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Sample records for ablation zone size

  1. Interactive Volumetry Of Liver Ablation Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egger, Jan; Busse, Harald; Brandmaier, Philipp; Seider, Daniel; Gawlitza, Matthias; Strocka, Steffen; Voglreiter, Philip; Dokter, Mark; Hofmann, Michael; Kainz, Bernhard; Hann, Alexander; Chen, Xiaojun; Alhonnoro, Tuomas; Pollari, Mika; Schmalstieg, Dieter; Moche, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive technique that destroys cancer cells by heat. The heat results from focusing energy in the radiofrequency spectrum through a needle. Amongst others, this can enable the treatment of patients who are not eligible for an open surgery. However, the possibility of recurrent liver cancer due to incomplete ablation of the tumor makes post-interventional monitoring via regular follow-up scans mandatory. These scans have to be carefully inspected for any conspicuousness. Within this study, the RF ablation zones from twelve post-interventional CT acquisitions have been segmented semi-automatically to support the visual inspection. An interactive, graph-based contouring approach, which prefers spherically shaped regions, has been applied. For the quantitative and qualitative analysis of the algorithm’s results, manual slice-by-slice segmentations produced by clinical experts have been used as the gold standard (which have also been compared among each other). As evaluation metric for the statistical validation, the Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) has been calculated. The results show that the proposed tool provides lesion segmentation with sufficient accuracy much faster than manual segmentation. The visual feedback and interactivity make the proposed tool well suitable for the clinical workflow.

  2. Interactive Volumetry Of Liver Ablation Zones

    PubMed Central

    Egger, Jan; Busse, Harald; Brandmaier, Philipp; Seider, Daniel; Gawlitza, Matthias; Strocka, Steffen; Voglreiter, Philip; Dokter, Mark; Hofmann, Michael; Kainz, Bernhard; Hann, Alexander; Chen, Xiaojun; Alhonnoro, Tuomas; Pollari, Mika; Schmalstieg, Dieter; Moche, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive technique that destroys cancer cells by heat. The heat results from focusing energy in the radiofrequency spectrum through a needle. Amongst others, this can enable the treatment of patients who are not eligible for an open surgery. However, the possibility of recurrent liver cancer due to incomplete ablation of the tumor makes post-interventional monitoring via regular follow-up scans mandatory. These scans have to be carefully inspected for any conspicuousness. Within this study, the RF ablation zones from twelve post-interventional CT acquisitions have been segmented semi-automatically to support the visual inspection. An interactive, graph-based contouring approach, which prefers spherically shaped regions, has been applied. For the quantitative and qualitative analysis of the algorithm’s results, manual slice-by-slice segmentations produced by clinical experts have been used as the gold standard (which have also been compared among each other). As evaluation metric for the statistical validation, the Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) has been calculated. The results show that the proposed tool provides lesion segmentation with sufficient accuracy much faster than manual segmentation. The visual feedback and interactivity make the proposed tool well suitable for the clinical workflow. PMID:26482818

  3. Analysis of iodinated contrast delivered during thermal ablation: is material trapped in the ablation zone?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Po-hung; Brace, Chris L.

    2016-08-01

    Intra-procedural contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) has been proposed to evaluate treatment efficacy of thermal ablation. We hypothesized that contrast material delivered concurrently with thermal ablation may become trapped in the ablation zone, and set out to determine whether such an effect would impact ablation visualization. CECT images were acquired during microwave ablation in normal porcine liver with: (A) normal blood perfusion and no iodinated contrast, (B) normal perfusion and iodinated contrast infusion or (C) no blood perfusion and residual iodinated contrast. Changes in CT attenuation were analyzed from before, during and after ablation to evaluate whether contrast was trapped inside of the ablation zone. Visualization was compared between groups using post-ablation contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Attenuation gradients were calculated at the ablation boundary and background to quantitate ablation conspicuity. In Group A, attenuation decreased during ablation due to thermal expansion of tissue water and water vaporization. The ablation zone was difficult to visualize (CNR  =  1.57  ±  0.73, boundary gradient  =  0.7  ±  0.4 HU mm-1), leading to ablation diameter underestimation compared to gross pathology. Group B ablations saw attenuation increase, suggesting that iodine was trapped inside the ablation zone. However, because the normally perfused liver increased even more, Group B ablations were more visible than Group A (CNR  =  2.04  ±  0.84, boundary gradient  =  6.3  ±  1.1 HU mm-1) and allowed accurate estimation of the ablation zone dimensions compared to gross pathology. Substantial water vaporization led to substantial attenuation changes in Group C, though the ablation zone boundary was not highly visible (boundary gradient  =  3.9  ±  1.1 HU mm-1). Our results demonstrate that despite iodinated contrast being trapped in the ablation zone, ablation visibility was

  4. Microfabrication of Fresnel zone plates by laser induced solid ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Vanessa R. M.; Thomas, John; Santhosh, Chidangil; Ramachandran, Hema; Mathur, Deepak

    2016-07-01

    A novel and simple single-step method of inscribing optical elements on metal-coated transparent substrates is demonstrated. Laser induced solid ablation (LISA) demands very low laser energies (nJ), as can be amply provided by a femtosecond laser oscillator. Here, LISA is used to write Fresnel zone plates on indium and tungsten coated glass. With up to 100 zones, remarkable agreement is obtained between measured and expected values of the focal length. LISA has enabled attainment of focal spot sizes that are 38% smaller than what would be obtained using conventional lenses of the same numerical aperture. The simplicity with which a high degree of automation can readily be achieved using LISA makes this cost-effective method amenable to a wide variety of applications related to microfabrication of optical elements.

  5. Perivascular parenchymal extension of the ablation zone following liver microwave ablation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Saurabh; Siriwardana, Pulathis Nilantha; Johnston, Edward William; Bandula, Steven; Davidson, Brian Ritchie; Illing, Rowland Oliver

    2016-03-31

    A 69-year-old man who presented with abdominal discomfort was, on examination, found to have a palpable abdominal mass. Contrast-enhanced CT showed a mass arising from the inferior vena cava, which biopsy confirmed to be a leiomyosarcoma. One month after chemoradiotherapy, CT demonstrated a new 15 mm solitary central right liver metastasis. Microwave ablation (MWA) of the metastasis was performed using an Acculis Sulis V system (Angiodynamics, USA) at a power of 140 Watts for 4 min, with no immediate complications. After 1 month, MRI with gadolinium was performed to assess the liver ablation zone. The MRI demonstrated thrombosis of a right inferior hepatic vein branch leading to the ablation zone and extension of the ablation zone 1 cm into the tissue around the thrombosed vessel.

  6. Size control of nanoparticles by multiple-pulse laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jiaxin; Nan, Junyi; Zeng, Heping

    2017-04-01

    Bare nanoparticles synthesized by laser ablation in water have found their application in catalysis, spectroscopy and biomedical research fields. In this perspective, how to efficiently produce stable nanoparticles with controllable size is an important topic and has attracted a lot of interests. Here, we introduce a multiple-pulse laser as the ablation source. By changing the number of sub-pulses, the average size of nanoparticles can be tuned in a broad range from ∼120 nm to ∼4 nm. The demonstration in this article may offer a new approach to fabricate ultrafine nanostructures and also help the scientific study of the mechanism in laser ablation.

  7. Radiofrequency Ablation of Lung Tumors: Imaging Features of the Postablation Zone

    PubMed Central

    Eradat, Jilbert; Gutierrez, Antonio J.; Lee, Christopher; Fishbein, Michael C.; Suh, Robert D.

    2012-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is used to treat pulmonary malignancies. Although preliminary results are suggestive of a survival benefit, local progression rates are appreciable. Because a patient can undergo repeat treatment if recurrence is detected early, reliable post-RFA imaging follow-up is critical. The purpose of this article is to describe (a) an algorithm for post-RFA imaging surveillance; (b) the computed tomographic (CT) appearance, size, enhancement, and positron emission tomographic (PET) metabolic activity of the ablation zone; and (c) CT, PET, and dual-modality imaging with PET and CT (PET/CT) features suggestive of partial ablation or tumor recurrence and progression. CT is routinely used for post-RFA follow-up. PET and PET/CT have emerged as auxiliary follow-up techniques. CT with nodule densitometry may be used to supplement standard CT. Post-RFA follow-up was divided into three phases: early (immediately after to 1 week after RFA), intermediate (>1 week to 2 months), and late (>2 months). CT and PET imaging features suggestive of residual or recurrent disease include (a) increasing contrast material uptake in the ablation zone (>180 seconds on dynamic images), nodular enhancement measuring more than 10 mm, any central enhancement greater than 15 HU, and enhancement greater than baseline anytime after ablation; (b) growth of the RFA zone after 3 months (compared with baseline) and definitely after 6 months, peripheral nodular growth and change from ground-glass opacity to solid opacity, regional or distant lymph node enlargement, and new intrathoracic or extrathoracic disease; and (c) increased metabolic activity beyond 2 months, residual activity centrally or at the ablated tumor, and development of nodular activity. © RSNA, 2012 PMID:22786987

  8. Microwave ablation at 10.0 GHz achieves comparable ablation zones to 1.9 GHz in ex vivo bovine liver.

    PubMed

    Luyen, Hung; Gao, Fuqiang; Hagness, Susan C; Behdad, Nader

    2014-06-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of using high-frequency microwaves for tissue ablation by comparing the performance of a 10 GHz microwave ablation system with that of a 1.9 GHz system. Two sets of floating sleeve dipole antennas operating at these frequencies were designed and fabricated for use in ex vivo experiments with bovine livers. Combined electromagnetic and transient thermal simulations were conducted to analyze the performance of these antennas. Subsequently, a total of 16 ablation experiments (eight at 1.9 GHz and eight at 10.0 GHz) were conducted at a power level of 42 W for either 5 or 10 min. In all cases, the 1.9 and 10 GHz experiments resulted in comparable ablation zone dimensions. Temperature monitoring probes revealed faster heating rates in the immediate vicinity of the 10.0 GHz antenna compared to the 1.9 GHz antenna, along with a slightly delayed onset of heating farther from the 10 GHz antenna, suggesting that heat conduction plays a greater role at higher microwave frequencies in achieving a comparably sized ablation zone. The results obtained from these experiments agree very well with the combined electromagnetic/thermal simulation results. These simulations and experiments show that using lower frequency microwaves does not offer any significant advantages, in terms of the achievable ablation zones, over using higher frequency microwaves. Indeed, it is demonstrated that high-frequency microwave antennas may be used to create reasonably large ablation zones. Higher frequencies offer the advantage of smaller antenna size, which is expected to lead to less invasive interstitial devices and may possibly lead to the development of more compact multielement arrays with heating properties not available from single-element antennas.

  9. Sustained Growth of the Ex Vivo Ablation Zones' Critical Short Axis Using Gas-cooled Radiofrequency Applicators

    SciTech Connect

    Rempp, Hansjoerg; Scharpf, Marcus; Voigtlaender, Matthias; Schraml, Christina; Schmidt, Diethard; Fend, Falko; Claussen, Claus D.; Enderle, Markus D.; Pereira, Philippe L.; Clasen, Stephan

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the ablation zones created with a gas-cooled bipolar radiofrequency applicator performed on ex vivo bovine liver tissue. Materials and Methods: A total of 320 ablations with an internally gas-cooled bipolar radiofrequency applicator were performed on fresh ex vivo bovine liver tissue, varying the ablation time (5, 10, 15, and 20 min), power (20, 30, 40, and 50 W), and gas pressure of the CO{sub 2} used for cooling (585, 600, 615, 630, 645 psi), leading to a total of 80 different parameter combinations. Size and shape of the white coagulation zone were assessed. Results: The largest complete ablation zone was achieved after 20 min of implementing 50 W and 645 psi, resulting in a short axis of mean 46 {+-} 1 mm and a long axis of 56 {+-} 2 mm (mean {+-} standard deviation). Short-axis diameters increased between 5 and 20 min of ablation time at 585 psi (increase of the short axis was 45% at 30 W, 29% at 40 W, and 39% at 50 W). This increase was larger at 645 psi (113% at 30 W, 67% at 40 W, and 70% at 50 W). Macroscopic assessment and NADH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) staining revealed incompletely ablated tissue along the needle track in 18 parameter combinations including low-power settings (20 and 30 W) and different cooling levels and ablation times. Conclusion: Gas-cooled radiofrequency applicators increase the short-axis diameter of coagulation in an ex vivo setting if appropriate parameters are selected.

  10. A methodology to analyze treatment zone geometry and variability of percutaneous thermal ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshava, Krishna N.; Kimia, Benjamin B.; Cook, Madeleine; Dupuy, Damian E.; Collins, Scott A.; Merck, Derek

    2015-03-01

    A major challenge for image guided tumor ablation is the high treatment variability due to heterogeneous tissue characteristics and thermal sinks. In this work, we present a methodology to analyze the geometry of the treatment zones and treatment zone variability. Our first contribution is an applicator centric co-ordinate system which enables us to compare treatment zones and vendor specifications across patients. Our second contribution is the analysis of the shape of the ablation zone using applicator centric longitudinal 2D cross sections. We present initial results of applying this methodology to analyze the geometry and variability in synthetic examples like ellipsoid, sphere and real microwave ablation zones in lung and liver.

  11. Thermal Response and Ablation Programs for TPS Sizing Computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Y. K.; Rasky, Daniel J. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The computer programs developed at NASA Ames Research Center for TPS sizing computation have been applied to many NASA's space missions, such as Mars Pathfinder, StarDust, Mars 2001, DS-II, and Saturn Entry Probe. These computer programs include FIAT (Fully Implicit Ablation and Thermal Response Program, MAT (Multi-component Ablation Thermochemistry Program), TPSX (Thermal Protection Systems Expert & Material Properties Database), and TPSGui (Thermal Protection Systems Graphical User Interface). For most planetary missions, the aerothermodynamics and material response are strongly coupled; thus a closed loop iteration technique between the FIAT and CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) codes has been developed to obtain the high fidelity bench mark TPS sizing solution. The computer codes and predictive methods are presented and discussed in detail.

  12. Particle size dependent chemistry from laser ablation of brass.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunyi; Mao, Xianglei; Mao, Sam S; Greif, Ralph; Russo, Richard E

    2005-10-15

    The proportion of zinc and copper in particles formed by laser ablation of brass was found to vary with the particle diameter. Energy-dispersive X-ray analysis showed that smaller particles were zinc enhanced while larger particles were composed mostly of copper. A model based on condensation of vapor onto large droplets ejected from a melted liquid layer is proposed to describe the change in particle composition versus size.

  13. Superselective Particle Embolization Enhances Efficacy of Radiofrequency Ablation: Effects of Particle Size and Sequence of Action

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Toshihiro; Isfort, Peter; Braunschweig, Till Westphal, Saskia; Woitok, Anna; Penzkofer, Tobias Bruners, Philipp; Kichikawa, Kimihiko; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas Mahnken, Andreas H.

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the effects of particle size and course of action of superselective bland transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) on the efficacy of radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Methods. Twenty pigs were divided into five groups: group 1a, 40-{mu}m bland TAE before RFA; group 1b, 40-{mu}m bland TAE after RFA; group 2a, 250-{mu}m bland TAE before RFA; group 2b, 250-{mu}m bland TAE after RFA and group 3, RFA alone. A total of 40 treatments were performed with a combined CT and angiography system. The sizes of the treated zones were measured from contrast-enhanced CTs on days 1 and 28. Animals were humanely killed, and the treated zones were examined pathologically. Results. There were no complications during procedures and follow-up. The short-axis diameter of the ablation zone in group 1a (mean {+-} standard deviation, 3.19 {+-} 0.39 cm) was significantly larger than in group 1b (2.44 {+-} 0.52 cm; P = 0.021), group 2a (2.51 {+-} 0.32 cm; P = 0.048), group 2b (2.19 {+-} 0.44 cm; P = 0.02), and group 3 (1.91 {+-} 0.55 cm; P < 0.001). The greatest volume of ablation was achieved by performing embolization with 40-{mu}m particles before RFA (group 1a; 20.97 {+-} 9.65 cm{sup 3}). At histology, 40-{mu}m microspheres were observed to occlude smaller and more distal arteries than 250-{mu}m microspheres. Conclusion. Bland TAE is more effective before RFA than postablation embolization. The use of very small 40-{mu}m microspheres enhances the efficacy of RFA more than the use of larger particles.

  14. Heat-affected zone of metals ablated with femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirayama, Yoichi; Obara, Minoru

    2003-07-01

    The melted area is found on the surface ablated by nanosecond and picosecond laser pulses. However, the heat effect is little on the ablated surface in the case of femtosecond laser due to non-thermal ablation process. Heat-affected zone of metallic bulk crystal ablated with femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser pulses is experimentally studied. As a result of XRD (X-ray diffraction) measurements, the XRD peak signal of the area ablated with Ti:sapphire laser becomes smaller than that of the crystalline metal sample. While the crystallinity of the metal sample is crystalline before the laser ablation, the crystallinity in the ablated area is partially changed into the amorphous form. Because the residual pulse energy that is not used for the ablation process remains, leading to the formation of thin layer of melt phase. The melt layer is abruptly cooled down not to be re-crystallized, but to transform into the amorphous form. It is evident that the area ablated with femtosecond laser is changed into the amorphous metal. Additionally XRD measurements and AR+ etching are performed alternately to measure the thickness of the amorphous layer. In the case of iron, the thickness is measured to be 1 μm approximately, therefore heat-affected zone is quite small.

  15. Molecular dynamics simulation of heat-affected zone of copper metal ablated with femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirayama, Yoichi; Obara, Minoru

    2005-03-01

    Femtosecond laser ablation of materials with high thermal conductivity is of paramount importance, because the chemical composition and properties of the area ablated with femtosecond laser are kept unchanged. The material processing by femtosecond laser can well control the heat-affected zone, compared to nanosecond laser ablation. We report on the heat-affected zone of crystalline copper (Cu) by use of femtosecond laser experimentally and theoretically. Laser ablation of Cu is investigated theoretically by two temperature model and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The MD simulation takes into account of electron temperature and thermal diffusion length calculated by two temperature model. The dependence of lattice temperature on time and depth is calculated by the MD simulation and two temperature model. The heat-affected zone estimated from the temperature is mainly studied and calculated to be 3 nm at 0.02 J/cm2 which is below the threshold fluence of 0.137 J/cm2. In addition, the thickness of heat-affected zone of copper crystal ablated with femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser is experimentally studied. As a result of X-ray diffraction (XRD) of the ablated surface, the surface crystallinity is partially changed into disordered structure from crystal form. The residual energy left in the metal, which is not used for ablation, will induce liquid phase, leading to the amorphous phase of the metal during resolidification. The thickness of heat-affected zone depends on laser fluence and is experimentally measured to be less than 1 μm at higher laser fluences than the ablation threshold.

  16. Analysis of laser ablation dynamics of CFRP in order to reduce heat affected zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Yuji; Tsukamoto, Masahiro; Nariyama, Tatsuya; Nakai, Kazuki; Matsuoka, Fumihiro; Takahashi, Kenjiro; Masuno, Shinichiro; Ohkubo, Tomomasa; Nakano, Hitoshi

    2014-03-01

    A carbon fiber reinforced plastic [CFRP], which has high strength, light weight and weather resistance, is attractive material applied for automobile, aircraft and so on. The laser processing of CFRP is one of suitable way to machining tool. However, thermal affected zone was formed at the exposure part, since the heat conduction property of the matrix is different from that of carbon fiber. In this paper, we demonstrated that the CFRP plates were cut with UV nanosecond laser to reduce the heat affected zone. The ablation plume and ablation mass were investigated by laser microscope and ultra-high speed camera. Furthermore, the ablation model was constructed by energy balance, and it was confirmed that the ablation rate was 0.028 μg/ pulse in good agreement with the calculation value of 0.03 μg/ pulse.

  17. Margin Size is an Independent Predictor of Local Tumor Progression After Ablation of Colon Cancer Liver Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xiaodong; Sofocleous, Constantinos T. Erinjeri, Joseph P.; Petre, Elena N.; Gonen, Mithat; Do, Kinh G.; Brown, Karen T.; Covey, Anne M.; Brody, Lynn A.; Alago, William; Thornton, Raymond H.; Kemeny, Nancy E.; Solomon, Stephen B.

    2013-02-15

    This study was designed to evaluate the relationship between the minimal margin size and local tumor progression (LTP) following CT-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of colorectal cancer liver metastases (CLM). An institutional review board-approved, HIPPA-compliant review identified 73 patients with 94 previously untreated CLM that underwent RFA between March 2003 and May 2010, resulting in an ablation zone completely covering the tumor 4-8 weeks after RFA dynamic CT. Comparing the pre- with the post-RFA CT, the minimal margin size was categorized to 0, 1-5, 6-10, and 11-15 mm. Follow-up included CT every 2-4 months. Kaplan-Meier methodology and Cox regression analysis were used to evaluate the effect of the minimal margin size, tumor location, size, and proximity to a vessel on LTP. Forty-five of 94 (47.9 %) CLM progressed locally. Median LTP-free survival (LPFS) was 16 months. Two-year LPFS rates for ablated CLM with minimal margin of 0, 1-5 mm, 6-10 mm, 11-15 mm were 26, 46, 74, and 80 % (p < 0.011). Minimal margin (p = 0.002) and tumor size (p = 0.028) were independent risk factors for LTP. The risk for LTP decreased by 46 % for each 5-mm increase in minimal margin size, whereas each additional 5-mm increase in tumor size increased the risk of LTP by 22 %. An ablation zone with a minimal margin uniformly larger than 5 mm 4-8 weeks postablation CT is associated with the best local tumor control.

  18. Modeling bimodal vessel effects on radio and microwave frequency ablation zones.

    PubMed

    Brannan, Joseph D; Ladtkow, Casey M

    2009-01-01

    A bench liver model is presented that separates the thermal and electrical effects of large blood vessels within radio and microwave frequency ablation boundaries. The model includes a cylindrical tissue environment with a 5 mm vessel placed parallel to and 15 mm way from either a Covidien Energy-based Devices Evident MW Ablation Percutaneous Antenna or a CoolTip RF Ablation Single Electrode Kit. An array of fiber optic thermal probes is used to monitor radial temperature profile on the vessel and non-vessel sides of the ablation zone. Circulating blood exhibits higher electrical conductivity than surrounding liver tissue and provides a significant means for transport of thermal energy. Data from the thermal probes indicate key performance differentiators between MW and RF ablation modalities when they are used next to large blood vessels clarifying the difference between thermal and electrical energy sink. The results suggest RFA is susceptible to both the thermal and electrical energy sink effects of large vasculature while MWA is only susceptible to thermal sink. Ablation zone boundaries were distorted on both the vessel and non-vessel sides with RFA whereas with MWA only the vessel side is affected.

  19. Radiofrequency Ablation of Liver Metastases-Software-Assisted Evaluation of the Ablation Zone in MDCT: Tumor-Free Follow-Up Versus Local Recurrent Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Keil, Sebastian Bruners, Philipp; Schiffl, Katharina; Sedlmair, Martin; Muehlenbruch, Georg; Guenther, Rolf W.; Das, Marco; Mahnken, Andreas H.

    2010-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate differences in change of size and CT value between local recurrences and tumor-free areas after CT-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of hepatic metastases during follow-up by means of dedicated software for automatic evaluation of hepatic lesions. Thirty-two patients with 54 liver metastases from breast or colorectal cancer underwent triphasic contrast-enhanced multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) to evaluate hepatic metastatic spread and localization before CT-guided RFA and for follow-up after intervention. Sixteen of these patients (65.1 {+-} 10.3 years) with 30 metastases stayed tumor-free (group 1), while the other group (n = 16 with 24 metastases; 62.0 {+-} 13.8 years) suffered from local recurrent disease (group 2). Applying an automated software tool (SyngoCT Oncology; Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany), size parameters (volume, RECIST, WHO) and attenuation were measured within the lesions before, 1 day after, and 28 days after RFA treatment. The natural logarithm (ln) of the quotient of the volume 1 day versus 28 days after RFA treament was computed: lnQ1//28/0{sub volume}. Analogously, ln ratios of RECIST, WHO, and attenuation were computed and statistically evaluated by repeated-measures ANOVA. One lesion in group 2 was excluded from further evaluation due to automated missegmentation. Statistically significant differences between the two groups were observed with respect to initial volume, RECIST, and WHO (p < 0.05). Furthermore, ln ratios corresponding to volume, RECIST, and WHO differed significantly between the two groups. Attenuation evaluations showed no significant differences, but there was a trend toward attenuation assessment for the parameter lnQ28/0{sub attenuation} (p = 0.0527), showing higher values for group 1 (-0.4 {+-} 0.3) compared to group 2 (-0.2 {+-} 0.2). In conclusion, hepatic metastases and their zone of coagulation necrosis after RFA differed significantly between tumor

  20. Radiofrequency ablation of liver metastases-software-assisted evaluation of the ablation zone in MDCT: tumor-free follow-up versus local recurrent disease.

    PubMed

    Keil, Sebastian; Bruners, Philipp; Schiffl, Katharina; Sedlmair, Martin; Mühlenbruch, Georg; Günther, Rolf W; Das, Marco; Mahnken, Andreas H

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate differences in change of size and CT value between local recurrences and tumor-free areas after CT-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of hepatic metastases during follow-up by means of dedicated software for automatic evaluation of hepatic lesions. Thirty-two patients with 54 liver metastases from breast or colorectal cancer underwent triphasic contrast-enhanced multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) to evaluate hepatic metastatic spread and localization before CT-guided RFA and for follow-up after intervention. Sixteen of these patients (65.1 + or - 10.3 years) with 30 metastases stayed tumor-free (group 1), while the other group (n = 16 with 24 metastases; 62.0 + or - 13.8 years) suffered from local recurrent disease (group 2). Applying an automated software tool (SyngoCT Oncology; Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany), size parameters (volume, RECIST, WHO) and attenuation were measured within the lesions before, 1 day after, and 28 days after RFA treatment. The natural logarithm (ln) of the quotient of the volume 1 day versus 28 days after RFA treament was computed: lnQ1//28/0(volume). Analogously, ln ratios of RECIST, WHO, and attenuation were computed and statistically evaluated by repeated-measures ANOVA. One lesion in group 2 was excluded from further evaluation due to automated missegmentation. Statistically significant differences between the two groups were observed with respect to initial volume, RECIST, and WHO (p < 0.05). Furthermore, ln ratios corresponding to volume, RECIST, and WHO differed significantly between the two groups. Attenuation evaluations showed no significant differences, but there was a trend toward attenuation assessment for the parameter lnQ28/0(attenuation) (p = 0.0527), showing higher values for group 1 (-0.4 + or - 0.3) compared to group 2 (-0.2 + or - 0.2). In conclusion, hepatic metastases and their zone of coagulation necrosis after RFA differed significantly between tumor

  1. Economic Effects of Increased Control Zone Sizes in Conflict Resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Datta, Koushik

    1998-01-01

    A methodology for estimating the economic effects of different control zone sizes used in conflict resolutions between aircraft is presented in this paper. The methodology is based on estimating the difference in flight times of aircraft with and without the control zone, and converting the difference into a direct operating cost. Using this methodology the effects of increased lateral and vertical control zone sizes are evaluated.

  2. Measurements of the conduction-zone length and mass ablation rate in cryogenic direct-drive implosions on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Michel, D. T.; Davis, A. K.; Goncharov, V. N.; Sangster, T. C.; Hu, S. X.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Seka, W.; Froula, D. H.

    2015-04-14

    Measurements of the conduction-zone length (110 ± 20 μm at t = 2.8 ns), the averaged mass ablation rate of the deuterated plastic (7.95 ± 0.3 μg/ns), shell trajectory, and laser absorption are made in direct-drive cryogenic implosions and are used to quantify the electron thermal transport through the conduction zone. Hydrodynamic simulations that use nonlocal thermal transport and cross-beam energy transfer models reproduce these experimental observables. Hydrodynamic simulations that use a time-dependent flux-limited model reproduce the measured shell trajectory and the laser absorption but underestimate the mass ablation rate by ~10% and the length of the conduction zone by nearly a factor of 2.

  3. Measurements of the Conduction-Zone Length and Mass Ablation Rate in Cryogenic Direct-Drive Implosions on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, D. T.; Davis, A. K.; Goncharov, V. N.; Sangster, T. C.; Hu, S. X.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Seka, W.; Froula, D. H.

    2015-04-01

    Measurements of the conduction-zone length (110 ±20 μ m at t =2.8 ns ), the averaged mass ablation rate of the deuterated plastic (7.95 ±0.3 μ g /ns ), shell trajectory, and laser absorption are made in direct-drive cryogenic implosions and are used to quantify the electron thermal transport through the conduction zone. Hydrodynamic simulations that use nonlocal thermal transport and cross-beam energy transfer models reproduce these experimental observables. Hydrodynamic simulations that use a time-dependent flux-limited model reproduce the measured shell trajectory and the laser absorption but underestimate the mass ablation rate by ˜10 % and the length of the conduction zone by nearly a factor of 2.

  4. Recurrent Polymorphic Ventricular Tachycardia Treated by Ablation of Purkinje Arborization within an Infarct Border-Zone

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyoung-Min; Nam, Gi-Byoung; Choi, Kee-Joon; Kim, You-Ho

    2011-01-01

    A 70-year-old patient with 3-vessel coronary artery disease and a left ventricular aneurysm underwent coronary artery bypass grafting, together with a surgical anterior ventricular endocardial restoration (SAVER) procedure. Four days later, he suddenly developed recurrent sustained and nonsustained polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, preceded by monomorphic ventricular premature contractions, and did not respond to any antiarrhythmic drug, including lidocaine, esmolol, or amiodarone. Repeated electrical cardioversion procedures were performed (28 in total). Mapping was performed to target the earliest site of activation in the left ventricle during the ventricular premature contractions, a site where the premature beats were preceded by Purkinje potentials. That site was located along a scar border-zone. Ablation at that site resulted in the disappearance of the monomorphic ventricular premature contractions and in the complete suppression of the electrical storm. These findings appear to indicate that the area in which the Purkinje potentials were recorded along the scar border-zone played an important role in the mechanism of the polymorphic ventricular tachycardia after myocardial infarction. PMID:21720476

  5. Changes in ice geometry and supraglacial hydrology, Sermeq Avannarleq ablation zone, West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLamb, W. S.; Colgan, W.; Phillips, T. P.; Abdalati, W.; Steffen, K.; Motyka, R. J.; Rajaram, H.

    2010-12-01

    Our study quantifies changes in ice geometry and surface hydrology within a ~30 by 50 km study area in the ablation zone of the Sermeq (Glacier) Avannarleq over the period 1985 to 2009. To investigate changes in surface hydrology, we compare a 1985 supraglacial topography map created by the Grønlands Geologiske Undersøgelse (GGU) accompanied by the panchromatic orthomosaic from which it was generated, and a 2009 panchromatic WorldView-1image of the same region. A 1985 digital elevation model (DEM) was created by manually digitizing the GGU map contour lines and performing a spline interpolation of these values into a 100 m spatial resolution DEM. Differencing the 1985 DEM from a 2009 ASTER DEM yields a mean thinning rate of 1.23 ± 1.29 m/a in the ablation zone and a mean thickening rate of 0.09 ± 1.29 m/a in the accumulation zone. Analysis of secondary DEM attributes suggests a significant increase (p < 0.05, t = 115.8, df = 128605) in mean surface slope from 2.12° in 1985 (σ 1.91°) to 2.68° in 2009 (σ 1.88°). From manual delineations of the ice sheet margin in both the 2009 WorldView-1 imagery and the 1985 GGU map, we calculate a mean rate of marginal recession (of predominately land terminating ice) of 9.4 ± 1.3 m/a. We quantify the distribution of supraglacial rivers in the southern 1/3 of our study area by classifying the regions that contain surface water (i.e. rivers) and those which do not. The classification algorithm is based on fuzzy set theory and user defined parameters to “defuzzify” unclear membership regions based on surrounding pixel values and density. Preliminary results of the river comparison between 1985 orthomosaic and 2009 WorldView-1 image suggest that the river system has been substantially reorganized in some areas, presumably due to increased crevassing and surface melt. In other areas, the locations of major river channels are persistent over the study time period, resulting in geographic variability of perennial stream

  6. Endometrial ablation

    MedlinePlus

    Hysteroscopy-endometrial ablation; Laser thermal ablation; Endometrial ablation-radiofrequency; Endometrial ablation-thermal balloon ablation; Rollerball ablation; Hydrothermal ablation; Novasure ablation

  7. Document zone classification using sizes of connected components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jisheng; Phillips, Ihsin T.; Ha, Jaekyu; Haralick, Robert M.

    1996-03-01

    In this paper, we describe a feature based supervised zone classifier using only the knowledge of the widths and the heights of the connected-components within a given zone. The distribution of the widths and the heights of the connected-components is encoded into a n multiplied by m dimensional vector in the decision making. Thus, the computational complexity is in the order of the number of connected-components within the given zone. A binary decision tree is used to assign a zone class on the basis of its feature vector. The training and testing data sets for the algorithm are drawn from the scientific document pages in the UW-I database. The classifier is able to classify each given scientific and technical document zone into one of the eight labels: text of font size 8-12, text of font size 13-18, text of font size 19-36, display math, table, halftone, line drawing, and ruling, in real time. The classifier is able to discriminate text from non-text with an accuracy greater than 97%.

  8. Controlled reshaping of the front surface of the cornea through its full-area ablation outside of the optical zone with a Gaussian ArF excimer laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semchishen, A. V.; Semchishen, V. A.

    2014-01-01

    We studied in vitro the response of the topography of the cornea to its full-area laser ablation (the laser beam spot diameter is commensurable with the size of the interface) outside of the central zone with an excimer laser having a Gaussian fluence distribution across the beam. Subject to investigation were the topographically controlled surface changes of the anterior cornea in 60 porcine eyes with a 5 ± 1.25-diopter artificially induced astigmatism, the changes being caused by laser ablation of the stromal collagen in two 3.5-mm-dia. circular areas along the weaker astigmatism axis. Experimental relationships are presented between the actual astigmatism correction and the expected correction for the intact optical zones 1, 2, 3, and 4 mm in diameter. The data for each zone were approximated by the least-squares method with the function d = a + bx. The coefficient b is given with the root-mean-square error. The statistical processing of the data yielded the following results: d = (0.14 ± 0.037)x for the 1-mm-dia. optical zone, (1.10 ± 0.036)x for the 2-mm-dia. optical zone, (1.04 ± 0.020)x for the 3-mm-dia. optical zone, and (0.55 ± 0.04)x for the 4-mm-dia. optical zone. Full astigmatism correction was achieved with ablation effected outside of the 3-mm-dia. optical zone. The surface changes of the cornea are shown to be due not only to the removal of the corneal tissue, but also to the biomechanical topographic response of the cornea to its strain caused by the formation of a dense pseudomembrane in the ablation area.

  9. Laser ablation synthesis in solution and size manipulation of noble metal nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Amendola, Vincenzo; Meneghetti, Moreno

    2009-05-28

    In the past years, laser ablation synthesis in solution (LASiS) emerged as a reliable alternative to traditional chemical reduction methods for obtaining noble metal nanoparticles (NMNp). LASiS is a "green" technique for the synthesis of stable NMNp in water or in organic solvents, which does not need stabilizing molecules or other chemicals. The so obtained NMNp are highly available for further functionalization or can be used wherever unprotected metal nanoparticles are desired. Surface functionalization of NMNp can be monitored in real time by UV-visible spectroscopy of the plasmon resonance. However LASiS has some limitations in the size control of NMNp, which can be overcome by "chemical free" laser treatments of NMNp. In this paper we provide an overview of LASiS, size manipulation by laser irradiation and functionalization of NMNp, with special care in pointing out some of the main issues about this research area.

  10. Measurements of nanoparticle size distribution produced by laser ablation of tungsten and boron-carbide in N 2 ambient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bereznai, Miklós; Heszler, Péter; Tóth, Zsolt; Wilhelmsson, Ola; Boman, Mats

    2006-04-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) were produced by ablating tungsten and boron-carbide (B 4C) target materials in atmospheric pressure nitrogen ambient using ArF excimer laser pulses. The size distributions of the NPs formed during the ablation were monitored—within a 7-133 nm size window—by a condensation particle counter connected to a differential mobility analyzer. The laser repetition rate was varied between 1-50 Hz, and the fluence was systematically changed in the range of 0.5-15 J/cm 2, for both materials, allowing a comparative study in an extended laser parameter regime. The multishot ablation threshold ( Φth) of B 4C was determined to be ˜1.9 J/cm 2 for the laser used (ArF excimer, λ = 193 nm). Similarly to earlier studies, it was shown that the size distributions consist of mainly small nanoparticles (<˜20 nm) attributed to a non-thermal ablation mechanism below Φth. An additional broad peak appears (between 20 and 40 nm) above Φth as a consequence of the thermally induced macroscopic ablation. Chemical composition of deposited polydisperse nanoparticles was studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showing nitrogen incorporation into the boron-carbide.

  11. Helicopter-based Photography for use in SfM over the West Greenland Ablation Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mote, T. L.; Tedesco, M.; Astuti, I.; Cotten, D.; Jordan, T.; Rennermalm, A. K.

    2015-12-01

    Results of low-elevation high-resolution aerial photography from a helicopter are reported for a supraglacial watershed in West Greenland. Data were collected at the end of July 2015 over a supraglacial watershed terminating in the Kangerlussuaq region of Greenland and following the Utrecht University K-Transect of meteorological stations. The aerial photography reported here were complementary observations used to support hyperspectral measurements of albedo, discussed in the Greenland Ice sheet hydrology session of this AGU Fall meeting. A compact digital camera was installed inside a pod mounted on the side of the helicopter together with gyroscopes and accelerometers that were used to estimate the relative orientation. Continuous video was collected on 19 and 21 July flights, and frames extracted from the videos are used to create a series of aerial photos. Individual geo-located aerial photos were also taken on a 24 July flight. We demonstrate that by maintaining a constant flight elevation and a near constant ground speed, a helicopter with a mounted camera can produce 3-D structure of the ablation zone of the ice sheet at unprecedented spatial resolution of the order of 5 - 10 cm. By setting the intervalometer on the camera to 2 seconds, the images obtained provide sufficient overlap (>60%) for digital image alignment, even at a flight elevation of ~170m. As a result, very accurate point matching between photographs can be achieved and an extremely dense RGB encoded point cloud can be extracted. Overlapping images provide a series of stereopairs that can be used to create point cloud data consisting of 3 position and 3 color variables, X, Y, Z, R, G, and B. This point cloud is then used to create orthophotos or large scale digital elevation models, thus accurately displaying ice structure. The geo-referenced images provide a ground spatial resolution of approximately 6 cm, permitting analysis of detailed features, such as cryoconite holes, evolving small

  12. Evaluation of the energy transfer in the char zone during ablation. Part 2: In-depth response of ablative composites, volume 1. Ph.D. Thesis, 1975. Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pike, R. W.; Delvalle, E. G.

    1974-01-01

    The decomposition of ablative composites is described along with the transport phenomena of pyrolysis gases which result from the decomposition of these plastics as they flow through the porous char of char-forming ablators. The pyrolysis products are those formed by the thermal degradation of nylon-phenolic resin and silicone elastomer composites. Emphasis is placed on the nature and extent of chemical reactions of the pyrolysis products and the char, along with the energy absorbed by the combined pyrolysis and char zone. Chemical reactions with thermodynamically consistent kinetic data are determined in order to develop a realistic analysis for predicting the thermal performance of ablative heat shields.

  13. Impact of monsoonal rainfall on specific mass balance in ablation zone of Chhota Shigri Glacier in 2008, Himachal Pradesh, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, P.; Ramanathan, A.; Linda, A.; Wagnon, P.; Arnod, Y.; Jose, P. G.; Chevallier, P.

    2009-04-01

    The Mass Balance of the Chhota Shigri glacier (32.2°N, 77.5°E; 15.7 km2, 4050 to 6263m a.m.s.l., 9 km long) located in Lahaul and Spiti valley, Himachal Pradesh, India has been monitored from 2002 to 2008 using glaciological method. In 2008, an additional field survey during 3- 10th August was undertaken to understand the impact of monsoonal rainfall on specific mass balance at various points on the ablation zone of this glacier that is alternatively influenced by the Indian monsoon and the mid-latitude westerlies. Specific Annual Mass Balance is negative (0.93 mweq), Equilibrium Line Altitude (ELA) is 5120m and Accumulation Area Ratio (AAR) is 38% in the 2007-08 hydrological year. In 2008 data obtained from nearest Weather station at Keylong show that the monsoon hit the Spiti valley in the middle of June (15 days earlier than normal date ) .The results reveal that 70% of total specific mass balance occurred by the first week of August indicating that most of the melting occurred in the first half of ablation season, dominated by monsoonal rainfall. The rainfall may accelerate ablation rate by supplying ( heat ) energy even it is very low and exposing bare dirty ice thereby decreasing albedo. In part A of the glacier, the mean vertical gradient of ablation up to August 08 is 0.67 m w.e. 100 m-1 between 4350 and 4850 m a.s.l., (area free of debris) and for part B, it is 0.41 m w.e. 100 m-1 between 4600m a.s.l. and 5000m a.s.l. From August 08 up to 1st week of October, mean vertical gradient of the ablation for part A is 0.54m w.e. 100 m-1 and it is 0.61 m w.e. 100 m-1 in part B for the same altitude ranges. Below 4350m a.s.l. the whole glacier is covered by debris and the melting rate is significantly reduced. Overall, ablation rate is influenced by rainfall, incoming solar radiation and debris cover.

  14. Production of nanometer-size GaAs nanocristals by nanosecond laser ablation in liquid.

    PubMed

    Abderrafi, Kamal; Jiménez, Ernesto; Ben, Teresa; Molina, Sergio I; Ibáñez, Rafael; Chirvony, Vladimir; Martínez-Pastor, Juan P

    2012-08-01

    This paper reports the formation and characterization of spherical GaAs quantum dots obtained by nanosecond pulsed laser ablation in a liquid (ethanol or methanol). The produced bare GaAs nanoparticles demonstrate rather narrow size distribution which depends on the applied laser power density (from 4.25 to 13.9 J/cm2 in our experiments) and is as low as 2.5 nm for the highest power used. The absolute value of the average diameter also decreases significantly, from 13.7 to 8.7 nm, as the laser power increases in this interval. Due to the narrow nanoparticle size dispersion achieved at the highest laser powers two absorption band edges are clearly distinguishable at about 1.72 and 3.15 eV which are ascribed to E0 and E1 effective optical transitions, respectively. A comparison of the energies with those known for bulk GaAs allows one to conclude that an average diameter of the investigated GaAs nanoparticles is close to 10 nm, i.e., they are quantum dots. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images show that the bare GaAs nanoparticles are nanocrystalline, but many of them exhibit single/multiple twin boundary defects or even polycrystallinity. The formation of the GaAs crystalline core capped with a SiO2 shell was demonstrated by HRTEM and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy. Effective band edges can be better distinguished in SiO2 capped nanoparticles than in bare ones, In both cases the band edges are correlated with size quantum confinement effect.

  15. Kepler Mission: Detecting Earth-sized Planets in Habitable Zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kondo, Yoji; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Kepler Mission, which is presently in Phase A, is being proposed for launch in 5 years for a 4-year mission to determine the frequency of Earth-sized or larger planets in habitable zones in our galaxy. Kepler will be placed in an Earth-trailing orbit to provide stable physical environments for the sensitive scientific instruments. The satellite is equipped with a photometric system with the precision of 10E-5, which should be sufficient for detecting the transits of Earth-sized or larger planets in front of dwarf stars similar to the Sun. Approximately 100,000 or more sun-like stars brighter than the 14th apparently magnitude will be monitored continuously for 4 years in a preselected region of the sky, which is about 100 square degrees in size. In addition, Kepler will have a participating scientist program that will enable research in intrinsic variable stars, interacting binaries including cataclysmic stars and X-ray binaries, and a large number of solar analogs in our galaxy. Several ten thousand additional stars may be investigated in the guest observer program open to the whole world.

  16. Cavitation-free CW laser ablation from a solid target to synthesize low size-dispersed Au nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kabashin, Andrei V; Kucherik, Alexei; Ryabchikov, Yury; Kutrovskaya, Stella; Al-Kattan, Ahmed; Arakelyan, Sergei; Itina, Tatiana

    2017-02-27

    Continuous wave (CW) radiation from Yb-fiber laser (central wave length is 1064 nm, power 1-200 W) is used to initiate ablation of material Au target in deionized water and synthesize bare (unprotected) Au nanoparticles. We show that the formed nanoparticles present a single low-size-dispersed population with the mean size of the order of 10 nm, which contrasts to previously reported data on dual populations of nanoparticles during pulsed laser ablation in liquids. The lacking second population of nanoparticles is explained by the absence of cavitation-related mechanism of material ablation, which typically takes place under pulsed laser action on a solid target in liquid ambience, and this supposition is confirmed by plume visualization tests. We also observe a gradual growth of mean nanoparticles size from 8-10 to 20-25 nm under the increase of laser power for 532 nm pumping wavelength, while for 1064 nm pumping wavelength the mean size 8-10 nm is independent of radiation power. The growth of the nanoparticles observed for 532 nm wavelength is attributed to the enhanced target melting and splashing followed by an additional heating due to an efficient excitation of plasmons over Au nanoparticles. Bare, low-size-dispersed Au nanoparticles are of importance for a variety of applications, including biomedicine, catalysis, photovoltaics etc., whereas the employment of CW radiation for nanomaterial production promises an improvement of cost-efficiency of this technology.

  17. The Annual Glaciohydrology Cycle in the Ablation Zone of the Greenland Ice Sheet: Part 1. Hydrology Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colgan, William; Rajaram, Harihar; Anderson, Robert; Steffen. Konrad; Phillips, Thomas; Zwally, H. Jay; Abdalati, Waleed

    2012-01-01

    We apply a novel one-dimensional glacier hydrology model that calculates hydraulic head to the tidewater-terminating Sermeq Avannarleq flowline of the Greenland ice sheet. Within a plausible parameter space, the model achieves a quasi-steady-state annual cycle in which hydraulic head oscillates close to flotation throughout the ablation zone. Flotation is briefly achieved during the summer melt season along a approx.17 km stretch of the approx.50 km of flowline within the ablation zone. Beneath the majority of the flowline, subglacial conduit storage closes (i.e. obtains minimum radius) during the winter and opens (i.e. obtains maximum radius) during the summer. Along certain stretches of the flowline, the model predicts that subglacial conduit storage remains open throughout the year. A calculated mean glacier water residence time of approx.2.2 years implies that significant amounts of water are stored in the glacier throughout the year. We interpret this residence time as being indicative of the timescale over which the glacier hydrologic system is capable of adjusting to external surface meltwater forcings. Based on in situ ice velocity observations, we suggest that the summer speed-up event generally corresponds to conditions of increasing hydraulic head during inefficient subglacial drainage. Conversely, the slowdown during fall generally corresponds to conditions of decreasing hydraulic head during efficient subglacial drainage.

  18. Intracoronary electrocardiogram during alcohol septal ablation for hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy predicts myocardial injury size.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jing; Qu, Xiaolong; Huang, Haiyun; Zhang, Shanwen; Zhao, Weibo; He, Guoxiang; Song, Zhiyuan; Hu, Houyuan

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol septal ablation (ASA) has been used widely to treat patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM). During the routine ASA procedure, it is difficult to detect the septal injury in real-time. The aim of the present study is to assess myocardial injury during ASA by recording intracoronary electrocardiogram (IC-ECG). From 2012 to 2015, 31 HOCM patients were treated with ASA, and IC-ECG was recorded in 21 patients successfully before and after ethanol injection. The elevation of ST-segment on IC-ECG after ethanol injection was expressed as its ratio to the level before injection or the absolute increasing value. Blood samples were collected before and after ASA for measuring changes in cardiac biomarkers. The ratio value of ST-segment elevation was positively correlated with both the amount of ethanol injected (r = 0.645, P = 0.001) and the myocardial injury size (creatine kinase-MB area under the curve (AUC) of CK-MB) (r = 0.466, P = 0.017). The absolute increment of ST-segment was also positively associated with both the amount of ethanol (r = 0.665, P = 0.001) and AUC of CK-MB (0.685, P = 0.001). However, there was no statistical correlation between the reduction of left ventricular outflow tract gradient and ST-segment elevation. Additionally no severe ASA procedure-related complications were observed in our patients. In conclusion, myocardial injury induced by ethanol injection can be assessed immediately by ST-segment elevation on IC-ECG. This study is the first to show that IC-ECG is a useful method for predicting myocardial injury during ASA in real-time.

  19. Tuning the size of aluminum oxide nanoparticles synthesized by laser ablation in water using physical and chemical approaches.

    PubMed

    Al-Mamun, Sharif Abdullah; Nakajima, Reiko; Ishigaki, Takamasa

    2013-02-15

    Colloidal solution of nano-sized spherical Al(2)O(3) particles were produced by nanosecond laser ablation upon irradiation on a corundum target in a distilled water environment. The effects of target inclination along the direction of laser irradiation and defocusing of the laser beam have been investigated in this study. The effect of the pH of the aqueous solution has also been studied. Synthesized particles were analyzed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to investigate particle shape and size distributions. Ablated nanoparticles (NPs) were spherical in shape, with the average particle size ranging from 8 to 18 nm in different operating conditions. Target inclination resulted in a decrease in the average particle size. Laser defocusing at the same power and thus with reduced fluence caused a decrease in the average size and standard deviation (SD), whereas defocusing that maintained the same fluence caused the reverse effect. Phase identification of NPs performed with high resolution TEM lattice images and fast Fourier transform indicated both a metastable γ-Al(2)O(3) phase and a stable α-Al(2)O(3) phase. X-ray diffraction analysis was also performed, which showed peaks of both α-Al(2)O(3) and γ-Al(2)O(3) with the presence of α- and γ-AlO(OH) polymorphs in acidic and alkaline solution, respectively. Surface conditions of the ablated particles representing the acidic and alkaline conditions were found to have a significant influence on both the size and crystallographic phase, which indicates it may be possible to induce size and phase transitions by changing the surface chemistry.

  20. Large and rapid melt-induced velocity changes in the ablation zone of the Greenland Ice Sheet.

    PubMed

    van de Wal, R S W; Boot, W; van den Broeke, M R; Smeets, C J P P; Reijmer, C H; Donker, J J A; Oerlemans, J

    2008-07-04

    Continuous Global Positioning System observations reveal rapid and large ice velocity fluctuations in the western ablation zone of the Greenland Ice Sheet. Within days, ice velocity reacts to increased meltwater production and increases by a factor of 4. Such a response is much stronger and much faster than previously reported. Over a longer period of 17 years, annual ice velocities have decreased slightly, which suggests that the englacial hydraulic system adjusts constantly to the variable meltwater input, which results in a more or less constant ice flux over the years. The positive-feedback mechanism between melt rate and ice velocity appears to be a seasonal process that may have only a limited effect on the response of the ice sheet to climate warming over the next decades.

  1. The Emprint™ Ablation System with Thermosphere™ Technology: One of the Newer Next-Generation Microwave Ablation Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Alonzo, Marc; Bos, Aaron; Bennett, Shelby; Ferral, Hector

    2015-01-01

    Microwave ablation is a recent development in the field of tumor ablation that uses electromagnetic waves to establish a microwave near-field with direct tissue heating. Some of the limitations of the earlier generation devices had been unpredictable size and shape of the ablation zones with changes in the surrounding tissue environment as well as differences across various different tissue types. The Emprint Ablation System with Thermosphere Technology (Covidien, Boulder, CO) is the most recent generation ablation system that attempts to produce predictable large spherical zones of ablation despite varying tissue environments across different tissue types such as liver, lung, and bone to name a few. This article will discuss these recent device developments as well as review some basic microwave characteristics. PMID:26622094

  2. In situ diagnostic of the size distribution of nanoparticles generated by ultrashort pulsed laser ablation in vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Bourquard, Florent; Loir, Anne-Sophie; Donnet, Christophe; Garrelie, Florence

    2014-03-10

    We aim to characterize the size distribution of nanoparticles located in the ablation plume produced by femtosecond laser interaction. The proposed method relies on the use of white-light extinction spectroscopy setup assisted by ultrafast intensified temporal gating. This method allows measurement of optical absorbance of a nickel nanoparticles cloud. Simulation of the extinction section of nickel nanoparticles size distributions has been developed in order to compare the measured optical absorbance to the optical extinction by theoretical and experimental nanoparticles size distributions (measured by scanning electron microscopy). A good agreement has been found between the in situ measured optical absorbance and the optical extinction cross section calculated from ex situ nanoparticles size distribution measurements.

  3. Evaluation of Movement Restriction Zone Sizes in Controlling Classical Swine Fever Outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Shankar; Olynk Widmar, Nicole; Lay, Donald C.; Croney, Candace; Weng, Hsin-Yi

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the impacts of movement restriction zone sizes of 3, 5, 9, and 11 km with that of 7 km (the recommended zone size in the United States) in controlling a classical swine fever (CSF) outbreak. In addition to zone size, different compliance assumptions and outbreak types (single site and multiple site) were incorporated in the study. Three assumptions of compliance level were simulated: baseline, baseline ± 10%, and baseline ± 15%. The compliance level was held constant across all zone sizes in the baseline simulation. In the baseline ± 10% and baseline ± 15% simulations, the compliance level was increased for 3 and 5 km and decreased for 9 and 11 km from the baseline by the indicated percentages. The compliance level remained constant in all simulations for the 7-km zone size. Four single-site (i.e., with one index premises at the onset of outbreak) and four multiple-site (i.e., with more than one index premises at the onset of outbreak) CSF outbreak scenarios in Indiana were simulated incorporating various zone sizes and compliance assumptions using a stochastic between-premises disease spread model to estimate epidemic duration, percentage of infected, and preemptively culled swine premises. Furthermore, a risk assessment model that incorporated the results from the disease spread model was developed to estimate the number of swine premises under movement restrictions that would experience animal welfare outcomes of overcrowding or feed interruption during a CSF outbreak in Indiana. Compared with the 7-km zone size, the 3-km zone size resulted in a longer median epidemic duration, larger percentages of infected premises, and preemptively culled premises (P’s < 0.001) across all compliance assumptions and outbreak types. With the assumption of a higher compliance level, the 5-km zone size significantly (P < 0.001) reduced the epidemic duration and percentage of swine premises that would

  4. Effect of inter-pulse delay time on production and size properties of colloidal nanoparticles prepared by collinear double-pulse laser ablation in liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fattahi, Behzad; Mahdieh, Mohammah Hossein

    2016-08-01

    The influence of inter-pulse delay times (0-20 ns) between two collinear sequential nanosecond pulses on the production and size properties (mean size and size distribution) of colloidal nanoparticles prepared by pulsed laser ablation of a silver target in a distilled water medium has been studied. Various laser fluences at different inter-pulse delay times between two collinear pulses were used. Furthermore, for a better understanding of the effect of the double-pulse and single-pulse mode, experiments were performed. The characterization of the synthesized colloidal nanoparticles was investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. Our results showed that 5 ns time-delayed double-pulse laser ablation results in the production of nanoparticles with the highest concentration among the other time-delayed ablation experiments and even more than single-pulse-mode experiments. It also found that using a double-pulse approach with inter-pulse delay times in the range of 0-20 ns leads to the production of nanoparticles with smaller mean sizes and narrower size distributions in comparison to single-pulse-mode laser ablation. The effect of time overlapping between two pulses in the case of double-pulse ablation was analyzed.

  5. Pulsed Tm:YAG laser ablation of knee joint tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wei-Qiang; Vari, Sandor G.; Duffy, J. T.; Miller, J. M.; Weiss, Andrew B.; Fishbein, Michael C.; Grundfest, Warren S.

    1992-06-01

    We investigated the effect of a free-running 2.01 micron pulsed Tm:YAG laser on bovine knee joint tissues. Ablation rates of fresh fibrocartilage, hyaline cartilage, and bone were measured in saline as a function of laser fluence (160 - 640 J/cm2) and fiber core size (400 and 600 microns). All tissues could be effectively ablated and the ablation rate increased linearly with the increasing fluence. Use of fibers of different core sizes, while maintaining constant energy fluence, did not result in significant difference in ablation rate. Histology analyses of the ablated tissue samples reveal average Tm:YAG radiation induced thermal damage (denatunalization) zones ranging between 130 and 540 microns, depending on the laser parameters and the tissue type.

  6. Local recurrence of small cell lung cancer following radiofrequency ablation is induced by HIF-1α expression in the transition zone

    PubMed Central

    WAN, JUN; WU, WEI; ZHANG, RENQUAN

    2016-01-01

    Local recurrence of lung cancer following radiofrequency ablation (RFA) treatment is common. The aims of the present study were to assess how RFA treatment affects the growth of small cell lung cancer (SCLC) micrometastases in the transition zone (TZ) surrounding the ablated region and in the reference zones (RZs) of the ablated or unablated lobes and to identify the molecular mechanism(s) of lung cancer recurrence following RFA treatment. After lung micrometastases of human SCLCs had formed, RFA treatment was applied to the right upper lobe (RUL) of the lung in nude mice. Hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1α expression, proliferation and angiogenesis potential both in the TZ and RZ were evaluated over time. Separately, at day 1, 7 and 14 following RFA treatment, the growth of micrometastases showed an ~2-fold increase in the TZ compared to the RZ of the unablated lobe, as the right lower lobe (RLL) and the growth of micrometastases in the RZ of the RUL was also induced by RFA. In addition, accelerated tumor growth in the TZ was induced by HIF-1α, but was not associated with tissue angiogenesis potential. We concluded that local recurrences of SCLCs caused by overproliferation of micrometastases following RFA treatment were driven by HIF-1α, although angiogenesis was not the driving force in the TZ. PMID:26750332

  7. Microwave Tissue Ablation: Biophysics, Technology and Applications

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Microwave ablation is an emerging treatment option for many cancers, cardiac arrhythmias and other medical conditions. During treatment, microwaves are applied directly to tissues to produce rapid temperature elevations sufficient to produce immediate coagulative necrosis. The engineering design criteria for each application differ, with individual consideration for factors such as desired ablation zone size, treatment duration, and procedural invasiveness. Recent technological developments in applicator cooling, power control and system optimization for specific applications promise to increase the utilization of microwave ablation in the future. This article will review the basic biophysics of microwave tissue heating, provide an overview of the design and operation of current equipment, and outline areas for future research for microwave ablation. PMID:21175404

  8. Optical changes as a marker for lesion size estimation during radio frequency ablation: a model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, Ola; Wardell, Karin

    2001-06-01

    Stereotactic radiofrequency (RF)-lesioning in the central part of the brain is performed on patients that, for instance, have severe movement or psychiatric disorders. The size of the generated lesion can to some extent be controlled by RF-generator settings such as temperature and time as well as the electrode configuration. Today, MR- imaging and CT are the essential diagnostic methods to confirm the lesion size in vivo. The aim of this study was to investigate whether it is possible to use changes in the reflected light intensity and laser Doppler flowmetry as a marker for size estimation during RF-lesioning.

  9. Measurements of the Conduction-Zone Length and Mass Ablation Rate to Study the Hydrodynamic Coupling in Cryogenic Direct-Drive Implosions on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, D. T.; Davis, A. K.; Goncharov, V. N.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Epstein, R.; Hu, S. X.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Seka, W.; Froula, D. H.

    2015-11-01

    The ablation-front trajectory and the averaged mass ablation rate is measured in direct-drive cryogenic target implosions on the OMEGA Laser System by imaging the soft x rays emitted by the coronal plasma. The length of the conduction zone is determined by coupling x-ray and scattered-light measurements. These measurements are compared to hydrodynamic simulations to study the modeling of the hydrodynamic coupling for various beam and target radii. Reducing the beam focal-spot radius relative to the target radius is a method that is being studied to reduce cross-beam energy transfer and increase the hydrodynamic efficiency. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  10. Genetic Ablation of Soluble TNF Does Not Affect Lesion Size and Functional Recovery after Moderate Spinal Cord Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ellman, Ditte Gry; Degn, Matilda; Lund, Minna Christiansen; Clausen, Bettina Hjelm; Novrup, Hans Gram; Flæng, Simon Bertram; Jørgensen, Louise Helskov; Suntharalingam, Lujitha; Svenningsen, Åsa Fex; Brambilla, Roberta

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is followed by an instant increase in expression of the microglial-derived proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF) within the lesioned cord. TNF exists both as membrane-anchored TNF (mTNF) and as cleaved soluble TNF (solTNF). We previously demonstrated that epidural administration of a dominant-negative inhibitor of solTNF, XPro1595, to the contused spinal cord resulted in changes in Iba1 protein expression in microglia/macrophages, decreased lesion volume, and improved locomotor function. Here, we extend our studies using mice expressing mTNF, but no solTNF (mTNFΔ/Δ), to study the effect of genetic ablation of solTNF on SCI. We demonstrate that TNF levels were significantly decreased within the lesioned spinal cord 3 days after SCI in mTNFΔ/Δ mice compared to littermates. This decrease did, however, not translate into significant changes in other pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-5, IL-2, CXCL1, CCL2, or CCL5), despite a tendency towards increased IL-10 and decreased IL-1β, TNFR1, and TNFR2 levels in mTNFΔ/Δ mice. In addition, microglial and leukocyte infiltration, activation state (Iba1, CD11b, CD11c, CD45, and MHCII), lesion size, and functional outcome after moderate SCI were comparable between genotypes. Collectively, our data demonstrate that genetic ablation of solTNF does not significantly modulate postlesion outcome after SCI. PMID:28070141

  11. “Edgeboost”: A Novel Technique to Extend the Ablation Zone Lateral to a Two-Probe Bipolar Radiofrequency Device

    SciTech Connect

    Huo, Ya Ruth Pillai, Krishna Akhter, Javed Morris, David L.

    2016-01-15

    BackgroundThe dual-electrode bipolar-RFA (B-RFA) is increasingly used to ablate large liver tumours (3–7 cm). However, the challenging aspect of B-RFA is the placement of the two electrodes around the tumour. Realignment often requires the electrodes to be extracted and reinserted.AimThe aim of this study is to examine “Edgeboost”, a novel technique to increase the lateral ablation dimension without requiring any realignment of the electrodes.Methods and MaterialsAn egg-white model and an ex vivo calf liver model were used compare the standard bipolar mode ablation to Edgeboost-1 (reaching full impedance in bipolar mode initially, then cycling in unipolar mode between left and right probes) and Edgeboost-2 (similar to Edgeboost-1 but not reaching full impedance initially in bipolar mode in order to minimize charring and, thus, to increase total ablation time).ResultsA significantly larger outer lateral ablation dimension to the probe was achieved with Edgeboost-1 compared to the standard method in the liver model (1.14 cm, SD: 0.16 vs. 0.44 cm, SD: 0.24, p = 0.04). Edgeboost-2 achieved the largest outer lateral ablation dimension of 1.75 cm (SD: 0.35). A similar association was seen in the egg model. Edgeboost-2 almost doubled the mass ablated with standard bipolar alone (mass ratio: 1:1.94 in egg white and 1:1.84 in liver).ConclusionThis study demonstrates that the novel “Edgeboost” technique can increase the outer lateral ablation dimension without requiring the two inserted electrodes to be reinserted. This would be beneficial for interventionists who use the dual B-RFA.

  12. Field experiments to assess the effect of lithology and grain size on the ablation of debris covered glaciers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juen, M.; Mayer, C.; Lambrecht, A.; Wirbel, A.; Kueppers, U.

    2012-04-01

    Currently many glaciers all over the world show negative mass balances. Because of the retreating ice masses, there is an increase of deglaciated slopes. In combination with increased melting of permafrost these areas can become unstable and account for an additional supply of weathered bedrock and sediments onto the glacier surface. Furthermore increasing ablation rates advance the melting out and accumulation of englacial till on the glacier surface. The experiment was performed during summer season 2010 at the middle tongue of Vernagtferner, a temperate glacier in the Oetztal Alps, Austria. The experimental setup was designed in a way to monitor the parameters which are most crucial for controlling sub-debris ice melt with regards to lithology, grain size and moisture content. Ten test plots were established with different debris grain sizes and debris thicknesses consisting of sieved natural material. The local metamorphic mica schist and volcanic debris were used for the experiment. Ablation was measured at stakes. Bare ice melt was observed continuously with a sonic ranger. Three automatic weather stations were installed to record meteorological data. To obtain information concerning the internal temperature distribution of the debris cover, thermistors were installed at various depths. For each individual plot thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity have been estimated. The observations during the season revealed a clear dependence of the sub-debris ice melt on the layer thickness and the grain size. For the fine sand fraction the moisture content plays an important role, as these test fields were always water saturated. Highly porous volcanic material protects the ice much more effectively from melting than similar layer thicknesses of the local mica schist. Also the albedo plays an important role, where melt rates under dark debris are about 1.75 times higher than underneath brighter material. The analysis of thermal diffusivities indicates that lower

  13. Fatigue Resistance of the Grain Size Transition Zone in a Dual Microstructure Superalloy Disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, T. P.; Kantzos, P. T.; Telesman, J.; Gayda, J.; Sudbrack, C. K.; Palsa, B. S.

    2010-01-01

    Mechanical property requirements vary with location in nickel-based superalloy disks. To maximize the associated mechanical properties, heat treatment methods have been developed for producing tailored microstructures. In this study, a specialized heat treatment method was applied to produce varying grain microstructures from the bore to the rim portions of a powder metallurgy processed nickel-based superalloy disk. The bore of the contoured disk consisted of fine grains to maximize strength and fatigue resistance at lower temperatures. The rim microstructure of the disk consisted of coarse grains for maximum resistance to creep and dwell crack growth at high temperatures up to 704 C. However, the fatigue resistance of the grain size transition zone was unclear, and needed to be evaluated. This zone was located as a band in the disk web between the bore and rim. Specimens were extracted parallel and transverse to the transition zone, and multiple fatigue tests were performed at 427 and 704 C. Mean fatigue lives were lower at 427 C than for 704 C. Specimen failures often initiated at relatively large grains, which failed on crystallographic facets. Grain size distributions were characterized in the specimens, and related to the grains initiating failures as well as location within the transition zone. Fatigue life decreased with increasing maximum grain size. Correspondingly, mean fatigue resistance of the transition zone was slightly higher than that of the rim, but lower than that of the bore. The scatter in limited tests of replicates was comparable for all transition zone locations examined.

  14. Fatigue Failure Modes of the Grain Size Transition Zone in a Dual Microstructure Disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, Timothy P.; Kantzos, Pete T.; Palsa, Bonnie; Telesman, Jack; Gayda, John; Sudbrack, Chantal K.

    2012-01-01

    Mechanical property requirements vary with location in nickel-based superalloy disks. In order to maximize the associated mechanical properties, heat treatment methods have been developed for producing tailored grain microstructures. In this study, fatigue failure modes of a grain size transition zone in a dual microstructure disk were evaluated. A specialized heat treatment method was applied to produce varying grain microstructure in the bore to rim portions of a powder metallurgy processed nickel-based superalloy disk. The transition in grain size was concentrated in a zone of the disk web, between the bore and rim. Specimens were extracted parallel and transversely across this transition zone, and multiple fatigue tests were performed at 427 C and 704 C. Grain size distributions were characterized in the specimens, and related to operative failure initiation modes. Mean fatigue life decreased with increasing maximum grain size, going out through the transition zone. The scatter in limited tests of replicates was comparable for failures of uniform gage specimens in all transition zone locations examined.

  15. Evaluation of movement restriction zone sizes in controlling classical swine fever outbreaks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to compare the movement restriction zone sizes of 3-km, 5-km, 9-km, and 11-km with that of 7-km in controlling a classical swine fever (CSF) outbreak. Three assumptions of compliance level were considered: baseline, baseline ±10%, and baseline ±15%. The compliance lev...

  16. Tissue healing response following hyperthermic vapor ablation in the porcine longissimus muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grantham, John T.; Grisez, Brian T.; Famoso, Justin; Hoey, Michael; Dixon, Chris; Coad, James E.

    2015-03-01

    As the use of hyperthermic ablation technologies has increased, so too has the need to understand their effects on tissue and their healing responses. This study was designed to characterize tissue injury and healing following hyperthermic vapor ablation in the in vivo porcine longissimus muscle model. The individual ablations were performed using the NxThera Vapor Delivery System (NxThera Inc., Minneapolis, MN). To assess the vapor ablation's evolution, the swine were euthanized post-treatment on Day 0, Day 3, Day 7, Day 14, Day 28, Day 45 and Day 90. Triphenyltetrazolium chloride viability staining (TTC staining) was used to macroscopically assess the extent of each vapor ablation within the tissue. The ablation associated healing responses were then histologically evaluated for acute inflammation, chronic inflammation, foreign body reaction and fibrosis. Two zones of tissue injury were initially identified in the ablations: 1) a central zone of complete coagulative necrosis and 2) an outer "transition zone" of viable and non-viable cells. The ablations initially increased in size from Day 0 to Day 7 and then progressively decreased in size though Day 45. The initial Day 3 healing changes originated in the transition zone with minimal acute and chronic inflammation. As time progressed, granulation tissue began to form by Day 7 and peaked around Day 14. Collagen formation, deposition and remodeling began in the adjacent healthy tissue by Day 28, replaced the ablation site by Day 45 and reorganized by Day 90. In conclusion, this vapor ablation technology provided a non-desiccating form of hyperthermic ablation that resulted in coagulative necrosis without a central thermally/heat-fixed tissue component, followed a classical wound healing pathway, and healed with minimal associated inflammation.

  17. Dependence of earthquake size distributions on convergence rates at subduction zones

    SciTech Connect

    Mccaffrey, R.

    1994-10-01

    The correlation of numbers of thrust earthquakes of moment magnitude 7 or greater in this century at subduction zones with convergence rate results from a combination of lower recurrence intervals for earthquakes of a given size where slip rates are high and peak in the global distribution of subduction zone convergence rates at high values (55 to 90 mm/yr). Hence, physical mechanisms related to convergence rate, such as plate interface force, slab pull, or thermal effects, are not required to explain the distribution of large earthquakes with convergence rate. The seismic coupling coefficient ranges from 10% to 100% at subduction zone segments where convergence is faster than 45 mm/yr but does not correlate with rate. The coefficient is generally orders of magnitude lower at rates below 40 mm/yr which may be due to long recurrence intervals and a short sampling period (94 years).

  18. CT thermometry for cone-beam CT guided ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeStefano, Zachary; Abi-Jaoudeh, Nadine; Li, Ming; Wood, Bradford J.; Summers, Ronald M.; Yao, Jianhua

    2016-03-01

    Monitoring temperature during a cone-beam CT (CBCT) guided ablation procedure is important for prevention of over-treatment and under-treatment. In order to accomplish ideal temperature monitoring, a thermometry map must be generated. Previously, this was attempted using CBCT scans of a pig shoulder undergoing ablation.1 We are extending this work by using CBCT scans of real patients and incorporating more processing steps. We register the scans before comparing them due to the movement and deformation of organs. We then automatically locate the needle tip and the ablation zone. We employ a robust change metric due to image noise and artifacts. This change metric takes windows around each pixel and uses an equation inspired by Time Delay Analysis to calculate the error between windows with the assumption that there is an ideal spatial offset. Once the change map is generated, we correlate change data with measured temperature data at the key points in the region. This allows us to transform our change map into a thermal map. This thermal map is then able to provide an estimate as to the size and temperature of the ablation zone. We evaluated our procedure on a data set of 12 patients who had a total of 24 ablation procedures performed. We were able to generate reasonable thermal maps with varying degrees of accuracy. The average error ranged from 2.7 to 16.2 degrees Celsius. In addition to providing estimates of the size of the ablation zone for surgical guidance, 3D visualizations of the ablation zone and needle are also produced.

  19. Pulsed Laser Ablation-Induced Green Synthesis of TiO2 Nanoparticles and Application of Novel Small Angle X-Ray Scattering Technique for Nanoparticle Size and Size Distribution Analysis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amandeep; Vihinen, Jorma; Frankberg, Erkka; Hyvärinen, Leo; Honkanen, Mari; Levänen, Erkki

    2016-12-01

    This paper aims to introduce small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) as a promising technique for measuring size and size distribution of TiO2 nanoparticles. In this manuscript, pulsed laser ablation in liquids (PLAL) has been demonstrated as a quick and simple technique for synthesizing TiO2 nanoparticles directly into deionized water as a suspension from titanium targets. Spherical TiO2 nanoparticles with diameters in the range 4-35 nm were observed with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed highly crystalline nanoparticles that comprised of two main photoactive phases of TiO2: anatase and rutile. However, presence of minor amounts of brookite was also reported. The traditional methods for nanoparticle size and size distribution analysis such as electron microscopy-based methods are time-consuming. In this study, we have proposed and validated SAXS as a promising method for characterization of laser-ablated TiO2 nanoparticles for their size and size distribution by comparing SAXS- and TEM-measured nanoparticle size and size distribution. SAXS- and TEM-measured size distributions closely followed each other for each sample, and size distributions in both showed maxima at the same nanoparticle size. The SAXS-measured nanoparticle diameters were slightly larger than the respective diameters measured by TEM. This was because SAXS measures an agglomerate consisting of several particles as one big particle which slightly increased the mean diameter. TEM- and SAXS-measured mean diameters when plotted together showed similar trend in the variation in the size as the laser power was changed which along with extremely similar size distributions for TEM and SAXS validated the application of SAXS for size distribution measurement of the synthesized TiO2 nanoparticles.

  20. Pulsed Laser Ablation-Induced Green Synthesis of TiO2 Nanoparticles and Application of Novel Small Angle X-Ray Scattering Technique for Nanoparticle Size and Size Distribution Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Amandeep; Vihinen, Jorma; Frankberg, Erkka; Hyvärinen, Leo; Honkanen, Mari; Levänen, Erkki

    2016-10-01

    This paper aims to introduce small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) as a promising technique for measuring size and size distribution of TiO2 nanoparticles. In this manuscript, pulsed laser ablation in liquids (PLAL) has been demonstrated as a quick and simple technique for synthesizing TiO2 nanoparticles directly into deionized water as a suspension from titanium targets. Spherical TiO2 nanoparticles with diameters in the range 4-35 nm were observed with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed highly crystalline nanoparticles that comprised of two main photoactive phases of TiO2: anatase and rutile. However, presence of minor amounts of brookite was also reported. The traditional methods for nanoparticle size and size distribution analysis such as electron microscopy-based methods are time-consuming. In this study, we have proposed and validated SAXS as a promising method for characterization of laser-ablated TiO2 nanoparticles for their size and size distribution by comparing SAXS- and TEM-measured nanoparticle size and size distribution. SAXS- and TEM-measured size distributions closely followed each other for each sample, and size distributions in both showed maxima at the same nanoparticle size. The SAXS-measured nanoparticle diameters were slightly larger than the respective diameters measured by TEM. This was because SAXS measures an agglomerate consisting of several particles as one big particle which slightly increased the mean diameter. TEM- and SAXS-measured mean diameters when plotted together showed similar trend in the variation in the size as the laser power was changed which along with extremely similar size distributions for TEM and SAXS validated the application of SAXS for size distribution measurement of the synthesized TiO2 nanoparticles.

  1. Predicted size of the inelastic zone in a ball-grid-array (BGA) assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suhir, E.; Bechou, L.; Levrier, B.; Calvez, D.

    Simple and easy-to-use analytical (mathematical) predictive model has been developed for the assessment of the size of an inelastic zone, if any, in a ball-grid-array (BGA) assembly. The solder material is considered linearly elastic at the strain level below the yield point and ideally plastic above this level. The numerical example carried out for a 30mm long surface-mount package with a 200 micrometer thick lead-free solder has indicated that, in the case of a high expansion PCB substrate, about 7.5% of the interface's length experiences inelastic strains, while no such strains occur in the case of a low expansion ceramic substrate. The FEA computations confirmed this result. The suggested model can be used to check if a zone of inelastic strains exists indeed in the design of interest, and if inelastic strains can be avoided by using a low expansion board or by some other means (say, by using different bonding material at the assembly ends). If not, the model can be used to determine the size of the inelastic zone. It is advisable that such an assessment is carried out prior to the application of a Coffin-Manson-type of an equation (such as, e.g., Anand's model employed in the ANSYS software) aimed at the evaluation of the BGA material lifetime.

  2. Estimating the size of a radio quiet zone for the radio astronomy service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Bo; Han, Wenjun

    2009-12-01

    The size of a radio quiet zone (RQZ) is largely determined by transmission losses of interfering signals, which can be divided into free space loss and diffraction loss. The free space loss is dominant. The diffraction loss presented in this paper is described as unified smooth spherical and knife edge diffractions, which is a function of minimum path clearance. We present a complete method to calculate the minimum path clearance. The cumulative distribution of the lapse rate of refractivity ( g n ), between the earth surface and 1 km above, is studied by using Chinese radio climate data. Because the size of an RQZ is proportional to g n , the cumulative distribution of g n can be used as an approximation for the size of the RQZ. When interference originates from mobile communication or television transmissions at a frequency of 408 MHz, and overline {g_n } is 40 N/km, where the refractivity N=left( {n-1} right) × 10^6, the size of the RQZ would be 180 km for a mobile source or 210 km for a television source, with a probability in the range of 15-100% in different months and for different stations. When speaking of the size of an RQZ, the radius in the case of a circular zone is implied. It results that a size of an RQZ is mainly influenced by transmission loss rather than effective radiated power. In the case where the distance between an interfering source and a radio astronomical observatory is about 100 km, at a frequency of 408 MHz, the allowable effective radiated power of the interfering source should be less than -30 dBW with a probability of about 85% for overline {g_n } equals 40 N/km, or -42 dBW with a probability less than 1 % for overline {g_n } equals 80 N/km.

  3. Analysis of the change in peak corneal temperature during excimer laser ablation in porcine eyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosquera, Samuel Arba; Verma, Shwetabh

    2015-07-01

    The objective is to characterize the impact of different ablation parameters on the thermal load during corneal refractive surgery by means of excimer laser ablation on porcine eyes. One hundred eleven ablations were performed in 105 porcine eyes. Each ablation was recorded using infrared thermography and analyzed mainly based on the two tested local frequencies (40 Hz, clinical local frequency; 1000 Hz, no local frequency). The change in peak corneal temperature was analyzed with respect to varying ablation parameters [local frequency, system repetition rate, pulse energy, optical zone (OZ) size, and refractive correction]. Transepithelial ablations were also compared to intrastromal ablations. The average of the baseline temperature across all eyes was 20.5°C±1.1 (17.7°C to 22.2°C). Average of the change in peak corneal temperature for all clinical local frequency ablations was 5.8°C±0.8 (p=3.3E-53 to baseline), whereas the average was 9.0°C±1.5 for all no local frequency ablations (p=1.8E-35 to baseline, 1.6E-16 to clinical local frequency ablations). A logarithmic relationship was observed between the changes in peak corneal temperature with increasing local frequency. For clinical local frequency, change in peak corneal temperature was comparatively flat (r2=0.68 with a range of 1.5°C) with increasing system repetition rate and increased linearly with increasing OZ size (r2=0.95 with a range of 2.4°C). Local frequency controls help maintain safe corneal temperature increase during excimer laser ablations. Transepithelial ablations induce higher thermal load compared to intrastromal ablations, indicating a need for stronger thermal controls in transepithelial refractive procedures.

  4. Analysis of the change in peak corneal temperature during excimer laser ablation in porcine eyes.

    PubMed

    Arba Mosquera, Samuel; Verma, Shwetabh

    2015-07-01

    The objective is to characterize the impact of different ablation parameters on the thermal load during corneal refractive surgery by means of excimer laser ablation on porcine eyes. One hundred eleven ablations were performed in 105 porcine eyes. Each ablation was recorded using infrared thermography and analyzed mainly based on the two tested local frequencies (40 Hz, clinical local frequency; 1000 Hz, no local frequency). The change in peak corneal temperature was analyzed with respect to varying ablation parameters [local frequency, system repetition rate, pulse energy, optical zone (OZ) size, and refractive correction]. Transepithelial ablations were also compared to intrastromal ablations. The average of the baseline temperature across all eyes was 20.5°C±1.1 (17.7°C to 22.2°C). Average of the change in peak corneal temperature for all clinical local frequency ablations was 5.8°C±0.8 (p=3.3E-53 to baseline), whereas the average was 9.0°C±1.5 for all no local frequency ablations (p=1.8E-35 to baseline, 1.6E-16 to clinical local frequency ablations). A logarithmic relationship was observed between the changes in peak corneal temperature with increasing local frequency. For clinical local frequency, change in peak corneal temperature was comparatively flat (r 2 =0.68 with a range of 1.5°C) with increasing system repetition rate and increased linearly with increasing OZ size (r 2 =0.95 with a range of 2.4°C). Local frequency controls help maintain safe corneal temperature increase during excimer laser ablations. Transepithelial ablations induce higher thermal load compared to intrastromal ablations, indicating a need for stronger thermal controls in transepithelial refractive procedures.

  5. Planning Irreversible Electroporation in the Porcine Kidney: Are Numerical Simulations Reliable for Predicting Empiric Ablation Outcomes?

    SciTech Connect

    Wimmer, Thomas Srimathveeravalli, Govindarajan; Gutta, Narendra; Ezell, Paula C.; Monette, Sebastien; Maybody, Majid; Erinjery, Joseph P.; Durack, Jeremy C.; Coleman, Jonathan A.; Solomon, Stephen B.

    2015-02-15

    PurposeNumerical simulations are used for treatment planning in clinical applications of irreversible electroporation (IRE) to determine ablation size and shape. To assess the reliability of simulations for treatment planning, we compared simulation results with empiric outcomes of renal IRE using computed tomography (CT) and histology in an animal model.MethodsThe ablation size and shape for six different IRE parameter sets (70–90 pulses, 2,000–2,700 V, 70–100 µs) for monopolar and bipolar electrodes was simulated using a numerical model. Employing these treatment parameters, 35 CT-guided IRE ablations were created in both kidneys of six pigs and followed up with CT immediately and after 24 h. Histopathology was analyzed from postablation day 1.ResultsAblation zones on CT measured 81 ± 18 % (day 0, p ≤ 0.05) and 115 ± 18 % (day 1, p ≤ 0.09) of the simulated size for monopolar electrodes, and 190 ± 33 % (day 0, p ≤ 0.001) and 234 ± 12 % (day 1, p ≤ 0.0001) for bipolar electrodes. Histopathology indicated smaller ablation zones than simulated (71 ± 41 %, p ≤ 0.047) and measured on CT (47 ± 16 %, p ≤ 0.005) with complete ablation of kidney parenchyma within the central zone and incomplete ablation in the periphery.ConclusionBoth numerical simulations for planning renal IRE and CT measurements may overestimate the size of ablation compared to histology, and ablation effects may be incomplete in the periphery.

  6. Middle East measurements of concentration and size distribution of aerosol particles for coastal zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendersky, Sergey; Kopeika, Norman S.; Blaunstein, Natan S.

    2005-10-01

    Recently, an extension of the Navy Aerosol Model (NAM) was proposed based on analysis of an extensive series of measurements at the Irish Atlantic Coast and at the French Mediterranean Coast. We confirm the relevance of that work for the distant eastern Meditteranean and extend several coefficients of that coastal model, proposed by Piazzola et al. for the Meditteranean Coast (a form of the Navy Aerosol Model), to midland Middle East coastal environments. This analysis is based on data collected at three different Middle East coastal areas: the Negev Desert (Eilat) Red Sea Coast, the Sea of Galilee (Tiberias) Coast, and the Mediterranean (Haifa) Coast. Aerosol size distributions are compared with those obtained through measurements carried out over the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Ocean Coasts, and Mediterranean, and Baltic Seas Coasts. An analysis of these different results allows better understanding of the similarities and differences between different coastal lake, sea, and open ocean zones. It is shown that in the coastal regions in Israel, compared to open ocean and other sea zones, larger differences in aerosol particle concentration are observed. The aerosol particle concentrations and their dependences on wind speed for these coastal zones are analyzed and discussed. We propose to classify the aerosol distribution models to either: 1. a coastal model with marine aerosol domination; 2. a coastal model with continental aerosol domination (referred to as midland coast in this work); or 3. a coastal model with balanced marine and continental conditions.

  7. An Earth-sized planet in the habitable zone of a cool star.

    PubMed

    Quintana, Elisa V; Barclay, Thomas; Raymond, Sean N; Rowe, Jason F; Bolmont, Emeline; Caldwell, Douglas A; Howell, Steve B; Kane, Stephen R; Huber, Daniel; Crepp, Justin R; Lissauer, Jack J; Ciardi, David R; Coughlin, Jeffrey L; Everett, Mark E; Henze, Christopher E; Horch, Elliott; Isaacson, Howard; Ford, Eric B; Adams, Fred C; Still, Martin; Hunter, Roger C; Quarles, Billy; Selsis, Franck

    2014-04-18

    The quest for Earth-like planets is a major focus of current exoplanet research. Although planets that are Earth-sized and smaller have been detected, these planets reside in orbits that are too close to their host star to allow liquid water on their surfaces. We present the detection of Kepler-186f, a 1.11 ± 0.14 Earth-radius planet that is the outermost of five planets, all roughly Earth-sized, that transit a 0.47 ± 0.05 solar-radius star. The intensity and spectrum of the star's radiation place Kepler-186f in the stellar habitable zone, implying that if Kepler-186f has an Earth-like atmosphere and water at its surface, then some of this water is likely to be in liquid form.

  8. A guideline for sizing Photovoltaic panels across different climatic zones in Burkina Faso

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waongo, M.; Koalaga, Z.; Zougmore, F.

    2012-02-01

    In many developing countries a long time series of solar radiation measurements are not often available. This is due to the cost, maintenance and calibration requirements of measuring devices. Consequently, the use of solar energy by Photovoltaic (PV) conversion copes with the choice and the optimization of the PV system. This work concerned the analysis of climate parameters strongly influencing the Photovoltaic (PV) systems energy production and the simulation of an ideal system based on a single PV module. Estimation and analysis of time series of climate parameters covered a set of six weather stations with respect to the three climatic zones in Burkina Faso (BF), over 38 years. The analysis showed that the solar irradiation in BF lies between 3 kWh/m2/day and 7.5 kWh/m2/day. The highest values of the solar irradiation are measured in the Northern part of the country while lowest values are measured in the Southern part. Daily mean temperature for all weather stations was greater than the Standard Test Condition (STC) temperature (25°C) over a long period of the year. Information on solar irradiation and temperature is fundamental for PV systems sizing process. For PV performance evaluation, a simulation is carried out using an ideal system composed of a single PV module from TENESOL Company. This simulation is performed for three classes of climatic conditions "Mean situation", "Adverse situation", and "Beneficial situation", and evaluated for six sitesacross BF. The results revealed intra-annual and spatial variability of Maximum Power (MP). Across BF, MP varied between 60 W/day and 190 W/day in Sahelian zone, between 65 W/day and 185 W/day in soudano-sahelian zone, and between 67 W/day and 208 W/day in Soudanian zone. MP intra-annual variability is higher during the period July-August, mainly for "Beneficial situation". The negative effect of temperature on PV energy production is specially amplified in Sahelian zone due to its highest temperatures. This

  9. Infrared laser bone ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Nuss, R.C.; Fabian, R.L.; Sarkar, R.; Puliafito, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    The bone ablation characteristics of five infrared lasers, including three pulsed lasers (Nd:YAG, lambda = 1064 micron; Hol:YSGG, lambda = 2.10 micron; and Erb:YAG, lambda = 2.94 micron) and two continuous-wave lasers (Nd:YAG, lambda = 1.064 micron; and CO/sub 2/, lambda = 10.6 micron), were studied. All laser ablations were performed in vitro, using moist, freshly dissected calvarium of guinea pig skulls. Quantitative etch rates of the three pulsed lasers were calculated. Light microscopy of histologic sections of ablated bone revealed a zone of tissue damage of 10 to 15 micron adjacent to the lesion edge in the case of the pulsed Nd:YAG and the Erb:YAG lasers, from 20 to 90 micron zone of tissue damage for bone ablated by the Hol:YSGG laser, and 60 to 135 micron zone of tissue damage in the case of the two continuous-wave lasers. Possible mechanisms of bone ablation and tissue damage are discussed.

  10. Metagenomic analysis of size-fractionated picoplankton in a marine oxygen minimum zone

    PubMed Central

    Ganesh, Sangita; Parris, Darren J; DeLong, Edward F; Stewart, Frank J

    2014-01-01

    Marine oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) support diverse microbial communities with roles in major elemental cycles. It is unclear how the taxonomic composition and metabolism of OMZ microorganisms vary between particle-associated and free-living size fractions. We used amplicon (16S rRNA gene) and shotgun metagenome sequencing to compare microbial communities from large (>1.6 μm) and small (0.2–1.6 μm) filter size fractions along a depth gradient in the OMZ off Chile. Despite steep vertical redox gradients, size fraction was a significantly stronger predictor of community composition compared to depth. Phylogenetic diversity showed contrasting patterns, decreasing towards the anoxic OMZ core in the small size fraction, but exhibiting maximal values at these depths within the larger size fraction. Fraction-specific distributions were evident for key OMZ taxa, including anammox planctomycetes, whose coding sequences were enriched up to threefold in the 0.2–1.6 μm community. Functional gene composition also differed between fractions, with the >1.6 μm community significantly enriched in genes mediating social interactions, including motility, adhesion, cell-to-cell transfer, antibiotic resistance and mobile element activity. Prokaryotic transposase genes were three to six fold more abundant in this fraction, comprising up to 2% of protein-coding sequences, suggesting that particle surfaces may act as hotbeds for transposition-based genome changes in marine microbes. Genes for nitric and nitrous oxide reduction were also more abundant (three to seven fold) in the larger size fraction, suggesting microniche partitioning of key denitrification steps. These results highlight an important role for surface attachment in shaping community metabolic potential and genome content in OMZ microorganisms. PMID:24030599

  11. Rate Equation Theory for Island Sizes and Capture Zone Areas in Submonolayer Deposition: Realistic Treatment of Spatial Aspects of Nucleation

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J W; Li, M; Bartelt, M C

    2002-12-05

    Extensive information on the distribution of islands formed during submonolayer deposition is provided by the joint probability distribution (JPD) for island sizes, s, and capture zone areas, A. A key ingredient determining the form of the JPD is the impact of each nucleation event on existing capture zone areas. Combining a realistic characterization of such spatial aspects of nucleation with a factorization ansatz for the JPD, we provide a concise rate equation formulation for the variation with island size of both the capture zone area and the island density.

  12. The effect of the melt thermal gradient on the size of the constitutionally supercooled zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, A.; Yuan, L.; Lee, P. D.; Easton, M.; StJohn, D.

    2016-03-01

    Recent verification of the analytical Interdependence model by a numerical solidification model (µMatIC) confirmed the critical role of constitutional supercooling (CS) in achieving sufficient undercooling to trigger successful nucleation events. The location of the maximum amount of CS (ΔTCSmax) is some distance from the interface of the previously growing grain and this distance contributes to the final as-cast grain size. The effect of the thermal gradient, G, on the size of the CS zone (CSZ) was neglected in that work. However, G is expected to affect the size of the CSZ (i.e. the length of the CSZ, x’ CSZ , and the location of ΔTCSmax, x’ CSmax ). This investigation assesses the effect of G on x’csz and x' CSmax . A range of G values is introduced into both the analytical and the numerical models to obtain a correlation between the value of G and the dimensions of the CSZ. The result of a test case from the analytical model shows that x’ CSmax initially decreases rapidly and then decreases gradually approaching zero at very high values of G. Independent of the analytical model, the results from the numerical model replicate the trend obtained from the analytical model.

  13. CT Mapping of the Distribution of Saline During Radiofrequency Ablation with Perfusion Electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Gillams, A.R. Lees, W.R.

    2005-05-15

    Purpose. During radiofrequency (RF) ablation, adjunctive saline increases the size of the ablation zone and therefore electrodes that simultaneously deliver current and saline have been developed, but the addition of saline also results in an irregular ablation zone. Our aim was to study the distribution of saline during RF ablation. Methods. Four patients were treated: 3 with liver metastases and 1 with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Two different perfusion electrodes were used: a high-perfusion-rate, straight electrode (Berchtold, Germany) and a low-perfusion-rate, expandable electrode (RITA Medical Systems, USA). The saline perfusate was doped with non-ionic contrast medium to render it visible on CT and the electrical conductivity was measured. CT scans were obtained of each electrode position prior to ablation and repeated after ablation. Contrast-enhanced CT was performed 18-24 hr later to demonstrate the ablation zone. All treatments were carried out according to the manufacturer's recommended protocol. Results. The addition of a small quantity of non-ionic contrast did not alter the electrical conductivity of the saline. Contrast-doped saline extravasated beyond the tumor in all 3 patients with metastases but was limited in the patient with HCC. In some areas where saline had extravasated there was reduced enhancement on contrast-enhanced CT consistent with tissue ablation. One patient treated with the high-perfusion-rate system sustained a jejunal perforation requiring surgery. Conclusion. Saline can extravasate beyond the tumor and with the high-perfusion-rate system this resulted in an undesirable extension of the ablation zone and a complication.

  14. Selections from 2015: Earth-Sized Planet Found in Star's Habitable Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-03-01

    Editors Note:In these last two weeks of 2015, well be looking at a few selections from among the most-downloaded paperspublished in AAS journals this year. The usual posting schedule will resume after the AAS winter meeting.Discovery and Validation of Kepler-452b: a 1.6 R Super Earth Exoplanet in the Habitable Zone of a G2 StarPublished July2015Main takeaway:A phase-folded light curve showing the transit of Kepler-452b. Its transit lasts 10.5 hours, and its period is 385 days. [Jenkins et al. 2015]A team led by Jon Jenkins (NASA Ames Research Center) announced the discovery and confirmation of Kepler-452b, an exoplanet only 60% larger than Earth and located in the habitable zone of its G2 star. This planet orbits its star at a distance of just over 1 AU, taking 385 days to complete an orbit. Kepler-452b also stands a good chance of being rocky, according to estimates.Why its interesting:Kepler-452b is the first near-Earth-sized planet to be found in the habitable zone of a Sun-like star making this the closest analog to the Earth-Sun system found in the Kepler dataset so far.About the history of the system (and the future of ours?):The authors estimate that the system is ~6 billion years old, and that Kepler-452b has been in the habitable zone of its star throughout its lifetime a substantially longer time than Earth has been around and habitable! Kepler-452bs host star, in addition to being 1.5 billion years older than the Sun, is roughly 10% larger. This system might therefore provide a glimpse of what Earths environment may be like in the future, as the Sun slowly expands on its way to becoming a red giant.CitationJon M. Jenkins et al 2015 AJ 150 56. doi:10.1088/0004-6256/150/2/56

  15. Kepler Mission: A Mission to Find Earth-size Planets in the Habitable Zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borucki, W. J.

    2003-01-01

    The Kepler Mission is a Discovery-class mission designed to continuously monitor the brightness of 100,000 solar-like stars to detect the transits of Earth-size and larger planets. It is a wide field of view photometer Schmidt-type telescope with an array of 42 CCDs. It has a 0.95 m aperture and 1.4 m primary and is designed to attain a photometric precision of 2 parts in 10(exp 5) for 12th magnitude solar-like stars for a 6 hr transit duration. It will continuously observe 100,000 main-sequence stars from 9th to 14th magnitude in the Cygnus constellation for a period of four years with a cadence of 4/hour. An additional 250 stars can be monitored at a cadence of l/minute to do astro-seismology of stars brighter than 11.5 mv. The photometer is scheduled to be launched into heliocentric orbit in 2007. When combined with ground-based spectrometric observations of these stars, the positions of the planets relative to the habitable zone can be found. The spectra of the stars are also used to determine the relationships between the characteristics of terrestrial planets and the characteristics of the stars they orbit. In particular, the association of planet size and occurrence frequency with stellar mass and metallicity will be investigated. Based on the results of the current Doppler-velocity discoveries, over a thousand giant planets will also be found. Information on the albedos and densities of those giants showing transits will be obtained. At the end of the four year mission, hundreds of Earth-size planets should be discovered in and near the HZ of their stars if such planets are common. A null result would imply that terrestrial planets in the HZ are very rare and that life might also be quite rare.

  16. Imaging Features of Radiofrequency Ablation with Heat-Deployed Liposomal Doxorubicin in Hepatic Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Cheng William Chow, Lucy; Turkbey, Evrim B.; Lencioni, Riccardo; Libutti, Steven K.; Wood, Bradford J.

    2016-03-15

    IntroductionThe imaging features of unresectable hepatic malignancies in patients who underwent radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in combination with lyso-thermosensitive liposomal doxorubicin (LTLD) were determined.Materials and MethodsA phase I dose escalation study combining RFA with LTLD was performed with peri- and post- procedural CT and MRI. Imaging features were analyzed and measured in terms of ablative zone size and surrounding penumbra size. The dynamic imaging appearance was described qualitatively immediately following the procedure and at 1-month follow-up. The control group receiving liver RFA without LTLD was compared to the study group in terms of imaging features and post-ablative zone size dynamics at follow-up.ResultsPost-treatment scans of hepatic lesions treated with RFA and LTLD have distinctive imaging characteristics when compared to those treated with RFA alone. The addition of LTLD resulted in a regular or smooth enhancing rim on T1W MRI which often correlated with increased attenuation on CT. The LTLD-treated ablation zones were stable or enlarged at follow-up four weeks later in 69 % of study subjects as opposed to conventional RFA where the ablation zone underwent involution compared to imaging acquired immediately after the procedure.ConclusionThe imaging features following RFA with LTLD were different from those after standard RFA and can mimic residual or recurrent tumor. Knowledge of the subtle findings between the two groups can help avoid misinterpretation and proper identification of treatment failure in this setting. Increased size of the LTLD-treated ablation zone after RFA suggests the ongoing drug-induced biological effects.

  17. Formation processes of floe size distribution in the marginal ice zone (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyota, T.; Kohout, A.; Fraser, A.

    2013-12-01

    Since the marginal ice zone (MIZ) is the outer sea ice zone, its behavior is key to the understanding of the variability of sea ice extent associated with climate change. Especially for the melting processes in MIZ, where relatively small ice floes are dominant, floe size distribution (FSD) is an important parameter because smaller ice floes are subject to stronger lateral melting due to their larger cumulative perimeters. As the MIZ is characterized by vigorous interaction between sea ice and waves, breakup of sea ice due to flexural forcing and collisions is considered to play an essential role in the determination of FSD there. However, the available data have been very limited so far. Analysis of the observations of ice floes with a heli-borne video camera, focusing on the floe size ranging from 2 m to 100 m, in the Sea of Okhotsk, the Weddell Sea and off East Antarctica, revealed that while FSD is basically scale-invariant, a regime shift occurs at a size of about a few tens of meters, irrespective of the study region. It was also shown 1) that the floe size at which regime shift occurs slightly increases from 20 to 40 m with ice thickness, consistent with the theory of the flexural failure of sea ice; and 2) that to explain the scale invariance in FSD for smaller floes, a fragility of sea ice which is relevant to the strength of sea ice relative to waves can be a useful physical parameter to be correlated with the fractal dimension. Thus these results confirm the importance of wave-ice interaction to the formation of FSD. Based on this, a possible mechanism of the melting process was hypothesized that in the melting season sea ice extent retreats keeping the FSD relative to the ice edge nearly constant. As a next step and to confirm and further investigate this result, we planned to conduct the concurrent measurements of FSD, wave activities, and ice thickness off East Antarctica during the Sea Ice Physics and Ecosystem Experiment 2 (SIPEX2) in September to

  18. Catheter ablation.

    PubMed

    Fromer, M; Shenasa, M

    1991-02-01

    Catheter ablation is gaining increasing interest for the therapy of symptomatic, sustained arrhythmias of various origins. The scope of this review is to give an overview of the biophysical aspects and major characteristics of some of the most widely used energy sources in catheter ablation, e.g., the discharge of conventional defibrillators, modified defibrillators, laser light, and radiofrequency current application. Results from animal studies are considered to explain the basic mechanisms of catheter ablation. The recent achievements with the use of radiofrequency current to modify or ablate cardiac conduction properties are outlined in more detail.

  19. Rates of burial and exhumation of lawsonite blueschist/eclogite in subduction zones from in situ UV laser ablation 40Ar/39Ar phengite geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornash, K.; Cosca, M. A.; Whitney, D. L.; Teyssier, C. P.

    2014-12-01

    Lawsonite eclogites and blueschists are accessible records of processes that occur at depth in subducting slabs and can therefore provide information about the chemical and physical evolution of subduction zones. In composite blueschist-eclogite terranes, blueschists may have formed (1) by prograde metamorphism (pre-eclogite), (2) at the same P-T conditions as eclogite-facies metamorphism as a result of differences in bulk composition, H2O content, or oxidation state, or (3) from retrogression of eclogite, e.g. during exhumation. Field and petrologic observations of lawsonite eclogite and blueschist in the Sivrihisar Massif, Turkey, suggest that some blueschist formed from eclogite during exhumation in the subduction channel, whereas results from thermobarometry suggest that some blueschist formed at the same P-T conditions as eclogite. To test the age, petrologic, and tectonic relationship of coexisting eclogite and blueschist, we applied in situ UV laser ablation 40Ar/39Ar phengite geochronology to eclogite- and blueschist-facies rocks representing different structural positions and displaying different phengite textures and coexisting mineral assemblages. Phengite from fresh lawsonite eclogite yield an age of 93 ± 2 Ma and have the narrowest spread in ages (<12 Ma) of any rock type analyzed. Retrogressed (epidote) eclogite yields a mean weighted age of 82 ± 2 Ma. In contrast to the tightly constrained ages obtained in eclogite pods, blueschists and blueschist-facies quartzite exhibit discrete age populations ranging from 82 Ma to 110 Ma. Deformed phengite clusters from lawsonite garnet blueschist record age populations at 82 Ma and 92 Ma. Phengite from lawsonite-garnet veins and glaucophane-rich margins of eclogite pods also record 92 Ma. Omphacite-bearing lawsonite blueschist and a blueschist-facies quartzite from the same structural position contain age populations at 97 Ma and 110 Ma. These results document a sequence of events from prograde blueschist

  20. Local ablative treatments for hepatocellular carcinoma: An updated review

    PubMed Central

    Facciorusso, Antonio; Serviddio, Gaetano; Muscatiello, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Ablative treatments currently represent the first-line option for the treatment of early stage unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Furthermore, they are effective as bridging/downstaging therapies before orthotopic liver transplantation. Contraindications based on size, number, and location of nodules are quite variable in literature and strictly dependent on local expertise. Among ablative therapies, radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has gained a pivotal role due to its efficacy, with a reported 5-year survival rate of 40%-70%, and safety. Although survival outcomes are similar to percutaneous ethanol injection, the lower local recurrence rate stands for a wider application of RFA in hepato-oncology. Moreover, RFA seems to be even more cost-effective than liver resection for very early HCC (single nodule ≤ 2 cm) and in the presence of two or three nodules ≤ 3 cm. There is increasing evidence that combining RFA to transarterial chemoembolization may increase the therapeutic benefit in larger HCCs without increasing the major complication rate, but more robust prospective data is still needed to validate these pivotal findings. Among other thermal treatments, microwave ablation (MWA) uses high frequency electromagnetic energy to induce tissue death via coagulation necrosis. In comparison to RFA, MWA has several theoretical advantages such as a broader zone of active heating, higher temperatures within the targeted area in a shorter treatment time and the lack of heat-sink effect. The safety concerns raised on the risks of this procedure, due to the broader and less predictable necrosis areas, have been recently overcome. However, whether MWA ability to generate a larger ablation zone will translate into a survival gain remains unknown. Other treatments, such as high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation, laser ablation, and cryoablation, are less investigated but showed promising results in early HCC patients and could be a valuable therapeutic option in

  1. Irreversible electroporation ablation area enhanced by synergistic high- and low-voltage pulses

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) produced by a pulsed electric field can ablate tissue. In this study, we achieved an enhancement in ablation area by using a combination of short high-voltage pulses (HVPs) to create a large electroporated area and long low-voltage pulses (LVPs) to ablate the electroporated area. The experiments were conducted in potato tuber slices. Slices were ablated with an array of four pairs of parallel steel electrodes using one of the following four electric pulse protocols: HVP, LVP, synergistic HVP+LVP (SHLVP) or LVP+HVP. Our results showed that the SHLVPs more effectively necrotized tissue than either the HVPs or LVPs, even when the SHLVP dose was the same as or lower than the HVP or LVP doses. The HVP and LVP order mattered and only HVPs+LVPs (SHLVPs) treatments increased the size of the ablation zone because the HVPs created a large electroporated area that was more susceptible to the subsequent LVPs. Real-time temperature change monitoring confirmed that the tissue was non-thermally ablated by the electric pulses. Theoretical calculations of the synergistic effects of the SHLVPs on tissue ablation were performed. Our proposed SHLVP protocol provides options for tissue ablation and may be applied to optimize the current clinical IRE protocols. PMID:28253331

  2. [New methodologicalapproaches to establishment the sizes of the sanitary protection zone and roadside clear zones of civil airports].

    PubMed

    Kartyshev, O A

    2013-01-01

    This circumstance leads to considerable mistakes it creation of SPZ borders of the airports, in some cases it impedes development of the latters and causes objective difficulties for hygienic assessment of projects. In this article the results of studies on the creation and validation of two new domestic methods for the construction of impact zones of aircraft noise and dispersion of the concentrations of pollutants in assessing the negative impact of airports are considered. Both branch methods agreed upon with the Ministry of Transport have been harmonized with ICAO (International Civil Aviation Organization) requirements. The results of full-scale measurements have confirmed the possibilities of developed software for their implementation in the formation of a common SPZ border of an airport.

  3. Microwave Ablation Compared with Radiofrequency Ablation for Breast Tissue in an Ex Vivo Bovine Udder Model

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Toshihiro; Westphal, Saskia; Isfort, Peter; Braunschweig, Till; Penzkofer, Tobias Bruners, Philipp; Kichikawa, Kimihiko; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas Mahnken, Andreas H.

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: To compare the effectiveness of microwave (MW) ablation with radiofrequency (RF) ablation for treating breast tissue in a nonperfused ex vivo model of healthy bovine udder tissue. Materials and Methods: MW ablations were performed at power outputs of 25W, 35W, and 45W using a 915-MHz frequency generator and a 2-cm active tip antenna. RF ablations were performed with a bipolar RF system with 2- and 3-cm active tip electrodes. Tissue temperatures were continuously monitored during ablation. Results: The mean short-axis diameters of the coagulation zones were 1.34 {+-} 0.14, 1.45 {+-} 0.13, and 1.74 {+-} 0.11 cm for MW ablation at outputs of 25W, 35W, and 45W. For RF ablation, the corresponding values were 1.16 {+-} 0.09 and 1.26 {+-} 0.14 cm with electrodes having 2- and 3-cm active tips, respectively. The mean coagulation volumes were 2.27 {+-} 0.65, 2.85 {+-} 0.72, and 4.45 {+-} 0.47 cm{sup 3} for MW ablation at outputs of 25W, 35W, and 45W and 1.18 {+-} 0.30 and 2.29 {+-} 0.55 cm{sup 3} got RF ablation with 2- and 3-cm electrodes, respectively. MW ablations at 35W and 45W achieved significantly longer short-axis diameters than RF ablations (P < 0.05). The highest tissue temperature was achieved with MW ablation at 45W (P < 0.05). On histological examination, the extent of the ablation zone in MW ablations was less affected by tissue heterogeneity than that in RF ablations. Conclusion: MW ablation appears to be advantageous with respect to the volume of ablation and the shape of the margin of necrosis compared with RF ablation in an ex vivo bovine udder.

  4. Sediment Distribution in the Nearshore Zone: Grain Size Evolution in Response to Shoreface Nourishment (Island of Terschelling, The Netherlands)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillén, J.; Hoekstra, P.

    1997-11-01

    The natural sediment distribution in the littoral zone of Terschelling, The Netherlands was disturbed by a shoreface nourishment carried out off the central part of the island. The sedimentological impact of this shoreface nourishment, i.e. the grain size evolution and the sediment dynamics, is studied in order to increase understanding of coastal processes. The variability of the sediment during the study period is due to both natural processes and the nourishment. Immediately after implementation of the nourishment, the sediment distribution was measurably affected. The sediment supplied caused a coarsening (20-40 μm) of the sediment in the zone directly affected by the nourishment. Six months after the nourishment, the grain size distribution across the profile was nearly the same as the original, and no significant effects of the nourishment could be recognized in the median grain size. Individual grain size fractions displayed a temporal evolution more complex than the median size, and significant changes, unrelated to the sand supplied, were observed. Results of the sediment analysis from the coastal zone of Terschelling indicate that the shoreface nourishment only had a short-term and very local impact on the sediment distribution. Some months after the nourishment, the former grain size distribution was re-established. This implies that the nourished sediment was quickly dispersed and mixed with the original deposits, and that it only represents a small part of the volume of sediment involved in the dynamics of the littoral zone. On a yearly perspective, the natural variability of the sediment was higher than the changes caused by the nourishment.

  5. Thermal ablation.

    PubMed

    Webb, Heather; Lubner, Meghan G; Hinshaw, J Louis

    2011-04-01

    Image-guided tumor ablation refers to a group of treatment modalities that have emerged during the past 2 decades as important tools in the treatment of a wide range of tumors throughout the body. Although most widely recognized in the treatment of hepatic and renal malignancies, the role of thermal ablation has expanded to include lesions of the lung, breast, prostate, bone, as well as other organs and its clinical applications continue to increase. In the following article, we discuss the major thermal ablation modalities, their respective strengths and weaknesses, potential complications and how to avoid them, as well as possible future applications.

  6. Release probability of hippocampal glutamatergic terminals scales with the size of the active zone

    PubMed Central

    Holderith, Noemi; Lorincz, Andrea; Katona, Gergely; Rózsa, Balázs; Kulik, Akos; Watanabe, Masahiko; Nusser, Zoltan

    2012-01-01

    Cortical synapses display remarkable structural, molecular and functional heterogeneity. Our knowledge regarding the relationship between the ultrastructural and functional parameters is still fragmented. Here we asked how the release probability and presynaptic [Ca2+] transients relate to the ultrastructure of rat hippocampal glutamatergic axon terminals. Two-photon Ca2+ imaging-derived optical quantal analysis and correlated electron microscopic reconstructions revealed a tight correlation between the release probability and the active zone area. The peak amplitude of [Ca2+] transients in single boutons also positively correlated with the active zone area. Freeze-fracture immunogold labeling revealed that the voltage-gated Ca2+ channel subunit Cav2.1 and the presynaptic protein Rim1/2 are confined to the active zone and their numbers scale linearly with the active zone area. Gold particles for Cav2.1 showed a nonrandom distribution within the active zones. Our results demonstrate that the number of several active zone proteins, including presynaptic Ca2+ channels, docked vesicles and the release probability scales linearly with the active zone area. PMID:22683683

  7. Preparation and investigation of the formation mechanism of submicron-sized spherical particles of gold using laser ablation and laser irradiation in liquids.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Takeshi; Yahata, Tatsuya; Yasutomo, Masato; Igawa, Kazunobu; Tsuji, Masaharu; Ishikawa, Yoshie; Koshizaki, Naoto

    2013-03-07

    Results of very recent studies have shown that laser irradiation (LI) of colloidal nanoparticles (NPs) using a non-focused laser beam at moderate fluence transforms the NPs to submicron-sized spherical particles (SMPs). For this study, we applied this technique to prepare gold SMPs from source gold NPs prepared by laser ablation of a gold plate in an aqueous solution. Results show that SMPs were obtained from NPs in pure water, but a considerably large amount of the source NPs were sedimented without LI. On the other hand, SMPs were not obtained from NPs stabilized by 1 mM citrate. These findings indicate that the agglomeration of the source NPs prior to the laser-induced melting is important to obtain SMPs, although the sedimentation of the source NPs caused by considerable agglomeration should be reduced to obtain SMPs efficiently. A proper condition of the agglomeration tendency of the source NPs to prepare SMPs reducing the sedimentation of the source NPs was obtainable by simply adjusting the citrate solution concentration. Moreover, investigation of the temporal dynamics of the formation process of SMPs suggested that the agglomeration of the source NPs not only is controlled by citrate but also is induced by LI. LI brings about the decomposition and removal of citrate molecules on the surface of the source NPs, and cause the agglomeration of the source NPs dynamically; then it brings about the fusion of the agglomerated NPs.

  8. Effects of Fusion Zone Size on Failure Modes and Performance of Advanced High Strength Steel Spot Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2006-04-28

    This paper examines the effects of fusion zone size on failure modes, static strength and energy absorption of resistance spot welds (RSW) of advanced high strength steels (AHSS). DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds are considered. The main failure modes for spot welds are nugget pullout and interfacial fracture. Partial interfacial fracture is also observed. The critical fusion zone sizes to ensure nugget pull-out failure mode are developed for both DP800 and TRIP800 using the limit load based analytical model and the micro-hardness measurements of the weld cross sections. Static weld strength tests using cross tension samples were performed on the joint populations with controlled fusion zone sizes. The resulted peak load and energy absorption levels associated with each failure mode were studied using statistical data analysis tools. The results in this study show that the conventional weld size of 4 t can not produce nugget pullout mode for both the DP800 and TRIP800 materials. The results also suggest that performance based spot weld acceptance criteria should be developed for different AHSS spot welds.

  9. In Vivo Evaluation of Lung Microwave Ablation in a Porcine Tumor Mimic Model

    SciTech Connect

    Planche, Olivier; Teriitehau, Christophe; Boudabous, Sana; Robinson, Joey Marie; Rao, Pramod; Deschamps, Frederic; Farouil, Geoffroy; Baere, Thierry de

    2013-02-15

    To evaluate the microwave ablation of created tumor mimics in the lung of a large animal model (pigs), with examination of the ablative synergy of multiple antennas. Fifty-six tumor-mimic models of various sizes were created in 15 pigs by using barium-enriched minced collected thigh muscle injected into the lung of the same animal. Tumors were ablated under fluoroscopic guidance by single-antenna and multiple-antenna microwaves. Thirty-five tumor models were treated in 11 pigs with a single antenna at 75 W for 15 min, with 15 measuring 20 mm in diameter, 10 measuring 30 mm, and 10 measuring 40 mm. Mean circularity of the single-antenna ablation zones measured 0.64 {+-} 0.12, with a diameter of 35.7 {+-} 8.7 mm along the axis of the antenna and 32.7 {+-} 12.8 mm perpendicular to the feeding point. Multiple-antenna delivery of 75 W for 15 min caused intraprocedural death of 2 animals; modified protocol to 60 W for 10 min resulted in an ablation zone with a diameter of 43.0 {+-} 7.7 along the axis of the antenna and 54.8 {+-} 8.5 mm perpendicular to the feeding point; circularity was 0.70 {+-} 0.10. A single microwave antenna can create ablation zones large enough to cover lung tumor mimic models of {<=}4 cm with no heat sink effect from vessels of {<=}6 mm. Synergic use of 3 antennas allows ablation of larger volumes than single-antenna or radiofrequency ablation, but great caution must be taken when 3 antennas are used simultaneously in the lung in clinical practice.

  10. Catheter Ablation

    MedlinePlus

    ... you during the procedure. Machines will measure your heart’s activity. All types of ablation require cardiac catheterization to place flexible tubes, or catheters, inside your heart to make the scars. Your doctor will clean ...

  11. Energy balance in the ablation zone during the summer season at the Gran Campo Nevado Ice Cap in the Southern Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Christoph; Kilian, Rolf; Glaser, Michael

    2007-10-01

    The energy balance and ablation of Glaciar Lengua were investigated during the austral summer of 1999/2000. Glaciar Lengua is located in Patagonia, in the southernmost Andes of Chile (53°S), within an extremely maritime climate. The aim of this study was to gain insight into current energy fluxes at this location and to evaluate how the energy fluxes depend on meteorological variables. From February to April 2000 an automated weather station was operated on Glaciar Lengua. Ablation was measured repeatedly at stakes during the same period. The point energy balance was calculated using the bulk approach formulation. The effective roughness length was adjusted in order to calibrate the model to the measured ablation. It was revealed that sensible heat transfer is the major contribution to the energy balance adding 54% of the energy available for melt. Net radiation contributes only 35% to the overall energy balance. Minor contributors are the latent heat flux (7%) and the heat flux by precipitation (4%). The net radiation shows little variance from day to day. Cross-correlations of the daily mean values of the energy fluxes derived from the energy balance model and meteorological variables reveal that air temperature and wind speed are the key factors controlling the summer energy balance in the ablation area. Melt derived from a multiple regression model based on these two variables correlates with computed melt with a correlation coefficient of 0.92. From the measured ablation, a summer-time degree-day factor of 7.6 mm·°C - 1 was derived for the ablation area.

  12. Modeling and Validation of Microwave Ablations with Internal Vaporization

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Jason; Birla, Sohan; Bedoya, Mariajose; Jones, David; Subbiah, Jeyam; Brace, Christopher L.

    2014-01-01

    Numerical simulation is increasingly being utilized for computer-aided design of treatment devices, analysis of ablation growth, and clinical treatment planning. Simulation models to date have incorporated electromagnetic wave propagation and heat conduction, but not other relevant physics such as water vaporization and mass transfer. Such physical changes are particularly noteworthy during the intense heat generation associated with microwave heating. In this work, a numerical model was created that integrates microwave heating with water vapor generation and transport by using porous media assumptions in the tissue domain. The heating physics of the water vapor model was validated through temperature measurements taken at locations 5, 10 and 20 mm away from the heating zone of the microwave antenna in homogenized ex vivo bovine liver setup. Cross-sectional area of water vapor transport was validated through intra-procedural computed tomography (CT) during microwave ablations in homogenized ex vivo bovine liver. Iso-density contours from CT images were compared to vapor concentration contours from the numerical model at intermittent time points using the Jaccard Index. In general, there was an improving correlation in ablation size dimensions as the ablation procedure proceeded, with a Jaccard Index of 0.27, 0.49, 0.61, 0.67 and 0.69 at 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 minutes. This study demonstrates the feasibility and validity of incorporating water vapor concentration into thermal ablation simulations and validating such models experimentally. PMID:25330481

  13. Analysis of the structure, configuration, and sizing of Cu and Cu oxide nanoparticles generated by fs laser ablation of solid target in liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Santillan, J. M. J.; Videla, F. A.; Schinca, D. C.; Scaffardi, L. B.; Fernandez van Raap, M. B.

    2013-04-07

    We report on the analysis of structure, configuration, and sizing of Cu and Cu oxide nanoparticles (Nps) produced by femtosecond (fs) laser ablation of solid copper target in liquids. Laser pulse energy ranged between 500 {mu}J and 50 {mu}J. Water and acetone were used to produce the colloidal suspensions. The study was performed through optical extinction spectroscopy using Mie theory to fit the full experimental spectra, considering free and bound electrons size dependent contributions to the metal dielectric function. Raman spectroscopy and AFM technique were also used to characterize the sample. Considering the possible oxidation of copper during the fabrication process, two species (Cu and Cu{sub 2}O) arranged in two structures (bare core or core-shell) and in two configuration types (Cu-Cu{sub 2}O or Cu{sub 2}O-Cu) were considered for the fitting depending on the laser pulse energy and the surrounding media. For water at high energy, it can be observed that a Cu-Cu{sub 2}O configuration fits the experimental spectra of the colloidal suspension, while for decreasing energy and below a certain threshold, a Cu{sub 2}O-Cu configuration needs to be included for the optimum fit. Both species coexist for energies below 170 {mu}J for water. On the other hand, for acetone at high energy, optimum fit of the full spectrum suggests the presence a bimodal Cu-Cu{sub 2}O core-shell Nps distribution while for decreasing energy and below a 70 {mu}J threshold energy value, Cu{sub 2}O-Cu core-shell Nps must be included, together with the former configuration, for the fit of the full spectrum. We discuss possible reasons for the changes in the structural configuration of the core-shell Nps.

  14. [Ablative and fractional lasers].

    PubMed

    Beylot, C; Grognard, C; Michaud, T

    2009-10-01

    The use of pulsed or scanning Carbon Dioxide, and pulsed Erbium-YAG lasers allows the programmable and reproducible photocoagulation of thin layers of the epidermis and superficial dermis. Thermal damage depends on the type of laser and is greater with CO(2) lasers. The degree of neocollagenesis is proportional to the thermal damage and is better with CO(2) lasers. Their main indication is the correction of photoaged facial skin but they can also be used for corrective dermatology, e.g. for scars and genodermatosis. Results are highly satisfactory but the technique is invasive and the patient experiences a social hindrance of around two weeks. Fractionated techniques treat 25% of the defective skin area at each session in noncontiguous microzones; four sessions are therefore necessary to treat the entire cutaneous surface. The treatment is given under topical anesthesia and is much less invasive, particularly with nonablative fractional laser treatment in which photothermolysis does not penetrate below the epidermis and/or the effects are slight, with no or very little social isolation. However, the results are much less satisfactory than the results of ablative laser and there is no firming effect. Other zones than the face can be treated. With the fractional CO(2) and Erbium ablative lasers, which have multiplied over the past 2 years, the much wider impacts cause perforation of the epidermis and there is a zone of ablation by laser photovaporization, with a zone of thermal damage below. The results are better in correcting photoaging of the face, without, however, achieving the efficacy of ablative lasers, which remain the reference technique. However, the effects are not insignificant, requiring at least 5 days of social isolation.

  15. The sensitivity of mechanical properties of TFRS composites to variations in reaction zone size and properties. [Tungsten Fiber Reinforced Superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craddock, James N.; Hopkins, Dale A.; Petrasek, Donald W.; Brindley, Pamela K.

    1987-01-01

    The properties of tungsten fiber reinforced superalloys (TFRS) composites are calculated using a 3-component micromechanical model. The properties and size of the reaction zone are varied and the effect of these variations on the composite properties are studied. Results are presented in graphical and tabular form. Post-matrix yield behavior is examined in terms of the tangent modulus of the composite and measures of the effective strength of the lamina.

  16. Computed Tomography-Guided Radiofrequency Ablation Following Transcatheter Arterial Embolization in Treatment of Large Hepatic Hemangiomas

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Jiansong; Gao, Jun; Zhao, Lizhen; Tu, Jianfei; Song, Jingjing; Sun, Wenbing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to evaluate the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of computed tomography (CT)-guided radiofrequency (RF) ablation combined with transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) to treat large (≥10 cm) hepatic hemangiomas. We retrospectively reviewed our sequential experience with 15 large hepatic hemangiomas in 15 patients. The mean diameter of the 15 hemangiomas was 13.0 ± 2.2 cm (10.0–16.0 cm). RF ablation combined with TAE treatment was performed successfully in all patients. The mean diameter of the hemangiomas decreased from 13.0 ± 2.2 to 7.1 ± 2.0 cm (P < 0.001) after TAE treatment. Out of 15 hepatic hemangiomas, 14 (93.3%) showed no enhancement on CT or MRI indicating complete ablation after RF treatment. The mean diameter of the ablation zone decreased to 6.1 ± 2.0 cm 1 month after ablation and further decreased to 4.9 ± 1.6 cm 6 months after ablation. There were 6 complications related to the ablation in 4 patients. According to the Dindo–Clavien classification, all the complications were minor (Grade I). RF ablation combined with TAE is a safe and effective treatment for large hepatic hemangiomas. TAE can improve the disruption of lesion blood supply and reduce lesion size to facilitate subsequent RF ablation and reduce the risk of ablation-related complications. PMID:27082617

  17. Computed Tomography-Guided Radiofrequency Ablation Following Transcatheter Arterial Embolization in Treatment of Large Hepatic Hemangiomas.

    PubMed

    Ji, Jiansong; Gao, Jun; Zhao, Lizhen; Tu, Jianfei; Song, Jingjing; Sun, Wenbing

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of computed tomography (CT)-guided radiofrequency (RF) ablation combined with transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) to treat large (≥10 cm) hepatic hemangiomas. We retrospectively reviewed our sequential experience with 15 large hepatic hemangiomas in 15 patients. The mean diameter of the 15 hemangiomas was 13.0 ± 2.2 cm (10.0-16.0 cm). RF ablation combined with TAE treatment was performed successfully in all patients. The mean diameter of the hemangiomas decreased from 13.0 ± 2.2 to 7.1 ± 2.0 cm (P < 0.001) after TAE treatment. Out of 15 hepatic hemangiomas, 14 (93.3%) showed no enhancement on CT or MRI indicating complete ablation after RF treatment. The mean diameter of the ablation zone decreased to 6.1 ± 2.0 cm 1 month after ablation and further decreased to 4.9 ± 1.6 cm 6 months after ablation. There were 6 complications related to the ablation in 4 patients. According to the Dindo-Clavien classification, all the complications were minor (Grade I). RF ablation combined with TAE is a safe and effective treatment for large hepatic hemangiomas. TAE can improve the disruption of lesion blood supply and reduce lesion size to facilitate subsequent RF ablation and reduce the risk of ablation-related complications.

  18. Comparative study on laser tissue ablation between PV and HPS lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hyun Wook; Jebens, David; Mitchell, Gerald; Koullick, Ed

    2008-02-01

    Laser therapy for obstructive benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) has gained broad adoption due to effective tissue removal, immediate hemostasis, and minor complications. The aim of this study is to quantitatively compare ablation characteristics of PV (Photoselective Vaporization) and the newly introduced HPS (High Performance System) 532 nm lasers. Bovine prostatic tissues were ablated in vitro, using a custom-made scanning system. Laser-induced volume produced by two lasers was quantified as a function of applied power, fiber working distance (WD), and treatment speed. Given the same power of 80 W and speed of 4 mm/s, HPS created up to 50 % higher tissue ablation volume than PV did. PV induced a rapid decrease of ablation volume when WD increased from 0.5 mm to 3 mm while HPS yielded almost constant tissue removal up to 3 mm for both 80 W and 120 W. As the treatment speed increased, both lasers reached saturation in tissue ablation volume. Lastly, both PV and HPS lasers exhibited approximately 1 mm thick heat affected zone (HAZ) in this study although HPS created twice deeper ablation channels with a depth of up to 4 mm. Due to a smaller beam size and a higher output power, HPS maximized tissue ablation rate with minimal thermal effects to the adjacent tissue. Furthermore, more collimated beam characteristics provides more spatial flexibility and may even help to decrease the rate of fiber degradation associated with thermal damage from debris reattachment to the tip.

  19. Sequential activation of ground pads reduces skin heating during radiofrequency tumor ablation: in vivo porcine results.

    PubMed

    Schutt, David J; Swindle, M Michael; Helke, Kristi L; Bastarrika, Gorka; Schwarz, Florian; Haemmerich, Dieter

    2010-03-01

    Skin burns below ground pads during monopolar RF ablation are increasingly prevalent, thereby hindering the development of higher power RF generators capable of creating larger tumor ablation zones in combination with multiple or new applicators. Our goal was to evaluate reduction in skin temperatures via additional ground pads in an in vivo porcine model. Three ground pads placed on the animal's abdomen were activated either simultaneously or sequentially, where activation timing was adjusted to equilibrate skin temperature below each pad. Thirteen RF ablations (n = 4 simultaneous at 300 W, n = 5 sequential at 300 W, and n = 4 sequential at 375 W) were performed for 12 min via two internally cooled cluster electrodes placed in the gluteus maximus of domestic swine. Temperature rise at each pad and burn degree as determined via histology were compared. Ablation zone size was determined via T2-weighted MRI. Maximum temperature rise was significantly higher with simultaneous activation than with either of the sequential activation group (21.4 degrees C versus 8.1 degrees C or 9.6 degrees C, p < 0.01). Ablation zone diameters during simultaneous (300 W) and sequential activations (300 and 375 W) were and 6.9 +/- 0.3, 5.6 +/- 0.3, and 7.5 +/- 0.6 cm, respectively. Sequential activation of multiple ground pads results in significantly lower skin temperatures and less severe burns, as measured by histological examination.

  20. Grain size reduction due to fracturing and subsequent grain-size-sensitive creep in a lower crustal shear zone in the presence of a CO2-bearing fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okudaira, Takamoto; Shigematsu, Norio; Harigane, Yumiko; Yoshida, Kenta

    2017-02-01

    To understand rheological weakening in the lower continental crust, we studied mylonites in the Paleoproterozoic Eidsfjord anorthosite, northern Norway. The zones of anorthositic mylonites range from a few millimeters to several meters thick, and include ultramylonites and protomylonites. They contain syn-kinematic metamorphic minerals, including Cl-bearing amphibole and scapolite. Thermodynamic analysis reveals that syn-deformational hydration reactions occurred at ∼600 °C and ∼700 MPa under CO2-bearing conditions. The protomylonites contain many fragmented plagioclase porphyroclasts. The fractures in porphyroclasts are filled with fine-grained plagioclase, suggesting that fracturing is a common mechanism of grain size reduction. The anorthite contents of fine-grained polygonal matrix plagioclase are different from those of porphyroclastic plagioclase, suggesting that the matrix grains nucleated and grew during syn-kinematic metamorphism. Plagioclase aggregates in the matrices of mylonites do not exhibit a distinct crystallographic preferred orientation, which implies that the dominant deformation mechanism was grain-size-sensitive creep. Consequently, in the lower crustal anorthositic mylonites, grain size reduction occurred via fracturing, rather than through dynamic recrystallization, leading to grain-size-sensitive creep. The syn-kinematic recrystallization of minor phases at plagioclase grain boundaries may suppress the growth of plagioclase and contribute to the development of grain-size-sensitive creep.

  1. Changes in Arctic Sea Ice Floe Size Distribution in the Marginal Ice Zone in a Thickness and Floe Size Distribution Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Stern, H. L., III; Hwang, P. B.; Schweiger, A. J. B.; Stark, M.; Steele, M.

    2015-12-01

    To better describe the state of sea ice in the marginal ice zone (MIZ) with floes of varying thicknesses and sizes, both an ice thickness distribution (ITD) and a floe size distribution (FSD) are needed. We have developed a FSD theory [Zhang et al., 2015] that is coupled to the ITD theory of Thorndike et al. [1975] in order to explicitly simulate the evolution of FSD and ITD jointly. The FSD theory includes a FSD function and a FSD conservation equation in parallel with the ITD equation. The FSD equation takes into account changes in FSD due to ice advection, thermodynamic growth, and lateral melting. It also includes changes in FSD because of mechanical redistribution of floe size due to ice opening, ridging and, particularly, ice fragmentation induced by stochastic ocean surface waves. The floe size redistribution due to ice fragmentation is based on the assumption that wave-induced breakup is a random process such that when an ice floe is broken, floes of any smaller sizes have an equal opportunity to form, without being either favored or excluded. It is also based on the assumption that floes of larger sizes are easier to break because they are subject to larger flexure-induced stresses and strains than smaller floes that are easier to ride with waves with little bending; larger floes also have higher areal coverages and therefore higher probabilities to break. These assumptions with corresponding formulations ensure that the simulated FSD follows a power law as observed by satellites and airborne surveys. The FSD theory has been tested in the Pan-arctic Ice/Ocean Modeling and Assimilation System (PIOMAS). The existing PIOMAS has 12 categories each for ice thickness, ice enthalpy, and snow depth. With the implementation of the FSD theory, PIOMAS is able to represent 12 categories of floe sizes ranging from 0.1 m to ~3000 m. It is found that the simulated 12-category FSD agrees reasonably well with FSD derived from SAR and MODIS images. In this study, we will

  2. Online monitoring of nanoparticles formed during nanosecond laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nováková, Hana; Holá, Markéta; Vojtíšek-Lom, Michal; Ondráček, Jakub; Kanický, Viktor

    2016-11-01

    The particle size distribution of dry aerosol originating from laser ablation of glass material was monitored simultaneously with Laser Ablation - Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) analysis and two aerosol spectrometers - Fast Mobility Particle Sizer (FMPS) and Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (APS). The unique combination of LA-ICP-MS and FMPS offers the possibility of measuring the particle size distribution every 1 s of the ablation process in the size range of 5.6-560 nm. APS extends the information about particle concentration in the size range 0.54-17 μm. Online monitoring of the dry aerosol was performed for two ablation modes (spot and line with a duration of 80 s) with a 193 nm excimer laser system, using the glass reference material NIST 610 as a sample. Different sizes of laser spot for spot ablation and different scan speeds for line ablation were tested. It was found that the FMPS device is capable of detecting changes in particle size distribution at the first pulses of spot laser ablation and is suitable for laser ablation control simultaneously with LA-ICP-MS analysis. The studied parameters of laser ablation have an influence on the resulting particle size distribution. The line mode of laser ablation produces larger particles during the whole ablation process, while spot ablation produces larger particles only at the beginning, during the ablation of the intact layer of the ablated material. Moreover, spot ablation produces more primary nano-particles (in ultrafine mode size range < 100 nm) than line ablation. This effect is most probably caused by a reduced amount of large particles released from the spot ablation crater. The larger particles scavenge the ultrafine particles during the line ablation mode.

  3. Methods for flexible sample-size design in clinical trials: Likelihood, weighted, dual test, and promising zone approaches.

    PubMed

    Shih, Weichung Joe; Li, Gang; Wang, Yining

    2016-03-01

    Sample size plays a crucial role in clinical trials. Flexible sample-size designs, as part of the more general category of adaptive designs that utilize interim data, have been a popular topic in recent years. In this paper, we give a comparative review of four related methods for such a design. The likelihood method uses the likelihood ratio test with an adjusted critical value. The weighted method adjusts the test statistic with given weights rather than the critical value. The dual test method requires both the likelihood ratio statistic and the weighted statistic to be greater than the unadjusted critical value. The promising zone approach uses the likelihood ratio statistic with the unadjusted value and other constraints. All four methods preserve the type-I error rate. In this paper we explore their properties and compare their relationships and merits. We show that the sample size rules for the dual test are in conflict with the rules of the promising zone approach. We delineate what is necessary to specify in the study protocol to ensure the validity of the statistical procedure and what can be kept implicit in the protocol so that more flexibility can be attained for confirmatory phase III trials in meeting regulatory requirements. We also prove that under mild conditions, the likelihood ratio test still preserves the type-I error rate when the actual sample size is larger than the re-calculated one.

  4. A SUPER-EARTH-SIZED PLANET ORBITING IN OR NEAR THE HABITABLE ZONE AROUND A SUN-LIKE STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Barclay, Thomas; Burke, Christopher J.; Howell, Steve B.; Rowe, Jason F.; Huber, Daniel; Jenkins, Jon M.; Quintana, Elisa V.; Still, Martin; Twicken, Joseph D.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Borucki, William J.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Clarke, Bruce D.; Christiansen, Jessie L; Coughlin, Jeffrey L.; Ciardi, David; Fischer, Debra A.; and others

    2013-05-10

    We present the discovery of a super-Earth-sized planet in or near the habitable zone of a Sun-like star. The host is Kepler-69, a 13.7 mag G4V-type star. We detect two periodic sets of transit signals in the 3-year flux time series of Kepler-69, obtained with the Kepler spacecraft. Using the very high precision Kepler photometry, and follow-up observations, our confidence that these signals represent planetary transits is >99.3%. The inner planet, Kepler-69b, has a radius of 2.24{sup +0.44}{sub -0.29} R{sub Circled-Plus} and orbits the host star every 13.7 days. The outer planet, Kepler-69c, is a super-Earth-sized object with a radius of 1.7{sup +0.34}{sub -0.23} R{sub Circled-Plus} and an orbital period of 242.5 days. Assuming an Earth-like Bond albedo, Kepler-69c has an equilibrium temperature of 299 {+-} 19 K, which places the planet close to the habitable zone around the host star. This is the smallest planet found by Kepler to be orbiting in or near the habitable zone of a Sun-like star and represents an important step on the path to finding the first true Earth analog.

  5. Climate controls how ecosystems size the root zone storage capacity at catchment scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, H.; Hrachowitz, M.; Schymanski, S. J.; Fenicia, F.; Sriwongsitanon, N.; Savenije, H. H. G.

    2014-11-01

    The root zone moisture storage capacity (SR) of terrestrial ecosystems is a buffer providing vegetation continuous access to water and a critical factor controlling land-atmospheric moisture exchange, hydrological response, and biogeochemical processes. However, it is impossible to observe directly at catchment scale. Here, using data from 300 diverse catchments, it was tested that, treating the root zone as a reservoir, the mass curve technique (MCT), an engineering method for reservoir design, can be used to estimate catchment-scale SR from effective rainfall and plant transpiration. Supporting the initial hypothesis, it was found that MCT-derived SR coincided with model-derived estimates. These estimates of parameter SR can be used to constrain hydrological, climate, and land surface models. Further, the study provides evidence that ecosystems dynamically design their root systems to bridge droughts with return periods of 10-40 years, controlled by climate and linked to aridity index, inter-storm duration, seasonality, and runoff ratio.

  6. Pore size controls on the base of the methane hydrate stability zone in the Kumano Basin, offshore Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daigle, Hugh; Dugan, Brandon

    2014-11-01

    The base of the methane hydrate stability zone (MHSZ) in the Kumano Basin, offshore Japan, is marked by a bottom-simulating reflection (BSR) on seismic data. At Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Site C0002, which penetrates this BSR, the in situ temperature profile combined with bulk seawater methane equilibrium conditions suggest that the base of the MHSZ is 428 m below seafloor (bsf), which is 28 m deeper than the observed BSR (400 m bsf). We found that submicron pore sizes determined by mercury injection capillary pressure are sufficiently small to cause 64% of the observed uplift of the base of the MHSZ by the Gibbs-Thomson effect. This is the most thorough characterization of pore sizes within the MHSZ performed to date and illustrates the extent to which pore size can influence MHSZ thickness. Our results demonstrate the importance of considering lithology and pore structure when assessing methane hydrate stability conditions in marine sediments.

  7. Percutaneous thermal ablation of primary lung cancer.

    PubMed

    de Baere, T; Tselikas, L; Catena, V; Buy, X; Deschamps, F; Palussière, J

    2016-10-01

    Percutaneous ablation of small-size non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has demonstrated feasibility and safety in nonsurgical candidates. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA), the most commonly used technique, has an 80-90% reported rate of complete ablation, with the best results obtained in tumors less than 2-3cm in diameter. The highest one-, three-, and five-year overall survival rates reported in NSCLC following RFA are 97.7%, 72.9%, and 55.7% respectively. Tumor size, tumor stage, and underlying comorbidities are the main predictors of survival. Other ablation techniques such as microwave or cryoablation may help overcome the limitations of RFA in the future, particularly for large tumors or those close to large vessels. Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) has its own complications and carries the risk of fiducial placement requiring multiple lung punctures. SABR has also demonstrated significant efficacy in treating small-size lung tumors and should be compared to percutaneous ablation.

  8. Hepatic ablation with multiple interstitial ultrasound applicators: initial ex vivo and computational studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Punit; Salgaonkar, Vasant A.; Burdette, E. Clif; Diederich, Chris J.

    2011-03-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) ablation has emerged as an effective method for treating liver tumors under 3 cm in diameter. Multiple applicator devices and techniques - using RF, microwave and other modalities - are under development for thermal ablation of large and irregularly-shaped liver tumors. Interstitial ultrasound (IUS) applicators, comprised of linear arrays of independently powered tubular transducers, enable 3D control of the spatial power deposition profile and simultaneous ablation with multiple applicators. We evaluated IUS applicator configurations (parallel, converging and diverging implants) suitable for percutaneous and laparascopic placement with experiments in ex vivo bovine tissue and computational models. Ex vivo ablation zones measured 4.6+/-0.5 x 4.2+/-0.5 × 3.3+/-0.5 cm3 and 5.6+/-0.5 × 4.9+/-0.5 x 2.8+/-0.3 cm3 using three parallel applicators spaced 2 and 3 cm apart, respectively, and 4.0+/-0.3 × 3.2+/-0.4 × 2.9+/-0.2 cm3 using two parallel applicators spaced 2 cm apart. Computational models indicate in vivo ablation zones up to 4.5 × 4.4 × 5.5 cm3 and 5.7 × 4.8 × 5.2 cm3, using three applicators spaced 2 and 3 cm apart, respectively. Converging and diverging implant patterns can also be employed for conformal ablation of irregularly-shaped tumor margins by tailoring power levels along each device. Simultaneously powered interstitial ultrasound devices can create tailored ablation zones comparable to currently available RF devices and similarly sized microwave antennas.

  9. Dynamics of Particle Size Distribution in Slide-Hold Tests on Laboratory Gouge Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhuri, S. K.; Dewers, T. A.; Scott, T. E.

    2001-12-01

    Slide-hold tests using triaxially-loaded precut forcing blocks and artificial gouge examine contrasts in gouge particle size dynamics during frictional sliding and annealing or healing stages. A series of room-dry sliding experiments were conducted to various shear strains using dry gypsum gouge in between precut steel forcing members. A separate series of experiments saturated with distilled water was conducted at a pore pressure of 6.9 MPa (effective pressure of 13.8 MPa identical to the dry tests). The latter experiments were taken to a constant shear strain but were held under shear loading for various lengths of time (0.01-10 hours) after slip. Pore-volume change was monitored during hold periods. Particle size distribution (PSD) of gouge was measured using a laser particle size analyzer with a measurement range of 0.4-2000 microns. Stress-strain behavior for both dry and wet tests revealed multiple stress drops or stick-slip events and were similar suggesting no marked strengthening or weakening effect due to presence of water over the time scale of sliding. Gouge PSD's were fit to a log-normal distribution function and then analyzed in terms of the moments of mass-size distributions. The best log-normal fits were obtained in the coarser fraction of the gouge (larger than peak size). PSD means decreased with shear while higher moments such as skewness increased with shear. Particle number-size relationships computed from the mass-size distributions revealed a fractal nature of the gouge with excellent fits obtained for fine and intermediate fractions (smaller than peak size). A fractal dimension (D) around 2.6 consistent with previous work on both natural and experimental fault gouge was obtained. There appears to be a correlation between D and the amount of shear strain and an inverse relationship between D and the maximum particle size. Empirical distributions such as the Weibull, Rosin-Rammler distribution functions and others provide good approximations

  10. Lung Tumor Radiofrequency Ablation: Where Do We Stand?

    SciTech Connect

    Baere, Thierry de

    2011-04-15

    Today, radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of primary and metastatic lung tumor is increasingly used. Because RFA is most often used with curative intent, preablation workup must be a preoperative workup. General anesthesia provides higher feasibility than conscious sedation. The electrode positioning must be performed under computed tomography for sake of accuracy. The delivery of RFA must be adapted to tumor location, with different impedances used when treating tumors with or without pleural contact. The estimated rate of incomplete local treatment at 18 months was 7% (95% confidence interval, 3-14) per tumor, with incomplete treatment depicted at 4 months (n = 1), 6 months (n = 2), 9 months (n = 2), and 12 months (n = 2). Overall survival and lung disease-free survival at 18 months were, respectively, 71 and 34%. Size is a key point for tumor selection because large size is predictive of incomplete local treatment and poor survival. The ratio of ablation volume relative to tumor volume is predictive of complete ablation. Follow-up computed tomography that relies on the size of the ablation zone demonstrates the presence of incomplete ablation. Positron emission tomography might be an interesting option. Chest tube placement for pneumothorax is reported in 8 to 12%. Alveolar hemorrhage and postprocedure hemoptysis occurred in approximately 10% of procedures and rarely required specific treatment. Death was mostly related to single-lung patients and hilar tumors. No modification of forced expiratory volume in the first second between pre- and post-RFA at 2 months was found. RFA in the lung provides a high local efficacy rate. The use of RFA as a palliative tool in combination with chemotherapy remains to be explored.

  11. Optimization of Direct Current-Enhanced Radiofrequency Ablation: An Ex Vivo Study

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Toshihiro Isfort, Peter; Bruners, Philipp; Penzkofer, Tobias; Kichikawa, Kimihiko; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Mahnken, Andreas H.

    2010-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the optimal setting for radiofrequency (RF) ablation combined with direct electrical current (DC) ablation in ex vivo bovine liver. An electrical circuit combining a commercially available RF ablation system with DC was developed. The negative electrode of a rectifier that provides DC was connected to a 3-cm multitined expandable RF probe. A 100-mH inductor was used to prevent electrical leakage from the RF generator. DC was applied for 15 min and followed by RF ablation in freshly excised bovine livers. Electric current was measured by an ammeter. Coagulation volume, ablation duration, and mean amperage were assessed for various DC voltages (no DC, 2.2, 4.5, and 9.0 V) and different RF ablation protocols (stepwise increase from 40 to 80 W, 40 W fixed, and 80 W fixed). Results were compared using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U test. Applying DC with 4.5 or 9.0 V, in combination with 40 W fixed or a stepwise increase of RF energy, resulted in significantly increased zone of ablation size compared with 2.2 V or no DC (P = 0.009). At 4.5 V DC, the stepwise increase of RF energy resulted in the same necrosis size as a 40 W fixed protocol (26.6 {+-} 3.9 vs. 26.5 {+-} 4.0 ml), but ablation duration was significantly decreased (296 {+-} 85 s vs. 423 {+-} 104 s; P = 0.028). Mean amperage was significantly lower at 4.5 V compared with 9.0 V (P = 0.028). Combining a stepwise increase of RF energy with a DC voltage of 4.5 V is most appropriate to increase coagulation volume and to minimize procedure time.

  12. 75 FR 51668 - Optional Mail Preparation Standards for Flat-Size Mailpieces in FSS Zones

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-23

    ... 51668-51671] [FR Doc No: 2010-20055] POSTAL SERVICE 39 CFR Part 111 Optional Mail Preparation Standards... Manual (DMM[supreg]) to provide optional mail preparation standards for flat- size Standard Mail... Postal Service is revising the DMM to provide optional standards for bundle and pallet preparation...

  13. Techniques for determining partial size distribution of particulate matter: Laser diffraction versus electrical sensing zone

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The study of health impacts, emission estimation of particulate matter (PM), and development of new control technologies require knowledge of PM characteristics. Among these PM characteristics, the particle size distribution (PSD) is perhaps the most important physical parameter governing particle b...

  14. Slip-weakening zone sizes at nucleation of catastrophic subaerial and submarine landslides by gradually increasing pore pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viesca, R. C.; Rice, J. R.

    2011-12-01

    We address the nucleation of dynamic landslide rupture in response to gradual pore pressure increases. Nucleation marks the onset of acceleration of the overlying slope mass due to the suddenly rapid enlargement of a sub-surface zone of shear failure, previously deforming quasi-statically. We model that zone as a planar surface undergoing initially linear slip-weakening frictional failure within a bordering linear-elastic medium. The results are also relevant to earthquake nucleation. The sub-surface rupture zone considered runs parallel to the free surface of a uniform slope, under a 2D plane-strain deformation state. We show results for ruptures with friction coefficients following linear slip weakening (i.e., the residual friction is not yet reached). For spatially broad increases in pore pressure, the nucleation length depends on a ratio of depth to a cohesive zone length scale. In the very broad-increase limit, a direct numerical solution for nucleation lengths compares well with solutions to a corresponding eigenvalue problem (similar to Uenishi and Rice [JGR '03]), in which spatial variations in normal stress are neglected. We estimate nucleation lengths for subaerial and submarine conditions using data [e.g., Bishop et al., Géotech. '71; Stark et al., JGGE '05] from ring-shear tests on sediments (peak friction fp = 0.5, frictional slip-weakening rate within the range w = -df/d(slip) = 0.1/cm-1/cm). We assume that only pre-stresses, and not material properties, vary with depth. With such fp and w, we find for a range of subsurface depths and shear moduli μ that nucleation lengths are typically several hundred meters long for shallow undersea slopes, and up to an order of magnitude less for steeper slopes on the Earth's surface. In the submarine case, this puts nucleation lengths in a size range comparable to observed pore-pressure-generated seafloor disturbances as pockmarks [e.g., Gay et al., MG '06].

  15. Analysis of Molecular Diffusion by First-Passage Time Variance Identifies the Size of Confinement Zones

    PubMed Central

    Rajani, Vishaal; Carrero, Gustavo; Golan, David E.; de Vries, Gerda; Cairo, Christopher W.

    2011-01-01

    The diffusion of receptors within the two-dimensional environment of the plasma membrane is a complex process. Although certain components diffuse according to a random walk model (Brownian diffusion), an overwhelming body of work has found that membrane diffusion is nonideal (anomalous diffusion). One of the most powerful methods for studying membrane diffusion is single particle tracking (SPT), which records the trajectory of a label attached to a membrane component of interest. One of the outstanding problems in SPT is the analysis of data to identify the presence of heterogeneity. We have adapted a first-passage time (FPT) algorithm, originally developed for the interpretation of animal movement, for the analysis of SPT data. We discuss the general application of the FPT analysis to molecular diffusion, and use simulations to test the method against data containing known regions of confinement. We conclude that FPT can be used to identify the presence and size of confinement within trajectories of the receptor LFA-1, and these results are consistent with previous reports on the size of LFA-1 clusters. The analysis of trajectory data for cell surface receptors by FPT provides a robust method to determine the presence and size of confined regions of diffusion. PMID:21402028

  16. Capillary zone electrophoresis of soil humic acid fractions obtained by coupling size-exclusion chromatography and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Cavani, Luciano; Ciavatta, Claudio; Trubetskaya, Olga E; Reznikova, Olga I; Afanas'eva, Gaida V; Trubetskoj, Oleg A

    2003-01-03

    Capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) was used for characterisation of soil humic acid (HA) fractions obtained by coupling size-exclusion chromatography with polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, on the basis of their molecular size and electrophoretic mobility. CZE was conducted using several low alkaline buffers as background electrolyte (BGE): 50 mM carbonate, pH 9.0; 50 mM phosphate, pH 8.5; 50 mM borate, pH 8.3; 50 mM Tris-borate+1 mM EDTA+7 M urea+0.1% sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS), pH 8.3. Independently of BGE conditions, the effective electrophoretic mobility of HA fractions were in good agreement with their molecular size. The better resolution of HA were obtained in Tris-borate-EDTA buffer with urea and SDS. This results indicated that CZE, mostly with BGE-contained disaggregating agents, is useful for separating HAs in fractions with different molecular sizes.

  17. Kepler Mission: a mission to find Earth-size planets in the habitable zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borucki, William J.; Koch, David; Basri, Gibor; Brown, Timothy; Caldwell, Douglas; Devore, Edna; Dunham, Edward; Gautier, Thomas; Geary, John; Gilliland, Ronald; Gould, Alan; Howell, Steve; Jenkins, Jon

    2003-10-01

    The Kepler Mission is a NASA Discovery-class mission designed to continuously monitor the brightness of 100,000 main sequence stars to detect the transit of Earth-size and larger planets. It is a wide field of view photometer with a Schmidt-type telescope and an array of 42 CCDs covering the 100 sq. degree field-of-view (FOV). It has a 0.95 m aperture and a 1.4 m primary and is designed to attain a photometric precision of 20 parts per million (ppm) for 12th magnitude solar-like stars for a 6.5-hour transit duration. It will continuously observe 100,000 main sequence stars from 9th to 15th magnitude in the Cygnus constellation for a period of four years with a cadence of 4 measurements per hour. The photometer is scheduled to be launched in 2007 into heliocentric orbit. A ground-based program to classify all 450,000 stars brighter than 15th magnitude in the FOV and to conduct a detailed examination of a subset of the stars that show planetary companions is also planned. Hundreds of Earth-size planets should be detected if they are common around solar-like stars. Ground-based spectrometric observations of those stars with planetary companions will be made to determine the dependences of the frequency and size of terrestrial planets on stellar characteristics such as type and metallicity. A null result would imply that terrestrial planets are rare.

  18. Individual tree size inequality enhances aboveground biomass in homegarden agroforestry systems in the dry zone of Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Ali, Arshad; Mattsson, Eskil

    2017-01-01

    Individual tree size variation, which is generally quantified by variances in tree diameter at breast height (DBH) and height in isolation or conjunction, plays a central role in ecosystem functioning in both controlled and natural environments, including forests. However, none of the studies have been conducted in homegarden agroforestry systems. In this study, aboveground biomass, stand quality, cation exchange capacity (CEC), DBH variation, and species diversity were determined across 45 homegardens in the dry zone of Sri Lanka. We employed structural equation modeling (SEM) to test for the direct and indirect effects of stand quality and CEC, via tree size inequality and species diversity, on aboveground biomass. The SEM accounted for 26, 8, and 1% of the variation in aboveground biomass, species diversity and DBH variation, respectively. DBH variation had the strongest positive direct effect on aboveground biomass (β=0.49), followed by the non-significant direct effect of species diversity (β=0.17), stand quality (β=0.17) and CEC (β=-0.05). There were non-significant direct effects of CEC and stand quality on DBH variation and species diversity. Stand quality and CEC had also non-significant indirect effects, via DBH variation and species diversity, on aboveground biomass. Our study revealed that aboveground biomass substantially increased with individual tree size variation only, which supports the niche complementarity mechanism. However, aboveground biomass was not considerably increased with species diversity, stand quality and soil fertility, which might be attributable to the adaptation of certain productive species to the local site conditions. Stand structure shaped by few productive species or independent of species diversity is a main determinant for the variation in aboveground biomass in the studied homegardens. Maintaining stand structure through management practices could be an effective approach for enhancing aboveground biomass in these dry

  19. An optimal sliding choke antenna for hepatic microwave ablation.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Punit; Converse, Mark C; Webster, John G; Mahvi, David M

    2009-10-01

    Microwave ablation (MWA) is a minimally invasive technique increasingly used for thermal therapy of liver tumors. Effective MWA requires efficient interstitial antennas that destroy tumors and a margin of healthy tissue, in situ, while minimizing damage to the rest of the organ. Previously, we presented a method for optimizing MWA antenna designs by coupling finite element method models of antennas with a real-coded, multiobjective genetic algorithm. We utilized this procedure to optimize the design of a minimally invasive choke antenna that can be used to create near-spherical ablation zones of adjustable size (radius 1-2 cm) by adjusting treatment durations and a sliding structure of the antenna. Computational results were validated with experiments in ex vivo bovine liver. The optimization procedure yielded antennas with reflection coefficients below -30 dB, which were capable of creating spherical ablation zones up to 2 cm in radius using 100 W input power at 2.45 GHz with treatment durations under 2 min.

  20. Effects of Fusion Zone Size and Failure Mode on Peak Load and Energy Absorption of Advanced High Strength Steel Spot Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the effects of fusion zone size on failure modes, static strength and energy absorption of resistance spot welds (RSW) of advanced high strength steels (AHSS). DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds are considered. The main failure modes for spot welds are nugget pullout and interfacial fracture. Partial interfacial fracture is also observed. The critical fusion zone sizes to ensure nugget pull-out failure mode are developed for both DP800 and TRIP800 using limit load based analytical model and micro-hardness measurements of the weld cross sections. Static weld strength tests using cross tension samples were performed on the joint populations with controlled fusion zone sizes. The resulted peak load and energy absorption levels associated with each failure mode were studied for all the weld populations using statistical data analysis tools. The results in this study show that AHSS spot welds with fusion zone size of can not produce nugget pullout mode for both the DP800 and TRIP800 materials examined. The critical fusion zone size for nugget pullout shall be derived for individual materials based on different base metal properties as well as different heat affected zone (HAZ) and weld properties resulted from different welding parameters.

  1. Influence of aggregate size, water cement ratio and age on the microstructure of the interfacial transition zone

    SciTech Connect

    Elsharief, Amir; Cohen, Menashi D.; Olek, Jan

    2003-11-01

    This paper presents the results of an investigation on the effect of water-cement ratio (w/c), aggregate size, and age on the microstructure of the interfacial transition zone (ITZ) between normal weight aggregate and the bulk cement paste. Backscattered electron images (BSE) obtained by scanning electron microscope were used to characterize the ITZ microstructure. The results suggest that the w/c plays an important role in controlling the microstructure of the ITZ and its thickness. Reducing w/c from 0.55 to 0.40 resulted in an ITZ with characteristics that are not distinguishable from those of the bulk paste as demonstrated by BSE images. Aggregate size appears to have an important influence on the ITZ characteristics. Reducing the aggregate size tends to reduce the ITZ porosity. The evolution of the ITZ microstructure relative to that of the bulk paste appears to depend on the initial content of the unhydrated cement grains (UH). The results suggest that the presence of a relatively low amount of UH in the ITZ at early age may cause the porosity of the ITZ, relative to that of the bulk paste, to increase with time. The presence of relatively large amount of UH in the ITZ at early ages may cause its porosity, relative to that of the bulk paste, to decrease with time.

  2. How Well Does Fracture Set Characterization Reduce Uncertainty in Capture Zone Size for Wells Situated in Sedimentary Bedrock Aquifers?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, A. C.; Novakowski, K. S.

    2005-12-01

    beyond a threshold concentration within the specified time. Aquifers are simulated by drawing the random spacings and apertures from specified distributions. Predictions are made of capture zone size assuming various degrees of knowledge of these distributions, with the parameters of the horizontal fractures being estimated using simulated hydraulic tests and a maximum likelihood estimator. The uncertainty is evaluated by calculating the variance in the capture zone size estimated in multiple realizations. The results show that despite good strategies to estimate the parameters of the horizontal fractures the uncertainty in capture zone size is enormous, mostly due to the lack of available information on vertical fractures. Also, at realistic distances (less than ten kilometers) and using realistic transmissivity distributions for the horizontal fractures the uptake of solute from fractures into matrix cannot be relied upon to protect the production well from contamination.

  3. Subsurface ablation of atherosclerotic plaque using ultrafast laser pulses

    PubMed Central

    Lanvin, Thomas; Conkey, Donald B.; Frobert, Aurelien; Valentin, Jeremy; Goy, Jean-Jacques; Cook, Stéphane; Giraud, Marie-Noelle; Psaltis, Demetri

    2015-01-01

    We perform subsurface ablation of atherosclerotic plaque using ultrafast pulses. Excised mouse aortas containing atherosclerotic plaque were ablated with ultrafast near-infrared (NIR) laser pulses. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) was used to observe the ablation result, while the physical damage was inspected in histological sections. We characterize the effects of incident pulse energy on surface damage, ablation hole size, and filament propagation. We find that it is possible to ablate plaque just below the surface without causing surface damage, which motivates further investigation of ultrafast ablation for subsurface atherosclerotic plaque removal. PMID:26203381

  4. Subsurface ablation of atherosclerotic plaque using ultrafast laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Lanvin, Thomas; Conkey, Donald B; Frobert, Aurelien; Valentin, Jeremy; Goy, Jean-Jacques; Cook, Stéphane; Giraud, Marie-Noelle; Psaltis, Demetri

    2015-07-01

    We perform subsurface ablation of atherosclerotic plaque using ultrafast pulses. Excised mouse aortas containing atherosclerotic plaque were ablated with ultrafast near-infrared (NIR) laser pulses. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) was used to observe the ablation result, while the physical damage was inspected in histological sections. We characterize the effects of incident pulse energy on surface damage, ablation hole size, and filament propagation. We find that it is possible to ablate plaque just below the surface without causing surface damage, which motivates further investigation of ultrafast ablation for subsurface atherosclerotic plaque removal.

  5. Lung Radiofrequency Ablation: In Vivo Experimental Study with Low-Perfusion-Rate Multitined Electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Crocetti, Laura Lencioni, Riccardo; Bozzi, Elena; Sbrana, Alberto; Bartolozzi, Carlo

    2008-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility and safety of lung radiofrequency (RF) ablation by using low-perfusion-rate, expandable, multitined electrodes in an in vivo animal model. Ten New Zealand White rabbits underwent RF ablation using low-perfusion-rate, expandable, multitined electrodes (Starburst Talon; RITA Medical Systems, Mountain View, CA) and a 200-W RF generator. The electrode was positioned under fluoroscopy guidance and a single percutaneous RF ablation was performed. Saline perfusate was doped with nonionic iodinated contrast agent to render it visible on computed tomography (CT). The pump infused the saline doped with contrast agent into the lateral tines at a rate of 0.1ml/min. The planned ablation was of 3 min, with the hooks deployed to 2 cm at a target temperature of 105{sup o}C. An immediate posttreatment CT scan documented the distribution of the doped saline and the presence of immediate complications. The animals were monitored for delayed complications and sacrificed within 72 h (n = 4), 2 weeks (n = 3), or 4 weeks (n = 3). Assessment of ablation zone and adjacent structures was done at autopsy. Major complications consisted of pneumothorax requiring drainage (n = 2) and skin burn (n = 1). Immediately after the procedure the area of ablation was depicted at CT as a round, well-demarcated area, homogeneously opacified by iodinated contrast medium (mean size, 2.3 {+-} 0.8 cm). The presence of a sharply demarcated area of coagulation necrosis (mean size, 2.1 {+-} 0.4 cm) without severe damage to adjacent structures was confirmed at autopsy. In one case, euthanized at 4 weeks, in whom pneumothorax and pleural effusion were depicted, pleural fibrinous adhesions were demonstrated at autopsy. In conclusion, lung RF ablation performed in an in vivo animal model using low-perfusion-rate, expandable, multitined electrodes is feasible and safe. No severe damage to adjacent structures was demonstrated.

  6. High-resolution Speckle Imaging of Kepler Exoplanet Host Stars - Validation of Earth-size, Habitable Zone Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Steve B.; Horch, Elliott; Everett, Mark; Ciardi, David

    2013-08-01

    We propose to utilize our speckle imaging instrument on the Gemini- North 8-m telescope to obtain high spatial resolution imaging of Kepler planetary candidate systems that host planets smaller than 1.5 R_earth. The high contrast images afforded by the speckle camera on Gemini-North, resolution to 0.02 arc-sec and (Delta)mag to 10, in conjunction with the Kepler data, will allow us to fully validate ~100 Kepler systems with earth-sized planets or smaller in or near the habitable zone independently of any other follow-up data. Additionally, we will provide unique information on the binary fraction of solar-like stars due to our speckle images reaching to ~10 AU separations, the RV determined peak of solar-type binary separations. Our speckle+Gemini-N observations will serve to not only validate the many Earth-like exoplanets in long period orbits and assess the binary fraction of the Kepler planet host stars, we will also re-determine the planetary radii in some cases after taking into account blending by physically associated or co-aligned stars. Gemini-N speckle imaging will detect possible blends that, if unaccounted for, can affect the measured planet sizes or could suggest a false positive in the form of a faint eclipsing binary blended with the target star.

  7. Laser ablation studies of concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Savina, M.; Xu, Z.; Wang, Y.; Reed, C.; Pellin, M.

    1999-10-20

    Laser ablation was studied as a means of removing radioactive contaminants from the surface and near-surface regions of concrete. The authors present the results of ablation tests on cement and concrete samples using a 1.6 kW pulsed Nd:YAG laser with fiber optic beam delivery. The laser-surface interaction was studied using cement and high density concrete as targets. Ablation efficiency and material removal rates were determined as functions of irradiance and pulse overlap. Doped samples were also ablated to determine the efficiency with which surface contaminants were removed and captured in the effluent. The results show that the cement phase of the material melts and vaporizes, but the aggregate portion (sand and rock) fragments. The effluent consists of both micron-size aerosol particles and chunks of fragmented aggregate material. Laser-induced optical emission spectroscopy was used to analyze the surface during ablation. Analysis of the effluent showed that contaminants such as cesium and strontium were strongly segregated into different regions of the particle size distribution of the aerosol.

  8. Pellet ablation and ablation model development

    SciTech Connect

    Houlberg, W.A.

    1989-01-01

    A broad survey of pellet ablation is given, based primarily on information presented at this meeting. The implications of various experimental observations for ablation theory are derived from qualitative arguments of the physics involved. The major elements of a more complete ablation theory are then outlined in terms of these observations. This is followed by a few suggestions on improving the connections between theory and experimental results through examination of ablation data. Although this is a rather aggressive undertaking for such a brief (and undoubtedly incomplete) assessment, some of the discussion may help us advance the understanding of pellet ablation. 17 refs.

  9. Test of Thermal Transport Models through Dynamic Overpressure Stabilization of Ablation-Front Perturbation Growth in Laser-Driven CH Foils

    SciTech Connect

    Gotchev, O.V.; Goncharov, V.N.; Knauer, J.P.; Boehly, T.R.; Collins, T.J.B.; Epstein, R.; Jaanimagi, P.A.; Meyerhofer, D.D.

    2006-03-24

    Heat-flow-induced dynamic overpressure at the perturbed ablation front of an ICF target can stabilize the ablative Richtmyer/Meshkov-like instability and mitigate the subsequent ablative Rayleigh/Taylor (RT) instability. A series of experiments was performed on the OMEGA laser to quantify the dynamic overpressure stabilization during the shock transit. Analysis of the experimental data using hydrocode simulations shows that the observed oscillatory evolution of the ablation-front perturbations depends on Dc, the size of the thermal conduction zone, and the fluid velocity in the blowoff region Vbl that are sensitive to the thermal transport model used. We show that the simulations match the experiment well when the time dependence of the heat-flux inhibition is taken into account using a recently developed nonlocal heat transport model.

  10. Effect of zone size on the convergence of exact solutions for diffusion in single phase systems with planar, cylindrical or spherical geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unnam, J.; Tenney, D. R.

    1981-01-01

    Exact solutions for diffusion in single phase binary alloy systems with constant diffusion coefficient and zero-flux boundary condition have been evaluated to establish the optimum zone size of applicability. Planar, cylindrical and spherical interface geometry, and finite, singly infinite, and doubly infinite systems are treated. Two solutions are presented for each geometry, one well suited to short diffusion times, and one to long times. The effect of zone-size on the convergence of these solutions is discussed. A generalized form of the diffusion solution for doubly infinite systems is proposed.

  11. Feasibility of ablative fractional laser-assisted drug delivery with optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chih-Hsun; Tsai, Meng-Tsan; Shen, Su-Chin; Ng, Chau Yee; Jung, Shih-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Fractional resurfacing creates hundreds of microscopic wounds in the skin without injuring surrounding tissue. This technique allows rapid wound healing owing to small injury regions, and has been proven as an effective method for repairing photodamaged skin. Recently, ablative fractional laser (AFL) treatment has been demonstrated to facilitate topical drug delivery into skin. However, induced fractional photothermolysis depends on several parameters, such as incident angle, exposure energy, and spot size of the fractional laser. In this study, we used fractional CO2 laser to induce microscopic ablation array on the nail for facilitating drug delivery through the nail. To ensure proper energy delivery without damaging tissue structures beneath the nail plate, optical coherence tomography (OCT) was implemented for quantitative evaluation of induced microscopic ablation zone (MAZ). Moreover, to further study the feasibility of drug delivery, normal saline was dripped on the exposure area of fingernail and the speckle variance in OCT signal was used to observe water diffusion through the ablative channels into the nail plate. In conclusion, this study establishes OCT as an effective tool for the investigation of fractional photothermolysis and water/drug delivery through microscopic ablation channels after nail fractional laser treatment. PMID:25426321

  12. Efficacy and predictability of soft tissue ablation using a prototype Raman-shifted alexandrite laser.

    PubMed

    Kozub, John A; Shen, Jin-H; Joos, Karen M; Prasad, Ratna; Hutson, M Shane

    2015-10-01

    Previous research showed that mid-infrared free-electron lasers could reproducibly ablate soft tissue with little collateral damage. The potential for surgical applications motivated searches for alternative tabletop lasers providing thermally confined pulses in the 6- to-7-µm wavelength range with sufficient pulse energy, stability, and reliability. Here, we evaluate a prototype Raman-shifted alexandrite laser. We measure ablation thresholds, etch rates, and collateral damage in gelatin and cornea as a function of laser wavelength (6.09, 6.27, or 6.43 µm), pulse energy (up to 3 mJ/pulse), and spot diameter (100 to 600 µm). We find modest wavelength dependence for ablation thresholds and collateral damage, with the lowest thresholds and least damage for 6.09 µm. We find a strong spot-size dependence for all metrics. When the beam is tightly focused (~100-µm diameter), ablation requires more energy, is highly variable and less efficient, and can yield large zones of mechanical damage (for pulse energies>1 mJ). When the beam is softly focused (~300-µm diameter), ablation proceeded at surgically relevant etch rates, with reasonable reproducibility (5% to 12% within a single sample), and little collateral damage. With improvements in pulse-energy stability, this prototype laser may have significant potential for soft-tissue surgical applications.

  13. Efficacy and predictability of soft tissue ablation using a prototype Raman-shifted alexandrite laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozub, John A.; Shen, Jin-H.; Joos, Karen M.; Prasad, Ratna; Shane Hutson, M.

    2015-10-01

    Previous research showed that mid-infrared free-electron lasers could reproducibly ablate soft tissue with little collateral damage. The potential for surgical applications motivated searches for alternative tabletop lasers providing thermally confined pulses in the 6- to-7-μm wavelength range with sufficient pulse energy, stability, and reliability. Here, we evaluate a prototype Raman-shifted alexandrite laser. We measure ablation thresholds, etch rates, and collateral damage in gelatin and cornea as a function of laser wavelength (6.09, 6.27, or 6.43 μm), pulse energy (up to 3 mJ/pulse), and spot diameter (100 to 600 μm). We find modest wavelength dependence for ablation thresholds and collateral damage, with the lowest thresholds and least damage for 6.09 μm. We find a strong spot-size dependence for all metrics. When the beam is tightly focused (˜100-μm diameter), ablation requires more energy, is highly variable and less efficient, and can yield large zones of mechanical damage (for pulse energies >1 mJ). When the beam is softly focused (˜300-μm diameter), ablation proceeded at surgically relevant etch rates, with reasonable reproducibility (5% to 12% within a single sample), and little collateral damage. With improvements in pulse-energy stability, this prototype laser may have significant potential for soft-tissue surgical applications.

  14. Efficacy and predictability of soft tissue ablation using a prototype Raman-shifted alexandrite laser

    PubMed Central

    Kozub, John A.; Shen, Jin-H.; Joos, Karen M.; Prasad, Ratna; Shane Hutson, M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Previous research showed that mid-infrared free-electron lasers could reproducibly ablate soft tissue with little collateral damage. The potential for surgical applications motivated searches for alternative tabletop lasers providing thermally confined pulses in the 6- to-7-μm wavelength range with sufficient pulse energy, stability, and reliability. Here, we evaluate a prototype Raman-shifted alexandrite laser. We measure ablation thresholds, etch rates, and collateral damage in gelatin and cornea as a function of laser wavelength (6.09, 6.27, or 6.43  μm), pulse energy (up to 3  mJ/pulse), and spot diameter (100 to 600  μm). We find modest wavelength dependence for ablation thresholds and collateral damage, with the lowest thresholds and least damage for 6.09  μm. We find a strong spot-size dependence for all metrics. When the beam is tightly focused (∼100-μm diameter), ablation requires more energy, is highly variable and less efficient, and can yield large zones of mechanical damage (for pulse energies >1  mJ). When the beam is softly focused (∼300-μm diameter), ablation proceeded at surgically relevant etch rates, with reasonable reproducibility (5% to 12% within a single sample), and little collateral damage. With improvements in pulse-energy stability, this prototype laser may have significant potential for soft-tissue surgical applications. PMID:26456553

  15. Effects of Fusion Zone Size and Failure Mode on Peak Load and Energy Absorption of Advanced High Strength Steel Spot Welds under Lap Shear Loading Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2008-06-01

    This paper examines the effects of fusion zone size on failure modes, static strength and energy absorption of resistance spot welds (RSW) of advanced high strength steels (AHSS) under lap shear loading condition. DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds are considered. The main failure modes for spot welds are nugget pullout and interfacial fracture. Partial interfacial fracture is also observed. Static weld strength tests using lap shear samples were performed on the joint populations with various fusion zone sizes. The resulted peak load and energy absorption levels associated with each failure mode were studied for all the weld populations using statistical data analysis tools. The results in this study show that AHSS spot welds with conventionally required fusion zone size of can not produce nugget pullout mode for both the DP800 and TRIP800 welds under lap shear loading. Moreover, failure mode has strong influence on weld peak load and energy absorption for all the DP800 welds and the TRIP800 small welds: welds failed in pullout mode have statistically higher strength and energy absorption than those failed in interfacial fracture mode. For TRIP800 welds above the critical fusion zone level, the influence of weld failure modes on peak load and energy absorption diminishes. Scatter plots of peak load and energy absorption versus weld fusion zone size were then constructed, and the results indicate that fusion zone size is the most critical factor in weld quality in terms of peak load and energy absorption for both DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds.

  16. Effects of repeated use and resterilization on structural and functional integrity of microwave ablation antennas.

    PubMed

    Finck, Cyrielle A; Zur Linden, Alex R; Singh, Ameet; Foster, Robert A; Nykamp, Stephanie G; Sears, William C

    2017-04-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine effects of repeated use and resterilization on structural and functional integrity of microwave ablation (MWA) antennas. SAMPLE 17 cooled-shaft MWA antennas (3 groups of 5 antennas/group and 2 control antennas). PROCEDURES 1, 2, and 3 ablations in the livers of bovine cadavers were performed at the maximum recommended settings. Antennas were cleaned and sterilized in hydrogen peroxide plasma, and the process was repeated (reprocessing cycle; n = 6). Control antennas were only sterilized (6 times). Aerobic and anaerobic bacterial cultures were performed, and antennas were microscopically assessed for damage. RESULTS 6 cycles were completed. Thirteen of 15 MWA antennas remained functional for up to 4 cycles, 10 were functional after 5 cycles, and only 7 were functional after 6 cycles. Progressive tearing of the silicone coating of the antennas was observed, with a negative effect of the number of cycles for silicone tearing. Size of the ablation zone decreased mildly over time after cycles 5 and 6; however, this was not considered clinically relevant. No significant changes in the shape of ablation zones were detected. All cultures yielded negative results, except for an isolated case, which was considered a contaminant. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Structural and functional integrity of the microwave antennas remained acceptable during repeated use and reprocessing for up to 4 cycles. However, there was a decrease in functional integrity at cycles 5 and 6. We suggest that these microwave antennas be subjected to > 3 reprocessing cycles. Antennas should be carefully examined before reuse.

  17. Spermidine Suppresses Age-Associated Memory Impairment by Preventing Adverse Increase of Presynaptic Active Zone Size and Release

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Varun K.; Pech, Ulrike; Fulterer, Andreas; Ender, Anatoli; Mauermann, Stephan F.; Andlauer, Till F. M.; Beuschel, Christine; Thriene, Kerstin; Quentin, Christine; Schwärzel, Martin; Mielke, Thorsten; Madeo, Frank; Dengjel, Joern; Fiala, André; Sigrist, Stephan J.

    2016-01-01

    Memories are assumed to be formed by sets of synapses changing their structural or functional performance. The efficacy of forming new memories declines with advancing age, but the synaptic changes underlying age-induced memory impairment remain poorly understood. Recently, we found spermidine feeding to specifically suppress age-dependent impairments in forming olfactory memories, providing a mean to search for synaptic changes involved in age-dependent memory impairment. Here, we show that a specific synaptic compartment, the presynaptic active zone (AZ), increases the size of its ultrastructural elaboration and releases significantly more synaptic vesicles with advancing age. These age-induced AZ changes, however, were fully suppressed by spermidine feeding. A genetically enforced enlargement of AZ scaffolds (four gene-copies of BRP) impaired memory formation in young animals. Thus, in the Drosophila nervous system, aging AZs seem to steer towards the upper limit of their operational range, limiting synaptic plasticity and contributing to impairment of memory formation. Spermidine feeding suppresses age-dependent memory impairment by counteracting these age-dependent changes directly at the synapse. PMID:27684064

  18. Depth Profiling of Polymer Composites by Ultrafast Laser Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Christopher; Clayton, Clive; Longtin, Jon

    2009-03-01

    Past work has shown femtosecond laser ablation to be an athermal process at low fluences in polymer systems. The ablation rate in this low fluence regime is very low, allowing for micro-scale removal of material. We have taken advantage of this fact to perform shallow depth profiling ablation on carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites. Neat composite and resin samples were studied to establish reference ablation profiles. These profiles and the effects of the heterogeneous distribution of carbon fibers were observed through confocal laser profilometry and optical and scanning electron microscopy. Weathered materials that have been subjected to accelerated tests in artificial sunlight or water conditions were ablated to determine the correlation between exposure and change in ablation characteristics. Preliminary Raman and micro-ATR analysis performed before and after ablation shows no chemical changes indicative of thermal effects. The low-volume-ablation property was utilized in an attempt to expose the sizing-matrix interphase for analysis.

  19. Fragmentation and ablation during entry

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1997-09-01

    This note discusses objects that both fragment and ablate during entry, using the results of previous reports to describe the velocity, pressure, and fragmentation of entering objects. It shows that the mechanisms used there to describe the breakup of non-ablating objects during deceleration remain valid for most ablating objects. It treats coupled fragmentation and ablation during entry, building on earlier models that separately discuss the entry of objects that are hard, whose high heat of ablation permits little erosion, and those who are strong whose strength prevents fragmentation, which are discussed in ``Radiation from Hard Objects,`` ``Deceleration and Radiation of Strong, Hard, Asteroids During Atmospheric Impact,`` and ``Meteor Signature Interpretation.`` This note provides a more detailed treatment of the further breakup and separation of fragments during descent. It replaces the constraint on mass per unit area used earlier to determine the altitude and magnitude of peak power radiation with a detailed analytic solution of deceleration. Model predictions are shown to be in agreement with the key features of numerical calculations of deceleration. The model equations are solved for the altitudes of maximum radiation, which agree with numerical integrations. The model is inverted analytically to infer object size and speed from measurements of peak power and altitude to provide a complete model for the approximate inversion of meteor data.

  20. Precisely shaped acoustic ablation of tumors utilizing steerable needle and 3D ultrasound image guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boctor, Emad M.; Stolka, Philipp; Kang, Hyun-Jae; Clarke, Clyde; Rucker, Caleb; Croom, Jordon; Burdette, E. Clif; Webster, Robert J., III

    2010-02-01

    Many recent studies have demonstrated the efficacy of interstitial ablative approaches for the treatment of hepatic tumors. Despite these promising results, current systems remain highly dependent on operator skill, and cannot treat many tumors because there is little control of the size and shape of the zone of necrosis, and no control over ablator trajectory within tissue once insertion has taken place. Additionally, tissue deformation and target motion make it extremely difficult to place the ablator device precisely into the target. Irregularly shaped target volumes typically require multiple insertions and several overlapping (thermal) lesions, which are even more challenging to accomplish in a precise, predictable, and timely manner without causing excessive damage to surrounding normal tissues. In answer to these problems, we have developed a steerable acoustic ablator called the ACUSITT with the ability of directional energy delivery to precisely shape the applied thermal dose . In this paper, we address image guidance for this device, proposing an innovative method for accurate tracking and tool registration with spatially-registered intra-operative three-dimensional US volumes, without relying on an external tracking device. This method is applied to guid-ance of the flexible, snake-like, lightweight, and inexpensive ACUSITT to facilitate precise placement of its ablator tip within the liver, with ablation monitoring via strain imaging. Recent advancements in interstitial high-power ultrasound applicators enable controllable and penetrating heating patterns which can be dynamically altered. This paper summarizes the design and development of the first synergistic system that integrates a novel steerable interstitial acoustic ablation device with a novel trackerless 3DUS guidance strategy.

  1. Interannual Variability in Carbon and Nitrogen Stable Isotopic Signatures of Size-Fractionated POM from the South Florida Coastal Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, S. L.; Anderson, W. T.; Jochem, F. J.; Fourqurean, J. W.

    2004-12-01

    Environmental conditions in South Florida coastal waters have been of local and national concern over the past 15 years. Attention has focused on the ecosystem impacts of salinity increases, seagrass die-off, increased algal bloom frequency, waste water influence, groundwater discharge, and exchange between Florida Bay, the Gulf of Mexico, and the Atlantic Ocean. Changes in water quality and productivity levels may be reflected in the isotopic signatures of coastal zone primary producers. Recent work with seagrasses in South Florida has demonstrated high seasonal and spatial variability in C and N isotopic signatures and decoupling between the two isotopic systems as they vary. To better understand the sources of seasonal and spatial fluctuation, size fractionated POM (particulate organic matter) samples have been collected on a quarterly basis since Sept. 2002. Fractions collected include >150μ m, 50-150μ m, and 0.1-50μ m using Nitex mesh sieves and a portable pump system deployed from a small boat at 10 sites around the Florida Keys and Florida Bay. It was hypothesized that planktonic groups respond more quickly to changes in water quality then seagrasses, and thus variations may be more clearly attributed to environmental parameters. Significant spatial and temporal variability is evident both within site between size fractions and between sites. Seasonal oscillations of up to 4‰ were observed in N isotopic values and 6‰ in C isotopic values of the 50-150μ m size fraction, which is dominated by diatoms and dinoflagellates. δ 13C values are depleted in the late winter/early spring sampling period possibly reflecting decreased productivity stress on available C pools. 13C depletion is generally coincident with δ 15N enrichment in the late winter/early spring, possibly demonstrating changes in DIN pools (NO3- and NH4+ concentrations) or changes in decomposition or denitrification rates. Broad groupings appear to separate Atlantic coral reef sites

  2. Effects of activated protein C on the size of modeled ischemic focus and morphometric parameters of neurons and neuroglia in its perifocal zone.

    PubMed

    Khudoerkov, R M; Savinkova, I G; Strukova, S M; Gorbacheva, L R; Gulyaev, M V; Pirogov, Yu A; Sal'kov, V N; Sobolev, V B; Gavrilova, S A; Koshelev, V B

    2014-08-01

    The effects of activated protein C (APC) on the quantitative parameters of neurons and neuroglia in the perifocal zone of infarction induced in the left hemispheric cortex were studied in two groups of rats. Group 1 animals served as control (control infarction). Group 2 rats were injected with APC (50 μg/kg) in the right lateral cerebral ventricle 3 h after infarction was induced, and after 72 h the infarction size was evaluated and the neurons and neuroglia in the perifocal zone were counted. APC reduced the infarction size 2.5 times in comparison with the control and reduced by 16% the neuronal death in the perifocal zone layer V, causing no appreciable changes in layer III, and did not change the size of neuronal bodies but increased (by 11%) the size of neuronal nuclei in layer III. The protein maintained the sharply increased count of gliocytes in the perifocal zone of infarction and promoted their growth. Hence, APC protected the neurons from death in the ischemic focus by increasing the gliocyte count and stimulating the compensatory reparative processes.

  3. Radiofrequency Ablation of Liver Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Site Index A-Z Radiofrequency Ablation (RFA) of Liver Tumors Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a treatment that ... of Liver Tumors? What is Radiofrequency Ablation of Liver Tumors? Radiofrequency ablation, sometimes referred to as RFA, ...

  4. Ablative therapies for small renal tumours.

    PubMed

    Castro, Arturo; Jenkins, Lawrence C; Salas, Nelson; Lorber, Gideon; Leveillee, Raymond J

    2013-05-01

    Improvements in imaging technology have resulted in an increase in detection of small renal masses (SRMs). Minimally invasive ablation modalities, including cryoablation, radiofrequencey ablation, microwave ablation and irreversible electroporation, are currently being used to treat SRMs in select groups of patients. Cryoablation and radiofrequency ablation have been extensively studied. Presently, cryoablation is gaining popularity because the resulting ice ball can be visualized easily using ultrasonography. Tumour size and location are strong predictors of outcome of radiofrequency ablation. One of the main benefits of microwave ablation is that microwaves can propagate through all types of tissue, including desiccated and charred tissue, as well as water vapour, which might be formed during the ablation. Irreversible electroporation has been shown in animal studies to affect only the cell membrane of undesirable target tissues and to spare adjacent structures; however, clinical studies that depict the efficacy and safety of this treatment modality in humans are still sparse. As more experience is gained in the future, ablation modalities might be utilized in all patients with tumours <4 cm in diameter, rather than just as an alternative treatment for high-risk surgical patients.

  5. Ablative skin resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Chwalek, Jennifer; Goldberg, David J

    2011-01-01

    Ablative skin resurfacing has remained the gold standard for treating photodamage and acne scars since the development of the first CO(2) lasers. CO(2) and Er:YAG lasers emit infrared light, which targets water resulting in tissue contraction and collagen formation. The first ablative laser systems created significant thermal damage resulting in unacceptably high rates of scarring and prolonged healing. Newer devices, such as high-energy pulsed lasers and fractional ablative lasers, are capable of achieving significant improvements with fewer side effects and shorter recovery times. While ablative resurfacing has become safer, careful patient selection is still important to avoid post-treatment scarring, dyspigmentation, and infections. Clinicians utilizing ablative devices need to be aware of possible side effects in order to maximize results and patient satisfaction. This chapter reviews the background of ablative lasers including the types of ablative lasers, mechanism of action, indications for ablative resurfacing, and possible side effects.

  6. Population Structure, Genetic Diversity, Effective Population Size, Demographic History and Regional Connectivity Patterns of the Endangered Dusky Grouper, Epinephelus marginatus (Teleostei: Serranidae), within Malta's Fisheries Management Zone.

    PubMed

    Buchholz-Sørensen, Molly; Vella, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to describe the genetic population structure and demographic history of the endangered marine fish, Epinephelus marginatus, within Malta's Fisheries Management Zone for the purpose of localised conservation planning. Epinephelus marginatus is a long-lived, sedentary, reef-associated protogynous hermaphrodite with high commercial and recreational value that is at risk of extinction throughout its global distribution. Based on global trends, population substructuring and gaps in local knowledge this has led to an increased interest in evaluation of local stock. Assessment of Maltese demography was based on historical and contemporary catch landings data whilst genetic population structure and regional connectivity patterns were evaluated by examining 175 individuals collected within the central Mediterranean region between 2002 and 2009 using 14 nuclear microsatellite loci. Demographic stock assessment of Maltese E. marginatus' revealed a 99% decline in catch landings between 1947 and 2009 within the Fisheries Management Zone. A contemporary modest mean size was observed, 3 ± 3 kg, where approximately 17% of the population was juvenile, 68% female/sex-changing and 15% were male with a male-to-female sex ratio of 1:5. Genetic analysis describes the overall population of E. marginatus' within the Fisheries Management Zone as decreasing in size (ƟH = 2.2), which has gone through a significant size reduction in the past (M = 0.41) and consequently shows signs of moderate inbreeding (FIS = 0.10, p < 0.001) with an estimated effective population size of 130 individuals. Results of spatially explicit Bayesian genetic cluster analysis detected two geographically distinct subpopulations within Malta's Fisheries Management Zone and that they are connected to a larger network of E. marginatus' within the Sicily Channel. Results suggest conservation management should be designed to reflect E. marginatus' within Malta's Fisheries Management Zone

  7. Effects of Fusion Zone Size on Failure Modes and Performance of Advanced High Strength Steel Spot Welds (2006-01-0531)

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2007-03-01

    This paper examines the effects of fusion zone size on failure modes, static strength and energy absorption of resistance spot welds (RSW) of advanced high strength steels (AHSS). DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds are considered. The main failure modes for spot welds are nugget pullout and interfacial fracture. Partial interfacial fracture is also observed. The critical fusion zone sizes to ensure nugget pull-out failure mode are developed for both DP800 and TRIP800 using the limit load based analytical model and the micro-hardness measurements of the weld cross sections. Static weld strength tests using cross tension samples were performed on the joint populations with controlled fusion zone sizes. The resulted peak load and energy absorption levels associated with each failure mode were studied using statistical data analysis tools. The results in this study show that the conventional weld size of 4 t1/2 can not produce nugget pullout mode for both the DP800 and TRIP800 materials. The results also suggest that performance based spot weld acceptance criteria should be developed for different AHSS spot welds.

  8. Sphere-Enhanced Microwave Ablation (sMWA) Versus Bland Microwave Ablation (bMWA): Technical Parameters, Specific CT 3D Rendering and Histopathology

    SciTech Connect

    Gockner, T. L.; Zelzer, S.; Mokry, T. Gnutzmann, D. Bellemann, N.; Mogler, C.; Beierfuß, A. Köllensperger, E. Germann, G.; Radeleff, B. A. Stampfl, U. Kauczor, H. U.; Pereira, P. L.; Sommer, C. M.

    2015-04-15

    PurposeThis study was designed to compare technical parameters during ablation as well as CT 3D rendering and histopathology of the ablation zone between sphere-enhanced microwave ablation (sMWA) and bland microwave ablation (bMWA).MethodsIn six sheep-livers, 18 microwave ablations were performed with identical system presets (power output: 80 W, ablation time: 120 s). In three sheep, transarterial embolisation (TAE) was performed immediately before microwave ablation using spheres (diameter: 40 ± 10 μm) (sMWA). In the other three sheep, microwave ablation was performed without spheres embolisation (bMWA). Contrast-enhanced CT, sacrifice, and liver harvest followed immediately after microwave ablation. Study goals included technical parameters during ablation (resulting power output, ablation time), geometry of the ablation zone applying specific CT 3D rendering with a software prototype (short axis of the ablation zone, volume of the largest aligned ablation sphere within the ablation zone), and histopathology (hematoxylin-eosin, Masson Goldner and TUNEL).ResultsResulting power output/ablation times were 78.7 ± 1.0 W/120 ± 0.0 s for bMWA and 78.4 ± 1.0 W/120 ± 0.0 s for sMWA (n.s., respectively). Short axis/volume were 23.7 ± 3.7 mm/7.0 ± 2.4 cm{sup 3} for bMWA and 29.1 ± 3.4 mm/11.5 ± 3.9 cm{sup 3} for sMWA (P < 0.01, respectively). Histopathology confirmed the signs of coagulation necrosis as well as early and irreversible cell death for bMWA and sMWA. For sMWA, spheres were detected within, at the rim, and outside of the ablation zone without conspicuous features.ConclusionsSpecific CT 3D rendering identifies a larger ablation zone for sMWA compared with bMWA. The histopathological signs and the detectable amount of cell death are comparable for both groups. When comparing sMWA with bMWA, TAE has no effect on the technical parameters during ablation.

  9. Effect of a poloxamer 407-based thermosensitive gel on minimization of thermal injury to diaphragm during microwave ablation of the liver

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li-Li; Xia, Gui-Min; Liu, Yu-Jiang; Dou, Rui; Eisenbrey, John; Liu, Ji-Bin; Wang, Xiao-Wei; Qian, Lin-Xue

    2017-01-01

    AIM To assess the insulating effect of a poloxamer 407 (P407)-based gel during microwave ablation of liver adjacent to the diaphragm. METHODS We prepared serial dilutions of P407, and 22.5% (w/w) concentration was identified as suitable for ablation procedures. Subsequently, microwave ablations were performed on the livers of 24 rabbits (gel, saline, control groups, n = 8 in each). The P407 solution and 0.9% normal saline were injected into the potential space between the diaphragm and liver in experimental groups. No barriers were applied to the controls. After microwave ablations, the frequency, size and degree of thermal injury were compared histologically among the three groups. Subsequently, another 8 rabbits were injected with the P407 solution and microwave ablation was performed. The levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine (Cr) in serum were tested at 1 d before microwave ablation and 3 and 7 d after operation. RESULTS In vivo ablation thermal injury to the adjacent diaphragm was evaluated in the control, saline and 22.5% P407 gel groups (P = 0.001-0.040). However, there was no significant difference in the volume of ablation zone among the three groups (P > 0.05). Moreover, there were no statistical differences among the preoperative and postoperative gel groups according to the levels of ALT, AST, BUN and Cr in serum (all P > 0.05). CONCLUSION Twenty-two point five percent P407 gel could be a more effective choice during microwave ablation of hepatic tumors adjacent to the diaphragm. Further studies for clinical translation are warranted.

  10. Increasing lengths of aftershock zones with depths of moderate-size earthquakes on the San Jacinto Fault suggests triggering of deep creep in the middle crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xiaofeng; Peng, Zhigang

    2016-01-01

    Recent geodetic studies along the San Jacinto Fault (SJF) in southern California revealed a shallower locking depth than the seismogenic depth outlined by microseismicity. This disagreement leads to speculations that creeping episodes drive seismicity in the lower part of the seismogenic zone. Whether deep creep occurs along the SJF holds key information on how fault slips during earthquake cycle and potential seismic hazard imposed to southern California. Here we apply a matched filter technique to 10 M > 4 earthquake sequences along the SJF since 2000 and obtain more complete earthquake catalogues. We then systematic investigate spatio-temporal evolutions of these aftershock sequences. We find anomalously large aftershock zones for earthquakes occurred below the geodetically inferred locking depth (i.e. 11-12 km), while aftershock zones of shallower main shocks are close to expectations from standard scaling relationships. Although we do not observe clear migration of aftershocks, most aftershock zones do expand systematically with logarithmic time since the main shock. All the evidences suggest that aftershocks near or below the locking depth are likely driven by deep creep following the main shock. The presence of a creeping zone below 11-12 km may have significant implications on the maximum sizes of events in this region.

  11. MIZMAS: Modeling the Evolution of Ice Thickness and Floe Size Distributions in the Marginal Ice Zone of the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    zone (MIZ) of the Chukchi and Beaufort seas (CBS) on seasonal time scales . Our primary interest is the ability to realistically simulate the...historical evolution of the CBS MIZ ice–ocean system and its ITD and FSD from 1978 to the present to quantify and understand the large- scale changes that...Library (GFL) (pixel size 1 meter). We continued to seek to establish a relationship between the FSD at the large scale and the small scale

  12. Analytical Investigation of the Decrease in the Size of the Habitable Zone Due to a Limited CO2 Outgassing Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbot, Dorian S.

    2016-08-01

    The habitable zone concept is important because it focuses the scientific search for extraterrestrial life and aids the planning of future telescopes. Recent work has shown that planets near the outer edge of the habitable zone might not actually be able to stay warm and habitable if CO2 outgassing rates are not large enough to maintain high CO2 partial pressures against removal by silicate weathering. In this paper, I use simple equations for the climate and CO2 budget of a planet in the habitable zone that can capture the qualitative behavior of the system. With these equations I derive an analytical formula for an effective outer edge of the habitable zone, including limitations imposed by the CO2 outgassing rate. I then show that climate cycles between a snowball state and a warm climate are only possible beyond this limit if the weathering rate in the snowball climate is smaller than the CO2 outgassing rate (otherwise stable snowball states result). I derive an analytical solution for the climate cycles including a formula for their period in this limit. This work allows us to explore the qualitative effects of weathering processes on the effective outer edge of the habitable zone, which is important because weathering parameterizations are uncertain.

  13. Pulsed HF laser ablation of dentin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papagiakoumou, Eirini I.; Papadopoulos, Dimitris N.; Makropoulou, Mersini I.; Khabbaz, Maruan G.; Serafetinides, Alexander A.

    2005-03-01

    The interaction of a TEA (Transversally Excited Atmospheric pressure) corona preionized oscillator double amplifier HF (hydrogen fluoride) laser beam with dentin tissue is reported. Pulses of 39 ns in the wavelength range of 2.65-3.35 μm and output energies in the range of 10-45 mJ, in a predominantly TEM00 beam were used to interact with dentin tissue. Ablation experiments were conducted with the laser beam directly focused on the tissue. Several samples of freshly extracted human teeth were used, cut longitudinally in facets of about 1mm thick and stored in phosphate buffered saline after being cleaned from the soft tissue remains. The experimental data (ablation thresholds, ablation rates) are discussed with respect to the ablation mechanism(s). Adequate tissue removal was observed and the ablation behavior was, in the greates part of the available fluences, almost linear. From the microscopic examination of teh samples, in a scanning electron microscope (SEM), the irradiated surfaces displayed oval craters (reflecting the laser beam shape) with absence of any melting or carbonization zone. It is suggested that the specific laser removes hard tissue by a combined photothermal and plasma mediated ablation mechanism, leaving a surface free from thermal damage and with a well-shaped crater.

  14. Impacts of Different Tree Species of Different Sizes on Spatial Distribution of Herbaceous Plants in the Nigerian Guinea Savannah Ecological Zone.

    PubMed

    Buba, Toma

    2015-01-01

    This study was aimed at finding the impacts of different tree species and individual trees of different sizes on species richness, diversity, and composition of the herbaceous layer. All the three tree species have greatly increased species richness and diversity both within and outside their crown zones compared with the open grassland. Both species richness and diversity were found to be higher under all the three tree species than outside their crowns, which was in turn higher than the open field. Daniella oliveri has the highest species richness and diversity both within and outside its crown zone followed by Vitellaria paradoxa and then Parkia biglobosa. The result also revealed that the same tree species with different sizes leads to different herbaceous species richness, diversity, and composition under and around the trees' crowns. P. biglobosa and V. paradoxa trees with smaller sizes showed higher species richness and diversity under their crowns than the bigger ones. The dissimilarity of species composition differs between the inside and outside crown zones of the individuals of the same tree species and among the different trees species and the open field.

  15. Exploring the size adaptability of the B ring binding zone of the colchicine site of tubulin with para-nitrogen substituted isocombretastatins.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Carmen; Ellahioui, Younes; Álvarez, Raquel; Aramburu, Laura; Riesco, Alejandra; González, Myriam; Vicente, Alba; Dahdouh, Abdelaziz; Ibn Mansour, Ahmed; Jiménez, Carlos; Martín, Diego; Sarmiento, Rogelio G; Medarde, Manuel; Caballero, Esther; Peláez, Rafael

    2015-07-15

    We have synthesized and assayed dimethylaminophenyl, pyrrolidin-1-ylphenyl and carbazole containing phenstatins and isocombretastatins as analogues of the highly potent indoleisocombretastatins with extended or reduced ring sizes. This is an attempt to explore beyond the structural constraints of the X-ray crystal structures the zone of the colchicine site where the tropolone ring of colchicine binds to tubulin (zone 1). The isocombretastatins display up to 30 fold increased water solubility when compared with combretastatin A-4, potent inhibition of tubulin polymerization, and nanomolar cytotoxicities against several human cancer cell lines irrespective of the size of the B ring. On the other hand, substitutions ortho to the nitrogen cause an important reduction in potency. We have also shown that representative compounds inhibit autophagy. These results show that zone 1 can adapt to systems of different size as far as they stay in a common plane, but does not tolerate substituents protruding above or below it. These results can help in the understanding of the binding modes of structures with similar systems and in the design of new colchicine site ligands.

  16. Impacts of Different Tree Species of Different Sizes on Spatial Distribution of Herbaceous Plants in the Nigerian Guinea Savannah Ecological Zone

    PubMed Central

    Buba, Toma

    2015-01-01

    This study was aimed at finding the impacts of different tree species and individual trees of different sizes on species richness, diversity, and composition of the herbaceous layer. All the three tree species have greatly increased species richness and diversity both within and outside their crown zones compared with the open grassland. Both species richness and diversity were found to be higher under all the three tree species than outside their crowns, which was in turn higher than the open field. Daniella oliveri has the highest species richness and diversity both within and outside its crown zone followed by Vitellaria paradoxa and then Parkia biglobosa. The result also revealed that the same tree species with different sizes leads to different herbaceous species richness, diversity, and composition under and around the trees' crowns. P. biglobosa and V. paradoxa trees with smaller sizes showed higher species richness and diversity under their crowns than the bigger ones. The dissimilarity of species composition differs between the inside and outside crown zones of the individuals of the same tree species and among the different trees species and the open field. PMID:26618024

  17. Nonequilibrium Ablation of Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milos, Frank S.; Chen, Yih K.; Gokcen, Tahir

    2012-01-01

    In previous work, an equilibrium ablation and thermal response model for Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator was developed. In general, over a wide range of test conditions, model predictions compared well with arcjet data for surface recession, surface temperature, in-depth temperature at multiple thermocouples, and char depth. In this work, additional arcjet tests were conducted at stagnation conditions down to 40 W/sq cm and 1.6 kPa. The new data suggest that nonequilibrium effects become important for ablation predictions at heat flux or pressure below about 80 W/sq cm or 10 kPa, respectively. Modifications to the ablation model to account for nonequilibrium effects are investigated. Predictions of the equilibrium and nonequilibrium models are compared with the arcjet data.

  18. Radiofrequency Ablation of Persistent Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Hussein, Ayman A.; Saliba, Walid I.; Barakat, Amr; Bassiouny, Mohammed; Chamsi-Pasha, Mohammed; Al-Bawardy, Rasha; Hakim, Ali; Tarakji, Khaldoun; Baranowski, Bryan; Cantillon, Daniel; Dresing, Thomas; Tchou, Patrick; Martin, David O.; Varma, Niraj; Bhargava, Mandeep; Callahan, Thomas; Niebauer, Mark; Kanj, Mohamed; Chung, Mina; Natale, Andrea; Lindsay, Bruce D.; Wazni, Oussama M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Various ablation strategies of persistent atrial fibrillation (PersAF) have had disappointing outcomes, despite concerted clinical and research efforts, which could reflect progressive atrial fibrillation–related atrial remodeling. Methods and Results Two-year outcomes were assessed in 1241 consecutive patients undergoing first-time ablation of PersAF (2005–2012). The time intervals between the first diagnosis of PersAF and the ablation procedures were determined. Patients had echocardiograms and measures of B-type natriuretic peptide and C-reactive protein before the procedures. The median diagnosis-to-ablation time was 3 years (25th–75th percentiles 1–6.5). With longer diagnosis-to-ablation time (based on quartiles), there was a significant increase in recurrence rates in addition to an increase in B-type natriuretic peptide levels (P=0.01), C-reactive protein levels (P<0.0001), and left atrial size (P=0.03). The arrhythmia recurrence rates over 2 years were 33.6%, 52.6%, 57.1%, and 54.6% in the first, second, third, and fourth quartiles, respectively (Pcategorical<0.0001). In Cox Proportional Hazard analyses, B-type natriuretic peptide levels, C-reactive protein levels, and left atrial size were associated with arrhythmia recurrence. The diagnosis-to-ablation time had the strongest association with the ablation outcomes which persisted in multivariable Cox analyzes (hazard ratio for recurrence per +1Log diagnosis-to-ablation time 1.27, 95% confidence interval 1.14–1.43; P<0.0001; hazard ratio fourth versus first quartile 2.44, 95% confidence interval 1.68–3.65; Pcategorical<0.0001). Conclusions In patients with PersAF undergoing ablation, the time interval between the first diagnosis of PersAF and the catheter ablation procedure had a strong association with the ablation outcomes, such as shorter diagnosis-to-ablation times were associated with better outcomes and in direct association with markers of atrial remodeling. PMID:26763227

  19. Printable Nanophotonic Devices via Holographic Laser Ablation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qiancheng; Yetisen, Ali K; Sabouri, Aydin; Yun, Seok Hyun; Butt, Haider

    2015-09-22

    Holography plays a significant role in applications such as data storage, light trapping, security, and biosensors. However, conventional fabrication methods remain time-consuming, costly, and complex, limiting the fabrication of holograms and their extensive use. Here, we demonstrate a single-pulse laser ablation technique to write parallel surface gratings and Fresnel zone plates. We utilized a 6 ns high-energy green laser pulse to form interference patterns to record a surface grating with 820 nm periodicity and asymmetric zone plate holograms on 4.5 nm gold-coated substrates. The holographic recording process was completed within seconds. The optical characteristics of the interference patterns have been computationally modeled, and well-ordered polychromatic diffraction was observed from the fabricated holograms. The zone plate showed a significant diffraction angle of 32° from the normal incident for the focal point. The nanosecond laser interference ablation for rapid hologram fabrication holds great potential in a vast range of optical devices.

  20. Sequential activation of a segmented ground pad reduces skin heating during radiofrequency tumor ablation: optimization via computational models.

    PubMed

    Schutt, David J; Haemmerich, Dieter

    2008-07-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) ablation has become an accepted treatment modality for unresectable tumors. The need for larger ablation zones has resulted in increased RF generator power. Skin burns due to ground pad heating are increasingly limiting further increases in generator power, and thus, ablation zone size. We investigated a method for reducing ground pad heating in which a commercial ground pad is segmented into multiple ground electrodes, with sequential activation of ground electrode subsets. We created finite-element method computer models of a commercial ground pad (14 x 23 cm) and compared normal operation of a standard pad to sequential activation of a segmented pad (two to five separate ground electrode segments). A constant current of 1 A was applied for 12 min in all simulations. Time periods during sequential activation simulations were adjusted to keep the leading edge temperatures at each ground electrode equal. The maximum temperature using standard activation of the commercial pad was 41.7 degrees C. For sequential activation of a segmented pad, the maximum temperature ranged from 39.3 degrees C (five segments) to 40.9 degrees C (two segments). Sequential activation of a segmented ground pad resulted in lower tissue temperatures. This method may reduce the incidence of ground pad burns and enable the use of higher power generators during RF tumor ablation.

  1. Sequential Activation of a Segmented Ground Pad Reduces Skin Heating During Radiofrequency Tumor Ablation: Optimization via Computational Models

    PubMed Central

    Schutt, David J.; Haemmerich, Dieter

    2009-01-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) ablation has become an accepted treatment modality for unresectable tumors. The need for larger ablation zones has resulted in increased RF generator power. Skin burns due to ground pad heating are increasingly limiting further increases in generator power, and thus, ablation zone size. We investigated a method for reducing ground pad heating in which a commercial ground pad is segmented into multiple ground electrodes, with sequential activation of ground electrode subsets. We created finite-element method computer models of a commercial ground pad (14 × 23 cm) and compared normal operation of a standard pad to sequential activation of a segmented pad (two to five separate ground electrode segments). A constant current of 1 A was applied for 12 min in all simulations. Time periods during sequential activation simulations were adjusted to keep the leading edge temperatures at each ground electrode equal. The maximum temperature using standard activation of the commercial pad was 41.7 °C. For sequential activation of a segmented pad, the maximum temperature ranged from 39.3 °C (five segments) to 40.9 °C (two segments). Sequential activation of a segmented ground pad resulted in lower tissue temperatures. This method may reduce the incidence of ground pad burns and enable the use of higher power generators during RF tumor ablation. PMID:18595807

  2. Thermal tumor ablation in clinical use.

    PubMed

    Brace, C

    2011-01-01

    Although a surgical procedure is performed by visual inspection with histopathological assessment of the excised tumor and margins, percutaneous and noninvasive thermal ablation is performed strictly with the aid of imaging. Applicator guidance into the target zone, treatment monitoring and verification, and clinical follow-up rely on effective imaging. Detailed discussion of imaging is beyond the scope of this article, but the influence of imaging on the choice of thermal ablation or procedural approach will be discussed as needed. More information on imaging for interventional therapies can be found in other articles in this issue of IEEE Pulse.

  3. Nanoscale ablation through optically trapped microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fardel, Romain; McLeod, Euan; Tsai, Yu-Cheng; Arnold, Craig B.

    2010-10-01

    The ability to directly create patterns with size scales below 100 nm is important for many applications where the production or repair of high resolution and density features is needed. Laser-based direct-write methods have the benefit of being able to quickly and easily modify and create structures on existing devices, but ablation can negatively impact the overall technique. In this paper we show that self-positioning of near-field objectives through the optical trap assisted nanopatterning (OTAN) method allows for ablation without harming the objective elements. Small microbeads are positioned in close proximity to a substrate where ablation is initiated. Upon ablation, these beads are temporarily displaced from the trap but rapidly return to the initial position. We analyze the range of fluence values for which this process occurs and find that there exists a critical threshold beyond which the beads are permanently ejected.

  4. Pulmonary ablation: a primer.

    PubMed

    Roberton, Benjamin J; Liu, David; Power, Mark; Wan, John M C; Stuart, Sam; Klass, Darren; Yee, John

    2014-05-01

    Percutaneous image-guided thermal ablation is safe and efficacious in achieving local control and improving outcome in the treatment of both early stage non-small-cell lung cancer and pulmonary metastatic disease, in which surgical treatment is precluded by comorbidity, poor cardiorespiratory reserve, or unfavorable disease distribution. Radiofrequency ablation is the most established technology, but new thermal ablation technologies such as microwave ablation and cryoablation may offer some advantages. The use of advanced techniques, such as induced pneumothorax and the popsicle stick technique, or combining thermal ablation with radiotherapy, widens the treatment options available to the multidisciplinary team. The intent of this article is to provide the reader with a practical knowledge base of pulmonary ablation by concentrating on indications, techniques, and follow-up.

  5. Renal Ablation Update

    PubMed Central

    Khiatani, Vishal; Dixon, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    Thermal ablative technologies have evolved considerably in the recent past and are now an important component of current clinical guidelines for the treatment of small renal masses. Both radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation have intermediate-term oncologic control that rivals surgical options, with favorable complication profiles. Studies comparing cryoablation and radiofrequency ablation show no significant difference in oncologic control or complication profile between the two modalities. Early data from small series with microwave ablation have shown similar promising results. Newer technologies including irreversible electroporation and high-intensity–focused ultrasound have theoretical advantages, but will require further research before becoming a routine part of the ablation armamentarium. The purpose of this review article is to discuss the current ablative technologies available, briefly review their mechanisms of action, discuss technical aspects of each, and provide current data supporting their use. PMID:25049445

  6. Radiofrequency Ablation of Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Marc; Mikityansky, Igor; Kam, Anthony; Libutti, Steven K.; Walther, McClellan M.; Neeman, Ziv; Locklin, Julia K.; Wood, Bradford J.

    2004-09-15

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has been used for over 18 years for treatment of nerve-related chronic pain and cardiac arrhythmias. In the last 10 years, technical developments have increased ablation volumes in a controllable, versatile, and relatively inexpensive manner. The host of clinical applications for RFA have similarly expanded. Current RFA equipment, techniques, applications, results, complications, and research avenues for local tumor ablation are summarized.

  7. Lung Ablation: Whats New?

    PubMed

    Xiong, Lillian; Dupuy, Damian E

    2016-07-01

    Lung cancer had an estimated incidence of 221,200 in 2015, making up 13% of all cancer diagnoses. Tumor ablation is an important treatment option for nonsurgical lung cancer and pulmonary metastatic patients. Radiofrequency ablation has been used for over a decade with newer modalities, microwave ablation, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation presenting as additional and possibly improved treatment options for patients. This minimally invasive therapy is best for small primary lesions or favorably located metastatic tumors. These technologies can offer palliation and sometimes cure of thoracic malignancies. This article discusses the current available technologies and techniques available for tumor ablation.

  8. Stellar Ablation of Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Thomas E.; Horwitz, J. L.

    2007-01-01

    We review observations and theories of the solar ablation of planetary atmospheres, focusing on the terrestrial case where a large magnetosphere holds off the solar wind, so that there is little direct atmospheric impact, but also couples the solar wind electromagnetically to the auroral zones. We consider the photothermal escape flows known as the polar wind or refilling flows, the enhanced mass flux escape flows that result from localized solar wind energy dissipation in the auroral zones, and the resultant enhanced neutral atom escape flows. We term these latter two escape flows the "auroral wind." We review observations and theories of the heating and acceleration of auroral winds, including energy inputs from precipitating particles, electromagnetic energy flux at magnetohydrodynamic and plasma wave frequencies, and acceleration by parallel electric fields and by convection pickup processes also known as "centrifugal acceleration." We consider also the global circulation of ionospheric plasmas within the magnetosphere, their participation in magnetospheric disturbances as absorbers of momentum and energy, and their ultimate loss from the magnetosphere into the downstream solar wind, loading reconnection processes that occur at high altitudes near the magnetospheric boundaries. We consider the role of planetary magnetization and the accumulating evidence of stellar ablation of extrasolar planetary atmospheres. Finally, we suggest and discuss future needs for both the theory and observation of the planetary ionospheres and their role in solar wind interactions, to achieve the generality required for a predictive science of the coupling of stellar and planetary atmospheres over the full range of possible conditions.

  9. Ablative Thermal Protection System Fundamentals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, Robin A. S.

    2013-01-01

    This is the presentation for a short course on the fundamentals of ablative thermal protection systems. It covers the definition of ablation, description of ablative materials, how they work, how to analyze them and how to model them.

  10. Numerical study and optimization of interstitial antennas for microwave ablation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komarov, Vyacheslav V.

    2014-10-01

    Electromagnetic and thermal characteristics of coaxial monopole antennas of 2.45 GHz and 24.125 GHz for microwave ablation of malignant tumors are investigated. Microwave heating processes in an interaction domain (biological tissue) are described by the coupled electromagnetic and heat transfer problem, which was solved numerically in the present study. Proposed applicators provide reducing of reflected power and localized distribution of temperature in the near-field zone. Different mathematical models are used to optimize the antennas sizes and simulate heating patterns.

  11. Catheter ablation of fascicular ventricular tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Ramprakash, B; Jaishankar, S; Rao, Hygriv B; Narasimhan, C

    2008-08-01

    Fascicular ventricular tachycardia (VT) is an idiopathic VT with right bundle branch block morphology and left-axis deviation occuring predominantly in young males. Fascicular tachycardia has been classified into three subtypes namely, left posterior fascicular VT, left anterior fascicular VT and upper septal fascicular VT. The mechanism of this tachycardia is believed to be localized reentry close to the fascicle of the left bundle branch. The reentrant circuit is composed of a verapamil sensitive zone, activated antegradely during tachycardia and the fast conduction Purkinje fibers activated retrogradely during tachycardia recorded as the pre Purkinje and the Purkinje potentials respectively. Catheter ablation is the preferred choice of therapy in patients with fascicular VT. Ablation is carried out during tachycardia, using conventional mapping techniques in majority of the patients, while three dimensional mapping and sinus rhythm ablation is reserved for patients with nonmappable tachycardia.

  12. Ablation of steel using picosecond laser pulses in burst mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lickschat, Peter; Demba, Alexander; Weissmantel, Steffen

    2017-02-01

    Results obtained in picosecond laser processing of steel applying the burst mode are presented. Using the burst mode, pulse trains, i.e., bursts, consisting of a number of picosecond pulses with an inter-pulse delay of 12.5 ns and 10 ps pulse duration are applied for material processing. Small cavities with sizes in the range of the laser beam diameter made by single-burst ablation are compared to quadratic cavities of 0.5 × 0.5 mm² produced by multiburst ablation and simultaneous scanning of the laser beam across the steel sample surface. The ablated volume per pulse within the burst was calculated either from the ablated volume per burst or from the ablation depth of the quadratic cavities. With the second to fourth pulses in the bursts, a reduction of the ablated volume per pulse in comparison with the first pulse in the bursts (i.e., to the use of single pulses) was found for both single- and multiburst ablation, which is assumed to be due to plasma shielding. By contrast, the ablated volume per pulse within the bursts increases for the fifth to eighth pulses. Heat accumulation effect and the influence of the heated plasma can be assumed to be the reason for these higher ablation rates. SEM micrographs also show that there is a higher melt ejection out of the laser processed area. This is indicated by the formation of bulges about the ablated area.

  13. Distribution of iron in size resolved aerosols generated by femtosecond laser ablation: Influence of cell geometry and implications for in situ isotopic measurements using LA-MC-ICP-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    d'Abzac, F.; Czaja, A. D.; Beard, B. L.; Schauer, J. J.; Johnson, C.

    2012-12-01

    Laser Ablation (LA) Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) is a common and reliable method for the in situ chemical analysis in geosciences. In contrast, use of LA for analyzing naturally occurring mass dependent isotope fractionation in geological samples is not widely used because of the difficulties of differentiating laser induced isotope fractionation from naturally occurring mass dependent isotope fractionation. A critical aspect for accurate in situ stable isotope analysis is the chemical and isotopic composition, size, and morphology of aerosols generated by LA. We report on the iron mass distribution over the particle size distribution (PSD) of aerosols produced by femtosecond LA of magnetite and pyrite. A Photon Machines "Analyte" fs-G2 was used that provides τ~150fs pulses in the near UV (λ=263nm) with an adjustable repetition rate 1Ablations were performed under Helium (~0.5L.min-1 outgoing flow) and two different cells were used: one cylindrical with a ~10s wash out time, the other (Photon Machines HelEx), with a wash out of less than 1s. For all experiments, aerosols were collected on Teflon filters using a MOUDI cascade impactor, according to their aerodynamic diameter, within a range of da<0.056μm to da>18μm (Marple, Rubow et al., 1991). Filters loads were dissolved in HCl (magnetite) or HNO3 (pyrite) and iron concentration was determined spectroscopically using the ferrozine method or by isotope dilution mass spectrometery. The PSD for a given cell is similar for both pyrite and magnetite and is independent of fluence (1-3J.cm-2). However, significant differences appear from one cell to the other. The cylindrical cell gives a unimodal distribution with a peak centered on da=0.18μm and spread from da=0.056μm to 0.56μm (83% of the total Fe mass). Using the Helex cell the PSD is bi modal with ~1/3 of the particles having a da<0.056μm in addition to the peak at da=0.18μm. Importantly we note that for a given mineral

  14. Sprayable lightweight ablative coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, William G. (Inventor); Sharpe, Max H. (Inventor); Hill, William E. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An improved lightweight, ablative coating is disclosed that may be spray applied and cured without the development of appreciable shrinkage cracks. The ablative mixture consists essentially of phenolic microballoons, hollow glass spheres, glass fibers, ground cork, a flexibilized resin binder, and an activated colloidal clay.

  15. Laser Ablated Carbon Nanodots for Light Emission.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Delfino; Camacho, Marco; Camacho, Miguel; Mayorga, Miguel; Weathers, Duncan; Salamo, Greg; Wang, Zhiming; Neogi, Arup

    2016-12-01

    The synthesis of fluorescent carbon dots-like nanostructures (CNDs) obtained through the laser ablation of a carbon solid target in liquid environment is reported. The ablation process was induced in acetone with laser pulses of 1064, 532, and 355 nm under different irradiation times. Close-spherical amorphous CNDs with sizes between 5 and 20 nm, whose abundance strongly depends on the ablation parameters were investigated using electron microscopy and was confirmed using absorption and emission spectroscopies. The π- π* electronic transition at 3.76 eV dominates the absorption for all the CNDs species synthesized under different irradiation conditions. The light emission is most efficient due to excitation at 3.54 eV with the photoluminescence intensity centered at 3.23 eV. The light emission from the CNDs is most efficient due to ablation at 355 nm. The emission wavelength of the CNDs can be tuned from the near-UV to the green wavelength region by controlling the ablation time and modifying the ablation and excitation laser wavelength.

  16. Automated planning of ablation targets in atrial fibrillation treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keustermans, Johannes; De Buck, Stijn; Heidbüchel, Hein; Suetens, Paul

    2011-03-01

    Catheter based radio-frequency ablation is used as an invasive treatment of atrial fibrillation. This procedure is often guided by the use of 3D anatomical models obtained from CT, MRI or rotational angiography. During the intervention the operator accurately guides the catheter to prespecified target ablation lines. The planning stage, however, can be time consuming and operator dependent which is suboptimal both from a cost and health perspective. Therefore, we present a novel statistical model-based algorithm for locating ablation targets from 3D rotational angiography images. Based on a training data set of 20 patients, consisting of 3D rotational angiography images with 30 manually indicated ablation points, a statistical local appearance and shape model is built. The local appearance model is based on local image descriptors to capture the intensity patterns around each ablation point. The local shape model is constructed by embedding the ablation points in an undirected graph and imposing that each ablation point only interacts with its neighbors. Identifying the ablation points on a new 3D rotational angiography image is performed by proposing a set of possible candidate locations for each ablation point, as such, converting the problem into a labeling problem. The algorithm is validated using a leave-one-out-approach on the training data set, by computing the distance between the ablation lines obtained by the algorithm and the manually identified ablation points. The distance error is equal to 3.8+/-2.9 mm. As ablation lesion size is around 5-7 mm, automated planning of ablation targets by the presented approach is sufficiently accurate.

  17. Healing responses following cryothermic and hyperthermic tissue ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godwin, Braden L.; Coad, James E.

    2009-02-01

    Minimally invasive, thermally ablative, interventional technologies have been changing the practice of medicine since before the turn of the 20th century. More recently, cryothermic and hyperthermic therapies have expanded in terms of their spectrum of thermal generators, modes for controlling and monitoring the treatment zone and both benign and malignant medical applications. The final tissue, and hence clinical outcome, of a thermal ablation is determined by the summation of direct primary (thermal) and secondary (apoptosis, ischemia, free radical, inflammation, wound healing, etc.) injury followed by possible cellular regeneration and scar formation. The initial thermal lesion can be broadly divided into two major zones of cellular death: 1) the complete ablation zone closer to the thermal source and 2) the peripheral transition zone with a decreasing gradient of cell death. While not applicable to cryotherapy, hyperthermic complete ablation zones are subdivided into two zones: 1) thermal or heat fixation and 2) coagulative necrosis. It is important to clearly differentiate these tissue zones because of their substantially different healing responses. Therefore, the development of clinically successful thermal therapies requires an understanding of tissue healing responses. The healing responses can be affected by a number of additional factors such as the tissue's anatomy, organ specific healing differences, blood supply, protein vs. lipid content, and other factors. Thus, effective biomedical instrument development requires both an understanding of thermal cell injury/death and the body's subsequent healing responses. This paper provides a general overview of the healing pathways that follow thermal tissue treatment.

  18. An Engineering Solution for Solving Mesh Size Effects in the Simulation of Delamination with Cohesive Zone Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turon, A.; Davila, C. G.; Camanho, P. P.; Costa, J.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a methodology to determine the parameters to be used in the constitutive equations of Cohesive Zone Models employed in the simulation of delamination in composite materials by means of decohesion finite elements. A closed-form expression is developed to define the stiffness of the cohesive layer. A novel procedure that allows the use of coarser meshes of decohesion elements in large-scale computations is also proposed. The procedure ensures that the energy dissipated by the fracture process is computed correctly. It is shown that coarse-meshed models defined using the approach proposed here yield the same results as the models with finer meshes normally used for the simulation of fracture processes.

  19. Percutaneous Microwave Ablation of Renal Angiomyolipomas

    SciTech Connect

    Cristescu, Mircea; Abel, E. Jason; Wells, Shane Ziemlewicz, Timothy J.; Hedican, Sean P.; Lubner, Megan G. Hinshaw, J. Louis Brace, Christopher L. Lee, Fred T.

    2016-03-15

    PurposeTo evaluate the safety and efficacy of US-guided percutaneous microwave (MW) ablation in the treatment of renal angiomyolipoma (AML).Materials and MethodsFrom January 2011 to April 2014, seven patients (5 females and 2 males; mean age 51.4) with 11 renal AMLs (9 sporadic type and 2 tuberous sclerosis associated) with a mean size of 3.4 ± 0.7 cm (range 2.4–4.9 cm) were treated with high-powered, gas-cooled percutaneous MW ablation under US guidance. Tumoral diameter, volume, and CT/MR enhancement were measured on pre-treatment, immediate post-ablation, and delayed post-ablation imaging. Clinical symptoms and creatinine were assessed on follow-up visits.ResultsAll ablations were technically successful and no major complications were encountered. Mean ablation parameters were ablation power of 65 W (range 60–70 W), using 456 mL of hydrodissection fluid per patient, over 4.7 min (range 3–8 min). Immediate post-ablation imaging demonstrated mean tumor diameter and volume decreases of 1.8 % (3.4–3.3 cm) and 1.7 % (27.5–26.3 cm{sup 3}), respectively. Delayed imaging follow-up obtained at a mean interval of 23.1 months (median 17.6; range 9–47) demonstrated mean tumor diameter and volume decreases of 29 % (3.4–2.4 cm) and 47 % (27.5–12.1 cm{sup 3}), respectively. Tumoral enhancement decreased on immediate post-procedure and delayed imaging by CT/MR parameters, indicating decreased tumor vascularity. No patients required additional intervention and no patients experienced spontaneous bleeding post-ablation.ConclusionOur early experience with high-powered, gas-cooled percutaneous MW ablation demonstrates it to be a safe and effective modality to devascularize and decrease the size of renal AMLs.

  20. Tumor Ablation and Nanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Manthe, Rachel L.; Foy, Susan P.; Krishnamurthy, Nishanth; Sharma, Blanka; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2010-01-01

    Next to surgical resection, tumor ablation is a commonly used intervention in the treatment of solid tumors. Tumor ablation methods include thermal therapies, photodynamic therapy, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) producing agents. Thermal therapies induce tumor cell death via thermal energy and include radiofrequency, microwave, high intensity focused ultrasound, and cryoablation. Photodynamic therapy and ROS producing agents cause increased oxidative stress in tumor cells leading to apoptosis. While these therapies are safe and viable alternatives when resection of malignancies is not feasible, they do have associated limitations that prevent their widespread use in clinical applications. To improve the efficacy of these treatments, nanoparticles are being studied in combination with nonsurgical ablation regimens. In addition to better thermal effect on tumor ablation, nanoparticles can deliver anticancer therapeutics that show synergistic anti-tumor effect in the presence of heat and can also be imaged to achieve precision in therapy. Understanding the molecular mechanism of nanoparticle-mediated tumor ablation could further help engineer nanoparticles of appropriate composition and properties to synergize the ablation effect. This review aims to explore the various types of nonsurgical tumor ablation methods currently used in cancer treatment and potential improvements by nanotechnology applications. PMID:20866097

  1. Evolution of a Directional Wave Spectrum in a 3D Marginal Ice Zone with Random Floe Size Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montiel, F.; Squire, V. A.

    2013-12-01

    A new ocean wave/sea-ice interaction model is proposed that simulates how a directional wave spectrum evolves as it travels through a realistic marginal ice zone (MIZ), where wave/ice dynamics are entirely governed by coherent conservative wave scattering effects. Field experiments conducted by Wadhams et al. (1986) in the Greenland Sea generated important data on wave attenuation in the MIZ and, particularly, on whether the wave spectrum spreads directionally or collimates with distance from the ice edge. The data suggest that angular isotropy, arising from multiple scattering by ice floes, occurs close to the edge and thenceforth dominates wave propagation throughout the MIZ. Although several attempts have been made to replicate this finding theoretically, including by the use of numerical models, none have confronted this problem in a 3D MIZ with fully randomised floe distribution properties. We construct such a model by subdividing the discontinuous ice cover into adjacent infinite slabs of finite width parallel to the ice edge. Each slab contains an arbitrary (but finite) number of circular ice floes with randomly distributed properties. Ice floes are modeled as thin elastic plates with uniform thickness and finite draught. We consider a directional wave spectrum with harmonic time dependence incident on the MIZ from the open ocean, defined as a continuous superposition of plane waves traveling at different angles. The scattering problem within each slab is then solved using Graf's interaction theory for an arbitrary incident directional plane wave spectrum. Using an appropriate integral representation of the Hankel function of the first kind (see Cincotti et al., 1993), we map the outgoing circular wave field from each floe on the slab boundaries into a directional spectrum of plane waves, which characterizes the slab reflected and transmitted fields. Discretizing the angular spectrum, we can obtain a scattering matrix for each slab. Standard recursive

  2. Determination of degradation rates of organic substances in the unsaturated soil zone depending on the grain size fractions of various soil types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fichtner, Thomas; Stefan, Catalin; Goersmeyer, Nora

    2015-04-01

    Rate and extent of the biological degradation of organic substances during transport through the unsaturated soil zone is decisively influenced by the chemical and physical properties of the pollutants such as water solubility, toxicity and molecular structure. Furthermore microbial degradation processes are also influenced by soil-specific properties. An important parameter is the soil grain size distribution on which the pore volume and the pore size depends. Changes lead to changes in air and water circulation as well as preferred flow paths. Transport capacity of water inclusive nutrients is lower in existing bad-drainable fine pores in soils with small grain size fractions than in well-drainable coarse pores in a soil with bigger grain size fractions. Because fine pores are saturated with water for a longer time than the coarse pores and oxygen diffusion in water is ten thousand times slower than in air, oxygen is replenished much slower in soils with small grain size fractions. As a result life and growth conditions of the microorganisms are negatively affected. This leads to less biological activity, restricted degradation/mineralization of pollutants or altered microbial processes. The aim of conducted laboratory column experiments was to study the correlation between the grain size fractions respectively pore sizes, the oxygen content and the biodegradation rate of infiltrated organic substances. Therefore two columns (active + sterile control) were filled with different grain size fractions (0,063-0,125 mm, 0,2-0,63 mm and 1-2 mm) of soils. The sterile soil was inoculated with a defined amount of a special bacteria culture (sphingobium yanoikuae). A solution with organic substances glucose, oxalic acid, sinaphylic alcohol and nutrients was infiltrated from the top in intervals. The degradation of organic substances was controlled by the measurement of dissolved organic carbon in the in- and outflow of the column. The control of different pore volumes

  3. Thermal ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Head, Hayden W; Dodd, Gerald D

    2004-11-01

    Thermal ablation, as a form of minimally invasive therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), has become an important treatment modality. Because of the limitations of surgery, the techniques of thermal ablation have become standard therapies for HCC in some situations. This article reviews 4 thermal ablation techniques-radiofrequency (RF) ablation, microwave ablation, laser ablation, and cryoablation. Each of these techniques may have a role in treating HCC, and the mechanisms, equipment, patient selection, results, and complications of each are considered. Furthermore, combined therapies consisting of thermal ablation and adjuvant chemotherapy also show promise for enhancing these techniques. Important areas of research into thermal ablation remain, including improving the ability of ablation to treat larger tumors, determining the indications for each thermal ablation modality, optimizing image guidance, and obtaining good outcome data on the efficacy of these techniques.

  4. Monitoring radiofrequency ablation using real-time ultrasound Nakagami imaging combined with frequency and temporal compounding techniques.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhuhuang; Wu, Shuicai; Wang, Chiao-Yin; Ma, Hsiang-Yang; Lin, Chung-Chih; Tsui, Po-Hsiang

    2015-01-01

    Gas bubbles induced during the radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of tissues can affect the detection of ablation zones (necrosis zone or thermal lesion) during ultrasound elastography. To resolve this problem, our previous study proposed ultrasound Nakagami imaging for detecting thermal-induced bubble formation to evaluate ablation zones. To prepare for future applications, this study (i) created a novel algorithmic scheme based on the frequency and temporal compounding of Nakagami imaging for enhanced ablation zone visualization, (ii) integrated the proposed algorithm into a clinical scanner to develop a real-time Nakagami imaging system for monitoring RFA, and (iii) investigated the applicability of Nakagami imaging to various types of tissues. The performance of the real-time Nakagami imaging system in visualizing RFA-induced ablation zones was validated by measuring porcine liver (n = 18) and muscle tissues (n = 6). The experimental results showed that the proposed algorithm can operate on a standard clinical ultrasound scanner to monitor RFA in real time. The Nakagami imaging system effectively monitors RFA-induced ablation zones in liver tissues. However, because tissue properties differ, the system cannot visualize ablation zones in muscle fibers. In the future, real-time Nakagami imaging should be focused on the RFA of the liver and is suggested as an alternative monitoring tool when advanced elastography is unavailable or substantial bubbles exist in the ablation zone.

  5. Monitoring Radiofrequency Ablation Using Real-Time Ultrasound Nakagami Imaging Combined with Frequency and Temporal Compounding Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhuhuang; Wu, Shuicai; Wang, Chiao-Yin; Ma, Hsiang-Yang; Lin, Chung-Chih; Tsui, Po-Hsiang

    2015-01-01

    Gas bubbles induced during the radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of tissues can affect the detection of ablation zones (necrosis zone or thermal lesion) during ultrasound elastography. To resolve this problem, our previous study proposed ultrasound Nakagami imaging for detecting thermal-induced bubble formation to evaluate ablation zones. To prepare for future applications, this study (i) created a novel algorithmic scheme based on the frequency and temporal compounding of Nakagami imaging for enhanced ablation zone visualization, (ii) integrated the proposed algorithm into a clinical scanner to develop a real-time Nakagami imaging system for monitoring RFA, and (iii) investigated the applicability of Nakagami imaging to various types of tissues. The performance of the real-time Nakagami imaging system in visualizing RFA-induced ablation zones was validated by measuring porcine liver (n = 18) and muscle tissues (n = 6). The experimental results showed that the proposed algorithm can operate on a standard clinical ultrasound scanner to monitor RFA in real time. The Nakagami imaging system effectively monitors RFA-induced ablation zones in liver tissues. However, because tissue properties differ, the system cannot visualize ablation zones in muscle fibers. In the future, real-time Nakagami imaging should be focused on the RFA of the liver and is suggested as an alternative monitoring tool when advanced elastography is unavailable or substantial bubbles exist in the ablation zone. PMID:25658424

  6. Size-fraction partitioning of community gene transcription and nitrogen metabolism in a marine oxygen minimum zone

    PubMed Central

    Ganesh, Sangita; Bristow, Laura A; Larsen, Morten; Sarode, Neha; Thamdrup, Bo; Stewart, Frank J

    2015-01-01

    The genetic composition of marine microbial communities varies at the microscale between particle-associated (PA; >1.6 μm) and free-living (FL; 0.2–1.6 μm) niches. It remains unclear, however, how metabolic activities differ between PA and FL fractions. We combined rate measurements with metatranscriptomics to quantify PA and FL microbial activity in the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) of the Eastern Tropical North Pacific, focusing on dissimilatory processes of the nitrogen (N) cycle. Bacterial gene counts were 8- to 15-fold higher in the FL compared with the PA fraction. However, rates of all measured N cycle processes, excluding ammonia oxidation, declined significantly following particle (>1.6 μm) removal. Without particles, rates of nitrate reduction to nitrite (1.5–9.4nMNd−1) fell to zero and N2 production by denitrification (0.5–1.7nMNd−1) and anammox (0.3–1.9nMNd−1) declined by 53–85%. The proportional representation of major microbial taxa and N cycle gene transcripts in metatranscriptomes followed fraction-specific trends. Transcripts encoding nitrate reductase were uniform among PA and FL fractions, whereas anammox-associated transcripts were proportionately enriched up to 15-fold in the FL fraction. In contrast, transcripts encoding enzymes for N2O and N2 production by denitrification were enriched up to 28-fold in PA samples. These patterns suggest that the majority of N cycle activity, excluding N2O and N2 production by denitrification, is confined to a FL majority that is critically dependent on access to particles, likely as a source of organic carbon and inorganic N. Variable particle distributions may drive heterogeneity in N cycle activity and gene expression in OMZs. PMID:25848875

  7. Ablative skin resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Nidhi; Smith, Greg; Heffelfinger, Ryan

    2014-02-01

    Ablative laser resurfacing has evolved as a safe and effective treatment for skin rejuvenation. Although traditional lasers were associated with significant thermal damage and lengthy recovery, advances in laser technology have improved safety profiles and reduced social downtime. CO2 lasers remain the gold standard of treatment, and fractional ablative devices capable of achieving remarkable clinical improvement with fewer side effects and shorter recovery times have made it a more practical option for patients. Although ablative resurfacing has become safer, careful patient selection and choice of suitable laser parameters are essential to minimize complications and optimize outcomes. This article describes the current modalities used in ablative laser skin resurfacing and examines their efficacy, indications, and possible side effects.

  8. Moldable cork ablation material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A successful thermal ablative material was manufactured. Moldable cork sheets were tested for density, tensile strength, tensile elongation, thermal conductivity, compression set, and specific heat. A moldable cork sheet, therefore, was established as a realistic product.

  9. Endometrial Ablation for Menorrhagia

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Barry H.

    1992-01-01

    Endometrial ablation is a relatively new treatment for patients with persistent menorrhagia. The procedure can be performed by either laser photocoagulation or electrocoagulation; both have a very low risk of complication. Generally, less than 24 hours of hospitalization is required and return to normal activities, including work, is almost immediate. Endometrial ablation is likely to become a mainstay of treatment for menorrhagia as the technology and training become more readily available. PMID:21229128

  10. Turbulence control of floc size in suspended particulate matter (SPM) in the river estuary transition zone (RETZ)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Suzanna; Jago, Colin

    2016-04-01

    Quantifying floc properties in relation to physical forcings are key in determining the transfer flux of SPM from the catchment to the coastal ocean. Observations of floc development require high resolution data; in situ optical and acoustic instruments were deployed in the RETZ to obtain SPM and hydrodynamic properties. Results suggest that turbulent kinetic energy dissipation (TKE) can be correlated to median particle size (D50) and concentration on tidal and lunar time scales. Analysis on a tidal scale indicates terrestrially derived SPM and SPM of a marine origin display different relationships with the local turbulence regime, suggesting the D50 of terrestrially derived SPM is not limited to the eddy length scales of the Kolmogorov microscale. It is essential to improve methods to quantify the role of hydrodynamic processes in controlling SPM properties and thus the fate of the transfer of terrestrially derived organic matter to the coastal ocean.

  11. Photoacoustic characterization of radiofrequency ablation lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchard, Richard; Dana, Nicholas; Di Biase, Luigi; Natale, Andrea; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2012-02-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) procedures are used to destroy abnormal electrical pathways in the heart that can cause cardiac arrhythmias. Current methods relying on fluoroscopy, echocardiography and electrical conduction mapping are unable to accurately assess ablation lesion size. In an effort to better visualize RFA lesions, photoacoustic (PA) and ultrasonic (US) imaging were utilized to obtain co-registered images of ablated porcine cardiac tissue. The left ventricular free wall of fresh (i.e., never frozen) porcine hearts was harvested within 24 hours of the animals' sacrifice. A THERMOCOOLR Ablation System (Biosense Webster, Inc.) operating at 40 W for 30-60 s was used to induce lesions through the endocardial and epicardial walls of the cardiac samples. Following lesion creation, the ablated tissue samples were placed in 25 °C saline to allow for multi-wavelength PA imaging. Samples were imaged with a VevoR 2100 ultrasound system (VisualSonics, Inc.) using a modified 20-MHz array that could provide laser irradiation to the sample from a pulsed tunable laser (Newport Corp.) to allow for co-registered photoacoustic-ultrasound (PAUS) imaging. PA imaging was conducted from 750-1064 nm, with a surface fluence of approximately 15 mJ/cm2 maintained during imaging. In this preliminary study with PA imaging, the ablated region could be well visualized on the surface of the sample, with contrasts of 6-10 dB achieved at 750 nm. Although imaging penetration depth is a concern, PA imaging shows promise in being able to reliably visualize RF ablation lesions.

  12. Regression of the level of different heavy metals to size of marine organisms harvested from the "Jiyeh" oil spill zone of the eastern Mediterranean Sea.

    PubMed

    Barbour, Elie K; Shaib, Houssam A; Yaghi, Ryan H; Sabra, Alia H

    2009-08-01

    This study aimed to establish a baseline data on regression of the levels of Lead (Pb), Nickel (Ni) and Vanadium (V) to specific size dimensions of selected marine organisms harvested from an oil spill zone of the Eastern Mediterranean Sea. Twenty samples of each of Siganus rivulatus, Mullets and oysters were collected from each of six harvest sites. A total of 1, 3, and 3 respective significant regression equations (p < 0.01) were established between Pb, Ni, V and specific size dimensions of the selected marine organisms. The significant correlation associated with the highest R (2) value was obtained between the Pb (y) level and the width (x) of the Siganus rivulatus (y = -86.833x + 417.72). The other six statistically significant correlations were associated with lower values of R (2) ranging between 0.338 and 0.380. This baseline data will be used in the future to evaluate the self-purification process of pollutants in different sizes of indicator-marine organisms in this part of the Mediterranean Sea.

  13. Laser ablated hard coating for microtools

    DOEpatents

    McLean, W. II; Balooch, M.; Siekhaus, W.J.

    1998-05-05

    Wear-resistant coatings composed of laser ablated hard carbon films, are deposited by pulsed laser ablation using visible light, on instruments such as microscope tips and micro-surgical tools. Hard carbon, known as diamond-like carbon (DLC), films produced by pulsed laser ablation using visible light enhances the abrasion resistance, wear characteristics, and lifetimes of small tools or instruments, such as small, sharp silicon tips used in atomic probe microscopy without significantly affecting the sharpness or size of these devices. For example, a 10--20 nm layer of diamond-like carbon on a standard silicon atomic force microscope (AFM) tip, enables the useful operating life of the tip to be increased by at least twofold. Moreover, the low inherent friction coefficient of the DLC coating leads to higher resolution for AFM tips operating in the contact mode. 12 figs.

  14. Laser ablated hard coating for microtools

    DOEpatents

    McLean, II, William; Balooch, Mehdi; Siekhaus, Wigbert J.

    1998-05-05

    Wear-resistant coatings composed of laser ablated hard carbon films, are deposited by pulsed laser ablation using visible light, on instruments such as microscope tips and micro-surgical tools. Hard carbon, known as diamond-like carbon (DLC), films produced by pulsed laser ablation using visible light enhances the abrasion resistance, wear characteristics, and lifetimes of small tools or instruments, such as small, sharp silicon tips used in atomic probe microscopy without significantly affecting the sharpness or size of these devices. For example, a 10-20 nm layer of diamond-like carbon on a standard silicon atomic force microscope (AFM) tip, enables the useful operating life of the tip to be increased by at least twofold. Moreover, the low inherent friction coefficient of the DLC coating leads to higher resolution for AFM tips operating in the contact mode.

  15. Multiple-antenna microwave ablation: analysis of non-parallel antenna implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Souvick; Curto, Sergio; Albin, Nathan; Natarajan, Bala; Prakash, Punit

    2015-03-01

    Microwave ablation is a minimally invasive modality increasingly being used for thermal treatment of cancer in various organs. During ablation procedures, treatment planning is typically restricted to vendor specifications of expected ablation zone volumes based on experiments in unperfused ex vivo tissues, presuming parallel insertion of antennas. However, parallel antenna implants are not always clinically possible due to the restricted control of flexible antennas and presence of intervening organs. This paper aims to quantify the effect of non-parallel antenna implants on the ablation volume. 3D electromagnetic-bioheat transfer models were implemented to analyze ablation zone profiles created by dual antenna arrays. Parallel and non-parallel implants spaced 10-25 mm with antenna tips deviated to create converging or diverging configurations were analyzed. Volumetric Dice Similarity Coefficients (DSC) were calculated to compare ablation zone volumes for parallel and non-parallel configuration. Antenna tip displacements of 3 mm/antenna yielded an average DSC of 0.78. Tip displacements of 5 mm/antenna yielded a DSC of 0.78 and 0.64 for 15 mm and 20 mm antenna spacing, respectively. For ablation with dipole antennas as the frequency of operation decreases from 2.45 GHz to 915 MHz the similarity between the ablation zones for parallel and angled cases increased significantly. In conclusion, ablation volumes with non-parallel antenna implants may differ significantly from the parallel configuration. Patient-specific treatment planning tools may provide more accurate predictions of 3D-ablation volumes based on imaging data of actual implanted antenna configurations. Methods to compare ablation zone volumes incorporating uncertainty in antenna positions and experimental results to validate the numerical modelling are also presented.

  16. Potential health risk for residents around a typical e-waste recycling zone via inhalation of size-fractionated particle-bound heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chun-Li; Bao, Lian-Jun; Luo, Pei; Wang, Zhao-Yi; Li, Shao-Meng; Zeng, Eddy Y

    2016-11-05

    Health risk of residents dwelling around e-waste recycling zones has been a global concern, but has not been adequately examined. The present study was intended to evaluate the potential health risk of residents through inhalation exposure to size-fractionated particle-bound heavy metals in a typical e-waste recycling zone, South China. Anthropogenic metals (Zn, Se, Pb, Sb, As, and Cd) were predominantly enriched in fine particles (Dp<1.8μm), whereas the crustal elements (Ti, Fe, and Co) tended to accumulate in coarse particles (Dp>1.8μm). Although the daily inhalation intakes of the target metals were significantly lower than those through food consumption and ingestion of house dust, the hazard quotients of total metals for adults (95% CI: 1.0-5.5) and children (95% CI: 3.0-17) were greater than 1. Moreover, the incremental lifetime cancer risks of five carcinogenic metals (Cr, Co, Ni, As, and Cd) for adults and children were 1.3×10(-3) (95% CI: 4.1×10(-4)-3.0×10(-3)) and 3.9×10(-3) (95% CI: 1.3×10(-3)-8.6×10(-3)), respectively, substantially higher than the acceptable cancer risk range of 10(-6)-10(-4). All these findings suggested that health risks were high for local residents dwelling around the e-waste recycling zone through inhalation exposure to particle-bound heavy metals, for both adults and children.

  17. PLANET HUNTERS. V. A CONFIRMED JUPITER-SIZE PLANET IN THE HABITABLE ZONE AND 42 PLANET CANDIDATES FROM THE KEPLER ARCHIVE DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ji; Fischer, Debra A.; Boyajian, Tabetha S.; Schmitt, Joseph R.; Giguere, Matthew J.; Brewer, John M.; Barclay, Thomas; Schwamb, Megan E.; Lintott, Chris; Simpson, Robert; Jek, Kian J.; Hoekstra, Abe J.; Jacobs, Thomas Lee; LaCourse, Daryll; Schwengeler, Hans Martin; Smith, Arfon M.; Parrish, Michael; Lynn, Stuart; Schawinski, Kevin; and others

    2013-10-10

    We report the latest Planet Hunter results, including PH2 b, a Jupiter-size (R{sub PL} = 10.12 ± 0.56 R{sub ⊕}) planet orbiting in the habitable zone of a solar-type star. PH2 b was elevated from candidate status when a series of false-positive tests yielded a 99.9% confidence level that transit events detected around the star KIC 12735740 had a planetary origin. Planet Hunter volunteers have also discovered 42 new planet candidates in the Kepler public archive data, of which 33 have at least 3 transits recorded. Most of these transit candidates have orbital periods longer than 100 days and 20 are potentially located in the habitable zones of their host stars. Nine candidates were detected with only two transit events and the prospective periods are longer than 400 days. The photometric models suggest that these objects have radii that range between those of Neptune and Jupiter. These detections nearly double the number of gas-giant planet candidates orbiting at habitable-zone distances. We conducted spectroscopic observations for nine of the brighter targets to improve the stellar parameters and we obtained adaptive optics imaging for four of the stars to search for blended background or foreground stars that could confuse our photometric modeling. We present an iterative analysis method to derive the stellar and planet properties and uncertainties by combining the available spectroscopic parameters, stellar evolution models, and transiting light curve parameters, weighted by the measurement errors. Planet Hunters is a citizen science project that crowd sources the assessment of NASA Kepler light curves. The discovery of these 43 planet candidates demonstrates the success of citizen scientists at identifying planet candidates, even in longer period orbits with only two or three transit events.

  18. Planet Hunters. V. A Confirmed Jupiter-size Planet in the Habitable Zone and 42 Planet Candidates from the Kepler Archive Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ji; Fischer, Debra A.; Barclay, Thomas; Boyajian, Tabetha S.; Crepp, Justin R.; Schwamb, Megan E.; Lintott, Chris; Jek, Kian J.; Smith, Arfon M.; Parrish, Michael; Schawinski, Kevin; Schmitt, Joseph R.; Giguere, Matthew J.; Brewer, John M.; Lynn, Stuart; Simpson, Robert; Hoekstra, Abe J.; Jacobs, Thomas Lee; LaCourse, Daryll; Schwengeler, Hans Martin; Chopin, Mike; Herszkowicz, Rafal

    2013-10-01

    We report the latest Planet Hunter results, including PH2 b, a Jupiter-size (R PL = 10.12 ± 0.56 R ⊕) planet orbiting in the habitable zone of a solar-type star. PH2 b was elevated from candidate status when a series of false-positive tests yielded a 99.9% confidence level that transit events detected around the star KIC 12735740 had a planetary origin. Planet Hunter volunteers have also discovered 42 new planet candidates in the Kepler public archive data, of which 33 have at least 3 transits recorded. Most of these transit candidates have orbital periods longer than 100 days and 20 are potentially located in the habitable zones of their host stars. Nine candidates were detected with only two transit events and the prospective periods are longer than 400 days. The photometric models suggest that these objects have radii that range between those of Neptune and Jupiter. These detections nearly double the number of gas-giant planet candidates orbiting at habitable-zone distances. We conducted spectroscopic observations for nine of the brighter targets to improve the stellar parameters and we obtained adaptive optics imaging for four of the stars to search for blended background or foreground stars that could confuse our photometric modeling. We present an iterative analysis method to derive the stellar and planet properties and uncertainties by combining the available spectroscopic parameters, stellar evolution models, and transiting light curve parameters, weighted by the measurement errors. Planet Hunters is a citizen science project that crowd sources the assessment of NASA Kepler light curves. The discovery of these 43 planet candidates demonstrates the success of citizen scientists at identifying planet candidates, even in longer period orbits with only two or three transit events. .

  19. Specific CT 3D rendering of the treatment zone after Irreversible Electroporation (IRE) in a pig liver model: the “Chebyshev Center Concept” to define the maximum treatable tumor size

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Size and shape of the treatment zone after Irreversible electroporation (IRE) can be difficult to depict due to the use of multiple applicators with complex spatial configuration. Exact geometrical definition of the treatment zone, however, is mandatory for acute treatment control since incomplete tumor coverage results in limited oncological outcome. In this study, the “Chebyshev Center Concept” was introduced for CT 3d rendering to assess size and position of the maximum treatable tumor at a specific safety margin. Methods In seven pig livers, three different IRE protocols were applied to create treatment zones of different size and shape: Protocol 1 (n = 5 IREs), Protocol 2 (n = 5 IREs), and Protocol 3 (n = 5 IREs). Contrast-enhanced CT was used to assess the treatment zones. Technique A consisted of a semi-automated software prototype for CT 3d rendering with the “Chebyshev Center Concept” implemented (the “Chebyshev Center” is the center of the largest inscribed sphere within the treatment zone) with automated definition of parameters for size, shape and position. Technique B consisted of standard CT 3d analysis with manual definition of the same parameters but position. Results For Protocol 1 and 2, short diameter of the treatment zone and diameter of the largest inscribed sphere within the treatment zone were not significantly different between Technique A and B. For Protocol 3, short diameter of the treatment zone and diameter of the largest inscribed sphere within the treatment zone were significantly smaller for Technique A compared with Technique B (41.1 ± 13.1 mm versus 53.8 ± 1.1 mm and 39.0 ± 8.4 mm versus 53.8 ± 1.1 mm; p < 0.05 and p < 0.01). For Protocol 1, 2 and 3, sphericity of the treatment zone was significantly larger for Technique A compared with B. Conclusions Regarding size and shape of the treatment zone after IRE, CT 3d rendering with the “Chebyshev Center Concept” implemented provides

  20. Fascicular ventricular tachycardia: experience with radiofrequency ablation.

    PubMed

    Magalhaes, Sónia; Gonçalves, Helena; Primo, João; Sá, Ana Paula; Silva, Paula; Rosas, Rui; Gama, Vasco

    2006-05-01

    Fascicular ventricular tachycardia (VT), the commonest form of idiopathic left VT, occurs more frequently in young males without structural heart disease and usually presents as paroxysmal palpitations. It is subdivided into two more common subtypes, posterior and anterior. A macro-reentrant circuit involving a considerable and variable extent of the left interventricular septum is presumed to be the underlying arrhythmogenic mechanism. A slow conduction zone with particular sensitivity to verapamil participates in the circuit and it seems that diastolic potentials (DP) represent the electrical activity in or near this zone. The fascicles of the left bundle appear to constitute part of the retrograde pathway and Purkinje potentials (PP) are assumed to represent their activation. In the present retrospective study, the authors review twelve cases of fascicular VT (ten posterior and two anterior) evaluated in the electrophysiology laboratory. Although initial induction was obtained in all patients, reproducibility was poor as a consequence of frequent contact inhibition during endocardial mapping of the left ventricle and this meant that ablation was not possible in two cases. Two cases of associated atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia (AVNRT) and a case of associated atrioventricular reentrant tachycardia by a right posterior accessory pathway were documented, which suggest a correlated anatomic substrate. After ablation of the slow nodal pathway in one of the AVNRTs, fascicular VT was no longer inducible. Ablation of the fascicular VT was attempted in nine patients, at the tachycardia exit site (characterized by an early ventricular electrogram fused with a Purkinje potential) in two patients with anterior fascicular VT and in five patients with the posterior subtype, and near the slow conduction pathway (site with simultaneous recording of DP and PP) in the other two patients. The initial success rate with a single procedure was 78%, two of the ablations

  1. Formation processes of sea ice floe size distribution in the interior pack and its relationship to the marginal ice zone off East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyota, Takenobu; Kohout, Alison; Fraser, Alexander D.

    2016-09-01

    To understand the behavior of the Seasonal Ice Zone (SIZ), which is composed of sea-ice floes of various sizes, knowledge of the floe size distribution (FSD) is important. In particular, FSD in the Marginal Ice Zone (MIZ), controlled by wave-ice interaction, plays an important role in determining the retreating rates of sea-ice extent on a global scale because the cumulative perimeter of floes enhances melting. To improve the understanding of wave-ice interaction and subsequent effects on FSD in the MIZ, FSD measurements were conducted off East Antarctica during the second Sea Ice Physics and Ecosystems eXperiment (SIPEX-2) in late winter 2012. Since logistical reasons limited helicopter operations to two interior ice regions, FSD in the interior ice region was determined using a combination of heli-photos and MODIS satellite visible images. The possible effect of wave-ice interaction in the MIZ was examined by comparison with past results obtained in the same MIZ, with our analysis showing: (1) FSD in the interior ice region is basically scale invariant for both small- (<100 m) and large- (>1 km) scale regimes; (2) although fractal dimensions are quite different between these two regimes, they are both rather close to that in the MIZ; and (3) for floes <100 m in diameter, a regime shift which appeared at 20-40 m in the MIZ is absent. These results indicate that one role of wave-ice interaction is to modulate the FSD that already exists in the interior ice region, rather than directly determine it. The possibilities of floe-floe collisions and storm-induced lead formation are considered as possible formation processes of FSD in the interior pack.

  2. Burn, freeze, or photo-ablate?: comparative symptom profile in Barrett's dysplasia patients undergoing endoscopic ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Kanwar Rupinder S.; Gross, Seth A.; Greenwald, Bruce D.; Hemminger, Lois L.; Wolfsen, Herbert C.

    2009-06-01

    Background: There are few data available comparing endoscopic ablation methods for Barrett's esophagus with high-grade dysplasia (BE-HGD). Objective: To determine differences in symptoms and complications associated with endoscopic ablation. Design: Prospective observational study. Setting: Two tertiary care centers in USA. Patients: Consecutive patients with BE-HGD Interventions: In this pilot study, symptoms profile data were collected for BE-HGD patients among 3 endoscopic ablation methods: porfimer sodium photodynamic therapy, radiofrequency ablation and low-pressure liquid nitrogen spray cryotherapy. Main Outcome Measurements: Symptom profiles and complications from the procedures were assessed 1-8 weeks after treatment. Results: Ten BE-HGD patients were treated with each ablation modality (30 patients total; 25 men, median age: 69 years (range 53-81). All procedures were performed in the clinic setting and none required subsequent hospitalization. The most common symptoms among all therapies were chest pain, dysphagia and odynophagia. More patients (n=8) in the porfimer sodium photodynamic therapy group reported weight loss compared to radio-frequency ablactation (n=2) and cryotherapy (n=0). Four patients in the porfimer sodium photodynamic therapy group developed phototoxicity requiring medical treatment. Strictures, each requiring a single dilation, were found in radiofrequency ablactation (n=1) and porfimer sodium photodynamic therapy (n=2) patients. Limitations: Small sample size, non-randomized study. Conclusions: These three endoscopic therapies are associated with different types and severity of post-ablation symptoms and complications.

  3. Pathology of non-thermal irreversible electroporation (N-TIRE)-induced ablation of the canine brain

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Paulo A.; Roberston, John L.; Ellis, Thomas L.; Davalos, Rafael V.

    2013-01-01

    This study describes the neuropathologic features of normal canine brain ablated with non-thermal irreversible electroporation (N-TIRE). The parietal cerebral cortices of four dogs were treated with N-TIRE using a dose-escalation protocol with an additional dog receiving sham treatment. Animals were allowed to recover following N-TIRE ablation and the effects of treatment were monitored with clinical and magnetic resonance imaging examinations. Brains were subjected to histopathologic and ultrastructural assessment along with Bcl-2, caspase-3, and caspase-9 immunohistochemical staining following sacrifice 72 h post-treatment. Adverse clinical effects of N-TIRE were only observed in the dog treated at the upper energy tier. MRI and neuropathologic examinations indicated that N-TIRE ablation resulted in focal regions of severe cytoarchitectural and blood-brain-barrier disruption. Lesion size correlated to the intensity of the applied electrical field. N-TIRE-induced lesions were characterized by parenchymal necrosis and hemorrhage; however, large blood vessels were preserved. A transition zone containing parenchymal edema, perivascular inflammatory cuffs, and reactive gliosis was interspersed between the necrotic focus and normal neuropil. Apoptotic labeling indices were not different between the N-TIRE-treated and control brains. This study identified N-TIRE pulse parameters that can be used to safely create circumscribed foci of brain necrosis while selectively preserving major vascular structures. PMID:23820168

  4. Highspeed laser ablation cutting of metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullmann, F.; Loeschner, U.; Hartwig, L.; Szczepanski, D.; Schille, J.; Gronau, S.; Knebel, T.; Drechsel, J.; Ebert, R.; Exner, H.

    2013-02-01

    In laser ablation cutting, irradiation of high-intense laser beams causes ejection of molten and evaporated material out of the cutting zone as a result of high pressure gradients, induced by expanding plasma plumes. This paper investigates highspeed laser ablation cutting of industrial grade metal sheets using high-brilliant continuous wave fiber lasers with output powers up to 5 kW. The laser beam was deflected with scan speeds up to 2700 m/min utilizing both a fast galvanometer scan system and a polygon scan system. By sharp laser beam focusing using different objectives with focal lengths ranging between 160 mm and 500 mm, small laser spot diameters between 16.5 μm and 60 μm were obtained, respectively. As a result high peak intensities between 3*108 W/cm² and 2.5*109 W/cm² were irradiated on the sample surface, and cutting kerfs with a maximum depth of 1.4 mm have been produced. In this study the impact of the processing parameters laser power, laser spot diameter, cutting speed, and number of scans on both the achievable cutting depth and the cutting edge quality was investigated. The ablation depths, the heights of the cutting burr, as well as the removed material volumes were evaluated by means of optical microscope images and cross section photographs. Finally highspeed laser ablation cutting was studied using an intensified ultra highspeed camera in order to get useful insights into the cutting process.

  5. A new system of microwave ablation at 2450 MHz: preliminary experience.

    PubMed

    Ierardi, Anna Maria; Mangano, Alberto; Floridi, Chiara; Dionigi, Gianlorenzo; Biondi, Antonio; Duka, Ejona; Lucchina, Natalie; Lianos, Georgios D; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of the application of the new system (Emprint Microwave Ablation System, Covidien Boulder, CO, USA) and to identify its advantages. In particular the attention was focused to the spherical ablation zone obtained and its usefulness in terms of effectiveness. The new system is composed of: a 2450 MHz generator that delivers a maximum power of 100 W, a fiberglass antenna and a pump for internally cooled antenna. Ten liver nodules (8 hepatocellular carcinomas and 2 metastasis) were percutaneously treated (mean diameter 24.9 mm, range 16-35 mm). Technical success, ablation duration time, overall procedure time and safety were registered. To define the shape of the ablation zone, multiplanar reformatting (MPR) was performed. Roundness index transverse was calculated: a value near 1 represents a more spherical ablation zone shape, and a value distant from 1 implies an oval configuration. Technical success was 100%. Mean ablation time was of 3.85 min (range 3-5 min), mean overall procedure time was 30.5 min (range 25-40 min). No major complications were recorded. Roundness index transverse presented a mean value of 0.94, meaning that a spherical shape of ablation zone was achieved. One of the most promising innovations of the new microwave technology is the spherical shape of the ablation volume that could be related with an improving of the effectiveness and safety.

  6. Nanoparticle fabrication of hydroxyapatite by laser ablation in water

    SciTech Connect

    Musaev, O. R.; Wieliczka, D. M.; Wrobel, J. M.; Kruger, M. B.; Dusevich, V.

    2008-10-15

    Synthetic polycrystalline hydroxyapatite was ablated in water with 337 nm radiation from a UV nitrogen pulsed laser. According to transmission electron microscopy micrographs, the ablated particles were approximately spherical and had a size of {approx}80 nm. Raman spectroscopic analysis demonstrated that particles had the same structure as the original crystal. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed that the surface chemical composition was close to that of the original material. The characteristics of the ablated particles and estimations of the temperature rise of the hydroxyapatite surface under laser irradiation are consistent with the mechanism of explosive boiling being responsible for ablation. The experimental observations offer the basis for preparation of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles by laser ablation in water.

  7. Brittle grain-size reduction of feldspar, phase mixing and strain localization in granitoids at mid-crustal conditions (Pernambuco shear zone, NE Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viegas, Gustavo; Menegon, Luca; Archanjo, Carlos

    2016-03-01

    The Pernambuco shear zone (northeastern Brazil) is a large-scale strike-slip fault that, in its eastern segment, deforms granitoids at mid-crustal conditions. Initially coarse-grained (> 50 µm) feldspar porphyroclasts are intensively fractured and reduced to an ultrafine-grained mixture consisting of plagioclase and K-feldspar grains (< 15 µm) localized in C' shear bands. Detailed microstructural observations and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analysis do not show evidence of intracrystalline plasticity in feldspar porphyroclasts and/or fluid-assisted replacement reactions. Quartz occurs either as thick (˜ 1-2 mm) monomineralic veins transposed along the shear zone foliation or as thin ribbons ( ≤ 25 µm width) dispersed in the feldspathic mixture. The microstructure and c axis crystallographic-preferred orientation are similar in the thick monomineralic veins and in the thin ribbons, and they suggest dominant subgrain rotation recrystallization and activity of prism < a > and rhomb < a > slip systems. However, the grain size in monophase recrystallized domains decreases when moving from the quartz monomineralic veins to the thin ribbons embedded in the feldspathic C' bands (14 µm vs. 5 µm respectively). The fine-grained feldspar mixture has a weak crystallographic-preferred orientation interpreted as the result of shear zone parallel-oriented growth during diffusion creep, as well as the same composition as the fractured porphyroclasts, suggesting that it generated by mechanical fragmentation of rigid porphyroclasts with a negligible role of chemical disequilibrium. Once C' shear bands were generated and underwent viscous deformation at constant stress conditions, the polyphase feldspathic aggregate would have deformed at a strain rate 1 order of magnitude faster than the monophase quartz monomineralic veins, as evidenced by applying experimentally and theoretically calibrated flow laws for dislocation creep in quartz and diffusion creep in

  8. Analysis of ablation debris from natural and artificial iron meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, M. B.; Davis, A. S.

    1977-01-01

    Artificial ablation studies were performed on iron and nickel-iron samples using an arc-heated plasma of ionized air. Experiment conditions simulated a meteoroid traveling about 12 km/sec at an altitude of 70 km. The artificially produced fusion crusts and ablation debris show features very similar to natural fusion crusts of the iron meteorites Boguslavka, Norfork, and N'Kandhla and to magnetic spherules recovered from Mn nodules. X-ray diffraction, electron microprobe, optical, and scanning electron microscope analyses reveal that important mineralogical, elemental, and textural changes occur during ablation. Some metal is melted and ablated. The outer margin of the melted rind is oxidized and recrystallizes as a discontinuous crust of magnetite and wustite. Adjacent to the oxidized metallic ablation zone is an unoxidized metallic ablation zone in which structures such as Widmannstatten bands are obliterated as the metal is transformed to unequilibrated alpha 2 nickel-iron. Volatile elements are vaporized and less volatile elements undergo fractionation.

  9. Method for evaluation of predictive models of microwave ablation via post-procedural clinical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Jarrod A.; Brown, Daniel; Kingham, T. Peter; Jarnagin, William R.; Miga, Michael I.; Clements, Logan W.

    2015-03-01

    Development of a clinically accurate predictive model of microwave ablation (MWA) procedures would represent a significant advancement and facilitate an implementation of patient-specific treatment planning to achieve optimal probe placement and ablation outcomes. While studies have been performed to evaluate predictive models of MWA, the ability to quantify the performance of predictive models via clinical data has been limited to comparing geometric measurements of the predicted and actual ablation zones. The accuracy of placement, as determined by the degree of spatial overlap between ablation zones, has not been achieved. In order to overcome this limitation, a method of evaluation is proposed where the actual location of the MWA antenna is tracked and recorded during the procedure via a surgical navigation system. Predictive models of the MWA are then computed using the known position of the antenna within the preoperative image space. Two different predictive MWA models were used for the preliminary evaluation of the proposed method: (1) a geometric model based on the labeling associated with the ablation antenna and (2) a 3-D finite element method based computational model of MWA using COMSOL. Given the follow-up tomographic images that are acquired at approximately 30 days after the procedure, a 3-D surface model of the necrotic zone was generated to represent the true ablation zone. A quantification of the overlap between the predicted ablation zones and the true ablation zone was performed after a rigid registration was computed between the pre- and post-procedural tomograms. While both model show significant overlap with the true ablation zone, these preliminary results suggest a slightly higher degree of overlap with the geometric model.

  10. Influence of timing of sea ice retreat on phytoplankton size during marginal ice zone bloom period on the Chukchi and Bering shelves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, A.; Hirawake, T.; Suzuki, K.; Eisner, L.; Imai, I.; Nishino, S.; Kikuchi, T.; Saitoh, S.-I.

    2016-01-01

    The size structure and biomass of a phytoplankton community during the spring bloom period can affect the energy use of higher-trophic-level organisms through the predator-prey body size relationships. The timing of the sea ice retreat (TSR) also plays a crucial role in the seasonally ice-covered marine ecosystem, because it is tightly coupled with the timing of the spring bloom. Thus, it is important to monitor the temporal and spatial distributions of a phytoplankton community size structure. Prior to this study, an ocean colour algorithm was developed to derive phytoplankton size index FL, which is defined as the ratio of chlorophyll a (chl a) derived from cells larger than 5 µm to the total chl a, using satellite remote sensing for the Chukchi and Bering shelves. Using this method, we analysed the pixel-by-pixel relationships between FL during the marginal ice zone (MIZ) bloom period and TSR over the period of 1998-2013. The influences of the TSR on the sea surface temperature (SST) and changes in ocean heat content (ΔOHC) during the MIZ bloom period were also investigated. A significant negative relationship between FL and the TSR was widely found in the shelf region during the MIZ bloom season. However, we found a significant positive (negative) relationship between the SST (ΔOHC) and TSR. Specifically, an earlier sea ice retreat was associated with the dominance of larger phytoplankton during a colder and weakly stratified MIZ bloom season, suggesting that the duration of the nitrate supply, which is important for the growth of large-sized phytoplankton in this region (i.e. diatoms), can change according to the TSR. In addition, under-ice phytoplankton blooms are likely to occur in years with late ice retreat, because sufficient light for phytoplankton growth can pass through the ice and penetrate into the water columns as a result of an increase in solar radiation toward the summer solstice

  11. Rat liver regeneration following ablation with irreversible electroporation

    PubMed Central

    Bruinsma, Bote G.; Jaramillo, Maria; Yarmush, Martin L.

    2016-01-01

    During the past decade, irreversible electroporation (IRE) ablation has emerged as a promising tool for the treatment of multiple diseases including hepatic cancer. However, the mechanisms behind the tissue regeneration following IRE ablation have not been investigated. Our results indicate that IRE treatment immediately kills the cells at the treatment site preserving the extracellular architecture, in effect causing in vivo decellularization. Over the course of 4 weeks, progenitor cell differentiation, through YAP and notch pathways, together with hepatocyte expansion led to almost complete regeneration of the ablated liver leading to the formation of hepatocyte like cells at the ablated zone. We did not observe significant scarring or tumor formation at the regenerated areas 6 months post IRE. Our study suggests a new model to study the regeneration of liver when the naïve extracellular matrix is decellularized in vivo with completely preserved extracellular architecture. PMID:26819842

  12. Rat liver regeneration following ablation with irreversible electroporation.

    PubMed

    Golberg, Alexander; Bruinsma, Bote G; Jaramillo, Maria; Yarmush, Martin L; Uygun, Basak E

    2016-01-01

    During the past decade, irreversible electroporation (IRE) ablation has emerged as a promising tool for the treatment of multiple diseases including hepatic cancer. However, the mechanisms behind the tissue regeneration following IRE ablation have not been investigated. Our results indicate that IRE treatment immediately kills the cells at the treatment site preserving the extracellular architecture, in effect causing in vivo decellularization. Over the course of 4 weeks, progenitor cell differentiation, through YAP and notch pathways, together with hepatocyte expansion led to almost complete regeneration of the ablated liver leading to the formation of hepatocyte like cells at the ablated zone. We did not observe significant scarring or tumor formation at the regenerated areas 6 months post IRE. Our study suggests a new model to study the regeneration of liver when the naïve extracellular matrix is decellularized in vivo with completely preserved extracellular architecture.

  13. Artificial meteor ablation studies. [for identification of cosmic dust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, M. B.

    1973-01-01

    Artificial meteor ablation was performed on natural minerals, composed predominately of magnetite and hematite, using an arc heated plasma stream of air. Analysis of the ablated debris indicated most was composed of two or more minerals. The more volatile elements were depleted and the relative abundance of Fe increased as a result of both volatile depletion and a reduction in its oxidation state. Hematite was converted to magnetite in the ablation zone, and quartz and apatite minerals were converted to an Fe-rich glass consisting of varying amounts of Si, P, Cl, and Ca, depending upon the accessory minerals available at the time of melting. Artificially created ablation products from iron oxides exhibited unique properties depending on the composition of the original material and the environmental conditions of formation. In addition to the accepted elemental criteria, these properties were morphologic characteristics, textural parameters, and the existence of metastable minerals.

  14. Thermal Ablation of Lung Tissue: In Vivo Experimental Comparison of Microwave and Radiofrequency

    SciTech Connect

    Crocetti, Laura Bozzi, Elena; Faviana, Pinuccia; Cioni, Dania; Della Pina, Clotilde; Sbrana, Alberto; Fontanini, Gabriella; Lencioni, Riccardo

    2010-08-15

    This study was designed to compare feasibility, safety, and effectiveness of microwave (MW) ablation versus radiofrequency (RF) ablation of lung tissue in a rabbit model. Twenty New Zealand White rabbits were submitted to MW (n = 10, group A) or RF ablation (n = 10, group B). The procedures were performed with a prototype MW ablation device with a 1.6-cm radiating section antenna (Valleylab MW Ablation System) and with a 2-cm exposed-tip RF electrode (Cool-tip RF Ablation System). At immediate computed tomography increase in density, maximum diameters (D1-D3) of ablation zones were measured and ablation volume was calculated. Histopathologic assessment was performed 3 and 7 days after the procedure. Technical success was achieved in nine of 10 rabbits in each group. One death occurred in group B. Complications included pneumothorax (group A, n = 4; group B, n = 4), abscess (group A, n = 1; group B, n = 1), and thoracic wall burn (group A, n = 4). No significant differences were demonstrated in attenuation increase (P = 0.73), dimensions (P = 0.28, 0.86, 0.06, respectively, comparing D1-D3) and volume (P = 0.17). At histopathology, ablation zones were similar, with septal necrosis, edema, hemorrhage, and peripheral lymphocytic infiltrate. Complete thrombosis of more than 90% of vessels up to 2 mm in diameter was depicted at the periphery of the ablation zone in group A specimens. In group B specimens, complete thrombosis was depicted in 20% of vessels. Feasibility and safety of MW and RF ablation are similar in a lung rabbit model. MW ablation produces a greater damage to peripheral small vessels inducing thrombosis.

  15. [Using 3.0 T MR to dynamically observe ablated lung tumors after percutaneous cryotherapy therapy].

    PubMed

    Li, J; Qu, J R; Zhang, H K; Xiao, J C; Jiang, L N; Zhao, Y; Li, H L

    2016-09-20

    Objective: To initially explore MRI features and its changing trends including of lung tumors after Argon-Helium cryoablation therapy, and enhance the recognition of MR findings of lung tumors postcryoablation. Methods: Twenty-three cases of patients with twenty six nodules of pulmonary malignance who received Argon-Helium cryoablation therapy in Henan Cancer Hospital from July 2014 to January 2016 were enrolled.All patients underwent unenhanced and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI scans at pre-and 1-day, 1-week, 1-, 3-, 6-, 12-month postcryoablation. Two radiologists independently reviewed MRI images, signal intensity in the ablated zone on T1WI and T2WI were assessed by a 5-point scale.The changing trends of size and signal intensity with time were showed by time-maximum diameter and time-score curve.Time-signal intensity curves based on dynamic enhanced sequence were also performed. Results: Typical MRI findings includes: heterogeneous signal intensity on both T1WI and T2WI at 1-day postcryoablation(26/26, 100%). Hyper-intense on T1WI(22/26, 84.6%) and T2WI(17/26, 65.4%) with a hypo-intense rim at 1-week postcryoablation.Decreasing signal intensity on T1WI(17/26, 65.4%) and increasing signal intensity on T2WI(22/26, 84.6%) at 1-month.Signal intensity declined to the level of muscle on both T1WI(18/26, 69.2%) and T2WI(19/26, 73.1%) at 3-month, nineteen ablated zone turned into patchy shape(19/26, 73.1%). The maximum diameter was largest at 1-day and gradually shrunk with time. The mean score value toped at 1-week and gradually decreased. A straight line type without definite enhancement was found from 1-day to 1-month postcryoablation, an inflow curve with a mild delayed enhancement was seen from 3- to 12- month. Totally 4 recurrence (4/26, 15.4%) all occurred at 3-month and were lack of a complete hypo-intense rim at 1-week postcryoablation. Conclusion: MRI findings of lung tumors postcryoablation are characteristic, a complete hypo-intense rim at 1-week is helpful

  16. Shuttle subscale ablative nozzle tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, L. B.; Bailey, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    Recent subscale nozzle tests have identified new and promising carbon phenolic nozzle ablatives which utilize staple rayon, PAN, and pitch based carbon cloth. A 4-inch throat diameter submerged test nozzle designed for the 48-inch Jet Propulsion Laboratory char motor was used to evaluate five different designs incorporating 20 candidate ablatives. Test results indicate that several pitch and PAN-based carbon phenolic ablatives can provide erosion and char performance equivalent or superior to the present continuous rayon-based SRM ablative.

  17. The sequence of moderate-size earthquakes at the junction of the Ligurian basin and the Corsica margin (western Mediterranean): The initiation of an active deformation zone revealed?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larroque, Christophe; Delouis, Bertrand; Sage, Françoise; Régnier, Marc; Béthoux, Nicole; Courboulex, Françoise; Deschamps, Anne

    2016-04-01

    A new seismically active zone is found in the southern part of the Ligurian basin, 80-km west of Corsica (western Mediterranean). The activity began in February 2011 with a foreshock (ML 4) and a mainshock (ML 5.3) 5 days later, followed by numerous aftershocks. We first analyze the fore- and mainshock in detail. We compare the results obtained using classical methods (linear location in a 1D medium and focal mechanisms from P and S polarities) and new approaches (non-linear location in a 3D medium and waveform modeling for determining the seismic moment and the focal mechanism). Both methods provided similar results for location, depth (in the range of 6-13 km) and focal mechanisms, which reveal reverse faulting with nodal planes oriented N-S and NE-SW. We then locate 27 of the aftershocks in the 3D model and find a 10-km-long NE-SW alignment with a depth between 7 and 16 km. In 2012 and 2013, three other moderate-size events (ML 3.8, 4 and 4.5) occurred and confirm that this zone is still active. The epicentral area is located in the oceanic domain of the Ligurian Basin. From analysis of the bathymetry and high-resolution multi-channel seismic profiles, no morphologic anomaly at surface and no inherited fault in the shallow ~ 4 km depth were imaged, which suggest that no significant deformation occurred in the area since 5 Ma. Thus, the structure(s) activated during the 2011-2013 sequence remain unknown. In light of these results, we point out a notable difference on both sides of the Ligurian Basin: the northern margin, close to the alpine chain, suffered strong earthquakes and large cumulated deformation since 5 Ma, while the southern margin, close to the Corsica-Sardinia continental block, is poorly deformed since 5 Ma.

  18. Histological evaluation of vertical laser channels from ablative fractional resurfacing: an ex vivo pig skin model.

    PubMed

    Skovbølling Haak, Christina; Illes, Monica; Paasch, Uwe; Hædersdal, Merete

    2011-07-01

    Ablative fractional resurfacing (AFR) represents a new treatment potential for various skin conditions and new laser devices are being introduced. It is important to gain information about the impact of laser settings on the dimensions of the created laser channels for obtaining a safe and efficient treatment outcome. The aim of this study was to establish a standard model to document the histological tissue damage profiles after AFR and to test a new laser device at diverse settings. Ex vivo abdominal pig skin was treated with a MedArt 620, prototype fractional carbon dioxide (CO(2)) laser (Medart, Hvidovre, Denmark) delivering single microbeams (MB) with a spot size of 165 μm. By using a constant pulse duration of 2 ms, intensities of 1-18 W, single and 2-4 stacked pulses, energies were delivered in a range from 2-144 mJ/MB. Histological evaluations included 3-4 high-quality histological measurements for each laser setting (n = 28). AFR created cone-shaped laser channels. Ablation depths varied from reaching the superficial dermis (2 mJ, median 41 μm) to approaching the subcutaneous fat (144 mJ, median 1,943 μm) and correlated to the applied energy levels in an approximate linear relation (r(2) = 0.84, p < 0.001). The dermal ablation width increased slightly within the energy range of 4-144 mJ (median 163 μm). The thickness of the coagulation zone reached a plateau around 65 μm at energies levels above 16 mJ. The calculated volumes of ablated tissue increased with increasing energies. We suggest this ex vivo pig skin model to characterize AFR laser channels histologically.

  19. Artificial ascites and pneumoperitoneum to facilitate thermal ablation of liver tumors: a pictorial essay.

    PubMed

    Bhagavatula, Sharath K; Chick, Jeffrey F B; Chauhan, Nikunj R; Shyn, Paul B

    2017-02-01

    Image-guided percutaneous thermal ablation is increasingly utilized in the treatment of hepatic malignancies. Peripherally located hepatic tumors can be difficult to access or located adjacent to critical structures that can be injured. As a result, ablation of peripheral tumors may be avoided or may be performed too cautiously, leading to inadequate ablation coverage. In these cases, separating the tumor from adjacent critical structures can increase the efficacy and safety of procedures. Artificial ascites and artificial pneumoperitoneum are techniques that utilize fluid and gas, respectively, to insulate critical structures from the thermal ablation zone. Induction of artificial ascites and artificial pneumoperitoneum can enable complete ablation of otherwise inaccessible hepatic tumors, improve tumor visualization, minimize unintended thermal injury to surrounding organs, and reduce post-procedural pain. This pictorial essay illustrates and discusses the proper technique and clinical considerations for successful artificial ascites and pneumoperitoneum creation to facilitate safe peripheral hepatic tumor ablation.

  20. Efficiency of planetesimal ablation in giant planetary envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinhas, Arazi; Madhusudhan, Nikku; Clarke, Cathie

    2016-12-01

    Observations of exoplanetary spectra are leading to unprecedented constraints on their atmospheric elemental abundances, particularly O/H, C/H, and C/O ratios. Recent studies suggest that elemental ratios could provide important constraints on formation and migration mechanisms of giant exoplanets. A fundamental assumption in such studies is that the chemical composition of the planetary envelope represents the sum-total of compositions of the accreted gas and solids during the formation history of the planet. We investigate the efficiency with which accreted planetesimals ablate in a giant planetary envelope thereby contributing to its composition rather than sinking to the core. From considerations of aerodynamic drag causing `frictional ablation' and the envelope temperature structure causing `thermal ablation', we compute mass ablations for impacting planetesimals of radii 30 m to 1 km for different compositions (ice to iron) and a wide range of velocities and impact angles, assuming spherical symmetry. Icy impactors are fully ablated in the outer envelope for a wide range of parameters. Even for Fe impactors substantial ablation occurs in the envelope for a wide range of sizes and velocities. For example, iron impactors of sizes below ˜0.5 km and velocities above ˜30 km s-1 are found to ablate by ˜60-80 per cent within the outer envelope at pressures below 103 bar due to frictional ablation alone. For deeper pressures (˜107 bar), substantial ablation happens over a wider range of parameters. Therefore, our exploratory study suggests that atmospheric abundances of volatile elements in giant planets reflect their accretion history during formation.

  1. Structural analysis of low molecular weight heparin by ultraperformance size exclusion chromatography/time of flight mass spectrometry and capillary zone electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qianqian; Chen, Xi; Zhu, Zhijia; Zhan, Xueqiang; Wu, Yanfang; Song, Lankun; Kang, Jingwu

    2013-02-05

    Although low molecular weight heparins (LMWHs) have been used as anticoagulant agents for over 2 decades, their structures have not been fully characterized. In this work, we propose a new strategy for the comprehensive structural analysis of LMWHs based on the combination of ultraperformance size exclusion chromatography/electrospray quadruple time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (UPSEC/Q-TOF-MS) and capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE). More than 70 components, including oligosaccharides with special structures such as 1,6-anhydro rings, saturated uronic acid at the nonreducing end and odd-numbered saccharides units were identified with UPSEC/Q-TOF-MS. Furthermore, a more detailed compositional analysis was accomplished by CZE analysis. PEG10000 and MgCl(2) were added to the background electrolyte to separate those saccharides with the nearly same charge-to-mass ratio. Baseline separation and quantification of all the building blocks of the most complex LMWH, namely, enoxaparin, which include 10 disaccharides, 1 trisaccharide, 2 tetrasaccharides, and, of particular importance, 4 1,6-anhyro derivatives, was achieved using CZE for the first time. Additionally, the peaks of oligosaccharides, in the absence of commercially available standards, were assigned on the basis of the linear correlation between the electrophoretic mobilities of oligosaccharides and their charge-to-mass ratios. These two approaches are simple and robust for structural analysis of LMWHs.

  2. The fractionation and geochemical characteristics of rare earth elements measured in ambient size-resolved PM in an integrated iron and steelmaking industry zone.

    PubMed

    Dai, Qili; Li, Liwei; Yang, Jiamei; Liu, Baoshuang; Bi, Xiaohui; Wu, Jianhui; Zhang, YuFen; Yao, Lin; Feng, Yinchang

    2016-09-01

    Improved understanding of the fractionation and geochemical characteristic of rare earth elements (REEs) from steel plant emissions is important due to the unclear atmospheric signature of these elements and their adverse impact on human health and the environment. In this study, ambient particulate matter of different sizes was collected from one site in an integrated iron and steelmaking industrial zone (HG) and one urban background site with no direct industrial emissions (ZWY) during a 1-year sampling campaign in China. The total concentrations of REEs for TSP, PM10, and PM2.5 were 27.248, 14.989, 3.542 ng/m(3) in HG and 6.326, 5.274, 1.731 ng/m(3), respectively, in ZWY, which revealed the local influence of the steelmaking activities to the air quality. With respect to ZWY, the REEs in HG site are obviously fractionated in the coarser fraction, and LREEs account for more than 80 % of the total REE burden in all of the samples. Additionally, the REEs in HG and ZWY show a homogeneous trend with successively increased LREE/HREE ratios from the coarse particles to the fine particles. In our samples, La, Ce, Nd, and Sm are the most enriched rare earth elements, especially in the HG site. Moreover, ternary diagrams of LaCeSm indicate that the REEs in HG are potentially contributed by steelworks, carrier vehicles, coal combustion, and road dust re-suspension.

  3. Temporal Trends in the Histology of the Rabbit Kidney after Cavitational Tissue Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Timothy L.; Kieran, Kathleen; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Cain, Charles A.; Roberts, William W.

    2007-05-01

    Tissue can be mechanically ablated through inertial cavitation generated by high intensity pulsed ultrasound. The ablation appears acutely as a fine slurry with absent cellular structure. Long-term effects and the evolution of histologic changes in disrupted tissue remain poorly understood. This study aimed to characterize the 0-60 day histology of cavitational ablation in a rabbit model. 29 New Zealand White rabbits were anesthetized and exposed to high intensity pulses of ultrasound (60000 pulses, 20 usec duration, 750 kHz, 1 kHz PRF, 18 MPa peak rarefactional pressure, lower pole, left kidney). Kidneys were harvested immediately from five rabbits. The others were recovered and the kidneys were harvested 1, 2, 7, 20, or 60 days after treatment. Grossly, kidneys from 0-2 days displayed subcapsular bruising near the exposure site and some hemorrhage in the adjacent perirenal fat; microscopically, a disrupted, acellular zone measuring 3-5 mm by 5-10 mm accompanied by local infiltration of neutrophils (acute inflammation) was seen. Kidneys harvested after 7 days displayed tubular dilatation adjacent to the targeted area and collagen deposition consistent with scar formation. Decreased collagen deposition, decreased size of the disrupted zone, and regeneration of the tubular basal cell layer of dilated tubules was evident by day 20. Kidneys harvested at 20 and 60 days had contour defects near the exposure site with an apparent volume loss. Cavitation causes orderly and predictable histologic changes. Local renal damage induced during histotripsy may be partially reversible. Further research is needed to identify the clinical correlates of the observed histologic findings.

  4. Thermochemical Ablation Analysis of the Orion Heatshield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sixel, William

    2015-01-01

    The Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle will one day carry astronauts to the Moon and beyond, and Orion's heatshield is a critical component in ensuring their safe return to Earth. The Orion heatshield is the structural component responsible for absorbing the intense heating environment caused by re-entry to Earth's atmosphere. The heatshield is primarily composed of Avcoat, an ablative material that is consumed during the re-entry process. Ablation is primarily characterized by two processes: pyrolysis and recession. The decomposition of in-depth virgin material is known as pyrolysis. Recession occurs when the exposed surface of the heatshield reacts with the surrounding flow. The Orion heatshield design was changed from an individually filled Avcoat honeycomb to a molded block Avcoat design. The molded block Avcoat heatshield relies on an adhesive bond to keep it attached to the capsule. In some locations on the heatshield, the integrity of the adhesive bond cannot be verified. For these locations, a mechanical retention device was proposed. Avcoat ablation was modelled in CHAR and the in-depth virgin material temperatures were used in a Thermal Desktop model of the mechanical retention device. The retention device was analyzed and shown to cause a large increase in the maximum bondline temperature. In order to study the impact of individual ablation modelling parameters on the heatshield sizing process, a Monte Carlo simulation of the sizing process was proposed. The simulation will give the sensitivity of the ablation model to each of its input parameters. As part of the Monte Carlo simulation, statistical uncertainties on material properties were required for Avcoat. Several properties were difficult to acquire uncertainties for: the pyrolysis gas enthalpy, non-dimensional mass loss rate (B´c), and Arrhenius equation parameters. Variability in the elemental composition of Avcoat was used as the basis for determining the statistical uncertainty in pyrolysis gas

  5. Fabrication of silver nanoparticles dispersed in palm oil using laser ablation.

    PubMed

    Zamiri, Reza; Zakaria, Azmi; Ahangar, Hossein Abbastabar; Sadrolhosseini, Amir Reza; Mahdi, Mohd Adzir

    2010-11-22

    In this study we used a laser ablation technique for preparation of silver nanoparticles. The fabrication process was carried out by ablation of a silver plate immersed in palm oil. A pulsed Nd:YAG laser at a wavelength of 1064 nm was used for ablation of the plate at different times. The palm coconut oil allowed formation of nanoparticles with very small and uniform particle size, which are dispersed very homogeneously within the solution. The obtained particle sizes for 15 and 30 minute ablation times were 2.5 and 2 nm, respectively. Stability study shows that all of the samples remained stable for a reasonable period of time.

  6. Percutaneous ablation of adrenal tumors.

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, Aradhana M; Locklin, Julia; Dupuy, Damian E; Wood, Bradford J

    2010-06-01

    Adrenal tumors comprise a broad spectrum of benign and malignant neoplasms and include functional adrenal adenomas, pheochromocytomas, primary adrenocortical carcinoma, and adrenal metastases. Percutaneous ablative approaches that have been described and used in the treatment of adrenal tumors include percutaneous radiofrequency ablation, cryoablation, microwave ablation, and chemical ablation. Local tumor ablation in the adrenal gland presents unique challenges, secondary to the adrenal gland's unique anatomic and physiological features. The results of clinical series employing percutaneous ablative techniques in the treatment of adrenal tumors are reviewed in this article. Clinical and technical considerations unique to ablation in the adrenal gland are presented, including approaches commonly used in our practices, and risks and potential complications are discussed.

  7. Comparison of Combination Therapies in the Management of Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Transarterial Chemoembolization with Radiofrequency Ablation versus Microwave Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Ginsburg, Michael; Zivin, Sean P.; Wroblewski, Kristen; Doshi, Taral; Vasnani, Raj J.; Van Ha, Thuong G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare retrospectively the outcomes and complications of transcatheter arterial chemoembolization with drug-eluting embolic agents combined with radiofrequency (RF) ablation or microwave (MW) ablation in treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Materials and Methods From 2003–2011, 89 patients with HCC received a combination therapy—transcatheter arterial chemoembolization plus RF ablation in 38 patients and transcatheter arterial chemoembolization plus MW ablation in 51 patients. Local tumor response, tumor progression-free survival (PFS), overall PFS, overall survival (OS), and complications were compared. Overall PFS and OS were compared between the two treatment groups in multivariate analysis controlling for Child-Pugh class, Barcelona Clinic Liver Classification stage, and index tumor size. Results Complete local tumor response was achieved in 37 (80.4%) of the tumors treated with transcatheter arterial chemoembolization plus RF ablation and 49 (76.6%) of the tumors treated with transcatheter arterial chemoembolization plus MW ablation (P = .67). The median tumor PFS and overall PFS were 20.8 months and 9.3 months (P = .72) for transarterial chemoembolization plus RF ablation and 21.8 months and 9.2 months for transarterial chemoembolization plus MW ablation (P = .32). The median OS of the transcatheter arterial chemoembolization plus RF ablation group was 23.3 months, and the median OS of the transcatheter arterial chemoembolization plus MW ablation group was 42.6 months, with no significant difference in the survival experience between the two groups (log-rank test, P = .10). In the multivariate analysis, Barcelona Clinic Liver Classification stage was the only factor associated with overall PFS and OS. One patient in the transcatheter arterial chemoembolization plus RF ablation cohort (3%) and two patients in the transcatheter arterial chemoembolization plus MW ablation cohort (4%) required prolonged hospitalization (< 48 h) for pain

  8. Ablation of skeletal metastases: current status.

    PubMed

    Kurup, A Nicholas; Callstrom, Matthew R

    2010-08-01

    Image-guided percutaneous ablation of bone metastases is an effective, minimally invasive alternative to conventional therapies in the palliation of pain from metastatic disease. Ablative technologies applied in the treatment of skeletal metastases include radiofrequency ablation, cryoablation, microwave ablation, laser ablation, ethanol ablation, and, most recently, focused ultrasound. These ablative methods may be performed in combination with percutaneous cementoplasty to provide support and stabilization for metastases in weight-bearing bones at risk for pathologic fracture.

  9. Noninvasive Assessment of Tissue Heating During Cardiac Radiofrequency Ablation Using MRI Thermography

    PubMed Central

    Kolandaivelu, Aravindan; Zviman, Menekhem M.; Castro, Valeria; Lardo, Albert C.; Berger, Ronald D.; Halperin, Henry R.

    2010-01-01

    Background Failure to achieve properly localized, permanent tissue destruction is a common cause of arrhythmia recurrence after cardiac ablation. Current methods of assessing lesion size and location during cardiac radiofrequency ablation are unreliable or not suited for repeated assessment during the procedure. MRI thermography could be used to delineate permanent ablation lesions because tissue heating above 50°C is the cause of permanent tissue destruction during radiofrequency ablation. However, image artifacts caused by cardiac motion, the ablation electrode, and radiofrequency ablation currently pose a challenge to MRI thermography in the heart. In the current study, we sought to demonstrate the feasibility of MRI thermography during cardiac ablation. Methods and Results An MRI-compatible electrophysiology catheter and filtered radiofrequency ablation system was used to perform ablation in the left ventricle of 6 mongrel dogs in a 1.5-T MRI system. Fast gradient-echo imaging was performed before and during radiofrequency ablation, and thermography images were derived from the preheating and postheating images. Lesion extent by thermography was within 20% of the gross pathology lesion. Conclusions MR thermography appears to be a promising technique for monitoring lesion formation and may allow for more accurate placement and titration of ablation, possibly reducing arrhythmia recurrences. PMID:20657028

  10. Cryosurgery and needle ablation of renal lesions.

    PubMed

    Johnson, D B; Nakada, S Y

    2001-05-01

    Laparoscopic renal cryoablation is a minimally invasive alternative for treating renal tumors utilizing narrow probes cooled with a compressed gas such as argon or carbon dioxide. At this time, cryotherapy has shown the most promise as an alternative to partial nephrectomy as a nephron-sparing treatment for renal tumors. Radiofrequency ablation employs needle electrodes placed percutaneously directly into renal lesions to deliver energy, creating high temperatures leading to cell death. High-intensity focused ultrasound is a noninvasive technique in which focused ultrasound energy is applied to cause cell death within the focal zone. Microwave thermotherapy uses small applicators to deliver microwave energy to tissues, resulting in the generation of heat. Although RF, HIFU, and microwave thermotherapy show promise as energy sources for tumor ablation, they are in the early stages of development. Little is known about their acute and chronic histologic effects and long-term efficacy as a treatment for malignant disease. Further work is needed to develop cryosurgery and needle ablation in order to delineate what role these techniques will ultimately play in the management of RCC.

  11. A novel instrument to measure differential ablation of meteorite samples and proxies: The Meteoric Ablation Simulator (MASI).

    PubMed

    Bones, D L; Gómez Martín, J C; Empson, C J; Carrillo Sánchez, J D; James, A D; Conroy, T P; Plane, J M C

    2016-09-01

    On entering the Earth's atmosphere, micrometeoroids partially or completely ablate, leaving behind layers of metallic atoms and ions. The relative concentration of the various metal layers is not well explained by current models of ablation. Furthermore, estimates of the total flux of cosmic dust and meteoroids entering the Earth's atmosphere vary over two orders of magnitude. To better constrain these estimates and to better model the metal layers in the mesosphere, an experimental Meteoric Ablation Simulator (MASI) has been developed. Interplanetary Dust Particle (IDP) analogs are subjected to temperature profiles simulating realistic entry heating, to ascertain the differential ablation of relevant metal species. MASI is the first ablation experiment capable of simulating detailed mass, velocity, and entry angle-specific temperature profiles whilst simultaneously tracking the resulting gas-phase ablation products in a time resolved manner. This enables the determination of elemental atmospheric entry yields which consider the mass and size distribution of IDPs. The instrument has also enabled the first direct measurements of differential ablation in a laboratory setting.

  12. A novel instrument to measure differential ablation of meteorite samples and proxies: The Meteoric Ablation Simulator (MASI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bones, D. L.; Gómez Martín, J. C.; Empson, C. J.; Carrillo Sánchez, J. D.; James, A. D.; Conroy, T. P.; Plane, J. M. C.

    2016-09-01

    On entering the Earth's atmosphere, micrometeoroids partially or completely ablate, leaving behind layers of metallic atoms and ions. The relative concentration of the various metal layers is not well explained by current models of ablation. Furthermore, estimates of the total flux of cosmic dust and meteoroids entering the Earth's atmosphere vary over two orders of magnitude. To better constrain these estimates and to better model the metal layers in the mesosphere, an experimental Meteoric Ablation Simulator (MASI) has been developed. Interplanetary Dust Particle (IDP) analogs are subjected to temperature profiles simulating realistic entry heating, to ascertain the differential ablation of relevant metal species. MASI is the first ablation experiment capable of simulating detailed mass, velocity, and entry angle-specific temperature profiles whilst simultaneously tracking the resulting gas-phase ablation products in a time resolved manner. This enables the determination of elemental atmospheric entry yields which consider the mass and size distribution of IDPs. The instrument has also enabled the first direct measurements of differential ablation in a laboratory setting.

  13. Characterization of Individual Microneedles Formed on Alloy Surfaces by Femtosecond Laser Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Sudip; Kam, Dong Hyuck; Song, Lijun; Mazumder, Jyotirmoy

    2012-08-01

    Cross-sectional microstructural analyses of micron/nano-sized structures (termed microneedles) formed by low and high fluence pulse laser ablation of AISI 4340 steel, Ti6Al4V, and Al 5754 alloy specimens were performed. Dependence of length scale and orientation of microneedle microstructures on energy absorptance during laser irradiation, heat transfer direction, absorptivity, and thermal conductivity of the material was established. Microneedle nucleation and growth process were explained based on penetration depths, redeposition of ablated material, and ablation rates.

  14. In situ Diagnostics During Carbon Nanotube Production by Laser Ablation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arepalli, Sivaram

    1999-01-01

    The preliminary results of spectral analysis of the reaction zone during the carbon nanotube production by laser ablation method indicate synergetic dependence on dual laser setup. The emission spectra recorded from different regions of the laser ablated plume at different delay times from the laser pulses are used to map the temperatures of C2 and C3. These are compared with Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) spectra also obtained during production to model the growth mechanism of carbon nanotubes. Experiments conducted to correlate the spectral features with nanotube yields as a function of different production parameters will be discussed.

  15. No-Touch Radiofrequency Ablation: A Comparison of Switching Bipolar and Switching Monopolar Ablation in Ex Vivo Bovine Liver

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Won; Lee, Sang Min; Han, Joon Koo

    2017-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the feasibility, efficiency, and safety of no-touch switching bipolar (SB) and switching monopolar (SM) radiofrequency ablation (RFA) using ex vivo bovine livers. Materials and Methods A pork loin cube was inserted as a tumor mimicker in the bovine liver block; RFA was performed using the no-touch technique in the SM (group A1; 10 minutes, n = 10, group A2; 15 minutes, n = 10) and SB (group B; 10 minutes, n = 10) modes. The groups were compared based on the creation of confluent necrosis with sufficient safety margins, the dimensions, and distance between the electrode and ablation zone margin (DEM). To evaluate safety, small bowel loops were placed above the liver surface and 30 additional ablations were performed in the same groups. Results Confluent necroses with sufficient safety margins were created in all specimens. SM RFA created significantly larger volumes of ablation compared to SB RFA (all p < 0.001). The DEM of group B was significantly lower than those of groups A1 and A2 (all p < 0.001). Although thermal injury to the small bowel was noted in 90%, 100%, and 30% of the cases in groups A1, A2, and B, respectively, full depth injury was noted only in 60% of group A2 cases. Conclusion The no-touch RFA technique is feasible in both the SB and SM modes; however, SB RFA appears to be more advantageous compared to SM RFA in the creation of an ablation zone while avoiding the unnecessary creation of an adjacent parenchymal ablation zone or adjacent small bowel injuries. PMID:28246508

  16. Temperature measurement within myocardium during in vitro RF catheter ablation.

    PubMed

    Cao, H; Vorperian, V R; Tsai, J Z; Tungjitkusolmun, S; Woo, E J; Webster, J G

    2000-11-01

    While most commercial ablation units and research systems can provide catheter tip temperature during ablation, they do not provide information about the temperature change inside the myocardium, which determines the lesion size. We present the details of a flow simulation and temperature measurement system, which allows the monitoring of the temperature change inside the myocardium during in vitro radio frequency (RF) cardiac catheter ablation at different blood flow rates to which the catheter site may be exposed. We set up a circulation system that simulated different blood flow rates of 0 to 5 L/min at 37 degrees C. We continuously measured the temperature at the catheter tip using the built-in thermistor and inside the myocardium using a three-thermocouple probe. The system provides a means for further study of the temperature inside myocardium during RF catheter ablation under different flow conditions and at different penetration depths.

  17. OCDR guided laser ablation device

    DOEpatents

    Dasilva, Luiz B.; Colston, Jr., Bill W.; James, Dale L.

    2002-01-01

    A guided laser ablation device. The device includes a mulitmode laser ablation fiber that is surrounded by one or more single mode optical fibers that are used to image in the vicinity of the laser ablation area to prevent tissue damage. The laser ablation device is combined with an optical coherence domain reflectometry (OCDR) unit and with a control unit which initializes the OCDR unit and a high power laser of the ablation device. Data from the OCDR unit is analyzed by the control unit and used to control the high power laser. The OCDR images up to about 3 mm ahead of the ablation surface to enable a user to see sensitive tissue such as a nerve or artery before damaging it by the laser.

  18. Catheter Ablation for Ventricular Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Nof, Eyal; Stevenson, William G; John, Roy M

    2013-01-01

    Catheter ablation has emerged as an important and effective treatment option for many recurrent ventricular arrhythmias. The approach to ablation and the risks and outcomes are largely determined by the nature of the severity and type of underlying heart disease. In patients with structural heart disease, catheter ablation can effectively reduce ventricular tachycardia (VT) episodes and implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) shocks. For VT and symptomatic premature ventricular beats that occur in the absence of structural heart disease, catheter ablation is often effective as the sole therapy. Advances in catheter technology, imaging and mapping techniques have improved success rates for ablation. This review discusses current approaches to mapping and ablation for ventricular arrhythmias. PMID:26835040

  19. Radiofrequency Ablation for Liver Cancer.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Amy

    2015-01-01

    Interventional ablative technologies aided by imaging techniques such as ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging have been crucial in managing patients with primary liver cancer and liver metastases over the past 20 years. Several ablative technologies have been used to treat liver cancer; however, radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has emerged as the most common ablative therapy for hepatic lesions, both in the United States and globally. RFA is the treatment of choice for patients who cannot have surgical resection of the liver. This article focuses on the role of imaging in RFA treatment of primary and metastatic hepatic lesions.

  20. Population Structure, Genetic Diversity, Effective Population Size, Demographic History and Regional Connectivity Patterns of the Endangered Dusky Grouper, Epinephelus marginatus (Teleostei: Serranidae), within Malta’s Fisheries Management Zone

    PubMed Central

    Vella, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to describe the genetic population structure and demographic history of the endangered marine fish, Epinephelus marginatus, within Malta’s Fisheries Management Zone for the purpose of localised conservation planning. Epinephelus marginatus is a long-lived, sedentary, reef-associated protogynous hermaphrodite with high commercial and recreational value that is at risk of extinction throughout its global distribution. Based on global trends, population substructuring and gaps in local knowledge this has led to an increased interest in evaluation of local stock. Assessment of Maltese demography was based on historical and contemporary catch landings data whilst genetic population structure and regional connectivity patterns were evaluated by examining 175 individuals collected within the central Mediterranean region between 2002 and 2009 using 14 nuclear microsatellite loci. Demographic stock assessment of Maltese E. marginatus’ revealed a 99% decline in catch landings between 1947 and 2009 within the Fisheries Management Zone. A contemporary modest mean size was observed, 3 ± 3 kg, where approximately 17% of the population was juvenile, 68% female/sex-changing and 15% were male with a male-to-female sex ratio of 1:5. Genetic analysis describes the overall population of E. marginatus’ within the Fisheries Management Zone as decreasing in size (ƟH = 2.2), which has gone through a significant size reduction in the past (M = 0.41) and consequently shows signs of moderate inbreeding (FIS = 0.10, p < 0.001) with an estimated effective population size of 130 individuals. Results of spatially explicit Bayesian genetic cluster analysis detected two geographically distinct subpopulations within Malta’s Fisheries Management Zone and that they are connected to a larger network of E. marginatus’ within the Sicily Channel. Results suggest conservation management should be designed to reflect E. marginatus’ within Malta’s Fisheries

  1. Dust ablation in Pluto's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horanyi, Mihaly; Poppe, Andrew; Sternovsky, Zoltan

    2016-04-01

    Based on measurements by dust detectors onboard the Pioneer 10/11 and New Horizons spacecraft the total production rate of dust particles born in the Edgeworth Kuiper Belt (EKB) has been be estimated to be on the order of 5 ṡ 103 kg/s in the approximate size range of 1 - 10 μm. Dust particles are produced by collisions between EKB objects and their bombardment by both interplanetary and interstellar dust particles. Dust particles of EKB origin, in general, migrate towards the Sun due to Poynting-Robertson drag but their distributions are further sculpted by mean-motion resonances as they first approach the orbit of Neptune and later the other planets, as well as mutual collisions. Subsequently, Jupiter will eject the vast majority of them before they reach the inner solar system. The expected mass influx into Pluto atmosphere is on the order of 200 kg/day, and the arrival speed of the incoming particles is on the order of 3 - 4 km/s. We have followed the ablation history as function of speed and size of dust particles in Pluto's atmosphere, and found that volatile rich particles can fully sublimate due to drag heating and deposit their mass in narrow layers. This deposition might promote the formation of the haze layers observed by the New Horizons spacecraft. This talk will explore the constraints on the composition of the dust particles by comparing the altitude of the deposition layers to the observed haze layers.

  2. Role of debris cover to control specific ablation of adjoining Batal and Sutri Dhaka glaciers in Chandra Basin (Himachal Pradesh) during peak ablation season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Parmanand; Patel, Lavkush K.; Ravindra, Rasik; Singh, Ajit; K, Mahalinganathan; Thamban, Meloth

    2016-04-01

    As part of the on-going annual mass balance measurements on Batal and Sutri Dhaka glaciers, observations were made during peak ablation (August-September) season in 2013 to understand the response of debris covered and clean-ice (debris free) glacier surface to melting processes. Though, both the Batal and Sutri Dhaka glaciers have almost similar geographical disposition, Batal shows extensive debris cover (90% of the ablation area), while the latter is free from debris (only 5% of the ablation area). The thickness of debris in Batal glacier is inversely proportional to altitude, whereas Sutri Dhaka mostly experienced debris-free zone except snout area. Observation revealed that the vertical gradient of ablation rate in ablation area is contrastingly opposite in these two glaciers, reflecting significant control of debris thickness and their distribution over glacier surface on the ablation rates. While different thickness (2-100 cm) of debris have attenuated melting rates up to 70% of total melting, debris cover of <2 cm thickness has accelerated melting up to 10% of the total melting. Estimated melt ratio reveals that about 90% of the ablation area has experienced inhibited melting in Batal glacier, whereas only less than 5% ablation area of Sutri Dhaka has undergone inhibited melting. Comparison of topographical maps of 1962 with successive satellite images of the area demonstrates a terminus retreat of 373 ± 33.5 m and 579 ± 33.5 m for Batal and Sutri Dhaka glaciers for the period 1962-2013, respectively.

  3. Plasma-mediated ablation: An optical tool for submicrometer surgery on neuronal and vascular systems

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Philbert S.; Blinder, Pablo; Migliori, Benjamin J.; Neev, Joseph; Jin, Yishi; Squier, Jeffrey A.; Kleinfeld, David

    2009-01-01

    Plasma-mediated ablation makes use of high energy laser pulses to ionize molecules within the first few femtoseconds of the pulse. This process leads to a submicrometer-sized bubble of plasma that can ablate tissue with negligible heat transfer and collateral damage to neighboring tissue. We review the physics of plasma-mediated ablation and its use as a tool to generate targeted insults at the subcellular level to neurons and blood vessels deep within nervous tissue. Illustrative examples from axon regeneration and microvascular research illustrate the utility of this tool. We further discuss the use of ablation as an integral part of automated histology. PMID:19269159

  4. Radiofrequency (electrosurgical) ablation of articular cartilage: a study in sheep.

    PubMed

    Turner, A S; Tippett, J W; Powers, B E; Dewell, R D; Mallinckrodt, C H

    1998-09-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effect of a bipolar ablation probe on experimentally roughened articular cartilage and compare it with the traditional mechanical shaving technique using the knee joint of sheep. Twenty-eight skeletally mature ewes were divided randomly into two groups: one group was treated with a rotating shaving device and another group was treated using the bipolar ablation probe (Bipolar Arthroscopic Probe; Electroscope, Inc, Boulder, CO). Animals were killed at 0, 6, 12, and 24 weeks, and histological sections of the experimental limbs were compared with sections of the opposite limb using a modified Mankin scale. The following variables were used to determine scores: surface (0-6), cells (0-4), hypocellularity (0-3), matrix staining (transitional zone [0-4], radiate zone [0-4], and focal empty lacunae or hypereosinophilic cells (0-3). Differences in scores for all response variables were calculated as treated limb minus sham limb. Response variables were formed: score >0 recoded as 1 (favorable response treated better than sham), score of 0 recoded as 2 (neutral response no differences), and score <0 recoded as 3 (unfavorable response treated worse than sham). Bipolar ablative probe-treated limbs had 14.29% favorable responses and 35.71% favorable or neutral responses, whereas shave-treated limbs had 0% favorable and only 7.14% favorable or neutral responses. For all variables, bipolar ablative probe-treated limbs had more favorable responses. The less severe histological change in the bipolar ablative probe-treated joints compared with the shave-treated joints suggests that bipolar ablation of articular cartilage may be a better treatment for chondromalacia than the usual shaving methods of debridement. Further, there were no pathological changes in the subchondral bone.

  5. High temperature ablative foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Matthew T. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An ablative foam composition is formed of approximately 150 to 250 parts by weight polymeric isocyanate having an isocyanate functionality of 2.6 to 3.2; approximately 15 to 30 parts by weight reactive flame retardant having a hydroxyl number range from 200-260; approximately 10 to 40 parts by weight non-reactive flame retardant; approximately 10 to 40 parts by weight nonhydrolyzable silicone copolymer having a hydroxyl number range from 75-205; and approximately 3 to 16 parts by weight amine initiated polyether resin having an isocyanate functionality greater than or equal to 3.0 and a hydroxyl number range from 400-800.

  6. Matricectomy and nail ablation.

    PubMed

    Baran, Robert; Haneke, Eckart

    2002-11-01

    Matricectomy refers to the complete extirpation of the nail matrix, resulting in permanent nail loss. Usually however, matricectomy is only partial, restricted to one or both lateral horns of the matrix. Nail ablation is the definitive removal of the entire nail organ. The most important common denominator in the successful matricectomy is the total removal or destruction of the matrix tissue. Matricectomy may be indicated for the management of onychauxis, onychogryphosis, congenital nail dystrophies, and chronic painful nail, such as recalcitrant ingrown toenail or split within the medial or lateral one-third of the nail.

  7. Molecular dynamic simulation of tungsten ablation under transient high heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Sha; Zhu, Yizhou; Xue, Jianming; Zhang, Jie; Qu, Miao; Le, Xiaoyun

    2015-08-01

    Molecular dynamic (MD) method is used to simulation the tungsten ablation under transient high heat flux generated by energetic ions. A model including 363,600 W atoms was built based on Finnis-Sinclair potential. The results show that the ablation threshold is much lower than the one of boiling. So the ablation effects might be underestimated if using energy threshold of boiling instead of that of ablation. Particle size distribution of ablation products follows a power decay law with an exponent around -2.5, which does not affect by the incident heat flux. The transverse velocities of particles obey normal distribution, and a stream speed is added to the random movement for the longitudinal velocity. As the ablation start up, the recoiled impulse can induce shock wave in remained target, which is supported by experimental pressure wave measurements.

  8. Numerical study of the thermal ablation of wet solids by ultrashort laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, Danny; Beland, Laurent Karim; Deryng, Delphine; Lewis, Laurent J.; Meunier, Michel

    2008-01-01

    The ablation by ultrashort laser pulses at relatively low fluences (i.e., in the thermal regime) of solids wetted by a thin liquid film is studied using a generic numerical model. In comparison with dry targets, the liquid is found to significantly affect ablation by confining the solid and slowing down the expansion of the laser-heated material. These factors affect the relative efficiency of the various ablation mechanisms, leading, in particular, to the complete inhibition of phase explosion at lower fluences, a reduced ablation yield, and significant changes in the composition of the plume. As a consequence, at fluences above the ablation threshold, the size of the ejected nanoclusters is lower in presence of the liquid. Our results provide a qualitative understanding of the effect of wetting layers on the ablation process.

  9. Similarities and differences in ablative and non-ablative iron oxide nanoparticle hyperthermia cancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petryk, Alicia A.; Misra, Adwiteeya; Kastner, Elliot J.; Mazur, Courtney M.; Petryk, James D.; Hoopes, P. Jack

    2015-03-01

    The use of hyperthermia to treat cancer is well studied and has utilized numerous delivery techniques, including microwaves, radio frequency, focused ultrasound, induction heating, infrared radiation, warmed perfusion liquids (combined with chemotherapy), and recently, metallic nanoparticles (NP) activated by near infrared radiation (NIR) and alternating magnetic field (AMF) based platforms. It has been demonstrated by many research groups that ablative temperatures and cytotoxicity can be produced with locally NP-based hyperthermia. Such ablative NP techniques have demonstrated the potential for success. Much attention has also been given to the fact that NP may be administered systemically, resulting in a broader cancer therapy approach, a lower level of tumor NP content and a different type of NP cancer therapy (most likely in the adjuvant setting). To use NP based hyperthermia successfully as a cancer treatment, the technique and its goal must be understood and utilized in the appropriate clinical context. The parameters include, but are not limited to, NP access to the tumor (large vs. small quantity), cancer cell-specific targeting, drug carrying capacity, potential as an ionizing radiation sensitizer, and the material properties (magnetic characteristics, size and charge). In addition to their potential for cytotoxicity, the material properties of the NP must also be optimized for imaging, detection and direction. In this paper we will discuss the differences between, and potential applications for, ablative and non-ablative magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia.

  10. Laser ablation in analytical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Russo, Richard E; Mao, Xianglei; Gonzalez, Jhanis J; Zorba, Vassilia; Yoo, Jong

    2013-07-02

    In 2002, we wrote an Analytical Chemistry feature article describing the Physics of Laser Ablation in Microchemical Analysis. In line with the theme of the 2002 article, this manuscript discusses current issues in fundamental research, applications based on detecting photons at the ablation site (LIBS and LAMIS) and by collecting particles for excitation in a secondary source (ICP), and directions for the technology.

  11. Ultrashort-pulse laser ablation of nanocrystalline aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Gill-Comeau, Maxime; Lewis, Laurent J.

    2011-12-01

    Molecular-dynamics simulations of the ablation of nanocrystalline Al films by ultrashort laser pulses in the low-fluence (no-ionization) regime (0-2.5 times the ablation threshold, F{sub th}) are reported. The simulations employ an embedded-atom method potential for the dynamics of the ions and a realistic two-temperature model for the electron gas (and its interactions with the ion gas), which confers different electronic properties to the monocrystalline solid, nanocrystalline solid, and liquid regions of the targets. The ablation dynamics in three nanocrystalline structures is studied: two dense targets with different crystallite sizes (d=3.1 and 6.2 nm on average) and a d=6.2 nm porous sample. The results are compared to the ablation of monocrystalline Al. Significant differences are observed, the nanocrystalline targets showing, in particular, a lower ablation threshold and a larger melting depth, and yielding pressure waves of higher amplitude than the monocrystalline targets. Furthermore, it is shown that nanocrystalline targets experience no residual stress associated with thermal expansion and lateral constraints, and that little crystal growth occurs in the solid during and after ablation. Laser-induced spallation of the back surface of the films is also investigated; we find, in particular, that the high-strain fracture resistance of nanocrystalline samples is significantly reduced in comparison to the crystalline material.

  12. Advances in local ablation of malignant liver lesions

    PubMed Central

    Eisele, Robert M

    2016-01-01

    Local ablation of liver tumors matured during the recent years and is now proven to be an effective tool in the treatment of malignant liver lesions. Advances focus on the improvement of local tumor control by technical innovations, individual selection of imaging modalities, more accurate needle placement and the free choice of access to the liver. Considering data found in the current literature for conventional local ablative treatment strategies, virtually no single technology is able to demonstrate an unequivocal superiority. Hints at better performance of microwave compared to radiofrequency ablation regarding local tumor control, duration of the procedure and potentially achievable larger size of ablation areas favour the comparably more recent treatment modality; image fusion enables more patients to undergo ultrasound guided local ablation; magnetic resonance guidance may improve primary success rates in selected patients; navigation and robotics accelerate the needle placement and reduces deviation of needle positions; laparoscopic thermoablation results in larger ablation areas and therefore hypothetically better local tumor control under acceptable complication rates, but seems to be limited to patients with no, mild or moderate adhesions following earlier surgical procedures. Apart from that, most techniques appear technically feasible, albeit demanding. Which technology will in the long run become accepted, is subject to future work. PMID:27099433

  13. Numerical design of RF ablation applicator for hepatic cancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakhmadi, Aditya; Basari

    2017-02-01

    Currently, cancer has become one of health problems that is difficult to be overcomed. This disease is not only difficult to be cured, but also to be detected and may cause death. For this reason, RF ablation treatment method is proposed to cure cancer. RF ablation therapy is a method in which an applicator is inserted into the body to kill cancer cells by heating the cells. The cancer cells are exposed to the temperature more than 60°C in short duration (few second to few minutes) so thus cell destruction occurs locally. For the sake of the successful treatment, a minimally invasive method is selected in order for perfect local temperature distribution in cancer cells can be achieved. In this paper, a coax-fed dipole-type applicator with interstitial irradiation technique is proposed aimed at RF ablation into hepatic cells. Numerical simulation is performed to obtain a suitable geometric dimension at operating frequency around 2.45 GHz, in order to localize the ablation area. The proposed applicator is inserted into a simple phantom representing an adult human body model in which normal and cancerous liver cells. The simulated results show that the proposed applicator is able to operate at center frequency of 2.355 GHz with blood droplet-type ablation zone and the temperature around the cancer cell by 60°C can be achieved.

  14. Simulation of Pellet Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parks, P. B.; Ishizaki, Ryuichi

    2000-10-01

    In order to clarify the structure of the ablation flow, 2D simulation is carried out with a fluid code solving temporal evolution of MHD equations. The code includes electrostatic sheath effect at the cloud interface.(P.B. Parks et al.), Plasma Phys. Contr. Fusion 38, 571 (1996). An Eulerian cylindrical coordinate system (r,z) is used with z in a spherical pellet. The code uses the Cubic-Interpolated Psudoparticle (CIP) method(H. Takewaki and T. Yabe, J. Comput. Phys. 70), 355 (1987). that divides the fluid equations into non-advection and advection phases. The most essential element of the CIP method is in calculation of the advection phase. In this phase, a cubic interpolated spatial profile is shifted in space according to the total derivative equations, similarly to a particle scheme. Since the profile is interpolated by using the value and the spatial derivative value at each grid point, there is no numerical oscillation in space, that often appears in conventional spline interpolation. A free boundary condition is used in the code. The possibility of a stationary shock will also be shown in the presentation because the supersonic ablation flow across the magnetic field is impeded.

  15. Effects of Liquid Medium and Ablation Wavelength on the Properties of Cadmium Sulfide Nanoparticles Formed by Pulsed-Laser Ablation.

    PubMed

    García Guillén, Grisel; Zuñiga Ibarra, Veronica Anahi; Mendivil Palma, Maria Isabel; Krishnan, Bindu; Avellaneda Avellaneda, David; Shaji, Sadasivan

    2016-11-03

    Pulsed-laser ablation in liquid (PLAL) is a green synthesis technique to obtain semiconductor nanomaterials in colloidal form. Herein, cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanoparticles were synthesized by the pulsed-laser ablation of a CdS target in different liquid media by using λ=532 and 1064 nm outputs from a pulsed (10 ns, 10 Hz) Nd:YAG laser at different ablation fluence values. The morphology, structure, crystalline phase, elemental composition, optical, and luminescent properties of CdS nanomaterials were analyzed by using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV/Vis absorption spectroscopy, and fluorescence spectroscopy. By changing the liquid medium and ablation wavelength, CdS nanoparticles with different morphology and size were formed, as demonstrated by using TEM analysis. The crystallinity and chemical states of the ablation products were confirmed by using XRD and XPS analyses. The optical bandgap of the CdS nanoparticles was dependent on the ablation wavelength and the fluence. These nanocolloids presented different green emissions, which implied the presence of several emission centers. CdS nanocolloids in distilled water catalyzed the photocatalytic decay of methylene blue dye under light irradiation from a solar simulator.

  16. Numerical models to evaluate the temperature increase induced by ex vivo microwave thermal ablation.

    PubMed

    Cavagnaro, M; Pinto, R; Lopresto, V

    2015-04-21

    Microwave thermal ablation (MTA) therapies exploit the local absorption of an electromagnetic field at microwave (MW) frequencies to destroy unhealthy tissue, by way of a very high temperature increase (about 60 °C or higher). To develop reliable interventional protocols, numerical tools able to correctly foresee the temperature increase obtained in the tissue would be very useful. In this work, different numerical models of the dielectric and thermal property changes with temperature were investigated, looking at the simulated temperature increments and at the size of the achievable zone of ablation. To assess the numerical data, measurement of the temperature increases close to a MTA antenna were performed in correspondence with the antenna feed-point and the antenna cooling system, for increasing values of the radiated power. Results show that models not including the changes of the dielectric and thermal properties can be used only for very low values of the power radiated by the antenna, whereas a good agreement with the experimental values can be obtained up to 20 W if water vaporization is included in the numerical model. Finally, for higher power values, a simulation that dynamically includes the tissue's dielectric and thermal property changes with the temperature should be performed.

  17. Numerical models to evaluate the temperature increase induced by ex vivo microwave thermal ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavagnaro, M.; Pinto, R.; Lopresto, V.

    2015-04-01

    Microwave thermal ablation (MTA) therapies exploit the local absorption of an electromagnetic field at microwave (MW) frequencies to destroy unhealthy tissue, by way of a very high temperature increase (about 60 °C or higher). To develop reliable interventional protocols, numerical tools able to correctly foresee the temperature increase obtained in the tissue would be very useful. In this work, different numerical models of the dielectric and thermal property changes with temperature were investigated, looking at the simulated temperature increments and at the size of the achievable zone of ablation. To assess the numerical data, measurement of the temperature increases close to a MTA antenna were performed in correspondence with the antenna feed-point and the antenna cooling system, for increasing values of the radiated power. Results show that models not including the changes of the dielectric and thermal properties can be used only for very low values of the power radiated by the antenna, whereas a good agreement with the experimental values can be obtained up to 20 W if water vaporization is included in the numerical model. Finally, for higher power values, a simulation that dynamically includes the tissue’s dielectric and thermal property changes with the temperature should be performed.

  18. Radiofrequency Ablation of Large Renal Angiomyolipoma: Median-Term Follow-Up

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, S. M. Anderson, C. J.; Patel, U.

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. To study the feasibility of percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of large angiomyolipomas (AMLs) using saline-cooled electrodes. Materials and Methods. Institutional Review Board approval for the study was received. Four patients (all female, age range 33-67 years) with large AMLs (maximal axis 6.1-32.4 cm) not suitable for embolotherapy or surgery consented to a trial of RFA. Procedures were performed under computerized tomographic guidance using 14G saline-infused electrodes. Two ablations (diameter 4-7 cm) were undertaken in each patient. Variables studied were technical success, treatment safety, alteration of tumor consistency, tumor size, effect on renal function, and medium-term freedom from haemorrhage. Results. All four patients underwent successful RFA without any intraprocedural complications. There has been no haemorrhage, or new renal specific symptom, during a minimum 48-month period, and normal renal function has been normal. On follow-up radiological imaging, the tumors have become fattier with involution of the soft-tissue elements (soft tissue-to-total tumor ratio decreased mean [range] of 0.26 [0.14-0.48] to 0.17 [0.04-0.34] U; p = 0.04 [paired Student t test]). Further evidence of treatment effect was the development of a capsule around the ablation zone, but there was no change in overall tumor volume (mean [range] 1,120 [118-2,845] to 1150 [90-3,013] ml; p = 1 [paired Student t test]). Conclusion. RFA of large AMLs is technically feasible using saline-infused electrodes. The soft-tissue elements decreased in volume; the tumors become fattier; and there has been no renal haemorrhage during a 48-month period.

  19. CT imaging during microwave ablation: Analysis of spatial and temporal tissue contraction

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Dong; Brace, Christopher L.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To analyze the spatial distribution and temporal development of liver tissue contraction during high-temperature ablation by using intraprocedural computed tomography (CT) imaging. Methods: A total of 46 aluminum fiducial markers were positioned in a 60 × 45 mm grid, in a single plane, around a microwave ablation antenna in each of six ex vivo bovine liver samples. Ablations were performed for 10 min at 100 W. CT data of the liver sample were acquired every 30 s during ablation. Fiducial motion between acquisitions was tracked in postprocessing and used to calculate measures of tissue contraction and contraction rates. The spatial distribution and temporal evolution of contraction were analyzed. Results: Fiducial displacement indicated that the zone measured postablation was 8.2 ± 1.8 mm (∼20%) smaller in the radial direction and 7.1 ± 1.0 mm (∼10%) shorter in the longitudinal direction than the preablation tissue dimension. Therefore, the total ablation volume was reduced from its preablation value by approximately 45%. Very little longitudinal contraction was noted in the distal portion of the ablation zone. Central tissues contracted more than 60%, which was near an estimated limit of ∼70% based on initial water content. More peripheral tissues contracted only 15% in any direction. Contraction rates peaked during the first 60 s of heating with a roughly exponential decay over time. Conclusions: Ablation zones measured posttreatment are significantly smaller than the pretreatment tissue dimensions. Tissue contraction is spatially dependent, with the greatest effect occurring in the central ablation zone. Contraction rate peaks early and decays over time.

  20. Thermal response and ablation characteristics of light weight ceramic ablators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tran, Huy K.; Rasky, Daniel J.; Esfahani, Lili

    1993-01-01

    An account is given of the thermal performance and ablation characteristics of the NASA-Ames Lightweight Ceramic Ablators (LCAs) in supersonic, high-enthalpy convective environments, which use low density ceramic or carbon fiber matrices as substrates for main structural support, with organic resin fillers. LCA densities are in the 0.224-1.282 g/cu cm range. In-depth temperature data have been obtained to determine thermal penetration depths and conductivity. The addition of SiC and PPMA is noted to significantly improve the ablation performance of LCAs with silica substrates. Carbon-based LCAs are the most mass-efficient at high flux levels.

  1. ANALYSIS OF FACTORS AFFECTING OUTCOME OF ULTRASOUND-GUIDED RADIOFREQUENCY HEAT ABLATION FOR TREATMENT OF PRIMARY HYPERPARATHYROIDISM IN DOGS.

    PubMed

    Bucy, Daniel; Pollard, Rachel; Nelson, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) parathyroid ablation is a noninvasive treatment for hyperparathyroidism in dogs. There are no published data assessing factors associated with RF parathyroid ablation success or failure in order to guide patient selection and improve outcome. The purpose of this retrospective analytical study was to determine whether imaging findings, biochemical data, or concurrent diseases were associated with RF heat ablation treatment failure. For inclusion in the study, dogs must have had a clinical diagnosis of primary hyperparathyroidism, undergone cervical ultrasound and RF ablation of abnormal parathyroid tissue, and must have had at least 3 months of follow-up information available following the date of ultrasound-guided parathyroid ablation. Dogs were grouped based on those with recurrent or persistent hypercalcemia and those without recurrent or persistent hypercalcemia following therapy. Parathyroid nodule size, thyroid lobe size, nodule location, and presence of concurrent disease were recorded. Recurrence of hypercalcemia occurred in 9/32 dogs that had ablation of abnormal parathyroid tissue (28%) and one patient had persistent hypercalcemia (3%) following parathyroid ablation. Nodule width (P = 0.036), height (P = 0.028), and largest cross-sectional area (P = 0.023) were larger in dogs that had recurrent or persistent hypercalcemia following ablation. Hypothyroidism was more common in dogs with recurrent disease (P = 0.044). Radiofrequency ablation was successful in 22/32 (69%) dogs. Larger parathyroid nodule size and/or concurrent hypothyroidism were associated with treatment failure in dogs that underwent ultrasound-guided RF parathyroid nodule ablation.

  2. A study of the effect of selected material properties on the ablation performance of artificial graphite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maahs, H. G.

    1972-01-01

    Eighteen material properties were measured on 45 different, commercially available, artificial graphites. Ablation performance of these same graphites were also measured in a Mach 2 airstream at a stagnation pressure of 5.6 atm. Correlations were developed, where possible, between pairs of the material properties. Multiple regression equations were then formulated relating ablation performance to the various material properties, thus identifying those material properties having the strongest effect on ablation performance. These regression equations reveal that ablation performance in the present test environment depends primarily on maximum grain size, density, ash content, thermal conductivity, and mean pore radius. For optimization of ablation performance, grain size should be small, ash content low, density and thermal conductivity high, and mean pore radius large.

  3. Considering Angle Selection When Using Ultrasound Electrode Displacement Elastography to Evaluate Radiofrequency Ablation of Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiang; Chen, Pin-Yu; Wang, Chiao-Yin; Liu, Hao-Li; Teng, Jianfu

    2014-01-01

    Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive treatment to thermally destroy tumors. Ultrasound-based electrode-displacement elastography is an emerging technique for evaluating the region of RFA-induced lesions. The angle between the imaging probe and the RFA electrode can influence electrode-displacement elastography when visualizing the ablation zone. We explored the angle effect on electrode-displacement elastography to measure the ablation zone. Phantoms embedded with meatballs were fabricated and then ablated using an RFA system to simulate RFA-induced lesions. For each phantom, a commercial ultrasound scanner with a 7.5 MHz linear probe was used to acquire raw image data at different angles, ranging from 30° to 90° at increments of 10°, to construct electrode-displacement images and facilitate comparisons with tissue section images. The results revealed that the ablation regions detected using electrode-displacement elastography were highly correlated with those from tissue section images when the angle was between 30° and 60°. However, the boundaries of lesions were difficult to distinguish, when the angle was larger than 60°. The experimental findings suggest that angle selection should be considered to achieve reliable electrode-displacement elastography to describe ablation zones. PMID:24971347

  4. Formation of nanostructures under femtosecond laser ablation of metals

    SciTech Connect

    Ashitkov, S I; Romashevskii, S A; Komarov, P S; Burmistrov, A A; Agranat, M B; Zhakhovskii, V V; Inogamov, N A

    2015-06-30

    We present the results of studying the morphology of the modified surface of aluminium, nickel and tantalum after ablation of the surface layer by a femtosecond laser pulse. The sizes of characteristic elements of a cellular nanostructure are found to correlate with thermo-physical properties of the material and the intensity of laser radiation. (superstrong light fields)

  5. [New techniques of tumor ablation (microwaves, electroporation)].

    PubMed

    de Baere, T

    2011-09-01

    Since the introduction of radiofrequency tumor ablation of liver tumors in the late 1990s, local destructive therapies have been applied to lung, renal and bone lesions. In addition, new techniques have been introduced to compensate for the limitations of radiofrequency ablation, namely the reduced rate of complete ablation for tumors larger than 3 cm and tumors near vessels larger than 3 mm. Microwave ablation is currently evolving rapidly. While it is a technique based on thermal ablation similar to radiofrequency ablation, there are significant differences between both techniques. Electroporation, of interest because of the non-thermal nature of the ablation process, also is under evaluation.

  6. Ablative heat shield design for space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiferth, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    Ablator heat shield configuration optimization studies were conducted for the orbiter. Ablator and reusable surface insulation (RSI) trajectories for design studies were shaped to take advantage of the low conductance of ceramic RSI and high temperature capability of ablators. Comparative weights were established for the RSI system and for direct bond and mechanically attached ablator systems. Ablator system costs were determined for fabrication, installation and refurbishment. Cost penalties were assigned for payload weight penalties, if any. The direct bond ablator is lowest in weight and cost. A mechanically attached ablator using a magnesium subpanel is highly competitive for both weight and cost.

  7. Ablation experiment and threshold calculation of titanium alloy irradiated by ultra-fast pulse laser

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Buxiang; Jiang, Gedong; Wang, Wenjun Wang, Kedian; Mei, Xuesong

    2014-03-15

    The interaction between an ultra-fast pulse laser and a material's surface has become a research hotspot in recent years. Micromachining of titanium alloy with an ultra-fast pulse laser is a very important research direction, and it has very important theoretical significance and application value in investigating the ablation threshold of titanium alloy irradiated by ultra-fast pulse lasers. Irradiated by a picosecond pulse laser with wavelengths of 1064 nm and 532 nm, the surface morphology and feature sizes, including ablation crater width (i.e. diameter), ablation depth, ablation area, ablation volume, single pulse ablation rate, and so forth, of the titanium alloy were studied, and their ablation distributions were obtained. The experimental results show that titanium alloy irradiated by a picosecond pulse infrared laser with a 1064 nm wavelength has better ablation morphology than that of the green picosecond pulse laser with a 532 nm wavelength. The feature sizes are approximately linearly dependent on the laser pulse energy density at low energy density and the monotonic increase in laser pulse energy density. With the increase in energy density, the ablation feature sizes are increased. The rate of increase in the feature sizes slows down gradually once the energy density reaches a certain value, and gradually saturated trends occur at a relatively high energy density. Based on the linear relation between the laser pulse energy density and the crater area of the titanium alloy surface, and the Gaussian distribution of the laser intensity on the cross section, the ablation threshold of titanium alloy irradiated by an ultra-fast pulse laser was calculated to be about 0.109 J/cm{sup 2}.

  8. Coarsening Behavior of the (Ti, Nb)(C, N) Complex Particle in a Microalloyed Steel Weld Heat-Affected Zone Considering the Critical Particle Size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Joonoh; Kim, Sanghoon; Lee, Jongbong; Lee, Changhee

    2007-11-01

    Our recent report revealed the effect of critical particle size on the particle coarsening behavior of the TiN particle. In the present work, the equation for critical particle size is extended by considering the change of particle volume fraction during the continuous thermal cycle. By considering the concept of modified critical particle size, coarsening of the (Ti, Nb)(C, N) complex particle is calculated, and the calculated results are in good agreement with experimental data.

  9. Local tumor progression patterns after radiofrequency ablation of colorectal cancer liver metastases

    PubMed Central

    Napoleone, Marc; Kielar, Ania Z.; Hibbert, Rebecca; Saif, Sameh; Kwan, Benjamin Y.M.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to evaluate patterns of local tumor progression (LTP) after radiofrequency ablation (RF ablation) of colorectal cancer liver metastases (CRCLM) and to highlight the percentage of LTP not attributable to lesion size or RF ablation procedure-related factors (heat sink or insufficient ablation margin). METHODS CRCLM treated by RF ablation at a single tertiary care center from 2004–2012, with a minimum of six months of postprocedure follow-up, were included in this retrospective study. LTP morphology was classified as focal nodular (<90° of ablation margin), circumferential (>270°), or crescentic (90°–270°). Initial metastasis size, minimum ablation margin size, morphology of LTP, presence of a heat sink, and time to progression were recorded independently by two radiologists. RESULTS Thirty-two of 127 RF ablation treated metastases (25%) with a mean size of 23 mm (standard deviation 12 mm) exhibited LTP. Fifteen of 32 LTPs (47%) were classified as focal nodular, with seven having no procedure-related factor to explain recurrence. Ten of 32 LTPs (31%) were circumferential, with four having no procedure-related factor to explain recurrence. Seven of 32 LTPs (22%) were crescentic, with two having no procedure-related factor to explain recurrence. Of the 13 lesions without any obvious procedure-related reason for LTP, six (46%) were <3 cm in size. CONCLUSION Although LTP in RF ablation treated CRCLM can often be explained by procedure-related factors or size of the lesion, in this study up to six (5%) of the CRCLM we treated showed LTP without any reasonable cause. PMID:27705879

  10. Magnetic and robotic navigation for catheter ablation: "joystick ablation".

    PubMed

    Ernst, Sabine

    2008-10-01

    Catheter ablation has become the treatment of choice to cure various arrhythmias in the last decades. The newest advancement of this general concept is made on the navigation ability using remote-controlled ablation catheters. This review summarizes the concept of the two currently available systems, followed by a critical review of the published clinical reports for each system, respectively. Despite the limited amount of data, an attempt to compare the two systems is made.

  11. Microgravity silicon zoning investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, E. L.; Gill, G. L., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    A resistance heated zoner, suitable for early zoning experiments with silicon, was designed and put into operation. The initial power usage and size was designed for an shown to be compatible with payload carriers contemplated for the Shuttle. This equipment will be used in the definition and development of flight experiments and apparatus for float zoning silicon and other materials in microgravity.

  12. An observation of ablation effect of soft biotissue by pulsed Er:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xianzeng; Xie, Shusen; Ye, Qing; Zhan, Zhenlin

    2007-02-01

    Because of the unique properties with regard to the absorption in organic tissue, pulsed Er:YAG laser has found most interest for various application in medicine, such as dermatology, dentistry, and cosmetic surgery. However, consensus regarding the optimal parameters for clinical use of this tool has not been reached. In this paper, the laser ablation characteristics of soft tissue by Er:YAG laser irradiation was studied. Porcine skin tissue in vitro was used in the experiment. Laser fluences ranged from 25mJ/mm2 to 200mJ/mm2, repetition rates was 5Hz, spot sizes on the tissue surface was 2mm. The ablation effects were assessed by the means of optical microscope, ablation diameters and depths were measured with reading microscope. It was shown that the ablation of soft biotissue by pulsed Er:YAG laser was a threshold process. With appropriate choice of irradiation parameters, high quality ablation with clean, sharp cuts following closely the spatial contour of the incident beam can be achieved. The curves of ablation crater diameter and depth versus laser fluence were obtained, then the ablation threshold and ablation yield were calculated subsequently, and the influence of the number of pulses fired into a crater on ablation crater depth was also discussed.

  13. Ablation of the locally advanced pancreatic cancer: An introduction and brief summary of techniques.

    PubMed

    Petrou, Athanasios; Moris, Demetrios; Paul Tabet, Patrick; David Wensley Richards, Brian; Kourounis, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is a lethal and late presenting malignancy with dismal survival rates. An estimated total of 330,000 people died from this malignancy in 2012. Although there have been improvements in diagnostic and treatment methods, the survival of late stage pancreatic cancer has not shown significant improvement in the past 4 decades. Multiple treatment approaches are available including chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and immunotherapy, but to this day surgical resection remains the only curative treatment option. Ablative techniques use various forms of energy to cause local tissue destruction through necrosis or apoptosis. They are relevant in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma as they are a treatment option in non-resectable tumors where their use ranges from symptom control to reducing tumor size for resection. In this narrative review we have grouped and outlined the various ablative methods, classifying them into thermal (Radiofrequency ablation, Microwave ablation, High Intensity Focused Ultrasound ablation, Cryoablation), and non-thermal ablative methods (Irreversible Electroporation (NanoKnife®), Photodynamic Therapy). This is followed by a description and review of the available evidence on survival and complications for each of these ablative methods. According to the literature, thermal ablative methods appear to be more accessible but are implicated with more complications than non thermal ablative methods which show the most promise.

  14. TPS Ablator Technologies for Interplanetary Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curry, Donald M.

    2004-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the status of Thermal Protection System (TPS) Ablator technologies and the preparation for use in interplanetary spacecraft. NASA does not have adequate TPS ablatives and sufficient selection for planned missions. It includes a comparison of shuttle and interplanetary TPS requirements, the status of mainline TPS charring ablator materials, a summary of JSC SBIR accomplishments in developing advanced charring ablators and the benefits of SBIR Ablator/fabrication technology.

  15. Multiple applicator hepatic ablation with interstitial ultrasound devices: Theoretical and experimental investigation

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Punit; Salgaonkar, Vasant A.; Clif Burdette, E.; Diederich, Chris J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate multiple applicator implant configurations of interstitial ultrasound devices for large volume ablation of liver tumors. Methods: A 3D bioacoustic-thermal model using the finite element method was implemented to assess multiple applicator implant configurations for thermal ablation with interstitial ultrasound energy. Interstitial applicators consist of linear arrays of up to four 10 mm-long tubular ultrasound transducers, each under separate and dynamic power control, enclosed within a water-cooled delivery catheter (2.4 mm OD). The authors considered parallel implants with two and three applicators (clustered configuration), spaced 2–3 cm apart, to simulate open surgical placement. In addition, the authors considered two applicator implants with applicators converging and diverging at angles of ∼20°, 30°, and 45° to simulate percutaneous placement. Heating experiments (10–15 min) were performed and compared against simulations employing the same experimental parameters. To estimate the performance of parallel, multiple applicator configurations in an in vivo setting, simulations were performed taking into account a range of blood perfusion levels (0, 5, 12, and 15 kg m−3 s−1) that may occur in tumors of varying vascularity. The impact of tailoring the power supplied to individual transducer elements along the length of applicators is explored for applicators inserted in non-parallel (converging and diverging) configurations. Thermal dose (t43 > 240 min) and temperature thresholds (T > 52 °C) were used to define the ablation zones, with dynamic changes to tissue acoustic and thermal properties incorporated within the model. Results: Experiments in ex vivo bovine liver yielded ablation zones ranging between 4.0–5.6 cm × 3.2–4.9 cm, in cross section. Ablation zone dimensions predicted by simulations with similar parameters to the experiments were in close agreement (within 5 mm). Simulations of in vivo heating showed that 15

  16. Development of moldable carbonaceous materials for ablative rocket nozzles.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockhart, R. J.; Bortz, S. A.; Schwartz, M. A.

    1972-01-01

    Description of a materials system developed for use as low-cost ablative nozzles for NASA's 260-in. solid rocket motor. Petroleum coke and carbon black fillers were employed; high density was achieved by controlling particle size distribution. An alumina catalyzed furfuryl ester resin which produced high carbon residues after pyrolysis was employed as the binder. Staple carbon fibers improved the strength and crack resistance of molded bodies. In static firing tests of two subscale nozzles, this material compared favorably in erosion rate with several other ablative systems.

  17. Real-time calibration of temperature estimates during radiofrequency ablation.

    PubMed

    Varghese, T; Daniels, M J

    2004-07-01

    Radiofrequency ablation is an interstitial focal ablative therapy that can be used in a percutaneous fashion and permits in situ destruction of hepatic tumors. Recurrence rates after rf therapy are as high as 34-55%, due to difficulties in accurately identifying the zone of necrosis (thermal lesion) because of the low intrinsic acoustic contrast between normal and ablated liver tissue. Our goal is to provide real-time ultrasonic tracking of temperature changes over the large range of temperatures traditionally used (40-100 degrees C) in rfablation procedures using an external ultrasound transducer. Temperature estimates are obtained using a cross-correlation algorithm applied to rf ultrasound echo signal data acquired at discrete intervals during heating. Apparent tissue displacement estimates obtained at these discrete time-intervals are accumulated to obtain a cumulative displacement map, whose gradient provides after appropriate scaling provides a temperature map at the specified elapsed ablation duration. Temperature maps are used to display the initial temperature rise and to continuously update a thermal map of the treated region. In this paper, we develop calibration curves that relate the echo shift due to the change in the speed of sound and thermal expansion to the corresponding temperature increase on in-vitro tissue specimens. These calibration curves can then be utilized for the real time calibration and analysis of temperature estimates obtained from the rf echo signals during ablation. Temperature maps obtained using the calibration curve compare favorably to temperature estimates observed using the invasive thermosensor readings on the ablation electrode and previous results that utilized a linear calibration factor.

  18. Evaluation of a Thermoprotective Gel for Hydrodissection During Percutaneous Microwave Ablation: In Vivo Results

    SciTech Connect

    Moreland, Anna J. Lubner, Meghan G. Ziemlewicz, Timothy J. Kitchin, Douglas R. Hinshaw, J. Louis Johnson, Alexander D. Lee, Fred T. Brace, Christopher L.

    2015-06-15

    PurposeTo evaluate whether thermoreversible poloxamer 407 15.4 % in water (P407) can protect non-target tissues adjacent to microwave (MW) ablation zones in a porcine model.Materials and MethodsMW ablation antennas were placed percutaneously into peripheral liver, spleen, or kidney (target tissues) under US and CT guidance in five swine such that the expected ablation zones would extend into adjacent diaphragm, body wall, or bowel (non-target tissues). For experimental ablations, P407 (a hydrogel that transitions from liquid at room temperature to semi-solid at body temperature) was injected into the potential space between target and non-target tissues, and the presence of a gel barrier was verified on CT. No barrier was used for controls. MW ablation was performed at 65 W for 5 min. Thermal damage to target and non-target tissues was evaluated at dissection.ResultsAntennas were placed 7 ± 3 mm from the organ surface for both control and gel-protected ablations (p = 0.95). The volume of gel deployed was 49 ± 27 mL, resulting in a barrier thickness of 0.8 ± 0.5 cm. Ablations extended into non-target tissues in 12/14 control ablations (mean surface area = 3.8 cm{sup 2}) but only 4/14 gel-protected ablations (mean surface area = 0.2 cm{sup 2}; p = 0.0005). The gel barrier remained stable at the injection site throughout power delivery.ConclusionWhen used as a hydrodissection material, P407 protected non-targeted tissues and was successfully maintained at the injection site for the duration of power application. Continued investigations to aid clinical translation appear warranted.

  19. Safety Zones

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    These are established primarily to reduce the accidental spread of hazardous substances by workers or equipment from contaminated areas to clean areas. They include the exclusion (hot) zone, contamination reduction (warm) zone, and support (cold) zone.

  20. Ablation dynamics in laser sclerotomy ab externo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinkmann, Ralf; Droege, Gerit; Mohrenstecher, Dirk; Scheu, M.; Birngruber, Reginald

    1996-01-01

    Laser sclerostomy ab externo with flashlamp excited mid-IR laser systems emitting in the 2-3 micrometer spectral range is in phase II clinical trials. Although acutely high success rates were achieved, the restenosis rate after several months is about 40%. Laser pulses of several hundreds of microseconds, known to induce thermo-mechanical explosive evaporation were used for this procedure. We investigated the ablation dynamics in tissue and the cavitation bubble dynamics in water by means of an Er:YAG laser system to estimate the extent of mechanical damage zones in the sclera and in the anterior chamber, which may contribute to the clinical failure. We found substantial mechanical tissue deformation during the ablation process caused by the cavitation effects. Stress waves up to several bar generated by explosive evaporization were measured. The fast mechanical stretching and collapsing of the scleral tissue induced by cavitation resulted in tissue dissection as could be proved by flash photography and histology. The observed high restenosis might be a result of a subsequent enhanced wound healing process. Early fistula occlusions due to iris adherences, observed in about 20% of the clinical cases may be attributed to intraocular trauma induced by vapor bubble expansion through the anterior chamber after scleral perforation. An automatic feedback system minimizing adverse effects by steering and terminating the laser process during scleral fistulization is demonstrated. Moreover, a new approach in laser sclerostomy ab externo is presented using a cw-IR laser diode system emitting at the 1.94 micrometer mid-IR water absorption peak. This system was used in vitro and showed smaller damage zones compared to the pulsed laser radiation.

  1. Tumour ablation: current role in the kidney, lung and bone.

    PubMed

    Gillams, Alice

    2009-10-02

    The last few years have seen a rapid expansion in the use and availability of ablation techniques with hundreds of papers published. Radiofrequency remains the front-runner in terms of cost, ease of set-up, versatility and flexibility but other techniques are catching up. Ablation with cryotherapy and microwave, which were previously only available at open laparotomy due to the large size of the probes, are now readily performed percutaneously, with a predictable reduction in morbidity. Ablation is now accepted as the first line of treatment in patients with limited volume hepatocellular carcinoma who are not candidates for transplantation. There is continuing debate in most other areas but the evidence is increasing for an important role in liver metastases, renal carcinoma, inoperable lung tumours and some bone tumours.

  2. Surgical Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation Using Energy Sources.

    PubMed

    Brick, Alexandre Visconti; Braile, Domingo Marcolino

    2015-01-01

    Surgical ablation, concomitant with other operations, is an option for treatment in patients with chronic atrial fibrillation. The aim of this study is to present a literature review on surgical ablation of atrial fibrillation in patients undergoing cardiac surgery, considering energy sources and return to sinus rhythm. A comprehensive survey was performed in the literature on surgical ablation of atrial fibrillation considering energy sources, sample size, study type, outcome (early and late), and return to sinus rhythm. Analyzing studies with immediate results (n=5), the percentage of return to sinus rhythm ranged from 73% to 96%, while those with long-term results (n=20) (from 12 months on) ranged from 62% to 97.7%. In both of them, there was subsequent clinical improvement of patients who underwent ablation, regardless of the energy source used. Surgical ablation of atrial fibrillation is essential for the treatment of this arrhythmia. With current technology, it may be minimally invasive, making it mandatory to perform a procedure in an attempt to revert to sinus rhythm in patients requiring heart surgery.

  3. Surgical Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation Using Energy Sources

    PubMed Central

    Brick, Alexandre Visconti; Braile, Domingo Marcolino

    2015-01-01

    Surgical ablation, concomitant with other operations, is an option for treatment in patients with chronic atrial fibrillation. The aim of this study is to present a literature review on surgical ablation of atrial fibrillation in patients undergoing cardiac surgery, considering energy sources and return to sinus rhythm. A comprehensive survey was performed in the literature on surgical ablation of atrial fibrillation considering energy sources, sample size, study type, outcome (early and late), and return to sinus rhythm. Analyzing studies with immediate results (n=5), the percentage of return to sinus rhythm ranged from 73% to 96%, while those with long-term results (n=20) (from 12 months on) ranged from 62% to 97.7%. In both of them, there was subsequent clinical improvement of patients who underwent ablation, regardless of the energy source used. Surgical ablation of atrial fibrillation is essential for the treatment of this arrhythmia. With current technology, it may be minimally invasive, making it mandatory to perform a procedure in an attempt to revert to sinus rhythm in patients requiring heart surgery. PMID:26934404

  4. Focal Hydrothermal Ablation: Preliminary Investigation of a New Concept

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Sumit

    2013-08-01

    PurposeTo determine whether focal tissue ablation is possible with interstitial instillation of steam.MethodsFresh swine livers were used. Through a 20 gauge needle, steam was instilled every 5 s, 3 (n = 5), 6 (n = 5), 9 (n = 5), or 12 (n = 5 + 5) times in a liver lobe. The ablated zones were sectioned parallel (n = 20) or perpendicular (n = 5) to the needle track. The longitudinal long and short axis diameters, or transverse long and short axis diameters of areas with discoloration on macroscopic examination, were measured. The experiment was repeated in vivo on a pig. Steam instillation was performed once every 5 s for 5 min in the liver (n = 3) and in muscle (n = 4), and temperature changes at three neighboring sites were monitored. Long and short axis diameters of the discolored areas were measured.ResultsA well-defined area of discoloration was invariably present at the site of steam instillation. The median longitudinal long axis diameter were 2.0, 2.5, 2.5, and 3.5 cm for 3, 6, 9, and 12 steam instillations in vitro, while median short axis diameters were 1.0, 1.5, 1.5, and 1.5 cm, respectively. Six attempts at ablation in vivo could be successfully completed. The long axis diameters of the ablated zones in the liver were 7.0 and 8.0 cm, while in muscle it ranged from 5.5 to 7.0 cm.ConclusionInstillation of steam in the liver in vitro and in vivo, and in muscle in vivo rapidly leads to circumscribed zones of coagulation necrosis.

  5. Possibility of Prediction of Properties of High-Toughness Materials by Complex Analysis of the Size of Zones of Plastic Strain and Other Parameters of Steel 09G2S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonov, M. Yu.; Shaimanov, G. S.; Simonov, Yu. N.; Khanov, A. M.

    2016-05-01

    Relations between the parameters of dynamic crack resistance, impact toughness, sizes of zones of plastic strain in the start region, hardness of the unstrained material, strength characteristics, and tempering temperature of steel 09G2S are determined. The linear regression equations are used to construct mathematical and graphical models for predicting the level of properties in quenched and tempered steel 09G2S. The method is used to predict the properties of a tubular billet from steel 09G2S with composition somewhat different from the rated one after quenching and high tempering at 570°C.

  6. 2D elemental mapping of sections of human kidney stones using laser ablation inductively-coupled plasma-mass spectrometry: Possibilities and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vašinová Galiová, Michaela; Čopjaková, Renata; Škoda, Radek; Štěpánková, Kateřina; Vaňková, Michaela; Kuta, Jan; Prokeš, Lubomír; Kynický, Jindřich; Kanický, Viktor

    2014-10-01

    A 213 nm Nd:YAG-based laser ablation (LA) system coupled to quadrupole-based inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer and an ArF* excimer-based LA-system coupled to a double-focusing sector field inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer were employed to study the spatial distribution of various elements in kidney stones (uroliths). Sections of the surfaces of uroliths were ablated according to line patterns to investigate the elemental profiles for the different urolith growth zones. This exploratory study was mainly focused on the distinguishing of the main constituents of urinary calculus fragments by means of LA-ICP-mass spectrometry. Changes in the ablation rate for oxalate and phosphate phases related to matrix density and hardness are discussed. Elemental association was investigated on the basis of 2D mapping. The possibility of using NIST SRM 1486 Bone Meal as an external standard for calibration was tested. It is shown that LA-ICP-MS is helpful for determination of the mineralogical composition and size of all phases within the analyzed surface area, for tracing down elemental associations and for documenting the elemental content of urinary stones. LA-ICP-MS results (elemental contents and maps) are compared to those obtained with electron microprobe analysis and solution analysis ICP-MS.

  7. A mathematical framework for minimally invasive tumor ablation therapies.

    PubMed

    Hall, Sheldon K; Ooi, Ean Hin; Payne, Stephen J

    2014-01-01

    Minimally invasive tumor ablations (MITAs) are an increasingly important tool in the treatment of solid tumors across multiple organs. The problems experienced in modeling different types of MITAs are very similar, but the development of mathematical models is mostly performed in isolation according to modality. Fundamental research into the modeling of specific types of MITAs is indeed required, but to choose the optimal treatment for an individual the primary clinical requirement is to have reliable predictions for a range of MITAs. In this review of the mathematical modeling of MITAs 4 modalities are considered: radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation. The similarities in the mathematical modeling of these treatments are highlighted, and the analysis of the models within a general framework is discussed. This will aid in developing a deeper understanding of the sensitivity of MITA models to physiological parameters and the impact of uncertainty on predictions of the ablation zone. Through robust validation and analysis of the models it will be possible to choose the best model for a given application. This is important because many different models exist with no objective comparison of their performance. The collection of relevant in vivo experimental data is also critical to parameterize such models accurately. This approach will be necessary to translate the field into clinical practice.

  8. Influence of bilateral eyestalk ablation on gonads of fresh water prawn, Macrobrachium dayanum.

    PubMed

    Pervaiz, Pervaiz Ahmed; Sikdar, Malabika

    2014-09-01

    The study was carried out in laboratory for one month to know the effect of bilateral eyestalk ablation on gonads of Macrobrachium dayanum. Healthy specimens of Macrobrachium dayanum in the size group of (4-6 cm in length) were taken for the experiment. The eyestalk ablation was done by cutting away the eyestalks from their bases with sterilized scissor. The results here obtained indicated positive effects of eyestalk ablation on ovary and testes of Macrobrachium dayanum. The histological details of the female prawns which were ablated showed post-vitellogenic oocytes; where as unablated females prawn never developed beyond pre-vitellogenic oocytes. Similarly in males, testes showed pronounced development of different cells as compared to unablated ones. Fully developed spermatozoa were seen in ablated ones. Gonadosomatic studies also showed that ovarian and testicular cells developed better as compared to control and these findings suggest the fact that the eyestalks of M. dayanum contain ovary and testis inhibiting factors.

  9. Silver nano-entities through ultrafast double ablation in aqueous media for surface enhanced Raman scattering and photonics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna Podagatlapalli, G.; Hamad, Syed; Tewari, Surya P.; Sreedhar, S.; Prasad, Muvva D.; Venugopal Rao, S.

    2013-02-01

    We have fabricated stable silver nanoparticles (NPs) and nanostructures (NSs) effectively through double ablation of bulk silver substrate immersed in double distilled water using ˜2 ps laser pulses. The effects of multiple/double/single ablation on silver substrates via surface morphology studies along with average size distribution of Ag NPs were investigated. Prepared Ag NPs in solution exhibited yellow color with an absorption peak near 410 nm, assigned to localized surface Plasmon resonance of nano-sized silver. Depending on the ablation parameters average sizes observed were ˜13 nm/˜17 nm in multiple/double ablation case and ˜7 nm in single ablation case. High resolution transmission electron microscope studies highlighted that most of the Ag NPs were spherical and polycrystalline in nature. Surface morphology of the substrates was characterized by field emission scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscope. A different scenario was observed in the double ablation case compared to single/multiple ablation case. Double ablation resulted in dome like NSs on the substrate with dimensions of few hundreds of nanometers while single ablation did not. Nonlinear optical (NLO) properties of Ag NPs were investigated using Z-scan technique with ˜2 ps pulses and corresponding NLO coefficients were obtained. Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) studies on multiple/double ablated Ag substrates with adsorbed Rhodamine 6G molecules were carried out using excitation wavelengths of 532 nm, 785 nm, and three orders of enhancement in Raman signal intensity was observed. Furthermore, influence of laser fluence on the fabrication of SERS active Ag substrates with double ablation was also investigated. In this case, Raman spectra of adsorbed Research Department eXplosive (RDX) molecules on ablated surfaces were recorded for 532 nm and 785 nm excitation. Enhancements up to 460 were observed from substrates fabricated at fluences of 12 J/cm2, 16 J/cm2 with

  10. Hepatic tumor ablation with clustered microwave antennae: the US Phase II Trial

    PubMed Central

    Iannitti, David A.; Martin, Robert C.G.; Simon, Caroline J.; Hope, William W.; Newcomb, William L.; McMasters, Kelly M.; Dupuy, Damian

    2007-01-01

    Background: Thermal ablation techniques have become important treatment options for patients with unresectable hepatic malignancies. Microwave ablation (MWA) is a new thermal ablative technique that uses electromagnetic energy to produce coagulation necrosis. We report outcomes from the first clinical trial in the United States using MWA and a 915 MHz generator. Patients and methods: Patients with unresectable primary or metastatic liver cancer were enrolled in a multi-institutional trial from March 2004 through May 2006. Demographic information, diagnosis, treatment, and outcomes were documented. Results: Eighty-seven patients underwent 94 ablation procedures for 224 hepatic tumors. Forty-two ablations (45%) were performed open, 7 (7%) laparoscopically, and 45 (48%) percutaneously. The average tumor size was 3.6 cm (range 0.5–9.0 cm). Single antenna ablation volumes were 10.0 ml (range 7.8–14.0 ml), and clustered antennae ablation volumes were 50.5 ml (range 21.1–146.5 ml). Outcome variables were measured with a mean follow-up of 19 months. Local recurrence at the ablation site occurred in 6 (2.7%) tumors, and regional recurrence occurred in 37 (43%) patients. With a mean follow-up of 19 months, 41 (47%) patients were alive with no evidence of disease. There were no procedure-related deaths. The overall mortality rate was 2.3%. Conclusions: Microwave ablation is a safe and effective technology for hepatic tumor ablation. In our study, clustered antennae resulted in larger ablation volumes. Further studies with histological confirmation are needed to verify clinical results. PMID:18333126

  11. Pilot Study to Assess Safety and Clinical Outcomes of Irreversible Electroporation for Partial Gland Ablation in Men with Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Katie S.; Ehdaie, Behfar; Musser, John; Mashni, Joseph; Srimathveeravalli, Govindarajan; Durack, Jeremy C.; Solomon, Stephen B.; Coleman, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Partial prostate gland ablation is a strategy to manage localized prostate cancer. Irreversible electroporation can ablate localized soft tissues. We sought to describe 30- and 90-day complications and intermediate-term functional outcomes in men undergoing prostate gland ablation using irreversible electroporation. Materials and Methods We reviewed the charts of 25 patients with prostate cancer who underwent prostate gland ablation using irreversible electroporation as a primary procedure and who were followed for at least 6 months. Results Median follow-up was 10.9 months. Grade 3 complications occurred in 2 patients including epididymitis (1) and urinary tract infection (1). Fourteen patients experienced grade ≤ 2 complications, mainly transient urinary symptoms, hematuria, and urinary tract infections. Of 25 patients, 4 (16%) had cancer in the zone of ablation on routine follow-up biopsy at 6 months. Of those with normal urinary function at baseline, 88% and 94% reported normal urinary function at 6 and 12 months after prostate gland ablation, respectively. By 12 months, only 1 patient with normal erectile function at baseline reported new difficulty with potency and only 2 patients (8%) required a pad for urinary incontinence. Conclusions Prostate gland ablation with irreversible electroporation is feasible and safe in selected men with localized prostate cancer. Intermediate-term urinary and erectile function outcomes appear reasonable. Irreversible electroporation is effective in ablation of tumor-bearing prostate tissue, as a majority of men had no evidence of residual cancer on biopsy 6 months after prostate gland ablation. PMID:27113966

  12. Percutaneous tumor ablation tools: microwave, radiofrequency, or cryoablation--what should you use and why?

    PubMed

    Hinshaw, J Louis; Lubner, Meghan G; Ziemlewicz, Timothy J; Lee, Fred T; Brace, Christopher L

    2014-01-01

    Image-guided thermal ablation is an evolving and growing treatment option for patients with malignant disease of multiple organ systems. Treatment indications have been expanding to include benign tumors as well. Specifically, the most prevalent indications to date have been in the liver (primary and metastatic disease, as well as benign tumors such as hemangiomas and adenomas), kidney (primarily renal cell carcinoma, but also benign tumors such as angiomyolipomas and oncocytomas), lung (primary and metastatic disease), and soft tissue and/or bone (primarily metastatic disease and osteoid osteomas). Each organ system has different underlying tissue characteristics, which can have profound effects on the resulting thermal changes and ablation zone. Understanding these issues is important for optimizing clinical results. In addition, thermal ablation technology has evolved rapidly during the past several decades, with substantial technical and procedural improvements that can help improve clinical outcomes and safety profiles. Staying up to date on these developments is challenging but critical because the physical properties underlying the different ablation modalities and the appropriate use of adjuncts will have a tremendous effect on treatment results. Ultimately, combining an understanding of the physical properties of the ablation modalities with an understanding of the thermal kinetics in tissue and using the most appropriate ablation modality for each patient are key to optimizing clinical outcomes. Suggested algorithms are described that will help physicians choose among the various ablation modalities for individual patients.

  13. Effects of the hot zone design during the growth of large size multi-crystalline silicon ingots by the seeded directional solidification process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Thi Hoai Thu; Liao, Szu-Han; Chen, Jyh-Chen; Chen, Chun-Hung; Huang, Yen-Hao; Yang, Cheng-Jui; Lin, Huang-Wei; Nguyen, Huy Bich

    2016-10-01

    In this study, the installation of insulation blocks in the hot zone is utilized to assist in the growth of multi-crystalline silicon ingots with 800 kg of silicon charge using the seeded directional solidification method. A transient global numerical simulation is carried out to investigate the heat and mass transport during growth process. At a higher solidification fraction, lower concavity of the crystal-melt interface near the crucible wall can be obtained as compared to the standard model. The lowest concavity and highest energy saving is achieved when insulation blocks are added to the side of a directional solidification block and to the low part of the side insulation. The simulation results for this design also show a reduction of the melt velocity. The average oxygen concentration is slightly higher along the crystal-melt interface, compared to the standard one.

  14. The Effect of Substrate Microstructure on the Heat-Affected Zone Size in Sn-Zn Alloys Due to Adjoining Ni-Al Reactive Multilayer Foil Reaction

    DOE PAGES

    Hooper, R. J.; Adams, D. P.; Hirschfeld, D.; ...

    2015-08-05

    The rapid release of energy from reactive multilayer foils can create extreme local temperature gradients near substrate materials. To fully exploit the potential of these materials, a better understanding of the interaction between the substrate or filler material and the foil is needed. In particular, this work investigates how variations in local properties within the substrate (i.e. differences between properties in constituent phases) can affect heat transport into the substrate. Furthermore, this can affect the microstructural evolution observed within the substrate, which may affect the final joint properties. The effect of the initial substrate microstructure on microstructural evolution within themore » heat-affected zone is evaluated experimentally in two Sn-Zn alloys and numerical techniques are utilized to inform the analysis.« less

  15. The Effect of Substrate Microstructure on the Heat-Affected Zone Size in Sn-Zn Alloys Due to Adjoining Ni-Al Reactive Multilayer Foil Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, R. J.; Adams, D. P.; Hirschfeld, D.; Manuel, M. V.

    2015-08-05

    The rapid release of energy from reactive multilayer foils can create extreme local temperature gradients near substrate materials. To fully exploit the potential of these materials, a better understanding of the interaction between the substrate or filler material and the foil is needed. In particular, this work investigates how variations in local properties within the substrate (i.e. differences between properties in constituent phases) can affect heat transport into the substrate. Furthermore, this can affect the microstructural evolution observed within the substrate, which may affect the final joint properties. The effect of the initial substrate microstructure on microstructural evolution within the heat-affected zone is evaluated experimentally in two Sn-Zn alloys and numerical techniques are utilized to inform the analysis.

  16. Femtosecond laser ablation of enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Quang-Tri; Bertrand, Caroline; Vilar, Rui

    2016-06-01

    The surface topographical, compositional, and structural modifications induced in human enamel by femtosecond laser ablation is studied. The laser treatments were performed using a Yb:KYW chirped-pulse-regenerative amplification laser system (560 fs and 1030 nm) and fluences up to 14 J/cm2. The ablation surfaces were studied by scanning electron microscopy, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, and micro-Raman spectroscopy. Regardless of the fluence, the ablation surfaces were covered by a layer of resolidified material, indicating that ablation is accompanied by melting of hydroxyapatite. This layer presented pores and exploded gas bubbles, created by the release of gaseous decomposition products of hydroxyapatite (CO2 and H2O) within the liquid phase. In the specimen treated with 1-kHz repetition frequency and 14 J/cm2, thickness of the resolidified material is in the range of 300 to 900 nm. The micro-Raman analysis revealed that the resolidified material contains amorphous calcium phosphate, while grazing incidence x-ray diffraction analysis allowed detecting traces of a calcium phosphate other than hydroxyapatite, probably β-tricalcium phosphate Ca3), at the surface of this specimen. The present results show that the ablation of enamel involves melting of enamel's hydroxyapatite, but the thickness of the altered layer is very small and thermal damage of the remaining material is negligible.

  17. Thermal ablation of lung tumors.

    PubMed

    McTaggart, Ryan A; Dupuy, Damian E

    2007-06-01

    Thermal ablation can be applied to treat any thoracic malignancy: primary lung cancers, recurrent primary lung cancers, metastatic disease, chest wall masses, and painful, bony metastases. Since the first reported use of thermal ablation for lung cancer in 2000 there has been an explosive use of the procedure, and by 2010 the number of procedures to treat thoracic malignancy is expected to exceed 150,000 per year. Presently, thermal ablation is best used for patients with early-stage lung cancers in patients who are not surgical candidates, patients with small and favorably located pulmonary metastases, and patients in whom palliation of tumor-related symptoms is the goal. Radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, and cryoablation are novel treatment modalities for lung cancer and can safely accomplish tumor destruction and even complete eradication of tumor in patients who are not candidates for surgical resection. In this article, we discuss technical considerations for each modality and the periprocedure and postprocedure management of patients with this disease.

  18. Water content contribution in calculus phantom ablation during Q-switched Tm:YAG laser lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian J; Rajabhandharaks, Danop; Xuan, Jason Rongwei; Wang, Hui; Chia, Ray W J; Hasenberg, Tom; Kang, Hyun Wook

    2015-01-01

    Q-switched (QS) Tm:YAG laser ablation mechanisms on urinary calculi are still unclear to researchers. Here, dependence of water content in calculus phantom on calculus ablation performance was investigated. White gypsum cement was used as a calculus phantom model. The calculus phantoms were ablated by a total 3-J laser pulse exposure (20 mJ, 100 Hz, 1.5 s) and contact mode with N=15 sample size. Ablation volume was obtained on average 0.079, 0.122, and 0.391  mm3 in dry calculus in air, wet calculus in air, and wet calculus in-water groups, respectively. There were three proposed ablation mechanisms that could explain the effect of water content in calculus phantom on calculus ablation performance, including shock wave due to laser pulse injection and bubble collapse, spallation, and microexplosion. Increased absorption coefficient of wet calculus can cause stronger spallation process compared with that caused by dry calculus; as a result, higher calculus ablation was observed in both wet calculus in air and wet calculus in water. The test result also indicates that the shock waves generated by short laser pulse under the in-water condition have great impact on the ablation volume by Tm:YAG QS laser.

  19. Irreversible Electroporation for Focal Ablation at the Porta Hepatis

    SciTech Connect

    Kasivisvanathan, Veeru; Thapar, Ankur Oskrochi, Youssof; Picard, John; Leen, Edward L. S.

    2012-12-15

    Patients with chemotherapy-refractory liver metastases who are not candidates for surgery may be treated with focal ablation techniques with established survival benefits. Irreversible electroporation is the newest of these and has the putative advantages of a nonthermal action, preventing damage to adjacent biliary structures and bowel. This report describes the use of irreversible electroporation in a 61-year-old man with a solitary chemoresistant liver metastasis unsuitable for radiofrequency ablation as a result of its proximity to the porta hepatis. At 3 months, tumor size was decreased on computed tomography from 28 Multiplication-Sign 19 to 20 Multiplication-Sign 17 mm, representing stable disease according to the response evaluation criteria in solid tumors. This corresponded to a decrease in tumor volume size from 5.25 to 3.16 cm{sup 3}. There were no early or late complications. Chemoresistant liver metastases in the proximity of the porta hepatis that are considered to be too high a risk for conventional surgery or thermal ablation may be considered for treatment by the novel ablation technique of irreversible electroporation.

  20. Study of ablation by laser irradiation of plane targets at wavelengths 1. 05, 0. 53, and 0. 35. mu. m

    SciTech Connect

    Key, M.H.; Toner, W.T.; Goldsack, T.J.; Kilkenny, J.D.; Veats, S.A.; Cunningham, P.F.; Lewis, C.L.S.

    1983-07-01

    Ablation by laser irradiation at wavelengths lambda = 1.05, 0.53, and 0.35 ..mu..m has been studied from analysis of time-resolved x-ray spectra of layered targets and of ion emission. Irradiance was varied in the range 2 x 10/sup 13/ to 2 x 10/sup 15/ W cm/sup -2/ with constant laser power and variable focal spot size. Deductions include the effect of lateral energy transport from small focal spots and ablation rates and ablation pressures obtained both in the limit of negligible transport and when lateral transport is significant. Advantages of short wavelengths for ablatively driven implosions are quantified.

  1. Evaluation of the analytical capability of NIR femtosecond laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Takafumi; Kon, Yoshiaki

    2008-03-01

    A laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometric (LA-ICPMS) technique utilizing a titanium-sapphire (TiS) femtosecond laser (fs-laser) has been developed for elemental and isotopic analysis. The signal intensity profile, depth of the ablation pit and level of elemental fractionation were investigated in order to evaluate the analytical capability of the present fs-laser ablation-ICPMS technique. The signal intensity profile of (57)Fe, obtained from iron sulfide (FeS(2)), demonstrated that the resulting signal intensity of (57)Fe achieved by the fs-laser ablation was almost 4-times higher than that obtained by ArF excimer laser ablation under a similar energy fluence (5 J/cm(2)). In fs-laser ablation, there is no significant difference in a depth of the ablation pit between glass and zircon material, while in ArF laser ablation, the resulting crater depth on the zircon crystal was almost half the level than that obtained for glass material. Both the thermal-induced and particle size-related elemental fractionations, which have been thought to be main sources of analytical error in the LA-ICPMS analysis, were measured on a Harvard 91500 zircon crystal. The resulting fractionation indexes on the (206)Pb/(238)U (f(Pb/U)) and (238)U/(232)Th (f(U/Th)) ratios obtained by the present fs-laser ablation system were significantly smaller than those obtained by a conventional ArF excimer laser ablation system, demonstrative of smaller elemental fractionation. Using the present fs-laser ablation technique, the time profile of the signal intensity of (56)Fe and the isotopic ratios ((57)Fe/(54)Fe and (56)Fe/(54)Fe) have been measured on a natural pyrite (FeS(2)) sample. Repeatability in signal intensity of (56)Fe achieved by the fs-laser ablation system was significantly better than that obtained by ArF excimer laser ablation. Moreover, the resulting precision in (57)Fe/(54)Fe and (56)Fe/(54)Fe ratio measurements could be improved by the fs-laser ablation system

  2. Theoretical Modeling for Hepatic Microwave Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Punit

    2010-01-01

    Thermal tissue ablation is an interventional procedure increasingly being used for treatment of diverse medical conditions. Microwave ablation is emerging as an attractive modality for thermal therapy of large soft tissue targets in short periods of time, making it particularly suitable for ablation of hepatic and other tumors. Theoretical models of the ablation process are a powerful tool for predicting the temperature profile in tissue and resultant tissue damage created by ablation devices. These models play an important role in the design and optimization of devices for microwave tissue ablation. Furthermore, they are a useful tool for exploring and planning treatment delivery strategies. This review describes the status of theoretical models developed for microwave tissue ablation. It also reviews current challenges, research trends and progress towards development of accurate models for high temperature microwave tissue ablation. PMID:20309393

  3. Image-guided ablation of adrenal lesions.

    PubMed

    Yamakado, Koichiro

    2014-06-01

    Although laparoscopic adrenalectomy has remained the standard of care for the treatment for adrenal tumors, percutaneous image-guided ablation therapy, such as chemical ablation, radiofrequency ablation, cryoablation, and microwave ablation, has been shown to be clinically useful in many nonsurgical candidates. Ablation therapy has been used to treat both functioning adenomas and malignant tumors, including primary adrenal carcinoma and metastasis. For patients with functioning adenomas, biochemical and symptomatic improvement is achieved in 96 to 100% after ablation; for patients with malignant adrenal neoplasms, however, the survival benefit from ablation therapy remains unclear, though good initial results have been reported. This article outlines the current role of ablation therapy for adrenal lesions, as well as identifying some of the technical considerations for this procedure.

  4. Microwave ablation at 915 MHz vs 2.45 GHz: A theoretical and experimental investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Curto, Sergio; Taj-Eldin, Mohammed; Fairchild, Dillon; Prakash, Punit

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: The relationship between microwave ablation system operating frequency and ablation performance is not currently well understood. The objective of this study was to comparatively assess the differences in microwave ablation at 915 MHz and 2.45 GHz. Methods: Analytical expressions for electromagnetic radiation from point sources were used to compare power deposition at the two frequencies of interest. A 3D electromagnetic-thermal bioheat transfer solver was implemented with the finite element method to characterize power deposition and thermal ablation with asymmetrical insulated dipole antennas (single-antenna and dual-antenna synchronous arrays). Simulation results were validated against experiments in ex vivo tissue. Results: Theoretical, computational, and experimental results indicated greater power deposition and larger diameter ablation zones when using a single insulated microwave antenna at 2.45 GHz; experimentally, 32 ± 4.1 mm and 36.3 ± 1.0 mm for 5 and 10 min, respectively, at 2.45 GHz, compared to 24 ± 1.7 mm and 29.5 ± 0.6 mm at 915 MHz, with 30 W forward power at the antenna input port. In experiments, faster heating was observed at locations 5 mm (0.91 vs 0.49 °C/s) and 10 mm (0.28 vs 0.15 °C/s) from the antenna operating at 2.45 GHz. Larger ablation zones were observed with dual-antenna arrays at 2.45 GHz; however, the differences were less pronounced than for single antennas. Conclusions: Single- and dual-antenna arrays systems operating at 2.45 GHz yield larger ablation zone due to greater power deposition in proximity to the antenna, as well as greater role of thermal conduction.

  5. Microwave ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Poggi, Guido; Tosoratti, Nevio; Montagna, Benedetta; Picchi, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    Although surgical resection is still the optimal treatment option for early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients with well compensated cirrhosis, thermal ablation techniques provide a valid non-surgical treatment alternative, thanks to their minimal invasiveness, excellent tolerability and safety profile, proven efficacy in local disease control, virtually unlimited repeatability and cost-effectiveness. Different energy sources are currently employed in clinics as physical agents for percutaneous or intra-surgical thermal ablation of HCC nodules. Among them, radiofrequency (RF) currents are the most used, while microwave ablations (MWA) are becoming increasingly popular. Starting from the 90s’, RF ablation (RFA) rapidly became the standard of care in ablation, especially in the treatment of small HCC nodules; however, RFA exhibits substantial performance limitations in the treatment of large lesions and/or tumors located near major heat sinks. MWA, first introduced in the Far Eastern clinical practice in the 80s’, showing promising results but also severe limitations in the controllability of the emitted field and in the high amount of power employed for the ablation of large tumors, resulting in a poor coagulative performance and a relatively high complication rate, nowadays shows better results both in terms of treatment controllability and of overall coagulative performance, thanks to the improvement of technology. In this review we provide an extensive and detailed overview of the key physical and technical aspects of MWA and of the currently available systems, and we want to discuss the most relevant published data on MWA treatments of HCC nodules in regard to clinical results and to the type and rate of complications, both in absolute terms and in comparison with RFA. PMID:26557950

  6. Surgical Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Ramlawi, Basel; Abu Saleh, Walid K

    2015-01-01

    The Cox-maze procedure for the restoration of normal sinus rhythm, initially developed by Dr. James Cox, underwent several iterations over the years. The main concept consists of creating a series of transmural lesions in the right and left atria that disrupt re-entrant circuits responsible for propagating the abnormal atrial fibrillation rhythm. The left atrial appendage is excluded as a component of the Maze procedure. For the first three iterations of the Cox- maze procedure, these lesions were performed using a surgical cut-and-sew approach that ensured transmurality. The Cox-Maze IV is the most currently accepted iteration. It achieves the same lesion set of the Cox- maze III but uses alternative energy sources to create the transmural lesions, potentially in a minimally invasive approach on the beating heart. High-frequency ultrasound, microwave, and laser energy have all been used with varying success in the past. Today, bipolar radiofrequency heat or cryotherapy cooling are the most accepted sources for creating linear lesions with consistent safety and transmurality. The robust and reliable nature of these energy delivery methods has yielded a success rate reaching 90% freedom from atrial fibrillation at 12 months. Such approaches offer a significant long-term advantage over catheter-based ablation, especially in patients having longstanding, persistent atrial fibrillation with characteristics such as dilated left atrial dimensions, poor ejection fraction, and failed catheter ablation. Based on these improved results, there currently is significant interest in developing a hybrid ablation strategy that incorporates the superior transmural robust lesions of surgical ablation, the reliable stroke prevention potential of epicardial left atrial appendage exclusion, and sophisticated mapping and confirmatory catheter-based ablation technology. Such a minimally invasive hybrid strategy for ablation may lead to the development of multidisciplinary "Afib teams" to

  7. An MRI guided system for prostate laser ablation with treatment planning and multi-planar temperature monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Sheng; Agarwal, Harsh; Bernardo, Marcelino; Seifabadi, Reza; Turkbey, Baris; Partanen, Ari; Negussie, Ayele; Glossop, Neil; Choyke, Peter; Pinto, Peter; Wood, Bradford J.

    2016-03-01

    Prostate cancer is often over treated with standard treatment options which impact the patients' quality of life. Laser ablation has emerged as a new approach to treat prostate cancer while sparing the healthy tissue around the tumor. Since laser ablation has a small treatment zone with high temperature, it is necessary to use accurate image guidance and treatment planning to enable full ablation of the tumor. Intraoperative temperature monitoring is also desirable to protect critical structures from being damaged in laser ablation. In response to these problems, we developed a navigation platform and integrated it with a clinical MRI scanner and a side firing laser ablation device. The system allows imaging, image guidance, treatment planning and temperature monitoring to be carried out on the same platform. Temperature sensing phantoms were developed to demonstrate the concept of iterative treatment planning and intraoperative temperature monitoring. Retrospective patient studies were also conducted to show the clinical feasibility of the system.

  8. Evaluation of a Novel Thermal Accelerant for Augmentation of Microwave Energy during Image-guided Tumor Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Park, William Keun Chan; Maxwell, Aaron Wilhelm Palmer; Frank, Victoria Elizabeth; Primmer, Michael Patrick; Collins, Scott Andrew; Baird, Grayson Luderman; Dupuy, Damian Edward

    2017-01-01

    The primary challenge in thermal ablation of liver tumors (e.g. hepatocellular carcinoma and hepatic colorectal cancer) is the relatively high recurrence rate (~30%) for which incomplete ablation at the periphery of the tumor is the most common reason. In an attempt to overcome this, we have developed a novel thermal accelerant (TA) agent capable of augmenting microwave energy from a distance normally unattainable by a single microwave ablation antenna. This cesium-based block co-polymer compound transforms from a liquid to a gel at body temperature and is intrinsically visible by computed tomography. Using an agarose phantom model, herein we demonstrate that both the rate and magnitude of temperature increase during microwave ablation were significantly greater in the presence of TA when compared with controls. These results suggest robust augmentation of microwave energy, and may translate into larger ablation zone volumes within biologic tissues. Further work using in vivo techniques is necessary to confirm these findings. PMID:28382173

  9. Low cost fabrication of ablative heat shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cecka, A. M.; Schofield, W. C.

    1972-01-01

    A material and process study was performed using subscale panels in an attempt to reduce the cost of fabricating ablative heat shield panels. Although no improvements were made in the material formulation, a significant improvement was obtained in the processing methods compared to those employed in the previous work. The principal feature of the new method is the press filling and curing of the ablation material in a single step with the bonding and curing of the face sheet. This method was chosen to replace the hand troweling and autoclave curing procedure used previously. Double-curvature panels of the same size as the flat panels were fabricated to investigate fabrication problems. It was determined that the same materials and processes used for flat panels can be used to produce the curved panels. A design with severe curvatures consisting of radii of 24 x 48 inches was employed for evaluation. Ten low-density and ten high-density panels were fabricated. With the exception of difficulties related to short run non-optimum tooling, excellent panel filling and density uniformity were obtained.

  10. Pellet ablation and temperature profile measurements in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, D.K.; Schmidt, G.L.; Cavallo, A.; Grek, B.; Hulse, R.; Johnson, D.; Mansfield, D.; McNeill, D.; Park, H.; Taylor, G.

    1988-01-01

    Single and multiple deuterium pellets have been injected into a variety of TFTR plasmas, including ohmically heated plasmas with wide range of electron temperatures, neutral beam heated plasmas at several NBI powers and high T/sub e/, post NBI plasmas. Pellet penetration into these plasmas was determined by measuring the pellet speed and duration of the H/sub ..cap alpha..//D/sub ..cap alpha../ light emission during pellet ablation in the plasma. These penetration measurements are compared to the predicted penetration computed using the ablation model developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The plasma density profiles before and after pellet injection are used to estimate the number of particles deposited in the plasma. The plasma particle increase compared to the estimated number of atoms in the pellet yields a measure of the fueling efficiency of pellets in TFTR. The ablation cloud parameters are discussed based on polychromater measurements of the H/sub ..cap alpha..//D/sub ..cap alpha../ line emission from the neutral cloud surrounding the pellet. The electron temperature profile evolution after pellet injection is examined for the case of multiple pellet injection into an ohmically heated plasma. The ORNL pellet ablation code was used to compare measured pellet penetration depths with a theoretical model. The measured input parameters to the model are the electron density and temperature profiles, the neutral beam heating profile, the neutral density profile, the pellet size, pellet speed and pellet composition. The free parameter in the model is the thickness of the neutral cloud surrounding the pellet. This parameter is adjusted to arrive at a reasonable agreement between measured and calculated pellet penetration depths. The output of the model which is directly comparable to experiment is the calculated ablation rate. It is assumed that the broad-band H/sub ..cap alpha..//D/sub ..cap alpha../ emission is proportional to the ablation rate.

  11. Infrared Laser Ablation Sample Transfer for MALDI and Electrospray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sung-Gun; Murray, Kermit King

    2011-08-01

    We have used an infrared laser to ablate materials under ambient conditions that were captured in solvent droplets. The droplets were either deposited on a MALDI target for off-line analysis by MALDI time-of-flight mass spectrometry or flow-injected into a nanoelectrospray source of an ion trap mass spectrometer. An infrared optical parametric oscillator (OPO) laser system at 2.94 μm wavelength and approximately 1 mJ pulse energy was focused onto samples for ablation at atmospheric pressure. The ablated material was captured in a solvent droplet 1-2 mm in diameter that was suspended from a silica capillary a few millimeters above the sample target. Once the sample was transferred to the droplet by ablation, the droplet was deposited on a MALDI target. A saturated matrix solution was added to the deposited sample, or in some cases, the suspended capture droplet contained the matrix. Peptide and protein standards were used to assess the effects of the number of IR laser ablation shots, sample to droplet distance, capture droplet size, droplet solvent, and laser pulse energy. Droplet collected samples were also injected into a nanoelectrospray source of an ion trap mass spectrometer with a 500 nL injection loop. It is estimated that pmol quantities of material were transferred to the droplet with an efficiency of approximately 1%. The direct analysis of biological fluids for off-line MALDI and electrospray was demonstrated with blood, milk, and egg. The implications of this IR ablation sample transfer approach for ambient imaging are discussed.

  12. Laser ablation based fuel ignition

    DOEpatents

    Early, James W.; Lester, Charles S.

    1998-01-01

    There is provided a method of fuel/oxidizer ignition comprising: (a) application of laser light to a material surface which is absorptive to the laser radiation; (b) heating of the material surface with the laser light to produce a high temperature ablation plume which emanates from the heated surface as an intensely hot cloud of vaporized surface material; and (c) contacting the fuel/oxidizer mixture with the hot ablation cloud at or near the surface of the material in order to heat the fuel to a temperature sufficient to initiate fuel ignition.

  13. Laser ablation based fuel ignition

    DOEpatents

    Early, J.W.; Lester, C.S.

    1998-06-23

    There is provided a method of fuel/oxidizer ignition comprising: (a) application of laser light to a material surface which is absorptive to the laser radiation; (b) heating of the material surface with the laser light to produce a high temperature ablation plume which emanates from the heated surface as an intensely hot cloud of vaporized surface material; and (c) contacting the fuel/oxidizer mixture with the hot ablation cloud at or near the surface of the material in order to heat the fuel to a temperature sufficient to initiate fuel ignition. 3 figs.

  14. Transhemangioma Ablation of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Pua, Uei

    2012-12-15

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a well-established treatment modality in the treatment of early hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) [1]. Safe trajectory of the RFA probe is crucial in decreasing collateral tissue damage and unwarranted probe transgression. As a percutaneous technique, however, the trajectory of the needle is sometimes constrained by the available imaging plane. The presence of a hemangioma beside an HCC is uncommon but poses the question of safety related to probe transgression. We hereby describe a case of transhemangioma ablation of a dome HCC.

  15. Damage in materials following ablation by ultrashort laser pulses: A molecular-dynamics study

    SciTech Connect

    Bouilly, Delphine; Perez, Danny; Lewis, Laurent J.

    2007-11-01

    The formation of craters following femtosecond- and picosecond-pulse laser ablation in the thermal regime is studied using a generic two-dimensional numerical model based on molecular-dynamics simulations and the Lennard-Jones potential. Femtosecond pulses are found to produce very clean craters through a combination of etching of the walls and the formation of a very thin heat affected zone. Our simulations also indicate that dislocations are emitted continuously during all of the ablation process (i.e., for hundreds of ps). For picosecond pulses, we observe much thicker heat affected zones which result from melting and recrystallization following the absorption of the light. In this case also, continuous emission of dislocations--though fewer in number--takes place throughout the ablation process.

  16. Airborne Hyperspectral Imaging of Supraglacial Lakes in Greenland's Ablation Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, J.; Behar, A. E.; Jacobson, N. T.

    2010-12-01

    In 2010 an airborne instrument was assembled to image supraglacial lakes near the Jakobshavn Isbrae of the Greenland Ice Sheet. The instrument was designed to fly on a helicopter, and consists of a hyperspectral imager, a GPS/inertial measurement unit (GPS/IMU), and a data-logging computer. A series of narrow visible optical channels ~13nm wide, such as found in a hyperspectral imager, are theorized to be useful in determining the depths of supraglacial lakes using techniques based on the Beer-Lambert-Bouguer Law. During June, several supraglacial lakes were selected for study each day, based upon MODIS imagery taken during the previous week. Flying over a given lake, several track lines were flown to image both shallow and deep sections of the lake, imaging the full range of depth for future algorithm development. The telescoping instrument mount was constructed to allow the sensor package to be deployed from a helicopter in-flight, with an unobstructed downward-facing field of view. The GPS/IMU records the pointing orientation, altitude, and geographical coordinates of the imager to the data-logger, in order to allow post-flight geo-referencing of the raw hyperspectral imagery. With this geo-referenced spectrum data, a depth map for a given lake can be calculated through reference to a water absorptivity model. This risk-reduction expedition to fly a helicopter-borne hyperspectral imager over the supraglacial lakes of Greenland was a success. The instrument mount for the imager worked as designed, and no vibration issues were encountered. As a result, we have confidence in the instrument platform's performance during future surveys of Greenland's supraglacial lakes. The hyperspectral imager, data acquisition computer, and geo-referencing services are provided by Resonon, Inc. of Bozeman, MT, and the GPS/IMU is manufactured by Cloudcap Technology of Hood River, OR.

  17. Fractional ablative laser skin resurfacing: a review.

    PubMed

    Tajirian, Ani L; Tarijian, Ani L; Goldberg, David J

    2011-12-01

    Ablative laser technology has been in use for many years now. The large side effect profile however has limited its use. Fractional ablative technology is a newer development which combines a lesser side effect profile along with similar efficacy. In this paper we review fractional ablative laser skin resurfacing.

  18. Numerical simulation of the ablation of thin molybdenum films under laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazanskiy, N. L.; Poletayev, S. D.

    2016-09-01

    Laser irradiation of a molybdenum film on a quartz substrate is numerically studied. The simulated results prove the experimental effect lying in a threefold decrease in the size of the ablation region in comparison with the focal spot. The numerical experiment proves the hypothesis on the two-stage ablation of metal film with the primary formation of oxide phase. It is demonstrated that oxidation leads to a selective decrease in the thermal resistance of the film along the vertical direction, so that the anisotropic character of the ablation is enhanced.

  19. Modern Advances in Ablative TPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatapathy, Ethiraj

    2013-01-01

    Topics covered include: Physics of Hypersonic Flow and TPS Considerations. Destinations, Missions and Requirements. State of the Art Thermal Protection Systems Capabilities. Modern Advances in Ablative TPS. Entry Systems Concepts. Flexible TPS for Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerators. Conformal TPS for Rigid Aeroshell. 3-D Woven TPS for Extreme Entry Environment. Multi-functional Carbon Fabric for Mechanically Deployable.

  20. Formation of tribological structures by laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilling, Niels; Paschke, Mike; Hendow, Sami T.; Klotzbach, Udo

    2012-03-01

    Many technical applications can benefit from the use of tribological structures in minimizing abrasive material wear and energy consumption without the integration of additional materials in a working assembly. Especially in lubricated friction systems, the tribological character can be significantly improved through the addition of oriented and repetitive microstructure. In this study, experimental tests are discussed for a small range of structure dimensions to verify the effect of optimizing the tribological contact performance. A nanosecond pulsed fiber laser is used to create various test structures with different sizes and form. The quality of the fabricated surface pattern, particularly form correctness, feathering and material modification effects of the ablated area is characterized and optimized. The influence of pulse duration, pulse energy and pulse delay using normal pulsing is presented and compared to various burst modes.

  1. Rupture of benign thyroid tumors after radio-frequency ablation.

    PubMed

    Shin, J H; Jung, S L; Baek, J H; Kim, J-H

    2011-12-01

    Rupture of benign thyroid tumors after RFA is very rare. We experienced 6 cases in 4 institutions. All patients presented with abrupt neck swelling and pain between 9 and 60 days after RFA. Imaging and clinical findings of the ruptured tumors were anterior subcapsular location, mixed composition, large size, and repeated ablations. Conservative treatment was sufficient in 3 cases, whereas surgical management was required in 3.

  2. Esophageal papilloma: Flexible endoscopic ablation by radiofrequency

    PubMed Central

    del Genio, Gianmattia; del Genio, Federica; Schettino, Pietro; Limongelli, Paolo; Tolone, Salvatore; Brusciano, Luigi; Avellino, Manuela; Vitiello, Chiara; Docimo, Giovanni; Pezzullo, Angelo; Docimo, Ludovico

    2015-01-01

    Squamous papilloma of the esophagus is a rare benign lesion of the esophagus. Radiofrequency ablation is an established endoscopic technique for the eradication of Barrett esophagus. No cases of endoscopic ablation of esophageal papilloma by radiofrequency ablation (RFA) have been reported. We report a case of esophageal papilloma successfully treated with a single session of radiofrequency ablation. Endoscopic ablation of the lesion was achieved by radiofrequency using a new catheter inserted through the working channel of endoscope. The esophageal ablated tissue was removed by a specifically designed cup. Complete ablation was confirmed at 3 mo by endoscopy with biopsies. This case supports feasibility and safety of as a new potential indication for BarrxTM RFA in patients with esophageal papilloma. PMID:25789102

  3. Percutaneous ablation of benign bone tumors.

    PubMed

    Welch, Brian T; Welch, Timothy J

    2011-09-01

    Percutaneous image-guided ablation has become a standard of practice and one of the primary modalities for treatment of benign bone tumors. Ablation is most commonly used to treat osteoid osteomas but may also be used in the treatment of chondroblastomas, osteoblastomas, and giant cell tumors. Percutaneous image-guided ablation of benign bone tumors carries a high success rate (>90% in case series) and results in decreased morbidity, mortality, and expense compared with traditional surgical methods. The ablation technique most often applied to benign bone lesions is radiofrequency ablation. Because the ablation technique has been extensively applied to osteoid osteomas and because of the uncommon nature of other benign bone tumors, we will primarily focus this discussion on the percutaneous ablation of osteoid osteomas.

  4. Model-based optimal planning of hepatic radiofrequency ablation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiyong; Müftü, Sinan; Meral, Faik Can; Tuncali, Kemal; Akçakaya, Murat

    2016-07-19

    This article presents a model-based pre-treatment optimal planning framework for hepatic tumour radiofrequency (RF) ablation. Conventional hepatic radiofrequency (RF) ablation methods rely on pre-specified input voltage and treatment length based on the tumour size. Using these experimentally obtained pre-specified treatment parameters in RF ablation is not optimal to achieve the expected level of cell death and usually results in more healthy tissue damage than desired. In this study we present a pre-treatment planning framework that provides tools to control the levels of both the healthy tissue preservation and tumour cell death. Over the geometry of tumour and surrounding tissue, we formulate the RF ablation planning as a constrained optimization problem. With specific constraints over the temperature profile (TP) in pre-determined areas of the target geometry, we consider two different cost functions based on the history of the TP and Arrhenius index (AI) of the target location, respectively. We optimally compute the input voltage variation to minimize the damage to the healthy tissue while ensuring a complete cell death in the tumour and immediate area covering the tumour. As an example, we use a simulation of a 1D symmetric target geometry mimicking the application of single electrode RF probe. Results demonstrate that compared to the conventional methods both cost functions improve the healthy tissue preservation.

  5. CO{sub 2} Laser Ablation Propulsion Tractor Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Sinko, John E.; Schlecht, Clifford A.

    2010-05-06

    Manipulation of objects at a distance has already been achieved with no small measure of success in the realm of microscopic objects on the scale size of nanometers to micrometers in applications including laser trapping and laser tweezers. However, there has been relatively little effort to apply such remote control to macroscopic systems. A space tractor beam could be applied to a wide range of applications, including removal of orbital debris, facilitation of spacecraft docking, adjustment of satellite attitude or orbital position, etc. In this paper, an ablative laser propulsion tractor beam is demonstrated based on radiation from a CO{sub 2} laser. Cooperative, layered polymer targets were used for remote impulse generation using a CO{sub 2} laser. The use of a structured ablatant enabling switching between thrust directional parity (i.e., forward or reverse) and imparting torque to a remote target. Fluence-dependent results are presented in the context of polymer ablation modeling work and with consideration of confined ablation effects.

  6. Femtosecond laser ablation of gold interdigitated electrodes for electronic tongues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzoli, Alexandra; de Almeida, Gustavo F. B.; Filho, José A.; Mattoso, Luiz H. C.; Riul, Antonio; Mendonca, Cleber R.; Correa, Daniel S.

    2015-06-01

    Electronic tongue (e-tongue) sensors based on impedance spectroscopy have emerged as a potential technology to evaluate the quality and chemical composition of food, beverages, and pharmaceuticals. E-tongues usually employ transducers based on metal interdigitated electrodes (IDEs) coated with a thin layer of an active material, which is capable of interacting chemically with several types of analytes. IDEs are usually produced by photolithographic methods, which are time-consuming and costly, therefore, new fabrication technologies are required to make it more affordable. Here, we employed femtosecond laser ablation with pulse duration of 50 fs to microfabricate gold IDEs having finger width from 2.3 μm up to 3.2 μm. The parameters used in the laser ablation technique, such as light intensity, scan speed and beam spot size have been optimized to achieve uniform IDEs, which were characterized by optical and scanning electron microscopy. The electrical properties of gold IDEs fabricated by laser ablation were evaluated by impedance spectroscopy, and compared to those produced by conventional photolithography. The results show that femtosecond laser ablation is a promising alternative to conventional photolithography for fabricating metal IDEs for e-tongue systems.

  7. Generation of NiO nanoparticles via pulsed laser ablation in deionised water and their antibacterial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khashan, Khawla S.; Sulaiman, Ghassan M.; Hamad, Abubaker H.; Abdulameer, Farah A.; Hadi, Assel

    2017-03-01

    Nickel oxide (NiO) nanoparticles were synthesised by nanosecond laser ablation in deionised water. Spherical NiO nanoparticles with sizes ranging from 2 to 21 nm were produced. The optical absorption spectra of the nanoparticles were measured using UV-VIS spectroscopy, and their size distribution was characterised using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The crystalline material structures were investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to obtain infrared spectra of the samples. The results show that crystalline NiO nanoparticles were produced. The antibacterial activity of the nanoparticles against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus vulgaris, and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria was then examined. It was found that the NiO nanoparticles have a synergistic effect on inhibiting E. coli and S. aureus growth; this effect was also tested using the well-diffusion method. In this method, NiO nanoparticles at a concentration of 1000 µg ml-1 along with amoxicillin yielded an inhibition zone against E. coli of 14.3 ± 1.15 mm; this zone was 12.6 ± 0.57 mm against S. aureus. Therefore, from the present findings, it can be concluded that the efficiency of inhibiting bacterial growth could be improved by the addition of metal-oxide nanoparticles to amoxicillin in comparison with either pure amoxicillin or pure metal-oxide nanoparticles.

  8. Lung Tumors Treated With Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation: Computed Tomography Imaging Follow-Up

    SciTech Connect

    Palussiere, Jean Marcet, Benjamin; Descat, Edouard; Deschamps, Frederic; Rao, Pramod; Ravaud, Alain; Brouste, Veronique; Baere, Thierry de

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: To describe the morphologic evolution of lung tumors treated with radiofrequency ablation (RFA) by way of computed tomography (CT) images and to investigate patterns of incomplete RFA at the site of ablation. Materials and Methods: One hundred eighty-nine patients with 350 lung tumors treated with RFA underwent CT imaging at 2, 4, 6, and 12 months. CT findings were interpreted separately by two reviewers with consensus. Five different radiologic patterns were predefined: fibrosis, cavitation, nodule, atelectasis, and disappearance. The appearance of the treated area was evaluated at each follow-up CT using the predefined patterns. Results: At 1 year after treatment, the most common evolutions were fibrosis (50.5%) or nodules (44.8%). Differences were noted depending on the initial size of the tumor, with fibrosis occurring more frequently for tumors <2 cm (58.6% vs. 22.9%, P = 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5}). Cavitation and atelectasis were less frequent patterns (2.4% and 1.4%, respectively, at 1 year). Tumor location (intraparenchymatous, with pleural contact <50% or >50%) was not significantly correlated with follow-up image pattern. Local tumor progressions were observed with each type of evolution. At 1 year, 12 local recurrences were noted: 2 cavitations, which represented 40% of the cavitations noted at 1 year; 2 fibroses (1.9%); 7 nodules (7.4%); and 1 atelectasis (33.3%). Conclusion: After RFA of lung tumors, follow-up CT scans show that the shape of the treatment zone can evolve in five different patterns. None of these patterns, however, can confirm the absence of further local tumor progression at subsequent follow-up.

  9. Planar laser-driven ablation model for nonlocalized absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Dahmani, F.; Kerdja, T. )

    1991-05-01

    A model for planar laser-driven ablation is presented. Nonlocalized inverse bremsstrahlung absorption of laser energy at a density {ital n}{sub 1}{lt}{ital n}{sub {ital c}} is assumed. A steady-state solution in the conduction zone is joined to a rarefaction wave in the underdense plasma. The calculations relate all steady-state fluid quantities to only the material, absorbed intensity, and laser wavelength. The theory agrees well with results from a computer hydrodynamics code MEDUSA (Comput. Phys. Commun. {bold 7}, 271 (1974)) and experiments.

  10. Radio-frequency ablation of small renal tumors: minimum follow up of 1 year

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Vipul; Thaly, Rahul; Shah, Ketul

    2007-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: With the increased utility of complex imaging modalities small renal tumors are being diagnosed with rising frequency. We performed radiofrequency ablation to treat tumors less than 4cm in size using a combination of temperature, impedance, ultrasound and laparoscopic guidance. In this article we reviewed the outcome of radiofrequency ablation of renal tumors at one year at our institution. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Over a three-year period 75 patients with a total of 93 renal tumors underwent radiofrequency ablation. Average patient age was 64.5 years with ASA of 2.9. Indications for nephron sparing were imperative in 33 (solitary kidney 21, renal insufficiency 12). Seventeen patients had significant co-morbidities with ASA score of 3 or more and were thought to be poor candidates for nephrectomy or partial nephrectomy. Five were Jehovah's Witness patients. Average tumor size was 3.2 cm (1.5-4.0). 60% of the tumors were exophytic and 40% deep. Radiofrequency ablation was performed via a transperitoneal approach using the single pronged 3cm Cool tip electrode (Radionics Inc). Tumor was isolated laparoscopically. Prior to ablation the lesions were biopsied. Ablation was performed using both laparoscopic and real-time ultrasound imaging of the boarders of the tumor. During ablation impedance and temperature monitoring was performed. For each tumor two separate ablations were performed at perpendicular angles, the first ablation was for 6 minutes and the second for 3 minutes. The center and periphery of the tumor was monitored to insure that the temperature rose above 70 degrees Celsius. Patients were followed at three-month intervals with triple phase CT scan or MRI to evaluate efficacy of the ablation. Our criteria for recurrent tumor were growth or enhancement of the lesion. RESULTS: Average operative time was 109 minutes with and average EBL of <25cc. Mean hospital stay was 1.4 days. At average follow up of 19.2 months (range 2-24), one lesion showed

  11. Combined ultrasonic thermal ablation with interleaved ARFI image monitoring using a single diagnostic curvilinear array: A feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Bing, Kristin Frinkley; Rouze, Ned C.; Palmeri, Mark L.; Rotemberg, Veronica M.; Nightingale, Kathryn R.

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this work is to demonstrate the feasibility of using a diagnostic ultrasound system (Siemens Antares™ and CH6-2 curvilinear array) 1) to ablate ex vivo liver with a custom M-mode sequence and 2) to monitor the resulting tissue stiffening with 2-D Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) imaging. Images were taken before and after ablation, as well as in 5 s intervals during the ablation sequence in order to monitor the ablation lesion formation temporally. Ablation lesions were generated at depths up to 1.5 cm from the surface of the liver and were not visible in B-mode. ARFI images showed liver stiffening with heating that corresponded to discolored regions in gross pathology. As expected, the contrast of ablation lesions in ARFI images is observed to increase with ablation lesion size. This study demonstrated the ability of a diagnostic system using custom beam sequences to localize an ablation site, heat the site to the point of irreversible damage, and monitor the formation of the ablation lesion with ARFI imaging. PMID:22518953

  12. Optical properties of tin oxide nanoparticles prepared by laser ablation in water: Influence of laser ablation time duration and laser fluence

    SciTech Connect

    Desarkar, Himadri Sankar; Kumbhakar, P. Mitra, A.K.

    2012-11-15

    Colloidal tin oxide nanoparticles are prepared by laser (having a wavelength of 1064 nm) ablation of tin metallic target immersed in pure deionized water. The influences of laser ablation time and laser fluence on the size and optical properties of the synthesized nanoparticles are studied. Prepared tin oxide nanoparticles are characterized by transmission electron microscope, selected area electron diffraction and UV-Visible absorption spectroscopy. The morphology of prepared tin oxide nanoparticles is found to be mostly spherical and with sizes in the nanometric range (mean radius of 3.2 to 7.3 nm). The measured UV-Visible absorption spectra show the presence of absorption peaks in the ultraviolet region. The band gap energy of samples prepared with different laser ablation time duration is calculated and is found to be increased with decrease in size (radius) of the prepared nanoparticles. Photoluminescence emission measurements at room temperature show that all the samples exhibit photoluminescence in the visible region. The peak photoluminescence emission intensity in the sample prepared with 50 min of laser ablation time is 3.5 times larger than that obtained in the sample prepared with 10 min of laser ablation time. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles (6.4-14.6 nm) are prepared by laser ablation in liquid technique. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The influences of laser ablation time and laser fluence are studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Samples are characterized by TEM and UV-Visible absorption spectroscopy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UV-Visible absorption spectra exhibit quantum confinement effect. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Samples exhibit enhanced photoluminescence emissions in the visible region.

  13. A study of photothermal laser ablation of various polymers on microsecond time scales.

    PubMed

    Kappes, Ralf S; Schönfeld, Friedhelm; Li, Chen; Golriz, Ali A; Nagel, Matthias; Lippert, Thomas; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Gutmann, Jochen S

    2014-01-01

    To analyze the photothermal ablation of polymers, we designed a temperature measurement setup based on spectral pyrometry. The setup allows to acquire 2D temperature distributions with 1 μm size and 1 μs time resolution and therefore the determination of the center temperature of a laser heating process. Finite element simulations were used to verify and understand the heat conversion and heat flow in the process. With this setup, the photothermal ablation of polystyrene, poly(α-methylstyrene), a polyimide and a triazene polymer was investigated. The thermal stability, the glass transition temperature Tg and the viscosity above Tg were governing the ablation process. Thermal decomposition for the applied laser pulse of about 10 μs started at temperatures similar to the start of decomposition in thermogravimetry. Furthermore, for polystyrene and poly(α-methylstyrene), both with a Tg in the range between room and decomposition temperature, ablation already occurred at temperatures well below the decomposition temperature, only at 30-40 K above Tg. The mechanism was photomechanical, i.e. a stress due to the thermal expansion of the polymer was responsible for ablation. Low molecular weight polymers showed differences in photomechanical ablation, corresponding to their lower Tg and lower viscosity above the glass transition. However, the difference in ablated volume was only significant at higher temperatures in the temperature regime for thermal decomposition at quasi-equilibrium time scales.

  14. Laser ablation of liver tumors: An ancillary technique, or an alternative to radiofrequency and microwave?

    PubMed Central

    Sartori, Sergio; Di Vece, Francesca; Ermili, Francesca; Tombesi, Paola

    2017-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is currently the most popular and used ablation modality for the treatment of non surgical patients with primary and secondary liver tumors, but in the last years microwave ablation (MWA) is being technically improved and widely rediscovered for clinical use. Laser thermal ablation (LTA) is by far less investigated and used than RFA and MWA, but the available data on its effectiveness and safety are quite good and comparable to those of RFA and MWA. All the three hyperthermia-based ablative techniques, when performed by skilled operators, can successfully treat all liver tumors eligible for thermal ablation, and to date in most centers of interventional oncology or interventional radiology the choice of the technique usually depends on the physician’s preference and experience, or technical availability. However, RFA, MWA, and LTA have peculiar advantages and limitations that can make each of them more suitable than the other ones to treat patients and tumors with different characteristics. When all the three thermal ablation techniques are available, the choice among RFA, MWA, and LTA should be guided by their advantages and disadvantages, number, size, and location of the liver nodules, and cost-saving considerations, in order to give patients the best treatment option.

  15. Anomalous zones (domal)

    SciTech Connect

    Kupfer, D.H. )

    1990-09-01

    Each zone contains several anomalous salt properties (anomalous features). Zones cannot be characterized by any single property Zones are highly variable, lenticular, and discontinuous in detail; however, once established, they commonly have a predictable trend. The individual anomalous features can occur alone (locally in pairs) over areas of various sizes and shapes. These alone occurrences are not anomalous zones. Anomalous zones may be of any origin, and origin is not part of the definition. Typical origins include: primary (sedimentary), external sheath zone, separating two spines of salt, or caused by toroidal flow. The major importance of an anomalous zone is that it consists of various anomalous features distributed discontinuously along the zone. Thus, if three or more anomalous properties are observed together, one should look for others. The anomalous zones observed in the Gulf Coast thus far are vertical, linear, and semicontinuous. Most are reasonably straight, but some bend sharply, end abruptly, or coalesce. Textures in salt involve grain size, color (white to dark gray), grain shape, or grain distribution of the salt. Typical anomalous textures are coarse-grain, poikiloblastic, and friability. A change in color is commonplace and seldom anomalous. Structural anomalous features, broadly defined, account for most of the rest of the anomalous features. Not uncommonly they cause mining problems. Among the structural anomalous features: INCLUSIONS: Sediments, hydrocarbons, brine, gases. Common gases are air (as N{sub 2}), CH-compounds, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}S. STRUCTURES: Sheared salt, undue stabbing or jointing, voids (crystal-lined pockets), permeability, increased porosity COMPOSITION: High anhydrite content, visible anhydrite as grains or boudins, very black salt = disseminated impurities such as clay.

  16. Reconfigurable tapered coaxial slot antenna for hepatic microwave ablation.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Neeru; Marwaha, Anupma; Kumar, Ajay

    2016-01-01

    Microwave ablation is rapidly being rediscovered and developed for treating many cancers of liver, lung, kidney and bone, as well as arrhythmias and other medical conditions. The microwaves ablate tissue by heating it to cytotoxic temperatures. The microwave antenna design suffers the challenges of effective coupling and penetration into body tissues, uncontrolled power deposition due to applicator construction limitations affecting uniform heating of target region, and narrowband operation leading to mismatch for many patients and detrimental heating. To meet out the requirements of wideband operation and localized lesion reconfigurable linearly tapered slot interstitial wideband antenna has been proposed for working in the 1.38 GHz to 4.31 GHz frequency band. The performance of the antenna is evaluated by using FEM-based HFSS software. The slot height and taper height are reconfigured for parametric analysis achieving maximum impedance matching and spherical ablation zone without requiring any additional adjustable structures. The tapering of the slot in coaxial antenna generates current distribution at the edges of the slot for maximizing specific absorption rate.

  17. Characterization of tracked radiofrequency ablation in phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chun-Cheng R.; Miga, Michael I.; Galloway, Robert L.

    2007-10-15

    In radiofrequency ablation (RFA), successful therapy requires accurate, image-guided placement of the ablation device in a location selected by a predictive treatment plan. Current planning methods rely on geometric models of ablations that are not sensitive to underlying physical processes in RFA. Implementing plans based on computational models of RFA with image-guided techniques, however, has not been well characterized. To study the use of computational models of RFA in planning needle placement, this work compared ablations performed with an optically tracked RFA device with corresponding models of the ablations. The calibration of the tracked device allowed the positions of distal features of the device, particularly the tips of the needle electrodes, to be determined to within 1.4{+-}0.6 mm of uncertainty. Ablations were then performed using the tracked device in a phantom system based on an agarose-albumin mixture. Images of the sliced phantom obtained from the ablation experiments were then compared with the predictions of a bioheat transfer model of RFA, which used the positional data of the tracked device obtained during ablation. The model was demonstrated to predict 90% of imaged pixels classified as being ablated. The discrepancies between model predictions and observations were analyzed and attributed to needle tracking inaccuracy as well as to uncertainties in model parameters. The results suggest the feasibility of using finite element modeling to plan ablations with predictable outcomes when implemented using tracked RFA.

  18. Dual-energy CT after radiofrequency ablation of liver, kidney, and lung lesions: a review of features.

    PubMed

    Vandenbroucke, Frederik; Van Hedent, Steven; Van Gompel, Gert; Buls, Nico; Craggs, Gordon; Vandemeulebroucke, Jef; Ros, Pablo R; de Mey, Johan

    2015-06-01

    Early detection of residual tumour and local tumour progression (LTP) after radiofrequency (RF) ablation is crucial in the decision whether or not to re-ablate. In general, standard contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) is used to evaluate the technique effectiveness; however, it is difficult to differentiate post-treatment changes from residual tumour. Dual-energy CT (DECT) is a relatively new technique that enables more specific tissue characterisation of iodine-enhanced structures because of the isolation of iodine in the imaging data. Necrotic post-ablation zones can be depicted as avascular regions by DECT on greyscale- and colour-coded iodine images. Synthesised monochromatic images from dual-energy CT with spectral analysis can be used to select the optimal keV to achieve the highest contrast-to-noise ratio between tissues. This facilitates outlining the interface between the ablation zone and surrounding tissue. Post-processing of DECT data can lead to an improved characterisation and delineation of benign post-ablation changes from LTP. Radiologists need to be familiar with typical post-ablation image interpretations when using DECT techniques. Here, we review the spectrum of changes after RF ablation of liver, kidney, and lung lesions using single-source DECT imaging, with the emphasis on the additional information obtained and pitfalls encountered with this relatively new technique. Teaching Points •Technical success of RF ablation means complete destruction of the tumour. •Assessment of residual tumour on contrast-enhanced CT is hindered by post-ablative changes. •DECT improves material differentiation and may improve focal lesion characterisation. •Iodine maps delineate the treated area from the surrounding parenchyma well.

  19. Cardiac shear-wave elastography using a transesophageal transducer: application to the mapping of thermal lesions in ultrasound transesophageal cardiac ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwiecinski, Wojciech; Bessière, Francis; Constanciel Colas, Elodie; Apoutou N'Djin, W.; Tanter, Mickaël; Lafon, Cyril; Pernot, Mathieu

    2015-10-01

    Heart rhythm disorders, such as atrial fibrillation or ventricular tachycardia can be treated by catheter-based thermal ablation. However, clinically available systems based on radio-frequency or cryothermal ablation suffer from limited energy penetration and the lack of lesion’s extent monitoring. An ultrasound-guided transesophageal device has recently successfully been used to perform High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) ablation in targeted regions of the heart in vivo. In this study we investigate the feasibility of a dual therapy and imaging approach on the same transesophageal device. We demonstrate in vivo that quantitative cardiac shear-wave elastography (SWE) can be performed with the device and we show on ex vivo samples that transesophageal SWE can map the extent of the HIFU lesions. First, SWE was validated with the transesophageal endoscope in one sheep in vivo. The stiffness of normal atrial and ventricular tissues has been assessed during the cardiac cycle (n=11 ) and mapped (n= 7 ). Second, HIFU ablation has been performed with the therapy-imaging transesophageal device in ex vivo chicken breast samples (n  =  3), then atrial (left, n= 2 ) and ventricular (left n=1 , right n=1 ) porcine heart tissues. SWE provided stiffness maps of the tissues before and after ablation. Areas of the lesions were obtained by tissue color change with gross pathology and compared to SWE. During the cardiac cycle stiffness varied from 0.5   ±   0.1 kPa to 6.0   ±   0.3 kPa in the atrium and from 1.3   ±   0.3 kPa to 13.5   ±   9.1 kPa in the ventricles. The thermal lesions were visible on all SWE maps performed after ablation. Shear modulus of the ablated zones increased to 16.3   ±   5.5 kPa (versus 4.4   ±   1.6 kPa before ablation) in the chicken breast, to 30.3   ±   10.3 kPa (versus 12.2   ±   4.3 kPa) in the atria and to 73.8   ±   13

  20. Artificial meteor ablation studies: Olivine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, M. B.; Cunningham, G. G.

    1973-01-01

    Artificial meteor ablation was performed on a Mg-rich olivine sample using an arc-heated plasma of ionized air. Experimental conditions simulated a meteor traveling about 12 km/sec at an altitude of 70 km. The mineral content of the original olivine sample was 98% olivine (including traces of olivine alteration products) and 2% chromite. Forsterite content of the original olivine was Fo-89. After ablation, the forsterite content had increased to Fo-94 in the recrystallized olivine. In addition, lamella-like intergrowths of magnetite were prevalent constituents. Wherever magnetite occurred, there was an increase in Mg and a corresponding decrease in Fe for the recrystallized olivine. The Allende fusion crust consisted of a recrystallized olivine, which was more Mg-rich and Fe-deficient than the original meteorite's olivine, and abundant magnetite grains. Although troilite and pentlandite were the common opaque mineral constituents in this meteorite, magnetite was the principal opaque mineral found in the fusion crust.

  1. Laser Ablation for Medical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Ken-Ichi

    Medical applications of laser are measurement, laser surgery, in-situ monitoring, and processing of medical devices. In this paper, author briefly reviews the trends of medical applications, describes some new applications, and then discuss about the future trends and problems of medical applications. At present, the domestic market of laser equipment for medical applications is nearly 1/10 of that for industrial applications, which has registered significant growth continuously. Laser surgery as a minimum invasive surgery under arthroscope is expected to decrease the pain of patients. Precise processing such as cutting and welding is suitable for manufacturing medical devices. Pulsed laser deposition has been successfully applied to the thin film coating. The corneal refractive surgery by ArF excimer laser has been widely accepted for its highly safe operation. Laser ablation for retinal implant in the visual prosthesis is one of the promising applications of laser ablation in medicine. New applications with femtosecond laser are expected in the near future.

  2. Percutaneous ablation of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    D’Onofrio, Mirko; Ciaravino, Valentina; De Robertis, Riccardo; Barbi, Emilio; Salvia, Roberto; Girelli, Roberto; Paiella, Salvatore; Gasparini, Camilla; Cardobi, Nicolò; Bassi, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is a highly aggressive tumor with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. Prognosis and treatment depend on whether the tumor is resectable or not, which mostly depends on how quickly the diagnosis is made. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy can be both used in cases of non-resectable pancreatic cancer. In cases of pancreatic neoplasm that is locally advanced, non-resectable, but non-metastatic, it is possible to apply percutaneous treatments that are able to induce tumor cytoreduction. The aim of this article will be to describe the multiple currently available treatment techniques (radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation), their results, and their possible complications, with the aid of a literature review. PMID:27956791

  3. Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Richard E.; Bol'shakov, Alexander A.; Mao, Xianglei; McKay, Christopher P.; Perry, Dale L.; Sorkhabi, Osman

    2011-02-01

    A new method of performing optical isotopic analysis of condensed samples in ambient air and at ambient pressure has been developed: Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry (LAMIS). The technique uses radiative transitions from molecular species either directly vaporized from a sample or formed by associative mechanisms of atoms or ions in a laser ablation plume. This method is an advanced modification of a known atomic emission technique called laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The new method — LAMIS — can determine not only chemical composition but also isotopic ratios of elements in the sample. Isotopic measurements are enabled by significantly larger isotopic shifts found in molecular spectra relative to atomic spectra. Analysis can be performed from a distance and in real time. No sample preparation or pre-treatment is required. Detection of the isotopes of hydrogen, boron, carbon, and oxygen are discussed to illustrate the technique.

  4. Percutaneous ablation of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    D'Onofrio, Mirko; Ciaravino, Valentina; De Robertis, Riccardo; Barbi, Emilio; Salvia, Roberto; Girelli, Roberto; Paiella, Salvatore; Gasparini, Camilla; Cardobi, Nicolò; Bassi, Claudio

    2016-11-28

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is a highly aggressive tumor with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. Prognosis and treatment depend on whether the tumor is resectable or not, which mostly depends on how quickly the diagnosis is made. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy can be both used in cases of non-resectable pancreatic cancer. In cases of pancreatic neoplasm that is locally advanced, non-resectable, but non-metastatic, it is possible to apply percutaneous treatments that are able to induce tumor cytoreduction. The aim of this article will be to describe the multiple currently available treatment techniques (radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation), their results, and their possible complications, with the aid of a literature review.

  5. Observation, Simulation, and Evaluation of Snow Dynamics in the Transitional Snow Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wayand, Nicholas E.

    The frequent mid-winter accumulation and ablation cycles of snowpack within the rain-snow transitional zone play an important role for the maritime basins along the western U.S. mountain ranges. Representation of transitional snowpack within hydrological models has remained a challenge, largely because surface and meteorological conditions frequently remain near the freezing point, which allows large errors in modeled accumulation or ablation to result from small forcing or structural errors. This research aims to improve model representation of accumulation and ablation processes by utilizing new observations within the transitional snow zone combined with novel methods of model evaluation. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  6. Growth of anatase and rutile phase TiO2 nanoparticles using pulsed laser ablation in liquid: Influence of surfactant addition and ablation time variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaturvedi, Amita; Joshi, M. P.; Mondal, P.; Sinha, A. K.; Srivastava, A. K.

    2017-02-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles were grown using nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of Ti target in DI water and in 0.001 M sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) surfactant aqueous solution. Growth was carried out with varying ablation times i. e. 30 min, 60 min and 90 min. The objective of our study was to investigate the influence of variations in liquid ambience conditions on the growth of the nanoparticles in a pulsed laser ablation in liquid (PLAL) process. Size, composition and optical properties of the grown TiO2 nanoparticles were investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), optical absorption, photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies. The obtained nanoparticles of TiO2 were found almost spherical in shape and polycrystalline in nature in both the liquid mediums i.e. DI water and aqueous solution of surfactant. Nanoparticles number density was also found to increase with increasing ablation time in both the liquid mediums. However crystalline phase of the grown TiO2 nanoparticles differs with the change in liquid ambience conditions. Selected area electron diffraction (SAED), PL and XRD studies suggest that DI water ambience is favorable for the growth of anatase phase TiO2 nanoparticles for all ablation times. While Surfactant added water ambience is favorable for the growth of rutile phase TiO2 nanoparticles but for shorter ablation times of 30 min and 60 min only, for longer ablation time of 90 min anatase phase was also observed along with the rutile phase TiO2 nanoparticles. The formation of anatase phase in DI water and rutile and anatase phase in aqueous solution of surfactant is explained on the basis of varying thermodynamic conditions with the two different liquid ambiences and different ablation times.

  7. Nanometer-scale ablation using focused, coherent extreme ultraviolet/soft x-ray light

    SciTech Connect

    Menoni, Carmen S; Rocca, Jorge J; Vaschenko, Georgiy; Bloom, Scott; Anderson, Erik H; Chao, Weilun; Hemberg, Oscar

    2011-04-26

    Ablation of holes having diameters as small as 82 nm and having clean walls was obtained in a poly(methyl methacrylate) on a silicon substrate by focusing pulses from a Ne-like Ar, 46.9 nm wavelength, capillary-discharge laser using a freestanding Fresnel zone plate diffracting into third order is described. Spectroscopic analysis of light from the ablation has also been performed. These results demonstrate the use of focused coherent EUV/SXR light for the direct nanoscale patterning of materials.

  8. Optoacoustic monitoring of real-time lesion formation during radiofrequency catheter ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Genny A.; Bay, Erwin; Deán-Ben, Xosé L.; Razansky, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    Current radiofrequency cardiac ablation procedures lack real-time lesion monitoring guidance, limiting the reliability and efficacy of the treatment. The objective of this work is to demonstrate that optoacoustic imaging can be applied to develop a diagnostic technique applicable to radiofrequency ablation for cardiac arrhythmia treatment with the capabilities of real-time monitoring of ablated lesion size and geometry. We demonstrate an optoacoustic imaging method using a 256-detector optoacoustic imaging probe and pulsed-laser illumination in the infrared wavelength range that is applied during radiofrequency ablation in excised porcine myocardial tissue samples. This technique results in images with high contrast between the lesion volume and unablated tissue, and is also capable of capturing time-resolved image sequences that provide information on the lesion development process. The size and geometry of the imaged lesion were shown to be in excellent agreement with the histological examinations. This study demonstrates the first deep-lesion real-time monitoring for radiofrequency ablation generated lesions, and the technique presented here has the potential for providing critical feedback that can significantly impact the outcome of clinical radiofrequency ablation procedures.

  9. 46 CFR 76.23-5 - Zoning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... deck, spaces separated by “A” or “B” Class bulkheads may be separately zoned. (b) On any particular... common area shall be of approximately the same size. Zones of this type shall overlap in such a...

  10. 46 CFR 76.23-5 - Zoning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... deck, spaces separated by “A” or “B” Class bulkheads may be separately zoned. (b) On any particular... common area shall be of approximately the same size. Zones of this type shall overlap in such a...

  11. 46 CFR 76.23-5 - Zoning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... deck, spaces separated by “A” or “B” Class bulkheads may be separately zoned. (b) On any particular... common area shall be of approximately the same size. Zones of this type shall overlap in such a...

  12. Synthesis of CaWO4 nanocolloidal suspension via pulsed laser ablation and its optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Jeong Ho; Park, Gyeong Seon; Kim, Kang Min; Lim, Chang Sung; Yoon, Jong-Won; Shim, Kwang Bo

    2007-09-01

    Pulsed laser ablation (PLA) in the liquid phase was successfully employed to synthesize calcium tungstate (CaWO4) nanocolloidal suspension. The crystalline phase, particle morphology and laser ablation mechanism for the colloidal nanoparticles were investigated using XRD, TEM and SEM. The obtained colloidal suspension consisted of well-dispersed CaWO4 nanoparticles which showed a spherical shape with sizes ranging from 5 to 30 nm. The laser ablation and the nanoparticle forming process were discussed under consideration of the photo-ablation mechanism, where the nanoparticles were generated by rapid condensation of the plume in high pressured ethanol vapor. The optical properties of the prepared CaWO4 colloidal nanoparticles were analyzed in detail using XPS, Raman spectroscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy and PL spectrophotometry. The optical band gap was estimated by Tauc and Menths law.

  13. Survival after Radiofrequency Ablation in 122 Patients with Inoperable Colorectal Lung Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Gillams, Alice; Khan, Zahid; Osborn, Peter; Lees, William

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. To analyze the factors associated with favorable survival in patients with inoperable colorectal lung metastases treated with percutaneous image-guided radiofrequency ablation. Methods. Between 2002 and 2011, a total of 398 metastases were ablated in 122 patients (87 male, median age 68 years, range 29-90 years) at 256 procedures. Percutaneous CT-guided cool-tip radiofrequency ablation was performed under sedation/general anesthesia. Maximum tumor size, number of tumors ablated, number of procedures, concurrent/prior liver ablation, previous liver or lung resection, systemic chemotherapy, disease-free interval from primary resection to lung metastasis, and survival from first ablation were recorded prospectively. Kaplan-Meier analysis was performed, and factors were compared by log rank test. Results. The initial number of metastases ablated was 2.3 (range 1-8); the total number was 3.3 (range 1-15). The maximum tumor diameter was 1.7 (range 0.5-4) cm, and the number of procedures was 2 (range 1-10). The major complication rate was 3.9 %. Overall median and 3-year survival rate were 41 months and 57 %. Survival was better in patients with smaller tumors-a median of 51 months, with 3-year survival of 64 % for tumors 2 cm or smaller versus 31 months and 44 % for tumors 2.1-4 cm (p = 0.08). The number of metastases ablated and whether the tumors were unilateral or bilateral did not affect survival. The presence of treated liver metastases, systemic chemotherapy, or prior lung resection did not affect survival. Conclusion. Three-year survival of 57 % in patients with inoperable colorectal lung metastases is better than would be expected with chemotherapy alone. Patients with inoperable but small-volume colorectal lung metastases should be referred for ablation.

  14. Deflection of uncooperative targets using laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiry, Nicolas; Vasile, Massimiliano

    2015-09-01

    Owing to their ability to move a target in space without requiring propellant, laser-based deflection methods have gained attention among the research community in the recent years. With laser ablation, the vaporized material is used to push the target itself allowing for a significant reduction in the mass requirement for a space mission. Specifically, this paper addresses two important issues which are thought to limit seriously the potential efficiency of a laser-deflection method: the impact of the tumbling motion of the target as well as the impact of the finite thickness of the material ablated in the case of a space debris. In this paper, we developed a steady-state analytical model based on energetic considerations in order to predict the efficiency range theoretically allowed by a laser deflection system in absence of the two aforementioned issues. A numerical model was then implemented to solve the transient heat equation in presence of vaporization and melting and account for the tumbling rate of the target. This model was also translated to the case where the target is a space debris by considering material properties of an aluminium 6061-T6 alloy and adapting at every time-step the size of the computational domain along with the recession speed of the interface in order to account for the finite thickness of the debris component. The comparison between the numerical results and the analytical predictions allow us to draw interesting conclusions regarding the momentum coupling achievable by a given laser deflection system both for asteroids and space debris in function of the flux, the rotation rate of the target and its material properties. In the last section of this paper, we show how a reasonably small spacecraft could deflect a 56m asteroid with a laser system requiring less than 5kW of input power.

  15. Microwave Ablation Compared to Radiofrequency Ablation for Hepatic Lesions: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Huo, Ya Ruth; Eslick, Guy D

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of microwave (MW) ablation compared with radiofrequency (RF) ablation for hepatic lesions by using meta-analytic techniques. Overall, 16 studies involving 2,062 patients were included. MW ablation was found to have significantly better 6-year overall survival than RF ablation (odds ratio, 1.64, 95% confidence interval, 1.15-2.35), but this was based on a few articles (n = 3 of 16). MW ablation and RF ablation had similar 1-5-year overall survival, disease-free survival, local recurrence rate, and adverse events. Based on similar safety and efficacy outcomes, either MW ablation or RF ablation may be used for effective local hepatic therapy.

  16. Tumor Thermal Ablation Enhancement by Micromaterials.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fan; Su, Hongying; Han, Xiangjun; Bao, Han; Qi, Ji

    2016-01-07

    Thermal ablation is a minimally invasive therapeutic technique that has shown remarkable potential in treating un resectable tumors. However, clinical applications have stalled, due to safety ambiguities, slow heat induction, lengthy ablation times, and post-therapeutic monitoring issues. To further improve treatment efficacy, an assortment of micro materials (eg, nano particulates of gold, silica, or iron oxide and single-walled carbon nanotubes) are under study as thermal ablative adjuncts.In recent years, the micro material domain has become especially interesting.In vivo and in vitro animal studies have validated the use of microspheres as embolic agents in liver tumors, in advance of radiofrequency ablation. Microcapsules and micro bubbles serving as ultrasound contrast and ablation sensibilizers are strong prospects for clinical applications. This review was conducted to explore benefits of the three aforementioned micro scale technologies, in conjunction with tumor thermal ablation.

  17. Image-guided ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lencioni, Riccardo; Crocetti, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Image-guided ablation is accepted as the best therapeutic choice for patients with early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) when surgical options-including resection and transplantation-are precluded. The term image-guided tumor ablation is defined as the direct application of chemical substances or sources of energy to a focal tumor in an attempt to achieve eradication or substantial tumor destruction. Over the past 25 years, several methods for local tumor destruction have been developed and clinically tested. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has shown superior anticancer effect and greater survival benefit with respect to the seminal percutaneous technique, ethanol injection, in meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials, and is currently established as the standard ablative modality. Nevertheless, novel thermal and nonthermal techniques for tumor ablation-including microwave ablation and irreversible electroporation-seem to have potential to improve the efficacy of RFA and are currently undergoing clinical investigation.

  18. Production of nanoparticles from natural hydroxylapatite by laser ablation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Laser ablation of solids in liquids technique has been used to obtain colloidal nanoparticles from biological hydroxylapatite using pulsed as well as a continuous wave (CW) laser. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurements revealed the formation of spherical particles with size distribution ranging from few nanometers to hundred nanometers and irregular submicronic particles. High resolution TEM showed that particles obtained by the use of pulsed laser were crystalline, while those obtained by the use of CW laser were amorphous. The shape and size of particles are consistent with the explosive ejection as formation mechanism. PMID:21711800

  19. The effects of ablation on the cross section of planetary envelopes at capturing planetesimals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benvenuto, Omar G.; Brunini, Adrián

    2008-06-01

    We explore the cross section of giant planet envelopes at capturing planetesimals of different sizes. For this purpose we employ two sets of realistic planetary envelope models (computed assuming for the protoplanetary nebula masses of 10 and 5 times the mass of the minimum mass solar nebula), account for drag and ablation effects and study the trajectories along which planetesimals move. The core accretion of these models has been computed in the oligarchic growth regime [Fortier, A., Benvenuto, O.G., Brunini, A., 2007. Astron. Astrophys. 473, 311-322], which has also been considered for the velocities of the incoming planetesimals. This regime predicts velocities larger that those used in previous studies of this problem. As the rate of ablation is dependent on the third power of velocity, ablation is more important in the oligarchic growth regime. We compute energy and mass deposition, fractional ablated masses and the total cross section of planets for a wide range of values of the critical parameter of ablation. In computing the total cross section of the planet we have included the contributions due to mass deposited by planetesimals moving along unbound orbits. Our results indicate that, for the case of small planetary cores and low velocities for the incoming planetesimals, ablation has a negligible impact on the capture cross section in agreement with the results presented in Inaba and Ikoma [Inaba, S., Ikoma, M., 2003. Astron. Astrophys. 410, 711-723]. However for the case of larger cores and high velocities of the incoming planetesimals as predicted by the oligarchic growth regime, we find that ablation is important in determining the planetary cross section, being several times larger than the value corresponding ignoring ablation. This is so regardless of the size of the incoming planetesimals.

  20. CdTe nanoparticles synthesized by laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Semaltianos, N. G.; Logothetidis, S.; Perrie, W.; Romani, S.; Potter, R. J.; Dearden, G.; Watkins, K. G.; Sharp, M.

    2009-07-20

    Nanoparticle generation by laser ablation of a solid target in a liquid environment is an easy, fast, and 'green' method for a large scale production of nanomaterials with tailored properties. In this letter we report the synthesis of CdTe nanoparticles by femtosecond laser [387 nm, 180 fs, 1 kHz, pulse energy=6 {mu}J (fluence=1.7 J/cm{sup 2})] ablation of the target material. Nanoparticles with diameters from {approx}2 up to {approx}25 nm were observed to be formed in the colloidal solution. Their size distribution follows the log-normal function with a statistical median diameter of {approx_equal}7.1 nm. Their crystal structure is the same as that of the bulk material (cubic zincblende) and they are slightly Cd-rich (Cd:Te percentage ratio {approx}1:0.9). Photoluminescence emission from the produced nanoparticles was detected in the deep red ({approx}652 nm)

  1. [Radiofrequency ablation of a symptomatic benign thyroid nodule].

    PubMed

    van Ginhoven, T M; Massolt, E T; Bijdevaate, D C; Peeters, R P; Burgers, J W A; Moelker, A

    2016-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) enables the ablation of selected tissue by means of heat. For the first time in the Netherlands, RFA is being used to treat patients with benign thyroid nodules. RFA is able to reduce the volume of a nodule that may be causing cosmetic complaints or problems due to mass effect. This avoids the need for surgery or treatment with radioactive iodine in this benign condition. The average reduction in size is 80% in the first year, leading to a considerable decrease in both symptomatic and cosmetic complaints. At Erasmus Medical Centre, Rotterdam, the Netherlands, this technique has been introduced in accordance with current guidelines, and it is expected that other centres of excellence will follow in implementing it. It is important that the initial experiences with this technique in the Netherlands in terms of effectiveness, risks and patient satisfaction should be monitored before RFA becomes routine treatment.

  2. Plasma-mediated ablation of biofilm contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhixiong; Wang, Xiaoliang; Huang, Huan

    2010-12-01

    Ultra-short pulsed laser removal of thin biofilm contamination on different substrates has been conducted via the use of plasma-mediated ablation. The biofilms were formed using sheep whole blood. The ablation was generated using a 1.2 ps ultra-short pulsed laser with wavelength centered at 1552 nm. The blood contamination was transformed into plasma and collected with a vacuum system. The single line ablation features have been measured. The ablation thresholds of blood contamination and bare substrates were determined. It is found that the ablation threshold of the blood contamination is lower than those of the beneath substrates including the glass slide, PDMS, and human dermal tissues. The ablation effects of different laser parameters (pulse overlap rate and pulse energy) were studied and ablation efficiency was measured. Proper ablation parameters were found to efficiently remove contamination with maximum efficiency and without damage to the substrate surface for the current laser system. Complete removal of blood contaminant from the glass substrate surface and freeze-dried dermis tissue surface was demonstrated by the USP laser ablation with repeated area scanning. No obvious thermal damage was found in the decontaminated glass and tissue samples.

  3. Percutaneous ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma: current status.

    PubMed

    McWilliams, Justin P; Yamamoto, Shota; Raman, Steven S; Loh, Christopher T; Lee, Edward W; Liu, David M; Kee, Stephen T

    2010-08-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is an increasingly common disease with dismal long-term survival. Percutaneous ablation has gained popularity as a minimally invasive, potentially curative therapy for HCC in nonoperative candidates. The seminal technique of percutaneous ethanol injection has been largely supplanted by newer modalities, including radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, cryoablation, and high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation. A review of these modalities, including technical success, survival rates, and complications, will be presented, as well as considerations for treatment planning and follow-up.

  4. Ablation of liver metastases: current status.

    PubMed

    Flanders, Vincent L; Gervais, Debra A

    2010-08-01

    Local ablative therapy for the treatment of metastatic disease to the liver has been evaluated most extensively in colorectal cancer with 5-year survival rates up to 55% after RF ablation. Recent findings suggest selected patients with other malignant processes may benefit as well, but conclusive evidence is limited. This article reviews the available literature regarding the use of radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, and cryoablation in the treatment of metastatic disease to the liver. The published results of each of these modalities in the treatment of metastatic disease to the liver are promising, and outcomes continue to be evaluated.

  5. Development of a Laser Ablation ICPMS Rutile Standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lytle, M. L.; Kohn, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Rutile is a common accessory mineral in igneous and high-grade metamorphic rocks and igneous, with many applications in geosciences. Rutile geochemistry, especially the high field strength elements (i.e., Nb and Ta), monitors many geological processes including subduction-zone metamorphism, while Zr provides temperature information in buffering assemblages. Rutile can also be used for U-Pb geochronology, but typically low U concentrations can make age dating difficult. Many applications of rutile now rely on laser ablation ICPMS (LA-ICPMS) analysis, a major disadvantage of this technique is the lack of reliable rutile standards. Here, we present laser ablation data of several rutile megacrysts from around the world, illustrating typical geochemical characteristics of potential standards. Whole-grain transects and depth profiles were collected on several rutiles, including Graves Mountain, Kragerø, Madagascar, Mozambique, Quebec, and Diamantina. Most transects, particularly across Graves Mountain and Diamantina, show dramatic zoning in Zr (up to 100 ppm), U (up to 10 ppm), and Nb (up to 1000 ppm). Rutile grains from Mozambique and Kragerø show little variation in concentration in Zr, U, and Nb. However, U concentrations generally range from 1ppm (Graves Mountain) to 45ppm (Kragero). Depth profiles (30-80s analysis; 15-40 μm) showed a combination of slight surface contamination plus minor to significant near-rim zoning. Some samples, such as Mozambique, show minor concentration changes in Zr, Nb, and Ta over the outer 10 μm but are otherwise unzoned, whereas U concentrations decrease for 25 μm then are constant. Kragero shows depth zoning throughout for Zr, Ta, and U but Nb is unzoned. Some rutile megacrysts show promise as standards (e.g. Mozambique and Kragero), but must be prepared to eliminate crystal surfaces. Other megacrysts would have to be subsampled within specific crystals to isolate chemical homogeneous domains.

  6. Production of microscale particles from fish bone by gas flow assisted laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutinguiza, M.; Lusquiños, F.; Comesaña, R.; Riveiro, A.; Quintero, F.; Pou, J.

    2007-12-01

    Recycled wastes from fish and seafood can constitute a source of precursor material for different applications in the biomedical field such as bone fillers or precursor material for bioceramic coatings to improve the osteointegration of metallic implants. In this work, fish bones have been used directly as target in a laser ablation system. A pulsed Nd:YAG laser was used to ablate the fish bone material and a transverse air flow was used to extract the ablated material out of the interaction zone. The particles collected at a filter were in the micro and nanoscale range. The morphology as well as the composition of the obtained particles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results reveal that the composition of the analyzed particles is similar to that of the inorganic part of the fish bone.

  7. Are the stratospheric dust particles meteor ablation debris or interplanetary dust?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, M. B.; Kyte, F. T.

    1978-01-01

    Natural and laboratory created fusion crusts and debris from artificial meteor samples were used to develop criteria for recognizing meteor ablation debris in a collection of 5 to 50 micron particles from the stratosphere. These laboratory studies indicate that meteor ablation debris from nickel-iron meteoroids produce spherules containing taenite, wuestite, magnetite, and hematite. These same studies also indicate that ablation debris from chondritic meteoroids produce spheres and fragmentary debris. The spheres may be either silicate rich, containing zoned olivine, magnetite, and glass, or sulfide rich, containing iron oxides (e.g., magnetite, wuestite) and iron sulfides (e.g., pyrrhotite, pentlandite). The fragmentary debris may be either fine-grained aggregates of olivine, magnetite, pyroxene, and occasionally pyrrhotite (derived from the meteorite matrix) or individual olivine and pyroxene grains (derived from meteorite inclusions).

  8. Dynamic response of laser ablative shock waves from coated and uncoated amorphous boron nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chelikani, Leela; Pinnoju, Venkateshwarlu; Verma, Pankaj; Singh, Raja V.; Kiran, P. Prem

    2017-01-01

    Laser ablative shock waves from compacted nano-sized powders was studied using time resolved shadowgraphy technique. Shock wave properties such as propagation of shock front, contact front, velocity and pressure behind the shock front were studied from nano-sized powders of Amorphous Boron (B) and Lithium Fluoride coated Boron (LiF-B) with the material density of 2.34 g/cc. The experiments were performed to understand the challenging aspects of laser-powder interactions to explore their application potential for laser ablation Propulsion (LAP).

  9. Properties of low power spark ablation in aqueous solution for dissolution of precious metals and alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goltz, Douglas; Boileau, Michael; Plews, Ian; Charleton, Kimberly; Hinds, Michael W.

    2006-07-01

    Spark ablation or electric dispersion of metal samples in aqueous solution can be a useful approach for sample preparation. The ablated metal forms a stable suspension that has been described as colloidal, which is easily dissolved with a small amount of concentrated (16 M) HNO 3. In this study, we have examined some of the properties of the spark ablation process for a variety of metals (Rh and Au) and alloys (stainless steel) using a low power spark (100-300 W). Particle size distributions and conductivity measurements were carried out on selected metals to characterize the stable suspensions. A LASER diffraction particle size analyzer was useful for showing that ablated particles varied in size from 1 to 30 μm for both the silver and the nickel alloy, Inconel. In terms of weight percent most of the particles were between 10 and 30 μm. Conductivity of the spark ablation solution was found to increase linearly for approximately 3 min before leveling off at approximately 300 S cm 3. These measurements suggest that a significant portion of the ablated metal is also ionic in nature. Scanning electron microscope measurements revealed that a low power spark is much less damaging to the metal surface than a high power spark. Crater formation of the low power spark was found in a wider area than expected with the highest concentration where the spark was directed. The feasibility of using spark ablation for metal dissolution of a valuable artifact such as gold was also performed. Determinations of Ag (4-12%) and Cu (1-3%) in Bullion Reference Material (BRM) gave results that were in very good agreement with the certified values. The precision was ± 0.27% for Ag at 4.15% (RSD = 6.5%) and ± 0.09% for Cu at 1% (RSD = 9.0%).

  10. Probabilistic finite element analysis of radiofrequency liver ablation using the unscented transform

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Icaro; Haemmerich, Dieter; Schutt, David; da Rocha, Adson Ferreira; Menezes, Leonardo Rax

    2009-01-01

    The main limitation of radiofrequency (RF) ablation numerical simulations reported in the literature is their failure to provide statistical results based on the statistical variability of tissue thermal–electrical parameters. This work developed an efficient probabilistic approach to hepatic RF ablation in order to statistically evaluate the effect of four thermal–electrical properties of liver tissue on the uncertainty of the ablation zone dimensions: thermal conductivity, specific heat, blood perfusion and electrical conductivity. A deterministic thermal–electrical finite element model of a monopolar electrode inserted in the liver was coupled with the unscented transform method in order to obtain coagulation zone confidence intervals, probability and cumulative density functions. The coagulation zone volume, diameter and length were 10.96 cm3, 2.17 cm and 4.08 cm, respectively (P < 0.01). Furthermore, a probabilistic sensitivity analysis showed that perfusion and thermal conductivity account for >95% of the variability in coagulation zone volume, diameter and length. PMID:19124948

  11. Laser Navigation for Radiofrequency Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Varro, Zoltan; Locklin, Julia K. Wood, Bradford J.

    2004-09-15

    A 45-year-old male with renal cell carcinoma secondary to von-Hippel Lindau (VHL) disease presented for radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of kidney tumors. Due to his prior history of several partial nephrectomies and limited renal reserve, RFA was chosen because of its relatively nephron-sparing nature. A laser guidance device was used to help guide probe placement in an attempt to reduce procedure time and improve targeting accuracy. The device was successful at guiding needle placement, as both tumors were located with a single pass. Follow-up CT scan confirmed accurate needle placement, showing an area of coagulation necrosis covering the previously seen tumor.

  12. Effect of adsorbent particle size on the relative merits of a non-triangular and a triangular separation region in the optimal design of a three-zone simulated moving bed chromatography for binary separation with linear isotherms.

    PubMed

    Mun, Sungyong

    2016-06-24

    The design approaches for a three-zone simulated moving bed (SMB) chromatography with linear isotherms can be classified into two categories, depending on whether the SMB design is based on a classical region (i.e., triangular region of the triangle theory) in the first quadrant (m2, m3) plane or on a non-triangular separation region in the third quadrant (m2, m3) plane. The SMBs based on the classical and the non-triangular design approaches, which are named here as (m(+))_SMB and (m(-))_SMB respectively, are compared in this study using the Pareto solutions from the simultaneous optimization of throughput and desorbent usage under the constraints on product purities and pressure drop. The results showed that the (m(-))_SMB approach led to significantly lower desorbent usage than the (m(+))_SMB approach, which was due to the fact that the flow-rate-ratios from the (m(-))_SMB approach are extremely lower than those from the (m(+))_SMB approach. This factor also enables the (m(-))_SMB to have a significantly lower pressure drop, thereby making its throughput less restricted by a pressure-drop constraint. Due to such advantage of the (m(-))_SMB, it can make a further substantial improvement in throughput by modulating its adsorbent particle size properly. This issue was investigated using a model separation system containing succinic acid and acetic acid. It was confirmed that if the adsorbent particle size corresponding to the boundary between a mass-transfer limiting region and a pressure-drop limiting region is adopted, the (m(-))_SMB can lead to 82% higher throughput and 73% lower desorbent usage than the (m(+))_SMB.

  13. Minimization of thermomechanical side effects in IR ablation by use of Q-switched double pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Alfred; Schmidt, Peter; Flucke, Barbara

    2001-07-01

    Holmium laser pulses (λ= 2.1 m) are often used for medical laser applications inside the human body, because they can be transmitted through low-OH quartz fibers, and they are relatively well absorbed in water and biological tissues. However, large thermal damage zones were observed after application of free-running holmium laser pulses for arthroscopic surgery. The aim of our study is to reduce thermal damage without introducing additional mechanical damage and without impairing the hemostatic action of the laser radiation. For that purpose we use double pulses from a custom-made acousto-optically Q- switched thulium laser (λ = 2.0 μm) that can emit pulses with energies of up to 150 mJ. The penetration depth of the thulium laser radiation (170 μm) as well as the thermal damage zone are only half as large as that of the holmium laser. The use of Q-switched pulses creates stress confinement conditions leading to a more efficient ablation than with free running pulses. For a given ablation depth, the residual heat deposited in the tissue is therefore smaller than with free running pulses and, hence, also the thermal damage zone. This reduction of thermal damage is possible even though the free-running pulses already fulfil the condition for thermal confinement. The thermal damage zone was only 100 μm for the Q-switched thulium pulses but 200 μm for the free-running pulses. The degree of thermal damage was, in addition, much more severe for the free-running pulses. Q-switched pulses lead to an explosive ablation of the target material. In a liquid environment, this gives rise to the formation of cavitation effects, we release a pre-pulse with small energy (40 mJ) before each ablation pulse of up to 150 mJ. The pre-pulse produces a small cavity that is then filled by the ablation products of the main pulse. The ablation pulse is emitted about 100 μs after the pre-pulse when the bubble is maximally expanded. This way, no additional cavitation effects are induced

  14. Possible role for cryoballoon ablation of right atrial appendage tachycardia when conventional ablation fails.

    PubMed

    Amasyali, Basri; Kilic, Ayhan

    2015-06-01

    Focal atrial tachycardia arising from the right atrial appendage usually responds well to radiofrequency ablation; however, successful ablation in this anatomic region can be challenging. Surgical excision of the right atrial appendage has sometimes been necessary to eliminate the tachycardia and prevent or reverse the resultant cardiomyopathy. We report the case of a 48-year-old man who had right atrial appendage tachycardia resistant to multiple attempts at ablation with use of conventional radiofrequency energy guided by means of a 3-dimensional mapping system. The condition led to cardiomyopathy in 3 months. The arrhythmia was successfully ablated with use of a 28-mm cryoballoon catheter that had originally been developed for catheter ablation of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. To our knowledge, this is the first report of cryoballoon ablation without isolation of the right atrial appendage. It might also be an alternative to epicardial ablation or surgery when refractory atrial tachycardia originates from the right atrial appendage.

  15. Local Ablation for Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shi-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the second commonest cancer in Taiwan. The national surveillance program can detect HCC in its early stages, and various curative modalities (including surgical resection, orthotopic liver transplantation, and local ablation) are employed for the treatment of small HCC. Local ablation therapies are currently advocated for early-stage HCC that is unresectable because of co-morbidities, the need to preserve liver function, or refusal of resection. Among the various local ablation therapies, the most commonly used modalities include percutaneous ethanol injection and radiofrequency ablation (RFA); percutaneous acetic acid injection and microwave ablation are used less often. RFA is more commonly employed than other local ablative modalities in Taiwan because the technique is highly effective, minimally invasive, and requires fewer sessions. RFA is therefore advocated in Taiwan as the first-line curative therapy for unresectable HCC or even for resectable HCC. However, current RFA procedures are less effective against tumors that are in high-risk or difficult-to-ablate locations, are poorly visualized on ultrasonography (US), or are large. Recent advancements in RFA in Taiwan can resolve these issues by the creation of artificial ascites or pleural effusion, application of real-time virtual US assistance, use of combination therapy before RFA, or use of switching RF controllers with multiple electrodes. This review article provides updates on the clinical outcomes and advances in local ablative modalities (mostly RFA) for HCC in Taiwan. PMID:24159599

  16. Testing and evaluation of light ablation decontamination

    SciTech Connect

    Demmer, R.L.; Ferguson, R.L.

    1994-10-01

    This report details the testing and evaluation of light ablation decontamination. It details WINCO contracted research and application of light ablation efforts by Ames Laboratory. Tests were conducted with SIMCON (simulated contamination) coupons and REALCON (actual radioactive metal coupons) under controlled conditions to compare cleaning effectiveness, speed and application to plant process type equipment.

  17. Effective temperatures of polymer laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furzikov, Nickolay P.

    1991-09-01

    Effective temperatures of laser ablation of certain polymers are extracted from experimental dependences of ablation depths on laser fluences. Dependence of these temperatures on laser pulse durations is established. Comparison with the known thermodestruction data shows that the effective temperature corresponds to transient thermodestruction proceeding by the statistically most probable way.

  18. Radiofrequency ablation to treat non-small cell lung cancer and pulmonary metastases.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Hiran C

    2008-02-01

    Radiofrequency ablation is being reported with increasing frequency for the treatment of lung tumors. Several studies have demonstrated that this is a feasible and safe approach. Intermediate outcomes are now becoming available. Although tumors up to 5 cm in size can be effectively treated with radiofrequency ablation, results are better for smaller tumors (3 cm or less). This review describes the techniques, available ablation devices, and the potential role of radiofrequency ablation for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and pulmonary metastases. Resection (lobar or sublobar) should remain the standard therapy for NSCLC. Radiofrequency ablation may be better than conventional external-beam radiation for the treatment of the high-risk individual with NSCLC. Preliminary results for pulmonary metastases are similar to those reported after resection. In addition, patients with pulmonary metastases have been demonstrated to develop recurrences even after thoracotomy and bimanual palpation of the lung. Radiofrequency ablation may be an alternative to resection for the patient with small-diameter pulmonary metastases, and future study of this may be indicated.

  19. Reduction of picosecond laser ablation threshold and damage via nanosecond pre-pulse for removal of dielectric layers on silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, A. A.; Meyer, F.; Nekarda, J.-F.; Preu, R.

    2014-10-01

    Laser microstructuring of thin dielectric layers on sensitive electronic devices, such as crystalline silicon solar cells, requires a careful design of the laser ablation process. For instance, degradation of the substrate's crystallinity can vastly decrease minority carrier lifetime and consequently impair the efficiency of such devices. Short-pulse laser ablation seems well suited for clean and spatially confined structuring because of the small heat-affected zone in the remaining substrate material [Dube and Gonsiorawski in Conference record of the twenty first IEEE photovoltaic specialists conference, 624-628 1990]. The short-time regimes, however, generate steep temperature gradients that can lead to amorphization of the remaining silicon surface. By `heating' the substrate via a non-ablative laser pulse in the nanosecond regime before the actual ablation pulse occurs we are able to prevent amorphization of the surface of the silicon solar cell substrate, while lowering the ablation thresholds of a SiNx layer on crystalline silicon wafers.

  20. In vitro assessment of a combined radiofrequency ablation and cryo-anchoring catheter for treatment of mitral valve prolapse.

    PubMed

    Boronyak, Steven M; Merryman, W David

    2014-03-21

    Percutaneous approaches to mitral valve repair are an attractive alternative to surgical repair or replacement. Radiofrequency ablation has the potential to approximate surgical leaflet resection by using resistive heating to reduce leaflet size, and cryogenic temperatures on a percutaneous catheter can potentially be used to reversibly adhere to moving mitral valve leaflets for reliable application of radiofrequency energy. We tested a combined cryo-anchoring and radiofrequency ablation catheter using excised porcine mitral valves placed in a left heart flow loop capable of reproducing physiologic pressure and flow waveforms. Transmitral flow and pressure were monitored during the cryo-anchoring procedure and compared to baseline flow conditions, and the extent of radiofrequency energy delivery to the mitral valve was assessed post-treatment. Long term durability of radiofrequency ablation treatment was assessed using statically treated leaflets placed in a stretch bioreactor for four weeks. Transmitral flow and pressure waveforms were largely unaltered during cryo-anchoring. Parameter fitting to mechanical data from leaflets treated with radiofrequency ablation and cryo-anchoring revealed significant mechanical differences from untreated leaflets, demonstrating successful ablation of mitral valves in a hemodynamic environment. Picrosirius red staining showed clear differences in morphology and collagen birefringence between treated and untreated leaflets. The durability study indicated that statically treated leaflets did not significantly change size or mechanics over four weeks. A cryo-anchoring and radiofrequency ablation catheter can adhere to and ablate mitral valve leaflets in a physiologic hemodynamic environment, providing a possible percutaneous alternative to surgical leaflet resection of mitral valve tissue.

  1. Lung Cancer Ablation: Technologies and Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Erica S.; Dupuy, Damian E.

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of lung cancers in 2012 is estimated to reach 226,160 new cases, with only a third of patients suitable surgical candidates. Tumor ablation has emerged as an important and efficacious treatment option for nonsurgical lung cancer patients. This localized minimally invasive therapy is best suited for small oligonodular lesions or favorably located metastatic tumors. Radiofrequency ablation has been in use for over a decade, and newer modalities including microwave ablation, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation have emerged as additional treatment options for patients. Ablation therapies can offer patients and clinicians a repeatable and effective therapy for palliation and, in some cases, cure of thoracic malignancies. This article discusses the available technologies and techniques available for tumor ablation of thoracic malignancies including patient selection, basic aspects of procedure technique, imaging follow-up, treatment outcomes, and comparisons between various therapies. PMID:24436530

  2. Lung cancer ablation: technologies and techniques.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Erica S; Dupuy, Damian E

    2013-06-01

    The incidence of lung cancers in 2012 is estimated to reach 226,160 new cases, with only a third of patients suitable surgical candidates. Tumor ablation has emerged as an important and efficacious treatment option for nonsurgical lung cancer patients. This localized minimally invasive therapy is best suited for small oligonodular lesions or favorably located metastatic tumors. Radiofrequency ablation has been in use for over a decade, and newer modalities including microwave ablation, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation have emerged as additional treatment options for patients. Ablation therapies can offer patients and clinicians a repeatable and effective therapy for palliation and, in some cases, cure of thoracic malignancies. This article discusses the available technologies and techniques available for tumor ablation of thoracic malignancies including patient selection, basic aspects of procedure technique, imaging follow-up, treatment outcomes, and comparisons between various therapies.

  3. Femtosecond ablation of ultrahard materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumitru, G.; Romano, V.; Weber, H. P.; Sentis, M.; Marine, W.

    Several ultrahard materials and coatings of definite interest for tribological applications were tested with respect to their response when irradiated with fs laser pulses. Results on cemented tungsten carbide and on titanium carbonitride are reported for the first time and compared with outcomes of investigations on diamond and titanium nitride. The experiments were carried out in air, in a regime of 5-8 J/cm2 fluences, using the beam of a commercial Ti:sapphire laser. The changes induced in the surface morphology were analysed with a Nomarski optical microscope, and with SEM and AFM techniques. From the experimental data and from the calculated incident energy density distributions, the damage and ablation threshold values were determined. As expected, the diamond showed the highest threshold, while the cemented tungsten carbide exhibited typical values for metallic surfaces. The ablation rates determined (under the above-mentioned experimental conditions) were in the range 0.1-0.2 μm per pulse for all the materials investigated.

  4. Ablative shielding for hypervelocity projectiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rucker, Michelle A. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A hypervelocity projectile shield which includes a hollow semi-flexible housing fabricated from a plastic like, or otherwise transparent membrane which is filled with a fluid (gas or liquid) is presented. The housing has a inlet valve, similar to that on a tire or basketball, to introduce an ablating fluid into the housing. The housing is attached by a Velcro mount or double-sided adhesive tape to the outside surface of a structure to be protected. The housings are arrayed in a side-by-side relationship for complete coverage of the surface to be protected. In use, when a hypervelocity projectile penetrates the outer wall of a housing it is broken up and then the projectile is ablated as it travels through the fluid, much like a meteorite 'burns up' as it enters the earth's atmosphere, and the housing is deflated. The deflated housing can be easily spotted for replacement, even from a distance. Replacement is then accomplished by simply pulling a deflated housing off the structure and installing a new housing.

  5. Tumor Ablation with Irreversible Electroporation

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sakere, Bassim; André, Franck; Bernat, Claire; Connault, Elisabeth; Opolon, Paule; Davalos, Rafael V.; Rubinsky, Boris; Mir, Lluis M.

    2007-01-01

    We report the first successful use of irreversible electroporation for the minimally invasive treatment of aggressive cutaneous tumors implanted in mice. Irreversible electroporation is a newly developed non-thermal tissue ablation technique in which certain short duration electrical fields are used to permanently permeabilize the cell membrane, presumably through the formation of nanoscale defects in the cell membrane. Mathematical models of the electrical and thermal fields that develop during the application of the pulses were used to design an efficient treatment protocol with minimal heating of the tissue. Tumor regression was confirmed by histological studies which also revealed that it occurred as a direct result of irreversible cell membrane permeabilization. Parametric studies show that the successful outcome of the procedure is related to the applied electric field strength, the total pulse duration as well as the temporal mode of delivery of the pulses. Our best results were obtained using plate electrodes to deliver across the tumor 80 pulses of 100 µs at 0.3 Hz with an electrical field magnitude of 2500 V/cm. These conditions induced complete regression in 12 out of 13 treated tumors, (92%), in the absence of tissue heating. Irreversible electroporation is thus a new effective modality for non-thermal tumor ablation. PMID:17989772

  6. Simple model for ablative stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikaelian, Karnig O.

    1992-11-01

    We present a simple analytic model for ablative stablization of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. In this model the effect of ablation is to move the peak of the perturbations to the location of peak pressure. This mechanism enhances the density-gradient stabilization, which is effective at short wavelengths, and it also enhances the stabilization of long-wavelength perturbations due to finite shell thickness. We consider the following density profile: exponential blowoff plasma with a density gradient β, followed by a constant-density shell of thickness δt. For perturbations of arbitrary wave number k, we present an explicit expression for the growth rate γ as a function of k, β, and δt. We find that ``thick'' shells defined by β δt>=1 have γ2>=0 for any k, while ``thin'' shells defined by β δt<1 can have γ2<0 for small k, reflecting stability by proximity to the back side of the shell. We also present lasnex simulations that are in good agreement with our analytic formulas.

  7. Influence of the embryonic preplate on the organization of the cerebral cortex: a targeted ablation model.

    PubMed

    Xie, Y; Skinner, E; Landry, C; Handley, V; Schonmann, V; Jacobs, E; Fisher, R; Campagnoni, A

    2002-10-15

    Transgenic mice were generated to permit the targeted ablation of cortical preplate cells at the time they are born. In these mice, the 1.3 kb golli promoter of the myelin basic protein gene was used to drive the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (TK) transgene in cortical preplate cells. Heterozygous transgenic pairs were bred, and pregnant dams were treated with ganciclovir at embryonic days 11-12 to ablate preplate cells at the time the preplate was forming. This paradigm exposed control (TK-) and experimental (TK+) littermates to exactly the same conditions. Embryological ablation of preplate cells led to an early disruption of the radial glial framework and subplate structure in the developing cortex and dramatically altered the cellular lamination and connectivity of the cortical plate. The disturbed radial glial network contributed to an impaired radial migration of neurons into the cortical plate from the ventricular zone. The cortical plate became dyslaminated, and there was a substantial reduction in short- and long-range cortical projections within the cortex and to subcortical regions. Cell death within the cortical plate and the proliferative zones was substantially increased in the ablated animals. After birth, a cortical lesion developed, which became exacerbated with the secondary onset of hydrocephaly in the second postnatal week. The results underscore the critical importance of the preplate in cortex formation, mediated through its guidance of the formation of radial glial scaffolding, subsequent neuronal migration into the incipient cortical plate, and the final arrangement of its vertical organization and cellular connectivity.

  8. Formation of atomic clusters through the laser ablation of refractory materials in a supersonic molecular beam source

    SciTech Connect

    Haufler, R.E.; Compton, R.N.; Puretzky, A.A. |

    1993-12-31

    Concepts which guide the design of atomic cluster supersonic beam sources have been developed. These ideas are founded on the knowledge of laser ablation dynamics and are structured in order to take advantage of certain features of the ablation event. Some of the drawbacks of previous cluster source designs become apparent when the sequence of events following laser ablation are clarified. Key features of the new cluster source design include control of the cluster size distribution, uniform performance with a variety of solid materials and elements, high beam intensity, and significant removal of internal energy during the supersonic expansion.

  9. Relationship Between LIBS Ablation and Pit Volume for Geologic Samples: Applications for the In Situ Absolute Geochronology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devismes, Damien; Cohen, Barbara; Miller, J.-S.; Gillot, P.-Y.; Lefevre, J.-C.; Boukari, C.

    2014-01-01

    These first results demonstrate that LIBS spectra can be an interesting tool to estimate the ablated volume. When the ablated volume is bigger than 9.10(exp 6) cubic micrometers, this method has less than 10% of uncertainties. Far enough to be directly implemented in the KArLE experiment protocol. Nevertheless, depending on the samples and their mean grain size, the difficulty to have homogeneous spectra will increase with the ablated volume. Several K-Ar dating studies based on this approach will be implemented. After that, the results will be shown and discussed.

  10. Experimental investigation on colloidal alumina nanoparticles produced by collinear nanosecond double-pulse laser ablation in liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdieh, M. H.; Fattahi, B.; Akbari Jafarabadi, M.

    2017-01-01

    In this research, we investigated the effect of inter-pulse delay times on production of colloidal alumina nanoparticles by collinear double pulse laser ablation. In comparison to single pulse laser ablation, collinear double pulse laser ablation with inter-pulse delay times of 5, 10, 15 and 20 ns results in production of colloidal nanoparticles with smaller mean size and lower variance size distribution. In the case of 5 ns inter-pulse delay time, the highest concentration of nanoparticles was obtained due to more rapid cooling time of the plasma as a result of higher rate of nuclei generation than particle growth. The results also showed that the main pulse and the pre-pulse with 5 ns delay time have significant overlap and consequently such condition leads to maximum influence on the ablation.

  11. Conditional Ablation of Neuroprogenitor Cells in Adult Mice Impedes Recovery of Poststroke Cognitive Function and Reduces Synaptic Connectivity in the Perforant Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Chongran; Sun, Hui; Wu, Steven; Lee, Chih Cheng; Akamatsu, Yosuke; Wang, Ruikang K.; Kernie, Steven G.

    2013-01-01

    The causal relationship between neurogenesis and the recovery of poststroke cognitive function has not been properly explored. The current study aimed to determine whether depleting neuroprogenitor cells (NPCs) affects poststroke functional outcome in nestin-δ-HSV-TK-EGFP transgenic mice, in which the expression of a truncated viral thymidine kinase gene and EGFP was restricted to nestin-expressing NPCs. Ganciclovir (GCV; 200 mg/kg/d) or saline was continuously administered via osmotic pumps in mice for 4 weeks before the induction of experimental stroke. Both baseline and stroke-induced type 1 and type 2 NPCs were conditionally ablated. GCV eliminated NPCs in a duration-dependent fashion, but it did not attenuate the genesis of astroglia or oligodendrocytes in the peri-infarct cortex, nor did it affect infarct size or cerebral blood reperfusion after stroke. Transgenic stroke mice given GCV displayed impaired spatial learning and memory in the Barnes maze test compared with saline control or wild-type stroke mice given GCV, suggesting a contributing role of stroke-induced neurogenesis in the recovery of cognitive function. However, there was no significant difference in poststroke motor function between transgenic mice treated with GCV and those treated with vehicle, despite a significant ablation of NPCs in the subventricular zone of the former. Furthermore, nestin-δ-HSV-TK-EGFP mice treated with GCV had fewer retrogradely labeled neurons in the entorhinal cortex (EC) when injected with the polysynaptic viral marker PRV614 in the dentate gyrus (DG), suggesting that there might be reduced synaptic connectivity between the DG and EC following ablation of NPCs, which may contribute to impaired poststroke memory function. PMID:24174664

  12. CT-guided percutaneous microwave ablation of pulmonary malignant tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Wei-Chun; Lee, Yee-Fan; Chen, Yi-Chang; Chien, Ning; Huang, Yu-Sen; Tseng, Yao-Hui; Lee, Jang-Ming; Hsu, Hsao-Hsun; Chen, Jin-Shing

    2016-01-01

    Background Microwave ablation (MWA) of lung tumors is a new approach for local tumor control. The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the preliminary results of safety and efficacy of MWA with a dynamic frequency range (902–928 MHz) and power (10–32 W) for local tumor control of thoracic malignancies. Methods From December 1, 2013 to February 1, 2016, there were total 32 lung tumors among 15 patients (7 men, 8 women, age range 43–82 years, mean 57.8±11.1 years of age) receiving MWA of thoracic neoplasms, including lung adenocarcinoma (n=5), metastatic colorectal cancer (n=7), invasive thymoma (n=1), metastatic uterine leiomyosarcoma (n=1), and metastatic ampullary carcinoma (n=1). Mean tumor size was 13.5 mm (range, 3.0–32.0 mm). The mean sequential ablation during each MWA was 2.3±1.1 times (range, 1–5 times). The outcomes of ablation were evaluated by follow-up computed tomography (CT) scans and the complications were assessed by medical records and CT scan after ablation. Results The mean follow-up interval of each tumor was 446.8 days (range, 196–902 days). Local tumor recurrence was found in 5 of the 32 tumors resulting in a local control rate 84.4%. No MWA-related mortality was noted. After MWA, the incidence of pneumothorax was 37.5% (12/32). Only one patient with pneumothorax required air evacuation. Third-degree skin burn adjacent to the entry site occurred in one patient and required debridement and closure with flap. Conclusions After appropriate patient selection, MWA with a dynamic frequency range (902–928 MHz) and power (10–32 W) is an effective and safe procedure for local tumor control of recurrent and metastatic lung tumors. PMID:28066666

  13. ICF Ablator Physics Experiments on Saturn and Nova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Rick

    1996-11-01

    In indirect drive ICF, the driver energy is absorbed in a high-Z enclosure (or "hohlraum") that surrounds a spherical shell (or "capsule") containing DT fuel. The hohlraum walls are heated by the driver and emit x-rays, which are absorbed by the capsule material (the "ablator") and drive the implosion. We have used the Saturn z-pinch at SNL and the Nova laser at LLNL to explore the behavior of ablator material in x-ray radiation environments comparable in magnitude, spectrum and duration to those that will be experienced in National Ignition Facility (NIF) hohlraums. The large x-ray outputs available from pulsed-power driven z-pinches have enabled us to drive hohlraums of full NIF ignition scale size at radiation temperatures and timescales comparable to those required for the low power "foot" pulse of an ignition capsule. The high intensity of the Nova laser has allowed us to study capsule ablator physics in smaller scale hohlraums at radiation temperatures and timescales relevant to the peak power pulse for an ignition capsule. Taken together, these experiments have allowed us test our radiation-hydrodynamics computer code predictions of ablator opacity, radiation flow, and equation of state over almost the complete range of radiation environments to be encountered in a NIF hohlraum. * in collaboration with J. Porter, G. Chandler, D. Fehl, D. Jobe, R. Leeper, K. Matzen, J. McGurn, D. Noack, L. Ruggles, P. Sawyer, J. Torres, M. Vargas, D. Zagar (SNL), and H. Kornblum, T. Orzechowski, L. Suter, R. Thiessen, R. Wallace (LLNL), and the Saturn and Nova operations and diagnostic crews at SNL and LLNL. +This work was supported by the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  14. Myocardial tissue ablation by single high-energy laser pulses for ELR and TMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theisen, Dirk; Brinkmann, Ralf; Stubbe, Hans-Martin; Birngruber, Reginald

    1999-02-01

    The objective of this study is to compare the ablation sites induced by two different laser and application systems for myocardial laser revascularization. One system used was an 800 W CO2 laser, which is clinically established for transmyocardial laser revascularization (TMR). The second system was a self-designed Holmium laser emitting single high energy pulses for the minimal invasive approach of endocardial laser revascularization (ELR), whereby the laser light is transmitted via optical fiber into the left ventricle to ablate the myocardial channels from the inside. The laser energy was applied to Polyacrylamide (PAA) as transparent tissue phantom and in water as blood phantom. The ablation dynamics were investigated by high speed flash photography recording a picture series of a single event. Reperfused ex- vivo porcine hearts were treated to quantify differences in the thermal-mechanical damage ranges by polarization light microscopy. Ablation dynamics in water revealed oscillatory changes of the axial length of the steam bubbles between 3 mm and 12 mm during the CO2 laser pulse. For the Holmium laser pulse a maximal axial and lateral length of 5 mm was observed. The lateral dimensions of the bubbles were maximal 1 mm with the CO2- and 3.5 mm with the Holmium laser system. In PAA bubbles also collapse during the laser pulse which affects the size of the ablated channels. Using 12 J Holmium laser pulses for ablation of PAA, channel depths around 7 mm were found. Single Holmium laser pulses demonstrate ablations comparable in size and thermal- mechanical collateral damage to those achieved with the standard CO2 laser. The results are very encouraging for single pulse ELR and demonstrate the potential of a catheter based minimal invasive procedure for laser heart reperfusion.

  15. Fully Automated Laser Ablation Liquid Capture Sample Analysis using NanoElectrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, Matthias; Ovchinnikova, Olga S; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2014-01-01

    RATIONALE: Laser ablation provides for the possibility of sampling a large variety of surfaces with high spatial resolution. This type of sampling when employed in conjunction with liquid capture followed by nanoelectrospray ionization provides the opportunity for sensitive and prolonged interrogation of samples by mass spectrometry as well as the ability to analyze surfaces not amenable to direct liquid extraction. METHODS: A fully automated, reflection geometry, laser ablation liquid capture spot sampling system was achieved by incorporating appropriate laser fiber optics and a focusing lens into a commercially available, liquid extraction surface analysis (LESA ) ready Advion TriVersa NanoMate system. RESULTS: Under optimized conditions about 10% of laser ablated material could be captured in a droplet positioned vertically over the ablation region using the NanoMate robot controlled pipette. The sampling spot size area with this laser ablation liquid capture surface analysis (LA/LCSA) mode of operation (typically about 120 m x 160 m) was approximately 50 times smaller than that achievable by direct liquid extraction using LESA (ca. 1 mm diameter liquid extraction spot). The set-up was successfully applied for the analysis of ink on glass and paper as well as the endogenous components in Alstroemeria Yellow King flower petals. In a second mode of operation with a comparable sampling spot size, termed laser ablation/LESA , the laser system was used to drill through, penetrate, or otherwise expose material beneath a solvent resistant surface. Once drilled, LESA was effective in sampling soluble material exposed at that location on the surface. CONCLUSIONS: Incorporating the capability for different laser ablation liquid capture spot sampling modes of operation into a LESA ready Advion TriVersa NanoMate enhanced the spot sampling spatial resolution of this device and broadened the surface types amenable to analysis to include absorbent and solvent resistant

  16. Antithyroglobulin Antibody as a Marker of Successful Ablation Therapy in Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dewi, Ayu Rosemeilia; Darmawan, Budi; Kartamihadja, Achmad Hussein Sundawa; Hidayat, Basuki; Masjhur, Johan S.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the role of antithyroglobulin antibody (ATA) serum as a marker of successful I-131 ablation therapy in differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) patients with low serum thyroglobulin (Tg). A retrospective study was conducted on 60 patients (10 males and 50 females). All patients underwent posttotal thyroidectomy and received 2.96 to 3 GBq I-131 ablation. Subjects were divided into two groups with succesful and unsuccessful I-131 ablation therapies. The data of age, gender, histopathologic type, tumor size, and metastasis were collected. Preablation serum Tg and ATA level (Tg1 and ATA1) 6–12 months after ablation (Tg2 and ATA2) were measured. The success of ablation therapy was evaluated by diagnostic whole body scan (DxWBS) 6–12 months after ablation. There were no significant differences in age, gender, type of histopathology, tumor size, and nodal metastasis between the two groups. ATA2 ≤30 kIU/L were found in 23 (62.2%) subjects with successful ablation therapy, and ATA2 >30 kIU/L in 16 (69.6%) subjects belonged to the unsuccessful group (P = 0.017). Changes between ATA1 and ATA2 levels did not differ significantly in both the groups (P = 0.062). Tg1 <10 mg/L was found in 26 (57.8%) subjects with successful therapy (P = 0.037). Multivariate analysis showed ATA2 and Tg1 as the independent factors for the success of ablation therapy (P = 0.007 and 0.015). Adjusted odds ratio of postablation ATA was 5.379 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.590 to 18.203] and preablation Tg was 5.822 (95% CI 1.418 to 23.902). ATA levels at 6–12 months after ablation, by considering the preablation Tg levels, is a useful marker to determine successful ablation therapy in WDTC patients with low serum Tg. Changes in serum ATA levels, although not statistically significant, can provide additional information about the course of the disease. PMID:28217014

  17. Pulsed infrared laser ablation and clinical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Kin Foong

    Sufficient light energy deposited in tissue can result in ablation and excessive thermal and mechanical damage to adjacent tissues. The goals of this research are to investigate the mechanisms of pulsed infrared laser ablation of tissue, to optimize laser parameters for minimizing unnecessary damage to healthy tissue, and to explore the potential of using pulsed infrared lasers for clinical applications, especially laser lithotripsy. A dual-channel optical low coherence reflectometer was implemented to measure the expansion and collapse velocities of a Q-switched Ho:YAG (λ = 2.12 μm) laser-induced cavitation in water. Cavitation wall velocities up to 11 m/s were measured with this technique, and the results were in fair agreement with those calculated from fast-flash photographic images. The dependence of ablation threshold fluence on calculus absorption was examined. Preliminary results indicated that the product of optical absorption and ablation threshold fluence, which is the heat of ablation, remained constant for a given urinary calculus type and laser pulse duration. An extended study examined the influence of optical absorption on pulsed infrared laser ablation. An analytical photothermal ablation model was applied and compared to experimental ablation results using an infrared free-electron laser at selected wavelengths between 2.12 μm and 6.45 μm Results were in good agreement with the model, and the ablation depths of urinary calculi were highly dependent upon the calculus optical absorption as well as light attenuation within the intrapulse ablation plume. An efficient wavelength for ablation corresponded to the wavelength of the Er:YAG laser (λ = 2.94 μm) suggested this laser should be examined for laser lithotripsy. Schlieren flash photography, acoustic transient measurements with a piezoelectric polyvinylidene-fluoride needle-hydrophone, mass loss measurements, and chemical analyses were employed to study the ablation mechanisms of the free

  18. Preoperative long-acting octreotide treatment for invasive thyrotropin-secreting pituitary macroadenoma after previous radioiodine thyroid ablation.

    PubMed

    Gruszka, Anna; Zielinski, Grzegorz M; Kunert-Radek, Jolanta

    2014-02-01

    We report a 33-year-old woman with invasive thyrotropin-secreting pituitary adenoma after previous thyroid ablation with radioiodine who was successfully treated with transsphenoidal surgery after pre-treatment with octreotide-LAR for 10 months. Since invasive and aggressive thyrotropin-secreting macroadenomas are more frequently observed in patients who have undergone thyroid ablation, we suggest preoperative treatment with somatostatin analogs should be considered in these patients to reduce serum thyrotropin and stabilize or reduce tumor size.

  19. Synthesis of gold nanoparticles by laser ablation of an Au foil inside and outside ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Wender, Heberton; Andreazza, Marcos L; Correia, Ricardo R B; Teixeira, Sérgio R; Dupont, Jairton

    2011-03-01

    Stable gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were prepared by simple laser ablation of an Au foil placed inside or outside four ionic liquids (ILs), without the addition of any external chemical reagent. Irregular spherical AuNPs with a diameter range of 5 to 20 nm were produced after laser ablation of an Au foil located inside or outside the ILs 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (BMI·BF4), 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate (BMI·PF6) and 1-(3-cyanopropyl)-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ((BCN)MI·NTf2). Additionally, whereas laser ablation inside the IL 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide BMI·N(CN)2 produced flower-like shaped nanoparticles of about 50 nm in size, ablation outside this IL presented similar results to the others ILs studied, as determined by TEM and UV-Vis. The size and shape of the prepared NPs were related to where NP nucleation and growth occurred, i.e., at the IL surface or within the IL. Indeed, the chemical composition of the IL/air interface and surface ion orientation played important roles in the stabilization of the AuNPs formed by laser ablation outside the ILs.

  20. Evaluation of the current radiofrequency ablation systems using axiomatic design theory.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bing; Moser, Michael A J; Luo, Yigang; Zhang, Edwin M; Zhang, Wenjun

    2014-04-01

    This article evaluates current radiofrequency ablation systems using axiomatic design theory. Due to its minimally invasive procedure, short-time hospital stay, low cost, and tumour metastasis treatment, the radiofrequency ablation technique has been playing an important role in tumour treatment in recent decades. Although the radiofrequency ablation technique has many advantages, some issues still need to be addressed. Among these issues, the two most important are as follows: (1) the size of tumours to be removed (has to be larger than 3 cm in diameter) and (2) cleanness of the removal. Many device solutions have been proposed to address the two issues. However, there is a lack of knowledge regarding the systematic evaluation of these solutions. This article evaluates these systems in terms of their solution principles (or simply called conceptual design in general product design theory) using a design theory called axiomatic design theory. In addition, with the axiomatic design theory, a better conceptual design in terms of its feasibility to cope with incomplete target tissue necrosis from the large size of tumours has been found. The detailed analysis and simulation of the new conceptual design are conducted using finite element approach. The results in this article are proved by the information of animal experiments and clinical practices obtained from the literature. This study thus contributes to the current knowledge to further developments in radiofrequency ablation systems and procedure guidelines for physicians to perform the radiofrequency ablation operation more effectively.

  1. A Simple Method for Improving the Spatial Resolution in Infrared Laser Ablation Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hieta, Juha-Pekka; Vaikkinen, Anu; Auno, Samuli; Räikkönen, Heikki; Haapala, Markus; Scotti, Gianmario; Kopra, Jaakko; Piepponen, Petteri; Kauppila, Tiina J.

    2017-01-01

    In mass spectrometry imaging of tissues, the size of structures that can be distinguished is determined by the spatial resolution of the imaging technique. Here, the spatial resolution of IR laser ablation is markedly improved by increasing the distance between the laser and the focusing lens. As the distance between the laser and the lens is increased from 1 to 18 m, the ablation spot size decreases from 440 to 44 μm. This way, only the collimated center of the divergent laser beam is directed on the focusing lens, which results in better focusing of the beam. Part of the laser energy is lost at longer distance, but this is compensated by focusing of the radiation to a smaller area on the sample surface. The long distance can also be achieved by a set of mirrors, between which the radiation travels before it is directed to the focusing lens and the sample. This method for improving the spatial resolution can be utilized in mass spectrometry imaging of tissues by techniques that utilize IR laser ablation, such as laser ablation electrospray ionization, laser ablation atmospheric pressure photoionization, and matrix-assisted laser desorption electrospray ionization.

  2. Infra-red femtosecond laser ablation: Benefit for LA-ICP-MS elemental analysis?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poitrasson, F.; d'Abzac, F.; Freydier, R.; Seydoux-Guillaume, A.; Chmeleff, J.; Chatel, B.

    2011-12-01

    nature of the material ablated and the ablation conditions, aggregates of small particles condensed from the most volatile elements are produced together with beads consisting of more refractory material. Only metals show specific particle types. Moreover, whatever the analytical conditions, quantitative particle counting shows that the size distribution remains monomodal and centred slightly below 100 nm, which is optimum for transport and decomposition in the ICP plasma torch. These observations explain the enhanced versatility of fs LA-ICP-MS compared to the ns approach. However, this benefit is currently limited by the complicated operation and maintenance of fs lasers. Also, it remains unclear whether the wavelength matters for in situ isotope measurements using a fs laser. Those first analytical studies permitted to define more precisely the critical parameters needed in fs LA-ICP-MS analysis and it can be expected that the next generation of fs laser ablation systems will be simpler to use, yet retaining the analytical benefit of fs laser ablation for LA-ICP-MS.

  3. A study of particle generation during laser ablation with applications

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chunyi

    2005-01-01

    A study has been made of the generation of particles during laser ablation and has included size distribution measurements and observation of the formation processes. The particle size distribution with respect to different laser parameters was obtained in-line using a differential mobility analyzer (DMA) and a particle counter. The experimental results show that the particle size varies with laser energy, laser pulsewidth, ambient gas flow rate and sample properties. The results serve as a basis for controlling the size of nanoparticles generated by laser ablation. Laser shadowgraph imaging was used to study mass ejection processes and mechanisms. At higher laser irradiance, some particles were ejected in the liquid and even in the solid phase. Time-resolved images show the propagation of the shockwaves: external shockwaves propagate outward and decelerate, and internal shockwaves reflect back and forth between the gas contact surface and the sample surface. The internal shockwave is proposed to cause the ejection of liquid particles when the internal shockwave strikes the liquid molten layer. A simulation based on vapor plume expansion was carried out and provides satisfactory agreement with experimental results. Different material properties result in different particle ejection behavior:particle ejection for most materials including metals result in a conically shaped envelope for the ejected material while ejection for silicon resembles a liquid jet. The difference in density change when the materials melt was proposed to be an important factor in the different ejection behavior. The characteristics of particles generated by laser ablation have a strong influence on the chemical analysis of the irradiated sample. Large particles are more difficult to completely vaporize and ionize, and induced preferential vaporization causes fractionation (i.e. a detected chemical composition that differs from the sample material). Large particles also result in spikes in

  4. On the Ablation Models of Fuel Pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Rozhansky, V.A.; Senichenkov, I.Yu.

    2005-12-15

    The neutral gas shielding model and neutral-gas-plasma shielding model are analyzed qualitatively. The main physical processes that govern the formation of the shielding gas cloud and, consequently, the ablation rate are considered. For the neutral gas shielding model, simple formulas relating the ablation rate and cloud parameters to the parameters of the pellet and the background plasma are presented. The estimates of the efficiency of neutral gas shielding and plasma shielding are compared. It is shown that the main portion of the energy flux of the background electrons is released in the plasma cloud. Formulas for the ablation rate and plasma parameters are derived in the neutral-gas-plasma shielding model. The question is discussed as to why the neutral gas shielding model describes well the ablation rate of the pellet material, although it does not take into account the ionization effects and the effects associated with the interaction of ionized particles with the magnetic field. The reason is that the ablation rate depends weakly on the energy flux of hot electrons; as a result, the attenuation of this flux by the electrostatic shielding and plasma shielding has little effect on the ablation rate. This justifies the use of the neutral gas shielding model to estimate the ablation rate (to within a factor of about 2) over a wide range of parameters of the pellet and the background plasma.

  5. [Indications for catheter ablation of ventricular tachycardia].

    PubMed

    Deneke, T; Israel, C W; Krug, J; Nentwich, K; Müller, P; Mügge, A; Schade, A

    2013-09-01

    Ventricular tachyarrhythmias (VT) can cause sudden cardiac death. This can be prevented by an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) but approximately 25% of patients with an ICD develop electrical storm (≥ 3 VTs within 24 hours) during the course of 4-5 years. This is a life-threatening event even in the presence of an ICD, particularly if incessant VT is present, and may significantly deteriorate the patient's psychological state if multiple shocks are discharged. Catheter ablation of VT has developed into a standard procedure in many specialized electrophysiology centers. Patients with hemodynamically stable and unstable VT are amendable to substrate-based ablation strategies. Catheter ablation can be performed as emergency procedure in patients with electrical storm as well as electively in patients with monomorphic VT stored in ICD memory. In patients with ischemic or non-ischemic cardiomyopathy, VT ablation is complementary to ICD implantation and can reduce the number of ventricular arrhythmia episodes and shocks and should be performed early. In patients with electrical storm, catheter ablation can acutely achieve rhythm stabilization and may improve prognosis in the long term. Further indications for catheter ablation exist in patients with idiopathic VT where catheter ablation represents a curative therapy, and in patients with symptomatic or asymptomatic frequent premature ventricular beats which may improve prognosis in patients with heart failure and cardiac resynchronization therapy.

  6. Analysis of infrared laser tissue ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, Gordon P.; Timmerman, Brenda H.; Bryanston-Cross, Peter J.

    2005-04-01

    The mechanisms involved in infrared laser tissue ablation are studied using a free electron laser (FELIX) in order to clarify whether the increased ablation efficiency reported in literature for certain infrared wavelengths is due to a wavelength effect or to the specific pulse structure of the lasers that are generally used in these studies. Investigations are presented of ablation of vitreous from pigs" eyes using several techniques including protein gel electrophoresis and ablation plume visualization. The ablation effects of three different infrared wavelengths are compared: 3 mm, which is currently in clinical surgical use, and the wavelengths associated with the amide I and amide II bands, i.e. 6.2 mm and 6.45mm, respectively. The results suggest a different ablation mechanism to be in operation for each studied wavelength, thus indicating that the generally reported increased ablation efficiency in the 6-6.5 micron range is due to the wavelength rather than the typical free electron laser pulse structure.

  7. Thermal therapy, Part III: ablation techniques.

    PubMed

    Habash, Riadh W Y; Bansal, Rajeev; Krewski, Daniel; Alhafid, Hafid T

    2007-01-01

    Ablative treatments are gaining increasing attention as an alternative to standard surgical therapies, especially for patients with contraindication or those who refuse open surgery. Thermal ablation is used in clinical applications mainly for treating heart arrhythmias, benign prostate hyperplasia, and nonoperable liver tumors; there is also increasing application to other organ sites, including the kidney, lung, and brain. Potential benefits of thermal ablation include reduced morbidity and mortality in comparison with standard surgical resection and the ability to treat nonsurgical patients. The purpose of this review is to outline and discuss the engineering principles and biological responses by which thermal ablation techniques can provide elevation of temperature in organs within the human body. Because of the individual problems associated with each type of treatment, a wide range of ablation techniques have evolved including cryoablation as well as ultrasound, radiofrequency (RF), microwave, and laser ablation. Aspects of each ablation technique, including mechanisms of action, equipment required, selection of eligible patients, treatment techniques, and patient outcomes are presented, along with a discussion of limitations of the techniques and future research directions.

  8. Ablation layers to prevent pitting in laser peening

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Lloyd A

    2016-08-09

    A hybrid ablation layer that comprises a separate under layer is applied to a material to prevent pitting resulting from laser peening. The underlayer adheres to the surface of the workpiece to be peened and does not have bubbles and voids that exceed an acceptable size. One or more overlayers are placed over and in contact with the underlayer. Any bubbles formed under the over layers are insulated from the surface to be peened. The process significantly reduces the incidence of pits on peened surfaces.

  9. Laser ablation synthesis of gold nanoparticles in organic solvents.

    PubMed

    Amendola, Vincenzo; Polizzi, Stefano; Meneghetti, Moreno

    2006-04-13

    Free and functionalized gold nanoparticles are synthesized by laser ablation of a gold metal plate immersed in dimethyl sulfoxide, acetonitrile, and tetrahydrofuran. Functionalized gold nanoparticles are synthesized in a one-step process thanks to the solubility of the ligands in these solvents. It is possible to have significant control of the concentration, aggregation, and size of the particles by varying a few parameters. UV-vis spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy are used for the characterization of the nanoparticles. The Mie model for spherical particles and the Gans model for spheroids allow a fast and reliable interpretation of experimental UV-vis spectra.

  10. Monitoring Radiofrequency Ablation Using Ultrasound Envelope Statistics and Shear Wave Elastography in the Periablation Period: An In Vitro Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Tsui, Po-Hsiang; Wang, Chiao-Yin; Zhou, Zhuhuang; Wan, Yung-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive method for treating tumors. Shear wave elastography (SWE) has been widely applied in evaluating tissue stiffness and final ablation size after RFA. However, the usefulness of periablation SWE imaging in assessing RFA remains unclear. Therefore, this study investigated the correlation between periablation SWE imaging and final ablation size. An in vitro porcine liver model was used for experimental validation (n = 36). During RFA with a power of 50 W, SWE images were collected using a clinical ultrasound system. To evaluate the effects of tissue temperature and gas bubbles during RFA, changes in the ablation temperature were recorded, and image echo patterns were measured using B-mode and ultrasound statistical parametric images. After RFA, the gross pathology of each tissue sample was compared with the region of change in the corresponding periablation SWE image. The experimental results showed that the tissue temperature at the ablation site varied between 70°C and 100°C. Hyperechoic regions and changes were observed in the echo amplitude distribution induced by gas bubbles. Under this condition, the confounding effects (including the temperature increase, tissue stiffness increase, and presence of gas bubbles) resulted in artifacts in the periablation SWE images, and the corresponding region correlated with the estimated final ablation size obtained from the gross pathology (r = 0.8). The findings confirm the feasibility of using periablation SWE imaging in assessing RFA. PMID:27603012

  11. Thermal protection system ablation sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorbunov, Sergey (Inventor); Martinez, Edward R. (Inventor); Scott, James B. (Inventor); Oishi, Tomomi (Inventor); Fu, Johnny (Inventor); Mach, Joseph G. (Inventor); Santos, Jose B. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An isotherm sensor tracks space vehicle temperatures by a thermal protection system (TPS) material during vehicle re-entry as a function of time, and surface recession through calibration, calculation, analysis and exposed surface modeling. Sensor design includes: two resistive conductors, wound around a tube, with a first end of each conductor connected to a constant current source, and second ends electrically insulated from each other by a selected material that becomes an electrically conductive char at higher temperatures to thereby complete an electrical circuit. The sensor conductors become shorter as ablation proceeds and reduced resistance in the completed electrical circuit (proportional to conductor length) is continually monitored, using measured end-to-end voltage change or current in the circuit. Thermocouple and/or piezoelectric measurements provide consistency checks on local temperatures.

  12. Radiofrequency Ablation: A Nursing Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Locklin, Julia K.; Wood, Bradford J.

    2008-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has emerged as a safe and predictable technology for treating certain patients with cancer who otherwise have few treatment options. Nurses need to be familiar with all phases of the RFA procedure to create an optimal environment for patients. This article offers a brief review of the RFA procedure and nurses' responsibilities in caring for these patients. Before RFA, nurses should focus on patient education and aggressive hydration. During the procedure, nurses can prevent injury by placing grounding pads appropriately, monitoring vital signs, and medicating patients as needed. After RFA, nurses should assess the skin puncture site, provide adequate pain relief, and, again, hydrate patients. Nurses who care appropriately for RFA recipients may help to improve patient outcomes and make an otherwise frightening procedure more comfortable. PMID:15973845

  13. Ablation of idiopathic ventricular tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Doreen; Kottkamp, Hans

    2010-09-01

    Idiopathic ventricular arrhythmias occur in patients without structural heart disease. They can arise from a variety of specific areas within both ventricles and in the supravalvular regions of the great arteries. Two main groups need to be differentiated: arrhythmias from the outflow tract (OT) region and idiopathic left ventricular, so-called fascicular, tachycardias (ILVTs). OT tachycardia typically originates in the right ventricular OT, but may also occur in the left ventricular OT, particularly in the sinuses of Valsalva or the anterior epicardium or the great cardiac vein. Activation mapping or pace mapping for the OT regions and mapping of diastolic potentials in ILVTs are the mapping techniques that are typically used. The ablation of idiopathic ventricular arrhythmias is highly successful, associated with only rare complications. Newly recognized entities of idiopathic ventricular tachycardias are those originating in the papillary muscles and in the atrioventricular annular regions.

  14. Pulsed and CW adjustable 1942 nm single-mode all-fiber Tm-doped fiber laser system for surgical laser soft tissue ablation applications.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yize; Jivraj, Jamil; Zhou, Jiaqi; Ramjist, Joel; Wong, Ronnie; Gu, Xijia; Yang, Victor X D

    2016-07-25

    A surgical laser soft tissue ablation system based on an adjustable 1942 nm single-mode all-fiber Tm-doped fiber laser operating in pulsed or CW mode with nitrogen assistance is demonstrated. Ex vivo ablation on soft tissue targets such as muscle (chicken breast) and spinal cord (porcine) with intact dura are performed at different ablation conditions to examine the relationship between the system parameters and ablation outcomes. The maximum laser average power is 14.4 W, and its maximum peak power is 133.1 W with 21.3 μJ pulse energy. The maximum CW power density is 2.33 × 106 W/cm2 and the maximum pulsed peak power density is 2.16 × 107 W/cm2. The system parameters examined include the average laser power in CW or pulsed operation mode, gain-switching frequency, total ablation exposure time, and the input gas flow rate. The ablation effects were measured by microscopy and optical coherence tomography (OCT) to evaluate the ablation depth, superficial heat-affected zone diameter (HAZD) and charring diameter (CD). Our results conclude that the system parameters can be tailored to meet different clinical requirements such as ablation for soft tissue cutting or thermal coagulation for future applications of hemostasis.

  15. Laser-Ablation (U-Th)/He Geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodges, K.; Boyce, J.

    2003-12-01

    Over the past decade, ultraviolet laser microprobes have revolutionized the field of 40Ar/39Ar geochronology. They provide unprecedented information about Ar isotopic zoning in natural crystals, permit high-resolution characterization of Ar diffusion profiles produced during laboratory experiments, and enable targeted dating of multiple generations of minerals in thin section. We have modified the analytical protocols used for 40Ar/39Ar laser microanalysis for use in (U-Th)/He geochronologic studies. Part of the success of the 40Ar/39Ar laser microprobe stems from fact that measurements of Ar isotopic ratios alone are sufficient for the calculation of a date. In contrast, the (U-Th)/He method requires separate analysis of U+Th and 4He. Our method employs two separate laser microprobes for this process. A target mineral grain is placed in an ultrahigh vacuum chamber fitted with a window of appropriate composition to transmit ultraviolet radiation. A focused ArF (193 nm) excimer laser is used to ablate tapered cylindrical pits on the surface of the target. The liberated material is scrubbed with a series of getters in a fashion similar to that used for 40Ar/39Ar geochronology, and the 4He abundance is determined using a quadrupole mass spectrometer with well-calibrated sensitivity. A key requirement for calculation of the 4He abundance in the target is a precise knowledge of the volume of the ablation pit. This is the principal reason why we employ the ArF excimer for 4He analysis rather than a less-expensive frequency-multiplied Nd-YAG laser; the excimer creates tapered cylindrical pits with extremely reproducible and easily characterized geometry. After 4He analysis, U and Th are measured on the same sample surface using the more familiar technique of laser-ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS). Our early experiments have been done using a frequency-quintupled Nd-YAG microprobe (213nm), While the need to analyze U+Th and He in separate

  16. Ablative skin resurfacing with a novel microablative CO2 laser.

    PubMed

    Gotkin, Robert H; Sarnoff, Deborah S; Cannarozzo, Giovanni; Sadick, Neil S; Alexiades-Armenakas, Macrene

    2009-02-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) laser skin resurfacing has been a mainstay of facial rejuvenation since its introduction in the mid 1990s. Recently, a new generation of fractional or microablative CO2 lasers has been introduced to the marketplace. According to the concept of fractional photothermolysis, these lasers ablate only a fraction of the epidermal and dermal architecture in the treatment area. An array of microscopic thermal wounds is created that ablates the epidermis and dermis within very tiny zones; adjacent to these areas, the epidermis and dermis are spared. This microablative process of laser skin resurfacing has proven safe and effective not only for facial rejuvenation, but elsewhere on the body as well. It is capable of improving wrinkles, acne scars, and other types of atrophic scars and benign pigmented lesions associated with elastotic, sun-damaged skin. Because of the areas of spared epidermis and dermis inherent in a procedure that employs fractional photothermolysis, healing is more rapid compared to fully ablative CO2 laser skin resurfacing and downtime is proportionately reduced. A series of 32 consecutive patients underwent a single laser resurfacing procedure with the a new microablative CO2 laser. All patients were followed for a minimum of 6 months and were asked to complete patient satisfaction questionnaires; a 6 month postoperative photographic evaluation by an independent physician, not involved in the treatment, was also performed. Both sets of data were graded and reported on a quartile scale. Results demonstrated greater than 50% improvement in almost all patients with those undergoing treatment for wrinkles, epidermal pigment or solar elastosis deriving the greatest change for the better (>75%).

  17. Nanosecond laser ablation of gold nanoparticle films

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, Seung H.; Choi, Yeonho; Hwang, David J.; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Chung, Jaewon; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2006-10-02

    Ablation of self-assembled monolayer protected gold nanoparticle films on polyimide was explored using a nanosecond laser. When the nanoparticle film was ablated and subsequently thermally sintered to a continuous film, the elevated rim structure by the expulsion of molten pool could be avoided and the ablation threshold fluence was reduced to a value at least ten times lower than the reported threshold for the gold film. This could be explained by the unusual properties of nanoparticle film such as low melting temperature, weak bonding between nanoparticles, efficient laser energy deposition, and reduced heat loss. Finally, submicron lines were demonstrated.

  18. IR laser ablation of dental enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fried, Daniel

    2000-03-01

    An overview of the basic mechanisms of IR laser ablation of dental enamel is presented. Enamel is a highly structured tissue consisting of an heterogeneous distribution of water, mineral, protein and lipid. Absorption bands of water and carbonated hydroxyapatite can be selectively targeted from 2.7 to 11-micrometer via several laser wavelengths. Mechanistic differences in the nature of ablation and the varying surface morphology produced can be explained by the microstructure of the tissue. Suggested criteria for the choice of the optimum laser parameters for clinical use, the influence of plasma shielding and the role of exogenous water on the mechanism of ablation are discussed.

  19. Diamond Ablators for Inertial Confinement Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Biener, J; Mirkarimi, P B; Tringe, J W; Baker, S L; Wang, Y M; Kucheyev, S O; Teslich, N E; Wu, K J; Hamza, A V; Wild, C; Woerner, E; Koidl, P; Bruehne, K; Fecht, H

    2005-06-21

    Diamond has a unique combination of physical properties for the inertial confinement fusion ablator application, such as appropriate optical properties, high atomic density, high yield strength, and high thermal conductivity. Here, we present a feasible concept to fabricate diamond ablator shells. The fabrication of diamond capsules is a multi-step process, which involves diamond chemical vapor deposition on silicon mandrels followed by polishing, microfabrication of holes, and removing of the silicon mandrel by an etch process. We also discuss the pros and cons of coarse-grained optical quality and nanocrystalline chemical vapor deposition diamond films for the ablator application.

  20. Ablation of pulmonary malignancy: current status.

    PubMed

    Pua, Bradley B; Thornton, Raymond H; Solomon, Stephen B

    2010-08-01

    Since the first reported use of radiofrequency ablation of the lung in 2000, the field of image-guided lung ablation has received a considerable amount of attention. Survival studies have demonstrated the potential utility of thermal ablation in the treatment of patients with early-stage primary and limited secondary pulmonary tumors with promising results. Diagnostic imaging studies have advanced the understanding of the expected immediate postablation appearance of treated lesions, leading the way for early detection of local tumor progression. These survival studies and the expected imaging follow-up of these patients are reviewed herein.

  1. Effect of dry and wet ambient environment on the pulsed laser ablation of titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Nisar; Bashir, Shazia; Umm-i-Kalsoom; Akram, Mahreen; Mahmood, Khaliq

    2013-04-01

    Surface and structural properties of the laser irradiated titanium targets have been investigated under dry and wet ambient environments. For this purpose KrF Excimer laser of wavelength 248 nm, pulse duration of 20 ns and repetition rate of 20 Hz has been employed. The targets were exposed for various number of laser pulses ranging from 500 to 2000 in the ambient environment of air, de-ionized water and propanol at a fluence of 3.6 J/cm2. The surface morphology, chemical composition and crystallographical analysis were performed by using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD), respectively. For both central and peripheral ablated areas, significant difference in surface morphology has been observed in case of dry and wet ambient conditions. Large sized and diffused grains are observed in case of dry ablation. Whereas, in case of wet ablation, small sized, and well defined grains with distinct grain boundaries and significantly enhanced density are revealed. This difference is ascribed to the confinement effects of the liquid. The peripheral ablated area shows redeposition in case of dry ablation whereas small sized grain like structures are formed in case of wet ablation. EDS analysis exhibits variation in chemical composition under both ambient conditions. When the targets are treated in air environment, enhancement of the oxygen as well as nitrogen content is observed while in case of de-ionized water and propanol only increase in content of oxygen is observed. X-ray diffraction analysis exhibits formation of oxides and nitrides in case of air, whereas, in case of de-ionized water and propanol only oxides along with hydrides are formed. For various number of laser pulses the variation in the peak intensity, crystallinity and d-spacing is observed under both ambient conditions.

  2. Use of a circular mapping and ablation catheter for ablation of atypical right ventricular outflow tract arrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Katritsis, Demosthenes G; Giazitzoglou, Eleftherios; Paxinos, George

    2010-02-01

    A new technique for ablation of persistent ectopic activity with atypical electrocardiographic characteristics at the vicinity of the right ventricular outflow tract is described. A new circular mapping and ablation catheter initially designed for pulmonary vein ablation was used. Abolition of ectopic activity was achieved with minimal fluoroscopy and ablation times.

  3. Influence of an Angular Hatching Exposure Strategy on the Surface Roughness During Picosecond Laser Ablation of Hard Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, Christian; Manderla, Jannik; Hallmann, Sina; Emmelmann, Claus

    Innovative chip breakers for cutting tools made of very hard materials require laser ablation and demand a high quality regarding the manufactured surface. When processing materials such as polycrystalline cubic boron-nitride or tungsten carbide the surface roughness by laser ablation reaches Sa = 1,0-2,9 μm compared to Sa = 0,42 μm achieved by grinding. Therefore in the presented research the influence of the hatching exposure strategy on surface roughness during picosecond laser ablation of tungsten carbide is examined. The areal, layerwise ablation process is separated into its elements which are represented by intersection zones between single and multiple laser vectors. Thus two mechanisms of roughness formation are identified and described by model functions. Further the mechanisms are transferred to areal ablation in which surface roughness decreases due to improved hatching angles compared to a commonly used one of φ= 0°/90°. With this approach the roughness is reduced by approximately factor 2,0-3,5 to Sa = 0,82 μm. In conclusion guidelines are derived which present favorable settings for high quality laser ablation processes.

  4. Laser ablation of a Cu-Al-Ni combinatorial thin film library: analysis of crater morphology and geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebegea, Simina Aurelia; Thomas, Keith; Chawla, Vipin; Michler, Johann; Kong, Ming Chu

    2016-12-01

    The conventional approach to studying laser-workpiece interaction in the ablation regime is to vary beam parameters used on a specimen of uniform chemical composition. The current work instead utilises a pulsed laser beam of constant parameters to ablate a ternary alloy thin film where the chemical composition of the sample varies continuously; this will enhance the understanding of pulsed laser ablation by means of a combinatorial approach. The analysis of the studied workpiece (a Cu-Al-Ni thin film deposited by magnetron sputtering) revealed the presence of both compositional and morphological gradients. Variation in the surface morphology was correlated with aluminium content. Single-pulse laser ablation (Nd:YAG, 1064 nm, 30 ns, 4.54 J/cm2) of the surface resulted in different crater features, geometry and volume. Two characteristic regions separated by a transition zone were identified based on the craters' geometrical and morphological characteristics. The ablated volume increases with the atomic percentage of aluminium up to a threshold value of roughly 30 at.% after which the ablation volume slowly declines. This phenomenon may be attributed to plasma absorption and heat dissipation in the thin film.

  5. 1.5T MRI-guided trans-perineal laser ablation of locally recurrent prostate adenocarcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhail, E. Frederick; Mynderse, Lance A.; Callstrom, Matthew R.; Gorny, Krzysztof R.; McNichols, Roger J.; Atwell, Thomas D.; Gettman, Matthew T.; Amrami, Kimberly K.; Kawashima, Akira; Woodrum, David A.

    2010-02-01

    Introduction: Biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer after definitive therapy with radical prostatectomy (RP) is known to occur between 25-30%. We present the first known case of 1.5T MRI guided ablation using laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) for locally recurrent prostate cancer following RP. Methods: The patient elected to undergo MRI-guided LITT of the biopsy proven cancer recurrence using an FDAapproved MRI compatible, 980nm, 15-watt laser system with MR thermometry. Under T2-weighted MR(1.5T Siemens) imaging, guidance and targeting of the lesions with trans-perineal placement of laser applicators. Multiple cycles of laser energy were used to ablate the tumor. A MRI-compatible urethral cooling catheter was placed to prevent urethral thermal damage. Results: Intra-procedural temperature mapping allowed continuous monitoring of the ablation zone and permitted ablation control until tumor coverage was achieved. Additionally, the protective cooling effects of the urethral cooling catheter could also be seen with the temperature mapping. Post-ablation gadolinium and T2 weighted MR imaging demonstrated an ablation defect encompassing the recurrent tumor with no residual hyper-enhancing nodules. Three month follow-up shows no residual or recurrent tumor seen on MR imaging. Conclusion: This represents the first known, successful, MRI-guided, LITT procedures at 1.5T for locally recurrent prostate adenocarcinoma following RP.

  6. CdSe quantum dots synthesized by laser ablation in water and their photovoltaic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horoz, Sabit; Lu, Liyou; Dai, Qilin; Chen, Jiajun; Yakami, Baichhabi; Pikal, J. M.; Wang, Wenyong; Tang, Jinke

    2012-11-01

    CdSe quantum dots (QDs) have been prepared by a facile and clean synthesis method--laser ablation in water. The structural and luminescent properties of the CdSe QDs have been investigated. The CdSe QDs of wurtzite crystal structure have an average particle size of about 5 nm. The QDs can be attached to ZnO nanowires making them ideal for applications in QD-sensitized nanowire solar cells. A uniqueness of the QDs attached to the ZnO nanowires by this laser ablation method is that they do not contain ligands, and the preparation avoids the complicated process of ligand exchange.

  7. Destruction of monocrystalline silicon with nanosecond pulsed fiber laser accompanied by the oxidation of ablation microparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veiko, V. P.; Skvortsov, A. M.; Huynh, C. T.; Petrov, A. A.

    2013-11-01

    In this work, we report an observation of process of local destruction monocrystalline silicon with a scanning beam irradiation of pulse ytterbium fiber laser with a wavelength λ= 1062 nm, accompanied by the oxidation of ablation microparticles. It is shown that depending on the power density of irradiation was observed a large scatter size of the microparticles. From a certain average power density is observed beginning oxidation particulate emitted from the surface of the irradiated area. By varying the parameters of the laser beam such as scanning speed, pulse repetition rate, overlap of laser spot, radiation dose can be achieved almost complete oxidation of all formed during the ablation of microparticles.

  8. Conformal Ablative Thermal Protection Systems (CA-TPS) for Venus and Saturn Backshells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, R.; Gasch, M.; Stackpoole, M.; Wilder, M.; Boghozian, T.; Chavez-Garcia, J.; Prabhu, Dinesh; Kazemba, Cole D.; Venkatapathy, E.

    2016-01-01

    This poster provides an overview of the work performed to date on the Conformal Ablative TPS (CA-TPS) element of the TPSM project out of GCDP. Under this element, NASA is developing improved ablative TPS materials based on flexible felt for reinforcement rather than rigid reinforcements. By replacing the reinforcements with felt, the resulting materials have much higher strain-to-failure and are much lower in thermal conductivity than their rigid counterparts. These characteristics should allow for larger tile sizes, direct bonding to aeroshells and even lower weight TPS. The conformal phenolic impregnated carbon felt (C-PICA) is a candidate for backshell TPS for both Venus and Saturn entry vehicles.

  9. Preparation of CuO nanoparticles by laser ablation in liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdulateef, Sinan A.; MatJafri, M. Z.; Omar, A. F.; Ahmed, Naser M.; Azzez, Shrook A.; Ibrahim, Issam M.; Al-Jumaili, Batool E. B.

    2016-07-01

    Colloidal Cu nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized by pulsed Nd:YAG laser ablation in acetone. Cu NPs were converted into CuO. The size and optical properties of these NPs were characterized using an UV/Vis spectrophotometer, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Cu NPs were spherical, and their mean diameter in acetone was 8 nm-10 nm. Optical extinction immediately after the ablation showed surface Plasmon resonance peaks at 602 nm. The color of Cu NPs in acetone was green and stable even after a long time.

  10. Ultrasound simulation of real-time temperature estimation during radiofrequency ablation using finite element models.

    PubMed

    Daniels, M J; Jiang, J; Varghese, T

    2008-03-01

    Radiofrequency ablation is the most common minimally invasive therapy used in the United States to treat hepatocellular carcinoma and liver metastases. The ability to perform real-time temperature imaging while a patient is undergoing ablation therapy may help reduce the high recurrence rates following ablation therapy. Ultrasound echo signals undergo time shifts with increasing temperature due to sound speed and thermal expansion, which are tracked using both 1D cross correlation and 2D block matching based speckle tracking methods. In this paper, we present a quantitative evaluation of the accuracy and precision of temperature estimation using the above algorithms on both simulated and experimental data. A finite element analysis simulation of radiofrequency ablation of hepatic tissue was developed. Finite element analysis provides a method to obtain the exact temperature distribution along with a mapping of the tissue displacement due to thermal expansion. These local displacement maps were combined with the displacement due to speed of sound changes and utilized to generate ultrasound radiofrequency frames at specified time increments over the entire ablation procedure. These echo signals provide an ideal test-bed to evaluate the performance of both speckle tracking methods, since the estimated temperature results can be compared directly to the exact finite element solution. Our results indicate that the 1D cross-correlation (CC) method underestimates the cumulative displacement by 0.20mm, while the underestimation with 2D block matching (BM) is about 0.14 mm after 360 s of ablation. The 1D method also overestimates the size of the ablated region by 5.4% when compared to 2.4% with the 2D method after 720 s of ablation. Hence 2D block matching provides better tracking of temperature variations when compared to the 1D cross-correlation method over the entire duration of the ablation procedure. In addition, results obtained using 1D cross-correlation diverge from

  11. In-Situ Apatite Laser Ablation U-Th-Sm/He Dating, Methods and Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickering, J. E.; Matthews, W.; Guest, B.; Hamilton, B.; Sykes, C.

    2015-12-01

    In-situ, laser ablation U-Th-Sm/He dating is an emerging technique in thermochronology that has been proven as a means to date zircon and monzonite1-5. In-situ U-Th-Sm/He thermochronology eliminates many of the problems and inconveniences associated with traditional, whole grain methods, including; reducing bias in grain selection based on size, shape and clarity; allowing for the use of broken grains and grains with inclusions; avoiding bad neighbour effects; and eliminating safety hazards associated with dissolution. In-situ apatite laser ablation is challenging due to low concentrations of U and Th and thus a low abundance of radiogenic He. For apatite laser ablation to be effective the ultra-high-vacuum (UHV) line must have very low and consistent background levels of He. To reduce He background, samples are mounted in a UHV stable medium. Our mounting process uses a MicroHePP (Microscope Mounted Heated Platen Press) to press samples into FEP (fluorinated ethylene propylene) bonded to an aluminum backing plate. Samples are ablated using a Resonetics 193 nm excimer laser and liberated He is measured using a quadrupole mass spectrometer on the ASI Alphachron noble gas line; collectively this system is known as the Resochron. The ablated sites are imaged using a Zygo Zescope optical profilometer and ablated pit volume measured using PitVol, a custom MatLab algorithm developed to enable precise and unbiased measurement of the ablated pit geometry. We use the well-characterized Durango apatite to demonstrate the accuracy and precision of the method. He liberated from forty-two pits, having volumes between 1700 and 9000 um3, were measured using the Resochron. The ablated sites were imaged using a Zygo Zescope optical profilometer and ablated pit volume measured using PitVol. U, Th and Sm concentrations were measured by laser ablation and the U-Th-Sm/He age calculated by standard age equation. An age of 33.8±0.31 Ma was determined and compares well with conventional

  12. Laser ablation in analytical chemistry - A review

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, Richard E.; Mao, Xianglei; Liu, Haichen; Gonzalez, Jhanis; Mao, Samuel S.

    2001-10-10

    Laser ablation is becoming a dominant technology for direct solid sampling in analytical chemistry. Laser ablation refers to the process in which an intense burst of energy delivered by a short laser pulse is used to sample (remove a portion of) a material. The advantages of laser ablation chemical analysis include direct characterization of solids, no chemical procedures for dissolution, reduced risk of contamination or sample loss, analysis of very small samples not separable for solution analysis, and determination of spatial distributions of elemental composition. This review describes recent research to understand and utilize laser ablation for direct solid sampling, with emphasis on sample introduction to an inductively coupled plasma (ICP). Current research related to contemporary experimental systems, calibration and optimization, and fractionation is discussed, with a summary of applications in several areas.

  13. Physical processes of laser tissue ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furzikov, Nickolay P.

    1991-05-01

    The revised ablation model applicable to homogeneous tissues is presented. It is based on the thermal mechanism and involves the instability of the laserinduced evaporation (thermodestruction) front the growth of the surface ripple structure the interference of the laser wave and of the surface wave arising by diffraction on the ripples Beer''s law violation the pulsed thermodestruction of the organic structural component the tissue water boiling and gas dynamic expansion of the resulting products into the surrounding medium which is followed by the shock wave formation. The UV and IR ablation schemes were implemented and compared to the corneal ablation experiments. The initial ablation pressure and temperature are given restored from the timeofflight measurements of the supersonic expansion of the product. 1.

  14. Evolving Ablative Therapies for Hepatic Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Hochwald, Steven N.

    2014-01-01

    The liver is a common site for both primary and secondary malignancy. Hepatic resection and transplantation are the two treatment modalities that have been shown to achieve complete cure, but only 10 to 20% of patients are candidates for these treatments. For the remaining patients, tumor ablation has emerged as the most promising alternative modality. In addition to providing local control and improving survival outcomes, tumor ablation also helps to down stage patients for potential curative treatments, both alone as well as in combination with other treatments. While tumor ablation can be achieved in multiple ways, the introduction of newer ablative techniques has shifted the focus from palliation to potentially curative treatment. Because the long-term safety and survival benefits are not substantive at present, it is important that we strive to evaluate the results from these studies using appropriate comparative outcome methodologies. PMID:24877069

  15. Thermal Ablation Modeling for Silicate Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yih-Kanq

    2016-01-01

    A general thermal ablation model for silicates is proposed. The model includes the mass losses through the balance between evaporation and condensation, and through the moving molten layer driven by surface shear force and pressure gradient. This model can be applied in the ablation simulation of the meteoroid and the glassy ablator for spacecraft Thermal Protection Systems. Time-dependent axisymmetric computations are performed by coupling the fluid dynamics code, Data-Parallel Line Relaxation program, with the material response code, Two-dimensional Implicit Thermal Ablation simulation program, to predict the mass lost rates and shape change. The predicted mass loss rates will be compared with available data for model validation, and parametric studies will also be performed for meteoroid earth entry conditions.

  16. Pharmacological Tests in Atrial Fibrillation Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Gourraud, Jean-Baptiste; Andrade, Jason G; Macle, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    The invasive management of atrial fibrillation (AF) has been considerably changed by the identification of major sites of AF initiation and/or maintenance within the pulmonary vein antra. Percutaneous catheter ablation of these targets has become the standard of care for sustained maintenance of sinus rhythm. Long-term failure of ablation is related to an inability to create a durable transmural lesion or to identify all of the non-pulmonary vein arrhythmia triggers. Pharmacological challenges during catheter ablation have been suggested to improve outcomes in both paroxysmal and persistent AF. Herein we review the mechanism and evidence for the use of pharmacological adjuncts during the catheter ablation of AF. PMID:28116081

  17. Indications and options for endometrial ablation.

    PubMed

    2008-11-01

    Endometrial ablation is an effective therapeutic option for the management of menorrhagia in properly selected patients. Hysteroscopic and non-hysteroscopic techniques offer similar rates of symptom relief and patient satisfaction.

  18. Percutaneous ablation of malignant thoracic tumors.

    PubMed

    Ghaye, B

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of death related to cancer. Fifteen to thirty percent of patients with a localized lung cancer are actually inoperable as they present with poor general condition, limited cardiopulmonary function, or a too high surgical risk. Therefore, minimally invasive treatments are needed and percutaneous ablation seems an attractive option. Thermal ablation can be performed by delivering heat (radiofrequency, microwave, laser) or cold (cryotherapy) through a needle inserted into the tumor under CT guidance. The ideal lesion is less than 2 or 3 cm in diameter. Success of percutaneous thermal ablation appears to be close to those of surgery for localized lung cancer. Nevertheless studies are still needed to definitely assess the role of ablation compared to other emerging techniques, as stereotactic radiotherapy as well as potential synergy with other treatments.

  19. Flexible Ablators: Applications and Arcjet Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, James O.; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Beck, Robin A S.; Mcguire, Kathy; Prabhu, Dinesh K.; Gorbunov, Sergey

    2011-01-01

    Flexible ablators were conceived in 2009 to meet the technology pull for large, human Mars Exploration Class, 23 m diameter hypersonic inflatable aerodynamic decelerators. As described elsewhere, they have been recently undergoing initial technical readiness (TRL) advancement by NASA. The performance limits of flexible ablators in terms of maximum heat rates, pressure and shear remain to be defined. Further, it is hoped that this emerging technology will vastly expand the capability of future NASA missions involving atmospheric entry systems. This paper considers four topics of relevance to flexible ablators: (1) Their potential applications to near/far term human and robotic missions (2) Brief consideration of the balance between heat shield diameter, flexible ablator performance limits, entry vehicle controllability and aft-body shear layer impingement of interest to designers of very large entry vehicles, (3) The approach for developing bonding processes of flexible ablators for use on rigid entry bodies and (4) Design of large arcjet test articles that will enable the testing of flexible ablators in flight-like, combined environments (heat flux, pressure, shear and structural tensile loading). Based on a review of thermal protection system performance requirements for future entry vehicles, it is concluded that flexible ablators have broad applications to conventional, rigid entry body systems and are enabling to large deployable (both inflatable and mechanical) heat shields. Because of the game-changing nature of flexible ablators, it appears that NASA's Office of the Chief Technologist (OCT) will fund a focused, 3-year TRL advancement of the new materials capable of performance in heat fluxes in the range of 200-600 W/sq. cm. This support will enable the manufacture and use of the large-scale arcjet test designs that will be a key element of this OCT funded activity.

  20. Resonant laser ablation: mechanisms and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.E.; Allen, T.M.; Garrett, A.W.; Gill, C.G.; Hemberger, P.H.; Kelly, P.B.; Nogar, N.S.

    1996-10-01

    We report on aspects of resonant laser ablation (RLA) behavior for a number of sample types: metals, alloys, thin films, zeolites and soil. The versatility of RLA is demonstrated, with results on a variety of samples and in several mass spectrometers. In addition, the application to depth profiling of thin films is described; absolute removal rates and detection limits are also displayed. A discussion of possible mechanisms for low-power ablation is presented.

  1. Percutaneous ablation of colorectal lung metastases

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Stephen B.

    2015-01-01

    Lung metastasectomy can prolong survival in patients with metastatic colorectal carcinoma. Thermal ablation offers a potential solution with similar reported survival outcomes. It has minimal effect on pulmonary function, or quality of life, can be repeated, and may be considered more acceptable to patients because of the associated shorter hospital stay and recovery. This review describes the indications, technique, reported outcomes, complications and radiologic appearances after thermal ablation of colorectal lung metastases. PMID:26697202

  2. Modeling Initial Stage of Ablation Material Pyrolysis: Graphitic Precursor Formation and Interfacial Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, Tapan G.; Lawson, John W.; Keblinski, Pawel

    2010-01-01

    Reactive molecular dynamics simulations are used to study initial stage of pyrolysis of ablation materials and their composites with carbon nanotubes and carbon fibers. The products formed during pyrolysis are characterized and water is found as the primary product in all cases. The water formation mechanisms are analyzed and the value of the activation energy for water formation is estimated. A detailed study on graphitic precursor formation reveals the presence of two temperature zones. In the lower temperature zone (less than 2000 K) polymerization occurs resulting in formation of large, stable graphitic precursors, and in the high temperature zone (greater than 2000 K) polymer scission results in formation of short polymer chains/molecules. Simulations performed in the high temperature zone on the phenolic resin composites (with carbon nanotubes and carbon fibers) shows that the presence of interfaces had no substantial effect on the chain scission rate or the activation energy value for water formation.

  3. Time-resolved photoluminescence for evaluating laser-induced damage during dielectric stack ablation in silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parola, Stéphanie; Blanc-Pélissier, Danièle; Barbos, Corina; Le Coz, Marine; Poulain, Gilles; Lemiti, Mustapha

    2016-06-01

    Selective laser ablation of dielectric layers on crystalline silicon wafers was investigated for solar cell fabrication. Laser processing was performed on Al2O3, and bi-layers Al2O3/SiNX:H with a nanosecond UV laser at various energy densities ranging from 0.4 to 2 J cm-2. Ablation threshold was correlated to the simulated temperature at the interface between the dielectric coatings and the silicon substrate. Laser-induced damage to the silicon substrate was evaluated by time-resolved photoluminescence. The minority carrier lifetime deduced from time-resolved photoluminescence was related to the depth of the heat affected zone in the substrate.

  4. Photoreduced silver nanoparticles grown on femtosecond laser ablated, D-shaped fiber probe for surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Yin, Zhen; Geng, Youfu; Xie, Qingli; Hong, Xueming; Tan, Xiaoling; Chen, Yuzhi; Wang, Lele; Wang, Wenjia; Li, Xuejin

    2016-07-10

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) probes are made by facile photochemical deposition of silver nanoparticles on a femtosecond (fs) laser ablated, D-shaped fiber. The structure and surface morphology of the probe are investigated by scanning electron microscopy. High-quality SERS signals are detected using Rhodamine 6G molecules via an in situ sensing mode. Experimental results show that the SERS signals increase with the increase of the length of fs laser ablated, D-shaped zone. Our D-shaped fiber SERS probe shows a feasible method for a large active area, high performance, and real-time and remote measurement of SERS signals in biochemical analysis.

  5. Preparation of silver nanoparticles in virgin coconut oil using laser ablation

    PubMed Central

    Zamiri, Reza; Azmi, B Z; Sadrolhosseini, Amir Reza; Ahangar, Hossein Abbastabar; Zaidan, A W; Mahdi, M A

    2011-01-01

    Laser ablation of a silver plate immersed in virgin coconut oil was carried out for fabrication of silver nanoparticles. A Nd:YAG laser at wavelengths of 1064 nm was used for ablation of the plate at different times. The virgin coconut oil allowed formation of nanoparticles with well-dispersed, uniform particle diameters that were stable for a reasonable length of time. The particle sizes and volume fraction of nanoparticles inside the solutions obtained at 15, 30, 45 min ablation times were 4.84, 5.18, 6.33 nm and 1.0 × 10−8, 1.6 × 10−8, 2.4 × 10−8, respectively. The presented method for preparation of silver nanoparticles in virgin coconut oil is environmentally friendly and may be considered a green method. PMID:21289983

  6. Ablation Modeling of Ares-I Upper State Thermal Protection System Using Thermal Desktop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharp, John R.; Page, Arthur T.

    2007-01-01

    The thermal protection system (TPS) for the Ares-I Upper Stage will be based on Space Transportation System External Tank (ET) and Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) heritage materials. These TPS materials were qualified via hot gas testing that simulated ascent and re-entry aerothermodynamic convective heating environments. From this data, the recession rates due to ablation were characterized and used in thermal modeling for sizing the thickness required to maintain structural substrate temperatures. At Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), the in-house code ABL is currently used to predict TPS ablation and substrate temperatures as a FORTRAN application integrated within SINDA/G. This paper describes a comparison of the new ablation utility in Thermal Desktop and SINDA/FLUINT with the heritage ABL code and empirical test data which serves as the validation of the Thermal Desktop software for use on the design of the Ares-I Upper Stage project.

  7. Preparation of silver nanoparticles in virgin coconut oil using laser ablation.

    PubMed

    Zamiri, Reza; Azmi, B Z; Sadrolhosseini, Amir Reza; Ahangar, Hossein Abbastabar; Zaidan, A W; Mahdi, M A

    2011-01-07

    Laser ablation of a silver plate immersed in virgin coconut oil was carried out for fabrication of silver nanoparticles. A Nd:YAG laser at wavelengths of 1064 nm was used for ablation of the plate at different times. The virgin coconut oil allowed formation of nanoparticles with well-dispersed, uniform particle diameters that were stable for a reasonable length of time. The particle sizes and volume fraction of nanoparticles inside the solutions obtained at 15, 30, 45 min ablation times were 4.84, 5.18, 6.33 nm and 1.0 × 10(-8), 1.6 × 10(-8), 2.4 × 10(-8), respectively. The presented method for preparation of silver nanoparticles in virgin coconut oil is environmentally friendly and may be considered a green method.

  8. The TriBeam system: Femtosecond laser ablation in situ SEM

    SciTech Connect

    Echlin, McLean P.; Straw, Marcus; Randolph, Steven; Filevich, Jorge; Pollock, Tresa M.

    2015-02-15

    Femtosecond laser ablation offers the unique ability to remove material at rates that are orders of magnitude faster than existing ion beam technologies with little or no associated damage. By combining ultrafast lasers with state-of-the-art electron microscopy equipment, we have developed a TriBeam system capable of targeted, in-situ tomography providing chemical, structural, and topographical information in three dimensions of near mm{sup 3} sized volumes. The origins, development, physics, current uses, and future potential for the TriBeam system are described in this tutorial review. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • An emerging tool, the TriBeam, for in situ femtosecond (fs) laser ablation is presented. • Fs laser ablation aided tomography at the mm{sup 3}-scale is demonstrated. • Fs laser induced deposition of Pt is demonstrated at sub-diffraction limit resolution. • Fs laser surface structuring is reviewed as well as micromachining applications.

  9. Promotion of protein crystal growth by actively switching crystal growth mode via femtosecond laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tominaga, Yusuke; Maruyama, Mihoko; Yoshimura, Masashi; Koizumi, Haruhiko; Tachibana, Masaru; Sugiyama, Shigeru; Adachi, Hiroaki; Tsukamoto, Katsuo; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Takano, Kazufumi; Murakami, Satoshi; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi Y.; Mori, Yusuke

    2016-11-01

    Large single crystals with desirable shapes are essential for various scientific and industrial fields, such as X-ray/neutron crystallography and crystalline devices. However, in the case of proteins the production of such crystals is particularly challenging, despite the efforts devoted to optimization of the environmental, chemical and physical parameters. Here we report an innovative approach for promoting the growth of protein crystals by directly modifying the local crystal structure via femtosecond laser ablation. We demonstrate that protein crystals with surfaces that are locally etched (several micrometers in diameter) by femtosecond laser ablation show enhanced growth rates without losing crystal quality. Optical phase-sensitive microscopy and X-ray topography imaging techniques reveal that the local etching induces spiral growth, which is energetically advantageous compared with the spontaneous two-dimensional nucleation growth mode. These findings prove that femtosecond laser ablation can actively switch the crystal growth mode, offering flexible control over the size and shape of protein crystals.

  10. An overview of energy sources in clinical use for the ablation of atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Comas, George M; Imren, Yildirim; Williams, Mathew R

    2007-01-01

    Recent years have seen many developments in the field of alternative energy sources for arrhythmia surgery. The impetus behind these advances is to replace the traditional, "cut-and-sew" Cox maze III procedure with lesion sets that are simpler, shorter, and safer but just as effective. There is demand for technology to make continuous, linear, transmural ablations reliably with a versatile energy source via an epicardial approach. This would make minimally invasive endoscopic surgical ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF) without cardiopulmonary bypass and with a closed chest feasible. These advances would shorten cardio-pulmonary bypass and improve outcomes in patients having surgical ablation and concomitant cardiac surgery. This review summarizes the technology behind alternative energy sources used to treat AF. Alternative energy sources include hypothermic sources (cryoablation) and hyperthermic sources (radiofrequency, microwave, laser, ultrasound). For each source, the biophysical background, mode of tissue injury, factors affecting lesion size, and advantages and complications are discussed.

  11. Application of gold nanoparticles produced by laser ablation for immunochromatographic assay labeling.

    PubMed

    Urusov, A E; Petrakova, A V; Kuzmin, P G; Zherdev, A V; Sveshnikov, P G; Shafeev, G A; Dzantiev, B B

    2015-12-15

    Nanodispersed gold is widely used as a marker in different analytical systems. For such purposes, it is usually obtained by the reduction of salts. This work studied the potential analytical applications of nanodispersed gold obtained by laser ablation because gold produced with this method has no chemical coating. The nanoparticles produced were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and spectrophotometry. The average size of the particles was 24.5 nm. Concentration dependences of antibody immobilization on ablative gold were obtained. With the use of antibody-conjugated nanoparticles, an immunochromatographic system was constructed for the detection of zearalenone mycotoxin. This immunoassay was characterized by a detection limit of 0.1 ng/ml antigen with an assay duration of only 15 min, which is on par with current test systems comprising nanodispersed gold obtained by chemical reduction. The simplicity of ablative dispersing makes this a prospective method for the labeling of various antibodies for analytical use.

  12. Generation of nanostructures on metals by laser ablation in liquids: new results

    SciTech Connect

    Barmina, E V; Shafeev, Georgii A; Stratakis, E; Fotakis, K

    2010-12-29

    Surface nanostructuring of titanium, nickel, molybdenum, and tungsten by ablation with pico- and femtosecond laser pulses in liquids is studied experimentally for the first time. The morphology and properties of obtained nanostructures are investigated using a field emission scanning electron microscope and Raman spectroscopy. The size of nanostructures depends on the laser pulse duration and energy density and on the target material. As a rule, the size distribution of structures is bimodal. Potential applications of such nanostructured substrates are discussed. (photonics and nanotechnology)

  13. Optical properties of petal-like aggregated nanocrystalline zinc oxide synthesized by laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Jafarkhani, P.; Chehrghani, A.; Torkamany, M.J.

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Petal like ZnO nanocrystals are synthesized by high frequency laser ablation in water. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Optical band gap of ZnO nanocrystals was tunable by changing the laser pulse energy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nonlinear optical properties and limiting threshold were obtained by Z-scan technique. -- Abstract: The results of the investigations carried out on the third-order nonlinearity in zinc oxide (ZnO) nanocrystals (NCs) by Z-scan technique are included in this paper. ZnO NCs show negative nonlinearity and good nonlinear absorption behavior at 532 nm. The third-order optical susceptibility {chi}(3) increases with enlargement of NCs due to the size dependent enhancement of exciton oscillator strength. The synthesis of ZnO NCs was performed by laser ablation from a high-purity metallic target of Zn in distilled water medium. For the ablation process, a high frequency pulsed Nd:YAG laser was employed operating at 532 nm with 100 ns pulse duration. UV-vis absorption spectroscopy illustrated the enhancement of the size of ZnO NCs upon increasing the laser pulse energy applied in ablation process. Accordingly the corresponding optical band gap (E{sub g}) decrease by increasing the size of NCs. X-ray diffraction (XRD) associated with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was utilized to characterize the crystalline phase and also for determining the ZnO NCs morphology.

  14. Towards nanopatterning by femtosecond laser ablation of pre-stretched elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surdo, Salvatore; Piazza, Simonluca; Ceseracciu, Luca; Diaspro, Alberto; Duocastella, Martí

    2016-06-01

    Diffraction limits the focusing capabilities of an optical system seriously constraining the use of lasers for nanopatterning. In this work, we present a novel and simple approach to reduce the minimum feature size of a laser-direct write system by ablating a pre-stretched material. In particular, by focusing and scanning a femtosecond laser beam on the surface of a uniaxially pre-stretched elastomeric membrane we are able to obtain microstructures according to a desired pattern. After removing the stress applied to the elastomer, the membrane relaxes to its original size and the ablated patterns shrink while preserving their shape. In this way, the minimum feature size that is typically determined by the optical properties of the focusing system can be now controlled by the strain applied to the elastomer during the ablation process. We demonstrate this approach by ablating lines on a stretchable polymeric membrane at different strain conditions. Experimental results are in good agreement with theoretical predictions. The proposed method opens up new interesting possibilities for the rapid prototyping of micro- and nano-structures suitable for a wide range of applications such as soft-lithography, micro-/nano-fluidics and lab-on-chip.

  15. Creation of a Tumor-Mimic Model Using a Muscle Paste for Radiofrequency Ablation of the Lung

    SciTech Connect

    Kawai, T. Kaminou, T.; Sugiura, K.; Hashimoto, M.; Ohuchi, Y.; Adachi, A.; Fujioka, S.; Ito, H.; Nakamura, K.; Ogawa, T.

    2009-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to develop an easily created tumor-mimic model and evaluate its efficacy for radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of the lung. The bilateral lungs of eight living adult swine were used. A tumor-mimic model was made by percutaneous injection of 1.0 ml muscle paste through the bone biopsy needle into the lung. An RFA probe was then inserted into the tumor mimics immediately after tumor creation. Ablation time, tissue impedance, and temperature were recorded. The tumor mimics and their coagulated regions were evaluated microscopically and macroscopically. The muscle paste was easily injected into the lung parenchyma through the bone biopsy needle and well visualized under fluoroscopy. In 10 of 12 sites the tumor mimics were oval shaped, localized, and homogeneous on gross specimens. Ten tumor mimics were successfully ablated, and four locations were ablated in the normal lung parenchyma as controls. In the tumor and normal lung parenchyma, ablation times were 8.9 {+-} 3.5 and 4.4 {+-} 1.6 min, respectively; tissue impedances at the start of ablation were 100.6 {+-} 16.6 and 145.8 {+-} 26.8 {Omega}, respectively; and temperatures at the end of ablation were 66.0 {+-} 7.9 and 57.5 {+-} 7.6{sup o}C, respectively. The mean size of tumor mimics was 13.9 x 8.2 mm, and their coagulated area was 18.8 x 13.1 mm. In the lung parenchyma, the coagulated area was 15.3 x 12.0 mm. In conclusion, our tumor-mimic model using muscle paste can be easily and safely created and can be ablated using the ablation algorithm in the clinical setting.

  16. Planarization of Isolated Defects on ICF Target Capsule Surfaces by Pulsed Laser Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Alfonso, Noel; Carlson, Lane C.; Bunn, Thomas L.

    2016-08-09

    Demanding surface quality requirements for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsules motivated the development of a pulsed laser ablation method to reduce or eliminate undesirable surface defects. The pulsed laser ablation technique takes advantage of a full surface (4π) capsule manipulation system working in combination with an optical profiling (confocal) microscope. Based on the defect topography, the material removal rate, the laser pulse energy and its beam profile, a customized laser raster pattern is derived to remove the defect. The pattern is a table of coordinates and number of pulses that dictate how the defect will be vaporized until its height is level with the capsule surface. This paper explains how the raster patterns are optimized to minimize surface roughness and how surface roughness after laser ablation is simulated. The simulated surfaces are compared with actual ablated surfaces. Large defects are reduced to a size regime where a tumble finishing process produces very high quality surfaces devoid of high mode defects. The combined polishing processes of laser ablation and tumble finishing have become routine fabrication steps for National Ignition Facility capsule production.

  17. A brain-sparing diphtheria toxin for chemical genetic ablation of peripheral cell lineages.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Mafalda M A; Mahú, Inês; Seixas, Elsa; Martinéz-Sánchez, Noelia; Kubasova, Nadiya; Pirzgalska, Roksana M; Cohen, Paul; Dietrich, Marcelo O; López, Miguel; Bernardes, Gonçalo J L; Domingos, Ana I

    2017-04-03

    Conditional expression of diphtheria toxin receptor (DTR) is widely used for tissue-specific ablation of cells. However, diphtheria toxin (DT) crosses the blood-brain barrier, which limits its utility for ablating peripheral cells using Cre drivers that are also expressed in the central nervous system (CNS). Here we report the development of a brain-sparing DT, termed BRAINSPAReDT, for tissue-specific genetic ablation of cells outside the CNS. We prevent blood-brain barrier passage of DT through PEGylation, which polarizes the molecule and increases its size. We validate BRAINSPAReDT with regional genetic sympathectomy: BRAINSPAReDT ablates peripheral but not central catecholaminergic neurons, thus avoiding the Parkinson-like phenotype associated with full dopaminergic depletion. Regional sympathectomy compromises adipose tissue thermogenesis, and renders mice susceptible to obesity. We provide a proof of principle that BRAINSPAReDT can be used for Cre/DTR tissue-specific ablation outside the brain using CNS drivers, while consolidating the link between adiposity and the sympathetic nervous system.

  18. Planarization of Isolated Defects on ICF Target Capsule Surfaces by Pulsed Laser Ablation

    DOE PAGES

    Alfonso, Noel; Carlson, Lane C.; Bunn, Thomas L.

    2016-08-09

    Demanding surface quality requirements for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsules motivated the development of a pulsed laser ablation method to reduce or eliminate undesirable surface defects. The pulsed laser ablation technique takes advantage of a full surface (4π) capsule manipulation system working in combination with an optical profiling (confocal) microscope. Based on the defect topography, the material removal rate, the laser pulse energy and its beam profile, a customized laser raster pattern is derived to remove the defect. The pattern is a table of coordinates and number of pulses that dictate how the defect will be vaporized until its heightmore » is level with the capsule surface. This paper explains how the raster patterns are optimized to minimize surface roughness and how surface roughness after laser ablation is simulated. The simulated surfaces are compared with actual ablated surfaces. Large defects are reduced to a size regime where a tumble finishing process produces very high quality surfaces devoid of high mode defects. The combined polishing processes of laser ablation and tumble finishing have become routine fabrication steps for National Ignition Facility capsule production.« less

  19. Effect of the pulse repetition rate on fiber-assisted tissue ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hyun Wook

    2016-07-01

    The effect of the pulse repetition rate on ablation performance was evaluated ex vivo at various fiber sweeping speeds for an effective 532-nm laser prostatectomy. Three pulse repetition rates (7.5, 15, and 30 kHz) at 100 W were delivered to bovine liver tissue at three sweeping speeds (2, 4, and 6 mm/s) to achieve bulky tissue removal. Ablation performance was quantitatively compared in terms of the ablation volume and the coagulation thickness. The lowest pulse repetition rate of 7.5 kHz attained the highest ablation volume (101.5 ± 12.0 mm3) and the thinnest coagulation (0.7 ± 0.1 mm) along with superficial carbonization. The highest pulse repetition rate of 30 kHz was associated with the least tissue removal (65.8 ± 5.0 mm3) and the deepest thermal denaturation (1.1 ± 0.2 mm). Quantitative evaluations of laser parameters can be instrumental in facilitating ablation efficiency and maintaining hemostatic coagulation during treatment of large-sized benign prostate hyperplasia.

  20. X-ray Micro-Tomography of Ablative Heat Shield Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panerai, Francesco; Ferguson, Joseph; Borner, Arnaud; Mansour, Nagi N.; Barnard, Harold S.; MacDowell, Alastair A.; Parkinson, Dilworth Y.

    2016-01-01

    X-ray micro-tomography is a non-destructive characterization technique that allows imaging of materials structures with voxel sizes in the micrometer range. This level of resolution makes the technique very attractive for imaging porous ablators used in hypersonic entry systems. Besides providing a high fidelity description of the material architecture, micro-tomography enables computations of bulk material properties and simulations of micro-scale phenomena. This presentation provides an overview of a collaborative effort between NASA Ames Research Center and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, aimed at developing micro-tomography experiments and simulations for porous ablative materials. Measurements are carried using x-rays from the Advanced Light Source at Berkeley Lab on different classes of ablative materials used in NASA entry systems. Challenges, strengths and limitations of the technique for imaging materials such as lightweight carbon-phenolic systems and woven textiles are discussed. Computational tools developed to perform numerical simulations based on micro-tomography are described. These enable computations of material properties such as permeability, thermal and radiative conductivity, tortuosity and other parameters that are used in ablator response models. Finally, we present the design of environmental cells that enable imaging materials under simulated operational conditions, such as high temperature, mechanical loads and oxidizing atmospheres.Keywords: Micro-tomography, Porous media, Ablation

  1. Saline Infusion Markedly Reduces Impedance and Improves Efficacy of Pulmonary Radiofrequency Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Gananadha, Sivakumar Morris, David Lawson

    2004-08-15

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a relatively new technique that has been investigated for the treatment of lung tumors. We evaluated for the first time the in vivo use of saline infusion during radiofrequency ablation of sheep lung. We performed RFA on 5 sheep using open and closed chest RFA and the RITA starburst XL and Xli probes using saline infusion with the Xli probe. The impedance and volume of ablation were compared. A total of 16 ablations were produced, 5 percutaneously and 11 open. The impedance during percutaneous and open RFA without saline infusion was 110 {+-} 16.2 and 183.3 {+-} 105.8 O, respectively. With the saline infusion the impedance was 71.3 {+-} 22O and 103.6 {+-} 37.5O. The effect of this was a significantly larger volume of ablation using the saline infusion during percutaneous RFA (90.6 {+-} 23 cm{sup 3} vs 10.47 {+-} 2.9 cm{sup 3}, p = 0.01) and open RFA (107.8 {+-} 25.8 cm{sup 3} vs 24.9 {+-} 19.3 cm{sup 3}, p = 0.0002). Saline infusion during RFA is associated with lower impedance, higher power delivery and larger lesion size.

  2. Restoration of Atrial Mechanical Function after Successful Radio-Frequency Catheter Ablation of Atrial Flutter

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Kyoung-Suk; Kang, Duk-Hyun; Song, Jae-Kwan; Nam, Gi-Byoung; Choi, Kee-Joon; Kim, You-Ho

    2001-01-01

    Background: Atrial mechanical dysfunction and its recovery time course after successful radiofrequency ablation of chronic atrial flutter (AFL) has been largely unknown. We serially evaluated left atrial function by echocardiography after successful ablation of chronic atrial flutter. Methods: In 13 patients with chronic AFL, mitral E wave A wave, and the ratio of A/E velocity were measured at 1 day, 1 month, 3 months and 6–12 months after successful radiofrequency (RF) ablation. Doppler tissue imaging (DTI) technique was also used to avoid load-dependent variation in the flow velocity pattern. Results: Left atrial mechanical function, assessed by A wave velocity and the annular motion, was depressed at 1 day, but improved significantly at 1 month and maintained through 6–12 months after the ablation. Left atrial size did not change significantly. Conclusion: Left atrial mechanical function was depressed immediately after successful RF ablation of chronic AFL, but it improved significantly after 1 month and was maintained over one year. PMID:11590904

  3. Radiofrequency Ablation Beyond the Liver

    PubMed Central

    Neeman, Ziv; Wood, Bradford J.

    2008-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has begun to show promise for extrahepatic indications. Although much of the reported work on image-guided RFA of liver neoplasms is quite promising, it is even earlier in the evaluation and validation process for extrahepatic RFA, with few short-term and no long-term studies reported. Although there are much more data for liver RFA with almost 3,000 cases reported in the literature, there are a number of ongoing investigations of RFA for tumors in the kidney, lung, bone, breast, bone, and adrenal gland. Debulking and pain control with RFA present palliative options becoming increasingly popular weapons in the interventionalist's oncology arsenal. Metastatic disease with a wide variety of primary histologies in a myriad of locations may be treated with RFA after a careful consideration of the risk-to-benefit ratio balance. The RFA technique can be slightly different outside the liver. Specifically, differing dielectric tissue characteristics may markedly alter the RFA treatment. Each different RFA system has a unique risk and advantage profile. Extrahepatic indications and contraindications will be suggested. Treatment tips and the unique complications and considerations will be introduced for some of the more common extrahepatic locations. PMID:12524646

  4. Plans and status of the Beryllium ablator campaign on NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kline, J. L.; Yi, S. A.; Simakov, A. N.; Wilson, D. C.; Olson, R. E.; Krasheninnikova, N. S.; Kyrala, G. A.; Perry, T. S.; Batha, S. H.; Dewald, E. L.; Edwards, M. J.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Meezan, N. B.

    2014-10-01

    Beryllium has long been known to have excellent properties for indirectly driven ICF implosions including enhanced ablation pressure, implosion velocity, and mass ablation rate. The high ablation velocity leads to stabilization of ablative hydrodynamic instabilities and higher ablation pressures. Recent ``high foot'' experiments have shown ablative Rayleigh-Taylor to be a leading cause of degraded performance for ICF implosions. While Beryllium ablators have these advantages, there are also risks associated with Beryllium target designs. A campaign is underway to design and to test these advantages for comparison with other ablator options and determine which provides the best path forward for ICF. Experiments using Beryllium ablators are expected to start in the late summer of 2014. This presentation will discuss the status of the experiments and layout the plans/goals for the campaign. This work is supported by the US DOE.

  5. A systematic review of surgical ablation versus catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Kearney, Katherine; Stephenson, Rowan; Phan, Kevin; Chan, Wei Yen; Huang, Min Yin

    2014-01-01

    Background Atrial fibrillation (AF) is an increasingly prevalent condition in the ageing population, with significantly associated morbidity and mortality. Surgical and catheter ablative strategies both aim to reduce mortality and morbidity through freedom from AF. This review consolidates all currently available comparative data to evaluate these two interventions. Methods A systematic search was conducted across MEDLINE, PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews from January 2000 until August 2013. All studies were critically appraised and only those directly comparing surgical and catheter ablation were included. Results Seven studies were deemed suitable for analysis according to the inclusion criteria. Freedom from AF was significantly higher in the surgical ablation group versus the catheter ablation group at 6-month, 12-month and study endpoint follow-up periods. Subgroup analysis demonstrated similar trends, with higher freedom from AF in the surgical ablation group for paroxysmal AF patients. The incidence of pacemaker implantation was higher, while no difference in stroke or cardiac tamponade was demonstrated for the surgical versus catheter ablation groups. Conclusions Current evidence suggests that epicardial ablative strategies are associated with higher freedom from AF, higher pacemaker implantation rates and comparable neurological complications and cardiac tamponade incidence to catheter ablative treatment. Other complications and risks were poorly reported, which warrants further randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of adequate power and follow-up duration. PMID:24516794

  6. Synthesis of nanoparticles by pulsed laser ablation in air: a versatile means for flexible synthesis and separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, R.; Huang, T. T.; Lin, S. D.

    2016-11-01

    In this work, various types of pure nanoparticles are synthesized by pulsed laser ablation. A novel method using laser ablation is presented to synthesize and separate different sizes of nanoparticles. Laser ablation is applied as a physical and environmental friendly method to generate a variety of nanoparticles in air-based environments. By tuning laser beam horizontal and placing target materials vertically to the substrate, nanoparticles can be generated and separated automatically depending on their sizes. The size distribution is evaluated by optical microscope and nanoparticles are counted according to their diameters. The diameter of the particles ranges from 30nm to 5000nm. This work provides a versatile means to collect many types of uniform functional nanoparticles for a wide range of applications.

  7. Irreversible Electroporation for the Ablation of Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Prospective, Human, In Vivo Study Protocol (IDEAL Phase 2b)

    PubMed Central

    van Lienden, Krijn P; Wagstaff, Peter GK; Scheltema, Matthijs JV; de Bruin, Daniel M; Zondervan, Patricia J; van Delden, Otto M; van Leeuwen, Ton G; de la Rosette, Jean JMCH; Laguna, M Pilar

    2017-01-01

    Background Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is an emerging technique delivering electrical pulses to ablate tissue, with the theoretical advantage to overcome the main shortcomings of conventional thermal ablation. Recent short-term research showed that IRE for the ablation of renal masses is a safe and feasible treatment option. In an ablate and resect design, histopathological analysis 4 weeks after radical nephrectomy demonstrated that IRE-targeted renal tumors were completely covered by ablation zone. In order to develop a validated long-term IRE follow-up study, it is essential to obtain clinical confirmation of the efficacy of this novel technology. Additionally, follow-up after IRE ablation obliges verification of a suitable imaging modality. Objective The objectives of this study are the clinical efficacy and safety of IRE ablation of renal masses and to evaluate the use of cross-sectional imaging modalities in the follow-up after IRE in renal tumors. This study conforms to the recommendations of the IDEAL Collaboration and can be categorized as a phase 2B exploration trial. Methods In this prospective clinical trial, IRE will be performed in 20 patients aged 18 years and older presenting with a solid enhancing small renal mass (SRM) (≤4 cm) who are candidates for ablation. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) will be performed at 1 day pre-IRE, and 1 week post-IRE. Computed tomography (CT), CEUS, and MRI will be performed at 3 months, 6 months, and 12 months post-IRE. Results Presently, recruitment of patients has started and the first inclusions are completed. Preliminary results and outcomes are expected in 2018. Conclusions To establish the position of IRE ablation for treating renal tumors, a structured stepwise assessment in clinical practice is required. This study will offer fundamental knowledge on the clinical efficacy of IRE ablation for SRMs, potentially positioning IRE as ablative modality for renal

  8. Left atrium segmentation for atrial fibrillation ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karim, R.; Mohiaddin, R.; Rueckert, D.

    2008-03-01

    Segmentation of the left atrium is vital for pre-operative assessment of its anatomy in radio-frequency catheter ablation (RFCA) surgery. RFCA is commonly used for treating atrial fibrillation. In this paper we present an semi-automatic approach for segmenting the left atrium and the pulmonary veins from MR angiography (MRA) data sets. We also present an automatic approach for further subdividing the segmented atrium into the atrium body and the pulmonary veins. The segmentation algorithm is based on the notion that in MRA the atrium becomes connected to surrounding structures via partial volume affected voxels and narrow vessels, the atrium can be separated if these regions are characterized and identified. The blood pool, obtained by subtracting the pre- and post-contrast scans, is first segmented using a region-growing approach. The segmented blood pool is then subdivided into disjoint subdivisions based on its Euclidean distance transform. These subdivisions are then merged automatically starting from a seed point and stopping at points where the atrium leaks into a neighbouring structure. The resulting merged subdivisions produce the segmented atrium. Measuring the size of the pulmonary vein ostium is vital for selecting the optimal Lasso catheter diameter. We present a second technique for automatically identifying the atrium body from segmented left atrium images. The separating surface between the atrium body and the pulmonary veins gives the ostia locations and can play an important role in measuring their diameters. The technique relies on evolving interfaces modelled using level sets. Results have been presented on 20 patient MRA datasets.

  9. Aneurysm-related ischemic ventricular tachycardia: safety and efficacy of catheter ablation

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jin-Rui; Zheng, Li-Hui; Wu, Ling-Min; Ding, Li-Gang; Yao, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Left ventricular aneurysm (LVA) postmyocardial infarction (MI) might be an arrhythmogenic substrate. We examined the safety and efficacy of catheter ablation of LVA-related ventricular tachycardia (VT). Thirty-three consecutive patients who underwent primary catheter ablation of ischemic VT were divided into LVA group (11 patients, mean age 61.9 years, 10 men) and none LVA group. Acute procedural outcomes, complications, and long-term outcomes were assessed. In LVA group, average number of induced VTs were 3.2 ± 2.6 (range 1–7), clinical VTs were located in the ventricular septum scar zone in 4 (36.4%) patients, acute success was achieved in 7 (63.6%) patients, partial success in 3 (27.3%) and failure in 1 patient, while none LVA group showing a statistically similar distribution of acute procedural outcomes (P = 0.52). There were no major or life-threatening complications. VT-free survival rate at median 19 (1–44) months follow-up was numerically but not significantly lower in LVA versus none LVA group (48.5% vs 62.8%, log-rank P = 0.40). Catheter ablation of ischemic VT in the presence of LVA appears feasible and effective, with about one-third of cases having septal ablation targets. Further studies are warranted. PMID:28353573

  10. In vitro assessment of fiber sweeping angle during Q-switched 532-nm laser tissue ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajabhandharaks, Danop; Kang, Hyun Wook; Ko, Woo Jin; Stinson, Douglas; Choi, Benjamin

    2011-03-01

    Photoselective vaporization of the prostate (PVP) has been widely used to treat benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). It is well regarded as a safe and minimally invasive procedure and an alternative to the gold standard transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP). Despite of its greatness, as well aware of, the operative procedure time during the PVP is still prolonged. Such attempts have been tried out in order to shorten the operative time and increase its efficacy. However, scientific study to investigate techniques used during the PVP is still lacking. The objective of this study is to investigate how sweeping angle might affect the PVP performance. Porcine kidneys acquired from a local grocery store were used (N=140). A Q-switched 532-nm GreenLight XPSTM (American Medical Systems, Inc., MN, USA), together with 750- μm core MoXyTM fiber, was set to have power levels of 120 W and 180 W. Treatment speed and sweeping speed were fixed at 2 mm/s and 0.5 sweep/s, respectively. Sweeping angles were varied from 0 (no sweeping motion) to 120 degree. Ablation rate, depth, and coagulation zone were measured and quantified. Tissue ablation rate was peaked at 15 and 30 degree for both 120- and 180-W power levels and dramatically decreased beyond 60 degree. At 180 W, ablation rate increased 20% at 30 degree compared to 0 degree. This study demonstrated that ablation rate could be maximized and was contingent upon sweeping angle.

  11. Contact pulsed Nd:YAG ablation of human dentin: ablation rates and tissue effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, David M.; Yessik, Michael J.

    1994-09-01

    Dentin from freshly extracted human teeth was exposed to flashlamp pumped Nd:YAG pulses (100 microsecond(s) duration, 50 - 200 mJ/pulse) delivered through a flat cut fiberoptic in contact with the dentin surface. Ablation depth and volume were measured optically and confirmed with electron microscope morphometrics. Ablation depth increased with force applied at the fiber tip up to 5 - 10 g. Above this ablation depths were insensitive to applied force. Craters made in dental stone were deeper and narrower than those made in normal dentin. Ablation depths per pulse and volumes per pulse decrease as the number of pulses increase. This is more prominent for 200 mJ pulses. At 60 mJ the ablation depths are the same from 10 to 100 Hz repetition rates, although qualitative changes (collateral damage) are greater at higher repetition rates. A progressive increase in collateral damage is seen from the 1st through the 200th pulse.

  12. Radioiodine Remnant Ablation: A Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Bal, Chandra Sekhar; Padhy, Ajit Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Radioiodine remnant ablation (RRA) is considered a safe and effective method for eliminating residual thyroid tissue, as well as microscopic disease if at all present in thyroid bed following thyroidectomy. The rationale of RRA is that in the absence of thyroid tissue, serum thyroglobulin (Tg) measurement can be used as an excellent tumor marker. Other considerations are like the presence of significant remnant thyroid tissue makes detection and treatment of nodal or distant metastases difficult. Rarely, microscopic disease in the thyroid bed if not ablated, in the future, could be a source of anaplastic transformation. On the other hand, microscopic tumor emboli in distant sites could be the cause of distant metastasis too. The ablation of remnant tissue would in all probability eliminate these theoretical risks. It may be noted that all these are unproven contentious issues except postablation serum Tg estimation that could be a good tumor marker for detecting early biochemical recurrence in long-term follow-up strategy. Radioactive iodine is administered as a form of “adjuvant therapy” for remnant ablation. There have been several reports with regard to the administered dose for remnant ablation. The first report of a prospective randomized clinical trial was published from India by a prospective randomized study conducted at the All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi in the year 1996. The study reported that increasing the empirical 131I initial dose to more than 50 mCi results in plateauing of the dose-response curve and thus, conventional high-dose remnant ablation needs critical evaluation. Recently, two important studies were published: One from French group and the other from UK on a similar line. Interestingly, all three studies conducted in three different geographical regions of the world showed exactly similar conclusion. The new era of low-dose remnant ablation has taken a firm scientific footing across the continents. PMID:26420983

  13. Catheter Ablation of Fascicular Ventricular Tachycardia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yaowu; Fang, Zhen; Yang, Bing; Kojodjojo, Pipin; Chen, Hongwu; Ju, Weizhu; Cao, Kejiang; Chen, Minglong

    2015-01-01

    Background— Fascicular ventricular tachycardia (FVT) is a common form of sustained idiopathic left ventricular tachycardia with an Asian preponderance. This study aimed to prospectively investigate long-term clinical outcomes of patients undergoing ablation of FVT and identify predictors of arrhythmia recurrence. Methods and Results— Consecutive patients undergoing FVT ablation at a single tertiary center were enrolled. Activation mapping was performed to identify the earliest presystolic Purkinje potential during FVT that was targeted by radiofrequency ablation. Follow-up with clinic visits, ECG, and Holter monitoring was performed at least every 6 months. A total of 120 consecutive patients (mean age, 29.3±12.7 years; 82% men; all patients with normal ejection fraction) were enrolled. FVT involved left posterior fascicle and left anterior fascicle in 118 and 2 subjects, respectively. VT was noninducible in 3 patients, and ablation was acutely successful in 117 patients. With a median follow-up of 55.7 months, VT of a similar ECG morphology recurred in 17 patients, and repeat procedure confirmed FVT recurrence involving the same fascicle. Shorter VT cycle length was the only significant predictor of FVT recurrence (P=0.03). Six other patients developed new-onset upper septal FVT that was successfully ablated. Conclusions— Ablation of FVT guided by activation mapping is associated with a single procedural success rate without the use of antiarrhythmic drugs of 80.3%. Arrhythmia recurrences after an initially successful ablation were caused by recurrent FVT involving the same fascicle in two thirds of patients or new onset of upper septal FVT in the remainder. PMID:26386017

  14. Acoustic emissions during 3.1 MHz ultrasound bulk ablation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mast, T Douglas; Salgaonkar, Vasant A; Karunakaran, Chandrapriya; Besse, John A; Datta, Saurabh; Holland, Christy K

    2008-09-01

    Acoustic emissions associated with cavitation and other bubble activity have previously been observed during ultrasound (US) ablation experiments. Because detectable bubble activity may be related to temperature, tissue state and sonication characteristics, these acoustic emissions are potentially useful for monitoring and control of US ablation. To investigate these relationships, US ablation experiments were performed with simultaneous measurements of acoustic emissions, tissue echogenicity and tissue temperature on fresh bovine liver. Ex vivo tissue was exposed to 0.9-3.3-s bursts of unfocused, continuous-wave, 3.10-MHz US from a miniaturized 32-element array, which performed B-scan imaging with the same piezoelectric elements during brief quiescent periods. Exposures used pressure amplitudes of 0.8-1.4 MPa for exposure times of 6-20 min, sufficient to achieve significant thermal coagulation in all cases. Acoustic emissions received by a 1-MHz, unfocused passive cavitation detector, beamformed A-line signals acquired by the array, and tissue temperature detected by a needle thermocouple were sampled 0.3-1.1 times per second. Tissue echogenicity was quantified by the backscattered echo energy from a fixed region-of-interest within the treated zone. Acoustic emission levels were quantified from the spectra of signals measured by the passive cavitation detector, including subharmonic signal components at 1.55 MHz, broadband signal components within the band 0.3-1.1 MHz and low-frequency components within the band 10-30 kHz. Tissue ablation rates, defined as the thermally ablated volumes per unit time, were assessed by quantitative analysis of digitally imaged, macroscopic tissue sections. Correlation analysis was performed among the averaged and time-dependent acoustic emissions in each band considered, B-mode tissue echogenicity, tissue temperature and ablation rate. Ablation rate correlated significantly with broadband and low-frequency emissions, but was

  15. New tumor ablation techniques for cancer treatment (microwave, electroporation).

    PubMed

    de Baere, T; Deschamps, F

    2014-01-01

    Since the introduction of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for the treatment of liver tumors at the end of the 1990s, indications for local ablation techniques have been extended to other organs, in particular, the lungs, kidneys and bones. These techniques have also been improved, in particular to try and overcome the limitations of radiofrequency techniques, especially the significant decrease in complete ablation rates for tumors larger than 3cm and tumors that are contiguous to vessels larger than 3mm. Microwave ablation is a rapidly developing thermal ablation technique similar to RFA but with numerous differences. Electroporation, a non-thermal ablation technique with other possibilities, is in earlier stages of clinical development.

  16. Microwave ablation using 915-MHz and 2.45-GHz systems: what are the differences?

    PubMed Central

    Simo, Kerri A; Tsirline, Victor B; Sindram, David; McMillan, Matthew T; Thompson, Kyle J; Swan, Ryan Z; McKillop, Iain H; Martinie, John B; Iannitti, David A

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study was conducted to evaluate differences between 915-MHz and 2.45-GHz microwave ablation (MWA) systems in the ablation of hepatic tumours. Methods A retrospective analysis of patients undergoing hepatic tumour MWA utilizing two different systems over a 10-month period was carried out. Results Data for a total of 48 patients with a mean age of 58 ± 1.24 years were analysed. A total of 124 tumours were ablated; 72 tumours were ablated with a 915-MHz system and 52 with a 2.45-GHz system. Mean tumour diameters were 1.7 ± 0.1 cm in the 915-MHz group and 2.5 ± 0.2 cm in the 2.45-GHz group (P < 0.01). Mean ablation time per burn was 8.1 ± 0.3 min in the 915-MHz group and 4.0 ± 0.1 min in the 2.45-GHz group (P < 0.01). The mean number of burns per lesion was 2.0 ± 0.1 in the 915-MHz group and 1.7 ± 0.1 in the 2.45-GHz group (P < 0.05). The mean ablation time per lesion was 9.7 ± 0.7 min in the 915-MHz group, and 6.6 ± 0.6 min in the 2.45-GHz group (P < 0.01). The 2.45-GHz system demonstrated a better correlation between ablation time and tumour size (r2 = 0.6222) than the 915-MHz system; (r2 = 0.0696). Mean total energy applied per lesion, and energy applied per cm, were greater with the 915-MHz system (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively). Total energy applied per lesion was similarly correlated for the 2.45-GHz (r2 = 0.6263) and 915-MHz (r2 = 0.7012) systems. Mean total energy applied per cm/min was greater with the 2.45-GHz system (P < 0.05). Conclusions Both 915-MHz and 2.45-GHz MWA systems achieve reproducible hepatic tumour ablation. The 2.45-GHz system achieves equivalent, but more predictable and faster ablations using a single antenna system. PMID:23490330

  17. Method to control depth error when ablating human dentin with numerically controlled picosecond laser: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuchun; Yuan, Fusong; Lv, Peijun; Wang, Dangxiao; Wang, Lei; Wang, Yong

    2015-07-01

    A three-axis numerically controlled picosecond laser was used to ablate dentin to investigate the quantitative relationships among the number of additive pulse layers in two-dimensional scans starting from the focal plane, step size along the normal of the focal plane (focal plane normal), and ablation depth error. A method to control the ablation depth error, suitable to control stepping along the focal plane normal, was preliminarily established. Twenty-four freshly removed mandibular first molars were cut transversely along the long axis of the crown and prepared as 48 tooth sample slices with approximately flat surfaces. Forty-two slices were used in the first section. The picosecond laser was 1,064 nm in wavelength, 3 W in power, and 10 kHz in repetition frequency. For a varying number (n = 5-70) of focal plane additive pulse layers (14 groups, three repetitions each), two-dimensional scanning and ablation were performed on the dentin regions of the tooth sample slices, which were fixed on the focal plane. The ablation depth, d, was measured, and the quantitative function between n and d was established. Six slices were used in the second section. The function was used to calculate and set the timing of stepwise increments, and the single-step size along the focal plane normal was d micrometer after ablation of n layers (n = 5-50; 10 groups, six repetitions each). Each sample underwent three-dimensional scanning and ablation to produce 2 × 2-mm square cavities. The difference, e, between the measured cavity depth and theoretical value was calculated, along with the difference, e 1, between the measured average ablation depth of a single-step along the focal plane normal and theoretical value. Values of n and d corresponding to the minimum values of e and e 1, respectively, were obtained. In two-dimensional ablation, d was largest (720.61 μm) when n = 65 and smallest when n = 5 (45.00 μm). Linear regression yielded the quantitative

  18. Preparation with laser ablation and photoluminescence of Y3Al5O12:Ce nanophosphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Young-Sik; Huh, Young-Duk; Park, Chan Ryang; Do, Young Rag

    2014-03-01

    We prepared Y3Al5O12:Ce (YAG:Ce) nanophosphors with a mean size of 15 nm by using laser ablation of micron-sized commercial YAG:Ce target phosphor in 1,4-butanediol. The photoluminescence properties of the YAG:Ce nanophosphors were compared with those of micron-sized YAG:Ce phosphor. The elimination of back-scattering effect was confirmed by the optical properties of the YAG:Ce nanophosphors. The thermal stability of the YAG:Ce nanophosphors was also examined for the use of high power white LED. We convinced that the laser ablation method in 1,4-butanediol is an adequate method for the preparation of YAG:Ce nanophosphors for high power white LED with enhancement of the transmittance of the blue light from the InGaN chip.

  19. Preparation of bismuth-based nanosheets by ultrasound-assisted liquid laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobar-Alarcón, L.; Velarde Granados, E.; Solís-Casados, D. A.; Olea-Mejía, O.; Espinosa-Pesqueira, M.; Haro-Poniatowski, E.

    2016-04-01

    The preparation of bismuth nanosheets ablating a high purity Bi target immersed in water subjected to an ultrasound wave is reported. The effect of the laser fluence used for ablation on the size and shape of the nanostructures synthesized was investigated. The obtained results reveal the formation of nanosheets with square-like shape and sizes from approximately 140-543 nm. In comparison, experiments without the ultrasound field lead to the formation of quasi-spherical nanoparticles. The nanosheets were characterized by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), UV-Vis and Raman spectroscopies. The bismuth nanosheets, as deposited, are highly crystalline, and depending on the preparation conditions, the α or β phases of Bi2O3 are obtained. UV-Vis measurements show the typical band absorption characteristic of bismuth with nanometric size. Raman spectra confirm the formation of Bi2O3 nanostructures.

  20. Inertial confinement fusion ablator physics experiments on Saturn and Nova

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, R.E.; Porter, J.L.; Chandler, G.A.; Fehl, D.L.; Jobe, D.O.; Leeper, R.J.; Matzen, M.K.; McGurn, J.S.; Noack, D.D.; Ruggles, L.E.; Sawyer, P.; Torres, J.A.; Vargas, M.; Zagar, D.M.; Kornblum, H.N.; Orzechowski, T.J.; Phillion, D.W.; Suter, L.J.; Thiessen, A.R.; Wallace, R.J.

    1997-05-01

    The Saturn pulsed power accelerator [R. B. Spielman {ital et al.}, in {ital Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Dense} Z-{ital pinches}, Laguna Beach, CA, 1989, edited by N. R. Pereira, J. Davis, and N. Rostoker (American Institute of Physics, New York, 1989), p. 3] at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the Nova laser [J. T. Hunt and D. R. Speck, Opt. Eng. {bold 28}, 461 (1989)] at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) have been used to explore techniques for studying the behavior of ablator material in x-ray radiation environments comparable in magnitude, spectrum, and duration to those that would be experienced in National Ignition Facility (NIF) hohlraums [J. D. Lindl, Phys. Plasmas {bold 2}, 3933 (1995)]. The large x-ray outputs available from the Saturn pulsed-power-driven z pinch have enabled us to drive hohlraums of full NIF ignition scale size at radiation temperatures and time scales comparable to those required for the low-power foot pulse of an ignition capsule. The high-intensity drives available in the Nova laser have allowed us to study capsule ablator physics in smaller-scale hohlraums at radiation temperatures and time scales relevant to the peak power pulse for an ignition capsule. Taken together, these experiments have pointed the way to possible techniques for testing radiation-hydrodynamics code predictions of radiation flow, opacity, equation of state, and ablator shock velocity over the range of radiation environments that will be encountered in a NIF hohlraum. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. Approximate model for laser ablation of carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shusser, Michael

    2010-08-01

    The paper presents an approximate kinetic theory model of ablation of carbon by a nanosecond laser pulse. The model approximates the process as sublimation and combines conduction heat transfer in the target with the gas dynamics of the ablated plume which are coupled through the boundary conditions at the interface. The ablated mass flux and the temperature of the ablating material are obtained from the assumption that the ablation rate is restricted by the kinetic theory limitation on the maximum mass flux that can be attained in a phase-change process. To account for non-uniform distribution of the laser intensity while keeping the calculation simple the quasi-one-dimensional approximation is used in both gas and solid phases. The results are compared with the predictions of the exact axisymmetric model that uses the conservation relations at the interface derived from the momentum solution of the Boltzmann equation for arbitrary strong evaporatio