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Sample records for ablation zone size

  1. Interactive Volumetry Of Liver Ablation Zones.

    PubMed

    Egger, Jan; Busse, Harald; Brandmaier, Philipp; Seider, Daniel; Gawlitza, Matthias; Strocka, Steffen; Voglreiter, Philip; Dokter, Mark; Hofmann, Michael; Kainz, Bernhard; Hann, Alexander; Chen, Xiaojun; Alhonnoro, Tuomas; Pollari, Mika; Schmalstieg, Dieter; Moche, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive technique that destroys cancer cells by heat. The heat results from focusing energy in the radiofrequency spectrum through a needle. Amongst others, this can enable the treatment of patients who are not eligible for an open surgery. However, the possibility of recurrent liver cancer due to incomplete ablation of the tumor makes post-interventional monitoring via regular follow-up scans mandatory. These scans have to be carefully inspected for any conspicuousness. Within this study, the RF ablation zones from twelve post-interventional CT acquisitions have been segmented semi-automatically to support the visual inspection. An interactive, graph-based contouring approach, which prefers spherically shaped regions, has been applied. For the quantitative and qualitative analysis of the algorithm's results, manual slice-by-slice segmentations produced by clinical experts have been used as the gold standard (which have also been compared among each other). As evaluation metric for the statistical validation, the Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) has been calculated. The results show that the proposed tool provides lesion segmentation with sufficient accuracy much faster than manual segmentation. The visual feedback and interactivity make the proposed tool well suitable for the clinical workflow. PMID:26482818

  2. Interactive Volumetry Of Liver Ablation Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egger, Jan; Busse, Harald; Brandmaier, Philipp; Seider, Daniel; Gawlitza, Matthias; Strocka, Steffen; Voglreiter, Philip; Dokter, Mark; Hofmann, Michael; Kainz, Bernhard; Hann, Alexander; Chen, Xiaojun; Alhonnoro, Tuomas; Pollari, Mika; Schmalstieg, Dieter; Moche, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive technique that destroys cancer cells by heat. The heat results from focusing energy in the radiofrequency spectrum through a needle. Amongst others, this can enable the treatment of patients who are not eligible for an open surgery. However, the possibility of recurrent liver cancer due to incomplete ablation of the tumor makes post-interventional monitoring via regular follow-up scans mandatory. These scans have to be carefully inspected for any conspicuousness. Within this study, the RF ablation zones from twelve post-interventional CT acquisitions have been segmented semi-automatically to support the visual inspection. An interactive, graph-based contouring approach, which prefers spherically shaped regions, has been applied. For the quantitative and qualitative analysis of the algorithm’s results, manual slice-by-slice segmentations produced by clinical experts have been used as the gold standard (which have also been compared among each other). As evaluation metric for the statistical validation, the Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) has been calculated. The results show that the proposed tool provides lesion segmentation with sufficient accuracy much faster than manual segmentation. The visual feedback and interactivity make the proposed tool well suitable for the clinical workflow.

  3. Interactive Volumetry Of Liver Ablation Zones

    PubMed Central

    Egger, Jan; Busse, Harald; Brandmaier, Philipp; Seider, Daniel; Gawlitza, Matthias; Strocka, Steffen; Voglreiter, Philip; Dokter, Mark; Hofmann, Michael; Kainz, Bernhard; Hann, Alexander; Chen, Xiaojun; Alhonnoro, Tuomas; Pollari, Mika; Schmalstieg, Dieter; Moche, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive technique that destroys cancer cells by heat. The heat results from focusing energy in the radiofrequency spectrum through a needle. Amongst others, this can enable the treatment of patients who are not eligible for an open surgery. However, the possibility of recurrent liver cancer due to incomplete ablation of the tumor makes post-interventional monitoring via regular follow-up scans mandatory. These scans have to be carefully inspected for any conspicuousness. Within this study, the RF ablation zones from twelve post-interventional CT acquisitions have been segmented semi-automatically to support the visual inspection. An interactive, graph-based contouring approach, which prefers spherically shaped regions, has been applied. For the quantitative and qualitative analysis of the algorithm’s results, manual slice-by-slice segmentations produced by clinical experts have been used as the gold standard (which have also been compared among each other). As evaluation metric for the statistical validation, the Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) has been calculated. The results show that the proposed tool provides lesion segmentation with sufficient accuracy much faster than manual segmentation. The visual feedback and interactivity make the proposed tool well suitable for the clinical workflow. PMID:26482818

  4. Analysis of iodinated contrast delivered during thermal ablation: is material trapped in the ablation zone?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Po-hung; Brace, Chris L.

    2016-08-01

    Intra-procedural contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) has been proposed to evaluate treatment efficacy of thermal ablation. We hypothesized that contrast material delivered concurrently with thermal ablation may become trapped in the ablation zone, and set out to determine whether such an effect would impact ablation visualization. CECT images were acquired during microwave ablation in normal porcine liver with: (A) normal blood perfusion and no iodinated contrast, (B) normal perfusion and iodinated contrast infusion or (C) no blood perfusion and residual iodinated contrast. Changes in CT attenuation were analyzed from before, during and after ablation to evaluate whether contrast was trapped inside of the ablation zone. Visualization was compared between groups using post-ablation contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Attenuation gradients were calculated at the ablation boundary and background to quantitate ablation conspicuity. In Group A, attenuation decreased during ablation due to thermal expansion of tissue water and water vaporization. The ablation zone was difficult to visualize (CNR  =  1.57  ±  0.73, boundary gradient  =  0.7  ±  0.4 HU mm‑1), leading to ablation diameter underestimation compared to gross pathology. Group B ablations saw attenuation increase, suggesting that iodine was trapped inside the ablation zone. However, because the normally perfused liver increased even more, Group B ablations were more visible than Group A (CNR  =  2.04  ±  0.84, boundary gradient  =  6.3  ±  1.1 HU mm‑1) and allowed accurate estimation of the ablation zone dimensions compared to gross pathology. Substantial water vaporization led to substantial attenuation changes in Group C, though the ablation zone boundary was not highly visible (boundary gradient  =  3.9  ±  1.1 HU mm‑1). Our results demonstrate that despite iodinated contrast being trapped in the ablation zone, ablation visibility

  5. Analysis of iodinated contrast delivered during thermal ablation: is material trapped in the ablation zone?

    PubMed

    Wu, Po-Hung; Brace, Chris L

    2016-08-21

    Intra-procedural contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) has been proposed to evaluate treatment efficacy of thermal ablation. We hypothesized that contrast material delivered concurrently with thermal ablation may become trapped in the ablation zone, and set out to determine whether such an effect would impact ablation visualization. CECT images were acquired during microwave ablation in normal porcine liver with: (A) normal blood perfusion and no iodinated contrast, (B) normal perfusion and iodinated contrast infusion or (C) no blood perfusion and residual iodinated contrast. Changes in CT attenuation were analyzed from before, during and after ablation to evaluate whether contrast was trapped inside of the ablation zone. Visualization was compared between groups using post-ablation contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Attenuation gradients were calculated at the ablation boundary and background to quantitate ablation conspicuity. In Group A, attenuation decreased during ablation due to thermal expansion of tissue water and water vaporization. The ablation zone was difficult to visualize (CNR  =  1.57  ±  0.73, boundary gradient  =  0.7  ±  0.4 HU mm(-1)), leading to ablation diameter underestimation compared to gross pathology. Group B ablations saw attenuation increase, suggesting that iodine was trapped inside the ablation zone. However, because the normally perfused liver increased even more, Group B ablations were more visible than Group A (CNR  =  2.04  ±  0.84, boundary gradient  =  6.3  ±  1.1 HU mm(-1)) and allowed accurate estimation of the ablation zone dimensions compared to gross pathology. Substantial water vaporization led to substantial attenuation changes in Group C, though the ablation zone boundary was not highly visible (boundary gradient  =  3.9  ±  1.1 HU mm(-1)). Our results demonstrate that despite iodinated contrast being trapped in the ablation zone, ablation visibility

  6. Microfabrication of Fresnel zone plates by laser induced solid ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Vanessa R. M.; Thomas, John; Santhosh, Chidangil; Ramachandran, Hema; Mathur, Deepak

    2016-07-01

    A novel and simple single-step method of inscribing optical elements on metal-coated transparent substrates is demonstrated. Laser induced solid ablation (LISA) demands very low laser energies (nJ), as can be amply provided by a femtosecond laser oscillator. Here, LISA is used to write Fresnel zone plates on indium and tungsten coated glass. With up to 100 zones, remarkable agreement is obtained between measured and expected values of the focal length. LISA has enabled attainment of focal spot sizes that are 38% smaller than what would be obtained using conventional lenses of the same numerical aperture. The simplicity with which a high degree of automation can readily be achieved using LISA makes this cost-effective method amenable to a wide variety of applications related to microfabrication of optical elements.

  7. GPU-based real-time approximation of the ablation zone for radiofrequency ablation.

    PubMed

    Rieder, Christian; Kröger, Tim; Schumann, Christian; Hahn, Horst K

    2011-12-01

    Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is becoming a standard minimally invasive clinical procedure for the treatment of liver tumors. However, planning the applicator placement such that the malignant tissue is completely destroyed, is a demanding task that requires considerable experience. In this work, we present a fast GPU-based real-time approximation of the ablation zone incorporating the cooling effect of liver vessels. Weighted distance fields of varying RF applicator types are derived from complex numerical simulations to allow a fast estimation of the ablation zone. Furthermore, the heat-sink effect of the cooling blood flow close to the applicator's electrode is estimated by means of a preprocessed thermal equilibrium representation of the liver parenchyma and blood vessels. Utilizing the graphics card, the weighted distance field incorporating the cooling blood flow is calculated using a modular shader framework, which facilitates the real-time visualization of the ablation zone in projected slice views and in volume rendering. The proposed methods are integrated in our software assistant prototype for planning RFA therapy. The software allows the physician to interactively place virtual RF applicator models. The real-time visualization of the corresponding approximated ablation zone facilitates interactive evaluation of the tumor coverage in order to optimize the applicator's placement such that all cancer cells are destroyed by the ablation. PMID:22034298

  8. Excimer laser photorefractive keratectomy with different ablation zones.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Z; Lampé, Z; Békési, L; Berta, A

    1997-01-01

    In this study we would like to introduce the excimer laser, and to demonstrate our results and complications by using different ablation zones during photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) in the correction of myopia and astigmatismus. In 1996 we performed photorefractive keratectomy on 100 myopic eyes of 52 patients (28 females, 24 males). Mean age was 26.21 years (ranged from 19 to 54 years). The preoperative refraction ranged from -1.0 D to -18.0 Diopters. The diameter of the ablation zones were between 5 and 6.5 mm. We evaluated the results and the complications of the surgeries of 100 eyes which were performed with Schwind keratom F excimer laser. After 2 days, 1 week, 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months postoperatively we tested the best uncorrected and corrected visual acuities, and performed intraocular pressure measurement, slit lamp examination as well as corneal topography. The postoperative refractions were between +/- 0.5 to +/- 1.0 Diopters. After six months postoperatively the slit lamp examination showed that 80% of the patients had no corneal haze while 20% had stage I (Hanna) corneal haze. The smaller the diameter of the ablation zone was, the more pronounced the corneal haze and the night-glare were. The photorefractive excimer laser keratectomy is judged to be a safe method, although it might have some side-effects. The different ablation zones of this treatment means an important modification, that not only allows the method to meet the individual requirements, but reduces the chance of the complications as well. Based on the authors' experiences PRK for moderate myopia with large diameter ablation zones appears more predictable than than with smaller ablation zone diameters. PMID:9408312

  9. Interstitial laser-induced thermotherapy of the lung: evaluation of the influence of ablation continuity on ablation size in a swine model

    PubMed Central

    Schoellnast, Helmut; Monette, Sebastien; Ezell, Paula C.; Keene, Andrew; Quehenberger, Franz; Erinjeri, Joseph P.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship between size and the continuity of energy application in interstitial laser-induced thermotherapy. Percutaneous computed tomography-guided laser ablation (30 W, 600 nm diode) of the lung was performed in 7 Yorkshire pigs; a total of 42 ablation zones were created. Twenty ablations were performed using a continuous cycle of 2 min (protocol A) and 22 ablations were performed using 4 intermittent cycles with a duration of 1 min for each cycle interrupted by a 10-s stop between the cycles (protocol B). The lung was harvested immediately after euthanasia for gross pathology and histopathologic evaluation. Statistical analysis was performed using the Student t test and the Spearman correlation coefficient. Laser ablation resulted in complete necrosis of variable size of lung. The mean ablation zone dimensions (±SD) were 1.9 (±0.4) cm × 1.4 (±0.3) cm for protocol A and 2.2 (±0.5) cm × 1.4 (±0.4) cm for protocol B. The size of the necrosis is not significantly different when comparing a continuous 2-min ablation to a 4-cycle intermittent ablation for 1 min each cycle interrupted by a 10-s stop between the cycles (P = 0.98 and 0.53, respectively). PMID:23439016

  10. Microwave ablation at 10.0 GHz achieves comparable ablation zones to 1.9 GHz in ex vivo bovine liver.

    PubMed

    Luyen, Hung; Gao, Fuqiang; Hagness, Susan C; Behdad, Nader

    2014-06-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of using high-frequency microwaves for tissue ablation by comparing the performance of a 10 GHz microwave ablation system with that of a 1.9 GHz system. Two sets of floating sleeve dipole antennas operating at these frequencies were designed and fabricated for use in ex vivo experiments with bovine livers. Combined electromagnetic and transient thermal simulations were conducted to analyze the performance of these antennas. Subsequently, a total of 16 ablation experiments (eight at 1.9 GHz and eight at 10.0 GHz) were conducted at a power level of 42 W for either 5 or 10 min. In all cases, the 1.9 and 10 GHz experiments resulted in comparable ablation zone dimensions. Temperature monitoring probes revealed faster heating rates in the immediate vicinity of the 10.0 GHz antenna compared to the 1.9 GHz antenna, along with a slightly delayed onset of heating farther from the 10 GHz antenna, suggesting that heat conduction plays a greater role at higher microwave frequencies in achieving a comparably sized ablation zone. The results obtained from these experiments agree very well with the combined electromagnetic/thermal simulation results. These simulations and experiments show that using lower frequency microwaves does not offer any significant advantages, in terms of the achievable ablation zones, over using higher frequency microwaves. Indeed, it is demonstrated that high-frequency microwave antennas may be used to create reasonably large ablation zones. Higher frequencies offer the advantage of smaller antenna size, which is expected to lead to less invasive interstitial devices and may possibly lead to the development of more compact multielement arrays with heating properties not available from single-element antennas. PMID:24845280

  11. Sustained Growth of the Ex Vivo Ablation Zones' Critical Short Axis Using Gas-cooled Radiofrequency Applicators

    SciTech Connect

    Rempp, Hansjoerg; Scharpf, Marcus; Voigtlaender, Matthias; Schraml, Christina; Schmidt, Diethard; Fend, Falko; Claussen, Claus D.; Enderle, Markus D.; Pereira, Philippe L.; Clasen, Stephan

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the ablation zones created with a gas-cooled bipolar radiofrequency applicator performed on ex vivo bovine liver tissue. Materials and Methods: A total of 320 ablations with an internally gas-cooled bipolar radiofrequency applicator were performed on fresh ex vivo bovine liver tissue, varying the ablation time (5, 10, 15, and 20 min), power (20, 30, 40, and 50 W), and gas pressure of the CO{sub 2} used for cooling (585, 600, 615, 630, 645 psi), leading to a total of 80 different parameter combinations. Size and shape of the white coagulation zone were assessed. Results: The largest complete ablation zone was achieved after 20 min of implementing 50 W and 645 psi, resulting in a short axis of mean 46 {+-} 1 mm and a long axis of 56 {+-} 2 mm (mean {+-} standard deviation). Short-axis diameters increased between 5 and 20 min of ablation time at 585 psi (increase of the short axis was 45% at 30 W, 29% at 40 W, and 39% at 50 W). This increase was larger at 645 psi (113% at 30 W, 67% at 40 W, and 70% at 50 W). Macroscopic assessment and NADH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) staining revealed incompletely ablated tissue along the needle track in 18 parameter combinations including low-power settings (20 and 30 W) and different cooling levels and ablation times. Conclusion: Gas-cooled radiofrequency applicators increase the short-axis diameter of coagulation in an ex vivo setting if appropriate parameters are selected.

  12. Laser ablation of a platinum target in water. II. Ablation rate and nanoparticle size distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, William T.; Sasaki, Takeshi; Koshizaki, Naoto

    2006-12-01

    This is the second in a series of three papers examining nanomaterial formation in laser ablation in liquids (LAL). Here we study the effect of the laser wavelength and fluence on the mass yield and size distribution of nanoparticles prepared by laser ablation of a platinum target immersed in water. For all wavelengths tested, laser fluences in the range of 10-70 J/cm{sup 2} resulted in spheroidal, nonagglomerated platinum nanoparticles with sizes ranging from 1 to 30 nm. Nanoparticle size distributions are found to be composed of two modes that are attributed to thermal vaporization and explosive boiling mechanisms. The peak of the smaller size mode remains nearly constant at 3 nm for all laser conditions, which is suggested to be due to the strong confinement of the vapor plume by the liquid. The larger size mode peaks in the range of 5-15 nm with a population that is strongly dependent on the laser parameters. It is concluded that changes in the mean size reported in many earlier studies on LAL of metal targets are a result of the relative quantity of nanoparticles from each mechanism rather than direct control over the ablation process. Additionally, it was observed that the yield of platinum nanoparticles was significantly larger for 1064 nm wavelength at fluences greater than 10 J/cm{sup 2}. The maximum ablation rate was approximately 4.4 mg/h, with an estimated ablation and collection efficiency of 0.9 {mu}g/J. Dependence of the mass yield on wavelength and fluence is seen to be dependent primarily on the extent of the explosive mechanism.

  13. Thermal Response and Ablation Programs for TPS Sizing Computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Y. K.; Rasky, Daniel J. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The computer programs developed at NASA Ames Research Center for TPS sizing computation have been applied to many NASA's space missions, such as Mars Pathfinder, StarDust, Mars 2001, DS-II, and Saturn Entry Probe. These computer programs include FIAT (Fully Implicit Ablation and Thermal Response Program, MAT (Multi-component Ablation Thermochemistry Program), TPSX (Thermal Protection Systems Expert & Material Properties Database), and TPSGui (Thermal Protection Systems Graphical User Interface). For most planetary missions, the aerothermodynamics and material response are strongly coupled; thus a closed loop iteration technique between the FIAT and CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) codes has been developed to obtain the high fidelity bench mark TPS sizing solution. The computer codes and predictive methods are presented and discussed in detail.

  14. Particle size dependent chemistry from laser ablation of brass.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunyi; Mao, Xianglei; Mao, Sam S; Greif, Ralph; Russo, Richard E

    2005-10-15

    The proportion of zinc and copper in particles formed by laser ablation of brass was found to vary with the particle diameter. Energy-dispersive X-ray analysis showed that smaller particles were zinc enhanced while larger particles were composed mostly of copper. A model based on condensation of vapor onto large droplets ejected from a melted liquid layer is proposed to describe the change in particle composition versus size. PMID:16223257

  15. Superselective Particle Embolization Enhances Efficacy of Radiofrequency Ablation: Effects of Particle Size and Sequence of Action

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Toshihiro; Isfort, Peter; Braunschweig, Till Westphal, Saskia; Woitok, Anna; Penzkofer, Tobias Bruners, Philipp; Kichikawa, Kimihiko; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas Mahnken, Andreas H.

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the effects of particle size and course of action of superselective bland transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) on the efficacy of radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Methods. Twenty pigs were divided into five groups: group 1a, 40-{mu}m bland TAE before RFA; group 1b, 40-{mu}m bland TAE after RFA; group 2a, 250-{mu}m bland TAE before RFA; group 2b, 250-{mu}m bland TAE after RFA and group 3, RFA alone. A total of 40 treatments were performed with a combined CT and angiography system. The sizes of the treated zones were measured from contrast-enhanced CTs on days 1 and 28. Animals were humanely killed, and the treated zones were examined pathologically. Results. There were no complications during procedures and follow-up. The short-axis diameter of the ablation zone in group 1a (mean {+-} standard deviation, 3.19 {+-} 0.39 cm) was significantly larger than in group 1b (2.44 {+-} 0.52 cm; P = 0.021), group 2a (2.51 {+-} 0.32 cm; P = 0.048), group 2b (2.19 {+-} 0.44 cm; P = 0.02), and group 3 (1.91 {+-} 0.55 cm; P < 0.001). The greatest volume of ablation was achieved by performing embolization with 40-{mu}m particles before RFA (group 1a; 20.97 {+-} 9.65 cm{sup 3}). At histology, 40-{mu}m microspheres were observed to occlude smaller and more distal arteries than 250-{mu}m microspheres. Conclusion. Bland TAE is more effective before RFA than postablation embolization. The use of very small 40-{mu}m microspheres enhances the efficacy of RFA more than the use of larger particles.

  16. Analysis of laser ablation dynamics of CFRP in order to reduce heat affected zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Yuji; Tsukamoto, Masahiro; Nariyama, Tatsuya; Nakai, Kazuki; Matsuoka, Fumihiro; Takahashi, Kenjiro; Masuno, Shinichiro; Ohkubo, Tomomasa; Nakano, Hitoshi

    2014-03-01

    A carbon fiber reinforced plastic [CFRP], which has high strength, light weight and weather resistance, is attractive material applied for automobile, aircraft and so on. The laser processing of CFRP is one of suitable way to machining tool. However, thermal affected zone was formed at the exposure part, since the heat conduction property of the matrix is different from that of carbon fiber. In this paper, we demonstrated that the CFRP plates were cut with UV nanosecond laser to reduce the heat affected zone. The ablation plume and ablation mass were investigated by laser microscope and ultra-high speed camera. Furthermore, the ablation model was constructed by energy balance, and it was confirmed that the ablation rate was 0.028 μg/ pulse in good agreement with the calculation value of 0.03 μg/ pulse.

  17. Slow dynamics of ablated zone observed around the density fluctuation ridge of fluid medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koizumi, Masato; Kulinich, Sergei A.; Shimizu, Yoshiki; Ito, Tsuyohito

    2013-12-01

    In-situ shadowgraph images were recorded to follow and study processes during laser ablation of Sn targets in pressurized carbon dioxide medium. The dynamics of the low-density region with a bubble-like structure forming by ablated Sn in CO2 at different pressures was studied. The lifetime of the region is shown to be pressure-dependent, being the longest near the density fluctuation ridge of the medium, i.e., at 8.8 MPa at 40 °C. The present work is to report on the slower dynamics of ablated zone near the medium density fluctuation maximum, which can be used in nanoparticle synthesis and processing.

  18. Margin Size is an Independent Predictor of Local Tumor Progression After Ablation of Colon Cancer Liver Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xiaodong; Sofocleous, Constantinos T. Erinjeri, Joseph P.; Petre, Elena N.; Gonen, Mithat; Do, Kinh G.; Brown, Karen T.; Covey, Anne M.; Brody, Lynn A.; Alago, William; Thornton, Raymond H.; Kemeny, Nancy E.; Solomon, Stephen B.

    2013-02-15

    This study was designed to evaluate the relationship between the minimal margin size and local tumor progression (LTP) following CT-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of colorectal cancer liver metastases (CLM). An institutional review board-approved, HIPPA-compliant review identified 73 patients with 94 previously untreated CLM that underwent RFA between March 2003 and May 2010, resulting in an ablation zone completely covering the tumor 4-8 weeks after RFA dynamic CT. Comparing the pre- with the post-RFA CT, the minimal margin size was categorized to 0, 1-5, 6-10, and 11-15 mm. Follow-up included CT every 2-4 months. Kaplan-Meier methodology and Cox regression analysis were used to evaluate the effect of the minimal margin size, tumor location, size, and proximity to a vessel on LTP. Forty-five of 94 (47.9 %) CLM progressed locally. Median LTP-free survival (LPFS) was 16 months. Two-year LPFS rates for ablated CLM with minimal margin of 0, 1-5 mm, 6-10 mm, 11-15 mm were 26, 46, 74, and 80 % (p < 0.011). Minimal margin (p = 0.002) and tumor size (p = 0.028) were independent risk factors for LTP. The risk for LTP decreased by 46 % for each 5-mm increase in minimal margin size, whereas each additional 5-mm increase in tumor size increased the risk of LTP by 22 %. An ablation zone with a minimal margin uniformly larger than 5 mm 4-8 weeks postablation CT is associated with the best local tumor control.

  19. Radiofrequency Ablation of Rabbit Liver In Vivo: Effect of the Pringle Maneuver on Pathologic Changes in Liver Surrounding the Ablation Zone

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seung Kwon; Ryu, Jeong-ah; Choi, Dongil; Lee, Won Jae; Lee, Ji Yeon; Lee, Ju Hyun; Sung, Yon Mi; Cho, Eun Yoon; Hong, Seung-Mo; Kim, Jong-Sung

    2004-01-01

    Objective We wished to evaluate the effect of the Pringle maneuver (occlusion of both the hepatic artery and portal vein) on the pathologic changes in the hepatic vessels, bile ducts and liver parenchyma surrounding the ablation zone in rabbit livers. Materials and Methods Radiofrequency (RF) ablation zones were created in the livers of 24 rabbits in vivo by using a 50-W, 480-kHz monopolar RF generator and a 15-gauge expandable electrode with four sharp prongs for 7 mins. The tips of the electrodes were placed in the liver parenchyma near the porta hepatis with the distal 1 cm of their prongs deployed. Radiofrequency ablation was performed in the groups with (n=12 rabbits) and without (n=12 rabbits) the Pringle maneuver. Three animals of each group were sacrificed immediately, three days (the acute phase), seven days (the early subacute phase) and two weeks (the late subacute phase) after RF ablation. The ablation zones were excised and serial pathologic changes in the hepatic vessels, bile ducts and liver parenchyma surrounding the ablation zone were evaluated. Results With the Pringle maneuver, portal vein thrombosis was found in three cases (in the immediate [n=2] and acute phase [n=1]), bile duct dilatation adjacent to the ablation zone was found in one case (in the late subacute phase [n=1]), infarction adjacent to the ablation zone was found in three cases (in the early subacute [n=2] and late subacute [n=1] phases). None of the above changes was found in the livers ablated without the Pringle maneuver. On the microscopic findings, centrilobular congestion, sinusoidal congestion, sinusoidal platelet and neutrophilic adhesion, and hepatocyte vacuolar and ballooning changes in liver ablated with Pringle maneuver showed more significant changes than in those livers ablated without the Pringle maneuver (p < 0.05) Conclusion Radiofrequency ablation with the Pringle maneuver created more severe pathologic changes in the portal vein, bile ducts and liver parenchyma

  20. Grain-size effects on the closure temperature of white mica in a crustal-scale extensional shear zone - Implications of in-situ 40Ar/39Ar laser-ablation of white mica for dating shearing and cooling (Tauern Window, Eastern Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharf, Andreas; Handy, Mark R.; Schmid, Stefan M.; Favaro, Silvia; Sudo, Masafumi; Schuster, Ralf; Hammerschmidt, Konrad

    2016-04-01

    In-situ 40Ar/39Ar laser ablation dating of white-mica grains was performed on samples from the footwall of a crustal-scale extensional fault (Katschberg Normal Fault; KNF) that accommodated eastward orogen-parallel displacement of Alpine orogenic crust in the eastern part of the Tauern Window. This dating yields predominantly cooling ages ranging from 31 to 13 Myr, with most ages clustering between 21 and 17 Myr. Folded white micas that predate the main Katschberg foliation yield, within error, the same ages as white-mica grains that overgrow this foliation. However, the absolute ages of both generations are older at the base (20 Myr) where their grain size is larger (300-500 μm), than at the top and adjacent to the hangingwall (17 Myr) of this shear zone where grain size is smaller (< 100-300 μm). This fining-upward trend of white-mica grain size within the KNF is associated with a reduction of the closure temperature from the base (~ 445 °C) to the top (< 400 °C) and explains the counter-intuitive trend of downward-increasing age of cooling in the footwall. The new data show that rapid cooling within the KNF of the eastern Tauern Window started sometime before 21 Myr according to the 40Ar/39Ar white-mica cooling ages and between 25-21 Myr according to the new Rb/Sr white-mica ages, i.e., shortly after the attainment of the thermal peak in the Tauern Window at ~ 25 Myr ago. These new data, combined with literature data, support earlier cooling in the eastern part of then Tauern Window than in the western part by some 3-5 Myr.

  1. Bimodal albedo distributions in the ablation zone of the southwestern Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moustafa, S. E.; Rennermalm, A. K.; Smith, L. C.; Miller, M. A.; Mioduszewski, J. R.

    2014-09-01

    Surface albedo is a key variable controlling solar radiation absorbed at the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) surface, and thus, meltwater production. Recent decline in surface albedo over the GrIS has been linked to enhanced snow grain metamorphic rates and amplified ice-albedo feedback from atmospheric warming. However, the importance of distinct surface types on ablation zone albedo and meltwater production is still relatively unknown, and excluded in surface mass balance models. In this study, we analyze albedo and ablation rates using in situ and remotely-sensed data. Observations include: (1) a new high-quality in situ spectral albedo dataset collected with an Analytical Spectral Devices (ASD) spectroradiometer measuring at 325-1075 nm, along a 1.25 km transect during three days in June 2013; (2) broadband albedo at two automatic weather stations; and (3) daily MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) albedo (MOD10A1) between 31 May and 30 August. We find that seasonal ablation zone albedos have a bimodal distribution, with two alternate states. This suggests that an abrupt switch from high to low albedo can be triggered by a modest melt event, resulting in amplified surface ablation rates. Our results show that such a shift corresponds to an observed melt rate percent difference increase of 51.6% during peak melt season (between 10-14 and 20-24 July 2013). Furthermore, our findings demonstrate that seasonal changes in GrIS ablation zone albedo are not exclusively a function of a darkening surface from ice crystal growth, but rather are controlled by changes in the fractional coverage of snow, bare ice, and impurity-rich surface types. As the climate continues to warm, regional climate models should consider the seasonal evolution of ice surface types in Greenland's ablation zone to improve projections of mass loss contributions to sea level rise.

  2. Bimodal Albedo Distributions in the Ablation Zone of the Southwestern Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moustafa, S.; Rennermalm, A. K.; Smith, L. C.; Miller, M. A.; Mioduszewski, J.; Koenig, L.

    2014-12-01

    Surface albedo is a key variable controlling solar radiation absorbed at the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) surface, and thus meltwater production. Recent decline in surface albedo over the GrIS has been linked to enhanced snow grain metamorphic rates and amplified ice-albedo feedback from atmospheric warming. However, the importance of distinct surface types on ablation zone albedo and meltwater production is still relatively unknown, and excluded in surface mass balance models. In this study, we analyze albedo and ablation rates (m d-1) using in situ and remotely-sensed data. Observations include: 1) a new high-quality in situ spectral albedo dataset collected with an Analytical Spectral Devices (ASD) spectroradiometer measuring at 325-1075 nm, along a 1.25 km transect during three days in June 2013; 2) broadband albedo at two automatic weather stations; and 3) daily MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) albedo (MOD10A1) between 31 May and 30 August. We find that seasonal ablation zone albedos have a bimodal distribution, with two alternate states. This suggests that an abrupt switch from high to low albedo can be triggered by a modest melt event, resulting in amplified ablation rates. Our results show that such a shift corresponds to an observed melt rate percent difference increase of 51.6% during peak melt season (between 10-14 July and 20-24 July, 2013). Furthermore, our findings demonstrate that seasonal changes in GrIS ablation zone albedo are not exclusively a function of a darkening surface from ice crystal growth, but rather are controlled by changes in the fractional coverage of snow, bare ice, and impurity-rich surface types. As the climate continues to warm, regional climate models should consider the seasonal evolution of ice surface types in Greenland's ablation zone to improve projections of mass loss contributions to sea level rise.

  3. Economic Effects of Increased Control Zone Sizes in Conflict Resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Datta, Koushik

    1998-01-01

    A methodology for estimating the economic effects of different control zone sizes used in conflict resolutions between aircraft is presented in this paper. The methodology is based on estimating the difference in flight times of aircraft with and without the control zone, and converting the difference into a direct operating cost. Using this methodology the effects of increased lateral and vertical control zone sizes are evaluated.

  4. Laser ablation and influence of Debye temperature and laser parameters on size and number of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaezzadeh, Majid; Saeidi, Mohammadreza; Zarei, Mohsen

    2010-03-01

    Dependence of size and number of nanoparticles on kind of material, power of laser and pulse duration of laser in laser ablation is investigated by presenting a model based on Debye model for specific heat capacity. Simulations from the theory demonstrate that there is a critical power of laser which is very important for controlling size of nanoparticles in laser ablation method. The critical power of laser depends on material Debye temperature and pulse duration of laser. Finally difference between experimental diagrams of zinc and carbon is explained by using results of the theory.

  5. The Influence of the Aspheric Profiles for Transition Zone on Optical Performance of Human Eye After Conventional Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, L.

    2014-12-01

    The analysis in the impact of transition zone on the optical performance of human eye after laser refractive surgery is important for improving visual correction technology. By designing the ablation profiles of aspheric transition zone and creating the ablation profile for conventional refractive surgery in optical zone, the influence of aspheric transition zone on residual aberrations was studied. The results indicated that the ablation profiles of transition zone had a significant influence on the residual wavefront aberrations. For a hyperopia correction, the profile #9 shows a larger induced coma and spherical aberration when the translation of the centre of pupil remains constant. However, for a myopia astigmatism correction, the induced coma and spherical aberration in profile #1 shows relatively larger RMS values than those in other profiles. Therefore, the residual higher order aberrations may be decreased by optimizing ablation profiles of transition zone, but they cannot be eliminated. In order to achieve the best visual performance, the design of ablation pattern of transition zone played a crucial role.

  6. Creation of short microwave ablation zones: In Vivo Characterization of single and paired Modified Triaxial Antennas Laboratory Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Lubner, Meghan G.; Ziemlewicz, Tim J; Hinshaw, J. Louis; Lee, Fred T.; Sampson, Lisa J.; Brace, Chris L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To characterize modified triaxial microwave antennas configured to produce short ablation zones. Materials and Methods 50 single- and 27 paired-antenna hepatic ablations were performed in domestic swine (n=11) with 17-gauge, gas-cooled modified triaxial antennas powered at 65W from a 2.45 GHz generator. Single-antenna ablations were performed at 2 (n=16), 5 (n=21), and 10 (n=13) minutes. Paired-antenna ablations were performed at 1-cm and 2-cm spacing for 5 (n=7, n=8) and 10 minutes (n=7, n=5). Mean transverse width, length and aspect ratio of sectioned ablation zones were measured and compared. Results For single antennas, mean ablation zone length was 2.9±0.45, 3.5±0.55 and 4.2±0.40 cm at 2, 5, and 10 minutes respectively. Mean width was 1.8±0.3, 2.0±0.32, 2.5±0.25 cm at 2, 5, and 10 minutes. For paired antennas, mean length at 5 min 1 and 2 cm and 10 min 1 and 2 cm spacing was 4.2±0.9, 4.4±0.9, 4.8±0.5 and 4.3±0.9 cm respectively. Mean width was 3.1±1.0, 4.0±0.8 and 3.8±0.4, 4.2±0.6 cm respectively. Paired-antenna ablations were more spherical (aspect ratios 0.72-0.79 for 5-10 min) than single-antenna ablations (0.57-0.59). For paired-antenna ablations, 1 cm spacing appeared optimal, with improved circularity and decreased clefting compared to 2 cm spacing (circ 1 cm 0.85, 2 cm 0.78). Conclusion Modified triaxial antennas can generate relatively short, spherical ablation zones. Paired-antenna ablations were rounder and larger in transverse dimension compared to single antenna ablations, with 1 cm spacing optimal for confluence of the ablation zone. PMID:25156644

  7. Glaciological characteristics of the ablation zone of Baltoro glacier, Karakoram, Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, C.; Lambrecht, A.; Belò, M.; Smiraglia, C.; Diolaiuti, G.

    Baltoro glacier in the Karakoram, Pakistan, is one of the world's largest valley glaciers. It drains an area of about 1500 km2 and is >60 km long. In 2004 an Italian/German expedition carried out a glaciological field program on the ablation zone of the glacier, focusing on the ablation conditions and the dynamic state of the glacier. As Baltoro glacier is a debris-covered glacier, ice ablation also depends on the debris properties. Stake measurements of ice ablation and debris cover in combination with meteorological data from automatic weather stations close by have been used to determine the local melt conditions. Results from these calculations have been combined with an analysis of different classes of surface cover and information about precipitation, using remote-sensing techniques, in order to calculate mass fluxes for the upper part of Baltoro glacier. The dynamic state of the glacier has been investigated by GPS-based surface velocity measurements along the stake network. A comparison of these short-term measurements during the melt season with surface velocities computed from feature tracking of satellite images shows a high seasonal variability of the ice motion. We have shown that this variability is up to 100% of the annual mean velocity. On the basis of these investigations, the mass fluxes at the Concordia cross-section have been quantified. This approach can now be used together with the ablation calculations to reconstruct the variability of glacier extent and volume in the past using available climate data from the central Karakoram. From the comparison of historical measurements and photographs it is shown that the snout of Baltoro glacier is oscillating back and forth a couple of hundred metres. Otherwise it seems not to react with the same magnitude as other glaciers to the climatic change. Elevation changes at Concordia are a few tens of metres at the most.

  8. An Approximate Ablative Thermal Protection System Sizing Tool for Entry System Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dec, John A.; Braun, Robert D.

    2006-01-01

    A computer tool to perform entry vehicle ablative thermal protection systems sizing has been developed. Two options for calculating the thermal response are incorporated into the tool. One, an industry-standard, high-fidelity ablation and thermal response program was integrated into the tool, making use of simulated trajectory data to calculate its boundary conditions at the ablating surface. Second, an approximate method that uses heat of ablation data to estimate heat shield recession during entry has been coupled to a one-dimensional finite-difference calculation that calculates the in-depth thermal response. The in-depth solution accounts for material decomposition, but does not account for pyrolysis gas energy absorption through the material. Engineering correlations are used to estimate stagnation point convective and radiative heating as a function of time. The sizing tool calculates recovery enthalpy, wall enthalpy, surface pressure, and heat transfer coefficient. Verification of this tool is performed by comparison to past thermal protection system sizings for the Mars Pathfinder and Stardust entry systems and calculations are performed for an Apollo capsule entering the atmosphere at lunar and Mars return speeds.

  9. An Approximate Ablative Thermal Protection System Sizing Tool for Entry System Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dec, John A.; Braun, Robert D.

    2005-01-01

    A computer tool to perform entry vehicle ablative thermal protection systems sizing has been developed. Two options for calculating the thermal response are incorporated into the tool. One, an industry-standard, high-fidelity ablation and thermal response program was integrated into the tool, making use of simulated trajectory data to calculate its boundary conditions at the ablating surface. Second, an approximate method that uses heat of ablation data to estimate heat shield recession during entry has been coupled to a one-dimensional finite-difference calculation that calculates the in-depth thermal response. The in-depth solution accounts for material decomposition, but does not account for pyrolysis gas energy absorption through the material. Engineering correlations are used to estimate stagnation point convective and radiative heating as a function of time. The sizing tool calculates recovery enthalpy, wall enthalpy, surface pressure, and heat transfer coefficient. Verification of this tool is performed by comparison to past thermal protection system sizings for the Mars Pathfinder and Stardust entry systems and calculations are performed for an Apollo capsule entering the atmosphere at lunar and Mars return speeds.

  10. Ultrashort laser ablation of bulk copper targets: Dynamics and size distribution of the generated nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Tsakiris, N.; Gill-Comeau, M.; Lewis, L. J.; Anoop, K. K.; Ausanio, G.; Bruzzese, R.; Amoruso, S.

    2014-06-28

    We address the role of laser pulse fluence on expansion dynamics and size distribution of the nanoparticles produced by irradiating a metallic target with an ultrashort laser pulse in a vacuum, an issue for which contrasting indications are present in the literature. To this end, we have carried out a combined theoretical and experimental analysis of laser ablation of a bulk copper target with ≈50 fs, 800 nm pulses, in an interval of laser fluencies going from few to several times the ablation threshold. On one side, molecular dynamics simulations, with two-temperature model, describe the decomposition of the material through the analysis of the evolution of thermodynamic trajectories in the material phase diagram, and allow estimating the size distribution of the generated nano-aggregates. On the other side, atomic force microscopy of less than one layer nanoparticles deposits on witness plates, and fast imaging of the nanoparticles broadband optical emission provide the corresponding experimental characterization. Both experimental and numerical findings agree on a size distribution characterized by a significant fraction (≈90%) of small nanoparticles, and a residual part (≈10%) spanning over a rather large size interval, evidencing a weak dependence of the nanoparticles sizes on the laser pulse fluence. Numerical and experimental findings show a good degree of consistency, thus suggesting that modeling can realistically support the search for experimental methods leading to an improved control over the generation of nanoparticles by ultrashort laser ablation.

  11. Determination of lesion size by ultrasound during radiofrequency catheter ablation.

    PubMed

    Awad, S; Eick, O

    2003-01-01

    The catheter tip temperature that is used to control the radiofrequency generator output poorly correlates to lesion size. We, therefore, evaluated lesions created in vitro using a B-mode ultrasound imaging device as a potential means to assess lesion generation during RF applications non-invasively. Porcine ventricular tissue was immersed in saline solution at 37 degrees C. The catheter was fixed in a holder and positioned in a parallel orientation to the tissue with an array transducer (7.5 MHz) app. 3 cm above the tissue. Lesions were produced either in a temperature controlled mode with a 4-mm tip catheter with different target temperatures (50, 60, 70 and 80 degrees C, 80 W maximum output) or in a power controlled mode (25, 50 and 75 W, 20 ml/min irrigation flow) using an irrigated tip catheter. Different contact forces (0.5 N, 1.0 N) were tested, and RF was delivered for 60 s. A total of 138 lesions was produced. Out of these, 128 could be identified on the ultrasound image. The lesion depth and volume was on average 4.1 +/- 1.6 mm and 52 +/- 53 mm3 as determined by ultrasound and 3.9 +/- 1.7 mm and 52 +/- 55 mm3 as measured thereafter, respectively. A linear correlation between the lesion size determined by ultrasound and that measured thereafter was demonstrated with a correlation coefficient of r = 0.87 for lesion depth and r = 0.93 for lesion volume. We conclude that lesions can be assessed by B-mode ultrasound imaging. PMID:12910859

  12. A Dual-Slot Microwave Antenna for More Spherical Ablation Zones: Ex Vivo and in Vivo Validation

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Jason; Hynes, Kieran A.; Bedoya, Mariajose

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the performance of a microwave antenna design with two annular slots to that of a monopole antenna design in creating a more spherical ablation zone. Materials and Methods: Animal care and use committee approval was obtained before in vivo experiments were performed. Microwave ablation zones were created by using dual-slot and monopole control antennas for 2, 5, and 10 minutes at 50 and 100 W in ex vivo bovine livers. Dual-slot and monopole antennas were then used to create ablation zones at 100 W for 5 minutes in in vivo porcine livers, which also underwent intraprocedural imaging. Ablation diameter, length, and aspect ratio (diameter ÷ length) were measured at gross pathologic examination and compared at each combination of power and time by using the paired Student t test. A P value less than .05 was considered to indicate a significant difference. Aspect ratios closer to 1 reflected a more spherical ablation zone. Results: The dual-slot antenna created ablation zones with a higher aspect ratio at 50 W for 2 minutes (0.75 vs 0.53, P = .003) and 5 minutes (0.82 vs 0.63, P = .053) than did the monopole antenna in ex vivo liver tissue, although the difference was only significant at 2 minutes. At 100 W, the dual-slot antenna had a significantly higher aspect ratio at 2 minutes (0.52 vs 0.42, P = .002). In vivo studies showed significantly higher aspect ratios at 100 W for 5 minutes (0.63 vs 0.53, respectively, P = .029). Intraprocedural imaging confirmed this characterization, showing higher rates of ablation zone growth and heating primarily at the early stages of the ablation procedure when the dual-slot antenna was used. Conclusion: The dual-slot microwave antenna created a more spherical ablation zone than did the monopole antenna both in vivo and ex vivo liver tissue. Greater control over power delivery can potentially extend the advantages of the dual-slot antenna design to higher power and longer treatment times. © RSNA, 2013 PMID

  13. Self-regulation of basal water pressure across the ablation zone in Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandewal, R.; Smeets, C. J.; Boot, W.; Stoffelen, M.; van Kampen, R.; Doyle, S. H.; Wilhelms, F.; van den Broeke, M. R.; Reijmer, C. H.; Oerlemans, J.; Hubbard, A.

    2013-12-01

    The concept of a positive feedback between ice flow and enhanced melt rates in a warmer climate fuelled the debate regarding the temporal and spatial controls on seasonal ice acceleration. Here we combine runoff data with long-term basal water pressure, and ice velocities. Results indicate that water pressure is controlled by runoff variations forcing continuous adjustments of the hydraulic system. Remarkably, across the upper ablation zone, variations in winter velocities compensate for early summer speed up yielding no evidence for a positive feedback between annual ice velocity and melt rates over the last 21 years. However the extreme melt in summer 2012 provides an indication that the sliding area may extend in a warmer climate yielding a flow acceleration.

  14. Document zone classification using sizes of connected components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jisheng; Phillips, Ihsin T.; Ha, Jaekyu; Haralick, Robert M.

    1996-03-01

    In this paper, we describe a feature based supervised zone classifier using only the knowledge of the widths and the heights of the connected-components within a given zone. The distribution of the widths and the heights of the connected-components is encoded into a n multiplied by m dimensional vector in the decision making. Thus, the computational complexity is in the order of the number of connected-components within the given zone. A binary decision tree is used to assign a zone class on the basis of its feature vector. The training and testing data sets for the algorithm are drawn from the scientific document pages in the UW-I database. The classifier is able to classify each given scientific and technical document zone into one of the eight labels: text of font size 8-12, text of font size 13-18, text of font size 19-36, display math, table, halftone, line drawing, and ruling, in real time. The classifier is able to discriminate text from non-text with an accuracy greater than 97%.

  15. Lesion size estimator of cardiac radiofrequency ablation at different common locations with different tip temperatures.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yu-Chi; Choy, Young Bin; Haemmerich, Dieter; Vorperian, Vicken R; Webster, John G

    2004-10-01

    Finite element method (FEM) analysis has become a common method to analyze the lesion formation during temperature-controlled radiofrequency (RF) cardiac ablation. We present a process of FEM modeling a system including blood, myocardium, and an ablation catheter with a thermistor embedded at the tip. The simulation used a simple proportional-integral (PI) controller to control the entire process operated in temperature-controlled mode. Several factors affect the lesion size such as target temperature, blood flow rate, and application time. We simulated the time response of RF ablation at different locations by using different target temperatures. The applied sites were divided into two groups each with a different convective heat transfer coefficient. The first group was high-flow such as the atrioventricular (AV) node and the atrial aspect of the AV annulus, and the other was low-flow such as beneath the valve or inside the coronary sinus. Results showed the change of lesion depth and lesion width with time, under different conditions. We collected data for all conditions and used it to create a database. We implemented a user-interface, the lesion size estimator, where the user enters set temperature and location. Based on the database, the software estimated lesion dimensions during different applied durations. This software could be used as a first-step predictor to help the electrophysiologist choose treatment parameters. PMID:15490835

  16. Silicon and zinc telluride nanoparticles synthesized by pulsed laser ablation: Size distributions and nanoscale structure

    SciTech Connect

    Lowndes, D.H.; Rouleau, C.M.; Duscher, G.

    1997-08-01

    Size distributions of Si and ZnTe nanoparticles produced by low energy density ArF (193 nm) pulsed laser ablation into ambient gases were measured as a function of the gas pressure and target-substrate separation, D{sub ts}, using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and high resolution scanning electron microscopy (HRSEM). For low energy density (Ed = 1.04 J/cm{sup 2}) ablation of Si into He at pressures of 0.5, 1.5, 4 and 10 torr, large nanoparticles were most numerous at D{sub ts} = 10 mm, with smaller nanoparticles found at 20 mm and 40 mm. For each D{sub ts} value a maximum of the mean nanoparticle diameter occurred for a He pressure near 6 torr, in contrast to other recent measurements in which the size of Si nanoparticles increased monotonically with the He pressure. High resolution Z-contrast transmission electron microscopy (HRZTEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) revealed that ZnTe nanoparticles formed by ablation into nitrogen at E{sub d} = 0.74 J/cm{sup 2} consisted of a crystalline ZnTe core surrounded by an amorphous ZnO shell. Growth defects and surface steps were clearly visible in the ZnTe crystalline core. The dependences of the mean diameter of ZnTe nanocrystals on nitrogen pressure and D{sub ts}, were qualitatively similar to those found for Si in He.

  17. Hepatic radiofrequency ablation with internally cooled probes: effect of coolant temperature on lesion size.

    PubMed

    Haemmerich, Dieter; Chachati, Louay; Wright, Andrew S; Mahvi, David M; Lee, Fred T; Webster, John G

    2003-04-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) ablation is a minimally invasive method for treatment of primary and metastatic liver tumors. One of the currently commercially available devices employs an internally cooled 17-gauge needle probe. Within the probe, cool water is circulated during ablation, which cools tissue close to the probe resulting in larger lesions. We evaluated the effect of different cooling water temperatures on lesion size. We created a finite-element method model, simulated 12 min impedance-controlled ablation and determined temperature distribution for three water temperatures. Lesion diameters in the model were 33.8, 33.4, and 32.8 mm for water temperatures of 5 degrees C, 15 degrees C, and 25 degrees C, respectively. We solved a simplified model geometry analytically and present dependence of lesion diameter on cooling temperature. We further performed ex vivo experiments in fresh bovine liver. We created four lesions for each water temperature, with the same water temperatures as used in the finite-element method (FEM) model. Average lesion diameters were 28.3, 30, and 29.5 mm for water temperatures of 5 degrees C, 15 degrees C, and 25 degrees C, respectively. Water temperature did not have a significant effect on lesion size in the ex vivo experiments (p = 0.76), the FEM model, and the analytical solution. PMID:12723061

  18. Quantification of the effect of electrical and thermal parameters on radiofrequency ablation for concentric tumour model of different sizes.

    PubMed

    Jamil, Muhammad; Ng, E Y K

    2015-07-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has been increasingly used in treating cancer for multitude of situations in various tissue types. To perform the therapy safely and reliably, the effect of critical parameters needs to be known beforehand. Temperature plays an important role in the outcome of the therapy and any uncertainties in temperature assessment can be lethal. This study presents the RFA case of fixed tip temperature where we've analysed the effect of electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity and blood perfusion rate of the tumour and surrounding normal tissue on the radiofrequency ablation. Ablation volume was chosen as the characteristic to be optimised and temperature control was achieved via PID controller. The effect of all 6 parameters each having 3 levels was quantified with minimum number of experiments harnessing the fractional factorial characteristic of Taguchi's orthogonal arrays. It was observed that as the blood perfusion increases the ablation volume decreases. Increasing electrical conductivity of the tumour results in increase of ablation volume whereas increase in normal tissue conductivity tends to decrease the ablation volume and vice versa. Likewise, increasing thermal conductivity of the tumour results in enhanced ablation volume whereas an increase in thermal conductivity of the surrounding normal tissue has a debilitating effect on the ablation volume and vice versa. With increase in the size of the tumour (i.e., 2-3cm) the effect of each parameter is not linear. The parameter effect varies with change in size of the tumour that is manifested by the different gradient observed in ablation volume. Most important is the relative insensitivity of ablation volume to blood perfusion rate for smaller tumour size (2cm) that is also in accordance with the previous results presented in literature. These findings will provide initial insight for safe, reliable and improved treatment planning perceptively. PMID:25965014

  19. Limits on great earthquake size at subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCaffrey, R.

    2012-12-01

    Subduction zones are where the world's greatest earthquakes occur due to the large fault area available to slip. Yet some subduction zones are thought to be immune from these massive events, where quake size is limited by some physical processes or properties. Accordingly, the size of the 2011 Tohoku-oki Mw 9.0 earthquake caught some in the earthquake research community by surprise. The expectations of these massive quakes have been driven in the past by reliance on our short, incomplete history of earthquakes and causal relationships derived from it. The logic applied is that if a great earthquake has not happened in the past, that we know of, one cannot happen in the future. Using the ~100-year global earthquake seismological history, and in some cases extended with geologic observations, relationships between maximum earthquake sizes and other properties of subduction zones are suggested, leading to the notion that some subduction zones, like the Japan Trench, would never produce a magnitude ~9 event. Empirical correlations of earthquake behavior with other subduction parameters can give false positive results when the data are incomplete or incorrect, of small numbers and numerous attributes are examined. Given multi-century return times of the greatest earthquakes, ignorance of those return times and our relatively limited temporal observation span (in most places), I suggest that we cannot yet rule out great earthquakes at any subduction zones. Alternatively, using the length of a subduction zone that is available for slip as the predominant factor in determining maximum earthquake size, we cannot rule out that any subduction zone of a few hundred kilometers or more in length may be capable of producing a magnitude 9 or larger earthquake. Based on this method, the expected maximum size for the Japan Trench was 9.0 (McCaffrey, Geology, p. 263, 2008). The same approach indicates that a M > 9 off Java, with twice the population density as Honshu and much lower

  20. Measurements of the Conduction-Zone Length and Mass Ablation Rate in Cryogenic Direct-Drive Implosions on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, D. T.; Davis, A. K.; Goncharov, V. N.; Sangster, T. C.; Hu, S. X.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Seka, W.; Froula, D. H.

    2015-04-01

    Measurements of the conduction-zone length (110 ±20 μ m at t =2.8 ns ), the averaged mass ablation rate of the deuterated plastic (7.95 ±0.3 μ g /ns ), shell trajectory, and laser absorption are made in direct-drive cryogenic implosions and are used to quantify the electron thermal transport through the conduction zone. Hydrodynamic simulations that use nonlocal thermal transport and cross-beam energy transfer models reproduce these experimental observables. Hydrodynamic simulations that use a time-dependent flux-limited model reproduce the measured shell trajectory and the laser absorption but underestimate the mass ablation rate by ˜10 % and the length of the conduction zone by nearly a factor of 2.

  1. Measurements of the conduction-zone length and mass ablation rate in cryogenic direct-drive implosions on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Michel, D. T.; Davis, A. K.; Goncharov, V. N.; Sangster, T. C.; Hu, S. X.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Seka, W.; Froula, D. H.

    2015-04-14

    Measurements of the conduction-zone length (110 ± 20 μm at t = 2.8 ns), the averaged mass ablation rate of the deuterated plastic (7.95 ± 0.3 μg/ns), shell trajectory, and laser absorption are made in direct-drive cryogenic implosions and are used to quantify the electron thermal transport through the conduction zone. Hydrodynamic simulations that use nonlocal thermal transport and cross-beam energy transfer models reproduce these experimental observables. Hydrodynamic simulations that use a time-dependent flux-limited model reproduce the measured shell trajectory and the laser absorption but underestimate the mass ablation rate by ~10% and the length of the conduction zone by nearly a factor of 2.

  2. Assessment of myocardial lesion size during in vitro radio frequency catheter ablation.

    PubMed

    He, Ding Sheng; Bosnos, Michael; Mays, Mary Z; Marcus, Frank

    2003-06-01

    We report our experience with a system that utilizes changes in several biophysical characteristics of cardiac tissue to determine lesion formation and to estimate lesion size both on and off-line in vitro during radio frequency (RF) energy delivery. We analyzed the reactive and resistive components of tissue impedance and tracked the change of phase angle during RF ablation. We correlated the amount of tissue damage with these and other biophysical parameters and compared them with off-line analysis. We found that there are irreversible changes in the reactive and resistive components of impedance that occurred during tissue ablation. The irreversible changes of these components are greater in magnitude, and correlate better with the size of lesions than that of impedance alone that is currently used. Numerically, the best single on-line and off-line correlation for combined perpendicular and parallel electrode orientation was with phase angle. On-line and off-line capacitance and susceptance correlations were essentially similar suggesting that they may be useful as lesion size predictors, given these parameter's persistent change without temperature sensitivity. This study indicates that it is technically feasible to assess lesion formation using biophysical parameters. PMID:12814243

  3. Endometrial ablation

    MedlinePlus

    Hysteroscopy-endometrial ablation; Laser thermal ablation; Endometrial ablation-radiofrequency; Endometrial ablation-thermal balloon ablation; Rollerball ablation; Hydrothermal ablation; Novasure ablation

  4. Radiofrequency Ablation of Metastatic Pheochromocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesan, Aradhana M.; Locklin, Julia; Lai, Edwin W.; Adams, Karen T.; Fojo, Antonio Tito; Pacak, Karel; Wood, Bradford J.

    2013-01-01

    In the present report on the preliminary safety and effectiveness of radiofrequency (RF) ablation for pheochromocytoma metastases, seven metastases were treated in six patients (mean size, 3.4 cm; range, 2.2–6 cm). α- and β-adrenergic and catecholamine synthesis inhibition and intraprocedural anesthesia monitoring were used. Safety was assessed by recording ablation-related complications. Complete ablation was defined as a lack of enhancement within the ablation zone on follow-up computed tomography. No serious adverse sequelae were observed. Complete ablation was achieved in six of seven metastases (mean follow-up, 12.3 months; range, 2.5–28 months). In conclusion, RF ablation may be safely performed for metastatic pheochromocytoma given careful attention to peri-procedural management. PMID:19875067

  5. Controlled reshaping of the front surface of the cornea through its full-area ablation outside of the optical zone with a Gaussian ArF excimer laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semchishen, A. V.; Semchishen, V. A.

    2014-01-01

    We studied in vitro the response of the topography of the cornea to its full-area laser ablation (the laser beam spot diameter is commensurable with the size of the interface) outside of the central zone with an excimer laser having a Gaussian fluence distribution across the beam. Subject to investigation were the topographically controlled surface changes of the anterior cornea in 60 porcine eyes with a 5 ± 1.25-diopter artificially induced astigmatism, the changes being caused by laser ablation of the stromal collagen in two 3.5-mm-dia. circular areas along the weaker astigmatism axis. Experimental relationships are presented between the actual astigmatism correction and the expected correction for the intact optical zones 1, 2, 3, and 4 mm in diameter. The data for each zone were approximated by the least-squares method with the function d = a + bx. The coefficient b is given with the root-mean-square error. The statistical processing of the data yielded the following results: d = (0.14 ± 0.037)x for the 1-mm-dia. optical zone, (1.10 ± 0.036)x for the 2-mm-dia. optical zone, (1.04 ± 0.020)x for the 3-mm-dia. optical zone, and (0.55 ± 0.04)x for the 4-mm-dia. optical zone. Full astigmatism correction was achieved with ablation effected outside of the 3-mm-dia. optical zone. The surface changes of the cornea are shown to be due not only to the removal of the corneal tissue, but also to the biomechanical topographic response of the cornea to its strain caused by the formation of a dense pseudomembrane in the ablation area.

  6. EFFECT OF PARTICLE DIAMETER ON EXCLUSION-ZONE SIZE

    PubMed Central

    NHAN, D.T.; POLLACK, G.H.

    2011-01-01

    Particles and solutes are excluded from the vicinity of hydrophilic surfaces, leaving large microsphere-free regions known as exclusion zones (EZs). Prior work had indicated that EZs could extend to distances of up to several hundred micrometers from the nucleating surface. These observations were made on large, extended surfaces, leaving open the question whether EZ size might depend on the characteristic dimension of the excluding surface. We placed one or few ion-exchange-resin beads whose diameters varied from 15 μm to 300 μm in cuvettes. The beads were suffused with aqueous microsphere suspensions for observing the surfaces’ exclusionary behavior. Results showed a direct relation between bead size and EZ size over the full range of bead diameter, implying a similar relation for smaller particles or molecules, perhaps extending beyond the resolution of the light microscope. PMID:22389653

  7. Effect of liquid medium on size and shape of nanoparticles prepared by pulsed laser ablation of tin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajaj, Geetika; Soni, R. K.

    2009-11-01

    The effect of the surrounding liquid medium on the size, shape and optical absorption of synthesized nanoparticles prepared by laser ablation of pure tin in different liquids is investigated. The liquid not only confines the ablated species at the liquid-solid interface, but also it acts as a mediator for chemical reaction at the liquid-solid interface. The liquid media surrounding the target is thus an important factor affecting the shape, mean size, size distribution and composition of the particles. The ablation of tin target was carried out in deionized water, ethanol and acetone medium, leading to formation of tin and tin oxide nanoparticles of various sizes and shapes. Electron microscopy and optical absorption were employed for characterization of the particle size, shape and optical properties, respectively. The effect of surfactant was also studied by carrying out ablation in aqueous sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) or cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) solution. It was observed that the average particle size and size distribution are considerably reduced by using surfactant.

  8. The first Earth-sized habitable zone exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barclay, T.; Quintana, E.

    2014-03-01

    The goal of the Kepler mission is the discovery of Earth-sized planets orbiting within the habitable zone (HZ) of their host star. Most HZ planets found to date are gas giants, but a few such as Kepler-62f are potentially rocky despite being larger than Earth. Here we report on the progress being made to identify transiting planets in Kepler data that are truly Earth-sized and unambiguously terrestrial in nature. We consider the structure of the identified systems and deduce likely formation scenarios. We consider whether water delivery to these planets is probable or even possible. The discovery of the first Earth-like planets will be a milestone on the road toward the finding life outside our solar system.

  9. Particle size and energetics of gouge from earthquake rupture zones.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Brent; Dewers, Thomas; Reches, Ze'ev; Brune, James

    2005-04-01

    Grain size reduction and gouge formation are found to be ubiquitous in brittle faults at all scales, and most slip along mature faults is observed to have been localized within gouge zones. This fine-grain gouge is thought to control earthquake instability, and thus understanding its properties is central to an understanding of the earthquake process. Here we show that gouge from the San Andreas fault, California, with approximately 160 km slip, and the rupture zone of a recent earthquake in a South African mine with only approximately 0.4 m slip, display similar characteristics, in that ultrafine grains approach the nanometre scale, gouge surface areas approach 80 m2 g(-1), and grain size distribution is non-fractal. These observations challenge the common perception that gouge texture is fractal and that gouge surface energy is a negligible contributor to the earthquake energy budget. We propose that the observed fine-grain gouge is not related to quasi-static cumulative slip, but is instead formed by dynamic rock pulverization during the propagation of a single earthquake. PMID:15815626

  10. Helicopter-based Photography for use in SfM over the West Greenland Ablation Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mote, T. L.; Tedesco, M.; Astuti, I.; Cotten, D.; Jordan, T.; Rennermalm, A. K.

    2015-12-01

    Results of low-elevation high-resolution aerial photography from a helicopter are reported for a supraglacial watershed in West Greenland. Data were collected at the end of July 2015 over a supraglacial watershed terminating in the Kangerlussuaq region of Greenland and following the Utrecht University K-Transect of meteorological stations. The aerial photography reported here were complementary observations used to support hyperspectral measurements of albedo, discussed in the Greenland Ice sheet hydrology session of this AGU Fall meeting. A compact digital camera was installed inside a pod mounted on the side of the helicopter together with gyroscopes and accelerometers that were used to estimate the relative orientation. Continuous video was collected on 19 and 21 July flights, and frames extracted from the videos are used to create a series of aerial photos. Individual geo-located aerial photos were also taken on a 24 July flight. We demonstrate that by maintaining a constant flight elevation and a near constant ground speed, a helicopter with a mounted camera can produce 3-D structure of the ablation zone of the ice sheet at unprecedented spatial resolution of the order of 5 - 10 cm. By setting the intervalometer on the camera to 2 seconds, the images obtained provide sufficient overlap (>60%) for digital image alignment, even at a flight elevation of ~170m. As a result, very accurate point matching between photographs can be achieved and an extremely dense RGB encoded point cloud can be extracted. Overlapping images provide a series of stereopairs that can be used to create point cloud data consisting of 3 position and 3 color variables, X, Y, Z, R, G, and B. This point cloud is then used to create orthophotos or large scale digital elevation models, thus accurately displaying ice structure. The geo-referenced images provide a ground spatial resolution of approximately 6 cm, permitting analysis of detailed features, such as cryoconite holes, evolving small

  11. Evaluation of the energy transfer in the char zone during ablation. Part 2: In-depth response of ablative composites, volume 1. Ph.D. Thesis, 1975. Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pike, R. W.; Delvalle, E. G.

    1974-01-01

    The decomposition of ablative composites is described along with the transport phenomena of pyrolysis gases which result from the decomposition of these plastics as they flow through the porous char of char-forming ablators. The pyrolysis products are those formed by the thermal degradation of nylon-phenolic resin and silicone elastomer composites. Emphasis is placed on the nature and extent of chemical reactions of the pyrolysis products and the char, along with the energy absorbed by the combined pyrolysis and char zone. Chemical reactions with thermodynamically consistent kinetic data are determined in order to develop a realistic analysis for predicting the thermal performance of ablative heat shields.

  12. Numerical study of the influence of picosecond laser spot size on ablated depth and threshold fluence of metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yiming; Lauer, Benjamin; Neuenschwander, Beat; Romano, Valerio

    2016-03-01

    Picosecond laser systems have been widely used in industrial microprocessing applications since they are a cost-effective tool to achieve high throughput. To better understand the ablation process, firstly the dependence of the ablation depth and the threshold fluence on the laser spot size were determined experimentally by performing ablation with a 10ps pulsed laser system. Further, a 2D axisymmetric model was established to demonstrate the possible mechanism of the phenomena. Three sets of spot radii, namely 15.5μm, 31.5μm and 49.6μm, respectively with equal laser peak fluences ranging from 0.6J/cm2 to 4.5J/cm2 were applied on copper. It was found that the laser ablation depth increases while the threshold fluence decreases with decreasing spot size at identical peak fluence. A 2D axisymmetric thermomechanical model was developed to qualitatively illustrate the mechanism behind these phenomena. The numerical results of the position where the tensile stress exceed to ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of copper show the same trend as the experimental ones. The longitudinal tensile stress was seen to play a more crucial role than the radial tensile/compressive stress on laser ablation process. The impact of the thermal stress on the ablation depth and threshold fluence is derived from the lattice temperature gradient along the surface of the material, leading to spallation and possible modifications of the mechanical properties already at lower laser peak fluences. This is elucidated numerically and analytically. The deviation of the experimental results from the simulation might be attributed to the fact that this simulation model is static. Nevertheless, at low laser fluences, this static approach can provide good explanations of the cold ablation with ultrashort pulsed laser. The limitation of this model is also illustrated.

  13. The role of cyclic plastic zone size on fatigue crack growth behavior in high strength steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korda, Akhmad A.; Miyashita, Y.; Mutoh, Y.

    2015-09-01

    The role of cyclic plastic zone in front of the crack tip was studied in high strength steels. Estimated plastic zone size would be compared with actual observation. Strain controlled fatigue tests of the steels were carried out to obtain cyclic stress-strain curves for plastic zone estimation. Observations of plastic zone were carried out using in situ SEM fatigue crack growth tests under a constant-ΔK. Hard microstructures in structural steels showed to inhibit the extent of plastic deformation around the crack tip. The rate of crack growth can be correlated with the size of plastic zone. The smaller the plastic zone size, the slower the fatigue crack growth.

  14. Subpixel variability of MODIS albedo retrievals and its importance for ice sheet surface melting in southwestern Greenland's ablation zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moustafa, S.; Rennermalm, A. K.; Roman, M. O.; Koenig, L.; Smith, L. C.; Schaaf, C.; Wang, Z.; Mioduszewski, J.

    2013-12-01

    On the Greenland ice sheet, albedo declined across 70% of its surface since 2000, with the greatest reduction in the lower 600 m of the southwestern ablation zone. Because albedo plays a prominent role in the ice sheet surface energy balance, its decline has resulted in near doubling of meltwater production. To characterize ice sheet albedo, Moderate Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) surface albedo products are typically used. However, it is unclear how the spatial variability of albedo within a MODIS pixel influences surface melting and whether it can be considered a linear function of albedo. In this study, high spatiotemporal resolution measurements of spectral albedo and ice sheet surface ablation were collected along a ~ 1.3 km transect during June 2013 within the Akuliarusiarsuup Kuua (AK) River watershed in southwest Greenland. Spectral measurements were made at 325-1075 nm using a Analytical Spectral Devices (ASD) spectroradiometer, fitted with a Remote Cosine Receptor (RCR). In situ albedo measurements are compared with the daily MODIS albedo product (MCD43A) to analyze how space, time, surface heterogeneity, atmospheric conditions, and solar zenith angle geometry govern albedo at different scales. Finally, analysis of sub-pixel albedo and ablation reveal its importance on meltwater production in the lower parts of the ice sheet margin.

  15. Seasonal changes of ice surface characteristics and productivity in the ablation zone of the Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandler, D. M.; Alcock, J. D.; Wadham, J. L.; Mackie, S. L.; Telling, J.

    2015-03-01

    Field and remote sensing observations in the ablation zone of the Greenland Ice Sheet have revealed a diverse range of ice surface characteristics, primarily reflecting the variable distribution of fine debris (cryoconite). This debris reduces the surface albedo and is therefore an important control on melt rates and ice sheet mass balance. Meanwhile, studies of ice sheet surface biological processes have found active microbial communities associated with the cryoconite debris, which may themselves modify the cryoconite distribution. Due to the considerable difficulties involved with collecting ground-based observations of the ice surface, our knowledge of the physical and biological surface processes, and their links, remains very limited. Here we present data collected at a field camp established in the ice sheet ablation zone at 67° N, occupied for almost the entire melt season (26 May-10 August 2012), with the aim of gaining a much more detailed understanding of the physical and biological processes occurring on the ice surface. These data sets include quadrat surveys of surface type, measurements of ice surface ablation, and in situ biological oxygen demand incubations to quantify microbial activity. In addition, albedo at the site was retrieved from AVHRR (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer) remote sensing data. Observations of the areal coverage of different surface types revealed a rapid change from complete snow cover to the "summer" (summer study period) ice surface of patchy debris ("dirty ice") and cryoconite holes. There was significant correlation between surface albedo, cryoconite hole coverage and surface productivity during the melt season, but microbial activity in "dirty ice" was not correlated with albedo and varied widely throughout the season. While this link suggests the potential for a remote-sensing approach to monitoring cryoconite hole biological processes, very wide seasonal and spatial variability in net surface productivity

  16. Seasonal changes of ice surface characteristics and productivity in the ablation zone of the Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandler, D. M.; Alcock, J. D.; Wadham, J. L.; Mackie, S. L.; Telling, J.

    2014-02-01

    Field and remote sensing observations in the ablation zone of the Greenland Ice Sheet have revealed a diverse range of ice surface characteristics, primarily reflecting the variable distribution of fine debris (cryoconite). This debris reduces the surface albedo and is therefore an important control on melt rates and ice sheet mass balance. Meanwhile, studies of ice sheet surface biological processes have found active microbial communities associated with the cryoconite debris, which may themselves modify the cryoconite distribution. Due to the considerable difficulties involved with collecting ground-based observations of the ice surface, our knowledge of the physical and biological surface processes, and their links, remains very limited. Here we present data collected at a field camp established in the ice sheet ablation zone at 67° N, occupied for almost the entire melt season (26 May-10 August 2012), with the aim of gaining a much more detailed understanding of the physical and biological processes occurring on the ice surface. These data sets include quadrat surveys of surface type, measurements of ice surface ablation, and in-situ biological oxygen demand incubations to quantify microbial activity. In addition, albedo at the site was retrieved from AVHRR remote sensing data. Observations of the areal coverage of different surface types revealed a rapid change from complete snow cover to the "summer" ice surface of patchy debris ("dirty ice") and cryoconite holes. There was significant correlation between surface albedo, cryoconite hole coverage and cryoconite hole productivity during the main melt season, but microbial activity in "dirty ice" was not correlated with albedo and varied widely throughout the season. While this link suggests the potential for a remote-sensing approach to monitoring cryoconite hole biological processes, very wide seasonal and spatial variability in net surface productivity demonstrates the need for caution when extrapolating

  17. The Annual Glaciohydrology Cycle in the Ablation Zone of the Greenland Ice Sheet: Part 1. Hydrology Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colgan, William; Rajaram, Harihar; Anderson, Robert; Steffen. Konrad; Phillips, Thomas; Zwally, H. Jay; Abdalati, Waleed

    2012-01-01

    We apply a novel one-dimensional glacier hydrology model that calculates hydraulic head to the tidewater-terminating Sermeq Avannarleq flowline of the Greenland ice sheet. Within a plausible parameter space, the model achieves a quasi-steady-state annual cycle in which hydraulic head oscillates close to flotation throughout the ablation zone. Flotation is briefly achieved during the summer melt season along a approx.17 km stretch of the approx.50 km of flowline within the ablation zone. Beneath the majority of the flowline, subglacial conduit storage closes (i.e. obtains minimum radius) during the winter and opens (i.e. obtains maximum radius) during the summer. Along certain stretches of the flowline, the model predicts that subglacial conduit storage remains open throughout the year. A calculated mean glacier water residence time of approx.2.2 years implies that significant amounts of water are stored in the glacier throughout the year. We interpret this residence time as being indicative of the timescale over which the glacier hydrologic system is capable of adjusting to external surface meltwater forcings. Based on in situ ice velocity observations, we suggest that the summer speed-up event generally corresponds to conditions of increasing hydraulic head during inefficient subglacial drainage. Conversely, the slowdown during fall generally corresponds to conditions of decreasing hydraulic head during efficient subglacial drainage.

  18. Scalable screen-size enlargement by multi-channel viewing-zone scanning holography.

    PubMed

    Takaki, Yasuhiro; Nakaoka, Mitsuki

    2016-08-01

    Viewing-zone scanning holographic displays can enlarge both the screen size and the viewing zone. However, limitations exist in the screen size enlargement process even if the viewing zone is effectively enlarged. This study proposes a multi-channel viewing-zone scanning holographic display comprising multiple projection systems and a planar scanner to enable the scalable enlargement of the screen size. Each projection system produces an enlarged image of the screen of a MEMS spatial light modulator. The multiple enlarged images produced by the multiple projection systems are seamlessly tiled on the planar scanner. This screen size enlargement process reduces the viewing zones of the projection systems, which are horizontally scanned by the planar scanner comprising a rotating off-axis lens and a vertical diffuser to enlarge the viewing zone. A screen size of 7.4 in. and a viewing-zone angle of 43.0° are demonstrated. PMID:27505840

  19. Design and evaluation of an oxidant-fuel-ratio-zoned rocket injector for high performance and ablative engine compatibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, J. M.; Pavli, A. J.; Shinn, A. M., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A method for temperature control of the combustion gases in the peripheral zone of a rocket combustor which would reduce ablative throat erosion, prevent melting of zirconia throat inserts, and maintain high combustion performance is discussed. Included are techniques for analyzing and predicting zoned injector performance, as well as the philosophy and method for accomplishing an optimum compromise between high performance and reduced effective gas temperature. The experimental work was done with a 1000-lbf rocket engine which used as propellants N2O4 and a blend of 50-percent N2H4 and 50-percent UDMH at 100-psia chamber pressure and an overall O/F of 2.0. The method selected to provide temperature control was to use 30 percent of the propellant to form a peripheral zone of combustion gases at an O/F of 1.31 and 2700 K. The remaining 70 percent of the propellant in the core was at an O/F of 2.45 to keep the overall O/F at 2.0.

  20. Investigation of the particle size distribution of the ejected material generated during the single femtosecond laser pulse ablation of aluminium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Han; Zhang, Nan; Zhu, Xiaonong

    2014-10-01

    Single femtosecond laser pulses are employed to ablate an aluminium target in vacuum, and the particle size distribution of the ablated material deposited on a mica substrate is examined with atomic force microscopy (AFM). The recorded AFM images show that these particles have a mean radius of several tens of nanometres. It is also determined that the mean radius of these deposited nanoparticles increases when the laser fluence at the aluminium target increases from 0.44 J/cm2 to 0.63 J/cm2. The mechanism of the laser-induced nanoparticle generation is thought to be photomechanical tensile stress relaxation. Raman spectroscopy measurements confirm that the nanoparticles thus produced have the same structure as the bulk aluminium.

  1. Silver-silver oxide core-shell nanoparticles by femtosecond laser ablation: core and shell sizing by extinction spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schinca, D. C.; Scaffardi, L. B.; Videla, F. A.; Torchia, G. A.; Moreno, P.; Roso, L.

    2009-11-01

    The generation of small silver metal nanoparticles (Nps) by ultrashort pulsed laser ablation has been an active area of research in recent years due to their interest in several fields of applied research such as biotechnology and material research, in particular those with sizes smaller than 10 nm. In general, laser ablation tends to produce environmentally clean metal Nps compared with wet chemical methods. However, since silver may be oxidized in the presence of water or ethanol, core-shell silver-silver oxide (Ag-Ag2O) Nps can be formed, whose size and thickness must be determined and characterized for functionalization related to future applications. This work analyses the size characteristics of core-shell Ag-Ag2O colloid nanostructures (smaller than 10 nm) obtained by femtosecond laser ablation of solid silver targets in different liquid media (water or ethanol) through the study of their optical extinction spectra. A fit of full experimental spectrum using Mie theory allows the determination of core size and shell thickness distributions as a function of fluence. The red-shift of the plasmon peak wavelength with respect to the bare-core peak wavelength at 400 nm, produced by the oxide shell, may be easily measured even for very small thicknesses. It was found that the dominant Ag2O effective thickness is inversely proportional to the fluence, reaching a maximum of 0.2 nm for a fluence of 60 J cm-2 and a minimum of 0.04 nm for a fluence of 1000 J cm-2.

  2. In situ diagnostic of the size distribution of nanoparticles generated by ultrashort pulsed laser ablation in vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Bourquard, Florent; Loir, Anne-Sophie; Donnet, Christophe; Garrelie, Florence

    2014-03-10

    We aim to characterize the size distribution of nanoparticles located in the ablation plume produced by femtosecond laser interaction. The proposed method relies on the use of white-light extinction spectroscopy setup assisted by ultrafast intensified temporal gating. This method allows measurement of optical absorbance of a nickel nanoparticles cloud. Simulation of the extinction section of nickel nanoparticles size distributions has been developed in order to compare the measured optical absorbance to the optical extinction by theoretical and experimental nanoparticles size distributions (measured by scanning electron microscopy). A good agreement has been found between the in situ measured optical absorbance and the optical extinction cross section calculated from ex situ nanoparticles size distribution measurements.

  3. Comparison of ablation defect on MR imaging with computer simulation estimated treatment zone following irreversible electroporation of patient prostate.

    PubMed

    Srimathveeravalli, Govindarajan; Cornelis, Francois; Mashni, Joseph; Takaki, Haruyuki; Durack, Jeremy C; Solomon, Stephen B; Coleman, Jonathan A

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether patient specific numerical simulations of irreversible electroporation (IRE) of the prostate correlates with the treatment effect seen on follow-up MR imaging. Computer models were created using intra-operative US images, post-treatment follow-up MR images and clinical data from six patients receiving IRE. Isoelectric contours drawn using simulation results were compared with MR imaging to estimate the energy threshold separating treated and untreated tissue. Simulation estimates of injury to the neurovascular bundle and rectum were compared with clinical follow-up and patient reported outcomes. At the electric field strength of 700 V/cm, simulation estimated electric field distribution was not different from the ablation defect seen on follow-up MR imaging (p = 0.43). Simulation predicted cross sectional area of treatment (mean 532.33 ± 142.32 mm(2)) corresponded well with the treatment zone seen on MR imaging (mean 540.16 ± 237.13 mm(2)). Simulation results did not suggest injury to the rectum or neurovascular bundle, matching clinical follow-up at 3 months. Computer simulation estimated zone of irreversible electroporation in the prostate at 700 V/cm was comparable to measurements made on follow-up MR imaging. Numerical simulation may aid treatment planning for irreversible electroporation of the prostate in patients. PMID:27026913

  4. Microwave Ablation of Hepatic Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Lubner, Meghan G.; Brace, Christopher L.; Ziemlewicz, Tim J.; Hinshaw, J. Louis; Lee, Fred T.

    2013-01-01

    Microwave ablation is an extremely promising heat-based thermal ablation modality that has particular applicability in treating hepatic malignancies. Microwaves can generate very high temperatures in very short time periods, potentially leading to improved treatment efficiency and larger ablation zones. As the available technology continues to improve, microwave ablation is emerging as a valuable alternative to radiofrequency ablation in the treatment of hepatic malignancies. This article reviews the current state of microwave ablation including technical and clinical considerations. PMID:24436518

  5. Radiofrequency ablation of porcine liver in vivo: effects of blood flow and treatment time on lesion size.

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, E J; Scudamore, C H; Owen, D A; Nagy, A G; Buczkowski, A K

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine, in vivo, the effect of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) treatment time and tissue blood flow on the size and shape of the resulting necrotic lesion in porcine liver. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Radiofrequency ablation is an electrosurgical technique that uses a high frequency alternating current to heat tissues to the point of desiccation (thermal coagulation). Radiofrequency ablation is well established as the treatment of choice for many symptomatic cardiac arrhythmias because of its ability to create localized necrotic lesions in the cardiac conducting system. Until recently, a major limitation of RFA was the small lesion size created by this technique. Development of bipolar and multiple-electrode RFA probes has enabled the creation of larger lesions and therefore has expanded the potential clinical applications of RFA, which includes the treatment of liver tumors. A basic understanding of factors that influence RFA lesion size in vivo is critical to the success of this treatment modality. The optimal RFA technique, which maximizes liver lesion size, has yet to be determined. Theoretically, lesion size varies directly with time of application of the RF current, and inversely with blood flow, but these relationships have not been previously studied in the liver. METHODS: Six animals underwent hepatic RFA (460 kHz), for 5, 7.5, 10, 12.5, 15, and 20 minutes. Identical, predetermined anatomic areas of the liver were ablated in each animal. Two additional animals underwent 12 RFA treatments -- 6 with vascular inflow occlusion (Pringle maneuver) and 6 with uninterrupted hepatic blood flow. Animals were euthanized and the livers were removed for gross pathologic examination. All lesions were measured in three dimensions and photographed. Tissues were examined by routine histology and by histochemistry to determine viability. RESULTS: Increasing duration of RFA application from 5 through 20 minutes did not create lesions of larger diameter, but this

  6. Effect of inter-pulse delay time on production and size properties of colloidal nanoparticles prepared by collinear double-pulse laser ablation in liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fattahi, Behzad; Mahdieh, Mohammah Hossein

    2016-08-01

    The influence of inter-pulse delay times (0–20 ns) between two collinear sequential nanosecond pulses on the production and size properties (mean size and size distribution) of colloidal nanoparticles prepared by pulsed laser ablation of a silver target in a distilled water medium has been studied. Various laser fluences at different inter-pulse delay times between two collinear pulses were used. Furthermore, for a better understanding of the effect of the double-pulse and single-pulse mode, experiments were performed. The characterization of the synthesized colloidal nanoparticles was investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and UV–vis absorption spectroscopy. Our results showed that 5 ns time-delayed double-pulse laser ablation results in the production of nanoparticles with the highest concentration among the other time-delayed ablation experiments and even more than single-pulse-mode experiments. It also found that using a double-pulse approach with inter-pulse delay times in the range of 0–20 ns leads to the production of nanoparticles with smaller mean sizes and narrower size distributions in comparison to single-pulse-mode laser ablation. The effect of time overlapping between two pulses in the case of double-pulse ablation was analyzed.

  7. Grain size in lithospheric-scale shear zones: Chicken or Egg?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thielmann, M.; Rozel, A.; Kaus, B. J. P.; Ricard, Y.

    2012-04-01

    Lithospheric-scale shear zones are commonly defined as regions inhomogeneous and localized deformation. Strain softening has been demonstrated to be necessary for localization in those shear zones, but there is still debate about the physical cause of this softening. As natural shear zones typically have a significantly reduced grain size, it has been proposed that grain size reduction provides the necessary strain softening to localize deformation. As grain size reduces, the dominant deformation mechanism switches from dislocation to diffusion creep, thus requiring less stress to deform the rock. Until recently, the equilibrium grain size has been thought to follow a piezometric relationship, thus indicating the stress under which a shear zone deformed. More recent work (Austin and Evans (2007), Rozel et. al. (2011)) suggests that the equilibrium grain size is not dependent on stress, but rather on the deformational work. Using this relationship, we use numerical models to investigate the effect of grain size evolution on lithospheric deformation. We focus on the question if grain size provides sufficient weakening to effectively localize deformation under lithospheric conditions or if it's effect is rather passive and as such a marker for the deformational work done in a shear zone. We then compare the localization potential of grain size reduction to shear heating and investigate the interplay between the two weakening mechanisms.

  8. Size properties of colloidal nanoparticles produced by nanosecond pulsed laser ablation and studying the effects of liquid medium and laser fluence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdieh, Mohammad Hossein; Fattahi, Behzad

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, pulsed laser ablation method was used for synthesis of colloidal nanoparticles of aluminum and titanium targets in distilled water, ethanol, and acetone as liquid environments. Ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) absorption spectrophotometer and scanning electron microscope (SEM) were used for characterization of produced nanoparticles. Using image processing technique and analyzing the SEM images, nanoparticles' mean size and size distribution were achieved. The results show that liquid medium has strong effect on size properties of produced nanoparticles. From the results, it was found that ablation of both metal targets in ethanol medium leads to formation of smaller size nanoparticles with narrower size distributions. The influence of laser fluence was also investigated. According to the results, higher laser fluence produces larger mean size nanoparticles with broader size distribution.

  9. Radiofrequency Ablation of Colorectal Liver Metastases: Small Size Favorably Predicts Technique Effectiveness and Survival

    SciTech Connect

    Veltri, Andrea Sacchetto, Paola; Tosetti, Irene; Pagano, Eva; Fava, Cesare; Gandini, Giovanni

    2008-09-15

    The objective of this study was to analyze long-term results of radiofrequency thermal ablation (RFA) for colorectal metastases (MTS), in order to evaluate predictors for adverse events, technique effectiveness, and survival. One hundred ninety-nine nonresectable MTS (0.5-8 cm; mean, 2.9 cm) in 122 patients underwent a total of 166 RFA sessions, percutaneously or during surgery. The technique was 'simple' or 'combined' with vascular occlusion. The mean follow-up time was 24.2 months. Complications, technique effectiveness, and survival rates were statistically analyzed. Adverse events occurred in 8.1% of lesions (major complication rate: 1.1%), 7.1% with simple and 16.7% with combined technique (p = 0.15). Early complete response was obtained in 151 lesions (81.2%), but 49 lesions (26.3%) recurred locally after a mean of 10.4 months. Sustained complete ablation was achieved in 66.7% of lesions {<=}3 cm versus 33.3% of lesions >3 cm (p < 0.0001). Survival rates at 1, 3, and 5 years were 91%, 54%, and 33%, respectively, from the diagnosis of MTS and 79%, 38%, and 22%, respectively, from RFA. Mean survival time from RFA was 31.5 months, 36.2 in patients with main MTS {<=}3 cm and 23.2 in those with at least one lesion >3 cm (p = 0.006). We conclude that 'simple' RFA is safe and successful for MTS {<=}3 cm, contributing to prolong survival when patients can be completely treated.

  10. Local recurrence of small cell lung cancer following radiofrequency ablation is induced by HIF-1α expression in the transition zone

    PubMed Central

    WAN, JUN; WU, WEI; ZHANG, RENQUAN

    2016-01-01

    Local recurrence of lung cancer following radiofrequency ablation (RFA) treatment is common. The aims of the present study were to assess how RFA treatment affects the growth of small cell lung cancer (SCLC) micrometastases in the transition zone (TZ) surrounding the ablated region and in the reference zones (RZs) of the ablated or unablated lobes and to identify the molecular mechanism(s) of lung cancer recurrence following RFA treatment. After lung micrometastases of human SCLCs had formed, RFA treatment was applied to the right upper lobe (RUL) of the lung in nude mice. Hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1α expression, proliferation and angiogenesis potential both in the TZ and RZ were evaluated over time. Separately, at day 1, 7 and 14 following RFA treatment, the growth of micrometastases showed an ~2-fold increase in the TZ compared to the RZ of the unablated lobe, as the right lower lobe (RLL) and the growth of micrometastases in the RZ of the RUL was also induced by RFA. In addition, accelerated tumor growth in the TZ was induced by HIF-1α, but was not associated with tissue angiogenesis potential. We concluded that local recurrences of SCLCs caused by overproliferation of micrometastases following RFA treatment were driven by HIF-1α, although angiogenesis was not the driving force in the TZ. PMID:26750332

  11. Fatigue Resistance of the Grain Size Transition Zone in a Dual Microstructure Superalloy Disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, T. P.; Kantzos, P. T.; Telesman, J.; Gayda, J.; Sudbrack, C. K.; Palsa, B. S.

    2010-01-01

    Mechanical property requirements vary with location in nickel-based superalloy disks. To maximize the associated mechanical properties, heat treatment methods have been developed for producing tailored microstructures. In this study, a specialized heat treatment method was applied to produce varying grain microstructures from the bore to the rim portions of a powder metallurgy processed nickel-based superalloy disk. The bore of the contoured disk consisted of fine grains to maximize strength and fatigue resistance at lower temperatures. The rim microstructure of the disk consisted of coarse grains for maximum resistance to creep and dwell crack growth at high temperatures up to 704 C. However, the fatigue resistance of the grain size transition zone was unclear, and needed to be evaluated. This zone was located as a band in the disk web between the bore and rim. Specimens were extracted parallel and transverse to the transition zone, and multiple fatigue tests were performed at 427 and 704 C. Mean fatigue lives were lower at 427 C than for 704 C. Specimen failures often initiated at relatively large grains, which failed on crystallographic facets. Grain size distributions were characterized in the specimens, and related to the grains initiating failures as well as location within the transition zone. Fatigue life decreased with increasing maximum grain size. Correspondingly, mean fatigue resistance of the transition zone was slightly higher than that of the rim, but lower than that of the bore. The scatter in limited tests of replicates was comparable for all transition zone locations examined.

  12. Fatigue Failure Modes of the Grain Size Transition Zone in a Dual Microstructure Disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, Timothy P.; Kantzos, Pete T.; Palsa, Bonnie; Telesman, Jack; Gayda, John; Sudbrack, Chantal K.

    2012-01-01

    Mechanical property requirements vary with location in nickel-based superalloy disks. In order to maximize the associated mechanical properties, heat treatment methods have been developed for producing tailored grain microstructures. In this study, fatigue failure modes of a grain size transition zone in a dual microstructure disk were evaluated. A specialized heat treatment method was applied to produce varying grain microstructure in the bore to rim portions of a powder metallurgy processed nickel-based superalloy disk. The transition in grain size was concentrated in a zone of the disk web, between the bore and rim. Specimens were extracted parallel and transversely across this transition zone, and multiple fatigue tests were performed at 427 C and 704 C. Grain size distributions were characterized in the specimens, and related to operative failure initiation modes. Mean fatigue life decreased with increasing maximum grain size, going out through the transition zone. The scatter in limited tests of replicates was comparable for failures of uniform gage specimens in all transition zone locations examined.

  13. Measurements of the Conduction-Zone Length and Mass Ablation Rate to Study the Hydrodynamic Coupling in Cryogenic Direct-Drive Implosions on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, D. T.; Davis, A. K.; Goncharov, V. N.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Epstein, R.; Hu, S. X.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Seka, W.; Froula, D. H.

    2015-11-01

    The ablation-front trajectory and the averaged mass ablation rate is measured in direct-drive cryogenic target implosions on the OMEGA Laser System by imaging the soft x rays emitted by the coronal plasma. The length of the conduction zone is determined by coupling x-ray and scattered-light measurements. These measurements are compared to hydrodynamic simulations to study the modeling of the hydrodynamic coupling for various beam and target radii. Reducing the beam focal-spot radius relative to the target radius is a method that is being studied to reduce cross-beam energy transfer and increase the hydrodynamic efficiency. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  14. RFA-cut: Semi-automatic segmentation of radiofrequency ablation zones with and without needles via optimal s-t-cuts.

    PubMed

    Egger, Jan; Busse, Harald; Brandmaier, Philipp; Seider, Daniel; Gawlitza, Matthias; Strocka, Steffen; Voglreiter, Philip; Dokter, Mark; Hofmann, Michael; Kainz, Bernhard; Chen, Xiaojun; Hann, Alexander; Boechat, Pedro; Yu, Wei; Freisleben, Bernd; Alhonnoro, Tuomas; Pollari, Mika; Moche, Michael; Schmalstieg, Dieter

    2015-08-01

    In this contribution, we present a semi-automatic segmentation algorithm for radiofrequency ablation (RFA) zones via optimal s-t-cuts. Our interactive graph-based approach builds upon a polyhedron to construct the graph and was specifically designed for computed tomography (CT) acquisitions from patients that had RFA treatments of Hepatocellular Carcinomas (HCC). For evaluation, we used twelve post-interventional CT datasets from the clinical routine and as evaluation metric we utilized the Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC), which is commonly accepted for judging computer aided medical segmentation tasks. Compared with pure manual slice-by-slice expert segmentations from interventional radiologists, we were able to achieve a DSC of about eighty percent, which is sufficient for our clinical needs. Moreover, our approach was able to handle images containing (DSC=75.9%) and not containing (78.1%) the RFA needles still in place. Additionally, we found no statistically significant difference (p<;0.423) between the segmentation results of the subgroups for a Mann-Whitney test. Finally, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first time a segmentation approach for CT scans including the RFA needles is reported and we show why another state-of-the-art segmentation method fails for these cases. Intraoperative scans including an RFA probe are very critical in the clinical practice and need a very careful segmentation and inspection to avoid under-treatment, which may result in tumor recurrence (up to 40%). If the decision can be made during the intervention, an additional ablation can be performed without removing the entire needle. This decreases the patient stress and associated risks and costs of a separate intervention at a later date. Ultimately, the segmented ablation zone containing the RFA needle can be used for a precise ablation simulation as the real needle position is known. PMID:26736783

  15. Size dependent Cu dielectric function for plasmon spectroscopy: Characterization of colloidal suspension generated by fs laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santillán, J. M. J.; Videla, F. A.; Fernández van Raap, M. B.; Schinca, D. C.; Scaffardi, L. B.

    2012-09-01

    Copper metal nanoparticles (Nps) have received increasing interest during the last years due to their potential applications in several fields of science and technology. Their optical properties depend on the characteristics of the dielectric function of the metal, their size, and the type of environment. The contribution of free and bound electrons on the dielectric function of copper Nps is analyzed as well as their influence on its plasmonic properties. The contribution of free electrons is corrected for particle size under 10 nm, introducing a term inversely proportional to the particle's radius in the damping constant. For bound electron contribution, interband transitions from the d-band to the conduction band are considered. For particles with sizes below 2 nm, the larger spacing between electronic energy levels must be taken into account by making the electronic density of states in the conduction band size-dependent. Considering these specific modifications, optical parameters and band energy values could be determined by fitting the bulk complex dielectric function. The obtained values were coefficient for bound electron contribution Kbulk = 2 × 1024, gap energy Eg = 1.95 eV, Fermi energy EF = 2.15 eV, and bound electrons damping constant γb = 1.15 × 1014 Hz. Based on the dielectric function determined in this way, experimental extinction spectra of colloid suspensions generated by ultrafast laser ablation of a solid copper target in liquids was fitted using the Drude-interband model and Mie's theory. Depending on the experimental conditions and liquid medium, the particles in the suspension may have nanometric or subnanometric core size and may be capped with a shell of oxide. From the fitting, it was possible to determine the structure and size distribution of spherical bare core and core-shell copper Nps in the nanometer-subnanometer size range. These results were compared with those obtained by standard microscopy techniques such as AFM and HRTEM

  16. 75 FR 51668 - Optional Mail Preparation Standards for Flat-Size Mailpieces in FSS Zones

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office POSTAL SERVICE 39 CFR Part 111 Optional Mail Preparation Standards for Flat-Size Mailpieces in FSS Zones AGENCY: Postal Service TM . ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Postal Service TM is revising the Mailing Standards of...

  17. Chemical Composition of Micrometer-Sized Filaments in an Aragonite Host by a Miniature Laser Ablation/Ionization Mass Spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Tulej, Marek; Neubeck, Anna; Ivarsson, Magnus; Riedo, Andreas; Neuland, Maike B; Meyer, Stefan; Wurz, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Detection of extraterrestrial life is an ongoing goal in space exploration, and there is a need for advanced instruments and methods for the detection of signatures of life based on chemical and isotopic composition. Here, we present the first investigation of chemical composition of putative microfossils in natural samples using a miniature laser ablation/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer (LMS). The studies were conducted with high lateral (∼15 μm) and vertical (∼20-200 nm) resolution. The primary aim of the study was to investigate the instrument performance on micrometer-sized samples both in terms of isotope abundance and element composition. The following objectives had to be achieved: (1) Consider the detection and calculation of single stable isotope ratios in natural rock samples with techniques compatible with their employment of space instrumentation for biomarker detection in future planetary missions. (2) Achieve a highly accurate chemical compositional map of rock samples with embedded structures at the micrometer scale in which the rock matrix is easily distinguished from the micrometer structures. Our results indicate that chemical mapping of strongly heterogeneous rock samples can be obtained with a high accuracy, whereas the requirements for isotope ratios need to be improved to reach sufficiently large signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). PMID:26247475

  18. The Effect of Catheter Ablation on Left Atrial Size and Function for Patients with Atrial Fibrillation: An Updated Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Bin; Li, Dan; Wang, Jianling; Gyawali, Laxman; Jing, Jinjin; Su, Li

    2015-01-01

    Background Catheter ablation (CA) for atrial fibrillation (AF) is now an important therapeutic modality for patients with AF. However, data regarding changes in left atrial (LA) function after CA have indicated conflicting results depending on the AF types, follow-up period, and the analytical imaging tools. The objective of this review was to analyze the effect of CA on the LA size and function for patients with AF. Methods We searched for studies regarding LA size and function pre- and post-ablation in PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane Library, and Web of Knowledge through May 2014. LA function was measured by LA ejective fraction (LAEF), LA active ejective fraction (LAAEF), or both. Total and subgroup analyses were implemented using Cochrane Review Manager Version 5.2. Weighted mean differences with 95% confidence intervals were used to express the results of continuous outcomes using fixed or random effect models. I2 was used to calculate heterogeneity. To assess publication bias, Egger’s test and Begg’s funnel plot were performed using Stata 12.0. Results Twenty-five studies (2040 enrolled patients) were selected for this meta-analysis. The LA diameter (LAD), maximum LA volume, and minimal LA volume were significantly decreased post-ablation, as compared with those at a pre-ablation visit. Compared with the pre-ablation outcomes, we found no significant differences in LAEF/LAAEF at a post-ablation follow-up. Decreases in LA volume and LAEF remained significant post-ablation for paroxysmal AF (PAF); however, the LAEF was insignificant changes in persistent AF (PeAF). Heterogeneity was significant in spite which individual study was excluded. A publication bias was not found. In a meta-regression analysis, we did not find any factor that contributed to the heterogeneity. Conclusion With CA, LA volumes and LAD were decreased significantly in patients with AF; LAEF was not significant changes in patients with PeAF but decreased in those with PAF. PMID:26147984

  19. Measurement of the isotopic composition of uranium micrometer-size particles by femtosecond laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubert, Amélie; Claverie, Fanny; Pécheyran, Christophe; Pointurier, Fabien

    In this paper, we will describe and indicate the performance of a new method based on the use of femtosecond laser ablation (fs-LA) coupled to a quadrupole-based inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-QMS) for analyzing the isotopic composition of micrometer-size uranium particles. The fs-LA device was equipped with a high frequency source (till 10 kHz). We applied this method to 1-2 μm diameter-uranium particles of known isotopic composition and we compared this technique with the two techniques currently used for uranium particle analysis: Secondary Ionization Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) and Fission Track Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry (FT-TIMS). By optimizing the experimental conditions, we achieved typical accuracy and reproducibility below 4% on 235U/238U for short transient signals of only 15 s related to 10 to 200 pg of uranium. The detection limit (at the 3 sigma level) was ~ 350 ag for the 235U isotope, meaning that 235U/238U isotope ratios in natural uranium particles of ~ 220 nm diameter can be measured. We also showed that the local contamination resulting from the side deposition of ablation debris at ~ 100 μm from the ablation crater represented only a small percentage of the initial uranium signal of the ablated particle. Despite the use of single collector ICP-MS, we were able to demonstrate that fs-LA-ICP-MS is a promising alternative technique for determining uranium isotopic composition in particle analysis.

  20. Tissue healing response following hyperthermic vapor ablation in the porcine longissimus muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grantham, John T.; Grisez, Brian T.; Famoso, Justin; Hoey, Michael; Dixon, Chris; Coad, James E.

    2015-03-01

    As the use of hyperthermic ablation technologies has increased, so too has the need to understand their effects on tissue and their healing responses. This study was designed to characterize tissue injury and healing following hyperthermic vapor ablation in the in vivo porcine longissimus muscle model. The individual ablations were performed using the NxThera Vapor Delivery System (NxThera Inc., Minneapolis, MN). To assess the vapor ablation's evolution, the swine were euthanized post-treatment on Day 0, Day 3, Day 7, Day 14, Day 28, Day 45 and Day 90. Triphenyltetrazolium chloride viability staining (TTC staining) was used to macroscopically assess the extent of each vapor ablation within the tissue. The ablation associated healing responses were then histologically evaluated for acute inflammation, chronic inflammation, foreign body reaction and fibrosis. Two zones of tissue injury were initially identified in the ablations: 1) a central zone of complete coagulative necrosis and 2) an outer "transition zone" of viable and non-viable cells. The ablations initially increased in size from Day 0 to Day 7 and then progressively decreased in size though Day 45. The initial Day 3 healing changes originated in the transition zone with minimal acute and chronic inflammation. As time progressed, granulation tissue began to form by Day 7 and peaked around Day 14. Collagen formation, deposition and remodeling began in the adjacent healthy tissue by Day 28, replaced the ablation site by Day 45 and reorganized by Day 90. In conclusion, this vapor ablation technology provided a non-desiccating form of hyperthermic ablation that resulted in coagulative necrosis without a central thermally/heat-fixed tissue component, followed a classical wound healing pathway, and healed with minimal associated inflammation.

  1. Effects of water depth and laser pulse numbers on size properties of colloidal nanoparticles prepared by nanosecond pulsed laser ablation in liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdieh, Mohammd Hossein; Fattahi, Behzad

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, pulsed laser ablation method was used for synthesis of colloidal nanoparticles of aluminum and titanium in a distilled water medium. The interaction was performed in a water cell in which the target was placed at different depths of water. The effects of the number of laser pulses and the water depth in which the interaction occurred on average size and size distribution of prepared colloidal nanoparticles were investigated. A UV-vis absorption spectrophotometer and a scanning electron microscope were used for the characterization of the produced nanoparticles. Using image processing techniques and analyzing the SEM images, nanoparticles size properties were achieved. According to the results, position of the target in different water depths has strong effect on size properties of the synthesized nanoparticles. Our results also showed that higher number of laser pulses produces smaller mean size nanoparticles with narrower size distribution.

  2. The Floe Size Distribution in the Marginal Ice Zone of the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweiger, A. J. B.; Stern, H. L., III; Stark, M.; Zhang, J.; Steele, M.; Hwang, P. B.

    2014-12-01

    Several key processes in the Marginal Ice Zone (MIZ) of the Arctic Ocean are related to the size of the ice floes, whose diameters range from meters to tens of kilometers. The floe size distribution (FSD) influences the mechanical properties of the ice cover, air-sea momentum and heat transfer, lateral melting, and light penetration. However, no existing sea-ice/ocean models currently simulate the FSD in the MIZ. Model development depends on observations of the FSD for parameterization, calibration, and validation. To support the development and implementation of the FSD in the Marginal Ice Zone Modeling and Assimilation System (MIZMAS), we have analyzed the FSD in the Beaufort and Chukchi seas using multiple sources of satellite imagery: NASA's Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Terra and Aqua satellites (250 m pixel size), the USGS Landsat 8 satellite (80 m pixel size), the Canadian Space Agency's synthetic aperture radar (SAR) on RADARSAT (50 meter pixel size), and declassified National Technical Means imagery from the Global Fiducials Library (GFL) of the USGS (1 m pixel size). The procedure for identifying ice floes in the imagery begins with manually delineating cloud-free regions (if necessary). A threshold is then chosen to separate ice from water. Morphological operations and other semi-automated techniques are used to identify individual floes, whose properties are then easily calculated. We use the mean caliper diameter as the measure of floe size. The FSD is adequately described by a power-law in which the exponent characterizes the relative number of large and small floes. Changes in the exponent over time and space reflect changes in physical processes in the MIZ, such as sea-ice deformation, fracturing, and melting. We report results of FSD analysis for the spring and summer of 2013 and 2014, and show how the FSD will be incorporated into the MIZMAS model.

  3. Real-time Monitoring of Radiofrequency Ablation and Postablation Assessment: Accuracy of Contrast-enhanced US in Experimental Rat Liver Model

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hanping; Wilkins, Luke R.; Ziats, Nicholas P.; Haaga, John R.

    2014-01-01

    fluorescence images was noted at all time points. Conclusion The temporary transition zone in NADH staining is partially damaged and should transition to nonviability 2 days after ablation. These results demonstrate that contrast-enhanced US can help delineate the maximum area of cell damage (to within 5% of the maximum) as early as 2 hours after ablation. Contrast-enhanced US may be a simple and accurate tool for monitoring the effects of RF ablation and quantifying the size of thermal damage after treatment. © RSNA, 2013 Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:23912621

  4. The active zone protein CAST regulates synaptic vesicle recycling and quantal size in the mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Shizuka; Hida, Yamato; Ishizaki, Hiroyoshi; Inoue, Eiji; Tanaka-Okamoto, Miki; Yamasaki, Miwako; Miyazaki, Taisuke; Fukaya, Masahiro; Kitajima, Isao; Takai, Yoshimi; Watanabe, Masahiko; Ohtsuka, Toshihisa; Manabe, Toshiya

    2016-09-01

    Synaptic efficacy is determined by various factors, including the quantal size, which is dependent on the amount of neurotransmitters in synaptic vesicles at the presynaptic terminal. It is essential for stable synaptic transmission that the quantal size is kept within a constant range and that synaptic efficacy during and after repetitive synaptic activation is maintained by replenishing release sites with synaptic vesicles. However, the mechanisms for these fundamental properties have still been undetermined. We found that the active zone protein CAST (cytomatrix at the active zone structural protein) played pivotal roles in both presynaptic regulation of quantal size and recycling of endocytosed synaptic vesicles. In the CA1 region of hippocampal slices of the CAST knockout mice, miniature excitatory synaptic responses were increased in size, and synaptic depression after prolonged synaptic activation was larger, which was attributable to selective impairment of synaptic vesicle trafficking via the endosome in the presynaptic terminal likely mediated by Rab6. Therefore, CAST serves as a key molecule that regulates dynamics and neurotransmitter contents of synaptic vesicles in the excitatory presynaptic terminal in the central nervous system. PMID:27422015

  5. Aerial observations of floe size distribution in the marginal ice zone of summer Prydz Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, P.; Li, Z. J.; Zhang, Z. H.; Dong, X. L.

    2008-02-01

    On the basis of aerial photographs of sea ice floes in the marginal ice zone (MIZ) of Prydz Bay acquired from December 2004 to February 2005 during the 21st Chinese National Antarctic Research Expedition, image processing techniques are employed to extract some geometric parameters of floes from two merged transects covering the whole MIZ. Variations of these parameters with the distance into the MIZ are then obtained. Different parameters of floe size, namely area, perimeter, and mean caliper diameter (MCD), follow three similar stages of increasing, flat and increasing again, with distance from the open ocean. Floe shape parameters (roundness and the ratio of perimeter to MCD), however, have less significant variations than that of floe size. Then, to modify the deviation of the cumulative floe size distribution from the ideal power law, an upper truncated power-law function and a Weibull function are used, and four calculated parameters of the above functions are found to be important descriptors of the evolution of floe size distribution in the MIZ. Among them, Lr of the upper truncated power-law function indicates the upper limit of floe size and roughly equals the maximum floe size in each square sample area. L0 in the Weibull distribution shows an increasing proportion of larger floes in squares farther from the open ocean and roughly equals the mean floe size. D in the upper truncated power-law function is closely associated with the degree of confinement during ice breakup. Its decrease with the distance into MIZ indicates the weakening of confinement conditions on floes owing to wave attenuation. The γ of the Weibull distribution characterizes the degree of homogeneity in a data set. It also decreases with distance into MIZ, implying that floe size distributes increase in range. Finally, a statistical test on floe size is performed to divide the whole MIZ into three distinct zones made up of floes of quite different characteristics. This zonal structure

  6. Estimating the size of a radio quiet zone for the radio astronomy service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Bo; Han, Wenjun

    2009-12-01

    The size of a radio quiet zone (RQZ) is largely determined by transmission losses of interfering signals, which can be divided into free space loss and diffraction loss. The free space loss is dominant. The diffraction loss presented in this paper is described as unified smooth spherical and knife edge diffractions, which is a function of minimum path clearance. We present a complete method to calculate the minimum path clearance. The cumulative distribution of the lapse rate of refractivity ( g n ), between the earth surface and 1 km above, is studied by using Chinese radio climate data. Because the size of an RQZ is proportional to g n , the cumulative distribution of g n can be used as an approximation for the size of the RQZ. When interference originates from mobile communication or television transmissions at a frequency of 408 MHz, and overline {g_n } is 40 N/km, where the refractivity N=left( {n-1} right) × 10^6, the size of the RQZ would be 180 km for a mobile source or 210 km for a television source, with a probability in the range of 15-100% in different months and for different stations. When speaking of the size of an RQZ, the radius in the case of a circular zone is implied. It results that a size of an RQZ is mainly influenced by transmission loss rather than effective radiated power. In the case where the distance between an interfering source and a radio astronomical observatory is about 100 km, at a frequency of 408 MHz, the allowable effective radiated power of the interfering source should be less than -30 dBW with a probability of about 85% for overline {g_n } equals 40 N/km, or -42 dBW with a probability less than 1 % for overline {g_n } equals 80 N/km.

  7. In vitro investigation of intra-canal dentine-laser beam interaction aspects: II. Evaluation of ablation zone extent and morphology.

    PubMed

    Minas, Nova Hambersom; Gutknecht, Norbert; Lampert, Friedrich

    2010-11-01

    Laser endodontic tips appear to provide a promising alternative to available treatment modalities in the field of endodontology. With the shortcomings in published results regarding the intra-canal behavioural aspects of those tips, it was the aim of this study to investigate the extent of the intra-canal ablation zone and the pattern associated with those tips. Ninety intact extracted bovine teeth were used to prepare mid-root testing cylinders. The samples were divided into three groups (A, B, C), corresponding to the tip diameters. Each group was further subdivided to be irradiated at three different power settings (1500 mW, 1750 mW, 2000 mW) with an erbium, chromium:yttrium-scandium-gallium-garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) laser with a 65% water to 35% air ratio. Collected data were subjected to analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Tukey test. At a chosen significance level of alpha = 1%, no statistical difference was found among the groups (P > 0.01). The results suggest that shortening of the estimated working length is mandatory for the use of those tips within the canal, and that, provided that certain measurements are used for intra-canal laser ablation, this is a secure mode of treatment. Further investigation and system improvement will be required for more satisfactory results. PMID:19727921

  8. ELECTROSTATIC BARRIER AGAINST DUST GROWTH IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS. II. MEASURING THE SIZE OF THE 'FROZEN' ZONE

    SciTech Connect

    Okuzumi, Satoshi; Sakagami, Masa-aki; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Takeuchi, Taku

    2011-04-20

    Coagulation of submicron-sized dust grains into porous aggregates is the initial step of dust evolution in protoplanetary disks. Recently, it has been pointed out that negative charging of dust in the weakly ionized disks could significantly slow down the coagulation process. In this paper, we apply the growth criteria obtained in Paper I to finding out a location ('frozen' zone) where the charging stalls dust growth at the fractal growth stage. For low-turbulence disks, we find that the frozen zone can cover a major part of the disks at a few to 100 AU from the central star. The maximum mass of the aggregates is approximately 10{sup -7}g at 1 AU and as small as a few monomer masses at 100 AU. Strong turbulence can significantly reduce the size of the frozen zone, but such turbulence will cause the fragmentation of macroscopic aggregates at later stages. We examine a possibility that complete freezeout of dust evolution in low-turbulence disks could be prevented by global transport of dust in the disks. Our simple estimation shows that global dust transport can lead to the supply of macroscopic aggregates and the removal of frozen aggregates on a timescale of 10{sup 6} yr. This overturns the usual understanding that tiny dust particles get depleted on much shorter timescales unless collisional fragmentation is effective. The frozen zone together with global dust transport might explain 'slow' ({approx}10{sup 6} yr) dust evolution suggested by infrared observation of T Tauri stars and by radioactive dating of chondrites.

  9. Image-Guided Spinal Ablation: A Review.

    PubMed

    Tsoumakidou, Georgia; Koch, Guillaume; Caudrelier, Jean; Garnon, Julien; Cazzato, Roberto Luigi; Edalat, Faramarz; Gangi, Afshin

    2016-09-01

    The image-guided thermal ablation procedures can be used to treat a variety of benign and malignant spinal tumours. Small size osteoid osteoma can be treated with laser or radiofrequency. Larger tumours (osteoblastoma, aneurysmal bone cyst and metastasis) can be addressed with radiofrequency or cryoablation. Results on the literature of spinal microwave ablation are scarce, and thus it should be used with caution. A distinct advantage of cryoablation is the ability to monitor the ice-ball by intermittent CT or MRI. The different thermal insulation, temperature and electrophysiological monitoring techniques should be applied. Cautious pre-procedural planning and intermittent intra-procedural monitoring of the ablation zone can help reduce neural complications. Tumour histology, patient clinical-functional status and life-expectancy should define the most efficient and least disabling treatment option. PMID:27329231

  10. Conformal needle-based ultrasound ablation using EM-tracked conebeam CT image guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdette, E. Clif; Banovac, Filip; Diederich, Chris J.; Cheng, Patrick; Wilson, Emmanuel; Cleary, Kevin R.

    2011-03-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated the efficacy of interstitial ablative approaches for the treatment of renal and hepatic tumors. Despite these promising results, current systems remain highly dependent on operator skill, and cannot treat many tumors because there is little control of the size and shape of the zone of necrosis, and no control over ablator trajectory within tissue once insertion has taken place. Additionally, tissue deformation and target motion make it extremely difficult to accurately place the ablator device into the target. Irregularly shaped target volumes typically require multiple insertions and several sequential thermal ablation procedures. This study demonstrated feasibility of spatially tracked image-guided conformal ultrasound (US) ablation for percutaneous directional ablation of diseased tissue. Tissue was prepared by suturing the liver within a pig belly and 1mm BBs placed to serve as needle targets. The image guided system used integrated electromagnetic tracking and cone-beam CT (CBCT) with conformable needlebased high-intensity US ablation in the interventional suite. Tomographic images from cone beam CT were transferred electronically to the image-guided tracking system (IGSTK). Paired-point registration was used to register the target specimen to CT images and enable navigation. Path planning is done by selecting the target BB on the GUI of the realtime tracking system and determining skin entry location until an optimal path is selected. Power was applied to create the desired ablation extent within 7-10 minutes at a thermal dose (>300eqm43). The system was successfully used to place the US ablator in planned target locations within ex-vivo kidney and liver through percutaneous access. Targeting accuracy was 3-4 mm. Sectioned specimens demonstrated uniform ablation within the planned target zone. Subsequent experiments were conducted for multiple ablator positions based upon treatment planning simulations. Ablation zones in

  11. The Feasibility and Efficacy of a Large-Sized Lasso Catheter Combined With 3 Dimensional Mapping System for Catheter Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Sung-Won; Shin, Woo-Seung; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Choi, Min-Seok; Choi, Yun Seok; Lee, Man-Young; Rho, Tai-Ho

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objectives We aimed to investigate whether a large-sized Lasso catheter could increase the success rate of immediate complete pulmonary vein (PV) antral isolation and improve the outcome of catheter ablation in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients. Subjects and Methods This study included 107 consecutive patients (67 males, mean age: 57.8±9.7 years) who underwent PV mapping and ablation due to symptomatic drug-refractory AF. The first 43 patients underwent isolation of both ipsilateral PVs using the Carto-Merge 3 dimensional mapping system (group 1). The other 64 patients underwent isolation of both ipsilateral PVs using the same technique with a large-sized (a diameter of 30 to 35 mm) Lasso cathe-ter (group 2). When ipsilateral PVs did not show any potential after the initial circumferential ablation, we defined this as 'immediate complete antral isolation (ICAI)'. We compared the AF recurrence rate of both groups. Results There was no significant difference of the clinical characteristics between group 1 and group 2. All the patients were followed-up for 1 year. The ICAI rate of group 1 and group 2 was significantly different (21% vs. 78%, p<0.001), and the AF recurrence rates of group 1 and group 2 were also different (34.9% vs. 18.8%, p=0.042). Using multiple logistic regression analysis, the use of a large-sized Lasso catheter was a significant predictive factor for preventing recurrence (odds ratio: 0.489, 95% confidence interval: 0.136-0.927). Conclusion It is likely that a large-sized Lasso catheter plays an important role in achieving ICAI and in lowering the rate of AF recurrence. PMID:21949528

  12. Radiofrequency Ablation Combined with Chemoembolization for Intermediate-Sized (3-5 cm) Hepatocellular Carcinomas Under Dual Guidance of Biplane Fluoroscopy and Ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Min, Ji Hye; Cha, Dong Ik; Jeon, Yong Hwan; Shin, Sung Wook; Cho, Sung Ki; Rhim, Hyunchul; Lim, Hyo K.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess the technical feasibility and local efficacy of percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) combined with transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) for an intermediate-sized (3-5 cm in diameter) hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) under the dual guidance of biplane fluoroscopy and ultrasonography (US). Materials and Methods Patients with intermediate-sized HCCs were treated with percutaneous RFA combined with TACE. RFA was performed under the dual guidance of biplane fluoroscopy and US within 14 days after TACE. We evaluated the rate of major complications on immediate post-RFA CT images. Primary technique effectiveness rate was determined on one month follow-up CT images. The cumulative rate of local tumor progression was estimated with the use of Kaplan-Meier method. Results Twenty-one consecutive patients with 21 HCCs (mean size: 3.6 cm; range: 3-4.5 cm) were included. After TACE (mean: 6.7 d; range: 1-14 d), 20 (95.2%) of 21 HCCs were visible on fluoroscopy and were ablated under dual guidance of biplane fluoroscopy and US. The other HCC that was poorly visible by fluoroscopy was ablated under US guidance alone. Major complications were observed in only one patient (pneumothorax). Primary technique effectiveness was achieved for all 21 HCCs in a single RFA session. Cumulative rates of local tumor progression were estimated as 9.5% and 19.0% at one and three years, respectively. Conclusion RFA combined with TACE under dual guidance of biplane fluoroscopy and US is technically feasible and effective for intermediate-sized HCC treatment. PMID:23483753

  13. An Earth-sized planet in the habitable zone of a cool star.

    PubMed

    Quintana, Elisa V; Barclay, Thomas; Raymond, Sean N; Rowe, Jason F; Bolmont, Emeline; Caldwell, Douglas A; Howell, Steve B; Kane, Stephen R; Huber, Daniel; Crepp, Justin R; Lissauer, Jack J; Ciardi, David R; Coughlin, Jeffrey L; Everett, Mark E; Henze, Christopher E; Horch, Elliott; Isaacson, Howard; Ford, Eric B; Adams, Fred C; Still, Martin; Hunter, Roger C; Quarles, Billy; Selsis, Franck

    2014-04-18

    The quest for Earth-like planets is a major focus of current exoplanet research. Although planets that are Earth-sized and smaller have been detected, these planets reside in orbits that are too close to their host star to allow liquid water on their surfaces. We present the detection of Kepler-186f, a 1.11 ± 0.14 Earth-radius planet that is the outermost of five planets, all roughly Earth-sized, that transit a 0.47 ± 0.05 solar-radius star. The intensity and spectrum of the star's radiation place Kepler-186f in the stellar habitable zone, implying that if Kepler-186f has an Earth-like atmosphere and water at its surface, then some of this water is likely to be in liquid form. PMID:24744370

  14. Middle East measurements of concentration and size distribution of aerosol particles for coastal zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendersky, Sergey; Kopeika, Norman S.; Blaunstein, Natan S.

    2005-10-01

    Recently, an extension of the Navy Aerosol Model (NAM) was proposed based on analysis of an extensive series of measurements at the Irish Atlantic Coast and at the French Mediterranean Coast. We confirm the relevance of that work for the distant eastern Meditteranean and extend several coefficients of that coastal model, proposed by Piazzola et al. for the Meditteranean Coast (a form of the Navy Aerosol Model), to midland Middle East coastal environments. This analysis is based on data collected at three different Middle East coastal areas: the Negev Desert (Eilat) Red Sea Coast, the Sea of Galilee (Tiberias) Coast, and the Mediterranean (Haifa) Coast. Aerosol size distributions are compared with those obtained through measurements carried out over the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Ocean Coasts, and Mediterranean, and Baltic Seas Coasts. An analysis of these different results allows better understanding of the similarities and differences between different coastal lake, sea, and open ocean zones. It is shown that in the coastal regions in Israel, compared to open ocean and other sea zones, larger differences in aerosol particle concentration are observed. The aerosol particle concentrations and their dependences on wind speed for these coastal zones are analyzed and discussed. We propose to classify the aerosol distribution models to either: 1. a coastal model with marine aerosol domination; 2. a coastal model with continental aerosol domination (referred to as midland coast in this work); or 3. a coastal model with balanced marine and continental conditions.

  15. Metagenomic analysis of size-fractionated picoplankton in a marine oxygen minimum zone.

    PubMed

    Ganesh, Sangita; Parris, Darren J; DeLong, Edward F; Stewart, Frank J

    2014-01-01

    Marine oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) support diverse microbial communities with roles in major elemental cycles. It is unclear how the taxonomic composition and metabolism of OMZ microorganisms vary between particle-associated and free-living size fractions. We used amplicon (16S rRNA gene) and shotgun metagenome sequencing to compare microbial communities from large (>1.6 μm) and small (0.2-1.6 μm) filter size fractions along a depth gradient in the OMZ off Chile. Despite steep vertical redox gradients, size fraction was a significantly stronger predictor of community composition compared to depth. Phylogenetic diversity showed contrasting patterns, decreasing towards the anoxic OMZ core in the small size fraction, but exhibiting maximal values at these depths within the larger size fraction. Fraction-specific distributions were evident for key OMZ taxa, including anammox planctomycetes, whose coding sequences were enriched up to threefold in the 0.2-1.6 μm community. Functional gene composition also differed between fractions, with the >1.6 μm community significantly enriched in genes mediating social interactions, including motility, adhesion, cell-to-cell transfer, antibiotic resistance and mobile element activity. Prokaryotic transposase genes were three to six fold more abundant in this fraction, comprising up to 2% of protein-coding sequences, suggesting that particle surfaces may act as hotbeds for transposition-based genome changes in marine microbes. Genes for nitric and nitrous oxide reduction were also more abundant (three to seven fold) in the larger size fraction, suggesting microniche partitioning of key denitrification steps. These results highlight an important role for surface attachment in shaping community metabolic potential and genome content in OMZ microorganisms. PMID:24030599

  16. Metagenomic analysis of size-fractionated picoplankton in a marine oxygen minimum zone

    PubMed Central

    Ganesh, Sangita; Parris, Darren J; DeLong, Edward F; Stewart, Frank J

    2014-01-01

    Marine oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) support diverse microbial communities with roles in major elemental cycles. It is unclear how the taxonomic composition and metabolism of OMZ microorganisms vary between particle-associated and free-living size fractions. We used amplicon (16S rRNA gene) and shotgun metagenome sequencing to compare microbial communities from large (>1.6 μm) and small (0.2–1.6 μm) filter size fractions along a depth gradient in the OMZ off Chile. Despite steep vertical redox gradients, size fraction was a significantly stronger predictor of community composition compared to depth. Phylogenetic diversity showed contrasting patterns, decreasing towards the anoxic OMZ core in the small size fraction, but exhibiting maximal values at these depths within the larger size fraction. Fraction-specific distributions were evident for key OMZ taxa, including anammox planctomycetes, whose coding sequences were enriched up to threefold in the 0.2–1.6 μm community. Functional gene composition also differed between fractions, with the >1.6 μm community significantly enriched in genes mediating social interactions, including motility, adhesion, cell-to-cell transfer, antibiotic resistance and mobile element activity. Prokaryotic transposase genes were three to six fold more abundant in this fraction, comprising up to 2% of protein-coding sequences, suggesting that particle surfaces may act as hotbeds for transposition-based genome changes in marine microbes. Genes for nitric and nitrous oxide reduction were also more abundant (three to seven fold) in the larger size fraction, suggesting microniche partitioning of key denitrification steps. These results highlight an important role for surface attachment in shaping community metabolic potential and genome content in OMZ microorganisms. PMID:24030599

  17. Microwave ablation energy delivery: Influence of power pulsing on ablation results in an ex vivo and in vivo liver model

    PubMed Central

    Bedoya, Mariajose; del Rio, Alejandro Muñoz; Chiang, Jason; Brace, Christopher L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare the impact of continuous and pulsed energy deliveries on microwave ablation growth and shape in unperfused and perfused liver models. Methods: A total of 15 kJ at 2.45 GHz was applied to ex vivo bovine liver using one of five delivery methods (n = 50 total, 10 per group): 25 W continuous for 10 min (25 W average), 50 W continuous for 5 min (50 W average), 100 W continuous for 2.5 min (100 W average), 100 W pulsed for 10 min (25 W average), and 100 W pulsed for 5 min (50 W average). A total of 30 kJ was applied to in vivo porcine livers (n = 35, 7 per group) using delivery methods similar to the ex vivo study, but with twice the total ablation time to offset heat loss to blood perfusion. Temperatures were monitored 5–20 mm from the ablation antenna, with values over 60 °C indicating acute cellular necrosis. Comparisons of ablation size and shape were made between experimental groups based on total energy delivery, average power applied, and peak power using ANOVA with post-hoc pairwise tests. Results: No significant differences were noted in ablation sizes or circularities between pulsed and continuous groups in ex vivo tissue. Temperature data demonstrated more rapid heating in pulsed ablations, suggesting that pulsing may overcome blood perfusion and coagulate tissues more rapidly in vivo. Differences in ablation size and shape were noted in vivo despite equivalent energy delivery among all groups. Overall, the largest ablation volume in vivo was produced with 100 W continuous for 5 min (265.7 ± 208.1 cm3). At 25 W average, pulsed-power ablation volumes were larger than continuous-power ablations (67.4 ± 34.5 cm3 versus 23.6 ± 26.5 cm3, P = 0.43). Similarly, pulsed ablations produced significantly greater length (P ≤ 0.01), with increase in diameter (P = 0.09) and a slight decrease in circularity (P = 0.97). When comparing 50 W average power groups, moderate differences in size were noted (P ≥ 0.06) and

  18. Analysis of the change in peak corneal temperature during excimer laser ablation in porcine eyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosquera, Samuel Arba; Verma, Shwetabh

    2015-07-01

    The objective is to characterize the impact of different ablation parameters on the thermal load during corneal refractive surgery by means of excimer laser ablation on porcine eyes. One hundred eleven ablations were performed in 105 porcine eyes. Each ablation was recorded using infrared thermography and analyzed mainly based on the two tested local frequencies (40 Hz, clinical local frequency; 1000 Hz, no local frequency). The change in peak corneal temperature was analyzed with respect to varying ablation parameters [local frequency, system repetition rate, pulse energy, optical zone (OZ) size, and refractive correction]. Transepithelial ablations were also compared to intrastromal ablations. The average of the baseline temperature across all eyes was 20.5°C±1.1 (17.7°C to 22.2°C). Average of the change in peak corneal temperature for all clinical local frequency ablations was 5.8°C±0.8 (p=3.3E-53 to baseline), whereas the average was 9.0°C±1.5 for all no local frequency ablations (p=1.8E-35 to baseline, 1.6E-16 to clinical local frequency ablations). A logarithmic relationship was observed between the changes in peak corneal temperature with increasing local frequency. For clinical local frequency, change in peak corneal temperature was comparatively flat (r2=0.68 with a range of 1.5°C) with increasing system repetition rate and increased linearly with increasing OZ size (r2=0.95 with a range of 2.4°C). Local frequency controls help maintain safe corneal temperature increase during excimer laser ablations. Transepithelial ablations induce higher thermal load compared to intrastromal ablations, indicating a need for stronger thermal controls in transepithelial refractive procedures.

  19. Planning Irreversible Electroporation in the Porcine Kidney: Are Numerical Simulations Reliable for Predicting Empiric Ablation Outcomes?

    SciTech Connect

    Wimmer, Thomas Srimathveeravalli, Govindarajan; Gutta, Narendra; Ezell, Paula C.; Monette, Sebastien; Maybody, Majid; Erinjery, Joseph P.; Durack, Jeremy C.; Coleman, Jonathan A.; Solomon, Stephen B.

    2015-02-15

    PurposeNumerical simulations are used for treatment planning in clinical applications of irreversible electroporation (IRE) to determine ablation size and shape. To assess the reliability of simulations for treatment planning, we compared simulation results with empiric outcomes of renal IRE using computed tomography (CT) and histology in an animal model.MethodsThe ablation size and shape for six different IRE parameter sets (70–90 pulses, 2,000–2,700 V, 70–100 µs) for monopolar and bipolar electrodes was simulated using a numerical model. Employing these treatment parameters, 35 CT-guided IRE ablations were created in both kidneys of six pigs and followed up with CT immediately and after 24 h. Histopathology was analyzed from postablation day 1.ResultsAblation zones on CT measured 81 ± 18 % (day 0, p ≤ 0.05) and 115 ± 18 % (day 1, p ≤ 0.09) of the simulated size for monopolar electrodes, and 190 ± 33 % (day 0, p ≤ 0.001) and 234 ± 12 % (day 1, p ≤ 0.0001) for bipolar electrodes. Histopathology indicated smaller ablation zones than simulated (71 ± 41 %, p ≤ 0.047) and measured on CT (47 ± 16 %, p ≤ 0.005) with complete ablation of kidney parenchyma within the central zone and incomplete ablation in the periphery.ConclusionBoth numerical simulations for planning renal IRE and CT measurements may overestimate the size of ablation compared to histology, and ablation effects may be incomplete in the periphery.

  20. The effect of the melt thermal gradient on the size of the constitutionally supercooled zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, A.; Yuan, L.; Lee, P. D.; Easton, M.; StJohn, D.

    2016-03-01

    Recent verification of the analytical Interdependence model by a numerical solidification model (µMatIC) confirmed the critical role of constitutional supercooling (CS) in achieving sufficient undercooling to trigger successful nucleation events. The location of the maximum amount of CS (ΔTCSmax) is some distance from the interface of the previously growing grain and this distance contributes to the final as-cast grain size. The effect of the thermal gradient, G, on the size of the CS zone (CSZ) was neglected in that work. However, G is expected to affect the size of the CSZ (i.e. the length of the CSZ, x’ CSZ , and the location of ΔTCSmax, x’ CSmax ). This investigation assesses the effect of G on x’csz and x' CSmax . A range of G values is introduced into both the analytical and the numerical models to obtain a correlation between the value of G and the dimensions of the CSZ. The result of a test case from the analytical model shows that x’ CSmax initially decreases rapidly and then decreases gradually approaching zero at very high values of G. Independent of the analytical model, the results from the numerical model replicate the trend obtained from the analytical model.

  1. Finding Earth-size planets in the habitable zone: the Kepler Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borucki, William; Koch, David; Basri, Gibor; Batalha, Natalie; Brown, Timothy; Caldwell, Douglas; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen; Cochran, William; Dunham, Edward; Gautier, Thomas N.; Geary, John; Gilliland, Ronald; Jenkins, Jon; Kondo, Yoji; Latham, David; Lissauer, Jack J.; Monet, David

    2008-05-01

    The Kepler Mission is a space-based mission whose primary goal is to detect Earth-size and smaller planets in the habitable zone of solar-like stars. The mission will monitor more than 100,000 stars for transits with a differential photometric precision of 20 ppm at V=12 for a 6.5 hour transit. It will also provide asteroseismic results on several thousand dwarf stars. It is specifically designed to continuously observe a single field of view of greater than 100 square degrees for 3.5 or more years. This overview describes the mission design, its goals and capabilities, the measured performance for those photometer components that have now been tested, the Kepler Input Catalog, an overview of the analysis pipeline, the plans for the Follow-up Observing Program to validate the detections and characterize the parent stars, and finally, the plans for the Guest Observer and Astrophysical Data Program.

  2. Selections from 2015: Earth-Sized Planet Found in Star's Habitable Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-03-01

    Editors Note:In these last two weeks of 2015, well be looking at a few selections from among the most-downloaded paperspublished in AAS journals this year. The usual posting schedule will resume after the AAS winter meeting.Discovery and Validation of Kepler-452b: a 1.6 R Super Earth Exoplanet in the Habitable Zone of a G2 StarPublished July2015Main takeaway:A phase-folded light curve showing the transit of Kepler-452b. Its transit lasts 10.5 hours, and its period is 385 days. [Jenkins et al. 2015]A team led by Jon Jenkins (NASA Ames Research Center) announced the discovery and confirmation of Kepler-452b, an exoplanet only 60% larger than Earth and located in the habitable zone of its G2 star. This planet orbits its star at a distance of just over 1 AU, taking 385 days to complete an orbit. Kepler-452b also stands a good chance of being rocky, according to estimates.Why its interesting:Kepler-452b is the first near-Earth-sized planet to be found in the habitable zone of a Sun-like star making this the closest analog to the Earth-Sun system found in the Kepler dataset so far.About the history of the system (and the future of ours?):The authors estimate that the system is ~6 billion years old, and that Kepler-452b has been in the habitable zone of its star throughout its lifetime a substantially longer time than Earth has been around and habitable! Kepler-452bs host star, in addition to being 1.5 billion years older than the Sun, is roughly 10% larger. This system might therefore provide a glimpse of what Earths environment may be like in the future, as the Sun slowly expands on its way to becoming a red giant.CitationJon M. Jenkins et al 2015 AJ 150 56. doi:10.1088/0004-6256/150/2/56

  3. Infrared laser bone ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Nuss, R.C.; Fabian, R.L.; Sarkar, R.; Puliafito, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    The bone ablation characteristics of five infrared lasers, including three pulsed lasers (Nd:YAG, lambda = 1064 micron; Hol:YSGG, lambda = 2.10 micron; and Erb:YAG, lambda = 2.94 micron) and two continuous-wave lasers (Nd:YAG, lambda = 1.064 micron; and CO/sub 2/, lambda = 10.6 micron), were studied. All laser ablations were performed in vitro, using moist, freshly dissected calvarium of guinea pig skulls. Quantitative etch rates of the three pulsed lasers were calculated. Light microscopy of histologic sections of ablated bone revealed a zone of tissue damage of 10 to 15 micron adjacent to the lesion edge in the case of the pulsed Nd:YAG and the Erb:YAG lasers, from 20 to 90 micron zone of tissue damage for bone ablated by the Hol:YSGG laser, and 60 to 135 micron zone of tissue damage in the case of the two continuous-wave lasers. Possible mechanisms of bone ablation and tissue damage are discussed.

  4. Kepler Mission: A Mission to Find Earth-size Planets in the Habitable Zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borucki, W. J.

    2003-01-01

    The Kepler Mission is a Discovery-class mission designed to continuously monitor the brightness of 100,000 solar-like stars to detect the transits of Earth-size and larger planets. It is a wide field of view photometer Schmidt-type telescope with an array of 42 CCDs. It has a 0.95 m aperture and 1.4 m primary and is designed to attain a photometric precision of 2 parts in 10(exp 5) for 12th magnitude solar-like stars for a 6 hr transit duration. It will continuously observe 100,000 main-sequence stars from 9th to 14th magnitude in the Cygnus constellation for a period of four years with a cadence of 4/hour. An additional 250 stars can be monitored at a cadence of l/minute to do astro-seismology of stars brighter than 11.5 mv. The photometer is scheduled to be launched into heliocentric orbit in 2007. When combined with ground-based spectrometric observations of these stars, the positions of the planets relative to the habitable zone can be found. The spectra of the stars are also used to determine the relationships between the characteristics of terrestrial planets and the characteristics of the stars they orbit. In particular, the association of planet size and occurrence frequency with stellar mass and metallicity will be investigated. Based on the results of the current Doppler-velocity discoveries, over a thousand giant planets will also be found. Information on the albedos and densities of those giants showing transits will be obtained. At the end of the four year mission, hundreds of Earth-size planets should be discovered in and near the HZ of their stars if such planets are common. A null result would imply that terrestrial planets in the HZ are very rare and that life might also be quite rare.

  5. Formation processes of floe size distribution in the marginal ice zone (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyota, T.; Kohout, A.; Fraser, A.

    2013-12-01

    Since the marginal ice zone (MIZ) is the outer sea ice zone, its behavior is key to the understanding of the variability of sea ice extent associated with climate change. Especially for the melting processes in MIZ, where relatively small ice floes are dominant, floe size distribution (FSD) is an important parameter because smaller ice floes are subject to stronger lateral melting due to their larger cumulative perimeters. As the MIZ is characterized by vigorous interaction between sea ice and waves, breakup of sea ice due to flexural forcing and collisions is considered to play an essential role in the determination of FSD there. However, the available data have been very limited so far. Analysis of the observations of ice floes with a heli-borne video camera, focusing on the floe size ranging from 2 m to 100 m, in the Sea of Okhotsk, the Weddell Sea and off East Antarctica, revealed that while FSD is basically scale-invariant, a regime shift occurs at a size of about a few tens of meters, irrespective of the study region. It was also shown 1) that the floe size at which regime shift occurs slightly increases from 20 to 40 m with ice thickness, consistent with the theory of the flexural failure of sea ice; and 2) that to explain the scale invariance in FSD for smaller floes, a fragility of sea ice which is relevant to the strength of sea ice relative to waves can be a useful physical parameter to be correlated with the fractal dimension. Thus these results confirm the importance of wave-ice interaction to the formation of FSD. Based on this, a possible mechanism of the melting process was hypothesized that in the melting season sea ice extent retreats keeping the FSD relative to the ice edge nearly constant. As a next step and to confirm and further investigate this result, we planned to conduct the concurrent measurements of FSD, wave activities, and ice thickness off East Antarctica during the Sea Ice Physics and Ecosystem Experiment 2 (SIPEX2) in September to

  6. [New methodologicalapproaches to establishment the sizes of the sanitary protection zone and roadside clear zones of civil airports].

    PubMed

    Kartyshev, O A

    2013-01-01

    This circumstance leads to considerable mistakes it creation of SPZ borders of the airports, in some cases it impedes development of the latters and causes objective difficulties for hygienic assessment of projects. In this article the results of studies on the creation and validation of two new domestic methods for the construction of impact zones of aircraft noise and dispersion of the concentrations of pollutants in assessing the negative impact of airports are considered. Both branch methods agreed upon with the Ministry of Transport have been harmonized with ICAO (International Civil Aviation Organization) requirements. The results of full-scale measurements have confirmed the possibilities of developed software for their implementation in the formation of a common SPZ border of an airport. PMID:23805707

  7. Rates of burial and exhumation of lawsonite blueschist/eclogite in subduction zones from in situ UV laser ablation 40Ar/39Ar phengite geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornash, K.; Cosca, M. A.; Whitney, D. L.; Teyssier, C. P.

    2014-12-01

    Lawsonite eclogites and blueschists are accessible records of processes that occur at depth in subducting slabs and can therefore provide information about the chemical and physical evolution of subduction zones. In composite blueschist-eclogite terranes, blueschists may have formed (1) by prograde metamorphism (pre-eclogite), (2) at the same P-T conditions as eclogite-facies metamorphism as a result of differences in bulk composition, H2O content, or oxidation state, or (3) from retrogression of eclogite, e.g. during exhumation. Field and petrologic observations of lawsonite eclogite and blueschist in the Sivrihisar Massif, Turkey, suggest that some blueschist formed from eclogite during exhumation in the subduction channel, whereas results from thermobarometry suggest that some blueschist formed at the same P-T conditions as eclogite. To test the age, petrologic, and tectonic relationship of coexisting eclogite and blueschist, we applied in situ UV laser ablation 40Ar/39Ar phengite geochronology to eclogite- and blueschist-facies rocks representing different structural positions and displaying different phengite textures and coexisting mineral assemblages. Phengite from fresh lawsonite eclogite yield an age of 93 ± 2 Ma and have the narrowest spread in ages (<12 Ma) of any rock type analyzed. Retrogressed (epidote) eclogite yields a mean weighted age of 82 ± 2 Ma. In contrast to the tightly constrained ages obtained in eclogite pods, blueschists and blueschist-facies quartzite exhibit discrete age populations ranging from 82 Ma to 110 Ma. Deformed phengite clusters from lawsonite garnet blueschist record age populations at 82 Ma and 92 Ma. Phengite from lawsonite-garnet veins and glaucophane-rich margins of eclogite pods also record 92 Ma. Omphacite-bearing lawsonite blueschist and a blueschist-facies quartzite from the same structural position contain age populations at 97 Ma and 110 Ma. These results document a sequence of events from prograde blueschist

  8. Beam size measurement of the stored electron beam at the APS storage ring using zone plate optics and undulator radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Z.; Lai, B.; Yun, W.

    1997-10-01

    Beam sizes of the stored electron beam at the Advanced Photon Source storage ring were measured using zone-plate optics and undulator radiation. A gold Fresnel zone plate (3.5 {micro}m thick) located 33.9 meters from the x-ray source focused radiation of 18 keV, selected by a cryogenically cooled Si(111) crystal in horizontal deflection, and formed a source image in a transverse plane 2.41 m downstream. The sizes of the source image were determined from measured intensity profiles of x-ray fluorescence from a smooth nickel edge (1.5 {micro}m thick), fabricated using a lithographic technique, while the nickel edge was scanned across over the beam in the transverse plane. The measured vertical and horizontal sizes of the electron beam were 60 {+-} 4.3 {micro}m and 300 {+-} 13 {micro}m, respectively, in reasonable agreement with the expected values.

  9. Ablative system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, V. H. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A carrier liquid containing ablative material bodies is connected to a plenum chamber wall with openings to a high temperature environment. The liquid and bodies pass through the openings of the wall to form a self replacing ablative surface. The wall is composed of honeycomb layers, spheres containing ablative whiskers or wads, and a hardening catalyst for the carrier liquid. The wall also has woven wicks of ablative material fibers that extend through the wall openings and into plenum chamber which contains the liquid.

  10. Microwave Ablation Compared with Radiofrequency Ablation for Breast Tissue in an Ex Vivo Bovine Udder Model

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Toshihiro; Westphal, Saskia; Isfort, Peter; Braunschweig, Till; Penzkofer, Tobias Bruners, Philipp; Kichikawa, Kimihiko; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas Mahnken, Andreas H.

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: To compare the effectiveness of microwave (MW) ablation with radiofrequency (RF) ablation for treating breast tissue in a nonperfused ex vivo model of healthy bovine udder tissue. Materials and Methods: MW ablations were performed at power outputs of 25W, 35W, and 45W using a 915-MHz frequency generator and a 2-cm active tip antenna. RF ablations were performed with a bipolar RF system with 2- and 3-cm active tip electrodes. Tissue temperatures were continuously monitored during ablation. Results: The mean short-axis diameters of the coagulation zones were 1.34 {+-} 0.14, 1.45 {+-} 0.13, and 1.74 {+-} 0.11 cm for MW ablation at outputs of 25W, 35W, and 45W. For RF ablation, the corresponding values were 1.16 {+-} 0.09 and 1.26 {+-} 0.14 cm with electrodes having 2- and 3-cm active tips, respectively. The mean coagulation volumes were 2.27 {+-} 0.65, 2.85 {+-} 0.72, and 4.45 {+-} 0.47 cm{sup 3} for MW ablation at outputs of 25W, 35W, and 45W and 1.18 {+-} 0.30 and 2.29 {+-} 0.55 cm{sup 3} got RF ablation with 2- and 3-cm electrodes, respectively. MW ablations at 35W and 45W achieved significantly longer short-axis diameters than RF ablations (P < 0.05). The highest tissue temperature was achieved with MW ablation at 45W (P < 0.05). On histological examination, the extent of the ablation zone in MW ablations was less affected by tissue heterogeneity than that in RF ablations. Conclusion: MW ablation appears to be advantageous with respect to the volume of ablation and the shape of the margin of necrosis compared with RF ablation in an ex vivo bovine udder.

  11. The sensitivity of mechanical properties of TFRS composites to variations in reaction zone size and properties. [Tungsten Fiber Reinforced Superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craddock, James N.; Hopkins, Dale A.; Petrasek, Donald W.; Brindley, Pamela K.

    1987-01-01

    The properties of tungsten fiber reinforced superalloys (TFRS) composites are calculated using a 3-component micromechanical model. The properties and size of the reaction zone are varied and the effect of these variations on the composite properties are studied. Results are presented in graphical and tabular form. Post-matrix yield behavior is examined in terms of the tangent modulus of the composite and measures of the effective strength of the lamina.

  12. Antenna design and tissue parameters considerations for an improved modelling of microwave ablation in the liver.

    PubMed

    Karampatzakis, Andreas; Kühn, Sven; Tsanidis, George; Neufeld, Esra; Samaras, Theodoros; Kuster, Niels

    2013-05-21

    Microwave ablation is a technique used in treating hepatocellular carcinoma, especially in cases where surgical removal is impossible. In the present study we are investigating the effects of design characteristics of a coaxial slot antenna (single- versus double-slot, slot-to-tip distance and slot size) on the ablation zone characteristics (dimensions and shape). The specific absorption rate field and the temperature rises are calculated for a variety of application times and powers. A plateau in the ablation zone dimensions in healthy and cirrhotic liver models is predicted, but not in malignant ones. It is found that the value of the perfusion rate (which is different for each clinical case) is of crucial importance in order to correctly estimate the ablation zone. An underestimation of dimensions is expected, if higher perfusion rates are used (i.e., values for healthy tissue rather than malignant). In contrast, an exact determination of the values of relative permittivity and conductivity is less significant for predicting the ablation zone. PMID:23603829

  13. Laser ablation of concrete.

    SciTech Connect

    Savina, M.

    1998-10-05

    Laser ablation is effective both as an analytical tool and as a means of removing surface coatings. The elemental composition of surfaces can be determined by either mass spectrometry or atomic emission spectroscopy of the atomized effluent. Paint can be removed from aircraft without damage to the underlying aluminum substrate, and environmentally damaged buildings and sculptures can be restored by ablating away deposited grime. A recent application of laser ablation is the removal of radioactive contaminants from the surface and near-surface regions of concrete. We present the results of ablation tests on concrete samples using a high power pulsed Nd:YAG laser with fiber optic beam delivery. The laser-surface interaction was studied on various model systems consisting of Type I Portland cement with varying amounts of either fine silica or sand in an effort to understand the effect of substrate composition on ablation rates and mechanisms. A sample of non-contaminated concrete from a nuclear power plant was also studied. In addition, cement and concrete samples were doped with non-radioactive isotopes of elements representative of cooling waterspills, such as cesium and strontium, and analyzed by laser-resorption mass spectrometry to determine the contamination pathways. These samples were also ablated at high power to determine the efficiency with which surface contaminants are removed and captured. The results show that the neat cement matrix melts and vaporizes when little or no sand or aggregate is present. Surface flows of liquid material are readily apparent on the ablated surface and the captured aerosol takes the form of glassy beads up to a few tens of microns in diameter. The presence of sand and aggregate particles causes the material to disaggregate on ablation, with intact particles on the millimeter size scale leaving the surface. Laser resorption mass spectrometric analysis showed that cesium and potassium have similar chemical environments in the

  14. Plasmonic properties and sizing of core-shell Cu-Cu2O nanoparticles fabricated by femtosecond laser ablation in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santillán, J. M. J.; Videla, F. A.; Schinca, D. C.; Scaffardi, L. B.

    2012-10-01

    The synthesis and study of optical properties of copper nanoparticles are of great interest since they are applicable to different areas such as catalysis, lubrication, conductive thin films and nanofluids. Their optical properties are governed by the characteristics of the dielectric function of the metal, its size and environment. The study of the dielectric function with radius is carried out through the contribution of free and bound electrons. The first one is corrected for size using the modification of the damping constant. The second one takes into consideration the contribution of the interband transitions from the d-band to the conduction band, considering the larger spacing between electronic energy levels as the particle decreases in size below 2 nm. Taking into account these specific modifications, it was possible to fit the bulk complex dielectric function, and consequently, determine optical parameters and band energy values such as the coefficient for bound electron contribution Qbulk = 2 x 1024, gap energy Eg = 1.95 eV, Fermi energy EF = 2.15 eV and damping constant for bound electrons γb = 1.15 x 1014 Hz. The fit of the experimental extinction spectra of the colloidal suspensions obtained by 500 μJ ultrashort pulse laser ablation of solid target in water and acetone, reveals that the nanometric and subnanometric particles have a Cu- Cu2O structure due to an oxidation reaction during the fabrication. The results were compared with those obtained by AFM, observing a very good agreement between the two techniques, showing that Optical Extinction Spectroscopy (OES) is a good complementary technique to standard electron microscopy.

  15. Vein Controlled Index Mineral Crystal Size Distribution in Barrow's Metamorphic Zones, Glen Esk, Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewerentz, A.; Skelton, A.; Linde, J. K.; Nilsson, J.; Möller, C.; Crill, P. M.; Spicuzza, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    The concept of index mineral based metamorphic zones was first introduced by George Barrow a little more than 100 years ago, and the Barrovian metamorphic zones are still today used as framework by metamorphic petrologists. Today the importance of metamorphic fluids for driving metamorphic reactions is widely recognised. Even so, a general view is that Barrovian metamorphism is solely controlled by pressure, temperature, and protolith composition. This study aims to establish if and how fluids control index mineral formation and distribution during Barrovian metamorphism. To do so, we use samples from Barrow's own type locality in Glen Esk, Southeast Scottish Highlands, and study possible relationships between veining and index mineral distribution. In addition to petrographic and textural observations and analyses, we also use whole rock chemistry, mineral chemistry, and oxygen isotope analyses. At low grade, in the chlorite zone and most of the biotite zone, no correlation between veining and index mineral distribution is seen. At higher grade, the index mineral abundance is shown to decrease away from veins in the garnet and staurolite zones. Pseudosection analysis show larger garnet stability fields in vein-adjacent rock. In addition, quartz abundance and oxygen isotope ratios of quartz coincidentally decrease, which we interpret as evidence for fluid-rock interaction. The kyanite zone shows a fairly homogenous kyanite distribution, but also indications of extensive fluid-rock interaction, such as high vein density and oxygen isotope ratios in equilibrium with the fluid. Based on our observations and the geochemical datasets, we conclude that fluid played a major role in the stabilisation and distribution of the Barrovian index minerals in Glen Esk, and that the fluid control was larger at higher metamorphic grades.

  16. Pulmonary Thermal Ablation: Comparison of Radiofrequency and Microwave Devices by Using Gross Pathologic and CT Findings in a Swine Model

    PubMed Central

    Brace, Christopher L.; Hinshaw, J. Louis; Laeseke, Paul F.; Sampson, Lisa A.; Lee, Fred T.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the performance of equivalently sized radiofrequency and microwave ablation applicators in a normal porcine lung model. Materials and Methods: All experiments were approved by an institutional animal care and use committee. A total of 18 ablations were performed in vivo in normal porcine lungs. By using computed tomographic (CT) fluoroscopic guidance, a 17-gauge cooled triaxial microwave antenna (n = 9) and a 17-gauge cooled radiofrequency (RF) electrode (n = 9) were placed percutaneously. Ablations were performed for 10 minutes by using either 125 W of microwave power or 200 W of RF power delivered with an impedance-based pulsing algorithm. CT images were acquired every minute during ablation to monitor growth. Animals were sacrificed after the procedure. Ablation zones were then excised and sectioned transverse to the applicator in 5-mm increments. Minimum and maximum diameter, cross-sectional area, length, and circularity were measured from gross specimens and CT images. Comparisons of each measurement were performed by using a mixed-effects model; P < .05 was considered to indicate a significant difference. Results: Mean diameter (3.32 cm ± 0.19 [standard deviation] vs 2.70 cm ± 0.23, P < .001) was 25% larger with microwave ablation and mean cross-sectional area (8.25 cm2 ± 0.92 vs 5.45 cm2 ± 1.14, P < .001) was 50% larger with microwave ablation, compared with RF ablation. With microwave ablation, the zones of ablation were also significantly more circular in cross section (mean circularity, 0.90 ± 0.06 vs 0.82 ± 0.09; P < .05). One small pneumothorax was noted during RF ablation but stabilized without intervention. Conclusion: Microwave ablation with a 17-gauge high-power triaxial antenna creates larger and more circular zones of ablation than does a similarly sized RF applicator in a preclinical animal model. Microwave ablation may be a more effective treatment of lung tumors. © RSNA, 2009 PMID:19336667

  17. Improving Precision and Accuracy of Isotope Ratios from Short Transient Laser Ablation-Multicollector-Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry Signals: Application to Micrometer-Size Uranium Particles.

    PubMed

    Claverie, Fanny; Hubert, Amélie; Berail, Sylvain; Donard, Ariane; Pointurier, Fabien; Pécheyran, Christophe

    2016-04-19

    The isotope drift encountered on short transient signals measured by multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS) is related to differences in detector time responses. Faraday to Faraday and Faraday to ion counter time lags were determined and corrected using VBA data processing based on the synchronization of the isotope signals. The coefficient of determination of the linear fit between the two isotopes was selected as the best criterion to obtain accurate detector time lag. The procedure was applied to the analysis by laser ablation-MC-ICPMS of micrometer sized uranium particles (1-3.5 μm). Linear regression slope (LRS) (one isotope plotted over the other), point-by-point, and integration methods were tested to calculate the (235)U/(238)U and (234)U/(238)U ratios. Relative internal precisions of 0.86 to 1.7% and 1.2 to 2.4% were obtained for (235)U/(238)U and (234)U/(238)U, respectively, using LRS calculation, time lag, and mass bias corrections. A relative external precision of 2.1% was obtained for (235)U/(238)U ratios with good accuracy (relative difference with respect to the reference value below 1%). PMID:27031645

  18. Changes in Arctic Sea Ice Floe Size Distribution in the Marginal Ice Zone in a Thickness and Floe Size Distribution Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Stern, H. L., III; Hwang, P. B.; Schweiger, A. J. B.; Stark, M.; Steele, M.

    2015-12-01

    To better describe the state of sea ice in the marginal ice zone (MIZ) with floes of varying thicknesses and sizes, both an ice thickness distribution (ITD) and a floe size distribution (FSD) are needed. We have developed a FSD theory [Zhang et al., 2015] that is coupled to the ITD theory of Thorndike et al. [1975] in order to explicitly simulate the evolution of FSD and ITD jointly. The FSD theory includes a FSD function and a FSD conservation equation in parallel with the ITD equation. The FSD equation takes into account changes in FSD due to ice advection, thermodynamic growth, and lateral melting. It also includes changes in FSD because of mechanical redistribution of floe size due to ice opening, ridging and, particularly, ice fragmentation induced by stochastic ocean surface waves. The floe size redistribution due to ice fragmentation is based on the assumption that wave-induced breakup is a random process such that when an ice floe is broken, floes of any smaller sizes have an equal opportunity to form, without being either favored or excluded. It is also based on the assumption that floes of larger sizes are easier to break because they are subject to larger flexure-induced stresses and strains than smaller floes that are easier to ride with waves with little bending; larger floes also have higher areal coverages and therefore higher probabilities to break. These assumptions with corresponding formulations ensure that the simulated FSD follows a power law as observed by satellites and airborne surveys. The FSD theory has been tested in the Pan-arctic Ice/Ocean Modeling and Assimilation System (PIOMAS). The existing PIOMAS has 12 categories each for ice thickness, ice enthalpy, and snow depth. With the implementation of the FSD theory, PIOMAS is able to represent 12 categories of floe sizes ranging from 0.1 m to ~3000 m. It is found that the simulated 12-category FSD agrees reasonably well with FSD derived from SAR and MODIS images. In this study, we will

  19. Energy balance in the ablation zone during the summer season at the Gran Campo Nevado Ice Cap in the Southern Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Christoph; Kilian, Rolf; Glaser, Michael

    2007-10-01

    The energy balance and ablation of Glaciar Lengua were investigated during the austral summer of 1999/2000. Glaciar Lengua is located in Patagonia, in the southernmost Andes of Chile (53°S), within an extremely maritime climate. The aim of this study was to gain insight into current energy fluxes at this location and to evaluate how the energy fluxes depend on meteorological variables. From February to April 2000 an automated weather station was operated on Glaciar Lengua. Ablation was measured repeatedly at stakes during the same period. The point energy balance was calculated using the bulk approach formulation. The effective roughness length was adjusted in order to calibrate the model to the measured ablation. It was revealed that sensible heat transfer is the major contribution to the energy balance adding 54% of the energy available for melt. Net radiation contributes only 35% to the overall energy balance. Minor contributors are the latent heat flux (7%) and the heat flux by precipitation (4%). The net radiation shows little variance from day to day. Cross-correlations of the daily mean values of the energy fluxes derived from the energy balance model and meteorological variables reveal that air temperature and wind speed are the key factors controlling the summer energy balance in the ablation area. Melt derived from a multiple regression model based on these two variables correlates with computed melt with a correlation coefficient of 0.92. From the measured ablation, a summer-time degree-day factor of 7.6 mm·°C - 1 was derived for the ablation area.

  20. In Vivo Evaluation of Lung Microwave Ablation in a Porcine Tumor Mimic Model

    SciTech Connect

    Planche, Olivier; Teriitehau, Christophe; Boudabous, Sana; Robinson, Joey Marie; Rao, Pramod; Deschamps, Frederic; Farouil, Geoffroy; Baere, Thierry de

    2013-02-15

    To evaluate the microwave ablation of created tumor mimics in the lung of a large animal model (pigs), with examination of the ablative synergy of multiple antennas. Fifty-six tumor-mimic models of various sizes were created in 15 pigs by using barium-enriched minced collected thigh muscle injected into the lung of the same animal. Tumors were ablated under fluoroscopic guidance by single-antenna and multiple-antenna microwaves. Thirty-five tumor models were treated in 11 pigs with a single antenna at 75 W for 15 min, with 15 measuring 20 mm in diameter, 10 measuring 30 mm, and 10 measuring 40 mm. Mean circularity of the single-antenna ablation zones measured 0.64 {+-} 0.12, with a diameter of 35.7 {+-} 8.7 mm along the axis of the antenna and 32.7 {+-} 12.8 mm perpendicular to the feeding point. Multiple-antenna delivery of 75 W for 15 min caused intraprocedural death of 2 animals; modified protocol to 60 W for 10 min resulted in an ablation zone with a diameter of 43.0 {+-} 7.7 along the axis of the antenna and 54.8 {+-} 8.5 mm perpendicular to the feeding point; circularity was 0.70 {+-} 0.10. A single microwave antenna can create ablation zones large enough to cover lung tumor mimic models of {<=}4 cm with no heat sink effect from vessels of {<=}6 mm. Synergic use of 3 antennas allows ablation of larger volumes than single-antenna or radiofrequency ablation, but great caution must be taken when 3 antennas are used simultaneously in the lung in clinical practice.

  1. Analysis of the structure, configuration, and sizing of Cu and Cu oxide nanoparticles generated by fs laser ablation of solid target in liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Santillan, J. M. J.; Videla, F. A.; Schinca, D. C.; Scaffardi, L. B.; Fernandez van Raap, M. B.

    2013-04-07

    We report on the analysis of structure, configuration, and sizing of Cu and Cu oxide nanoparticles (Nps) produced by femtosecond (fs) laser ablation of solid copper target in liquids. Laser pulse energy ranged between 500 {mu}J and 50 {mu}J. Water and acetone were used to produce the colloidal suspensions. The study was performed through optical extinction spectroscopy using Mie theory to fit the full experimental spectra, considering free and bound electrons size dependent contributions to the metal dielectric function. Raman spectroscopy and AFM technique were also used to characterize the sample. Considering the possible oxidation of copper during the fabrication process, two species (Cu and Cu{sub 2}O) arranged in two structures (bare core or core-shell) and in two configuration types (Cu-Cu{sub 2}O or Cu{sub 2}O-Cu) were considered for the fitting depending on the laser pulse energy and the surrounding media. For water at high energy, it can be observed that a Cu-Cu{sub 2}O configuration fits the experimental spectra of the colloidal suspension, while for decreasing energy and below a certain threshold, a Cu{sub 2}O-Cu configuration needs to be included for the optimum fit. Both species coexist for energies below 170 {mu}J for water. On the other hand, for acetone at high energy, optimum fit of the full spectrum suggests the presence a bimodal Cu-Cu{sub 2}O core-shell Nps distribution while for decreasing energy and below a 70 {mu}J threshold energy value, Cu{sub 2}O-Cu core-shell Nps must be included, together with the former configuration, for the fit of the full spectrum. We discuss possible reasons for the changes in the structural configuration of the core-shell Nps.

  2. Analysis of the structure, configuration, and sizing of Cu and Cu oxide nanoparticles generated by fs laser ablation of solid target in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santillán, J. M. J.; Videla, F. A.; Fernández van Raap, M. B.; Schinca, D. C.; Scaffardi, L. B.

    2013-04-01

    We report on the analysis of structure, configuration, and sizing of Cu and Cu oxide nanoparticles (Nps) produced by femtosecond (fs) laser ablation of solid copper target in liquids. Laser pulse energy ranged between 500 μJ and 50 μJ. Water and acetone were used to produce the colloidal suspensions. The study was performed through optical extinction spectroscopy using Mie theory to fit the full experimental spectra, considering free and bound electrons size dependent contributions to the metal dielectric function. Raman spectroscopy and AFM technique were also used to characterize the sample. Considering the possible oxidation of copper during the fabrication process, two species (Cu and Cu2O) arranged in two structures (bare core or core-shell) and in two configuration types (Cu-Cu2O or Cu2O-Cu) were considered for the fitting depending on the laser pulse energy and the surrounding media. For water at high energy, it can be observed that a Cu-Cu2O configuration fits the experimental spectra of the colloidal suspension, while for decreasing energy and below a certain threshold, a Cu2O-Cu configuration needs to be included for the optimum fit. Both species coexist for energies below 170 μJ for water. On the other hand, for acetone at high energy, optimum fit of the full spectrum suggests the presence a bimodal Cu-Cu2O core-shell Nps distribution while for decreasing energy and below a 70 μJ threshold energy value, Cu2O-Cu core-shell Nps must be included, together with the former configuration, for the fit of the full spectrum. We discuss possible reasons for the changes in the structural configuration of the core-shell Nps.

  3. Climate controls how ecosystems size the root zone storage capacity at catchment scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, H.; Hrachowitz, M.; Schymanski, S. J.; Fenicia, F.; Sriwongsitanon, N.; Savenije, H. H. G.

    2014-11-01

    The root zone moisture storage capacity (SR) of terrestrial ecosystems is a buffer providing vegetation continuous access to water and a critical factor controlling land-atmospheric moisture exchange, hydrological response, and biogeochemical processes. However, it is impossible to observe directly at catchment scale. Here, using data from 300 diverse catchments, it was tested that, treating the root zone as a reservoir, the mass curve technique (MCT), an engineering method for reservoir design, can be used to estimate catchment-scale SR from effective rainfall and plant transpiration. Supporting the initial hypothesis, it was found that MCT-derived SR coincided with model-derived estimates. These estimates of parameter SR can be used to constrain hydrological, climate, and land surface models. Further, the study provides evidence that ecosystems dynamically design their root systems to bridge droughts with return periods of 10-40 years, controlled by climate and linked to aridity index, inter-storm duration, seasonality, and runoff ratio.

  4. A SUPER-EARTH-SIZED PLANET ORBITING IN OR NEAR THE HABITABLE ZONE AROUND A SUN-LIKE STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Barclay, Thomas; Burke, Christopher J.; Howell, Steve B.; Rowe, Jason F.; Huber, Daniel; Jenkins, Jon M.; Quintana, Elisa V.; Still, Martin; Twicken, Joseph D.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Borucki, William J.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Clarke, Bruce D.; Christiansen, Jessie L; Coughlin, Jeffrey L.; Ciardi, David; Fischer, Debra A.; and others

    2013-05-10

    We present the discovery of a super-Earth-sized planet in or near the habitable zone of a Sun-like star. The host is Kepler-69, a 13.7 mag G4V-type star. We detect two periodic sets of transit signals in the 3-year flux time series of Kepler-69, obtained with the Kepler spacecraft. Using the very high precision Kepler photometry, and follow-up observations, our confidence that these signals represent planetary transits is >99.3%. The inner planet, Kepler-69b, has a radius of 2.24{sup +0.44}{sub -0.29} R{sub Circled-Plus} and orbits the host star every 13.7 days. The outer planet, Kepler-69c, is a super-Earth-sized object with a radius of 1.7{sup +0.34}{sub -0.23} R{sub Circled-Plus} and an orbital period of 242.5 days. Assuming an Earth-like Bond albedo, Kepler-69c has an equilibrium temperature of 299 {+-} 19 K, which places the planet close to the habitable zone around the host star. This is the smallest planet found by Kepler to be orbiting in or near the habitable zone of a Sun-like star and represents an important step on the path to finding the first true Earth analog.

  5. Plastic zone size and crack tip opening displacement of a Dugdale crack interacting with a coated circular inclusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoh, H. J.; Xiao, Z. M.; Luo, J.

    2010-09-01

    An analytical investigation on the plastic zone size of a crack near a coated circular inclusion under three different loading conditions of uniaxial tension, uniform tension and pure shear was carried out. Both the crack and coated circular inclusion are embedded in an infinite matrix, with the crack oriented along the radial direction of the inclusion. In the solution procedure, the crack is simulated as a continuous distribution of edge dislocations. With the Dugdale model of small-scale yielding [J. Mech. Phys. Solids 8 (1960) p. 100], two thin strips of yielded plastic zones are introduced at both crack tips. Using the solution for a coated circular inclusion interacting with a single dislocation as the Green's function, the physical problem is formulated into a set of singular integral equations. Using the method of Erdogan and Gupta [Q. J. Appl. Math. 29 (1972) p. 525] and iterative numerical procedures, the singular integral equations are solved numerically for the plastic zone sizes and crack tip opening displacement.

  6. Pore size controls on the base of the methane hydrate stability zone in the Kumano Basin, offshore Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daigle, Hugh; Dugan, Brandon

    2014-11-01

    The base of the methane hydrate stability zone (MHSZ) in the Kumano Basin, offshore Japan, is marked by a bottom-simulating reflection (BSR) on seismic data. At Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Site C0002, which penetrates this BSR, the in situ temperature profile combined with bulk seawater methane equilibrium conditions suggest that the base of the MHSZ is 428 m below seafloor (bsf), which is 28 m deeper than the observed BSR (400 m bsf). We found that submicron pore sizes determined by mercury injection capillary pressure are sufficiently small to cause 64% of the observed uplift of the base of the MHSZ by the Gibbs-Thomson effect. This is the most thorough characterization of pore sizes within the MHSZ performed to date and illustrates the extent to which pore size can influence MHSZ thickness. Our results demonstrate the importance of considering lithology and pore structure when assessing methane hydrate stability conditions in marine sediments.

  7. Modeling and Validation of Microwave Ablations with Internal Vaporization

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Jason; Birla, Sohan; Bedoya, Mariajose; Jones, David; Subbiah, Jeyam; Brace, Christopher L.

    2014-01-01

    Numerical simulation is increasingly being utilized for computer-aided design of treatment devices, analysis of ablation growth, and clinical treatment planning. Simulation models to date have incorporated electromagnetic wave propagation and heat conduction, but not other relevant physics such as water vaporization and mass transfer. Such physical changes are particularly noteworthy during the intense heat generation associated with microwave heating. In this work, a numerical model was created that integrates microwave heating with water vapor generation and transport by using porous media assumptions in the tissue domain. The heating physics of the water vapor model was validated through temperature measurements taken at locations 5, 10 and 20 mm away from the heating zone of the microwave antenna in homogenized ex vivo bovine liver setup. Cross-sectional area of water vapor transport was validated through intra-procedural computed tomography (CT) during microwave ablations in homogenized ex vivo bovine liver. Iso-density contours from CT images were compared to vapor concentration contours from the numerical model at intermittent time points using the Jaccard Index. In general, there was an improving correlation in ablation size dimensions as the ablation procedure proceeded, with a Jaccard Index of 0.27, 0.49, 0.61, 0.67 and 0.69 at 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 minutes. This study demonstrates the feasibility and validity of incorporating water vapor concentration into thermal ablation simulations and validating such models experimentally. PMID:25330481

  8. Modeling and validation of microwave ablations with internal vaporization.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Jason; Birla, Sohan; Bedoya, Mariajose; Jones, David; Subbiah, Jeyam; Brace, Christopher L

    2015-02-01

    Numerical simulation is increasingly being utilized for computer-aided design of treatment devices, analysis of ablation growth, and clinical treatment planning. Simulation models to date have incorporated electromagnetic wave propagation and heat conduction, but not other relevant physics such as water vaporization and mass transfer. Such physical changes are particularly noteworthy during the intense heat generation associated with microwave heating. In this paper, a numerical model was created that integrates microwave heating with water vapor generation and transport by using porous media assumptions in the tissue domain. The heating physics of the water vapor model was validated through temperature measurements taken at locations 5, 10, and 20 mm away from the heating zone of the microwave antenna in homogenized ex vivo bovine liver setup. Cross-sectional area of water vapor transport was validated through intraprocedural computed tomography (CT) during microwave ablations in homogenized ex vivo bovine liver. Iso-density contours from CT images were compared to vapor concentration contours from the numerical model at intermittent time points using the Jaccard index. In general, there was an improving correlation in ablation size dimensions as the ablation procedure proceeded, with a Jaccard index of 0.27, 0.49, 0.61, 0.67, and 0.69 at 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 min, respectively. This study demonstrates the feasibility and validity of incorporating water vapor concentration into thermal ablation simulations and validating such models experimentally. PMID:25330481

  9. Endometrial ablation

    MedlinePlus

    ... can be seen on the video screen. Small tools can be used through the scope to remove abnormal growths or tissue for examination. Ablation uses heat, cold, or electricity to destroy the lining of the womb. The ...

  10. Ablation article and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, W. D.; Sullivan, E. M. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An ablation article, such as a conical heat shield, having an ablating surface is provided with at least one discrete area of at least one seed material, such as aluminum. When subjected to ablation conditions, the seed material is ablated. Radiation emanating from the ablated seed material is detected to analyze ablation effects without disturbing the ablation surface. By providing different seed materials having different radiation characteristics, the ablating effects on various areas of the ablating surface can be analyzed under any prevailing ablation conditions. The ablating article can be provided with means for detecting the radiation characteristics of the ablated seed material to provide a self-contained analysis unit.

  11. Tumour ablation: technical aspects

    PubMed Central

    Bodner, Gerd; Bale, Reto

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Image-guided percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive, relatively low-risk procedure for tumour treatment. Local recurrence and survival rates depend on the rate of complete ablation of the entire tumour including a sufficient margin of surrounding healthy tissue. Currently a variety of different RFA devices are available. The interventionalist must be able to predict the configuration and extent of the resulting ablation necrosis. Accurate planning and execution of RFA according to the size and geometry of the tumour is essential. In order to minimize complications, individualized treatment strategies may be necessary for tumours close to vital structures. This review examines the state-of-the art of different device technologies, approaches, and treatment strategies for percutaneous RFA of liver tumours. PMID:19965296

  12. Computed Tomography-Guided Radiofrequency Ablation Following Transcatheter Arterial Embolization in Treatment of Large Hepatic Hemangiomas

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Jiansong; Gao, Jun; Zhao, Lizhen; Tu, Jianfei; Song, Jingjing; Sun, Wenbing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to evaluate the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of computed tomography (CT)-guided radiofrequency (RF) ablation combined with transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) to treat large (≥10 cm) hepatic hemangiomas. We retrospectively reviewed our sequential experience with 15 large hepatic hemangiomas in 15 patients. The mean diameter of the 15 hemangiomas was 13.0 ± 2.2 cm (10.0–16.0 cm). RF ablation combined with TAE treatment was performed successfully in all patients. The mean diameter of the hemangiomas decreased from 13.0 ± 2.2 to 7.1 ± 2.0 cm (P < 0.001) after TAE treatment. Out of 15 hepatic hemangiomas, 14 (93.3%) showed no enhancement on CT or MRI indicating complete ablation after RF treatment. The mean diameter of the ablation zone decreased to 6.1 ± 2.0 cm 1 month after ablation and further decreased to 4.9 ± 1.6 cm 6 months after ablation. There were 6 complications related to the ablation in 4 patients. According to the Dindo–Clavien classification, all the complications were minor (Grade I). RF ablation combined with TAE is a safe and effective treatment for large hepatic hemangiomas. TAE can improve the disruption of lesion blood supply and reduce lesion size to facilitate subsequent RF ablation and reduce the risk of ablation-related complications. PMID:27082617

  13. Practical Laser Ablation U-Th Thermochronology and Geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodges, K.; Van Soest, M. C.; Tripathy, A.; Boyce, J. W.

    2012-12-01

    this technique by dating a variety of accessory minerals, but it appears especially useful for zircon, which often exhibits fine-scale U + Th zoning. Employing ablation pit sizes on the scale of tens of microns, we are able to measure (U-Th)/He dates with analytical precisions roughly twice those of conventional (U-Th)/He measurements of the same material. With anticipated improvements in analytical protocol, we are optimistic that the difference in precision level between conventional and laser ablation analysis can be reduced further.

  14. Dynamics of Particle Size Distribution in Slide-Hold Tests on Laboratory Gouge Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhuri, S. K.; Dewers, T. A.; Scott, T. E.

    2001-12-01

    Slide-hold tests using triaxially-loaded precut forcing blocks and artificial gouge examine contrasts in gouge particle size dynamics during frictional sliding and annealing or healing stages. A series of room-dry sliding experiments were conducted to various shear strains using dry gypsum gouge in between precut steel forcing members. A separate series of experiments saturated with distilled water was conducted at a pore pressure of 6.9 MPa (effective pressure of 13.8 MPa identical to the dry tests). The latter experiments were taken to a constant shear strain but were held under shear loading for various lengths of time (0.01-10 hours) after slip. Pore-volume change was monitored during hold periods. Particle size distribution (PSD) of gouge was measured using a laser particle size analyzer with a measurement range of 0.4-2000 microns. Stress-strain behavior for both dry and wet tests revealed multiple stress drops or stick-slip events and were similar suggesting no marked strengthening or weakening effect due to presence of water over the time scale of sliding. Gouge PSD's were fit to a log-normal distribution function and then analyzed in terms of the moments of mass-size distributions. The best log-normal fits were obtained in the coarser fraction of the gouge (larger than peak size). PSD means decreased with shear while higher moments such as skewness increased with shear. Particle number-size relationships computed from the mass-size distributions revealed a fractal nature of the gouge with excellent fits obtained for fine and intermediate fractions (smaller than peak size). A fractal dimension (D) around 2.6 consistent with previous work on both natural and experimental fault gouge was obtained. There appears to be a correlation between D and the amount of shear strain and an inverse relationship between D and the maximum particle size. Empirical distributions such as the Weibull, Rosin-Rammler distribution functions and others provide good approximations

  15. Larger low voltage zone in endocardial unipolar map compared with that in epicardial bipolar map indicates difficulty in eliminating ventricular tachycardia by catheter ablation.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Koji; Noda, Takashi; Satomi, Kazuhiro; Wada, Mitsuru; Nakajima, Ikutaro; Ishibashi, Kohei; Okamura, Hideo; Noguchi, Teruo; Anzai, Toshihisa; Yasuda, Satoshi; Ogawa, Hisao; Shimizu, Wataru; Aiba, Takeshi; Kamakura, Shiro; Kusano, Kengo

    2016-08-01

    Patients with ischemic and non-ischemic cardiomyopathy often have substrate for ventricular tachycardia (VT) in the endocardium (ENDO), epicardium (EPI), and/or intramural. Although it has been reported that the ENDO unipolar (UNI) voltage map is useful in detecting EPI substrate, its feasibility to detect intramural scarring and its usefulness in radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) remain unclear. To assess the relationship between the left ventricle (LV) ENDO UNI voltage map and the LV EPI bipolar (BIP) voltage map, and to determine the usefulness of the ENDO UNI voltage map to guide RFCA for VT in patients with cardiomyopathy undergoing combined ENDO- and EPI RFCA. Eleven patients with VT undergoing detailed ENDO and EPI electroanatomical mapping of the LV were included (mean age 59 ± 11 years, 9 men). We assessed the value of the LV ENDO UNI voltage map in identifying EPI and/or intramural substrate in these 11 patients with non-ischemic or ischemic cardiomyopathy. The underlying heart disease was dilated cardiomyopathy in 4 patients, cardiac sarcoidosis in 3, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in 2, and ischemic heart disease in 2 patients. The mean LV ejection fraction was 24 ± 7 %. The low voltage zone (LVZ) was defined as <1.5 mV for LV ENDO BIP electrograms (EGMs), <8.3 mV for LV ENDO UNI EGMs, and <1.0 mV for LV EPI BIP EGMs. The surface area of each LVZ was measured. We also measured the LVZ of the spatial overlap between ENDO UNI and EPI BIP voltage maps using the transparency mode on CARTO software. We performed RFCA at the ENDO and EPI based on activation and/or substrate maps, targeting the LVZ and/or abnormal EGMs. The LVZ was present in the LV ENDO BIP voltage map in 10 of 11 patients (42 ± 33 cm(2)), and in the LV ENDO UNI voltage map in 10 of 11 patients (72 ± 45 cm(2)). The LVZ was present in the EPI BIP voltage map in 9 of 11 patients (70 ± 61 cm(2)), and the LVZ in the ENDO UNI voltage map was also seen in all 9 patients

  16. Climate controls how ecosystems size the root zone storage capacity at catchment scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Hongkai; Hrachowitz, Markus; Schymanski, Stan; Fenicia, Fabrizio; Sriwongsitanon, Nutchanart; Savenije, Hubert

    2015-04-01

    The root zone moisture storage capacity (SR) of terrestrial ecosystems is a buffer providing vegetation continuous access to water and a critical factor controlling land-atmospheric moisture exchange, hydrological response and biogeochemical processes. However, it is impossible to observe directly at catchment scale. Here, using data from 300 diverse catchments, it was tested that, treating the root zone as a reservoir, the mass curve technique (MCT), an engineering method for reservoir design, can be used to estimate catchment-scale SR from effective rainfall and plant transpiration. Supporting the initial hypothesis, it was found that MCT-derived SR coincided with model-derived estimates. These estimates of parameter SR can be used to constrain hydrological, climate and land surface models. Further, the study provides evidence that ecosystems dynamically design their root systems to bridge droughts with return periods of 10-40 years, controlled by climate and linked to aridity index, inter-storm duration, seasonality and runoff ratio. This adaptation of ecosystems to climate could be explored for prediction in ungauged basins. We found that implementing the MCT-derived SR without recalibration has dramatically increased hydrological model transferability.

  17. Continent-sized anomalous zones with low seismic velocity at the base of Earth's mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnero, Edward J.; McNamara, Allen K.; Shim, Sang-Heon

    2016-07-01

    Seismic images of Earth's interior reveal two massive anomalous zones at the base of the mantle, above the core, where seismic waves travel slowly. The mantle materials that surround these anomalous regions are thought to be composed of cooler rocks associated with downward advection of former oceanic tectonic plates. However, the origin and composition of the anomalous provinces is uncertain. These zones have long been depicted as warmer-than-average mantle materials related to convective upwelling. Yet, they may also be chemically distinct from the surrounding mantle, and potentially partly composed of subducted or primordial material, and have therefore been termed thermochemical piles. From seismic, geochemical and mineral physics data, the emerging view is that these thermochemical piles appear denser than the surrounding mantle materials, are dynamically stable and long-lived, and are shaped by larger-scale mantle flow. Whether remnants of a primordial layer or later accumulations of more-dense materials, the composition of the piles is modified over time by stirring and by chemical reactions with material from the surrounding mantle, underlying core and potentially from volatile elements transported into the deep Earth by subducted plates. Upwelling mantle plumes may originate from the thermochemical piles, so the unusual chemical composition of the piles could be the source of distinct trace-element signatures observed in hotspot lavas.

  18. RF Field Visualization of RF Ablation at the Larmor Frequency

    PubMed Central

    Stang, Pascal; Kerr, Adam; Pauly, John; Scott, Greig

    2012-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation is an effective minimally invasive treatment for tumors. One primary source of difficulty is monitoring and controlling the ablation region. Currently, RF ablation is performed at 460 kHz, for which MRI could play a role given its capability for temperature monitoring and tumor visualization. If instead the ablation were to be performed at the MRI Larmor frequency, then the MR capability for B1 field mapping could be used to directly visualize the RF fields created by the ablation currents. Visualizing the RF fields may enable better control of the ablation currents, enabling better control of lesion shape and size and improving repeatability. We demonstrate the feasibility of performing RF ablations at 64 MHz and show preliminary results from imaging the RF fields from the ablation. The post-ablation RF fields show an increase in current density in the ablated region, consistent with an increase in conductivity of the ablated tissue. PMID:21775256

  19. Techniques for determining partial size distribution of particulate matter: Laser diffraction versus electrical sensing zone

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The study of health impacts, emission estimation of particulate matter (PM), and development of new control technologies require knowledge of PM characteristics. Among these PM characteristics, the particle size distribution (PSD) is perhaps the most important physical parameter governing particle b...

  20. Slip-weakening zone sizes at nucleation of catastrophic subaerial and submarine landslides by gradually increasing pore pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viesca, R. C.; Rice, J. R.

    2011-12-01

    We address the nucleation of dynamic landslide rupture in response to gradual pore pressure increases. Nucleation marks the onset of acceleration of the overlying slope mass due to the suddenly rapid enlargement of a sub-surface zone of shear failure, previously deforming quasi-statically. We model that zone as a planar surface undergoing initially linear slip-weakening frictional failure within a bordering linear-elastic medium. The results are also relevant to earthquake nucleation. The sub-surface rupture zone considered runs parallel to the free surface of a uniform slope, under a 2D plane-strain deformation state. We show results for ruptures with friction coefficients following linear slip weakening (i.e., the residual friction is not yet reached). For spatially broad increases in pore pressure, the nucleation length depends on a ratio of depth to a cohesive zone length scale. In the very broad-increase limit, a direct numerical solution for nucleation lengths compares well with solutions to a corresponding eigenvalue problem (similar to Uenishi and Rice [JGR '03]), in which spatial variations in normal stress are neglected. We estimate nucleation lengths for subaerial and submarine conditions using data [e.g., Bishop et al., Géotech. '71; Stark et al., JGGE '05] from ring-shear tests on sediments (peak friction fp = 0.5, frictional slip-weakening rate within the range w = -df/d(slip) = 0.1/cm-1/cm). We assume that only pre-stresses, and not material properties, vary with depth. With such fp and w, we find for a range of subsurface depths and shear moduli μ that nucleation lengths are typically several hundred meters long for shallow undersea slopes, and up to an order of magnitude less for steeper slopes on the Earth's surface. In the submarine case, this puts nucleation lengths in a size range comparable to observed pore-pressure-generated seafloor disturbances as pockmarks [e.g., Gay et al., MG '06].

  1. [Determination of average particle diameter and size distribution of ultra-fine beta zeolite by capillary zone electrophoresis].

    PubMed

    Xue, Yan; Yang, Haiying; Yang, Yongtan

    2004-09-01

    A new method was developed for the determination of average particle diameter and size distribution of ultra-fine beta zeolite by capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE). The dispersion and stabilization conditions of ultra-fine beta zeolite powder in suspensions were investigated by measuring the isoelectric point (IEP) of the powder suspension. Stable dispersion condition of beta zeolite ultrafine particles in aqueous solution was obtained by adding beta zeolite into the buffer (1.25 mmol/L NaHCO3-5 mmol/L Na2CO3, pH 10.82). The calibration equation between migration time and particle size was established to obtain the data of particle diameter by relating the beta zeolite diameters determined by laser particle sizer with the migration time from electropherogram of beta zeolite through the cumulative percentage of particle distribution. The calibration equation between particle size and amount was also established to correct the deviation of the response caused by particle size as the special relating principle suggested in the paper. The method is advantageous in small sample quantity required, low cost and short measurement period for each individual analysis. PMID:15706938

  2. Grain size reduction of feldspar and pyroxene, phase mixing, and strain localization in lower crustal shear zones (Lofoten, Norway)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menegon, L.; Stunitz, H.; Nasipuri, P.; Svahnberg, H.; Heilbronner, R.

    2011-12-01

    High temperature shear zones are common in the magmatic suite of the granulite facies Lofoten basement of Norway, and typically consist of narrow structures (1 cm to 1 m in thickness) showing a mylonite-to ultramylonite transition from the shear zone boundary to the shear zone center. In this contribution we examine the deformation microstructures and synkinematic mineral assemblages of shear zones developed from a mangerite (=monzonite) protolith. The mineral assemblage in the host mangerite indicates anhydrous conditions (mesoperthite + clinopyroxene ± orthopyroxene), whereas the mineral assemblage in the shear zones consists of plagioclase + K-feldspar + quartz + hornblende + calcite + biotite ± clinopyroxene and indicates hydrated conditions. Hornblende-plagioclase geothermobarometry yields upper amphibolite- to granulite facies conditions during shearing (730-760° C, 0.55-0.8 GPa). The mylonite consists of two distinct compositional domains: a pyroxene-derived aggregate and a feldspar-derived aggregate. The pyroxene-derived aggregate consists of the products of the following breakdown reaction: clinopyroxene + plagioclase ± K-feldspar ± orthopyroxene + H2O + CO2 --> quartz + hornblende + calcite ± biotite. In the feldspar-derived aggregate fractured fragments of mesoperthite are surrounded by a bi-phase mixture of recrystallized plagioclase and K-feldspar. EBSD analysis indicates that the recrystallized grains originated as micro-fragments from fracturation, and recrystallization was compositionally-induced (e.g. An22 average composition of plagioclase in the mesoperthite, An14 in the recrystallized aggregate). Detailed grain size, grain shape and EBSD analysis indicate that diffusion creep was the dominant deformation mechanism in both aggregates. Spatial distribution of K-feldspar and plagioclase shows a well dispersed aggregate and may serve as a tool to characterize diffusion creep deformation in phase mixtures. In the ultramylonite the two

  3. Particle size distribution and estimated carbon flux across the Arabian Sea oxygen minimum zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roullier, F.; Berline, L.; Guidi, L.; Durrieu De Madron, X.; Picheral, M.; Sciandra, A.; Pesant, S.; Stemmann, L.

    2014-08-01

    The goal of the Arabian Sea section of the TARA oceans expedition was to study large particulate matter (LPM > 100 μm) distributions and possible impact of associated midwater biological processes on vertical carbon export through the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) of this region. We propose that observed spatial patterns in LPM distribution resulted from the timing and location of surface phytoplankton bloom, lateral transport, microbial processes in the core of the OMZ, and enhanced biological processes mediated by bacteria and zooplankton at the lower oxycline. Indeed, satellite-derived net primary production maps showed that the northern stations of the transect were under the influence of a previous major bloom event while the most southern stations were in a more oligotrophic situation. Lagrangian simulations of particle transport showed that deep particles of the northern stations could originate from the surface bloom while the southern stations could be considered as driven by 1-D vertical processes. In the first 200 m of the OMZ core, minima in nitrate concentrations and the intermediate nepheloid layer (INL) coincided with high concentrations of 100 μm < LPM < 200 μm. These particles could correspond to colonies of bacteria or detritus produced by anaerobic microbial activity. However, the calculated carbon flux through this layer was not affected. Vertical profiles of carbon flux indicate low flux attenuation in the OMZ, with a Martin model b exponent value of 0.22. At three stations, the lower oxycline was associated to a deep nepheloid layer, an increase of calculated carbon flux and an increase in mesozooplankton abundance. Enhanced bacterial activity and zooplankton feeding in the deep OMZ is proposed as a mechanism for the observed deep particle aggregation. Estimated lower flux attenuation in the upper OMZ and re-aggregation at the lower oxycline suggest that OMZ may be regions of enhanced carbon flux to the deep sea relative to non OMZ regions.

  4. Particles size distribution and carbon flux across the Arabian Sea Oxygen Minimum Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roullier, F.; Berline, L.; Guidi, L.; Sciandra, A.; Durrieu De Madron, X.; Picheral, M.; Pesant, S.; Stemmann, L.

    2013-12-01

    The goal of the Arabian Sea section of the TARA oceans expedition was to study Large Particulate Matter (LPM > 100 μm) distributions and possible impact of associated midwater biological processes on vertical carbon export through the Oxygen Minimum Zone (OMZ) of this region. We found that spatial patterns in LPM distribution resulted from the timing and location of surface phytoplankton bloom, lateral transport, microbial processes in the core of the OMZ, and zooplankton activity at the lower oxycline. Indeed, satellite-derived net primary production maps showed that the northern stations of the transect were under the influence of a previous major bloom event while, the most southern stations were in a more oligotrophic situation. Lagrangian simulations of particle transport showed that deep particles of the northern stations could originate from the surface bloom while the southern stations could be considered as driven by 1-D vertical processes. In the first 200 m of the OMZ core, minima in nitrate concentrations and the Intermediate Nepheloid Layer (INL) coincided with high concentrations of 100 μm < LPM < 200 μm. These particles could correspond to colonies of bacteria or detritus produced by anaerobic microbial activity. However, the calculated carbon flux through this layer was not affected. Vertical profiles of carbon flux indicate low flux attenuation in the OMZ, with a Martin model b exponent value of 0.22. At the lower oxycline, a deep nepheloid layer was associated to an increase of carbon flux and an increase in mesozooplankton abundance. Zooplankton feeding on un-mineralized sinking particles in the OMZ is proposed as a mechanism for the observed deep particle aggregation. These results suggest that OMZ may be regions of enhanced carbon flux to the deep sea relative to non-OMZ regions.

  5. Size separation of proteins by capillary zone electrophoresis with cationic hitchhiking (CZECH)

    PubMed Central

    Dolnik, Vladislav; Gurske, William A.

    2012-01-01

    The paper describes a method of size separation of proteins by capillary sieving electrophoresis with cationic surfactant. Proteins are separated within 12 minutes with repeatability of migration times better than 0.2%. Some proteins achieve the separation efficiency of 200,000 theoretical plates. The method can be used for determination of protein relative molecular masses. The accuracy of the determined relative molecular masses and the limitation of the method were investigated by the analysis of more than 60 proteins. The method also allows separation of protein oligomers. Proteins can be quantitated after the electrokinetic injection in the concentration range 0.07–0.43 g/L. The average detection limit is about 2 mg/L. PMID:21948216

  6. Lung Tumor Radiofrequency Ablation: Where Do We Stand?

    SciTech Connect

    Baere, Thierry de

    2011-04-15

    Today, radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of primary and metastatic lung tumor is increasingly used. Because RFA is most often used with curative intent, preablation workup must be a preoperative workup. General anesthesia provides higher feasibility than conscious sedation. The electrode positioning must be performed under computed tomography for sake of accuracy. The delivery of RFA must be adapted to tumor location, with different impedances used when treating tumors with or without pleural contact. The estimated rate of incomplete local treatment at 18 months was 7% (95% confidence interval, 3-14) per tumor, with incomplete treatment depicted at 4 months (n = 1), 6 months (n = 2), 9 months (n = 2), and 12 months (n = 2). Overall survival and lung disease-free survival at 18 months were, respectively, 71 and 34%. Size is a key point for tumor selection because large size is predictive of incomplete local treatment and poor survival. The ratio of ablation volume relative to tumor volume is predictive of complete ablation. Follow-up computed tomography that relies on the size of the ablation zone demonstrates the presence of incomplete ablation. Positron emission tomography might be an interesting option. Chest tube placement for pneumothorax is reported in 8 to 12%. Alveolar hemorrhage and postprocedure hemoptysis occurred in approximately 10% of procedures and rarely required specific treatment. Death was mostly related to single-lung patients and hilar tumors. No modification of forced expiratory volume in the first second between pre- and post-RFA at 2 months was found. RFA in the lung provides a high local efficacy rate. The use of RFA as a palliative tool in combination with chemotherapy remains to be explored.

  7. Effects of Fusion Zone Size and Failure Mode on Peak Load and Energy Absorption of Advanced High Strength Steel Spot Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the effects of fusion zone size on failure modes, static strength and energy absorption of resistance spot welds (RSW) of advanced high strength steels (AHSS). DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds are considered. The main failure modes for spot welds are nugget pullout and interfacial fracture. Partial interfacial fracture is also observed. The critical fusion zone sizes to ensure nugget pull-out failure mode are developed for both DP800 and TRIP800 using limit load based analytical model and micro-hardness measurements of the weld cross sections. Static weld strength tests using cross tension samples were performed on the joint populations with controlled fusion zone sizes. The resulted peak load and energy absorption levels associated with each failure mode were studied for all the weld populations using statistical data analysis tools. The results in this study show that AHSS spot welds with fusion zone size of can not produce nugget pullout mode for both the DP800 and TRIP800 materials examined. The critical fusion zone size for nugget pullout shall be derived for individual materials based on different base metal properties as well as different heat affected zone (HAZ) and weld properties resulted from different welding parameters.

  8. Size-fractionated diversity of eukaryotic microbial communities in the Eastern Tropical North Pacific oxygen minimum zone.

    PubMed

    Duret, Manon T; Pachiadaki, Maria G; Stewart, Frank J; Sarode, Neha; Christaki, Urania; Monchy, Sébastien; Srivastava, Ankita; Edgcomb, Virginia P

    2015-05-01

    Oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) caused by water column stratification appear to expand in parts of the world's ocean, with consequences for marine biogeochemical cycles. OMZ formation is often fueled by high surface primary production, and sinking organic particles can be hotspots of interactions and activity within microbial communities. This study investigated the diversity of OMZ protist communities in two biomass size fractions (>30 and 30-1.6 μm filters) from the world's largest permanent OMZ in the Eastern Tropical North Pacific. Diversity was quantified via Illumina MiSeq sequencing of V4 region of 18S SSU rRNA genes in samples spanning oxygen gradients at two stations. Alveolata and Rhizaria dominated the two size fractions at both sites along the oxygen gradient. Community composition at finer taxonomic levels was partially shaped by oxygen concentration, as communities associated with versus anoxic waters shared only ∼32% of operational taxonomic unit (OTU) (97% sequence identity) composition. Overall, only 9.7% of total OTUs were recovered at both stations and under all oxygen conditions sampled, implying structuring of the eukaryotic community in this area. Size-fractionated communities exhibited different taxonomical features (e.g. Syndiniales Group I in the 1.6-30 μm fraction) that could be explained by the microniches created on the surface-originated sinking particles. PMID:25873468

  9. Laser Ablation of Alumina in Water

    SciTech Connect

    Musaev, O.; Midgley, A; Wrobel, J; Kruger, M

    2010-01-01

    Bulk {alpha}-alumina immersed in distilled water was ablated by pulsed UV laser radiation. The resulting colloidal solution contained micron and submicron size particles. X-ray diffraction and Raman spectra of the ablated and original material are similar. Hence, most of the ablated material is {alpha}-alumina. From transmission electron microscope images, most of the submicron and all of the micron-sized particles have sharp edges and do not have spherical shapes, indicating that the dominant ablation mechanism is due to crack propagation. Some spherical particles of diameter less than 100 nm are observed, indicating that they were formed from the liquid state.

  10. How Well Does Fracture Set Characterization Reduce Uncertainty in Capture Zone Size for Wells Situated in Sedimentary Bedrock Aquifers?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, A. C.; Novakowski, K. S.

    2005-12-01

    beyond a threshold concentration within the specified time. Aquifers are simulated by drawing the random spacings and apertures from specified distributions. Predictions are made of capture zone size assuming various degrees of knowledge of these distributions, with the parameters of the horizontal fractures being estimated using simulated hydraulic tests and a maximum likelihood estimator. The uncertainty is evaluated by calculating the variance in the capture zone size estimated in multiple realizations. The results show that despite good strategies to estimate the parameters of the horizontal fractures the uncertainty in capture zone size is enormous, mostly due to the lack of available information on vertical fractures. Also, at realistic distances (less than ten kilometers) and using realistic transmissivity distributions for the horizontal fractures the uptake of solute from fractures into matrix cannot be relied upon to protect the production well from contamination.

  11. Optimization of Direct Current-Enhanced Radiofrequency Ablation: An Ex Vivo Study

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Toshihiro Isfort, Peter; Bruners, Philipp; Penzkofer, Tobias; Kichikawa, Kimihiko; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Mahnken, Andreas H.

    2010-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the optimal setting for radiofrequency (RF) ablation combined with direct electrical current (DC) ablation in ex vivo bovine liver. An electrical circuit combining a commercially available RF ablation system with DC was developed. The negative electrode of a rectifier that provides DC was connected to a 3-cm multitined expandable RF probe. A 100-mH inductor was used to prevent electrical leakage from the RF generator. DC was applied for 15 min and followed by RF ablation in freshly excised bovine livers. Electric current was measured by an ammeter. Coagulation volume, ablation duration, and mean amperage were assessed for various DC voltages (no DC, 2.2, 4.5, and 9.0 V) and different RF ablation protocols (stepwise increase from 40 to 80 W, 40 W fixed, and 80 W fixed). Results were compared using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U test. Applying DC with 4.5 or 9.0 V, in combination with 40 W fixed or a stepwise increase of RF energy, resulted in significantly increased zone of ablation size compared with 2.2 V or no DC (P = 0.009). At 4.5 V DC, the stepwise increase of RF energy resulted in the same necrosis size as a 40 W fixed protocol (26.6 {+-} 3.9 vs. 26.5 {+-} 4.0 ml), but ablation duration was significantly decreased (296 {+-} 85 s vs. 423 {+-} 104 s; P = 0.028). Mean amperage was significantly lower at 4.5 V compared with 9.0 V (P = 0.028). Combining a stepwise increase of RF energy with a DC voltage of 4.5 V is most appropriate to increase coagulation volume and to minimize procedure time.

  12. Percutaneous microwave ablation vs radiofrequency ablation in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Poulou, Loukia S; Botsa, Evanthia; Thanou, Ioanna; Ziakas, Panayiotis D; Thanos, Loukas

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular cancer ranks fifth among cancers and is related to chronic viral hepatitis, alcohol abuse, steatohepatitis and liver autoimmunity. Surgical resection and orthotopic liver transplantation have curative potential, but fewer than 20% of patients are suitable candidates. Interventional treatments are offered to the vast majority of patients. Radiofrequency (RFA) and microwave ablation (MWA) are among the therapeutic modalities, with similar indications which include the presence of up to three lesions, smaller than 3 cm in size, and the absence of extrahepatic disease. The therapeutic effect of both methods relies on thermal injury, but MWA uses an electromagnetic field as opposed to electrical current used in RFA. Unlike MWA, the effect of RFA is partially limited by the heat-sink effect and increased impedance of the ablated tissue. Compared with RFA, MWA attains a more predictable ablation zone, permits simultaneous treatment of multiple lesions, and achieves larger coagulation volumes in a shorter procedural time. Major complications of both methods are comparable and infrequent (approximately 2%-3%), and they include haemorrhage, infection/abscess, visceral organ injury, liver failure, and pneumothorax. RFA may incur the additional complication of skin burns. Nevertheless, there is no compelling evidence for differences in clinical outcomes, including local recurrence rates and survival. PMID:26052394

  13. Percutaneous microwave ablation vs radiofrequency ablation in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Poulou, Loukia S; Botsa, Evanthia; Thanou, Ioanna; Ziakas, Panayiotis D; Thanos, Loukas

    2015-05-18

    Hepatocellular cancer ranks fifth among cancers and is related to chronic viral hepatitis, alcohol abuse, steatohepatitis and liver autoimmunity. Surgical resection and orthotopic liver transplantation have curative potential, but fewer than 20% of patients are suitable candidates. Interventional treatments are offered to the vast majority of patients. Radiofrequency (RFA) and microwave ablation (MWA) are among the therapeutic modalities, with similar indications which include the presence of up to three lesions, smaller than 3 cm in size, and the absence of extrahepatic disease. The therapeutic effect of both methods relies on thermal injury, but MWA uses an electromagnetic field as opposed to electrical current used in RFA. Unlike MWA, the effect of RFA is partially limited by the heat-sink effect and increased impedance of the ablated tissue. Compared with RFA, MWA attains a more predictable ablation zone, permits simultaneous treatment of multiple lesions, and achieves larger coagulation volumes in a shorter procedural time. Major complications of both methods are comparable and infrequent (approximately 2%-3%), and they include haemorrhage, infection/abscess, visceral organ injury, liver failure, and pneumothorax. RFA may incur the additional complication of skin burns. Nevertheless, there is no compelling evidence for differences in clinical outcomes, including local recurrence rates and survival. PMID:26052394

  14. Quantifying the Floe Size Distribution in the Marginal Ice Zone from Satellite Imagery for use in Model Development and Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweiger, A. J.; Stern, H. L.; Stark, M.; Zhang, J.; Hwang, P.; Steele, M.

    2013-12-01

    Several key processes in the Marginal Ice Zone (MIZ) of the Arctic Ocean are related to the size of the ice floes, whose diameters range from meters to tens of kilometers. The floe size distribution (FSD) influences mechanical properties of the ice and thus its response to winds, currents, and waves, which is likely to modify the air-sea momentum transfer. The FSD also influences the air-sea heat transfer and the response of the MIZ ice cover to the thermal forcing. The FSD also has a significant role in lateral melting. No existing sea-ice/ocean models currently simulate the FSD in the MIZ. Significant uncertainties in FSD-related processes hinder model incorporation of the FSD, and model development must heavily depend on observations of the FSD for parameterization, calibration, and validation. To support the development and implementation of the FSD in the Marginal Ice Zone Modeling and Assimilation System (MIZMAS), we have conducted an analysis of the FSD in the Beaufort and Chukchi seas using three sources of satellite imagery: NASA's Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Terra and Aqua satellites, the Canadian Space Agency's synthetic aperture radar (SAR) on RADARSAT, and declassified National Technical Means imagery from the Global Fiducials Library (GFL) of the U.S. Geological Survey. The MODIS visible and short-wave infrared bands have a pixel size of 250 meters, and are only useful in cloud-free regions. The SAR imagery is unaffected by clouds and darkness, and has a pixel size of 50 meters. The GFL visible imagery, with a pixel size of 1 meter, is only useful in cloud-free regions. The resolution and spatial extent of the various image products allows us to identify ice floes of all sizes from 10 meters to 100 kilometers. The general procedure for identifying ice floes in the imagery is as follows: delineate cloud-free regions (if necessary); choose a threshold to separate ice from water, and create a binary image; apply the

  15. Gouge Powder from Earthquakes Rupture-zones and Laboratory Rupture Experiments: Sub- microscopic Observations and Particle size Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reches, Z.; Mishima, T. D.; Strout, G.; Lockner, D. A.; Hamilton, M.; Heesakkers, V.

    2007-12-01

    We examine grain features and estimate the particle size distribution (PSD) in gouge collected from three sources: rupture zones of two recent earthquakes in South African mines (m3.7 event in 1997 and m2.2 event in 2004); unstable faulting experiments of quartzite cylinders; and the San Andreas fault-zone at Tejon Pass, California. Studies in nanotechnology indicate that PSD measurements of fine powders are susceptible to major errors due to aggregation and agglomeration of the fine particles that cause a systematic bias toward coarser PSD. Thus, our central analytical objective is to determine the true grain size of the gouge that forms during an earthquake and we have employed several techniques. In the TEM (Jeol-2010F) we use bright-field and dark-field modes for magnifications smaller than 200,000, and FFT-filtering mode for high-resolution (HREM) magnifications of 200,000-500,000. We also test several methods to disperse the agglomerates (with ethanol, silanes and toluene) and measure the PDS in the Dynamic Light Scattering method (using the Zeta particle analyzer ZetaPALS-90Plus of Brookhaven Instruments). The grains in the TEM analyses of eight gouge samples display similar shapes: aspect ratios range up to 1:3 with small amounts of very elongated grains, and most grains are angular to very angular while grains of the rock mechanics experiment are the most angular. The samples display wide ranges of grain sizes (5 nm to 5 microns), however, quantitative PSD cannot be determined as most (if not all) grains appear in clusters and aggregates that are hardly separable in the bright-field mode. We thus use the dark-field and FFT-filter methods to map the internal structure of tens of grains ranging in size from a few nanometers to about 2 microns. With a few exceptions, all examined grains are composites of 3 to more than 15 (and probably more) secondary grains that are as small as a few nanometers in size. The PSD of these samples is measured with the Zeta

  16. Micro-ablation with high power pulsed copper vapor lasers.

    PubMed

    Knowles, M

    2000-07-17

    Visible and UV lasers with nanosecond pulse durations, diffraction-limited beam quality and high pulse repetition rates have demonstrated micro-ablation in a wide variety of materials with sub-micron precision and sub-micron-sized heat-affected zones. The copper vapour laser (CVL) is one of the important industrial lasers for micro-ablation applications. Manufacturing applications for the CVL include orifice drilling in fuel injection components and inkjet printers, micro-milling of micromoulds, via hole drilling in printed circuit boards and silicon machining. Recent advances in higher power (100W visible, 5W UV), diffraction-limited, compact CVLs are opening new possibilities for manufacturing with this class of nanosecond laser. PMID:19404369

  17. Cryoballoon Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Jason G; Dubuc, Marc; Guerra, Peter G; Macle, Laurent; Rivard, Lena; Roy, Denis; Talajic, Mario; Thibault, Bernard; Khairy, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Focal point-by-point radiofrequency catheter ablation has shown considerable success in the treatment of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. However, it is not without limitations. Recent clinical and preclinical studies have demonstrated that cryothermal ablation using a balloon catheter (Artic Front©, Medtronic CryoCath LP) provides an effective alternative strategy to treating atrial fibrillation. The objective of this article is to review efficacy and safety data surrounding cryoballoon ablation for paroxysmal and persistent atrial fibrillation. In addition, a practical step-by-step approach to cryoballoon ablation is presented, while highlighting relevant literature regarding: 1) the rationale for adjunctive imaging, 2) selection of an appropriate cryoballoon size, 3) predictors of efficacy, 4) advanced trouble-shooting techniques, and 5) strategies to reduce procedural complications, such as phrenic nerve palsy. PMID:22557842

  18. Designing multifocal corneal models to correct presbyopia by laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alarcón, Aixa; Anera, Rosario G.; Del Barco, Luis Jiménez; Jiménez, José R.

    2012-01-01

    Two multifocal corneal models and an aspheric model designed to correct presbyopia by corneal photoablation were evaluated. The design of each model was optimized to achieve the best visual quality possible for both near and distance vision. In addition, we evaluated the effect of myosis and pupil decentration on visual quality. The corrected model with the central zone for near vision provides better results since it requires less ablated corneal surface area, permits higher addition values, presents stabler visual quality with pupil-size variations and lower high-order aberrations.

  19. Investigation of different liquid media and ablation times on pulsed laser ablation synthesis of aluminum nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baladi, Arash; Sarraf Mamoory, Rasoul

    2010-10-01

    Aluminum nanoparticles were synthesized by pulsed laser ablation of Al targets in ethanol, acetone, and ethylene glycol. Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) images, Particle size distribution diagram from Laser Particle Size Analyzer (LPSA), UV-visible absorption spectra, and weight changes of targets were used for the characterization and comparison of products. The experiments demonstrated that ablation efficiency in ethylene glycol is too low, in ethanol is higher, and in acetone is highest. Comparison between ethanol and acetone clarified that acetone medium leads to finer nanoparticles (mean diameter of 30 nm) with narrower size distribution (from 10 to 100 nm). However, thin carbon layer coats some of them, which was not observed in ethanol medium. It was also revealed that higher ablation time resulted in higher ablated mass, but lower ablation rate. Finer nanoparticles, moreover, were synthesized in higher ablation times.

  20. Subsurface ablation of atherosclerotic plaque using ultrafast laser pulses

    PubMed Central

    Lanvin, Thomas; Conkey, Donald B.; Frobert, Aurelien; Valentin, Jeremy; Goy, Jean-Jacques; Cook, Stéphane; Giraud, Marie-Noelle; Psaltis, Demetri

    2015-01-01

    We perform subsurface ablation of atherosclerotic plaque using ultrafast pulses. Excised mouse aortas containing atherosclerotic plaque were ablated with ultrafast near-infrared (NIR) laser pulses. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) was used to observe the ablation result, while the physical damage was inspected in histological sections. We characterize the effects of incident pulse energy on surface damage, ablation hole size, and filament propagation. We find that it is possible to ablate plaque just below the surface without causing surface damage, which motivates further investigation of ultrafast ablation for subsurface atherosclerotic plaque removal. PMID:26203381

  1. Effects of Fusion Zone Size and Failure Mode on Peak Load and Energy Absorption of Advanced High Strength Steel Spot Welds under Lap Shear Loading Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2008-06-01

    This paper examines the effects of fusion zone size on failure modes, static strength and energy absorption of resistance spot welds (RSW) of advanced high strength steels (AHSS) under lap shear loading condition. DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds are considered. The main failure modes for spot welds are nugget pullout and interfacial fracture. Partial interfacial fracture is also observed. Static weld strength tests using lap shear samples were performed on the joint populations with various fusion zone sizes. The resulted peak load and energy absorption levels associated with each failure mode were studied for all the weld populations using statistical data analysis tools. The results in this study show that AHSS spot welds with conventionally required fusion zone size of can not produce nugget pullout mode for both the DP800 and TRIP800 welds under lap shear loading. Moreover, failure mode has strong influence on weld peak load and energy absorption for all the DP800 welds and the TRIP800 small welds: welds failed in pullout mode have statistically higher strength and energy absorption than those failed in interfacial fracture mode. For TRIP800 welds above the critical fusion zone level, the influence of weld failure modes on peak load and energy absorption diminishes. Scatter plots of peak load and energy absorption versus weld fusion zone size were then constructed, and the results indicate that fusion zone size is the most critical factor in weld quality in terms of peak load and energy absorption for both DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds.

  2. Lung Radiofrequency Ablation: In Vivo Experimental Study with Low-Perfusion-Rate Multitined Electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Crocetti, Laura Lencioni, Riccardo; Bozzi, Elena; Sbrana, Alberto; Bartolozzi, Carlo

    2008-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility and safety of lung radiofrequency (RF) ablation by using low-perfusion-rate, expandable, multitined electrodes in an in vivo animal model. Ten New Zealand White rabbits underwent RF ablation using low-perfusion-rate, expandable, multitined electrodes (Starburst Talon; RITA Medical Systems, Mountain View, CA) and a 200-W RF generator. The electrode was positioned under fluoroscopy guidance and a single percutaneous RF ablation was performed. Saline perfusate was doped with nonionic iodinated contrast agent to render it visible on computed tomography (CT). The pump infused the saline doped with contrast agent into the lateral tines at a rate of 0.1ml/min. The planned ablation was of 3 min, with the hooks deployed to 2 cm at a target temperature of 105{sup o}C. An immediate posttreatment CT scan documented the distribution of the doped saline and the presence of immediate complications. The animals were monitored for delayed complications and sacrificed within 72 h (n = 4), 2 weeks (n = 3), or 4 weeks (n = 3). Assessment of ablation zone and adjacent structures was done at autopsy. Major complications consisted of pneumothorax requiring drainage (n = 2) and skin burn (n = 1). Immediately after the procedure the area of ablation was depicted at CT as a round, well-demarcated area, homogeneously opacified by iodinated contrast medium (mean size, 2.3 {+-} 0.8 cm). The presence of a sharply demarcated area of coagulation necrosis (mean size, 2.1 {+-} 0.4 cm) without severe damage to adjacent structures was confirmed at autopsy. In one case, euthanized at 4 weeks, in whom pneumothorax and pleural effusion were depicted, pleural fibrinous adhesions were demonstrated at autopsy. In conclusion, lung RF ablation performed in an in vivo animal model using low-perfusion-rate, expandable, multitined electrodes is feasible and safe. No severe damage to adjacent structures was demonstrated.

  3. Distribution of metals in various particle-size fractions in topsoil of a gully system (European Russia, forest zone)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samonova, Olga; Aseyeva, Elena

    2014-05-01

    Being depressions in a relief gullies often serve as locations for illegal dumping of hazardous substances, which may be mobilized, retained or recycled during the transport. In the present study we analyze concentrations and distributions of Fe, Ti and potentially hazardous trace elements in various grain-size fractions of a gully's topsoil and focus on examination of spatial variations and grain-size effect. The study object is located in the southern taiga zone of European Russia and represents a relatively young erosional landform, incised in Quaternary deposits. It has a simple rhomboid plan view and the length of about 200 m. Sampling of cross-sectional and longitudinal sequences of soils was performed. In total 25 samples of surface soil horizons were collected in different positions of the system including its internal (slopes, bottom, detrial fan) and external (watershed) units. The distributions of Fe, Ti, Mn, Cu, Ni, Co, Cr, Zn, Pb, Zr were analyzed in undifferentiated samples and in particle-size fractions: coarse and medium sand (1-0,25 mm), fine and very fine sand (0,25-0,05 mm), coarse silt (0,05-0,01 mm), medium and fine silt (0,01-0,001 mm) and clay (<0,001 mm). The concentrations of the studied metals in total sample population vary differently in each particle-size fraction: for the majority of elements the variations are diminishing from coarser to finer fractions. Clearly defined relationship between fraction size and metal concentrations is typical of Ti and Zr. The highest levels of Ti are found in silt fractions, while concentrations of Zr show highest values in coarse silt and finer sand fraction. The concentrations of many elements (Mn, Co, Ni, Cr, Zn) are generally higher in clay fractions than in other fractions while the concentrations of Cu and Pb are higher in medium and fine silt. The comparison between the samples collected in different landform positions revealed that soil material in the gully's bottom in all size fractions

  4. Interannual Variability in Carbon and Nitrogen Stable Isotopic Signatures of Size-Fractionated POM from the South Florida Coastal Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, S. L.; Anderson, W. T.; Jochem, F. J.; Fourqurean, J. W.

    2004-12-01

    Environmental conditions in South Florida coastal waters have been of local and national concern over the past 15 years. Attention has focused on the ecosystem impacts of salinity increases, seagrass die-off, increased algal bloom frequency, waste water influence, groundwater discharge, and exchange between Florida Bay, the Gulf of Mexico, and the Atlantic Ocean. Changes in water quality and productivity levels may be reflected in the isotopic signatures of coastal zone primary producers. Recent work with seagrasses in South Florida has demonstrated high seasonal and spatial variability in C and N isotopic signatures and decoupling between the two isotopic systems as they vary. To better understand the sources of seasonal and spatial fluctuation, size fractionated POM (particulate organic matter) samples have been collected on a quarterly basis since Sept. 2002. Fractions collected include >150μ m, 50-150μ m, and 0.1-50μ m using Nitex mesh sieves and a portable pump system deployed from a small boat at 10 sites around the Florida Keys and Florida Bay. It was hypothesized that planktonic groups respond more quickly to changes in water quality then seagrasses, and thus variations may be more clearly attributed to environmental parameters. Significant spatial and temporal variability is evident both within site between size fractions and between sites. Seasonal oscillations of up to 4‰ were observed in N isotopic values and 6‰ in C isotopic values of the 50-150μ m size fraction, which is dominated by diatoms and dinoflagellates. δ 13C values are depleted in the late winter/early spring sampling period possibly reflecting decreased productivity stress on available C pools. 13C depletion is generally coincident with δ 15N enrichment in the late winter/early spring, possibly demonstrating changes in DIN pools (NO3- and NH4+ concentrations) or changes in decomposition or denitrification rates. Broad groupings appear to separate Atlantic coral reef sites

  5. Laser ablation studies of concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Savina, M.; Xu, Z.; Wang, Y.; Reed, C.; Pellin, M.

    1999-10-20

    Laser ablation was studied as a means of removing radioactive contaminants from the surface and near-surface regions of concrete. The authors present the results of ablation tests on cement and concrete samples using a 1.6 kW pulsed Nd:YAG laser with fiber optic beam delivery. The laser-surface interaction was studied using cement and high density concrete as targets. Ablation efficiency and material removal rates were determined as functions of irradiance and pulse overlap. Doped samples were also ablated to determine the efficiency with which surface contaminants were removed and captured in the effluent. The results show that the cement phase of the material melts and vaporizes, but the aggregate portion (sand and rock) fragments. The effluent consists of both micron-size aerosol particles and chunks of fragmented aggregate material. Laser-induced optical emission spectroscopy was used to analyze the surface during ablation. Analysis of the effluent showed that contaminants such as cesium and strontium were strongly segregated into different regions of the particle size distribution of the aerosol.

  6. Hepatic radiofrequency ablation: in vivo and ex vivo comparisons of 15-gauge (G) and 17-G internally cooled electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Song, K D; Park, H J; Cha, D I; Kang, T W; Lee, J; Moon, J Y; Rhim, H

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare the performance of the 15-G internally cooled electrode with that of the conventional 17-G internally cooled electrode. Methods: A total of 40 (20 for each electrode) and 20 ablation zones (10 for each electrode) were made in extracted bovine livers and in in vivo porcine livers, respectively. Technical parameters, three dimensions [long-axis diameter (Dl), vertical-axis diameter (Dv) and short-axis diameter (Ds)], volume and the circularity (Ds/Dl) of the ablation zone were compared. Results: The total delivered energy was higher in the 15-G group than in the 17-G group in both ex vivo and in vivo studies (8.78 ± 1.06 vs 7.70 ± 0.98 kcal, p = 0.033; 11.20 ± 1.13 vs 8.49 ± 0.35 kcal, p = 0.001, respectively). The three dimensions of the ablation zone had a tendency to be larger in the 15-G group than in the 17-G group in both studies. The ablation volume was larger in the 15-G group than in the 17-G group in both ex vivo and in vivo studies (29.61 ± 7.10 vs 23.86 ± 3.82 cm3, p = 0.015; 10.26 ± 2.28 vs 7.79 ± 1.68 cm3, p = 0.028, respectively). The circularity of ablation zone was not significantly different in both the studies. Conclusion: The size of ablation zone was larger in the 15-G internally cooled electrode than in the 17-G electrode in both ex vivo and in vivo studies. Advances in knowledge: Radiofrequency ablation of hepatic tumours using 15-G electrode is useful to create larger ablation zones. PMID:25882688

  7. Sulfur and chalcophile elements in subduction zones: constraints from a laser ablation ICP-MS study of melt inclusions from Galunggung Volcano, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Hoog, J. C. M.; Mason, P. R. D.; van Bergen, M. J.

    2001-09-01

    Mafic melt inclusions hosted in olivine phenocrysts (Fo 89-78) in high-Mg basalts of Galunggung volcano (Java, Indonesia) were analyzed in situ by laser ablation ICP-MS to determine concentrations of chalcophile and associated trace elements. Our results indicate that sulfur in the mantle beneath Galunggung is significantly enriched relative to MORB source mantle, suggesting large-scale fluxing of sulfur into the mantle wedge during slab dehydration. Melt-inclusion compositions range from strongly undersaturated to transitional basaltic and are characterized by a wide range of sulfur contents (350-2900 ppm). Chalcophile element concentrations are not affected by exsolution of immiscible sulfide liquids and generally fall within the range of whole-rock samples from other arcs. We infer that primary Galunggung melts contain approximately 290 ppm Ni, 60 ppm Co, 190 ppm Cu, and 3 ppm Pb. Patterns of refractory trace elements point to ˜15% melting of a MORB-source mantle below Galunggung, which was enriched in LILE and LREE by slab-derived fluids before melting. Based on this value, we use melting model calculations to investigate whether slab-derived contributions to a MORB-source mantle are required to balance the budgets of sulfur and associated chalcophile elements, assuming that all Cu and S originally resided in sulfides and adopting a Cu concentration of 28 ppm in the presubduction mantle, similar to that in MORB-type mantle. Modeling results predict at least 256 to 465 ppm S in the magma source of Galunggung, which is up to twice the amount commonly assumed for MORB sources. A slab-derived origin of the excess sulfur is consistent with 34S enrichments that commonly characterize arc magmas and gases. Although modeling suggests that elevated copper concentrations relative to MORB can be the consequence of the higher solubility of sulfur in Galunggung melts, the results do not rule out that the subarc mantle was enriched by slab-derived Cu. Lead must have been

  8. Feasibility of ablative fractional laser-assisted drug delivery with optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chih-Hsun; Tsai, Meng-Tsan; Shen, Su-Chin; Ng, Chau Yee; Jung, Shih-Ming

    2014-11-01

    Fractional resurfacing creates hundreds of microscopic wounds in the skin without injuring surrounding tissue. This technique allows rapid wound healing owing to small injury regions, and has been proven as an effective method for repairing photodamaged skin. Recently, ablative fractional laser (AFL) treatment has been demonstrated to facilitate topical drug delivery into skin. However, induced fractional photothermolysis depends on several parameters, such as incident angle, exposure energy, and spot size of the fractional laser. In this study, we used fractional CO2 laser to induce microscopic ablation array on the nail for facilitating drug delivery through the nail. To ensure proper energy delivery without damaging tissue structures beneath the nail plate, optical coherence tomography (OCT) was implemented for quantitative evaluation of induced microscopic ablation zone (MAZ). Moreover, to further study the feasibility of drug delivery, normal saline was dripped on the exposure area of fingernail and the speckle variance in OCT signal was used to observe water diffusion through the ablative channels into the nail plate. In conclusion, this study establishes OCT as an effective tool for the investigation of fractional photothermolysis and water/drug delivery through microscopic ablation channels after nail fractional laser treatment. PMID:25426321

  9. Efficacy and predictability of soft tissue ablation using a prototype Raman-shifted alexandrite laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozub, John A.; Shen, Jin-H.; Joos, Karen M.; Prasad, Ratna; Shane Hutson, M.

    2015-10-01

    Previous research showed that mid-infrared free-electron lasers could reproducibly ablate soft tissue with little collateral damage. The potential for surgical applications motivated searches for alternative tabletop lasers providing thermally confined pulses in the 6- to-7-μm wavelength range with sufficient pulse energy, stability, and reliability. Here, we evaluate a prototype Raman-shifted alexandrite laser. We measure ablation thresholds, etch rates, and collateral damage in gelatin and cornea as a function of laser wavelength (6.09, 6.27, or 6.43 μm), pulse energy (up to 3 mJ/pulse), and spot diameter (100 to 600 μm). We find modest wavelength dependence for ablation thresholds and collateral damage, with the lowest thresholds and least damage for 6.09 μm. We find a strong spot-size dependence for all metrics. When the beam is tightly focused (˜100-μm diameter), ablation requires more energy, is highly variable and less efficient, and can yield large zones of mechanical damage (for pulse energies >1 mJ). When the beam is softly focused (˜300-μm diameter), ablation proceeded at surgically relevant etch rates, with reasonable reproducibility (5% to 12% within a single sample), and little collateral damage. With improvements in pulse-energy stability, this prototype laser may have significant potential for soft-tissue surgical applications.

  10. Efficacy and predictability of soft tissue ablation using a prototype Raman-shifted alexandrite laser.

    PubMed

    Kozub, John A; Shen, Jin-H; Joos, Karen M; Prasad, Ratna; Hutson, M Shane

    2015-10-01

    Previous research showed that mid-infrared free-electron lasers could reproducibly ablate soft tissue with little collateral damage. The potential for surgical applications motivated searches for alternative tabletop lasers providing thermally confined pulses in the 6- to-7-µm wavelength range with sufficient pulse energy, stability, and reliability. Here, we evaluate a prototype Raman-shifted alexandrite laser. We measure ablation thresholds, etch rates, and collateral damage in gelatin and cornea as a function of laser wavelength (6.09, 6.27, or 6.43 µm), pulse energy (up to 3 mJ/pulse), and spot diameter (100 to 600 µm). We find modest wavelength dependence for ablation thresholds and collateral damage, with the lowest thresholds and least damage for 6.09 µm. We find a strong spot-size dependence for all metrics. When the beam is tightly focused (~100-µm diameter), ablation requires more energy, is highly variable and less efficient, and can yield large zones of mechanical damage (for pulse energies>1 mJ). When the beam is softly focused (~300-µm diameter), ablation proceeded at surgically relevant etch rates, with reasonable reproducibility (5% to 12% within a single sample), and little collateral damage. With improvements in pulse-energy stability, this prototype laser may have significant potential for soft-tissue surgical applications. PMID:26456553

  11. In-situ bioconjugation in stationary media and in liquid flow by femtosecond laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajti, Csaba László; Petersen, Svea; Menéndez-Manjón, Ana; Barcikowski, Stephan

    2010-11-01

    In-situ functionalization of gold nanoparticles with fluorophore-tagged oligonucleotides is studied by comparing femtosecond laser ablation in stationary liquid and in biomolecule flow. Femtosecond laser pulses induce significant degradation to sensitive biomolecules when ablating gold in a stationary solution of oligonucleotides. Contrary, in-situ conjugation of nanoparticles in biomolecule flow considerably reduces the degree of degradation studied by gel electrophoresis and UV-Vis spectrometry. Ablating gold with 100 μJ femtosecond laser pulses DNA sequence does not degrade, while the degree of fluorophore tag degradation was 84% in stationary solution compared to 5% for 1 mL/min liquid flow. It is concluded that femtosecond laser-induced degradation of biomolecules is triggered by absorption of nanoparticle conjugates suspended in the colloid and not by ablation of the target. Quenching of nanoparticle size appears from 0.5 μM biomolecule concentration for 0.3 μg/s nanoparticle productivity indicating the successful surface functionalization. Finally, increasing the liquid flow rate from stationary to 450 mL/min enhances nanoparticle productivity from 0.2 μg/s to 1.5 μg/s, as increasing liquid flow allows removal of light absorbing nanoparticles from the ablation zone, avoiding attenuation of subsequent laser photons.

  12. Feasibility of ablative fractional laser-assisted drug delivery with optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chih-Hsun; Tsai, Meng-Tsan; Shen, Su-Chin; Ng, Chau Yee; Jung, Shih-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Fractional resurfacing creates hundreds of microscopic wounds in the skin without injuring surrounding tissue. This technique allows rapid wound healing owing to small injury regions, and has been proven as an effective method for repairing photodamaged skin. Recently, ablative fractional laser (AFL) treatment has been demonstrated to facilitate topical drug delivery into skin. However, induced fractional photothermolysis depends on several parameters, such as incident angle, exposure energy, and spot size of the fractional laser. In this study, we used fractional CO2 laser to induce microscopic ablation array on the nail for facilitating drug delivery through the nail. To ensure proper energy delivery without damaging tissue structures beneath the nail plate, optical coherence tomography (OCT) was implemented for quantitative evaluation of induced microscopic ablation zone (MAZ). Moreover, to further study the feasibility of drug delivery, normal saline was dripped on the exposure area of fingernail and the speckle variance in OCT signal was used to observe water diffusion through the ablative channels into the nail plate. In conclusion, this study establishes OCT as an effective tool for the investigation of fractional photothermolysis and water/drug delivery through microscopic ablation channels after nail fractional laser treatment. PMID:25426321

  13. Femtosecond laser ablation of dentin and enamel: relationship between laser fluence and ablation efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hu; Liu, Jing; Li, Hong; Ge, Wenqi; Sun, Yuchun; Wang, Yong; Lü, Peijun

    2015-02-01

    The objective was to study the relationship between laser fluence and ablation efficiency of a femtosecond laser with a Gaussian-shaped pulse used to ablate dentin and enamel for prosthodontic tooth preparation. A diode-pumped thin-disk femtosecond laser with wavelength of 1025 nm and pulse width of 400 fs was used for the ablation of dentin and enamel. The laser spot was guided in a line on the dentin and enamel surfaces to form a groove-shaped ablation zone under a series of laser pulse energies. The width and volume of the ablated line were measured under a three-dimensional confocal microscope to calculate the ablation efficiency. Ablation efficiency for dentin reached a maximum value of 0.020 mm3/J when the laser fluence was set at 6.51 J/cm2. For enamel, the maximum ablation efficiency was 0.009 mm3/J at a fluence of 7.59 J/cm2. Ablation efficiency of the femtosecond laser on dentin and enamel is closely related to the laser fluence and may reach a maximum when the laser fluence is set to an appropriate value.

  14. Population Structure, Genetic Diversity, Effective Population Size, Demographic History and Regional Connectivity Patterns of the Endangered Dusky Grouper, Epinephelus marginatus (Teleostei: Serranidae), within Malta's Fisheries Management Zone.

    PubMed

    Buchholz-Sørensen, Molly; Vella, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to describe the genetic population structure and demographic history of the endangered marine fish, Epinephelus marginatus, within Malta's Fisheries Management Zone for the purpose of localised conservation planning. Epinephelus marginatus is a long-lived, sedentary, reef-associated protogynous hermaphrodite with high commercial and recreational value that is at risk of extinction throughout its global distribution. Based on global trends, population substructuring and gaps in local knowledge this has led to an increased interest in evaluation of local stock. Assessment of Maltese demography was based on historical and contemporary catch landings data whilst genetic population structure and regional connectivity patterns were evaluated by examining 175 individuals collected within the central Mediterranean region between 2002 and 2009 using 14 nuclear microsatellite loci. Demographic stock assessment of Maltese E. marginatus' revealed a 99% decline in catch landings between 1947 and 2009 within the Fisheries Management Zone. A contemporary modest mean size was observed, 3 ± 3 kg, where approximately 17% of the population was juvenile, 68% female/sex-changing and 15% were male with a male-to-female sex ratio of 1:5. Genetic analysis describes the overall population of E. marginatus' within the Fisheries Management Zone as decreasing in size (ƟH = 2.2), which has gone through a significant size reduction in the past (M = 0.41) and consequently shows signs of moderate inbreeding (FIS = 0.10, p < 0.001) with an estimated effective population size of 130 individuals. Results of spatially explicit Bayesian genetic cluster analysis detected two geographically distinct subpopulations within Malta's Fisheries Management Zone and that they are connected to a larger network of E. marginatus' within the Sicily Channel. Results suggest conservation management should be designed to reflect E. marginatus' within Malta's Fisheries Management Zone

  15. The Effectiveness of Multiple Electrode Radiofrequency Ablation in Patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma with Lesions More than 3 cm in Size and Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer Stage A to B2

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chen-Chun; Cheng, Ya-Ting; Chen M, Wei-Ting; Lin, Shi-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Outcomes of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) lesions >3.0 cm in size including Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC) stage B after radiofrequency ablation (RFA) with a single electrode remain unsatisfactory. This study aimed to investigate the outcomes of RFA with multiple electrodes (ME-RFA) for HCC tumors 3.1-7.0 cm in size and BCLC stage B. This retrospective study included 70 consecutive patients with 58 medium- (3.1-5.0 cm) and 17 large- (5.1-7.0 cm) sized HCCs after ME-RFA using a controller. Outcomes in terms of complete response, primary technique effectiveness, local tumor progression, and overall survival were investigated. After 1-4 applications of ME-RFA, the rates of complete response and PTE in medium-sized tumors were 79.3% and 91.4%, respectively, and in large tumors were 76.5% and 94.1%, respectively. Overall, the major complication rate was 5.7%. After a median 21-month follow-up period, both two- and three-year estimated overall survival rates were above 80%. There were no significant differences in overall survival and local tumor progression rates between medium- and large-size tumors and among BCLC stages A, B1 and B2. A complete response to ME-RFA was the only significant factor associated with improved survival (p=0.008). In conclusion, ME-RFA can effectively treat 3.1-7.0-cm sized HCCs with a comparable outcome between medium- and large-size tumors and among BCLA stages A to B2. PMID:26989656

  16. Fragmentation and ablation during entry

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1997-09-01

    This note discusses objects that both fragment and ablate during entry, using the results of previous reports to describe the velocity, pressure, and fragmentation of entering objects. It shows that the mechanisms used there to describe the breakup of non-ablating objects during deceleration remain valid for most ablating objects. It treats coupled fragmentation and ablation during entry, building on earlier models that separately discuss the entry of objects that are hard, whose high heat of ablation permits little erosion, and those who are strong whose strength prevents fragmentation, which are discussed in ``Radiation from Hard Objects,`` ``Deceleration and Radiation of Strong, Hard, Asteroids During Atmospheric Impact,`` and ``Meteor Signature Interpretation.`` This note provides a more detailed treatment of the further breakup and separation of fragments during descent. It replaces the constraint on mass per unit area used earlier to determine the altitude and magnitude of peak power radiation with a detailed analytic solution of deceleration. Model predictions are shown to be in agreement with the key features of numerical calculations of deceleration. The model equations are solved for the altitudes of maximum radiation, which agree with numerical integrations. The model is inverted analytically to infer object size and speed from measurements of peak power and altitude to provide a complete model for the approximate inversion of meteor data.

  17. On the spatial variability of the hyporheic zone: in-situ investigation of porosity and grain size using diving bells and 3D photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frings, R. M.; Vollmer, S.

    2012-04-01

    In order to improve the ecological status of rivers, lakes and other water bodies, recent legislation, such as the European Water Framework Directive, requires for each water body an assessment of its suitability as habitat for organisms. Such an assessment, though, is not easy. This is especially true for the lowest part of the water body: the substrate or hyporheic zone. Even if it is known which kind of hyporheic zone is preferred by an organism, it remains difficult to determine where it can be found, because it is often impossible to observe the hyporheic zone from the banks or shores. It has become common to classify an entire water body as suitable or unsuitable as habitat, using only limited field observations of the hyporheic zone. This is a doubtful practice, which disregards the huge spatial variability of this zone. The objective of this study was to quantify the spatial variability in hyporheic-zone characteristics in the river Rhine. We focused on two basic characteristics: grain size and porosity, the latter being a primary control on the transport of nutrients, heat, oxygen and organic matter. A diving bell (caisson) was used to obtain access to the river bed, which enabled undisturbed sampling of the hyporheic zone. Between 1968 and 2009 6436 sediment samples were taken and sieved to determine their grain size distribution. Furthermore, in 2009 and 2011 about 100 porosity measurements were carried out, using a novel technique based on a combination of field measurements using three-dimensional photogrammetry and laboratory measurements using the water displacement method. The measurements revealed a strong cross-sectional variability in porosity and grain size. Each river cross-section contains spots with high porosity (order 0.40) and spots with low porosity (order 0.10). The large cross-sectional variability made it impossible to recognize systematic streamwise porosity trends from the data. Therefore we investigated if porosity was correlated to

  18. Increasing lengths of aftershock zones with depths of moderate-size earthquakes on the San Jacinto Fault suggests triggering of deep creep in the middle crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xiaofeng; Peng, Zhigang

    2016-01-01

    Recent geodetic studies along the San Jacinto Fault (SJF) in southern California revealed a shallower locking depth than the seismogenic depth outlined by microseismicity. This disagreement leads to speculations that creeping episodes drive seismicity in the lower part of the seismogenic zone. Whether deep creep occurs along the SJF holds key information on how fault slips during earthquake cycle and potential seismic hazard imposed to southern California. Here we apply a matched filter technique to 10 M > 4 earthquake sequences along the SJF since 2000 and obtain more complete earthquake catalogues. We then systematic investigate spatio-temporal evolutions of these aftershock sequences. We find anomalously large aftershock zones for earthquakes occurred below the geodetically inferred locking depth (i.e. 11-12 km), while aftershock zones of shallower main shocks are close to expectations from standard scaling relationships. Although we do not observe clear migration of aftershocks, most aftershock zones do expand systematically with logarithmic time since the main shock. All the evidences suggest that aftershocks near or below the locking depth are likely driven by deep creep following the main shock. The presence of a creeping zone below 11-12 km may have significant implications on the maximum sizes of events in this region.

  19. Analytical Investigation of the Decrease in the Size of the Habitable Zone Due to a Limited CO2 Outgassing Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbot, Dorian S.

    2016-08-01

    The habitable zone concept is important because it focuses the scientific search for extraterrestrial life and aids the planning of future telescopes. Recent work has shown that planets near the outer edge of the habitable zone might not actually be able to stay warm and habitable if CO2 outgassing rates are not large enough to maintain high CO2 partial pressures against removal by silicate weathering. In this paper, I use simple equations for the climate and CO2 budget of a planet in the habitable zone that can capture the qualitative behavior of the system. With these equations I derive an analytical formula for an effective outer edge of the habitable zone, including limitations imposed by the CO2 outgassing rate. I then show that climate cycles between a snowball state and a warm climate are only possible beyond this limit if the weathering rate in the snowball climate is smaller than the CO2 outgassing rate (otherwise stable snowball states result). I derive an analytical solution for the climate cycles including a formula for their period in this limit. This work allows us to explore the qualitative effects of weathering processes on the effective outer edge of the habitable zone, which is important because weathering parameterizations are uncertain.

  20. In vitro parameter optimization for spatial control of focused ultrasound ablation when using low boiling point phase-change nanoemulsions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Phase-shift nanoemulsions (PSNEs) provide cavitation sites when the perfluorocarbon (PFC) nanodroplets (ND) are vaporized to microbubbles by acoustic energy. Their presence lowers the power required to ablate tissue by high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), potentially making it a safer option for a broader range of treatment sites. However, spatial control over the ablation region can be problematic when cavitation is used to enhance heating. This study explored relationships between vaporization, ablation, and the PSNE concentration in vitro to optimize the acoustic intensity and insonation time required for spatially controlled ablation enhancement using a PSNE that included a volatile PFC component. Methods HIFU (continuous wave at 1 MHz; insonation times of 5, 10, 15, and 20 s; cool-down times of 2, 4, and 6 s; peak negative pressures of 2, 3, and 4 MPa) was applied to albumin-acrylamide gels containing PFC agents (1:1 mix of volatile decafluorobutane and more stable dodecafluoropentane at 105 to 108 PFC ND per milliliter) or agent-free controls. Vaporization fields (microbubble clouds) were imaged by conventional ultrasound, and ablation lesions were measured directly by calipers. Controlled ablation was defined as the production of ‘cigar’-shaped lesions corresponding with the acoustic focal zone. This control was considered to be lost when ablation occurred in prefocal vaporization fields having a predominantly ‘tadpole’ or oblong shape. Results Changes in the vaporization field shape and location occurred on a continuum with increasing PSNE concentration and acoustic intensity. Working with the maximum concentration-intensity combinations resulting in controlled ablation demonstrated a dose-responsive relationship between insonation time and volumes of both the vaporization fields (approximately 20 to 240 mm3) and the ablation lesions (1 to 135 mm3) within them. Conclusions HIFU ablation was enhanced by this PSNE and could be achieved

  1. Upgrade of the hot zone for large-size high-performance multi-crystalline silicon ingot casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhiyong; Zhong, Genxiang; Zhou, Xucheng; Zhang, Zhaoyu; Wang, Zixu; Chen, Wenliang; Huang, Xinming

    2016-05-01

    Casting larger silicon ingots by upgrading the hot zone is one of the main methods used to reduce the cost of multi-crystalline silicon wafers. In this paper, a new hot zone is designed and a transient global model is applied to investigate the effects of the new hot zone on the electricity consumption, the crystal growth rate, and the shape of the C-M interface during the solidification process. Based on the simulation results, a generation-five, directional-solidification furnace was upgraded and implemented in casting experiments. The experimental results show that the feedstock capacity increased by 77.8%, the crystal growth efficiency increased by 53.8%, and the average yield rate of the silicon ingots increased by 9%. The crystal-melt interface was flatter and the growth direction of the grains was almost straight upward.

  2. Exploring the size adaptability of the B ring binding zone of the colchicine site of tubulin with para-nitrogen substituted isocombretastatins.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Carmen; Ellahioui, Younes; Álvarez, Raquel; Aramburu, Laura; Riesco, Alejandra; González, Myriam; Vicente, Alba; Dahdouh, Abdelaziz; Ibn Mansour, Ahmed; Jiménez, Carlos; Martín, Diego; Sarmiento, Rogelio G; Medarde, Manuel; Caballero, Esther; Peláez, Rafael

    2015-07-15

    We have synthesized and assayed dimethylaminophenyl, pyrrolidin-1-ylphenyl and carbazole containing phenstatins and isocombretastatins as analogues of the highly potent indoleisocombretastatins with extended or reduced ring sizes. This is an attempt to explore beyond the structural constraints of the X-ray crystal structures the zone of the colchicine site where the tropolone ring of colchicine binds to tubulin (zone 1). The isocombretastatins display up to 30 fold increased water solubility when compared with combretastatin A-4, potent inhibition of tubulin polymerization, and nanomolar cytotoxicities against several human cancer cell lines irrespective of the size of the B ring. On the other hand, substitutions ortho to the nitrogen cause an important reduction in potency. We have also shown that representative compounds inhibit autophagy. These results show that zone 1 can adapt to systems of different size as far as they stay in a common plane, but does not tolerate substituents protruding above or below it. These results can help in the understanding of the binding modes of structures with similar systems and in the design of new colchicine site ligands. PMID:26092446

  3. Impacts of Different Tree Species of Different Sizes on Spatial Distribution of Herbaceous Plants in the Nigerian Guinea Savannah Ecological Zone

    PubMed Central

    Buba, Toma

    2015-01-01

    This study was aimed at finding the impacts of different tree species and individual trees of different sizes on species richness, diversity, and composition of the herbaceous layer. All the three tree species have greatly increased species richness and diversity both within and outside their crown zones compared with the open grassland. Both species richness and diversity were found to be higher under all the three tree species than outside their crowns, which was in turn higher than the open field. Daniella oliveri has the highest species richness and diversity both within and outside its crown zone followed by Vitellaria paradoxa and then Parkia biglobosa. The result also revealed that the same tree species with different sizes leads to different herbaceous species richness, diversity, and composition under and around the trees' crowns. P. biglobosa and V. paradoxa trees with smaller sizes showed higher species richness and diversity under their crowns than the bigger ones. The dissimilarity of species composition differs between the inside and outside crown zones of the individuals of the same tree species and among the different trees species and the open field. PMID:26618024

  4. Impacts of Different Tree Species of Different Sizes on Spatial Distribution of Herbaceous Plants in the Nigerian Guinea Savannah Ecological Zone.

    PubMed

    Buba, Toma

    2015-01-01

    This study was aimed at finding the impacts of different tree species and individual trees of different sizes on species richness, diversity, and composition of the herbaceous layer. All the three tree species have greatly increased species richness and diversity both within and outside their crown zones compared with the open grassland. Both species richness and diversity were found to be higher under all the three tree species than outside their crowns, which was in turn higher than the open field. Daniella oliveri has the highest species richness and diversity both within and outside its crown zone followed by Vitellaria paradoxa and then Parkia biglobosa. The result also revealed that the same tree species with different sizes leads to different herbaceous species richness, diversity, and composition under and around the trees' crowns. P. biglobosa and V. paradoxa trees with smaller sizes showed higher species richness and diversity under their crowns than the bigger ones. The dissimilarity of species composition differs between the inside and outside crown zones of the individuals of the same tree species and among the different trees species and the open field. PMID:26618024

  5. Radiofrequency ablation during continuous saline infusion can extend ablation margins

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Toru; Kubota, Tomoyuki; Horigome, Ryoko; Kimura, Naruhiro; Honda, Hiroki; Iwanaga, Akito; Seki, Keiichi; Honma, Terasu; Yoshida, Toshiaki

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether fluid injection during radiofrequency ablation (RFA) can increase the coagulation area. METHODS: Bovine liver (1-2 kg) was placed on an aluminum tray with a return electrode affixed to the base, and the liver was punctured by an expandable electrode. During RFA, 5% glucose; 50% glucose; or saline fluid was infused continuously at a rate of 1.0 mL/min through the infusion line connected to the infusion port. The area and volume of the thermocoagulated region of bovine liver were determined after RFA. The Joule heat generated was determined from the temporal change in output during the RFA experiment. RESULTS: No liquid infusion was 17.3 ± 1.6 mL, similar to the volume of a 3-cm diameter sphere (14.1 mL). Mean thermocoagulated volume was significantly larger with continuous infusion of saline (29.3 ± 3.3 mL) than with 5% glucose (21.4 ± 2.2 mL), 50% glucose (16.5 ± 0.9 mL) or no liquid infusion (17.3 ± 1.6 mL). The ablated volume for RFA with saline was approximately 1.7-times greater than for RFA with no liquid infusion, representing a significant difference between these two conditions. Total Joule heat generated during RFA was highest with saline, and lowest with 50% glucose. CONCLUSION: RFA with continuous saline infusion achieves a large ablation zone, and may help inhibit local recurrence by obtaining sufficient ablation margins. RFA during continuous saline infusion can extend ablation margins, and may be prevent local recurrence. PMID:23483097

  6. Laser-ablation processes

    SciTech Connect

    Dingus, R.S.

    1992-01-01

    The various mechanisms by which ablation of materials can be induced with lasers are discussed in this paper. The various ablation processes and potential applications are reviewed from the threshold for ablation up to fluxes of about 10{sup 13} W/cm{sup 2}, with emphasis on three particular processes; namely, front-surface spallation, two-dimensional blowoff, and contained vaporization.

  7. [Characteristics of particle size structure of plankton community in turbidity zone of near-shore waters, Liaoning Province of Northeast China].

    PubMed

    Song, Lun; Wang, Nian-bin; Song, Yong-Gang; Li, Nan

    2013-04-01

    Estuary and nearshore waters have complicated environment, where plankton community has a frequent feedback regulation and a very unstable particle size structure. In this paper, an investigation was made on the particle size structure of plankton in the turbidity zone of nearshore and port area waters in Liaoning Province of Northeast China. In the waters with high concentration inorganic nitrogen, phytoplankton biomass was mainly of small particle sizes, with the equivalent sphere diameter (ESD) being primarily 20-100 micro m, while in low nutrient waters, the phytoplankton biomass was mainly of larger size particles, with the ESD>100 micro m, indicating that the phytoplankton feedback regulation caused the phytoplankton community to be comprised of small sized organisms as part of the biological responses to high concentration suspended solids, which reduced the individual number of larger organisms such as Coscinodiscus. sp. and other species, and in turn, directly affected the fisheries resources, including a variety of fish and shrimp larvae fed on phytoplankton. A normalized biomass size spectrum with the characteristics of nearshore shallow aquatic oceanic ecosystems exhibiting eutrophication was constructed. The spectrum slope indicated that the plankton community biomass would gradually increase in size. The feasibility of using dinoflagellates and cladocerans as the bio-indicators for eutrophication was discussed. PMID:23898643

  8. Sphere-Enhanced Microwave Ablation (sMWA) Versus Bland Microwave Ablation (bMWA): Technical Parameters, Specific CT 3D Rendering and Histopathology

    SciTech Connect

    Gockner, T. L.; Zelzer, S.; Mokry, T. Gnutzmann, D. Bellemann, N.; Mogler, C.; Beierfuß, A. Köllensperger, E. Germann, G.; Radeleff, B. A. Stampfl, U. Kauczor, H. U.; Pereira, P. L.; Sommer, C. M.

    2015-04-15

    PurposeThis study was designed to compare technical parameters during ablation as well as CT 3D rendering and histopathology of the ablation zone between sphere-enhanced microwave ablation (sMWA) and bland microwave ablation (bMWA).MethodsIn six sheep-livers, 18 microwave ablations were performed with identical system presets (power output: 80 W, ablation time: 120 s). In three sheep, transarterial embolisation (TAE) was performed immediately before microwave ablation using spheres (diameter: 40 ± 10 μm) (sMWA). In the other three sheep, microwave ablation was performed without spheres embolisation (bMWA). Contrast-enhanced CT, sacrifice, and liver harvest followed immediately after microwave ablation. Study goals included technical parameters during ablation (resulting power output, ablation time), geometry of the ablation zone applying specific CT 3D rendering with a software prototype (short axis of the ablation zone, volume of the largest aligned ablation sphere within the ablation zone), and histopathology (hematoxylin-eosin, Masson Goldner and TUNEL).ResultsResulting power output/ablation times were 78.7 ± 1.0 W/120 ± 0.0 s for bMWA and 78.4 ± 1.0 W/120 ± 0.0 s for sMWA (n.s., respectively). Short axis/volume were 23.7 ± 3.7 mm/7.0 ± 2.4 cm{sup 3} for bMWA and 29.1 ± 3.4 mm/11.5 ± 3.9 cm{sup 3} for sMWA (P < 0.01, respectively). Histopathology confirmed the signs of coagulation necrosis as well as early and irreversible cell death for bMWA and sMWA. For sMWA, spheres were detected within, at the rim, and outside of the ablation zone without conspicuous features.ConclusionsSpecific CT 3D rendering identifies a larger ablation zone for sMWA compared with bMWA. The histopathological signs and the detectable amount of cell death are comparable for both groups. When comparing sMWA with bMWA, TAE has no effect on the technical parameters during ablation.

  9. Does Artificial Ascites Induce the Heat-Sink Phenomenon during Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation of the Hepatic Subcapsular Area?: an in vivo Experimental Study Using a Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-sun; Choi, Dongil; Lim, Hyo K.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of the heat-sink phenomenon induced by artificial ascites on the size of the ablation zone during percutaneous radiofrequency (RF) ablation of the hepatic subcapsular area in an in vivo rabbit model. Materials and Methods A total of 21 percutaneous rabbit liver RF ablations were performed with and without artificial ascites (5% dextrose aqueous solution). The rabbits were divided into three groups: a) control group (C, n = 7); b) room temperature ascites group (R, n = 7); and c) warmed ascites group (W, n = 7). The tip of a 1 cm, internally cooled electrode was placed on the subcapsular region of the hepatic dome via ultrasound guidance, and ablation was continued for 6 min. Changes in temperature of the ascites were monitored during the ablation. The size of the ablation zones of the excised livers and immediate complications rates were compared statistically between the groups (Mann-Whitney U test, Kruskal-Wallis test, linear-by-linear association, p = 0.05). Results One rabbit from the "W" group expired during the procedure. In all groups, the ascites temperatures approached their respective body temperatures as the ablations continued; however, a significant difference in ascites temperature was found between groups "W" and "R" throughout the procedures (39.2±0.4℃ in group W and 33.4±4.3℃ in group R at 6 min, p = 0.003). No significant difference was found between the size of the ablation zones (782.4±237.3 mL in group C, 1,172.0±468.9 mL in group R, and 1,030.6±665.1 mL in group W, p = 0.170) for the excised liver specimens. Diaphragmatic injury was identified in three of seven cases (42.9%) upon visual inspection of group "C" rabbits (p = 0.030). Conclusion Artificial ascites are not likely to cause a significant heat-sink phenomenon in the percutaneous RF ablation of the hepatic subcapsular region. PMID:19182502

  10. Comparison of procedure costs of various percutaneous tumor ablation modalities.

    PubMed

    Astani, Seyed A; Brown, Manuel L; Steusloff, Kay

    2014-01-01

    Microwave ablation, radiofrequency ablation, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation are percutaneous ablation modalities commonly employed to treat tumors. The procedure cost of treating the same lesion with each of the four modalities is compared. A cost model was created for each ablation modality estimating the cost of treating a tumor based on the number of probes required, which is estimated by the tumor size.Total cost of treating a 3 cm kidney lesion with each modality was individually calculated. There was a strongly positive and statistically significant relationship between estimated cost based on the cost modules and actual cost for all procedures. The number of required probes is the dominant factor in determining the cost of an ablation procedure. The most expensive ablation modalities in decreasing order are irreversible electroporation, cryoablation, and microwave and radiofrequency ablations. PMID:25174139

  11. Assessment of liver ablation using cone beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Rehim, Mohamed; Ronot, Maxime; Sibert, Annie; Vilgrain, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the feasibility and accuracy of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in assessing the ablation zone after liver tumor ablation. METHODS: Twenty-three patients (17 men and 6 women, range: 45-85 years old, mean age 65 years) with malignant liver tumors underwent ultrasound-guided percutaneous tumor ablation [radiofrequency (n = 14), microwave (n = 9)] followed by intravenous contrast-enhanced CBCT. Baseline multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and peri-procedural CBCT images were compared. CBCT image quality was assessed as poor, good, or excellent. Image fusion was performed to assess tumor coverage, and quality of fusion was rated as bad, good, or excellent. Ablation zone volumes on peri-procedural CBCT and post-procedural MDCT were compared using the non-parametric paired Wilcoxon t-test. RESULTS: Rate of primary ablation effectiveness was 100%. There were no complications related to ablation. Local tumor recurrence and new liver tumors were found 3 mo after initial treatment in one patient (4%). The ablation zone was identified in 21/23 (91.3%) patients on CBCT. The fusion of baseline MDCT and peri-procedural CBCT images was feasible in all patients and showed satisfactory tumor coverage (at least 5-mm margin). CBCT image quality was poor, good, and excellent in 2 (9%), 8 (35%), and 13 (56%), patients respectively. Registration quality between peri-procedural CBCT and post-procedural MDCT images was good to excellent in 17/23 (74%) patients. The median ablation volume on peri-procedural CBCT and post-procedural MDCT was 30 cm3 (range: 4-95 cm3) and 30 cm3 (range: 4-124 cm3), respectively (P-value > 0.2). There was a good correlation (r = 0.79) between the volumes of the two techniques. CONCLUSION: Contrast-enhanced CBCT after tumor ablation of the liver allows early assessment of the ablation zone. PMID:25593467

  12. Laser ablation of blepharopigmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Tanenbaum, M.; Karas, S.; McCord, C.D. Jr. )

    1988-01-01

    This article discusses laser ablation of blepharopigmentation in four stages: first, experimentally, where pigment vaporization is readily achieved with the argon blue-green laser; second, in the rabbit animal model, where eyelid blepharopigmentation markings are ablated with the laser; third, in human subjects, where the argon blue-green laser is effective in the ablation of implanted eyelid pigment; and fourth, in a case report, where, in a patient with improper pigment placement in the eyelid, the laser is used to safely and effectively ablate the undesired pigment markings. This article describes in detail the new technique of laser ablation of blepharopigmentation. Potential complications associated with the technique are discussed.

  13. Photophysical ablation of porous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksenov, Valerii P.; Mikhailova, G. N.

    2004-07-01

    Laser ablation of porous silicon as a function of laser wavelength and width of silicon nanowires was studied in our experiments. The time-resolved evolution of the cloud of the porous silicon particles produced by laser ablation is studied in situ by the analysis of the kinetics of photoluminescence signal. The laser ablation of porous silicon produced by pulses of 532 nm or 337 nm radiation with addition of synchronized power pulses of 1064 nm radiation. The cloud of the nanometer-sized silicon crystallites had the high enhancement of luminescence quantum efficiency in the red region of spectra. The slow PL kinetics component, which is due to the localized carriers, decays on a millisecond time scale. The squeezed electron-hole plasma heating by IR-laser radiation may produce a damage of silicon nanowires. The fragments of nanowires in cloud must be smaller, than the critical length. The energy of excitation of e-h pair in fragment with contribution of longitude quantum modes must be lower than energy of the excited photons. Particles with lesser length don't absorb excited laser radiation and don't damage. For this case we may speak about the quantum mechanism of laser ablation of nanowires.

  14. Real-time temperature control system based on the finite element method for liver radiofrequency ablation: effect of the time interval on control.

    PubMed

    Isobe, Yosuke; Watanabe, Hiroki; Yamazaki, Nozomu; Lu, XiaoWei; Kobayashi, Yo; Miyashita, Tomoyuki; Hashizume, Makoto; Fujie, Masakatsu G

    2013-01-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) ablation is increasingly being used to treat liver cancer because it is minimally invasive. However, it is difficult for operators to control the size of the coagulation zones precisely, because no method has been established to form an adequate and suitable ablation area. To overcome this limitation, we propose a new system that can control the coagulation zone size. The system operates as follows: 1) the liver temperature is estimated using a temperature-distribution simulator to reduce invasiveness; 2) the output power of the RF generator is controlled automatically according to the liver temperature. To use this system in real time, both the time taken to calculate the temperature in the simulation and the control accuracy are important. We therefore investigated the relationship between the time interval required to change the output voltage and temperature control stability in RF ablation. The results revealed that the proposed method can control the temperature at a point away from the electrode needle to obtain the desired ablation size. It was also shown to be necessary to reduce the time interval when small tumors are cauterized to avoid excessive treatment. In contrast, such high frequency feedback control is not required when large tumors are cauterized. PMID:24109706

  15. Combination of erbium and holmium laser radiation for tissue ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratisto, Hans S.; Frenz, Martin; Koenz, Flurin; Altermatt, Hans J.; Weber, Heinz P.

    1996-05-01

    Erbium lasers emitting at 2.94 micrometers and holmium lasers emitting at 2.1 micrometers are interesting tools for cutting, drilling, smoothing and welding of water containing tissues. The high absorption coefficient of water at these wavelengths leads to their good ablation efficiency with controlled thermally altered zones around the ablation sites. Combination of pulses with both wavelengths transmitted through one fiber were used to perform incisions in soft tissue and impacts in bone disks. Histological results and scanning electron microscope evaluations reveal the strong influence of the absorption coefficient on tissue effects, especially on the ablation efficiency and the zone of thermally damaged tissue. It is demonstrated that the combination of high ablation rates and deep coagulation zones can be achieved. The results indicate that this laser system can be considered as a first step towards a multi-functional medical instrument.

  16. Ultra-short pulsed laser tissue ablation using focused laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaunich, Megan K.; Raje, Shreya; Mitra, Kunal; Grace, Michael S.; Fahey, Molly; Spooner, Greg

    2008-02-01

    Short pulse lasers are used for a variety of therapeutic applications in medicine. Recently ultra-short pulse lasers have gained prominence due to the reduction in collateral thermal damage to surrounding healthy tissue during tissue ablation. In this paper, ultra-short pulsed laser ablation of mouse skin tissue is analyzed by assessing the extent of damage produced due to focused laser beam irradiation. The laser used for this study is a fiber-based desktop laser (Raydiance, Inc.) having a wavelength of 1552 nm and a pulse width of 1.3 ps. The laser beam is focused on the sample surface to a spot size on the order of 10 microns, thus producing high peak intensity necessary for precise clean ablation. A parametric study is performed on in vitro mouse tissue specimens and live anaesthetized mice with mammary tumors through variation of laser parameters such as time-averaged laser power, repetition rate, laser scanning rate and irradiation time. Radial temperature distribution is measured using thermal camera to analyze the heat affected zone. Temperature measurements are performed to assess the peak temperature rise attained during ablation. A detailed histological study is performed using frozen section technique to observe the nature and extent of laser-induced damages.

  17. Sequential Activation of a Segmented Ground Pad Reduces Skin Heating During Radiofrequency Tumor Ablation: Optimization via Computational Models

    PubMed Central

    Schutt, David J.; Haemmerich, Dieter

    2009-01-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) ablation has become an accepted treatment modality for unresectable tumors. The need for larger ablation zones has resulted in increased RF generator power. Skin burns due to ground pad heating are increasingly limiting further increases in generator power, and thus, ablation zone size. We investigated a method for reducing ground pad heating in which a commercial ground pad is segmented into multiple ground electrodes, with sequential activation of ground electrode subsets. We created finite-element method computer models of a commercial ground pad (14 × 23 cm) and compared normal operation of a standard pad to sequential activation of a segmented pad (two to five separate ground electrode segments). A constant current of 1 A was applied for 12 min in all simulations. Time periods during sequential activation simulations were adjusted to keep the leading edge temperatures at each ground electrode equal. The maximum temperature using standard activation of the commercial pad was 41.7 °C. For sequential activation of a segmented pad, the maximum temperature ranged from 39.3 °C (five segments) to 40.9 °C (two segments). Sequential activation of a segmented ground pad resulted in lower tissue temperatures. This method may reduce the incidence of ground pad burns and enable the use of higher power generators during RF tumor ablation. PMID:18595807

  18. Nonequilibrium Ablation of Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milos, Frank S.; Chen, Yih K.; Gokcen, Tahir

    2012-01-01

    In previous work, an equilibrium ablation and thermal response model for Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator was developed. In general, over a wide range of test conditions, model predictions compared well with arcjet data for surface recession, surface temperature, in-depth temperature at multiple thermocouples, and char depth. In this work, additional arcjet tests were conducted at stagnation conditions down to 40 W/sq cm and 1.6 kPa. The new data suggest that nonequilibrium effects become important for ablation predictions at heat flux or pressure below about 80 W/sq cm or 10 kPa, respectively. Modifications to the ablation model to account for nonequilibrium effects are investigated. Predictions of the equilibrium and nonequilibrium models are compared with the arcjet data.

  19. An Engineering Solution for Solving Mesh Size Effects in the Simulation of Delamination with Cohesive Zone Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turon, A.; Davila, C. G.; Camanho, P. P.; Costa, J.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a methodology to determine the parameters to be used in the constitutive equations of Cohesive Zone Models employed in the simulation of delamination in composite materials by means of decohesion finite elements. A closed-form expression is developed to define the stiffness of the cohesive layer. A novel procedure that allows the use of coarser meshes of decohesion elements in large-scale computations is also proposed. The procedure ensures that the energy dissipated by the fracture process is computed correctly. It is shown that coarse-meshed models defined using the approach proposed here yield the same results as the models with finer meshes normally used for the simulation of fracture processes.

  20. Laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy via a single-needle delivery system: Optimal conditions of ablation, pathological and ultrasonic changes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan-Rong; Fang, Ling-Yun; Yu, Cheng; Sun, Zhen-Xing; Huang, Yan; Chen, Juan; Guo, Tao; Xiang, Fei-Xiang; Wang, Jing; Lu, Cheng-Fa; Yan, Tian-Wei; Lv, Qing; Xie, Ming-Xing

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to examine the optimal conditions of laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy (LITT) via a single-needle delivery system, and the ablation-related pathological and ultrasonic changes. Ultrasound (US)-guided LITT (EchoLaser system) was performed at the output power of 2-4 Wattage (W) for 1-10 min in ex vivo bovine liver. Based on the results of the ex vivo study, the output power of 3 and 4 W with different durations was applied to in vivo rabbit livers (n=24), and VX2 tumors implanted in the hind limbs of rabbits (n=24). The ablation area was histologically determined by hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining. Traditional US and contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) were used to evaluate the treatment outcomes. The results showed: (1) In the bovine liver, ablation disruption was grossly seen, including a strip-like ablation crater, a carbonization zone anteriorly along the fiber tip, and a surrounding gray-white coagulation zone. The coagulation area, 1.2 cm in length and 1.0 cm in width, was formed in the bovine liver subjected to the ablation at 3 W for 5 min and 4 W for 4 min, and it extended slightly with the ablation time. (2) In the rabbit liver, after LITT at 3 W for 3 min and more, the coagulation area with length greater than or equal to 1.2 cm, and width greater than or equal to 1.0 cm, was found. Similar coagulation area was seen in the implanted VX2 carcinoma at 3 W for 5 min. (3) Gross examination of the liver and carcinoma showed three distinct regions: ablation crater/carbonization, coagulation and congestion distributed from the center outwards. (4) Microscopy revealed four zones after LITT, including ablation crater/carbonization, coagulation, edema and congestion from the center outwards. A large area with coagulative necrosis was observed around a vessel in the peripheral area with edema and hyperemia. (5) The size of coagulation was consistent well to the CEUS findings. It was concluded that EchoLaser system at low power can produce a

  1. Nanoscale ablation through optically trapped microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fardel, Romain; McLeod, Euan; Tsai, Yu-Cheng; Arnold, Craig B.

    2010-10-01

    The ability to directly create patterns with size scales below 100 nm is important for many applications where the production or repair of high resolution and density features is needed. Laser-based direct-write methods have the benefit of being able to quickly and easily modify and create structures on existing devices, but ablation can negatively impact the overall technique. In this paper we show that self-positioning of near-field objectives through the optical trap assisted nanopatterning (OTAN) method allows for ablation without harming the objective elements. Small microbeads are positioned in close proximity to a substrate where ablation is initiated. Upon ablation, these beads are temporarily displaced from the trap but rapidly return to the initial position. We analyze the range of fluence values for which this process occurs and find that there exists a critical threshold beyond which the beads are permanently ejected.

  2. Renal Ablation Update

    PubMed Central

    Khiatani, Vishal; Dixon, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    Thermal ablative technologies have evolved considerably in the recent past and are now an important component of current clinical guidelines for the treatment of small renal masses. Both radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation have intermediate-term oncologic control that rivals surgical options, with favorable complication profiles. Studies comparing cryoablation and radiofrequency ablation show no significant difference in oncologic control or complication profile between the two modalities. Early data from small series with microwave ablation have shown similar promising results. Newer technologies including irreversible electroporation and high-intensity–focused ultrasound have theoretical advantages, but will require further research before becoming a routine part of the ablation armamentarium. The purpose of this review article is to discuss the current ablative technologies available, briefly review their mechanisms of action, discuss technical aspects of each, and provide current data supporting their use. PMID:25049445

  3. Renal ablation update.

    PubMed

    Khiatani, Vishal; Dixon, Robert G

    2014-06-01

    Thermal ablative technologies have evolved considerably in the recent past and are now an important component of current clinical guidelines for the treatment of small renal masses. Both radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation have intermediate-term oncologic control that rivals surgical options, with favorable complication profiles. Studies comparing cryoablation and radiofrequency ablation show no significant difference in oncologic control or complication profile between the two modalities. Early data from small series with microwave ablation have shown similar promising results. Newer technologies including irreversible electroporation and high-intensity-focused ultrasound have theoretical advantages, but will require further research before becoming a routine part of the ablation armamentarium. The purpose of this review article is to discuss the current ablative technologies available, briefly review their mechanisms of action, discuss technical aspects of each, and provide current data supporting their use. PMID:25049445

  4. Numerical study and optimization of interstitial antennas for microwave ablation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komarov, Vyacheslav V.

    2014-10-01

    Electromagnetic and thermal characteristics of coaxial monopole antennas of 2.45 GHz and 24.125 GHz for microwave ablation of malignant tumors are investigated. Microwave heating processes in an interaction domain (biological tissue) are described by the coupled electromagnetic and heat transfer problem, which was solved numerically in the present study. Proposed applicators provide reducing of reflected power and localized distribution of temperature in the near-field zone. Different mathematical models are used to optimize the antennas sizes and simulate heating patterns.

  5. Evolution of a Directional Wave Spectrum in a 3D Marginal Ice Zone with Random Floe Size Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montiel, F.; Squire, V. A.

    2013-12-01

    A new ocean wave/sea-ice interaction model is proposed that simulates how a directional wave spectrum evolves as it travels through a realistic marginal ice zone (MIZ), where wave/ice dynamics are entirely governed by coherent conservative wave scattering effects. Field experiments conducted by Wadhams et al. (1986) in the Greenland Sea generated important data on wave attenuation in the MIZ and, particularly, on whether the wave spectrum spreads directionally or collimates with distance from the ice edge. The data suggest that angular isotropy, arising from multiple scattering by ice floes, occurs close to the edge and thenceforth dominates wave propagation throughout the MIZ. Although several attempts have been made to replicate this finding theoretically, including by the use of numerical models, none have confronted this problem in a 3D MIZ with fully randomised floe distribution properties. We construct such a model by subdividing the discontinuous ice cover into adjacent infinite slabs of finite width parallel to the ice edge. Each slab contains an arbitrary (but finite) number of circular ice floes with randomly distributed properties. Ice floes are modeled as thin elastic plates with uniform thickness and finite draught. We consider a directional wave spectrum with harmonic time dependence incident on the MIZ from the open ocean, defined as a continuous superposition of plane waves traveling at different angles. The scattering problem within each slab is then solved using Graf's interaction theory for an arbitrary incident directional plane wave spectrum. Using an appropriate integral representation of the Hankel function of the first kind (see Cincotti et al., 1993), we map the outgoing circular wave field from each floe on the slab boundaries into a directional spectrum of plane waves, which characterizes the slab reflected and transmitted fields. Discretizing the angular spectrum, we can obtain a scattering matrix for each slab. Standard recursive

  6. Radiofrequency Ablation of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Marc; Mikityansky, Igor; Kam, Anthony; Libutti, Steven K.; Walther, McClellan M.; Neeman, Ziv; Locklin, Julia K.; Wood, Bradford J.

    2008-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has been used for over 18 years for treatment of nerve-related chronic pain and cardiac arrhythmias. In the last 10 years, technical developments have increased ablation volumes in a controllable, versatile, and relatively inexpensive manner. The host of clinical applications for RFA have similarly expanded. Current RFA equipment, techniques, applications, results, complications, and research avenues for local tumor ablation are summarized. PMID:15383844

  7. Radiofrequency Ablation of Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Marc; Mikityansky, Igor; Kam, Anthony; Libutti, Steven K.; Walther, McClellan M.; Neeman, Ziv; Locklin, Julia K.; Wood, Bradford J.

    2004-09-15

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has been used for over 18 years for treatment of nerve-related chronic pain and cardiac arrhythmias. In the last 10 years, technical developments have increased ablation volumes in a controllable, versatile, and relatively inexpensive manner. The host of clinical applications for RFA have similarly expanded. Current RFA equipment, techniques, applications, results, complications, and research avenues for local tumor ablation are summarized.

  8. Stellar Ablation of Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Thomas E.; Horwitz, J. L.

    2007-01-01

    We review observations and theories of the solar ablation of planetary atmospheres, focusing on the terrestrial case where a large magnetosphere holds off the solar wind, so that there is little direct atmospheric impact, but also couples the solar wind electromagnetically to the auroral zones. We consider the photothermal escape flows known as the polar wind or refilling flows, the enhanced mass flux escape flows that result from localized solar wind energy dissipation in the auroral zones, and the resultant enhanced neutral atom escape flows. We term these latter two escape flows the "auroral wind." We review observations and theories of the heating and acceleration of auroral winds, including energy inputs from precipitating particles, electromagnetic energy flux at magnetohydrodynamic and plasma wave frequencies, and acceleration by parallel electric fields and by convection pickup processes also known as "centrifugal acceleration." We consider also the global circulation of ionospheric plasmas within the magnetosphere, their participation in magnetospheric disturbances as absorbers of momentum and energy, and their ultimate loss from the magnetosphere into the downstream solar wind, loading reconnection processes that occur at high altitudes near the magnetospheric boundaries. We consider the role of planetary magnetization and the accumulating evidence of stellar ablation of extrasolar planetary atmospheres. Finally, we suggest and discuss future needs for both the theory and observation of the planetary ionospheres and their role in solar wind interactions, to achieve the generality required for a predictive science of the coupling of stellar and planetary atmospheres over the full range of possible conditions.

  9. Lung Ablation: Whats New?

    PubMed

    Xiong, Lillian; Dupuy, Damian E

    2016-07-01

    Lung cancer had an estimated incidence of 221,200 in 2015, making up 13% of all cancer diagnoses. Tumor ablation is an important treatment option for nonsurgical lung cancer and pulmonary metastatic patients. Radiofrequency ablation has been used for over a decade with newer modalities, microwave ablation, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation presenting as additional and possibly improved treatment options for patients. This minimally invasive therapy is best for small primary lesions or favorably located metastatic tumors. These technologies can offer palliation and sometimes cure of thoracic malignancies. This article discusses the current available technologies and techniques available for tumor ablation. PMID:27050331

  10. Determination of degradation rates of organic substances in the unsaturated soil zone depending on the grain size fractions of various soil types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fichtner, Thomas; Stefan, Catalin; Goersmeyer, Nora

    2015-04-01

    Rate and extent of the biological degradation of organic substances during transport through the unsaturated soil zone is decisively influenced by the chemical and physical properties of the pollutants such as water solubility, toxicity and molecular structure. Furthermore microbial degradation processes are also influenced by soil-specific properties. An important parameter is the soil grain size distribution on which the pore volume and the pore size depends. Changes lead to changes in air and water circulation as well as preferred flow paths. Transport capacity of water inclusive nutrients is lower in existing bad-drainable fine pores in soils with small grain size fractions than in well-drainable coarse pores in a soil with bigger grain size fractions. Because fine pores are saturated with water for a longer time than the coarse pores and oxygen diffusion in water is ten thousand times slower than in air, oxygen is replenished much slower in soils with small grain size fractions. As a result life and growth conditions of the microorganisms are negatively affected. This leads to less biological activity, restricted degradation/mineralization of pollutants or altered microbial processes. The aim of conducted laboratory column experiments was to study the correlation between the grain size fractions respectively pore sizes, the oxygen content and the biodegradation rate of infiltrated organic substances. Therefore two columns (active + sterile control) were filled with different grain size fractions (0,063-0,125 mm, 0,2-0,63 mm and 1-2 mm) of soils. The sterile soil was inoculated with a defined amount of a special bacteria culture (sphingobium yanoikuae). A solution with organic substances glucose, oxalic acid, sinaphylic alcohol and nutrients was infiltrated from the top in intervals. The degradation of organic substances was controlled by the measurement of dissolved organic carbon in the in- and outflow of the column. The control of different pore volumes

  11. Distribution of iron in size resolved aerosols generated by femtosecond laser ablation: Influence of cell geometry and implications for in situ isotopic measurements using LA-MC-ICP-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    d'Abzac, F.; Czaja, A. D.; Beard, B. L.; Schauer, J. J.; Johnson, C.

    2012-12-01

    Laser Ablation (LA) Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) is a common and reliable method for the in situ chemical analysis in geosciences. In contrast, use of LA for analyzing naturally occurring mass dependent isotope fractionation in geological samples is not widely used because of the difficulties of differentiating laser induced isotope fractionation from naturally occurring mass dependent isotope fractionation. A critical aspect for accurate in situ stable isotope analysis is the chemical and isotopic composition, size, and morphology of aerosols generated by LA. We report on the iron mass distribution over the particle size distribution (PSD) of aerosols produced by femtosecond LA of magnetite and pyrite. A Photon Machines "Analyte" fs-G2 was used that provides τ~150fs pulses in the near UV (λ=263nm) with an adjustable repetition rate 1Ablations were performed under Helium (~0.5L.min-1 outgoing flow) and two different cells were used: one cylindrical with a ~10s wash out time, the other (Photon Machines HelEx), with a wash out of less than 1s. For all experiments, aerosols were collected on Teflon filters using a MOUDI cascade impactor, according to their aerodynamic diameter, within a range of da<0.056μm to da>18μm (Marple, Rubow et al., 1991). Filters loads were dissolved in HCl (magnetite) or HNO3 (pyrite) and iron concentration was determined spectroscopically using the ferrozine method or by isotope dilution mass spectrometery. The PSD for a given cell is similar for both pyrite and magnetite and is independent of fluence (1-3J.cm-2). However, significant differences appear from one cell to the other. The cylindrical cell gives a unimodal distribution with a peak centered on da=0.18μm and spread from da=0.056μm to 0.56μm (83% of the total Fe mass). Using the Helex cell the PSD is bi modal with ~1/3 of the particles having a da<0.056μm in addition to the peak at da=0.18μm. Importantly we note that for a given mineral

  12. Laser systems for ablative fractional resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Paasch, Uwe; Haedersdal, Merete

    2011-01-01

    Ablative fractional resurfacing (AFR) creates microscopic vertical ablated channels that are surrounded by a thin layer of coagulated tissue, constituting the microscopic treatment zones (MTZs). AFR induces epidermal and dermal remodeling, which raises new possibilities for the treatment of a variety of skin conditions, primarily chronically photodamaged skin, but also acne and burn scars. In addition, it is anticipated that AFR can be utilized in the laser-assisted delivery of topical drugs. Clinical efficacy coupled with minimal downtime has driven the development of various fractional ablative laser systems. Fractionated CO(2) (10,600-nm), erbium yttrium aluminum garnet, 2940-nm and yttrium scandium gallium garnet, 2790-nm lasers are available. In this article, we present an overview of AFR technology, devices and histopathology, and we summarize the current clinical possibilities with AFR incorporating our personal experience. AFR is still in the exploratory era, and systematic investigations of clinical outcomes related to various system settings are needed. PMID:21158542

  13. Ablative Thermal Protection System Fundamentals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, Robin A. S.

    2013-01-01

    This is the presentation for a short course on the fundamentals of ablative thermal protection systems. It covers the definition of ablation, description of ablative materials, how they work, how to analyze them and how to model them.

  14. Creation of silicon nanocrystals using the laser ablation in liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perminov, P. A.; Dzhun, I. O.; Ezhov, A. A.; Zabotnov, S. V.; Golovan, L. A.; Ivlev, G. D.; Gatskevich, E. I.; Malevich, V. L.; Kashkarov, P. K.

    2011-04-01

    The method for the formation of silicon nanoparticles by picosecond laser pulses is studied upon the surface irradiation of the single-crystal silicon in various liquids. The ablation products are investigated using the atomic-force microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The experimental results indicate the crystal-line structure of nanoparticles and the dependence of their size on the ablation medium.

  15. Size-fraction partitioning of community gene transcription and nitrogen metabolism in a marine oxygen minimum zone.

    PubMed

    Ganesh, Sangita; Bristow, Laura A; Larsen, Morten; Sarode, Neha; Thamdrup, Bo; Stewart, Frank J

    2015-12-01

    The genetic composition of marine microbial communities varies at the microscale between particle-associated (PA; >1.6 μm) and free-living (FL; 0.2-1.6 μm) niches. It remains unclear, however, how metabolic activities differ between PA and FL fractions. We combined rate measurements with metatranscriptomics to quantify PA and FL microbial activity in the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) of the Eastern Tropical North Pacific, focusing on dissimilatory processes of the nitrogen (N) cycle. Bacterial gene counts were 8- to 15-fold higher in the FL compared with the PA fraction. However, rates of all measured N cycle processes, excluding ammonia oxidation, declined significantly following particle (>1.6 μm) removal. Without particles, rates of nitrate reduction to nitrite (1.5-9.4nMNd(-1)) fell to zero and N2 production by denitrification (0.5-1.7nMNd(-1)) and anammox (0.3-1.9nMNd(-1)) declined by 53-85%. The proportional representation of major microbial taxa and N cycle gene transcripts in metatranscriptomes followed fraction-specific trends. Transcripts encoding nitrate reductase were uniform among PA and FL fractions, whereas anammox-associated transcripts were proportionately enriched up to 15-fold in the FL fraction. In contrast, transcripts encoding enzymes for N2O and N2 production by denitrification were enriched up to 28-fold in PA samples. These patterns suggest that the majority of N cycle activity, excluding N2O and N2 production by denitrification, is confined to a FL majority that is critically dependent on access to particles, likely as a source of organic carbon and inorganic N. Variable particle distributions may drive heterogeneity in N cycle activity and gene expression in OMZs. PMID:25848875

  16. Near-infrared laser ablation of poly tetrafluoroethylene (Teflon) sensitized by nanoenergetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Yanqiang; Wang Shufeng; Sun Zhaoyong; Dlott, Dana D.

    2004-08-30

    Laser ablation of Teflon doped with size-selected (30-250 nm) Al nanoparticles is studied. Unlike pure Teflon, which requires a vacuum-ultraviolet or femtosecond excimer laser for ablation, this sensitized Teflon can be ablated with a near-infrared laser. Using 100 ps duration pulses, near-infrared ablation thresholds are lower by about a factor of 10 from excimer ablation of pure Teflon. A mechanism is discussed that involves Teflon decomposition by spherical shock fronts originating at each irradiated nanoparticle. Studies of the distance dependence of this process as a function of particle diameter and oxide layer thickness suggest ways of optimizing the ablation process.

  17. Turbulence control of floc size in suspended particulate matter (SPM) in the river estuary transition zone (RETZ)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Suzanna; Jago, Colin

    2016-04-01

    Quantifying floc properties in relation to physical forcings are key in determining the transfer flux of SPM from the catchment to the coastal ocean. Observations of floc development require high resolution data; in situ optical and acoustic instruments were deployed in the RETZ to obtain SPM and hydrodynamic properties. Results suggest that turbulent kinetic energy dissipation (TKE) can be correlated to median particle size (D50) and concentration on tidal and lunar time scales. Analysis on a tidal scale indicates terrestrially derived SPM and SPM of a marine origin display different relationships with the local turbulence regime, suggesting the D50 of terrestrially derived SPM is not limited to the eddy length scales of the Kolmogorov microscale. It is essential to improve methods to quantify the role of hydrodynamic processes in controlling SPM properties and thus the fate of the transfer of terrestrially derived organic matter to the coastal ocean.

  18. Population sizes and growth pressure responses of intestinal microfloras of deep-sea fish retrieved from the abyssal zone.

    PubMed

    Yano, Y; Nakayama, A; Yoshida, K

    1995-12-01

    The intestinal floras of seven deep-sea fish retrieved at depths of from 3,200 to 5,900 m were examined for population sizes and growth responses to pressure. Large populations of culturable bacteria, ranging from 1.1 x 10(sup6) to 3.6 x 10(sup8) cells per ml of contents, were detected when samples were incubated at conditions characteristic of those of the deep sea. Culturable cell counts at in situ pressures were greater than those at atmospheric pressure in all samples. Most of the strains isolated by the spread-plating method at atmospheric pressure later proved barophilic. Barophilic bacteria were the predominant inhabitants of the abyssal fish intestines. PMID:16535199

  19. Flow-Dependent Vascular Heat Transfer during Microwave Thermal Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Jason; Hynes, Kieran; Brace, Christopher L.

    2012-01-01

    Microwave tumor ablation is an attractive option for thermal ablation because of its inherent benefits over radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in the treatment of solid tumors such as hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Microwave energy heats tissue to higher temperatures and at a faster rate than RFA, creating larger, more homogenous ablation zones. In this study, we investigate microwave heating near large vasculature using coupled fluid-flow and thermal analysis. Low-flow conditions are predicted to be more likely to cause cytotoxic heating and, therefore, vessel thrombosis and endothelial damage of downstream tissues. Such conditions may be more prevalent in patient with severe cirrhosis or compromised blood flow. High-flow conditions create the more familiar heat-sink effect that can protect perivascular tissues from the intended thermal damage. These results may help guide placement and use of microwave ablation technologies in future studies. PMID:23367194

  20. Femtosecond laser lithotripsy: feasibility and ablation mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Jinze; Teichman, Joel M. H.; Wang, Tianyi; Neev, Joseph; Glickman, Randolph D.; Chan, Kin Foong; Milner, Thomas E.

    2010-03-01

    Light emitted from a femtosecond laser is capable of plasma-induced ablation of various materials. We tested the feasibility of utilizing femtosecond-pulsed laser radiation (λ=800 nm, 140 fs, 0.9 mJ/pulse) for ablation of urinary calculi. Ablation craters were observed in human calculi of greater than 90% calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM), cystine (CYST), or magnesium ammonium phosphate hexahydrate (MAPH). Largest crater volumes were achieved on CYST stones, among the most difficult stones to fragment using Holmium:YAG (Ho:YAG) lithotripsy. Diameter of debris was characterized using optical microscopy and found to be less than 20 μm, substantially smaller than that produced by long-pulsed Ho:YAG ablation. Stone retropulsion, monitored by a high-speed camera system with a spatial resolution of 15 μm, was negligible for stones with mass as small as 0.06 g. Peak shock wave pressures were less than 2 bars, measured by a polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) needle hydrophone. Ablation dynamics were visualized and characterized with pump-probe imaging and fast flash photography and correlated to shock wave pressures. Because femtosecond-pulsed laser ablates urinary calculi of soft and hard compositions, with micron-sized debris, negligible stone retropulsion, and small shock wave pressures, we conclude that the approach is a promising candidate technique for lithotripsy.

  1. Laser Ablation for Small Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Pacella, Claudio Maurizio; Francica, Giampiero; Di Costanzo, Giovanni Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignancies worldwide and is increasingly detected at small size (<5 cm) owing to surveillance programmes in high-risk patients. For these cases, curative therapies such as resection, liver transplantation, or percutaneous ablation have been proposed. When surgical options are precluded, image-guided tumor ablation is recommended as the most appropriate therapeutic choice in terms of tumor local control, safety, and improvement in survival. Laser ablation (LA) represents one of currently available loco-ablative techniques: light is delivered via flexible quartz fibers of diameter from 300 to 600 μm inserted into tumor lesion through either fine needles (21g Chiba needles) or large-bore catheters. The thermal destruction of tissue is achieved through conversion of absorbed light (usually infrared) into heat. A range of different imaging modalities have been used to guide percutaneous laser ablation, but ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging are most widely employed, according to local experience and resource availability. Available clinical data suggest that LA is highly effective in terms of tumoricidal capability with an excellent safety profile; the best results in terms of long-term survival are obtained in early HCC so that LA can be proposed not only in unresectable cases but, not differently from radiofrequency ablation, also as the first-line treatment. PMID:22191028

  2. Basic ablation phenomena during laser thrombolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathyam, Ujwal S.; Shearin, Alan; Prahl, Scott A.

    1997-05-01

    This paper presents studies of microsecond ablation phenomena that take place during laser thrombolysis. The main goals were to optimize laser parameters for efficient ablation, and to investigate the ablation mechanism. Gelatin containing an absorbing dye was used as the clot model. A parametric study was performed to identify the optimal wavelength, spot size, pulse energies, and repetition rate for maximum material removal. The minimum radiant exposures to achieve ablation at any wavelength were measured. The results suggest that most visible wavelengths were equally efficient at removing material at radiant exposures above threshold. Ablation was initiated at surface temperatures just above 100 degrees Celsius. A vapor bubble was formed during ablation. Less than 5% of the total pulse energy is coupled into the bubble energy. A large part of the delivered energy is unaccounted for and is likely released partly as acoustic transients from the vapor expansion and partly wasted as heat. The current laser and delivery systems may not be able to completely remove large clot burden that is sometimes encountered in heart attacks. However, laser thrombolysis may emerge as a favored treatment for strokes where the occlusion is generally smaller and rapid recanalization is of paramount importance. A final hypothesis is that laser thrombolysis should be done at radiant exposures close to threshold to minimize any damaging effects of the bubble dynamics on the vessel wall.

  3. Lung Cancer Ablation: What Is the Evidence?

    PubMed Central

    de Baere, Thierry; Farouil, Geoffroy; Deschamps, Frederic

    2013-01-01

    Percutaneous ablation of small non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has been demonstrated to be both feasible and safe in nonsurgical candidates. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA), the most commonly used technique for ablation, has a reported rate of complete ablation of ~90%, with best results obtained in tumors <2 to 3 cm in diameter. The best reported 1-, 3-, and 5-year overall survival rates after RFA of NSCLC are 97.7%, 72.9%, and 55.7%, respectively. It is noteworthy that in most studies, cancer-specific survival is greater than overall survival due to severe comorbidities in patients treated with RFA for NSCLC. Aside from tumor size and tumor stage, these comorbidities are predictive of survival. Other ablation techniques such as microwave and irreversible electroporation may in the future prove to overcome some of the limitations of RFA, namely for large tumors or tumors close to large vessels. Stereotactic body radiation therapy has also been demonstrated to be highly efficacious in treating small lung tumors and will need to be compared with percutaneous ablation. This article reviews the current evidence regarding RFA for lung cancer. PMID:24436531

  4. Automated planning of ablation targets in atrial fibrillation treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keustermans, Johannes; De Buck, Stijn; Heidbüchel, Hein; Suetens, Paul

    2011-03-01

    Catheter based radio-frequency ablation is used as an invasive treatment of atrial fibrillation. This procedure is often guided by the use of 3D anatomical models obtained from CT, MRI or rotational angiography. During the intervention the operator accurately guides the catheter to prespecified target ablation lines. The planning stage, however, can be time consuming and operator dependent which is suboptimal both from a cost and health perspective. Therefore, we present a novel statistical model-based algorithm for locating ablation targets from 3D rotational angiography images. Based on a training data set of 20 patients, consisting of 3D rotational angiography images with 30 manually indicated ablation points, a statistical local appearance and shape model is built. The local appearance model is based on local image descriptors to capture the intensity patterns around each ablation point. The local shape model is constructed by embedding the ablation points in an undirected graph and imposing that each ablation point only interacts with its neighbors. Identifying the ablation points on a new 3D rotational angiography image is performed by proposing a set of possible candidate locations for each ablation point, as such, converting the problem into a labeling problem. The algorithm is validated using a leave-one-out-approach on the training data set, by computing the distance between the ablation lines obtained by the algorithm and the manually identified ablation points. The distance error is equal to 3.8+/-2.9 mm. As ablation lesion size is around 5-7 mm, automated planning of ablation targets by the presented approach is sufficiently accurate.

  5. Healing responses following cryothermic and hyperthermic tissue ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godwin, Braden L.; Coad, James E.

    2009-02-01

    Minimally invasive, thermally ablative, interventional technologies have been changing the practice of medicine since before the turn of the 20th century. More recently, cryothermic and hyperthermic therapies have expanded in terms of their spectrum of thermal generators, modes for controlling and monitoring the treatment zone and both benign and malignant medical applications. The final tissue, and hence clinical outcome, of a thermal ablation is determined by the summation of direct primary (thermal) and secondary (apoptosis, ischemia, free radical, inflammation, wound healing, etc.) injury followed by possible cellular regeneration and scar formation. The initial thermal lesion can be broadly divided into two major zones of cellular death: 1) the complete ablation zone closer to the thermal source and 2) the peripheral transition zone with a decreasing gradient of cell death. While not applicable to cryotherapy, hyperthermic complete ablation zones are subdivided into two zones: 1) thermal or heat fixation and 2) coagulative necrosis. It is important to clearly differentiate these tissue zones because of their substantially different healing responses. Therefore, the development of clinically successful thermal therapies requires an understanding of tissue healing responses. The healing responses can be affected by a number of additional factors such as the tissue's anatomy, organ specific healing differences, blood supply, protein vs. lipid content, and other factors. Thus, effective biomedical instrument development requires both an understanding of thermal cell injury/death and the body's subsequent healing responses. This paper provides a general overview of the healing pathways that follow thermal tissue treatment.

  6. Potential health risk for residents around a typical e-waste recycling zone via inhalation of size-fractionated particle-bound heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chun-Li; Bao, Lian-Jun; Luo, Pei; Wang, Zhao-Yi; Li, Shao-Meng; Zeng, Eddy Y

    2016-11-01

    Health risk of residents dwelling around e-waste recycling zones has been a global concern, but has not been adequately examined. The present study was intended to evaluate the potential health risk of residents through inhalation exposure to size-fractionated particle-bound heavy metals in a typical e-waste recycling zone, South China. Anthropogenic metals (Zn, Se, Pb, Sb, As, and Cd) were predominantly enriched in fine particles (Dp<1.8μm), whereas the crustal elements (Ti, Fe, and Co) tended to accumulate in coarse particles (Dp>1.8μm). Although the daily inhalation intakes of the target metals were significantly lower than those through food consumption and ingestion of house dust, the hazard quotients of total metals for adults (95% CI: 1.0-5.5) and children (95% CI: 3.0-17) were greater than 1. Moreover, the incremental lifetime cancer risks of five carcinogenic metals (Cr, Co, Ni, As, and Cd) for adults and children were 1.3×10(-3) (95% CI: 4.1×10(-4)-3.0×10(-3)) and 3.9×10(-3) (95% CI: 1.3×10(-3)-8.6×10(-3)), respectively, substantially higher than the acceptable cancer risk range of 10(-6)-10(-4). All these findings suggested that health risks were high for local residents dwelling around the e-waste recycling zone through inhalation exposure to particle-bound heavy metals, for both adults and children. PMID:27322902

  7. PLANET HUNTERS. V. A CONFIRMED JUPITER-SIZE PLANET IN THE HABITABLE ZONE AND 42 PLANET CANDIDATES FROM THE KEPLER ARCHIVE DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ji; Fischer, Debra A.; Boyajian, Tabetha S.; Schmitt, Joseph R.; Giguere, Matthew J.; Brewer, John M.; Barclay, Thomas; Schwamb, Megan E.; Lintott, Chris; Simpson, Robert; Jek, Kian J.; Hoekstra, Abe J.; Jacobs, Thomas Lee; LaCourse, Daryll; Schwengeler, Hans Martin; Smith, Arfon M.; Parrish, Michael; Lynn, Stuart; Schawinski, Kevin; and others

    2013-10-10

    We report the latest Planet Hunter results, including PH2 b, a Jupiter-size (R{sub PL} = 10.12 ± 0.56 R{sub ⊕}) planet orbiting in the habitable zone of a solar-type star. PH2 b was elevated from candidate status when a series of false-positive tests yielded a 99.9% confidence level that transit events detected around the star KIC 12735740 had a planetary origin. Planet Hunter volunteers have also discovered 42 new planet candidates in the Kepler public archive data, of which 33 have at least 3 transits recorded. Most of these transit candidates have orbital periods longer than 100 days and 20 are potentially located in the habitable zones of their host stars. Nine candidates were detected with only two transit events and the prospective periods are longer than 400 days. The photometric models suggest that these objects have radii that range between those of Neptune and Jupiter. These detections nearly double the number of gas-giant planet candidates orbiting at habitable-zone distances. We conducted spectroscopic observations for nine of the brighter targets to improve the stellar parameters and we obtained adaptive optics imaging for four of the stars to search for blended background or foreground stars that could confuse our photometric modeling. We present an iterative analysis method to derive the stellar and planet properties and uncertainties by combining the available spectroscopic parameters, stellar evolution models, and transiting light curve parameters, weighted by the measurement errors. Planet Hunters is a citizen science project that crowd sources the assessment of NASA Kepler light curves. The discovery of these 43 planet candidates demonstrates the success of citizen scientists at identifying planet candidates, even in longer period orbits with only two or three transit events.

  8. Radiofrequency ablation of renal tumours with clinical, radiographical and pathological results

    PubMed Central

    Karam, Jose A.; Ahrar, Kamran; Vikram, Raghunandan; Romero, Claudio A.; Jonasch, Eric; Tannir, Nizar M.; Rao, Priya; Wood, Christopher G.; Matin, Surena F.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate our experience with radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for renal masses and to report on clinical, radiological and post-RFA biopsy results. Patients and methods The study collected clinical, radiological and pathological data from 150 consecutive patients who were treated with RFA of a renal mass between 2002 and 2008 at a tertiary referral centre. Post-ablation biopsies were performed in patients with non-involuting lesions or suspicion of recurrence on imaging. Comparisons were performed using the Mann–Whitney U-test. Survival was estimated using the Kaplan–Meier method. Results Renal malignancy was found in 72.1% of patients based on the initial diagnostic biopsy. Median tumour size was 2.6 cm, 22.7% of patients had a solitary kidney, and most were central tumours. The mean follow-up period was 40.1 months. There was no recurrence in 96.7% of the entire cohort. Cancer-specific survival for 106 patients with sporadic, localized, biopsy proven renal malignancy was 100% at 38.5 months. Biopsies were obtained in 43 patients for a median of 21 months after RFA. Among 38 patients who had biopsy for non-involuting, non-enhancing zones of ablation, three (7.9%) were positive. Conclusions Short-term cancer-specific survival after RFA remains excellent and most cases are successful based on a combination of imaging and post-ablation biopsies performed almost 2 years after treatment. There were four out of 150 (2.7%) patients who had recurrences with tissue confirmation; one of these patients was detected on imaging and three (2%) were radiologically occult. The absence of enhancement in the setting of non-involuting lesions is not always a guarantee of a successful ablation. PMID:23510233

  9. Brittle grain-size reduction of feldspar, phase mixing and strain localization in granitoids at mid-crustal conditions (Pernambuco shear zone, NE Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viegas, Gustavo; Menegon, Luca; Archanjo, Carlos

    2016-03-01

    The Pernambuco shear zone (northeastern Brazil) is a large-scale strike-slip fault that, in its eastern segment, deforms granitoids at mid-crustal conditions. Initially coarse-grained (> 50 µm) feldspar porphyroclasts are intensively fractured and reduced to an ultrafine-grained mixture consisting of plagioclase and K-feldspar grains (< 15 µm) localized in C' shear bands. Detailed microstructural observations and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analysis do not show evidence of intracrystalline plasticity in feldspar porphyroclasts and/or fluid-assisted replacement reactions. Quartz occurs either as thick (˜ 1-2 mm) monomineralic veins transposed along the shear zone foliation or as thin ribbons ( ≤ 25 µm width) dispersed in the feldspathic mixture. The microstructure and c axis crystallographic-preferred orientation are similar in the thick monomineralic veins and in the thin ribbons, and they suggest dominant subgrain rotation recrystallization and activity of prism < a > and rhomb < a > slip systems. However, the grain size in monophase recrystallized domains decreases when moving from the quartz monomineralic veins to the thin ribbons embedded in the feldspathic C' bands (14 µm vs. 5 µm respectively). The fine-grained feldspar mixture has a weak crystallographic-preferred orientation interpreted as the result of shear zone parallel-oriented growth during diffusion creep, as well as the same composition as the fractured porphyroclasts, suggesting that it generated by mechanical fragmentation of rigid porphyroclasts with a negligible role of chemical disequilibrium. Once C' shear bands were generated and underwent viscous deformation at constant stress conditions, the polyphase feldspathic aggregate would have deformed at a strain rate 1 order of magnitude faster than the monophase quartz monomineralic veins, as evidenced by applying experimentally and theoretically calibrated flow laws for dislocation creep in quartz and diffusion creep in

  10. Clinical Experience with Cone Beam CT Navigation for Tumor Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Abi-Jaoudeh, Nadine; Venkatesan, Aradhana M.; Van der Sterren, William; Radaelli, Alessandro; Carelsen, Bart; Wood, Bradford J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To describe clinical use and potential benefits of Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) navigation to perform image guided percutaneous tumor ablations. Materials and Methods All ablations performed between February 2011 and February 2013 using CBCT navigation, were included. Sixteen patients underwent 20 ablations for 29 lesions. CBCT ablation planning capabilities include multimodality image fusion and tumor segmentation for visualization, depiction of the predicted ablation zones for intra-procedural planning and segmentation of the ablated area for immediate post-treatment verification. Number and purpose of CBCT were examined. The initial ablation plan defined as number of probes and duration of energy delivery was recorded for 20/29 lesions. Technical success and local recurrences were recorded. Primary and secondary effectiveness rates were calculated. Results Image fusion was utilized for 16 lesions and intra-procedural ultrasound for 4. Of the 20/29 lesions, where the ablation plans were recorded, there was no deviation from the plan in 14. In the remaining 6/20, iterative planning was needed for complete tumor coverage. An average of 8.7 ± 3.2 CBCT were performed per procedure, including 1.3 ± 0.5 for tumor segmentation and planning, 1.7 ± 0.7 for probe position confirmation, 3.9 ± 2 to ensure complete coverage. Mean follow-up was 18.6 ± 6.5 months. 28/29 ablations were technically successful (96.5%). Of ablations performed with curative intent, technical effectiveness at one-month was 25/26 (96.1%) and 22/26 (84.6%) at last follow-up. Local tumor progression was observed in 11.5% (3/26). Conclusion CBCT navigation may add information to assist and improve ablation guidance and monitoring. PMID:25645409

  11. Experimental Evaluation of the Heat Sink Effect in Hepatic Microwave Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Ringe, Kristina I.; Lutat, Carolin; Rieder, Christian; Schenk, Andrea; Wacker, Frank; Raatschen, Hans-Juergen

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate and quantify the heat sink effect in hepatic microwave ablation (MWA) in a standardized ex vivo model, and to analyze the influence of vessel distance and blood flow on lesion volume and shape. Materials and Methods 108 ex vivo MWA procedures were performed in freshly harvested pig livers. Antennas were inserted parallel to non-perfused and perfused (700,1400 ml/min) glass tubes (diameter 5mm) at different distances (10, 15, 20mm). Ablation zones (radius, area) were analyzed and compared (Kruskal-Wallis Test, Dunn’s multiple comparison Test). Temperature changes adjacent to the tubes were measured throughout the ablation cycle. Results Maximum temperature decreased significantly with increasing flow and distance (p<0.05). Compared to non-perfused tubes, ablation zones were significantly deformed by perfused tubes within 15mm distance to the antenna (p<0.05). At a flow rate of 700ml/min ablation zone radius was reduced to 37.2% and 80.1% at 10 and 15mm tube distance, respectively; ablation zone area was reduced to 50.5% and 89.7%, respectively. Conclusion Significant changes of ablation zones were demonstrated in a pig liver model. Considerable heat sink effect was observed within a diameter of 15mm around simulated vessels, dependent on flow rate. This has to be taken into account when ablating liver lesions close to vessels. PMID:26222431

  12. Convergent ablator performance measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, D. G.; Spears, B. K.; Braun, D. G.; Sorce, C. M.; Celliers, P. M.; Collins, G. W.; Landen, O. L.; Olson, R. E.

    2010-10-15

    The velocity and remaining ablator mass of an imploding capsule are critical metrics for assessing the progress toward ignition of an inertially confined fusion experiment. These and other convergent ablator performance parameters have been measured using a single streaked x-ray radiograph. Traditional Abel inversion of such a radiograph is ill-posed since backlighter intensity profiles and x-ray attenuation by the ablated plasma are unknown. To address this we have developed a regularization technique which allows the ablator density profile {rho}(r) and effective backlighter profile I{sub 0}(y) at each time step to be uniquely determined subject to the constraints that {rho}(r) is localized in radius space and I{sub 0}(y) is delocalized in object space. Moments of {rho}(r) then provide the time-resolved areal density, mass, and average radius (and thus velocity) of the remaining ablator material. These results are combined in the spherical rocket model to determine the ablation pressure and mass ablation rate during the implosion. The technique has been validated on simulated radiographs of implosions at the National Ignition Facility [Miller et al., Nucl. Fusion 44, 228 (2004)] and implemented on experiments at the OMEGA laser facility [Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)].

  13. Tumor Ablation and Nanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Manthe, Rachel L.; Foy, Susan P.; Krishnamurthy, Nishanth; Sharma, Blanka; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2010-01-01

    Next to surgical resection, tumor ablation is a commonly used intervention in the treatment of solid tumors. Tumor ablation methods include thermal therapies, photodynamic therapy, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) producing agents. Thermal therapies induce tumor cell death via thermal energy and include radiofrequency, microwave, high intensity focused ultrasound, and cryoablation. Photodynamic therapy and ROS producing agents cause increased oxidative stress in tumor cells leading to apoptosis. While these therapies are safe and viable alternatives when resection of malignancies is not feasible, they do have associated limitations that prevent their widespread use in clinical applications. To improve the efficacy of these treatments, nanoparticles are being studied in combination with nonsurgical ablation regimens. In addition to better thermal effect on tumor ablation, nanoparticles can deliver anticancer therapeutics that show synergistic anti-tumor effect in the presence of heat and can also be imaged to achieve precision in therapy. Understanding the molecular mechanism of nanoparticle-mediated tumor ablation could further help engineer nanoparticles of appropriate composition and properties to synergize the ablation effect. This review aims to explore the various types of nonsurgical tumor ablation methods currently used in cancer treatment and potential improvements by nanotechnology applications. PMID:20866097

  14. Convergent ablator performance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, D. G.; Spears, B. K.; Braun, D. G.; Olson, R. E.; Sorce, C. M.; Celliers, P. M.; Collins, G. W.; Landen, O. L.

    2010-10-01

    The velocity and remaining ablator mass of an imploding capsule are critical metrics for assessing the progress toward ignition of an inertially confined fusion experiment. These and other convergent ablator performance parameters have been measured using a single streaked x-ray radiograph. Traditional Abel inversion of such a radiograph is ill-posed since backlighter intensity profiles and x-ray attenuation by the ablated plasma are unknown. To address this we have developed a regularization technique which allows the ablator density profile ρ(r ) and effective backlighter profile I0(y) at each time step to be uniquely determined subject to the constraints that ρ(r ) is localized in radius space and I0(y) is delocalized in object space. Moments of ρ(r ) then provide the time-resolved areal density, mass, and average radius (and thus velocity) of the remaining ablator material. These results are combined in the spherical rocket model to determine the ablation pressure and mass ablation rate during the implosion. The technique has been validated on simulated radiographs of implosions at the National Ignition Facility [Miller et al., Nucl. Fusion 44, 228 (2004)] and implemented on experiments at the OMEGA laser facility [Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)].

  15. Influence of timing of sea ice retreat on phytoplankton size during marginal ice zone bloom period on the Chukchi and Bering shelves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, A.; Hirawake, T.; Suzuki, K.; Eisner, L.; Imai, I.; Nishino, S.; Kikuchi, T.; Saitoh, S.-I.

    2016-01-01

    The size structure and biomass of a phytoplankton community during the spring bloom period can affect the energy use of higher-trophic-level organisms through the predator-prey body size relationships. The timing of the sea ice retreat (TSR) also plays a crucial role in the seasonally ice-covered marine ecosystem, because it is tightly coupled with the timing of the spring bloom. Thus, it is important to monitor the temporal and spatial distributions of a phytoplankton community size structure. Prior to this study, an ocean colour algorithm was developed to derive phytoplankton size index FL, which is defined as the ratio of chlorophyll a (chl a) derived from cells larger than 5 µm to the total chl a, using satellite remote sensing for the Chukchi and Bering shelves. Using this method, we analysed the pixel-by-pixel relationships between FL during the marginal ice zone (MIZ) bloom period and TSR over the period of 1998-2013. The influences of the TSR on the sea surface temperature (SST) and changes in ocean heat content (ΔOHC) during the MIZ bloom period were also investigated. A significant negative relationship between FL and the TSR was widely found in the shelf region during the MIZ bloom season. However, we found a significant positive (negative) relationship between the SST (ΔOHC) and TSR. Specifically, an earlier sea ice retreat was associated with the dominance of larger phytoplankton during a colder and weakly stratified MIZ bloom season, suggesting that the duration of the nitrate supply, which is important for the growth of large-sized phytoplankton in this region (i.e. diatoms), can change according to the TSR. In addition, under-ice phytoplankton blooms are likely to occur in years with late ice retreat, because sufficient light for phytoplankton growth can pass through the ice and penetrate into the water columns as a result of an increase in solar radiation toward the summer solstice

  16. Monitoring Radiofrequency Ablation Using Real-Time Ultrasound Nakagami Imaging Combined with Frequency and Temporal Compounding Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhuhuang; Wu, Shuicai; Wang, Chiao-Yin; Ma, Hsiang-Yang; Lin, Chung-Chih; Tsui, Po-Hsiang

    2015-01-01

    Gas bubbles induced during the radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of tissues can affect the detection of ablation zones (necrosis zone or thermal lesion) during ultrasound elastography. To resolve this problem, our previous study proposed ultrasound Nakagami imaging for detecting thermal-induced bubble formation to evaluate ablation zones. To prepare for future applications, this study (i) created a novel algorithmic scheme based on the frequency and temporal compounding of Nakagami imaging for enhanced ablation zone visualization, (ii) integrated the proposed algorithm into a clinical scanner to develop a real-time Nakagami imaging system for monitoring RFA, and (iii) investigated the applicability of Nakagami imaging to various types of tissues. The performance of the real-time Nakagami imaging system in visualizing RFA-induced ablation zones was validated by measuring porcine liver (n = 18) and muscle tissues (n = 6). The experimental results showed that the proposed algorithm can operate on a standard clinical ultrasound scanner to monitor RFA in real time. The Nakagami imaging system effectively monitors RFA-induced ablation zones in liver tissues. However, because tissue properties differ, the system cannot visualize ablation zones in muscle fibers. In the future, real-time Nakagami imaging should be focused on the RFA of the liver and is suggested as an alternative monitoring tool when advanced elastography is unavailable or substantial bubbles exist in the ablation zone. PMID:25658424

  17. Injection of colloidal size particles of Fe{sup 0} in porous media with shearthinning fluids as a method to emplace a permeable reactive zone

    SciTech Connect

    Cantrell, K.J.; Kaplan, D.I.; Gilmore, T.J.

    1997-12-31

    Previous work has demonstrated the feasibility of injecting suspensions of micron-size zero-valent (FeO) particles into porous media as a method to emplace a permeable reactive zone. Further studies were conducted to evaluate the effects of several shearthinning fluids on enhancing the injectability of micron-size FeO particles into porous media. In contrast to Newtonian fluids, whose viscosities are constant with shear rate, certain non-Newtonian fluids are shearthinning, that is, the viscosity of these fluids decreases with increasing shear rate. The primary benefit of using these fluids for this application is that they increase the viscosity of the aqueous phase without adversely decreasing the hydraulic conductivity. A suspension formulated with a shearthinning fluid will maintain a relatively high viscosity in solution near the FeO particles (where the shear stress is low) relative to locations near the surfaces of the porous media, where the shear stress is high. The increased viscosity decreases the rate of gravitational settling of the dense FeO colloids (7.6 9/cm3) while maintaining a relatively high hydraulic conductivity that permits pumping the colloid suspensions into porous media at greater flowrates and distances. Aqueous solutions of three polymers at different concentrations were investigated. It was determined that, the use of shear thinning fluids greatly increases the injectability of the colloidal FeO suspensions in porous media.

  18. Brittle grain size reduction of feldspar, phase mixing and strain localization in granitoids at mid-crustal conditions (Pernambuco shear zone, NE Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viegas, Gustavo; Menegon, Luca; Archanjo, Carlos

    2016-04-01

    The Pernambuco shear zone (northeastern Brazil) is a large-scale strike-slip fault that, in its eastern segment, deforms granitoids at mid-crustal conditions. Initially coarse (> 50 μm) grained feldspar porphyroclasts are intensively fractured and reduced to an ultrafine-grained mixture consisting of plagioclase and K-feldspar grains (< 15 μm in size) localized in C' shear bands. Detailed microstructural observations and EBSD analysis do not show evidence of intracrystalline plasticity in feldspar porphyroclasts and/or fluid-assisted replacement reactions. Quartz occurs either as thick (˜ 1-2 mm) monomineralic bands or as thin ribbons dispersed in the feldspathic mixture. The microstructure and c-axis crystallographic preferred orientation are similar in the thick monomineralic band and in the thin ribbons, and suggest dominant subgrain rotation recrystallization and activity of prism and rhomb slip systems. However, the grain size in monophase recrystallized domains decreases when moving from the monomineralic veins to the thin ribbons embedded in the feldspathic C' bands (14 μm vs 5 μm, respectively).The fine-grained feldspar mixture has a weak crystallographic preferred orientation interpreted as the result of oriented growth during diffusion creep, as well as the same composition as the fractured porphyroclasts, suggesting that it generated by mechanical fragmentation of rigid porphyroclasts with a negligible role of chemical disequilibrium. Assuming that the C' shear bands deformed under constant stress conditions, the polyphase feldspathic aggregate would have deformed at a strain rate one order of magnitude faster than the monophase quartz ribbons. Overall, our dataset indicates that feldspar underwent a brittle-viscous transition while quartz was deforming via crystalline plasticity. The resulting rock microstructure consists of a two-phase rheological mixture (fine-grained feldspars and recrystallized quartz) in which the feldspathic material

  19. Navigation Systems for Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Wood, B. J.; Kruecker, J.; Abi-Jaoudeh, N; Locklin, J.; Levy, E.; Xu, S.; Solbiati, L.; Kapoor, A.; Amalou, H.; Venkatesan, A.

    2010-01-01

    Navigation systems, devices and intra-procedural software are changing the way we practice interventional oncology. Prior to the development of precision navigation tools integrated with imaging systems, thermal ablation of hard-to-image lesions was highly dependent upon operator experience, spatial skills, and estimation of positron emission tomography-avid or arterial-phase targets. Numerous navigation systems for ablation bring the opportunity for standardization and accuracy that extends our ability to use imaging feedback during procedures. Existing systems and techniques are reviewed, and specific clinical applications for ablation are discussed to better define how these novel technologies address specific clinical needs, and fit into clinical practice. PMID:20656236

  20. Ablation of kidney tumors.

    PubMed

    Karam, Jose A; Ahrar, Kamran; Matin, Surena F

    2011-04-01

    While surgical excision remains the gold standard for curative treatment of small renal cell carcinomas, ablative therapy has a place as a minimally invasive, kidney function-preserving therapy in carefully selected patients who are poor candidates for surgery. Although laparoscopic cryoablation and percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) are commonly performed, percutaneous cryoablation and laparoscopic RFA are reportedly being performed with increasing frequency. The renal function and complication profiles following ablative therapy are favorable, while oncologic outcomes lag behind those of surgery, thus reinforcing the need for careful patient selection. PMID:21377587

  1. Difficulties with Ablation for Arrhythmias in Children

    PubMed Central

    Asirvatham, Samuel J

    2008-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation procedures in children present unique challenges for the electrophysiologist. At times, obtaining vascular access to reach the heart is a problem. If this first step is accomplished, the small size of the child's heart, arrhythmias relatively unique to the pediatric population, and the presence of congenital heart disease add to the complexity. In this manuscript, a review of commonly encountered problems and suggested solutions based on practice are presented. Precise mapping of the arrhythmogenic substrate, techniques to access excluded portions of the atrium from prior surgery, and the basis for electrophysiology maneuvers important in pediatric ablation are highlighted. PMID:18478062

  2. Influence of timing of sea ice retreat on phytoplankton size during marginal ice zone bloom period in the Chukchi and Bering shelves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, A.; Hirawake, T.; Suzuki, K.; Eisner, L.; Imai, I.; Nishino, S.; Kikuchi, T.; Saitoh, S. I.

    2015-08-01

    Timing of sea ice retreat (TSR) as well as cell size of primary producers (i.e., phytoplankton) plays crucial roles in seasonally ice-covered marine ecosystem. Thus, it is important to monitor the temporal and spatial distribution of phytoplankton community size structure. Prior to this study, an ocean color algorithm has been developed to derive phytoplankton size index FL, which is defined as the ratio of chlorophyll a derived from the cells larger than 5 μm to the total chl a using satellite remote sensing for the Chukchi and Bering shelves. Using this method, we analyzed pixel-by-pixel relationships between FL during marginal ice zone (MIZ) bloom period and TSR over a period of 1998-2013. The influence of TSR on sea surface temperature (SST) and changes in ocean heat content (ΔOHC) during the MIZ bloom period were also investigated. A significant negative relationship between FL and TSR was widely found in the shelf region during MIZ bloom season. On the other hand, we found a significant positive (negative) relationship between SST (ΔOHC) and TSR. That is, earlier sea-ice retreat was associated with a dominance of larger phytoplankton during a colder and weakly stratified MIZ bloom season, suggesting that duration of nitrate supply, which is important for large-sized phytoplankton growth in this region (i.e., diatoms), can change according to TSR. In addition, under-ice phytoplankton blooms are likely to occur in years with late ice retreat, because sufficient light for phytoplankton growth can pass through the ice and penetrate into the water columns due to an increase in solar radiation toward the summer solstice. Moreover, we found not only the length of ice-free season but also annual median of FL positively correlated with annual net primary production (APP). Thus, both phytoplankton community composition and growing season are important for APP in the study area. Our findings showed quantitative relationship between the inter-annual variability of FL

  3. Photoacoustic characterization of radiofrequency ablation lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchard, Richard; Dana, Nicholas; Di Biase, Luigi; Natale, Andrea; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2012-02-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) procedures are used to destroy abnormal electrical pathways in the heart that can cause cardiac arrhythmias. Current methods relying on fluoroscopy, echocardiography and electrical conduction mapping are unable to accurately assess ablation lesion size. In an effort to better visualize RFA lesions, photoacoustic (PA) and ultrasonic (US) imaging were utilized to obtain co-registered images of ablated porcine cardiac tissue. The left ventricular free wall of fresh (i.e., never frozen) porcine hearts was harvested within 24 hours of the animals' sacrifice. A THERMOCOOLR Ablation System (Biosense Webster, Inc.) operating at 40 W for 30-60 s was used to induce lesions through the endocardial and epicardial walls of the cardiac samples. Following lesion creation, the ablated tissue samples were placed in 25 °C saline to allow for multi-wavelength PA imaging. Samples were imaged with a VevoR 2100 ultrasound system (VisualSonics, Inc.) using a modified 20-MHz array that could provide laser irradiation to the sample from a pulsed tunable laser (Newport Corp.) to allow for co-registered photoacoustic-ultrasound (PAUS) imaging. PA imaging was conducted from 750-1064 nm, with a surface fluence of approximately 15 mJ/cm2 maintained during imaging. In this preliminary study with PA imaging, the ablated region could be well visualized on the surface of the sample, with contrasts of 6-10 dB achieved at 750 nm. Although imaging penetration depth is a concern, PA imaging shows promise in being able to reliably visualize RF ablation lesions.

  4. The sequence of moderate-size earthquakes at the junction of the Ligurian basin and the Corsica margin (western Mediterranean): The initiation of an active deformation zone revealed?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larroque, Christophe; Delouis, Bertrand; Sage, Françoise; Régnier, Marc; Béthoux, Nicole; Courboulex, Françoise; Deschamps, Anne

    2016-04-01

    A new seismically active zone is found in the southern part of the Ligurian basin, 80-km west of Corsica (western Mediterranean). The activity began in February 2011 with a foreshock (ML 4) and a mainshock (ML 5.3) 5 days later, followed by numerous aftershocks. We first analyze the fore- and mainshock in detail. We compare the results obtained using classical methods (linear location in a 1D medium and focal mechanisms from P and S polarities) and new approaches (non-linear location in a 3D medium and waveform modeling for determining the seismic moment and the focal mechanism). Both methods provided similar results for location, depth (in the range of 6-13 km) and focal mechanisms, which reveal reverse faulting with nodal planes oriented N-S and NE-SW. We then locate 27 of the aftershocks in the 3D model and find a 10-km-long NE-SW alignment with a depth between 7 and 16 km. In 2012 and 2013, three other moderate-size events (ML 3.8, 4 and 4.5) occurred and confirm that this zone is still active. The epicentral area is located in the oceanic domain of the Ligurian Basin. From analysis of the bathymetry and high-resolution multi-channel seismic profiles, no morphologic anomaly at surface and no inherited fault in the shallow ~ 4 km depth were imaged, which suggest that no significant deformation occurred in the area since 5 Ma. Thus, the structure(s) activated during the 2011-2013 sequence remain unknown. In light of these results, we point out a notable difference on both sides of the Ligurian Basin: the northern margin, close to the alpine chain, suffered strong earthquakes and large cumulated deformation since 5 Ma, while the southern margin, close to the Corsica-Sardinia continental block, is poorly deformed since 5 Ma.

  5. Ablative skin resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Nidhi; Smith, Greg; Heffelfinger, Ryan

    2014-02-01

    Ablative laser resurfacing has evolved as a safe and effective treatment for skin rejuvenation. Although traditional lasers were associated with significant thermal damage and lengthy recovery, advances in laser technology have improved safety profiles and reduced social downtime. CO2 lasers remain the gold standard of treatment, and fractional ablative devices capable of achieving remarkable clinical improvement with fewer side effects and shorter recovery times have made it a more practical option for patients. Although ablative resurfacing has become safer, careful patient selection and choice of suitable laser parameters are essential to minimize complications and optimize outcomes. This article describes the current modalities used in ablative laser skin resurfacing and examines their efficacy, indications, and possible side effects. PMID:24488638

  6. Moldable cork ablation material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A successful thermal ablative material was manufactured. Moldable cork sheets were tested for density, tensile strength, tensile elongation, thermal conductivity, compression set, and specific heat. A moldable cork sheet, therefore, was established as a realistic product.

  7. Cardiac ablation procedures

    MedlinePlus

    ... Accessory pathway, such as Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome Atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter Ventricular tachycardia ... consensus statement on catheter and surgical ablation of atrial fibrillation: ... for personnel, policy, procedures and follow-up. ...

  8. Multiple-antenna microwave ablation: analysis of non-parallel antenna implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Souvick; Curto, Sergio; Albin, Nathan; Natarajan, Bala; Prakash, Punit

    2015-03-01

    Microwave ablation is a minimally invasive modality increasingly being used for thermal treatment of cancer in various organs. During ablation procedures, treatment planning is typically restricted to vendor specifications of expected ablation zone volumes based on experiments in unperfused ex vivo tissues, presuming parallel insertion of antennas. However, parallel antenna implants are not always clinically possible due to the restricted control of flexible antennas and presence of intervening organs. This paper aims to quantify the effect of non-parallel antenna implants on the ablation volume. 3D electromagnetic-bioheat transfer models were implemented to analyze ablation zone profiles created by dual antenna arrays. Parallel and non-parallel implants spaced 10-25 mm with antenna tips deviated to create converging or diverging configurations were analyzed. Volumetric Dice Similarity Coefficients (DSC) were calculated to compare ablation zone volumes for parallel and non-parallel configuration. Antenna tip displacements of 3 mm/antenna yielded an average DSC of 0.78. Tip displacements of 5 mm/antenna yielded a DSC of 0.78 and 0.64 for 15 mm and 20 mm antenna spacing, respectively. For ablation with dipole antennas as the frequency of operation decreases from 2.45 GHz to 915 MHz the similarity between the ablation zones for parallel and angled cases increased significantly. In conclusion, ablation volumes with non-parallel antenna implants may differ significantly from the parallel configuration. Patient-specific treatment planning tools may provide more accurate predictions of 3D-ablation volumes based on imaging data of actual implanted antenna configurations. Methods to compare ablation zone volumes incorporating uncertainty in antenna positions and experimental results to validate the numerical modelling are also presented.

  9. Laser ablated hard coating for microtools

    DOEpatents

    McLean, II, William; Balooch, Mehdi; Siekhaus, Wigbert J.

    1998-05-05

    Wear-resistant coatings composed of laser ablated hard carbon films, are deposited by pulsed laser ablation using visible light, on instruments such as microscope tips and micro-surgical tools. Hard carbon, known as diamond-like carbon (DLC), films produced by pulsed laser ablation using visible light enhances the abrasion resistance, wear characteristics, and lifetimes of small tools or instruments, such as small, sharp silicon tips used in atomic probe microscopy without significantly affecting the sharpness or size of these devices. For example, a 10-20 nm layer of diamond-like carbon on a standard silicon atomic force microscope (AFM) tip, enables the useful operating life of the tip to be increased by at least twofold. Moreover, the low inherent friction coefficient of the DLC coating leads to higher resolution for AFM tips operating in the contact mode.

  10. Laser ablated hard coating for microtools

    DOEpatents

    McLean, W. II; Balooch, M.; Siekhaus, W.J.

    1998-05-05

    Wear-resistant coatings composed of laser ablated hard carbon films, are deposited by pulsed laser ablation using visible light, on instruments such as microscope tips and micro-surgical tools. Hard carbon, known as diamond-like carbon (DLC), films produced by pulsed laser ablation using visible light enhances the abrasion resistance, wear characteristics, and lifetimes of small tools or instruments, such as small, sharp silicon tips used in atomic probe microscopy without significantly affecting the sharpness or size of these devices. For example, a 10--20 nm layer of diamond-like carbon on a standard silicon atomic force microscope (AFM) tip, enables the useful operating life of the tip to be increased by at least twofold. Moreover, the low inherent friction coefficient of the DLC coating leads to higher resolution for AFM tips operating in the contact mode. 12 figs.

  11. Dual thermal ablation modality of solid tumors in a mouse model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafirstein, Gal; Barnes, Klressa; Hennings, Leah; Webber, Jessica; Moros, Eduardo G.; Przybyla, Beata; Griffin, Robert J.

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: Develop a new combination therapy consisting of cryoablation and conductive high-temperature ablation for enhanced thermal ablation of solid tumors. Methods: We have constructed an invasive probe that can be used for consecutive cryoablation and hightemperature ablation (C/HTA), with a single insertion. The C/HTA probe was tested, in Balb/c mice bearing solid 4T1 tumors, in comparison to cryoablation and high temperature ablation, only. Three days after ablation, the diameter of the ablated zone was evaluated with pathological examination. Results: The C/HTA device can be used to induce larger ablation zones, in comparison to high temperature or cryoablation alone, and at lower thermal doses and temperatures than either modality alone. Conclusions: The relatively high thermal conductivity of ice, in comparison to water and native tissue, enables rapid heating of the ice-ball that result in improved conductive high temperature ablation. The new dual thermal modality improves ablation outcomes at lower thermal doses in comparison to a single ablation modality.

  12. Pathology of non-thermal irreversible electroporation (N-TIRE)-induced ablation of the canine brain.

    PubMed

    Rossmeisl, John H; Garcia, Paulo A; Roberston, John L; Ellis, Thomas L; Davalos, Rafael V

    2013-01-01

    This study describes the neuropathologic features of normal canine brain ablated with non-thermal irreversible electroporation (N-TIRE). The parietal cerebral cortices of four dogs were treated with N-TIRE using a dose-escalation protocol with an additional dog receiving sham treatment. Animals were allowed to recover following N-TIRE ablation and the effects of treatment were monitored with clinical and magnetic resonance imaging examinations. Brains were subjected to histopathologic and ultrastructural assessment along with Bcl-2, caspase-3, and caspase-9 immunohistochemical staining following sacrifice 72 h post-treatment. Adverse clinical effects of N-TIRE were only observed in the dog treated at the upper energy tier. MRI and neuropathologic examinations indicated that N-TIRE ablation resulted in focal regions of severe cytoarchitectural and blood-brain-barrier disruption. Lesion size correlated to the intensity of the applied electrical field. N-TIRE-induced lesions were characterized by parenchymal necrosis and hemorrhage; however, large blood vessels were preserved. A transition zone containing parenchymal edema, perivascular inflammatory cuffs, and reactive gliosis was interspersed between the necrotic focus and normal neuropil. Apoptotic labeling indices were not different between the N-TIRE-treated and control brains. This study identified N-TIRE pulse parameters that can be used to safely create circumscribed foci of brain necrosis while selectively preserving major vascular structures. PMID:23820168

  13. Pathology of non-thermal irreversible electroporation (N-TIRE)-induced ablation of the canine brain

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Paulo A.; Roberston, John L.; Ellis, Thomas L.; Davalos, Rafael V.

    2013-01-01

    This study describes the neuropathologic features of normal canine brain ablated with non-thermal irreversible electroporation (N-TIRE). The parietal cerebral cortices of four dogs were treated with N-TIRE using a dose-escalation protocol with an additional dog receiving sham treatment. Animals were allowed to recover following N-TIRE ablation and the effects of treatment were monitored with clinical and magnetic resonance imaging examinations. Brains were subjected to histopathologic and ultrastructural assessment along with Bcl-2, caspase-3, and caspase-9 immunohistochemical staining following sacrifice 72 h post-treatment. Adverse clinical effects of N-TIRE were only observed in the dog treated at the upper energy tier. MRI and neuropathologic examinations indicated that N-TIRE ablation resulted in focal regions of severe cytoarchitectural and blood-brain-barrier disruption. Lesion size correlated to the intensity of the applied electrical field. N-TIRE-induced lesions were characterized by parenchymal necrosis and hemorrhage; however, large blood vessels were preserved. A transition zone containing parenchymal edema, perivascular inflammatory cuffs, and reactive gliosis was interspersed between the necrotic focus and normal neuropil. Apoptotic labeling indices were not different between the N-TIRE-treated and control brains. This study identified N-TIRE pulse parameters that can be used to safely create circumscribed foci of brain necrosis while selectively preserving major vascular structures. PMID:23820168

  14. A new system of microwave ablation at 2450 MHz: preliminary experience.

    PubMed

    Ierardi, Anna Maria; Mangano, Alberto; Floridi, Chiara; Dionigi, Gianlorenzo; Biondi, Antonio; Duka, Ejona; Lucchina, Natalie; Lianos, Georgios D; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of the application of the new system (Emprint Microwave Ablation System, Covidien Boulder, CO, USA) and to identify its advantages. In particular the attention was focused to the spherical ablation zone obtained and its usefulness in terms of effectiveness. The new system is composed of: a 2450 MHz generator that delivers a maximum power of 100 W, a fiberglass antenna and a pump for internally cooled antenna. Ten liver nodules (8 hepatocellular carcinomas and 2 metastasis) were percutaneously treated (mean diameter 24.9 mm, range 16-35 mm). Technical success, ablation duration time, overall procedure time and safety were registered. To define the shape of the ablation zone, multiplanar reformatting (MPR) was performed. Roundness index transverse was calculated: a value near 1 represents a more spherical ablation zone shape, and a value distant from 1 implies an oval configuration. Technical success was 100%. Mean ablation time was of 3.85 min (range 3-5 min), mean overall procedure time was 30.5 min (range 25-40 min). No major complications were recorded. Roundness index transverse presented a mean value of 0.94, meaning that a spherical shape of ablation zone was achieved. One of the most promising innovations of the new microwave technology is the spherical shape of the ablation volume that could be related with an improving of the effectiveness and safety. PMID:25776064

  15. A Retrospective Comparison of Microwave Ablation vs. Radiofrequency Ablation for Colorectal Cancer Hepatic Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Correa-Gallego, Camilo; Fong, Yuman; Gonen, Mithat; D'Angelica, Michael I.; Allen, Peter J.; DeMatteo, Ronald P.; Jarnagin, William R.; Kingham, T. Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background Microwave (MWA) and radiofrequency ablation (RFA) are the most commonly used techniques for ablating colorectal-liver metastases (CRLM). The technical and oncologic differences between these modalities are unclear. Methods We conducted a matched-cohort analysis of patients undergoing open MWA or RFA for CRLM at a tertiary-care center between 2008 and 2011; the primary endpoint was ablation-site recurrence. Tumors were matched by size, clinical-risk score, and arterial-intrahepatic or systemic chemotherapy use. Outcomes were compared using conditional logistic regression and stratified log-rank test. Results We matched 254 tumors (127 per group) from 134 patients. MWA and RFA groups were comparable by age, gender, median number of tumors treated, proximity to major vessels, and postoperative complication rates. Patients in the MWA group had lower ablation-site recurrence rates (6% vs. 20%; P < 0.01). Median follow-up, however, was significantly shorter in the MWA group (18 months [95% confidence interval 17–20] vs. 31 months [95% confidence interval 28–35]; P < 0.001). Kaplan–Meier estimates of ablation-site recurrence at 2 years were significantly lower for the lesions treated with MWA (7% vs. 18%, P: 0.01). Conclusions Ablation-site recurrences of CRLM were lower with MWA compared with RFA in this matched cohort analysis. Longer follow-up time in the MWA may increase the recurrence rate; however, actuarial local failure estimations demonstrated better local control with MWA. PMID:24889486

  16. Burn, freeze, or photo-ablate?: comparative symptom profile in Barrett's dysplasia patients undergoing endoscopic ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Kanwar Rupinder S.; Gross, Seth A.; Greenwald, Bruce D.; Hemminger, Lois L.; Wolfsen, Herbert C.

    2009-06-01

    Background: There are few data available comparing endoscopic ablation methods for Barrett's esophagus with high-grade dysplasia (BE-HGD). Objective: To determine differences in symptoms and complications associated with endoscopic ablation. Design: Prospective observational study. Setting: Two tertiary care centers in USA. Patients: Consecutive patients with BE-HGD Interventions: In this pilot study, symptoms profile data were collected for BE-HGD patients among 3 endoscopic ablation methods: porfimer sodium photodynamic therapy, radiofrequency ablation and low-pressure liquid nitrogen spray cryotherapy. Main Outcome Measurements: Symptom profiles and complications from the procedures were assessed 1-8 weeks after treatment. Results: Ten BE-HGD patients were treated with each ablation modality (30 patients total; 25 men, median age: 69 years (range 53-81). All procedures were performed in the clinic setting and none required subsequent hospitalization. The most common symptoms among all therapies were chest pain, dysphagia and odynophagia. More patients (n=8) in the porfimer sodium photodynamic therapy group reported weight loss compared to radio-frequency ablactation (n=2) and cryotherapy (n=0). Four patients in the porfimer sodium photodynamic therapy group developed phototoxicity requiring medical treatment. Strictures, each requiring a single dilation, were found in radiofrequency ablactation (n=1) and porfimer sodium photodynamic therapy (n=2) patients. Limitations: Small sample size, non-randomized study. Conclusions: These three endoscopic therapies are associated with different types and severity of post-ablation symptoms and complications.

  17. Synthesis of Ag@Silica Nanoparticles by Assisted Laser Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Castillo, Jr.; Rodriguez, E.; Jimenez-Villar, E.; Rodríguez, D.; Salomon-García, I.; de Sá, Gilberto F.; García-Fernández, T.; Almeida, DB; Cesar, CL; Johnes, R.; Ibarra, Juana C.

    2015-10-01

    This paper reports the synthesis of silver nanoparticles coated with porous silica (Ag@Silica NPs) using an assisted laser ablation method. This method is a chemical synthesis where one of the reagents (the reducer agent) is introduced in nanometer form by laser ablation of a solid target submerged in an aqueous solution. In a first step, a silicon wafer immersed in water solution was laser ablated for several minutes. Subsequently, an AgNO3 aliquot was added to the aqueous solution. The redox reaction between the silver ions and ablation products leads to a colloidal suspension of core-shell Ag@Silica NPs. The influence of the laser pulse energy, laser wavelength, ablation time, and Ag+ concentration on the size and optical properties of the Ag@Silica NPs was investigated. Furthermore, the colloidal suspensions were studied by UV-VIS-NIR spectroscopy, X-Ray diffraction, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM).

  18. Synthesis of Ag@Silica Nanoparticles by Assisted Laser Ablation.

    PubMed

    González-Castillo, J R; Rodriguez, E; Jimenez-Villar, E; Rodríguez, D; Salomon-García, I; de Sá, Gilberto F; García-Fernández, T; Almeida, D B; Cesar, C L; Johnes, R; Ibarra, Juana C

    2015-12-01

    This paper reports the synthesis of silver nanoparticles coated with porous silica (Ag@Silica NPs) using an assisted laser ablation method. This method is a chemical synthesis where one of the reagents (the reducer agent) is introduced in nanometer form by laser ablation of a solid target submerged in an aqueous solution. In a first step, a silicon wafer immersed in water solution was laser ablated for several minutes. Subsequently, an AgNO3 aliquot was added to the aqueous solution. The redox reaction between the silver ions and ablation products leads to a colloidal suspension of core-shell Ag@Silica NPs. The influence of the laser pulse energy, laser wavelength, ablation time, and Ag(+) concentration on the size and optical properties of the Ag@Silica NPs was investigated. Furthermore, the colloidal suspensions were studied by UV-VIS-NIR spectroscopy, X-Ray diffraction, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). PMID:26464175

  19. Analysis of ablation debris from natural and artificial iron meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, M. B.; Davis, A. S.

    1977-01-01

    Artificial ablation studies were performed on iron and nickel-iron samples using an arc-heated plasma of ionized air. Experiment conditions simulated a meteoroid traveling about 12 km/sec at an altitude of 70 km. The artificially produced fusion crusts and ablation debris show features very similar to natural fusion crusts of the iron meteorites Boguslavka, Norfork, and N'Kandhla and to magnetic spherules recovered from Mn nodules. X-ray diffraction, electron microprobe, optical, and scanning electron microscope analyses reveal that important mineralogical, elemental, and textural changes occur during ablation. Some metal is melted and ablated. The outer margin of the melted rind is oxidized and recrystallizes as a discontinuous crust of magnetite and wustite. Adjacent to the oxidized metallic ablation zone is an unoxidized metallic ablation zone in which structures such as Widmannstatten bands are obliterated as the metal is transformed to unequilibrated alpha 2 nickel-iron. Volatile elements are vaporized and less volatile elements undergo fractionation.

  20. In-vitro Photoacoustic Visualization of Myocardial Ablation Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Dana, Nicholas; Biase, Luigi Di; Natale, Andrea; Emelianov, Stanislav; Bouchard, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Background Radiofrequency (RF) ablation to treat atrial arrhythmia is limited by an inability to reliably assess lesion durability and transmurality. Objective Determine feasibility of photoacoustic characterization of myocardial ablation lesions in vitro. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of combined ultrasound (US) and spectroscopic photoacoustic (sPA) imaging to visualize RF ablation lesions in 3-D based on unique differences in the optical absorption spectra between normal and ablated myocardial tissue. Methods Tissue samples were excised from the ventricles of fresh porcine hearts. Lesions were generated using an RF catheter ablation system using 20 - 30 W of power applied for 40 - 60 s. Ablated samples were imaged in the NIR regime (740-780 nm) using a combined PA/US imaging system. Measured PA spectra were correlated to the absorption spectra of deoxy-hemoglobin and ablated tissue to produce a tissue characterization map (TCM) identifying 3-D lesion location and extent. Tissue samples were stained and photographed for gross pathology. TCM and gross pathology images were co-registered to assess TCM accuracy. Results The TCM reliably characterized ablated and non-ablated tissue up to depths of 3 mm. The TCM also assessed lesion position and extent with sub-millimeter accuracy in multiple dimensions. Segmented TCMs achieved greater than 69% agreement with gross pathology. Conclusion These results suggest that sPA imaging has the potential to accurately assess RF ablation lesion size and position with sub-millimeter precision and may be well suited to guide trans-catheter RF atrial ablation in clinical practice. PMID:24080065

  1. Ablative therapies for renal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Rajan; Leveillee, Raymond J.

    2010-01-01

    Owing to an increased use of diagnostic imaging for evaluating patients with other abdominal conditions, incidentally discovered kidney masses now account for a majority of renal tumors. Renal ablative therapy is assuming a more important role in patients with borderline renal impairment. Renal ablation uses heat or cold to bring about cell death. Radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation are two such procedures, and 5-year results are now emerging from both modalities. Renal biopsy at the time of ablation is extremely important in order to establish tissue diagnosis. Real-time temperature monitoring at the time of radiofrequency ablation is very useful to ensure adequacy of ablation. PMID:21789083

  2. Artificial meteor ablation studies. [for identification of cosmic dust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, M. B.

    1973-01-01

    Artificial meteor ablation was performed on natural minerals, composed predominately of magnetite and hematite, using an arc heated plasma stream of air. Analysis of the ablated debris indicated most was composed of two or more minerals. The more volatile elements were depleted and the relative abundance of Fe increased as a result of both volatile depletion and a reduction in its oxidation state. Hematite was converted to magnetite in the ablation zone, and quartz and apatite minerals were converted to an Fe-rich glass consisting of varying amounts of Si, P, Cl, and Ca, depending upon the accessory minerals available at the time of melting. Artificially created ablation products from iron oxides exhibited unique properties depending on the composition of the original material and the environmental conditions of formation. In addition to the accepted elemental criteria, these properties were morphologic characteristics, textural parameters, and the existence of metastable minerals.

  3. Rat liver regeneration following ablation with irreversible electroporation

    PubMed Central

    Bruinsma, Bote G.; Jaramillo, Maria; Yarmush, Martin L.

    2016-01-01

    During the past decade, irreversible electroporation (IRE) ablation has emerged as a promising tool for the treatment of multiple diseases including hepatic cancer. However, the mechanisms behind the tissue regeneration following IRE ablation have not been investigated. Our results indicate that IRE treatment immediately kills the cells at the treatment site preserving the extracellular architecture, in effect causing in vivo decellularization. Over the course of 4 weeks, progenitor cell differentiation, through YAP and notch pathways, together with hepatocyte expansion led to almost complete regeneration of the ablated liver leading to the formation of hepatocyte like cells at the ablated zone. We did not observe significant scarring or tumor formation at the regenerated areas 6 months post IRE. Our study suggests a new model to study the regeneration of liver when the naïve extracellular matrix is decellularized in vivo with completely preserved extracellular architecture. PMID:26819842

  4. Rat liver regeneration following ablation with irreversible electroporation.

    PubMed

    Golberg, Alexander; Bruinsma, Bote G; Jaramillo, Maria; Yarmush, Martin L; Uygun, Basak E

    2016-01-01

    During the past decade, irreversible electroporation (IRE) ablation has emerged as a promising tool for the treatment of multiple diseases including hepatic cancer. However, the mechanisms behind the tissue regeneration following IRE ablation have not been investigated. Our results indicate that IRE treatment immediately kills the cells at the treatment site preserving the extracellular architecture, in effect causing in vivo decellularization. Over the course of 4 weeks, progenitor cell differentiation, through YAP and notch pathways, together with hepatocyte expansion led to almost complete regeneration of the ablated liver leading to the formation of hepatocyte like cells at the ablated zone. We did not observe significant scarring or tumor formation at the regenerated areas 6 months post IRE. Our study suggests a new model to study the regeneration of liver when the naïve extracellular matrix is decellularized in vivo with completely preserved extracellular architecture. PMID:26819842

  5. Thermal Ablation of Lung Tissue: In Vivo Experimental Comparison of Microwave and Radiofrequency

    SciTech Connect

    Crocetti, Laura Bozzi, Elena; Faviana, Pinuccia; Cioni, Dania; Della Pina, Clotilde; Sbrana, Alberto; Fontanini, Gabriella; Lencioni, Riccardo

    2010-08-15

    This study was designed to compare feasibility, safety, and effectiveness of microwave (MW) ablation versus radiofrequency (RF) ablation of lung tissue in a rabbit model. Twenty New Zealand White rabbits were submitted to MW (n = 10, group A) or RF ablation (n = 10, group B). The procedures were performed with a prototype MW ablation device with a 1.6-cm radiating section antenna (Valleylab MW Ablation System) and with a 2-cm exposed-tip RF electrode (Cool-tip RF Ablation System). At immediate computed tomography increase in density, maximum diameters (D1-D3) of ablation zones were measured and ablation volume was calculated. Histopathologic assessment was performed 3 and 7 days after the procedure. Technical success was achieved in nine of 10 rabbits in each group. One death occurred in group B. Complications included pneumothorax (group A, n = 4; group B, n = 4), abscess (group A, n = 1; group B, n = 1), and thoracic wall burn (group A, n = 4). No significant differences were demonstrated in attenuation increase (P = 0.73), dimensions (P = 0.28, 0.86, 0.06, respectively, comparing D1-D3) and volume (P = 0.17). At histopathology, ablation zones were similar, with septal necrosis, edema, hemorrhage, and peripheral lymphocytic infiltrate. Complete thrombosis of more than 90% of vessels up to 2 mm in diameter was depicted at the periphery of the ablation zone in group A specimens. In group B specimens, complete thrombosis was depicted in 20% of vessels. Feasibility and safety of MW and RF ablation are similar in a lung rabbit model. MW ablation produces a greater damage to peripheral small vessels inducing thrombosis.

  6. Brittle grain size reduction of feldspar, phase mixing and strain localization in granitoids at mid-crustal conditions (Pernambuco shear zone, NE Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viegas, G.; Menegon, L.; Archanjo, C. J.

    2015-10-01

    The Pernambuco shear zone (northeastern Brazil) is a large-scale strike-slip fault that, in its eastern segment, deforms granitoids at mid-crustal conditions. Initially coarse (> 50 μm) grained feldspar porphyroclasts are intensively fractured and reduced to an ultrafine-grained mixture consisting of plagioclase and K-feldspar grains (~ < 15 μm in size) localized in C' shear bands. Detailed microstructural observations and EBSD analysis do not show evidence of intracrystalline plasticity in feldspar porphyroclasts and/or fluid-assisted replacement reactions. Quartz occurs either as thick (~ 1-2 mm) monomineralic bands or as thin ribbons dispersed in the feldspathic mixture. The microstructure and c axis crystallographic preferred orientation are similar in the thick monomineralic band and in the thin ribbons, and suggest dominant subgrain rotation recrystallization and activity of prism ⟨a⟩ and rhomb ⟨a⟩ slip systems. However, the grain size in monophase recrystallized domains decreases when moving from the transposed veins to the thin ribbons embedded in the feldspathic C' bands (14 μm vs. 5 μm, respectively). The fine-grained feldspar mixture has a weak crystallographic preferred orientation interpreted as the result of oriented growth during diffusion creep, as well as the same composition as the fractured porphyroclasts, suggesting that it generated by mechanical fragmentation of rigid porphyroclasts with a negligible role of chemical disequilibrium. Assuming that the C' shear bands deformed under constant stress conditions, the polyphase feldspathic aggregate would have deformed at a strain rate one order of magnitude faster than the monophase quartz ribbons. Overall, our dataset indicates that feldspar underwent a brittle-viscous transition while quartz was deforming via crystal plasticity. The resulting rock microstructure consists of a two-phase rheological mixture (fine-grained feldspars and recrystallized quartz) in which the polyphase

  7. Atrial fibrillation ablation.

    PubMed

    Pappone, Carlo; Santinelli, Vincenzo

    2012-06-01

    Atrial fibrillation is the commonest cardiac arrhythmia, with significant morbidity related to symptoms, heart failure, and thromboembolism, which is associated with excess mortality. Over the past 10 years, many centers worldwide have reported high success rates and few complications after a single ablation procedure in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. Recent studies indicate a short-term and long-term superiority of catheter ablation as compared with conventional antiarrhythmic drug therapy in terms of arrhythmia recurrence, quality of life, and arrhythmia progression. As a result, catheter ablation is evolving to a front-line therapy in many patients with atrial fibrillation. However, in patients with persistent long-standing atrial fibrillation catheter ablation strategy is more complex and time-consuming, frequently requiring repeat procedures to achieve success rates as high as in paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. In the near future, however, with growing experience and evolving technology, catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation may be extended also to patients with long-standing atrial fibrillation. PMID:22541284

  8. Transient Ablation of Teflon Hemispheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arai, Norio; Karashima, Kei-ichi; Sato, Kiyoshi

    1997-01-01

    For high-speed entry of space vehicles into atmospheric environments, ablation is a practical method for alleviating severe aerodynamic heating. Several studies have been undertaken on steady or quasi-steady ablation. However, ablation is a very complicated phenomenon in which a nonequilibrium chemical process is associated with an aerodynamic process that involves changes in body shape with time. Therefore, it seems realistic to consider that ablation is an unsteady phenomenon. In the design of an ablative heat-shield system, since the ultimate purpose of the heat shield is to keep the internal temperature of the space vehicle at a safe level during entry, the transient heat conduction characteristics of the ablator may be critical in the selection of the material and its thickness. This note presents an experimental study of transient ablation of Teflon, with particular emphasis on the change in body shape, the instantaneous internal temperature distribution, and the effect of thermal expansion on ablation rate.

  9. Advanced Ablative TPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasch, Matthew J.

    2011-01-01

    Early NASA missions (Gemini, Apollo, Mars Viking) employed new ablative TPS that were tailored for the entry environment. After 40 years, heritage ablative TPS materials using Viking or Pathfinder era materials are at or near their performance limits and will be inadequate for future exploration missions. Significant advances in TPS materials technology are needed in order to enable any subsequent human exploration missions beyond Low Earth Orbit. This poster summarizes some recent progress at NASA in developing families of advanced rigid/conformable and flexible ablators that could potentially be used for thermal protection in planetary entry missions. In particular the effort focuses technologies required to land heavy (approx.40 metric ton) masses on Mars to facilitate future exploration plans.

  10. Radiofrequency ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Hiroki; Kimura, Toru; Kita, Ryuichi; Osaki, Yukio

    2013-09-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common causes of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Unfortunately, only 20% of HCC patients are amenable to curative therapy (liver transplantation or surgical resection). Locoregional therapies such as radiofrequency ablation (RFA), percutaneous ethanol injection, microwave coagulation therapy, and transcatheter arterial chemoembolisation play a key role in the management of HCC. The choice of the treatment modality depends on the size of the tumour, tumour location, anatomic considerations and the number of tumours present and liver function. RFA therapy for HCC can be performed safely using a percutaneous, laparoscopic, or an open approach, even in patients with poor functional reserve. Since the introduction of RFA, several randomised controlled trials and non-randomised studies comparing RFA and other therapies for HCC have been conducted. In addition, in the last decade there have been technical advances in RFA therapy for HCC, resulting in significant improvement in the prognosis of HCC patients treated with this modality. In this review, we primarily focus on percutaneous RFA therapy for HCC and refer to current knowledge and future perspectives for this therapy. We also discuss new emerging ablation techniques. PMID:23937321

  11. Dynamics of laser ablated colliding plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Shyam L.; Pandey, Pramod K.; Thareja, Raj K.

    2013-01-15

    We report the dynamics of single and two collinearly colliding laser ablated plumes of ZnO studied using fast imaging and the spectroscopic measurements. Two dimensional imaging of expanding plume and temporal evolution of various species in interacting zones of plumes are used to calculate plume front velocity, electron temperature, and density of plasma. The two expanding plumes interact with each other at early stage of expansion ({approx}20 ns) resulting in an interaction zone that propagates further leading to the formation of stagnation layer at later times (>150 ns) at the lateral collision front of two plumes. Colliding plumes have larger concentration of higher ionic species, higher temperature, and increased electron density in the stagnation region. A one-to-one correlation between the imaging and optical emission spectroscopic observations in interaction zone of the colliding plumes is reported.

  12. Automatic alignment of pre- and post-interventional liver CT images for assessment of radiofrequency ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieder, Christian; Wirtz, Stefan; Strehlow, Jan; Zidowitz, Stephan; Bruners, Philipp; Isfort, Peter; Mahnken, Andreas H.; Peitgen, Heinz-Otto

    2012-02-01

    Image-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is becoming a standard procedure for minimally invasive tumor treatment in clinical practice. To verify the treatment success of the therapy, reliable post-interventional assessment of the ablation zone (coagulation) is essential. Typically, pre- and post-interventional CT images have to be aligned to compare the shape, size, and position of tumor and coagulation zone. In this work, we present an automatic workflow for masking liver tissue, enabling a rigid registration algorithm to perform at least as accurate as experienced medical experts. To minimize the effect of global liver deformations, the registration is computed in a local region of interest around the pre-interventional lesion and post-interventional coagulation necrosis. A registration mask excluding lesions and neighboring organs is calculated to prevent the registration algorithm from matching both lesion shapes instead of the surrounding liver anatomy. As an initial registration step, the centers of gravity from both lesions are aligned automatically. The subsequent rigid registration method is based on the Local Cross Correlation (LCC) similarity measure and Newton-type optimization. To assess the accuracy of our method, 41 RFA cases are registered and compared with the manually aligned cases from four medical experts. Furthermore, the registration results are compared with ground truth transformations based on averaged anatomical landmark pairs. In the evaluation, we show that our method allows to automatic alignment of the data sets with equal accuracy as medical experts, but requiring significancy less time consumption and variability.

  13. Conservative Management of Left Atrial Intramural Hematoma after Catheter Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Oraii, Saeed; Roshanali, Farideh; Ghorbanisharif, Alireza; Mikaeili, Javad; Tahraei, Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    Left atrial intramural hematoma is a very rare complication of radiofrequency ablation procedures. A patient with tachyarrhythmia underwent radiofrequency catheter ablation. Echocardiography performed the following morning showed a large mass in the left atrium, suggestive of intramural hematoma formation. The patient was in a stable condition; therefore, it was decided that follow-up should be conservative and her anticoagulation therapy was continued. The size of the hematoma decreased significantly over the following 50 days. This case highlights a rare complication of a complex catheter ablation procedure in the left atrium that was managed via a noninvasive approach, with which all interventionists should be familiar. PMID:27482270

  14. Development of a radiofrequency ablation platform in a clinically relevant murine model of hepatocellular cancer.

    PubMed

    Qi, Xiaoqiang; Li, Guangfu; Liu, Dai; Motamarry, Anjan; Huang, Xiangwei; Wolfe, A Marissa; Helke, Kristi L; Haemmerich, Dieter; Staveley-O'Carroll, Kevin F; Kimchi, Eric T

    2015-01-01

    RFA is used in treatment of patients with hepatocellular cancer (HCC); however, tumor location and size often limit therapeutic efficacy. The absence of a realistic animal model and a radiofrequency ablation (RFA) suitable for small animals presents significant obstacles in developing new strategies. To establish a realistic RFA platform that allows the development of effective RFA-integrated treatment in an orthotopic murine model of HCC, a human cardiac radiofrequency generator was modified for murine use. Parameters were optimized and RFA was then performed in normal murine livers and HCCs. The effects of RFA were monitored by measuring the ablation zone and transaminases. The survival of tumor-bearing mice with and without RFA was monitored, ablated normal liver and HCCs were evaluated macroscopically and histologically. We demonstrated that tissue-mimicking media was able to optimize RFA parameters. Utilizing this information we performed RFA in normal and HCC-bearing mice. RFA was applied to hepatic parenchyma and completely destroyed small tumors and part of large tumors. Localized healing of the ablation and normalization of transaminases occurred within 7 days post RFA. RFA treatment extended the survival of small tumor-bearing mice. They survived at least 5 months longer than the controls; however, mice with larger tumors only had a slight therapeutic effect after RFA. Collectively, we performed RFA in murine HCCs and observed a significant therapeutic effect in small tumor-bearing mice. The quick recovery of tumor-bearing mice receiving RFA mimics observations in human subjects. This platform provides us a unique opportunity to study RFA in HCC treatment. PMID:26537481

  15. Shuttle subscale ablative nozzle tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, L. B.; Bailey, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    Recent subscale nozzle tests have identified new and promising carbon phenolic nozzle ablatives which utilize staple rayon, PAN, and pitch based carbon cloth. A 4-inch throat diameter submerged test nozzle designed for the 48-inch Jet Propulsion Laboratory char motor was used to evaluate five different designs incorporating 20 candidate ablatives. Test results indicate that several pitch and PAN-based carbon phenolic ablatives can provide erosion and char performance equivalent or superior to the present continuous rayon-based SRM ablative.

  16. Ablative thermal protection systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaniman, J.; Fisher, R.; Wojciechowski, C.; Dean, W.

    1983-01-01

    The procedures used to establish the TPS (thermal protection system) design of the SRB (solid rocket booster) element of the Space Shuttle vehicle are discussed. A final evaluation of the adequacy of this design will be made from data obtained from the first five Shuttle flights. Temperature sensors installed at selected locations on the SRB structure covered by the TPS give information as a function of time throughout the flight. Anomalies are to be investigated and computer design thermal models adjusted if required. In addition, the actual TPS ablator material loss is to be measured after each flight and compared with analytically determined losses. The analytical methods of predicting ablator performance are surveyed.

  17. Scattering Properties of Jovian Tropospheric Cloud Particles from Cassini/ISS: Mie Scattering Phase Function and Particle Size in the South Tropical Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Takao M.; Satoh, T.; Kasaba, Y.

    2010-10-01

    It is essential to know scattering properties (e.g., scattering phase function) of clouds for determination of vertical cloud structure. However, we cannot derive those from ground-based and Earth-orbit observations because of the limitation of solar phase angle as viewed from the Earth. Then, most previous studies have used the scattering phase function deduced from the Pioneer 10/IPP data (blue: 440 nm, red: 640nm) [Tomasko et al., 1978]. There are two shortcomings in the Pioneer scattering phase function. One is that we have to use this scattering phase function at red as a substitute for analyses of imaging photometry using CH4 bands (center: 727 and 890 nm), although clouds should have wavelength dependency. The other is that the red pass band of IPP was so broad (595-720 nm) that this scattering phase function in red just show wavelength-averaged scattering properties of clouds. To provide a new reference scattering phase function with wavelength dependency, we have analyzed the Cassini/ISS data in BL1 (451 nm), CB1 (619 nm), CB2 (750 nm), and CB3 (938 nm) over wide solar phase angles (3-141 degrees) during its Jovian flyby in 2000-2001. A simple cloud model which consists of a thin stratospheric haze, a semi-infinite cloud, and an intervening Rayleigh gas layers is adopted. Applying Mie theory to scattering by clouds, we deduce the scattering phase function of cloud and effective particle size in the South Tropical Zone. When we use the nominal value of reflective index for ammonia ice (Martonchik et al., 1984), we cannot obtain reasonable fit to the observed limb-darkening profiles. This would imply that we should consider possible effects on the impurity and/or the nonsphericiy of clouds. In this presentation, we will show detail model description and these results. Finally, we discuss scattering properties of clouds through comparison with previous works.

  18. Heating characteristics of antenna arrays used in microwave ablation: A theoretical parametric study.

    PubMed

    Karampatzakis, Andreas; Kühn, Sven; Tsanidis, George; Neufeld, Esra; Samaras, Theodoros; Kuster, Niels

    2013-10-01

    A numerical study of the performance of antenna arrays used in microwave ablation (MWA) is carried out. Double-slot coaxial antennas in triangular and square configurations are studied. Clinical (healthy vs. malignant) and experimental (in vs. ex vivo) scenarios for hepatic cancer treatment are modeled, and further application in bone and lung tissue is examined. It is found that triangular arrays can create spherical ablation zones, while square configurations result in flatter ones. Thresholds in power and application times for creating continuous ablation zones are calculated, and the characteristics of the latter are quantified. PMID:24034722

  19. Customized ablation using an all-solid-state deep-UV laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korn, G.; Lenzner, M.; Kittelmann, O.; Zatonski, R.; Kirsch, M.; Kuklin, Y.

    2003-07-01

    We show first deep UV ablation results achieved with our new all solid state laser system. The system parameters allow high repetition rate ablation with a small spot diameter of about 0.250mm and a fluence of 350 mJ/cm2 at a wavelength of 210 nm using sequential frequency conversion of a diode pumped laser source. The single shot and multishot ablation rates as well as the ablation profiles have been defined using MicroProf (Fries Research and Technology GmbH, Germany). By means of computer controlled scanning we produce smooth ablation profiles corresponding to a correction of myopia, hyperopia or astigmatism. Due to the small spot size and high repetition rate of the laser we are able to generate in short time intervals complicated ablation profiles described by higher order polynomial functions which are required for the needs of customized corneal ablation.

  20. Efficiency of Planetesimal Ablation in Giant Planetary Envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinhas, Arazi; Madhusudhan, Nikku; Clarke, Cathie

    2016-09-01

    Observations of exoplanetary spectra are leading to unprecedented constraints on their atmospheric elemental abundances, particularly O/H, C/H, and C/O ratios. Recent studies suggest that elemental ratios could provide important constraints on formation and migration mechanisms of giant exoplanets. A fundamental assumption in such studies is that the chemical composition of the planetary envelope represents the sum-total of compositions of the accreted gas and solids during the formation history of the planet. We investigate the efficiency with which accreted planetesimals ablate in a giant planetary envelope thereby contributing to its composition rather than sinking to the core. From considerations of aerodynamic drag causing `frictional ablation' and the envelope temperature structure causing `thermal ablation', we compute mass ablations for impacting planetesimals of radii 30 m to 1 km for different compositions (ice to iron) and a wide range of velocities and impact angles, assuming spherical symmetry. Icy impactors are fully ablated in the outer envelope for a wide range of parameters. Even for Fe impactors substantial ablation occurs in the envelope for a wide range of sizes and velocities. For example, iron impactors of sizes below ˜0.5 km and velocities above ˜30 km/s are found to ablate by ˜ 60-80% within the outer envelope at pressures below 103 bar due to frictional ablation alone. For deeper pressures (˜107 bar), substantial ablation happens over a wider range of parameters. Therefore, our exploratory study suggests that atmospheric abundances of volatile elements in giant planets reflect their accretion history during formation.

  1. Fabrication of silver nanoparticles dispersed in palm oil using laser ablation.

    PubMed

    Zamiri, Reza; Zakaria, Azmi; Ahangar, Hossein Abbastabar; Sadrolhosseini, Amir Reza; Mahdi, Mohd Adzir

    2010-01-01

    In this study we used a laser ablation technique for preparation of silver nanoparticles. The fabrication process was carried out by ablation of a silver plate immersed in palm oil. A pulsed Nd:YAG laser at a wavelength of 1064 nm was used for ablation of the plate at different times. The palm coconut oil allowed formation of nanoparticles with very small and uniform particle size, which are dispersed very homogeneously within the solution. The obtained particle sizes for 15 and 30 minute ablation times were 2.5 and 2 nm, respectively. Stability study shows that all of the samples remained stable for a reasonable period of time. PMID:21151470

  2. Therapeutic stimulation versus ablation.

    PubMed

    Hariz, Marwan I; Hariz, Gun-Marie

    2013-01-01

    The renaissance of functional stereotactic neurosurgery was pioneered in the mid 1980s by Laitinen's introduction of Leksell's posteroventral pallidotomy for Parkinson´s disease (PD). This ablative procedure experienced a worldwide spread in the 1990s, owing to its excellent effect on dyskinesias and other symptoms of post-l-dopa PD. Modern deep brain stimulation (DBS), pioneered by Benabid and Pollak in 1987 for the treatment of tremor, first became popular when it was applied to the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in the mid 1990s, where it demonstrated a striking effect on all cardinal symptoms of advanced PD, and permitted reduced dosages of medication. DBS, as a nondestructive, adaptable, and reversible procedure that is proving safe in bilateral surgery on basal ganglia, has great appeal to clinicians and patients alike, despite the fact that it is expensive, laborious, and relies on very strict patient selection criteria, especially for STN DBS. Psychiatric surgery has experienced the same phenomenon, with DBS supplanting completely stereotactic ablative procedures. This chapter discusses the pros and cons of ablation versus stimulation and investigates the reasons why DBS has overshadowed proven efficient ablative procedures such as pallidotomy for PD, and capsulotomy and cingulotomy for obsessive-compulsive disorder and depression. PMID:24112885

  3. Advanced Rigid Ablative TPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasch, Matthew J.

    2011-01-01

    NASA Exploration Systems Mission Directorate s (ESMD) Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) Technology Development Project (TDP) and the NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate s (ARMD) Hypersonics Project are developing new advanced rigid ablators in an effort to substantially increase reliability, decrease mass, and reduce life cycle cost of rigid aeroshell-based entry systems for multiple missions. Advanced Rigid Ablators combine ablation resistant top layers capable of high heat flux entry and enable high-speed EDL with insulating mass-efficient bottom that, insulate the structure and lower the areal weight. These materials may benefit Commercial Orbital Transportation Services (COTS) vendors and may potentially enable new NASA missions for higher velocity returns (e.g. asteroid, Mars). The materials have been thermally tested to 400-450 W/sq cm at the Laser Hardened Materials Evaluation Lab (LHMEL), Hypersonics Materials Evaluation Test System (HyMETS) and in arcjet facilities. Tested materials exhibit much lower backface temperatures and reduced recession over the baseline materials (PICA). Although the EDL project is ending in FY11, NASA in-house development of advanced ablators will continue with a focus on varying resin systems and fiber/resin interactions.

  4. Printable Nanophotonic Devices via Holographic Laser Ablation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qiancheng; Yetisen, Ali K; Sabouri, Aydin; Yun, Seok Hyun; Butt, Haider

    2015-09-22

    Holography plays a significant role in applications such as data storage, light trapping, security, and biosensors. However, conventional fabrication methods remain time-consuming, costly, and complex, limiting the fabrication of holograms and their extensive use. Here, we demonstrate a single-pulse laser ablation technique to write parallel surface gratings and Fresnel zone plates. We utilized a 6 ns high-energy green laser pulse to form interference patterns to record a surface grating with 820 nm periodicity and asymmetric zone plate holograms on 4.5 nm gold-coated substrates. The holographic recording process was completed within seconds. The optical characteristics of the interference patterns have been computationally modeled, and well-ordered polychromatic diffraction was observed from the fabricated holograms. The zone plate showed a significant diffraction angle of 32° from the normal incident for the focal point. The nanosecond laser interference ablation for rapid hologram fabrication holds great potential in a vast range of optical devices. PMID:26301907

  5. New Ablation Technologies and Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Berte, Benjamin; Yamashita, Seigo; Derval, Nicolas; Denis, Arnaud; Shah, Ashok; Amraoui, Sana; Hocini, Meleze; Haissaguerre, Michel; Jais, Pierre; Sacher, Frederic

    2014-01-01

    Catheter ablation is an established treatment strategy for a range of different cardiac arrhythmias. Over the past decade two major areas of expansion have been ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular tachycardia (VT) in the context of structurally abnormal hearts. In parallel with the expanding role of catheter ablation for AF and VT, multiple novel technologies have been developed which aim to increase safety and procedural success. Areas of development include novel catheter designs, novel navigation technologies and higher resolution imaging techniques. The aim of the present review is to provide an overview of novel developments in AF ablation and VT ablation in patients with of structural cardiac diseases. PMID:26835075

  6. New Ablation Technologies and Techniques.

    PubMed

    Mahida, Saagar; Berte, Benjamin; Yamashita, Seigo; Derval, Nicolas; Denis, Arnaud; Shah, Ashok; Amraoui, Sana; Hocini, Meleze; Haissaguerre, Michel; Jais, Pierre; Sacher, Frederic

    2014-08-01

    Catheter ablation is an established treatment strategy for a range of different cardiac arrhythmias. Over the past decade two major areas of expansion have been ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular tachycardia (VT) in the context of structurally abnormal hearts. In parallel with the expanding role of catheter ablation for AF and VT, multiple novel technologies have been developed which aim to increase safety and procedural success. Areas of development include novel catheter designs, novel navigation technologies and higher resolution imaging techniques. The aim of the present review is to provide an overview of novel developments in AF ablation and VT ablation in patients with of structural cardiac diseases. PMID:26835075

  7. Population Structure, Genetic Diversity, Effective Population Size, Demographic History and Regional Connectivity Patterns of the Endangered Dusky Grouper, Epinephelus marginatus (Teleostei: Serranidae), within Malta’s Fisheries Management Zone

    PubMed Central

    Vella, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to describe the genetic population structure and demographic history of the endangered marine fish, Epinephelus marginatus, within Malta’s Fisheries Management Zone for the purpose of localised conservation planning. Epinephelus marginatus is a long-lived, sedentary, reef-associated protogynous hermaphrodite with high commercial and recreational value that is at risk of extinction throughout its global distribution. Based on global trends, population substructuring and gaps in local knowledge this has led to an increased interest in evaluation of local stock. Assessment of Maltese demography was based on historical and contemporary catch landings data whilst genetic population structure and regional connectivity patterns were evaluated by examining 175 individuals collected within the central Mediterranean region between 2002 and 2009 using 14 nuclear microsatellite loci. Demographic stock assessment of Maltese E. marginatus’ revealed a 99% decline in catch landings between 1947 and 2009 within the Fisheries Management Zone. A contemporary modest mean size was observed, 3 ± 3 kg, where approximately 17% of the population was juvenile, 68% female/sex-changing and 15% were male with a male-to-female sex ratio of 1:5. Genetic analysis describes the overall population of E. marginatus’ within the Fisheries Management Zone as decreasing in size (ƟH = 2.2), which has gone through a significant size reduction in the past (M = 0.41) and consequently shows signs of moderate inbreeding (FIS = 0.10, p < 0.001) with an estimated effective population size of 130 individuals. Results of spatially explicit Bayesian genetic cluster analysis detected two geographically distinct subpopulations within Malta’s Fisheries Management Zone and that they are connected to a larger network of E. marginatus’ within the Sicily Channel. Results suggest conservation management should be designed to reflect E. marginatus’ within Malta’s Fisheries

  8. Thermochemical Ablation Analysis of the Orion Heatshield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sixel, William

    2015-01-01

    The Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle will one day carry astronauts to the Moon and beyond, and Orion's heatshield is a critical component in ensuring their safe return to Earth. The Orion heatshield is the structural component responsible for absorbing the intense heating environment caused by re-entry to Earth's atmosphere. The heatshield is primarily composed of Avcoat, an ablative material that is consumed during the re-entry process. Ablation is primarily characterized by two processes: pyrolysis and recession. The decomposition of in-depth virgin material is known as pyrolysis. Recession occurs when the exposed surface of the heatshield reacts with the surrounding flow. The Orion heatshield design was changed from an individually filled Avcoat honeycomb to a molded block Avcoat design. The molded block Avcoat heatshield relies on an adhesive bond to keep it attached to the capsule. In some locations on the heatshield, the integrity of the adhesive bond cannot be verified. For these locations, a mechanical retention device was proposed. Avcoat ablation was modelled in CHAR and the in-depth virgin material temperatures were used in a Thermal Desktop model of the mechanical retention device. The retention device was analyzed and shown to cause a large increase in the maximum bondline temperature. In order to study the impact of individual ablation modelling parameters on the heatshield sizing process, a Monte Carlo simulation of the sizing process was proposed. The simulation will give the sensitivity of the ablation model to each of its input parameters. As part of the Monte Carlo simulation, statistical uncertainties on material properties were required for Avcoat. Several properties were difficult to acquire uncertainties for: the pyrolysis gas enthalpy, non-dimensional mass loss rate (B´c), and Arrhenius equation parameters. Variability in the elemental composition of Avcoat was used as the basis for determining the statistical uncertainty in pyrolysis gas

  9. Comparison of Combination Therapies in the Management of Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Transarterial Chemoembolization with Radiofrequency Ablation versus Microwave Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Ginsburg, Michael; Zivin, Sean P.; Wroblewski, Kristen; Doshi, Taral; Vasnani, Raj J.; Van Ha, Thuong G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare retrospectively the outcomes and complications of transcatheter arterial chemoembolization with drug-eluting embolic agents combined with radiofrequency (RF) ablation or microwave (MW) ablation in treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Materials and Methods From 2003–2011, 89 patients with HCC received a combination therapy—transcatheter arterial chemoembolization plus RF ablation in 38 patients and transcatheter arterial chemoembolization plus MW ablation in 51 patients. Local tumor response, tumor progression-free survival (PFS), overall PFS, overall survival (OS), and complications were compared. Overall PFS and OS were compared between the two treatment groups in multivariate analysis controlling for Child-Pugh class, Barcelona Clinic Liver Classification stage, and index tumor size. Results Complete local tumor response was achieved in 37 (80.4%) of the tumors treated with transcatheter arterial chemoembolization plus RF ablation and 49 (76.6%) of the tumors treated with transcatheter arterial chemoembolization plus MW ablation (P = .67). The median tumor PFS and overall PFS were 20.8 months and 9.3 months (P = .72) for transarterial chemoembolization plus RF ablation and 21.8 months and 9.2 months for transarterial chemoembolization plus MW ablation (P = .32). The median OS of the transcatheter arterial chemoembolization plus RF ablation group was 23.3 months, and the median OS of the transcatheter arterial chemoembolization plus MW ablation group was 42.6 months, with no significant difference in the survival experience between the two groups (log-rank test, P = .10). In the multivariate analysis, Barcelona Clinic Liver Classification stage was the only factor associated with overall PFS and OS. One patient in the transcatheter arterial chemoembolization plus RF ablation cohort (3%) and two patients in the transcatheter arterial chemoembolization plus MW ablation cohort (4%) required prolonged hospitalization (< 48 h) for pain

  10. Percutaneous Ablation of Adrenal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesan, Aradhana M.; Locklin, Julia; Dupuy, Damian E.; Wood, Bradford J.

    2010-01-01

    Adrenal tumors comprise a broad spectrum of benign and malignant neoplasms, and include functional adrenal adenomas, pheochromocytomas, primary adrenocortical carcinoma and adrenal metastases. Percutaneous ablative approaches that have been described and used in the treatment of adrenal tumors include percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA), cryoablation, microwave ablation and chemical ablation. Local tumor ablation in the adrenal gland presents unique challenges, secondary to the adrenal gland’s unique anatomic and physiologic features. The results of clinical series employing percutaneous ablative techniques in the treatment of adrenal tumors are reviewed in this article. Clinical and technical considerations unique to ablation in the adrenal gland are presented, including approaches commonly used in our practices, and risks and potential complications are discussed. PMID:20540918

  11. Urban field classification by "local climate zones" in a medium-sized Central European city: the case of Olomouc (Czech Republic)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehnert, Michal; Geletič, Jan; Husák, Jan; Vysoudil, Miroslav

    2015-11-01

    The stations of the Metropolitan Station Network in Olomouc (Czech Republic) were assigned to local climatic zones, and the temperature characteristics of the stations were compared. The classification of local climatic zones represents an up-to-date concept for the unification of the characterization of the neighborhoods of climate research sites. This study is one of the first to provide a classification of existing stations within local climate zones. Using a combination of GIS-based analyses and field research, the values of geometric and surface cover properties were calculated, and the stations were subsequently classified into the local climate zones. It turned out that the classification of local climatic zones can be efficiently used for representative documentation of the neighborhood of the climate stations. To achieve a full standardization of the description of the neighborhood of a station, the classification procedures, including the methods used for the processing of spatial data and methods used for the indication of specific local characteristics, must be also standardized. Although the main patterns of temperature differences between the stations with a compact rise, those with an open rise and the stations with no rise or sparsely built areas were evident; the air temperature also showed considerable differences within particular zones. These differences were largely caused by various geometric layout of development and by unstandardized placement of the stations. For the direct comparison of temperatures between zones, particularly those stations which have been placed in such a way that they are as representative as possible for the zone in question should be used in further research.

  12. Cell death, perfusion and electrical parameters are critical in models of hepatic radiofrequency ablation

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Sheldon K.; Ooi, Ean H.; Payne, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: A sensitivity analysis has been performed on a mathematical model of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in the liver. The purpose of this is to identify the most important parameters in the model, defined as those that produce the largest changes in the prediction. This is important in understanding the role of uncertainty and when comparing the model predictions to experimental data. Materials and methods: The Morris method was chosen to perform the sensitivity analysis because it is ideal for models with many parameters or that take a significant length of time to obtain solutions. A comprehensive literature review was performed to obtain ranges over which the model parameters are expected to vary, crucial input information. Results: The most important parameters in predicting the ablation zone size in our model of RFA are those representing the blood perfusion, electrical conductivity and the cell death model. The size of the 50 °C isotherm is sensitive to the electrical properties of tissue while the heat source is active, and to the thermal parameters during cooling. Conclusions: The parameter ranges chosen for the sensitivity analysis are believed to represent all that is currently known about their values in combination. The Morris method is able to compute global parameter sensitivities taking into account the interaction of all parameters, something that has not been done before. Research is needed to better understand the uncertainties in the cell death, electrical conductivity and perfusion models, but the other parameters are only of second order, providing a significant simplification. PMID:26000972

  13. Extensional Failure of "Pre-Stressed" Lithosphere Above a Subduction Zone May Have Contributed to the Size of the Tohoku-Oki Earthquake and Tsunami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buck, W. R.; Lavier, L. L.; Petersen, K. D.

    2015-12-01

    The Tohoku-oki earthquake was not only the costliest natural disaster in history it was the best monitored. The unprecedented data set showed that anomalously large lateral motion of the seafloor near the trench contributed to the size of the tsunami. Also, for the first time it was shown that a large subduction earthquake was followed by extensional aftershocks in a broad region of the upper plate (up to 250 km from the Japan Trench). Several observations suggest that the near-trench seafloor motion and the extensional aftershocks are linked. For example, a seismically imaged fault, just landward of the region of large seafloor motion, slipped in a normal sense during the earthquake. Also, inspired by the Tohoku data, researchers have searched for and found upper plate extensional aftershocks associated with several other subduction earthquakes that produced large tsunami. Extension of the upper plate can be driven by a reduction in the dip of a subducting slab. Such a dip change is suggested by the post-Miocene westward migration of the volcanic arc in Honshu. Numerical models show that a long-term reduction in slab dip can generate enough extensional stress to cause normal faulting over a broad region of the upper plate. The time step of the numerical model is then reduced to treat the inter-seismic time scale of 100-1000 years, when the subduction interface is locked. The interface dip continues to be reduced during the inter-seismic period, but extensional fault slip is suppressed by the relative compression of the upper plate caused by continued convergence. The relief of compressional stresses during dynamic weakening of the megathrust triggers a release of bending-related extensional strain energy. This extensional yielding can add significantly to the co-seismic radiated seismic energy and seafloor deformation. This mechanism is analogous to the breaking of a pre-stressed concrete beam supporting a bending moment when the compressional pre-stress is

  14. Lip Reconstruction after Tumor Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi, Ali; Kalantar Motamedi, Mohammad Hossein; Ebrahimi, Azin; Kazemi, Mohammad; Shams, Amin; Hashemzadeh, Haleh

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 25% of all oral cavity carcinomas involve the lips, and the primary management of these lesions is complete surgical resection. Loss of tissue in the lips after resection is treated with a variety of techniques, depending on the extension and location of the defect. Here we review highly accepted techniques of lip reconstruction and some of new trials with significant clinical results. Reconstruction choice is primarily depend to size of the defect, localization of defect, elasticity of tissues. But patient’s age, comorbidities, and motivation are also important. According to the defect location and size, different reconstruction methods can be used. For defects involved less than 30% of lips, primary closures are sufficient. In defects with 35–70% lip involvement, the Karapandzic, Abbe, Estlander, McGregor or Gillies’ fan flaps or their modifications can be used. When lip remaining tissues are insufficient, cheek tissue can be used in Webster and Bernard advancement flaps and their various modifications. Deltopectoral or radial forearm free flaps can be options for large defects of the lip extending to the Jaws. To achieve best functional and esthetic results, surgeons should be able to choose most appropriate reconstruction method. Considering defects’ size and location, patients’ expects and surgeon’s ability and knowledge, a variety of flaps are presented in order to reconstruct defects resulted from tumor ablation. It’s necessary for surgeons to trace the recent innovations in lip reconstruction to offer best choices to patients. PMID:27308236

  15. In situ Diagnostics During Carbon Nanotube Production by Laser Ablation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arepalli, Sivaram

    1999-01-01

    The preliminary results of spectral analysis of the reaction zone during the carbon nanotube production by laser ablation method indicate synergetic dependence on dual laser setup. The emission spectra recorded from different regions of the laser ablated plume at different delay times from the laser pulses are used to map the temperatures of C2 and C3. These are compared with Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) spectra also obtained during production to model the growth mechanism of carbon nanotubes. Experiments conducted to correlate the spectral features with nanotube yields as a function of different production parameters will be discussed.

  16. Time-resolved investigations of the non-thermal ablation process of graphite induced by femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalupka, C.; Finger, J.; Reininghaus, M.

    2016-04-01

    We report on the in-situ analysis of the ablation dynamics of the, so-called, laser induced non-thermal ablation process of graphite. A highly oriented pyrolytic graphite is excited by femtosecond laser pulses with fluences below the classic thermal ablation threshold. The ablation dynamics are investigated by axial pump-probe reflection measurements, transversal pump-probe shadowgraphy, and time-resolved transversal emission photography. The combination of the applied analysis methods allows for a continuous and detailed time-resolved observation of the non-thermal ablation dynamics from several picoseconds up to 180 ns. Formation of large, μm-sized particles takes place within the first 3.5 ns after irradiation. The following propagation of ablation products and the shock wave front are tracked by transversal shadowgraphy up to 16 ns. The comparison of ablation dynamics of different fluences by emission photography reveals thermal ablation products even for non-thermal fluences.

  17. Preclinical Assessment of a 980-nm Diode Laser Ablation System in a Large Animal Tumor Model

    PubMed Central

    Ahrar, Kamran; Gowda, Ashok; Javadi, Sanaz; Borne, Agatha; Fox, Matthew; McNichols, Roger; Ahrar, Judy U.; Stephens, Clifton; Stafford, R. Jason

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To characterize the performance of a 980-nm diode laser ablation system in an in vivo tumor model. Materials and Methods This study was approved by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. The ablation system consisted of a 15-W, 980-nm diode laser, flexible diffusing tipped fiber optic, and 17-gauge internally cooled catheter. Ten immunosuppressed dogs were inoculated subcutaneously with canine transmissible venereal tumor fragments in eight dorsal locations. Laser ablations were performed at 79 sites where inoculations were successful (99%) using powers of 10 W, 12.5 W, and 15 W, with exposure times between 60 and 180 seconds. In 20 cases, multiple overlapping ablations were performed. After the dogs were euthanized, the tumors were harvested, sectioned along the applicator track, measured and photographed. Measurements of ablation zone were performed on gross specimen. Histopathology and viability staining was performed using hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide hydrogen (NADH) staining. Results Gross pathology confirmed well-circumscribed ablation zone with sharp boundaries between thermally ablated tumor in the center surrounded by viable tumor tissue. When a single applicator was used, the greatest ablation diameters ranged from 12 mm at the lowest dose (10 W, 60 sec) to 26 mm at the highest dose (15 W, 180 sec). Multiple applicators created ablation zones of up to 42 mm in greatest diameter (with the lasers operating at 15 W for 120 sec). Conclusions The new 980-nm diode laser and internally cooled applicator effectively creates large ellipsoid thermal ablations in less than 3 minutes. PMID:20346883

  18. OCDR guided laser ablation device

    DOEpatents

    Dasilva, Luiz B.; Colston, Jr., Bill W.; James, Dale L.

    2002-01-01

    A guided laser ablation device. The device includes a mulitmode laser ablation fiber that is surrounded by one or more single mode optical fibers that are used to image in the vicinity of the laser ablation area to prevent tissue damage. The laser ablation device is combined with an optical coherence domain reflectometry (OCDR) unit and with a control unit which initializes the OCDR unit and a high power laser of the ablation device. Data from the OCDR unit is analyzed by the control unit and used to control the high power laser. The OCDR images up to about 3 mm ahead of the ablation surface to enable a user to see sensitive tissue such as a nerve or artery before damaging it by the laser.

  19. Automated microwave ablation therapy planning with single and multiple entry points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Sheena X.; Dalal, Sandeep; Kruecker, Jochen

    2012-02-01

    Microwave ablation (MWA) has become a recommended treatment modality for interventional cancer treatment. Compared with radiofrequency ablation (RFA), MWA provides more rapid and larger-volume tissue heating. It allows simultaneous ablation from different entry points and allows users to change the ablation size by controlling the power/time parameters. Ablation planning systems have been proposed in the past, mainly addressing the needs for RFA procedures. Thus a planning system addressing MWA-specific parameters and workflows is highly desirable to help physicians achieve better microwave ablation results. In this paper, we design and implement an automated MWA planning system that provides precise probe locations for complete coverage of tumor and margin. We model the thermal ablation lesion as an ellipsoidal object with three known radii varying with the duration of the ablation and the power supplied to the probe. The search for the best ablation coverage can be seen as an iterative optimization problem. The ablation centers are steered toward the location which minimizes both un-ablated tumor tissue and the collateral damage caused to the healthy tissue. We assess the performance of our algorithm using simulated lesions with known "ground truth" optimal coverage. The Mean Localization Error (MLE) between the computed ablation center in 3D and the ground truth ablation center achieves 1.75mm (Standard deviation of the mean (STD): 0.69mm). The Mean Radial Error (MRE) which is estimated by comparing the computed ablation radii with the ground truth radii reaches 0.64mm (STD: 0.43mm). These preliminary results demonstrate the accuracy and robustness of the described planning algorithm.

  20. Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation of Hepatocellular Carcinomas Adjacent to the Gallbladder with Internally Cooled Electrodes: Assessment of Safety and Therapeutic Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Won; Park, Mihyun; Kim, Heejung; Kim, Young-sun; Choi, Dongil; Lim, Hyo K.

    2009-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate the safety and therapeutic efficacy of percutaneous radiofrequency (RF) ablation for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) adjacent to the gallbladder with the use of internally cooled electrodes. Materials and Methods We retrospectively assessed 45 patients with 46 HCCs (mean size, 2.2 cm) adjacent to the gallbladder (≤1.0 cm) treated with RF ablation using an internally cooled electrode system. An electrode was inserted into the tumor either parallel (n = 38) or perpendicular (n = 8) to the gallbladder wall. The safety and therapeutic efficacy of the procedures were assessed with clinical and imaging follow-up examinations. Follow-up with the use of CT ranged from four to 45 months (mean, 19 months). The association between variables (electrode direction, electrode type, tumor size, tumor location, lobar location) and the presence of a residual tumor or local tumor progression was also analyzed. Results There were no major complications and minor complications were noted in three patients (7%) including one case of vasovagal syncope and two cases of bilomas. Wall thickening of the gallbladder adjacent to the RF ablation zone was noted in 14 patients (41%) as determined on immediate follow-up CT imaging. Wall thickening showed complete disappearance on subsequent follow-up CT imaging. The primary technique effectiveness rate was 96% (44/46) based on one-month follow-up CT imaging. Local tumor progression was noted in six (14%) of 44 completely ablated tumors during the follow-up period. The direction of electrode insertion (perpendicular), tumor size (≥3 cm) and tumor location (a tumor that abutted the gallbladder) were associated with an increased risk of early incomplete treatment. No variable was significantly associated with local tumor progression. Conclusion Percutaneous RF ablation of HCCs adjacent to the gallbladder using an internally cooled electrode is a safe and effective treatment

  1. Multiple target laser ablation system

    DOEpatents

    Mashburn, Douglas N.

    1996-01-01

    A laser ablation apparatus and method are provided in which multiple targets consisting of material to be ablated are mounted on a movable support. The material transfer rate is determined for each target material, and these rates are stored in a controller. A position detector determines which target material is in a position to be ablated, and then the controller controls the beam trigger timing and energy level to achieve a desired proportion of each constituent material in the resulting film.

  2. Multiple target laser ablation system

    DOEpatents

    Mashburn, D.N.

    1996-01-09

    A laser ablation apparatus and method are provided in which multiple targets consisting of material to be ablated are mounted on a movable support. The material transfer rate is determined for each target material, and these rates are stored in a controller. A position detector determines which target material is in a position to be ablated, and then the controller controls the beam trigger timing and energy level to achieve a desired proportion of each constituent material in the resulting film. 3 figs.

  3. Scattering Properties of Jovian Tropospheric Cloud Particles Inferred from Cassini/ISS: Mie Scattering Phase Function and Particle Size in South Tropical Zone III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, T.; Satoh, T.; Kasaba, Y.

    2010-12-01

    nm), CB2 (750 nm), and CB3 (938 nm) over wide solar phase angles (3-141 degrees) during its Jovian flyby in 2000-2001. A simple cloud model which consists of a thin stratospheric haze, a semi-infinite cloud, and an intervening Rayleigh gas layers is adopted. Applying Mie theory to scattering by clouds, we deduce the scattering phase function of cloud and effective particle size in the South Tropical Zone. When we use the nominal value of reflective index for ammonia ice (Martonchik et al., 1984), we cannot obtain reasonable fit to the observed limb-darkening profiles. This would imply that we should consider possible effects on the impurity and/or the nonsphericiy of clouds. In this presentation, we will show detail model description and these results. Finally, we discuss scattering properties of clouds through comparison with previous works.

  4. CO2 Laser Absorption in Ablation Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Eckel, Hans-Albert; Tegel, Jochen; Schall, Wolfgang O.

    2006-05-02

    The impulse formation by laser ablation is limited by the premature absorption of the incident laser radiation in the initially produced cloud of ablation products. The power fraction of a CO2 laser pulse transmitted through a small hole in a POM sample for pulse energies of 35 to 150 J focused on a spot of 2 cm2 has been compared with the incident power. The plasma formation in vacuum and in air of 3500 Pa and the spread of the shock wave with velocities of 1.6 to 2.4 km/s in the low pressure air was observed by Schlieren photography. A sharp edged dark zone with a maximum extension of 10 to 12 mm away from the target surface develops within 5 {mu}s independently of the pressure and is assumed to be a plasma. In order to find out, if this is also the zone where the majority of the incident laser radiation is absorbed, a CO2 probe laser beam was directed through the expansion cloud parallel to and at various distances from the sample surface. The time behavior of the absorption signal of the probe beam has been measured and an absorption wave could be observed.

  5. Role of debris cover to control specific ablation of adjoining Batal and Sutri Dhaka glaciers in Chandra Basin (Himachal Pradesh) during peak ablation season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Parmanand; Patel, Lavkush K.; Ravindra, Rasik; Singh, Ajit; K, Mahalinganathan; Thamban, Meloth

    2016-04-01

    As part of the on-going annual mass balance measurements on Batal and Sutri Dhaka glaciers, observations were made during peak ablation (August-September) season in 2013 to understand the response of debris covered and clean-ice (debris free) glacier surface to melting processes. Though, both the Batal and Sutri Dhaka glaciers have almost similar geographical disposition, Batal shows extensive debris cover (90% of the ablation area), while the latter is free from debris (only 5% of the ablation area). The thickness of debris in Batal glacier is inversely proportional to altitude, whereas Sutri Dhaka mostly experienced debris-free zone except snout area. Observation revealed that the vertical gradient of ablation rate in ablation area is contrastingly opposite in these two glaciers, reflecting significant control of debris thickness and their distribution over glacier surface on the ablation rates. While different thickness (2-100 cm) of debris have attenuated melting rates up to 70% of total melting, debris cover of <2 cm thickness has accelerated melting up to 10% of the total melting. Estimated melt ratio reveals that about 90% of the ablation area has experienced inhibited melting in Batal glacier, whereas only less than 5% ablation area of Sutri Dhaka has undergone inhibited melting. Comparison of topographical maps of 1962 with successive satellite images of the area demonstrates a terminus retreat of 373 ± 33.5 m and 579 ± 33.5 m for Batal and Sutri Dhaka glaciers for the period 1962-2013, respectively.

  6. Dust Ablation in Pluto's Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horanyi, M.; Poppe, A. R.; Sternovsky, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Based on measurements by in situ dust detectors onboard the Pioneer and New Horizon spacecraft the total production rate of dust particles born in the Kuiper belt can be estimated to be on the order of 5 x 10 ^3 kg/s in the approximate size range of 1 - 10 micron. These particles slowly migrate inward due to Poynting - Robertson drag and their spatial distribution is shaped by mean motion resonances with the gas giant planets in the outer solar system. The expected mass influx into Pluto's atmosphere is on the order of 50 kg/day, and the arrival speed of the incoming particles is on the order of 3 - 4 km/s. We have followed the ablation history as function of speed and size of dust particles in Pluto's atmosphere, and found that, if the particles are rich in volatiles, they can fully sublimate due to drag heating and deposit their mass in a narrow layer. This deposition might promote the formation of the haze layers observed by the New Horizons spacecraft. This talk will explore the constraints on the composition of the dust particles, as well as on our newly developed models of Pluto's atmosphere that can be learned by matching the altitude where haze layers could be formed.

  7. Dust ablation in Pluto's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horanyi, Mihaly; Poppe, Andrew; Sternovsky, Zoltan

    2016-04-01

    Based on measurements by dust detectors onboard the Pioneer 10/11 and New Horizons spacecraft the total production rate of dust particles born in the Edgeworth Kuiper Belt (EKB) has been be estimated to be on the order of 5 ṡ 103 kg/s in the approximate size range of 1 - 10 μm. Dust particles are produced by collisions between EKB objects and their bombardment by both interplanetary and interstellar dust particles. Dust particles of EKB origin, in general, migrate towards the Sun due to Poynting-Robertson drag but their distributions are further sculpted by mean-motion resonances as they first approach the orbit of Neptune and later the other planets, as well as mutual collisions. Subsequently, Jupiter will eject the vast majority of them before they reach the inner solar system. The expected mass influx into Pluto atmosphere is on the order of 200 kg/day, and the arrival speed of the incoming particles is on the order of 3 - 4 km/s. We have followed the ablation history as function of speed and size of dust particles in Pluto's atmosphere, and found that volatile rich particles can fully sublimate due to drag heating and deposit their mass in narrow layers. This deposition might promote the formation of the haze layers observed by the New Horizons spacecraft. This talk will explore the constraints on the composition of the dust particles by comparing the altitude of the deposition layers to the observed haze layers.

  8. Characterization of Acute and Subacute Radiofrequency Ablation Lesions with Non-enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Dickfeld, Timm; Kato, Ritsushi; Zviman, Menekem; Nazarian, Saman; Dong, Jun; Ashikaga, Hiroshi; Lardo, Albert C.; Berger, Ronald D.; Calkins, Hugh; Halperin, Henry

    2007-01-01

    Background MRI has the potential to visualize radiofrequency ablations (RFA), which have become the preferred treatment strategy for many arrhythmias. However, MRI patterns after RFA have not been well investigated. Objective This study sought to define the characteristic appearance and the effect of time and energy on non-contrast-enhanced MR imaging of RFA. Methods Using a power-controlled, cooled tip ablation system, RFA (5W–50W for 45s) were created on the right ventricular epicardium in 10 mongrel dogs. T1- and T2-weighted MR images were obtained during a 12-hours follow-up and compared to gross anatomy and histopathology. Results Lesions were successfully visualized with T2- and T1-weighted images 30min to 12 hours after RFA. T2 images were more consistent and displayed a characteristic elliptical, high-signal core (Contrast-to-noise-ratio [CNR] =18.9 ± 8.4) with a surrounding 0.5 mm low-intensity rim, which corresponded on histopathology to the central tissue necrosis and the transition zone, respectively. T1 images showed a less remarked increase in signal intensity (CNR=9.6 ± 7.4) without surrounding rim. Lesion size and appearance were well defined and unchanged during the 12 hours follow-up (ANOVA). CNR was independent of applied RF energy and allowed accurate assessment of the RFA at all time points (r=0.87 and r=0.83 for T2/T1 images, respectively). Transmural lesions, interlesional gaps and intralesional pathology could be reliably predicted in >90%. Conclusion Non-contrast-enhanced MRI allows accurate assessment of RFA and its intra-lesional pathology during a 12h follow-up. This confirms a possible role for MRI in guiding and evaluating RF application during electrophysiological ablation procedures. CONDENSED ABSTRACT MRI can visualize heat-induced tissue damage and its associated histological changes such as interstitial edema or protein necrosis through changes in T1- and T2-relaxation parameters. This study demonstrates that the

  9. Plasma-mediated ablation: An optical tool for submicrometer surgery on neuronal and vascular systems

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Philbert S.; Blinder, Pablo; Migliori, Benjamin J.; Neev, Joseph; Jin, Yishi; Squier, Jeffrey A.; Kleinfeld, David

    2009-01-01

    Plasma-mediated ablation makes use of high energy laser pulses to ionize molecules within the first few femtoseconds of the pulse. This process leads to a submicrometer-sized bubble of plasma that can ablate tissue with negligible heat transfer and collateral damage to neighboring tissue. We review the physics of plasma-mediated ablation and its use as a tool to generate targeted insults at the subcellular level to neurons and blood vessels deep within nervous tissue. Illustrative examples from axon regeneration and microvascular research illustrate the utility of this tool. We further discuss the use of ablation as an integral part of automated histology. PMID:19269159

  10. Image-guided focused ultrasound ablation of breast cancer: current status, challenges, and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, A. C.; Gianfelice, D.; Daniel, B. L.; Mali, W. P. Th. M.

    2008-01-01

    Image-guided focussed ultrasound (FUS) ablation is a non-invasive procedure that has been used for treatment of benign or malignant breast tumours. Image-guidance during ablation is achieved either by using real-time ultrasound (US) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The past decade phase I studies have proven MRI-guided and US-guided FUS ablation of breast cancer to be technically feasible and safe. We provide an overview of studies assessing the efficacy of FUS for breast tumour ablation as measured by percentages of complete tumour necrosis. Successful ablation ranged from 20% to 100%, depending on FUS system type, imaging technique, ablation protocol, and patient selection. Specific issues related to FUS ablation of breast cancer, such as increased treatment time for larger tumours, size of ablation margins, methods used for margin assessment and residual tumour detection after FUS ablation, and impact of FUS ablation on sentinel node procedure are presented. Finally, potential future applications of FUS for breast cancer treatment such as FUS-induced anti-tumour immune response, FUS-mediated gene transfer, and enhanced drug delivery are discussed. Currently, breast-conserving surgery remains the gold standard for breast cancer treatment. PMID:18351348

  11. Radiofrequency (electrosurgical) ablation of articular cartilage: a study in sheep.

    PubMed

    Turner, A S; Tippett, J W; Powers, B E; Dewell, R D; Mallinckrodt, C H

    1998-09-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effect of a bipolar ablation probe on experimentally roughened articular cartilage and compare it with the traditional mechanical shaving technique using the knee joint of sheep. Twenty-eight skeletally mature ewes were divided randomly into two groups: one group was treated with a rotating shaving device and another group was treated using the bipolar ablation probe (Bipolar Arthroscopic Probe; Electroscope, Inc, Boulder, CO). Animals were killed at 0, 6, 12, and 24 weeks, and histological sections of the experimental limbs were compared with sections of the opposite limb using a modified Mankin scale. The following variables were used to determine scores: surface (0-6), cells (0-4), hypocellularity (0-3), matrix staining (transitional zone [0-4], radiate zone [0-4], and focal empty lacunae or hypereosinophilic cells (0-3). Differences in scores for all response variables were calculated as treated limb minus sham limb. Response variables were formed: score >0 recoded as 1 (favorable response treated better than sham), score of 0 recoded as 2 (neutral response no differences), and score <0 recoded as 3 (unfavorable response treated worse than sham). Bipolar ablative probe-treated limbs had 14.29% favorable responses and 35.71% favorable or neutral responses, whereas shave-treated limbs had 0% favorable and only 7.14% favorable or neutral responses. For all variables, bipolar ablative probe-treated limbs had more favorable responses. The less severe histological change in the bipolar ablative probe-treated joints compared with the shave-treated joints suggests that bipolar ablation of articular cartilage may be a better treatment for chondromalacia than the usual shaving methods of debridement. Further, there were no pathological changes in the subchondral bone. PMID:9754476

  12. High resolution selective multilayer laser processing by nanosecond laser ablation of metal nanoparticle films

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, Seung H.; Pan Heng; Hwang, David J.; Chung, Jaewon; Ryu, Sangil; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2007-11-01

    Ablation of gold nanoparticle films on polymer was explored using a nanosecond pulsed laser, with the goal to achieve feature size reduction and functionality not amenable with inkjet printing. The ablation threshold fluence for the unsintered nanoparticle deposit was at least ten times lower than the reported threshold for the bulk film. This could be explained by the combined effects of melting temperature depression, lower conductive heat transfer loss, strong absorption of the incident laser beam, and the relatively weak bonding between nanoparticles. The ablation physics were verified by the nanoparticle sintering characterization, ablation threshold measurement, time resolved ablation plume shadowgraphs, analysis of ablation ejecta, and the measurement and calculation of optical properties. High resolution and clean feature fabrication with small energy and selective multilayer processing are demonstrated.

  13. Factors Limiting Complete Tumor Ablation by Radiofrequency Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Paulet, Erwan Aube, Christophe; Pessaux, Patrick; Lebigot, Jerome; Lhermitte, Emilie; Oberti, Frederic; Ponthieux, Anne; Cales, Paul; Ridereau-Zins, Catherine; Pereira, Philippe L.

    2008-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine radiological or physical factors to predict the risk of residual mass or local recurrence of primary and secondary hepatic tumors treated by radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Eighty-two patients, with 146 lesions (80 hepatocellular carcinomas, 66 metastases), were treated by RFA. Morphological parameters of the lesions included size, location, number, ultrasound echogenicity, computed tomography density, and magnetic resonance signal intensity were obtained before and after treatment. Parameters of the generator were recorded during radiofrequency application. The recurrence-free group was statistically compared to the recurrence and residual mass groups on all these parameters. Twenty residual masses were detected. Twenty-nine lesions recurred after a mean follow-up of 18 months. Size was a predictive parameter. Patients' sex and age and the echogenicity and density of lesions were significantly different for the recurrence and residual mass groups compared to the recurrence-free group (p < 0.05). The presence of an enhanced ring on the magnetic resonance control was more frequent in the recurrence and residual mass groups. In the group of patients with residual lesions, analysis of physical parameters showed a significant increase (p < 0.05) in the time necessary for the temperature to rise. In conclusion, this study confirms risk factors of recurrence such as the size of the tumor and emphasizes other factors such as a posttreatment enhanced ring and an increase in the time necessary for the rise in temperature. These factors should be taken into consideration when performing RFA and during follow-up.

  14. Microgravity silicon zoning investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, E. L.; Gill, G. L., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    A resistance heated zoner, suitable for early zoning experiments with silicon, was designed and put into operation. The initial power usage and size was designed for an shown to be compatible with payload carriers contemplated for the Shuttle. This equipment will be used in the definition and development of flight experiments and apparatus for float zoning silicon and other materials in microgravity.

  15. Microwave Lung Ablation Complicated by Bronchocutaneous Fistula: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Bui, James T.; Gaba, Ron C.; Knuttinen, M. Grace; Omene, Benedictta O.; Shon, Andrew; Martinez, Brandon K.; Owens, Charles A.

    2011-01-01

    Microwave ablation is a developing treatment option for unresectable lung cancer. Early experience suggests that it may have advantages over radiofrequency (RF) ablation with larger ablation zones, shorter heating times, less susceptibility to heat sink, effectiveness in charred lung, synergism with multiple applicators, no need for grounding pads, and similar survival benefit. Newer microwave ablation devices are being developed and as their use becomes more prevalent, a greater understanding of device limitations and complications are important. Herein we describe a microwave lung ablation complicated by bronchocutaneous fistula (BCF) and its treatment. BCF treatment options include close monitoring, surgical closure, percutaneous sealant injection, and endoscopic plug or sealant in those who are not surgical candidates. PMID:22654252

  16. High temperature ablative foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Matthew T. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An ablative foam composition is formed of approximately 150 to 250 parts by weight polymeric isocyanate having an isocyanate functionality of 2.6 to 3.2; approximately 15 to 30 parts by weight reactive flame retardant having a hydroxyl number range from 200-260; approximately 10 to 40 parts by weight non-reactive flame retardant; approximately 10 to 40 parts by weight nonhydrolyzable silicone copolymer having a hydroxyl number range from 75-205; and approximately 3 to 16 parts by weight amine initiated polyether resin having an isocyanate functionality greater than or equal to 3.0 and a hydroxyl number range from 400-800.

  17. Advances in local ablation of malignant liver lesions

    PubMed Central

    Eisele, Robert M

    2016-01-01

    Local ablation of liver tumors matured during the recent years and is now proven to be an effective tool in the treatment of malignant liver lesions. Advances focus on the improvement of local tumor control by technical innovations, individual selection of imaging modalities, more accurate needle placement and the free choice of access to the liver. Considering data found in the current literature for conventional local ablative treatment strategies, virtually no single technology is able to demonstrate an unequivocal superiority. Hints at better performance of microwave compared to radiofrequency ablation regarding local tumor control, duration of the procedure and potentially achievable larger size of ablation areas favour the comparably more recent treatment modality; image fusion enables more patients to undergo ultrasound guided local ablation; magnetic resonance guidance may improve primary success rates in selected patients; navigation and robotics accelerate the needle placement and reduces deviation of needle positions; laparoscopic thermoablation results in larger ablation areas and therefore hypothetically better local tumor control under acceptable complication rates, but seems to be limited to patients with no, mild or moderate adhesions following earlier surgical procedures. Apart from that, most techniques appear technically feasible, albeit demanding. Which technology will in the long run become accepted, is subject to future work. PMID:27099433

  18. Advances in local ablation of malignant liver lesions.

    PubMed

    Eisele, Robert M

    2016-04-21

    Local ablation of liver tumors matured during the recent years and is now proven to be an effective tool in the treatment of malignant liver lesions. Advances focus on the improvement of local tumor control by technical innovations, individual selection of imaging modalities, more accurate needle placement and the free choice of access to the liver. Considering data found in the current literature for conventional local ablative treatment strategies, virtually no single technology is able to demonstrate an unequivocal superiority. Hints at better performance of microwave compared to radiofrequency ablation regarding local tumor control, duration of the procedure and potentially achievable larger size of ablation areas favour the comparably more recent treatment modality; image fusion enables more patients to undergo ultrasound guided local ablation; magnetic resonance guidance may improve primary success rates in selected patients; navigation and robotics accelerate the needle placement and reduces deviation of needle positions; laparoscopic thermoablation results in larger ablation areas and therefore hypothetically better local tumor control under acceptable complication rates, but seems to be limited to patients with no, mild or moderate adhesions following earlier surgical procedures. Apart from that, most techniques appear technically feasible, albeit demanding. Which technology will in the long run become accepted, is subject to future work. PMID:27099433

  19. LASER ABLATION STUDIES OF CONCRETE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laser ablation was studied as a means of removing radioactive contaminants from the surface and near-surface regions of concrete. We present the results of ablation tests on cement and concrete samples using a 1.6 kW pulsed Nd:YAG laser with fiber optic beam delivery. The laser-s...

  20. Numerical models to evaluate the temperature increase induced by ex vivo microwave thermal ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavagnaro, M.; Pinto, R.; Lopresto, V.

    2015-04-01

    Microwave thermal ablation (MTA) therapies exploit the local absorption of an electromagnetic field at microwave (MW) frequencies to destroy unhealthy tissue, by way of a very high temperature increase (about 60 °C or higher). To develop reliable interventional protocols, numerical tools able to correctly foresee the temperature increase obtained in the tissue would be very useful. In this work, different numerical models of the dielectric and thermal property changes with temperature were investigated, looking at the simulated temperature increments and at the size of the achievable zone of ablation. To assess the numerical data, measurement of the temperature increases close to a MTA antenna were performed in correspondence with the antenna feed-point and the antenna cooling system, for increasing values of the radiated power. Results show that models not including the changes of the dielectric and thermal properties can be used only for very low values of the power radiated by the antenna, whereas a good agreement with the experimental values can be obtained up to 20 W if water vaporization is included in the numerical model. Finally, for higher power values, a simulation that dynamically includes the tissue’s dielectric and thermal property changes with the temperature should be performed.

  1. Numerical models to evaluate the temperature increase induced by ex vivo microwave thermal ablation.

    PubMed

    Cavagnaro, M; Pinto, R; Lopresto, V

    2015-04-21

    Microwave thermal ablation (MTA) therapies exploit the local absorption of an electromagnetic field at microwave (MW) frequencies to destroy unhealthy tissue, by way of a very high temperature increase (about 60 °C or higher). To develop reliable interventional protocols, numerical tools able to correctly foresee the temperature increase obtained in the tissue would be very useful. In this work, different numerical models of the dielectric and thermal property changes with temperature were investigated, looking at the simulated temperature increments and at the size of the achievable zone of ablation. To assess the numerical data, measurement of the temperature increases close to a MTA antenna were performed in correspondence with the antenna feed-point and the antenna cooling system, for increasing values of the radiated power. Results show that models not including the changes of the dielectric and thermal properties can be used only for very low values of the power radiated by the antenna, whereas a good agreement with the experimental values can be obtained up to 20 W if water vaporization is included in the numerical model. Finally, for higher power values, a simulation that dynamically includes the tissue's dielectric and thermal property changes with the temperature should be performed. PMID:25826652

  2. Radiofrequency Ablation of Large Renal Angiomyolipoma: Median-Term Follow-Up

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, S. M. Anderson, C. J.; Patel, U.

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. To study the feasibility of percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of large angiomyolipomas (AMLs) using saline-cooled electrodes. Materials and Methods. Institutional Review Board approval for the study was received. Four patients (all female, age range 33-67 years) with large AMLs (maximal axis 6.1-32.4 cm) not suitable for embolotherapy or surgery consented to a trial of RFA. Procedures were performed under computerized tomographic guidance using 14G saline-infused electrodes. Two ablations (diameter 4-7 cm) were undertaken in each patient. Variables studied were technical success, treatment safety, alteration of tumor consistency, tumor size, effect on renal function, and medium-term freedom from haemorrhage. Results. All four patients underwent successful RFA without any intraprocedural complications. There has been no haemorrhage, or new renal specific symptom, during a minimum 48-month period, and normal renal function has been normal. On follow-up radiological imaging, the tumors have become fattier with involution of the soft-tissue elements (soft tissue-to-total tumor ratio decreased mean [range] of 0.26 [0.14-0.48] to 0.17 [0.04-0.34] U; p = 0.04 [paired Student t test]). Further evidence of treatment effect was the development of a capsule around the ablation zone, but there was no change in overall tumor volume (mean [range] 1,120 [118-2,845] to 1150 [90-3,013] ml; p = 1 [paired Student t test]). Conclusion. RFA of large AMLs is technically feasible using saline-infused electrodes. The soft-tissue elements decreased in volume; the tumors become fattier; and there has been no renal haemorrhage during a 48-month period.

  3. CT imaging during microwave ablation: Analysis of spatial and temporal tissue contraction

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Dong; Brace, Christopher L.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To analyze the spatial distribution and temporal development of liver tissue contraction during high-temperature ablation by using intraprocedural computed tomography (CT) imaging. Methods: A total of 46 aluminum fiducial markers were positioned in a 60 × 45 mm grid, in a single plane, around a microwave ablation antenna in each of six ex vivo bovine liver samples. Ablations were performed for 10 min at 100 W. CT data of the liver sample were acquired every 30 s during ablation. Fiducial motion between acquisitions was tracked in postprocessing and used to calculate measures of tissue contraction and contraction rates. The spatial distribution and temporal evolution of contraction were analyzed. Results: Fiducial displacement indicated that the zone measured postablation was 8.2 ± 1.8 mm (∼20%) smaller in the radial direction and 7.1 ± 1.0 mm (∼10%) shorter in the longitudinal direction than the preablation tissue dimension. Therefore, the total ablation volume was reduced from its preablation value by approximately 45%. Very little longitudinal contraction was noted in the distal portion of the ablation zone. Central tissues contracted more than 60%, which was near an estimated limit of ∼70% based on initial water content. More peripheral tissues contracted only 15% in any direction. Contraction rates peaked during the first 60 s of heating with a roughly exponential decay over time. Conclusions: Ablation zones measured posttreatment are significantly smaller than the pretreatment tissue dimensions. Tissue contraction is spatially dependent, with the greatest effect occurring in the central ablation zone. Contraction rate peaks early and decays over time.

  4. Growth rate and the cutoff wavelength of the Darrieus-Landau instability in laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Modestov, Mikhail; Bychkov, Vitaly; Valiev, Damir; Marklund, Mattias

    2009-10-15

    The main characteristics of the linear Darrieus-Landau instability in the laser ablation flow are investigated. The dispersion relation of the instability is found numerically as a solution to an eigenvalue stability problem, taking into account the continuous structure of the flow. The results are compared to the classical Darrieus-Landau instability of a usual slow flame. The difference between the two cases is due to the specific features of laser ablation: sonic velocities of hot plasma and strong temperature dependence of thermal conduction. It is demonstrated that the Darrieus-Landau instability in laser ablation is much stronger than in the classical case. In particular, the maximum growth rate in the case of laser ablation is about three times larger than that for slow flames. The characteristic length scale of the Darrieus-Landau instability in the ablation flow is comparable to the total distance from the ablation zone to the critical zone of laser light absorption. The possibility of experimental observations of the Darrieus-Landau instability in laser ablation is discussed.

  5. Study of polymer ablation products obtained by ultraviolet laser ablation — inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todolí, J.-L.; Mermet, J.-M.

    1998-10-01

    A study of the nature of aerosols following polymer laser ablation was performed. A glass sample was used for comparison. Aerosol fractions were analyzed by using simple methods based on transport efficiency and filters. Three different tube lengths, i.e. 4, 29 and 54 m, were inserted between the ablation cell and the inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) injector. For the glass sample, 10 elements were studied. Only Na and K exhibited different results as the particle size, i.e. tube length, was varied. The polymers used were poly(vinyl chloride), PVC, and poly(ethylene), PE. Three elements (Ca, Ti and Sn) under different chemical forms were measured. Unlike Ti and Sn the ablated aerosol particle size (mass) seemed to depend on the Ca chemical form. Another PVC sample containing 11 elements was also studied. Na, Al and C exhibited a different behavior with particle size with respect to the remaining elements. Then, the carbon signal was studied after a 0.3 μm pore size filter had been placed between the ablation cell and the ICP torch. The results indicated that carbon was mainly present under gaseous form and particles smaller than 0.3 μm size. The analysis of the aerosol gaseous phase by thermal desorption GC-MS confirmed the presence of polymer volatile thermal degradation products. These results explained why carbon could not be applied as an efficient internal standard.

  6. Radiofrequency Ablated Lesion in the Normal Porcine Lung: Long-Term Follow-Up with MRI and Pathology

    SciTech Connect

    Oyama, Yoshimasa E-mail: yoshimasa03155@ych.or.jp; Nakamura, Kenji; Matsuoka, Toshiyuki; Toyoshima, Masami; Yamamoto, Akira; Okuma, Tomohisa; Ikura, Yoshihiro; Ueda, Makiko; Inoue, Yuichi

    2005-04-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the effectiveness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in reflecting histopathologic changes after radiofrequency ablation (RFA) to the lung and to assess accurately the extent of tissue necrosis for evaluating untreated lesions. Methods. Percutaneous RFA was performed on 72 lung regions in 12 pigs under computed tomographic guidance. After performing MRI, the animals were divided into three experimental phases: in the acute phase, 4 pigs were killed immediately after the procedure; in the subacute phase, 4 pigs were killed at 1 week; and in the chronic phases, 2 pigs were killed at 4 and 8 weeks after the procedure, respectively. MRI-histopathologic correlation was performed. Results. In the acute phase, the inner zone showed hypointensity on T2-weighted images and isointensity on T1-weighted images, with a lack of enhancement on contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images, representing early changes in coagulative necrosis on histopathologic examination. The outer zone showed hyperintensity on T2-weighted images and isointensity on T1-weighted images, with ring-like enhancement on contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images. The histopathologic section showed alveolar fluid collections and congestion. In the subacute phase the MR zone pattern was essentially similar to that of the acute phase, but the ablated lesion showed extensive coagulative necrosis with a fibrovascular rim on histopathologic examination. In the chronic phase, there was no change in the zone pattern on MRI. The lesions showed gradual resorption of coagulative necrosis. The area of coagulative necrosis correlated closely with the histopathologic size (p < 0.05). Conclusions. MRI effectively visualized the histopathologic changes after RFA and accurately determined the extent of the necrotic lesion. MRI is potentially a useful modality for evaluating therapeutic efficacy after RFA to the lung.

  7. A study of the effect of selected material properties on the ablation performance of artificial graphite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maahs, H. G.

    1972-01-01

    Eighteen material properties were measured on 45 different, commercially available, artificial graphites. Ablation performance of these same graphites were also measured in a Mach 2 airstream at a stagnation pressure of 5.6 atm. Correlations were developed, where possible, between pairs of the material properties. Multiple regression equations were then formulated relating ablation performance to the various material properties, thus identifying those material properties having the strongest effect on ablation performance. These regression equations reveal that ablation performance in the present test environment depends primarily on maximum grain size, density, ash content, thermal conductivity, and mean pore radius. For optimization of ablation performance, grain size should be small, ash content low, density and thermal conductivity high, and mean pore radius large.

  8. Thermal response and ablation characteristics of light weight ceramic ablators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tran, Huy K.; Rasky, Daniel J.; Esfahani, Lili

    1993-01-01

    An account is given of the thermal performance and ablation characteristics of the NASA-Ames Lightweight Ceramic Ablators (LCAs) in supersonic, high-enthalpy convective environments, which use low density ceramic or carbon fiber matrices as substrates for main structural support, with organic resin fillers. LCA densities are in the 0.224-1.282 g/cu cm range. In-depth temperature data have been obtained to determine thermal penetration depths and conductivity. The addition of SiC and PPMA is noted to significantly improve the ablation performance of LCAs with silica substrates. Carbon-based LCAs are the most mass-efficient at high flux levels.

  9. Ablation experiment and threshold calculation of titanium alloy irradiated by ultra-fast pulse laser

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Buxiang; Jiang, Gedong; Wang, Wenjun Wang, Kedian; Mei, Xuesong

    2014-03-15

    The interaction between an ultra-fast pulse laser and a material's surface has become a research hotspot in recent years. Micromachining of titanium alloy with an ultra-fast pulse laser is a very important research direction, and it has very important theoretical significance and application value in investigating the ablation threshold of titanium alloy irradiated by ultra-fast pulse lasers. Irradiated by a picosecond pulse laser with wavelengths of 1064 nm and 532 nm, the surface morphology and feature sizes, including ablation crater width (i.e. diameter), ablation depth, ablation area, ablation volume, single pulse ablation rate, and so forth, of the titanium alloy were studied, and their ablation distributions were obtained. The experimental results show that titanium alloy irradiated by a picosecond pulse infrared laser with a 1064 nm wavelength has better ablation morphology than that of the green picosecond pulse laser with a 532 nm wavelength. The feature sizes are approximately linearly dependent on the laser pulse energy density at low energy density and the monotonic increase in laser pulse energy density. With the increase in energy density, the ablation feature sizes are increased. The rate of increase in the feature sizes slows down gradually once the energy density reaches a certain value, and gradually saturated trends occur at a relatively high energy density. Based on the linear relation between the laser pulse energy density and the crater area of the titanium alloy surface, and the Gaussian distribution of the laser intensity on the cross section, the ablation threshold of titanium alloy irradiated by an ultra-fast pulse laser was calculated to be about 0.109 J/cm{sup 2}.

  10. Ultrasonic characterization of laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J. A.; Telschow, K. L.

    When a pulsed laser beam strikes the surface of an absorbing material, ultrasonic waves are generated due to thermoelectric expansion and, at higher laser power densities, ablation of the material. These sound generation mechanisms have been the subject of numerous theoretical and experimental studies and are now fairly well understood. In particular, it has been established that at low power densities the thermoelastic mechanism is well described by a surface center of expansion. This mechanism produces a characteristic waveform whose amplitude is proportional to the energy absorbed from the laser pulse and also dependent on the thermal and elastic properties of the material. The ablation ultrasonic source can be described by a point normal force acting on the material surface. For laser power densities near the ablation onset, the time dependence of the source is that of the laser pulse. The resultant waveform recorded on epicenter (source and detector collinear) has a sharp peak determined by the momentum impulse delivered to the material by the ablation process. Particularly in the near ablation onset region, this ultrasonic displacement peak can be used to characterize the ablation process occurring at the material surface. The onset power density for ablation and subsequent ablation dependence on power density are material dependent and thought to be a function of the heat capacity and thermal conductivity of the material. With this in mind, it is possible that these ablation signals could be used to characterize material microstructures, and perhaps material mechanical properties such as hardness, through microstructural changes of the material thermal parameters. This paper explores this question for samples of Type 304 stainless steel with microstructures controlled through work hardening and annealing.

  11. A study of structure formation on PET, PBT, and PS surfaces by excimer laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jongdae

    Usually polymer surface treatment is performed to modify surface layers by inserting some functional group and/or by inducing roughness on surfaces to improve their wettability, printability, and adhesion to other polymers or metals. In this work, different polymer surfaces were treated using an excimer laser (LPX 240i, Lambda Physik). Polystyrene, polyethylene terephtalate, and polybutylene terephtalate were chosen as model materials for this study. Films were made by cast film processing and stretched with biaxial stretching machine. With excimer laser treatment on polymer surfaces, it was found that we could produce 1--2 micron size structures depending on material properties and film processing conditions. Materials with lower UV absorption coefficient produced double digit micron size structures, while those with higher UV absorption coefficients produced single digit micron size structures. In all these cases the structures formed only on stretched films. In addition to those microstructure developments, the determination of ablation threshold fluence was of interest mainly for understanding fundamentals of ablation behavior and technical applications. In this study, ablation thresholds were measured by various methods including ablation depth, ablation weight, and ablation sound level measurements. Among these methods, we confirmed that the measurement by ablation sound level gives the most reliable results, because this method is based on single pulse ablation. To understand the ablation phenomenon, and how microstructures can be developed during ablation, different material processing and excimer laser conditions were chosen for experimentation. During our experiments, we observed incubation phenomenon during laser ablation and showed that this incubation was significant for materials with low UV absorption coefficients. Based on UV absorption value change after excimer laser irradiation, we proposed a mechanism to explain the ablation of PS films. From

  12. Ablative heat shield design for space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiferth, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    Ablator heat shield configuration optimization studies were conducted for the orbiter. Ablator and reusable surface insulation (RSI) trajectories for design studies were shaped to take advantage of the low conductance of ceramic RSI and high temperature capability of ablators. Comparative weights were established for the RSI system and for direct bond and mechanically attached ablator systems. Ablator system costs were determined for fabrication, installation and refurbishment. Cost penalties were assigned for payload weight penalties, if any. The direct bond ablator is lowest in weight and cost. A mechanically attached ablator using a magnesium subpanel is highly competitive for both weight and cost.

  13. Advances in Atrial Fibrillation Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Darge, Alicia; Reynolds, Matthew R.; Germano, Joseph J.

    2009-01-01

    Atrial Fibrillation (AF) is an increasingly common and costly medical problem.1–3 Given the disappointing efficacy and side effects associated with pharmacological therapy for AF, new treatment options are needed. Over the last decade, advances in our understanding of the mechanisms of AF, coupled with iterative improvements in catheter ablation techniques, have spurred the evolution of catheter ablation for AF from an experimental procedure to an increasingly important treatment option.4 This paper will review recent advances in the approaches and outcomes of AF ablation. PMID:19411729

  14. Epicardial Ablation For Ventricular Tachycardia

    PubMed Central

    Maccabelli, Giuseppe; Mizuno, Hiroya; Della Bella, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Epicardial ablation has lately become a necessary tool to approach some ventricular tachycardias in different types of cardiomyopathy. Its diffusion is now limited to a few high volume centers not because of the difficulty of the pericardial puncture but since it requires high competence not only in the VT ablation field but also in knowing and recognizing the possible complications each of which require a careful treatment. This article will review the state of the art of epicardial ablation with special attention to the procedural aspects and to the possible selection criteria of the patients PMID:23233758

  15. [Percutaneous ablation of renal tumors: radiofrequency ablation or cryoablation?].

    PubMed

    Buy, X; Lang, H; Garnon, J; Gangi, A

    2011-09-01

    Percutaneous ablation of renal tumors, including radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation, are increasingly being used for small tumors as an alternative to surgery for poor surgical candidates. Compared to radiofrequency ablation, cryoablation has several advantages: improved volume control and preservation of adjacent structures due to the excellent depiction of the ice ball on CT and MRI; better protection of the collecting system for central tumor with reduced risk of postprocedural urinary fistula. The main pitfall of cryoablation is the higher cost. Therefore, cryoablation should be reserved for the treatment of complex tumors. In this article, we will review the different steps of percutaneous renal tumor ablation procedures including patient selection, technical considerations, and follow-up imaging. PMID:21944236

  16. An observation of ablation effect of soft biotissue by pulsed Er:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xianzeng; Xie, Shusen; Ye, Qing; Zhan, Zhenlin

    2007-02-01

    Because of the unique properties with regard to the absorption in organic tissue, pulsed Er:YAG laser has found most interest for various application in medicine, such as dermatology, dentistry, and cosmetic surgery. However, consensus regarding the optimal parameters for clinical use of this tool has not been reached. In this paper, the laser ablation characteristics of soft tissue by Er:YAG laser irradiation was studied. Porcine skin tissue in vitro was used in the experiment. Laser fluences ranged from 25mJ/mm2 to 200mJ/mm2, repetition rates was 5Hz, spot sizes on the tissue surface was 2mm. The ablation effects were assessed by the means of optical microscope, ablation diameters and depths were measured with reading microscope. It was shown that the ablation of soft biotissue by pulsed Er:YAG laser was a threshold process. With appropriate choice of irradiation parameters, high quality ablation with clean, sharp cuts following closely the spatial contour of the incident beam can be achieved. The curves of ablation crater diameter and depth versus laser fluence were obtained, then the ablation threshold and ablation yield were calculated subsequently, and the influence of the number of pulses fired into a crater on ablation crater depth was also discussed.

  17. Ablation of the locally advanced pancreatic cancer: An introduction and brief summary of techniques.

    PubMed

    Petrou, Athanasios; Moris, Demetrios; Paul Tabet, Patrick; David Wensley Richards, Brian; Kourounis, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is a lethal and late presenting malignancy with dismal survival rates. An estimated total of 330,000 people died from this malignancy in 2012. Although there have been improvements in diagnostic and treatment methods, the survival of late stage pancreatic cancer has not shown significant improvement in the past 4 decades. Multiple treatment approaches are available including chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and immunotherapy, but to this day surgical resection remains the only curative treatment option. Ablative techniques use various forms of energy to cause local tissue destruction through necrosis or apoptosis. They are relevant in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma as they are a treatment option in non-resectable tumors where their use ranges from symptom control to reducing tumor size for resection. In this narrative review we have grouped and outlined the various ablative methods, classifying them into thermal (Radiofrequency ablation, Microwave ablation, High Intensity Focused Ultrasound ablation, Cryoablation), and non-thermal ablative methods (Irreversible Electroporation (NanoKnife®), Photodynamic Therapy). This is followed by a description and review of the available evidence on survival and complications for each of these ablative methods. According to the literature, thermal ablative methods appear to be more accessible but are implicated with more complications than non thermal ablative methods which show the most promise. PMID:27569086

  18. Simulation and Visualization of Liver Cancer Ablation Focus in Optical Surgical Navigation.

    PubMed

    Cai, Ken; Yang, Rongqian; Chen, Huazhou; Ning, Hai; Ma, Amin; Zhou, Jing; Huang, Wenhua; Ou, Shanxing

    2016-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation therapy of liver cancer is a local mini-invasive treatment technology with several advantages, such as low trauma, safety, effectiveness, and quick postoperative recovery. The application of the optical surgical navigation system in radiofrequency ablation therapy can realize the real-time positioning of surgical instruments and focus. The positioning results can be displayed on the computer, thereby guiding doctors to accurately insert the radiofrequency electrode into the focus and improving surgical efficiency. Meanwhile, the accurate evaluation of the form and size of the ablation focus by the navigation system is the key to realizing the complete ablation of liver cancer. Therefore, based on the heat conduction equation, this paper simplifies the simulation process of the ablation focus, calculates the volume of the ablation focus by distinguishing boundary points and internal points, achieves the effective simulation of the ablation results in the surgery, and reconstructs the ablation focus by using ray casting algorithm and mobile cube algorithm for 3D visualization processing, thereby providing doctors the convenience of being able to simulate the radiofrequency ablation surgery before the actual surgery. PMID:26525057

  19. The Effect of Substrate Microstructure on the Heat-Affected Zone Size in Sn-Zn Alloys Due to Adjoining Ni-Al Reactive Multilayer Foil Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooper, R. J.; Adams, D. P.; Hirschfeld, D.; Manuel, M. V.

    2016-01-01

    The rapid release of energy from reactive multilayer foils can create extreme local temperature gradients near substrate materials. In order to fully exploit the potential of these materials, a better understanding of the interaction between the substrate or filler material and the foil is needed. Specifically, this work investigates how variations in local properties within the substrate (i.e. differences between properties in constituent phases) can affect heat transport into the substrate. This can affect the microstructural evolution observed within the substrate, which may affect the final joint properties. The effect of the initial substrate microstructure on microstructural evolution within the heat-affected zone is evaluated experimentally in two Sn-Zn alloys and numerical techniques are utilized to inform the analysis.

  20. Deviation from threshold model in ultrafast laser ablation of graphene at sub-micron scale

    SciTech Connect

    Gil-Villalba, A.; Xie, C.; Salut, R.; Furfaro, L.; Giust, R.; Jacquot, M.; Lacourt, P. A.; Dudley, J. M.; Courvoisier, F.

    2015-08-10

    We investigate a method to measure ultrafast laser ablation threshold with respect to spot size. We use structured complex beams to generate a pattern of craters in CVD graphene with a single laser pulse. A direct comparison between beam profile and SEM characterization allows us to determine the dependence of ablation probability on spot-size, for crater diameters ranging between 700 nm and 2.5 μm. We report a drastic decrease of ablation probability when the crater diameter is below 1 μm which we interpret in terms of free-carrier diffusion.

  1. Ion acceleration enhanced by target ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, S.; Lin, C. Wang, H. Y.; Lu, H. Y.; He, X. T.; Yan, X. Q.; Chen, J. E.; Cowan, T. E.

    2015-07-15

    Laser proton acceleration can be enhanced by using target ablation, due to the energetic electrons generated in the ablation preplasma. When the ablation pulse matches main pulse, the enhancement gets optimized because the electrons' energy density is highest. A scaling law between the ablation pulse and main pulse is confirmed by the simulation, showing that for given CPA pulse and target, proton energy improvement can be achieved several times by adjusting the target ablation.

  2. TPS Ablator Technologies for Interplanetary Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curry, Donald M.

    2004-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the status of Thermal Protection System (TPS) Ablator technologies and the preparation for use in interplanetary spacecraft. NASA does not have adequate TPS ablatives and sufficient selection for planned missions. It includes a comparison of shuttle and interplanetary TPS requirements, the status of mainline TPS charring ablator materials, a summary of JSC SBIR accomplishments in developing advanced charring ablators and the benefits of SBIR Ablator/fabrication technology.

  3. Development of moldable carbonaceous materials for ablative rocket nozzles.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockhart, R. J.; Bortz, S. A.; Schwartz, M. A.

    1972-01-01

    Description of a materials system developed for use as low-cost ablative nozzles for NASA's 260-in. solid rocket motor. Petroleum coke and carbon black fillers were employed; high density was achieved by controlling particle size distribution. An alumina catalyzed furfuryl ester resin which produced high carbon residues after pyrolysis was employed as the binder. Staple carbon fibers improved the strength and crack resistance of molded bodies. In static firing tests of two subscale nozzles, this material compared favorably in erosion rate with several other ablative systems.

  4. Evaluation of a Thermoprotective Gel for Hydrodissection During Percutaneous Microwave Ablation: In Vivo Results

    SciTech Connect

    Moreland, Anna J. Lubner, Meghan G. Ziemlewicz, Timothy J. Kitchin, Douglas R. Hinshaw, J. Louis Johnson, Alexander D. Lee, Fred T. Brace, Christopher L.

    2015-06-15

    PurposeTo evaluate whether thermoreversible poloxamer 407 15.4 % in water (P407) can protect non-target tissues adjacent to microwave (MW) ablation zones in a porcine model.Materials and MethodsMW ablation antennas were placed percutaneously into peripheral liver, spleen, or kidney (target tissues) under US and CT guidance in five swine such that the expected ablation zones would extend into adjacent diaphragm, body wall, or bowel (non-target tissues). For experimental ablations, P407 (a hydrogel that transitions from liquid at room temperature to semi-solid at body temperature) was injected into the potential space between target and non-target tissues, and the presence of a gel barrier was verified on CT. No barrier was used for controls. MW ablation was performed at 65 W for 5 min. Thermal damage to target and non-target tissues was evaluated at dissection.ResultsAntennas were placed 7 ± 3 mm from the organ surface for both control and gel-protected ablations (p = 0.95). The volume of gel deployed was 49 ± 27 mL, resulting in a barrier thickness of 0.8 ± 0.5 cm. Ablations extended into non-target tissues in 12/14 control ablations (mean surface area = 3.8 cm{sup 2}) but only 4/14 gel-protected ablations (mean surface area = 0.2 cm{sup 2}; p = 0.0005). The gel barrier remained stable at the injection site throughout power delivery.ConclusionWhen used as a hydrodissection material, P407 protected non-targeted tissues and was successfully maintained at the injection site for the duration of power application. Continued investigations to aid clinical translation appear warranted.

  5. Microwaves create larger ablations than radiofrequency when controlled for power in ex vivo tissue

    PubMed Central

    Andreano, A.; Huang, Yu; Meloni, M. Franca; Lee, Fred T.; Brace, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To compare ablation zones created with equal amounts of 2.45 GHz microwave and 480 kHz radiofrequency (RF) energy in ex vivo liver and lung. Methods: A total of 38 ablations were performed in ex vivo liver and lung for 10 min each. Nineteen RF ablations (nine liver, ten lung) were performed with a 480 kHz system (200 W max, impedance-based pulsing) and cooled electrode while measuring the average RF power applied. Nineteen microwave ablations (nine liver, ten lung) were then created using a cooled triaxial antenna to deliver 2.45 GHz at the same power level as in RF experiments. Ablation zones were then sectioned and measured for minimum, maximum and mean diameters, and circularity. Measurements were compared using t-tests, with P<0.05 indicating statistical significance. Results: Mean diameters of microwave ablations were greater than RF ablations in both liver and lung (4.4±0.3 vs 3.3±0.2 cm in liver; 2.45±0.3 vs 1.6±0.5 cm in lungs; P<0.0005 all comparisons). There was no significant difference in the mean power applied during microwave or RF ablations in either organ (54.44±1.71 W vs 56.4±6.7 W in liver, P>0.05; 40±0.95 W vs 44.9±7.1 W in lung, P>0.05). Conclusions: Using a single cooled applicator, microwave energy at 2.45 GHz produces larger ablations than an equivalent amount of 480 kHz RF energy in normal liver and lung. This was more apparent in lung, likely due to the high baseline impedance which limits RF, but not microwave power delivery. PMID:20632609

  6. Flexible Ablators Char Depths LHMEL Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Susan; Qu, Vince; Fan, Wendy; Stackpoole, Mairead; Thornton, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    Char and pyrolysis zone depths give physical evidence of peak temperature reached in depth: The pyrolyzing material acts as a temperature indicator within its characteristic thermal decomposition range. A matrix of novel flexible ablators were laser tested in one component of material screening for NASA Entry, Descent and Landing research for future Mars missions. LHMEL tests were run both on virgin materials, and on previously charred materials for a dual pulse simulation of the heating due to aerocapture followed by atmospheric entry. The test models were machined to expose the cross-sections. Char measurements were made at three locations near the center of the exposed area. Data are presented showing the char depths developed in these flexible materials, grouped by reinforcing fiber and pyrolyzing material type.

  7. Treatment planning for prostate focal laser ablation in the face of needle placement uncertainty

    SciTech Connect

    Cepek, Jeremy Fenster, Aaron; Lindner, Uri; Trachtenberg, John; Davidson, Sean R. H.; Haider, Masoom A.; Ghai, Sangeet

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: To study the effect of needle placement uncertainty on the expected probability of achieving complete focal target destruction in focal laser ablation (FLA) of prostate cancer. Methods: Using a simplified model of prostate cancer focal target, and focal laser ablation region shapes, Monte Carlo simulations of needle placement error were performed to estimate the probability of completely ablating a region of target tissue. Results: Graphs of the probability of complete focal target ablation are presented over clinically relevant ranges of focal target sizes and shapes, ablation region sizes, and levels of needle placement uncertainty. In addition, a table is provided for estimating the maximum target size that is treatable. The results predict that targets whose length is at least 5 mm smaller than the diameter of each ablation region can be confidently ablated using, at most, four laser fibers if the standard deviation in each component of needle placement error is less than 3 mm. However, targets larger than this (i.e., near to or exceeding the diameter of each ablation region) require more careful planning. This process is facilitated by using the table provided. Conclusions: The probability of completely ablating a focal target using FLA is sensitive to the level of needle placement uncertainty, especially as the target length approaches and becomes greater than the diameter of ablated tissue that each individual laser fiber can achieve. The results of this work can be used to help determine individual patient eligibility for prostate FLA, to guide the planning of prostate FLA, and to quantify the clinical benefit of using advanced systems for accurate needle delivery for this treatment modality.

  8. Laser ablation in analytical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Russo, Richard E; Mao, Xianglei; Gonzalez, Jhanis J; Zorba, Vassilia; Yoo, Jong

    2013-07-01

    In 2002, we wrote an Analytical Chemistry feature article describing the Physics of Laser Ablation in Microchemical Analysis. In line with the theme of the 2002 article, this manuscript discusses current issues in fundamental research, applications based on detecting photons at the ablation site (LIBS and LAMIS) and by collecting particles for excitation in a secondary source (ICP), and directions for the technology. PMID:23614661

  9. Ablation dynamics in laser sclerotomy ab externo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinkmann, Ralf; Droege, Gerit; Mohrenstecher, Dirk; Scheu, M.; Birngruber, Reginald

    1996-01-01

    Laser sclerostomy ab externo with flashlamp excited mid-IR laser systems emitting in the 2-3 micrometer spectral range is in phase II clinical trials. Although acutely high success rates were achieved, the restenosis rate after several months is about 40%. Laser pulses of several hundreds of microseconds, known to induce thermo-mechanical explosive evaporation were used for this procedure. We investigated the ablation dynamics in tissue and the cavitation bubble dynamics in water by means of an Er:YAG laser system to estimate the extent of mechanical damage zones in the sclera and in the anterior chamber, which may contribute to the clinical failure. We found substantial mechanical tissue deformation during the ablation process caused by the cavitation effects. Stress waves up to several bar generated by explosive evaporization were measured. The fast mechanical stretching and collapsing of the scleral tissue induced by cavitation resulted in tissue dissection as could be proved by flash photography and histology. The observed high restenosis might be a result of a subsequent enhanced wound healing process. Early fistula occlusions due to iris adherences, observed in about 20% of the clinical cases may be attributed to intraocular trauma induced by vapor bubble expansion through the anterior chamber after scleral perforation. An automatic feedback system minimizing adverse effects by steering and terminating the laser process during scleral fistulization is demonstrated. Moreover, a new approach in laser sclerostomy ab externo is presented using a cw-IR laser diode system emitting at the 1.94 micrometer mid-IR water absorption peak. This system was used in vitro and showed smaller damage zones compared to the pulsed laser radiation.

  10. Tumour ablation: current role in the kidney, lung and bone.

    PubMed

    Gillams, Alice

    2009-01-01

    The last few years have seen a rapid expansion in the use and availability of ablation techniques with hundreds of papers published. Radiofrequency remains the front-runner in terms of cost, ease of set-up, versatility and flexibility but other techniques are catching up. Ablation with cryotherapy and microwave, which were previously only available at open laparotomy due to the large size of the probes, are now readily performed percutaneously, with a predictable reduction in morbidity. Ablation is now accepted as the first line of treatment in patients with limited volume hepatocellular carcinoma who are not candidates for transplantation. There is continuing debate in most other areas but the evidence is increasing for an important role in liver metastases, renal carcinoma, inoperable lung tumours and some bone tumours. PMID:19965298

  11. Preparation of platinum nanoparticles in liquids by laser ablation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binh Nguyen, The; Dinh Nguyen, Thanh; Nguyen, Quang Dong; Trinh Nguyen, Thi

    2014-09-01

    Platinum (Pt) nanoparticles were prepared in solutions of ethanol and TSC (trisodium citrate—Na3C6H5O7.nH2O) in water by laser ablation method using Nd:YAG laser. The role of laser fluence, laser wavelength and concentration of surfactant liquids in laser ablation process were investigated. The morphology, size distribution and optical properties of the Pt nanoparticles (NPs) were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), UV-vis spectrometer and x-ray diffraction measurements. The average diameter of Pt NPs prepared in ethanol and TSC solutions ranges around 7-9 nm and 10-12 nm, respectively. The results showed advantages of the laser ablation method.

  12. Bone and Soft Tissue Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Ryan C.B.; Stavas, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    Bone and soft tissue tumor ablation has reached widespread acceptance in the locoregional treatment of various benign and malignant musculoskeletal (MSK) lesions. Many principles of ablation learned elsewhere in the body are easily adapted to the MSK system, particularly the various technical aspects of probe/antenna design, tumoricidal effects, selection of image guidance, and methods to reduce complications. Despite the common use of thermal and chemical ablation procedures in bone and soft tissues, there are few large clinical series that show longitudinal benefit and cost-effectiveness compared with conventional methods, namely, surgery, external beam radiation, and chemotherapy. Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation of osteoid osteomas has been evaluated the most and is considered a first-line treatment choice for many lesions. Palliation of painful metastatic bone disease with thermal ablation is considered safe and has been shown to reduce pain and analgesic use while improving quality of life for cancer patients. Procedure-related complications are rare and are typically easily managed. Similar to all interventional procedures, bone and soft tissue lesions require an integrated approach to disease management to determine the optimum type of and timing for ablation techniques within the context of the patient care plan. PMID:25053865

  13. Bone and soft tissue ablation.

    PubMed

    Foster, Ryan C B; Stavas, Joseph M

    2014-06-01

    Bone and soft tissue tumor ablation has reached widespread acceptance in the locoregional treatment of various benign and malignant musculoskeletal (MSK) lesions. Many principles of ablation learned elsewhere in the body are easily adapted to the MSK system, particularly the various technical aspects of probe/antenna design, tumoricidal effects, selection of image guidance, and methods to reduce complications. Despite the common use of thermal and chemical ablation procedures in bone and soft tissues, there are few large clinical series that show longitudinal benefit and cost-effectiveness compared with conventional methods, namely, surgery, external beam radiation, and chemotherapy. Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation of osteoid osteomas has been evaluated the most and is considered a first-line treatment choice for many lesions. Palliation of painful metastatic bone disease with thermal ablation is considered safe and has been shown to reduce pain and analgesic use while improving quality of life for cancer patients. Procedure-related complications are rare and are typically easily managed. Similar to all interventional procedures, bone and soft tissue lesions require an integrated approach to disease management to determine the optimum type of and timing for ablation techniques within the context of the patient care plan. PMID:25053865

  14. Producing Uniform Lesion Pattern in HIFU Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yufeng; Kargl, Steven G.; Hwang, Joo Ha

    2009-04-01

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is emerging as a modality for treatment of solid tumors. The temperature at the focus can reach over 65° C denaturing cellular proteins resulting in coagulative necrosis. Typically, HIFU parameters are the same for each treated spot in most HIFU control systems. Because of thermal diffusion from nearby spots, the size of lesions will gradually become larger as the HIFU therapy progresses, which may cause insufficient treatment of initial spots, and over-treatment of later ones. It is found that the produced lesion pattern also depends on the scanning pathway. From the viewpoint of the physician creating uniform lesions and minimizing energy exposure are preferred in tumor ablation. An algorithm has been developed to adaptively determine the treatment parameters for every spot in a theoretical model in order to maintain similar lesion size throughout the HIFU therapy. In addition, the exposure energy needed using the traditional raster scanning is compared with those of two other scanning pathways, spiral scanning from the center to the outside and from the outside to the center. The theoretical prediction and proposed algorithm were further evaluated using transparent gel phantoms as a target. Digital images of the lesions were obtained, quantified, and then compared with each other. Altogether, dynamically changing treatment parameters can improve the efficacy and safety of HIFU ablation.

  15. Surgical Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation Using Energy Sources

    PubMed Central

    Brick, Alexandre Visconti; Braile, Domingo Marcolino

    2015-01-01

    Surgical ablation, concomitant with other operations, is an option for treatment in patients with chronic atrial fibrillation. The aim of this study is to present a literature review on surgical ablation of atrial fibrillation in patients undergoing cardiac surgery, considering energy sources and return to sinus rhythm. A comprehensive survey was performed in the literature on surgical ablation of atrial fibrillation considering energy sources, sample size, study type, outcome (early and late), and return to sinus rhythm. Analyzing studies with immediate results (n=5), the percentage of return to sinus rhythm ranged from 73% to 96%, while those with long-term results (n=20) (from 12 months on) ranged from 62% to 97.7%. In both of them, there was subsequent clinical improvement of patients who underwent ablation, regardless of the energy source used. Surgical ablation of atrial fibrillation is essential for the treatment of this arrhythmia. With current technology, it may be minimally invasive, making it mandatory to perform a procedure in an attempt to revert to sinus rhythm in patients requiring heart surgery. PMID:26934404

  16. Focal Hydrothermal Ablation: Preliminary Investigation of a New Concept

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Sumit

    2013-08-01

    PurposeTo determine whether focal tissue ablation is possible with interstitial instillation of steam.MethodsFresh swine livers were used. Through a 20 gauge needle, steam was instilled every 5 s, 3 (n = 5), 6 (n = 5), 9 (n = 5), or 12 (n = 5 + 5) times in a liver lobe. The ablated zones were sectioned parallel (n = 20) or perpendicular (n = 5) to the needle track. The longitudinal long and short axis diameters, or transverse long and short axis diameters of areas with discoloration on macroscopic examination, were measured. The experiment was repeated in vivo on a pig. Steam instillation was performed once every 5 s for 5 min in the liver (n = 3) and in muscle (n = 4), and temperature changes at three neighboring sites were monitored. Long and short axis diameters of the discolored areas were measured.ResultsA well-defined area of discoloration was invariably present at the site of steam instillation. The median longitudinal long axis diameter were 2.0, 2.5, 2.5, and 3.5 cm for 3, 6, 9, and 12 steam instillations in vitro, while median short axis diameters were 1.0, 1.5, 1.5, and 1.5 cm, respectively. Six attempts at ablation in vivo could be successfully completed. The long axis diameters of the ablated zones in the liver were 7.0 and 8.0 cm, while in muscle it ranged from 5.5 to 7.0 cm.ConclusionInstillation of steam in the liver in vitro and in vivo, and in muscle in vivo rapidly leads to circumscribed zones of coagulation necrosis.

  17. 2D elemental mapping of sections of human kidney stones using laser ablation inductively-coupled plasma-mass spectrometry: Possibilities and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vašinová Galiová, Michaela; Čopjaková, Renata; Škoda, Radek; Štěpánková, Kateřina; Vaňková, Michaela; Kuta, Jan; Prokeš, Lubomír; Kynický, Jindřich; Kanický, Viktor

    2014-10-01

    A 213 nm Nd:YAG-based laser ablation (LA) system coupled to quadrupole-based inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer and an ArF* excimer-based LA-system coupled to a double-focusing sector field inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer were employed to study the spatial distribution of various elements in kidney stones (uroliths). Sections of the surfaces of uroliths were ablated according to line patterns to investigate the elemental profiles for the different urolith growth zones. This exploratory study was mainly focused on the distinguishing of the main constituents of urinary calculus fragments by means of LA-ICP-mass spectrometry. Changes in the ablation rate for oxalate and phosphate phases related to matrix density and hardness are discussed. Elemental association was investigated on the basis of 2D mapping. The possibility of using NIST SRM 1486 Bone Meal as an external standard for calibration was tested. It is shown that LA-ICP-MS is helpful for determination of the mineralogical composition and size of all phases within the analyzed surface area, for tracing down elemental associations and for documenting the elemental content of urinary stones. LA-ICP-MS results (elemental contents and maps) are compared to those obtained with electron microprobe analysis and solution analysis ICP-MS.

  18. Silver nano-entities through ultrafast double ablation in aqueous media for surface enhanced Raman scattering and photonics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna Podagatlapalli, G.; Hamad, Syed; Tewari, Surya P.; Sreedhar, S.; Prasad, Muvva D.; Venugopal Rao, S.

    2013-02-01

    We have fabricated stable silver nanoparticles (NPs) and nanostructures (NSs) effectively through double ablation of bulk silver substrate immersed in double distilled water using ˜2 ps laser pulses. The effects of multiple/double/single ablation on silver substrates via surface morphology studies along with average size distribution of Ag NPs were investigated. Prepared Ag NPs in solution exhibited yellow color with an absorption peak near 410 nm, assigned to localized surface Plasmon resonance of nano-sized silver. Depending on the ablation parameters average sizes observed were ˜13 nm/˜17 nm in multiple/double ablation case and ˜7 nm in single ablation case. High resolution transmission electron microscope studies highlighted that most of the Ag NPs were spherical and polycrystalline in nature. Surface morphology of the substrates was characterized by field emission scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscope. A different scenario was observed in the double ablation case compared to single/multiple ablation case. Double ablation resulted in dome like NSs on the substrate with dimensions of few hundreds of nanometers while single ablation did not. Nonlinear optical (NLO) properties of Ag NPs were investigated using Z-scan technique with ˜2 ps pulses and corresponding NLO coefficients were obtained. Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) studies on multiple/double ablated Ag substrates with adsorbed Rhodamine 6G molecules were carried out using excitation wavelengths of 532 nm, 785 nm, and three orders of enhancement in Raman signal intensity was observed. Furthermore, influence of laser fluence on the fabrication of SERS active Ag substrates with double ablation was also investigated. In this case, Raman spectra of adsorbed Research Department eXplosive (RDX) molecules on ablated surfaces were recorded for 532 nm and 785 nm excitation. Enhancements up to 460 were observed from substrates fabricated at fluences of 12 J/cm2, 16 J/cm2 with

  19. Contrast-enhanced sonographically guided thermal ablation for treatment of solid-organ hemorrhage: preliminary clinical results.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Luyao; Kuang, Ming; Xu, Zuofeng; Xie, Xiaoyan; Lu, Mingde

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this series was to preliminarily evaluate the use of contrast-enhanced sonographically guided percutaneous thermal ablation in the evaluation and treatment of solid-organ bleeding by retrospectively analyzing 6 cases observed in clinical practice. Six patients who underwent contrast-enhanced sonographically guided thermal ablation for treatment of solid-organ bleeding (5 in liver and 1 in spleen) from December 2005 to August 2012 were included in this series. Clinical information, contrast-enhanced sonograms before and after ablation, and the ablation method were retrospectively collected and analyzed. In 5 of the 6 patients, the location of the bleeding lesion was clearly seen. Hemostasis was successfully achieved in 4 of these 5 patients: 1 by radiofrequency ablation and 3 by microwave ablation. Ablation failed to achieve hemostasis in 1 patient who had postbiopsy splenic arterial bleeding because the bleeding vessel was a thick branch of the splenic artery. In the sixth remaining patient, who had bleeding after liver biopsy, hemostasis failed because contrast-enhanced sonography did not precisely locate the bleeding lesion; hence, the ablation zone did not cover the whole lesion. Contrast-enhanced sonographically guided ablation can be an alternative choice for treating solid-organ bleeding because of its effectiveness and minimal invasiveness. However, it should be carefully investigated for those in whom the bleeding lesion cannot be located by contrast-enhanced sonography and in those who have bleeding in a large vessel. PMID:25911724

  20. Hepatic tumor ablation with clustered microwave antennae: the US Phase II Trial

    PubMed Central

    Iannitti, David A.; Martin, Robert C.G.; Simon, Caroline J.; Hope, William W.; Newcomb, William L.; McMasters, Kelly M.; Dupuy, Damian

    2007-01-01

    Background: Thermal ablation techniques have become important treatment options for patients with unresectable hepatic malignancies. Microwave ablation (MWA) is a new thermal ablative technique that uses electromagnetic energy to produce coagulation necrosis. We report outcomes from the first clinical trial in the United States using MWA and a 915 MHz generator. Patients and methods: Patients with unresectable primary or metastatic liver cancer were enrolled in a multi-institutional trial from March 2004 through May 2006. Demographic information, diagnosis, treatment, and outcomes were documented. Results: Eighty-seven patients underwent 94 ablation procedures for 224 hepatic tumors. Forty-two ablations (45%) were performed open, 7 (7%) laparoscopically, and 45 (48%) percutaneously. The average tumor size was 3.6 cm (range 0.5–9.0 cm). Single antenna ablation volumes were 10.0 ml (range 7.8–14.0 ml), and clustered antennae ablation volumes were 50.5 ml (range 21.1–146.5 ml). Outcome variables were measured with a mean follow-up of 19 months. Local recurrence at the ablation site occurred in 6 (2.7%) tumors, and regional recurrence occurred in 37 (43%) patients. With a mean follow-up of 19 months, 41 (47%) patients were alive with no evidence of disease. There were no procedure-related deaths. The overall mortality rate was 2.3%. Conclusions: Microwave ablation is a safe and effective technology for hepatic tumor ablation. In our study, clustered antennae resulted in larger ablation volumes. Further studies with histological confirmation are needed to verify clinical results. PMID:18333126

  1. Radiofrequency Ablation to Prevent Sudden Cardiac Death

    PubMed Central

    Atoui, Moustapha; Gunda, Sampath; Lakkireddy, Dhanunjaya; Mahapatra, Srijoy

    2015-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation may prevent or treat atrial and ventricular arrhythmias. Since some of these arrhythmias are associated with sudden cardiac death, it has been hypothesized that ablation may prevent sudden death in certain cases. We performed a literature search to better understand under which circumstances ablation may prevent sudden death and found little randomized data demonstrating the long-term effects of ablation. Current literature shows that ablation clearly prevents symptoms of arrhythmia and may reduce the incidence of sudden cardiac death in select patients, although data does not indicate improved mortality. Ongoing clinical trials are needed to better define the role of ablation in preventing sudden cardiac death. PMID:26306130

  2. Percutaneous Tumor Ablation Tools: Microwave, Radiofrequency, or Cryoablation—What Should You Use and Why?

    PubMed Central

    Lubner, Meghan G.; Ziemlewicz, Timothy J.; Lee, Fred T.; Brace, Christopher L.

    2014-01-01

    Image-guided thermal ablation is an evolving and growing treatment option for patients with malignant disease of multiple organ systems. Treatment indications have been expanding to include benign tumors as well. Specifically, the most prevalent indications to date have been in the liver (primary and metastatic disease, as well as benign tumors such as hemangiomas and adenomas), kidney (primarily renal cell carcinoma, but also benign tumors such as angiomyolipomas and oncocytomas), lung (primary and metastatic disease), and soft tissue and/or bone (primarily metastatic disease and osteoid osteomas). Each organ system has different underlying tissue characteristics, which can have profound effects on the resulting thermal changes and ablation zone. Understanding these issues is important for optimizing clinical results. In addition, thermal ablation technology has evolved rapidly during the past several decades, with substantial technical and procedural improvements that can help improve clinical outcomes and safety profiles. Staying up to date on these developments is challenging but critical because the physical properties underlying the different ablation modalities and the appropriate use of adjuncts will have a tremendous effect on treatment results. Ultimately, combining an understanding of the physical properties of the ablation modalities with an understanding of the thermal kinetics in tissue and using the most appropriate ablation modality for each patient are key to optimizing clinical outcomes. Suggested algorithms are described that will help physicians choose among the various ablation modalities for individual patients. ©RSNA, 2014 PMID:25208284

  3. Current and future modalities of catheter ablation for the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Haines, D E

    1992-01-01

    Catheter ablation has proven to be a safe and effective treatment for a wide variety of cardiac arrhythmias. By destroying the critical zone of conductive tissue responsible for impulse generation or propagation, the arrhythmias may be cured. A variety of modalities of catheter ablation have been tested in the past decade. Initially, high energy direct current shocks delivered through a conventional electrode catheter were used. Now, use of radiofrequency energy as a power supply has resulted in higher efficacy and much improved safety of this technique. New approaches including low energy direct current shock ablation, microwave hyperthermic ablation, and laser photocoagulation are being tested, and may result in further refinement of nonsurgical curative therapy of arrhythmias. PMID:10147817

  4. Evaluation of explosive sublimation as the mechanism of nanosecond laser ablation of tungsten under vacuum conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oderji, Hassan Yousefi; Farid, Nazar; Sun, Liying; Fu, Cailong; Ding, Hongbin

    2016-08-01

    A non-equilibrium mechanism for nanosecond laser ablation is suggested herein, and its predictions are compared to the results of W experiments performed under vacuum conditions. A mechanism of particle formation is explained via this model, with partial sublimation of the superheated irradiated zone of the target considered to be the mechanism of laser ablation. In this study, a mixture of vapor and particles was explosively generated and subsequently prevented the rest of a laser pulse from reaching its intended target. This mechanism was found to play an essential role in the ablation of W under vacuum conditions, and it provides a theoretical justification for particle formation. Moreover, special considerations were taken into account for the expansion of plasma into a vacuum. The model was evaluated by measuring the mass of ablated particles using a quartz crystal deposition monitor and time-resolved optical emission spectroscopy. The results of this model were found to be in good agreement with experimental values.

  5. Rough Fresnel zone plates over metallic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Salgado-Remacha, Francisco Javier; Sanchez-Brea, Luis Miguel; Alvarez-Rios, Francisco Javier; Bernabeu, Eusebio

    2010-04-01

    We analyze the focusing properties of Fresnel zone plates fabricated over steel tapes using laser ablation. Our intention is to implement the use of micro-optical elements when the use of conventional chrome-glass elements is not indicated. Because of the manufacture process, the surface presents a certain anisotropic roughness, which reduces the focusing properties. First, we develop numerical simulations by means of the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld approach, showing how roughness in both levels of the Fresnel zone plate affects the focalization of the lens. We also manufacture Fresnel zone plates over steel tape, and perform experimental verification that corroborates the numerical results. PMID:20357856

  6. Long electrodes for radio frequency ablation: comparative study of surface versus intramural application.

    PubMed

    Berjano, Enrique J; Hornero, Fernando; Atienza, Felipe; Montero, Anastasio

    2003-12-01

    There is increasing use of radio frequency (RF) ablation with long electrodes in the intraoperative treatment of atrial fibrillation. Nevertheless, the disparity in the lesion geometry in both depth and width is the major pitfall in the use of RF currents. The objective of this study was to differentiate the shape and size of long lesions created by three surface application electrodes (SAE) and two intramural electrodes (IE). The SAE included a standard multi-polar catheter, and two standard electrosurgical pencils. The IE consisted of a needle and a wire both intramurally buried. The lesions were created on fresh fragments of porcine ventricular tissue. The IE created lesions with a curved prism-like shape around the electrode body, with homogeneous characteristics along the lesion trajectory. On the contrary, the lesions created with the SAE were in the shape of an hourglass. They showed a different geometry between the central zone and the edge zone (p<0.001 for depth and surface width). Electrical impedance evolution was recorded during the RF heating. We observed a slow decrease of the impedance in all the electrodes, except in the wire electrode. In conclusion, the results suggest that the IE might be a more suitable option than SAE when it is necessary to create long and homogeneous thermal lesions. PMID:14630474

  7. Study of ablation by laser irradiation of plane targets at wavelengths 1. 05, 0. 53, and 0. 35. mu. m

    SciTech Connect

    Key, M.H.; Toner, W.T.; Goldsack, T.J.; Kilkenny, J.D.; Veats, S.A.; Cunningham, P.F.; Lewis, C.L.S.

    1983-07-01

    Ablation by laser irradiation at wavelengths lambda = 1.05, 0.53, and 0.35 ..mu..m has been studied from analysis of time-resolved x-ray spectra of layered targets and of ion emission. Irradiance was varied in the range 2 x 10/sup 13/ to 2 x 10/sup 15/ W cm/sup -2/ with constant laser power and variable focal spot size. Deductions include the effect of lateral energy transport from small focal spots and ablation rates and ablation pressures obtained both in the limit of negligible transport and when lateral transport is significant. Advantages of short wavelengths for ablatively driven implosions are quantified.

  8. Water content contribution in calculus phantom ablation during Q-switched Tm:YAG laser lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian J.; Rajabhandharaks, Danop; Xuan, Jason Rongwei; Wang, Hui; Chia, Ray W. J.; Hasenberg, Tom; Kang, Hyun Wook

    2015-12-01

    Q-switched (QS) Tm:YAG laser ablation mechanisms on urinary calculi are still unclear to researchers. Here, dependence of water content in calculus phantom on calculus ablation performance was investigated. White gypsum cement was used as a calculus phantom model. The calculus phantoms were ablated by a total 3-J laser pulse exposure (20 mJ, 100 Hz, 1.5 s) and contact mode with N=15 sample size. Ablation volume was obtained on average 0.079, 0.122, and 0.391 mm3 in dry calculus in air, wet calculus in air, and wet calculus in-water groups, respectively. There were three proposed ablation mechanisms that could explain the effect of water content in calculus phantom on calculus ablation performance, including shock wave due to laser pulse injection and bubble collapse, spallation, and microexplosion. Increased absorption coefficient of wet calculus can cause stronger spallation process compared with that caused by dry calculus; as a result, higher calculus ablation was observed in both wet calculus in air and wet calculus in water. The test result also indicates that the shock waves generated by short laser pulse under the in-water condition have great impact on the ablation volume by Tm:YAG QS laser.

  9. Water content contribution in calculus phantom ablation during Q-switched Tm:YAG laser lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian J; Rajabhandharaks, Danop; Xuan, Jason Rongwei; Wang, Hui; Chia, Ray W J; Hasenberg, Tom; Kang, Hyun Wook

    2015-12-01

    Q-switched (QS) Tm:YAG laser ablation mechanisms on urinary calculi are still unclear to researchers. Here, dependence of water content in calculus phantom on calculus ablation performance was investigated. White gypsum cement was used as a calculus phantom model. The calculus phantoms were ablated by a total 3-J laser pulse exposure (20 mJ, 100 Hz, 1.5 s) and contact mode with N=15 sample size. Ablation volume was obtained on average 0.079, 0.122, and 0.391  mm3 in dry calculus in air, wet calculus in air, and wet calculus in-water groups, respectively. There were three proposed ablation mechanisms that could explain the effect of water content in calculus phantom on calculus ablation performance, including shock wave due to laser pulse injection and bubble collapse, spallation, and microexplosion. Increased absorption coefficient of wet calculus can cause stronger spallation process compared with that caused by dry calculus; as a result, higher calculus ablation was observed in both wet calculus in air and wet calculus in water. The test result also indicates that the shock waves generated by short laser pulse under the in-water condition have great impact on the ablation volume by Tm:YAG QS laser. PMID:26662067

  10. Irreversible Electroporation for Focal Ablation at the Porta Hepatis

    SciTech Connect

    Kasivisvanathan, Veeru; Thapar, Ankur Oskrochi, Youssof; Picard, John; Leen, Edward L. S.

    2012-12-15

    Patients with chemotherapy-refractory liver metastases who are not candidates for surgery may be treated with focal ablation techniques with established survival benefits. Irreversible electroporation is the newest of these and has the putative advantages of a nonthermal action, preventing damage to adjacent biliary structures and bowel. This report describes the use of irreversible electroporation in a 61-year-old man with a solitary chemoresistant liver metastasis unsuitable for radiofrequency ablation as a result of its proximity to the porta hepatis. At 3 months, tumor size was decreased on computed tomography from 28 Multiplication-Sign 19 to 20 Multiplication-Sign 17 mm, representing stable disease according to the response evaluation criteria in solid tumors. This corresponded to a decrease in tumor volume size from 5.25 to 3.16 cm{sup 3}. There were no early or late complications. Chemoresistant liver metastases in the proximity of the porta hepatis that are considered to be too high a risk for conventional surgery or thermal ablation may be considered for treatment by the novel ablation technique of irreversible electroporation.

  11. Current Hot Potatoes in Atrial Fibrillation Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Roten, Laurent; Derval, Nicolas; Pascale, Patrizio; Scherr, Daniel; Komatsu, Yuki; Shah, Ashok; Ramoul, Khaled; Denis, Arnaud; Sacher, Frédéric; Hocini, Mélèze; Haïssaguerre, Michel; Jaïs, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation has evolved to the treatment of choice for patients with drug-resistant and symptomatic AF. Pulmonary vein isolation at the ostial or antral level usually is sufficient for treatment of true paroxysmal AF. For persistent AF ablation, drivers and perpetuators outside of the pulmonary veins are responsible for AF maintenance and have to be targeted to achieve satisfying arrhythmia-free success rate. Both complex fractionated atrial electrogram (CFAE) ablation and linear ablation are added to pulmonary vein isolation for persistent AF ablation. Nevertheless, ablation failure and necessity of repeat ablations are still frequent, especially after persistent AF ablation. Pulmonary vein reconduction is the main reason for arrhythmia recurrence after paroxysmal and to a lesser extent after persistent AF ablation. Failure of persistent AF ablation mostly is a consequence of inadequate trigger ablation, substrate modification or incompletely ablated or reconducting linear lesions. In this review we will discuss these points responsible for AF recurrence after ablation and review current possibilities on how to overcome these limitations. PMID:22920482

  12. Thermal response and ablation characteristics of lightweight ceramic ablators

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, H.K.; Rasky, D.J.; Esfahani, L.

    1994-11-01

    This paper presents the thermal performance and ablation characteristics of the newly developed lightweight ceramic ablators (LCAs) in a supersonic, high-enthalpy convective environment. Lightweight ceramic ablators were recently conceived and developed at NASA Ames using low-density ceramic or carbon fibrous matrices as substrates for main structural support and organic resins as fillers. These LCAs were successfully produced with densities ranging from approximately 0.224 to 1.282 g/cu cm. Several infiltrants with different char yields were used to study the effect on surface recession. Tests were conducted in the NASA Ames arc-jet facilities. Material thermal performance was evaluated at cold-wall heat fluxes from 113.5 to 1634 W/sq cm, and stagnation pressures of 0.018 to 0.331 atm. Conventional ablators such as SLA-561, Avcoat 5026-39HC, MA-25S, and balsa wood were tested at the same heat fluxes for direct comparison. Surface temperature was measured using optical pyrometers, and the recession rates were obtained from the high-speed films. In-depth temperature data were obtained to determine the thermal penetration depths and conductivity. Preliminary results indicated that most LCAs performed comparably to or better than conventional ablators. At low flux levels (less than 454 W/sq cm), the addition of silicon carbide and polymethyl methacrylate significantly improved the ablation performance of silica substrates. The carbon-based LCAs were the most mass-efficient at high flux levels (greater than 454 W/sq cm). 16 refs.

  13. Femtosecond laser ablation of enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Quang-Tri; Bertrand, Caroline; Vilar, Rui

    2016-06-01

    The surface topographical, compositional, and structural modifications induced in human enamel by femtosecond laser ablation is studied. The laser treatments were performed using a Yb:KYW chirped-pulse-regenerative amplification laser system (560 fs and 1030 nm) and fluences up to 14 J/cm2. The ablation surfaces were studied by scanning electron microscopy, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, and micro-Raman spectroscopy. Regardless of the fluence, the ablation surfaces were covered by a layer of resolidified material, indicating that ablation is accompanied by melting of hydroxyapatite. This layer presented pores and exploded gas bubbles, created by the release of gaseous decomposition products of hydroxyapatite (CO2 and H2O) within the liquid phase. In the specimen treated with 1-kHz repetition frequency and 14 J/cm2, thickness of the resolidified material is in the range of 300 to 900 nm. The micro-Raman analysis revealed that the resolidified material contains amorphous calcium phosphate, while grazing incidence x-ray diffraction analysis allowed detecting traces of a calcium phosphate other than hydroxyapatite, probably β-tricalcium phosphate Ca3), at the surface of this specimen. The present results show that the ablation of enamel involves melting of enamel's hydroxyapatite, but the thickness of the altered layer is very small and thermal damage of the remaining material is negligible.

  14. Evaluation of the analytical capability of NIR femtosecond laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Takafumi; Kon, Yoshiaki

    2008-03-01

    A laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometric (LA-ICPMS) technique utilizing a titanium-sapphire (TiS) femtosecond laser (fs-laser) has been developed for elemental and isotopic analysis. The signal intensity profile, depth of the ablation pit and level of elemental fractionation were investigated in order to evaluate the analytical capability of the present fs-laser ablation-ICPMS technique. The signal intensity profile of (57)Fe, obtained from iron sulfide (FeS(2)), demonstrated that the resulting signal intensity of (57)Fe achieved by the fs-laser ablation was almost 4-times higher than that obtained by ArF excimer laser ablation under a similar energy fluence (5 J/cm(2)). In fs-laser ablation, there is no significant difference in a depth of the ablation pit between glass and zircon material, while in ArF laser ablation, the resulting crater depth on the zircon crystal was almost half the level than that obtained for glass material. Both the thermal-induced and particle size-related elemental fractionations, which have been thought to be main sources of analytical error in the LA-ICPMS analysis, were measured on a Harvard 91500 zircon crystal. The resulting fractionation indexes on the (206)Pb/(238)U (f(Pb/U)) and (238)U/(232)Th (f(U/Th)) ratios obtained by the present fs-laser ablation system were significantly smaller than those obtained by a conventional ArF excimer laser ablation system, demonstrative of smaller elemental fractionation. Using the present fs-laser ablation technique, the time profile of the signal intensity of (56)Fe and the isotopic ratios ((57)Fe/(54)Fe and (56)Fe/(54)Fe) have been measured on a natural pyrite (FeS(2)) sample. Repeatability in signal intensity of (56)Fe achieved by the fs-laser ablation system was significantly better than that obtained by ArF excimer laser ablation. Moreover, the resulting precision in (57)Fe/(54)Fe and (56)Fe/(54)Fe ratio measurements could be improved by the fs-laser ablation system

  15. Formation and characterization of nanoparticles via laser ablation in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golightly, Justin Samuel

    isopropyl alcohol. Ablation in n-hexane also showed diffraction patterns correlating with carbides, and water showed oxygen incorporation. These results showed the ability to utilize the solvent in tailoring nanoparticles to achieve desired properties. Zirconium and nickel were ablated with the Nd:YAG at 532 nm. These studies utilized a stainless steel chamber designed and built to improve control over the experimental variables. The nickel study showcased the new chamber's ability for reproducibility in a size dependence study based upon laser fluence. The results of ablation with the Nd:YAG were compared to femtosecond ablation experiments performed with a titanium:sapphire femtosecond laser system. The Ti:sapphire femtosecond laser operated at 10 Hz, produced femtosecond pulses centered at ˜795 nm. The pulse duration was varied from 100 fs to 390 fs, the nanoparticles created from each condition were characterized, and the results are presented in chapters 5 and 6. Aluminum nanoparticles were made using both nanosecond and femtosecond laser ablation techniques. Aluminum nanoparticles have a great deal of potential for use as fuel additives as well as in paints and coatings. The nanosecond ablation process rendered large nanoparticles (over 200 nm) and the results are briefly shown in Appendix A. The femtosecond system produced a much smaller distribution of nanoparticles, with nanoparticles remaining in suspension for over a month's time, as evidenced by their unique UV-Vis absorbance. These nanoparticles were produced in isopropyl alcohol, and were stabilized by the solvent, as TEM analysis showed nanoparticles with very little oxygen incorporation. The solvent is bound to the nanoparticles as a result of the formation process and as a result forms a protective coating, which prevents further oxidation over time. The remarkable stability of these aluminum nanoparticles is a testament of employing the high energy scheme of the laser ablation process in a manner to

  16. Microwave ablation at 915 MHz vs 2.45 GHz: A theoretical and experimental investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Curto, Sergio; Taj-Eldin, Mohammed; Fairchild, Dillon; Prakash, Punit

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: The relationship between microwave ablation system operating frequency and ablation performance is not currently well understood. The objective of this study was to comparatively assess the differences in microwave ablation at 915 MHz and 2.45 GHz. Methods: Analytical expressions for electromagnetic radiation from point sources were used to compare power deposition at the two frequencies of interest. A 3D electromagnetic-thermal bioheat transfer solver was implemented with the finite element method to characterize power deposition and thermal ablation with asymmetrical insulated dipole antennas (single-antenna and dual-antenna synchronous arrays). Simulation results were validated against experiments in ex vivo tissue. Results: Theoretical, computational, and experimental results indicated greater power deposition and larger diameter ablation zones when using a single insulated microwave antenna at 2.45 GHz; experimentally, 32 ± 4.1 mm and 36.3 ± 1.0 mm for 5 and 10 min, respectively, at 2.45 GHz, compared to 24 ± 1.7 mm and 29.5 ± 0.6 mm at 915 MHz, with 30 W forward power at the antenna input port. In experiments, faster heating was observed at locations 5 mm (0.91 vs 0.49 °C/s) and 10 mm (0.28 vs 0.15 °C/s) from the antenna operating at 2.45 GHz. Larger ablation zones were observed with dual-antenna arrays at 2.45 GHz; however, the differences were less pronounced than for single antennas. Conclusions: Single- and dual-antenna arrays systems operating at 2.45 GHz yield larger ablation zone due to greater power deposition in proximity to the antenna, as well as greater role of thermal conduction.

  17. An MRI guided system for prostate laser ablation with treatment planning and multi-planar temperature monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Sheng; Agarwal, Harsh; Bernardo, Marcelino; Seifabadi, Reza; Turkbey, Baris; Partanen, Ari; Negussie, Ayele; Glossop, Neil; Choyke, Peter; Pinto, Peter; Wood, Bradford J.

    2016-03-01

    Prostate cancer is often over treated with standard treatment options which impact the patients' quality of life. Laser ablation has emerged as a new approach to treat prostate cancer while sparing the healthy tissue around the tumor. Since laser ablation has a small treatment zone with high temperature, it is necessary to use accurate image guidance and treatment planning to enable full ablation of the tumor. Intraoperative temperature monitoring is also desirable to protect critical structures from being damaged in laser ablation. In response to these problems, we developed a navigation platform and integrated it with a clinical MRI scanner and a side firing laser ablation device. The system allows imaging, image guidance, treatment planning and temperature monitoring to be carried out on the same platform. Temperature sensing phantoms were developed to demonstrate the concept of iterative treatment planning and intraoperative temperature monitoring. Retrospective patient studies were also conducted to show the clinical feasibility of the system.

  18. A Review of Mitral Isthmus Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Kelvin CK; Betts, Timothy R

    2012-01-01

    Mitral isthmus ablation forms part of the electrophysiologist’s armoury in the catheter ablation treatment of atrial fibrillation. It is well recognised however, that mitral isthmus ablation is technically challenging and incomplete ablation may be pro-arrhythmic, leading some to question its role. This article first reviews the evidence for the use of adjunctive mitral isthmus ablation and its association with the development of macroreentrant perimitral flutter. It then describes the practical techniques of mitral isthmus ablation, with particular emphasis on the assessment of bi-directional mitral isthmus block. The anatomy of the mitral isthmus is also discussed in order to understand the possible obstacles to successful ablation. Finally, novel techniques which may facilitate mitral isthmus ablation are reviewed. PMID:22912536

  19. Femtosecond lasers for machining of transparent, brittle materials: ablative vs. non-ablative femtosecond laser processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendricks, F.; Matylitsky, V. V.

    2016-03-01

    This paper focuses on precision machining of transparent materials by means of ablative and non-ablative femtosecond laser processing. Ablation technology will be compared with a newly developed patent pending non-ablative femtosecond process, ClearShapeTM, using the Spectra-Physics Spirit industrial femtosecond laser.

  20. Infrared Laser Ablation Sample Transfer for MALDI and Electrospray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sung-Gun; Murray, Kermit King

    2011-08-01

    We have used an infrared laser to ablate materials under ambient conditions that were captured in solvent droplets. The droplets were either deposited on a MALDI target for off-line analysis by MALDI time-of-flight mass spectrometry or flow-injected into a nanoelectrospray source of an ion trap mass spectrometer. An infrared optical parametric oscillator (OPO) laser system at 2.94 μm wavelength and approximately 1 mJ pulse energy was focused onto samples for ablation at atmospheric pressure. The ablated material was captured in a solvent droplet 1-2 mm in diameter that was suspended from a silica capillary a few millimeters above the sample target. Once the sample was transferred to the droplet by ablation, the droplet was deposited on a MALDI target. A saturated matrix solution was added to the deposited sample, or in some cases, the suspended capture droplet contained the matrix. Peptide and protein standards were used to assess the effects of the number of IR laser ablation shots, sample to droplet distance, capture droplet size, droplet solvent, and laser pulse energy. Droplet collected samples were also injected into a nanoelectrospray source of an ion trap mass spectrometer with a 500 nL injection loop. It is estimated that pmol quantities of material were transferred to the droplet with an efficiency of approximately 1%. The direct analysis of biological fluids for off-line MALDI and electrospray was demonstrated with blood, milk, and egg. The implications of this IR ablation sample transfer approach for ambient imaging are discussed.

  1. Low cost fabrication of ablative heat shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cecka, A. M.; Schofield, W. C.

    1972-01-01

    A material and process study was performed using subscale panels in an attempt to reduce the cost of fabricating ablative heat shield panels. Although no improvements were made in the material formulation, a significant improvement was obtained in the processing methods compared to those employed in the previous work. The principal feature of the new method is the press filling and curing of the ablation material in a single step with the bonding and curing of the face sheet. This method was chosen to replace the hand troweling and autoclave curing procedure used previously. Double-curvature panels of the same size as the flat panels were fabricated to investigate fabrication problems. It was determined that the same materials and processes used for flat panels can be used to produce the curved panels. A design with severe curvatures consisting of radii of 24 x 48 inches was employed for evaluation. Ten low-density and ten high-density panels were fabricated. With the exception of difficulties related to short run non-optimum tooling, excellent panel filling and density uniformity were obtained.

  2. Microwave ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Poggi, Guido; Tosoratti, Nevio; Montagna, Benedetta; Picchi, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    Although surgical resection is still the optimal treatment option for early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients with well compensated cirrhosis, thermal ablation techniques provide a valid non-surgical treatment alternative, thanks to their minimal invasiveness, excellent tolerability and safety profile, proven efficacy in local disease control, virtually unlimited repeatability and cost-effectiveness. Different energy sources are currently employed in clinics as physical agents for percutaneous or intra-surgical thermal ablation of HCC nodules. Among them, radiofrequency (RF) currents are the most used, while microwave ablations (MWA) are becoming increasingly popular. Starting from the 90s’, RF ablation (RFA) rapidly became the standard of care in ablation, especially in the treatment of small HCC nodules; however, RFA exhibits substantial performance limitations in the treatment of large lesions and/or tumors located near major heat sinks. MWA, first introduced in the Far Eastern clinical practice in the 80s’, showing promising results but also severe limitations in the controllability of the emitted field and in the high amount of power employed for the ablation of large tumors, resulting in a poor coagulative performance and a relatively high complication rate, nowadays shows better results both in terms of treatment controllability and of overall coagulative performance, thanks to the improvement of technology. In this review we provide an extensive and detailed overview of the key physical and technical aspects of MWA and of the currently available systems, and we want to discuss the most relevant published data on MWA treatments of HCC nodules in regard to clinical results and to the type and rate of complications, both in absolute terms and in comparison with RFA. PMID:26557950

  3. Surgical Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Ramlawi, Basel; Abu Saleh, Walid K

    2015-01-01

    The Cox-maze procedure for the restoration of normal sinus rhythm, initially developed by Dr. James Cox, underwent several iterations over the years. The main concept consists of creating a series of transmural lesions in the right and left atria that disrupt re-entrant circuits responsible for propagating the abnormal atrial fibrillation rhythm. The left atrial appendage is excluded as a component of the Maze procedure. For the first three iterations of the Cox- maze procedure, these lesions were performed using a surgical cut-and-sew approach that ensured transmurality. The Cox-Maze IV is the most currently accepted iteration. It achieves the same lesion set of the Cox- maze III but uses alternative energy sources to create the transmural lesions, potentially in a minimally invasive approach on the beating heart. High-frequency ultrasound, microwave, and laser energy have all been used with varying success in the past. Today, bipolar radiofrequency heat or cryotherapy cooling are the most accepted sources for creating linear lesions with consistent safety and transmurality. The robust and reliable nature of these energy delivery methods has yielded a success rate reaching 90% freedom from atrial fibrillation at 12 months. Such approaches offer a significant long-term advantage over catheter-based ablation, especially in patients having longstanding, persistent atrial fibrillation with characteristics such as dilated left atrial dimensions, poor ejection fraction, and failed catheter ablation. Based on these improved results, there currently is significant interest in developing a hybrid ablation strategy that incorporates the superior transmural robust lesions of surgical ablation, the reliable stroke prevention potential of epicardial left atrial appendage exclusion, and sophisticated mapping and confirmatory catheter-based ablation technology. Such a minimally invasive hybrid strategy for ablation may lead to the development of multidisciplinary "Afib teams" to

  4. Thermal Ablation of Lung Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sonntag, P. David; Hinshaw, J. Louis; Lubner, Meghan G.; Brace, Christopher L.; Lee, Fred T.

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer death in the United States, accounting for an estimated 29% of cancer deaths in 2009.1 Pneumonectomy or lobectomy with hilar and mediastinal lymph node sampling is the gold standard treatment and offers the best option for cure of stage 1/2 nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC).2 Unfortunately, only 15% of patients present with stage 1/2 disease, and many of these patients do not meet the pulmonary physiologic guidelines for lobar resection.3 In addition to lung cancer, pulmonary metastases are present in 25% to 30% of patients dying from all types of cancer.4 For some patients with oligometastatic pulmonary disease, metastectomy is associated with an improvement in survival.5 External beam radiation traditionally has been offered as the alternative to surgical resection for NSCLC or pulmonary metastatic disease. Unfortunately, the 5-year survival following radiation for stage 1 and 2 NSCLC remains low at 15% to 20%, with local recurrence being the most common mode of failure.6,7 Thermal ablation offers an intriguing therapeutic option to increase local tumor control and survival in patients with early stage NSCLC or with limited metastatic disease from nonlung primaries who are not surgical candidates because of poor cardiopulmonary reserve, anatomic constraints limiting resection, failure of traditional therapies, or refusal of operative approaches. Thermal ablation has been shown to be effective in treating tumors in bone, kidney, and liver.8–11 Most preclinical and clinical trials have focused on demonstrating the feasibility of three modalities for pulmonary thermal ablation, namely radiofrequency (RF) ablation, microwave (MW) ablation, and cryoablation. This article discusses the unique challenges of performing thermal ablation in lung tissue and reviews the current literature regarding RF, MW, and cryoablation in the lung. PMID:21377589

  5. Microwave ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Poggi, Guido; Tosoratti, Nevio; Montagna, Benedetta; Picchi, Chiara

    2015-11-01

    Although surgical resection is still the optimal treatment option for early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients with well compensated cirrhosis, thermal ablation techniques provide a valid non-surgical treatment alternative, thanks to their minimal invasiveness, excellent tolerability and safety profile, proven efficacy in local disease control, virtually unlimited repeatability and cost-effectiveness. Different energy sources are currently employed in clinics as physical agents for percutaneous or intra-surgical thermal ablation of HCC nodules. Among them, radiofrequency (RF) currents are the most used, while microwave ablations (MWA) are becoming increasingly popular. Starting from the 90s', RF ablation (RFA) rapidly became the standard of care in ablation, especially in the treatment of small HCC nodules; however, RFA exhibits substantial performance limitations in the treatment of large lesions and/or tumors located near major heat sinks. MWA, first introduced in the Far Eastern clinical practice in the 80s', showing promising results but also severe limitations in the controllability of the emitted field and in the high amount of power employed for the ablation of large tumors, resulting in a poor coagulative performance and a relatively high complication rate, nowadays shows better results both in terms of treatment controllability and of overall coagulative performance, thanks to the improvement of technology. In this review we provide an extensive and detailed overview of the key physical and technical aspects of MWA and of the currently available systems, and we want to discuss the most relevant published data on MWA treatments of HCC nodules in regard to clinical results and to the type and rate of complications, both in absolute terms and in comparison with RFA. PMID:26557950

  6. Efficacy and Safety of Endoscopic Ultrasound-guided Ethanol Ablation Therapy for Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Kazuyuki; Kato, Hironari; Tsutsumi, Koichiro; Mizukawa, Sho; Yabe, Syuntaro; Seki, Hiroyuki; Akimoto, Yutaka; Uchida, Daisuke; Tomoda, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Naoki; Horiguchi, Shigeru; Okada, Hiroyuki

    2016-08-01

    Recently, endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS)-guided ethanol ablation for small pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (p-NETs) has been reported. However, the efficacy and safety of the technique remain unclear. We have launched a prospective pilot study of EUS-guided ethanol ablation for p-NETs. The major eligibility criteria are the presence of a pathologically diagnosed grade (G) 1 or G2 p-NET, a tumor size of 2cm, and being a poor candidate for surgery. A total of 5 patients will be treated. The primary endpoint will be the complete ablation rate at 1 month after treatment. PMID:27549680

  7. Ablation of GaAs by Intense, Ultrafast Electronic Excitation from Highly Charged Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Schenkel, T.; Hamza, A.V.; Barnes, A.V.; Schneider, D.H.; Banks, J.C.; Doyle, B.L.

    1998-09-01

    We have measured total ablation rates and secondary ion yields from undoped GaAs(100) interacting with slow (v=6.6{times}10{sup 5} m /s) , very highly charged ions. Ablation rates increase strongly as a function of projectile charge. Some 1400thinspthinsptarget atoms are removed when a single Th{sup 70+} ion deposits a potential energy of 152.6thinspthinspkeV within a few femtoseconds into a nanometer-sized target volume. We discuss models for ablation of semiconductors by intense, ultrafast electronic excitation. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  8. Retrograde mechanochemical ablation of the small saphenous vein for the treatment of a venous ulcer.

    PubMed

    Moore, Hayley M; Lane, Tristan R A; Franklin, Ian J; Davies, Alun H

    2014-10-01

    We present the first case of retrograde ablation of the small saphenous vein to treat active venous ulceration. A 73-year-old gentleman with complicated varicose veins of the left leg and a non-healing venous ulcer despite previous successful endovenous treatment to his left great saphenous vein underwent mechanochemical ablation of his small saphenous vein with the ClariVein® system, under local anaesthetic, using a retrograde cannulation technique. Post-operatively the patient had improved symptomatically and the ulcer size had reduced. This report highlights that patients with small saphenous vein incompetence and active ulceration can be treated successfully with retrograde mechanochemical ablation. PMID:24347131

  9. Femtosecond pulsed laser ablation of GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trelenberg, T. W.; Dinh, L. N.; Saw, C. K.; Stuart, B. C.; Balooch, M.

    2004-01-01

    The properties of femtosecond-pulsed laser deposited GaAs nanoclusters were investigated. Nanoclusters of GaAs were produced by laser ablating a single crystal GaAs target in vacuum or in a buffer gas using a Ti-sapphire laser with a 150 fs minimum pulse length. For in-vacuum deposition, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed that the average cluster size was approximately 7 nm for laser pulse lengths between 150 fs and 25 ps. The average cluster size dropped to approximately 1.5 nm at a pulse length of 500 ps. It was also observed that film thickness decreased with increasing laser pulse length. A reflective coating, which accumulated on the laser admission window during ablation, reduced the amount of laser energy reaching the target for subsequent laser shots and developed more rapidly at longer pulse lengths. This observation indicates that non-stoichiometric (metallic) ablatants were produced more readily at longer pulse lengths. The angular distribution of ejected material about the target normal was well fitted to a bi-cosine distribution of cos 47 θ+ cos 4 θ for ablation in vacuum using 150 fs pulses. XPS and AES revealed that the vacuum-deposited films contained excess amorphous Ga or As in addition to the stoichiometric GaAs nanocrystals seen with XRD. However, films containing only the GaAs nanocrystals were produced when ablation was carried out in the presence of a buffer gas with a pressure in excess of 6.67 Pa. At buffer gas pressure on the order of 1 Torr, it was found that the stoichiometry of the ablated target was also preserved. These experiments indicate that both laser pulse length and buffer gas pressure play important roles in the formation of multi-element nanocrystals by laser ablation. The effects of gas pressure on the target's morphology and the size of the GaAs nanocrystals formed will also be discussed.

  10. Dependence of gold nanoparticle production on pulse duration by laser ablation in liquid media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riabinina, Daria; Chaker, Mohamed; Margot, Joëlle

    2012-04-01

    The dependence on laser fluence and laser pulse duration of size, size distribution and concentration of gold nanoparticles synthesized by laser ablation in liquid media was investigated. It was demonstrated that increasing laser energy from 1 to 5 mJ/pulse enhances the ablation rate by a factor of 100. The behavior of the ablation rate, hence of the nanoparticle concentration, as a function of pulse duration (varied from 40 fs to 200 ps) was found to strongly differ from that in air, which can be explained by photoionization and important losses of laser energy in the femtosecond regime. The optimal pulse duration for maximum ablation rate in liquid media was found to be equal to 2 ps.

  11. Transhemangioma Ablation of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Pua, Uei

    2012-12-15

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a well-established treatment modality in the treatment of early hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) [1]. Safe trajectory of the RFA probe is crucial in decreasing collateral tissue damage and unwarranted probe transgression. As a percutaneous technique, however, the trajectory of the needle is sometimes constrained by the available imaging plane. The presence of a hemangioma beside an HCC is uncommon but poses the question of safety related to probe transgression. We hereby describe a case of transhemangioma ablation of a dome HCC.

  12. Laser ablation of human tooth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franklin, Sushmita R.; Chauhan, P.; Mitra, A.; Thareja, R. K.

    2005-05-01

    We report the measurements of ablation threshold of human tooth in air using photo-thermal deflection technique. A third harmonic (355nm) of Nd:YAG (yttrium aluminum garnet) laser was used for irradiation and a low power helium neon laser as a probe beam. The experimental observations of ablation threshold in conjunction with theoretical model based on heat conduction equations for simulating the interaction of a laser radiation with a calcified tissue are used to estimate the absorption coefficient of human tooth.

  13. Tektite ablation - Some confirming calculations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Keefe, J. A., III; Silver, A. D.; Cameron, W. S.; Adams , E. W.; Warmbrod, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    The calculation of tektite ablation has been redone, taking into account transient effects, internal radiation, melting and nonequilibrium vaporization of the glass, and the drag effect of the flanges. It is found that the results confirm the earlier calculations of Chapman and his group and of Adams and his co-workers. The general trend of the results is not sensitive to reasonable changes of the physical parameters. The ablation is predominantly by melting rather than by vaporization at all velocities up to 11 km/sec; this is surprising in view of the lack of detectable melt flow in most tektites. Chemical effects have not been considered.

  14. Ablative Therapies for Barrett's Esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Garman, Katherine S.; Shaheen, Nicholas J.

    2011-01-01

    Barrett's esophagus has gained increased clinical attention because of its association with esophageal adenocarcinoma, a cancer with increasing incidence and poor survival rates. The goals of ablating Barrett's esophagus are to decrease esophageal cancer rates and to improve overall survival and quality of life. Different techniques have been developed and tested for their effectiveness eradicating Barrett's epithelium. This review assesses the literature associated with different ablative techniques. The safety and efficacy of different techniques are discussed. This review concludes with recommendations for the clinician, including specific strategies for patient care decisions for patients with Barrett's esophagus with varying degrees of dysplasia. PMID:21373836

  15. Laser ablation based fuel ignition

    DOEpatents

    Early, J.W.; Lester, C.S.

    1998-06-23

    There is provided a method of fuel/oxidizer ignition comprising: (a) application of laser light to a material surface which is absorptive to the laser radiation; (b) heating of the material surface with the laser light to produce a high temperature ablation plume which emanates from the heated surface as an intensely hot cloud of vaporized surface material; and (c) contacting the fuel/oxidizer mixture with the hot ablation cloud at or near the surface of the material in order to heat the fuel to a temperature sufficient to initiate fuel ignition. 3 figs.

  16. Laser ablation based fuel ignition

    DOEpatents

    Early, James W.; Lester, Charles S.

    1998-01-01

    There is provided a method of fuel/oxidizer ignition comprising: (a) application of laser light to a material surface which is absorptive to the laser radiation; (b) heating of the material surface with the laser light to produce a high temperature ablation plume which emanates from the heated surface as an intensely hot cloud of vaporized surface material; and (c) contacting the fuel/oxidizer mixture with the hot ablation cloud at or near the surface of the material in order to heat the fuel to a temperature sufficient to initiate fuel ignition.

  17. Atrial Fibrillation Ablation and Stroke.

    PubMed

    Aagaard, Philip; Briceno, David; Csanadi, Zoltan; Mohanty, Sanghamitra; Gianni, Carola; Trivedi, Chintan; Nagy-Baló, Edina; Danik, Stephan; Barrett, Conor; Santoro, Francesco; Burkhardt, J David; Sanchez, Javier; Natale, Andrea; Di Biase, Luigi

    2016-05-01

    Catheter ablation has become a widely available and accepted treatment to restore sinus rhythm in atrial fibrillation patients who fail antiarrhythmic drug therapy. Although generally safe, the procedure carries a non-negligible risk of complications, including periprocedural cerebral insults. Uninterrupted anticoagulation, maintenance of an adequate ACT during the procedure, and measures to avoid and detect thrombus build-up on sheaths and atheters during the procedure, appears useful to reduce the risk of embolic events. This is a review of the incidence, mechanisms, impact, and methods to reduce catheter ablation related cerebral insults. PMID:27150179

  18. The role of cold volcanic debris in glacier ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, L. K.; Gilbert, J. S.; Lane, S. J.

    2011-12-01

    Debris deposits on ice can either enhance or hinder glacial ablation relative to a clean ice surface. The effect of debris on ice is dependent on whether its thickness is above or below a critical thickness. This is the thickness at which ablation of the underlying ice equates to that of bare ice. It is dependent on the properties of the debris material, as well as local conditions. The small amount of published data available indicate that volcanic deposits have lower critical thickness values than non-volcanic deposits at similar latitudes and altitudes, suggesting that they are more effective insulators. Volcanic ash fall events are significant for glacial ablation because (1) they mantle topography and distribute well-sorted material over a wide area, and (2) the locations of Earth's glaciers often coincide with regions of active volcanism; at least 280 active volcanoes have ice or snow cover. At ice-capped volcanoes, volcanic material will also be deposited on glaciers by erosion and aeolian remobilisation. Volcán Sollipulli is an active, ice-filled caldera volcano in southern Chile (38.97°S:71.52°W) which last erupted 700 years ago. Satellite imagery and comparisons of field photographs show that the intra-caldera ice body is receding. The Sollipulli glacier is a local water resource and an increase in melting rate could produce lahars. Sollipulli lies between Llaima and Villarrica, two of the most active volcanoes in Chile, and the potential for its glacier to receive ablation-changing ash fall from other volcanoes in the Southern Volcanic Zone of the Andes is high. Indeed, it has in June-July 2011 received ash fall from Puyehue-Cordón Caulle volcano to the south. It is, therefore, important to understand the ice ablation effects of volcanic debris deposited both at Sollipulli and on glaciers worldwide. In February-March 2011, field experiments were conducted on the surface of Sollipulli glacier, on both ice and snow, in order to determine critical

  19. Silver Nanoparticle Fabrication by Laser Ablation in Polyvinyl Alcohol Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halimah Mohamed., K.; Mahmoud Goodarz, Naseri; Amir, Reza Sadrolhosseini; Arash, Dehzangi; Ahmad, Kamalianfar; Elias, B. Saion; Reza, Zamiri; Hossein Abastabar, Ahangar; Burhanuddin, Y. Majlis

    2014-07-01

    A laser ablation technique is applied for synthesis of silver nanoparticles in different concentrations of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) aqueous solution. The ablation of high pure silver plate in the solution is carried out by a nanosecond Q-switched Nd:YAG pulsed laser. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy are implemented to explore the particles sizes. The effects of PVA concentrations on the absorbance of the silver nanoparticles are studied as well, by using a UV-vis spectrophotometer. The preparation process is carried out for deionized water as a reference sample. The comparison of the obtained results with the reference sample shows that the formation efficiency of nanoparticles in PVA is much higher and the sizes of particles are also smaller.

  20. First observation of micrometeoroid differential ablation in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janches, D.; Dyrud, L. P.; Broadley, S. L.; Plane, J. M. C.

    2009-03-01

    Every day, billions of microgram-sized-extraterrestrial particles enter and ablate in the upper layers of the Earth's atmosphere, depositing their mass in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT). This evaporated meteoric mass is the source of global layers of neutral metal atoms, sporadic E layers of metal ions, and meteoric smoke particles. Because their kinetic energy is insufficient to produce detectable optical emissions, these particles can only be observed using sensitive radars, which detect the plasma (i.e., electrons) either immediately surrounding the meteoroid (head-echo), or left behind along its path (trail-echo). Here we show that observed short-scale temporal features in the radar returned signal from the meteor head-echo are explained by differential ablation of the chemical constituents. These results represent the first observation of this mass-loss process, indicating that this is the main mechanism through which the meteoric mass of micron-sized particles is deposited in the MLT.

  1. Increased Duration of Heating Boosts Local Drug Deposition during Radiofrequency Ablation in Combination with Thermally Sensitive Liposomes (ThermoDox) in a Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Swenson, Christine E.; Haemmerich, Dieter; Maul, Donald H.; Knox, Bridget; Ehrhart, Nicole; Reed, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is used for the local treatment of liver cancer. RFA is effective for small (<3cm) tumors, but for tumors > 3 cm, there is a tendency to leave viable tumor cells in the margins or clefts of overlapping ablation zones. This increases the possibility of incomplete ablation or local recurrence. Lyso-Thermosensitive Liposomal Doxorubicin (LTLD), is a thermally sensitive liposomal doxorubicin formulation for intravenous administration, that rapidly releases its drug content when exposed to temperatures >40°C. When used with RFA, LTLD releases its doxorubicin in the vasculature around the zone of ablation-induced tumor cell necrosis, killing micrometastases in the ablation margin. This may reduce recurrence and be more effective than thermal ablation alone. Purpose The purpose of this study was to optimize the RFA procedure used in combination with LTLD to maximize the local deposition of doxorubicin in a swine liver model. Pigs were anaesthetized and the liver was surgically exposed. Each pig received a single, 50 mg/m2 dose of the clinical LTLD formulation (ThermoDox®). Subsequently, ablations were performed with either 1, 3 or 6 sequential, overlapping needle insertions in the left medial lobe with total ablation time of 15, 45 or 90 minutes respectively. Two different RFA generators and probes were evaluated. After the final ablation, the ablation zone (plus 3 cm margin) was dissected out and examined for doxorubicin concentration by LC/MS and fluorescence. Conclusion The mean Cmax of plasma total doxorubicin was 26.5 μg/ml at the end of the infusion. Overall, increased heat time from 15 to 45 to 90 minutes shows an increase in both the amount of doxorubicin deposited (up to ~100 μg/g) and the width of the ablation target margin to which doxorubicin is delivered as determined by tissue homogenization and LC/MS detection of doxorubicin and by fluorescent imaging of tissues. PMID:26431204

  2. Percutaneous Tumor Ablation with Radiofrequency

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Bradford J.; Ramkaransingh, Jeffrey R.; Fojo, Tito; Walther, McClellan M.; Libutti, Stephen K.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND Radiofrequency thermal ablation (RFA) is a new minimally invasive treatment for localized cancer. Minimally invasive surgical options require less resources, time, recovery, and cost, and often offer reduced morbidity and mortality, compared with more invasive methods. To be useful, image-guided, minimally invasive, local treatments will have to meet those expectations without sacrificing efficacy. METHODS Image-guided, local cancer treatment relies on the assumption that local disease control may improve survival. Recent developments in ablative techniques are being applied to patients with inoperable, small, or solitary liver tumors, recurrent metachronous hereditary renal cell carcinoma, and neoplasms in the bone, lung, breast, and adrenal gland. RESULTS Recent refinements in ablation technology enable large tumor volumes to be treated with image-guided needle placement, either percutaneously, laparoscopically, or with open surgery. Local disease control potentially could result in improved survival, or enhanced operability. CONCLUSIONS Consensus indications in oncology are ill-defined, despite widespread proliferation of the technology. A brief review is presented of the current status of image-guided tumor ablation therapy. More rigorous scientific review, long-term follow-up, and randomized prospective trials are needed to help define the role of RFA in oncology. PMID:11900230

  3. Modern Advances in Ablative TPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatapathy, Ethiraj

    2013-01-01

    Topics covered include: Physics of Hypersonic Flow and TPS Considerations. Destinations, Missions and Requirements. State of the Art Thermal Protection Systems Capabilities. Modern Advances in Ablative TPS. Entry Systems Concepts. Flexible TPS for Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerators. Conformal TPS for Rigid Aeroshell. 3-D Woven TPS for Extreme Entry Environment. Multi-functional Carbon Fabric for Mechanically Deployable.

  4. Photochemical Ablation of Organic Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrison, Barbara

    2004-03-01

    As discovered by Srinivasan in 1982, irradiation of materials by far UV laser light can lead to photochemical ablation, a process distinct from normal thermal ablation in which the laser primarily heats the material. A versatile mesoscopic model for molecular dynamics simulations of the laser ablation phenomena is presented. The model incorporates both the thermal and photochemical events, that is, both heating of the system and UV induced bond-cleavage followed by abstraction and radical-radical recombination reactions. The results from the simulations are compared to experimental data and the basic physics and chemistry for each irradiation regime are discussed. Initial results from polymer ablation simulations will be presented. L. V. Zhigilei, P. B. S. Kodali and B. J. Garrison, J. Phys. Chem. B, 102, 2845-2853 (1998); L. V. Zhigilei and B. J. Garrison, Journal of Applied Physics, 88, 1281-1298 (2000). Y. G. Yingling, L. V. Zhigilei and B. J. Garrison, J. Photochemistry and Photobiology A: Chemistry, 145, 173-181 (2001); Y. G. Yingling and B. J. Garrison, Chem. Phys. Lett., 364, 237-243 (2002).

  5. Electron Beam Ablation of Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovaleski, S. D.; Gilgenbach, R. M.; Rintamaki, J. I.; Ang, L. K.; Spindler, H. L.; Cohen, W. E.; Lau, Y. Y.; Lash, J. S.

    1996-10-01

    An experiment has recently been devised for material ablation using a channelspark electron beam. The ultimate goal of this experiment is to deposit thin films by electron beam ablation. The channelspark is a pseudospark device developed by Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (G. Muller, C. Schultheiss, Proc. of Beams, 2, 833(1994)) for production of high current, low energy electron beams. The channelspark has the following operating parameters: a 15-20kV accelerating potential and measured source current of <2000A. Initial experiments have concentrated on characterizing ion-focused electron beam current transport through the necessary background fill gas (typically 5-50 mTorr of Argon). Ablation of Al, Fe, and Ti is being studied with spectroscopy and electron beam current diagnostics. Physical beam target damage is also being investigated and compared to laser ablated targets. Simulations of electron transport and energy deposition are being conducted via the ITS-TIGER code (Sandia Report No. SAND 91-1634) developed at Sandia National Laboratory.

  6. Special regime of liquid-assisted laser ablation of ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinev, D. A.; Dobrina, D. A.; Strusevich, A. V.; Veiko, V. P.; Baranov, M. A.; Yakusheva, A. A.

    2016-05-01

    Results of experimental study the peculiarities of liquid-assisted laser ablation of alumina-silicate ceramics are reported giving attention particularly to effect of thin-wall glass macrosphere appearance at the end of irradiation onto a formed hole in bulk material. Typical times of formation, size and temperature dynamics, and chemical composition were determined; kinetics and mechanism of formation are discussed in presented paper.

  7. Lung Tumors Treated With Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation: Computed Tomography Imaging Follow-Up

    SciTech Connect

    Palussiere, Jean Marcet, Benjamin; Descat, Edouard; Deschamps, Frederic; Rao, Pramod; Ravaud, Alain; Brouste, Veronique; Baere, Thierry de

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: To describe the morphologic evolution of lung tumors treated with radiofrequency ablation (RFA) by way of computed tomography (CT) images and to investigate patterns of incomplete RFA at the site of ablation. Materials and Methods: One hundred eighty-nine patients with 350 lung tumors treated with RFA underwent CT imaging at 2, 4, 6, and 12 months. CT findings were interpreted separately by two reviewers with consensus. Five different radiologic patterns were predefined: fibrosis, cavitation, nodule, atelectasis, and disappearance. The appearance of the treated area was evaluated at each follow-up CT using the predefined patterns. Results: At 1 year after treatment, the most common evolutions were fibrosis (50.5%) or nodules (44.8%). Differences were noted depending on the initial size of the tumor, with fibrosis occurring more frequently for tumors <2 cm (58.6% vs. 22.9%, P = 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5}). Cavitation and atelectasis were less frequent patterns (2.4% and 1.4%, respectively, at 1 year). Tumor location (intraparenchymatous, with pleural contact <50% or >50%) was not significantly correlated with follow-up image pattern. Local tumor progressions were observed with each type of evolution. At 1 year, 12 local recurrences were noted: 2 cavitations, which represented 40% of the cavitations noted at 1 year; 2 fibroses (1.9%); 7 nodules (7.4%); and 1 atelectasis (33.3%). Conclusion: After RFA of lung tumors, follow-up CT scans show that the shape of the treatment zone can evolve in five different patterns. None of these patterns, however, can confirm the absence of further local tumor progression at subsequent follow-up.

  8. CO{sub 2} Laser Ablation Propulsion Tractor Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Sinko, John E.; Schlecht, Clifford A.

    2010-05-06

    Manipulation of objects at a distance has already been achieved with no small measure of success in the realm of microscopic objects on the scale size of nanometers to micrometers in applications including laser trapping and laser tweezers. However, there has been relatively little effort to apply such remote control to macroscopic systems. A space tractor beam could be applied to a wide range of applications, including removal of orbital debris, facilitation of spacecraft docking, adjustment of satellite attitude or orbital position, etc. In this paper, an ablative laser propulsion tractor beam is demonstrated based on radiation from a CO{sub 2} laser. Cooperative, layered polymer targets were used for remote impulse generation using a CO{sub 2} laser. The use of a structured ablatant enabling switching between thrust directional parity (i.e., forward or reverse) and imparting torque to a remote target. Fluence-dependent results are presented in the context of polymer ablation modeling work and with consideration of confined ablation effects.

  9. Femtosecond laser ablation of gold interdigitated electrodes for electronic tongues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzoli, Alexandra; de Almeida, Gustavo F. B.; Filho, José A.; Mattoso, Luiz H. C.; Riul, Antonio; Mendonca, Cleber R.; Correa, Daniel S.

    2015-06-01

    Electronic tongue (e-tongue) sensors based on impedance spectroscopy have emerged as a potential technology to evaluate the quality and chemical composition of food, beverages, and pharmaceuticals. E-tongues usually employ transducers based on metal interdigitated electrodes (IDEs) coated with a thin layer of an active material, which is capable of interacting chemically with several types of analytes. IDEs are usually produced by photolithographic methods, which are time-consuming and costly, therefore, new fabrication technologies are required to make it more affordable. Here, we employed femtosecond laser ablation with pulse duration of 50 fs to microfabricate gold IDEs having finger width from 2.3 μm up to 3.2 μm. The parameters used in the laser ablation technique, such as light intensity, scan speed and beam spot size have been optimized to achieve uniform IDEs, which were characterized by optical and scanning electron microscopy. The electrical properties of gold IDEs fabricated by laser ablation were evaluated by impedance spectroscopy, and compared to those produced by conventional photolithography. The results show that femtosecond laser ablation is a promising alternative to conventional photolithography for fabricating metal IDEs for e-tongue systems.

  10. Esophageal papilloma: Flexible endoscopic ablation by radiofrequency

    PubMed Central

    del Genio, Gianmattia; del Genio, Federica; Schettino, Pietro; Limongelli, Paolo; Tolone, Salvatore; Brusciano, Luigi; Avellino, Manuela; Vitiello, Chiara; Docimo, Giovanni; Pezzullo, Angelo; Docimo, Ludovico

    2015-01-01

    Squamous papilloma of the esophagus is a rare benign lesion of the esophagus. Radiofrequency ablation is an established endoscopic technique for the eradication of Barrett esophagus. No cases of endoscopic ablation of esophageal papilloma by radiofrequency ablation (RFA) have been reported. We report a case of esophageal papilloma successfully treated with a single session of radiofrequency ablation. Endoscopic ablation of the lesion was achieved by radiofrequency using a new catheter inserted through the working channel of endoscope. The esophageal ablated tissue was removed by a specifically designed cup. Complete ablation was confirmed at 3 mo by endoscopy with biopsies. This case supports feasibility and safety of as a new potential indication for BarrxTM RFA in patients with esophageal papilloma. PMID:25789102

  11. Planar laser-driven ablation model for nonlocalized absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Dahmani, F.; Kerdja, T. )

    1991-05-01

    A model for planar laser-driven ablation is presented. Nonlocalized inverse bremsstrahlung absorption of laser energy at a density {ital n}{sub 1}{lt}{ital n}{sub {ital c}} is assumed. A steady-state solution in the conduction zone is joined to a rarefaction wave in the underdense plasma. The calculations relate all steady-state fluid quantities to only the material, absorbed intensity, and laser wavelength. The theory agrees well with results from a computer hydrodynamics code MEDUSA (Comput. Phys. Commun. {bold 7}, 271 (1974)) and experiments.

  12. Combined ultrasonic thermal ablation with interleaved ARFI image monitoring using a single diagnostic curvilinear array: A feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Bing, Kristin Frinkley; Rouze, Ned C.; Palmeri, Mark L.; Rotemberg, Veronica M.; Nightingale, Kathryn R.

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this work is to demonstrate the feasibility of using a diagnostic ultrasound system (Siemens Antares™ and CH6-2 curvilinear array) 1) to ablate ex vivo liver with a custom M-mode sequence and 2) to monitor the resulting tissue stiffening with 2-D Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) imaging. Images were taken before and after ablation, as well as in 5 s intervals during the ablation sequence in order to monitor the ablation lesion formation temporally. Ablation lesions were generated at depths up to 1.5 cm from the surface of the liver and were not visible in B-mode. ARFI images showed liver stiffening with heating that corresponded to discolored regions in gross pathology. As expected, the contrast of ablation lesions in ARFI images is observed to increase with ablation lesion size. This study demonstrated the ability of a diagnostic system using custom beam sequences to localize an ablation site, heat the site to the point of irreversible damage, and monitor the formation of the ablation lesion with ARFI imaging. PMID:22518953

  13. DRAINAGE IN FINITE-SIZED UNSATURATED ZONES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    After the initiation of gravity drainage, water is often assumed to be either a) draining under unit gradient, or b) at capillary/gravity equilibrium. Both of these simplifications can be useful, but the regimes of validity of each assumption must be delineated. Water pressures are measured versus t...

  14. Electric Ablation with Irreversible Electroporation (IRE) in Vital Hepatic Structures and Follow-up Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xinhua; Ren, Zhigang; Zhu, Tongyin; Zhang, Xiongxin; Peng, Zhiyi; Xie, Haiyang; Zhou, Lin; Yin, Shengyong; Sun, Junhui; Zheng, Shusen

    2015-01-01

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) with microsecond-pulsed electric fields (μsPEFs) can effectively ablate hepatocellular carcinomas in animal models. This preclinical study evaluates the feasibility and safety of IRE on porcine livers. Altogether, 10 pigs were included. Computed tomography (CT) was used to guide two-needle electrodes that were inserted near the hilus hepatis and gall bladder. Animals were followed-up at 2 hours and at 2, 7 and 14 days post-treatment. During and after μsPEF ablation, electrocardiographs found no cardiovascular events, and contrast CT found no portal vein thrombosis. There was necrosis in the ablation zone. Mild cystic oedema around the gall bladder was found 2 hours post-treatment. Pathological studies showed extensive cell death. There was no large vessel damage, but there was mild endothelial damage in some small vessels. Follow-up liver function tests and routine blood tests showed immediate liver function damage and recovery from the damage, which correlated to the pathological changes. These results indicate that μsPEF ablation affects liver tissue and is less effective in vessels, which enable μsPEFs to ablate central tumour lesions close to the hilus hepatis and near large vessels and bile ducts, removing some of the limitations and contraindications of conventional thermal ablation. PMID:26549662

  15. Electric Ablation with Irreversible Electroporation (IRE) in Vital Hepatic Structures and Follow-up Investigation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xinhua; Ren, Zhigang; Zhu, Tongyin; Zhang, Xiongxin; Peng, Zhiyi; Xie, Haiyang; Zhou, Lin; Yin, Shengyong; Sun, Junhui; Zheng, Shusen

    2015-01-01

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) with microsecond-pulsed electric fields (μsPEFs) can effectively ablate hepatocellular carcinomas in animal models. This preclinical study evaluates the feasibility and safety of IRE on porcine livers. Altogether, 10 pigs were included. Computed tomography (CT) was used to guide two-needle electrodes that were inserted near the hilus hepatis and gall bladder. Animals were followed-up at 2 hours and at 2, 7 and 14 days post-treatment. During and after μsPEF ablation, electrocardiographs found no cardiovascular events, and contrast CT found no portal vein thrombosis. There was necrosis in the ablation zone. Mild cystic oedema around the gall bladder was found 2 hours post-treatment. Pathological studies showed extensive cell death. There was no large vessel damage, but there was mild endothelial damage in some small vessels. Follow-up liver function tests and routine blood tests showed immediate liver function damage and recovery from the damage, which correlated to the pathological changes. These results indicate that μsPEF ablation affects liver tissue and is less effective in vessels, which enable μsPEFs to ablate central tumour lesions close to the hilus hepatis and near large vessels and bile ducts, removing some of the limitations and contraindications of conventional thermal ablation. PMID:26549662

  16. Towards intraoperative monitoring of ablation using tracked 3D ultrasound elastography and internal palpation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foroughi, Pezhman; Burgner, Jessica; Choti, Michael A.; Webster, Robert J., III; Hager, Gregory D.; Boctor, Emad M.

    2012-03-01

    B-mode ultrasound is widely used in liver ablation. However, the necrosis zone is typically not visible under b-mode ultrasound, since ablation does not necessarily change the acoustic properties of the tissue. In contrast, the change in tissue stiffness makes elastography ideal for monitoring ablation. Tissue palpation for elastography is typically applied at the imaging probe, by indenting it slightly into the tissue surface. However, in this paper we propose an alternate approach, where palpation is applied by a surgical instrument located inside the tissue. In our approach, the ablation needle is placed inside a steerable device called an active cannula and inserted into the tissue. A controlled motion is applied to the center of the ablation zone via the active cannula. Since the type and direction of motion is known, displacement can then be computed from two frames with the desired motion. The elastography results show the ablated region around the needle. While internal palpation provides excellent local contrast, freehand palpation from outside of the tissue via the transducer can provide a more global view of the region of the interest. For this purpose, we used a tracked 3D transducer to generate volumetric elastography images covering the ablated region. The tracking information is employed to improve the elastography results by selecting volume pairs suitable for elastography. This is an extension of our 2D frame selection technique which can cope with uncertainties associated with intra-operative elastography. In our experiments with phantom and ex-vivo tissue, we were able to generate high-quality images depicting the boundaries of the hard lesions.

  17. Nickel Nanoparticles Production using Pulsed Laser Ablation under Pressurized CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mardis, Mardiansyah; Takada, Noriharu; Machmudah, Siti; Diono, Wahyu; Kanda, Hideki; Sasaki, Koichi; Goto, Motonobu

    2014-10-01

    We used nickel (Ni) plate as a target and irradiated pulse laser ablation with a fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm under pressurized CO2. The Ni plate was ablated at various pressure (5-15 MPa), temperature (15-80°), and irradiation time (3-30 min). The method successfully generated Ni nanoparticles in various shape and size. Generated Ni nanoparticles collected on a Si wafer and the ablated Ni plate were analyzed by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FE-SEM). With changing pressure and temperature, the structures of Ni nanoparticles also changed. The shape of generated particles is sphere-like structure with diameter around 10--100 nm. Also it was observed that a network structure of smaller particles was fabricated. The mechanism of nanoparticles fabrication could be explained as follows. Ablated nickel plate melted during the ablation process and larger particles formed, then ejected smaller spherical nanoparticles, which formed nanoclusters attached on the large particles. This morphology of particles was also observed for gold and silver nanoparticles with same condition. Further, the optical emission intensity from ablation plasma and the volume of the ablated crater were also examined under pressurized CO2.

  18. Femtosecond laser ablation and nanoparticle formation in intermetallic NiAl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorgensen, David J.; Titus, Michael S.; Pollock, Tresa M.

    2015-10-01

    The ablation behavior of a stoichiometric intermetallic compound β-NiAl subjected to femtosecond laser pulsing in air has been investigated. The single-pulse ablation threshold for NiAl was determined to be 83 ± 4 mJ/cm2 and the transition to the high-fluence ablation regime occurred at 2.8 ± 0.3 J/cm2. Two sizes of nanoparticles consisting of Al, NiAl, Ni3Al and NiO were formed and ejected from the target during high-fluence ablation. Chemical analysis revealed that smaller nanoparticles (1-30 nm) tended to be rich in Al while larger nanoparticles (>100 nm) were lean in Al. Ablation in the low-fluence regime maintained this trend. Redeposited material and nanoparticles remaining on the surface after a single 3.7 J/cm2 pulse, one hundred 1.7 J/cm2 pulses, or one thousand 250 mJ/cm2 pulses were enriched in Al relative to the bulk target composition. Further, the surface of the irradiated high-fluence region was depleted in Al indicating that the fs laser ablation removal rate of the intermetallic constituents in this regime does not scale with the individual pure element ablation thresholds.

  19. Femtosecond and picosecond ablation of aluminum for synthesis of nanoparticles and nanostructures and their optical characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamad, Syed; Podagatlapalli, G. Krishna; Sreedhar, S.; Tewari, Surya P.; Venugopal Rao, S.

    2012-03-01

    In this paper we report the fabrication of nanoparticles and nanostructures through the interaction of ultrashort (~40 fs) and short (~2 ps) laser pulses with bulk Aluminum immersed in various liquid media of different polarity [chloroform which is polar, carbon tetrachloride which is non-polar, water which is polar, dichloromethane (DCM) which is polar, and Cyclohexane which is non-polar] using the laser ablation technique. Except water and Cyclohexane, other media showed yellow coloration after ablation took place indicating formation of nanoparticles in the solution in both fs and ps domains. The coloration of the laser exposed portion in the Al substrate was golden yellow and its closer view depicted micro-grating (~1-2 μm) and nano-ripple (period 330 nm) formation depending on the focal conditions. The investigation of polarization dependence on the ablation was performed for water media. Depending on the ablation threshold, we observed micron sized structures and nano-ripples on the surface. As the rate of ablation depends on the position of the focus on the Al substrate and beam waist parameters, we have studied the liquid level dependence of ablation with different water levels on the Al substrate and we compared these patterns obtained below, near, and above the ablation thresholds of the sample. Field Emission-Scanning Electron Microscope (FE-SEM), UV-Vis absorption spectra, Electron Diffraction Pattern and Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) were used for the characterization and comparison of products in both domains.

  20. [Catheter ablation of persistent atrial fibrillation : pulmonary vein isolation, ablation of fractionated electrograms, stepwise approach or rotor ablation?].

    PubMed

    Scherr, D

    2015-02-01

    Catheter ablation is an established treatment option for patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). In paroxysmal AF ablation, pulmonary vein isolation alone is a well-defined procedural endpoint, leading to success rates of up to 80% with multiple procedures over 5 years of follow-up. The success rate in persistent AF ablation is significantly more limited. This is partly due to the rudimentary understanding of the substrate maintaining persistent AF. Three main pathophysiological concepts for this arrhythmia exist: the multiple wavelet hypothesis, the concept of focal triggers, mainly located in the pulmonary veins and the rotor hypothesis. However, the targets and endpoints of persistent AF ablation are ill-defined and there is no consensus on the optimal ablation strategy in these patients. Based on these concepts, several ablation approaches for persistent AF have emerged: pulmonary vein isolation, the stepwise approach (i.e. pulmonary vein isolation, ablation of fractionated electrograms and linear ablation), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and rotor-based approaches. Currently, persistent AF ablation is a second-line therapy option to restore and maintain sinus rhythm. Several factors, such as the presence of structural heart disease, duration of persistent AF and dilatation and possibly also the degree of fibrosis of the left atrium should influence the decision to perform persistent AF ablation. PMID:25687615

  1. Cardiac shear-wave elastography using a transesophageal transducer: application to the mapping of thermal lesions in ultrasound transesophageal cardiac ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwiecinski, Wojciech; Bessière, Francis; Constanciel Colas, Elodie; Apoutou N'Djin, W.; Tanter, Mickaël; Lafon, Cyril; Pernot, Mathieu

    2015-10-01

    Heart rhythm disorders, such as atrial fibrillation or ventricular tachycardia can be treated by catheter-based thermal ablation. However, clinically available systems based on radio-frequency or cryothermal ablation suffer from limited energy penetration and the lack of lesion’s extent monitoring. An ultrasound-guided transesophageal device has recently successfully been used to perform High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) ablation in targeted regions of the heart in vivo. In this study we investigate the feasibility of a dual therapy and imaging approach on the same transesophageal device. We demonstrate in vivo that quantitative cardiac shear-wave elastography (SWE) can be performed with the device and we show on ex vivo samples that transesophageal SWE can map the extent of the HIFU lesions. First, SWE was validated with the transesophageal endoscope in one sheep in vivo. The stiffness of normal atrial and ventricular tissues has been assessed during the cardiac cycle (n=11 ) and mapped (n= 7 ). Second, HIFU ablation has been performed with the therapy-imaging transesophageal device in ex vivo chicken breast samples (n  =  3), then atrial (left, n= 2 ) and ventricular (left n=1 , right n=1 ) porcine heart tissues. SWE provided stiffness maps of the tissues before and after ablation. Areas of the lesions were obtained by tissue color change with gross pathology and compared to SWE. During the cardiac cycle stiffness varied from 0.5   ±   0.1 kPa to 6.0   ±   0.3 kPa in the atrium and from 1.3   ±   0.3 kPa to 13.5   ±   9.1 kPa in the ventricles. The thermal lesions were visible on all SWE maps performed after ablation. Shear modulus of the ablated zones increased to 16.3   ±   5.5 kPa (versus 4.4   ±   1.6 kPa before ablation) in the chicken breast, to 30.3   ±   10.3 kPa (versus 12.2   ±   4.3 kPa) in the atria and to 73.8   ±   13

  2. Cardiac shear-wave elastography using a transesophageal transducer: application to the mapping of thermal lesions in ultrasound transesophageal cardiac ablation.

    PubMed

    Kwiecinski, Wojciech; Bessière, Francis; Colas, Elodie Constanciel; N'Djin, W Apoutou; Tanter, Mickaël; Lafon, Cyril; Pernot, Mathieu

    2015-10-21

    Heart rhythm disorders, such as atrial fibrillation or ventricular tachycardia can be treated by catheter-based thermal ablation. However, clinically available systems based on radio-frequency or cryothermal ablation suffer from limited energy penetration and the lack of lesion's extent monitoring. An ultrasound-guided transesophageal device has recently successfully been used to perform High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) ablation in targeted regions of the heart in vivo. In this study we investigate the feasibility of a dual therapy and imaging approach on the same transesophageal device. We demonstrate in vivo that quantitative cardiac shear-wave elastography (SWE) can be performed with the device and we show on ex vivo samples that transesophageal SWE can map the extent of the HIFU lesions. First, SWE was validated with the transesophageal endoscope in one sheep in vivo. The stiffness of normal atrial and ventricular tissues has been assessed during the cardiac cycle (n = 11) and mapped (n = 7). Second, HIFU ablation has been performed with the therapy-imaging transesophageal device in ex vivo chicken breast samples (n  =  3), then atrial (left, n = 2) and ventricular (left n = 1, right n = 1) porcine heart tissues. SWE provided stiffness maps of the tissues before and after ablation. Areas of the lesions were obtained by tissue color change with gross pathology and compared to SWE. During the cardiac cycle stiffness varied from 0.5   ±   0.1 kPa to 6.0   ±   0.3 kPa in the atrium and from 1.3   ±   0.3 kPa to 13.5   ±   9.1 kPa in the ventricles. The thermal lesions were visible on all SWE maps performed after ablation. Shear modulus of the ablated zones increased to 16.3   ±   5.5 kPa (versus 4.4   ±   1.6 kPa before ablation) in the chicken breast, to 30.3   ±   10.3 kPa (versus 12.2   ±   4.3 kPa) in the atria and to 73.8

  3. Surgical Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Ramlawi, Basel; Abu Saleh, Walid K.

    2015-01-01

    The Cox-maze procedure for the restoration of normal sinus rhythm, initially developed by Dr. James Cox, underwent several iterations over the years. The main concept consists of creating a series of transmural lesions in the right and left atria that disrupt re-entrant circuits responsible for propagating the abnormal atrial fibrillation rhythm. The left atrial appendage is excluded as a component of the Maze procedure. For the first three iterations of the Cox- maze procedure, these lesions were performed using a surgical cut-and-sew approach that ensured transmurality. The Cox-Maze IV is the most currently accepted iteration. It achieves the same lesion set of the Cox- maze III but uses alternative energy sources to create the transmural lesions, potentially in a minimally invasive approach on the beating heart. High-frequency ultrasound, microwave, and laser energy have all been used with varying success in the past. Today, bipolar radiofrequency heat or cryotherapy cooling are the most accepted sources for creating linear lesions with consistent safety and transmurality. The robust and reliable nature of these energy delivery methods has yielded a success rate reaching 90% freedom from atrial fibrillation at 12 months. Such approaches offer a significant long-term advantage over catheter-based ablation, especially in patients having longstanding, persistent atrial fibrillation with characteristics such as dilated left atrial dimensions, poor ejection fraction, and failed catheter ablation. Based on these improved results, there currently is significant interest in developing a hybrid ablation strategy that incorporates the superior transmural robust lesions of surgical ablation, the reliable stroke prevention potential of epicardial left atrial appendage exclusion, and sophisticated mapping and confirmatory catheter-based ablation technology. Such a minimally invasive hybrid strategy for ablation may lead to the development of multidisciplinary “Afib teams

  4. Picosecond and femtosecond laser ablation of hard tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafetinides, Alexander A.; Makropoulou, Mersini I.; Kar, Ajoy K.; Khabbaz, Marouan

    1996-12-01

    In this study, the interaction of picosecond and femtosecond pulsed laser radiation with human dental tissue was investigated experimentally, as this unexplored field is expected to be a potential alternative in powerful laser processing of biomedical structures. Dentin ablation rate experiments were performed by using teeth sections of different thickness. Dental tissue samples were irradiated in air with i) a regenerative amplifier laser at 1064 nm, pulse duration 110 ps, ii) the second harmonic laser at 532 nm, pulse duration 100 ps, and iii) a picosecond tunable dye amplifier at 595 nm, pulse width 800 fs. In all the experiments the pulse repetition rate was 10 Hz. The ablation rate per pulse at different energy fluence settings was calculated by measuring the time needed for the perforation of the whole dental sample thickness. Short laser pulses can confine thermal energy within the optical zone, which maximizes photothermal and photomechanical mechanisms of interaction. Tissue ablation rates were found to be comparable to or better than other nanosecond lasers, and left smooth surfaces, free of thermal damage.

  5. Effect of adsorbent particle size on the relative merits of a non-triangular and a triangular separation region in the optimal design of a three-zone simulated moving bed chromatography for binary separation with linear isotherms.

    PubMed

    Mun, Sungyong

    2016-06-24

    The design approaches for a three-zone simulated moving bed (SMB) chromatography with linear isotherms can be classified into two categories, depending on whether the SMB design is based on a classical region (i.e., triangular region of the triangle theory) in the first quadrant (m2, m3) plane or on a non-triangular separation region in the third quadrant (m2, m3) plane. The SMBs based on the classical and the non-triangular design approaches, which are named here as (m(+))_SMB and (m(-))_SMB respectively, are compared in this study using the Pareto solutions from the simultaneous optimization of throughput and desorbent usage under the constraints on product purities and pressure drop. The results showed that the (m(-))_SMB approach led to significantly lower desorbent usage than the (m(+))_SMB approach, which was due to the fact that the flow-rate-ratios from the (m(-))_SMB approach are extremely lower than those from the (m(+))_SMB approach. This factor also enables the (m(-))_SMB to have a significantly lower pressure drop, thereby making its throughput less restricted by a pressure-drop constraint. Due to such advantage of the (m(-))_SMB, it can make a further substantial improvement in throughput by modulating its adsorbent particle size properly. This issue was investigated using a model separation system containing succinic acid and acetic acid. It was confirmed that if the adsorbent particle size corresponding to the boundary between a mass-transfer limiting region and a pressure-drop limiting region is adopted, the (m(-))_SMB can lead to 82% higher throughput and 73% lower desorbent usage than the (m(+))_SMB. PMID:27208988

  6. Irreversible Electroporation versus Radiofrequency Ablation: A Comparison of Local and Systemic Effects in a Small-Animal Model.

    PubMed

    Bulvik, Baruch E; Rozenblum, Nir; Gourevich, Svetlana; Ahmed, Muneeb; Andriyanov, Alexander V; Galun, Eithan; Goldberg, S Nahum

    2016-08-01

    Purpose To compare both periablational and systemic effects of two mechanistically different types of ablation: thermal radiofrequency (RF) ablation and electroporative ablation with irreversible electroporation (IRE) in appropriately selected animal models. Materials and Methods Animal experiments were performed according to a protocol approved by the Animal Care Committee of Hebrew University. Female C57BL/6 mice (n = 165) were randomized to undergo either RF or IRE ablation of noncancerous normal liver. The inflammatory response, cell proliferation, interleukin 6 (IL-6) levels, and intactness of vessels in the liver were assessed at 6, 12, and 24 hours and at 3, 7, and 14 days after ablation (n = 122 for mechanistic experiments). Systemic effects were then assessed by comparing tumor formation in an Mdr2-knockout (KO) mouse model (n = 15) and tumor growth in a remote BNL 1ME hepatoma xenograft tumor (n = 28). Results were averaged and evaluated by using two-tailed t tests. Results Although RF ablation was associated with a well-defined periablational inflammatory rim, for IRE, the infiltrate penetrated the ablation zone, largely along persistently patent vessels. Peak IL-6 levels (6 hours after ablation) were 10 and three times higher than at baseline for IRE and RF, respectively (P < .03). Mdr2-KO mice that were treated with IRE ablation had more tumors that were 3 mm or larger than mice treated with RF ablation or sham operation (mean, 3.6 ± 1.3 [standard deviation] vs 2.4 ± 1.1 and 2.2 ± 0.8, respectively; P < .05 for IRE vs both RF ablation and sham operation). For BNL 1ME tumors, both RF and IRE liver ablation reduced tumor growth, with a greater effect noted for IRE (1329 mm(3) ± 586 and 819 mm(3) ± 327 vs 2241 mm(3) ± 548 for sham operation; P < .05) that was accompanied by more infiltrating lymphocytes compared with sham operation (7.6 cells per frame ± 1.9 vs 11.2 ± 2.1 vs 0.3 ± 0.1; P < .05). Conclusion Persistent patency of vasculature within

  7. Nanometer-scale ablation using focused, coherent extreme ultraviolet/soft x-ray light

    DOEpatents

    Menoni, Carmen S.; Rocca, Jorge J.; Vaschenko, Georgiy; Bloom, Scott; Anderson, Erik H.; Chao, Weilun; Hemberg, Oscar

    2011-04-26

    Ablation of holes having diameters as small as 82 nm and having clean walls was obtained in a poly(methyl methacrylate) on a silicon substrate by focusing pulses from a Ne-like Ar, 46.9 nm wavelength, capillary-discharge laser using a freestanding Fresnel zone plate diffracting into third order is described. Spectroscopic analysis of light from the ablation has also been performed. These results demonstrate the use of focused coherent EUV/SXR light for the direct nanoscale patterning of materials.

  8. XeCl Laser Ablation Of Organic Polymers: Characterization Of Debris And Its Effect On Surface Morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singleton, Donald L.; Paraskevopoulos, George; Irwin, Robert S.; Taylor, Roderick S.; Leopold, Kurt E.

    1988-12-01

    Evidence is presented, that the formation of conical structures on the surface of polyi-mide etched at low laser fluences is caused by shielding of the underlying polymer by particulate debris. The results show that with increasing diameter of the etched zone, higher laser fluences are required to achieve a smooth surface. XeCl ablation of polyimide in an atmosphere of oxygen at 0.2 J/cm2 results in oxidation of nearly 90% of ablated carbon to CO2 and CO, but does not eliminate the deposition of debris on the perimeter of the etched zone.

  9. Optoacoustic monitoring of real-time lesion formation during radiofrequency catheter ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Genny A.; Bay, Erwin; Deán-Ben, Xosé L.; Razansky, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    Current radiofrequency cardiac ablation procedures lack real-time lesion monitoring guidance, limiting the reliability and efficacy of the treatment. The objective of this work is to demonstrate that optoacoustic imaging can be applied to develop a diagnostic technique applicable to radiofrequency ablation for cardiac arrhythmia treatment with the capabilities of real-time monitoring of ablated lesion size and geometry. We demonstrate an optoacoustic imaging method using a 256-detector optoacoustic imaging probe and pulsed-laser illumination in the infrared wavelength range that is applied during radiofrequency ablation in excised porcine myocardial tissue samples. This technique results in images with high contrast between the lesion volume and unablated tissue, and is also capable of capturing time-resolved image sequences that provide information on the lesion development process. The size and geometry of the imaged lesion were shown to be in excellent agreement with the histological examinations. This study demonstrates the first deep-lesion real-time monitoring for radiofrequency ablation generated lesions, and the technique presented here has the potential for providing critical feedback that can significantly impact the outcome of clinical radiofrequency ablation procedures.

  10. Laser Ablation Propulsion A Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irfan, Sayed A.; Ugalatad, Akshata C.

    Laser Ablation Propulsion (LAP) will serve as an alternative propulsion system for development of microthrusters. The principle of LAP is that when a laser (pulsed or continuous wave) with sufficient energy (more than the vaporization threshold energy of material) is incident on material, ablation or vaporization takes place which leads to the generation of plasma. The generated plasma has the property to move away from the material hence pressure is generated which leads to the generation of thrust. Nowadays nano satellites are very common in different space and defence applications. It is important to build micro thruster which are useful for orienting and re-positioning small aircraft (like nano satellites) above the atmosphere. modelling of LAP using MATLAB and Mathematica. Schematic is made for the suitable optical configuration of LAP. Practical experiments with shadowgraphy and self emission techniques and the results obtained are analysed taking poly (vinyl-chloride) (PVC) as propellant to study the

  11. Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Richard E.; Bol'shakov, Alexander A.; Mao, Xianglei; McKay, Christopher P.; Perry, Dale L.; Sorkhabi, Osman

    2011-02-01

    A new method of performing optical isotopic analysis of condensed samples in ambient air and at ambient pressure has been developed: Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry (LAMIS). The technique uses radiative transitions from molecular species either directly vaporized from a sample or formed by associative mechanisms of atoms or ions in a laser ablation plume. This method is an advanced modification of a known atomic emission technique called laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The new method — LAMIS — can determine not only chemical composition but also isotopic ratios of elements in the sample. Isotopic measurements are enabled by significantly larger isotopic shifts found in molecular spectra relative to atomic spectra. Analysis can be performed from a distance and in real time. No sample preparation or pre-treatment is required. Detection of the isotopes of hydrogen, boron, carbon, and oxygen are discussed to illustrate the technique.

  12. Electron Beam Ablation and Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovaleski, S. D.; Gilgenbach, R. M.; Ang, L. K.; Lau, Y. Y.

    1997-11-01

    Ablation of fused silica, titanium nitride, and boron nitride with a channel spark electron beam is being studied. The channel spark is a low energy (15-20kV), high current (1600A) electron beam source developed at KFK(G. Muller and C. Schultheiss, Proc. of Beams `94, Vol. II, p833). This is a pseudospark device which operates in the ion focused regime of electron beam transport. For this reason, a low pressure (10-15mTorr of Ar) background gas is used to provide electron beam focusing. Plume composition and excitation has been studied via optical emission spectroscopy. Ablation has also been imaged photographically. Electron density gradients and densities are being studied through laser deflection. Film deposition experiments are also being performed. Electron transport and energy deposition in metals are being simulated in the ITS-TIGER code(Sandia Report No. SAND 91-1634).

  13. Artificial meteor ablation studies: Olivine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, M. B.; Cunningham, G. G.

    1973-01-01

    Artificial meteor ablation was performed on a Mg-rich olivine sample using an arc-heated plasma of ionized air. Experimental conditions simulated a meteor traveling about 12 km/sec at an altitude of 70 km. The mineral content of the original olivine sample was 98% olivine (including traces of olivine alteration products) and 2% chromite. Forsterite content of the original olivine was Fo-89. After ablation, the forsterite content had increased to Fo-94 in the recrystallized olivine. In addition, lamella-like intergrowths of magnetite were prevalent constituents. Wherever magnetite occurred, there was an increase in Mg and a corresponding decrease in Fe for the recrystallized olivine. The Allende fusion crust consisted of a recrystallized olivine, which was more Mg-rich and Fe-deficient than the original meteorite's olivine, and abundant magnetite grains. Although troilite and pentlandite were the common opaque mineral constituents in this meteorite, magnetite was the principal opaque mineral found in the fusion crust.

  14. Incidence and predictors of adenocarcinoma following endoscopic ablation of Barrett’s esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Kazuhiro; Choi, Sung Eun; Nishioka, Norman S.; Rattner, David W.; Puricelli, William P.; Tramontano, Angela C.; Kitano, Seigo; Hur, Chin

    2014-01-01

    Background The rate and risk factors of recurrent or metachronous adenocarcinoma following endoscopic ablation therapy in patients with Barrett’s esophagus (BE) have not been specifically reported. Aims The aim of this study was to determine the incidence and predictors of adenocarcinoma after ablation therapy for BE high-grade dysplasia (HGD) or intramucosal carcinoma (IMC). Methods This is a single center, retrospective review of prospectively collected data on consecutive cases of endoscopic ablation for BE. A total of 223 patients with BE (HGD or IMC) were treated by ablation between 1996 and 2011. Primary outcome measures were recurrence and new development of adenocarcinoma after ablation. Recurrence was defined as the presence of adenocarcinoma following the absence of adenocarcinoma in biopsy samples from 2 consecutive surveillance endoscopies. Logistic regression analysis was performed to assess predictors of adenocarcinoma after ablation. Results 183 patients were included in the final analysis, and 40 patients were excluded: 22 for palliative ablation, 8 lost to follow-up, 5 for residual carcinoma and 5 for postoperative state. Median follow-up was 39 months. Recurrence or new development of adenocarcinoma was found in 20 patients (11%) and the median time to recurrence/development of adenocarcinoma was 11.5 months. Independent predictors of recurrent or metachronous adenocarcinoma were hiatal hernia size ≥ 4cm (odds ratio 3.649, P = 0.0233) and histology (HGD/adenocarcinoma) after 1st ablation (odds ratio 4.141, P = 0.0065). Conclusions Adenocarcinoma after endoscopic therapy for HGD or IMC in BE is associated with large hiatal hernia and histology status after initial ablation therapy. PMID:24395382

  15. Survival after Radiofrequency Ablation in 122 Patients with Inoperable Colorectal Lung Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Gillams, Alice; Khan, Zahid; Osborn, Peter; Lees, William

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. To analyze the factors associated with favorable survival in patients with inoperable colorectal lung metastases treated with percutaneous image-guided radiofrequency ablation. Methods. Between 2002 and 2011, a total of 398 metastases were ablated in 122 patients (87 male, median age 68 years, range 29-90 years) at 256 procedures. Percutaneous CT-guided cool-tip radiofrequency ablation was performed under sedation/general anesthesia. Maximum tumor size, number of tumors ablated, number of procedures, concurrent/prior liver ablation, previous liver or lung resection, systemic chemotherapy, disease-free interval from primary resection to lung metastasis, and survival from first ablation were recorded prospectively. Kaplan-Meier analysis was performed, and factors were compared by log rank test. Results. The initial number of metastases ablated was 2.3 (range 1-8); the total number was 3.3 (range 1-15). The maximum tumor diameter was 1.7 (range 0.5-4) cm, and the number of procedures was 2 (range 1-10). The major complication rate was 3.9 %. Overall median and 3-year survival rate were 41 months and 57 %. Survival was better in patients with smaller tumors-a median of 51 months, with 3-year survival of 64 % for tumors 2 cm or smaller versus 31 months and 44 % for tumors 2.1-4 cm (p = 0.08). The number of metastases ablated and whether the tumors were unilateral or bilateral did not affect survival. The presence of treated liver metastases, systemic chemotherapy, or prior lung resection did not affect survival. Conclusion. Three-year survival of 57 % in patients with inoperable colorectal lung metastases is better than would be expected with chemotherapy alone. Patients with inoperable but small-volume colorectal lung metastases should be referred for ablation.

  16. Production of nanoparticles from natural hydroxylapatite by laser ablation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Laser ablation of solids in liquids technique has been used to obtain colloidal nanoparticles from biological hydroxylapatite using pulsed as well as a continuous wave (CW) laser. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurements revealed the formation of spherical particles with size distribution ranging from few nanometers to hundred nanometers and irregular submicronic particles. High resolution TEM showed that particles obtained by the use of pulsed laser were crystalline, while those obtained by the use of CW laser were amorphous. The shape and size of particles are consistent with the explosive ejection as formation mechanism. PMID:21711800

  17. Modification of carbon nanotubes by laser ablation of copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshio, A.; Shiraishi, M.; Kobayashi, Y.; Ishihara, M.; Koga, Y.; Bandow, S.; Iijima, S.; Kokai, F.

    2004-10-01

    Multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were modified by laser ablation of Cu in the presence of He gas. Quasi-spherical particles with diameters of 200 nm to 2 μm were sparsely deposited on as-grown MWNTs. Agglomerated nanoparticles with sizes of 1-10 nm covered ultrasonically treated MWNTs. Both particles were oxidized. The interaction of nanoparticles with the surface of the ultrasonicated MWNTs, due to small charge transfer to carbon atoms of the MWNTs upon adsorption of Cu, was suggested. We discuss the size distribution and morphology of the particles from cluster and particle formation in the gas phase and the surface properties of the two MWNTs.

  18. Caries selective ablation: the handpiece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennig, Thomas; Rechmann, Peter; Holtermann, Andreas

    1995-05-01

    Caries selective ablation is fixed to a window of fluences predicted by the ablation thresholds of carious and healthy dentin, respectively. The aim of the study was to develop a dental handpiece which guarantees homogeneous fluence at the irradiated tooth surface. Furthermore the point of treatment should be cooled down without energy losses due to the cooling system. We suggest the direct coupling of the laser radiation into a laminar stream of liquid, which acts in turn as a lengthened beam guide. The impacts of the laser radiation and of the cooling medium fall exactly into the same point. Hot ablation debris is removed out of the crater by the flush of the water jet. Fluences are constant if the handpiece is used in contact mode or at a distance. Normally the surface of a bare fiber working in contact mode is destroyed after a few shots. Coupling the laser radiation into a stream of liquid prevents this destruction. Putting together the benefits of this special handpiece short overall treatment times seem to be possible. High average power can be applied to the tooth without the threat of thermal damage. Furthermore no time consuming cutting of the fiber prolongs the treatment time.

  19. Excimer laser ablation of ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, A. C.; Leung, W. P.; Krajnovich, D.

    1991-02-01

    Laser etching of ferrites was previously done by scanning a focused continuous-wave laser beam on a ferrite sample in a chemical environment. We study the phenomenon of photo-ablation of Ni-Zn or Mn-Zn ferrites by pulsed 248-nm KrF excimer laser irradiation. A transfer lens system is used to project a grating pattern of a mask irradiated by the pulsed KrF laser onto the ferrite sample. The threshold fluence for ablation at the ferrite surface is about 0.3 J/cm2. A typical fluence of 1 J/cm2 is used. The etched grooves produced are typically 20-50 μm wide, with depths achieved as deep as 70 μm . Groove straightness is good as long as a sharp image is projected onto the sample surface. The wall angle is steeper than 60 degrees. Scanning electron microscopy of the etched area shows a ``glassy'' skin with extensive microcracks and solidified droplets being ejected that is frozen in action. We found that this skin can be entirely removed by ultrasonic cleaning. A fairly efficient etching rate of about 10 nm/pulse for a patterned area of about 2 mm×2 mm is obtained at a fluence of 1 J/cm2. This study shows that projection excimer laser ablation is useful for micromachining of ferrite ceramics, and indicates that a hydrodynamic sputtering mechanism involving droplet emission is a cause of material removal.

  20. Generation of nanoparticles at a fluence less than the ablation threshold using femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odachi, Go; Sakamoto, Ryosuke; Hara, Kento; Yagi, Takashi

    2013-10-01

    Femtosecond laser machining of crystalline Si in vacuum resulted in the formation of pillars and particles of ∼100 nm in size at the wall surfaces and the periphery of the ablated hole. These structures were created at a laser fluence below the ablation threshold. The nanopillars and nanoparticles appear to grow from the target surface. The target surface near the particles showed molten features with descending height, indicating significant mass transport from the surface layer to the particles. The nanopillars and nanoparticles likely formed as a result of successive crystal growth processes including amorphization of the laser-irradiated target surface, followed by crystalline nucleation, melting of the amorphous Si surrounding the crystalline particles, and liquid Si creeping over particle surfaces leading to an increase in particle size. By repeating these processes, the particles grow in cumulative laser shots. These particles are the major debris components distributed near micron-sized holes formed at the ablation threshold fluence in vacuum.

  1. The mesoscopic modeling of laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoneham, A. M.; Ramos, M. M. D.; Ribeiro, R. M.

    It is common to look at the atomic processes of removal of atoms or ions from surfaces. At this microscopic scale, one has to understand which surface ions are involved, which excited states are created, how electrons are transferred and scattered, and how the excitation leads to ion removal. It is even more common to look at continuum models of energy deposition in solids, and at the subsequent heat transfer. In these macroscopic analyses, thermal conduction is combined with empirical assumptions about surface binding. Both these pictures are useful, and both pictures have weaknesses. The atomistic pictures concentrate on relatively few atoms, and do not recognize structural features or the energy and carrier fluxes on larger scales. The continuum macroscopic models leave out crystallographic information and the interplay of the processes with high nonequilibrium at smaller scales. Fortunately, there is a middle way: mesoscopic modeling, which both models the key microstructural features and provides a link between microscopic and macroscopic. In a mesoscopic model, the length scale is determined by the system; often this scale is similar to the grain size. Microstructural features like grain boundaries or dislocations are considered explicitly. The time scale in a mesoscopic model is determined by the ablation process (such as the pulse length) rather than the short time limitations of molecular dynamics, yet the highly nonequilibrium behavior is adequately represented. Mesoscopic models are especially important when key process rates vary on a short length scale. Some microstructural feature (like those in dentine or dental enamel) may absorb light much more than others; other features (like grain boundaries) may capture carriers readily, or allow easier evaporation, or capture and retain charge (like grain boundaries); it is these processes which need a mesoscopic analysis. The results described will be taken largely from the work on MgO of Ribeiro, Ramos, and

  2. Deflection of uncooperative targets using laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiry, Nicolas; Vasile, Massimiliano

    2015-09-01

    Owing to their ability to move a target in space without requiring propellant, laser-based deflection methods have gained attention among the research community in the recent years. With laser ablation, the vaporized material is used to push the target itself allowing for a significant reduction in the mass requirement for a space mission. Specifically, this paper addresses two important issues which are thought to limit seriously the potential efficiency of a laser-deflection method: the impact of the tumbling motion of the target as well as the impact of the finite thickness of the material ablated in the case of a space debris. In this paper, we developed a steady-state analytical model based on energetic considerations in order to predict the efficiency range theoretically allowed by a laser deflection system in absence of the two aforementioned issues. A numerical model was then implemented to solve the transient heat equation in presence of vaporization and melting and account for the tumbling rate of the target. This model was also translated to the case where the target is a space debris by considering material properties of an aluminium 6061-T6 alloy and adapting at every time-step the size of the computational domain along with the recession speed of the interface in order to account for the finite thickness of the debris component. The comparison between the numerical results and the analytical predictions allow us to draw interesting conclusions regarding the momentum coupling achievable by a given laser deflection system both for asteroids and space debris in function of the flux, the rotation rate of the target and its material properties. In the last section of this paper, we show how a reasonably small spacecraft could deflect a 56m asteroid with a laser system requiring less than 5kW of input power.

  3. Preparation of nanofluids using laser ablation in liquid technique

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, P.X.; Soong, Yee

    2007-06-01

    In this work we report some results on thermal and transport properties of Ag-di water and Al-di water nanofluids that were prepared using Nd:yag laser to ablate Ag and Al in deionized water. The produced nanofluids were characterized using UV-VIS spectroscopy and TEM analysis. Our results on the UV-VIS spectra of the generated nanofluids demonstrated that using laser ablation in liquid we could generate stable colloids containing well-dispersed nanosized particles without use of any dispersants or surface reactive reagents. For Ag-di water nanofluids, the particles were spherical and the majority of the particles were in the 9 – 21 nm range with some big ones 23 - 26nm in size. The results on Al showed that the amplitude of the UV-VIS absorption spectra of Al-di water changed with time indicating that the ablated Al species reacts with water to yield an amorphous gel that transforms to the crystallized aluminum hydroxides with different shapes and sizes. The shapes were fibrous, triangular, rectangular, spherical shapes and joining of two pieces of triangles. In fact, these triangular and rectangular shapes were indeed pyramidal structures and hexagonal prisms, respectively.

  4. Image-guided ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lencioni, Riccardo; Crocetti, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Image-guided ablation is accepted as the best therapeutic choice for patients with early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) when surgical options-including resection and transplantation-are precluded. The term image-guided tumor ablation is defined as the direct application of chemical substances or sources of energy to a focal tumor in an attempt to achieve eradication or substantial tumor destruction. Over the past 25 years, several methods for local tumor destruction have been developed and clinically tested. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has shown superior anticancer effect and greater survival benefit with respect to the seminal percutaneous technique, ethanol injection, in meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials, and is currently established as the standard ablative modality. Nevertheless, novel thermal and nonthermal techniques for tumor ablation-including microwave ablation and irreversible electroporation-seem to have potential to improve the efficacy of RFA and are currently undergoing clinical investigation. PMID:22941021

  5. Generic incubation law for laser damage and ablation thresholds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhanliang; Lenzner, Matthias; Rudolph, Wolfgang

    2015-02-01

    In multi-pulse laser damage and ablation experiments, the laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) usually changes with the number of pulses in the train, a phenomenon known as incubation. We introduce a general incubation model based on two physical mechanisms—pulse induced change of (i) absorption and (ii) critical energy that must be deposited to cause ablation. The model is applicable to a broad class of materials and we apply it to fit data for dielectrics and metals. It also explains observed changes of the LIDT as a function of the laser repetition rate. We discuss under which conditions the crater-size method to determine LIDTs can be applied in multi-pulse experiments.

  6. CdTe nanoparticles synthesized by laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Semaltianos, N. G.; Logothetidis, S.; Perrie, W.; Romani, S.; Potter, R. J.; Dearden, G.; Watkins, K. G.; Sharp, M.

    2009-07-20

    Nanoparticle generation by laser ablation of a solid target in a liquid environment is an easy, fast, and 'green' method for a large scale production of nanomaterials with tailored properties. In this letter we report the synthesis of CdTe nanoparticles by femtosecond laser [387 nm, 180 fs, 1 kHz, pulse energy=6 {mu}J (fluence=1.7 J/cm{sup 2})] ablation of the target material. Nanoparticles with diameters from {approx}2 up to {approx}25 nm were observed to be formed in the colloidal solution. Their size distribution follows the log-normal function with a statistical median diameter of {approx_equal}7.1 nm. Their crystal structure is the same as that of the bulk material (cubic zincblende) and they are slightly Cd-rich (Cd:Te percentage ratio {approx}1:0.9). Photoluminescence emission from the produced nanoparticles was detected in the deep red ({approx}652 nm)

  7. Ablative therapies in renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chan, A A; Ahrar, K; Matin, S F

    2011-09-01

    We reviewed the use of ablative therapies in the management of renal cell carcinoma. We performed a PubMed search of the English language literature using the keywords "ablation" and "renal carcinoma." Pertinent articles specific to the technologic advancement of ablative therapy and clinical outcomes were selected for review. Intermediate-term oncologic outcomes of cryoablation and radiofrequency ablation are acceptable but are not quite as good as for surgical excision based nearly all on retrospective studies. No randomized studies have been performed comparing excisional and ablative therapies. Careful selection of patients and tumor characteristics results in improved outcomes. Diagnostic biopsy for tissue confirmation is mandatory and should even be considered post therapy after 6-12 months in patients with a concern about recurrence. Ablative therapies are associated with decreased morbidity, less severe complication rates, and excellent preservation of renal function in comparison with surgical excision. The majority of recurrences occur early, but long-term surveillance is required as delayed recurrences are also possible and the long-term oncologic efficacy is not yet established. Ablation can be delivered percutaneously or laparoscopically, and the superiority of one over the other remains controversial. The percutaneous approach is more cost effective and causes less perinephric desmoplasia. Nearly all data on ablation are retrospective and, with few exceptions, from single institutions. Ablative therapy is an appealing option for the management of small renal tumors shown to be renal cell carcinoma on biopsy in patients who are unsuitable candidates for surgical extirpation. PMID:21993322

  8. Plasma-mediated ablation of biofilm contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhixiong; Wang, Xiaoliang; Huang, Huan

    2010-12-01

    Ultra-short pulsed laser removal of thin biofilm contamination on different substrates has been conducted via the use of plasma-mediated ablation. The biofilms were formed using sheep whole blood. The ablation was generated using a 1.2 ps ultra-short pulsed laser with wavelength centered at 1552 nm. The blood contamination was transformed into plasma and collected with a vacuum system. The single line ablation features have been measured. The ablation thresholds of blood contamination and bare substrates were determined. It is found that the ablation threshold of the blood contamination is lower than those of the beneath substrates including the glass slide, PDMS, and human dermal tissues. The ablation effects of different laser parameters (pulse overlap rate and pulse energy) were studied and ablation efficiency was measured. Proper ablation parameters were found to efficiently remove contamination with maximum efficiency and without damage to the substrate surface for the current laser system. Complete removal of blood contaminant from the glass substrate surface and freeze-dried dermis tissue surface was demonstrated by the USP laser ablation with repeated area scanning. No obvious thermal damage was found in the decontaminated glass and tissue samples.

  9. Pulse laser ablation at water-air interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utsunomiya, Yuji; Kajiwara, Takashi; Nishiyama, Takashi; Nagayama, Kunihito; Kubota, Shiro

    2010-06-01

    We studied a new pulse laser ablation phenomenon on a liquid surface layer, which is caused by the difference between the refractive indices of the two materials involved. The present study was motivated by our previous study, which showed that laser ablation can occur at the interface between a transparent material and a gas or liquid medium when the laser pulse is focused through the transparent material. In this case, the ablation threshold fluence is reduced remarkably. In the present study, experiments were conducted in water and air in order to confirm this phenomenon for a combination of two fluid media with different refractive indices. This phenomenon was observed in detail by pulse laser shadowgraphy. A high-resolution film was used to record the phenomenon with a Nd:YAG pulse laser with 10-ns duration as a light source. The laser ablation phenomenon on the liquid surface layer caused by a focused Nd:YAG laser pulse with 1064-nm wavelength was found to be followed by the splashing of the liquid surface, inducing a liquid jet with many ligaments. The liquid jet extension velocity was around 1000 m/s in a typical case. The liquid jet decelerated drastically due to rapid atomization at the tips of the ligaments. The liquid jet phenomenon was found to depend on the pulse laser parameters such as the laser fluence on the liquid surface, laser energy, and laser beam pattern. The threshold laser fluence for the generation of a liquid jet was 20 J/cm2. By increasing the incident laser energy with a fixed laser fluence, the laser focused area increased, which eventually led to an increase in the size of the plasma column. The larger the laser energy, the larger the jet size and the longer the temporal behavior. The laser beam pattern was found to have significant effects on the liquid jet’s velocity, shape, and history.

  10. Production of microscale particles from fish bone by gas flow assisted laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutinguiza, M.; Lusquiños, F.; Comesaña, R.; Riveiro, A.; Quintero, F.; Pou, J.

    2007-12-01

    Recycled wastes from fish and seafood can constitute a source of precursor material for different applications in the biomedical field such as bone fillers or precursor material for bioceramic coatings to improve the osteointegration of metallic implants. In this work, fish bones have been used directly as target in a laser ablation system. A pulsed Nd:YAG laser was used to ablate the fish bone material and a transverse air flow was used to extract the ablated material out of the interaction zone. The particles collected at a filter were in the micro and nanoscale range. The morphology as well as the composition of the obtained particles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results reveal that the composition of the analyzed particles is similar to that of the inorganic part of the fish bone.

  11. Are the stratospheric dust particles meteor ablation debris or interplanetary dust?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, M. B.; Kyte, F. T.

    1978-01-01

    Natural and laboratory created fusion crusts and debris from artificial meteor samples were used to develop criteria for recognizing meteor ablation debris in a collection of 5 to 50 micron particles from the stratosphere. These laboratory studies indicate that meteor ablation debris from nickel-iron meteoroids produce spherules containing taenite, wuestite, magnetite, and hematite. These same studies also indicate that ablation debris from chondritic meteoroids produce spheres and fragmentary debris. The spheres may be either silicate rich, containing zoned olivine, magnetite, and glass, or sulfide rich, containing iron oxides (e.g., magnetite, wuestite) and iron sulfides (e.g., pyrrhotite, pentlandite). The fragmentary debris may be either fine-grained aggregates of olivine, magnetite, pyroxene, and occasionally pyrrhotite (derived from the meteorite matrix) or individual olivine and pyroxene grains (derived from meteorite inclusions).

  12. Plasma-assisted laser ablation of tungsten: Reduction in ablation power threshold due to bursting of holes/bubbles

    SciTech Connect

    Kajita, Shin; Ohno, Noriyasu; Takamura, Shuichi; Sakaguchi, Wataru; Nishijima, Dai

    2007-12-24

    Nanosecond laser ablation of tungsten (W) exposed to helium plasma is investigated using optical emission spectroscopy. Submicrometer-sized holes/bubbles are formed on the surface of W when it was exposed to the helium plasma at a sufficiently high temperature (> or approx. 1500-1600 K). The emissions from a virgin W (before the helium plasma irradiation) cannot be detected when the fluence is <1 J/cm{sup 2}; however, the threshold fluence for the detection of neutral W emission after it was exposed to the helium plasma is {approx}0.2 J/cm{sup 2}. The physical mechanism of laser-induced bursting of holes/bubbles is proposed for achieving a significant reduction in ablation power threshold.

  13. Three Potential Mechanisms for Failure of HIFU Ablation in Cardiac Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Laughner, Jacob I.; Sulkin, Matthew S.; Wu, Ziqi; Deng, Cheri X.; Efimov, Igor R.

    2012-01-01

    Background High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) has been introduced for treatment of cardiac arrhythmias, because it offers the ability to create rapid tissue modification in confined volumes without directly contacting the myocardium. In spite of the benefits of HIFU, a number of limitations have been reported, which hindered its clinical adoption. Methods and Results In this study, we used a multimodal approach to evaluate thermal and non-thermal effects of HIFU in cardiac ablation. We designed a computer-controlled system capable of simultaneous fluorescence mapping and HIFU ablation. Using this system, linear lesions were created in isolated rabbit atria (n = 6) and point lesions were created in the ventricles of whole-heart (n = 6) preparations by applying HIFU at clinical doses (4–16W). Additionally, we evaluate the gap size in ablation lines necessary for conduction in atrial preparations (n = 4). The voltage sensitive dye di-4-ANEPPS was used to assess functional damage produced by HIFU. Optical coherence tomography and general histology were used to evaluate lesion extent. Conduction block was achieved in 1 (17%) of 6 atrial preparations with a single ablation line. Following 10 minutes of rest, 0 (0%) of 6 atrial preparations demonstrated sustained conduction block from a single ablation line. Tissue displacement of 1–3mm was observed during HIFU application due to acoustic radiation force along the lesion line. Additionally, excessive acoustic pressure and high temperature from HIFU generated cavitation causing macroscopic tissue damage. A minimum gap size of 1.5mm was found to conduct electrical activity. Conclusions This study identified three potential mechanisms responsible for the failure of HIFU ablation in cardiac tissues. Both acoustic radiation force and acoustic cavitation in conjunction with inconsistent thermal deposition can increase the risk of lesion discontinuity and result in gap sizes that promote ablation failure. PMID:22322367

  14. Pulsed laser ablation of binary semiconductors: mechanisms of vaporisation and cluster formation

    SciTech Connect

    Bulgakov, A V; Evtushenko, A B; Shukhov, Yu G; Ozerov, I; Marin, W

    2010-12-29

    Formation of small clusters during pulsed ablation of two binary semiconductors, zinc oxide and indium phosphide, in vacuum by UV, visible, and IR laser radiation is comparatively studied. The irradiation conditions favourable for generation of neutral and charged Zn{sub n}O{sub m} and In{sub n}P{sub m} clusters of different stoichiometry in the ablation products are found. The size and composition of the clusters, their expansion dynamics and reactivity are analysed by time-of-flight mass spectrometry. A particular attention is paid to the mechanisms of ZnO and InP ablation as a function of laser fluence, with the use of different ablation models. It is established that ZnO evapourates congruently in a wide range of irradiation conditions, while InP ablation leads to enrichment of the target surface with indium. It is shown that this radically different character of semiconductor ablation determines the composition of the nanostructures formed: zinc oxide clusters are mainly stoichiometric, whereas In{sub n}P{sub m} particles are significantly enriched with indium. (photonics and nanotechnology)

  15. Possible Role for Cryoballoon Ablation of Right Atrial Appendage Tachycardia when Conventional Ablation Fails

    PubMed Central

    Kilic, Ayhan

    2015-01-01

    Focal atrial tachycardia arising from the right atrial appendage usually responds well to radiofrequency ablation; however, successful ablation in this anatomic region can be challenging. Surgical excision of the right atrial appendage has sometimes been necessary to eliminate the tachycardia and prevent or reverse the resultant cardiomyopathy. We report the case of a 48-year-old man who had right atrial appendage tachycardia resistant to multiple attempts at ablation with use of conventional radiofrequency energy guided by means of a 3-dimensional mapping system. The condition led to cardiomyopathy in 3 months. The arrhythmia was successfully ablated with use of a 28-mm cryoballoon catheter that had originally been developed for catheter ablation of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. To our knowledge, this is the first report of cryoballoon ablation without isolation of the right atrial appendage. It might also be an alternative to epicardial ablation or surgery when refractory atrial tachycardia originates from the right atrial appendage. PMID:26175651

  16. Testing and evaluation of light ablation decontamination

    SciTech Connect

    Demmer, R.L.; Ferguson, R.L.

    1994-10-01

    This report details the testing and evaluation of light ablation decontamination. It details WINCO contracted research and application of light ablation efforts by Ames Laboratory. Tests were conducted with SIMCON (simulated contamination) coupons and REALCON (actual radioactive metal coupons) under controlled conditions to compare cleaning effectiveness, speed and application to plant process type equipment.

  17. PULSED LASER ABLATION OF CEMENT AND CONCRETE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laser ablation was investigated as a means of removing radioactive contaminants from the surface and near-surface regions of concrete from nuclear facilities. We present the results of ablation tests on cement and concrete samples using a pulsed Nd:YAG laser with fiber optic beam...

  18. Percutaneous Local Ablative Therapy for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lau, W. Y.; Leung, Thomas W. T.; Yu, Simon C. H.; Ho, Stephen K. W.

    2003-01-01

    Objective To review and compare treatment result for percutaneous local ablative therapy (PLAT) with surgical resection in the treatment of small hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Summary Background Data PLAT is indicated for small unresectable HCC localized to the liver. From the use of ethanol to the latest technology of radiofrequency ablation, ablative techniques have been refined and their role in the management of HCC established. This review aims to give an overview of various ablative methods, including their efficacy, indications, and limitations, and also tries to look into the future of clinical trials in PLAT. Methods The authors reviewed recent papers in the English medical literature about the use of local ablative therapy for HCC. Focus was given to the results of treatment in terms of local control, progression-free survival, and overall survival, and to compare treatment results with those of surgery. Results PLAT for small HCC (<5 cm) with thermal ablation (radiofrequency ablation or microwave coagulation) can achieve effective local control of disease and is superior to ethanol injection. Progressive disease in untreated areas is a common reason for failure. Overall progression-free survival is similar to that of surgical resection. Conclusions Thermal ablation gives good local control of small HCC, is superior to ethanol, and may be comparable to surgical resection in long-term outcome. PMID:12560774

  19. Excimer laser ablation of the lens.

    PubMed

    Nanevicz, T M; Prince, M R; Gawande, A A; Puliafito, C A

    1986-12-01

    Ablation of the bovine crystalline lens was studied using radiation from an excimer laser at four ultraviolet wave lengths as follows: 193 nm (argon fluoride), 248 nm (krypton fluoride), 308 nm (xenon chloride), and 351 nm (xenon fluoride). The ablation process was quantitated by measuring mass ablated with an electronic balance, and characterized by examining ablation craters with scanning electron microscopy. The highest ablation rate was observed at 248 nm with lower rates at 193 and 308 nm. No ablation was observed at 351 nm. Scanning electron microscopy revealed the smoothest craters at 193 nm while at 248 nm there was vacuolization in the crater walls and greater disruption of surrounding tissue. The craters made at 308 nm did not have as smooth a contour as the 193-nm lesions. The spectral absorbance of the bovine lens was calculated at the wavelengths used for ablation and correlated with ablation rates and thresholds. High peak-power, pulsed ultraviolet laser radiation may have a role in surgical removal of the lens. PMID:3789982

  20. Local Ablation for Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shi-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the second commonest cancer in Taiwan. The national surveillance program can detect HCC in its early stages, and various curative modalities (including surgical resection, orthotopic liver transplantation, and local ablation) are employed for the treatment of small HCC. Local ablation therapies are currently advocated for early-stage HCC that is unresectable because of co-morbidities, the need to preserve liver function, or refusal of resection. Among the various local ablation therapies, the most commonly used modalities include percutaneous ethanol injection and radiofrequency ablation (RFA); percutaneous acetic acid injection and microwave ablation are used less often. RFA is more commonly employed than other local ablative modalities in Taiwan because the technique is highly effective, minimally invasive, and requires fewer sessions. RFA is therefore advocated in Taiwan as the first-line curative therapy for unresectable HCC or even for resectable HCC. However, current RFA procedures are less effective against tumors that are in high-risk or difficult-to-ablate locations, are poorly visualized on ultrasonography (US), or are large. Recent advancements in RFA in Taiwan can resolve these issues by the creation of artificial ascites or pleural effusion, application of real-time virtual US assistance, use of combination therapy before RFA, or use of switching RF controllers with multiple electrodes. This review article provides updates on the clinical outcomes and advances in local ablative modalities (mostly RFA) for HCC in Taiwan. PMID:24159599

  1. Particle-based ablation model for faint meteors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stokan, E.; Campbell-Brown, M.

    2014-07-01

    ]. Large trail widths in faint meteors observed with CAMO are also explained by the collisional light production emphasized with this model [4]. Ultimately, improving models of meteoroid ablation, such that they are able to satisfy more constraints simultaneously, will provide a better understanding of the composition and structure of objects throughout the Solar System. Particularly, we hope to use this model in the future to quantify meteoroid density and the distribution of particle sizes present in dust-ball bodies.

  2. Processing condition influence on the characteristics of gold nanoparticles produced by pulsed laser ablation in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikov, R. G.; Nikolov, A. S.; Nedyalkov, N. N.; Atanasov, P. A.; Alexandrov, M. T.; Karashanova, D. B.

    2013-06-01

    A study is presented of Au nanoparticles (NPs) created by nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of a solid target in double distilled water. The influence was examined of the laser wavelength on the size, shape and optical properties of the resulting NPs. Three different wavelengths: the fundamental (λ = 1064 nm), second (λSHG = 532) and third (λTHG = 355) harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser at the same fluence were utilized to produce various colloids. Ablation at the wavelength of 532 nm was investigated in more detail to reveal the influence of self-absorption by the already created NPs on their characteristics. The colloid produced was irradiated by λirrad = 532 nm (laser energy 40 mJ) at different times up to 25 min after the end of ablation. The initial structure of welded NPs forming wires was modified. Transmission electron microscopy and optical transmission measurements were used to evaluate the shape and size distribution of the NPs.

  3. Iron and iron oxide nanoparticles obtained by ultra-short laser ablation in liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Bonis, A.; Lovaglio, T.; Galasso, A.; Santagata, A.; Teghil, R.

    2015-10-01

    Laser ablation of an iron target in water and acetone has been carried out using a frequency doubled Nd:glass laser source (pulse duration of 250 fs and frequency repetition rate of 10 Hz). The observation of the nanostructures formed in the laser irradiated region of the metallic target and fast shadowgraphic analysis of the laser induced cavitation bubble have been performed in order to correlate the size distribution of the obtained nanoparticles to the dynamics of the ablation process. The composition, morphology and oxidation state of the synthesized nanoproducts have been investigated by XPS (X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy), TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy) and microRaman spectroscopy. The experimental data support a relationship between the nanoparticles size distribution and the femtosecond laser ablation mechanism, while the chemical and structural characteristics of the nanoparticles can be tuned by varying the liquid medium.

  4. Relationship Between LIBS Ablation and Pit Volume for Geologic Samples: Applications for the In Situ Absolute Geochronology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devismes, Damien; Cohen, Barbara; Miller, J.-S.; Gillot, P.-Y.; Lefevre, J.-C.; Boukari, C.

    2014-01-01

    These first results demonstrate that LIBS spectra can be an interesting tool to estimate the ablated volume. When the ablated volume is bigger than 9.10(exp 6) cubic micrometers, this method has less than 10% of uncertainties. Far enough to be directly implemented in the KArLE experiment protocol. Nevertheless, depending on the samples and their mean grain size, the difficulty to have homogeneous spectra will increase with the ablated volume. Several K-Ar dating studies based on this approach will be implemented. After that, the results will be shown and discussed.

  5. Lung Cancer Ablation: Technologies and Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Erica S.; Dupuy, Damian E.

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of lung cancers in 2012 is estimated to reach 226,160 new cases, with only a third of patients suitable surgical candidates. Tumor ablation has emerged as an important and efficacious treatment option for nonsurgical lung cancer patients. This localized minimally invasive therapy is best suited for small oligonodular lesions or favorably located metastatic tumors. Radiofrequency ablation has been in use for over a decade, and newer modalities including microwave ablation, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation have emerged as additional treatment options for patients. Ablation therapies can offer patients and clinicians a repeatable and effective therapy for palliation and, in some cases, cure of thoracic malignancies. This article discusses the available technologies and techniques available for tumor ablation of thoracic malignancies including patient selection, basic aspects of procedure technique, imaging follow-up, treatment outcomes, and comparisons between various therapies. PMID:24436530

  6. Epicardial Ventricular Tachycardia Ablation for Which Patients?

    PubMed Central

    Roten, Laurent; Sacher, Frédéric; Daly, Matthew; Pascale, Patrizio; Komatsu, Yuki; Ramoul, Khaled; Scherr, Daniel; Chaumeil, Arnaud; Shah, Ashok; Denis, Arnaud; Derval, Nicolas; Hocini, Mélèze; Haïssaguerre, Michel; Jaïs, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    With the widespread use of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators, an increasing number of patients present with ventricular tachycardia (VT). Large multicentre studies have shown that ablation of VT successfully reduces recurrent VT and this procedure is being performed by an increasing number of centres. However, for a number of reasons, many patients experience VT recurrence after ablation. One important reason for VT recurrence is the presence of an epicardial substrate involved in the VT circuit which is not affected by endocardial ablation. Epicardial access and ablation is now frequently performed either after failed endocardial VT ablation or as first-line treatment in selected patients. This review will focus on the available evidence for identifying VT of epicardial origin, and discuss in which patients an epicardial approach would be benefitial. PMID:26835028

  7. Pulsed Laser Ablation of Soft Biological Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Alfred; Venugopalan, Vasan

    In this chapter we focus on the key elements that form our current understanding of the mechanisms of pulsed laser ablation of soft biological tissues. We present a conceptual framework providing mechanistic links between various ablation applications and the underlying thermodynamic and phase change processes [1]. We define pulsed laser ablation as the use of laser pulses with duration of ~1 ms or less for the incision or removal of tissue regardless of the photophysical or photochemical processes involved. However, we will confine this presentation to pulsed ablation performed on a tissue level that does not involve laser-induced plasma formation. Ablation processes within transparent tissues or cells resulting from non-linear absorption have been considered in reviews by Vogel and Venugopalan [1] and by Vogel and co-workers [2].

  8. Software-assisted post-interventional assessment of radiofrequency ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieder, Christian; Geisler, Benjamin; Bruners, Philipp; Isfort, Peter; Na, Hong-Sik; Mahnken, Andreas H.; Hahn, Horst K.

    2014-03-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is becoming a standard procedure for minimally invasive tumor treatment in clinical practice. Due to its common technical procedure, low complication rate, and low cost, RFA has become an alternative to surgical resection in the liver. To evaluate the therapy success of RFA, thorough follow-up imaging is essential. Conventionally, shape, size, and position of tumor and coagulation are visually compared in a side-by-side manner using pre- and post-interventional images. To objectify the verification of the treatment success, a novel software assistant allowing for fast and accurate comparison of tumor and coagulation is proposed. In this work, the clinical value of the proposed assessment software is evaluated. In a retrospective clinical study, 39 cases of hepatic tumor ablation are evaluated using the prototype software and conventional image comparison by four radiologists with different levels of experience. The cases are randomized and evaluated in two sessions to avoid any recall-bias. Self-confidence of correct diagnosis (local recurrence vs. no local recurrence) on a six-point scale is given for each case by the radiologists. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values as well as receiver operating curves are calculated for both methods. It is shown that the software-assisted method allows physicians to correctly identify local tumor recurrence with a higher percentage than the conventional method (sensitivity: 0.6 vs. 0.35), whereas the percentage of correctly identified successful ablations is slightly reduced (specificity: 0.83 vs. 0.89).

  9. Ablative shielding for hypervelocity projectiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rucker, Michelle A. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A hypervelocity projectile shield which includes a hollow semi-flexible housing fabricated from a plastic like, or otherwise transparent membrane which is filled with a fluid (gas or liquid) is presented. The housing has a inlet valve, similar to that on a tire or basketball, to introduce an ablating fluid into the housing. The housing is attached by a Velcro mount or double-sided adhesive tape to the outside surface of a structure to be protected. The housings are arrayed in a side-by-side relationship for complete coverage of the surface to be protected. In use, when a hypervelocity projectile penetrates the outer wall of a housing it is broken up and then the projectile is ablated as it travels through the fluid, much like a meteorite 'burns up' as it enters the earth's atmosphere, and the housing is deflated. The deflated housing can be easily spotted for replacement, even from a distance. Replacement is then accomplished by simply pulling a deflated housing off the structure and installing a new housing.

  10. Fully Automated Laser Ablation Liquid Capture Sample Analysis using NanoElectrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, Matthias; Ovchinnikova, Olga S; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2014-01-01

    RATIONALE: Laser ablation provides for the possibility of sampling a large variety of surfaces with high spatial resolution. This type of sampling when employed in conjunction with liquid capture followed by nanoelectrospray ionization provides the opportunity for sensitive and prolonged interrogation of samples by mass spectrometry as well as the ability to analyze surfaces not amenable to direct liquid extraction. METHODS: A fully automated, reflection geometry, laser ablation liquid capture spot sampling system was achieved by incorporating appropriate laser fiber optics and a focusing lens into a commercially available, liquid extraction surface analysis (LESA ) ready Advion TriVersa NanoMate system. RESULTS: Under optimized conditions about 10% of laser ablated material could be captured in a droplet positioned vertically over the ablation region using the NanoMate robot controlled pipette. The sampling spot size area with this laser ablation liquid capture surface analysis (LA/LCSA) mode of operation (typically about 120 m x 160 m) was approximately 50 times smaller than that achievable by direct liquid extraction using LESA (ca. 1 mm diameter liquid extraction spot). The set-up was successfully applied for the analysis of ink on glass and paper as well as the endogenous components in Alstroemeria Yellow King flower petals. In a second mode of operation with a comparable sampling spot size, termed laser ablation/LESA , the laser system was used to drill through, penetrate, or otherwise expose material beneath a solvent resistant surface. Once drilled, LESA was effective in sampling soluble material exposed at that location on the surface. CONCLUSIONS: Incorporating the capability for different laser ablation liquid capture spot sampling modes of operation into a LESA ready Advion TriVersa NanoMate enhanced the spot sampling spatial resolution of this device and broadened the surface types amenable to analysis to include absorbent and solvent resistant

  11. Synthesis of gold nanoparticles by laser ablation of an Au foil inside and outside ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wender, Heberton; Andreazza, Marcos L.; Correia, Ricardo R. B.; Teixeira, Sérgio R.; Dupont, Jairton

    2011-03-01

    Stable gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were prepared by simple laser ablation of an Au foil placed inside or outside four ionic liquids (ILs), without the addition of any external chemical reagent. Irregular spherical AuNPs with a diameter range of 5 to 20 nm were produced after laser ablation of an Au foil located inside or outside the ILs 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (BMI.BF4), 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate (BMI.PF6) and 1-(3-cyanopropyl)-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ((BCN)MI.NTf2). Additionally, whereas laser ablation inside the IL 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide BMI.N(CN)2 produced flower-like shaped nanoparticles of about 50 nm in size, ablation outside this IL presented similar results to the others ILs studied, as determined by TEM and UV-Vis. The size and shape of the prepared NPs were related to where NP nucleation and growth occurred, i.e., at the IL surface or within the IL. Indeed, the chemical composition of the IL/air interface and surface ion orientation played important roles in the stabilization of the AuNPs formed by laser ablation outside the ILs.

  12. First Experience of Ultrasound-guided Percutaneous Ablation for Recurrent Hepatoblastoma after Liver Resection in Children

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Baoxian; Zhou, Luyao; Huang, Guangliang; Zhong, Zhihai; Jiang, Chunlin; Shan, Quanyuan; Xu, Ming; Kuang, Ming; Xie, Xiaoyan

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to summarize the first experience with ultrasound-guided percutaneous ablation treatment (PAT) for recurrent hepatoblastoma (HB) after liver resection in children. From August 2013 to October 2014, PAT was used to treat 5 children with a total of 8 recurrent HB (mean size, 1.4 ± 0.8 cm; size range, 0.7–3.1 cm), including 4 patients with 7 tumors in the liver and 1 patient with 1 tumor in the lung. Technical success was achieved in all patients (5/5, 100%). The complete ablation rate after the first ablation session was 80% (4/5) on a patient-by-patient basis and 87.5% (7/8) on a tumor-by-tumor basis. Only 1 patient developed a fever with temperature >39 °C; it lasted 4 days after radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and was resolved by conservative therapy. During the follow-up period, new intrahepatic recurrences after PAT were detected in two patients. One died due to tumor progression 4 months after ablation. The median overall survival time after PAT was 13.8 months. PAT is a safe and promising therapy for children with recurrent HB after liver resection, and further investigation in large-scale randomized clinical trials is required to determine its role in the treatment of this disease. PMID:26578035

  13. Small molecule ambient mass spectrometry imaging by infrared laser ablation metastable-induced chemical ionization.

    PubMed

    Galhena, Asiri S; Harris, Glenn A; Nyadong, Leonard; Murray, Kermit K; Fernández, Facundo M

    2010-03-15

    Presented here is a novel ambient ion source termed infrared laser ablation metastable-induced chemical ionization (IR-LAMICI). IR-LAMICI integrates IR laser ablation and direct analysis in real time (DART)-type metastable-induced chemical ionization for open air mass spectrometry (MS) ionization. The ion generation in the IR-LAMICI source is a two step process. First, IR laser pulses impinge the sample surface ablating surface material. Second, a portion of ablated material reacts with the metastable reactive plume facilitating gas-phase chemical ionization of analyte molecules generating protonated or deprotonated species in positive and negative ion modes, respectively. The successful coupling of IR-laser ablation with metastable-induced chemical ionization resulted in an ambient plasma-based spatially resolved small molecule imaging platform for mass spectrometry (MS). The analytical capabilities of IR-LAMICI are explored by imaging pharmaceutical tablets, screening counterfeit drugs, and probing algal tissue surfaces for natural products. The resolution of a chemical image is determined by the crater size produced with each laser pulse but not by the size of the metastable gas jet. The detection limits for an active pharmaceutical ingredient (acetaminophen) using the IR-LAMICI source is calculated to be low picograms. Furthermore, three-dimensional computational fluid dynamic simulations showed improvements in the IR-LAMICI ion source are possible. PMID:20155978

  14. Evaluation of the current radiofrequency ablation systems using axiomatic design theory.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bing; Moser, Michael A J; Luo, Yigang; Zhang, Edwin M; Zhang, Wenjun

    2014-04-01

    This article evaluates current radiofrequency ablation systems using axiomatic design theory. Due to its minimally invasive procedure, short-time hospital stay, low cost, and tumour metastasis treatment, the radiofrequency ablation technique has been playing an important role in tumour treatment in recent decades. Although the radiofrequency ablation technique has many advantages, some issues still need to be addressed. Among these issues, the two most important are as follows: (1) the size of tumours to be removed (has to be larger than 3 cm in diameter) and (2) cleanness of the removal. Many device solutions have been proposed to address the two issues. However, there is a lack of knowledge regarding the systematic evaluation of these solutions. This article evaluates these systems in terms of their solution principles (or simply called conceptual design in general product design theory) using a design theory called axiomatic design theory. In addition, with the axiomatic design theory, a better conceptual design in terms of its feasibility to cope with incomplete target tissue necrosis from the large size of tumours has been found. The detailed analysis and simulation of the new conceptual design are conducted using finite element approach. The results in this article are proved by the information of animal experiments and clinical practices obtained from the literature. This study thus contributes to the current knowledge to further developments in radiofrequency ablation systems and procedure guidelines for physicians to perform the radiofrequency ablation operation more effectively. PMID:24705341

  15. Pilot-scale synthesis of metal nanoparticles by high-speed pulsed laser ablation in liquids.

    PubMed

    Streubel, René; Bendt, Georg; Gökce, Bilal

    2016-05-20

    The synthesis of catalysis-relevant nanoparticles such as platinum and gold is demonstrated with productivities of 4 g h(-1) for pulsed laser ablation in liquids (PLAL). The major drawback of low productivity of PLAL is overcome by utilizing a novel ultrafast high-repetition rate laser system combined with a polygon scanner that reaches scanning speeds up to 500 m s(-1). This high scanning speed is exploited to spatially bypass the laser-induced cavitation bubbles at MHz-repetition rates resulting in an increase of the applicable, ablation-effective, repetition rate for PLAL by two orders of magnitude. The particle size, morphology and oxidation state of fully automated synthesized colloids are analyzed while the ablation mechanisms are studied for different laser fluences, repetition rates, interpulse distances, ablation times, volumetric flow rates and focus positions. It is found that at high scanning speeds and high repetition rate PLAL the ablation process is stable in crystallite size and decoupled from shielding and liquid effects that conventionally occur during low-speed PLAL. PMID:27053598

  16. Pilot-scale synthesis of metal nanoparticles by high-speed pulsed laser ablation in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streubel, René; Bendt, Georg; Gökce, Bilal

    2016-05-01

    The synthesis of catalysis-relevant nanoparticles such as platinum and gold is demonstrated with productivities of 4 g h‑1 for pulsed laser ablation in liquids (PLAL). The major drawback of low productivity of PLAL is overcome by utilizing a novel ultrafast high-repetition rate laser system combined with a polygon scanner that reaches scanning speeds up to 500 m s‑1. This high scanning speed is exploited to spatially bypass the laser-induced cavitation bubbles at MHz-repetition rates resulting in an increase of the applicable, ablation-effective, repetition rate for PLAL by two orders of magnitude. The particle size, morphology and oxidation state of fully automated synthesized colloids are analyzed while the ablation mechanisms are studied for different laser fluences, repetition rates, interpulse distances, ablation times, volumetric flow rates and focus positions. It is found that at high scanning speeds and high repetition rate PLAL the ablation process is stable in crystallite size and decoupled from shielding and liquid effects that conventionally occur during low-speed PLAL.

  17. Ablation depth control with 40 nm resolution on ITO thin films using a square, flat top beam shaped femtosecond NIR laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hoon-Young; Yoon, Ji-Wook; Choi, Won-Suk; Kim, Kwang-Ryul; Cho, Sung-Hak

    2016-09-01

    We reported on the ablation depth control with a resolution of 40 nm on indium tin oxide (ITO) thin film using a square beam shaped femtosecond (190 fs) laser (λp=1030 nm). A slit is used to make the square, flat top beam shaped from the Gaussian spatial profile of the femtosecond laser. An ablation depth of 40 nm was obtained using the single pulse irradiation at a peak intensity of 2.8 TW/cm2. The morphologies of the ablated area were characterized using an optical microscope, atomic force microscope (AFM), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Ablations with square and rectangular types with various sizes were demonstrated on ITO thin film using slits with varying x-y axes. The stereo structure of the ablation with the depth resolution of approximately 40 nm was also fabricated successfully using the irradiation of single pulses with different shaped sizes of femtosecond laser.

  18. Infra-red femtosecond laser ablation: Benefit for LA-ICP-MS elemental analysis?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poitrasson, F.; d'Abzac, F.; Freydier, R.; Seydoux-Guillaume, A.; Chmeleff, J.; Chatel, B.

    2011-12-01

    nature of the material ablated and the ablation conditions, aggregates of small particles condensed from the most volatile elements are produced together with beads consisting of more refractory material. Only metals show specific particle types. Moreover, whatever the analytical conditions, quantitative particle counting shows that the size distribution remains monomodal and centred slightly below 100 nm, which is optimum for transport and decomposition in the ICP plasma torch. These observations explain the enhanced versatility of fs LA-ICP-MS compared to the ns approach. However, this benefit is currently limited by the complicated operation and maintenance of fs lasers. Also, it remains unclear whether the wavelength matters for in situ isotope measurements using a fs laser. Those first analytical studies permitted to define more precisely the critical parameters needed in fs LA-ICP-MS analysis and it can be expected that the next generation of fs laser ablation systems will be simpler to use, yet retaining the analytical benefit of fs laser ablation for LA-ICP-MS.

  19. A study of particle generation during laser ablation withapplications

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chunyi

    2005-08-12

    A study has been made of the generation of particles during laser ablation and has included size distribution measurements and observation of the formation processes. The particle size distribution with respect to different laser parameters was obtained in-line using a differential mobility analyzer (DMA) and a particle counter. The experimental results show that the particle size varies with laser energy, laser pulsewidth, ambient gas flow rate and sample properties. The results serve as a basis for controlling the size of nanoparticles generated by laser ablation. Laser shadowgraph imaging was used to study mass ejection processes and mechanisms. At higher laser irradiance, some particles were ejected in the liquid and even in the solid phase. Time-resolved images show the propagation of the shockwaves: external shockwaves propagate outward and decelerate, and internal shockwaves reflect back and forth between the gas contact surface and the sample surface. The internal shockwave is proposed to cause the ejection of liquid particles when the internal shockwave strikes the liquid molten layer. A simulation based on vapor plume expansion was carried out and provides satisfactory agreement with experimental results. Different material properties result in different particle ejection behavior:particle ejection for most materials including metals result in a conically shaped envelope for the ejected material while ejection for silicon resembles a liquid jet. The difference in density change when the materials melt was proposed to be an important factor in the different ejection behavior. The characteristics of particles generated by laser ablation have a strong influence on the chemical analysis of the irradiated sample. Large particles are more difficult to completely vaporize and ionize, and induced preferential vaporization causes fractionation (i.e. a detected chemical composition that differs from the sample material). Large particles also result in spikes in

  20. Monitoring Radiofrequency Ablation Using Ultrasound Envelope Statistics and Shear Wave Elastography in the Periablation Period: An In Vitro Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Po-Hsiang; Wang, Chiao-Yin; Zhou, Zhuhuang; Wan, Yung-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive method for treating tumors. Shear wave elastography (SWE) has been widely applied in evaluating tissue stiffness and final ablation size after RFA. However, the usefulness of periablation SWE imaging in assessing RFA remains unclear. Therefore, this study investigated the correlation between periablation SWE imaging and final ablation size. An in vitro porcine liver model was used for experimental validation (n = 36). During RFA with a power of 50 W, SWE images were collected using a clinical ultrasound system. To evaluate the effects of tissue temperature and gas bubbles during RFA, changes in the ablation temperature were recorded, and image echo patterns were measured using B-mode and ultrasound statistical parametric images. After RFA, the gross pathology of each tissue sample was compared with the region of change in the corresponding periablation SWE image. The experimental results showed that the tissue temperature at the ablation site varied between 70°C and 100°C. Hyperechoic regions and changes were observed in the echo amplitude distribution induced by gas bubbles. Under this condition, the confounding effects (including the temperature increase, tissue stiffness increase, and presence of gas bubbles) resulted in artifacts in the periablation SWE images, and the corresponding region correlated with the estimated final ablation size obtained from the gross pathology (r = 0.8). The findings confirm the feasibility of using periablation SWE imaging in assessing RFA. PMID:27603012

  1. Ablation layers to prevent pitting in laser peening

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Lloyd A

    2016-08-09

    A hybrid ablation layer that comprises a separate under layer is applied to a material to prevent pitting resulting from laser peening. The underlayer adheres to the surface of the workpiece to be peened and does not have bubbles and voids that exceed an acceptable size. One or more overlayers are placed over and in contact with the underlayer. Any bubbles formed under the over layers are insulated from the surface to be peened. The process significantly reduces the incidence of pits on peened surfaces.

  2. Pulsed and CW adjustable 1942 nm single-mode all-fiber Tm-doped fiber laser system for surgical laser soft tissue ablation applications.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yize; Jivraj, Jamil; Zhou, Jiaqi; Ramjist, Joel; Wong, Ronnie; Gu, Xijia; Yang, Victor X D

    2016-07-25

    A surgical laser soft tissue ablation system based on an adjustable 1942 nm single-mode all-fiber Tm-doped fiber laser operating in pulsed or CW mode with nitrogen assistance is demonstrated. Ex vivo ablation on soft tissue targets such as muscle (chicken breast) and spinal cord (porcine) with intact dura are performed at different ablation conditions to examine the relationship between the system parameters and ablation outcomes. The maximum laser average power is 14.4 W, and its maximum peak power is 133.1 W with 21.3 μJ pulse energy. The maximum CW power density is 2.33 × 106 W/cm2 and the maximum pulsed peak power density is 2.16 × 107 W/cm2. The system parameters examined include the average laser power in CW or pulsed operation mode, gain-switching frequency, total ablation exposure time, and the input gas flow rate. The ablation effects were measured by microscopy and optical coherence tomography (OCT) to evaluate the ablation depth, superficial heat-affected zone diameter (HAZD) and charring diameter (CD). Our results conclude that the system parameters can be tailored to meet different clinical requirements such as ablation for soft tissue cutting or thermal coagulation for future applications of hemostasis. PMID:27464121

  3. Nanoparticle formation by laser ablation in air and by spark discharges at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itina, T. E.; Voloshko, A.

    2013-12-01

    Recent promising methods of nanoparticle fabrication include laser ablation and spark discharge. Despite different experimental conditions, a striking similarity is often observed in the sizes of the obtained particles. To explain this result, we elucidate physical mechanisms involved in the formation of metallic nanoparticles. In particular, we compare supersaturation degree and sizes of critical nucleus obtained under laser ablation conditions with that obtained for spark discharge in air. For this, the dynamics of the expansion of either ablated or eroded products is described by using a three-dimensional blast wave model. Firstly, we consider nanosecond laser ablation in air. In the presence of a background gas, the plume expansion is limited by the gas pressure. Nanoparticles are mostly formed by nucleation and condensation taking place in the supersaturated vapor. Secondly, we investigate nanoparticles formation by spark discharge at atmospheric pressure. After efficient photoionization and streamer expansion, the cathode material suffers erosion and NPs appear. The calculation results allow us to examine the sizes of critical nuclei as function of the experimental parameters and to reveal the conditions favorable for the size reduction and for the increase in the nanoparticle yield.

  4. Subpicosecond laser ablation of dental enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rode, A. V.; Gamaly, E. G.; Luther-Davies, B.; Taylor, B. T.; Dawes, J.; Chan, A.; Lowe, R. M.; Hannaford, P.

    2002-08-01

    Laser ablation of dental enamel with subpicosecond laser pulses has been studied over the intensity range of (0.1-1.4) x1014 W/