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Sample records for ablation threshold fluence

  1. Fluence ablation threshold dependence on tin impurities in commercial soda-lime glass.

    PubMed

    Nieto, Daniel; Arines, Justo; Flores-Arias, María Teresa

    2014-08-20

    In this paper, we study the reduction in the fluence ablation threshold induced by tin impurities incorporated in float soda-lime glass during the fabrication process. The laser system used in the experiments was a Nd:YVO4 laser operating at 1064 nm with a pulse duration of 20 ns. The fluence ablation thresholds found were 112  J/cm2 for the tin side and 920  J/cm2 for the tin-free side, which means a reduction of nearly 1 order of magnitude. The fluence ablation threshold reduction permits the manufacturing of narrower grooves with small level of roughness, obtaining quality elements in low-cost soda-lime substrates. PMID:25321113

  2. Generation of nanoparticles at a fluence less than the ablation threshold using femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odachi, Go; Sakamoto, Ryosuke; Hara, Kento; Yagi, Takashi

    2013-10-01

    Femtosecond laser machining of crystalline Si in vacuum resulted in the formation of pillars and particles of ∼100 nm in size at the wall surfaces and the periphery of the ablated hole. These structures were created at a laser fluence below the ablation threshold. The nanopillars and nanoparticles appear to grow from the target surface. The target surface near the particles showed molten features with descending height, indicating significant mass transport from the surface layer to the particles. The nanopillars and nanoparticles likely formed as a result of successive crystal growth processes including amorphization of the laser-irradiated target surface, followed by crystalline nucleation, melting of the amorphous Si surrounding the crystalline particles, and liquid Si creeping over particle surfaces leading to an increase in particle size. By repeating these processes, the particles grow in cumulative laser shots. These particles are the major debris components distributed near micron-sized holes formed at the ablation threshold fluence in vacuum.

  3. Material properties of lithium fluoride for predicting XUV laser ablation rate and threshold fluence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blejchař, Tomáś; Nevrlý, Václav; Vašinek, Michal; Dostál, Michal; Pečínka, Lukáś; Dlabka, Jakub; Stachoň, Martin; Juha, Libor; Bitala, Petr; Zelinger, Zdeněk.; Pira, Peter; Wild, Jan

    2015-05-01

    This paper deals with prediction of extreme ultraviolet (XUV) laser ablation of lithium fluoride at nanosecond timescales. Material properties of lithium fluoride were determined based on bibliographic survey. These data are necessary for theoretical estimation of surface removal rate in relevance to XUV laser desorption/ablation process. Parameters of XUV radiation pulses generated by the Prague capillary-discharge laser (CDL) desktop system were assumed in this context. Prediction of ablation curve and threshold laser fluence for lithium fluoride was performed employing XUV-ABLATOR code. Quasi-random sampling approach was used for evaluating its predictive capabilities in the means of variance and stability of model outputs in expected range of uncertainties. These results were compared to experimental data observed previously.

  4. Numerical study of the influence of picosecond laser spot size on ablated depth and threshold fluence of metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yiming; Lauer, Benjamin; Neuenschwander, Beat; Romano, Valerio

    2016-03-01

    Picosecond laser systems have been widely used in industrial microprocessing applications since they are a cost-effective tool to achieve high throughput. To better understand the ablation process, firstly the dependence of the ablation depth and the threshold fluence on the laser spot size were determined experimentally by performing ablation with a 10ps pulsed laser system. Further, a 2D axisymmetric model was established to demonstrate the possible mechanism of the phenomena. Three sets of spot radii, namely 15.5μm, 31.5μm and 49.6μm, respectively with equal laser peak fluences ranging from 0.6J/cm2 to 4.5J/cm2 were applied on copper. It was found that the laser ablation depth increases while the threshold fluence decreases with decreasing spot size at identical peak fluence. A 2D axisymmetric thermomechanical model was developed to qualitatively illustrate the mechanism behind these phenomena. The numerical results of the position where the tensile stress exceed to ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of copper show the same trend as the experimental ones. The longitudinal tensile stress was seen to play a more crucial role than the radial tensile/compressive stress on laser ablation process. The impact of the thermal stress on the ablation depth and threshold fluence is derived from the lattice temperature gradient along the surface of the material, leading to spallation and possible modifications of the mechanical properties already at lower laser peak fluences. This is elucidated numerically and analytically. The deviation of the experimental results from the simulation might be attributed to the fact that this simulation model is static. Nevertheless, at low laser fluences, this static approach can provide good explanations of the cold ablation with ultrashort pulsed laser. The limitation of this model is also illustrated.

  5. Caries-selective ablation: the second threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennig, Thomas; Rechmann, Peter; Jeitner, Peter; Kaufmann, Raimund

    1993-07-01

    The aim of the study was to describe the appropriate fluence necessary for the effective removal of dental decay by ablation processes without or with at least minimal removal of healthy dentin. The experiments were conducted at two wavelengths [355 nm (frequency tripled, Q-switched Nd:YAG-laser) and 377 nm (frequency doubled, gain-switched Alexandrite-laser)] found to be close to the maximum of preferential absorption of carious dentin over healthy dentin. Optoacoustic techniques were applied to determine the ablation thresholds of healthy and carious dentin. The ablation efficiencies at characteristic fluences were determined using non-tactile microtopography. During all experiments a fiber optic delivery system was engaged.

  6. The fluence threshold of femtosecond laser blackening of metals: The effect of laser-induced ripples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Zhigui; Huang, Min; Zhao, Fuli

    2016-05-01

    With the primary controlling factor of the laser fluence, we have investigated femtosecond laser blackening of stainless steel, brass, and aluminum in visible light range. In general, low reflectance about 5% can be achieved in appropriate ranges of laser fluences for all the treated metal surfaces. Significantly, towards stainless steel and brass a fluence threshold of blackening emerges unusually: a dramatic reflectance decline occurs in a specific, narrow fluence range. In contrast, towards aluminum the reflectance declines steadily over a wide fluence range instead of the threshold-like behavior from steel and brass. The morphological characteristics and corresponding reflectance spectra of the treated surfaces indicates that the blackening threshold of stainless steel and brass corresponds to the fluence threshold of laser-induced subwavelength ripples. Such periodic ripples growing rapidly near ablation threshold absorb visible light efficiently through grating coupling and cavity trapping promoted by surface plasmon polaritons. Whereas, for aluminum, with fluence increasing the looming ripples are greatly suppressed by re-deposited nanoparticle aggregates that present intrinsic colors other than black, and until the formation of large scale "ravines" provided with strong light-trapping, sufficient blackening is achieved. In short, there are different fluence dependencies for femtosecond laser blackening of metals, and the specific blackening fluence threshold for certain metals in the visible range originates in the definite fluence threshold of femtosecond laser-induced ripples.

  7. Effect of fluence on carbon nanostructures produced by laser ablation in liquid nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabatabaie, Nushin; Dorranian, Davoud

    2016-05-01

    Effects of laser fluence on the properties of carbon nanostructures produced by laser ablation method in liquid nitrogen have been studied experimentally. The beam of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser of 1064-nm wavelength at 7 ns pulse width and different fluences is employed to irradiate the graphite target in liquid nitrogen. Properties of carbon nanostructures were studied using their UV-Vis-NIR spectrum, TEM images, and Raman scattering spectrum. Two categories of graphene nanosheets and carbon nanoparticles were observed due to variation of laser fluence. Results show that in our experimental condition there is a threshold fluence for producing carbon nanoparticles. With increasing the laser fluence from the threshold, the amount of carbon nanoparticles in suspensions was increased, while the amount of graphene nanosheets was decreased.

  8. Multidiagnostics analysis of ion dynamics in ultrafast laser ablation of metals over a large fluence range

    SciTech Connect

    Anoop, K. K.; Polek, M. P.; Bruzzese, R.; Amoruso, S.; Harilal, Sivanandan S.

    2015-02-28

    The ions dynamics in ultrafast laser ablation of metals is studied over a fluence range spanning from the ablation threshold up to ~75 J/cm2 by means of three established diagnostic techniques. Langmuir probe, Faraday cup and spectrally resolved ICCD imaging simultaneously monitor the laser-produced plasma ions produced during ultrafast laser ablation of a copper target. The fluence dependence of ion yield is analyzed observing the occurrence of three different regimes. Moreover, the specific ion yield shows a maximum at about 4-5 J/cm2, followed by a gradual reduction and a transition to a high-fluence regime above ~50 J/cm2. The fluence variation of the copper ions angular distribution is also analyzed, observing a gradual increase of forward peaking of Cu ions for fluences up to ~10 J/cm2. Then, a broader ion component is observed at larger angles for fluences larger than ~10 J/cm2. Finally, an experimental characterization of the ions angular distribution for several metallic targets (Mg, Al, Cr, Fe, Cu, and W) is carried out at a relatively high fluence of ~66 J/cm2. Interestingly, the ion emission from the volatile metals show a narrow forward peaked distribution and a high peak ion yield compared to the refractory metals. Moreover, the width of ion angular distributions presents a striking correlation with the peak ion yield.

  9. Femtosecond laser ablation of dentin and enamel: relationship between laser fluence and ablation efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hu; Liu, Jing; Li, Hong; Ge, Wenqi; Sun, Yuchun; Wang, Yong; Lü, Peijun

    2015-02-01

    The objective was to study the relationship between laser fluence and ablation efficiency of a femtosecond laser with a Gaussian-shaped pulse used to ablate dentin and enamel for prosthodontic tooth preparation. A diode-pumped thin-disk femtosecond laser with wavelength of 1025 nm and pulse width of 400 fs was used for the ablation of dentin and enamel. The laser spot was guided in a line on the dentin and enamel surfaces to form a groove-shaped ablation zone under a series of laser pulse energies. The width and volume of the ablated line were measured under a three-dimensional confocal microscope to calculate the ablation efficiency. Ablation efficiency for dentin reached a maximum value of 0.020 mm3/J when the laser fluence was set at 6.51 J/cm2. For enamel, the maximum ablation efficiency was 0.009 mm3/J at a fluence of 7.59 J/cm2. Ablation efficiency of the femtosecond laser on dentin and enamel is closely related to the laser fluence and may reach a maximum when the laser fluence is set to an appropriate value.

  10. Critical Fluences And Modeling Of CO{sub 2} Laser Ablation Of Polyoxymethylene From Vaporization To The Plasma Regime

    SciTech Connect

    Sinko, John E.; Phipps, Claude R.; Tsukiyama, Yosuke; Ogita, Naoya; Sasoh, Akihiro; Umehara, Noritsugu; Gregory, Don A.

    2010-05-06

    A CO{sub 2} laser was operated at pulse energies up to 10 J to ablate polyoxymethylene targets in air and vacuum conditions. Critical effects predicted by ablation models are discussed in relation to the experimental data, including specifically the threshold fluences for vaporization and critical plasma formation, and the fluence at which the optimal momentum coupling coefficient is found. Finally, we discuss a new approach for modeling polymers at long wavelengths, including a connection formula that links the vaporization and plasma regimes for laser ablation propulsion.

  11. Multidiagnostic analysis of ion dynamics in ultrafast laser ablation of metals over a large fluence range

    SciTech Connect

    Anoop, K. K. Bruzzese, R.; Amoruso, S.; Polek, M. P.; Harilal, S. S.

    2015-02-28

    The dynamics of ions in ultrafast laser ablation of metals is studied over fluences ranging from the ablation threshold up to ≈75 J/cm{sup 2} by means of three well-established diagnostic techniques. Langmuir probe, Faraday cup, and spectrally resolved intensified charge coupled device imaging simultaneously monitored the ions produced during ultrafast laser ablation of a pure copper target with 800 nm, ≈50 fs, Ti: Sapphire laser pulses. The fluence dependence of ion yield is analyzed, resulting in the observance of three different regimes. The specific ion yield shows a maximum at about 4–5 J/cm{sup 2}, followed by a gradual reduction and a transition to a high-fluence regime above ≈50 J/cm{sup 2}. The fluence dependence of the copper ions angular distribution is also analyzed, observing a gradual increase in forward-peaking of Cu ions for fluences up to ≈10 J/cm{sup 2}. A broader ion component is observed at larger angles for fluences larger than ≈10 J/cm{sup 2}. Finally, an experimental characterization of the ionic angular distribution for several metallic targets (Mg, Al, Cr, Fe, Cu, and W) is carried out at a relatively high fluence of ≈66 J/cm{sup 2}. Interestingly, the ion emission from the volatile metals shows a narrow, forward-peaked distribution, and a high peak ion yield compared to the refractory metals. Moreover, the width of ionic angular distributions presents a striking correlation with the peak ion yield.

  12. Single-shot ablation threshold of chromium using UV femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, S. P.; Fedosejevs, R.

    2014-07-01

    Single-shot ablation threshold for thin chromium film was studied using 266 nm, femtosecond laser pulses. Chromium is a useful material in the nanotechnology industry and information on ablation threshold using UV femtosecond pulses would help in precise micromachining of the material. The ablation threshold was determined by measuring the ablation crater diameters as a function of incident laser pulse energy. Absorption of 266 nm light on the chromium film was also measured under our experimental conditions, and the absorbed energy single-shot ablation threshold fluence was 46 ± 5 mJ/cm2. The experimental ablation threshold fluence value was compared to time-dependent heat flow calculations based on the two temperature model for ultrafast laser pulses. The model predicts a value of 31.6 mJ/cm2 which is qualitatively consistent with the experimentally obtained value, given the simplicity of the model.

  13. Ablation threshold and ablation mechanism transition of polyoxymethylene irradiated by CO2 laser.

    PubMed

    Li, Gan; Cheng, Mousen; Li, Xiaokang

    2016-09-01

    Polyoxymethylene (POM) decomposes gradually as it is heated up by the irradiation of CO2 laser; the long-chain molecules of POM are broken into short chains, which leads to the lowering of the melting point and the critical temperature of the ablation products. When the product temperature is above the melting point, ablation comes up in the way of vaporization; when the product temperature is higher than the critical temperature, all liquid products are transformed into gas instantly and the ablation mechanism is changed. The laser fluence at which significant ablation is observed is defined as the ablation threshold, and the fluence corresponding to the ablation mechanism changing is denoted as the flyover threshold. In this paper, random pyrolysis is adopted to describe the pyrolytic decomposition of POM, and consequently, the components of the pyrolysis products under different pyrolysis rates are acquired. The Group Contribution method is used to count the thermodynamic properties of the pyrolysis products, and the melting point and the critical temperature of the product mixture are obtained by the Mixing Law. The Knudsen layer relationship is employed to evaluate the ablation mass removal when the product temperature is below the critical temperature. The gas dynamics conservation laws associated with the Jouguet condition are used to calculate the mass removal when the product temperature is higher than the critical temperature. Based on the model, a set of simulations for various laser intensities and lengths are carried out to generalize the relationships between the thresholds and the laser parameters. Besides the ablated mass areal density, which fits the experimental data quite well, the ablation temperature, pyrolysis rate, and product components are also discussed for a better understanding of the ablation mechanism of POM. PMID:27607281

  14. Possible evidence of Coulomb explosion in the femtosecond laser ablation of metal at low laser fluence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuchang; Li, Suyu; Zhang, Fangjian; Tian, Dan; Li, He; Liu, Dunli; Jiang, Yuanfei; Chen, Anmin; Jin, Mingxing

    2015-11-01

    We use a computational model to study the ablation mechanism of metal target irradiated by femtosecond pulse laser. It is confirmed that the Coulomb explosion can occur during femtosecond laser ablation of metal. The influence of thermal ablation and Coulomb explosion on the ablation depth is respectively investigated. Comparing the calculated results with the experimental ones, we find that the theoretical results which consider the thermal ablation only agree well with the experimental ones at high laser fluence, and those which take the Coulomb explosion into account fit well with the experimental ones at lower laser fluence, which exactly explains the ablation mechanism. In contrast with the previous theoretical results which only consider the thermal ablation, our theoretical simulation describes the ablation mechanism straightforward by making comparison of ablation depth, and provides a more reasonable explanation that fits with the actual ablation process.

  15. Ultrashort laser pulse ablation of copper, silicon and gelatin: effect of the pulse duration on the ablation thresholds and the incubation coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nathala, Chandra S. R.; Ajami, Ali; Husinsky, Wolfgang; Farooq, Bilal; Kudryashov, Sergey I.; Daskalova, Albena; Bliznakova, Irina; Assion, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, the influence of the pulse duration on the ablation threshold and the incubation coefficient was investigated for three different types of materials: metal (copper), semiconductor (silicon) and biopolymer (gelatin). Ablation threshold values and the incubation coefficients have been measured for multiple Ti:sapphire laser pulses (3 to 1000 pulses) and for four different pulse durations (10, 30, 250 and 550 fs). The ablation threshold fluence was determined by extrapolation of curves from squared crater diameter versus fluence plots. For copper and silicon, the experiments were conducted in vacuum and for gelatin in air. For all materials, the ablation threshold fluence increases with the pulse duration. For copper, the threshold increases as τ 0.05, for silicon as τ 0.12 and for gelatin as τ 0.22. By extrapolating the curves of the threshold fluence versus number of pulses, the single-shot threshold fluence was determined for each sample. For 30 fs pulses, the single-shot threshold fluences were found to be 0.79, 0.35, and 0.99 J/cm2 and the incubation coefficients were found to be 0.75, 0.83 and 0.68 for copper, silicon and gelatin, respectively.

  16. Fluence thresholds for grazing incidence hard x-ray mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Aquila, A.; Ozkan, C.; Sinn, H.; Tschentscher, T.; Mancuso, A. P.; Gaudin, J.; Sobierajski, R.; Klepka, M. T.; Dłużewski, P.; Morawiec, K.; Störmer, M.; Bajt, S.; Ohashi, H.; Koyama, T.; Tono, K.; Inubushi, Y. [RIKEN and others

    2015-06-15

    X-ray Free Electron Lasers (XFELs) have the potential to contribute to many fields of science and to enable many new avenues of research, in large part due to their orders of magnitude higher peak brilliance than existing and future synchrotrons. To best exploit this peak brilliance, these XFEL beams need to be focused to appropriate spot sizes. However, the survivability of X-ray optical components in these intense, femtosecond radiation conditions is not guaranteed. As mirror optics are routinely used at XFEL facilities, a physical understanding of the interaction between intense X-ray pulses and grazing incidence X-ray optics is desirable. We conducted single shot damage threshold fluence measurements on grazing incidence X-ray optics, with coatings of ruthenium and boron carbide, at the SPring-8 Angstrom compact free electron laser facility using 7 and 12 keV photon energies. The damage threshold dose limits were found to be orders of magnitude higher than would naively be expected. The incorporation of energy transport and dissipation via keV level energetic photoelectrons accounts for the observed damage threshold.

  17. A common fluence threshold for first positive and second positive phototropism in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janoudi, A.; Poff, K. L.

    1990-01-01

    The relationship between the amount of light and the amount of response for any photobiological process can be based on the number of incident quanta per unit time (fluence rate-response) or on the number of incident quanta during a given period of irradiation (fluence-response). Fluence-response and fluence rate-response relationships have been measured for second positive phototropism by seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana. The fluence-response relationships exhibit a single limiting threshold at about 0.01 micromole per square meter when measured at fluence rates from 2.4 x 10(-5) to 6.5 x 10(-3) micromoles per square meter per second. The threshold values in the fluence rate-response curves decrease with increasing time of irradiation, but show a common fluence threshold at about 0.01 micromole per square meter. These thresholds are the same as the threshold of about 0.01 micromole per square meter measured for first positive phototropism. Based on these data, it is suggested that second positive curvature has a threshold in time of about 10 minutes. Moreover, if the times of irradiation exceed the time threshold, there is a single limiting fluence threshold at about 0.01 micromole per square meter. Thus, the limiting fluence threshold for second positive phototropism is the same as the fluence threshold for first positive phototropism. Based on these data, we suggest that this common fluence threshold for first positive and second positive phototropism is set by a single photoreceptor pigment system.

  18. A Common Fluence Threshold for First Positive and Second Positive Phototropism in Arabidopsis thaliana1

    PubMed Central

    Janoudi, Abdul; Poff, Kenneth L.

    1990-01-01

    The relationship between the amount of light and the amount of response for any photobiological process can be based on the number of incident quanta per unit time (fluence rate-response) or on the number of incident quanta during a given period of irradiation (fluence-response). Fluence-response and fluence rate-response relationships have been measured for second positive phototropism by seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana. The fluence-response relationships exhibit a single limiting threshold at about 0.01 micromole per square meter when measured at fluence rates from 2.4 × 10−5 to 6.5 × 10−3 micromoles per square meter per second. The threshold values in the fluence rateresponse curves decrease with increasing time of irradiation, but show a common fluence threshold at about 0.01 micromole per square meter. These thresholds are the same as the threshold of about 0.01 micromole per square meter measured for first positive phototropism. Based on these data, it is suggested that second positive curvature has a threshold in time of about 10 minutes. Moreover, if the times of irradiation exceed the time threshold, there is a single limiting fluence threshold at about 0.01 micromole per square meter. Thus, the limiting fluence threshold for second positive phototropism is the same as the fluence threshold for first positive phototropism. Based on these data, we suggest that this common fluence threshold for first positive and second positive phototropism is set by a single photoreceptor pigment system. PMID:11537470

  19. Increase of bulk optical damage threshold fluences of KDP crystals by laser irradiation and heat treatment

    DOEpatents

    Swain, J.E.; Stokowski, S.E.; Milam, D.; Kennedy, G.C.; Rainer, F.

    1982-07-07

    The bulk optical damage threshold fluence of potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystals is increased by irradiating the crystals with laser pulses of duration 1 to 20 nanoseconds of increasing fluence, below the optical damage threshold fluence for untreated crystals, or by baking the crystals for times of the order of 24 hours at temperatures of 110 to 165/sup 0/C, or by a combination of laser irradiation and baking.

  20. Determination of ablation threshold for composite resins and amalgam irradiated with femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, A. Z.; Freschi, L. R.; Samad, R. E.; Zezell, D. M.; Gouw-Soares, S. C.; Vieira, N. D., Jr.

    2010-03-01

    The use of laser for caries removal and cavity preparation is already a reality in the dental clinic. The objective of the present study was to consider the viability of ultrashort laser pulses for restorative material selective removal, by determining the ablation threshold fluence for composite resins and amalgam irradiated with femtosecond laser pulses. Lasers pulses centered at 830 nm with 50 fs of duration and 1 kHz of repetition rate, with energies in the range of 300 to 770 μJ were used to irradiate the samples. The samples were irradiated using two different geometrical methods for ablation threshold fluence determinations and the volume ablation was measured by optical coherence tomography. The shape of the ablated surfaces were analyzed by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The determined ablation threshold fluence is 0.35 J/cm2 for the composite resins Z-100 and Z-350, and 0.25 J/cm2 for the amalgam. These values are half of the value for enamel in this temporal regime. Thermal damages were not observed in the samples. Using the OCT technique (optical coherence tomography) was possible to determine the ablated volume and the total mass removed.

  1. Plasma-assisted laser ablation of tungsten: Reduction in ablation power threshold due to bursting of holes/bubbles

    SciTech Connect

    Kajita, Shin; Ohno, Noriyasu; Takamura, Shuichi; Sakaguchi, Wataru; Nishijima, Dai

    2007-12-24

    Nanosecond laser ablation of tungsten (W) exposed to helium plasma is investigated using optical emission spectroscopy. Submicrometer-sized holes/bubbles are formed on the surface of W when it was exposed to the helium plasma at a sufficiently high temperature (> or approx. 1500-1600 K). The emissions from a virgin W (before the helium plasma irradiation) cannot be detected when the fluence is <1 J/cm{sup 2}; however, the threshold fluence for the detection of neutral W emission after it was exposed to the helium plasma is {approx}0.2 J/cm{sup 2}. The physical mechanism of laser-induced bursting of holes/bubbles is proposed for achieving a significant reduction in ablation power threshold.

  2. Coupling effects of the number of pulses, pulse repetition rate and fluence during laser PMMA ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z. Q.; Feng, Y.; Yi, X.-S.

    2000-10-01

    Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) was ablated using a 248-nm long-pulsed KrF excimer laser operating at a pulse repetition rate (PRR) of 2 and 10 Hz, and fluence varying from 0.4 to 2 J/cm 2. The coupling effects of multiple shots, PRR, and fluence are found and discussed on the etching depth data and topography of PMMA. An increase in either PRR, or fluence or the number of pulses can accelerate the etching efficiency in terms of ablation rate, as a result of strengthened thermal effects. Quality of the craters such as roughness, porosity and contamination is sensitively dependent on the specific laser operating conditions. Basically, increasing the PRR and the number of pulses gives rise to a crater with smoother and less porous bottom.

  3. Laser-induced Breakdown Spectroscopy and ablation threshold analysis using a megahertz Yb fiber laser oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Gregory J.; Parker, Daniel E.; Nie, Bai; Lozovoy, Vadim; Dantus, Marcos

    2015-05-01

    A LIBS system is demonstrated using a 100 m cavity Yb fiber oscillator producing ~ 70 ps, 320 nJ clusters of 50-100 fs sub-pulses at 2 MHz. A new empirical model for femtosecond ablation is presented to explain the LIBS signal intensity's non-linear dependence on pulse fluence by accounting for the Gaussian beam's spatial distribution. This model is compared to experimental data and found to be superior to linear threshold fits. This model is then used to measure the ablation threshold of Cu using a typical amplified Ti:sapphire system, and found to reproduce previously reported values to within ~ 20%. The ablation threshold of Cu using the Yb fiber oscillator system was measured to be five times lower than on the amplified Ti:sapphire system. This effect is attributed to the formation of nanostructures on the surface, which have previously been shown to decrease the ablation threshold. The plasma lifetime is found to be ~ 1 ns, much shorter than that of nanosecond ablation, further indicating that the decreased threshold results from surface effects rather than laser-plasma interaction. The low threshold and high pulse energy of the Yb fiber oscillator allows the acquisition of LIBS spectra at megahertz repetition rates. This system could potentially be developed into a compact, fiber-based portable LIBS device taking advantage of the benefits of ultrafast pulses and high repetition rates.

  4. Ultrasound generated by a femtosecond and a picosecond laser pulse near the ablation threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hébert, H.; Vidal, F.; Martin, F.; Kieffer, J.-C.; Nadeau, A.; Johnston, T. W.; Blouin, A.; Moreau, A.; Monchalin, J.-P.

    2005-08-01

    We have investigated high-frequency ultrasound generated by single laser pulses in thin (50μm) aluminum foils as a function of the laser fluence. Laser-pulse durations of 80fs and 270ps were used to compare the ultrasound generated in two very different regimes: thermoelastic and ablation. The measured rear-surface displacement induced by the ultrasound pulse is similar after 50-μm propagation through the foils for the two laser-pulse durations in the fluence range of 0.1-0.7J/cm2. For fluences greater than the ablation threshold (0.25 and 0.63J/cm2 for the 80-fs and 270-ps pulses, respectively), the ultrasound amplitude generated by the 270-ps laser pulse is increased significantly due to absorption of laser energy by the ablating plasma. This is not observed for the 80-fs laser pulse since ablation is produced well after the laser-pulse irradiation of the target. The measured surface displacement as a function of laser fluence is compared to the calculations of a one-dimensional fluid code for both laser-pulse durations. The model calculations agree in many ways with the experimental results, but some discrepancies are observed.

  5. Generation of multiple stress waves in silica glass in high fluence femtosecond laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Haofeng; Wang Xiaolei; Zhai Hongchen; Zhang Nan; Wang Pan

    2010-08-09

    Shadowgraphs of dynamic processes outside and inside transparent target during the intense femtosecond laser ablation of silica glass are recorded. Two material ejections outside the target and two corresponding stress waves inside the target are observed at different energy fluences. In particular, a third stress wave can be observed at energy fluence as high as 40 J/cm{sup 2}. The first wave is a thermoelastic wave, while the second and the third may be generated subsequently by the mechanical expansions. In addition, the magnitudes of the three stress waves decrease sequentially based on our analysis.

  6. Fractal hydrodynamic model of high-fluence laser ablation plasma expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Agop, M.; Nica, P.; Gurlui, S.; Focsa, C.

    2010-10-08

    Optical/electrical characterization of transient plasmas generated by high-fluence (up to 1 kJ/cm{sup 2}) laser ablation of various targets revealed as a general feature the splitting of the plume in two structures. In order to account for this behavior, a new fractal hydrodynamic model has been developed in a non-differentiable space-time. The model successfully retrieves the kinetics of the two structures.

  7. Impact of open de-ionized water thin film laminar immersion on the liquid-immersed ablation threshold and ablation rate of features machined by KrF excimer laser ablation of bisphenol A polycarbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowding, C. F.; Lawrence, J.

    2009-11-01

    Debris control and surface quality are potential major benefits of sample liquid immersion when laser micromachining; however, the use of an immersion technique potentially modifies the ablation mechanism when compared to an ambient air interaction. To investigate the machining characteristics, bisphenol A polycarbonate has been laser machined in air and under a controllable open liquid film. To provide quantitative analysis, ablation threshold, ablation rate and the attenuation coefficient of the immersing de-ionized (DI) water fluid were measured. In ambient air the threshold fluence was measured to be 37 mJ cm -2. Thin film immersion displayed two trends: threshold fluences of 58.6 and 83.9 mJ cm -2. The attenuation of DI water was found to be negligible; thus, the change in ablation rate resulted from increased confinement of the vapour plume by the liquid medium, generating higher Bremsstrahlung attenuation of the beam, lowering the laser etch rate. Simultaneously, splashing motivated by the confined ablation plume allowed release of plume pressure before plume etching commenced. This contributed to the loss of total etching efficiency. Two interaction scenarios were obsereved as a result of splashing: (i) intermediate threshold fluence, where splashing occured after every pulse in a mode that interrupted the flow entirely, leaving an ambient air interaction for the following pulse; (ii) high threshold fluence, where splashing occured for every pulse in a mode that allowed the flow to recommence over the image before the next pulse causing every pulse to experience Bremsstrahlung attenuation. Since attenuation of the immersion liquid was negligible, it is the action of the constrained ablation plume within a thin flowing immersion liquid, the resultant Bremsstrahlung attenuation and splashing events that are the critical mechanisms that modify the primary ablation characteristics.

  8. Pulsed laser ablation of Germanium under vacuum and hydrogen environments at various fluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, Muhammad Hassan; Bashir, Shazia; Rafique, Muhammad Shahid; Dawood, Asadullah; Akram, Mahreen; Mahmood, Khaliq; Hayat, Asma; Ahmad, Riaz; Hussain, Tousif; Mahmood, Arshad

    2015-07-01

    Laser fluence and ambient environment play a significant role for the formation and development of the micro/nano-structures on the laser irradiated targets. Single crystal (1 0 0) Germanium (Ge) has been ablated under two environments of vacuum (10-3 Torr) and hydrogen (100 Torr) at various fluences ranging from 4.5 J cm-2 to 6 J cm-2. For this purpose KrF Excimer laser with wavelength of 248 nm, pulse duration of 18 ns and repetition rate of 20 Hz has been employed. Surface morphology has been observed by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Whereas, structural modification of irradiated targets was explored by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy. Electrical conductivity of the irradiated Ge is measured by four probe method. SEM analysis exhibits the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS), cones and micro-bumps in both ambient environments (vacuum and hydrogen). The formation as well as development of these structures is strongly dependent upon the laser fluence and environmental conditions. The periodicity of LIPSS or ripples varies from 38 μm to 60 μm in case of vacuum whereas in case of hydrogen environment, the periodicity varies from 20 μm to 45 μm. The difference in number of ripples and periodicity as well as in shape and size of cones and bumps in vacuum and hydrogen is explained on the basis of confinement and shielding effect of plasma. FTIR spectroscopy reveals that no new bands are formed for laser ablated Ge under vacuum, whereas Csbnd H stretching vibration band is formed for two moderate fluences (5 J cm-2 and 5.5 J cm-2) in case of ablation in hydrogen. Raman spectroscopy shows that no new bands are formed in case of ablation in both environments; however a slight Raman shift is observed which is attributed to laser-induced stresses. The electrical conductivity of the irradiated Ge increases with increasing fluence and is also dependent upon the environment as well as grown structures.

  9. Effects of closed immersion filtered water flow velocity on the ablation threshold of bisphenol A polycarbonate during excimer laser machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowding, Colin; Lawrence, Jonathan

    2010-04-01

    A closed flowing thick film filtered water immersion technique ensures a controlled geometry for both the optical interfaces of the flowing liquid film and allows repeatable control of flow-rate during machining. This has the action of preventing splashing, ensures repeatable machining conditions and allows control of liquid flow velocity. To investigate the impact of this technique on ablation threshold, bisphenol A polycarbonate samples have been machined using KrF excimer laser radiation passing through a medium of filtered water flowing at a number of flow velocities, that are controllable by modifying the liquid flow-rates. An average decrease in ablation threshold of 7.5% when using turbulent flow velocity regime closed thick film filtered water immersed ablation, compared to ablation using a similar beam in ambient air; however, the use of laminar flow velocities resulted in negligible differences between closed flowing thick film filtered water immersion and ambient air. Plotting the recorded threshold fluence achieved with varying flow velocity showed that an optimum flow velocity of 3.00 m/s existed which yielded a minimum ablation threshold of 112 mJ/cm 2. This is attributed to the distortion of the ablation plume effected by the flowing immersion fluid changing the ablation mechanism: at laminar flow velocities Bremsstrahlung attenuation decreases etch rate, at excessive flow velocities the plume is completely destroyed, removing the effect of plume etching. Laminar flow velocity regime ablation is limited by slow removal of debris causing a non-linear etch rate over ' n' pulses which is a result of debris produced by one pulse remaining suspended over the feature for the next pulse. The impact of closed thick film filtered water immersed ablation is dependant upon beam fluence: high fluence beams achieved greater etch efficiency at high flow velocities as the effect of Bremsstrahlung attenuation is removed by the action of the fluid on the plume; low

  10. Epoxy-paint stripping using TEA CO2 laser: Determination of threshold fluence and the process parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Manoj; Bhargava, P.; Biswas, A. K.; Sahu, Shasikiran; Mandloi, V.; Ittoop, M. O.; Khattak, B. Q.; Tiwari, M. K.; Kukreja, L. M.

    2013-03-01

    It is shown that the threshold fluence for laser paint stripping can be accurately estimated from the heat of gasification and the absorption coefficient of the epoxy-paint. The threshold fluence determined experimentally by stripping of the epoxy-paint on a substrate using a TEA CO2 laser matches closely with the calculated value. The calculated threshold fluence and the measured absorption coefficient of the paint allowed us to determine the epoxy paint thickness that would be removed per pulse at a given laser fluence even without experimental trials. This was used to predict the optimum scan speed required to strip the epoxy-paint of a given thickness using a high average power TEA CO2 laser. Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) studies were also carried out on laser paint-stripped concrete substrate to show high efficacy of this modality.

  11. Comparison of ablation mechanisms at low fluence for ultrashort and short-pulse laser exposure of very thin molybdenum films on glass.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Pinaki Das; O'Connor, Gerard M

    2016-03-20

    Complete removal of a loosely adhered very thin molybdenum film from a glass substrate is investigated for both femtosecond and nanosecond lasers at different wavelengths. Atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy confirm that ablation of the molybdenum film by femtosecond pulses occurs close to the damage threshold fluence, creating minimal damage to the substrate. This is in contrast to nanosecond laser processing where significant substrate damage at the equivalent damage threshold fluence is observed. Simulations predict a two-stage mechanical buckling mechanism in the femtosecond case. Out-of-plane thermal expansion first results in a tensile expansion of molybdenum film from the glass substrate; this locally delaminated film is then buckled by a subsequent compressive stress, leading to thin film spallation. Ablation by nanosecond laser pulses behaves differently. The appreciable heat diffusion length (∼700  nm) in molybdenum, observed for the nanosecond case, results in an increased thermal expansion of the glass. The thermally induced stress generated by the molten glass creates a delaminated area, which "pushes" the compressed film away from the substrate. These findings are relevant to future selective laser patterning of very thin molybdenum layers. PMID:27140542

  12. Ablation by ultrashort laser pulses: Atomistic and thermodynamic analysis of the processes at the ablation threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhyay, Arun K.; Inogamov, Nail A.; Rethfeld, Baerbel; Urbassek, Herbert M.

    2008-07-15

    Ultrafast laser irradiation of solids may ablate material off the surface. We study this process for thin films using molecular-dynamics simulation and thermodynamic analysis. Both metals and Lennard-Jones (LJ) materials are studied. We find that despite the large difference in thermodynamical properties between these two classes of materials--e.g., for aluminum versus LJ the ratio T{sub c}/T{sub tr} of critical to triple-point temperature differs by more than a factor of 4--the values of the ablation threshold energy E{sub abl} normalized to the cohesion energy, {epsilon}{sub abl}=E{sub abl}/E{sub coh}, are surprisingly universal: all are near 0.3 with {+-}30% scattering. The difference in the ratio T{sub c}/T{sub tr} means that for metals the melting threshold {epsilon}{sub m} is low, {epsilon}{sub m}<{epsilon}{sub abl}, while for LJ it is high, {epsilon}{sub m}>{epsilon}{sub abl}. This thermodynamical consideration gives a simple explanation for the difference between metals and LJ. It explains why despite the universality in {epsilon}{sub abl}, metals thermomechanically ablate always from the liquid state. This is opposite to LJ materials, which (near threshold) ablate from the solid state. Furthermore, we find that immediately below the ablation threshold, the formation of large voids (cavitation) in the irradiated material leads to a strong temporary expansion on a very slow time scale. This feature is easily distinguished from the acoustic oscillations governing the material response at smaller intensities, on the one hand, and the ablation occurring at larger intensities, on the other hand. This finding allows us to explain the puzzle of huge surface excursions found in experiments at near-threshold laser irradiation.

  13. Short-wavelength ablation of polymers in the high-fluence regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liberatore, Chiara; Mann, Klaus; Müller, Matthias; Pina, Ladislav; Juha, Libor; Vyšín, Ludek; Rocca, Jorge J.; Endo, Akira; Mocek, Tomas

    2014-05-01

    Short-wavelength ablation of poly(1,4-phenylene ether-ether-sulfone) (PPEES) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) was investigated using extreme ultraviolet (XUV) and soft x-ray (SXR) radiation from plasma-based sources. The initial experiment was performed with a 10 Hz desktop capillary-discharge XUV laser lasing at 46.9 nm. The XUV laser beam was focused onto the sample by a spherical mirror coated with a Si/Sc multilayer. The same materials were irradiated with 13.5 nm radiation emitted by plasmas produced by focusing an optical laser beam onto a xenon gas-puff target. A Schwarzschild focusing optics coated with a Mo/Si multilayer was installed at the source to achieve energy densities exceeding 0.1 J cm-2 in the tight focus. The existing experimental system at the Laser Laboratorium Göttingen was upgraded by implementing a 1.2 J driving laser. An increase of the SXR fluence was secured by improving the alignment technique.

  14. Generic incubation law for laser damage and ablation thresholds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhanliang; Lenzner, Matthias; Rudolph, Wolfgang

    2015-02-01

    In multi-pulse laser damage and ablation experiments, the laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) usually changes with the number of pulses in the train, a phenomenon known as incubation. We introduce a general incubation model based on two physical mechanisms—pulse induced change of (i) absorption and (ii) critical energy that must be deposited to cause ablation. The model is applicable to a broad class of materials and we apply it to fit data for dielectrics and metals. It also explains observed changes of the LIDT as a function of the laser repetition rate. We discuss under which conditions the crater-size method to determine LIDTs can be applied in multi-pulse experiments.

  15. Investigation Into the Optimum Beam Shape and Fluence for Selective Ablation of Dental Calculus at lambda = 400 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenly, J.E.; Seka. W.; Rechmann, P.

    2010-02-25

    A frequency-doubled Ti:sapphire laser is shown to selectively ablate dental calculus. The optimal transverse shape of the laser beam, including its variability under water-cooling, is determined for selective ablation of dental calculus. Intensity profiles under various water-cooling conditions were optically observed. The 400-nm laser was coupled into a multimode optical fiber using an f = 2.5-cm lens and light-shaping diffuser. Water-cooling was supplied coaxially around the fiber. Five human tooth samples (four with calculus and one pristine) were irradiated perpendicular to the tooth surface while the tooth was moved back and forth at 0.3 mm/second, varying between 20 and 180 iterations. The teeth were imaged before and after irradiation using light microscopy with a flashing blue light-emitting diode (LED). An environmental scanning electron microscope imaged each tooth after irradiation. High-order super-Gaussian intensity profiles are observed at the output of a fiber coiled around a 4-in. diameter drum. Super-Gaussian beams have a morehomogenous fluence distribution than Gaussian beams and have a higher energy efficiency for selective ablation. Coaxial water-cooling does not noticeably distort the intensity distribution within 1 mm from the optical fiber. In contrast, lasers focused to a Gaussian cross section (<=50-mm diameter) without fiber propagation and cooled by a water spray are heavily distorted and may lead to variable ablation. Calculus is preferentially ablated at high fluences (>= 2 J/cm^2); below this fluence, stalling occurs because of photo-bleaching of the calculus. Healthy dental hard tissue is not removed at fluences <=3 J/cm^2. Supplying laser light to a tooth using an optical fiber with coaxial water-cooling is determined to be the most appropriate method when selectively removing calculus with a frequency-doubled Ti:sapphire laser. Fluences over 2 J/cm^2 are required to remove calculus efficiently since photo-bleaching stalls calculus

  16. Effects of dopant type and concentration on the femtosecond laser ablation threshold and incubation behaviour of silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oosterbeek, Reece N.; Corazza, Carsten; Ashforth, Simon; Simpson, M. Cather

    2016-04-01

    In laser micromachining, the ablation threshold (minimum fluence required to cause ablation) is a key performance parameter and overall indicator of the efficiency of material removal. For pulsed laser micromachining, this important observable depends upon material properties, pulse properties and the number of pulses applied in a complex manner that is not yet well understood. The incubation effect is one example. It manifests as a change in the ablation threshold as a function of number of laser pulses applied and is driven by photoinduced defect accumulation in the material. Here, we study femtosecond (800 nm, 110 fs, 0.1-1 mJ/pulse) micromachining of a material with well-defined initial defect concentrations: doped Si across a range of dopant types and concentrations. The single-pulse ablation threshold (F th,1) was observed to decrease with increasing dopant concentration, from a maximum of 0.70 J/cm2 (±0.02) for undoped Si to 0.51 J/cm2 (±0.01) for highly N-type doped Si. The effect was greater for N-type doped Si than for P-type, consistent with the higher carrier mobility of electrons compared to holes. In contrast, the infinite-pulse ablation threshold (F th, ∞ ) was the same for all doping levels and types. We attribute this asymptotic behaviour to a maximum defect concentration that is independent of the initial defect concentration and type. These results lend insight into the mechanism of multipulse, femtosecond laser ablation.

  17. Structural properties of gold-silicon nanohybrids formed by femtosecond laser ablation in water at different fluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabchikov, Y. V.; Popov, A. A.; Sentis, M.; Timoshenko, V. Y.; Kabashin, A. V.

    2016-03-01

    A gold target was ablated by femtosecond laser radiation in aqueous solutions of preliminarily prepared Si nanoparticles. The ablation process led to the formation of Au-based spherical colloids with the mean size around 5-10 nm and a weak abundance of larger species. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis revealed the presence of Au and Si in colloid composition, while the stoichiometry of colloids did not depend on laser fluence during the fabrication experiments. The formation of Au-Si nanohybrid structure was explained by an effect of the interaction of laser-ablated Au nanoclusters with water-dispersed Si nanoparticles. The fabricated structures can be of importance for biomedical, catalysis, and photovoltaics applications.

  18. The influence of laser wavelength and fluence on palladium nanoparticles produced by pulsed laser ablation in deionized water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jinil; Amaranatha Reddy, D.; Ma, Rory; Kim, Tae Kyu

    2014-11-01

    Homogeneous spherical palladium (Pd) nanoparticles were synthesized by pulsed laser ablation of a solid Pd foil target submerged in deionized water, without the addition of any external chemical surfactant. The influence of laser wavelength (355, 532, and 1064 nm) and fluence (8.92, 12.74, and 19.90 J/cm2) on nucleation, growth, and aggregation of Pd nanoparticles were systematically studied. Microstructural and optical properties of the obtained nanoparticles were studied by field emission transmission electron microscopy (FETEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and UV-vis spectroscopy. FETEM micrographs indicate that the average nanocrystallite sizes are relatively low (3-6 nm) and homogeneous for the particles synthesized at the laser wavelengths of 355 and 532 nm. However, at a laser wavelength of 1064 nm, the average nanocrystallite size is relatively large and inhomogeneous in nature. Moreover, we observe that the mean diameter and production rate of particles increases with an increase in laser fluence. The selected area electron diffraction patterns obtained from isolated Pd nanoparticles show the characteristic diffused electron diffraction rings of polycrystalline materials with a face-centered cubic structure. Absorbance spectrum of the synthesized nanoparticle solution shows a broad absorption band, which corresponds to a typical inter-band transition of a metallic system, indicating the production of pure palladium nanoparticles. The present work provides new insights into the effect of laser wavelength and fluence on the control of size and aggregation of palladium nanoparticles in the liquid medium.

  19. The ablation threshold of Er;Cr:YSGG laser radiation in bone tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benetti, Carolina; Zezell, Denise Maria

    2015-06-01

    In laser cut clinical applications, the use of energy densities lower than the ablation threshold causes increase of temperature of the irradiated tissue, which might result in an irreversible thermal damage. Hence, knowing the ablation threshold is crucial for insuring the safety of these procedures. The aim of this study was to determine the ablation threshold of the Er,Cr:YSGG laser in bone tissue. Bone pieces from jaws of New Zealand rabbits were cut as blocks of 5 mm × 8 mm and polished with sandpaper. The Er,Cr:YSGG laser used in this study had wavelength of 2780 nm, 20 Hz of frequency, and the irradiation condition was chosen so as to simulate the irradiation during a surgical procedure. The laser irradiation was performed with 12 different values of laser energy densities, between 3 J/cm2 and 42 J/cm2, during 3 seconds, resulting in the overlap of 60 pulses. This process was repeated in each sample, for all laser energy densities. After irradiation, the samples were analyzed by scanning electron microscope (SEM), and it was measured the crater diameter for each energy density. By fitting a curve that related the ablation threshold with the energy density and the corresponding diameter of ablation crater, it was possible to determine the ablation threshold. The results showed that the ablation threshold of the Er,Cr:YSGG in bone tissue was 1.95+/-0.42 J/cm2.

  20. Fluence Thresholds for Laser-Induced Damage of Optical Components in the Injector Laser of the SSRL Gun Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Boton, P

    2005-01-31

    Damage threshold fluences for several optical components were measured at three wavelengths using the injector laser at SSRL's Gun Test Facility. Measurements were conducted using the fundamental ir wavelength at 1053 nanometers and harmonics at 526 nm and 263 nm with 3.4ps pulses (1/e{sup 2} full width intensity); ir measurements were also conducted with 850 ps pulses. Practical surfaces relevant to the laser system performance are emphasized. Damage onset was evidenced by an alteration of the specular reflection of a cw probe laser (650 nm) from the irradiated region of the target surface. For the case of stretched ir pulses, damage to a Nd:glass rod was observed to begin at a site within the bulk material and to progress back toward the incident surface.

  1. Influence of film thickness on laser ablation threshold of transparent conducting oxide thin-films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rung, S.; Christiansen, A.; Hellmann, R.

    2014-06-01

    We report on a comprehensive study of the laser ablation threshold of transparent conductive oxide thin films. The ablation threshold is determined for both indium tin oxide and gallium zinc oxide as a function of film thickness and for different laser wavelengths. By using a pulsed diode pumped solid state laser at 1064 nm, 532 nm, 355 nm and 266 nm, respectively, the relationship between optical absorption length and film thickness is studied. We find that the ablation threshold decreases with increasing film thickness in a regime where the absorption length is larger than the film thickness. In turn, the ablation threshold increases in case the absorption length is smaller than the film thickness. In particular, we observe a minimum of the ablation threshold in a region where the film thickness is comparable to the absorption length. To the best of our knowledge, this behaviour previously predicted for thin metal films, has been unreported for all three regimes in case of transparent conductive oxides, yet. For industrial laser scribing processes, these results imply that the efficiency can be optimized by using a laser where the optical absorption length is close to the film thickness.

  2. Investigations of the Cavitation and Damage Thresholds of Histotripsy and Applications in Targeted Tissue Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlaisavljevich, Eli

    Histotripsy is a noninvasive ultrasound therapy that controls acoustic cavitation to mechanically fractionate soft tissue. This dissertation investigates the physical thresholds to initiate cavitation and produce tissue damage in histotripsy and factors affecting these thresholds in order to develop novel strategies for targeted tissue ablation. In the first part of this dissertation, the effects of tissue properties on histotripsy cavitation thresholds and damage thresholds were investigated. Results demonstrated that the histotripsy shock scattering threshold using multi-cycle pulses increases in stiffer tissues, while the histotripsy intrinsic threshold using single-cycle pulses is independent of tissue stiffness. Further, the intrinsic threshold slightly decreases with lower frequencies and significantly decreases with increasing temperature. The effects of tissue properties on the susceptibility to histotripsy-induced tissue damage were also investigated, demonstrating that stiffer tissues are more resistant to histotripsy. Two strategies were investigated for increasing the effectiveness of histotripsy for the treatment of stiffer tissues, with results showing that thermal preconditioning may be used to alter tissue susceptibility to histotripsy and that lower frequency treatments may increase the efficiency of histotripsy tissue ablation due to enhanced bubble expansion. In the second part of this dissertation, the feasibility of using histotripsy for targeted liver ablation was investigated in an intact in vivo porcine model, with results demonstrating that histotripsy was capable of non-invasively creating precise lesions throughout the entire liver. Additionally, a tissue selective ablation approach was developed, where histotripsy completely fractionated the liver tissue surrounding the major hepatic vessels and gallbladder while being self-limited at the boundaries of these critical structures. Finally, the long-term effects of histotripsy liver

  3. Size properties of colloidal nanoparticles produced by nanosecond pulsed laser ablation and studying the effects of liquid medium and laser fluence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdieh, Mohammad Hossein; Fattahi, Behzad

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, pulsed laser ablation method was used for synthesis of colloidal nanoparticles of aluminum and titanium targets in distilled water, ethanol, and acetone as liquid environments. Ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) absorption spectrophotometer and scanning electron microscope (SEM) were used for characterization of produced nanoparticles. Using image processing technique and analyzing the SEM images, nanoparticles' mean size and size distribution were achieved. The results show that liquid medium has strong effect on size properties of produced nanoparticles. From the results, it was found that ablation of both metal targets in ethanol medium leads to formation of smaller size nanoparticles with narrower size distributions. The influence of laser fluence was also investigated. According to the results, higher laser fluence produces larger mean size nanoparticles with broader size distribution.

  4. Excimer laser ablation of thick SiOx-films: Etch rate measurements and simulation of the ablation threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihlemann, J.; Meinertz, J.; Danev, G.

    2012-08-01

    Excimer laser ablation of 4.5 μm thick SiOx-films with x ≈ 1 is investigated at 193 nm, 248 nm, and 308 nm. Strong absorption enables precisely tunable removal depths. The ablation rates correlate with laser penetration depths calculated from low level absorption coefficients. The experimental ablation thresholds are in agreement with numerical simulations on the basis of linear absorption and one-dimensional heat flow. This behaviour is similar to that of strongly UV-absorbing polymers, leading to well controllable micro machining prospects. After laser processing, SiOx can be converted to SiO2, opening a route to laser based fabrication of micro optical components.

  5. Deviation from threshold model in ultrafast laser ablation of graphene at sub-micron scale

    SciTech Connect

    Gil-Villalba, A.; Xie, C.; Salut, R.; Furfaro, L.; Giust, R.; Jacquot, M.; Lacourt, P. A.; Dudley, J. M.; Courvoisier, F.

    2015-08-10

    We investigate a method to measure ultrafast laser ablation threshold with respect to spot size. We use structured complex beams to generate a pattern of craters in CVD graphene with a single laser pulse. A direct comparison between beam profile and SEM characterization allows us to determine the dependence of ablation probability on spot-size, for crater diameters ranging between 700 nm and 2.5 μm. We report a drastic decrease of ablation probability when the crater diameter is below 1 μm which we interpret in terms of free-carrier diffusion.

  6. Ablation experiment and threshold calculation of titanium alloy irradiated by ultra-fast pulse laser

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Buxiang; Jiang, Gedong; Wang, Wenjun Wang, Kedian; Mei, Xuesong

    2014-03-15

    The interaction between an ultra-fast pulse laser and a material's surface has become a research hotspot in recent years. Micromachining of titanium alloy with an ultra-fast pulse laser is a very important research direction, and it has very important theoretical significance and application value in investigating the ablation threshold of titanium alloy irradiated by ultra-fast pulse lasers. Irradiated by a picosecond pulse laser with wavelengths of 1064 nm and 532 nm, the surface morphology and feature sizes, including ablation crater width (i.e. diameter), ablation depth, ablation area, ablation volume, single pulse ablation rate, and so forth, of the titanium alloy were studied, and their ablation distributions were obtained. The experimental results show that titanium alloy irradiated by a picosecond pulse infrared laser with a 1064 nm wavelength has better ablation morphology than that of the green picosecond pulse laser with a 532 nm wavelength. The feature sizes are approximately linearly dependent on the laser pulse energy density at low energy density and the monotonic increase in laser pulse energy density. With the increase in energy density, the ablation feature sizes are increased. The rate of increase in the feature sizes slows down gradually once the energy density reaches a certain value, and gradually saturated trends occur at a relatively high energy density. Based on the linear relation between the laser pulse energy density and the crater area of the titanium alloy surface, and the Gaussian distribution of the laser intensity on the cross section, the ablation threshold of titanium alloy irradiated by an ultra-fast pulse laser was calculated to be about 0.109 J/cm{sup 2}.

  7. Comparison of holmium:YAG and thulium fiber laser lithotripsy: ablation thresholds, ablation rates, and retropulsion effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackmon, Richard L.; Irby, Pierce B.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2011-07-01

    The holmium:YAG (Ho:YAG) laser lithotriptor is capable of operating at high pulse energies, but efficient operation is limited to low pulse rates (~10 Hz) during lithotripsy. On the contrary, the thulium fiber laser (TFL) is limited to low pulse energies, but can operate efficiently at high pulse rates (up to 1000 Hz). This study compares stone ablation threshold, ablation rate, and retropulsion for the two different Ho:YAG and TFL operation modes. The TFL (λ = 1908 nm) was operated with pulse energies of 5 to 35 mJ, 500-μs pulse duration, and pulse rates of 10 to 400 Hz. The Ho:YAG laser (λ = 2120 nm) was operated with pulse energies of 30 to 550 mJ, 350-μs pulse duration, and a pulse rate of 10 Hz. Laser energy was delivered through 200- and 270-μm-core optical fibers in contact mode with human calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) stones for ablation studies and plaster-of-Paris stone phantoms for retropulsion studies. The COM stone ablation threshold for Ho:YAG and TFL measured 82.6 and 20.8 J/cm2, respectively. Stone retropulsion with the Ho:YAG laser linearly increased with pulse energy. Retropulsion with TFL was minimal at pulse rates less than 150 Hz, then rapidly increased at higher pulse rates. For minimal stone retropulsion, Ho:YAG operation at pulse energies less than 175 mJ at 10 Hz and TFL operation at 35 mJ at 100 Hz is recommended, with both lasers producing comparable ablation rates. Further development of a TFL operating with both high pulse energies of 100 to 200 mJ and high pulse rates of 100 to 150 Hz may also provide an alternative to the Ho:YAG laser for higher ablation rates, when retropulsion is not a primary concern.

  8. Comparison of holmium:YAG and thulium fiber laser lithotripsy: ablation thresholds, ablation rates, and retropulsion effects.

    PubMed

    Blackmon, Richard L; Irby, Pierce B; Fried, Nathaniel M

    2011-07-01

    The holmium:YAG (Ho:YAG) laser lithotriptor is capable of operating at high pulse energies, but efficient operation is limited to low pulse rates (∼10 Hz) during lithotripsy. On the contrary, the thulium fiber laser (TFL) is limited to low pulse energies, but can operate efficiently at high pulse rates (up to 1000 Hz). This study compares stone ablation threshold, ablation rate, and retropulsion for the two different Ho:YAG and TFL operation modes. The TFL (λ = 1908 nm) was operated with pulse energies of 5 to 35 mJ, 500-μs pulse duration, and pulse rates of 10 to 400 Hz. The Ho:YAG laser (λ = 2120 nm) was operated with pulse energies of 30 to 550 mJ, 350-μs pulse duration, and a pulse rate of 10 Hz. Laser energy was delivered through 200- and 270-μm-core optical fibers in contact mode with human calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) stones for ablation studies and plaster-of-Paris stone phantoms for retropulsion studies. The COM stone ablation threshold for Ho:YAG and TFL measured 82.6 and 20.8 J∕cm(2), respectively. Stone retropulsion with the Ho:YAG laser linearly increased with pulse energy. Retropulsion with TFL was minimal at pulse rates less than 150 Hz, then rapidly increased at higher pulse rates. For minimal stone retropulsion, Ho:YAG operation at pulse energies less than 175 mJ at 10 Hz and TFL operation at 35 mJ at 100 Hz is recommended, with both lasers producing comparable ablation rates. Further development of a TFL operating with both high pulse energies of 100 to 200 mJ and high pulse rates of 100 to 150 Hz may also provide an alternative to the Ho:YAG laser for higher ablation rates, when retropulsion is not a primary concern. PMID:21806249

  9. Interaction thresholds in Er:YAG laser ablation of organic tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukac, Matjaz; Marincek, Marko; Poberaj, Gorazd; Grad, Ladislav; Mozina, Janez I.; Sustercic, Dusan; Funduk, Nenad; Skaleric, Uros

    1996-01-01

    Because of their unique properties with regard to the absorption in organic tissue, pulsed Er:YAG lasers are of interest for various applications in medicine, such as dentistry, dermatology, and cosmetic surgery. The relatively low thermal side effects, and surgical precision of erbium medical lasers have been attributed to the micro-explosive nature of their interaction with organic tissue. In this paper, we report on preliminary results of our study of the thresholds for tissue ablation, using an opto-acoustic technique. Two laser energy thresholds for the interaction are observed. The lower energy threshold is attributed to surface water vaporization, and the higher energy threshold to explosive ablation of thin tissue layers.

  10. Ablation of crystalline oxides by infrared femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Fumiya; Cahill, David G.; Gundrum, Bryan; Averback, R. S.

    2006-10-15

    We use focused laser pulses with duration of 180 fs and wavelength of 800 nm to study the interactions of high power near-infrared light with the surfaces of single-crystal transparent oxides (sapphire, LaAlO{sub 3}, SrTiO{sub 3}, yttria-stabilized ZrO{sub 2}, and MgO); the morphologies of the ablation craters are studied by atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. With the exception of LaAlO{sub 3}, the high temperature annealing of these oxide crystals produces atomically flat starting surfaces that enable studies of the morphology of ablation craters with subnanometer precision. The threshold fluence for ablation is determined directly from atomic-force microscopy images and increases approximately linearly with the band gap of the oxide. For all oxides except sapphire, the depth of the ablation crater increases approximately as the square root of the difference between the peak laser fluence and the threshold fluence for ablation. Sapphire shows unique behavior: (i) at laser fluences within 1 J/cm{sup 2} of the threshold for ablation, the depth of the ablation crater increases gradually instead of abruptly with laser fluence, and (ii) the rms roughness of the ablation crater shows a pronounced minimum of <0.2 nm at a laser fluence of 1 J/cm{sup 2} above the threshold.

  11. Measurement of ablation threshold of oxide-film-coated aluminium nanoparticles irradiated by femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chefonov, O. V.; Ovchinnikov, A. V.; Il'ina, I. V.; Agranat, M. B.

    2016-03-01

    We report the results of experiments on estimation of femtosecond laser threshold intensity at which nanoparticles are removed from the substrate surface. The studies are performed with nanoparticles obtained by femtosecond laser ablation of pure aluminium in distilled water. The attenuation (or extinction, i.e. absorption and scattering) spectra of nanoparticles are measured at room temperature in the UV and optical wavelength ranges. The size of nanoparticles is determined using atomic force microscopy. A new method of scanning photoluminescence is proposed to evaluate the threshold of nanoparticle removal from the surface of a glass substrate exposed to IR femtosecond laser pulses with intensities 1011 – 1013 W cm-2.

  12. Influence of the per pulse laser fluence on the optical properties of carbon nanoparticles synthesized by laser ablation of solids in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes-Contreras, Delfino; Camacho-López, Marco; Camacho-López, Miguel A.; Camacho-López, Santiago; Rodríguez-Beltrán, René I.; Mayorga-Rojas, Miguel

    2015-11-01

    In this work we present experimental results on the optical characterization of carbon-nanoparticles (CNPs) synthesized by the laser ablation of solids in liquids technique (LASL). A pulsed Nd-YAG laser, a graphite disk and acetone were used in the laser ablation experiments. The per pulse laser fluence was varied, while all the other irradiation parameters (irradiation time, repetition rate, etc.) were kept constant. Both the graphite target and the obtained CNPs were characterized by Raman micro-spectroscopy. The colloidal solutions were characterized by UV-vis and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopies. Additionally, the CNPs were also characterized by TEM and HRTEM. Our results show that spherical nanoparticles in the range of 4-20 nm in diameter were obtained. UV-vis and PL results for the obtained CNPs colloidal solutions showed that the optical absorption and PL intensity are dependent on the per pulse laser fluence. We also found that the PL spectral emission of the CNPs can be tuned from blue to yellow by varying the excitation wavelength.

  13. Laser ablation of optically thin absorbing liquid layer predeposited onto a transparent solid substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Kudryashov, S. I.; Lyon, K.; Shukla, S.; Murry, D.; Allen, S. D.

    2006-09-01

    Ablation of optically thin liquid 2-propanol layers of variable thickness on IR-transparent solid Si substrate by a nanosecond CO{sub 2} laser has been experimentally studied using time-resolved optical interferometric and microscopy techniques. Basic ablation parameters - threshold fluences for surface vaporization and explosive homogeneous boiling of the superheated liquid, ablation depths, vaporization (ablation) rates, and characteristic ablation times versus laser fluence - were measured as a function of alcohol layer thickness. The underlying ablation mechanisms, their thermodynamics, and microscopic details are discussed.

  14. Desorption/Ionization Fluence Thresholds and Improved Mass Spectral Consistency Measured Using a Flattop Laser Profile in the Bioaerosol Mass Spectrometry of Single Bacillus Endospores

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, P T; Srivastava, A; Pitesky, M E; Fergenson, D P; Tobias, H J; Gard, E E; Frank, M

    2004-11-30

    Bioaerosol mass spectrometry (BAMS) is being developed to analyze and identify biological aerosols in real-time. Mass spectra of individual Bacillus endospores were measured here with a bipolar aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer in which molecular desorption and ionization were produced using a single laser pulse from a Q-switched, frequency-quadrupled Nd:YAG laser that was modified to have an approximately flattop profile. The flattened laser profile allowed the minimum fluence required to desorb and ionize significant numbers of ions from single aerosol particles to be determined. For Bacillus spores this threshold had a mean value of approximately 1 nJ/{micro}m{sup 2} (0.1 J/cm{sup 2}). Thresholds for individual spores, however, could apparently deviate by 20% or more from the mean. Threshold distributions for clumps of MS2 bacteriophage and bovine serum albumin were subsequently determined. Finally, the flattened profile was observed to increase the reproducibility of single spore mass spectra. This is consistent with the general conclusions of our earlier paper on the fluence dependence of single spore mass spectra and is particularly significant because it is expected to enable more robust differentiation and identification of single bioaerosol particles.

  15. Numerical Study of Thrust Generation in the Process of Laser Ablated Doped Polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Nanlei; Hong, Yanji; Li, Xiuqian

    2011-11-01

    Recoil impulse of ablation products is a dominant source of thrust during laser ablation of polymers in vacuum. Based on the experiment phenomenon, put forward the threshold energy model to described ablation process, used laser deposition energy in polymer as ablation criterion, and calculated the fluence of energy generation from polymer chemolysis. Take the doped polymer PVC as research object, analyzed and computed interested parameter in process of laser ablated polymer, such as exhaust velocities of ablated product, ablated mass of polymer, recoil momentum gained by polymer target. Consulted experiment data, the numerical model well revealed the propulsion capability of different polymers.

  16. Time-resolved investigations of the non-thermal ablation process of graphite induced by femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalupka, C.; Finger, J.; Reininghaus, M.

    2016-04-01

    We report on the in-situ analysis of the ablation dynamics of the, so-called, laser induced non-thermal ablation process of graphite. A highly oriented pyrolytic graphite is excited by femtosecond laser pulses with fluences below the classic thermal ablation threshold. The ablation dynamics are investigated by axial pump-probe reflection measurements, transversal pump-probe shadowgraphy, and time-resolved transversal emission photography. The combination of the applied analysis methods allows for a continuous and detailed time-resolved observation of the non-thermal ablation dynamics from several picoseconds up to 180 ns. Formation of large, μm-sized particles takes place within the first 3.5 ns after irradiation. The following propagation of ablation products and the shock wave front are tracked by transversal shadowgraphy up to 16 ns. The comparison of ablation dynamics of different fluences by emission photography reveals thermal ablation products even for non-thermal fluences.

  17. Thermal-to-plasma transitions and energy thresholds in laser ablated metals monitored by atomic emission/mass spectrometry coincidence analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadillo, José M.; García, Carmen C.; Alcántara, José F.; Laserna, J. Javier

    2005-08-01

    A simultaneous laser-induced plasma spectrometry/laser ionization mass spectrometry experiment has been used to follow the ion and photon intensity in laser plasmas generated over pure metallic targets as a function of fluence. The excitation conditions have been chosen to cover the range from low fluence levels, where surface desorption and thermoemission are the common processes, to the high fluence regime, characterized by plasma formation. The fluence thresholds for ion formation and plasma formation have been calculated. The dependence of both processes with melting temperature has been demonstrated.

  18. Saturation effects in femtosecond laser ablation of silicon-on-insulator

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Hao; Oosten, D. van; Krol, D. M.; Dijkhuis, J. I.

    2011-12-05

    We report a surface morphology study on single-shot submicron features fabricated on silicon on insulator by tightly focused femtosecond laser pulses. In the regime just below single-shot ablation threshold nano-tips are formed, whereas in the regime just above single-shot ablation threshold, a saturation in the ablation depth is found. We attribute this saturation by secondary laser absorption in the laser-induced plasma. In this regime, we find excellent agreement between the measured depths and a simple numerical model. When the laser fluence is further increased, a sharp increase in ablation depth is observed accompanied by a roughening of the ablated hole.

  19. Determination of energy density threshold for laser ablation of bacteria. An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Coffelt, D W; Cobb, C M; MacNeill, S; Rapley, J W; Killoy, W J

    1997-01-01

    The Nd:YAG and CO2 lasers have been shown to be bactericidal at relative low energy densities. However, at energy densities exceeding 120 J/cm2 (CO2) and 200 J/cm2 (Nd:YAG), laser irradiation also causes irreparable root surface damage. The purpose of this study was to determine, in vitro, the energy density threshold at which microbial ablation could be achieved while inflicting the least amount of damage to the root surfaces of human teeth. Pairs of Escherichia coli colonies cultured on broth agar were treated with a CO2 laser using a pulsed waveform at approximate energy densities ranging from 3 to 110 J/cm2. One of each colony-pair was then examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and the other subcultured for viable microbes. Roots of extracted teeth were lightly scaled and treated by CO2 laser, again with pulsed beam using approximate energy densities of 3 to 110 J/cm2: and examined by SEM. Regardless of the level of energy density, residual bacteria could be subcultured from all laser treated microbial colonies. The inability of the laser to completely obliterate microbial colonies was likely due to: depth of energy penetration, difficulty in precisely overlapping beam focal spots, irregular beam profile, and presence of microbes at the periphery of the beam focal spot. The threshold energy density for bacterial obliteration was determined to be 11 J/cm2 and that for root damage was 41 J/cm2. Root damage was evident by charring, crater formation, melt-down and resolidification surface mineral, and increasing surface porosity. The results of this in vitro study indicate that when used at an energy density between 11 and 41 J/cm2 the CO2 laser may destroy microbial colonies without inflicting undue damage to the tooth root surface. PMID:9049791

  20. Pulsed laser generation of ultrasound in a metal plate between the melting and ablation thresholds

    SciTech Connect

    Every, A. G.; Utegulov, Z. N.; Veres, I. A.

    2015-03-31

    The generation of ultrasound in a metal plate exposed to nanosecond pulsed laser heating, sufficient to cause melting but not ablation, is treated. Consideration is given to the spatial and temporal profiles of the laser pulse, penetration of the laser beam into the sample, the evolution of the melt pool, and thermal conduction in the melt and surrounding solid. The excitation of the ultrasound takes place over a few nanoseconds, and occurs predominantly within the thermal diffusion length of a micron or so beneath the surface. Because of this, the output of the thermal simulations can be represented as axially symmetric transient radial and normal surface force distributions. The epicentral displacement response at the opposite surface to these forces is obtained by two methods, the one based on the elastodynamic Green’s functions for plate geometry determined by the Cagniard generalized ray method, and the other using a finite element numerical method. The two approaches are in very close agreement. Numerical simulations are reported of the epicentral displacement response of a 3.12mm thick tungsten plate irradiated with a 4 ns pulsed laser beam with Gaussian spatial profile, at intensities below and above the melt threshold. Comparison is made between results obtained using available temperature dependent thermophysical data, and room temperature materials constants except near the melting point.

  1. Pulsed laser generation of ultrasound in a metal plate between the melting and ablation thresholds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Every, A. G.; Utegulov, Z. N.; Veres, I. A.

    2015-03-01

    The generation of ultrasound in a metal plate exposed to nanosecond pulsed laser heating, sufficient to cause melting but not ablation, is treated. Consideration is given to the spatial and temporal profiles of the laser pulse, penetration of the laser beam into the sample, the evolution of the melt pool, and thermal conduction in the melt and surrounding solid. The excitation of the ultrasound takes place over a few nanoseconds, and occurs predominantly within the thermal diffusion length of a micron or so beneath the surface. Because of this, the output of the thermal simulations can be represented as axially symmetric transient radial and normal surface force distributions. The epicentral displacement response at the opposite surface to these forces is obtained by two methods, the one based on the elastodynamic Green's functions for plate geometry determined by the Cagniard generalized ray method, and the other using a finite element numerical method. The two approaches are in very close agreement. Numerical simulations are reported of the epicentral displacement response of a 3.12mm thick tungsten plate irradiated with a 4 ns pulsed laser beam with Gaussian spatial profile, at intensities below and above the melt threshold. Comparison is made between results obtained using available temperature dependent thermophysical data, and room temperature materials constants except near the melting point.

  2. In Situ Characterization of Laser Ablation by Pulsed Photoacoustics: The Case of Organic Nanocrystal Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alba-Rosales, J. E.; Ramos-Ortiz, G.; Rodríguez, M.; Polo-Parada, L.; Gutiérrez-Juárez, G.

    2013-09-01

    Here, a new methodology based on the pulsed photoacoustic (PA) technique for real-time monitoring of the ablation process used to synthesize organic nanocrystals is described. The methodology is implemented by ablating microcrystals grown from an organic chromophore with nonlinear optical properties. It was determined that the PA signal from the ablation process increases in amplitude and is time-shifted as the ablation process advances. Comparing the PA signals generated at different ablation times under different laser fluences with the nanocrystal characterization obtained through light scattering, optical microscopy, and AFM, it was demonstrated that the pulsed PA technique can be useful for monitoring the process and determining the threshold of ablation.

  3. Hydrodynamic simulation of ultrashort pulse laser ablation of gold film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Dong; Jiang, Lan; Wang, Feng; Shi, Xuesong; Qu, Liangti; Lu, Yongfeng

    2015-06-01

    The electron collision frequency in a hydrodynamic model was improved to match the laser energy absorbed with experimental data. The model calculation was used to investigate the ablation depth and the dependence of the threshold fluence of gold film on pulse width and wavelength. Two methods for estimating the ablation depth are introduced here with their respective scope of application. The dependence of the threshold fluence of gold film on the pulse width of the laser with a 1053 nm center wavelength agreed well with the experimental data. It was also observed that for pulses shorter than ~200 ps, the threshold fluence showed linear dependence on the logarithm of pulse width and increased with the wavelength, which was different from previous results.

  4. Micropillar fabrication on bovine cortical bone by direct-write femtosecond laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Yong C.; Altman, Katrina J.; Farson, Dave F.; Flores, Katharine M.

    2009-11-01

    We investigated fabrication of cylindrical micropillars on bovine cortical bone using direct-write femtosecond laser ablation. The ablation threshold of the material was measured by single-pulse ablation tests, and the incubation coefficient was measured from linear scanned ablation tests. A motion system was programmed to apply multiple layers of concentric rings of pulses to machine pillars of various diameters and heights. The diameter of the top surface of the pillar was found to steadily decrease due to incubation of damage from successive layers of pulses during the machining process. Pillar top diameter was predicted based on a paraxial beam fluence approximation and single-pulse ablation threshold and incubation coefficient measurements. Pillar diameters predicted as successive layers of pulses were applied were well-matched to experiments, confirming that femtosecond laser ablation of the cortical bone was well-modeled by single-pulse ablation threshold measurements and an incubation coefficient.

  5. Effects of Laser Wavelength and Fluence in Pulsed Laser Deposition of Ge Films

    SciTech Connect

    Yap, Seong Shan; Reenaas, Turid Worren; Siew, Wee Ong; Tou, Teck Yong; Ladam, Cecile

    2011-03-30

    Nanosecond lasers with ultra-violet, visible and infrared wavelengths: KrF (248 nm, 25 ns) and Nd:YAG (1064 nm, 532 nm, 355 nm, 5 ns) were used to ablate polycrystalline Ge target and deposit Ge films in vacuum (<10-6 Torr). Time-integrated optical emission spectra were obtained for laser fluence from 0.5-10 J/cm{sup 2}. Neutrals and ionized Ge species in the plasma plume were detected by optical emission spectroscopy. Ge neutrals dominated the plasma plume at low laser fluence while Ge{sup +} ions above some threshold fluence. The deposited amorphous thin-film samples consisted of particulates of size from nano to micron. The relation of the film properties and plume species at different laser fluence and wavelengths were discussed.

  6. Nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of Ge investigated by employing photoacoustic deflection technique and SEM analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaseen, Nazish; Bashir, Shazia; Shabbir, Muhammad Kaif; Jalil, Sohail Abdul; Akram, Mahreen; Hayat, Asma; Mahmood, Khaliq; Haq, Faizan-ul; Ahmad, Riaz; Hussain, Tousif

    2016-06-01

    Nanosecond pulsed laser ablation phenomena of single crystal Ge (100) has been investigated by employing photoacoustic deflection as well as SEM analysis techniques. Nd: YAG laser (1064 nm, 10 ns, 1-10 Hz) at various laser fluences ranging from 0.2 to 11 J cm-2 is employed as pump beam to ablate Ge targets. In order to evaluate in-situe ablation threshold fluence of Ge by photoacoustic deflection technique, Continuous Wave (CW) He-Ne laser (632 nm, power 10 mW) is employed as a probe beam. It travels parallel to the target surface at a distance of 3 mm and after passing through Ge plasma it causes deflection due to density gradient of acoustic waves. The deflected signal is detected by photodiode and is recorded by oscilloscope. The threshold fluence of Ge, the velocity of ablated species and the amplitude of the deflected signal are evaluated. The threshold fluence of Ge comes out to be 0.5 J cm-2 and is comparable with the analytical value. In order to compare the estimated value of threshold with ex-situe measurements, the quantitative analysis of laser irradiated Ge is performed by using SEM analysis. For this purpose Ge is exposed to single and multiple shots of 5, 10, 50 and 100 at various laser fluences ranging from 0.2 to 11 J cm-2. The threshold fluence for single and multiple shots as well as incubation coefficients are evaluated. It is observed that the value of incubation co-efficient decreases with increasing number of pulses and is therefore responsible for lowering the threshold fluence of Ge. SEM analysis also reveals the growth of various features such as porous structures, non-uniform ripples and blisters on the laser irradiated Ge. It is observed that both the fluence as well as number of laser shots plays a significant role for the growth of these structures.

  7. Laser ablation of silicon induced by a femtosecond optical vortex beam.

    PubMed

    Nivas, Jijil J J; Shutong, He; Anoop, K K; Rubano, A; Fittipaldi, R; Vecchione, A; Paparo, D; Marrucci, L; Bruzzese, R; Amoruso, S

    2015-10-15

    We investigate laser ablation of crystalline silicon induced by a femtosecond optical vortex beam, addressing how beam properties can be obtained by analyzing the ablation crater. The morphology of the surface structures formed in the annular crater surface allows direct visualization of the beam polarization, while analysis of the crater size provides beam spot parameters. We also determine the diverse threshold fluences for the formation of various complex microstructures generated within the annular laser spot on the silicon sample. Our analysis indicates an incubation behavior of the threshold fluence as a function of the number of laser pulses, independent of the optical vortex polarization, in weak focusing conditions. PMID:26469576

  8. High resolution selective multilayer laser processing by nanosecond laser ablation of metal nanoparticle films

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, Seung H.; Pan Heng; Hwang, David J.; Chung, Jaewon; Ryu, Sangil; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2007-11-01

    Ablation of gold nanoparticle films on polymer was explored using a nanosecond pulsed laser, with the goal to achieve feature size reduction and functionality not amenable with inkjet printing. The ablation threshold fluence for the unsintered nanoparticle deposit was at least ten times lower than the reported threshold for the bulk film. This could be explained by the combined effects of melting temperature depression, lower conductive heat transfer loss, strong absorption of the incident laser beam, and the relatively weak bonding between nanoparticles. The ablation physics were verified by the nanoparticle sintering characterization, ablation threshold measurement, time resolved ablation plume shadowgraphs, analysis of ablation ejecta, and the measurement and calculation of optical properties. High resolution and clean feature fabrication with small energy and selective multilayer processing are demonstrated.

  9. Update On CO{sub 2} Laser Ablation Of Polyoxymethylene At 101 kPa

    SciTech Connect

    Sinko, John E.; Scharring, Stefan; Eckel, Hans-Albert; Ogita, Naoya; Sasoh, Akihiro; Roeser, Hans-Peter

    2010-10-08

    Recent work has brought about a renewed interest in CO{sub 2} laser ablation studies of polyoxymethylene, due to its potential as a test target for enhancing modern understanding of the laser ablation process. In this paper, new results taken in air at atmosphere pressure are reported, including data measured at institutions in Germany and Japan, which increase the body of literature data on CO{sub 2} laser ablation of polyoxymethylene. The results are discussed in terms of aerospace parameters such as the momentum coupling coefficient and specific impulse, and are compared to a previous literature study. The threshold fluence is specified for ablation of polyoxymethylene by CO{sub 2} laser radiation. Fluences higher (and lower) than previously tested for CO{sub 2} laser ablation were studied herein, and record specific impulse values for CO{sub 2} laser ablation of flat polyoxymethylene are also reported here.

  10. Femtosecond laser ablation and nanoparticle formation in intermetallic NiAl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorgensen, David J.; Titus, Michael S.; Pollock, Tresa M.

    2015-10-01

    The ablation behavior of a stoichiometric intermetallic compound β-NiAl subjected to femtosecond laser pulsing in air has been investigated. The single-pulse ablation threshold for NiAl was determined to be 83 ± 4 mJ/cm2 and the transition to the high-fluence ablation regime occurred at 2.8 ± 0.3 J/cm2. Two sizes of nanoparticles consisting of Al, NiAl, Ni3Al and NiO were formed and ejected from the target during high-fluence ablation. Chemical analysis revealed that smaller nanoparticles (1-30 nm) tended to be rich in Al while larger nanoparticles (>100 nm) were lean in Al. Ablation in the low-fluence regime maintained this trend. Redeposited material and nanoparticles remaining on the surface after a single 3.7 J/cm2 pulse, one hundred 1.7 J/cm2 pulses, or one thousand 250 mJ/cm2 pulses were enriched in Al relative to the bulk target composition. Further, the surface of the irradiated high-fluence region was depleted in Al indicating that the fs laser ablation removal rate of the intermetallic constituents in this regime does not scale with the individual pure element ablation thresholds.

  11. Identification of non-thermal and thermal processes in femtosecond laser-ablated aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashir, Shazia; Shahid Rafique, M.; Husinsky, Wolfgang

    2013-12-01

    Non-thermal and thermal processes due to femtosecond laser ablation of aluminum (Al) at low, moderate, and high-fluence regimes are identified by Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) surface topography investigations. For this purpose, surface modifications of Al by employing 25 fs Ti: sapphire laser pulses at the central wavelength of 800 nm have been performed to explore different nano- and microscale features such as hillocks, bumps, pores, and craters. The mechanism for the formation of these diverse kinds of structures is discussed in the scenario of three ablation regimes. Ultrafast electronic and non-thermal processes are dominant in the lower fluence regime, whereas slow thermal processes are dominant at the higher fluence regime. Therefore, by starting from the ablation threshold three different fluence regimes have been chosen: a lower fluence regime (0.06-0.5 J cm-2 single-shot irradiation under ultrahigh vacuum condition and 0.25-2.5 J cm-2 single-shot irradiation in ambient condition), a moderate-fluence regime (0.25-1.5 J cm-2 multiple-shot irradiation), and a high-fluence regime 2.5-3.5 J cm-2 multiple-shot irradiation. For the lower fluence (gentle ablation) regime, around the ablation threshold, the unique appearance of individual, localized Nano hillocks typically a few nanometers in height and less than 100 nm in diameter are identified. These Nano hillock-like features can be regarded as a nonthermal, electronically induced phase transition process due to localized energy deposition as a result of Coulomb explosion or field ion emission by surface optical rectification. At a moderate-fluence regime, slightly higher than ablation threshold multiple-pulse irradiation produces bump-formation and is attributed to ultrafast melting (plasma formation). The high-fluence regime results in greater rates of material removal with highly disturbed and chaotic surface of Al with an appearance of larger protrusions at laser fluence well above the ablation threshold

  12. Silicon wafer surface patterning using femtosecond laser irradiation below ablation threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalili, Alireza; Tan, Bo; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan

    2010-03-01

    Surface patterning using femtosecond laser can be utilized for the fabrication of MEMS/NEMS, CMOS, 3D-microstructures, microtrenches, microchannels, microholes, periodical submicron gratings and nanophotonics. A unique high repetition rate femtosecond fiber laser system was used to study the effect of pulse width, repetition rate and pulse energy on the spacing of ripples as well as diameter of grains created during the surface patterning operations. Also, this report strides to identify the mechanisms that lead to ripple and grain formation at different pulse durations. In our experiments, the ripples formed at a lower laser fluence range 1.56-4.66 J/cm 2, whereas the grains were created at a higher laser fluence range 3.34-6.77 J/cm 2. The primary theory we used to explain the creation of ripples in the femtosecond regime was the Boson Condensation Hypothesis since mechanical and thermal forces are deemed to be negligible. For the picosecond pulse width range, the ripple formation can be based on any or a combination of the acoustic wave, surface tension gradient and interference between the incident light/surface wave mechanisms. The grain formation both in the femtosecond, as well as the picosecond span used in our experiments is due to the bond weakening and breaking in the silicon substrate and the short duration of the crystal lattice rearrangement following illumination by the laser. The small movements lead to the creation of new bonds between the atoms and eventual formation of grains. It was seen that for our pulse width, repetition rate and pulse energy range, the ripple spacing increased with laser pulse duration, while other parameters did not play an important role. In terms of grain diameter a similar trend was seen.

  13. Modeling of nanosecond-laser ablation: calculations based on a nonstationary averaging technique (spatial moments)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, N. D.; Luk'yanchuk, Boris S.; Bityurin, Nikita M.; Baeuerle, D.

    1998-09-01

    Semi-analytical approach to a quantitative analysis of thermal ns laser ablation is presented. It permits one to take into account: (1) Arbitrary temperature dependences of material parameters, such as the specific heat, thermal conductivity, absorptivity, absorption coefficient, etc. (2) Arbitrary temporal profiles of the laser pulse. (3) Strong (Arrhenius- type) dependence of the ablation velocity on the temperature of the ablation front, which leads to a non-steady movement of the ablation boundary during the (single) pulse. (4) Screening of the incoming radiation by the ablated products. (5) Influence of the ablation (vaporization) enthalpy on the heating process. (6) Influence of melting and/or other phase transformations. The nonlinear heat conduction equation is reduced to three ordinary differential equations which describe the evolution of the surface temperature, spatial width of the enthalpy distribution, and the ablated depth. Due to its speed and flexibility, the method provides powerful tool for the fast analysis of the experimental data. The influence of different factors onto ablation curves (ablated depth h vs. fluence (phi) ) is studied. Analytical formulas for (phi) th and h((phi) ) dependences are derived and discussed. The ablation curves reveal three regions of fluence: Arrhenius region, linear region, and screening region. Threshold fluence (phi) th and Arrhenius tails at (phi) less than (phi) th, are affected heavily by the temperature dependences in material parameters, surface evaporation rate, and pulse duration and shape. In contrast, the slope of the ablation curves at (phi) greater than (phi) th, is determined almost exclusively by the latent heat of vaporization, high temperature dependence of absorptivity, and, in the case of screening, by the absorption coefficient of the plume (alpha) g. In the screening region ablated depth increases logarithmically with fluence and its qualitative behavior is weakly affected by the temperature

  14. Caries selective ablation: the handpiece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennig, Thomas; Rechmann, Peter; Holtermann, Andreas

    1995-05-01

    Caries selective ablation is fixed to a window of fluences predicted by the ablation thresholds of carious and healthy dentin, respectively. The aim of the study was to develop a dental handpiece which guarantees homogeneous fluence at the irradiated tooth surface. Furthermore the point of treatment should be cooled down without energy losses due to the cooling system. We suggest the direct coupling of the laser radiation into a laminar stream of liquid, which acts in turn as a lengthened beam guide. The impacts of the laser radiation and of the cooling medium fall exactly into the same point. Hot ablation debris is removed out of the crater by the flush of the water jet. Fluences are constant if the handpiece is used in contact mode or at a distance. Normally the surface of a bare fiber working in contact mode is destroyed after a few shots. Coupling the laser radiation into a stream of liquid prevents this destruction. Putting together the benefits of this special handpiece short overall treatment times seem to be possible. High average power can be applied to the tooth without the threat of thermal damage. Furthermore no time consuming cutting of the fiber prolongs the treatment time.

  15. Excimer laser ablation of ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, A. C.; Leung, W. P.; Krajnovich, D.

    1991-02-01

    Laser etching of ferrites was previously done by scanning a focused continuous-wave laser beam on a ferrite sample in a chemical environment. We study the phenomenon of photo-ablation of Ni-Zn or Mn-Zn ferrites by pulsed 248-nm KrF excimer laser irradiation. A transfer lens system is used to project a grating pattern of a mask irradiated by the pulsed KrF laser onto the ferrite sample. The threshold fluence for ablation at the ferrite surface is about 0.3 J/cm2. A typical fluence of 1 J/cm2 is used. The etched grooves produced are typically 20-50 μm wide, with depths achieved as deep as 70 μm . Groove straightness is good as long as a sharp image is projected onto the sample surface. The wall angle is steeper than 60 degrees. Scanning electron microscopy of the etched area shows a ``glassy'' skin with extensive microcracks and solidified droplets being ejected that is frozen in action. We found that this skin can be entirely removed by ultrasonic cleaning. A fairly efficient etching rate of about 10 nm/pulse for a patterned area of about 2 mm×2 mm is obtained at a fluence of 1 J/cm2. This study shows that projection excimer laser ablation is useful for micromachining of ferrite ceramics, and indicates that a hydrodynamic sputtering mechanism involving droplet emission is a cause of material removal.

  16. Nanoscale ablation through optically trapped microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fardel, Romain; McLeod, Euan; Tsai, Yu-Cheng; Arnold, Craig B.

    2010-10-01

    The ability to directly create patterns with size scales below 100 nm is important for many applications where the production or repair of high resolution and density features is needed. Laser-based direct-write methods have the benefit of being able to quickly and easily modify and create structures on existing devices, but ablation can negatively impact the overall technique. In this paper we show that self-positioning of near-field objectives through the optical trap assisted nanopatterning (OTAN) method allows for ablation without harming the objective elements. Small microbeads are positioned in close proximity to a substrate where ablation is initiated. Upon ablation, these beads are temporarily displaced from the trap but rapidly return to the initial position. We analyze the range of fluence values for which this process occurs and find that there exists a critical threshold beyond which the beads are permanently ejected.

  17. Subpicosecond laser ablation of dental enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rode, A. V.; Gamaly, E. G.; Luther-Davies, B.; Taylor, B. T.; Dawes, J.; Chan, A.; Lowe, R. M.; Hannaford, P.

    2002-08-01

    Laser ablation of dental enamel with subpicosecond laser pulses has been studied over the intensity range of (0.1-1.4) x1014 W/cm2 using 95 and 150 fs pulses at a pulse repetition rate of 1 kHz. The experimentally determined ablation threshold of 2.2plus-or-minus0.1 J/cm2 was in good agreement with theoretical predictions based on an electrostatic ablation model. The ablation rate increased linearly with the laser fluence for up to 15 times the ablation threshold. The absence of collateral damage was observed using optical and scanning electron microscopy. Pulpal temperature measurements showed an increase of about 10 degC during the 200 s course of ablation. However, air cooling at a rate of 5 l/min resulted in the intrapulpal temperature being maintained below the pulpal damage threshhold of 5.5 degC. The material removal rates for subpicosecond precision laser ablation of dental enamel are compared with other techniques.

  18. An observation of ablation effect of soft biotissue by pulsed Er:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xianzeng; Xie, Shusen; Ye, Qing; Zhan, Zhenlin

    2007-02-01

    Because of the unique properties with regard to the absorption in organic tissue, pulsed Er:YAG laser has found most interest for various application in medicine, such as dermatology, dentistry, and cosmetic surgery. However, consensus regarding the optimal parameters for clinical use of this tool has not been reached. In this paper, the laser ablation characteristics of soft tissue by Er:YAG laser irradiation was studied. Porcine skin tissue in vitro was used in the experiment. Laser fluences ranged from 25mJ/mm2 to 200mJ/mm2, repetition rates was 5Hz, spot sizes on the tissue surface was 2mm. The ablation effects were assessed by the means of optical microscope, ablation diameters and depths were measured with reading microscope. It was shown that the ablation of soft biotissue by pulsed Er:YAG laser was a threshold process. With appropriate choice of irradiation parameters, high quality ablation with clean, sharp cuts following closely the spatial contour of the incident beam can be achieved. The curves of ablation crater diameter and depth versus laser fluence were obtained, then the ablation threshold and ablation yield were calculated subsequently, and the influence of the number of pulses fired into a crater on ablation crater depth was also discussed.

  19. Femtosecond laser corneal surgery with in situ determination of the laser attenuation and ablation threshold by second harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plamann, Karsten; Nuzzo, Valeria; Albert, Olivier; Mourou, Gérard A.; Savoldelli, Michèle; Dagonet, Françoise; Donate, David; Legeais, Jean-Marc

    2007-02-01

    Femtosecond lasers start to be routinely used in refractive eye surgery. Current research focuses on their application to glaucoma and cataract surgery as well as cornea transplant procedures. To avoid unwanted tissue damage during the surgical intervention it is of utmost importance to maintain a working energy just above the ablation threshold and maintain the laser energy at this working point independently of the local and global tissue properties. To quantify the attenuation of the laser power density in the tissue by absorption, scattering and modification of the point spread function we monitor the second harmonic radiation generated in the collagen matrix of the cornea when exposed to ultrashort laser pulses. We use a CPA system with a regenerative amplifier delivering pulses at a wavelength of 1.06 μm, pulse durations of 400 fs and a maximum energy of 60 μJ. The repetition rate is adjustable from single shot up to 10 kHz. The experiments are performed on human corneas provided by the French Eye bank. To capture the SHG radiation we use a photomultiplier tube connected to a lockin amplifier tuned to the laser repetition rate. The measured data indicates an exponential decay of the laser beam intensity in the volume of the sample and allows for the quantification of the attenuation coefficient and its correlation with the optical properties of the cornea. Complementary analyses were performed on the samples by ultrastructural histology.

  20. Study of the integrated fluence threshold condition for the formation of β-Bi2O3 on Bi thin films by using ns laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venegas-Castro, A.; Reyes-Contreras, A.; Camacho-López, M.; Olea-Mejía, O.; Camacho-López, S.; Esparza-García, A.

    2016-07-01

    The formation of β-Bi2O3 through laser irradiation of a bismuth (Bi) thin film is reported. The bismuth thin films were irradiated in atmospheric air using Nd:YAG laser pulses of 7 ns duration and 1064 nm wavelength. A set of irradiations was done on the samples varying the total irradiation time (i. e. the number of pulses) for a fix per pulse laser fluence of 25 mJ/cm2. The laser processed regions were characterized by optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and microRaman spectroscopy (mRS). OM results show that the laser modified cross section on the film is smaller than the laser beam cross section, which means a thermally confined interaction; SEM micrographs reveled the formation of submicron sized particles as a result of the multi-pulse laser irradiation; using microRaman spectroscopy characterization we were able to determine the formation of the β-Bi2O3 crystalline phase within the laser irradiated spot on the sample.

  1. Holmium:YAG (λ=2120nm) vs. Thulium fiber laser (λ=1908nm) ablation of kidney stones: thresholds, rates, and retropulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackmon, Richard L.; Irby, Pierce B.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2011-03-01

    The Holmium:YAG (Ho:YAG) laser lithotriptor is capable of operating at high pulse energies, but its efficient operation is limited to relatively low pulse rates (~10 Hz) during lithotripsy. On the contrary, the Thulium Fiber Laser (TFL) is limited to low pulse energies, but can operate at very high pulse rates (up to 1000 Hz). This study compares stone ablation threshold, ablation rate, and retropulsion effects for different Ho:YAG and TFL operation modes. The TFL (λ=1908 nm) was operated with pulse energies of 5-35 mJ, 500-μs pulse duration, and pulse rates of 10-400 Hz. The Ho:YAG laser (λ=2120 nm) was operated with pulse energies of 30-550 mJ, 350-μs pulse duration, and pulse rate of 10 Hz. Laser energy was delivered through small-core (200-270-μm) optical fibers in contact mode with human calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) stones for ablation studies and plaster-of-Paris stone phantoms for retropulsion studies. The COM stone ablation threshold for Ho:YAG and TFL measured 82.6 J/cm2and 20.8 J/cm2, respectively. Stone retropulsion with Ho:YAG laser increased linearly with pulse energy. Retropulsion with TFL was minimal at pulse rates < 150 Hz, then rapidly increased at higher pulse rates. For minimal stone retropulsion, Ho:YAG operation at pulse energies < 175 mJ at 10 Hz, and TFL operation at 35 mJ at 100 Hz is recommended, with both lasers producing comparable ablation rates. Further development of a TFL operating with both high pulse energies (e.g. 100-200 mJ) and high pulse rates (100-150 Hz) may also provide higher ablation rates, when retropulsion is not the primary concern.

  2. Ablation of CsI by XUV Capillary Discharge Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pira, Peter; Zelinger, Zdenek; Burian, Tomas; Vysin, Ludek; Wild, Jan; Juha, Libor; Lancok, Jan; Nevrly, Vaclav

    2015-09-01

    XUV capillary discharge laser (CDL) is suitable source for ablation of ionic crystals as material which is difficult to ablate by conventional laser. Single crystal of CsI was irradiated by 2.5 ns pulses of a 46.9 nm radiation at 2 Hz. The CDL beam was focused by Sc/Si multilayer spherical mirror. Attenuation length of CsI for this wavelength is 38 nm. Ablation rate was calculated after irradiation of 10, 20, 30, 50 and 100 pulses. Depth of the craters was measured by optical profiler (white light interferometry). Ablation threshold was determined from craters after irradiation with the changing fluence and compared with modeling by XUV-ABLATOR.

  3. Laser ablation of a turbid medium: Modeling and experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Brygo, F.; Semerok, A.; Weulersse, J.-M.; Thro, P.-Y.; Oltra, R.

    2006-08-01

    Q-switched Nd:YAG laser ablation of a turbid medium (paint) is studied. The optical properties (absorption coefficient, scattering coefficient, and its anisotropy) of a paint are determined with a multiple scattering model (three-flux model), and from measurements of reflection-transmission of light through thin layers. The energy deposition profiles are calculated at wavelengths of 532 nm and 1.064 {mu}m. They are different from those described by a Lambert-Beer law. In particular, the energy deposition of the laser beam is not maximum on the surface but at some depth inside the medium. The ablated rate was measured for the two wavelengths and compared with the energy deposition profile predicted by the model. This allows us to understand the evolution of the ablated depth with the wavelength: the more the scattering coefficient is higher, the more the ablated depth and the threshold fluence of ablation decrease.

  4. Nanoscale patterning of graphene through femtosecond laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Sahin, R.; Akturk, S.; Simsek, E.

    2014-02-03

    We report on nanometer-scale patterning of single layer graphene on SiO{sub 2}/Si substrate through femtosecond laser ablation. The pulse fluence is adjusted around the single-pulse ablation threshold of graphene. It is shown that, even though both SiO{sub 2} and Si have more absorption in the linear regime compared to graphene, the substrate can be kept intact during the process. This is achieved by scanning the sample under laser illumination at speeds yielding a few numbers of overlapping pulses at a certain point, thereby effectively shielding the substrate. By adjusting laser fluence and translation speed, 400 nm wide ablation channels could be achieved over 100 μm length. Raster scanning of the sample yields well-ordered periodic structures, provided that sufficient gap is left between channels. Nanoscale patterning of graphene without substrate damage is verified with Scanning Electron Microscope and Raman studies.

  5. Endometrial ablation

    MedlinePlus

    Hysteroscopy-endometrial ablation; Laser thermal ablation; Endometrial ablation-radiofrequency; Endometrial ablation-thermal balloon ablation; Rollerball ablation; Hydrothermal ablation; Novasure ablation

  6. Excimer laser ablation of polymer-clay nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, I.-Ta

    The ablation behavior of Polystyrene-Organically Modified Montmorillonite (OMMT) nanocomposites was evaluated by measuring the weight loss induced by KrF excimer laser irradiation of the nanocomposite specimens under air atmosphere. The characteristic values of ablation, ablation threshold fluence and effective absorption coefficient for polystyrene and its naonocomposites were calculated based on the weight loss data. The effects of morphology due to spatial variation in injection molded samples are also discussed in this work. Results demonstrate that both the dispersion state and the concentration of clay play important roles in excimer laser ablation. The sensitivity of threshold fluence and absorption coefficient to dispersion state of OMMT depends on the clay concentration. The excimer laser induced surface micro/nano structure formation and modification of PS-Clay Nanocomposites at various OMMT concentrations were also investigated. Scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy with attenuated total reflectance accessory were utilized to analyze the ablated surface. Results show that, in general, better dispersion of OMMT leads to less continuous surface structures and more pronounced carbonyl regions on FTIR spectra. Clay nanoparticles are exposed on ablated surfaces and affect surface structure formation after irradiation by laser. A mechanism for the formation of excimer laser induced surface structures on injection molded parts is thus proposed.

  7. Damage and ablation of large band gap dielectrics induced by a 46.9 nm laser beam

    SciTech Connect

    Ritucci, A; Tomassetti, G; Reale, A; Arrizza, L; Zuppella, P; Reale, L; Palladino, L; Flora, F; Bonfigli, F; Faenov, A; Pikuz, T; Kaiser, J; Nilsen, J; Jankowski, A F

    2006-03-08

    We applied a 0.3 mJ, 1.7 ns, 46.9 nm soft X-ray Argon laser to ablate the surface of large band gap dielectrics: CaF{sub 2} and LiF crystals. The ablation versus the fluence of the soft X-ray beam has been studied varying the fluence in the range of 0.05-3 J/cm{sup 2}. An ablation threshold of 0.06 and 0.1 J/cm{sup 2} and an ablation depth of 14 and 20 nm have been found for CaF{sub 2} and LiF, respectively. These results define new ablation conditions for these large band gap dielectrics, which can be of interest for the fine processing of these materials.

  8. Effects of varying argon ion laser intensity and exposure time on the ablation of atherosclerotic plaque.

    PubMed

    Strikwerda, S; Bott-Silverman, C; Ratliff, N B; Goormastic, M; Cothren, R M; Costello, B; Kittrell, C; Feld, M S; Kramer, J R

    1988-01-01

    Using continuous wave (CW) argon ion laser light, a total of 253 laser exposures of varying power (1.5, 3, 5, 8 or 10 W) and duration (20-1,333 ms) were delivered to four segments of human atheromatous aorta obtained at autopsy. Exposure conditions were controlled by using an optically shielded laser catheter that provided a 500 micron spot of light of known power. Two thresholds for consistently reproducible ablation could be defined-an intensity threshold at 25.5 W/mm2 and a fluence threshold at 3.2 J/mm2. Above threshold, a fluence of 5.1 J/mm2 was found to produce the most efficient ablation, ie, removed the greatest volume (mm3) per energy delivered (J) compared to other fluence levels employed (p less than 0.0001). Between aortic segments, however, considerable variability in efficiency (mm3/J) was observed, possibly owing to different optical properties and/or plaque composition. Low-intensity laser radiation produced inconsistent ablation and extensive coagulation effects to surrounding tissue. When a fluence of 5.1 J/mm2 was constructed with a high-intensity laser beam and a short exposure time, consistent and efficient tissue removal resulted without histologic evidence of coagulation necrosis. PMID:2965289

  9. A comparison of the characteristics of excimer and femtosecond laser ablation of acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    See, Tian Long; Liu, Zhu; Li, Lin; Zhong, Xiang Li

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents an investigation on the ablation characteristics of excimer laser (λ = 248 nm, τ = 15 ns) and femtosecond laser (λ = 800 nm, τ = 100 fs) on ABS polymer sheets. The laser-material interaction parameters (ablation threshold, optical penetration depth and incubation factor) and the changes in material chemical properties were evaluated and compared between the two lasers. The work shows that the ablation threshold and effective optical penetration depth values are dependent on the wavelength of laser beam (photon energy) and the pulse width. The ablation threshold value is lower for the excimer laser ablation of ABS (Fth = 0.087 J/cm2) than that for the femtosecond laser ablation of ABS (Fth = 1.576 J/cm2), demonstrating a more dominating role of laser wavelength than the pulse width in influencing the ablation threshold. The ablation depth versus the logarithmic scale of laser fluence shows two linear regions for the fs laser ablation, not previously known for polymers. The effective optical penetration depth value is lower for excimer laser ablation (α-1 = 223 nm) than that for femtosecond laser ablation (α-1 = 2917 nm). The ablation threshold decreases with increasing number of pulses (NOP) due to the chain scission process that shortens the polymeric chains, resulting in a weaker polymeric configuration and the dependency is governed by the incubation factor. Excimer laser treatment of ABS eliminates the Cdbnd C bond completely through the chain scission process whereas Cdbnd C bond is partially eliminated through the femtosecond laser treatment due to the difference in photon energy of the two laser beams. A reduction in the Cdbnd C bond through the chain scission process creates free radical carbons which then form crosslinks with each other or react with oxygen, nitrogen and water in air producing oxygen-rich (Csbnd O and Cdbnd O bond) and nitrogen-rich (Csbnd N) functional groups.

  10. Ablation and cone formation mechanism on CR-39 by ArF laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Shakeri Jooybari, B. E-mail: hafarideh@aut.ac.ir; Afarideh, H. E-mail: hafarideh@aut.ac.ir; Lamehi-Rachti, M.; Ghergherehchi, M.

    2015-03-07

    In this work, chemical properties, surface modification, and micro structures formation on ablated polyallyl di-glycol carbonate (CR-39) polymer by ArF laser irradiation (λ = 193 nm) at various fluences and pulse number were investigated. CR-39 samples have been irradiated with an ArF laser (193 nm) at a repetition rate of 1 Hz. Threshold fluence of ablation and effective absorption coefficient of CR-39 were determined. Conical microstructures (Taylor cone) formed on laser-ablated CR-39 exhibit: smooth, Taylor cone shape walls and sharp tips together with interference and well defined fringe-structure with a period of 230 nm, around cone base. Mechanism of cone formation and cone evolution of CR-39 ablated surface were investigated by change of fluences (at a given pulse number) and pulse number (at a given fluence). Cone height, cone base, and region of interface were increased in micrometer steps by increasing the total fluence. Depression on the base of the cone and the circular fringe were simulated. FTIR spectra were measured and energy dispersive x-ray analysis of irradiated and un-irradiated samples was performed.

  11. Ablation and cone formation mechanism on CR-39 by ArF laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakeri Jooybari, B.; Afarideh, H.; Lamehi-Rachti, M.; Ghergherehchi, M.

    2015-03-01

    In this work, chemical properties, surface modification, and micro structures formation on ablated polyallyl di-glycol carbonate (CR-39) polymer by ArF laser irradiation (λ = 193 nm) at various fluences and pulse number were investigated. CR-39 samples have been irradiated with an ArF laser (193 nm) at a repetition rate of 1 Hz. Threshold fluence of ablation and effective absorption coefficient of CR-39 were determined. Conical microstructures (Taylor cone) formed on laser-ablated CR-39 exhibit: smooth, Taylor cone shape walls and sharp tips together with interference and well defined fringe-structure with a period of 230 nm, around cone base. Mechanism of cone formation and cone evolution of CR-39 ablated surface were investigated by change of fluences (at a given pulse number) and pulse number (at a given fluence). Cone height, cone base, and region of interface were increased in micrometer steps by increasing the total fluence. Depression on the base of the cone and the circular fringe were simulated. FTIR spectra were measured and energy dispersive x-ray analysis of irradiated and un-irradiated samples was performed.

  12. Cold ablation driven by localized forces in alkali halides.

    PubMed

    Hada, Masaki; Zhang, Dongfang; Pichugin, Kostyantyn; Hirscht, Julian; Kochman, Michał A; Hayes, Stuart A; Manz, Stephanie; Gengler, Regis Y N; Wann, Derek A; Seki, Toshio; Moriena, Gustavo; Morrison, Carole A; Matsuo, Jiro; Sciaini, Germán; Miller, R J Dwayne

    2014-01-01

    Laser ablation has been widely used for a variety of applications. Since the mechanisms for ablation are strongly dependent on the photoexcitation level, so called cold material processing has relied on the use of high-peak-power laser fluences for which nonthermal processes become dominant; often reaching the universal threshold for plasma formation of ~1 J cm(-2) in most solids. Here we show single-shot time-resolved femtosecond electron diffraction, femtosecond optical reflectivity and ion detection experiments to study the evolution of the ablation process that follows femtosecond 400 nm laser excitation in crystalline sodium chloride, caesium iodide and potassium iodide. The phenomenon in this class of materials occurs well below the threshold for plasma formation and even below the melting point. The results reveal fast electronic and localized structural changes that lead to the ejection of particulates and the formation of micron-deep craters, reflecting the very nature of the strong repulsive forces at play. PMID:24835317

  13. Underwater excimer laser ablation of polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elaboudi, I.; Lazare, S.; Belin, C.; Talaga, D.; Labrugère, C.

    2008-09-01

    In this paper, we study the photoablation kinetic of poly (ethylene terephthalate) (PET), polycarbonate (PC), polyimide (PI) and polystyrene (PS) in both air and water. Compared to the results obtained in air, we highlight the decrease of the ablation threshold (AT) of polyesters in contact with water as a function of polymer chemical structure. In order to check the expected hydrolytic reaction of polyesters near the ablation threshold, the chemical modification of the polymer surfaces, as well the composition of the ablation products, were investigated after irradiation near the fluence of ablation threshold in air (air- F t ) by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and confocal Raman microspectroscopy. The morphology of polymers obtained by underwater irradiation and near the air- F t was also examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). To understand the process and its dynamics in contact with water, we consider the model of temperature at the polymer-water interface based on the semi-analytical solution of the transit heat-diffusion equation.

  14. Chemical and Spectroscopic Aspects of Polymer Ablation-Special Features and Novel Directions-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lippert, Thomas

    2004-03-01

    Laser ablation of polymers has become an established technique in the electronic industry and the large number of studies published annually indicates that this is still an attractive area of research. Several new approaches with new techniques and materials have given new insights in the ablation process. One of these approaches is the development of polymers designed specifically for laser ablation which are a unique tool for probing the ablation mechanisms as well as for improving ablation properties. These novel polymers exhibit very low thresholds of ablation, with high ablation rates (even at low fluences), and excellent ablation quality. New commercial applications will require improved ablation rates and control of undesirable surface effects, such as debris. The complexity of the interactions between polymers and laser photons are illustrated by the various processes associated with different irradiation conditions. i) Photothermal-photochemical laser ablation under excimer laser irradiation. ii) Dopant-induced laser ablation. iii) Photo-oxidative etching with lamps in an oxidizing atmosphere. iv) VUV etching in the absence of oxidizing conditions. v) Photokinetic etching with CW UV lasers. vi) Ultrafast laser ablation, affected by pulse length, wavelength, and possibly shock waves. vii) Shock assisted photothermal ablation on picosecond time scales. viii) VUV laser ablation: purely photochemical? ix) Synchrotron structuring. x) Mid-IR ablation (FEL and CO2 laser), the influence of exciting various functional groups. Several of these new approaches and processes will be discussed to emphasize the importance of different approaches but also to review some fundamental processes. The combination of various experimental techniques (new approaches and 'well-known') with materials made to measure has given new insights in the ablation mechanisms, but has also shown new possible future directions of laser polymer ablation.

  15. Laser ablation of Al-Ni alloys and multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Johannes; Trebin, Hans-Rainer; Kiselev, Alexander; Rapp, Dennis-Michael

    2016-05-01

    Laser ablation of Al-Ni alloys and multilayers has been studied by molecular dynamics simulations. The method was combined with a two-temperature model to describe the interaction between the laser beam, the electrons, and the atoms. As a first step, electronic parameters for the alloys had to be found and the model developed originally for pure metals had to be generalized to multilayers. The modifications were verified by computing melting depths and ablation thresholds for pure Al and Ni. Here known data could be reproduced. The improved model was applied to the alloys Al_3Ni, AlNi and AlNi_3. While melting depths and ablation thresholds for AlNi behave unspectacular, sharp drops at high fluences are observed for Al_3Ni and AlNi_3. In both cases, the reason is a change in ablation mechanism from phase explosion to vaporization. Furthermore, a phase transition occurs in Al_3Ni. Finally, Al layers of various thicknesses on a Ni substrate have been simulated. Above threshold, 8 nm Al films are ablated as a whole while 24 nm Al films are only partially removed. Below threshold, alloying with a mixture gradient has been observed in the thin layer system.

  16. Ablation of polymers by focused EUV radiation from a table-top laser-produced plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkusky, Frank; Bayer, Armin; Mann, Klaus

    2011-10-01

    We have investigated ablation of polymers with radiation of 13.5 nm wavelength, using a table-top laser produced plasma source based on solid gold as target material. A Schwarzschild objective with Mo/Si multilayer coatings was adapted to the source, generating an EUV spot of 5 μm diameter with a maximum energy density of ˜1.3 J/cm2. In combination with a Zirconium transmission filter, radiation of high spectral purity (2% bandwidth) can be provided on the irradiated spot. Ablation experiments were performed on PMMA, PTFE and PC. Ablation rates were determined for varying fluences using atomic force microscopy and white light interferometry. The slopes of these curves are discussed with respect to the chemical structure of the polymers. Additionally, the ablation behavior in terms of effective penetration depths, threshold fluences and incubation effects is compared to literature data for higher UV wavelength.

  17. Femtosecond melting and ablation of semiconductors studied with time of flight mass spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavalleri, Andrea; Sokolowski-Tinten, Klaus; Bialkowski, Joerg; Schreiner, Michaela; von der Linde, Dietrich

    1999-03-01

    Using time-of-flight mass spectroscopy, we have investigated melting and ablation of gallium arsenide and silicon irradiated by femtosecond pulses. Below the ablation threshold the maximum surface temperature is obtained from the collisionless time-of-flight distributions of evaporated or sublimated particles. At the melting threshold, we estimate a temperature for the silicon surface which is approximately 500 K higher than the equilibrium melting temperature. In the fluence regime where melting is known to be a nonthermal process, we measure maximum surface temperatures in excess of 2500 K for both silicon and gallium arsenide, indicating rapid thermalization after nonthermal melting. At the ablation threshold, we estimated for both materials surface temperatures between 3000 and 4000 K. We observed a clear threshold-like effect in the number of detected particles, indicating the occurrence of a bulk effect. The flow parameters above the ablation threshold are discussed and compared to the different models of collisional expansion. For Fabl2Fabl, we find evidence that expansion takes place at temperatures that are higher than the critical temperature. Plasma formation appears only at fluences above 1 J/cm2 (F>5Fabl).

  18. An improved three-dimensional two-temperature model for multi-pulse femtosecond laser ablation of aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jinping; Chen, Yuping Hu, Mengning; Chen, Xianfeng

    2015-02-14

    In this paper, an improved three-dimensional two-temperature model for multi-pulse femtosecond laser ablation of aluminum was proposed and proved in our experiment. Aiming to achieve hole-drilling with a high ratio of depth/entrance diameter in vacuum, this model can predict the depth and radius of the drilled holes precisely when employing different laser parameters. Additionally, for multi-pulse laser ablation, we found that the laser fluence and number of pulses are the dominant parameters and the multi-pulse ablation threshold is much lower than the single-pulse one, which will help to obtain high-quality holes.

  19. Pulse laser ablation at water-air interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utsunomiya, Yuji; Kajiwara, Takashi; Nishiyama, Takashi; Nagayama, Kunihito; Kubota, Shiro

    2010-06-01

    We studied a new pulse laser ablation phenomenon on a liquid surface layer, which is caused by the difference between the refractive indices of the two materials involved. The present study was motivated by our previous study, which showed that laser ablation can occur at the interface between a transparent material and a gas or liquid medium when the laser pulse is focused through the transparent material. In this case, the ablation threshold fluence is reduced remarkably. In the present study, experiments were conducted in water and air in order to confirm this phenomenon for a combination of two fluid media with different refractive indices. This phenomenon was observed in detail by pulse laser shadowgraphy. A high-resolution film was used to record the phenomenon with a Nd:YAG pulse laser with 10-ns duration as a light source. The laser ablation phenomenon on the liquid surface layer caused by a focused Nd:YAG laser pulse with 1064-nm wavelength was found to be followed by the splashing of the liquid surface, inducing a liquid jet with many ligaments. The liquid jet extension velocity was around 1000 m/s in a typical case. The liquid jet decelerated drastically due to rapid atomization at the tips of the ligaments. The liquid jet phenomenon was found to depend on the pulse laser parameters such as the laser fluence on the liquid surface, laser energy, and laser beam pattern. The threshold laser fluence for the generation of a liquid jet was 20 J/cm2. By increasing the incident laser energy with a fixed laser fluence, the laser focused area increased, which eventually led to an increase in the size of the plasma column. The larger the laser energy, the larger the jet size and the longer the temporal behavior. The laser beam pattern was found to have significant effects on the liquid jet’s velocity, shape, and history.

  20. Models For Laser Ablation Mass Removal And Impulse Generation In Vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Sinko, John E.; Gregory, Don A.

    2010-05-06

    To the present day, literature efforts at modeling laser propulsion impulse often used empirical models. Recently, a simple physical approach was demonstrated to be effective for predicting many practical properties of laser ablative impulse generation under vacuum. The model used photochemical mass removal and energy conservation to predict parameters such as the peak momentum coupling coefficient, the optimal fluence position at which this maximum is reached, and various critical properties related to the laser ablation threshold. Although the current model understanding is not complete, improvements in the treatment of mass removal and ambient pressure are expected to allow this type of model to be broadly applicable to many diverse applications using laser ablation impulse generation. In this paper, we also introduce an alternative formulation of the model incorporating photothermal mass removal. Implications and limitations of the model formulation in its initial stage of development are discussed, particularly concerning critical fluence effects and directions for improvement.

  1. Single-pulse laser ablation threshold of borosilicate, fused silica, sapphire, and soda-lime glass for pulse widths of 500  fs, 10  ps, 20  ns.

    PubMed

    Nieto, Daniel; Arines, Justo; O'Connor, Gerard M; Flores-Arias, María Teresa

    2015-10-10

    In this work, we report a comparative study of the laser ablation threshold of borosilicate, fused silica, sapphire, and soda-lime glass as a function of the pulse width and for IR laser wavelengths. We determine the ablation threshold for three different pulse durations: τ=500  fs, 10 ps, and 20 ns. Experiments have been performed using a single laser pulse per shot in an ambient (air) environment. The results show a significant difference, of two orders of magnitude, between the group of ablation thresholds obtained for femtosecond, picosecond, and nanosecond pulses. This difference is reduced to 1 order of magnitude in the soda-lime substrate with tin impurities, pointing out the importance of the incubation effect. The morphology of the marks generated over the different glass materials by one single pulse of different pulse durations has been analyzed using a scanning electron microscope (FESEM ULTRA Plus). Our results are important for practical purposes, providing the ablation threshold data of four commonly used substrates at three different pulse durations in the infrared regime (1030-1064 nm) and complete data for increasing the understanding of the differences in the mechanism's leading ablation in the nanosecond, picosecond, and femtosecond regimes. PMID:26479792

  2. Absorption of a single 500 fs laser pulse at the surface of fused silica: Energy balance and ablation efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Varkentina, N.; Sanner, N.; Lebugle, M.; Sentis, M.; Utéza, O.

    2013-11-07

    Ablation of fused silica by a single femtosecond laser pulse of 500 fs pulse duration is investigated from the perspective of efficiency of incident photons to remove matter. We measure the reflected and transmitted fractions of the incident pulse energy as a function of fluence, allowing us to recover the evolution of absorption at the material surface. At the ablation threshold fluence, 25% of incident energy is absorbed. At high fluences, this ratio saturates around 70% due to the appearance of a self-triggered plasma mirror (or shielding) effect. By using the energy balance retrieved experimentally and measurements of the ablated volume, we show that the amount of absorbed energy is far above the bonding energy of fused silica at rest and also above the energy barrier to ablate the material under non-equilibrium thermodynamic conditions. Our results emphasize the crucial role of transient plasma properties during the laser pulse and suggest that the major part of the absorbed energy has been used to heat the plasma formed at the surface of the material. A fluence range yielding an efficient and high quality ablation is also defined, which makes the results relevant for femtosecond micromachining processes.

  3. Laser-ablation processes

    SciTech Connect

    Dingus, R.S.

    1992-01-01

    The various mechanisms by which ablation of materials can be induced with lasers are discussed in this paper. The various ablation processes and potential applications are reviewed from the threshold for ablation up to fluxes of about 10{sup 13} W/cm{sup 2}, with emphasis on three particular processes; namely, front-surface spallation, two-dimensional blowoff, and contained vaporization.

  4. Atomic Oxygen Fluence Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.

    2011-01-01

    This innovation enables a means for actively measuring atomic oxygen fluence (accumulated atoms of atomic oxygen per area) that has impinged upon spacecraft surfaces. Telemetered data from the device provides spacecraft designers, researchers, and mission managers with real-time measurement of atomic oxygen fluence, which is useful for prediction of the durability of spacecraft materials and components. The innovation is a compact fluence measuring device that allows in-space measurement and transmittance of measured atomic oxygen fluence as a function of time based on atomic oxygen erosion yields (the erosion yield of a material is the volume of material that is oxidized per incident oxygen atom) of materials that have been measured in low Earth orbit. It has a linear electrical response to atomic oxygen fluence, and is capable of measuring high atomic oxygen fluences (up to >10(exp 22) atoms/sq cm), which are representative of multi-year low-Earth orbital missions (such as the International Space Station). The durability or remaining structural lifetime of solar arrays that consist of polymer blankets on which the solar cells are attached can be predicted if one knows the atomic oxygen fluence that the solar array blanket has been exposed to. In addition, numerous organizations that launch space experiments into low-Earth orbit want to know the accumulated atomic oxygen fluence that their materials or components have been exposed to. The device is based on the erosion yield of pyrolytic graphite. It uses two 12deg inclined wedges of graphite that are over a grit-blasted fused silica window covering a photodiode. As the wedges erode, a greater area of solar illumination reaches the photodiode. A reference photodiode is also used that receives unobstructed solar illumination and is oriented in the same direction as the pyrolytic graphite covered photodiode. The short-circuit current from the photodiodes is measured and either sent to an onboard data logger, or

  5. Femtosecond laser ablation of sapphire on different crystallographic facet planes by single and multiple laser pulses irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Litao; Nishii, Kazuhiro; Yasui, Motohiro; Aoki, Hikoharu; Namba, Yoshiharu

    2010-10-01

    Ablation of sapphire on different crystallographic facet planes by single and multiple laser pulses irradiation was carried out with a femtosecond pulsed laser operating at a wavelength of 780 nm and a pulse width of 164 fs. The quality and morphology of the laser ablated sapphire surface were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. For single laser pulse irradiation, two ablation phases were observed, which have a strong dependency on the pulse energy. The volume of the ablated craters kept an approximately linear relationship with the pulse energy. The threshold fluences of the two ablation phases on different crystallographic facet planes were calculated from the relationship between the squared diameter of the craters and pulse energy. With multiple laser pulses irradiation, craters free of cracks were obtained in the 'gentle' ablation phase. The threshold fluence for N laser pulses was calculated and found to decrease inversely to the number of laser pulses irradiating on the substrate surface due to incubation effect. The depth of the craters increased with the number of laser pulses until reaching a saturation value. The mechanism of femtosecond laser ablation of sapphire in two ablation phases was discussed and identified as either phase explosion, Coulomb explosion or particle vaporization. The choice of crystallographic facet plane has little effect on the process of femtosecond laser ablation of sapphire when compared with the parameters of the femtosecond laser pulses, such as pulse energy and number of laser pulses. In the 'gentle' ablation phase, laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) with a spatial period of 340 nm were obtained and the mechanism of the LIPSS formation is discussed. There is a potential application of the femtosecond laser ablation to the fabrication of sapphire-based devices.

  6. Dynamics of ions produced by laser ablation of several metals at 193 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Baraldi, G.; Perea, A.; Afonso, C. N.

    2011-02-15

    This work reports the study of ion dynamics produced by ablation of Al, Cu, Ag, Au, and Bi targets using nanosecond laser pulses at 193 nm as a function of the laser fluence from threshold up to 15 J cm{sup -2}. An electrical (Langmuir) probe has been used for determining the ion yield as well as kinetic energy distributions. The results clearly evidence that ablation of Al shows unique features when compared to other metals. The ion yield both at threshold (except for Al, which shows a two-threshold-like behavior) and for a fixed fluence above threshold scale approximately with melting temperature of the metal. Comparison of the magnitude of the yield reported in literature using other wavelengths allows us to conclude its dependence with wavelength is not significant. The evolution of the ion yield with fluence becomes slower for fluences above 4-5 J cm{sup -2} with no indication of saturation suggesting that ionization processes in the plasma are still active up to 15 J cm{sup -2} and production of multiple-charged ions are promoted. This dependence is mirrored in the proportion of ions with kinetic energies higher than 200 eV. This proportion is not significant around threshold fluence for all metals except for Al, which is already 20%. The unique features of Al are discussed in terms of the energy of laser photons (6.4 eV) that is enough to induce direct photoionization from the ground state only in the case of this metal.

  7. CO{sub 2} Laser Ablation Area Scaling And Redeposition On Flat Polyoxymethylene Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Sinko, John E.; Scharring, Stefan; Eckel, Hans-Albert; Tsukiyama, Yosuke; Umehara, Noritsugu; Ichihashi, Katsuhiro; Ogita, Naoya; Sasoh, Akihiro; Roeser, Hans-Peter

    2010-10-08

    One of the remaining unknown subjects of laser propulsion involves whether special benefits or challenges exist for applying laser ablation propulsion to targets with particularly large or small spot areas. This subject is of high importance for a wide range of topics ranging from laser removal of space debris to micropropulsion for laser propulsion vehicles. Analysis is complex since different ablation phenomena are dominant between atmosphere and vacuum conditions. Progress has also been impeded by the difficulty of setting control parameters (particularly fluence) constant while the spot area is adjusted. It is also usually difficult for one group to address small- and large-area effects using a single high-power laser system. Recent collaborative experiments on laser ablation area scaling at several institutions, using 100-J class and 10-J class CO{sub 2} lasers, have advanced the understanding of laser propulsion area scaling. The spot area-dependence of laser propulsion parameters has been investigated over an area range covering approximately 0.05-50 cm{sup 2} at low fluence of about 0.6 J/cm{sup 2}. The experiments were conducted well below the threshold for plasma formation, and provide an estimate of the ablation threshold for CO{sub 2} laser ablation of POM.

  8. Laser ablation and microstructuring of Si-containing polycarbonates and polyestercarbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, J.; Stebani, Juergen; Kunz, Thilo; Hahn, Christina; Lippert, Thomas; Wokaun, Alexander J.

    1999-09-01

    Si-containing polymers, which act as RIE-resists by generating a passivating SiO2 film on the polymer surfaces, are applied in microlithographic processes. New Si-containing polymers, i.e., Si-containing polycarbonates and polyestercarbonates have been synthesized. Various contents of Si (up to 30 wt%) were incorporated into the polymers. Thin films (about 100 micrometers thick) of the polymers were prepared for ablation and microstructuring at 308 nm. With a pinhole mask and a lens, a 10 X 10 matrix of circular craters was created on the polymer films. The fluence and number of pulses were varied for each crater. Ablation parameters (alpha) eff (effective absorption coefficient) and Fth (threshold fluence) were determined for each polymer. Using a reflecting objective (Schwarzschild type), microstructures with a sub-micron resolution can be produced on the polymer films. The quality of the ablated structures was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy. The incorporation of Si into polymers does not affect the ablation behavior of the polymers. Si-containing polyestercarbonates exhibited good ablation behavior, while surface swelling (incubation) was observed for polycarbonates films. The results from this work includes that Si-containing polyestercarbonates are suitable for laser ablation and microstructuring.

  9. Picosecond laser ablation of poly-L-lactide: Effect of crystallinity on the material response

    SciTech Connect

    Ortiz, Rocio; Quintana, Iban; Etxarri, Jon; Lejardi, Ainhoa; Sarasua, Jose-Ramon

    2011-11-01

    The picosecond laser ablation of poly-L-lactide (PLLA) as a function of laser fluence and degree of crystallinity was examined. The ablation parameters and the surface modifications were analyzed under various irradiation conditions using laser wavelengths ranging from the ultraviolet through the visible. When processing the amorphous PLLA, both energy threshold and topography varied considerably depending on laser wavelength. Laser irradiation showed a reduction in the energy ablation threshold as the degree of crystallinity increased, probably related to photomechanical effects involved in laser ablation with ultra-short pulses and the lower stress accommodation behavior of semicrystalline polymers. In particular, cooperative chain motions are impeded by the higher degree of crystallinity, showing fragile mechanical behavior and lower energy dissipation. The experimental results on ablation rate versus laser energy showed that UV laser ablation on semicrystalline PLLA was more efficient than the visible ablation, i.e., it exhibits higher etch rates over a wide range of pulse energy conditions. These results were interpreted in terms of photo-thermal and photo-chemical response of polymers as a function of material micro-structure and incident laser wavelength. High quality micro-grooves were produced in amorphous PLLA, reveling the potential of ultra-fast laser processing technique in the field of micro-structuring biocompatible and biodegradable polymers for biomedical applications.

  10. Effect of fluence and ambient environment on the surface and structural modification of femtosecond laser irradiated Ti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umm-i-Kalsoom; Shazia, Bashir; Nisar, Ali; M Shahid, Rafique; Wolfgang, Husinsky; Chandra, S. R. Nathala; Sergey, V. Makarov; Narjis, Begum

    2016-01-01

    Under certain conditions, ultrafast pulsed laser interaction with matter leads to the formation of self-organized conical as well as periodic surface structures (commonly reffered to as, laser induced periodic surface structures, LIPSS). The purpose of the present investigations is to explore the effect of fsec laser fluence and ambient environments (Vacuum & O2) on the formation of LIPSS and conical structures on the Ti surface. The surface morphology was investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The ablation threshold with single and multiple (N = 100) shots and the existence of an incubation effect was demonstrated by SEM investigations for both the vacuum and the O2 environment. The phase analysis and chemical composition of the exposed targets were performed by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS), respectively. SEM investigations reveal the formation of LIPSS (nano & micro). FFT d-spacing calculations illustrate the dependence of periodicity on the fluence and ambient environment. The periodicity of nano-scale LIPSS is higher in the case of irradiation under vacuum conditions as compared to O2. Furthermore, the O2 environment reduces the ablation threshold. XRD data reveal that for the O2 environment, new phases (oxides of Ti) are formed. EDS analysis exhibits that after irradiation under vacuum conditions, the percentage of impurity element (Al) is reduced. The irradiation in the O2 environment results in 15% atomic diffusion of oxygen. Project supported by Österreichische Forschungsfödergesellschaft (FFG) (Grant No. 834325).

  11. Molecular dynamics simulations of ablation and spallation of gold irradiated by femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demaske, Brian; Zhakhovsky, Vasily; Inogamov, Nail; Oleynik, Ivan

    2010-03-01

    The dynamics of material response to irradiation of thin gold foils by a femtosecond laser pulse is examined by molecular dynamics simulations. The major physical phenomena include ablation - the removal of material from irradiated surface and spallation - the ejection of a thin layer of material from the rear of the film. In order to reproduce the physical processes that occur under experimental conditions, we simulated 1 μm thick foils containing up to 170,000,000 atoms. Such thick foils are also needed to prevent the ablation and spallation zones from overlapping. In this presentation, we discuss the major physics of laser ablation and spallation observed in MD simulations: heating of a narrow region beneath the surface of the foil, its transformation to a metastable stress-confined state, and the rapid decomposition of this state into a strong rarefaction and compression wave. At some critical absorbed laser fluence, the rarefaction wave results in nucleation and growth of voids leading to ablation of the frontal surface. At higher absorbed fluences, the compression wave causes rear-side spallation of crystalline gold. Quantitative data such as the absorbed fluence thresholds, crater depths, and cavitation strength of gold are obtained from simulation and compared to experimental data.

  12. Evaluation of corneal ablation by an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) at 2.94 μm and an Er:YAG laser and comparison to ablation by a 193-nm excimer laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telfair, William B.; Hoffman, Hanna J.; Nordquist, Robert E.; Eiferman, Richard A.

    1998-06-01

    Purpose: This study first evaluated the corneal ablation characteristics of (1) an Nd:YAG pumped OPO (Optical Parametric Oscillator) at 2.94 microns and (2) a short pulse Er:YAG laser. Secondly, it compared the histopathology and surface quality of these ablations with (3) a 193 nm excimer laser. Finally, the healing characteristics over 4 months of cat eyes treated with the OPO were evaluated. Methods: Custom designed Nd:YAG/OPO and Er:YAG lasers were integrated with a new scanning delivery system to perform PRK myopic correction procedures. After initial ablation studies to determine ablation thresholds and rates, human cadaver eyes and in-vivo cat eyes were treated with (1) a 6.0 mm Dia, 30 micron deep PTK ablation and (2) a 6.0 mm Dia, -5.0 Diopter PRK ablation. Cadaver eyes were also treated with a 5.0 mm Dia, -5.0 Diopter LASIK ablation. Finally, cats were treated with the OPO in a 4 month healing study. Results: Ablation thresholds below 100 mJ/cm2 and ablation rates comparable to the excimer were demonstrated for both infrared systems. Light Microscopy (LM) showed no thermal damage for low fluence treatments, but noticeable thermal damage at higher fluences. SEM and TEM revealed morphologically similar surfaces for low fluence OPO and excimer samples with a smooth base and no evidence of collagen shrinkage. The Er:YAG and higher fluence OPO treated samples revealed more damage along with visible collagen coagulation and shrinkage in some cases. Healing was remarkably unremarkable. All eyes had a mild healing response with no stromal haze and showed topographic flattening. LM demonstrated nothing except a moderate increase in keratocyte activity in the upper third of the stroma. TEM confirmed this along with irregular basement membranes. Conclusions: A non- thermal ablation process called photospallation is demonstrated for the first time using short pulse infrared lasers yielding damage zones comparable to the excimer and healing which is also comparable to

  13. Selective ablation of sub- and supragingival calculus with a frequency-doubled Alexandrite laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rechmann, Peter; Hennig, Thomas

    1995-05-01

    In a preceding trial the absorption characteristics of subgingival calculus were calculated using fluorescence emission spectroscopy (excitation laser: N2-laser, wavelength 337 nm, pulse duration 4 ns). Subgingival calculus seems to contain chromophores absorbing in the ultraviolet spectral region up to 420 nm. The aim of the actual study was the ablation of sub- and supragingival calculus using a frequency doubled Alexandrite-laser (wavelength 377 nm, pulse duration 100 ns, repetition rate 110 Hz). Extracted human teeth presenting sub- and supragingival calculus were irradiated perpendicular to their axis with a laser fluence of 1 Jcm-2. Using a standard application protocol calculus was irradiated at the enamel surface, at the junction between enamel and root, and at the root surface (located on dentin or on cementum). During the irradiation procedure an effective water cooling-system was engaged. For light microscopical investigations undecalcified histological sections were prepared after treatment. The histological sections revealed that a selective and total removal of calculus is possible at all locations without ablation of healthy enamel, dentin or cementum. Even low fluences provide us with a high effectiveness for the ablation of calculus. Thus, based on different absorption characteristics and ablation thresholds, engaging a frequency doubled Alexandrite-laser a fast and, even more, a selective ablation of sub- and supragingival calculus is possible without adverse side effects to the surrounding tissues. Even more, microbial dental plaque can be perfectly removed.

  14. Fundamentals and applications of polymers designed for laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lippert, T.; Hauer, M.; Phipps, C. R.; Wokaun, A.

    The ablation characteristics of various polymers were studied at low and high fluences for an irradiation wavelength of 308 nm. The polymers can be divided into three groups, i.e. polymers containing triazene groups, designed ester groups, and reference polymers, such as polyimide. The polymers containing the photochemically most active group (triazene) exhibit the lowest thresholds of ablation (as low as 25 mJcm-2) and the highest etch rates (e.g. 250 nm/pulse at 100 mJcm-2), followed by the designed polyesters and then polyimide. Neither the linear nor the effective absorption coefficients have a clear influence on the ablation characteristics. The different behavior of polyimide might be explained by a pronounced thermal part in the ablation mechanism. The laser-induced decomposition of the designed polymers was studied by nanosecond interferometry and shadowgraphy. The etching of the triazene polymer starts and ends with the laser pulse, indicating photochemical ablation. Shadowgraphy reveals mainly gaseous products and a pronounced shockwave in air. The designed polymers were tested for an application as the polymer fuel in laser plasma thrusters.

  15. Improved performance of selective ablation using a specially designed handpiece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennig, Thomas; Rechmann, Peter

    1996-01-01

    Selective ablation is fixed to a range of fluences predicted by the ablation thresholds of infected and healthy tooth structures respectively. The aim of the study was to develop a dental handpiece, which guarantees homogeneous fluence at the irradiated tooth surface. Furthermore the point of treatment should be cooled down without energy losses due to the cooling system. We suggest the direct coupling of the laser radiation into a laminar stream of liquid, which may act in turn as a lengthened beam guide. The impacts of the laser radiation and of the cooling medium hit exactly the same point. Hot ablation debris is removed out of the crater by the flush of the water jet. While the surface of a bare fiber working on contact mode is destroyed after a few shots, it was shown that coupling the laser radiation into a stream of liquid prevents this destruction. Putting together the benefits of this special handpiece short overall treatment times seem to be possible. High average power can be applied to the tooth without the threat of thermal damage. Furthermore no time consuming cutting of the fiber prolongs the treatment time.

  16. A study of structure formation on PET, PBT, and PS surfaces by excimer laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jongdae

    Usually polymer surface treatment is performed to modify surface layers by inserting some functional group and/or by inducing roughness on surfaces to improve their wettability, printability, and adhesion to other polymers or metals. In this work, different polymer surfaces were treated using an excimer laser (LPX 240i, Lambda Physik). Polystyrene, polyethylene terephtalate, and polybutylene terephtalate were chosen as model materials for this study. Films were made by cast film processing and stretched with biaxial stretching machine. With excimer laser treatment on polymer surfaces, it was found that we could produce 1--2 micron size structures depending on material properties and film processing conditions. Materials with lower UV absorption coefficient produced double digit micron size structures, while those with higher UV absorption coefficients produced single digit micron size structures. In all these cases the structures formed only on stretched films. In addition to those microstructure developments, the determination of ablation threshold fluence was of interest mainly for understanding fundamentals of ablation behavior and technical applications. In this study, ablation thresholds were measured by various methods including ablation depth, ablation weight, and ablation sound level measurements. Among these methods, we confirmed that the measurement by ablation sound level gives the most reliable results, because this method is based on single pulse ablation. To understand the ablation phenomenon, and how microstructures can be developed during ablation, different material processing and excimer laser conditions were chosen for experimentation. During our experiments, we observed incubation phenomenon during laser ablation and showed that this incubation was significant for materials with low UV absorption coefficients. Based on UV absorption value change after excimer laser irradiation, we proposed a mechanism to explain the ablation of PS films. From

  17. Non-thermal effects on femtosecond laser ablation of polymers extracted from the oscillation of time-resolved reflectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Kumada, Takayuki Akagi, Hiroshi; Itakura, Ryuji; Otobe, Tomohito; Nishikino, Masaharu; Yokoyama, Atsushi

    2015-06-01

    The dynamics of femtosecond laser ablation of transparent polymers were examined using time-resolved reflectivity. When these polymers were irradiated by a pump pulse with fluence above the ablation threshold of 0.8–2.0 J/cm{sup 2}, we observed the oscillation of the reflectivity caused by the interference between the reflected probe pulses from the sample surface and the thin layer due to the non-thermal photomechanical effects of spallation. As the fluence of the pump pulse increased, the separation velocity of the thin layer increased from 6 km/s to the asymptotic value of 11 km/s. It is suggested that the velocities are determined by shock-wave velocities of the photo-excited layer.

  18. Single-shot front-side nanoscale femtosecond laser ablation of a thin silver film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilov, P. A.; Drozdova, E. A.; Ionin, A. A.; Kudryashov, S. I.; Odinokov, S. B.; Rudenko, A. A.; Yurovskikh, V. I.; Zayarny, D. A.

    2014-08-01

    Nano- and microscale holes, as well as related sub-ablative nanospikes and sub-micron bumps, were produced in a 30-nm thick silver film on a silica substrate by single femtosecond laser pulses with variable pulse energies, focused by different strong focusing optics. Characteristic laser energy deposition dimensions exceed the expected focal spots by nearly 2 microns, indicating the considerable lateral thermal transport in the film, while the effective hole formation thresholds decrease versus increasing numerical aperture of focusing optics. Morphologies of the sub-ablative solidified surface nanostructures and numerical estimates of deposited volume energy density undermine blowing-off the molten film due to subsurface boiling and near-critical phase explosion at lower and higher sub-threshold fluences, respectively.

  19. Characteristics of 308 nm excimer laser activated arterial tissue photoemission under ablative and non-ablative conditions.

    PubMed

    Laufer, G; Wollenek, G; Rüeckle, B; Buchelt, M; Kuckla, C; Ruatti, H; Buxbaum, P; Fasol, R; Zilla, P

    1989-01-01

    The present study was designed to assess the characteristics of tissue photoemission obtained from normal and atherosclerotic segments of human postmortem femoral arteries by 308 nm excimer laser irradiation of 60 ns pulsewidth. Three ablative (20, 30, and 40 mJ/pulse) and three non-ablative (2.5, 5, and 10 mJ/pulse) energy fluences were employed. Both the activating laser pulses and the induced photoemission were guided simultaneously over one and the same 1,000 micron core optical fiber that was positioned in direct tissue contact perpendicular to the vascular surface. The spectral lineshape of normal arterial and noncalcified atherosclerotic structures was characterized by a broad-continuum, double-peak emission of relevant intensity between wavelengths of 360 and 500 nm, with the most prominent emission in the range of 400-415 (407 nm peak) and 430-445 nm (437 nm peak). Fibrous and lipid atherosclerotic lesions, however, exhibited a significantly reduced intensity at 437 nm compared to normal artery layers (P less than 0.001), expressed as a 407/437 nm ratio of 1.321 +/- 0.075 for fibrous and 1.392 +/- 0.104 for lipid lesions. Normal artery components presented with approximately equal intensity at both emission peaks (407/437 nm ratio: intima, 1.054 +/- 0.033; media, 1.024 +/- 0.019; adventitia, 0.976 +/- 0.021). Comparison of spectral lineshape obtained under various energy fluences within a group of noncalcified tissues disclosed no substantial difference using the 407/437 nm ratio (P greater than 0.05). In contrast, calcified lesions revealed high-intensity multiple-line (397, 442, 461, and 528 nm) emission spectra under ablative energy fluences, whereas a low-intensity broad-continuum, single-peak spectrum resulted from irradiation beyond the ablation threshold. Thus, these findings suggest fluorescence phenomena for broad-continuum spectra, and plasma emission for multiple-line spectra as an underlying photodynamic process. Regardless of the activating

  20. On the correlation between the photoexcitation pathways and the critical energies required for ablation of poly(methyl methacrylate): A molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect

    Conforti, Patrick F.; Prasad, Manish; Garrison, Barbara J.

    2008-05-15

    The energetics initiating ablation in poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) are studied using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The critical energy to initiate ablation in PMMA following the absorption of photons is investigated for two penetration depths along a range of fluences using a coarse-grained, hybrid Monte Carlo-MD scheme. Both heating and direct bond scission are simulated separately after photon absorption with additional transformation of material occurring via chemical reactions following the photochemical bond cleavage. For a given type of absorption and reaction channel, a critical energy can well describe the amount of energy required to initiate ablation. The simulations show a decrease in the critical energy when a greater amount of photochemistry is introduced in the system. The simulations complement experimental studies and elucidate how enhanced photochemistry lowers ablation thresholds in polymer substrates.

  1. Early plume and shock wave dynamics in atmospheric-pressure ultraviolet-laser ablation of different matrix-assisted laser ablation matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, Thomas A.; Koch, Joachim; Guenther, Detlef; Zenobi, Renato

    2011-06-15

    Pulsed laser ablation of molecular solids is important for identification and quantification in (bio-)organic mass spectrometry, for example using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI). Recently, there has been a major shift to using MALDI and related laser ablation/post-ionization methods at atmospheric pressure. However, the underlying laser ablation processes, in particular early plume formation and expansion, are still poorly understood. Here, we present a study of the early ablation processes on the ns-time scale in atmospheric pressure UV-laser ablation of anthracene as well as of different common MALDI matrices such as 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (2,5-DHB), {alpha}-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid and sinapinic acid. Material release as well as the formation and expansion of hemi-spherical shock waves were studied by shadowgraphy with high temporal resolution ({approx}5 ns). The applicability of the classical Taylor-Sedov model for expansion of strong shock waves ('point-blast model'), as well as the drag force model, were evaluated to mathematically describe the observed shock wave propagation. The time- and energy-dependent expansion of the shock waves could be described using a Taylor-Sedov scaling law of the form R {proportional_to} t{sup q}, when a q-exponent of {approx}0.5 instead of the theoretical value of q 0.4 was found, indicating a faster expansion than expected. The deviations from the ideal value of q were attributed to the non-negligible influence of ambient pressure, a weak versus strong shock regime, and additional acceleration processes present in laser ablation that surpass the limit of the point-blast model. The onset of shock wave formation at a fluence of {approx}15-30 mJ/cm{sup 2} for the compounds investigated coincides with the onset of bulk material release, whereas, pure desorption below this fluence threshold did not lead to features visible in shadowgraphy.

  2. Imaging the ultrafast Kerr effect, free carrier generation, relaxation and ablation dynamics of Lithium Niobate irradiated with femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Lechuga, Mario Siegel, Jan Hernandez-Rueda, Javier; Solis, Javier

    2014-09-21

    The interaction of high-power single 130 femtosecond (fs) laser pulses with the surface of Lithium Niobate is experimentally investigated in this work. The use of fs-resolution time-resolved microscopy allows us to separately observe the instantaneous optical Kerr effect induced by the pulse and the generation of a free electron plasma. The maximum electron density is reached 550 fs after the peak of the Kerr effect, confirming the presence of a delayed carrier generation mechanism. We have also observed the appearance of transient Newton rings during the ablation process, related to optical interference of the probe beam reflected at the front and back surface of the ablating layer. Finally, we have analyzed the dynamics of the photorefractive effect on a much longer time scale by measuring the evolution of the transmittance of the irradiated area for different fluences below the ablation threshold.

  3. Laser-induced back-ablation of aluminum thin films using picosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    BULLOCK, A B

    1999-05-26

    Experiments were performed to understand laser-induced back-ablation of Al film targets with picosecond laser pulses. Al films deposited on the back surface of BK-7 substrates are ablated by picosecond laser pulses propagating into the Al film through the substrate. The ablated Al plume is transversely probed by a time-delayed, two-color sub-picoseond (500 fs) pulse, and this probe is then used to produce self-referencing interferograms and shadowgraphs of the Al plume in flight. Optical emission from the Al target due to LIBA is directed into a time-integrated grating spectrometer, and a time-integrating CCD camera records images of the Al plume emission. Ablated Al plumes are also redeposited on to receiving substrates. A post-experimental study of the Al target and recollected deposit characteristics was also done using optical microscopy, interferometry, and profilometry. In this high laser intensity regime, laser-induced substrate ionization and damage strongly limits transmitted laser fluence through the substrate above a threshold fluence. The threshold fluence for this ionization-based transmission limit in the substrate is dependent on the duration of the incident pulse. The substrate ionization can be used as a dynamic control of both transmitted spatial pulse profile and ablated Al plume shape. The efficiency of laser energy transfer between the laser pulse incident on the Al film and the ablated Al plume is estimated to be of order 5% and is a weak function of laser pulsewidth. The Al plume is highly directed. Low plume divergence ({theta}{sub divergence} < 5{sup o}) shows the ablated plume temperature to be very low at long time delays ( T << 0.5 eV at delays of 255 ns). Spectroscopic observations and calculations indicate that, in early time (t < 100 ps), the Al film region near the substrate/metal interface is at temperatures of order 0.5 eV. Interferograms of Al plumes produced with 0.1 {micro}m films show these plumes to be of high neutral atom

  4. Ablation performances in natural and synthetic quartz using an Infra Red femtosecond laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtieu, C.; D'Abzac, F.; Seydoux-Guillaume, A.; Guillaume, D.

    2009-12-01

    Performances of laser ablation have been widely explored, especially for industrial purposes. Nevertheless, some study fields remain unknown, notably the use of Infra-Red femtosecond pulses for the ablation of hard transparent materials. Thus, we present analytical results on quartz, which is the most widespread mineral in earth sciences, especially for fluid inclusions studies[1]. We used a commercial Ti:Sapphire femtosecond pulsed laser operated at its fundamental wavelength (λ=800nm). Ablation thresholds have been determined for N=1 and 10 consecutive shots (τ=60fs, E(pulse)=0.1-1mJ/pulse)[2]. Sequences from N=10 to 8000 shots (τ=60fs, E(pulse)=1mJ/pulse and f=5Hz) have been carried out with two different focusing optics: a convergent 50mm focusing lens and a 25mm focusing Cassegrain objective (wavefront corrected). Experiments have been realized on polished and unpolished single synthetic and natural (Campério, Swiss Alps) crystals, with a laser beam parallel and perpendicular to the quartz C-axis. Series of craters have then been observed with an optical microscope. Threshold fluence for a single shot is variable from Fth=1.1J.cm-2 (unpolished surface) to Fth=2.9J.cm-2 (polished surface). For N=10, threshold decreases to Fth=0.1J.cm-2 (unpolished surface) and Fth=1.76J.cm-2 (polished surface) respectively. When using lens, a constant ablation rate of ~0.5µm/pulse can be calculated until N=2000 shots. Crater stops developing after N=3000 shots. The maximum depth measured is 1342µm. Ablation pattern is different when using the Cassegrain objective. An initial ablation rate of ~0.5µm/pulse decreases following a logarithmic trend until a maximum crater depth of ~350µm (N=3000 shots). Orientation of the crystal lattice has shown no influence on ablation performances. Data bring evidences of capabilities of Infra Red femtosecond laser ablation, even in high IR-transmitting materials. High fluence regime is not required. Matter removal is not dependant on the

  5. Cleaning and characterization of objects of cultural value by laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilmes, Gabriel M.; Freisztav, Cesar; Schinca, Daniel; Orsetti, Alberto

    2005-06-01

    Surface ablation with nanosecond laser pulses was applied to preservation, cleaning and compositional identification of objects of cultural value. On one hand, treatments of fabrics, coins, bones, and other archeological objects are shown, as well as applications to the preservation of covers, front of books and old manuscripts made in rag paper. Damage fluence thresholds for 17 different XIXth century types of papers, made by processing textiles, were determined. On the other hand, we use the spectroscopic analysis of the plasma generated as a result of laser ablation (LIBS- laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy-) for the determination of the elementary composition of unique pieces in anthropology and archaeology. In particular, we show applications to the identification of trace elements in Hominide teeth, of interest concerning the analysis of eating habits. We also apply LIBS to the determination of the composition of acheological objects belonging to different pre-Columbian cultures.

  6. Ultrashort laser ablation of bulk copper targets: Dynamics and size distribution of the generated nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Tsakiris, N.; Gill-Comeau, M.; Lewis, L. J.; Anoop, K. K.; Ausanio, G.; Bruzzese, R.; Amoruso, S.

    2014-06-28

    We address the role of laser pulse fluence on expansion dynamics and size distribution of the nanoparticles produced by irradiating a metallic target with an ultrashort laser pulse in a vacuum, an issue for which contrasting indications are present in the literature. To this end, we have carried out a combined theoretical and experimental analysis of laser ablation of a bulk copper target with ≈50 fs, 800 nm pulses, in an interval of laser fluencies going from few to several times the ablation threshold. On one side, molecular dynamics simulations, with two-temperature model, describe the decomposition of the material through the analysis of the evolution of thermodynamic trajectories in the material phase diagram, and allow estimating the size distribution of the generated nano-aggregates. On the other side, atomic force microscopy of less than one layer nanoparticles deposits on witness plates, and fast imaging of the nanoparticles broadband optical emission provide the corresponding experimental characterization. Both experimental and numerical findings agree on a size distribution characterized by a significant fraction (≈90%) of small nanoparticles, and a residual part (≈10%) spanning over a rather large size interval, evidencing a weak dependence of the nanoparticles sizes on the laser pulse fluence. Numerical and experimental findings show a good degree of consistency, thus suggesting that modeling can realistically support the search for experimental methods leading to an improved control over the generation of nanoparticles by ultrashort laser ablation.

  7. New interplanetary proton fluence model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feynman, Joan; Armstrong, T. P.; Dao-Gibner, L.; Silverman, S.

    1990-01-01

    A new predictive engineering model for the interplanetary fluence of protons with above 10 MeV and above 30 MeV is described. The data set used is a combination of observations made from the earth's surface and from above the atmosphere between 1956 and 1963 and observations made from spacecraft in the vicinity of earth between 1963 and 1985. The data cover a time period three times as long as the period used in earlier models. With the use of this data set the distinction between 'ordinary proton events' and 'anomalously large events' made in earlier work disappears. This permitted the use of statistical analysis methods developed for 'ordinary events' on the entire data set. The greater than 10 MeV fluences at 1 AU calculated with the new model are about twice those expected on the basis of models now in use. At energies above 30 MeV, the old and new models agree. In contrast to earlier models, the results do not depend critically on the fluence from any one event and are independent of sunspot number. Mission probability curves derived from the fluence distribution are presented.

  8. Excimer Laser Ablation of Egg Tempera Paints and Varnishes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morais, P. J.; Bordalo, R.; Santos, L. dos; Marques, S. F.; Salgueiredo, E.; Gouveia, H.

    In this work a series of egg tempera paint and varnish systems have been prepared, artificially aged and irradiated with KrF excimer laser at a wavelength of 248 nm. The samples were prepared with pure pigments and selected mixtures. It was found that, for some pigments, the colour changed upon laser irradiation even at low energy densities, below the ablation threshold while for other inorganic pigmented egg temperas the degree of discoloration is very small at moderate fluence of ˜0.30 J cm?2. The varnish systems did not present signs of discoloration. The thickness, superficial roughness and magnitude of the colour changes of the samples were measured. X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and UV/visible spectroscopy were used in order to investigate the changes induced by the KrF excimer laser radiation.

  9. On the physics of self-organized nanostructure formation upon femtosecond laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reif, Juergen; Varlamova, Olga; Uhlig, Sebastian; Varlamov, Sergej; Bestehorn, Michael

    2014-10-01

    We present new results on femtosecond LIPSS on silicon, fostering the dynamic model of self-organized structure formation. The first set of experiments demonstrates LIPSS formation by irradiation with a femtosecond white light continuum. The ripples are, as usual, perpendicular to the light polarization with a fluence-dependent wavelength between 500 and 700 nm. At higher dose (fluence × number of shots), the LIPSS turn to much coarser structures. The second set of experiments displays the dose dependence of pattern evolution at about threshold fluence. In contrast to the general case of multi-pulse LIPSS, where a strong dependence of the structures on the laser polarization is observed, single-shot exposition of silicon at about the ablation threshold results in a concentric pattern of very regular sub-wavelength ripples following the oval shape of the irradiated spot, without any reference to the laser polarization. When increasing the number of pulses, the usual, typical ripples develop and then coalesce into broader perpendicular structures, interlaced with remnants of the first, finer ripples.

  10. Ablation enhancement of silicon by ultrashort double-pulse laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Xin; Shin, Yung C.

    2014-09-15

    In this study, the ultrashort double-pulse ablation of silicon is investigated. An atomistic simulation model is developed to analyze the underlying physics. It is revealed that the double-pulse ablation could significantly increase the ablation rate of silicon, compared with the single pulse ablation with the same total pulse energy, which is totally different from the case of metals. In the long pulse delay range (over 1 ps), the enhancement is caused by the metallic transition of melted silicon with the corresponding absorption efficiency. At ultrashort pulse delay (below 1 ps), the enhancement is due to the electron excitation by the first pulse. The enhancement only occurs at low and moderate laser fluence. The ablation is suppressed at high fluence due to the strong plasma shielding effect.

  11. Femtosecond laser for cavity preparation in enamel and dentin: ablation efficiency related factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H.; Li, H.; Sun, Yc.; Wang, Y.; Lü, Pj.

    2016-02-01

    To study the effects of laser fluence (laser energy density), scanning line spacing and ablation depth on the efficiency of a femtosecond laser for three-dimensional ablation of enamel and dentin. A diode-pumped, thin-disk femtosecond laser (wavelength 1025 nm, pulse width 400 fs) was used for the ablation of enamel and dentin. The laser spot was guided in a series of overlapping parallel lines on enamel and dentin surfaces to form a three-dimensional cavity. The depth and volume of the ablated cavity was then measured under a 3D measurement microscope to determine the ablation efficiency. Different values of fluence, scanning line spacing and ablation depth were used to assess the effects of each variable on ablation efficiency. Ablation efficiencies for enamel and dentin were maximized at different laser fluences and number of scanning lines and decreased with increases in laser fluence or with increases in scanning line spacing beyond spot diameter or with increases in ablation depth. Laser fluence, scanning line spacing and ablation depth all significantly affected femtosecond laser ablation efficiency. Use of a reasonable control for each of these parameters will improve future clinical application.

  12. Femtosecond laser for cavity preparation in enamel and dentin: ablation efficiency related factors

    PubMed Central

    Chen, H.; Li, H.; Sun, YC.; Wang, Y.; Lü, PJ.

    2016-01-01

    To study the effects of laser fluence (laser energy density), scanning line spacing and ablation depth on the efficiency of a femtosecond laser for three-dimensional ablation of enamel and dentin. A diode-pumped, thin-disk femtosecond laser (wavelength 1025 nm, pulse width 400 fs) was used for the ablation of enamel and dentin. The laser spot was guided in a series of overlapping parallel lines on enamel and dentin surfaces to form a three-dimensional cavity. The depth and volume of the ablated cavity was then measured under a 3D measurement microscope to determine the ablation efficiency. Different values of fluence, scanning line spacing and ablation depth were used to assess the effects of each variable on ablation efficiency. Ablation efficiencies for enamel and dentin were maximized at different laser fluences and number of scanning lines and decreased with increases in laser fluence or with increases in scanning line spacing beyond spot diameter or with increases in ablation depth. Laser fluence, scanning line spacing and ablation depth all significantly affected femtosecond laser ablation efficiency. Use of a reasonable control for each of these parameters will improve future clinical application. PMID:26864679

  13. Femtosecond laser ablation of enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Quang-Tri; Bertrand, Caroline; Vilar, Rui

    2016-06-01

    The surface topographical, compositional, and structural modifications induced in human enamel by femtosecond laser ablation is studied. The laser treatments were performed using a Yb:KYW chirped-pulse-regenerative amplification laser system (560 fs and 1030 nm) and fluences up to 14 J/cm2. The ablation surfaces were studied by scanning electron microscopy, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, and micro-Raman spectroscopy. Regardless of the fluence, the ablation surfaces were covered by a layer of resolidified material, indicating that ablation is accompanied by melting of hydroxyapatite. This layer presented pores and exploded gas bubbles, created by the release of gaseous decomposition products of hydroxyapatite (CO2 and H2O) within the liquid phase. In the specimen treated with 1-kHz repetition frequency and 14 J/cm2, thickness of the resolidified material is in the range of 300 to 900 nm. The micro-Raman analysis revealed that the resolidified material contains amorphous calcium phosphate, while grazing incidence x-ray diffraction analysis allowed detecting traces of a calcium phosphate other than hydroxyapatite, probably β-tricalcium phosphate Ca3), at the surface of this specimen. The present results show that the ablation of enamel involves melting of enamel's hydroxyapatite, but the thickness of the altered layer is very small and thermal damage of the remaining material is negligible.

  14. Intraocular tissue ablation using an optical fibre to deliver the 5th harmonic of a Nd:YAG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Joseph; Yu, Xiaobo; Yu, Paula K.; Cringle, Stephen J.; Yu, Dao-Yi

    2009-02-01

    We report the evaluation of a system which delivers the 5th harmonic of an Nd:YAG (213nm) via optical fibre to ocular tissue sites. The 213nm beam is concentrated, using a hollow glass taper, prior to launch into 200 μm or 600 μm core diameter silica/silica optical fibre. The fibre tip was tapered to enhance the fluence delivered. An operating window of fluence values that could be delivered via 330 - 1100mm lengths of optical fibre was determined. The lower value of 0.2J/cm2 determined by the ablation threshold of the tissue and the upper value of 1.3J/cm2 by the launch, transmission and tip characteristics of the optical fibre. The fluence output decreased as a function of both transmitted pulse energy and number of pulses transmitted. Fresh retinal tissue was cleanly ablated with minimal damage to the surrounding tissue. Lesions were generated using 1, 3 and 10 pulses with fluences from 0.2 to 1.0J/cm2. The lesion depth demonstrated clear dose dependence. Lesions generated in ex vivo preparations of human trabecular meshwork in a fluid environment also demonstrated dose dependence, 50 pulses being sufficient to create a hole within the trabecular meshwork extending to Schlemm's canal. The dose dependence of the ablation depth combined with the ability of this technique to create a conduit through to Schlemm's canal demonstrates the potential of this technique for ophthalmological applications requiring precise and controlled intraocular tissue removal and has potential applications in the treatment and management of glaucoma.

  15. Low electron temperature in ablating materials formed by picosecond soft x-ray laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishino, Masahiko; Hasegawa, Noboru; Nishikino, Masaharu; Pikuz, Tatiana; Skobelev, Igor; Faenov, Anatoly; Inogamov, Nail; Kawachi, Tetsuya; Yamagiwa, Mitsuru

    2015-09-01

    To study the ablation process induced by the soft x-ray laser pulse, we investigated the electron temperature of the ablating material. Focused soft x-ray laser pulses having a wavelength of 13.9 nm and duration of 7 ps were irradiated onto the LiF, Al, and Cu surfaces, and we observed the optical emission from the surfaces by use of an optical camera. On sample surfaces, we could confirm damage structures, but no emission signal in the visible spectral range during ablation could be observed. Then, we estimated the electron temperature in the ablating matter. To consider the radiation from a heated layer, we supposed a black-body radiator as an object. The calculation result was that the electron temperature was estimated to be lower than 1 eV and the process duration was shorter than 1000 ps. The theoretical model calculation suggests the spallative ablation for the interaction between the soft x-ray laser and materials. The driving force for the spallation is an increasing pressure appearing in the heated layer, and the change of the surface is considered to be due to a splash of a molten layer. The model calculation predicts that the soft x-ray laser with the fluence around the ablation threshold can create an electron temperature around 1 eV in a material. The experimental result is in good accordance with the theoretical prediction. Our investigation implies that the spallative ablation occurs in the low electron temperature region of a non-equilibrium state of warm dense matter.

  16. Particle Test Fluence: What's the Right Number?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.

    2016-01-01

    While we have been utilizing standard fluence levels such as those listed in the JESD57 document, we have begun revisiting what an appropriate test fluence is when it comes to qualifying a device for single events. Instead of a fixed fluence level or until a specific number of events occurs, a different thought process is required.

  17. The effect of ultrafast laser wavelength on ablation properties and implications on sample introduction in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    LaHaye, N. L.; Harilal, S. S.; Diwakar, P. K.; Hassanein, A.; Kulkarni, P.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the role of femtosecond (fs) laser wavelength on laser ablation (LA) and its relation to laser generated aerosol counts and particle distribution, inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) signal intensity, detection limits, and elemental fractionation. Four different NIST standard reference materials (610, 613, 615, and 616) were ablated using 400 nm and 800 nm fs laser pulses to study the effect of wavelength on laser ablation rate, accuracy, precision, and fractionation. Our results show that the detection limits are lower for 400 nm laser excitation than 800 nm laser excitation at lower laser energies but approximately equal at higher energies. Ablation threshold was also found to be lower for 400 nm than 800 nm laser excitation. Particle size distributions are very similar for 400 nm and 800 nm wavelengths; however, they differ significantly in counts at similar laser fluence levels. This study concludes that 400 nm LA is more beneficial for sample introduction in ICP-MS, particularly when lower laser energies are to be used for ablation. PMID:26640294

  18. The effect of ultrafast laser wavelength on ablation properties and implications on sample introduction in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    LaHaye, N. L.; Harilal, S. S.; Diwakar, P. K.; Hassanein, A.; Kulkarni, P.

    2013-07-14

    We investigated the role of femtosecond (fs) laser wavelength on laser ablation (LA) and its relation to laser generated aerosol counts and particle distribution, inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) signal intensity, detection limits, and elemental fractionation. Four different NIST standard reference materials (610, 613, 615, and 616) were ablated using 400 nm and 800 nm fs laser pulses to study the effect of wavelength on laser ablation rate, accuracy, precision, and fractionation. Our results show that the detection limits are lower for 400 nm laser excitation than 800 nm laser excitation at lower laser energies but approximately equal at higher energies. Ablation threshold was also found to be lower for 400 nm than 800 nm laser excitation. Particle size distributions are very similar for 400 nm and 800 nm wavelengths; however, they differ significantly in counts at similar laser fluence levels. This study concludes that 400 nm LA is more beneficial for sample introduction in ICP-MS, particularly when lower laser energies are to be used for ablation.

  19. Characterization of UV laser ablation for microprocessing of a-Si:H thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molpeceres, C.; Lauzurica, S.; Ocaña, J. L.; Gandía, J. J.; Urbina, L.; Cárabe, J.; Villar, F.; Escarré, J.; Bertomeu, J.; Andreu, J.

    2006-04-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon has been widely studied last years, both from the basic research and industrial points of view, due to the important set of potential applications that this material offers, ranging from Thin Films Transistors (TFTs) to solar cells technologies. In different fabrication steps of a-Si:H based devices, laser sources have been used as appropriate tools for cutting, crystallising, contacting, patterning, etc., and more recent research lines are undertaking the problem of a-Si:H selective laser ablation for different applications. The controlled ablation of photovoltaic materials with minimum debris and small heat affected zone with low processing costs, is one of the main difficulties for the successful implementation of laser micromachining as competitive technology in this field. This work presents a detailed study of a-Si:H laser ablation in the ns regime. Ablation curves are measured and fluence thresholds are determined. Additionally, and due to the improved performance in optolectronic properties associated to the nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si:H), some samples of this material have been also studied.

  20. Production of microstructures in wide-band-gap and organic materials using pulsed laser ablation at 157 nm wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haehnel, Falk; Bertram, Rene; Reisse, Guenter; Boettcher, Rene; Weissmantel, Steffen

    2010-11-01

    New results on three-dimensional microstructuring of fused silica, sapphire, calcium fluoride, magnesium fluoride, and PTFE using pulsed laser ablation at 157 nm wavelength are presented. A largely automated high-precision fluorine laser micromachining station was used for the investigations. In some fundamental investigations, threshold fluences of 0.9 J/cm2 for fused silica, 0.6 J/cm2 for sapphire, 1.7 J/cm2 for calcium fluoride, and of 0.05 J/cm2 for PTFE have been determined. The ablation rates at 3 J/cm2 fluence were 60 to 100 nm/pulse for the inorganic insulators and 450 nm/pulse for PTFE. In the second part of the paper, it is shown that on the basis of the knowledge of the ablation rates and the laser beam parameters, bores of a few µm size and complex 3D microstructures with a variety of geometries can be produced in the surface of these materials. Thereby, no cracking occurs if proper parameters are used.

  1. Electron dynamics and prompt ablation of aluminum surface excited by intense femtosecond laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionin, A. A.; Kudryashov, S. I.; Makarov, S. V.; Seleznev, L. V.; Sinitsyn, D. V.

    2014-12-01

    Thin aluminum film homogeneously heated by intense IR femtosecond laser pulses exhibits on the excitation timescale consequent fluence-dependent rise and drop of the IR-pump self-reflectivity, followed by its final saturation at higher fluences F > 0.3 J/cm2. This prompt optical dynamics correlates with the initial monotonic increase in the accompanying laser-induced electron emission, which is succeeded by its non-linear (three-photon) increase for F > 0.3 J/cm2. The underlying electronic dynamics is related to the initial saturation of IR resonant interband transitions in this material, followed by its strong instantaneous electronic heating via intraband transitions during the pump pulse resulting in thermionic emission. Above the threshold fluence of 0.3 J/cm2, the surface electronic heating is balanced during the pump pulse by simultaneous cooling via intense plasma removal (prompt ablation). The relationship between the deposited volume energy density in the film and its prompt electronic temperature derived from the self-reflection measurements using a Drude model, demonstrates a kind of electron "liquid-vapor" phase transition, driven by strong cubic optical non-linearity of the photo-excited aluminum.

  2. IR laser ablation of doped poly(methyl methacrylate)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaspard, S.; Oujja, M.; Rebollar, E.; Walczak, M.; Díaz, L.; Santos, M.; Castillejo, M.

    2007-05-01

    We investigate the TEA CO 2 laser ablation of films of poly(methyl methacrylate), PMMA, with average MW 2.5, 120 and 996 kDa doped with photosensitive compounds iodo-naphthalene (NapI) and iodo-phenanthrene (PhenI) by examining the induced morphological and physicochemical modifications. The films casted on CaF 2 substrates were irradiated with a pulsed CO 2 laser (10P(20) line at 10.59 μm) in resonance with vibrational modes of PMMA and of the dopants at fluences up to 6 J/cm 2. Laser induced fluorescence probing of photoproducts in a pump and probe configuration is carried out at 266 nm. Formation of naphthalene (NapH) and phenanthrene (PhenH) is observed in NapI and PhenI doped PMMA, respectively, with relatively higher yields in high MW polymer, in similarity with results obtained previously upon irradiation in the UV at 248 nm. Above threshold, formation of photoproducts is nearly complete after 200 ms. As established via optical microscopy, bubbles are formed in the irradiated areas with sizes that depend on polymer MW and filaments are observed to be ejected out of the irradiated volume in the samples made with high MW polymer. The implications of these results for the mechanisms of polymer IR laser ablation are discussed and compared with UV range studies.

  3. Laser ablation of human tooth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franklin, Sushmita R.; Chauhan, P.; Mitra, A.; Thareja, R. K.

    2005-05-01

    We report the measurements of ablation threshold of human tooth in air using photo-thermal deflection technique. A third harmonic (355nm) of Nd:YAG (yttrium aluminum garnet) laser was used for irradiation and a low power helium neon laser as a probe beam. The experimental observations of ablation threshold in conjunction with theoretical model based on heat conduction equations for simulating the interaction of a laser radiation with a calcified tissue are used to estimate the absorption coefficient of human tooth.

  4. Ablative system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, V. H. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A carrier liquid containing ablative material bodies is connected to a plenum chamber wall with openings to a high temperature environment. The liquid and bodies pass through the openings of the wall to form a self replacing ablative surface. The wall is composed of honeycomb layers, spheres containing ablative whiskers or wads, and a hardening catalyst for the carrier liquid. The wall also has woven wicks of ablative material fibers that extend through the wall openings and into plenum chamber which contains the liquid.

  5. Structuring by field enhancement of glass, Ag, Au, and Co thin films using short pulse laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulmeanu, M.; Zamfirescu, M.; Rusen, L.; Luculescu, C.; Moldovan, A.; Stratan, A.; Dabu, R.

    2009-12-01

    Single pulse laser ablation of glass, Ag, Au, and Co thin films was experimentally investigated with a laser pulse width of 400 ps at a wavelength of 532 nm both in the far and near fields. In the far-field regime, the electromagnetic field results from a focused laser beam, while the near-field regime is realized by a combination of the focused laser beam incident on a spherical colloidal particle. For the near-field experiments we have used polystyrene colloidal particles of 700 nm diameter self-assembled or spin coated on top of the surfaces. Laser fluences applied are in the range of 0.01-10 J/cm2. The diameter and the morphologies of the ablated holes were investigated by optical microscopy, profilometry, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. The dependence of the shape of the holes reflects the fluence regime and the thermophysical properties, i.e., melting temperature and thermal diffusivity of the surfaces involved in the experiments. We give quantitative data about the fluence threshold, diameter, and depth ablation dependence for the far and near fields and discuss their values with respect to the enhancement factor of the intensity of the electromagnetic field due to the use of the colloidal particles. Theoretical estimations of the intensity enhancement were done using the finite-difference time-domain method by using the RSOFT software. The application of near fields allows structuring of the surfaces with structure dimension in the order of 100 nm and even below.

  6. Structuring by field enhancement of glass, Ag, Au, and Co thin films using short pulse laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Ulmeanu, M.; Zamfirescu, M.; Rusen, L.; Luculescu, C.; Moldovan, A.; Stratan, A.; Dabu, R.

    2009-12-01

    Single pulse laser ablation of glass, Ag, Au, and Co thin films was experimentally investigated with a laser pulse width of 400 ps at a wavelength of 532 nm both in the far and near fields. In the far-field regime, the electromagnetic field results from a focused laser beam, while the near-field regime is realized by a combination of the focused laser beam incident on a spherical colloidal particle. For the near-field experiments we have used polystyrene colloidal particles of 700 nm diameter self-assembled or spin coated on top of the surfaces. Laser fluences applied are in the range of 0.01-10 J/cm{sup 2}. The diameter and the morphologies of the ablated holes were investigated by optical microscopy, profilometry, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. The dependence of the shape of the holes reflects the fluence regime and the thermophysical properties, i.e., melting temperature and thermal diffusivity of the surfaces involved in the experiments. We give quantitative data about the fluence threshold, diameter, and depth ablation dependence for the far and near fields and discuss their values with respect to the enhancement factor of the intensity of the electromagnetic field due to the use of the colloidal particles. Theoretical estimations of the intensity enhancement were done using the finite-difference time-domain method by using the RSOFT software. The application of near fields allows structuring of the surfaces with structure dimension in the order of 100 nm and even below.

  7. Quantitative Photoacoustic Image Reconstruction using Fluence Dependent Chromophores

    PubMed Central

    Cox, B.T.; Laufer, J.G.; Beard, P.C.

    2010-01-01

    In biomedical photoacoustic imaging the images are proportional to the absorbed optical energy density, and not the optical absorption, which makes it difficult to obtain a quantitatively accurate image showing the concentration of a particular absorbing chromophore from photoacoustic measurements alone. Here it is shown that the spatially varying concentration of a chromophore whose absorption becomes zero above a threshold light fluence can be estimated from photoacoustic images obtained at increasing illumination strengths. This technique provides an alternative to model-based multiwavelength approaches to quantitative photoacoustic imaging, and a new approach to photoacoustic molecular and functional imaging. PMID:21258458

  8. Experimental study on 785 nm femtosecond laser ablation of sapphire in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaheen, M. E.; Gagnon, J. E.; Fryer, B. J.

    2015-06-01

    Changes in surface morphology and ablation rate induced on sapphire were investigated after interaction with femtosecond laser pulses in air at variable fluence (2 to 77 J cm-2) and repetition rate (10 to 1000 Hz). Multiple laser pulses at a wavelength of 785 nm and pulse width of 130 fs were fired at the surface of sapphire to produce craters whose depth, size and morphology were evaluated using optical and scanning electron microscopy. Ablation rate was found to depend on laser fluence, number of laser pulses and repetition rate. A rapid increase in ablation rate with fluence was observed for fluences lower than 5.9 J cm-2, followed by a slow increase up to fluence of 40.7 J cm-2. A drop in ablation rate occurred at fluence greater than 40.7 J cm-2. Craters produced at high repetition rate (1000 Hz) at fluence of 11.8 J cm-2 were deeper than those produced at low repetition rate (10 Hz) during the first 40 to 50 pulses. The situation was reversed for craters produced by greater than 50 laser pulses. The drop in ablation rate observed at high fluence and repetition rate can be attributed to attenuation of the laser energy due to plasma and particle shielding that result from interactions with the laser-generated particles that cannot be completely removed from the ablated crater. Defocusing effects associated with the non-equilibrium ionization of air which causes a divergence to the laser beam and consequently a reduction in the laser intensity at the sample surface can be another reason for the observed drop in the ablation rate at high fluence.

  9. Femtosecond laser ablation of bovine cortical bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cangueiro, Liliana T.; Vilar, Rui; Botelho do Rego, Ana M.; Muralha, Vania S. F.

    2012-12-01

    We study the surface topographical, structural, and compositional modifications induced in bovine cortical bone by femtosecond laser ablation. The tests are performed in air, with a Yb:KYW chirped-pulse-regenerative amplification laser system (500 fs, 1030 nm) at fluences ranging from 0.55 to 2.24 J/cm2. The ablation process is monitored by acoustic emission measurements. The topography of the laser-treated surfaces is studied by scanning electron microscopy, and their constitution is characterized by glancing incidence x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The results show that femtosecond laser ablation allows removing bone without melting, carbonization, or cracking. The structure and composition of the remaining tissue are essentially preserved, the only constitutional changes observed being a reduction of the organic material content and a partial recrystallization of hydroxyapatite in the most superficial region of samples. The results suggest that, within this fluence range, ablation occurs by a combination of thermal and electrostatic mechanisms, with the first type of mechanism predominating at lower fluences. The associated thermal effects explain the constitutional changes observed. We show that femtosecond lasers are a promising tool for delicate orthopaedic surgeries, where small amounts of bone must be cut with negligible damage, thus minimizing surgical trauma.

  10. Optical Effects on Laser Ablated Polymer Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhu, R. D.; Govinthasamy, R.; Murthy, N. S.

    2006-03-01

    Laser ablation of poly (ethylene terephthalate) and polyimide films were investigated using Excimer-UV laser. SEM analyses indicate the presence of rings for a wide range of ablation parameters (fluence, frequency and number of pulses). It is proposed that the particles present in the plasma plume could cause the incident laser light to diffract, similar to the optical effects observed in the femtosecond laser ablation of solids. The polymer surface provides a perfect medium to register the optical signatures as seen in the SEM images. The fringe-spacings observed in the images are compared with the theoretical diffraction patterns and the height of the plasma particles above the surface is estimated using an optimization scheme. The results of the analysis are consistent with experimentally observed dynamics of the plasma plume. It is proposed that such optical effects could be a routine feature in the laser ablation of polymers. The significance of such artifacts for lithography is discussed.

  11. Dynamics of femtosecond laser absorption of fused silica in the ablation regime

    SciTech Connect

    Lebugle, M. Sanner, N.; Varkentina, N.; Sentis, M.; Utéza, O.

    2014-08-14

    We investigate the ultrafast absorption dynamics of fused silica irradiated by a single 500 fs laser pulse in the context of micromachining applications. A 60-fs-resolution pump-probe experiment that measures the reflectivity and transmissivity of the target under excitation is developed to reveal the evolution of plasma absorption. Above the ablation threshold, an overcritical plasma with highly non-equilibrium conditions is evidenced in a thin layer at the surface. The maximum electron density is reached at a delay of 0.5 ps after the peak of the pump pulse, which is a strong indication of the occurrence of electronic avalanche. The results are further analyzed to determine the actual feedback of the evolution of the optical properties of the material on the pump pulse. We introduce an important new quantity, namely, the duration of absorption of the laser by the created plasma, corresponding to the actual timespan of laser absorption by inverse Bremsstrahlung. Our results indicate an increasing contribution of plasma absorption to the total material absorption upon raising the excitation fluence above the ablation threshold. The role of transient optical properties during the energy deposition stage is characterized and our results emphasize the necessity to take it into account for better understanding and control of femtosecond laser-dielectrics interaction.

  12. Endometrial ablation

    MedlinePlus

    ... can be seen on the video screen. Small tools can be used through the scope to remove abnormal growths or tissue for examination. Ablation uses heat, cold, or electricity to destroy the lining of the womb. The ...

  13. Laser ablation characteristics of yttria-doped zirconia in the nanosecond and femtosecond regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiroth, S.; Koch, J.; Lippert, T.; Wokaun, A.; Günther, D.; Garrelie, F.; Guillermin, M.

    2010-01-01

    The laser ablation characteristics of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) have been investigated as a function of the target microstructure and dopant level for different nanosecond- [ArF, KrF, and XeCl excimers; Nd:YAG (yttrium aluminum garnet) (fourth harmonic)] and femtosecond-laser sources [Ti:sapphire (fundamental and third harmonic)]. Particle ejection, which compromises the quality of coatings prepared by pulsed laser deposition (PLD), was analyzed in detail. Nanosecond-laser pulses cause a severe thermomechanical surface cracking and exfoliation of micron-sized fragments on a microsecond to millisecond time scale in the case of 8-9.5 mol % Y2O3-doped, fully stabilized zirconia (8YSZ and 9.5YSZ) targets. As a consequence of the intrinsic material brittleness, fully stabilized YSZ coatings deposited by PLD contained particles for all tested conditions. Lower doped partially stabilized zirconia (3YSZ) exhibits a superior fracture toughness attributed to a laser-induced partial transition to the monoclinic phase, detected by Raman spectroscopy, which enables the deposition of particle-free dense thin films by conventional PLD using nanosecond-UV laser radiation at moderate fluences of 1.2-1.5 J/cm2. The ablation dynamics of ultrashort laser pulses differ fundamentally from the nanosecond regime as evidenced, e.g., by time-resolved shadowgraphy and light scattering experiments. Femtosecond pulses prevent the exfoliation of micron-sized fragments but result invariably in a pronounced ejection of submicron particles. The resulting PLD coatings are porous and reveal a large surface roughness as they consist of an agglomeration of nanoparticles. Femtosecond-NIR pulses provide a factor of 2.5-10 higher material removal rates compared to nanosecond- and femtosecond-UV pulses. The ablation metrics, i.e., threshold fluence and effective absorptivity, mainly depend on the laser wavelength while the pulse duration, target microstructure, and dopant level are of minor

  14. Ablation article and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, W. D.; Sullivan, E. M. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An ablation article, such as a conical heat shield, having an ablating surface is provided with at least one discrete area of at least one seed material, such as aluminum. When subjected to ablation conditions, the seed material is ablated. Radiation emanating from the ablated seed material is detected to analyze ablation effects without disturbing the ablation surface. By providing different seed materials having different radiation characteristics, the ablating effects on various areas of the ablating surface can be analyzed under any prevailing ablation conditions. The ablating article can be provided with means for detecting the radiation characteristics of the ablated seed material to provide a self-contained analysis unit.

  15. Threshold Doses for Focal Liver Reaction After Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiation Therapy for Small Hepatocellular Carcinoma Depend on Liver Function: Evaluation on Magnetic Resonance Imaging With Gd-EOB-DTPA

    SciTech Connect

    Sanuki, Naoko; Takeda, Atsuya; Oku, Yohei; Eriguchi, Takahisa; Nishimura, Shuichi; Aoki, Yosuke; Mizuno, Tomikazu; Iwabuchi, Shogo; Kunieda, Etsuo

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: Focal liver reaction (FLR) appears on radiographic images after stereotactic ablative body radiation therapy (SABR) in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and chronic liver disease. We investigated the threshold dose (TD) of FLR and possible factors affecting the TD on gadoxetate acid (Gd-EOB-DTPA)-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods and Materials: In 50 patients who were treated with SABR for small HCC and followed up by MRI for >6 months, FLR, seen as a hypointense area, was evaluated on the hepatobiliary phase of Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI. The follow-up MRI with the largest extent of FLR was fused to the planning computed tomography (CT) image, and patients with good image fusion concordance were eligible. After delineating the border of the FLR manually, a dose–volume histogram was used to identify the TD for the FLR. Clinical and volumetric factors were analyzed for correlation with the TD. Results: A total of 45 patients were eligible for analysis with a median image fusion concordance of 84.9% (range, 71.6-95.4%). The median duration between SABR and subsequent hepatobiliary phase MRI with the largest extent of FLR was 3 months (range, 1-6 months). The median TD for FLR was 28.0 Gy (range, 22.3-36.4 Gy). On univariate analysis, pre-treatment Child-Pugh (CP) score and platelet count were significantly correlated with the TD. On multiple linear regression analysis, CP score was the only parameter that predicted TD. Median TDs were 30.5 Gy (range, 26.2.3-36.4 Gy) and 25.2 Gy (range, 22.3-27.5 Gy) for patients with CP-A and CP-B disease, respectively. Conclusion: The TD was significantly correlated with baseline liver function. We propose 30 Gy for CP-A disease and 25 Gy for CP-B disease in 5 fractions as TDs for FLR after SABR for patients with HCC and chronic liver disease. Use of these TDs will help to predict potential loss of liver tissue after SABR.

  16. Plasma-mediated ablation of biofilm contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhixiong; Wang, Xiaoliang; Huang, Huan

    2010-12-01

    Ultra-short pulsed laser removal of thin biofilm contamination on different substrates has been conducted via the use of plasma-mediated ablation. The biofilms were formed using sheep whole blood. The ablation was generated using a 1.2 ps ultra-short pulsed laser with wavelength centered at 1552 nm. The blood contamination was transformed into plasma and collected with a vacuum system. The single line ablation features have been measured. The ablation thresholds of blood contamination and bare substrates were determined. It is found that the ablation threshold of the blood contamination is lower than those of the beneath substrates including the glass slide, PDMS, and human dermal tissues. The ablation effects of different laser parameters (pulse overlap rate and pulse energy) were studied and ablation efficiency was measured. Proper ablation parameters were found to efficiently remove contamination with maximum efficiency and without damage to the substrate surface for the current laser system. Complete removal of blood contaminant from the glass substrate surface and freeze-dried dermis tissue surface was demonstrated by the USP laser ablation with repeated area scanning. No obvious thermal damage was found in the decontaminated glass and tissue samples.

  17. Femtosecond laser ablation of polytetrafluoroethylene (Teflon) in ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z. B.; Hong, M. H.; Lu, Y. F.; Wu, D. J.; Lan, B.; Chong, T. C.

    2003-05-01

    Teflon, polytetrafluorethylene (PTFE), is an important material in bioscience and medical application due to its special characteristics (bio-compatible, nonflammable, antiadhesive, and heat resistant). The advantages of ultrashort laser processing of Teflon include a minimal thermal penetration region and low processing temperatures, precision removal of material, and good-quality feature definition. In this paper, laser processing of PTFE in ambient air by a Ti:sapphire femtosecond laser (780 nm, 110 fs) is investigated. It is found that the pulse number on each irradiated surface area must be large enough for a clear edge definition and the ablated depth increases with the pulse number. The air ionization effect at high laser fluences not only degrades the ablated structures quality but also reduces the ablation efficiency. High quality microstructures are demonstrated with controlling laser fluence below a critical fluence to exclude the air ionization effect. The ablated microstructures show strong adhesion property to liquids and clear edges that are suitable for bio-implantation applications. Theoretical calculation is used to analyze the evolution of the ablated width and depth at various laser fluences.

  18. Evaluation of ablation efficiency and surface morphology of human teeth upon irradiation with femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaheen, M. E.; Gagnon, J. E.; Fryer, B. J.

    2014-11-01

    This study investigates changes in ablation efficiency and surface morphology induced in human dental enamel and dentin upon interaction with femtosecond laser pulses at variable energies and number of laser pulses. Craters were created using a Ti:sapphire femtosecond laser ablation system operating at a wavelength of 785 nm, pulse width of 130 fs, and repetition rate of 20 Hz. Various techniques, such as optical and scanning electron microscopy and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), were used to evaluate ablation depth, amount of material ablated, and surface morphology of the craters. Ablation rate (ablation depth per pulse) was found to be lower in enamel than dentin with the maximum rate occurring at fluence of 12.4 J cm-2 in both materials. A drop in ablation rate was observed for fluence greater than 12.4 J cm-2 and was attributed to attenuation of laser energy due to interaction with the laser-generated particles. Above this fluence, signs of thermal effects, such as melting and formation of droplets of molten material at the sample surface, were observed. The response of the ICP-MS indicated that the amount of ablated material removed from dentin is greater than that removed from enamel by a factor of 1.5 or more at all investigated fluence.

  19. Adaptive Thresholds

    SciTech Connect

    Bremer, P. -T.

    2014-08-26

    ADAPT is a topological analysis code that allow to compute local threshold, in particular relevance based thresholds for features defined in scalar fields. The initial target application is vortex detection but the software is more generally applicable to all threshold based feature definitions.

  20. Microsecond enamel ablation with 10.6μm CO2 laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Góra, W. S.; McDonald, A.; Hand, D. P.; Shephard, J. D.

    2016-02-01

    Lasers have been previously been used for dental applications, however there remain issues with thermally-induced cracking. In this paper we investigate the impact of pulse length on CO2 laser ablation of human dental enamel. Experiments were carried in vitro on molar teeth without any modification to the enamel surface, such as grinding or polishing. In addition to varying the pulse length, we also varied pulse energy and focal position, to determine the most efficient ablation of dental hard tissue and more importantly to minimize or eradicate cracking. The maximum temperature rise during the multi pulse ablation process was monitored using a set of thermocouples embedded into the pulpal chamber. The application of a laser device in dental surgery allows removal of tissue with higher precision, which results in minimal loss of healthy dental tissue. In this study we use an RF discharge excited CO2 laser operating at 10.6μm. The wavelength of 10.6 μm overlaps with a phosphate band (PO3-4) absorption in dental hard tissue hence the CO2 laser radiation has been selected as a potential source for modification of the tissue. This research describes an in-depth analysis of single pulse laser ablation. To determine the parameters that are best suited for the ablation of hard dental tissue without thermal cracking, a range of pulse lengths (10-200 μs), and fluences (0-100 J/cm2) are tested. In addition, different laser focusing approaches are investigated to select the most beneficial way of delivering laser radiation to the surface (divergent/convergent beam). To ensure that these processes do not increase the temperature above the critical threshold and cause the necrosis of the tissue a set of thermocouples was placed into the pulpal chambers. Intermittent laser radiation was investigated with and without application of a water spray to cool down the ablation site and the adjacent area. Results show that the temperature can be kept below the critical threshold

  1. Laser ablation of a platinum target in water. II. Ablation rate and nanoparticle size distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, William T.; Sasaki, Takeshi; Koshizaki, Naoto

    2006-12-01

    This is the second in a series of three papers examining nanomaterial formation in laser ablation in liquids (LAL). Here we study the effect of the laser wavelength and fluence on the mass yield and size distribution of nanoparticles prepared by laser ablation of a platinum target immersed in water. For all wavelengths tested, laser fluences in the range of 10-70 J/cm{sup 2} resulted in spheroidal, nonagglomerated platinum nanoparticles with sizes ranging from 1 to 30 nm. Nanoparticle size distributions are found to be composed of two modes that are attributed to thermal vaporization and explosive boiling mechanisms. The peak of the smaller size mode remains nearly constant at 3 nm for all laser conditions, which is suggested to be due to the strong confinement of the vapor plume by the liquid. The larger size mode peaks in the range of 5-15 nm with a population that is strongly dependent on the laser parameters. It is concluded that changes in the mean size reported in many earlier studies on LAL of metal targets are a result of the relative quantity of nanoparticles from each mechanism rather than direct control over the ablation process. Additionally, it was observed that the yield of platinum nanoparticles was significantly larger for 1064 nm wavelength at fluences greater than 10 J/cm{sup 2}. The maximum ablation rate was approximately 4.4 mg/h, with an estimated ablation and collection efficiency of 0.9 {mu}g/J. Dependence of the mass yield on wavelength and fluence is seen to be dependent primarily on the extent of the explosive mechanism.

  2. SOLPRO: A computer code to calculate probabilistic energetic solar proton fluences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stassinopoulos, E. G.

    1975-01-01

    A code was developed for the calculation of interplanetary solar proton fluences at 1 AU for the active years 1977 to 1983. The fluences are presented as functions of mission duration tau, energy threshold E, and confidence level Q. For a given combination of tau and Q, the routine determines whether ordinary or anomalously large events are to be considered, and in the latter case, the number of anomalously large events that are predicted by probabilistic theory for the specified mission duration. The code is described in detail. A listing and sample calculations are included.

  3. Algorithms for optimizing CT fluence control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Scott S.; Pelc, Norbert J.

    2014-03-01

    The ability to customize the incident x-ray fluence in CT via beam-shaping filters or mA modulation is known to improve image quality and/or reduce radiation dose. Previous work has shown that complete control of x-ray fluence (ray-by-ray fluence modulation) would further improve dose efficiency. While complete control of fluence is not currently possible, emerging concepts such as dynamic attenuators and inverse-geometry CT allow nearly complete control to be realized. Optimally using ray-by-ray fluence modulation requires solving a very high-dimensional optimization problem. Most optimization techniques fail or only provide approximate solutions. We present efficient algorithms for minimizing mean or peak variance given a fixed dose limit. The reductions in variance can easily be translated to reduction in dose, if the original variance met image quality requirements. For mean variance, a closed form solution is derived. The peak variance problem is recast as iterated, weighted mean variance minimization, and at each iteration it is possible to bound the distance to the optimal solution. We apply our algorithms in simulations of scans of the thorax and abdomen. Peak variance reductions of 45% and 65% are demonstrated in the abdomen and thorax, respectively, compared to a bowtie filter alone. Mean variance shows smaller gains (about 15%).

  4. Residual energy deposition in dental enamel during IR laser ablation at 2.79, 2.94, 9.6, and 10.6 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragadio, Jerome N.; Lee, Christian K.; Fried, Daniel

    2000-03-01

    The objective of this study was to measure the residual heat deposition during laser ablation at those IR laser wavelengths best suited for the removal of dental caries. The principal factor limiting the rate of laser ablation of dental hard tissue is the risk of excessive heat accumulation in the tooth, which has the potential for causing damage to the pulp. Optimal laser ablation systems minimize the residual energy deposition in the tooth by transferring deposited laser energy to kinetic and internal energy of ejected tissue components. The residual heat deposition in the tooth was measured at laser wavelengths of 2.79, 2.94, 9.6 and 10.6 micrometer and pulse widths of 150 ns - 150 microsecond(s) . The residual energy was at a minimum for fluences well above the ablation threshold where it saturates at values from 25 - 70% depending on pulse duration and wavelength for the systems investigated. The lowest values of the residual energy were measured for short (less than 20 microseconds) CO2 laser pulses at 9.6 micrometer and for Q-switched erbium laser pulses. This work was supported by NIH/NIDCR R29DE12091 and the Center for Laser Applications in Medicine, DOE DEFG0398ER62576.

  5. Laser ablation dynamics in metals: The thermal regime

    SciTech Connect

    Mezzapesa, F. P.; Brambilla, M.; Dabbicco, M.; Scamarcio, G.; Columbo, L. L.; Ancona, A.; Sibillano, T.

    2012-07-02

    We studied the laser ablation dynamics of steel in the thermal regime both experimentally and theoretically. The real-time monitoring of the process shows that the ablation rate depends on laser energy density and ambient pressure during the exposure time. We demonstrated that the ablation efficiency can be enhanced when the pressure is reduced with respect to the atmospheric pressure for a given laser fluence, reaching an upper limit despite of high-vacuum conditions. An analytical model based on the Hertz-Knudsen law reproduces all the experimental results.

  6. Ad-hoc design of temporally shaped fs laser pulses based on plasma dynamics for deep ablation in fused silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez-Rueda, J.; Siegel, J.; Puerto, D.; Galvan-Sosa, M.; Gawelda, W.; Solis, J.

    2013-07-01

    We have analyzed the ablation depth yield of fused silica irradiated with shaped pulse trains with a separation of 500 fs and increasing or decreasing intensity envelopes. This temporal separation value is extracted from previous studies on ablation dynamics upon irradiation with transform-limited 100 fs laser pulses. The use of decreasing intensity pulse trains leads to a strong increase of the induced ablation depth when compared to the behavior, at the same pulse fluence, of intensity increasing pulse trains. In addition, we have studied the material response under stretched (500 fs, FWHM) and transform-limited (100 fs, FWHM) pulses, for which avalanche or multiphoton ionization respectively dominates the carrier generation process. The comparison of the corresponding evolution of the ablated depth vs. fluence suggests that the use of pulse trains with decreasing intensity at high fluences should lead to enhanced single exposure ablation depths, beyond the limits corresponding to MPI- or AI-alone dominated processes.

  7. Dependence of ultraviolet nanosecond laser polymer ablation on polymer molecular weight: Poly(methyl methacrylate) at 248 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Bounos, Giannis; Selimis, Alexandros; Georgiou, Savas; Rebollar, Esther; Castillejo, Marta; Bityurin, Nikita

    2006-12-01

    We rely on a methodology demonstrated previously for assessing the temperature evolution and polymer viscosity changes in the 248 nm irradiation of poly(methyl methacrylate)s (PMMAs) with molecular weights (M{sub w}) ranging from 2.5 to 996 kDa. Briefly, this methodology [G. Bounos et al., J. Appl. Phys. 98, 084317 (2005)] relies on monitoring the formation of aryl products in the irradiation of polymer doped with iodonaphthalene or iodophenanthrene. The results demonstrate that higher temperatures are attained with increasing M{sub w}. The surface temperatures at the corresponding ablation thresholds are estimated to be {approx}850-900 K for M{sub w}{>=}120 kDa vs {approx}600 K for 2.5 kDa PMMA. In addition, for all M{sub w}'s, melting is demonstrated (viscosity values of {approx_equal}10{sup 1} Pa s), but it lasts longer for high M{sub w} PMMAs. We ascribe these differences to the fact that low M{sub w} PMMAs dissociate efficiently to desorbing monomers/oligomers, thereby resulting in more efficient energy removal. Even so, the ablation threshold of the high M{sub w} PMMAs is attained at higher fluences. This can be ascribed to the higher fraction of bonds that is required to be broken, and also plausibly to the higher gaseous product pressures that must be attained, for material ejection to be effected. The results are overall well accounted by the bulk photothermal model.

  8. Enhanced coupling of optical energy during liquid-confined metal ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Hyun Wook; Welch, Ashley J.

    2015-10-21

    Liquid-confined laser ablation was investigated with various metals of indium, aluminum, and nickel. Ablation threshold and rate were characterized in terms of surface deformation, transient acoustic responses, and plasma emissions. The surface condition affected the degree of ablation dynamics due to variations in reflectance. The liquid confinement yielded up to an order of larger ablation crater along with stronger acoustic transients than dry ablation. Enhanced ablation performance resulted possibly from effective coupling of optical energy at the interface during explosive vaporization, plasma confinement, and cavitation. The deposition of a liquid layer can induce more efficient ablation for laser metal processing.

  9. Femtosecond laser-induced size reduction of carbon nanodots in solution: Effect of laser fluence, spot size, and irradiation time

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Vanthan; Yan, Lihe Si, Jinhai; Hou, Xun

    2015-02-28

    Photoluminescent carbon nanodots (C-dots) with size tunability and uniformity were fabricated in polyethylene glycol (PEG{sub 200N}) solution using femtosecond laser ablation method. The size distributions and photoluminescence (PL) properties of C-dots are well controlled by adjusting the combined parameters of laser fluence, spot size, and irradiation time. The size reduction efficiency of the C-dots progressively increases with decreasing laser fluence and spot size. The optimal PL spectra are red-shifted and the quantum yields decrease with the increase in C-dots size, which could be attributed to the more complex surface functional groups attached on C-dots induced at higher laser fluence and larger spot size. Moreover, an increase in irradiation time leads to a decrease in size of C-dots, but long-time irradiation will result in the generation of complex functional groups on C-dots, subsequently the PL spectra are red-shifted.

  10. Excimer laser ablation of the lens.

    PubMed

    Nanevicz, T M; Prince, M R; Gawande, A A; Puliafito, C A

    1986-12-01

    Ablation of the bovine crystalline lens was studied using radiation from an excimer laser at four ultraviolet wave lengths as follows: 193 nm (argon fluoride), 248 nm (krypton fluoride), 308 nm (xenon chloride), and 351 nm (xenon fluoride). The ablation process was quantitated by measuring mass ablated with an electronic balance, and characterized by examining ablation craters with scanning electron microscopy. The highest ablation rate was observed at 248 nm with lower rates at 193 and 308 nm. No ablation was observed at 351 nm. Scanning electron microscopy revealed the smoothest craters at 193 nm while at 248 nm there was vacuolization in the crater walls and greater disruption of surrounding tissue. The craters made at 308 nm did not have as smooth a contour as the 193-nm lesions. The spectral absorbance of the bovine lens was calculated at the wavelengths used for ablation and correlated with ablation rates and thresholds. High peak-power, pulsed ultraviolet laser radiation may have a role in surgical removal of the lens. PMID:3789982

  11. Microscopic mechanisms of laser spallation and ablation of metal targets from large-scale molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chengping; Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    2014-01-01

    The microscopic mechanisms of femtosecond laser ablation of an Al target are investigated in large-scale massively parallel atomistic simulations performed with a computational model combining classical molecular dynamics technique with a continuum description of the laser excitation and subsequent relaxation of conduction band electrons. The relatively large lateral size of the computational systems used in the simulations enables a detailed analysis of the evolution of multiple voids generated in a sub-surface region of the irradiated target in the spallation regime, when the material ejection is driven by the relaxation of laser-induced stresses. The nucleation, growth, and coalescence of voids take place within a broad (100 nm) region of the target, leading to the formation of a transient foamy structure of interconnected liquid regions and eventual separation (or spallation) of a thin liquid layer from the bulk of the target. The thickness of the spalled layer is decreasing from the maximum of 50 nm while the temperature and ejection velocity are increasing with increasing fluence. At a fluence of 2.5 times the spallation threshold, the top part of the target reaches the conditions for an explosive decomposition into vapor and small clusters/droplets, marking the transition to the phase explosion regime of laser ablation. This transition is signified by a change in the composition of the ablation plume from large liquid droplets to a mixture of vapor-phase atoms and clusters/droplets of different sizes. The clusters of different sizes are spatially segregated in the expanding ablation plume, where small/medium size clusters present in the middle of the plume are followed by slower (velocities of less than 3 km/s) large droplets consisting of more than 10,000 atoms. The similarity of some of the characteristics of laser ablation of Al targets (e.g., evolution of voids in the spallation regime and cluster size distributions in the phase explosion regime) to the

  12. Customized ablation using an all-solid-state deep-UV laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korn, G.; Lenzner, M.; Kittelmann, O.; Zatonski, R.; Kirsch, M.; Kuklin, Y.

    2003-07-01

    We show first deep UV ablation results achieved with our new all solid state laser system. The system parameters allow high repetition rate ablation with a small spot diameter of about 0.250mm and a fluence of 350 mJ/cm2 at a wavelength of 210 nm using sequential frequency conversion of a diode pumped laser source. The single shot and multishot ablation rates as well as the ablation profiles have been defined using MicroProf (Fries Research and Technology GmbH, Germany). By means of computer controlled scanning we produce smooth ablation profiles corresponding to a correction of myopia, hyperopia or astigmatism. Due to the small spot size and high repetition rate of the laser we are able to generate in short time intervals complicated ablation profiles described by higher order polynomial functions which are required for the needs of customized corneal ablation.

  13. Dissolution in a supercritical liquid as a mechanism of laser ablation of sapphire

    SciTech Connect

    Dolgaev, Sergei I; Karasev, M E; Kulevskii, L A; Simakin, Aleksandr V; Shafeev, Georgii A

    2001-07-31

    The laser ablation of sapphire is studied by irradiating its interface with water and aqueous solutions of KOH, KCl and Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} by 2.92-{mu}m 130-ns holmium laser pulses. The ablation rate depends on the concentration and type of the dissolved substance. The highest ablation rate is 2.5{mu}m per pulse for a laser fluence of 120 J cm{sup -2}. The ablation of sapphire is attributed to its dissolution in water or in aqueous solutions in the supercritical state. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  14. Ultra-fast Movies Resolve Ultra-short Pulse Laser Ablation and Bump Formation on Thin Molybdenum Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domke, Matthias; Rapp, Stephan; Huber, Heinz

    For the monolithic serial interconnection of CIS thin film solar cells, 470 nm molybdenum films on glass substrates must be separated galvanically. The single pulse ablation with a 660 fs laser at a wavelength of 1053 nm is investigated in a fluence regime from 0.5 to 5.0 J/cm2. At fluences above 2.0 J/cm2 bump and jet formation can be observed that could be used for creating microstructures. For the investigation of the underlying mechanisms of the laser ablation process itself as well as of the bump or jet formation, pump probe microscopy is utilized to resolve the transient ablation behavior.

  15. Proton Particle Test Fluence: What's the Right Number?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.; Ladbury, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    While we have been utilizing standard fluence levels such as those listed in the JESD57 document, we have begun revisiting what an appropriate test fluence is when it comes to qualifying a device for single events. Instead of a fixed fluence level or until a specific number of events occurs, a different thought process is required.

  16. Basic ablation phenomena during laser thrombolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathyam, Ujwal S.; Shearin, Alan; Prahl, Scott A.

    1997-05-01

    This paper presents studies of microsecond ablation phenomena that take place during laser thrombolysis. The main goals were to optimize laser parameters for efficient ablation, and to investigate the ablation mechanism. Gelatin containing an absorbing dye was used as the clot model. A parametric study was performed to identify the optimal wavelength, spot size, pulse energies, and repetition rate for maximum material removal. The minimum radiant exposures to achieve ablation at any wavelength were measured. The results suggest that most visible wavelengths were equally efficient at removing material at radiant exposures above threshold. Ablation was initiated at surface temperatures just above 100 degrees Celsius. A vapor bubble was formed during ablation. Less than 5% of the total pulse energy is coupled into the bubble energy. A large part of the delivered energy is unaccounted for and is likely released partly as acoustic transients from the vapor expansion and partly wasted as heat. The current laser and delivery systems may not be able to completely remove large clot burden that is sometimes encountered in heart attacks. However, laser thrombolysis may emerge as a favored treatment for strokes where the occlusion is generally smaller and rapid recanalization is of paramount importance. A final hypothesis is that laser thrombolysis should be done at radiant exposures close to threshold to minimize any damaging effects of the bubble dynamics on the vessel wall.

  17. Laser Fabrication of Silica Gratings by Ablation and Modification of Silicone Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittrich, A.; Fricke-Begemann, T.; Ihlemann, J.

    Silicone (polydimethylsiloxane) films are irradiated with a nanosecond F2-laser at a wavelength of 157 nm. Low fluence irradiation < 100 mJ/cm2 causes elimination of the organic groups leading to the formation of silica like material. Irradiation at fluences> 200 mJ/cm2 causes precise ablation of the silicone material. By combining ablative patterning and low fluence modification, the fabrication of silica devices with precise shape control is possible. Using spin coating of a diluted silicone solution (type ACCUGLASS), the preparation of thin silicone films (100 nm to 1 μm thickness) is possible. High resolution patterns like surface relief gratings with 1 μm period are obtained in these films by patterned ablation using a mask projection system and subsequent large area irradiation for the modification to silica. The chemical modification to carbon free silica is confirmed by Raman spectroscopy.

  18. Ablation of hard dental tissues with an ArF-pulsed excimer laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neev, Joseph; Raney, Daniel; Whalen, William E.; Fujishige, Jack T.; Ho, Peter D.; McGrann, John V.; Berns, Michael W.

    1991-06-01

    The interaction of 15 ns pulses from an ArF excimer laser with hard dental tissue was investigated for the purpose of obtaining practical information on the ablation process. Dark field fast photography utilizing an auxiliary, 15 ns Nd:Yag laser 'probe', was used to study the ablation plume dynamics as a function of time, luminescence were studied at different fluence levels and prr. Dentin ablation was found to be about four times as efficient as ablation of enamel in the higher fluence levels tested (> 10 J/cm2) and about twice as efficient as the ablation in the lower fluence regime (approximately equals 1 J/cm2). The dentin etch depth per pulse was found to increase exponentially with fluence (at least up to the tested level of 11 J/cm2), while in enamel the etch depth per pulse appears to increase logarithmically with fluence. Dentin ablation yields a larger, more dense plume which can be ejected (depending on the fluence level) to a height of several millimeters above the surface with observed ejection velocity in access of 1200 m/s. The dentin plume consisted of a relatively uniform particle size distribution (0.1 micrometers to 10 micrometers in diameter). Enamel ablation, on the other hand, yields a smaller observed ejection velocities (about 800 m/s), and a much smaller plume of fine particles (about 0.1 micrometers in diameter) and gases, confined to within 0.5 mm of the surface. In addition, an even smaller amount of highly non-uniform debris, (from ten to several hundred micrometers in size) is observed to be ejected to higher levels, and reach roughly half the height of the corresponding dentin plume for similar fluence levels. Although both dentin and enamel yield lower ablation efficiencies at 1 Hz, no significant difference is detected between the ablation efficiency at 5 Hz and ablation 10 Hz prr. Both materials remained within 20 degree(s)C of room temperature even at fluences as high as 20 J/cm2 and prr as high as 10 Hz for enamel and 20 Hz for

  19. Micromachining of optically transparent materials by laser ablation of a solution containing pyrene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabe, Akira; Niino, Hiroyuki; Wang, Jun

    2001-01-01

    Optically transparent materials such as fused silica, quartz crystal, calcium fluoride, and fluorocarbon polymer were etched upon irradiation of organic solution containing pyrene with a conventional KrF or XeCl excimer laser. Threshold fluences for etching were 240 mJ/cm2 for fused silica, 330 mJ/cm2 for quartz crystal, 740 mJ/cm2 for calcium fluoride, and 45 mJ/cm2 for fluorocarbon polymer. These threshold values were remarkably low compared with those of direct ablation by using conventional lasers. Their etch rates remarkably depended on a concentration of pyrene: the etch rate became higher as the pyrene concentration increased. It means that pyrene molecules play an important role in this process. The mechanisms for this process is discussed by cyclic multiphotonic absorption of pyrene in the excited states, thermal relaxation, and formation of super-heated solution. As the results suggest, the process is based on the combination of two physical processes in the interface between the transparent materials and the liquid: one is a heating process by a super-heated liquid and the other is an attacking process by a high temperature and pressure vapor. The mechanism is also referred to thermal properties of materials.

  20. Photoacoustic characterization of radiofrequency ablation lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchard, Richard; Dana, Nicholas; Di Biase, Luigi; Natale, Andrea; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2012-02-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) procedures are used to destroy abnormal electrical pathways in the heart that can cause cardiac arrhythmias. Current methods relying on fluoroscopy, echocardiography and electrical conduction mapping are unable to accurately assess ablation lesion size. In an effort to better visualize RFA lesions, photoacoustic (PA) and ultrasonic (US) imaging were utilized to obtain co-registered images of ablated porcine cardiac tissue. The left ventricular free wall of fresh (i.e., never frozen) porcine hearts was harvested within 24 hours of the animals' sacrifice. A THERMOCOOLR Ablation System (Biosense Webster, Inc.) operating at 40 W for 30-60 s was used to induce lesions through the endocardial and epicardial walls of the cardiac samples. Following lesion creation, the ablated tissue samples were placed in 25 °C saline to allow for multi-wavelength PA imaging. Samples were imaged with a VevoR 2100 ultrasound system (VisualSonics, Inc.) using a modified 20-MHz array that could provide laser irradiation to the sample from a pulsed tunable laser (Newport Corp.) to allow for co-registered photoacoustic-ultrasound (PAUS) imaging. PA imaging was conducted from 750-1064 nm, with a surface fluence of approximately 15 mJ/cm2 maintained during imaging. In this preliminary study with PA imaging, the ablated region could be well visualized on the surface of the sample, with contrasts of 6-10 dB achieved at 750 nm. Although imaging penetration depth is a concern, PA imaging shows promise in being able to reliably visualize RF ablation lesions.

  1. Laser ablated zirconium plasma: A source of neutral zirconium

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, Dheerendra; Thareja, Raj K.

    2010-10-15

    The authors report spectroscopic investigations of laser produced zirconium (Zr) plasma at moderate laser fluence. At low laser fluence the neutral zirconium species are observed to dominate over the higher species of zirconium. Laser induced fluorescence technique is used to study the velocity distribution of ground state neutral zirconium species. Two-dimensional time-resolved density distributions of ground state zirconium is mapped using planner laser induced fluorescence imaging and total ablated mass of neutral zirconium atoms is estimated. Temporal and spatial evolutions of electron density and temperature are discussed by measuring Stark broadened profile and ratio of intensity of emission lines, respectively.

  2. Droplet distributions from melt displacement and ejection mechanism during Al ns-laser ablation and deposition experiments: Influence of laser spot position

    SciTech Connect

    Cultrera, L.; Lorusso, A.; Maiolo, B.; Cangueiro, L.; Vilar, R.; Perrone, A.

    2014-03-07

    Experimental observations of the angular distribution of droplets during laser ablation and deposition of Al thin films are presented and discussed. The experimental results, obtained by simply moving the laser spot position with respect to the rotation axis of the target, allow clarification of the unexpected symmetric double peaked angular droplet distribution on the films. These results provide direct evidence that a laser fluence threshold exists, beyond which droplets are generated from a melt displacement and ejection mechanism rather than from a phase explosion. The main directions of particulate ejection are related to the particular geometry of the laser generated tracks, whose profiles depend on the relative position of the incident beam with respect to the rotation axis of the target.

  3. LOWTHRM: a thermal fluence code. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Westbrook, C.R.

    1980-03-01

    A Fortran computer program LOWTERM is described for calculating nuclear thermal fluence incident upon a target area. Atmospheric transmissivity factors in the spectral region 0.25 to 28.5 microns are determined through use of the LOWTRAN5 computer code. The program provides a choice of six model atmospheres covering seasonal and latitudinal variations from sea level to 100 km, eight haze models, and accounts for molecular absorption, molecular scattering, and aerosol extinction. Atmospheric refraction, earth curvature effects, thermal scattering, and thermal ground reflection contributions are included.

  4. Near-infrared laser ablation of poly tetrafluoroethylene (Teflon) sensitized by nanoenergetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Yanqiang; Wang Shufeng; Sun Zhaoyong; Dlott, Dana D.

    2004-08-30

    Laser ablation of Teflon doped with size-selected (30-250 nm) Al nanoparticles is studied. Unlike pure Teflon, which requires a vacuum-ultraviolet or femtosecond excimer laser for ablation, this sensitized Teflon can be ablated with a near-infrared laser. Using 100 ps duration pulses, near-infrared ablation thresholds are lower by about a factor of 10 from excimer ablation of pure Teflon. A mechanism is discussed that involves Teflon decomposition by spherical shock fronts originating at each irradiated nanoparticle. Studies of the distance dependence of this process as a function of particle diameter and oxide layer thickness suggest ways of optimizing the ablation process.

  5. New method for estimation of fluence complexity in IMRT fields and correlation with gamma analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanušová, T.; Vondráček, V.; Badraoui-Čuprová, K.; Horáková, I.; Koniarová, I.

    2015-01-01

    A new method for estimation of fluence complexity in Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) fields is proposed. Unlike other previously published works, it is based on portal images calculated by the Portal Dose Calculation algorithm in Eclipse (version 8.6, Varian Medical Systems) in the plane of the EPID aS500 detector (Varian Medical Systems). Fluence complexity is given by the number and the amplitudes of dose gradients in these matrices. Our method is validated using a set of clinical plans where fluence has been smoothed manually so that each plan has a different level of complexity. Fluence complexity calculated with our tool is in accordance with the different levels of smoothing as well as results of gamma analysis, when calculated and measured dose matrices are compared. Thus, it is possible to estimate plan complexity before carrying out the measurement. If appropriate thresholds are determined which would distinguish between acceptably and overly modulated plans, this might save time in the re-planning and re-measuring process.

  6. Ultra low fluence rate photodynamic therapy: simulation of light emitted by the Cerenkov effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzales, Jonathan; Wang, Fred; Zamora, Genesis; Trinidad, Anthony; Marcu, Laura; Cherry, Simon; Hirschberg, Henry

    2014-03-01

    PDT has been shown to be most effective at low fluence rates. Many radionuclides used for both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes produce measurable amounts of visible radiation when they decay via the Cerenkov effect which occurs when a charged particle travels faster in a dielectric medium than the speed of light in that medium. Cerenkov radiation from radiopharmaceuticals could serve as a source of extended duration, low level "internal" light, to mediate PDT, with the ultimate goals of overcoming some its current limitations. Using laser light, we are exploring the effects of fluence rates that could be generated by Cerenkov radiation on PDT efficacy. ALA or TPPS2a mediated PDT of rat gliomas monolayers or multicell spheroids ( F98, C6) was performed with 410 nm laser light exposure over an extended period of 24-96hrs. Photosensitizers were delivered either as a bolus or continuously with light exposure. At fluence rate of 20μW/cm2 effective PDT was obtained as measured by decrease in cell viability or inhibition of spheroid growth. PDT is effective at ultra low fluence rates if given over long time periods. No lower threshold has been ascertained. Since the half-life of 90Y, a radionuclide with a high Cherenkov yield is 64 hrs it is a good candidate to supply sufficient light activation for PDT. The combination of radionuclide and photodynamic therapies could improve the effectiveness of cancer treatment by exploiting synergies between these two modalities.

  7. Study of Laser Ablation Efficiency for an Acrylic-Based Photopolymerizing Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loktionov, E. Yu.

    2014-05-01

    Results are presented from study of the effi ciency (ablated mass per unit energy, mechanical recoil momentum per unit energy) of laser ablation for a light-curable polymer. A substantial difference is seen between the thresholds and indicated criteria for laser ablation effi ciency in the liquid and cured phases. The highest energy effi ciency for laser ablation (~22.6 %) is achieved when the initially liquid polymer is exposed to radiation with the wavelength optimal for photopolymerization (365 ± 15 nm).

  8. Solar proton fluences as observed during 1966-1972 and as predicted for 1977-1983 space missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, J. H.

    1973-01-01

    The probability with which any given proton fluence level will be exceeded during a space mission is computed for missions to be flown during the active phase of the next solar cycle (1977-1983). This probability is a function of fluence level, proton energy threshold, and mission duration. Data on the major solar proton events of 1966-1972 are given; it is argued that only this data set (and not that of the previous solar cycle) is appropriate for estimating next-cycle fluences. Probable numbers of each of the two types of events are estimated from Burrell's extension of Poisson statistics. Fluences of all future anomalously large events are assumed to have a common spectrum, that given by the August 1972 event. Fluences of the ordinary events are assumed to obey a log normal distribution. It is shown that for much of the confidence-level mission-duration regime of interest, at least one anomalously large event will occur; and given such an occurrence, the ordinary-event contribution to mission fluence is negligible.

  9. Laser Ablation Propulsion A Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irfan, Sayed A.; Ugalatad, Akshata C.

    Laser Ablation Propulsion (LAP) will serve as an alternative propulsion system for development of microthrusters. The principle of LAP is that when a laser (pulsed or continuous wave) with sufficient energy (more than the vaporization threshold energy of material) is incident on material, ablation or vaporization takes place which leads to the generation of plasma. The generated plasma has the property to move away from the material hence pressure is generated which leads to the generation of thrust. Nowadays nano satellites are very common in different space and defence applications. It is important to build micro thruster which are useful for orienting and re-positioning small aircraft (like nano satellites) above the atmosphere. modelling of LAP using MATLAB and Mathematica. Schematic is made for the suitable optical configuration of LAP. Practical experiments with shadowgraphy and self emission techniques and the results obtained are analysed taking poly (vinyl-chloride) (PVC) as propellant to study the

  10. Convoluted effect of laser fluence and pulse duration on the property of a nanosecond laser-induced plasma into an argon ambient gas at the atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Bai Xueshi; Ma Qianli; Motto-Ros, Vincent; Yu Jin; Sabourdy, David; Nguyen, Luc; Jalocha, Alain

    2013-01-07

    We studied the behavior of the plasma induced by a nanosecond infrared (1064 nm) laser pulse on a metallic target (Al) during its propagation into argon ambient gas at the atmospheric pressure and especially over the delay interval ranging from several hundred nanoseconds to several microseconds. In such interval, the plasma is particularly interesting as a spectroscopic emission source for laser-induced plasma spectroscopy (LIBS). We show a convoluted effect between laser fluence and pulse duration on the structure and the emission property of the plasma. With a relatively high fluence of about 160 J/cm{sup 2} where a strong plasma shielding effect is observed, a short pulse of about 4 ns duration is shown to be significantly more efficient to excite the optical emission from the ablation vapor than a long pulse of about 25 ns duration. While with a lower fluence of about 65 J/cm{sup 2}, a significantly more efficient excitation is observed with the long pulse. We interpret our observations by considering the post-ablation interaction between the generated plume and the tailing part of the laser pulse. We demonstrate that the ionization of the layer of ambient gas surrounding the ablation vapor plays an important role in plasma shielding. Such ionization is the consequence of laser-supported absorption wave and directly dependent on the laser fluence and the pulse duration. Further observations of the structure of the generated plume in its early stage of expansion support our explanations.

  11. Isotopic Dependence of GCR Fluence behind Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wilson, John W.; Saganti, Premkumar; Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Cleghorn, Timothy; Zeitlin, Cary; Tripathi, Ram K.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we consider the effects of the isotopic composition of the primary galactic cosmic rays (GCR), nuclear fragmentation cross-sections, and isotopic-grid on the solution to transport models used for shielding studies. Satellite measurements are used to describe the isotopic composition of the GCR. For the nuclear interaction data-base and transport solution, we use the quantum multiple-scattering theory of nuclear fragmentation (QMSFRG) and high-charge and energy (HZETRN) transport code, respectively. The QMSFRG model is shown to accurately describe existing fragmentation data including proper description of the odd-even effects as function of the iso-spin dependence on the projectile nucleus. The principle finding of this study is that large errors (+/-100%) will occur in the mass-fluence spectra when comparing transport models that use a complete isotopic-grid (approx.170 ions) to ones that use a reduced isotopic-grid, for example the 59 ion-grid used in the HZETRN code in the past, however less significant errors (<+/-20%) occur in the elemental-fluence spectra. Because a complete isotopic-grid is readily handled on small computer workstations and is needed for several applications studying GCR propagation and scattering, it is recommended that they be used for future GCR studies.

  12. Temperature profiles of 980- and 1,470-nm endovenous laser ablation, endovenous radiofrequency ablation and endovenous steam ablation.

    PubMed

    Malskat, W S J; Stokbroekx, M A L; van der Geld, C W M; Nijsten, T E C; van den Bos, R R

    2014-03-01

    Endovenous thermal ablation (EVTA) techniques are very effective for the treatment of varicose veins, but their exact working mechanism is still not well documented. The lack of knowledge of mechanistic properties has led to a variety of EVTA protocols and a commercially driven dissemination of new or modified techniques without robust scientific evidence. The aim of this study is to compare temperature profiles of 980-and 1,470-nm endovenous laser ablation (EVLA), segmental radiofrequency ablation (RFA), and endovenous steam ablation (EVSA). In an experimental setting, temperature measurements were performed using thermocouples; raw potato was used to mimic a vein wall. Two laser wavelengths (980 and 1,470 nm) were used with tulip-tip fibers and 1,470 nm also with a radial-emitting fiber. Different powers and pullback speeds were used to achieve fluences of 30, 60, and 90 J/cm. For segmental RFA, 1 cycle of 20 s was analyzed. EVSA was performed with two and three pulses of steam per centimeter. Maximum temperature increase, time span of relevant temperature increase, and area under the curve of the time of relevant temperature increase were measured. In all EVLA settings, temperatures increased and decreased rapidly. High fluence is associated with significantly higher temperatures and increased time span of temperature rise. Temperature profiles of 980- and 1,470-nm EVLA with tulip-tip fibers did not differ significantly. Radial EVLA showed significantly higher maximum temperatures than tulip-tip EVLA. EVSA resulted in mild peak temperatures for longer durations than EVLA. Maximum temperatures with three pulses per centimeter were significantly higher than with two pulses. RFA temperature rises were relatively mild, resulting in a plateau-shaped temperature profile, similar to EVSA. Temperature increase during EVLA is fast with a high-peak temperature for a short time, where EVSA and RFA have longer plateau phases and lower maximum temperatures. PMID

  13. Metal particles produced by laser ablation for ICP-MSmeasurements

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, Jhanis J.; Liu, Chunyi; Wen, Sy-Bor; Mao, Xianglei; Russo, Richard E.

    2007-06-01

    Pulsed laser ablation (266nm) was used to generate metal particles of Zn and Al alloys using femtosecond (150 fs) and nanosecond (4 ns) laser pulses with identical fluences of 50 J cm{sup -2}. Characterization of particles and correlation with Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS) performance was investigated. Particles produced by nanosecond laser ablation were mainly primary particles with irregular shape and hard agglomerates (without internal voids). Particles produced by femtosecond laser ablation consisted of spherical primary particles and soft agglomerates formed from numerous small particles. Examination of the craters by white light interferometric microscopy showed that there is a rim of material surrounding the craters formed after nanosecond laser ablation. The determination of the crater volume by white light interferometric microscopy, considering the rim of material surrounding ablation craters, revealed that the volume ratio (fs/ns) of the craters on the selected samples was approximately 9 (Zn), 7 (NIST627 alloy) and 5 (NIST1711 alloy) times more ablated mass with femtosecond pulsed ablation compared to nanosecond pulsed ablation. In addition, an increase of Al concentration from 0 to 5% in Zn base alloys caused a large increase in the diameter of the particles, up to 65% while using nanosecond laser pulses. When the ablated particles were carried in argon into an ICP-MS, the Zn and Al signals intensities were greater by factors of {approx} 50 and {approx} 12 for fs vs. ns ablation. Femtosecond pulsed ablation also reduced temporal fluctuations in the {sup 66}Zn transient signal by a factor of ten compared to nanosecond laser pulses.

  14. Generation and elimination of polarization-dependent ablation of cubic crystals by femtosecond laser radiation.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Rong, Wenlong; Jiang, Lan; Zhang, Kaihu; Li, Cong; Cao, Qiang; Zhang, Guangming; Lu, Yongfeng

    2014-12-01

    We experimentally showed that the π/2-period oscillation of an ablation area with laser polarization direction can be observed in GaAs, ZnSe, MgO and LiF with cubic crystal by a femtosecond laser (800 nm, 100 fs) and that the modulation in the ablation area can be controlled by the laser fluence. While the polarization dependence is sustained in a wide range of laser fluences for a narrow band-gap crystal, it is strongly suppressed with a slight augmentation of laser fluence in a wide band-gap material. The polarization-dependent ablation is explained by the crystal's orientation-dependent reduced-electron mass and the resultant contrasting nonlinear absorptions with slightly different reduced electron mass. The interplay between photoionization and avalanche ionization is discussed to interpret the influence of laser fluence on polarization-dependent ablation. Based on Keldysh's theory, polarization-dependent ablation occurs in a mixed regime between tunneling and multiphoton ionization. PMID:25606947

  15. Survey Of CO{sub 2} Laser Ablation Propulsion With Polyoxymethylene Propellant

    SciTech Connect

    Sinko, John E.; Sasoh, Akihiro

    2010-05-06

    Polyoxymethylene (POM) has been widely studied as a laser propulsion propellant paired to CO{sub 2} laser radiation. POM is a good test case for studying ablation properties of polymer materials, and within limits, for study of general trends in laser ablation-induced impulse. Despite many studies, there is no general understanding of POM ablation that takes into account the ambient pressure, spot area, fluence, and effects from confinement and combustion. This paper reviews and synthesizes CO{sub 2} laser ablation propulsion research using POM targets. Necessary directions for future study are indicated to address incomplete regions of the various parameter spaces. Literature data is compared in terms of propulsion parameters such as momentum coupling coefficient and specific impulse, within a range of fluences from about 1-500 J/cm{sup 2}, ambient pressures from about 10{sup -2}-10{sup 5} Pa, and laser spot areas from about 0.01-10 cm{sup 2}.

  16. Dependence of light fluence on treated depth with photosensitization reaction shortly after photosensitizer injection in rabbit myocardial tissue in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suenari, T.; Matsuo, H.; Ito, A.; Miyoshi, S.; Arai, T.

    2010-02-01

    We investigated experimentally dependence of light fluence on treated depth with photosensitization reaction shortly after photosensitizer injection in rabbit myocardial tissue in vivo. In this particular photosensitization reaction scheme, the photosensitizer accumulation characteristics for target region are not available. Meanwhile, the photosensitizer dose and hospitalization period under restricted light circumstance might be reduced. Since both photosensitizer and oxygen supply are governed by blood flow, this photosensitization reaction is influenced significantly by blood flow variation in particular blood vessel occlusion. We employed the myocardial tissue to keep tissue blood flow during the photosensitization reaction because vessel blood flow speed in myocardial tissue is fast to resist vascular occlusion. Surgically exposed rabbits myocardial tissues were irradiated with the light fluence ranging 25-100 J/cm2 by a 663 nm diode laser 30 min after the injection of 2 mg/kg water soluble chlorin photosensitizer, Talaporfin sodium. Two weeks after the irradiation, the rabbits were sacrificed and the histological specimens of the irradiated area were made to measure scar layer thickness. The scar layer tissue thickness of 0.2-3.0 mm was observed microscopically by the light fluence ranging 25-100 J/cm2. The scarring threshold in the deposit light fluence was estimated to 15-25 J/cm3 based on the above mentioned relation assuming constant and uniform myocardial effective attenuation coefficient of 0.72 mm-1. The estimated scarring threshold in the deposit light fluence was lower than the threshold of conventional PDT. Large variation of the estimated threshold value might be attributed to unconsidered PDT parameter such as flow rate inhomogeneity in the myocardial tissue. These results suggested that the photosensitization reaction investigated in this study would be available to apply arrhythmia therapy such as atrial fibrillation.

  17. Predictable surface ablation of dielectrics with few-cycle laser pulse even beyond air ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquier, C.; Sentis, M.; Utéza, O.; Sanner, N.

    2016-08-01

    We study surface ablation of dielectrics with single-shot few-cycle optical pulse (˜10 fs) in air, at intensities below and above the onset of air ionization. We perform 3D analysis and careful calibration of the fluence distribution at the laser focus, spanning from linear- to nonlinear- focusing regimes, enabling to thoroughly characterize the severe limitation of the fluence delivered onto the sample surface upon increase of incident pulse energy. Despite significant beam reshaping taking place at high fluence, we demonstrate that it is nevertheless possible to confidently predict the resulting crater profiles on fused silica surface, even in the regime of filamentation.

  18. Simulation of the dependence of spatial fluence profiles on tissue optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, S.; Mitra, K.

    2016-03-01

    Medical laser applications are promoted as safe, effective treatments for a multiplicity of concerns, ranging from hyperthermal skin rejuvenation to subcutaneous tumor ablation. Chromophore and structural protein concentration and distribution within a patient's tissue vary from patient to patient and dictate the interaction of incident radiative energy of a specific wavelength with the target tissue. Laser parameters must be matched to tissue optical and thermal properties in order to achieve the desired therapeutic results without inducing unnecessary tissue damage, although accurate tissue optical properties are not always measured prior to and during laser therapies. A weighted variable step size Monte Carlo simulation of laser irradiation of skin tissue was used to determine the effects of variations in absorption (μa) and scattering coefficients (μs) and the degree of anisotropy (g) on the radiant energy transport per mm2 in response to steady-state photon propagation. The three parameters were varied in a factorial experimental design for the ranges of 0.25/mm <= μa <= 2.0/mm, 30.0/mm <= μs <= 140.0/mm, and 0.65 <= g <= 0.99 in order to isolate their impacts on the overall fluence distribution. Box plots of the resulting fluence profiles were created and compared to identify ranges in which optical property variance could be considered to significantly impact the spatial variance of fluence within the simulation volume. Results indicated that accurate prediction of the fluence profiles that will be achieved by any given medical laser treatment is unlikely without pre-treatment assessment of the tissue optical properties of individual patients.

  19. Resonant laser ablation: Mechanisms and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.E.; Bodla, R.; Eiden, G.C.; Nogar, N.S.; Smith, C.H.

    1994-06-01

    Ever since the first report of laser action, it has been recognized that laser ablation (evaporation/volatilization) may provide a useful sampling mechanism for chemical analysis. In particular, laser ablation is rapidly gaining popularity as a method of sample introduction for mass spectrometry. While most laser ablation/mass spectrometry has been performed with fixed frequency lasers operating at relatively high intensities/fluences ({ge}10{sup 8} W/cm{sup 2}, {ge}1 J/cm{sup 2}), there has been some recent interest in the use of tunable lasers to enhance the ionization yield of selected components in an analytical sample. This process has been termed resonant laser ablation (RLA), and typically relies on irradiation of a sample in a mass spectrometer with modest intensity laser pulses tuned to a one- or two-photon resonant transition in the analyte of interest. Potential advantages of RLA include: (1) simplification of the mass spectrum, by enhancement of signal from the analyte of interest; (2) improvement of the absolute detection limits by improving the ionization efficiency, and (3) improvement in relative sensitivity. The sensitivity enhancement results from reduction of spurious signal, and accompanying noise, in the detection channel. This spurious signal may be due to bleed through from adjacent mass channels, or from isobaric interferences. RLA tends to produce higher mass resolution because of minimal spatial spread in the ion source and small space charge effects. In this manuscript we present a survey of RLA attributes and applications.

  20. Fabrication of Sapphire Micro Optics by F 2-Laser Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesner, Markus; Ihlemann, Jürgen

    F2-laser irradiation enables high precision ablation of sapphire. A mask projection system with high numerical aperture, equipped with an optical coherence tomography module for focus control, delivers submicron resolution. High fluences of up to 10 J/cm2 lead to smooth, crack free surfaces. Various micro-optical elements like fiber tip lenses, gratings, and diffractive optical elements can be manufactured this way.

  1. Impact of proton fluence on DC and trapping characteristics in InAlN/GaN HEMTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossetto, I.; Rampazzo, F.; Gerardin, S.; Meneghini, M.; Bagatin, M.; Zanandrea, A.; Dua, C.; di Forte-Poisson, M.-A.; Aubry, R.; Oualli, M.; Delage, S. L.; Paccagnella, A.; Meneghesso, G.; Zanoni, E.

    2015-11-01

    Robustness of InAlN/GaN devices under proton radiation is investigated. Several proton fluences ranging from 1 × 1014 to 4 × 1014 have been considered on two typologies of devices. Displacement damage is found to be the major responsible of device DC degradation leading to threshold voltage positive shift, ON resistance increase and drain current decrease, in all cases well correlated with proton fluence. Negligible difference is noticed in displacement damage effects measured on different device typologies. Furthermore, device geometry does not influence the impact of proton radiation on main DC parameters, either if gate width or length are considered. Radiation significantly affects trapping properties. A good correlation between the so-called current collapse increase and proton fluence is demonstrated when a high gate drain voltage value is imposed as trapping condition. Moreover radiation enhances the contribution of dynamic ON resistance and transconductance peak variation on current collapse increase.

  2. Matrix and energy effects during in-situ determination of Cu isotope ratios by ultraviolet-femtosecond laser ablation multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarov, Marina; Horn, Ingo

    2015-09-01

    Copper isotope compositions in Cu-bearing metals and minerals have been measured by deep (194 nm) ultraviolet femtosecond laser ablation multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (UV-fsLA-MC-ICP-MS). Pure Cu-metal, brass, and several Cu-rich minerals (chalcopyrite, enargite, covellite, malachite and cuprite) have been investigated. A long-term reproducibility of better than 0.08‰ at the 95% confidence limit on the NIST SRM 976 (National Institute of Standards and Technology) Cu-metal standard has been achieved with this technique. The δ65Cu values for all samples have been calculated by standard-sample-standard bracketing with NIST SRM 976. All analyses have been carried out using Ni as a mass discrimination monitor added by nebulization prior to entering the plasma torch. For further verification samples have been analysed by conventional solution nebulization MC-ICP-MS and the results obtained have been compared with those from UV-fsLA-MC-ICP-MS. Several potential matrix-induced molecular interferences on the mineral copper isotope ratio, such as (32S33S)+ and (32S-16O17O)+ do not affect the Cu isotope measurements on sulfides, while hydrides, such as Zn-H or doubly-charged Sn2 + that interfere Ni isotopes can be either neglected or stripped by calculation. Matrix independent Cu-isotope measurements are sensitive to the energy density (fluence) applied onto the sample and can produce artificial shifts in the obtained δ65Cu values which are on the order of 3‰ for Cu-metal, 0.5‰ for brass and 0.3‰ for malachite when using energy density of up to 2 J/cm2 for ablation. A positive correlation between applied energy density and the magnitude of the isotope ratio shift has been found in the energy density range from 0.2 to 1.3 J/cm2 which is below the ablation threshold for ns-laser ablation. The results demonstrate that by using appropriate low fluence it is possible to measure Cu isotopic ratios in native copper and Cu-bearing sulfides

  3. Concurrent Monte Carlo transport and fluence optimization with fluence adjusting scalable transport Monte Carlo

    PubMed Central

    Svatos, M.; Zankowski, C.; Bednarz, B.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The future of radiation therapy will require advanced inverse planning solutions to support single-arc, multiple-arc, and “4π” delivery modes, which present unique challenges in finding an optimal treatment plan over a vast search space, while still preserving dosimetric accuracy. The successful clinical implementation of such methods would benefit from Monte Carlo (MC) based dose calculation methods, which can offer improvements in dosimetric accuracy when compared to deterministic methods. The standard method for MC based treatment planning optimization leverages the accuracy of the MC dose calculation and efficiency of well-developed optimization methods, by precalculating the fluence to dose relationship within a patient with MC methods and subsequently optimizing the fluence weights. However, the sequential nature of this implementation is computationally time consuming and memory intensive. Methods to reduce the overhead of the MC precalculation have been explored in the past, demonstrating promising reductions of computational time overhead, but with limited impact on the memory overhead due to the sequential nature of the dose calculation and fluence optimization. The authors propose an entirely new form of “concurrent” Monte Carlo treat plan optimization: a platform which optimizes the fluence during the dose calculation, reduces wasted computation time being spent on beamlets that weakly contribute to the final dose distribution, and requires only a low memory footprint to function. In this initial investigation, the authors explore the key theoretical and practical considerations of optimizing fluence in such a manner. Methods: The authors present a novel derivation and implementation of a gradient descent algorithm that allows for optimization during MC particle transport, based on highly stochastic information generated through particle transport of very few histories. A gradient rescaling and renormalization algorithm, and the

  4. MAPLE-deposited PFO films: influence of the laser fluence and repetition rate on the film emission and morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caricato, A. P.; Anni, M.; Cesaria, M.; Lattante, S.; Leggieri, G.; Leo, C.; Martino, M.; Perulli, A.; Resta, V.

    2015-06-01

    The Matrix-Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE) technique is emerging as an alternative route to the conventional methods for depositing organic materials, although the MAPLE-deposited films very often present high surface roughness and characteristic morphological features. Films of the blue-emitting polymer, poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene)—PFO, have been deposited by MAPLE to investigate the influence of the laser fluence and repetition rate on both their topography and emission properties. The laser fluence has been changed from 150 up to 450 mJ/cm2, while laser repetition rates of 2 and 10 Hz have been considered. The interplay/relationship between the topography and the emission properties of the MAPLE-deposited films has been studied by confocal microscopy, photoluminescence spectrometry and atomic force microscopy. It has been found that under high irradiation (fluence of 450 mJ/cm2) conditions, the sample surface is characterized by bubbles presenting the intrinsic PFO blue emission. Instead, while improvements in the film morphology can be observed for lowered fluence and laser repetition rate, green emission becomes predominant in such conditions. Such result is very interesting to better understand the MAPLE ablation mechanism, which is discussed in this study.

  5. Mechanism study of skin tissue ablation by nanosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Qiyin

    Understanding the fundamental mechanisms in laser tissue ablation is essential to improve clinical laser applications by reducing collateral damage and laser pulse energy requirement. The motive of this dissertation is to study skin tissue ablation by nanosecond laser pulses in a wide spectral region from near-infrared to ultraviolet for a clear understanding of the mechanism that can be used to improve future design of the pulsed lasers for dermatology and plastic surgery. Multiple laser and optical configurations have been constructed to generate 9 to 12ns laser pulses with similar profiles at 1064. 532, 266 and 213nm for this study of skin tissue ablation. Through measurements of ablation depth as a function cf laser pulse energy, the 589nm spectral line in the secondary radiation from ablated skin tissue samples was identified as the signature of the occurrence of ablation. Subsequently, this spectral signature has been used to investigate the probabilistic process of the ablation near the threshold at the four wavelengths. Measurements of the ablation probability were conducted as a function of the electrical field strength of the laser pulse and the ablation thresholds in a wide spectral range from 1064nm to 213nm were determined. Histology analysis and an optical transmission method were applied in assessing of the ablation depth per pulse to study the ablation process at irradiance levels higher than threshold. Because more than 70% of the wet weight of the skin tissue is water, optical breakdown and backscattering in water was also investigated along with a nonlinear refraction index measurement using a z-scan technique. Preliminary studies on ablation of a gelatin based tissue phantom are also reported. The current theoretical models describing ablation of soft tissue ablation by short laser pulses were critically reviewed. Since none of the existing models was found capable of explaining the experimental results, a new plasma-mediated model was developed

  6. Formation de nano-structures lors de l'ablation du silicium par laser femtoseconde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berton, Nicolas

    When a material is irradiated with a laser fluence near its ablation threshold, periodic surface structures appear on its surface. Those structures are perpendicular to the polarisation vector and their periods are close to the laser wavelength. They have been extensively studied for more than thirty years, and their origins are quite well understood. However, the recent use of ultra-short laser sources has renewed the subject. Because of the appearance of other structures and the modification of previously observed surface structures having slightly different characteristics. In that master thesis, we will propose explanations concerning the origins of those modifications and the growth of these new structures. Experiments were performed on silicon irradiated by a titanium/sapphire femtosecond laser, by varying several parameters including the fluence, number of pulses, pulse duration and the ambient medium. Some discrepancies with the previous theory of J.Sipe have been observed in the case of "classical ripples", the period obtained after irradiating is slightly random, and definitely lower than the laser incident wavelength; within certain conditions even two dimensional structures can be observed. Those features have been explained using a Sipe-Drude model which takes the electronic excitation during the pulse into account. Irradiating in a liquid medium, more exotic structures have been observed. In deed, ripples with higher frequency period approching 100 nm and perpendicular to the polarisation are also formed. Structures growing on the classical ripples are also formed that are parallels to the polarisation and their period is more important than the laser wavelength. These structures are probably due to interference between two surface waves. This study shows that the effect of the excited electron gaz during the laser irradiation cannot be ignored and that other phenomena, previously not taken into account, leads to new structures. Hypothesis on their

  7. Laser ablation of blepharopigmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Tanenbaum, M.; Karas, S.; McCord, C.D. Jr. )

    1988-01-01

    This article discusses laser ablation of blepharopigmentation in four stages: first, experimentally, where pigment vaporization is readily achieved with the argon blue-green laser; second, in the rabbit animal model, where eyelid blepharopigmentation markings are ablated with the laser; third, in human subjects, where the argon blue-green laser is effective in the ablation of implanted eyelid pigment; and fourth, in a case report, where, in a patient with improper pigment placement in the eyelid, the laser is used to safely and effectively ablate the undesired pigment markings. This article describes in detail the new technique of laser ablation of blepharopigmentation. Potential complications associated with the technique are discussed.

  8. Basis for equivalent fluence concept in space solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meulenberg, A.

    1982-01-01

    The equivalent fluence concept is defined, and its use and potential problems are noted. Silicon and GaAs solar cells are compared in a radiation environment. The analysis indicates that valid equivalent fluence values may be easier to obtain in GaAs than in silicon.

  9. Neutron detector simultaneously measures fluence and dose equivalent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dvorak, R. F.; Dyer, N. C.

    1967-01-01

    Neutron detector acts as both an area monitoring instrument and a criticality dosimeter by simultaneously measuring dose equivalent and fluence. The fluence is determined by activation of six foils one inch below the surface of the moderator. Dose equivalent is determined from activation of three interlocked foils at the center of the moderator.

  10. Reactor vessel fluence evaluation and dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Lois, L. )

    1992-01-01

    The methodology currently in use for the estimation of the fast neutron fluence to the pressure vessel (inside surface and reactor cavity) is based on discrete ordinates two-dimensional codes such as DOT or its updated version DORT. This methodology assumes a P[sub 3] scattering, an S[sub 8] quadrature approximation, and cross sections based on the ENDF/B-IV file. Associated one-dimensional codes are often used for the cross-section collapsing portion of the calculation. The neutron spectrum at the pressure vessel location of interest is estimated assuming a [sup 235]U, [sup 239]Pu, or [sup 241]Pu source spectrum or an appropriate combination thereof. The two-dimensional codes and associated methodologies were benchmarked in the early eighties using the results of the PCA and PSF Oak Ridge National Laboratory reactor experiments. The benchmarking experiments were estimated to provide an uncertainty of [approx]10%. The results of the calculations applied to a reactor were estimated to have an uncertainty of [approx]20%. This level of uncertainty was assumed in the estimation of the margin term defined in 10CFR50.61

  11. Spatiotemporal evolution of plasma molecular emission following laser ablation of explosive analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merten, Jonathan; Jones, Matthew; Sheppard, Cheyenne; Parigger, Christian; Allen, Susan

    2013-05-01

    The spatial and temporal evolution of the CN molecular emission following laser ablation of a TNT analog (3- nitrobenzoic acid) has been studied along with ablation of targets that contain neither nitro groups nor C-N bonds. At a fluence of ~104 J/cm2, behavior indicative of the ablation of native CN bonds has been observed in samples containing no native CN bonds. The recorded data show significant plasma background emissions that pose difficulties for direct spectral imaging. Spatially resolved images suggest that some of the observed phenomena are simply the result of the interaction of the plasma and the observation volume of the collection optics.

  12. Demonstration of periodic nanostructure formation with less ablation by double-pulse laser irradiation on titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Yuki; Sakata, Ryoichi; Konishi, Kazuki; Ono, Koki; Matsuoka, Shusaku; Watanabe, Kota; Inoue, Shunsuke; Hashida, Masaki; Sakabe, Shuji

    2016-06-01

    By pairing femtosecond laser pulses (duration ˜40 fs and central wavelength ˜810 nm) at an appropriate time interval, a laser-induced periodic surface structure (LIPSS) is formed with much less ablation than one formed with a single pulse. On a titanium plate, a pair of laser pulses with fluences of 70 and 140 mJ/cm2 and a rather large time interval (>10 ps) creates a LIPSS with an interspace of 600 nm, the same as that formed by a single pulse of 210 mJ/cm2, while the double pulse ablates only 4 nm, a quarter of the ablation depth of a single pulse.

  13. Geometrical analysis of the loss of ablation efficiency at non-normal incidence.

    PubMed

    Arba-Mosquera, Samuel; de Ortueta, Diego

    2008-03-17

    A general method to analyze the loss of ablation efficiency at non-normal incidence in a geometrical way is provided. The model is comprehensive and directly considers curvature, system geometry, applied correction, and astigmatism as model parameters, and indirectly laser beam characteristics and ablative spot properties. The model replaces the direct dependency on the fluence by a direct dependence on the nominal spot volume and on considerations about the area illuminated by the beam, reducing the analysis to pure geometry of impact. Compensation of the loss of ablation efficiency at non-normal incidence can be made at relatively low cost and would directly improve the quality of results. PMID:18542485

  14. Laser ablation of a platinum target in water. III. Laser-induced reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, William T.; Sasaki, Takeshi; Koshizaki, Naoto

    2006-12-01

    This is the third paper in our series studying the laser-target-liquid interactions occurring in laser ablation in liquids (LAL). Here, laser ablation of a platinum target in pure water at 355 nm wavelength is studied as a function of laser energy. We describe three distinct reaction regimes between the ablated target species and water at different laser focusing conditions. At low laser fluence (<10 J/cm{sup 2}), material removal is caused by laser heating of the platinum surface and the primary products are small clusters with a large percentage of platinum atoms in a nonzero oxidation state. At intermediate fluences (10-70 J/cm{sup 2}), platinum nanoparticles are the primary products. Our previous studies demonstrated that in this fluence regime ablation occurs through both thermal vaporization and explosive ejection of molten droplets. In both cases reactivity is small due to the low reactivity of platinum with water. At high fluences (>70 J/cm{sup 2}), we find large, faceted particles that are attributed to the drying of PtO{sub x} gels formed by reactive plasma etching of the target. Taken together these results demonstrate that significant tunability in the target-liquid interaction is possible during nanomaterial synthesis by LAL.

  15. Excimer laser ablation of ferrite ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, A. C.; Leung, W. P.; Krajnovich, D.

    We study the ablation of Ni-Zn or Mn-7n ferrites by 248-nm KrF excimer laser irradiation for high-resolution patterning. A transfer lens system is used to project the image of a mask irradiated by the pulsed KrF laser onto the ferrite sample. The threshold fluente for ablation of the ferrite surface is about 0.3 J/cm2. A typical fluente of 1 J/cm2 is used to produce good-quality patterning. Scanning electron microscopy of the ablated area shows a "glassy" skin with extensive microcracks and solidified droplets being ejected that is frozen in action. This skin can be removed by ultrasonic cleaning.

  16. NOTE: Comparison of sources of exit fluence variation for IMRT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Joseph K.; Clews, Luke; Gordon, J. James; Wang, Song; Greer, Peter B.; Siebers, Jeffrey V.

    2009-10-01

    The fluence exiting a patient during beam delivery can be used as treatment delivery quality assurance, either by direct comparison with expected exit fluences or by backprojection to reconstruct the patient dose. Multiple possible sources of measured exit fluence deviations exist, including changes in the beam delivery and changes in the patient anatomy. The purpose of this work is to compare the deviations caused by these sources. Machine delivery-related variability is measured by acquiring multiple dosimetric portal images (DPIs) of several test fields without a patient/phantom in the field over a time period of 2 months. Patient anatomy-related sources of fluence variability are simulated by computing transmission DPIs for a prostate patient using the same incident fluence for 11 different computed tomography (CT) images of the patient anatomy. The standard deviation (SD) and maximum deviation of the exit fluence, averaged over 5 mm × 5 mm square areas, is calculated for each test set. Machine delivery fluence SDs as large as 1% are observed for a sample patient field and as large as 2.5% for a picket-fence dMLC test field. Simulations indicate that day-to-day patient anatomy variations induce exit fluence SDs as large as 3.5%. The largest observed machine delivery deviations are 4% for the sample patient field and 7% for the picket-fence field, while the largest difference for the patient anatomy-related source is 8.5%. Since daily changes in patient anatomy can result in substantial exit fluence deviations, care should be taken when applying fluence back-projection to ensure that such deviations are properly attributed to their source.

  17. Laser Ablation of Dental Calculus Around 400 nm Using a Ti:Sapphire Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenly, J.; Seka, W.; Rechmann, P.

    2009-10-19

    A Nd:YAG laser-pumped, frequency-doubled Ti:sapphire laser is used for selective ablation of calculus. The laser provides ≤25 mJ at 400 nm (60-ns pulse width, 10-Hz repetition rate). The laser is coupled into an optical multimode fiber coiled around a 4-in.-diam drum to generate a top-hat output intensity profile. With coaxial water cooling, this is ideal for efficient, selective calculus removal. This is in stark contrast with tightly focused Gaussian beams that are energetically inefficient and lead to irreproducible results. Calculus is well ablated at high fluences ≥2 J/cm^2; stalling occurs below this fluence because of photobleaching. Healthy hard tissue is not removed at fluences ≤3 J/cm^2.

  18. UV laser ablation of parylene films from gold substrates

    SciTech Connect

    O. R. Musaev, P. Scott, J. M. Wrobel, and M. B. Kruger

    2009-11-19

    Parylene films, coating gold substrates, were removed by laser ablation using 248 nm light from an excimer laser. Each sample was processed by a different number of pulses in one of three different environments: air at atmospheric pressure, nitrogen at atmospheric pressure, and vacuum. The laser-induced craters were analyzed by optical microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Multi-pulse ablation thresholds of gold and parylene were estimated.

  19. Plasma mediated ablation of biological tissues with ultrashort laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Oraevsky, A.A. |; DaSilva, L.B.; Feit, M.D.

    1995-03-08

    Plasma mediated ablation of collagen gels and porcine cornea was studied at various laser pulse durations in the range from 350 fs to 1 ns at 1,053 nm wavelength. A time resolved stress detection technique was employed to measure transient stress profiles and amplitudes. Optical microscopy was used to characterize ablation craters qualitatively, while a wide band acoustic transducer helped to quantify tissue mechanical response and the ablation threshold. The ablation threshold was measured as a function of laser pulse duration and linear absorption coefficient. For nanosecond pulses the ablation threshold was found to have a strong dependence on the linear absorption coefficient of the material. As the pulse length decreased into the subpicosecond regime the ablation threshold became insensitive to the linear absorption coefficient. The ablation efficiency was found to be insensitive to both the laser pulse duration and the linear absorption coefficient. High quality ablation craters with no thermal or mechanical damage to surrounding material were obtained with 350 fs laser pulses. The mechanism of optical breakdown at the tissue surface was theoretically investigated. In the nanosecond regime, optical breakdown proceeds as an electron collisional avalanche ionization initiated by thermal seed electrons. These seed electrons are created by heating of the tissue by linear absorption. In the ultrashort pulse range, optical breakdown is initiated by the multiphoton ionization of the irradiated medium (6 photons in case of tissue irradiated at 1,053 nm wavelength), and becomes less sensitive to the linear absorption coefficient. The energy deposition profile is insensitive to both the laser pulse duration and the linear absorption coefficient.

  20. Near infrared femtosecond laser ablation of urinary calculi in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Jinze; Teichman, Joel M.; Kuranov, Roman V.; McElroy, Austin B.; Wang, Tianyi; Paranjape, Amit S.; Milner, Thomas E.

    2009-02-01

    Pulsed light emitted from a near infrared (λ=800nm) femtosecond laser is capable of plasma induced photodisruption of various materials. We used femtosecond laser pulses to ablate human urinary calculi. Femtosecond pulsed laser interaction with urinary calculi was investigated with various stone compositions, different incident fluences and number of applied pulses. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography was used to image cross sections of ablation craters on the surface of urinary calculi. Our results indicate that femtosecond laser pulses can ablate various calculi compositions. Crater diameter and depth varies from tens of microns to several hundred microns when up to 1000 pulses were applied. Future studies are required to determine if pulsed near infrared femtosecond laser pulses can be applied clinically for lithotripsy of urinary calculi.

  1. Preparation of platinum nanoparticles in liquids by laser ablation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binh Nguyen, The; Dinh Nguyen, Thanh; Nguyen, Quang Dong; Trinh Nguyen, Thi

    2014-09-01

    Platinum (Pt) nanoparticles were prepared in solutions of ethanol and TSC (trisodium citrate—Na3C6H5O7.nH2O) in water by laser ablation method using Nd:YAG laser. The role of laser fluence, laser wavelength and concentration of surfactant liquids in laser ablation process were investigated. The morphology, size distribution and optical properties of the Pt nanoparticles (NPs) were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), UV-vis spectrometer and x-ray diffraction measurements. The average diameter of Pt NPs prepared in ethanol and TSC solutions ranges around 7-9 nm and 10-12 nm, respectively. The results showed advantages of the laser ablation method.

  2. Photoactive dye enhanced tissue ablation for endoscopic laser prostatectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Minwoo; Nguyen, Trung Hau; Nguyen, Van Phuc; Oh, Junghwan; Kang, Hyun Wook

    2015-02-01

    Laser light has been widely used as a surgical tool to treat benign prostate hyperplasia with high laser power. The purpose of this study was to validate the feasibility of photoactive dye injection to enhance light absorption and eventually to facilitate tissue ablation with low laser power. The experiment was implemented on chicken breast due to minimal optical absorption Amaranth (AR), black dye (BD), hemoglobin powder (HP), and endoscopic marker (EM), were selected and tested in vitro with a customized 532-nm laser system with radiant exposure ranging from 0.9 to 3.9 J/cm2. Light absorbance and ablation threshold were measured with UV-VIS spectrometer and Probit analysis, respectively, and compared to feature the function of the injected dyes. Ablation performance with dye-injection was evaluated in light of radiant exposure, dye concentration, and number of injection. Higher light absorption by injected dyes led to lower ablation threshold as well as more efficient tissue removal in the order of AR, BD, HP, and EM. Regardless of the injected dyes, ablation efficiency principally increased with input parameter. Among the dyes, AR created the highest ablation rate of 44.2+/-0.2 μm/pulse due to higher absorbance and lower ablation threshold. Preliminary tests on canine prostate with a hydraulic injection system demonstrated that 80 W with dye injection yielded comparable ablation efficiency to 120 W with no injection, indicating 33 % reduced laser power with almost equivalent performance. In-depth comprehension on photoactive dye-enhanced tissue ablation can help accomplish efficient and safe laser treatment for BPH with low power application.

  3. Computational modeling of ultra-short-pulse ablation of enamel

    SciTech Connect

    London, R.A.; Bailey, D.S.; Young, D.A.

    1996-02-29

    A computational model for the ablation of tooth enamel by ultra-short laser pulses is presented. The role of simulations using this model in designing and understanding laser drilling systems is discussed. Pulses of duration 300 sec and intensity greater than 10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2} are considered. Laser absorption proceeds via multi-photon initiated plasma mechanism. The hydrodynamic response is calculated with a finite difference method, using an equation of state constructed from thermodynamic functions including electronic, ion motion, and chemical binding terms. Results for the ablation efficiency are presented. An analytic model describing the ablation threshold and ablation depth is presented. Thermal coupling to the remaining tissue and long-time thermal conduction are calculated. Simulation results are compared to experimental measurements of the ablation efficiency. Desired improvements in the model are presented.

  4. XeCl Laser Ablation Of Organic Polymers: Characterization Of Debris And Its Effect On Surface Morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singleton, Donald L.; Paraskevopoulos, George; Irwin, Robert S.; Taylor, Roderick S.; Leopold, Kurt E.

    1988-12-01

    Evidence is presented, that the formation of conical structures on the surface of polyi-mide etched at low laser fluences is caused by shielding of the underlying polymer by particulate debris. The results show that with increasing diameter of the etched zone, higher laser fluences are required to achieve a smooth surface. XeCl ablation of polyimide in an atmosphere of oxygen at 0.2 J/cm2 results in oxidation of nearly 90% of ablated carbon to CO2 and CO, but does not eliminate the deposition of debris on the perimeter of the etched zone.

  5. Nonequilibrium Ablation of Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milos, Frank S.; Chen, Yih K.; Gokcen, Tahir

    2012-01-01

    In previous work, an equilibrium ablation and thermal response model for Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator was developed. In general, over a wide range of test conditions, model predictions compared well with arcjet data for surface recession, surface temperature, in-depth temperature at multiple thermocouples, and char depth. In this work, additional arcjet tests were conducted at stagnation conditions down to 40 W/sq cm and 1.6 kPa. The new data suggest that nonequilibrium effects become important for ablation predictions at heat flux or pressure below about 80 W/sq cm or 10 kPa, respectively. Modifications to the ablation model to account for nonequilibrium effects are investigated. Predictions of the equilibrium and nonequilibrium models are compared with the arcjet data.

  6. Prolonged laser ablation effects of YBCO ceramic targets during thin film deposition: Influence of processing parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomov, R.; Tsaneva, V.; Tsanev, V.; Ouzounov, D.

    1996-12-01

    Cumulative laser irradiation during high-Tc superconducting thin film pulsed laser deposition (PLD) may have a detrimental effect on film characteristics. Initial decrease of deposition rate and gradual shift of the center of the deposited material spot towards the incoming laser beam were registered on cold glass substrates. Their absorbance was used for evaluation of the film thickness distribution over the substrate area. At the initial stage, two components of the spot could be distinguished along its short axis: central (˜cosn θ, n≫1) and peripherial (˜cos θ), while with cumulative irradiation the thickness followed an overall cosm θ (mfluence and oxygen environment. The results can be consistently explained suggesting the existence of an additional effective ablation threshold imposed by the modified surface relief.

  7. Graphene patterning by nanosecond laser ablation: the effect of the substrate interaction with graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Mas, Ana M.; Álvarez, Patricia; Campos, Nuria; Gómez, David; Menéndez, Rosa

    2016-08-01

    This paper focuses on the development of patterned graphene/substrate by means of green nanosecond pulse laser irradiation. Monolayer graphene samples supported on a Si/SiO2 substrate were patterned using 532 nm laser irradiation under fluence conditions ranging from 31 mJ cm‑2 to 4240 mJ cm‑2. Raman spectroscopy was used to investigate the effect of laser irradiation on the graphene. It was found that at 356 mJ cm‑2 selective ablation of the graphene occurs. However, at fluence values above 1030 mJ cm‑2 (when damage to the substrate is observed) no ablation of the graphene takes place. In contrast, its graphenic structure was found to have been modified. Only at fluence values where the ablation of the substrate occurs, is graphene eliminated in an area almost equivalent to that of the ablated substrate. In this case, additional damage to the graphene sheet edges is produced. The increment in the number of oxygenated functional groups in these regions, as measured by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), suggests that this damage is probably caused by thermal phenomena during the ablation of the substrate.

  8. Thermal Convection on an Ablating Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehmedagic, Igbal; Thangam, Siva

    2015-11-01

    Modeling and analysis of thermal convection of a metallic targets subject to radiative flux is of relevance to various manufacturing processes as well as for the development of protective shields. The present work involves the computational modeling of metallic targets subject to high heat fluxes that are both steady and pulsed. Modeling of the ablation and associated fluid dynamics when metallic surfaces are exposed to high intensity pulsed laser fluence at normal atmospheric conditions is considered. The incident energy from the laser is partly absorbed and partly reflected by the surface during ablation and subsequent vaporization of the convecting melt also participates in the radiative exchange. The energy distribution during the process between the bulk and vapor phase strongly depends on optical and thermodynamic properties of the irradiated material, radiation wavelength, and laser pulse intensity and duration. Computational findings based on effective representation and prediction of the heat transfer, melting and vaporization of the targeting material as well as plume formation and expansion are presented and discussed in the context of various ablation mechanisms, variable thermo-physical and optical properties, plume expansion and surface geometry. Funded in part by U. S. Army ARDEC, Picatinny Arsenal, NJ.

  9. Calcified lesion modeling for excimer laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Holly A.; Archuleta, Andrew; Splinter, Robert

    2009-06-01

    Objective: Develop a representative calcium target model to evaluate penetration of calcified plaque lesions during atherectomy procedures using 308 nm Excimer laser ablation. Materials and Methods: An in-vitro model representing human calcified plaque was analyzed using Plaster-of-Paris and cement based composite materials as well as a fibrinogen model. The materials were tested for mechanical consistency. The most likely candidate(s) resulting from initial mechanical and chemical screening was submitted for ablation testing. The penetration rate of specific multi-fiber catheter designs and a single fiber probe was obtained and compared to that in human cadaver calcified plaque. The effects of lasing parameters and catheter tip design on penetration speed in a representative calcified model were verified against the results in human cadaver specimens. Results: In Plaster of Paris, the best penetration was obtained using the single fiber tip configuration operating at 100 Fluence, 120 Hz. Calcified human lesions are twice as hard, twice as elastic as and much more complex than Plaster of Paris. Penetration of human calcified specimens was highly inconsistent and varied significantly from specimen to specimen and within individual specimens. Conclusions: Although Plaster of Paris demonstrated predictable increases in penetration with higher energy density and repetition rate, it can not be considered a totally representative laser ablation model for calcified lesions. This is in part due to the more heterogeneous nature and higher density composition of cadaver intravascular human calcified occlusions. Further testing will require a more representative model of human calcified lesions.

  10. Probing timescales during back side ablation of Molybdenum thin films with optical and electrical measurement techniques.

    PubMed

    Bartl, D; Ametowobla, M; Schmid, F; Letsch, A; Hafner, M; Nolte, S; Tünnermann, A

    2013-07-15

    In this study we present a new measurement technique to investigate the timescales of back side ablation of conductive films, using Molybdenum as an application example from photovoltaics. With ultrashort laser pulses at fluences below 0.6 J/cm(2), we ablate the Mo film in the shape of a fully intact Mo 'disc' from a transparent substrate. By monitoring the time-dependent current flow across a specifically developed test structure, we determine the time required for the lift-off of the disc. This value decreases with increasing laser fluence down to a minimum of 21 ± 2 ns. Furthermore, we record trajectories of the discs using a shadowgraphic setup. Ablated discs escape with a maximum velocity of 150 ± 5 m/s whereas droplets of Mo forming at the center of the disc can reach velocities up to 710 ± 11 m/s. PMID:23938494

  11. Renal Ablation Update

    PubMed Central

    Khiatani, Vishal; Dixon, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    Thermal ablative technologies have evolved considerably in the recent past and are now an important component of current clinical guidelines for the treatment of small renal masses. Both radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation have intermediate-term oncologic control that rivals surgical options, with favorable complication profiles. Studies comparing cryoablation and radiofrequency ablation show no significant difference in oncologic control or complication profile between the two modalities. Early data from small series with microwave ablation have shown similar promising results. Newer technologies including irreversible electroporation and high-intensity–focused ultrasound have theoretical advantages, but will require further research before becoming a routine part of the ablation armamentarium. The purpose of this review article is to discuss the current ablative technologies available, briefly review their mechanisms of action, discuss technical aspects of each, and provide current data supporting their use. PMID:25049445

  12. Renal ablation update.

    PubMed

    Khiatani, Vishal; Dixon, Robert G

    2014-06-01

    Thermal ablative technologies have evolved considerably in the recent past and are now an important component of current clinical guidelines for the treatment of small renal masses. Both radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation have intermediate-term oncologic control that rivals surgical options, with favorable complication profiles. Studies comparing cryoablation and radiofrequency ablation show no significant difference in oncologic control or complication profile between the two modalities. Early data from small series with microwave ablation have shown similar promising results. Newer technologies including irreversible electroporation and high-intensity-focused ultrasound have theoretical advantages, but will require further research before becoming a routine part of the ablation armamentarium. The purpose of this review article is to discuss the current ablative technologies available, briefly review their mechanisms of action, discuss technical aspects of each, and provide current data supporting their use. PMID:25049445

  13. Probing the Relationship Between Detected Ion Intensity, Laser Fluence, and Beam Profile in Thin Film and Tissue in MALDI MSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steven, Rory T.; Race, Alan M.; Bunch, Josephine

    2016-08-01

    Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI MSI) is increasingly widely used to provide information regarding molecular location within tissue samples. The nature of the photon distribution within the irradiated region, the laser beam profile, and fluence, will significantly affect the form and abundance of the detected ions. Previous studies into these phenomena have focused on circular-core optic fibers or Gaussian beam profiles irradiating dried droplet preparations, where peptides were employed as the analyte of interest. Within this work, we use both round and novel square core optic fibers of 100 and 50 μm diameter to deliver the laser photons to the sample. The laser beam profiles were recorded and analyzed to quantify aspects of the photon distributions and their relation to the spectral data obtained with each optic fiber. Beam profiles with a relatively small number of large beam profile features were found to give rise to the lowest threshold fluence. The detected ion intensity versus fluence relationship was investigated, for the first time, in both thin films of α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA) with phosphatidylcholine (PC) 34:1 lipid standard and in CHCA coated murine tissue sections for both the square and round optic fibers in continuous raster imaging mode. The fluence threshold of ion detection was found to occur at between ~14 and ~64 J/m2 higher in tissue compared with thin film for the same lipid, depending upon the optic fiber employed. The image quality is also observed to depend upon the fluence employed during image acquisition.

  14. Probing the Relationship Between Detected Ion Intensity, Laser Fluence, and Beam Profile in Thin Film and Tissue in MALDI MSI.

    PubMed

    Steven, Rory T; Race, Alan M; Bunch, Josephine

    2016-08-01

    Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI MSI) is increasingly widely used to provide information regarding molecular location within tissue samples. The nature of the photon distribution within the irradiated region, the laser beam profile, and fluence, will significantly affect the form and abundance of the detected ions. Previous studies into these phenomena have focused on circular-core optic fibers or Gaussian beam profiles irradiating dried droplet preparations, where peptides were employed as the analyte of interest. Within this work, we use both round and novel square core optic fibers of 100 and 50 μm diameter to deliver the laser photons to the sample. The laser beam profiles were recorded and analyzed to quantify aspects of the photon distributions and their relation to the spectral data obtained with each optic fiber. Beam profiles with a relatively small number of large beam profile features were found to give rise to the lowest threshold fluence. The detected ion intensity versus fluence relationship was investigated, for the first time, in both thin films of α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA) with phosphatidylcholine (PC) 34:1 lipid standard and in CHCA coated murine tissue sections for both the square and round optic fibers in continuous raster imaging mode. The fluence threshold of ion detection was found to occur at between ~14 and ~64 J/m(2) higher in tissue compared with thin film for the same lipid, depending upon the optic fiber employed. The image quality is also observed to depend upon the fluence employed during image acquisition. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27206508

  15. Probing the Relationship Between Detected Ion Intensity, Laser Fluence, and Beam Profile in Thin Film and Tissue in MALDI MSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steven, Rory T.; Race, Alan M.; Bunch, Josephine

    2016-05-01

    Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI MSI) is increasingly widely used to provide information regarding molecular location within tissue samples. The nature of the photon distribution within the irradiated region, the laser beam profile, and fluence, will significantly affect the form and abundance of the detected ions. Previous studies into these phenomena have focused on circular-core optic fibers or Gaussian beam profiles irradiating dried droplet preparations, where peptides were employed as the analyte of interest. Within this work, we use both round and novel square core optic fibers of 100 and 50 μm diameter to deliver the laser photons to the sample. The laser beam profiles were recorded and analyzed to quantify aspects of the photon distributions and their relation to the spectral data obtained with each optic fiber. Beam profiles with a relatively small number of large beam profile features were found to give rise to the lowest threshold fluence. The detected ion intensity versus fluence relationship was investigated, for the first time, in both thin films of α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA) with phosphatidylcholine (PC) 34:1 lipid standard and in CHCA coated murine tissue sections for both the square and round optic fibers in continuous raster imaging mode. The fluence threshold of ion detection was found to occur at between ~14 and ~64 J/m2 higher in tissue compared with thin film for the same lipid, depending upon the optic fiber employed. The image quality is also observed to depend upon the fluence employed during image acquisition.

  16. Radiofrequency Ablation of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Marc; Mikityansky, Igor; Kam, Anthony; Libutti, Steven K.; Walther, McClellan M.; Neeman, Ziv; Locklin, Julia K.; Wood, Bradford J.

    2008-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has been used for over 18 years for treatment of nerve-related chronic pain and cardiac arrhythmias. In the last 10 years, technical developments have increased ablation volumes in a controllable, versatile, and relatively inexpensive manner. The host of clinical applications for RFA have similarly expanded. Current RFA equipment, techniques, applications, results, complications, and research avenues for local tumor ablation are summarized. PMID:15383844

  17. Radiofrequency Ablation of Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Marc; Mikityansky, Igor; Kam, Anthony; Libutti, Steven K.; Walther, McClellan M.; Neeman, Ziv; Locklin, Julia K.; Wood, Bradford J.

    2004-09-15

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has been used for over 18 years for treatment of nerve-related chronic pain and cardiac arrhythmias. In the last 10 years, technical developments have increased ablation volumes in a controllable, versatile, and relatively inexpensive manner. The host of clinical applications for RFA have similarly expanded. Current RFA equipment, techniques, applications, results, complications, and research avenues for local tumor ablation are summarized.

  18. Lung Ablation: Whats New?

    PubMed

    Xiong, Lillian; Dupuy, Damian E

    2016-07-01

    Lung cancer had an estimated incidence of 221,200 in 2015, making up 13% of all cancer diagnoses. Tumor ablation is an important treatment option for nonsurgical lung cancer and pulmonary metastatic patients. Radiofrequency ablation has been used for over a decade with newer modalities, microwave ablation, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation presenting as additional and possibly improved treatment options for patients. This minimally invasive therapy is best for small primary lesions or favorably located metastatic tumors. These technologies can offer palliation and sometimes cure of thoracic malignancies. This article discusses the current available technologies and techniques available for tumor ablation. PMID:27050331

  19. Formation and characterization of nanoparticles via laser ablation in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golightly, Justin Samuel

    The work presented in this thesis encompassed laser ablation of various transition metals within a liquid environment. Through an improved understanding of the ablation process, control over the properties of the resultant nanoparticles can be obtained, and thusly nanoparticles can be tailored with specific properties. Creation of nanoparticles via laser ablation in solution is a relatively youngtechnique for nanoparticle synthesis, and the work presented should prove useful in guiding further exploration in ablation processes in liquids for nanomaterial production. When a laser is focused onto a target under a liquid environment, the target material and its surrounding liquid are vaporized. The concoction of vapor is ejected normal to the surface as a bubble. The bubble has a temperature reaching the boiling point of the metal, and has a gradient to the boiling point of the solvent. The bubble expands until it reaches a critical volume, and then subsequently collapses. It is within this bubble that nanoparticle formation occurs. As the bubble expands, the vapor cools and nanoparticle growth transpires. During the bubble collapse, pressures reaching GigaPascals have been reported, and a secondary nanoparticle formation occurs as a result of these high pressures. Chapter 1 delves a little more into the nanoparticle formation mechanisms, as well as an introduction to the analytical techniques used for characterization. Ablation of titanium took place in isopropanol, ethanol, water, and n-hexane, under various fluences, with a 532 nm Nd:YAG operating at 10 Hz. It was found that a myriad of nanoparticles could be made with vastly different compositions that were both solvent and fluence dependent. Nanoparticles were made that incorporated carbon and oxygen from the solvent, showing how solvent choice is an important factor in nanoparticle creation. Chapter 3 discusses the results of the titanium work in great detail and demonstrates carbide production with ablation in

  20. Light parameters influence cell viability in antifungal photodynamic therapy in a fluence and rate fluence-dependent manner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prates, Renato A.; da Silva, Eriques G.; Yamada, Aécio M.; Suzuki, Luis C.; Paula, Claudete R.; Ribeiro, Martha S.

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of light parameters on yeast cells. It has been proposed for many years that photodynamic therapy (PDT) can inactivate microbial cells. A number of photosensitizer and light sources were reported in different light parameters and in a range of dye concentrations. However, much more knowledge concerning the importance of fluence, fluence rate and exposure time are required for a better understanding of the photodynamic efficiency. Suspensions (106 CFU/mL) of Candida albicans, Candida krusei, and Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii were used. Two fluence rates, 100 and 300 mW/cm2 were compared at 3, 6, and 9 min of irradiation, resulting fluences from 18 to 162 J/cm2. The light source was a laser emitting at λ = 660 nm with output power adjusted at 30 and 90 mW. As photosensitizer, one hundred-μM methylene blue was used. Temperature was monitored to verify possible heat effect and reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation was evaluated. The same fluence in different fluence rates showed dissimilar levels of inactivation on yeast cells as well as in ROS formation. In addition, the increase of the fluence rate showed an improvement on cell photoinactivation. PDT was efficient against yeast cells (6 log reduction), and no significant temperature increase was observed. Fluence per se should not be used as an isolate parameter to compare photoinactivation effects on yeast cells. The higher fluence rate was more effective than the lower one. Furthermore, an adequate duration of light exposure cannot be discarded.

  1. Continuous multigram nanoparticle synthesis by high-power, high-repetition-rate ultrafast laser ablation in liquids.

    PubMed

    Streubel, René; Barcikowski, Stephan; Gökce, Bilal

    2016-04-01

    Utilizing a novel laser system consisting of a 500 W, 10 MHz, 3 ps laser source which is fully synchronized with a polygon scanner reaching scanning speeds up to 500 m/s, we explore the possibilities to increase the productivity of nanoparticle synthesis by laser ablation in liquids. By exploiting the high scanning speed, laser-induced cavitation bubbles are spatially bypassed at high repetition rates and continuous multigram ablation rates up to 4 g/h are demonstrated for platinum, gold, silver, aluminum, copper, and titanium. Furthermore, the applicable, ablation-effective repetition rate is increased by two orders of magnitude. The ultrafast ablation mechanisms are investigated for different laser fluences, repetition rates, interpulse distances, and ablation times, while the resulting trends are successfully described by validating a model developed for ultrafast laser ablation in air to hold in liquids as well. PMID:27192268

  2. Ablative Thermal Protection System Fundamentals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, Robin A. S.

    2013-01-01

    This is the presentation for a short course on the fundamentals of ablative thermal protection systems. It covers the definition of ablation, description of ablative materials, how they work, how to analyze them and how to model them.

  3. HIGH FLUENCE NEUTRON SOURCE FOR NONDESTRUCTIVE CHARACTERIZATION OF NUCLEAR WASTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    We propose to research the basic plasma physics necessary to develop a high fluence neutron source based on the inertial electrostatically confined (IEC) plasma. An intense neutron source directly addresses the capability to characterize nuclear materials under difficult measurem...

  4. System and Method for Determining Fluence of a Substance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A system and method for measuring a fluence of gas are disclosed. The system has a first light detector capable of outputting an electrical signal based on an amount of light received. A barrier is positionable adjacent the first light detector and is susceptible to a change in dimension from the fluence of the gas. The barrier permits a portion of light from being received by the first light detector. The change in the dimension of the barrier changes the electrical signal output from the first light detector. A second light detector is positionable to receive light representative of the first light detector without the barrier. The system and method have broad application to detect fluence of gas that may cause erosion chemical reaction causing erosive deterioration. One application is in low orbit Earth for detecting the fluence of atomic oxygen.

  5. Anisotropy of the neutron fluence from a plasma focus.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. H.; Shomo, L. P.; Kim, K. H.

    1972-01-01

    The fluence of neutrons from a plasma focus was measured by gamma spectrometry of an activated silver target. This method results in a significant increase in accuracy over the beta-counting method. Multiple detectors were used in order to measure the anisotropy of the fluence of neutrons. The fluence was found to be concentrated in a cone with a half-angle of 30 deg about the axis, and to drop off rapidly outside of this cone; the anisotropy was found to depend upon the total yield of neutrons. This dependence was strongest on the axis. Neither the axial concentration of the fluence of neutrons nor its dependence on the total yield of neutrons is explained by any of the currently proposed models. Some other explanations, including the possibility of an axially distributed source, are considered.

  6. Laser damage and ablation of differently prepared CaF2(111) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sils, J.; Reichling, M.; Matthias, E.; Johansen, H.

    1999-12-01

    Ablation thresholds and damage behavior of cleaved and polished CaF2(111) surfaces produced by single shot irradiation with 248 nm/14 ns laser pulses have been investigated using the photoacoustic mirage technique and scanning electron microscopy. The standard polishing yields an ablation threshold of typically 20 J/cm2. When surfaces are polished chemo-mechanically the threshold is raised to 43 J/cm2. Polishing by diamond turning leads to intermediate values around 30 J/cm2. Cleaved surfaces possess no well-defined damage threshold. The damage topography of conventionally polished surfaces shows ablation of flakes across the laser heated area with cracks along the cleavage planes. In the case of chemo-mechanical polishing only a few cracks appear. Diamond turned surfaces show small optical absorption, but cracks and ablation of tiles. The origin of such different damage behavior is discussed.

  7. Microwave Ablation of Hepatic Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Lubner, Meghan G.; Brace, Christopher L.; Ziemlewicz, Tim J.; Hinshaw, J. Louis; Lee, Fred T.

    2013-01-01

    Microwave ablation is an extremely promising heat-based thermal ablation modality that has particular applicability in treating hepatic malignancies. Microwaves can generate very high temperatures in very short time periods, potentially leading to improved treatment efficiency and larger ablation zones. As the available technology continues to improve, microwave ablation is emerging as a valuable alternative to radiofrequency ablation in the treatment of hepatic malignancies. This article reviews the current state of microwave ablation including technical and clinical considerations. PMID:24436518

  8. Effects of fluence rate on cytoxicity during photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitnik, Theresa M.; Henderson, Barbara W.

    1997-05-01

    Production of 1O2 during PDT may be limited as a consequence of tissue oxygen depletion by the photodynamic process. This may in turn limit cytotoxicity during PDT. One possible way of controlling oxygen consumption during treatment is through modification of fluence rate. We have studied the impact of fluence rate on tumor oxygenation and direct PDT cytotoxicity using the RIF murine tumor and the photosensitizer Photofrin. Both fluence rates caused an acute decrease in tumor pO2 to severely hypoxic levels. With 150 mW/cm2 light median pO2 remained low during prolonged exposure, while with 30 mW/cm2 light median pO2 values recovered to above control levels. When tumors treated with 135 J/cm2 at each fluence rate were tested for cell survival in a clonogenic assay, 30 mW/cm2 significantly decreased both cell clonogenicity and plating efficiency compared to light-only controls. Slight but insignificant decreases were found with 150 mW/cm2. During in vitro PDT the fluence rate of light delivery had no effect on cell survival. In summary, we have found that low fluence rate improves tumor oxygenation and direct cell effects during PDT.

  9. Silver nano-entities through ultrafast double ablation in aqueous media for surface enhanced Raman scattering and photonics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna Podagatlapalli, G.; Hamad, Syed; Tewari, Surya P.; Sreedhar, S.; Prasad, Muvva D.; Venugopal Rao, S.

    2013-02-01

    We have fabricated stable silver nanoparticles (NPs) and nanostructures (NSs) effectively through double ablation of bulk silver substrate immersed in double distilled water using ˜2 ps laser pulses. The effects of multiple/double/single ablation on silver substrates via surface morphology studies along with average size distribution of Ag NPs were investigated. Prepared Ag NPs in solution exhibited yellow color with an absorption peak near 410 nm, assigned to localized surface Plasmon resonance of nano-sized silver. Depending on the ablation parameters average sizes observed were ˜13 nm/˜17 nm in multiple/double ablation case and ˜7 nm in single ablation case. High resolution transmission electron microscope studies highlighted that most of the Ag NPs were spherical and polycrystalline in nature. Surface morphology of the substrates was characterized by field emission scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscope. A different scenario was observed in the double ablation case compared to single/multiple ablation case. Double ablation resulted in dome like NSs on the substrate with dimensions of few hundreds of nanometers while single ablation did not. Nonlinear optical (NLO) properties of Ag NPs were investigated using Z-scan technique with ˜2 ps pulses and corresponding NLO coefficients were obtained. Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) studies on multiple/double ablated Ag substrates with adsorbed Rhodamine 6G molecules were carried out using excitation wavelengths of 532 nm, 785 nm, and three orders of enhancement in Raman signal intensity was observed. Furthermore, influence of laser fluence on the fabrication of SERS active Ag substrates with double ablation was also investigated. In this case, Raman spectra of adsorbed Research Department eXplosive (RDX) molecules on ablated surfaces were recorded for 532 nm and 785 nm excitation. Enhancements up to 460 were observed from substrates fabricated at fluences of 12 J/cm2, 16 J/cm2 with

  10. Neutron fluences and dose equivalents measured with passive detectors on LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, A. L.; Benton, E. V.; Armstrong, T. W.; Colborn, B. L.

    1996-01-01

    Neutron fluences were measured on LDEF in the low energy (< 1 MeV) and high energy (> 1 MeV) ranges. The low energy detectors used the 6Li(n,alpha)T reaction with Gd foil absorbers to separate thermal (< 0.2 eV) and resonance (0.2 eV-1 MeV) neutron response. High energy detectors contained sets of fission foils (181Ta, 209Bi, 232Th, 238U) with different neutron energy thresholds. The measured neutron fluences together with predicted spectral shapes were used to estimate neutron dose equivalents. The detectors were located in the A0015 and P0006 experiments at the west and Earth sides of LDEF under shielding varying from 1 to 19 g/cm2. Dose equivalent rates varied from 0.8 to 3.3 microSv/d for the low energy neutrons and from 160 to 390 microSv/d for the high energy neutrons. This compares with TLD measured absorbed dose rates in the range of 1000-3000 microGy/d near these locations and demonstrates that high energy neutrons contribute a significant fraction of the total dose equivalent in LEO. Comparisons between measurements and calculations were made for high energy neutrons based on fission fragment tracks generated by fission foils at different shielding depths. A simple 1-D slab geometry was used in the calculations. Agreement between measurements and calculations depended on both shielding depth and threshold energy of the fission foils. Differences increased as both shielding and threshold energy increased. The modeled proton/neutron spectra appeared deficient at high energies. A 3-D model of the experiments is needed to help resolve the differences.

  11. Increasing the penetration depth for ultrafast laser tissue ablation using glycerol based optical clearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabay, Ilan; Subramanian, Kaushik G.; Martin, Chris; Yildirim, Murat; Tuchin, Valery V.; Ben-Yakar, Adela

    2016-03-01

    Background: Deep tissue ablation is the next challenge in ultrafast laser microsurgery. By focusing ultrafast pulses below the tissue surface one can create an ablation void confined to the focal volume. However, as the ablation depth increases in a scattering tissue, increase in the required power can trigger undesired nonlinear phenomena out of focus that restricts our ability to ablate beyond a maximum ablation depth of few scattering lengths. Optical clearing (OC) might reduce the intensity and increase the maximal ablation depth by lowering the refractive index mismatch, and therefore reducing scattering. Some efforts to ablate deeper showed out of focus damage, while others used brutal mechanical methods for clearing. Our clinical goal is to create voids in the scarred vocal folds and inject a biomaterial to bring back the tissue elasticity and restore phonation. Materials and methods: Fresh porcine vocal folds were excised and applied a biocompatible OC agent (75% glycerol). Collimated transmittance was monitored. The tissue was optically cleared and put under the microscope for ablation threshold measurements at different depths. Results: The time after which the tissue was optically cleared was roughly two hours. Fitting the threshold measurements to an exponential decay graph indicated that the scattering length of the tissue increased to 83+/-16 μm, which is more than doubling the known scattering length for normal tissue. Conclusion: Optical clearing with Glycerol increases the tissue scattering length and therefore reduces the energy for ablation and increases the maximal ablation depth. This technique can potentially improve clinical microsurgery.

  12. Ablation characteristics of electrospun core-shell nanofiber by femtosecond laser.

    PubMed

    Park, ChangKyoo; Xue, Ruipeng; Lannutti, John J; Farson, Dave F

    2016-08-01

    This study examined the femtosecond laser ablation properties of core and shell polymers their relationship to the ablation characteristics of core-shell nanofibers. The single-pulse ablation threshold of bulk polycaprolactone (PCL) was measured to be 2.12J/cm(2) and that of bulk polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) was 4.07J/cm(2). The incubation coefficients were measured to be 0.82±0.02 for PCL and 0.53±0.03 for PDMS. PDMS-PCL core-shell and pure PCL nanofibers were fabricated by electrospinning. The energy/volume of pure PCL and PDMS-PCL core-shell nanofiber ablation was investigated by measuring linear ablation grooves made at different scanning speeds. At large scanning speed, higher energy/volume was required for machining PDMS-PCL nanofiber than for PCL nanofiber. However, at small scanning speed, comparable energy/volume was measured for PDMS-PCL and PCL nanofiber ablation. Additionally, in linear scanned ablation of PDMS-PCL fibers at small laser pulse energy and large scanning speed, there were partially ablated fibers where the shell was ablated but the core remained. This was attributed to the lower ablation threshold of the shell material. PMID:27157748

  13. Surface roughness and wettability of dentin ablated with ultrashort pulsed laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing; Lü, Peijun; Sun, Yuchun; Wang, Yong

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the surface roughness and wettability of dentin following ultrashort pulsed laser ablation with different levels of fluence and pulse overlap (PO). Twenty-five extracted human teeth crowns were cut longitudinally into slices of approximately 1.5-mm thick and randomly divided into nine groups of five. Samples in groups 1 to 8 were ablated with an ultrashort pulsed laser through a galvanometric scanning system. Samples in group 9 were prepared using a mechanical rotary instrument. The surface roughness of samples from each group was then measured using a three-dimensional profile measurement laser microscope, and wettability was evaluated by measuring the contact angle of a drop of water on the prepared dentin surface using an optical contact angle measuring device. The results showed that both laser fluence and PO had an effect on dentin surface roughness. Specifically, a higher PO decreased dentin surface roughness and reduced the effect of high-laser fluence on decreasing the surface roughness in some groups. Furthermore, all ablated dentin showed a contact angle of approximately 0 deg, meaning that laser ablation significantly improved wettability. Adjustment of ultrashort pulsed laser parameters can, therefore, significantly alter dentin surface roughness and wettability.

  14. Thermal activation in KrF laser ablation of CuCl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuper, S.; Brannon, J.

    1994-07-01

    248 nm excimer abaltion of carefully prepared CuCi samples is reported, and shown to occur by a predominantly thermal mechanism. Using a quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) to monitor abaltion, a precise detailed plot of single-pulse mass removal versus incident fluence was obtained for fluences up to 150 mJ/sq cm. A two-parameter Arrhenius exponential function was found to fit the experimental abaltion data. Calculations of laser-induced surface heating were caried out by use of a finite-difference heating code, formulated in terms of enthalpy. Ablation was observed to commence at a fluence of 25 mJ/sq cm, where the calculated surface temperature is approximately 910 K-some 200 K above the melting point. Dynamic ablation was included in the finite-difference calculation by allowing the position of the CuCl surface Xi to vary in time. The best data fit is provided by the zeroth-order kinetic equation: d Xi/dt = (16 A/ns)exp(-38 kJ/mole)/RT(sub Xi) where T(sub Xi) is the surface temperature. A thermodynamic calculation shows the average heat of CuCl vaporization in the temperature range from 900 to 2000 K to be near the fit of value of 38 kJ/mole. From plots of the ablation depth versus time, the CuCl surface was estimated to recede during the ablation at rates up to 10 cm/s.

  15. Convergent ablator performance measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, D. G.; Spears, B. K.; Braun, D. G.; Sorce, C. M.; Celliers, P. M.; Collins, G. W.; Landen, O. L.; Olson, R. E.

    2010-10-15

    The velocity and remaining ablator mass of an imploding capsule are critical metrics for assessing the progress toward ignition of an inertially confined fusion experiment. These and other convergent ablator performance parameters have been measured using a single streaked x-ray radiograph. Traditional Abel inversion of such a radiograph is ill-posed since backlighter intensity profiles and x-ray attenuation by the ablated plasma are unknown. To address this we have developed a regularization technique which allows the ablator density profile {rho}(r) and effective backlighter profile I{sub 0}(y) at each time step to be uniquely determined subject to the constraints that {rho}(r) is localized in radius space and I{sub 0}(y) is delocalized in object space. Moments of {rho}(r) then provide the time-resolved areal density, mass, and average radius (and thus velocity) of the remaining ablator material. These results are combined in the spherical rocket model to determine the ablation pressure and mass ablation rate during the implosion. The technique has been validated on simulated radiographs of implosions at the National Ignition Facility [Miller et al., Nucl. Fusion 44, 228 (2004)] and implemented on experiments at the OMEGA laser facility [Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)].

  16. Tumor Ablation and Nanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Manthe, Rachel L.; Foy, Susan P.; Krishnamurthy, Nishanth; Sharma, Blanka; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2010-01-01

    Next to surgical resection, tumor ablation is a commonly used intervention in the treatment of solid tumors. Tumor ablation methods include thermal therapies, photodynamic therapy, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) producing agents. Thermal therapies induce tumor cell death via thermal energy and include radiofrequency, microwave, high intensity focused ultrasound, and cryoablation. Photodynamic therapy and ROS producing agents cause increased oxidative stress in tumor cells leading to apoptosis. While these therapies are safe and viable alternatives when resection of malignancies is not feasible, they do have associated limitations that prevent their widespread use in clinical applications. To improve the efficacy of these treatments, nanoparticles are being studied in combination with nonsurgical ablation regimens. In addition to better thermal effect on tumor ablation, nanoparticles can deliver anticancer therapeutics that show synergistic anti-tumor effect in the presence of heat and can also be imaged to achieve precision in therapy. Understanding the molecular mechanism of nanoparticle-mediated tumor ablation could further help engineer nanoparticles of appropriate composition and properties to synergize the ablation effect. This review aims to explore the various types of nonsurgical tumor ablation methods currently used in cancer treatment and potential improvements by nanotechnology applications. PMID:20866097

  17. Convergent ablator performance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, D. G.; Spears, B. K.; Braun, D. G.; Olson, R. E.; Sorce, C. M.; Celliers, P. M.; Collins, G. W.; Landen, O. L.

    2010-10-01

    The velocity and remaining ablator mass of an imploding capsule are critical metrics for assessing the progress toward ignition of an inertially confined fusion experiment. These and other convergent ablator performance parameters have been measured using a single streaked x-ray radiograph. Traditional Abel inversion of such a radiograph is ill-posed since backlighter intensity profiles and x-ray attenuation by the ablated plasma are unknown. To address this we have developed a regularization technique which allows the ablator density profile ρ(r ) and effective backlighter profile I0(y) at each time step to be uniquely determined subject to the constraints that ρ(r ) is localized in radius space and I0(y) is delocalized in object space. Moments of ρ(r ) then provide the time-resolved areal density, mass, and average radius (and thus velocity) of the remaining ablator material. These results are combined in the spherical rocket model to determine the ablation pressure and mass ablation rate during the implosion. The technique has been validated on simulated radiographs of implosions at the National Ignition Facility [Miller et al., Nucl. Fusion 44, 228 (2004)] and implemented on experiments at the OMEGA laser facility [Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)].

  18. Contact and non-contact ultrasonic diagnostics of shock waves driven by single-shot femtosecond laser ablation of titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ageev, E. I.; Veiko, V. P.; Kudryashov, S. I.; Petrov, A. A.; Samokhvalov, A. A.

    2015-11-01

    Initial pressures and expansion speeds of air shock waves, driven by single-shot femtosecond laser ablation of titanium surface at fluences up to 6 J/cm2, were acquired by means of front-side non-contact time-of-flight ultrasonic measurements. Similar contact ultrasonic measurements on the rear side of the titanium target demonstrate general correlation of ultrasonic amplitudes the measured in the contact and non-contact modes at high ablative pressures (above 100 GPa, superelastic propagation regime), and strong deviation of these dependences at lower ablative pressures (strong dissipation regime) without any indications of new titanium phases, besides the initial α-Ti phase.

  19. CARA Risk Assessment Thresholds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hejduk, M. D.

    2016-01-01

    Warning remediation threshold (Red threshold): Pc level at which warnings are issued, and active remediation considered and usually executed. Analysis threshold (Green to Yellow threshold): Pc level at which analysis of event is indicated, including seeking additional information if warranted. Post-remediation threshold: Pc level to which remediation maneuvers are sized in order to achieve event remediation and obviate any need for immediate follow-up maneuvers. Maneuver screening threshold: Pc compliance level for routine maneuver screenings (more demanding than regular Red threshold due to additional maneuver uncertainty).

  20. Navigation Systems for Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Wood, B. J.; Kruecker, J.; Abi-Jaoudeh, N; Locklin, J.; Levy, E.; Xu, S.; Solbiati, L.; Kapoor, A.; Amalou, H.; Venkatesan, A.

    2010-01-01

    Navigation systems, devices and intra-procedural software are changing the way we practice interventional oncology. Prior to the development of precision navigation tools integrated with imaging systems, thermal ablation of hard-to-image lesions was highly dependent upon operator experience, spatial skills, and estimation of positron emission tomography-avid or arterial-phase targets. Numerous navigation systems for ablation bring the opportunity for standardization and accuracy that extends our ability to use imaging feedback during procedures. Existing systems and techniques are reviewed, and specific clinical applications for ablation are discussed to better define how these novel technologies address specific clinical needs, and fit into clinical practice. PMID:20656236

  1. Ablation of kidney tumors.

    PubMed

    Karam, Jose A; Ahrar, Kamran; Matin, Surena F

    2011-04-01

    While surgical excision remains the gold standard for curative treatment of small renal cell carcinomas, ablative therapy has a place as a minimally invasive, kidney function-preserving therapy in carefully selected patients who are poor candidates for surgery. Although laparoscopic cryoablation and percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) are commonly performed, percutaneous cryoablation and laparoscopic RFA are reportedly being performed with increasing frequency. The renal function and complication profiles following ablative therapy are favorable, while oncologic outcomes lag behind those of surgery, thus reinforcing the need for careful patient selection. PMID:21377587

  2. Variability in fluence and spectrum of high-energy photon bursts produced by lightning leaders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celestin, Sebastien; Xu, Wei; Pasko, Victor P.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we model the production and acceleration of thermal runaway electrons during negative corona flash stages of stepping lightning leaders and the corresponding terrestrial gamma ray flashes (TGFs) or negative cloud-to-ground (-CG) lightning-produced X-ray bursts in a unified fashion. We show how the source photon spectrum and fluence depend on the potential drop formed in the lightning leader tip region during corona flash and how the X-ray burst spectrum progressively converges toward typical TGF spectrum as the potential drop increases. Additionally, we show that the number of streamers produced in a negative corona flash, the source electron energy distribution function, the corresponding number of photons, and the photon energy distribution and transport through the atmosphere up to low-orbit satellite altitudes exhibit a very strong dependence on this potential drop. This leads to a threshold effect causing X-rays produced by leaders with potentials lower than those producing typical TGFs extremely unlikely to be detected by low-orbit satellites. Moreover, from the number of photons in X-ray bursts produced by -CGs estimated from ground observations, we show that the proportionality between the number of thermal runaway electrons and the square of the potential drop in the leader tip region during negative corona flash proposed earlier leads to typical photon fluences on the order of 1 ph/cm2 at an altitude of 500 km and a radial distance of 200 km for intracloud lightning discharges producing 300 MV potential drops, which is consistent with observations of TGF fluences and spectra from satellites.

  3. Exit fluence analysis using portal dosimetry in volumetric modulated arc therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sukumar, Prabakar; Padmanaban, Sriram; Rajasekaran, Dhanabalan; Kannan, Muniyappan; Nagarajan, Vivekanandan

    2012-01-01

    Aim In measuring exit fluences, there are several sources of deviations which include the changes in the entrance fluence, changes in the detector response and patient orientation or geometry. The purpose of this work is to quantify these sources of errors. Background The use of the volumetric modulated arc therapy treatment with the help of image guidance in radiotherapy results in high accuracy of delivering complex dose distributions while sparing critical organs. The transit dosimetry has the potential of Verifying dose delivery by the linac, Multileaf collimator positional accuracy and the calculation of dose to a patient or phantom. Materials and methods The quantification of errors caused by a machine delivery is done by comparing static and arc picket fence test for 30 days. A RapidArc plan, created for the pelvis site was delivered without and with Rando phantom and exit portal images were acquired. The day to day dose variation were analysed by comparing the daily exit dose images during the course of treatment. The gamma criterion used for analysis is 3% dose difference and 3 mm distance to agreement with a threshold of 10% of maximum dose. Results The maximum standard deviation for the static and arc picket fence test fields were 0.19 CU and 1.3 CU, respectively. The delivery of the RapidArc plans without a phantom shows the maximum standard deviation of 1.85 CU and the maximum gamma value of 0.59. The maximum gamma value for the RapidArc plan delivered with the phantom was found to be 1.2. The largest observed fluence deviation during the delivery to patient was 5.7% and the maximum standard deviation was 4.1 CU. Conclusion It is found from this study that the variation due to patient anatomy and interfraction organ motion is significant. PMID:24377034

  4. Laser ablation and high precision patterning of biomaterials and intraocular lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafetinides, A. A.; Spyratou, E.; Makropoulou, M.

    2010-10-01

    The use of intraocular lenses (IOL) is the most promising method for restoring excellent vision in cataract surgery. In addition, multifocal intraocular lenses for good distant and near vision are investigated. Several new materials, techniques and patterns are studied for the formation and etching of intraocular lenses in order to improve their optical properties and reduce the diffractive aberrations. As pulsed laser ablation is well established as a universal tool for surface processing of organic polymer materials, this study was focused in using laser ablation with short and ultra short laser pulses for surface modification of PMMA and intraocular lenses, instead of using other conventional techniques. The main advantage of using very short laser pulses, e.g. of ns, ps or fs duration, is that heat diffusion into the polymer material is negligible. As a result high precision patterning of the sample, without thermal damage of the surroundings, becomes possible. In this study, laser ablation was performed using commercially available hydrophobic acrylic IOLs, hydrophilic acrylic IOLs, and PMMA IOLs, with various diopters. We investigated the ablation efficiency and the phenomenology of the etched patterns by testing the ablation rate, versus laser energy fluence, at several wavelengths and the surface modification with atomic force microscopy (AFM), or scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The irradiated polymers have different optical properties, at the applied wavelengths, and therefore, present different ablation behaviour and morphology of the laser ablated crater walls and surrounding surfaces. The experimental results, some theoretical assumptions for mathematical modeling of the relevant ablation mechanisms are discussed.

  5. Proton dose calculation based on in-air fluence measurements.

    PubMed

    Schaffner, Barbara

    2008-03-21

    Proton dose calculation algorithms--as well as photon and electron algorithms--are usually based on configuration measurements taken in a water phantom. The exceptions to this are proton dose calculation algorithms for modulated scanning beams. There, it is usual to measure the spot profiles in air. We use the concept of in-air configuration measurements also for scattering and uniform scanning (wobbling) proton delivery techniques. The dose calculation includes a separate step for the calculation of the in-air fluence distribution per energy layer. The in-air fluence calculation is specific to the technique and-to a lesser extent-design of the treatment machine. The actual dose calculation uses the in-air fluence as input and is generic for all proton machine designs and techniques. PMID:18367787

  6. Fluence dependence of deuterium retention in oxidized SS-316

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oya, Yasuhisa; Suzuki, Sachiko; Matsuyama, Masao; Hayashi, Takumi; Yamanishi, Toshihiko; Asakura, Yamato; Okuno, Kenji

    2011-10-01

    The ion fluence dependence of deuterium retention in SS-316 during oxidation at a temperature of 673 K was studied to evaluate the dynamics of deuterium retention in the oxide layer of SS-316. The correlation between the chemical state of stainless steel and deuterium retention was evaluated using XPS and TDS. It was found that the major deuterium desorption temperatures were located at around 660 K and 935 K, which correspond to the desorption of deuterium trapped as hydroxide. The deuterium retention increased with increasing deuterium ion fluence, since the deuterium retention as hydroxide increased significantly. However, retention saturated at an ion fluence of ˜2.5 × 10 21 D + m -2. The XPS result showed that FeOOD was formed on the surface, although pure Fe also remained in the oxide layer. These facts indicate the nature of the oxide layer have a key role in deuterium trapping behavior.

  7. Proton dose calculation based on in-air fluence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaffner, Barbara

    2008-03-01

    Proton dose calculation algorithms—as well as photon and electron algorithms—are usually based on configuration measurements taken in a water phantom. The exceptions to this are proton dose calculation algorithms for modulated scanning beams. There, it is usual to measure the spot profiles in air. We use the concept of in-air configuration measurements also for scattering and uniform scanning (wobbling) proton delivery techniques. The dose calculation includes a separate step for the calculation of the in-air fluence distribution per energy layer. The in-air fluence calculation is specific to the technique and—to a lesser extent—design of the treatment machine. The actual dose calculation uses the in-air fluence as input and is generic for all proton machine designs and techniques.

  8. Dynamics of ultrashort pulsed laser radiation induced non-thermal ablation of graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reininghaus, M.; Kalupka, C.; Faley, O.; Holtum, T.; Finger, J.; Stampfer, C.

    2014-12-01

    We report on the dependence of a laser radiation induced ablation process of graphite on the applied pulse duration of ultrashort pulsed laser radiation smaller than 4 ps. The emerging so-called non-thermal ablation process of graphite has been confirmed to be capable to physically separate ultrathin graphitic layers from the surface of pristine graphite bulk crystal. This allows the deposition of ablated graphitic flakes on a substrate in the vicinity of the target. The observed ablation threshold determined at different pulse durations shows a modulation, which we ascribe to lattice motions along the c axis that are theoretically predicted to induce the non-thermal ablation process. In a simple approach, the ablation threshold can be described as a function of the energy penetration depth and the absorption of the applied ultrashort pulsed laser radiation. Based on the analysis of the pulse duration dependence of those two determining factors and the assumption of an invariant ablation process, we are able to reproduce the pulse duration dependence of the ablation threshold. Furthermore, the observed pulse duration dependences confirm the assumption of a fast material specific response of graphite target subsequent to optical excitation within the first 2 ps.

  9. Effect of focusing conditions and laser parameters on the fabrication of gold nanoparticles via laser ablation in liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsayed, Khaled A.; Imam, Hisham; Ahmed, M. A.; Ramadan, Rania

    2013-02-01

    The generation of nanoparticles using pulsed laser ablation has inherent advantages compared to conventional methods, like the purity and stability of the fabricated nanoparticles, aerosols and colloids. This study addresses the influence of laser parameters such as laser fluence, laser wavelength as well as focusing condition of laser beam on the size and morphology of the gold nanoparticles prepared in de-ionized water by pulsed laser ablation. The optimum conditions at which gold nanoparticles are obtained with controllable average size have been reported as these parameters affected the size, distribution and absorbance spectrum. The effect of laser fluence was studied. The laser fluences were divided into three regions (low, middle and high). A noteworthy change was observed at each region. At low fluences, the size of the nanoparticles decreases as the fluence increases to a certain critical value after which the size of the nanoparticles increases as the fluence increases. Also a significant change in the size distribution of the gold nanoparticles was noticed during the variation of the focusing conditions at gold-water interface.

  10. Fluence field optimization for noise and dose objectives in CT

    SciTech Connect

    Bartolac, Steven; Graham, Sean; Siewerdsen, Jeff; Jaffray, David

    2011-05-15

    Purpose: Selecting the appropriate imaging technique in computed tomography (CT) inherently involves balancing the tradeoff between image quality and imaging dose. Modulation of the x-ray fluence field, laterally across the beam, and independently for each projection, may potentially meet user-prescribed, regional image quality objectives, while reducing radiation to the patient. The proposed approach, called fluence field modulated CT (FFMCT), parallels the approach commonly used in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), except ''image quality plans'' replace the ''dose plans'' of IMRT. This work studies the potential noise and dose benefits of FFMCT via objective driven optimization of fluence fields. Methods: Experiments were carried out in simulation. Image quality plans were defined by specifying signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) criteria for regions of interest (ROIs) in simulated cylindrical and oblong water phantoms, and an anthropomorphic phantom with bone, air, and water equivalent regions. X-ray fluence field patterns were generated using a simulated annealing optimization method that attempts to achieve the spatially-dependent prescribed SNR criteria in the phantoms while limiting dose (to the volume or subvolumes). The resulting SNR and dose distributions were analyzed and compared to results using a bowtie filtered fluence field. Results: Compared to using a fixed bowtie filtered fluence, FFMCT achieved superior agreement with the target image quality objectives, and resulted in integral dose reductions ranging from 39 to 52%. Prioritizing dose constraints for specific regions of interest resulted in a preferential reduction of dose to those regions with some tradeoff in SNR, particularly where the target low dose regions overlapped with regions where high SNR was prescribed. The method appeared fairly robust under increased complexity and heterogeneity of the object structure. Conclusions: These results support that FFMCT has the potential to meet

  11. The effect of magnetic fields on the products of laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musaev, O. R.; Sutter, E. A.; Wrobel, J. M.; Kruger, M. B.

    2016-02-01

    Structures of gold nanoparticles were formed by laser ablation of bulk gold immersed in water. An excimer laser with a wavelength of 351 nm and a pulse energy of 7 mJ was used. Ablation was performed in two configurations: without and with an external 0.2 T magnetic field parallel to the ablation plume. Both configurations result in structures that include chains of aggregated nanoparticles, but to different degrees. Ablation in a magnetic field results in a higher fraction of spherical nanoparticles and shorter nanowires, compared to the nanowire networks formed in the absence of the field. This can be explained by magnetic confinement of the plasma during plume expansion. A model explaining nanowire formation and dependence on fluence and magnetic field is proposed.

  12. Ablation of metal thin films using femtosecond laser Bessel vortex beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahin, Ramazan; Ersoy, Tansu; Akturk, Selcuk

    2015-01-01

    Femtosecond lasers can provide submicron ablation resolution, making them suitable and attractive for various micro/nanofabrication applications. Laser beam shaping lends further advantages and increases the versatility of these sources. In this work, we report on the use of femtosecond laser pulses with first-order Bessel function (Bessel vortex) beam profiles in ablation of metal thin films. The diffraction-free nature of Bessel beams provides significant convenience regarding alignment and repeatability. Ablation profiles with Bessel vortex beams generally consist of single or multiple concentric rings, determined by pulse fluence on target. We investigate single-pulse ablation behavior with two laser wavelengths (1,030 and 515 nm) and three different Bessel beam cone angles. For each case, we measure inner and outer ring diameters and compare our results with theoretical calculations.

  13. Dependence of gold nanoparticle production on pulse duration by laser ablation in liquid media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riabinina, Daria; Chaker, Mohamed; Margot, Joëlle

    2012-04-01

    The dependence on laser fluence and laser pulse duration of size, size distribution and concentration of gold nanoparticles synthesized by laser ablation in liquid media was investigated. It was demonstrated that increasing laser energy from 1 to 5 mJ/pulse enhances the ablation rate by a factor of 100. The behavior of the ablation rate, hence of the nanoparticle concentration, as a function of pulse duration (varied from 40 fs to 200 ps) was found to strongly differ from that in air, which can be explained by photoionization and important losses of laser energy in the femtosecond regime. The optimal pulse duration for maximum ablation rate in liquid media was found to be equal to 2 ps.

  14. Theoretical research on damage mechanism of ultrafast laser ablation crystal silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Junfeng; Guo, Jin; Wang, Tingfeng

    2013-09-01

    High peak power picosecond laser ablation of silicon draws great attention in solar cell manufacture,laser optoelectric countermeasure applications, eta. This paper reports the damage process of ultrafast lasers interaction with silicon,which is based on Two-Temperature Model(TTM) and 1-on-1 damage threshold test method. Pulsed laser caused damage manifests in several ways, such as heat damage, mechanical effect and even eletrical effect. In this paper, a modified Two Temperature Model is applied in ultrashort laser interaction with silicon.The traditional Two-Temperature Model methods is proposed by Anismov in 1970s to calculate the interaction between ultrafast laser with metals, which is composed of free electrons and lattice. Beyond the carrier and lattice temperture model, an additional excited term and Auger recombination term of carriers is taken into account in this modified Two-Temperature Model model to reflect the characteristics in semicondutors. Under the same pulse-duration condition, the damage threshold is found to be 161 mJ/cm2 and a characteritic double-peak shape shows up. As the pulse energy density rises from 50mJ/cm2 to 161 mJ/cm2, the difference between carrier and lattice temperature steps down proportionally.Also,a detailed interaction process between photon-electron and electron-phonon is discussed. Electron and lattice temperature evolutes distinctly different, while the former is much higher than the latter until heat tranfer finished at 200 picoseconds. Two-peak feature of electron temperature is also identified. As the pulse duration increases from 20 picosecond to 60 picosecond, the he difference between carrier and lattice temperature steps down significantly. The calculated damage threshold does not change fundamentally, remaining approximately 0.16J/cm2. Also, the damage mechanism is found to be thermal heating with the pulse width between 20 and 60 picoseconds at threshold fluences which is identical to experiment test result

  15. Nickel Foil as Transmutation Detector for Neutron Fluence Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klupák, Vít; Viererbl, Ladislav; Lahodová, Zdena; Šoltés, Jaroslav; Tomandl, Ivo; Kudějová, Petra

    2016-02-01

    Activation detectors are very often used for determination of the neutron fluence in reactor dosimetry. However, there are few disadvantages concerning these detectors; it is the demand of the knowledge of the irradiation history and a loss of information due to a radioactive decay in time. Transmutation detectors TMD could be a solution in this case. The transmutation detectors are materials in which stable or long-lived nuclides are produced by nuclear reactions with neutrons. From a measurement of concentration of these nuclides, neutron fluence can be evaluated regardless of the cooling time.

  16. Ablative skin resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Nidhi; Smith, Greg; Heffelfinger, Ryan

    2014-02-01

    Ablative laser resurfacing has evolved as a safe and effective treatment for skin rejuvenation. Although traditional lasers were associated with significant thermal damage and lengthy recovery, advances in laser technology have improved safety profiles and reduced social downtime. CO2 lasers remain the gold standard of treatment, and fractional ablative devices capable of achieving remarkable clinical improvement with fewer side effects and shorter recovery times have made it a more practical option for patients. Although ablative resurfacing has become safer, careful patient selection and choice of suitable laser parameters are essential to minimize complications and optimize outcomes. This article describes the current modalities used in ablative laser skin resurfacing and examines their efficacy, indications, and possible side effects. PMID:24488638

  17. Moldable cork ablation material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A successful thermal ablative material was manufactured. Moldable cork sheets were tested for density, tensile strength, tensile elongation, thermal conductivity, compression set, and specific heat. A moldable cork sheet, therefore, was established as a realistic product.

  18. Cardiac ablation procedures

    MedlinePlus

    ... Accessory pathway, such as Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome Atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter Ventricular tachycardia ... consensus statement on catheter and surgical ablation of atrial fibrillation: ... for personnel, policy, procedures and follow-up. ...

  19. Laser ablation of concrete.

    SciTech Connect

    Savina, M.

    1998-10-05

    Laser ablation is effective both as an analytical tool and as a means of removing surface coatings. The elemental composition of surfaces can be determined by either mass spectrometry or atomic emission spectroscopy of the atomized effluent. Paint can be removed from aircraft without damage to the underlying aluminum substrate, and environmentally damaged buildings and sculptures can be restored by ablating away deposited grime. A recent application of laser ablation is the removal of radioactive contaminants from the surface and near-surface regions of concrete. We present the results of ablation tests on concrete samples using a high power pulsed Nd:YAG laser with fiber optic beam delivery. The laser-surface interaction was studied on various model systems consisting of Type I Portland cement with varying amounts of either fine silica or sand in an effort to understand the effect of substrate composition on ablation rates and mechanisms. A sample of non-contaminated concrete from a nuclear power plant was also studied. In addition, cement and concrete samples were doped with non-radioactive isotopes of elements representative of cooling waterspills, such as cesium and strontium, and analyzed by laser-resorption mass spectrometry to determine the contamination pathways. These samples were also ablated at high power to determine the efficiency with which surface contaminants are removed and captured. The results show that the neat cement matrix melts and vaporizes when little or no sand or aggregate is present. Surface flows of liquid material are readily apparent on the ablated surface and the captured aerosol takes the form of glassy beads up to a few tens of microns in diameter. The presence of sand and aggregate particles causes the material to disaggregate on ablation, with intact particles on the millimeter size scale leaving the surface. Laser resorption mass spectrometric analysis showed that cesium and potassium have similar chemical environments in the

  20. Enhanced upconversion luminescence from ZnO/Zn hybrid nanostructures induced on a Zn foil by femtosecond laser ablation.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Zhang, Cheng-Yun; Li, Xian-Feng; Xiang, Jin; Tie, Shao-Long; Lan, Sheng

    2015-11-16

    ZnO/Zn hybrid nanostructures including nanowires and nanonets were induced on a Zn foil by using 400-nm femtosecond (fs) laser pulses with a low repetition rate of 1 kHz and duration of 100 fs. The laser fluence was chosen to be slightly above the ablation threshold of Zn. The luminescence of the formed ZnO/Zn hybrid nanostructures was examined by using fs laser pulses with a high repetition rate of 76 MHz and duration of ~130 fs through both single-photon and multiphoton excitation. While the luminescence spectrum under the single-photon excitation exhibited a single peak at ~480 nm, a broadband upconversion luminescence with many ripples was observed under the multiphoton excitation. More interestingly, the upconversion luminescence of the ZnO/Zn hybrid nanostructures was significantly enhanced by the underlying Zn nanostructures which induced strongly localized electric field. The enhancement of the upconversion luminescence was verified by the short lifetime of only ~79 ps observed for the ZnO/Zn hybrid nanostructures, which is nearly one order of magnitude smaller as compared with the luminescence lifetime of the ZnO nanorods synthesized by using the chemical coprecipitation method. The localization of electric field in the ZnO/Zn hybrid nanostructures was confirmed by the numerical simulations based the finite-difference time-domain technique. PMID:26698492

  1. Metal particles produced by laser ablation for ICP-MS measurements.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Jhanis J; Liu, Chunyi; Wen, Sy-Bor; Mao, Xianglei; Russo, Richard E

    2007-09-30

    Pulsed laser ablation (266nm) was used to generate metal particles of Zn and Al alloys using femtosecond (150fs) and nanosecond (4ns) laser pulses with identical fluences of 50Jcm(-2). Characterization of particles and correlation with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) performance was investigated. Particles produced by nanosecond laser ablation were mainly primary particles with irregular shape and hard agglomerates (without internal voids). Particles produced by femtosecond laser ablation consisted of spherical primary particles and soft agglomerates formed from numerous small particles. Examination of the craters by white light interferometric microscopy showed that there is a rim of material surrounding the craters formed after nanosecond laser ablation. The determination of the crater volume by white light interferometric microscopy, considering the rim of material surrounding ablation craters, revealed that the volume ratio (fs/ns) of the craters on the selected samples was approximately 9 (Zn), 7 (NIST627 alloy) and 5 (NIST1711 alloy) times more ablated mass with femtosecond pulsed ablation compared to nanosecond pulsed ablation. In addition, an increase of Al concentration from 0 to 5% in Zn base alloys caused a large increase in the diameter of the particles, up to 65% while using nanosecond laser pulses. When the ablated particles were carried in argon into an ICP-MS, the Zn and Al signals intensities were greater by factors of approximately 50 and approximately 12 for fs versus ns ablation. Femtosecond pulsed ablation also reduced temporal fluctuations in the (66)Zn transient signal by a factor of 10 compared to nanosecond laser pulses. PMID:19073072

  2. Reflection of femtosecond laser light in multipulse ablation of metals

    SciTech Connect

    Vorobyev, A. Y.; Guo Chunlei

    2011-08-15

    The shot-to-shot reflectance of high-intensity laser light is studied as a function of both the number of laser shots and laser fluence in multipulse ablation of a metal when the irradiated surface undergoes structural changes from an initially smooth surface to a deep crater. Our study shows that the reflectance of the irradiated surface significantly decreases due to the high intensity of laser pulses and the laser-induced surface structures in ablation regimes typically used for femtosecond laser processing of materials. The high-intensity effect dominates in the reflection reduction at low numbers of laser shots when laser-induced surface structures do not cause the reflectance to decrease noticeably. With increasing the number of laser shots, the structural effect comes into play, and both high-intensity and structural effects quickly reduce the reflectance of the sample to a low value.

  3. Pulsed CO2 laser ablation of graphite and polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, K. H.; Tou, T. Y.; Low, K. S.

    1998-02-01

    Spectroscopic analysis of the emission plumes of graphite, polyimide, polyethylene terepthalate, and polymethylmethacrylate that have been ablated by using a pulsed CO2 laser operating at 10.6 μm shows the presence of CN and C2, species not previously reported for CO2 laser ablation. The gross dynamics of the luminous plume, which was studied by using a streak camera, compares favorably with predictions from the snowplow model, which also accurately forecasts the time history of the plume expansion for a wide range of background gas pressures and laser fluences. Framing shadowgraphy reveals the onset of laser-supported detonation waves at approximately 50 mbar Ar, thus somewhat limiting the validity of this model.

  4. CdTe nanoparticles synthesized by laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Semaltianos, N. G.; Logothetidis, S.; Perrie, W.; Romani, S.; Potter, R. J.; Dearden, G.; Watkins, K. G.; Sharp, M.

    2009-07-20

    Nanoparticle generation by laser ablation of a solid target in a liquid environment is an easy, fast, and 'green' method for a large scale production of nanomaterials with tailored properties. In this letter we report the synthesis of CdTe nanoparticles by femtosecond laser [387 nm, 180 fs, 1 kHz, pulse energy=6 {mu}J (fluence=1.7 J/cm{sup 2})] ablation of the target material. Nanoparticles with diameters from {approx}2 up to {approx}25 nm were observed to be formed in the colloidal solution. Their size distribution follows the log-normal function with a statistical median diameter of {approx_equal}7.1 nm. Their crystal structure is the same as that of the bulk material (cubic zincblende) and they are slightly Cd-rich (Cd:Te percentage ratio {approx}1:0.9). Photoluminescence emission from the produced nanoparticles was detected in the deep red ({approx}652 nm)

  5. Threshold quantum cryptography

    SciTech Connect

    Tokunaga, Yuuki; Okamoto, Tatsuaki; Imoto, Nobuyuki

    2005-01-01

    We present the concept of threshold collaborative unitary transformation or threshold quantum cryptography, which is a kind of quantum version of threshold cryptography. Threshold quantum cryptography states that classical shared secrets are distributed to several parties and a subset of them, whose number is greater than a threshold, collaborates to compute a quantum cryptographic function, while keeping each share secretly inside each party. The shared secrets are reusable if no cheating is detected. As a concrete example of this concept, we show a distributed protocol (with threshold) of conjugate coding.

  6. Characterization of excimer laser ablation generated pepsin particles using multi-wavelength photoacoustic instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopp, B.; Kecskeméti, G.; Smausz, T.; Ajtai, T.; Filep, A.; Utry, N.; Kohut, A.; Bozóki, Z.; Szabó, G.

    2012-05-01

    Preparation of organic thin layers on various special substrates using the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique is an important task from the point of view of bioengineering and biosensor technologies. Earlier studies demonstrated that particle ejection starts during the ablating laser pulse resulting in significant shielding effects which can influence the real fluence on the target surface and consequently the efficiency of layer preparation. In this study, we introduce a photoacoustic absorption measurement technique for in-situ characterization of ablated particles during PLD experiments. A KrF excimer laser beam ( λ=248 nm, FWHM=18 ns) was focused onto pepsin targets in a PLD chamber; the applied laser fluences were 440 and 660 mJ/cm2. We determined the wavelength dependence of optical absorption and mass specific absorption coefficient of laser ablation generated pepsin aerosols in the UV-VIS-NIR range. On the basis of our measurements, we calculated the absorbance at the ablating laser wavelength, too. We demonstrated that when the laser ablation generated pepsin aerosols spread through the whole PLD chamber the effect of absorptivity is negligible for the subsequent pulses. However, the interaction of the laser pulse and the just formed particle cloud generated by the same pulse is more significant.

  7. Proton-induced nanorod melting in a coating obtained from the pulsed laser ablation of W2B5 /B4 C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadadjeu Sokeng, I.; Ngom, B. D.; Cummings, F.; Kotsedi, L.; Msimanga, M.; Maaza, M.; Van Zyl, R. R.

    2015-02-01

    Coatings obtained from pulsed laser ablated W2B5 /B4 C were irradiated with 900keV protons at fluences ranging from about 1 ×1015protons /cm2 to about 4 ×1015protons /cm2 . Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) were used to study the resulting structural effects. Clusters of nanorods were observed to disperse and reduce in number with increase in proton fluence. The atomic percentage of constituent elements were observed to vary with proton fluence, both within the nanorods and the film floor. Our results show that the structural effect of proton irradiation on the coating is lateral dispersion of matter.

  8. UV-laser Ablation of Fibre Reinforced Composites with Ns-Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittmar, H.; Gäbler, F.; Stute, U.

    Within this work the ablation behaviour of both carbon and glass fibre reinforced epoxy resin was assessed when ablated by a nanosecond-pulsed laser source emitting radiation in the ultra-violet spectrum. The investigation focussed on the influences of pulse overlap, focus spot diameter and resulting fluence on process quality and machining time.Results showed that ns-pulsed UV-lasers are capable of machining both types of fibre reinforced composites, while achieving good quality surfaces without burn marks or otherwise heat-damaged areas.

  9. Spectroscopic Analysis of a Low Fluence Li-Ag Laser Driven Plasma Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherrill, M. E.; Mancini, R. C.; Bailey, J. E.; Filuk, A.; Clark, B.; Lake, P.; Abdallah, J.

    2002-10-01

    Low fluence laser produced plasmas are used in many applications: from ion sources to material synthesis. Our work focuses on developing a quantitative description of these ablation plasmas through the interpretation and analysis of time- and spatially-resolved spectroscopic measurements with detailed spectral modeling. To this end, in a series of experiments performed at Sandia National Laboratories, laser generated Li-Ag plasma plumes were produced by irradiation of solid targets using a Nd pulsed laser. Time- and spatially-resolved optical spectra were recorded with a framing spectrograph. In order to limit the gradients along a direction perpendicular to the target's normal, targets with strips of Li-Ag coated on top of Pt were used. The Pt plume collisionally confines the Li-Ag, thus reducing the Li-Ag lateral expansion. The spectra display line transitions in Li and Ag atoms. A spectroscopic model based on time-dependent collisional-radiative atomic kinetics, detailed line shapes, and radiation transport was used to describe plasma parameters both spatially and temporally. In particular, this analysis has revealed that level populations in laser-ablated plumes may behave in a time-dependent manner, i.e. not in Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE). The time-scales associated with these phenomena and the interpretation of spectral data critically depends on the details of the atomic kinetic model and the quality of the rate coefficients. In order to generate accurate atomic data for atoms present in the plasma, a semi-empirical technique has been implemented in the Los Alamos suite of atomic structure and electron scattering codes. Details of the spectral model and analysis results will be discussed.

  10. Using high-energy proton fluence to improve risk prediction for consequences of solar particle events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Hayat, Matthew J.; Feiveson, Alan H.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2009-12-01

    The potential for exposure to large solar particle events (SPEs) with high energy levels is a major concern during interplanetary transfer and extra-vehicular activities (EVAs) on the lunar and Mars surface. Previously, we have used data from the last 5 solar cycles to estimate percentiles of dose to a typical blood-forming organ (BFO) for a hypothetical astronaut in a nominally shielded spacecraft during a 120-d lunar mission. As part of this process, we made use of complete energy spectra for 34 large historical SPEs to calculate what the BFO mGy-Eq dose would have been in the above lunar scenario for each SPE. From these calculated doses, we then developed a prediction model for BFO dose based solely on an assumed value of integrated fluence above 30 MeV ( Φ30) for an otherwise unspecified future SPE. In this study, we reasoned that since BFO dose is determined more by protons with higher energies than by those with lower energies, more accurate BFO dose prediction models could be developed using integrated fluence above 60 ( Φ60) and above 100 MeV ( Φ100) as predictors instead of Φ30. However to calculate the unconditional probability of a BFO dose exceeding a pre-specified limit ("BFO dose risk"), one must also take into account the distribution of the predictor ( Φ30,Φ60, or Φ100), as estimated from historical SPEs. But Φ60 and Φ100 have more variability, and less available historical information on which to estimate their distributions over many SPE occurrences, than does Φ30. Therefore, when estimating BFO dose risk there is a tradeoff between increased BFO dose prediction at a given energy threshold and decreased accuracy of models for describing the distribution of that threshold over future SPEs as the threshold increases. Even when taking the second of these two factors into account, we still arrived at the conclusion that overall prediction improves as the energy level threshold increases from 30 to 60 to 100 MeV. These results can be applied

  11. Creation of an atlas of filter positions for fluence field modulated CT

    SciTech Connect

    Szczykutowicz, Timothy P.; Hermus, James

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Fluence field modulated CT (FFMCT) and volume of interest (VOI) CT imaging applications require adjustment of the profile of the x-ray fluence incident on a patient as a function of view angle. Since current FFMCT prototypes can theoretically take on an infinite number of configurations, measuring a calibration data set for all possible positions would not be feasible. The present work details a methodology for calculating an atlas of configurations that will span all likely body regions, patient sizes, patient positioning, and imaging modes. The hypothesis is that there exists a finite number of unique modulator configurations that effectively span the infinite number of possible fluence profiles with minimal loss in performance. Methods: CT images of a head, shoulder, thorax, abdominal, wrist, and leg anatomical slices were dilated and contracted to model small, medium, and large sized patients. Additionally, the images were positioned from iso-center by three different amounts. The modulator configurations required to compensate for each image were computed assuming a FFMCT prototype, digital beam attenuator, (DBA), was set to equalize the detector exposure. Each atlas configuration should be different from the other atlas configurations. The degree of difference was quantified using the sum of the absolute differences in filter thickness between configurations. Using this metric, a set of unique wedge configurations for which no two configurations have a metric value smaller than some threshold can be constructed. Differences in the total number of incident photons between the unconstrained filters and the atlas were studied as a function of the number of atlas positions for each anatomical site and size/off-centering combination. Results: By varying the threshold used in creating the atlas, it was found that roughly 322 atlas positions provided an incident number of photons within 20% of using 19 440 unique filters (the number of atlas entries

  12. Ablative therapies for renal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Rajan; Leveillee, Raymond J.

    2010-01-01

    Owing to an increased use of diagnostic imaging for evaluating patients with other abdominal conditions, incidentally discovered kidney masses now account for a majority of renal tumors. Renal ablative therapy is assuming a more important role in patients with borderline renal impairment. Renal ablation uses heat or cold to bring about cell death. Radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation are two such procedures, and 5-year results are now emerging from both modalities. Renal biopsy at the time of ablation is extremely important in order to establish tissue diagnosis. Real-time temperature monitoring at the time of radiofrequency ablation is very useful to ensure adequacy of ablation. PMID:21789083

  13. Low-fluence carbon dioxide laser irradiation of lentigines

    SciTech Connect

    Dover, J.S.; Smoller, B.R.; Stern, R.S.; Rosen, S.; Arndt, K.A.

    1988-08-01

    Low-fluence carbon dioxide (CO2) laser irradiation of skin has previously been shown to induce damage limited primarily to the epidermis. To evaluate whether this technique was therapeutically effective for pigmented epidermal lesions, ten lentigines caused by methoxsalen and ultraviolet light therapy were treated in one patient using the CO2 laser at fluences ranging from 3.0 to 7.7 J/cm2 for 0.1-s exposures with 4.5-mm spot size. Based on substantial clearing in seven of ten lesions treated, 146 solar lentigines were treated in five patients at fluences of 3.0, 3.7, or 4.4 J/cm2. Biopsies were performed on a total of 30 lesions immediately and 24 hours, seven days, and six weeks after irradiation. Of 125 lesions followed up clinically for six weeks, 12 cleared completely, 81 lightened substantially, and 28 remained unchanged. Only two demonstrated atrophic change. Hyperpigmentation or hypopigmentation did not occur. All lesions that improved had been treated at 3.7 or 4.4 J/cm2. Immediate histologic injury consisted of vacuolar and spindly change and subsequent vesiculation limited to the basilar epidermis. Twenty-four hours later there was epidermal necrosis with regeneration, 0.1 mm of dermal basophilia and stromal condensation, and a mild inflammatory infiltrate. These alterations were dose-dependent, with near complete epidermal necrosis and superficial dermal involvement at the highest fluence, and only focal epidermal necrosis at the lowest. At seven days, epidermal regeneration was complete with traces of melanin remaining in keratinocytes. Melanophages first appeared at seven days and persisted at six weeks, by which time the inflammatory infiltrate had cleared. No lentiginous proliferation was evident and epidermal pigmentation had become normal. Low-fluence CO2 laser irradiation is an effective means of damaging the epidermis with only minimal dermal change.

  14. Spatial investigations of ion and electron time of flight in laser ablated ZnO plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshy, N. V.; Jayaraj, M. K.

    2010-02-01

    The time of flight (TOF) spectra of ions and electrons of laser ablated ZnO:Ga plasma plume were recorded. The laser fluence was varied from 2.55 Jcm-2 to 17.85 Jcm-2 and the ablation was carried out in vacuum and N2O ambient pressure ranging from 0.0001 mbar to 0.1 mbar. The TOF spectra were recorded at positions 10 mm to 50 mm from the target surface along the direction normal to the surface. Ion acceleration and corresponding electron deceleration were detected in the plasma due to the formation of electric double layer during plasma expansion. Twin peaks were recorded in the ion TOF spectra-corresponding to accelerated and thermal ions, while two categories of thermal electrons were detected in electron TOF spectra. The behaviour of these ions and electrons is studied as a function of laser fluence, ambient gas pressure and distance from the target surface.

  15. Global sensitivity analysis of the XUV-ABLATOR code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevrlý, Václav; Janku, Jaroslav; Dlabka, Jakub; Vašinek, Michal; Juha, Libor; Vyšín, Luděk.; Burian, Tomáš; Lančok, Ján.; Skřínský, Jan; Zelinger, Zdeněk.; Pira, Petr; Wild, Jan

    2013-05-01

    Availability of numerical model providing reliable estimation of the parameters of ablation processes induced by extreme ultraviolet laser pulses in the range of nanosecond and sub-picosecond timescales is highly desirable for recent experimental research as well as for practical purposes. Performance of the one-dimensional thermodynamic code (XUV-ABLATOR) in predicting the relationship of ablation rate and laser fluence is investigated for three reference materials: (i) silicon, (ii) fused silica and (iii) polymethyl methacrylate. The effect of pulse duration and different material properties on the model predictions is studied in the frame of this contribution for the conditions typical for two compact laser systems operating at 46.9 nm. Software implementation of the XUV-ABLATOR code including graphical user's interface and the set of tools for sensitivity analysis was developed. Global sensitivity analysis using high dimensional model representation in combination with quasi-random sampling was applied in order to identify the most critical input data as well as to explore the uncertainty range of model results.

  16. CO{sub 2} Laser Ablation Propulsion Tractor Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Sinko, John E.; Schlecht, Clifford A.

    2010-05-06

    Manipulation of objects at a distance has already been achieved with no small measure of success in the realm of microscopic objects on the scale size of nanometers to micrometers in applications including laser trapping and laser tweezers. However, there has been relatively little effort to apply such remote control to macroscopic systems. A space tractor beam could be applied to a wide range of applications, including removal of orbital debris, facilitation of spacecraft docking, adjustment of satellite attitude or orbital position, etc. In this paper, an ablative laser propulsion tractor beam is demonstrated based on radiation from a CO{sub 2} laser. Cooperative, layered polymer targets were used for remote impulse generation using a CO{sub 2} laser. The use of a structured ablatant enabling switching between thrust directional parity (i.e., forward or reverse) and imparting torque to a remote target. Fluence-dependent results are presented in the context of polymer ablation modeling work and with consideration of confined ablation effects.

  17. Femtosecond laser ablation of cadmium tungstate for scintillator arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, S.; Baker, M. A.; Wilson, M. D.; Lohstroh, A.; Seller, P.

    2016-08-01

    Ultrafast pulsed laser ablation has been investigated as a technique to machine CdWO4 single crystal scintillator and segment it into small blocks with the aim of fabricating a 2D high energy X-ray imaging array. Cadmium tungstate (CdWO4) is a brittle transparent scintillator used for the detection of high energy X-rays and γ-rays. A 6 W Yb:KGW Pharos-SP pulsed laser of wavelength 1028 nm was used with a tuneable pulse duration of 10 ps to 190 fs, repetition rate of up to 600 kHz and pulse energies of up to 1 mJ was employed. The effect of varying the pulse duration, pulse energy, pulse overlap and scan pattern on the laser induced damage to the crystals was investigated. A pulse duration of ≥500 fs was found to induce substantial cracking in the material. The laser induced damage was minimised using the following operating parameters: a pulse duration of 190 fs, fluence of 15.3 J cm-2 and employing a serpentine scan pattern with a normalised pulse overlap of 0.8. The surface of the ablated surfaces was studied using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Ablation products were found to contain cadmium tungstate together with different cadmium and tungsten oxides. These laser ablation products could be removed using an ammonium hydroxide treatment.

  18. Threshold Concepts in Biochemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loertscher, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Threshold concepts can be identified for any discipline and provide a framework for linking student learning to curricular design. Threshold concepts represent a transformed understanding of a discipline, without which the learner cannot progress and are therefore pivotal in learning in a discipline. Although threshold concepts have been…

  19. Rethinking the Concepts of Fluence (UV Dose) and Fluence Rate: The Importance of Photon-based Units - A Systemic Review.

    PubMed

    Bolton, James R; Mayor-Smith, Ian; Linden, Karl G

    2015-11-01

    After a critical review of the fundamental equations describing photobiological and photochemical processes occurring in a medium exposed to a quasi-collimated monochromatic UV light beam, the analysis in this review is extended to analogous processes driven by polychromatic UV light, such as that emitted by medium pressure mercury-vapor arc lamps. The analysis is based on the Second Law of Photochemistry, namely that all photochemical events must be independent, and the rate of such events must be proportional to the rate of photon absorption. A consistent application of the Second Law of Photochemistry leads to a concept change; hence it is proposed herein to use photon fluence and photon fluence rate, rather than fluence (UV dose) and fluence rate, respectively, in the analysis and interpretation of photobiological and photochemical processes. As a consequence, many equations that have been used in the past must be revised, and some experimental information (e.g. action spectra) needs to be re-analyzed. PMID:26277478

  20. Atrial fibrillation ablation.

    PubMed

    Pappone, Carlo; Santinelli, Vincenzo

    2012-06-01

    Atrial fibrillation is the commonest cardiac arrhythmia, with significant morbidity related to symptoms, heart failure, and thromboembolism, which is associated with excess mortality. Over the past 10 years, many centers worldwide have reported high success rates and few complications after a single ablation procedure in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. Recent studies indicate a short-term and long-term superiority of catheter ablation as compared with conventional antiarrhythmic drug therapy in terms of arrhythmia recurrence, quality of life, and arrhythmia progression. As a result, catheter ablation is evolving to a front-line therapy in many patients with atrial fibrillation. However, in patients with persistent long-standing atrial fibrillation catheter ablation strategy is more complex and time-consuming, frequently requiring repeat procedures to achieve success rates as high as in paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. In the near future, however, with growing experience and evolving technology, catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation may be extended also to patients with long-standing atrial fibrillation. PMID:22541284

  1. Infrared laser bone ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Nuss, R.C.; Fabian, R.L.; Sarkar, R.; Puliafito, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    The bone ablation characteristics of five infrared lasers, including three pulsed lasers (Nd:YAG, lambda = 1064 micron; Hol:YSGG, lambda = 2.10 micron; and Erb:YAG, lambda = 2.94 micron) and two continuous-wave lasers (Nd:YAG, lambda = 1.064 micron; and CO/sub 2/, lambda = 10.6 micron), were studied. All laser ablations were performed in vitro, using moist, freshly dissected calvarium of guinea pig skulls. Quantitative etch rates of the three pulsed lasers were calculated. Light microscopy of histologic sections of ablated bone revealed a zone of tissue damage of 10 to 15 micron adjacent to the lesion edge in the case of the pulsed Nd:YAG and the Erb:YAG lasers, from 20 to 90 micron zone of tissue damage for bone ablated by the Hol:YSGG laser, and 60 to 135 micron zone of tissue damage in the case of the two continuous-wave lasers. Possible mechanisms of bone ablation and tissue damage are discussed.

  2. Pulsed IR laser ablation of organic polymers in air: shielding effects and plasma pipe formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchenko, A. N.; Shulepov, M. A.; Tel'minov, A. E.; Zakharov, L. A.; Paletsky, A. A.; Bulgakova, N. M.

    2011-09-01

    We report the effect of 'plasma pipe' formation on pulsed laser ablation of organic polymers in air under normal conditions. Ablation of polymers (PMMA, polyimide) is carried out in a wide range of CO2 laser fluences with special attention to plasma formation in the ablation products. Evolution of laser ablation plumes in air under different pressures is investigated with simultaneous registration of radiation spectra of the ablation products. An analysis based on thermo-chemical modelling is performed to elucidate the effects of laser light attenuation upon ablation, including plasma and chemical processes in a near-target space. The analysis has shown that the experimental observations of plume development in air can be explained by a combination of processes including formation of a pre-ionized channel along the laser beam propagation, laser-supported detonation wave and effective combustion of the polymer ablation products. A scenario of a streamer-like polymer plasma flow within an air plasma pipe created via laser-induced breakdown is proposed.

  3. Generation of cavities in silicon wafers by laser ablation using silicon nitride as sacrificial layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerner, B.; Perez, M. S.; Toro, C.; Lasorsa, C.; Rinaldi, C. A.; Boselli, A.; Lamagna, A.

    2012-01-01

    Throughout this investigation, experiments on laser ablation with silicon (Si) wafers have been performed using silicon nitride (Si3N4) as a sacrificial layer to find the optimal fluence capable of removing the Si3N4, which allows the subsequent anisotropic etching in Si with potassium hydroxide. As a result, an alternative to the traditional micromachining techniques that require more steps and processing times has been introduced. The effect of the pulse numbers on Si wafers has been studied and it has been observed that when increasing the pulse numbers at the same fluence, the capacity of the pyramidal cavity formed was greater than using only one pulse at higher fluences. Microcavities were performed with a floating Si3N4 layer. This happens to be very useful for the development of drug delivery systems and the manufacture of microarrays. Microcavities were also used as masters for the fabrication of microionizers in polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS).

  4. Surface Treatment of Polymers by Ion Beam Irradiation to Control the Human Osteoblast Adhesion: Fluence and Current Density Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guibert, G.; Rossel, T.; Weder, G.; Betschart, B.; Meunier, C.; Mikhailov, S.

    2009-03-01

    In the biomaterial field, the modification of surfaces are used to create polymers with high performances, preserving their bulk properties and creating specific interactions between the designed surfaces and the cells or tissues. The polymers were irradiated with a 900 keV Helium beam to modify their surface properties. Cell cultivation on the samples was done using human osteoblasts cells (hFOB 1.19). For PTFE, PS and PEEK polymers, the cell adhesion occurs after reached some threshold values of fluences. For PET or PMMA polymers, the cells adhere on the non irradiated samples, however the fluence value modifies the cell density. For PMMA and PTFE both, the fluence and the current density influence the cell adhesion. By modifying the appropriate parameters on each material, the control of the cell adhesion is possible. Indeed the surface treatment must be selected and adapted according to the further application: for biosensors, tissue engineering, tissue regeneration, neural probes, drug delivery, bio-actuators etc.

  5. Surface Treatment of Polymers by Ion Beam Irradiation to Control the Human Osteoblast Adhesion: Fluence and Current Density Study

    SciTech Connect

    Guibert, G.; Mikhailov, S.; Rossel, T.; Weder, G.; Betschart, B.; Meunier, C.

    2009-03-10

    In the biomaterial field, the modification of surfaces are used to create polymers with high performances, preserving their bulk properties and creating specific interactions between the designed surfaces and the cells or tissues. The polymers were irradiated with a 900 keV Helium beam to modify their surface properties. Cell cultivation on the samples was done using human osteoblasts cells (hFOB 1.19). For PTFE, PS and PEEK polymers, the cell adhesion occurs after reached some threshold values of fluences. For PET or PMMA polymers, the cells adhere on the non irradiated samples, however the fluence value modifies the cell density. For PMMA and PTFE both, the fluence and the current density influence the cell adhesion. By modifying the appropriate parameters on each material, the control of the cell adhesion is possible. Indeed the surface treatment must be selected and adapted according to the further application: for biosensors, tissue engineering, tissue regeneration, neural probes, drug delivery, bio-actuators etc.

  6. Modeling ultrashort-pulse laser ablation of dielectric materials

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, B. H.; Balling, P.

    2009-04-15

    An approach to modeling ablation thresholds and depths in dielectric materials is proposed. The model is based on the multiple-rate-equation description suggested by Rethfeld [Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 187401 (2004)]. This model has been extended to include a description of the propagation of the light into the dielectric sample. The generic model is based on only a few experimental quantities that characterize the native material. A Drude model describing the evolution of the dielectric constant owing to an excitation of the electrons in the material is applied. The model is compared to experimental ablation data for different dielectric materials from the literature.

  7. Data Fitting to Study Ablated Hard Dental Tissues by Nanosecond Laser Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Daiem, A. M.; Ansari, M. Shahnawaze; Babkair, Saeed S.; Salah, Numan A.; Al-Mujtaba, A.

    2016-01-01

    Laser ablation of dental hard tissues is one of the most important laser applications in dentistry. Many works have reported the interaction of laser radiations with tooth material to optimize laser parameters such as wavelength, energy density, etc. This work has focused on determining the relationship between energy density and ablation thresholds using pulsed, 5 nanosecond, neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet; Nd:Y3Al5O12 (Nd:YAG) laser at 1064 nanometer. For enamel and dentin tissues, the ablations have been performed using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique. The ablation thresholds and relationship between energy densities and peak areas of calcium lines, which appeared in LIBS, were determined using data fitting. Furthermore, the morphological changes were studied using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Moreover, the chemical stability of the tooth material after ablation has been studied using Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDX). The differences between carbon atomic % of non-irradiated and irradiated samples were tested using statistical t-test. Results revealed that the best fitting between energy densities and peak areas of calcium lines were exponential and linear for enamel and dentin, respectively. In addition, the ablation threshold of Nd:YAG lasers in enamel was higher than that of dentin. The morphology of the surrounded ablated region of enamel showed thermal damages. For enamel, the EDX quantitative analysis showed that the atomic % of carbon increased significantly when laser energy density increased. PMID:27228169

  8. Data Fitting to Study Ablated Hard Dental Tissues by Nanosecond Laser Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Al-Hadeethi, Y; Al-Jedani, S; Razvi, M A N; Saeed, A; Abdel-Daiem, A M; Ansari, M Shahnawaze; Babkair, Saeed S; Salah, Numan A; Al-Mujtaba, A

    2016-01-01

    Laser ablation of dental hard tissues is one of the most important laser applications in dentistry. Many works have reported the interaction of laser radiations with tooth material to optimize laser parameters such as wavelength, energy density, etc. This work has focused on determining the relationship between energy density and ablation thresholds using pulsed, 5 nanosecond, neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet; Nd:Y3Al5O12 (Nd:YAG) laser at 1064 nanometer. For enamel and dentin tissues, the ablations have been performed using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique. The ablation thresholds and relationship between energy densities and peak areas of calcium lines, which appeared in LIBS, were determined using data fitting. Furthermore, the morphological changes were studied using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Moreover, the chemical stability of the tooth material after ablation has been studied using Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDX). The differences between carbon atomic % of non-irradiated and irradiated samples were tested using statistical t-test. Results revealed that the best fitting between energy densities and peak areas of calcium lines were exponential and linear for enamel and dentin, respectively. In addition, the ablation threshold of Nd:YAG lasers in enamel was higher than that of dentin. The morphology of the surrounded ablated region of enamel showed thermal damages. For enamel, the EDX quantitative analysis showed that the atomic % of carbon increased significantly when laser energy density increased. PMID:27228169

  9. Transient Ablation of Teflon Hemispheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arai, Norio; Karashima, Kei-ichi; Sato, Kiyoshi

    1997-01-01

    For high-speed entry of space vehicles into atmospheric environments, ablation is a practical method for alleviating severe aerodynamic heating. Several studies have been undertaken on steady or quasi-steady ablation. However, ablation is a very complicated phenomenon in which a nonequilibrium chemical process is associated with an aerodynamic process that involves changes in body shape with time. Therefore, it seems realistic to consider that ablation is an unsteady phenomenon. In the design of an ablative heat-shield system, since the ultimate purpose of the heat shield is to keep the internal temperature of the space vehicle at a safe level during entry, the transient heat conduction characteristics of the ablator may be critical in the selection of the material and its thickness. This note presents an experimental study of transient ablation of Teflon, with particular emphasis on the change in body shape, the instantaneous internal temperature distribution, and the effect of thermal expansion on ablation rate.

  10. Tumour ablation: technical aspects

    PubMed Central

    Bodner, Gerd; Bale, Reto

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Image-guided percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive, relatively low-risk procedure for tumour treatment. Local recurrence and survival rates depend on the rate of complete ablation of the entire tumour including a sufficient margin of surrounding healthy tissue. Currently a variety of different RFA devices are available. The interventionalist must be able to predict the configuration and extent of the resulting ablation necrosis. Accurate planning and execution of RFA according to the size and geometry of the tumour is essential. In order to minimize complications, individualized treatment strategies may be necessary for tumours close to vital structures. This review examines the state-of-the art of different device technologies, approaches, and treatment strategies for percutaneous RFA of liver tumours. PMID:19965296

  11. Advanced Ablative TPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasch, Matthew J.

    2011-01-01

    Early NASA missions (Gemini, Apollo, Mars Viking) employed new ablative TPS that were tailored for the entry environment. After 40 years, heritage ablative TPS materials using Viking or Pathfinder era materials are at or near their performance limits and will be inadequate for future exploration missions. Significant advances in TPS materials technology are needed in order to enable any subsequent human exploration missions beyond Low Earth Orbit. This poster summarizes some recent progress at NASA in developing families of advanced rigid/conformable and flexible ablators that could potentially be used for thermal protection in planetary entry missions. In particular the effort focuses technologies required to land heavy (approx.40 metric ton) masses on Mars to facilitate future exploration plans.

  12. Compensator models for fluence field modulated computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Bartolac, Steven; Jaffray, David

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Fluence field modulated computed tomography (FFMCT) presents a novel approach for acquiring CT images, whereby a patient model guides dynamically changing fluence patterns in an attempt to achieve task-based, user-prescribed, regional variations in image quality, while also controlling dose to the patient. This work aims to compare the relative effectiveness of FFMCT applied to different thoracic imaging tasks (routine diagnostic CT, lung cancer screening, and cardiac CT) when the modulator is subject to limiting constraints, such as might be present in realistic implementations.Methods: An image quality plan was defined for a simulated anthropomorphic chest slice, including regions of high and low image quality, for each of the thoracic imaging tasks. Modulated fluence patterns were generated using a simulated annealing optimization script, which attempts to achieve the image quality plan under a global dosimetric constraint. Optimization was repeated under different types of modulation constraints (e.g., fixed or gantry angle dependent patterns, continuous or comprised of discrete apertures) with the most limiting case being a fixed conventional bowtie filter. For each thoracic imaging task, an image quality map (IQM{sub sd}) representing the regionally varying standard deviation is predicted for each modulation method and compared to the prescribed image quality plan as well as against results from uniform fluence fields. Relative integral dose measures were also compared.Results: Each IQM{sub sd} resulting from FFMCT showed improved agreement with planned objectives compared to those from uniform fluence fields for all cases. Dynamically changing modulation patterns yielded better uniformity, improved image quality, and lower dose compared to fixed filter patterns with optimized tube current. For the latter fixed filter cases, the optimal choice of tube current modulation was found to depend heavily on the task. Average integral dose reduction compared

  13. Femtosecond laser ablation of carbon: From spallation to formation of hot critical plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryashov, S. I.; Ionin, A. A.; Makarov, S. V.; Mel'nik, N. N.; Seleznev, L. V.; Sinitsyn, D. V.

    2012-07-01

    Strong ablative shock waves were generated on a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite surface by intense IR femtosecond laser pulses in a broad fluence range and their basic parameters (pressure, velocity) were acquired by means of a non-contact broadband ultrasonic technique. At moderate laser fluences (F ≥ 0.3 J/cm2), ultrafast formation of a dense, strongly-heated (supercritical) carbon phase is expected, which expands on a fluence-dependent picosecond timescale in the form of a point-like three-dimensional explosion, driving a multi-GPa shock wave both in ambient air and the graphite target. At higher laser fluences (F > 5 J/cm2), critical electron-ion plasma is formed instantaneously during the exciting femtosecond laser pulse, with its strong plasma absorption initiating a TPa-level shock wave (the maximum shock wave pressure ≈ 3 TPa is more than twice the previous maximum for carbon). Because of the ablative removal of the laser-heated surface carbon layer, the following time-integrated structural studies indicate the formation of a mixture of diamond and graphite nanocrystallites or, in other words, glassy carbon only in the redeposition products.

  14. Evaluation of the analytical capability of NIR femtosecond laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Takafumi; Kon, Yoshiaki

    2008-03-01

    A laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometric (LA-ICPMS) technique utilizing a titanium-sapphire (TiS) femtosecond laser (fs-laser) has been developed for elemental and isotopic analysis. The signal intensity profile, depth of the ablation pit and level of elemental fractionation were investigated in order to evaluate the analytical capability of the present fs-laser ablation-ICPMS technique. The signal intensity profile of (57)Fe, obtained from iron sulfide (FeS(2)), demonstrated that the resulting signal intensity of (57)Fe achieved by the fs-laser ablation was almost 4-times higher than that obtained by ArF excimer laser ablation under a similar energy fluence (5 J/cm(2)). In fs-laser ablation, there is no significant difference in a depth of the ablation pit between glass and zircon material, while in ArF laser ablation, the resulting crater depth on the zircon crystal was almost half the level than that obtained for glass material. Both the thermal-induced and particle size-related elemental fractionations, which have been thought to be main sources of analytical error in the LA-ICPMS analysis, were measured on a Harvard 91500 zircon crystal. The resulting fractionation indexes on the (206)Pb/(238)U (f(Pb/U)) and (238)U/(232)Th (f(U/Th)) ratios obtained by the present fs-laser ablation system were significantly smaller than those obtained by a conventional ArF excimer laser ablation system, demonstrative of smaller elemental fractionation. Using the present fs-laser ablation technique, the time profile of the signal intensity of (56)Fe and the isotopic ratios ((57)Fe/(54)Fe and (56)Fe/(54)Fe) have been measured on a natural pyrite (FeS(2)) sample. Repeatability in signal intensity of (56)Fe achieved by the fs-laser ablation system was significantly better than that obtained by ArF excimer laser ablation. Moreover, the resulting precision in (57)Fe/(54)Fe and (56)Fe/(54)Fe ratio measurements could be improved by the fs-laser ablation system

  15. Laser ablation of liquid surface in air induced by laser irradiation through liquid medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utsunomiya, Yuji; Kajiwara, Takashi; Nishiyama, Takashi; Nagayama, Kunihito; Kubota, Shiro; Nakahara, Motonao

    2010-10-01

    The pulse laser ablation of a liquid surface in air when induced by laser irradiation through a liquid medium has been experimentally investigated. A supersonic liquid jet is observed at the liquid-air interface. The liquid surface layer is driven by a plasma plume that is produced by laser ablation at the layer, resulting in a liquid jet. This phenomenon occurs only when an Nd:YAG laser pulse (wavelength: 1064 nm) is focused from the liquid onto air at a low fluence of 20 J/cm2. In this case, as Fresnel’s law shows, the incident and reflected electric fields near the liquid surface layer are superposed constructively. In contrast, when the incident laser is focused from air onto the liquid, a liquid jet is produced only at an extremely high fluence, several times larger than that in the former case. The similarities and differences in the liquid jets and atomization processes are studied for several liquid samples, including water, ethanol, and vacuum oil. The laser ablation of the liquid surface is found to depend on the incident laser energy and laser fluence. A pulse laser light source and high-resolution film are required to observe the detailed structure of a liquid jet.

  16. Effects of Yb:KYW thin-disk femtosecond laser ablation on enamel surface roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing; Sun, Yuchun; Wang, Yong; Lü, Peijun

    2014-07-01

    This study aimed to quantitatively evaluate the surface roughness of enamel following ablation with a Yb:KYW thin-disk femtosecond pulsed laser at different fluences (F), scanning speeds and scanning line spacings. Thirty human extracted teeth were sectioned into crowns and roots along the cementum-enamel junction, and then the crowns were cut longitudinally into sheets about 1.5 mm thick. The samples were randomly divided into ten groups (n=3). Samples of groups 1-8 were irradiated with a femtosecond pulsed laser. These enamel samples were fixed on a stage at focus plane, and a laser beam irradiated onto the samples through a galvanometric scanning system, with which rectangular movement could be achieved. Samples of groups 9 and 10 were prepared with grinding instruments. Following ablation and preparation, the samples were examined for surface roughness with a three-dimensional laser profile measurement microscope. The results showed that scanning speed and scanning line spacing had little influence on the surface roughness of femtosecond pulsed laser-ablated enamel, except when F=4 J/cm2. When a lower fluence was used, the enamel surface roughness was higher, and vice versa. This study showed that various laser fluences, scanning speeds and scanning line spacings can affect and alter enamel surface roughness. Therefore, adequate parameters should be chosen to achieve the proper therapeutic benefits.

  17. Shuttle subscale ablative nozzle tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, L. B.; Bailey, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    Recent subscale nozzle tests have identified new and promising carbon phenolic nozzle ablatives which utilize staple rayon, PAN, and pitch based carbon cloth. A 4-inch throat diameter submerged test nozzle designed for the 48-inch Jet Propulsion Laboratory char motor was used to evaluate five different designs incorporating 20 candidate ablatives. Test results indicate that several pitch and PAN-based carbon phenolic ablatives can provide erosion and char performance equivalent or superior to the present continuous rayon-based SRM ablative.

  18. Bone Ablation at 2.94 mm Using the Free-Electron Laser and Er:YAG Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Borislav; Hakimian, Arman; Peavy, G. M.; Haglund, Richard

    2002-03-01

    Bone Ablation at 2.94 microns Using the Free-Electron Laser and Er:YAG Laser in Perfluorocarbon Compounds B. Ivanov^1, A. M. Hakimian^1, G. M. Peavy^2, R. F. Haglund, Jr.1 1Department of Physics and Astronomy, W. M. Keck Foundation Free-Electron Laser Center, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 2Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic, College of Medicine, University of California, Irvine, CA 92612 We report studies on the efficiency of mid-IR laser ablation of cow cortical bone using the Vanderbilt free-electron laser (FEL), when irrigating the ablation zone with an inert and biocompatible perfluorocarbon compounds (PFC). At 2.94 microns, the bone matrix (mainly by water) absorbs the radiation while the PFCs transmit this wavelength, dissipate heat and acoustical stress, and prevent carbonization of the bone sample. The ablation rate, as a function of laser fluence, scanning speed and the type of PFC, was investigated. The laser fluence was estimated to be 5 J/cm^2 - 100 J/cm^2 with a laser focal spot diameter of 160 microns 500 microns and a scanning speed of 40 microns/s 2960 microns/s. The ablation rate was estimated from scanning electron microscopy to be 0.5 mm/s 2.4 mm/s. Comparisons of ablation rates with the FEL and a Er:YAG laser at 2.94 microns are being evaluated.

  19. Ablative thermal protection systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaniman, J.; Fisher, R.; Wojciechowski, C.; Dean, W.

    1983-01-01

    The procedures used to establish the TPS (thermal protection system) design of the SRB (solid rocket booster) element of the Space Shuttle vehicle are discussed. A final evaluation of the adequacy of this design will be made from data obtained from the first five Shuttle flights. Temperature sensors installed at selected locations on the SRB structure covered by the TPS give information as a function of time throughout the flight. Anomalies are to be investigated and computer design thermal models adjusted if required. In addition, the actual TPS ablator material loss is to be measured after each flight and compared with analytically determined losses. The analytical methods of predicting ablator performance are surveyed.

  20. Neutral atomic jet generation by laser ablation of copper targets

    SciTech Connect

    Matos, J. B. de; Rodrigues, N. A. S.

    2014-08-15

    This work aimed the obtainment of a neutral atomic jet departing from a plume generated by laser ablation of copper targets. A pair of electrodes together with a transducer pressure sensor was used to study the ablated plume charge composition and also to measure the ion extraction from the plasma plume. The neutral beam was produced with this setup and the relative abundance of neutrals in the plasma was measured, it decreases from 30% to 8% when the laser fluence is varied from 20 J/cm{sup 2} to 32 J/cm{sup 2}. The necessary voltage to completely remove the ions from the plume varied from 10 V to 230 V in the same fluence range. TOF analysis resulted in center of mass velocities between 3.4 and 4.6 km/s, longitudinal temperature in the range from 1 × 10{sup 4} K to 2.4 × 10{sup 4} K and a Mach number of M = 2.36, calculated using purely hydrodynamic expansion approximation.

  1. Experimental study on GaP surface damage threshold induced by a high repetition rate femtosecond laser

    SciTech Connect

    Li Yi; Liu Feng; Li Yanfeng; Chai Lu; Xing Qirong; Hu Minglie; Wang Chingyue

    2011-05-01

    The surface damage threshold of undoped bulk <110> GaP induced by a high repetition rate femtosecond pulse at 1040 nm with a duration of 61 fs was studied. The threshold value was obtained by a linear fit of the incident single pulse fluence and was confirmed with a breakdown test around the threshold level. The result will be useful in high intensity, high repetition rate laser applications and ultrafast processes.

  2. Comparative analysis of SN1987A antineutrino fluence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vissani, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the electron antineutrino fluence derived from the events detected by Kamiokande-II, IMB and Baksan on 23 February 1987. The data are analysed adopting a new simple and accurate formula for the signal, improving on the previous modeling of the detectors response, considering the possibility of background events. We perform several alternative analyses to quantify the relevance of various descriptions, approximations and biases. In particular, we study the effect of: omitting Baksan data or neglecting the background, using simplified formulae for the signal, modifying the fluence to account for oscillations and pinching, including the measured times and angles of the events, using other descriptions of detector response, etc. We show that most of these effects are small or negligible and argue, by comparing the allowed regions for astrophysical parameters, that the results are stable. We comment on the accordance with theoretical results and on open questions.

  3. Accurate on line measurements of low fluences of charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palla, L.; Czelusniak, C.; Taccetti, F.; Carraresi, L.; Castelli, L.; Fedi, M. E.; Giuntini, L.; Maurenzig, P. R.; Sottili, L.; Taccetti, N.

    2015-03-01

    Ion beams supplied by the 3MV Tandem accelerator of LABEC laboratory (INFN-Firenze), have been used to study the feasibility of irradiating materials with ion fluences reproducible to about 1%. Test measurements have been made with 7.5 MeV 7Li2+ beams of different intensities. The fluence control is based on counting ions contained in short bursts generated by chopping the continuous beam with an electrostatic deflector followed by a couple of adjustable slits. Ions are counted by means of a micro-channel plate (MCP) detecting the electrons emitted from a thin layer of Al inserted along the beam path in between the pulse defining slits and the target. Calibration of the MCP electron detector is obtained by comparison with the response of a Si detector.

  4. How simulated fluence of photons from terrestrial gamma ray flashes at aircraft and balloon altitudes depends on initial parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, R. S.; ØStgaard, N.; Gjesteland, T.; Carlson, B.

    2013-05-01

    Up to a few years ago, terrestrial gamma ray flashes (TGFs) were only observed by spaceborne instruments. The aircraft campaign ADELE was able to observe one TGF, and more attempts on aircraft observations are planned. There is also a planned campaign with stratospheric balloons, COBRAT. In this context an important question that arises is what count rates we can expect and how these estimates are affected by the initial properties of the TGFs. Based on simulations of photon propagation in air we find the photon fluence at different observation points at aircraft and balloon altitudes. The observed fluence is highly affected by the initial parameters of the simulated TGFs. One of the most important parameters is the number of initial photons in a TGF. In this paper, we give a semi-analytical approach to find the initial number of photons with an order of magnitude accuracy. The resulting number varies over several orders of magnitude, depending mostly on the production altitude of the TGF. The initial production altitude is also one of the main parameters in the simulations. Given the same number of initial photons, the fluence at aircraft and balloon altitude from a TGF produced at 10 km altitude is 2-3 orders of magnitude smaller then a TGF originating from 20 km altitude. Other important parameters are altitude distribution, angular distribution and amount of feedback. The differences in altitude, altitude distribution and amount of feedback are especially important for the fluence of photons observed at altitudes less than 20 km, and for instruments with a low-energy threshold larger than 100 keV. We find that the maximum radius of observation in 14 km for a TGF with the intensity of an average RHESSI TGF is smaller than the results reported by Smith et al. (2011), and our results support the conclusion in Gjesteland et al. (2012) and Østgaard et al. (2012) that TGFs probably are a more common phenomenon than previously reported.

  5. Physical mechanisms of SiN{sub x} layer structuring with ultrafast lasers by direct and confined laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Rapp, S.; Heinrich, G.; Wollgarten, M.; Huber, H. P.; Schmidt, M.

    2015-03-14

    In the production process of silicon microelectronic devices and high efficiency silicon solar cells, local contact openings in thin dielectric layers are required. Instead of photolithography, these openings can be selectively structured with ultra-short laser pulses by confined laser ablation in a fast and efficient lift off production step. Thereby, the ultrafast laser pulse is transmitted by the dielectric layer and absorbed at the substrate surface leading to a selective layer removal in the nanosecond time domain. Thermal damage in the substrate due to absorption is an unwanted side effect. The aim of this work is to obtain a deeper understanding of the physical laser-material interaction with the goal of finding a damage-free ablation mechanism. For this, thin silicon nitride (SiN{sub x}) layers on planar silicon (Si) wafers are processed with infrared fs-laser pulses. Two ablation types can be distinguished: The known confined ablation at fluences below 300 mJ/cm{sup 2} and a combined partial confined and partial direct ablation at higher fluences. The partial direct ablation process is caused by nonlinear absorption in the SiN{sub x} layer in the center of the applied Gaussian shaped laser pulses. Pump-probe investigations of the central area show ultra-fast reflectivity changes typical for direct laser ablation. Transmission electron microscopy results demonstrate that the Si surface under the remaining SiN{sub x} island is not damaged by the laser ablation process. At optimized process parameters, the method of direct laser ablation could be a good candidate for damage-free selective structuring of dielectric layers on absorbing substrates.

  6. Inertial confinement fusion method producing line source radiation fluence

    DOEpatents

    Rose, Ronald P.

    1984-01-01

    An inertial confinement fusion method in which target pellets are imploded in sequence by laser light beams or other energy beams at an implosion site which is variable between pellet implosions along a line. The effect of the variability in position of the implosion site along a line is to distribute the radiation fluence in surrounding reactor components as a line source of radiation would do, thereby permitting the utilization of cylindrical geometry in the design of the reactor and internal components.

  7. Fluence estimation by deconvolution via l1-norm minimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García Hernández, J. C.; Lazaro-Ponthus, D.; Gmar, M.; Barthe, J.

    2011-03-01

    Advances in radiotherapy irradiation techniques have led to very complex treatments requiring for a more stringent control. The dosimetric properties of electronic portal imaging devices (EPID) encouraged their use for treatment verification. Two main approaches have been proposed: the forward approach, where measured portal dose images are compared to predicted dose images and the backward approach, where EPID images are used to estimate the dose delivered to the patient. Both approaches need EPID images to be converted into a fluence distribution by deconvolution. However, deconvolution is an ill-posed problem which is very sensitive to small variations on input data. This study presents the application of a deconvolution method based on l1-norm minimization; this is a method known for being very stable while working with noisy data. The algorithm was first evaluated on synthetic images with different noise levels, the results were satisfactory. Deconvolution algorithm was then applied to experimental portal images; the required EPID response kernel and energy fluence images were computed by Monte-Carlo calculation, accelerator treatment head and EPID models had already been commissioned in a previous work. The obtained fluence images were in good agreement with simulated fluence images. This deconvolution algorithm may be generalized to an inverse problem with a general operator, where image formation is not longer modeled by a convolution but by a linear operation that might be seen as a position-dependent convolution. Moreover, this procedure would be detector independent and could be used for any detector type provided its response function is known.

  8. Sensitivity Analysis and Neutron Fluence Adjustment for VVER-1000 Rpv

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belousov, S.; Ilieva, Kr.; Kirilova, D.

    2003-06-01

    Adjustment of the neutron fluence at the VVER-1000 RPV inner wall has been carried out. For the purpose of this adjustment the neutron flux response sensitivity to the main parameters of calculation uncertainty has been calculated. The obtained sensitivities, the parameters uncertainty and activity measurement data of iron, copper and niobium detectors positioned behind the RPV of Kozloduy NPP Unit 5 have been used in this adjustment.

  9. Determining beam resistance of large-scale optics by measuring thresholds for surface damage caused by low-size laser beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, D. I.; Ivanova, I. V.; Pasunkin, V. N.; Sirazetdinov, V. S.

    2010-07-01

    The paper describes an experimental method of determining probability density distribution for random threshold values of laser fluence, damaging surface of optical components. The method is as follows. Numerous surface sites of an optical component have been irradiated by a laser beam with a known non-uniform fluence distribution and magnitude sufficient for surface damage. Subsequently, the minimal fluence value ɛ has beens determined at the boundary of the damaged zone for each irradiation spot. It is shown that the sampling of minimal damage threshold values obtained from the above-described data assembly makes it possible to construct the probability density distribution f(ɛ). Knowledge of this distribution provides for the use of order statistics in damage threshold fluence data analysis and, thus, enhances accuracy and reliability of determination of surface strength for sizable optic components tested by small-diameter beams.

  10. Determining beam resistance of large-scale optics by measuring thresholds for surface damage caused by low-size laser beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, D. I.; Ivanova, I. V.; Pasunkin, V. N.; Sirazetdinov, V. S.

    2011-03-01

    The paper describes an experimental method of determining probability density distribution for random threshold values of laser fluence, damaging surface of optical components. The method is as follows. Numerous surface sites of an optical component have been irradiated by a laser beam with a known non-uniform fluence distribution and magnitude sufficient for surface damage. Subsequently, the minimal fluence value ɛ has beens determined at the boundary of the damaged zone for each irradiation spot. It is shown that the sampling of minimal damage threshold values obtained from the above-described data assembly makes it possible to construct the probability density distribution f(ɛ). Knowledge of this distribution provides for the use of order statistics in damage threshold fluence data analysis and, thus, enhances accuracy and reliability of determination of surface strength for sizable optic components tested by small-diameter beams.

  11. Dopant distribution in high fluence Fe implanted GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Azarov, A. Yu.; Jensen, J.; Hallen, A.; Aggerstam, T.

    2008-09-01

    Undoped wurtzite GaN epilayers implanted at room temperature with 50-325 keV Fe{sup +} ions in the fluence range of 10{sup 15}-10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2} are studied by a combination of Rutherford backscattering/channeling spectrometry and time-of-flight elastic recoil detection analysis. The results show an enhanced Fe concentration close to the surface for high ion fluences (>1x10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}), which increases with the ion fluence. Annealing at 800 deg. C for 30 min has a negligible effect on the Fe distribution in the material bulk, but further increases the Fe concentration near the surface. Our findings can be understood by radiation enhanced diffusion during ion implantation and an increased Fe diffusivity in the near surface region with distorted stoichiometry, or formation of secondary phases and precipitates for the highest doses. The simulation shows that, if enhanced diffusion is the reason for Fe buildup at the surface, both radiation enhanced diffusion and the thermal diffusion of Fe atoms near the surface, need to be at least five times larger than ordinary bulk diffusion to explain the increased Fe surface concentration.

  12. Temperature Dependence of the Flare Fluence Scaling Exponent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kretzschmar, M.

    2015-12-01

    Solar flares result in an increase of the solar irradiance at all wavelengths. While the distribution of the flare fluence observed in coronal emission has been widely studied and found to scale as f(E)˜ E^{-α}, with α slightly below 2, the distribution of the flare fluence in chromospheric lines is poorly known. We used the solar irradiance measurements observed by the SDO/EVE instrument at a 10 s cadence to investigate the dependency of the scaling exponent on the formation region of the lines (or temperature). We analyzed all flares above the C1 level since the start of the EVE observations (May 2010) to determine the flare fluence distribution in 16 lines covering a wide range of temperatures, several of which were not studied before. Our results show a weak downward trend with temperature of the scaling exponent of the PDF that reaches from above 2 at lower temperature (a few 104 K) to {˜ }1.8 for hot coronal emission (several 106 K). However, because colder lines also have fainter contrast, we cannot exclude that this behavior is caused by including more noise for smaller flares for these lines. We discuss the method and its limitations and tentatively associate this possible trend with the different mechanisms responsible for the heating of the chromosphere and corona during flares.

  13. Correlating Fast Fluence to dpa in Atypical Locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drury, Thomas H.

    2016-02-01

    Damage to a nuclear reactor's materials by high-energy neutrons causes changes in the ductility and fracture toughness of the materials. The reactor vessel and its associated piping's ability to withstand stress without brittle fracture are paramount to safety. Theoretically, the material damage is directly related to the displacements per atom (dpa) via the residual defects from induced displacements. However in practice, the material damage is based on a correlation to the high-energy (E > 1.0 MeV) neutron fluence. While the correlated approach is applicable when the material in question has experienced the same neutron spectrum as test specimens which were the basis of the correlation, this approach is not generically acceptable. Using Monte Carlo and discrete ordinates transport codes, the energy dependent neutron flux is determined throughout the reactor structures and the reactor vessel. Results from the models provide the dpa response in addition to the high-energy neutron flux. Ratios of dpa to fast fluence are calculated throughout the models. The comparisons show a constant ratio in the areas of historical concern and thus the validity of the correlated approach to these areas. In regions above and below the fuel however, the flux spectrum has changed significantly. The correlated relationship of material damage to fluence is not valid in these regions without adjustment. An adjustment mechanism is proposed.

  14. Therapeutic stimulation versus ablation.

    PubMed

    Hariz, Marwan I; Hariz, Gun-Marie

    2013-01-01

    The renaissance of functional stereotactic neurosurgery was pioneered in the mid 1980s by Laitinen's introduction of Leksell's posteroventral pallidotomy for Parkinson´s disease (PD). This ablative procedure experienced a worldwide spread in the 1990s, owing to its excellent effect on dyskinesias and other symptoms of post-l-dopa PD. Modern deep brain stimulation (DBS), pioneered by Benabid and Pollak in 1987 for the treatment of tremor, first became popular when it was applied to the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in the mid 1990s, where it demonstrated a striking effect on all cardinal symptoms of advanced PD, and permitted reduced dosages of medication. DBS, as a nondestructive, adaptable, and reversible procedure that is proving safe in bilateral surgery on basal ganglia, has great appeal to clinicians and patients alike, despite the fact that it is expensive, laborious, and relies on very strict patient selection criteria, especially for STN DBS. Psychiatric surgery has experienced the same phenomenon, with DBS supplanting completely stereotactic ablative procedures. This chapter discusses the pros and cons of ablation versus stimulation and investigates the reasons why DBS has overshadowed proven efficient ablative procedures such as pallidotomy for PD, and capsulotomy and cingulotomy for obsessive-compulsive disorder and depression. PMID:24112885

  15. Advanced Rigid Ablative TPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasch, Matthew J.

    2011-01-01

    NASA Exploration Systems Mission Directorate s (ESMD) Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) Technology Development Project (TDP) and the NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate s (ARMD) Hypersonics Project are developing new advanced rigid ablators in an effort to substantially increase reliability, decrease mass, and reduce life cycle cost of rigid aeroshell-based entry systems for multiple missions. Advanced Rigid Ablators combine ablation resistant top layers capable of high heat flux entry and enable high-speed EDL with insulating mass-efficient bottom that, insulate the structure and lower the areal weight. These materials may benefit Commercial Orbital Transportation Services (COTS) vendors and may potentially enable new NASA missions for higher velocity returns (e.g. asteroid, Mars). The materials have been thermally tested to 400-450 W/sq cm at the Laser Hardened Materials Evaluation Lab (LHMEL), Hypersonics Materials Evaluation Test System (HyMETS) and in arcjet facilities. Tested materials exhibit much lower backface temperatures and reduced recession over the baseline materials (PICA). Although the EDL project is ending in FY11, NASA in-house development of advanced ablators will continue with a focus on varying resin systems and fiber/resin interactions.

  16. New Ablation Technologies and Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Berte, Benjamin; Yamashita, Seigo; Derval, Nicolas; Denis, Arnaud; Shah, Ashok; Amraoui, Sana; Hocini, Meleze; Haissaguerre, Michel; Jais, Pierre; Sacher, Frederic

    2014-01-01

    Catheter ablation is an established treatment strategy for a range of different cardiac arrhythmias. Over the past decade two major areas of expansion have been ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular tachycardia (VT) in the context of structurally abnormal hearts. In parallel with the expanding role of catheter ablation for AF and VT, multiple novel technologies have been developed which aim to increase safety and procedural success. Areas of development include novel catheter designs, novel navigation technologies and higher resolution imaging techniques. The aim of the present review is to provide an overview of novel developments in AF ablation and VT ablation in patients with of structural cardiac diseases. PMID:26835075

  17. New Ablation Technologies and Techniques.

    PubMed

    Mahida, Saagar; Berte, Benjamin; Yamashita, Seigo; Derval, Nicolas; Denis, Arnaud; Shah, Ashok; Amraoui, Sana; Hocini, Meleze; Haissaguerre, Michel; Jais, Pierre; Sacher, Frederic

    2014-08-01

    Catheter ablation is an established treatment strategy for a range of different cardiac arrhythmias. Over the past decade two major areas of expansion have been ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular tachycardia (VT) in the context of structurally abnormal hearts. In parallel with the expanding role of catheter ablation for AF and VT, multiple novel technologies have been developed which aim to increase safety and procedural success. Areas of development include novel catheter designs, novel navigation technologies and higher resolution imaging techniques. The aim of the present review is to provide an overview of novel developments in AF ablation and VT ablation in patients with of structural cardiac diseases. PMID:26835075

  18. Magnetocardiographically-guided catheter ablation.

    PubMed

    Fenici, R R; Covino, M; Cellerino, C; Di Lillo, M; De Filippo, M C; Melillo, G

    1995-12-01

    After more than 30 years since the first magnetocardiographic (MCG) recording was carried out with induction coils, MCG is now approaching the threshold of clinical use. During the last 5 years, in fact, there has been a growing interest of clinicians in this new method which provides an unrivalled accuracy for noninvasive, three-dimensional localization of intracardiac source. An increasing number of laboratories are reporting data validating the use of MCG as an effective method for preoperative localization of arrhythmogenic substrates and for planning the best catheter ablation approach for different arrhythmogenic substrates. In this article, available data from literature have been reviewed. We consider the clinical use of MCG to localize arrhythmogenic substrates in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome and in patients with ventricular tachycardia in order to assess the state-of-the-art of the method on a large number of patients. This article also addresses some suggestions for industrial development of more compact, medically oriented MCG equipments at reasonable cost. PMID:10159774

  19. Analysis of laser energy deposition leading to damage and ablation of HfO2 and Nb2O5 single layers submitted to 500 fs pulses at 1030 and 343 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douti, Dam-Bé; Bégou, Thomas; Lemarchand, Fabien; Lumeau, Julien; Commandré, Mireille; Gallais, Laurent

    2016-07-01

    Laser- induced damage thresholds and morphologies of laser ablated sites on dielectric thin films are studied based on experiments and simulations. The films are single layers of hafnia and niobia deposited on fused silica substrates with a magnetron sputtering technique. Laser experiments are conducted with 500 fs pulses at 1030 and 343 nm, and the irradiated sites are characterized with optical profilometry and scanning electron microscopy. The results, i.e., LIDT and damage morphologies, are compared to simulations of energy deposition in the films based on the single rate equation for electron excitation, taking into account transient optical properties of the films during the pulse. The results suggest that a critical absorbed energy as a damage criterion gives consistent results both with the measured LIDT and the observed damage morphologies at fluences close to the damage threshold. Based on the numerical and experimental results, the determined LIDT evolution with the wavelength is described as nearly constant in the near-infrared region, and as rapidly decreasing with laser wavelength in the visible and near-ultraviolet regions.

  20. Percutaneous Ablation of Adrenal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesan, Aradhana M.; Locklin, Julia; Dupuy, Damian E.; Wood, Bradford J.

    2010-01-01

    Adrenal tumors comprise a broad spectrum of benign and malignant neoplasms, and include functional adrenal adenomas, pheochromocytomas, primary adrenocortical carcinoma and adrenal metastases. Percutaneous ablative approaches that have been described and used in the treatment of adrenal tumors include percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA), cryoablation, microwave ablation and chemical ablation. Local tumor ablation in the adrenal gland presents unique challenges, secondary to the adrenal gland’s unique anatomic and physiologic features. The results of clinical series employing percutaneous ablative techniques in the treatment of adrenal tumors are reviewed in this article. Clinical and technical considerations unique to ablation in the adrenal gland are presented, including approaches commonly used in our practices, and risks and potential complications are discussed. PMID:20540918

  1. Direct femtosecond laser ablation of copper with an optical vortex beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anoop, K. K.; Fittipaldi, R.; Rubano, A.; Wang, X.; Paparo, D.; Vecchione, A.; Marrucci, L.; Bruzzese, R.; Amoruso, S.

    2014-09-01

    Laser surface structuring of copper is induced by laser ablation with a femtosecond optical vortex beam generated via spin-to-orbital conversion of the angular momentum of light by using a q-plate. The variation of the produced surface structures is studied as a function of the number of pulses, N, and laser fluence, F. After the first laser pulse (N = 1), the irradiated surface presents an annular region characterized by a corrugated morphology made by a rather complex network of nanometer-scale ridges, wrinkles, pores, and cavities. Increasing the number of pulses (2 < N < 100), the surface texture progressively evolves towards larger structures, while the central, non-ablated area is gradually decorated by nanoparticles produced during laser ablation. At large number of pulses (200 < N < 1000), a micro-tip with a nanostructured surface forms in the center of the irradiated area, which eventually disappears at still larger number of pulses (N > 1000) and a deep crater is formed. The nanostructure variation with the laser fluence, F, also evidences an interesting dependence, with a coarsening of the structure morphology as F increases. Our experimental findings demonstrate that direct femtosecond laser ablation with optical vortex beams produces interesting patterns not achievable by the more standard beams with a Gaussian intensity profile. They also suggest that appropriate tuning of the experimental conditions (F, N) can allow generating micro- and/or nano-structured surface for any specific application.

  2. Direct femtosecond laser ablation of copper with an optical vortex beam

    SciTech Connect

    Anoop, K. K.; Rubano, A.; Marrucci, L.; Bruzzese, R.; Amoruso, S.; Fittipaldi, R.; Vecchione, A.; Wang, X.; Paparo, D.

    2014-09-21

    Laser surface structuring of copper is induced by laser ablation with a femtosecond optical vortex beam generated via spin-to-orbital conversion of the angular momentum of light by using a q-plate. The variation of the produced surface structures is studied as a function of the number of pulses, N, and laser fluence, F. After the first laser pulse (N=1), the irradiated surface presents an annular region characterized by a corrugated morphology made by a rather complex network of nanometer-scale ridges, wrinkles, pores, and cavities. Increasing the number of pulses (2ablated area is gradually decorated by nanoparticles produced during laser ablation. At large number of pulses (2001000) and a deep crater is formed. The nanostructure variation with the laser fluence, F, also evidences an interesting dependence, with a coarsening of the structure morphology as F increases. Our experimental findings demonstrate that direct femtosecond laser ablation with optical vortex beams produces interesting patterns not achievable by the more standard beams with a Gaussian intensity profile. They also suggest that appropriate tuning of the experimental conditions (F, N) can allow generating micro- and/or nano-structured surface for any specific application.

  3. Ablation of metal-containing perylene tetracarboxylic dianhydride with third harmonic of Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishio, S.; Kanezawa, C.; Hatanaka, K.; Hobley, J.; Fukumura, H.

    2007-04-01

    Deposited films were prepared by ablation of disk-like targets of 3,4,9,10- perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) and mixed targets of PTCDA with cobalt (PTCDA-Co) and copper powders (PTCDA-Cu) using the third harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser (355 nm) at fluences ranging from 0.1 to 1.0 Jcm-2pulse-1. FT-IR and Raman spectroscopy showed that ablation of PTCDA-Cu at more than 500 mJcm-2pulse-1 led to an effective elimination reaction of the anhydride groups of PTCDA as well as PTCDA-Co at more than 700 mJcm-2pulse-1. In ablation of PTCDA-Co and PTCDA-Cu, plasma emission was observed around 500 nm. With increasing fluence, addition to the plasma emission, peaks at 437, 469, 513 and 550 nm coming from C2 radicals were observed, suggesting that PTCDA was partially decomposed into C2. TOF mass spectra in ablation of PTCDA-Co showed fragments of PTCDA without one or two anhydride groups as well as CoCn+ (n = 0-5) and Co (CO)2+.

  4. Color Matters—Material Ejection and Ion Yields in UV-MALDI Mass Spectrometry as a Function of Laser Wavelength and Laser Fluence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltwisch, Jens; Jaskolla, Thorsten W.; Dreisewerd, Klaus

    2013-10-01

    The success of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) as a widely employed analytical tool in the biomolecular sciences builds strongly on an effective laser-material interaction that is resulting in a soft co-desorption and ionization of matrix and imbedded biomolecules. To obtain a maximized ion yield for the analyte(s) of interest, in general both wavelength and fluence need to be tuned to match the specific optical absorption profile of the used matrix. However, commonly only lasers with fixed emission wavelengths of either 337 or 355 nm are used for MALDI-MS. Here, we employed a wavelength-tunable dye laser and recorded both the neutral material ejection and the MS ion data in a wide wavelength and fluence range between 280 and 377.5 nm. α-Cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (HCCA), 4-chloro-α-cyanocinnamic acid (ClCCA), α-cyano-2,4-difluorocinnamic acid (DiFCCA), and 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB) were investigated as matrices, and several peptides as analytes. Recording of the material ejection was achieved by adopting a photoacoustic approach. Relative ion yields were derived by division of photoacoustic and ion signals. In this way, distinct wavelength/fluence regions can be identified for which maximum ion yields were obtained. For the tested matrices, optimal results were achieved for wavelengths corresponding to areas of high optical absorption of the respective matrix and at fluences about a factor of 2-3 above the matrix- and wavelength-dependent ion detection threshold fluences. The material ejection as probed by the photoacoustic method is excellently fitted by the quasithermal model, while a sigmoidal function allows for an empirical description of the ion signal-fluence relationship.

  5. UV solid state laser ablation of intraocular lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostolopoulos, A.; Lagiou, D. P.; Evangelatos, Ch.; Spyratou, E.; Bacharis, C.; Makropoulou, M.; Serafetinides, A. A.

    2013-06-01

    Commercially available intraocular lenses (IOLs) are manufactured from silicone and acrylic, both rigid (e.g. PMMA) and foldable (hydrophobic or hydrophilic acrylic biomaterials), behaving different mechanical and optical properties. Recently, the use of apodizing technology to design new diffractive-refractive multifocals improved the refractive outcome of these intraocular lenses, providing good distant and near vision. There is also a major ongoing effort to refine laser refractive surgery to correct other defects besides conventional refractive errors. Using phakic IOLs to treat high myopia potentially provides better predictability and optical quality than corneal-based refractive surgery. The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of laser ablation on IOL surface shaping, by drilling circular arrays of holes, with a homemade motorized rotation stage, and scattered holes on the polymer surface. In material science, the most popular lasers used for polymer machining are the UV lasers, and, therefore, we tried in this work the 3rd and the 5th harmonic of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (λ=355 nm and λ=213 nm respectively). The morphology of the ablated IOL surface was examined with a scanning electron microscope (SEM, Fei - Innova Nanoscope) at various laser parameters. Quantitative measurements were performed with a contact profilometer (Dektak-150), in which a mechanical stylus scanned across the surface of gold-coated IOLs (after SEM imaging) to measure variations in surface height and, finally, the ablation rates were also mathematically simulated for depicting the possible laser ablation mechanism(s). The experimental results and the theoretical modelling of UV laser interaction with polymeric IOLs are discussed in relation with the physical (optical, mechanical and thermal) properties of the material, in addition to laser radiation parameters (laser energy fluence, number of pulses). The qualitative aspects of laser ablation at λ=213 nm reveal a

  6. Non-contact acoustic tests based on nanosecond laser ablation: Generation of a pulse sound source with a small amplitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosoya, Naoki; Kajiwara, Itsuro; Inoue, Tatsuo; Umenai, Koh

    2014-09-01

    A method to generate a pulse sound source for acoustic tests based on nanosecond laser ablation with a plasma plume is discussed. Irradiating a solid surface with a laser beam expands a high-temperature plasma plume composed of free electrons, ionized atoms, etc. at a high velocity throughout ambient air. The shockwave generated by the plasma plume becomes the pulse sound source. A laser ablation sound source has two features. Because laser ablation is induced when the laser fluence reaches 1012-1014 W/m2, which is less than that for laser-induced breakdown (1015 W/m2), laser ablation can generate a lower sound pressure, and the sound source has a hemispherical radiation pattern on the surface where laser ablation is generated. Additionally, another feature is that laser-induced breakdown sound sources can fluctuate, whereas laser ablation sound sources do not because laser ablation is produced at a laser beam-irradiation point. We validate this laser ablation method for acoustic tests by comparing the measured and theoretical resonant frequencies of an impedance tube.

  7. Preparation of gold and silver nanoparticles by pulsed laser ablation of solid target in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikov, R. G.; Nikolov, A. S.; Atanasov, P. A.

    2010-10-01

    Colloidal solutions of gold and silver nanoparticles (NPs) were prepared using a method pulsed laser ablation of target in liquid media. A gold and silver targets immersed in double distilled water are irradiated for 20 min by laser pulses with duration of 15 ns and repetition rate of 10 Hz. In order to investigate influences of laser wavelength and fluence on the particle size, shape and optical properties the experiments were preformed by using two different wavelength - the fundamental and the second harmonic (SH) (λ = 1064 and 532 nm, respectively) of a Nd:YAG laser system. Two different values of the laser fluence for each wavelength at the experimental conditions chosen were used and thus it was changed from several J/cm2 to tens of J/cm2. For characterization of the NPs shape and size distribution were used transmission electron microscope (TEM) and optical transmission spectroscopy in the near UV and in the visible region. Spherical shape of the nanoparticles at the low laser fluence and appearance of aggregation and building of nanowires at the SH and high laser fluence is seen. Dependence of the mean particle size at the SH on the laser fluence was established. The mean diameter of gold NPs became smaller with decrease in laser wavelength.

  8. Gas-dynamic acceleration of laser-ablation plumes: Hyperthermal particle energies under thermal vaporization

    SciTech Connect

    Morozov, A. A.; Evtushenko, A. B.; Bulgakov, A. V.

    2015-02-02

    The expansion of a plume produced by low-fluence laser ablation of graphite in vacuum is investigated experimentally and by direct Monte Carlo simulations in an attempt to explain hyperthermal particle energies for thermally vaporized materials. We demonstrate that the translation energy of neutral particles, ∼2 times higher than classical expectations, is due to two effects, hydrodynamic plume acceleration into the forward direction and kinetic selection of fast particles in the on-axis region. Both effects depend on the collision number within the plume and on the particles internal degrees of freedom. The simulations allow ablation properties to be evaluated, such as ablation rate and surface temperature, based on time-of-flight measurements. Available experimental data on kinetic energies of various laser-produced particles are well described by the presented model.

  9. Gas-dynamic acceleration of laser-ablation plumes: Hyperthermal particle energies under thermal vaporization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, A. A.; Evtushenko, A. B.; Bulgakov, A. V.

    2015-02-01

    The expansion of a plume produced by low-fluence laser ablation of graphite in vacuum is investigated experimentally and by direct Monte Carlo simulations in an attempt to explain hyperthermal particle energies for thermally vaporized materials. We demonstrate that the translation energy of neutral particles, ˜2 times higher than classical expectations, is due to two effects, hydrodynamic plume acceleration into the forward direction and kinetic selection of fast particles in the on-axis region. Both effects depend on the collision number within the plume and on the particles internal degrees of freedom. The simulations allow ablation properties to be evaluated, such as ablation rate and surface temperature, based on time-of-flight measurements. Available experimental data on kinetic energies of various laser-produced particles are well described by the presented model.

  10. The thermoelastic basis of short pulsed laser ablation of biological tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Itzkan, I; Albagli, D; Dark, M L; Perelman, L T; von Rosenberg, C; Feld, M S

    1995-01-01

    Strong evidence that short-pulse laser ablation of biological tissues is a photomechanical process is presented. A full three-dimensional, time-dependent solution to the thermoelastic wave equation is compared to the results of experiments using an interferometric surface monitor to measure thermoelastic expansion. Agreement is excellent for calibrations performed on glass and on acrylic at low laser fluences. For cortical bone, the measurements agree well with the theoretical predictions once optical scattering is included. The theory predicts the presence of the tensile stresses necessary to rupture the tissue during photomechanical ablation. The technique is also used to monitor the ablation event both before and after material is ejected. PMID:7892208

  11. Formation of AlN in laser ablated plasma of Al in nitrogen ambient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thareja, Raj K.; Sharma, A. K.

    2005-05-01

    We report on spectroscopic investigations of interaction of an expanding laser ablated plume of aluminum and graphite with nitrogen gas and the formation of AlN and CN. AlN and CN bands are formed by reactive process of ablated aluminum and graphite in ambient nitrogen pressures of 70 and 0.1 Torr and laser fluence of 500 and 12 Jcm-2 respectively. Images of the expanding plasma plume were captured using ICCD to understand the role of vapor and shock temperature in the formation of AlN. Instability observed in laser ablated plume at later times attributed to Rayleigh-Taylor instability could be the cause for weak AlN band observed in the emission spectrum.

  12. Synthesis of higher diamondoids by pulsed laser ablation plasmas in supercritical CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakahara, Sho; Stauss, Sven; Kato, Toru; Sasaki, Takehiko; Terashima, Kazuo

    2011-06-01

    Pulsed laser ablation (wavelength 532 nm; fluence 18 J/cm2; pulse width 7 ns; repetition rate 10 Hz) of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite was conducted in adamantane-dissolved supercritical CO2 with and without cyclohexane as a cosolvent. Micro-Raman spectroscopy of the products revealed the presence of hydrocarbons possessing sp3-hybridized carbons similar to diamond structures. The synthesis of diamantane and other possible diamondoids consisting of up to 12 cages was confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Furthermore, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry measurements of samples before and after pyrolysis treatment indicate the synthesis of the most compact decamantane, namely, superadamantane. It is thought that oxidant species originating from CO2 during pulsed laser ablation might lead to the selective dissociation of C-H bonds, enabling the synthesis of low H/C ratio molecules. Therefore, laser ablation in supercritical CO2 is proposed as a practical method for synthesizing diamondoids.

  13. Processing condition influence on the characteristics of gold nanoparticles produced by pulsed laser ablation in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikov, R. G.; Nikolov, A. S.; Nedyalkov, N. N.; Atanasov, P. A.; Alexandrov, M. T.; Karashanova, D. B.

    2013-06-01

    A study is presented of Au nanoparticles (NPs) created by nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of a solid target in double distilled water. The influence was examined of the laser wavelength on the size, shape and optical properties of the resulting NPs. Three different wavelengths: the fundamental (λ = 1064 nm), second (λSHG = 532) and third (λTHG = 355) harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser at the same fluence were utilized to produce various colloids. Ablation at the wavelength of 532 nm was investigated in more detail to reveal the influence of self-absorption by the already created NPs on their characteristics. The colloid produced was irradiated by λirrad = 532 nm (laser energy 40 mJ) at different times up to 25 min after the end of ablation. The initial structure of welded NPs forming wires was modified. Transmission electron microscopy and optical transmission measurements were used to evaluate the shape and size distribution of the NPs.

  14. Confocal microscopy to guide Erbium:yttrium aluminum garnet laser ablation of basal cell carcinoma: an ex vivo feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Bjorg A.; Chen, Chih-Shan Jason; Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. For the removal of superficial and nodular basal cell carcinomas (BCCs), laser ablation provides certain advantages relative to other treatment modalities. However, efficacy and reliability tend to be variable because tissue is vaporized such that none is available for subsequent histopathological examination for residual BCC (and to confirm complete removal of tumor). Intra-operative reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) may provide a means to detect residual tumor directly on the patient and guide ablation. However, optimization of ablation parameters will be necessary to control collateral thermal damage and preserve sufficient viability in the underlying layer of tissue, so as to subsequently allow labeling of nuclear morphology with a contrast agent and imaging of residual BCC. We report the results of a preliminary study of two key parameters (fluence, number of passes) vis-à-vis the feasibility of labeling and RCM imaging in human skin ex vivo, following ablation with an erbium:yttrium aluminum garnet laser. PMID:24045654

  15. Pulsed laser ablation of binary semiconductors: mechanisms of vaporisation and cluster formation

    SciTech Connect

    Bulgakov, A V; Evtushenko, A B; Shukhov, Yu G; Ozerov, I; Marin, W

    2010-12-29

    Formation of small clusters during pulsed ablation of two binary semiconductors, zinc oxide and indium phosphide, in vacuum by UV, visible, and IR laser radiation is comparatively studied. The irradiation conditions favourable for generation of neutral and charged Zn{sub n}O{sub m} and In{sub n}P{sub m} clusters of different stoichiometry in the ablation products are found. The size and composition of the clusters, their expansion dynamics and reactivity are analysed by time-of-flight mass spectrometry. A particular attention is paid to the mechanisms of ZnO and InP ablation as a function of laser fluence, with the use of different ablation models. It is established that ZnO evapourates congruently in a wide range of irradiation conditions, while InP ablation leads to enrichment of the target surface with indium. It is shown that this radically different character of semiconductor ablation determines the composition of the nanostructures formed: zinc oxide clusters are mainly stoichiometric, whereas In{sub n}P{sub m} particles are significantly enriched with indium. (photonics and nanotechnology)

  16. Fabrication of CVD graphene-based devices via laser ablation for wafer-scale characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackenzie, David M. A.; Buron, Jonas D.; Whelan, Patrick R.; Jessen, Bjarke S.; Silajdźić, Adnan; Pesquera, Amaia; Centeno, Alba; Zurutuza, Amaia; Bøggild, Peter; Petersen, Dirch H.

    2015-12-01

    Selective laser ablation of a wafer-scale graphene film is shown to provide flexible, high speed (1 wafer/hour) device fabrication while avoiding the degradation of electrical properties associated with traditional lithographic methods. Picosecond laser pulses with single pulse peak fluences of 140 mJ cm-2 for 1064 nm, 40 mJ cm-2 for 532 nm, and 30 mJ cm-2 for 355 nm are sufficient to ablate the graphene film, while the ablation onset for Si/SiO2 (thicknesses 500 μm/302 nm) did not occur until 240 mJ cm-2, 150 mJ cm-2, and 135 mJ cm-2, respectively, allowing all wavelengths to be used for graphene ablation without detectable substrate damage. Optical microscopy and Raman Spectroscopy were used to assess the ablation of graphene, while stylus profilometery indicated that the SiO2 substrate was undamaged. CVD graphene devices were electrically characterized and showed comparable field-effect mobility, doping level, on-off ratio, and conductance minimum before and after laser ablation fabrication.

  17. Tailored ablation processing of advanced biomedical hydroxyapatite by femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozono, K.; Obara, M.

    The micromachining of hydroxyapatite (HAp) is highly important for orthopedics and dentistry, since human bone and teeth consist mainly of HAp. We demonstrate ultrashort Ti:sapphire laser ablation of HAp, using pulse-widths of 50 fs, 500 fs, and 2 ps at a wavelength of 820 nm and at 1 kpps. The crucial medical issue is to preserve the chemical properties of the machined (ablated) surface. If the chemical properties of HAp change, the human bone or tooth cannot re-grow after laser processing. Using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, we observe chemical properties of HAp ablated in air. The HAp is ablated at laser fluences of 3.2 J/cm2 (6.4×1013 W/cm2 at 50 fs), 3.3 J/cm2 (6.6×1012 W/cm2 at 500 fs), and 9.6 J/cm2 (4.8×1012 W/cm2 at 2 ps), respectively. As a result it is found that the ablated surface is unchanged after laser ablation over the pulse-width range used in this experiment.

  18. Pausing at the Threshold

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Patrick K.

    2015-01-01

    Since about 2003, the notion of threshold concepts--the central ideas in any field that change how learners think about other ideas--have become difficult to escape at library conferences and in general information literacy discourse. Their visibility will likely only increase because threshold concepts figure prominently in the Framework for…

  19. Threshold Concepts in Economics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shanahan, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine threshold concepts in the context of teaching and learning first-year university economics. It outlines some of the arguments for using threshold concepts and provides examples using opportunity cost as an exemplar in economics. Design/ Methodology/Approach: The paper provides an overview of the…

  20. Bayesian Threshold Estimation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gustafson, S. C.; Costello, C. S.; Like, E. C.; Pierce, S. J.; Shenoy, K. N.

    2009-01-01

    Bayesian estimation of a threshold time (hereafter simply threshold) for the receipt of impulse signals is accomplished given the following: 1) data, consisting of the number of impulses received in a time interval from zero to one and the time of the largest time impulse; 2) a model, consisting of a uniform probability density of impulse time…

  1. Hydrodynamic model for ultra-short pulse ablation of hard dental tissue

    SciTech Connect

    London, R.A.; Bailey, D.S.; Young, D.A.; Alley, W.E.; Feit, M.D.; Rubenchik, A.M.; Neev, J.

    1996-02-29

    A computational model for the ablation of tooth enamel by ultra-short laser pulses is presented. The role of simulations using this model in designing and understanding laser drilling systems is discussed. Pulses of duration 300 fsec and intensity greater than 10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2} are considered. Laser absorption proceeds via multi-photon initiated plasma mechanism. The hydrodynamic response is calculated with a finite difference method, using an equation of state constructed from thermodynamic functions including electronic, ion motion, and chemical binding terms. Results for the ablation efficiency are presented. An analytic model describing the ablation threshold and ablation depth is presented. Thermal coupling to the remaining tissue and long-time thermal conduction are calculated. Simulation results are compared to experimental measurements of the ablation efficiency. Desired improvements in the model are presented.

  2. Laser ablation of ceramic Al2O3 at 193 nm and 248 nm: The importance of single-photon ionization processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peláez, R. J.; Afonso, C. N.; Bator, M.; Lippert, T.

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this work is to demonstrate that single-photon photoionization processes make a significant difference in the expansion and temperature of the plasma produced by laser ablation of ceramic Al2O3 in vacuum as well as to show their consequences in the kinetic energy distribution of the species that eventually will impact on the film properties produced by pulsed laser deposition. This work compares results obtained by mass spectrometry and optical spectroscopy on the composition and features of the plasma produced by laser ablation at 193 nm and 248 nm, i.e., photon energies that are, respectively, above and below the ionization potential of Al, and for fluences between threshold for visible plasma and up to ≈2 times higher. The results show that the ionic composition and excitation of the plasma as well as the ion kinetic energies are much higher at 193 nm than at 248 nm and, in the latter case, the population of excited ions is even negligible. The comparison of Maxwell-Boltzmann temperature, electron temperatures, and densities of the plasmas produced with the two laser wavelengths suggests that the expansion of the plasma produced at 248 nm is dominated by a single population. Instead, the one produced at 193 nm is consistent with the existence of two populations of cold and hot species, the latter associated to Al+ ions that travel at the forefront and produced by single photon ionization as well as Al neutrals and double ionized ions produced by electron-ion impact. The results also show that the most energetic Al neutrals in the plasma produced at the two studied wavelengths are in the ground state.

  3. Atomic oxygen flux and fluence calculation for Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourassa, Roger J.; Gillis, James R.

    1991-01-01

    The LDEF mission was to study the effects of the space environment on various materials over an extended period of time. One of the important factors for materials degradation in low earth orbit is the atomic oxygen fluxes and fluences experienced by the materials. These fluxes and fluences are a function of orbital parameters, solar and geomagnetic activity, and material surface orientation. Calculations of atomic oxygen fluences and fluxes for the LDEF mission are summarized. Included are descriptions of LDEF orbital parameters, solar and geomagnetic data, computer code FLUXAV, which was used to perform calculations of fluxes and fluences, along with a discussion of the calculated fluxes and fluences.

  4. Investigations of the damage mechanisms during ultrashort pulse laser ablation of dental tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domke, Matthias; Wick, Sebastian; Laible, Maike; Rapp, Stephan; Kuznetsova, Julia; Homann, Christian; Huber, Heinz P.; Sroka, Ronald

    2015-07-01

    Several investigations of dental tissue ablation with ultrashort pulsed lasers suggest that these lasers enable precise and selective material removal and reduce the formation of micro cracks and thermal effects, when compared to ns-pulses. In this study, two damage mechanisms are presented occurring during ablation of dentin using a laser emitting pulses of a duration of 380 fs at a wavelength of 1040 nm. First, it was found that nano cracks appear around the craters after single fs-pulse ablation. These cracks are directed to the crater and cross the dentinal tubules. Transient investigation of the single fs-pulse ablation process by pump-probe microscopy suggest that the driving mechanism could be a pressure wave that is released after stress confinement. Second, squared ablation holes were created by moving the laser focus at scan speeds between 0.5 mm/s and 2.0 m/s and fluences up to 14 J/cm2. It was found that deep cracks appear at the edges of the squared holes, if the scan speed is about 0.5 m/s. The fluence has only a minor impact on the crack formation. The crack propagation was investigated in the depth using x-ray micro tomography and optical coherence tomography. It was found that these cracks appear in the depth down to the dental pulp. These findings suggest that fast scanning of the laser beam is the key for damage free processing using ultrashort pulse lasers. Then, ablation rates of about 2.5 - 3.5 mm3/min/W can be achieved in dentine with pulse durations of 380 fs.

  5. Heating characteristics of antenna arrays used in microwave ablation: A theoretical parametric study.

    PubMed

    Karampatzakis, Andreas; Kühn, Sven; Tsanidis, George; Neufeld, Esra; Samaras, Theodoros; Kuster, Niels

    2013-10-01

    A numerical study of the performance of antenna arrays used in microwave ablation (MWA) is carried out. Double-slot coaxial antennas in triangular and square configurations are studied. Clinical (healthy vs. malignant) and experimental (in vs. ex vivo) scenarios for hepatic cancer treatment are modeled, and further application in bone and lung tissue is examined. It is found that triangular arrays can create spherical ablation zones, while square configurations result in flatter ones. Thresholds in power and application times for creating continuous ablation zones are calculated, and the characteristics of the latter are quantified. PMID:24034722

  6. A model for thermal ablation of biological tissue using laser radiation.

    PubMed

    Partovi, F; Izatt, J A; Cothren, R M; Kittrell, C; Thomas, J E; Strikwerda, S; Kramer, J R; Feld, M S

    1987-01-01

    We present a theory of thermal laser ablation based on the heat equation and on an energy balance equation derived from it. Ablation is assumed to be brought about by the heating and evaporation of tissue water. The model is three-dimensional, and scattering and the water-steam phase transition are explicitly taken into account. The model predicts threshold parameters and a steady-state ablation velocity in terms of the optical and thermal properties of the tissue and the laser beam intensity and spot diameter. PMID:3613805

  7. Sub-500-nm patterning of glass by nanosecond KrF excimer laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekesi, J.; Meinertz, J.; Simon, P.; Ihlemann, J.

    2013-01-01

    The surface of flint glass of type F2 is patterned by nanosecond KrF excimer laser ablation. Strong UV absorption provides a comparatively low ablation threshold and precise ablation contours. By using a two-grating interferometer, periodic surface patterns with 330 nm period and 100 nm modulation depth are obtained. This method enables the fabrication of 7 mm×13 mm wide grating areas with perfectly aligned grooves without the need of high-precision sample positioning. By double exposure, crossed gratings with adjustable depths in the two orthogonal directions can be generated.

  8. On the efficiency of laser ablation of photopolymerizing compositions in liquid and solidified states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loktionov, E. Yu.; Protasov, Yu. S.; Protasov, Yu. Yu.; Telekh, V. D.

    2015-02-01

    The efficiency of laser ablation of photocuring compositions that are working substances of various laser-plasma facilities is investigated for the first time. A substantial difference in spectral-energetic laser ablation thresholds, specific mass consumption, momentum coupling coefficient, and conversion efficiency of the laser energy to the kinetic energy of gas-plasma flow for liquid and solidified phases is demonstrated. Application of this class of working media allows not only solving problems related to laser ablation of a target, transport, fine dosing, and obtaining long lifetime and reliability of laser-plasma-based technological setups, but also considerably broadens the range of their operational characteristics.

  9. Nanosecond laser ablation for pulsed laser deposition of yttria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Sucharita

    2013-09-01

    A thermal model to describe high-power nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of yttria (Y2O3) has been developed. This model simulates ablation of material occurring primarily through vaporization and also accounts for attenuation of the incident laser beam in the evolving vapor plume. Theoretical estimates of process features such as time evolution of target temperature distribution, melt depth and ablation rate and their dependence on laser parameters particularly for laser fluences in the range of 6 to 30 J/cm2 are investigated. Calculated maximum surface temperatures when compared with the estimated critical temperature for yttria indicate absence of explosive boiling at typical laser fluxes of 10 to 30 J/cm2. Material ejection in large fragments associated with explosive boiling of the target needs to be avoided when depositing thin films via the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique as it leads to coatings with high residual porosity and poor compaction restricting the protective quality of such corrosion-resistant yttria coatings. Our model calculations facilitate proper selection of laser parameters to be employed for deposition of PLD yttria corrosion-resistive coatings. Such coatings have been found to be highly effective in handling and containment of liquid uranium.

  10. Picosecond and femtosecond laser ablation of hard tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafetinides, Alexander A.; Makropoulou, Mersini I.; Kar, Ajoy K.; Khabbaz, Marouan

    1996-12-01

    In this study, the interaction of picosecond and femtosecond pulsed laser radiation with human dental tissue was investigated experimentally, as this unexplored field is expected to be a potential alternative in powerful laser processing of biomedical structures. Dentin ablation rate experiments were performed by using teeth sections of different thickness. Dental tissue samples were irradiated in air with i) a regenerative amplifier laser at 1064 nm, pulse duration 110 ps, ii) the second harmonic laser at 532 nm, pulse duration 100 ps, and iii) a picosecond tunable dye amplifier at 595 nm, pulse width 800 fs. In all the experiments the pulse repetition rate was 10 Hz. The ablation rate per pulse at different energy fluence settings was calculated by measuring the time needed for the perforation of the whole dental sample thickness. Short laser pulses can confine thermal energy within the optical zone, which maximizes photothermal and photomechanical mechanisms of interaction. Tissue ablation rates were found to be comparable to or better than other nanosecond lasers, and left smooth surfaces, free of thermal damage.

  11. Experiments and Theory of Ablation Plasma Ion Implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilgenbach, R. M.; Qi, B.; Lau, Y. Y.; Johnston, M. D.; Doll, G. L.; Lazarides, A.

    2000-10-01

    Research is underway to accelerate laser ablation plume ions for implantation into substrates. Ablation plasma ion implantation (APII) biases the deposition substrate to a large negative voltage. APII has the advantages of direct acceleration and implantation of ions from metals or any other solid targets. This process is environmentally friendly because it avoids the use of toxic gaseous precursors. Initial experiments are directed towards the implantation of iron ions into silicon substrates at negative voltages from 2-10 kV. A KrF laser ablates iron targets at pulse energies up to 600 mJ and typical repetition rates of 10 Hz. Parameters which can be varied include laser fluence, relative timing of laser and high voltage pulse, and target-to-substrate distance. Spectroscopic diagnostics yield Fe plasma plume electron temperatures up to about 10 eV. Analysis of films will compare surface morphology, hardness and adhesion between deposited Vs accelerated-implanted plumes. A simple one dimensional theory is developed [1] to calculate the implanted ion current, extracted from the ion matrix sheath, as a function of time for various substrate-plume separations. This model accurately recovers Lieberman's classic results when the plume front is initially in contact with the substrate. [1] B. Qi, Y. Y. Lau, and R. M. Gilgenbach, Appl. Phys. Lett. (to be published). * This research is supported by the National Science Foundation.

  12. Microscopic and macroscopic modeling of femtosecond laser ablation of metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Povarnitsyn, Mikhail E.; Fokin, Vladimir B.; Levashov, Pavel R.

    2015-12-01

    Simulation of femtosecond laser ablation of a bulk aluminum target is performed using two complementary approaches. The first method is single-fluid two-temperature hydrodynamics (HD) completed with a two-temperature equation of state (EOS). The second approach is a combination of classical molecular dynamics (MD) and a continuum model of a free electron subsystem. In both methods, an identical and accurate description of optical and transport properties of the electron subsystem is based on wide-range models reproducing effects of electron heat wave propagation, electron-phonon/ion coupling and laser energy absorption on a time-dependent profile of the dielectric function. For simulation of homogeneous nucleation in a metastable liquid phase, a kinetic model of nucleation is implemented in the HD approach. The phase diagrams of the EOS and MD potential are in good agreement that gives opportunity to compare the dynamics of laser ablation obtained by both methods directly. Results of simulation are presented in the range of incident fluences 0.1-20 J/cm2 and match well with experimental findings for an ablation crater depth. The MD accurately reproduces nonequilibrium phase transitions and takes into account surface effects on nanoscale. The HD approach demonstrates good qualitative agreement with the MD method in the dynamics of phase explosion and spallation. Other advantages and disadvantages of both approaches are examined and discussed.

  13. Interaction of extreme ultraviolet laser radiation with solid surface: ablation, desorption, nanostructuring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolacek, Karel; Schmidt, Jiri; Straus, Jaroslav; Frolov, Oleksandr; Juha, Libor; Chalupsky, Jaromir

    2015-02-01

    The area, where interaction of focused XUV laser radiation with solid surface takes place, can be divided according to local fluency into desorption region (if fluency is larger than zero and smaller than ablation threshold) and ablation region (if fluency is equal or larger than this threshold). It turned out that a direct nanostructuring (e.g. imprinting diffraction pattern created on edges of windows of proximity standing grid) is possible in the desorption region only. While for femtosecond pulses the particle (atom/molecule) removal-efficiency η in the desorption region is very small (η < 10%), and hence, it can be easily distinguished from the ablation region with η ~ 100%, for nanosecond pulses in desorption region this η rises at easily ablated materials from 0% at the periphery up to ~90% at the ablation contour and, therefore, the boundary between these two regions can be found with the help of nanostructuring only. This rise of removal efficiency could be explained by gradually increased penetration depth (due to gradually removed material) during laser pulse. This is a warning against blind using crater shape for fluency mapping in the case of long laser pulses. On the other hand it is a motivation to study an ablation plum (or ablation jet) and to create a knowledge bank to be used at future numerical modeling of this process.

  14. Femtosecond and picosecond ablation of aluminum for synthesis of nanoparticles and nanostructures and their optical characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamad, Syed; Podagatlapalli, G. Krishna; Sreedhar, S.; Tewari, Surya P.; Venugopal Rao, S.

    2012-03-01

    In this paper we report the fabrication of nanoparticles and nanostructures through the interaction of ultrashort (~40 fs) and short (~2 ps) laser pulses with bulk Aluminum immersed in various liquid media of different polarity [chloroform which is polar, carbon tetrachloride which is non-polar, water which is polar, dichloromethane (DCM) which is polar, and Cyclohexane which is non-polar] using the laser ablation technique. Except water and Cyclohexane, other media showed yellow coloration after ablation took place indicating formation of nanoparticles in the solution in both fs and ps domains. The coloration of the laser exposed portion in the Al substrate was golden yellow and its closer view depicted micro-grating (~1-2 μm) and nano-ripple (period 330 nm) formation depending on the focal conditions. The investigation of polarization dependence on the ablation was performed for water media. Depending on the ablation threshold, we observed micron sized structures and nano-ripples on the surface. As the rate of ablation depends on the position of the focus on the Al substrate and beam waist parameters, we have studied the liquid level dependence of ablation with different water levels on the Al substrate and we compared these patterns obtained below, near, and above the ablation thresholds of the sample. Field Emission-Scanning Electron Microscope (FE-SEM), UV-Vis absorption spectra, Electron Diffraction Pattern and Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) were used for the characterization and comparison of products in both domains.

  15. SEM and Raman spectroscopy analyses of laser-induced periodic surface structures grown by ethanol-assisted femtosecond laser ablation of chromium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashir, Shazia; Shahid Rafique, M.; Nathala, Chandra S. R.; Ajami, Ali; Husinsky, Wolfgang

    2015-05-01

    The effect of fluence and pulse duration on the growth of nanostructures on chromium (Cr) surfaces has been investigated upon irradiation of femtosecond (fs) laser pulses in a liquid confined environment of ethanol. In order to explore the effect of fluence, targets were exposed to 1000 pulses at various peak fluences ranging from 4.7 to 11.8 J cm-2 for pulse duration of ∼25 fs. In order to explore the effect of pulse duration, targets were exposed to fs laser pulses of various pulse durations ranging from 25 to 100 fs, for a constant fluence of 11.8 J cm-2. Surface morphology and structural transformations have been analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy, respectively. After laser irradiation, disordered sputtered surface with intense melting and cracking is obtained at the central ablated areas, which are augmented with increasing laser fluence due to enhanced thermal effects. At the peripheral ablated areas, where local fluence is approximately in the range of 1.4-4 mJ cm-2, very well-defined laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) with periodicity ranging from 270 to 370 nm along with dot-like structures are formed. As far as the pulse duration is concerned, a significant effect on the surface modification of Cr has been revealed. In the central ablated areas, for the shortest pulse duration (25 fs), only melting has been observed. However, LIPSS with dot-like structures and droplets have been grown for longer pulse durations. The periodicity of LIPSS increases and density of dot-like structures decreases with increasing pulse duration. The chemical and structural modifications of irradiated Cr have been revealed by Raman spectroscopy. It confirms the formation of new bands of chromium oxides and enol complexes or Cr-carbonyl compounds. The peak intensities of identified bands are dependent upon laser fluence and pulse duration.

  16. Optical time of flight studies of lithium plasma in double pulse laser ablation: Evidence of inverse Bremsstrahlung absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Sivakumaran, V.; Joshi, H. C.; Singh, R. K.; Kumar, Ajai

    2014-06-15

    The early stage of formation of lithium plasma in a collinear—double pulse laser ablation mode has been studied using optical time of flight (OTOF) spectroscopy as a function of inter-pulse delay time, the distance from the target surface and the fluence of the ablation lasers. The experimental TOF measurements were carried out for lithium neutral (670.8 nm and 610.3 nm), and ionic (548.4 nm and 478.8 nm) lines. These experimental observations have been compared with that for single pulse laser ablation mode. It is found that depending on the fluence and laser pulse shape of the first pre-ablation laser and the second main ablation laser, the plasma plume formation and its characteristic features can be described in terms of plume-plume or laser-plume interaction processes. Moreover, the enhancement in the intensity of Li neutral and ionic lines is observed when the laser-plume interaction is the dominant process. Here, we see the evidence of the role of inverse Bremsstrahlung absorption process in the initial stage of formation of lithium plasma in this case.

  17. Radiofrequency Ablation of Metastatic Pheochromocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesan, Aradhana M.; Locklin, Julia; Lai, Edwin W.; Adams, Karen T.; Fojo, Antonio Tito; Pacak, Karel; Wood, Bradford J.

    2013-01-01

    In the present report on the preliminary safety and effectiveness of radiofrequency (RF) ablation for pheochromocytoma metastases, seven metastases were treated in six patients (mean size, 3.4 cm; range, 2.2–6 cm). α- and β-adrenergic and catecholamine synthesis inhibition and intraprocedural anesthesia monitoring were used. Safety was assessed by recording ablation-related complications. Complete ablation was defined as a lack of enhancement within the ablation zone on follow-up computed tomography. No serious adverse sequelae were observed. Complete ablation was achieved in six of seven metastases (mean follow-up, 12.3 months; range, 2.5–28 months). In conclusion, RF ablation may be safely performed for metastatic pheochromocytoma given careful attention to peri-procedural management. PMID:19875067

  18. OCDR guided laser ablation device

    DOEpatents

    Dasilva, Luiz B.; Colston, Jr., Bill W.; James, Dale L.

    2002-01-01

    A guided laser ablation device. The device includes a mulitmode laser ablation fiber that is surrounded by one or more single mode optical fibers that are used to image in the vicinity of the laser ablation area to prevent tissue damage. The laser ablation device is combined with an optical coherence domain reflectometry (OCDR) unit and with a control unit which initializes the OCDR unit and a high power laser of the ablation device. Data from the OCDR unit is analyzed by the control unit and used to control the high power laser. The OCDR images up to about 3 mm ahead of the ablation surface to enable a user to see sensitive tissue such as a nerve or artery before damaging it by the laser.

  19. Effect of laser ablation parameters on the structure and properties of multicomponent magnetic films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luches, A.; Luby, S.; Acquaviva, S.; Caricato, A. P.; Fernandez, M.; Majkova, E.; Frait, Z.; Fraitova, D.; Malych, R.; Mengucci, P.

    2005-06-01

    Co and Fe-based alloy films were deposited and studied as perspective materials for the development of fast magnetic sensors. Pulsed laser ablation deposition (PLD) was used as an appropriate technique to fabricate thin films preserving the stoichiomeUy ofthe complex bulk materials. Co67Cr7Fe4SiB14, Fe75Nb3Cu1Si12B9, Fe40Ni40B20 and FexNi1-x (x=22, 36, 50) amorphous ribbons and metallic foils were ablated to deposit 10-120 nm thick films onto oxidized Si wafers using a KrF (λ= 248 urn) laser with 30 ns pulses at fluence from 2 to 7 Jcm-2. The films were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersion spectroscopy (EDS), Rutherford backscattering spewometiy (RBS), x-ray diffraction (XRD) and reflectivity (XRR), and ferromagnetic resonance (FMR). The structural and magnetic characteristics of the films strongly depend on the laser fluence. Stoichiometry is well preserved at low laser fluences. At higher fluences lighter elements (Si, B) are partly lost. Unwanted crystallization of films is also observed at the high fluence. Magnetic characteristics are closely related to the corresponding source materials, unless the light elements are partly lost. When this happens increased magnetization of film is observed. The relaxation process in films was characterized by FMR linewidth. They are typically very narrow (110-250 G) for Fe-based alloys, indicating low values of magnetization motion damping (down to 6.06x107 radius) and therefore pointing to a perspective use of these materials for fast sensors.

  20. Investigation of factors affecting the synthesis of nano-cadmium sulfide by pulsed laser ablation in liquid environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darwish, Ayman M.; Eisa, Wael H.; Shabaka, Ali A.; Talaat, Mohamed H.

    2016-01-01

    Pulsed laser ablation in a liquid medium is a promising technique as compared to the other synthetic methods to synthesize different materials in nanoscale form. The laser parameters (e.g., wavelength, pulse width, fluence, and repetition frequency) and liquid medium (e.g., aqueous/nonaqueous liquid or solution with surfactant) were tightly controlled during and after the ablation process. By optimizing these parameters, the particle size and distribution of materials can be adjusted. The UV-vis absorption spectra and weight changes of targets were used for the characterization and comparison of products.

  1. Multiple target laser ablation system

    DOEpatents

    Mashburn, Douglas N.

    1996-01-01

    A laser ablation apparatus and method are provided in which multiple targets consisting of material to be ablated are mounted on a movable support. The material transfer rate is determined for each target material, and these rates are stored in a controller. A position detector determines which target material is in a position to be ablated, and then the controller controls the beam trigger timing and energy level to achieve a desired proportion of each constituent material in the resulting film.

  2. Multiple target laser ablation system

    DOEpatents

    Mashburn, D.N.

    1996-01-09

    A laser ablation apparatus and method are provided in which multiple targets consisting of material to be ablated are mounted on a movable support. The material transfer rate is determined for each target material, and these rates are stored in a controller. A position detector determines which target material is in a position to be ablated, and then the controller controls the beam trigger timing and energy level to achieve a desired proportion of each constituent material in the resulting film. 3 figs.

  3. Diagnosing implosion velocity and ablator dynamics at NIF (u)

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, Anna; Grim, Gary; Jungnam, Jerry; Bradley, Paul; Rundberg, Bob; Wilhelmy, Jerry; Wilson, Doug

    2009-07-09

    An enhanced understanding of the unique physics probed in a burning NIP capsule is important for both nuclear weapons physics and thermonuclear ignition. In this talk we introduce a new diagnostic idea, designed to measure dynamic aspects of the capsule implosion that are not currently accessible. The current set of diagnostics for the NIF experiments includes reaction history (a time resolved measure of the d + t burn), neutron time-of-flight and spectrometry and spatial imaging of the neutron production and scattering. Although valuable, this abbreviated set of diagnostics cannot determine key dynamical properties of the implosion, such as implosion velocity (v{sub impl}) and ablator thickness. To surpass the present limits of {approx} 10{sup 15} d+t reactions, it will be necessary to increase significantly the implosion energy delivered to the DT fuel by finely tuning the balance between the remaining (imploding) ablator mass and velocity. If too much mass remains, the implosion velocity will be too slow, and the subsecpwnt PdV work will not be sufficient to overcome cooling via conduction and radiation. If too little mass remains, hydrodynamic instabilities will occur, resulting in unpredictable and degraded performance. Detailed calculations suggest the ablator must reach an implosion velocity of 3-4 x 10{sup 7} cm/sec and an areal density of {rho}{Delta}R {approx}200 mg/cm{sup 2} in order to achieve ignition. The authors present a new scheme to measure these important quantities using neutron reactions on the ablator material. During the burn, the ablator is moving relative to the 14.1 MeV d+t neutrons that are traversing the capsule. The resulting neutron-ablator Doppler shift causes a few unique nuclear reactions to become sensitive detectors of the ablator velocity at peak burn time. The 'point-design' capsule at the NIF will be based on a {sup 9}Be ablator, and the {sup 9}Be(n,p){sup 9}Li reaction has an energy threshold of 14.2 MeV, making it the ideal

  4. Monte Carlo simulation of light fluence calculation during pleural PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meo, Julia L.; Zhu, Timothy

    2013-03-01

    A thorough understanding of light distribution in the desired tissue is necessary for accurate light dosimetry in PDT. Solving the problem of light dose depends, in part, on the geometry of the tissue to be treated. When considering PDT in the thoracic cavity for treatment of malignant, localized tumors such as those observed in malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM), changes in light dose caused by the cavity geometry should be accounted for in order to improve treatment efficacy. Cavity-like geometries demonstrate what is known as the "integrating sphere effect" where multiple light scattering off the cavity walls induces an overall increase in light dose in the cavity. We present a Monte Carlo simulation of light fluence based on a spherical and an elliptical cavity geometry with various dimensions. The tissue optical properties as well as the non-scattering medium (air and water) varies. We have also introduced small absorption inside the cavity to simulate the effect of blood absorption. We expand the MC simulation to track photons both within the cavity and in the surrounding cavity walls. Simulations are run for a variety of cavity optical properties determined using spectroscopic methods. We concluded from the MC simulation that the light fluence inside the cavity is inversely proportional to the surface area.

  5. Laser-ablation processes (Invited Paper)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dingus, Ronald S.

    1992-06-01

    pulselength, beam diameter, flux and target material are such that the blowoff becomes opaque to the laser and also the blowoff can traverse many beam diameters during the pulselength, then a complicated radiation-hydrodynamic process is involved with strong feedback between blowoff hydrodynamic expansion, laser absorption, radiation transport, and target ablation by plasma reradiation. In this paper the various ablation processes and potential applications are reviewed from the threshold for ablation up to fluxes of about 1013 W/cm2, with emphasis on three particular processes; namely, front-surface spallation, two-dimensional blowoff, and contained vaporization.

  6. Time threshold for second positive phototropism is decreased by a preirradiation with red light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konjevic, R.; Apel, P.; Poff, K. L.

    1992-01-01

    A second positive phototropic response is exhibited by a plant after the time of irradiation has exceeded a time threshold. The time threshold of dark-grown seedlings is about 15 minutes for Arabidopsis thaliana. This threshold is decreased to about 4 minutes by a 669-nanometer preirradiation. Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) seedlings show a similar response. The time threshold of dark-grown seedlings is about 60 minutes for tobacco, and is decreased to about 15 minutes after a preirradiation with either 450- or 669- nanometer light. The existence of a time threshold for second positive phototropism and the dependence of this threshold on the irradiation history of the seedling contribute to the complexity of the fluence response relationship for phototropism.

  7. Time threshold for second positive phototropism is decreased by a preirradiation with red light.

    PubMed Central

    Janoudi A-K; Konjevic, R; Apel, P; Poff, K L

    1992-01-01

    A second positive phototropic response is exhibited by a plant after the time of irradiation has exceeded a time threshold. The time threshold of dark-grown seedlings is about 15 minutes for Arabidopsis thaliana. This threshold is decreased to about 4 minutes by a 669-nanometer preirradiation. Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) seedlings show a similar response. The time threshold of dark-grown seedlings is about 60 minutes for tobacco, and is decreased to about 15 minutes after a preirradiation with either 450- or 669- nanometer light. The existence of a time threshold for second positive phototropism and the dependence of this threshold on the irradiation history of the seedling contribute to the complexity of the fluence response relationship for phototropism. PMID:11537887

  8. DS02 fluence spectra for neutrons and gamma rays at Hiroshima and Nagasaki with fluence-to-kerma coefficients and transmission factors for sample measurements.

    PubMed

    Egbert, Stephen D; Kerr, George D; Cullings, Harry M

    2007-11-01

    Fluence spectra at several ground distances in Hiroshima and Nagasaki are provided along with associated fluence-to-kerma coefficients from the Dosimetry System 2002 (DS02). Also included are transmission factors for calculating expected responses of in situ sample measurements of neutron activation products such as (32)P,(36)Cl,(39)Ar,(41)Ca, (60)Co,(63)Ni,(152)Eu, and (154)Eu. The free-in-air (FIA) fluences calculated in 2002 are available for 240 angles, 69 energy groups, 101 ground distances, 5 heights, 4 radiation source components, 2 cities. The DS02 code uses these fluences partitioned to a prompt and delayed portion, collapsed to 58 energy groups and restricted to 97 ground distances. This is because the fluence spectra were required to be in the same format that was used in the older Dosimetry System 1986 (DS86) computer code, of which the DS02 computer code is a modification. The 2002 calculation fluences and the collapsed DS02 code fluences are presented and briefly discussed. A report on DS02, which is available on the website at the Radiation Effects Research Foundation, provides tables and figures of the A-bomb neutron and gamma-ray output used as the sources in the 2002 radiation transport calculations. While figures illustrating the fluence spectra at several ground ranges are presented in the DS02 Report, it does not include any tables of the calculated fluence spectra in the DS02 report. This paper provides, at several standard distances from the hypocenter, the numerical information which is required to translate the FIA neutron fluences given in DS02 to a neutron activation measurement or neutron and gamma-ray soft-tissue dose. PMID:17643260

  9. Characterization of binary silver based alloys by nanosecond-infrared-laser-ablation-inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Márquez, Ciro; Sobral, Hugo

    2013-11-01

    A nanosecond infrared laser ablation (LA) system was examined to determine the composition of several silver-copper alloys through an inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES). Samples with different concentrations were prepared and analyzed by atomic absorption, and ICP-OES after sample digestion, and compared with an energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometer-scanning electron microscopy (EDX-SEM). Elemental fractionation during the ablation process and within the ICP was investigated for different laser frequencies and fluences. Samples were used for optimizing and calibrating the coupling between LA to the ICP-OES system. Results obtained from the samples analysis were in agreement with those obtained by atomic absorption spectroscopy, ICP-OES and EDX-SEM, showing that fractionation was not significant for laser fluences higher than 55 J cm-2.

  10. A ruggedness evaluation of procedures for damage threshold testing optical materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooker, Matthew W.; Thomas, Milfred E.; Wise, Stephanie A.; Tappan, Nina D.

    1995-01-01

    A ruggedness evaluation of approaches to damage threshold testing was performed to determine the influence of three procedural variables on damage threshold data. The differences between the number of test sites evaluated at an applied fluence level (1 site versus 10 sites), the number of laser pulses at each test site (1 pulse versus 200 pulses), and the beam diameter (0.35 mm versus 0.70 mm) were all found to significantly influence the damage threshold data over a 99-percent confidence interval.

  11. Parameter dependence of marginal microleakage in Er:YAG-laser-ablated and -modified dental preparations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilder-Smith, Petra B. B.; Choi, Sam; Kurosaki, Tom

    1998-04-01

    Previous studies have shown that the status of the residual tooth surface after hard dental tissue ablation using laser irradiation may vary depending on the parameter combinations and cooling mechanisms used. The purpose of this investigation was to assess the effects of Er:YAG laser cavity preparation at different fluences on microleakage of glass ionomer and composite resin restorations. In freshly extracted clinically and radiographically healthy human anterior teeth, standardized Class V cavities were prepared using the dental drill or the Er:YAG laser (Quantronix 294). Fluences of 10 - 40J/cm2 were used at a p.r.r. of 1 Hz and pulse durations of 250 microseconds under an air/water coolant spray. Thirty three teeth were included in each subgroup; 3 teeth were used for light microscopy and SEM; 15 underwent conventional restoration with glass ionomer and 15 with composite resin. After immersion in 5% methylene blue, dye penetration was measured linearly in 5 standardized locations on each of the bisected samples. Using the Pearson correlation coefficients, microleakage correlated strongly with laser fluence for glass ionomer (p equals 0.0238) and for composite resin (p equals 0.0099) restorations. Results differed significantly between the 2 restoration types (p less than 0.05). In conclusion, the parameters used during laser ablation of dental tissues must be carefully controlled to optimize clinical outcome.

  12. High temperature ablative foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Matthew T. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An ablative foam composition is formed of approximately 150 to 250 parts by weight polymeric isocyanate having an isocyanate functionality of 2.6 to 3.2; approximately 15 to 30 parts by weight reactive flame retardant having a hydroxyl number range from 200-260; approximately 10 to 40 parts by weight non-reactive flame retardant; approximately 10 to 40 parts by weight nonhydrolyzable silicone copolymer having a hydroxyl number range from 75-205; and approximately 3 to 16 parts by weight amine initiated polyether resin having an isocyanate functionality greater than or equal to 3.0 and a hydroxyl number range from 400-800.

  13. Hydrodynamics of sediment threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Sk Zeeshan; Dey, Subhasish

    2016-07-01

    A novel hydrodynamic model for the threshold of cohesionless sediment particle motion under a steady unidirectional streamflow is presented. The hydrodynamic forces (drag and lift) acting on a solitary sediment particle resting over a closely packed bed formed by the identical sediment particles are the primary motivating forces. The drag force comprises of the form drag and form induced drag. The lift force includes the Saffman lift, Magnus lift, centrifugal lift, and turbulent lift. The points of action of the force system are appropriately obtained, for the first time, from the basics of micro-mechanics. The sediment threshold is envisioned as the rolling mode, which is the plausible mode to initiate a particle motion on the bed. The moment balance of the force system on the solitary particle about the pivoting point of rolling yields the governing equation. The conditions of sediment threshold under the hydraulically smooth, transitional, and rough flow regimes are examined. The effects of velocity fluctuations are addressed by applying the statistical theory of turbulence. This study shows that for a hindrance coefficient of 0.3, the threshold curve (threshold Shields parameter versus shear Reynolds number) has an excellent agreement with the experimental data of uniform sediments. However, most of the experimental data are bounded by the upper and lower limiting threshold curves, corresponding to the hindrance coefficients of 0.2 and 0.4, respectively. The threshold curve of this study is compared with those of previous researchers. The present model also agrees satisfactorily with the experimental data of nonuniform sediments.

  14. Synthesis of Ag-deionized water nanofluids using multi-beam laser ablation in liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, P.X.; Soong, Yee; Chyu, M.K.

    2007-12-01

    Multi-pulse laser ablation of silver in deionized water was studied. The laser beams were arranged in a cross-beam configuration. In our experiments, two single-mode, Q-switched Nd-Yag lasers operating at 1064 nm, pulse duration of 5.5 ns and 10 Hz rep rate were used. The laser fluence of the second beam was 0.265 J/cm2 for all tests. Two levels of the laser fluences were used for the ablating beam: 0.09 and 0.265 J/cm2 (11,014 and 33,042 J/cm2 at the focal point, respectively). The silver target was at 50mm from the cell window and 10mm deep. The second beam was aligned parallelly with the silver target and focused at 2mm in front of the focal point of the ablating beam. For all cases, the delay time between the ablating beam and the cross-beam was 40 ms. In general, the ablated particles were almost all spherical. For fluence of 0.09 J/cm 2 and single-beam approach, the mean particle size was about 29 nm. The majority of the particles, however, were in 19–35nm range and there were some big ones as large as 50–60nm in size. For double-beam approach, the particles were smaller with the average size of about 18nm and the majority of the particles were in 9–21nm range with few big one as large as 40 nm. For the beam fluence of 0.265 J/cm2 and single-beam configuration, the particle sizes were smaller, the mean particles size was about 18nm and the majority of the particles were in the range of 10–22nm with some big one as large as 40 nm. For double-beam approach, the mean particle size was larger (24.2 nm) and the majority of the particle were distributed from 14 to 35nm with some big particles can be found with sizes as big as 70 nm. Preliminary measurements of the thermal conductivity and viscosity of the produced samples showed that the thermal conductivity increased about 3–5% and the viscosity increased 3.7% above the base fluid viscosity even with the particle volume concentration as low as 0.01%.

  15. LASER ABLATION STUDIES OF CONCRETE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laser ablation was studied as a means of removing radioactive contaminants from the surface and near-surface regions of concrete. We present the results of ablation tests on cement and concrete samples using a 1.6 kW pulsed Nd:YAG laser with fiber optic beam delivery. The laser-s...

  16. The Meteoroid Fluence at Mars Due to Comet Siding Spring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moorhead, Althea V.

    2014-01-01

    Long-period comet C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring) is headed for a close encounter with Mars on 2014 Oct 19. A collision between the comet and the planet has been ruled out, but the comets coma may envelop Mars and its man-made satellites. We present an analytic model of the dust component of cometary comae that describes the spatial distribution of cometary dust and meteoroids and their size distribution. If the coma reaches Mars, we estimate a total incident particle fluence on the planet and its satellites of 0.01 particles per square meter. We compare our model with numerical simulations, data from past comet missions, and recent Siding Spring observations.

  17. Mitochondrial threshold effects.

    PubMed Central

    Rossignol, Rodrigue; Faustin, Benjamin; Rocher, Christophe; Malgat, Monique; Mazat, Jean-Pierre; Letellier, Thierry

    2003-01-01

    The study of mitochondrial diseases has revealed dramatic variability in the phenotypic presentation of mitochondrial genetic defects. To attempt to understand this variability, different authors have studied energy metabolism in transmitochondrial cell lines carrying different proportions of various pathogenic mutations in their mitochondrial DNA. The same kinds of experiments have been performed on isolated mitochondria and on tissue biopsies taken from patients with mitochondrial diseases. The results have shown that, in most cases, phenotypic manifestation of the genetic defect occurs only when a threshold level is exceeded, and this phenomenon has been named the 'phenotypic threshold effect'. Subsequently, several authors showed that it was possible to inhibit considerably the activity of a respiratory chain complex, up to a critical value, without affecting the rate of mitochondrial respiration or ATP synthesis. This phenomenon was called the 'biochemical threshold effect'. More recently, quantitative analysis of the effects of various mutations in mitochondrial DNA on the rate of mitochondrial protein synthesis has revealed the existence of a 'translational threshold effect'. In this review these different mitochondrial threshold effects are discussed, along with their molecular bases and the roles that they play in the presentation of mitochondrial diseases. PMID:12467494

  18. An x-ray probe of nickel nanoparticles generated by laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, C. S.; Doumy, G.; Southworth, S. H.; March, A. M.; Dichiara, A. D.; Gao, Y.; Kanter, E. P.; Krässig, B.; Moonshiram, D.; Young, L.; Chapman, K. W.; Chupas, P. J.

    2014-05-01

    A plume of nickel atoms and nanoparticles can be generated by an intense laser pulse hitting a solid nickel surface. We set up a Ni ablation source in a vacuum chamber on an x-ray beamline at the Advanced Photon Source and used x-ray absorption, x-ray emission, and ion spectroscopies to probe the ablation plume at x-ray energies above the Ni K-edge at 8.33 keV. The laser and x-ray pulses were overlapped in time and space with variable delay to measure the time evolution of the ablation plume. Measurements of the charge states produced by x-ray absorption were not possible due to the intense prompt ions ejected in the ablation process. However, Ni K α x-ray emission was measured as functions of laser fluence and pump-probe delay. The fluorescence yield was also used to record the near-edge x-ray absorption spectrum of the nanoparticles in the plume. The nanoparticles were collected and their diameters were determined to be ~9 nm from x-ray scattering pair-distribution-function measurements. The experiments demonstrate the use of x-ray techniques to characterize laser ablation processes. Work supported by the Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Science, US Dept of Energy, Contract DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  19. Wavelength-Dependent Collagen Fragmentation during Mid-IR Laser Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yaowu; Guo, Mingsheng; Parker, Kevin; Hutson, M. Shane

    2006-01-01

    Mid-infrared free-electron lasers have proven adept in surgical applications. When tuned to wavelengths between 6 and 7 μm, such lasers remove defined volumes of soft tissue with very little collateral damage. Previous attempts to explain the wavelength-dependence of collateral damage have invoked a wavelength-dependent loss of protein structural integrity. However, the molecular nature of this structural failure has been heretofore ill-defined. In this report, we evaluate several candidates for the relevant transition by analyzing the nonvolatile debris ejected during ablation. Porcine corneas were ablated with a free-electron laser tuned to 2.77 or 6.45 μm—wavelengths with matched absorption coefficients for hydrated corneas that respectively target either tissue water or protein. The debris ejected during these ablations was characterized via gel electrophoresis, as well as Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, micro-Raman and 13C-NMR spectroscopy. We find that high-fluence (240 J/cm2) ablation at 6.45 μm, but not at 2.77 μm, leads to protein fragmentation accompanied by the accumulation of nitrile and alkyne species. The candidate transition most consistent with these observations is scission of the collagen protein backbone at N-alkylamide bonds. Identifying this transition is a key step toward understanding the observed wavelength-dependence of collateral damage in mid-infrared laser ablation. PMID:16714345

  20. Pilot-scale synthesis of metal nanoparticles by high-speed pulsed laser ablation in liquids.

    PubMed

    Streubel, René; Bendt, Georg; Gökce, Bilal

    2016-05-20

    The synthesis of catalysis-relevant nanoparticles such as platinum and gold is demonstrated with productivities of 4 g h(-1) for pulsed laser ablation in liquids (PLAL). The major drawback of low productivity of PLAL is overcome by utilizing a novel ultrafast high-repetition rate laser system combined with a polygon scanner that reaches scanning speeds up to 500 m s(-1). This high scanning speed is exploited to spatially bypass the laser-induced cavitation bubbles at MHz-repetition rates resulting in an increase of the applicable, ablation-effective, repetition rate for PLAL by two orders of magnitude. The particle size, morphology and oxidation state of fully automated synthesized colloids are analyzed while the ablation mechanisms are studied for different laser fluences, repetition rates, interpulse distances, ablation times, volumetric flow rates and focus positions. It is found that at high scanning speeds and high repetition rate PLAL the ablation process is stable in crystallite size and decoupled from shielding and liquid effects that conventionally occur during low-speed PLAL. PMID:27053598

  1. Excimer ablation of ITO on flexible substrates for large format display applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghandour, Osman A.; Constantinide, Dan; Sheets, Ronald E.

    2002-06-01

    Excimer-based ablative patterning of Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) thin film on flexible substrates has been evaluated for large format display applications. In display package manufacturing, excimer-based ITO ablation can provide a great advantage over conventional photolithographic processing. It can eliminate many steps from the manufacturing cycle, resulting in significant cost reduction. Flexible substrate display packaging is desirable for at least two reasons. It allows roll-to-roll low cost, large volume manufacturing. Its low weight provides for an easy scale up to larger format displays. An XeCl excimer, 1x, amplitude mask pattern projection, scan-and-repeat system was utilized in the evaluation work. The mask pattern had line groupings of line-widths varying from 8 to 30 micrometers with line length of 44 mm. Lines from all the groupings were simultaneously ablated in 150 nm-thick ITO layer on a flexible 100 micrometers thick Polyethylene terephtalate (PET) substrate using scanning with optimized dwell duration of 10 pulses and optimized fluence level of 350 mJ/cm2. Lines ablated with mask line groupings of line-width greater than or equal to 11 micrometers showed complete electrical isolation indicating complete ITO removal. Scanning electron Microscopy (SEM) showed the presence of a slight curling effect at ablated line edges. The effect was studied as a function of wavelength and imaging resolution. A CO2 cleaning method was evaluated for removing the extruding curled material.

  2. Pilot-scale synthesis of metal nanoparticles by high-speed pulsed laser ablation in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streubel, René; Bendt, Georg; Gökce, Bilal

    2016-05-01

    The synthesis of catalysis-relevant nanoparticles such as platinum and gold is demonstrated with productivities of 4 g h‑1 for pulsed laser ablation in liquids (PLAL). The major drawback of low productivity of PLAL is overcome by utilizing a novel ultrafast high-repetition rate laser system combined with a polygon scanner that reaches scanning speeds up to 500 m s‑1. This high scanning speed is exploited to spatially bypass the laser-induced cavitation bubbles at MHz-repetition rates resulting in an increase of the applicable, ablation-effective, repetition rate for PLAL by two orders of magnitude. The particle size, morphology and oxidation state of fully automated synthesized colloids are analyzed while the ablation mechanisms are studied for different laser fluences, repetition rates, interpulse distances, ablation times, volumetric flow rates and focus positions. It is found that at high scanning speeds and high repetition rate PLAL the ablation process is stable in crystallite size and decoupled from shielding and liquid effects that conventionally occur during low-speed PLAL.

  3. Properties of zirconia thin films deposited by laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Cancea, V. N.; Filipescu, M.; Colceag, D.; Dinescu, M.; Mustaciosu, C.

    2013-11-13

    Zirconia thin films have been deposited by laser ablation of a ceramic ZrO{sub 2} target in vacuum or in oxygen background at 0.01 mbar. The laser beam generated by an ArF laser (λ=193 nm, ν=40 Hz) has been focalized on the target through a spherical lens at an incident angle of 45°. The laser fluence has been established to a value from 2.0 to 3.4 Jcm{sup −2}. A silicon (100) substrate has been placed parallel to the target, at a distance of 4 cm, and subsequently has been heated to temperatures ranging between 300 °C and 600 °C. Thin films morphology has been characterized by atomic force microscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry. Biocompatibility of these thin films has been assessed by studying the cell attachment of L929 mouse fibroblasts.

  4. Properties of zirconia thin films deposited by laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cancea, V. N.; Filipescu, M.; Colceag, D.; Mustaciosu, C.; Dinescu, M.

    2013-11-01

    Zirconia thin films have been deposited by laser ablation of a ceramic ZrO2 target in vacuum or in oxygen background at 0.01 mbar. The laser beam generated by an ArF laser (λ=193 nm, ν=40 Hz) has been focalized on the target through a spherical lens at an incident angle of 45°. The laser fluence has been established to a value from 2.0 to 3.4 Jcm-2. A silicon (100) substrate has been placed parallel to the target, at a distance of 4 cm, and subsequently has been heated to temperatures ranging between 300 °C and 600 °C. Thin films morphology has been characterized by atomic force microscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry. Biocompatibility of these thin films has been assessed by studying the cell attachment of L929 mouse fibroblasts.

  5. A u.v. fiber-coupled resonant laser-ablation chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, M.; Zheng, R.; Ledingham, K. W. D.; Clark, A.; Marshall, A.; Singhal, R. P.

    1993-10-01

    This paper describes the characterization of a u.v. transmitting fibre which forms the basis of a novel type of resonant ablation vacuum chamber. Resonant Laser Ablation (RLA) is a relatively new surface analysis technique which has been used to study impurity concentrations at relatively low laser fluences. These results have indicated that if a moderately focused laser resonant wavelength laser beam is directed at a grazing angle of incidence to the target surface, the resulting ion yield may be enhanced by two orders of magnitude or more. RLA is therefore ideally suited to surface analysis. However, it is known that any movement of the beam relative to the surface of the target results in poor reproducibility and it is for this reason that a large core all-silica u.v. transmitting fibre has been chosen to couple the laser beam to the vacuum chamber. An additional advantage of the fibre is that the laser beam is confined within it thereby rendering the system intrinsically safe. Because of its underlying importance to the success of the ablation system, the method of measuring beam attenuation in the fibre, as a function of laser wavelength and fluence, is discussed in detail.

  6. Heavy Ion Irradiation Fluence Dependence for Single-Event Upsets of NAND Flash Memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Dakai; Wilcox, Edward; Ladbury, Raymond; Kim, Hak; Phan, Anthony; Seidleck, Christina; LaBel, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the single-event effect (SEE) susceptibility of the Micron 16 nm NAND flash, and found the single-event upset (SEU) cross section varied inversely with fluence. The SEU cross section decreased with increasing fluence. We attribute the effect to the variable upset sensitivities of the memory cells. The current test standards and procedures assume that SEU follow a Poisson process and do not take into account the variability in the error rate with fluence. Therefore, heavy ion irradiation of devices with variable upset sensitivity distribution using typical fluence levels may underestimate the cross section and on-orbit event rate.

  7. Efficacy and predictability of soft tissue ablation using a prototype Raman-shifted alexandrite laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozub, John A.; Shen, Jin-H.; Joos, Karen M.; Prasad, Ratna; Shane Hutson, M.

    2015-10-01

    Previous research showed that mid-infrared free-electron lasers could reproducibly ablate soft tissue with little collateral damage. The potential for surgical applications motivated searches for alternative tabletop lasers providing thermally confined pulses in the 6- to-7-μm wavelength range with sufficient pulse energy, stability, and reliability. Here, we evaluate a prototype Raman-shifted alexandrite laser. We measure ablation thresholds, etch rates, and collateral damage in gelatin and cornea as a function of laser wavelength (6.09, 6.27, or 6.43 μm), pulse energy (up to 3 mJ/pulse), and spot diameter (100 to 600 μm). We find modest wavelength dependence for ablation thresholds and collateral damage, with the lowest thresholds and least damage for 6.09 μm. We find a strong spot-size dependence for all metrics. When the beam is tightly focused (˜100-μm diameter), ablation requires more energy, is highly variable and less efficient, and can yield large zones of mechanical damage (for pulse energies >1 mJ). When the beam is softly focused (˜300-μm diameter), ablation proceeded at surgically relevant etch rates, with reasonable reproducibility (5% to 12% within a single sample), and little collateral damage. With improvements in pulse-energy stability, this prototype laser may have significant potential for soft-tissue surgical applications.

  8. Efficacy and predictability of soft tissue ablation using a prototype Raman-shifted alexandrite laser.

    PubMed

    Kozub, John A; Shen, Jin-H; Joos, Karen M; Prasad, Ratna; Hutson, M Shane

    2015-10-01

    Previous research showed that mid-infrared free-electron lasers could reproducibly ablate soft tissue with little collateral damage. The potential for surgical applications motivated searches for alternative tabletop lasers providing thermally confined pulses in the 6- to-7-µm wavelength range with sufficient pulse energy, stability, and reliability. Here, we evaluate a prototype Raman-shifted alexandrite laser. We measure ablation thresholds, etch rates, and collateral damage in gelatin and cornea as a function of laser wavelength (6.09, 6.27, or 6.43 µm), pulse energy (up to 3 mJ/pulse), and spot diameter (100 to 600 µm). We find modest wavelength dependence for ablation thresholds and collateral damage, with the lowest thresholds and least damage for 6.09 µm. We find a strong spot-size dependence for all metrics. When the beam is tightly focused (~100-µm diameter), ablation requires more energy, is highly variable and less efficient, and can yield large zones of mechanical damage (for pulse energies>1 mJ). When the beam is softly focused (~300-µm diameter), ablation proceeded at surgically relevant etch rates, with reasonable reproducibility (5% to 12% within a single sample), and little collateral damage. With improvements in pulse-energy stability, this prototype laser may have significant potential for soft-tissue surgical applications. PMID:26456553

  9. Multiple pulse thermal damage thresholds of materials for x-ray free electron laser optics investigated with an ultraviolet laser

    SciTech Connect

    Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; London, Richard A.; Bionta, Richard M.; Soufli, Regina; Ryutov, Dmitri; Shirk, Michael; Baker, Sherry L.; Smith, Patrick M.; Nataraj, Pradeep

    2008-11-17

    Optical elements to be used for x-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) must withstand multiple high-fluence pulses. We have used an ultraviolet laser to study the damage of two candidate materials, crystalline Si and B{sub 4}C-coated Si, emulating the temperature profile expected to occur in optics exposed to XFEL pulses. We found that the damage threshold for 10{sup 5} pulses is {approx}20% to 70% lower than the melting threshold.

  10. Yield threshold decision framework

    SciTech Connect

    Judd, B.R.; Younker, L.W.; Hannon, W.J.

    1989-08-17

    The USA is developing a decision analysis framework for evaluating the relative value of lower yield thresholds and related verification policies. The framework facilitates systematic analysis of the major issues in the yield threshold decision. The framework can be used to evaluate options proposed either in the inter-agency process or in the negotiations. In addition, the framework can measure the importance of uncertainties and alternative judgments, and thereby determine the advantages of additional research. Since the model is explicit and quantitative, it provides a rational, defensible approach for reaching important treaty and verification decisions. 9 figs.

  11. Thermal response and ablation characteristics of light weight ceramic ablators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tran, Huy K.; Rasky, Daniel J.; Esfahani, Lili

    1993-01-01

    An account is given of the thermal performance and ablation characteristics of the NASA-Ames Lightweight Ceramic Ablators (LCAs) in supersonic, high-enthalpy convective environments, which use low density ceramic or carbon fiber matrices as substrates for main structural support, with organic resin fillers. LCA densities are in the 0.224-1.282 g/cu cm range. In-depth temperature data have been obtained to determine thermal penetration depths and conductivity. The addition of SiC and PPMA is noted to significantly improve the ablation performance of LCAs with silica substrates. Carbon-based LCAs are the most mass-efficient at high flux levels.

  12. Threshold dose of three photosensitizers in dogs with spontaneous tumors.

    PubMed

    Gloi, Aime M; Beck, Elsa

    2003-01-01

    Photodynamic threshold doses in dogs with spontaneous tumors can be achieved through a mathematical model. For this to be clinically relevant, it is important to know the treatment parameters for tissue necrosis. The threshold dose for three photosensitizers (porfimer sodium, aluminum cholorophthalocyanine [AlClPc], and tin ethyl etiopurpurin [SnET2]) commonly used in veterinary chemotherapy protocols was evaluated in 12 dogs with spontaneous tumors. To derive the photodynamic threshold dose, the tissue optical properties of each compound were determined by diffuse reflectance and thus the light fluence rate. Uptake was measured by fluorimetry using tissue solubilization techniques. The threshold values calculated were highest for AlClPc (irradiated 48 hours after administration). The radius of necrosis (4.00 to 5.48 mm) and photosensitizer uptake (3.4 to 6.91 microg/g) were elevated after injection of porfimer sodium. The threshold dose model described here is photosensitizer dependent but independent of photosensitizer uptake and light dose. This study indicates that more photon absorption is needed for tumor necrosis with AlClPc than for either SnET2 or porfimer sodium. PMID:15136988

  13. Elaborating on Threshold Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rountree, Janet; Robins, Anthony; Rountree, Nathan

    2013-01-01

    We propose an expanded definition of Threshold Concepts (TCs) that requires the successful acquisition and internalisation not only of knowledge, but also its practical elaboration in the domains of applied strategies and mental models. This richer definition allows us to clarify the relationship between TCs and Fundamental Ideas, and to account…

  14. Thermal ablation of thin gold films irradiated by ultrashort laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ling; Zhao, Shiqiang

    2016-04-01

    The vaporization process of gold film irradiated by ultrashort-pulsed laser is investigated using the parabolic two-step model and the dual-hyperbolic two-step model. The liquid-vapor interfacial velocity in the vaporization process is obtained by considering the interface energy balance equation and gas kinetics law. Comparisons between the temperature, velocity and location of the interface based on two different models are presented, the results show a great difference between them. In addition, the variation of ablation depth with pulse widths and fluence are also compared. The effects of laser parameters and film thickness on vaporization process are investigated. The relationship between the maximum temperature, velocity of liquid-vapor interface and laser fluence are also studied.

  15. Ultrasonic characterization of laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J. A.; Telschow, K. L.

    When a pulsed laser beam strikes the surface of an absorbing material, ultrasonic waves are generated due to thermoelectric expansion and, at higher laser power densities, ablation of the material. These sound generation mechanisms have been the subject of numerous theoretical and experimental studies and are now fairly well understood. In particular, it has been established that at low power densities the thermoelastic mechanism is well described by a surface center of expansion. This mechanism produces a characteristic waveform whose amplitude is proportional to the energy absorbed from the laser pulse and also dependent on the thermal and elastic properties of the material. The ablation ultrasonic source can be described by a point normal force acting on the material surface. For laser power densities near the ablation onset, the time dependence of the source is that of the laser pulse. The resultant waveform recorded on epicenter (source and detector collinear) has a sharp peak determined by the momentum impulse delivered to the material by the ablation process. Particularly in the near ablation onset region, this ultrasonic displacement peak can be used to characterize the ablation process occurring at the material surface. The onset power density for ablation and subsequent ablation dependence on power density are material dependent and thought to be a function of the heat capacity and thermal conductivity of the material. With this in mind, it is possible that these ablation signals could be used to characterize material microstructures, and perhaps material mechanical properties such as hardness, through microstructural changes of the material thermal parameters. This paper explores this question for samples of Type 304 stainless steel with microstructures controlled through work hardening and annealing.

  16. Effect of molecular weight on the physicochemical modifications induced in the UV laser ablation of doped polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebollar, E.; Bounos, G.; Oujja, M.; Georgiou, S.; Castillejo, M.

    2007-04-01

    This work investigates the effect of polymer molecular weight MW on the UV ablation of iodo-naphthalene- and iodo-phenanthrene-doped poly(methyl methacrylate) PMMA, and polystyrene PS films following irradiation at 248 nm. For irradiation at weakly absorbed wavelengths, the ablation threshold increases with increasing MW. However, at strongly absorbed wavelengths, the difference in the ablation thresholds is much smaller, or minimal. In parallel, bubble formation due to accumulation of gas produced by polymer and dopant decomposition differs depending on MW. For highly absorbing PS, the differences of behaviour show a less dramatic dependence on MW. These results are explained within the framework of the bulk photothermal model, according to which ejection requires that a critical number of bonds is broken. In all, they are of direct importance for the optimisation of laser processing schemes and applications and provide the first indication of explosive boiling in UV ablation of polymers.

  17. Ablative heat shield design for space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiferth, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    Ablator heat shield configuration optimization studies were conducted for the orbiter. Ablator and reusable surface insulation (RSI) trajectories for design studies were shaped to take advantage of the low conductance of ceramic RSI and high temperature capability of ablators. Comparative weights were established for the RSI system and for direct bond and mechanically attached ablator systems. Ablator system costs were determined for fabrication, installation and refurbishment. Cost penalties were assigned for payload weight penalties, if any. The direct bond ablator is lowest in weight and cost. A mechanically attached ablator using a magnesium subpanel is highly competitive for both weight and cost.

  18. Preclinical investigations of articular cartilage ablation with femtosecond and pulsed infrared lasers as an alternative to microfracture surgery

    PubMed Central

    Su, Erica; Sun, Hui; Juhasz, Tibor; Wong, Brian J. F.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Microfracture surgery is a bone marrow stimulation technique for treating cartilage defects and injuries in the knee. Current methods rely on surgical skill and instrumentation. This study investigates the potential use of laser technology as an alternate means to create the microfracture holes. Lasers investigated in this study include an erbium:YAG laser (λ=2.94  μm), titanium:sapphire femtosecond laser system (λ=1700  nm), and Nd:glass femtosecond laser (λ=1053  nm). Bovine samples were ablated at fluences of 8 to 18  J/cm2 with the erbium:YAG laser, at a power of 300±15  mW with the titanium:sapphire femtosecond system, and at an energy of 3  μJ/pulse with the Nd:glass laser. Samples were digitally photographed and histological sections were taken for analysis. The erbium:YAG laser is capable of fast and efficient ablation; specimen treated with fluences of 12 and 18  J/cm2 experienced significant amounts of bone removal and minimal carbonization with saline hydration. The femtosecond laser systems successfully removed cartilage but not clinically significant amounts of bone. Precise tissue removal was possible but not to substantial depths due to limitations of the systems. With additional studies and development, the use of femtosecond laser systems to ablate bone may be achieved at clinically valuable ablation rates. PMID:25200394

  19. Preclinical investigations of articular cartilage ablation with femtosecond and pulsed infrared lasers as an alternative to microfracture surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Erica; Sun, Hui; Juhasz, Tibor; Wong, Brian J. F.

    2014-09-01

    Microfracture surgery is a bone marrow stimulation technique for treating cartilage defects and injuries in the knee. Current methods rely on surgical skill and instrumentation. This study investigates the potential use of laser technology as an alternate means to create the microfracture holes. Lasers investigated in this study include an erbium:YAG laser (λ=2.94 μm), titanium:sapphire femtosecond laser system (λ=1700 nm), and Nd:glass femtosecond laser (λ=1053 nm). Bovine samples were ablated at fluences of 8 to 18 J/cm2 with the erbium:YAG laser, at a power of 300±15 mW with the titanium:sapphire femtosecond system, and at an energy of 3 μJ/pulse with the Nd:glass laser. Samples were digitally photographed and histological sections were taken for analysis. The erbium:YAG laser is capable of fast and efficient ablation; specimen treated with fluences of 12 and 18 J/cm2 experienced significant amounts of bone removal and minimal carbonization with saline hydration. The femtosecond laser systems successfully removed cartilage but not clinically significant amounts of bone. Precise tissue removal was possible but not to substantial depths due to limitations of the systems. With additional studies and development, the use of femtosecond laser systems to ablate bone may be achieved at clinically valuable ablation rates.

  20. High-speed photographic studies of dye-assisted pulsed Nd:YAG laser ablation of dental hard tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Quiang; Wallace, David B.; Hayes, Donald J.

    1997-06-01

    We have been evaluating the use of a pulsed Nd:YAG laser for ablating hard dental tissue. For this application we apply dye-drops of an IR absorptive fluid on the enamel, then irradiate with a laser pulse from the laser. By using ink- jet technology to deliver the dye-drops, we can attain micron- and millisecond-scale precision in drop delivery, with a 'burst' of drops preceding each laser pulse. To gain better understanding of the ablation process we have used a high- speed CCD camera system with 1 microsecond(s) exposure and 1 microsecond(s) inter-exposure-interval capability. Fast photography of the ablation process showed the following typical events. (i) The laser induced plasma plume erupts immediately after pulse onset, expands to maximum within 50 microsecond(s) , and lasts up to 200 microsecond(s) . (ii) Ejected particles flying away from the site of laser pulse/dye-drop impact are detected within 30 microsecond(s) of laser pulse onset, and continue up to 10 ms. These particles attain velocities up to 50 m/s with lower velocities from lower pulse power. (iii) The plasma plume has a peak height that increases with increasing laser fluence, ranging up to 10 mm for a fluence of 242 J/cm2 on enamel. From this study, the dye-assisted ablation mechanisms are inferred to be plasma-mediated and explosion- mediated tissue removal.

  1. Ablation of ionic crystals induced by capillary-discharge XUV laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pira, Peter; Burian, Tomáš; Vyšín, Ludék; Chalupský, Jaromír; Lančok, Ján; Wild, Jan; Střižík, Michal; Zelinger, Zdeněk; Rocca, Jorge J.; Juha, Libor

    2011-06-01

    Single crystals of two fluorides (LiF and CaF2) and a tungstate (PbWO4) were irradiated by nanosecond pulses of 46.9- nm radiation provided by 10-Hz capillary-discharge Ne-like Ar laser (CDL). The damage threshold was determined in LiF using the CDL beam focused by a Sc/Si multilayer-coated spherical mirror. Irradiated samples have been investigated by Nomarski (DIC - Differential Interference Contrast) microscopy and optical (WLI - white light intereferometry) profiler. After an exposure by a certain number of CDL pulses, an ablation rate can be calculated from WLI measured depth of the crater created by the XUV ablation. Potential use of XUV ablation of ionic crystals in pulsed laser deposition (PLD) of thin layers of such a particular material, which is difficult to ablate by conventional UV-Vis- NIR lasers, is discussed in this contribution.

  2. Advances in Atrial Fibrillation Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Darge, Alicia; Reynolds, Matthew R.; Germano, Joseph J.

    2009-01-01

    Atrial Fibrillation (AF) is an increasingly common and costly medical problem.1–3 Given the disappointing efficacy and side effects associated with pharmacological therapy for AF, new treatment options are needed. Over the last decade, advances in our understanding of the mechanisms of AF, coupled with iterative improvements in catheter ablation techniques, have spurred the evolution of catheter ablation for AF from an experimental procedure to an increasingly important treatment option.4 This paper will review recent advances in the approaches and outcomes of AF ablation. PMID:19411729

  3. Epicardial Ablation For Ventricular Tachycardia

    PubMed Central

    Maccabelli, Giuseppe; Mizuno, Hiroya; Della Bella, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Epicardial ablation has lately become a necessary tool to approach some ventricular tachycardias in different types of cardiomyopathy. Its diffusion is now limited to a few high volume centers not because of the difficulty of the pericardial puncture but since it requires high competence not only in the VT ablation field but also in knowing and recognizing the possible complications each of which require a careful treatment. This article will review the state of the art of epicardial ablation with special attention to the procedural aspects and to the possible selection criteria of the patients PMID:23233758

  4. [Percutaneous ablation of renal tumors: radiofrequency ablation or cryoablation?].

    PubMed

    Buy, X; Lang, H; Garnon, J; Gangi, A

    2011-09-01

    Percutaneous ablation of renal tumors, including radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation, are increasingly being used for small tumors as an alternative to surgery for poor surgical candidates. Compared to radiofrequency ablation, cryoablation has several advantages: improved volume control and preservation of adjacent structures due to the excellent depiction of the ice ball on CT and MRI; better protection of the collecting system for central tumor with reduced risk of postprocedural urinary fistula. The main pitfall of cryoablation is the higher cost. Therefore, cryoablation should be reserved for the treatment of complex tumors. In this article, we will review the different steps of percutaneous renal tumor ablation procedures including patient selection, technical considerations, and follow-up imaging. PMID:21944236

  5. Self-assembled and etched cones on laser ablated polymer surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murthy, N. S.; Prabhu, R. D.; Martin, J. J.; Zhou, L.; Headrick, R. L.

    2006-07-01

    At least two different routes lead to conical structures on laser ablated polymer surfaces. These were investigated by studying laser ablation on the surfaces of different classes of polymers. Cones appeared readily in strongly absorbing polymers such as poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) and polyimide (PI), but only within narrow laser parameters in nylon 6, and rarely in poly(chlorotrifluoroethylene), the last two being weak ultraviolet (UV) absorbers. Self-assembled, close-packed cones occurred in PET, in which heat generated due to absorbed laser energy creates a thin, chemically stable, viscoelastic, highly compliant layer (above the glass transition temperature). Surface structure in such polymers evolves from nodules through donuts into ripples and finally to cones as the energy deposited per unit area on the surface (total fluence) is increased using a combination of single pulse fluence and number of pulses. A phase transition from a ripple phase to a cone phase is thought to occur as the thickness of the viscoelastic surface layer increases above a critical value. Cones began to appear from almost the beginning of the irradiation process at random locations in PI, a polymer whose surface irreversibly turns into a hard solid upon exposure to either or both UV and heat. It is proposed that the radiation hardened spots serve as nuclei, a cone "grows" out of this as the material surrounding this nuclei is ablated. The initial sparse occurrence of cones in PI-like polymers, and the increase in their number density with total fluence until the surface is densely packed with cones can be explained by a nucleation and growth model.

  6. Ion acceleration enhanced by target ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, S.; Lin, C. Wang, H. Y.; Lu, H. Y.; He, X. T.; Yan, X. Q.; Chen, J. E.; Cowan, T. E.

    2015-07-15

    Laser proton acceleration can be enhanced by using target ablation, due to the energetic electrons generated in the ablation preplasma. When the ablation pulse matches main pulse, the enhancement gets optimized because the electrons' energy density is highest. A scaling law between the ablation pulse and main pulse is confirmed by the simulation, showing that for given CPA pulse and target, proton energy improvement can be achieved several times by adjusting the target ablation.

  7. TPS Ablator Technologies for Interplanetary Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curry, Donald M.

    2004-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the status of Thermal Protection System (TPS) Ablator technologies and the preparation for use in interplanetary spacecraft. NASA does not have adequate TPS ablatives and sufficient selection for planned missions. It includes a comparison of shuttle and interplanetary TPS requirements, the status of mainline TPS charring ablator materials, a summary of JSC SBIR accomplishments in developing advanced charring ablators and the benefits of SBIR Ablator/fabrication technology.

  8. Reference Materials for Reactor Neutron Fluence Rate and Temperature Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingelbrecht, C.

    2003-06-01

    Certified reference materials are distributed by the European Commission through the BCR® programme (over 500 CRMs) including a series of activation and fission monitor materials originally proposed by the Euratom Working Group on Reactor Dosimetry. The current range (18 CRMs) includes materials to cover the complete energy spectrum, and suitable for different irradiation times. Fission monitors are 238UO2 or 237NpO2 in the form of microspheres. Activation monitors are high purity metals (Ni, Cu, Al, Fe, Nb, Rh, or Ti), certified for interfering trace impurities, or dilute aluminium-based alloys. Reference materials newly certified are IRMM-530R A1-0.1%Au, replacing the exhausted IRMM-530 material, used as comparator for k0- standardisation, and three new Al-Co alloys (0.01, 0.1 and 1.0%Co). Others in the process of certification are A1-0.1%Ag and A1-2%Sc for thermal and epithermal fluence rate measurements and two uranium-doped glass materials intended for dosimetry by the fission-track technique. Various alloy compositions have been prepared for use as melt-wire temperature monitors with melting points ranging from 198 to 327ºC.

  9. The radial and longitudinal dependence of SEP intensities and fluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, G.; Zank, G.; Verkhoglyadova, O.; Ruzmaikin, A.; Feynman, J.; Jun, I.

    Solar Energetic Particles SEPs are an important hazard in the context of space weather These particles bombard spacecraft and can cause instruments onboard to malfunction At sufficiently high energies and dosages they can also be extremely harmful to biological materials human bodies and are therefore one of the major safety concerns for the future manned spacecraft program We now know that these particles are associated with Coronal Mass Ejection CMEs driven shocks As a CME-driven shock propagates outward particles are injected and accelerated at the shock front via a first order Fermi mechanism aka diffusive shock acceleration After being accelerated the particles convect with the shock diffuse both upstream and downstream of the shock and many eventually escape the shock complex after reaching far upstream downstream In this work we present a model calculation of the SEP time intensity profile The model is based on a 2D-ZEUS MHD code which is used to simulate the solar wind The shock is modeled using a shell model where particle convection and diffusion are followed numerically When particles reach some distance ahead of the shock they are can escape from the shock Their subsequent motion is followed using a Monte-Carlo approach This sophisticated model allows us to obtain a time intensity profile and instantaneous particle spectra at various locations We will discuss the radial and longitudinal dependence of both the intensities and fluences

  10. Fluence-convolution broad-beam (FCBB) dose calculation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Weiguo; Chen, Mingli

    2010-12-01

    IMRT optimization requires a fast yet relatively accurate algorithm to calculate the iteration dose with small memory demand. In this paper, we present a dose calculation algorithm that approaches these goals. By decomposing the infinitesimal pencil beam (IPB) kernel into the central axis (CAX) component and lateral spread function (LSF) and taking the beam's eye view (BEV), we established a non-voxel and non-beamlet-based dose calculation formula. Both LSF and CAX are determined by a commissioning procedure using the collapsed-cone convolution/superposition (CCCS) method as the standard dose engine. The proposed dose calculation involves a 2D convolution of a fluence map with LSF followed by ray tracing based on the CAX lookup table with radiological distance and divergence correction, resulting in complexity of O(N(3)) both spatially and temporally. This simple algorithm is orders of magnitude faster than the CCCS method. Without pre-calculation of beamlets, its implementation is also orders of magnitude smaller than the conventional voxel-based beamlet-superposition (VBS) approach. We compared the presented algorithm with the CCCS method using simulated and clinical cases. The agreement was generally within 3% for a homogeneous phantom and 5% for heterogeneous and clinical cases. Combined with the 'adaptive full dose correction', the algorithm is well suitable for calculating the iteration dose during IMRT optimization. PMID:21081826

  11. Plume expansion and stoichiometry in the growth of multi-component thin films using dual-laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Pritish; Cuff, John B.; Witanachchi, Sarath

    1998-05-01

    The application of dual-laser ablation for the growth of ZnO and multi-component films of CuIn 0.75.Ga 0.25Se 2 is presented. Comparison of the optical emission from the ZnO plume under dual-laser and single excimer laser ablation reveals that the coupling of the CO 2 laser into the excimer laser-ablated plume causes both significant ionic excitation as well as lateral plume expansion. The cos 21( θ) thickness profile of the single laser film transforms to a more uniform cos 6( θ) for dual-laser ablation. A comparison of the enhancement of film uniformity at different CO 2 laser fluences shows that increasing the CO 2 laser energy leads to greater film uniformity in dual-laser ablation. The advantages of the growth of multi-component materials using dual-laser ablation are demonstrated by optical plume analysis and the deposition of CuIn 0.75Ga 0.25Se 2 films.

  12. Femtosecond pulse damage thresholds of dielectric coatings in vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Michelle D. Shinn, Duy N. Nguyen, Luke A. Emmert ,Paul Schwoebel, Dinesh Patel, Carmen S. Menoni, Wolfgang Rudolph

    2011-03-01

    At 10-7 Torr, the multiple femtosecond pulse damage threshold, F(?), is about 10% of the single pulse damage fluence F(1) for hafnia and silica films compared to about 65% and 50%, respectively, at 630 Torr. In contrast, the single-pulse damage threshold is pressure independent. The decrease of F(?) with decreasing air pressure correlates with the water vapor and oxygen content of the ambient gas with the former having the greater effect. The decrease in F(?) is likely associated with an accumulation of defects derived from oxygen deficiency, for example vacancies. From atmospheric air pressure to pressures of {approx}3 x 10{sup -6} Torr, the damage 'crater' starts deterministically at the center of the beam and grows in diameter as the fluence increases. At pressure below 3x10-6 Torr, damage is initiated at random 'sites' within the exposed area in hafnia films, while the damage morphology remains deterministic in silica films. A possible explanation is that absorbing centers are created at predisposed sample sites in hafnia, for example at boundaries between crystallites, or crystalline and amorphous phases.

  13. Cryoballoon Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Jason G; Dubuc, Marc; Guerra, Peter G; Macle, Laurent; Rivard, Lena; Roy, Denis; Talajic, Mario; Thibault, Bernard; Khairy, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Focal point-by-point radiofrequency catheter ablation has shown considerable success in the treatment of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. However, it is not without limitations. Recent clinical and preclinical studies have demonstrated that cryothermal ablation using a balloon catheter (Artic Front©, Medtronic CryoCath LP) provides an effective alternative strategy to treating atrial fibrillation. The objective of this article is to review efficacy and safety data surrounding cryoballoon ablation for paroxysmal and persistent atrial fibrillation. In addition, a practical step-by-step approach to cryoballoon ablation is presented, while highlighting relevant literature regarding: 1) the rationale for adjunctive imaging, 2) selection of an appropriate cryoballoon size, 3) predictors of efficacy, 4) advanced trouble-shooting techniques, and 5) strategies to reduce procedural complications, such as phrenic nerve palsy. PMID:22557842

  14. Space Environment Effects: Model for Emission of Solar Protons (ESP): Cumulative and Worst Case Event Fluences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xapsos, M. A.; Barth, J. L.; Stassinopoulos, E. G.; Burke, E. A.; Gee, G. B.

    1999-01-01

    The effects that solar proton events have on microelectronics and solar arrays are important considerations for spacecraft in geostationary and polar orbits and for interplanetary missions. Designers of spacecraft and mission planners are required to assess the performance of microelectronic systems under a variety of conditions. A number of useful approaches exist for predicting information about solar proton event fluences and, to a lesser extent, peak fluxes. This includes the cumulative fluence over the course of a mission, the fluence of a worst-case event during a mission, the frequency distribution of event fluences, and the frequency distribution of large peak fluxes. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, under the sponsorship of NASA's Space Environments and Effects (SEE) Program, have developed a new model for predicting cumulative solar proton fluences and worst-case solar proton events as functions of mission duration and user confidence level. This model is called the Emission of Solar Protons (ESP) model.

  15. Metallic targets ablation by laser plasma production in a vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beilis, I. I.

    2016-03-01

    A model of metallic target ablation and metallic plasma production by laser irradiation is reported. The model considers laser energy absorption by the plasma, electron emission from hot targets and ion flux to the target from the plasma as well as an electric sheath produced at the target-plasma interface. The proposed approach takes into account that the plasma, partially shields the laser radiation from the target, and also converts absorbed laser energy to kinetic and potential energies of the charged plasma particles, which they transport not only through the ambient vacuum but also through the electrostatic sheath to the solid surface. Therefore additional plasma heating by the accelerated emitted electrons and target heating caused by bombardment of it by the accelerated ions are considered. A system of equations, including equations for solid heat conduction, plasma generation, and plasma expansion, is solved self-consistently. The results of calculations explain the measured dependencies of ablation yield (μ g/pulse) for Al, Ni, and Ti targets on laser fluence in range of (5-21)J/cm2 published previously by Torrisi et al.

  16. Laser ablation in analytical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Russo, Richard E; Mao, Xianglei; Gonzalez, Jhanis J; Zorba, Vassilia; Yoo, Jong

    2013-07-01

    In 2002, we wrote an Analytical Chemistry feature article describing the Physics of Laser Ablation in Microchemical Analysis. In line with the theme of the 2002 article, this manuscript discusses current issues in fundamental research, applications based on detecting photons at the ablation site (LIBS and LAMIS) and by collecting particles for excitation in a secondary source (ICP), and directions for the technology. PMID:23614661

  17. Network problem threshold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gejji, Raghvendra, R.

    1992-01-01

    Network transmission errors such as collisions, CRC errors, misalignment, etc. are statistical in nature. Although errors can vary randomly, a high level of errors does indicate specific network problems, e.g. equipment failure. In this project, we have studied the random nature of collisions theoretically as well as by gathering statistics, and established a numerical threshold above which a network problem is indicated with high probability.

  18. Elaborating on threshold concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rountree, Janet; Robins, Anthony; Rountree, Nathan

    2013-09-01

    We propose an expanded definition of Threshold Concepts (TCs) that requires the successful acquisition and internalisation not only of knowledge, but also its practical elaboration in the domains of applied strategies and mental models. This richer definition allows us to clarify the relationship between TCs and Fundamental Ideas, and to account for both the important and the problematic characteristics of TCs in terms of the Knowledge/Strategies/Mental Models Framework defined in previous work.

  19. Materials International Space Station Experiment-6 (MISSE-6) Atomic Oxygen Fluence Monitor Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Miller, Sharon K.; Waters, Deborah L.

    2010-01-01

    An atomic oxygen fluence monitor was flown as part of the Materials International Space Station Experiment-6 (MISSE-6). The monitor was designed to measure the accumulation of atomic oxygen fluence with time as it impinged upon the ram surface of the MISSE 6B Passive Experiment Container (PEC). This was an active experiment for which data was to be stored on a battery-powered data logger for post-flight retrieval and analysis. The atomic oxygen fluence measurement was accomplished by allowing atomic oxygen to erode two opposing wedges of pyrolytic graphite that partially covered a photodiode. As the wedges of pyrolytic graphite erode, the area of the photodiode that is illuminated by the Sun increases. The short circuit current, which is proportional to the area of illumination, was to be measured and recorded as a function of time. The short circuit current from a different photodiode, which was oriented in the same direction and had an unobstructed view of the Sun, was also to be recorded as a reference current. The ratio of the two separate recorded currents should bear a linear relationship with the accumulated atomic oxygen fluence and be independent of the intensity of solar illumination. Ground hyperthermal atomic oxygen exposure facilities were used to evaluate the linearity of the ratio of short circuit current to the atomic oxygen fluence. In flight, the current measurement circuitry failed to operate properly, thus the overall atomic oxygen mission fluence could only be estimated based on the physical erosion of the pyrolytic graphite wedges. The atomic oxygen fluence was calculated based on the knowledge of the space atomic oxygen erosion yield of pyrolytic graphite measured from samples on the MISSE 2. The atomic oxygen fluence monitor, the expected result and comparison of mission atomic oxygen fluence based on the erosion of the pyrolytic graphite and Kapton H atomic oxygen fluence witness samples are presented in this paper.

  20. Dependence of the phototropic response of Arabidopsis thaliana on fluence rate and wavelength

    PubMed Central

    Konjević, Radomir; Steinitz, Benjamin; Poff, Kenneth L.

    1989-01-01

    In the phototropic response of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings, the shape of the fluence-response relation depends on fluence rate and wavelength. At low fluence rates, the response to 450-nm light is characterized by a single maximum at about 0.3 μmol·m-2. At higher fluence rates, the response shows two distinct maxima, I and II, at 0.3 and 3.5 μmol·m-2, respectively. The response to 500-nm light shows a single maximum at 2 μmol·m-2, and the response to 510-nm light shows a single maximum at 4.5 μmol·m-2, independent of fluence rate. The response to 490-nm light shows a maximal at 4.5 μmol·m-2 and a shoulder at about 0.6 μmol·m-2. Preirradiation with high-fluence 510-nm light from above, immediately followed by unilateral 450-nm light, eliminates maximum II but not maximum I. Preirradiation with high-fluence 450-nm light from above eliminates the response to subsequent unilateral irradiation with either 450-nm or 510-nm light. The recovery of the response following high-fluence 450-nm light is considerably slower than the recovery following high-fluence 510-nm light. Unilateral irradiation with low-fluence 510-nm light followed by 450-nm light results in curvature that is approximately the sum of those produced by either irradiation alone. Based on these results, it is proposed that phototropism in A. thaliana seedlings is mediated by at least two blue-light photoreceptor pigments. PMID:16594094

  1. Laser ablation in CdZnTe crystal due to thermal self-focusing: Secondary phase hydrodynamic expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvid', A.; Mychko, A.; Dauksta, E.; Kosyak, V.; Grase, L.

    2016-06-01

    The present paper deals with the laser ablation in CdZnTe crystal irradiated by pulsed infrared laser. Two values of threshold intensities of the laser ablation were determined, namely of about 8.5 and 6.2 MW/cm2 for the incident and the rear surfaces, correspondingly. Lower intensity of the laser ablation for the rear surface is explained by thermal self-focusing of the laser beam in the CdZnTe crystal due to heating of Te inclusions with a following hydrodynamic expansion.

  2. Bone and Soft Tissue Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Ryan C.B.; Stavas, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    Bone and soft tissue tumor ablation has reached widespread acceptance in the locoregional treatment of various benign and malignant musculoskeletal (MSK) lesions. Many principles of ablation learned elsewhere in the body are easily adapted to the MSK system, particularly the various technical aspects of probe/antenna design, tumoricidal effects, selection of image guidance, and methods to reduce complications. Despite the common use of thermal and chemical ablation procedures in bone and soft tissues, there are few large clinical series that show longitudinal benefit and cost-effectiveness compared with conventional methods, namely, surgery, external beam radiation, and chemotherapy. Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation of osteoid osteomas has been evaluated the most and is considered a first-line treatment choice for many lesions. Palliation of painful metastatic bone disease with thermal ablation is considered safe and has been shown to reduce pain and analgesic use while improving quality of life for cancer patients. Procedure-related complications are rare and are typically easily managed. Similar to all interventional procedures, bone and soft tissue lesions require an integrated approach to disease management to determine the optimum type of and timing for ablation techniques within the context of the patient care plan. PMID:25053865

  3. Bone and soft tissue ablation.

    PubMed

    Foster, Ryan C B; Stavas, Joseph M

    2014-06-01

    Bone and soft tissue tumor ablation has reached widespread acceptance in the locoregional treatment of various benign and malignant musculoskeletal (MSK) lesions. Many principles of ablation learned elsewhere in the body are easily adapted to the MSK system, particularly the various technical aspects of probe/antenna design, tumoricidal effects, selection of image guidance, and methods to reduce complications. Despite the common use of thermal and chemical ablation procedures in bone and soft tissues, there are few large clinical series that show longitudinal benefit and cost-effectiveness compared with conventional methods, namely, surgery, external beam radiation, and chemotherapy. Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation of osteoid osteomas has been evaluated the most and is considered a first-line treatment choice for many lesions. Palliation of painful metastatic bone disease with thermal ablation is considered safe and has been shown to reduce pain and analgesic use while improving quality of life for cancer patients. Procedure-related complications are rare and are typically easily managed. Similar to all interventional procedures, bone and soft tissue lesions require an integrated approach to disease management to determine the optimum type of and timing for ablation techniques within the context of the patient care plan. PMID:25053865

  4. A review of Thulium fiber laser ablation of kidney stones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fried, Nathaniel M.; Blackmon, Richard L.; Irby, Pierce B.

    2011-02-01

    The clinical solid-state Holmium:YAG laser lithotripter (λ=2120 nm) is capable of operating at high pulse energies, but its efficient operation is limited to low pulse rates during lithotripsy. The diode-pumped experimental Thulium Fiber Laser (λ=1908 nm) is limited to low pulse energies, but can operate at high pulse rates. This review compares stone ablation threshold, ablation rate, and retropulsion effects for Ho:YAG and TFL. Laser lithotripsy complications also include optical fiber bending failure resulting in endoscope damage and low irrigation rates leading to poor visibility. Both problems are related to fiber diameter and limited by Ho:YAG laser multimode spatial beam profile. This study exploits TFL spatial beam profile for higher power transmission through smaller fibers. A short taper is also studied for expanding TFL beam at the distal tip of a small-core fiber. Stone mass loss, stone crater depths, fiber transmission losses, fiber burn-back, irrigation rates, and deflection through a flexible ureteroscope were measured for tapered fiber and compared with conventional fibers. The stone ablation threshold for TFL was four times lower than for Ho:YAG. Stone retropulsion with Ho:YAG increased linearly with pulse energy. Retropulsion with TFL was minimal at pulse rates < 150 Hz, then rapidly increased at higher pulse rates. TFL beam profile provides higher laser power through smaller fibers than Ho:YAG laser, potentially reducing fiber failure and endoscope damage and allowing greater irrigation rates for improved visibility and safety. Use of a short tapered distal fiber tip also allows expansion of the laser beam, resulting in decreased fiber tip damage compared to conventional fibers, without compromising fiber bending, stone ablation efficiency, or irrigation rates.

  5. Damage threshold of inorganic solids under free-electron-laser irradiation at 32.5 nm wavelength

    SciTech Connect

    Hau-Riege, S; London, R A; Bionta, R M; McKernan, M A; Baker, S L; Krzywinski, J; Sobierajski, R; Nietubyc, R; Pelka, J B; Jurek, M; Klinger, D; Juha, L; Chalupsky, J; Cihelka, J; Hajkova, V; Koptyaev, S; Velyhan, A; Krasa, J; Kuba, J; Tiedtke, K; Toleikis, S; Tschentscher, T; Wabnitz, H; Bergh, M; Caleman, C; Sokolowski-Tinten, K; Stojanovic, N; Zastrau, U; Tronnier, A; Meyer-ter-Vehn, J

    2007-12-03

    We exposed samples of B4C, amorphous C, chemical-vapor-deposition (CVD)-diamond C, Si, and SiC to single 25 fs-long pulses of 32.5 nm free-electron-laser radiation at fluences of up to 2.2 J/cm{sup 2}. The samples were chosen as candidate materials for x-ray free electron laser (XFEL) optics. We found that the threshold for surface-damage is on the order of the fluence required for thermal melting. For larger fluences, the crater depths correspond to temperatures on the order of the critical temperature, suggesting that the craters are formed by two-phase vaporization [1]. XFELs have the promise of producing extremely high-intensity ultrashort pulses of coherent, monochromatic radiation in the 1 to 10 keV regime. The expected high output fluence and short pulse duration pose significant challenges to the optical components, including radiation damage. It has not been possible to obtain direct experimental verification of the expected damage thresholds since appropriate x-ray sources are not yet available. FLASH has allowed us to study the interaction of high-fluence short-duration photon pulses with materials at the shortest wavelength possible to date. With these experiments, we have come closer to the extreme conditions expected in XFEL-matter interaction scenarios than previously possible.

  6. Silver-silver oxide core-shell nanoparticles by femtosecond laser ablation: core and shell sizing by extinction spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schinca, D. C.; Scaffardi, L. B.; Videla, F. A.; Torchia, G. A.; Moreno, P.; Roso, L.

    2009-11-01

    The generation of small silver metal nanoparticles (Nps) by ultrashort pulsed laser ablation has been an active area of research in recent years due to their interest in several fields of applied research such as biotechnology and material research, in particular those with sizes smaller than 10 nm. In general, laser ablation tends to produce environmentally clean metal Nps compared with wet chemical methods. However, since silver may be oxidized in the presence of water or ethanol, core-shell silver-silver oxide (Ag-Ag2O) Nps can be formed, whose size and thickness must be determined and characterized for functionalization related to future applications. This work analyses the size characteristics of core-shell Ag-Ag2O colloid nanostructures (smaller than 10 nm) obtained by femtosecond laser ablation of solid silver targets in different liquid media (water or ethanol) through the study of their optical extinction spectra. A fit of full experimental spectrum using Mie theory allows the determination of core size and shell thickness distributions as a function of fluence. The red-shift of the plasmon peak wavelength with respect to the bare-core peak wavelength at 400 nm, produced by the oxide shell, may be easily measured even for very small thicknesses. It was found that the dominant Ag2O effective thickness is inversely proportional to the fluence, reaching a maximum of 0.2 nm for a fluence of 60 J cm-2 and a minimum of 0.04 nm for a fluence of 1000 J cm-2.

  7. Preparation of bismuth-based nanosheets by ultrasound-assisted liquid laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobar-Alarcón, L.; Velarde Granados, E.; Solís-Casados, D. A.; Olea-Mejía, O.; Espinosa-Pesqueira, M.; Haro-Poniatowski, E.

    2016-04-01

    The preparation of bismuth nanosheets ablating a high purity Bi target immersed in water subjected to an ultrasound wave is reported. The effect of the laser fluence used for ablation on the size and shape of the nanostructures synthesized was investigated. The obtained results reveal the formation of nanosheets with square-like shape and sizes from approximately 140-543 nm. In comparison, experiments without the ultrasound field lead to the formation of quasi-spherical nanoparticles. The nanosheets were characterized by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), UV-Vis and Raman spectroscopies. The bismuth nanosheets, as deposited, are highly crystalline, and depending on the preparation conditions, the α or β phases of Bi2O3 are obtained. UV-Vis measurements show the typical band absorption characteristic of bismuth with nanometric size. Raman spectra confirm the formation of Bi2O3 nanostructures.

  8. Multi-level diffractive optical elements produced by excimer laser ablation of sol-gel.

    PubMed

    Neiss, Estelle; Flury, Manuel; Mager, Loïc; Rehspringer, Jean-Luc; Fort, Alain; Montgomery, Paul; Gérard, Philippe; Fontaine, Joël; Robert, Stéphane

    2008-09-01

    Material ablation by excimer laser micromachining is a promising approach for structuring sol-gel materials as we demonstrate in the present study. Using the well-known direct etching technique, the behaviour of different hybrid organic/inorganic self-made sol-gel materials is examined with a KrF* laser. Ablated depths ranging from 0.1 to 1.5 microm are obtained with a few laser pulses at low fluence (< 1 J/cm(2)). The aim is to rapidly transfer surface relief multi-level diffractive patterns in such a substrate, without intermediate steps. The combination with the 3D profilometry technique of coherence probe microscopy permits to analyse the etching process with the aim of producing multi-level Diffractive Optical Elements (DOE). Examples of four-level DOEs with 10 microm square elementary cells are presented, as well as their laser reconstructions in the infrared. PMID:18773015

  9. Photo-fragmentation of selenium powder by Excimer laser ablation in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Overschelde, O.; Guisbiers, G.

    2015-10-01

    Laser ablation in liquids is especially adapted to produce nanoparticles free of any contamination as suited for biological and medical applications. A KrF Excimer laser delivering an UV light at 248 nm and operating at low fluence (F~0.5 J/cm2) was used to irradiate a micro-sized powder of selenium dispersed into a de-ionized water solution. To avoid any agglomeration of the selenium nanoparticles during the irradiation, surfactants (SDS and CTAB) were added to the solution and their efficiency was compared. The concentration of surfactants had to be chosen around the critical micellar concentration to produce small selenium nanoparticles (<60 nm). Moreover, SDS shows better mono-disperse size distribution compared to CTAB. Finally, photo-fragmentation is found to be more efficient than bulk thermal ablation to produce very small selenium nanoparticles (less than 10 nm).

  10. Synthesis of ceramic nanoparticles by ultrafast laser ablation of solid targets in water.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Pablo; Méndez, Cruz; García, Ana; Torchia, Gustavo; Delgado, Diego; Vázquez de Aldana, Javier R; Arias, Isabel; Roso, Luis

    2006-07-01

    We report production of nanoparticles of several advanced ceramics (Si3N4, SiC, AlN, and Al2O3) by ablation with femtosecond laser pulses of solid targets submerged in deionized water. The products withstand comparison with commercial nanoparticle suspensions obtained by other techniques as they are analyzed by means of transmission electron microscopy. As compared with metal nanoparticles produced with the same technique, we have found that the overall dependence of mean sizes and distribution widths on the laser fluence is similar. We explain why it is difficult to synthetize very small (<5 nm) and monodisperse particles in terms of ablation mechanism and discuss the aplicability of the technique for industrial production. PMID:17025109

  11. Fabrication of gold nanoparticles in Therminol VP-1 by laser ablation and fragmentation with fs pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Mendieta, R.; Mondragón, R.; Juliá, E.; Mendoza-Yero, O.; Cordoncillo, E.; Lancis, J.; Mínguez-Vega, G.

    2014-12-01

    This letter reports on a physical method to produce highly pure, size-controlled and well-dispersed spherical gold nanoparticles (NPs) in Therminol VP-1 by pulsed laser ablation in liquids (PLAL) using a 30 fs Ti:Sapphire laser at a fluence of 1 J cm-2. A second photo-fragmentation of the ablated colloid solution by subsequent treatment with the same laser light yields a mean size and size dispersion of the NPs of 58 ± 31 nm. A study of the nanofluid properties reveals a low agglomeration over time and an enhancement of thermal conductivity of the base fluid by up to 4%. These results improve the characteristics of current nanofluids in thermal oils that may have a potential impact on the improvement of the efficiency of harvesting of solar light.

  12. On the plume splitting of pulsed laser ablated Fe and Al plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmood, S.; Rawat, R. S.; Darby, M. S. B.; Zakaullah, M.; Springham, S. V.; Tan, T. L.; Lee, P.

    2010-10-01

    A time resolved imaging study of pulsed laser ablated Fe and Al plasma plumes with specific interest in the splitting of plumes into the slow and fast moving components as they expand through the background argon gas at different pressures is reported. The material ablation was achieved using a Q-switched Nd:YAG (yttrium aluminum garnet) laser operating at 532 nm with a pulse duration of ˜8 ns full width at half maximum and a fluence of 30 Jcm-2 at the target surface. Typical time resolved images with low magnification show that the splitting occurs at moderate background gas pressures (0.5 and 1.0 mbar for Fe, and 0.2 mbar for Al plasma plumes). The plume splitting did not occur for higher background gas pressures.

  13. On the plume splitting of pulsed laser ablated Fe and Al plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmood, S.; Rawat, R. S.; Springham, S. V.; Tan, T. L.; Lee, P.; Darby, M. S. B.; Zakaullah, M.

    2010-10-15

    A time resolved imaging study of pulsed laser ablated Fe and Al plasma plumes with specific interest in the splitting of plumes into the slow and fast moving components as they expand through the background argon gas at different pressures is reported. The material ablation was achieved using a Q-switched Nd:YAG (yttrium aluminum garnet) laser operating at 532 nm with a pulse duration of {approx}8 ns full width at half maximum and a fluence of 30 Jcm{sup -2} at the target surface. Typical time resolved images with low magnification show that the splitting occurs at moderate background gas pressures (0.5 and 1.0 mbar for Fe, and 0.2 mbar for Al plasma plumes). The plume splitting did not occur for higher background gas pressures.

  14. Optical Emission Spectroscopy of the Laser Ablation Plume Controled by RF Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suda, Yoshiyuki; Nishimura, Takuma; Mizuno, Manabu; Bratescu, Maria Antoaneta; Sakai, Yosuke

    1999-10-01

    Recently, film deposition has been investigated using laser ablation methods which have a lot of advantages. For the purpose of control of the laser ablation plume, we introduced a radio frequency (RF) plasma. In this report we present position resolved optical emission spectra of the plume observed by an OMA (optical multichannel analyzer). The plume current is also measured. The RF plasma is generated in a helical coil installed between the substrate and the target. An ArF excimer laser (wavelength 193 nm, pulse duration time 20 ns) is used as a light source, and the target material is sintered carbon graphite. The laser fluence on the target surface is changed in a range from 1.2 to 6.4 J/cm^2. Ar gas is introduced to sustain the RF plasma. When the plume goes through the RF plasma, interaction of the plume with the plasma is expected. The possibility of control of the plume behavior is discussed.

  15. Photoluminescent zinc oxide polymer nanocomposites fabricated using picosecond laser ablation in an organic solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagener, Philipp; Faramarzi, Shamsolzaman; Schwenke, Andreas; Rosenfeld, Rupert; Barcikowski, Stephan

    2011-06-01

    Nanocomposites made of ZnO nanoparticles dispersed in thermoplastic polyurethane were synthesized using picosecond laser ablation of zinc in a polymer-doped solution of tetrahydrofuran. The pre-added polymer stabilizes the ZnO nanoparticles in situ during laser ablation by forming a polymer shell around the nanoparticles. This close-contact polymer shell has a layer thickness up to 30 nm. Analysis of ZnO polyurethane nanocomposites using optical spectroscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction revealed that oxidized and crystalline ZnO nanoparticles were produced. Those nanocomposites showed a green photoluminescence emission centred at 538 nm after excitation at 350 nm, which should be attributed to oxygen defects generated during the laser formation mechanism of the monocrystalline nanoparticles. Further, the influence of pulse energy and polymer concentration on the production rate, laser fluence and energy-specific mass productivity was investigated.

  16. Damage threshold of lithium niobate crystal under single and multiple femtosecond laser pulses: theoretical and experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qinglong; Zhang, Bin; Zhong, Sencheng; Zhu, Liguo

    2016-06-01

    The damage threshold of lithium niobate crystal under single and multiple femtosecond laser pulses has been studied theoretically and experimentally. Firstly, the model for the damage threshold prediction of crystal materials based on the improved rate equation has been proposed. Then, the experimental measure method of the damage threshold of crystal materials has been given in detail. On the basis, the variation of the damage threshold of lithium niobate crystal with the pulse duration has also been analyzed quantitatively. Finally, the damage threshold of lithium niobate crystal under multiple laser pulses has been measured and compared to the theoretical results. The results show that the transmittance of lithium niobate crystal is almost a constant when the laser pulse fluence is relative low, whereas it decreases linearly with the increase in the laser pulse fluence below the damage threshold. The damage threshold of lithium niobate crystal increases with the increase in the duration of the femtosecond laser pulse. And the damage threshold of lithium niobate crystal under multiple laser pulses is obviously lower than that irradiated by a single laser pulse. The theoretical data fall in good agreement with the experimental results.

  17. X-ray ablation measurements and modeling for ICF applications

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, A.T.

    1996-09-01

    X-ray ablation of material from the first wall and other components of an ICF (Inertial Confinement Fusion) chamber is a major threat to the laser final optics. Material condensing on these optics after a shot may cause damage with subsequent laser shots. To ensure the successful operation of the ICF facility, removal rates must be predicted accurately. The goal for this dissertation is to develop an experimentally validated x-ray response model, with particular application to the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Accurate knowledge of the x-ray and debris emissions from ICF targets is a critical first step in the process of predicting the performance of the target chamber system. A number of 1-D numerical simulations of NIF targets have been run to characterize target output in terms of energy, angular distribution, spectrum, and pulse shape. Scaling of output characteristics with variations of both target yield and hohlraum wall thickness are also described. Experiments have been conducted at the Nova laser on the effects of relevant x-ray fluences on various materials. The response was diagnosed using post-shot examinations of the surfaces with scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscope instruments. Judgments were made about the dominant removal mechanisms for each material. Measurements of removal depths were made to provide data for the modeling. The finite difference ablation code developed here (ABLATOR) combines the thermomechanical response of materials to x-rays with models of various removal mechanisms. The former aspect refers to energy deposition in such small characteristic depths ({approx} micron) that thermal conduction and hydrodynamic motion are significant effects on the nanosecond time scale. The material removal models use the resulting time histories of temperature and pressure-profiles, along with ancillary local conditions, to predict rates of surface vaporization and the onset of conditions that would lead to spallation.

  18. Laser ablation of basal cell carcinomas guided by confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sierra, Heidy; Cordova, Miguel; Nehal, Kishwer; Rossi, Anthony; Chen, Chih-Shan Jason; Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2016-02-01

    Laser ablation offers precise and fast removal of superficial and early nodular types of basal cell carcinomas (BCCs). Nevertheless, the lack of histological confirmation has been a limitation. Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) imaging combined with a contrast agent can offer cellular-level histology-like feedback to detect the presence (or absence) of residual BCC directly on the patient. We conducted an ex vivo bench-top study to provide a set of effective ablation parameters (fluence, number of passes) to remove superficial BCCs while also controlling thermal coagulation post-ablation to allow uptake of contrast agent. The results for an Er:YAG laser (2.9 um and pulse duration 250us) show that with 6 passes of 25 J/cm2, thermal coagulation can be effectively controlled, to allow both the uptake of acetic acid (contrast agent) and detection of residual (or absence) BCCs. Confirmation was provided with histological examination. An initial in vivo study on 35 patients shows that the uptake of contrast agent aluminum chloride) and imaging quality is similar to that observed in the ex vivo study. The detection of the presence of residual tumor or complete clearance was confirmed in 10 wounds with (additional) histology and in 25 lesions with follow-up imaging. Our results indicate that resolution is sufficient but further development and use of appropriate contrast agent are necessary to improve sensitivity and specificity. Advances in RCM technology for imaging of lateral and deep margins directly on the patient may provide less invasive, faster and less expensive image-guided approaches for treatment of BCCs.

  19. Thermal and structural properties of low-fluence irradiated graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lexa, Dusan; Dauke, Michael

    2009-02-01

    The release of Wigner energy from graphite irradiated by fast neutrons at a TRIGA Mark II research reactor has been studied by differential scanning calorimetry and simultaneous differential scanning calorimetry / synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction between 25 and 725 °C at a heating rate of 10 °C min -1. The graphite, having been subject to a fast-neutron fluence from 5.67 × 10 20 to 1.13 × 10 22 n m -2 at a fast-neutron flux ( E > 0.1 MeV) of 7.88 × 10 16 n m -2 s -1 and at temperatures not exceeding 100 °C, exhibits Wigner energies ranging from 1.2 to 21.8 J g -1 and a Wigner energy accumulation rate of 1.9 × 10 -21 J g -1 n -1 m 2. The differential-scanning-calorimeter curves exhibit, in addition to the well known peak at ˜200 °C, a pronounced fine structure consisting of additional peaks at ˜150, ˜230, and ˜280 °C. These peaks correspond to activation energies of 1.31, 1.47, 1.57, and 1.72 eV, respectively. Crystal structure of the samples is intact. The dependence of the c lattice parameter on temperature between 25 and 725 °C as determined by Rietveld refinement leads to the expected microscopic thermal expansion coefficient along the c axis of ˜26 × 10 -6 °C -1. At 200 °C, coinciding with the maximum in the differential-scanning-calorimeter curves, no measurable changes in the rate of thermal expansion have been detected - unlike its decrease previously seen in more highly irradiated graphite.

  20. Ultra-fast fluence optimization for beam angle selection algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bangert, M.; Ziegenhein, P.; Oelfke, U.

    2014-03-01

    Beam angle selection (BAS) including fluence optimization (FO) is among the most extensive computational tasks in radiotherapy. Precomputed dose influence data (DID) of all considered beam orientations (up to 100 GB for complex cases) has to be handled in the main memory and repeated FOs are required for different beam ensembles. In this paper, the authors describe concepts accelerating FO for BAS algorithms using off-the-shelf multiprocessor workstations. The FO runtime is not dominated by the arithmetic load of the CPUs but by the transportation of DID from the RAM to the CPUs. On multiprocessor workstations, however, the speed of data transportation from the main memory to the CPUs is non-uniform across the RAM; every CPU has a dedicated memory location (node) with minimum access time. We apply a thread node binding strategy to ensure that CPUs only access DID from their preferred node. Ideal load balancing for arbitrary beam ensembles is guaranteed by distributing the DID of every candidate beam equally to all nodes. Furthermore we use a custom sorting scheme of the DID to minimize the overall data transportation. The framework is implemented on an AMD Opteron workstation. One FO iteration comprising dose, objective function, and gradient calculation takes between 0.010 s (9 beams, skull, 0.23 GB DID) and 0.070 s (9 beams, abdomen, 1.50 GB DID). Our overall FO time is < 1 s for small cases, larger cases take ~ 4 s. BAS runs including FOs for 1000 different beam ensembles take ~ 15-70 min, depending on the treatment site. This enables an efficient clinical evaluation of different BAS algorithms.

  1. Excimer ablation of human intervertebral disc at 308 nanometers.

    PubMed

    Wolgin, M; Finkenberg, J; Papaioannou, T; Segil, C; Soma, C; Grundfest, W

    1989-01-01

    Excimer laser energy, which has been shown to photoablate tissue at a precisely controllable rate with minimal thermal damage, was applied to human intervertebral disc in an effort to develop a technique for percutaneous discectomy. Cadaveric samples of human disc were used. Excimer laser energy was produced by a XeCl, magnetically switched, long-pulse laser working at 308 nm, 20 Hz. Annulus tissue of approximately 1 mm thickness was placed in contact with the output tip of a 400 microns core diameter quartz fiber, and measurements of ablation rate were made at different radiant exposures. Ablation rates were found to vary linearly with radiant exposure, from 0.7 micron/pulse at 10 mJ/mm2 to 11.0 microns/pulse at 55 mJ/mm2, with a correlation coefficient of 0.984. Threshold radiant exposure, calculated by extrapolation, was found to be about 7 mJ/mm2. Histologic analysis showed a minimum of thermal damage in these specimens, and when ablated with modification to maintain constant fiber-tissue contact, thermal injury was nearly absent, as compared to samples ablated with Nd:YAG through a contact probe. Thermographic analysis, performed using the AGA 782 Digital Thermography system, showed increasing temperature with increasing radiant exposure, with a maximum temperature of 47.2 degrees C at 55 mJ/mm2. In that precise tissue ablation was demonstrated with minimal generated heat, and excimer energy at 308 nm is transmissible through fiber optics, excimer holds great promise for the development of a percutaneous discectomy technique. PMID:2716456

  2. Role of ambient gas and laser fluence in governing the dynamics of the plasma plumes produced by laser blow off of LiF-C thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, R. K.; Kumar, Ajai; Patel, B. G.; Subramanian, K. P.

    2007-05-01

    The time- and space-resolved emission profiles of Li mathsize="8pt">I and Li mathsize="8pt">II emission lines from the laser-blow-off plumes of a multilayered LiF-C thin film have been studied using spectroscopic technique. The evolution features were analyzed in different ambient environments ranging from high vacuum to 3mbars of argon pressures and at various fluences of the ablating laser. During the evolution of the plume, a transition region was found to exist between 4 and 6mm. Here, the plume dynamics changed from free expansion to collisional regime, where the plume experienced viscous force of the medium. The enhancement observed in neutral lines, in comparison with ionic lines, is explained in terms of the yield difference in electron impact excitation and ionization processes. Substantial difference in the arrival time distribution of the plume species was observed for Li mathsize="8pt">I and Li mathsize="8pt">II lines at high ambient pressures. Three expansion models are invoked to explain the evolution of the plume in different ambient conditions. The laser fluence was found to control the ratio of ions and neutrals.

  3. Short-wavelength ablation of solids: pulse duration and wavelength effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juha, Libor; Bittner, Michal; Chvostova, Dagmar; Letal, Vit; Krasa, Josef; Otcenasek, Zdenek; Kozlova, Michaela; Polan, Jiri; Prag, Ansgar R.; Rus, Bedrich; Stupka, Michal; Krzywinski, Jacek; Andrejczuk, Andrzej; Pelka, Jerzy B.; Sobierajski, Ryszard H.; Ryc, Leszek; Feldhaus, Josef; Boody, Frederick P.; Fiedorowicz, Henryk; Bartnik, Andrzej; Mikolajczyk, Janusz; Rakowski, Rafal; Kubat, P.; Pina, Ladislav; Grisham, Michael E.; Vaschenko, Georgiy O.; Menoni, Carmen S.; Rocca, Jorge J. G.

    2004-11-01

    For conventional wavelength (UV-Vis-IR) lasers delivering radiation energy to the surface of materials, ablation thresholds, ablation (etch) rates, and the quality of ablated structures often differ dramatically between short (typically nanosecond) and ultrashort (typically femtosecond) pulses. Various short-wavelength (l < 100 nm) lasers emitting pulses with durations ranging from ~ 10 fs to ~ 1 ns have recently been put into a routine operation. This makes it possible to investigate how the ablation characteristics depend on the pulse duration in the XUV spectral region. 1.2-ns pulses of 46.9-nm radiation delivered from a capillary-discharge Ne-like Ar laser (Colorado State University, Fort Collins), focused by a spherical Sc/Si multilayer-coated mirror were used for an ablation of organic polymers and silicon. Various materials were irradiated with ellipsoidal-mirror-focused XUV radiation (λ = 86 nm, τ = 30-100 fs) generated by the free-electron laser (FEL) operated at the TESLA Test Facility (TTF1 FEL) in Hamburg. The beam of the Ne-like Zn XUV laser (λ = 21.2 nm, τ < 100 ps) driven by the Prague Asterix Laser System (PALS) was also successfully focused by a spherical Si/Mo multilayer-coated mirror to ablate various materials. Based on the results of the experiments, the etch rates for three different pulse durations are compared using the XUV-ABLATOR code to compensate for the wavelength difference. Comparing the values of etch rates calculated for short pulses with those measured for ultrashort pulses, we can study the influence of pulse duration on XUV ablation efficiency. Ablation efficiencies measured with short pulses at various wavelengths (i.e. 86/46.9/21.2 nm from the above-mentioned lasers and ~ 1 nm from the double stream gas-puff Xe plasma source driven by PALS) show that the wavelength influences the etch rate mainly through the different attenuation lengths.

  4. Nanosecond laser induced ignition thresholds and reaction velocities of energetic bimetallic nanolaminates

    SciTech Connect

    Picard, Yoosuf N.; Yalisove, Steven M.; McDonald, Joel P.; Friedmann, Thomas A.; Adams, David P.

    2008-09-08

    Thresholds for optically igniting self-propagating reactions are quantified for energetic Ni/Ti, Co/Al, and Al/Pt nanolaminates, where smaller enthalpy material pairs required larger laser ignition fluences. The threshold fluences (J/cm{sup 2}) for ignition by 30 ns laser pulses focused to {approx}8 {mu}m spot size varied from 720 to 15 000 J/cm{sup 2} for Ni/Ti, 8.6 to 380 J/cm{sup 2} for Co/Al, and 3.2 to 27 J/cm{sup 2} for Al/Pt. Conversely, smaller enthalpy nanolaminates exhibited reduced steady-state propagation speeds ranging from 0.05 to 0.9 m/s for Ni/Ti, 0.6 to 8.5 m/s for Co/Al, and 24 to 73 m/s for Al/Pt. Increasing the laser spot diameter tenfold reduced the ignition threshold fluence by as much as two orders of magnitude.

  5. Qualification of materials for applications in high fluence lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pryatel, James A.; Gourdin, William H.; Hampton, George J.; Behne, Daniel M.; Meissner, Richard A.

    2007-01-01

    High power laser systems require nearly contamination free optics to maintain desired transport efficiency and to minimize optic damage. The required cleanliness is generally achieved through practices that preclude or remove foreign particle contamination. However, laser optic systems may also be contaminated by vapor-borne contaminants from material outgassing, by particles ablated from surfaces exposed to amplifier or laser light, or by contact with items used in the production and cleaning of optics and components. To minimize such contamination on the optics of the National Ignition Facility (NIF), a rigorous screening test program was introduced. This test program replicates conditions in the beam path as well as conditions during production and cleaning. The former is represented by sol-gel exposure tests and by subjecting materials to amplifier flashlamp light and 1ω laser light. The latter is represented by organic solvent extraction tests and surface contact tests for items that could contact optic surfaces. This paper will discuss the methodology for, and administration of, these tests and present results for selected materials.

  6. Radiofrequency Ablation to Prevent Sudden Cardiac Death

    PubMed Central

    Atoui, Moustapha; Gunda, Sampath; Lakkireddy, Dhanunjaya; Mahapatra, Srijoy

    2015-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation may prevent or treat atrial and ventricular arrhythmias. Since some of these arrhythmias are associated with sudden cardiac death, it has been hypothesized that ablation may prevent sudden death in certain cases. We performed a literature search to better understand under which circumstances ablation may prevent sudden death and found little randomized data demonstrating the long-term effects of ablation. Current literature shows that ablation clearly prevents symptoms of arrhythmia and may reduce the incidence of sudden cardiac death in select patients, although data does not indicate improved mortality. Ongoing clinical trials are needed to better define the role of ablation in preventing sudden cardiac death. PMID:26306130

  7. Neutron fluence vessel assessment in the 1300 MWe NPP French fleet: the FLUOLE program in EOLE

    SciTech Connect

    Blaise, P.; Thiollay, N.; Fougeras, P.; Destouches, C.; Beretz, D.; Pont, T.; Garnier, D.

    2006-07-01

    The Vessel Neutron fluence assessment is a key parameter for vessel embrittlement determination and plant lifetime estimation To validate this parameters, the CEA and its Industrial Partner EdF have decided to launch a devoted experimental program in the EOLE facility of the Cadarache Research Centre The aim of this proposed FLUOLE experimental program (acronym of Fluence in EOLE) is to provide the most accurate neutron propagation measurements in representative PWR neutron spectrum material and geometry in order to enable a reduction of uncertainties on calculated vessel fluence with Monte-Carlo codes such as MCNP or TRIPOLI. (authors)

  8. Review of the Palisades pressure vessel accumulated fluence estimate and of the least squares methodology employed

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, P.J.

    1998-05-01

    This report provides a review of the Palisades submittal to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission requesting endorsement of their accumulated neutron fluence estimates based on a least squares adjustment methodology. This review highlights some minor issues in the applied methodology and provides some recommendations for future work. The overall conclusion is that the Palisades fluence estimation methodology provides a reasonable approach to a {open_quotes}best estimate{close_quotes} of the accumulated pressure vessel neutron fluence and is consistent with the state-of-the-art analysis as detailed in community consensus ASTM standards.

  9. Neutron fluence and energy reproducibility of a 2-dollar TRIGA reactor Pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, Rosara F.; Drader, Jessica A.; Friese, Judah I.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Hines, Corey C.; Metz, Lori A.; Kephart, Jeremy D.; King, Matthew D.; Pierson, Bruce D.; Smith, Jeremy D.; Wall, Donald E.

    2009-10-01

    Washington State University’s 1 MW TRIGA reactor has a long history of utilization for neutron activation analysis (NAA). TRIGA reactors have the ability to pulse, reach supercritical (k>1) for short bursts of time. At this high power and fast time the energy spectrum and neutron fluence are largely uncharacterized. The pulse neutron energy spectrum and fluence were determined by the activation of Cu, Au, Co, Fe, and Ti. These analyses were completed with and without Cd shielding to determine reproducibility between pulses. The applications and implications of the neutron energy and fluence reproducibility to the use of pulsed NAA will be discussed.

  10. Radial fast-neutron fluence gradients during rotating 40Ar/39Ar sample irradiation recorded with metallic fluence monitors and geological age standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutte, Daniel; Pfänder, Jörg A.; Koleška, Michal; Jonckheere, Raymond; Unterricker, Sepp

    2015-01-01

    the neutron-irradiation parameter J is one of the major uncertainties in 40Ar/39Ar dating. The associated uncertainty of the individual J-value for a sample of unknown age depends on the accuracy of the age of the geological standards, the fast-neutron fluence distribution in the reactor, and the distances between standards and samples during irradiation. While it is generally assumed that rotating irradiation evens out radial neutron fluence gradients, we observed axial and radial variations of the J-values in sample irradiations in the rotating channels of two reactors. To quantify them, we included three-dimensionally distributed metallic fast (Ni) and thermal- (Co) neutron fluence monitors in three irradiations and geological age standards in three more. Two irradiations were carried out under Cd shielding in the FRG1 reactor in Geesthacht, Germany, and four without Cd shielding in the LVR-15 reactor in Řež, Czech Republic. The 58Ni(nf,p)58Co activation reaction and γ-spectrometry of the 811 keV peak associated with the subsequent decay of 58Co to 58Fe allow one to calculate the fast-neutron fluence. The fast-neutron fluences at known positions in the irradiation container correlate with the J-values determined by mass-spectrometric 40Ar/39Ar measurements of the geological age standards. Radial neutron fluence gradients are up to 1.8 %/cm in FRG1 and up to 2.2 %/cm in LVR-15; the corresponding axial gradients are up to 5.9 and 2.1 %/cm. We conclude that sample rotation might not always suffice to meet the needs of high-precision dating and gradient monitoring can be crucial.

  11. Current Hot Potatoes in Atrial Fibrillation Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Roten, Laurent; Derval, Nicolas; Pascale, Patrizio; Scherr, Daniel; Komatsu, Yuki; Shah, Ashok; Ramoul, Khaled; Denis, Arnaud; Sacher, Frédéric; Hocini, Mélèze; Haïssaguerre, Michel; Jaïs, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation has evolved to the treatment of choice for patients with drug-resistant and symptomatic AF. Pulmonary vein isolation at the ostial or antral level usually is sufficient for treatment of true paroxysmal AF. For persistent AF ablation, drivers and perpetuators outside of the pulmonary veins are responsible for AF maintenance and have to be targeted to achieve satisfying arrhythmia-free success rate. Both complex fractionated atrial electrogram (CFAE) ablation and linear ablation are added to pulmonary vein isolation for persistent AF ablation. Nevertheless, ablation failure and necessity of repeat ablations are still frequent, especially after persistent AF ablation. Pulmonary vein reconduction is the main reason for arrhythmia recurrence after paroxysmal and to a lesser extent after persistent AF ablation. Failure of persistent AF ablation mostly is a consequence of inadequate trigger ablation, substrate modification or incompletely ablated or reconducting linear lesions. In this review we will discuss these points responsible for AF recurrence after ablation and review current possibilities on how to overcome these limitations. PMID:22920482

  12. Thermal response and ablation characteristics of lightweight ceramic ablators

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, H.K.; Rasky, D.J.; Esfahani, L.

    1994-11-01

    This paper presents the thermal performance and ablation characteristics of the newly developed lightweight ceramic ablators (LCAs) in a supersonic, high-enthalpy convective environment. Lightweight ceramic ablators were recently conceived and developed at NASA Ames using low-density ceramic or carbon fibrous matrices as substrates for main structural support and organic resins as fillers. These LCAs were successfully produced with densities ranging from approximately 0.224 to 1.282 g/cu cm. Several infiltrants with different char yields were used to study the effect on surface recession. Tests were conducted in the NASA Ames arc-jet facilities. Material thermal performance was evaluated at cold-wall heat fluxes from 113.5 to 1634 W/sq cm, and stagnation pressures of 0.018 to 0.331 atm. Conventional ablators such as SLA-561, Avcoat 5026-39HC, MA-25S, and balsa wood were tested at the same heat fluxes for direct comparison. Surface temperature was measured using optical pyrometers, and the recession rates were obtained from the high-speed films. In-depth temperature data were obtained to determine the thermal penetration depths and conductivity. Preliminary results indicated that most LCAs performed comparably to or better than conventional ablators. At low flux levels (less than 454 W/sq cm), the addition of silicon carbide and polymethyl methacrylate significantly improved the ablation performance of silica substrates. The carbon-based LCAs were the most mass-efficient at high flux levels (greater than 454 W/sq cm). 16 refs.

  13. Fragmentation and ablation during entry

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1997-09-01

    This note discusses objects that both fragment and ablate during entry, using the results of previous reports to describe the velocity, pressure, and fragmentation of entering objects. It shows that the mechanisms used there to describe the breakup of non-ablating objects during deceleration remain valid for most ablating objects. It treats coupled fragmentation and ablation during entry, building on earlier models that separately discuss the entry of objects that are hard, whose high heat of ablation permits little erosion, and those who are strong whose strength prevents fragmentation, which are discussed in ``Radiation from Hard Objects,`` ``Deceleration and Radiation of Strong, Hard, Asteroids During Atmospheric Impact,`` and ``Meteor Signature Interpretation.`` This note provides a more detailed treatment of the further breakup and separation of fragments during descent. It replaces the constraint on mass per unit area used earlier to determine the altitude and magnitude of peak power radiation with a detailed analytic solution of deceleration. Model predictions are shown to be in agreement with the key features of numerical calculations of deceleration. The model equations are solved for the altitudes of maximum radiation, which agree with numerical integrations. The model is inverted analytically to infer object size and speed from measurements of peak power and altitude to provide a complete model for the approximate inversion of meteor data.

  14. Laser ablation studies of concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Savina, M.; Xu, Z.; Wang, Y.; Reed, C.; Pellin, M.

    1999-10-20

    Laser ablation was studied as a means of removing radioactive contaminants from the surface and near-surface regions of concrete. The authors present the results of ablation tests on cement and concrete samples using a 1.6 kW pulsed Nd:YAG laser with fiber optic beam delivery. The laser-surface interaction was studied using cement and high density concrete as targets. Ablation efficiency and material removal rates were determined as functions of irradiance and pulse overlap. Doped samples were also ablated to determine the efficiency with which surface contaminants were removed and captured in the effluent. The results show that the cement phase of the material melts and vaporizes, but the aggregate portion (sand and rock) fragments. The effluent consists of both micron-size aerosol particles and chunks of fragmented aggregate material. Laser-induced optical emission spectroscopy was used to analyze the surface during ablation. Analysis of the effluent showed that contaminants such as cesium and strontium were strongly segregated into different regions of the particle size distribution of the aerosol.

  15. Coloring geographical threshold graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Bradonjic, Milan; Percus, Allon; Muller, Tobias

    2008-01-01

    We propose a coloring algorithm for sparse random graphs generated by the geographical threshold graph (GTG) model, a generalization of random geometric graphs (RGG). In a GTG, nodes are distributed in a Euclidean space, and edges are assigned according to a threshold function involving the distance between nodes as well as randomly chosen node weights. The motivation for analyzing this model is that many real networks (e.g., wireless networks, the Internet, etc.) need to be studied by using a 'richer' stochastic model (which in this case includes both a distance between nodes and weights on the nodes). Here, we analyze the GTG coloring algorithm together with the graph's clique number, showing formally that in spite of the differences in structure between GTG and RGG, the asymptotic behavior of the chromatic number is identical: {chi}1n 1n n / 1n n (1 + {omicron}(1)). Finally, we consider the leading corrections to this expression, again using the coloring algorithm and clique number to provide bounds on the chromatic number. We show that the gap between the lower and upper bound is within C 1n n / (1n 1n n){sup 2}, and specify the constant C.

  16. Laser threshold magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeske, Jan; Cole, Jared H.; Greentree, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new type of sensor, which uses diamond containing the optically active nitrogen-vacancy (NV-) centres as a laser medium. The magnetometer can be operated at room-temperature and generates light that can be readily fibre coupled, thereby permitting use in industrial applications and remote sensing. By combining laser pumping with a radio-frequency Rabi-drive field, an external magnetic field changes the fluorescence of the NV- centres. We use this change in fluorescence level to push the laser above threshold, turning it on with an intensity controlled by the external magnetic field, which provides a coherent amplification of the readout signal with very high contrast. This mechanism is qualitatively different from conventional NV--based magnetometers which use fluorescence measurements, based on incoherent photon emission. We term our approach laser threshold magnetometer (LTM). We predict that an NV--based LTM with a volume of 1 mm3 can achieve shot-noise limited dc sensitivity of 1.86 fT /\\sqrt{{{Hz}}} and ac sensitivity of 3.97 fT /\\sqrt{{{Hz}}}.

  17. A novel algorithm for the reconstruction of an entrance beam fluence from treatment exit patient portal dosimetry images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperling, Nicholas Niven

    The problem of determining the in vivo dosimetry for patients undergoing radiation treatment has been an area of interest since the development of the field. Most methods which have found clinical acceptance work by use of a proxy dosimeter, e.g.: glass rods, using radiophotoluminescence; thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD), typically CaF or LiF; Metal Oxide Silicon Field Effect Transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters, using threshold voltage shift; Optically Stimulated Luminescent Dosimeters (OSLD), composed of Carbon doped Aluminum Dioxide crystals; RadioChromic film, using leuko-dye polymers; Silicon Diode dosimeters, typically p-type; and ion chambers. More recent methods employ Electronic Portal Image Devices (EPID), or dosimeter arrays, for entrance or exit beam fluence determination. The difficulty with the proxy in vivo dosimetery methods is the requirement that they be placed at the particular location where the dose is to be determined. This precludes measurements across the entire patient volume. These methods are best suited where the dose at a particular location is required. The more recent methods of in vivo dosimetry make use of detector arrays and reconstruction techniques to determine dose throughout the patient volume. One method uses an array of ion chambers located upstream of the patient. This requires a special hardware device and places an additional attenuator in the beam path, which may not be desirable. A final approach is to use the existing EPID, which is part of most modern linear accelerators, to image the patient using the treatment beam. Methods exist to deconvolve the detector function of the EPID using a series of weighted exponentials. Additionally, this method has been extended to determine in vivo dosimetry. The method developed here employs the use of EPID images and an iterative deconvolution algorithm to reconstruct the impinging primary beam fluence on the patient. This primary fluence may then be employed to determine dose through

  18. A Review of Mitral Isthmus Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Kelvin CK; Betts, Timothy R

    2012-01-01

    Mitral isthmus ablation forms part of the electrophysiologist’s armoury in the catheter ablation treatment of atrial fibrillation. It is well recognised however, that mitral isthmus ablation is technically challenging and incomplete ablation may be pro-arrhythmic, leading some to question its role. This article first reviews the evidence for the use of adjunctive mitral isthmus ablation and its association with the development of macroreentrant perimitral flutter. It then describes the practical techniques of mitral isthmus ablation, with particular emphasis on the assessment of bi-directional mitral isthmus block. The anatomy of the mitral isthmus is also discussed in order to understand the possible obstacles to successful ablation. Finally, novel techniques which may facilitate mitral isthmus ablation are reviewed. PMID:22912536

  19. Femtosecond lasers for machining of transparent, brittle materials: ablative vs. non-ablative femtosecond laser processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendricks, F.; Matylitsky, V. V.

    2016-03-01

    This paper focuses on precision machining of transparent materials by means of ablative and non-ablative femtosecond laser processing. Ablation technology will be compared with a newly developed patent pending non-ablative femtosecond process, ClearShapeTM, using the Spectra-Physics Spirit industrial femtosecond laser.

  20. Ablation with a single micropatterned KrF laser pulse: quantitative evidence of transient liquid microflow driven by the plume pressure gradient at the surface of polyesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisbuch, F.; Tokarev, V. N.; Lazare, S.; Débarre, D.

    A microscopic flow of a transient liquid film produced by KrF laser ablation is evidenced on targets of PET and PEN. Experiments were done by using single pulses of the excimer laser beam micropatterned with the aid of submicron projection optics and grating masks. The samples of various crystalline states, ablated with a grating-forming beam (period Λ=3.7 μm), were precisely measured by atomic force microscopy, in order to evidence any deviation from the ablation behavior predicted by the current theory (combination of ablation curve and beam profile). This was confirmed by comparing various behaviors dependent on the polymer nature (PC, PET and PEN). PC is a normally ablating polymer in the sense that the ablated profile can be predicted with previous theory neglecting liquid-flow effects. This case is called `dry' ablation and PC is used as a reference material. But, for some particular samples like crystalline PET, it is revealed that during ablation a film of transient liquid, composed of various components, which are discussed, can flow under the transient action of the gradient of the pressure of the ablation plume and resolidify at the border of the spot after the end of the pulse. This mechanism is further supported by a hydrodynamics theoretical model in which a laser-induced viscosity drop and the gradient of the plume pressure play an important role. The volume of displaced liquid increases with fluence (0.5 to 2 J/cm2) and satisfactory quantitative agreement is obtained with the present model. The same experiment done on the same PET polymer but prepared in the amorphous state does not show microflow, and such an amorphous sample behaves like the reference PC (`dry' ablation). The reasons for this surprising result are discussed.

  1. Cost-Effectiveness of Catheter Ablation for Rhythm Control of Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Blackhouse, Gord; Assasi, Nazila; Xie, Feng; Gaebel, Kathryn; Campbell, Kaitryn; Healey, Jeff S.; O'Reilly, Daria

    2013-01-01

    Objective. The objective of this study is to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of catheter ablation for rhythm control compared to antiarrhythmic drug (AAD) therapy in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) who have previously failed on an AAD. Methods. An economic model was developed to compare (1) catheter ablation and (2) AAD (amiodarone 200 mg/day). At the end of the initial 12 month phase of the model, patients are classified as being in normal sinus rhythm or with AF, based on data from a meta-analysis. In the 5-year Markov phase of the model, patients are at risk of ischemic stroke each 3-month model cycle. Results. The model estimated that, compared to the AAD strategy, ablation had $8,539 higher costs, 0.033 fewer strokes, and 0.144 more QALYS over the 5-year time horizon. The incremental cost per QALY of ablation compared to AAD was estimated to be $59,194. The probability of ablation being cost-effective for willingness to pay thresholds of $50,000 and $100,000 was estimated to be 0.89 and 0.90, respectively. Conclusion. Based on current evidence, pulmonary vein ablation for treatment of AF is cost-effective if decision makers willingness to pay for a QALY is $59,194 or higher. PMID:24089640

  2. Microwave ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Poggi, Guido; Tosoratti, Nevio; Montagna, Benedetta; Picchi, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    Although surgical resection is still the optimal treatment option for early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients with well compensated cirrhosis, thermal ablation techniques provide a valid non-surgical treatment alternative, thanks to their minimal invasiveness, excellent tolerability and safety profile, proven efficacy in local disease control, virtually unlimited repeatability and cost-effectiveness. Different energy sources are currently employed in clinics as physical agents for percutaneous or intra-surgical thermal ablation of HCC nodules. Among them, radiofrequency (RF) currents are the most used, while microwave ablations (MWA) are becoming increasingly popular. Starting from the 90s’, RF ablation (RFA) rapidly became the standard of care in ablation, especially in the treatment of small HCC nodules; however, RFA exhibits substantial performance limitations in the treatment of large lesions and/or tumors located near major heat sinks. MWA, first introduced in the Far Eastern clinical practice in the 80s’, showing promising results but also severe limitations in the controllability of the emitted field and in the high amount of power employed for the ablation of large tumors, resulting in a poor coagulative performance and a relatively high complication rate, nowadays shows better results both in terms of treatment controllability and of overall coagulative performance, thanks to the improvement of technology. In this review we provide an extensive and detailed overview of the key physical and technical aspects of MWA and of the currently available systems, and we want to discuss the most relevant published data on MWA treatments of HCC nodules in regard to clinical results and to the type and rate of complications, both in absolute terms and in comparison with RFA. PMID:26557950

  3. Surgical Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Ramlawi, Basel; Abu Saleh, Walid K

    2015-01-01

    The Cox-maze procedure for the restoration of normal sinus rhythm, initially developed by Dr. James Cox, underwent several iterations over the years. The main concept consists of creating a series of transmural lesions in the right and left atria that disrupt re-entrant circuits responsible for propagating the abnormal atrial fibrillation rhythm. The left atrial appendage is excluded as a component of the Maze procedure. For the first three iterations of the Cox- maze procedure, these lesions were performed using a surgical cut-and-sew approach that ensured transmurality. The Cox-Maze IV is the most currently accepted iteration. It achieves the same lesion set of the Cox- maze III but uses alternative energy sources to create the transmural lesions, potentially in a minimally invasive approach on the beating heart. High-frequency ultrasound, microwave, and laser energy have all been used with varying success in the past. Today, bipolar radiofrequency heat or cryotherapy cooling are the most accepted sources for creating linear lesions with consistent safety and transmurality. The robust and reliable nature of these energy delivery methods has yielded a success rate reaching 90% freedom from atrial fibrillation at 12 months. Such approaches offer a significant long-term advantage over catheter-based ablation, especially in patients having longstanding, persistent atrial fibrillation with characteristics such as dilated left atrial dimensions, poor ejection fraction, and failed catheter ablation. Based on these improved results, there currently is significant interest in developing a hybrid ablation strategy that incorporates the superior transmural robust lesions of surgical ablation, the reliable stroke prevention potential of epicardial left atrial appendage exclusion, and sophisticated mapping and confirmatory catheter-based ablation technology. Such a minimally invasive hybrid strategy for ablation may lead to the development of multidisciplinary "Afib teams" to

  4. Thermal Ablation of Lung Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sonntag, P. David; Hinshaw, J. Louis; Lubner, Meghan G.; Brace, Christopher L.; Lee, Fred T.

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer death in the United States, accounting for an estimated 29% of cancer deaths in 2009.1 Pneumonectomy or lobectomy with hilar and mediastinal lymph node sampling is the gold standard treatment and offers the best option for cure of stage 1/2 nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC).2 Unfortunately, only 15% of patients present with stage 1/2 disease, and many of these patients do not meet the pulmonary physiologic guidelines for lobar resection.3 In addition to lung cancer, pulmonary metastases are present in 25% to 30% of patients dying from all types of cancer.4 For some patients with oligometastatic pulmonary disease, metastectomy is associated with an improvement in survival.5 External beam radiation traditionally has been offered as the alternative to surgical resection for NSCLC or pulmonary metastatic disease. Unfortunately, the 5-year survival following radiation for stage 1 and 2 NSCLC remains low at 15% to 20%, with local recurrence being the most common mode of failure.6,7 Thermal ablation offers an intriguing therapeutic option to increase local tumor control and survival in patients with early stage NSCLC or with limited metastatic disease from nonlung primaries who are not surgical candidates because of poor cardiopulmonary reserve, anatomic constraints limiting resection, failure of traditional therapies, or refusal of operative approaches. Thermal ablation has been shown to be effective in treating tumors in bone, kidney, and liver.8–11 Most preclinical and clinical trials have focused on demonstrating the feasibility of three modalities for pulmonary thermal ablation, namely radiofrequency (RF) ablation, microwave (MW) ablation, and cryoablation. This article discusses the unique challenges of performing thermal ablation in lung tissue and reviews the current literature regarding RF, MW, and cryoablation in the lung. PMID:21377589

  5. Microwave ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Poggi, Guido; Tosoratti, Nevio; Montagna, Benedetta; Picchi, Chiara

    2015-11-01

    Although surgical resection is still the optimal treatment option for early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients with well compensated cirrhosis, thermal ablation techniques provide a valid non-surgical treatment alternative, thanks to their minimal invasiveness, excellent tolerability and safety profile, proven efficacy in local disease control, virtually unlimited repeatability and cost-effectiveness. Different energy sources are currently employed in clinics as physical agents for percutaneous or intra-surgical thermal ablation of HCC nodules. Among them, radiofrequency (RF) currents are the most used, while microwave ablations (MWA) are becoming increasingly popular. Starting from the 90s', RF ablation (RFA) rapidly became the standard of care in ablation, especially in the treatment of small HCC nodules; however, RFA exhibits substantial performance limitations in the treatment of large lesions and/or tumors located near major heat sinks. MWA, first introduced in the Far Eastern clinical practice in the 80s', showing promising results but also severe limitations in the controllability of the emitted field and in the high amount of power employed for the ablation of large tumors, resulting in a poor coagulative performance and a relatively high complication rate, nowadays shows better results both in terms of treatment controllability and of overall coagulative performance, thanks to the improvement of technology. In this review we provide an extensive and detailed overview of the key physical and technical aspects of MWA and of the currently available systems, and we want to discuss the most relevant published data on MWA treatments of HCC nodules in regard to clinical results and to the type and rate of complications, both in absolute terms and in comparison with RFA. PMID:26557950

  6. Plasma focus ion beam fluence and flux—For various gases

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.; Institute for Plasma Focus Studies, 32 Oakpark Drive, Chadstone 3148; Physics Department, University of Malaya ; Saw, S. H.; Institute for Plasma Focus Studies, 32 Oakpark Drive, Chadstone 3148

    2013-06-15

    A recent paper derived benchmarks for deuteron beam fluence and flux in a plasma focus (PF) [S. Lee and S. H. Saw, Phys. Plasmas 19, 112703 (2012)]. In the present work we start from first principles, derive the flux equation of the ion beam of any gas; link to the Lee Model code and hence compute the ion beam properties of the PF. The results show that, for a given PF, the fluence, flux, ion number and ion current decrease from the lightest to the heaviest gas except for trend-breaking higher values for Ar fluence and flux. The energy fluence, energy flux, power flow, and damage factors are relatively constant from H{sub 2} to N{sub 2} but increase for Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe due to radiative cooling and collapse effects. This paper provides much needed benchmark reference values and scaling trends for ion beams of a PF operated in any gas.

  7. Light fluence normalization in turbid tissues via temporally unmixed multispectral optoacoustic tomography.

    PubMed

    Deán-Ben, X Luís; Stiel, Andre C; Jiang, Yuanyuan; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Westmeyer, Gil G; Razansky, Daniel

    2015-10-15

    Discerning the accurate distribution of chromophores and biomarkers by means of optoacoustic imaging is commonly challenged by the highly heterogeneous excitation light patterns resulting from strong spatial variations of tissue scattering and absorption. Here we used the light-fluence dependent switching kinetics of reversibly switchable fluorescent proteins (RSFPs), in combination with real-time acquisition of volumetric multi-spectral optoacoustic data to correct for the light fluence distribution deep in scattering media. The new approach allows for dynamic fluence correction in time-resolved imaging, e.g., of moving organs, and can be extended to work with a large palette of available synthetic and genetically encoded photochromic substances for multiplexed wavelength-specific fluence normalization. PMID:26469596

  8. Rate of F center formation in sapphire under low-energy low-fluence Ar+ irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epie, E. N.; Wijesundera, D. N.; Tilakaratne, B. P.; Chen, Q. Y.; Chu, W. K.

    2016-03-01

    Ionoluminescence, optical absorption spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry channelling (RBS-C) have been used to study the rate of F center formation with fluence in 170 keV Ar+ irradiated single crystals of α-Al2O3 (sapphire) at room temperature. Implantation fluences range between 1013 cm-2 and 5 ×1014 cm-2. F center density (NF) has been found to display an initial rapid linear increase with Ar+ fluence followed by saturation to a maximum value of 1.74 ×1015 cm-2. Experimental results show a 1-1 correlation between radiation damage in the oxygen sublattice and F center density. This suggest F center kinetics in sapphire under low-energy low-fluence Ar irradiation is a direct consequence of dynamic competition between oxygen defect creation and recombination. An attempt has also been made to extend this discussion to F center kinetics in sapphire under swift heavy ion irradiation.

  9. Pressure-vessel-damage fluence reduction by low-leakage fuel management. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Cokinos, D.; Aronson, A.L.; Carew, J.F.; Kohut, P.; Todosow, M.; Lois, L.

    1983-01-01

    As a result of neutron-induced radiation damage to the pressure vessel and of an increased concern that in a PWR transient the pressure vessel may be subjected to pressurized thermal shock (PTS), detailed analyses have been undertaken to determine the levels of neutron fluence accumulation at the pressure vessels of selected PWR's. In addition, various methods intended to limit vessel damage by reducing the vessel fluence have been investigated. This paper presents results of the fluence analysis and the evaluation of the low-leakage fuel management fluence reduction method. The calculations were performed with DOT-3.5 in an octant of the core/shield/vessel configuration using a 120 x 43 (r, theta) mesh structure.

  10. Oscillatory Threshold Logic

    PubMed Central

    Borresen, Jon; Lynch, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    In the 1940s, the first generation of modern computers used vacuum tube oscillators as their principle components, however, with the development of the transistor, such oscillator based computers quickly became obsolete. As the demand for faster and lower power computers continues, transistors are themselves approaching their theoretical limit and emerging technologies must eventually supersede them. With the development of optical oscillators and Josephson junction technology, we are again presented with the possibility of using oscillators as the basic components of computers, and it is possible that the next generation of computers will be composed almost entirely of oscillatory devices. Here, we demonstrate how coupled threshold oscillators may be used to perform binary logic in a manner entirely consistent with modern computer architectures. We describe a variety of computational circuitry and demonstrate working oscillator models of both computation and memory. PMID:23173034

  11. Transhemangioma Ablation of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Pua, Uei

    2012-12-15

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a well-established treatment modality in the treatment of early hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) [1]. Safe trajectory of the RFA probe is crucial in decreasing collateral tissue damage and unwarranted probe transgression. As a percutaneous technique, however, the trajectory of the needle is sometimes constrained by the available imaging plane. The presence of a hemangioma beside an HCC is uncommon but poses the question of safety related to probe transgression. We hereby describe a case of transhemangioma ablation of a dome HCC.

  12. Tektite ablation - Some confirming calculations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Keefe, J. A., III; Silver, A. D.; Cameron, W. S.; Adams , E. W.; Warmbrod, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    The calculation of tektite ablation has been redone, taking into account transient effects, internal radiation, melting and nonequilibrium vaporization of the glass, and the drag effect of the flanges. It is found that the results confirm the earlier calculations of Chapman and his group and of Adams and his co-workers. The general trend of the results is not sensitive to reasonable changes of the physical parameters. The ablation is predominantly by melting rather than by vaporization at all velocities up to 11 km/sec; this is surprising in view of the lack of detectable melt flow in most tektites. Chemical effects have not been considered.

  13. Ablative Therapies for Barrett's Esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Garman, Katherine S.; Shaheen, Nicholas J.

    2011-01-01

    Barrett's esophagus has gained increased clinical attention because of its association with esophageal adenocarcinoma, a cancer with increasing incidence and poor survival rates. The goals of ablating Barrett's esophagus are to decrease esophageal cancer rates and to improve overall survival and quality of life. Different techniques have been developed and tested for their effectiveness eradicating Barrett's epithelium. This review assesses the literature associated with different ablative techniques. The safety and efficacy of different techniques are discussed. This review concludes with recommendations for the clinician, including specific strategies for patient care decisions for patients with Barrett's esophagus with varying degrees of dysplasia. PMID:21373836

  14. Laser ablation based fuel ignition

    DOEpatents

    Early, J.W.; Lester, C.S.

    1998-06-23

    There is provided a method of fuel/oxidizer ignition comprising: (a) application of laser light to a material surface which is absorptive to the laser radiation; (b) heating of the material surface with the laser light to produce a high temperature ablation plume which emanates from the heated surface as an intensely hot cloud of vaporized surface material; and (c) contacting the fuel/oxidizer mixture with the hot ablation cloud at or near the surface of the material in order to heat the fuel to a temperature sufficient to initiate fuel ignition. 3 figs.

  15. Laser ablation based fuel ignition

    DOEpatents

    Early, James W.; Lester, Charles S.

    1998-01-01

    There is provided a method of fuel/oxidizer ignition comprising: (a) application of laser light to a material surface which is absorptive to the laser radiation; (b) heating of the material surface with the laser light to produce a high temperature ablation plume which emanates from the heated surface as an intensely hot cloud of vaporized surface material; and (c) contacting the fuel/oxidizer mixture with the hot ablation cloud at or near the surface of the material in order to heat the fuel to a temperature sufficient to initiate fuel ignition.

  16. Atrial Fibrillation Ablation and Stroke.

    PubMed

    Aagaard, Philip; Briceno, David; Csanadi, Zoltan; Mohanty, Sanghamitra; Gianni, Carola; Trivedi, Chintan; Nagy-Baló, Edina; Danik, Stephan; Barrett, Conor; Santoro, Francesco; Burkhardt, J David; Sanchez, Javier; Natale, Andrea; Di Biase, Luigi

    2016-05-01

    Catheter ablation has become a widely available and accepted treatment to restore sinus rhythm in atrial fibrillation patients who fail antiarrhythmic drug therapy. Although generally safe, the procedure carries a non-negligible risk of complications, including periprocedural cerebral insults. Uninterrupted anticoagulation, maintenance of an adequate ACT during the procedure, and measures to avoid and detect thrombus build-up on sheaths and atheters during the procedure, appears useful to reduce the risk of embolic events. This is a review of the incidence, mechanisms, impact, and methods to reduce catheter ablation related cerebral insults. PMID:27150179

  17. SWIMRT: a graphical user interface using sliding window algorithm to construct a fluence map machine file.

    PubMed

    Chow, James C L; Grigorov, Grigor N; Yazdani, Nuri

    2006-01-01

    A custom-made computer program, SWIMRT, to construct "multileaf collimator (MLC) machine" file for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) fluence maps was developed using MATLAB and the sliding window algorithm. The user can either import a fluence map with a graphical file format created by an external treatment-planning system such as Pinnacle3 or create his or her own fluence map using the matrix editor in the program. Through comprehensive calibrations of the dose and the dimension of the imported fluence field, the user can use associated image-processing tools such as field resizing and edge trimming to modify the imported map. When the processed fluence map is suitable, a "MLC machine" file is generated for our Varian 21 EX linear accelerator with a 120-leaf Millennium MLC. This machine file is transferred to the MLC console of the LINAC to control the continuous motions of the leaves during beam irradiation. An IMRT field is then irradiated with the 2D intensity profiles, and the irradiated profiles are compared to the imported or modified fluence map. This program was verified and tested using film dosimetry to address the following uncertainties: (1) the mechanical limitation due to the leaf width and maximum traveling speed, and (2) the dosimetric limitation due to the leaf leakage/transmission and penumbra effect. Because the fluence map can be edited, resized, and processed according to the requirement of a study, SWIMRT is essential in studying and investigating the IMRT technique using the sliding window algorithm. Using this program, future work on the algorithm may include redistributing the time space between segmental fields to enhance the fluence resolution, and readjusting the timing of each leaf during delivery to avoid small fields. Possible clinical utilities and examples for SWIMRT are given in this paper. PMID:17533330

  18. Pulsed laser ablation of borax target in vacuum and hydrogen DC glow discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kale, A. N.; Miotello, A.; Mosaner, P.

    2006-09-01

    The aim of our experiment was to produce a material with B sbnd H bonds for applications in hydrogen storage and generation. By using KrF excimer laser ( λ = 248 nm) ablation of borax (Na 2B 4O 7) target, thin films were deposited on KBr and silicon substrates. Ablation was performed both in vacuum and in hydrogen atmosphere. DC glow discharge technique was utilized to enhance hydrogen gas ionization. Experiments were performed using laser fluence from 5 to 20 J/cm 2. Films were deposited under gas pressure of 1 × 10 -5 to 5 × 10 -2 mbar and substrate temperatures of 130-450 °C. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of films showed presence of circular particulates. Film thickness, roughness and particulates number increased with increase in laser fluence. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis shows that sodium content in the particulates is higher than in the target. This effect is discussed in terms of atomic arrangements (both at surface and bulk) in systems where ionic and covalent bonds are present and by looking at the increased surface/bulk ratio of the particulates with respect to the deposited films. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy measurements showed presence of B sbnd O stretching and B sbnd O sbnd B bending bonds. Possible reasons for absence of B sbnd H bonds are attributed to binding enthalpy of the competing molecules.

  19. Characterization of Carbon Plasma Evolution Using Laser Ablation TOF Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Feng, Chunlei; Xiao, Qingmei; Hai, Ran; Ding, Hongbin

    2015-11-01

    In this work, a time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer has been used to investigate the distribution of intermediate species and formation process of carbon clusters. The graphite sample was ablated by Nd:YAG laser (532 nm and 1064 nm). The results indicate that the maximum size distribution shifted towards small cluster ions as the laser fluence increased, which happened because of the fragmentation of larger clusters in the hot plume. The temporal evolution of ions was measured by varying the delay time of the ion extraction pulse with respect to the laser irradiation, which was used to provide distribution information of the species in the ablated plasma plume. When the laser fluence decreased, the yield of all of the clusters obviously dropped. supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (No. 2013GB109005) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11175035), Chinesisch-Deutsches Forschungs Project (GZ768), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China (Nos. DUT12ZD(G)01, DUT14ZD(G)04) and MMLab Research Project (DP1051208)

  20. A Roughness Study of Ytterbium-Doped Potassium Yttrium Tungstate (YB: KYW) Thin-Disk Femtosecond Ablated Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing; Chen, Hu; Ge, Wenqi; Wang, Yongbo; Sun, Yuchun; Wang, Yong; Lü, Peijun

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to evaluate the morphological changes and quantitatively assess the roughness of dentin after the ablation with a Ytterbium-Doped Potassium Yttrium Tungstate (YB: KYW) thin-disk femtosecond pulsed laser of different fluences, scanning speeds and scanning distances. Method: Twelve extracted human premolars were sectioned into crowns and roots along the cementum-enamel junction, and then the crowns were cut longitudinally into sheets about 1.5 mm thick with a cutting machine. The dentin samples were fixed on a stage at focus plane. The laser beam was irradiated onto the samples through a galvanometric scanning system, so rectangular movement could be achieved. After ablation, the samples were examined with a scanning electron microscope and laser three-dimensional profile measurement microscope for morphology and roughness study.With increasing laser fluence, dentin samples exhibited more melting and resolidification of dentin as well as debris-like structure and occluded parts of dentinal tubules. Results: When at the scanning speed of 2400mm/s and scanning distance of 24μm, the surface roughness of dentin ablated with femtosecond pulsed laser decreased significantly and varied between values of dentin surface roughness grinded with two kinds of diamond burs with different grits. When at the scanning speed of 1200mm/s and scanning distance of 12μm, the surface roughness decreased slightly, and the surface roughness of dentin ablated with femtosecond pulsed laser was almost equal to that grinded with a low grit diamond bur. Conclusion: This study showed that increased laser influence may lead to more collateral damage and lower dentin surface roughness, while scanning speed and scanning distance were also negatively correlated with surface roughness. Adequate parameters should be chosen to achieve therapeutic benefits, and different parameters can result in diverse ablation results. PMID:25606337