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Sample records for ablative body radiotherapy

  1. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy and Ablative Therapies for Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Ghulam; Danish, Adnan; Krasna, Mark J

    2016-07-01

    The treatment paradigm for early stage lung cancer and oligometastatic disease to the lung is rapidly changing. Ablative therapies, especially stereotactic body radiation therapy, are challenging the surgical gold standard and have the potential to be the standard for operable patients with early stage lung cancer who are high risk due to co- morbidities. The most commonly used ablative modalities include stereotactic body radiation therapy, microwave ablation, and radiofrequency ablation. PMID:27261915

  2. Stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR) for primary and secondary lung tumours

    PubMed Central

    Gaya, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR) represents a technological breakthrough in radiotherapy technique, with proven benefits to patients in terms of improved tumour control and overall survival. The key components of SABR are described. The current evidence base for SABR for the treatment of primary and secondary lung tumours is appraised, and key ongoing trials are identified. PMID:23023165

  3. Microsimulation Model Predicts Survival Benefit of Radiofrequency Ablation and Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Versus Radiotherapy for Treating Inoperable Stage I Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tramontano, Angela C.; Cipriano, Lauren E.; Kong, Chung Yin; Shepard, Jo-Anne O.; Lanuti, Michael; Gazelle, G. Scott; McMahon, Pamela M.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE A subset of patients with stage IA and IB non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is ineligible for surgical resection and undergoes radiation therapy. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and stereotactic body radiotherapy are newer potentially attractive alternative therapies. MATERIALS AND METHODS We added RFA and stereotactic body radiotherapy treatment modules to a microsimulation model that simulates lung cancer’s natural history, detection, and treatment. Natural history parameters were previously estimated via calibration against tumor registry data and cohort studies; the model was validated with screening study and cohort data. RFA model parameters were calibrated against 2-year survival from the Radiofrequency Ablation of Pulmonary Tumor Response Evaluation (RAPTURE) study, and stereotactic body radiotherapy model parameters were calibrated against 3-year survival from a phase 2 prospective trial. We simulated lifetime histories of identical patients with early-stage NSCLC who were ineligible for resection, who were treated with radiation therapy, RFA, or stereotactic body radiotherapy under a range of scenarios. From 5,000,000 simulated individuals, we selected a cohort of patients with stage I medically inoperable cancer for analysis (n = 2056 per treatment scenario). Main outcomes were life expectancy gains. RESULTS RFA or stereotactic body radiotherapy treatment in patients with peripheral stage IA or IB NSCLC who were nonoperative candidates resulted in life expectancy gains of 1.71 and 1.46 life-years, respectively, compared with universal radiation therapy. A strategy where patients with central tumors underwent stereotactic body radiotherapy and those with peripheral tumors underwent RFA resulted in a gain of 2.02 life-years compared with universal radiation therapy. Findings were robust with respect to changes in model parameters. CONCLUSION Microsimulation modeling results suggest that RFA and stereotactic body radiotherapy could provide life

  4. Recommendations for dose calculations of lung cancer treatment plans treated with stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devpura, S.; Siddiqui, M. S.; Chen, D.; Liu, D.; Li, H.; Kumar, S.; Gordon, J.; Ajlouni, M.; Movsas, B.; Chetty, I. J.

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to systematically evaluate dose distributions computed with 5 different dose algorithms for patients with lung cancers treated using stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR). Treatment plans for 133 lung cancer patients, initially computed with a 1D-pencil beam (equivalent-path-length, EPL-1D) algorithm, were recalculated with 4 other algorithms commissioned for treatment planning, including 3-D pencil-beam (EPL-3D), anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA), collapsed cone convolution superposition (CCC), and Monte Carlo (MC). The plan prescription dose was 48 Gy in 4 fractions normalized to the 95% isodose line. Tumors were classified according to location: peripheral tumors surrounded by lung (lung-island, N=39), peripheral tumors attached to the rib-cage or chest wall (lung-wall, N=44), and centrally-located tumors (lung-central, N=50). Relative to the EPL-1D algorithm, PTV D95 and mean dose values computed with the other 4 algorithms were lowest for "lung-island" tumors with smallest field sizes (3-5 cm). On the other hand, the smallest differences were noted for lung-central tumors treated with largest field widths (7-10 cm). Amongst all locations, dose distribution differences were most strongly correlated with tumor size for lung-island tumors. For most cases, convolution/superposition and MC algorithms were in good agreement. Mean lung dose (MLD) values computed with the EPL-1D algorithm were highly correlated with that of the other algorithms (correlation coefficient =0.99). The MLD values were found to be ~10% lower for small lung-island tumors with the model-based (conv/superposition and MC) vs. the correction-based (pencil-beam) algorithms with the model-based algorithms predicting greater low dose spread within the lungs. This study suggests that pencil beam algorithms should be avoided for lung SABR planning. For the most challenging cases, small tumors surrounded entirely by lung tissue (lung-island type), a Monte

  5. Survey of stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy in the UK by the QA group on behalf of the UK SABR Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Baker, A; Scott, A J D; Webster, G J

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To ascertain the progress being made towards the implementation of stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR) treatment in the UK, to obtain details of current practice in centres with an active treatment programme and to assess the projected future provision. Methods: In August 2012, an online questionnaire was sent to all 65 UK radiotherapy institutions. The included questions covered the current number of patients being treated and the intended number of patients for each clinical site; immobilization and motion management methods; CT scanning protocols; target and organ-at-risk delineation; treatment planning; image-guidance and treatment protocols; and quality assurance methods. Results: 48/65 (74%) institutions responded by the end of November 2012, with 15 indicating an active SABR programme. A further four centres indicated that a SABR protocol had been established but was not yet in clinical use. 14 of the 29 remaining responses stated an intention to develop a SABR programme in the next 2 years. Conclusion: The survey responses confirm that SABR provision in the UK is increasing and that this should be expected to continue in the next 2 years. A projection of the future uptake would suggest that by the end of 2014, UK SABR provision will be broadly in line with international practice. PMID:24620840

  6. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy and Radiofrequency Ablation for Medically Inoperable, Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Sher, David J.

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: The standard management of medically inoperable Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) conventionally has been fractionated three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT). The relatively poor local control rate and inconvenience associated with this therapy have prompted the development of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), a technique that delivers very high doses of irradiation typically over 3 to 5 sessions. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has also been investigated as a less costly, single-day therapy that thermally ablates small, peripheral tumors. The cost-effectiveness of these three techniques has never been compared. Methods and Materials: We developed a Markov model to describe health states of 65-year-old men with medically inoperable NSCLC after treatment with 3D-CRT, SBRT, and RFA. Given their frail state, patients were assumed to receive supportive care after recurrence. Utility values, recurrence risks, and costs were adapted from the literature. Sensitivity analyses were performed to model uncertainty in these parameters. Results: The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for SBRT over 3D-CRT was $6,000/quality-adjusted life-year, and the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for SBRT over RFA was $14,100/quality-adjusted life-year. One-way sensitivity analysis showed that the results were robust across a range of tumor sizes, patient utility values, and costs. This result was confirmed with probabilistic sensitivity analyses that varied local control rates and utilities. Conclusion: In comparison to 3D-CRT and RFA, SBRT was the most cost-effective treatment for medically inoperable NSCLC over a wide range of treatment and disease assumptions. On the basis of efficacy and cost, SBRT should be the primary treatment approach for this disease.

  7. Stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR): an alternative to surgery in stage I-II non-small-cell cancer of the lung?

    PubMed

    Mirimanoff, René-Olivier

    2015-12-01

    For decades, surgery was considered to be the only standard therapy for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR) has been used in a growing number of patients and institutions since the early 2000's. Initially this technique was intended mainly for patients who were deemed to be medically inoperable due to co-morbidities or who refused surgery, but more recently it has been applied to operable patients as well. Strict criteria for treatment planning, the use of high-technology equipment and the appropriate selection of dose based on tumor size and location are of paramount importance for a proper application of SABR. Under these conditions, SABR offers high control rates with a moderate risk of severe toxicity, quite comparable to those of modern surgery. This article reviews the basic principles of SABR, its practical aspects, the definition of biologically equivalent doses, the results in terms of tumor control, survival and toxicity and an attempt will be made to compare the results of SABR with those of surgery. PMID:26730754

  8. Effect of different breathing patterns in the same patient on stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy dosimetry for primary renal cell carcinoma: A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Pham, Daniel; Kron, Tomas; Foroudi, Farshad; Siva, Shankar

    2013-10-01

    Stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR) for primary renal cell carcinoma (RCC) targets requires motion management strategies to verify dose delivery. This case study highlights the effect of a change in patient breathing amplitude on the dosimetry to organs at risk and target structures. A 73-year-old male patient was planned for receiving 26 Gy of radiation in 1 fraction of SABR for a left primary RCC. The patient was simulated with four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) and the tumor internal target volume (ITV) was delineated using the 4DCT maximum intensity projection. However, the initially planned treatment was abandoned at the radiation oncologist's discretion after pretreatment cone-beam CT (CBCT) motion verification identified a greater than 50% reduction in superior to inferior diaphragm motion as compared with the planning 4DCT. This patient was resimulated with respiratory coaching instructions. To assess the effect of the change in breathing on the dosimetry to the target, each plan was recalculated on the data set representing the change in breathing condition. A change from smaller to larger breathing showed a 46% loss in planning target volume (PTV) coverage, whereas a change from larger breathing to smaller breathing resulted in an 8% decrease in PTV coverage. ITV coverage was similarly reduced by 8% in both scenarios. This case study highlights the importance of tools to verify breathing motion prior to treatment delivery. 4D image guided radiation therapy verification strategies should focus on not only verifying ITV margin coverage but also the effect on the surrounding organs at risk.

  9. Hypofractionated ablative radiotherapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Christopher H.

    2016-01-01

    The role of radiation in locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer (LAPC) is controversial. Randomized trials evaluating standard doses of chemoradiation have not shown a significant benefit from the use of consolidative radiation. Results from non-randomized studies of 3–5-fraction stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) have been similar to standard chemoradiation, but with less toxicity and a shorter treatment time. Doses of SBRT have been reduced to subablative levels for the sake of tolerability. The benefit of both options is unclear. In contrast, ablative doses can be delivered using an SBRT technique in 15–28 fractions. The keys to the delivery of ablative doses are computed tomography (CT) image guidance and respiratory gating. Higher doses have resulted in encouraging long-term survival results. In this review, we present a comprehensive solution to achieving ablative doses for selected patients with pancreatic tumors by using a combination of classical, modern and novel concepts of radiotherapy: fractionation, CT image guidance, respiratory gating, intentional dose heterogeneity, and simultaneous integrated protection. PMID:27029741

  10. Whole body radiotherapy: A TBI-guideline

    PubMed Central

    Quast, Ulrich

    2006-01-01

    Total Body Irradiation (TBI) is one main component in the interdisciplinary treatment of widely disseminated malignancies predominantly of haematopoietic diseases. Combined with intensive chemotherapy, TBI enables myeloablative high dose therapy and immuno-ablative conditioning treatment prior to subsequent transplantation of haematopoietic stem cells: bone marrow stem cells or peripheral blood progenitor stem cells. Jointly prepared by DEGRO and DGMP, the German Society of Radio-Oncology, and the German Association of Medical Physicists, this DEGRO/DGMP-Leitlinie Ganzkoerper-Strahlenbehandlung - DEGRO/DGMP Guideline Whole Body Radiotherapy, summarises the concepts, principles, facts and common methods of Total Body Irradiation and poses a set of recommendations for reliable and successful application of high dose large-field radiotherapy as essential part of this interdisciplinary, multi-modality treatment concept. The guideline is geared towards radio-oncologists, medical physicists, haematooncolo-gists, and all contributing to Whole Body Radiotherapy. To guide centres intending to start or actualise TBI criteria are included. The relevant treatment parameters are defined and a sample of a form is given for reporting TBI to international registries. PMID:21206634

  11. Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy for Oligometastatic Disease in Liver

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myungsoo; Son, Seok Hyun; Won, Yong Kyun; Kay, Chul Seung

    2014-01-01

    Liver metastasis in solid tumors, including colorectal cancer, is the most frequent and lethal complication. The development of systemic therapy has led to prolonged survival. However, in selected patients with a finite number of discrete lesions in liver, defined as oligometastatic state, additional local therapies such as surgical resection, radiofrequency ablation, cryotherapy, and radiotherapy can lead to permanent local disease control and improve survival. Among these, an advance in radiation therapy made it possible to deliver high dose radiation to the tumor more accurately, without impairing the liver function. In recent years, the introduction of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) has offered even more intensive tumor dose escalation in a few fractions with reduced dose to the adjacent normal liver. Many studies have shown that SABR for oligometastases is effective and safe, with local control rates widely ranging from 50% to 100% at one or two years. And actuarial survival at one and two years has been reported ranging from 72% to 94% and from 30% to 62%, respectively, without severe toxicities. In this paper, we described the definition and technical aspects of SABR, clinical outcomes including efficacy and toxicity, and related parameters after SABR in liver oligometastases from colorectal cancer. PMID:24868526

  12. Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for oligometastatic disease in liver.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myungsoo; Son, Seok Hyun; Won, Yong Kyun; Kay, Chul Seung

    2014-01-01

    Liver metastasis in solid tumors, including colorectal cancer, is the most frequent and lethal complication. The development of systemic therapy has led to prolonged survival. However, in selected patients with a finite number of discrete lesions in liver, defined as oligometastatic state, additional local therapies such as surgical resection, radiofrequency ablation, cryotherapy, and radiotherapy can lead to permanent local disease control and improve survival. Among these, an advance in radiation therapy made it possible to deliver high dose radiation to the tumor more accurately, without impairing the liver function. In recent years, the introduction of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) has offered even more intensive tumor dose escalation in a few fractions with reduced dose to the adjacent normal liver. Many studies have shown that SABR for oligometastases is effective and safe, with local control rates widely ranging from 50% to 100% at one or two years. And actuarial survival at one and two years has been reported ranging from 72% to 94% and from 30% to 62%, respectively, without severe toxicities. In this paper, we described the definition and technical aspects of SABR, clinical outcomes including efficacy and toxicity, and related parameters after SABR in liver oligometastases from colorectal cancer. PMID:24868526

  13. Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy for the Treatment of Clinically Localized Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Scott P.; Song, Daniel Y.; Pierorazio, Phillip M.; Allaf, Mohamad E.; Gorin, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Thermal ablation is currently the most studied treatment option for medically inoperable patients with clinically localized renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Recent evidence suggests that stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) may offer an effective noninvasive alternative for these patients. In this review, we explore the current literature on SABR for the primary treatment of RCC and make recommendations for future studies so that an accurate comparison between SABR and other ablative therapies may be conducted. PMID:26640488

  14. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Henderson, D R; Tree, A C; van As, N J

    2015-05-01

    The use of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for localised prostate cancer is now supported by a substantial body of non-randomised data, with medium-term outcomes consistent with current standard radiotherapy. The ability to deliver profoundly hypofractionated treatment, combined with the relatively low α/β ratio of prostate cancer, may result in a more favourable therapeutic ratio, presenting an opportunity for isotoxic dose escalation. Furthermore, as treatment can be given in five attendances, SBRT has the potential both to reduce costs and improve patient quality of life. However, in a treatment landscape with many competing options of broadly similar efficacy, randomised trials are essential to define the relative benefits of this approach. SBRT also has an emerging application in oligometastatic prostate cancer, with promising early outcomes for delaying disease progression and deferring the need for androgen deprivation therapy. PMID:25707911

  15. Commissioning and initial stereotactic ablative radiotherapy experience with Vero.

    PubMed

    Solberg, Timothy D; Medin, Paul M; Ramirez, Ezequiel; Ding, Chuxiong; Foster, Ryan D; Yordy, John

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the comprehensive commissioning process and initial clinical performance of the Vero linear accelerator, a new radiotherapy device recently installed at UT Southwestern Medical Center specifically developed for delivery of image-guided stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR). The Vero system utilizes a ring gantry to integrate a beam delivery platform with image guidance systems. The ring is capable of rotating ± 60° about the vertical axis to facilitate noncoplanar beam arrangements ideal for SABR delivery. The beam delivery platform consists of a 6 MV C-band linac with a 60 leaf MLC projecting a maximum field size of 15 × 15 cm² at isocenter. The Vero planning and delivery systems support a range of treatment techniques, including fixed beam conformal, dynamic conformal arcs, fixed gantry IMRT in either SMLC (step-and-shoot) or DMLC (dynamic) delivery, and hybrid arcs, which combines dynamic conformal arcs and fixed beam IMRT delivery. The accelerator and treatment head are mounted on a gimbal mechanism that allows the linac and MLC to pivot in two dimensions for tumor tracking. Two orthogonal kV imaging subsystems built into the ring facilitate both stereoscopic and volumetric (CBCT) image guidance. The system is also equipped with an always-active electronic portal imaging device (EPID). We present our commissioning process and initial clinical experience focusing on SABR applications with the Vero, including: (1) beam data acquisition; (2) dosimetric commissioning of the treatment planning system, including evaluation of a Monte Carlo algorithm in a specially-designed anthropomorphic thorax phantom; (3) validation using the Radiological Physics Center thorax, head and neck (IMRT), and spine credentialing phantoms; (4) end-to-end evaluation of IGRT localization accuracy; (5) ongoing system performance, including isocenter stability; and (6) clinical SABR applications. PMID:24710458

  16. Canine ocular tumors following ciliary body ablation with intravitreal gentamicin.

    PubMed

    Duke, Felicia D; Strong, Travis D; Bentley, Ellison; Dubielzig, Richard R

    2013-03-01

    Iridociliary tumors are the second most common primary ocular tumor in dogs and are usually benign. A review of the Comparative Ocular Pathology Laboratory of Wisconsin (COPLOW) database in 2009 suggested a potential correlation between malignant iridociliary epithelial tumors and ciliary body ablation by intravitreal gentamicin injection for the treatment of glaucoma. The purpose of this case series was to determine whether there is evidence of such a correlation in the COPLOW collection. Mining of the COPLOW database revealed that a significant number (39.5%) of canine globes with a history of ciliary body ablation were subsequently diagnosed with primary ocular tumors at enucleation, most commonly iridociliary epithelial tumors and melanocytic tumors. It is possible that neoplasia was present but unrecognized at the time of ciliary body ablation. These tumors had a higher than expected incidence of malignancy. These cases underscore the importance of reserving ciliary body ablation with gentamicin for disease-free eyes. PMID:22812389

  17. Feline ocular tumors following ciliary body ablation with intravitreal gentamicin.

    PubMed

    Duke, Felicia D; Strong, Travis D; Bentley, Ellison; Dubielzig, Richard R

    2013-07-01

    Practitioners approach chemical ciliary body ablation (CBA) in cats with caution. In 1994, an academic letter proposed a potential link between intraocular gentamicin injections for glaucoma and the appearance of ocular tumors in cats (Veterinary and Comparative Ophthalmology, 4, 1994, 166). There is an historic perceived risk for the development of feline ocular post-traumatic sarcoma following gentamicin ciliary body ablation, and many clinicians refrain from chemical ablation in cats for this reason. A recent study discussed the possibility of a correlation between intravitreal gentamicin and tumor promotion in dogs (Veterinary Ophthalmology, 16, 2013, 159). We searched the Comparative Ocular Pathology Laboratory of Wisconsin (COPLOW) database for cases of cats diagnosed with ocular tumors following ciliary body ablation. Of eight cases with historic gentamicin injection, five had malignant tumors: three post-traumatic sarcomas and two melanomas. PMID:23701585

  18. Successful treatment of hepatic oligometastases with stereotactic ablative radiotherapy and radiofrequency ablation in an anaplastic lymphoma kinase fusion-positive lung cancer patient.

    PubMed

    Weber, Britta; Liu, Mitchell; Sobkin, Paul; Morris, Stephan W; Hout, David; van der Westhuizen, Nicholas; Tonseth, R Petter; Saltman, David L

    2016-03-01

    Local ablative therapy with stereotactic ablative radiotherapy may improve survival in oncogene-addicted lung cancer patients with extracranial oligometastatic disease treated with targeted therapies. There is limited data on the use of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in this same setting. We present a case of an anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-positive lung cancer patient with hepatic oligometastatic progression who was successfully treated with both stereotactic ablative radiation and RFA while continuing with an ALK inhibitor. PMID:27087977

  19. Emerging applications of stereotactic body radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lo, Simon S; Loblaw, Andrew; Chang, Eric L; Mayr, Nina A; Teh, Bin S; Huang, Zhibin; Yao, Min; Ellis, Rodney J; Biswas, Tithi; Sohn, Jason W; Machtay, Mitchell; Sahgal, Arjun

    2014-05-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has been used extensively in patients with lung, liver and spinal tumors, and the treatment outcomes are very favorable. For certain conditions such as medically inoperable stage I non-small-cell lung cancer, liver and lung oligometastases, primary liver cancer and spinal metastases, SBRT is regarded as one of the standard therapies. In the recent years, the use of SBRT has been extended to other disease conditions and sites such as recurrent head and neck cancer, renal cell carcinoma, prostate cancer, adrenal metastasis, pancreatic cancer, gynecological malignancies, spinal cord compression, breast cancer, and stage II-III non-small-cell lung cancer. Preliminary data in the literature show promising results but the follow-up intervals are short for most studies. This paper will provide an overview of these emerging applications. PMID:24947266

  20. Body Surface Mapping to Guide Atrial Fibrillation Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Seigo; Shah, Ashok J; Mahida, Saagar; Sellal, Jean-Marc; Berte, Benjamin; Hooks, Darren; Frontera, Antonio; Jefairi, Nora Al; Wielandts, Jean-Yves; Lim, Han S; Amraoui, Sana; Denis, Arnaud; Derval, Nicolas; Sacher, Frédéric; Cochet, Hubert; Hocini, Mélèze; Jaïs, Pierre; Haïssaguerre, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common rhythm disorder, and is strongly associated with thromboembolic events and heart failure. Over the past decade, catheter ablation of AF has advanced considerably with progressive improvement in success rates. However, interventional treatment is still challenging, especially for persistent and long-standing persistent AF. Recently, AF analysis using a non-invasive body surface mapping technique has been shown to identify localised reentrant and focal sources, which play an important role in driving and perpetuating AF. Non-invasive mapping-guided ablation has also been reported to be effective for persistent AF. In this review, we describe new clinical insights obtained from non-invasive mapping of persistent AF to guide catheter ablation. PMID:26835121

  1. Body Surface Mapping to Guide Atrial Fibrillation Ablation.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Seigo; Shah, Ashok J; Mahida, Saagar; Sellal, Jean-Marc; Berte, Benjamin; Hooks, Darren; Frontera, Antonio; Jefairi, Nora Al; Wielandts, Jean-Yves; Lim, Han S; Amraoui, Sana; Denis, Arnaud; Derval, Nicolas; Sacher, Frédéric; Cochet, Hubert; Hocini, Mélèze; Jaïs, Pierre; Haïssaguerre, Michel

    2015-12-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common rhythm disorder, and is strongly associated with thromboembolic events and heart failure. Over the past decade, catheter ablation of AF has advanced considerably with progressive improvement in success rates. However, interventional treatment is still challenging, especially for persistent and long-standing persistent AF. Recently, AF analysis using a non-invasive body surface mapping technique has been shown to identify localised reentrant and focal sources, which play an important role in driving and perpetuating AF. Non-invasive mapping-guided ablation has also been reported to be effective for persistent AF. In this review, we describe new clinical insights obtained from non-invasive mapping of persistent AF to guide catheter ablation. PMID:26835121

  2. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Oligometastatic Lung Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Norihisa, Yoshiki; Nagata, Yasushi Takayama, Kenji; Matsuo, Yukinori; Sakamoto, Takashi; Sakamoto, Masato; Mizowaki, Takashi; Yano, Shinsuke; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: Since 1998, we have treated primary and oligometastatic lung tumors with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). The term 'oligometastasis' is used to indicate a small number of metastases limited to an organ. We evaluated our clinical experience of SBRT for oligometastatic lung tumors. Methods and Materials: A total of 34 patients with oligometastatic lung tumors were included in this study. The primary involved organs were the lung (n = 15), colorectum (n = 9), head and neck (n = 5), kidney (n = 3), breast (n = 1), and bone (n = 1). Five to seven, noncoplanar, static 6-MV photon beams were used to deliver 48 Gy (n = 18) or 60 Gy (n = 16) at the isocenter, with 12 Gy/fraction within 4-18 days (median, 12 days). Results: The overall survival rate, local relapse-free rate, and progression-free rate at 2 years was 84.3%, 90.0%, and 34.8%, respectively. No local progression was observed in tumors irradiated with 60 Gy. SBRT-related pulmonary toxicities were observed in 4 (12%) Grade 2 cases and 1 (3%) Grade 3 case. Patients with a longer disease-free interval had a greater overall survival rate. Conclusion: The clinical result of SBRT for oligometastatic lung tumors in our institute was comparable to that after surgical metastasectomy; thus, SBRT could be an effective treatment of pulmonary oligometastases.

  3. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Andolino, David L.; Johnson, Cynthia S.; Maluccio, Mary; Kwo, Paul; Tector, A. Joseph; Zook, Jennifer; Johnstone, Peter A.S.; Cardenes, Higinia R.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for the treatment of primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods and Materials: From 2005 to 2009, 60 patients with liver-confined HCC were treated with SBRT at the Indiana University Simon Cancer Center: 36 Child-Turcotte-Pugh (CTP) Class A and 24 CTP Class B. The median number of fractions, dose per fraction, and total dose, was 3, 14 Gy, and 44 Gy, respectively, for those with CTP Class A cirrhosis and 5, 8 Gy, and 40 Gy, respectively, for those with CTP Class B. Treatment was delivered via 6 to 12 beams and in nearly all cases was prescribed to the 80% isodose line. The records of all patients were reviewed, and treatment response was scored according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors v1.1. Toxicity was graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v4.0. Local control (LC), time to progression (TTP), progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) were calculated according to the method of Kaplan and Meier. Results: The median follow-up time was 27 months, and the median tumor diameter was 3.2 cm. The 2-year LC, PFS, and OS were 90%, 48%, and 67%, respectively, with median TTP of 47.8 months. Subsequently, 23 patients underwent transplant, with a median time to transplant of 7 months. There were no {>=}Grade 3 nonhematologic toxicities. Thirteen percent of patients experienced an increase in hematologic/hepatic dysfunction greater than 1 grade, and 20% experienced progression in CTP class within 3 months of treatment. Conclusions: SBRT is a safe, effective, noninvasive option for patients with HCC {<=}6 cm. As such, SBRT should be considered when bridging to transplant or as definitive therapy for those ineligible for transplant.

  4. Available evidence on re-irradiation with stereotactic ablative radiotherapy following high-dose previous thoracic radiotherapy for lung malignancies.

    PubMed

    De Bari, Berardino; Filippi, Andrea Riccardo; Mazzola, Rosario; Bonomo, Pierluigi; Trovò, Marco; Livi, Lorenzo; Alongi, Filippo

    2015-06-01

    Patients affected with intra-thoracic recurrences of primary or secondary lung malignancies after a first course of definitive radiotherapy have limited therapeutic options, and they are often treated with a palliative intent. Re-irradiation with stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) represents an appealing approach, due to the optimized dose distribution that allows for high-dose delivery with better sparing of organs at risk. This strategy has the goal of long-term control and even cure. Aim of this review is to report and discuss published data on re-irradiation with SABR in terms of efficacy and toxicity. Results indicate that thoracic re-irradiation may offer satisfactory disease control, however the data on outcome and toxicity are derived from low quality retrospective studies, and results should be cautiously interpreted. As SABR may be associated with serious toxicity, attention should be paid for an accurate patients' selection. PMID:25913714

  5. Stereotactic body radiotherapy in lung cancer: an update *

    PubMed Central

    Abreu, Carlos Eduardo Cintra Vita; Ferreira, Paula Pratti Rodrigues; de Moraes, Fabio Ynoe; Neves, Wellington Furtado Pimenta; Gadia, Rafael; Carvalho, Heloisa de Andrade

    2015-01-01

    Abstract For early-stage lung cancer, the treatment of choice is surgery. In patients who are not surgical candidates or are unwilling to undergo surgery, radiotherapy is the principal treatment option. Here, we review stereotactic body radiotherapy, a technique that has produced quite promising results in such patients and should be the treatment of choice, if available. We also present the major indications, technical aspects, results, and special situations related to the technique. PMID:26398758

  6. Complete PSA Response Following Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy for a Bony Metastasis in the Setting of Castrate-Resistant Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lukovic, Jelena; Rodrigues, George

    2015-01-01

    A majority of patients with castrate-resistant prostate cancer ultimately develop distant metastases, with bone being the most common site of spread. Classically, systemic therapy has been considered the standard of care for patients with metastatic cancer. Emerging evidence, however, suggests that an intermediate oligometastatic state, between limited disease and widespread metastases, exists; theoretically, with locally ablative treatment, patients may be curable. We describe a complete PSA response following aggressive management, using stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), of an oligometastatic spine lesion in the setting of castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). This case report supports the use of SBRT in oligometastatic CRPC and suggests that management of limited metastases may provide good long-term outcomes in well-selected patients. PMID:26623220

  7. Complete PSA Response Following Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy for a Bony Metastasis in the Setting of Castrate-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, George

    2015-01-01

    A majority of patients with castrate-resistant prostate cancer ultimately develop distant metastases, with bone being the most common site of spread. Classically, systemic therapy has been considered the standard of care for patients with metastatic cancer. Emerging evidence, however, suggests that an intermediate oligometastatic state, between limited disease and widespread metastases, exists; theoretically, with locally ablative treatment, patients may be curable. We describe a complete PSA response following aggressive management, using stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), of an oligometastatic spine lesion in the setting of castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). This case report supports the use of SBRT in oligometastatic CRPC and suggests that management of limited metastases may provide good long-term outcomes in well-selected patients. PMID:26623220

  8. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Oligometastasis: Opportunities for Biology to Guide Clinical Management.

    PubMed

    Correa, Rohann J M; Salama, Joseph K; Milano, Michael T; Palma, David A

    2016-01-01

    Oligometastasis refers to a state of limited metastatic disease burden, in which surgical or ablative treatment to all known visible metastases holds promise to extend survival or even effect cure. Stereotactic body radiotherapy is a form of radiation treatment capable of delivering a high biologically effective dose of radiation in a highly conformal manner, with a favorable toxicity profile. Enthusiasm for oligometastasis ablation, however, should be counterbalanced against the limited supporting evidence. It remains unknown to what extent (if any) ablation influences survival or quality of life. Rising clinical equipoise necessitates the completion of randomized controlled trials to assess this, several of which are underway. However, a lack of clear identification criteria or biomarkers to define the oligometastatic state hampers optimal patient selection.This narrative review explores the evolutionary origins of oligometastasis, the steps of the metastatic process at which oligometastases may arise, and the biomolecular mediators of this state. It discusses clinical outcomes with treatment of oligometastases, ongoing trials, and areas of basic and translational research that may lead to novel biomarkers. These efforts should provide a clearer, biomolecular definition of oligometastatic disease and aid in the accurate selection of patients for ablative therapies. PMID:27441744

  9. Survival outcomes after stereotactic body radiotherapy for 79 Japanese patients with hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Hideomi; Onishi, Hiroshi; Murakami, Naoya; Matsumoto, Yasuo; Matsuo, Yukinori; Nomiya, Takuma; Nakagawa, Keiichi

    2015-05-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is a relatively new treatment for liver tumor. Outcomes of SBRT for liver tumors unsuitable for ablation or surgical resection were evaluated. A total of 79 patients treated with SBRT for primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) between 2004 and 2012 in six Japanese institutions were studied retrospectively. Patients treated with SBRT preceded by trans-arterial chemoembolization were eligible. Their median age was 73 years, 76% were males, and their Child-Pugh scores were Grades A (85%) and B (11%) before SBRT. The median biologically effective dose (α/β = 10 Gy) was 96.3 Gy. The median follow-up time was 21.0 months for surviving patients. The 2-year overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), and distant metastasis-free survival were 53%, 40% and 76%, respectively. Sex and serum PIVKA-II values were significant predictive factors for OS. Hypovascular or hypervascular types of HCC, sex and clinical stage were significant predictive factors for PFS. The 2-year PFS was 66% in Stage I vs 18% in Stages II-III. Multivariate analysis indicated that clinical stage was the only significant predictive factor for PFS. No Grade 3 laboratory toxicities in the acute, sub-acute, and chronic phases were observed. PFS after SBRT for liver tumor was satisfactory, especially for Stage I HCC, even though these patients were unsuitable for resection and ablation. SBRT is safe and might be an alternative to resection and ablation. PMID:25691453

  10. Survival outcomes after stereotactic body radiotherapy for 79 Japanese patients with hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Hideomi; Onishi, Hiroshi; Murakami, Naoya; Matsumoto, Yasuo; Matsuo, Yukinori; Nomiya, Takuma; Nakagawa, Keiichi

    2015-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is a relatively new treatment for liver tumor. Outcomes of SBRT for liver tumors unsuitable for ablation or surgical resection were evaluated. A total of 79 patients treated with SBRT for primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) between 2004 and 2012 in six Japanese institutions were studied retrospectively. Patients treated with SBRT preceded by trans-arterial chemoembolization were eligible. Their median age was 73 years, 76% were males, and their Child–Pugh scores were Grades A (85%) and B (11%) before SBRT. The median biologically effective dose (α/β = 10 Gy) was 96.3 Gy. The median follow-up time was 21.0 months for surviving patients. The 2-year overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), and distant metastasis-free survival were 53%, 40% and 76%, respectively. Sex and serum PIVKA-II values were significant predictive factors for OS. Hypovascular or hypervascular types of HCC, sex and clinical stage were significant predictive factors for PFS. The 2-year PFS was 66% in Stage I vs 18% in Stages II–III. Multivariate analysis indicated that clinical stage was the only significant predictive factor for PFS. No Grade 3 laboratory toxicities in the acute, sub-acute, and chronic phases were observed. PFS after SBRT for liver tumor was satisfactory, especially for Stage I HCC, even though these patients were unsuitable for resection and ablation. SBRT is safe and might be an alternative to resection and ablation. PMID:25691453

  11. Increasing the Therapeutic Ratio of Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy by Individualized Isotoxic Dose Prescription.

    PubMed

    Zindler, Jaap D; Thomas, Charles R; Hahn, Stephen M; Hoffmann, Aswin L; Troost, Esther G C; Lambin, Philippe

    2016-02-01

    To obtain a favorable tradeoff between treatment benefits and morbidity ("therapeutic ratio"), radiotherapy (RT) dose is prescribed according to the tumor volume, with the goal of controlling the disease while respecting normal tissue tolerance levels. We propose a new paradigm for tumor dose prescription in stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) based on organ-at-risk (OAR) tolerance levels called isotoxic dose prescription (IDP), which is derived from experiences and limitations of conventionally fractionated radiotherapy. With IDP, the radiation dose is prescribed based on the predefined level of normal tissue complication probability of a nearby dose-limiting OAR at a prespecified dose-volume constraint. Simultaneously, the prescribed total tumor dose (TTD) is maximized to the technically highest achievable level in order to increase the local tumor control probability (TCP). IDP is especially relevant for tumors located at eloquent locations or for large tumors in which severe toxicity has been described. IDP will result in a lower RT dose or a treatment scheduled with more fractions if the OAR tolerance level is exceeded, and potential dose escalation occurs when the OAR tolerance level allows it and when it is expected to be beneficial (if TCP < 90%). For patients with small tumors at noneloquent sites, the current SABR dose prescription already results in high rates of local control at low toxicity rates. In this review, the concept of IDP is described in the context of SABR. PMID:26476075

  12. Dynamic Lung Tumor Tracking for Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kunos, Charles A.; Fabien, Jeffrey M.; Shanahan, John P.; Collen, Christine; Gevaert, Thierry; Poels, Kenneth; Van den Begin, Robbe; Engels, Benedikt; De Ridder, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Physicians considering stereotactic ablative body radiation therapy (SBRT) for the treatment of extracranial cancer targets must be aware of the sizeable risks for normal tissue injury and the hazards of physical tumor miss. A first-of-its-kind SBRT platform achieves high-precision ablative radiation treatment through a combination of versatile real-time imaging solutions and sophisticated tumor tracking capabilities. It uses dual-diagnostic kV x-ray units for stereoscopic open-loop feedback of cancer target intrafraction movement occurring as a consequence of respiratory motions and heartbeat. Image-guided feedback drives a gimbaled radiation accelerator (maximum 15 x 15 cm field size) capable of real-time ±4 cm pan-and-tilt action. Robot-driven ±60° pivots of an integrated ±185° rotational gantry allow for coplanar and non-coplanar accelerator beam set-up angles, ultimately permitting unique treatment degrees of freedom. State-of-the-art software aids real-time six dimensional positioning, ensuring irradiation of cancer targets with sub-millimeter accuracy (0.4 mm at isocenter). Use of these features enables treating physicians to steer radiation dose to cancer tumor targets while simultaneously reducing radiation dose to normal tissues. By adding respiration correlated computed tomography (CT) and 2-[18F] fluoro-2-deoxy-ᴅ-glucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) images into the planning system for enhanced tumor target contouring, the likelihood of physical tumor miss becomes substantially less1. In this article, we describe new radiation plans for the treatment of moving lung tumors. PMID:26131774

  13. Stereotactic body radiotherapy: current strategies and future development

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has emerged as the standard treatment for medically inoperable early-staged non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The local control rate after SBRT is over 90%. Some forms of tumour motion management and image-guided radiation delivery techniques are the prerequisites for fulfilment of its goal to deliver a high radiation dose to the tumour target without overdosing surrounding normal tissues. In this review, the current strategies of tumour motion management will be discussed, followed by an overview of various image-guided radiotherapy (RT) systems and devices available for clinical practice. Besides medically inoperable stage I NSCLC, SBRT has also been widely adopted for treatment of oligometastasis involving the lungs. Its possible applications in various other cancer illnesses are under extensive exploration. The progress of SBRT is critically technology-dependent. With advancement of technology, the ideal of personalised, effective and yet safe SBRT is already on the horizon. PMID:27606082

  14. Stereotactic body radiotherapy: current strategies and future development.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Maverick W K

    2016-07-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has emerged as the standard treatment for medically inoperable early-staged non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The local control rate after SBRT is over 90%. Some forms of tumour motion management and image-guided radiation delivery techniques are the prerequisites for fulfilment of its goal to deliver a high radiation dose to the tumour target without overdosing surrounding normal tissues. In this review, the current strategies of tumour motion management will be discussed, followed by an overview of various image-guided radiotherapy (RT) systems and devices available for clinical practice. Besides medically inoperable stage I NSCLC, SBRT has also been widely adopted for treatment of oligometastasis involving the lungs. Its possible applications in various other cancer illnesses are under extensive exploration. The progress of SBRT is critically technology-dependent. With advancement of technology, the ideal of personalised, effective and yet safe SBRT is already on the horizon. PMID:27606082

  15. Intermittent androgen ablation in patients with biochemical failure after pelvic radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Cury, Fabio L.B.; Souhami, Luis . E-mail: luis.souhami@muhc.mcgill.ca; Rajan, Raghu; Tanguay, Simon; Gagnon, Bruno; Duclos, Marie; Shenouda, George; Faria, Sergio L.; David, Marc; Freeman, Carolyn R.

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy of intermittent androgen ablation (IAA) in patients with biochemical failure after radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Thirty-nine patients received a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone analog every 2 months for a total of 4 doses. IAA was then discontinued if serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) fell to a normal level with a castrate level of testosterone. Therapy was restarted when the serum PSA level reached {>=}10 ng/mL and was discontinued if hormone resistance or unacceptable toxicity occurred. Results: Median PSA was 9.1 ng/mL at the time of first IAA. The median time between the first and the second cycles was 20.1 months, decreasing to 15.5 months between the third and fourth cycles. Two patients discontinued the treatment because of severe hot flushes. Four patients developed hormone resistance. With a median follow-up of 56.4 months, 5-year survival is 92.3%. Three patients died of unrelated causes. The incidence of distant metastasis is 6.8%. Conclusions: The use of IAA seems to be a safe and effective treatment for patients with biochemical failure post radiotherapy and no evidence of metastatic disease. The use of IAA limits hormone-related side effects and health care costs without an apparent increase in the risk for the development of metastatic disease.

  16. The Role of Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy for Early-Stage and Oligometastatic Non-small Cell Lung Cancer: Evidence for Changing Paradigms

    PubMed Central

    Dahele, Max

    2011-01-01

    A compelling body of non-randomized evidence has established stereotactic ablative lung radiotherapy (SABR) as a standard of care for medically inoperable patients with peripheral early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). This convenient outpatient therapy, which is typically delivered in 3-8 fractions, is also well tolerated by elderly and frail patients, makes efficient use of resources and is feasible using standard commercial equipment. The introduction of lung SABR into large populations has led to an increased utilization of radiotherapy, a reduction in the proportion of untreated patients and an increase in overall survival. In selected patients, the same ablative technology can now achieve durable local control of NSCLC metastases in a variety of common locations including the adrenal glands, bone, brain, and liver. At the same time as this, advances in prognostic molecular markers and targeted systemic therapies mean that there is now a subgroup of patients with stage IV NSCLC and a median survival of around 2 years. This creates opportunities for new trials that incorporate SABR and patient-specific systemic strategies. This selective mini-review focuses on the emerging role of SABR in patients with early-stage and oligometastatic NSCLC. PMID:21811422

  17. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) for Intrahepatic and Hilar Cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Mahadevan, Anand; Dagoglu, Nergiz; Mancias, Joseph; Raven, Kristin; Khwaja, Khalid; Tseng, Jennifer F; Ng, Kimmie; Enzinger, Peter; Miksad, Rebecca; Bullock, Andrea; Evenson, Amy

    2015-01-01

    Background: Unresectable intrahepatic and hilar cholangiocarcinomas carry a dismal prognosis. Systemic chemotherapy and conventional external beam radiation and brachytherapy have been used with limited success. We explored the use of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for these patients. Methods: Patients with unresectable intrahepatic or hilar cholangiocarcinoma or those with positive margins were included in this study. Systemic therapy was used at the discretion of the medical oncologist. The CyberknifeTM stereotactic body radiotherapy system used to treat these patients. Patients were treated with three daily fractions. Clinical and radiological follow-up were performed every three months. Results: 34 patients (16 male and 18 female) with 42 lesions were included in this study. There were 32 unresectable tumors and two patients with resected tumors with positive margins. The median SBRT dose was 30Gy in three fractions. The median follow-up was 38 months (range 8-71 months). The actuarial local control rate was 79%. The median overall survival was 17 months and the median progression free survival was ten months. There were four Grade III toxicities (12%), including duodenal ulceration, cholangitis and liver abscess. Conclusions: SBRT is an effective and reasonably safe local therapy option for unresectable intrahepatic or hilar cholangiocarcinoma. PMID:26516357

  18. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for the treatment of medically inoperable primary renal cell carcinoma: Current evidence and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Swaminath, Anand; Chu, William

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is steadily rising due to an aging population and more frequent imaging of the abdomen for other medical conditions. While surgery remains the standard of care treatment for localized disease, many patients are unfit due to their advanced age and medical comorbidities. In these patients, an active surveillance strategy or ablative therapies, including radiofrequency/microwave ablation or cryotherapy, can be offered. Such options have limitations particularly with fast growing, or larger tumors. A promising ablative therapy option to consider is stereo-tactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). SBRT refers to high dose, focally ablative radiation delivered in a short time (3–5 fractions), and is safe and effective in many other cancer sites, including lung, liver and spine. SBRT offers potential advantages in the primary kidney cancer setting due to its ablative dosing (overcoming the notion of “radio-resistance”), short treatment duration (important in an elderly population), low toxicity profile (enabling SBRT to treat larger RCCs than other ablative modalities), and non-invasiveness. To date, there is limited long-term prospective data on the outcomes of SBRT in primary RCC. However, early evidence is intriguing with respect to excellent local control and low toxicity; however, most studies vary in terms of technique and radiation dosing used. Well-designed prospective cohort studies with clearly defined and standardized techniques, dosing, follow-up, and integration of quality of life outcomes will be essential to further establish the role of SBRT in management of inoperable, localized RCC. PMID:26316914

  19. Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy for Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Patients Unfit for Resection, Ablation, or Chemotherapy: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Mosa, Eftychia; Georgakopoulos, John; Platoni, Kalliopi; Brountzos, Ilias; Zygogianni, Anna; Kosmidis, Paraskevas; Mystakidou, Kyriaki; Tolia, Maria; Beli, Ivelina; Gouliamos, Athanasios; Kouvaris, John; Kelekis, Nikoalos

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose is to evaluate the feasibility, efficacy, and the toxicity of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) in patients with advanced hepatocelluar carcinoma (HCC) and inferior vena cava tumor thrombosis (IVCTT). Methods. Between 2007 and 2012, in a retrospective way, 9 patients (median age 69 years) with advanced HCC and IVCTT unfit for surgery, radiofrequency ablation, embolization, or chemotherapy were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT). The radiotherapy volume included both primary tumor and IVTT. The radiotherapy schedule was 50–52 Gy in 2 Gy fractions. Overall survival (OS), response to radiotherapy, visual analogue scale (VAS), and toxicity were assessed. Results. All patients demonstrated a response rate up to 60%. During radiotherapy, 3 patients experienced grade 1 nausea/vomit toxicity. All patients demonstrated an elevation of the liver enzymes (3 patients with grade 1 and 6 patients with grade 2). The mean VAS-score was decreased from 6.11 to 3.11, while the median overall survival was 24 months. Conclusion. 3DCRT achieves a very high local control rate and is suitable for patients with HCC and IVTT, while the documented radiation induced toxicity is moderate. It can be recommended for palliation in patients unable to undergo curative therapies. PMID:24379750

  20. Improved survival with stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) over lobectomy for early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC): addressing the fallout of disruptive randomized data

    PubMed Central

    Kavanagh, Brian D.; Karam, Sana D.

    2015-01-01

    The gold-standard therapy for early stage non-small cell lung cancer (esNSCLC) has historically been lobectomy with mediastinal lymph node dissection. However, up to one-third of patients with esNSCLC are considered medically-inoperable due to factors such as advanced age and comorbid illnesses. The past decade has witnessed a dramatic increase in the use of high-dose conformal radiotherapy delivered over 1-5 fractions, synonymously termed stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) or stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). High rates of tumor control and favorable toxicity profiles have led to the adoption of SABR as the treatment of choice for medically-inoperable patients. Limited but growing data exist using SABR for medically-operable patients who are also candidates for lobectomy. A recent pooled analysis of two multicenter prospective randomized trials, the STARS (NCT00840749) and ROSEL (NCT00687986) protocols, published by Chang and colleagues (PMID 25981812) reported improved overall survival (OS) and reduced toxicity with SABR over lobectomy for medically-operable patients with esNSCLC. In this article we review the outcomes of this analysis in the context of existing radiotherapy and surgical data for NSCLC. Further, we discuss the potential causes and implications of these provocative results, including the shifting balance between oncologic control and treatment-related mortality in comparisons of SABR and surgical resection, termed the Head Start Effect. PMID:26244136

  1. Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy with CyberKnife for advanced thymic carcinoma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Fan, C.Y.; Huang, W.Y.; Jen, Y.M.; Lin, M.J.; Lin, K.T.

    2015-01-01

    Thymic carcinoma is a rare but lethal mediastinal cancer. The optimal treatment for advanced thymic carcinoma is not yet established. This report is the first known of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (sabr) with CyberKnife (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA, U.S.A.) as definitive therapy for thymic carcinoma. The patient, a 70-year-old woman with thymic carcinoma, invasion into neighboring organs, and pleural metastases—underwent CyberKnife sabr at 40 Gy in 5 fractions for two lesions, one in the thymus and one in the right paraspinal pleura. After 61 months of observation, a partial response was observed in the irradiated fields. However, disease progression in the non-irradiated pleura was noted. The patient underwent salvage CyberKnife sabr for the four initially nonirradiated pleural lesions. Computed tomography images obtained 10 months after the salvage therapy revealed a partial response. The patient is living, with progression-free irradiated lesions and no radiation-related toxicity. CyberKnife sabr is feasible for patients who are unable to undergo either surgery or conventionally fractionated radiation therapy. PMID:26628883

  2. Severe Chest Wall Toxicity From Cryoablation in the Setting of Prior Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Aadel A; Binkley, Michael S; Aggarwal, Sonya; Qian, Yushen; Carter, Justin N; Shah, Rajesh; Loo, Billy W

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a 42-year-old woman with metastatic synovial sarcoma of parotid origin, treated definitively with chemoradiation, who subsequently developed oligometastatic disease limited to the lungs. She underwent multiple left and right lung wedge resections and left lower lobectomy, followed by right lower lobe stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR), 54 Gy in three fractions to a right lower lobe lesion abutting the chest wall. Two years later, she was treated with cryoablation for a separate right upper lobe nodule abutting the chest wall. Two months later, she presented with acute shortness of breath, pleuritic chest pain, decreased peripheral blood O2 saturation, and productive cough. A computed tomography (CT) scan demonstrated severe chest wall necrosis in the area of recent cryoablation that, in retrospect, also received a significant radiation dose from her prior SABR. This case demonstrates that clinicians should exercise caution in using cryoablation when treating lung tumors abutting a previously irradiated chest wall. Note: Drs. Loo and Shah contributed equally as co-senior authors. PMID:27004154

  3. Severe Chest Wall Toxicity From Cryoablation in the Setting of Prior Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhuri, Aadel A; Binkley, Michael S; Aggarwal, Sonya; Qian, Yushen; Carter, Justin N; Shah, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a 42-year-old woman with metastatic synovial sarcoma of parotid origin, treated definitively with chemoradiation, who subsequently developed oligometastatic disease limited to the lungs. She underwent multiple left and right lung wedge resections and left lower lobectomy, followed by right lower lobe stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR), 54 Gy in three fractions to a right lower lobe lesion abutting the chest wall. Two years later, she was treated with cryoablation for a separate right upper lobe nodule abutting the chest wall. Two months later, she presented with acute shortness of breath, pleuritic chest pain, decreased peripheral blood O2 saturation, and productive cough. A computed tomography (CT) scan demonstrated severe chest wall necrosis in the area of recent cryoablation that, in retrospect, also received a significant radiation dose from her prior SABR. This case demonstrates that clinicians should exercise caution in using cryoablation when treating lung tumors abutting a previously irradiated chest wall. Note: Drs. Loo and Shah contributed equally as co-senior authors. PMID:27004154

  4. Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for early stage non-small cell lung cancer: a word of caution.

    PubMed

    Varela, Gonzalo; Gómez-Hernández, María Teresa

    2016-02-01

    Recently published data from pooled randomised trials conclude that stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) can be considered the treatment of choice in operable lung cancer patients fit for lobectomy. This conclusion comes for comparable 3-year survival and much lower risk of early severe morbidity and mortality. In this editorial comment we discuss the validity of the conclusions due to the prematurity of the survival analysis and to the poor accuracy of patients' staging leading to higher rates of regional relapse in the SABR arm. Besides, therapy-related mortality and morbidity in the pooled cohort is much higher that the internationally accepted standards maybe because surgery was not performed according to the best approaches and procedures currently available. The effectiveness of SABR as the sole therapy for resectable lung cancer is still awaiting for sound evidences. It could be adopted for individual cases only in two situations: (I) the patient does not accept surgical treatment; and (II) in cases were the risk of surgical related mortality is considered to exceed the probability of long-term survival after lung resection. For this, a multidisciplinary team (MDT) assessment, including surgeons and oncologists, is mandatory. PMID:26958502

  5. Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for early stage non-small cell lung cancer: a word of caution

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Hernández, María Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Recently published data from pooled randomised trials conclude that stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) can be considered the treatment of choice in operable lung cancer patients fit for lobectomy. This conclusion comes for comparable 3-year survival and much lower risk of early severe morbidity and mortality. In this editorial comment we discuss the validity of the conclusions due to the prematurity of the survival analysis and to the poor accuracy of patients’ staging leading to higher rates of regional relapse in the SABR arm. Besides, therapy-related mortality and morbidity in the pooled cohort is much higher that the internationally accepted standards maybe because surgery was not performed according to the best approaches and procedures currently available. The effectiveness of SABR as the sole therapy for resectable lung cancer is still awaiting for sound evidences. It could be adopted for individual cases only in two situations: (I) the patient does not accept surgical treatment; and (II) in cases were the risk of surgical related mortality is considered to exceed the probability of long-term survival after lung resection. For this, a multidisciplinary team (MDT) assessment, including surgeons and oncologists, is mandatory. PMID:26958502

  6. Dosimetric comparison of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, intensity modulated radiotherapy, and helical tomotherapy for lung stereotactic body radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kinhikar, Rajesh Ashok; Ghadi, Yogesh G; Sahoo, Priyadarshini; Laskar, Sarbani Ghosh; Deshpande, Deepak D; Shrivastava, Shyam K; Agarwal, Jaiprakash

    2015-01-01

    To compare the treatment plans generated with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT), intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and helical tomotherapy (HT) for stereotactic body radiotherapy of lung, twenty patients with medically inoperable (early nonsmall cell lung cancer) were retrospectively reviewed for dosimetric evaluation of treatment delivery techniques (3DCRT, IMRT, and HT). A dose of 6 Gy per fraction in 8 fractions was prescribed to deliver 95% of the prescription dose to 95% volume of planning target volume (PTV). Plan quality was assessed using conformity index (CI) and homogeneity index (HI). Doses to critical organs were assessed. Mean CI with 3DCRT, IMRT, and HT was 1.19 (standard deviation [SD] 0.13), 1.18 (SD 0.11), and 1.08 (SD 0.04), respectively. Mean HI with 3DCRT, IMRT, and HT was 1.14 (SD 0.05), 1.08 (SD 0.02), and 1.07 (SD 0.04), respectively. Mean R50% values for 3DCRT, IMRT, and HT was 8.5 (SD 0.35), 7.04 (SD 0.45), and 5.43 (SD 0.29), respectively. D2cm was found superior with IMRT and HT. Significant sparing of critical organs can be achieved with highly conformal techniques (IMRT and HT) without compromising the PTV conformity and homogeneity. PMID:26865754

  7. Reirradiation Human Spinal Cord Tolerance for Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sahgal, Arjun; Ma, Lijun; Weinberg, Vivian; Gibbs, Iris C.; Chao, Sam; Chang, Ung-Kyu; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Angelov, Liliyanna; Chang, Eric L.; Sohn, Moon-Jun; Soltys, Scott G.; Letourneau, Daniel; Ryu, Sam; Gerszten, Peter C.; Fowler, Jack; Wong, C. Shun; and others

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: We reviewed the treatment for patients with spine metastases who initially received conventional external beam radiation (EBRT) and were reirradiated with 1-5 fractions of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) who did or did not subsequently develop radiation myelopathy (RM). Methods and Materials: Spinal cord dose-volume histograms (DVHs) for 5 RM patients (5 spinal segments) and 14 no-RM patients (16 spine segments) were based on thecal sac contours at retreatment. Dose to a point within the thecal sac that receives the maximum dose (P{sub max}), and doses to 0.1-, 1.0-, and 2.0-cc volumes within the thecal sac were reviewed. The biologically effective doses (BED) using {alpha}/{beta} = 2 Gy for late spinal cord toxicity were calculated and normalized to a 2-Gy equivalent dose (nBED = Gy{sub 2/2}). Results: The initial conventional radiotherapy nBED ranged from {approx}30 to 50 Gy{sub 2/2} (median {approx}40 Gy{sub 2/2}). The SBRT reirradiation thecal sac mean P{sub max} nBED in the no-RM group was 20.0 Gy{sub 2/2} (95% confidence interval [CI], 10.8-29.2), which was significantly lower than the corresponding 67.4 Gy{sub 2/2} (95% CI, 51.0-83.9) in the RM group. The mean total P{sub max} nBED in the no-RM group was 62.3 Gy{sub 2/2} (95% CI, 50.3-74.3), which was significantly lower than the corresponding 105.8 Gy{sub 2/2} (95% CI, 84.3-127.4) in the RM group. The fraction of the total P{sub max} nBED accounted for by the SBRT P{sub max} nBED for the RM patients ranged from 0.54 to 0.78 and that for the no-RM patients ranged from 0.04 to 0.53. Conclusions: SBRT given at least 5 months after conventional palliative radiotherapy with a reirradiation thecal sac P{sub max} nBED of 20-25 Gy{sub 2/2} appears to be safe provided the total P{sub max} nBED does not exceed approximately 70 Gy{sub 2/2}, and the SBRT thecal sac P{sub max} nBED comprises no more than approximately 50% of the total nBED.

  8. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for primary prostate cancer: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Tan, Tze-Jian; Siva, Shankar; Foroudi, Farshad; Gill, Suki

    2014-10-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for prostate cancer allows overall treatment times to be reduced to as little as 1 week while maintaining a non-invasive approach. This study provides a comprehensive summary of the literature relating to SBRT in prostate cancer. A systematic review of the relevant literature was performed using structured search terms. Fourteen phase I-II trials and retrospective studies using SBRT for the treatment of prostate cancer were used. Three studies were identified which addressed cost. Dose fractionation, radiotherapy procedures, biochemical progression-free survival, toxicity, cost and quality of life were critically appraised. A total of 1472 patients were examined across studies. Median follow-up ranged from 11 to 60 months. The most common dose fractionation was 35-36.25 Gy in five fractions, used in nine out of 14 studies. Ten of 14 studies used CyberKnife. The overall biochemical progression-free survival ranged 81-100%. Acute grade 2 urinary and rectal toxicities were reported in 5-42% and 0-27% of patients, respectively. Acute grade 3 or more urinary and rectal toxicity were 0.5% and 0%, respectively. Late grade 2 urinary toxicity was reported in 0-29% of patients, while 1.3% had a late grade 3 urinary toxicity. There were no late grade 4 urinary toxicities seen. Late grade 2 rectal toxicity was reported in 0-11%, while 0.5% had a late grade 3 rectal toxicity. Late grade 4 rectal toxicity was reported in 0.2% of patients. PMID:25155286

  9. Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy Should Be Combined With a Hypoxic Cell Radiosensitizer

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, J. Martin; Diehn, Maximilian; Loo, Billy W.

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of tumor hypoxia on the expected level of cell killing by regimens of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) and to determine the extent to which the negative effect of hypoxia could be prevented using a clinically available hypoxic cell radiosensitizer. Results and Discussion: We have calculated the expected level of tumor cell killing from regimens of SABR, both with and without the assumption that 20% of the tumor cells are hypoxic, using the standard linear quadratic model and the universal survival curve modification. We compare the results obtained with our own clinical data for lung tumors of different sizes and with published data from other studies. We also have calculated the expected effect on cell survival of adding the hypoxic cell sensitizer etanidazole at clinically achievable drug concentrations. Modeling tumor cell killing with any of the currently used regimens of SABR produces results that are inconsistent with the majority of clinical findings if tumor hypoxia is not considered. However, with the assumption of tumor hypoxia, the expected level of cell killing is consistent with clinical data. For only some of the smallest tumors are the clinical data consistent with no tumor hypoxia, but there could be other reasons for the sensitivity of these tumors. The addition of etanidazole at clinically achievable tumor concentrations produces a large increase in the expected level of tumor cell killing from the large radiation doses used in SABR. Conclusions: The presence of tumor hypoxia is a major negative factor in limiting the curability of tumors by SABR at radiation doses that are tolerable to surrounding normal tissues. However, this negative effect of hypoxia could be overcome by the addition of clinically tolerable doses of the hypoxic cell radiosensitizer etanidazole.

  10. Tumor Volume-Adapted Dosing in Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy of Lung Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Trakul, Nicholas; Chang, Christine N.; Harris, Jeremy; Chapman, Christopher; Rao, Aarti; Shen, John; Quinlan-Davidson, Sean; Filion, Edith J.; Wakelee, Heather A.; Colevas, A. Dimitrios; Whyte, Richard I.; and others

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Current stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) protocols for lung tumors prescribe a uniform dose regimen irrespective of tumor size. We report the outcomes of a lung tumor volume-adapted SABR dosing strategy. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the outcomes in 111 patients with a total of 138 primary or metastatic lung tumors treated by SABR, including local control, regional control, distant metastasis, overall survival, and treatment toxicity. We also performed subset analysis on 83 patients with 97 tumors treated with a volume-adapted dosing strategy in which small tumors (gross tumor volume <12 mL) received single-fraction regimens with biologically effective doses (BED) <100 Gy (total dose, 18-25 Gy) (Group 1), and larger tumors (gross tumor volume {>=}12 mL) received multifraction regimens with BED {>=}100 Gy (total dose, 50-60 Gy in three to four fractions) (Group 2). Results: The median follow-up time was 13.5 months. Local control for Groups 1 and 2 was 91.4% and 92.5%, respectively (p = 0.24) at 12 months. For primary lung tumors only (excluding metastases), local control was 92.6% and 91.7%, respectively (p = 0.58). Regional control, freedom from distant metastasis, and overall survival did not differ significantly between Groups 1 and 2. Rates of radiation pneumonitis, chest wall toxicity, and esophagitis were low in both groups, but all Grade 3 toxicities developed in Group 2 (p = 0.02). Conclusion: A volume-adapted dosing approach for SABR of lung tumors seems to provide excellent local control for both small- and large-volume tumors and may reduce toxicity.

  11. Surgery versus stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer: less is not more.

    PubMed

    White, Abby; Swanson, Scott J

    2016-04-01

    High level evidence from randomized studies comparing surgery to stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) is lacking and available retrospective cohort and case control studies are highly variable in how thoroughly they define and stage lung cancer, in how they determine operability, and in the offered surgical approaches to operable lung cancer (open vs. video-assisted). This makes it difficult to compare best radiotherapy and best surgery approaches to treatment and to be confident in conclusions of equipoise between the two modalities. What has become clear from the controversy surrounding surgery versus SABR for early stage lung cancer is the desire to optimize treatment efficacy while minimizing invasiveness and morbidity. This review highlights the ongoing debate in light of these goals. PMID:27195137

  12. Surgery versus stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer: less is not more

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Scott J.

    2016-01-01

    High level evidence from randomized studies comparing surgery to stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) is lacking and available retrospective cohort and case control studies are highly variable in how thoroughly they define and stage lung cancer, in how they determine operability, and in the offered surgical approaches to operable lung cancer (open vs. video-assisted). This makes it difficult to compare best radiotherapy and best surgery approaches to treatment and to be confident in conclusions of equipoise between the two modalities. What has become clear from the controversy surrounding surgery versus SABR for early stage lung cancer is the desire to optimize treatment efficacy while minimizing invasiveness and morbidity. This review highlights the ongoing debate in light of these goals. PMID:27195137

  13. Solutions that enable ablative radiotherapy for large liver tumors: Fractionated dose painting, simultaneous integrated protection, motion management, and computed tomography image guidance.

    PubMed

    Crane, Christopher H; Koay, Eugene J

    2016-07-01

    The emergence and success of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for the treatment of lung cancer have led to its rapid adoption for liver cancers. SBRT can achieve excellent results for small liver tumors. However, the vast majority of physicians interpret SBRT as meaning doses of radiation (range, 4-20 Gray [Gy]) that may not be ablative but are delivered within about 1 week (ie, in 3-6 fractions). Adherence to this approach has limited the effectiveness of SBRT for large liver tumors (>7 cm) because of the need to reduce doses to meet organ constraints. The prognosis for patients who present with large liver tumors is poor, with a median survival ≤12 months, and most of these patients die from tumor-related liver failure. Herein, the authors present a comprehensive solution to achieve ablative SBRT doses for patients with large liver tumors by using a combination of classic, modern, and novel concepts of radiotherapy: fractionation, dose painting, motion management, image guidance, and simultaneous integrated protection. The authors discuss these concepts in the context of large, inoperable liver tumors and review how this approach can substantially prolong survival for patients, most of whom otherwise have a very poor prognosis and few effective treatment options. Cancer 2016;122:1974-86. © 2016 American Cancer Society. PMID:26950735

  14. Multicentre results of stereotactic body radiotherapy for secondary liver tumours

    PubMed Central

    Berber, Betul; Ibarra, Rafael; Snyder, Laura; Yao, Min; Fabien, Jeffrey; Milano, Michael T; Katz, Alan W; Goodman, Karyn; Stephans, Kevin; El-Gazzaz, Galal; Aucejo, Federico; Miller, Charles; Fung, John; Lo, Simon; Machtay, Mitchell; Sanabria, Juan

    2013-01-01

    Background Surgical resection is the standard treatment for liver metastases, although for the majority of patients this is not possible. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is an alternative local-regional therapy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the results of SBRT for secondary liver tumours from a combined multicentre database. Methods Variables from patients treated with SBRT from four Academic Medical Centres were entered into a common database. Local tumour control and 1-year survival rates were calculated. Results In total, 153 patients (91 women) 59 ± 8.4 years old with 363 metastatic liver lesions were treated with SBRT. The underlying primary tumour arose from gastrointestinal (GI), retroperitoneal and from extra-abdominal primaries in 56%, 8% and 36% of patients, respectively. Metastases, with a gross tumour volume (GTV) of 138.5 ± 126.8 cm3, were treated with a total radiation dose of 37.5 ± 8.2 Gy in 5 ± 3 fractions. The 1-year overall survival was 51% with an overall local control rate of 62% at a mean follow-up of 25.2 ± 5.9 months. A complete tumour response was observed in 32% of patients. Grade 3–5 adverse events were noted in 3% of patients. Conclusion Secondary liver tumours treated with SBRT had a high rate of local control with a low incidence of adverse events. PMID:23458468

  15. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Reirradiation for Recurrent Epidural Spinal Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Mahadevan, Anand; Floyd, Scott; Wong, Eric; Jeyapalan, Suriya; Groff, Michael; Kasper, Ekkehard

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: When patients show progression after conventional fractionated radiation for spine metastasis, further radiation and surgery may not be options. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has been successfully used in treatment of the spine and may be applicable in these cases. We report the use of SBRT for 60 consecutive patients (81 lesions) who had radiological progressive spine metastasis with epidural involvement after previous radiation for spine metastasis. Methods and Materials: SBRT was used with fiducial and vertebral anatomy-based targeting. The radiation dose was prescribed based on the extent of spinal canal involvement; the dose was 8 Gy Multiplication-Sign 3 = 24 Gy when the tumor did not touch the spinal cord and 5 to 6 Gy x 5 = 25 to 30 Gy when the tumor abutted the cord. The cord surface received up to the prescription dose with no hot spots in the cord. Results: The median overall survival was 11 months, and the median progression-free survival was 9 months. Overall, 93% of patients had stable or improved disease while 7% of patients showed disease progression; 65% of patients had pain relief. There was no significant toxicity other than fatigue. Conclusions: SBRT is feasible and appears to be an effective treatment modality for reirradiation after conventional palliative radiation fails for spine metastasis patients.

  16. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) Reirradiation for Recurrent Pancreas Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dagoglu, Nergiz; Callery, Mark; Moser, James; Tseng, Jennifer; Kent, Tara; Bullock, Andrea; Miksad, Rebecca; Mancias, Joseph D.; Mahadevan, Anand

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: After adjuvant or definitive radiation for pancreas cancer, there are limited conventional treatment options for recurrent pancreas cancer. We explored the role of (Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy) SBRT for reirradiation of recurrent pancreas Cancer. Methods: This is a retrospective study of patients reirradiated with SBRT for recurrent pancreas cancer. All patients were deemed unresectable and treated with systemic therapy. Fiducial gold markers were used. CT simulation was performed with oral and IV contrast and patients were treated with respiratory motion tracking in the CyberknifeTM system. Results: 30 patients (17 men and 13 women) with a median age of 67 years were included in the study. The median target volume was 41.29cc. The median prescription dose was 25Gy (24-36Gy) in a median of 5 fractions prescribed to a mean 78% isodose line. The median overall survival was 14 months. The 1 and 2 year local control was 78%. The worst toxicity included 3/30(10%) Grade III acute toxicity for pain, bleeding and vomiting. There was 2/30 (7%) Grade III long-term bowel obstructions. Conclusions: SBRT can be a useful and tolerable option for patients with recurrent pancreas cancer after prior radiation. PMID:26918041

  17. Monte Carlo calculation of dose distributions in oligometastatic patients planned for spine stereotactic ablative radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiseenko, V.; Liu, M.; Loewen, S.; Kosztyla, R.; Vollans, E.; Lucido, J.; Fong, M.; Vellani, R.; Popescu, I. A.

    2013-10-01

    Dosimetric consequences of plans optimized using the analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA) implemented in the Varian Eclipse treatment planning system for spine stereotactic body radiotherapy were evaluated by re-calculating with BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc Monte Carlo. Six patients with spinal vertebral metastases were planned using volumetric modulated arc therapy. The planning goal was to cover at least 80% of the planning target volume with a prescribed dose of 35 Gy in five fractions. Tissue heterogeneity-corrected AAA dose distributions for the planning target volume and spinal canal planning organ-at-risk volume were compared against those obtained from Monte Carlo. The results showed that the AAA overestimated planning target volume coverage with the prescribed dose by up to 13.5% (mean 8.3% +/- 3.2%) when compared to Monte Carlo simulations. Maximum dose to spinal canal planning organ-at-risk volume calculated with Monte Carlo was consistently smaller than calculated with the treatment planning system and remained under spinal cord dose tolerance. Differences in dose distribution appear to be related to the dosimetric effects of accounting for body composition in Monte Carlo simulations. In contrast, the treatment planning system assumes that all tissues are water-equivalent in their composition and only differ in their electron density.

  18. A Case of Metastatic Low-Grade Endometrial Stromal Sarcoma Treated with Letrozole after Ovarian Ablation by Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kyung Ho; Shin, Jung A; Jung, Joo Hyuk; Jung, Hae Won; Lee, Hye Ran; Chang, Sunhee; Park, Ji Yeon; Yi, Seong Yoon

    2015-01-01

    A 50-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital due to multiple lung nodules detected incidentally on a chest X-ray. A video-assisted thoracoscopic lung biopsy revealed low-grade endometrial stromal sarcoma (LG-ESS). She had undergone a simple hysterectomy 1 year earlier owing to a diagnosis of adenomyosis. A review of her previous hysterectomy specimen showed not endometriosis but LG-ESS. According to the patient’s levels of serum follicle stimulating hormone and estradiol, she was in the premenopausal state with retained and normally functioning ovaries. She then underwent ovarian ablation by radiotherapy, after which she was administered 2.5 mg of letrozole once per day. Three months later, the size of the metastatic nodules in both lungs had decreased. The patient was followed up for 24 months while continuing on letrozole, and maintained a partial remission. We report herein on a case of metastatic LG-ESS treated with letrozole after ovarian ablation by radiotherapy. PMID:25715770

  19. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Treatment of Adrenal Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Chawla, Sheema; Chen, Yuhchyau; Katz, Alan W.; Muhs, Ann G.; Philip, Abraham; Okunieff, Paul; Milano, Michael T.

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetry and outcomes of patients undergoing stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for metastases to the adrenal glands. Methods and Materials: At University of Rochester, patients have been undergoing SBRT for limited metastases since 2001. We retrospectively reviewed 30 patients who had undergone SBRT for adrenal metastases from various primary sites, including lung (n = 20), liver (n = 3), breast (n = 3), melanoma (n = 1), pancreas (n = 1), head and neck (n = 1), and unknown primary (n = 1). Results: Of the 30 patients, 14 with five or fewer metastatic lesions (including adrenal) underwent SBRT, with the intent of controlling all known sites of metastatic disease, and 16 underwent SBRT for palliation or prophylactic palliation of bulky adrenal metastases. The prescribed dose ranged from 16 Gy in 4 fractions to 50 Gy in 10 fractions. The median dose was 40 Gy. Of the 30 patients, 24 had >3 months of follow-up with serial computed tomography. Of these 24 patients, 1 achieved a complete response, 15 achieved a partial response, 4 had stable disease, and 4 developed progressive disease. No patient developed symptomatic progression of their adrenal metastases. The 1-year survival, local control, and distant control rate was 44%, 55%, and 13%, respectively. No patient developed Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 2 or greater toxicity. Conclusion: SBRT for adrenal metastases is well tolerated. Most patients developed widespread metastases shortly after treatment. Local control was poor, although this was a patient population selected for adverse risk factors, such as bulky disease. Additional studies are needed to determine the efficacy of SBRT for oligometastatic adrenal metastases, given the propensity of these patients to develop further disease progression.

  20. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy and Gemcitabine for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mahadevan, Anand; Jain, Sanjay; Goldstein, Michael; Miksad, Rebecca; Pleskow, Douglas; Sawhney, Mandeep; Brennan, Darren M.D.; Callery, Mark; Vollmer, Charles

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: Patients with nonmetastatic locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer have a dismal prognosis. Conventional concurrent chemoradiotherapy requires 6 weeks of daily treatment and can be arduous. We explored the safety and effectiveness of a 3-day course of hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) followed by gemcitabine in this population. Patients and Methods: A total of 36 patients with nonmetastatic, locally advanced, unresectable pancreatic cancer with {>=}12 months of follow-up were included. They received three fractions of 8, 10, or 12 Gy (total dose, 24-36 Gy) of SBRT according to the tumor location in relation to the stomach and duodenum, using fiducial-based respiratory motion tracking on a robotic radiosurgery system. The patients were then offered gemcitabine for 6 months or until tolerance or disease progression. Results: With an overall median follow-up of 24 months (range, 12-33), the local control rate was 78%, the median overall survival time was 14.3 months, the median carbohydrate antigen 19-9-determined progression-free survival time was 7.9 months, and the median computed tomography-determined progression-free survival time was 9.6 months. Of the 36 patients, 28 (78%) eventually developed distant metastases. Six patients (17%) were free of progression at the last follow-up visit (range, 13-30 months) as determined by normalized tumor markers with stable computed tomography findings. Nine Grade 2 (25%) and five Grade 3 (14%) toxicities attributable to SBRT occurred. Conclusion: Hypofractionated SBRT can be delivered quickly and effectively in patients with nonmetastatic, locally advanced, unresectable pancreatic cancer with acceptable side effects and minimal interference with gemcitabine chemotherapy.

  1. [Current Status of Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR) for Early-stage 
Non-small Cell Lung Cancer].

    PubMed

    Shi, Anhui; Zhu, Guangying

    2016-06-20

    High level evidence from randomized studies comparing stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) to surgery is lacking. Although the results of pooled analysis of two randomized trials for STARS and ROSEL showed that SABR is better tolerated and might lead to better overall survival than surgery for operable clinical stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), SABR, however, is only recommended as a preferred treatment option for early stage NSCLC patients who cannot or will not undergo surgery. We, therefore, are waiting for the results of the ongoing randomized studies [Veterans affairs lung cancer surgery or stereotactic radiotherapy in the US (VALOR) and the SABRTooth study in the United Kingdom (SABRTooths)]. Many retrospective and case control studies showed that SABR is safe and effective (local control rate higher than 90%, 5 years survival rate reached 70%), but there are considerable variations in the definitions and staging of lung cancer, operability determination, and surgical approaches to operable lung cancer (open vs video-assisted). Therefore, it is difficult to compare the superiority of radiotherapy and surgery in the treatment of early staged lung cancer. Most studies demonstrated that the efficacy of the two modalities for early staged lung cancer is equivalent; however, due to the limited data, the conclusions from those studies are difficult to be evidence based. Therefore, the controversies will be focusing on the safety and invasiveness of the two treatment modalities. This article will review the ongoing debate in light of these goals. PMID:27335303

  2. Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma >3 cm.

    PubMed

    Guarneri, Alessia; Franco, Pierfrancesco; Trino, Elisabetta; Campion, Daniela; Faletti, Riccardo; Mirabella, Stefano; Gaia, Silvia; Ragona, Riccardo; Diotallevi, Margherita; Saracco, Giorgio; Salizzoni, Mauro; Ricardi, Umberto; Carucci, Patrizia

    2016-10-01

    Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) is a safe treatment approach for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with comparable results to other local therapies. For lesions larger than 3 cm, no definitive standard treatment is present and several options are available. We retrospectively review local control (LC) and survival results of SABR in patients with HCC lesions >3 cm. Between 2012 and 2015, we treated 29 patients (39 lesions) having histological or radiological diagnosis of HCC and at least one lesion sized >3 cm. Patients were prescribed 36-48 Gy in 3-5 fractions (mainly 16 Gy × 3 fractions or 8 Gy × 5 fractions), in 3-5 consecutive days. A total of 15 lesions (52 %) had complete, while 10 (34 %) had partial remission; 3 (11 %) had a stable disease. Mean time for CR achievement was 5.8 months (range 1-17). One- and two-year actuarial LC was 100 %. Moreover, 1- and 2-year progression-free (PFS), cancer-specific and overall survival were 57.9 % [standard error (SE) 0.09; 95 % CI 36.9-74.2] and 41.2 % (SE 0.12; 95 % CI 17.7-63.5), 80.7 % (SE 0.08; 95 % CI 59.6-91.5) and 63.3 % (SE 0.11; 95 % CI 38.4-80.3), 71.7 % (SE 0.08; 95 % CI 51.2-84.7) and 56.2 % (SE 0.10; 95 % CI 33.8-73.6). On multivariate analysis, achieving a CR within the target lesion had a borderline significance with respect to PFS (HR 0.83; SE = 0.014; z -1.15; p = 0.095; 95 % CI 0.71-7.45). Time between HCC diagnosis and SABR delivery (< vs >12 months) was significantly correlated with OS (HR 16.5; SE 21.5; z = 2.14; p = 0.032; 95 % CI 1.27-213.3) as CLIP score (score: 0-1 vs 2) (HR 5.6; SE 4.6; z = 2.10; p = 0.036; 95 % CI 1.11-27.8). A total of 6 major toxic events (G3-G4) were recorded (20 %). In 2 patients (6 %), a radiation-induced liver disease was seen. In conclusion, SABR provided LC and survival rates comparable to other local therapies for patients with HCC lesion sized >3 cm, with acceptable toxicity profile. PMID:27566310

  3. Pulmonary Function Testing After Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy to the Lung

    SciTech Connect

    Bishawi, Muath; Kim, Bong; Moore, William H.; Bilfinger, Thomas V.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Surgical resection remains the standard of care for operable early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, some patients are not fit for surgery because of comorbidites such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and other medical conditions. We aimed to evaluate pulmonary function and tumor volume before and after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for patients with and without COPD in early-stage lung cancer. Methods and Materials: A review of prospectively collected data of Stage I and II lung cancers, all treated with SBRT, was performed. The total SBRT treatment was 60 Gy administered in three 20 Gy fractions. The patients were analyzed based on their COPD status, using their pretreatment pulmonary function test cutoffs as established by the American Thoracic Society guidelines (forced expiratory volume [FEV]% {<=}50% predicted, FEV%/forced vital capacity [FVC]% {<=}70%). Changes in tumor volume were also assessed by computed tomography. Results: Of a total of 30 patients with Stage I and II lung cancer, there were 7 patients in the COPD group (4 men, 3 women), and 23 in t he No-COPD group (9 men, 14 women). At a mean follow-up time of 4 months, for the COPD and No-COPD patients, pretreatment and posttreatment FEV% was similar: 39 {+-} 5 vs. 40 {+-} 9 (p = 0.4) and 77 {+-} 0.5 vs. 73 {+-} 24 (p = 0.9), respectively. The diffusing capacity of the lungs for carbon monoxide (DL{sub CO}) did significantly increase for the No-COPD group after SBRT treatment: 60 {+-} 24 vs. 69 {+-} 22 (p = 0.022); however, DL{sub CO} was unchanged for the COPD group: 49 {+-} 13 vs. 50 {+-} 14 (p = 0.8). Although pretreatment tumor volume was comparable for both groups, tumor volume significantly shrank in the No-COPD group from 19 {+-} 24 to 9 {+-} 16 (p < 0.001), and there was a trend in the COPD patients from 12 {+-} 9 to 6 {+-} 5 (p = 0.06). Conclusion: SBRT did not seem to have an effect on FEV{sub 1} and FVC, but it shrank tumor volume and

  4. Repeated stereotactic body radiotherapy for oligometastatic prostate cancer recurrence

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To assess the outcome of prostate cancer (PCa) patients diagnosed with oligometastatic disease at recurrence and treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods Non-castrate patients with up to 3 synchronous metastases (bone and/or lymph nodes) diagnosed on positron emission tomography - computed tomography, following biochemical recurrence after local curative treatment, were treated with (repeated) SBRT to a dose of 50 Gy in 10 fractions or 30 Gy in 3 fractions. Androgen deprivation therapy-free survival (ADT-FS) defined as the time interval between the first day of SBRT and the initiation of ADT was the primary endpoint. ADT was initiated if more than 3 metastases were detected during follow-up even when patients were still asymptomatic. Secondary endpoints were local control, progression free survival (PFS) and toxicity. Toxicity was scored using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events. Results With a median follow-up from time of SBRT of 2 years, we treated 50 patients with 70 metastatic lesions with a local control rate of 100%. The primary involved metastatic sites were lymph nodes (54%), bone (44%), and viscera (2%). The median PFS was 19 mo (95% CI: 13–25 mo) with 75% of recurring patients having ≤3 metastases. A 2nd and 3rd course of SBRT was delivered in 19 and 6 patients respectively. This results in a median ADT-FS of 25 months (20–30 mo). On univariate analysis, only a short PSA doubling time was a significant predictor for both PFS (HR: 0.90, 95% CI: 0.82 – 0.99) and ADT-FS (HR: 0.83; 95% CI: 0.71 – 0.97). Ten patients (20%) developed toxicity following treatment, which was classified as grade I in 7 and grade II in 3 patients. Conclusion Repeated SBRT for oligometastatic prostate cancer postpones palliative androgen deprivation therapy with 2 years without grade III toxicity. PMID:24920079

  5. Mathematical modelling of tumour volume dynamics in response to stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tariq, Imran; Humbert-Vidan, Laia; Chen, Tao; South, Christopher P.; Ezhil, Veni; Kirkby, Norman F.; Jena, Rajesh; Nisbet, Andrew

    2015-05-01

    This paper reports a modelling study of tumour volume dynamics in response to stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR). The main objective was to develop a model that is adequate to describe tumour volume change measured during SABR, and at the same time is not excessively complex as lacking support from clinical data. To this end, various modelling options were explored, and a rigorous statistical method, the Akaike information criterion, was used to help determine a trade-off between model accuracy and complexity. The models were calibrated to the data from 11 non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with SABR. The results showed that it is feasible to model the tumour volume dynamics during SABR, opening up the potential for using such models in a clinical environment in the future.

  6. Percutaneous fiducial marker placement prior to stereotactic body radiotherapy for malignant liver tumors: an initial experience

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Kengo; Shimohira, Masashi; Murai, Taro; Nishimura, Junichi; Iwata, Hiromitsu; Ogino, Hiroyuki; Hashizume, Takuya; Shibamoto, Yuta

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe our initial experience with a gold flexible linear fiducial marker and to evaluate the safety and technical and clinical efficacy of stereotactic body radiotherapy using this marker for malignant liver tumors. Between July 2012 and February 2015, 18 patients underwent percutaneous fiducial marker placement before stereotactic body radiotherapy for malignant liver tumors. We evaluated the technical and clinical success rates of the procedure and the associated complications. Technical success was defined as successful placement of the fiducial marker at the target site, and clinical success was defined as the completion of stereotactic body radiotherapy without the marker dropping out of position. All 18 fiducial markers were placed successfully, so the technical success rate was 100% (18/18). All 18 patients were able to undergo stereotactic body radiotherapy without marker migration. Thus, the clinical success rate was 100% (18/18). Slight pneumothorax occurred as a minor complication in one case. No major complications such as coil migration or bleeding were observed. The examined percutaneous fiducial marker was safely placed in the liver and appeared to be useful for stereotactic body radiotherapy for malignant liver tumors. PMID:26826200

  7. TRANSIENT RESPONSE OF ABLATING AXISYMMETRIC BODIES INCLUDING THE EFFECTS OF SHAPE CHANGE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howser, L. M.

    1994-01-01

    A computer program has been developed to analyze the transient response of an ablating axisymmetric body, including the effect of shape change. The governing differential equation, the boundary conditions for the analysis on which the computer program is based, and the method of solution of the resulting finite-difference equations are discussed in the documentation. Some of the features of the analysis and the associated program are (1) the ablation material is considered to be orthotropic with temperature-dependent thermal properties; (2) the thermal response of the entire body is considered simultaneously; (3) the heat transfer and pressure distribution over the body are adjusted to the new geometry as ablation occurs; (4) the governing equations and several boundary-condition options are formulated in terms of generalized orthogonal coordinates for fixed points in a moving coordinate system; (5) the finite-difference equations are solved implicitly; and (6) other instantaneous body shapes can be displayed with a user-supplied plotting routine. The physical problem to be modeled with the analysis is described by FORTRAN input variables. For example, the external body geometry is described in the W, Z coordinates; material density is given; and the stagnation cold-wall heating rate is given in a time-dependent array. Other input variables are required which control the solution, specify boundary conditions, and determine output from the program. The equations have been programmed so that either the International System of Units or the U. S. Customary Units may be used. This program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and has been implemented on a CDC 6000 Series computer. This program was developed in 1972.

  8. Stereotactic body radiotherapy using CyberKnife for locally advanced unresectable and metastatic pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Su, Ting-Shi; Liang, Ping; Lu, Huan-Zhen; Liang, Jian-Ning; Liu, Jian-Min; Zhou, Ying; Gao, Ying-Chuan; Tang, Min-Yang

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of stereotactic body radiotherapy using CyberKnife for locally advanced unresectable and metastatic pancreatic cancer. METHODS: From June 2010 to May 2014, 25 patients with locally advanced unresectable and metastatic pancreatic cancer underwent stereotactic body radiotherapy. Nine patients presented with unresectable locally advanced disease and 16 had metastatic disease. Primary end-points of this study were overall survival, relief of abdominal pain, and toxicity. RESULTS: Fourteen patients were treated with a total dose of 30-36 Gy in three fractions and the remainder with 40-48 Gy in four fractions. Median follow-up was 11 mo (range: 2-25 mo). The median survival duration calculated from the time of stereotactic body radiotherapy for the entire group, the locally advanced group, and the metastatic group was 9.0 mo, 13.5 mo, and 8.5 mo, respectively. Overall survival was 37% and 18% at one and two years, respectively. Abdominal pain relief was achieved within 2 wk of completing radiotherapy in the patients who received successful palliation (13 of 20 patients had significant pain). Five patients (20%) had grade 1 nausea, and one (4%) had grade 2 nausea. No acute grade 3+ toxicity was seen. CONCLUSION: Stereotactic body radiotherapy using the CyberKnife system is a promising, noninvasive, palliative treatment with acceptable toxicity for locally advanced unresectable and metastatic pancreatic cancer. PMID:26185389

  9. Geometrical Scaling of an Ablative Bluff Body under Different Outer Flow Velocity and Temperature Configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allard, Michael; White, Christopher M.; Dubief, Yves

    2015-11-01

    Experimental results investigating the geometrical scaling and local properties of an eroding low temperature ablator (para-dichlorobenzene) are presented. The bluff body is placed in a heated open-circuit wind tunnel and the effects of incoming outer flow velocity (uniform and spatially varying) and temperature on the ablation process are investigated. Image sequencing of the projected area in the streamwise-spanwise and streamwise-wall normal flow direction are used to quantify the time evolution of the geometrical shape and compute local recession rates and curvature. The geometrical self-similarity and local recession rates are evaluated and compared to Moore et al. and Huang et al. who investigated erosion under the action of fluid shear force and dissolution, respectively. This work is supported by the NSF (CBET-0967224).

  10. Body radiation exposure in breast cancer radiotherapy: Impact of breast IMRT and virtual wedge compensation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, Tony; Pignol, Jean-Philippe . E-mail: Jean-Philippe.Pignol@sw.ca; Rakovitch, Eileen; Vu, Toni; Hicks, Deanna; O'Brien, Peter; Pritchard, Kathleen

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: Recent reports demonstrate a dramatically increased rate of secondary leukemia for breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant high-dose anthracycline and radiotherapy, and that radiation is an independent factor for the development of leukemia. This study aimed to evaluate the radiation body exposure during breast radiotherapy and to characterize the factors associated with an increased exposure. Patients and Methods: In a prospective cohort of 120 women, radiation measurements were taken from four sites on the body at the time of adjuvant breast radiotherapy. Multiple regression analysis was performed to analyze patient and treatment factors associated with the amount of scattered radiation. Results: For standard 50 Gy breast radiotherapy, the minimal dose received by abdominal organs is on average 0.45 Gy, ranging from 0.06 to 1.55 Gy. The use of physical wedges as a compensation technique was the most significant factor associated with increased scattered dose (p < 0.001), resulting in approximately three times more exposure compared with breast intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and dynamic wedge. Conclusions: The amount of radiation that is scattered to a patient's body is consistent with exposure reported to be associated with excess of leukemia. In accordance with the As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) principle, we recommend using breast IMRT or virtual wedging for the radiotherapy of breast cancer receiving high-dose anthracycline chemotherapy.

  11. Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiation Therapy for Octogenarians With Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, Atsuya; Sanuki, Naoko; Eriguchi, Takahisa; Kaneko, Takeshi; Morita, Satoshi; Handa, Hiroshi; Aoki, Yousuke; Oku, Yohei; Kunieda, Etsuo

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively investigate treatment outcomes of stereotactic ablative body radiation therapy (SABR) for octogenarians with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Between 2005 and 2012, 109 patients aged ≥80 years with T1-2N0M0 NSCLC were treated with SABR: 47 patients had histology-unproven lung cancer; 62 patients had pathologically proven NSCLC. The prescribed doses were either 50 Gy/5 fractions for peripheral tumors or 40 Gy/5 fractions for centrally located tumors. The treatment outcomes, toxicities, and the correlating factors for overall survival (OS) were evaluated. Results: The median follow-up duration after SABR was 24.2 (range, 3.0-64.6) months. Only limited toxicities were observed, except for 1 grade 5 radiation pneumonitis. The 3-year local, regional, and distant metastasis-free survival rates were 82.3%, 90.1%, and 76.8%, respectively. The OS and lung cancer-specific survival rates were 53.7% and 70.8%, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that medically inoperable, low body mass index, high T stage, and high C-reactive protein were the predictors for short OS. The OS for the operable octogenarians was significantly better than that for inoperable (P<.01). Conclusions: Stereotactic ablative body radiation therapy for octogenarians was feasible, with excellent OS. Multivariate analysis revealed that operability was one of the predictors for OS. For medically operable octogenarians with early-stage NSCLC, SABR should be prospectively compared with resection.

  12. Metastatic breast cancer: ovarian ablation with lower half-body irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick, P.J.; Garrett, P.G.

    1981-11-01

    Lower half-body irradiation with 1000 rad in a single exposure was used to treat 34 pre- and perimenopausal women with metastatic breast cancer. A direct response with relief of pain in the treated area occurred in 21 of 26 (82%) assessable patients. An indirect response in distant metastases was seen in 9 of 28 (32%) patients as a result of ovarian ablation. The median duration for both responses was 17 months. Treatment was well tolerated and no late complictions developed. Subsequent therapy for progressive cancer, with either radiation, hormones or chemotherapy was not compromised by this approach.

  13. Carotid Body Ablation Abrogates Hypertension and Autonomic Alterations Induced by Intermittent Hypoxia in Rats.

    PubMed

    Del Rio, Rodrigo; Andrade, David C; Lucero, Claudia; Arias, Paulina; Iturriaga, Rodrigo

    2016-08-01

    Chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH), the main feature of obstructive sleep apnea, enhances carotid body (CB) chemosensory responses to hypoxia and produces autonomic dysfunction, cardiac arrhythmias, and hypertension. We tested whether autonomic alterations, arrhythmogenesis, and the progression of hypertension induced by CIH depend on the enhanced CB chemosensory drive, by ablation of the CB chemoreceptors. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to control (Sham) conditions for 7 days and then to CIH (5% O2, 12/h 8 h/d) for a total of 28 days. At 21 days of CIH exposure, rats underwent bilateral CB ablation and then exposed to CIH for 7 additional days. Arterial blood pressure and ventilatory chemoreflex response to hypoxia were measured in conscious rats. In addition, cardiac autonomic imbalance, cardiac baroreflex gain, and arrhythmia score were assessed during the length of the experiments. In separate experimental series, we measured extracellular matrix remodeling content in cardiac atrial tissue and systemic oxidative stress. CIH induced hypertension, enhanced ventilatory response to hypoxia, induced autonomic imbalance toward sympathetic preponderance, reduced baroreflex gain, and increased arrhythmias and atrial fibrosis. CB ablation normalized blood pressure, reduced ventilatory response to hypoxia, and restored cardiac autonomic and baroreflex function. In addition, CB ablation reduced the number of arrhythmias, but not extracellular matrix remodeling or systemic oxidative stress, suggesting that reductions in arrhythmia incidence during CIH were related to normalization of cardiac autonomic balance. Present results show that autonomic alterations induced by CIH are critically dependent on the CB and support a main role for the CB in the CIH-induced hypertension. PMID:27381902

  14. Endometrial ablation

    MedlinePlus

    Hysteroscopy-endometrial ablation; Laser thermal ablation; Endometrial ablation-radiofrequency; Endometrial ablation-thermal balloon ablation; Rollerball ablation; Hydrothermal ablation; Novasure ablation

  15. Structural shielding design for a gamma ray stereotactic body radiotherapy system.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiangdong; Yang, Guoshan; Zhou, Hongmei; Qu, Decheng

    2006-09-01

    An OUR-QGD gamma ray stereotactic body radiotherapy system (body knife), made in China, is described. According to its structure and the principle of gamma radiation revolved on a focus, the energy distribution of scattered radiation in its treatment room is calculated. The structural shielding of the wall, roof, and door for a certain treatment room is calculated according to the local radiation protection law. PMID:16926472

  16. Measuring the Population Impact of Introducing Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy for Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, George B.; Palma, David A.; Senan, Suresh

    2014-01-01

    Background. The Cancer Risk Management Model (CRMM) was used to estimate the health and economic impact of introducing stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in Canada. Methods. The CRMM uses Monte Carlo microsimulation representative of all Canadians. Lung cancer outputs were previously validated internally (Statistics Canada) and externally (Canadian Cancer Registry). We updated costs using the Ontario schedule of fees and benefits or the consumer price index to calculate 2013 Canadian dollars, discounted at a 3% rate. The reference model assumed that for stage I NSCLC, 75% of patients undergo surgery (lobectomy, sublobar resection, or pneumonectomy), 12.5% undergo radiotherapy (RT), and 12.5% undergo best supportive care (BSC). SABR was introduced in 2008 as an alternative to sublobar resection, RT, and BSC at rates reflective of the literature. Incremental cost effectiveness ratios (ICERs) were calculated; a willingness-to-pay threshold of $100,000 (all amounts are in Canadian dollars) per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) was used from the health care payer perspective. Results. The total cost for 25,085 new cases of lung cancer in 2013 was calculated to be $608,002,599. Mean upfront costs for the 4,318 stage I cases were $7,646.98 for RT, $8,815.55 for SABR, $12,161.17 for sublobar resection, $16,266.12 for lobectomy, $22,940.59 for pneumonectomy, and $14,582.87 for BSC. SABR dominated (higher QALY, lower cost) RT, sublobar resection, and BSC. RT had lower initial costs than SABR that were offset by subsequent costs associated with recurrence. Lobectomy was cost effective when compared with SABR, with an ICER of $55,909.06. Conclusion. The use of SABR for NSCLC in Canada is projected to result in significant cost savings and survival gains. PMID:24951606

  17. Durable control of locally recurrent renal cell carcinoma using stereotactic body radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Maclean, Jillian; Breau, Rodney H; Scheida, Nicola; Malone, Shawn

    2014-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is generally poorly responsive to conventional radiation doses, and patients with inoperable local recurrence have limited therapeutic options. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is an increasingly available technology that allows delivery of a radiation schedule providing doses far more biologically effective against cancer cells than conventional radiotherapy. We present a case where durable disease control was achieved using SBRT in a patient with inoperable locally recurrent RCC who presented 18 years from original nephrectomy. The patient remains asymptomatic with no evidence of active disease 30 months following SBRT. This case highlights the need to reconsider the role of therapies with continuing advances in technology. PMID:25199199

  18. Laser Ablation Mass Spectrometer (LAMS) as a Standoff Analyzer in Space Missions for Airless Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, X.; Brinckerhoff, W. B.; Managadze, G. G.; Pugel, D. E.; Corrigan, C. M.; Doty, J. H.

    2012-01-01

    A laser ablation mass spectrometer (LAMS) based on a time-of-flight (TOF) analyzer with adjustable drift length is proposed as a standoff elemental composition sensor for space missions to airless bodies. It is found that the use of a retarding potential analyzer in combination with a two-stage reflectron enables LAMS to be operated at variable drift length. For field-free drift lengths between 33 cm to 100 cm, at least unit mass resolution can be maintained solely by adjustment of internal voltages, and without resorting to drastic reductions in sensitivity. Therefore, LAMS should be able to be mounted on a robotic arm and analyze samples at standoff distances of up to several tens of cm, permitting high operational flexibility and wide area coverage of heterogeneous regolith on airless bodies.

  19. Radiation-induced second primary cancer risks from modern external beam radiotherapy for early prostate cancer: impact of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and flattening filter free (FFF) radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Louise J.; Thompson, Christopher M.; Lilley, John; Cosgrove, Vivian; Franks, Kevin; Sebag-Montefiore, David; Henry, Ann M.

    2015-02-01

    Risks of radiation-induced second primary cancer following prostate radiotherapy using 3D-conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), flattening filter free (FFF) and stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) were evaluated. Prostate plans were created using 10 MV 3D-CRT (78 Gy in 39 fractions) and 6 MV 5-field IMRT (78 Gy in 39 fractions), VMAT (78 Gy in 39 fractions, with standard flattened and energy-matched FFF beams) and SABR (42.7 Gy in 7 fractions with standard flattened and energy-matched FFF beams). Dose-volume histograms from pelvic planning CT scans of three prostate patients, each planned using all 6 techniques, were used to calculate organ equivalent doses (OED) and excess absolute risks (EAR) of second rectal and bladder cancers, and pelvic bone and soft tissue sarcomas, using mechanistic, bell-shaped and plateau models. For organs distant to the treatment field, chamber measurements recorded in an anthropomorphic phantom were used to calculate OEDs and EARs using a linear model. Ratios of OED give relative radiation-induced second cancer risks. SABR resulted in lower second cancer risks at all sites relative to 3D-CRT. FFF resulted in lower second cancer risks in out-of-field tissues relative to equivalent flattened techniques, with increasing impact in organs at greater distances from the field. For example, FFF reduced second cancer risk by up to 20% in the stomach and up to 56% in the brain, relative to the equivalent flattened technique. Relative to 10 MV 3D-CRT, 6 MV IMRT or VMAT with flattening filter increased second cancer risks in several out-of-field organs, by up to 26% and 55%, respectively. For all techniques, EARs were consistently low. The observed large relative differences between techniques, in absolute terms, were very low, highlighting the importance of considering absolute risks alongside the corresponding relative risks, since when absolute

  20. Outcomes of Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy in Patients With Potentially Operable Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lagerwaard, Frank J.; Verstegen, Naomi E.; Haasbeek, Cornelis J.A.; Slotman, Ben J.; Paul, Marinus A.; Smit, Egbert F.; Senan, Suresh

    2012-05-01

    Background: Approximately two-thirds of patients with early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in The Netherlands currently undergo surgical resection. As an increasing number of fit patients have elected to undergo stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) in recent years, we studied outcomes after SABR in patients with potentially operable stage I NSCLC. Methods and Materials: In an institutional prospective database collected since 2003, 25% of lung SABR cases (n = 177 patients) were found to be potentially operable when the following patients were excluded: those with (1) synchronous lung tumors or other malignancy, (2) prior high-dose radiotherapy/pneumonectomy, (3) chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with a severity score of 3-4 according to the Global initiative for Obstructive Lung Disease classification. (4) a performance score of {>=}3, and (5) other comorbidity precluding surgery. Study patients included 101 males and 76 females, with a median age of 76 years old, 60% of whom were staged as T1 and 40% of whom were T2. Median Charlson comorbidity score was 2 (range, 0-5). A SABR dose of 60 Gy was delivered using a risk-adapted scheme in 3, 5, or 8 fractions, depending on tumor size and location. Follow-up chest computed tomography scans were obtained at 3, 6, and 12 months and yearly thereafter. Results: Median follow-up was 31.5 months; and median overall survival (OS) was 61.5 months, with 1- and 3-year survival rates of 94.7% and 84.7%, respectively. OS rates at 3 years in patients with (n = 59) and without (n = 118) histological diagnosis did not differ significantly (96% versus 81%, respectively, p = 0.39). Post-SABR 30-day mortality was 0%, while predicted 30-day mortality for a lobectomy, derived using the Thoracoscore predictive model (Falcoz PE et al. J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 2007;133:325-332), would have been 2.6%. Local control rates at 1 and 3 years were 98% and 93%, respectively. Regional and distant failure rates at 3 years were each

  1. Ablative system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, V. H. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A carrier liquid containing ablative material bodies is connected to a plenum chamber wall with openings to a high temperature environment. The liquid and bodies pass through the openings of the wall to form a self replacing ablative surface. The wall is composed of honeycomb layers, spheres containing ablative whiskers or wads, and a hardening catalyst for the carrier liquid. The wall also has woven wicks of ablative material fibers that extend through the wall openings and into plenum chamber which contains the liquid.

  2. Advances of stereotactic body radiotherapy in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Qichun; Yu, Wei; Rosati, Lauren M.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PCA) is one of the most aggressive tumors with few effective treatment modalities. It is the 4th and 7th leading cause of cancer death in the United States and China, respectively. At the time of diagnosis, only 20% of cases present with a resectable tumor, and about 40% with a locally advanced tumor that is considered unresectable. Even resected patients still have a poor prognosis, with an incidence of local recurrence ranging from 20% to 60%. It is also reported that up to 30% of PCA patients die from locally obstructive disease with few or no distant metastases. These findings have highlighted the importance of local radiation therapy in the treatment of PCA. As the role of conventional chemoradiotherapy remains controversial, the dawn of the pancreas stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) era represents a potential paradigm shift in the management of PCA. SBRT delivers a higher biological effective dose to the tumor with sharp dose escalation in a shorter treatment time course. Pancreas SBRT is a novel therapeutic option to achieve local tumor control with minimal toxicity. Herein, we review the advancement of SBRT for PCA patients with different stages of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. PMID:26361404

  3. Volumetric-Modulated Arc Therapy for Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy of Lung Tumors: A Comparison With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, Andrea; Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine van; Mans, Anton; Belderbos, Jose S.; Damen, Eugene M.F.

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the potential of volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) compared with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) techniques with a limited number of segments for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for early-stage lung cancer. Methods and Materials: For a random selection of 27 patients eligible for SBRT, coplanar and noncoplanar IMRT and coplanar VMAT (using SmartArc) treatment plans were generated in Pinnacle{sup 3} and compared. In addition, film measurements were performed using an anthropomorphic phantom to evaluate the skin dose for the different treatment techniques. Results: Using VMAT, the delivery times could be reduced to an average of 6.6 min compared with 23.7 min with noncoplanar IMRT. The mean dose to the healthy lung was 4.1 Gy for VMAT and noncoplanar IMRT and 4.2 Gy for coplanar IMRT. The volume of healthy lung receiving >5 Gy and >20 Gy was 18.0% and 5.4% for VMAT, 18.5% and 5.0% for noncoplanar IMRT, and 19.4% and 5.7% for coplanar IMRT, respectively. The dose conformity at 100% and 50% of the prescribed dose of 54 Gy was 1.13 and 5.17 for VMAT, 1.11 and 4.80 for noncoplanar IMRT and 1.12 and 5.31 for coplanar IMRT, respectively. The measured skin doses were comparable for VMAT and noncoplanar IMRT and slightly greater for coplanar IMRT. Conclusions: Coplanar VMAT for SBRT for early-stage lung cancer achieved plan quality and skin dose levels comparable to those using noncoplanar IMRT and slightly better than those with coplanar IMRT. In addition, the delivery time could be reduced by {<=}70% with VMAT.

  4. Dose-Volume Comparison of Proton Radiotherapy and Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kadoya, Noriyuki; Obata, Yasunori; Kato, Takahiro; Kagiya, Masaru; Nakamura, Tatsuya; Tomoda, Takuya; Takada, Akinori; Takayama, Kanako; Fuwa, Nobukazu

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: This study designed photon and proton treatment plans for patients treated with hypofractionated proton radiotherapy (PT) at the Southern Tohoku Proton Therapy Center (STPTC). We then calculated dosimetric parameters and compared results with simulated treatment plans for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), using dose--volume histograms to clearly explain differences in dose distributions between PT and SBRT. Methods and Materials: Twenty-one patients with stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (stage IA, n = 15 patients; stage IB, n = 6 patients) were studied. All tumors were located in the peripheral lung, and total dose was 66 Gray equivalents (GyE) (6.6 GyE/fraction). For treatment planning, beam incidence for proton beam technique was restricted to two to three directions for PT, and seven or eight noncoplanar beams were manually selected for SBRT to achieve optimal planning target volume (PTV) coverage and minimal dose to organs at risk. Results: Regarding lung tissues, mean dose, V5, V10, V13, V15, and V20 values were 4.6 Gy, 13.2%, 11.4%, 10.6%, 10.1%, and 9.1%, respectively, for PT, whereas those values were 7.8 Gy, 32.0%, 21.8%, 17.4%, 15.3%, and 11.4%, respectively, for SBRT with a prescribed dose of 66 Gy. Pearson product moment correlation coefficients between PTV and dose--volume parameters of V5, V10, V15, and V20 were 0.45, 0.52, 0.58, and 0.63, respectively, for PT, compared to 0.52, 0.45, 0.71, and 0.74, respectively, for SBRT. Conclusions: Correlations between dose--volume parameters of the lung and PTV were observed and may indicate that PT is more advantageous than SBRT when treating a tumor with a relatively large PTV or several tumors.

  5. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy-Based Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Medically Inoperable Early-Stage Lung Cancer: Excellent Local Control

    SciTech Connect

    Videtic, Gregory M.M.; Stephans, Kevin; Reddy, Chandana; Gajdos, Stephen; Kolar, Matthew; Clouser, Edward; Djemil, Toufik

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: To validate the use of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) beams for medically inoperable Stage I lung cancer. Methods and Materials: From February 2004 to November 2006, a total of 26 patients with 28 lesions received SBRT using a Novalis/BrainLAB system. Immobilization involved a Bodyfix vacuum cushion. A weighted abdominal belt limited respiratory excursion. Computed tomographic simulation images were acquired at rest, full inhalation, and full exhalation and were merged to generate an internal gross tumor volume (ITV). Dose was prescribed to cover the planning target volume (PTV), defined as PTV = ITV + 3-5 mm set-up margin. Heterogeneity corrections were used. Delivery of 50 Gy in five sequential fractions typically used seven nonopposing, noncoplanar beams. Image-guided target verification was provided by BrainLAB-ExacTrac. Results: Among the 26 patients, the mean age was 74 years (range, 49-88 years). Of the patients, 50% were male and 50% female. The median Karnofsky performance status was 70 (range, 40-100). The median follow-up was 30.9 months (range, 10.4-51.4 months). Tissue diagnosis was contraindicated in seven patients (26.9%). There were 22 T1 (78.6%) and six T2 (21.4%) tumors. The median conformality index was 1.38 (range, 1.12-1.8). The median heterogeneity index was 1.08 (range, 1.04-1.2). One patient (3.6%) developed acute Grade 3 dyspnea and one patient developed late Grade 2 chest wall pain. Actuarial local control and overall survival at 3 years were 94.4% and 52%, respectively. Conclusions: Use of IMRT-based delivery of SBRT using restriction of tumor motion in medically inoperable lung cancer demonstrates excellent local control and favorable survival.

  6. A Treatment Planning Study of Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Kotecha, Rupesh; Sharma, Naveen; Andrews, Martin; Stephans, Kevin L; Oberti, Carlos; Lin, Sara; Wazni, Oussama; Tchou, Patrick; Saliba, Walid I; Suh, John

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To explore the feasibility of using stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) to irradiate the antra of the four pulmonary veins while protecting nearby critical organs, such as the esophagus. Materials and Methods: Twenty patients who underwent radiofrequency catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation were selected. For each patient, the antra of the four pulmonary veins were identified as the target volumes on a pre-catheterization contrast or non-contrast CT scan. On each CT scan, the esophagus, trachea, heart, and total lung were delineated and the esophagus was identified as the critical organ. For each patient, three treatment plans were designed with 0, 2, and 5 mm planning margins around the targets while avoiding overlap with a planning organ at risk volume (PRV) generated by a 2 mm expansion of the esophagus. Using three non-coplanar volumetric modulated arcs (VMAT), 60 plans were created to deliver a prescription dose of 50 Gy in five fractions, following the SBRT dose regimen for central lung tumors. With greater than 97% of the planning target volumes (PTV) receiving the prescription doses, we examined dosimetry to 0.03 cc and 5 cc of the esophagus PRV volume as well as other contoured structures. Results: The average PTV-0 mm, PTV-2 mm, and PTV-5 mm volumes were 3.05 ± 1.90 cc, 14.70 ± 5.00 cc, and 40.85 ± 10.20 cc, respectively. With three non-coplanar VMAT arcs, the average conformality indices (ratio of prescription isodose volume to the PTV volume) for the PTV-0 mm, PTV-2 mm and PTV-5 mm were 4.81 ± 2.0, 1.71 ± 0.19, and 1.23 ± 0.08, respectively. Assuming patients were treated under breath-hold with 2 mm planning margins to account for cardiac motion, all plans met esophageal PRV maximum dose limits < 50 Gy to 0.03 cc and 16 plans (80%) met < 27.5 Gy to 5 cc of the esophageal PRVs. For PTV-5 mm plans, 18 plans met the maximum dose limit < 50 Gy to 0.03 cc and only two plans met the maximum dose limit < 27.5 Gy to 5 cc of the

  7. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for pancreatic cancer: recent progress and future directions.

    PubMed

    Myrehaug, Sten; Sahgal, Arjun; Russo, Suzanne M; Lo, Simon S; Rosati, Lauren M; Mayr, Nina A; Lock, Michael; Small, William; Dorth, Jennifer A; Ellis, Rodney J; Teh, Bin S; Herman, Joseph M

    2016-05-01

    Despite advances in surgical, medical, and radiation therapy for pancreatic cancer, the prognosis remains poor. At this time, the only chance for long-term survival is surgical resection. More challenging is the optimal management of unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer, which has historically been treated with concurrent chemoradiation or chemotherapy alone. However, the survival and local control benefit of conventional radiotherapy in addition to chemotherapy was unclear. More recently, stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is emerging as a viable approach to maximizing local tumor control with a tolerable side effect profile. SBRT achieves sharp dose fall-off facilitating safe delivery of highly focused radiation to the tumor over 1-5 days. Although the optimal regimen of pancreas SBRT has not yet been established, its short treatment course limits the delay of additional. Future directions involve prospective study of pancreas SBRT and exploration of biomarkers and imaging technology in order to adopt a personalized management paradigm. PMID:26999329

  8. [Stereotactic body radiation radiotherapy for oligometastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC): A case report].

    PubMed

    Leduc, C; Antoni, D; Quoix, É; Noël, G

    2015-05-01

    Metastatic non-small cell lung cancer is associated with a poor prognosis, and palliative chemotherapy is the mainstay of treatment. However, long-time survival has been observed in oligometastatic patients treated with locally ablative therapies to all sites of metastatic disease. An 80-year-old man was diagnosed with an adenocarcinoma of the lung. The right upper lobe lesion was classified cT2aN0M0 and was treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy at the dose of 60Gy in eight fractions. A few months after, he successively presented with two brain metastases and one left adrenal metastasis, with a complete response on the primary tumor. The three secondary lesions were treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy alone. Thirty months after the diagnosis and 12months after metastases' apparition, primary and brain lesion kept controlled (complete response). Oligometastatic non-small cell lung cancer management is not clear. Locally ablative therapies such as stereotactic body radiation therapy, surgery and radiofrequency are efficient and should be considered. A phase III study should evaluate radical treatment strategies in such patients. PMID:25841992

  9. Early prediction of tumor recurrence based on CT texture changes after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mattonen, Sarah A.; Palma, David A.; Haasbeek, Cornelis J. A.; Senan, Suresh; Ward, Aaron D.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Benign computed tomography (CT) changes due to radiation induced lung injury (RILI) are common following stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) and can be difficult to differentiate from tumor recurrence. The authors measured the ability of CT image texture analysis, compared to more traditional measures of response, to predict eventual cancer recurrence based on CT images acquired within 5 months of treatment. Methods: A total of 24 lesions from 22 patients treated with SABR were selected for this study: 13 with moderate to severe benign RILI, and 11 with recurrence. Three-dimensional (3D) consolidative and ground-glass opacity (GGO) changes were manually delineated on all follow-up CT scans. Two size measures of the consolidation regions (longest axial diameter and 3D volume) and nine appearance features of the GGO were calculated: 2 first-order features [mean density and standard deviation of density (first-order texture)], and 7 second-order texture features [energy, entropy, correlation, inverse difference moment (IDM), inertia, cluster shade, and cluster prominence]. For comparison, the corresponding response evaluation criteria in solid tumors measures were also taken for the consolidation regions. Prediction accuracy was determined using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) and two-fold cross validation (CV). Results: For this analysis, 46 diagnostic CT scans scheduled for approximately 3 and 6 months post-treatment were binned based on their recorded scan dates into 2–5 month and 5–8 month follow-up time ranges. At 2–5 months post-treatment, first-order texture, energy, and entropy provided AUCs of 0.79–0.81 using a linear classifier. On two-fold CV, first-order texture yielded 73% accuracy versus 76%–77% with the second-order features. The size measures of the consolidative region, longest axial diameter and 3D volume, gave two-fold CV accuracies of 60% and 57%, and AUCs of 0.72 and 0.65, respectively

  10. Extrapulmonary Soft-Tissue Fibrosis Resulting From Hypofractionated Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Pulmonary Nodular Lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Kawase, Takatsugu; Takeda, Atsuya; Kunieda, Etsuo Kokubo, Masaki; Kamikubo, Yoshifumi; Ishibashi, Ryouchi; Nagaoka, Tomoaki; Shigematsu, Naoyuki; Kubo, Atsushi

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: To clarify the incidence, symptoms, and timing of extrapulmonary fibrosis developing after hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy. Patients and Methods: We analyzed 379 consecutive patients who underwent stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung tumors at four institutions between February 2001 and March 2007. The median follow-up time was 29 months (range, 1-72). We investigated the subjective and objective characteristics of the extrapulmonary masses, redelineated the origin tissue of each on the treatment planning computed tomography scan, and generated dose-volume histograms. Results: In 9 patients (2.4%), extrapulmonary masses were found 3-36 months (median, 14) after irradiation. Coexisting swelling occurred in 3 patients, chest pain in 2, thumb numbness in 1, and arm edema in 1 patient. Extrapulmonary masses occurred in 5 (5.4%) of 92 and 4 (1.4%) of 287 patients irradiated with a 62.5-Gy and 48.0-Gy isocenter dose, respectively. The mean and maximal dose to the origin tissue was 25.8-53.9 Gy (median, 43.7) and 47.5-62.5 Gy (median, 50.2), respectively. In 5 of 9 patients, the standardized uptake values on 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography was 1.8-2.8 (median, 2.2). Percutaneous needle biopsy was performed in 3 patients, and all the specimens showed benign fibrotic changes without malignant cells. Conclusion: All patients should be carefully followed after stereotactic body radiotherapy. The findings of any new lesion should prompt an assessment for radiation-induced extrapulmonary fibrosis before an immediate diagnosis of recurrence is made. Careful beam-shape modification and dose prescription near the thoracic outlet are required to prevent forearm neuropathy and lymphedema.

  11. Positioning accuracy for lung stereotactic body radiotherapy patients determined by on-treatment cone-beam CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Richmond, N D; Pilling, K E; Peedell, C; Shakespeare, D; Walker, C P

    2012-06-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy for early stage non-small cell lung cancer is an emerging treatment option in the UK. Since relatively few high-dose ablative fractions are delivered to a small target volume, the consequences of a geometric miss are potentially severe. This paper presents the results of treatment delivery set-up data collected using Elekta Synergy (Elekta, Crawley, UK) cone-beam CT imaging for 17 patients immobilised using the Bodyfix system (Medical Intelligence, Schwabmuenchen, Germany). Images were acquired on the linear accelerator at initial patient treatment set-up, following any position correction adjustments, and post-treatment. These were matched to the localisation CT scan using the Elekta XVI software. In total, 71 fractions were analysed for patient set-up errors. The mean vector error at initial set-up was calculated as 5.3 ± 2.7 mm, which was significantly reduced to 1.4 ± 0.7 mm following image guided correction. Post-treatment the corresponding value was 2.1 ± 1.2 mm. The use of the Bodyfix abdominal compression plate on 5 patients to reduce the range of tumour excursion during respiration produced mean longitudinal set-up corrections of -4.4 ± 4.5 mm compared with -0.7 ± 2.6 mm without compression for the remaining 12 patients. The use of abdominal compression led to a greater variation in set-up errors and a shift in the mean value. PMID:22665927

  12. Induction of MiR-21 by Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Contributes to the Pulmonary Fibrotic Response

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Ok-Seon; Kim, Keun-Tae; Lee, Eunioo; Kim, Myoungjae; Choi, Seo-Hyun; Li, Henghong; Fornace, Albert J.; Cho, Jae-Ho; Lee, Yun-Sil; Lee, Ji-Seon; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Cha, Hyuk-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Radiation-induced lung fibrosis, the most serious effect of lung cancer radiotherapy on normal tissue, remains a major technical obstacle to the broader application of radiotherapy to patients with lung cancer. This study describes the use of an image-guided irradiation system in mice mimicking stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) to examine the molecular features of chronic fibrotic response after radiation injury. MicroRNA (miR) array analysis of injured pulmonary tissue identified a set of miRs whose expression was significantly increased in damaged lung tissue. In particular, miR-21 expression was increased at the radiation injury site, concurrent with collagen deposition. Although the inhibition of miR-21 by its specific inhibitor anti-miR-21 only marginally affected endothelial-mesenchymal transition (EndMT) in lung endothelial cells, this inhibition significantly reduced collagen synthesis in lung fibroblasts. Furthermore, ectopic expression of miR-21 was sufficient to promote a fibrotic response in lung fibroblasts, enhancing Smad2 phosphorylation concurrent with Smad7 downregulation. These findings indicate that the induction of miR-21 expression is responsible for fibrotic responses observed in mesenchymal cells at the injury site through the potentiation of TGF-β signaling. Local targeting of miR-21 at the injured area could have potential therapeutic utility in mitigating radiation-induced lung fibrosis. PMID:27171163

  13. Induction of MiR-21 by Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Contributes to the Pulmonary Fibrotic Response.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Ok-Seon; Kim, Keun-Tae; Lee, Eunioo; Kim, Myoungjae; Choi, Seo-Hyun; Li, Henghong; Fornace, Albert J; Cho, Jae-Ho; Lee, Yun-Sil; Lee, Ji-Seon; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Cha, Hyuk-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Radiation-induced lung fibrosis, the most serious effect of lung cancer radiotherapy on normal tissue, remains a major technical obstacle to the broader application of radiotherapy to patients with lung cancer. This study describes the use of an image-guided irradiation system in mice mimicking stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) to examine the molecular features of chronic fibrotic response after radiation injury. MicroRNA (miR) array analysis of injured pulmonary tissue identified a set of miRs whose expression was significantly increased in damaged lung tissue. In particular, miR-21 expression was increased at the radiation injury site, concurrent with collagen deposition. Although the inhibition of miR-21 by its specific inhibitor anti-miR-21 only marginally affected endothelial-mesenchymal transition (EndMT) in lung endothelial cells, this inhibition significantly reduced collagen synthesis in lung fibroblasts. Furthermore, ectopic expression of miR-21 was sufficient to promote a fibrotic response in lung fibroblasts, enhancing Smad2 phosphorylation concurrent with Smad7 downregulation. These findings indicate that the induction of miR-21 expression is responsible for fibrotic responses observed in mesenchymal cells at the injury site through the potentiation of TGF-β signaling. Local targeting of miR-21 at the injured area could have potential therapeutic utility in mitigating radiation-induced lung fibrosis. PMID:27171163

  14. Sexual Function After Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer: Results of a Prospective Clinical Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Wiegner, Ellen A.; King, Christopher R.

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: To study the sexual quality of life for prostate cancer patients after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Using the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC)-validated quality-of-life questionnaire, the sexual function of 32 consecutive patients who received prostate SBRT in a prospective Phase II clinical trial were analyzed at baseline, and at median times of 4, 12, 20, and 50 months after treatment. SBRT consisted of 36.25 Gy in five fractions of 7.25 Gy using the Cyberknife. No androgen deprivation therapy was given. The use of erectile dysfunction (ED) medications was monitored. A comprehensive literature review for radiotherapy-alone modalities based on patient self-reported questionnaires served as historical comparison. Results: Median age at treatment was 67.5 years, and median follow-up was 35.5 months (minimum 12 months). The mean EPIC sexual domain summary score, sexual function score, and sexual bother score decreased by 45%, 49%, and 25% respectively at 50 months follow-up. These differences reached clinical relevance by 20 months after treatment. Baseline ED rate was 38% and increased to 71% after treatment (p = 0.024). Use of ED medications was 3% at baseline and progressed to 25%. For patients aged <70 years at follow-up, 60% maintained satisfactory erectile function after treatment compared with only 12% aged {>=}70 years (p = 0.008). Penile bulb dose was not associated with ED. Conclusions: The rates of ED after treatment appear comparable to those reported for other modalities of radiotherapy. Given the modest size of this study and the uncertainties in the physiology of radiotherapy-related ED, these results merit further investigations.

  15. Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Adamietz, Irenaus A

    2010-01-01

    The intrathoracic growth of the tumor causes several severe symptoms as cough, dyspnea, chest pain, hemoptysis, hoarseness, anorexia/nausea, and dysphagia. In patients with manifest or threatening symptoms radiotherapy (RT) as an effective measure should be implemented into the management concept. Palliative RT radiotherapy prefers short hypofractionated schemas (e.g. 10 x 3 Gy, 4 x 5 Gy, 2 x 8 Gy, 1 x 10 Gy). Careful radiation planning supports the precision of palliative RT and reduces significantly the complication rate. A good response and prolonged palliation effects (6-12 months) can be achieved in many cases. However, the minimum biologically equivalent dose should not be less than 35 Gy. RT produces a good outcome in all types of metastases of lung carcinoma. In emergencies like VCSS or spinal cord compression RT should be initiated immediately. The selection of the optimal therapy for locally advanced lung carcinoma with malignant airway obstruction is difficult. Both brachytherapy and percutaneous irradiation are effective, however published results including local a sum of response, functionality and life quality demonstrates more benefit by percutaneous RT. Due to different physical properties of these two methods the combination of brachytherapy and external beam irradiation may be advantageous. PMID:19955803

  16. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Lesions of the Spine and Paraspinal Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, John W.; Yoo, David S.; Sampson, John H.; Isaacs, Robert E.; Larrier, Nicole A.; Marks, Lawrence B.; Yin Fangfang; Wu, Q. Jackie; Wang Zhiheng; Kirkpatrick, John P.

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: To describe our experience and clinical strategy for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of spinal lesions. Methods and Materials: Thirty-two patients with 33 spinal lesions underwent computed tomography-based simulation while free breathing. Gross/clinical target volumes included involved portions of the vertebral body and paravertebral/epidural tumor. Planning target volume (PTV) expansion was 6 mm axially and 3 mm radially; the cord was excluded from the PTV. Biologic equivalent dose was calculated using the linear quadratic model with {alpha}/{beta} = 3 Gy. Treatment was linear accelerator based with on-board imaging; dose was adjusted to maintain cord dose within tolerance. Survival, local control, pain, and neurologic status were monitored. Results: Twenty-one patients are alive at 1 year (median survival, 14 months). Median follow-up is 6 months for all patients (7 months for survivors). Mean previous radiotherapy dose to 22 patients was 35 Gy, and median interval was 17 months. Renal (31%), breast, and lung (19% each) were the most common histologic sites. Three SBRT fractions (range, one to four fractions) of 7 Gy (range, 5-16 Gy) were delivered. Median cord and target biologic equivalent doses were 70 Gy{sub 3} and 34.3 Gy{sub 10}, respectively. Thirteen patients reported complete and 17 patients reported partial pain relief at 1 month. There were four failures (mean, 5.8 months) with magnetic resonance imaging evidence of in-field progression. No dosimetric parameters predictive of failure were identified. No treatment-related toxicity was seen. Conclusions: Spinal SBRT is effective in the palliative/re-treatment setting. Volume expansion must ensure optimal PTV coverage while avoiding spinal cord toxicity. The long-term safety of spinal SBRT and the applicability of the linear-quadratic model in this setting remain to be determined, particularly the time-adjusted impact of prior radiotherapy.

  17. The role of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy in oncological and non-oncological clinical settings: highlights from the 7th Meeting of AIRO--Young Members Working Group (AIRO Giovani).

    PubMed

    Franco, Pierfrancesco; De Bari, Berardino; Ciammella, Patrizia; Fiorentino, Alba; Chiesa, Silvia; Amelio, Dante; Pinzi, Valentina; Bonomo, Pierluigi; Vagge, Stefano; Fiore, Michele; Comito, Tiziana; Cecconi, Agnese; Mortellaro, Gianluca; Bruni, Alessio; Trovò, Marco; Filippi, Andrea Riccardo; Greto, Daniela; Alongi, Filippo

    2014-01-01

    Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy is a modern cancer treatment strategy able to deliver highly focused radiation in one or a few fractions with a radical intent in several clinical settings. Young radiation oncologists need a constant and tailored update in this context to improve patient care in daily clinical practice. A recent meeting of AIRO Giovani (AIRO--Young Members Working Group) was specifically addressed to this topic, presenting state-of-the-art knowledge, based on the latest evidence in this field. Highlights of the congress are summarized and presented in this report, including thorough contributions of the speakers dealing with the role of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy in both oncological and non-oncological diseases, divided according to anatomical and clinical scenarios: intra-cranial settings (brain malignant primary tumors, metastases, benign tumors and functional disorders) and extra-cranial indications (lung primary tumors and metastases, thoracic re-irradiation, liver, lymph node and bone metastases, prostate cancer). With literature data discussed during the congress as a background, stereotactic ablative radiotherapy has proved to be a consolidated treatment approach in specific oncological and non-oncological scenarios, as well as a promising option in other clinical settings, requiring a further prospective validation in the near future. We herein present an updated overview of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy use in the clinic. PMID:25688503

  18. A review of stereotactic body radiotherapy – is volumetric modulated arc therapy the answer?

    PubMed Central

    Sapkaroski, Daniel; Osborne, Catherine; Knight, Kellie A

    2015-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is a high precision radiotherapy technique used for the treatment of small to moderate extra-cranial tumours. Early studies utilising SBRT have shown favourable outcomes. However, major disadvantages of static field SBRT include long treatment times and toxicity complications. Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) may potentially mitigate these disadvantages. This review aims to assess the feasibility of emerging VMAT and IMRT-based SBRT treatment techniques and qualify which offers the best outcome for patients, whilst identifying any emerging and advantageous SBRT planning trends. A review and synthesis of data from current literature up to September 2013 was conducted on EMBASE, Medline, PubMed, Science Direct, Proquest central, Google Scholar and the Cochrane Database of Systematic reviews. Only full text papers comparing VMAT and or IMRT and or Static SBRT were included. Ten papers were identified that evaluated the results of VMAT/IMRT SBRT. Five related to medically inoperable stage 1 and 2 non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), three to spinal metastasis, one related to abdominal lymph node malignancies, with the final one looking at pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Overall treatment times with VMAT were reduced by 66–70% for lung, 46–58% for spine, 42% and 21% for lymph node and pancreatic metastasis respectively, planning constraints were met with several studies showing improved organs at risk sparing with IMRT/VMAT to static SBRT. Both IMRT and VMAT were able to meet all planning constraints in the studies reviewed, with VMAT offering the greatest treatment efficiency. Early clinical outcomes with VMAT and IMRT SBRT have demonstrated excellent local control and favourable survival outcomes. PMID:26229679

  19. A review of stereotactic body radiotherapy – is volumetric modulated arc therapy the answer?

    SciTech Connect

    Sapkaroski, Daniel Osborne, Catherine; Knight, Kellie A

    2015-06-15

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is a high precision radiotherapy technique used for the treatment of small to moderate extra-cranial tumours. Early studies utilising SBRT have shown favourable outcomes. However, major disadvantages of static field SBRT include long treatment times and toxicity complications. Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) may potentially mitigate these disadvantages. This review aims to assess the feasibility of emerging VMAT and IMRT-based SBRT treatment techniques and qualify which offers the best outcome for patients, whilst identifying any emerging and advantageous SBRT planning trends. A review and synthesis of data from current literature up to September 2013 was conducted on EMBASE, Medline, PubMed, Science Direct, Proquest central, Google Scholar and the Cochrane Database of Systematic reviews. Only full text papers comparing VMAT and or IMRT and or Static SBRT were included. Ten papers were identified that evaluated the results of VMAT/IMRT SBRT. Five related to medically inoperable stage 1 and 2 non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), three to spinal metastasis, one related to abdominal lymph node malignancies, with the final one looking at pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Overall treatment times with VMAT were reduced by 66–70% for lung, 46–58% for spine, 42% and 21% for lymph node and pancreatic metastasis respectively, planning constraints were met with several studies showing improved organs at risk sparing with IMRT/VMAT to static SBRT. Both IMRT and VMAT were able to meet all planning constraints in the studies reviewed, with VMAT offering the greatest treatment efficiency. Early clinical outcomes with VMAT and IMRT SBRT have demonstrated excellent local control and favourable survival outcomes.

  20. Salvage Reirradiaton With Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Locally Recurrent Head-and-Neck Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Cengiz, Mustafa; Ozyigit, Goekhan; Yazici, Goezde; Dogan, Ali; Yildiz, Ferah; Zorlu, Faruk; Guerkaynak, Murat; Gullu, Ibrahim H.; Hosal, Sefik; Akyol, Fadil

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: In this study, we present our results of reirradiation of locally recurrent head-and-neck cancer with image-guided, fractionated, frameless stereotactic body radiotherapy technique. Methods and Materials: From July 2007 to February 2009, 46 patients were treated using the CyberKnife (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA) at the Department of Radiation Oncology, Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey. All patients had recurrent, unresectable, and previously irradiated head-and-neck cancer. The most prominent site was the nasopharynx (32.6%), and the most common histopathology was epidermoid carcinoma. The planning target volume was defined as the gross tumor volume identified on magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography. There were 22 female and 24 male patients. Median age was 53 years (range, 19-87 years). The median tumor dose with stereotactic body radiotherapy was 30 Gy (range, 18-35 Gy) in a median of five (range, one to five) fractions. Results: Of 37 patients whose response to therapy was evaluated, 10 patients (27%) had complete tumor regression, 11 (29.8%) had partial response, and 10 (27%) had stable disease. Ultimate local disease control was achieved in 31 patients (83.8%). The overall survival was 11.93 months in median (ranged, 11.4 - 17.4 months), and the median progression free survival was 10.5 months. One-year progression-free survival and overall survival were 41% and 46%, respectively. Grade II or greater long-term complications were observed in 6 (13.3%) patients. On follow-up, 8 (17.3%) patients had carotid blow-out syndrome, and 7 (15.2%) patients died of bleeding from carotid arteries. We discovered that this fatal syndrome occurred only in patients with tumor surrounding carotid arteries and carotid arteries receiving all prescribed dose. Conclusions: Stereotactic body radiotherapy is an appealing treatment option for patients with recurrent head-and-neck cancer previously treated with radiation to high doses. Good local control with

  1. The effect of changes in patients’ body position on the back pain intensity and hemodynamic status during and after radiofrequency catheter ablation of cardiac dysrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Haghshenas, Hajar; Mansoori, Parisa; Najafi, Saeed; Nikoo, Mohamad Hosein; Zare, Najaf; Jonoobi, Mitra

    2013-01-01

    Background: After radiofrequency catheter ablation of arrhythmias, patients have to bed rest for 4-6 h to prevent bleeding and hematoma. However, such a rest may cause back pain in the patients. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of continuous change in body position during and after the radiofrequency ablation on the back pain. Materials and Methods: In a quasi-experimental design 75 patients referring to university-affiliated hospitals were randomly assigned to a control group, receiving no change in body position, group A subjected to changes in body position during and after ablation, and group B subjected to changes in body position during ablation. The intensity of pain, blood pressure, heart rate, and extent of bleeding and hematoma were measured. Results: The groups were not significantly different in terms of demographic characteristics, blood pressure, heart rate, overall bleeding, or hematoma at the entry into the coronary care unit. While not significantly different from each other, the intensity of back pain between group A and B were significantly lower than that of group C. Compared to group C, group A and B had a significantly lower pain score up to 6 and 4 h after the procedure, respectively. Group B had a significantly higher pain score at 2, 4, and 6 h post ablation than group A. Conclusions: The findings show that changing the body position during and after the ablation procedure would reduce or prevent the back pain without increasing the chance of bleeding and hematoma. PMID:23983735

  2. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Metastatic and Recurrent Ewing Sarcoma and Osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Lindsay C.; Lester, Rachael A.; Grams, Michael P.; Haddock, Michael G.; Olivier, Kenneth R.; Arndt, Carola A. S.; Rose, Peter S.; Laack, Nadia N.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Radiotherapy has been utilized for metastatic and recurrent osteosarcoma and Ewing sarcoma (ES), in order to provide palliation and possibly prolong overall or progression-free survival. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is convenient for patients and offers the possibility of increased efficacy. We report our early institutional experience using SBRT for recurrent and metastatic osteosarcoma and Ewing sarcoma. Methods. We reviewed all cases of osteosarcoma or ES treated with SBRT between 2008 and 2012. Results. We identified 14 patients with a total of 27 lesions from osteosarcoma (n = 19) or ES (n = 8). The median total curative/definitive SBRT dose delivered was 40 Gy in 5 fractions (range, 30–60 Gy in 3–10 fractions). The median total palliative SBRT dose delivered was 40 Gy in 5 fractions (range, 16–50 Gy in 1–10 fractions). Two grade 2 and 1 grade 3 late toxicities occurred, consisting of myonecrosis, avascular necrosis with pathologic fracture, and sacral plexopathy. Toxicity was seen in the settings of concurrent chemotherapy and reirradiation. Conclusions. This descriptive report suggests that SBRT may be a feasible local treatment option for patients with osteosarcoma and ES. However, significant toxicity can result, and thus systematic study is warranted to clarify efficacy and characterize long-term toxicity. PMID:25548538

  3. Management of Spinal Metastases From Renal Cell Carcinoma Using Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Quynh-Nhu; Shiu, Almon S.; Rhines, Laurence D.; Wang He; Allen, Pamela K.; Wang, Xin Shelley; Chang, Eric L.

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcomes associated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in the management of spinal metastases from renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Methods and Materials: SBRT was used in the treatment of patients with spinal metastases from RCC. Patients received either 24 Gy in a single fraction, 27 Gy in three fractions, or 30 Gy delivered in five fractions. Effectiveness of SBRT with respect to tumor control and palliation of pain was assessed using patient-reported outcomes. Results: A total of 48 patients with 55 spinal metastases were treated with SBRT with a median follow-up time of 13.1 months (range, 3.3-54.5 months). The actuarial 1-year spine tumor progression free survival was 82.1%. At pretreatment baseline, 23% patients were pain free; at 1 month and 12 months post-SBRT, 44% and 52% patients were pain free, respectively. No Grade 3-4 neurologic toxicity was observed. Conclusions: The data support SBRT as a safe and effective treatment modality that can be used to achieve good tumor control and palliation of pain associated with RCC spinal metastases. Further evaluation with randomized trials comparing SBRT to conventional radiotherapy may be warranted.

  4. Clinical usefulness of a newly developed body surface navigation and monitoring system in radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Hitoshi; Obata, Yasunori; Kobayashi, Hidetoshi; Takenaka, Kazuyuki; Hirose, Yasujirou; Goto, Hajime; Hattori, Tomohiko

    2011-01-01

    In radiotherapy, setup precision has great influence on the therapeutic effect. In addition, body movements during the irradiation and physical alternations during the treatment period might cause deviation from the planned irradiation dosage distribution. Both of these factors could undesirably influence the dose absorbed by the target. In order to solve these problems, we developed the "body surface navigation and monitoring system" (hereafter referred to as "Navi-system"). The purpose of this study is to review the precision of the Navi-system as well as its usefulness in clinical radiotherapy. The Navi-system consists of a LED projector, a CCD camera, and a personal computer (PC). The LED projector projects 19 stripes on the patient's body and the CCD camera captures these stripes. The processed image of these stripes in color can be displayed on the PC monitor along with the patient's body surface image, and the digitalized results can be also displayed on the same monitor. The Navi-system calculates the height of the body contour and the transverse height centroid for the 19 levels and compares them with the reference data to display the results on the monitor on a real-time basis. These results are always replaced with new data after they are used for display; so, if the results need to be recorded, such recording commands should be given to the computer. 1) Evaluating the accuracy of the body surface height measurement: from the relationship between actual height changes and calculated height changes with torso surface by the Navi-system, for the height changes from 0.0 mm to ± 10.0mm, the changes show the underestimation of 1.0-1.5 mm and for ± 11.0mm to ± 20.0 mm, the underestimation of 1.5-3.0 mm. 2) Evaluating the accuracy of the transverse height centroid measurement: displacement of the inclined flat panel to the right by 5.0 mm, 10.0 mm, 15.0 mm and 20.0 mm showed the transverse height centroid calculated by the Navi-system for 0.024 ± 0.007 line

  5. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Localized Ureter Transitional Cell Carcinoma: Three Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Maehata, Yoshiyasu; Kuriyama, Kengo; Aoki, Shinichi; Araya, Masayuki; Marino, Kan; Onishi, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    The gold standard management for ureter transitional cell carcinoma (UTCC) is radical nephroureterectomy with excision of the bladder cuff. However, some patients cannot undergo this procedure for several reasons. In the case reports described herein, we performed stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) on three patients with inoperable or surgery-rejected localized UTCC. Two out of the three patients did not develop local recurrence or distant metastasis during the observation period. However, recurrence was detected in the bladder of one patient 22 months after the treatment. No acute or late adverse events occurred in any of the three patients. SBRT may become one of the treatment options for inoperable or surgery-rejected UTCC patients. PMID:26442166

  6. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for the pancreas: a critical review for the medical oncologist

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Samuel K.; Wu, Cheng-Chia

    2016-01-01

    With recent advances in imaging modalities and radiation therapy, stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has allowed for the delivery of high doses of radiation with accuracy and precision. As such, SBRT has generated favorable results in the treatment of several cancers. Although the role of radiation has been controversial for the treatment of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) due to rather lackluster results in clinical trials, SBRT may offer improved outcomes, enhance the quality of life, and aid in palliative care settings for PDAC patients. This review delineates the role of SBRT in the treatment of PDAC, presents the defining principles of radiation biology and the radiation oncology work flow, and discusses the prospects of new treatment regimens involving tumor immunology and radiation therapy. PMID:27284482

  7. Respiratory Gating during Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer Reduces Tumor Position Variability

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Tetsuo; Matsuyama, Tomohiko; Toya, Ryo; Fukugawa, Yoshiyuki; Toyofuku, Takamasa; Semba, Akiko; Oya, Natsuo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated the effects of respiratory gating on treatment accuracy in lung cancer patients undergoing lung stereotactic body radiotherapy by using electronic portal imaging device (EPID) images. Materials and Methods Our study population consisted of 30 lung cancer patients treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (48 Gy/4 fractions/4 to 9 days). Of these, 14 were treated with- (group A) and 16 without gating (group B); typically the patients whose tumors showed three-dimensional respiratory motion ≧5 mm were selected for gating. Tumor respiratory motion was estimated using four-dimensional computed tomography images acquired during treatment simulation. Tumor position variability during all treatment sessions was assessed by measuring the standard deviation (SD) and range of tumor displacement on EPID images. The two groups were compared for tumor respiratory motion and position variability using the Mann-Whitney U test. Results The median three-dimensional tumor motion during simulation was greater in group A than group B (9 mm, range 3–30 mm vs. 2 mm, range 0–4 mm; p<0.001). In groups A and B the median SD of the tumor position was 1.1 mm and 0.9 mm in the craniocaudal- (p = 0.24) and 0.7 mm and 0.6 mm in the mediolateral direction (p = 0.89), respectively. The median range of the tumor position was 4.0 mm and 3.0 mm in the craniocaudal- (p = 0.21) and 2.0 mm and 1.5 mm in the mediolateral direction (p = 0.20), respectively. Conclusions Although patients treated with respiratory gating exhibited greater respiratory tumor motion during treatment simulation, tumor position variability in the EPID images was low and comparable to patients treated without gating. This demonstrates the benefit of respiratory gating. PMID:25379729

  8. A feasibility study evaluating the relationship between dose and focal liver reaction in stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for liver cancer based on intensity change of Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced magnetic resonance images

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Sang Hoon; Yu, Jeong Il; Lim, Do Hoon; Han, Youngyih

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In order to evaluate the relationship between the dose to the liver parenchyma and focal liver reaction (FLR) after stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR), we suggest a novel method using a three-dimensional dose distribution and change in signal intensity of gadoxetate disodium-gadolinium ethoxybenzyl diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-EOB-DTPA)-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) hepatobiliary phase images. Materials and Methods In our method, change of the signal intensity between the pretreatment and follow-up hepatobiliary phase images of Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI was calculated and then threshold dose (TD) for developing FLR was obtained from correlation of dose with the change of the signal intensity. For validation of the method, TDs for six patients, who had been treated for liver cancer with SABR with 45–60 Gy in 3 fractions, were calculated using the method, and we evaluated concordance between volume enclosed by isodose of TD by the method and volume identified as FLR by a physician. Results The dose to normal liver was correlated with change in signal intensity between pretreatment and follow-up MRI with a median R2 of 0.935 (range, 0.748 to 0.985). The median TD by the method was 23.5 Gy (range, 18.3 to 39.4 Gy). The median value of concordance was 84.5% (range, 44.7% to 95.9%). Conclusion Our method is capable of providing a quantitative evaluation of the relationship between dose and intensity changes on follow-up MRI, as well as determining individual TD for developing FLR. We expect our method to provide better information about the individual relationship between dose and FLR in radiotherapy for liver cancer. PMID:27104169

  9. Descriptive Analysis of Oligometastatic Lesions Treated With Curative-Intent Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Milano, Michael T. Katz, Alan W.; Schell, Michael C.; Philip, Abraham; Okunieff, Paul

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: To characterize oligometastases in patients enrolled on two prospective pilot studies, treating oligometastases with hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy and stereotactic radiosurgery to cranial lesions. Methods and Materials: We describe the characteristics and local control (LC) of 293 lesions in 121 patients with five or fewer metastases treated with stereotactic body radiation and/or cranial stereotactic radiosurgery. For each lesion, the primary cancer site, tumor histology, site of metastasis, gross tumor volume, and prescribed dose were ascertained. The prescribed dose is expressed by the biologically effective dose in 2-Gy fractions (BED2), calculated using the linear quadratic model, assuming an {alpha}/{beta} ratio of 10. Results: Lung lesions were significantly smaller than other lesions in our cohort, whereas liver lesions were significantly larger, possibly reflecting a detection and/or referral bias. The 2-year and 4-year tumor LC rates were 77% and 73% respectively. A larger gross tumor volume was significantly (p < 0.0001) correlated with worse lesion LC. Lesions originating from primary pancreatic, biliary or liver cancer exhibited significantly poorer LC, as did lesions from colorectal cancer. Lesions from breast cancer were better controlled. A higher BED2 did not correlate with improved tumor control. Conclusions: Stereotactic body radiation to aggressively treat oligometastatic lesions results in good local tumor control. Bulkier lesions are more difficult to control and may benefit from dose escalation.

  10. Prostate-specific antigen kinetics following hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy boost as post-external beam radiotherapy versus conventionally fractionated external beam radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Phak, Jeong Hoon; Kim, Hun Jung; Kim, Woo Chul

    2015-01-01

    Background Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has emerged as an effective treatment for localized prostate cancer. The purpose of this study was to compare the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) kinetics between conventionally fractionated external beam radiotherapy (CF-EBRT) and SBRT boost after whole pelvis EBRT (WP-EBRT) in localized prostate cancer. Methods A total of 77 patients with localized prostate cancer [T-stage, T1–T3; Gleason score (GS) 5–9; PSA < 20 ng/mL] were enrolled. A total of 35 patients were treated with SBRT boost (21 Gy in 3 fractions) after WP-EBRT and 42 patients were treated with CF-EBRT (45 Gy WP-EBRT and boost of 25.2–30.6 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions). PSA nadir and rate of change in PSA (slope) were calculated and compared. Results With a median follow-up of 52.4 months (range, 14–74 months), the median PSA nadir and slope for SBRT boost were 0.29 ng/mL and −0.506, −0.235, −0.129, and −0.092 ng/mL/mo, respectively, for durations of 1 year, 2 years, 3 years, and 4 years postradiotherapy. Similarly, for CF-EBRT, the median PSA nadir and slopes were 0.39 ng/mL and −0.720 ng/mL/mo, −0.204 ng/mL/mo, −0.121 ng/mL/mo, and −0.067 ng/mL/mo, respectively. The slope of CF-EBRT was significantly different with a greater median rate of change for 1 year postradiotherapy than that of SBRT boost (P = 0.018). Contrastively, the slopes of SBRT boost for durations of 2 years, 3 years, and 4 years tended to be continuously greater than that of CF-EBRT. The significantly lower PSA nadir was observed in SBRT boost (median nadir 0.29 ng/mL) compared with CF-EBRT (median nadir 0.35 ng/mL, P = 0.025). Five-year biochemical failure (BCF) free survival was 94.3% for SBRT boost and 78.6% for CF-EBRT (P = 0.012). Conclusion Patients treated with SBRT boost after WP-EBRT experienced a lower PSA nadir and there tended to be a continuously greater rate of decline of PSA for durations of 2 years, 3 years, and

  11. Inter- and Intrafraction Variability in Liver Position in Non-Breath-Hold Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Case, Robert B.; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Moseley, Douglas J.; Kim, John; Brock, Kristy K.; Dawson, Laura A.

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: The inter- and intrafraction variability of liver position was assessed in patients with liver cancer treated with kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT)-guided stereotactic body radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 314 CBCT scans obtained in the treatment position immediately before and after each fraction were evaluated from 29 patients undergoing six-fraction, non-breath-hold stereotactic body radiotherapy for unresectable liver cancer. Off-line, the CBCT scans were sorted into 10 bins, according to the phase of respiration. The liver position (relative to the vertebral bodies) was measured using rigid alignment of the exhale CBCT liver with the exhale planning CT liver, following the alignment of the vertebrae. The interfraction liver position change was measured by comparing the pretreatment CBCT scans, and the intrafraction change was measured from the CBCT scans obtained immediately before and after each fraction. Results: The mean amplitude of liver motion for all patients was 1.8 mm (range, 0.1-5.7), 8.0 mm (range, 0.1-18.8), and 4.3 mm (range 0.1-12.1) in the medial-lateral (ML), craniocaudal (CC), and anteroposterior (AP) directions, respectively. The mean absolute ML, CC, and AP interfraction changes in liver position were 2.0 mm (90th percentile, 4.2), 3.5 mm (90th percentile, 7.3), and 2.3 mm (90th percentile, 4.7). The mean absolute intrafraction ML, CC, and AP changes were 1.3 mm (90th percentile, 2.9), 1.6 mm (90th percentile, 3.6), and 1.5 mm (90th percentile, 3.1), respectively. The interfraction changes were significantly larger than the intrafraction changes, with a CC systematic error of 2.9 and 1.1 mm, respectively. The intraobserver reproducibility ({sigma}, n = 29 fractions) was 1.3 mm in the ML, 1.4 mm in the CC, and 1.6 mm in the AP direction. Conclusion: Interfraction liver position changes relative to the vertebral bodies are an important source of geometric uncertainty, providing a rationale for

  12. Internal movement, set-up accuracy and margins for stereotactic body radiotherapy using a stereotactic body frame.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Anders T; Petersen, Jørgen B; Høyer, Morten

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the uncertainty of patient immobilization within the Elekta body frame (SBF) used for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) and to suggest margins sufficient to ensure dose coverage to the gross target volume (GTV). The study was based on the evaluation of repeated CT-scans of 30 patients treated by SBRT. The overall uncertainty was divided between uncertainty related to internal movement of the tumor and uncertainty in the patient set-up. Standard deviations of the overall tumor displacement were 2 mm, 3 mm and 4 mm in medial-lateral (m-l), anterior-posterior (a-p), and cranio-caudal (c-c) directions, respectively. In a model based on the data, an ellipsoid planned target volume (PTV) corresponding to the standard deviations in the orthogonal directions and a scaling factor, K defined a 3-dimentional (3-D) probability density. According to the model, a 90% probability of full dose coverage of the GTV was secured using margins of 9 mm (m-l), 9 mm (a-p) and 13 mm (c-c), respectively. The overall uncertainty was dominated by internal tumor movements whereas the set-up uncertainty of the patient in the SBF was less pronounced. It was concluded that the Elekta SBF is useful for immobilisation of patients for SBRT. However, due to internal movement conventional margins of 5 mm in m-l and a-p and 10 mm in the c-c directions may be insufficient for full dose coverage. PMID:16982562

  13. Clinical Evaluation of an Immbolization System for Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Using Helical Tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Gutierrez, Alonso N.; Stathakis, Sotirios; Crownover, Richard; Esquivel, Carlos; Shi Chengyu; Papanikolaou, Niko

    2011-07-01

    In this study, a clinical evaluation of the Body Pro-Lok{sup TM} System combined with the TomoTherapy megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) was performed for lung and liver stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) to reduce interfractional setup uncertainty. Twenty patients treated with 3-5 fractions of SBRT were analyzed retrospectively. The Body Pro-Lok{sup TM} system was used in both CT simulation and during patient treatment setup. Patients were immobilized with a vacuum cushion placed posteriorly over the thoracic region, an abdominal compression plate, and a knee and foot sponge. Pretreatment MVCT scans of the TomoTherapy HI-ART II unit were fused with the planning kVCT before delivery of each fraction to determine the interfractional setup error. A total of 84 shifts were analyzed to assess the interfractional setup accuracy. Results showed that the mean interfractional setup errors and standard deviations were -0.9 {+-} 3.1 mm, 1.2 {+-} 5.5 mm, and 6.5 {+-} 2.6 mm for lateral (IEC-X), longitudinal (IEC-Y), and vertical (IEC-Z) variations, respectively. The maximum motion was 17.1 mm in the longitudinal direction. When all 3 translational coordinates were analyzed, a mean composite displacement vector of 8.2 {+-} 2.0 mm (range 4.1-11.7 mm) was obtained for all patients. Based on the findings, image-guided SBRT using the Body Pro-Lok{sup TM} system in conjunction with the MVCT of TomoTherapy is capable of minimizing interfractional setup error and improving treatment accuracy.

  14. Immunologic changes after loco-regional radiotherapy and fractionated total body irradiation (TBI) in mice

    SciTech Connect

    De Ruysscher, D.; Waer, M.; Vandeputte, M.; van der Schueren, E. )

    1989-12-01

    The immunologic effects of fractionated irradiation to both hind limbs and the tail of adult mice were investigated. A dose of 34 Gy given in 17 fractions of 2 Gy, 1 fraction per day, 5 days per week, was delivered with a 60Co source. A significant decrease of the total splenocyte count and of the PHA(phytohemagglutinin)-induced proliferation of T cells was found immediately after irradiation. Both parameters normalized within 30 days after irradiation. Immediately after irradiation, the MLC (mixed lymphocyte culture) was supranormal, dropped to 45% 1 week later, and normalized within 1 month after radiotherapy. The NK (natural killer) activity was significantly decreased only the first week after loco-regional irradiation, while the LAK (lymphokine activated killer) activity was not altered at all. The percentage of goat-anti-mouse+ cells (mainly B lymphocytes) was not changed immediately after loco-regional irradiation, but rose to supranormal values (175% of control level) 3 months after irradiation. A persistent decrease of the percentage and the absolute numbers of the Lyt2+ cells (= CD8+ cells, suppressor/cytotoxic phenotype) was observed up to 3 months after irradiation, while the percentage of L3T4+ cells (= CD4+ cells, helper phenotype) remained normal for the total follow-up. No differences in allogeneic skin graft survival could be demonstrated between irradiated and control animals. The observed immunological effects could not be explained by the scatter irradiation to the whole body as total body irradiation (TBI) administered in a dose and dose rate similar to the scatter dose did not result in persistent immunologic changes. No dose-rate effect could be demonstrated in a low dose fractionated total body irradiation schedule. A total body irradiation similar to the scatter dose in humans did not result in significant immunologic changes.

  15. Extracranial stereotactic body radiotherapy. Review of main SBRT features and indications in primary tumors

    PubMed Central

    Rubio, Carmen; Morera, Rosa; Hernando, Ovidio; Leroy, Thomas.; Lartigau, S. Eric

    2013-01-01

    Aim Review of main SBRT features and indications in primary tumors. Background Stereotactic body radiotherapy has been developed in the last few years. SBRT allows the hypofractionated treatment of extra cranial tumors, using either a single or limited number of dose fractions, and resulting in the delivery of a high biological effective dose with low toxicity. Material and methods SBRT requires a high level of accuracy for all phases of the treatment process: effective patient immobilization, precise target localization, highly conformed dosimetry and image guided systems for treatment verification. The implementation of SBRT in routine requires a careful considering of organ motion. Gating and tracking are effective ways to do so, and less invasive technologies “fiducials free” have been developed. Due to the hypofractionated scheme, the physician must pay attention to new dosimetric constraints in organ at risk and new radiobiological models are needed to assess the optimal fractionation and dose schemes. Results Currently, SBRT is safe and effective to treat primary tumors, which are otherwise untreatable with conventional radiotherapy or surgery. SBRT has quickly developed because of its excellent results in terms of tolerance and its high locoregional control rates. SBRT indications in primary tumors, such as lung primary tumors, have become a standard of care for inoperable patients. SBRT seems to be effective in many others indications in curative or palliative intent such as liver primary tumors, and novel indications and strategies are currently emerging in prostate cancer, head and neck tumor recurrences or pelvis reirradiations. Conclusion Currently, SBRT is mainly used when there is no other therapeutic alternative for the patient. This is due to the lack of randomized trials in these settings. However, the results shown in retrospective studies let us hope to impose SBRT as a new standard of care for many patients in the next few years. PMID

  16. Gemcitabine Chemotherapy and Single-Fraction Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Schellenberg, Devin; Goodman, Karyn A.; Lee, Florence; Chang, Stephanie; Kuo, Timothy; Quon, Andrew; Desser, Terry S.; Norton, Jeffrey; Greco, Ralph; Yang, George P.; Koong, Albert C.

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: Fractionated radiotherapy and chemotherapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer achieves only modest local control. This prospective trial evaluated the efficacy of a single fraction of 25 Gy stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) delivered between Cycle 1 and 2 of gemcitabine chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 16 patients with locally advanced, nonmetastatic, pancreatic adenocarcinoma received gemcitabine with SBRT delivered 2 weeks after completion of the first cycle. Gemcitabine was resumed 2 weeks after SBRT and was continued until progression or dose-limiting toxicity. The gross tumor volume, with a 2-3-mm margin, was treated in a single 25-Gy fraction by Cyberknife. Patients were evaluated at 4-6 weeks, 10-12 weeks, and every 3 months after SBRT. Results: All 16 patients completed SBRT. A median of four cycles (range one to nine) of chemotherapy was delivered. Three patients (19%) developed local disease progression at 14, 16, and 21 months after SBRT. The median survival was 11.4 months, with 50% of patients alive at 1 year. Patients with normal carbohydrate antigen (CA)19-9 levels either at diagnosis or after Cyberknife SBRT had longer survival (p <0.01). Acute gastrointestinal toxicity was mild, with 2 cases of Grade 2 (13%) and 1 of Grade 3 (6%) toxicity. Late gastrointestinal toxicity was more common, with five ulcers (Grade 2), one duodenal stenosis (Grade 3), and one duodenal perforation (Grade 4). A trend toward increased duodenal volumes radiated was observed in those experiencing late effects (p = 0.13). Conclusion: SBRT with gemcitabine resulted in comparable survival to conventional chemoradiotherapy and good local control. However, the rate of duodenal ulcer development was significant.

  17. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy as Primary Treatment for Elderly Patients with Medically Inoperable Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vargo, John A.; Ferris, Robert L.; Clump, David A.; Heron, Dwight E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: With a growing elderly population, elderly patients with head and neck cancers represent an increasing challenge with limited prospective data to guide management. The complex interplay between advanced age, associated co-morbidities, and conventional local therapies, such as surgery and external beam radiotherapy ± chemotherapy, can significantly impact elderly patients’ quality of life (QoL). Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is a well-established curative strategy for medical-inoperable early-stage lung cancers even in elderly populations; however, there is limited data examining SBRT as primary therapy in head and neck cancer. Material/methods: Twelve patients with medically inoperable head and neck cancer treated with SBRT ± cetuximab from 2002 to 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. SBRT consisted of primarily 44 Gy in five fractions delivered on alternating days over 1–2 weeks. Concurrent cetuximab was administered at a dose of 400 mg/m2 on day −7 followed by 250 mg/m2 on day 0 and +7 in n = 3 (25%). Patient-reported quality of life (PRQoL) was prospectively recorded using the previously validated University of Washington quality of life revised (UW-QoL-R). Results: Median clinical follow-up was 6 months (range: 0.5–29 months). The 1-year actuarial local progression-free survival, distant progression-free survival, progression-free survival, and overall survival for definitively treated patients were 69, 100, 69, and 64%, respectively. One patient (8%) experienced acute grade 3 dysphagia and one patient (8%) experienced late grade 3 mucositis; there were no grade 4–5 toxicities. Prospective collection of PRQoL as assessed by UW-QoL-R was preserved across domains. Conclusion: Stereotactic body radiotherapy shows encouraging survival and relatively low toxicity in elderly patients with unresectable head and neck cancer, which may provide an aggressive potentially curative local therapy while maintaining QoL. PMID

  18. Influence of segment width on plan quality for volumetric modulated arc based stereotactic body radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Nithiyanantham, Karthikeyan; Kadirampatti Mani, Ganesh; Subramani, Vikraman; Karukkupalayam Palaniappan, Karrthick; Uthiran, Mohanraj; Vellengiri, Sennniandavar; Raju, Sambasivaselli; Supe, Sanjay S.; Kataria, Tejinder

    2014-01-01

    Aim To study the influence of segment width on plan quality for volumetric modulated arc based stereotactic body radiotherapy. Background The redundancy of modulation for regularly shaped small volume tumors results in creation of many small segments and an increase of monitor units, with a consequent prolongation of treatment and uncertainty in treatment delivery. Materials and methods Six cases each in lung, abdomen and liver were taken for the study. For each case, three VMAT SBRT plans were generated with different penalties on minimum segment width of 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 cm. A comparison was made on the metrics of dose volume histogram, dosimetric indices, monitor units (MUs) and delivery accuracy. Results The mean reduction of total MUs when compared with 0.5 cm plan was observed as 12.7 ± 6.0% and 17.5 ± 7.2% for 1.0 cm and 1.5 cm of minimum segment width, respectively. The p value showed a significant degradation in dosimetric indices for 1.5 cm plans when compared with 0.5 cm and 1.0 cm plans. The average deviation of measured dose with TPS calculated was 3.0 ± 1.1%, 2.1 ± 0.84% and 1.8 ± 0.9% for 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 cm, respectively. The calculated gamma index with pass criteria of 2% dose difference and 2 mm distance to agreement was 95.9 ± 2.8%, 96.5 ± 2.6% and 97.8 ± 1.6% as calculated for 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 cm of penalties, respectively. In view of the trade off between delivery efficiency and plan quality, 1 cm minimum segment width plans showed an improvement. Conclusions VMAT SBRT plans with increased optimal value of minimum segment width showed better plan quality and delivery efficiency for stereotactic body radiotherapy. PMID:25184052

  19. Influence of nuclear interactions in body tissues on tumor dose in carbon-ion radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Inaniwa, T. Kanematsu, N.; Tsuji, H.; Kamada, T.

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: In carbon-ion radiotherapy treatment planning, the planar integrated dose (PID) measured in water is applied to the patient dose calculation with density scaling using the stopping power ratio. Since body tissues are chemically different from water, this dose calculation can be subject to errors, particularly due to differences in inelastic nuclear interactions. In recent studies, the authors proposed and validated a PID correction method for these errors. In the present study, the authors used this correction method to assess the influence of these nuclear interactions in body tissues on tumor dose in various clinical cases. Methods: Using 10–20 cases each of prostate, head and neck (HN), bone and soft tissue (BS), lung, liver, pancreas, and uterine neoplasms, the authors first used treatment plans for carbon-ion radiotherapy without nuclear interaction correction to derive uncorrected dose distributions. The authors then compared these distributions with recalculated distributions using the nuclear interaction correction (corrected dose distributions). Results: Median (25%/75% quartiles) differences between the target mean uncorrected doses and corrected doses were 0.2% (0.1%/0.2%), 0.0% (0.0%/0.0%), −0.3% (−0.4%/−0.2%), −0.1% (−0.2%/−0.1%), −0.1% (−0.2%/0.0%), −0.4% (−0.5%/−0.1%), and −0.3% (−0.4%/0.0%) for the prostate, HN, BS, lung, liver, pancreas, and uterine cases, respectively. The largest difference of −1.6% in target mean and −2.5% at maximum were observed in a uterine case. Conclusions: For most clinical cases, dose calculation errors due to the water nonequivalence of the tissues in nuclear interactions would be marginal compared to intrinsic uncertainties in treatment planning, patient setup, beam delivery, and clinical response. In some extreme cases, however, these errors can be substantial. Accordingly, this correction method should be routinely applied to treatment planning in clinical practice.

  20. SU-E-T-501: Normal Tissue Toxicities of Pulsed Low Dose Rate Radiotherapy and Conventional Radiotherapy: An in Vivo Total Body Irradiation Study

    SciTech Connect

    Cvetkovic, D; Zhang, P; Wang, B; Chen, L; Ma, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Pulsed low dose rate radiotherapy (PLDR) is a re-irradiation technique for therapy of recurrent cancers. We have previously shown a significant difference in the weight and survival time between the mice treated with conventional radiotherapy (CRT) and PLDR using total body irradiation (TBI). The purpose of this study was to investigate the in vivo effects of PLDR on normal mouse tissues.Materials and Methods: Twenty two male BALB/c nude mice, 4 months of age, were randomly assigned into a PLDR group (n=10), a CRT group (n=10), and a non-irradiated control group (n=2). The Siemens Artiste accelerator with 6 MV photon beams was used. The mice received a total of 18Gy in 3 fractions with a 20day interval. The CRT group received the 6Gy dose continuously at a dose rate of 300 MU/min. The PLDR group was irradiated with 0.2Gyx20 pulses with a 3min interval between the pulses. The mice were weighed thrice weekly and sacrificed 2 weeks after the last treatment. Brain, heart, lung, liver, spleen, gastrointestinal, urinary and reproductive organs, and sternal bone marrow were removed, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded and stained with H and E. Morphological changes were observed under a microscope. Results: Histopathological examination revealed atrophy in several irradiated organs. The degree of atrophy was mild to moderate in the PLDR group, but severe in the CRT group. The most pronounced morphological abnormalities were in the immune and hematopoietic systems, namely spleen and bone marrow. Brain hemorrhage was seen in the CRT group, but not in the PLDR group. Conclusions: Our results showed that PLDR induced less toxicity in the normal mouse tissues than conventional radiotherapy for the same dose and regimen. Considering that PLDR produces equivalent tumor control as conventional radiotherapy, it would be a good modality for treatment of recurrent cancers.

  1. Ablative Radiotherapy Doses Lead to a Substantial Prolongation of Survival in Patients With Inoperable Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma: A Retrospective Dose Response Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Randa; Krishnan, Sunil; Bhosale, Priya R.; Javle, Milind M.; Aloia, Thomas A.; Shroff, Rachna T.; Kaseb, Ahmed O.; Bishop, Andrew J.; Swanick, Cameron W.; Koay, Eugene J.; Thames, Howard D.; Hong, Theodore S.; Das, Prajnan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Standard therapies for localized inoperable intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (IHCC) are ineffective. Advances in radiotherapy (RT) techniques and image guidance have enabled ablative doses to be delivered to large liver tumors. This study evaluated the effects of RT dose escalation in the treatment of IHCC. Patients and Methods Seventy-nine consecutive patients with inoperable IHCC were identified and treated with definitive RT from 2002 to 2014. At diagnosis, the median tumor size was 7.9 cm (range, 2.2 to 17 cm). Seventy patients (89%) received systemic chemotherapy before RT. RT doses were 35 to 100 Gy (median, 58.05 Gy) in three to 30 fractions for a median biologic equivalent dose (BED) of 80.5 Gy (range, 43.75 to 180 Gy). Results Median follow-up time for patients alive at time of analysis was 33 months (range, 11 to 93 months). Median overall survival (OS) time after diagnosis was 30 months; 3-year OS rate was 44%. Radiation dose was the single most important prognostic factor; higher doses correlated with an improved local control (LC) rate and OS. The 3-year OS rate for patients receiving BED greater than 80.5 Gy was 73% versus 38% for those receiving lower doses (P = .017); 3-year LC rate was significantly higher (78%) after a BED greater than 80.5 Gy than after lower doses (45%, P = .04). BED as a continuous variable significantly affected LC (P = .009) and OS (P = .004). There were no significant treatment-related toxicities. Conclusion Delivery of higher doses of RT improves LC and OS in inoperable IHCC. A BED greater than 80.5 Gy seems to be an ablative dose of RT for large IHCCs, with long-term survival rates that compare favorably with resection. PMID:26503201

  2. Feasibility and early clinical assessment of flattening filter free (FFF) based stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) treatments

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To test feasibility and safety of clinical usage of Flattening Filter Free (FFF) beams for delivering ablative stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) doses to various tumor sites, by means of Varian TrueBeam™ (Varian Medical Systems). Methods and Materials Seventy patients were treated with SBRT and FFF: 51 lesions were in the thorax (48 patients),10 in the liver, 9 in isolated abdominal lymph node, adrenal gland or pancreas. Doses ranged from 32 to 75 Gy, depending on the anatomical site and the volume of the lesion to irradiate. Lung lesions were treated with cumulative doses of 32 or 48 Gy, delivered in 4 consecutive fractions. The liver patients were treated in 3 fractions with total dose of 75 Gy. The isolated lymph nodes were irradiated in 6 fractions with doses of 45 Gy. The inclusion criteria were the presence of isolated node, or few lymph nodes in the same lymph node region, in absence of other active sites of cancer disease before the SBRT treatment. Results All 70 patients completed the treatment. The minimum follow-up was 3 months. Six cases of acute toxicities were recorded (2 Grade2 and 2 Grade3 in lung and 2 Grade2 in abdomen). No patient experienced acute toxicity greater than Grade3. No other types or grades of toxicities were observed at clinical evaluation visits. Conclusions This study showed that, with respect to acute toxicity, SBRT with FFF beams showed to be a feasible technique in 70 consecutive patients with various primary and metastatic lesions in the body. PMID:21910868

  3. Optimal number of beams for stereotactic body radiotherapy of lung and liver lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Ruiguo; Buatti, John M.; Howes, Terese L.; Dill, John; Modrick, Joseph M.; Meeks, Sanford L. . E-mail: sanford.meeks@orhs.org

    2006-11-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine the optimal number of coplanar and noncoplanar external beams in the setting of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Spherical targets were delineated within 2 separate extracranial sites, the lung and liver, with diameters varying from 2 cm to 7 cm to cover the range of volumes used in SBRT. Treatment plans were created for all target volumes using 5 to 15 geometrically optimized coplanar and noncoplanar conformal beams. Dose gradient and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) were evaluated for each set of beam configurations and for each target size. Results: For all lung and liver target volumes, the dose gradient improved with an increase in beam number from 5 to 15 for both coplanar and noncoplanar beam configurations. NTCP decreased as the beam number increased from 5 to 9 beams for all target sizes for both coplanar and noncoplanar beams. There is no significant improvement in NTCP when more than 9 beams were used for treatment planning regardless of target size. Conclusion: Based on dosimetric criteria, the optimal number of external beams is 13 to 15 for SBRT using either coplanar or noncoplanar beam bouquets. Simple biologic models indicate that the optimal number of beams is 9 for SBRT of lung and liver lesions >2 cm, whereas smaller lesions may benefit from plans using up to 13 beams.

  4. Clinical outcomes of stereotactic body radiotherapy for spinal metastases from hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eonju; Kim, Tae Gyu; Yu, Jeong Il; Lim, Do Hoon; Nam, Heerim; Lee, Hyebin; Lee, Joon Hyeok

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the outcomes of patients with spinal metastases from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), who were treated by stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Materials and Methods This retrospective study evaluated 23 patients who underwent SBRT from October 2008 to August 2012 for 36 spinal metastases from HCC. SBRT consisted of approximately 2 fractionation schedules, which were 18 to 40 Gy in 1 to 4 fractions for group A lesions (n = 15) and 50 Gy in 10 fractions for group B lesions (n = 21). Results The median follow-up period was 7 months (range, 2 to 16 months). Seven patients developed grade 1 or 2 gastrointestinal toxicity, and one developed grade 2 leucopenia. Compression fractures occurred in association with 25% of the lesions, with a median time to fracture of 2 months. Pain relief occurred in 92.3% and 68.4% of group A and B lesions, respectively. Radiologic response (complete and partial response) occurred in 80.0% and 61.9% of group A and B lesions, respectively. The estimated 1-year spinal-tumor progression-free survival rate was 78.5%. The median overall survival period and 1-year overall survival rate were 9 months (range, 2 to 16 months) and 25.7%, respectively. Conclusion SBRT for spinal metastases from HCC is well tolerated and effective at providing pain relief and radiologic response. Because compression fractures develop at a high rate following SBRT for spinal metastases from primary HCC, careful follow up of the patient is required. PMID:26484305

  5. Stereotactic body radiotherapy in operable patients with stage I NSCLC: where is the evidence?

    PubMed

    Guckenberger, Matthias

    2015-05-01

    This review summarizes the evidence of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) as an alternative to surgery (lobectomy and sublobar resection) for stage I NSCLC. Three randomized trials comparing SBRT and surgery were initiated but all three were stopped early due to poor accrual. As the next level of evidence, results from matched-pair analyses performed in single-institutional (n = 4), multi-institutional (n = 3) and population-based (n = 3) settings are available. There was close agreement between all studies that SBRT is at least equivalent to sublobar resection making it the preferred treatment for a high-risk population. SBRT was equivalent to lobectomy in the endpoints of loco-regional control and cancer-specific survival. Disease-free survival and overall survival were inferior after SBRT compared with lobectomy in one and two studies, respectively, and not significantly different in all other studies. Consequently, for patients without relevant comorbidities, who are accepting the risk of a surgical procedure, lobectomy remains the standard of care. PMID:25761997

  6. Impact of Body Mass Index on Outcomes After Conformal Radiotherapy in Patients With Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Geinitz, Hans; Thamm, Reinhard; Mueller, Tobias; Jess, Kerstin; Zimmermann, Frank B.; Molls, Michael; Nieder, Carsten

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: Several retrospective analyses have suggested that obese men with prostate cancer treated with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) have outcomes inferior to those of normal-weight men. However, a recently presented analysis for the first time challenged this association between body mass index (BMI) and treatment failure. It is therefore important to provide further data on this issue. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective analysis of 564 men treated with risk-adapted conformal EBRT at a single institution. Low-risk patients received EBRT alone, and the other patients received EBRT plus endocrine treatment. In addition, high-risk patients were treated to higher EBRT doses (74 Gy). A rectal balloon catheter for internal immobilization, which can be identified on portal images, was used in 261 patients (46%). Thus, localization did not rely on bony landmarks alone in these cases. Results: The median BMI was 26, and 15% of patients had BMI {>=}30. Neither univariate nor multivariate analyses detected any significant impact of BMI on biochemical relapse, prostate cancer-specific survival, or overall survival. The 5-year biochemical relapse rate was 21% and prostate cancerspecific survival 96%. Conclusions: The present analysis of a large cohort of consecutively treated patients suggests that efforts to reduce prostate movement and geographic miss might result in comparable outcomes in obese and normal-weight patients.

  7. Target Coverage in Image-Guided Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy of Liver Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Wunderink, Wouter . E-mail: w.wunderink@erasmusmc.nl; Romero, Alejandra Mendez; Osorio, Eliana M. Vasquez; Boer, Hans C.J. de; Brandwijk, Rene P.; Levendag, Peter C.; Heijmen, Ben

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: To determine the effect of image-guided procedures (with computed tomography [CT] and electronic portal images before each treatment fraction) on target coverage in stereotactic body radiotherapy for liver patients using a stereotactic body frame (SBF) and abdominal compression. CT guidance was used to correct for day-to-day variations in the tumor's mean position in the SBF. Methods and Materials: By retrospectively evaluating 57 treatment sessions, tumor coverage, as obtained with the clinically applied CT-guided protocol, was compared with that of alternative procedures. The internal target volume-plus (ITV{sup +}) was introduced to explicitly include uncertainties in tumor delineations resulting from CT-imaging artifacts caused by residual respiratory motion. Tumor coverage was defined as the volume overlap of the ITV{sup +}, derived from a tumor delineated in a treatment CT scan, and the planning target volume. Patient stability in the SBF, after acquisition of the treatment CT scan, was evaluated by measuring the displacement of the bony anatomy in the electronic portal images relative to CT. Results: Application of our clinical protocol (with setup corrections following from manual measurements of the distances between the contours of the planning target volume and the daily clinical target volume in three orthogonal planes, multiple two-dimensional) increased the frequency of nearly full ({>=}99%) ITV{sup +} coverage to 77% compared with 63% without setup correction. An automated three-dimensional method further improved the frequency to 96%. Patient displacements in the SBF were generally small ({<=}2 mm, 1 standard deviation), but large craniocaudal displacements (maximal 7.2 mm) were occasionally observed. Conclusion: Daily, CT-assisted patient setup may substantially improve tumor coverage, especially with the automated three-dimensional procedure. In the present treatment design, patient stability in the SBF should be verified with portal

  8. MDM2 Inhibition Sensitizes Prostate Cancer Cells to Androgen Ablation and Radiotherapy in a p53-Dependent Manner12

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Felix Y.; Zhang, Yu; Kothari, Vishal; Evans, Joseph R.; Jackson, William C.; Chen, Wei; Johnson, Skyler B.; Luczak, Connor; Wang, Shaomeng; Hamstra, Daniel A.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Increased murine double minute 2 (MDM2) expression, independent of p53 status, is associated with increased cancer-specific mortality for men with prostate cancer treated with radiotherapy. We assessed MI-219, a small molecule inhibitor of MDM2 with improved pharmacokinetics over nutlin-3, for sensitization of prostate cancer cells to radiotherapy and androgen deprivation therapy, a standard treatment option for men with high-risk prostate cancer. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: The effect of MDM2 inhibition by MI-219 was assessed in vitro and in vivo with mouse xenograft models across multiple prostate cancer cell lines containing varying p53 functional status. RESULTS: MDM2 inhibition by MI-219 resulted in dose- and time-dependent p53 activation and decreased clonogenic cell survival after radiation in a p53-dependent manner. Mechanistically, radiosensitization following inhibition of MDM2 was largely the result of p53-dependent increases in apoptosis and DNA damage as evidenced by Annexin V flow cytometry and γ-H2AX foci immunofluorescence. Similarly, treatment with MI-219 enhanced response to antiandrogen therapy via a p53-dependent increase in apoptotic cell death. Lastly, triple therapy with radiation, androgen deprivation therapy, and MI-219 decreased xenograft tumor growth compared with any single- or double-agent treatment. CONCLUSION: MDM2 inhibition with MI-219 results in p53-dependent sensitization of prostate cancer cells to radiation, antiandrogen therapy, and the combination. These findings support MDM2 small molecule inhibitor therapy as a therapy intensification strategy to improve clinical outcomes in high-risk localized prostate cancer. TRANSLATIONAL RELEVANCE: The combination of radiotherapy and androgen deprivation therapy is a standard treatment option for men with high-risk prostate cancer. Despite improvements in outcomes when androgen deprivation therapy is added to radiation, men with high-risk prostate cancer have significant risk for

  9. Technical advances in external radiotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Park, Shin-Hyung; Kim, Jae-Chul; Kang, Min Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy techniques have substantially improved in the last two decades. After the introduction of 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, radiotherapy has been increasingly used for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Currently, more advanced techniques, including intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR), and charged particle therapy, are used for the treatment of HCC. IMRT can escalate the tumor dose while sparing the normal tissue even though the tumor is large or located near critical organs. SABR can deliver a very high radiation dose to small HCCs in a few fractions, leading to high local control rates of 84%-100%. Various advanced imaging modalities are used for radiotherapy planning and delivery to improve the precision of radiotherapy. These advanced techniques enable the delivery of high dose radiotherapy for early to advanced HCCs without increasing the radiation-induced toxicities. However, as there have been no effective tools for the prediction of the response to radiotherapy or recurrences within or outside the radiation field, future studies should focus on selecting the patients who will benefit from radiotherapy. PMID:27621577

  10. Technical advances in external radiotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Park, Shin-Hyung; Kim, Jae-Chul; Kang, Min Kyu

    2016-08-28

    Radiotherapy techniques have substantially improved in the last two decades. After the introduction of 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, radiotherapy has been increasingly used for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Currently, more advanced techniques, including intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR), and charged particle therapy, are used for the treatment of HCC. IMRT can escalate the tumor dose while sparing the normal tissue even though the tumor is large or located near critical organs. SABR can deliver a very high radiation dose to small HCCs in a few fractions, leading to high local control rates of 84%-100%. Various advanced imaging modalities are used for radiotherapy planning and delivery to improve the precision of radiotherapy. These advanced techniques enable the delivery of high dose radiotherapy for early to advanced HCCs without increasing the radiation-induced toxicities. However, as there have been no effective tools for the prediction of the response to radiotherapy or recurrences within or outside the radiation field, future studies should focus on selecting the patients who will benefit from radiotherapy. PMID:27621577

  11. Early Development of Mushroom Bodies in the Brain of the Honeybee Apis mellifera as Revealed by BrdU Incorporation and Ablation Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Malun, Dagmar

    1998-01-01

    In the honeybee the mushroom bodies are prominent neuropil structures arranged as pairs in the dorsal protocerebrum of the brain. Each mushroom body is composed of a medial and a lateral subunit. To understand their development, the proliferation pattern of mushroom body intrinsic cells, the Kenyon cells, were examined during larval and pupal stages using the bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) technique and chemical ablation with hydroxyurea. By larval stage 1, ∼40 neuroblasts are located in the periphery of the protocerebrum. Many of these stem cells divide asymmetrically to produce a chain of ganglion mother cells. Kenyon cell precursors underly a different proliferation pattern. With the beginning of larval stage 3, they are arranged in two large distinct cell clusters in each side of the brain. BrdU incorporation into newly synthesized DNA and its immunohistochemical detection show high mitotic activity in these cell clusters that lasts until mid-pupal stages. The uniform diameter of cells, the homogeneous distribution of BrdU-labeled nuclei, and the presence of equally dividing cells in these clusters indicate symmetrical cell divisions of Kenyon cell precursors. Hydroxyurea applied to stage 1 larvae caused the selective ablation of mushroom bodies. Within these animals a variety of defects were observed. In the majority of brains exhibiting mushroom body defects, either one mushroom body subunit on one or on both sides, or three or four subunits (e.g., complete mushroom body ablation) were missing. In contrast, partial ablation of mushroom body subunits resulting in small Kenyon cell clusters and peduncles was observed very rarely. These findings indicate that hydroxyurea applied during larval stage 1 selectively deletes Kenyon stem cells. The results also show that each mushroom body subunit originates from a very small number of stem cells and develops independently of its neighboring subunit. PMID:10454374

  12. Characteristics of Coupled Nongray Radiating Gas Flows with Ablation Product Effects About Blunt Bodies During Planetary Entries. Ph.D. Thesis - North Carolina State Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, K.

    1973-01-01

    A computational method was developed for the fully-coupled solution of nongray, radiating gas flows with ablation product effects about blunt bodies during planetary entries. The treatment of radiation accounts for molecular band, continuum, and atomic line transitions with a detailed frequency dependence of the absorption coefficient. The ablation of the entry body was solved as part of the solution for a steady-state ablation process. The method was applied by results at typical conditions during entry to Venus. The radiative heating rates along the downstream region of the body can exceed the stagnation point value. The radiative heating to the body is attenuated in the boundary layer at the downstream region of the body and at the stagnation point of the body. A study of the radiation, inviscid flow about spherically capped, conical bodies during planetary entries shows that the nondimensional, radiative heating distributions are nonsimilar with entry conditions. Caution should be exercised in attempting to extrapolate results from known distributions to other entry conditions for which solutions have not yet been obtained.

  13. Stereotactic body radiotherapy combined with transarterial chemoembolization for hepatocellular carcinoma with portal vein tumor thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    KANG, JINGBO; NIE, QING; DU, RUI; ZHANG, LIPING; ZHANG, JUN; LI, QILIANG; LI, JIANGUO; QI, WENJIE

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical efficacy, toxicity and adverse effects of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) combined with transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT). A total of 101 patients diagnosed with primary HCC with PVTT were enrolled in this study and were randomly divided into three groups as follows: group A, 34 patients treated with γ-SBRT followed by TACE; group B, 37 patients treated with TACE followed by γ-SBRT; and group C, 30 patients treated with γ-SBRT alone. The effective response rate for the entire patient sample was 87.1% (88/101) following a 3-month treatment. The differences in the response rate, survival rate, α-fetoprotein level restoration rate and rate of improvement of abdominal distention and discomfort between groups A and B were not statistically significant (P>0.05). However, the rates of groups A and B were higher compared to those of group C (P<0.05). The exacerbation rate of liver function in group A was lower compared to that in group B (P<0.05), although it exhibited no statistically significant difference from that in group C (P>0.05). No severe radiation-related complications were reported during the follow-up period. The combination of γ-SBRT and TACE was shown to be a relatively effective local treatment for primary HCC patients with PVTT. Compared to γ-SBRT followed by TACE and γ-SBRT alone, TACE followed by γ-SBRT may exert a negative effect on liver function. These results suggested that the combination of TACE and γ-SBRT may be considered a relatively effective, safe and feasible treatment method for primary HCC patients with PVTT, although TACE followed by γ-SBRT may negatively affect liver function. PMID:24649306

  14. Influence of Rotations on Dose Distributions in Spinal Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT)

    PubMed Central

    Gutfeld, Orit; Kretzler, Annette E; Kashani, Rojano; Tatro, Daniel; Balter, James M

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the impact of rotational setup errors on dose distribution in spinal stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials 39 Cone Beam CT (CBCT) scans from 16 SBRT treatment courses were analyzed. Alignment (including rotation) to the treatment planning CT was performed, followed by translational alignment that reproduced the actual positioning. The planned fluence was then applied to determine the delivered dose to the targets and organs at risk. Results The mean PTV volume was 71.01 mL (SD ± 60.05, range 22.62 – 250.65 mL). Prescribed dose (to the 62 – 82% isodose) was 14 – 30 Gy in one to six fractions. The average rotational displacements were 0.38 ± 1.21, 1.12 ± 1.82 and −0.51 ± 2.0 degrees with maximal rotations of −4.29, 5.76 and −6.64 degrees along the x (pitch), y (yaw), and z (roll) axes, respectively. PTV coverage changed by an average of −0.07 Gy (SD ± 0.20 Gy) between the rotated and the original plan, representing 0.92% of prescription dose (SD ± 2.65%). For the spinal cord, planned with 2 mm expansion to create a planning organ at risk volume (PRV), the difference in minimum dose to the upper 10% of the PRV volume was 0.03 ± 0.3 Gy (maximum 0.9 Gy). Other organs at risk saw insignificant changes in dose. Conclusions PRV expansion generally assures safe treatment delivery in the face of typically encountered rotations. Given the variability of delivered dose within this expansion for certain cases, caution should be taken to properly interpret doses to the cord when considering clinical dose limits. PMID:19306757

  15. Induction Gemcitabine and Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Nonmetastatic Pancreas Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mahadevan, Anand; Miksad, Rebecca; Goldstein, Michael; Sullivan, Ryan; Bullock, Andrea; Buchbinder, Elizabeth; Pleskow, Douglas; Sawhney, Mandeep; Kent, Tara; Vollmer, Charles; Callery, Mark

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has been used successfully to treat patients with locally advanced pancreas cancer. However, many patients develop metastatic disease soon after diagnosis and may receive little benefit from such therapy. We therefore retrospectively analyzed a planned strategy of initial chemotherapy with restaging and then treatment for those patients with no evidence of metastatic progression with SBRT. Methods and Materials: Forty-seven patients received gemcitabine (1,000 mg/m{sup 2} per week for 3 weeks then 1 week off) until tolerance, at least six cycles, or progression. Patients without metastases after two cycles were treated with SBRT (tolerance-based dose of 24-36 Gy in 3 fractions) between the third and fourth cycles without interrupting the chemotherapy cycles. Results: Eight of the 47 patients (17%) were found to have metastatic disease after two cycles of gemcitabine; the remaining 39 patients received SBRT. The median follow-up for survivors was 21 months (range, 6-36 months). The median overall survival for all patients who received SBRT was 20 months, and the median progression-free survival was 15 months. The local control rate was 85% (33 of 39 patients); and 54% of patients (21 of 39) developed metastases. Late Grade III toxicities such as GI bleeding and obstruction were observed in 9% (3/39) of patients. Conclusion: For patients with locally advanced pancreas cancer, this strategy uses local therapy for those who are most likely to benefit from it and spares those patients with early metastatic progression from treatment. SBRT delivers such local therapy safely with minimal interruption to systemic chemotherapy, thereby potentially improving the outcome in these patients.

  16. Chest Wall Toxicity After Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Malignant Lesions of the Lung and Liver

    SciTech Connect

    Andolino, David L.; Forquer, Jeffrey A.; Henderson, Mark A.; Barriger, Robert B.; Shapiro, Ronald H.; Brabham, Jeffrey G.; Johnstone, Peter A.S.; Cardenes, Higinia R.; Fakiris, Achilles J.

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: To quantify the frequency of rib fracture and chest wall (CW) pain and identify the dose-volume parameters that predict CW toxicity after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: The records of patients treated with SBRT between 2000 and 2008 were reviewed, and toxicity was scored according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0 for pain and rib fracture. Dosimetric data for CW and rib were analyzed and related to the frequency of toxicity. The risks of CW toxicity were then further characterized according to the median effective concentration (EC{sub 50}) dose-response model. Results: A total of 347 lesions were treated with a median follow-up of 19 months. Frequency of Grade I and higher CW pain and/or fracture for CW vs. non-CW lesions was 21% vs. 4%, respectively (p < 0.0001). A dose of 50 Gy was the cutoff for maximum dose (Dmax) to CW and rib above which there was a significant increase in the frequency of any grade pain and fracture (p = 0.03 and p = 0.025, respectively). Volume of CW receiving 15 Gy - 40 Gy was highly predictive of toxicity (R{sup 2} > 0.9). According to the EC{sub 50} model, 5 cc and 15 cc of CW receiving 40 Gy predict a 10% and 30% risk of CW toxicity, respectively. Conclusion: Adequate tumor coverage remains the primary objective when treating lung or liver lesions with SBRT. To minimize toxicity when treating lesions in close proximity to the CW, Dmax of the CW and/or ribs should remain <50 Gy, and <5 cc of CW should receive {>=}40 Gy.

  17. Progression of Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer During the Interval Before Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Murai, Taro; Shibamoto, Yuta; Baba, Fumiya; Hashizume, Chisa; Mori, Yoshimasa; Ayakawa, Shiho; Kawai, Tatsuya; Takemoto, Shinya; Sugie, Chikao; Ogino, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the relationship between waiting time (WT) and disease progression in patients undergoing stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung adenocarcinoma (AD) or squamous cell carcinoma (SQ). Methods and Materials: 201 patients with Stage I AD or SQ undergoing SBRT between January 2004 and June 2010 were analyzed. The WT was defined as the interval between diagnostic computed tomography before referral and computed tomography for treatment planning or positioning before SBRT. Tumor size was measured on the slice of the longest tumor diameter, and tumor volume was calculated from the longest diameter and the diameter perpendicular to it. Changes in tumor volume and TNM stage progression were evaluated, and volume doubling time (VDT) was estimated. Results: The median WT was 42 days (range, 5-323 days). There was a correlation between WT and rate of increase in volume in both AD and SQ. The median VDTs of AD and SQ were 170 and 93 days, respectively. Thirty-six tumors (23%) did not show volume increase during WTs >25 days. In 41 patients waiting for {<=}4 weeks, no patient showed T stage progression, whereas in 25 of 120 (21%) patients waiting for >4 weeks, T stage progressed from T1 to T2 (p = 0.001). In 10 of 110 (9.1%) T1 ADs and 15 of 51 (29%) T1 SQs, T stage progressed (p = 0.002). N stage and M stage progressions were not observed. Conclusion: Generally, a WT of {<=}4 weeks seems to be acceptable. The WT seems to be more important in SQ than in AD.

  18. Predictor of Severe Gastroduodenal Toxicity After Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Abdominopelvic Malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Sun Hyun; Kim, Mi-Sook; Cho, Chul Koo; Kang, Jin-Kyu; Lee, Sang Yeob; Lee, Kyung-Nam; Lee, Dong Han; Han, Chul Ju; Yang, Ki Young; Kim, Sang Bum

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To identify the predictors for the development of severe gastroduodenal toxicity (GDT) in patients treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) using 3 fractionations for abdominopelvic malignancies. Methods and Materials: From 2001 to 2011, 202 patients with abdominopelvic malignancies were treated with curative-intent SBRT. Among these patients, we retrospectively reviewed the clinical records of 40 patients with the eligibility criteria as follows: 3 fractionations, follow-up period {>=}1 year, absence of previous radiation therapy (RT) history or combination of external-beam RT and the presence of gastroduodenum (GD) that received a dose higher than 20% of prescribed dose. The median SBRT dose was 45 Gy (range, 33-60 Gy) with 3 fractions. We analyzed the clinical and dosimetric parameters, including multiple dose-volume histogram endpoints: V{sub 20} (volume of GD that received 20 Gy), V{sub 25}, V{sub 30}, V{sub 35}, and D{sub max} (the maximum point dose). The grade of GDT was defined by the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria version 4.0, and GDT {>=}grade 3 was defined as severe GDT. Results: The median time to the development of severe GDT was 6 months (range, 3-12 months). Severe GDT was found in 6 patients (15%). D{sub max} was the best dosimetric predictor for severe GDT. D{sub max} of 35 Gy and 38 Gy were respectively associated with a 5% and 10% probability of the development of severe GDT. A history of ulcer before SBRT was the best clinical predictor on univariate analysis (P=.0001). Conclusions: We suggest that D{sub max} is a valuable predictor of severe GDT after SBRT using 3 fractionations for abdominopelvic malignancies. A history of ulcer before SBRT should be carefully considered as a clinical predictor, especially in patients who receive a high dose to GD.

  19. Feasibility Study for Markerless Tracking of Lung Tumors in Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, Anne; Wilbert, Juergen; Baier, Kurt; Flentje, Michael; Guckenberger, Matthias

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and accuracy of a method for markerless tracking of lung tumors in electronic portal imaging device (EPID) movies and to analyze intra- and interfractional variations in tumor motion. Methods and Materials: EPID movies were acquired during stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) given to 40 patients with 49 pulmonary targets and retrospectively analyzed. Tumor visibility and tracking accuracy were determined by three observers. Tumor motion of 30 targets was analyzed in detail via four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) and EPID in the superior-inferior direction for intra- and interfractional variations. Results: Tumor visibility was sufficient for markerless tracking in 47% of the EPID movies. Tumor size and visibility in the DRR were correlated with visibility in the EPID images. The difference between automatic and manual tracking was a maximum of 2 mm for 98.3% in the x direction and 89.4% in the y direction. Motion amplitudes in 4DCT images (range, 0.7-17.9 mm; median, 4.9 mm) were closely correlated with amplitudes in the EPID movies. Intrafractional and interfractional variability of tumor motion amplitude were of similar magnitude: 1 mm on average to a maximum of 4 mm. A change in moving average of more than {+-}1 mm, {+-}2 mm, and {+-}4 mm were observed in 47.1%, 17.1%, and 4.5% of treatment time for all trajectories, respectively. Mean tumor velocity was 3.4 mm/sec, to a maximum 61 mm/sec. Conclusions: Tracking of pulmonary tumors in EPID images without implanted markers was feasible in 47% of all treatment beams. 4DCT is representative of the evaluation of mean breathing motion on average, but larger deviations occurred in target motion between treatment planning and delivery effort a monitoring during delivery.

  20. Radiation-induced organizing pneumonia after stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung tumor

    PubMed Central

    Ochiai, Satoru; Nomoto, Yoshihito; Yamashita, Yasufumi; Murashima, Shuuichi; Hasegawa, Daisuke; Kurobe, Yusuke; Toyomasu, Yutaka; Kawamura, Tomoko; Takada, Akinori; II, Noriko

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate characteristics of organizing pneumonia (OP) after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung tumor. Between September 2010 and June 2014, patients who were diagnosed as Stage I lung cancer and treated with SBRT at our institution were included in this study. A total of 78 patients (47 males with a median age of 80 years) were analyzed. The median follow-up period was 23 months. Five patients (6.4%) developed OP at 6–18 months after SBRT. The cumulative incidence of OP was 4.3% (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1–11.0) and 8.2% (95% CI, 2.9–17.0) at 1 and 2 years, respectively. Tumor location (superior and middle lobe vs inferior lobe) was shown to be a borderline significant factor for the occurrence of OP (P = 0.069). In the subgroup analysis of patients with a radiographic follow-up period at least 6 months, or who died within 6 months after SBRT, 7 of 72 patients (9.7%) developed Grade 2 or 3 radiation pneumonitis (G2/3 RP) at 2–4 months after SBRT. A statistically significant association between G2/3 RP in the subacute phase and OP was shown (P = 0.040). In two of the five patients who developed OP, the symptoms and radiographic change were improved rapidly by corticosteroid administration. One patient had relapsed OP after suspending the treatment and re-administration was required. Three patients with minor symptoms were managed without corticosteroid administration and OP resolved without any relapse. The radiation-induced OP should be considered as one of the late lung injuries after SBRT for lung tumors. PMID:26338993

  1. Teflon cylindrical phantom for delivery quality assurance of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT).

    PubMed

    Lack, Danielle W; Kakakhel, Ali; Starin, Ross; Snyder, Michael

    2014-01-01

    At our institution the standard delivery quality assurance (DQA) procedure for tomotherapy plans is accomplished with a water equivalent phantom, EDR2 film, and ion chamber point-dose measurements. Most plans deliver at most 5 Gy to the dose plane; however, recently a stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) protocol has produced plans delivering upwards of 12 Gy to the film plane. EDR2 film saturates at a dose of ~ 7 Gy, requiring a modification of our DQA procedure for SBRT plans. To reduce the dose to the film plane and accommodate a possible move to SBRT using Varian RapidArc, a Teflon phantom has been constructed and tested. Our Teflon phantom is cylindrical in shape and of a similar design to the standard phantom. The phantom was MVCT scanned on the TomoTherapy system with images imported into the TomoTherapy and Varian Eclipse planning systems. Phantom images were smoothed to reduce artifacts for treatment planning purposes. Verification SBRT plans were delivered with film and point-dose benchmarked against the standard procedure. Verification tolerance criteria were 3% dose difference for chamber measurements and a gamma pass rate > 90% for film (criteria: 3 mm DTA, 3% dose difference, 10% threshold). The phantom sufficiently reduced dose to the film plane for DQA of SBRT plans. Both planning systems calculated accurate point doses in phantom, with the largest differences being 2.4% and 4.4% for TomoTherapy and Rapid Arc plans. Measured dose distributions correlated well with planning system calculations (γ < 1 for > 95%). These results were comparable to the standard phantom. The Teflon phantom appears to be a potential option for SBRT DQA. Preliminary data show that the planning systems are capable of calculating point doses in the Teflon, and the dose to the film plane is reduced sufficiently to allow for a direct measured DQA without the need for dose rescaling. PMID:24423855

  2. Prognostic Factors in Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuo, Yukinori; Shibuya, Keiko; Nagata, Yasushi; Takayama, Kenji; Norihisa, Yoshiki; Mizowaki, Takashi; Narabayashi, Masaru; Sakanaka, Katsuyuki; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the factors that influence clinical outcomes after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: A total of 101 consecutive patients who underwent SBRT with 48 Gy in 4 fractions for histologically confirmed Stage I NSCLC were enrolled in this study. Factors including age, maximal tumor diameter, sex, performance status, operability, histology, and overall treatment time were evaluated with regard to local progression (LP), disease progression (DP), and overall survival (OS) using the Cox proportional hazards model. Prognostic models were built with recursive partitioning analysis. Results: Three-year OS was 58.6% with a median follow-up of 31.4 months. Cumulative incidence rates of LP and DP were 13.2% and 40.8% at 3 years, respectively. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that tumor diameter was a significant factor in all endpoints of LP, DP, and OS. Other significant factors were age in DP and sex in OS. Recursive partitioning analysis indicated a condition for good prognosis (Class I) as follows: female or T1a (tumor diameter {<=}20 mm). When the remaining male patients with T1b-2a (>20 mm) were defined as Class II, 3-year LP, DP, and OS were 6.8%, 23.6%, and 69.9% in recursive partitioning analysis Class I, respectively, whereas these values were 19.9%, 58.3%, and 47.1% in Class II. The differences between the classes were statistically significant. Conclusions: Tumor diameter and sex were the most significant factors in SBRT for NSCLC. T1a or female patients had good prognosis.

  3. Microscopic and Macroscopic Tumor and Parenchymal Effects of Liver Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, C.C.; Welsh, J.; Kavanagh, B.D.; Franklin, W.; McCarter, M.; Cardenes, H.R.; Gaspar, L.E.; Schefter, T.E.

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: To describe the histologic and volumetric changes in normal liver tissue after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for liver metastases. Methods and Materials: Pre- and post-SBRT imaging studies were analyzed to evaluate the effect of SBRT on normal liver volume (NLV) in 15 patients treated in a prospective clinical trial. Two other patients underwent exploratory surgery after SBRT and histologic analyses of the irradiated liver were performed to characterize the pathologic effects of SBRT. Results: In the 15 patients studied quantitatively, the total NLV had decreased transiently at 2-3 months after SBRT and then began to regenerate at 3-8 months after SBRT. The median NLV reduction at the maximal observed effect was 315 cm{sup 3} (range, 125-600) or 19% (range, 13-33%). Among the several dosimetric parameters evaluated, the strongest linear correlation was noted for the NLV percentage receiving 30 Gy as a predictor of maximal NLV reduction (r{sup 2} = 0.72). The histologic changes observed 2 and 8 months after SBRT demonstrated distinct zones of tissue injury consistent with localized veno-occlusive disease. Conclusion: The well-demarcated focal parenchymal changes after liver SBRT (demonstrated both radiographically and histologically) within the high-dose zone are consistent with a threshold dose-induced set of phenomena. In contrast, the more global effect of NLV reduction, which is roughly proportional to whole organ dose parameters, resembles more closely an effect determined from radiobiologically parallel architecture. These observations suggest that modeling of normal tissue effects after liver SBRT might require different governing equations for different classes of effects.

  4. Is internal target volume accurate for dose evaluation in lung cancer stereotactic body radiotherapy?

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Jiayuan; Zhang, Zhen; Wang, Jiazhou; Xie, Jiang; Hu, Weigang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose 4DCT delineated internal target volume (ITV) was applied to determine the tumor motion and used as planning target in treatment planning in lung cancer stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). This work is to study the accuracy of using ITV to predict the real target dose in lung cancer SBRT. Materials and methods Both for phantom and patient cases, the ITV and gross tumor volumes (GTVs) were contoured on the maximum intensity projection (MIP) CT and ten CT phases, respectively. A SBRT plan was designed using ITV as the planning target on average projection (AVG) CT. This plan was copied to each CT phase and the dose distribution was recalculated. The GTV_4D dose was acquired through accumulating the GTV doses over all ten phases and regarded as the real target dose. To analyze the ITV dose error, the ITV dose was compared to the real target dose by endpoints of D99, D95, D1 (doses received by the 99%, 95% and 1% of the target volume), and dose coverage endpoint of V100(relative volume receiving at least the prescription dose). Results The phantom study shows that the ITV underestimates the real target dose by 9.47%∼19.8% in D99, 4.43%∼15.99% in D95, and underestimates the dose coverage by 5% in V100. The patient cases show that the ITV underestimates the real target dose and dose coverage by 3.8%∼10.7% in D99, 4.7%∼7.2% in D95, and 3.96%∼6.59% in V100 in motion target cases. Conclusions Cautions should be taken that ITV is not accurate enough to predict the real target dose in lung cancer SBRT with large tumor motions. Restricting the target motion or reducing the target dose heterogeneity could reduce the ITV dose underestimation effect in lung SBRT. PMID:26968812

  5. Prognostic value of pretreatment circulating neutrophils, monocytes, and lymphocytes on outcomes in lung stereotactic body radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Giuliani, M.; Sampson, L.R.; Wong, O.; Gay, J.; Le, L.W.; Cho, B.C.J.; Brade, A.; Sun, A.; Bezjak, A.; Hope, A.J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In the present study, we determined the association of pretreatment circulating neutrophils, monocytes, and lymphocytes with clinical outcomes after lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (sbrt). Methods All patients with primary lung cancer and with a complete blood count within 3 months of lung sbrt from 2005 to 2012 were included. Overall survival (os) was calculated using the Kaplan–Meier method. Factors associated with os were investigated using univariable and multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression. Fine–Gray competing risk regression was performed to test the association of the neutrophil:lymphocyte (nlr) and monocyte:lymphocyte (mlr) ratios with two types of failure: disease-related failure and death, and death unrelated to disease. Results Of the 299 sbrt patients identified, 122 were eligible for analysis. The median and range of the nlr and mlr were 3.0 (0.3–22.0) and 0.4 (0.1–1.9) respectively. On multivariable analysis, sex (p = 0.02), T stage (p = 0.04), and nlr (p < 0.01) were associated with os. On multivariable analysis, T stage (p < 0.01) and mlr (p < 0.01) were associated with disease-related failure; mlr (p = 0.03), nlr (p < 0.01), and sbrt dose of 48 Gy in 4 fractions (p = 0.03) and 54 Gy or 60 Gy in 3 fractions (p = 0.02) were associated with disease-unrelated death. Median survival was 4.3 years in the nlr≤3 group (95% confidence interval: 3.5 to not reached) and 2.5 years in the nlr>3 group (95% confidence interval: 1.7 to 4.8; p < 0.01). Conclusions In lung sbrt patients, nlr and mlr are independently associated with os and disease-unrelated death. If validated, nlr and mlr could help to identify patients who would benefit most from sbrt. PMID:27536185

  6. Surgical resection of epidural disease improves local control following postoperative spine stereotactic body radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Al-Omair, Ameen; Masucci, Laura; Masson-Cote, Laurence; Campbell, Mikki; Atenafu, Eshetu G.; Parent, Amy; Letourneau, Daniel; Yu, Eugene; Rampersaud, Raja; Massicotte, Eric; Lewis, Stephen; Yee, Albert; Thibault, Isabelle; Fehlings, Michael G.; Sahgal, Arjun

    2013-01-01

    Background Spine stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is increasingly being applied to the postoperative spine metastases patient. Our aim was to identify clinical and dosimetric predictors of local control (LC) and survival. Methods Eighty patients treated between October 2008 and February 2012 with postoperative SBRT were identified from our prospective database and retrospectively reviewed. Results The median follow-up was 8.3 months. Thirty-five patients (44%) were treated with 18–26 Gy in 1 or 2 fractions, and 45 patients (56%) with 18–40 Gy in 3–5 fractions. Twenty-one local failures (26%) were observed, and the 1-year LC and overall survival (OS) rates were 84% and 64%, respectively. The most common site of failure was within the epidural space (15/21, 71%). Multivariate proportional hazards analysis identified systemic therapy post-SBRT as the only significant predictor of OS (P = .02) and treatment with 18–26 Gy/1 or 2 fractions (P = .02) and a postoperative epidural disease grade of 0 or 1 (0, no epidural disease; 1, epidural disease that compresses dura only, P = .003) as significant predictors of LC. Subset analysis for only those patients (n = 48/80) with high-grade preoperative epidural disease (cord deformed) indicated significantly greater LC rates when surgically downgraded to 0/1 vs 2 (P = .0009). Conclusions Postoperative SBRT with high total doses ranging from 18 to 26 Gy delivered in 1–2 fractions predicted superior LC, as did postoperative epidural grade. PMID:24057886

  7. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer: Interim Results of a Prospective Phase II Clinical Trial

    SciTech Connect

    King, Christopher R. Brooks, James D.; Gill, Harcharan; Pawlicki, Todd; Cotrutz, Cristian; Presti, Joseph C.

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: The radiobiology of prostate cancer favors a hypofractionated dose regimen. We report results of a prospective Phase II clinical trial of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty-one low-risk prostate cancer patients with 6 months' minimum follow-up received 36.25 Gy in five fractions of 7.25 Gy with image-guided SBRT alone using the CyberKnife. The early (<3 months) and late (>6 months) urinary and rectal toxicities were assessed using validated quality of life questionnaires (International Prostate Symptom Score, Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite) and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) toxicity criteria. Patterns of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) response are analyzed. Results: The median follow-up was 33 months. There were no RTOG Grade 4 acute or late rectal/urinary complications. There were 2 patients with RTOG Grade 3 late urinary toxicity and none with RTOG Grade 3 rectal complications. A reduced rate of severe rectal toxicities was observed with every-other-day vs. 5 consecutive days treatment regimen (0% vs. 38%, p = 0.0035). A benign PSA bounce (median, 0.4 ng/mL) was observed in 12 patients (29%) occurring at 18 months (median) after treatment. At last follow-up, no patient has had a PSA failure regardless of biochemical failure definition. Of 32 patients with 12 months minimum follow-up, 25 patients (78%) achieved a PSA nadir {<=}0.4 ng/mL. A PSA decline to progressively lower nadirs up to 3 years after treatment was observed. Conclusions: The early and late toxicity profile and PSA response for prostate SBRT are highly encouraging. Continued accrual and follow-up will be necessary to confirm durable biochemical control rates and low toxicity profiles.

  8. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung metastases as oligo-recurrence: a single institutional study

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, Masahiko; Hatayama, Yoshiomi; Kawaguchi, Hideo; Hirose, Katsumi; Sato, Mariko; Akimoto, Hiroyoshi; Miura, Hiroyuki; Ono, Shuichi; Takai, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate clinical outcomes following stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung metastases as oligo-recurrence. From May 2003 to June 2014, records for 66 patients with 76 oligo-recurrences in the lungs treated with SBRT were retrospectively reviewed. Oligo-recurrence primary sites and patient numbers were as follows: lungs, 31; colorectal, 13; head and neck, 10; esophagus, 3; uterus, 3; and others, 6. The median SBRT dose was 50 Gy (range, 45–60 Gy) administered in a median of 5 (range, 5–9) fractions. All patients received SBRT, with no acute toxicity. Surviving patients had a median follow-up time of 36.5 months. The 3-year rates of local control, overall survival and disease-free survival were 90.6%, 76.0% and 53.7%, respectively. Longer disease-free interval from initial treatment to SBRT, and non-colorectal cancer were both associated with favorable outcomes. Disease progression after SBRT occurred in 31 patients, most with distant metastases (n = 24) [among whom, 87.5% (n = 21) had new lung metastases]. Among these 21 patients, 12 were judged as having a second oligo-recurrence. Additional SBRT was performed for these 12 patients, and all 12 tumors were controlled without disease progression. Three patients (4.5%) developed Grade 2 radiation pneumonitis. No other late adverse events of Grade ≥2 were identified. Thus, SBRT for oligo-recurrence achieved acceptable tumor control, with additional SBRT also effective for selected patients with a second oligo-recurrence after primary SBRT. PMID:26494115

  9. Effect of Acuros XB algorithm on monitor units for stereotactic body radiotherapy planning of lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Rao F. Villarreal-Barajas, Eduardo; Lau, Harold; Liu, Hong-Wei

    2014-04-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is a curative regimen that uses hypofractionated radiation-absorbed dose to achieve a high degree of local control in early stage non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In the presence of heterogeneities, the dose calculation for the lungs becomes challenging. We have evaluated the dosimetric effect of the recently introduced advanced dose-calculation algorithm, Acuros XB (AXB), for SBRT of NSCLC. A total of 97 patients with early-stage lung cancer who underwent SBRT at our cancer center during last 4 years were included. Initial clinical plans were created in Aria Eclipse version 8.9 or prior, using 6 to 10 fields with 6-MV beams, and dose was calculated using the anisotropic analytic algorithm (AAA) as implemented in Eclipse treatment planning system. The clinical plans were recalculated in Aria Eclipse 11.0.21 using both AAA and AXB algorithms. Both sets of plans were normalized to the same prescription point at the center of mass of the target. A secondary monitor unit (MU) calculation was performed using commercial program RadCalc for all of the fields. For the planning target volumes ranging from 19 to 375 cm{sup 3}, a comparison of MUs was performed for both set of algorithms on field and plan basis. In total, variation of MUs for 677 treatment fields was investigated in terms of equivalent depth and the equivalent square of the field. Overall, MUs required by AXB to deliver the prescribed dose are on an average 2% higher than AAA. Using a 2-tailed paired t-test, the MUs from the 2 algorithms were found to be significantly different (p < 0.001). The secondary independent MU calculator RadCalc underestimates the required MUs (on an average by 4% to 5%) in the lung relative to either of the 2 dose algorithms.

  10. Impact of Immobilization on Intrafraction Motion for Spine Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Using Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Winnie; Sahgal, Arjun; Foote, Matthew; Millar, Barbara-Ann; Jaffray, David A.; Letourneau, Daniel

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: Spine stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) involves tight planning margins and steep dose gradients to the surrounding organs at risk (OAR). This study aimed to assess intrafraction motion using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) for spine SBRT patients treated using three immobilization devices. Methods and Materials: Setup accuracy using CBCT was retrospectively analyzed for 102 treated spinal metastases in 84 patients. Thoracic and lumbar spine patients were immobilized with either an evacuated cushion (EC, n = 24) or a semirigid vacuum body fixation (BF, n = 60). For cases treated at cervical/upper thoracic (thoracic [T]1-T3) vertebrae, a thermoplastic S-frame (SF) mask (n = 18) was used. Patient setup was corrected by using bony anatomy image registration and couch translations only (no rotation corrections) with shifts confirmed on verification CBCTs. Repeat imaging was performed mid- and post-treatment. Patient translational and rotational positioning data were recorded to calculate means, standard deviations (SD), and corresponding margins {+-} 2 SD for residual setup errors and intrafraction motion. Results: A total of 355 localizations, 333 verifications, and 248 mid- and 280 post-treatment CBCTs were analyzed. Residual translations and rotations after couch corrections (verification scans) were similar for all immobilization systems, with SDs of 0.6 to 0.9 mm in any direction and 0.9 Degree-Sign to 1.6 Degree-Sign , respectively. Margins to encompass residual setup errors after couch corrections were within 2 mm. Including intrafraction motion, as measured on post-treatment CBCTs, SDs for total setup error in the left-right, cranial-caudal, and anterior-posterior directions were 1.3, 1.2, and 1.0 mm for EC; 0.9, 0.7, and 0.9 mm for BF; and 1.3, 0.9, and 1.1 mm for SF, respectively. The calculated margins required to encompass total setup error increased to 3 mm for EC and SF and remained within 2 mm for BF. Conclusion: Following image

  11. Prediction of Chest Wall Toxicity From Lung Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT)

    SciTech Connect

    Stephans, Kevin L.; Djemil, Toufik; Tendulkar, Rahul D.; Robinson, Cliff G.; Reddy, Chandana A.; Videtic, Gregory M.M.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To determine patient, tumor, and treatment factors related to the development of late chest wall toxicity after lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: We reviewed a registry of 134 patients treated with lung SBRT to 60 Gy in 3 fractions who had greater than 1 year of clinical follow-up and no history of multiple treatments to the same lobe (n = 48). Patients were treated as per Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Protocol 0236 without specific chest wall avoidance criteria. The chest wall was retrospectively contoured. Thirty-two lesions measured less than 3 cm, and sixteen measured 3 to 5 cm. The median planning target volume was 29 cm{sup 3}. Results: With a median follow-up of 18.8 months, 10 patients had late symptomatic chest wall toxicity (4 Grade 1 and 6 Grade 2) at a median of 8.8 months after SBRT. No patient characteristics (age, diabetes, hypertension, peripheral vascular disease, or body mass index) were predictive for toxicity, whereas there was a trend for continued smoking (p = 0.066; odds ratio [OR], 4.4). Greatest single tumor dimension (p = 0.047; OR, 2.63) and planning target volume (p = 0.040; OR, 1.04) were correlated with toxicity, whereas distance from tumor edge to chest wall and gross tumor volume did not reach statistical significance. Volumes of chest wall receiving 30 Gy (V30) through 70 Gy (V70) were all highly significant, although this correlation weakened for V65 and V70 and maximum chest wall point dose only trended to significance (p = 0.06). On multivariate analysis, tumor volume was no longer correlated with toxicity and only V30 through V60 remained statistically significant. Conclusions: Tumor size and chest wall dosimetry are correlated to late chest wall toxicity. Only chest wall V30 through V60 remained significant on multivariate analysis. Restricting V30 to 30 cm{sup 3} or less and V60 to 3 cm{sup 3} or less should result in a 10% to 15% risk of late chest wall toxicity or lower.

  12. Hypofractionated radiotherapy in pancreatic cancer: Lessons from the past in the era of stereotactic body radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    De Bari, Berardino; Porta, Laetitia; Mazzola, Rosario; Alongi, Filippo; Wagner, Anna Dorothea; Schäfer, Markus; Bourhis, Jean; Ozsahin, Mahmut

    2016-07-01

    The role of neoadjuvant and definitive radiotherapy combined or not to chemotherapy in the therapeutic approach to pancreatic cancer has not been yet elucidated. There is some evidence in favour of neoadjuvant local and/or systemic approaches that enable surgical resection in patients initially considered to be "borderline resectable". Nevertheless, most of these studies have been conducted using schedules of radiotherapy (treatment volumes, total doses, dose/fraction) that are nowadays considered not efficient enough and/or too toxic. Recently, stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has been proposed as a new therapeutic option for pancreatic cancer, both in the neoadjuvant and in the definitive setting. The aim of this study is to review the radiobiological and clinical evidences supporting hypofractionation in pancreatic cancer. Moreover, we performed an extensive review of available clinical and dosimetric data on SBRT in pancreatic cancer. PMID:27233119

  13. A study on the measurement of the core body temperature change after radiofrequency ablation (RFA) through MR temperature mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chang-Bok; Dong, Kyung-Rae; Yu, Young; Chung, Woon-Kwan; Cho, Jae-Hwan; Joo, Kyu-Ji

    2013-09-01

    This study examined the change in the heat generated during radiofrequency ablation (RFA) using a self-manufactured phantom and used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to analyze the change in the temperature of the core body and the tissues surrounding the phantom. In this experiment, the image and the phase image were obtained simultaneously from a gradient echo-based sequence using 1.5-Tesla MRI equipment and a 12-channel head coil. The temperature mapping technique was used to calculate the change in temperature. The regions of interest (ROIs) (ROI 1 - ROI 6) were set with a focus on the area where the RFA was performed, according to the temperature distribution, before monitoring the temperature change for one hour in time intervals of five minutes. The results showed that the temperature change in the ROI with time was largest in the ROI 1 and smallest in the ROI 5. In addition, after the RFA procedure, the temperature decreased from the initial value to 0 °C in one hour. The temperature changes in the core body and the surrounding tissues were confirmed by MRI temperature mapping, which is a noninvasive method.

  14. Changes in the Secretory Profile of NSCLC-Associated Fibroblasts after Ablative Radiotherapy: Potential Impact on Angiogenesis and Tumor Growth1

    PubMed Central

    Hellevik, Turid; Pettersen, Ingvild; Berg, Vivian; Bruun, Jack; Bartnes, Kristian; Busund, Lill-Tove; Chalmers, Anthony; Bremnes, Roy; Martinez-Zubiaurre, Iñigo

    2013-01-01

    In the context of radiotherapy, collateral effects of ablative doses of ionizing radiation (AIR) on stromal components of tumors remains understudied. In this work, cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) isolated from freshly resected human lung tumors were exposed to AIR (1x 18 Gy) and analyzed for their release of paracrine factors. Inflammatory mediators and regulators of angiogenesis and tumor growth were analyzed by multiplex protein assays in conditioned medium (CM) from irradiated and non-irradiated CAFs. Additionally, the profile of secreted proteins was examined by proteomics. In functional assays, effects of CAF-CM on proliferative and migratory capacity of lung tumor cells (H-520/H-522) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and their tube-forming capacity were assessed. Our data show that exposure of CAFs to AIR results in 1) downregulated release of angiogenic molecules such as stromal cell-derived factor-1, angiopoietin, and thrombospondin-2 (TSP-2); 2) upregulated release of basic fibroblast growth factor from most donors; and 3) unaffected expression levels of hepatocyte growth factor, interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-8, IL-1β, and tumor necrosis factor-α. CM from irradiated and control CAFs did not affect differently the proliferative or migratory capacity of tumor cells (H-520/H-522), whereas migratory capacity of HUVECs was partially reduced in the presence of irradiated CAF-CM. Overall, we conclude that AIR mediates a transformation on the secretory profile of CAFs that could influence the behavior of other cells in the tumor tissue and hence guide therapeutic outcomes. Downstream consequences of the changes observed in this study merits further investigations. PMID:23418618

  15. Assessing feasibility of real-time ultrasound monitoring in stereotactic body radiotherapy of liver tumors.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yahua; Stephans, Kevin; Qi, Peng; Yu, Naiching; Wong, John; Xia, Ping

    2013-06-01

    To monitor tumor motion during stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for patients with liver cancer, an integrated ultrasound and kilo-voltage cone-beam computed tomography (KV-CBCT) system has been proposed. The presence of an ultrasound probe may interfere with the radiation beams. The purpose of this study is to minimize this interference by altering orientations of the ultrasound probe and directions of radiation beams while not compromising the quality of SBRT plans. Ten patients, who received SBRT of liver cancer, were randomly selected for this study. To simulate the presence of an ultrasound probe, a virtual probe was oriented either parallel or vertical to the longitudinal axis of the patient's body and was added on the surface of the patient's body at the nearest location to the tumor. For both the parallel and vertical probe orientations, 2 new SBRT (Probe-Para and Probe-Vert) plans that minimize the interference between the probe and radiation beams were created for each patient. These SBRT plans were compared to the original clinically accepted SBRT plans, with a treatment goal of 37.5 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV) in 3 fractions. Specific dosimetric endpoints were evaluated, including doses to 95% (D95), of the PTV plan conformal index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), and relevant endpoint doses to organs at risk. For 2 patients with superficially located tumors, no clinically acceptable SBRT plans could be produced without the interference between the probe and radiation beams. For the remaining 8 patients, the Probe-Para plans allowed 7 patients to be treated with coplanar radiation beams (without moving the treatment couch during treatment) and 1 patient to be treated with non-coplanar beams (by moving the treatment couch during treatment). The Probe-Vert plans allowed 2 patients to be treated with coplanar beams and 6 patients to be treated with non-coplanar beams. The average D95 of the PTV were 38.63 Gy ± 0.14 (р = 0.65) for

  16. Laser ablation for mineral analysis in the human body: integration of LIFS with LIBS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samek, Ota; Liska, Miroslav; Kaiser, Josef; Krzyzanek, Vladislav; Beddows, David C.; Belenkevitch, Alexander; Morris, Gavin W.; Telle, Helmut H.

    1999-01-01

    Trace mineral analysis of the body is invaluable in biology, medicine and dentistry when considering the role of mineral nutrition and metabolism in the context of maintaining human health. The presence of key elements in the body, such as boron, calcium, chromium, copper, iron, silicon and zinc are known to be of vital importance, but are often found to be present in inadequate quantity. In sharp contrast, the accumulation of other elements, such as aluminum, cadmium, lead and mercury is less favorable, since frequently these metals are already toxic at extremely low concentration levels, interfering with essential chemical processing of vitamins and minerals. Here we report on the application of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy to the analysis of important minerals and toxic elements within the body. Samples from different parts of the body have been studied, including specimens of skin tissue, finger nails and teeth. It is particularly noteworthy that specific sample preparation was not needed for any of these laser spectroscopic measurements, but that specimens could be used as taken from the source.

  17. Local control rates with five-fraction stereotactic body radiotherapy for oligometastatic cancer to the lung

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuhchyau; Hare, Mary Z.; Usuki, Kenneth Y.; Zhang, Hong; Lundquist, Thomas; Joyce, Neil; Schell, Michael C.; Milano, Michael T.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To report our institutional experience with five fractions of daily 8-12 Gy stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for the treatment of oligometastatic cancer to the lung. Methods Thirty-four consecutive patients with oligometastatic cancers to the lung were treated with image-guided SBRT between 2008 and 2011. Patient age ranged from 38 to 81 years. There were 17 males and 17 females. Lung metastases were from the following primary cancer types: colon cancer (n=13 patients), head and neck cancer (n=6), breast cancer (n=4), melanoma (n=4), sarcoma (n=4) and renal cell carcinoma (n=3). The median prescription dose was 50 Gy in five fractions (range, 40-60 Gy) to the isocenter, with the 80% isodose line encompassing the planning target volume (PTV) [defined as gross tumor volume (GTV) + 7-11 mm volumetric expansion]. The follow-up interval ranged from 2.4-54 months, with a median of 16.7 months. Results The 1-, 2-, and 3-year patient local control (LC) rates for all patients were 93%, 88%, and 80% respectively. The 1-, 2-, and 3-year overall survival (OS) rates were 62%, 44%, and 23% respectively. The 1- and 2-year patient LC rates were 95% and 88% for tumor size 1-2 cm (n=25), and 86% for tumor size 2-3 cm (n=7). The majority (n=4) of local failures occurred within 12 months. No patient experienced local failure after 12 months except for one patient with colon cancer whose tumors progressed locally at 26 months. All five patients with local recurrences had colorectal cancer. Statistical analyses showed that age, gender, previous chemotherapy, previous surgery or radiation had no significant effect on LC rates. No patient was reported to have any symptomatic pneumonitis at any time point. Conclusions SBRT for oligometastatic disease to the lung using 8-12 Gy daily fractions over five treatments resulted in excellent 1- and 2-year LC rates. Most local failures occurred within the first 12 months, with five local failures associated with colorectal cancer

  18. Spine Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Outcomes in Patients with Concurrent Brain Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Park, Henry S; Laurans, Maxwell S; Chiang, Veronica S; Yu, James B; Husain, Zain A

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is an emerging technique for maximizing tumor and pain control in selected patients with spinal metastases. Outcomes for those with concurrent brain metastases (CBM) have not been well-described previously. The goal of this study was to compare outcomes for patients with or without CBM treated with spine SBRT. Methods: Records of all patients treated with SBRT for spine metastases at our institution from January 2008 to January 2014 were reviewed. Chi-square analyses and the Mann-Whitney test were used to assess the association of CBM (defined as brain metastasis present prior to or at the time of spinal SBRT) with potential covariates. The log-rank test and Cox proportional hazards regression were used to evaluate the impact of CBM on overall survival and local control from the time of the first course of spine SBRT. Results: Seventy-eight patients and a total of 86 SBRT lesions were treated. Median patient age was 60 years (range: 38-84 years); 28.2% had radioresistant histologies. A single fraction was used in 91.0% of treatments. One-year local control was 89.4%, and one-year overall survival was 45.8%. A total of 19 patients (24.4%) had CBM. Among these CBM patients, 18 (94.7%) underwent intracranial radiosurgery and nine (47.4%) were diagnosed synchronously with their spine metastases. Local control was not significantly different between patients with or without CBM on univariable (median: 58 months vs. not reached, p = 0.53) or multivariable analyses (HR 0.52, 95% CI 0.06-4.33). Overall survival was also not significantly different between patients with or without CBM on univariable (median: 7 vs. 11 months, log-rank p = 0.12) or multivariable analyses (HR 1.62, 95% CI 0.87-3.03). Conclusions: Patients with CBM do not appear to have a statistically significant detriment in clinical outcomes, suggesting that CBM should not necessarily be considered a contraindication for spine SBRT. Although our

  19. Patterns of epidural progression following postoperative spine stereotactic body radiotherapy: implications for clinical target volume delineation.

    PubMed

    Chan, Michael W; Thibault, Isabelle; Atenafu, Eshetu G; Yu, Eugene; John Cho, B C; Letourneau, Daniel; Lee, Young; Yee, Albert; Fehlings, Michael G; Sahgal, Arjun

    2016-04-01

    OBJECT The authors performed a pattern-of-failure analysis, with a focus on epidural disease progression, in patients treated with postoperative spine stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). METHODS Of the 70 patients with 75 spinal metastases (cases) treated with postoperative spine SBRT, there were 26 cases of local disease recurrence and 25 cases with a component of epidural disease progression. Twenty-four of the 25 cases had preoperative epidural disease with subsequent epidural disease progression, and this cohort was the focus of this epidural-specific pattern-of-failure investigation. Preoperative, postoperative, and follow-up MRI scans were reviewed, and epidural disease was characterized based on location according to a system in which the vertebral anatomy is divided into 6 sectors, with the anterior compartment comprising Sectors 1, 2, and 6, and the posterior compartment comprising Sectors 3, 4, and 5. RESULTS Patterns of epidural progression are reported specifically for the 24 cases with preoperative epidural disease and subsequent epidural progression. Epidural disease progression within the posterior compartment was observed to be significantly lower in those with preoperative epidural disease confined to the anterior compartment than in those with preoperative epidural disease involving both anterior and posterior compartments (56% vs 93%, respectively; p = 0.047). In a high proportion of patients with epidural disease progression, treatment failure was found in the anterior compartment, including both those with preoperative epidural disease confined to the anterior compartment and those with preoperative epidural disease involving both anterior and posterior compartments (100% vs. 73%, respectively). When epidural disease was confined to the anterior compartment on the preoperative and postoperative MRIs, no epidural disease progression was observed in Sector 4, which is the most posterior sector. Postoperative epidural disease characteristics

  20. Interfraction variation in lung tumor position with abdominal compression during stereotactic body radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mampuya, Wambaka Ange; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Matsuo, Yukinori; Ueki, Nami; Iizuka, Yusuke; Monzen, Hajime; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Fujimoto, Takahiro; Yano, Shinsuke

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: To assess the effect of abdominal compression on the interfraction variation in tumor position in lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in a larger series of patients with large tumor motion amplitude.Methods: Thirty patients with lung tumor motion exceeding 8 mm who underwent SBRT were included in this study. After translational and rotational initial setup error was corrected based on bone anatomy, CBCT images were acquired for each fraction. The residual interfraction variation was defined as the difference between the centroid position of the visualized target in three dimensions derived from CBCT scans and those derived from averaged intensity projection images. The authors compared the magnitude of the interfraction variation in tumor position between patients treated with [n= 16 (76 fractions)] and without [n= 14 (76 fractions)] abdominal compression.Results: The mean ± standard deviation (SD) of the motion amplitude in the longitudinal direction before abdominal compression was 19.9 ± 7.3 (range, 10–40) mm and was significantly (p < 0.01) reduced to 12.4 ± 5.8 (range, 5–30) mm with compression. The greatest variance of the interfraction variation with abdominal compression was observed in the longitudinal direction, with a mean ± SD of 0.79 ± 3.05 mm, compared to −0.60 ± 2.10 mm without abdominal compression. The absolute values of the 95th percentile of the interfraction variation for one side in each direction were 3.97/6.21 mm (posterior/anterior), 4.16/3.76 mm (caudal/cranial), and 2.90/2.32 mm (right/left) without abdominal compression, and 2.14/5.03 mm (posterior/anterior), 3.93/9.23 mm (caudal/cranial), and 2.37/5.45 mm (right/left) with abdominal compression. An absolute interfraction variation greater than 5 mm was observed in six (9.2%) fractions without and 13 (17.1%) fractions with abdominal compression.Conclusions: Abdominal compression was effective for reducing the amplitude

  1. Evaluating Proton Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy to Reduce Chest Wall Dose in the Treatment of Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Welsh, James; Nguyen, Ngoc; Palmer, Matt; Allen, Pamela K.; Paolini, Michael; Liao, Zhongxing; Bluett, Jaques; Mohan, Radhe; Gomez, Daniel; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Chang, Joe Y.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) can produce excellent local control of several types of solid tumor; however, toxicity to nearby critical structures is a concern. We found previously that in SBRT for lung cancer, the chest wall (CW) volume receiving 20, 30, or 40 Gy (V20, V30, or V40) was linked with the development of neuropathy. Here we sought to determine whether the dosimetric advantages of protons could produce lower CW doses than traditional photon-based SBRT. Methods We searched an institutional database to identify patients treated with photon SBRT for lung cancer with tumors within <2.5 cm of the CW. We found 260 cases; of these chronic grade ≥2 CW pain was identified in 23 patients. We then selected 10 representative patients from this group and generated proton SBRT treatment plans, using the identical dose of 50 Gy in 4 fractions, and assessed potential differences in CW dose between the two plans. Results The proton SBRT plans reduced the CW doses at all dose levels measured. The median CW V was 364.0 cm320 for photons and 160.0 cm3 for protons (P<0.0001); V30 was 144.6 cm3 for photons vs. 77.0 cm3 for protons (P=0.0012); V was 93.9 cm335 for photons vs. 57.9 cm3 for protons (P=0.005); V40 was 66.5 cm3 for photons vs. 45.4 cm3 for protons (P=0.0112); and mean lung dose was 5.9 Gy for photons vs. 3.8 Gy for protons (P=0.0001). Coverage of the planning target volume was comparable between the two sets of plans (96.4% for photons and 97% for protons). Conclusions From a dosimetric standpoint, proton SBRT can achieve the same coverage of the PTV while significantly reducing the dose to the CW and lung relative to photon SBRT and therefore may be beneficial for the treatment of lesions close to critical structures. PMID:24200220

  2. Evaluating proton stereotactic body radiotherapy to reduce chest wall dose in the treatment of lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Welsh, James; Amini, Arya; Ciura, Katherine; Nguyen, Ngoc; Palmer, Matt; Soh, Hendrick; Allen, Pamela K.; Paolini, Michael; Liao, Zhongxing; Bluett, Jaques; Mohan, Radhe; Gomez, Daniel; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Chang, Joe Y.

    2013-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) can produce excellent local control of several types of solid tumor; however, toxicity to nearby critical structures is a concern. We found previously that in SBRT for lung cancer, the chest wall (CW) volume receiving 20, 30, or 40 Gy (V{sub 20}, V{sub 30}, or V{sub 40}) was linked with the development of neuropathy. Here we sought to determine whether the dosimetric advantages of protons could produce lower CW doses than traditional photon-based SBRT. We searched an institutional database to identify patients treated with photon SBRT for lung cancer with tumors within < 2.5 cm of the CW. We found 260 cases; of these, chronic grade ≥ 2 CW pain was identified in 23 patients. We then selected 10 representative patients from this group and generated proton SBRT treatment plans, using the identical dose of 50 Gy in 4 fractions, and assessed potential differences in CW dose between the 2 plans. The proton SBRT plans reduced the CW doses at all dose levels measured. The median CW V{sub 20} was 364.0 cm{sup 3} and 160.0 cm{sup 3} (p < 0.0001), V{sub 30} was 144.6 cm{sup 3}vs 77.0 cm{sup 3} (p = 0.0012), V{sub 35} was 93.9 cm{sup 3}vs 57.9 cm{sup 3} (p = 0.005), V{sub 40} was 66.5 cm{sup 3}vs 45.4 cm{sup 3} (p = 0.0112), and mean lung dose was 5.9 Gy vs 3.8 Gy (p = 0.0001) for photons and protons, respectively. Coverage of the planning target volume (PTV) was comparable between the 2 sets of plans (96.4% for photons and 97% for protons). From a dosimetric standpoint, proton SBRT can achieve the same coverage of the PTV while significantly reducing the dose to the CW and lung relative to photon SBRT and therefore may be beneficial for the treatment of lesions closer to critical structures.

  3. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for metastatic spinal sarcoma: a detailed patterns-of-failure study.

    PubMed

    Leeman, Jonathan E; Bilsky, Mark; Laufer, Ilya; Folkert, Michael R; Taunk, Neil K; Osborne, Joseph R; Arevalo-Perez, Julio; Zatcky, Joan; Alektiar, Kaled M; Yamada, Yoshiya; Spratt, Daniel E

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to report the first detailed analysis of patterns of failure within the spinal axis of patients treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for sarcoma spine metastases. METHODS Between 2005 and 2012, 88 consecutive patients with metastatic sarcoma were treated with SBRT for 120 spinal lesions. Seventy-one percent of patients were enrolled on prospective institutional protocols. For patients who underwent routine posttreatment total-spine MRI (64 patients, 88 lesions), each site of progression within the entire spinal axis was mapped in relation to the treated lesion. Actuarial rates of local-, adjacent-, and distant-segment failure-free survival (FFS) were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. RESULTS The median follow-up for the cohort was 14.4 months, with 81.7% of patients followed up until death. The 12-month actuarial rate of local FFS was 85.9%; however, 83.3% of local failures occurred in conjunction with distant-segment failures. The 12-month actuarial rates of isolated local-, adjacent-, and distant-segment FFS were 98.0%, 97.8%, and 74.7%, respectively. Of patients with any spinal progression (n = 55), only 25.5% (n = 14) had progression at a single vertebral level, with 60.0% (n = 33) having progression at ≥ 3 sites within the spine simultaneously. Linear regression analysis revealed a relationship of decreasing risk of failure with increasing distance from the treated index lesion (R(2) = 0.87), and 54.1% of failures occurred ≥ 5 vertebral levels away. Treatment of the index lesion with a lower biological effective dose (OR 3.2, 95% CI 1.1-9.2) and presence of local failure (OR 18.0, 95% CI 2.1-152.9) independently predicted for distant spine failure. CONCLUSIONS Isolated local- and adjacent-segment failures are exceptionally rare for patients with metastatic sarcoma to the spine treated with SBRT, thereby affirming the treatment of the involved level only. The majority of progression within the spinal

  4. Oligometastases Treated With Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy: Long-Term Follow-Up of Prospective Study

    SciTech Connect

    Milano, Michael T.; Katz, Alan W.; Zhang Hong; Okunieff, Paul

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To analyze the long-term survival and tumor control outcomes after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for metastases limited in number and extent. Methods and Materials: We prospectively analyzed the long-term overall survival (OS) and cancer control outcomes of 121 patients with five or fewer clinically detectable metastases, from any primary site, metastatic to one to three organ sites, and treated with SBRT. Freedom from widespread distant metastasis (FFDM) was defined as metastatic disease not amenable to local therapy (i.e., resection or SBRT). Prognostic variables were assessed using log-rank and Cox regression analyses. Results: For breast cancer patients, the median follow-up was 4.5 years (7.1 years for 16 of 39 patients alive at the last follow-up visit). The 2-year OS, FFDM, and local control (LC) rate was 74%, 52%, and 87%, respectively. The 6-year OS, FFDM, and LC rate was 47%, 36%, and 87%, respectively. From the multivariate analyses, the variables of bone metastases (p = .057) and one vs. more than one metastasis (p = .055) were associated with a fourfold and threefold reduced hazard of death, respectively. None of the 17 bone lesions from breast cancer recurred after SBRT vs. 10 of 68 lesions from other organs that recurred (p = .095). For patients with nonbreast cancers, the median follow-up was 1.7 years (7.3 years for 7 of 82 patients alive at the last follow-up visit). The 2-year OS, FFDM, and LC rate was 39%, 28%, and 74%, respectively. The 6-year OS, FFDM, and LC rate was 9%, 13%, and 65%, respectively. For nonbreast cancers, a greater SBRT target volume was significantly adverse for OS (p = .012) and lesion LC (p < .0001). Patients whose metastatic lesions, before SBRT, demonstrated radiographic progression after systemic therapy experienced significantly worse OS compared with patients with stable or regressing disease. Conclusions: Select patients with limited metastases treated with SBRT are long-term survivors. Future

  5. A Dosimetric Model of Duodenal Toxicity After Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, James D.; Christman-Skieller, Claudia; Kim, Jeff; Dieterich, Sonja; Chang, Daniel T.; Koong, Albert C.

    2010-12-01

    Introduction: Dose escalation for pancreas cancer is limited by the tolerance of adjacent normal tissues, especially with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). The duodenum is generally considered to be the organ at greatest risk. This study reports on the dosimetric determinants of duodenal toxicity with single-fraction SBRT. Methods and Materials: Seventy-three patients with locally advanced unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma received 25 Gy in a single fraction. Dose-volume histogram (DVH) endpoints evaluated include V{sub 5} (volume of duodenum that received 5 Gy), V{sub 10}, V{sub 15}, V{sub 20}, V{sub 25}, and D{sub max} (maximum dose to 1 cm{sup 3}). Normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) was evaluated with a Lyman model. Univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted with Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression models. Results: The median time to Grade 2-4 duodenal toxicity was 6.3 months (range, 1.6-11.8 months). The 6- and 12-month actuarial rates of toxicity were 11% and 29%, respectively. V{sub 10}-V{sub 25} and D{sub max} all correlated significantly with duodenal toxicity (p < 0.05). In particular, V{sub 15} {>=} 9.1 cm{sup 3} and V{sub 15} < 9.1 cm{sup 3} yielded duodenal toxicity rates of 52% and 11%, respectively (p = 0.002); V{sub 20} {>=} 3.3 cm{sup 3} and V{sub 20} < 3.3 cm{sup 3} gave toxicity rates of 52% and 11%, respectively (p = 0.002); and D{sub max} {>=} 23 Gy and D{sub max} < 23 Gy gave toxicity rates of 49% and 12%, respectively (p = 0.004). Lyman NTCP model optimization generated the coefficients m = 0.23, n = 0.12, and TD{sub 50} = 24.6 Gy. Only the Lyman NTCP model remained significant in multivariate analysis (p = 0.001). Conclusions: Multiple DVH endpoints and a Lyman NTCP model are strongly predictive of duodenal toxicity after SBRT for pancreatic cancer. These dose constraints will be valuable in future abdominal SBRT studies.

  6. Dosimetric Impact of Breathing Motion in Lung Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Treatment Using Image-Modulated Radiotherapy and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Rao Min; Wu Jianzhou; Cao Daliang; Wong, Tony; Mehta, Vivek; Shepard, David; Ye Jinsong

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of tumor motion on dose delivery in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung cancer, using fixed field intensity- modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Methods and Materials: For each of 10 patients with stage I/II non-small-cell pulmonary tumors, a respiration-correlated four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) study was carried out. The internal target volume was delineated on the maximum intensity projection CT, which was reconstructed from the 4DCT dataset. A 5-mm margin was used for generation of the planning target volume. VMAT and five-field IMRT plans were generated using Pinnacle{sup 3} SmartArc and direct machine parameter optimization, respectively. All plans were generated for an Elekta Synergy linear accelerator using 6-MV photons. Simulation was performed to study the interplay between multileaf collimator (MLC) sequences and target movement during the delivery of VMAT and IMRT. For each plan, 4D dose was calculated using deformable image registration of the 4DCT images. Target volume coverage and doses to critical structures calculated using 4D methodology were compared with those calculated using 3D methodology. Results: For all patients included in this study, the interplay effect was found to present limited impact (less than 1% of prescription) on the target dose distribution, especially for SBRT, in which fewer fractions (three fractions) are delivered. Dose to the gross tumor volume (GTV) was, on average, slightly decreased (1% of prescription) in the 4D calculation compared with the 3D calculation. The motion impact on target dose homogeneity was patient-dependent and relatively small. Conclusions: Both VMAT and IMRT plans experienced negligible interplay effects between MLC sequence and tumor motion. For the most part, the 3D doses to the GTV and critical structures provided good approximations of the 4D dose calculations.

  7. High-dose-rate Three-dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy Combined with Active Breathing Control for Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy of Early-stage Non-small-cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruozheng; Yin, Yong; Qin, Yonghui; Yu, Jinming

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and benefits of using high-dose-rate three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) combined with active breathing control (ABC) for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of patients with early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Eight patients with early-stage NSCLC underwent CT scans under standard free-breathing (FB) and moderately deep inspiration breath-hold (mDIBH) with ABC. Two high-dose-rate 3D-CRT plans (1000 Mu/min) were designed based on the CT scans with FB and mDIBH. The maximal dose (D1%), minimal dose (D99%), conformity index (CI), and homogeneity index (HI) of the planning target volume (PTV), and dose-volume indices of the organs at risk between each plan were compared. The mean PTV volume decreased from 158.04 cm(3) with FB to 76.90 cm(3) with mDIBH (p < 0.05). When mDIBH was used, increases in the affected lung volume (by 47%), contralateral lung volume (by 55%), and total lung volume (by 50%) were observed compared to FB (p < 0.05). The V5-V40 of the affected lung (Vx represented the percentage volume of organs receiving at least the x Gy), V5-V40 and the mean dose for the total lung, V5-V40 and mean dose of the chest wall, and the maximum dose of the spinal cord were less for mDIBH than FB (p < 0.05). There were no significant differences in CI, HI, D1%, or D99% for the PTV between the plans. In conclusion, high-dose-rate 3D-CRT combined with ABC reduced the radiation dose to the lungs and chest wall without affecting the dose distribution in SBRT of early-stage NSCLC patients. PMID:24988055

  8. Proton Beam Radiotherapy Versus Three-Dimensional Conformal Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy in Primary Peripheral, Early-Stage Non-Small-Cell Lung Carcinoma: A Comparative Dosimetric Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, O. Kenneth; Kruse, Jon J.; Miller, Janelle M.; Garces, Yolanda I.; Brown, Paul D.; Miller, Robert C.; Foote, Robert L.

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: Proton radiotherapy (PT) and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) have the capacity to optimize the therapeutic ratio. We analyzed the dosimetric differences between PT and SBRT in treating primary peripheral early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Eight patients were simulated, planned, and treated with SBRT according to accepted techniques. SBRT treatments were retrospectively planned using heterogeneity corrections. PT treatment plans were generated using single-, two-, and three-field passively scattered and actively scanned proton beams. Calculated dose characteristics were compared. Results: Comparable planning target volume (PTV) median minimum and maximum doses were observed between PT and SBRT plans. Higher median maximum doses 2 cm from the PTV were observed for PT, but higher median PTV doses were observed for SBRT. The total lung mean and V5 doses were significantly lower with actively scanned PT. The lung V13 and V20 were comparable. The dose to normal tissues was lower with PT except to skin and ribs. Although the maximum doses to skin and ribs were similar or higher with PT, the median doses to these structures were higher with SBRT. Passively scattered plans, compared with actively scanned plans, typically demonstrated higher doses to the PTV, lung, and organs at risk. Conclusions: Single-, two-, or three-field passively or actively scanned proton therapy delivered comparable PTV dose with generally less dose to normal tissues in these hypothetic treatments. Actively scanned beam plans typically had more favorable dose characteristics to the target, lung, and other soft tissues compared with the passively scanned plans. The clinical significance of these findings remains to be determined.

  9. Long-Term Outcomes From a Prospective Trial of Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Low-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    King, Christopher R.; Brooks, James D.; Gill, Harcharan; Presti, Joseph C.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Hypofractionated radiotherapy has an intrinsically different normal tissue and tumor radiobiology. The results of a prospective trial of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for prostate cancer with long-term patient-reported toxicity and tumor control rates are presented. Methods and Materials: From 2003 through 2009, 67 patients with clinically localized low-risk prostate cancer were enrolled. Treatment consisted of 36.25 Gy in 5 fractions using SBRT with the CyberKnife as the delivery technology. No patient received hormone therapy. Patient self-reported bladder and rectal toxicities were graded on the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale (RTOG). Results: Median follow-up was 2.7 years. There were no grade 4 toxicities. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 3, 2, and 1 bladder toxicities were seen in 3% (2 patients), 5% (3 patients), and 23% (13 patients) respectively. Dysuria exacerbated by urologic instrumentation accounted for both patients with Grade 3 toxicity. Urinary incontinence, complete obstruction, or persistent hematuria was not observed. Rectal Grade 3, 2, and 1 toxicities were seen in 0, 2% (1 patient), and 12.5% (7 patients), respectively. Persistent rectal bleeding was not observed. Low-grade toxicities were substantially less frequent with QOD vs. QD dose regimen (p = 0.001 for gastrointestinal and p = 0.007 for genitourinary). There were two prostate-specific antigen (PSA), biopsy-proven failures with negative metastatic workup. Median PSA at follow-up was 0.5 {+-} 0.72 ng/mL. The 4-year Kaplan-Meier PSA relapse-free survival was 94% (95% confidence interval, 85%-102%). Conclusion: Significant late bladder and rectal toxicities from SBRT for prostate cancer are infrequent. PSA relapse-free survival compares favorably with other definitive treatments. The current evidence supports consideration of stereotactic body radiotherapy among the therapeutic options for localized prostate cancer.

  10. [Hepatic tumors and radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Rio, E; Mornex, F; Peiffert, D; Huertas, A

    2016-09-01

    Recent technological developments led to develop the concept of focused liver radiation therapy. We must distinguish primary and secondary tumors as the indications are restricted and must be discussed as an alternative to surgical or medical treatments. For hepatocellular carcinoma 5 to 10cm (or more), a conformational radiation with or without intensity modulation is performed. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is being evaluated and is increasingly proposed as an alternative to radiofrequency ablative treatment for primary or secondary tumors (typically less than 5cm). Tumor (and liver) movements induced by respiratory motions must be taken into account. Strict dosimetric criteria must be met with particular attention to the dose-volume histograms to liver and the hollow organs, including cases of SBRT. PMID:27521035

  11. Optimization of leaf margins for lung stereotactic body radiotherapy using a flattening filter-free beam

    SciTech Connect

    Wakai, Nobuhide; Sumida, Iori; Otani, Yuki; Suzuki, Osamu; Seo, Yuji; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Ogawa, Kazuhiko; Hasegawa, Masatoshi

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: The authors sought to determine the optimal collimator leaf margins which minimize normal tissue dose while achieving high conformity and to evaluate differences between the use of a flattening filter-free (FFF) beam and a flattening-filtered (FF) beam. Methods: Sixteen lung cancer patients scheduled for stereotactic body radiotherapy underwent treatment planning for a 7 MV FFF and a 6 MV FF beams to the planning target volume (PTV) with a range of leaf margins (−3 to 3 mm). Forty grays per four fractions were prescribed as a PTV D95. For PTV, the heterogeneity index (HI), conformity index, modified gradient index (GI), defined as the 50% isodose volume divided by target volume, maximum dose (Dmax), and mean dose (Dmean) were calculated. Mean lung dose (MLD), V20 Gy, and V5 Gy for the lung (defined as the volumes of lung receiving at least 20 and 5 Gy), mean heart dose, and Dmax to the spinal cord were measured as doses to organs at risk (OARs). Paired t-tests were used for statistical analysis. Results: HI was inversely related to changes in leaf margin. Conformity index and modified GI initially decreased as leaf margin width increased. After reaching a minimum, the two values then increased as leaf margin increased (“V” shape). The optimal leaf margins for conformity index and modified GI were −1.1 ± 0.3 mm (mean ± 1 SD) and −0.2 ± 0.9 mm, respectively, for 7 MV FFF compared to −1.0 ± 0.4 and −0.3 ± 0.9 mm, respectively, for 6 MV FF. Dmax and Dmean for 7 MV FFF were higher than those for 6 MV FF by 3.6% and 1.7%, respectively. There was a positive correlation between the ratios of HI, Dmax, and Dmean for 7 MV FFF to those for 6 MV FF and PTV size (R = 0.767, 0.809, and 0.643, respectively). The differences in MLD, V20 Gy, and V5 Gy for lung between FFF and FF beams were negligible. The optimal leaf margins for MLD, V20 Gy, and V5 Gy for lung were −0.9 ± 0.6, −1.1 ± 0.8, and −2.1 ± 1.2 mm, respectively, for 7 MV FFF compared

  12. Dosimetric comparison of Acuros XB, AAA, and XVMC in stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuruta, Yusuke; Nakata, Manabu; Higashimura, Kyoji; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro Matsuo, Yukinori; Monzen, Hajime; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetric performance of Acuros XB (AXB), anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA), and x-ray voxel Monte Carlo (XVMC) in heterogeneous phantoms and lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) plans. Methods: Water- and lung-equivalent phantoms were combined to evaluate the percentage depth dose and dose profile. The radiation treatment machine Novalis (BrainLab AG, Feldkirchen, Germany) with an x-ray beam energy of 6 MV was used to calculate the doses in the composite phantom at a source-to-surface distance of 100 cm with a gantry angle of 0°. Subsequently, the clinical lung SBRT plans for the 26 consecutive patients were transferred from the iPlan (ver. 4.1; BrainLab AG) to the Eclipse treatment planning systems (ver. 11.0.3; Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). The doses were then recalculated with AXB and AAA while maintaining the XVMC-calculated monitor units and beam arrangement. Then the dose-volumetric data obtained using the three different radiation dose calculation algorithms were compared. Results: The results from AXB and XVMC agreed with measurements within ±3.0% for the lung-equivalent phantom with a 6 × 6 cm{sup 2} field size, whereas AAA values were higher than measurements in the heterogeneous zone and near the boundary, with the greatest difference being 4.1%. AXB and XVMC agreed well with measurements in terms of the profile shape at the boundary of the heterogeneous zone. For the lung SBRT plans, AXB yielded lower values than XVMC in terms of the maximum doses of ITV and PTV; however, the differences were within ±3.0%. In addition to the dose-volumetric data, the dose distribution analysis showed that AXB yielded dose distribution calculations that were closer to those with XVMC than did AAA. Means ± standard deviation of the computation time was 221.6 ± 53.1 s (range, 124–358 s), 66.1 ± 16.0 s (range, 42–94 s), and 6.7 ± 1.1 s (range, 5–9 s) for XVMC, AXB, and AAA, respectively. Conclusions: In the

  13. Enucleation vs cobalt plaque radiotherapy for malignant melanomas of the choroid and ciliary body

    SciTech Connect

    Augsburger, J.J.; Gamel, J.W.; Sardi, V.F.; Greenberg, R.A.; Shields, J.A.; Brady, L.W.

    1986-05-01

    Clinical risk factors were assessed prospectively in a nonrandomized concurrent observational study of 237 patients with posterior uveal malignant melanoma. One hundred forty of these patients were treated with enucleation, and 97 underwent cobalt plaque radiotherapy. Tumor size and location of the anterior tumor margin proved to be the most significant clinical risk factors for death from metastatic melanoma. When Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to adjust for recognized intergroup differences in risk factors, the effect of therapy (enucleation vs cobalt plaque radiotherapy) on survival time was not statistically significant. We discuss the implications of this study for a randomized clinical trial of enucleation vs cobalt plaque therapy or comparable forms of irradiation.

  14. New Experiences of Treatment in Multiple Tumors with HIFU Ablation and Whole Body Hyperthermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Akira; Gondo, Hideki; Iijima, Norio; Xia, Yuantian; Takeuchi, Takashi

    2007-05-01

    We have performed some 5000 whole body hyperthermia (WBH) treatments using far-infrared equipment (RHD 7500: Enthermics medical systems, USA) in 1000 cancer patients since 1991 at Luke Hospital & Clinic (Nakano, Japan). Hyperthermia is a natural treatment whereby patients are heated within the fever temperature range of 41-42 C. However, this therapy alone is poorly suited to advanced cancer patients, where regional tumor control is needed. The potential of HIFU therapy for theses cases deserves further investigation. We have treated 20 times in 12 advanced cancer patients, since importing a new HIFU device (Sonic CZ901: Mianyang some electronic Ltd: China) last December and are able to report some interesting results of combination treatment with HIFU and WBH. Our first experience was a 20-year old female pharyngeal cancer patient with lung and multiple liver metastases. Her lung tumor reduced following WBH (given weekly, 4 times in total) and her liver tumor clearly reduced following HIFU treatment. Our second experience of combinative treatment was in a 65-year old male suffering from a neck tumor with bone metastasis. He received WBH after HIFU treatment into 7th lib bone metastasis. After 10 days, his neck tumor grew with evidence of internal necrosis, and finally ruptured. CT images showed necrotic changes in the focus of the neck tumor and also lib bone metastasis. We believe that this new thermal combinative therapy shows great promise.

  15. Dosimetric comparison of a 6-MV flattening-filter and a flattening-filter-free beam for lung stereotactic ablative radiotherapy treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yon-Lae; Chung, Jin-Beom; Kim, Jae-Sung; Lee, Jeong-Woo; Kim, Jin-Young; Kang, Sang-Won; Suh, Tae-Suk

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility of clinical usage of a flattening-filter-free (FFF) beam for treatment with lung stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR). Ten patients were treated with SABR and a 6-MV FFF beam for this study. All plans using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) were optimized in the Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS) by using the Acuros XB (AXB) dose calculation algorithm and were delivered by using a Varian TrueBeam ™ linear accelerator equipped with a high-definition (HD) multi-leaf collimator. The prescription dose used was 48 Gy in 4 fractions. In order to compare the plan using a conventional 6-MV flattening-filter (FF) beam, the SABR plan was recalculated under the condition of the same beam settings used in the plan employing the 6-MV FFF beam. All dose distributions were calculated by using Acuros XB (AXB, version 11) and a 2.5-mm isotropic dose grid. The cumulative dosevolume histograms (DVH) for the planning target volume (PTV) and all organs at risk (OARs) were analyzed. Technical parameters, such as total monitor units (MUs) and the delivery time, were also recorded and assessed. All plans for target volumes met the planning objectives for the PTV ( i.e., V95% > 95%) and the maximum dose ( i.e., Dmax < 110%) revealing adequate target coverage for the 6-MV FF and FFF beams. Differences in DVH for target volumes (PTV and clinical target volume (CTV)) and OARs on the lung SABR plans from the interchange of the treatment beams were small, but showed a marked reduction (52.97%) in the treatment delivery time. The SABR plan with a FFF beam required a larger number of MUs than the plan with the FF beam, and the mean difference in MUs was 4.65%. This study demonstrated that the use of the FFF beam for lung SABR plan provided better treatment efficiency relative to 6-MV FF beam. This strategy should be particularly beneficial for high dose conformity to the lung and decreased intra-fraction movements because of

  16. Residual {sup 18}F-FDG-PET Uptake 12 Weeks After Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy for Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Predicts Local Control

    SciTech Connect

    Bollineni, Vikram Rao; Widder, Joachim; Pruim, Jan; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Wiegman, Erwin M.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate the prognostic value of [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) uptake at 12 weeks after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: From November 2006 to February 2010, 132 medically inoperable patients with proven Stage I NSCLC or FDG-PET-positive primary lung tumors were analyzed retrospectively. SABR consisted of 60 Gy delivered in 3 to 8 fractions. Maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) of the treated lesion was assessed 12 weeks after SABR, using FDG-PET. Patients were subsequently followed at regular intervals using computed tomography (CT) scans. Association between post-SABR SUV{sub max} and local control (LC), mediastinal failure, distant failure, overall survival (OS), and disease-specific survival (DSS) was examined. Results: Median follow-up time was 17 months (range, 3-40 months). Median lesion size was 25 mm (range, 9-70 mm). There were 6 local failures: 15 mediastinal failures, 15 distant failures, 13 disease-related deaths, and 16 deaths from intercurrent diseases. Glucose corrected post-SABR median SUV{sub max} was 3.0 (range, 0.55-14.50). Using SUV{sub max} 5.0 as a cutoff, the 2-year LC was 80% versus 97.7% for high versus low SUV{sub max}, yielding an adjusted subhazard ratio (SHR) for high post-SABR SUV{sub max} of 7.3 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.4-38.5; p = 0.019). Two-year DSS rates were 74% versus 91%, respectively, for high and low SUV{sub max} values (SHR, 2.2; 95% CI, 0.8-6.3; p = 0.113). Two-year OS was 62% versus 81% (hazard ratio [HR], 1.6; 95% CI, 0.7-3.7; p = 0.268). Conclusions: Residual FDG uptake (SUV{sub max} {>=}5.0) 12 weeks after SABR signifies increased risk of local failure. A single FDG-PET scan at 12 weeks could be used to tailor further follow-up according to the risk of failure, especially in patients potentially eligible for salvage surgery.

  17. High Retention and Safety of Percutaneously Implanted Endovascular Embolization Coils as Fiducial Markers for Image-Guided Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy of Pulmonary Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Julian C.; Yu Yao; Rao, Aarti K.; Dieterich, Sonja; Maxim, Peter G.; Le, Quynh-Thu; Diehn, Maximilian; Sze, Daniel Y.; Kothary, Nishita; Loo, Billy W.

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: To compare the retention rates of two types of implanted fiducial markers for stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) of pulmonary tumors, smooth cylindrical gold 'seed' markers ('seeds') and platinum endovascular embolization coils ('coils'), and to compare the complication rates associated with the respective implantation procedures. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed the retention of percutaneously implanted markers in 54 consecutive patients between January 2004 and June 2009. A total of 270 markers (129 seeds, 141 coils) were implanted in or around 60 pulmonary tumors over 59 procedures. Markers were implanted using a percutaneous approach under computed tomography (CT) guidance. Postimplantation and follow-up imaging studies were analyzed to score marker retention relative to the number of markers implanted. Markers remaining near the tumor were scored as retained. Markers in a distant location (e.g., pleural space) were scored as lost. CT imaging artifacts near markers were quantified on radiation therapy planning scans. Results: Immediately after implantation, 140 of 141 coils (99.3%) were retained, compared to 110 of 129 seeds (85.3%); the difference was highly significant (p < 0.0001). Of the total number of lost markers, 45% were reported lost during implantation, but 55% were lost immediately afterwards. No additional markers were lost on longer-term follow-up. Implanted lesions were peripherally located for both seeds (mean distance, 0.33 cm from pleural surface) and coils (0.34 cm) (p = 0.96). Incidences of all pneumothorax (including asymptomatic) and pneumothorax requiring chest tube placement were lower in implantation of coils (23% and 3%, respectively) vs. seeds (54% and 29%, respectively; p = 0.02 and 0.01). The degree of CT artifact was similar between marker types. Conclusions: Retention of CT-guided percutaneously implanted coils is significantly better than that of seed markers. Furthermore, implanting coils is at

  18. Dosimetric comparison of flattened and unflattened beams for stereotactic ablative radiotherapy of stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hrbacek, Jan; Lang, Stephanie; Graydon, Shaun N.; Klöck, Stephan; Riesterer, Oliver

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To compare contribution and accuracy of delivery for two flattening filter free (FFF) beams of the nominal energy 6 and 10 MV and a 6 MV flattened beam for early stage lung cancer. Methods: For each of 11 patients with stage I nonsmall cell lung cancer three volumetric modulated arc therapy plans were prepared utilizing a 6 MV flattened photon beam (X6FF) and two nonflattened beams of nominal energy 6 and 10 MV (X6FFF, X10FFF). Optimization constraints were set to produce dose distributions that meet the criteria of the RTOG-0915 protocol. The radiation schedule used for plan comparison in all patients was 50 Gy in five fractions. Dosimetric parameters of planning target volume (PTV) and organs-at-risk and delivery times were assessed and compared. All plans were subject to verification using Delta{sup 4} unit (Scandidos, Sweden) and absolutely calibrated gafchromic films in a thorax phantom. Results: All plans had a qualitatively comparable outcome. Obtained dose distributions were conformal (CI < 1.17) and exhibited a steep dose fall-off outside the PTV. The ratio of monitor units for FFF versus FF plans in the authors' study ranged from 0.95 to 1.21 and from 0.93 to 1.25 for X6FFF/X6FF and X10FFF/X6FF comparisons, respectively. The ratio systematically increased with increasing size of the PTV (up to +25% for 150 cm{sup 3} PTV). Yet the integral dose to healthy tissue did not follow this trend. Comparison of cumulative dose volume histograms for a patient's body showed that X6FFF plans exhibit improved conformity and reduced the volume of tissue that received more than 50% of the prescription dose. Parameters related to dose gradient showed statistically significant improvement. CI{sub 50%}, CI{sub 60%}, CI{sub 80%}, and CI{sub 100%} were on average reduced by 4.6% (p < 0.001), 4.6% (p = 0.002), 3.1% (p = 0.002), and 1.2% (p = 0.039), respectively. Gradient measure was on average reduced by 4.2% (p < 0.001). Due to dose reduction in the surrounding lung

  19. Prostate-specific antigen kinetics after stereotactic body radiotherapy as monotherapy or boost after whole pelvic radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hun Jung; Phak, Jung Hoon; Kim, Woo Chul

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has emerged as an effective treatment for localized prostate cancer. However, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) kinetics after SBRT has not been well characterized. The purpose of the current study is to assess the kinetics of PSA for low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients treated with SBRT using Cyberknife as both monotherapy and boost after whole pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT) in the absence of androgen deprivation therapy. Methods A total of 61 patients with low- and intermediated-risk prostate cancer treated with SBRT as monotherapy (36.25 Gy in 5 fractions in 32 patients) and SBRT (21 Gy in 3 fractions in 29 patients) boost combined with WPRT (45 Gy in 25 fractions). Patients were excluded if they failed therapy by the Phoenix definition or had androgen deprivation therapy. PSA nadir and rate of change in PSA over time (slope) were calculated and compared. Results With a median follow-up of 52.4 months (range, 14–74 months), for SBRT monotherapy, the median PSA nadir was 0.31 ng/mL (range, 0.04–1.15 ng/mL) and slopes were –0.41 ng/mL/mo, –0.17 ng/mL/mo, –0.12 ng/mL/mo, and –0.09 ng/mL/mo, respectively, for durations of 1 year, 2 years, 3 years, and 4 years postradiotherapy. Similarly, for SBRT boost after WPRT, the median PSA nadir was 0.34 ng/mL (range, 0.04–1.44 ng/mL) and slopes were –0.53 ng/mL/mo, –0.25 ng/mL/mo, –0.14 ng/mL/mo, and –0.09 ng/mL/mo, respectively. The median nadir and slopes of SBRT monotherapy did not differ significantly from those of SBRT boost after WPRT. Benign PSA bounces were common in 30.4% of all cohorts, and the median time to PSA bounce was 12 months (range, 6–25 months). Conclusions In this report of low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients, an initial period of rapid PSA decline was followed by a slow decline, which resulted in a lower PSA nadir. The PSA kinetics of SBRT monotherapy appears to be comparable to those achieved

  20. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy as Monotherapy or Post-External Beam Radiotherapy Boost for Prostate Cancer: Technique, Early Toxicity, and PSA Response

    SciTech Connect

    Jabbari, Siavash; Weinberg, Vivian K.; Kaprealian, Tania; Hsu, I-Chow; Ma Lijun; Chuang, Cynthia; Descovich, Martina; Shiao, Stephen; Shinohara, Katsuto; Roach, Mack; Gottschalk, Alexander R.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: High dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy has been established as an excellent monotherapy or after external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) boost treatment for prostate cancer (PCa). Recently, dosimetric studies have demonstrated the potential for achieving similar dosimetry with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) compared with HDR brachytherapy. Here, we report our technique, PSA nadir, and acute and late toxicity with SBRT as monotherapy and post-EBRT boost for PCa using HDR brachytherapy fractionation. Patients and Methods: To date, 38 patients have been treated with SBRT at University of California-San Francisco with a minimum follow-up of 12 months. Twenty of 38 patients were treated with SBRT monotherapy (9.5 Gy Multiplication-Sign 4 fractions), and 18 were treated with SBRT boost (9.5 Gy Multiplication-Sign 2 fractions) post-EBRT and androgen deprivation therapy. PSA nadir to date for 44 HDR brachytherapy boost patients with disease characteristics similar to the SBRT boost cohort was also analyzed as a descriptive comparison. Results: SBRT was well tolerated. With a median follow-up of 18.3 months (range, 12.6-43.5), 42% and 11% of patients had acute Grade 2 gastrourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity, respectively, with no Grade 3 or higher acute toxicity to date. Two patients experienced late Grade 3 GU toxicity. All patients are without evidence of biochemical or clinical progression to date, and favorably low PSA nadirs have been observed with a current median PSA nadir of 0.35 ng/mL (range, <0.01-2.1) for all patients (0.47 ng/mL, range, 0.2-2.1 for the monotherapy cohort; 0.10 ng/mL, range, 0.01-0.5 for the boost cohort). With a median follow-up of 48.6 months (range, 16.4-87.8), the comparable HDR brachytherapy boost cohort has achieved a median PSA nadir of 0.09 ng/mL (range, 0.0-3.3). Conclusions: Early results with SBRT monotherapy and post-EBRT boost for PCa demonstrate acceptable PSA response and minimal toxicity. PSA nadir with SBRT boost

  1. Transient Ablation of Teflon Hemispheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arai, Norio; Karashima, Kei-ichi; Sato, Kiyoshi

    1997-01-01

    For high-speed entry of space vehicles into atmospheric environments, ablation is a practical method for alleviating severe aerodynamic heating. Several studies have been undertaken on steady or quasi-steady ablation. However, ablation is a very complicated phenomenon in which a nonequilibrium chemical process is associated with an aerodynamic process that involves changes in body shape with time. Therefore, it seems realistic to consider that ablation is an unsteady phenomenon. In the design of an ablative heat-shield system, since the ultimate purpose of the heat shield is to keep the internal temperature of the space vehicle at a safe level during entry, the transient heat conduction characteristics of the ablator may be critical in the selection of the material and its thickness. This note presents an experimental study of transient ablation of Teflon, with particular emphasis on the change in body shape, the instantaneous internal temperature distribution, and the effect of thermal expansion on ablation rate.

  2. Long term survival with stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) versus thoracoscopic sublobar lung resection in elderly people: national population based study with propensity matched comparative analysis

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Subroto; Lee, Paul C; Mao, Jialin; Isaacs, Abby J

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To compare cancer specific survival after thoracoscopic sublobar lung resection and stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for tumors ≤2 cm in size and thoracoscopic resection (sublobar resection or lobectomy) and SABR for tumors ≤5 cm in size. Design National population based retrospective cohort study with propensity matched comparative analysis. Setting Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registry linked with Medicare database in the United States. Participants Patients aged ≥66 with lung cancer undergoing SABR or thoracoscopic lobectomy or sublobar resection from 1 Oct 2007 to 31 June 2012 and followed up to 31 December 2013. Main outcome measures Cancer specific survival after SABR or thoracoscopic surgery for lung cancer. Results 690 (275 (39.9%) SABR and 415 (60.1%) thoracoscopic sublobar lung resection) and 2967 (714 (24.1%) SABR and 2253 (75.9%) thoracoscopic resection) patients were included in primary and secondary analyses. The average age of the entire cohort was 76. Follow-up of the entire cohort ranged from 0 to 6.25 years, with an average of three years. In the primary analysis of patients with tumors sized ≤2 cm, 37 (13.5%) undergoing SABR and 44 (10.6%) undergoing thoracoscopic sublobar resection died from lung cancer, respectively. The cancer specific survival diverged after one year, but in the matched analysis (201 matched patients in each group) there was no significant difference between the groups (SABR v sublobar lung resection mortality: hazard ratio 1.32, 95% confidence interval 0.77 to 2.26; P=0.32). Estimated cancer specific survival at three years after SABR and thoracoscopic sublobar lung resection was 82.6% and 86.4%, respectively. The secondary analysis (643 matched patients in each group) showed that thoracoscopic resection was associated with improved cancer specific survival over SABR in patients with tumors sized ≤5 cm (SABR v resection mortality: hazard ratio 2.10, 1.52 to 2.89; P<0

  3. Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy versus lobectomy for operable stage I non-small-cell lung cancer: a pooled analysis of two randomised trials

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Joe Y; Senan, Suresh; Paul, Marinus A; Mehran, Reza J; Louie, Alexander V; Balter, Peter; Groen, Harry J M; McRae, Stephen E; Widder, Joachim; Feng, Lei; van den Borne, Ben E E M; Munsell, Mark F; Hurkmans, Coen; Berry, Donald A; van Werkhoven, Erik; Kresl, John J; Dingemans, Anne-Marie; Dawood, Omar; Haasbeek, Cornelis J A; Carpenter, Larry S; De Jaeger, Katrien; Komaki, Ritsuko; Slotman, Ben J; Smit, Egbert F; Roth, Jack A

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background The standard of care for operable, stage I, non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is lobectomy with mediastinal lymph node dissection or sampling. Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for inoperable stage I NSCLC has shown promising results, but two independent, randomised, phase 3 trials of SABR in patients with operable stage I NSCLC (STARS and ROSEL) closed early due to slow accrual. We aimed to assess overall survival for SABR versus surgery by pooling data from these trials. Methods Eligible patients in the STARS and ROSEL studies were those with clinical T1–2a (<4 cm), N0M0, operable NSCLC. Patients were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to SABR or lobectomy with mediastinal lymph node dissection or sampling. We did a pooled analysis in the intention-to-treat population using overall survival as the primary endpoint. Both trials are registered with ClinicalTrials.gov (STARS: NCT00840749; ROSEL: NCT00687986). Findings 58 patients were enrolled and randomly assigned (31 to SABR and 27 to surgery). Median follow-up was 40.2 months (IQR 23.0–47.3) for the SABR group and 35.4 months (18.9–40.7) for the surgery group. Six patients in the surgery group died compared with one patient in the SABR group. Estimated overall survival at 3 years was 95% (95% CI 85–100) in the SABR group compared with 79% (64–97) in the surgery group (hazard ratio [HR] 0.14 [95% CI 0.017–1.190], log-rank p=0.037). Recurrence-free survival at 3 years was 86% (95% CI 74–100) in the SABR group and 80% (65–97) in the surgery group (HR 0.69 [95% CI 0.21–2.29], log-rank p=0.54). In the surgery group, one patient had regional nodal recurrence and two had distant metastases; in the SABR group, one patient had local recurrence, four had regional nodal recurrence, and one had distant metastases. Three (10%) patients in the SABR group had grade 3 treatment-related adverse events (three [10%] chest wall pain, two [6%] dyspnoea or cough, and one [3%] fatigue and rib

  4. Treatment Plan Technique and Quality for Single-Isocenter Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy of Multiple Lung Lesions with Volumetric-Modulated Arc Therapy or Intensity-Modulated Radiosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Kimmen; Xu, Karen M.; Lalonde, Ron; Horne, Zachary D.; Bernard, Mark E.; McCoy, Chuck; Clump, David A.; Burton, Steven A.; Heron, Dwight E.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to provide a practical approach to the planning technique and evaluation of plan quality for the multi-lesion, single-isocenter stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) of the lung. Eleven patients with two or more lung lesions underwent single-isocenter volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) radiosurgery or IMRS. All plans were normalized to the target maximum dose. For each plan, all targets were treated to the same dose. Plan conformity and dose gradient were maximized with dose-control tuning structures surrounding targets. For comparison, multi-isocenter plans were retrospectively created for four patients. Conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), gradient index (GI), and gradient distance (GD) were calculated for each plan. V5, V10, and V20 of the lung and organs at risk (OARs) were collected. Treatment time and total monitor units (MUs) were also recorded. One patient had four lesions and the remainder had two lesions. Six patients received VMAT and five patients received intensity-modulated radiosurgery (IMRS). For those treated with VMAT, two patients received 3-arc VMAT and four received 2-arc VMAT. For those treated with IMRS, two patients were treated with 10 and 11 beams, respectively, and the rest received 12 beams. Prescription doses ranged from 30 to 54 Gy in three to five fractions. The median prescribed isodose line was 84% (range: 80–86%). The median maximum dose was 57.1 Gy (range: 35.7–65.1 Gy). The mean combined PTV was 49.57 cm3 (range: 14.90–87.38 cm3). For single-isocenter plans, the median CI was 1.15 (range: 0.97–1.53). The median HI was 1.19 (range: 1.16–1.28). The median GI was 4.60 (range: 4.16–7.37). The median maximum radiation dose (Dmax) to total lung was 55.6 Gy (range: 35.7–62.0 Gy). The median mean radiation dose to the lung (Dmean) was 4.2 Gy (range: 1.1–9.3 Gy). The median lung V5 was 18.7% (range: 3.8–41.3%). There was no significant difference in CI, HI, GI

  5. Image-guided robotic stereotactic body radiotherapy for benign spinal tumors: theUniversity of California San Francisco preliminary experience.

    PubMed

    Sahgal, A; Chou, D; Ames, C; Ma, L; Lamborn, K; Huang, K; Chuang, C; Aiken, A; Petti, P; Weinstein, P; Larson, D

    2007-12-01

    We evaluate our preliminary experience using the Cyberknife Radiosurgery System in treating benign spinal tumors. A retrospective review of 16 consecutively treated patients, comprising 19 benign spinal tumors, was performed. Histologic types included neurofibroma [11], chordoma [4], hemangioma [2], and meningioma [2]. Three patients had Neurofibromatosis Type 1 (NF1). Only one tumor, recurrent chordoma, had been previously irradiated, and as such not considered in the local failure analysis. Local failure, for the remaining 18 tumors, was based clinically on symptom progression and/or tumor enlargement based on imaging. Indications for spine stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) consisted of either adjuvant to subtotal resection (5/19), primary treatment alone (12/19), boost following external beam radiotherapy (1/19), and salvage following previous radiation (1/19). Median tumor follow-up is 25 months (2-37), and one patient (with NF1) died at 12 months from a stroke. The median total dose, number of fractions, and prescription isodose was 21 Gy (10-30 Gy), 3 fx (1-5 fx), 80% (42-87%). The median tumor volume was 7.6 cc (0.2-274.1 cc). The median V100 (volume V receiving 100% of the prescribed dose) and maximum tumor dose was 95% (77-100%) and 26.7 Gy (15.4-59.7 Gy), respectively. Three tumors progressed at 2, 4, and 36 months post-SR (n=18). Two tumors were neurofibromas (both in NF1 patients), and the third was an intramedullary hemangioblastoma. Based on imaging, two tumors had MRI documented progression, three had regressed, and 13 were unchanged (n=18). With short follow-up, local control following Cyberknife spine SBRT for benign spinal tumors appear acceptable. PMID:17994789

  6. Survey of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Japan by the Japan 3-D Conformal External Beam Radiotherapy Group

    SciTech Connect

    Nagata, Yasushi Hiraoka, Masahiro; Mizowaki, Takashi; Narita, Yuichiro; Matsuo, Yukinori; Norihisa, Yoshiki; Onishi, Hiroshi; Shirato, Hiroki

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: To recognize the current status of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in Japan, using a nationwide survey conducted by the Japan 3-D Conformal External Beam Radiotherapy Group. Methods and Materials: The questionnaire was sent by mail to 117 institutions. Ninety-four institutions (80%) responded by the end of November 2005. Fifty-three institutions indicated that they have already started SBRT, and 38 institutions had been reimbursed by insurance. Results: A total of 1111 patients with histologically confirmed lung cancer were treated. Among these patients, 637 had T1N0M0 and 272 had T2N0M0 lung cancer. Metastatic lung cancer was found in 702 and histologically unconfirmed lung tumor in 291 patients. Primary liver cancer was found in 207 and metastatic liver cancer in 76 patients. The most frequent schedule used for primary lung cancer was 48Gy in 4 fractions at 22 institutions (52%), followed by 50Gy in 5 fractions at 11 institutions (26%) and 60Gy in 8 fractions at 4 institutions (10%). The tendency was the same for metastatic lung cancer. The average number of personnel involved in SBRT was 1.8 radiation oncologists, including 1.1 certified radiation oncologists, 2.8 technologists, 0.7 nurses, and 0.6 certified quality assurance personnel and 0.3 physicists. The most frequent amount of time for treatment planning was 61-120min, for quality assurance was 50-60min, and for treatment was 30min. There were 14 (0.6% of all cases) reported Grade 5 complications: 11 cases of radiation pneumonitis, 2 cases of hemoptysis, and 1 case of radiation esophagitis. Conclusion: The current status of SBRT in Japan was surveyed.

  7. Dose-Volume Histogram Analysis of Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer: A Focus on Duodenal Dose Constraints.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, Christy; Price, Patricia; Cross, Timothy; Loughlin, Sheila; Cowley, Ian; Plowman, Nicholas

    2016-04-01

    Pancreatic carcinoma is an aggressive disease and radiotherapy treatment delivery to the primary tumor is constrained by the anatomical close location of the duodenum, stomach, and small bowel. Duodenal dose tolerance for radiosurgery in 2-5 fractions has been largely unknown. The literature was surveyed for quantitative models of risk in 1-5 fractions and we analyzed our own patient population of 44 patients with unresectable pancreatic tumors who received 3 or 5 fractions of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) between March 2009 and March 2013. A logistic model was constructed in the dose-volume histogram (DVH) Evaluator software for the duodenal D50%, D30cc, D5cc, D1cc, and maximum point dose D0.035cc. Dose tolerance limits from the literature were overlaid onto the clinical duodenal data in the form of a DVH Risk Map, with risk levels of the published limits estimated from the model of clinical data. In 3 fractions, Kopek 2010 found a statistically significant difference in D1cc of patients with no common terminology criteria for adverse events (CTCAE) v3 grade 2 or higher duodenal complications (mean D1cc = 25.3Gy) as compared with patients with grade 2 or higher toxicity (mean D1cc = 37.4Gy). From the logistic model of our duodenal data in 3 fractions, D1cc = 25.3Gy had 4.7% risk of grade 3-4 hemorrhage or stricture and D1cc = 37.4Gy had 20% risk. The 10% risk level was D1cc = 31.4Gy and we were able to keep duodenum dose for all our patients later this level. PMID:27000512

  8. The impact of abdominal compression on outcome in patients treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy for primary lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mampuya, Wambaka Ange; Matsuo, Yukinori; Ueki, Nami; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Mukumoto, Nobutaka; Nakamura, Akira; Iizuka, Yusuke; Kishi, Takahiro; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of abdominal compression (AC) on outcome in patients treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for primary lung cancer. We retrospectively reviewed data for 47 patients with histologically proven non-small cell lung cancer and lung tumour motion ≥8 mm treated with SBRT. Setup error was corrected based on bony structure. The differences in overall survival (OS), local control (LC) and disease-free survival (DFS) were evaluated to compare patients treated with AC (n = 22) and without AC (n = 25). The median follow-up was 42.6 months (range, 1.4–94.6 months). The differences in the 3-year OS, LC and DFS rate between the two groups were not statistically significant (P = 0.909, 0.209 and 0.639, respectively). However, the largest difference was observed in the LC rate, which was 82.5% (95% CI, 54.9–94.0%) for patients treated without AC and 65.4% (95% CI, 40.2–82.0%) for those treated with AC. After stratifying the patients into prognostic groups based on sex and T-stage, the LC difference increased in the group with an unfavourable prognosis. The present study suggests that AC might be associated with a worse LC rate after SBRT using a bony-structure-based set-up. PMID:24801474

  9. Long-Term PSA Control with Repeated Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy in a Patient with Oligometastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Pasqualetti, Francesco; Cocuzza, Paola; Coraggio, Gabriele; Ferrazza, Patrizia; Derosa, Lisa; Galli, Luca; Pasqualetti, Giuseppe; Locantore, Luisa; Boni, Roberto; Fabrini, Maria G; Erba, Paola A

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is one of the most common malignancies and main causes of cancer death in Western countries. In the presence of metastatic disease, systemic treatment remains the main clinical option. However, since the introduction of highly sensitive imaging techniques, a new clinical 'entity' of metastatic patients with a limited number of lesions has been defined: oligometastatic patients. In this patient group, the use of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) or other local therapies against all active sites of disease revealed by 18F-choline positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) could achieve sufficient prostate-specific antigen (PSA) control. However, a clear benefit of this procedure in terms of significant endpoints is yet to be demonstrated. This case report describes our experience with treating a castration-resistant PCa patient with 18F-choline PET/CT-guided SBRT. Because of the occurrence of 5 metachronous lesions over 4 years, the pattern of recurrence was defined by the local multidisciplinary team as oligometastatic disease, and the patient was treated with 5 courses of SBRT which yielded good PSA control. He started systemic therapy with abiraterone acetate almost 5 years after the diagnosis of recurrent PCa. PMID:27160394

  10. Comparing the clinical outcomes in stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung tumors between Ray-Tracing and Monte-Carlo algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jin Ho; Kang, Ki Mun; Choi, Hoon-Sik; Jeong, Hojin; Ha, In Bong; Lee, Jong Deog; Kim, Ho Cheol; Jeong, Yi Yeong; Cho, Yu Ji; Lee, Seung Jun; Kim, Sung Hwan; Jang, In-Seok; Jeong, Bae Kwon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical outcomes between the groups using Ray-Tracing (RAT) and Monte-Carlo (MC) calculation algorithms for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of lung tumors. Materials and Methods Thirty-five patients received SBRT with CyberKnife for 47 primary or metastatic lung tumors. RAT was used for 22 targets in 12 patients, and MC for 25 targets in 23 patients. Total dose of 48 to 60 Gy was prescribed in 3 to 5 fractions on median 80% isodose line. The response rate, local control rate, and toxicities were compared between RAT and MC groups. Results The response rate was lower in the RAT group (77.3%) compared to the MC group (100%) (p = 0.008). The response rates showed an association with the mean dose to the gross tumor volume, which the doses were re-calculated with MC algorithm in both groups. However, the local control rate and toxicities did not differ between the groups. Conclusions The clinical outcome and toxicity of lung SBRT between the RAT and MC groups were similar except for the response rate when the same apparent doses were prescribed. The lower response rate in the RAT group, however, did not compromise the local control rates. As such, reducing the prescription dose for MC algorithm may be performed but done with caution. PMID:26544622

  11. Combination effects of tissue heterogeneity and geometric targeting error in stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung cancer using CyberKnife.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ki Mun; Jeong, Bae Kwon; Choi, Hoon-Sik; Yoo, Seung Hoon; Hwang, Ui-Jung; Lim, Young Kyung; Jeong, Hojin

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated the combined effect of tissue heterogeneity and its variation associated with geometric error in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung cancer. The treatment plans for eight lung cancer patients were calculated using effective path length (EPL) correction and Monte Carlo (MC) algorithms, with both having the same beam configuration for each patient. These two kinds of plans for individual patients were then subsequently recalculated with adding systematic and random geometric errors. In the ordinary treatment plans calculated with no geometric offset, the EPL calculations, compared with the MC calculations, largely overestimated the doses to PTV by ~ 21%, whereas the overestimation were markedly lower in GTV by ~ 12% due to relatively higher density of GTV than of PTV. When recalculating the plans for individual patients with assigning the systematic and random geometric errors, no significant changes in the relative dose distribution, except for overall shift, were observed in the EPL calculations, whereas largely altered in the MC calculations with a consistent increase in dose to GTV. Considering the better accuracy of MC than EPL algorithms, the present results demonstrated the strong coupling of tissue heterogeneity and geometric error, thereby emphasizing the essential need for simultaneous correction for tissue heterogeneity and geometric targeting error in SBRT of lung cancer. PMID:26699300

  12. Monitor unit optimization in stereotactic body radiotherapy for small peripheral non-small cell lung cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bao-Tian; Lin, Zhu; Lin, Pei-Xian; Lu, Jia-Yang; Chen, Chuang-Zhen

    2015-01-01

    The increasingly attractive stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) treatment for stage I lung cancer is concomitant with a large amount of monitor units (MU), leading to excessive out-of-field dose and prolonged beam-on time. The study aims to reduce the MU number and shorten the beam-on time by optimizing the planning parameters. Clinically acceptable treatment plans from fourteen patients suffered from peripheral stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were created in the study. Priority for the upper objective of the target (PUOT), strength and Max MU setting in the MU objective function (MUOF) were adjusted respectively to investigate their effect on MU number, organs at risk (OARs) sparing and beam-on time. We found that the planning parameters influenced the MU number in a PUOT, strength and Max MU dependent manner. Combined with high priority for the UOT (HPUOT) and MUOF, the MU number was reduced from 443 ± 25 to 228 ± 22 MU/Gy without compromising the target coverage and OARs sparing. We also found beam-on time was proportional to MU number and it could be shortened from 7.9 ± 0.5 to 4.1 ± 0.4 minutes. PMID:26679747

  13. Clinical Feasibility of Using an EPID in cine Mode for Image-Guided Verification of Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Berbeco, Ross I.

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: To introduce a novel method for monitoring tumor location during stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) while the treatment beam is on by using a conventional electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Methods and Materials: In our clinic, selected patients were treated under a phase I institutional review board-approved SBRT protocol for limited hepatic metastases from solid tumors. Before treatment planning multiple gold fiducial markers were implanted on the periphery of the tumor. During treatment the EPID was used in cine mode to collect the exit radiation and produce a sequence of images for each field. An in-house program was developed for calculating the location of the fiducials and their relative distance to the planned locations. Results: Three case studies illustrate the utility of the technique. Patient A exhibited a systematic shift of 4 mm during one of the treatment beams. Patient B showed an inferior drift of the target of approximately 1 cm from the time of setup to the end of the fraction. Patient C had a poor setup on the first day of treatment that was quantified and accounted for on subsequent treatment days. Conclusions: Target localization throughout each treatment beam can be quickly assessed with the presented technique. Treatment monitoring with an EPID in cine mode is shown to be a clinically feasible and useful tool.

  14. SU-F-BRF-12: Investigating Dosimetric Effects of Inter-Fraction Deformation in Lung Cancer Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT)

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, J; Tian, Z; Gu, X; Yan, H; Jia, X; Jiang, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: We studied dosimetric effects of inter-fraction deformation in lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), in order to investigate the necessity of adaptive re-planning for lung SBRT treatments. Methods: Six lung cancer patients with different treatment fractions were retrospectively investigated. All the patients were immobilized and localized with a stereotactic body frame and were treated under cone-beam CT (CBCT) image guidance at each fraction. We calculated the actual delivered dose of the treatment plan using the up-to-date patient geometry of each fraction, and compared the dose with the intended plan dose to investigate the dosimetric effects of the inter-fraction deformation. Deformable registration was carried out between the treatment planning CT and the CBCT of each fraction to obtain deformed planning CT for more accurate dose calculations of the delivered dose. The extent of the inter-fraction deformation was also evaluated by calculating the dice similarity coefficient between the delineated structures on the planning CT and those on the deformed planning CT. Results: The average dice coefficients for PTV, spinal cord, esophagus were 0.87, 0.83 and 0.69, respectively. The volume of PTV covered by prescription dose was decreased by 23.78% on average for all fractions and all patients. For spinal cord and esophagus, the volumes covered by the constraint dose were increased by 4.57% and 3.83%. The maximum dose was also increased by 4.11% for spinal cord and 4.29% for esophagus. Conclusion: Due to inter-fraction deformation, large deterioration was found in both PTV coverage and OAR sparing, which demonstrated the needs for adaptive re-planning of lung SBRT cases to improve target coverage while reducing radiation dose to nearby normal tissues.

  15. Positron Emission Tomography for Assessing Local Failure After Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Xu; Liu Hui; Balter, Peter; Allen, Pamela K.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Pan, Tinsu; Chuang, Hubert H.; Chang, Joe Y.

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: We analyzed whether positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography standardized uptake values (SUVs) after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) could predict local recurrence (LR) in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: This study comprised 128 patients with Stage I (n = 68) or isolated recurrent/secondary parenchymal (n = 60) NSCLC treated with image-guided SBRT to 50 Gy over 4 consecutive days; prior radiotherapy was allowed. PET/computed tomography scans were obtained before therapy and at 1 to 6 months after therapy, as well as subsequently as clinically indicated. Continuous variables were analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis tests and categorical variables with Pearson chi-square or Fisher exact tests. Actuarial local failure rates were calculated with the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: At a median follow-up of 31 months (range, 6-71 months), the actuarial 1-, 2-, and 3-year local control rates were 100%, 98.5%, and 98.5%, respectively, in the Stage I group and 95.8%, 87.6%, and 85.8%, respectively, in the recurrent group. The cumulative rates of regional nodal recurrence and distant metastasis were 8.8% (6 of 68) and 14.7% (10 of 68), respectively, for the Stage I group and 11.7% (7 of 60) and 16.7% (10 of 60), respectively, for the recurrent group. Univariate analysis showed that SUVs obtained 12.1 to 24 months after treatment for the Stage I group (p = 0.007) and 6.1 to 12 months and 12.1 to 24 months after treatment for the recurrent group were associated with LR (p < 0.001 for both). Of the 128 patients, 17 (13.3%) had ipsilateral consolidation after SBRT but no elevated metabolic activity on PET; none had LR. The cutoff maximum SUV of 5 was found to have 100% sensitivity, 91% specificity, a 50% positive predictive value, and a 100% negative predictive value for predicting LR. Conclusions: PET was helpful for distinguishing SBRT-induced consolidation from LR. SUVs obtained more than 6 months after SBRT for NSCLC were

  16. Registration of DRRs and portal images for verification of stereotactic body radiotherapy: a feasibility study in lung cancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Künzler, Thomas; Grezdo, Jozef; Bogner, Joachim; Birkfellner, Wolfgang; Georg, Dietmar

    2007-04-01

    Image guidance has become a pre-requisite for hypofractionated radiotherapy where the applied dose per fraction is increased. Particularly in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung tumours, one has to account for set-up errors and intrafraction tumour motion. In our feasibility study, we compared digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) of lung lesions with MV portal images (PIs) to obtain the displacement of the tumour before irradiation. The verification of the tumour position was performed by rigid intensity based registration and three different merit functions such as the sum of squared pixel intensity differences, normalized cross correlation and normalized mutual information. The registration process then provided a translation vector that defines the displacement of the target in order to align the tumour with the isocentre. To evaluate the registration algorithms, 163 test images were created and subsequently, a lung phantom containing an 8 cm3 tumour was built. In a further step, the registration process was applied on patient data, containing 38 tumours in 113 fractions. To potentially improve registration outcome, two filter types (histogram equalization and display equalization) were applied and their impact on the registration process was evaluated. Generated test images showed an increase in successful registrations when applying a histogram equalization filter whereas the lung phantom study proved the accuracy of the selected algorithms, i.e. deviations of the calculated translation vector for all test algorithms were below 1 mm. For clinical patient data, successful registrations occurred in about 59% of anterior-posterior (AP) and 46% of lateral projections, respectively. When patients with a clinical target volume smaller than 10 cm3 were excluded, successful registrations go up to 90% in AP and 50% in lateral projection. In addition, a reliable identification of the tumour position was found to be difficult for clinical target volumes

  17. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Small Lung Tumors in the University of Tokyo Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Haga, Akihiro; Kida, Satoshi; Nakagawa, Keiichi

    2014-01-01

    Our work on stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for primary and metastatic lung tumors will be described. The eligibility criteria for SBRT, our previous SBRT method, the definition of target volume, heterogeneity correction, the position adjustment using four-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (4D CBCT) immediately before SBRT, volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) method for SBRT, verifying of tumor position within internal target volume (ITV) using in-treatment 4D-CBCT during VMAT-SBRT, shortening of treatment time using flattening-filter-free (FFF) techniques, delivery of 4D dose calculation for lung-VMAT patients using in-treatment CBCT and LINAC log data with agility multileaf collimator, and SBRT method for centrally located lung tumors in our institution will be shown. In our institution, these efforts have been made with the goal of raising the local control rate and decreasing adverse effects after SBRT. PMID:25110653

  18. Predicting Chest Wall Pain From Lung Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Different Fractionation Schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Woody, Neil M.; Videtic, Gregory M.M.; Stephans, Kevin L.; Djemil, Toufik; Kim, Yongbok; Xia Ping

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Recent studies with two fractionation schemes predicted that the volume of chest wall receiving >30 Gy (V30) correlated with chest wall pain after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) to the lung. This study developed a predictive model of chest wall pain incorporating radiobiologic effects, using clinical data from four distinct SBRT fractionation schemes. Methods and Materials: 102 SBRT patients were treated with four different fractionations: 60 Gy in three fractions, 50 Gy in five fractions, 48 Gy in four fractions, and 50 Gy in 10 fractions. To account for radiobiologic effects, a modified equivalent uniform dose (mEUD) model calculated the dose to the chest wall with volume weighting. For comparison, V30 and maximum point dose were also reported. Using univariable logistic regression, the association of radiation dose and clinical variables with chest wall pain was assessed by uncertainty coefficient (U) and C statistic (C) of receiver operator curve. The significant associations from the univariable model were verified with a multivariable model. Results: 106 lesions in 102 patients with a mean age of 72 were included, with a mean of 25.5 (range, 12-55) months of follow-up. Twenty patients reported chest wall pain at a mean time of 8.1 (95% confidence interval, 6.3-9.8) months after treatment. The mEUD models, V30, and maximum point dose were significant predictors of chest wall pain (p < 0.0005). mEUD improved prediction of chest wall pain compared with V30 (C = 0.79 vs. 0.77 and U = 0.16 vs. 0.11). The mEUD with moderate weighting (a = 5) better predicted chest wall pain than did mEUD without weighting (a = 1) (C = 0.79 vs. 0.77 and U = 0.16 vs. 0.14). Body mass index (BMI) was significantly associated with chest wall pain (p = 0.008). On multivariable analysis, mEUD and BMI remained significant predictors of chest wall pain (p = 0.0003 and 0.03, respectively). Conclusion: mEUD with moderate weighting better predicted chest wall pain than

  19. Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography Response and Normal Tissue Regeneration After Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy to Liver Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Stinauer, Michelle A.; Diot, Quentin; Westerly, David C.; Schefter, Tracey E.; Kavanagh, Brian D.

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To characterize changes in standardized uptake value (SUV) in positron emission tomography (PET) scans and determine the pace of normal tissue regeneration after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for solid tumor liver metastases. Methods and Materials: We reviewed records of patients with liver metastases treated with SBRT to {>=}40 Gy in 3-5 fractions. Evaluable patients had pretreatment PET and {>=}1 post-treatment PET. Each PET/CT scan was fused to the planning computed tomography (CT) scan. The maximum SUV (SUV{sub max}) for each lesion and the total liver volume were measured on each PET/CT scan. Maximum SUV levels before and after SBRT were recorded. Results: Twenty-seven patients with 35 treated liver lesions were studied. The median follow-up was 15.7 months (range, 1.5-38.4 mo), with 5 PET scans per patient (range, 2-14). Exponential decay curve fitting (r=0.97) showed that SUV{sub max} declined to a plateau of 3.1 for controlled lesions at 5 months after SBRT. The estimated SUV{sub max} decay half-time was 2.0 months. The SUV{sub max} in controlled lesions fluctuated up to 4.2 during follow-up and later declined; this level is close to 2 standard deviations above the mean normal liver SUV{sub max} (4.01). A failure cutoff of SUV{sub max} {>=}6 is twice the calculated plateau SUV{sub max} of controlled lesions. Parenchymal liver volume decreased by 20% at 3-6 months and regenerated to a new baseline level approximately 10% below the pretreatment level at 12 months. Conclusions: Maximum SUV decreases over the first months after SBRT to plateau at 3.1, similar to the median SUV{sub max} of normal livers. Transient moderate increases in SUV{sub max} may be observed after SBRT. We propose a cutoff SUV{sub max} {>=}6, twice the baseline normal liver SUV{sub max}, to score local failure by PET criteria. Post-SBRT values between 4 and 6 would be suspicious for local tumor persistence or recurrence. The volume of normal liver reached nadir 3

  20. Salvage Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) Following In-Field Failure of Initial SBRT for Spinal Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Thibault, Isabelle; Campbell, Mikki; Tseng, Chia-Lin; Atenafu, Eshetu G.; Letourneau, Daniel; Yu, Eugene; Cho, B.C. John; Lee, Young K.; Fehlings, Michael G.; Sahgal, Arjun

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: We report our experience in salvaging spinal metastases initially irradiated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), who subsequently progressed with imaging-confirmed local tumor progression, and were re-irradiated with a salvage second SBRT course to the same level. Methods and Materials: From a prospective database, 56 metastatic spinal segments in 40 patients were identified as having been irradiated with a salvage second SBRT course to the same level. In addition, 24 of 56 (42.9%) segments had initially been irradiated with conventional external beam radiation therapy before the first course of SBRT. Local control (LC) was defined as no progression on magnetic resonance imaging at the treated segment, and calculated according to the competing risk model. Overall survival (OS) was evaluated for each patient treated by use of the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The median salvage second SBRT total dose and number of fractions was 30 Gy in 4 fractions (range, 20-35 Gy in 2-5 fractions), and for the first course of SBRT was 24 Gy in 2 fractions (range, 20-35 Gy in 1-5 fractions). The median follow-up time after salvage second SBRT was 6.8 months (range, 0.9-39 months), the median OS was 10.0 months, and the 1-year OS rate was 48%. A longer time interval between the first and second SBRT courses predicted for better OS (P=.02). The crude LC was 77% (43/56), the 1-year LC rate was 81%, and the median time to local failure was 3.0 months (range, 2.7-16.7 months). Of the 13 local failures, 85% (11/13) and 46% (6/13) showed progression within the epidural space and paraspinal soft tissues, respectively. Absence of baseline paraspinal disease predicted for better LC (P<.01). No radiation-induced vertebral compression fractures or cases of myelopathy were observed. Conclusion: A second course of spine SBRT, most often with 30 Gy in 4 fractions, for spinal metastases that failed initial SBRT is a feasible and efficacious salvage treatment option.

  1. TH-A-9A-03: Dosimetric Effect of Rotational Errors for Lung Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J; Kim, H; Park, J; Kim, J; Kim, H; Ye, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric effects on target volume and organs at risk (OARs) due to roll rotational errors in treatment setup of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung cancer. Methods: There were a total of 23 volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans for lung SBRT examined in this retrospective study. Each CT image of VMAT plans was intentionally rotated by ±1°, ±2°, and ±3° to simulate roll rotational setup errors. The axis of rotation was set at the center of T-spine. The target volume and OARs in the rotated CT images were re-defined by deformable registration of original contours. The dose distributions on each set of rotated images were re-calculated to cover the planning target volume (PTV) with the prescription dose before and after the couch translational correction. The dose-volumetric changes of PTVs and spinal cords were analyzed. Results: The differences in D95% of PTVs by −3°, −2°, −1°, 1°, 2°, and 3° roll rotations before the couch translational correction were on average −11.3±11.4%, −5.46±7.24%, −1.11±1.38% −3.34±3.97%, −9.64±10.3%, and −16.3±14.7%, respectively. After the couch translational correction, those values were −0.195±0.544%, −0.159±0.391%, −0.188±0.262%, −0.310±0.270%, −0.407±0.331%, and −0.433±0.401%, respectively. The maximum dose difference of spinal cord among the 23 plans even after the couch translational correction was 25.9% at −3° rotation. Conclusions: Roll rotational setup errors in lung SBRT significantly influenced the coverage of target volume using VMAT technique. This could be in part compensated by the translational couch correction. However, in spite of the translational correction, the delivered doses to the spinal cord could be more than the calculated doses. Therefore if rotational setup errors exist during lung SBRT using VMAT technique, the rotational correction would rather be considered to prevent over-irradiation of normal

  2. Modeling of body tissues for Monte Carlo simulation of radiotherapy treatments planned with conventional x-ray CT systems.

    PubMed

    Kanematsu, Nobuyuki; Inaniwa, Taku; Nakao, Minoru

    2016-07-01

    In the conventional procedure for accurate Monte Carlo simulation of radiotherapy, a CT number given to each pixel of a patient image is directly converted to mass density and elemental composition using their respective functions that have been calibrated specifically for the relevant x-ray CT system. We propose an alternative approach that is a conversion in two steps: the first from CT number to density and the second from density to composition. Based on the latest compilation of standard tissues for reference adult male and female phantoms, we sorted the standard tissues into groups by mass density and defined the representative tissues by averaging the material properties per group. With these representative tissues, we formulated polyline relations between mass density and each of the following; electron density, stopping-power ratio and elemental densities. We also revised a procedure of stoichiometric calibration for CT-number conversion and demonstrated the two-step conversion method for a theoretically emulated CT system with hypothetical 80 keV photons. For the standard tissues, high correlation was generally observed between mass density and the other densities excluding those of C and O for the light spongiosa tissues between 1.0 g cm(-3) and 1.1 g cm(-3) occupying 1% of the human body mass. The polylines fitted to the dominant tissues were generally consistent with similar formulations in the literature. The two-step conversion procedure was demonstrated to be practical and will potentially facilitate Monte Carlo simulation for treatment planning and for retrospective analysis of treatment plans with little impact on the management of planning CT systems. PMID:27300449

  3. Dose-Response Relationship for Image-Guided Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy of Pulmonary Tumors: Relevance of 4D Dose Calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Guckenberger, Matthias Wulf, Joern; Mueller, Gerd; Krieger, Thomas; Baier, Kurt; Gabor, Manuela; Richter, Anne; Wilbert, Juergen; Flentje, Michael

    2009-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate outcome after image-guided stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and pulmonary metastases. Methods and Materials: A total of 124 patients with 159 pulmonary lesions (metastases n = 118; NSCLC, n = 41; Stage IA, n = 13; Stage IB, n = 19; T3N0, n = 9) were treated with SBRT. Patients were treated with hypofractionated schemata (one to eight fractions of 6-26 Gy); biologic effective doses (BED) to the clinical target volume (CTV) were calculated based on four-dimensional (4D) dose calculation. The position of the pulmonary target was verified using volume imaging before all treatments. Results: With mean/median follow-up of 18/14 months, actuarial local control was 83% at 36 months with no difference between NSCLC and metastases. The dose to the CTV based on 4D dose calculation was closely correlated with local control: local control rates were 89% and 62% at 36 months for >100 Gy and <100 Gy BED (p = 0.0001), respectively. Actuarial freedom from regional and systemic progression was 34% at 36 months for primary NSCLC group; crude rate of regional failure was 15%. Three-year overall survival was 37% for primary NSCLC and 16% for metastases; no dose-response relationship for survival was observed. Exacerbation of comorbidities was the most frequent cause of death for primary NSCLC. Conclusions: Doses of >100 Gy BED to the CTV based on 4D dose calculation resulted in excellent local control rates. This cutoff dose is not specific to the treatment technique and protocol of our study and may serve as a general recommendation.

  4. The Technique, Resources and Costs of Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy of Prostate Cancer: A Comparison of Dose Regimens and Delivery Systems.

    PubMed

    Sharieff, Waseem; Greenspoon, Jeffrey N; Dayes, Ian; Chow, Tom; Wright, James; Lukka, Himu

    2016-02-01

    Robotic system has been used for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of prostate cancer. Arc-based and fixed-gantry systems are used for hypofractionated regimens (10-20 ractions) and the standard regimen (39 fractions); they may also be used to deliver SBRT. Studies are currently underway to compare efficacy and safety of these systems and regimens. Thus, we describe the technique and required resources for the provision of robotic SBRT in relation to the standard regimen and other systems to guide investment decisions. Using administrative data of resource volumes and unit prices, we computed the cost per patient, cost per cure and cost per quality adjusted life year (QALY) of four regimens (5, 12, 20 and 39 fractions) and three delivery systems (robotic, arc-based and fixed-gantry) from a payer's perspective. We performed sensitivity analyses to examine the effects of daily hours of operation and in-room treatment delivery times on cost per patient. In addition, we estimated the budget impact when a robotic system is preferred over an arc-based or fixed-gantry system. Costs of SBRT were $6333/patient (robotic), $4368/patient (arc-based) and $4443/patient (fixed-gantry). When daily hours of operation were varied, the cost of robotic SBRT varied from $9324/patient (2 hours daily) to $5250/patient (10 hours daily). This was comparable to the costs of 39 fraction standard regimen which were $5935/patient (arc-based) and $7992/ patient (fixed-gantry). In settings of moderate to high patient volume, robotic SBRT is cost effective compared to the standard regimen. If SBRT can be delivered with equivalent efficacy and safety, the arc-based system would be the most cost effective system. PMID:24750007

  5. On the automated definition of mobile target volumes from 4D-CT images for stereotactic body radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Tiezhi; Orton, Nigel P.; Tome, Wolfgang A.

    2005-11-15

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) can be used to treat small lesions in the chest. A vacuum-based immobilization system is used in our clinic for SBRT, and a motion envelope is used in treatment planning. The purpose of this study is to automatically derive motion envelopes using deformable image registration of 4D-CT images, and to assess the effect of abdominal pressure on the motion envelopes. 4D-CT scans at ten phases were acquired prior to treatment for both free and restricted breathing using a vacuum-based immobilization system that includes an abdominal pressure pillow. To study the stability of the motion envelope over the course of treatment, a mid-treatment 4D-CT scan was obtained after delivery of the third fraction for two patients. The planning target volume excluding breathing motion (PTV{sub ex}) was defined on the image set at full exhalation phase and transformed into all other phases using displacement maps from deformable image registration. The motion envelope was obtained as the union of PTV{sub ex} masks of all phases. The ratios of the motion envelope to PTV{sub ex} volume ranged from 1.3 to 2.5. When pressure was applied, the ratios were reduced by as much as 29% compared to free breathing for some patients, but increased by up to 9% for others. The abdominal pressure pillow has more motion restriction effects on the anterior/inferior region of the lung. For one of the two patients for whom the 4D-CT scan was repeated at mid-treatment, the motion envelope was reproducible. However, for the other patient the tumor location and lung motion pattern significantly changed due to changes in the anatomy surrounding the tumor during the course of treatment, indicating that an image-guided approach to SBRT may increase the efficacy of this treatment.

  6. Clinical outcomes of CyberKnife stereotactic body radiotherapy for peripheral stage I non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ze-Tian; Wu, Xin-Hu; Li, Bing; Zhu, Xi-Xu

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcome of CyberKnife stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Fifty patients with peripheral stage I NSCLC who refused surgery or were medically inoperable were treated with 48-60 Gy (median dose: 57 Gy) in three divided doses. Histopathology was available in 86% of patients. Thirty patients had a T1 tumor, and 20 patients had T2 tumors. More than 95% of the target volume was covered by the 72% isodose surface. Fiducials were implanted in or near the tumors in all patients to track tumor movement and breathing patterns. The median follow-up time was 35 months (3-45 months). Based on computed tomography scans, 40 patients achieved complete remission, six patients achieved partial remission, two patients exhibited stable disease, and two patients had progressive disease. The local control rate (CR + PR) was 92%, and the 2-year disease control rate (CR + PR + SD) was 96%. Overall survival for the whole group was 86% at 1 year and 74% at 2 years. Grade III toxicity occurred in two patients (4%) after marker placement. Treatment-related late grade III toxicity occurred in five patients (10%). Toxicities greater than grade III were not observed. CyberKnife SBRT achieves a high rate of local control and long-term curative effect with acceptable toxicity for patients with inoperable stage I NSCLC. However, long-term follow-up is necessary to evaluate survival and late toxicity. PMID:25638468

  7. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for T3 and T4N0M0 non–small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Eriguchi, Takahisa; Takeda, Atsuya; Sanuki, Naoko; Nishimura, Shuichi; Takagawa, Yoshiaki; Enomoto, Tatsuji; Saeki, Noriyuki; Yashiro, Kae; Mizuno, Tomikazu; Aoki, Yousuke; Oku, Yohei; Yokosuka, Tetsuya; Shigematsu, Naoyuki

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the outcomes and feasibility of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for cT3 and cT4N0M0 non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), 25 patients with localized primary NSCLC diagnosed as cT3 or cT4N0M0, given SBRT between May 2005 and July 2013, were analyzed. All patients had inoperable tumors. The major reasons for tumors being unresectable were insufficient respiratory function for curative resection, advanced age (>80 years old) or technically inoperable due to invasion into critical organs. The median patient age was 79 years (range; 60–86). The median follow-up duration was 25 months (range: 5–100 months). The 2-year overall survival rates for T3 and T4 were 57% and 69%, respectively. The 2-year local control rates for T3 and T4 were 91% and 68%, respectively. As for toxicities, Grade 0–1, Grade 2 and Grade 3 radiation pneumonitis occurred in 23, 1 and 1 patient, respectively. No other acute or symptomatic late toxicities were reported. Thirteen patients who had no local, mediastinal or intrapulmonary progression at one year after SBRT underwent pulmonary function testing. The median variation in pre-SBRT and post-SBRT forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) values was –0.1 (–0.8–0.8). This variation was not statistically significant (P = 0.56). Forced vital capacity (FVC), vital capacity (VC), %VC and %FEV1 also showed no significant differences. SBRT for cT3 and cT4N0M0 NSCLC was both effective and feasible. Considering the favorable survival and low morbidity rate, SBRT is a potential treatment option for cT3 and cT4N0M0 NSCLC. PMID:26983978

  8. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients undergoing or eligible for long-term domiciliary oxygen therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Yu; Takeda, Atsuya; Eriguchi, Takahisa; Sanuki, Naoko; Aoki, Yousuke; Nishimura, Shuichi; Enomoto, Tatsuji; Shinkai, Masaharu; Kawana, Akihiko; Kaneko, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    A major cause of death in patients undergoing long-term domiciliary oxygen therapy (LTOT) is lung cancer progression. In our institution, we actively perform stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) on patients with early-stage non–small-cell lung cancer undergoing LTOT. In this study, we retrospectively analyzed the treatment efficacy and safety of SBRT for patients with T1-3N0M0 non–small-cell lung cancer who had been prescribed LTOT for treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). A total of 24 patients were studied. Their median age was 74 years (range, 63–87 years). The median duration from the start of LTOT to SBRT was 23 months (range, 0–85 months). Four of the 24 patients underwent lobectomy due to lung cancer. The median follow-up duration was 29 months (range, 5–79 months). One patient had a local recurrence. The median survival time was 30 months. The 3-year overall survival was 49%. In 6 of the 24 patients (25%), COPD presented with interstitial pneumonia. The 3-year overall survival for patients with COPD without interstitial pneumonia was significantly better than that for patients with both COPD and interstitial pneumonia (67% and 0%, respectively; P < 0.0001). Grade 5 radiation pneumonitis occurred in one patient (4%) with COPD with interstitial pneumonia. SBRT was tolerated by patients with early-stage non–small-cell lung cancer undergoing LTOT. SBRT should be considered for patients undergoing LTOT. However, clinicians should consider the risk of severe radiation pneumonitis in patients with interstitial pneumonia. PMID:26487713

  9. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for T3 and T4N0M0 non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Eriguchi, Takahisa; Takeda, Atsuya; Sanuki, Naoko; Nishimura, Shuichi; Takagawa, Yoshiaki; Enomoto, Tatsuji; Saeki, Noriyuki; Yashiro, Kae; Mizuno, Tomikazu; Aoki, Yousuke; Oku, Yohei; Yokosuka, Tetsuya; Shigematsu, Naoyuki

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the outcomes and feasibility of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for cT3 and cT4N0M0 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), 25 patients with localized primary NSCLC diagnosed as cT3 or cT4N0M0, given SBRT between May 2005 and July 2013, were analyzed. All patients had inoperable tumors. The major reasons for tumors being unresectable were insufficient respiratory function for curative resection, advanced age (>80 years old) or technically inoperable due to invasion into critical organs. The median patient age was 79 years (range; 60-86). The median follow-up duration was 25 months (range: 5-100 months). The 2-year overall survival rates for T3 and T4 were 57% and 69%, respectively. The 2-year local control rates for T3 and T4 were 91% and 68%, respectively. As for toxicities, Grade 0-1, Grade 2 and Grade 3 radiation pneumonitis occurred in 23, 1 and 1 patient, respectively. No other acute or symptomatic late toxicities were reported. Thirteen patients who had no local, mediastinal or intrapulmonary progression at one year after SBRT underwent pulmonary function testing. The median variation in pre-SBRT and post-SBRT forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) values was -0.1 (-0.8-0.8). This variation was not statistically significant (P = 0.56). Forced vital capacity (FVC), vital capacity (VC), %VC and %FEV1 also showed no significant differences. SBRT for cT3 and cT4N0M0 NSCLC was both effective and feasible. Considering the favorable survival and low morbidity rate, SBRT is a potential treatment option for cT3 and cT4N0M0 NSCLC. PMID:26983978

  10. Pathologic response with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and stereotactic body radiotherapy for borderline resectable and locally-advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Neoadjuvant stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has potential applicability in the management of borderline resectable and locally-advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma. In this series, we report the pathologic outcomes in the subset of patients who underwent surgery after neoadjuvant SBRT. Methods Patients with borderline resectable or locally-advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma who were treated with SBRT followed by resection were included. Chemotherapy was to the discretion of the medical oncologist and preceded SBRT for most patients. Results Twelve patients met inclusion criteria. Most (92%) received neoadjuvant chemotherapy, and gemcitabine/capecitabine was most frequently utilized (n = 7). Most were treated with fractionated SBRT to 36 Gy/3 fractions (n = 7) and the remainder with single fraction to 24 Gy (n = 5). No grade 3+ acute toxicities attributable to SBRT were found. Two patients developed post-surgical vascular complications and one died secondary to this. The mean time to surgery after SBRT was 3.3 months. An R0 resection was performed in 92% of patients (n = 11/12). In 25% (n = 3/12) of patients, a complete pathologic response was achieved, and an additional 16.7% (n = 2/12) demonstrated <10% viable tumor cells. Kaplan-Meier estimated median progression free survival is 27.4 months. Overall survival is 92%, 64% and 51% at 1-, 2-, and 3-years. Conclusions This study reports the pathologic response in patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and SBRT for borderline resectable and locally-advanced pancreatic cancer. In our experience, 92% achieved an R0 resection and 41.7% of patients demonstrated either complete or extensive pathologic response to treatment. The results of a phase II study of this novel approach will be forthcoming. PMID:24175982

  11. DOSIMETRIC CONSEQUENCES OF USING CONTRAST-ENHANCED COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC IMAGES FOR INTENSITY-MODULATED STEREOTACTIC BODY RADIOTHERAPY PLANNING.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Hiroto; Roback, Donald M; Larue, Susan M; Nolan, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    Potential benefits of planning radiation therapy on a contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan (ceCT) should be weighed against the possibility that this practice may be associated with an inadvertent risk of overdosing nearby normal tissues. This study investigated the influence of ceCT on intensity-modulated stereotactic body radiotherapy (IM-SBRT) planning. Dogs with head and neck, pelvic, or appendicular tumors were included in this retrospective cross-sectional study. All IM-SBRT plans were constructed on a pre- or ceCT. Contours for tumor and organs at risk (OAR) were manually constructed and copied onto both CT's; IM-SBRT plans were calculated on each CT in a manner that resulted in equal radiation fluence. The maximum and mean doses for OAR, and minimum, maximum, and mean doses for targets were compared. Data were collected from 40 dogs per anatomic site (head and neck, pelvis, and limbs). The average dose difference between minimum, maximum, and mean doses as calculated on pre- and ceCT plans for the gross tumor volume was less than 1% for all anatomic sites. Similarly, the differences between mean and maximum doses for OAR were less than 1%. The difference in dose distribution between plans made on CTs with and without contrast enhancement was tolerable at all treatment sites. Therefore, although caution would be recommended when planning IM-SBRT for tumors near "reservoirs" for contrast media (such as the heart and urinary bladder), findings supported the use of ceCT with this dose calculation algorithm for both target delineation and IM-SBRT treatment planning. PMID:26242716

  12. SU-E-J-199: Evaluation of Motion Tracking Effects On Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy of Abdominal Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Monterroso, M; Dogan, N; Yang, Y

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effects of respiratory motion on the delivered dose distribution of CyberKnife motion tracking-based stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of abdominal targets. Methods: Four patients (two pancreas and two liver, and all with 4DCT scans) were retrospectively evaluated. A plan (3D plan) using CyberKnife Synchrony was optimized on the end-exhale phase in the CyberKnife's MultiPlan treatment planning system (TPS), with 40Gy prescribed in 5 fractions. A 4D plan was then created following the 4D planning utility in the MultiPlan TPS, by recalculating dose from the 3D plan beams on all 4DCT phases, with the same prescribed isodose line. The other seven phases of the 4DCT were then deformably registered to the end-exhale phase for 4D dose summation. Doses to the target and organs at risk (OAR) were compared between 3D and 4D plans for each patient. The mean and maximum doses to duodenum, liver, spinal cord and kidneys, and doses to 5cc of duodenum, 700cc of liver, 0.25cc of spinal cord and 200cc of kidneys were used. Results: Target coverage in the 4D plans was about 1% higher for two patients and about 9% lower in the other two. OAR dose differences between 3D and 4D varied among structures, with doses as much as 8.26Gy lower or as much as 5.41Gy higher observed in the 4D plans. Conclusion: The delivered dose can be significantly different from the planned dose for both the target and OAR close to the target, which is caused by the relative geometry change while the beams chase the moving target. Studies will be performed on more patients in the future. The differences of motion tracking versus passive motion management with the use of internal target volumes will also be investigated.

  13. SU-E-J-52: Dosimetric Benefit of Adaptive Re-Planning in Lung Cancer Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT)

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, J; Tian, Z; Gu, X; Yan, H; Jiang, S; Jia, X

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric benefit of adaptive re-planning for lung stereotactic body radiotherapy(SBRT). Methods: Five lung cancer patients with SBRT treatment were retrospectively investigated. Our in-house supercomputing online re-planning environment (SCORE) was used to realize the re-planning process. First a deformable image registration was carried out to transfer contours from treatment planning CT to each treatment CBCT. Then an automatic re-planning using original plan DVH guided fluence-map optimization is performed to get a new plan for the up-to-date patient geometry. We compared the re-optimized plan to the original plan projected on the up-to-date patient geometry in critical dosimetric parameters, such as PTV coverage, spinal cord maximum and volumetric constraint dose, esophagus maximum and volumetric constraint dose. Results: The average volume of PTV covered by prescription dose for all patients was improved by 7.56% after the adaptive re-planning. The volume of the spinal cord receiving 14.5Gy and 23Gy (V14.5, V23) decreased by 1.48% and 0.68%, respectively. For the esophagus, the volume receiving 19.5Gy (V19.5) reduced by 1.37%. Meanwhile, the maximum dose dropped off by 2.87% for spinal cord and 4.80% for esophagus. Conclusion: Our experimental results demonstrate that adaptive re-planning for lung SBRT has the potential to minimize the dosimetric effect of inter-fraction deformation and thus improve target coverage while reducing the risk of toxicity to nearby normal tissues.

  14. Modeling of body tissues for Monte Carlo simulation of radiotherapy treatments planned with conventional x-ray CT systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanematsu, Nobuyuki; Inaniwa, Taku; Nakao, Minoru

    2016-07-01

    In the conventional procedure for accurate Monte Carlo simulation of radiotherapy, a CT number given to each pixel of a patient image is directly converted to mass density and elemental composition using their respective functions that have been calibrated specifically for the relevant x-ray CT system. We propose an alternative approach that is a conversion in two steps: the first from CT number to density and the second from density to composition. Based on the latest compilation of standard tissues for reference adult male and female phantoms, we sorted the standard tissues into groups by mass density and defined the representative tissues by averaging the material properties per group. With these representative tissues, we formulated polyline relations between mass density and each of the following; electron density, stopping-power ratio and elemental densities. We also revised a procedure of stoichiometric calibration for CT-number conversion and demonstrated the two-step conversion method for a theoretically emulated CT system with hypothetical 80 keV photons. For the standard tissues, high correlation was generally observed between mass density and the other densities excluding those of C and O for the light spongiosa tissues between 1.0 g cm‑3 and 1.1 g cm‑3 occupying 1% of the human body mass. The polylines fitted to the dominant tissues were generally consistent with similar formulations in the literature. The two-step conversion procedure was demonstrated to be practical and will potentially facilitate Monte Carlo simulation for treatment planning and for retrospective analysis of treatment plans with little impact on the management of planning CT systems.

  15. Magnesium Isotopes in the Earth, Moon, Mars, and Pallasite Parent Body: High-Precision Analysis of Olivine by Laser-Ablation Multi-Collector ICPMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, M.; McCulloch, M.; ONeill, H.; Brandon, A.

    2004-01-01

    Magnesium isotopes potentially offer new insights into a diverse range of processes including evaporation and condensation in the solar nebula, melting and metasomatism in planetary interiors, and hydrothermal alteration [1,2,3,4]. Volatility-related Mg isotopic variations of up to 10 per mil/amu relative to a terrestrial standard have been found in early nebular phases interpreted as evaporation residues [1], and relatively large variations (up to 3 per mil/amu) in the terrestrial mantle have been reported recently [4]. In order to investigate possible differences in the nebular history of material contributing to the terrestrial planets, and to search for evidence of a high-temperature origin of the Moon, we have measured the magnesium isotopic composition of primitive olivines from the Earth, Moon, Mars, and pallasite parent body using laser-ablation multicollector ICPMS.

  16. SU-E-T-131: Dosimetric Impact and Evaluation of Different Heterogenity Algorithm in Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Plan for Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy Lung Treatment with the Flattening Filter Free Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, J; Kim, J; Lee, J; Kim, Y

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The present study aimed to investigate the dosimetric impacts of the anisotropic analytic algorithm (AAA) and the Acuros XB (AXB) plan for lung stereotactic ablative radiation therapy using flattening filter-free (FFF) beam. We retrospectively analyzed 10 patients. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 10 patients. The dosimetric parameters for the target and organs at risk (OARs) from the treatment plans calculated with these dose calculation algorithms were compared. The technical parameters, such as the computation times and the total monitor units (MUs), were also evaluated. Results: A comparison of DVHs from AXB and AAA showed that the AXB plan produced a high maximum PTV dose by average 4.40% with a statistical significance but slightly lower mean PTV dose by average 5.20% compared to the AAA plans. The maximum dose to the lung was slightly higher in the AXB compared to the AAA. For both algorithms, the values of V5, V10 and V20 for ipsilateral lung were higher in the AXB plan more than those of AAA. However, these parameters for contralateral lung were comparable. The differences of maximum dose for the spinal cord and heart were also small. The computation time of AXB was found fast with the relative difference of 13.7% than those of AAA. The average of monitor units (MUs) for all patients was higher in AXB plans than in the AAA plans. These results indicated that the difference between AXB and AAA are large in heterogeneous region with low density. Conclusion: The AXB provided the advantages such as the accuracy of calculations and the reduction of the computation time in lung stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) with using FFF beam, especially for VMAT planning. In dose calculation with the media of different density, therefore, the careful attention should be taken regarding the impacts of different heterogeneity correction algorithms. The authors report no conflicts of interest.

  17. Long-Term Outcome After Static Intensity-Modulated Total Body Radiotherapy Using Compensators Stratified by Pediatric and Adult Cohorts

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Ralf A. Schultze, Juergen; Jensen, J. Martin; Hebbinghaus, Dieter; Galalae, Razvan M.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To report the long-term outcome after total body irradiation with intensity-modulating compensators and allogeneic/autologous transplantation, especially in terms of therapy-related toxicity in pediatric and adult cohorts. Methods and Materials: A total of 257 consecutive patients (40 children and 217 adults) have been treated since 1983 with TBI using static intensity-modulated radiotherapy for hematologic malignancies. The total dose of 12 Gy was applied in six fractions within 3 days before allogeneic (n = 174) or autologous (n = 83) transplantation. The median follow-up was 9.2 years. Results: The 5-year overall survival rate was 47.9% (49.8% for the adults and 37.5% for the children, p = 0.171). The 5-year tumor-related mortality rate was 23%, and the 5-year treatment-related mortality rate 29.2% (29.5% in the adults and 27.5% in the pediatric patients). Interstitial pneumonitis developed in 28 (10.9%) of 257 patients and in 12.5% of the pediatric cohort. The interstitial pneumonitis rate was 25% in pediatric patients treated with a 12-Gy lung dose compared with 4.2% for those treated to an 11-Gy lung dose. The overall survival rate stratified by lung dose was 26.7% for 12 Gy and 52.4% for 11 Gy (p = 0.001). The incidence of veno-occlusive disease and cataract was 5.8% and 6.6% in all patients and 12.5% and 15% in the pediatric patients, respectively (p < 0.05). Secondary malignancies were found in 4.3% of all patients, all in the adult cohort at transplantation. Conclusion: Static intensity-modulated total body irradiation with a total dose of 12 Gy before allogeneic/autologous transplantation is a successful treatment with good long-term outcome and acceptable therapy-related toxicities. Constraining the lung dose to 11 Gy substantially lowered the actuarial treatment-related mortality. This effect was especially striking in the pediatric patients.

  18. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Medically Inoperable Lung Cancer: Prospective, Single-Center Study of 108 Consecutive Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Taremi, Mojgan; Hope, Andrew; Dahele, Max; Pearson, Shannon; Fung, Sharon; Purdie, Thomas; Brade, Anthony; Cho, John; Sun, Alexander; Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre; Bezjak, Andrea

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To present the results of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for medically inoperable patients with Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and contrast outcomes in patients with and without a pathologic diagnosis. Methods and Materials: Between December 2004 and October 2008, 108 patients (114 tumors) underwent treatment according to the prospective research ethics board-approved SBRT protocols at our cancer center. Of the 108 patients, 88 (81.5%) had undergone pretreatment whole-body [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography. A pathologic diagnosis was unavailable for 33 (28.9%) of the 114 lesions. The SBRT schedules included 48 Gy in 4 fractions or 54-60 Gy in 3 fractions for peripheral lesions and 50-60 Gy in 8-10 fractions for central lesions. Toxicity and radiologic response were assessed at the 3-6-month follow-up visits using conventional criteria. Results: The mean tumor diameter was 2.4-cm (range, 0.9-5.7). The median follow-up was 19.1 months (range, 1-55.7). The estimated local control rate at 1 and 4 years was 92% (95% confidence interval [CI], 86-97%) and 89% (95% CI, 81-96%). The cause-specific survival rate at 1 and 4 years was 92% (95% CI, 87-98%) and 77% (95% CI, 64-89%), respectively. No statistically significant difference was found in the local, regional, and distant control between patients with and without pathologically confirmed NSCLC. The most common acute toxicity was Grade 1 or 2 fatigue (53 of 108 patients). No toxicities of Grade 4 or greater were identified. Conclusions: Lung SBRT for early-stage NSCLC resulted in excellent local control and cause-specific survival with minimal toxicity. The disease-specific outcomes were comparable for patients with and without a pathologic diagnosis. SBRT can be considered an option for selected patients with proven or presumed early-stage NSCLC.

  19. Intrafraction Variation of Mean Tumor Position During Image-Guided Hypofractionated Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Chirag; Grills, Inga S.; Kestin, Larry L.; McGrath, Samuel; Ye Hong; Martin, Shannon K.; Yan Di

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: Prolonged delivery times during daily cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT)-guided lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) introduce concerns regarding intrafraction variation (IFV) of the mean target position (MTP). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the magnitude of the IFV-MTP and to assess target margins required to compensate for IFV and postonline CBCT correction residuals. Patient, treatment, and tumor characteristics were analyzed with respect to their impact on IFV-MTP. Methods and Materials: A total of 126 patients with 140 tumors underwent 659 fractions of lung SBRT. Dose prescribed was 48 or 60 Gy in 12 Gy fractions. Translational target position correction of the MTP was performed via onboard CBCT. IFV-MTP was measured as the difference in MTP between the postcorrection CBCT and the posttreatment CBCT excluding residual error. Results: IFV-MTP was 0.2 {+-} 1.8 mm, 0.1 {+-} 1.9 mm, and 0.01 {+-} 1.5 mm in the craniocaudal, anteroposterior, and mediolateral dimensions and the IFV-MTP vector was 2.3 {+-} 2.1 mm. Treatment time and excursion were found to be significant predictors of IFV-MTP. An IFV-MTP vector greater than 2 and 5 mm was seen in 40.8% and 7.2% of fractions, respectively. IFV-MTP greater than 2 mm was seen in heavier patients with larger excursions and longer treatment times. Significant differences in IFV-MTP were seen between immobilization devices. The stereotactic frame immobilization device was found to be significantly less likely to have an IFV-MTP vector greater than 2 mm compared with the alpha cradle, BodyFIX, and hybrid immobilization devices. Conclusions: Treatment time and respiratory excursion are significantly associated with IFV-MTP. Significant differences in IFV-MTP were found between immobilization devices. Target margins for IFV-MTP plus post-correction residuals are dependent on immobilization device with 5-mm uniform margins being acceptable for the frame immobilization device.

  20. WE-E-BRE-02: BEST IN PHYSICS (THERAPY) - Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Renal Sympathetic Ablation for the Treatment of Refractory Hypertension

    SciTech Connect

    Maxim, P; Wheeler, M; Loo, B; Maguire, P

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To determine the safety and efficacy of stereotactic radiotherapy as a novel treatment for patients with refractory hypertension in a swine model. Uncontrolled hypertension is a significant contributor to morbidity and mortality, substantially increasing the risk of ischemic stroke, ischemic heart disease, and kidney failure. Methods: High-resolution computed tomography (CT) images of anesthetized pigs were acquired and treatment plans for each renal artery and nerve were developed using our clinically implemented treatment planning system. Stereotactic radiotherapy, 40Gy in single fraction was delivered bilaterally to the renal nerves using a state-of-the-art medical linear accelerator under image guidance utilizing dynamic conformal arcs. Dose to nearby critical organs was evaluated by dosevolume histogram analysis and correlated to toxicity data obtained through follow up pathology analysis. The animals were observed for six months with serial measurements of blood pressure, urine analysis, serum laboratories, and overall clinical and behavioral status. Results: All animals survived to the follow-up point without evidence of renal dysfunction (stable serum creatinine), skin changes, or behavioral changes that might suggest animal discomfort. Plasma norepinephrine levels (ng/ml) were followed monthly for 6 months. The average reduction observed was 63%, with the median reduction at 73.5%. Microscopic evaluation 4–6 weeks after treatment showed evidence of damage to the nerves around treated renal arteries. Considerable attenuation in pan neurofilament expression by immunohistochemistry was observed with some vacuolar changes indicative of injury. There was no histological or immunohistochemical evidence of damage to nearby spinal cord or spinal nerve root structures. Conclusion: Our preclinical studies have shown stereotactic radiotherapy to the renal sympathetic plexus to be safe and effective in reducing blood pressure, thus this approach holds great

  1. A Retrospective Comparison of Robotic Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy and Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy for the Reirradiation of Locally Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Ozyigit, Gokhan; Cengiz, Mustafa; Yazici, Gozde; Yildiz, Ferah; Gurkaynak, Murat; Zorlu, Faruk; Yildiz, Demet; Hosal, Sefik; Gullu, Ibrahim; Akyol, Fadil

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: We assessed therapeutic outcomes of reirradiation with robotic stereotactic radiotherapy (SBRT) for locally recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma (LRNPC) patients and compared those results with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (CRT) with or without brachytherapy (BRT). Methods and Materials: Treatment outcomes were evaluated retrospectively in 51 LRNPC patients receiving either robotic SBRT (24 patients) or CRT with or without BRT (27 patients) in our department. CRT was delivered with a 6-MV linear accelerator, and a median total reirradiation dose of 57 Gy in 2 Gy/day was given. Robotic SBRT was delivered with CyberKnife (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA). Patients in the SBRT arm received 30 Gy over 5 consecutive days. We calculated actuarial local control and cancer-specific survival rates for the comparison of treatment outcomes in SBRT and CRT arms. The Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0 was used for toxicity evaluation. Results: The median follow-up was 24 months for all patients. Two-year actuarial local control rates were 82% and 80% for SBRT and CRT arms, respectively (p = 0.6). Two-year cancer-specific survival rates were 64% and 47% for the SBRT and CRT arms, respectively (p = 0.4). Serious late toxicities (Grade 3 and above) were observed in 21% of patients in the SBRT arm, whereas 48% of patients had serious toxicity in the CRT arm (p = 0.04). Fatal complications occurred in three patients (12.5%) of the SBRT arm, and four patients (14.8%) of the CRT arm (p = 0.8). T stage at recurrence was the only independent predictor for local control and survival. Conclusion: Our robotic SBRT protocol seems to be feasible and less toxic in terms of late effects compared with CRT arm for the reirradiation of LRNPC patients.

  2. Implementation of Feedback-Guided Voluntary Breath-Hold Gating for Cone Beam CT-Based Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Peng Yong; Vedam, Sastry; Chang, Joe Y.; Gao Song; Sadagopan, Ramaswamy; Bues, Martin; Balter, Peter

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: To analyze tumor position reproducibility of feedback-guided voluntary deep inspiration breath-hold (FGBH) gating for cone beam computed tomography (CBCT)-based stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods and materials: Thirteen early-stage lung cancer patients eligible for SBRT with tumor motion of >1cm were evaluated for FGBH-gated treatment. Multiple FGBH CTs were acquired at simulation, and single FGBH CBCTs were also acquired prior to each treatment. Simulation CTs and treatment CBCTs were analyzed to quantify reproducibility of tumor positions during FGBH. Benefits of FGBH gating compared to treatment during free breathing, as well treatment with gating at exhalation, were examined for lung sparing, motion margins, and reproducibility of gross tumor volume (GTV) position relative to nonmoving anatomy. Results: FGBH increased total lung volumes by 1.5 times compared to free breathing, resulting in a proportional drop in total lung volume receiving 10 Gy or more. Intra- and inter-FGBH reproducibility of GTV centroid positions at simulation were 1.0 {+-} 0.5 mm, 1.3 {+-} 1.0 mm, and 0.6 {+-} 0.4 mm in the anterior-posterior (AP), superior-inferior (SI), and left-right lateral (LR) directions, respectively, compared to more than 1 cm of tumor motion at free breathing. During treatment, inter-FGBH reproducibility of the GTV centroid with respect to bony anatomy was 1.2 {+-} 0.7 mm, 1.5 {+-} 0.8 mm, and 1.0 {+-} 0.4 mm in the AP, SI, and LR directions. In addition, the quality of CBCTs was improved due to elimination of motion artifacts, making this technique attractive for poorly visualized tumors, even with small motion. Conclusions: The extent of tumor motion at normal respiration does not influence the reproducibility of the tumor position under breath hold conditions. FGBH-gated SBRT with CBCT can improve the reproducibility of GTV centroids, reduce required margins, and minimize dose to normal tissues in the treatment of mobile tumors.

  3. Dosimetric comparison of two arc-based stereotactic body radiotherapy techniques for early-stage lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Huan Ye, Jingjing; Kim, John J.; Deng, Jun; Kaur, Monica S.; Chen, Zhe

    2015-04-01

    To compare the dosimetric and delivery characteristics of two arc-based stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) techniques for early-stage lung cancer treatment. SBRT treatment plans for lung tumors of different sizes and locations were designed using a single-isocenter multisegment dynamic conformal arc technique (SiMs-arc) and a volumetric modulated arc therapy technique (RapidArc) for 5 representative patients treated previously with lung SBRT. The SiMs-arc plans were generated with the isocenter located in the geometric center of patient's axial plane (which allows for collision-free gantry rotation around the patient) and 6 contiguous 60° arc segments spanning from 1° to 359°. 2 RapidArc plans, one using the same arc geometry as the SiMs-arc and the other using typical partial arcs (210°) with the isocenter inside planning target volume (PTV), were generated for each corresponding SiMs-arc plan. All plans were generated using the Varian Eclipse treatment planning system (V10.0) and were normalized with PTV V{sub 100} to 95%. PTV coverage, dose to organs at risk, and total monitor units (MUs) were then compared and analyzed. For PTV coverage, the RapidArc plans generally produced higher PTV D{sub 99} (by 1.0% to 3.3%) and higher minimum dose (by 2.7% to 12.7%), better PTV conformality index (by 1% to 8%), and less volume of 50% dose outside 2 cm from PTV (by 0 to 20.8 cm{sup 3}) than the corresponding SiMs-arc plans. For normal tissues, no significant dose differences were observed for the lungs, trachea, chest wall, and heart; RapidArc using partial arcs produced lowest maximum dose to spinal cord. For dose delivery, the RapidArc plans typically required 50% to 90% more MUs than SiMs-arc plans to deliver the same prescribed dose. The additional intensity modulation afforded by variable gantry speed and dose rate and by overlapping arcs enabled RapidArc plans to produce dosimetrically improved plans for lung SBRT, but required more MUs (by a factor > 1.5) to

  4. Dose-Response for Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy in Early-Stage Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, Jeffrey R.; Robinson, Clifford G.; El Naqa, Issam; Creach, Kimberly M.; Drzymala, Robert E.; Bloch, Charles; Parikh, Parag J.; Bradley, Jeffrey D.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To compare the efficacy of three lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) regimens in a large institutional cohort. Methods: Between 2004 and 2009, 130 patients underwent definitive lung cancer SBRT to a single lesion at the Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology. We delivered 18 Gy Multiplication-Sign 3 fractions for peripheral tumors (n = 111) and either 9 Gy Multiplication-Sign 5 fractions (n = 8) or 10 Gy Multiplication-Sign 5 fractions (n = 11) for tumors that were central or near critical structures. Univariate and multivariate analysis of prognostic factors was performed using the Cox proportional hazard model. Results: Median follow-up was 11, 16, and 13 months for the 9 Gy Multiplication-Sign 5, 10 Gy Multiplication-Sign 5, and 18 Gy Multiplication-Sign 3 groups, respectively. Local control statistics for Years 1 and 2 were, respectively, 75% and 50% for 9 Gy Multiplication-Sign 5, 100% and 100% for 10 Gy Multiplication-Sign 5, and 99% and 91% for 18 Gy Multiplication-Sign 3. Median overall survival was 14 months, not reached, and 34 months for the 9 Gy Multiplication-Sign 5, 10 Gy Multiplication-Sign 5, and 18 Gy Multiplication-Sign 3 treatments, respectively. No difference in local control or overall survival was found between the 10 Gy Multiplication-Sign 5 and 18 Gy Multiplication-Sign 3 groups on log-rank test, but both groups had improved local control and overall survival compared with 9 Gy Multiplication-Sign 5. Treatment with 9 Gy Multiplication-Sign 5 was the only independent prognostic factor for reduced local control on multivariate analysis, and increasing age, increasing tumor volume, and poor performance status predicted independently for reduced overall survival. Conclusion: Treatment regimens of 10 Gy Multiplication-Sign 5 and 18 Gy Multiplication-Sign 3 seem to be efficacious for lung cancer SBRT and provide superior local control and overall survival compared with 9 Gy Multiplication-Sign 5.

  5. Best of the Radiosurgery Society® Scientific Meeting 2014: stereotactic radiosurgery/stereotactic body radiotherapy treatment of extracranial and intracranial lesions.

    PubMed

    Mahadevan, Anand; Bucholz, Richard; Gaya, Andrew M; Kresl, John J; Mantz, Constantine; Minnich, Douglas J; Muacevic, Alexander; Medbery, Clinton; Yang, Jun; Caglar, Hale Basak; Davis, Joanne N

    2014-12-01

    The SRS/SBRT Scientific Meeting 2014, Minneapolis, MN, USA, 7-10 May 2014. The Radiosurgery Society(®), a professional medical society dedicated to advancing the field of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), held the international Radiosurgery Society Scientific Meeting, from 7-10 May 2014 in Minneapolis (MN, USA). This year's conference attracted over 400 attendants from around the world and featured over 100 presentations (46 oral) describing the role of SRS/SBRT for the treatment of intracranial and extracranial malignant and nonmalignant lesions. This article summarizes the meeting highlights for SRS/SBRT treatments, both intracranial and extracranial, in a concise review. PMID:25525840

  6. Ablation of the GNB3 gene in mice does not affect body weight, metabolism or blood pressure, but causes bradycardia

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Yuanchao; Sun, Zhizeng; Guo, Ang; Song, Long-sheng; Grobe, Justin L.; Chen, Songhai

    2014-01-01

    G protein β3 (Gβ3) is an isoform of heterotrimeric G protein β subunits involved in transducing G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling. Polymorphisms in Gβ3 (GNB3) are associated with many human disorders (e.g. hypertension, diabetes and obesity) but the role of GNB3 in these pathogeneses remains unclear. Here, Gβ3-null mice (GNB3−/−) were characterized to determine how Gβ3 functions to regulate blood pressure, body weight and metabolism. We found Gβ3 expression restricted to limited types of tissues, including the retina, several regions of brain and heart ventricles. Gβ3-deficient mice were normal as judged by body weight gain by age or by feeding with high-fat diet (HFD); glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity; baseline blood pressure and angiotensin II infusion-induced hypertension. During tail-cuff blood pressure measurements, however, Gβ3-null mice had slower heart rates (~450 vs ~500 beats/min). This bradycardia was not observed in isolated and perfused Gβ3-null mouse hearts. Moreover, mouse hearts isolated from GNB3−/− and controls responded equivalently to muscarinic receptor- and β-adrenergic receptor-stimulated bradycardia and tachycardia, respectively. Since no difference was seen in isolated hearts, Gβ3 is unlikely to be involved directly in the GPCR signaling activity that controls heart pacemaker activity. These results demonstrate that although Gβ3 appears dispensable in mice for regulation of blood pressure, body weight and metabolic features associated with obesity and diabetes, Gβ3 may regulate heart rate. PMID:25093805

  7. Sci—Sat AM: Stereo — 08: Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR) for low, intermediate and high risk prostate cancer using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) with a 10x Flattening Filter Free (FFF) beam

    SciTech Connect

    Mestrovic, A; Fortin, D; Alexander, A

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility of using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) with a 10x Flattening Filter Free (FFF) beam for Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR) for low, intermediate and high risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Ten anonymized patient CT data sets were used in this planning study. For each patient CT data set, three sets of contours were generated: 1) low risk, 2) intermediate risk, and 3) high risk scenarios. For each scenario, a single-arc and a double-arc VMAT treatment plans were created. Plans were generated with the Varian Eclipse™ treatment planning system for a Varian TrueBeam™ linac equipped with Millenium 120 MLC. Plans were created using a 10x-FFF beam with a maximum dose rate of 2400 MU/min. Dose prescription was 36.25Gy/5 fractions with the planning objective of covering 99% of the Planning Target Volume with the 95% of the prescription dose. Normal tissue constraints were based on provincial prostate SABR planning guidelines, derived from national and international prostate SABR protocols. Plans were evaluated and compared in terms of: 1) dosimetric plan quality, and 2) treatment delivery efficiency. Results: Both single-arc and double-arc VMAT plans were able to meet the planning goals for low, intermediate and high risk scenarios. No significant dosimetric differences were observed between the plans. However, the treatment time was significantly lower for a single-arc VMAT plans. Conclusions: Prostate SABR treatments are feasible with 10x-FFF VMAT technique. A single-arc VMAT offers equivalent dosimetric plan quality and a superior treatment delivery efficiency, compared to a double-arc VMAT.

  8. Endometrial ablation

    MedlinePlus

    ... can be seen on the video screen. Small tools can be used through the scope to remove abnormal growths or tissue for examination. Ablation uses heat, cold, or electricity to destroy the lining of the womb. The ...

  9. Ablation article and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, W. D.; Sullivan, E. M. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An ablation article, such as a conical heat shield, having an ablating surface is provided with at least one discrete area of at least one seed material, such as aluminum. When subjected to ablation conditions, the seed material is ablated. Radiation emanating from the ablated seed material is detected to analyze ablation effects without disturbing the ablation surface. By providing different seed materials having different radiation characteristics, the ablating effects on various areas of the ablating surface can be analyzed under any prevailing ablation conditions. The ablating article can be provided with means for detecting the radiation characteristics of the ablated seed material to provide a self-contained analysis unit.

  10. Role of radiotherapy in the management of hepatocellular carcinoma: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Kalogeridi, Maria-Aggeliki; Zygogianni, Anna; Kyrgias, George; Kouvaris, John; Chatziioannou, Sofia; Kelekis, Nikolaos; Kouloulias, Vassilis

    2015-01-01

    Many patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) present with advanced disease, not amenable to curative therapies such as surgery, transplantation or radiofrequency ablation. Treatment options for this group of patients include transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) and radiation therapy. Especially TACE, delivering a highly concentrated dose of chemotherapy to tumor cells while minimizing systemic toxicity of chemotherapy, has given favorable results on local control and survival. Radiotherapy, as a therapeutic modality of internal radiation therapy with radioisotopes, has also achieved efficacious tumor control in advanced disease. On the contrary, the role of external beam radiotherapy for HCC has been limited in the past, due to the low tolerance of surrounding normal liver parenchyma. However, technological innovations in the field of radiotherapy treatment planning and delivery, have provided the means of delivering radical doses to the tumor, while sparing normal tissues. Advanced and highly conformal radiotherapy approaches such as stereotactic body radiotherapy and proton therapy, evaluated for efficacy and safety for HCC, report encouraging results. In this review, we present the role of radiotherapy in hepatocellular carcinoma patients not suitable for radical treatment. PMID:25625001

  11. Response assessment after stereotactic body radiotherapy for spinal metastasis: a report from the SPIne response assessment in Neuro-Oncology (SPINO) group.

    PubMed

    Thibault, Isabelle; Chang, Eric L; Sheehan, Jason; Ahluwalia, Manmeet S; Guckenberger, Matthias; Sohn, Moon-Jun; Ryu, Samuel; Foote, Matthew; Lo, Simon S; Muacevic, Alexander; Soltys, Scott G; Chao, Samuel; Gerszten, Peter; Lis, Eric; Yu, Eugene; Bilsky, Mark; Fisher, Charles; Schiff, David; Fehlings, Michael G; Ma, Lijun; Chang, Susan; Chow, Edward; Parelukar, Wendy R; Vogelbaum, Michael A; Sahgal, Arjun

    2015-12-01

    The SPine response assessment In Neuro-Oncology (SPINO) group is a committee of the Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology working group and comprises a panel of international experts in spine stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Here, we present the group's first report on the challenges in standardising imaging-based assessment of local control and pain for spinal metastases. We review current imaging modalities used in SBRT treatment planning and tumour assessment and review the criteria for pain and local control in registered clinical trials specific to spine SBRT. We summarise the results of an international survey of the panel to establish the range of current practices in assessing tumour response to spine SBRT. The ultimate goal of the SPINO group is to report consensus criteria for tumour imaging, clinical assessment, and symptom-based response criteria to help standardise future clinical trials. PMID:26678212

  12. Chest Wall Volume Receiving >30 Gy Predicts Risk of Severe Pain and/or Rib Fracture After Lung Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dunlap, Neal E.; Cai, Jing; Biedermann, Gregory B.; Yang, Wensha; Benedict, Stanley H.; Sheng Ke; Schefter, Tracey E.; Kavanagh, Brian D.; Larner, James M.

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: To identify the dose-volume parameters that predict the risk of chest wall (CW) pain and/or rib fracture after lung stereotactic body radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: From a combined, larger multi-institution experience, 60 consecutive patients treated with three to five fractions of stereotactic body radiotherapy for primary or metastatic peripheral lung lesions were reviewed. CW pain was assessed using the Common Toxicity Criteria for pain. Peripheral lung lesions were defined as those located within 2.5 cm of the CW. A minimal point dose of 20 Gy to the CW was required. The CW volume receiving >=20, >=30, >=40, >=50, and >=60 Gy was determined and related to the risk of CW toxicity. Results: Of the 60 patients, 17 experienced Grade 3 CW pain and five rib fractures. The median interval to the onset of severe pain and/or fracture was 7.1 months. The risk of CW toxicity was fitted to the median effective concentration dose-response model. The CW volume receiving 30 Gy best predicted the risk of severe CW pain and/or rib fracture (R{sup 2} = 0.9552). A volume threshold of 30 cm{sup 3} was observed before severe pain and/or rib fracture was reported. A 30% risk of developing severe CW toxicity correlated with a CW volume of 35 cm{sup 3} receiving 30 Gy. Conclusion: The development of CW toxicity is clinically relevant, and the CW should be considered an organ at risk in treatment planning. The CW volume receiving 30 Gy in three to five fractions should be limited to <30 cm{sup 3}, if possible, to reduce the risk of toxicity without compromising tumor coverage.

  13. Minimal Inter-Fractional Fiducial Migration during Image-Guided Lung Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Using SuperLock Nitinol Coil Fiducial Markers

    PubMed Central

    Rong, Yi; Bazan, Jose G.; Sekhon, Ashley; Haglund, Karl; Xu-Welliver, Meng; Williams, Terence

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is being increasingly used for the treatment of patients with lung cancer or lung metastasis who are medically unfit to undergo resection. In order to improve accuracy and confidence in targeting tumors, many centers rely on fiducial implantation. We evaluated the migration of a novel fiducial marker specifically designed for lung tissue implanted via electromagnetic navigation bronchoscopy (ENB). Methods We retrospectively quantified the individual and group migrations of SuperLock nitinol coil fiducials for 15 patients receiving lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), in order to evaluate the reliability of using these fiducials as a target surrogate for cases where tumors cannot be clearly delineated on cone beam CTs (CBCTs). For each fraction, we compared the individual and group migrations of the fiducials between the planning CT and the acquired CBCT. The group migration was defined as the distance between the centroids of the fiducial group and GTV. Results A total of 16 lung targets were included in our study for these 15 patients (one patient with two targets). Of 55 fiducials placed, we observed a 100% retention rate. The mean individual migration was 1.87 mm (range, 0.63–5.25 mm) with a standard deviation of 1.26 mm. The mean group migration was 1.94 mm (range, 0.03–6.19 mm) with a standard deviation of 1.45 mm. Overall, there was minimal change in the relative locations of the markers with respect to each other, as well as to the target. Conclusions We found that the SuperLock nitinol coil fiducial marker positions are stable throughout the radiation treatment, and can be used as a reliable surrogate to target, and to avoid geometric misses during gated treatments. PMID:26158847

  14. Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiation Therapy for Primary Kidney Cancer: A 3-Dimensional Conformal Technique Associated With Low Rates of Early Toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Pham, Daniel; Thompson, Ann; Kron, Tomas; Foroudi, Farshad; Kolsky, Michal Schneider; Devereux, Thomas; Lim, Andrew; Siva, Shankar

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To describe our 3-dimensional conformal planning approaches and report early toxicities with stereotactic body radiation therapy for the management of primary renal cell carcinoma. Methods and Materials: This is an analysis of a phase 1 trial of stereotactic body radiation therapy for primary inoperable renal cell carcinoma. A dose of 42 Gy/3 fractions was prescribed to targets ≥5 cm, whereas for <5 cm 26 Gy/1 fraction was used. All patients underwent a planning 4-dimensional CT to generate a planning target volume (PTV) from a 5-mm isotropic expansion of the internal target volume. Planning required a minimum of 8 fields prescribing to the minimum isodose surrounding the PTV. Intermediate dose spillage at 50% of the prescription dose (R50%) was measured to describe the dose gradient. Early toxicity (<6 months) was scored using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (v4.0). Results: From July 2012 to August 2013 a total of 20 patients (median age, 77 years) were recruited into a prospective clinical trial. Eleven patients underwent fractionated treatment and 9 patients a single fraction. For PTV targets <100 cm{sup 3} the median number of beams used was 8 (2 noncoplanar) to achieve an average R50% of 3.7. For PTV targets >100 cm{sup 3} the median beam number used was 10 (4 noncoplanar) for an average R50% value of 4.3. The R50% was inversely proportional to decreasing PTV volume (r=−0.62, P=.003) and increasing total beams used (r=−0.51, P=.022). Twelve of 20 patients (60%) suffered grade ≤2 early toxicity, whereas 8 of 20 patients (40%) were asymptomatic. Nausea, chest wall pain, and fatigue were the most common toxicities reported. Conclusion: A 3-dimensional conformal planning technique of 8-10 beams can be used to deliver highly tolerable stereotactic ablation to primary kidney targets with minimal early toxicities. Ongoing follow-up is currently in place to assess long-term toxicities and cancer control.

  15. TU-F-BRE-07: In Vivo Neutron Detection in Patients Undergoing Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR) for Primary Kidney Cancer Using 6Li and 7Li Enriched TLD Pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Lonski, P; Kron, T; Franich, R; Keehan, S; Siva, S; Taylor, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for primary kidney cancer often involves the use of high-energy photons combined with a large number of monitor units. While important for risk assessment, the additional neutron dose to untargeted healthy tissue is not accounted for in treatment planning. This work aims to detect out-of-field neutrons in vivo for patients undergoing SABR with high-energy (>10 MV) photons and provides preliminary estimates of neutron effective dose. Methods: 3 variations of high-sensitivity LiF:Mg,Cu,P thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) material, each with varying {sup 6}Li / {sup 7}Li concentrations, were used in custom-made Perspex holders for in vivo measurements. The variation in cross section for thermal neutrons between Li isotopes was exploited to distinguish neutron from photon signal. Measurements were made out-of-field for 7 patients, each undergoing 3D-conformal SABR treatment for primary kidney cancer on a Varian 21iX linear accelerator. Results: In vivo measurements show increased signal for the {sup 6}Li enriched material for patients treated with 18 MV photons. Measurements on one SABR patient treated using only 6 MV showed no difference between the 3 TLD materials. The out-of-field photon signal decreased exponentially with distance from the treatment field. The neutron signal, taken as the difference between {sup 6}Li enriched and {sup 7}Li enriched TLD response, remains almost constant up to 50 cm from the beam central axis. Estimates of neutron effective dose from preliminary TLD calibration suggest between 10 and 30 mSv per 1000 MU delivered at 18 MV for the 7 patients. Conclusion: TLD was proven to be a useful tool for the purpose of in vivo neutron detection at out-of-field locations. Further work is required to understand the relationship between TL signal and neutron dose. Dose estimates based on preliminary TLD calibration in a neutron beam suggest the additional neutron dose was <30 mSv per 1000 MU at 18 MV.

  16. Tumor control probability and the utility of 4D vs 3D dose calculations for stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Valdes, Gilmer; Robinson, Clifford; Lee, Percy; Morel, Delphine; Low, Daniel; Iwamoto, Keisuke S.; Lamb, James M.

    2015-04-01

    Four-dimensional (4D) dose calculations for lung cancer radiotherapy have been technically feasible for a number of years but have not become standard clinical practice. The purpose of this study was to determine if clinically significant differences in tumor control probability (TCP) exist between 3D and 4D dose calculations so as to inform the decision whether 4D dose calculations should be used routinely for treatment planning. Radiotherapy plans for Stage I-II lung cancer were created for 8 patients. Clinically acceptable treatment plans were created with dose calculated on the end-exhale 4D computed tomography (CT) phase using a Monte Carlo algorithm. Dose was then projected onto the remaining 9 phases of 4D-CT using the Monte Carlo algorithm and accumulated onto the end-exhale phase using commercially available deformable registration software. The resulting dose-volume histograms (DVH) of the gross tumor volume (GTV), planning tumor volume (PTV), and PTV{sub setup} were compared according to target coverage and dose. The PTV{sub setup} was defined as a volume including the GTV and a margin for setup uncertainties but not for respiratory motion. TCPs resulting from these DVHs were estimated using a wide range of alphas, betas, and tumor cell densities. Differences of up to 5 Gy were observed between 3D and 4D calculations for a PTV with highly irregular shape. When the TCP was calculated using the resulting DVHs for fractionation schedules typically used in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), the TCP differed at most by 5% between 4D and 3D cases, and in most cases, it was by less than 1%. We conclude that 4D dose calculations are not necessary for most cases treated with SBRT, but they might be valuable for irregularly shaped target volumes. If 4D calculations are used, 4D DVHs should be evaluated on volumes that include margin for setup uncertainty but not respiratory motion.

  17. Local image descriptor-based searching framework of usable similar cases in a radiation treatment planning database for stereotactic body radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nonaka, Ayumi; Arimura, Hidetaka; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Soufi, Mazen; Magome, Taiki; Honda, Hiroshi; Hirata, Hideki

    2014-03-01

    Radiation treatment planning (RTP) of the stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) was more complex compared with conventional radiotherapy because of using a number of beam directions. We reported that similar planning cases could be helpful for determination of beam directions for treatment planners, who have less experiences of SBRT. The aim of this study was to develop a framework of searching for usable similar cases to an unplanned case in a RTP database based on a local image descriptor. This proposed framework consists of two steps searching and rearrangement. In the first step, the RTP database was searched for 10 cases most similar to object cases based on the shape similarity of two-dimensional lung region at the isocenter plane. In the second step, the 5 most similar cases were selected by using geometric features related to the location, size and shape of the planning target volume, lung and spinal cord. In the third step, the selected 5 cases were rearranged by use of the Euclidean distance of a local image descriptor, which is a similarity index based on the magnitudes and orientations of image gradients within a region of interest around an isocenter. It was assumed that the local image descriptor represents the information around lung tumors related to treatment planning. The cases, which were selected as cases most similar to test cases by the proposed method, were more resemble in terms of the tumor location than those selected by a conventional method. For evaluation of the proposed method, we applied a similar-cases-based beam arrangement method developed in the previous study to the similar cases selected by the proposed method based on a linear registration. The proposed method has the potential to suggest the superior beam-arrangements from the treatment point of view.

  18. Optical sensor feedback assistive technology to enable patients to play an active role in the management of their body dynamics during radiotherapy treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkhurst, J. M.; Price, G. J.; Sharrock, P. J.; Stratford, J.; Moore, C. J.

    2013-04-01

    Patient motion during treatment is well understood as a prime factor limiting radiotherapy success, with the risks most pronounced in modern safety critical therapies promising the greatest benefit. In this paper we describe a real-time visual feedback device designed to help patients to actively manage their body position, pose and motion. In addition to technical device details, we present preliminary trial results showing that its use enables volunteers to successfully manage their respiratory motion. The device enables patients to view their live body surface measurements relative to a prior reference, operating on the concept that co-operative engagement with patients will both improve geometric conformance and remove their perception of isolation, in turn easing stress related motion. The device is driven by a real-time wide field optical sensor system developed at The Christie. Feedback is delivered through three intuitive visualization modes of hierarchically increasing display complexity. The device can be used with any suitable display technology; in the presented study we use both personal video glasses and a standard LCD projector. The performance characteristics of the system were measured, with the frame rate, throughput and latency of the feedback device being 22.4 fps, 47.0 Mbps, 109.8 ms, and 13.7 fps, 86.4 Mbps, 119.1 ms for single and three-channel modes respectively. The pilot study, using ten healthy volunteers over three sessions, shows that the use of visual feedback resulted in both a reduction in the participants' respiratory amplitude, and a decrease in their overall body motion variability.

  19. A Study on Target Positioning Error and Its Impact on Dose Variation in Image-Guided Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for the Spine

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Siyong Jin, Hosang; Yang, Huey; Amdur, Robert J.

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate the amount of target positioning error and evaluate its dosimetric impact during image-guided stereotactic body radiotherapy for single-fraction spine treatment. Methods and Materials: A prescription dose of 15 Gy and five to nine coplanar intensity-modulated beams were used. The patient was immobilized with a custom-fit vacuum mold, and the target was localized with a volumetric cone-beam CT image. A robotic couch with six degrees of freedom was used for target adjustment. For evaluation a cone-beam CT image was obtained at the end of treatment. Both target positioning error and its dosimetric impact were investigated for the first 9 cases. Results: For cases studied, translational errors were 0.9 {+-} 0.5 mm (lateral), 1.2 {+-} 0.9 mm (longitudinal), 0.7 {+-} 0.6 mm (vertical), and 1.8 {+-} 1.0 mm (vector), and rotational errors were 1.6 deg. {+-} 1.3 deg. (pitch), 0.8 deg. {+-} 0.9 deg. (roll), and 0.8 deg. {+-} 0.4{sup o} (yaw). For the clinical target volume, D{sub 95} (dose to 95% of target volume), D{sub 90}, D{sub max}, and D{sub mean} were evaluated. Only 1 case showed significant dose variations, reaching up to 18% in D{sub 95}. The spinal cord dose was evaluated by observing D{sub 0.1} (dose to 0.1 cm{sup 3}), D{sub 0.5}, D{sub 1.0}, and D{sub max}. Although 1 case showed a dose change reaching up to 30% in D{sub max}, cord dose was within the planning tolerance limit in all but 2 cases (3% higher in one and 0.4% higher in the other). Conclusion: The implemented image-guided stereotactic body radiotherapy provides precise target localization. However, despite reasonably precise spatial precision, dosimetric perturbation can be significant because of both extremely steep dose gradients and close distances between the target and the spinal cord.

  20. Bone and Soft Tissue Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Ryan C.B.; Stavas, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    Bone and soft tissue tumor ablation has reached widespread acceptance in the locoregional treatment of various benign and malignant musculoskeletal (MSK) lesions. Many principles of ablation learned elsewhere in the body are easily adapted to the MSK system, particularly the various technical aspects of probe/antenna design, tumoricidal effects, selection of image guidance, and methods to reduce complications. Despite the common use of thermal and chemical ablation procedures in bone and soft tissues, there are few large clinical series that show longitudinal benefit and cost-effectiveness compared with conventional methods, namely, surgery, external beam radiation, and chemotherapy. Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation of osteoid osteomas has been evaluated the most and is considered a first-line treatment choice for many lesions. Palliation of painful metastatic bone disease with thermal ablation is considered safe and has been shown to reduce pain and analgesic use while improving quality of life for cancer patients. Procedure-related complications are rare and are typically easily managed. Similar to all interventional procedures, bone and soft tissue lesions require an integrated approach to disease management to determine the optimum type of and timing for ablation techniques within the context of the patient care plan. PMID:25053865

  1. Bone and soft tissue ablation.

    PubMed

    Foster, Ryan C B; Stavas, Joseph M

    2014-06-01

    Bone and soft tissue tumor ablation has reached widespread acceptance in the locoregional treatment of various benign and malignant musculoskeletal (MSK) lesions. Many principles of ablation learned elsewhere in the body are easily adapted to the MSK system, particularly the various technical aspects of probe/antenna design, tumoricidal effects, selection of image guidance, and methods to reduce complications. Despite the common use of thermal and chemical ablation procedures in bone and soft tissues, there are few large clinical series that show longitudinal benefit and cost-effectiveness compared with conventional methods, namely, surgery, external beam radiation, and chemotherapy. Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation of osteoid osteomas has been evaluated the most and is considered a first-line treatment choice for many lesions. Palliation of painful metastatic bone disease with thermal ablation is considered safe and has been shown to reduce pain and analgesic use while improving quality of life for cancer patients. Procedure-related complications are rare and are typically easily managed. Similar to all interventional procedures, bone and soft tissue lesions require an integrated approach to disease management to determine the optimum type of and timing for ablation techniques within the context of the patient care plan. PMID:25053865

  2. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for Stage I lung cancer with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: special reference to survival and radiation-induced pneumonitis

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Toshihiko; Shiomi, Hiroya; Oh, Ryoong-Jin

    2015-01-01

    This retrospective study aimed to evaluate radiation-induced pneumonitis (RIP) and a related condition that we define in this report—prolonged minimal RIP (pmRIP)—after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for Stage I primary lung cancer in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We assessed 136 Stage I lung cancer patients with COPD who underwent SBRT. Airflow limitation on spirometry was classified into four Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) grades, with minor modifications: GOLD 1 (mild), GOLD 2 (moderate), GOLD 3 (severe) and GOLD 4 (very severe). On this basis, we defined two subgroups: COPD-free (COPD −) and COPD-positive (COPD +). There was no significant difference in overall survival or cause-specific–survival between these groups. Of the 136 patients, 44 (32%) had pmRIP. Multivariate analysis showed that COPD and the Brinkman index were statistically significant risk factors for the development of pmRIP. COPD and the Brinkman index were predictive factors for pmRIP, although our findings also indicate that SBRT can be tolerated in early lung cancer patients with COPD. PMID:25887042

  3. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck: Results of a Phase I Dose-Escalation Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Heron, Dwight E.; Ferris, Robert L.; Karamouzis, Michalis; Andrade, Regiane S.; Deeb, Erin L.; Burton, Steven; Gooding, William E.; Branstetter, Barton F.; Mountz, James M.; Johnson, Jonas T.; Argiris, Athanassios; Grandis, Jennifer R.; Lai, Stephen Y.

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in previously irradiated patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Patients and Methods: In this Phase I dose-escalation clinical trial, 25 patients were treated in five dose tiers up to 44 Gy, administered in 5 fractions over a 2-week course. Response was assessed according to the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors and [{sup 18}F]-fluorodeoxyglucose standardized uptake value change on positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT). Results: No Grade 3/4 or dose-limiting toxicities occurred. Four patients had Grade 1/2 acute toxicities. Four objective responses were observed, for a response rate of 17% (95% confidence interval 2%-33%). The maximum duration of response was 4 months. Twelve patients had stable disease. Median time to disease progression was 4 months, and median overall survival was 6 months. Self-reported quality of life was not significantly affected by treatment. Fluorodeoxyglucose PET was a more sensitive early-measure response to treatment than CT volume changes. Conclusion: Reirradiation up to 44 Gy using SBRT is well tolerated in the acute setting and warrants further evaluation in combination with conventional and targeted therapies.

  4. Computerized method for estimation of the location of a lung tumor on EPID cine images without implanted markers in stereotactic body radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arimura, H.; Egashira, Y.; Shioyama, Y.; Nakamura, K.; Yoshidome, S.; Anai, S.; Nomoto, S.; Honda, H.; Toyofuku, F.; Higashida, Y.; Onizuka, Y.; Terashima, H.

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a computerized method for estimation of the location of a lung tumor in cine images on an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) without implanted markers during stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Each tumor region was segmented in the first EPID cine image, i.e., reference portal image, based on a multiple-gray level thresholding technique and a region growing technique, and then the image including the tumor region was cropped as a 'tumor template' image. The tumor location was determined as the position in which the tumor template image took the maximum cross-correlation value within each consecutive portal image, which was acquired in cine mode on the EPID in treatment. EPID images with 512 × 384 pixels (pixel size: 0.56 mm) were acquired at a sampling rate of 0.5 frame s-1 by using energies of 4, 6 or 10 MV on linear accelerators. We applied our proposed method to EPID cine images (226 frames) of 12 clinical cases (ages: 51-83, mean: 72) with a non-small cell lung cancer. As a result, the average location error between tumor points obtained by our method and the manual method was 1.47 ± 0.60 mm. This preliminary study suggests that our method based on the tumor template matching technique might be feasible for tracking the location of a lung tumor without implanted markers in SBRT.

  5. Concurrent sunitinib and stereotactic body radiotherapy for patients with oligometastases: final report of a prospective clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Kao, Johnny; Chen, Chien-Ting; Tong, Charles C L; Packer, Stuart H; Schwartz, Myron; Chen, Shu-Hsia; Sung, Max W

    2014-06-01

    Preliminary results demonstrated that concurrent sunitinib and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is an active regimen for metastases limited in number and extent. This analysis was conducted to determine the long-term survival and cancer control outcomes for this novel regimen. Forty-six patients with oligometastases, defined as five or fewer clinical detectable metastases from any primary site, were treated on a phase I/II trial from February 2007 to September 2010. The majority of patients were treated with 37.5 mg sunitinib (days 1-28) and SBRT 50 Gy (days 8-12 and 15-19) and maintenance sunitinib was used in 39 % of patients. Median follow up for surviving patients is 3.6 years. The 4-year estimates for local control, distant control, progression-free and overall survival were 75 %, 40 %, 34 % and 29 %, respectively. At last follow-up, 26 % of patients were alive without evidence of disease, 7 % were alive with distant metastases, 48 % died from distant metastases, 2 % died from local progression, 13 % died from comorbid illness, and 4 % died from treatment-related toxicities. Patients with kidney and prostate primary tumors were associated with a significantly improved overall survival (hazard ratio = 0.25, p = 0.04). Concurrent sunitinib and SBRT is a promising approach for the treatment of oligometastases and further study of this novel combination is warranted. PMID:23660867

  6. Investigating the accuracy of microstereotactic-body-radiotherapy utilizing anatomically accurate 3D printed rodent-morphic dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Bache, Steven T.; Juang, Titania; Belley, Matthew D.; Koontz, Bridget F.; Yoshizumi, Terry T.; Kirsch, David G.; Oldham, Mark; Adamovics, John

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Sophisticated small animal irradiators, incorporating cone-beam-CT image-guidance, have recently been developed which enable exploration of the efficacy of advanced radiation treatments in the preclinical setting. Microstereotactic-body-radiation-therapy (microSBRT) is one technique of interest, utilizing field sizes in the range of 1–15 mm. Verification of the accuracy of microSBRT treatment delivery is challenging due to the lack of available methods to comprehensively measure dose distributions in representative phantoms with sufficiently high spatial resolution and in 3 dimensions (3D). This work introduces a potential solution in the form of anatomically accurate rodent-morphic 3D dosimeters compatible with ultrahigh resolution (0.3 mm{sup 3}) optical computed tomography (optical-CT) dose read-out. Methods: Rodent-morphic dosimeters were produced by 3D-printing molds of rodent anatomy directly from contours defined on x-ray CT data sets of rats and mice, and using these molds to create tissue-equivalent radiochromic 3D dosimeters from Presage. Anatomically accurate spines were incorporated into some dosimeters, by first 3D printing the spine mold, then forming a high-Z bone equivalent spine insert. This spine insert was then set inside the tissue equivalent body mold. The high-Z spinal insert enabled representative cone-beam CT IGRT targeting. On irradiation, a linear radiochromic change in optical-density occurs in the dosimeter, which is proportional to absorbed dose, and was read out using optical-CT in high-resolution (0.5 mm isotropic voxels). Optical-CT data were converted to absolute dose in two ways: (i) using a calibration curve derived from other Presage dosimeters from the same batch, and (ii) by independent measurement of calibrated dose at a point using a novel detector comprised of a yttrium oxide based nanocrystalline scintillator, with a submillimeter active length. A microSBRT spinal treatment was delivered consisting of a 180

  7. Investigating the accuracy of microstereotactic-body-radiotherapy utilizing anatomically accurate 3D printed rodent-morphic dosimeters

    PubMed Central

    Bache, Steven T.; Juang, Titania; Belley, Matthew D.; Koontz, Bridget F.; Adamovics, John; Yoshizumi, Terry T.; Kirsch, David G.; Oldham, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Sophisticated small animal irradiators, incorporating cone-beam-CT image-guidance, have recently been developed which enable exploration of the efficacy of advanced radiation treatments in the preclinical setting. Microstereotactic-body-radiation-therapy (microSBRT) is one technique of interest, utilizing field sizes in the range of 1–15 mm. Verification of the accuracy of microSBRT treatment delivery is challenging due to the lack of available methods to comprehensively measure dose distributions in representative phantoms with sufficiently high spatial resolution and in 3 dimensions (3D). This work introduces a potential solution in the form of anatomically accurate rodent-morphic 3D dosimeters compatible with ultrahigh resolution (0.3 mm3) optical computed tomography (optical-CT) dose read-out. Methods: Rodent-morphic dosimeters were produced by 3D-printing molds of rodent anatomy directly from contours defined on x-ray CT data sets of rats and mice, and using these molds to create tissue-equivalent radiochromic 3D dosimeters from Presage. Anatomically accurate spines were incorporated into some dosimeters, by first 3D printing the spine mold, then forming a high-Z bone equivalent spine insert. This spine insert was then set inside the tissue equivalent body mold. The high-Z spinal insert enabled representative cone-beam CT IGRT targeting. On irradiation, a linear radiochromic change in optical-density occurs in the dosimeter, which is proportional to absorbed dose, and was read out using optical-CT in high-resolution (0.5 mm isotropic voxels). Optical-CT data were converted to absolute dose in two ways: (i) using a calibration curve derived from other Presage dosimeters from the same batch, and (ii) by independent measurement of calibrated dose at a point using a novel detector comprised of a yttrium oxide based nanocrystalline scintillator, with a submillimeter active length. A microSBRT spinal treatment was delivered consisting of a 180

  8. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Pulmonary Metastases From Soft-Tissue Sarcomas: Excellent Local Lesion Control and Improved Patient Survival

    SciTech Connect

    Dhakal, Sughosh; Corbin, Kimberly S.; Milano, Michael T.; Philip, Abraham; Sahasrabudhe, Deepak; Jones, Carolyn

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Patients with pulmonary metastases (PM) from soft-tissue sarcomas (STS) have historically been treated with surgery and/or chemotherapy. Since 2001, we have treated PM with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). We postulated that SBRT for PM from STS would yield excellent local control (LC) and overall survival (OS). Methods and Materials: Fifty-two patients with PM from STS, diagnosed between 1990 and 2006 at University of Rochester, were retrospectively reviewed. Most patients received multimodality treatment comprising of surgery, chemotherapy, and/or radiation. SBRT used the Novalis ExacTrac patient positioning platform, vacuum bag immobilization, and relaxed end-expiratory breath hold techniques. Results: Leiomyosarcoma (23%), malignant fibrous histiocytoma (19%), and synovial sarcoma (15%) were the most common histologies. Forty-eight percent initially presented with PM, whereas 52% developed PM at a median of 0.7 (0.3-7.3) years after initial diagnosis. Median follow-up from diagnosis of PM was 0.9 (0.3-7.3) years. Fifteen patients underwent SBRT to 74 lesions. Median number of lesions treated was 4 (1-16) per patient and 3.5 (1-6) per session. Preferred dose and fractionation was 50 Gy in 5 Gy fractions. Three-year LC was 82%. No patients experienced Grade {>=}3 toxicity. Median OS was 2.1 (0.8-11.5) years for patients treated with SBRT, and 0.6 (0.1-7.8) years for those who never received SBRT (p = 0.002). Conclusions: SBRT provides excellent LC of PM and may extend OS. SBRT should be considered for all patients with PM from STS, particularly those who are not surgical candidates. Further investigation is warranted to establish criteria for the use of SBRT for STS patients with PM.

  9. Improving Delivery Accuracy of Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy to a Moving Tumor Using Simplified Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Young Eun; Cho, Byungchul; Kim, Su Ssan; Song, Si Yeol; Choi, Eun Kyung; Ahn, Seung Do; Yi, Byongyong

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To develop a simplified volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) technique for more accurate dose delivery in thoracic stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials For each of the 22 lung SBRT cases treated with respiratory-gated VMAT, a dose rate modulated arc therapy (DrMAT) plan was retrospectively generated. A dynamic conformal arc therapy plan with 33 adjoining coplanar arcs was designed and their beam weights were optimized by an inverse planning process. All sub-arc beams were converted into a series of control points with varying MLC segment and dose rates and merged into an arc beam for a DrMAT plan. The plan quality of original VMAT and DrMAT was compared in terms of target coverage, compactness of dose distribution, and dose sparing of organs at risk. To assess the delivery accuracy, the VMAT and DrMAT plans were delivered to a motion phantom programmed with the corresponding patients’ respiratory signal; results were compared using film dosimetry with gamma analysis. Results The plan quality of DrMAT was equivalent to that of VMAT in terms of target coverage, dose compactness, and dose sparing for the normal lung. In dose sparing for other critical organs, DrMAT was less effective than VMAT for the spinal cord, heart, and esophagus while being well within the limits specified by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group. Delivery accuracy of DrMAT to a moving target was similar to that of VMAT using a gamma criterion of 2%/2mm but was significantly better using a 2%/1mm criterion, implying the superiority of DrMAT over VMAT in SBRT for thoracic/abdominal tumors with respiratory movement. Conclusion We developed a DrMAT technique for SBRT that produces plans of a quality similar to that achieved with VMAT but with better delivery accuracy. This technique is well-suited for small tumors with motion uncertainty. PMID:27333199

  10. Evaluation of the Effectiveness of the Stereotactic Body Frame in Reducing Respiratory Intrafractional Organ Motion Using the Real-Time Tumor-Tracking Radiotherapy System

    SciTech Connect

    Bengua, Gerard; Ishikawa, Masayori; Sutherland, Kenneth; Horita, Kenji; Yamazaki, Rie; Fujita, Katsuhisa; Onimaru, Rikiya; Katoh, Noriwo; Inoue, Tetsuya; Onodera, Shunsuke; Shirato, Hiroki

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of the stereotactic body frame (SBF), with or without a diaphragm press or a breathing cycle monitoring device (Abches), in controlling the range of lung tumor motion, by tracking the real-time position of fiducial markers. Methods and Materials: The trajectories of gold markers in the lung were tracked with the real-time tumor-tracking radiotherapy system. The SBF was used for patient immobilization and the diaphragm press and Abches were used to actively control breathing and for self-controlled respiration, respectively. Tracking was performed in five setups, with and without immobilization and respiration control. The results were evaluated using the effective range, which was defined as the range that includes 95% of all the recorded marker positions in each setup. Results: The SBF, with or without a diaphragm press or Abches, did not yield effective ranges of marker motion which were significantly different from setups that did not use these materials. The differences in the effective marker ranges in the upper lobes for all the patient setups were less than 1mm. Larger effective ranges were obtained for the markers in the middle or lower lobes. Conclusion: The effectiveness of controlling respiratory-induced organ motion by using the SBF+diaphragm press or SBF + Abches patient setups were highly dependent on the individual patient reaction to the use of these materials and the location of the markers. They may be considered for lung tumors in the lower lobes, but are not necessary for tumors in the upper lobes.

  11. Experimental validation of heterogeneity-corrected dose-volume prescription on respiratory-averaged CT images in stereotactic body radiotherapy for moving tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Miyabe, Yuki; Matsuo, Yukinori; Kamomae, Takeshi; Nakata, Manabu; Yano, Shinsuke; Sawada, Akira; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to experimentally assess the validity of heterogeneity-corrected dose-volume prescription on respiratory-averaged computed tomography (RACT) images in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for moving tumors. Four-dimensional computed tomography (CT) data were acquired while a dynamic anthropomorphic thorax phantom with a solitary target moved. Motion pattern was based on cos (t) with a constant respiration period of 4.0 sec along the longitudinal axis of the CT couch. The extent of motion (A{sub 1}) was set in the range of 0.0-12.0 mm at 3.0-mm intervals. Treatment planning with the heterogeneity-corrected dose-volume prescription was designed on RACT images. A new commercially available Monte Carlo algorithm of well-commissioned 6-MV photon beam was used for dose calculation. Dosimetric effects of intrafractional tumor motion were then investigated experimentally under the same conditions as 4D CT simulation using the dynamic anthropomorphic thorax phantom, films, and an ionization chamber. The passing rate of {gamma} index was 98.18%, with the criteria of 3 mm/3%. The dose error between the planned and the measured isocenter dose in moving condition was within {+-} 0.7%. From the dose area histograms on the film, the mean {+-} standard deviation of the dose covering 100% of the cross section of the target was 102.32 {+-} 1.20% (range, 100.59-103.49%). By contrast, the irradiated areas receiving more than 95% dose for A{sub 1} = 12 mm were 1.46 and 1.33 times larger than those for A{sub 1} = 0 mm in the coronal and sagittal planes, respectively. This phantom study demonstrated that the cross section of the target received 100% dose under moving conditions in both the coronal and sagittal planes, suggesting that the heterogeneity-corrected dose-volume prescription on RACT images is acceptable in SBRT for moving tumors.

  12. Adjuvant stereotactic body radiotherapy following transarterial chemoembolization in patients with non-resectable hepatocellular carcinoma tumours of ≥3 cm

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Rojymon; Turley, Falynn; Redden, David T; Saddekni, Souheil; Aal, Ahmed K A; Keene, Kimberly; Yang, Eddy; Zarzour, Jessica; Bolus, David; Smith, J Kevin; Gray, Stephen; White, Jared; Eckhoff, Devin E; DuBay, Derek A

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The optimal locoregional treatment for non-resectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) of ≥3 cm in diameter is unclear. Transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) is the initial intervention most commonly performed, but it rarely eradicates HCC. The purpose of this study was to measure survival in HCC patients treated with adjuvant stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) following TACE. Methods A retrospective study of patients with HCC of ≥3 cm was conducted. Outcomes in patients treated with TACE alone (n = 124) were compared with outcomes in those treated with TACE + SBRT (n = 37). Results There were no significant baseline differences between the two groups. The pre-TACE mean number of tumours (P = 0.57), largest tumour size (P = 0.09) and total tumour diameter (P = 0.21) did not differ significantly between the groups. Necrosis of the HCC tumour, measured after the first TACE, did not differ between the groups (P = 0.69). Local recurrence was significantly decreased in the TACE + SBRT group (10.8%) in comparison with the TACE-only group (25.8%) (P = 0.04). After censoring for liver transplantation, overall survival was found to be significantly increased in the TACE + SBRT group compared with the TACE-only group (33 months and 20 months, respectively; P = 0.02). Conclusions This retrospective study suggests that in patients with HCC tumours of ≥3 cm, treatment with TACE + SBRT provides a survival advantage over treatment with only TACE. Confirmation of this observation requires that the concept be tested in a prospective, randomized clinical trial. PMID:25186290

  13. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for patients with oligometastases from colorectal cancer: risk-adapted dose prescription with a maximum dose of 83–100 Gy in five fractions

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Atsuya; Sanuki, Naoko; Tsurugai, Yuichiro; Oku, Yohei; Aoki, Yousuke

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that the local control of pulmonary metastases from colorectal cancer (CRC) following stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) with moderate prescription dose was relatively worse. We investigated the treatment outcomes and toxicities of patients with oligometastases from CRC treated by SBRT using risk-adapted, very high- and convergent-dose regimens. Among patients referred for SBRT from August 2011 to January 2015, those patients were extracted who had liver or pulmonary metastases from CRC, and they were treated with a total dose of 50–60 Gy in five fractions prescribed to the 60% isodose line of the maximum dose covering the surface of the planning target volume. Concurrent administration of chemotherapy was not admitted during SBRT, while neoadjuvant or adjuvant chemotherapy was allowed. A total of 21 patients (12 liver, 9 lung) with 28 oligometastases were evaluated. The median follow-up duration was 27.5 months (range: 6.5–43.3 months). Four patients were treated with SBRT as a series of initial treatments, and 17 patients were treated after recurrent oligometastases. The local control rates at 1 and 2 years from the start of SBRT were 100%. The disease-free and actuarial overall survival rates were 62% and 55%, and 79% and 79%, respectively. No severe toxicities (≥grade 3) occurred during follow-up. The outcomes following high-dose SBRT were excellent. This treatment can provide an alternative to the surgical resection of oligometastases from CRC. Prospective studies are needed to validate the effectiveness of SBRT. PMID:26983981

  14. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy: A Promising Treatment Option for the Boost of Oropharyngeal Cancers Not Suitable for Brachytherapy: A Single-Institutional Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Mamgani, Abrahim; Tans, Lisa; Teguh, David N.; Rooij, Peter van; Zwijnenburg, Ellen M.; Levendag, Peter C.

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To prospectively assess the outcome and toxicity of frameless stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) as a treatment option for boosting primary oropharyngeal cancers (OPC) in patients who not suitable for the standard brachytherapy boost (BTB). Methods and Materials: Between 2005 and 2010, 51 patients with Stage I to IV biopsy-proven OPC who were not suitable for BTB received boosts by means of SBRT (3 times 5.5 Gy, prescribed to the 80% isodose line), after 46 Gy of IMRT to the primary tumor and neck (when indicated). Endpoints of the study were local control (LC), disease-free survival (DFS), overall survival (OS), and acute and late toxicity. Results: After a median follow-up of 18 months (range, 6-65 months), the 2-year actuarial rates of LC, DFS, and OS were 86%, 80%, and 82%, respectively, and the 3-year rates were 70%, 66%, and 54%, respectively. The treatment was well tolerated, as there were no treatment breaks and no Grade 4 or 5 toxicity reported, either acute or chronic. The overall 2-year cumulative incidence of Grade {>=}2 late toxicity was 28%. Of the patients with 2 years with no evidence of disease (n = 20), only 1 patient was still feeding tube dependent and 2 patients had Grade 3 xerostomia. Conclusions: According to our knowledge, this study is the first report of patients with primary OPC who received boosts by means of SBRT. Patients with OPC who are not suitable for the standard BTB can safely and effectively receive boosts by SBRT. With this radiation technique, an excellent outcome was achieved. Furthermore, the SBRT boost did not have a negative impact regarding acute and late side effects.

  15. Comparison of pencil beam–based homogeneous vs inhomogeneous target dose planning for stereotactic body radiotherapy of peripheral lung tumors through Monte Carlo–based recalculation

    SciTech Connect

    Ohtakara, Kazuhiro; Hoshi, Hiroaki

    2015-10-01

    This study was conducted to ascertain whether homogeneous target dose planning is suitable for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of peripheral lung cancer under appropriate breath-holding. For 20 peripheral lung tumors, paired dynamic conformal arc plans were generated by only adjusting the leaf margin to the planning target volume (PTV) edge for fulfilling the conditions such that the prescription isodose surface (IDS) encompassing exactly 95% of the PTV (PTV D{sub 95}) corresponds to 95% and 80% IDS, normalized to 100% at the PTV isocenter under a pencil beam (PB) algorithm with radiologic path length correction. These plans were recalculated using the x-ray voxel Monte Carlo (XVMC) algorithm under otherwise identical conditions, and then compared. Lesions abutting the parietal pleura or not were defined as edge or island tumors, respectively, and the influences of the target volume and its location relative to the chest wall on the target dose were examined. The median (range) leaf margin required for the 95% and 80% plans was 3.9 mm (1.3 to 5.0) and −1.2 mm (−1.8 to 0.1), respectively. Notably, the latter was significantly correlated negatively with PTV. In the 80% plans, the PTV D{sub 95} was slightly higher under XVMC, whereas the PTV D{sub 98} was significantly lower, irrespective of the dose calculation algorithm used. Other PTV and all gross tumor volume doses were significantly higher, while the lung doses outside the PTV were slightly lower. The target doses increased as a function of PTV and were significantly lower for island tumors than for edge tumors. In conclusion, inhomogeneous target dose planning using smaller leaf margin for a larger tumor volume was deemed suitable in ensuring more sufficient target dose while slightly reducing lung dose. In addition, more inhomogeneous target dose planning using <80% IDS (e.g., 70%) for PTV covering would be preferable for island tumors.

  16. Effect of Body Mass Index on Magnitude of Setup Errors in Patients Treated With Adjuvant Radiotherapy for Endometrial Cancer With Daily Image Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Lilie L.; Hertan, Lauren; Rengan, Ramesh; Teo, Boon-Keng Kevin

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the impact of body mass index (BMI) on daily setup variations and frequency of imaging necessary for patients with endometrial cancer treated with adjuvant intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with daily image guidance. Methods and Materials: The daily shifts from a total of 782 orthogonal kilovoltage images from 30 patients who received pelvic IMRT between July 2008 and August 2010 were analyzed. The BMI, mean daily shifts, and random and systematic errors in each translational and rotational direction were calculated for each patient. Margin recipes were generated based on BMI. Linear regression and spearman rank correlation analysis were performed. To simulate a less-than-daily IGRT protocol, the average shift of the first five fractions was applied to subsequent setups without IGRT for assessing the impact on setup error and margin requirements. Results: Median BMI was 32.9 (range, 23-62). Of the 30 patients, 16.7% (n = 5) were normal weight (BMI <25); 23.3% (n = 7) were overweight (BMI {>=}25 to <30); 26.7% (n = 8) were mildly obese (BMI {>=}30 to <35); and 33.3% (n = 10) were moderately to severely obese (BMI {>=} 35). On linear regression, mean absolute vertical, longitudinal, and lateral shifts positively correlated with BMI (p = 0.0127, p = 0.0037, and p < 0.0001, respectively). Systematic errors in the longitudinal and vertical direction were found to be positively correlated with BMI category (p < 0.0001 for both). IGRT for the first five fractions, followed by correction of the mean error for all subsequent fractions, led to a substantial reduction in setup error and resultant margin requirement overall compared with no IGRT. Conclusions: Daily shifts, systematic errors, and margin requirements were greatest in obese patients. For women who are normal or overweight, a planning target margin margin of 7 to 10 mm may be sufficient without IGRT, but for patients who are moderately or severely obese, this is insufficient.

  17. Prognostic impact of average iodine density assessed by dual-energy spectral imaging for predicting lung tumor recurrence after stereotactic body radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Masahiko; Hirose, Katsumi; Sato, Mariko; Akimoto, Hiroyoshi; Kawaguchi, Hideo; Hatayama, Yoshiomi; Fujioka, Ichitaro; Tanaka, Mitsuki; Ono, Shuichi; Takai, Yoshihiro

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the prognostic significance of average iodine density as assessed by dual-energy computed tomography (DE-CT) for lung tumors treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). From March 2011 to August 2014, 93 medically inoperable patients with 74 primary lung cancers and 19 lung metastases underwent DE-CT prior to SBRT of a total dose of 45-60 Gy in 5-10 fractions. Of these 93 patients, nine patients had two lung tumors. Thus, 102 lung tumors were included in this study. DE-CT was performed for pretreatment evaluation. Regions of interest were set for the entire tumor, and average iodine density was obtained using a dedicated imaging software and evaluated with regard to local control. The median follow-up period was 23.4 months (range, 1.5-54.5 months). The median value of the average iodine density was 1.86 mg/cm(3) (range, 0.40-9.27 mg/cm(3)). Two-year local control rates for the high and low average iodine density groups divided by the median value of the average iodine density were 96.9% and 75.7% (P = 0.006), respectively. Tumors with lower average iodine density showed a worse prognosis, possibly reflecting a hypoxic cell population in the tumor. The average iodine density exhibited a significant impact on local control. Our preliminary results indicate that iodine density evaluated using dual-energy spectral CT may be a useful, noninvasive and quantitative assessment of radio-resistance caused by presumably hypoxic cell populations in tumors. PMID:26826198

  18. Prognostic impact of average iodine density assessed by dual-energy spectral imaging for predicting lung tumor recurrence after stereotactic body radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, Masahiko; Hirose, Katsumi; Sato, Mariko; Akimoto, Hiroyoshi; Kawaguchi, Hideo; Hatayama, Yoshiomi; Fujioka, Ichitaro; Tanaka, Mitsuki; Ono, Shuichi; Takai, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the prognostic significance of average iodine density as assessed by dual-energy computed tomography (DE-CT) for lung tumors treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). From March 2011 to August 2014, 93 medically inoperable patients with 74 primary lung cancers and 19 lung metastases underwent DE-CT prior to SBRT of a total dose of 45–60 Gy in 5–10 fractions. Of these 93 patients, nine patients had two lung tumors. Thus, 102 lung tumors were included in this study. DE-CT was performed for pretreatment evaluation. Regions of interest were set for the entire tumor, and average iodine density was obtained using a dedicated imaging software and evaluated with regard to local control. The median follow-up period was 23.4 months (range, 1.5–54.5 months). The median value of the average iodine density was 1.86 mg/cm3 (range, 0.40–9.27 mg/cm3). Two-year local control rates for the high and low average iodine density groups divided by the median value of the average iodine density were 96.9% and 75.7% (P = 0.006), respectively. Tumors with lower average iodine density showed a worse prognosis, possibly reflecting a hypoxic cell population in the tumor. The average iodine density exhibited a significant impact on local control. Our preliminary results indicate that iodine density evaluated using dual-energy spectral CT may be a useful, noninvasive and quantitative assessment of radio-resistance caused by presumably hypoxic cell populations in tumors. PMID:26826198

  19. Radiobiological modeling analysis of the optimal fraction scheme in patients with peripheral non-small cell lung cancer undergoing stereotactic body radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bao-Tian; Lu, Jia-Yang; Lin, Pei-Xian; Chen, Jian-Zhou; Li, De-Rui; Chen, Chuang-Zhen

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the optimal fraction scheme (FS) in patients with small peripheral non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) undergoing stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) with the 4 × 12 Gy scheme as the reference. CT simulation data for sixteen patients diagnosed with primary NSCLC or metastatic tumor with a single peripheral lesion ≤3 cm were used in this study. Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans were designed based on ten different FS of 1 × 25 Gy, 1 × 30 Gy, 1 × 34 Gy, 3 × 15 Gy, 3 × 18 Gy, 3 × 20 Gy, 4 × 12 Gy, 5 × 12 Gy, 6 × 10 Gy and 10 × 7 Gy. Five different radiobiological models were employed to predict the tumor control probability (TCP) value. Three other models were utilized to estimate the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) value to the lung and the modified equivalent uniform dose (mEUD) value to the chest wall (CW). The 1 × 30 Gy regimen is recommended to achieve 4.2% higher TCP and slightly higher NTCP and mEUD values to the lung and CW compared with the 4 × 12 Gy schedule, respectively. This regimen also greatly shortens the treatment duration. However, the 3 × 15 Gy schedule is suggested in patients where the lung-to-tumor volume ratio is small or where the tumor is adjacent to the CW. PMID:26657569

  20. Comparison of Two RapidArc Delivery Strategies in Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy of Peripheral Lung Cancer with Flattening Filter Free Beams

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Pei-Xian; Chen, Jian-Zhou; Kuang, Yu; Chen, Chuang-Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the performance of using partial arc (PA) and full arc with avoidance sectors (FAAS) in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of peripheral lung cancer with flattening filter free (FFF) beams. Methods Eighteen patients with primary (T1 or T2) non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) or lung metastatic were selected for this study. Nine patients with a gross tumor volume (GTV) <= 10 cc were designated as the small tumor group. The other nine patients with a GTV between 10 cc and 44 cc were assigned to the large tumor group. The treatment plans were generated in eighteen patients using PA and FAAS techniques, respectively, and delivered with a Varian TrueBeam Linac. Dosimetry of the target and organs at risk (OARs), monitor unit (MU), out-of-field dose, and delivery time were statistically analyzed. Delta4 and portal dosimetry were employed to evaluate the delivery accuracy. Results For the small tumor group, compared with the PA plans, the FAAS plans significantly achieved a lower MU/fraction, out-of-field dose and a shorter treatment time (p<0.05), but the target dose was slightly higher than that delivered by PA plans (p<0.05). For the large tumor group, the PA plans significantly attained a shorter treatment time (p<0.05), whereas MU/fraction, out-of-field dose and dose to OARs were comparable between the two plans (p>0.05). Furthermore, all plans generated from the eighteen patients achieved a high pass rate in patient-specific quality assurance, with all the gamma indices greater than 97% at the Γ3mm, 3% threshold. Conclusion This study suggests that the FAAS technique is more beneficial for the small tumor patients undergoing lung SBRT with FFF beams because of its higher treatment efficiency and MU reduction. However, for the large tumor patients, the PA technique is recommended due to its higher treatment efficiency. PMID:26131554

  1. Radiobiological modeling analysis of the optimal fraction scheme in patients with peripheral non-small cell lung cancer undergoing stereotactic body radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bao-Tian; Lu, Jia-Yang; Lin, Pei-Xian; Chen, Jian-Zhou; Li, De-Rui; Chen, Chuang-Zhen

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the optimal fraction scheme (FS) in patients with small peripheral non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) undergoing stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) with the 4 × 12 Gy scheme as the reference. CT simulation data for sixteen patients diagnosed with primary NSCLC or metastatic tumor with a single peripheral lesion ≤3 cm were used in this study. Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans were designed based on ten different FS of 1 × 25 Gy, 1 × 30 Gy, 1 × 34 Gy, 3 × 15 Gy, 3 × 18 Gy, 3 × 20 Gy, 4 × 12 Gy, 5 × 12 Gy, 6 × 10 Gy and 10 × 7 Gy. Five different radiobiological models were employed to predict the tumor control probability (TCP) value. Three other models were utilized to estimate the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) value to the lung and the modified equivalent uniform dose (mEUD) value to the chest wall (CW). The 1 × 30 Gy regimen is recommended to achieve 4.2% higher TCP and slightly higher NTCP and mEUD values to the lung and CW compared with the 4 × 12 Gy schedule, respectively. This regimen also greatly shortens the treatment duration. However, the 3 × 15 Gy schedule is suggested in patients where the lung-to-tumor volume ratio is small or where the tumor is adjacent to the CW. PMID:26657569

  2. Dosimetric evaluation of the feasibility of stereotactic body radiotherapy for primary lung cancer with lobe-specific selective elective nodal irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Komatsu, Tetsuya; Kunieda, Etsuo; Kitahara, Tadashi; Akiba, Takeshi; Nagao, Ryuta; Fukuzawa, Tsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    More than 10% of all patients treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for primary lung cancer develop regional lymph node recurrence. We evaluated the dosimetric feasibility of SBRT with lobe-specific selective elective nodal irradiation (ENI) on dose–volume histograms. A total of 21 patients were treated with SBRT for Stage I primary lung cancer between January 2010 and June 2012 at our institution. The extents of lobe-specific selective ENI fields were determined with reference to prior surgical reports. The ENI fields included lymph node stations (LNS) 3 + 4 + 11 for the right upper lobe tumors, LNS 7 + 11 for the right middle or lower lobe tumors, LNS 5 + 11 for the left upper lobe tumors, and LNS 7 + 11 for the left lower lobe tumors. A composite plan was generated by combining the ENI plan and the SBRT plan and recalculating for biologically equivalent doses of 2 Gy per fraction, using a linear quadratic model. The V20 of the lung, D1cm3 of the spinal cord, D1cm3 and D10cm3 of the esophagus and D10cm3 of the tracheobronchial wall were evaluated. Of the 21 patients, nine patients (43%) could not fulfill the dose constraints. In all these patients, the distance between the planning target volume (PTV) of ENI (PTVeni) and the PTV of SBRT (PTVsrt) was ≤2.0 cm. Of the three patients who developed regional metastasis, two patients had isolated lymph node failure, and the lymph node metastasis was included within the ENI field. When the distance between the PTVeni and PTVsrt is >2.0 cm, SBRT with selective ENI may therefore dosimetrically feasible. PMID:26566656

  3. FDG-PET Maximum Standardized Uptake Value is Prognostic for Recurrence and Survival after Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kohutek, Zachary A.; Wu, Abraham J.; Zhang, Zhigang; Foster, Amanda; Din, Shaun U.; Yorke, Ellen D.; Downey, Robert; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E.; Weber, Wolfgang A.; Rimner, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Glucose metabolic activity measured by [18F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) has shown prognostic value in multiple malignancies, but results are often confounded by the inclusion of patients with various disease stages and undergoing various therapies. This study was designed to evaluate the prognostic value of tumor FDG uptake quantified by maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) in a large group of early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) using consistent treatment techniques. Materials and Methods 219 lesions in 211 patients treated with definitive SBRT for stage I NSCLC were analyzed after a median follow-up of 25.2 months. Cox regression was used to determine associations between SUVmax and overall survival (OS), disease-specific survival (DSS), and freedom from local recurrence (FFLR) or distant metastasis (FFDM). Results SUVmax >3.0 was associated with worse OS (p<0.001), FFLR (p=0.003) and FFDM (p=0.003). On multivariate analysis, OS was associated with SUVmax (HR 1.89, p=0.03), gross tumor volume (GTV) (HR 1.94, p=0.005) and Karnofsky performance status (KPS) (HR 0.51, p=0.008). DSS was associated only with SUVmax (HR 2.58, p=0.04). Both LR (HR 11.47, p=0.02) and DM (HR 3.75, p=0.006) were also associated with higher SUVmax. Conclusion In a large patient population, SUVmax >3.0 was associated with worse survival and a greater propensity for local recurrence and distant metastasis after SBRT for NSCLC. PMID:26078260

  4. Spine Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Utilizing Cone-Beam CT Image-Guidance With a Robotic Couch: Intrafraction Motion Analysis Accounting for all Six Degrees of Freedom

    SciTech Connect

    Hyde, Derek; Lochray, Fiona; Korol, Renee; Davidson, Melanie; Wong, C. Shun; Ma, Lijun; Sahgal, Arjun

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the residual setup error and intrafraction motion following kilovoltage cone-beam CT (CBCT) image guidance, for immobilized spine stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) patients, with positioning corrected for in all six degrees of freedom. Methods and Materials: Analysis is based on 42 consecutive patients (48 thoracic and/or lumbar metastases) treated with a total of 106 fractions and 307 image registrations. Following initial setup, a CBCT was acquired for patient alignment and a pretreatment CBCT taken to verify shifts and determine the residual setup error, followed by a midtreatment and posttreatment CBCT image. For 13 single-fraction SBRT patients, two midtreatment CBCT images were obtained. Initially, a 1.5-mm and 1 Degree-Sign tolerance was used to reposition the patient following couch shifts which was subsequently reduced to 1 mm and 1 Degree-Sign degree after the first 10 patients. Results: Small positioning errors after the initial CBCT setup were observed, with 90% occurring within 1 mm and 97% within 1 Degree-Sign . In analyzing the impact of the time interval for verification imaging (10 {+-} 3 min) and subsequent image acquisitions (17 {+-} 4 min), the residual setup error was not significantly different (p > 0.05). A significant difference (p = 0.04) in the average three-dimensional intrafraction positional deviations favoring a more strict tolerance in translation (1 mm vs. 1.5 mm) was observed. The absolute intrafraction motion averaged over all patients and all directions along x, y, and z axis ({+-} SD) were 0.7 {+-} 0.5 mm and 0.5 {+-} 0.4 mm for the 1.5 mm and 1 mm tolerance, respectively. Based on a 1-mm and 1 Degree-Sign correction threshold, the target was localized to within 1.2 mm and 0.9 Degree-Sign with 95% confidence. Conclusion: Near-rigid body immobilization, intrafraction CBCT imaging approximately every 15-20 min, and strict repositioning thresholds in six degrees of freedom yields minimal intrafraction motion

  5. SU-E-T-620: Dosimetric Compliance Study for a New Prostate Protocol of Combined High Dose Rate Brachytherapy and Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, C; Giaddui, T; Den, R; Harrison, A; Yu, Y

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the adherence of treatment plans of prostate cancer patients with the dosimetric compliance criteria of the new in house phase I trial of high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy combined with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for intermediate risk prostate cancer patients. Methods: Ten prostate cancer patients were treated using this trial. They received one fraction of HDR to 15Gy, followed by external beam(EB) boost of 3.2Gy(Level 1, five patients) or 3.94Gy(level 2, five patients) per fraction for 10 or 7 fractions, respectively, both equivalent to EB treatments of 113.5Gy in 2Gy fractions. The EB plans were either IMRT or VMAT plans. DVH analysis was performed to verify the adherence of treatment plans to the dosimetric criteria of the trial. Results: For Level 1 patients, target coverage were adequate, with CTV V32Gy(%) of 99.0±1.0 (mean ± 1 standard deviation), and PTV V31Gy(%) of 99.6±0.3. PTV V32.9Gy(%) is 1.4±3.1 and PTVmax is 32.9±0.2Gy. Rectum, bladder and femoral heads sparing were well within protocol criteria. For Level 2 patients, CTV V27.6Gy(%) is 98.7±1.8; PTV V26.7Gy(%) is 99.0±1.4. PTV V28.4Gy(%) is 1.3±1.4, with three patients having minor deviation from protocol. Again critical structures were spared compliant to the protocol. The analysis of HDR plans show similar results, with adequate dose coverage to the prostate and sparing of critical structures including urethra and rectum. V100(%) and V90(%) of prostate are 96.0±1.1 and 98.9±0.5. Urethra D10(%) is 113.1±2.9. Rectum V80(cc) is 1.4±0.5. Hotspot in prostate is substantially higher than what the protocol specifies. But the criteria for hotspot are only guidelines, serving to lower the dose to urethra . Conclusion: This new high biological equivalent dose prostate trial has been carried out successfully for ten patients. Based on dosimetric analysis, all HDR and external plans were compliant to the protocol criteria, with only minor deviations.

  6. Ghost marker detection and elimination in marker-based optical tracking systems for real-time tracking in stereotactic body radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Guanghua Li, Jonathan; Huang, Yin; Mittauer, Kathryn; Lu, Bo; Liu, Chihray

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: To propose a simple model to explain the origin of ghost markers in marker-based optical tracking systems (OTS) and to develop retrospective strategies to detect and eliminate ghost markers. Methods: In marker-based OTS, ghost markers are virtual markers created due to the cross-talk between the two camera sensors, which can lead to system execution failure or inaccuracy in patient tracking. As a result, the users have to limit the number of markers and avoid certain marker configurations to reduce the chances of ghost markers. In this work, the authors propose retrospective strategies to detect and eliminate ghost markers. The two camera sensors were treated as mathematical points in space. The authors identified the coplanar within limit (CWL) condition as the necessary condition for ghost marker occurrence. A simple ghost marker detection method was proposed based on the model. Ghost marker elimination was achieved through pattern matching: a ghost marker-free reference set was matched with the optical marker set observed by the OTS; unmatched optical markers were eliminated as either ghost markers or misplaced markers. The pattern matching problem was formulated as a constraint satisfaction problem (using pairwise distances as constraints) and solved with an iterative backtracking algorithm. Wildcard markers were introduced to address missing or misplaced markers. An experiment was designed to measure the sensor positions and the limit for the CWL condition. The ghost marker detection and elimination algorithms were verified with samples collected from a five-marker jig and a nine-marker anthropomorphic phantom, rotated with the treatment couch from −60° to +60°. The accuracy of the pattern matching algorithm was further validated with marker patterns from 40 patients who underwent stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). For this purpose, a synthetic optical marker pattern was created for each patient by introducing ghost markers, marker position

  7. Optimizing the flattening filter free beam selection in RapidArc®-based stereotactic body radiotherapy for Stage I lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lu, J-Y; Lin, Z; Lin, P-X

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To optimize the flattening filter-free (FFF) beam selection in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) treatment for Stage I lung cancer in different fraction schemes. Methods: Treatment plans from 12 patients suffering from Stage I lung cancer were designed using the 6XFFF and 10XFFF beams in different fraction schemes of 4 × 12, 3 × 18 and 1 × 34 Gy. Plans were evaluated mainly in terms of organs at risk (OARs) sparing, normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) estimation and treatment efficiency. Results: Compared with the 10XFFF beam, 6XFFF beam showed statistically significant lower dose to all the OARs investigated. The percentage of NTCP reduction for both lung and chest wall was about 10% in the fraction schemes of 4 × 12 and 3 × 18 Gy, whereas only 7.4% and 2.6% was obtained in the 1 × 34 Gy scheme. For oesophagus, heart and spinal cord, the reduction was greater with the 6XFFF beam, but their absolute estimates were <10−6%. The mean beam-on time for 6XFFF and 10XFFF beams at 4 × 12, 3 × 18 and 1 × 34 Gy schemes were 2.2 ± 0.2 vs 1.5 ± 0.1, 3.3 ± 0.9 vs 2.0 ± 0.5 and 6.3 ± 0.9 vs 3.5 ± 0.4 min, respectively. Conclusion: The 6XFFF beam obtains better OARs sparing and lower incidence of NTCP in SBRT treatment of Stage I lung cancer, whereas the 10XFFF beam improves the treatment efficiency. To balance the OARs sparing and intrafractional variation owing to the prolonged treatment time, the authors recommend using the 6XFFF beam in the 4 × 12 and 3 × 18 Gy schemes but the 10XFFF beam in the 1 × 34 Gy scheme. Advances in knowledge: This study optimizes the FFF beam selection in different fraction schemes in SBRT treatment of Stage I lung cancer. PMID:26133073

  8. SU-E-T-383: Can Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Mimic the Dose Distribution of High-Dose-Rate Tandem and Ovoids/ring Brachytherapy?

    SciTech Connect

    Park, S; Demanes, J; Kamrava, M; Scanderbeg, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) can mimic the dosimetry of tandem and ovoids/ring brachytherapy. Methods: We selected 5 patients treated with 3D-CT based high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy using 4 tandem and ovoid and 1 tandem and ring case. Manual optimization based on the Manchester system followed by graphical optimization (Nucletron Oncentra MasterPlan or Varian BrachyVision) was performed to deliver 6.0 Gy per fraction to a high-risk CTV while maintaining dose to organs at risk (OAR) below the ABS recommendations. For theoretical SBRT plans, CT images and OAR contours from the HDR plans were imported into Eclipse (Varian). The SBRT plan was created to mimic the heterogeneity of HDR plans by using a simultaneous integrated boost technique to match the V100, V150, and V200 isodose volumes from HDR. The OAR Dmax from HDR was used to define the OAR dose constraints for SBRT. Target coverage, dose spill-out, and OAR doses (D0.1cc, D1cc, and D2cc) between the HDR and SBRT plans were compared for significance using a two-tail paired ttest. Results: The mean isodose volumes for HDR vs. SBRT were 29.4 cc vs. 29.0 cc (V200, p = 0.674), 49.2 cc vs. 56.3 cc (V150, p = 0.017), 95.4 cc vs. 127.7 cc (V100, p = 0.001), and 271.9 cc vs. 581.6 cc (V50, p = 0.001). The D2cc to OAR for HDR vs. SBRT was 71.6% vs. 96.2% (bladder, p = 0.002), 69.2% vs. 101.7% (rectum, p = 0.0003), and 56.9% vs. 68.6% (sigmoid, p = 0.004). Conclusion: SBRT with VMAT can provide similar dose target coverage (V200), but dose spill-out and doses to OAR were statistically significantly higher than HDR. This study clearly demonstrated that brachytherapy can not be substituted with SBRT in gynecologic cervical cancer treatment.

  9. SU-E-T-591: Optimizing the Flattening Filter Free Beam Selection in RapidArc-Based Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Stage I Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, B-T; Lu, J-Y

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To optimize the flattening filter free (FFF) beam energy selection in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) treatment for stage I lung cancer with different fraction schemes. Methods: Twelve patients suffering from stage I lung cancer were enrolled in this study. Plans were designed using 6XFFF and 10XFFF beams with the most widely used fraction schemes of 4*12 Gy, 3*18 Gy and 1*34 Gy, respectively. The plan quality was appraised in terms of planning target volume (PTV) coverage, conformity of the prescribed dose (CI100%), intermediate dose spillage (R50% and D2cm), organs at risk (OARs) sparing and beam-on time. Results: The 10XFFF beam predicted 1% higher maximum, mean dose to the PTV and 4–5% higher R50% compared with the 6XFFF beam in the three fraction schemes, whereas the CI100% and D2cm was similar. Most importantly, the 6XFFF beam exhibited 3–10% lower dose to all the OARs. However, the 10XFFF beam reduced the beam-on time by 31.9±7.2%, 38.7±2.8% and 43.6±4.0% compared with the 6XFFF beam in the 4*12 Gy, 3*18 Gy and 1*34 Gy schemes, respectively. Beam-on time was 2.2±0.2 vs 1.5±0.1, 3.3±0.9 vs 2.0±0.5 and 6.3±0.9 vs 3.5±0.4 minutes for the 6XFFF and 10XFFF one in the three fraction schemes. Conclusion: The 6XFFF beam obtains better OARs sparing in SBRT treatment for stage I lung cancer, but the 10XFFF one provides improved treatment efficiency. To balance the OARs sparing and intrafractional variation as a function of prolonged treatment time, the authors recommend to use the 6XFFF beam in the 4*12 Gy and 3*18 Gy schemes for better OARs sparing. However, for the 1*34 Gy scheme, the 10XFFF beam is recommended to achieve improved treatment efficiency.

  10. SU-E-J-32: Dosimetric Evaluation Based On Pre-Treatment Cone Beam CT for Spine Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy: Does Region of Interest Focus Matter?

    SciTech Connect

    Magnelli, A; Xia, P

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Spine stereotactic body radiotherapy requires very conformal dose distributions and precise delivery. Prior to treatment, a KV cone-beam CT (KV-CBCT) is registered to the planning CT to provide image-guided positional corrections, which depend on selection of the region of interest (ROI) because of imperfect patient positioning and anatomical deformation. Our objective is to determine the dosimetric impact of ROI selections. Methods: Twelve patients were selected for this study with the treatment regions varied from C-spine to T-spine. For each patient, the KV-CBCT was registered to the planning CT three times using distinct ROIs: one encompassing the entire patient, a large ROI containing large bony anatomy, and a small target-focused ROI. Each registered CBCT volume, saved as an aligned dataset, was then sent to the planning system. The treated plan was applied to each dataset and dose was recalculated. The tumor dose coverage (percentage of target volume receiving prescription dose), maximum point dose to 0.03 cc of the spinal cord, and dose to 10% of the spinal cord volume (V10) for each alignment were compared to the original plan. Results: The average magnitude of tumor coverage deviation was 3.9%±5.8% with external contour, 1.5%±1.1% with large ROI, 1.3%±1.1% with small ROI. Spinal cord V10 deviation from plan was 6.6%±6.6% with external contour, 3.5%±3.1% with large ROI, and 1.2%±1.0% with small ROI. Spinal cord max point dose deviation from plan was: 12.2%±13.3% with external contour, 8.5%±8.4% with large ROI, and 3.7%±2.8% with small ROI. Conclusion: A small ROI focused on the target results in the smallest deviation from planned dose to target and cord although rotations at large distances from the targets were observed. It is recommended that image fusion during CBCT focus narrowly on the target volume to minimize dosimetric error. Improvement in patient setups may further reduce residual errors.

  11. SU-E-J-182: Reproducibility of Tumor Motion Probability Distribution Function in Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy of Lung Using Real-Time Tumor-Tracking Radiotherapy System

    SciTech Connect

    Shiinoki, T; Hanazawa, H; Park, S; Takahashi, T; Shibuya, K; Kawamura, S; Uehara, T; Yuasa, Y; Koike, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: We aim to achieve new four-dimensional radiotherapy (4DRT) using the next generation real-time tumor-tracking (RTRT) system and flattening-filter-free techniques. To achieve new 4DRT, it is necessary to understand the respiratory motion of tumor. The purposes of this study were: 1.To develop the respiratory motion analysis tool using log files. 2.To evaluate the reproducibility of tumor motion probability distribution function (PDF) during stereotactic body RT (SBRT) of lung tumor. Methods: Seven patients having fiducial markers closely implanted to the lung tumor were enrolled in this study. The positions of fiducial markers were measured using the RTRT system (Mitsubishi Electronics Co., JP) and recorded as two types of log files during the course of SBRT. For each patients, tumor motion range and tumor motion PDFs in left-right (LR), anterior-posterior (AP) and superior-inferior (SI) directions were calculated using log files of all beams per fraction (PDFn). Fractional PDF reproducibility (Rn) was calculated as Kullback-Leibler (KL) divergence between PDF1 and PDFn of tumor motion. The mean of Rn (Rm) was calculated for each patient and correlated to the patient’s mean tumor motion range (Am). The change of Rm during the course of SBRT was also evluated. These analyses were performed using in-house developed software. Results: The Rm were 0.19 (0.07–0.30), 0.14 (0.07–0.32) and 0.16 (0.09–0.28) in LR, AP and SI directions, respectively. The Am were 5.11 mm (2.58–9.99 mm), 7.81 mm (2.87–15.57 mm) and 11.26 mm (3.80–21.27 mm) in LR, AP and SI directions, respectively. The PDF reproducibility decreased as the tumor motion range increased in AP and SI direction. That decreased slightly through the course of RT in SI direction. Conclusion: We developed the respiratory motion analysis tool for 4DRT using log files and quantified the range and reproducibility of respiratory motion for lung tumors.

  12. Volumetric modulated arc planning for lung stereotactic body radiotherapy using conventional and unflattened photon beams: a dosimetric comparison with 3D technique

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Frequently, three-dimensional (3D) conformal beams are used in lung cancer stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Recently, volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) was introduced as a new treatment modality. VMAT techniques shorten delivery time, reducing the possibility of intrafraction target motion. However dose distributions can be quite different from standard 3D therapy. This study quantifies those differences, with focus on VMAT plans using unflattened photon beams. Methods A total of 15 lung cancer patients previously treated with 3D or VMAT SBRT were randomly selected. For each patient, non-coplanar 3D, coplanar and non-coplanar VMAT and flattening filter free VMAT (FFF-VMAT) plans were generated to meet the same objectives with 50 Gy covering 95% of the PTV. Two dynamic arcs were used in each VMAT plan. The couch was set at ± 5° to the 0° straight position for the two non-coplanar arcs. Pinnacle version 9.0 (Philips Radiation Oncology, Fitchburg WI) treatment planning system with VMAT capabilities was used. We analyzed the conformity index (CI), which is the ratio of the total volume receiving at least the prescription dose to the target volume receiving at least the prescription dose; the conformity number (CN) which is the ratio of the target coverage to CI; and the gradient index (GI) which is the ratio of the volume of 50% of the prescription isodose to the volume of the prescription isodose; as well as the V20, V5, and mean lung dose (MLD). Paired non-parametric analysis of variance tests with post-tests were performed to examine the statistical significance of the differences of the dosimetric indices. Results Dosimetric indices CI, CN and MLD all show statistically significant improvement for all studied VMAT techniques compared with 3D plans (p < 0.05). V5 and V20 show statistically significant improvement for the FFF-VMAT plans compared with 3D (p < 0.001). GI is improved for the FFF-VMAT and the non-coplanar VMAT plans (p < 0.01 and p

  13. Once-Weekly, High-Dose Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer: 6-Year Analysis of 60 Early-Stage, 42 Locally Advanced, and 7 Metastatic Lung Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar, Omar M. Sandhu, Taljit S.; Lattin, Paul B.; Chang, Jung H.; Lee, Choon K.; Groshko, Gayle A.; Lattin, Cheryl J.

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: To explore once-weekly stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in nonoperable patients with localized, locally advanced, or metastatic lung cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 102 primary (89 untreated plus 13 recurrent) and 7 metastatic tumors were studied. The median follow-up was 38 months, the average patient age was 75 years. Of the 109 tumors studied, 60 were Stage I (45 IA and 15 IB), 9 were Stage II, 30 were Stage III, 3 were Stage IV, and 7 were metastases. SBRT only was given in 73% (40 Gy in four fractions to the planning target volume to a total dose of 53 Gy to the isocenter for a biologically effective dose of 120 Gy{sub 10}). SBRT was given as a boost in 27% (22.5 Gy in three fractions once weekly for a dose of 32 Gy at the isocenter) after 45 Gy in 25 fractions to the primary plus the mediastinum. The total biologically effective dose was 120 Gy{sub 10}. Respiration gating was used in 46%. Results: The overall response rate was 75%; 33% had a complete response. The overall response rate was 89% for Stage IA patients (40% had a complete response). The local control rate was 82%; it was 100% and 93% for Stage IA and IB patients, respectively. The failure rate was 37%, with 17% within the planning target volume. No Grade 3-4 acute toxicities developed in any patient; 12% and 7% of patients developed Grade 1 and 2 toxicities, respectively. Late toxicity, all Grade 2, developed in 3% of patients. The 5-year cause-specific survival rate for Stage I was 70% and was 74% and 64% for Stage IA and IB patients, respectively. The 3-year Stage III cause-specific survival rate was 30%. The patients with metastatic lung cancer had a 57% response rate, a 27% complete response rate, an 86% local control rate, a median survival time of 19 months, and 23% 3-year survival rate. Conclusions: SBRT is noninvasive, convenient, fast, and economically attractive; it achieves results similar to surgery for early or metastatic lung cancer patients who are older

  14. The use of RapidArc volumetric-modulated arc therapy to deliver stereotactic radiosurgery and stereotactic body radiotherapy to intracranial and extracranial targets

    SciTech Connect

    Roa, Dante E.; Schiffner, Daniel C.; Zhang Juying; Dietrich, Salam N.; Kuo, Jeffrey V.; Wong, Jason; Ramsinghani, Nilam S.; Al-Ghazi, Muthana S.A.L.

    2012-10-01

    Twenty-three targets in 16 patients treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) or stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) were analyzed in terms of dosimetric homogeneity, target conformity, organ-at-risk (OAR) sparing, monitor unit (MU) usage, and beam-on time per fraction using RapidArc volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) vs. multifield sliding-window intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Patients underwent computed tomography simulation with site-specific immobilization. Magnetic resonance imaging fusion and optical tracking were incorporated as clinically indicated. Treatment planning was performed using Eclipse v8.6 to generate sliding-window IMRT and 1-arc and 2-arc RapidArc plans. Dosimetric parameters used for target analysis were RTOG conformity index (CI{sub RTOG}), homogeneity index (HI{sub RTOG}), inverse Paddick Conformity Index (PCI), D{sub mean} and D5-D95. OAR sparing was analyzed in terms of D{sub max} and D{sub mean}. Treatment delivery was evaluated based on measured beam-on times delivered on a Varian Trilogy linear accelerator and recorded MU values. Dosimetric conformity, homogeneity, and OAR sparing were comparable between IMRT, 1-arc RapidArc and 2-arc RapidArc plans. Mean beam-on times {+-} SD for IMRT and 1-arc and 2-arc treatments were 10.5 {+-} 7.3, 2.6 {+-} 1.6, and 3.0 {+-} 1.1 minutes, respectively. Mean MUs were 3041, 1774, and 1676 for IMRT, 1-, and 2-arc plans, respectively. Although dosimetric conformity, homogeneity, and OAR sparing were similar between these techniques, SRS and SBRT fractions treated with RapidArc were delivered with substantially less beam-on time and fewer MUs than IMRT. The rapid delivery of SRS and SBRT with RapidArc improved workflow on the linac with these otherwise time-consuming treatments and limited the potential for intrafraction organ and patient motion, which can cause significant dosimetric errors. These clinically important advantages make image-guided RapidArc useful in the delivery

  15. SU-E-J-110: Dosimetric Analysis of Respiratory Motion Based On Four-Dimensional Dose Accumulation in Liver Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, S; Kim, D; Kim, T; Kim, K; Cho, M; Shin, D; Suh, T; Kim, S; Park, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Respiratory motion in thoracic and abdominal region could lead to significant underdosing of target and increased dose to healthy tissues. The aim of this study is to evaluate the dosimetric effect of respiratory motion in conventional 3D dose by comparing 4D deformable dose in liver stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods: Five patients who had previously treated liver SBRT were included in this study. Four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) images with 10 phases for all patients were acquired on multi-slice CT scanner (Siemens, Somatom definition). Conventional 3D planning was performed using the average intensity projection (AIP) images. 4D dose accumulation was calculated by summation of dose distribution for all phase images of 4DCT using deformable image registration (DIR) . The target volume and normal organs dose were evaluated with the 4D dose and compared with those from 3D dose. And also, Index of achievement (IOA) which assesses the consistency between planned dose and prescription dose was used to compare target dose distribution between 3D and 4D dose. Results: Although the 3D dose calculation considered the moving target coverage, significant differences of various dosimetric parameters between 4D and 3D dose were observed in normal organs and PTV. The conventional 3D dose overestimated dose to PTV, however, there was no significant difference for GTV. The average difference of IOA which become ‘1’ in an ideal case was 3.2% in PTV. The average difference of liver and duodenum was 5% and 16% respectively. Conclusion: 4D dose accumulation which can provide dosimetric effect of respiratory motion has a possibility to predict the more accurate delivered dose to target and normal organs and improve treatment accuracy. This work was supported by the Radiation Technology R&D program (No. 2013M2A2A7043498) and the Mid-career Researcher Program (2014R1A2A1A10050270) through the National Research Foundation of Korea funded by the

  16. SU-E-J-179: Assessment of Tumor Volume Change and Movement During Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) for Lung Cancer: Is Adaptive Radiation Therapy (ART) Necessary?

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C; Lee, C

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Delineation of gross tumor volumes (GTVs) is important for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). However, tumor volume changes during treatment response. Here, we have investigated tumor volume changes and movement during SBRT for lung cancer, as a means of examining the need for adaptive radiation therapy (ART). Methods: Fifteen tumors in 15 patients with lung cancer were treated with SBRT (total dose: 60 Gy in 4 fractions). GTVs were obtained from cone-beam computed tomography scans (CBCT1–4) taken before each of the 4 fractions was administered. GTVs were delineated and measured by radiation oncologists using a treatment planning system. Variance in the tumor position was assessed between the planning CT and the CBCT images. To investigate the dosimetric effects of tumor volume changes, planning CT and CBCT4 treatment plans were compared using the conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), and Paddick’s index (PCI). Results: The GTV on CBCT1 was employed as a baseline for comparisons. GTV had decreased by a mean of 20.4% (range: 0.7% to 47.2%) on CBCT4. Most patients had smaller GTVs on CBCT4 than on CBCT1. The interfractional shifts of the tumor position between the planning CT and CBCT1–4 were as follows: right-left, −0.4 to 1.3 mm; anterior-posterior, −0.8 to 0.5 mm; and superiorinferior, −0.9 to 1.1 mm. Indices for plans from the planning CT and CBCT4 were as follows: CI = 0.94±0.02 and 1.11±0.03; HI= 1.1±0.02 and 1.10±0.03; and PCI = 1.35±0.16 and 1.11±0.02, respectively. Conclusion: CI, HI, and PCI did not differ between the planning CT and CBCTs. However, daily CBCT revealed a significant decrease in the GTV during lung SBRT. Furthermore, there was an obvious interfractional shift in tumor position. Using ART could potentially lead to a reduced GTV margin and improved regional tumor control for lung cancer patients with significantly decreased GTV.

  17. Assessment of Monte Carlo algorithm for compliance with RTOG 0915 dosimetric criteria in peripheral lung cancer patients treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Pokhrel, Damodar; Sood, Sumit; Badkul, Rajeev; Jiang, Hongyu; McClinton, Christopher; Lominska, Christopher; Kumar, Parvesh; Wang, Fen

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate Monte Carlo-generated dose distributions with the X-ray Voxel Monte Carlo (XVMC) algorithm in the treatment of peripheral lung cancer patients using stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) with non-protocol dose-volume normalization and to assess plan outcomes utilizing RTOG 0915 dosimetric compliance criteria. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) protocols for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) currently require radiation dose to be calculated using tissue density heterogeneity corrections. Dosimetric criteria of RTOG 0915 were established based on superposition/convolution or heterogeneities corrected pencil beam (PB-hete) algorithms for dose calculations. Clinically, more accurate Monte Carlo (MC)-based algorithms are now routinely used for lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) dose calculations. Hence, it is important to determine whether MC calculations in the delivery of lung SBRT can achieve RTOG standards. In this report, we evaluate iPlan generated MC plans for peripheral lung cancer patients treated with SBRT using dose-volume histogram (DVH) normalization to determine if the RTOG 0915 compliance criteria can be met. This study evaluated 20 Stage I-II NSCLC patients with peripherally located lung tumors, who underwent MC-based SBRT with heterogeneity correction using X-ray Voxel Monte Carlo (XVMC) algorithm (Brainlab iPlan version 4.1.2). Total dose of 50 to 54 Gy in 3 to 5 fractions was delivered to the planning target vol-ume (PTV) with at least 95% of the PTV receiving 100% of the prescription dose (V100% ≥ 95%). The internal target volume (ITV) was delineated on maximum intensity projection (MIP) images of 4D CT scans. The PTV included the ITV plus 5 mm uniform margin applied to the ITV. The PTV ranged from 11.1 to 163.0 cc (mean = 46.1 ± 38.7 cc). Organs at risk (OARs) including ribs were delineated on mean intensity projection (MeanIP) images of 4D CT scans. Optimal clinical MC SBRT plans were

  18. Effects of material composition on the ablation performance of low density elastomeric ablators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tompkins, S. S.; Kabana, W. P.

    1973-01-01

    The ablation performance of materials composed of various concentrations of nylon, hollow silica spheres, hollow phenolic spheres, and four elastomeric resins was determined. Both blunt-body and flat-panel specimens were used, the cold-wall heating-rate ranges being 0.11 to 0.8 MW/sq m, respectively. The corresponding surface pressure ranges for these tests were 0.017 to 0.037 atmosphere and 0.004 to 0.005 atmosphere. Some of the results show that (1) the addition of nylon significantly improved the ablation performance, but the nylon was not compatible with one resin system; (2) panel and blunt-body specimen data do not show the same effect of phenolic sphere content on ablation effectiveness; and (3) there appears to be an optimum concentration of hollow silica spheres for good ablation performance. The composition of an efficient, nonproprietary ablator for lifting body application is identified and the ablation performance of this ablator is compared with the performance of three commercially available materials.

  19. Ablation of TRPM5 in Mice Results in Reduced Body Weight Gain and Improved Glucose Tolerance and Protects from Excessive Consumption of Sweet Palatable Food when Fed High Caloric Diets

    PubMed Central

    Larsson, Marie H.; Håkansson, Pernilla; Jansen, Frank P.; Magnell, Kerstin; Brodin, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The calcium activated cation channel transient receptor potential channel type M5 (TRPM5) is part of the downstream machinery of the taste receptors and have been shown to play a central role in taste signalling. In addition it is also found in other types of chemosensory cells in various parts of the body as well as in pancreatic β-cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of TRPM5 gene ablation on body weight, insulin sensitivity and other metabolic parameters in long-term high caloric diet induced obesity. Trpm5-/- mice gained significantly less body weight and fat mass on both palatable carbohydrate and fat rich cafeteria diet and 60% high fat diet (HFD) and developed less insulin resistance compared to wild type mice. A main finding was the clearly improved glucose tolerance in Trpm5-/- mice compared to wild type mice on cafeteria diet, which was independent of body weight. In addition, it was shown that Trpm5-/- mice consumed the same amount of calories when fed a HFD only or a HFD in combination with a palatable chocolate ball, which is in contrast to wild type mice that increased their caloric intake when fed the combination, mainly due to excessive consumption of the chocolate ball. Thus the palatable sugar containing diet induced overeating was prevented in Trpm5-/- mice. This indicates that sweet taste induced overeating may be a cause for the increased energy intake and glucose intolerance development seen for wild type mice on a sugar and high fat rich cafeteria diet compared to when on a high fat diet. This study point to an important role for the taste signalling system and TRPM5 in diet induced glucose intolerance. PMID:26397098

  20. Ablation of TRPM5 in Mice Results in Reduced Body Weight Gain and Improved Glucose Tolerance and Protects from Excessive Consumption of Sweet Palatable Food when Fed High Caloric Diets.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Marie H; Håkansson, Pernilla; Jansen, Frank P; Magnell, Kerstin; Brodin, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The calcium activated cation channel transient receptor potential channel type M5 (TRPM5) is part of the downstream machinery of the taste receptors and have been shown to play a central role in taste signalling. In addition it is also found in other types of chemosensory cells in various parts of the body as well as in pancreatic β-cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of TRPM5 gene ablation on body weight, insulin sensitivity and other metabolic parameters in long-term high caloric diet induced obesity. Trpm5-/- mice gained significantly less body weight and fat mass on both palatable carbohydrate and fat rich cafeteria diet and 60% high fat diet (HFD) and developed less insulin resistance compared to wild type mice. A main finding was the clearly improved glucose tolerance in Trpm5-/- mice compared to wild type mice on cafeteria diet, which was independent of body weight. In addition, it was shown that Trpm5-/- mice consumed the same amount of calories when fed a HFD only or a HFD in combination with a palatable chocolate ball, which is in contrast to wild type mice that increased their caloric intake when fed the combination, mainly due to excessive consumption of the chocolate ball. Thus the palatable sugar containing diet induced overeating was prevented in Trpm5-/- mice. This indicates that sweet taste induced overeating may be a cause for the increased energy intake and glucose intolerance development seen for wild type mice on a sugar and high fat rich cafeteria diet compared to when on a high fat diet. This study point to an important role for the taste signalling system and TRPM5 in diet induced glucose intolerance. PMID:26397098

  1. Flexible Ablators: Applications and Arcjet Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, James O.; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Beck, Robin A S.; Mcguire, Kathy; Prabhu, Dinesh K.; Gorbunov, Sergey

    2011-01-01

    Flexible ablators were conceived in 2009 to meet the technology pull for large, human Mars Exploration Class, 23 m diameter hypersonic inflatable aerodynamic decelerators. As described elsewhere, they have been recently undergoing initial technical readiness (TRL) advancement by NASA. The performance limits of flexible ablators in terms of maximum heat rates, pressure and shear remain to be defined. Further, it is hoped that this emerging technology will vastly expand the capability of future NASA missions involving atmospheric entry systems. This paper considers four topics of relevance to flexible ablators: (1) Their potential applications to near/far term human and robotic missions (2) Brief consideration of the balance between heat shield diameter, flexible ablator performance limits, entry vehicle controllability and aft-body shear layer impingement of interest to designers of very large entry vehicles, (3) The approach for developing bonding processes of flexible ablators for use on rigid entry bodies and (4) Design of large arcjet test articles that will enable the testing of flexible ablators in flight-like, combined environments (heat flux, pressure, shear and structural tensile loading). Based on a review of thermal protection system performance requirements for future entry vehicles, it is concluded that flexible ablators have broad applications to conventional, rigid entry body systems and are enabling to large deployable (both inflatable and mechanical) heat shields. Because of the game-changing nature of flexible ablators, it appears that NASA's Office of the Chief Technologist (OCT) will fund a focused, 3-year TRL advancement of the new materials capable of performance in heat fluxes in the range of 200-600 W/sq. cm. This support will enable the manufacture and use of the large-scale arcjet test designs that will be a key element of this OCT funded activity.

  2. Local Ablative Strategies for Ductal Pancreatic Cancer (Radiofrequency Ablation, Irreversible Electroporation): A Review

    PubMed Central

    Paiella, Salvatore; Salvia, Roberto; Ramera, Marco; Girelli, Roberto; Frigerio, Isabella; Giardino, Alessandro; Allegrini, Valentina; Bassi, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) has still a dismal prognosis. Locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) accounts for the 40% of the new diagnoses. Current treatment options are based on chemo- and radiotherapy regimens. Local ablative techniques seem to be the future therapeutic option for stage-III patients with PDAC. Radiofrequency Ablation (RFA) and Irreversible Electroporation (IRE) are actually the most emerging local ablative techniques used on LAPC. Initial clinical studies on the use of these techniques have already demonstrated encouraging results in terms of safety and feasibility. Unfortunately, few studies on their efficacy are currently available. Even though some reports on the overall survival are encouraging, randomized studies are still required to corroborate these findings. This study provides an up-to-date overview and a thematic summary of the current available evidence on the application of RFA and IRE on PDAC, together with a comparison of the two procedures. PMID:26981115

  3. Local Ablative Strategies for Ductal Pancreatic Cancer (Radiofrequency Ablation, Irreversible Electroporation): A Review.

    PubMed

    Paiella, Salvatore; Salvia, Roberto; Ramera, Marco; Girelli, Roberto; Frigerio, Isabella; Giardino, Alessandro; Allegrini, Valentina; Bassi, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) has still a dismal prognosis. Locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) accounts for the 40% of the new diagnoses. Current treatment options are based on chemo- and radiotherapy regimens. Local ablative techniques seem to be the future therapeutic option for stage-III patients with PDAC. Radiofrequency Ablation (RFA) and Irreversible Electroporation (IRE) are actually the most emerging local ablative techniques used on LAPC. Initial clinical studies on the use of these techniques have already demonstrated encouraging results in terms of safety and feasibility. Unfortunately, few studies on their efficacy are currently available. Even though some reports on the overall survival are encouraging, randomized studies are still required to corroborate these findings. This study provides an up-to-date overview and a thematic summary of the current available evidence on the application of RFA and IRE on PDAC, together with a comparison of the two procedures. PMID:26981115

  4. Laser-ablation processes

    SciTech Connect

    Dingus, R.S.

    1992-01-01

    The various mechanisms by which ablation of materials can be induced with lasers are discussed in this paper. The various ablation processes and potential applications are reviewed from the threshold for ablation up to fluxes of about 10{sup 13} W/cm{sup 2}, with emphasis on three particular processes; namely, front-surface spallation, two-dimensional blowoff, and contained vaporization.

  5. Experimental evaluations of the accuracy of 3D and 4D planning in robotic tracking stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Mark K. H.; Kwong, Dora L. W.; Ng, Sherry C. Y.; Tong, Anthony S. M.; Tam, Eric K. W.

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: Due to the complexity of 4D target tracking radiotherapy, the accuracy of this treatment strategy should be experimentally validated against established standard 3D technique. This work compared the accuracy of 3D and 4D dose calculations in respiration tracking stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods: Using the 4D planning module of the CyberKnife treatment planning system, treatment plans for a moving target and a static off-target cord structure were created on different four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) datasets of a thorax phantom moving in different ranges. The 4D planning system used B-splines deformable image registrations (DIR) to accumulate dose distributions calculated on different breathing geometries, each corresponding to a static 3D-CT image of the 4D-CT dataset, onto a reference image to compose a 4D dose distribution. For each motion, 4D optimization was performed to generate a 4D treatment plan of the moving target. For comparison with standard 3D planning, each 4D plan was copied to the reference end-exhale images and a standard 3D dose calculation was followed. Treatment plans of the off-target structure were first obtained by standard 3D optimization on the end-exhale images. Subsequently, they were applied to recalculate the 4D dose distributions using DIRs. All dose distributions that were initially obtained using the ray-tracing algorithm with equivalent path-length heterogeneity correction (3D{sub EPL} and 4D{sub EPL}) were recalculated by a Monte Carlo algorithm (3D{sub MC} and 4D{sub MC}) to further investigate the effects of dose calculation algorithms. The calculated 3D{sub EPL}, 3D{sub MC}, 4D{sub EPL}, and 4D{sub MC} dose distributions were compared to measurements by Gafchromic EBT2 films in the axial and coronal planes of the moving target object, and the coronal plane for the static off-target object based on the {gamma} metric at 5%/3mm criteria ({gamma}{sub 5%/3mm}). Treatment plans were considered

  6. How to Improve Therapeutic Ratio in Radiotherapy of HCC

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Chiao-Ling; Hsu, Feng-Ming; Cheng, Jason Chia-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    Background During the past two decades, external-beam radiation technology has substantially changed from traditional two-dimensional to conformal three-dimensional to intensity-modulated planning and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Summary Modern techniques of radiotherapy (RT) are highly focused and capable of delivering an ablative dose to targeted hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tumors. SBRT is an option for selected patients with limited tumor volume and non-eligibility for other invasive treatments. Moreover, RT combined with a radiation sensitizer (RS) to increase the therapeutic ratio has shown promising results in select studies, prompting further investigation of this combination. With the undetermined role of RT in treatment guidelines and variation in patterns of treatment failure after RT in patient with HCC, useful biomarkers to guide RT decision-making and selection of patients are needed and emerging. Key Message The objective of this review is to summarize the current RS with SBRT schemes and biomarkers for patient selection used to maximize the effect of RT on HCC. PMID:27493896

  7. Laser ablation of blepharopigmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Tanenbaum, M.; Karas, S.; McCord, C.D. Jr. )

    1988-01-01

    This article discusses laser ablation of blepharopigmentation in four stages: first, experimentally, where pigment vaporization is readily achieved with the argon blue-green laser; second, in the rabbit animal model, where eyelid blepharopigmentation markings are ablated with the laser; third, in human subjects, where the argon blue-green laser is effective in the ablation of implanted eyelid pigment; and fourth, in a case report, where, in a patient with improper pigment placement in the eyelid, the laser is used to safely and effectively ablate the undesired pigment markings. This article describes in detail the new technique of laser ablation of blepharopigmentation. Potential complications associated with the technique are discussed.

  8. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer: Toxicity and Biochemical Disease-Free Outcomes from a Multi-Institutional Patient Registry

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sanjeev; Shumway, Richard; Perry, David; Bydder, Sean; Simpson, C. Kelley; D'Ambrosio, David

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To report on initial patient characteristics, treatment practices, toxicity, and early biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS) of localized prostate cancer treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) and enrolled in the RSSearch® Patient Registry. Methods: A retrospective analysis was conducted on patients with clinically localized prostate cancer enrolled in RSSearch® from June 2006 - January 2015. Patients were classified as low-risk (PSA ≤ 10 ng/ml, T1c-T2a, Gleason score ≤ 6), intermediate-risk (PSA 10.1 - 20 ng/ml, T2b-T2c, or Gleason 7), or high-risk (PSA > 20 ng/ml, T3 or Gleason ≥ 8). Toxicity was reported using Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3. Biochemical failure was assessed using the Phoenix definition (nadir + 2 ng/ml). The Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to calculate bDFS and association of patient and tumor characteristics with the use of SBRT. Results: Four hundred thirty-seven patients (189 low, 215 intermediate, and 33 high-risk) at a median of 69 years (range: 48-88) received SBRT at 17 centers. Seventy-eight percent of patients received 36.25 Gy/5 fractions, 13% received 37 Gy/5 fractions, 6% received 35 Gy/5 fractions, 3% received 38 Gy/4 fractions, and 5% received a boost dose of 19.5-29 Gy following external beam radiation therapy. Median follow-up was 20 months (range: 1–64 months). Genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities were minimal, with no acute or late Grade 3+ GU or GI toxicity. Late Grade 1 and 2 urinary frequency was 25% and 8%. Late Grade 1 and 2 proctitis was 3% and 2%. Median PSA decreased from 5.8 ng/ml (range: 0.3-43) to 0.88, 0.4, and 0.3 ng/ml at one, two, and three years. Two-year bDFS for all patients was 96.1%. Two-year bDFS was 99.0%, 94.5%, and 89.8% for low, intermediate, and high-risk patients (p < 0.0001). Two-year bDFS was 99.2%, 93.2%, and 90.4% for Gleason ≤ 6, Gleason 7, and Gleason ≥ 8 (p < 0.0001). Two-year bDFS was 96.4%, 97

  9. Nonequilibrium Ablation of Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milos, Frank S.; Chen, Yih K.; Gokcen, Tahir

    2012-01-01

    In previous work, an equilibrium ablation and thermal response model for Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator was developed. In general, over a wide range of test conditions, model predictions compared well with arcjet data for surface recession, surface temperature, in-depth temperature at multiple thermocouples, and char depth. In this work, additional arcjet tests were conducted at stagnation conditions down to 40 W/sq cm and 1.6 kPa. The new data suggest that nonequilibrium effects become important for ablation predictions at heat flux or pressure below about 80 W/sq cm or 10 kPa, respectively. Modifications to the ablation model to account for nonequilibrium effects are investigated. Predictions of the equilibrium and nonequilibrium models are compared with the arcjet data.

  10. [French experience in paediatric total body irradiation: A study from the radiotherapy committee of the Société française des cancers de l'enfant (SFCE)].

    PubMed

    Demoor-Goldschmidt, C; Supiot, S; Claude, L; Carrie, C; Mazeron, R; Helfré, S; Alapetite, C; Jouin, A; Coche, B; Padovani, L; Muracciole, X; Bernier, V; Vigneron, C; Noël, G; Leseur, J; Le Prisé, É; Stefan, D; Habrand, J L; Kerr, C; Bondiau, P Y; Ruffier, A; Chapet, S; Mahé, M A

    2016-06-01

    A survey was conducted in 2015 in France on the care of children in radiotherapy services. We present the results for total body irradiation in children, a specific technique of radiation treatment, which needs dedicated controls for this particular population. Of the 17 centres interviewed, 16 responded, and 13 practiced total body irradiation. Patients are positioned in lateral decubitus in 11 centres and supine/prone in two centres. Doses used for total body irradiation in myeloablative bone marrow transplantation are the same in all centres (12Gy); treatments are always fractionated. Lung shielding is positioned to limit the dose at an average of 8Gy with extremes ranging from 6 to 10Gy. The shape of the shieldings varies depending on departments' protocol, with a smaller size in case of mediastinal mass. Four centres have experience of total body irradiation under general anaesthesia, despite twice-daily fractions. In total, practice is relatively homogeneous throughout France and is inspired by the knowledge obtained in adults. PMID:27342946

  11. Renal Ablation Update

    PubMed Central

    Khiatani, Vishal; Dixon, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    Thermal ablative technologies have evolved considerably in the recent past and are now an important component of current clinical guidelines for the treatment of small renal masses. Both radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation have intermediate-term oncologic control that rivals surgical options, with favorable complication profiles. Studies comparing cryoablation and radiofrequency ablation show no significant difference in oncologic control or complication profile between the two modalities. Early data from small series with microwave ablation have shown similar promising results. Newer technologies including irreversible electroporation and high-intensity–focused ultrasound have theoretical advantages, but will require further research before becoming a routine part of the ablation armamentarium. The purpose of this review article is to discuss the current ablative technologies available, briefly review their mechanisms of action, discuss technical aspects of each, and provide current data supporting their use. PMID:25049445

  12. Renal ablation update.

    PubMed

    Khiatani, Vishal; Dixon, Robert G

    2014-06-01

    Thermal ablative technologies have evolved considerably in the recent past and are now an important component of current clinical guidelines for the treatment of small renal masses. Both radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation have intermediate-term oncologic control that rivals surgical options, with favorable complication profiles. Studies comparing cryoablation and radiofrequency ablation show no significant difference in oncologic control or complication profile between the two modalities. Early data from small series with microwave ablation have shown similar promising results. Newer technologies including irreversible electroporation and high-intensity-focused ultrasound have theoretical advantages, but will require further research before becoming a routine part of the ablation armamentarium. The purpose of this review article is to discuss the current ablative technologies available, briefly review their mechanisms of action, discuss technical aspects of each, and provide current data supporting their use. PMID:25049445

  13. Radiofrequency Ablation of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Marc; Mikityansky, Igor; Kam, Anthony; Libutti, Steven K.; Walther, McClellan M.; Neeman, Ziv; Locklin, Julia K.; Wood, Bradford J.

    2008-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has been used for over 18 years for treatment of nerve-related chronic pain and cardiac arrhythmias. In the last 10 years, technical developments have increased ablation volumes in a controllable, versatile, and relatively inexpensive manner. The host of clinical applications for RFA have similarly expanded. Current RFA equipment, techniques, applications, results, complications, and research avenues for local tumor ablation are summarized. PMID:15383844

  14. Radiofrequency Ablation of Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Marc; Mikityansky, Igor; Kam, Anthony; Libutti, Steven K.; Walther, McClellan M.; Neeman, Ziv; Locklin, Julia K.; Wood, Bradford J.

    2004-09-15

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has been used for over 18 years for treatment of nerve-related chronic pain and cardiac arrhythmias. In the last 10 years, technical developments have increased ablation volumes in a controllable, versatile, and relatively inexpensive manner. The host of clinical applications for RFA have similarly expanded. Current RFA equipment, techniques, applications, results, complications, and research avenues for local tumor ablation are summarized.

  15. Synergistic Effects of Gold Nanocages in Hyperthermia and Radiotherapy Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ai-wei; Guo, Wei-hua; Qi, Ya-fei; Wang, Jian-zhen; Ma, Xiang-xing; Yu, De-xin

    2016-06-01

    Gold nanocages (GNCs) are a promising material that not only converts near infrared (NIR) light to heat for the ablation of tumors but also acts as a radiosensitizer. The combination of hyperthermia and radiotherapy has a synergistic effect that can lead to significant tumor cell necrosis. In the current study, we synthesized GNCs that offered the combined effects of hyperthermia and radiotherapy. This combination strategy resulted in increased tumor cell apoptosis and significant tumor tissue necrosis. We propose that GNCs can be used for clinical treatment and to potentially overcome resistance to radiotherapy by clearly increasing the antitumor effect.

  16. Synergistic Effects of Gold Nanocages in Hyperthermia and Radiotherapy Treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ai-Wei; Guo, Wei-Hua; Qi, Ya-Fei; Wang, Jian-Zhen; Ma, Xiang-Xing; Yu, De-Xin

    2016-12-01

    Gold nanocages (GNCs) are a promising material that not only converts near infrared (NIR) light to heat for the ablation of tumors but also acts as a radiosensitizer. The combination of hyperthermia and radiotherapy has a synergistic effect that can lead to significant tumor cell necrosis. In the current study, we synthesized GNCs that offered the combined effects of hyperthermia and radiotherapy. This combination strategy resulted in increased tumor cell apoptosis and significant tumor tissue necrosis. We propose that GNCs can be used for clinical treatment and to potentially overcome resistance to radiotherapy by clearly increasing the antitumor effect. PMID:27255899

  17. Lung Cancer Ablation: What Is the Evidence?

    PubMed Central

    de Baere, Thierry; Farouil, Geoffroy; Deschamps, Frederic

    2013-01-01

    Percutaneous ablation of small non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has been demonstrated to be both feasible and safe in nonsurgical candidates. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA), the most commonly used technique for ablation, has a reported rate of complete ablation of ~90%, with best results obtained in tumors <2 to 3 cm in diameter. The best reported 1-, 3-, and 5-year overall survival rates after RFA of NSCLC are 97.7%, 72.9%, and 55.7%, respectively. It is noteworthy that in most studies, cancer-specific survival is greater than overall survival due to severe comorbidities in patients treated with RFA for NSCLC. Aside from tumor size and tumor stage, these comorbidities are predictive of survival. Other ablation techniques such as microwave and irreversible electroporation may in the future prove to overcome some of the limitations of RFA, namely for large tumors or tumors close to large vessels. Stereotactic body radiation therapy has also been demonstrated to be highly efficacious in treating small lung tumors and will need to be compared with percutaneous ablation. This article reviews the current evidence regarding RFA for lung cancer. PMID:24436531

  18. Lowering Whole-Body Radiation Doses in Pediatric Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Through the Use of Unflattened Photon Beams;Flattening filter; Pediatric; Intensity-modulated radiotherapy; Second cancers; Radiation-induced malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Cashmore, Jason; Ramtohul, Mark; Ford, Dan

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) has been linked with an increased risk of secondary cancer induction due to the extra leakage radiation associated with delivery of these techniques. Removal of the flattening filter offers a simple way of reducing head leakage, and it may be possible to generate equivalent IMRT plans and to deliver these on a standard linear accelerator operating in unflattened mode. Methods and Materials: An Elekta Precise linear accelerator has been commissioned to operate in both conventional and unflattened modes (energy matched at 6 MV) and a direct comparison made between the treatment planning and delivery of pediatric intracranial treatments using both approaches. These plans have been evaluated and delivered to an anthropomorphic phantom. Results: Plans generated in unflattened mode are clinically identical to those for conventional IMRT but can be delivered with greatly reduced leakage radiation. Measurements in an anthropomorphic phantom at clinically relevant positions including the thyroid, lung, ovaries, and testes show an average reduction in peripheral doses of 23.7%, 29.9%, 64.9%, and 70.0%, respectively, for identical plan delivery compared to conventional IMRT. Conclusions: IMRT delivery in unflattened mode removes an unwanted and unnecessary source of scatter from the treatment head and lowers leakage doses by up to 70%, thereby reducing the risk of radiation-induced second cancers. Removal of the flattening filter is recommended for IMRT treatments.

  19. Lung Ablation: Whats New?

    PubMed

    Xiong, Lillian; Dupuy, Damian E

    2016-07-01

    Lung cancer had an estimated incidence of 221,200 in 2015, making up 13% of all cancer diagnoses. Tumor ablation is an important treatment option for nonsurgical lung cancer and pulmonary metastatic patients. Radiofrequency ablation has been used for over a decade with newer modalities, microwave ablation, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation presenting as additional and possibly improved treatment options for patients. This minimally invasive therapy is best for small primary lesions or favorably located metastatic tumors. These technologies can offer palliation and sometimes cure of thoracic malignancies. This article discusses the current available technologies and techniques available for tumor ablation. PMID:27050331

  20. Spine radiosurgery for the local treatment of spine metastases: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy, image guidance, clinical aspects and future directions

    PubMed Central

    de Moraes, Fabio Ynoe; Taunk, Neil Kanth; Laufer, Ilya; Neves-Junior, Wellington Furtado Pimenta; Hanna, Samir Abdallah; de Andrade Carvalho, Heloisa; Yamada, Yoshiya

    2016-01-01

    Many cancer patients will develop spinal metastases. Local control is important for preventing neurologic compromise and to relieve pain. Stereotactic body radiotherapy or spinal radiosurgery is a new radiation therapy technique for spinal metastasis that can deliver a high dose of radiation to a tumor while minimizing the radiation delivered to healthy, neighboring tissues. This treatment is based on intensity-modulated radiotherapy, image guidance and rigid immobilization. Spinal radiosurgery is an increasingly utilized treatment method that improves local control and pain relief after delivering ablative doses of radiation. Here, we present a review highlighting the use of spinal radiosurgery for the treatment of metastatic tumors of the spine. The data used in the review were collected from both published studies and ongoing trials. We found that spinal radiosurgery is safe and provides excellent tumor control (up to 94% local control) and pain relief (up to 96%), independent of histology. Extensive data regarding clinical outcomes are available; however, this information has primarily been generated from retrospective and nonrandomized prospective series. Currently, two randomized trials are enrolling patients to study clinical applications of fractionation schedules spinal Radiosurgery. Additionally, a phase I clinical trial is being conducted to assess the safety of concurrent stereotactic body radiotherapy and ipilimumab for spinal metastases. Clinical trials to refine clinical indications and dose fractionation are ongoing. The concomitant use of targeted agents may produce better outcomes in the future. PMID:26934240

  1. Locally ablative therapies for primary and metastatic liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, David; Kang, Josephine; Madoff, David C

    2014-08-01

    Locally ablative therapies have an increasing role in the effective multidisciplinary approach towards the treatment of both primary and metastatic liver tumors. In patients who are not considered surgical candidates and have low volume disease, these therapies have now become established into consensus practice guidelines. A large range of therapeutic options exist including percutaneous ethanol injection (PEI), radiofrequency ablation (RFA), microwave ablation (MWA), cryoablation, percutaneous laser ablation (PLA), irreversible electroporation (IRE), stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU); each having benefits and drawbacks. The greatest body of evidence supporting clinical utility in the liver currently exists for RFA, with PEI having fallen out of favor. MWA, IRE, SBRT and HIFU are relatively nascent technologies, and outcomes data supporting their use is promising. Future directions of ablative therapies include tandem approaches to improve efficacy in the treatment of liver tumors. PMID:24746315

  2. Ablative Thermal Protection System Fundamentals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, Robin A. S.

    2013-01-01

    This is the presentation for a short course on the fundamentals of ablative thermal protection systems. It covers the definition of ablation, description of ablative materials, how they work, how to analyze them and how to model them.

  3. Microwave Ablation of Hepatic Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Lubner, Meghan G.; Brace, Christopher L.; Ziemlewicz, Tim J.; Hinshaw, J. Louis; Lee, Fred T.

    2013-01-01

    Microwave ablation is an extremely promising heat-based thermal ablation modality that has particular applicability in treating hepatic malignancies. Microwaves can generate very high temperatures in very short time periods, potentially leading to improved treatment efficiency and larger ablation zones. As the available technology continues to improve, microwave ablation is emerging as a valuable alternative to radiofrequency ablation in the treatment of hepatic malignancies. This article reviews the current state of microwave ablation including technical and clinical considerations. PMID:24436518

  4. Study of the ablative effects on tektite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, K. K.

    1975-01-01

    The tumbling and surface roughness effects on the trajectory of entry tektite are studied in both free molecular and continuum flows. It was concluded that, while surface roughness has negligible effect on trajectory, the tumbling may play an important role in tektite trajectory and the consequent ablation, provided the body shape is different from a sphere. A shape factor was a good parameter for correlations between body shape and tumbling effects.

  5. Image-Guided Percutaneous Ablation of Bone and Soft Tissue Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kurup, A. Nicholas; Callstrom, Matthew R.

    2010-01-01

    Image-guided percutaneous ablation of bone and soft tissue tumors is an effective minimally invasive alternative to conventional therapies, such as surgery and external beam radiotherapy. Proven applications include treatment of benign primary bone tumors, particularly osteoid osteoma, as well as palliation of painful bone metastases. Use of percutaneous ablation in combination with cementoplasty can provide stabilization of metastases at risk for fracture. Local control of oligometastatic disease and treatment of desmoid tumors are emerging applications. PMID:22550367

  6. Long-Term Results of a Prospective, Phase II Study of Long-Term Androgen Ablation, Pelvic Radiotherapy, Brachytherapy Boost, and Adjuvant Docetaxel in Patients With High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    DiBiase, Steven J.; Hussain, Arif; Kataria, Ritesh; Amin, Pradip; Bassi, Sunakshi; Dawson, Nancy; Kwok, Young

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: We report the long-term results of a prospective, Phase II study of long-term androgen deprivation (AD), pelvic radiotherapy (EBRT), permanent transperineal prostate brachytherapy boost (PB), and adjuvant docetaxel in patients with high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Eligibility included biopsy-proven prostate adenocarcinoma with the following: prostate-specific antigen (PSA) > 20 ng/ml; or Gleason score of 7 and a PSA >10 ng/ml; or any Gleason score of 8 to 10; or stage T2b to T3 irrespective of Gleason score or PSA. Treatment consisted of 45 Gy of pelvic EBRT, followed 1 month later by PB with either iodine-125 or Pd-103. One month after PB, patients received three cycles of docetaxel chemotherapy (35 mg/m{sup 2} per week, Days 1, 8, and 15 every 28 days). All patients received 2 years of AD. Biochemical failure was defined as per the Phoenix definition (PSA nadir + 2). Results: From August 2000 to March 2004, 42 patients were enrolled. The median overall and active follow-ups were 5.6 years (range, 0.9-7.8 years) and 6.3 years (range, 4-7.8 years), respectively. Grade 2 and 3 acute genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities were 50.0% and 14.2%, respectively, with no Grade 4 toxicities noted. Grade 3 and 4 acute hematologic toxicities were 19% and 2.4%, respectively. Of the patients, 85.7% were able to complete the planned multimodality treatment. The 5- and 7-year actuarial freedom from biochemical failures rates were 89.6% and 86.5%, and corresponding rates for disease-free survival were 76.2% and 70.4%, respectively. The 5- and 7-year actuarial overall survival rates were 83.3% and 80.1%, respectively. The 5- and 7-year actuarial rates of late Grade 2 GI/GU toxicity (no Grade 3-5) was 7.7%. Conclusions: The trimodality approach of using 2 years of AD, external radiation, brachytherapy, and upfront docetaxel in high-risk prostate cancer is well tolerated, produces encouraging long-term results, and should be validated in a

  7. Convergent ablator performance measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, D. G.; Spears, B. K.; Braun, D. G.; Sorce, C. M.; Celliers, P. M.; Collins, G. W.; Landen, O. L.; Olson, R. E.

    2010-10-15

    The velocity and remaining ablator mass of an imploding capsule are critical metrics for assessing the progress toward ignition of an inertially confined fusion experiment. These and other convergent ablator performance parameters have been measured using a single streaked x-ray radiograph. Traditional Abel inversion of such a radiograph is ill-posed since backlighter intensity profiles and x-ray attenuation by the ablated plasma are unknown. To address this we have developed a regularization technique which allows the ablator density profile {rho}(r) and effective backlighter profile I{sub 0}(y) at each time step to be uniquely determined subject to the constraints that {rho}(r) is localized in radius space and I{sub 0}(y) is delocalized in object space. Moments of {rho}(r) then provide the time-resolved areal density, mass, and average radius (and thus velocity) of the remaining ablator material. These results are combined in the spherical rocket model to determine the ablation pressure and mass ablation rate during the implosion. The technique has been validated on simulated radiographs of implosions at the National Ignition Facility [Miller et al., Nucl. Fusion 44, 228 (2004)] and implemented on experiments at the OMEGA laser facility [Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)].

  8. Tumor Ablation and Nanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Manthe, Rachel L.; Foy, Susan P.; Krishnamurthy, Nishanth; Sharma, Blanka; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2010-01-01

    Next to surgical resection, tumor ablation is a commonly used intervention in the treatment of solid tumors. Tumor ablation methods include thermal therapies, photodynamic therapy, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) producing agents. Thermal therapies induce tumor cell death via thermal energy and include radiofrequency, microwave, high intensity focused ultrasound, and cryoablation. Photodynamic therapy and ROS producing agents cause increased oxidative stress in tumor cells leading to apoptosis. While these therapies are safe and viable alternatives when resection of malignancies is not feasible, they do have associated limitations that prevent their widespread use in clinical applications. To improve the efficacy of these treatments, nanoparticles are being studied in combination with nonsurgical ablation regimens. In addition to better thermal effect on tumor ablation, nanoparticles can deliver anticancer therapeutics that show synergistic anti-tumor effect in the presence of heat and can also be imaged to achieve precision in therapy. Understanding the molecular mechanism of nanoparticle-mediated tumor ablation could further help engineer nanoparticles of appropriate composition and properties to synergize the ablation effect. This review aims to explore the various types of nonsurgical tumor ablation methods currently used in cancer treatment and potential improvements by nanotechnology applications. PMID:20866097

  9. Convergent ablator performance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, D. G.; Spears, B. K.; Braun, D. G.; Olson, R. E.; Sorce, C. M.; Celliers, P. M.; Collins, G. W.; Landen, O. L.

    2010-10-01

    The velocity and remaining ablator mass of an imploding capsule are critical metrics for assessing the progress toward ignition of an inertially confined fusion experiment. These and other convergent ablator performance parameters have been measured using a single streaked x-ray radiograph. Traditional Abel inversion of such a radiograph is ill-posed since backlighter intensity profiles and x-ray attenuation by the ablated plasma are unknown. To address this we have developed a regularization technique which allows the ablator density profile ρ(r ) and effective backlighter profile I0(y) at each time step to be uniquely determined subject to the constraints that ρ(r ) is localized in radius space and I0(y) is delocalized in object space. Moments of ρ(r ) then provide the time-resolved areal density, mass, and average radius (and thus velocity) of the remaining ablator material. These results are combined in the spherical rocket model to determine the ablation pressure and mass ablation rate during the implosion. The technique has been validated on simulated radiographs of implosions at the National Ignition Facility [Miller et al., Nucl. Fusion 44, 228 (2004)] and implemented on experiments at the OMEGA laser facility [Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)].

  10. Harnessing the immunomodulatory effect of thermal and non-thermal ablative therapies for cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Bastianpillai, Christopher; Petrides, Neophytos; Shah, Taimur; Guillaumier, Stephanie; Ahmed, Hashim U; Arya, Manit

    2015-12-01

    Minimally invasive interventional therapies are evolving rapidly and their use for the treatment of solid tumours is becoming more extensive. The in situ destruction of solid tumours by such therapies is thought to release antigens that can prime an antitumour immune response. In this review, we offer an overview of the current evidence for immune response activation associated with the utilisation of the main thermal and non-thermal ablation therapies currently in use today. This is followed by an assessment of the hypothesised mechanisms behind this immune response priming and by a discussion of potential methods of harnessing this specific response, which may subsequently be applicable in the treatment of cancer patients. References were identified through searches of PubMed/MEDLINE and Cochrane databases to identify peer-reviewed original articles, meta-analyses and reviews. Papers were searched from 1850 until October 2014. Articles were also identified through searches of the authors' files. Only papers published in English were reviewed. Thermal and non-thermal therapies have the potential to stimulate antitumour immunity although the current body of evidence is based mostly on murine trials or small-scale phase 1 human trials. The evidence for this immune-modulatory response is currently the strongest in relation to cryotherapy and radiotherapy, although data is accumulating for related ablative treatments such as high-intensity focused ultrasound, radiofrequency ablation and irreversible electroporation. This effect may be greatly enhanced by combining these therapies with other immunostimulatory interventions. Evidence is emerging into the immunomodulatory effect associated with thermal and non-thermal ablative therapies used in cancer treatment in addition to the mechanism behind this effect and how it may be harnessed for therapeutic use. A potential exists for treatment approaches that combine ablation of the primary tumour with control and possible

  11. Navigation Systems for Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Wood, B. J.; Kruecker, J.; Abi-Jaoudeh, N; Locklin, J.; Levy, E.; Xu, S.; Solbiati, L.; Kapoor, A.; Amalou, H.; Venkatesan, A.

    2010-01-01

    Navigation systems, devices and intra-procedural software are changing the way we practice interventional oncology. Prior to the development of precision navigation tools integrated with imaging systems, thermal ablation of hard-to-image lesions was highly dependent upon operator experience, spatial skills, and estimation of positron emission tomography-avid or arterial-phase targets. Numerous navigation systems for ablation bring the opportunity for standardization and accuracy that extends our ability to use imaging feedback during procedures. Existing systems and techniques are reviewed, and specific clinical applications for ablation are discussed to better define how these novel technologies address specific clinical needs, and fit into clinical practice. PMID:20656236

  12. Ablation of kidney tumors.

    PubMed

    Karam, Jose A; Ahrar, Kamran; Matin, Surena F

    2011-04-01

    While surgical excision remains the gold standard for curative treatment of small renal cell carcinomas, ablative therapy has a place as a minimally invasive, kidney function-preserving therapy in carefully selected patients who are poor candidates for surgery. Although laparoscopic cryoablation and percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) are commonly performed, percutaneous cryoablation and laparoscopic RFA are reportedly being performed with increasing frequency. The renal function and complication profiles following ablative therapy are favorable, while oncologic outcomes lag behind those of surgery, thus reinforcing the need for careful patient selection. PMID:21377587

  13. Ablative skin resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Nidhi; Smith, Greg; Heffelfinger, Ryan

    2014-02-01

    Ablative laser resurfacing has evolved as a safe and effective treatment for skin rejuvenation. Although traditional lasers were associated with significant thermal damage and lengthy recovery, advances in laser technology have improved safety profiles and reduced social downtime. CO2 lasers remain the gold standard of treatment, and fractional ablative devices capable of achieving remarkable clinical improvement with fewer side effects and shorter recovery times have made it a more practical option for patients. Although ablative resurfacing has become safer, careful patient selection and choice of suitable laser parameters are essential to minimize complications and optimize outcomes. This article describes the current modalities used in ablative laser skin resurfacing and examines their efficacy, indications, and possible side effects. PMID:24488638

  14. Moldable cork ablation material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A successful thermal ablative material was manufactured. Moldable cork sheets were tested for density, tensile strength, tensile elongation, thermal conductivity, compression set, and specific heat. A moldable cork sheet, therefore, was established as a realistic product.

  15. Cardiac ablation procedures

    MedlinePlus

    ... Accessory pathway, such as Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome Atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter Ventricular tachycardia ... consensus statement on catheter and surgical ablation of atrial fibrillation: ... for personnel, policy, procedures and follow-up. ...

  16. Laser ablation of concrete.

    SciTech Connect

    Savina, M.

    1998-10-05

    Laser ablation is effective both as an analytical tool and as a means of removing surface coatings. The elemental composition of surfaces can be determined by either mass spectrometry or atomic emission spectroscopy of the atomized effluent. Paint can be removed from aircraft without damage to the underlying aluminum substrate, and environmentally damaged buildings and sculptures can be restored by ablating away deposited grime. A recent application of laser ablation is the removal of radioactive contaminants from the surface and near-surface regions of concrete. We present the results of ablation tests on concrete samples using a high power pulsed Nd:YAG laser with fiber optic beam delivery. The laser-surface interaction was studied on various model systems consisting of Type I Portland cement with varying amounts of either fine silica or sand in an effort to understand the effect of substrate composition on ablation rates and mechanisms. A sample of non-contaminated concrete from a nuclear power plant was also studied. In addition, cement and concrete samples were doped with non-radioactive isotopes of elements representative of cooling waterspills, such as cesium and strontium, and analyzed by laser-resorption mass spectrometry to determine the contamination pathways. These samples were also ablated at high power to determine the efficiency with which surface contaminants are removed and captured. The results show that the neat cement matrix melts and vaporizes when little or no sand or aggregate is present. Surface flows of liquid material are readily apparent on the ablated surface and the captured aerosol takes the form of glassy beads up to a few tens of microns in diameter. The presence of sand and aggregate particles causes the material to disaggregate on ablation, with intact particles on the millimeter size scale leaving the surface. Laser resorption mass spectrometric analysis showed that cesium and potassium have similar chemical environments in the

  17. SU-E-T-547: A Method to Correlate Treatment Planning Issue with Clinical Analysis for Prostate Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT)

    SciTech Connect

    Li, K; Jung, E; Newton, J; Cornell, D; Able, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In this study, the algorithms and calculation setting effect and contribution weighing on prostate Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) based SBRT were evaluated for clinical analysis. Methods: A low risk prostate patient under SBRT was selected for the treatment planning evaluation. The treatment target was divided into low dose prescription target volume (PTV) and high Dose PTV. Normal tissue constraints include urethra and femur head, and rectum was separated into anterior, lateral and posterior parts. By varying the constraint limit of treatment plan calculation setting and algorithms, the effect on dose coverage and normal tissue dose constraint parameter carried effective comparison for the nominal prescription and constraint. For each setting, their percentage differences to the nominal value were calculated with geometric mean and harmonic mean. Results: In the arbitrary prostate SBRT case, 14 variables were selected for this evaluation by using nominal prescription and constraint. Six VMAT planning settings were anisotropic analytic algorithm stereotactic beam with and without couch structure in grid size of 1mm and 2mm, non stereotactic beam, Acuros algorithm . Their geometry means of the variable sets for these plans were 112.3%, 111.9%, 112.09%, 111.75%, 111.28%, and 112.05%. And the corresponding harmonic means were 2.02%, 2.16%, 3.15%, 4.74%, 5.47% and 5.55%. Conclusions: In this study, the algorithm difference shows relatively larger harmonic mean between prostate SBRT VMAT plans. This study provides a methodology to find sensitive combined variables related to clinical analysis, and similar approach could be applied to the whole treatment procedure from simulation to treatment in radiotherapy for big clinical data analysis.

  18. Threshold Doses for Focal Liver Reaction After Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiation Therapy for Small Hepatocellular Carcinoma Depend on Liver Function: Evaluation on Magnetic Resonance Imaging With Gd-EOB-DTPA

    SciTech Connect

    Sanuki, Naoko; Takeda, Atsuya; Oku, Yohei; Eriguchi, Takahisa; Nishimura, Shuichi; Aoki, Yosuke; Mizuno, Tomikazu; Iwabuchi, Shogo; Kunieda, Etsuo

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: Focal liver reaction (FLR) appears on radiographic images after stereotactic ablative body radiation therapy (SABR) in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and chronic liver disease. We investigated the threshold dose (TD) of FLR and possible factors affecting the TD on gadoxetate acid (Gd-EOB-DTPA)-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods and Materials: In 50 patients who were treated with SABR for small HCC and followed up by MRI for >6 months, FLR, seen as a hypointense area, was evaluated on the hepatobiliary phase of Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI. The follow-up MRI with the largest extent of FLR was fused to the planning computed tomography (CT) image, and patients with good image fusion concordance were eligible. After delineating the border of the FLR manually, a dose–volume histogram was used to identify the TD for the FLR. Clinical and volumetric factors were analyzed for correlation with the TD. Results: A total of 45 patients were eligible for analysis with a median image fusion concordance of 84.9% (range, 71.6-95.4%). The median duration between SABR and subsequent hepatobiliary phase MRI with the largest extent of FLR was 3 months (range, 1-6 months). The median TD for FLR was 28.0 Gy (range, 22.3-36.4 Gy). On univariate analysis, pre-treatment Child-Pugh (CP) score and platelet count were significantly correlated with the TD. On multiple linear regression analysis, CP score was the only parameter that predicted TD. Median TDs were 30.5 Gy (range, 26.2.3-36.4 Gy) and 25.2 Gy (range, 22.3-27.5 Gy) for patients with CP-A and CP-B disease, respectively. Conclusion: The TD was significantly correlated with baseline liver function. We propose 30 Gy for CP-A disease and 25 Gy for CP-B disease in 5 fractions as TDs for FLR after SABR for patients with HCC and chronic liver disease. Use of these TDs will help to predict potential loss of liver tissue after SABR.

  19. Ablation of the locally advanced pancreatic cancer: An introduction and brief summary of techniques.

    PubMed

    Petrou, Athanasios; Moris, Demetrios; Paul Tabet, Patrick; David Wensley Richards, Brian; Kourounis, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is a lethal and late presenting malignancy with dismal survival rates. An estimated total of 330,000 people died from this malignancy in 2012. Although there have been improvements in diagnostic and treatment methods, the survival of late stage pancreatic cancer has not shown significant improvement in the past 4 decades. Multiple treatment approaches are available including chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and immunotherapy, but to this day surgical resection remains the only curative treatment option. Ablative techniques use various forms of energy to cause local tissue destruction through necrosis or apoptosis. They are relevant in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma as they are a treatment option in non-resectable tumors where their use ranges from symptom control to reducing tumor size for resection. In this narrative review we have grouped and outlined the various ablative methods, classifying them into thermal (Radiofrequency ablation, Microwave ablation, High Intensity Focused Ultrasound ablation, Cryoablation), and non-thermal ablative methods (Irreversible Electroporation (NanoKnife®), Photodynamic Therapy). This is followed by a description and review of the available evidence on survival and complications for each of these ablative methods. According to the literature, thermal ablative methods appear to be more accessible but are implicated with more complications than non thermal ablative methods which show the most promise. PMID:27569086

  20. Clinical quality standards for radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Aim of the study The technological progress that is currently being witnessed in the areas of diagnostic imaging, treatment planning systems and therapeutic equipment has caused radiotherapy to become a high-tech and interdisciplinary domain involving staff of various backgrounds. This allows steady improvement in therapy results, but at the same time makes the diagnostic, imaging and therapeutic processes more complex and complicated, requiring every stage of those processes to be planned, organized, controlled and improved so as to assure high quality of services provided. The aim of this paper is to present clinical quality standards for radiotherapy as developed by the author. Material and methods In order to develop the quality standards, a comparative analysis was performed between European and Polish legal acts adopted in the period of 1980-2006 and the universal industrial ISO 9001:2008 standard, defining requirements for quality management systems, and relevant articles published in 1984-2009 were reviewed, including applicable guidelines and recommendations of American, international, European and Polish bodies, such as the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), the European Society for Radiotherapy & Oncology (ESTRO), the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and the Organisation of European Cancer Institutes (OECI) on quality assurance and management in radiotherapy. Results As a result, 352 quality standards for radiotherapy were developed and categorized into the following three groups: 1 – organizational standards; 2 – physico-technical standards and 3 – clinical standards. Conclusion Proposed clinical quality standards for radiotherapy can be used by any institution using ionizing radiation for medical purposes. However, standards are of value only if they are implemented, reviewed, audited and improved, and if there is a clear mechanism in place to monitor and address failure to meet agreed standards. PMID:23788854

  1. Ablative therapies for renal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Rajan; Leveillee, Raymond J.

    2010-01-01

    Owing to an increased use of diagnostic imaging for evaluating patients with other abdominal conditions, incidentally discovered kidney masses now account for a majority of renal tumors. Renal ablative therapy is assuming a more important role in patients with borderline renal impairment. Renal ablation uses heat or cold to bring about cell death. Radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation are two such procedures, and 5-year results are now emerging from both modalities. Renal biopsy at the time of ablation is extremely important in order to establish tissue diagnosis. Real-time temperature monitoring at the time of radiofrequency ablation is very useful to ensure adequacy of ablation. PMID:21789083

  2. Atrial fibrillation ablation.

    PubMed

    Pappone, Carlo; Santinelli, Vincenzo

    2012-06-01

    Atrial fibrillation is the commonest cardiac arrhythmia, with significant morbidity related to symptoms, heart failure, and thromboembolism, which is associated with excess mortality. Over the past 10 years, many centers worldwide have reported high success rates and few complications after a single ablation procedure in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. Recent studies indicate a short-term and long-term superiority of catheter ablation as compared with conventional antiarrhythmic drug therapy in terms of arrhythmia recurrence, quality of life, and arrhythmia progression. As a result, catheter ablation is evolving to a front-line therapy in many patients with atrial fibrillation. However, in patients with persistent long-standing atrial fibrillation catheter ablation strategy is more complex and time-consuming, frequently requiring repeat procedures to achieve success rates as high as in paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. In the near future, however, with growing experience and evolving technology, catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation may be extended also to patients with long-standing atrial fibrillation. PMID:22541284

  3. Infrared laser bone ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Nuss, R.C.; Fabian, R.L.; Sarkar, R.; Puliafito, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    The bone ablation characteristics of five infrared lasers, including three pulsed lasers (Nd:YAG, lambda = 1064 micron; Hol:YSGG, lambda = 2.10 micron; and Erb:YAG, lambda = 2.94 micron) and two continuous-wave lasers (Nd:YAG, lambda = 1.064 micron; and CO/sub 2/, lambda = 10.6 micron), were studied. All laser ablations were performed in vitro, using moist, freshly dissected calvarium of guinea pig skulls. Quantitative etch rates of the three pulsed lasers were calculated. Light microscopy of histologic sections of ablated bone revealed a zone of tissue damage of 10 to 15 micron adjacent to the lesion edge in the case of the pulsed Nd:YAG and the Erb:YAG lasers, from 20 to 90 micron zone of tissue damage for bone ablated by the Hol:YSGG laser, and 60 to 135 micron zone of tissue damage in the case of the two continuous-wave lasers. Possible mechanisms of bone ablation and tissue damage are discussed.

  4. Tumour ablation: technical aspects

    PubMed Central

    Bodner, Gerd; Bale, Reto

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Image-guided percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive, relatively low-risk procedure for tumour treatment. Local recurrence and survival rates depend on the rate of complete ablation of the entire tumour including a sufficient margin of surrounding healthy tissue. Currently a variety of different RFA devices are available. The interventionalist must be able to predict the configuration and extent of the resulting ablation necrosis. Accurate planning and execution of RFA according to the size and geometry of the tumour is essential. In order to minimize complications, individualized treatment strategies may be necessary for tumours close to vital structures. This review examines the state-of-the art of different device technologies, approaches, and treatment strategies for percutaneous RFA of liver tumours. PMID:19965296

  5. Advanced Ablative TPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasch, Matthew J.

    2011-01-01

    Early NASA missions (Gemini, Apollo, Mars Viking) employed new ablative TPS that were tailored for the entry environment. After 40 years, heritage ablative TPS materials using Viking or Pathfinder era materials are at or near their performance limits and will be inadequate for future exploration missions. Significant advances in TPS materials technology are needed in order to enable any subsequent human exploration missions beyond Low Earth Orbit. This poster summarizes some recent progress at NASA in developing families of advanced rigid/conformable and flexible ablators that could potentially be used for thermal protection in planetary entry missions. In particular the effort focuses technologies required to land heavy (approx.40 metric ton) masses on Mars to facilitate future exploration plans.

  6. Expanding global access to radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Atun, Rifat; Jaffray, David A; Barton, Michael B; Bray, Freddie; Baumann, Michael; Vikram, Bhadrasain; Hanna, Timothy P; Knaul, Felicia M; Lievens, Yolande; Lui, Tracey Y M; Milosevic, Michael; O'Sullivan, Brian; Rodin, Danielle L; Rosenblatt, Eduardo; Van Dyk, Jacob; Yap, Mei Ling; Zubizarreta, Eduardo; Gospodarowicz, Mary

    2015-09-01

    Radiotherapy is a critical and inseparable component of comprehensive cancer treatment and care. For many of the most common cancers in low-income and middle-income countries, radiotherapy is essential for effective treatment. In high-income countries, radiotherapy is used in more than half of all cases of cancer to cure localised disease, palliate symptoms, and control disease in incurable cancers. Yet, in planning and building treatment capacity for cancer, radiotherapy is frequently the last resource to be considered. Consequently, worldwide access to radiotherapy is unacceptably low. We present a new body of evidence that quantifies the worldwide coverage of radiotherapy services by country. We show the shortfall in access to radiotherapy by country and globally for 2015-35 based on current and projected need, and show substantial health and economic benefits to investing in radiotherapy. The cost of scaling up radiotherapy in the nominal model in 2015-35 is US$26·6 billion in low-income countries, $62·6 billion in lower-middle-income countries, and $94·8 billion in upper-middle-income countries, which amounts to $184·0 billion across all low-income and middle-income countries. In the efficiency model the costs were lower: $14·1 billion in low-income, $33·3 billion in lower-middle-income, and $49·4 billion in upper-middle-income countries-a total of $96·8 billion. Scale-up of radiotherapy capacity in 2015-35 from current levels could lead to saving of 26·9 million life-years in low-income and middle-income countries over the lifetime of the patients who received treatment. The economic benefits of investment in radiotherapy are very substantial. Using the nominal cost model could produce a net benefit of $278·1 billion in 2015-35 ($265·2 million in low-income countries, $38·5 billion in lower-middle-income countries, and $239·3 billion in upper-middle-income countries). Investment in the efficiency model would produce in the same period an even

  7. Shuttle subscale ablative nozzle tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, L. B.; Bailey, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    Recent subscale nozzle tests have identified new and promising carbon phenolic nozzle ablatives which utilize staple rayon, PAN, and pitch based carbon cloth. A 4-inch throat diameter submerged test nozzle designed for the 48-inch Jet Propulsion Laboratory char motor was used to evaluate five different designs incorporating 20 candidate ablatives. Test results indicate that several pitch and PAN-based carbon phenolic ablatives can provide erosion and char performance equivalent or superior to the present continuous rayon-based SRM ablative.

  8. Ablative thermal protection systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaniman, J.; Fisher, R.; Wojciechowski, C.; Dean, W.

    1983-01-01

    The procedures used to establish the TPS (thermal protection system) design of the SRB (solid rocket booster) element of the Space Shuttle vehicle are discussed. A final evaluation of the adequacy of this design will be made from data obtained from the first five Shuttle flights. Temperature sensors installed at selected locations on the SRB structure covered by the TPS give information as a function of time throughout the flight. Anomalies are to be investigated and computer design thermal models adjusted if required. In addition, the actual TPS ablator material loss is to be measured after each flight and compared with analytically determined losses. The analytical methods of predicting ablator performance are surveyed.

  9. Gold Nanoparticle Hyperthermia Reduces Radiotherapy Dose

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lynn; Slatkin, Daniel N.; Dilmanian, F. Avraham; Vadas, Timothy M.; Smilowitz, Henry M.

    2014-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles can absorb near infrared light, resulting in heating and ablation of tumors. Gold nanoparticles have also been used for enhancing the dose of X-rays in tumors during radiotherapy. The combination of hyperthermia and radiotherapy is synergistic, importantly allowing a reduction in X-ray dose with improved therapeutic results. Here we intratumorally infused small 15 nm gold nanoparticles engineered to be transformed from infrared-transparent to infrared-absorptive by the tumor, which were then heated by infrared followed by X-ray treatment. Synergy was studied using a very radioresistant subcutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCCVII) in mice. It was found that the dose required to control 50% of the tumors, normally 55 Gy, could be reduced to <15 Gy (a factor of >3.7). Gold nanoparticles therefore provide a method to combine hyperthermia and radiotherapy to drastically reduce the X-ray radiation needed, thus sparing normal tissue, reducing the side effects, and making radiotherapy more effective. PMID:24990355

  10. Accuracy of an infrared marker-based patient positioning system (ExacTrac®) for stereotactic body radiotherapy in localizing the planned isocenter using fiducial markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montes-Rodríguez, María de los Ángeles; Hernández-Bojórquez, Mariana; Martínez-Gómez, Alma Angélica; Contreras-Pérez, Agustín; Negrete-Hernández, Ingrid Mireya; Hernández-Oviedo, Jorge Omar; Mitsoura, Eleni; Santiago-Concha, Bernardino Gabriel

    2014-11-01

    Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) requires a controlled immobilization and position monitoring of patient and target. The purpose of this work is to analyze the performance of the imaging system ExacTrac® (ETX) using infrared and fiducial markers. Materials and methods: In order to assure the accuracy of isocenter localization, a Quality Assurance procedure was applied using an infrared marker-based positioning system. Scans were acquired of an inhouse-agar gel and solid water phantom with infrared spheres. In the inner part of the phantom, three reference markers were delineated as reference and one pellet was place internally; which was assigned as the isocenter. The iPlan® RT Dose treatment planning system. Images were exported to the ETX console. Images were acquired with the ETX to check the correctness of the isocenter placement. Adjustments were made in 6D the reference markers were used to fuse the images. Couch shifts were registered. The procedure was repeated for verification purposes. Results: The data recorded of the verifications in translational and rotational movements showed averaged 3D spatial uncertainties of 0.31 ± 0.42 mm respectively 0.82° ± 0.46° in the phantom and the first correction of these uncertainties were of 1.51 ± 1.14 mm respectively and 1.37° ± 0.61°. Conclusions: This study shows a high accuracy and repeatability in positioning the selected isocenter. The ETX-system for verifying the treatment isocenter position has the ability to monitor the tracing position of interest, making it possible to be used for SBRT positioning within uncertainty ≤1mm.

  11. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Versus Surgery for Medically Operable Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: A Markov Model-Based Decision Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Louie, Alexander V.; Rodrigues, George; Palma, David A.; Cao, Jeffrey Q.; Yaremko, Brian P.; Malthaner, Richard; Mocanu, Joseph D.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To compare the quality-adjusted life expectancy and overall survival in patients with Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with either stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) or surgery. Methods and Materials: We constructed a Markov model to describe health states after either SBRT or lobectomy for Stage I NSCLC for a 5-year time frame. We report various treatment strategy survival outcomes stratified by age, sex, and pack-year history of smoking, and compared these with an external outcome prediction tool (Adjuvant{exclamation_point} Online). Results: Overall survival, cancer-specific survival, and other causes of death as predicted by our model correlated closely with those predicted by the external prediction tool. Overall survival at 5 years as predicted by baseline analysis of our model is in favor of surgery, with a benefit ranging from 2.2% to 3.0% for all cohorts. Mean quality-adjusted life expectancy ranged from 3.28 to 3.78 years after surgery and from 3.35 to 3.87 years for SBRT. The utility threshold for preferring SBRT over surgery was 0.90. Outcomes were sensitive to quality of life, the proportion of local and regional recurrences treated with standard vs. palliative treatments, and the surgery- and SBRT-related mortalities. Conclusions: The role of SBRT in the medically operable patient is yet to be defined. Our model indicates that SBRT may offer comparable overall survival and quality-adjusted life expectancy as compared with surgical resection. Well-powered prospective studies comparing surgery vs. SBRT in early-stage lung cancer are warranted to further investigate the relative survival, quality of life, and cost characteristics of both treatment paradigms.

  12. Which Is the Optimal Biologically Effective Dose of Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer? A Meta-Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Jian; Yang Fujun; Li Baosheng; Li Hongsheng; Liu Jing; Huang Wei; Wang Dongqing; Yi Yan; Wang Juan

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To assess the relationship between biologically effective dose (BED) and efficacy of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and to explore the optimal BED range for Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Eligible studies were identified on Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Library, and the proceedings of annual meetings through June 2010. According to the quartile of included studies, BED was divided into four dose groups: low (<83.2 Gy), medium (83.2-106 Gy), medium to high (106-146 Gy), high (>146 Gy). To obtain pooled estimates of overall survival (OS), cancer-specific survival (CSS), and local control rate (LCR), data were combined in a random effect model. Pooled estimates were corrected for the percentage of small tumors (<3 cm). Results: Thirty-four observational studies with a total of 2,587 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Corrected pooled estimates of 2- or 3-year OS in the medium BED (76.1%, 63.5%) or the medium to high BED (68.3%, 63.2%) groups were higher than in the low (62.3%, 51.9%) or high groups (55.9%, 49.5%), respectively (p {<=} 0.004). Corrected 3-year CSS in the medium (79.5%), medium to high (80.6%), and high groups (90.0%) were higher than in the low group (70.1%, p = 0.016, 0.018, 0.001, respectively). Conclusion: The OS for the medium or medium to high BED groups were higher than those for the low or high BED group for SBRT in Stage I NSCLC. The medium or medium to high BED (range, 83.2-146 Gy) for SBRT may currently be more beneficial and reasonable in Stage I NSCLC.

  13. Accuracy of an infrared marker-based patient positioning system (ExacTrac®) for stereotactic body radiotherapy in localizing the planned isocenter using fiducial markers

    SciTech Connect

    Montes-Rodríguez, María de los Ángeles Mitsoura, Eleni; Hernández-Bojórquez, Mariana; Martínez-Gómez, Alma Angélica; Contreras-Pérez, Agustín; Negrete-Hernández, Ingrid Mireya; Hernández-Oviedo, Jorge Omar; Santiago-Concha, Bernardino Gabriel

    2014-11-07

    Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) requires a controlled immobilization and position monitoring of patient and target. The purpose of this work is to analyze the performance of the imaging system ExacTrac® (ETX) using infrared and fiducial markers. Materials and methods: In order to assure the accuracy of isocenter localization, a Quality Assurance procedure was applied using an infrared marker-based positioning system. Scans were acquired of an inhouse-agar gel and solid water phantom with infrared spheres. In the inner part of the phantom, three reference markers were delineated as reference and one pellet was place internally; which was assigned as the isocenter. The iPlan® RT Dose treatment planning system. Images were exported to the ETX console. Images were acquired with the ETX to check the correctness of the isocenter placement. Adjustments were made in 6D the reference markers were used to fuse the images. Couch shifts were registered. The procedure was repeated for verification purposes. Results: The data recorded of the verifications in translational and rotational movements showed averaged 3D spatial uncertainties of 0.31 ± 0.42 mm respectively 0.82° ± 0.46° in the phantom and the first correction of these uncertainties were of 1.51 ± 1.14 mm respectively and 1.37° ± 0.61°. Conclusions: This study shows a high accuracy and repeatability in positioning the selected isocenter. The ETX-system for verifying the treatment isocenter position has the ability to monitor the tracing position of interest, making it possible to be used for SBRT positioning within uncertainty ≤1mm.

  14. Therapeutic stimulation versus ablation.

    PubMed

    Hariz, Marwan I; Hariz, Gun-Marie

    2013-01-01

    The renaissance of functional stereotactic neurosurgery was pioneered in the mid 1980s by Laitinen's introduction of Leksell's posteroventral pallidotomy for Parkinson´s disease (PD). This ablative procedure experienced a worldwide spread in the 1990s, owing to its excellent effect on dyskinesias and other symptoms of post-l-dopa PD. Modern deep brain stimulation (DBS), pioneered by Benabid and Pollak in 1987 for the treatment of tremor, first became popular when it was applied to the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in the mid 1990s, where it demonstrated a striking effect on all cardinal symptoms of advanced PD, and permitted reduced dosages of medication. DBS, as a nondestructive, adaptable, and reversible procedure that is proving safe in bilateral surgery on basal ganglia, has great appeal to clinicians and patients alike, despite the fact that it is expensive, laborious, and relies on very strict patient selection criteria, especially for STN DBS. Psychiatric surgery has experienced the same phenomenon, with DBS supplanting completely stereotactic ablative procedures. This chapter discusses the pros and cons of ablation versus stimulation and investigates the reasons why DBS has overshadowed proven efficient ablative procedures such as pallidotomy for PD, and capsulotomy and cingulotomy for obsessive-compulsive disorder and depression. PMID:24112885

  15. Advanced Rigid Ablative TPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasch, Matthew J.

    2011-01-01

    NASA Exploration Systems Mission Directorate s (ESMD) Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) Technology Development Project (TDP) and the NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate s (ARMD) Hypersonics Project are developing new advanced rigid ablators in an effort to substantially increase reliability, decrease mass, and reduce life cycle cost of rigid aeroshell-based entry systems for multiple missions. Advanced Rigid Ablators combine ablation resistant top layers capable of high heat flux entry and enable high-speed EDL with insulating mass-efficient bottom that, insulate the structure and lower the areal weight. These materials may benefit Commercial Orbital Transportation Services (COTS) vendors and may potentially enable new NASA missions for higher velocity returns (e.g. asteroid, Mars). The materials have been thermally tested to 400-450 W/sq cm at the Laser Hardened Materials Evaluation Lab (LHMEL), Hypersonics Materials Evaluation Test System (HyMETS) and in arcjet facilities. Tested materials exhibit much lower backface temperatures and reduced recession over the baseline materials (PICA). Although the EDL project is ending in FY11, NASA in-house development of advanced ablators will continue with a focus on varying resin systems and fiber/resin interactions.

  16. New Ablation Technologies and Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Berte, Benjamin; Yamashita, Seigo; Derval, Nicolas; Denis, Arnaud; Shah, Ashok; Amraoui, Sana; Hocini, Meleze; Haissaguerre, Michel; Jais, Pierre; Sacher, Frederic

    2014-01-01

    Catheter ablation is an established treatment strategy for a range of different cardiac arrhythmias. Over the past decade two major areas of expansion have been ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular tachycardia (VT) in the context of structurally abnormal hearts. In parallel with the expanding role of catheter ablation for AF and VT, multiple novel technologies have been developed which aim to increase safety and procedural success. Areas of development include novel catheter designs, novel navigation technologies and higher resolution imaging techniques. The aim of the present review is to provide an overview of novel developments in AF ablation and VT ablation in patients with of structural cardiac diseases. PMID:26835075

  17. New Ablation Technologies and Techniques.

    PubMed

    Mahida, Saagar; Berte, Benjamin; Yamashita, Seigo; Derval, Nicolas; Denis, Arnaud; Shah, Ashok; Amraoui, Sana; Hocini, Meleze; Haissaguerre, Michel; Jais, Pierre; Sacher, Frederic

    2014-08-01

    Catheter ablation is an established treatment strategy for a range of different cardiac arrhythmias. Over the past decade two major areas of expansion have been ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular tachycardia (VT) in the context of structurally abnormal hearts. In parallel with the expanding role of catheter ablation for AF and VT, multiple novel technologies have been developed which aim to increase safety and procedural success. Areas of development include novel catheter designs, novel navigation technologies and higher resolution imaging techniques. The aim of the present review is to provide an overview of novel developments in AF ablation and VT ablation in patients with of structural cardiac diseases. PMID:26835075

  18. SU-C-BRA-01: 18F-NaF PET/CT-Directed Dose Escalation in Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Spine Oligometastases From Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, L; Zhang, W; Li, M; Peng, X; Xie, L; Lin, Z; Kwee, S; Wang, H; Kuang, Y

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the technical feasibility of SBRT dose painting using {sup 18}F-NaF positron emission tomography (PET) scans guidance in patients with spine oligometastases from prostate cancer. Methods: As a proof of concept, six patients with 14 spine oligometastatic lesions from prostate cancer who had {sup 18}F-NaF PET/CT scan prior to treatment were retrospectively included. GTV{sub reg} was delineated according to the regular tumor boundary shown on PET and/or CT images; and GTV{sub MATV} was contoured based on a net metabolically active tumor volume (MATV) defined by 60% of the SUV{sub max} values on {sup 18}F-NaF PET images. The PTVs (PTV{sub reg} and PTV{sub MATV}) were defined as respective GTVs (plus involved entire vertebral body for PTV{sub reg}) with a 3-mm isotropic expansion margin. Three 1-fraction SBRT plans using VMAT technique along with 10 MV FFF beams (Plan{sub 24Gy}, Plan{sub 24–27Gy}, and Plan{sub 24–30Gy}) were generated for each patient. All plans included a dose of 24 Gy prescribed to PTV{sub reg}. The Plan{sub 24–27Gy} and Plan{sub 24–30Gy} also included a simultaneous boost dose of 27 Gy or 30 Gy prescribed to the PTV{sub MATV}, respectively. The feasibility of 18F-NaF PET-guided SBRT dose escalation was evaluated by its ability to achieve the prescription dose objectives while adhering to organ-at-risk (OAR) dose constraints. The normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP) calculated by radiological models were also compared between the plans. Results: In all 33 SBRT plans generated, the planning objectives and dose constraints were met without exception. Plan{sub 24–27Gy} and Plan{sub 24–30Gy} had a significantly higher dose in PTV{sub MATV} than Plan{sub 24Gy} (p < 0.05), respectively, while maintaining a similar OAR sparing profile and NTCP values. Conclusion: Using VMAT with FFF beams to incorporate a simultaneous {sup 18}F-NaF PET-guided radiation boost dose up to 30 Gy into a SBRT plan is technically

  19. MRI-guided laser ablation of neuroendocrine tumor hepatic metastases

    PubMed Central

    Perälä, Jukka; Klemola, Rauli; Kallio, Raija; Li, Chengli; Vihriälä, Ilkka; Salmela, Pasi I; Tervonen, Osmo

    2014-01-01

    Background Neuroendocrine tumors (NET) represent a therapeutically challenging and heterogeneous group of malignancies occurring throughout the body, but mainly in the gastrointestinal system. Purpose To describe magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided laser ablation of NET liver metastases and assess its role within the current treatment options and methods. Material and Methods Two patients with NET tumor hepatic metastases were treated with MRI-guided interstitial laser ablation (LITT). Three tumors were treated. Clinical follow-up time was 10 years. Results Both patients were successfully treated. There were no local recurrences at the ablation site during the follow-up. Both patients had survived at 10-year follow-up. One patient is disease-free. Conclusion MRI-guided laser ablation can be used to treat NET tumor liver metastases but combination therapy and a rigorous follow-up schedule are recommended. PMID:24778794

  20. Review of photon and proton radiotherapy for skull base tumours.

    PubMed

    Fossati, Piero; Vavassori, Andrea; Deantonio, Letizia; Ferrara, Eleonora; Krengli, Marco; Orecchia, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    An extremely large variety of benign and malignant tumours occur at skull base; these tumour lesions are in the proximity to structures deputed to relevant physiologic functions, limiting extensive surgical approaches to this body district. Most recent progresses of surgery and radiotherapy have allowed to improve local control with acceptable rates of side effects. Various photon radiotherapy techniques are employed, including 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) and brachytherapy that is manly limited to the treatment of primary or recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Proton beam radiotherapy is also extensively used thanks to its physical characteristics. Our review, focusing in particular on meningioma, chordoma, and chondrosarcoma, suggests that proton therapy plays a major role in the treatment of malignant tumours whereas photon therapy still plays a relevant role in the treatment of benign tumour lesions. PMID:27330419

  1. Percutaneous Ablation of Adrenal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesan, Aradhana M.; Locklin, Julia; Dupuy, Damian E.; Wood, Bradford J.

    2010-01-01

    Adrenal tumors comprise a broad spectrum of benign and malignant neoplasms, and include functional adrenal adenomas, pheochromocytomas, primary adrenocortical carcinoma and adrenal metastases. Percutaneous ablative approaches that have been described and used in the treatment of adrenal tumors include percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA), cryoablation, microwave ablation and chemical ablation. Local tumor ablation in the adrenal gland presents unique challenges, secondary to the adrenal gland’s unique anatomic and physiologic features. The results of clinical series employing percutaneous ablative techniques in the treatment of adrenal tumors are reviewed in this article. Clinical and technical considerations unique to ablation in the adrenal gland are presented, including approaches commonly used in our practices, and risks and potential complications are discussed. PMID:20540918

  2. A Pilot Trial of Serial 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography in Patients With Medically Inoperable Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Hypofractionated Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Mark A.; Hoopes, David J.; Fletcher, James W.; Lin, P.-F.; Tann, Mark; Yiannoutsos, Constantin T.; Williams, Mark D.; Fakiris, Achilles J.; McGarry, Ronald C.; Timmerman, Robert D.

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: Routine assessment was made of tumor metabolic activity as measured by 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). This report describes PET correlates prospectively collected after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for patients with medically inoperable NSCLC. Methods and Materials: 14 consecutive patients with medically inoperable Stage I NSCLC were enrolled. All patients received SBRT to 60-66 Gy in three fractions. Patients underwent serial planned FDG-PET/computed tomography fusion imaging before SBRT and at 2, 26, and 52 weeks after SBRT. Results: With median follow-up of 30.2 months, no patients experienced local failure. One patient developed regional failure, 1 developed distant failure, and 1 developed a second primary. The median tumor maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) before SBRT was 8.70. The median SUV{sub max} values at 2, 26, and 52 weeks after SBRT were 6.04, 2.80, and 3.58, respectively. Patients with low pre-SBRT SUV were more likely to experience initial 2-week rises in SUV, whereas patients with high pre-SBRT SUV commonly had SUV declines 2 weeks after treatment (p = 0.036). Six of 13 patients had primary tumor SUV{sub max} >3.5 at 12 months after SBRT but remained without evidence of local disease failure on further follow-up. Conclusions: A substantial proportion of patients may have moderately elevated FDG-PET SUV{sub max} at 12 months without evidence of local failure on further follow-up. Thus, slightly elevated PET SUV{sub max} should not be considered a surrogate for local treatment failure. Our data do not support routine serial FDG-PET/computed tomography for follow-up of patients receiving SBRT for Stage I NSCLC.

  3. High Dose-Per-Fraction Irradiation of Limited Lung Volumes Using an Image-Guided, Highly Focused Irradiator: Simulating Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Regimens in a Small-Animal Model

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Jaeho; Kodym, Reinhard; Seliounine, Serguei

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate the underlying biology associated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), both in vivo models and image-guided, highly focal irradiation systems are necessary. Here, we describe such an irradiation system and use it to examine normal tissue toxicity in a small-animal model at lung volumes similar to those associated with human therapy. Methods and Materials: High-dose radiation was delivered to a small volume of the left lung of C3H/HeJCr mice using a small-animal stereotactic irradiator. The irradiator has a collimation mechanism to produce focal radiation beams, an imaging subsystem consisting of a fluorescent screen coupled to a charge-coupled device camera, and a manual positioning stage. Histopathologic examination and micro-CT were used to evaluate the radiation response. Results: Focal obliteration of the alveoli by fibrous connective tissue, hyperplasia of the bronchiolar epithelium, and presence of a small number of inflammatory cells are the main reactions to low-volume/high-dose irradiation of the mouse lung. The tissue response suggested a radiation dose threshold for early phase fibrosis lying between 40 and 100 Gy. The irradiation system satisfied our requirements of high-dose-rate, small beam diameter, and precise localization and verification. Conclusions: We have established an experimental model and image-guided animal irradiation system for the study of high dose per fraction irradiations such as those used with SBRT at volumes analogous to those used in human beings. It will also allow the targeting of specific anatomical structures of the thorax or ultimately, orthotopic tumors of the lung.

  4. SU-E-T-179: Exploring Appropriate Offset Values for Pencil Beam and Monte Carlo Dose Optimization in Lung Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Encompassing the Effects of Respiration and Tumor Location

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, G; Shang, C; Leventouri, T

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Exploring appropriate offset values in dose optimization with pencil beam (PB) algorithm to minimize dosimetric differences with plans calculated with Monte Carlo (MC) for lung cancer treatment with Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods: 20 cases of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, treated with gated full motion range SBRT were selected. According to the proximity of the Gross Tumor Volume (GTV) to the chest wall, two groups are defined: peripherally located when GTV merges with the chest wall for at least 50% of the lesion diameter, and centrally located when the GTV is surrounded by lung tissue. Treatment plans were created on 4D average intensity projection (AIP) CT set with Brainlab iPlanDose 4.1.2 planning system. The D97 of PTV was normalized to 50Gy using the fast PB and compared with MC. The optimized plan was then recomputed over each 4D respiratory phase, and compared with MC using the same plan MU's. Results: The mean difference in the PB and MC D97 of the ITV was 10.5% (±0.8%) of the prescription dose (50Gy). PB algorithm showed 2.3–2.4% less overestimation to the D97 of the ITV, when comparing to MC, in the maximum exhalation phase than in the maximal inhalation phase. Significantly smaller dose difference between PB and MC is also shown in plans for peripheral lesions (7.7 ± 0.7%) versus for central lesions (12.7±0.8%) (p< 0.01). Conclusion: The dosimetric differences between PB and MC can be reasonably predicted depending on the location of lesion in the lung, and may be used as offset value in dose optimization with PB. Since the maximal exhalation phase demonstrates less dose discrepancy between the two algorithms than that in maximal inhalation phase, caution is suggested when the latter is included as a major phase portion in the respiration gated lung SBRT.

  5. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Primary Lung Cancer at a Dose of 50 Gy Total in Five Fractions to the Periphery of the Planning Target Volume Calculated Using a Superposition Algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, Atsuya; Sanuki, Naoko; Kunieda, Etsuo Ohashi, Toshio; Oku, Yohei; Takeda, Toshiaki; Shigematsu, Naoyuki; Kubo, Atsushi

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively analyze the clinical outcomes of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for patients with Stages 1A and 1B non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the records of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer treated with curative intent between Dec 2001 and May 2007. All patients had histopathologically or cytologically confirmed disease, increased levels of tumor markers, and/or positive findings on fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography. Staging studies identified their disease as Stage 1A or 1B. Performance status was 2 or less according to World Health Organization guidelines in all cases. The prescribed dose of 50 Gy total in five fractions, calculated by using a superposition algorithm, was defined for the periphery of the planning target volume. Results: One hundred twenty-one patients underwent SBRT during the study period, and 63 were eligible for this analysis. Thirty-eight patients had Stage 1A (T1N0M0) and 25 had Stage 1B (T2N0M0). Forty-nine patients were not appropriate candidates for surgery because of chronic pulmonary disease. Median follow-up of these 49 patients was 31 months (range, 10-72 months). The 3-year local control, disease-free, and overall survival rates in patients with Stages 1A and 1B were 93% and 96% (p = 0.86), 76% and 77% (p = 0.83), and 90% and 63% (p = 0.09), respectively. No acute toxicity was observed. Grade 2 or higher radiation pneumonitis was experienced by 3 patients, and 1 of them had fatal bacterial pneumonia. Conclusions: The SBRT at 50 Gy total in five fractions to the periphery of the planning target volume calculated by using a superposition algorithm is feasible. High local control rates were achieved for both T2 and T1 tumors.

  6. Radiofrequency ablation: a safe and economical modality in treatment of Brooke-Spiegler syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Savita; Dayal, Surabhi

    2012-08-01

    Brooke-Spiegler syndrome is an uncommon disease. Patients have a predisposition to develop cutaneous adnexal neoplasms such as cylindromas, trichoepitheliomas, spiradenomas, trichoblastomas, basal cell carcinomas, follicular cysts, and organoid nevi. Malignant transformation of preexisting tumors also occurs in these individuals. Various techniques have been used for the treatment of trichoepitheliomas and cylindromas including excision, electrocautery, carbon dioxide laser ablation, cryosurgery, and radiotherapy. In our case, cylindromas were ablated by radiofrequency in multiple sittings. Trichoepitheliomas were ablated using coagulation mode with power # 3 to 3.5. Cosmetically acceptable results were obtained in 100 percent of the cylindromas and 70 percent of the trichoepitheliomas (Visual Analog Scale). The radiofrequency ablation technique under different modes can be used in both large tumors as well as smaller ones, especially in developing countries because it is very cost effective and easily accessible. PMID:22948057

  7. Update On CO{sub 2} Laser Ablation Of Polyoxymethylene At 101 kPa

    SciTech Connect

    Sinko, John E.; Scharring, Stefan; Eckel, Hans-Albert; Ogita, Naoya; Sasoh, Akihiro; Roeser, Hans-Peter

    2010-10-08

    Recent work has brought about a renewed interest in CO{sub 2} laser ablation studies of polyoxymethylene, due to its potential as a test target for enhancing modern understanding of the laser ablation process. In this paper, new results taken in air at atmosphere pressure are reported, including data measured at institutions in Germany and Japan, which increase the body of literature data on CO{sub 2} laser ablation of polyoxymethylene. The results are discussed in terms of aerospace parameters such as the momentum coupling coefficient and specific impulse, and are compared to a previous literature study. The threshold fluence is specified for ablation of polyoxymethylene by CO{sub 2} laser radiation. Fluences higher (and lower) than previously tested for CO{sub 2} laser ablation were studied herein, and record specific impulse values for CO{sub 2} laser ablation of flat polyoxymethylene are also reported here.

  8. Radiofrequency Ablation of Metastatic Pheochromocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesan, Aradhana M.; Locklin, Julia; Lai, Edwin W.; Adams, Karen T.; Fojo, Antonio Tito; Pacak, Karel; Wood, Bradford J.

    2013-01-01

    In the present report on the preliminary safety and effectiveness of radiofrequency (RF) ablation for pheochromocytoma metastases, seven metastases were treated in six patients (mean size, 3.4 cm; range, 2.2–6 cm). α- and β-adrenergic and catecholamine synthesis inhibition and intraprocedural anesthesia monitoring were used. Safety was assessed by recording ablation-related complications. Complete ablation was defined as a lack of enhancement within the ablation zone on follow-up computed tomography. No serious adverse sequelae were observed. Complete ablation was achieved in six of seven metastases (mean follow-up, 12.3 months; range, 2.5–28 months). In conclusion, RF ablation may be safely performed for metastatic pheochromocytoma given careful attention to peri-procedural management. PMID:19875067

  9. OCDR guided laser ablation device

    DOEpatents

    Dasilva, Luiz B.; Colston, Jr., Bill W.; James, Dale L.

    2002-01-01

    A guided laser ablation device. The device includes a mulitmode laser ablation fiber that is surrounded by one or more single mode optical fibers that are used to image in the vicinity of the laser ablation area to prevent tissue damage. The laser ablation device is combined with an optical coherence domain reflectometry (OCDR) unit and with a control unit which initializes the OCDR unit and a high power laser of the ablation device. Data from the OCDR unit is analyzed by the control unit and used to control the high power laser. The OCDR images up to about 3 mm ahead of the ablation surface to enable a user to see sensitive tissue such as a nerve or artery before damaging it by the laser.

  10. Multiple target laser ablation system

    DOEpatents

    Mashburn, Douglas N.

    1996-01-01

    A laser ablation apparatus and method are provided in which multiple targets consisting of material to be ablated are mounted on a movable support. The material transfer rate is determined for each target material, and these rates are stored in a controller. A position detector determines which target material is in a position to be ablated, and then the controller controls the beam trigger timing and energy level to achieve a desired proportion of each constituent material in the resulting film.

  11. Multiple target laser ablation system

    DOEpatents

    Mashburn, D.N.

    1996-01-09

    A laser ablation apparatus and method are provided in which multiple targets consisting of material to be ablated are mounted on a movable support. The material transfer rate is determined for each target material, and these rates are stored in a controller. A position detector determines which target material is in a position to be ablated, and then the controller controls the beam trigger timing and energy level to achieve a desired proportion of each constituent material in the resulting film. 3 figs.

  12. Stereotactic Radiosurgery and Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT)

    MedlinePlus

    ... deliver high-energy x-rays, also known as photons. The linear accelerator can perform SRS on larger ... A neurosurgeon will use local anesthesia to numb two spots on your forehead and two spots on ...

  13. [Radiotherapy for Thyroid Cancer].

    PubMed

    Jingu, Keiichi; Maruoka, Shin; Umezawa, Rei; Takahashi, Noriyoshi

    2015-06-01

    Radioactive 131I therapy for differentiated thyroid cancer has been used since the 1940s and is an established and effective treatment. In contrast, external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) was considered to be effective for achieving local control but not for prolonging survival. Although clinicians were hesitant to administer EBRT owing to the potential radiation-induced adverse effects of 2 dimensional (2D)-radiotherapy until 2000, it is expected that adverse effects will be reduced and treatment efficacy improved through the introduction of more advanced techniques for delivering radiation (eg, 3D-radiotherapy and intensity modulated radiotherapy [IMRT]). The prognosis of undifferentiated thyroid cancer is known to be extremely bad, although in very rare cases, multimodality therapy (total or subtotal resection, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy) has allowed long-term survival. Here, we report the preliminary results of using hypofractionated radiotherapy for undifferentiated thyroid cancer in our institution. PMID:26199238

  14. Resin-Impregnated Carbon Ablator: A New Ablative Material for Hyperbolic Entry Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esper, Jaime; Lengowski, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Ablative materials are required to protect a space vehicle from the extreme temperatures encountered during the most demanding (hyperbolic) atmospheric entry velocities, either for probes launched toward other celestial bodies, or coming back to Earth from deep space missions. To that effect, the resin-impregnated carbon ablator (RICA) is a high-temperature carbon/phenolic ablative thermal protection system (TPS) material designed to use modern and commercially viable components in its manufacture. Heritage carbon/phenolic ablators intended for this use rely on materials that are no longer in production (i.e., Galileo, Pioneer Venus); hence the development of alternatives such as RICA is necessary for future NASA planetary entry and Earth re-entry missions. RICA s capabilities were initially measured in air for Earth re-entry applications, where it was exposed to a heat flux of 14 MW/sq m for 22 seconds. Methane tests were also carried out for potential application in Saturn s moon Titan, with a nominal heat flux of 1.4 MW/sq m for up to 478 seconds. Three slightly different material formulations were manufactured and subsequently tested at the Plasma Wind Tunnel of the University of Stuttgart in Germany (PWK1) in the summer and fall of 2010. The TPS integrity was well preserved in most cases, and results show great promise.

  15. Proton Radiotherapy for Liver Tumors: Dosimetric Advantages Over Photon Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xiaochun Krishnan, Sunil; Zhang Xiaodong; Dong Lei; Briere, Tina; Crane, Christopher H.; Martel, Mary; Gillin, Michael; Mohan, Radhe; Beddar, Sam

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to dosimetrically investigate the advantages of proton radiotherapy over photon radiotherapy for liver tumors. The proton plan and the photon plan were designed using commercial treatment planning systems. The treatment target dose conformity and heterogeneity and dose-volume analyses of normal structures were compared between proton and photon radiotherapy for 9 patients with liver tumors. Proton radiotherapy delivered a more conformal target dose with slightly less homogeneity when compared with photon radiotherapy. Protons significantly reduced the fractional volume of liver receiving dose greater or equal to 30 Gy (V{sub 30}) and the mean liver dose. The stomach and duodenal V{sub 45} were significantly lower with the use of proton radiotherapy. The V{sub 40} and V{sub 50} of the heart and the maximum spinal cord dose were also significantly lower with the use of proton radiotherapy. Protons were better able to spare one kidney completely and deliver less dose to one (generally the left) kidney than photons. The mean dose to the total body and most critical structures was significantly decreased using protons when compared to corresponding photon plans. In conclusion, our study suggests the dosimetric benefits of proton radiotherapy over photon radiotherapy. These dosimetric advantages of proton plans may permit further dose escalation with lower risk of complications.

  16. New Strategies in Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Oligometastases.

    PubMed

    Palma, David A; Louie, Alexander V; Rodrigues, George B

    2015-12-01

    Patients with metastatic solid tumors are usually treated with palliative intent. Systemic therapy and palliative radiation are often used, with the goals of prolonging survival or maintaining quality of life, but not of cure. In contrast to this paradigm, the theory of oligometastasis suggests that some patients who have a small number of metastases may be amenable to cure if all lesions can be eradicated. Aggressive treatment of patients with oligometastases, using either surgery or radiotherapy, has become more common in the past decade, yet in most situations, no randomized evidence is available to support such an approach. Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) is a novel treatment for oligometastases, delivering large doses of radiotherapy in only a few treatments, with excellent rates of local control, and appears to be an excellent noninvasive alternative to surgical resection of metastases. This article reviews recent biologic and clinical data that support the existence of the oligometastatic state and discusses gaps in this evidence base. The emerging role for SABR in the management of this challenging patient population is discussed with a focus on ongoing clinical trials in an attempt to improve overall survival, delay progression, or induce immunologic anticancer effects through the abscopal effect. PMID:26626571

  17. Maximum Standardized Uptake Value From Staging FDG-PET/CT Does not Predict Treatment Outcome for Early-Stage Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Burdick, Michael J.; Stephans, Kevin L.; Reddy, Chandana A.; Djemil, Toufik; Srinivas, Shyam M.; Videtic, Gregory M.M.

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: To perform a retrospective review to determine whether maximum standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max}) from staging 2-deoxy-2- [{sup 18}F] fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) studies are associated with outcomes for early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Seventy-two medically inoperable patients were treated between October 17, 2003 and August 17, 2007 with SBRT for T1-2N0M0 NSCLC. SBRT was administered as 60 Gy in 3 fractions, 50 Gy in 5 fractions, or 50 Gy in 10 fractions using abdominal compression and image-guided SBRT. Cox proportional hazards regression was performed to determine whether PET SUV{sub max} and other variables influenced outcomes: mediastinal failure (MF), distant metastases (DM), and overall survival (OS). Results: Biopsy was feasible in 49 patients (68.1%). Forty-nine patients had T1N0 disease, and 23 had T2N0 disease. Median SUV{sub max} was 6.55 (range, 1.5-21). Median follow-up was 16.9 months (range, 0.1-37.9 months). There were 3 local failures, 8 MF, 19 DM, and 30 deaths. Two-year local control, MF, DM, and OS rates were 94.0%, 10.4%, 30.1%, and 61.3%, respectively. In univariate analysis, PET/CT SUV{sub max}, defined either as a continuous or dichotomous variable, did not predict for MF, DM, or OS. On multivariable analysis, the only predictors for overall survival were T1 stage (hazard ratio = 0.331 [95% confidence interval, 0.156-0.701], p = 0.0039) and smoking pack-year history (hazard ratio = 1.015 [95% confidence interval, 1.004-1.026], p = 0.0084). Conclusions: Pretreatment PET SUV{sub max} did not predict for MF, DM, or OS in patients treated with SBRT for early-stage NSCLC.

  18. Radiotherapy of Cervical Cancer.

    PubMed

    Vordermark, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Curative-intent radical radiotherapy of cervical cancer consists of external-beam radiotherapy, brachytherapy, and concomitant chemotherapy with cisplatin. For each element, new developments aim to improve tumor control rates or treatment tolerance. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) has been shown to reduce gastrointestinal toxicity and can be used to selectively increase the radiotherapy dose. Individualized, image-guided brachytherapy enables better adaptation of high-dose volumes to the tumor extension. Intensification of concomitant or sequential systemic therapy is under evaluation. PMID:27614991

  19. Quality Assurance in Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mckenzie, Alan

    A common feature of the Radiotherapy Centres where there have been major accidents involving incorrect radiotherapy treatment is that they did not operate good Quality Assurance systems. A Quality Assurance system is sometimes called a Quality Management system, and it is designed to give assurance that quality standards are being met. One of the "spin offs" from operating a Quality Management system is that it reduces the likelihood of a radiotherapy accident. A detailed account of how to set up a quality system in radiotherapy has been given in an ESTRO booklet.2

  20. High temperature ablative foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Matthew T. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An ablative foam composition is formed of approximately 150 to 250 parts by weight polymeric isocyanate having an isocyanate functionality of 2.6 to 3.2; approximately 15 to 30 parts by weight reactive flame retardant having a hydroxyl number range from 200-260; approximately 10 to 40 parts by weight non-reactive flame retardant; approximately 10 to 40 parts by weight nonhydrolyzable silicone copolymer having a hydroxyl number range from 75-205; and approximately 3 to 16 parts by weight amine initiated polyether resin having an isocyanate functionality greater than or equal to 3.0 and a hydroxyl number range from 400-800.

  1. Study of the ablative effects on tektite. [reentry trajectories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, K. K.

    1975-01-01

    The tumbling and surface roughness effects on the trajectory of entry tektite were studied in both free molecular and continuum flows. It is shown that, while surface roughness has negligible effect on trajectory, the tumbling may play an important role in tektite trajectory and the consequent ablation, provided the body shape is different from a sphere. A shape factor B was proposed to measure the shape irregularity and is found to be a good parameter for correlations between body shape and tumbling effects.

  2. LASER ABLATION STUDIES OF CONCRETE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laser ablation was studied as a means of removing radioactive contaminants from the surface and near-surface regions of concrete. We present the results of ablation tests on cement and concrete samples using a 1.6 kW pulsed Nd:YAG laser with fiber optic beam delivery. The laser-s...

  3. Radiotherapy Treatment Planning for Testicular Seminoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wilder, Richard B.; Buyyounouski, Mark K.; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Beard, Clair J.

    2012-07-15

    Virtually all patients with Stage I testicular seminoma are cured regardless of postorchiectomy management. For patients treated with adjuvant radiotherapy, late toxicity is a major concern. However, toxicity may be limited by radiotherapy techniques that minimize radiation exposure of healthy normal tissues. This article is an evidence-based review that provides radiotherapy treatment planning recommendations for testicular seminoma. The minority of Stage I patients who choose adjuvant treatment over surveillance may be considered for (1) para-aortic irradiation to 20 Gy in 10 fractions, or (2) carboplatin chemotherapy consisting of area under the curve, AUC = 7 Multiplication-Sign 1-2 cycles. Two-dimensional radiotherapy based on bony anatomy is a simple and effective treatment for Stage IIA or IIB testicular seminoma. Centers with expertise in vascular and nodal anatomy may consider use of anteroposterior-posteroanterior fields based on three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy instead. For modified dog-leg fields delivering 20 Gy in 10 fractions, clinical studies support placement of the inferior border at the top of the acetabulum. Clinical and nodal mapping studies support placement of the superior border of all radiotherapy fields at the top of the T12 vertebral body. For Stage IIA and IIB patients, an anteroposterior-posteroanterior boost is then delivered to the adenopathy with a 2-cm margin to the block edge. The boost dose consists of 10 Gy in 5 fractions for Stage IIA and 16 Gy in 8 fractions for Stage IIB. Alternatively, bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin chemotherapy for 3 cycles or etoposide and cisplatin chemotherapy for 4 cycles may be delivered to Stage IIA or IIB patients (e.g., if they have a horseshoe kidney, inflammatory bowel disease, or a history of radiotherapy).

  4. [Radiotherapy of skin cancers].

    PubMed

    Hennequin, C; Rio, E; Mahé, M-A

    2016-09-01

    The indications of radiotherapy for skin cancers are not clearly defined because of the lack of randomised trials or prospective studies. For basal cell carcinomas, radiotherapy frequently offers a good local control, but a randomized trial showed that surgery is more efficient and less toxic. Indications of radiotherapy are contra-indications of surgery for patients older than 60, non-sclerodermiform histology and occurring in non-sensitive areas. Adjuvant radiotherapy could be proposed to squamous cell carcinomas, in case of poor prognostic factors. Dose of 60 to 70Gy are usually required, and must be modulated to the size of the lesions. Adjuvant radiotherapy seems beneficial for desmoplastic melanomas but not for the other histological types. Prophylactic nodal irradiation (45 to 50Gy), for locally advanced tumours (massive nodal involvement), decreases the locoregional failure rate but do not increase survival. Adjuvant radiotherapy (50 to 56Gy) for Merckel cell carcinomas increases also the local control rate, as demonstrated by meta-analysis and a large epidemiological study. Nodal areas must be included, if there is no surgical exploration (sentinel lymph node dissection). Kaposi sarcomas are radiosensitive and could be treated with relatively low doses (24 to 30Gy). Also, cutaneous lymphomas are good indications for radiotherapy: B lymphomas are electively treated with limited fields. The role of total skin electron therapy for T-lymphomas is still discussed; but palliative radiotherapy is very efficient in case of cutaneous nodules. PMID:27522189

  5. Planning National Radiotherapy Services

    PubMed Central

    Rosenblatt, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Countries, states, and island nations often need forward planning of their radiotherapy services driven by different motives. Countries without radiotherapy services sponsor patients to receive radiotherapy abroad. They often engage professionals for a feasibility study in order to establish whether it would be more cost-beneficial to establish a radiotherapy facility. Countries where radiotherapy services have developed without any central planning, find themselves in situations where many of the available centers are private and thus inaccessible for a majority of patients with limited resources. Government may decide to plan ahead when a significant exodus of cancer patients travel to another country for treatment, thus exposing the failure of the country to provide this medical service for its citizens. In developed countries, the trigger has been the existence of highly visible waiting lists for radiotherapy revealing a shortage of radiotherapy equipment. This paper suggests that there should be a systematic and comprehensive process of long-term planning of radiotherapy services at the national level, taking into account the regulatory infrastructure for radiation protection, planning of centers, equipment, staff, education programs, quality assurance, and sustainability aspects. Realistic budgetary and cost considerations must also be part of the project proposal or business plan. PMID:25505730

  6. 3.4 Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, H.-M.; Selbach, H.-J.; Vatnitsky, S.

    This document is part of Subvolume A 'Fundamentals and Data in Radiobiology, Radiation Biophysics, Dosimetry and Medical Radiological Protection' of Volume 7 'Medical Radiological Physics' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group VIII 'Advanced Materials and Technologies'. It contains the Section '3.4 Radiotherapy' of the Chapter '3 Dosimetry in Diagnostic Radiology and Radiotherapy' with the contents:

  7. Development of moldable carbonaceous materials for ablative rocket nozzles.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockhart, R. J.; Bortz, S. A.; Schwartz, M. A.

    1972-01-01

    Description of a materials system developed for use as low-cost ablative nozzles for NASA's 260-in. solid rocket motor. Petroleum coke and carbon black fillers were employed; high density was achieved by controlling particle size distribution. An alumina catalyzed furfuryl ester resin which produced high carbon residues after pyrolysis was employed as the binder. Staple carbon fibers improved the strength and crack resistance of molded bodies. In static firing tests of two subscale nozzles, this material compared favorably in erosion rate with several other ablative systems.

  8. Solar Wind Ablation of Terrestrial Planet Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Thomas Earle; Fok, Mei-Ching H.; Delcourt, Dominique C.

    2009-01-01

    Internal plasma sources usually arise in planetary magnetospheres as a product of stellar ablation processes. With the ignition of a new star and the onset of its ultraviolet and stellar wind emissions, much of the volatiles in the stellar system undergo a phase transition from gas to plasma. Condensation and accretion into a disk is replaced by radiation and stellar wind ablation of volatile materials from the system- Planets or smaller bodies that harbor intrinsic magnetic fields develop an apparent shield against direct stellar wind impact, but UV radiation still ionizes their gas phases, and the resulting internal plasmas serve to conduct currents to and from the central body along reconnected magnetic field linkages. Photoionization and thermalization of electrons warms the ionospheric topside, enhancing Jeans' escape of super-thermal particles, with ambipolar diffusion and acceleration. Moreover, observations and simulations of auroral processes at Earth indicate that solar wind energy dissipation is concentrated by the geomagnetic field by a factor of 10-100, enhancing heavy species plasma and gas escape from gravity, and providing more current carrying capacity. Thus internal plasmas enable coupling with the plasma, neutral gas and by extension, the entire body. The stellar wind is locally loaded and slowed to develop the required power. The internal source plasma is accelerated and heated, inflating the magnetosphere as it seeks escape, and is ultimately blown away in the stellar wind. Bodies with little sensible atmosphere may still produce an exosphere of sputtered matter when exposed to direct solar wind impact. Bodies with a magnetosphere and internal sources of plasma interact more strongly with the stellar wind owing to the magnetic linkage between the two created by reconnection.

  9. Thermal response and ablation characteristics of light weight ceramic ablators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tran, Huy K.; Rasky, Daniel J.; Esfahani, Lili

    1993-01-01

    An account is given of the thermal performance and ablation characteristics of the NASA-Ames Lightweight Ceramic Ablators (LCAs) in supersonic, high-enthalpy convective environments, which use low density ceramic or carbon fiber matrices as substrates for main structural support, with organic resin fillers. LCA densities are in the 0.224-1.282 g/cu cm range. In-depth temperature data have been obtained to determine thermal penetration depths and conductivity. The addition of SiC and PPMA is noted to significantly improve the ablation performance of LCAs with silica substrates. Carbon-based LCAs are the most mass-efficient at high flux levels.

  10. Down-staging of hepatocellular carcinoma via external-beam radiotherapy with subsequent liver transplantation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Wigg, Alan; Hon, Kenneth; Mosel, Leigh; Sladden, Nicole; Palumbo, Kevin

    2013-10-01

    Despite the widespread use of locoregional therapies [radiofrequency ablation and transarterial chemoembolization (TACE)], there is currently a lack of high-quality evidence supporting their use for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients on the liver transplantation (LT) waiting list or requiring down-staging. Radiotherapy has rarely been used in this setting and has usually been in the form of more complex and less accessible techniques such as proton-beam and stereotactic body radiation therapy. Only 1 report describes the use of conventional 3-dimensional conformal external-beam radiotherapy (cEBRT) techniques as neoadjuvant or down-staging therapy for patients who are LT candidates. This report describes the use of cEBRT in a 52-year-old hepatitis C-positive man with cirrhosis. A 40-mm right lobe HCC was treated initially with TACE while he was on the waiting list. The lesion progressed beyond transplant criteria (76 mm). Conventional external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) was used (54 Gy in 27 fractions) to down-stage the lesion. EBRT was well tolerated and resulted in a complete radiological response with no arterial enhancement of the lesion for a total of 16 months. Subsequent LT and a review of the explant demonstrated complete histological necrosis of the lesion. This report provides the first description of complete histological necrosis of HCC through the use of cEBRT techniques as down-staging/neoadjuvant therapy before LT. Because of its potential efficacy, accessibility, tolerability, noninvasive and outpatient nature, and ability to treat lesions adjacent to vessels and biliary structures, further trials examining the efficacy of cEBRT versus other neoadjuvant techniques are urgently required. PMID:23894122

  11. Laser ablation synthesis of lanthanide oxide clusters: Mechanisms and chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, J.K.

    1995-07-15

    Excimer laser ablation into vacuum of hydrated lanthanide oxalates has produced new lanthanide (Ln) oxide cluster ions which were identified by time-of-flight mass spectrometry. In addition to binary oxide clusters (Ln{sub {ital m}}O{sup +}{sub {ital n}}), mixed lanthanide oxide clusters [Ln{sub {ital m}1}Ln{sub {ital m}2}{sup {prime}}O{sup +}{sub {ital n}} with ({ital m}1+{ital m}2){le}9] were discerned for the following Ln-Ln{prime}: La-Tb, La-Ho, La-Lu, and Ho-Lu. The observed cluster ion stoichiometries, abundance distributions, and hydration systematics provide insights into cluster formation mechanisms and chemistries. Time-variable ion sampling revealed cluster enhancement in the tail of the ablation plume. The body of experimental results support cluster formation by aggregation of small ablated species. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  12. Current readings: Percutaneous ablation for pulmonary metastatic disease.

    PubMed

    Quirk, Matthew T; Pomykala, Kelsey L; Suh, Robert D

    2014-01-01

    Percutaneous image-guided ablation is a technique for maintaining local control of metastatic lung lesions that may, in selected patients, confer a survival benefit over no treatment or systemic therapy alone. Although the currently accepted treatment for oligometastatic pulmonary disease is surgical resection, the existing body of literature, including the recent investigations reviewed within this article, supports a role for percutaneous ablation as an important and relatively safe therapeutic option for nonsurgical and in carefully selected surgical patients, conferring survival benefits competitive with surgical metastasectomy. Continued clinical investigations are needed to further understand the nuances of thermal technologies and applications to treat lung primary and secondary pulmonary malignancy, directly compare available therapeutic options and further define the role of percutaneous image-guided ablation in the treatment of pulmonary metastatic disease. PMID:25527018

  13. Ultrasonic characterization of laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J. A.; Telschow, K. L.

    When a pulsed laser beam strikes the surface of an absorbing material, ultrasonic waves are generated due to thermoelectric expansion and, at higher laser power densities, ablation of the material. These sound generation mechanisms have been the subject of numerous theoretical and experimental studies and are now fairly well understood. In particular, it has been established that at low power densities the thermoelastic mechanism is well described by a surface center of expansion. This mechanism produces a characteristic waveform whose amplitude is proportional to the energy absorbed from the laser pulse and also dependent on the thermal and elastic properties of the material. The ablation ultrasonic source can be described by a point normal force acting on the material surface. For laser power densities near the ablation onset, the time dependence of the source is that of the laser pulse. The resultant waveform recorded on epicenter (source and detector collinear) has a sharp peak determined by the momentum impulse delivered to the material by the ablation process. Particularly in the near ablation onset region, this ultrasonic displacement peak can be used to characterize the ablation process occurring at the material surface. The onset power density for ablation and subsequent ablation dependence on power density are material dependent and thought to be a function of the heat capacity and thermal conductivity of the material. With this in mind, it is possible that these ablation signals could be used to characterize material microstructures, and perhaps material mechanical properties such as hardness, through microstructural changes of the material thermal parameters. This paper explores this question for samples of Type 304 stainless steel with microstructures controlled through work hardening and annealing.

  14. Ablative heat shield design for space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiferth, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    Ablator heat shield configuration optimization studies were conducted for the orbiter. Ablator and reusable surface insulation (RSI) trajectories for design studies were shaped to take advantage of the low conductance of ceramic RSI and high temperature capability of ablators. Comparative weights were established for the RSI system and for direct bond and mechanically attached ablator systems. Ablator system costs were determined for fabrication, installation and refurbishment. Cost penalties were assigned for payload weight penalties, if any. The direct bond ablator is lowest in weight and cost. A mechanically attached ablator using a magnesium subpanel is highly competitive for both weight and cost.

  15. Advances in Atrial Fibrillation Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Darge, Alicia; Reynolds, Matthew R.; Germano, Joseph J.

    2009-01-01

    Atrial Fibrillation (AF) is an increasingly common and costly medical problem.1–3 Given the disappointing efficacy and side effects associated with pharmacological therapy for AF, new treatment options are needed. Over the last decade, advances in our understanding of the mechanisms of AF, coupled with iterative improvements in catheter ablation techniques, have spurred the evolution of catheter ablation for AF from an experimental procedure to an increasingly important treatment option.4 This paper will review recent advances in the approaches and outcomes of AF ablation. PMID:19411729

  16. Epicardial Ablation For Ventricular Tachycardia

    PubMed Central

    Maccabelli, Giuseppe; Mizuno, Hiroya; Della Bella, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Epicardial ablation has lately become a necessary tool to approach some ventricular tachycardias in different types of cardiomyopathy. Its diffusion is now limited to a few high volume centers not because of the difficulty of the pericardial puncture but since it requires high competence not only in the VT ablation field but also in knowing and recognizing the possible complications each of which require a careful treatment. This article will review the state of the art of epicardial ablation with special attention to the procedural aspects and to the possible selection criteria of the patients PMID:23233758

  17. [Percutaneous ablation of renal tumors: radiofrequency ablation or cryoablation?].

    PubMed

    Buy, X; Lang, H; Garnon, J; Gangi, A

    2011-09-01

    Percutaneous ablation of renal tumors, including radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation, are increasingly being used for small tumors as an alternative to surgery for poor surgical candidates. Compared to radiofrequency ablation, cryoablation has several advantages: improved volume control and preservation of adjacent structures due to the excellent depiction of the ice ball on CT and MRI; better protection of the collecting system for central tumor with reduced risk of postprocedural urinary fistula. The main pitfall of cryoablation is the higher cost. Therefore, cryoablation should be reserved for the treatment of complex tumors. In this article, we will review the different steps of percutaneous renal tumor ablation procedures including patient selection, technical considerations, and follow-up imaging. PMID:21944236

  18. Chinese expert consensus workshop report: Guidelines for thermal ablation of primary and metastatic lung tumors.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xin; Fan, Weijun; Chen, Jun-Hui; Feng, Wei-Jian; Gu, Shan-Zhi; Han, Yue; Huang, Guang-Hui; Lei, Guang-Yan; Li, Xiao-Guang; Li, Yu-Liang; Li, Zhen-Jia; Lin, Zheng-Yu; Liu, Bao-Dong; Liu, Ying; Peng, Zhong-Min; Wang, Hui; Yang, Wu-Wei; Yang, Xia; Zhai, Bo; Zhang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Although surgical resection is the primary means of curing both primary and metastatic lung cancers, about 80% of lung cancers cannot be removed by surgery. As most patients with unresectable lung cancer receive only limited benefits from traditional radiotherapy and chemotherapy, many new local treatment methods have emerged, including local ablation therapy. The Minimally Invasive and Comprehensive Treatment of Lung Cancer Branch, Professional Committee of Minimally Invasive Treatment of Cancer of the Chinese Anti-Cancer Association has organized multidisciplinary experts to develop guidelines for this treatment modality. These guidelines aim at standardizing thermal ablation procedures and criteria for selecting treatment candidates and assessing outcomes; and for preventing and managing post-ablation complications. PMID:26273346

  19. Chinese expert consensus workshop report: Guidelines for thermal ablation of primary and metastatic lung tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xin; Fan, Weijun; Chen, Jun-hui; Feng, Wei-jian; Gu, Shan-zhi; Han, Yue; Huang, Guang-hui; Lei, Guang-yan; Li, Xiao-guang; Li, Yu-liang; Li, Zhen-jia; Lin, Zheng-yu; Liu, Bao-dong; Liu, Ying; Peng, Zhong-min; Wang, Hui; Yang, Wu-wei; Yang, Xia; Zhai, Bo; Zhang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Although surgical resection is the primary means of curing both primary and metastatic lung cancers, about 80% of lung cancers cannot be removed by surgery. As most patients with unresectable lung cancer receive only limited benefits from traditional radiotherapy and chemotherapy, many new local treatment methods have emerged, including local ablation therapy. The Minimally Invasive and Comprehensive Treatment of Lung Cancer Branch, Professional Committee of Minimally Invasive Treatment of Cancer of the Chinese Anti-Cancer Association has organized multidisciplinary experts to develop guidelines for this treatment modality. These guidelines aim at standardizing thermal ablation procedures and criteria for selecting treatment candidates and assessing outcomes; and for preventing and managing post-ablation complications. PMID:26273346

  20. Ion acceleration enhanced by target ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, S.; Lin, C. Wang, H. Y.; Lu, H. Y.; He, X. T.; Yan, X. Q.; Chen, J. E.; Cowan, T. E.

    2015-07-15

    Laser proton acceleration can be enhanced by using target ablation, due to the energetic electrons generated in the ablation preplasma. When the ablation pulse matches main pulse, the enhancement gets optimized because the electrons' energy density is highest. A scaling law between the ablation pulse and main pulse is confirmed by the simulation, showing that for given CPA pulse and target, proton energy improvement can be achieved several times by adjusting the target ablation.

  1. TPS Ablator Technologies for Interplanetary Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curry, Donald M.

    2004-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the status of Thermal Protection System (TPS) Ablator technologies and the preparation for use in interplanetary spacecraft. NASA does not have adequate TPS ablatives and sufficient selection for planned missions. It includes a comparison of shuttle and interplanetary TPS requirements, the status of mainline TPS charring ablator materials, a summary of JSC SBIR accomplishments in developing advanced charring ablators and the benefits of SBIR Ablator/fabrication technology.

  2. Modern Radiotherapy Concepts and the Impact of Radiation on Immune Activation

    PubMed Central

    Deloch, Lisa; Derer, Anja; Hartmann, Josefin; Frey, Benjamin; Fietkau, Rainer; Gaipl, Udo S.

    2016-01-01

    Even though there is extensive research carried out in radiation oncology, most of the clinical studies focus on the effects of radiation on the local tumor tissue and deal with normal tissue side effects. The influence of dose fractionation and timing particularly with regard to immune activation is not satisfactorily investigated so far. This review, therefore, summarizes current knowledge on concepts of modern radiotherapy (RT) and evaluates the potential of RT for immune activation. Focus is set on radiation-induced forms of tumor cell death and consecutively the immunogenicity of the tumor cells. The so-called non-targeted, abscopal effects can contribute to anti-tumor responses in a specific and systemic manner and possess the ability to target relapsing tumor cells as well as metastases. The impact of distinct RT concepts on immune activation is outlined and pre-clinical evidence and clinical observations on RT-induced immunity will be discussed. Knowledge on the radiosensitivity of immune cells as well as clinical evidence for enhanced immunity after RT will be considered. While stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy seem to have a beneficial outcome over classical RT fractionation in pre-clinical animal models, in vitro model systems suggest an advantage for classical fractionated RT for immune activation. Furthermore, the optimal approach may differ based on the tumor site and/or genetic signature. These facts highlight that clinical trials are urgently needed to identify whether high-dose RT is superior to induce anti-tumor immune responses compared to classical fractionated RT and in particular how the outcome is when RT is combined with immunotherapy in selected tumor entities. PMID:27379203

  3. Cryoballoon Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Jason G; Dubuc, Marc; Guerra, Peter G; Macle, Laurent; Rivard, Lena; Roy, Denis; Talajic, Mario; Thibault, Bernard; Khairy, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Focal point-by-point radiofrequency catheter ablation has shown considerable success in the treatment of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. However, it is not without limitations. Recent clinical and preclinical studies have demonstrated that cryothermal ablation using a balloon catheter (Artic Front©, Medtronic CryoCath LP) provides an effective alternative strategy to treating atrial fibrillation. The objective of this article is to review efficacy and safety data surrounding cryoballoon ablation for paroxysmal and persistent atrial fibrillation. In addition, a practical step-by-step approach to cryoballoon ablation is presented, while highlighting relevant literature regarding: 1) the rationale for adjunctive imaging, 2) selection of an appropriate cryoballoon size, 3) predictors of efficacy, 4) advanced trouble-shooting techniques, and 5) strategies to reduce procedural complications, such as phrenic nerve palsy. PMID:22557842

  4. Recruitment in Radiotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deeley, T. J.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    The Faculty Board of Radiotherapy and Oncology of the Royal College of Radiobiologists surveyed the factors thought to influence recruitment into the specialty. Possible factors listed in replies of 36 questionnaires are offered. (LBH)

  5. Laser ablation in analytical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Russo, Richard E; Mao, Xianglei; Gonzalez, Jhanis J; Zorba, Vassilia; Yoo, Jong

    2013-07-01

    In 2002, we wrote an Analytical Chemistry feature article describing the Physics of Laser Ablation in Microchemical Analysis. In line with the theme of the 2002 article, this manuscript discusses current issues in fundamental research, applications based on detecting photons at the ablation site (LIBS and LAMIS) and by collecting particles for excitation in a secondary source (ICP), and directions for the technology. PMID:23614661

  6. Tissue healing response following hyperthermic vapor ablation in the porcine longissimus muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grantham, John T.; Grisez, Brian T.; Famoso, Justin; Hoey, Michael; Dixon, Chris; Coad, James E.

    2015-03-01

    As the use of hyperthermic ablation technologies has increased, so too has the need to understand their effects on tissue and their healing responses. This study was designed to characterize tissue injury and healing following hyperthermic vapor ablation in the in vivo porcine longissimus muscle model. The individual ablations were performed using the NxThera Vapor Delivery System (NxThera Inc., Minneapolis, MN). To assess the vapor ablation's evolution, the swine were euthanized post-treatment on Day 0, Day 3, Day 7, Day 14, Day 28, Day 45 and Day 90. Triphenyltetrazolium chloride viability staining (TTC staining) was used to macroscopically assess the extent of each vapor ablation within the tissue. The ablation associated healing responses were then histologically evaluated for acute inflammation, chronic inflammation, foreign body reaction and fibrosis. Two zones of tissue injury were initially identified in the ablations: 1) a central zone of complete coagulative necrosis and 2) an outer "transition zone" of viable and non-viable cells. The ablations initially increased in size from Day 0 to Day 7 and then progressively decreased in size though Day 45. The initial Day 3 healing changes originated in the transition zone with minimal acute and chronic inflammation. As time progressed, granulation tissue began to form by Day 7 and peaked around Day 14. Collagen formation, deposition and remodeling began in the adjacent healthy tissue by Day 28, replaced the ablation site by Day 45 and reorganized by Day 90. In conclusion, this vapor ablation technology provided a non-desiccating form of hyperthermic ablation that resulted in coagulative necrosis without a central thermally/heat-fixed tissue component, followed a classical wound healing pathway, and healed with minimal associated inflammation.

  7. Radiofrequency Ablation to Prevent Sudden Cardiac Death

    PubMed Central

    Atoui, Moustapha; Gunda, Sampath; Lakkireddy, Dhanunjaya; Mahapatra, Srijoy

    2015-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation may prevent or treat atrial and ventricular arrhythmias. Since some of these arrhythmias are associated with sudden cardiac death, it has been hypothesized that ablation may prevent sudden death in certain cases. We performed a literature search to better understand under which circumstances ablation may prevent sudden death and found little randomized data demonstrating the long-term effects of ablation. Current literature shows that ablation clearly prevents symptoms of arrhythmia and may reduce the incidence of sudden cardiac death in select patients, although data does not indicate improved mortality. Ongoing clinical trials are needed to better define the role of ablation in preventing sudden cardiac death. PMID:26306130

  8. HIFU Tissue Ablation: Concept and Devices.

    PubMed

    Ter Haar, Gail

    2016-01-01

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is rapidly gaining clinical acceptance as a technique capable of providing non-invasive heating and ablation for a wide range of applications. Usually requiring only a single session, treatments are often conducted as day case procedures, with the patient either fully conscious, lightly sedated or under light general anesthesia. HIFU scores over other thermal ablation techniques because of the lack of necessity for the transcutaneous insertion of probes into the target tissue. Sources placed either outside the body (for treatment of tumors or abnormalities of the liver, kidney, breast, uterus, pancreas brain and bone), or in the rectum (for treatment of the prostate), provide rapid heating of a target tissue volume, the highly focused nature of the field leaving tissue in the ultrasound propagation path relatively unaffected. Numerous extra-corporeal, transrectal and interstitial devices have been designed to optimize application-specific treatment delivery for the wide-ranging areas of application that are now being explored with HIFU. Their principle of operation is described here, and an overview of their design principles is given. PMID:26486329

  9. Current Hot Potatoes in Atrial Fibrillation Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Roten, Laurent; Derval, Nicolas; Pascale, Patrizio; Scherr, Daniel; Komatsu, Yuki; Shah, Ashok; Ramoul, Khaled; Denis, Arnaud; Sacher, Frédéric; Hocini, Mélèze; Haïssaguerre, Michel; Jaïs, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation has evolved to the treatment of choice for patients with drug-resistant and symptomatic AF. Pulmonary vein isolation at the ostial or antral level usually is sufficient for treatment of true paroxysmal AF. For persistent AF ablation, drivers and perpetuators outside of the pulmonary veins are responsible for AF maintenance and have to be targeted to achieve satisfying arrhythmia-free success rate. Both complex fractionated atrial electrogram (CFAE) ablation and linear ablation are added to pulmonary vein isolation for persistent AF ablation. Nevertheless, ablation failure and necessity of repeat ablations are still frequent, especially after persistent AF ablation. Pulmonary vein reconduction is the main reason for arrhythmia recurrence after paroxysmal and to a lesser extent after persistent AF ablation. Failure of persistent AF ablation mostly is a consequence of inadequate trigger ablation, substrate modification or incompletely ablated or reconducting linear lesions. In this review we will discuss these points responsible for AF recurrence after ablation and review current possibilities on how to overcome these limitations. PMID:22920482

  10. Thermal response and ablation characteristics of lightweight ceramic ablators

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, H.K.; Rasky, D.J.; Esfahani, L.

    1994-11-01

    This paper presents the thermal performance and ablation characteristics of the newly developed lightweight ceramic ablators (LCAs) in a supersonic, high-enthalpy convective environment. Lightweight ceramic ablators were recently conceived and developed at NASA Ames using low-density ceramic or carbon fibrous matrices as substrates for main structural support and organic resins as fillers. These LCAs were successfully produced with densities ranging from approximately 0.224 to 1.282 g/cu cm. Several infiltrants with different char yields were used to study the effect on surface recession. Tests were conducted in the NASA Ames arc-jet facilities. Material thermal performance was evaluated at cold-wall heat fluxes from 113.5 to 1634 W/sq cm, and stagnation pressures of 0.018 to 0.331 atm. Conventional ablators such as SLA-561, Avcoat 5026-39HC, MA-25S, and balsa wood were tested at the same heat fluxes for direct comparison. Surface temperature was measured using optical pyrometers, and the recession rates were obtained from the high-speed films. In-depth temperature data were obtained to determine the thermal penetration depths and conductivity. Preliminary results indicated that most LCAs performed comparably to or better than conventional ablators. At low flux levels (less than 454 W/sq cm), the addition of silicon carbide and polymethyl methacrylate significantly improved the ablation performance of silica substrates. The carbon-based LCAs were the most mass-efficient at high flux levels (greater than 454 W/sq cm). 16 refs.

  11. Fragmentation and ablation during entry

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1997-09-01

    This note discusses objects that both fragment and ablate during entry, using the results of previous reports to describe the velocity, pressure, and fragmentation of entering objects. It shows that the mechanisms used there to describe the breakup of non-ablating objects during deceleration remain valid for most ablating objects. It treats coupled fragmentation and ablation during entry, building on earlier models that separately discuss the entry of objects that are hard, whose high heat of ablation permits little erosion, and those who are strong whose strength prevents fragmentation, which are discussed in ``Radiation from Hard Objects,`` ``Deceleration and Radiation of Strong, Hard, Asteroids During Atmospheric Impact,`` and ``Meteor Signature Interpretation.`` This note provides a more detailed treatment of the further breakup and separation of fragments during descent. It replaces the constraint on mass per unit area used earlier to determine the altitude and magnitude of peak power radiation with a detailed analytic solution of deceleration. Model predictions are shown to be in agreement with the key features of numerical calculations of deceleration. The model equations are solved for the altitudes of maximum radiation, which agree with numerical integrations. The model is inverted analytically to infer object size and speed from measurements of peak power and altitude to provide a complete model for the approximate inversion of meteor data.

  12. Laser ablation studies of concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Savina, M.; Xu, Z.; Wang, Y.; Reed, C.; Pellin, M.

    1999-10-20

    Laser ablation was studied as a means of removing radioactive contaminants from the surface and near-surface regions of concrete. The authors present the results of ablation tests on cement and concrete samples using a 1.6 kW pulsed Nd:YAG laser with fiber optic beam delivery. The laser-surface interaction was studied using cement and high density concrete as targets. Ablation efficiency and material removal rates were determined as functions of irradiance and pulse overlap. Doped samples were also ablated to determine the efficiency with which surface contaminants were removed and captured in the effluent. The results show that the cement phase of the material melts and vaporizes, but the aggregate portion (sand and rock) fragments. The effluent consists of both micron-size aerosol particles and chunks of fragmented aggregate material. Laser-induced optical emission spectroscopy was used to analyze the surface during ablation. Analysis of the effluent showed that contaminants such as cesium and strontium were strongly segregated into different regions of the particle size distribution of the aerosol.

  13. Femtosecond laser ablation of enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Quang-Tri; Bertrand, Caroline; Vilar, Rui

    2016-06-01

    The surface topographical, compositional, and structural modifications induced in human enamel by femtosecond laser ablation is studied. The laser treatments were performed using a Yb:KYW chirped-pulse-regenerative amplification laser system (560 fs and 1030 nm) and fluences up to 14 J/cm2. The ablation surfaces were studied by scanning electron microscopy, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, and micro-Raman spectroscopy. Regardless of the fluence, the ablation surfaces were covered by a layer of resolidified material, indicating that ablation is accompanied by melting of hydroxyapatite. This layer presented pores and exploded gas bubbles, created by the release of gaseous decomposition products of hydroxyapatite (CO2 and H2O) within the liquid phase. In the specimen treated with 1-kHz repetition frequency and 14 J/cm2, thickness of the resolidified material is in the range of 300 to 900 nm. The micro-Raman analysis revealed that the resolidified material contains amorphous calcium phosphate, while grazing incidence x-ray diffraction analysis allowed detecting traces of a calcium phosphate other than hydroxyapatite, probably β-tricalcium phosphate Ca3), at the surface of this specimen. The present results show that the ablation of enamel involves melting of enamel's hydroxyapatite, but the thickness of the altered layer is very small and thermal damage of the remaining material is negligible.

  14. [Radiotherapy of larynx cancers].

    PubMed

    Pointreau, Y; Lafond, C; Legouté, F; Trémolières, P; Servagi-Vernat, S; Giraud, P; Maingon, P; Calais, G; Lapeyre, M

    2016-09-01

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy is the gold standard in the treatment of larynx cancers (except T1 glottic tumour). Early T1 and T2 tumours may be treated by exclusive radiation or surgery. For tumours requiring total laryngectomy (T2 or T3), induction chemotherapy followed by exclusive radiotherapy or concurrent chemoradiotherapy is possible. For T4 tumour, surgery must be proposed. The treatment of lymph nodes is based on the initial treatment of the primary tumour. In non-surgical procedure, in case of sequential radiotherapy, the curative dose is 70Gy and the prophylactic dose is 50Gy. An integrated simultaneous boost radiotherapy is allowed (70Gy in 2Gy per fraction and 56Gy in 1.8Gy per fraction or 70Gy in 2.12Gy per fraction). Postoperatively, radiotherapy is used in locally advanced cancer with dose levels based on pathologic criteria (66Gy for R1 resection, 50 to 54Gy for complete resection). Volume delineation was based on guidelines. PMID:27521037

  15. Radiotherapy of malignant melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, J.S.

    1985-04-01

    The role of radiotherapy in the treatment of malignant melanoma is limited, and surgery generally forms the mainstay of medical practice. However, there are some circumstances in which radiotherapy should be considered the treatment of choice. Symptomatic metastatic lesions in bone or brain can effectively be palliated in a substantial proportion of instances. At the current stage of our knowledge, conventionally fractionated treatment of such lesions forms the standard against which other treatments should be measured. In contrast, metastatic lesions to skin or lymph nodes that do not overlie critical normal structures probably are better treated by high-dose-per-fraction techniques. Radiotherapy may play a definitive role in the treatment of lentigo maligna. The precise optimal energy of the beam to be used remains to be defined. Slightly more penetrating radiation appears to be required for lentigo maligna melanomas. Here, too, the optimal energy remains to be defined. The treatment of nonlentigenous melanomas primarily by radiotherapy is unproved in my opinion. Certainly, the data from the Princess Margaret Hospital is exciting, but I believe it must be corroborated by a well-designed trial before it can be accepted without question. Future directions in treatment of malignant melanoma are likely to include further trials of unconventional fractionation and the use of radiosensitizing agents in conjunction with radiotherapy. The time for dermatologists and radiation therapists to cooperate in such studies is at hand.

  16. [Prostate cancer external beam radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    de Crevoisier, R; Pommier, P; Latorzeff, I; Chapet, O; Chauvet, B; Hennequin, C

    2016-09-01

    The prostate external beam radiotherapy techniques are described, when irradiating the prostate or after prostatectomy, with and without pelvic lymph nodes. The following parts are presented: indications of radiotherapy, total dose and fractionation, planning CT image acquisition, volume of interest delineation (target volumes and organs at risk) and margins, Intensity modulated radiotherapy planning and corresponding dose-volume constraints, and finally Image guided radiotherapy. PMID:27516051

  17. Evaluation of a Thermoprotective Gel for Hydrodissection During Percutaneous Microwave Ablation: In Vivo Results

    SciTech Connect

    Moreland, Anna J. Lubner, Meghan G. Ziemlewicz, Timothy J. Kitchin, Douglas R. Hinshaw, J. Louis Johnson, Alexander D. Lee, Fred T. Brace, Christopher L.

    2015-06-15

    PurposeTo evaluate whether thermoreversible poloxamer 407 15.4 % in water (P407) can protect non-target tissues adjacent to microwave (MW) ablation zones in a porcine model.Materials and MethodsMW ablation antennas were placed percutaneously into peripheral liver, spleen, or kidney (target tissues) under US and CT guidance in five swine such that the expected ablation zones would extend into adjacent diaphragm, body wall, or bowel (non-target tissues). For experimental ablations, P407 (a hydrogel that transitions from liquid at room temperature to semi-solid at body temperature) was injected into the potential space between target and non-target tissues, and the presence of a gel barrier was verified on CT. No barrier was used for controls. MW ablation was performed at 65 W for 5 min. Thermal damage to target and non-target tissues was evaluated at dissection.ResultsAntennas were placed 7 ± 3 mm from the organ surface for both control and gel-protected ablations (p = 0.95). The volume of gel deployed was 49 ± 27 mL, resulting in a barrier thickness of 0.8 ± 0.5 cm. Ablations extended into non-target tissues in 12/14 control ablations (mean surface area = 3.8 cm{sup 2}) but only 4/14 gel-protected ablations (mean surface area = 0.2 cm{sup 2}; p = 0.0005). The gel barrier remained stable at the injection site throughout power delivery.ConclusionWhen used as a hydrodissection material, P407 protected non-targeted tissues and was successfully maintained at the injection site for the duration of power application. Continued investigations to aid clinical translation appear warranted.

  18. Radiotherapy of inoperable lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Namer, M.; Lalanne, C.M.; Boublil, J.L.; Hery, M.; Chauvel, P.; Verschoore, J.; Aubanel, J.M.; Bruneton, J.N.

    1980-08-01

    Evaluation of loco-regional results obtained by radiotherapy for 31 patients with inoperable epidermoid lung cancer revealed objective remission (over 50%) in only 25% of patients. These results emphasize the limited effectiveness of radiotherapy in such cases and point out the need for increased research in radiotherapy techniques if survival rates are to be improved.

  19. A Review of Mitral Isthmus Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Kelvin CK; Betts, Timothy R

    2012-01-01

    Mitral isthmus ablation forms part of the electrophysiologist’s armoury in the catheter ablation treatment of atrial fibrillation. It is well recognised however, that mitral isthmus ablation is technically challenging and incomplete ablation may be pro-arrhythmic, leading some to question its role. This article first reviews the evidence for the use of adjunctive mitral isthmus ablation and its association with the development of macroreentrant perimitral flutter. It then describes the practical techniques of mitral isthmus ablation, with particular emphasis on the assessment of bi-directional mitral isthmus block. The anatomy of the mitral isthmus is also discussed in order to understand the possible obstacles to successful ablation. Finally, novel techniques which may facilitate mitral isthmus ablation are reviewed. PMID:22912536

  20. [Radiotherapy for brain metastases].

    PubMed

    Latorzeff, I; Antoni, D; Gaudaire-Josset, S; Feuvret, L; Tallet-Richard, A; Truc, G; Noël, G

    2016-09-01

    Radiotherapy for brain metastases has become more multifaceted. Indeed, with the improvement of the patient's life expectancy, side effects must be undeniably avoided and the retreatments or multiple treatments are common. The cognitive side effects should be warned and the most modern techniques of radiation therapy are used regularly to reach this goal. The new classifications of patients with brain metastases help guiding treatment more appropriately. Stereotactic radiotherapy has supplanted whole brain radiation therapy both for patients with metastases in place and for those who underwent surgery. Hippocampus protection is possible with intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Its relevance in terms of cognitive functioning should be more clearly demonstrated but the requirement, for using it, is increasingly strong. While addressing patients in palliative phase, the treatment of brain metastases is one of the localisations where technical thinking is the most challenging. PMID:27523410

  1. [Radiotherapy in Europe].

    PubMed

    Verheij, M; Slotman, B J

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy plays an important part in the curing of cancer patients and is an effective treatment for tumour-related symptoms. However, in many countries the level of access to this treatment modality is unacceptably low due to shortage of infrastructure, modern apparatus and trained staff. In Europe it is mainly the Eastern European countries that are behind in the provision of and accessibility to radiotherapy. Worldwide investment to narrow the gap would put an end to these undesirable differences. In addition, these investments would deliver economic benefits, especially in low-to-middle income countries. In this article, on the basis of a number of recently published reports, we discuss the differences that exist in the geographical spread of radiotherapy departments and the availability of apparatus within Europe. In conclusion we also take a short look at the Dutch situation. PMID:27334085

  2. Femtosecond lasers for machining of transparent, brittle materials: ablative vs. non-ablative femtosecond laser processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendricks, F.; Matylitsky, V. V.

    2016-03-01

    This paper focuses on precision machining of transparent materials by means of ablative and non-ablative femtosecond laser processing. Ablation technology will be compared with a newly developed patent pending non-ablative femtosecond process, ClearShapeTM, using the Spectra-Physics Spirit industrial femtosecond laser.

  3. Microwave ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Poggi, Guido; Tosoratti, Nevio; Montagna, Benedetta; Picchi, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    Although surgical resection is still the optimal treatment option for early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients with well compensated cirrhosis, thermal ablation techniques provide a valid non-surgical treatment alternative, thanks to their minimal invasiveness, excellent tolerability and safety profile, proven efficacy in local disease control, virtually unlimited repeatability and cost-effectiveness. Different energy sources are currently employed in clinics as physical agents for percutaneous or intra-surgical thermal ablation of HCC nodules. Among them, radiofrequency (RF) currents are the most used, while microwave ablations (MWA) are becoming increasingly popular. Starting from the 90s’, RF ablation (RFA) rapidly became the standard of care in ablation, especially in the treatment of small HCC nodules; however, RFA exhibits substantial performance limitations in the treatment of large lesions and/or tumors located near major heat sinks. MWA, first introduced in the Far Eastern clinical practice in the 80s’, showing promising results but also severe limitations in the controllability of the emitted field and in the high amount of power employed for the ablation of large tumors, resulting in a poor coagulative performance and a relatively high complication rate, nowadays shows better results both in terms of treatment controllability and of overall coagulative performance, thanks to the improvement of technology. In this review we provide an extensive and detailed overview of the key physical and technical aspects of MWA and of the currently available systems, and we want to discuss the most relevant published data on MWA treatments of HCC nodules in regard to clinical results and to the type and rate of complications, both in absolute terms and in comparison with RFA. PMID:26557950

  4. Surgical Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Ramlawi, Basel; Abu Saleh, Walid K

    2015-01-01

    The Cox-maze procedure for the restoration of normal sinus rhythm, initially developed by Dr. James Cox, underwent several iterations over the years. The main concept consists of creating a series of transmural lesions in the right and left atria that disrupt re-entrant circuits responsible for propagating the abnormal atrial fibrillation rhythm. The left atrial appendage is excluded as a component of the Maze procedure. For the first three iterations of the Cox- maze procedure, these lesions were performed using a surgical cut-and-sew approach that ensured transmurality. The Cox-Maze IV is the most currently accepted iteration. It achieves the same lesion set of the Cox- maze III but uses alternative energy sources to create the transmural lesions, potentially in a minimally invasive approach on the beating heart. High-frequency ultrasound, microwave, and laser energy have all been used with varying success in the past. Today, bipolar radiofrequency heat or cryotherapy cooling are the most accepted sources for creating linear lesions with consistent safety and transmurality. The robust and reliable nature of these energy delivery methods has yielded a success rate reaching 90% freedom from atrial fibrillation at 12 months. Such approaches offer a significant long-term advantage over catheter-based ablation, especially in patients having longstanding, persistent atrial fibrillation with characteristics such as dilated left atrial dimensions, poor ejection fraction, and failed catheter ablation. Based on these improved results, there currently is significant interest in developing a hybrid ablation strategy that incorporates the superior transmural robust lesions of surgical ablation, the reliable stroke prevention potential of epicardial left atrial appendage exclusion, and sophisticated mapping and confirmatory catheter-based ablation technology. Such a minimally invasive hybrid strategy for ablation may lead to the development of multidisciplinary "Afib teams" to

  5. Thermal Ablation of Lung Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sonntag, P. David; Hinshaw, J. Louis; Lubner, Meghan G.; Brace, Christopher L.; Lee, Fred T.

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer death in the United States, accounting for an estimated 29% of cancer deaths in 2009.1 Pneumonectomy or lobectomy with hilar and mediastinal lymph node sampling is the gold standard treatment and offers the best option for cure of stage 1/2 nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC).2 Unfortunately, only 15% of patients present with stage 1/2 disease, and many of these patients do not meet the pulmonary physiologic guidelines for lobar resection.3 In addition to lung cancer, pulmonary metastases are present in 25% to 30% of patients dying from all types of cancer.4 For some patients with oligometastatic pulmonary disease, metastectomy is associated with an improvement in survival.5 External beam radiation traditionally has been offered as the alternative to surgical resection for NSCLC or pulmonary metastatic disease. Unfortunately, the 5-year survival following radiation for stage 1 and 2 NSCLC remains low at 15% to 20%, with local recurrence being the most common mode of failure.6,7 Thermal ablation offers an intriguing therapeutic option to increase local tumor control and survival in patients with early stage NSCLC or with limited metastatic disease from nonlung primaries who are not surgical candidates because of poor cardiopulmonary reserve, anatomic constraints limiting resection, failure of traditional therapies, or refusal of operative approaches. Thermal ablation has been shown to be effective in treating tumors in bone, kidney, and liver.8–11 Most preclinical and clinical trials have focused on demonstrating the feasibility of three modalities for pulmonary thermal ablation, namely radiofrequency (RF) ablation, microwave (MW) ablation, and cryoablation. This article discusses the unique challenges of performing thermal ablation in lung tissue and reviews the current literature regarding RF, MW, and cryoablation in the lung. PMID:21377589

  6. Microwave ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Poggi, Guido; Tosoratti, Nevio; Montagna, Benedetta; Picchi, Chiara

    2015-11-01

    Although surgical resection is still the optimal treatment option for early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients with well compensated cirrhosis, thermal ablation techniques provide a valid non-surgical treatment alternative, thanks to their minimal invasiveness, excellent tolerability and safety profile, proven efficacy in local disease control, virtually unlimited repeatability and cost-effectiveness. Different energy sources are currently employed in clinics as physical agents for percutaneous or intra-surgical thermal ablation of HCC nodules. Among them, radiofrequency (RF) currents are the most used, while microwave ablations (MWA) are becoming increasingly popular. Starting from the 90s', RF ablation (RFA) rapidly became the standard of care in ablation, especially in the treatment of small HCC nodules; however, RFA exhibits substantial performance limitations in the treatment of large lesions and/or tumors located near major heat sinks. MWA, first introduced in the Far Eastern clinical practice in the 80s', showing promising results but also severe limitations in the controllability of the emitted field and in the high amount of power employed for the ablation of large tumors, resulting in a poor coagulative performance and a relatively high complication rate, nowadays shows better results both in terms of treatment controllability and of overall coagulative performance, thanks to the improvement of technology. In this review we provide an extensive and detailed overview of the key physical and technical aspects of MWA and of the currently available systems, and we want to discuss the most relevant published data on MWA treatments of HCC nodules in regard to clinical results and to the type and rate of complications, both in absolute terms and in comparison with RFA. PMID:26557950

  7. Radiotherapy for lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bleehen, N.M.; Cox, J.D.

    1985-05-01

    The role of radiation therapy in the management of lung cancer was reviewed at a workshop held in Cambridge, England, in June 1984. It was concluded that there was a continuing role for radiation therapy in the primary management of small cell lung cancer, including the loco-regional treatment for patients with limited disease. Radical radiotherapy for patients with non-small cell carcinoma could be curative for a proportion of patients with limited disease. Careful planning and quality control was essential. Palliative radiotherapy provided useful treatment for many other patients. Other related aspects of treatment are also presented.

  8. Role of Radiotherapy and Newer Techniques in the Treatment of GI Cancers.

    PubMed

    Hajj, Carla; Goodman, Karyn A

    2015-06-01

    The role of radiotherapy in multidisciplinary treatment of GI malignancies is well established. Recent advances in imaging as well as radiotherapy planning and delivery techniques have made it possible to target tumors more accurately while sparing normal tissues. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy is an advanced method of delivering radiation using cutting-edge technology to manipulate beams of radiation. The role of intensity-modulated radiotherapy is growing for many GI malignancies, such as cancers of the stomach, pancreas, esophagus, liver, and anus. Stereotactic body radiotherapy is an emerging treatment option for some GI tumors such as locally advanced pancreatic cancer and primary or metastatic tumors of the liver. Stereotactic body radiotherapy requires a high degree of confidence in tumor location and subcentimeter accuracy of the delivered dose. New image-guided techniques have been developed to overcome setup uncertainties at the time of treatment, including real-time imaging on the linear accelerator. Modern imaging techniques have also allowed for more accurate pretreatment staging and delineation of the primary tumor and involved sites. In particular, magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography scans can be particularly useful in radiotherapy planning and assessing treatment response. Molecular biomarkers are being investigated as predictors of response to radiotherapy with the intent of ultimately moving toward using genomic and proteomic determinants of therapeutic strategies. The role of all of these new approaches in the radiotherapeutic management of GI cancers and the evolving role of radiotherapy in these tumor sites will be highlighted in this review. PMID:25918298

  9. Transhemangioma Ablation of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Pua, Uei

    2012-12-15

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a well-established treatment modality in the treatment of early hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) [1]. Safe trajectory of the RFA probe is crucial in decreasing collateral tissue damage and unwarranted probe transgression. As a percutaneous technique, however, the trajectory of the needle is sometimes constrained by the available imaging plane. The presence of a hemangioma beside an HCC is uncommon but poses the question of safety related to probe transgression. We hereby describe a case of transhemangioma ablation of a dome HCC.

  10. Laser ablation of human tooth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franklin, Sushmita R.; Chauhan, P.; Mitra, A.; Thareja, R. K.

    2005-05-01

    We report the measurements of ablation threshold of human tooth in air using photo-thermal deflection technique. A third harmonic (355nm) of Nd:YAG (yttrium aluminum garnet) laser was used for irradiation and a low power helium neon laser as a probe beam. The experimental observations of ablation threshold in conjunction with theoretical model based on heat conduction equations for simulating the interaction of a laser radiation with a calcified tissue are used to estimate the absorption coefficient of human tooth.

  11. Tektite ablation - Some confirming calculations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Keefe, J. A., III; Silver, A. D.; Cameron, W. S.; Adams , E. W.; Warmbrod, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    The calculation of tektite ablation has been redone, taking into account transient effects, internal radiation, melting and nonequilibrium vaporization of the glass, and the drag effect of the flanges. It is found that the results confirm the earlier calculations of Chapman and his group and of Adams and his co-workers. The general trend of the results is not sensitive to reasonable changes of the physical parameters. The ablation is predominantly by melting rather than by vaporization at all velocities up to 11 km/sec; this is surprising in view of the lack of detectable melt flow in most tektites. Chemical effects have not been considered.

  12. Ablative Therapies for Barrett's Esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Garman, Katherine S.; Shaheen, Nicholas J.

    2011-01-01

    Barrett's esophagus has gained increased clinical attention because of its association with esophageal adenocarcinoma, a cancer with increasing incidence and poor survival rates. The goals of ablating Barrett's esophagus are to decrease esophageal cancer rates and to improve overall survival and quality of life. Different techniques have been developed and tested for their effectiveness eradicating Barrett's epithelium. This review assesses the literature associated with different ablative techniques. The safety and efficacy of different techniques are discussed. This review concludes with recommendations for the clinician, including specific strategies for patient care decisions for patients with Barrett's esophagus with varying degrees of dysplasia. PMID:21373836

  13. Laser ablation based fuel ignition

    DOEpatents

    Early, J.W.; Lester, C.S.

    1998-06-23

    There is provided a method of fuel/oxidizer ignition comprising: (a) application of laser light to a material surface which is absorptive to the laser radiation; (b) heating of the material surface with the laser light to produce a high temperature ablation plume which emanates from the heated surface as an intensely hot cloud of vaporized surface material; and (c) contacting the fuel/oxidizer mixture with the hot ablation cloud at or near the surface of the material in order to heat the fuel to a temperature sufficient to initiate fuel ignition. 3 figs.

  14. Laser ablation based fuel ignition

    DOEpatents

    Early, James W.; Lester, Charles S.

    1998-01-01

    There is provided a method of fuel/oxidizer ignition comprising: (a) application of laser light to a material surface which is absorptive to the laser radiation; (b) heating of the material surface with the laser light to produce a high temperature ablation plume which emanates from the heated surface as an intensely hot cloud of vaporized surface material; and (c) contacting the fuel/oxidizer mixture with the hot ablation cloud at or near the surface of the material in order to heat the fuel to a temperature sufficient to initiate fuel ignition.

  15. Atrial Fibrillation Ablation and Stroke.

    PubMed

    Aagaard, Philip; Briceno, David; Csanadi, Zoltan; Mohanty, Sanghamitra; Gianni, Carola; Trivedi, Chintan; Nagy-Baló, Edina; Danik, Stephan; Barrett, Conor; Santoro, Francesco; Burkhardt, J David; Sanchez, Javier; Natale, Andrea; Di Biase, Luigi

    2016-05-01

    Catheter ablation has become a widely available and accepted treatment to restore sinus rhythm in atrial fibrillation patients who fail antiarrhythmic drug therapy. Although generally safe, the procedure carries a non-negligible risk of complications, including periprocedural cerebral insults. Uninterrupted anticoagulation, maintenance of an adequate ACT during the procedure, and measures to avoid and detect thrombus build-up on sheaths and atheters during the procedure, appears useful to reduce the risk of embolic events. This is a review of the incidence, mechanisms, impact, and methods to reduce catheter ablation related cerebral insults. PMID:27150179

  16. Healing responses following cryothermic and hyperthermic tissue ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godwin, Braden L.; Coad, James E.

    2009-02-01

    Minimally invasive, thermally ablative, interventional technologies have been changing the practice of medicine since before the turn of the 20th century. More recently, cryothermic and hyperthermic therapies have expanded in terms of their spectrum of thermal generators, modes for controlling and monitoring the treatment zone and both benign and malignant medical applications. The final tissue, and hence clinical outcome, of a thermal ablation is determined by the summation of direct primary (thermal) and secondary (apoptosis, ischemia, free radical, inflammation, wound healing, etc.) injury followed by possible cellular regeneration and scar formation. The initial thermal lesion can be broadly divided into two major zones of cellular death: 1) the complete ablation zone closer to the thermal source and 2) the peripheral transition zone with a decreasing gradient of cell death. While not applicable to cryotherapy, hyperthermic complete ablation zones are subdivided into two zones: 1) thermal or heat fixation and 2) coagulative necrosis. It is important to clearly differentiate these tissue zones because of their substantially different healing responses. Therefore, the development of clinically successful thermal therapies requires an understanding of tissue healing responses. The healing responses can be affected by a number of additional factors such as the tissue's anatomy, organ specific healing differences, blood supply, protein vs. lipid content, and other factors. Thus, effective biomedical instrument development requires both an understanding of thermal cell injury/death and the body's subsequent healing responses. This paper provides a general overview of the healing pathways that follow thermal tissue treatment.

  17. Measurement of neutron ambient dose equivalent in passive carbon-ion and proton radiotherapies

    SciTech Connect

    Yonai, Shunsuke; Matsufuji, Naruhiro; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Matsui, Yuki; Matsushita, Kaoru; Yamashita, Haruo; Numano, Masumi; Sakae, Takeji; Terunuma, Toshiyuki; Nishio, Teiji; Kohno, Ryosuke; Akagi, Takashi

    2008-11-15

    Secondary neutron ambient dose equivalents per the treatment absorbed dose in passive carbon-ion and proton radiotherapies were measured using a rem meter, WENDI-II at two carbon-ion radiotherapy facilities and four proton radiotherapy facilities in Japan. Our measured results showed that (1) neutron ambient dose equivalent in carbon-ion radiotherapy is lower than that in proton radiotherapy, and (2) the difference to the measured neutron ambient dose equivalents among the facilities is within a factor of 3 depending on the operational beam setting used at the facility and the arrangement of the beam line, regardless of the method for making a laterally uniform irradiation field: the double scattering method or the single-ring wobbling method. The reoptimization of the beam line in passive particle radiotherapy is an effective way to reduce the risk of secondary cancer because installing an adjustable precollimator and designing the beam line devices with consideration of their material, thickness and location, etc., can significantly reduce the neutron exposure. It was also found that the neutron ambient dose equivalent in passive particle radiotherapy is equal to or less than that in the photon radiotherapy. This result means that not only scanning particle radiotherapy but also passive particle radiotherapy can provide reduced exposure to normal tissues around the target volume without an accompanied increase in total body dose.

  18. Recombinant TSH Stimulated Remnant Ablation Therapy in Thyroid Cancer: The Success Rate Depends on the Definition of Ablation Success—An Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    van der Horst-Schrivers, Anouk N. A.; Sluiter, Wim J.; Muller Kobold, Anneke C.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. R.; Plukker, John T. M.; Bisschop, Peter H.; de Klerk, John M.; Al Younis, Imad; Lips, Paul; Smit, Jan W.; Brouwers, Adrienne H.; Links, Thera P.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) are treated with (near)-total thyroidectomy followed by remnant ablation. Optimal radioiodine-131 (131I) uptake is achieved by withholding thyroid hormone (THW), pretreatment with recombinant human Thyrotropin Stimulating Hormone (rhTSH) is an alternative. Six randomized trials have been published comparing THW and rhTSH, however comparison is difficult because an uniform definition of ablation success is lacking. Using a strict definition, we performed an observational study aiming to determine the efficacy of rhTSH as preparation for remnant ablation. Patients and Methods Adult DTC patients with, tumor stage T1b to T3, Nx, N0 and N1, M0 were included in a prospective multicenter observational study with a fully sequential design, using a stopping rule. All patients received remnant ablation with 131I using rhTSH. Ablation success was defined as no visible uptake in the original thyroid bed on a rhTSH stimulated 150 MBq 131I whole body scan (WBS) 9 months after remnant ablation, or no visible uptake in the original thyroid bed on a post therapeutic WBS when a second high dose was necessary. Results After interim analysis of the first 8 patients, the failure rate was estimated to be 69% (90% confidence interval (CI) 20-86%) and the inclusion of new patients had to be stopped. Final analysis resulted in an ablation success in 11 out of 17 patients (65%, 95% CI 38-86%). Conclusion According to this study, the efficacy of rhTSH in the preparation of 131I ablation therapy is inferior, when using a strict definition of ablation success. The current lack of agreement as to the definition of successful remnant ablation, makes comparison between different ablation strategies difficult. Our results point to the need for an international consensus on the definition of ablation success, not only in routine patient’s care but also for scientific reasons. Trial Registration Dutch Trial Registration NTR2395 PMID

  19. Radiofrequency ablation during continuous saline infusion can extend ablation margins

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Toru; Kubota, Tomoyuki; Horigome, Ryoko; Kimura, Naruhiro; Honda, Hiroki; Iwanaga, Akito; Seki, Keiichi; Honma, Terasu; Yoshida, Toshiaki

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether fluid injection during radiofrequency ablation (RFA) can increase the coagulation area. METHODS: Bovine liver (1-2 kg) was placed on an aluminum tray with a return electrode affixed to the base, and the liver was punctured by an expandable electrode. During RFA, 5% glucose; 50% glucose; or saline fluid was infused continuously at a rate of 1.0 mL/min through the infusion line connected to the infusion port. The area and volume of the thermocoagulated region of bovine liver were determined after RFA. The Joule heat generated was determined from the temporal change in output during the RFA experiment. RESULTS: No liquid infusion was 17.3 ± 1.6 mL, similar to the volume of a 3-cm diameter sphere (14.1 mL). Mean thermocoagulated volume was significantly larger with continuous infusion of saline (29.3 ± 3.3 mL) than with 5% glucose (21.4 ± 2.2 mL), 50% glucose (16.5 ± 0.9 mL) or no liquid infusion (17.3 ± 1.6 mL). The ablated volume for RFA with saline was approximately 1.7-times greater than for RFA with no liquid infusion, representing a significant difference between these two conditions. Total Joule heat generated during RFA was highest with saline, and lowest with 50% glucose. CONCLUSION: RFA with continuous saline infusion achieves a large ablation zone, and may help inhibit local recurrence by obtaining sufficient ablation margins. RFA during continuous saline infusion can extend ablation margins, and may be prevent local recurrence. PMID:23483097

  20. Emission spectroscopy analysis during Nopal cladodes dethorning by laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peña-Díaz, M.; Ponce, L.; Arronte, M.; Flores, T.

    2007-04-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy of the pulsed laser ablation of spines and glochids from Opuntia (Nopal) cladodes was performed. Nopal cladodes were irradiated with Nd:YAG free-running laser pulses on their body, glochids and spines. Emission spectroscopy analyses in the 350-1000 nm region of the laser induced plasma were made. Plasma plume evolution characterization, theoretical calculations of plasma plume temperature and experiments varying the processing atmosphere showed that the process is dominated by a thermally activated combustion reaction which increases the dethorning process efficiency. Therefore, appropriate laser pulse energy for minimal damage of cladodes body and in the area beneath glochids and spines can be obtained.

  1. Prevention of immediate recurrence of atrial fibrillation with low-dose landiolol after radiofrequency catheter ablation

    PubMed Central

    Ishigaki, Daisuke; Arimoto, Takanori; Iwayama, Tadateru; Hashimoto, Naoaki; Kutsuzawa, Daisuke; Kumagai, Yu; Nishiyama, Satoshi; Takahashi, Hiroki; Shishido, Tetsuro; Miyamoto, Takuya; Watanabe, Tetsu; Kubota, Isao

    2015-01-01

    Background Immediate recurrence of atrial fibrillation (AF) after radiofrequency (RF) catheter ablation is commonly observed within 3 d after the procedure. The mechanism and pharmacological management of immediate AF recurrence remain unclear. Methods A total of 50 consecutive patients with paroxysmal AF were randomized to receive either low-dose landiolol (landiolol group) or a placebo (placebo group). In the landiolol group, intravenous landiolol (0.5 μg kg−1 min−1) was administered for 3 d after AF ablation. Results No serious adverse event associated with RF catheter ablation or landiolol administration was observed. The prevalence of immediate AF recurrence (≤3 d after RF catheter ablation) was significantly lower in the landiolol group than in the placebo group (16% vs. 48%, p=0.015). Although the postprocedural change in heart rate was significantly lower in the landiolol group compared to that in the placebo group, the changes in blood pressure and body temperature were not different between the two groups. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that landiolol treatment was the only independent predictor of immediate AF recurrence after ablation (odds ratio: 0.180; 95% confidence interval: 0.044–0.729; p=0.016). Conclusions Prophylactic administration of low-dose landiolol after AF ablation may be effective and safe for preventing immediate AF recurrence within 3 d after AF ablation. PMID:26550083

  2. Particle-based ablation model for faint meteors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stokan, E.; Campbell-Brown, M.

    2014-07-01

    Modeling the ablation of meteoroids as they enter the atmosphere is a way of determining their physical structure and elemental composition. This can provide insight into the structure of parent bodies when combined with an orbit computed from observations. The Canadian Automated Meteor Observatory (CAMO) is a source of new, high-resolution observations of faint meteors [1]. These faint objects tend to have pre-atmospheric masses around 10^{-5} kg, corresponding to a radius of 1 mm. A wide-field camera with a 28° field of view provides guidance to a high-resolution camera that tracks meteors in flight with 1.5° field of view. Meteors are recorded with a scale of 4 m per pixel at a range of 135 km, at 110 frames per second, allowing us to investigate detailed meteor morphology. This serves as an important new constraint for ablation models, in addition to meteor brightness (lightcurves) and meteoroid deceleration. High-resolution observations of faint meteors have revealed that contemporary ablation models are not able to predict meteor morphology, even while matching the observed lightcurve and meteoroid deceleration [2]. This implies that other physical processes, in addition to fragmentation, must be considered for faint meteor ablation. We present a new, particle-based approach to modeling the ablation of small meteoroids. In this model, we simulate the collisions between atmospheric particles and the meteoroid to determine the rate of evaporation and deceleration. Subsequent collisions simulated between evaporated meteoroid particles and ambient atmospheric particles then produce light that would be observed by high-resolution cameras. Preliminary results show simultaneous agreement with meteor morphology, lightcurves, and decelerations recorded with CAMO. A sample comparison of simulated and observed meteor morphology is given in the attached figure. Several meteoroids are well-represented as solid, stony bodies, but some require modeling as a dustball [3

  3. Percutaneous Tumor Ablation with Radiofrequency

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Bradford J.; Ramkaransingh, Jeffrey R.; Fojo, Tito; Walther, McClellan M.; Libutti, Stephen K.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND Radiofrequency thermal ablation (RFA) is a new minimally invasive treatment for localized cancer. Minimally invasive surgical options require less resources, time, recovery, and cost, and often offer reduced morbidity and mortality, compared with more invasive methods. To be useful, image-guided, minimally invasive, local treatments will have to meet those expectations without sacrificing efficacy. METHODS Image-guided, local cancer treatment relies on the assumption that local disease control may improve survival. Recent developments in ablative techniques are being applied to patients with inoperable, small, or solitary liver tumors, recurrent metachronous hereditary renal cell carcinoma, and neoplasms in the bone, lung, breast, and adrenal gland. RESULTS Recent refinements in ablation technology enable large tumor volumes to be treated with image-guided needle placement, either percutaneously, laparoscopically, or with open surgery. Local disease control potentially could result in improved survival, or enhanced operability. CONCLUSIONS Consensus indications in oncology are ill-defined, despite widespread proliferation of the technology. A brief review is presented of the current status of image-guided tumor ablation therapy. More rigorous scientific review, long-term follow-up, and randomized prospective trials are needed to help define the role of RFA in oncology. PMID:11900230

  4. Modern Advances in Ablative TPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatapathy, Ethiraj

    2013-01-01

    Topics covered include: Physics of Hypersonic Flow and TPS Considerations. Destinations, Missions and Requirements. State of the Art Thermal Protection Systems Capabilities. Modern Advances in Ablative TPS. Entry Systems Concepts. Flexible TPS for Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerators. Conformal TPS for Rigid Aeroshell. 3-D Woven TPS for Extreme Entry Environment. Multi-functional Carbon Fabric for Mechanically Deployable.

  5. Photochemical Ablation of Organic Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrison, Barbara

    2004-03-01

    As discovered by Srinivasan in 1982, irradiation of materials by far UV laser light can lead to photochemical ablation, a process distinct from normal thermal ablation in which the laser primarily heats the material. A versatile mesoscopic model for molecular dynamics simulations of the laser ablation phenomena is presented. The model incorporates both the thermal and photochemical events, that is, both heating of the system and UV induced bond-cleavage followed by abstraction and radical-radical recombination reactions. The results from the simulations are compared to experimental data and the basic physics and chemistry for each irradiation regime are discussed. Initial results from polymer ablation simulations will be presented. L. V. Zhigilei, P. B. S. Kodali and B. J. Garrison, J. Phys. Chem. B, 102, 2845-2853 (1998); L. V. Zhigilei and B. J. Garrison, Journal of Applied Physics, 88, 1281-1298 (2000). Y. G. Yingling, L. V. Zhigilei and B. J. Garrison, J. Photochemistry and Photobiology A: Chemistry, 145, 173-181 (2001); Y. G. Yingling and B. J. Garrison, Chem. Phys. Lett., 364, 237-243 (2002).

  6. Electron Beam Ablation of Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovaleski, S. D.; Gilgenbach, R. M.; Rintamaki, J. I.; Ang, L. K.; Spindler, H. L.; Cohen, W. E.; Lau, Y. Y.; Lash, J. S.

    1996-10-01

    An experiment has recently been devised for material ablation using a channelspark electron beam. The ultimate goal of this experiment is to deposit thin films by electron beam ablation. The channelspark is a pseudospark device developed by Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (G. Muller, C. Schultheiss, Proc. of Beams, 2, 833(1994)) for production of high current, low energy electron beams. The channelspark has the following operating parameters: a 15-20kV accelerating potential and measured source current of <2000A. Initial experiments have concentrated on characterizing ion-focused electron beam current transport through the necessary background fill gas (typically 5-50 mTorr of Argon). Ablation of Al, Fe, and Ti is being studied with spectroscopy and electron beam current diagnostics. Physical beam target damage is also being investigated and compared to laser ablated targets. Simulations of electron transport and energy deposition are being conducted via the ITS-TIGER code (Sandia Report No. SAND 91-1634) developed at Sandia National Laboratory.

  7. Photophysical ablation of porous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksenov, Valerii P.; Mikhailova, G. N.

    2004-07-01

    Laser ablation of porous silicon as a function of laser wavelength and width of silicon nanowires was studied in our experiments. The time-resolved evolution of the cloud of the porous silicon particles produced by laser ablation is studied in situ by the analysis of the kinetics of photoluminescence signal. The laser ablation of porous silicon produced by pulses of 532 nm or 337 nm radiation with addition of synchronized power pulses of 1064 nm radiation. The cloud of the nanometer-sized silicon crystallites had the high enhancement of luminescence quantum efficiency in the red region of spectra. The slow PL kinetics component, which is due to the localized carriers, decays on a millisecond time scale. The squeezed electron-hole plasma heating by IR-laser radiation may produce a damage of silicon nanowires. The fragments of nanowires in cloud must be smaller, than the critical length. The energy of excitation of e-h pair in fragment with contribution of longitude quantum modes must be lower than energy of the excited photons. Particles with lesser length don't absorb excited laser radiation and don't damage. For this case we may speak about the quantum mechanism of laser ablation of nanowires.

  8. Cold Atmospheric Plasma for Selectively Ablating Metastatic Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mian; Holmes, Benjamin; Cheng, Xiaoqian; Zhu, Wei; Keidar, Michael; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2013-01-01

    Traditional breast cancer treatments such as surgery and radiotherapy contain many inherent limitations with regards to incomplete and nonselective tumor ablation. Cold atomospheric plasma (CAP) is an ionized gas where the ion temperature is close to room temperature. It contains electrons, charged particles, radicals, various excited molecules, UV photons and transient electric fields. These various compositional elements have the potential to either enhance and promote cellular activity, or disrupt and destroy them. In particular, based on this unique composition, CAP could offer a minimally-invasive surgical approach allowing for specific cancer cell or tumor tissue removal without influencing healthy cells. Thus, the objective of this research is to investigate a novel CAP-based therapy for selectively bone metastatic breast cancer treatment. For this purpose, human metastatic breast cancer (BrCa) cells and bone marrow derived human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were separately treated with CAP, and behavioral changes were evaluated after 1, 3, and 5 days of culture. With different treatment times, different BrCa and MSC cell responses were observed. Our results showed that BrCa cells were more sensitive to these CAP treatments than MSCs under plasma dose conditions tested. It demonstrated that CAP can selectively ablate metastatic BrCa cells in vitro without damaging healthy MSCs at the metastatic bone site. In addition, our study showed that CAP treatment can significantly inhibit the migration and invasion of BrCa cells. The results suggest the great potential of CAP for breast cancer therapy. PMID:24040051

  9. Effective Rat Lung Tumor Model for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhang; Wodzak, Michelle; Belzile, Olivier; Zhou, Heling; Sishc, Brock; Yan, Hao; Stojadinovic, Strahinja; Mason, Ralph P; Brekken, Rolf A; Chopra, Rajiv; Story, Michael D; Timmerman, Robert; Saha, Debabrata

    2016-06-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has found an important role in the treatment of patients with non-small cell lung cancer, demonstrating improvements in dose distribution and even tumor cure rates, particularly for early-stage disease. Despite its emerging clinical efficacy, SBRT has primarily evolved due to advances in medical imaging and more accurate dose delivery, leaving a void in knowledge of the fundamental biological mechanisms underlying its activity. Thus, there is a critical need for the development of orthotropic animal models to further probe the biology associated with high-dose-per-fraction treatment typical of SBRT. We report here on an improved surgically based methodology for generating solitary intrapulmonary nodule tumors, which can be treated with simulated SBRT using the X-RAD 225Cx small animal irradiator and Small Animal RadioTherapy (SmART) Plan treatment system. Over 90% of rats developed solitary tumors in the right lung. Furthermore, the tumor response to radiation was monitored noninvasively via bioluminescence imaging (BLI), and complete ablation of tumor growth was achieved with 36 Gy (3 fractions of 12 Gy each). We report a reproducible, orthotopic, clinically relevant lung tumor model, which better mimics patient treatment regimens. This system can be utilized to further explore the underlying biological mechanisms relevant to SBRT and high-dose-per-fraction radiation exposure and to provide a useful model to explore the efficacy of radiation modifiers in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer. PMID:27223828

  10. Nutritional consequences of the radiotherapy of head and neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chencharick, J.D.; Mossman, K.L.

    1983-03-01

    Nutrition-related complications of radiotherapy were evaluated in 74 head and neck cancer patients. Subjective changes of mouth dryness, taste, dysphagia, appetite, and food preferences were determined by questionnaire before and at weekly intervals during curative radiotherapy. Changes in body weight during therapy were also recorded. In addition, 24-hour dietary histories were taken from eight patients at the beginning and end of treatment. Results of the study indicate that patients were subjectively aware of nutritional problems prior to therapy and that therapy exacerbated these problems. As many as 25% of the patients experienced oral complications such as taste loss and/or dry mouth prior to initiation of radiotherapy. By the end of radiotherapy, over 80% of the patients were aware of oral and nutritional problems. Patients had an average weight loss of 5 kg prior to therapy; this loss of weight did not change during therapy. Diet histories of eight patients indicate significant caloric deficiencies early and late in radiotherapy. The oral and nutritional problems experienced by patients, even prior to therapy, support the idea that nutritional evaluation and maintenance are important not only during therapy, but prior to radiotherapy as well. Nutritional evaluation should be made a routine, integral part of therapy for every cancer patient.

  11. Esophageal papilloma: Flexible endoscopic ablation by radiofrequency

    PubMed Central

    del Genio, Gianmattia; del Genio, Federica; Schettino, Pietro; Limongelli, Paolo; Tolone, Salvatore; Brusciano, Luigi; Avellino, Manuela; Vitiello, Chiara; Docimo, Giovanni; Pezzullo, Angelo; Docimo, Ludovico

    2015-01-01

    Squamous papilloma of the esophagus is a rare benign lesion of the esophagus. Radiofrequency ablation is an established endoscopic technique for the eradication of Barrett esophagus. No cases of endoscopic ablation of esophageal papilloma by radiofrequency ablation (RFA) have been reported. We report a case of esophageal papilloma successfully treated with a single session of radiofrequency ablation. Endoscopic ablation of the lesion was achieved by radiofrequency using a new catheter inserted through the working channel of endoscope. The esophageal ablated tissue was removed by a specifically designed cup. Complete ablation was confirmed at 3 mo by endoscopy with biopsies. This case supports feasibility and safety of as a new potential indication for BarrxTM RFA in patients with esophageal papilloma. PMID:25789102

  12. The use of dual vacuum stabilization device to reduce kidney motion for stereotactic radiotherapy planning.

    PubMed

    Pham, Daniel; Kron, Tomas; Styles, Colin; Whitaker, May; Bressel, Mathias; Foroudi, Farshad; Schneider, Michal; Devereux, Thomas; Dang, Kim; Siva, Shankar

    2015-04-01

    Abdominal stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy is aided by motion management strategies to ensure accurate dose delivery as targets such as the kidney are easily influenced by breathing motion. Commercial devices such as compression plates and dual vacuum technology have been demonstrated to reduce the motion of lung and liver tumors. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a dual vacuum system in reducing kidney motion as well to investigate any relationship between abdominal wall motions with kidney motion. Ten healthy volunteers were set up with and without vacuum compression (Elekta BodyFIX(TM)) to simulate free and dampened breathing. Ultrasound imaging was used to visualize kidney motion at the same time an abdominal surface marker was monitored using infrared imaging (Varian, Real Time Position Management). The resulting kidney and abdominal motion tracks were imported into motion analysis (Physmo(TM)) and custom built software (Matlab) to calculate amplitude of motion independent of shifting baselines. Thirty-four kidney datasets were available for analysis, with six datasets unable to be retrieved. With vacuum compression six out of nine participants showed a mean reduction of kidney motion ranging between 1.6 and 8 mm (p < 0.050). One participant showed an increase in motion of 8.2 mm (p < 0.001) with vacuum compression. Two participants showed no significant change (<1 mm) in kidney motion. No relationship was observed for abdominal wall motion and motion changes in the left kidney (r = 0.345, p = 0.402) or right kidney (r = 0.527, p = 0.145). Vacuum compression reduced kidney motion in the majority of participants; however larger breathing motion can also result from its use. No pattern emerged regarding which patients may benefit from vacuum immobilization as abdominal wall motion was not found to be an adequate surrogate for kidney motion. PMID:24502551

  13. The role of cold volcanic debris in glacier ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, L. K.; Gilbert, J. S.; Lane, S. J.

    2011-12-01

    Debris deposits on ice can either enhance or hinder glacial ablation relative to a clean ice surface. The effect of debris on ice is dependent on whether its thickness is above or below a critical thickness. This is the thickness at which ablation of the underlying ice equates to that of bare ice. It is dependent on the properties of the debris material, as well as local conditions. The small amount of published data available indicate that volcanic deposits have lower critical thickness values than non-volcanic deposits at similar latitudes and altitudes, suggesting that they are more effective insulators. Volcanic ash fall events are significant for glacial ablation because (1) they mantle topography and distribute well-sorted material over a wide area, and (2) the locations of Earth's glaciers often coincide with regions of active volcanism; at least 280 active volcanoes have ice or snow cover. At ice-capped volcanoes, volcanic material will also be deposited on glaciers by erosion and aeolian remobilisation. Volcán Sollipulli is an active, ice-filled caldera volcano in southern Chile (38.97°S:71.52°W) which last erupted 700 years ago. Satellite imagery and comparisons of field photographs show that the intra-caldera ice body is receding. The Sollipulli glacier is a local water resource and an increase in melting rate could produce lahars. Sollipulli lies between Llaima and Villarrica, two of the most active volcanoes in Chile, and the potential for its glacier to receive ablation-changing ash fall from other volcanoes in the Southern Volcanic Zone of the Andes is high. Indeed, it has in June-July 2011 received ash fall from Puyehue-Cordón Caulle volcano to the south. It is, therefore, important to understand the ice ablation effects of volcanic debris deposited both at Sollipulli and on glaciers worldwide. In February-March 2011, field experiments were conducted on the surface of Sollipulli glacier, on both ice and snow, in order to determine critical

  14. A critical review of recent developments in radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Baker, Sarah; Dahele, Max; Lagerwaard, Frank J; Senan, Suresh

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality, and radiotherapy plays a key role in both curative and palliative treatments for this disease. Recent advances include stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR), which is now established as a curative-intent treatment option for patients with peripheral early-stage NSCLC who are medically inoperable, or at high risk for surgical complications. Improved delivery techniques have facilitated studies evaluating the role of SABR in oligometastatic NSCLC, and encouraged the use of high-technology radiotherapy in some palliative settings. Although outcomes in locally advanced NSCLC remain disappointing for many patients, future progress may come about from an improved understanding of disease biology and the development of radiotherapy approaches that further reduce normal tissue irradiation. At the moment, the benefits, if any, of radiotherapy technologies such as proton beam therapy remain unproven. This paper provides a critical review of selected aspects of modern radiotherapy for lung cancer, highlights the current limitations in our understanding and treatment approaches, and discuss future treatment strategies for NSCLC. PMID:27600665

  15. [Catheter ablation of persistent atrial fibrillation : pulmonary vein isolation, ablation of fractionated electrograms, stepwise approach or rotor ablation?].

    PubMed

    Scherr, D

    2015-02-01

    Catheter ablation is an established treatment option for patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). In paroxysmal AF ablation, pulmonary vein isolation alone is a well-defined procedural endpoint, leading to success rates of up to 80% with multiple procedures over 5 years of follow-up. The success rate in persistent AF ablation is significantly more limited. This is partly due to the rudimentary understanding of the substrate maintaining persistent AF. Three main pathophysiological concepts for this arrhythmia exist: the multiple wavelet hypothesis, the concept of focal triggers, mainly located in the pulmonary veins and the rotor hypothesis. However, the targets and endpoints of persistent AF ablation are ill-defined and there is no consensus on the optimal ablation strategy in these patients. Based on these concepts, several ablation approaches for persistent AF have emerged: pulmonary vein isolation, the stepwise approach (i.e. pulmonary vein isolation, ablation of fractionated electrograms and linear ablation), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and rotor-based approaches. Currently, persistent AF ablation is a second-line therapy option to restore and maintain sinus rhythm. Several factors, such as the presence of structural heart disease, duration of persistent AF and dilatation and possibly also the degree of fibrosis of the left atrium should influence the decision to perform persistent AF ablation. PMID:25687615

  16. Microwave Ablation Compared with Radiofrequency Ablation for Breast Tissue in an Ex Vivo Bovine Udder Model

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Toshihiro; Westphal, Saskia; Isfort, Peter; Braunschweig, Till; Penzkofer, Tobias Bruners, Philipp; Kichikawa, Kimihiko; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas Mahnken, Andreas H.

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: To compare the effectiveness of microwave (MW) ablation with radiofrequency (RF) ablation for treating breast tissue in a nonperfused ex vivo model of healthy bovine udder tissue. Materials and Methods: MW ablations were performed at power outputs of 25W, 35W, and 45W using a 915-MHz frequency generator and a 2-cm active tip antenna. RF ablations were performed with a bipolar RF system with 2- and 3-cm active tip electrodes. Tissue temperatures were continuously monitored during ablation. Results: The mean short-axis diameters of the coagulation zones were 1.34 {+-} 0.14, 1.45 {+-} 0.13, and 1.74 {+-} 0.11 cm for MW ablation at outputs of 25W, 35W, and 45W. For RF ablation, the corresponding values were 1.16 {+-} 0.09 and 1.26 {+-} 0.14 cm with electrodes having 2- and 3-cm active tips, respectively. The mean coagulation volumes were 2.27 {+-} 0.65, 2.85 {+-} 0.72, and 4.45 {+-} 0.47 cm{sup 3} for MW ablation at outputs of 25W, 35W, and 45W and 1.18 {+-} 0.30 and 2.29 {+-} 0.55 cm{sup 3} got RF ablation with 2- and 3-cm electrodes, respectively. MW ablations at 35W and 45W achieved significantly longer short-axis diameters than RF ablations (P < 0.05). The highest tissue temperature was achieved with MW ablation at 45W (P < 0.05). On histological examination, the extent of the ablation zone in MW ablations was less affected by tissue heterogeneity than that in RF ablations. Conclusion: MW ablation appears to be advantageous with respect to the volume of ablation and the shape of the margin of necrosis compared with RF ablation in an ex vivo bovine udder.

  17. Optimization of post ablative I-131 scintigraphy: Comparison of 2 day vs. 7 day post therapy study in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC)

    SciTech Connect

    Khfan, S.; Waxman, A.; Nagaraj, N.

    1994-05-01

    Whole body scintigraphy is recommended following ablative I-131 therapy to assess residual iodine-avid tissue, including metastasis in patients with DTC. Some controversy exists regarding the optimum time for performing the post-ablative study. A study performed as early as 2 days post-therapy would be desirable since patients could be scanned prior to discharge from the hospital.

  18. Laser-ablation-assisted microparticle acceleration for drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menezes, V.; Takayama, K.; Ohki, T.; Gopalan, J.

    2005-10-01

    Localized drug delivery with minimal tissue damage is desired in some of the clinical procedures such as gene therapy, treatment of cancer cells, treatment of thrombosis, etc. We present an effective method for delivering drug-coated microparticles using laser ablation on a thin metal foil containing particles. A thin metal foil, with a deposition of a layer of microparticles is subjected to laser ablation on its backface such that a shock wave propagates through the foil. Due to shock wave loading, the surface of the foil containing microparticles is accelerated to very high speeds, ejecting the deposited particles at hypersonic speeds. The ejected particles have sufficient momentum to penetrate soft body tissues, and the penetration depth observed is sufficient for most of the pharmacological treatments. We have tried delivering 1μm tungsten particles into gelatin models that represent soft tissues, and liver tissues of an experimental rat. Sufficient penetration depths have been observed in these experiments with minimum target damage.

  19. Surgical Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Ramlawi, Basel; Abu Saleh, Walid K.

    2015-01-01

    The Cox-maze procedure for the restoration of normal sinus rhythm, initially developed by Dr. James Cox, underwent several iterations over the years. The main concept consists of creating a series of transmural lesions in the right and left atria that disrupt re-entrant circuits responsible for propagating the abnormal atrial fibrillation rhythm. The left atrial appendage is excluded as a component of the Maze procedure. For the first three iterations of the Cox- maze procedure, these lesions were performed using a surgical cut-and-sew approach that ensured transmurality. The Cox-Maze IV is the most currently accepted iteration. It achieves the same lesion set of the Cox- maze III but uses alternative energy sources to create the transmural lesions, potentially in a minimally invasive approach on the beating heart. High-frequency ultrasound, microwave, and laser energy have all been used with varying success in the past. Today, bipolar radiofrequency heat or cryotherapy cooling are the most accepted sources for creating linear lesions with consistent safety and transmurality. The robust and reliable nature of these energy delivery methods has yielded a success rate reaching 90% freedom from atrial fibrillation at 12 months. Such approaches offer a significant long-term advantage over catheter-based ablation, especially in patients having longstanding, persistent atrial fibrillation with characteristics such as dilated left atrial dimensions, poor ejection fraction, and failed catheter ablation. Based on these improved results, there currently is significant interest in developing a hybrid ablation strategy that incorporates the superior transmural robust lesions of surgical ablation, the reliable stroke prevention potential of epicardial left atrial appendage exclusion, and sophisticated mapping and confirmatory catheter-based ablation technology. Such a minimally invasive hybrid strategy for ablation may lead to the development of multidisciplinary “Afib teams

  20. Proton beam radiotherapy of iris melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Damato, Bertil . E-mail: Bertil@damato.co.uk; Kacperek, Andrzej; Chopra, Mona; Sheen, Martin A.; Campbell, Ian R.; Errington, R. Douglas

    2005-09-01

    Purpose: To report on outcomes after proton beam radiotherapy of iris melanoma. Methods and Materials: Between 1993 and 2004, 88 patients with iris melanoma received proton beam radiotherapy, with 53.1 Gy in 4 fractions. Results: The patients had a mean age of 52 years and a median follow-up of 2.7 years. The tumors had a median diameter of 4.3 mm, involving more than 2 clock hours of iris in 32% of patients and more than 2 hours of angle in 27%. The ciliary body was involved in 20%. Cataract was present in 13 patients before treatment and subsequently developed in another 18. Cataract had a 4-year rate of 63% and by Cox analysis was related to age (p = 0.05), initial visual loss (p < 0.0001), iris involvement (p < 0.0001), and tumor thickness (p < 0.0001). Glaucoma was present before treatment in 13 patients and developed after treatment in another 3. Three eyes were enucleated, all because of recurrence, which had an actuarial 4-year rate of 3.3% (95% CI 0-8.0%). Conclusions: Proton beam radiotherapy of iris melanoma is well tolerated, the main problems being radiation-cataract, which was treatable, and preexisting glaucoma, which in several patients was difficult to control.

  1. Laser Ablation Propulsion A Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irfan, Sayed A.; Ugalatad, Akshata C.

    Laser Ablation Propulsion (LAP) will serve as an alternative propulsion system for development of microthrusters. The principle of LAP is that when a laser (pulsed or continuous wave) with sufficient energy (more than the vaporization threshold energy of material) is incident on material, ablation or vaporization takes place which leads to the generation of plasma. The generated plasma has the property to move away from the material hence pressure is generated which leads to the generation of thrust. Nowadays nano satellites are very common in different space and defence applications. It is important to build micro thruster which are useful for orienting and re-positioning small aircraft (like nano satellites) above the atmosphere. modelling of LAP using MATLAB and Mathematica. Schematic is made for the suitable optical configuration of LAP. Practical experiments with shadowgraphy and self emission techniques and the results obtained are analysed taking poly (vinyl-chloride) (PVC) as propellant to study the

  2. Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Richard E.; Bol'shakov, Alexander A.; Mao, Xianglei; McKay, Christopher P.; Perry, Dale L.; Sorkhabi, Osman

    2011-02-01

    A new method of performing optical isotopic analysis of condensed samples in ambient air and at ambient pressure has been developed: Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry (LAMIS). The technique uses radiative transitions from molecular species either directly vaporized from a sample or formed by associative mechanisms of atoms or ions in a laser ablation plume. This method is an advanced modification of a known atomic emission technique called laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The new method — LAMIS — can determine not only chemical composition but also isotopic ratios of elements in the sample. Isotopic measurements are enabled by significantly larger isotopic shifts found in molecular spectra relative to atomic spectra. Analysis can be performed from a distance and in real time. No sample preparation or pre-treatment is required. Detection of the isotopes of hydrogen, boron, carbon, and oxygen are discussed to illustrate the technique.

  3. Electron Beam Ablation and Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovaleski, S. D.; Gilgenbach, R. M.; Ang, L. K.; Lau, Y. Y.

    1997-11-01

    Ablation of fused silica, titanium nitride, and boron nitride with a channel spark electron beam is being studied. The channel spark is a low energy (15-20kV), high current (1600A) electron beam source developed at KFK(G. Muller and C. Schultheiss, Proc. of Beams `94, Vol. II, p833). This is a pseudospark device which operates in the ion focused regime of electron beam transport. For this reason, a low pressure (10-15mTorr of Ar) background gas is used to provide electron beam focusing. Plume composition and excitation has been studied via optical emission spectroscopy. Ablation has also been imaged photographically. Electron density gradients and densities are being studied through laser deflection. Film deposition experiments are also being performed. Electron transport and energy deposition in metals are being simulated in the ITS-TIGER code(Sandia Report No. SAND 91-1634).

  4. Artificial meteor ablation studies: Olivine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, M. B.; Cunningham, G. G.

    1973-01-01

    Artificial meteor ablation was performed on a Mg-rich olivine sample using an arc-heated plasma of ionized air. Experimental conditions simulated a meteor traveling about 12 km/sec at an altitude of 70 km. The mineral content of the original olivine sample was 98% olivine (including traces of olivine alteration products) and 2% chromite. Forsterite content of the original olivine was Fo-89. After ablation, the forsterite content had increased to Fo-94 in the recrystallized olivine. In addition, lamella-like intergrowths of magnetite were prevalent constituents. Wherever magnetite occurred, there was an increase in Mg and a corresponding decrease in Fe for the recrystallized olivine. The Allende fusion crust consisted of a recrystallized olivine, which was more Mg-rich and Fe-deficient than the original meteorite's olivine, and abundant magnetite grains. Although troilite and pentlandite were the common opaque mineral constituents in this meteorite, magnetite was the principal opaque mineral found in the fusion crust.

  5. Caries selective ablation: the handpiece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennig, Thomas; Rechmann, Peter; Holtermann, Andreas

    1995-05-01

    Caries selective ablation is fixed to a window of fluences predicted by the ablation thresholds of carious and healthy dentin, respectively. The aim of the study was to develop a dental handpiece which guarantees homogeneous fluence at the irradiated tooth surface. Furthermore the point of treatment should be cooled down without energy losses due to the cooling system. We suggest the direct coupling of the laser radiation into a laminar stream of liquid, which acts in turn as a lengthened beam guide. The impacts of the laser radiation and of the cooling medium fall exactly into the same point. Hot ablation debris is removed out of the crater by the flush of the water jet. Fluences are constant if the handpiece is used in contact mode or at a distance. Normally the surface of a bare fiber working in contact mode is destroyed after a few shots. Coupling the laser radiation into a stream of liquid prevents this destruction. Putting together the benefits of this special handpiece short overall treatment times seem to be possible. High average power can be applied to the tooth without the threat of thermal damage. Furthermore no time consuming cutting of the fiber prolongs the treatment time.

  6. Excimer laser ablation of ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, A. C.; Leung, W. P.; Krajnovich, D.

    1991-02-01

    Laser etching of ferrites was previously done by scanning a focused continuous-wave laser beam on a ferrite sample in a chemical environment. We study the phenomenon of photo-ablation of Ni-Zn or Mn-Zn ferrites by pulsed 248-nm KrF excimer laser irradiation. A transfer lens system is used to project a grating pattern of a mask irradiated by the pulsed KrF laser onto the ferrite sample. The threshold fluence for ablation at the ferrite surface is about 0.3 J/cm2. A typical fluence of 1 J/cm2 is used. The etched grooves produced are typically 20-50 μm wide, with depths achieved as deep as 70 μm . Groove straightness is good as long as a sharp image is projected onto the sample surface. The wall angle is steeper than 60 degrees. Scanning electron microscopy of the etched area shows a ``glassy'' skin with extensive microcracks and solidified droplets being ejected that is frozen in action. We found that this skin can be entirely removed by ultrasonic cleaning. A fairly efficient etching rate of about 10 nm/pulse for a patterned area of about 2 mm×2 mm is obtained at a fluence of 1 J/cm2. This study shows that projection excimer laser ablation is useful for micromachining of ferrite ceramics, and indicates that a hydrodynamic sputtering mechanism involving droplet emission is a cause of material removal.

  7. The Osteosarcoradionecrosis as an Unfavorable Result Following Head and Neck Tumor Ablation and Microsurgical Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Al Deek, Nidal Farhan; Wei, Fu-Chan

    2016-10-01

    Osteoradionecrosis is preferably called osteosarcoradionecrosis to adequately cover the scope of the problem: multitissue necrosis. The changes following radiotherapy and leading to necrosis are further classified into 2 phases based on improved understanding of the underlying mechanisms. The reversible-damage phase could respond to the medical treatment, while the irreversible damage phase or osteosarcoradionecrosis may benefit from complete resection and free flap reconstruction. The role of ablation and reconstruction in paving the road for the development of osteosarcoradionecrosis is discussed, a case study provided, and a refined reconstructive approach proposed. PMID:27601399

  8. Femtosecond Laser Ablation Reveals Antagonistic Sensory and Neuroendocrine Signaling that Underlie C. elegans Behavior and Development

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Samuel H.; Schmalz, Anja; Ruiz, Roanna C.H.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The specific roles of neuronal subcellular components in behavior and development remain largely unknown, even though advances in molecular biology and conventional whole-cell laser ablation have greatly accelerated the identification of contributors at the molecular and cellular levels. We systematically applied femtosecond laser ablation, which has submicrometer resolution in vivo, to dissect the cell bodies, dendrites, or axons of a sensory neuron (ASJ) in Caenorhabditis elegans to determine their roles in modulating locomotion and the developmental decisions for dauer, a facultative, stress-resistant life stage. Our results indicate that the cell body sends out axonally mediated and hormonal signals in order to mediate these functions. Furthermore, our results suggest that antagonistic sensory dendritic signals primarily drive and switch polarity between the decisions to enter and exit dauer. Thus, the improved resolution of femtosecond laser ablation reveals a rich complexity of neuronal signaling at the subcellular level, including multiple neurite and hormonally mediated pathways dependent on life stage. PMID:23871668

  9. Image-guided ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lencioni, Riccardo; Crocetti, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Image-guided ablation is accepted as the best therapeutic choice for patients with early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) when surgical options-including resection and transplantation-are precluded. The term image-guided tumor ablation is defined as the direct application of chemical substances or sources of energy to a focal tumor in an attempt to achieve eradication or substantial tumor destruction. Over the past 25 years, several methods for local tumor destruction have been developed and clinically tested. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has shown superior anticancer effect and greater survival benefit with respect to the seminal percutaneous technique, ethanol injection, in meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials, and is currently established as the standard ablative modality. Nevertheless, novel thermal and nonthermal techniques for tumor ablation-including microwave ablation and irreversible electroporation-seem to have potential to improve the efficacy of RFA and are currently undergoing clinical investigation. PMID:22941021

  10. Laser Ablation of Alumina in Water

    SciTech Connect

    Musaev, O.; Midgley, A; Wrobel, J; Kruger, M

    2010-01-01

    Bulk {alpha}-alumina immersed in distilled water was ablated by pulsed UV laser radiation. The resulting colloidal solution contained micron and submicron size particles. X-ray diffraction and Raman spectra of the ablated and original material are similar. Hence, most of the ablated material is {alpha}-alumina. From transmission electron microscope images, most of the submicron and all of the micron-sized particles have sharp edges and do not have spherical shapes, indicating that the dominant ablation mechanism is due to crack propagation. Some spherical particles of diameter less than 100 nm are observed, indicating that they were formed from the liquid state.

  11. Ablative therapies in renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chan, A A; Ahrar, K; Matin, S F

    2011-09-01

    We reviewed the use of ablative therapies in the management of renal cell carcinoma. We performed a PubMed search of the English language literature using the keywords "ablation" and "renal carcinoma." Pertinent articles specific to the technologic advancement of ablative therapy and clinical outcomes were selected for review. Intermediate-term oncologic outcomes of cryoablation and radiofrequency ablation are acceptable but are not quite as good as for surgical excision based nearly all on retrospective studies. No randomized studies have been performed comparing excisional and ablative therapies. Careful selection of patients and tumor characteristics results in improved outcomes. Diagnostic biopsy for tissue confirmation is mandatory and should even be considered post therapy after 6-12 months in patients with a concern about recurrence. Ablative therapies are associated with decreased morbidity, less severe complication rates, and excellent preservation of renal function in comparison with surgical excision. The majority of recurrences occur early, but long-term surveillance is required as delayed recurrences are also possible and the long-term oncologic efficacy is not yet established. Ablation can be delivered percutaneously or laparoscopically, and the superiority of one over the other remains controversial. The percutaneous approach is more cost effective and causes less perinephric desmoplasia. Nearly all data on ablation are retrospective and, with few exceptions, from single institutions. Ablative therapy is an appealing option for the management of small renal tumors shown to be renal cell carcinoma on biopsy in patients who are unsuitable candidates for surgical extirpation. PMID:21993322

  12. Plasma-mediated ablation of biofilm contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhixiong; Wang, Xiaoliang; Huang, Huan

    2010-12-01

    Ultra-short pulsed laser removal of thin biofilm contamination on different substrates has been conducted via the use of plasma-mediated ablation. The biofilms were formed using sheep whole blood. The ablation was generated using a 1.2 ps ultra-short pulsed laser with wavelength centered at 1552 nm. The blood contamination was transformed into plasma and collected with a vacuum system. The single line ablation features have been measured. The ablation thresholds of blood contamination and bare substrates were determined. It is found that the ablation threshold of the blood contamination is lower than those of the beneath substrates including the glass slide, PDMS, and human dermal tissues. The ablation effects of different laser parameters (pulse overlap rate and pulse energy) were studied and ablation efficiency was measured. Proper ablation parameters were found to efficiently remove contamination with maximum efficiency and without damage to the substrate surface for the current laser system. Complete removal of blood contaminant from the glass substrate surface and freeze-dried dermis tissue surface was demonstrated by the USP laser ablation with repeated area scanning. No obvious thermal damage was found in the decontaminated glass and tissue samples.

  13. Clinical evaluation of X-ray voxel Monte Carlo versus pencil beam-based dose calculation in stereotactic body radiotherapy of lung cancer under normal and deep inspiration breath hold.

    PubMed

    Landoni, V; Borzì, G R; Strolin, S; Bruzzaniti, V; Soriani, A; D'Alessio, D; Ambesi, F; Di Grazia, A M; Strigari, L

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the differences between dose distributions calculated with the pencil beam (PB) and X-ray voxel Monte Carlo (MC) algorithms for patients with lung cancer using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or HybridArc techniques. The 2 algorithms were compared in terms of dose-volume histograms, under normal and deep inspiration breath hold, and in terms of the tumor control probability (TCP). The dependence of the differences in tumor volume and location was investigated. Dosimetric validation was performed using Gafchromic EBT3 (International Specialty Products, ISP, Wayne, NJ). Forty-five Computed Tomography (CT) data sets were used for this study; 40 Gy at 8 Gy/fraction was prescribed with 5 noncoplanar 6-MV IMRT beams or 3 to 4 dynamic conformal arcs with 3 to 5 IMRT beams distributed per arc. The plans were first calculated with PB and then recalculated with MC. The difference between the mean tumor doses was approximately 10% ± 4%; these differences were even larger under deep inspiration breath hold. Differences between the mean tumor dose correlated with tumor volume and path length of the beams. The TCP values changed from 99.87% ± 0.24% to 96.78% ± 4.81% for both PB- and MC-calculated plans (P = .009). When a fraction of hypoxic cells was considered, the mean TCP values changed from 76.01% ± 5.83% to 34.78% ± 18.06% for the differently calculated plans (P < .0001). When the plans were renormalized to the same mean dose at the tumor, the mean TCP for oxic cells was 99.05% ± 1.59% and for hypoxic cells was 60.20% ± 9.53%. This study confirms that the MC algorithm adequately accounts for inhomogeneities. The inclusion of the MC in the process of IMRT optimization could represent a further step in the complex problem of determining the optimal treatment plan. PMID:25223324

  14. Analysis of iodinated contrast delivered during thermal ablation: is material trapped in the ablation zone?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Po-hung; Brace, Chris L.

    2016-08-01

    Intra-procedural contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) has been proposed to evaluate treatment efficacy of thermal ablation. We hypothesized that contrast material delivered concurrently with thermal ablation may become trapped in the ablation zone, and set out to determine whether such an effect would impact ablation visualization. CECT images were acquired during microwave ablation in normal porcine liver with: (A) normal blood perfusion and no iodinated contrast, (B) normal perfusion and iodinated contrast infusion or (C) no blood perfusion and residual iodinated contrast. Changes in CT attenuation were analyzed from before, during and after ablation to evaluate whether contrast was trapped inside of the ablation zone. Visualization was compared between groups using post-ablation contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Attenuation gradients were calculated at the ablation boundary and background to quantitate ablation conspicuity. In Group A, attenuation decreased during ablation due to thermal expansion of tissue water and water vaporization. The ablation zone was difficult to visualize (CNR  =  1.57  ±  0.73, boundary gradient  =  0.7  ±  0.4 HU mm‑1), leading to ablation diameter underestimation compared to gross pathology. Group B ablations saw attenuation increase, suggesting that iodine was trapped inside the ablation zone. However, because the normally perfused liver increased even more, Group B ablations were more visible than Group A (CNR  =  2.04  ±  0.84, boundary gradient  =  6.3  ±  1.1 HU mm‑1) and allowed accurate estimation of the ablation zone dimensions compared to gross pathology. Substantial water vaporization led to substantial attenuation changes in Group C, though the ablation zone boundary was not highly visible (boundary gradient  =  3.9  ±  1.1 HU mm‑1). Our results demonstrate that despite iodinated contrast being trapped in the ablation zone, ablation visibility

  15. Analysis of iodinated contrast delivered during thermal ablation: is material trapped in the ablation zone?

    PubMed

    Wu, Po-Hung; Brace, Chris L

    2016-08-21

    Intra-procedural contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) has been proposed to evaluate treatment efficacy of thermal ablation. We hypothesized that contrast material delivered concurrently with thermal ablation may become trapped in the ablation zone, and set out to determine whether such an effect would impact ablation visualization. CECT images were acquired during microwave ablation in normal porcine liver with: (A) normal blood perfusion and no iodinated contrast, (B) normal perfusion and iodinated contrast infusion or (C) no blood perfusion and residual iodinated contrast. Changes in CT attenuation were analyzed from before, during and after ablation to evaluate whether contrast was trapped inside of the ablation zone. Visualization was compared between groups using post-ablation contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Attenuation gradients were calculated at the ablation boundary and background to quantitate ablation conspicuity. In Group A, attenuation decreased during ablation due to thermal expansion of tissue water and water vaporization. The ablation zone was difficult to visualize (CNR  =  1.57  ±  0.73, boundary gradient  =  0.7  ±  0.4 HU mm(-1)), leading to ablation diameter underestimation compared to gross pathology. Group B ablations saw attenuation increase, suggesting that iodine was trapped inside the ablation zone. However, because the normally perfused liver increased even more, Group B ablations were more visible than Group A (CNR  =  2.04  ±  0.84, boundary gradient  =  6.3  ±  1.1 HU mm(-1)) and allowed accurate estimation of the ablation zone dimensions compared to gross pathology. Substantial water vaporization led to substantial attenuation changes in Group C, though the ablation zone boundary was not highly visible (boundary gradient  =  3.9  ±  1.1 HU mm(-1)). Our results demonstrate that despite iodinated contrast being trapped in the ablation zone, ablation visibility

  16. Development of three-dimensional radiotherapy techniques in breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coles, Charlotte E.

    Radiotherapy following conservation surgery decreases local relapse and death from breast cancer. Currently, the challenge is to minimise the morbidity caused by this treatment without losing efficacy. Despite many advances in radiation techniques in other sites of the body, the majority of breast cancer patients are still planned and treated using 2-dimensional simple radiotherapy techniques. In addition, breast irradiation currently consumes 30% of the UK's radiotherapy workload. Therefore, any change to more complex treatment should be of proven benefit. The primary objective of this research is to develop and evaluate novel radiotherapy techniques to decrease irradiation of normal structures and improve localisation of the tumour bed. I have developed a forward-planned intensity modulated (IMRT) breast radiotherapy technique, which has shown improved dosimetry results compared to standard breast radiotherapy. Subsequently, I have developed and implemented a phase III randomised controlled breast IMRT trial. This National Cancer Research Network adopted trial will answer an important question regarding the clinical benefit of breast IMRT. It will provide DNA samples linked with high quality clinical outcome data, for a national translational radiogenomics study investigating variation in normal tissue toxicity. Thus, patients with significant late normal tissue side effects despite good dose homogeneity will provide the best model for finding differences due to underlying genetics. I evaluated a novel technique using high definition free-hand 3-dimensional (3D) ultrasound in a phantom study, and the results suggested that this is an accurate and reproducible method for tumour bed localisation. I then compared recognised methods of tumour bed localisation with the 3D ultrasound method in a clinical study. The 3D ultrasound technique appeared to accurately represent the shape and spatial position of the tumour cavity. This tumour bed localisation research

  17. Development of a highly efficient implanted thermal ablation device: in vivo experiment in rat liver

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, H; Hamuro, M; Nakamura, K; Kayahara, H; Murano, K; Kotsuka, Y; Miki, Y

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate an implanted thermal ablation device that can be heated with high efficiency using a resonant circuit as the implant. Methods 16 rats were used. The implants, adjusted at a resonance frequency of 4 MHz, were fixed on the surface of the liver of rats under laparotomy. In 14 of 16 rats, an alternating magnetic field (AMF) was applied for 6 min with an output of 300 W from outside the body using a ferrite core applicator. The implant temperature during AMF exposure was measured. The 14 rats were divided into 5 groups, depending on time from AMF application until they were sacrificed (1 h, 1 day, 3 days, 7 days and 1 month after application). Two rats not exposed to AMF were used as controls. Livers were removed and evaluated; the cross-sectional area and width of the ablated region were measured. Results During AMF exposure, the implant temperature rose to 127.8±39.3 °C (mean±standard deviation). The cross-sectional area of the ablated region was largest after 1 day and tended to decrease with time. The widths of the ablated region were 4.87±0.22 mm, 4.15±0.36 mm, 3.67±0.58 mm and 3.24±0.16 mm in the 1 day, 3 day, 7 day and 1 month groups, respectively. No significant differences (p<0.05) were seen in either cross-sectional area or width of the ablated region. Conclusion Sufficient heat for ablation was obtained in vivo using a newly developed implanted thermal ablation device. This device may be a new option for thermal ablation therapy. PMID:22422380

  18. [Stereotactic radiotherapy in brain metastases].

    PubMed

    Dhermain, F; Reyns, N; Colin, P; Métellus, P; Mornex, F; Noël, G

    2015-02-01

    Stereotactic radiotherapy of brain metastases is increasingly proposed after polydisciplinary debates among experts. Its definition and modalities of prescription, indications and clinical interest regarding the balance between efficacy versus toxicity need to be discussed. Stereotactic radiotherapy is a 'high precision' irradiation technique (within 1mm), using different machines (with invasive contention or frameless, photons X or gamma) delivering high doses (4 to 25Gy) in a limited number of fractions (usually 1 to 5, ten maximum) with a high dose gradient. Dose prescription will depend on materials, dose constraints to organs at risk varying with fractionation. Stereotactic radiotherapy may be proposed: (1) in combination with whole brain radiotherapy with the goal of increasing (modestly) overall survival of patients with a good performance status, 1 to 3 brain metastases and a controlled extracranial disease; (2) for recurrence of 1-3 brain metastases after whole brain radiotherapy; (3) after complete resection of a large and/or symptomatic brain metastases; (4) after diagnosis of 3-5 asymptomatic new or progressing brain metastases during systemic therapy, with the aim of delaying whole brain radiotherapy (avoiding its potential neurotoxicity) and maintaining a high focal control rate. Only a strict follow-up with clinical and MRI every 3 months will permit to deliver iterative stereotactic radiotherapies without jeopardizing survival. Simultaneous delivering of stereotactic radiotherapy with targeted medicines should be carefully discussed. PMID:25640215

  19. Ablation study of tungsten-based nuclear thermal rocket fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Tabitha Elizabeth Rose

    ablation of the NASA sample, could be applied to an atmospheric reentry body, reentering at a ballistic trajectory at hypersonic velocities.

  20. Immediate functional loading of an implant-supported fixed prosthesis at the time of ablative surgery and mandibular reconstruction for squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Odin, Guillaume; Balaguer, Thierry; Savoldelli, Charles; Scortecci, Gérard

    2010-01-01

    The authors describe a case of squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity managed by ablative surgery, mandibular reconstruction with a fibula free flap, and implant placement during the same session. Immediate functional implant loading, respecting the principles of basal implantology, was performed 48 hours later using a highly rigid, screw-secured fixed prosthesis that served as an external fixator for the implants and grafted bone. Implant loading before external beam radiotherapy improves flap stability, bone consolidation, and quality of life. Functional and esthetic outcomes were evaluated 2 years after radiotherapy was completed. PMID:20553177

  1. Establishment of an Effective Radioiodide Thyroid Ablation Protocol in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Schmohl, Kathrin A.; Müller, Andrea M.; Schwenk, Nathalie; Knoop, Kerstin; Rijntjes, Eddy; Köhrle, Josef; Heuer, Heike; Bartenstein, Peter; Göke, Burkhard; Nelson, Peter J.; Spitzweg, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Due to the high variance in available protocols on iodide-131 (131I) ablation in rodents, we set out to establish an effective method to generate a thyroid-ablated mouse model that allows the application of the sodium iodide symporter (NIS) as a reporter gene without interference with thyroidal NIS. We tested a range of 131I doses with and without prestimulation of thyroidal radioiodide uptake by a low-iodine diet and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) application. Efficacy of induction of hypothyroidism was tested by measurement of serum T4 concentrations, pituitary TSHβ and liver deiodinase type 1 (DIO1) mRNA expression, body weight analysis, and 99mTc-pertechnetate scintigraphy. While 200 µCi (7.4 MBq) 131I alone was not sufficient to abolish thyroidal T4 production, 500 µCi (18.5 MBq) 131I combined with 1 week of a low-iodine diet decreased serum concentrations below the detection limit. However, the high 131I dose resulted in severe side effects. A combination of 1 week of a low-iodine diet followed by injection of bovine TSH before the application of 150 µCi (5.5 MBq) 131I decreased serum T4 concentrations below the detection limit and significantly increased pituitary TSHβ concentrations. The systemic effects of induced hypothyroidism were shown by growth arrest and a decrease in liver DIO1 expression below the detection limit. 99mTc-pertechnetate scintigraphy revealed absence of thyroidal 99mTc-pertechnetate uptake in ablated mice. In summary, we report a revised protocol for radioiodide ablation of the thyroid gland in the mouse to generate an in vivo model that allows the study of thyroid hormone action using NIS as a reporter gene. PMID:26601076

  2. Implicit Coupling Approach for Simulation of Charring Carbon Ablators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yih-Kanq; Gokcen, Tahir

    2013-01-01

    This study demonstrates that coupling of a material thermal response code and a flow solver with nonequilibrium gas/surface interaction for simulation of charring carbon ablators can be performed using an implicit approach. The material thermal response code used in this study is the three-dimensional version of Fully Implicit Ablation and Thermal response program, which predicts charring material thermal response and shape change on hypersonic space vehicles. The flow code solves the reacting Navier-Stokes equations using Data Parallel Line Relaxation method. Coupling between the material response and flow codes is performed by solving the surface mass balance in flow solver and the surface energy balance in material response code. Thus, the material surface recession is predicted in flow code, and the surface temperature and pyrolysis gas injection rate are computed in material response code. It is demonstrated that the time-lagged explicit approach is sufficient for simulations at low surface heating conditions, in which the surface ablation rate is not a strong function of the surface temperature. At elevated surface heating conditions, the implicit approach has to be taken, because the carbon ablation rate becomes a stiff function of the surface temperature, and thus the explicit approach appears to be inappropriate resulting in severe numerical oscillations of predicted surface temperature. Implicit coupling for simulation of arc-jet models is performed, and the predictions are compared with measured data. Implicit coupling for trajectory based simulation of Stardust fore-body heat shield is also conducted. The predicted stagnation point total recession is compared with that predicted using the chemical equilibrium surface assumption

  3. Improving radiotherapy planning, delivery accuracy, and normal tissue sparing using cutting edge technologies

    PubMed Central

    Glide-Hurst, Carri K.

    2014-01-01

    In the United States, more than half of all new invasive cancers diagnosed are non-small cell lung cancer, with a significant number of these cases presenting at locally advanced stages, resulting in about one-third of all cancer deaths. While the advent of stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR, also known as stereotactic body radiotherapy, or SBRT) for early-staged patients has improved local tumor control to >90%, survival results for locally advanced stage lung cancer remain grim. Significant challenges exist in lung cancer radiation therapy including tumor motion, accurate dose calculation in low density media, limiting dose to nearby organs at risk, and changing anatomy over the treatment course. However, many recent technological advancements have been introduced that can meet these challenges, including four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) and volumetric cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) to enable more accurate target definition and precise tumor localization during radiation, respectively. In addition, advances in dose calculation algorithms have allowed for more accurate dosimetry in heterogeneous media, and intensity modulated and arc delivery techniques can help spare organs at risk. New delivery approaches, such as tumor tracking and gating, offer additional potential for further reducing target margins. Image-guided adaptive radiation therapy (IGART) introduces the potential for individualized plan adaptation based on imaging feedback, including bulky residual disease, tumor progression, and physiological changes that occur during the treatment course. This review provides an overview of the current state of the art technology for lung cancer volume definition, treatment planning, localization, and treatment plan adaptation. PMID:24688775

  4. Possible Role for Cryoballoon Ablation of Right Atrial Appendage Tachycardia when Conventional Ablation Fails

    PubMed Central

    Kilic, Ayhan

    2015-01-01

    Focal atrial tachycardia arising from the right atrial appendage usually responds well to radiofrequency ablation; however, successful ablation in this anatomic region can be challenging. Surgical excision of the right atrial appendage has sometimes been necessary to eliminate the tachycardia and prevent or reverse the resultant cardiomyopathy. We report the case of a 48-year-old man who had right atrial appendage tachycardia resistant to multiple attempts at ablation with use of conventional radiofrequency energy guided by means of a 3-dimensional mapping system. The condition led to cardiomyopathy in 3 months. The arrhythmia was successfully ablated with use of a 28-mm cryoballoon catheter that had originally been developed for catheter ablation of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. To our knowledge, this is the first report of cryoballoon ablation without isolation of the right atrial appendage. It might also be an alternative to epicardial ablation or surgery when refractory atrial tachycardia originates from the right atrial appendage. PMID:26175651

  5. Testing and evaluation of light ablation decontamination

    SciTech Connect

    Demmer, R.L.; Ferguson, R.L.

    1994-10-01

    This report details the testing and evaluation of light ablation decontamination. It details WINCO contracted research and application of light ablation efforts by Ames Laboratory. Tests were conducted with SIMCON (simulated contamination) coupons and REALCON (actual radioactive metal coupons) under controlled conditions to compare cleaning effectiveness, speed and application to plant process type equipment.

  6. PULSED LASER ABLATION OF CEMENT AND CONCRETE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laser ablation was investigated as a means of removing radioactive contaminants from the surface and near-surface regions of concrete from nuclear facilities. We present the results of ablation tests on cement and concrete samples using a pulsed Nd:YAG laser with fiber optic beam...

  7. Percutaneous Local Ablative Therapy for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lau, W. Y.; Leung, Thomas W. T.; Yu, Simon C. H.; Ho, Stephen K. W.

    2003-01-01

    Objective To review and compare treatment result for percutaneous local ablative therapy (PLAT) with surgical resection in the treatment of small hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Summary Background Data PLAT is indicated for small unresectable HCC loc