual-laser ablation. Furthermore, plasma generated in the process is highly ionized (>75%) leading to films with high density and crystallinity. This paper will show the enhancement in properties attainable by the dual-laser ablation process in comparison to the single laser ablation.

  11. Elemental fractionation in 785 nm picosecond and femtosecond laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaheen, M. E.; Gagnon, J. E.; Fryer, B. J.

    2015-05-01

    Elemental fractionation and ICP-MS signal response were investigated for two different pulse width laser beams originating from the same laser system. Femtosecond and picosecond laser beams at pulse widths of 130 fs and 110 ps, respectively, and wavelength of 785 nm were used to ablate NIST 610 synthetic glass and SRM 1107 Naval Brass B at the same spot for 800 to 1000 laser pulses at different repetition rates (5 to 50 Hz). Elemental fractionation was found to depend on repetition rate and showed a trend with femtosecond laser ablation that is opposite to that observed in picosecond laser ablation for most measured isotopes. ICP-MS signal intensity was higher in femtosecond than picosecond LA-ICP-MS in both NIST 610 and naval brass when ablation was conducted under the same fluence and repetition rate. The differences in signal intensity were partly related to differences in particle size distribution between particles generated by femtosecond and picosecond laser pulses and the consequent differences in transport and ionization efficiencies. The main reason for the higher signal intensity resulting from femtosecond laser pulses was related to the larger crater sizes compared to those created during picosecond laser ablation. Elemental ratios measured using 66Zn/63Cu, 208Pb/238U, 232Th/238U, 66Zn/232Th and 66Zn/208Pb were found to change with the number of laser pulses with data points being more scattered in picosecond than femtosecond laser pulses. Reproducibility of replicate measurements of signal intensities, fractionation and elemental ratios was better for fs-LA-ICP-MS (RSD ~ 3 to 6%) than ps-LA-ICP-MS (RSD ~ 7 to 11%).

  12. [INVITED] Control of femtosecond pulsed laser ablation and deposition by temporal pulse shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrelie, Florence; Bourquard, Florent; Loir, Anne--Sophie; Donnet, Christophe; Colombier, Jean-Philippe

    2016-04-01

    This study explores the effects of temporal laser pulse shaping on femtosecond pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The potential of laser pulses temporally tailored on ultrafast time scales is used to control the expansion and the excitation degree of ablation products including atomic species and nanoparticles. The ablation plume generated by temporally shaped femtosecond pulsed laser ablation of aluminum and graphite targets is studied by in situ optical diagnostic methods. Taking advantage of automated pulse shaping techniques, an adaptive procedure based on spectroscopic feedback regulates the irradiance for the enhancement of typical plasma features. Thin films elaborated by unshaped femtosecond laser pulses and by optimized sequence indicate that the nanoparticles generation efficiency is strongly influenced by the temporal shaping of the laser irradiation. The ablation processes leading either to the generation of the nanoparticles either to the formation of plasma can be favored by using a temporal shaping of the laser pulse. Insights are given on the possibility to control the quantity of the nanoparticles. The temporal laser pulse shaping is shown also to strongly modify the laser-induced plasma contents and kinetics for graphite ablation. Temporal pulse shaping proves its capability to reduce the number of slow radicals while increasing the proportion of monomers, with the addition of ionized species in front of the plume. This modification of the composition and kinetics of plumes in graphite ablation using temporal laser pulse shaping is discussed in terms of modification of the structural properties of deposited Diamond-Like Carbon films (DLC). This gives rise to a better understanding of the growth processes involved in femtosecond-PLD and picosecond-PLD of DLC suggesting the importance of neutral C atoms, which are responsible for the subplantation process.

  13. Structure of the dense cores and ablation plasmas in the initiation phase of tungsten wire-array Z pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Douglass, J. D.; Hammer, D. A.; McBride, R. D.; Pikuz, S. A.; Shelkovenko, T. A.; Bland, S. N.; Bott, S. C.

    2007-01-15

    The early stages of tungsten (W) wire-array Z-pinch implosions have been studied using two-frame point projection x-ray backlighting on the 1 MA COBRA pulsed power generator [J. D. Douglass, J. B. Greenly, D. A. Hammer, and B. R. Kusse, in Proceedings of the 15th IEEE International Pulsed Power Conference, Monterey, 2005 (to be published)]. X-pinch backlighter images with subnanosecond time resolution and 4-10 {mu}m spatial resolution have been obtained of individual W exploding wires in 8-wire arrays that show evolution of wire-core and coronal plasma structures. The timing of the X-pinch x-ray bursts relative to the Z-pinch initiation time was adjusted over a 50 ns time interval by varying the X-pinch mass per unit length. Wire-cores seen in two images separated in view by 120 deg. show that the expansion is remarkably azimuthally symmetric. A strong correlation is observed between the structure on the dense exploding wire-cores and the structure of the {>=}10{sup 18}/cm{sup 3} ablation plasma being drawn from radial prominences. Plasma ablation velocity was estimated to have a lower bound of 24 km/s. The wire-core expansion rate was found to be approximately constant with time over the interval 50-100 ns after the start of the current pulse. Finally, micron-scale axial gaps, seen as early as 70 ns into the current pulse and persisting from that time, were observed along the wire-core.

  14. Catheter Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation Raises the Plasma Level of NGF-β Which Is Associated with Sympathetic Nerve Activity

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae Hyung; Wi, Jin; Lee, Da Lyung; Joung, Boyoung; Lee, Moon Hyoung

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The expression of nerve growth factor-β (NGF-β) is related to cardiac nerve sprouting and sympathetic hyper innervation. We investigated the changes of plasma levels of NGF-β and the relationship to follow-up heart rate variability (HRV) after radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) of atrial fibrillation (AF). Materials and Methods This study included 147 patients with AF (117 men, 55.8±11.5 years, 106 paroxysmal AF) who underwent RFCA. The plasma levels of NGF-β were quantified using double sandwich enzyme linked immunosorbent assay method before (NGF-βpre) and 1 hour after RFCA (NGF-βpost-1hr). HRV at pre-procedure (HRVpre), 3 months (HRVpost-3mo), and 1 year post-procedure (HRVpost-1yr) were analyzed and compared with plasma levels of NGF-β. Results 1) The plasma levels of NGF-β significantly increased after RFCA (20.05±11.09 pg/mL vs. 29.60±19.43 pg/mL, p<0.001). The patients who did not show increased NGF-βpost-1hr were older (p=0.023) and had greater left atrial volume index (p=0.028) than those with increased NGF-βpost-1hr. 2) In patients with NGF-βpre >18 pg/mL, low frequency components (LF)/high-frequency components (HF) (p=0.003) and the number of atrial premature contractions (APCs, p=0.045) in HRVpost-3mo were significantly higher than those with ≤18 pg/mL. 3) The LF/HF at HRVpost-3mo was linearly associated with the NGF-βpre (B=4.240, 95% CI 1.114-7.336, p=0.008) and the NGF-βpost-1hr (B=7.617, 95% CI 2.106-13.127, p=0.007). 4) Both NGF-βpre (OR=1.159, 95% CI 1.045-1.286, p=0.005) and NGF-βpost-1hr (OR=1.098, 95% CI 1.030-1.170, p=0.004) were independent predictors for the increase of LF/HF at HRVpost-3mo. Conclusion AF catheter ablation increases plasma level of NGF-β, and high plasma levels of NGF-βpre was associated with higher sympathetic nerve activity and higher frequency of APCs in HRVpost-3mo. PMID:26446633

  15. Time-resolved studies of particle effects in laser ablation inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Perdian, D.; Bajic, S.; Baldwin, D.; Houk, R.

    2007-11-13

    Transient signal responses for ablated samples as a function of particle size and laser parameters are characterized. Data are acquired with time resolution of 5 or 6 ms per data point. Large positive spikes in signal are observed and increase in both amplitude and frequency with increasing particle size. Particle sizes are selected using a differential mobility analyzer. Spikes in the signal also increase with decreasing laser rastering rates. A comparison of lasers with pulse widths of 370 fs and 5 ns shows that shortening the pulse width significantly reduces the frequency and amplitude of positive spikes in signal. These large positive spikes are attributed to the vaporization, atomization, and ionization of individual large intact particles, which are considered to be a major cause of fractionation in laser ablation ICP-MS.

  16. Effect of mass and density of ambient gas on the interaction of laser-blow-off plasma plumes propagating in close proximity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Bhupesh; Singh, R. K.; Kumar, Ajai

    2016-04-01

    The effects of mass and pressure of ambient gas on the propagation dynamics of two laser-blow-off plasma plumes created in close proximity are investigated. A time gated fast imaging technique is used for recording the images of the laterally colliding plumes under different experimental conditions. Pressure is varied from 0.1 to 3 mbar in three ambient, i.e., helium, neon, and argon. Emphasis is given on the nature of shock-shock interaction under different ambient conditions. It has been observed that the shock-velocity, shape, strength, and their interactions are strongly dependent on the mass and density of the ambient gases. The role of the interacting shocks and their subsequent reflections on the formation and geometrical shape of the interaction region in different ambient conditions is briefly described.

  17. Synthesis of higher diamondoids by pulsed laser ablation plasmas in supercritical CO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Nakahara, Sho; Stauss, Sven; Kato, Toru; Terashima, Kazuo; Sasaki, Takehiko

    2011-06-15

    Pulsed laser ablation (wavelength 532 nm; fluence 18 J/cm{sup 2}; pulse width 7 ns; repetition rate 10 Hz) of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite was conducted in adamantane-dissolved supercritical CO{sub 2} with and without cyclohexane as a cosolvent. Micro-Raman spectroscopy of the products revealed the presence of hydrocarbons possessing sp{sup 3}-hybridized carbons similar to diamond structures. The synthesis of diamantane and other possible diamondoids consisting of up to 12 cages was confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Furthermore, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry measurements of samples before and after pyrolysis treatment indicate the synthesis of the most compact decamantane, namely, superadamantane. It is thought that oxidant species originating from CO{sub 2} during pulsed laser ablation might lead to the selective dissociation of C-H bonds, enabling the synthesis of low H/C ratio molecules. Therefore, laser ablation in supercritical CO{sub 2} is proposed as a practical method for synthesizing diamondoids.

  18. Effect of ambient gas on the expansion dynamics of plasma plume formed by laser blow off of thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Sony; Kumar, Ajai; Singh, R. K.; Nampoori, V. P. N.

    2010-03-01

    A study has been carried out to understand the influence of ambient gases on the dynamics of laser-blow-off plumes of multi-layered LiF-C thin film. Plume images at various time intervals ranging from 100 to 3000 ns have been recorded using an intensified CCD camera. Enhancement in the plume intensity and change in size and shape occurs on introducing ambient gases and these changes are highly dependent on the nature and composition of the ambient gas used. Velocity of the plume was found to be higher in helium ambient whereas intensity enhancement is greater in argon environment. The plume shapes have maximum size at 10-2 and 10-1 Torr of Ar and He pressures, respectively. As the background pressure increases further (>10-2 Torr: depending on the nature of gas), the plume gets compressed/focused in the lateral direction. Internal structure formation and turbulences are observed at higher pressures (>10-1 Torr) in both ambient gases.

  19. Unambiguous characterization of gunshot residue particles using scanning laser ablation and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Abrego, Zuriñe; Ugarte, Ana; Unceta, Nora; Fernández-Isla, Alberto; Goicolea, M Aranzazu; Barrio, Ramón J

    2012-03-01

    A new method based on scanning laser ablation and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS) for the detection and identification of gunshot residue (GSR) particles from firearms discharges has been developed. Tape lifts were used to collect inorganic residues from skin surfaces. The laser ablation pattern and ICPMS conditions were optimized for the detection of metals present in GSR, such as (121)Sb, (137)Ba, and (208)Pb. Other isotopes ((27)Al, (29)Si, (31)P, (33)S, (35)Cl, (39)K, (44)Ca, (57)Fe, (60)Ni, (63)Cu, (66)Zn, and (118)Sn) were monitored during the ICPMS analyses to obtain additional information to possibly classify the GSR particles as either characteristic of GSR or consistent with GSR. In experiments with real samples, different firearms, calibers, and ammunitions were used. The performed method evaluation confirms that the developed methodology can be used as an alternative to the standard scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) technique, with the significant advantage of drastically reducing the analysis time to less than 66 min. PMID:22304477

  20. Formation of diatomic molecular radicals in reactive nitrogen-carbon plasma generated by electron cyclotron resonance discharge and pulsed laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Peipei; Li, Yanli; You, Qinghu; Cai, Hua; Yang, Xu; Sun, Jian; Xu, Ning; Wu, Jiada

    2014-04-15

    The reactive nitrogen-carbon plasma generated by electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) microwave discharge of N{sub 2} gas and pulsed laser ablation of a graphite target was characterized spectroscopically by time-integrated and time-resolved optical emission spectroscopy with space resolution for a study of gas-phase reactions and molecular radical formation in the plasma. The plasma exhibits very high reactivity compared with the plasma generated solely by ECR discharge or by pulsed laser ablation and contains highly excited species originally present in the ambient gaseous environment and directly ablated from the target as well as formed as the products of gas-phase reactions occurring in the plasma. The space distribution and the time evolution of the plasma emission give an access to the gas-phase reactions for the formation of C{sub 2} and CN radicals, revealing that C{sub 2} radicals are formed mainly in the region near the target while CN radicals can be formed in a much larger region not only in the vicinity of the target, but especially in the region near a substrate far away from the target.

  1. Multilayered metal oxide thin film gas sensors obtained by conventional and RF plasma-assisted laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitu, B.; Marotta, V.; Orlando, S.

    2006-04-01

    Multilayered thin films of In 2O 3 and SnO 2 have been deposited by conventional and RF plasma-assisted reactive pulsed laser ablation, with the aim to evaluate their behaviour as toxic gas sensors. The depositions have been carried out by a frequency doubled Nd-YAG laser ( λ = 532 nm, τ = 7 ns) on Si(1 0 0) substrates, in O 2 atmosphere. The thin films have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electrical resistance measurements. A comparison of the electrical response of the simple (indium oxide, tin oxide) and multilayered oxides to toxic gas (nitric oxide, NO) has been performed. The influence on the structural and electrical properties of the deposition parameters, such as substrate temperature and RF power is reported.

  2. Determination of bromine and tin compounds in plastics using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS).

    PubMed

    İzgi, Belgin; Kayar, Murat

    2015-07-01

    The polybrominated flame retardants and organotin compounds were screened in terms of bromine and tin content using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry in plastics. The calibration standards were prepared using the fused-disk technique, and all samples were investigated under optimal conditions. Using a central composite experimental design, laser parameters, laser energy, pulse rate, scan rate and spot size were identified. The detection limits of the method were 1000 mgkg(-1) and 1600 mgkg(-1) for bromide and tin, whereas the relative standard deviation (%) values of the analysis were 9% and 6% (n=3) for ERM EC681k with 770 ± 70 mgkg(-1) Br and 86 ± 6 mgkg(-1) Sn respectively, and 106-115% of Br and 102-104% of Sn were observed for the tetrabromobisphenol A and butyltin trichloride spike plastics, respectively. PMID:25882416

  3. Effects of anode temperature on the arc volt-ampere characteristics and ejected plume property of a low-power supersonic plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, W. X.; Meng, X.; Huang, H. J.; Wu, C. K.

    2011-12-01

    Low-power plasma generators with two kinds of hot anode/nozzle structures, one with a natural radiation-cooled nozzle and the other with a regeneratively cooled nozzle, were designed to investigate the dependence of the volt-ampere characteristics on the anode temperature. Pure argon, nitrogen or hydrogen gas was used as the plasma working gas at input powers from 130 to 1200 W in a plenum chamber kept at a pressure of below 20 Pa. Variations of the arc voltage with changes in arc current, gas flow rate and firing time (anode temperature) were examined, and the effects of the arc volt-ampere characteristics on the properties of the ejected plasma flow from the nozzle exit are discussed with respect to the evaluation of the average plume temperature and flow velocity. Results show that there are definitely non-negligible effects of anode temperature on these characteristics.

  4. Elemental analysis of glass by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (LA-ICP-OES).

    PubMed

    Schenk, Emily R; Almirall, José R

    2012-04-10

    The elemental analysis of glass evidence has been established as a powerful discrimination tool for forensic analysts. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (LA-ICP-OES) has been compared to laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) and energy dispersive micro X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (μXRF/EDS) as competing instrumentation for the elemental analysis of glass. The development of a method for the forensic analysis of glass coupling laser ablation to ICP-OES is presented for the first time. LA-ICP-OES has demonstrated comparable analytical performance to LA-ICP-MS based on the use of the element menu, Al (Al I 396.15 nm), Ba (Ba II 455.40 nm), Ca (Ca II 315.88 nm), Fe (Fe II 238.20 nm), Li (Li I 670.78 nm), Mg (Mg I 285.21 nm), Sr (Sr II 407.77 nm), Ti (Ti II 368.51 nm), and Zr (Zr II 343.82 nm). The relevant figures of merit, such as precision, accuracy and sensitivity, are presented and compared to LA-ICP-MS. A set of 41 glass samples was used to assess the discrimination power of the LA-ICP-OES method in comparison to other elemental analysis techniques. This sample set consisted of several vehicle glass samples that originated from the same source (inside and outside windshield panes) and several glass samples that originated from different vehicles. Different match criteria were used and compared to determine the potential for Type I and Type II errors. It was determined that broader match criteria is more applicable to the forensic comparison of glass analysis because it can reduce the affect that micro-heterogeneity inherent in the glass fragments and a less than ideal sampling strategy can have on the interpretation of the results. Based on the test set reported here, a plus or minus four standard deviation (± 4s) match criterion yielded the lowest possibility of Type I and Type II errors. The developed LA-ICP-OES method has been shown to perform similarly to LA-ICP-MS in the

  5. A fibre based triature interferometer for measuring rapidly evolving, ablatively driven plasma densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macdonald, J.; Bland, S. N.; Threadgold, J.

    2015-08-01

    We report on the first use of a fibre interferometer incorporating triature analysis for measuring rapidly evolving plasma densities of ne ˜ 1013/cm3 and above, such as those produced by simple coaxial plasma guns. The resultant system is extremely portable, easy to field in experiments, relatively cheap to produce, and—with the exception of a small open area in which the plasma is sampled—safe in operation as all laser light is enclosed.

  6. Mapping of lead, magnesium and copper accumulation in plant tissues by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and laser-ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, J.; Galiová, M.; Novotný, K.; Červenka, R.; Reale, L.; Novotný, J.; Liška, M.; Samek, O.; Kanický, V.; Hrdlička, A.; Stejskal, K.; Adam, V.; Kizek, R.

    2009-01-01

    Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) and Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) were utilized for mapping the accumulation of Pb, Mg and Cu with a resolution up to 200 μm in a up to cm × cm area of sunflower ( Helianthus annuus L.) leaves. The results obtained by LIBS and LA-ICP-MS are compared with the outcomes from Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (AAS) and Thin-Layer Chromatography (TLC). It is shown that laser-ablation based analytical methods can substitute or supplement these techniques mainly in the cases when a fast multi-elemental mapping of a large sample area is needed.

  7. Ablation enhancement by femtosecond laser irradiation assisted with a microtorch for microgrooves fabrication in PMMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Kai; Wang, Cong; Dong, Xinran; Song, Yuxin; Duan, Ji'an

    2016-08-01

    This study proposes an ablation enhancement approach to fabricate microgrooves in PMMA by femtosecond laser irradiation assisted with a microtorch. The influences of pulse energy and scanning speed on the groove depth and removal area of groove are investigated. It is demonstrated that the improvement of groove depth has a close relationship with the scanning speed. When the scanning speed was less than 50 µm/s, the ablated groove depth is considerably improved with various pulse energies, up to 100 %. Moreover, the removal area of groove has significant enhancements of up to 250 % in various processing parameters. It is suggested that the ablation enhancement of microgrooves fabrication is related to the status of plasma plume and substrate heating. With the assistance of the microtorch, laser-induced plasma plume is confined and its density at center region is raised, which results in the increment of the central plasma's temperature and more energy deposited on the PMMA surface, ultimately leading to the ablation enhancement. Meanwhile, the instantaneous substrate heating also plays a crucial role on enhanced microgrooves fabrication.

  8. Plume radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dirscherl, R.

    1993-06-01

    The electromagnetic radiation originating from the exhaust plume of tactical missile motors is of outstanding importance for military system designers. Both missile- and countermeasure engineer rely on the knowledge of plume radiation properties, be it for guidance/interference control or for passive detection of adversary missiles. To allow access to plume radiation properties, they are characterized with respect to the radiation producing mechanisms like afterburning, its chemical constituents, and reactions as well as particle radiation. A classification of plume spectral emissivity regions is given due to the constraints imposed by available sensor technology and atmospheric propagation windows. Additionally assessment methods are presented that allow a common and general grouping of rocket motor properties into various categories. These methods describe state of the art experimental evaluation techniques as well as calculation codes that are most commonly used by developers of NATO countries. Dominant aspects influencing plume radiation are discussed and a standardized test technique is proposed for the assessment of plume radiation properties that include prediction procedures. These recommendations on terminology and assessment methods should be common to all employers of plume radiation. Special emphasis is put on the omnipresent need for self-protection by the passive detection of plume radiation in the ultraviolet (UV) and infrared (IR) spectral band.

  9. Radiation Chemistry of Potential Europa Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudipati, M. S.; Henderson, B. L.

    2014-12-01

    Recent detection of atomic hydrogen and atomic oxygen and their correlation to potential water plumes on Europa [Roth, Saur et al. 2014] invoked significant interest in further understanding of these potential/putative plumes on Europa. Unlike on Enceladus, Europa receives significant amount of electron and particle radiation. If the plumes come from trailing hemisphere and in the high radiation flux regions, then it is expected that the plume molecules be subjected to radiation processing. Our interest is to understand to what extent such radiation alterations occur and how they can be correlated to the plume original composition, whether organic or inorganic in nature. We will present laboratory studies [Henderson and Gudipati 2014] involving pulsed infrared laser ablation of ice that generates plumes similar to those observed on Enceladus [Hansen, Esposito et al. 2006; Hansen, Shemansky et al. 2011] and expected to be similar on Europa as a starting point; demonstrating the applicability of laser ablation to simulate plumes of Europa and Enceladus. We will present results from electron irradiation of these plumes to determine how organic and inorganic composition is altered due to radiation. Acknowledgments:This research was enabled through partial funding from NASA funding through Planetary Atmospheres, and the Europa Clipper Pre-Project. B.L.H. acknowledges funding from the NASA Postdoctoral Program for an NPP fellowship. Hansen, C. J., L. Esposito, et al. (2006). "Enceladus' water vapor plume." Science 311(5766): 1422-1425. Hansen, C. J., D. E. Shemansky, et al. (2011). "The composition and structure of the Enceladus plume." Geophysical Research Letters 38. Henderson, B. L. and M. S. Gudipati (2014). "Plume Composition and Evolution in Multicomponent Ices Using Resonant Two-Step Laser Ablation and Ionization Mass Spectrometry." The Journal of Physical Chemistry A 118(29): 5454-5463. Roth, L., J. Saur, et al. (2014). "Transient Water Vapor at Europa's South

  10. Laser optogalvanic spectroscopy of neon in a discharge plasma and modeling and analysis of rocket plume RF-line emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogungbemi, Kayode I.

    The Optogalvanic Effect (OGE) of neon in a hollow cathode discharge lamp has been investigated both experimentally and theoretically. A tunable dye laser was tuned to several 1si -- 2pj neon transitions and the associated time--resolved optogalvanic (OG) spectral waveforms recorded corresponding to the DeltaJ = DeltaK = 0, +/-1 selection rules and modeled using a semi-empirical model. Decay rate constants, amplitudes and the instrumentation time constants were recorded following a good least-squares fit (between the experimental and the theoretical OG data) using the Monte Carlo technique and utilizing both the search and random walk methods. Dominant physical processes responsible for the optogalvanic effect have been analyzed, and the corresponding populations of the laser-excited level and collisional excited levels determined. The behavior of the optogalvanic signal waveform as a function of time, together with the decay rate constants as a function of the discharge current and the instrumentation time constant as a function of current have been studied in detail. The decay times of the OG signals and the population redistributions were also determined. Fairly linear relationships between the decay rate constant and the discharge current, as well as between the instrumental time constant and the discharge current, have been observed. The decay times and the electron collisional rate parameters of the 1s levels involved in the OG transitions have been obtained with accuracy. The excitation temperature of the discharge for neon transitions grouped with the same 1s level have been determined and found to be fairly constant for the neon transitions studied. The experimental optogalvanic effort in the visible region of the electromagnetic spectrum has been complemented by a computation-intensive modeling investigation of rocket plumes in the microwave region. Radio frequency lines of each of the plume species identified were archived utilizing the HITRAN and other

  11. Dual beam optical system for pulsed laser ablation film deposition

    DOEpatents

    Mashburn, D.N.

    1996-09-24

    A laser ablation apparatus having a laser source outputting a laser ablation beam includes an ablation chamber having a sidewall, a beam divider for dividing the laser ablation beam into two substantially equal halves, and a pair of mirrors for converging the two halves on a surface of the target from complementary angles relative to the target surface normal, thereby generating a plume of ablated material emanating from the target. 3 figs.

  12. Influence of plasma parameters and substrate temperature on the structural and optical properties of CdTe thin films deposited on glass by laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Quiñones-Galván, J. G.; Santana-Aranda, M. A.; Pérez-Centeno, A.; Camps, Enrique; Campos-González, E.; Guillén-Cervantes, A.; Santoyo-Salazar, J.; Zelaya-Angel, O.; Hernández-Hernández, A.

    2015-09-28

    In the pulsed laser deposition of thin films, plasma parameters such as energy and density of ions play an important role in the properties of materials. In the present work, cadmium telluride thin films were obtained by laser ablation of a stoichiometric CdTe target in vacuum, using two different values for: substrate temperature (RT and 200 °C) and plasma energy (120 and 200 eV). Structural characterization revealed that the crystalline phase can be changed by controlling both plasma energy and substrate temperature; which affects the corresponding band gap energy. All the thin films showed smooth surfaces and a Te rich composition.

  13. Quasi ?non-destructive? laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry fingerprinting of sapphires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillong, M.; Günther, D.

    2001-07-01

    A homogenized 193 nm excimer laser with a flat-top beam profile was used to study the capabilities of LA-ICP-MS for 'quasi' non-destructive fingerprinting and sourcing of sapphires from different locations. Sapphires contain 97-99% of Al 2O 3 (corundum), with the remainder composed of several trace elements, which can be used to distinguish the origin of these gemstones. The ablation behavior of sapphires, as well as the minimum quantity of sample removal that is required to determine these trace elements, was investigated. The optimum ablation conditions were a fluency of 6 J cm -2, a crater diameter of 120 μm, and a laser repetition rate of 10 Hz. The optimum time for the ablation was determined to be 2 s, equivalent to 20 laser pulses. The mean sample removal was 60 nm per pulse (approx. 3 ng per pulse). This allowed satisfactory trace element determination, and was found to cause the minimum amount of damage, while allowing for the fingerprinting of sapphires. More than 40 isotopes were measured using different spatial resolutions (20-120 μm) and eight elements were reproducibly detected in 25 sapphire samples from five different locations. The reproducibility of the trace element distribution is limited by the heterogeneity of the sample. The mean of five or more replicate analyses per sample was used. Calibration was carried out using NIST 612 glass reference material as external standard. The linear dynamic range of the ICP-MS (nine orders of magnitude) allowed the use of Al, the major element in sapphire, as an internal standard. The limits of detection for most of the light elements were in the μg g -1 range and were better for heavier elements (mass >85), being in the 0.1 μg g -1 range. The accuracy of the determinations was demonstrated by comparison with XRF analyses of the same set of samples. Using the quantitative analyses obtained using LA-ICP-MS, natural sapphires from five different origins were statistically classified using ternary plots and

  14. The effects of electron thermal radiation on laser ablative shock waves from aluminum plasma into ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sai Shiva, S.; Leela, Ch.; Prem Kiran, P.; Sijoy, C. D.; Chaturvedi, S.

    2016-05-01

    The effect of electron thermal radiation on 7 ns laser ablative shock waves from aluminum (Al) plasma into an ambient atmospheric air has been numerically investigated using a one-dimensional, three-temperature (electron, ion, and radiation) radiation hydrodynamic code MULTI. The governing equations in Lagrangian form are solved using an implicit scheme for planar, cylindrical, and spherical geometries. The shockwave velocities (Vsw) obtained numerically are compared with our experimental values obtained over the intensity range of 2.0 × 1010 to 1.4 × 1011 W/cm2. It is observed that the numerically obtained Vsw is significantly influenced by the thermal radiation effects which are found to be dominant in the initial stage up to 2 μs depending on the input laser energy. Also, the results are found to be sensitive to the co-ordinate geometry used in the simulation (planar, cylindrical, and spherical). Moreover, it is revealed that shock wave undergoes geometrical transitions from planar to cylindrical nature and from cylindrical to spherical nature with time during its propagation into an ambient atmospheric air. It is also observed that the spatio-temporal evolution of plasma electron and ion parameters such as temperature, specific energy, pressure, electron number density, and mass density were found to be modified significantly due to the effects of electron thermal radiation.

  15. Ablation pressure driven by an energetic electron beam in a dense plasma.

    PubMed

    Gus'kov, S; Ribeyre, X; Touati, M; Feugeas, J-L; Nicolaï, Ph; Tikhonchuk, V

    2012-12-21

    An intense beam of high energy electrons may create extremely high pressures in solid density materials. An analytical model of ablation pressure formation and shock wave propagation driven by an energetic electron beam is developed and confirmed with numerical simulations. In application to the shock-ignition approach in inertial confinement fusion, the energy transfer by fast electrons may be a dominant mechanism of creation of the igniting shock wave. An electron beam with an energy of 30 keV and energy flux 2-5 PW/cm(2) can create a pressure amplitude more than 300 Mbar for a duration of 200-300 ps in a precompressed solid material. PMID:23368476

  16. Temporal and spectral analysis of laser induced plasma in the ablation process of flexible printed circuit board

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryoo, Hoon C.; Kim, Seok; Hahn, Jae W.

    2008-02-01

    Flexible printed circuit board (FPCB), consisting of copper sheets laminated onto non conductive film substrates with multiple structures, are core elements in electronics with their flexibility and capability of high density 3 dimensional wiring characteristics. In laser applied FPCB processing, a better understanding of the ablation mechanism leads to precision control of the depth processing especially by monitoring of the material transition layer. For this purpose, here we investigate the temporal and spectral behavior of the plasma plum generated on the single sided structure of FPCB using the technique of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). Using KrF excimer laser, the characteristic spectral emission lines of C II swan band at the wavelength of 516.5 nm and neutral copper at the wavelength range from 510 nm to 522 nm are acquired under ambient pressure in the ablation process of polyimide film and copper coated layer respectively. From a time delay from 50 ns to 4.05 μs from the beginning of the laser pulse, the temporal profiles of the spectral intensity are obtained in steps of 200 ns, which have a tendency of exponential decrease on both C II and neutral copper. In particular, we concentrate our attention on the temporal intensity behavior of the Bremsstrahlung continuum emission that decides the proper set of detection time window, by which the monitoring sensitivity of LIBS is determined. Finally, using the information of the temporal analysis for each molecular, atomic, and continuum emission, the transition layer between polyimide and copper film is distinguished by their characteristic peak information.

  17. Imaging of Cu, Zn, Pb and U in human brain tumor resections by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoriy, M. V.; Dehnhardt, M.; Reifenberger, G.; Zilles, K.; Becker, J. S.

    2006-11-01

    Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) was used to produce images of element distribution in 20 [mu]m thin tissue sections of primary human brain tumors (glioblastoma multiforme--GBM) and adjacent non-neoplastic brain tissue. The sample surface was scanned (raster area ~1 cm2) with a focused laser beam (wavelength 266 nm, diameter of laser crater 50 [mu]m, and laser power density 1 x 109 W cm-2). The laser ablation system was coupled to a double-focusing sector field ICP-SFMS. Ion intensities of 63Cu+, 64Zn+, 208Pb+, and 238U+ were measured by LA-ICP-MS within the tumor area and the surrounding region invaded by GBM as well as in control tissue. The quantitative determination of copper, zinc, lead and uranium distribution in brain tissues by LA-ICP-MS was performed using prepared matrix-matched laboratory standards doped with these elements of interest. The limits of detection (LODs) obtained for Cu and Zn were 0.34 and 0.14 [mu]g g-1, respectively, while LODs of 12.5 and 6.9 ng g-1 were determined for Pb and U. The concentration and distribution of selected elements are compared between the control tissues and regions affected by GBM. A correlation was found between LA-ICP-MS and receptor-autoradiographic results. As receptor-autoradiographic techniques, a labeling for A1AR and the pBR was employed. Regarding the A1AR, we used the specific A1 adenosine receptor (A1AR)-ligand, 3H-CPFPX [3H-cyclopentyl-3-(3-fluoropropyl)-1-propylxanthine], which has been shown to specifically label the invasive zone around GBMs. The peripheral benzodiazepine receptor was labeled with 3H-Pk11195 [3H-1-(2-chlorphenyl)-N-methyl-N-(1-methylpropyl)-3-isoquinoline-carboxamide].

  18. Influence of the reactive atmosphere on the formation of nanoparticles in the plasma plume induced by nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation of metallic targets at atmospheric pressure and high repetition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girault, M.; Le Garrec, J.-L.; Mitchell, J. B. A.; Jouvard, J.-M.; Carvou, E.; Menneveux, J.; Yu, J.; Ouf, F.-X.; Carles, S.; Potin, V.; Pillon, G.; Bourgeois, S.; Perez, J.; Marco de Lucas, M. C.; Lavisse, L.

    2016-06-01

    The influence of a reactive atmosphere on the formation of nanoparticles (NPs) in the plasma plume generated by nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation of metal targets (Ti, Al, Ag) was probed in situ using Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS). Air and different O2-N2 gas mixtures were used as reactive gas within atmospheric pressure. SAXS results showed the formation of NPs in the plasma-plume with a mean radius varying in the 2-5 nm range. A decrease of the NPs size with increasing the O2 percentage in the O2-N2 gas mixture was also showed. Ex situ observations by transmission electron microscopy and structural characterizations by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy were also performed for powders collected in experiments done using air as ambient gas. The stability of the different metal oxides is discussed as being a key parameter influencing the formation of NPs in the plasma-plume.

  19. Comparative analysis of the high-order harmonic generation in the laser ablation plasmas prepared on the surfaces of complex and atomic targets

    SciTech Connect

    Ganeev, R. A.; Milosevic, D. B.

    2008-07-15

    We analyzed high-order harmonic generation from the plasma plumes prepared on the surfaces of complex targets. The studies of In-Ag targets showed that the characteristics of the high-order harmonics from the double-target plume were the same as those from the single-target plasmas. For the chromium-tellurium plasma, the enhancements of the 29th and 27th harmonics were obtained, thus indicating the appearance of the enhancement properties from both components of the double-target plasma. These comparative studies also showed higher enhancement of a single harmonic in the case of atomic plasma (Sb) with regard to the molecular one (InSb). The additional component can only decrease the enhancement factor of the medium, due to the change of the oscillator strength and spectral distribution of the transitions involved in the resonance enhancement of the specific harmonic order. The theoretical calculations have shown the enhancement of specific harmonics for the Sb, Te, and Cr plasmas in the double-target configurations.

  20. Hybrid simulation of shock formation for super-Alfvénic expansion of laser ablated debris through an ambient, magnetized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, S. E.; Winske, D.; Schaeffer, D. B.; Everson, E. T.; Bondarenko, A. S.; Constantin, C. G.; Niemann, C.

    2013-08-01

    Two-dimensional hybrid simulations of perpendicular collisionless shocks are modeled after potential laboratory conditions that are attainable in the LArge Plasma Device (LAPD) at the University of California, Los Angeles Basic Plasma Science Facility. The kJ class 1053 nm Nd:Glass Raptor laser will be used to ablate carbon targets in the LAPD with on-target energies of 100-500 J. The ablated debris ions will expand into ambient, partially ionized hydrogen or helium. A parameter study is performed via hybrid simulation to determine possible conditions that could lead to shock formation in future LAPD experiments. Simulation results are presented along with a comparison to an analytical coupling parameter.

  1. Hybrid simulation of shock formation for super-Alfvénic expansion of laser ablated debris through an ambient, magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, S. E.; Schaeffer, D. B.; Everson, E. T.; Bondarenko, A. S.; Constantin, C. G.; Niemann, C.; Winske, D.

    2013-08-15

    Two-dimensional hybrid simulations of perpendicular collisionless shocks are modeled after potential laboratory conditions that are attainable in the LArge Plasma Device (LAPD) at the University of California, Los Angeles Basic Plasma Science Facility. The kJ class 1053 nm Nd:Glass Raptor laser will be used to ablate carbon targets in the LAPD with on-target energies of 100-500 J. The ablated debris ions will expand into ambient, partially ionized hydrogen or helium. A parameter study is performed via hybrid simulation to determine possible conditions that could lead to shock formation in future LAPD experiments. Simulation results are presented along with a comparison to an analytical coupling parameter.

  2. Status of the Ablative Laser Propulsion Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herren, Kenneth A.; Lin, Jun; Cohen, Tinothy; Pakhomov, Andrew V.; Thompson, M. Shane

    2004-01-01

    We present a short review of our laser-propulsion research as well as some of the current results of the Ablative Laser Propulsion (ALP) studies currently underway at the University of Alabama in Huntsville. It has been shown that direct surface ablation of a solid material produces high specific impulse (Isp) at relatively high energy conversion efficiency (20 - 40%). We detail measurements of specific impulse, thrust and coupling coefficients for elemental target materials both with single and with double pulse laser shots. We also present measurements taken using three independent methods for determination of Isp. The three methods produce consistent values from ion time-of-flight technique, impulse measurements and imaging of the expansion front of plasma plume. We present a demonstration of our ALP lightcraft, a small free-flying micro-vehicle that is propelled by ablation. For ALP lightcraft we use a subscale thin shell of nickel replicated over a diamond turned mandrel that produces a highly polished self-focusing, truncated at the focus parabolic mirror. The mass of the lightcraft is 54 mg and it is driven by 100-ps wide, 35-mJ laser pulses at 532 nm wavelength. This is an ongoing research. We also present the latest work on laserdriven micro-thrusters and detail some the near term goals of our program.

  3. Infrared laser ablation study of pressed soil pellets with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mikolás, J; Musil, P; Stuchliková, V; Novotný, K; Otruba, V; Kanický, V

    2002-09-01

    Potential of infrared laser ablation (LA) coupled with ICP-AES as a technique suitable for the determination of trace elements (Zn, Cu, Ni, Cr, and V) in agricultural soils was studied. Operating parameters such as laser beam energy, laser beam focusing with respect to the sample surface, and velocity of the sample translation in the plane perpendicular to the laser beam were optimized. Soil samples were mixed with powdered Ag as a binder, and an internal standard (GeO(2)), and pressed into pellets. Calibration samples were prepared by adding known amounts of oxides of elements of interest into soils of known elemental composition and then processed in the same way as the analyzed samples. Calibration curves were found to be linear at least up to several hundreds of mg kg(-1) for the elements of interest. The elemental contents obtained by using LA-ICP-AES were compared with those obtained by analysis using wet chemistry followed by ICP-AES with pneumatic nebulization (PN). The results were in good agreement. Accuracy was also tested using certified reference soils with a bias not exceeding 10% relative. PMID:12324844

  4. Determination of refractive and volatile elements in sediment using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Duodu, Godfred Odame; Goonetilleke, Ashantha; Allen, Charlotte; Ayoko, Godwin A

    2015-10-22

    Wet-milling protocol was employed to produce pressed powder tablets with excellent cohesion and homogeneity suitable for laser ablation (LA) analysis of volatile and refractive elements in sediment. The influence of sample preparation on analytical performance was also investigated, including sample homogeneity, accuracy and limit of detection. Milling in volatile solvent for 40 min ensured sample is well mixed and could reasonably recover both volatile (Hg) and refractive (Zr) elements. With the exception of Cr (-52%) and Nb (+26%) major, minor and trace elements in STSD-1 and MESS-3 could be analysed within ±20% of the certified values. Comparison of the method with total digestion method using HF was tested by analysing 10 different sediment samples. The laser method recovers significantly higher amounts of analytes such as Ag, Cd, Sn and Sn than the total digestion method making it a more robust method for elements across the periodic table. LA-ICP-MS also eliminates the interferences from chemical reagents as well as the health and safety risks associated with digestion processes. Therefore, it can be considered as an enhanced method for the analysis of heterogeneous matrices such as river sediments. PMID:26526906

  5. Plume detachment from a magnetic nozzle

    SciTech Connect

    Deline, Christopher A.; Bengtson, Roger D.; Breizman, Boris N.; Tushentsov, Mikhail R.; Jones, Jonathan E.; Chavers, D. Greg; Dobson, Chris C.; Schuettpelz, Branwen M.

    2009-03-15

    High-powered electric propulsion thrusters utilizing a magnetized plasma require that plasma exhaust detach from the applied magnetic field in order to produce thrust. This paper presents experimental results demonstrating that a sufficiently energetic and flowing plasma can indeed detach from a magnetic nozzle. Microwave interferometer and probe measurements provide plume density, electron temperature, and ion flux measurements in the nozzle region. Measurements of ion flux show a low-beta plasma plume which follows applied magnetic field lines until the plasma kinetic pressure reaches the magnetic pressure and a high-beta plume expanding ballistically afterward. Several magnetic configurations were tested including a reversed field nozzle configuration. Despite the dramatic change in magnetic field profile, the reversed field configuration yielded little measurable change in plume trajectory, demonstrating the plume is detached. Numerical simulations yield density profiles in agreement with the experimental results.

  6. Role of laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry in cultural heritage research: a review.

    PubMed

    Giussani, Barbara; Monticelli, Damiano; Rampazzi, Laura

    2009-03-01

    Cultural heritage represents a bridge between the contemporary society and the past populations, and a strong collaboration between archaeologists, art historians and analysts may lead to the decryption of the information hidden in an ancient object. Quantitative elemental compositional data play a key role in solving questions concerning dating, provenance, technology, use and the relationship of ancient cultures with the environment. Nevertheless, the scientific investigation of an artifact should be carried out complying with some important constraints: above all the analyses should be as little destructive as possible and performed directly on the object to preserve its integrity. Laser ablation sampling coupled to inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) fulfils these requirements exhibiting comparably strong analytical performance in trace element determination. This review intends to show through the applications found in the literature how valuable is the contribution of LA-ICP-MS in the investigation of ancient materials such as obsidian, glass, pottery, human remains, written heritage, metal objects and miscellaneous stone materials. The main issues related to cultural heritage investigation are introduced, followed by a brief description of the features of this technique. An overview of the exploitation of LA-ICP-MS is then presented. Finally, advantages and drawbacks of this technique are critically discussed: the fit for purpose and prospects of the use of LA-ICP-MS are presented. PMID:19200475

  7. Visualizing fossilization using laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry maps of trace elements in Late Cretaceous bones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koenig, A.E.; Rogers, R.R.; Trueman, C.N.

    2009-01-01

    Elemental maps generated by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) provide a previously unavailable high-resolution visualization of the complex physicochemical conditions operating within individual bones during the early stages of diagenesis and fossilization. A selection of LA-ICP-MS maps of bones collected from the Late Cretaceous of Montana (United States) and Madagascar graphically illustrate diverse paths to recrystallization, and reveal unique insights into geochemical aspects of taphonomic history. Some bones show distinct gradients in concentrations of rare earth elements and uranium, with highest concentrations at external bone margins. Others exhibit more intricate patterns of trace element uptake related to bone histology and its control on the flow paths of pore waters. Patterns of element uptake as revealed by LA-ICP-MS maps can be used to guide sampling strategies, and call into question previous studies that hinge upon localized bulk samples of fossilized bone tissue. LA-ICP-MS maps also allow for comparison of recrystallization rates among fossil bones, and afford a novel approach to identifying bones or regions of bones potentially suitable for extracting intact biogeochemical signals. ?? 2009 Geological Society of America.

  8. Direct multielement trace analyses of silicon carbide powders by spark ablation simultaneous inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiera, Arne F.; Schmidt-Lehr, Sebastian; Song, Ming; Bings, Nicolas H.; Broekaert, José A. C.

    2008-02-01

    A procedure for the direct analysis of silicon carbide powders (SiC) by simultaneous detection inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry using a Spectro-CIROS™ spectrometer (CCD-ICP-OES) and a novel spark ablation system Spectro-SASSy (SA) as sample introduction technique is described. The sample preparation procedure for SA of non-conducting material is based on mixing the sample powders with a conducting matrix, in this case copper and briquetting pellets. Pressing time, pressure and mixing ratio are shown to be important parameters of the pelleting technique with respect to their mechanical stability for the reliability of the analysis results. A mixing ratio of 0.2 g +0.6 g for SiC and Cu, a pressure of 10 t cm - 2 and a pressing time of 8 min have been found optimum. It has also been shown that the spark parameters selected are crucial for uniform volatilization. Electron probe micrographs of the burning spots and the analytical signal magnitude showed that a rather hard spark at 100 Hz was optimum. The determination of trace elements in silicon carbide powders is demonstrated using a calibration based on the addition of standard solutions. For Al, Ti, V, Mn and Fe detection limits in the lower µg g - 1 range can be achieved. Internal standardization with Y in combination with the addition of standard solutions allows relative standard deviations in the range of 4 to 24% for concentration levels of the order of 3 to 350 µg g - 1 .

  9. Provenance determination of oriental porcelain using laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS).

    PubMed

    Bartle, Emma K; Watling, R John

    2007-03-01

    The sale of fraudulent oriental ceramics constitutes a large proportion of the illegal artifact and antique trade and threatens to undermine the legitimate international market. The sophistication and skill of forgers has reached a level where, using traditional appraisal by eye and hand, even the most experienced specialist is often unable to distinguish between a genuine and fraudulent piece. In addition, current provenancing techniques such as energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrometry and thermoluminescence (TL) dating can result in significant damage to the artifact itself. Laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), a relatively nondestructive analytical technique, has been used for the provenance determination of materials based on geographical origin. The technique requires the production of a laser crater, c. 100 microm in diameter, which is essentially invisible to the naked eye. Debris from this crater is analyzed using ICP-MS, with the results forming the basis of the provenance establishment protocol. Chinese, Japanese, and English porcelain shards have been analyzed using this protocol and generic isotopic distribution patterns have been produced that enable the provenance establishment of porcelain artifacts to their country of production. Minor variations between elemental fingerprints of artifacts produced in the same country also indicate that it may be possible to further provenance oriental ceramics to a specific production region or kiln site. PMID:17316230

  10. Quantitative analysis of gold nanoparticles in single cells by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng; Zheng, Ling-Na; Wang, Bing; Chen, Han-Qing; Zhao, Yu-Liang; Chai, Zhi-Fang; Reid, Helen J; Sharp, Barry L; Feng, Wei-Yue

    2014-10-21

    Single cell analysis has become an important field of research in recent years reflecting the heterogeneity of cellular responses in biological systems. Here, we demonstrate a new method, based on laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS), which can quantify in situ gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) in single cells. Dried residues of picoliter droplets ejected by a commercial inkjet printer were used to simulate matrix-matched calibration standards. The gold mass in single cells exposed to 100 nM NIST Au NPs (Reference material 8012, 30 nm) for 4 h showed a log-normal distribution, ranging from 1.7 to 72 fg Au per cell, which approximately corresponds to 9 to 370 Au NPs per cell. The average result from 70 single cells (15 ± 13 fg Au per cell) was in good agreement with the result from an aqua regia digest solution of 1.2 × 10(6) cells (18 ± 1 fg Au per cell). The limit of quantification was 1.7 fg Au. This paper demonstrates the great potential of LA-ICPMS for single cell analysis and the beneficial study of biological responses to metal drugs or NPs at the single cell level. PMID:25225851

  11. On-line double isotope dilution laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for the quantitative analysis of solid materials.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Beatriz; Rodríguez-González, Pablo; García Alonso, J Ignacio; Malherbe, Julien; García-Fonseca, Sergio; Pereiro, Rosario; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo

    2014-12-01

    We report on the determination of trace elements in solid samples by the combination of on-line double isotope dilution and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). The proposed method requires the sequential analysis of the sample and a certified natural abundance standard by on-line IDMS using the same isotopically-enriched spike solution. In this way, the mass fraction of the analyte in the sample can be directly referred to the certified standard so the previous characterization of the spike solution is not required. To validate the procedure, Sr, Rb and Pb were determined in certified reference materials with different matrices, including silicate glasses (SRM 610, 612 and 614) and powdered samples (PACS-2, SRM 2710a, SRM 1944, SRM 2702 and SRM 2780). The analysis of powdered samples was carried out both by the preparation of pressed pellets and by lithium borate fusion. Experimental results for the analysis of powdered samples were in agreement with the certified values for all materials. Relative standard deviations in the range of 6-21% for pressed pellets and 3-21% for fused solids were obtained from n=3 independent measurements. Minimal sample preparation, data treatment and consumption of the isotopically-enriched isotopes are the main advantages of the method over previously reported approaches. PMID:25440666

  12. Submicrometer Imaging by Laser Ablation-Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry via Signal and Image Deconvolution Approaches.

    PubMed

    Van Malderen, Stijn J M; van Elteren, Johannes T; Vanhaecke, Frank

    2015-06-16

    In this work, pre- and postacquisition procedures for enhancing the lateral resolution of laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS) in two- and three-dimensional (2D, 3D) nuclide distribution mapping beyond the laser beam waist are described. 2D images were constructed by projecting a rectangular grid of discrete LA positions, arranged at interspacings smaller than the dimensions of the laser beam waist, onto the sample surface, thus oversampling the region of interest and producing a 2D image convolved in the spatial domain. The pulse response peaks of a low-dispersion LA cell were isolated via signal deconvolution of the transient mass analyzer response. A 3D stack of 2D images was deconvolved by an iterative Richardson-Lucy algorithm with Total Variance regularization, enabling submicrometer image fidelity, demonstrated in the analysis of trace level features in corroded glass. A point spread function (PSF) could be derived from topography maps of single pulse craters from atomic force microscopy. This experimental PSF allows the approach to take into account the laser beam shape, beam aberrations, and the laser-solid interaction, which in turn enhances the spatial resolution of the reconstructed volume. PMID:25975805

  13. High-speed photographic studies of dye-assisted pulsed Nd:YAG laser ablation of dental hard tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Quiang; Wallace, David B.; Hayes, Donald J.

    1997-06-01

    We have been evaluating the use of a pulsed Nd:YAG laser for ablating hard dental tissue. For this application we apply dye-drops of an IR absorptive fluid on the enamel, then irradiate with a laser pulse from the laser. By using ink- jet technology to deliver the dye-drops, we can attain micron- and millisecond-scale precision in drop delivery, with a 'burst' of drops preceding each laser pulse. To gain better understanding of the ablation process we have used a high- speed CCD camera system with 1 microsecond(s) exposure and 1 microsecond(s) inter-exposure-interval capability. Fast photography of the ablation process showed the following typical events. (i) The laser induced plasma plume erupts immediately after pulse onset, expands to maximum within 50 microsecond(s) , and lasts up to 200 microsecond(s) . (ii) Ejected particles flying away from the site of laser pulse/dye-drop impact are detected within 30 microsecond(s) of laser pulse onset, and continue up to 10 ms. These particles attain velocities up to 50 m/s with lower velocities from lower pulse power. (iii) The plasma plume has a peak height that increases with increasing laser fluence, ranging up to 10 mm for a fluence of 242 J/cm2 on enamel. From this study, the dye-assisted ablation mechanisms are inferred to be plasma-mediated and explosion- mediated tissue removal.

  14. Measurement of the isotopic composition of uranium micrometer-size particles by femtosecond laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubert, Amélie; Claverie, Fanny; Pécheyran, Christophe; Pointurier, Fabien

    In this paper, we will describe and indicate the performance of a new method based on the use of femtosecond laser ablation (fs-LA) coupled to a quadrupole-based inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-QMS) for analyzing the isotopic composition of micrometer-size uranium particles. The fs-LA device was equipped with a high frequency source (till 10 kHz). We applied this method to 1-2 μm diameter-uranium particles of known isotopic composition and we compared this technique with the two techniques currently used for uranium particle analysis: Secondary Ionization Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) and Fission Track Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry (FT-TIMS). By optimizing the experimental conditions, we achieved typical accuracy and reproducibility below 4% on 235U/238U for short transient signals of only 15 s related to 10 to 200 pg of uranium. The detection limit (at the 3 sigma level) was ~ 350 ag for the 235U isotope, meaning that 235U/238U isotope ratios in natural uranium particles of ~ 220 nm diameter can be measured. We also showed that the local contamination resulting from the side deposition of ablation debris at ~ 100 μm from the ablation crater represented only a small percentage of the initial uranium signal of the ablated particle. Despite the use of single collector ICP-MS, we were able to demonstrate that fs-LA-ICP-MS is a promising alternative technique for determining uranium isotopic composition in particle analysis.

  15. High spatial resolution mapping of deposition layers on plasma facing materials by laser ablation microprobe time-of-flight mass spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Qingmei; Li, Cong; Hai, Ran; Zhang, Lei; Feng, Chunlei; Ding, Hongbin; Zhou, Yan; Yan, Longwen; Duan, Xuru

    2014-05-15

    A laser ablation microprobe time-of-flight mass spectroscopy (LAM-TOF-MS) system with high spatial resolution, ∼20 nm in depth and ∼500 μm or better on the surface, is developed to analyze the composition distributions of deposition layers on the first wall materials or first mirrors in tokamak. The LAM-TOF-MS system consists of a laser ablation microprobe combined with a TOF-MS and a data acquisition system based on a LabVIEW program software package. Laser induced ablation combined with TOF-MS is an attractive method to analyze the depth profile of deposited layer with successive laser shots, therefore, it can provide information for composition reconstruction of the plasma wall interaction process. In this work, we demonstrate that the LAM-TOF-MS system is capable of characterizing the depth profile as well as mapping 2D composition of deposited film on the molybdenum first mirror retrieved from HL-2A tokamak, with particular emphasis on some of the species produced during the ablation process. The presented LAM-TOF-MS system provides not only the 3D characterization of deposition but also the removal efficiency of species of concern.

  16. Mechanism of Er:YAG laser-induced ablation of dental hard substances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibst, Raimund; Keller, Ulrich

    1993-07-01

    Er:YAG laser ablation was investigated by fast photography in a Schlieren optic setup. The results support the idea of continuous, thermally driven microexplosion type of ablation, which is based on the inhomogeneous distribution of strong (water) and weak absorbers (hydroxyapatite). Sudden vaporization and heating of the water content leads to a very effective material removal by bursting off the solid tissue components. Material is ejected in the form of particles when the threshold energy density for ablation (about 3 J cm-2) is reached. For high radiant exposure, initial plume velocity is in the order of the speed of sound in air. After leaving the tissue surface, particles are heated by the still incoming laser radiation, causing glowing and melting. No surface plasma and only weak pressure waves caused by individual spikes were observed.

  17. Ad-hoc design of temporally shaped fs laser pulses based on plasma dynamics for deep ablation in fused silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez-Rueda, J.; Siegel, J.; Puerto, D.; Galvan-Sosa, M.; Gawelda, W.; Solis, J.

    2013-07-01

    We have analyzed the ablation depth yield of fused silica irradiated with shaped pulse trains with a separation of 500 fs and increasing or decreasing intensity envelopes. This temporal separation value is extracted from previous studies on ablation dynamics upon irradiation with transform-limited 100 fs laser pulses. The use of decreasing intensity pulse trains leads to a strong increase of the induced ablation depth when compared to the behavior, at the same pulse fluence, of intensity increasing pulse trains. In addition, we have studied the material response under stretched (500 fs, FWHM) and transform-limited (100 fs, FWHM) pulses, for which avalanche or multiphoton ionization respectively dominates the carrier generation process. The comparison of the corresponding evolution of the ablated depth vs. fluence suggests that the use of pulse trains with decreasing intensity at high fluences should lead to enhanced single exposure ablation depths, beyond the limits corresponding to MPI- or AI-alone dominated processes.

  18. 2D elemental mapping of sections of human kidney stones using laser ablation inductively-coupled plasma-mass spectrometry: Possibilities and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vašinová Galiová, Michaela; Čopjaková, Renata; Škoda, Radek; Štěpánková, Kateřina; Vaňková, Michaela; Kuta, Jan; Prokeš, Lubomír; Kynický, Jindřich; Kanický, Viktor

    2014-10-01

    A 213 nm Nd:YAG-based laser ablation (LA) system coupled to quadrupole-based inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer and an ArF* excimer-based LA-system coupled to a double-focusing sector field inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer were employed to study the spatial distribution of various elements in kidney stones (uroliths). Sections of the surfaces of uroliths were ablated according to line patterns to investigate the elemental profiles for the different urolith growth zones. This exploratory study was mainly focused on the distinguishing of the main constituents of urinary calculus fragments by means of LA-ICP-mass spectrometry. Changes in the ablation rate for oxalate and phosphate phases related to matrix density and hardness are discussed. Elemental association was investigated on the basis of 2D mapping. The possibility of using NIST SRM 1486 Bone Meal as an external standard for calibration was tested. It is shown that LA-ICP-MS is helpful for determination of the mineralogical composition and size of all phases within the analyzed surface area, for tracing down elemental associations and for documenting the elemental content of urinary stones. LA-ICP-MS results (elemental contents and maps) are compared to those obtained with electron microprobe analysis and solution analysis ICP-MS.

  19. Features in the ion emission of Cu, Al, and C plasmas produced by ultrafast laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, T. J.; Butler, T.; Walsh, N.; Hayden, P.; Costello, J. T.

    2015-12-01

    The bi-modal nature of charge integrated ion kinetic energy distributions, which result from ultrafast laser produced plasmas, is discussed in this paper. A negatively biased Faraday cup was used as a charge collector to measure ion distributions from three different solid targets that had been irradiated with an ultrafast laser in the fluence range 0.1 -1 J/cm 2 . A bi-modal time of flight distribution is found for all three targets (C, Al, and Cu). In the case of the metallic targets (Al and Cu), high- and low-kinetic energy peaks exhibit quite different dependencies on laser fluence, whereas for the semi-metallic target (C), both peaks scale similarly with ultrafast laser fluence. The results are discussed within the framework of a one dimensional capacitor model resulting in ion acceleration.

  20. Ablation of hard dental tissues with an ArF-pulsed excimer laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neev, Joseph; Raney, Daniel; Whalen, William E.; Fujishige, Jack T.; Ho, Peter D.; McGrann, John V.; Berns, Michael W.

    1991-06-01

    The interaction of 15 ns pulses from an ArF excimer laser with hard dental tissue was investigated for the purpose of obtaining practical information on the ablation process. Dark field fast photography utilizing an auxiliary, 15 ns Nd:Yag laser 'probe', was used to study the ablation plume dynamics as a function of time, luminescence were studied at different fluence levels and prr. Dentin ablation was found to be about four times as efficient as ablation of enamel in the higher fluence levels tested (> 10 J/cm2) and about twice as efficient as the ablation in the lower fluence regime (approximately equals 1 J/cm2). The dentin etch depth per pulse was found to increase exponentially with fluence (at least up to the tested level of 11 J/cm2), while in enamel the etch depth per pulse appears to increase logarithmically with fluence. Dentin ablation yields a larger, more dense plume which can be ejected (depending on the fluence level) to a height of several millimeters above the surface with observed ejection velocity in access of 1200 m/s. The dentin plume consisted of a relatively uniform particle size distribution (0.1 micrometers to 10 micrometers in diameter). Enamel ablation, on the other hand, yields a smaller observed ejection velocities (about 800 m/s), and a much smaller plume of fine particles (about 0.1 micrometers in diameter) and gases, confined to within 0.5 mm of the surface. In addition, an even smaller amount of highly non-uniform debris, (from ten to several hundred micrometers in size) is observed to be ejected to higher levels, and reach roughly half the height of the corresponding dentin plume for similar fluence levels. Although both dentin and enamel yield lower ablation efficiencies at 1 Hz, no significant difference is detected between the ablation efficiency at 5 Hz and ablation 10 Hz prr. Both materials remained within 20 degree(s)C of room temperature even at fluences as high as 20 J/cm2 and prr as high as 10 Hz for enamel and 20 Hz for

  1. Visualizing trace element distribution in quartz using cathodoluminescence, electron microprobe, and laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rusk, Brian; Koenig, Alan; Lowers, Heather

    2011-01-01

    Cathodoluminescent (CL) textures in quartz reveal successive histories of the physical and chemical fluctuations that accompany crystal growth. Such CL textures reflect trace element concentration variations that can be mapped by electron microprobe or laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). Trace element maps in hydrothermal quartz from four different ore deposit types (Carlin-type Au, epithermal Ag, porphyry-Cu, and MVT Pb-Zn) reveal correlations among trace elements and between trace element concentrations and CL textures. The distributions of trace elements reflect variations in the physical and chemical conditions of quartz precipitation. These maps show that Al is the most abundant trace element in hydrothermal quartz. In crystals grown at temperatures below 300 °C, Al concentrations may vary by up to two orders of magnitude between adjacent growth zones, with no evidence for diffusion. The monovalent cations Li, Na, and K, where detectable, always correlate with Al, with Li being the most abundant of the three. In most samples, Al is more abundant than the combined total of the monovalent cations; however, in the MVT sample, molar Al/Li ratios are ~0.8. Antimony is present in concentrations up to ~120 ppm in epithermal quartz (~200–300 °C), but is not detectable in MVT, Carlin, or porphyry-Cu quartz. Concentrations of Sb do not correlate consistently with those of other trace elements or with CL textures. Titanium is only abundant enough to be mapped in quartz from porphyry-type ore deposits that precipitate at temperatures above ~400 °C. In such quartz, Ti concentration correlates positively with CL intensity, suggesting a causative relationship. In contrast, in quartz from other deposit types, there is no consistent correlation between concentrations of any trace element and CL intensity fluctuations.

  2. A plasma cell differentiation quality control ablates B cell clones with biallelic Ig rearrangements and truncated Ig production

    PubMed Central

    Srour, Nivine; Chemin, Guillaume; Tinguely, Aurélien; Ashi, Mohamad Omar; Oruc, Zéliha; Péron, Sophie; Sirac, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Aberrantly rearranged immunoglobulin (Ig) alleles are frequent. They are usually considered sterile and innocuous as a result of nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. However, alternative splicing can yield internally deleted proteins from such nonproductively V(D)J-rearranged loci. We show that nonsense codons from variable (V) Igκ exons promote exon-skipping and synthesis of V domain-less κ light chains (ΔV-κLCs). Unexpectedly, such ΔV-κLCs inhibit plasma cell (PC) differentiation. Accordingly, in wild-type mice, rearrangements encoding ΔV-κLCs are rare in PCs, but frequent in B cells. Likewise, enforcing expression of ΔV-κLCs impaired PC differentiation and antibody responses without disturbing germinal center reactions. In addition, PCs expressing ΔV-κLCs synthesize low levels of Ig and are mostly found among short-lived plasmablasts. ΔV-κLCs have intrinsic toxic effects in PCs unrelated to Ig assembly, but mediated by ER stress–associated apoptosis, making PCs producing ΔV-κLCs highly sensitive to proteasome inhibitors. Altogether, these findings demonstrate a quality control checkpoint blunting terminal PC differentiation by eliminating those cells expressing nonfunctionally rearranged Igκ alleles. This truncated Ig exclusion (TIE) checkpoint ablates PC clones with ΔV-κLCs production and exacerbated ER stress response. The TIE checkpoint thus mediates selection of long-lived PCs with limited ER stress supporting high Ig secretion, but with a cost in terms of antigen-independent narrowing of the repertoire. PMID:26666261

  3. Quantitative Characterization of Gold Nanoparticles by Coupling Thin Layer Chromatography with Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yan, Neng; Zhu, Zhenli; Jin, Lanlan; Guo, Wei; Gan, Yiqun; Hu, Shenghong

    2015-06-16

    Metal nanoparticles (NPs) determination has recently attracted considerable attention because of the continuing boom of nanotechnology. In this study, a novel method for separation and quantitative characterization of NPs in aqueous suspension was established by coupling thin layer chromatography (TLC) with laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) of various sizes were used as the model system. It was demonstrated that TLC not only allowed separation of gold nanoparticles from ionic gold species by using acetyl acetone/butyl alcohol/triethylamine (6:3:1, v/v) as the mobile phase, but it also achieved the separation of differently sized gold nanoparticles (13, 34, and 47 nm) by using phosphate buffer (0.2 M, pH = 6.8), Triton X-114 (0.4%, w/v), and EDTA (10 mM) as the mobile phase. Various experimental parameters that affecting TLC separation of AuNPs, such as the pH of the phosphate buffer, the coating of AuNPs, the concentrations of EDTA and Triton X-114, were investigated and optimized. It was found that separations of AuNPs by TLC displayed size dependent retention behavior with good reproducibility, and the retardation factors (R(f) value) increased linearly with decreasing nanoparticle size. The analytical performance of the present method was evaluated under optimized conditions. The limits of detection were in the tens of pg range, and repeatability (RSD, n = 7) was 6.3%, 5.9%, and 8.3% for 30 ng of 13 nm AuNPs, 34 nm AuNPs, and 47 nm AuNPs, respectively. The developed TLC-LA-ICP-MS method has also been applied to the analysis of spiked AuNPs in lake water, river water, and tap water samples. PMID:26005902

  4. Direct solid sampling of fire assay beads by spark ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Hoven, R. L.; Nam, Sang-Ho; Montaser, Akbar; Doughten, M. W.; Dorrzapf, A. F.

    1995-06-01

    A spark-based, solid-sampling cell is described for inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The cell is devised for the direct sampling of gold and silver beads produced by the classical lead fire assay procedure. The sampler produces a solid aerosol composed of submicron-sized vapor condensates and small (< 2 μm) spherules. In contrast to solution nebulization, the mass spectrum for spark-ICP-MS is relatively free of interfering metal oxide, polyatomic, and multiply-charged ions. The measurement precision is 3% RSD for Pt, Pd, and Rh preconcentrated into fire assay beads, but is 6% RSD for Ir due to its heterogeneous distribution in a silver bead. Detection limits determined for Pt, Pd, Rh, and Ir in fire assay beads range from 0.6 μg/g (Pt) to 1.2 μg/g (Pd). Calibration curves for these elements are linear up to the highest concentration in the bead studied (2000 μg/g). The quantitative potential of the method is evaluated using the South African Reference Material (SARM-7) geologic standard.

  5. Time- and space-resolved spectroscopic characterization of a laser carbon plasma plume in an argon background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, H. M.; Guzmán, F.; Favre, M.; Bhuyan, H.; Chuaqui, H.; Wyndham, E. S.

    2012-06-01

    We present time- and space-resolved spectroscopic observations of a laser-produced carbon plasma, in an argon background. An Nd : YAG laser pulse, 370 mJ, 3.5 ns, at 1.06 µm, with a fluence of 6.9 J cm-2, is used to produce a plasma from a solid graphite target in a 0.5 to 415 mTorr argon background. The spectral emission in the visible is recorded with 15 ns time resolution. We use 20 ns time resolution plasma imaging, filtered at characteristic carbon species emission wavelengths, to study the dynamics of the expanding plasma. The carbon plasma emission is found to evolve from the characteristic of single ionized carbon, to a more complex one, where C2 and C3 molecular bands dominate. Several plasma fronts, with either ionic or molecular composition, are seen to detach from the laser target plasma. The temporal and spatial features of the molecular carbon species evolution are found to be dependent on the actual argon background pressure.

  6. Convergent ablator performance measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, D. G.; Spears, B. K.; Braun, D. G.; Sorce, C. M.; Celliers, P. M.; Collins, G. W.; Landen, O. L.; Olson, R. E.

    2010-10-15

    The velocity and remaining ablator mass of an imploding capsule are critical metrics for assessing the progress toward ignition of an inertially confined fusion experiment. These and other convergent ablator performance parameters have been measured using a single streaked x-ray radiograph. Traditional Abel inversion of such a radiograph is ill-posed since backlighter intensity profiles and x-ray attenuation by the ablated plasma are unknown. To address this we have developed a regularization technique which allows the ablator density profile {rho}(r) and effective backlighter profile I{sub 0}(y) at each time step to be uniquely determined subject to the constraints that {rho}(r) is localized in radius space and I{sub 0}(y) is delocalized in object space. Moments of {rho}(r) then provide the time-resolved areal density, mass, and average radius (and thus velocity) of the remaining ablator material. These results are combined in the spherical rocket model to determine the ablation pressure and mass ablation rate during the implosion. The technique has been validated on simulated radiographs of implosions at the National Ignition Facility [Miller et al., Nucl. Fusion 44, 228 (2004)] and implemented on experiments at the OMEGA laser facility [Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)].

  7. Convergent ablator performance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, D. G.; Spears, B. K.; Braun, D. G.; Olson, R. E.; Sorce, C. M.; Celliers, P. M.; Collins, G. W.; Landen, O. L.

    2010-10-01

    The velocity and remaining ablator mass of an imploding capsule are critical metrics for assessing the progress toward ignition of an inertially confined fusion experiment. These and other convergent ablator performance parameters have been measured using a single streaked x-ray radiograph. Traditional Abel inversion of such a radiograph is ill-posed since backlighter intensity profiles and x-ray attenuation by the ablated plasma are unknown. To address this we have developed a regularization technique which allows the ablator density profile ρ(r ) and effective backlighter profile I0(y) at each time step to be uniquely determined subject to the constraints that ρ(r ) is localized in radius space and I0(y) is delocalized in object space. Moments of ρ(r ) then provide the time-resolved areal density, mass, and average radius (and thus velocity) of the remaining ablator material. These results are combined in the spherical rocket model to determine the ablation pressure and mass ablation rate during the implosion. The technique has been validated on simulated radiographs of implosions at the National Ignition Facility [Miller et al., Nucl. Fusion 44, 228 (2004)] and implemented on experiments at the OMEGA laser facility [Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)].

  8. LASER ABLATION-INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA-ATOMIC EMISSION SPECTROSCOPY STUDY AT THE 222-S LABORATORY USING HOT-CELL GLOVE BOX PROTOTYPE SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    LOCKREM LL; OWENS JW; SEIDEL CM

    2009-03-26

    This report describes the installation, testing and acceptance of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant procured laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (LA-ICP-AES) system for remotely analyzing high-level waste samples in a hot cell environment. The 2005-003; ATS MP 1027, Management Plan for Waste Treatment Plant Project Work Performed by Analytical Technical Services. The APD group at the 222-S laboratory demonstrated acceptable turnaround time (TAT) and provide sufficient data to assess sensitivity, accuracy, and precision of the LA-ICP-AES method.

  9. LASER ABLATION-INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA-ATOMIC EMISSION SPECTROSCOPY STUDY AT THE 222-S LABORATORY USING HOT-CELL GLOVE BOX PROTOTYPE SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    SEIDEL CM; JAIN J; OWENS JW

    2009-02-23

    This report describes the installation, testing, and acceptance of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) procured laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (LA-ICP-AES) system for remotely analyzing high-level waste (HLW) samples in a hot cell environment. The work was completed by the Analytical Process Development (APD) group in accordance with Task Order 2005-003; ATS MP 1027, Management Plan for Waste Treatment Plant Project Work Performed by Analytical Technical Services. The APD group at the 222-S Laboratory demonstrated acceptable turnaround time (TAT) and provide sufficient data to assess sensitivity, accuracy, and precision of the LA-ICP-AES method.

  10. Direct analysis of samples by mass spectrometry: From elements to bio-molecules using laser ablation inductively couple plasma mass spectrometry and laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Perdian, David C.

    2009-01-01

    Mass spectrometric methods that are able to analyze solid samples or biological materials with little or no sample preparation are invaluable to science as well as society. Fundamental research that has discovered experimental and instrumental parameters that inhibit fractionation effects that occur during the quantification of elemental species in solid samples by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry is described. Research that determines the effectiveness of novel laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric methods for the molecular analysis of biological tissues at atmospheric pressure and at high spatial resolution is also described. A spatial resolution is achieved that is able to analyze samples at the single cell level.

  11. Determination of Ag, Tl, and Pb in few milligrams of platinum nanoclusters by on-line isotope dilution in laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, J. Sabine; Pickhardt, Carola; Pompe, W.

    2004-09-01

    A new analysis procedure for determination of trace impurities in a few milligram noble metal nanoclusters, using on-line isotope dilution in laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) was developed. During the laser ablation of investigated sample simultaneous the dry aerosol of nebulized enriched isotope spike solution was added and mixed in the laser ablation chamber. The capability of solution-based calibration by a modified isotope dilution analysis in LA-ICP-MS for the determination of selected elements was tested, using platinum reference material NIST SRM 681. A good agreement of measured with certified concentration for Ag and Pb was found. The detection limits for trace element determination of the developed analytical technique, using LA-ICP-MS with quadrupole analyzer varied between 6 ng g-1 for Ag and 90 ng g-1 for Pb. The analytical technique was applied for the determination of Ag, Tl, and Pb in a few milligram of platinum nanoclusters.

  12. Matrix and energy effects during in-situ determination of Cu isotope ratios by ultraviolet-femtosecond laser ablation multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarov, Marina; Horn, Ingo

    2015-09-01

    Copper isotope compositions in Cu-bearing metals and minerals have been measured by deep (194 nm) ultraviolet femtosecond laser ablation multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (UV-fsLA-MC-ICP-MS). Pure Cu-metal, brass, and several Cu-rich minerals (chalcopyrite, enargite, covellite, malachite and cuprite) have been investigated. A long-term reproducibility of better than 0.08‰ at the 95% confidence limit on the NIST SRM 976 (National Institute of Standards and Technology) Cu-metal standard has been achieved with this technique. The δ65Cu values for all samples have been calculated by standard-sample-standard bracketing with NIST SRM 976. All analyses have been carried out using Ni as a mass discrimination monitor added by nebulization prior to entering the plasma torch. For further verification samples have been analysed by conventional solution nebulization MC-ICP-MS and the results obtained have been compared with those from UV-fsLA-MC-ICP-MS. Several potential matrix-induced molecular interferences on the mineral copper isotope ratio, such as (32S33S)+ and (32S-16O17O)+ do not affect the Cu isotope measurements on sulfides, while hydrides, such as Zn-H or doubly-charged Sn2 + that interfere Ni isotopes can be either neglected or stripped by calculation. Matrix independent Cu-isotope measurements are sensitive to the energy density (fluence) applied onto the sample and can produce artificial shifts in the obtained δ65Cu values which are on the order of 3‰ for Cu-metal, 0.5‰ for brass and 0.3‰ for malachite when using energy density of up to 2 J/cm2 for ablation. A positive correlation between applied energy density and the magnitude of the isotope ratio shift has been found in the energy density range from 0.2 to 1.3 J/cm2 which is below the ablation threshold for ns-laser ablation. The results demonstrate that by using appropriate low fluence it is possible to measure Cu isotopic ratios in native copper and Cu-bearing sulfides

  13. Laser-induced metal plasmas for pulsed laser deposition of metal-oxide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagenaars, Erik; Colgan, James; Rajendiran, Sudha; Rossall, Andrew

    2015-09-01

    Metal and metal-oxide thin films, e.g. ZnO, MgO, Al2O3 and TiO2, are widely used in e.g. microelectronics, catalysts, photonics and displays. Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) is a plasma-based thin-film deposition technique that is highly versatile and fast, however it suffers from limitations in control of film quality due to a lack of fundamental understanding of the underlying physical processes. We present experimental and modelling studies of the initial phases of PLD: laser ablation and plume expansion. A 2D hydrodynamic code, POLLUX, is used to model the laser-solid interaction of a Zn ablation with a Nd:YAG laser. In this early phase of PLD, the plasma plume has temperatures of about 10 eV, is highly ionized, and travels with a velocity of about 10-100 km/sec away from the target. Subsequently, the plasma enters the plume expansion phase in which the plasma cools down and collision chemistry changes the composition of the plume. Time-integrated optical emission spectroscopy shows that Zn I and Zn II emission lines dominate the visible range of the light emission. Comparison with the Los Alamos plasma kinetics code ATOMIC shows an average temperature around 1 eV, indicating a significant drop in plasma temperature during the expansion phase. We acknowledge support from the UK Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), Grant EP/K018388/1.

  14. Imaging of copper, zinc, and other elements in thin section of human brain samples (hippocampus) by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Becker, J S; Zoriy, M V; Pickhardt, C; Palomero-Gallagher, N; Zilles, K

    2005-05-15

    Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS) was used to produce images of element distribution in 20-microm thin sections of human brain tissue. The sample surface was scanned (raster area approximately 80 mm(2)) with a focused laser beam (wavelength 213 nm, diameter of laser crater 50 microm, and laser power density 3 x 10(9) W cm(-2)) in a cooled laser ablation chamber developed for these measurements. The laser ablation system was coupled to a double-focusing sector field ICPMS. Ion intensities of 31P+, 32S+, 56Fe+, 63Cu+, 64Zn+, 232Th+, and 238U+ were measured within the area of interest of the human brain tissue (hippocampus) by LA-ICPMS. The quantitative determination of copper, zinc, uranium, and thorium distribution in thin slices of the human hippocampus was performed using matrix-matched laboratory standards. In addition, a new arrangement in solution-based calibration using a micronebulizer, which was inserted directly into the laser ablation chamber, was applied for validation of synthetic laboratory standard. The mass spectrometric analysis yielded an inhomogeneous distribution (layered structure) for P, S, Cu, and Zn in thin brain sections of the hippocampus. In contrast, Th and U are more homogeneously distributed at a low-concentration level with detection limits in the low-nanogram per gram range. The unique analytical capability and the limits of LA-ICPMS will be demonstrated for the imaging of element distribution in thin cross sections of brain tissue from the hippocampus. LA-ICPMS provides new information on the spatial element distribution of the layered structure in thin sections of brain tissues from the hippocampus. PMID:15889910

  15. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma dynamic reaction cell mass spectrometry for the multi-element analysis of polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resano, M.; García-Ruiz, E.; Vanhaecke, F.

    2005-11-01

    In this work, the potential of laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry for the fast analysis of polymers has been explored. Different real-life samples (polyethylene shopping bags, an acrylonitrile butadiene styrene material and various plastic bricks) as well as several reference materials (VDA 001 to 004, Cd in polyethylene) have been selected for the study. Two polyethylene reference materials (ERM-EC 680 and 681), for which a reference or indicative value for the most relevant metals is available, have proved their suitability as standards for calibration. Special attention has been paid to the difficulties expected for the determination of Cr at the μg g - 1 level in this kind of materials, due to the interference of ArC + ions on the most abundant isotopes of Cr. The use of ammonia as a reaction gas in a dynamic reaction cell is shown to alleviate this problem, resulting in a limit of detection of 0.15 μg g - 1 for this element, while limiting only modestly the possibilities of the technique for simultaneous multi-element analysis. In this regard, As is the analyte most seriously affected by the use of ammonia, and its determination has to be carried out in vented mode, at the expense of measuring time. In all cases studied, accurate results could be obtained for elements ranging in content from the sub-μg g - 1 level to tens of thousands of μg g - 1 . However, the use of an element of known concentration as internal standard may be needed for materials with a matrix significantly different from that of the standard (polyethylene in this work). Precision ranged between 5% and 10% RSD for elements found at the 10 μg g - 1 level or higher, while this value could deteriorate to 20% for analytes found at the sub-μg g - 1 level. Overall, the technique evaluated presents many advantages for the fast and accurate multi-element analysis of these materials, avoiding laborious digestion procedures and minimizing the risk of analyte losses due

  16. Gadolinium-uptake by aquatic and terrestrial organisms-distribution determined by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lingott, Jana; Lindner, Uwe; Telgmann, Lena; Esteban-Fernández, Diego; Jakubowski, Norbert; Panne, Ulrich

    2016-02-17

    Gadolinium (Gd) based contrast agents (CA) are used to enhance magnetic resonance imaging. As a consequence of excretion by patients and insufficient elimination in wastewater treatment plants they are detected in high concentrations in surface water. At present, little is known about the uptake of these species by living organisms in aquatic systems. Therefore the uptake of gadolinium containing chelates by plants and animals grown in exposed water or on soil irrigated with exposed water was investigated. For this purpose two types of plants were treated with two different contrast agents. The uptake of the Gd contrast agents was studied by monitoring the elemental distribution with laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). This technique allows the multi-elemental analysis of solid samples with high resolution and little sample preparation. The analysis of L. minor showed that the uptake of Gd correlated with the concentration of gadodiamide in the water. The higher the concentration in the exposed water, the larger the Gd signal in the LA-ICP-MS acquired image. Exposure time experiments showed saturation within one day. The L. minor had contact with the CAs through roots and fronds, whereas the L. sativum only showed uptake through the roots. These results show that an external absorption of the CA through the leaves of L. sativum was impossible. All the analyzed parts of the plant showed Gd signal from the CA; the highest being at the main vein of the leaf. It is shown that the CAs can be taken up from plants. Furthermore, the uptake and distribution of Gd in Daphnia magna were shown. The exposure via cultivation medium is followed by Gd signals on the skin and in the area of the intestine, while the uptake via exposed nutrition algae causes the significantly highest Gd intensities in the area of the intestine. Because there are hints of negative effects for human organism these findings are important as they show that Gd based

  17. Laser-solid interaction and dynamics of laser-ablated materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, K.R.; Neboeuf, J.N.; Wood, R.F.; Geohegan, D.B.; Donato, J.M.; Liu, C.L.; Puretzky, A.A.

    1995-09-01

    An annealing model is extended to treat the vaporization process, and a hydrodynamic model describes the ablated material. We find that dynamic source and ionization effects accelerate the expansion front of the ablated plume with thermal vaporization temperature. The vaporization process and plume propagation in high background gas pressure are studied.

  18. Evaluation of Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry for the Quantitative Determination of Lead in Different Parts of Archeological Human Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Bellis, David J.; Parsons, Patrick J.; Jones, Joseph; Amarasiriwardena, Dula

    2011-01-01

    The lead content of teeth or tooth-parts has been used as a biomarker of cumulative lead exposure in clinical, epidemiological, environmental, and archaeological studies. Through the application of laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, a pilot study of the micrometer-scale distribution and quantification of lead was conducted for two human teeth obtained from an archeological burial site in Manhattan, New York, USA. Lead was highly localized within each tooth, with accumulation in circumpulpal dentine and cementum. The maximum localized lead content in circumpulpal dentine was remarkably high, almost 2000 μg g-1, compared to the mean enamel and dentine content of about 5 μg g-1. The maximum lead content in cementum was approximately 700 μg g-1. The large quantity of cementum found in the teeth suggested that the subjects had hypercementosis (excess cementum formation) of the root, a condition reported to have been prevalent among African-American slave populations. The distribution of lead in these human teeth was remarkably similar to the distribution that we previously reported in the teeth of present-day lead-dosed goats. The data shown demonstrate the feasibility of using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry to examine lead exposure in archaeological studies. PMID:22467976

  19. Laser ablation based fuel ignition

    DOEpatents

    Early, J.W.; Lester, C.S.

    1998-06-23

    There is provided a method of fuel/oxidizer ignition comprising: (a) application of laser light to a material surface which is absorptive to the laser radiation; (b) heating of the material surface with the laser light to produce a high temperature ablation plume which emanates from the heated surface as an intensely hot cloud of vaporized surface material; and (c) contacting the fuel/oxidizer mixture with the hot ablation cloud at or near the surface of the material in order to heat the fuel to a temperature sufficient to initiate fuel ignition. 3 figs.

  20. Laser ablation based fuel ignition

    DOEpatents

    Early, James W.; Lester, Charles S.

    1998-01-01

    There is provided a method of fuel/oxidizer ignition comprising: (a) application of laser light to a material surface which is absorptive to the laser radiation; (b) heating of the material surface with the laser light to produce a high temperature ablation plume which emanates from the heated surface as an intensely hot cloud of vaporized surface material; and (c) contacting the fuel/oxidizer mixture with the hot ablation cloud at or near the surface of the material in order to heat the fuel to a temperature sufficient to initiate fuel ignition.

  1. Expansion Dynamics of Ultrafast Laser Produced Plasmas in the Presence of Ambient Argon

    SciTech Connect

    Diwakar, P. K.; Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Hassanein, A.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2014-10-07

    In this paper, we report the emission features of fs laser ablated brass plasma plumes at various Ar background pressure levels ranging from vacuum to atmospheric conditions. Spectrally integrated 2D-imaging of plasma self-emission showed several interesting features at various pressure levels which consists of plume morphological changes, increase in persistence, confinement, and internal structures. Spatially resolved wavelength dispersed images of the plume were recorded for characterizing the spectral features at various pressure levels and also used for obtaining spatial distribution of Cu I and Zn I species in the plume, signal to noise ratios and fundamental parameters of the plasma; viz. temperature and density. The spatial evolution of excitation temperature and density showed significant changes at various ambient pressure levels and these results were correlated to morphological changes seen in the plume images. Optimum signal to background ratios for emission lines were observed in the moderate pressure range (~ 1-10 Torr). Optical time-of-flight profiles were used to study time evolution of various species in the plume and noticed oscillations at intermediate pressure levels. Possible mechanisms for observed changes in plume shape, optical emission intensity, and dual peak structures in time-of-flight profiles were discussed.

  2. Optimization of laser-produced plasmas for nanolithography and materials detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Justin R.

    In this work, laser-matter interactions and resultant plasma emission using traditional short pulsed lasers are studied in the context of semiconductor lithography and material sensing applications. Ultrafast laser ablation and plasma emission results are then compared to those using traditional short pulsed lasers. Then fundamental laser-matter interactions and ablation processes of ultrafast lasers are investigated. This work focuses on laser-produced plasma (LPP) light sources at extreme ultraviolet (EUV) wavelengths. The out-of-band (OoB) light emission as well as ionic and atomic debris from the plasma source, which are capable of damaging collection optics, have been studied as a function of incident laser wavelength to characterize the angular distributions of debris and identify the differences in debris from longer and shorter laser excitation wavelengths. By applying a prepulse to create improved laser-target coupling conditions, conversion efficiency (CE) from laser energy to 13.5 nm light emission from the plasma source can be improved by 30% or higher. Energetic ions escaping from the plasma can cause significant damage to light collection optics, greatly reducing their lifetimes, but by implementing a prepulse, it has been shown that most-probable ion energies can be reduced significantly, minimizing damage caused to collection optics. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a technique used to identify the elemental constituents of unknown samples by studying the optical light spectra emitted from a LPP. Despite advantages such as in situ capabilities and near-instant results, detection limits of LIBS systems are not as competitive as other laboratory-based systems. To overcome such limitations, a double pulse (DP) LIBS system is arranged using a long-wavelength laser for the second pulse and heating of the plume created by the first pulse. Detector gating parameters were optimized and different first-pulse laser energies were investigated to

  3. Small molecule ambient mass spectrometry imaging by infrared laser ablation metastable-induced chemical ionization.

    PubMed

    Galhena, Asiri S; Harris, Glenn A; Nyadong, Leonard; Murray, Kermit K; Fernández, Facundo M

    2010-03-15

    Presented here is a novel ambient ion source termed infrared laser ablation metastable-induced chemical ionization (IR-LAMICI). IR-LAMICI integrates IR laser ablation and direct analysis in real time (DART)-type metastable-induced chemical ionization for open air mass spectrometry (MS) ionization. The ion generation in the IR-LAMICI source is a two step process. First, IR laser pulses impinge the sample surface ablating surface material. Second, a portion of ablated material reacts with the metastable reactive plume facilitating gas-phase chemical ionization of analyte molecules generating protonated or deprotonated species in positive and negative ion modes, respectively. The successful coupling of IR-laser ablation with metastable-induced chemical ionization resulted in an ambient plasma-based spatially resolved small molecule imaging platform for mass spectrometry (MS). The analytical capabilities of IR-LAMICI are explored by imaging pharmaceutical tablets, screening counterfeit drugs, and probing algal tissue surfaces for natural products. The resolution of a chemical image is determined by the crater size produced with each laser pulse but not by the size of the metastable gas jet. The detection limits for an active pharmaceutical ingredient (acetaminophen) using the IR-LAMICI source is calculated to be low picograms. Furthermore, three-dimensional computational fluid dynamic simulations showed improvements in the IR-LAMICI ion source are possible. PMID:20155978

  4. Influence of C{sub 60} morphology on high-order harmonic generation enhancement in fullerene-containing plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ganeev, R. A.; Singhal, H.; Naik, P. A.; Chakera, J. A.; Srivastava, A. K.; Dhami, T. S.; Joshi, M. P.; Gupta, P. D.

    2009-11-15

    The morphologies of the fullerene targets and the ablated fullerenes to determine the optimal conditions of excitation of the C{sub 60}-containing targets have been analyzed. The optimization of fullerene-containing plasma conditions allowed the enhanced harmonic generation in these plasmas using laser radiation of different wavelengths, pulse durations, and phase modulation. A comparison between the harmonic generation in single-atom/ion-containing plasmas (using bulk carbon, silver, and indium targets) and fullerene-rich plasma plumes showed better conversion efficiency for the latter medium. The influence of phase modulation of the fundamental radiation in fullerene plasmas on the spectral properties of harmonics has been studied.

  5. Ablative system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, V. H. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A carrier liquid containing ablative material bodies is connected to a plenum chamber wall with openings to a high temperature environment. The liquid and bodies pass through the openings of the wall to form a self replacing ablative surface. The wall is composed of honeycomb layers, spheres containing ablative whiskers or wads, and a hardening catalyst for the carrier liquid. The wall also has woven wicks of ablative material fibers that extend through the wall openings and into plenum chamber which contains the liquid.

  6. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry: A new technique for the determination of trace and ultra-trace elements in silicates

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, W.T.; Pearce, N.J.G.; Jeffries, T.E. )

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes recent work applying a laser ablation system coupled to an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (LA-ICP-MS) for the direct analysis of solid geological materials. This work demonstrates the potential of LA-ICP-MS for the determination of a wide range of petrogenetically important trace and ultra-trace elements (including for example REE, Hf, Ta, Nb, Th, U) following a routine method of sample preparation. Powdered geological materials have been prepared as both pressed powder disks and fused glasses; both common methods of sample preparation for X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis. The solid materials were sampled by ablation using a pulsed Nd:YAG laser operating at 1,064 nm. Analyses can be produced at approximately 10 samples per hour. This instrumental method has limits of detection at or close to those in chondritic meteorites and gives linear calibrations over four orders of magnitude. The accuracy of the technique has been evaluated using reference materials to calibrate the instrument and treating Geological Survey of Japan basalts JB-1a, JB-2, and JB-3 as unknowns.' Detection limits are better than routine XRF analysis and compare favorably with Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis. Laser ablation overcomes the problems of sample dissolution employed in standard wet chemical techniques, whilst the fused glasses provide homogeneous solid samples. The fused glass technique has been applied to a wide range of reference materials from ultra-basic rocks through basalts and andesites to granites, as well as syenite, mica schist, and black shale. For all of the elements commonly used to generate multi-element discrimination diagrams the data obtained define straight line calibrations. This method is therefore capable of analyzing the complete range of silicate compositions normally encountered with a single calibration (i.e., there is no apparent matrix effect). 47 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. A novel method for exploring elemental composition of microbial communities: laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry of intact bacterial colonies.

    PubMed

    Latimer, Joe; Stokes, Sarah L; Graham, Alison I; Bunch, Josephine; Jackson, Rachel J; McLeod, Cameron W; Poole, Robert K

    2009-12-01

    Bacterial colonies are spatially complex structures whose physiology is profoundly dependent on interactions between cells and with the underlying semi-solid substratum. Here, we use bacterial colonies as a model of a microbial community to evaluate the potential of laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) to delineate elemental distributions within colonies with minimal pre-treatment. To reduce water content of the colony and limit undesirable absorption of laser energy, we compared methods of preparing 24h-old colonies of Escherichia coli TG1 on agar for laser ablation. Colonies on excised agar segments dried on chromatography paper were superior to colonies dried in a dessicator or by prolonged incubation, with respect to signal magnitude, signal:noise ratio and background signal. Having optimised laser scan speed (10 microm s(-1)) and laser beam diameter (100 microm), further improvements were achieved by growing colonies on nylon membranes over agar, which were then transferred to the ablation chamber without further treatment. Repeated line rasters across individual membrane-supported colonies yielded three-dimensional elemental maps of colonies, revealing a convex morphology consistent with visual inspection. By normalising isotope counts for P, Mn, Zn, Fe and Ca against Mg, the most abundant cellular divalent cation, we sought elemental heterogeneity within the colony. The normalised concentration of Mn in the perimeter was higher than in the colony interior, whereas the converse was true for Ca. LA-ICP-MS is a novel and powerful method for probing elemental composition and organisation within microbial communities and should find numerous applications in, for example, biofilm studies. PMID:19835915

  8. Phenomenological and experimental study of the thermal response of low density silica ablators to high enthalpy plasma flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henline, William D.; Tran, Huy K.; Hamm, Michael K.

    1991-01-01

    A complete analysis of the melting-ablator governing equations is carried out for porous ablators with the purpose of establishing an approximate analytical model capable of determining surface recession, temperature, and heat flux as well as in-depth temperature profiles. A detailed dimensional analysis of the melt-flow governing equations is performed for parameters applicable to high-enthalpy flows. Results of arc-jet flow experiments performed on NASA Reusable Surface Insulation materials of different densities and over a range of stagnation pressures and heat fluxes are discussed. A dimensionless correlation for melt run-offs is derived in terms of material and flow parameters; however, it is pointed out that the accuracy of the current data is sufficient to conclude the compliance with the model.

  9. In situ signatures of residual plasmaspheric plumes: Observations and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, J.; Thomsen, M. F.; DeJong, A.

    2014-06-01

    We compare in situ observations of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Magnetospheric Plasma Analyzers with output of a dynamic, plasmapause test particle (PTP) simulation for the moderately disturbed interval 18-20 January 2000. In the model, weakly enhanced convection on 18 January creates a narrow drainage plume (plume A) that wraps completely around the main torus. Moderate convection on 19 January triggers significant plasmaspheric erosion, forming a second plume (B) that coexists with the narrow, wrapped, residual plume A. We fly three virtual LANL satellites through the simulation domain. The observations are globally consistent with the PTP simulation; LANL data contain several intervals of plume plasma in the model's predicted magnetic local time (MLT) sector. The modeled durations of plume sector transits are in good agreement with the LANL data. On a subglobal scale, the MLT widths and timings of the simulated plumes do not precisely agree with observations. However, several observation intervals exhibit good morphological agreement with virtual spacecraft signatures of two distinct, coexisting plumes (A and B). The fine-scale structure in the PTP model arises from the merging of residual plume A with the newer plume B. Plume merging is one theoretical means of generating fine structure in the plasmasphere: during multiple cycles of erosion and recovery, successive layers of wrapped, residual plumes can merge with newer plumes, creating layers of filamentary density structure. The model-data comparisons suggest that the plasmaspheric density distribution may preserve some memory of prior epochs of erosion and recovery.

  10. Depth profile studies of ZrTiN coatings by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kanický, Viktor; Kuhn, Hans-Rudolf; Guenther, Detlef

    2004-09-01

    The feasibility of depth profiling was studied by using a 193-nm ArF* excimer laser ablation system (GeoLas, MicroLas, Goettingen, Germany) with a lens array-based beam homogenizer in combination with an ICP-QMS Agilent 7500. Two ablation cells (20 and 1.5 cm3) were compared at the laser repetition rate of 1 Hz, laser beam energy of 135 mJ and the carrier gas flow rate 1.5 L min(-1) He + 0.78 L min(-1) Ar. The ablation cell dimensions are important parameters for signal tailing; however, very small cell volumes (e.g. 1.5 cm3) may cause memory effects, which can be probably explained by dominant inertial losses of aerosol on cell walls with its delayed mobilization. The 20-cm3 ablation cell seems to be appropriate for depth profiling by continuous single-hole drilling. The study of the influence of the pit diameter magnitude on the waning and emerging signals under small crater depth/diameter aspect ratios, which range between 0.75 and 0.0375 for the 3-microm-thick coatings and pit diameters 4-80 microm, revealed that the steady-state signals of pure coating and pure substrate (out of interface) were obtained at crater diameters between 20 and 40 microm. Depth resolution defined by means of slopes of tangents in the layer interface region depend on the pit diameter and has an optimum value between 20 and 40 microm and gives 0.6 microm for the 20-microm pit. In-depth variation of concentration of coating constituent (Ti) was proved to be almost identical with two different laser/ICP systems. PMID:15551076

  11. THE STRUCTURE AND ORIGIN OF SOLAR PLUMES: NETWORK PLUMES

    SciTech Connect

    Gabriel, A.; Tison, E.; Bely-Dubau, F.; Wilhelm, K.

    2009-07-20

    This study is based upon plumes seen close to the solar limb within coronal holes in the emission from ions formed in the temperature region of 1 MK, in particular, the band of Fe IX 171 A from EIT on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory. It is shown, using geometric arguments, that two distinct classes of structure contribute to apparently similar plume observations. Quasi-cylindrical structures are anchored in discrete regions of the solar surface (beam plumes), and faint extended structures require integration along the line of sight (LOS) in order to reproduce the observed brightness. This second category, sometimes called 'curtains', are ubiquitous within the polar holes and are usually more abundant than the beam plumes, which depend more on the enhanced magnetic structures detected at their footpoints. It is here proposed that both phenomena are based on plasma structures in which emerging magnetic loops interact with ambient monopolar fields, involving reconnection. The important difference is in terms of physical scale. It is proposed that curtains are composed of a large number of microplumes, distributed along the LOS. The supergranule network provides the required spatial structure. It is shown by modeling that the observations can be reproduced if microplumes are concentrated within some 5 Mm of the cell boundaries. For this reason, we propose to call this second population 'network plumes'. The processes involved could represent a major contribution to the heating mechanism of the solar corona.

  12. Ablative Rocket Deflector Testing and Computational Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allgood, Daniel C.; Lott, Jeffrey W.; Raines, Nickey

    2010-01-01

    A deflector risk mitigation program was recently conducted at the NASA Stennis Space Center. The primary objective was to develop a database that characterizes the behavior of industry-grade refractory materials subjected to rocket plume impingement conditions commonly experienced on static test stands. The program consisted of short and long duration engine tests where the supersonic exhaust flow from the engine impinged on an ablative panel. Quasi time-dependent erosion depths and patterns generated by the plume impingement were recorded for a variety of different ablative materials. The erosion behavior was found to be highly dependent on the material s composition and corresponding thermal properties. For example, in the case of the HP CAST 93Z ablative material, the erosion rate actually decreased under continued thermal heating conditions due to the formation of a low thermal conductivity "crystallization" layer. The "crystallization" layer produced near the surface of the material provided an effective insulation from the hot rocket exhaust plume. To gain further insight into the complex interaction of the plume with the ablative deflector, computational fluid dynamic modeling was performed in parallel to the ablative panel testing. The results from the current study demonstrated that locally high heating occurred due to shock reflections. These localized regions of shock-induced heat flux resulted in non-uniform erosion of the ablative panels. In turn, it was observed that the non-uniform erosion exacerbated the localized shock heating causing eventual plume separation and reversed flow for long duration tests under certain conditions. Overall, the flow simulations compared very well with the available experimental data obtained during this project.

  13. The direct determination of trace metals in gold and silver materials by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry without matrix matched standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogan, Valentina V.; Hinds, Michael W.; Ramendik, Gregory I.

    1994-04-01

    Typically, accurate trace element determination in solid samples by laser ablation ICP-MS requires calibration with matrix matched standards. Trace metal analysis was performed in high purity gold, high purity silver and 14 karat gold-silver alloys. A Nd : YAG laser was used to evaporate solid samples of precious metals into an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer. Analytical data and a study of the crater sizes indicated that approximately the same amount of material for both gold and silver samples was vaporized by a Nd : YAG laser operated in a Q-switched mode with the following parameters: 210 mJ laser energy; 8 Hz repetition rate; and focused 7 mm below the sample surface. High purity gold and silver, and a 14 karat gold-silver alloy were analyzed for trace metals common to gold and silver reference materials. In general, the determination of Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Pd, Pt, Pb, and Bi did not strongly depend on whether gold or silver reference materials were used for calibration. This permits these trace metals to be determined directly with only one set of reference materials, by laser ablation ICP-MS, in a wide variety of gold-silver alloys.

  14. Multivariate classification of edible salts: Simultaneous Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy and Laser-Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yonghoon; Nam, Sang-Ho; Ham, Kyung-Sik; Gonzalez, Jhanis; Oropeza, Dayana; Quarles, Derrick; Yoo, Jonghyun; Russo, Richard E.

    2016-04-01

    Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) and Laser-Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), both based on laser ablation sampling, can be employed simultaneously to obtain different chemical fingerprints from a sample. We demonstrated that this analysis approach can provide complementary information for improved classification of edible salts. LIBS could detect several of the minor metallic elements along with Na and Cl, while LA-ICP-MS spectra were used to measure non-metallic and trace heavy metal elements. Principal component analysis using LIBS and LA-ICP-MS spectra showed that their major spectral variations classified the sample salts in different ways. Three classification models were developed by using partial least squares-discriminant analysis based on the LIBS, LA-ICP-MS, and their fused data. From the cross-validation performances and confusion matrices of these models, the minor metallic elements (Mg, Ca, and K) detected by LIBS and the non-metallic (I) and trace heavy metal (Ba, W, and Pb) elements detected by LA-ICP-MS provided complementary chemical information to distinguish particular salt samples.

  15. Preparation and Ablation Properties of Y2SiO5 Coating for SiC-Coated C/C Composites by Supersonic Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jia-Ping; Fu, Qian-Gang; Zhuang, Lei; Li, He-Jun; Sun, Can

    2015-08-01

    Y2SiO5 coating was prepared on the surface of SiC-coated C/C composites by supersonic plasma spraying at different powers of 35, 40, 45, and 50 kW. The microstructures and phase compositions were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction, respectively. Roughness of the coating was measured by a confocal laser scanning microscope. Bonding force between Y2SiO5 outer coating and SiC inner coating was measured by a scratch tester. The results show that Y2SiO5 coating prepared at the spraying power of 45 kW possesses the biggest deposition rate, minimum surface roughness (Ra = 11.12 μm), and maximum bonding force (up to 28 N). The linear and mass ablation rates of Y2SiO5 coating prepared at 45 kW are 2.6 μm/s and 0.031 mg cm-2 s-1 in the heat flux of 2.38 MW/m2 under oxyacetylene torch. During ablation, a glassy layer of SiO2 + Y2O3 was formed, acting as a barrier to high-speed gas flow of oxyacetylene flame.

  16. A new strategy of solution calibration in laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for multielement trace analysis of geological samples.

    PubMed

    Pickhardt, C; Becker, J S; Dietze, H J

    2000-01-01

    Because multielement trace analysis by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) is often limited by the lack of suitable reference materials with a similar matrix composition, a novel quantification strategy using solution calibration was developed. For mass spectrometric multielement determination in geological samples a quadrupole-based LA-ICP-MS is coupled with an ultrasonic nebulizer (USN). In order to arrange matrix matching the standard solutions are nebulized with a USN during solution calibration and simultaneously a blank target (e.g. lithium borate) is ablated with a focused laser beam. The homogeneous geological samples were measured using the same experimental arrangement where a 2% nitric acid is simultaneously nebulized with the USN. Homogeneous targets were prepared from inhomogeneous geological samples by powdering, homogenizing and fusing with a lithium borate mixture in a muffle furnace at 1050 degrees C. Furthermore, a homogeneous geological glass was also investigated. The quantification of analytical results was performed by external calibration using calibration curves measured on standard solutions. In order to compare two different approaches for the quantification of analytical results in LA-ICP-MS, measured concentrations in homogeneous geological targets were also corrected with relative sensitivity coefficients (RSCs) determined using one standard solution only. The analytical results of LA-ICP-MS on various geological samples are in good agreement with the reference values and the results of other trace analytical methods. The relative standard deviation (RSD) for trace element determination (N = 6) is between 2 and 10%. PMID:11220576

  17. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and laser ablation ICP-MS for isotope analysis of long-lived radionuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, J. Sabine

    2005-04-01

    For a few years now inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry has been increasingly used for precise and accurate determination of isotope ratios of long-lived radionuclides at the trace and ultratrace level due to its excellent sensitivity, good precision and accuracy. At present, ICP-MS and also laser ablation ICP-MS are applied as powerful analytical techniques in different fields such as the characterization of nuclear materials, recycled and by-products (e.g., spent nuclear fuel or depleted uranium ammunitions), radioactive waste control, in environmental monitoring and in bioassay measurements, in health control, in geochemistry and geochronology. Especially double-focusing sector field ICP mass spectrometers with single ion detector or with multiple ion collector device have been used for the precise determination of long-lived radionuclides isotope ratios at very low concentration levels. Progress has been achieved by the combination of ultrasensitive mass spectrometric techniques with effective separation and enrichment procedures in order to improve detection limits or by the introduction of the collision cell in ICP-MS for reducing disturbing interfering ions (e.g., of 129Xe+ for the determination of 129I). This review describes the state of the art and the progress of ICP-MS and laser ablation ICP-MS for isotope ratio measurements of long-lived radionuclides in different sample types, especially in the main application fields of characterization of nuclear and radioactive waste material, environmental research and health controls.

  18. Dust Plumes off Libya

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Two-toned dust plumes blew northward off the coast of Libya on October 26, 2007, as the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Terra satellite took this picture. While plumes in the west are beige, reminiscent of the Sahara's sands, the plumes in the east are distinctly darker. The differences in color can be traced to the plumes's varied origins.

  19. Current developments in laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry for use in geology, forensics, and nuclear nonproliferation research

    SciTech Connect

    Messerly, Joshua D.

    2008-08-26

    This dissertation focused on new applications of laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). The diverse fields that were investigated show the versatility of the technique. In Chapter 2, LA-ICP-MS was used to investigate the rare earth element (REE) profiles of garnets from the Broken Hill Deposit in New South Wales, Australia. The normalized REE profiles helped to shed new light on the formation of deposits of sulfide ores. This information may be helpful in identifying the location of sulfide ore deposits in other locations. New sources of metals such as Pg, Zn, and Ag, produced from these ores, are needed to sustain our current technological society. The application of LA-ICP-MS presented in Chapter 3 is the forensics analysis of automotive putty and caulking. The elemental analysis of these materials was combined with the use of Principal Components Analysis (PCA). The PCA comparison was able to differentiate the automotive putty samples by manufacturer and lot number. The analysis of caulk was able to show a differentiation based on manufacturer, but no clear differentiation was shown by lot number. This differentiation may allow matching of evidence in the future. This will require many more analyses and the construction of a database made up of many different samples. The 4th chapter was a study of the capabilities of LA-ICP-MS for fast and precise analysis of particle ensembles for nuclear nonproliferation applications. Laser ablation has the ability to spatially resolve particle ensembles which may contain uranium or other actinides from other particles present in a sample. This is of importance in samples obtained from air on filter media. The particle ensembles of interest may be mixed in amongst dust and other particulates. A problem arises when ablating these particle ensembles directly from the filter media. Dust particles other than ones of interest may be accidentally entrained in the aerosol of the ablated particle

  20. Tissue ablation after 120W greenlight laser vaporization and bipolar plasma vaporization of the prostate: a comparison using transrectal three-dimensional ultrasound volumetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kranzbühler, Benedikt; Gross, Oliver; Fankhauser, Christian D.; Hefermehl, Lukas J.; Poyet, Cédric; Largo, Remo; Müntener, Michael; Seifert, Hans-Helge; Zimmermann, Matthias; Sulser, Tullio; Müller, Alexander; Hermanns, Thomas

    2012-02-01

    Introduction and objectives: Greenlight laser vaporization (LV) of the prostate is characterized by simultaneous vaporization and coagulation of prostatic tissue resulting in tissue ablation together with excellent hemostasis during the procedure. It has been reported that bipolar plasma vaporization (BPV) of the prostate might be an alternative for LV. So far, it has not been shown that BPV is as effective as LV in terms of tissue ablation or hemostasis. We performed transrectal three-dimensional ultrasound investigations to compare the efficiency of tissue ablation between LV and BPV. Methods: Between 11.2009 and 5.2011, 50 patients underwent pure BPV in our institution. These patients were matched with regard to the pre-operative prostate volume to 50 LV patients from our existing 3D-volumetry-database. Transrectal 3D ultrasound and planimetric volumetry of the prostate were performed pre-operatively, after catheter removal, 6 weeks and 6 months. Results: Median pre-operative prostate volume was not significantly different between the two groups (45.3ml vs. 45.4ml; p=1.0). After catheter removal, median absolute volume reduction (BPV 12.4ml, LV 6.55ml) as well as relative volume reduction (27.8% vs. 16.4%) were significantly higher in the BPV group (p<0.001). After six weeks (42.9% vs. 33.3%) and six months (47.2% vs. 39.7%), relative volume reduction remained significantly higher in the BPV group (p<0.001). Absolute volume reduction was non-significantly higher in the BPV group after six weeks (18.4ml, 13.8ml; p=0.051) and six months (20.8ml, 18ml; p=0.3). Clinical outcome parameters improved significantly in both groups without relevant differences between the groups. Conclusions: Both vaporization techniques result in efficient tissue ablation with initial prostatic swelling. BPV seems to be superior due to a higher relative volume reduction. This difference had no clinical impact after a follow-up of 6M.

  1. Laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry: Examinations of the origins of polyatomic ions and advances in the sampling of particulates

    SciTech Connect

    Witte, Travis

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation provides a general introduction to Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and laser ablation (LA) sampling, with an examination of analytical challenges in the employment of this technique. It discusses the origin of metal oxide ions (MO+) in LA-ICP-MS, as well as the effect of introducing helium and nitrogen to the aerosol gas flow on the formation of these polyatomic interferences. It extends the study of polyatomic ions in LA-ICP-MS to metal argide (MAr+) species, an additional source of possible significant interferences in the spectrum. It describes the application of fs-LA-ICP-MS to the determination of uranium isotope ratios in particulate samples.

  2. Demonstration of femtosecond laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for uranium isotopic measurements in U-10Mo nuclear fuel foils

    SciTech Connect

    Havrilla, George Joseph; Gonzalez, Jhanis

    2015-06-10

    The use of femtosecond laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was used to demonstrate the feasibility of measuring the isotopic ratio of uranium directly in U-10Mo fuel foils. The measurements were done on both the flat surface and cross sections of bare and Zr clad U-10Mo fuel foil samples. The results for the depleted uranium content measurements were less than 10% of the accepted U235/238 ratio of 0.0020. Sampling was demonstrated for line scans and elemental mapping over large areas. In addition to the U isotopic ratio measurement, the Zr thickness could be measured as well as trace elemental composition if required. A number of interesting features were observed during the feasibility measurements which could provide the basis for further investigation using this methodology. The results demonstrate the feasibility of using fs-LA-ICP-MS for measuring the U isotopic ratio in U-10Mo fuel foils.

  3. Calibration graphs for Ti, Ta and Nb in sintered tungsten carbide by infrared laser ablation inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kanický, V; Otruba, V; Mermet, J M

    2001-12-01

    Infrared laser ablation (IR-LA) has been studied as a sample introduction technique for the analysis of sintered cobalt-cemented tungsten carbide materials by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Fractionation of cobalt was observed. Linearity of calibration plots was verified at least up to 15% Ti, 8% Ta, and 3% Nb. Above 1% (m/m) Ti, Ta, and Nb, the repeatability of results was better than 3% R.S.D. The relative uncertainty at the centroid of the calibration line was in the range from +/- 3% to +/- 4% for Ti, Ta, and Nb with internal standardization by tungsten and up to +/- 5% without internal standardization. The limits of detection were 0.004% Ti, 0.001% Ta, and 0.004% Nb. Elimination of the cemented hardmetal dissolution procedure is the main advantage of this method. PMID:11769803

  4. Investigation of heavy-metal accumulation in selected plant samples using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galiová, M.; Kaiser, J.; Novotný, K.; Novotný, J.; Vaculovič, T.; Liška, M.; Malina, R.; Stejskal, K.; Adam, V.; Kizek, R.

    2008-12-01

    Single-pulse Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) and Laser-Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass-Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) were applied for mapping the silver and copper distribution in Helianthus Annuus L. samples treated with contaminant in controlled conditions. For Ag and Cu detection the 328.07 nm Ag(I) and 324.75 nm Cu(I) lines were used, respectively. The LIBS experimental conditions (mainly the laser energy and the observation window) were optimized in order to avoid self-absorption effect in the measured spectra. In the LA-ICP-MS analysis the Ag 107 and Cu 63 isotopes were detected. The capability of these two analytical techniques for high-resolution mapping of selected trace chemical elements was demonstrated.

  5. Angular emission of ions and mass deposition from femtosecond and nanosecond laser-produced plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Verhoff, B.; Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A.

    2012-06-15

    We investigated the angular distribution of ions and atoms emanating from femto- and nanosecond laser-produced metal plasmas under similar laser fluence conditions. For producing plasmas, aluminum targets are ablated in vacuum employing pulses from a Ti:Sapphire ultrafast laser (40 fs, 800 nm) and an Nd:YAG laser (6 ns, 1064 nm). The angular distribution of ion emission as well as the kinetic energy distribution is characterized by a Faraday cup, while a quartz microbalance is used for evaluating deposited mass. The ion and deposited mass features showed that fs laser ablated plasmas produced higher kinetic energy and more mass per pulse than ns plumes over all angles. The ion flux and kinetic energy studies show fs laser plasmas produce narrower angular distribution while ns laser plasmas provide narrower energy distribution.

  6. On the Ablation Models of Fuel Pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Rozhansky, V.A.; Senichenkov, I.Yu.

    2005-12-15

    The neutral gas shielding model and neutral-gas-plasma shielding model are analyzed qualitatively. The main physical processes that govern the formation of the shielding gas cloud and, consequently, the ablation rate are considered. For the neutral gas shielding model, simple formulas relating the ablation rate and cloud parameters to the parameters of the pellet and the background plasma are presented. The estimates of the efficiency of neutral gas shielding and plasma shielding are compared. It is shown that the main portion of the energy flux of the background electrons is released in the plasma cloud. Formulas for the ablation rate and plasma parameters are derived in the neutral-gas-plasma shielding model. The question is discussed as to why the neutral gas shielding model describes well the ablation rate of the pellet material, although it does not take into account the ionization effects and the effects associated with the interaction of ionized particles with the magnetic field. The reason is that the ablation rate depends weakly on the energy flux of hot electrons; as a result, the attenuation of this flux by the electrostatic shielding and plasma shielding has little effect on the ablation rate. This justifies the use of the neutral gas shielding model to estimate the ablation rate (to within a factor of about 2) over a wide range of parameters of the pellet and the background plasma.

  7. Gas dynamic effects on formation of carbon dimers in laser-produced plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Shboul, K. F.; Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A.

    2011-09-01

    We investigated the effect of helium and nitrogen pressures on the dynamics of molecular species formation during laser ablation of carbon. For producing plasmas, planar carbon targets were irradiated with 1064 nm, 6 ns pulses from an Nd:yttrium aluminum garnet laser. The emission from excited C2 and CN molecules was studied using space resolved optical time-of-flight emission spectroscopy and spectrally resolved fast imaging. The intensity oscillations in C2 and CN monochromatic fast imaging and their emission space-time contours suggest that recombination is the major mechanism of C2 formation within the laser ablation carbon plumes in the presence of ambient gas.

  8. Quantitation of trace metals in liquid samples by dried-droplet laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lu; Sturgeon, Ralph E; Mester, Zoltán

    2005-05-01

    A new, discrete sample introduction approach based on laser ablation (LA) is described for the quantitation of several trace metals in aqueous samples by ICPMS. Dried microdroplets of sample, previously mixed with a sodium acetate matrix, were quantitatively ablated from a polystyrene substrate. Calibration via the method of standard additions or isotope dilution provided accurate results for Ni, Cd, and Pb in drinking water and Se in a yeast extract. Compared to conventional solution nebulization, LA sample introduction provided a 2-7-fold enhancement in absolute sensitivity and transport efficiency of 2-14% for the elements examined. Estimated detection limits are 1-7-fold poorer for the dried-droplet LA technique, primarily a result of degraded precision arising from counting statistics limitations for discrete sample introduction. On the basis of the several-second half-width of the resulting transient signals, sample throughput can be in the range of 250 samples per hour. Additionally, integration of the transient signal should eliminate contributions to elemental fractionation from the LA step. Dried-droplet LA-ICPMS offers several advantages over its counterpart, ETV-ICPMS, with respect to background intensity, throughput, and ease of desorption. PMID:15859618

  9. Endometrial ablation

    MedlinePlus

    ... can be seen on the video screen. Small tools can be used through the scope to remove abnormal growths or tissue for examination. Ablation uses heat, cold, or electricity to destroy the lining of the womb. The ...

  10. Ablation article and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, W. D.; Sullivan, E. M. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An ablation article, such as a conical heat shield, having an ablating surface is provided with at least one discrete area of at least one seed material, such as aluminum. When subjected to ablation conditions, the seed material is ablated. Radiation emanating from the ablated seed material is detected to analyze ablation effects without disturbing the ablation surface. By providing different seed materials having different radiation characteristics, the ablating effects on various areas of the ablating surface can be analyzed under any prevailing ablation conditions. The ablating article can be provided with means for detecting the radiation characteristics of the ablated seed material to provide a self-contained analysis unit.

  11. Plasma temperature clamping in filamentation laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Yeak, J.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2015-10-19

    Ultrafast laser filament induced breakdown spectroscopy is a very promising method for remote material detection. We present characteristics of plasmas generated in a metal target by laser filaments in air. Our measurements show that the temperature of the ablation plasma is clamped along the filamentation channel due to intensity clamping in a filament. Nevertheless, significant changes in radiation intensity are noticeable, and this is essentially due to variation in the number density of emitting atoms. The present results also partly explains the reason for the occurrence of atomic plume during fs LIBS in air compared to long-pulse ns LIBS.

  12. Plasma temperature clamping in filamentation laser induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Harilal, S S; Yeak, J; Phillips, M C

    2015-10-19

    Ultrafast laser filament induced breakdown spectroscopy is a very promising method for remote material detection. We present characteristics of plasmas generated in a metal target by laser filaments in air. Our measurements show that the temperature of the ablation plasma is clamped along the filament channel due to intensity clamping in a filament. Nevertheless, significant changes in radiation intensity are noticeable, and this is essentially due to variation in the number density of emitting atoms. The present results also explain the near absence of ion emission but strong atomic neutral emission from plumes produced during fs LIBS in air. PMID:26480372

  13. Using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) to characterize copper, zinc and mercury along grizzly bear hair providing estimate of diet.

    PubMed

    Noël, Marie; Christensen, Jennie R; Spence, Jody; Robbins, Charles T

    2015-10-01

    We enhanced an existing technique, laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), to function as a non-lethal tool in the temporal characterization of trace element exposure in wild mammals. Mercury (Hg), copper (Cu), cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb), iron (Fe) and zinc (Zn) were analyzed along the hair of captive and wild grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis). Laser parameters were optimized (consecutive 2000 μm line scans along the middle line of the hair at a speed of 50 μm/s; spot size=30 μm) for consistent ablation of the hair. A pressed pellet of reference material DOLT-2 and sulfur were used as external and internal standards, respectively. Our newly adapted method passed the quality control tests with strong correlations between trace element concentrations obtained using LA-ICP-MS and those obtained with regular solution-ICP-MS (r(2)=0.92, 0.98, 0.63, 0.57, 0.99 and 0.90 for Hg, Fe, Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb, respectively). Cross-correlation analyses revealed good reproducibility between trace element patterns obtained from hair collected from the same bear. One exception was Cd for which external contamination was observed resulting in poor reproducibility. In order to validate the method, we used LA-ICP-MS on the hair of five captive grizzly bears fed known and varying amounts of cutthroat trout over a period of 33 days. Trace element patterns along the hair revealed strong Hg, Cu and Zn signals coinciding with fish consumption. Accordingly, significant correlations between Hg, Cu, and Zn in the hair and Hg, Cu, and Zn intake were evident and we were able to develop accumulation models for each of these elements. While the use of LA-ICP-MS for the monitoring of trace elements in wildlife is in its infancy, this study highlights the robustness and applicability of this newly adapted method. PMID:26005744

  14. Influence of relative abundance of isotopes on depth resolution for depth profiling of metal coatings by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fariñas, Juan C; Coedo, Aurora G; Dorado, Teresa

    2010-04-15

    A systematic study on the influence of relative abundance of isotopes of elements in the coating (A(c)) and in the substrate (A(s)) on both shape of time-resolved signals and depth resolution (Delta z) was performed for depth profile analysis of metal coatings on metal substrates by ultraviolet (266 nm) nanosecond laser ablation inductively coupled plasma quadrupole mass spectrometry. Five coated samples with coating thicknesses of the same order of magnitude (20-30 microm) were tested: nickel coating on aluminium, chromium and copper, and steel coated with copper and zinc. A laser repetition rate of 1 Hz and a laser fluence of 21 J cm(-2) were used. Five different depth profile types were established, which showed a clear dependence on A(c)/A(s) ratio. In general, depth profiles obtained for ratios above 1-10 could not be used to determine Delta z. We found that Delta z increased non-linearly with A(c)/A(s) ratio. The best depth profile types, leading to highest depth resolution and reproducibility, were attained in all cases by using the isotopes with low/medium A(c) values and with the highest A(s) values. In these conditions, an improvement of up to 4 times in Delta z values was achieved. The average ablation rates were in the range from 0.55 microm pulse(-1) for copper coating on steel to 0.83 microm pulse(-1) for zinc coating on steel, and the Delta z values were between 2.74 microm for nickel coating on chromium and 5.91 microm for nickel coating on copper, with RSD values about 5-8%. PMID:20188923

  15. Comparison of 265 nm Femtosecond and 213 nm Nanosecond Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry for Pb Isotope Ratio Measurements.

    PubMed

    Ohata, Masaki; Nonose, Naoko; Dorta, Ladina; Günther, Detlef

    2015-01-01

    The analytical performance of 265 nm femtosecond laser ablation (fs-LA) and 213 nm nanosecond laser ablation (ns-LA) systems coupled with multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS) for Pb isotope ratio measurements of solder were compared. Although the time-resolved signals of Pb measured by fs-LA-MC-ICPMS showed smoother signals compared to those obtained by ns-LA-MC-ICPMS, similar precisions on Pb isotope ratio measurements were obtained between them, even though their operating conditions were slightly different. The mass bias correction of the Pb isotope ratio measurement was carried out by a comparison method using a Pb standard solution prepared from NIST SRM 981 Pb metal isotopic standard, which was introduced into the ICP by a desolvation nebulizer (DSN) via a dual-sample introduction system, and it was successfully demonstrated for Pb isotope ratio measurements for either NIST 981 metal isotopic standard or solder by fs-LA-MC-ICPMS since the analytical results agreed well with the certified value as well as the determined value within their standard deviations obtained and the expanded uncertainty of the certified or determined value. The Pb isotope ratios of solder obtained by ns-LA-MC-ICPMS also showed agreement with respect to the determined value within their standard deviations and expanded uncertainty. From these results, it was evaluated that the mass bias correction applied in the present study was useful and both LA-MC-ICPMS could show similar analytical performance for the Pb isotope ratio microanalysis of metallic samples such as solder. PMID:26656823

  16. Elemental mapping in fossil tooth root section of Ursus arctos by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS).

    PubMed

    Vašinová Galiová, M; Nývltová Fišáková, M; Kynický, J; Prokeš, L; Neff, H; Mason, A Z; Gadas, P; Košler, J; Kanický, V

    2013-02-15

    Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) was used to map the matrix (Ca, P) and trace (Ba, Sr, Zn) elements in the root section of a fossilized brown bear (Ursus arctos) tooth. Multielemental analysis was performed on a (2.5 × 1.5)cm(2) area. For elemental distribution, a UP 213 laser ablation system was coupled either with a quadrupole or a time of flight ICP-MS. The cementum and dentine on the slice of the sample surface were clearly distinguishable, especially changes in elemental distribution in the summer and winter bands in the fossil root dentine. Migration and diet of U. arctos were determined on the basis of fluctuations in Sr/Zn ratio and their contents. Quantification was accomplished with standard reference material of bone meal (NIST 1486) and by the use of electron microprobe analysis (EMPA). Changes in Sr/Zn and Sr/Ba ratios relating to the season, and composition of food during the lifetime of the animal are discussed on basis of analysis of light stable isotopes. It was observed that there was an increase in the Sr/Zn ratio during the winter season caused by a reduction of food intake during hibernation. Above mentioned inferences drawn from elemental data obtained by LA-ICP-MS were confirmed independently by determination of carbon, nitrogen and strontium isotopes. Moreover, diagenesis and its interfering influence on the biogenic composition of cementum and dentine were resolved. According to the distribution and/or content of the element of interest, post-mortem alterations were revealed. Namely, U, Na, Fe, Mg and F predicate about the suitability of the selected area for determination of migration and diet. PMID:23598013

  17. In situ location and U-Pb dating of small zircon grains in igneous rocks using laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-quadrupole mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sack, Patrick J.; Berry, Ron F.; Meffre, Sebastien; Falloon, Trevor J.; Gemmell, J. Bruce; Friedman, Richard M.

    2011-05-01

    A new U-Pb zircon dating protocol for small (10-50 μm) zircons has been developed using an automated searching method to locate zircon grains in a polished rock mount. The scanning electron microscope-energy-dispersive X ray spectrum-based automated searching method can routinely find in situ zircon grains larger than 5 μm across. A selection of these grains was ablated using a 10 μm laser spot and analyzed in an inductively coupled plasma-quadrupole mass spectrometer (ICP-QMS). The technique has lower precision (˜6% uncertainty at 95% confidence on individual spot analyses) than typical laser ablation ICP-MS (˜2%), secondary ion mass spectrometry (<1%), and isotope dilution-thermal ionization mass spectrometry (˜0.4%) methods. However, it is accurate and has been used successfully on fine-grained lithologies, including mafic rocks from island arcs, ocean basins, and ophiolites, which have traditionally been considered devoid of dateable zircons. This technique is particularly well suited for medium- to fine-grained mafic volcanic rocks where zircon separation is challenging and can also be used to date rocks where only small amounts of sample are available (clasts, xenoliths, dredge rocks). The most significant problem with dating small in situ zircon grains is Pb loss. In our study, many of the small zircons analyzed have high U contents, and the isotopic compositions of these grains are consistent with Pb loss resulting from internal α radiation damage. This problem is not significant in very young rocks and can be minimized in older rocks by avoiding high-U zircon grains.

  18. Expansion dynamics of laser produced plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Doggett, B.; Lunney, J. G.

    2011-05-01

    We consider the applicability of the isentropic, adiabatic gas dynamical model of plume expansion for laser ablation in vacuum. We show that the model can be applied to ionized plumes and estimate the upper electron temperature limit on the applicability of the isentropic approximation. The model predictions are compared with Langmuir ion probe measurements and deposition profiles obtained for excimer laser ablation of silver.

  19. Micro Dynamics of Pulsed Laser Induced Bubbles in Dusty Plasma Liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, L.-W.; Tsai, C.-Y.; Tseng, Y.-P.; I Lin

    2008-09-07

    We experimentally study the micro dynamics of the laser induced plasma bubble in a dusty plasma liquid formed by negatively charged dust particles suspended in a low pressure rf Ar glow discharge. The plume from the ablation of the suspended dust particles pushes away dust particle and generates a dust-free plasma bubble. It then travels downward. The spatio-temporal evolution of the dust density fluctuation surrounding the bubble is monitored by directly tracking dust motion through optical video microscopy. The micro dynamics of the bubble associated dust acoustic type solitary oscillation in the wake field is investigated and discussed.

  20. Laser-Plasma Density and Temperature Measurements with Triple Langmuir Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arias, A.; Quiros, N.; Khanal, V.; Wan, W. C.; Meineke, J.; Kugland, N. L.; Morita, T.; Gregori, G.; Park, H.-S.; Presura, R.

    2013-10-01

    Experiments to investigate shocks produced by the explosive expansion of a laser-plasma plume against a gas background were performed on the Titan laser (LLNL). Knowledge of density and temperature is essential for understanding the underlying processes. Triple Langmuir probes (TLP) were used for measuring these quantities as function of time at a given location in the plasma. In the experiment, laser ablation plasma from a carbon rod expanded in hydrogen, helium, or argon ambient gas. Density and temperature jumps in the TLP measurements can be correlated with shocks detected by interferometry and proton deflectometry. This work was supported by the US DOE/OFES grant DE-SC0008829.

  1. Influence of water environment on holmium laser ablation performance for hard tissues.

    PubMed

    Lü, Tao; Xiao, Qing; Li, Zhengjia

    2012-05-01

    This study clarifies the ablation differences in air and in water for hard biological tissues, which are irradiated by fiber-guided long-pulsed holmium lasers. High-speed photography is used to record the dynamic characteristics of ablation plumes and vaporization bubbles induced by pulsed holmium lasers. The ablation morphologies and depth of hard tissues are quantitatively measured by optical coherence microscopy. Explosive vaporization effects in water play a positive role in the contact ablation process and are directly responsible for significant ablation enhancement. Furthermore, water layer depth can also contribute to ablation performance. Under the same laser parameters for fiber-tissue contact ablation in air and water, ablation performances are comparable for a single-laser pulse, but for more laser pulses the ablation performances in water are better than those in air. Comprehensive knowledge of ablation differences under various environments is important, especially in medical procedures that are performed in a liquid environment. PMID:22614434

  2. Quasi-phase-matching induced enhancement of the groups of high-order harmonics generating in various multi-jet plasmas produced using perforated targets and modulated heating pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganeev, R. A.; Suzuki, M.; Yoneya, S.; Kuroda, H.

    2014-11-01

    Quasi-phase-matching (QPM) of the harmonics of ultrashort pulses in the perforated aluminum, indium, and chromium plasma plumes produced by different techniques is analyzed. We extend our recent studies (2014 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 47 105401) to other plasma ablations and show the advantages of modulated plasma profiles for the harmonic generation. We demonstrate the 20 × growth of QPM-enhanced harmonics in the plasma produced on the perforated aluminum surface. The calculations of plasma concentrations at different delays and distances from ablating targets are presented. We show the tuning of maximally enhanced harmonics using variable excitation of metallic targets at the conditions of QPM, as well as demonstrate the use of a two-color pump of the four-jet indium plasma for enhancement of the harmonics, which were not present in the spectra obtained from the extended indium plasma.

  3. Laser induced plasma on copper target, a non-equilibrium model

    SciTech Connect

    Oumeziane, Amina Ait Liani, Bachir; Parisse, Jean-Denis

    2014-02-15

    The aim of this work is to present a comprehensive numerical model for the UV laser ablation of metal targets, it focuses mainly on the prediction of laser induced plasma thresholds, the effect of the laser-plasma interaction, and the importance of the electronic non-equilibrium in the laser induced plume and its expansion in the background gas. This paper describes a set of numerical models for laser-matter interaction between 193-248 and 355 nm lasers and a copper target. Along with the thermal effects inside the material resulting from the irradiation of the latter with the pulsed laser, the laser-evaporated matter interaction and the plasma formation are thoroughly modelled. In the laser induced plume, the electronic nonequilibrium and the laser beam absorption have been investigated. Our calculations of the plasmas ignition thresholds on copper targets have been validated and compared to experimental as well as theoretical results. Comparison with experiment data indicates that our results are in good agreement with those reported in the literature. Furthermore, the inclusion of electronic non-equilibrium in our work indicated that this important process must be included in models of laser ablation and plasma plume formation.

  4. Ablation of boron carbide for high-order harmonic generation of ultrafast pulses in laser-produced plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganeev, R. A.; Suzuki, M.; Kuroda, H.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate the generation of harmonics up to the 27th order (λ=29.9 nm) of 806 nm radiation in the boron carbide plasma. We analyze the advantages and disadvantages of this target compared with the ingredients comprising B4C (solid boron and graphite) by studying the plasma emission and harmonic spectra from three species. We compare different schemes of the two-color pump of B4C plasma, particularly using the second harmonics of 806 nm laser and optical parametric amplifier (1310 nm) as the assistant fields, as well as demonstrate the sum and difference frequency generation using the mixture of the wavelengths of two laser sources. These studies showed the advantages of the two-color pump of B4C plasma leading to the stable harmonic generation and the growth of harmonic conversion efficiency. We also show that the coincidence of harmonic and plasma emission wavelengths in most cases does not cause the enhancement or decrease of the conversion efficiency of this harmonic. Our spatial characterization of harmonics shows their on-axis modification depending on the conditions of frequency conversion.

  5. Ultra-violet and resonant laser ablation coupled with microwave induced plasma atomic emission spectrometry and determination of tin in nickel based alloys by electrothermal atomizer atomic absorption and laser excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaodong

    Chapter 1 reviews laser ablation in analytical atomic spectrometry. Laser ablation is categorized into two functions: one is used as a sample introduction method, the other function is used as a microprobe analysis method. Both fundamental and applicational aspects are reviewed with the citations of related papers. This chapter also serves as an introduction to the work which is described in chapter 2 and chapter 3 as laser ablation is a relatively new research area for the research group. In chapter 2, instrumentation for excimer (308nm) laser ablation of samples was coupled with a microwave induced plasma (MLP), and evaluated for its potential as an approach to solid sampling for atomic emission spectrometry. Operating parameters were optimized, and the effects of laser repetition rate and number of laser shots on the emission signal were investigated. The UV excimer laser removed more material than would be expected of an infrared laser of similar energy. The chromium detection limit in the solid steel sample was estimated to be about 500 mug/g. In chapter 3, a wavelength tunable optical parametric oscillator (OPO) laser was used to ablate a steel sample into the same apparatus described in chapter 2. The emission signal for the elements was selectively enhanced when the ablation wavelength was tuned to be in resonance with any atomic transition of that element. This was the first report of the observation of resonant ablation by use of optical detection, as prior reports of resonant ablation have used mass spectrometric detectors. Chapter 4 reviews the publications in laser excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry in recent eight years. The focus of the review is on recent development on new instruments and applications of this technique. Chapter 5 studies the determination of tin in nickel-based alloys with laser excited atomic fluorescence in a graphite furnace. Zeeman electrothermal atomizer atomic absorption spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma mass

  6. Testing the limits of micro-scale analyses of Si stable isotopes by femtosecond laser ablation multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry with application to rock weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuessler, Jan A.; von Blanckenburg, Friedhelm

    2014-08-01

    An analytical protocol for accurate in-situ Si stable isotope analysis has been established on a new second-generation custom-built femtosecond laser ablation system. The laser was coupled to a multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (fsLA-MC-ICP-MS). We investigated the influence of laser parameters such as spot size, laser focussing, energy density and repetition rate, and ICP-MS operating conditions such as ICP mass load, spectral and non-spectral matrix effects, signal intensities, and data processing on precision and accuracy of Si isotope ratios. We found that stable and reproducible ICP conditions were obtained by using He as aerosol carrier gas mixed with Ar/H2O before entering the plasma. Precise δ29Si and δ30Si values (better than ± 0.23‰, 2SD) can be obtained if the area ablated is at least 50 × 50 μm; or, alternatively, for the analysis of geometric features down to the width of the laser spot (about 20 μm) if an equivalent area is covered. Larger areas can be analysed by rastering the laser beam, whereas small single spot analyses reduce the attainable precision of δ30Si to ca. ± 0.6‰, 2SD, for < 30 μm diameter spots. It was found that focussing the laser beam beneath the sample surface with energy densities between 1 and 3.8 J/cm2 yields optimal analytical conditions for all materials investigated here. Using pure quartz (NIST 8546 aka. NBS-28) as measurement standard for calibration (standard-sample-bracketing) did result in accurate and precise data of international reference materials and samples covering a wide range in chemical compositions (Si single crystal IRMM-017, basaltic glasses KL2-G, BHVO-2G and BHVO-2, andesitic glass ML3B-G, rhyolitic glass ATHO-G, diopside glass JER, soda-lime glasses NIST SRM 612 and 610, San Carlos olivine). No composition-dependent matrix effect was discernible within uncertainties of the method. The method was applied to investigate the Si isotope signature of rock weathering at

  7. Development of routines for simultaneous in situ chemical composition and stable Si isotope ratio analysis by femtosecond laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Frick, Daniel A; Schuessler, Jan A; von Blanckenburg, Friedhelm

    2016-09-28

    Stable metal (e.g. Li, Mg, Ca, Fe, Cu, Zn, and Mo) and metalloid (B, Si, Ge) isotope ratio systems have emerged as geochemical tracers to fingerprint distinct physicochemical reactions. These systems are relevant to many Earth Science questions. The benefit of in situ microscale analysis using laser ablation (LA) over bulk sample analysis is to use the spatial context of different phases in the solid sample to disclose the processes that govern their chemical and isotopic compositions. However, there is a lack of in situ analytical routines to obtain a samples' stable isotope ratio together with its chemical composition. Here, we evaluate two novel analytical routines for the simultaneous determination of the chemical and Si stable isotope composition (δ(30)Si) on the micrometre scale in geological samples. In both routines, multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) is combined with femtosecond-LA, where stable isotope ratios are corrected for mass bias using standard-sample-bracketing with matrix-independent calibration. The first method is based on laser ablation split stream (LASS), where the laser aerosol is split and introduced simultaneously into both the MC-ICP-MS and a quadrupole ICP-MS. The second method is based on optical emission spectroscopy using direct observation of the MC-ICP-MS plasma (LA-MC-ICP-MS|OES). Both methods are evaluated using international geological reference materials. Accurate and precise Si isotope ratios were obtained with an uncertainty typically better than 0.23‰, 2SD, δ(30)Si. With both methods major element concentrations (e.g., Na, Al, Si, Mg, Ca) can be simultaneously determined. However, LASS-ICP-MS is superior over LA-MC-ICP-MS|OES, which is limited by its lower sensitivity. Moreover, LASS-ICP-MS offers trace element analysis down to the μg g(-1)-range for more than 28 elements due to lower limits of detection, and with typical uncertainties better than 15%. For in situ simultaneous

  8. Galileo observations of volcanic plumes on Io

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geissler, P. E.; McMillan, M. T.

    2008-10-01

    Io's volcanic plumes erupt in a dazzling variety of sizes, shapes, colors and opacities. In general, the plumes fall into two classes, representing distinct source gas temperatures. Most of the Galileo imaging observations were of the smaller, more numerous Prometheus-type plumes that are produced when hot flows of silicate lava impinge on volatile surface ices of SO 2. Few detections were made of the giant, Pele-type plumes that vent high temperature, sulfur-rich gases from the interior of Io; this was partly because of the insensitivity of Galileo's camera to ultraviolet wavelengths. Both gas and dust spout from plumes of each class. Favorably located gas plumes were detected during eclipse, when Io was in Jupiter's shadow. Dense dust columns were imaged in daylight above several Prometheus-type eruptions, reaching heights typically less than 100 km. Comparisons between eclipse observations, sunlit images, and the record of surface changes show that these optically thick dust columns are much smaller in stature than the corresponding gas plumes but are adequate to produce the observed surface deposits. Mie scattering calculations suggest that these conspicuous dust plumes are made up of coarse grained "ash" particles with radii on the order of 100 nm, and total masses on the order of 10 6 kg per plume. Long exposure images of Thor in sunlight show a faint outer envelope apparently populated by particles small enough to be carried along with the gas flow, perhaps formed by condensation of sulfurous "snowflakes" as suggested by the plasma instrumentation aboard Galileo as it flew through Thor's plume [Frank, L.A., Paterson, W.R., 2002. J. Geophys. Res. (Space Phys.) 107, doi:10.1029/2002JA009240. 31-1]. If so, the total mass of these fine, nearly invisible particles may be comparable to the mass of the gas, and could account for much of Io's rapid resurfacing.

  9. Galileo observations of volcanic plumes on Io

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geissler, P.E.; McMillan, M.T.

    2008-01-01

    Io's volcanic plumes erupt in a dazzling variety of sizes, shapes, colors and opacities. In general, the plumes fall into two classes, representing distinct source gas temperatures. Most of the Galileo imaging observations were of the smaller, more numerous Prometheus-type plumes that are produced when hot flows of silicate lava impinge on volatile surface ices of SO2. Few detections were made of the giant, Pele-type plumes that vent high temperature, sulfur-rich gases from the interior of Io; this was partly because of the insensitivity of Galileo's camera to ultraviolet wavelengths. Both gas and dust spout from plumes of each class. Favorably located gas plumes were detected during eclipse, when Io was in Jupiter's shadow. Dense dust columns were imaged in daylight above several Prometheus-type eruptions, reaching heights typically less than 100 km. Comparisons between eclipse observations, sunlit images, and the record of surface changes show that these optically thick dust columns are much smaller in stature than the corresponding gas plumes but are adequate to produce the observed surface deposits. Mie scattering calculations suggest that these conspicuous dust plumes are made up of coarse grained “ash” particles with radii on the order of 100 nm, and total masses on the order of 106 kg per plume. Long exposure images of Thor in sunlight show a faint outer envelope apparently populated by particles small enough to be carried along with the gas flow, perhaps formed by condensation of sulfurous “snowflakes” as suggested by the plasma instrumentation aboard Galileo as it flew through Thor's plume [Frank, L.A., Paterson, W.R., 2002. J. Geophys. Res. (Space Phys.) 107, doi:10.1029/2002JA009240. 31-1]. If so, the total mass of these fine, nearly invisible particles may be comparable to the mass of the gas, and could account for much of Io's rapid resurfacing.

  10. Turbulent Plumes in Nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, Andrew W.

    2010-01-01

    This review describes a range of natural processes leading to the formation of turbulent buoyant plumes, largely relating to volcanic processes, in which there are localized, intense releases of energy. Phenomena include volcanic eruption columns, bubble plumes in lakes, hydrothermal plumes, and plumes beneath the ice in polar oceans. We assess how the dynamics is affected by heat transfer, particle fallout and recycling, and Earth's rotation, as well as explore some of the mixing of the ambient fluid produced by plumes in a confined geometry.

  11. Damage on fused silica optics caused by laser ablation of surface-bound microparticles.

    PubMed

    Raman, Rajesh N; Demos, Stavros G; Shen, Nan; Feigenbaum, Eyal; Negres, Raluca A; Elhadj, Selim; Rubenchik, Alexander M; Matthews, Manyalibo J

    2016-02-01

    High peak power laser systems are vulnerable to performance degradation due to particulate contamination on optical surfaces. In this work, we show using model contaminant particles that their optical properties decisively determine the nature of the optical damage. Borosilicate particles with low intrinsic optical absorption undergo ablation initiating in their sub-surface, leading to brittle fragmentation, distributed plasma formation, material dispersal and ultimately can lead to micro-fractures in the substrate optical surface. In contrast, energy coupling into metallic particles is highly localized near the particle-substrate interface leading to the formation of a confined plasma and subsequent etching of the substrate surface, accompanied by particle ejection driven by the recoil momentum of the ablation plume. While the tendency to create fractured surface pitting from borosilicate is stochastic, the smooth ablation pits created by metal particles is deterministic, with pit depths scaling linearly with laser fluence. A simple model is employed which predicts ~3x electric field intensity enhancement from surface-bound fragments. In addition, our results suggest that the amount of energy deposited in metal particles is at least twice that in transparent particles. PMID:26906835

  12. Monitoring the formation of inorganic fullerene-like MoS2 nanostructures by laser ablation in liquid environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compagnini, Giuseppe; Sinatra, Marco G.; Messina, Gabriele C.; Patanè, Giacomo; Scalese, Silvia; Puglisi, Orazio

    2012-05-01

    Laser ablation of solid targets in liquid media is emerging as a simple, clean and reproducible way to generate a large number of intriguing nanometric structures with peculiar properties. In this work we present some results on the formation of MoS2 fullerene-like nanoparticles (10-15 nm diameter) obtained by the ablation of crystalline targets in water. Such a top-down approach can be considered greener than standard sulphidization reactions and represents an intriguing single step procedure. The generation of the MoS2 nanostructures is in competition with that of oxide clusters and strongly depends on the oxidative environment created by the plasma plume. The size, shape and crystalline phase of the obtained nanoparticles are studied by microscopy while X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy is used to investigate the chemical state of produced nanostructures and to propose mechanisms for their growth.

  13. Room temperature synthesized rutile TiO2 nanoparticles induced by laser ablation in liquid and their photocatalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Peisheng; Cai, Weiping; Fang, Ming; Li, Zhigang; Zeng, Haibo; Hu, Jinlian; Luo, Xiangdong; Jing, Weiping

    2009-07-01

    TiO2 nanoparticles were prepared by one-step pulsed laser ablation of a titanium target immersed in a poly-(vinylpyrrolidone) solution at room temperature. The products were systematically characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results indicated that the rutile TiO2 nanocrystalline particles were one-step synthesized at room temperature and the mean size in diameter is about 50 nm with a narrow size distribution. A probable formation process was proposed on the basis of the microstructure and the instantaneous plasma plume induced by the laser. Photocatalytic activity was monitored by degradation of a methylene blue solution. The as-prepared rutile TiO2 nanoparticles demonstrate a good photocatalytic performance. This work shows that pulsed laser ablation in liquid media is a good method to synthesize some nanosized materials which are difficult to produce by other conventional methods.

  14. Dust Plume off Mauritania

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    A thick plume of dust blew off the coast of Mauritania in western Africa on October 2, 2007. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Aqua satellite observed the dust plume as it headed toward the southwest over the Atlantic Ocean. In this image, the dust varies in color from nearly white to medium tan. The dust plume is easier to see over the dark background of the ocean, but the plume stretches across the land surface to the east, as well. The dust plume's structure is clearest along the coastline, where relatively clear air pockets separate distinct puffs of dust. West of that, individual pillows of dust push together to form a more homogeneous plume. Near its southwest tip, the plume takes on yet another shape, with stripes of pale dust fanning out toward the northwest. Occasional tiny white clouds dot the sky overhead, but skies are otherwise clear.

  15. Modeling Europa's dust plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Southworth, B. S.; Kempf, S.; Schmidt, J.

    2015-12-01

    The discovery of Jupiter's moon Europa maintaining a probably sporadic water vapor plume constitutes a huge scientific opportunity for NASA's upcoming mission to this Galilean moon. Measuring properties of material emerging from interior sources offers a unique chance to understand conditions at Europa's subsurface ocean. Exploiting results obtained for the Enceladus plume, we simulate possible Europa plume configurations, analyze particle number density and surface deposition results, and estimate the expected flux of ice grains on a spacecraft. Due to Europa's high escape speed, observing an active plume will require low-altitude flybys, preferably at altitudes of 5-100 km. At higher altitudes a plume may escape detection. Our simulations provide an extensive library documenting the possible structure of Europa dust plumes, which can be quickly refined as more data on Europa dust plumes are collected.

  16. Population inversions in ablation plasmas generated by intense electron beams. Final report, 1 November 1985-31 October 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Gilgenbach, R.M.; Kammash, T.; Brake, M.L.

    1988-11-01

    Experiments during the past three years have concerned the generation and spectroscopic study of electron beam-driven carbon plasmas in order to explore the production of optical and ultraviolet radiation from nonequilibrium populations. The output of MELBA (Michigan Electron Long Beam Accelerator), has been connected to an electron-beam diode consisting of an aluminum (or brass) cathode stalk and a carbon anode. Magnetic-field coils were designed, procured, and utilized to focus the electron beam. A side viewing port permitted spectroscopic diagnostics to view across the surface of the anode. Spectroscopic diagnosis was performed using a 1-m spectrograph capable of operation from the vacuum-ultraviolet through the visible. This spectrograph is coupled to a 1024-channel optical multichannel analyzer. Spectra taken during the initial 400-ns period of the e-beam pulse showed a low effective-charge plasma with primarily molecular components (C/sub 2/, CH) as well as atomic hydrogen and singly ionized carbon (CII). When the generator pulse was crowbarred after the first 400 ns, the spectra revealed a continuation of the low-charge-state plasma. At times greater than 400 ns in non-crowbarred shots, the spectra revealed a highly ionized plasma with a very large intensity line at 2530 Angstroms due to CIV (5g-4f), and lower-intensity lines due to CIII and CII. This CIV line emission increased with time, peaking sharply between 750 and 900 ns, and decayed rapidly in less than 100 ns. Emission from these high ionization states may be due to electron beam-plasma instabilities, as this emission was accompanied by high levels of radio frequency and microwave emission.

  17. Volcanic Plumes on Io: Old Friends and Recent Surprises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEwen, A. S.

    2002-05-01

    One of the most spectacular phenomena on Io are the active volcanic plumes. Nine plumes were observed during the Voyager 1 encounter in 1979: Pele (300 km high), Loki (150 km; 2 plumes), and 6 smaller "Prometheus-type" plumes. When Voyager 2 imaged Io 4 months later, all of the these plumes were detected except Pele, and there were two new large red plume deposits (Surt and Aten) similar to the deposits of Pele. These 2 new plume vents were at relatively high latitudes (45N and 48S) whereas the others were more equatorial. Galileo observed a total of 10 plumes prior to 2000, 4 of which were erupting from the same volcanic complexes as in 1979, so there was a total of 15 volcanic centers with observed plumes, all equatorial except Masubi at 44S. We found that Prometheus-type plumes wander, apparently erupting from rootless vents where silicate lava flows over volatile-rich ground. Red deposits, on the other hand, seem to mark the deep vents for silicate lava. Galileo and HST also showed that Pele is normally detectable only at UV wavelengths or at very high phase angles, and was in an anomalous state during the Voyager 1 encounter. The only good candidate for a "stealth" SO2 gas plume visible only in eclipse was seen over Acala, although some Prometheus-type plumes appeared much larger in eclipse. The existence of many much smaller plumes was predicted from Voyager observations of bright streaks radial to Pele, but Galileo has not confirmed this hypothesis. From the joint Galileo-Cassini observations within a few days of Jan 1, 2001 we were surprised to see a giant new plume (400 km high) over Tvashtar Catena (63 N) with UV color properties and a 1200-km diameter red plume deposit, both very similar to Pele. In the I31 flyby (August 2001) Galileo flew through the region occupied by the Tvashtar plume 7 months earlier. The images did not detect a plume, but SO2 may have been detected by the plasma science experiment. However, the images did reveal a giant (500 km

  18. Forensic analysis of printing inks using tandem Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy and Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subedi, Kiran; Trejos, Tatiana; Almirall, José

    2015-01-01

    Elemental analysis, using either LA-ICP-MS or LIBS, can be used for the chemical characterization of materials of forensic interest to discriminate between source materials originating from different sources and also for the association of materials known to originate from the same source. In this study, a tandem LIBS/LA-ICP-MS system that combines the benefits of both LIBS and LA-ICP-MS was evaluated for the characterization of samples of printing inks (toners, inkjets, intaglio and offset.). The performance of both laser sampling methods is presented. A subset of 9 black laser toners, 10 colored (CMYK) inkjet samples, 12 colored (CMYK) offset samples and 12 intaglio inks originating from different manufacturing sources were analyzed to evaluate the discrimination capability of the tandem method. These samples were selected because they presented a very similar elemental profile by LA-ICP-MS. Although typical discrimination between different ink sources is found to be > 99% for a variety of inks when only LA-ICP-MS was used for the analysis, additional discrimination was achieved by combining the elemental results from the LIBS analysis to the LA-ICP-MS analysis in the tandem technique, enhancing the overall discrimination capability of the individual laser ablation methods. The LIBS measurements of the Ca, Fe, K and Si signals, in particular, improved the discrimination for this specific set of different ink samples previously shown to exhibit very similar LA-ICP-MS elemental profiles. The combination of these two techniques in a single setup resulted in better discrimination of the printing inks with two distinct fingerprint spectra, providing information from atomic/ionic emissions and isotopic composition (m/z) for each ink sample.

  19. Analytical procedure for characterization of medieval wall-paintings by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syta, Olga; Rozum, Karol; Choińska, Marta; Zielińska, Dobrochna; Żukowska, Grażyna Zofia; Kijowska, Agnieszka; Wagner, Barbara

    2014-11-01

    Analytical procedure for the comprehensive chemical characterization of samples from medieval Nubian wall-paintings by means of portable X-ray fluorescence (pXRF), laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS) and Raman spectroscopy (RS) was proposed in this work. The procedure was used for elemental and molecular investigations of samples from archeological excavations in Nubia (modern southern Egypt and northern Sudan). Numerous remains of churches with painted decorations dated back to the 7th-14th century were excavated in the region of medieval kingdoms of Nubia but many aspects of this art and its technology are still unknown. Samples from the selected archeological sites (Faras, Old Dongola and Banganarti) were analyzed in the form of transfers (n = 26), small fragments collected during the excavations (n = 35) and cross sections (n = 15). XRF was used to collect data about elemental composition, LA-ICPMS allowed mapping of selected elements, while RS was used to get the molecular information about the samples. The preliminary results indicated the usefulness of the proposed analytical procedure for distinguishing the substances, from both the surface and sub-surface domains of the wall-paintings. The possibility to identify raw materials from the wall-paintings will be used in the further systematic, archeometric studies devoted to the detailed comparison of various historic Nubian centers.

  20. Validation of the determination of the B isotopic composition in Roman glasses with laser ablation multi-collector inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devulder, Veerle; Gerdes, Axel; Vanhaecke, Frank; Degryse, Patrick

    2015-03-01

    The applicability of laser ablation multi-collector inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-MC-ICP-MS) for the determination of the B isotopic composition in Roman glasses was investigated. The δ11B values thus obtained provide information on the natron flux used during the glass-making process. The glass samples used for this purpose were previously characterized using pneumatic nebulization (PN) MC-ICP-MS. Unfortunately, this method is time-consuming and labor-intensive and consumes some 100 mg of sample, which is a rather high amount for ancient materials. Therefore, the use of the less invasive and faster LA-MC-ICP-MS approach was explored. In this work, the results for 29 Roman glasses and 4 home-made glasses obtained using both techniques were compared to assess the suitability of LA-MC-ICP-MS in this context. The results are in excellent agreement within experimental uncertainty. No difference in overall mass discrimination was observed between the Roman glasses, NIST SRM 610 reference glass and B6 obsidian. The expanded uncertainty of the LA-MC-ICP-MS approach was estimated to be < 2‰, which is similar to that obtained upon sample digestion and PN-MC-ICP-MS measurement.