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Sample records for ablative capillary discharge

  1. Ablation of CsI by XUV Capillary Discharge Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pira, Peter; Zelinger, Zdenek; Burian, Tomas; Vysin, Ludek; Wild, Jan; Juha, Libor; Lancok, Jan; Nevrly, Vaclav

    2015-09-01

    XUV capillary discharge laser (CDL) is suitable source for ablation of ionic crystals as material which is difficult to ablate by conventional laser. Single crystal of CsI was irradiated by 2.5 ns pulses of a 46.9 nm radiation at 2 Hz. The CDL beam was focused by Sc/Si multilayer spherical mirror. Attenuation length of CsI for this wavelength is 38 nm. Ablation rate was calculated after irradiation of 10, 20, 30, 50 and 100 pulses. Depth of the craters was measured by optical profiler (white light interferometry). Ablation threshold was determined from craters after irradiation with the changing fluence and compared with modeling by XUV-ABLATOR.

  2. Comparisons of kinetic ablation models for the capillary discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Li Rui; Li Xingwen; Jia Shenli; Murphy, Anthony B.

    2010-07-15

    The properties of kinetic ablation models are considered in this paper. The widely used kinetic ablation model (model-K) only considers monatomic vapor. A revised model (model-Z) was introduced by taking into account the polyatomic vapor's internal degrees of freedom, as well as the temperature dependence of the average particle mass. In this work, both temperature and pressure dependence of average particle mass and the specific heat ratio {gamma} are taken into account, producing an improved version of model-Z (denoted model-Z{sup *}). Ablation data calculated by model-K and model-Z* for two typical capillary materials are presented. Compared to model-K, model-Z* predicts an increased ablation rate at lower plasma temperature and higher plasma density, and a decreased rate for the opposite conditions. Finally, based on the plasma parameters in a typical discharge cycle, all three models are used to calculate the time-dependent ablation rate and the integrated ablated mass. It is found that the main difference between their results arises because of the different average particle masses near the wall surface, and model-Z* is the most accurate for the discharge cycle considered. Further, it is found that the ablation parameters are highly sensitive to the pressure, in particular, through the pressure dependence of average particle mass.

  3. Observations of soft x-ray emission and wall ablation in a fast low-energy pulsed capillary discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdivia, M. P.; Wyndham, E. S.; Ramos-Moore, E.; Ferrari, P.; Favre, M.

    2013-08-01

    We report on experimental observations of pulsed capillary discharges aimed at soft x-ray production within the water-window range. Through systematical studies of capillary tube characteristics and discharge conditions, radiation emission was analysed. Plasma properties were studied by means of spectrometry, wide-band PIN diode signals and plasma micro-channel plate imaging. Surface and bulk material analyses were performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) in order to characterize the capillary inner surface after discharges. We report on hollow cathode effect enhancement by modification of cathode electrode aperture, as well as pressure conditions along the capillary, which were found to have an important effect over plasma and x-ray yields due to the modification of local electrical field and gas density. Capillary tube material and inner diameter also modified the interaction of the plasma channel with the capillary surface, thus modifying the plasma source characteristics. It was found that emission of the NVI line at 28.8 Å can be enhanced within the conditions studied, from no significant emission to sources delivering an average brightness of over 70.0 mW mm-2 per 2π sr. This demonstrates that hollow cathode electrons and plasma-wall interaction and ablation have a direct impact on emission quality.

  4. Laser wakefield acceleration of electron beams beyond 1 GeV from an ablative capillary discharge waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Haiyang; Liu, Mingwei; Wang, Wentao; Wang, Cheng; Liu, Jiansheng; Deng, Aihua; Xu, Jiancai; Xia, Changquan; Li, Wentao; Zhang, Hui; Lu, Xiaoming; Wang, Cheng; Wang, Jianzhou; Liang, Xiaoyan; Leng, Yuxin; Shen, Baifei; Nakajima, Kazuhisa; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2011-08-01

    Laser wakefield acceleration of electrons well beyond 1 GeV and optical guiding of ultraintense laser pulses of peak powers up to 160 TW over a 4-cm long ablative capillary discharge plasma channel were experimentally demonstrated. Electron beams, with energies up to 1.8 GeV, were generated by using the 130 TW, 55 fs driving laser pulses. A comparison of oxygen-containing acrylic resin (C:O:H = 4:2:7) capillary and no oxygen-containing polyethylene (C:O:H = 1:0:2) capillary measurements suggests that the injection of electron into the laser wakefield is assisted by the ionization of oxygen K-shell electrons.

  5. Laser wakefield acceleration of electron beams beyond 1 GeV from an ablative capillary discharge waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Haiyang; Liu Mingwei; Wang Wentao; Wang Cheng; Liu Jiansheng; Deng Aihua; Xu Jiancai; Xia Changquan; Li Wentao; Zhang Hui; Lu Xiaoming; Wang Cheng; Wang Jianzhou; Liang Xiaoyan; Leng Yuxin; Shen Baifei; Li Ruxin; Xu Zhizhan; Nakajima, Kazuhisa

    2011-08-29

    Laser wakefield acceleration of electrons well beyond 1 GeV and optical guiding of ultraintense laser pulses of peak powers up to 160 TW over a 4-cm long ablative capillary discharge plasma channel were experimentally demonstrated. Electron beams, with energies up to 1.8 GeV, were generated by using the 130 TW, 55 fs driving laser pulses. A comparison of oxygen-containing acrylic resin (C:O:H = 4:2:7) capillary and no oxygen-containing polyethylene (C:O:H = 1:0:2) capillary measurements suggests that the injection of electron into the laser wakefield is assisted by the ionization of oxygen K-shell electrons.

  6. Capillary discharge source

    DOEpatents

    Bender, III, Howard Albert

    2003-11-25

    Debris generation from an EUV electric discharge plasma source device can be significantly reduced or essentially eliminated by encasing the electrodes with dielectric or electrically insulating material so that the electrodes are shielded from the plasma, and additionally by providing a path for the radiation to exit wherein the electrodes are not exposed to the area where the radiation is collected. The device includes: (a) a body, which is made of an electrically insulating material, that defines a capillary bore that has a proximal end and a distal end and that defines at least one radiation exit; (b) a first electrode that defines a first channel that has a first inlet end that is connected to a source of gas and a first outlet end that is in communication with the capillary bore, wherein the first electrode is positioned at the distal end of the capillary bore; (c) a second electrode that defines a second channel that has a second inlet end that is in communication with the capillary bore and an outlet end, wherein the second electrode is positioned at the proximal end of the capillary bore; and (d) a source of electric potential that is connected across the first and second electrodes, wherein radiation generated within the capillary bore is emitted through the at least one radiation exit and wherein the first electrode and second electrode are shielded from the emitted radiation.

  7. Guiding and Ionization Blueshift in Ablative Capillary Waveguide Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    McGuffey, Chris; Matsuoka, Takeshi; Bulanov, Stepan; Chvykov, Vladimir; Kalintchenko, Galina; Rousseau, Pascal; Yanovsky, Victor; Maksimchuk, Anatoly; Krushelnick, Karl; Levin, Michael; Zigler, Arie

    2009-01-22

    Laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) in plasmas has been demonstrated with gradients which are orders of magnitude greater than the limit on conventional Radio Frequency accelerators. However, the acceleration length is limited by two factors, the dephasing length and the Rayleigh range of the laser pulse. Dephasing length is the distance in which electrons overtake the laser pulse and can be increased by decreasing plasma density. Alternatively the interaction length can be extended by orders of magnitude by using ablative wall discharge capillary targets, in which a plasma is preformed with a transverse density profile capable of guiding the focused laser. We have demonstrated guiding of high intensity laser pulses from the HERCULES laser over 3 cm for powers up to 35 TW. The quality of the laser spot can be retained and the intensity remains high even at the exit of the capillary. The transmitted laser spectrum shows blueshifting due to field ionization by the laser pulse. This ionization might enhance electron injection at low electron density for LWFA GeV accelerators. The field ionization affects carbon atoms and ions from the ablated capillary, which are not present in hydrogen-filled capillaries. This creates an additional challenge to guiding compared to hydrogen-filled capillaries. However, the setup and materials are easier to come by. The use of these capillary targets may also be of interest to other high intensity laser-plasma interactions requiring long interaction lengths such as high harmonic generation from gases and plasmas, or x-ray lasing in underdense plasmas.

  8. EUV Emission of a Pulsed Capillary Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, L. S.; Yap, S. L.; Wong, C. S.

    2011-03-01

    An argon-filled capillary discharge system with an inner diameter of 1 mm and a length of 10 mm is investigated as potential Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) light source. The working pressure is maintained in the range of 10-4 mbar and the discharge voltage is varied in order to obtain the maximum emission of the EUV energy. The current that flows through the capillary plasma is measured by a magnetic probe while EUV radiation from the capillary discharge is detected by two sets of EUV detector, D1 and D2. Total EUV energy of the order of milli joules is obtained in the wavelength range of 11 to 18 nm from measurement using D1. However, the total energy of the 13.5 nm radiation, as deduced from the signal of D2 is only of the order of micro joules. It is also found that the total EUV energy in the wavelength of 11 to 18 nm increases with the discharge voltage, while the total energy of the EUV radiation at 13.5 nm decreases with the discharge voltage for the current setup.

  9. Two-dimensional, three-fluid modeling of capillary plasma discharges in electrothermal mass accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmond, M. J.; Winfrey, A. L.

    2016-06-01

    Electrothermal (ET) plasma launchers have a wide array of applications as mass acceleration devices. An ET plasma launcher utilizes an ET plasma discharge to accelerate a projectile. ET plasma discharges are arc-driven capillary discharges that ablate liner materials and form partially ionized plasmas. ET plasma discharges are generated by driving current pulses through a capillary source. Current pulses typically have peak currents on the order of tens of kA with pulse lengths on the order of hundreds of μs. These types of plasma discharges have been explored for their application to military ballistics, electric thrusters, and nuclear fusion power. ET plasma discharges have been studied using 0D, 1D, and semi-2D fluid models. In this work, a three-fluid, fully two-dimensional model of ET plasma discharges is presented. First approximations used in the newly developed model and code are discussed and simulation results are compared with experiment. Simulation results indicate the development of back flow inside ET plasma discharges due to collisional drag forces between individual plasma species. This back flow is observed for simulations of ET plasma discharges receiving current pulses with peak currents of 10, 20, 30, and 40 kA. Simulation results also reveal the development of fluid perturbations near the breech of the plasma source. These perturbations cause variations in the plasma electrical conductivity and ultimately cause changes in the local ablation rate of the source liner. At higher current pulses, these perturbations are more localized in the region of the source closest to the breech. This effect causes a decrease in the ablated mass in this region relative to the region of the source experiencing the highest ablation.

  10. Plasma Acceleration from RF Discharge in Dielectric Capillary

    SciTech Connect

    A. Dunaevsky; Y. Raitses; N. J. Fisch

    2005-08-09

    Plasma acceleration from rf discharge in dielectric capillary was demonstrated. Observed plasma flow had ion energies of approximately 100 eV and electron energies of approximately 20 eV. The discharge was powered by a MHz-range rf generator and fed by Ar. Experimental results indicate possible validity of assumptions about formation of a potential difference at the open end of the capillary and presence of hot electron fraction in the capillary discharge. Simplicity and small dimensions of the source are attractive for micro-propulsion applications.

  11. EUV Emission Spectra and Gain in Polyacetal Capillary Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrbova, M.; Vrba, P.; Jancarek, A.; Bobrova, N. A.; Sasorov, P. V.; Limpouch, J.; Pina, L.; Nadvornikova, L.; Fojtik, A.

    2002-11-01

    Experimental and computer studies of polyacetal capillary discharge are reported. Time resolved spectra in the wavelength region 3 - 25 nm are measured. Space-time dependences of plasma electron density and temperature are calculated by means of MHD code. Time profiles of selected lithium-, helium- and hydrogen-like carbon and oxygen ion populations and time resolved spectra are evaluated by means of the FLY code. Gain factors for a capillary initially either evacuated or filled by polyacetal vapors are calculated.

  12. Recent results in capillary discharge soft x-ray laser research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocca, Jorge J.; Marconi, Mario C.; Wang, Yong; Luther, Bradley M.; Pedacci, Francesco; Grisham, Michael; Vaschenko, Georgiy; Menoni, Carmen S.; Filevich, Jorge; Juha, Libor; Pershin, Yu. P.; Zubarev, E. N.; Voronov, D. L.; Sevryukova, V. A.; Kondratenko, V. V.; Shlyaptsev, Vyacheslav V.; Vinogradov, Alexander; Artioukov, Igor

    2003-12-01

    We report results of the development of capillary discharge driven metal-vapor plasma waveguides for the development of efficient laser-pumped soft x-ray lasers; and of the use of a previously developed capillary discharge Ne-like Ar 46.9 nm laser in study of the interaction of intense soft x-ray laser with materials. The guiding of a laser beam in a dense capillary discharge plasma channel containing a large density of Ag ions is reported. In term of applications we have conducted studies of materials modification and ablation with focalized 46.9 nm laser radiation at fluences between 0.1 and 100 J cm-2. The experiments demonstrated that the combined high repetition rate and high energy per pulse of the capillary discharge laser allows for the first time the processing of large surface areas with intense soft x-ray laser radiation. The damage threshold and damage mechanism of extreme ultraviolet Sc/Si multilayer mirror coatings was studied . Damage threshold fluences of ~ 0.08 J/cm2 were determined for coatings deposited on both borosilicate glass and Si substrates. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and small-angle X-ray diffraction techniques revealed the thermal nature of the damage mechanism. These results provide a benchmark for the use of Sc/Si multilayer mirrors in high fluence applications, and for the development of higher damage threshold mirrors. Soft x-ray laser ablation studies were also conducted for silicon and several plastic materials, including PMMA, Polyamide and PTFE.

  13. Study on the characteristics of a two gap capillary discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, D.; Yang, L. J. Huo, P.; Ma, J. B.; Ding, W. D.; Wang, W.

    2015-02-15

    The paper presents a new two-gap capillary (TGC) discharge structure. The prominent innovation is the introduction of the middle electrode, which divides the capillary into the trigger gap and the main gap. The discharge circuit of the TGC comprises the trigger circuit and the main circuit. The two circuits are used for the pre-ionization of the trigger gap and providing energy of 450 J for the main gap arc discharging, respectively. When the discharge initiates, the trigger gap is pre-ionized under high voltage pulse produced by trigger circuit, and meanwhile, the weakly ionized plasma is generated. The main circuit then maintains the expansion of the plasma, which is called soft capillary discharge. Afterwards, the main gap is shorted and discharges under a relatively low voltage. With the optimization of the circuit parameter, both the energy deposition ratio in main gap and the degree of plasma ionization are enhanced. The efficiency of the energy deposition is almost twice higher compared with that of the conventional capillary structure. The life performance test indicates that the erosion of the middle electrode and the trigger gap carbonization are the key factors that limit the life performance of the TGC.

  14. A capillary discharge plasma source of intense VUV radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sobel'man, Igor I; Shevelko, A P; Yakushev, O F; Knight, L V; Turley, R S

    2003-01-31

    The results of investigation of a capillary discharge plasma, used as a source of intense VUV radiation and soft X-rays, are presented. The plasma was generated during the discharge of low-inductance condensers in a gas-filled ceramic capillary. Intense line radiation was observed in a broad spectral range (30-400 A) in various gases (CO{sub 2}, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe). The absolute radiation yield for the xenon discharge was {approx}5 mJ (2{pi} sr){sup -1} pulse{sup -1} within a spectral band of width 9 A at 135 A. Such a radiation source can be used for various practical applications, such as EUV projection lithography, microscopy of biological objects in a 'water window', reflectometry, etc. (special issue devoted to the 80th anniversary of academician n g basov's birth)

  15. High-order harmonic generation in a capillary discharge

    DOEpatents

    Rocca, Jorge J.; Kapteyn, Henry C.; Mumane, Margaret M.; Gaudiosi, David; Grisham, Michael E.; Popmintchev, Tenio V.; Reagan, Brendan A.

    2010-06-01

    A pre-ionized medium created by a capillary discharge results in more efficient use of laser energy in high-order harmonic generation (HHG) from ions. It extends the cutoff photon energy, and reduces the distortion of the laser pulse as it propagates down the waveguide. The observed enhancements result from a combination of reduced ionization energy loss and reduced ionization-induced defocusing of the driving laser as well as waveguiding of the driving laser pulse. The discharge plasma also provides a means to spectrally tune the harmonics by tailoring the initial level of ionization of the medium.

  16. Femtosecond laser ablation particle introduction to a liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure glow discharge ionization source

    SciTech Connect

    Carado, Anthony J.; Quarles, C. Derrick; Duffin, Andrew M.; Barinaga, Charles J.; Russo, Richard E.; Marcus, R. Kenneth; Eiden, Gregory C.; Koppenaal, David W.

    2012-01-01

    This work describes the use of a compact, liquid sampling – atmospheric pressure glow discharge (LS-APGD) ionization source to ionize metal particles within a laser ablation aerosol. Mass analysis was performed with a Thermo Scientific Exactive Mass Spectrometer which utilizes an orbitrap mass analyzer capable of producing mass resolution exceeding M/ΔM > 160,000. The LS-APGD source generates a low-power plasma between the surface of an electrolytic solution flowing at several µl min-1 through a fused silica capillary and a counter electrode consisting of a stainless steel capillary employed to deliver the laser ablation particles into the plasma. Sample particles of approximately 100 nm were generated with an Applied Spectra femtosecond laser located remotely and transported through 25 meters of polyurethane tubing by means of argon carrier gas. Samples consisted of an oxygen free copper shard, a disk of solder, and a one-cent U.S. coin. Analyte signal onset was readily detectable relative to the background signal produced by the carrier gas alone. The high mass resolution capability of the orbitrap mass spectrometer was demonstrated on the solder sample with resolution exceeding 90,000 for Pb and 160,000 for Cu. In addition, results from a laser ablation depth-profiling experiment of a one cent coin revealed retention of the relative locations of the ~10 µm copper cladding and zinc rich bulk layers.

  17. Modification of narrow ablating capillaries under the influence of multiple femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubin, K. V.; Lotov, K. V.; Trunov, V. I.; Pestryakov, E. V.

    2016-09-01

    Powerful femtosecond laser pulses that propagate through narrow ablating capillaries cause modification of capillary walls, which is studied experimentally and theoretically. At low intensities, the laser-induced periodic surface structures and porous coating composed of sub-micron particles appear on the walls. At higher intensities, the surface is covered by deposited droplets of the size up to 10 μm. In both cases, the ablated material forms a solid plug that completely blocks the capillary after several hundreds or thousands of pulses. The suggested theoretical model indicates that the plug formation is a universal effect. It must take place in any narrow tube subject to ablation under the action of short laser pulses.

  18. Time resolved EUV spectra from Zpinching capillary discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jancarek, Alexandr; Nevrkla, Michal; Nawaz, Fahad

    2015-09-01

    We developed symmetrically charged driver to obtain high voltage, high current Z-pinching capillary discharge. Plasma is created by up to 70 kA, 29 ns risetime current pulse passing through a 5 mm inner diameter, 224 mm long capillary filled with gas to initial pressure in the range of 1 kPa. Due to the low inductance design of the driver, the pinch is observable directly from the measured current curve. Time-integrated and time-resolved spectra of discharge plasma radiation are recorded together with the capillary current and analyzed. The most encouraging spectra were captured in the wavelength range 8.3 ÷ 14 nm. This spectral region contains nitrogen Balmer series lines including potentially lasing NVII 2 - 3 transition. Spectral lines are identified in the NIST database using the FLY kinetic code. The line of 13.38 nm wavelength, transition NVII 2 - 3, was observed in gated, and also in time-integrated spectra for currents >60 kA. This work has been supported by the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports of the Czech Republic grants LG13029.

  19. Atmospheric pressure arc discharge with ablating graphite anode

    SciTech Connect

    Nemchinsky, V. A.; Raitses, Y.

    2015-05-18

    The anodic carbon arc discharge is used to produce carbon nanoparticles. Recent experiments with the carbon arc at atmospheric pressure helium demonstrated the enhanced ablation rate for narrow graphite anodes resulting in high deposition rates of carbonaceous products on the copper cathode (Fetterman et al 2008 Carbon 46 1322–6). The proposed model explains these results with interconnected steady-state models of the cathode and the anode processes. When considering cathode functioning, the model predicts circulation of the particles in the near-cathode region: evaporation of the cathode material, ionization of evaporated atoms and molecules in the near-cathode plasma, return of the resulting ions to the cathode, surface recombination of ions and electrons followed again by cathode evaporation etc. In the case of the low anode ablation rate, the ion acceleration in the cathode sheath provides the major cathode heating mechanism. In the case of an intensive anode ablation, an additional cathode heating is due to latent fusion heat of the atomic species evaporated from the anode and depositing at the cathode. Using the experimental arc voltage as the only input discharge parameter, the model allows us to calculate the anode ablation rate. A comparison of the results of calculations with the available experimental data shows reasonable agreement.

  20. Performance of capillary discharge guided laser plasma wakefieldaccelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Kei; Esarey, Eric; Geddes, Cameron G.R.; Gonsalves,Anthony J.; Leemans, Wim P.; Panasenko, Dmitriy; Schroeder, Carl B.; Toth, Csaba; Hooker, S.M.

    2007-06-25

    A GeV-class laser-driven plasma-based wakefield acceleratorhas been realized at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL).The device consists of the 40TW high repetition rate Ti:sapphire LOASISlaser system at LBNL and a gas-filled capillary discharge waveguidedeveloped at Oxford University. The operation of the capillary dischargeguided laser plasma wakefield accelerator with a capillaryof 225 mu mdiameter and 33 mm in length was analyzed in detail. The input intensitydependence suggests that excessive self-injection causes increased beamloading leading to broadband lower energy electron beam generation. Thetrigger versus laser arrival timing dependence suggests that the plasmachannel parameters can be tuned to reduce beam divergence.

  1. The research of interaction of the capillary discharge with metal foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirko, D. L.; Egorov, I. D.

    2016-09-01

    The properties of capillary discharge under its interaction with various metal foils are analysed. Spectral composition of capillary discharge jet is investigated. Upon jet interaction with metal foils, plasma domains occur. The properties of glowing plasma domains, which occur in a constant magnetic field, are analysed. The possible internal structure of plasma domains is analysed.

  2. Modeling nanoparticle formation by laser ablation and by spark discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itina, Tatiana E.

    2016-03-01

    Nanoparticles have found numerous applications in such areas as photonics, electronics, medicine, etc. Further development of these fields requires reliable and versatile methods of nanoparticle synthesis with well-controlled properties. Among promising synthesis techniques, both laser ablation and plasma discharges are considered. These methods provide numerous advantages that are unique in several cases. On one hand, the main advantage of the laser ablation method is in the possibilities of changing laser parameters and background conditions and in its capacity to preserve stoichiometry. Laser-based methods also yield bio-compatible nanoparticles and nano-colloids with unique chemical properties. Laser-induced fragmentation provides additional control ways over nanoparticle sizes. To better understand and to optimize these processes, detailed numerical modeling is performed. The involved stages are considered and analyzed. The resulting nanoparticle parameters are investigated as a function of the experimental conditions. Nanoparticle properties, such as mean size and mean concentration are analyzed. Differences and similarities between the considered synthesis methods are discussed.

  3. Enhancement of the EUV emission of a metallic capillary discharge operated with argon ambient gas

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, L. S. Tan, D. Saboohi, S. Yap, S. L. Wong, C. S.

    2014-03-05

    In this work, the metallic capillary discharge is operated with two different ambients: air and argon. In the experiments reported here, the chamber is first evacuated to 10{sup −5} mbar. The discharge is initiated by the transient hollow cathode effect generated electron beam, with either air ambient or argon ambient at 10{sup −4} mbar. The bombardment of electron beam at the tip of the stainless steel anode gives rise to a metallic vapor, which is injected into the capillary and initiates the main discharge through the capillary. The EUV emission is measured for different discharge voltages for both conditions and compared. It is found that the metallic capillary discharge with argon ambientis able to produce higher EUV energy compared to that with air ambient.

  4. Pulsed Power Issues for the Phillips Laboratory's Capillary Discharge Soft X-Ray Laser Experiment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruden, Edward L.; Graham, Jack D.

    1996-11-01

    The Phillips Laboratory is presently attempting to reproduce the high gain laser results of J. Rocca's Capillary Discharge z-pinch pumped 46.9 nm Ne-like Ar laser. This poster discusses the design and operation of the PL laser's pulsed power circuit. The capillary circuit consists of a low inductance 3nH water capacitor discharged by a coaxial spark gap into a presently 12 cm capillary. The capillary is supplied with 39 kA of current which rises in 20ns. The capillary tube itself is submerged in the same water supply as the capacitor. The effect of the slower speed of electromagnetic propagation in water vs. plastic on the dynamic inductance of the plastic capillary is discussed. Higher current rise rates for the first few ns apparently result from the lag in the EM propagation in the water. This effect may improve implosion uniformity during the initial formative phase of the imploding z- pinch plasma.

  5. Experimental study of self-trapping in capillary discharge guided laser wakefield acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Panasenko, D.; Esarey, E.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Gonsalves, A. J.; Leemans, W. P.; Lin, C.; Nakamura, K.; Schroeder, C. B.; Toth, C.

    2009-05-04

    Laser wakefield acceleration experiments were carried out using hydrogen-filled capillary discharge waveguides. For a 33 mm long, 300 mu m capillary, parameter regimes with high energy electron beams (up to 1 GeV) and stable 0.5 GeV were found. In the high energy regime, the electron beam peak energy was correlated with the number of trapped electrons. For a 15 mm long, 200 mu m diameter capillary, quasi-monoenergetic e beams up to 300 MeV were observed. By de-tuning discharge delay from optimum guiding performance, self-trapping was found to be stabilized.

  6. Exploring the Potential of Table-Top X-Ray Lasers and Capillary Discharge for Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Shlyaptev, V N; Dunn, J; Smith, R F; Moon, S J; Fournier, K B; Nilsen, J; Osterheld, A L; Kuba, J; Wootton, A J; Lee, R W; Rocca, J J; Rahman, A; Hammarsten, E; Filevich, J; Jankovska, E; Marconi, M C; Fornaciari, N; Buchenauer, D; Hender, H A; Kari,M S; Kanouff, M; Dimkoff, J; Kubiak, G; Shimkaveg, G; Silfvast, W T

    2003-05-08

    The advantages of using of table top x-ray lasers (XRLs) for different applications have been described. Examples of the first successful use of XRLs, the current efforts in applying them and the potential applications where an XRL can be used in future have been discussed. Modeling results showing the possibility of 3-4 times shorter wavelength capillary discharge x-ray lasers and calculated spectrum of Xe capillary EUV source are presented.

  7. Observation and numerical analysis of plasma parameters in a capillary discharge-produced plasma channel waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Terauchi, Hiromitsu; Bobrova, Nadezhda; Sasorov, Pavel; Kikuchi, Takashi; Sasaki, Toru; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Yugami, Noboru; Kodama, Ryosuke

    2011-03-01

    We observed the parameters of the discharge-produced plasma in cylindrical capillary. Plasma parameters of the waveguide were investigated by use of both a Normarski laser interferometer and a hydrogen plasma line spectrum. A space-averaged maximum temperature of 3.3 eV with electron densities of the order of 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} was observed at a discharge time of 150 ns and a maximum discharge current of 200 A. One-dimensional dissipative magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code was used to analyze the discharge dynamics in the gas-filled capillary discharge waveguide for high-intensity laser pulses. Simulations were performed for the conditions of the experiment. We compared the temporal behavior of the electron temperature and the radial electron density profiles, measured in the experiment with the results of the numerical simulations. They occurred to be in a good agreement. An ultrashort, intense laser pulse was guided by use of this plasma channel.

  8. GeV Electron Beams from a Capillary Discharge Guided Laser Plasma Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Kei; Gonsalves, Anthony; Panasenko, Dmitriy; Lin, Chen; Toth, Csaba; Geddes, Cameron; Schroeder, Carl; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim

    2010-07-08

    Laser plasma acceleration (LPA) up to 1 GeV has been realized at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory by using a capillary discharge waveguide. In this paper, the capillary discharge guided LPA system including a broadband single-shot electron spectrometer is described. The spectrometer was designed specifically for LPA experiments and has amomentumacceptance of 0.01 - 1.1 GeV/c with a percent level resolution. Experiments using a 33 mm long, 300 mu m diameter capillary demonstrated the generation of high energy electron beams up to 1 GeV. By de-tuning discharge delay from optimum guiding performance, selftrapping and acceleration were found to be stabilized producing 460 MeV electron beams.

  9. Characteristics of ac capillary discharge produced in electrically conductive water solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeBaerdemaeker, F.; Simek, M.; Schmidt, J.; Leys, C.

    2007-05-01

    Basic electrical, optical and calorimetric characteristics of an ac (50 Hz) driven capillary discharge produced in a water solution were studied for initial water solution conductivity in the range 50-1000 µS cm-1. Typical current and voltage waveforms and emission intensities produced by several electronically excited species were recorded with high time resolution. The evolution of the electrical current, power and capillary resistance was inspected during positive ac half-cycle for various operational regimes. A fast relaxation of the discharge following a breakdown event was observed. Optical measurements indicate that radiative species are mostly generated during the first few hundreds of nanoseconds of plasma generation and that the average duration of plasma emission induced by a discharge pulse is of the order of a few microseconds. Results of calorimetric measurements are in good agreement with average electrical measurements and support the assumption that the discharge is a constant source of heat delivered to the liquid. Assuming that only a fraction of the heat released inside the capillary can be transported by conduction through the capillary wall and via its orifices, the processes of bubble formation, expulsion and re-filling the capillary with 'fresh' water must play a key role in maintaining a thermal balance during long-time steady-state operation of the device. Furthermore, a simplified numerical model and a first order energy deposition calculation prove the plausibility of the bubble breakdown mechanism.

  10. Dynamics of pre-ionized fast capillary discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hübner, J.; Vrba, P.; Straus, J.; Jancarek, A.; Nevrkla, M.

    2014-05-01

    The goal of this work is to determine the best conditions for pre-ionization of the nitrogen filled capillary plasma column applying an external exponentially damped or high-frequency alternating current. As we supposed, optimal pre-ionization conditions are achieved when the plasma is quiescent, motionless and isothermal, near the local thermodynamical equilibrium. At the time of optimal conditions for the pre-ionization plasma column, the main pulse is applied. This approach enables us to estimate the influence of such prepared plasma on the value of emitted energy during the main current pulse. For modeling of plasma during the pre-pulse and main pulse, the magneto-hydro-dynamics (MHD) NPINCH code [1] and the radiative-MHD Z* code [2] were used. The computer results are used for further improvement of x-ray-ultraviolet-capillary sources designed in IPP ASCR and CTU FNSPE laboratories in Prague.

  11. A high voltage pulsed power supply for capillary discharge waveguide applications

    SciTech Connect

    Abuazoum, S.; Wiggins, S. M.; Issac, R. C.; Welsh, G. H.; Vieux, G.; Jaroszynski, D. A.; Ganciu, M.

    2011-06-15

    We present an all solid-state, high voltage pulsed power supply for inducing stable plasma formation (density {approx}10{sup 18} cm{sup -3}) in gas-filled capillary discharge waveguides. The pulser (pulse duration of 1 {mu}s) is based on transistor switching and wound transmission line transformer technology. For a capillary of length 40 mm and diameter 265 {mu}m and gas backing pressure of 100 mbar, a fast voltage pulse risetime of 95 ns initiates breakdown at 13 kV along the capillary. A peak current of {approx}280 A indicates near complete ionization, and the r.m.s. temporal jitter in the current pulse is only 4 ns. Temporally stable plasma formation is crucial for deploying capillary waveguides as plasma channels in laser-plasma interaction experiments, such as the laser wakefield accelerator.

  12. Temporal evolution of electron density and temperature in capillary discharge plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Seong Y.; Kang, Hoonsoo; Uhm, Han S.; Lee, In W.; Suk, Hyyong

    2010-05-15

    Time-resolved spectroscopic measurements of a capillary discharge plasma of helium gas were carried out to obtain detailed information about dynamics of the discharge plasma column, where the fast plasma dynamics is determined by the electron density and temperature. Our measurements show that the electron density of the capillary plasma column increases sharply after gas breakdown and reaches its peak of the order of 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} within less than 100 ns, and then it decreases as time goes by. The result indicates that a peak electron density of 2.3x10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} occurs about 65 ns after formation of the discharge current, which is ideal for laser wakefield acceleration experiments reported by Karsch et al. [New J. Phys. 9, 415 (2007)].

  13. Modelling of a nitrogen x-ray laser pumped by capillary discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrba, Pavel; Vrbová, Miroslava; Bobrova, Nadezhda; Sasorov, Pavel

    2005-12-01

    We performed computer modelling of a fast electrical discharge in a nitrogen-filled alumina capillary in order to discover discharge system parameters that may lead to efficient recombination pumping of soft X-ray laser with active medium created by H-like nitrogen ions. The space-time dependences of pinch plasma quantities were found by means of a one-dimensional MHD code. Time dependences of populations of all ionisation states and populations of selected energy levels of lithium-, helium- and hydrogen-like nitrogen ions were evaluated using the FLY code as a post-processor. The population inversion was found at the quantum transition corresponding to the Balmer α-line of N6+ ions and the resulting gain factor was evaluated for different capillary radii, initial pressure, electric current peaks and periods. A gain factor of 1 cm-1 spanning the time interval of 1 ns was found for an optimised arrangement with capillary radius 1.5 mm, peak current 50 kA, quarter period 40 ns and filling gas pressure 0.5 kPa. It is pointed out that even higher values of the gain factor may be achieved with thinner capillaries and shorter current pulses, e.g. a gain factor of 6 cm-1 is achieved if the capillary radius is 0.5 mm, peak current 56 kA, quarter period 15 ns, and filling nitrogen pressure 3.9 kPa.

  14. Generation of dc pin-hole discharges in liquids: comparison of discharge breakdown in diaphragm and capillary configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozáková, Zdenka; Krčma, František; Vašíček, Michal; Hlavatá, Lucie; Hlochová, Lenka

    2015-04-01

    Electrical discharges in liquids can be generated in several electrode configurations; one of them is called as a pin-hole. The discharge is created inside a small orifice in the dielectric barrier connecting two chambers filled by any conductive solution. Each chamber contains one electrode. Based on the orifice length/diameter ratio, the discharge is called as a capillary or diaphragm discharge. The present paper gives the first detailed observation of the dependence of discharge creation on the orifice shape for selected NaCl solution conductivities (250-1000 μS cm-1). As a dielectric barrier, ceramic discs with thickness varying from 0.3 to 1.5 mm were used. Diameter of one central pin-hole was in the range of 0.25-1.00 mm. The non-pulsing dc high voltage up to 2 kV with power up to 500 W was used for the presented study. The bubble theory of the discharge generation was confirmed at the set conditions.

  15. A compact, low cost Marx bank for generating capillary discharge plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyson, A. E.; Thornton, C.; Hooker, S. M.

    2016-09-01

    We describe in detail a low power Compact Marx Bank (CMB) circuit that can provide 20 kV, 500 A pulses of approximately 100-200 ns duration. One application is the generation of capillary discharge plasmas of density ≈1018 cm-3 used in laser plasma accelerators. The CMB is triggered with a high speed solid state switch and gives a high voltage output pulse with a ns scale rise time into a 50 Ω load (coaxial cable) with <4 ns voltage jitter. Its small size (10 cm × 25 cm × 5 cm) means that it can be placed right next to the capillary discharge in the target chamber to avoid the need to impedance match. The electrical energy required per discharge is <1 J, and the CMB can be run at shot repetition rates of ≳1 Hz. This low power requirement means that the circuit can easily be powered by a small lead acid battery and, therefore, can be floated relative to laboratory earth. The CMB is readily scalable and pulses >45 kV are demonstrated in air discharges.

  16. Water-assisted CO(2) laser ablated glass and modified thermal bonding for capillary-driven bio-fluidic application.

    PubMed

    Chung, C K; Chang, H C; Shih, T R; Lin, S L; Hsiao, E J; Chen, Y S; Chang, E C; Chen, C C; Lin, C C

    2010-02-01

    The glass-based microfluidic chip has widely been applied to the lab-on-a-chip for clotting tests. Here, we have demonstrated a capillary driven flow chip using the water-assisted CO(2) laser ablation for crackless fluidic channels and holes as well as the modified low-temperature glass bonding with assistance of adhesive polymer film at 300 degrees Celsius. Effect of water depth on the laser ablation of glass quality was investigated. The surface hydrophilic property of glass and polymer film was measured by static contact angle method for hydrophilicity examination in comparison with the conventional polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) material. Both low-viscosity deionized water and high-viscosity whole blood were used for testing the capillary-driving flow behavior. The preliminary coagulation testing in the Y-channel chip was also performed using whole blood and CaCl(2) solution. The water-assisted CO(2) laser processing can cool down glass during ablation for less temperature gradient to eliminate the crack. The modified glass bonding can simplify the conventional complex fabrication procedure of glass chips, such as high-temperature bonding, long consuming time and high cost. Moreover, the developed fluidic glass chip has the merit of hydrophilic behavior conquering the problem of traditional hydrophobic recovery of polymer fluidic chips and shows the ability to drive high-viscosity bio-fluids.

  17. Plasma Parameter of a Capillary Discharge-Produced Plasma Channel to Guide an Ultrashort Laser Pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Terauchi, Hiromitsu; Bai, Jin-xiang; Yugami, Noboru

    2009-01-22

    We have observed the optical guiding of a 100-fs laser pulse with the laser intensity in the range of 10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2} using a 1.5-cm long capillary discharge-produced plasma channel for compact electron acceleration applications. The optical pulse propagation using the plasma channel is achieved with the electron densities of 10{sup 17}-10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} and the electron temperatures of 0.5-4 eV at a discharge time delay of around 150 ns and a discharge current of 500 A with a pulse duration of 100-150 ns. An energy spectrum of the accelerated electrons from a laser-plasma acceleration scheme showed a peak at 1.3 MeV with a maximum energy tail of 1.6 MeV.

  18. The effects of the prepulse on capillary discharge extreme ultraviolet laser

    SciTech Connect

    Shuker, M.; Ben-kish, A.; Nemirovsky, R.A.; Fisher, A.; Ron, A.

    2006-01-15

    In the past few years collisionally pumped extreme ultraviolet (XUV) lasers utilizing a capillary discharge were demonstrated. An intense current pulse is applied to a gas-filled capillary, inducing magnetic collapse (Z pinch) and formation of a highly ionized plasma column. Usually, a small current pulse (prepulse) is applied to the gas in order to preionize it prior to the onset of the main current pulse. In this paper we investigate the effects of the prepulse on a capillary discharge Ne-like Ar XUV laser (46.9 nm). The importance of the prepulse in achieving suitable initial conditions of the gas column and preventing instabilities during the collapse is demonstrated. Furthermore, measurements of the amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) properties (intensity and duration) in different prepulse currents revealed unexpected sensitivity. Increasing the prepulse current by a factor of 2 caused the ASE intensity to decrease by an order of magnitude and to nearly disappear. This effect is accompanied by a slight increase in the lasing duration. We attribute this effect to axial flow in the gas during the prepulse.

  19. Dynamics and density distributions in a capillary-discharge waveguide with an embedded supersonic jet

    SciTech Connect

    Matlis, N. H. Gonsalves, A. J.; Steinke, S.; Tilborg, J. van; Shaw, B.; Mittelberger, D. E.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Matlis, E. H.; Leemans, W. P.

    2015-11-28

    We present an analysis of the gas dynamics and density distributions within a capillary-discharge waveguide with an embedded supersonic jet. This device provides a target for a laser plasma accelerator which uses longitudinal structuring of the gas-density profile to enable control of electron trapping and acceleration. The functionality of the device depends sensitively on the details of the density profile, which are determined by the interaction between the pulsed gas in the jet and the continuously-flowing gas in the capillary. These dynamics are captured by spatially resolving recombination light from several emission lines of the plasma as a function of the delay between the jet and the discharge. We provide a phenomenological description of the gas dynamics as well as a quantitative evaluation of the density evolution. In particular, we show that the pressure difference between the jet and the capillary defines three regimes of operation with qualitatively different longitudinal density profiles and show that jet timing provides a sensitive method for tuning between these regimes.

  20. Linearly tapered discharge capillary waveguides as a medium for a laser plasma wakefield accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Abuazoum, S.; Wiggins, S. M.; Ersfeld, B.; Hart, K.; Vieux, G.; Yang, X.; Welsh, G. H.; Issac, R. C.; Reijnders, M. P.; Jones, D. R.; Jaroszynski, D. A.

    2012-01-02

    Gas-filled capillary discharge waveguides are commonly used as media for plasma wakefield accelerators. We show that effective waveguides can be manufactured using a femtosecond laser micromachining technique to produce a linearly tapered plasma density, which enables the energy of the accelerator to be enhanced significantly. A laser guiding efficiency in excess of 82% at sub-relativistic intensities has been demonstrated in a 40 mm long capillary with a diameter tapering from 320 {mu}m to 270 {mu}m, which gives rise to an on-axis, time-averaged plasma density that varies from 1.0 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} to 1.6 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3}.

  1. Characteristics of argon plasma waveguide produced by alumina capillary discharge for short wavelength laser application

    SciTech Connect

    Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Yugami, Noboru; Bobrova, Nadezhda; Sasorov, Pavel; Sakai, Shohei; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Kodama, Ryosuke

    2012-05-01

    We have reported the argon (Ar) plasma waveguide produced in an alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) capillary discharge and used to guide ultrashort laser pulses at intensities of the order of 10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2}. The electron density in the plasma waveguide was measured to be 1x10{sup 18} cm{sup -3}, in agreement with one-dimensional magnetrohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations. The MHD code was also used to evaluate the degree of ionization of argon (Ar) in the preformed plasma waveguide. The maximum ion charge state of Ar{sup 3+} in capillary discharge was measured and obtained in the MHD simulations. The spectrum of the propagated laser pulse in the Ar plasma waveguide was not modified and was well reproduced by a particle-in-cell simulations under initial ion charge state of Ar{sup 3+} in the preformed plasma waveguide. The optimum timing for the laser pulse injection was around 150 ns after initiation of a discharge with a peak current of 200 A.

  2. Signal enhancement of lead and arsenic in soil using laser ablation combined with fast electric discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kexue, L. I.; Zhou, Weidong; Shen, Qinmei; Shao, Jie; Qian, Huiguo

    2010-05-01

    In comparison to the traditional single pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (SP-LIBS), a significant enhancement of atomic emission of lead and arsenic from laser plasma of soil has been demonstrated by the use of a laser ablation and fast pulse discharge plasma spectroscopy technique (LA-FPDPS). In this technique, a specifically designed high voltage and rapid discharge circuit was used to reheat the laser plasma and to enhance the plasma emission. A rapid and time damped alternating discharge current was observed with a short oscillating period ˜ 0.6 μs and sustained for about 6 μs. The peak intensities of Pb (283.31 nm) and As (286.04 nm) lines from soil plasma emission were greatly enhanced when compare to the traditional single pulse (SP) LIBS system. In addition, the precision of measurements in terms of the relative standard deviation (RSD) and the signal to noise ( S/ N) ratios were also improved. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of the laser ablation regions indicated that the plasma reheating by the discharge spark was presumably the main mechanism for observed signal enhancement in the LA-FPDPS technique.

  3. Investigation on the characteristics of a two gap capillary discharge based on surface flash over ignition in atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Dong; Yang, Lanjun; Huo, Peng; Ma, Jiangbo; Guo, Haishan; Xu, Ran; Ding, Weidong

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a two gap capillary (TGC) structure is presented and the corresponding driving circuit based on surface flashover ignition is designed to achieve reliable and repetitive discharge in atmosphere. The characteristics of the two gap capillary (TGC) discharge in low energy are investigated, of which the discharge energy is from 27 J to 432 J. With the rise of charging voltage, the delay of the weak capillary discharge and the main discharge both decrease. Meanwhile, the current flowing through the main gap and the plasma jet ejection are enhanced. The main gap resistance is about several hundreds of milliohms in the main discharge and rises gradually with the decay of the current. The long tail extinction is witnessed at the relatively low charging voltage of 0.5 kV and 1.0 kV, by which the pulse width of the discharge is extended. However, the discharge during the long tail extinction contributes little to the plasma jet ejection with negligible plasma jet velocity and low degree of the plasma ionization. The effective energy deposition efficiency on the main gap increases gradually with the charging voltage and reaches approximately 2 times higher than that of the traditional structure at the charging voltage of 2.0 kV. The series inductor in the circuit can restrain the development of the long tail extinction and increase the effective energy deposition efficiency. Thus, the discharge characteristics and the plasma ejection of TGC under the relatively low charging voltage are optimized.

  4. Implementation of moire-schlieren deflectometry on a small scale fast capillary plasma discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Valenzuela, J. C.; Wyndham, E. S.; Chuaqui, H.; Cortes, D. S.; Favre, M.; Bhuyan, H.

    2012-05-15

    We present the results of an implementation of a refractive diagnostic to study fast dynamics in capillary discharges. It consists of a moire-schlieren deflectometry technique that provides a quantitative analysis of the refractive index gradients. The technique is composed of an angular deflection mapping system (moire deflectometry) and a spatial Fourier filter (schlieren). Temporal resolution of 12 ps, 50 {mu}m of spatial resolution and minimum detectable gradient of ({nabla}n{sub e}){sub min}=6x10{sup 18}cm{sup -4} were obtained. With these parameters, a large aspect ratio capillary discharge of 15 ns half period current was studied; the diagnostic was implemented axially along the alumina tube of 1.6 mm inner diameter and 21 mm length. The detectable electron density for these conditions was 1x10{sup 17}cm{sup -3}. From the interpretation of the fringe displacement, we are able to measure the velocity of the radial compression wave and the compression ratio due to the Lorentz force. On axis, electron densities of the order of 5x10{sup 17}cm{sup -3} were obtained at the time of maximum soft x-ray emission.

  5. Characteristics of a multi-wavelength Ne-like Ar laser excited by capillary discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yongpeng; Liu, Tao; Jiang, Shan; Cui, Huaiyu; Ding, Yujie; Li, Lianbo

    2016-05-01

    We report the characteristics of 46.9, 69.8 and 72.6 nm lasers of Ne-like Ar in a plasma column pumped by capillary discharge. A main current of 12 kA with rise time of 40 ns was used to generate the plasma in a 35-cm-long capillary. The temporal and spatial characteristics of 46.9 and 69.8 nm laser pulses were measured. The time of lasing onset for the two lasers is about 35 ns. The pulse widths are about 1.3 ns for 46.9 nm laser and 1.2 ns for 69.8 nm laser. The FWHM beam divergences of the 46.9 and 69.8 nm lasers are approximately 0.5 and 0.4 mrad, respectively. The initial pressure ranges for 46.9, 69.8 and 72.6 nm lasers correspond to 13-24, 12.5-20 and 14-20 Pa, respectively. A gain coefficient of 0.58 cm-1 was measured and gain saturation behavior was observed at 46.9 nm, conditioning the initial pressure of 19 Pa. At the same discharge current, a 69.8 nm laser with gain coefficient of 0.41 cm-1 and a 72.6 nm laser with gain coefficient of 0.22 cm-1 were achieved by changing the initial pressure to 16 Pa.

  6. Diurnal discharge fluctuations and streambed ablation in a supraglacial stream on the Vaughan-Lewis and Gilkey glaciers, Juneau Icefield, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, J.W. |; Pinchak, A.C. |

    1995-12-31

    The study reported here focuses on the dynamics of two supraglacial streams on the Juneau Icefield in southeast Alaska. Data on streambed ablation (melting) rates, stream discharge, radiation, and air temperature and humidity were collected in August 1990 and 1991. Radiation had the greatest effect on stream discharge. Daily peak discharges occurred only 30 minutes after peak radiation, but two hours after peak temperature. Factors influencing variation in discharge of the streams were velocity, stream depth, and stream width, in decreasing order of importance. Streambed ablation due to radiation was greater than glacier surface ablation due to radiation. Streambed ablation due to frictional heating was very small.

  7. High-repetition rate laser ablation coupled to dielectric barrier discharge postionization for ambient mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bierstedt, Andreas; Riedel, Jens

    2016-07-15

    Most ambient sample introduction and ionization techniques for native mass spectrometry are highly selective for polar agents. To achieve a more general sensitivity for a wider range of target analytes, a novel laser ablation dielectric barrier discharge (LA DBD) ionization scheme was developed. The approach employs a two-step mechanism with subsequent sample desorption and post-ionization. Effective ablation was achieved by the second harmonic output (λ=532nm) of a diode pumped Nd:YVO4 laser operating at a high-repetition rate of several kHz and pulse energies below 100μJ. The ejected analyte-containing aerosol was consecutively vaporized and ionized in the afterglow of a DBD plasma jet. Depending on their proton affinity the superexcited helium species in this afterglow produced analyte ions as protonated and ammoniated species, as well as radical cations. The optimization procedure could corroborate underlying conceptual consideration on the ablation, desorption and ionization mechanisms. A successful detection of a variety of target molecules could be shown from the pharmaceutical ibuprofen, urea, the amino acids l-arginine, l-lysine, the polymer polyethylene glycol, the organometallic compound ferrocene and the technical mixture wild mint oil. For a reliable evaluation of the introduced detection procedure spectra from the naturally abundant alkaloid capsaicin in dried capsicum fruits were recorded. PMID:26851554

  8. Soft X-Ray Emission Analysis Of A Pulsed Capillary Discharge Operated In Nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdivia, M. P.; Valenzuela, J. C.; Wyndham, E. S.; Favre, M.; Chuaqui, H.; Bhuyan, H.

    2014-05-01

    We present results from a pulsed capillary ns discharge source, operated in Nitrogen and N/He mixtures, in an alumina capillary 2.1mm long with outer diameter of 6.3mm and inner diameter of 1.6mm. The electrical energy stored is 0.5J with peak current of 6kA. Fast charging from an IGBT based pulsed power circuit allows operation at 35-600 Hz with voltages in the range of 18-24kV. Characteristic time-integrated N/He spectra were recorded and analyzed for values of 20-200 Å, with clear evidence of He-like Nitrogen emission at 28.8Å, which represents a possible source for water window soft x-ray microscopy. Filtered diode measurements reveal the influence of axial electron beams, generated by hollow cathode dynamics, on the x-ray emission in the range of 300-450 eV. We discuss optimal voltage applied and pressure conditions for soft x-ray generation. Time-integrated MCP images of a filtered slit-wire system delivered clear evidence of full wall detachment with ~500μm in radial size for the entire emission range and ~200μm for the emission in the 300-450 eV range.

  9. Time-resolved EUV spectra from nitrogen Z-pinching capillary discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevrkla, Michal; Jančárek, Alexandr; Nawaz, Fahad; Parkman, Tomáś; Vrbová, Miroslava

    2015-05-01

    Time-integrated spectra and time-resolved spectra (20 ns resolution) of nitrogen discharge plasma radiation were recorded and analyzed. Plasma was created by a 70 kA, 29 ns rise-time current pulse flowing through a 5 mm inner diameter, 224 mm long capillary filled with nitrogen to initial pressure ˜0.1 ÷ 1 kPa. Spectra were captured in the wavelength range 8.3 ÷ 14 nm. This spectral region contains nitrogen Balmer series lines including potentially lasing NVII 2 - 3 transition1. Spectral lines were identified using the NIST database and the FLY kinetic code. Together with spectra the capillary current was measured. Due to the low inductance design of the driver, the pinch is observable directly from the measured current. 13.38 nm NVII 2 - 3 line was observed in gated, and also in time-integrated spectra for currents <60 kA. For higher gas-filling pressure also other Balmer series lines were observed.

  10. Properties of a capillary discharge-produced argon plasma waveguide for shorter wavelength source application

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Shohei; Miyazawa, Jun; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Yugami, Noboru; Bobrova, Nadezhda; Sasorov, Pavel; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Kodama, Ryosuke

    2011-10-15

    We report the operation of a discharge-produced argon (Ar) plasma waveguide in an alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) capillary to guide a 10{sup 16}-W/cm{sup 2} ultrashort laser pulse for shorter wavelength light sources at high repetition rate operation. The electron density in the plasma channel was measured to be 1 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3}. Modeling with a one-dimensional magnetrohydrodynamic code was used to evaluate the degree of ionization of Ar in the preformed plasma channel. The observed spectrum of the laser pulse after propagation in the argon plasma waveguide was not modified and was well reproduced by a particle in cell simulation.

  11. Plasma formation using a capillary discharge in water and its application to the sterilization of E. coli

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Yong Cheol; Park, Hyun Jae; Lee, Bong Ju; Kang, Won-Seok; Uhm, Han Sup

    2010-05-15

    An underwater electrical discharge in a narrow dielectric capillary provides the details of the evolution of microbubbles to plasma as formed by a tungsten electrode inserted in the capillary. An increase in the applied voltage forms microbubbles after water fills the capillary. A further increase in the voltage generates a surface discharge through the boundary of the bubble, elongating the bubble shape, and eventually forming plasma by electrical breakdown. This produces atomic oxygen, atomic hydrogen, and hydroxyl radicals from dissociation of water vapor. Also, a bactericidal test in normal saline solution showed that more than 99.6% of the bacterial cells were killed within 8 s, resulting from chlorine-containing species, in particular hypochlorous acid as a major bactericidal agent.

  12. Experimental and numerical study of the propagation of a discharge in a capillary tube in air at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jánský, Jaroslav; Le Delliou, Pierre; Tholin, Fabien; Tardiveau, Pierre; Bourdon, Anne; Pasquiers, Stéphane

    2011-08-01

    This paper presents an experimental and numerical study of a pulsed air plasma discharge at atmospheric pressure propagating in a capillary glass tube. In this work, we have compared the discharge structures and the axial propagation velocities of discharges. First, we have studied a needle-to-plane configuration without tube. For applied voltages in the range 7-18 kV, we have observed in experiments and in simulations that a plasma ball starts to develop around the needle tip. Then, for applied voltages less than 14 kV, in experiments, the discharge rapidly splits into several streamer channels with a main axial streamer. In simulations, we have computed only the main axial discharge. For applied voltages higher than 14 kV, in experiments and in simulations, we have observed that the discharge propagates with a cone shape in the gap. For all studied voltages, a good experiment/modelling agreement is obtained on the axial propagation velocity of the discharge, which increases with the applied voltage. Then, we have studied the propagation of discharges inside capillary tubes with radii in the range 37.5-300 µm. In experiments and simulations, we have observed that for small tube radius, the discharge front is quite homogeneous inside the tube and becomes tubular when the tube radius increases. Experimentally, we have observed that the velocity of the discharge reaches a maximum for a tube radius slightly less than 100 µm. We have noted that for a tube radius of 100 µm, the discharge velocity is three to four times higher than the velocity obtained without tube. This clearly shows the influence of the confinement by a capillary tube on the discharge dynamics. In this work, we have only simulated discharges for tube radii in the range 100-300 µm. We have noted that both in experiments and in simulations, the velocity of the discharge in tubes increases linearly with the applied voltage. As the radius of the tube decreases, the discharge velocity derived from the

  13. TALIF measurements of oxygen atom density in the afterglow of a capillary nanosecond discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klochko, A. V.; Lemainque, J.; Booth, J. P.; Starikovskaia, S. M.

    2015-04-01

    The atomic oxygen density has been measured in the afterglow of a capillary nanosecond discharge in 24-30 mbar synthetic air (N2 : O2 = 4 : 1) by the two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence (TALIF) technique, combined with absolute calibration by comparison with xenon TALIF. The discharge was initiated by a train of 30 ns FWHM pulses of alternating positive-negative-positive polarity, separated by 250 ns, with a train repetition frequency of 10 Hz. The amplitude of the first pulse was 10 kV in the cable. A flow of synthetic air through the tube provided complete gas renewal between pulse trains. The O-atom density measurements were made over the time interval 200 ns-2 µs after the initial pulse. The gas temperature was determined by analysis of the molecular nitrogen second positive system optical emission spectrum. The influence of the gas temperature on the atom density measurements, and the reactions producing O atoms, are discussed.

  14. Lasing in Ne-Like Argon Capillary Discharge at Low Current and the Effect of Current Prepulse

    SciTech Connect

    Kwek, K. H.; Tan, C. A.

    2009-01-21

    The output characteristics of saturated capillary discharge 46.9 nm Ne-like argon soft x-ray laser obtained with relatively low main discharge current of less than 20 kA, with the lowest being 9 kA. The 3 mm diameter and 200 mm long alumina capillary with Argon filling pressure range between 0.1-0.4 mbar was pumped by a discharge current with a quarter-cycle of about 40 ns. A current pulse with a typical RC shape (decay time {approx}30 {mu}s) was used as a prepulse. Measurements indicate that the laser output is affected by the timing of the application of the prepulse. This effect is most significant when the time delay between the application of the prepulse and the onset of the main current is around 2 to 4 {mu}s, and beyond these times, the effect is less significant.

  15. Pulsed laser ablation of borax target in vacuum and hydrogen DC glow discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kale, A. N.; Miotello, A.; Mosaner, P.

    2006-09-01

    The aim of our experiment was to produce a material with B sbnd H bonds for applications in hydrogen storage and generation. By using KrF excimer laser ( λ = 248 nm) ablation of borax (Na 2B 4O 7) target, thin films were deposited on KBr and silicon substrates. Ablation was performed both in vacuum and in hydrogen atmosphere. DC glow discharge technique was utilized to enhance hydrogen gas ionization. Experiments were performed using laser fluence from 5 to 20 J/cm 2. Films were deposited under gas pressure of 1 × 10 -5 to 5 × 10 -2 mbar and substrate temperatures of 130-450 °C. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of films showed presence of circular particulates. Film thickness, roughness and particulates number increased with increase in laser fluence. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis shows that sodium content in the particulates is higher than in the target. This effect is discussed in terms of atomic arrangements (both at surface and bulk) in systems where ionic and covalent bonds are present and by looking at the increased surface/bulk ratio of the particulates with respect to the deposited films. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy measurements showed presence of B sbnd O stretching and B sbnd O sbnd B bending bonds. Possible reasons for absence of B sbnd H bonds are attributed to binding enthalpy of the competing molecules.

  16. Prostate resection - minimally invasive - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Laser prostatectomy - discharge; Transurethral needle ablation - discharge; TUNA - discharge; Transurethral incision - discharge; TUIP - discharge; Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate - discharge; HoLep - discharge; Interstitial laser ...

  17. Diagnostics of a capillary discharge of a CO2 waveguide laser by coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakhterov, A. A.; Iliukhin, A. A.; Konev, Iu. B.; Lipatov, N. I.; Pashinin, P. P.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental results are reported from coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) diagnostic studies of capillary discharge in the CO2:N2:He = 1:1:8 working mixture of a CO2 waveguide laser. The CARS scans were used to characterize the translational temperature of the gas and the vibrational temperatures of the discharge plasma components. The data are vital for identifying anharmonic states which reduce the laser power and working mixture lifetime. Data are furnished on the translational temperature and vibrational temperature as functions of the capillary radius. CARS is concluded to be a valid technique for studying the distribution of pump power among the degrees of freedom of the working mixture components, even when dissociation is occurring.

  18. Table-top water-window soft X-ray microscope using a Z-pinching capillary discharge source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawaz, M. F.; Nevrkla, M.; Jancarek, A.; Torrisi, A.; Parkman, T.; Turnova, J.; Stolcova, L.; Vrbova, M.; Limpouch, J.; Pina, L.; Wachulak, P.

    2016-07-01

    The development and demonstration of a table-top transmission soft X-ray (SXR) microscope, using a laboratory incoherent capillary discharge source has been carried out. This Z-pinching capillary discharge water-window SXR source, is a first of its kind to be used for high spatial resolution microscopy at λ = 2.88 nm (430 eV) . A grazing incidence ellipsoidal condenser mirror is used for focusing of the SXR radiation at the sample plane. The Fresnel zone plate objective lens is used for imaging of the sample onto a back-illuminated (BI) CCD camera. The achieved half-pitch spatial resolution of the microscope approaches 100 nm, as demonstrated by the knife-edge test. Details about the source, and the construction of the microscope are presented and discussed. Additionally, the SXR images of various samples, proving applicability of such microscope for observation of objects in the nanoscale, are shown.

  19. Investigation of capillary nanosecond discharges in air at moderate pressure: comparison of experiments and 2D numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klochko, Andrei V.; Starikovskaia, Svetlana M.; Xiong, Zhongmin; Kushner, Mark J.

    2014-09-01

    Nanosecond electrical discharges in the form of ionization waves are of interest for rapidly ionizing and exciting complex gas mixtures to initiate chemical reactions. Operating with a small discharge tube diameter can significantly increase the specific energy deposition and so enable optimization of the initiation process. Analysis of the uniformity of energy release in small diameter capillary tubes will aid in this optimization. In this paper, results for the experimentally derived characteristics of nanosecond capillary discharges in air at moderate pressure are presented and compared with results from a two-dimensional model. The quartz capillary tube, having inner and outer diameters of 1.5 and 3.4 mm, is about 80 mm long and filled with synthetic dry air at 27 mbar. The capillary tube with two electrodes at the ends is inserted into a break of the central wire of a long coaxial cable. A metal screen around the tube is connected to the cable ground shield. The discharge is driven by a 19 kV 35 ns voltage pulse applied to the powered electrode. The experimental measurements are conducted primarily by using a calibrated capacitive probe and back current shunts. The numerical modelling focuses on the fast ionization wave (FIW) and the plasma properties in the immediate afterglow after the conductive plasma channel has been established between the two electrodes. The FIW produces a highly focused region of electric field on the tube axis that sustains the ionization wave that eventually bridges the electrode gap. Results from the model predict FIW propagation speed and current rise time that agree with the experiment.

  20. A comparative study of silver nanoparticles synthesized by arc discharge and femtosecond laser ablation in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongqiang; Zou, Guisheng; Liu, Lei; Li, Yong; Tong, Hao; Sun, Zhenguo; Zhou, Y. Norman

    2016-10-01

    Silver nanoparticles have been synthesized by arc discharge and femtosecond laser ablation in polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) aqueous solution. Both methods are the simple, cost-effective and environment-friendly way to obtain the purity silver nanoparticles. In this study, the structure, composition, morphology, size and distribution, stability, production rate and sintering properties of silver nanoparticles synthesized by both methods were compared. The spherical or pseudo-spherical silver nanoparticles were synthesized by both methods, and the diameters were below 50 nm. The arc discharge-synthesized particle distribution varied with the breakdown voltage, and laser-synthesized particle size mainly depended on the laser energy. PVP solution could cap and stabilize the silver nanoparticles by Ag-O bond, while arc discharge and laser ablation resulted in some level of PVP degradation during processing. Sliver nanoparticle colloids synthesized by both methods had the high negative values of zeta potential and exhibited the good stability. The maximum production rates of the silver nanoparticles synthesized by arc discharge and femtosecond laser ablation were 6.0 and 3.0 mg/min, respectively. In addition, the sintering properties of silver nanoparticles synthesized by both methods were also discussed.

  1. Liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy detection of laser ablation produced particles: A feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quarles, C. Derrick, Jr.; Gonzalez, Jhanis; Choi, Inhee; Ruiz, Javier; Mao, Xianglei; Marcus, R. Kenneth; Russo, Richard E.

    2012-10-01

    The use of a liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure glow discharge (LS-APGD) microplasma source as an alternative to conventional inductively coupled plasma (ICP) detection of laser ablation (LA) produced particles using a Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm is demonstrated. This configuration utilizes a 180° geometry, which is different from the 40° geometry that was used to ionize ablated particles followed by mass spectrometric detection. The use of a hollow counter electrode (nickel, 0.3 cm o.d., 0.1 cm i.d.) was implemented to introduce ablated particles directly into the APGD plasma with helium as a carrier gas. The LS-APGD source was optimized using ablated copper as the test sample (helium carrier gas flow rate (0.30 L min- 1 He), discharge current (60 mA), laser power (44 mJ), and solution electrode sheath gas (0.2 L min- 1 He) and solution flow rates (10 μL min- 1 5% HNO3)). Standard brass samples having known Zn/Cu percentages were ablated and analyzed using the LS-APGD source. As a comparison, the established technique of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was used to analyze the same set of brass standards under similar ablation conditions to the LS-AGPD measurements, yielding comparable results. The Zn/Cu ratio results for the LS-APGD and LIBS measurements showed good similarity to previous measurements using ICP-MS detection. The performance of the LS-APGD-OES microplasma, comparable to well established methods, with lower capital and operational overhead expenses, suggests a great deal of promise as an analytical excitation source.

  2. Capillary - Discharge Based Hand-Held Detector For Chemical Vapor Monitoring

    DOEpatents

    Duan, Yixiang

    2005-05-31

    A handheld/portable detector for chemical vapor monitoring includes a housing and a discharge chamber that is established therein. The plasma discharge has a relatively small volume, e.g., in the micro-liter range. A first electrode and a second electrode are disposed within the discharge chamber and a discharge gap is established therebetween. A sample gas tube is in fluid communication with the discharge chamber and provides a sample gas to the discharge chamber. Also, a plasma gas tube is in fluid communication with the discharge chamber and provides a plasma gas thereto. Accordingly, the plasma gas can be used to maintain microplasma discharge between the electrodes and the sample gas can be introduced into the microplasma discharge. A spectrometer optically connected to the handheld/portable detector is used to measure the radiation emitted by the sample gas when subjected to the microplasma discharge.

  3. Note: Characterization of the plasma parameters of a capillary discharge-produced plasma channel waveguide to guide an intense laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Yugami, Noboru; Hikida, Masafumi; Terauchi, Hiromitsu; Bai Jinxiang; Kikuchi, Takashi; Tao Yezheng

    2010-04-15

    We demonstrated the production of an optical waveguide in a capillary discharge-produced plasma using a cylindrical capillary. Plasma parameters of its waveguide were characterized by use of both a Nomarski laser interferometer and a hydrogen plasma line spectrum. A space-averaged maximum temperature of 3.3 eV with electron densities of the order of 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} was observed at a discharge time of 150 ns and a maximum discharge current of 400 A. An ultrashort, intense laser pulse was guided by use of this plasma channel.

  4. Longitudinal Density Tailoring for the Enhancement of Electron Beams in theCapillary-discharge Laser-guidedWakefield Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    LBNL; Gonsalves, A. J.; Esarey, E.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Leemans, W. P.; Lin, C.; Nakamura, K.; Panasenko, D.; Schroeder, C. B.; Toth, C.

    2009-05-04

    Density perturbations in a hydrogen-filled capillary discharge waveguide have been used to control the injection of electrons into a laser wakefield. This has allowed injection and acceleration in channels of lower density than previously possible, and the production of relativistic electron beams with improved stability. For parameters of optimum stability, the mean bunch energy was 300MeV +- 7 MeV rms, with divergence 1.3 mrad +- 0:1 mrad rms and pointing stability 0.8 mrad rms.

  5. Sampling modulation technique in radio-frequency helium glow discharge emission source by use of pulsed laser ablation.

    PubMed

    Naeem, Tariq Mahmood; Matsuta, Hideyuki; Wagatsuma, Kazuaki

    2004-05-01

    An emission excitation source comprising a high-frequency diode-pumped Q-switched Nd:YAG laser and a radio-frequency powered glow discharge lamp is proposed. In this system sample atoms ablated by the laser irradiation are introduced into the lamp chamber and subsequently excited by the helium glow discharge plasma. The pulsed operation of the laser can produce a cyclic variation in the emission intensities of the sample atoms whereas the plasma gas species emit the radiation continuously. The salient feature of the proposed technique is the selective detection of the laser modulation signal from the rest of the continuous background emissions, which can be achieved with the phase sensitive detection of the lock-in amplifier. The arrangement may be used to estimate the emission intensity of the laser ablated atom, free from the interference of other species present in the plasma. The experiments were conducted with a 13.56 MHz radio-frequency (rf) generator operated at 80 W power to produce plasma and the laser at a wavelength of 1064 nm (pulse duration:34 ns, repetition rate:7 kHz and average pulse energy of about 0.36 mJ) was employed for sample ablation. The measurements resulted in almost complete removal of nitrogen molecular bands (N(2)(+) 391.44 nm). Considerable reduction (about 75%) in the emission intensity of a carbon atomic line (C I 193.03 nm) was also observed. PMID:15034707

  6. Ozone generation in a kHz-pulsed He-O2 capillary dielectric barrier discharge operated in ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sands, Brian L.; Ganguly, Biswa N.

    2013-12-01

    The generation of reactive oxygen species using nonequilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma jet devices has been a subject of recent interest due to their ability to generate localized concentrations from a compact source. To date, such studies with plasma jet devices have primarily utilized radio-frequency excitation. In this work, we characterize ozone generation in a kHz-pulsed capillary dielectric barrier discharge configuration comprised of an active discharge plasma jet operating in ambient air that is externally grounded. The plasma jet flow gas was composed of helium with an admixture of up to 5% oxygen. A unipolar voltage pulse train with a 20 ns pulse risetime was used to drive the discharge at repetition rates between 2-25 kHz. Using UVLED absorption spectroscopy centered at 255 nm near the Hartley-band absorption peak, ozone was detected over 1 cm from the capillary axis. We observed roughly linear scaling of ozone production with increasing pulse repetition rate up to a "turnover frequency," beyond which ozone production steadily dropped and discharge current and 777 nm O(5P→5S°) emission sharply increased. The turnover in ozone production occurred at higher pulse frequencies with increasing flow rate and decreasing applied voltage with a common energy density of 55 mJ/cm3 supplied to the discharge. The limiting energy density and peak ozone production both increased with increasing O2 admixture. The power dissipated in the discharge was obtained from circuit current and voltage measurements using a modified parallel plate dielectric barrier discharge circuit model and the volume-averaged ozone concentration was derived from a 2D ozone absorption measurement. From these measurements, the volume-averaged efficiency of ozone production was calculated to be 23 g/kWh at conditions for peak ozone production of 41 mg/h at 11 kV applied voltage, 3% O2, 2 l/min flow rate, and 13 kHz pulse repetition rate, with 1.79 W dissipated in the discharge.

  7. Output and Optical Performances of Ne-like Ar Capillary Discharge Soft X-ray Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Masato; Xiao Yifan; Sakai, Yusuke; Okino, Akitoshi; Hotta, Eiki

    2006-01-05

    Compact soft X-ray laser has been developed. In past experiments, spike output has been observed, when operating the device with a predischarge current of 5 to 15 A, a current of 9 to 35 kA with a rise time of 55 ns in an argon gas pressure range from 100 to 800 mTorr. Spectroscopic measurement has been conducted using a grazing incidence spectrometer. The line at 46.9 nm has been observed. In present study, varying the capillary length, the X-ray diode measurement has been conducted. The result shows that the laser output exponentially increases with increasing the capillary length. The divergence of laser beam is also measured. For the 20 cm-long capillary, the diameter of a laser beam is in a range from 3.2 to 4.0 mm, which is corresponding to a range of divergence from 2.2 to 2.8 mrad.

  8. Observations of soft X-ray emission and plasma dynamics of a compact capillary discharge operated in xenon

    SciTech Connect

    Valenzuela, J. C.; Wyndham, E. S.; Favre, M.; Chuaqui, H.

    2013-09-15

    We report observations of a low stored energy, low inductance compact capillary discharge operated in xenon. Even though the stored electrical energy is less than 1 J, significant output in the optical windows at 110 and 135 Å is measured. The soft X-ray emission is time-resolved and the conversion energy of the source is obtained. A lower bound to the conversion efficiency at 110 Å ± 2% and 135 Å ± 1% of 3.6% and 1.6% is obtained, respectively. The use of moiré-schlieren optical diagnostic allows the evolution of the line electron density. In particular, we observe a significant degree of compression in a tight on axis pinch as well as radial compression waves. The temporal evolution of the X-ray emission, which occurs during the current reversal and later, is discussed in relation to work in argon discharges and in relation to model calculations.

  9. Endometrial ablation

    MedlinePlus

    Hysteroscopy-endometrial ablation; Laser thermal ablation; Endometrial ablation-radiofrequency; Endometrial ablation-thermal balloon ablation; Rollerball ablation; Hydrothermal ablation; Novasure ablation

  10. Stable transmission of slow highly charged ions through tapered glass capillary with active discharging method for sub-micron sized beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Tokihiro; Kojima, Takao M.; Natsume, Yoshio; Kimura, Jun; Abe, Tomoko

    2016-09-01

    Stable transmission of a sub-μm-sized Ar8+ beam of 64-104-keV energy through glass tandem optics was achieved. The optics consisted of a 4-electrode tapered capillary and a sub-μm-sized tapered capillary tip, arranged in series. To actively discharge the capillary, and thus obtain stable transmission, an electrode was applied with a mechanical relay closing at a 0.01-0.1 Hz frequency. Transmitted beams were observed for tip outlets' diameters of 0.75 and 2.0 μm. When only a 4-electrode capillary was used, a beam density enhancement with a multiplicity of 14 times of the input beam density was achieved. A transmission efficiency up to 70% was observed with good reproducibility when the electrodes were biased with appropriate voltages.

  11. Modeling of capillary Z-pinch recombination pumping of boron extreme ultraviolet laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrba, P.; Bobrova, N. A.; Sasorov, P. V.; Vrbova, M.; Hubner, J.

    2009-07-01

    Computer modeling of fast capillary discharge is performed to investigate a new laser active medium created by excited hydrogenlike boron ions leading to lasing at 26.23 nm. Recombination excitation of the boron ions is expected in the undercooled pinching plasma created during the expansion phase of the pinch. Plasma dynamics is described by the magnetohydrodynamic code NPINCH and the plasma ion kinetics is evaluated according to the FLY code. Results of simulations for capillary filled with boron are reported and compared with previous results achieved for nitrogen filled capillary. In both cases, the same nonablative capillary with radius of 1.6 mm is presumed and the current pulse with 50 kA peak value and 1012 A s-1 current slope are taken into account. Evaluated pressure optimized gains are 1.04 and 0.11 cm-1 are found for boron and nitrogen filled capillary, respectively. Capillary wall ablation is then also assayed.

  12. Studies on the Application of High Voltage Discharge Ionization and Ablation in Supersonic-Jets for the Generation of Intense Cluster Ion Beams.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brock, Ansgar

    Glow discharge and pulsed capacitor discharge ionization in supersonic expansions were investigated for the production of intense beams of molecular cluster ions from seeded and ablated compounds. A low cost high voltage high current pulser based on a triggered spark gap switch is described as a mean for ionization and ablation. Besides, details of the molecular beam apparatus and modified pulsed valve are given. Cluster cations rm (Ar)_ {n}^+, rm (CO_2) _{n}^{+}, rm (C_6H_6)_{n}^+ and rm (H_2O)_{n }^+ were produced by pulsed capacitor discharge ionization in the expansion region of a seeded free-jet. The observed cluster mass spectra (CMS) for Ar, rm C_6H_6 and H _2O show the characteristic features (magic numbers) of electron beam and photo ionized clusters under molecular flow conditions. Indications for the presence of magic numbers in the CMS of {(CO _2)_{n}^+} cluster ions at n = 20, 26, 30 and 34 similar to those found for rare gas clusters have been found. Cationic metal ligand complexes Cu(Toluene) _{rm n}^+, Cu(Acetone) _{rm n}^+, Cu(Methanol)_{rm n}^+ , Cu(Ethylether)_{rm n }^+, Cu(Water)_{ rm n}^+, Al(Water)_ {rm n}^+ were synthesized by ablation of the metal from metallic discharge electrodes in a discharge gas mixture of helium seeded with the ligand of choice. The CMS of the expanded plasmas show little background ion signal besides the metal-ligand species. Charge exchange processes in the expansion guarantee high ionization yields of the desired species and account for low backgrounds. Changes in the successive binding energy of Cu(Water)_ {rm n}^+ clusters n = 1-4 are clearly observed in the CMS as step formation. A similar pattern found in the Cu(Acetone)_{ rm n}^+ CMS suggests the same trend in the successive binding energy as known for water. Ablation from a Cr(acac)_3 in a copper matrix was employed for the synthesis of Cr(Acetone) _{rm n}^+ and Cr(Benzene)^+ complexes demonstrating the ability to use nonconducting compounds as a metal source

  13. Formation of diatomic molecular radicals in reactive nitrogen-carbon plasma generated by electron cyclotron resonance discharge and pulsed laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Peipei; Li, Yanli; You, Qinghu; Cai, Hua; Yang, Xu; Sun, Jian; Xu, Ning; Wu, Jiada

    2014-04-15

    The reactive nitrogen-carbon plasma generated by electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) microwave discharge of N{sub 2} gas and pulsed laser ablation of a graphite target was characterized spectroscopically by time-integrated and time-resolved optical emission spectroscopy with space resolution for a study of gas-phase reactions and molecular radical formation in the plasma. The plasma exhibits very high reactivity compared with the plasma generated solely by ECR discharge or by pulsed laser ablation and contains highly excited species originally present in the ambient gaseous environment and directly ablated from the target as well as formed as the products of gas-phase reactions occurring in the plasma. The space distribution and the time evolution of the plasma emission give an access to the gas-phase reactions for the formation of C{sub 2} and CN radicals, revealing that C{sub 2} radicals are formed mainly in the region near the target while CN radicals can be formed in a much larger region not only in the vicinity of the target, but especially in the region near a substrate far away from the target.

  14. Evaluation of the temporal profiles and the analytical features of a laser ablation - Pulsed glow discharge coupling for optical emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González de Vega, Claudia; Bordel, Nerea; Pereiro, Rosario; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo

    2016-07-01

    The coupling of a glow discharge (GD) in pulsed mode (PGD) as secondary source for excitation/ionization of the material provided by laser ablation (LA) has been investigated using optical emission spectrometry (OES). The variation of the laser pulse delay with respect to the GD pulse allows to producing the ablation process during prepeak, plateau or afterglow GD regions. Emission properties of the LA-PGD plasma in each temporal region of the GD pulse have been evaluated for analytical lines of different elements. Resonant atomic lines have shown higher emission intensity in the prepeak region compared to non-resonant lines. Non-resonant lines showed higher enhancement of the emission intensity in the afterglow region. Moreover, the coupled LA-PGD system offered better linear correlation coefficients using a set of glass standards for calibration as well as lower detection limits (by at least a factor of two) when compared to laser induced breakdown spectroscopy.

  15. The role of the gas/plasma plume and self-focusing in a gas-filled capillary discharge waveguide for high-power laser-plasma applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ciocarlan, C.; Wiggins, S. M.; Islam, M. R.; Ersfeld, B.; Abuazoum, S.; Wilson, R.; Aniculaesei, C.; Welsh, G. H.; Vieux, G.; Jaroszynski, D. A.

    2013-09-15

    The role of the gas/plasma plume at the entrance of a gas-filled capillary discharge plasma waveguide in increasing the laser intensity has been investigated. Distinction is made between neutral gas and hot plasma plumes that, respectively, develop before and after discharge breakdown. Time-averaged measurements show that the on-axis plasma density of a fully expanded plasma plume over this region is similar to that inside the waveguide. Above the critical power, relativistic and ponderomotive self-focusing lead to an increase in the intensity, which can be nearly a factor of 2 compared with the case without a plume. When used as a laser plasma wakefield accelerator, the enhancement of intensity can lead to prompt electron injection very close to the entrance of the waveguide. Self-focusing occurs within two Rayleigh lengths of the waveguide entrance plane in the region, where the laser beam is converging. Analytical theory and numerical simulations show that, for a density of 3.0 × 10{sup 18} cm{sup −3}, the peak normalized laser vector potential, a{sub 0}, increases from 1.0 to 1.85 close to the entrance plane of the capillary compared with a{sub 0} = 1.41 when the plume is neglected.

  16. Direct quantification of chemical warfare agents and related compounds at low ppt levels: comparing active capillary dielectric barrier discharge plasma ionization and secondary electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Jan-Christoph; Schaer, Martin; Siegenthaler, Peter; Zenobi, Renato

    2015-01-01

    A novel active capillary dielectric barrier discharge plasma ionization (DBDI) technique for mass spectrometry is applied to the direct detection of 13 chemical warfare related compounds, including sarin, and compared to secondary electrospray ionization (SESI) in terms of selectivity and sensitivity. The investigated compounds include an intact chemical warfare agent and structurally related molecules, hydrolysis products and/or precursors of highly toxic nerve agents (G-series, V-series, and "new" nerve agents), and blistering and incapacitating warfare agents. Well-defined analyte gas phase concentrations were generated by a pressure-assisted nanospray with consecutive thermal evaporation and dilution. Identification was achieved by selected reaction monitoring (SRM). The most abundant fragment ion intensity of each compound was used for quantification. For DBDI and SESI, absolute gas phase detection limits in the low ppt range (in MS/MS mode) were achieved for all compounds investigated. Although the sensitivity of both methods was comparable, the active capillary DBDI sensitivity was found to be dependent on the applied AC voltage, thus enabling direct tuning of the sensitivity and the in-source fragmentation, which may become a key feature in terms of field applicability. Our findings underline the applicability of DBDI and SESI for the direct, sensitive detection and quantification of several CWA types and their degradation products. Furthermore, they suggest the use of DBDI in combination with hand-held instruments for CWAs on-site monitoring.

  17. Capillary Hemangioma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Why do capillary hemangiomas on the eyelids cause vision problems? Capillary Hemangiomas of the eyelid can cause ... a capillary hemangioma in the eye socket cause vision problems? A capillary hemangioma in the eye socket ( ...

  18. Gas-Filled Capillary Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhauer, L. C.; Kimura, W. D.

    2006-11-01

    We have developed a 1-D, quasi-steady-state numerical model for a gas-filled capillary discharge that is designed to aid in selecting the optimum capillary radius in order to guide a laser beam with the required intensity through the capillary. The model also includes the option for an external solenoid B-field around the capillary, which increases the depth of the parabolic density channel in the capillary, thereby allowing for propagation of smaller laser beam waists. The model has been used to select the parameters for gas-filled capillaries to be utilized during the Staged Electron Laser Acceleration — Laser Wakefield (STELLA-LW) experiment.

  19. Nanometer-scale ablation using focused, coherent extreme ultraviolet/soft x-ray light

    DOEpatents

    Menoni, Carmen S.; Rocca, Jorge J.; Vaschenko, Georgiy; Bloom, Scott; Anderson, Erik H.; Chao, Weilun; Hemberg, Oscar

    2011-04-26

    Ablation of holes having diameters as small as 82 nm and having clean walls was obtained in a poly(methyl methacrylate) on a silicon substrate by focusing pulses from a Ne-like Ar, 46.9 nm wavelength, capillary-discharge laser using a freestanding Fresnel zone plate diffracting into third order is described. Spectroscopic analysis of light from the ablation has also been performed. These results demonstrate the use of focused coherent EUV/SXR light for the direct nanoscale patterning of materials.

  20. Time-resolved study of the extreme-ultraviolet emission and plasma dynamics of a sub-Joule, fast capillary discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenzuela, J. C.; Wyndham, E. S.; Favre, M.

    2015-08-01

    In this work, we discuss experimental observations on the dynamics of a fast, low energy capillary discharge when operated in argon and its properties as an intense source of extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) radiation. The discharge pre-ionization and self-triggering were accomplished by the use of the hollow cathode effect. This allowed a compact size and low inductance discharge with multi-kA current level and a quarter-period of ˜10 ns at sub-Joule energy level. We used the novel moiré and schlieren diagnostics with a 12 ps laser to obtain the time evolution of the line electron density and to study the plasma dynamics. EUV spectroscopy and filtered diodes were also implemented to estimate the plasma temperature and density throughout the evolution of the discharge. EUV source size was measured by using a filtered slit-wire camera. We observed that EUV emission starts from a compressed plasma on axis during the second quarter-period of the current and continues until the fifth quarter-period. Ionization levels from Ar VII to X were observed. By comparing the EUV emission spectra with synthetic spectra, we found that at the onset of emission (˜7 ns), the plasma is well fitted by a single Maxwellian electron distribution function with Te ˜ 12 eV and ne ˜ 1017 cm-3. Close to peak emission (˜13 ns), plasma temperature and density increase to ˜20 eV and ne ˜ 1018 cm-3, respectively. However, in order to successfully match the experimental data, a two component electron distribution function was necessary. Later in time, a smaller fraction in the high energy component and higher temperature suggests homogenization of the plasma. The moiré and schlieren diagnostics showed multiple radial compression-waves merging on axis throughout the discharge; they are an important heating mechanism that leads to a period of severe turbulence at peak EUV emission. It was also observed that emission ceases when the axial maximum of the electron density collapses.

  1. Time-resolved study of the extreme-ultraviolet emission and plasma dynamics of a sub-Joule, fast capillary discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Valenzuela, J. C.; Wyndham, E. S.; Favre, M.

    2015-08-15

    In this work, we discuss experimental observations on the dynamics of a fast, low energy capillary discharge when operated in argon and its properties as an intense source of extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) radiation. The discharge pre-ionization and self-triggering were accomplished by the use of the hollow cathode effect. This allowed a compact size and low inductance discharge with multi-kA current level and a quarter-period of ∼10 ns at sub-Joule energy level. We used the novel moiré and schlieren diagnostics with a 12 ps laser to obtain the time evolution of the line electron density and to study the plasma dynamics. EUV spectroscopy and filtered diodes were also implemented to estimate the plasma temperature and density throughout the evolution of the discharge. EUV source size was measured by using a filtered slit-wire camera. We observed that EUV emission starts from a compressed plasma on axis during the second quarter-period of the current and continues until the fifth quarter-period. Ionization levels from Ar VII to X were observed. By comparing the EUV emission spectra with synthetic spectra, we found that at the onset of emission (∼7 ns), the plasma is well fitted by a single Maxwellian electron distribution function with T{sub e} ∼ 12 eV and n{sub e} ∼ 10{sup 17 }cm{sup −3}. Close to peak emission (∼13 ns), plasma temperature and density increase to ∼20 eV and n{sub e} ∼ 10{sup 18 }cm{sup −3}, respectively. However, in order to successfully match the experimental data, a two component electron distribution function was necessary. Later in time, a smaller fraction in the high energy component and higher temperature suggests homogenization of the plasma. The moiré and schlieren diagnostics showed multiple radial compression-waves merging on axis throughout the discharge; they are an important heating mechanism that leads to a period of severe turbulence at peak EUV emission. It was also observed that emission

  2. Plume collimation for laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A.

    2016-06-07

    In various embodiments, a device may generally comprise a capillary having a first end and a second end; a laser to emit energy at a sample in the capillary to ablate the sample and generate an ablation plume in the capillary; an electrospray apparatus to generate an electrospray plume to intercept the ablation plume to produce ions; and a mass spectrometer having an ion transfer inlet to capture the ions. The ablation plume may comprise a collimated ablation plume. The device may comprise a flow cytometer. Methods of making and using the same are also described.

  3. Plume collimation for laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A.

    2014-09-09

    In various embodiments, a device may generally comprise a capillary having a first end and a second end; a laser to emit energy at a sample in the capillary to ablate the sample and generate an ablation plume in the capillary; an electrospray apparatus to generate an electrospray plume to intercept the ablation plume to produce ions; and a mass spectrometer having an ion transfer inlet to capture the ions. The ablation plume may comprise a collimated ablation plume. The device may comprise a flow cytometer. Methods of making and using the same are also described.

  4. Long-lived plasma and fast quenching of N2(C3Π u ) by electrons in the afterglow of a nanosecond capillary discharge in nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepikhin, N. D.; Klochko, A. V.; Popov, N. A.; Starikovskaia, S. M.

    2016-08-01

    Quenching of electronically excited nitrogen state, {{\\text{N}}2}≤ft({{\\text{C}}3}{{\\Pi}u},{{v}\\prime}=0\\right) , in the afterglow of nanosecond capillary discharge in pure nitrogen is studied. It is found experimentally that an additional collisional mechanism appears and dominates at high specific deposited energies leading to the anomalously fast quenching of the {{\\text{N}}2}≤ft({{\\text{C}}3}{{\\Pi}u}\\right) in the afterglow. On the basis of obtained experimental data and of the analysis of possible quenching agents, it is concluded that the anomalously fast deactivation of the {{\\text{N}}2}≤ft({{\\text{C}}3}{{\\Pi}u}\\right) can be explained by quenching by electrons. Long-lived plasma at time scale of hundreds nanoseconds after the end of the pulse is observed. High electron densities, about 1014 cm‑3 at 27 mbar, are sustained by reactions of associative ionization. Kinetic 1D numerical modeling and comparison of calculated results with experimentally measured electric fields in the second high-voltage pulse 250 ns after the initial pulse, and electron density measurements in the afterglow confirm the validity of the suggested mechanism.

  5. Long-lived plasma and fast quenching of N2(C3Π u ) by electrons in the afterglow of a nanosecond capillary discharge in nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepikhin, N. D.; Klochko, A. V.; Popov, N. A.; Starikovskaia, S. M.

    2016-08-01

    Quenching of electronically excited nitrogen state, {{\\text{N}}2}≤ft({{\\text{C}}3}{{\\Pi}u},{{v}\\prime}=0\\right) , in the afterglow of nanosecond capillary discharge in pure nitrogen is studied. It is found experimentally that an additional collisional mechanism appears and dominates at high specific deposited energies leading to the anomalously fast quenching of the {{\\text{N}}2}≤ft({{\\text{C}}3}{{\\Pi}u}\\right) in the afterglow. On the basis of obtained experimental data and of the analysis of possible quenching agents, it is concluded that the anomalously fast deactivation of the {{\\text{N}}2}≤ft({{\\text{C}}3}{{\\Pi}u}\\right) can be explained by quenching by electrons. Long-lived plasma at time scale of hundreds nanoseconds after the end of the pulse is observed. High electron densities, about 1014 cm-3 at 27 mbar, are sustained by reactions of associative ionization. Kinetic 1D numerical modeling and comparison of calculated results with experimentally measured electric fields in the second high-voltage pulse 250 ns after the initial pulse, and electron density measurements in the afterglow confirm the validity of the suggested mechanism.

  6. Focusing and photon flux measurements of the 2.88-nm radiation at the sample plane of the soft x-ray microscope, based on capillary discharge source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawaz, M. Fahad; Jancarek, Alexandr; Nevrkla, Michal; Wachulak, Przemyslaw; Limpouch, Jiri; Pina, Ladislav

    2015-05-01

    Feasibility measurements leading to the development of a Soft X-ray (SXR) microscopy setup, based on capillary discharge XUV source is presented. Here the Z-pinching plasma is acting as a source of XUV radiation, emitting incoherent radiation in the "water-window" (λ = 2.3 - 4.4 nm) region of interest (natural contrast between the carbon and oxygen edges).This soft X-ray microscopy setup will realize imaging of the biological objects with high spatial resolution. The 2.88 nm radiation line is filtered out from the water-window band, and is focused by an axi-symmetric ellipsoidal mirror, coated with nickle. The focussed spot size is measured and reported. Flux measurements for the available number of photons (photons/pulse) at the sample plane has been carried out with AXUV PIN diode at the sample plane (slightly out of focus). For imaging, a fresnel zone plate lens will be used as an objective. The overall compact transmission SXR microscopy setup design is presented.

  7. Capillary sample

    MedlinePlus

    ... using capillary blood sampling. Disadvantages to capillary blood sampling include: Only a limited amount of blood can be drawn using this method. The procedure has some risks (see below). Capillary ...

  8. Highly efficient pulsed power supply system with a two-stage LC generator and a step-up transformer for fast capillary discharge soft x-ray laser at shorter wavelength.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Yusuke; Takahashi, Shnsuke; Komatsu, Takanori; Song, Inho; Watanabe, Masato; Hotta, Eiki

    2010-01-01

    Highly efficient and compact pulsed power supply system for a capillary discharge soft x-ray laser (SXRL) has been developed. The system consists of a 2.2 microF two-stage LC inversion generator, a 2:54 step-up transformer, a 3 nF water capacitor, and a discharge section with a few tens of centimeter length capillary. Adoption of the pulsed transformer in combination with the LC inversion generator enables us to use only one gap switch in the circuit for charging the water capacitor up to about 0.5 MV. Furthermore, step-up ratio of a water capacitor voltage to a LC inversion generator initial charging voltage is about 40 with energy transfer efficiency of about 50%. It also leads to good reproducibility of a capillary discharge which is necessary for lasing a SXRL stably. For the study of the possibility of lasing a SXRL at shorter wavelength in a small laboratory scale, high-density and high-temperature plasma column suitable for the laser can be generated relatively easily with this system. PMID:20113089

  9. Highly efficient pulsed power supply system with a two-stage LC generator and a step-up transformer for fast capillary discharge soft x-ray laser at shorter wavelength

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Yusuke; Takahashi, Shnsuke; Komatsu, Takanori; Song, Inho; Watanabe, Masato; Hotta, Eiki

    2010-01-15

    Highly efficient and compact pulsed power supply system for a capillary discharge soft x-ray laser (SXRL) has been developed. The system consists of a 2.2 {mu}F two-stage LC inversion generator, a 2:54 step-up transformer, a 3 nF water capacitor, and a discharge section with a few tens of centimeter length capillary. Adoption of the pulsed transformer in combination with the LC inversion generator enables us to use only one gap switch in the circuit for charging the water capacitor up to about 0.5 MV. Furthermore, step-up ratio of a water capacitor voltage to a LC inversion generator initial charging voltage is about 40 with energy transfer efficiency of about 50%. It also leads to good reproducibility of a capillary discharge which is necessary for lasing a SXRL stably. For the study of the possibility of lasing a SXRL at shorter wavelength in a small laboratory scale, high-density and high-temperature plasma column suitable for the laser can be generated relatively easily with this system.

  10. Capillary Transit Time Heterogeneity Is Associated with Modified Rankin Scale Score at Discharge in Patients with Bilateral High Grade Internal Carotid Artery Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Mundiyanapurath, Sibu; Ringleb, Peter Arthur; Diatschuk, Sascha; Hansen, Mikkel Bo; Mouridsen, Kim; Østergaard, Leif; Wick, Wolfgang; Bendszus, Martin; Radbruch, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Perfusion weighted imaging (PWI) is inherently unreliable in patients with severe perfusion abnormalities. We compared the diagnostic accuracy of a novel index of microvascular flow-patterns, so-called capillary transit time heterogeneity (CTH) to that of the commonly used delay parameter Tmax in patients with bilateral high grade internal carotid artery stenosis (ICAS). Methods Consecutive patients with bilateral ICAS ≥ 70%NASCET who underwent PWI were retrospectively examined. Maps of CTH and Tmax were analyzed with a volumetric approach using several thresholds. Predictors of favorable outcome (modified Rankin scale at discharge 0–2) were identified using univariate and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Results Eighteen patients were included. CTH ≥ 30s differentiated best between patients with favorable and unfavorable outcome when both hemispheres were taken into account (sensitivity 83%, specificity 73%, area under the curve [AUC] 0.833 [confidence interval (CI) 0.635; 1.000]; p = 0.027). The best discrimination using Tmax was achieved with a threshold of ≥ 4s (sensitivity 83%, specificity 64%, AUC 0.803 [CI 0.585;1.000]; p = 0.044). The highest AUC was found for left sided volume with CTH ≥ 15s (sensitivity 83%, specificity 91%, AUC 0.924 [CI 0.791;1.000]; p = 0.005). Conclusion The study suggests that CTH is superior to Tmax in discriminating ICAS patients with favorable from non-favorable outcome. This finding may reflect the simultaneous involvement of large vessels and microvessels in ICAS and underscore the need to diagnose and manage both aspects of the disease. PMID:27336668

  11. The rotational spectrum of CuCCH(X̃  1Σ+): a Fourier transform microwave discharge assisted laser ablation spectroscopy and millimeter/submillimeter study.

    PubMed

    Sun, M; Halfen, D T; Min, J; Harris, B; Clouthier, D J; Ziurys, L M

    2010-11-01

    The pure rotational spectrum of CuCCH in its ground electronic state (X̃  (1)Σ(+)) has been measured in the frequency range of 7-305 GHz using Fourier transform microwave (FTMW) and direct absorption millimeter/submillimeter methods. This work is the first spectroscopic study of CuCCH, a model system for copper acetylides. The molecule was synthesized using a new technique, discharge assisted laser ablation spectroscopy (DALAS). Four to five rotational transitions were measured for this species in six isotopologues ((63)CuCCH, (65)CuCCH, (63)Cu(13)CCH, (63)CuC(13)CH, (63)Cu(13)C(13)CH, and (63)CuCCD); hyperfine interactions arising from the copper nucleus were resolved, as well as smaller splittings in CuCCD due to deuterium quadrupole coupling. Five rotational transitions were also recorded in the millimeter region for (63)CuCCH and (65)CuCCH, using a Broida oven source. The combined FTMW and millimeter spectra were analyzed with an effective Hamiltonian, and rotational, electric quadrupole (Cu and D) and copper nuclear spin-rotation constants were determined. From the rotational constants, an r(m)(2) structure for CuCCH was established, with r(Cu-C) = 1.8177(6) Å, r(C-C) = 1.2174(6) Å, and r(C-H) = 1.046(2) Å. The geometry suggests that CuCCH is primarily a covalent species with the copper atom singly bonded to the C≡C-H moiety. The copper quadrupole constant indicates that the bonding orbital of this atom may be sp hybridized. The DALAS technique promises to be fruitful in the study of other small, metal-containing molecules of chemical interest.

  12. Short-wavelength ablation of solids: pulse duration and wavelength effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juha, Libor; Bittner, Michal; Chvostova, Dagmar; Letal, Vit; Krasa, Josef; Otcenasek, Zdenek; Kozlova, Michaela; Polan, Jiri; Prag, Ansgar R.; Rus, Bedrich; Stupka, Michal; Krzywinski, Jacek; Andrejczuk, Andrzej; Pelka, Jerzy B.; Sobierajski, Ryszard H.; Ryc, Leszek; Feldhaus, Josef; Boody, Frederick P.; Fiedorowicz, Henryk; Bartnik, Andrzej; Mikolajczyk, Janusz; Rakowski, Rafal; Kubat, P.; Pina, Ladislav; Grisham, Michael E.; Vaschenko, Georgiy O.; Menoni, Carmen S.; Rocca, Jorge J. G.

    2004-11-01

    For conventional wavelength (UV-Vis-IR) lasers delivering radiation energy to the surface of materials, ablation thresholds, ablation (etch) rates, and the quality of ablated structures often differ dramatically between short (typically nanosecond) and ultrashort (typically femtosecond) pulses. Various short-wavelength (l < 100 nm) lasers emitting pulses with durations ranging from ~ 10 fs to ~ 1 ns have recently been put into a routine operation. This makes it possible to investigate how the ablation characteristics depend on the pulse duration in the XUV spectral region. 1.2-ns pulses of 46.9-nm radiation delivered from a capillary-discharge Ne-like Ar laser (Colorado State University, Fort Collins), focused by a spherical Sc/Si multilayer-coated mirror were used for an ablation of organic polymers and silicon. Various materials were irradiated with ellipsoidal-mirror-focused XUV radiation (λ = 86 nm, τ = 30-100 fs) generated by the free-electron laser (FEL) operated at the TESLA Test Facility (TTF1 FEL) in Hamburg. The beam of the Ne-like Zn XUV laser (λ = 21.2 nm, τ < 100 ps) driven by the Prague Asterix Laser System (PALS) was also successfully focused by a spherical Si/Mo multilayer-coated mirror to ablate various materials. Based on the results of the experiments, the etch rates for three different pulse durations are compared using the XUV-ABLATOR code to compensate for the wavelength difference. Comparing the values of etch rates calculated for short pulses with those measured for ultrashort pulses, we can study the influence of pulse duration on XUV ablation efficiency. Ablation efficiencies measured with short pulses at various wavelengths (i.e. 86/46.9/21.2 nm from the above-mentioned lasers and ~ 1 nm from the double stream gas-puff Xe plasma source driven by PALS) show that the wavelength influences the etch rate mainly through the different attenuation lengths.

  13. Transient Flowfield Characteristics of Polycarbonate Plasma Discharge from Pulse-powered Electrothermal Gun Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyoungjin

    2008-12-01

    An electrothermal gun is the device that produces high-temperature and high-velocity plasma vapor using high current pulsed power and has a potential to be an efficient method for producing a variety of nanomaterials. Pulsed plasma discharge from the electrothermal gun into the open air has been investigated numerically, and the time-dependent inviscid gas dynamics equations are solved for the two-dimensional computational domain including electrothermal gun and the open-air space using flux-corrected transport (FCT) scheme. The modeling of the Joule heating and the mass ablation from the bore wall are incorporated in the computation. The computational results yield the details of the plasma discharge behavior inside and outside the capillary bore including choked condition at the bore exit and complex shock structure of external plasma discharge. The flow structure of freely expanding plasma discharge in the open air is essentially the highly underexpanded supersonic jet featuring Mach disk, barrel shock, contact surface, and spherical blast wave. Compared to the experiments, the numerical simulation agrees well with the experimental data such as the capillary mass ablation and shock structure of the plasma jet.

  14. EUV nanosecond laser ablation of silicon carbide, tungsten and molybdenum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, Oleksandr; Kolacek, Karel; Schmidt, Jiri; Straus, Jaroslav; Choukourov, Andrei; Kasuya, Koichi

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we present results of study interaction of nanosecond EUV laser pulses at wavelength of 46.9 nm with silicon carbide (SiC), tungsten (W) and molybdenum (Mo). As a source of laser radiation was used discharge-plasma driver CAPEX (CAPillary EXperiment) based on high current capillary discharge in argon. The laser beam is focused with a spherical Si/Sc multilayer-coated mirror on samples. Experimental study has been performed with 1, 5, 10, 20 and 50 laser pulses ablation of SiC, W and Mo at various fluence values. Firstly, sample surface modification in the nanosecond time scale have been registered by optical microscope. And the secondly, laser beam footprints on the samples have been analyzed by atomic-force microscope (AFM). This work supported by the Czech Science Foundation under Contract GA14-29772S and by the Grant Agency of the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports of the Czech Republic under Contract LG13029.

  15. Comparing ablation induced by fs, ps, and ns XUV-laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittner, Michal; Juha, Libor; Chvostova, Dagmar; Letal, Vit; Krasa, Josef; Otcenasek, Zdenek; Kozlova, Michaela; Polan, Jiri; Praeg, Ansgar R.; Rus, Bedrich; Stupka, Michal; Krzywinski, Jacek; Andrejczuk, Andrzej; Pelka, Jerzy B.; Sobierajski, Ryszard; Feldhaus, Josef; Boody, Frederick P.; Grisham, Michael E.; Vaschenko, Georgiy O.; Menoni, Carmen S.; Rocca, Jorge J.

    2004-09-01

    Ablation thresholds, etch rates, and quality of ablated structures often differ dramatically if a conventional, UV-Vis-IR laser delivers radiation energy onto a material surface in a short (nanosecond) or ultra-short (picosecond/femtosecond) pulses. Various short-wavelength (λ < 100 nm) lasers emitting pulses with durations ranging from ~ 10 fs to ~ 1 ns have recently been put into a routine operation. This makes possible to investigate how the ablation characteristics depends on the pulse duration in the XUV spectral region. 1.2-ns pulses of 46.9-nm radiation delivered from a capillary-discharge Ne-like Ar laser, focused by a spherical Sc/Si multilayer-coated mirror were used for an ablation of organic polymers and silicon. Various materials were irradiated with an ellipsoidal-mirror-focused XUV radiation (λ = 86 nm, τ = 30-100 fs) generated by the free-electron laser (FEL) operated at the TESLA Test Facility (TTF1 FEL) in Hamburg. The beam of the Ne-like Zn XUV laser (λ = 21.2 nm, τ < 100 ps) driven by the Prague Asterix Laser System (PALS) was also successfully focused by a spherical Si/Mo multilayer-coated mirror to ablate various materials. Based on the results of the experiment the etch rates for three different pulse durations are compared using the XUV-ABLATOR code to compensate for the wavelength difference. Comparing the values of etch rates calculated for short pulses with the measured ones for ultrashort pulses we may study the influence of pulse duration on the XUV ablation efficiency.

  16. Demonstration of gain saturation and double-pass amplification of a 69.8  nm laser pumped by capillary discharge.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yongpeng; Liu, Tao; Zhang, Wenhong; Li, Wei; Cui, Huaiyu

    2016-08-15

    With a 45-cm-long capillary, we obtained a saturated 69.8 nm laser with a gain coefficient of 0.4  cm-1 and a gain length product of 18. In order to increase the laser energy further, a double-pass amplification of the 69.8 nm laser was first realized with a SiC mirror without a coating. With a half cavity, the effective plasma column length and the effective gain length product can reach 84 cm and 33.7, respectively. The amplitude of a laser pulse for double-pass amplification is 9 times larger than that for single-pass amplification. In addition, the full width at half-maximum (FWHM) pulse width of a laser pulse and FWHM divergence for single-pass amplification are 1.4 ns and 0.5 mrad, respectively, which increase to 2.2 ns and 3.4 mrad for double-pass amplification. PMID:27519087

  17. Capillary origami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Py, Charlotte; Doppler, Lionel; Bico, Jose; Roman, Benoit; Reverdy, Paul; Baroud, Charles

    2006-11-01

    The wet fur of a dog coming out of a pond assembles into bunches: this is the most common effect of capillary forces on elasticity structures (the hairs). From a practical point of view, the deformation of flexible elements by surface tension forces dramatically damages mechanical microsystems or lung airways, but also allows the self-organization of nanotube carpets into well defined clump patterns. But capillary forces may generate even more complex structures when flexible sheets are brought to contact with a liquid interface. Here we present experiments where surface tension folds up an elastic sheet around a deposited water droplet, and discuss the different possible shapes obtained. These self-folding origami may be used in microsy stems design as a convenient and robust way to fold two-dimensional planar patterns into 3-dimensional structures, since surface tension effects are enhanced at small scales.

  18. Mastectomy - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Breast removal surgery - discharge; Nipple-sparing mastectomy - discharge; Total mastectomy - discharge; Simple mastectomy - discharge; Modified radical mastectomy - discharge; Breast cancer - mastectomy -discharge

  19. Capillary muscle

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Caroline; Mouterde, Timothée; Quéré, David; Clanet, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    The contraction of a muscle generates a force that decreases when increasing the contraction velocity. This “hyperbolic” force–velocity relationship has been known since the seminal work of A. V. Hill in 1938 [Hill AV (1938) Proc R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 126(843):136–195]. Hill’s heuristic equation is still used, and the sliding-filament theory for the sarcomere [Huxley H, Hanson J (1954) Nature 173(4412):973–976; Huxley AF, Niedergerke R (1954) Nature 173(4412):971–973] suggested how its different parameters can be related to the molecular origin of the force generator [Huxley AF (1957) Prog Biophys Biophys Chem 7:255–318; Deshcherevskiĭ VI (1968) Biofizika 13(5):928–935]. Here, we develop a capillary analog of the sarcomere obeying Hill’s equation and discuss its analogy with muscles. PMID:25944938

  20. Ablative Thermal Protection: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laub, Bernie

    2003-01-01

    Contents include the following: Why ablative thermal protections - TPS. Ablative TPS chronology: strategic reentry systems, solid rocket motor nozzles, space (manned missions and planetary entry probes). Ablation mechanisms. Ablation material testing. Ablative material testing.

  1. Analysis of Capillary Guided Laser Plasma Accelerator Experiments at LBNL

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, K.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.; Gonsalves, A. J.; Panasenko, D.; Toth, Cs.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Schroeder, C. B.; Lin, C.

    2009-01-22

    Laser wakefield acceleration experiments were carried out by using a hydrogen-filled capillary discharge waveguide. For a 15 mm long, 200 {mu}m diameter capillary, quasi-monoenergetic e-beams up to 300 MeV were observed. By de-tuning discharge delay from optimum guiding performance, self-trapping was found to be stabilized. For a 33 mm long, 300 {mu}m capillary, a parameter regime with high energy electron beams, up to 1 GeV, was found. In this regime, the electron beam peak energy was correlated with the amount of trapped electrons.

  2. YO A{sup 2}II{sub 1/2,3/2} vibrational state distributions measured after the excimer laser ablation of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} using a laser-initiated pulsed discharge as a probe

    SciTech Connect

    Fried, D.; Kushida, T.; Reck, G.P.; Rothe, E.W.

    1994-02-01

    The vibrational populations of the YO A{sup 2}II-{Chi}{sup 2}{Sigma} system of YO were measured in the plasmas generated after the excimer laser ablation of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} in oxygen when both continuous and pulsed electric fields were applied. When an electric field is applied antiparallel to the direction of propagation of the ejected electrons, two luminous plumes appear, separated by several microseconds. The measured vibrational populations of the YO A{sup 2}II-{Chi}{sup 2}{Sigma} system are different for each plume. The YO A{sup 2}II populations were nonthermal in the first plume, representing emission from chemiluminescent reactive collisions in the plume after ablation. The second emission pulse, initiated by the discharge of a high-voltage capacitor, probes the ground-state YO in the plume via electron collisions. This pulsed electric field holds promise as a diagnostic probe of the ground-state species emitted in laser ablative processes. 11 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Multiple capillary biochemical analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Dovichi, Norman J.; Zhang, Jian Z.

    1995-01-01

    A multiple capillary analyzer allows detection of light from multiple capillaries with a reduced number of interfaces through which light must pass in detecting light emitted from a sample being analyzed, using a modified sheath flow cuvette. A linear or rectangular array of capillaries is introduced into a rectangular flow chamber. Sheath fluid draws individual sample streams through the cuvette. The capillaries are closely and evenly spaced and held by a transparent retainer in a fixed position in relation to an optical detection system. Collimated sample excitation radiation is applied simultaneously across the ends of the capillaries in the retainer. Light emitted from the excited sample is detected by the optical detection system. The retainer is provided by a transparent chamber having inward slanting end walls. The capillaries are wedged into the chamber. One sideways dimension of the chamber is equal to the diameter of the capillaries and one end to end dimension varies from, at the top of the chamber, slightly greater than the sum of the diameters of the capillaries to, at the bottom of the chamber, slightly smaller than the sum of the diameters of the capillaries. The optical system utilizes optic fibres to deliver light to individual photodetectors, one for each capillary tube. A filter or wavelength division demultiplexer may be used for isolating fluorescence at particular bands.

  4. Multiple capillary biochemical analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Dovichi, N.J.; Zhang, J.Z.

    1995-08-08

    A multiple capillary analyzer allows detection of light from multiple capillaries with a reduced number of interfaces through which light must pass in detecting light emitted from a sample being analyzed, using a modified sheath flow cuvette. A linear or rectangular array of capillaries is introduced into a rectangular flow chamber. Sheath fluid draws individual sample streams through the cuvette. The capillaries are closely and evenly spaced and held by a transparent retainer in a fixed position in relation to an optical detection system. Collimated sample excitation radiation is applied simultaneously across the ends of the capillaries in the retainer. Light emitted from the excited sample is detected by the optical detection system. The retainer is provided by a transparent chamber having inward slanting end walls. The capillaries are wedged into the chamber. One sideways dimension of the chamber is equal to the diameter of the capillaries and one end to end dimension varies from, at the top of the chamber, slightly greater than the sum of the diameters of the capillaries to, at the bottom of the chamber, slightly smaller than the sum of the diameters of the capillaries. The optical system utilizes optic fibers to deliver light to individual photodetectors, one for each capillary tube. A filter or wavelength division demultiplexer may be used for isolating fluorescence at particular bands. 21 figs.

  5. Pancreatitis - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic pancreatitis - discharge; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - discharge; Acute pancreatitis - discharge ... fluids through an intravenous (IV) tube in your vein and nutrition through a feeding tube or IV. ...

  6. Knee arthroscopy - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... retinacular release - discharge; Synovectomy - discharge; Patellar debridement - discharge; Meniscus repair - discharge; Lateral release - discharge; Collateral ligament repair - discharge; Knee surgery - ...

  7. Stereotactic radiosurgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Gamma knife - discharge; Cyberknife - discharge; Stereotactic radiotherapy - discharge; Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy- discharge; Cyclotrons- discharge; Linear accelerator- discharge; Lineacs - discharge; Proton beam radiosurgery - discharge

  8. Intranasal lobular capillary haemangioma

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Dipak Ranjan; Bhandarkar, Ajay M; Shivamurthy, Archana; Joy, Jasmi

    2014-01-01

    Lobular capillary haemangioma (LCH) is a benign proliferation of capillaries with a characteristic lobular architecture on microscopy; it has an affinity for mucous membrane and skin of the head and neck. It is extremely rare in the nasal cavity. We present the case of a 45-year-old man who presented with epistaxis without any predisposing factors, which was diagnosed as lobular capillary haemangioma. PMID:25304675

  9. Extreme-UV electrical discharge source

    DOEpatents

    Fornaciari, Neal R.; Nygren, Richard E.; Ulrickson, Michael A.

    2002-01-01

    An extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray radiation electric capillary discharge source that includes a boron nitride housing defining a capillary bore that is positioned between two electrodes one of which is connected to a source of electric potential can generate a high EUV and soft x-ray radiation flux from the capillary bore outlet with minimal debris. The electrode that is positioned adjacent the capillary bore outlet is typically grounded. Pyrolytic boron nitride, highly oriented pyrolytic boron nitride, and cubic boron nitride are particularly suited. The boron nitride capillary bore can be configured as an insert that is encased in an exterior housing that is constructed of a thermally conductive material. Positioning the ground electrode sufficiently close to the capillary bore outlet also reduces bore erosion.

  10. Capillary zone electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgenson, J.W.; Lukacs, K.D.

    1983-10-21

    Zone electrophoresis in capillaries is a technique complementary to electrophoresis in supporting media, and each approach has its own particular advantages. Efficient heat transfer from small-diameter capillaries permits use of unusually high voltages, resulting in both high resolution and rapid analysis. Capillaries also seem well suited for automation. Our present electromigration injection technique is relatively straightforward and should be simple to automate. Capillaries are reusable, which is an advantage over gels. On-line electronic detection permits good quantification, further enhancing possibilities for fully automatic operation. The greatest obstacle to further development and utilization of capillaries is the requirement of extremely sensitive detectors, and more types of detectors with higher sensitivity are greatly needed. A better understanding of capillary surface modification will also be important, both for improved capillary surface deactivation and for better control over electroosmotic flow. Capillaries should provide an ideal system in which to explore nonaqueous separation media. The prospects for nonaqueous media in electrophoresis are similar to those in electrochemistry, and capillaries should prove an excellent system in which to begin their study. 18 refs., 8 figs.

  11. Laser ablation of blepharopigmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Tanenbaum, M.; Karas, S.; McCord, C.D. Jr. )

    1988-01-01

    This article discusses laser ablation of blepharopigmentation in four stages: first, experimentally, where pigment vaporization is readily achieved with the argon blue-green laser; second, in the rabbit animal model, where eyelid blepharopigmentation markings are ablated with the laser; third, in human subjects, where the argon blue-green laser is effective in the ablation of implanted eyelid pigment; and fourth, in a case report, where, in a patient with improper pigment placement in the eyelid, the laser is used to safely and effectively ablate the undesired pigment markings. This article describes in detail the new technique of laser ablation of blepharopigmentation. Potential complications associated with the technique are discussed.

  12. Lung surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Thoracotomy - discharge; Lung tissue removal - discharge; Pneumonectomy - discharge; Lobectomy - discharge; Lung biopsy - discharge; Thoracoscopy - discharge; Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery - discharge; VATS - ...

  13. Nonequilibrium Ablation of Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milos, Frank S.; Chen, Yih K.; Gokcen, Tahir

    2012-01-01

    In previous work, an equilibrium ablation and thermal response model for Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator was developed. In general, over a wide range of test conditions, model predictions compared well with arcjet data for surface recession, surface temperature, in-depth temperature at multiple thermocouples, and char depth. In this work, additional arcjet tests were conducted at stagnation conditions down to 40 W/sq cm and 1.6 kPa. The new data suggest that nonequilibrium effects become important for ablation predictions at heat flux or pressure below about 80 W/sq cm or 10 kPa, respectively. Modifications to the ablation model to account for nonequilibrium effects are investigated. Predictions of the equilibrium and nonequilibrium models are compared with the arcjet data.

  14. Kidney stones - lithotripsy - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy - discharge; Shock wave lithotripsy - discharge; Laser lithotripsy - discharge; Percutaneous lithotripsy - discharge; Endoscopic lithotripsy - discharge; ESWL - ...

  15. Radical prostatectomy - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... prostatectomy - discharge; Laparoscopic radical prostatectomy - discharge; LRP - discharge; Robotic-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy - discharge ; RALP - discharge; Pelvic lymphadenectomy - ...

  16. Capillary micro-switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steen, Paul; Matalanis, Claude; Hirsa, Amir; Cox, Christhopher

    2002-11-01

    A capillary surface is a liquid/liquid or liquid/gas interface whose shape is determined by surface tension. Capillary surfaces occur when the capillary length is large compared to the container scale, as happens for typical liquids against gas on the sub-millimeter scale on Earth and on the meter scale in the micro-gravity environment of space vehicles. Manipulating capillary surfaces has emerged as a leading strategy for moving liquids on the micro-scale [1]. Practitioners have yet to take advantage of capillary instability in their design of devices, though. We illustrate how the response diagram of a single switch (bi-stable device) can be constructed from that of two capillary elements, how that of a system of switches (a pair) can be built from that of a single switch and finally how understanding the response of the system guides us to observations of new behavior in the laboratory. Experiments on capillary surfaces use either a soap-film analog (10 centimeter scale) or a liquid/gas (millimeter scale) apparatus. Progress is reported on the application of an array of micro-switches to make a controllable adhesion device, with the aim of effecting droplet transport. 1. Cho, Fan, Moon and Kim, "Towards digital microfluidic circuits: creating, transporting, cutting and merging liquid droplets by electrowetting-based actuation." Proc. 15th IEEE Int'l Conf. on MEMS, January 2002.

  17. Renal Ablation Update

    PubMed Central

    Khiatani, Vishal; Dixon, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    Thermal ablative technologies have evolved considerably in the recent past and are now an important component of current clinical guidelines for the treatment of small renal masses. Both radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation have intermediate-term oncologic control that rivals surgical options, with favorable complication profiles. Studies comparing cryoablation and radiofrequency ablation show no significant difference in oncologic control or complication profile between the two modalities. Early data from small series with microwave ablation have shown similar promising results. Newer technologies including irreversible electroporation and high-intensity–focused ultrasound have theoretical advantages, but will require further research before becoming a routine part of the ablation armamentarium. The purpose of this review article is to discuss the current ablative technologies available, briefly review their mechanisms of action, discuss technical aspects of each, and provide current data supporting their use. PMID:25049445

  18. Multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, E.S.; Li, Q.; Lu, X.

    1998-04-21

    The invention provides a side-entry optical excitation geometry for use in a multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system. A charge-injection device is optically coupled to capillaries in the array such that the interior of a capillary is imaged onto only one pixel. In Sanger-type 4-label DNA sequencing reactions, nucleotide identification (``base calling``) is improved by using two long-pass filters to split fluorescence emission into two emission channels. A binary poly(ethyleneoxide) matrix is used in the electrophoretic separations. 19 figs.

  19. Multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, E.S.; Chang, H.T.; Fung, E.N.; Li, Q.; Lu, X.

    1996-12-10

    The invention provides a side-entry optical excitation geometry for use in a multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system. A charge-injection device is optically coupled to capillaries in the array such that the interior of a capillary is imaged onto only one pixel. In Sanger-type 4-label DNA sequencing reactions, nucleotide identification (``base calling``) is improved by using two long-pass filters to split fluorescence emission into two emission channels. A binary poly(ethyleneoxide) matrix is used in the electrophoretic separations. 19 figs.

  20. Multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Li, Qingbo; Lu, Xiandan

    1998-04-21

    The invention provides a side-entry optical excitation geometry for use in a multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system. A charge-injection device is optically coupled to capillaries in the array such that the interior of a capillary is imaged onto only one pixel. In Sanger-type 4-label DNA sequencing reactions, nucleotide identification ("base calling") is improved by using two long-pass filters to split fluorescence emission into two emission channels. A binary poly(ethyleneoxide) matrix is used in the electrophoretic separations.

  1. Multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Chang, Huan-Tsang; Fung, Eliza N.; Li, Qingbo; Lu, Xiandan

    1996-12-10

    The invention provides a side-entry optical excitation geometry for use in a multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system. A charge-injection device is optically coupled to capillaries in the array such that the interior of a capillary is imaged onto only one pixel. In Sanger-type 4-label DNA sequencing reactions, nucleotide identification ("base calling") is improved by using two long-pass filters to split fluorescence emission into two emission channels. A binary poly(ethyleneoxide) matrix is used in the electrophoretic separations.

  2. Nasal Lobular Capillary Hemangioma

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Prashant; Singla, Saurabh; Mane, Ranoji; Jagdeesh, K. S.

    2013-01-01

    Nasal lobular capillary hemangioma is a rare benign tumor of the paranasal sinuses. This lesion is believed to grow rapidly in size over time. The exact etiopathogenesis is still a dilemma. We discuss a case of nasal lobular capillary hemangioma presenting with a history of epistaxis. Contrast enhanced computed tomography of paranasal sinuses revealed an intensely enhancing soft-tissue mass in the left nasal cavity and left middle and inferior meati with no obvious bony remodeling or destruction. We present imaging and pathologic features of nasal lobular capillary hemangioma and differentiate it from other entities like nasal angiofibroma. PMID:24228209

  3. Analysis of Capillary Guided Laser Plasma Accelerator Experiments at LBNL

    SciTech Connect

    Advanced Light Source; Nakamura, Kei; Gonsalves, Anthony; Panasenko, Dmitriy; Lin, Chen; Toth, Csaba; Geddes, Cameron; Schroeder, Carl; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim

    2008-09-29

    Laser wakefield acceleration experiments were carried out by using a hydrogen-filledcapillary discharge waveguide. For a 15 mm long, 200 mu m diameter capillary, quasi-monoenergetic e-beams up to 300 MeV were observed. By de-tuning discharge delay from optimum guiding performance, self-trapping was found to be stabilized. For a 33 mm long, 300 mu m capillary, a parameter regime with high energy electron beams, up to 1 GeV, was found. In this regime, the electron beam peak energy was correlated with the amount of trapped electrons.

  4. Radiofrequency Ablation of Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Marc; Mikityansky, Igor; Kam, Anthony; Libutti, Steven K.; Walther, McClellan M.; Neeman, Ziv; Locklin, Julia K.; Wood, Bradford J.

    2004-09-15

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has been used for over 18 years for treatment of nerve-related chronic pain and cardiac arrhythmias. In the last 10 years, technical developments have increased ablation volumes in a controllable, versatile, and relatively inexpensive manner. The host of clinical applications for RFA have similarly expanded. Current RFA equipment, techniques, applications, results, complications, and research avenues for local tumor ablation are summarized.

  5. Capillary rise of superspreaders.

    PubMed

    Radulovic, Jovana; Sefiane, Khellil; Shanahan, Martin E R

    2011-09-15

    Trisiloxane surfactants, known as 'superspreaders', are commonly employed in numerous applications where enhanced wetting is of the utmost importance. The underlying mechanisms of superspreader wetting have been a focus of scientific interest for ca. 2 decades, and a number of mechanisms have been proposed to explain the unique trisiloxane dynamics. We have studied trisiloxane behaviour in thin capillaries to get further insight into their interfacial activity. Additionally, our knowledge of the capillary rise of superspreaders is surprisingly limited, and the effect of this extraordinary group of surfactants on capillary phenomena has been largely overlooked. Diffusion was confirmed to be the limiting factor of trisiloxane behaviour. A tentative theoretical explanation for the phenomenon studied and an appropriate mathematical model are presented. It is concluded that the enhancement of wetting due to surfactant addition is also a function of geometry: the effect is clear for a sessile drop, but more complex and less beneficial in a capillary.

  6. Displaced capillary dies

    DOEpatents

    Kalejs, Juris P.; Chalmers, Bruce; Surek, Thomas

    1984-01-01

    An asymmetrical shaped capillary die made exclusively of graphite is used to grow silicon ribbon which is capable of being made into solar cells that are more efficient than cells produced from ribbon made using a symmetrically shaped die.

  7. Displaced capillary dies

    DOEpatents

    Kalejs, Juris P.; Chalmers, Bruce; Surek, Thomas

    1982-01-01

    An asymmetrical shaped capillary die made exclusively of graphite is used to grow silicon ribbon which is capable of being made into solar cells that are more efficient than cells produced from ribbon made using a symmetrically shaped die.

  8. Capillary saturation and desaturation.

    PubMed

    Hilfer, R; Armstrong, R T; Berg, S; Georgiadis, A; Ott, H

    2015-12-01

    Capillary desaturation experiments produce disconnected (trapped) ganglia of mesoscopic sizes intermediate between pore size and system size. Experimental evidence for interactions between these mesoscale clusters during desaturation is analyzed and discussed within the established microscopic and macroscopic laws of Newton, Young-Laplace, and Darcy. A theoretical expression for capillary number correlations is introduced that seems to have remained unnoticed. It expresses capillary desaturation curves in terms of stationary capillary pressures and relative permeabilities. The theoretical expression shows that the plateau saturation in capillary desaturation curves may in general differ from the residual nonwetting saturation defined through the saturation limit of the main hysteresis loop. Hysteresis effects as well as the difference between wetting and nonwetting fluids are introduced into the analysis of capillary desaturation experiments. The article examines experiments with different desaturation protocols and discusses the existence of a mesoscopic length scale intermediate between pore scale and sample scale. The theoretical expression is derived entirely within the existing traditional theory of two-phase flow in porous media and compared to a recent experiment. PMID:26764820

  9. Sprayable lightweight ablative coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, William G. (Inventor); Sharpe, Max H. (Inventor); Hill, William E. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An improved lightweight, ablative coating is disclosed that may be spray applied and cured without the development of appreciable shrinkage cracks. The ablative mixture consists essentially of phenolic microballoons, hollow glass spheres, glass fibers, ground cork, a flexibilized resin binder, and an activated colloidal clay.

  10. Vaginal Discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... also be on the lookout for symptoms of yeast infections, bacterial vaginosis and trichomoniasis, 3 infections that ... cause changes in your vaginal discharge. Signs of yeast infections White, cottage cheese-like discharge Swelling and ...

  11. Laser ablation of dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Späth, M.; Stuke, M.

    1992-01-01

    High density 50 μs pulses of the UV dyes PPF, POPOP and BBO and of two dyes in the visible region, Xanthen N92 and Fluorol 7GA were generated by laser ablation. Dye powders were pressed with 7800 kp/cm 2 in round pellets which were ablated by exposure to KrF excimer laser radiation (248 nm) at a fluence of 100 mJ/cm 2. The ablation cloud was optically activated with a XeCl excimer laser. Its fluorescence spectrum was measured and was identified as a dye vapour fluorescence spectrum by comparison to conventional dye solution and dye vapour spectra. The dye cloud is not deflected in an electric field (10 6 V/m). By changing the delay time between the ablation laser and the focused activation laser, the velocity distribution of the ablated dye was measured. Its maximum is at 600 m/s for PPF. Knowing the thickness of the ablated dye layer per shot (300 Å) and the size of the ablation cloud (pictures of a video camera), one can estimate the maximum density of the dye in the gas pulse to be 10 -5 mol/ l in the range of concentration of lasing dyes. However, no lasing was observed up to now.

  12. Tumor Ablation and Nanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Manthe, Rachel L.; Foy, Susan P.; Krishnamurthy, Nishanth; Sharma, Blanka; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2010-01-01

    Next to surgical resection, tumor ablation is a commonly used intervention in the treatment of solid tumors. Tumor ablation methods include thermal therapies, photodynamic therapy, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) producing agents. Thermal therapies induce tumor cell death via thermal energy and include radiofrequency, microwave, high intensity focused ultrasound, and cryoablation. Photodynamic therapy and ROS producing agents cause increased oxidative stress in tumor cells leading to apoptosis. While these therapies are safe and viable alternatives when resection of malignancies is not feasible, they do have associated limitations that prevent their widespread use in clinical applications. To improve the efficacy of these treatments, nanoparticles are being studied in combination with nonsurgical ablation regimens. In addition to better thermal effect on tumor ablation, nanoparticles can deliver anticancer therapeutics that show synergistic anti-tumor effect in the presence of heat and can also be imaged to achieve precision in therapy. Understanding the molecular mechanism of nanoparticle-mediated tumor ablation could further help engineer nanoparticles of appropriate composition and properties to synergize the ablation effect. This review aims to explore the various types of nonsurgical tumor ablation methods currently used in cancer treatment and potential improvements by nanotechnology applications. PMID:20866097

  13. Derivatization in Capillary Electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Marina, M Luisa; Castro-Puyana, María

    2016-01-01

    Capillary electrophoresis is a well-established separation technique in analytical research laboratories worldwide. Its interesting advantages make CE an efficient and potent alternative to other chromatographic techniques. However, it is also recognized that its main drawback is the relatively poor sensitivity when using optical detection. One way to overcome this limitation is to perform a derivatization reaction which is intended to provide the analyte more suitable analytical characteristics enabling a high sensitive detection. Based on the analytical step where the CE derivatization takes place, it can be classified as precapillary (before separation), in-capillary (during separation), or postcapillary (after separation). This chapter describes the application of four different derivatization protocols (in-capillary and precapillary modes) to carry out the achiral and chiral analysis of different compounds in food and biological samples with three different detection modes (UV, LIF, and MS). PMID:27645730

  14. Capillary stretching of fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duprat, C.; Protiere, S.

    2015-09-01

    We study the interaction of a finite volume of liquid with two parallel thin flexible fibers. A tension along the fibers is imposed and may be varied. We report two morphologies, i.e. two types of wet adhesion: a weak capillary adhesion, where a liquid drop bridges the fibers, and a strong elastocapillary adhesion where the liquid is spread between two collapsed fibers. We show that geometry, capillarity and stretching are the key parameters at play. We describe the collapse and detachment of the fibers as a function of two nondimensional parameters, arising from the geometry of the system and a balance between capillary and stretching energies. In addition, we show that the morphology, thus the capillary adhesion, can be controlled by changing the tension within the fibers.

  15. Capillary condenser/evaporator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valenzuela, Javier A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A heat transfer device is disclosed for transferring heat to or from a fluid that is undergoing a phase change. The heat transfer device includes a liquid-vapor manifold in fluid communication with a capillary structure thermally connected to a heat transfer interface, all of which are disposed in a housing to contain the vapor. The liquid-vapor manifold transports liquid in a first direction and conducts vapor in a second, opposite direction. The manifold provides a distributed supply of fluid (vapor or liquid) over the surface of the capillary structure. In one embodiment, the manifold has a fractal structure including one or more layers, each layer having one or more conduits for transporting liquid and one or more openings for conducting vapor. Adjacent layers have an increasing number of openings with decreasing area, and an increasing number of conduits with decreasing cross-sectional area, moving in a direction toward the capillary structure.

  16. Navigation Systems for Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Wood, B. J.; Kruecker, J.; Abi-Jaoudeh, N; Locklin, J.; Levy, E.; Xu, S.; Solbiati, L.; Kapoor, A.; Amalou, H.; Venkatesan, A.

    2010-01-01

    Navigation systems, devices and intra-procedural software are changing the way we practice interventional oncology. Prior to the development of precision navigation tools integrated with imaging systems, thermal ablation of hard-to-image lesions was highly dependent upon operator experience, spatial skills, and estimation of positron emission tomography-avid or arterial-phase targets. Numerous navigation systems for ablation bring the opportunity for standardization and accuracy that extends our ability to use imaging feedback during procedures. Existing systems and techniques are reviewed, and specific clinical applications for ablation are discussed to better define how these novel technologies address specific clinical needs, and fit into clinical practice. PMID:20656236

  17. Moldable cork ablation material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A successful thermal ablative material was manufactured. Moldable cork sheets were tested for density, tensile strength, tensile elongation, thermal conductivity, compression set, and specific heat. A moldable cork sheet, therefore, was established as a realistic product.

  18. Laser ablation of concrete.

    SciTech Connect

    Savina, M.

    1998-10-05

    Laser ablation is effective both as an analytical tool and as a means of removing surface coatings. The elemental composition of surfaces can be determined by either mass spectrometry or atomic emission spectroscopy of the atomized effluent. Paint can be removed from aircraft without damage to the underlying aluminum substrate, and environmentally damaged buildings and sculptures can be restored by ablating away deposited grime. A recent application of laser ablation is the removal of radioactive contaminants from the surface and near-surface regions of concrete. We present the results of ablation tests on concrete samples using a high power pulsed Nd:YAG laser with fiber optic beam delivery. The laser-surface interaction was studied on various model systems consisting of Type I Portland cement with varying amounts of either fine silica or sand in an effort to understand the effect of substrate composition on ablation rates and mechanisms. A sample of non-contaminated concrete from a nuclear power plant was also studied. In addition, cement and concrete samples were doped with non-radioactive isotopes of elements representative of cooling waterspills, such as cesium and strontium, and analyzed by laser-resorption mass spectrometry to determine the contamination pathways. These samples were also ablated at high power to determine the efficiency with which surface contaminants are removed and captured. The results show that the neat cement matrix melts and vaporizes when little or no sand or aggregate is present. Surface flows of liquid material are readily apparent on the ablated surface and the captured aerosol takes the form of glassy beads up to a few tens of microns in diameter. The presence of sand and aggregate particles causes the material to disaggregate on ablation, with intact particles on the millimeter size scale leaving the surface. Laser resorption mass spectrometric analysis showed that cesium and potassium have similar chemical environments in the

  19. Capillary action liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Bergström, Edmund T; Goodall, David M; Myers, Peter

    2009-06-01

    Capillary action LC (caLC) is introduced as a technique using capillary action as the driving force to perform LC in capillary columns packed with HPLC type microparticulate materials. A dry packing method with centrifugal force was developed to prepare capillary columns in parallel (10 columns per 3 min) to support their disposable use in caLC. Using a digital microscope for real-time imaging and recording separations of components in a dye mixture, caLC was found to have flow characteristics similar to TLC. Based on the investigation of microparticulate HPLC silica gels of different size (1.5-10 microm) and a typical TLC grade irregular medium, Merck 60G silica, the van Deemter curves suggested molecular diffusion as the major contribution to band broadening in caLC. With Waters Xbridge 2.6 microm silica, plate heights down to 8.8 microm were obtained, comparable to those achievable in HPLC. Assisted by an image-processing method, the visual caLC separation was converted to a classical chromatogram for further data analysis and such a facility confirmed the observation of highly efficient bands.

  20. Bone marrow transplant - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Transplant - bone marrow - discharge; Stem cell transplant - discharge; Hematopoietic stem cell transplant - discharge; Reduced intensity; Non-myeloablative transplant - discharge; Mini transplant - discharge; Allogenic bone marrow transplant - ...

  1. Pediatric heart surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Congenital heart surgery - discharge; Patent ductus arteriosus ligation - discharge; Hypoplastic left heart repair - discharge; Tetralogy of Fallot repair - discharge; Coarctation of the aorta repair - discharge; ...

  2. Deep vein thrombosis - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    DVT - discharge; Blood clot in the legs - discharge; Thromboembolism - discharge; Venous thromboembolism - deep vein thrombosis; Post-phlebitic syndrome - discharge; Post-thrombotic syndrome - discharge

  3. Noise suppressing capillary separation system

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Xue, Yongjun

    1996-07-30

    A noise-suppressing capillary separation system for detecting the real-time presence or concentration of an analyte in a sample is provided. The system contains a capillary separation means through which the analyte is moved, a coherent light source that generates a beam which is split into a reference beam and a sample beam that irradiate the capillary, and a detector for detecting the reference beam and the sample beam light that transmits through the capillary. The laser beam is of a wavelength effective to be absorbed by a chromophore in the capillary. The system includes a noise suppressing system to improve performance and accuracy without signal averaging or multiple scans.

  4. [Steam ablation of varicose veins].

    PubMed

    van den Bos, Renate R; Malskat, Wendy S J; Neumann, H A M Martino

    2013-01-01

    In many western countries endovenous thermal ablation techniques have largely replaced classical surgery for the treatment of saphenous varicose veins as they are more effective and patient friendly. Because these treatments can be performed under local tumescent anaesthesia, patients can mobilize immediately after the procedure. A new method of thermal ablation is endovenous steam ablation, which is a fast and easy procedure. Steam ablation may cause less pain than laser ablation and it is also cheaper and more flexible than segmental radiofrequency ablation. PMID:23484513

  5. Ablative therapies for renal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Rajan; Leveillee, Raymond J.

    2010-01-01

    Owing to an increased use of diagnostic imaging for evaluating patients with other abdominal conditions, incidentally discovered kidney masses now account for a majority of renal tumors. Renal ablative therapy is assuming a more important role in patients with borderline renal impairment. Renal ablation uses heat or cold to bring about cell death. Radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation are two such procedures, and 5-year results are now emerging from both modalities. Renal biopsy at the time of ablation is extremely important in order to establish tissue diagnosis. Real-time temperature monitoring at the time of radiofrequency ablation is very useful to ensure adequacy of ablation. PMID:21789083

  6. [Venoruton and capillary permeability].

    PubMed

    Cesarone, M R; Laurora, G; Gabini, M; Errichi, B M; Candiani, C; Belcaro, G

    1989-05-01

    A new system to evaluate capillary permeability, the vacuum suction chamber (VSC) device, was used to assess the effects of Venoruton in patients with venous hypertension. A temporary, superficial skin lesion (wheal) was produced with the VSC device by negative pressure (30 mmHg) applied for 10 minutes on the internal, perimalleolar region. Wheals disappear in less than 60 minutes in normals while in patients with venous hypertension the wheal is more persistent, requiring a significantly longer time to disappear. This new technique was used in association with laser-Doppler flowmetry to evaluate the efficacy of Venoruton (1000 mgs t.i.d.) administered for 2 weeks on venous hypertension. Results indicate a positive effect of Venoruton in reducing the abnormally increased capillary permeability in venous hypertension and are proportional to the changes observed in signs and symptoms after treatment.

  7. Enantioseparations by capillary electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Fanali, S; Catarcini, P; Blaschke, G; Chankvetadze, B

    2001-09-01

    The review summarizes recent developments in enantioseparations by capillary electrochromatography (CEC). Selected fundamental aspects of CEC are discussed in order to stress those features which may allow the success of this technique in the competitive field of enantioseparations. In addition, the comparative characteristics of the different modes of chiral CEC and the stationary phases are presented. The effects of the characteristics of the stationary and liquid phases and operational conditions on the separation results are discussed. Finally, some future trends are briefly addressed.

  8. Automated Parallel Capillary Electrophoretic System

    DOEpatents

    Li, Qingbo; Kane, Thomas E.; Liu, Changsheng; Sonnenschein, Bernard; Sharer, Michael V.; Kernan, John R.

    2000-02-22

    An automated electrophoretic system is disclosed. The system employs a capillary cartridge having a plurality of capillary tubes. The cartridge has a first array of capillary ends projecting from one side of a plate. The first array of capillary ends are spaced apart in substantially the same manner as the wells of a microtitre tray of standard size. This allows one to simultaneously perform capillary electrophoresis on samples present in each of the wells of the tray. The system includes a stacked, dual carousel arrangement to eliminate cross-contamination resulting from reuse of the same buffer tray on consecutive executions from electrophoresis. The system also has a gel delivery module containing a gel syringe/a stepper motor or a high pressure chamber with a pump to quickly and uniformly deliver gel through the capillary tubes. The system further includes a multi-wavelength beam generator to generate a laser beam which produces a beam with a wide range of wavelengths. An off-line capillary reconditioner thoroughly cleans a capillary cartridge to enable simultaneous execution of electrophoresis with another capillary cartridge. The streamlined nature of the off-line capillary reconditioner offers the advantage of increased system throughput with a minimal increase in system cost.

  9. Transient Ablation of Teflon Hemispheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arai, Norio; Karashima, Kei-ichi; Sato, Kiyoshi

    1997-01-01

    For high-speed entry of space vehicles into atmospheric environments, ablation is a practical method for alleviating severe aerodynamic heating. Several studies have been undertaken on steady or quasi-steady ablation. However, ablation is a very complicated phenomenon in which a nonequilibrium chemical process is associated with an aerodynamic process that involves changes in body shape with time. Therefore, it seems realistic to consider that ablation is an unsteady phenomenon. In the design of an ablative heat-shield system, since the ultimate purpose of the heat shield is to keep the internal temperature of the space vehicle at a safe level during entry, the transient heat conduction characteristics of the ablator may be critical in the selection of the material and its thickness. This note presents an experimental study of transient ablation of Teflon, with particular emphasis on the change in body shape, the instantaneous internal temperature distribution, and the effect of thermal expansion on ablation rate.

  10. Study of breakdown in an ablative pulsed plasma thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Tiankun; Wu, Zhiwen; Liu, Xiangyang; Xie, Kan; Wang, Ningfei; Cheng, Yue

    2015-10-15

    Breakdown in ablative pulsed plasma thrusters (APPTs) must be studied in order to design new types of APPTs and measure particular parameters. In this paper, we studied a parallel-plate ablative pulsed plasma thruster that used a coaxial semiconductor spark plug. By operating the APPT about 500 times with various capacitor voltages and electrode gaps, we measured and analyzed the voltage of the spark plug, the voltage between the electrodes, and the discharge current. These experiments revealed a time delay (∼1–10 μs) between spark plug ignition and capacitor discharge, which may affect the performance of high-pulsing-rate (>10 kHz) and double-discharge APPTs, and the measurements of some of the APPT parameters. The delay time decreased as the capacitor voltage increased, and it increased with an increasing electrode gap and increasing number of ignitions. We explain our results through a simple theoretical analysis.

  11. Advanced Ablative TPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasch, Matthew J.

    2011-01-01

    Early NASA missions (Gemini, Apollo, Mars Viking) employed new ablative TPS that were tailored for the entry environment. After 40 years, heritage ablative TPS materials using Viking or Pathfinder era materials are at or near their performance limits and will be inadequate for future exploration missions. Significant advances in TPS materials technology are needed in order to enable any subsequent human exploration missions beyond Low Earth Orbit. This poster summarizes some recent progress at NASA in developing families of advanced rigid/conformable and flexible ablators that could potentially be used for thermal protection in planetary entry missions. In particular the effort focuses technologies required to land heavy (approx.40 metric ton) masses on Mars to facilitate future exploration plans.

  12. Shuttle subscale ablative nozzle tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, L. B.; Bailey, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    Recent subscale nozzle tests have identified new and promising carbon phenolic nozzle ablatives which utilize staple rayon, PAN, and pitch based carbon cloth. A 4-inch throat diameter submerged test nozzle designed for the 48-inch Jet Propulsion Laboratory char motor was used to evaluate five different designs incorporating 20 candidate ablatives. Test results indicate that several pitch and PAN-based carbon phenolic ablatives can provide erosion and char performance equivalent or superior to the present continuous rayon-based SRM ablative.

  13. Thermal ablation in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yong; Cao, Cheng-Song; Yu, Yang; Si, Ya-Meng

    2016-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and cryoablation are alternative forms of therapy used widely in various pathological states, including treatment of carcinogenesis. The reason is that ablation techniques have ability of modulating the immune system. Furthermore, recent studies have applied this form of therapy on tumor microenvironment and in the systematic circulation. Moreover, RFA and cryoablation result in an inflammatory immune response along with tissue disruption. Evidence has demonstrated that these procedures affect carcinogenesis by causing a significant local inflammatory response leading to an immunogenic gene signature. The present review enlightens the current view of these techniques in cancer. PMID:27703520

  14. Rapid fabrication of supercapacitor electrodes using bionanoscaffolds in capillary microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zang, F.; Chu, S.; Gerasopoulos, K.; Culver, J. N.; Ghodssi, R.

    2015-12-01

    This paper reports the utilization of capillary microfluidics to rapidly create nanostructure-patterned electrodes for energy storage applications. Using patterned photoresist as open-channel capillary microfluidics, Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) bio-nanoscaffolds suspended in solution are autonomously delivered onto planar gold electrodes over a 1 cm2 area. The TMVs assemble on the electrode and form a dense bio-nanoscaffold layer due to enhanced evaporation-assisted assembly in the open-channel capillary microfluidic device within an hour. The TMV structures are coated with Ni/NiO through electroless plating and thermal oxidation to form supercapacitor electrodes. The galvanostatic charge/discharge cycle showed a 3.6-fold increase in areal capacitance for the nanostructured electrode compared to planar structures.

  15. Capillary reference half-cell

    DOEpatents

    Hall, Stephen H.

    1996-01-01

    The present invention is a reference half-cell electrode wherein intermingling of test fluid with reference fluid does not affect the performance of the reference half-cell over a long time. This intermingling reference half-cell may be used as a single or double junction submersible or surface reference electrode. The intermingling reference half-cell relies on a capillary tube having a first end open to reference fluid and a second end open to test fluid wherein the small diameter of the capillary tube limits free motion of fluid within the capillary to diffusion. The electrode is placed near the first end of the capillary in contact with the reference fluid. The method of operation of the present invention begins with filling the capillary tube with a reference solution. After closing the first end of the capillary, the capillary tube may be fully submerged or partially submerged with the second open end inserted into test fluid. Since the electrode is placed near the first end of the capillary, and since the test fluid may intermingle with the reference fluid through the second open end only by diffusion, this intermingling capillary reference half-cell provides a stable voltage potential for long time periods.

  16. Capillary reference half-cell

    DOEpatents

    Hall, S.H.

    1996-02-13

    The present invention is a reference half-cell electrode wherein intermingling of test fluid with reference fluid does not affect the performance of the reference half-cell over a long time. This intermingling reference half-cell may be used as a single or double junction submersible or surface reference electrode. The intermingling reference half-cell relies on a capillary tube having a first end open to reference fluid and a second end open to test fluid wherein the small diameter of the capillary tube limits free motion of fluid within the capillary to diffusion. The electrode is placed near the first end of the capillary in contact with the reference fluid. The method of operation of the present invention begins with filling the capillary tube with a reference solution. After closing the first end of the capillary, the capillary tube may be fully submerged or partially submerged with the second open end inserted into test fluid. Since the electrode is placed near the first end of the capillary, and since the test fluid may intermingle with the reference fluid through the second open end only by diffusion, this intermingling capillary reference half-cell provides a stable voltage potential for long time periods. 11 figs.

  17. Stability of Constrained Capillary Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostwick, J. B.; Steen, P. H.

    2015-01-01

    A capillary surface is an interface between two fluids whose shape is determined primarily by surface tension. Sessile drops, liquid bridges, rivulets, and liquid drops on fibers are all examples of capillary shapes influenced by contact with a solid. Capillary shapes can reconfigure spontaneously or exhibit natural oscillations, reflecting static or dynamic instabilities, respectively. Both instabilities are related, and a review of static stability precedes the dynamic case. The focus of the dynamic case here is the hydrodynamic stability of capillary surfaces subject to constraints of (a) volume conservation, (b) contact-line boundary conditions, and (c) the geometry of the supporting surface.

  18. [Nipple discharge].

    PubMed

    Deodato, G; Consoli, A; Riggi, M; Longo, G; Finocchiaro, G B

    1981-02-01

    The Authors examine the various types of breast discharge concentrating in particular on the secretions due to inherent pathology. After having studied origin, they concentrate on the diagnostic significance and the limits of exfoliative cytology and contrast mammography. The Authors conclude by presenting an original protocol of treatment of the afflicted breast illustrating in addition, the various surgical techniques proposed for the cure of the sicknesses of intramammary origin that cause abnormal discharge. PMID:7261200

  19. Alveolar Capillary Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Stankiewicz, Pawel; Steinhorn, Robin H.

    2011-01-01

    Alveolar capillary dysplasia with misalignment of the pulmonary veins (ACD/MPV) is a rare, fatal developmental lung disorder of neonates and infants. This review aims to address recent findings in the etiology and genetics of ACD/MPV and to raise awareness of this poorly known disease, which may also present as milder, unclassified forms. Successively discussed are what is known about the epidemiology, pathogenesis, pathophysiology, diagnostic indicators and approaches, genetic testing, treatment, and cases of delayed onset. The review concludes with suggestions for future directions to answer the many unknowns about this disorder. PMID:21471096

  20. Heart attack - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Myocardial infarction - discharge; MI - discharge; Coronary event - discharge; Infarct - discharge ... patients with unstable angina/non-ST-Elevation myocardial infarction: a report of the American College of Cardiology/ ...

  1. Capillary suspensions: Particle networks formed through the capillary force

    PubMed Central

    Koos, Erin

    2014-01-01

    The addition of small amounts of a secondary fluid to a suspension can, through the attractive capillary force, lead to particle bridging and network formation. The capillary bridging phenomenon can be used to stabilize particle suspensions and precisely tune their rheological properties. This effect can even occur when the secondary fluid wets the particles less well than the bulk fluid. These materials, so-called capillary suspensions, have been the subject of recent research studying the mechanism for network formation, the properties of these suspensions, and how the material properties can be modified. Recent work in colloidal clusters is summarized and the relationship to capillary suspensions is discussed. Capillary suspensions can also be used as a pathway for new material design and some of these applications are highlighted. Results obtained to date are summarized and central questions that remain to be answered are proposed in this review. PMID:25729316

  2. Tapered capillary optics

    DOEpatents

    Hirsch, Gregory

    1998-01-01

    A metal or glass wire is etched with great precision into a very narrowly tapering cone which has the shape of the desired final capillary-optics bore. By controlling the rate of removal of the wire from an etchant bath, a carefully controlled taper is produced. A sensor measures the diameter of the wire as it leaves the surface of the etchant. This signal is used for feedback control of the withdrawal speed. The etched wire undergoes a treatment to produce an extremely low surface-roughness. The etched and smoothed wire is coated with the material of choice for optimizing the reflectivity of the radiation being focused. This could be a vacuum evaporation, sputtering, CVD or aqueous chemical process. The coated wire is either electroplated, built up with electroless plating, or encapsulated in a polymer cylinder such as epoxy to increase the diameter of the wire for easier handling and greater robustness. During this process, the wire is vertically oriented and tensioned to assure that the wire is absolutely straight. The coated and electroformed wire is bonded to a flat, rigid substrate and is then periodically segmented by cutting or etching a series of narrow slits or grooves into the wire. The wire is vertically oriented and tensioned during the bonding process to assure that it is straight. The original wire material is then chemically etched away through the slits or otherwise withdrawn to leave the hollow internal bore of the final tapered-capillary optical element.

  3. Capillary Electrophoresis in Metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Maier, Tanja Verena; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomics is an analytical toolbox to describe (all) low-molecular-weight compounds in a biological system, as cells, tissues, urine, and feces, as well as in serum and plasma. To analyze such complex biological samples, high requirements on the analytical technique are needed due to the high variation in compound physico-chemistry (cholesterol derivatives, amino acids, fatty acids as SCFA, MCFA, or LCFA, or pathway-related metabolites belonging to each individual organism) and concentration dynamic range. All main separation techniques (LC-MS, GC-MS) are applied in routine to metabolomics hyphenated or not to mass spectrometry, and capillary electrophoresis is a powerful high-resolving technique but still underused in this field of complex samples. Metabolomics can be performed in the non-targeted way to gain an overview on metabolite profiles in biological samples. Targeted metabolomics is applied to analyze quantitatively pre-selected metabolites. This chapter reviews the use of capillary electrophoresis in the field of metabolomics and exemplifies solutions in metabolite profiling and analysis in urine and plasma. PMID:27645748

  4. On Capillary Rise and Nucleation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prasad, R.

    2008-01-01

    A comparison of capillary rise and nucleation is presented. It is shown that both phenomena result from a balance between two competing energy factors: a volume energy and a surface energy. Such a comparison may help to introduce nucleation with a topic familiar to the students, capillary rise. (Contains 1 table and 3 figures.)

  5. Capillary optics for radiation focusing

    SciTech Connect

    Peurrung, A.J.; Reeder, P.L.; Bliss, M.; Craig, R.A.; Lepel, E.A.; Stromswold, D.C.; Stoffels, J.; Sunberg, D.S.; Tenny, H.

    1996-11-01

    Capillary lens technology may ultimately bring benefits to neutron and x-ray-based science like conventional lenses with visible light. Although the technology is not yet 10 years old, these lenses have already had a significant impact in engineering, science, and medicine. Capillary lenses are advantageous when it is desirable to increase the radiation flux at a location without regard to its angular divergence. PNNL has worked to improve the technology in several ways. A single, optimally tapered capillary was manufactured, which allows intensity gains of a factor of 270 for an initially parallel, incident x-ray beam. Feasibility of constructing neutron lenses using {sup 58}Ni (particularly effective at reflecting neutrons) has been explored. Three applications for capillary optics have been identified and studied: neutron telescope, Gandolphi x-ray diffractometry, and neutron radiotherapy. A brief guide is given for determining which potential applications are likely to be helped by capillary optics.

  6. Biomedical applications of capillary electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartsova, L. A.; Bessonova, E. A.

    2015-08-01

    The review deals with modern analytical approaches used in capillary electrophoresis for solving medical and biological problems: search for biomarkers of various diseases and rapid diagnosis based on characteristic profiles of biologically active compounds by capillary electrophoresis with mass spectrometric detection; monitoring of the residual drugs in biological fluids for evaluating the efficiency of drug therapy; testing of the enantiomeric purity of pharmaceutical products; the use of novel materials as components of stationary and pseudo-stationary phases in capillary electrophoresis and capillary electrochromatography to increase the selectivity of separation of components of complex matrices; and identification of various on-line preconcentration techniques to reduce the detection limits of biologically active analytes. A topical trend in capillary electrophoresis required in clinical practice, viz., the design of microfluidic systems, is discussed. The bibliography includes 173 references.

  7. Noise suppressing capillary separation system

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, E.S.; Xue, Y.

    1996-07-30

    A noise-suppressing capillary separation system for detecting the real-time presence or concentration of an analyte in a sample is provided. The system contains a capillary separation means through which the analyte is moved, a coherent light source that generates a beam which is split into a reference beam and a sample beam that irradiate the capillary, and a detector for detecting the reference beam and the sample beam light that transmits through the capillary. The laser beam is of a wavelength effective to be absorbed by a chromophore in the capillary. The system includes a noise suppressing system to improve performance and accuracy without signal averaging or multiple scans. 13 figs.

  8. Ablation of Martian glaciers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Henry J.; Davis, Philip A.

    1987-01-01

    Glacier like landforms are observed in the fretted terrain of Mars in the latitude belts near + or - 42 deg. It was suggested that sublimation or accumulation-ablation rates could be estimated for these glaciers if their shapes were known. To this end, photoclinometric profiles were obtained of a number of these landforms. On the basis of analyses of these profiles, it was concluded that ice is chiefly ablating from these landforms that either are inactive rock-glaciers or have materials within them that are moving exceedingly slowly at this time. These conclusions are consistent with other geologic information. The analyses were performed using a two-dimensional model of an isothermal glacier.

  9. Influence of charge accumulation on a dielectric capillary atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sands, Brian; Huang, Shih; Speltz, Jared; Niekamp, Matthew; Ganguly, Biswa

    2011-10-01

    Using a single ring electrode configuration and a positive unipolar pulsed voltage source, we examine the influence of the dielectric barrier on the distribution of ionization in a streamer-like dielectric capillary plasma jet utilizing a rare gas flow as a function of anode placement and pulse repetition frequency. At low frequencies, when the anode is recessed at least 5 mm along the capillary, two regions of enhanced ionization can be resolved near the anode and near the capillary tip that are associated with two distinct peaks in the discharge current and locally increased emission intensity in the residual streamer channel. With the anode placed ~20 mm from the capillary tip, the two current peaks were ~13 mA. Increasing the frequency between 6 and 10 kHz, the capillary tip enhancement expanded towards the anode and concentrated there at higher frequencies. The discharge current over this frequency range rose to 18 mA and was increasingly dominated by the earlier peak associated with ionization near the anode. This increased charging of the dielectric surface and reduced the potential available to the ionization front outside the capillary as indicated by a 25% drop in velocity and reduced emission intensity. The surface charging effect is visualized at discharge inception using a Phantom high-frame-rate CCD camera.

  10. [Ablative and fractional lasers].

    PubMed

    Beylot, C; Grognard, C; Michaud, T

    2009-10-01

    The use of pulsed or scanning Carbon Dioxide, and pulsed Erbium-YAG lasers allows the programmable and reproducible photocoagulation of thin layers of the epidermis and superficial dermis. Thermal damage depends on the type of laser and is greater with CO(2) lasers. The degree of neocollagenesis is proportional to the thermal damage and is better with CO(2) lasers. Their main indication is the correction of photoaged facial skin but they can also be used for corrective dermatology, e.g. for scars and genodermatosis. Results are highly satisfactory but the technique is invasive and the patient experiences a social hindrance of around two weeks. Fractionated techniques treat 25% of the defective skin area at each session in noncontiguous microzones; four sessions are therefore necessary to treat the entire cutaneous surface. The treatment is given under topical anesthesia and is much less invasive, particularly with nonablative fractional laser treatment in which photothermolysis does not penetrate below the epidermis and/or the effects are slight, with no or very little social isolation. However, the results are much less satisfactory than the results of ablative laser and there is no firming effect. Other zones than the face can be treated. With the fractional CO(2) and Erbium ablative lasers, which have multiplied over the past 2 years, the much wider impacts cause perforation of the epidermis and there is a zone of ablation by laser photovaporization, with a zone of thermal damage below. The results are better in correcting photoaging of the face, without, however, achieving the efficacy of ablative lasers, which remain the reference technique. However, the effects are not insignificant, requiring at least 5 days of social isolation.

  11. Steady Capillary Driven Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weislogel, Mark M.

    1996-01-01

    A steady capillary driven flow is developed for a liquid index in a circular tube which is partially coated with a surface modifier to produce a discontinuous wetting condition from one side of the tube to the other. The bulk flow is novel in that it is truly steady, and controlled solely by the physics associated with dynamic wetting. The influence of gravity on the flow is minimized through the use of small diameter tubes approximately O(1 mm) tested horizontally in a laboratory and larger tubes approximately O(10 mm) tested in the low gravity environment of a drop tower. Average steady velocities are predicted and compared against a large experimental data set which includes the effects of tube dimensions and fluid properties. The sensitivity of the velocity to surface cleanliness is dramatic and the advantages of experimentation in a microgravity environment are discussed.

  12. Benign sinonasal capillary haemangioma

    PubMed Central

    Stubbs, Darren; Poulios, Aristotelis; Khalil, Hisham

    2014-01-01

    Haemangiomas are benign fibrovascular tumours relatively that are common in the head and neck, where 60% of them occur Among the various categories of haemangiomas, lobular capillary haemangiomas (LCH) occur frequently on the skin, lips, buccal mucosa, tongue and gingiva. However, they are vanishingly rare in the paranasal sinuses. The imaging features of LCH are non-specific. The histological characteristics of LCH can also make diagnosis difficult as sometimes resemble highly vascular malignant tumours. This leads to the false preoperative diagnosis of suspected malignancy in many cases, which places the patient under unnecessary distress and anxiety. We present a case of LCH appearing as a suspicious nasal lesion of the lateral nasal wall with unilateral nasal obstruction, necrotic centre and epistaxis. The tumour was excised endoscopically in one operation including endoscopic medial maxillectomy. Further education about this lesion is deemed important as preoperative embolisation may be needed for a safe operation. PMID:25287393

  13. Capillaries for use in a multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, E.S.; Chang, H.T.; Fung, E.N.

    1997-12-09

    The invention provides a side-entry optical excitation geometry for use in a multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system. A charge-injection device is optically coupled to capillaries in the array such that the interior of a capillary is imaged onto only one pixel. In Sanger-type 4-label DNA sequencing reactions, nucleotide identification (``base calling``) is improved by using two long-pass filters to split fluorescence emission into two emission channels. A binary poly(ethyleneoxide) matrix is used in the electrophoretic separations. 19 figs.

  14. Capillaries for use in a multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Chang, Huan-Tsang; Fung, Eliza N.

    1997-12-09

    The invention provides a side-entry optical excitation geometry for use in a multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system. A charge-injection device is optically coupled to capillaries in the array such that the interior of a capillary is imaged onto only one pixel. In Sanger-type 4-label DNA sequencing reactions, nucleotide identification ("base calling") is improved by using two long-pass filters to split fluorescence emission into two emission channels. A binary poly(ethyleneoxide) matrix is used in the electrophoretic separations.

  15. Capillary ratchet: Hydrodynamics of capillary feeding in shorebirds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Manu; Quere, David; Bush, John

    2008-03-01

    Bill morphologies are highly specialized to particular foraging strategies in birds, as is apparent from the large diversity of beak shapes observed in nature. Here we present an experimental and analytical study of capillary feeding in shorebirds. We highlight the critical role of contact angle hysteresis in capillary feeding. Our study provides a simple physical rationalization for the observation of multiple mandibular spreading cycles in feeding, necessary to overcome contact line resistance. We also find a unique geometrical optima in beak opening and closing angles for the most efficient drop transport. This capillary ratchet mechanism may also find applications in micro scale fluid transport, such as valveless pumping of fluid drops.

  16. OCDR guided laser ablation device

    DOEpatents

    Dasilva, Luiz B.; Colston, Jr., Bill W.; James, Dale L.

    2002-01-01

    A guided laser ablation device. The device includes a mulitmode laser ablation fiber that is surrounded by one or more single mode optical fibers that are used to image in the vicinity of the laser ablation area to prevent tissue damage. The laser ablation device is combined with an optical coherence domain reflectometry (OCDR) unit and with a control unit which initializes the OCDR unit and a high power laser of the ablation device. Data from the OCDR unit is analyzed by the control unit and used to control the high power laser. The OCDR images up to about 3 mm ahead of the ablation surface to enable a user to see sensitive tissue such as a nerve or artery before damaging it by the laser.

  17. Applications of capillary optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romaniuk, Ryszard

    2006-10-01

    The paper updates and summarizes contemporary applications of capillary optical fibers. Some of these applications are straight consequence of the classical capillary properties and capillary devices like: rheometry, electrophoresis, column chromatography (gas and liquid). Some new applications are tightly connected with co-propagation (or counter-propagation) of micro-mass together with optical wave - evanescent or of considerable intensity. In the first case, the optical wave is propagated in a narrow (more and more frequently single-mode) optical ring core adjacent to the capillary hole. The optical propagation is purely refractive. In the second case, the intensity maximum of optical wave is on the capillary long axis, i.e. in the center of the hole. The optical propagation is purely photonic, i.e. in a Bragg waveguide (one dimensional photonic band-gap). The capillary hole is filled with vacuum or with propagated matter (gas, liquid, single atoms, continuous particle arrangement). Optical capillaries, filamentary and embedded, are turning to a fundamental component of nano- and micro-MOEMS.

  18. Instability of the capillary bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pare, Gounseti; Hoepffner, Jerome

    2014-11-01

    Capillary adhesion is a physical mechanism that maintains two bodies in contact by capillarity through a liquid ligament. The capillary bridge is an idealization of this capillary adhesion. In this study we first focus on the classical case of the stability of the capillary bridge. Secondly we study a slightly more complex configuration, imagining a flow in the capillary bridge as in the case of the dynamics of the neck of a liquid ligament, in its withdrawal under the effect of capillarity. Inspired by the experiments on soap films of Plateau, the configuration analyzed consists of an initially axisymmetric, mass of fluid held by surface tension forces between two parallel, coaxial, solid pipes of the same diameter. The results presented are obtained by numerical simulations using the free software, Gerris Flow Solver. We first focus on the capillary Venturi. In the static configuration the stability diagram of the capillary bridge obtained is in perfect agreement with the results of Lev A. Slobozhanin. In the dynamic case we develop a matlab code based on the one dimensional equations of Eggers and Dupont. The comparison of the bifurcation diagram obtained and the numerical simulations shows a good agreement.

  19. Multiple target laser ablation system

    DOEpatents

    Mashburn, Douglas N.

    1996-01-01

    A laser ablation apparatus and method are provided in which multiple targets consisting of material to be ablated are mounted on a movable support. The material transfer rate is determined for each target material, and these rates are stored in a controller. A position detector determines which target material is in a position to be ablated, and then the controller controls the beam trigger timing and energy level to achieve a desired proportion of each constituent material in the resulting film.

  20. Multiple target laser ablation system

    DOEpatents

    Mashburn, D.N.

    1996-01-09

    A laser ablation apparatus and method are provided in which multiple targets consisting of material to be ablated are mounted on a movable support. The material transfer rate is determined for each target material, and these rates are stored in a controller. A position detector determines which target material is in a position to be ablated, and then the controller controls the beam trigger timing and energy level to achieve a desired proportion of each constituent material in the resulting film. 3 figs.

  1. Direct chemical-analysis of uv laser-ablation products of organic polymers by using selective ion monitoring mode in gas-chromatography mass-spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cho, Yirang; Lee, H.W.; Fountain, S.T.; Lubman, D.M.

    1994-01-01

    Trace quantities of laser ablated organic polymers were analyzed by using commercial capillary column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry; the instrument was modified so that the laser ablation products could be introduced into the capillary column directly and the constituents of each peak in the chromatogram were identified by using a mass spectrometer. The present study takes advantage of the selective ion monitoring mode for significantly improving the sensitivity of the mass spectrometer as a detector, which is critical in analyzing the trace quantities and confirming the presence or absence of the species of interest in laser ablated polymers. The initial composition of the laser ablated polymers was obtained by using an electron impact reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer and the possible structure of the fragments observed in the spectra was proposed based on the structure of the polymers.

  2. Capillary flow solder wettability test

    SciTech Connect

    Vianco, P.T.; Rejent, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    A test procedure was developed to assess the capillary flow wettability of solders inside of a confined geometry. The test geometry was comprised of two parallel plates with a controlled gap of constant thickness (0.008 cm, 0.018 cm, 0.025 cm, and 0.038 cm). Capillary flow was assessed by: (1) the meniscus or capillary rise of the solder within the gap, (2) the extent of void formation in the gap, and (3) the time-dependence of the risen solder film. Tests were performed with the lead-free solders.

  3. Integrated multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Tan, Hongdong

    2002-05-14

    The present invention provides an integrated multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system for the analysis of sample analytes. The system integrates and automates multiple components, such as chromatographic columns and separation capillaries, and further provides a detector for the detection of analytes eluting from the separation capillaries. The system employs multiplexed freeze/thaw valves to manage fluid flow and sample movement. The system is computer controlled and is capable of processing samples through reaction, purification, denaturation, pre-concentration, injection, separation and detection in parallel fashion. Methods employing the system of the invention are also provided.

  4. Analysis of Capillary Rise in Asymmetric Branch-Like Capillary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Caoxiong; Shen, Yinghao; Ge, Hongkui; Yang, Zhihui; Su, Shuai; Ren, Kai; Huang, Heyu

    2016-05-01

    Transport in porous media is common in nature, attracting many attentions for a long time. Tree-like network model is often used as a simplification for porous space, expressing the complexity of pore spaces instead of capillary bundle. To investigate spontaneous imbibition characteristics in this network, a dynamic asymmetric branch-like capillary model is used to represent basic network structure, using fractal method to represent tortuosity. This work investigates the influence of parameters on imbibition process in the branch-like capillary model. An analytical equation for the imbibition mass versus time is derived. Parameters from capillary structures to liquid properties are taken into account and analyzed based on the numerical solution of the equation. It is found that the imbibition process in asymmetric branch-like capillary model can be recognized by four sections and brunching tubes are positive for imbibition process. Concomitantly, meniscus arrest event is simulated and discussed. Moreover, the influence of parameters on imbibition process is discussed. These parameters can be classified as static and dynamic. Static parameters mainly change the capillary force, which are related to the ultimate imbibition mass or imbibition ability, while dynamic parameters mainly have influence on resistance of flowing fluid, which are related to the imbibition speed in the imbibition process.

  5. Numerical Simulation of Unsteady Blood Flow through Capillary Networks.

    PubMed

    Davis, J M; Pozrikidis, C

    2011-08-01

    A numerical method is implemented for computing unsteady blood flow through a branching capillary network. The evolution of the discharge hematocrit along each capillary segment is computed by integrating in time a one-dimensional convection equation using a finite-difference method. The convection velocity is determined by the local and instantaneous effective capillary blood viscosity, while the tube to discharge hematocrit ratio is deduced from available correlations. Boundary conditions for the discharge hematocrit at divergent bifurcations arise from the partitioning law proposed by Klitzman and Johnson involving a dimensionless exponent, q≥1. When q=1, the cells are partitioned in proportion to the flow rate; as q tends to infinity, the cells are channeled into the branch with the highest flow rate. Simulations are performed for a tree-like, perfectly symmetric or randomly perturbed capillary network with m generations. When the tree involves more than a few generations, a supercritical Hopf bifurcation occurs at a critical value of q, yielding spontaneous self-sustained oscillations in the absence of external forcing. A phase diagram in the m-q plane is presented to establish conditions for unsteady flow, and the effect of various geometrical and physical parameters is examined. For a given network tree order, m, oscillations can be induced for a sufficiently high value of q by increasing the apparent intrinsic viscosity, decreasing the ratio of the vessel diameter from one generation to the next, or by decreasing the diameter of the terminal vessels. With other parameters fixed, oscillations are inhibited by increasing m. The results of the continuum model are in excellent agreement with the predictions of a discrete model where the motion of individual cells is followed from inlet to outlet.

  6. DNA typing by capillary electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, N.

    1997-10-08

    Capillary electrophoresis is becoming more and more important in nucleic acid analysis including DNA sequencing, typing and disease gene measurements. This work summarized the background of DNA typing. The recent development of capillary electrophoresis was also discussed. The second part of the thesis showed the principle of DNA typing based on using the allelic ladder as the absolute standard ladder in capillary electrophoresis system. Future work will be focused on demonstrating DNA typing on multiplex loci and examples of disease diagnosis in the on-line format of PCR-CE. Also capillary array electrophoresis system should allow high throughput, fast speed DNA typing. Only the introduction and conclusions for this report are available here. A reprint was removed for separate processing.

  7. Liposome behavior in capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Roberts, M A; Locascio-Brown, L; Maccrehan, W A; Durst, R A

    1996-10-01

    The behavior of liposomes in capillary electrophoresis is studied for the purpose of developing a potential method for characterizing liposomes prepared for use in industrial and analytical applications. This study characterizes the electrophoretic behavior of liposomes under various conditions to provide information about electrophoretic mobility and liposome-capillary surface interactions. The results of this method are compared with the results obtained using traditional laser light-scattering methods to obtain size information about liposome preparations. Additionally, reactions of liposomes and the surfactant n-octyl-β-d-glucopyranoside are performed off-line in bulk solution experiments and on-line in the capillary. Automated delivery of lysis agents by multiple electrokinetic injections is demonstrated as a general method for inducing on-capillary reactions between liposomes and other reagents. Furthermore, some preliminary evidence on the use of liposomes as a hydrophobic partitioning medium for analytical separations is presented.

  8. Capillary Electrophoresis in Wine Science.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Christian; Bagala, Franck; Gougeon, Régis D; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Capillary electrophoresis appeared to be a powerful and reliable technique to analyze the diversity of wine compounds. Wine presents a great variety of natural chemicals coming from the grape berry extraction and the fermentation processes. The first and more abundant after water, ethanol has been quantified in wines via capillary electrophoresis. Other families like organic acids, neutral and acid sugars, polyphenols, amines, thiols, vitamins, and soluble proteins are electrophoretically separated from the complex matrix.Here, we will focus on the different methodologies that have been employed to conduct properly capillary electrophoresis in wine analysis.Two examples informing on wine chemistry obtained by capillary electrophoresis will be detailed. They concern polyphenol analysis and protein profiling. The first category is a well-developed quantitative approach important for the quality and the antioxidant properties conferred to wine. The second aspect involves more research aspects dealing with microbiota infections in the vineyard or in the grape as well as enological practices. PMID:27645750

  9. Surface Tension and Capillary Rise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walton, Alan J.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of the shortcomings of textbook explanations of surface tension, distinguishing between concepts of tension and capillary rise. The arguments require only a clear understanding of Newtonian mechanics, notably potential energy. (DF)

  10. Capillary electrophoresis electrospray ionization mass spectrometry interface

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Richard D.; Severs, Joanne C.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is an interface between a capillary electrophoresis separation capillary end and an electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary end, for transporting an anolyte sample from a capillary electrophoresis separation capillary to a electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary. The interface of the present invention has: (a) a charge transfer fitting enclosing both of the capillary electrophoresis capillary end and the electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary end; (b) a reservoir containing an electrolyte surrounding the charge transfer fitting; and (c) an electrode immersed into the electrolyte, the electrode closing a capillary electrophoresis circuit and providing charge transfer across the charge transfer fitting while avoiding substantial bulk fluid transfer across the charge transfer fitting. Advantages of the present invention have been demonstrated as effective in providing high sensitivity and efficient analyses.

  11. Matricectomy and nail ablation.

    PubMed

    Baran, Robert; Haneke, Eckart

    2002-11-01

    Matricectomy refers to the complete extirpation of the nail matrix, resulting in permanent nail loss. Usually however, matricectomy is only partial, restricted to one or both lateral horns of the matrix. Nail ablation is the definitive removal of the entire nail organ. The most important common denominator in the successful matricectomy is the total removal or destruction of the matrix tissue. Matricectomy may be indicated for the management of onychauxis, onychogryphosis, congenital nail dystrophies, and chronic painful nail, such as recalcitrant ingrown toenail or split within the medial or lateral one-third of the nail.

  12. High temperature ablative foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Matthew T. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An ablative foam composition is formed of approximately 150 to 250 parts by weight polymeric isocyanate having an isocyanate functionality of 2.6 to 3.2; approximately 15 to 30 parts by weight reactive flame retardant having a hydroxyl number range from 200-260; approximately 10 to 40 parts by weight non-reactive flame retardant; approximately 10 to 40 parts by weight nonhydrolyzable silicone copolymer having a hydroxyl number range from 75-205; and approximately 3 to 16 parts by weight amine initiated polyether resin having an isocyanate functionality greater than or equal to 3.0 and a hydroxyl number range from 400-800.

  13. Ulcerative colitis - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Inflammatory bowel disease - ulcerative colitis - discharge; Ulcerative proctitis - discharge; Colitis - discharge ... were in the hospital because you have ulcerative colitis. This is a swelling of the inner lining ...

  14. Percutaneous Ablation in the Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Bradford J.; Gervais, Debra A.

    2011-01-01

    Percutaneous ablation in the kidney is now performed as a standard therapeutic nephron-sparing option in patients who are poor candidates for resection. Its increasing use has been largely prompted by the rising incidental detection of renal cell carcinomas with cross-sectional imaging and the need to preserve renal function in patients with comorbid conditions, multiple renal cell carcinomas, and/or heritable renal cancer syndromes. Clinical studies to date indicate that radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation are effective therapies with acceptable short- to intermediate-term outcomes and with a low risk in the appropriate setting, with attention to pre-, peri-, and postprocedural detail. The results following percutaneous radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation in the treatment of renal cell carcinoma are reviewed in this article, including those of several larger scale studies of ablation of T1a tumors. Clinical and technical considerations unique to ablation in the kidney are presented, and potential complications are discussed. © RSNA, 2011 PMID:22012904

  15. Curvature capillary migration of microspheres.

    PubMed

    Sharifi-Mood, Nima; Liu, Iris B; Stebe, Kathleen J

    2015-09-14

    We address the question: how does capillarity propel microspheres along curvature gradients? For a particle on a fluid interface, there are two conditions that can apply at the three phase contact line: either the contact line adopts an equilibrium contact angle, or it can be pinned by kinetic trapping, e.g. at chemical heterogeneities, asperities, or other pinning sites on the particle surface. We formulate the curvature capillary energy for both scenarios for particles smaller than the capillary length and far from any pinning boundaries. The scale and range of the distortion made by the particle are set by the particle radius; we use singular perturbation methods to find the distortions and to rigorously evaluate the associated capillary energies. For particles with equilibrium contact angles, contrary to the literature, we find that the capillary energy is negligible, with the first contribution bounded to fourth order in the product of the particle radius and the deviatoric curvature of the host interface. For pinned contact lines, we find curvature capillary energies that are finite, with a functional form investigated previously by us for disks and microcylinders on curved interfaces. In experiments, we show microspheres migrate along deterministic trajectories toward regions of maximum deviatoric curvature with curvature capillary energies ranging from 6 × 10(3)-5 × 10(4)kBT. These data agree with the curvature capillary energy for the case of pinned contact lines. The underlying physics of this migration is a coupling of the interface deviatoric curvature with the quadrupolar mode of nanometric disturbances in the interface owing to the particle's contact line undulations. This work is an example of the major implications of nanometric roughness and contact line pinning for colloidal dynamics.

  16. Thermal response and ablation characteristics of light weight ceramic ablators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tran, Huy K.; Rasky, Daniel J.; Esfahani, Lili

    1993-01-01

    An account is given of the thermal performance and ablation characteristics of the NASA-Ames Lightweight Ceramic Ablators (LCAs) in supersonic, high-enthalpy convective environments, which use low density ceramic or carbon fiber matrices as substrates for main structural support, with organic resin fillers. LCA densities are in the 0.224-1.282 g/cu cm range. In-depth temperature data have been obtained to determine thermal penetration depths and conductivity. The addition of SiC and PPMA is noted to significantly improve the ablation performance of LCAs with silica substrates. Carbon-based LCAs are the most mass-efficient at high flux levels.

  17. Gastroesophageal reflux - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Peptic esophagitis - discharge; Reflux esophagitis - discharge; GERD - discharge; Heartburn - chronic - discharge ... You have gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This is a condition in which food or liquid travels backwards from the stomach to the ...

  18. Ventriculoperitoneal shunt - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... ventriculoperitoneal - discharge; VP shunt - discharge; Shunt revision - discharge; Hydrocephalus shunt placement - discharge ... Your child has hydrocephalus and needed a shunt placed to drain excess fluid and relieve pressure in the brain. This buildup of brain ...

  19. Gastric bypass surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... bypass - discharge; Gastric bypass - Roux-en-Y - discharge; Obesity gastric bypass discharge; Weight loss - gastric bypass discharge ... al. Bariatric surgery versus non-surgical treatment for obesity: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised ...

  20. Epicardial Ablation of Ventricular Tachycardia

    PubMed Central

    Tung, Roderick; Shivkumar, Kalyanam

    2015-01-01

    Epicardial mapping and ablation via a percutaneous subxiphoid technique has been instrumental in improving the working understanding of complex myocardial scars in various arrhythmogenic substrates. Endocardial ablation alone may not be sufficient in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and Chagas disease to prevent recurrent ventricular tachycardia. Multiple observational studies have demonstrated greater freedom from recurrence with adjunctive epicardial ablation compared with endocardial ablation alone. While epicardial ablation is performed predominantly at tertiary referral centers, knowledge of the technical approach, clinical indications, and potential complications is imperative to maximizing clinical success and patient safety. In 1996, Sosa and colleagues modified the pericardiocentesis technique to enable percutaneous access to the pericardial space for mapping and catheter ablation of ventricular tachycardia.1 Originally developed for patients with epicardial scarring due to chagasic cardiomyopathy and patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy refractory to endocardial ablationm,2,3 this approach has since become an essential part of the armamentarium for the treatment of ventricular tachycardia. Myocardial scars are three-dimensionally complex with varying degrees of transmurality, and the ability to map and ablate the epicardial surface has contributed to a greater understanding of scar-related VT in postinfarction cardiomyopathy and nonischemic substrates including idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and chagasic cardiomyopathy. In this review, we highlight the percutaneous approach and discuss clinical indications and potential complications. PMID:26306131

  1. Interstitial lung disease - adults - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Diffuse parenchymal lung disease - discharge; Alveolitis - discharge; Idiopathic pulmonary pneumonitis - discharge; IPP - discharge; Chronic interstitial lung - discharge; Chronic respiratory interstitial lung - ...

  2. Capillary instability of jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, Anuj

    This thesis studies the capillary instability of a compound jet. A compound jet comprises an inner core of a primary fluid surrounded by an annulus of an immiscible secondary fluid. The compound jet is unstable due to capillarity. A compound jet finds applications in a variety of fields, such as, ink jet printing, particle sorting, extrusion, molding, particle production etc. In some of these applications such as molding, the disturbances that could cause the jet breakup start as periodic spatial disturbances of Fourier wave number k and grow in time. This is the temporal instability. In some other applications, such as, ink-jet printing, the disturbances initiate at the edge of the nozzle from which the jet issues out. These disturbances grow in space. This is the spatial instability. At small velocities, even if the initial disturbances are periodic in time, they grow exponentially in time. This is the absolute instability. We perform the temporal, spatial and the absolute stability analysis of an inviscid compound jet in a unified framework using the theory of transforms. Further, we solve the temporal instability problem for a viscous jet to understand the effect of viscosity on breakup dynamics. In the temporal analysis, we show that each interface of the compound jet contributes one mode to the instability. The modes contributed by the inner and outer interfaces grow for waves longer than the inner and the outer circumference of the undisturbed jet, respectively. The inner interface mode has a higher growth rate and hence dominates the breakup. The two interfaces grow exactly in phase in this mode and hence it is refereed to as the stretching mode. The other mode is the squeezing mode because the two interfaces grow exactly out of phase. The same two modes are also present in the spatial analysis. At high Weber numbers the predictions of the spatial theory reduce to those of the temporal theory because the waves simply convect with the jet velocity and there

  3. [New techniques of tumor ablation (microwaves, electroporation)].

    PubMed

    de Baere, T

    2011-09-01

    Since the introduction of radiofrequency tumor ablation of liver tumors in the late 1990s, local destructive therapies have been applied to lung, renal and bone lesions. In addition, new techniques have been introduced to compensate for the limitations of radiofrequency ablation, namely the reduced rate of complete ablation for tumors larger than 3 cm and tumors near vessels larger than 3 mm. Microwave ablation is currently evolving rapidly. While it is a technique based on thermal ablation similar to radiofrequency ablation, there are significant differences between both techniques. Electroporation, of interest because of the non-thermal nature of the ablation process, also is under evaluation.

  4. Capillary Suction Time. Operational Control Tests for Wastewater Treatment Facilities. Instructor's Manual [and] Student Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wooley, John F.

    Capillary suction time is time required for the liquid phase of a treated sludge to travel through 1 centimeter of media (blotter or filter paper). Designed for individuals who have completed National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) level 1 laboratory training skills, this module provides waste water treatment plant operators with…

  5. Decay of capillary wave turbulence.

    PubMed

    Deike, Luc; Berhanu, Michael; Falcon, Eric

    2012-06-01

    We report on the observation of freely decaying capillary wave turbulence on the surface of a fluid. The capillary wave turbulence spectrum decay is found to be self-similar in time with the same power law exponent as the one found in the stationary regime, in agreement with weak turbulence predictions. The amplitude of all Fourier modes are found to decrease exponentially with time at the same damping rate. The longest wavelengths involved in the system are shown to be damped by a viscous surface boundary layer. These long waves play the role of an energy source during the decay that sustains nonlinear interactions to keep capillary waves in a wave turbulent state.

  6. Paramecium swimming in capillary tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, Saikat; Um, Soong Ho; Jung, Sunghwan

    2012-04-01

    Swimming organisms in their natural habitat need to navigate through a wide range of geometries and chemical environments. Interaction with boundaries in such situations is ubiquitous and can significantly modify the swimming characteristics of the organism when compared to ideal laboratory conditions. We study the different patterns of ciliary locomotion in glass capillaries of varying diameter and characterize the effect of the solid boundaries on the velocities of the organism. Experimental observations show that Paramecium executes helical trajectories that slowly transition to straight lines as the diameter of the capillary tubes decreases. We predict the swimming velocity in capillaries by modeling the system as a confined cylinder propagating longitudinal metachronal waves that create a finite pressure gradient. Comparing with experiments, we find that such pressure gradient considerations are necessary for modeling finite sized ciliary organisms in restrictive geometries.

  7. Ion acceleration enhanced by target ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, S.; Lin, C. Wang, H. Y.; Lu, H. Y.; He, X. T.; Yan, X. Q.; Chen, J. E.; Cowan, T. E.

    2015-07-15

    Laser proton acceleration can be enhanced by using target ablation, due to the energetic electrons generated in the ablation preplasma. When the ablation pulse matches main pulse, the enhancement gets optimized because the electrons' energy density is highest. A scaling law between the ablation pulse and main pulse is confirmed by the simulation, showing that for given CPA pulse and target, proton energy improvement can be achieved several times by adjusting the target ablation.

  8. Revised Capillary Breakup Rheometer Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Louise; Schultz, William; Solomon, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Rather than integrate the one-dimensional equation of motion for a capillary breakup rheometer, we take the axial derivative of that equation. This avoids the determination of the axial force with all of its complications and correction factors. The resulting evolutionary equation that involves either two or four derivatives of the capillary radius as a function of the axial coordinate determines the ratio of elongational viscosity to surface tension coefficient. We examine several silicone and olive oils to show the accuracy of the method for Newtonian fluids. We will discuss our surface tension measurement techniques and briefly describe measurements of viscoelastic materials, including saliva.

  9. Conformation-sensitive capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Ashton, Emma Jane

    2011-01-01

    Conformation-sensitive capillary electrophoresis (CSCE) is a rapid, high-throughput screening method that can be applied to any region of a genome for detection of sequence variants. Slab gel-based conformation-sensitive gel electrophoresis was first described by Ganguly et al., and the transfer from slab gels to capillaries for higher throughput was reported by Rozycka et al. CSCE is based on the principle that DNA homoduplexes and heteroduplexes migrate at different rates during electrophoresis under mildly denaturing conditions. Fragments showing an altered peak morphology compared to the wild type are then sequenced to determine the precise nature of the sequence variant detected.

  10. Nonsteady Flow in Capillary Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Ayako

    2000-03-01

    Surface phenomena in the field of electron devices and the problem of how long. It takes plants to absorb water during their growth in hydroponic cultivation is attraching the attention of riseachers. However, the related study of non-steady flow in capillary tubes has a number of issues that require investigation. In response to this situation, we made attempted to assess nonsteady fiow in capillary tubes, the liquid rise time and other issues, using a motion equation that takes factors including the friction force of the tube and the surface tension into consideration.

  11. Capillary interactions in Pickering emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzowski, J.; Tasinkevych, M.; Dietrich, S.

    2011-09-01

    The effective capillary interaction potentials for small colloidal particles trapped at the surface of liquid droplets are calculated analytically. Pair potentials between capillary monopoles and dipoles, corresponding to particles floating on a droplet with a fixed center of mass and subjected to external forces and torques, respectively, exhibit a repulsion at large angular separations and an attraction at smaller separations, with the latter resembling the typical behavior for flat interfaces. This change of character is not observed for quadrupoles, corresponding to free particles on a mechanically isolated droplet. The analytical results are compared with the numerical minimization of the surface free energy of the droplet in the presence of spherical or ellipsoidal particles.

  12. Lung radiofrequency and microwave ablation: a review of indications, techniques and post-procedural imaging appearances

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, P E

    2015-01-01

    Lung ablation can be used to treat both primary and secondary thoracic malignancies. Evidence to support its use, particularly for metastases from colonic primary tumours, is now strong, with survival data in selected cases approaching that seen after surgery. Because of this, the use of ablative techniques (particularly thermal ablation) is growing and the Royal College of Radiologists predict that the number of patients who could benefit from such treatment may reach in excess of 5000 per year in the UK. Treatment is often limited to larger regional centres, and general radiologists often have limited awareness of the current indications and the techniques involved. Furthermore, radiologists without any prior experience are frequently expected to interpret post-treatment imaging, often performed in the context of acute complications, which have occurred after discharge. This review aims to provide an overview of the current indications for pulmonary ablation, together with the techniques involved and the range of post-procedural appearances. PMID:25465192

  13. Off-Hugoniot characterization of alternative inertial confinement fusion ablator materials.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Alastair S.; Prisbrey, Shon; Baker, Kevin L.; Celliers, Peter M.; Fry, Jonathan; Dittrich, Thomas R.; Wu, Kuang-Jen J.; Kervin, Margaret L.; Schoff, Michael E.; Farrell, Mike; Nikroo, Abbas; Hurricane, Omar A.

    2016-05-01

    The ablation material used during the National Ignition Campaign, a glow- discharge polymer (GDP), does not couple as efficiently as simulations indicated to the multiple- shock inducing radiation drive environment created by laser power profile [1]. We investigate the performance of two other ablators, boron carbide (B4C) and high-density carbon (HDC) and compare with GDP under the same hohlraum conditions. Ablation performance is determined through measurement of the shock speed produced in planar samples of the ablator subjected to the identical multiple-shock inducing radiation drive environments that are similar to a generic three-shock ignition drive. Simulations are in better agreement with the off-Hugoniot performance of B4C than either HDC or GDP.

  14. Effects of insulator ablation on the operation of a quasi-steady MPD arc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, M. J.; Jahn, R. G.

    1973-01-01

    Multimegawatt operation of quasi-steady MPD arcjets can involve serious ablation of the insulator surfaces within the arc discharge chamber. Various degrees of insulator ablation manifest themselves by significantly perturbing the voltage-current characteristics and the exhaust velocity profiles. Voltage-current characteristics for two different insulator materials, Plexiglas and boron nitride, are interpreted in terms of an empirical Ohm's law. Use of the refractory insulator material eliminates the ablation-dominated nature of the terminal voltage, but the exhaust stream is still disturbed by insulator material. An Alfven critical velocity model can be applied to this influence of insulator ablation on exhaust velocity. Appropriate changes in the propellant injection geometry eliminate this influence and result in arcjet operation which is independent of insulator material. A particular combination of propellant injection geometries reduces the terminal voltage for a given current and mass flow while maintaining insulator-independent operation, thus implying an improvement in the overall efficiency of the device.

  15. Ablative Approaches for Pulmonary Metastases.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Matthew J; Ricardi, Umberto; Ball, David; Salama, Joseph K

    2016-02-01

    Pulmonary metastases are common in patients with cancer for which surgery is considered a standard approach in appropriately selected patients. A number of patients are not candidates for surgery due to a medical comorbidities or the extent of surgery required. For these patients, noninvasive or minimally invasive approaches to ablate pulmonary metastases are potential treatment strategies. This article summarizes the rationale and outcomes for non-surgical treatment approaches, including radiotherapy, radiofrequency and microwave ablation, for pulmonary metastases.

  16. Laser ablation in analytical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Russo, Richard E; Mao, Xianglei; Gonzalez, Jhanis J; Zorba, Vassilia; Yoo, Jong

    2013-07-01

    In 2002, we wrote an Analytical Chemistry feature article describing the Physics of Laser Ablation in Microchemical Analysis. In line with the theme of the 2002 article, this manuscript discusses current issues in fundamental research, applications based on detecting photons at the ablation site (LIBS and LAMIS) and by collecting particles for excitation in a secondary source (ICP), and directions for the technology. PMID:23614661

  17. Numerical studies of wall-plasma interactions and ionization phenomena in an ablative pulsed plasma thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lei; Zeng, Guangshang; Tang, Haibin; Huang, Yuping; Liu, Xiangyang

    2016-07-01

    Wall-plasma interactions excited by ablation controlled arcs are very critical physical processes in pulsed plasma thrusters (PPTs). Their effects on the ionization processes of ablated vapor into discharge plasma directly determine PPT performances. To reveal the physics governing the ionization phenomena in PPT discharge, a modified model taking into account the pyrolysis effect of heated polytetrafluoroethylene propellant on the wall-plasma interactions was developed. The feasibility of the modified model was analyzed by creating a one-dimensional simulation of a rectangular ablative PPT. The wall-plasma interaction results based on this modified model were found to be more realistic than for the unmodified model; this reflects the dynamic changes of the inflow parameters during discharge in our model. Furthermore, the temporal and spatial variations of the different plasma species in the discharge chamber were numerically studied. The numerical studies showed that polytetrafluoroethylene plasma was mainly composed of monovalent ions; carbon and fluorine ions were concentrated in the upstream and downstream discharge chamber, respectively. The results based on this modified model were in good agreement with the experimental formation times of the various plasma species. A large number of short-lived and highly ionized carbon and fluorine species (divalent and trivalent ions) were created during initial discharge. These highly ionized species reached their peak density earlier than the singly ionized species.

  18. Bone and Soft Tissue Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Ryan C.B.; Stavas, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    Bone and soft tissue tumor ablation has reached widespread acceptance in the locoregional treatment of various benign and malignant musculoskeletal (MSK) lesions. Many principles of ablation learned elsewhere in the body are easily adapted to the MSK system, particularly the various technical aspects of probe/antenna design, tumoricidal effects, selection of image guidance, and methods to reduce complications. Despite the common use of thermal and chemical ablation procedures in bone and soft tissues, there are few large clinical series that show longitudinal benefit and cost-effectiveness compared with conventional methods, namely, surgery, external beam radiation, and chemotherapy. Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation of osteoid osteomas has been evaluated the most and is considered a first-line treatment choice for many lesions. Palliation of painful metastatic bone disease with thermal ablation is considered safe and has been shown to reduce pain and analgesic use while improving quality of life for cancer patients. Procedure-related complications are rare and are typically easily managed. Similar to all interventional procedures, bone and soft tissue lesions require an integrated approach to disease management to determine the optimum type of and timing for ablation techniques within the context of the patient care plan. PMID:25053865

  19. Multiplexed fluorescence detector system for capillary electrophoresis

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, E.S.; Taylor, J.A.

    1996-03-12

    A fluorescence detection system for capillary electrophoresis is provided wherein the detection system can simultaneously excite fluorescence and substantially simultaneously monitor separations in multiple capillaries. This multiplexing approach involves laser irradiation of a sample in a plurality of capillaries through optical fibers that are coupled individually with the capillaries. The array is imaged orthogonally through a microscope onto a charge-coupled device camera for signal analysis. 14 figs.

  20. Multiplexed fluorescence detector system for capillary electrophoresis

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Taylor, John A.

    1994-06-28

    A fluorescence detection system for capillary electrophoresis is provided wherein the detection system can simultaneously excite fluorescence and substantially simultaneously monitor separations in multiple capillaries. This multiplexing approach involves laser irradiation of a sample in a plurality of capillaries through optical fibers that are coupled individually with the capillaries. The array is imaged orthogonally through a microscope onto a charge-coupled device camera for signal analysis.

  1. Multiplexed fluorescence detector system for capillary electrophoresis

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, E.S.; Taylor, J.A.

    1994-06-28

    A fluorescence detection system for capillary electrophoresis is provided wherein the detection system can simultaneously excite fluorescence and substantially simultaneously monitor separations in multiple capillaries. This multiplexing approach involves laser irradiation of a sample in a plurality of capillaries through optical fibers that are coupled individually with the capillaries. The array is imaged orthogonally through a microscope onto a charge-coupled device camera for signal analysis. 14 figures.

  2. Multiplexed fluorescence detector system for capillary electrophoresis

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Taylor, John A.

    1996-03-12

    A fluorescence detection system for capillary electrophoresis is provided wherein the detection system can simultaneously excite fluorescence and substantially simultaneously monitor separations in multiple capillaries. This multiplexing approach involves laser irradiation of a sample in a plurality of capillaries through optical fibers that are coupled individually with the capillaries. The array is imaged orthogonally through a microscope onto a charge-coupled device camera for signal analysis.

  3. UV-laser-assisted modification of poly(methyl methacrylate) and its application to capillary-driven-flow immunoassay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchiwaki, Y.; Takaoka, H.

    2015-07-01

    A concave microchannel surface was formed by nanosecond pulse laser ablation to allow antibody immobilization on a capillary flow immunoassay chip. Microscopic analysis showed that UV laser ablation of poly(methyl methacrylate) at 193 nm and 1.76 J · cm-2 allowed excellent immobilization of Cy5 conjugated antibody. The concave structure was 10 µm deep and 260 µm wide and supported uniform antibody printing on the microchannel surface. The characteristics of immobilized antibodies on this surface and on a commercially available polymer coating were comparable. Quantitative analysis of procollagen type I C-peptide (PICP) at different concentrations provided a linear relationship in the range 0-600 ng ml-1 PICP, which is sufficient for clinical estimation of PICP in the blood. The results may provide a new benchmark for a mechatronic antibody immobilization-based capillary flow immunoassay chip.

  4. Capillary electrophoresis for drug analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lurie, Ira S.

    1999-02-01

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is a high resolution separation technique which is amenable to a wide variety of solutes, including compounds which are thermally degradable, non-volatile and highly polar, and is therefore well suited for drug analysis. Techniques which have been used in our laboratory include electrokinetic chromatography (ECC), free zone electrophoresis (CZE) and capillary electrochromatography (CEC). ECC, which uses a charged run buffer additive which migrates counter to osmotic flow, is excellent for many applications, including, drug screening and analyses of heroin, cocaine and methamphetamine samples. ECC approaches include the use of micelles and charged cyclodextrins, which allow for the separation of complex mixtures. Simultaneous separation of acidic, neutral and basic solutes and the resolution of optical isomers and positional isomers are possible. CZE has been used for the analysis of small ions (cations and anions) in heroin exhibits. For the ECC and CZE experiments performed in our laboratory, uncoated capillaries were used. In contrast, CEC uses capillaries packed with high performance liquid chromatography stationary phases, and offers both high peak capacities and unique selectivities. Applications include the analysis of cannabinoids and drug screening. Although CE suffers from limited concentration sensitivity, it is still applicable to trace analysis of drug samples, especially when using injection techniques such as stacking, or detection schemes such as laser induced fluorescence and extended pathlength UV.

  5. Capillary Rise in a Wedge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piva, M.

    2009-01-01

    In introductory-level physics courses, the concept of surface tension is often illustrated using the example of capillary rise in thin tubes. In this paper the author describes experiments conducted using a planar geometry created with two small plates forming a thin wedge. The distribution of the fluid entering the wedge can be studied as a…

  6. Capillary blood viscosity in microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Cortinovis, A; Crippa, A; Cavalli, R; Corti, M; Cattaneo, L

    2006-01-01

    As known, at the arteriolar level there is the highest resistance to the flow due to the section and to the velocity with an average pressure fall of 50 mmHg (from 85 to 35 mmHg). This resistance is expressed in sec(-1) by the ratio W/2r. This ratio is very high with an average value of 332 sec(-1) and viscosity at this high shear-rate is negligible. At the capillary level the pressure fall is 11.5 mmHg but the vascular resistance W/2r is much lower, on average 32 sec(-1). We can say that if a resistance of 333 sec(-1) corresponds with a pressure fall of 50 mmHg, then a resistance of 32 sec(-1) should correspond with a pressure fall of 4.8 mmHg. The highest pressure fall is due to another kind of resistance which we can define as "Capillary Blood Viscosity" because it depends on the rheological and structural characteristics of the blood. Our instrument reproduces the structure of the capillary district in an experimental model and measures the General Blood Viscosity (GBV) and the Capillary Blood Viscosity (CBV) at the same shear-rate and in particular at the low shear-rate when in non-Newtonian fluids the highest increase in viscosity appears. Consequently, at the capillary, viscosity is dominant with respect to the other geometric and physical resistances. Moreover, the percentage ratio between the GBV and the CBV gives a physical measure of erythrocyte deformability. Knowing viscosity at shear-rate present in the circulatory system, we can obtain the size of RBCs aggregates in the different circulatory districts and their characteristics expressed like "aggregation bond". Changes in CBV are the only possibility in clinical practice to improve the circulatory flow in the capillary district because it is not sure that changes in the arteriolar section can improve the capillary flow or rather open arterio-venous anastomosis. Moreover, in the systemic circulation the aggregate size allows us to point out the phenomenon of cell adhesion because the presence of

  7. Gradient elution in capillary electrochromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Anex, D.; Rakestraw, D.J.; Yan, Chao; Dadoo, R.; Zare, R.N.

    1997-08-01

    In analogy to pressure-driven gradient techniques in high-performance liquid chromatography, a system has been developed for delivering electroosmotically-driven solvent gradients for capillary electrochromatography (CEC). Dynamic gradients with sub-mL/min flow rates are generated by merging two electroosmotic flows that are regulated by computer-controlled voltages. These flows are delivered by two fused-silica capillary arms attached to a T-connector, where they mix and then flow into a capillary column that has been electrokinetically packed with 3-mm reversed-phase particles. The inlet of one capillary arm is placed in a solution reservoir containing one mobile phase and the inlet of the other is placed in a second reservoir containing a second mobile phase. Two independent computer-controlled programmable high-voltage power supplies (0-50 kV)--one providing an increasing ramp and the other providing a decreasing ramp--are used to apply variable high-voltage potentials to the mobile phase reservoirs to regulate the electroosmotic flow in each arm. The ratio of the electroosmotic flow rates between the two arms is changed with time according to the computer-controlled voltages to deliver the required gradient profile to the separation column. Experiments were performed to confirm the composition of the mobile phase during a gradient run and to determine the change of the composition in response to the programmed voltage profile. To demonstrate the performance of electroosmotically-driven gradient elution in CEC, a mixture of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was separated in less than 90 minutes. This gradient technique is expected to be well-suited for generating not only solvent gradients in CEC, but also other types of gradients such as pH- and ionic-strength gradients in capillary electrokinetic separations and analyses.

  8. Asthma - child - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Pediatric asthma - discharge; Wheezing - discharge; Reactive airway disease - discharge ... Your child has asthma , which causes the airways of the lungs to swell and narrow. In the hospital, the doctors and nurses helped ...

  9. Tubal ligation - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tubal sterilization - discharge; Tube tying - discharge; Tying the tubes - discharge; Contraception - tubal ... You had tubal ligation (or tying the tubes) surgery to close your fallopian tubes. These tubes connect the ovaries to the uterus. After tubal ...

  10. Concussion - child - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... discharge; Mild traumatic brain injury - child - discharge; Closed head injury - child - discharge ... mild brain injury that can result when the head hits an object or a moving object strikes ...

  11. Laparoscopic gastric banding - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... laparoscopic gastric banding - discharge; Obesity gastric banding discharge; Weight loss - gastric banding discharge ... as your body gets used to your weight loss and your weight becomes stable. Weight loss may be slower after ...

  12. Tennis elbow surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Lateral epicondylitis surgery - discharge; Lateral tendinosis surgery - discharge; Lateral tennis elbow surgery - discharge ... Soon after surgery, severe pain will decrease, but you may have mild soreness for 3 to 6 months.

  13. Concussion - adults - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Brain injury - concussion - discharge; Traumatic brain injury - concussion - discharge; Closed head injury - concussion - discharge ... Play contact sports, such as football, hockey, and soccer Ride a bicycle, motorcycle, or off-road vehicle ...

  14. Capillary filling dynamics of viscoelastic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandopadhyay, Aditya; Ghosh, Uddipta; Chakraborty, Suman

    2014-05-01

    We consider the filling of a capillary by a viscoelastic fluid described by the Phan-Thien-Tanner (PTT) constitutive behavior. By considering both vertical capillary filling and horizontal capillary filling, we demarcate the role played by gravity and fluid rheology towards long-time oscillations in the capillary penetration depth. We also consider the isothermal filling of the capillary for a closed channel and thus bring out the fundamental differences in the nature of capillary filling for PTT and Newtonian fluids for closed channels in comparison to open channels. Through a scaling analysis, we highlight a distinct viscoelastic regime in the horizontal capillary filling which is in contrast to the Washburn scaling seen in the case of Newtonian fluids. Such an analysis with a very general constitutive behavior is therefore expected to shed light on many areas of microfluidics which focus on biofluids that are often well described by the PTT constitutive behavior.

  15. Current hot potatoes in atrial fibrillation ablation.

    PubMed

    Roten, Laurent; Derval, Nicolas; Pascale, Patrizio; Scherr, Daniel; Komatsu, Yuki; Shah, Ashok; Ramoul, Khaled; Denis, Arnaud; Sacher, Frédéric; Hocini, Mélèze; Haïssaguerre, Michel; Jaïs, Pierre

    2012-11-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation has evolved to the treatment of choice for patients with drug-resistant and symptomatic AF. Pulmonary vein isolation at the ostial or antral level usually is sufficient for treatment of true paroxysmal AF. For persistent AF ablation, drivers and perpetuators outside of the pulmonary veins are responsible for AF maintenance and have to be targeted to achieve satisfying arrhythmia-free success rate. Both complex fractionated atrial electrogram (CFAE) ablation and linear ablation are added to pulmonary vein isolation for persistent AF ablation. Nevertheless, ablation failure and necessity of repeat ablations are still frequent, especially after persistent AF ablation. Pulmonary vein reconduction is the main reason for arrhythmia recurrence after paroxysmal and to a lesser extent after persistent AF ablation. Failure of persistent AF ablation mostly is a consequence of inadequate trigger ablation, substrate modification or incompletely ablated or reconducting linear lesions. In this review we will discuss these points responsible for AF recurrence after ablation and review current possibilities on how to overcome these limitations. PMID:22920482

  16. Femtosecond laser ablation of enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Quang-Tri; Bertrand, Caroline; Vilar, Rui

    2016-06-01

    The surface topographical, compositional, and structural modifications induced in human enamel by femtosecond laser ablation is studied. The laser treatments were performed using a Yb:KYW chirped-pulse-regenerative amplification laser system (560 fs and 1030 nm) and fluences up to 14 J/cm2. The ablation surfaces were studied by scanning electron microscopy, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, and micro-Raman spectroscopy. Regardless of the fluence, the ablation surfaces were covered by a layer of resolidified material, indicating that ablation is accompanied by melting of hydroxyapatite. This layer presented pores and exploded gas bubbles, created by the release of gaseous decomposition products of hydroxyapatite (CO2 and H2O) within the liquid phase. In the specimen treated with 1-kHz repetition frequency and 14 J/cm2, thickness of the resolidified material is in the range of 300 to 900 nm. The micro-Raman analysis revealed that the resolidified material contains amorphous calcium phosphate, while grazing incidence x-ray diffraction analysis allowed detecting traces of a calcium phosphate other than hydroxyapatite, probably β-tricalcium phosphate Ca3), at the surface of this specimen. The present results show that the ablation of enamel involves melting of enamel's hydroxyapatite, but the thickness of the altered layer is very small and thermal damage of the remaining material is negligible.

  17. Femtosecond laser ablation of enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Quang-Tri; Bertrand, Caroline; Vilar, Rui

    2016-06-01

    The surface topographical, compositional, and structural modifications induced in human enamel by femtosecond laser ablation is studied. The laser treatments were performed using a Yb:KYW chirped-pulse-regenerative amplification laser system (560 fs and 1030 nm) and fluences up to 14 J/cm2. The ablation surfaces were studied by scanning electron microscopy, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, and micro-Raman spectroscopy. Regardless of the fluence, the ablation surfaces were covered by a layer of resolidified material, indicating that ablation is accompanied by melting of hydroxyapatite. This layer presented pores and exploded gas bubbles, created by the release of gaseous decomposition products of hydroxyapatite (CO2 and H2O) within the liquid phase. In the specimen treated with 1-kHz repetition frequency and 14 J/cm2, thickness of the resolidified material is in the range of 300 to 900 nm. The micro-Raman analysis revealed that the resolidified material contains amorphous calcium phosphate, while grazing incidence x-ray diffraction analysis allowed detecting traces of a calcium phosphate other than hydroxyapatite, probably β-tricalcium phosphate Ca3), at the surface of this specimen. The present results show that the ablation of enamel involves melting of enamel's hydroxyapatite, but the thickness of the altered layer is very small and thermal damage of the remaining material is negligible.

  18. Laser ablation studies of concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Savina, M.; Xu, Z.; Wang, Y.; Reed, C.; Pellin, M.

    1999-10-20

    Laser ablation was studied as a means of removing radioactive contaminants from the surface and near-surface regions of concrete. The authors present the results of ablation tests on cement and concrete samples using a 1.6 kW pulsed Nd:YAG laser with fiber optic beam delivery. The laser-surface interaction was studied using cement and high density concrete as targets. Ablation efficiency and material removal rates were determined as functions of irradiance and pulse overlap. Doped samples were also ablated to determine the efficiency with which surface contaminants were removed and captured in the effluent. The results show that the cement phase of the material melts and vaporizes, but the aggregate portion (sand and rock) fragments. The effluent consists of both micron-size aerosol particles and chunks of fragmented aggregate material. Laser-induced optical emission spectroscopy was used to analyze the surface during ablation. Analysis of the effluent showed that contaminants such as cesium and strontium were strongly segregated into different regions of the particle size distribution of the aerosol.

  19. Fragmentation and ablation during entry

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1997-09-01

    This note discusses objects that both fragment and ablate during entry, using the results of previous reports to describe the velocity, pressure, and fragmentation of entering objects. It shows that the mechanisms used there to describe the breakup of non-ablating objects during deceleration remain valid for most ablating objects. It treats coupled fragmentation and ablation during entry, building on earlier models that separately discuss the entry of objects that are hard, whose high heat of ablation permits little erosion, and those who are strong whose strength prevents fragmentation, which are discussed in ``Radiation from Hard Objects,`` ``Deceleration and Radiation of Strong, Hard, Asteroids During Atmospheric Impact,`` and ``Meteor Signature Interpretation.`` This note provides a more detailed treatment of the further breakup and separation of fragments during descent. It replaces the constraint on mass per unit area used earlier to determine the altitude and magnitude of peak power radiation with a detailed analytic solution of deceleration. Model predictions are shown to be in agreement with the key features of numerical calculations of deceleration. The model equations are solved for the altitudes of maximum radiation, which agree with numerical integrations. The model is inverted analytically to infer object size and speed from measurements of peak power and altitude to provide a complete model for the approximate inversion of meteor data.

  20. Solvent jet desorption capillary photoionization-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Haapala, Markus; Teppo, Jaakko; Ollikainen, Elisa; Kiiski, Iiro; Vaikkinen, Anu; Kauppila, Tiina J; Kostiainen, Risto

    2015-03-17

    A new ambient mass spectrometry method, solvent jet desorption capillary photoionization (DCPI), is described. The method uses a solvent jet generated by a coaxial nebulizer operated at ambient conditions with nitrogen as nebulizer gas. The solvent jet is directed onto a sample surface, from which analytes are extracted into the solvent and ejected from the surface in secondary droplets formed in collisions between the jet and the sample surface. The secondary droplets are directed into the heated capillary photoionization (CPI) device, where the droplets are vaporized and the gaseous analytes are ionized by 10 eV photons generated by a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) krypton discharge lamp. As the CPI device is directly connected to the extended capillary inlet of the MS, high ion transfer efficiency to the vacuum of MS is achieved. The solvent jet DCPI provides several advantages: high sensitivity for nonpolar and polar compounds with limit of detection down to low fmol levels, capability of analyzing small and large molecules, and good spatial resolution (250 μm). Two ionization mechanisms are involved in DCPI: atmospheric pressure photoionization, capable of ionizing polar and nonpolar compounds, and solvent assisted inlet ionization capable of ionizing larger molecules like peptides. The feasibility of DCPI was successfully tested in the analysis of polar and nonpolar compounds in sage leaves and chili pepper. PMID:25715054

  1. Capillary-Inertial Colloidal Catapult upon Drop Coalescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavez, Roger; Liu, Fangjie; Feng, James; Chen, Chuan-Hua

    2014-11-01

    To discharge micron-sized particles such as colloidal contaminants and biological spores, an enormous power density is needed to compete against the strong adhesive forces between the small particles and the supporting surface as well as the significant air friction exerted on the particles. Here, we demonstrate a colloidal catapult that achieves such a high power density by extracting surface energy released upon drop coalescence within an extremely short time period, which is governed by the capillary-inertial process converting the released surface energy into the bulk inertia of the merged drop. When two drops coalesce on top of a spherical particle, the resulting capillary-inertial oscillation is perturbed by the solid particle, giving rise to a net momentum eventually propelling the particle to launch from the supporting surface. The measured launching velocity follows a scaling law that accounts for the redistribution of the momentum of the merged drop onto the particle-drop complex, and is therefore proportional to the capillary-inertial velocity characterizing the coalescing drops. The interfacial flow process associated with the colloidal catapult is elucidated with both high-speed imaging and phase-field simulations.

  2. A rectangular capillary suction apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, D.J. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Hsu, Y.H. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1994-06-01

    Fluid flow and cake formation in a rectangular capillary suction apparatus (RCSA) are investigated experimentally and theoretically. Water, methanol, ethanol, and ethylene glycol are used to study the effects of liquid properties, and CaCO[sub 3], kaolin, and bentonite slurries are employed for studying the effects of cake formation on capillary suction-time (CST). A theory based on a diffusion-like approach is developed. The liquid saturation under the inner cell will approach a constant value when the wet front distance is large. A method based on this experimental finding for estimating the cake specific resistance is proposed. The agreement between experiments and calculations is close. The RCSA is superior to the cylindrical CSA when treating liquids with small diffusivities or slurries with high solid concentration and/or with high averaged specific resistance.

  3. Theoretical Modeling for Hepatic Microwave Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Punit

    2010-01-01

    Thermal tissue ablation is an interventional procedure increasingly being used for treatment of diverse medical conditions. Microwave ablation is emerging as an attractive modality for thermal therapy of large soft tissue targets in short periods of time, making it particularly suitable for ablation of hepatic and other tumors. Theoretical models of the ablation process are a powerful tool for predicting the temperature profile in tissue and resultant tissue damage created by ablation devices. These models play an important role in the design and optimization of devices for microwave tissue ablation. Furthermore, they are a useful tool for exploring and planning treatment delivery strategies. This review describes the status of theoretical models developed for microwave tissue ablation. It also reviews current challenges, research trends and progress towards development of accurate models for high temperature microwave tissue ablation. PMID:20309393

  4. Image-Guided Ablation of Adrenal Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Yamakado, Koichiro

    2014-01-01

    Although laparoscopic adrenalectomy has remained the standard of care for the treatment for adrenal tumors, percutaneous image-guided ablation therapy, such as chemical ablation, radiofrequency ablation, cryoablation, and microwave ablation, has been shown to be clinically useful in many nonsurgical candidates. Ablation therapy has been used to treat both functioning adenomas and malignant tumors, including primary adrenal carcinoma and metastasis. For patients with functioning adenomas, biochemical and symptomatic improvement is achieved in 96 to 100% after ablation; for patients with malignant adrenal neoplasms, however, the survival benefit from ablation therapy remains unclear, though good initial results have been reported. This article outlines the current role of ablation therapy for adrenal lesions, as well as identifying some of the technical considerations for this procedure. PMID:25049444

  5. Femtosecond lasers for machining of transparent, brittle materials: ablative vs. non-ablative femtosecond laser processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendricks, F.; Matylitsky, V. V.

    2016-03-01

    This paper focuses on precision machining of transparent materials by means of ablative and non-ablative femtosecond laser processing. Ablation technology will be compared with a newly developed patent pending non-ablative femtosecond process, ClearShapeTM, using the Spectra-Physics Spirit industrial femtosecond laser.

  6. Capillary electrophoresis in food authenticity.

    PubMed

    Kvasnicka, Frantisek

    2005-06-01

    Food authenticity is a term which simply refers to whether the food purchased by the consumer matches its description. False description can occur in many forms, from the undeclared addition of water or other cheaper materials, or the wrong declaration of the amount of a particular ingredient in the product, to making false statements about the source of ingredients i.e., their geographic, plant, or animal origin. The aim of this review is to summarize applications of capillary electrophoresis in food authentication.

  7. Capillary electrophoresis systems and methods

    SciTech Connect

    Dorairaj, Rathissh; Keynton, Robert S.; Roussel, Thomas J.; Crain, Mark M.; Jackson, Douglas J.; Walsh, Kevin M.; Naber, John F.; Baldwin, Richard P.; Franco, Danielle B.

    2011-08-02

    An embodiment of the invention is directed to a capillary electrophoresis apparatus comprising a plurality of separation micro-channels. A sample loading channel communicates with each of the plurality of separation channels. A driver circuit comprising a plurality of electrodes is configured to induce an electric field across each of the plurality of separation channels sufficient to cause analytes in the samples to migrate along each of the channels. The system further comprises a plurality of detectors configured to detect the analytes.

  8. Microwave ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Poggi, Guido; Tosoratti, Nevio; Montagna, Benedetta; Picchi, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    Although surgical resection is still the optimal treatment option for early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients with well compensated cirrhosis, thermal ablation techniques provide a valid non-surgical treatment alternative, thanks to their minimal invasiveness, excellent tolerability and safety profile, proven efficacy in local disease control, virtually unlimited repeatability and cost-effectiveness. Different energy sources are currently employed in clinics as physical agents for percutaneous or intra-surgical thermal ablation of HCC nodules. Among them, radiofrequency (RF) currents are the most used, while microwave ablations (MWA) are becoming increasingly popular. Starting from the 90s’, RF ablation (RFA) rapidly became the standard of care in ablation, especially in the treatment of small HCC nodules; however, RFA exhibits substantial performance limitations in the treatment of large lesions and/or tumors located near major heat sinks. MWA, first introduced in the Far Eastern clinical practice in the 80s’, showing promising results but also severe limitations in the controllability of the emitted field and in the high amount of power employed for the ablation of large tumors, resulting in a poor coagulative performance and a relatively high complication rate, nowadays shows better results both in terms of treatment controllability and of overall coagulative performance, thanks to the improvement of technology. In this review we provide an extensive and detailed overview of the key physical and technical aspects of MWA and of the currently available systems, and we want to discuss the most relevant published data on MWA treatments of HCC nodules in regard to clinical results and to the type and rate of complications, both in absolute terms and in comparison with RFA. PMID:26557950

  9. Microwave ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Poggi, Guido; Tosoratti, Nevio; Montagna, Benedetta; Picchi, Chiara

    2015-11-01

    Although surgical resection is still the optimal treatment option for early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients with well compensated cirrhosis, thermal ablation techniques provide a valid non-surgical treatment alternative, thanks to their minimal invasiveness, excellent tolerability and safety profile, proven efficacy in local disease control, virtually unlimited repeatability and cost-effectiveness. Different energy sources are currently employed in clinics as physical agents for percutaneous or intra-surgical thermal ablation of HCC nodules. Among them, radiofrequency (RF) currents are the most used, while microwave ablations (MWA) are becoming increasingly popular. Starting from the 90s', RF ablation (RFA) rapidly became the standard of care in ablation, especially in the treatment of small HCC nodules; however, RFA exhibits substantial performance limitations in the treatment of large lesions and/or tumors located near major heat sinks. MWA, first introduced in the Far Eastern clinical practice in the 80s', showing promising results but also severe limitations in the controllability of the emitted field and in the high amount of power employed for the ablation of large tumors, resulting in a poor coagulative performance and a relatively high complication rate, nowadays shows better results both in terms of treatment controllability and of overall coagulative performance, thanks to the improvement of technology. In this review we provide an extensive and detailed overview of the key physical and technical aspects of MWA and of the currently available systems, and we want to discuss the most relevant published data on MWA treatments of HCC nodules in regard to clinical results and to the type and rate of complications, both in absolute terms and in comparison with RFA. PMID:26557950

  10. Ionic Liquids in Capillary Electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Holzgrabe, Ulrike; Wahl, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Recently, a great interest was drawn toward ionic liquids (ILs) in analytical separation techniques. ILs possess many properties making them excellent additives in capillary electrophoresis (CE) background electrolytes (BGE). The most important property is the charge of the dissolved ions in BGE enabling the cations to interact with deprotonated silanol groups on the capillary surface and thereby modifying the electroosmotic flow (EOF). Ionic and/or proton donor-acceptor interactions between analyte and IL are possible interactions facilitating new kinds of separation mechanisms in CE. Further advantages of ILs are the high conductivity, the environmentally friendliness, and the good solubility for organic and inorganic compounds. The most commonly used ILs in capillary electrophoresis are dialkylimidazolium-based ILs, whereas for enantioseparation a lot of innovative chiral cations and anions were investigated.ILs are reported to be additives to a normal CE background electrolyte or the sole electrolyte in CE, nonaqueous CE (NACE), micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC), and in enantioseparation. An overview of applications and separation mechanisms reported in the literature is given here, in addition to the enantioseparation of pseudoephedrine using tetrabutylammonium chloride (TBAC) as IL additive to an ammonium formate buffer containing β-cyclodextrin (β-CD). PMID:27645735

  11. Capillary Electrophoresis - Optical Detection Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sepaniak, M. J.

    2001-08-06

    Molecular recognition systems are developed via molecular modeling and synthesis to enhance separation performance in capillary electrophoresis and optical detection methods for capillary electrophoresis. The underpinning theme of our work is the rational design and development of molecular recognition systems in chemical separations and analysis. There have been, however, some subtle and exciting shifts in our research paradigm during this period. Specifically, we have moved from mostly separations research to a good balance between separations and spectroscopic detection for separations. This shift is based on our perception that the pressing research challenges and needs in capillary electrophoresis and electrokinetic chromatography relate to the persistent detection and flow rate reproducibility limitations of these techniques (see page 1 of the accompanying Renewal Application for further discussion). In most of our work molecular recognition reagents are employed to provide selectivity and enhance performance. Also, an emerging trend is the use of these reagents with specially-prepared nano-scale materials. Although not part of our DOE BES-supported work, the modeling and synthesis of new receptors has indirectly supported the development of novel microcantilevers-based MEMS for the sensing of vapor and liquid phase analytes. This fortuitous overlap is briefly covered in this report. Several of the more significant publications that have resulted from our work are appended. To facilitate brevity we refer to these publications liberally in this progress report. Reference is also made to very recent work in the Background and Preliminary Studies Section of the Renewal Application.

  12. Treelike networks accelerating capillary flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shou, Dahua; Ye, Lin; Fan, Jintu

    2014-05-01

    Transport in treelike networks has received wide attention in natural systems, oil recovery, microelectronic cooling systems, and textiles. Existing studies are focused on transport behaviors under a constant potential difference (including pressure, temperature, and voltage) in a steady state [B. Yu and B. Li, Phys. Rev. E 73, 066302 (2006), 10.1103/PhysRevE.73.066302; J. Chen, B. Yu, P. Xu, and Y. Li, Phys. Rev. E 75, 056301 (2007), 10.1103/PhysRevE.75.056301]. However, dynamic (time-dependent) transport in such systems has rarely been concerned. In this work, we theoretically investigate the dynamics of capillary flow in treelike networks and design the distribution of radius and length of local branches for the fastest capillary flow. It is demonstrated that capillary flow in the optimized tree networks is faster than in traditional parallel tube nets under fixed constraints. As well, the flow time of the liquid is found to increase approximately linearly with penetration distance, which differs from Washburn's classic description that flow time increases as the square of penetration distance in a uniform tube.

  13. Capillary-driven automatic packaging.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yuzhe; Hong, Lingfei; Nie, Baoqing; Lam, Kit S; Pan, Tingrui

    2011-04-21

    Packaging continues to be one of the most challenging steps in micro-nanofabrication, as many emerging techniques (e.g., soft lithography) are incompatible with the standard high-precision alignment and bonding equipment. In this paper, we present a simple-to-operate, easy-to-adapt packaging strategy, referred to as Capillary-driven Automatic Packaging (CAP), to achieve automatic packaging process, including the desired features of spontaneous alignment and bonding, wide applicability to various materials, potential scalability, and direct incorporation in the layout. Specifically, self-alignment and self-engagement of the CAP process induced by the interfacial capillary interactions between a liquid capillary bridge and the top and bottom substrates have been experimentally characterized and theoretically analyzed with scalable implications. High-precision alignment (of less than 10 µm) and outstanding bonding performance (up to 300 kPa) has been reliably obtained. In addition, a 3D microfluidic network, aligned and bonded by the CAP technique, has been devised to demonstrate the applicability of this facile yet robust packaging technique for emerging microfluidic and bioengineering applications.

  14. A simulation-based and analytic analysis of the off-Hugoniot response of alternative inertial confinement fusion ablator materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Alastair S.; Prisbrey, Shon; Baker, Kevin L.; Celliers, Peter M.; Fry, Jonathan; Dittrich, Thomas R.; Wu, Kuang-Jen J.; Kervin, Margaret L.; Schoff, Michael E.; Farrell, Mike; Nikroo, Abbas; Hurricane, Omar A.

    2016-09-01

    The attainment of self-propagating fusion burn in an inertial confinement target at the National Ignition Facility will require the use of an ablator with high rocket-efficiency and ablation pressure. The ablation material used during the National Ignition Campaign (Lindl et al. 2014) [1], a glow-discharge polymer (GDP), does not couple as efficiently as simulations indicated to the multiple-shock inducing radiation drive environment created by laser power profile (Robey et al., 2012). We investigate the performance of two other ablators, boron carbide (B4C) and high-density carbon (HDC) compared to the performance of GDP under the same hohlraum conditions. Ablation performance is determined through measurement of the shock speed produced in planar samples of the ablator material subjected to the identical multiple-shock inducing radiation drive environments that are similar to a generic three-shock ignition drive. Simulations are in better agreement with the off-Hugoniot performance of B4C than either HDC or GDP, and analytic estimations of the ablation pressure indicate that while the pressure produced by B4C and GDP is similar when the ablator is allowed to release, the pressure reached by B4C seems to exceed that of HDC when backed by a Au/quartz layer.

  15. Transhemangioma Ablation of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Pua, Uei

    2012-12-15

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a well-established treatment modality in the treatment of early hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) [1]. Safe trajectory of the RFA probe is crucial in decreasing collateral tissue damage and unwarranted probe transgression. As a percutaneous technique, however, the trajectory of the needle is sometimes constrained by the available imaging plane. The presence of a hemangioma beside an HCC is uncommon but poses the question of safety related to probe transgression. We hereby describe a case of transhemangioma ablation of a dome HCC.

  16. Photochemical ablation of organic solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yingling, Yaroslava G.; Garrison, Barbara J.

    2003-04-01

    We have investigated by molecular dynamics simulations the ablation of material that is onset by photochemical processes. We compare this system with only photochemical processes to a system containing photochemical and photothermal processes. The simulations reveal that ablation by purely photochemical processes is accompanied by the ejection of relatively cold massive molecular clusters from the surface of the sample. The top of the plume exhibits high temperatures whereas the residual part of the sample is cold. The removal of the damaged material through big molecular cluster ejection is consistent with experimental observations of low heat damage of material.

  17. Laser ablation based fuel ignition

    DOEpatents

    Early, J.W.; Lester, C.S.

    1998-06-23

    There is provided a method of fuel/oxidizer ignition comprising: (a) application of laser light to a material surface which is absorptive to the laser radiation; (b) heating of the material surface with the laser light to produce a high temperature ablation plume which emanates from the heated surface as an intensely hot cloud of vaporized surface material; and (c) contacting the fuel/oxidizer mixture with the hot ablation cloud at or near the surface of the material in order to heat the fuel to a temperature sufficient to initiate fuel ignition. 3 figs.

  18. Laser ablation based fuel ignition

    DOEpatents

    Early, James W.; Lester, Charles S.

    1998-01-01

    There is provided a method of fuel/oxidizer ignition comprising: (a) application of laser light to a material surface which is absorptive to the laser radiation; (b) heating of the material surface with the laser light to produce a high temperature ablation plume which emanates from the heated surface as an intensely hot cloud of vaporized surface material; and (c) contacting the fuel/oxidizer mixture with the hot ablation cloud at or near the surface of the material in order to heat the fuel to a temperature sufficient to initiate fuel ignition.

  19. Atrial Fibrillation Ablation and Stroke.

    PubMed

    Aagaard, Philip; Briceno, David; Csanadi, Zoltan; Mohanty, Sanghamitra; Gianni, Carola; Trivedi, Chintan; Nagy-Baló, Edina; Danik, Stephan; Barrett, Conor; Santoro, Francesco; Burkhardt, J David; Sanchez, Javier; Natale, Andrea; Di Biase, Luigi

    2016-05-01

    Catheter ablation has become a widely available and accepted treatment to restore sinus rhythm in atrial fibrillation patients who fail antiarrhythmic drug therapy. Although generally safe, the procedure carries a non-negligible risk of complications, including periprocedural cerebral insults. Uninterrupted anticoagulation, maintenance of an adequate ACT during the procedure, and measures to avoid and detect thrombus build-up on sheaths and atheters during the procedure, appears useful to reduce the risk of embolic events. This is a review of the incidence, mechanisms, impact, and methods to reduce catheter ablation related cerebral insults. PMID:27150179

  20. Radiofrequency ablation of lung tumours

    PubMed Central

    Goh, PYT

    2006-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a well-established local therapy for hepatic malignancies. It is rapidly emerging as an effective treatment modality for small lesions elsewhere in the body, in particular, the kidney and the lung. It is a relatively safe and minimally invasive treatment for small lung malignancies, both primary and secondary. In particular, it is the preferred form of treatment for non-surgical candidates. This paper describes the technique employed for radiofrequency ablation of lung tumours, as well as the protocol established, at the Mount Elizabeth Hospital, Singapore. PMID:21614247

  1. Ablative Therapies for Barrett's Esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Garman, Katherine S.; Shaheen, Nicholas J.

    2011-01-01

    Barrett's esophagus has gained increased clinical attention because of its association with esophageal adenocarcinoma, a cancer with increasing incidence and poor survival rates. The goals of ablating Barrett's esophagus are to decrease esophageal cancer rates and to improve overall survival and quality of life. Different techniques have been developed and tested for their effectiveness eradicating Barrett's epithelium. This review assesses the literature associated with different ablative techniques. The safety and efficacy of different techniques are discussed. This review concludes with recommendations for the clinician, including specific strategies for patient care decisions for patients with Barrett's esophagus with varying degrees of dysplasia. PMID:21373836

  2. Tektite ablation - Some confirming calculations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Keefe, J. A., III; Silver, A. D.; Cameron, W. S.; Adams , E. W.; Warmbrod, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    The calculation of tektite ablation has been redone, taking into account transient effects, internal radiation, melting and nonequilibrium vaporization of the glass, and the drag effect of the flanges. It is found that the results confirm the earlier calculations of Chapman and his group and of Adams and his co-workers. The general trend of the results is not sensitive to reasonable changes of the physical parameters. The ablation is predominantly by melting rather than by vaporization at all velocities up to 11 km/sec; this is surprising in view of the lack of detectable melt flow in most tektites. Chemical effects have not been considered.

  3. Operation of Ferroelectric Plasma Sources in a Gas Discharge Mode

    SciTech Connect

    A. Dunaevsky; N.J. Fisch

    2004-03-08

    Ferroelectric plasma sources in vacuum are known as sources of ablative plasma, formed due to surface discharge. In this paper, observations of a gas discharge mode of operation of the ferroelectric plasma sources (FPS) are reported. The gas discharge appears at pressures between approximately 20 and approximately 80 Torr. At pressures of 1-20 Torr, there is a transition from vacuum surface discharge to the gas discharge, when both modes coexist and the surface discharges sustain the gas discharge. At pressures between 20 and 80 Torr, the surface discharges are suppressed, and FPS operate in pure gas discharge mode, with the formation of almost uniform plasma along the entire surface of the ceramics between strips. The density of the expanding plasma is estimated to be about 1013 cm-3 at a distance of 5.5 mm from the surface. The power consumption of the discharge is comparatively low, making it useful for various applications. This paper also presents direct measurements of the yield of secondary electron emission from ferroelectric ceramics, which, at low energies of primary electrons, is high and dependent on the polarization of the ferroelectric material

  4. Progression of Diabetic Capillary Occlusion: A Model

    PubMed Central

    Gens, John Scott; Glazier, James A.; Burns, Stephen A.; Gast, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    An explanatory computational model is developed of the contiguous areas of retinal capillary loss which play a large role in diabetic maculapathy and diabetic retinal neovascularization. Strictly random leukocyte mediated capillary occlusion cannot explain the occurrence of large contiguous areas of retinal ischemia. Therefore occlusion of an individual capillary must increase the probability of occlusion of surrounding capillaries. A retinal perifoveal vascular sector as well as a peripheral retinal capillary network and a deleted hexagonal capillary network are modelled using Compucell3D. The perifoveal modelling produces a pattern of spreading capillary loss with associated macular edema. In the peripheral network, spreading ischemia results from the progressive loss of the ladder capillaries which connect peripheral arterioles and venules. System blood flow was elevated in the macular model before a later reduction in flow in cases with progression of capillary occlusions. Simulations differing only in initial vascular network structures but with identical dynamics for oxygen, growth factors and vascular occlusions, replicate key clinical observations of ischemia and macular edema in the posterior pole and ischemia in the retinal periphery. The simulation results also seem consistent with quantitative data on macular blood flow and qualitative data on venous oxygenation. One computational model applied to distinct capillary networks in different retinal regions yielded results comparable to clinical observations in those regions. PMID:27300722

  5. Fluid Delivery System For Capillary Electrophoretic Applications.

    DOEpatents

    Li, Qingbo; Liu, Changsheng; Kane, Thomas E.; Kernan, John R.; Sonnenschein, Bernard; Sharer, Michael V.

    2002-04-23

    An automated electrophoretic system is disclosed. The system employs a capillary cartridge having a plurality of capillary tubes. The cartridge has a first array of capillary ends projecting from one side of a plate. The first array of capillary ends are spaced apart in substantially the same manner as the wells of a microtitre tray of standard size. This allows one to simultaneously perform capillary electrophoresis on samples present in each of the wells of the tray. The system includes a stacked, dual carrousel arrangement to eliminate cross-contamination resulting from reuse of the same buffer tray on consecutive executions from electrophoresis. The system also has a gel delivery module containing a gel syringe/a stepper motor or a high pressure chamber with a pump to quickly and uniformly deliver gel through the capillary tubes. The system further includes a multi-wavelength beam generator to generate a laser beam which produces a beam with a wide range of wavelengths. An off-line capillary reconditioner thoroughly cleans a capillary cartridge to enable simultaneous execution of electrophoresis with another capillary cartridge. The streamlined nature of the off-line capillary reconditioner offers the advantage of increased system throughput with a minimal increase in system cost.

  6. Quantifying the cleanliness of glass capillaries.

    PubMed

    Bowman, C L

    1998-01-01

    I used capillary rise methods to investigate the lumenal surface properties of quartz (fused silica, Amersil T-08), borosilicate (Corning 7800), and high-lead glass (Corning 0010) capillaries commonly used to make patch pipets. I calculated the capillary rise and contact angle for water and methanol from weight measurements. The capillary rise was compared with the theoretical maximum value calculated by assuming each fluid perfectly wetted the lumenal surface of the glass (i.e., zero contact angle, which reflects the absence of surface contamination). For borosilicate, high-lead, and quartz capillaries, the rise for water was substantially less than the theoretical maximum rise. Exposure of the borosilicate, lead, and quartz capillaries to several cleaning methods resulted in substantially better--but not perfect--agreement between the theoretical maximum rise and calculated capillary rise. By contrast, the capillary rise for methanol was almost identical in untreated and cleaned capillaries, but less than its theoretical maximum rise. The residual discrepancy between the observed and theoretical rise for water could not be improved on by trying a variety of cleaning procedures, but some cleaning methods were superior to others. The water solubility of the surface contaminants, deduced from the effectiveness of repeated rinsing, was different for each of the three types of capillaries examined: Corning 7800 > quartz > Corning 0010. A surface film was also detected in quatz tubing with an internal filament. I conclude that these borosilicate, quartz, and high-lead glass capillaries have a film on the lumenal surface, which can be removed using appropriate cleaning methods. The surface contaminants may be unique to each type of capillary and may also be hydrophobic. Two simple methods are presented to quantitate the cleanliness of glass capillary tubing commonly used to make pipets for studies of biological membranes. It is not known if the surface film is of

  7. Electron density measurement in gas discharge plasmas by optical and acoustic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biagioni, A.; Anania, M. P.; Bellaveglia, M.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Di Giovenale, D.; Di Pirro, G.; Ferrario, M.; Filippi, F.; Mostacci, A.; Pompili, R.; Shpakov, V.; Vaccarezza, C.; Villa, F.; Zigler, A.

    2016-08-01

    Plasma density represents a very important parameter for both laser wakefield and plasma wakefield acceleration, which use a gas-filled capillary plasma source. Several techniques can be used to measure the plasma density within a capillary discharge, which are mainly based on optical diagnostic methods, as for example the well-known spectroscopic method using the Stark broadening effect. In this work, we introduce a preliminary study on an alternative way to detect the plasma density, based on the shock waves produced by gas discharge in a capillary. Firstly, the measurements of the acoustic spectral content relative to the laser-induced plasmas by a solid target allowed us to understand the main properties of the acoustic waves produced during this kind of plasma generation; afterwards, we have extended such acoustic technique to the capillary plasma source in order to calibrate it by comparison with the stark broadening method.

  8. Visualization experiment to investigate capillary barrier performance in the context of a Yucca Mountain emplacement drift.

    PubMed

    Tidwell, Vincent C; Glass, Robert J; Chocas, Connie; Barker, Glenn; Orear, Lee

    2003-01-01

    The use of capillary barriers as engineered backfill systems to divert water away from radioactive waste potentially stored in a Yucca Mountain emplacement drift is investigated. We designed and conducted a flow visualization experiment to investigate capillary barrier performance in this context. A two-dimensional, thin slab, test system replicated the physical emplacement drift to one-quarter scale (1.4-m diameter) and included the simulated drift wall, waste canister, pedestal, capillary barrier backfill, and host-rock fracture system. Water was supplied at the top of the simulated drift and allowed to discharge by way of wicks located along the left wall of the cell (simulated fractures) or by a gravity drain at the bottom of the right side (simulated impermeable rock with floor drain). Photographs captured the migration of water and a blue dye tracer within the system, analytical balances measured the mass balance of water, while tensiometers measured the capillary pressure at numerous locations. Of particular concern to this test was the drainage of the capillary barrier, which terminates against the drift wall. We found that while the simulated fractures (left side) and drain (right side) each influenced the performance of the capillary barrier at early time, they had little differential affect at later times. Also of concern was the small disparity in capillary properties between the fine and coarse layer (limited by the need of a fine-grained material that would not filter into the coarse layer under dry conditions). While the capillary barrier was able to divert the majority of flow toward the edges of the system and away from the simulated waste canister, the barrier did not preclude flow in the coarse layer, which was noted to be visually wet next to the waste canister on day 92 and was continuing to take on water at termination on day 112.

  9. Catheter ablation of parahisian premature ventricular complex.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun; Kim, Jeong Su; Park, Yong Hyun; Kim, June Hong; Chun, Kook Jin

    2011-12-01

    Catheter ablation is performed in selected patients with a symptomatic premature ventricular complex (PVC) or PVC-induced cardiomyopathy. Ablation of PVC from the His region has a high risk of inducing a complete atrioventricular block. Here we report successful catheter ablation of a parahisian PVC in a 63-year-old man.

  10. Successful control of life-threatening polymorphic ventricular tachycardia by radiofrequency catheter ablation in an infant.

    PubMed

    Abe, Yuriko; Sumitomo, Naokata; Okuma, Hiromi; Nakamura, Takahiro; Fukuhara, Junji; Ichikawa, Rie; Matsumura, Masaharu; Miyashita, Michio; Kamiyama, Hiroshi; Ayusawa, Mamoru; Watanabe, Mamie; Joo, Kunitaka; Makita, Naomasa; Horie, Minoru

    2014-05-01

    We present a case of a 9-month-old girl in whom malignant polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (VT) was successfully controlled by radiofrequency catheter ablation under guidance with a three-dimensional mapping system. The VTs originated from the left ventricular lateral wall, left ventricular anterior wall, and left ventricular apex. At least six types of VTs were documented during the electrophysiology study. All VTs were successfully controlled after two sessions of radiofrequency catheter ablation, and she was discharged from our hospital on propranolol, mexiletine, flecainide, and aprindine. PMID:23836069

  11. Capillary Phenomena at Nanoscales: Electrowetting and Capillary Adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robbins, Mark

    2011-11-01

    Theories of capillary phenomena have traditionally been based on continuum approximations that break down as dimensions shrink to nanometer scales. Molecular simulations are used to test the limits of continuum theory in electrowetting on dielectric (EWOD) and capillary adhesion between solids. In EWOD, a fluid drop is separated from an electrode by a dielectric. Increasing the voltage V between drop and electrode, decreases the contact angle θ, allowing the droplet to be manipulated. Simulations of nanoscale drops show the same behavior as experiments on millimeter drops. The contact angle follows the continuum Young-Lippmann equation (YLE) at low voltages and then saturates. The saturation mechanism has been difficult to identify in experiments. Simulations show that charged molecules are pulled from the drop by large electrostatic forces near the contact line. Saturation can be delayed by increasing molecular binding, lowering temperature or increasing dielectric constant. A local force balance equation is derived that agrees with the YLE below saturation and remains valid after saturation. Simulations of capillary adhesion examined the force between a spherical tip of radius R and a flat substrate. The shape of the meniscus agrees remarkably well with continuum theory down to nanometer separations, as does the adhesive force from interfacial tension. However, the total force may deviate by factors of two or have the opposite sign. While the component of the pressure along the substrate agrees with the Laplace pressure from continuum theory, the out-of âplane component does not. There may also be significant force oscillations associated with layering near the solids. The elastic response of the solid has little affect on adhesive forces. This material is based upon work supported by National Science Foundation Grant No. CMS-0103408.

  12. Capillary pumped loop body heat exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, Theodore D. (Inventor); Wren, deceased, Paul (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A capillary pumped loop for transferring heat from one body part to another body part, the capillary pumped loop comprising a capillary evaporator for vaporizing a liquid refrigerant by absorbing heat from a warm body part, a condenser for turning a vaporized refrigerant into a liquid by transferring heat from the vaporized liquid to a cool body part, a first tube section connecting an output port of the capillary evaporator to an input of the condenser, and a second tube section connecting an output of the condenser to an input port of the capillary evaporator. A wick may be provided within the condenser. A pump may be provided between the second tube section and the input port of the capillary evaporator. Additionally, an esternal heat source or heat sink may be utilized.

  13. Modern Advances in Ablative TPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatapathy, Ethiraj

    2013-01-01

    Topics covered include: Physics of Hypersonic Flow and TPS Considerations. Destinations, Missions and Requirements. State of the Art Thermal Protection Systems Capabilities. Modern Advances in Ablative TPS. Entry Systems Concepts. Flexible TPS for Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerators. Conformal TPS for Rigid Aeroshell. 3-D Woven TPS for Extreme Entry Environment. Multi-functional Carbon Fabric for Mechanically Deployable.

  14. Reconstruction of an ablated breast.

    PubMed

    Scarfì, A; Ordemann, K; Hüter, J

    1986-01-01

    It is the aim of the reconstruction of an ablated breast to repair the woman's integrity. The technique of this operation, according to Bomert, is the sliding of a flap of skin in the case of a horizontal breast scar. For the reconstruction, a silicone prosthesis is implanted which in most cases is prepectoral.

  15. Surface Modification of ICF Target Capsules by Pulsed Laser Ablation

    DOE PAGES

    Carlson, Lane C.; Johnson, Michael A.; Bunn, Thomas L.

    2016-06-30

    Topographical modifications of spherical surfaces are imprinted on National Ignition Facility (NIF) target capsules by extending the capabilities of a recently developed full surface (4π) laser ablation and mapping apparatus. The laser ablation method combines the precision, energy density and long reach of a focused laser beam to pre-impose sinusoidal modulations on the outside surface of High Density Carbon (HDC) capsules and the inside surface of Glow Discharge Polymer (GDP) capsules. Sinusoidal modulations described in this paper have sub-micron to 10’s of microns vertical scale and wavelengths as small as 30 μm and as large as 200 μm. The modulatedmore » patterns are created by rastering a focused laser fired at discrete capsule surface locations for a specified number of pulses. The computer program developed to create these raster patterns uses inputs such as laser beam intensity profile, the material removal function, the starting surface figure and the desired surface figure. The patterns are optimized to minimize surface roughness. Lastly, in this paper, simulated surfaces are compared with actual ablated surfaces measured using confocal microscopy.« less

  16. DNA Sequencing Using capillary Electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Barry Karger

    2011-05-09

    The overall goal of this program was to develop capillary electrophoresis as the tool to be used to sequence for the first time the Human Genome. Our program was part of the Human Genome Project. In this work, we were highly successful and the replaceable polymer we developed, linear polyacrylamide, was used by the DOE sequencing lab in California to sequence a significant portion of the human genome using the MegaBase multiple capillary array electrophoresis instrument. In this final report, we summarize our efforts and success. We began our work by separating by capillary electrophoresis double strand oligonucleotides using cross-linked polyacrylamide gels in fused silica capillaries. This work showed the potential of the methodology. However, preparation of such cross-linked gel capillaries was difficult with poor reproducibility, and even more important, the columns were not very stable. We improved stability by using non-cross linked linear polyacrylamide. Here, the entangled linear chains could move when osmotic pressure (e.g. sample injection) was imposed on the polymer matrix. This relaxation of the polymer dissipated the stress in the column. Our next advance was to use significantly lower concentrations of the linear polyacrylamide that the polymer could be automatically blown out after each run and replaced with fresh linear polymer solution. In this way, a new column was available for each analytical run. Finally, while testing many linear polymers, we selected linear polyacrylamide as the best matrix as it was the most hydrophilic polymer available. Under our DOE program, we demonstrated initially the success of the linear polyacrylamide to separate double strand DNA. We note that the method is used even today to assay purity of double stranded DNA fragments. Our focus, of course, was on the separation of single stranded DNA for sequencing purposes. In one paper, we demonstrated the success of our approach in sequencing up to 500 bases. Other

  17. Measurement of Liquid Viscosities in Tapered or Parabolic Capillaries.

    PubMed

    Ershov; Zorin; Starov

    1999-08-01

    The possibility of using tapered or parabolic capillaries for measurement of liquid viscosities is investigated both experimentally and theoretically. It is demonstrated that even small deviations in capillary radius from a constant value may substantially affect measurement results. Equations are derived which allow correct analysis of the measurement results in tapered or parabolic capillaries. The following cases are analyzed: a water imbibition into a tapered or parabolic capillary and displacement of one liquid by another immiscible liquid in tapered or parabolic capillaries. Two possibilities are considered: (a) the narrow end of the capillary as capillary inlet and (b) the wide end of the capillary as capillary inlet. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  18. Transmission of slow highly charged ions through glass capillaries: Role of the capillary shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, C. L.; Simon, M.; Ikeda, T.; Guillous, S.; Iskandar, W.; Méry, A.; Rangama, J.; Lebius, H.; Benyagoub, A.; Grygiel, C.; Müller, A.; Döbeli, M.; Tanis, J. A.; Cassimi, A.

    2013-11-01

    Comparison of the transmission of 27-keV Ar9+ ions through insulating funnel- and conical-shaped glass capillaries of outlet diameters of ˜22 μm is reported. Beam intensities of 1, 5, and 10 pA were injected into both capillaries. Transmission at the untilted angle of 0° was measured as well as at a tilt angle of ˜0.5° for the funnel capillary and a tilt angle of ˜1.1° for the conical capillary. For the funnel capillary, blocking of transmission was observed, whereas, the transmission was continuous for the conical capillary. These measurements suggest that conical-shaped capillaries have transport properties that are different than funnel-shaped capillaries for slow highly charged ions.

  19. Malpighi and the discovery of capillaries.

    PubMed

    Pearce, J M S

    2007-01-01

    Leonardo da Vinci clearly observed and described capillaries. Using the microscope, Marcello Malpighi examined the brain and major organs to demonstrate their finer anatomical features. This led to his discovery in 1661, of capillaries that proved fundamental to our understanding of the vascular system in the brain and cord. He hypothesized that capillaries were the connection between arteries and veins that allowed blood to flow back to the heart in the circulation of the blood, as first asserted by William Harvey.

  20. Analysis of Small Ions with Capillary Electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Aulakh, Jatinder Singh; Kaur, Ramandeep; Malik, Ashok Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Small inorganic ions are easily separated through capillary electrophoresis because they have a high charge-to-mass ratio and suffer little from some of the undesired phenomenon affecting higher molecular weight species like adsorption to the capillary wall, decomposition, and precipitation. This chapter is focused on the analysis of small ions other than metal ions using capillary electrophoresis. Methods are described for the determination of ions of nitrogen, phosphorus, sulfur, fluorine, chlorine, bromine, and iodine. PMID:27645739

  1. Analysis and removal of ITER relevant materials and deposits by laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Qingmei; Huber, Alexander; Philipps, Volker; Sergienko, Gennady; Gierse, Niels; Mertens, Philippe; Hai, Ran; Ding, Hongbin

    2014-12-01

    The analysis of the deposition of eroded wall material on the plasma-facing materials in fusion devices is one of the crucial issues to maintain the plasma performance and to fulfill safety requirements with respect to tritium retention by co-deposition. Laser ablation with minimal damage to the plasma facing material is a promising method for in situ monitoring and removal of the deposition, especially for plasma-shadowed areas which are difficult to reach by other cleaning methods like plasma discharge. It requires the information of ablation process and the ablation threshold for quantitative analysis and effective removal of the different deposits. This paper presents systemic laboratory experimental analysis of the behavior of the ITER relevant materials, graphite, tungsten, aluminum (as a substitution of beryllium) and mixed deposits ablated by a Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) with different energy densities (1-27 J/cm2, power density 0.3-3.9 GW/cm2). The mixed deposits consisted of W-Al-C layer were deposited on W substrate by magnetron sputtering and arc plasma deposition. The aim was to select the proper parameters for the quantitative analysis and for laser removal of the deposits by investigating the ablation efficiency and ablation threshold for the bulk materials and deposits. The comparison of the ablation and saturation energy thresholds for pure and mixed materials shows that the ablation threshold of the mixed layer depends on the concentration of the components. We propose laser induced breakdown spectroscopy for determination of the elemental composition of deposits and then we select the laser parameters for the layer removal. Comparison of quantitative analysis results from laboratory to that from TEXTOR shows reasonable agreements. The dependence of the spectra on plasma parameters and ambient gas pressure is investigated.

  2. Transient studies of capillary-induced flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reagan, M. K.; Bowman, W. J.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents the numerical and experimental results of a study performed on the transient rise of fluid in a capillary tube. The capillary tube problem provides an excellent mechanism from which to launch an investigation into the transient flow of a fluid in a porous wick structure where capillary forces must balance both adverse gravitational effects and frictional losses. For the study, a capillary tube, initially charged with a small volume of water, was lowered into a pool of water. The behavior of the column of fluid during the transient that followed as more water entered the tube from the pool was both numerically and experimentally studied.

  3. The vitamin D, ionised calcium and parathyroid hormone axis of cerebral capillary function: therapeutic considerations for vascular-based neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Lam, Virginie; Takechi, Ryusuke; Pallabage-Gamarallage, Menuka; Giles, Corey; Mamo, John C L

    2015-01-01

    Blood-brain barrier dysfunction characterised by brain parenchymal extravasation of plasma proteins may contribute to risk of neurodegenerative disorders, however the mechanisms for increased capillary permeability are not understood. Increasing evidence suggests vitamin D confers central nervous system benefits and there is increasing demand for vitamin D supplementation. Vitamin D may influence the CNS via modulation of capillary function, however such effects may be indirect as it has a central role in maintaining calcium homeostasis, in concert with calcium regulatory hormones. This study utilised an integrated approach and investigated the effects of vitamin D supplementation, parathyroid tissue ablation (PTX), or exogenous infusion of parathyroid hormone (PTH) on cerebral capillary integrity. Parenchymal extravasation of immunoglobulin G (IgG) was used as a marker of cerebral capillary permeability. In C57BL/6J mice and Sprague Dawley rats, dietary vitamin D was associated with exaggerated abundance of IgG within cerebral cortex (CTX) and hippocampal formation (HPF). Vitamin D was also associated with increased plasma ionised calcium (iCa) and decreased PTH. A response to dose was suggested and parenchymal effects persisted for up to 24 weeks. Ablation of parathyroid glands increased CTX- and HPF-IgG abundance concomitant with a reduction in plasma iCa. With the provision of PTH, iCa levels increased, however the PTH treated animals did not show increased cerebral permeability. Vitamin D supplemented groups and rats with PTH-tissue ablation showed modestly increased parenchymal abundance of glial-fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), a marker of astroglial activation. PTH infusion attenuated GFAP abundance. The findings suggest that vitamin D can compromise capillary integrity via a mechanism that is independent of calcium homeostasis. The effects of exogenous vitamin D supplementation on capillary function and in the context of prevention of vascular

  4. The Vitamin D, Ionised Calcium and Parathyroid Hormone Axis of Cerebral Capillary Function: Therapeutic Considerations for Vascular-Based Neurodegenerative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Virginie; Takechi, Ryusuke; Pallabage-Gamarallage, Menuka; Giles, Corey; Mamo, John C. L.

    2015-01-01

    Blood-brain barrier dysfunction characterised by brain parenchymal extravasation of plasma proteins may contribute to risk of neurodegenerative disorders, however the mechanisms for increased capillary permeability are not understood. Increasing evidence suggests vitamin D confers central nervous system benefits and there is increasing demand for vitamin D supplementation. Vitamin D may influence the CNS via modulation of capillary function, however such effects may be indirect as it has a central role in maintaining calcium homeostasis, in concert with calcium regulatory hormones. This study utilised an integrated approach and investigated the effects of vitamin D supplementation, parathyroid tissue ablation (PTX), or exogenous infusion of parathyroid hormone (PTH) on cerebral capillary integrity. Parenchymal extravasation of immunoglobulin G (IgG) was used as a marker of cerebral capillary permeability. In C57BL/6J mice and Sprague Dawley rats, dietary vitamin D was associated with exaggerated abundance of IgG within cerebral cortex (CTX) and hippocampal formation (HPF). Vitamin D was also associated with increased plasma ionised calcium (iCa) and decreased PTH. A response to dose was suggested and parenchymal effects persisted for up to 24 weeks. Ablation of parathyroid glands increased CTX- and HPF-IgG abundance concomitant with a reduction in plasma iCa. With the provision of PTH, iCa levels increased, however the PTH treated animals did not show increased cerebral permeability. Vitamin D supplemented groups and rats with PTH-tissue ablation showed modestly increased parenchymal abundance of glial-fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), a marker of astroglial activation. PTH infusion attenuated GFAP abundance. The findings suggest that vitamin D can compromise capillary integrity via a mechanism that is independent of calcium homeostasis. The effects of exogenous vitamin D supplementation on capillary function and in the context of prevention of vascular

  5. Esophageal papilloma: Flexible endoscopic ablation by radiofrequency

    PubMed Central

    del Genio, Gianmattia; del Genio, Federica; Schettino, Pietro; Limongelli, Paolo; Tolone, Salvatore; Brusciano, Luigi; Avellino, Manuela; Vitiello, Chiara; Docimo, Giovanni; Pezzullo, Angelo; Docimo, Ludovico

    2015-01-01

    Squamous papilloma of the esophagus is a rare benign lesion of the esophagus. Radiofrequency ablation is an established endoscopic technique for the eradication of Barrett esophagus. No cases of endoscopic ablation of esophageal papilloma by radiofrequency ablation (RFA) have been reported. We report a case of esophageal papilloma successfully treated with a single session of radiofrequency ablation. Endoscopic ablation of the lesion was achieved by radiofrequency using a new catheter inserted through the working channel of endoscope. The esophageal ablated tissue was removed by a specifically designed cup. Complete ablation was confirmed at 3 mo by endoscopy with biopsies. This case supports feasibility and safety of as a new potential indication for BarrxTM RFA in patients with esophageal papilloma. PMID:25789102

  6. Enantiomer Separations by Capillary Electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Scriba, Gerhard K E; Harnisch, Henrik; Zhu, Qingfu

    2016-01-01

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is a versatile and flexible technique for analytical enantioseparations. This is due to the large variety of chiral selectors as well as the different operation modes including electrokinetic chromatography, micellar electrokinetic chromatography, and microemulsion electrokinetic chromatography. The chiral selector, which is added to the background electrolyte, represents a pseudostationary phase with its own electrophoretic mobility allowing a variety of different separation protocols. The present chapter briefly addresses the basic fundamentals of CE enantioseparations as well as the most frequently applied chiral selectors and separation modes. The practical example illustrates the separation of the enantiomers of a positively charged analyte using native and charged cyclodextrin derivatives as chiral selectors. PMID:27645742

  7. Capillary pumped loop application guide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cullimore, Brent A.

    Capillary pumped loops (CPLs) have undergone extensive development since the late 1970's, and represent a maturing technology that is beginning to appear in spacecraft designs. Perhaps because most CPL literature is intended for CPL and heat pipe dedvelopers, or perhaps because of the myriad of component design and layout options available, many thermal control designers are either unfamiliar with the capabilities offered by CPLs, or are confused about their limitations. This survey paper is targeted toward thermal control designers who must decide when and where to use CPLs, or having chosen a CPL solution, must deal with system-level integration and test issues.

  8. Capillary surfaces in exotic containers

    SciTech Connect

    Concus, P. ); Finn, R. . Dept. of Mathematics)

    1991-07-01

    A survey is presented of results to date for capillary surfaces in exotic'' containers. These containers have the property that each one admits a continuum of distinct equilibrium free surfaces, all bounding with the container walls the same volume of fluid, making the same contact angle at the trip interface curve, and having identical mechanical energies. The containers can be so designed that they are themselves axially symmetric but that the fluid configurations of minimizing energy cannot be axially symmetric. 9 refs., 2 figs.

  9. Capillary rafts and their destabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Protiere, Suzie; Abkarian, Manouk; Aristoff, Jeffrey; Stone, Howard

    2010-11-01

    Small objects trapped at an interface are very common in Nature (insects walking on water, ant rafts, bubbles or pollen at the water-air interface, membranes...) and are found in many multiphase industrial processes. The study of such particle-laden interfaces is therefore of practical as well as fundamental importance. Here we report experiments on the self-assembly of spherical particles into capillary rafts at an oil-water interface and elucidate how such rafts sink. We characterize different types of sinking behavior and show that it is possible to obtain "armored droplets," whereby the sinking oil is encapsulated within a shell of particles.

  10. High pressure pulsed capillary viscometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. L.; Walowitt, J. A.; Pan, C. H. T.

    1972-01-01

    An analytical and test program was conducted in order to establish the feasibility of a multichamber pulsed-capillary viscometer. The initial design incorporated a piston, ram, and seals which produced measured pulses up to 30,000 psi in the closed chamber system. Pressure pulses from one to ten milliseconds were investigated in a system volume of 1 cuin. Four test fluids: a MIL-L-7808, a 5P4E polyphenyl ether, a MIL-L-23699A, and a synthetic hydrocarbon were examined in the test pressure assembly. The pressure-viscosity coefficient and viscosity delay time were determined for the MIL-L-7808 lubricant tested.

  11. Capillary electrophoresis in metallodrug development.

    PubMed

    Holtkamp, Hannah; Hartinger, Christian G

    2015-09-01

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is a separation method based on differential migration of analytes in electric fields. The compatibility with purely aqueous separation media makes it a versatile tool in metallodrug research. Many metallodrugs undergo ligand exchange reactions that can easily be followed with this method and the information gained can even be improved by coupling the CE to advanced detectors, such as mass spectrometers. This gives the method high potential to facilitate the development of metallodrugs, especially when combined with innovative method development and experimental design. PMID:26547417

  12. [Catheter ablation of persistent atrial fibrillation : pulmonary vein isolation, ablation of fractionated electrograms, stepwise approach or rotor ablation?].

    PubMed

    Scherr, D

    2015-02-01

    Catheter ablation is an established treatment option for patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). In paroxysmal AF ablation, pulmonary vein isolation alone is a well-defined procedural endpoint, leading to success rates of up to 80% with multiple procedures over 5 years of follow-up. The success rate in persistent AF ablation is significantly more limited. This is partly due to the rudimentary understanding of the substrate maintaining persistent AF. Three main pathophysiological concepts for this arrhythmia exist: the multiple wavelet hypothesis, the concept of focal triggers, mainly located in the pulmonary veins and the rotor hypothesis. However, the targets and endpoints of persistent AF ablation are ill-defined and there is no consensus on the optimal ablation strategy in these patients. Based on these concepts, several ablation approaches for persistent AF have emerged: pulmonary vein isolation, the stepwise approach (i.e. pulmonary vein isolation, ablation of fractionated electrograms and linear ablation), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and rotor-based approaches. Currently, persistent AF ablation is a second-line therapy option to restore and maintain sinus rhythm. Several factors, such as the presence of structural heart disease, duration of persistent AF and dilatation and possibly also the degree of fibrosis of the left atrium should influence the decision to perform persistent AF ablation. PMID:25687615

  13. Microwave Ablation Compared with Radiofrequency Ablation for Breast Tissue in an Ex Vivo Bovine Udder Model

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Toshihiro; Westphal, Saskia; Isfort, Peter; Braunschweig, Till; Penzkofer, Tobias Bruners, Philipp; Kichikawa, Kimihiko; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas Mahnken, Andreas H.

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: To compare the effectiveness of microwave (MW) ablation with radiofrequency (RF) ablation for treating breast tissue in a nonperfused ex vivo model of healthy bovine udder tissue. Materials and Methods: MW ablations were performed at power outputs of 25W, 35W, and 45W using a 915-MHz frequency generator and a 2-cm active tip antenna. RF ablations were performed with a bipolar RF system with 2- and 3-cm active tip electrodes. Tissue temperatures were continuously monitored during ablation. Results: The mean short-axis diameters of the coagulation zones were 1.34 {+-} 0.14, 1.45 {+-} 0.13, and 1.74 {+-} 0.11 cm for MW ablation at outputs of 25W, 35W, and 45W. For RF ablation, the corresponding values were 1.16 {+-} 0.09 and 1.26 {+-} 0.14 cm with electrodes having 2- and 3-cm active tips, respectively. The mean coagulation volumes were 2.27 {+-} 0.65, 2.85 {+-} 0.72, and 4.45 {+-} 0.47 cm{sup 3} for MW ablation at outputs of 25W, 35W, and 45W and 1.18 {+-} 0.30 and 2.29 {+-} 0.55 cm{sup 3} got RF ablation with 2- and 3-cm electrodes, respectively. MW ablations at 35W and 45W achieved significantly longer short-axis diameters than RF ablations (P < 0.05). The highest tissue temperature was achieved with MW ablation at 45W (P < 0.05). On histological examination, the extent of the ablation zone in MW ablations was less affected by tissue heterogeneity than that in RF ablations. Conclusion: MW ablation appears to be advantageous with respect to the volume of ablation and the shape of the margin of necrosis compared with RF ablation in an ex vivo bovine udder.

  14. Electrode configuration for extreme-UV electrical discharge source

    DOEpatents

    Spence, Paul Andrew; Fornaciari, Neal Robert; Chang, Jim Jihchyun

    2002-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that debris generation within an electric capillary discharge source, for generating extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray, is dependent on the magnitude and profile of the electric field that is established along the surfaces of the electrodes. An electrode shape that results in uniform electric field strength along its surface has been developed to minimize sputtering and debris generation. The electric discharge plasma source includes: (a) a body that defines a circular capillary bore that has a proximal end and a distal end; (b) a back electrode positioned around and adjacent to the distal end of the capillary bore wherein the back electrode has a channel that is in communication with the distal end and that is defined by a non-uniform inner surface which exhibits a first region which is convex, a second region which is concave, and a third region which is convex wherein the regions are viewed outwardly from the inner surface of the channel that is adjacent the distal end of the capillary bore so that the first region is closest to the distal end; (c) a front electrode positioned around and adjacent to the proximal end of the capillary bore wherein the front electrode has an opening that is communication with the proximal end and that is defined by a non-uniform inner surface which exhibits a first region which is convex, a second region which is substantially linear, and third region which is convex wherein the regions are viewed outwardly from the inner surface of the opening that is adjacent the proximal end of the capillary bore so that the first region is closest to the proximal end; and (d) a source of electric potential that is connected across the front and back electrodes.

  15. Evaluation of capillary reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahill, J. E.; Halase, J. F.; South, W. K.; Stoffer, L. J.

    1985-01-01

    Anti-icing of the inlet of jet engines is generally performed with high pressure heated air that is directed forward from the compressor through a series of pipes to various manifolds located near the structures to be anti-iced. From these manifolds, the air is directed to all flowpath surfaces that may be susceptible to ice formation. There the anti-icing function may be performed by either heat conduction or film heating. Unfortunately, the prospect of utilizing lighweight, high strength composites for inlet structures of jet engines has been frustrated by the low transverse thermal conductivity of such materials. It was the objective of this program to develop an advanced materials and design concept for anti-icing composite structures. The concept that was evaluated used capillary glass tubes embedded on the surface of a composite structure with heated air ducted through the tubes. An analytical computer program was developed to predict the anti-icing performance of such tubes and a test program was conducted to demonstrate actual performance of this system. Test data and analytical code results were in excellent agreement. Both indicate feasibility of using capillary tubes for surface heating as a means for composite engine structures to combat ice accumulation.

  16. Cryogenic Capillary Screen Heat Entrapment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolshinskiy, L.G.; Hastings, L.J.; Stathman, G.

    2007-01-01

    Cryogenic liquid acquisition devices (LADs) for space-based propulsion interface directly with the feed system, which can be a significant heat leak source. Further, the accumulation of thermal energy within LAD channels can lead to the loss of sub-cooled propellant conditions and result in feed system cavitation during propellant outflow. Therefore, the fundamental question addressed by this program was: "To what degree is natural convection in a cryogenic liquid constrained by the capillary screen meshes envisioned for LADs.?"Testing was first conducted with water as the test fluid, followed by LN2 tests. In either case, the basic experimental approach was to heat the bottom of a cylindrical column of test fluid to establish stratification patterns measured by temperature sensors located above and below a horizontal screen barrier position. Experimentation was performed without barriers, with screens, and with a solid barrier. The two screen meshes tested were those typically used by LAD designers, "200x1400" and "325x2300", both with Twill Dutch Weave. Upon consideration of both the water and LN2 data it was concluded that heat transfer across the screen meshes was dependent upon barrier thermal conductivity and that the capillary screen meshes were impervious to natural convection currents.

  17. Nonaqueous Capillary Electrophoresis Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Klampfl, Christian W; Himmelsbach, Markus

    2016-01-01

    The term nonaqueous capillary electrophoresis (NACE) commonly refers to capillary electrophoresis with purely nonaqueous background electrolytes (BGE). Main advantages of NACE are the possibility to analyze substances with very low solubility in aqueous media as well as separation selectivity that can be quite different in organic solvents (compared to water)-a property that can be employed for manipulation of separation selectivities. Mass spectrometry (MS) has become more and more popular as a detector in CE a fact that applies also for NACE. In the present chapter, the development of NACE-MS since 2004 is reviewed. Relevant parameters like composition of BGE and its influence on separation and detection in NACE as well as sheath liquid for NACE-MS are discussed. Finally, an overview of the papers published in the field of NACE-MS between 2004 and 2014 is given. Applications are grouped according to the field (analysis of natural products, biomedical analysis, food analysis, analysis of industrial products, and fundamental investigations). PMID:27645734

  18. Capillary Rise in Porous Media.

    PubMed

    Lago, Marcelo; Araujo, Mariela

    2001-02-01

    Capillary rise experiments were performed in columns filled with glass beads and Berea sandstones, using visual methods to register the advance of the water front. For the glass bead filled columns, early time data are well fitted by the Washburn equation. However, in the experiments, the advancing front exceeded the predicted equilibrium height. For large times, an algebraic behavior of the velocity of the front is observed (T. Delker et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 76, 2902 (1996)). A model for studying the capillary pressure evolution in a regular assembly of spheres is proposed and developed. It is based on a quasi-static advance of the meniscus with a piston-like motion and allows us to estimate the hydraulic equilibrium height, with values very close to those obtained by fitting early time data to a Washburn equation. The change of regime is explained as a transition in the mechanism of advance of the meniscus. On the other hand, only the Washburn regime was observed for the sandstones. The front velocity was fitted to an algebraical form with an exponent close to 0.5, a value expected from the asymptotic limit of the Washburn equation. Copyright 2001 Academic Press. PMID:11161488

  19. Atomic Force Controlled Capillary Electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Aaron; Yeshua, Talia; Palchan, Mila; Lovsky, Yulia; Taha, Hesham

    2010-03-01

    Lithography based on scanning probe microscopic techniques has considerable potential for accurate & localized deposition of material on the nanometer scale. Controlled deposition of metallic features with high purity and spatial accuracy is of great interest for circuit edit applications in the semiconductor industry, for plasmonics & nanophotonics and for basic research in surface enhanced Raman scattering & nanobiophysics. Within the context of metal deposition we will review the development of fountain pen nanochemistry and its most recent emulation Atomic Force Controlled Capillary Electrophoresis (ACCE). Using this latter development we will demonstrate achievement of unprecedented control of nanoparticle deposition using a three-electrode geometry. Three electrodes are attached: one on the outside of a metal coated glass probe, one on the inside of a hollow probe in a solution containing Au nanoparticles in the capillary, and a third on the surface where the writing takes place. The three electrodes provide electrical pulses for accurate control of deposition and retraction of the liquid from the surface overcoming the lack of control seen in both dip pen lithography & fountain pen nanochemistry when the tip contacts the surface. With this development, we demonstrate depositing a single 1.3 nm Au nanoparticle onto surfaces such as semiconductors.

  20. Glue septal ablation: A promising alternative to alcohol septal ablation

    PubMed Central

    Aytemir, Kudret; Oto, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is defined as myocardial hypertrophy in the absence of another cardiac or systemic disease capable of producing the magnitude of present hypertrophy. In about 70% of patients with HCM, there is left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) obstruction (LVOTO) and this is known as obstructive type of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HOCM). Cases refractory to medical treatment have had two options either surgical septal myectomy or alcohol septal ablation (ASA) to alleviate LVOT gradient. ASA may cause some life-threatening complications including conduction disturbances and complete heart block, hemodynamic compromise, ventricular arrhythmias, distant and massive myocardial necrosis. Glue septal ablation (GSA) is a promising technique for the treatment of HOCM. Glue seems to be superior to alcohol due to some intrinsic advantageous properties of glue such as immediate polymerization which prevents the leak into the left anterior descending coronary artery and it is particularly useful in patients with collaterals to the right coronary artery in whom alcohol ablation is contraindicated. In our experience, GSA is effective and also a safe technique without significant complications. GSA decreases LVOT gradient immediately after the procedure and this reduction persists during 12 months of follow-up. It improves New York Heart Association functional capacity and decrease interventricular septal wall thickness. Further studies are needed in order to assess the long-term efficacy and safety of this technique. PMID:27011786

  1. Cholecystokinin-Assisted Hydrodissection of the Gallbladder Fossa during FDG PET/CT-guided Liver Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Tewari, Sanjit O.; Petre, Elena N.; Osborne, Joseph; Sofocleous, Constantinos T.

    2013-12-15

    A 68-year-old female with colorectal cancer developed a metachronous isolated fluorodeoxyglucose-avid (FDG-avid) segment 5/6 gallbladder fossa hepatic lesion and was referred for percutaneous ablation. Pre-procedure computed tomography (CT) images demonstrated a distended gallbladder abutting the segment 5/6 hepatic metastasis. In order to perform ablation with clear margins and avoid direct puncture and aspiration of the gallbladder, cholecystokinin was administered intravenously to stimulate gallbladder contraction before hydrodissection. Subsequently, the lesion was ablated successfully with sufficient margins, of greater than 1.0 cm, using microwave with ultrasound and FDG PET/CT guidance. The patient tolerated the procedure very well and was discharged home the next day.

  2. Characterization of tracked radiofrequency ablation in phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chun-Cheng R.; Miga, Michael I.; Galloway, Robert L.

    2007-10-15

    In radiofrequency ablation (RFA), successful therapy requires accurate, image-guided placement of the ablation device in a location selected by a predictive treatment plan. Current planning methods rely on geometric models of ablations that are not sensitive to underlying physical processes in RFA. Implementing plans based on computational models of RFA with image-guided techniques, however, has not been well characterized. To study the use of computational models of RFA in planning needle placement, this work compared ablations performed with an optically tracked RFA device with corresponding models of the ablations. The calibration of the tracked device allowed the positions of distal features of the device, particularly the tips of the needle electrodes, to be determined to within 1.4{+-}0.6 mm of uncertainty. Ablations were then performed using the tracked device in a phantom system based on an agarose-albumin mixture. Images of the sliced phantom obtained from the ablation experiments were then compared with the predictions of a bioheat transfer model of RFA, which used the positional data of the tracked device obtained during ablation. The model was demonstrated to predict 90% of imaged pixels classified as being ablated. The discrepancies between model predictions and observations were analyzed and attributed to needle tracking inaccuracy as well as to uncertainties in model parameters. The results suggest the feasibility of using finite element modeling to plan ablations with predictable outcomes when implemented using tracked RFA.

  3. Investigation of a Gallium MPD Thruster with an Ablating Cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Robert E.; Burton, Rodney L.; Polzin, Kurt A.

    2010-01-01

    Arc impedance, exhaust velocity, and plasma probe measurements are presented. The thruster is driven by a 50 microsecond pulse from a 6.2 milliohm pulse forming network, and gallium is supplied to the discharge by evaporation of the cathode. The arc voltage is found to vary linearly with the discharge current with an arc impedance of 6.5 milliohms. Electrostatic probes yield an exhaust velocity that is invariant with the discharge current and has a peak value of 20 kilometers per second, which is in reasonable agreement with the value (16 plus or minus 1 kilometer per second) calculated from the mass bit and discharge current data. Triple probe measurements yield on axis electron temperatures in the range of 0.8-3.8 eV, electron densities in the range of 1.6 x 10(exp 21) to 2.1 x 10(exp 22) per cubic meter, and a divergence half angle of 16 degrees. Measurements within the interelectrode region yield a peak magnetic field of 0.8 T, and the observed radial trends are consistent with an azimuthally symmetric current distribution. A cathode power balance model is coupled with an ablative heat conduction model predicting mass bit values that are within 20% of the experimental values.

  4. Sheathless interface for coupling capillary electrophoresis with mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chenchen; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.

    2014-06-17

    A sheathless interface for coupling capillary electrophoresis (CE) with mass spectrometry is disclosed. The sheathless interface includes a separation capillary for performing CE separation and an emitter capillary for electrospray ionization. A portion of the emitter capillary is porous or, alternatively, is coated to form an electrically conductive surface. A section of the emitter capillary is disposed within the separation capillary, forming a joint. A metal tube, containing a conductive liquid, encloses the joint.

  5. Argon excimer emission from high-pressure microdischarges in metal capillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankaran, R. Mohan; Giapis, Konstantinos P.; Moselhy, Mohamed; Schoenbach, Karl H.

    2003-12-01

    We report on argon excimer emission from high-pressure microdischarges formed inside metal capillaries with or without gas flow. Excimer emission intensity from a single tube increases linearly with gas pressure between 400 and 1000 Torr. Higher discharge current also results in initial intensity gains until gas heating causes saturation or intensity drop. Argon flow through the discharge intensifies emission perhaps by gas cooling. Emission intensity was found to be additive in prealigned dual microdischarges, suggesting that an array of microdischarges could produce a high-intensity excimer source.

  6. Enzymophoresis of nucleic acids by tandem capillary enzyme reactor-capillary zone electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Nashabeh, W; el Rassi, Z

    1992-04-10

    Enzymophoresis with coupled heterogeneous capillary enzyme reactor-capillary zone electrophoresis was developed and evaluated in the area of nucleic acids. Ribonuclease T1, hexokinase and adenosine deaminase were successfully immobilized on the inner walls of short fused-silica capillaries through glutaraldehyde attachment. These open-tubular capillary enzyme reactors were quite stable for a prolonged period of use under operation conditions normally used in capillary zone electrophoresis. The capillary enzyme reactors coupled in series with capillary zone electrophoresis served as peak locator on the electropherogram, improved the system selectivity, and facilitated the quantitative determination of the analytes with good accuracy. Also, they allowed the on-line digestion and mapping of minute amounts of transfer ribonucleic acids, and the simultaneous synthesis and separation of nanogram quantities of oligonucleotides.

  7. Intracranial capillary hemangioma in an elderly patient

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Ai; Nakagawa, Ichiro; Matsuda, Ryosuke; Nishimura, Fumihiko; Motoyama, Yasushi; Park, Young-Su; Nakamura, Mitsutoshi; Nakase, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Background: Capillary hemangiomas are neoplasms involving skin and soft tissue in infants. These lesions rarely involved an intracranial space and reported age distribution ranges from infancy to middle age. We report an extremely rare case of rapidly rising intracranial capillary hemangioma in an elderly woman. Case Description: The 82-year-old woman presented with vomiting, reduced level of consciousness, and worsening mental state. Computed tomography showed a contrast-enhanced extra-axial lesion in the left frontal operculum, although no intracranial mass lesion was identifiable from magnetic resonance imaging taken 2 years earlier. Complete surgical excision was performed and histopathological examination diagnosed benign capillary hemangioma consisting of a variety of dilated capillary blood vessels lined by endothelial cells. Conclusion: This is the first description of rapid growth of an intracranial capillary hemangioma in an elderly woman. These lesions are exceedingly rare in the elderly population, but still show the capacity for rapid growth. Complete excision would prevent further recurrence. PMID:26664868

  8. Modeling capillary barriers in unsaturated fractured rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yu-Shu; Zhang, W.; Pan, Lehua; Hinds, Jennifer; Bodvarsson, G. S.

    2002-11-01

    This work presents a series of numerical modeling studies that investigate the hydrogeologic conditions required to form capillary barriers and the effect that capillary barriers have on fluid flow and tracer transport processes in the unsaturated fractured rock of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a potential site for storing high-level radioactive waste. The modeling approach is based on a dual-continuum formulation of coupled multiphase fluid and tracer transport through fractured porous rock. The numerical modeling results showed that effective capillary barriers can develop where both matrix and fracture capillary gradients tend to move water upward. Under the current hydrogeologic conceptualization of Yucca Mountain, strong capillary barrier effects exist for diverting a significant amount of moisture flow through the relatively shallow Paintbrush nonwelded unit, with major faults observed at the site serving as major downward pathways for laterally diverted percolation fluxes. In addition, we used observed field liquid saturation and goechemical isotopic data to check model results and found consistent agreement.

  9. Anti-reflux surgery - children - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Fundoplication - children - discharge; Nissen fundoplication - children - discharge; Belsey (Mark IV) fundoplication - children - discharge; Toupet fundoplication - children - discharge; Thal fundoplication - ...

  10. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease - adults - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... adults - discharge; Chronic obstructive airways disease - adults - discharge; Chronic obstructive lung disease - adults - discharge; Chronic bronchitis - adults - discharge; Emphysema - adults - ...

  11. Copolymers For Capillary Gel Electrophoresis

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Changsheng; Li, Qingbo

    2005-08-09

    This invention relates to an electrophoresis separation medium having a gel matrix of at least one random, linear copolymer comprising a primary comonomer and at least one secondary comonomer, wherein the comonomers are randomly distributed along the copolymer chain. The primary comonomer is an acrylamide or an acrylamide derivative that provides the primary physical, chemical, and sieving properties of the gel matrix. The at least one secondary comonomer imparts an inherent physical, chemical, or sieving property to the copolymer chain. The primary and secondary comonomers are present in a ratio sufficient to induce desired properties that optimize electrophoresis performance. The invention also relates to a method of separating a mixture of biological molecules using this gel matrix, a method of preparing the novel electrophoresis separation medium, and a capillary tube filled with the electrophoresis separation medium.

  12. Demographic Differences in Catheter Ablation After Hospital Presentation With Symptomatic Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Kummer, Benjamin R; Bhave, Prashant D; Merkler, Alexander E; Gialdini, Gino; Okin, Peter M; Kamel, Hooman

    2015-01-01

    Background Catheter ablation is increasingly used for rhythm control in symptomatic atrial fibrillation (AF), but the demographic characteristics of patients undergoing this procedure are unclear. Methods and Results We used data on all admissions at nonfederal acute care hospitals in California, Florida, and New York to identify patients discharged with a primary diagnosis of AF between 2006 and 2011. Our primary outcome was readmission for catheter ablation of AF, identified using validated International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification procedure codes. Cox regression models were used to assess relationships between demographic characteristics and catheter ablation, adjusting for Elixhauser comorbidities. We identified 397 612 eligible patients. Of these, 16 717 (4.20%, 95% CI 0.41 to 0.43) underwent ablation. These patients were significantly younger, more often male, more often white, and more often privately insured, with higher household incomes and lower rates of medical comorbidity. In Cox regression models, the likelihood of ablation was lower in women than men (hazard ratio [HR] 0.83; 95% CI 0.80 to 0.86) despite higher rates of AF-related rehospitalization (HR 1.23; 95% CI 1.21 to 1.24). Compared to whites, the likelihood of ablation was lower in Hispanics (HR 0.60; 95% CI 0.56 to 0.64) and blacks (HR 0.68; 95% CI 0.64 to 0.73), even though blacks had only a slightly lower likelihood of AF-related rehospitalization (HR 0.97; 95% CI 0.94 to 0.99) and a higher likelihood of all-cause hospitalization (HR 1.38; 95% CI 1.37 to 1.39). Essentially the same pattern existed in Hispanics. Conclusions We found differences in use of catheter ablation for symptomatic AF according to sex and race despite adjustment for available data on demographic characteristics and medical comorbidities. PMID:26396201

  13. Initial Steps Toward a Hydrologic "Watershed" Model for the Ablation Zone of the Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, M. G.; Smith, L. C.; Rennermalm, A. K.; Pitcher, L. H.; Overstreet, B. T.; Chu, V. W.; Ryan, J.; Yang, K.

    2015-12-01

    Surface meltwater production on the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) is a well-documented phenomenon but we lack understanding of the physical mechanisms that control the production, transport, and fate of the meltwater. To address this, we present initial steps toward the development of a novel hydrologic model for supraglacial streamflow on the GrIS. Ice ablation and surface meteorology were measured during a 6-day field campaign in a 112 km2 ablation zone of southwest Greenland. We modeled ablation using SnowModel, an energy balance snow- and ice-ablation model. The required model inputs included standard surface meteorology and a digital elevation model (DEM), and the model outputs include all components of the energy balance and surface meltwater production for each grid cell in the ice-sheet watershed. Our next steps toward developing a complete hydrologic model for supraglacial streamflow in the ablation zone of the GrIS include the application of the meltwater-routing model HydroFlow to compare with in-situ measurements of supraglacial river discharge.

  14. Catheter Ablation of Arrhythmias Exclusively Using Electroanatomic Mapping: A Series of Cases

    PubMed Central

    Pires, Leonardo Martins; Leiria, Tiago Luiz Luz; Kruse, Marcelo Lapa; Ronsoni, Rafael; Gensas, Caroline Saltz; de Lima, Gustavo Glotz

    2013-01-01

    Background Catheter ablation is a treatment that can cure various cardiac arrhythmias. Fluoroscopy is used to locate and direct catheters to areas that cause arrhythmias. However, fluoroscopy has several risks. Electroanatomic mapping (EAM) facilitates three-dimensional imaging without X-rays, which reduces risks associated with fluoroscopy. Objective We describe a series of patient cases wherein cardiac arrhythmia ablation was exclusively performed using EAM. Methods Patients who presented with cardiac arrhythmias that were unresponsive to pharmacological therapy were prospectively selected between March 2011 and March 2012 for arrhythmia ablation exclusively through EAM. Patients with indications for a diagnostic electrophysiology study and ablation of atrial fibrillation, left atrial tachyarrhythmias as well as hemodynamically unstable ventricular arrhythmia were excluded. We documented the procedure time, success rate and complications as well as whether fluoroscopy was necessary during the procedure. Results In total, 11 patients were enrolled in the study, including seven female patients (63%). The mean age of the patients was 50 years (SD ±16.5). Indications for the investigated procedures included four cases (35%) of atrial flutter, three cases (27%) of pre-excitation syndrome, two cases (19%) of paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia and two cases (19%) of ventricular extrasystoles. The mean procedure duration was 86.6 min (SD ± 26 min). Immediate success (at discharge) of the procedure was evident for nine patients (81%). There were no complications during the procedures. Conclusion This study demonstrates the feasibility of performing an arrhythmia ablation exclusively using EAM with satisfactory results. PMID:23877742

  15. Preparation of carbon-coated iron nanofluid and its application in radiofrequency ablation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qiguang; Zhang, Haiyan; Chen, Minshan; Zhang, Yaojun; Huang, Junting; Xu, Zuowen; Wang, Wenguang

    2015-05-01

    Carbon-coated iron nanoparticles (Fe@C CCINs) were synthesized by carbon arc discharge method and were studied via X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results showed that CCINs have good core-shell structure and are in size of 40-50 nm. Also, carbon-coated iron nanofluid (CCINs-nanofluid) was prepared via two-step method by dispersing as-prepared CCINs and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) into physiological saline. Its dispersion stability and thermal conductivity were detected by gravity sedimentation method and Hotdisk thermal constant analyzer respectively. The results indicated that CCINs-nanofluid possesses good dispersity and stability. Moreover, CCINs-nanofluid showed enhanced thermal conductivity compared with its base fluid physiological saline. The enhancement of thermal conductivity even reaches 41%. Additionally, CCINs-nanofluid injection aided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) was carried out. The relation between tissue temperature and ablation time revealed that by injecting CCINs-nanofluid into pork livers during RFA, target tissue temperatures were less than 100°C. Dissected pork livers showed that there was little or no tissue charring around the ablation probe. Results of ablation area calculation showed that the ablation area of CCINs-nanofluid injection aided RFA was 67% larger than that of saline injection aided RFA, indicating that a larger-volume tumor tissue necrosis at a single session can be achieved by CCINs-nanofluid injection aided RFA. PMID:25171467

  16. Carburetor fuel discharge assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Yost, R.M.

    1993-06-29

    An improved carburetor for use on an internal combustion engine is described, the carburetor having an airflow passage and fuel discharge means for admitting fuel into the airflow passage for mixing the fuel with air flowing in the airflow passage to form a fuel/air mixture to be supplied to the combustion chamber(s) of the engine, the fuel discharge means including a fuel discharge assembly which comprises a hollow discharge tube and fuel supplying means connected to the discharge tube for admitting fuel into the interior of the discharge tube, wherein the discharge tube has a longitudinal internal bore in fluid communication with the fuel supplying means, wherein the internal bore extends between an inlet that is closest to the fuel supplying means and an outlet that is furthest from the fuel supplying means with the outlet of the bore being located within the airflow passage of the carburetor to supply fuel into this passage after the fuel passes from the fuel supplying means through the internal bore of the discharge tube, wherein the improvement relates to the fuel discharge assembly and comprises: a hollow fuel flow guide tube telescopically received inside the internal bore of the discharge tube, wherein the fuel flow guide tube extends from approximately the location of the inlet of the bore up at least a portion of the length of the bore towards the outlet of the bore to conduct fuel from the fuel supplying means into the bore of the discharge tube.

  17. Towards new applications using capillary waveguides

    PubMed Central

    Stasio, Nicolino; Shibukawa, Atsushi; Papadopoulos, Ioannis N.; Farahi, Salma; Simandoux, Olivier; Huignard, Jean-Pierre; Bossy, Emmanuel; Moser, Christophe; Psaltis, Demetri

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate the enhancement of the sensing capabilities of glass capillaries. We exploit their properties as optical and acoustic waveguides to transform them potentially into high resolution minimally invasive endoscopic devices. We show two possible applications of silica capillary waveguides demonstrating fluorescence and optical-resolution photoacoustic imaging using a single 330 μm-thick silica capillary. A nanosecond pulsed laser is focused and scanned in front of a capillary by digital phase conjugation through the silica annular ring of the capillary, used as an optical waveguide. We demonstrate optical-resolution photoacoustic images of a 30 μm-thick nylon thread using the water-filled core of the same capillary as an acoustic waveguide, resulting in a fully passive endoscopic device. Moreover, fluorescence images of 1.5 μm beads are obtained collecting the fluorescence signal through the optical waveguide. This kind of silica-capillary waveguide together with wavefront shaping techniques such as digital phase conjugation, paves the way to minimally invasive multi-modal endoscopy. PMID:26713182

  18. Analysis of iodinated contrast delivered during thermal ablation: is material trapped in the ablation zone?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Po-hung; Brace, Chris L.

    2016-08-01

    Intra-procedural contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) has been proposed to evaluate treatment efficacy of thermal ablation. We hypothesized that contrast material delivered concurrently with thermal ablation may become trapped in the ablation zone, and set out to determine whether such an effect would impact ablation visualization. CECT images were acquired during microwave ablation in normal porcine liver with: (A) normal blood perfusion and no iodinated contrast, (B) normal perfusion and iodinated contrast infusion or (C) no blood perfusion and residual iodinated contrast. Changes in CT attenuation were analyzed from before, during and after ablation to evaluate whether contrast was trapped inside of the ablation zone. Visualization was compared between groups using post-ablation contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Attenuation gradients were calculated at the ablation boundary and background to quantitate ablation conspicuity. In Group A, attenuation decreased during ablation due to thermal expansion of tissue water and water vaporization. The ablation zone was difficult to visualize (CNR  =  1.57  ±  0.73, boundary gradient  =  0.7  ±  0.4 HU mm‑1), leading to ablation diameter underestimation compared to gross pathology. Group B ablations saw attenuation increase, suggesting that iodine was trapped inside the ablation zone. However, because the normally perfused liver increased even more, Group B ablations were more visible than Group A (CNR  =  2.04  ±  0.84, boundary gradient  =  6.3  ±  1.1 HU mm‑1) and allowed accurate estimation of the ablation zone dimensions compared to gross pathology. Substantial water vaporization led to substantial attenuation changes in Group C, though the ablation zone boundary was not highly visible (boundary gradient  =  3.9  ±  1.1 HU mm‑1). Our results demonstrate that despite iodinated contrast being trapped in the ablation zone, ablation visibility

  19. Analysis of iodinated contrast delivered during thermal ablation: is material trapped in the ablation zone?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Po-hung; Brace, Chris L.

    2016-08-01

    Intra-procedural contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) has been proposed to evaluate treatment efficacy of thermal ablation. We hypothesized that contrast material delivered concurrently with thermal ablation may become trapped in the ablation zone, and set out to determine whether such an effect would impact ablation visualization. CECT images were acquired during microwave ablation in normal porcine liver with: (A) normal blood perfusion and no iodinated contrast, (B) normal perfusion and iodinated contrast infusion or (C) no blood perfusion and residual iodinated contrast. Changes in CT attenuation were analyzed from before, during and after ablation to evaluate whether contrast was trapped inside of the ablation zone. Visualization was compared between groups using post-ablation contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Attenuation gradients were calculated at the ablation boundary and background to quantitate ablation conspicuity. In Group A, attenuation decreased during ablation due to thermal expansion of tissue water and water vaporization. The ablation zone was difficult to visualize (CNR  =  1.57  ±  0.73, boundary gradient  =  0.7  ±  0.4 HU mm-1), leading to ablation diameter underestimation compared to gross pathology. Group B ablations saw attenuation increase, suggesting that iodine was trapped inside the ablation zone. However, because the normally perfused liver increased even more, Group B ablations were more visible than Group A (CNR  =  2.04  ±  0.84, boundary gradient  =  6.3  ±  1.1 HU mm-1) and allowed accurate estimation of the ablation zone dimensions compared to gross pathology. Substantial water vaporization led to substantial attenuation changes in Group C, though the ablation zone boundary was not highly visible (boundary gradient  =  3.9  ±  1.1 HU mm-1). Our results demonstrate that despite iodinated contrast being trapped in the ablation zone, ablation visibility was

  20. Further developments of capillary absorption spectrometers using small hollow-waveguide fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, James F.; Sams, Robert L.; Blake, Thomas A.; Kriesel, Jason M.

    2014-05-01

    Our objective is to enhance quantification of stable carbon and oxygen isotope ratios to better than 1‰ relative isotope precision for sample sizes < 1 pico-mole. A newer variant Capillary Absorption Spectrometer (CAS) is described using a proprietary linear-taper hollow waveguide in conjunction with wavelength and frequency modulation techniques of tunable laser absorption spectrometry. Previous work used circular capillaries with uniform 1 mm ID to measure 13C/12C ratios with ≥ 20 pico-mole samples to ≤ 10 ppm (1‰ precision against standards) [1]. While performing fairly well, it generated residual modal noise due to multipath propagation in the hollow-waveguides (HWGs). This system has been utilized with laser ablation-catalytic combustion techniques to analyze small resolution (~ 25 μm spot diameter) laser ablation events on solids. Using smaller ID capillary waveguides could improve detection limits and spatial resolutions. Reducing an IR compatible hollow waveguide’s inner diameter (ID) to < 300 μm, reduces modal noise significantly for mid-IR operation, but feedback noise with high gain semiconductor lasers can become problematic. A proprietary linear-taper small waveguide (mean ID = 0.35 mm, L = 1 m) was tested to understand whether modal noise and optical feedback effects could be simultaneously reduced. We see better mode filtering and, significant reductions of feedback noise under favorable coupling of a multi-spatial mode QC laser to the smaller ID of the linear-tapered HWG. We demonstrate that better modal coupling operation is consistent with Liouville’s theorem, where greater suppression of feedback from spurious scatter within the HWG occurs by injecting the laser into the smaller ID port. Our progress on developing lighter weight, potentially fieldable alternatives to Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometers (IRMS) with a small volume (≤ 0.1 cm3) CAS system will be discussed and compared to other competitive systems.

  1. Micromechanism linear actuator with capillary force sealing

    DOEpatents

    Sniegowski, Jeffry J.

    1997-01-01

    A class of micromachine linear actuators whose function is based on gas driven pistons in which capillary forces are used to seal the gas behind the piston. The capillary forces also increase the amount of force transmitted from the gas pressure to the piston. In a major subclass of such devices, the gas bubble is produced by thermal vaporization of a working fluid. Because of their dependence on capillary forces for sealing, such devices are only practical on the sub-mm size scale, but in that regime they produce very large force times distance (total work) values.

  2. "Getting the best sensitivity from on-capillary fluorescence detection in capillary electrophoresis" - A tutorial.

    PubMed

    Galievsky, Victor A; Stasheuski, Alexander S; Krylov, Sergey N

    2016-09-01

    Capillary electrophoresis with Laser-Induced Fluorescence (CE-LIF) detection is being applied to new analytical problems which challenge both the power of CE separation and the sensitivity of LIF detection. On-capillary LIF detection is much more practical than post-capillary detection in a sheath-flow cell. Therefore, commercial CE instruments utilize solely on-capillary CE-LIF detection with a Limit of Detection (LOD) in the nM range, while there are multiple applications of CE-LIF that require pM or lower LODs. This tutorial analyzes all aspects of on-capillary LIF detection in CE in an attempt to identify means for improving LOD of CE-LIF with on-capillary detection. We consider principles of signal enhancement and noise reduction, as well as relevant areas of fluorophore photochemistry and fluorescent microscopy. PMID:27543015

  3. Signal enhancement in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy using fast square-pulse discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobral, H.; Robledo-Martinez, A.

    2016-10-01

    A fast, high voltage square-shaped electrical pulse initiated by laser ablation was investigated as a means to enhance the analytical capabilities of laser Induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The electrical pulse is generated by the discharge of a charged coaxial cable into a matching impedance. The pulse duration and the stored charge are determined by the length of the cable. The ablation plasma was produced by hitting an aluminum target with a nanosecond 532-nm Nd:YAG laser beam under variable fluence 1.8-900 J cm- 2. An enhancement of up to one order of magnitude on the emission signal-to-noise ratio can be achieved with the spark discharge assisted laser ablation. Besides, this increment is larger for ionized species than for neutrals. LIBS signal is also increased with the discharge voltage with a tendency to saturate for high laser fluences. Electron density and temperature evolutions were determined from time delays of 100 ns after laser ablation plasma onset. Results suggest that the spark discharge mainly re-excites the laser produced plume.

  4. Angioplasty and stent placement - peripheral arteries - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty - peripheral artery - discharge; PTA - peripheral artery - discharge; Angioplasty - peripheral artery - discharge; Balloon angioplasty - peripheral artery- discharge; PAD - PTA discharge; PVD - ...

  5. Possible role for cryoballoon ablation of right atrial appendage tachycardia when conventional ablation fails.

    PubMed

    Amasyali, Basri; Kilic, Ayhan

    2015-06-01

    Focal atrial tachycardia arising from the right atrial appendage usually responds well to radiofrequency ablation; however, successful ablation in this anatomic region can be challenging. Surgical excision of the right atrial appendage has sometimes been necessary to eliminate the tachycardia and prevent or reverse the resultant cardiomyopathy. We report the case of a 48-year-old man who had right atrial appendage tachycardia resistant to multiple attempts at ablation with use of conventional radiofrequency energy guided by means of a 3-dimensional mapping system. The condition led to cardiomyopathy in 3 months. The arrhythmia was successfully ablated with use of a 28-mm cryoballoon catheter that had originally been developed for catheter ablation of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. To our knowledge, this is the first report of cryoballoon ablation without isolation of the right atrial appendage. It might also be an alternative to epicardial ablation or surgery when refractory atrial tachycardia originates from the right atrial appendage.

  6. Testing and evaluation of light ablation decontamination

    SciTech Connect

    Demmer, R.L.; Ferguson, R.L.

    1994-10-01

    This report details the testing and evaluation of light ablation decontamination. It details WINCO contracted research and application of light ablation efforts by Ames Laboratory. Tests were conducted with SIMCON (simulated contamination) coupons and REALCON (actual radioactive metal coupons) under controlled conditions to compare cleaning effectiveness, speed and application to plant process type equipment.

  7. Multistaged stokes injected Raman capillary waveguide amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Kurnit, Norman A.

    1980-01-01

    A multistaged Stokes injected Raman capillary waveguide amplifier for providing a high gain Stokes output signal. The amplifier uses a plurality of optically coupled capillary waveguide amplifiers and one or more regenerative amplifiers to increase Stokes gain to a level sufficient for power amplification. Power amplification is provided by a multifocused Raman gain cell or a large diameter capillary waveguide. An external source of CO.sub.2 laser radiation can be injected into each of the capillary waveguide amplifier stages to increase Raman gain. Devices for injecting external sources of CO.sub.2 radiation include: dichroic mirrors, prisms, gratings and Ge Brewster plates. Alternatively, the CO.sub.2 input radiation to the first stage can be coupled and amplified between successive stages.

  8. Capillary electrochromatography using fibers as stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Jinno, K; Watanabe, H; Saito, Y; Takeichi, T

    2001-10-01

    Fiber-packed capillary columns have been evaluated in chromatographic performance in capillary electrochromatography (CEC). The change of electroosmotic flow (EOF) velocity and selectivity using different kinds of fiber materials was examined. Although the EOF velocity among the different fiber packed columns was almost the same, retention of parabens was larger on the Kevlar-packed column than on the Zylon-packed one, and was larger on the as-span-type fiber-packed column than on the high-modulus-type packed one. Using 200 microm ID x 5 cm Kevlar packed column combined with a 100 microm ID x 20 cm precolumn capillary and a 530 microm ID x 45 cm postcolumn capillary, the separation of three parabens within 30 s was achieved. Other compounds were also separated in a few minutes by the fiber-packed CEC method.

  9. Capillary electrochromatography using fibers as stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Jinno, K; Watanabe, H; Saito, Y; Takeichi, T

    2001-10-01

    Fiber-packed capillary columns have been evaluated in chromatographic performance in capillary electrochromatography (CEC). The change of electroosmotic flow (EOF) velocity and selectivity using different kinds of fiber materials was examined. Although the EOF velocity among the different fiber packed columns was almost the same, retention of parabens was larger on the Kevlar-packed column than on the Zylon-packed one, and was larger on the as-span-type fiber-packed column than on the high-modulus-type packed one. Using 200 microm ID x 5 cm Kevlar packed column combined with a 100 microm ID x 20 cm precolumn capillary and a 530 microm ID x 45 cm postcolumn capillary, the separation of three parabens within 30 s was achieved. Other compounds were also separated in a few minutes by the fiber-packed CEC method. PMID:11669512

  10. CAPILLARY ELECTROPHORETIC BEHAVIOR OF SEVEN SULFONYLUREAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The electrophoretic behavior of bensulfuron Me, sulfometuron Me, nicosulfuron (Accent), chlorimuron Et, thifensulfuron Me (Harmony), metsulfuron Me, and chlorsulfuron was studied under capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) and micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) conditio...

  11. Capillary Flow Resistors: Local and Global Resistors.

    PubMed

    Berthier, Jean; Gosselin, David; Pham, Andrew; Delapierre, Guillaume; Belgacem, Naceur; Chaussy, Didier

    2016-01-26

    The use of capillary systems in space and biotechnology applications requires the regulation of the capillary flow velocity. It has been observed that constricted sections act as flow resistors. In this work, we also show that enlarged sections temporarily reduce the velocity of the flow. In this work, the theory of the dynamics of capillary flows passing through a constricted or an enlarged channel section is presented. It is demonstrated that the physics of a capillary flow in a channel with a constriction or an enlargement is different and that a constriction acts as a global flow resistor and an enlargement as a local flow resistor. The theoretical results are checked against experimental approaches. PMID:26704147

  12. Capillary Optics generate stronger X-rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    NASA scientist, in the Space Sciences lab at Marshall, works with capillary optics that generate more intense X-rays than conventional sources. This capability is useful in studying the structure of important proteins.

  13. Characterising Microstructured Materials Using a Capillary Rheometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, Christopher I.; See, Howard; Arabo, Emad Y. M.

    2008-07-01

    A parallel plate and capillary rheometer have been used to rheologically characterize an Australian hard wheat flour-water dough over an extensive range of shear rates (10-3-104 s-1). Torsional measurements showed that the shear viscosity of dough increased with strain to a maximum value then decreased, suggesting a breakdown of the dough structure. This was consistent with other published data on doughs. Capillary experiments revealed the shear thinning behavior of dough, which was described by a power-law model. The wall slip behavior of dough was examined, revealing a critical shear stress at which slip occurs for a 1 mm diameter capillary. The capillary data was best linked to the torsional data at low strain values (˜0.1) as expected given the nature of sampling in the two rheometers.

  14. ISS Update: Capillary Flow Experiments-2

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Kelly Humphries interviews Dr. Mark Weislogel, Principal Investigator for the Capillary Flow Experiments-2 (CFE), from the Portland State University in Oregon. The CFE i...

  15. RF Liquid Measurement Of Capillary Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poudyal, Bashudev; Mazzeo, Brian; Warnick, Karl

    2009-10-01

    Electromagnetic measurements of capillary tubes containing liquids can reveal solution properties for industrial, biological, and chemical processes. An analytical model was created for a perpendicular arrangement of SMA cables and a capillary tube. Numerical simulations in Ansoft High Frequency Structural Simulator were performed on the simple arrangement. The transmission parameters of the capillary tube were simulated between two lumped ports over a frequency range from 1 GHz to 20 GHz. Sensitivity of the transmission parameters to solution conditions were calculated for DI water and other variations of conductivity and permittivity. Experiments were performed on a capillary tube in a perpendicular arrangement using an HP 8720B Network Analyzer. The transmission parameters were measured and the resulting data was compared with the simulations. This measurement method can be adapted to different tube and solution conditions.

  16. Time- and spatially resolved emission spectroscopy of the dielectric barrier discharge for soft ionization sustained by a quasi-sinusoidal high voltage.

    PubMed

    Horvatic, Vlasta; Michels, Antje; Ahlmann, Norman; Jestel, Günter; Veza, Damir; Vadla, Cedomil; Franzke, Joachim

    2015-09-01

    A helium capillary dielectric barrier discharge was investigated by means of time-resolved optical emission spectroscopy with the aim of elucidating the process of the formation of the plasma jet. The helium emission line at 706 nm was utilized to monitor spatial and temporal propagation of the excitation of helium atoms. The discharge was sustained with quasi-sinusoidal high voltage, and the temporal evolution of the helium atomic emission was measured simultaneously with the discharge current. The spatial development of the plasma was investigated along the discharge axis in the whole region, which covers the positions in the capillary between the electrodes as well as the plasma jet outside the capillary. The high voltage electrode was placed 2 mm from the capillary orifice, and the distance between the ground and high voltage electrode was 10 mm. The complete spatiotemporal grid of the development of the helium excitation has shown that during the positive half-period of the applied voltage, two independent plasmas, separated in time, are formed. First, the early plasma that constitutes the plasma jet is formed, while the discharge in the capillary follows subsequently. In the early plasma, the helium atom excitation propagation starts in the vicinity of the high voltage electrode and departs from the capillary towards the ground electrode as well as several millimeters outside of the capillary in the form of the plasma jet. After relatively slow propagation of the early plasma in the capillary and the jet, the second plasma starts between the electrodes. During the negative voltage period, only the plasma in the capillary between the electrodes occurs. PMID:26077750

  17. Capillary Movement in Substrates in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bula, R. J.; Duffie, N. A.

    1996-01-01

    A more complete understanding of the dynamics of capillary flow through an unsaturated porous medium would be useful for a number of space and terrestrial applications. Knowledge of capillary migration of liquids in granular beds in microgravity would significantly enhance the development and understanding of how a matrix based nutrient delivery system for the growth of plants would function in a microgravity environment. Thus, such information is of interest from the theoretical as well as practical point of view.

  18. Thin film capillary process and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Conrad M.

    2003-11-18

    Method and system of forming microfluidic capillaries in a variety of substrate materials. A first layer of a material such as silicon dioxide is applied to a channel etched in substrate. A second, sacrificial layer of a material such as a polymer is deposited on the first layer. A third layer which may be of the same material as the first layer is placed on the second layer. The sacrificial layer is removed to form a smooth walled capillary in the substrate.

  19. Unusual intraosseous capillary hemangioma of the mandible

    PubMed Central

    Dereci, Omur; Acikalin, Mustafa Fuat; Ay, Sinan

    2015-01-01

    Intraosseous hemangioma is a benign vascular neoplasm, which is mostly seen in vertebrae, maxillofacial bones, and long bones. Intraosseous hemangioma is rarely seen on jaw bones compared to other skeletal bones and usually occurs in the cavernous form. Capillary intraosseous hemangioma of jaws is an uncommon form of intraosseous hemangioma and has not been thoroughly described so far. In this study, a case of capillary intraosseous hemangioma of the mandible was presented with relevant literature review. PMID:26430377

  20. Lung Cancer Ablation: Technologies and Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Erica S.; Dupuy, Damian E.

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of lung cancers in 2012 is estimated to reach 226,160 new cases, with only a third of patients suitable surgical candidates. Tumor ablation has emerged as an important and efficacious treatment option for nonsurgical lung cancer patients. This localized minimally invasive therapy is best suited for small oligonodular lesions or favorably located metastatic tumors. Radiofrequency ablation has been in use for over a decade, and newer modalities including microwave ablation, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation have emerged as additional treatment options for patients. Ablation therapies can offer patients and clinicians a repeatable and effective therapy for palliation and, in some cases, cure of thoracic malignancies. This article discusses the available technologies and techniques available for tumor ablation of thoracic malignancies including patient selection, basic aspects of procedure technique, imaging follow-up, treatment outcomes, and comparisons between various therapies. PMID:24436530

  1. Capillary fracture of soft gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostwick, Joshua B.; Daniels, Karen E.

    2013-10-01

    A liquid droplet resting on a soft gel substrate can deform that substrate to the point of material failure, whereby fractures develop on the gel surface that propagate outwards from the contact line in a starburst pattern. In this paper, we characterize (i) the initiation process, in which the number of arms in the starburst is controlled by the ratio of the surface tension contrast to the gel's elastic modulus, and (ii) the propagation dynamics showing that once fractures are initiated they propagate with a universal power law L∝t3/4. We develop a model for crack initiation by treating the gel as a linear elastic solid and computing the deformations within the substrate from the liquid-solid wetting forces. The elastic solution shows that both the location and the magnitude of the wetting forces are critical in providing a quantitative prediction for the number of fractures and, hence, an interpretation of the initiation of capillary fractures. This solution also reveals that the depth of the gel is an important factor in the fracture process, as it can help mitigate large surface tractions; this finding is confirmed with experiments. We then develop a model for crack propagation by considering the transport of an inviscid fluid into the fracture tip of an incompressible material and find that a simple energy-conservation argument can explain the observed material-independent power law. We compare predictions for both linear elastic and neo-Hookean solids, finding that the latter better explains the observed exponent.

  2. OCT methods for capillary velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Vivek J; Radhakrishnan, Harsha; Lo, Eng H; Mandeville, Emiri T; Jiang, James Y; Barry, Scott; Cable, Alex E

    2012-03-01

    TO DATE, TWO MAIN CATEGORIES OF OCT TECHNIQUES HAVE BEEN DESCRIBED FOR IMAGING HEMODYNAMICS: Doppler OCT and OCT angiography. Doppler OCT can measure axial velocity profiles and flow in arteries and veins, while OCT angiography can determine vascular morphology, tone, and presence or absence of red blood cell (RBC) perfusion. However, neither method can quantify RBC velocity in capillaries, where RBC flow is typically transverse to the probe beam and single-file. Here, we describe new methods that potentially address these limitations. Firstly, we describe a complex-valued OCT signal in terms of a static scattering component, dynamic scattering component, and noise. Secondly, we propose that the time scale of random fluctuations in the dynamic scattering component are related to red blood cell velocity. Analysis was performed along the slow axis of repeated B-scans to parallelize measurements. We correlate our purported velocity measurements against two-photon microscopy measurements of RBC velocity, and investigate changes during hypercapnia. Finally, we image the ischemic stroke penumbra during distal middle cerebral artery occlusion (dMCAO), where OCT velocimetry methods provide additional insight that is not afforded by either Doppler OCT or OCT angiography.

  3. Nonlinear waves in capillary electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Ghosal, Sandip; Chen, Zhen

    2011-01-01

    Electrophoretic separation of a mixture of chemical species is a fundamental technique of great usefulness in biology, health care and forensics. In capillary electrophoresis the sample migrates in a microcapillary in the presence of a background electrolyte. When the ionic concentration of the sample is sufficiently high, the signal is known to exhibit features reminiscent of nonlinear waves including sharp concentration ‘shocks’. In this paper we consider a simplified model consisting of a single sample ion and a background electrolyte consisting of a single co-ion and a counterion in the absence of any processes that might change the ionization states of the constituents. If the ionic diffusivities are assumed to be the same for all constituents the concentration of sample ion is shown to obey a one dimensional advection diffusion equation with a concentration dependent advection velocity. If the analyte concentration is sufficiently low in a suitable non-dimensional sense, Burgers’ equation is recovered, and thus, the time dependent problem is exactly solvable with arbitrary initial conditions. In the case of small diffusivity either a leading edge or trailing edge shock is formed depending on the electrophoretic mobility of the sample ion relative to the background ions. Analytical formulas are presented for the shape, width and migration velocity of the sample peak and it is shown that axial dispersion at long times may be characterized by an effective diffusivity that is exactly calculated. These results are consistent with known observations from physical and numerical simulation experiments. PMID:20238181

  4. Pelvic radiation - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Radiation of the pelvis - discharge; Cancer treatment - pelvic radiation; Prostate cancer - pelvic radiation; Ovarian cancer - pelvic radiation; Cervical cancer - pelvic radiation; Uterine cancer - pelvic radiation; Rectal cancer - ...

  5. Ablative shielding for hypervelocity projectiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rucker, Michelle A. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A hypervelocity projectile shield which includes a hollow semi-flexible housing fabricated from a plastic like, or otherwise transparent membrane which is filled with a fluid (gas or liquid) is presented. The housing has a inlet valve, similar to that on a tire or basketball, to introduce an ablating fluid into the housing. The housing is attached by a Velcro mount or double-sided adhesive tape to the outside surface of a structure to be protected. The housings are arrayed in a side-by-side relationship for complete coverage of the surface to be protected. In use, when a hypervelocity projectile penetrates the outer wall of a housing it is broken up and then the projectile is ablated as it travels through the fluid, much like a meteorite 'burns up' as it enters the earth's atmosphere, and the housing is deflated. The deflated housing can be easily spotted for replacement, even from a distance. Replacement is then accomplished by simply pulling a deflated housing off the structure and installing a new housing.

  6. Stellar Ablation of Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Thomas E.; Horwitz, J. L.

    2007-01-01

    We review observations and theories of the solar ablation of planetary atmospheres, focusing on the terrestrial case where a large magnetosphere holds off the solar wind, so that there is little direct atmospheric impact, but also couples the solar wind electromagnetically to the auroral zones. We consider the photothermal escape flows known as the polar wind or refilling flows, the enhanced mass flux escape flows that result from localized solar wind energy dissipation in the auroral zones, and the resultant enhanced neutral atom escape flows. We term these latter two escape flows the "auroral wind." We review observations and theories of the heating and acceleration of auroral winds, including energy inputs from precipitating particles, electromagnetic energy flux at magnetohydrodynamic and plasma wave frequencies, and acceleration by parallel electric fields and by convection pickup processes also known as "centrifugal acceleration." We consider also the global circulation of ionospheric plasmas within the magnetosphere, their participation in magnetospheric disturbances as absorbers of momentum and energy, and their ultimate loss from the magnetosphere into the downstream solar wind, loading reconnection processes that occur at high altitudes near the magnetospheric boundaries. We consider the role of planetary magnetization and the accumulating evidence of stellar ablation of extrasolar planetary atmospheres. Finally, we suggest and discuss future needs for both the theory and observation of the planetary ionospheres and their role in solar wind interactions, to achieve the generality required for a predictive science of the coupling of stellar and planetary atmospheres over the full range of possible conditions.

  7. Multiple capillary biochemical analyzer with barrier member

    DOEpatents

    Dovichi, Norman J.; Zhang, Jian Z.

    1996-01-01

    A multiple capillary biochemical analyzer for sequencing DNA and performing other analyses, in which a set of capillaries extends from wells in a microtiter plate into a cuvette. In the cuvette the capillaries are held on fixed closely spaced centers by passing through a sandwich construction having a pair of metal shims which squeeze between them a rubber gasket, forming a leak proof seal for an interior chamber in which the capillary ends are positioned. Sheath fluid enters the chamber and entrains filament sample streams from the capillaries. The filament sample streams, and sheath fluid, flow through aligned holes in a barrier member spaced close to the capillary ends, into a collection chamber having a lower glass window. The filament streams are illuminated above the barrier member by a laser, causing them to fluoresce. The fluorescence is viewed end-on by a CCD camera chip located below the glass window. The arrangement ensures an equal optical path length from all fluorescing spots to the CCD chip and also blocks scattered fluorescence illumination, providing more uniform results and an improved signal to noise ratio.

  8. Capillary pressure experiments under simulated reservoir conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kummerow, J.; Spangenberg, E.

    2012-04-01

    The contribution of residual trapping to a long-term storage of CO2 in saline aquifers mainly depends on the drainage capillary pressure of a reservoir and the hysteresis of the drainage and imbibition branches of the capillary pressure curve. However, the experimental database of capillary pressure measured at relevant pT conditions is still scarce. Here, we present an experimental set-up, which allows for the performance of capillary pressure experiments with a semi-permeable disk (porous plate) at simulated reservoir conditions. In the framework of the EU funded project CO2CARE, drainage and imbibition cycles are performed on Triassic sandstone samples. We use a temperature controlled oil pressure autoclave to apply a maximum confining pressure of 400 bar and a maximum working temperature of 150°C. The fluid displacement, and hence the sample saturation is controlled by a gear pump with a fine resolution of 0.01 ml. Additionally, the capillary pressure experiment is combined with measurements of elastic wave velocities as well as of the electrical resistivity. In this case, P and S wave velocities and the formation resistivity factor are determined as functions of the brine/ CO2 saturation. The experiment provides information about the efficiency of the capillary trapping of the sample and a calibration of the petrophysical properties on saturation.

  9. Multiple capillary biochemical analyzer with barrier member

    DOEpatents

    Dovichi, N.J.; Zhang, J.Z.

    1996-10-22

    A multiple capillary biochemical analyzer is disclosed for sequencing DNA and performing other analyses, in which a set of capillaries extends from wells in a microtiter plate into a cuvette. In the cuvette the capillaries are held on fixed closely spaced centers by passing through a sandwich construction having a pair of metal shims which squeeze between them a rubber gasket, forming a leak proof seal for an interior chamber in which the capillary ends are positioned. Sheath fluid enters the chamber and entrains filament sample streams from the capillaries. The filament sample streams, and sheath fluid, flow through aligned holes in a barrier member spaced close to the capillary ends, into a collection chamber having a lower glass window. The filament streams are illuminated above the barrier member by a laser, causing them to fluoresce. The fluorescence is viewed end-on by a CCD camera chip located below the glass window. The arrangement ensures an equal optical path length from all fluorescing spots to the CCD chip and also blocks scattered fluorescence illumination, providing more uniform results and an improved signal-to-noise ratio. 12 figs.

  10. Cell adhesion during bullet motion in capillaries.

    PubMed

    Takeishi, Naoki; Imai, Yohsuke; Ishida, Shunichi; Omori, Toshihiro; Kamm, Roger D; Ishikawa, Takuji

    2016-08-01

    A numerical analysis is presented of cell adhesion in capillaries whose diameter is comparable to or smaller than that of the cell. In contrast to a large number of previous efforts on leukocyte and tumor cell rolling, much is still unknown about cell motion in capillaries. The solid and fluid mechanics of a cell in flow was coupled with a slip bond model of ligand-receptor interactions. When the size of a capillary was reduced, the cell always transitioned to "bullet-like" motion, with a consequent decrease in the velocity of the cell. A state diagram was obtained for various values of capillary diameter and receptor density. We found that bullet motion enables firm adhesion of a cell to the capillary wall even for a weak ligand-receptor binding. We also quantified effects of various parameters, including the dissociation rate constant, the spring constant, and the reactive compliance on the characteristics of cell motion. Our results suggest that even under the interaction between P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) and P-selectin, which is mainly responsible for leukocyte rolling, a cell is able to show firm adhesion in a small capillary. These findings may help in understanding such phenomena as leukocyte plugging and cancer metastasis.

  11. Cell adhesion during bullet motion in capillaries.

    PubMed

    Takeishi, Naoki; Imai, Yohsuke; Ishida, Shunichi; Omori, Toshihiro; Kamm, Roger D; Ishikawa, Takuji

    2016-08-01

    A numerical analysis is presented of cell adhesion in capillaries whose diameter is comparable to or smaller than that of the cell. In contrast to a large number of previous efforts on leukocyte and tumor cell rolling, much is still unknown about cell motion in capillaries. The solid and fluid mechanics of a cell in flow was coupled with a slip bond model of ligand-receptor interactions. When the size of a capillary was reduced, the cell always transitioned to "bullet-like" motion, with a consequent decrease in the velocity of the cell. A state diagram was obtained for various values of capillary diameter and receptor density. We found that bullet motion enables firm adhesion of a cell to the capillary wall even for a weak ligand-receptor binding. We also quantified effects of various parameters, including the dissociation rate constant, the spring constant, and the reactive compliance on the characteristics of cell motion. Our results suggest that even under the interaction between P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) and P-selectin, which is mainly responsible for leukocyte rolling, a cell is able to show firm adhesion in a small capillary. These findings may help in understanding such phenomena as leukocyte plugging and cancer metastasis. PMID:27261363

  12. Radiofrequency catheter septal ablation for hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy in children

    PubMed Central

    Emmel, M.; Sreeram, N.

    2005-01-01

    Background The definitive therapeutic options for symptomatic obstructive cardiomyopathy in childhood are restricted. At present, extensive surgical myectomy is the only procedure that is of proven benefit. Patients and Methods Three patients, aged 5, 11 and 17 years, respectively, with progressive hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy and increasing symptoms were considered for radiofrequency catheter septal ablation. The peak Doppler gradient recorded on several occasions ranged between 50 to 90mmHg. Via a femoral arterial approach, the His bundle was initially plotted and marked using the LocaLisa navigation system. Subsequently, using a cooled tip catheter a series of lesions were placed in the hypertrophied septum, taking care to stay away from the His bundle. A total of 17, 50 and 45 lesions were applied in the three patients. In one case, the procedure was complicated by two episodes of ventricular fibrillation requiring DC cardioversion but without any neurological sequelae. Results The preablation peak-to-peak gradient between left ventricle and aorta was 50 mmHg, 60 mmHg and 60 mmHg, respectively, and remained unchanged immediately after the procedure. All patients were discharged from hospital 48 hours later. Serial measurement of serum troponin T and CK-MB isoenzyme confirmed significant myocardial necrosis. Follow-up echocardiography both at seven days and at six weeks postablation confirmed a beneficial haemodynamic result, with reduction of left ventricular outflow obstruction and relief of symptoms. Conclusion In young children, in whom alcohol-induced septal ablation is not an option, radiofrequency catheter ablation offers an alternative to surgery, with the benefits of repeatability and a lower risk of procedure-related permanent AV block. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:25696442

  13. Effect of novel modified bipolar radiofrequency ablation for preoperative atrial fibrillation combined with off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting surgery.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhaolei; Ma, Nan; Tang, Min; Liu, Hao; Ding, Fangbao; Yin, Hang; Mei, Ju

    2015-11-01

    We described a novel modified bipolar radiofrequency (RF) ablation for preoperative atrial fibrillation (AF) combined with off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (OPCABG) for patients with AF and coronary artery disease (CAD). The aim of this study was to assess the effect of this novel procedure and to determine whether it can eliminate AF for CAD patients. From January 2007 to June 2013, 45 patients (26 male patients) with AF (9 paroxysmal, 17 persistent, and 19 long-standing persistent) and CAD underwent the novel modified bipolar RF ablation combined with OPCABG in our department. After median sternotomy, the modified bipolar RF ablation and OPCABG were performed on beating heart without cardiopulmonary bypass. Pulmonary vein isolation and left atrium ablation were achieved using a bipolar RF champ. Mitral annular lesion and ganglionic plexus were ablated with a bipolar RF pen. The left atrial appendage was excluded using a surgical stapler. 24 h holter monitoring and echocardiography were performed at discharge and 3, 6, 12 months postoperatively as well as every year thereafter. The modified bipolar RF ablation and OPCABG were performed successfully in all patients. Mean AF ablation time was 33.6 ± 4.2 min, and mean OPCABG time was 87.6 ± 13.3 min. Mean postoperative hospital stay was 12.6 ± 5.5 days. The maintenance of sinus rhythm was 95.6 % (43/45) at discharge. There was no early death and permanent pacemaker implantation in perioperation. At a mean follow-up of 29.8 ± 10.2 months, 38 of 45 (84.4 %) patients were in sinus rhythm. Follow-up TTE at 6 months postoperatively showed that left atrial diameter was significantly reduced and left ventricular ejection fraction was significantly increased. The novel modified bipolar RF ablation procedure was safe, feasible and effective. It may be useful in selecting the best ablation approaches for patients with AF and CAD. PMID:24820449

  14. Design and Performance Estimates of an Ablative Gallium Electromagnetic Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Robert E.

    2012-01-01

    The present study details the high-power condensable propellant research being conducted at NASA Glenn Research Center. The gallium electromagnetic thruster is an ablative coaxial accelerator designed to operate at arc discharge currents in the range of 10-25 kA. The thruster is driven by a four-parallel line pulse forming network capable of producing a 250 microsec pulse with a 60 kA amplitude. A torsional-type thrust stand is used to measure the impulse of a coaxial GEM thruster. Tests are conducted in a vacuum chamber 1.5 m in diameter and 4.5 m long with a background pressure of 2 microtorr. Electromagnetic scaling calculations predict a thruster efficiency of 50% at a specific impulse of 2800 seconds.

  15. Dynamics of charge evolution in glass capillaries for 230-keV Xe23+ ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassimi, A.; Ikeda, T.; Maunoury, L.; Zhou, C. L.; Guillous, S.; Mery, A.; Lebius, H.; Benyagoub, A.; Grygiel, C.; Khemliche, H.; Roncin, P.; Merabet, H.; Tanis, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    We have measured the transmission of 230-keV (10-keV/q) Xe23+ ions through insulating tapered glass capillaries of microscopic dimensions. The dynamics of charging and discharging processes have been investigated, evidencing an unexpected slow alignment of the beam along the capillary axis. Oscillations of the exiting beam position have been observed during the charging process associated to the formation of charge patches on the capillary inner walls. The emerging ions are guided with a characteristic guiding angle falling on a universal curve proposed for PET polymer nanocapillaries. This result, very similar to the channeling process, is somewhat surprising in view of the significant differences between the straight nanocapillary polymer foils and the tapered microscopic single glass capillary used here. The transmitted ions show no evidence of energy loss or charge changing except for the production of a small neutral fraction that was determined to be due to ions that had become neutralized to form atoms rather than due to photon emission. These results thus test and confirm the validity of transmission and guiding and provide insight into the dynamics of higher-energy ions than have been previously studied in this regard, allowing a determination of the maximum energy for which the guiding process might occur.

  16. Plasma ionization source for atmospheric pressure mass spectrometry imaging using near-field optical laser ablation.

    PubMed

    Nudnova, Maryia M; Sigg, Jérôme; Wallimann, Pascal; Zenobi, Renato

    2015-01-20

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) at ambient pressures with submicrometer resolution is challenging, due to the very low amount of material available for mass spectrometric analysis. In this work, we present the development and characterization of a method for MSI based on pulsed laser ablation via a scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM) aperture tip. SNOM allows laser ablation of material from surfaces with submicrometer spatial resolution, which can be ionized for further chemical analysis with MS. Efficient ionization is realized here with a custom-built capillary plasma ionization source. We show the applicability of this setup for mass spectrometric analysis of three common MALDI matrices, α-4-hydroxycyanocinnamic acid, 3-aminobenzoic acid, and 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid. Although the ultimate goal has been to optimize sensitivity for detecting material ablated from submicrometer diameter craters, the effective lateral resolution is currently limited by the sensitivity of the MS detection system. In our case, the sensitivity of the MS was about 1 fmol, which allowed us to achieve a spatial resolution of 2 μm. We also characterize the analytical figures of merit of our method. In particular, we demonstrate good reproducibility, a repetition rate in the range of only a few seconds, and we determined the amount of substance required to achieve optimal resolution and sensitivity. Moreover, the sample topography is available from SNOM scans, a parameter that is missing in common MSI methods.

  17. Longitudinal discharge laser electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Warner, B.E.; Miller, J.L.; Ault, E.R.

    1994-08-23

    The improved longitudinal discharge laser electrode with IR baffle includes an electrode made up of washers spaced along the laser axis in order to form inter-washer spaces for hollow cathode discharge to take place and for IR radiation to be trapped. Additional IR baffles can be placed between the electrode ann the window. 2 figs.

  18. Longitudinal discharge laser electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Warner, Bruce E.; Miller, John L.; Ault, Earl R.

    1994-01-01

    The improved longitudinal discharge laser electrode with IR baffle includes an electrode made up of washers spaced along the laser axis in order to form inter-washer spaces for hollow cathode discharge to take place and for IR radiation to be trapped. Additional IR baffles can be placed between the electrode ann the window.

  19. Lithium battery discharge tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. J.

    1980-01-01

    The long term discharge of a variety of lithium cells was characterized and the susceptibility of the cells to chemical variation during the slow discharge was tested. A shunt resistor was set across the terminals to monitor the voltage as a function of time. Failures were identified by premature voltage drops.

  20. Hollow Electrode Discharge Triodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenbach, K. H.; Peterkin, F. E.; Tessnow, T.

    1996-10-01

    The current through a direct current micro-hollow electrode (electrode hole diameter: 0.7 mm) discharge in argon was shown to be controllable by means of a third, external electrode placed close to the cathode opening. By increasing the potential of the positively biased control electrode from zero to 30 V the discharge current could be linearly reduced from 5 μA to 0.75 μA, at a discharge voltage of 300 V. The current-voltage characteristic of the micro-hollow electrode discharge was found to have a positive slope, allowing parallel discharge operation without ballast. By drilling holes through a metal-plated, dielectric film, an array of hollow electrode discharges could be generated. It was shown that each discharge responds individually to variations in the potential of the corresponding external control electrode. The simplicity of the electrode configuration and the possibility of linear, electrical control of the individual discharge currents offers the possibility to use these triode arrays in addressable flat panel displays (patent pending).

  1. Time-resolved spectroscopy of a homogeneous dielectric barrier discharge for soft ionization driven by square wave high voltage.

    PubMed

    Horvatic, Vlasta; Michels, Antje; Ahlmann, Norman; Jestel, Günter; Veza, Damir; Vadla, Cedomil; Franzke, Joachim

    2015-10-01

    Helium capillary dielectric barrier discharge driven by the square wave-shaped high voltage was investigated spatially and temporally by means of optical emission spectroscopy. The finding of the previous investigation conducted with the sinusoidal-like high voltage was confirmed, i.e., the plasma in the jet and the plasma in the capillary constitute two temporally separated events. The plasma in the jet occurs prior to the discharge in the capillary and exists only during the positive half period of the applied high voltage. The time delay of the capillary discharge with respect to the discharge in the jet depended on the high voltage, and it was between 2.4 and 8.4 μs for the voltage amplitude change in the range from 1.96 to 2.31 kV, respectively. It was found that, compared to sinusoidal-like voltage, application of the square wave high voltage results with stronger (~6 times) He line emission in the jet, which makes the latter more favorable for efficient soft ionization. The use of the square wave high voltage enabled comparison of the currents (~1 mA) flowing in the capillary during the positive and negative high voltage periods, which yielded the estimation for the charge dissipated in the atmosphere ((4 ± 20 %) × 10(-11) C) through the plasma jet.

  2. Time-resolved spectroscopy of a homogeneous dielectric barrier discharge for soft ionization driven by square wave high voltage.

    PubMed

    Horvatic, Vlasta; Michels, Antje; Ahlmann, Norman; Jestel, Günter; Veza, Damir; Vadla, Cedomil; Franzke, Joachim

    2015-10-01

    Helium capillary dielectric barrier discharge driven by the square wave-shaped high voltage was investigated spatially and temporally by means of optical emission spectroscopy. The finding of the previous investigation conducted with the sinusoidal-like high voltage was confirmed, i.e., the plasma in the jet and the plasma in the capillary constitute two temporally separated events. The plasma in the jet occurs prior to the discharge in the capillary and exists only during the positive half period of the applied high voltage. The time delay of the capillary discharge with respect to the discharge in the jet depended on the high voltage, and it was between 2.4 and 8.4 μs for the voltage amplitude change in the range from 1.96 to 2.31 kV, respectively. It was found that, compared to sinusoidal-like voltage, application of the square wave high voltage results with stronger (~6 times) He line emission in the jet, which makes the latter more favorable for efficient soft ionization. The use of the square wave high voltage enabled comparison of the currents (~1 mA) flowing in the capillary during the positive and negative high voltage periods, which yielded the estimation for the charge dissipated in the atmosphere ((4 ± 20 %) × 10(-11) C) through the plasma jet. PMID:26297466

  3. Capillary fracture of soft gels.

    PubMed

    Bostwick, Joshua B; Daniels, Karen E

    2013-10-01

    A liquid droplet resting on a soft gel substrate can deform that substrate to the point of material failure, whereby fractures develop on the gel surface that propagate outwards from the contact line in a starburst pattern. In this paper, we characterize (i) the initiation process, in which the number of arms in the starburst is controlled by the ratio of the surface tension contrast to the gel's elastic modulus, and (ii) the propagation dynamics showing that once fractures are initiated they propagate with a universal power law L[proportional]t(3/4). We develop a model for crack initiation by treating the gel as a linear elastic solid and computing the deformations within the substrate from the liquid-solid wetting forces. The elastic solution shows that both the location and the magnitude of the wetting forces are critical in providing a quantitative prediction for the number of fractures and, hence, an interpretation of the initiation of capillary fractures. This solution also reveals that the depth of the gel is an important factor in the fracture process, as it can help mitigate large surface tractions; this finding is confirmed with experiments. We then develop a model for crack propagation by considering the transport of an inviscid fluid into the fracture tip of an incompressible material and find that a simple energy-conservation argument can explain the observed material-independent power law. We compare predictions for both linear elastic and neo-Hookean solids, finding that the latter better explains the observed exponent.

  4. Microfluidic flow counterbalanced capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ling; Dutta, Debashis

    2013-04-01

    Flow counterbalanced capillary electrophoresis (FCCE) offers a powerful approach to realizing difficult charge based separations in compact microchip devices with application of relatively small electrical voltages. The need for dynamically controlling the pressure-gradient in the FCCE column however presents a significant challenge in implementing this technique on the microchip platform. In this article, we report the use of a simple on-chip pumping unit that allows precise introduction of a periodic pressure-driven backflow into a microfluidic separation channel enabling an FCCE analysis. The backflow in our device was produced by fabricating a shallow segment (0.5 μm deep) downstream of the analysis column (5 μm deep) and applying an electric field across it. A mismatch in the electroosmotic transport rate at the interface of this segment was shown to yield a pressure-gradient that could reverse the flow of the analyte bands without inverting the direction of the electric field. Although such a pressure-gradient also led to additional band broadening in the system, overall, the separation resolution of our device was observed to improve with an increasing number of back-and-forth sample passes through the analysis channel. For our current design, the corresponding improvement in the effective separation length was as much as 52% of the actual distance travelled by the chosen FITC-labeled amino acid samples. The reported device is well suited for further miniaturization of the FCCE method to the nanofluidic length scale which likely would improve its performance, and is easily integrable to other analytical procedures on the microchip platform for lab-on-a-chip applications. PMID:23420375

  5. Capillary fracture of soft gels.

    PubMed

    Bostwick, Joshua B; Daniels, Karen E

    2013-10-01

    A liquid droplet resting on a soft gel substrate can deform that substrate to the point of material failure, whereby fractures develop on the gel surface that propagate outwards from the contact line in a starburst pattern. In this paper, we characterize (i) the initiation process, in which the number of arms in the starburst is controlled by the ratio of the surface tension contrast to the gel's elastic modulus, and (ii) the propagation dynamics showing that once fractures are initiated they propagate with a universal power law L[proportional]t(3/4). We develop a model for crack initiation by treating the gel as a linear elastic solid and computing the deformations within the substrate from the liquid-solid wetting forces. The elastic solution shows that both the location and the magnitude of the wetting forces are critical in providing a quantitative prediction for the number of fractures and, hence, an interpretation of the initiation of capillary fractures. This solution also reveals that the depth of the gel is an important factor in the fracture process, as it can help mitigate large surface tractions; this finding is confirmed with experiments. We then develop a model for crack propagation by considering the transport of an inviscid fluid into the fracture tip of an incompressible material and find that a simple energy-conservation argument can explain the observed material-independent power law. We compare predictions for both linear elastic and neo-Hookean solids, finding that the latter better explains the observed exponent. PMID:24229192

  6. HOLLOW CARBON ARC DISCHARGE

    DOEpatents

    Luce, J.S.

    1960-10-11

    A device is described for producing an energetic, direct current, hollow, carbon-arc discharge in an evacuated container and within a strong magnetic field. Such discharges are particularly useful not only in dissociation and ionization of high energy molecular ion beams, but also in acting as a shield or barrier against the instreaming of lowenergy neutral particles into a plasma formed within the hollow discharge when it is used as a dissociating mechanism for forming the plasma. There is maintained a predetermined ratio of gas particles to carbon particles released from the arc electrodes during operation of the discharge. The carbon particles absorb some of the gas particles and are pumped along and by the discharge out of the device, with the result that smaller diffusion pumps are required than would otherwise be necessary to dispose of the excess gas.

  7. GAS DISCHARGE DEVICES

    DOEpatents

    Jefferson, S.

    1958-11-11

    An apparatus utilized in introducing tritium gas into envelope of a gas discharge device for the purpose f maintaining the discharge path in ionized condition is described. ln addition to the cathode and anode, the ischarge device contains a zirconium or tantalum ilament arranged for external excitation and a metallic seed containing tritium, and also arranged to have a current passed through it. Initially, the zirconium or tantalum filament is vaporized to deposit its material adjacent the main discharge region. Then the tritium gas is released and, due to its affinity for the first released material, it deposits in the region of the main discharge where it is most effective in maintaining the discharge path in an ionized condition.

  8. Community nurses & discharge planning.

    PubMed

    Worth, A; Tierney, A; Lockerbie, L

    The role of community nurses in discharge planning for elderly patients leaving hospital is of increasing importance in the wake of the NHS and Community Care Act 1990. Community nurses can play a key role in contributing to pre-discharge assessments and in providing continuing post-discharge assessment and care. The Nursing Research Unit at the University of Edinburgh conducted a survey early in 1993, just prior to implementation of the Community Care Act in Scotland, to ascertain the views and experiences of a national 1 in 3 sample of community nurses relating to the discharge of elderly people from acute hospitals. This article presents the results of that survey and offers recommendations regarding the role of community nurses in discharge planning for elderly patients.

  9. CO-AXIAL DISCHARGES

    DOEpatents

    Luce, J.S.; Smith, L.P.

    1960-11-22

    A method and apparatus are given for producing coaxial arc discharges in an evacuated enclosure and within a strong, confining magnetic field. The arcs are maintained at a high potential difference. Electrons will diffuse to the more positive arc from the negative arc, and positive ions will diffuse from the more positive arc to the negative arc. Coaxial arc discharges have the advantage that ions which return to strike the positive arc discharge will lose no energy since they do not strike a solid wall or electrode. Those discharges are useful in confining an ionized plasma between the discharges, and have the advantage of preventing impurities from the walls of the enclosure from entering ihe plasma area because of the arc barrier set up bv the cylindrical outer arc.

  10. Co-axial discharges

    DOEpatents

    Luce, J. S.; Smith, L. P.

    1960-11-22

    An apparatus is described for producing coaxial arc discharges in an evacuated enclosure and within a strong, confining magnetic field. The arcs are maintained at a high potential difference. Electrons diffuse to the more positive arc from the negative arc, and positive ions diffuse from the more positive arc to the negative arc. Coaxial arc discharges have the advantuge that ions that return to strike the positive arc discharge will lose no energy since they do not strike a solid wall or electrode. These discharges are useful in confining an ionized plasma between the discharges and have the advantage of preventing impurities from the walls of the enclosure from entering the plasma area because of the arc barrier set up by the cylindrical outer arc. (auth)

  11. On the Ablation Models of Fuel Pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Rozhansky, V.A.; Senichenkov, I.Yu.

    2005-12-15

    The neutral gas shielding model and neutral-gas-plasma shielding model are analyzed qualitatively. The main physical processes that govern the formation of the shielding gas cloud and, consequently, the ablation rate are considered. For the neutral gas shielding model, simple formulas relating the ablation rate and cloud parameters to the parameters of the pellet and the background plasma are presented. The estimates of the efficiency of neutral gas shielding and plasma shielding are compared. It is shown that the main portion of the energy flux of the background electrons is released in the plasma cloud. Formulas for the ablation rate and plasma parameters are derived in the neutral-gas-plasma shielding model. The question is discussed as to why the neutral gas shielding model describes well the ablation rate of the pellet material, although it does not take into account the ionization effects and the effects associated with the interaction of ionized particles with the magnetic field. The reason is that the ablation rate depends weakly on the energy flux of hot electrons; as a result, the attenuation of this flux by the electrostatic shielding and plasma shielding has little effect on the ablation rate. This justifies the use of the neutral gas shielding model to estimate the ablation rate (to within a factor of about 2) over a wide range of parameters of the pellet and the background plasma.

  12. Capillary adhesion at the nanometer scale.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shengfeng; Robbins, Mark O

    2014-06-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the capillary adhesion from a nonvolatile liquid meniscus between a spherical tip and a flat substrate. The atomic structure of the tip, the tip radius, the contact angles of the liquid on the two surfaces, and the volume of the liquid bridge are varied. The capillary force between the tip and substrate is calculated as a function of their separation h. The force agrees with continuum predictions based on macroscopic theory for h down to ∼5 to 10 nm. At smaller h, the force tends to be less attractive than predicted and has strong oscillations. This oscillatory component of the capillary force is completely missed in the macroscopic theory, which only includes contributions from the surface tension around the circumference of the meniscus and the pressure difference over the cross section of the meniscus. The oscillation is found to be due to molecular layering of the liquid confined in the narrow gap between the tip and substrate. This effect is most pronounced for large tip radii and/or smooth surfaces. The other two components considered by the macroscopic theory are also identified. The surface tension term, as well as the meniscus shape, is accurately described by the macroscopic theory for h down to ∼1 nm, but the capillary pressure term is always more positive than the corresponding continuum result. This shift in the capillary pressure reduces the average adhesion by a factor as large as 2 from its continuum value and is found to be due to an anisotropy in the pressure tensor. The component in the plane of the substrate is consistent with the capillary pressure predicted by the macroscopic theory (i.e., the Young-Laplace equation), but the normal pressure that determines the capillary force is always more positive than the continuum counterpart.

  13. Critical Velocities in Open Capillary Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreyer, Michael; Langbein, Dieter; Rath, Hans J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the proposed research program on open capillary flow and the preliminary work performed theoretically and in drop tower experiments. The work focuses on the fundamental physical understanding of the flow through capillary bound geometries, where the circumference of the cross section of the flow path contains free surfaces. Examples for such a flow configuration are capillary vanes in surface tension tanks, flow along edges and corners and flow through liquid bridges. The geometries may be classified by their cross section areas, wetted circumferences and the radii of curvature of the free surfaces. In the streaming float zone the flow path is bound by a free surface only. The ribbon vane is a model for vane types used in surface tension tanks, where a structure in proximity to the tank wall forms a capillary gap. A groove is used in heat pipes for the transportation of the condensed working fluid to the heat source and a wedge may occur in a spaceborne experiment where fluid has to be transported by the means of surface tension. The research objectives are the determination of the maximum volume flux, the observation of the free surfaces and the liquid flow inside the flow path as well as the evaluation of the limiting capillary wave speed. The restriction of the maximum volume flux is due to convective forces (flow velocity exceeding the capillary wave speed) and/or viscous forces, i.e. the viscous head loss along the flow path must be compensated by the capillary pressure due to the curved free surface. Exceeding the maximum volume flux leads to the choking of the flow path, thus the free surface collapses and.gas ingestion occurs at the outlet. The means are ground-based experimental work with plateau tanks and in a drop tower, a sounding rocket flight, and theoretical analysis with integral balances as well as full three dimensional CFD solutions for flow with free surfaces.

  14. Improving Hospital Discharge Time

    PubMed Central

    El-Eid, Ghada R.; Kaddoum, Roland; Tamim, Hani; Hitti, Eveline A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Delays in discharging patients can impact hospital and emergency department (ED) throughput. The discharge process is complex and involves setting specific challenges that limit generalizability of solutions. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of using Six Sigma methods to improve the patient discharge process. This is a quantitative pre and post-intervention study. Three hundred and eighty-six bed tertiary care hospital. A series of Six Sigma driven interventions over a 10-month period. The primary outcome was discharge time (time from discharge order to patient leaving the room). Secondary outcome measures included percent of patients whose discharge order was written before noon, percent of patients leaving the room by noon, hospital length of stay (LOS), and LOS of admitted ED patients. Discharge time decreased by 22.7% from 2.2 hours during the preintervention period to 1.7 hours post-intervention (P < 0.001). A greater proportion of patients left their room before noon in the postintervention period (P < 0.001), though there was no statistical difference in before noon discharge. Hospital LOS dropped from 3.4 to 3.1 days postintervention (P < 0.001). ED mean LOS of patients admitted to the hospital was significantly lower in the postintervention period (6.9 ± 7.8 vs 5.9 ± 7.7 hours; P < 0.001). Six Sigma methodology can be an effective change management tool to improve discharge time. The focus of institutions aspiring to tackle delays in the discharge process should be on adopting the core principles of Six Sigma rather than specific interventions that may be institution-specific. PMID:25816029

  15. Frequency and Risk Factors of Various Complications After Computed Tomography-Guided Radiofrequency Ablation of Lung Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Okuma, Tomohisa Matsuoka, Toshiyuki; Yamamoto, Akira; Oyama, Yoshimasa; Toyoshima, Masami; Nakamura, Kenji; Inoue, Yuichi

    2008-01-15

    Objective. To retrospectively determine the frequency and risk factors of various side effects and complications after percutaneous computed tomography-guided radiofrequency (RF) ablation of lung tumors. Methods. We reviewed and analyzed records of 112 treatment sessions in 57 of our patients (45 men and 12 women) with unresectable lung tumors treated by ablation. Risk factors, including sex, age, tumor diameter, tumor location, history of surgery, presence of pulmonary emphysema, electrode gauge, array diameter, patient position, maximum power output, ablation time, and minimum impedance during ablation, were analyzed using univariate and multivariate analyses. Results. Total rates of side effects and minor and major complications occurred in 17%, 50%, and 8% of treatment sessions, respectively. Side effects, including pain during ablation (46% of sessions) and pleural effusion (13% of sessions), occurred with RF ablation. Minor complications, including pneumothorax not requiring chest tube drainage (30% of sessions), subcutaneous emphysema (16% of sessions), and hemoptysis (9% of sessions) also occurred after the procedure. Regarding major complications, three patients developed fever >38.5 deg. C; three patients developed abscesses; two patients developed pneumothorax requiring chest tube insertion; and one patient had air embolism and was discharged without neurologic deficit. Univariate and multivariate analyses suggested that a lesion located {<=}1 cm of the chest wall was significantly related to pain (p < 0.01, hazard index 5.76). Risk factors for pneumothorax increased significantly with previous pulmonary surgery (p < 0.05, hazard index 6.1) and presence of emphysema (p <0.01, hazard index 13.6). Conclusion. The total complication rate for all treatment sessions was 58%, and 25% of patients did not have any complications after RF ablation. Although major complications can occur, RF ablation of lung tumors can be considered a safe and minimally invasive

  16. Dynamics of mid-infrared femtosecond laser resonant ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Dongqing; Li, Yunxuan; Wang, Qingyue

    2014-06-01

    Resonant ablation is beneficial to avoiding uncontrollable subsurface damages in the laser ablation of polymers. In this paper the dynamics of mid-infrared laser resonant ablation of polylactic acid and toluene was calculated by using fluid dynamic equations. The merits and drawbacks of mid-infrared femtosecond laser resonant ablation of high molecular weight polymers have been discussed.

  17. Low-cost foil metallization using arc discharge for passivated emitter and rear solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurimoto, Yuji; Yamasaki, Ichiro

    2016-04-01

    For the cost reduction of passivated emitter and rear cells (PERC), we propose a new rear contact formation method, in which an aluminum foil and an arc discharge system are used. The arc discharge system consists of inexpensive parts and does not contain any sophisticated part such as a laser ablation apparatus. Therefore, this system can save the cost of the rear contact forming process. We applied this technique to a test production of PERC. It is found that the arc discharge system can provide a similar performance to that attained by a conventional PERC production method.

  18. Separation of Recombinant Therapeutic Proteins Using Capillary Gel Electrophoresis and Capillary Isoelectric Focusing.

    PubMed

    De Jong, Caitlyn A G; Risley, Jessica; Lee, Alexis K; Zhao, Shuai Sherry; Chen, David D Y

    2016-01-01

    Detailed step-by-step methods for protein separation techniques based on capillary electrophoresis (CE) are described in this chapter. Focus is placed on two techniques, capillary gel electrophoresis (CGE) and capillary isoelectric focusing (cIEF). CGE is essentially gel electrophoresis, performed in a capillary, where a hydrogel is used as a sieving matrix to separate proteins or peptides based on size. cIEF separates proteins or peptides based on their isoelectric point (pI), the pH at which the protein or peptide bears no charges. Detailed protocols and steps (including capillary preparation, sample preparation, CE separation conditions, and detection) for both CGE and cIEF presented so that readers can follow the described methods in their own labs. PMID:27473487

  19. Thermal protection system ablation sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorbunov, Sergey (Inventor); Martinez, Edward R. (Inventor); Scott, James B. (Inventor); Oishi, Tomomi (Inventor); Fu, Johnny (Inventor); Mach, Joseph G. (Inventor); Santos, Jose B. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An isotherm sensor tracks space vehicle temperatures by a thermal protection system (TPS) material during vehicle re-entry as a function of time, and surface recession through calibration, calculation, analysis and exposed surface modeling. Sensor design includes: two resistive conductors, wound around a tube, with a first end of each conductor connected to a constant current source, and second ends electrically insulated from each other by a selected material that becomes an electrically conductive char at higher temperatures to thereby complete an electrical circuit. The sensor conductors become shorter as ablation proceeds and reduced resistance in the completed electrical circuit (proportional to conductor length) is continually monitored, using measured end-to-end voltage change or current in the circuit. Thermocouple and/or piezoelectric measurements provide consistency checks on local temperatures.

  20. Diamond Ablators for Inertial Confinement Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Biener, J; Mirkarimi, P B; Tringe, J W; Baker, S L; Wang, Y M; Kucheyev, S O; Teslich, N E; Wu, K J; Hamza, A V; Wild, C; Woerner, E; Koidl, P; Bruehne, K; Fecht, H

    2005-06-21

    Diamond has a unique combination of physical properties for the inertial confinement fusion ablator application, such as appropriate optical properties, high atomic density, high yield strength, and high thermal conductivity. Here, we present a feasible concept to fabricate diamond ablator shells. The fabrication of diamond capsules is a multi-step process, which involves diamond chemical vapor deposition on silicon mandrels followed by polishing, microfabrication of holes, and removing of the silicon mandrel by an etch process. We also discuss the pros and cons of coarse-grained optical quality and nanocrystalline chemical vapor deposition diamond films for the ablator application.

  1. Ablation response testing of aerospace power supplies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, S. A.; Chan, C. C.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental program was performed to assess the aerothermal ablation response of aerospace power supplies. Full-scale General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) test articles, Graphite Impact Shell (GIS) test articles, and Lightweight Radioisotope Heater Unit (LWRHU) test articles were all tested without nuclear fuel in simulated reentry environments at the NASA Ames Research Center. Stagnation heating, stagnation pressure, stagnation surface temperature, stagnation surface recession profile, and weight loss measurements were obtained for diffusion-limited and sublimation ablation conditions. The recession profile and weight loss measurements showed an effect of surface features on the stagnation face. The surface features altered the local heating which in turn affected the local ablation.

  2. Capillary liquid chromatography using laser-based and mass spectrometric detection. [Capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE); micellar electrokinetic capillary kchromatography (MECC)

    SciTech Connect

    Sepaniak, M.J.; Cook, K.D.

    1992-01-01

    In the years following the 1986 seminal paper (J. Chromatogr. Sci., 24, 347-352) describing modern capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE), the prominence of capillary electrokinetic separation techniques has grown. A related electrochromatographic technique is micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography (MECC). This report presents a brief synopsis of research efforts during the current 3-year period. In addition to a description of analytical separations-based research, results of efforts to develop and expand spectrometric detection for the techniques is reviewed. Laser fluorometric detection schemes have been successfully advanced. Mass spectrometric research was less fruitful, largely owing to personnel limitations. A regenerable fiber optic sensor was developed that can be used to remotely monitor chemical carcinogens, etc. (DLC)

  3. Synthetic Capillaries to Control Microscopic Blood Flow

    PubMed Central

    Sarveswaran, K.; Kurz, V.; Dong, Z.; Tanaka, T.; Penny, S.; Timp, G.

    2016-01-01

    Capillaries pervade human physiology. The mean intercapillary distance is only about 100 μm in human tissue, which indicates the extent of nutrient diffusion. In engineered tissue the lack of capillaries, along with the associated perfusion, is problematic because it leads to hypoxic stress and necrosis. However, a capillary is not easy to engineer due to its complex cytoarchitecture. Here, it is shown that it is possible to create in vitro, in about 30 min, a tubular microenvironment with an elastic modulus and porosity consistent with human tissue that functionally mimicks a bona fide capillary using “live cell lithography”(LCL) to control the type and position of cells on a composite hydrogel scaffold. Furthermore, it is established that these constructs support the forces associated with blood flow, and produce nutrient gradients similar to those measured in vivo. With LCL, capillaries can be constructed with single cell precision—no other method for tissue engineering offers such precision. Since the time required for assembly scales with the number of cells, this method is likely to be adapted first to create minimal functional units of human tissue that constitute organs, consisting of a heterogeneous population of 100–1000 cells, organized hierarchically to express a predictable function. PMID:26905751

  4. Micro-injector for capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Sáiz, Jorge; Koenka, Israel Joel; García-Ruiz, Carmen; Müller, Beat; Chwalek, Thomas; Hauser, Peter C

    2015-08-01

    A novel micro-injector for capillary electrophoresis for the handling of samples with volumes down to as little as 300 nL was designed and built in our laboratory for analyses in which the available volume is a limitation. The sample is placed into a small cavity located directly in front of the separation capillary, and the injection is then carried out automatically by controlled pressurization of the chamber with compressed air. The system also allows automated flushing of the injection chamber as well as of the capillary. In a trial with a capillary electrophoresis system with contactless conductivity detector, employing a capillary of 25 μm diameter, the results showed good stability of migration times and peak areas. To illustrate the technique, the fast separation of five inorganic cations (Na(+) , K(+) , NH4 (+) , Ca(2+) , and Mg(2+) ) was set up. This could be achieved in less than 3 min, with good limits of detection (10 μM) and linear ranges (between about 10 and 1000 μM). The system was demonstrated for the determination of the inorganic cations in porewater samples of a lake sediment core.

  5. Passive Reactor Cooling Using Capillary Porous Wick

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Christopher G.; Lin, Thomas F.

    2006-07-01

    Long-term reliability of actively pumped cooling systems is a concern in space-based nuclear reactors. Capillary-driven passive cooling systems are being considered as an alternative to gravity-driven systems. The high surface tension of liquid lithium makes it attractive as the coolant in a capillary-driven cooling system. A system has been conceived in which the fuel rod of a reactor is surrounded by a concentric wick through which liquid lithium flows to provide cooling under normal and emergency operating conditions. Unheated wicking experiments at three pressures using four layered screen mesh wicks of different porosities and three relatively high surface tension fluids have been conducted to gain insight into capillary phenomena for such a capillary cooling system. All fluids tested demonstrated wicking ability in each of the wick structures for all pressures, and wicking ability for each fluid increased with decreasing wick pore size. An externally heated wicking experiment with liquid lithium as the wicking fluid was also conducted. In addition to wicking experiments, a heater rod is under development to simulate the fuel rod of a space based nuclear reactor by providing a heat flux of up to 110 kW/m{sup 2}. Testing of this heater rod has shown its ability to undergo repeated cycling from below 533 K to over 1255 K without failure. This heater rod will be integrated into lithium wicking experiments to provide more realistic simulation of the proposed capillary-driven space nuclear reactor cooling system. (authors)

  6. Restructuring and aging in a capillary suspension

    PubMed Central

    Koos, Erin; Kannowade, Wolfgang; Willenbacher, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    The rheological properties of capillary suspensions, suspensions with small amounts of an added immiscible fluid, are dramatically altered with the addition of the secondary fluid. We investigate a capillary suspension to determine how the network ages and restructures at rest and under applied external shear deformation. The present work uses calcium carbonate suspended in silicone oil (11 % solids) with added water as a model system. Aging of capillary suspensions and their response to applied oscillatory shear is distinctly different from particulate gels dominated by the van der Waals forces. The suspensions dominated by the capillary force are very sensitive to oscillatory flow, with the linear viscoelastic regime ending at a deformation of only 0.1% and demonstrating power-law aging behavior. This aging persists for long times at low deformations or for shorter times with a sudden decrease in the strength at higher deformations. This aging behavior suggests that the network is able to rearrange and even rupture. This same sensitivity is not demonstrated in shear flow where very high shear rates are required to rupture the agglomerates returning the apparent viscosity of capillary suspensions to the same viscosity as for the pure vdW suspension. A transitional region is also present at intermediate water contents wherein the material response depends very strongly on the type, strength, and duration of the external forcing. PMID:25729113

  7. Case report of lumbar intradural capillary hemangioma

    PubMed Central

    Unnithan, Ajaya Kumar Ayyappan; Joseph, T. P.; Gautam, Amol; Shymole, V.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Capillary hemangioma is a rare tumor in spinal intradural location. Despite the rarity, early recognition is important because of the risk of hemorrhage. This is a case report of a woman who had capillary hemangioma of cauda equina. Case Description: A 54 -year-old woman presented with a low backache, radiating to the left leg for 2 months. She had left extensor hallucis weakness, sensory impairment in left L5 dermatome, and mild tenderness in lower lumbar spine. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) LS spine showed L4/5 intradural tumor, completely occluding canal in myelogram, enhancing with contrast, s/o benign nerve sheath tumor. L4 laminectomy was done. Reddish tumor was seen originating from a single root. It was removed preserving the root. Postoperatively, she was relieved of symptoms. MRI showed no residue. Histopathology showed lobular proliferation of capillary-sized blood vessels and elongated spindle cells. Immunohistochemistry showed CD34 positivity in endothelial cell lining of blood vessel and smooth muscle actin positivity in blood vessel muscle cells. HPR-capillary hemangioma. Conclusion: Although rare, capillary hemangioma should be in the differential diagnosis of intradural tumors. It closely mimics nerve sheath tumor. PMID:27069745

  8. Synthetic Capillaries to Control Microscopic Blood Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarveswaran, K.; Kurz, V.; Dong, Z.; Tanaka, T.; Penny, S.; Timp, G.

    2016-02-01

    Capillaries pervade human physiology. The mean intercapillary distance is only about 100 μm in human tissue, which indicates the extent of nutrient diffusion. In engineered tissue the lack of capillaries, along with the associated perfusion, is problematic because it leads to hypoxic stress and necrosis. However, a capillary is not easy to engineer due to its complex cytoarchitecture. Here, it is shown that it is possible to create in vitro, in about 30 min, a tubular microenvironment with an elastic modulus and porosity consistent with human tissue that functionally mimicks a bona fide capillary using “live cell lithography”(LCL) to control the type and position of cells on a composite hydrogel scaffold. Furthermore, it is established that these constructs support the forces associated with blood flow, and produce nutrient gradients similar to those measured in vivo. With LCL, capillaries can be constructed with single cell precision—no other method for tissue engineering offers such precision. Since the time required for assembly scales with the number of cells, this method is likely to be adapted first to create minimal functional units of human tissue that constitute organs, consisting of a heterogeneous population of 100–1000 cells, organized hierarchically to express a predictable function.

  9. Capillary xray compressor: principle versus practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewe, Dale L.; Heald, Steve M.; Barg, Bill; Brown, Frederick C.; Kim, Kyungha H.; Stern, Edward A.

    1995-09-01

    Guiding x rays down the inside of tapered capillaries is a means to increase the flux density of x rays from synchrotron light sources without some of the disadvantages inherent in other techniques. We have demonstrated that a process based on techniques for fabrication of glass fibers may be used to produce tapered capillaries with inlet diameters on the order of 150 micrometers or more, and outlets on the order of 1 micrometer or less. We present a description of the capillary fabrication and results of tests of the performance of several capillaries, along with a comparison with calculations of performance. We also summarize refinements to the fabrication process that will provide additional improvements. The transmission of x rays from linear capillaries with inlet diameters of approximately 150 micrometers and outlet diameters of 1.3 - 1.4 micrometer is on the order of 2%, with corresponding intensity gains of up to 274. Initial results indicate that the capability exists for producing convex profiles necessary for optimal transmission. Calculated and measured transmission efficiencies are in fairly good agreement, leading to the expectation that efficiencies predicted by calculations to be attainable from optimal profiles are a realistic goal, given the ability to manufacture these profiles.

  10. Self-similar magnetohydrodynamic model for direct current discharge fireball experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Tsui, K. H.; Navia, C. E.; Robba, M. B.; Carneiro, L. T.; Emelin, S. E.

    2006-11-15

    Ball lightning models and corresponding laboratory efforts in generating fireballs are briefly summarized to give an overview of the current status. In particular, emphasis is given to direct current discharge experiments at atmospheric pressure such as capillary discharge with a plasma plume in front of the anode opening [Emelin et al., Tech. Phys. Letters 23, 758 (1997)] and water resistor discharge with fluttering fireball overhead [Egorov and Stepanov, Tech. Phys. 47, 1584 (2002)]. These fireballs are interpreted as laboratory demonstrations of the self-similar magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model of ball lightning [Tsui, Phys. Plasmas 13, 072102 (2006)].

  11. Self-similar magnetohydrodynamic model for direct current discharge fireball experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsui, K. H.; Navia, C. E.; Robba, M. B.; Carneiro, L. T.; Emelin, S. E.

    2006-11-01

    Ball lightning models and corresponding laboratory efforts in generating fireballs are briefly summarized to give an overview of the current status. In particular, emphasis is given to direct current discharge experiments at atmospheric pressure such as capillary discharge with a plasma plume in front of the anode opening [Emelin et al., Tech. Phys. Letters 23, 758 (1997)] and water resistor discharge with fluttering fireball overhead [Egorov and Stepanov, Tech. Phys. 47, 1584 (2002)]. These fireballs are interpreted as laboratory demonstrations of the self-similar magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model of ball lightning [Tsui, Phys. Plasmas 13, 072102 (2006)].

  12. Micro hollow cathode discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenbach, K.H.; Peterkin, F.E.; Verhappen, R.

    1995-12-31

    Hollow cathode discharges are glow discharges with the cathode fall and negative glow confined in a cavity in the cathode. For the discharge to develop, the cathode hole dimensions must be on the order of the mean free path. By reducing the cathode hole dimensions it is therefore possible to increase the pressure. Stable hollow cathode discharges in air have been observed at almost one atmosphere when the cathode diameter was reduced to 20 micrometers. In order to study the electrical parameters of a micro hollow cathode discharge, a set of experiments has been performed in argon at pressures in the torr range and a cathode hole diameter of 0.7 mm in molybdenum. The current-voltage characteristics and the appearance of the discharge plasma showed two distinct regions. At lower voltage or pressure the current varies linearly with voltage and the hollow cathode plasma is concentrated around the axis of the cathode hole (low glow mode). At higher values of voltage or pressure the current increases nonlinearly, up to a point where a transition into a low voltage hollow cathode arc was observed, and the plasma column expands and fills almost the entire cathode hole (high glow mode). Spectral measurements showed that the transition from the low glow mode into the high glow mode is related to an increased density of electrode vapor in the hollow cathode discharge. Up to the breakdown into a hollow cathode arc, the current voltage characteristic of the discharge has a positive slope. In this range, hollow cathode discharges can be operated in parallel without a ballast resistor.

  13. Glow discharge detector

    DOEpatents

    Koo, Jackson C.; Yu, Conrad M.

    2002-01-01

    A highly sensitive electronic ion cell for the measurement of trace elements in He carrier gas which involves glow discharge. A constant wave (CW) glow discharge detector which is controlled through a biased resistor, can detect the change of electron density caused by impurities in the He carrier gas by many orders of magnitude larger than that caused by direct ionization or electron capture. The glow discharge detector utilizes a floating pseudo-electrode to form a probe in or near the plasma. By using this probe, the large variation of electron density due to trace amounts of impurities can be directly measured.

  14. Discharge lamp technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dakin, James

    1994-01-01

    This talk is an overview of discharge lamp technology commonly employed in general lighting, with emphasis on issues pertinent to lighting for plant growth. Since the audience is primarily from the plant growth community, and this begins the light source part of the program, we will start with a brief description of the discharge lamps. Challenges of economics and of thermal management make lamp efficiency a prime concern in controlled environment agriculture, so we will emphasize science considerations relating to discharge lamp efficiency. We will then look at the spectra and ratings of some representative lighting products, and conclude with a discussion of technological advances.

  15. INTENSE ENERGETIC GAS DISCHARGE

    DOEpatents

    Luce, J.S.

    1960-03-01

    A method and apparatus for initiating and sustaining an energetic gas arc discharge are described. A hollow cathode and a hollow anode are provided. By regulating the rate of gas flow into the interior of the cathode, the arc discharge is caused to run from the inner surface of the cathode with the result that adequate space-charge neutralization is provided inside the cathode but not in the main arc volume. Thus, the gas fed to the cathode is substantially completely ionized before it leaves the cathode, with the result that an energetic arc discharge can be maintained at lower operating pressures.

  16. Femtosecond laser ablation of dentin and enamel: relationship between laser fluence and ablation efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hu; Liu, Jing; Li, Hong; Ge, Wenqi; Sun, Yuchun; Wang, Yong; Lü, Peijun

    2015-02-01

    The objective was to study the relationship between laser fluence and ablation efficiency of a femtosecond laser with a Gaussian-shaped pulse used to ablate dentin and enamel for prosthodontic tooth preparation. A diode-pumped thin-disk femtosecond laser with wavelength of 1025 nm and pulse width of 400 fs was used for the ablation of dentin and enamel. The laser spot was guided in a line on the dentin and enamel surfaces to form a groove-shaped ablation zone under a series of laser pulse energies. The width and volume of the ablated line were measured under a three-dimensional confocal microscope to calculate the ablation efficiency. Ablation efficiency for dentin reached a maximum value of 0.020 mm3/J when the laser fluence was set at 6.51 J/cm2. For enamel, the maximum ablation efficiency was 0.009 mm3/J at a fluence of 7.59 J/cm2. Ablation efficiency of the femtosecond laser on dentin and enamel is closely related to the laser fluence and may reach a maximum when the laser fluence is set to an appropriate value.

  17. Model of a stationary microwave argon discharge at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Zhelyazkov, I.; Pencheva, M.; Benova, E.

    2008-03-19

    The many applications of microwave gas discharges at atmospheric pressure in various fields of science, technology and medicine require an adequate model of these discharges. Such a model is based on the electromagnetic wave's propagation properties and on the elementary processes in the discharge bulk. In contrast to the microwave discharges at low-gas pressures, where many elementary processes might be ignored because of their negligible contribution to the electron and heavy particle's balance equations, for such discharges at atmospheric pressure the consideration of a large number of collisional processes is mandatory. For the build of a successful discharge-column model one needs three important quantities, notably the power {theta} necessary for sustaining an electron - ion pair, electron - neutral collision frequency for momentum transfer v{sub en}, and gas temperature T{sub g}. The first two key parameters are obtained by a collisional-radiative model of the argon at atmospheric pressure, while the microwave frequency {omega}/2{pi} = 2.45 GHz, plasma column radius R, gas pressure p and gas temperature T{sub g} are fixed external parameters determined by the experimental conditions. Here, we present a model of a capillary argon microwave plasma column with a length L {approx_equal} 14 cm, sustained by wave power of 110 W - the model yields the longitudinal distributions of the plasma density, expended wave power, wave electric field magnitude, and complex wave number.

  18. Lithium granule ablation and penetration during ELM pacing experiments at DIII-D

    DOE PAGES

    Lunsford, R.; Bortolon, A.; Roquemore, A. L.; Mansfield, D. K.; Nagy, A.; Maingi, R.; Parks, P. B.; Jackson, G.; Gilson, E.; Chrobak, C. P.

    2016-05-25

    At DIII-D, lithium granules were radially injected into the plasma at the outer midplane to trigger and pace edge localized modes (ELMs). Granules ranging in size from 300 to 1000 microns were horizontally launched into H-mode discharges with velocities near 100 m/s, and granule to granule injection frequencies less than 500 Hz. While the smaller granules were only successful in triggering ELMs approximately 20% of the time, the larger granules regularly demonstrated ELM triggering efficiencies of greater than 80%. A fast visible camera looking along the axis of injection observed the ablation of the lithium granules. We used the durationmore » of ablation as a benchmark for a neutral gas shielding calculation, and approximated the ablation rate and mass deposition location for the various size granules, using measured edge plasma profiles as inputs. In conclusion, this calculation suggests that the low triggering efficiency of the smaller granules is due to the inability of these granules to traverse the steep edge pressure gradient region and reach the top of the pedestal prior to full ablation.« less

  19. On the validity of a universal solution for viscous capillary jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanero, J. M.; Herrada, M. A.; Ferrera, C.; Vega, E. J.; Gañán-Calvo, A. M.

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, we assess the validity of a universal solution based on the slenderness approximation to describe the velocity and shape of viscous capillary jets produced by two very different mechanisms: the action of the constant gravity force and the focusing effect of a coflowing gas stream. In the gravitational case, the jet's velocity distribution given by the universal solution is compared with that calculated numerically from the Navier-Stokes equations. The universal solution provides remarkably good predictions for the wide range of parameters considered in this work. Its accuracy generally improves as the Reynolds number increases and/or the Froude number decreases, probably because the jet viscous region decreases in this case. The flow focusing method was examined experimentally by acquiring and processing images of the tapering liquid meniscus formed between the feeding capillary and the discharge orifice. In this case, the universal solution provides satisfactory results for sufficiently slender liquid meniscus (i.e., for sufficiently large liquid viscosities and flow rates and small applied pressure drops), provided that the ratio capillary-to-orifice distance H to orifice diameter D takes sufficiently small values. If these conditions are not satisfied, the universal solution underestimates the jet radius close to the feeding capillary, but it still provides accurate predictions beyond the discharge orifice. For small H/D values, the accuracy of the universal solution is mainly limited by radial momentum effects associated with the sharp contraction of the meniscus shape, which becomes less slender as the liquid viscosity and flow rate decrease, or the pressure drop increases. For large H/D values, the driving force significantly deviates from its assumed constant value in the universal solution, giving rise to larger discrepancies between that solution and the experimental results even for slender shapes.

  20. Femtosecond laser ablation of the stapes

    PubMed Central

    McCaughey, Ryan G.; Sun, Hui; Rothholtz, Vanessa S.; Juhasz, Tibor; Wong, Brian J. F.

    2014-01-01

    A femtosecond laser, normally used for LASIK eye surgery, is used to perforate cadaveric human stapes. The thermal side effects of bone ablation are measured with a thermocouple in an inner ear model and are found to be within acceptable limits for inner ear surgery. Stress and acoustic events, recorded with piezoelectric film and a microphone, respectively, are found to be negligible. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and optical coherence tomography are used to confirm the precision of the ablation craters and lack of damage to the surrounding tissue. Ablation is compared to that from an Er:YAG laser, the current laser of choice for stapedotomy, and is found to be superior. Ultra-short-pulsed lasers offer a precise and efficient ablation of the stapes, with minimal thermal and negligible mechanical and acoustic damage. They are, therefore, ideal for stapedotomy operations. PMID:19405768

  1. Simple spherical ablative-implosion model

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, F.J.; Steele, J.T.; Larsen, J.T.

    1980-06-23

    A simple model of the ablative implosion of a high-aspect-ratio (shell radius to shell thickness ratio) spherical shell is described. The model is similar in spirit to Rosenbluth's snowplow model. The scaling of the implosion time was determined in terms of the ablation pressure and the shell parameters such as diameter, wall thickness, and shell density, and compared these to complete hydrodynamic code calculations. The energy transfer efficiency from ablation pressure to shell implosion kinetic energy was examined and found to be very efficient. It may be possible to attach a simple heat-transport calculation to our implosion model to describe the laser-driven ablation-implosion process. The model may be useful for determining other energy driven (e.g., ion beam) implosion scaling.

  2. Nanosecond laser ablation of silver nanoparticle film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Jaewon; Han, Sewoon; Lee, Daeho; Ahn, Sanghoon; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Moon, Jooho; Ko, Seung H.

    2013-02-01

    Nanosecond laser ablation of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) protected silver nanoparticle (20 nm diameter) film is studied using a frequency doubled Nd:YAG nanosecond laser (532 nm wavelength, 6 ns full width half maximum pulse width). In the sintered silver nanoparticle film, absorbed light energy conducts well through the sintered porous structure, resulting in ablation craters of a porous dome shape or crown shape depending on the irradiation fluence due to the sudden vaporization of the PVP. In the unsintered silver nanoparticle film, the ablation crater with a clean edge profile is formed and many coalesced nanoparticles of 50 to 100 nm in size are observed inside the ablation crater. These results and an order of magnitude analysis indicate that the absorbed thermal energy is confined within the nanoparticles, causing melting of nanoparticles and their coalescence to larger agglomerates, which are removed following melting and subsequent partial vaporization.

  3. Laser ablation in analytical chemistry - A review

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, Richard E.; Mao, Xianglei; Liu, Haichen; Gonzalez, Jhanis; Mao, Samuel S.

    2001-10-10

    Laser ablation is becoming a dominant technology for direct solid sampling in analytical chemistry. Laser ablation refers to the process in which an intense burst of energy delivered by a short laser pulse is used to sample (remove a portion of) a material. The advantages of laser ablation chemical analysis include direct characterization of solids, no chemical procedures for dissolution, reduced risk of contamination or sample loss, analysis of very small samples not separable for solution analysis, and determination of spatial distributions of elemental composition. This review describes recent research to understand and utilize laser ablation for direct solid sampling, with emphasis on sample introduction to an inductively coupled plasma (ICP). Current research related to contemporary experimental systems, calibration and optimization, and fractionation is discussed, with a summary of applications in several areas.

  4. Neocuproine ablates melanocytes in adult zebrafish.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly-Pol, Thomas; Johnson, Stephen L

    2008-12-01

    The simplest regeneration experiments involve the ablation of a single cell type. While methods exist to ablate the melanocytes of the larval zebrafish,(1,2) no convenient method exists to ablate melanocytes in adult zebrafish. Here, we show that the copper chelator neocuproine (NCP) causes fragmentation and disappearance of melanin in adult zebrafish melanocytes. Adult melanocytes expressing eGFP under the control of a melanocyte-specific promoter also lose eGFP fluorescence in the presence of NCP. We conclude that NCP causes melanocyte death. This death is independent of p53 and melanin, but can be suppressed by the addition of exogenous copper. NCP is ineffective at ablating larval melanocytes. This now provides a tool for addressing questions about stem cells and the maintenance of the adult pigment pattern in zebrafish.

  5. Photodynamic therapy toward selective endometrial ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadir, Yona; Tromberg, Bruce J.; Krasieva, Tatiana B.; Berns, Michael W.

    1993-05-01

    Potential applications of photodynamic therapy for endometrial disease are discussed. Experimental models that may lead to diagnosis and treatment of endometriosis as well as selective endometrial ablation are summarized.

  6. Nanoscale ablation through optically trapped microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fardel, Romain; McLeod, Euan; Tsai, Yu-Cheng; Arnold, Craig B.

    2010-10-01

    The ability to directly create patterns with size scales below 100 nm is important for many applications where the production or repair of high resolution and density features is needed. Laser-based direct-write methods have the benefit of being able to quickly and easily modify and create structures on existing devices, but ablation can negatively impact the overall technique. In this paper we show that self-positioning of near-field objectives through the optical trap assisted nanopatterning (OTAN) method allows for ablation without harming the objective elements. Small microbeads are positioned in close proximity to a substrate where ablation is initiated. Upon ablation, these beads are temporarily displaced from the trap but rapidly return to the initial position. We analyze the range of fluence values for which this process occurs and find that there exists a critical threshold beyond which the beads are permanently ejected.

  7. Thermal Ablation Modeling for Silicate Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yih-Kanq

    2016-01-01

    A general thermal ablation model for silicates is proposed. The model includes the mass losses through the balance between evaporation and condensation, and through the moving molten layer driven by surface shear force and pressure gradient. This model can be applied in the ablation simulation of the meteoroid and the glassy ablator for spacecraft Thermal Protection Systems. Time-dependent axisymmetric computations are performed by coupling the fluid dynamics code, Data-Parallel Line Relaxation program, with the material response code, Two-dimensional Implicit Thermal Ablation simulation program, to predict the mass lost rates and shape change. The predicted mass loss rates will be compared with available data for model validation, and parametric studies will also be performed for meteoroid earth entry conditions.

  8. Modeling and Simulation of Ablation-Controlled Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundrapu, Madhusudhan N.

    Ablation and plasma formation in high energy laser target interactions and arc discharges are studied numerically. Each of the two processes is modeled separately due to the type of energy source and the resulting flow eld. Ablation of the target material and plasma formation are coupled to obtain evaporation rate, temperature distribution, velocity eld, and species concentration self-consistently. Laser ablation is studied in the perspective of directed energy applications, where beam size varies from few centimeters to tens of centimeters with energies extending up to 10 kW/cm2. Because of this high energy deposition, the evaporated material expands to supersonic speeds into the free space. Due to the large spot sizes and associated supersonic flow, one dimensional Euler equations are considered to be sufficient for modeling the plume. Instead, more emphasis was given to evaporation model, by introducing Knudsen layer kinetics at the plume target interface, and plasma shielding. The evaporation rate is validated with results from the experiments and simulations are carried out to nd the in fluence of laser beam frequency on evaporation rates. The evaporation model used in this work is found to be more accurate than the widely used model based on sonic speed assumption. The optimum beam wavelength for Al surfaces is found to be 850 nm. Attenuation of telemetry data by plasma is a concern for the testing of directed energy systems. Electrostatic approach for the mitigation of communication attenuation is analyzed to obtain the fluency limits up to which the approach can be implemented. It is found from sheath calculations that uninterrupted telemetry can be achieved through Al plasma for fluences below 4 J/cm2 at a background pressure of 1 atm, using a maximum bias voltage of 10 kV . Arc discharge ablation is modeled for the synthesis of nanoparticles. The electric arc generated between the electrodes, placed inside a Helium chamber, evaporates the catalyst

  9. Novel absorption detection techniques for capillary electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Y.

    1994-07-27

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) has emerged as one of the most versatile separation methods. However, efficient separation is not sufficient unless coupled to adequate detection. The narrow inner diameter (I.D.) of the capillary column raises a big challenge to detection methods. For UV-vis absorption detection, the concentration sensitivity is only at the {mu}M level. Most commercial CE instruments are equipped with incoherent UV-vis lamps. Low-brightness, instability and inefficient coupling of the light source with the capillary limit the further improvement of UV-vis absorption detection in CE. The goals of this research have been to show the utility of laser-based absorption detection. The approaches involve: on-column double-beam laser absorption detection and its application to the detection of small ions and proteins, and absorption detection with the bubble-shaped flow cell.

  10. Capillary breakup of discontinuously rate thickening suspensions.

    PubMed

    Zimoch, Pawel J; McKinley, Gareth H; Hosoi, A E

    2013-07-19

    Using discontinuously rate thickening suspensions (DRTS) as a model system, we show that beads-on-a-string morphologies can arise as a result of external viscous drag acting during capillary-driven breakup of a non-Newtonian fluid. To minimize the perturbative effect of gravity, we developed a new experimental test platform in which the filament is supported in a horizontal position at the surface of an immiscible oil bath. We show that the evolution of thin DRTS filaments during the capillary thinning process is well described by a set of one-dimensional slender filament equations. The strongly rate-dependent rheology of the test fluid and the aspect ratio of the filament couple to control the thinning dynamics and lead to a simple criterion describing the localized arrest of the capillary thinning process and the subsequent formation of complex, high aspect ratio beads-on-a-string structures. PMID:23909338

  11. Photosensitive diazotized poly(ethylene glycol) covalent capillary coatings for analysis of proteins by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Bing; Chen, Xin; Cong, Hailin; Shu, Xi; Peng, Qiaohong

    2016-09-01

    A new method for the fabrication of covalently cross-linked capillary coatings of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) is described using diazotized PEG (diazo-PEG) as a new photosensitive coating agent. The film of diazo-PEG depends on ionic bonding and was first prepared on the inner surface of capillary by self-assembly, and ionic bonding was converted into covalent bonding after reaction of ultraviolet light with diazo groups through unique photochemical reaction. The covalently bonded coating impedance adsorption of protein on the central surface of capillary and hence the four proteins ribonuclease A, cytochrome c, bovine serum albumin, and lysosome can be baseline separated by using capillary electrophoresis (CE). The covalently cross-linked diazo-PEG capillary column coatings not only improved the CE separation performance for proteins compared to non-covalently cross-linked coatings or bare capillary but also showed a remarkable chemical solidity and repeatability. Because photosensitive diazo-PEG took the place of the highly noxious and silane moisture-sensitive coating reagents in the fabrication of covalent coating, this technique shows the advantage of being environment-friendly and having a high efficiency for CE to make the covalently bonded capillaries. PMID:27475442

  12. Mach-like capillary-gravity wakes.

    PubMed

    Moisy, Frédéric; Rabaud, Marc

    2014-08-01

    We determine experimentally the angle α of maximum wave amplitude in the far-field wake behind a vertical surface-piercing cylinder translated at constant velocity U for Bond numbers Bo(D)=D/λ(c) ranging between 0.1 and 4.2, where D is the cylinder diameter and λ(c) the capillary length. In all cases the wake angle is found to follow a Mach-like law at large velocity, α∼U(-1), but with different prefactors depending on the value of Bo(D). For small Bo(D) (large capillary effects), the wake angle approximately follows the law α≃c(g,min)/U, where c(g,min) is the minimum group velocity of capillary-gravity waves. For larger Bo(D) (weak capillary effects), we recover a law α∼√[gD]/U similar to that found for ship wakes at large velocity [Rabaud and Moisy, Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 214503 (2013)]. Using the general property of dispersive waves that the characteristic wavelength of the wave packet emitted by a disturbance is of order of the disturbance size, we propose a simple model that describes the transition between these two Mach-like regimes as the Bond number is varied. We show that the new capillary law α≃c(g,min)/U originates from the presence of a capillary cusp angle (distinct from the usual gravity cusp angle), along which the energy radiated by the disturbance accumulates for Bond numbers of order of unity. This model, complemented by numerical simulations of the surface elevation induced by a moving Gaussian pressure disturbance, is in qualitative agreement with experimental measurements.

  13. Mach-like capillary-gravity wakes.

    PubMed

    Moisy, Frédéric; Rabaud, Marc

    2014-08-01

    We determine experimentally the angle α of maximum wave amplitude in the far-field wake behind a vertical surface-piercing cylinder translated at constant velocity U for Bond numbers Bo(D)=D/λ(c) ranging between 0.1 and 4.2, where D is the cylinder diameter and λ(c) the capillary length. In all cases the wake angle is found to follow a Mach-like law at large velocity, α∼U(-1), but with different prefactors depending on the value of Bo(D). For small Bo(D) (large capillary effects), the wake angle approximately follows the law α≃c(g,min)/U, where c(g,min) is the minimum group velocity of capillary-gravity waves. For larger Bo(D) (weak capillary effects), we recover a law α∼√[gD]/U similar to that found for ship wakes at large velocity [Rabaud and Moisy, Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 214503 (2013)]. Using the general property of dispersive waves that the characteristic wavelength of the wave packet emitted by a disturbance is of order of the disturbance size, we propose a simple model that describes the transition between these two Mach-like regimes as the Bond number is varied. We show that the new capillary law α≃c(g,min)/U originates from the presence of a capillary cusp angle (distinct from the usual gravity cusp angle), along which the energy radiated by the disturbance accumulates for Bond numbers of order of unity. This model, complemented by numerical simulations of the surface elevation induced by a moving Gaussian pressure disturbance, is in qualitative agreement with experimental measurements. PMID:25215822

  14. Principles of the radiative ablation modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saillard, Yves; Arnault, Philippe; Silvert, Virginie

    2010-12-01

    Indirectly driven inertial confinement fusion (ICF) rests on the setting up of a radiation temperature within a laser cavity and on the optimization of the capsule implosion ablated by this radiation. In both circumstances, the ablation of an optically thick medium is at work. The nonlinear radiation conduction equations that describe this phenomenon admit different kinds of solutions called generically Marshak waves. In this paper, a completely analytic model is proposed to describe the ablation in the subsonic regime relevant to ICF experiments. This model approximates the flow by a deflagrationlike structure where Hugoniot relations are used in the stationary part from the ablation front up to the isothermal sonic Chapman-Jouguet point and where the unstationary expansion from the sonic point up to the external boundary is assumed quasi-isothermal. It uses power law matter properties. It can also accommodate arbitrary boundary conditions provided the ablation wave stays very subsonic and the surface temperature does not vary too quickly. These requirements are often met in realistic situations. Interestingly, the ablated mass rate, the ablation pressure, and the absorbed radiative energy depend on the time history of the surface temperature, not only on the instantaneous temperature values. The results compare very well with self-similar solutions and with numerical simulations obtained by hydrodynamic code. This analytic model gives insight into the physical processes involved in the ablation and is helpful for optimization and sensitivity studies in many situations of interest: radiation temperature within a laser cavity, acceleration of finite size medium, and ICF capsule implosion, for instance.

  15. Principles of the radiative ablation modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Saillard, Yves; Arnault, Philippe; Silvert, Virginie

    2010-12-15

    Indirectly driven inertial confinement fusion (ICF) rests on the setting up of a radiation temperature within a laser cavity and on the optimization of the capsule implosion ablated by this radiation. In both circumstances, the ablation of an optically thick medium is at work. The nonlinear radiation conduction equations that describe this phenomenon admit different kinds of solutions called generically Marshak waves. In this paper, a completely analytic model is proposed to describe the ablation in the subsonic regime relevant to ICF experiments. This model approximates the flow by a deflagrationlike structure where Hugoniot relations are used in the stationary part from the ablation front up to the isothermal sonic Chapman-Jouguet point and where the unstationary expansion from the sonic point up to the external boundary is assumed quasi-isothermal. It uses power law matter properties. It can also accommodate arbitrary boundary conditions provided the ablation wave stays very subsonic and the surface temperature does not vary too quickly. These requirements are often met in realistic situations. Interestingly, the ablated mass rate, the ablation pressure, and the absorbed radiative energy depend on the time history of the surface temperature, not only on the instantaneous temperature values. The results compare very well with self-similar solutions and with numerical simulations obtained by hydrodynamic code. This analytic model gives insight into the physical processes involved in the ablation and is helpful for optimization and sensitivity studies in many situations of interest: radiation temperature within a laser cavity, acceleration of finite size medium, and ICF capsule implosion, for instance.

  16. Flexible Ablators: Applications and Arcjet Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, James O.; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Beck, Robin A S.; Mcguire, Kathy; Prabhu, Dinesh K.; Gorbunov, Sergey

    2011-01-01

    Flexible ablators were conceived in 2009 to meet the technology pull for large, human Mars Exploration Class, 23 m diameter hypersonic inflatable aerodynamic decelerators. As described elsewhere, they have been recently undergoing initial technical readiness (TRL) advancement by NASA. The performance limits of flexible ablators in terms of maximum heat rates, pressure and shear remain to be defined. Further, it is hoped that this emerging technology will vastly expand the capability of future NASA missions involving atmospheric entry systems. This paper considers four topics of relevance to flexible ablators: (1) Their potential applications to near/far term human and robotic missions (2) Brief consideration of the balance between heat shield diameter, flexible ablator performance limits, entry vehicle controllability and aft-body shear layer impingement of interest to designers of very large entry vehicles, (3) The approach for developing bonding processes of flexible ablators for use on rigid entry bodies and (4) Design of large arcjet test articles that will enable the testing of flexible ablators in flight-like, combined environments (heat flux, pressure, shear and structural tensile loading). Based on a review of thermal protection system performance requirements for future entry vehicles, it is concluded that flexible ablators have broad applications to conventional, rigid entry body systems and are enabling to large deployable (both inflatable and mechanical) heat shields. Because of the game-changing nature of flexible ablators, it appears that NASA's Office of the Chief Technologist (OCT) will fund a focused, 3-year TRL advancement of the new materials capable of performance in heat fluxes in the range of 200-600 W/sq. cm. This support will enable the manufacture and use of the large-scale arcjet test designs that will be a key element of this OCT funded activity.

  17. Resonant laser ablation: mechanisms and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.E.; Allen, T.M.; Garrett, A.W.; Gill, C.G.; Hemberger, P.H.; Kelly, P.B.; Nogar, N.S.

    1996-10-01

    We report on aspects of resonant laser ablation (RLA) behavior for a number of sample types: metals, alloys, thin films, zeolites and soil. The versatility of RLA is demonstrated, with results on a variety of samples and in several mass spectrometers. In addition, the application to depth profiling of thin films is described; absolute removal rates and detection limits are also displayed. A discussion of possible mechanisms for low-power ablation is presented.

  18. Brain radiation - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Radiation - brain - discharge; Cancer-brain radiation; Lymphoma - brain radiation; Leukemia - brain radiation ... Decadron) while you are getting radiation to the brain. It may make you hungrier, cause leg swelling ...

  19. Chest radiation - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Radiation - chest - discharge; Cancer - chest radiation; Lymphoma - chest radiation ... When you have radiation treatment for cancer, your body goes through changes. About 2 weeks after your first treatment: It may be hard ...

  20. Eye muscle repair - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000111.htm Eye muscle repair - discharge To use the sharing features on ... enable JavaScript. You or your child had eye muscle repair surgery to correct eye muscle problems that ...

  1. Capacitor discharge pulse analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Michael Sean; Griffiths, Stewart K.; Tanner, Danelle Mary

    2013-08-01

    Capacitors used in firing sets and other high discharge current applications are discharge tested to verify performance of the capacitor against the application requirements. Parameters such as capacitance, inductance, rise time, pulse width, peak current and current reversal must be verified to ensure that the capacitor will meet the application needs. This report summarizes an analysis performed on the discharge current data to extract these parameters by fitting a second-order system model to the discharge data and using this fit to determine the resulting performance metrics. Details of the theory and implementation are presented. Using the best-fit second-order system model to extract these metrics results in less sensitivity to noise in the measured data and allows for direct extraction of the total series resistance, inductance, and capacitance.

  2. Discharges for lighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoffels, W. W.; Nimalasuriya, T.; Flikweert, A. J.; Mulders, H. C. J.

    2007-12-01

    The most common man-made discharge is a lamp. Even though lamps are often considered a mature technology, the discharge physics is often poorly understood. Two recent initiatives discussed here show that plasma research can help to make significant improvements. First we discuss color separation in metal halide lamps, which is a problem that prevents these highly efficient lamps from being used in more applications. Secondly a novel lamp concept is presented that may replace the current mercury based fluorescent lamps.

  3. Use of Plastic Capillaries for Macromolecular Crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, Rachel R.; Hong, Young-Soo; Ciszak, Ewa M.

    2003-01-01

    Methods of crystallization of biomolecules in plastic capillaries (Nalgene 870 PFA tubing) are presented. These crystallization methods used batch, free-interface liquid- liquid diffusion alone, or a combination with vapor diffusion. Results demonstrated growth of crystals of test proteins such as thaumatin and glucose isomerase, as well as protein studied in our laboratory such dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase. Once the solutions were loaded in capillaries, they were stored in the tubes in frozen state at cryogenic temperatures until the desired time of activation of crystallization experiments.

  4. Control of electroosmosis in coated quartz capillaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herren, Blair J.; Van Alstine, James; Snyder, Robert S.; Shafer, Steven G.; Harris, J. Milton

    1987-01-01

    The effectiveness of various coatings for controlling the electroosmotic fluid flow that hinders electrophoretic processes is studied using analytical particle microelectrophoresis. The mobilities of 2-micron diameter glass and polystyrene latex spheres (exhibiting both negative and zero effective surface charge) were measured in 2-mm diameter quartz capillaries filled with NaCl solutions within the 3.5-7.8 pH range. It is found that capillary inner surface coatings using 5000 molecular weight (or higher) poly(ethylene glycol): significantly reduced electroosmosis within the selected pH range, were stable for long time periods, and appeared to be more effective than dextran, methylcellulose, or silane coatings.

  5. Laser Ablated Carbon Nanodots for Light Emission.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Delfino; Camacho, Marco; Camacho, Miguel; Mayorga, Miguel; Weathers, Duncan; Salamo, Greg; Wang, Zhiming; Neogi, Arup

    2016-12-01

    The synthesis of fluorescent carbon dots-like nanostructures (CNDs) obtained through the laser ablation of a carbon solid target in liquid environment is reported. The ablation process was induced in acetone with laser pulses of 1064, 532, and 355 nm under different irradiation times. Close-spherical amorphous CNDs with sizes between 5 and 20 nm, whose abundance strongly depends on the ablation parameters were investigated using electron microscopy and was confirmed using absorption and emission spectroscopies. The π- π* electronic transition at 3.76 eV dominates the absorption for all the CNDs species synthesized under different irradiation conditions. The light emission is most efficient due to excitation at 3.54 eV with the photoluminescence intensity centered at 3.23 eV. The light emission from the CNDs is most efficient due to ablation at 355 nm. The emission wavelength of the CNDs can be tuned from the near-UV to the green wavelength region by controlling the ablation time and modifying the ablation and excitation laser wavelength.

  6. Femtosecond laser lithotripsy: feasibility and ablation mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Jinze; Teichman, Joel M. H.; Wang, Tianyi; Neev, Joseph; Glickman, Randolph D.; Chan, Kin Foong; Milner, Thomas E.

    2010-03-01

    Light emitted from a femtosecond laser is capable of plasma-induced ablation of various materials. We tested the feasibility of utilizing femtosecond-pulsed laser radiation (λ=800 nm, 140 fs, 0.9 mJ/pulse) for ablation of urinary calculi. Ablation craters were observed in human calculi of greater than 90% calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM), cystine (CYST), or magnesium ammonium phosphate hexahydrate (MAPH). Largest crater volumes were achieved on CYST stones, among the most difficult stones to fragment using Holmium:YAG (Ho:YAG) lithotripsy. Diameter of debris was characterized using optical microscopy and found to be less than 20 μm, substantially smaller than that produced by long-pulsed Ho:YAG ablation. Stone retropulsion, monitored by a high-speed camera system with a spatial resolution of 15 μm, was negligible for stones with mass as small as 0.06 g. Peak shock wave pressures were less than 2 bars, measured by a polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) needle hydrophone. Ablation dynamics were visualized and characterized with pump-probe imaging and fast flash photography and correlated to shock wave pressures. Because femtosecond-pulsed laser ablates urinary calculi of soft and hard compositions, with micron-sized debris, negligible stone retropulsion, and small shock wave pressures, we conclude that the approach is a promising candidate technique for lithotripsy.

  7. Laser Ablated Carbon Nanodots for Light Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, Delfino; Camacho, Marco; Camacho, Miguel; Mayorga, Miguel; Weathers, Duncan; Salamo, Greg; Wang, Zhiming; Neogi, Arup

    2016-09-01

    The synthesis of fluorescent carbon dots-like nanostructures (CNDs) obtained through the laser ablation of a carbon solid target in liquid environment is reported. The ablation process was induced in acetone with laser pulses of 1064, 532, and 355 nm under different irradiation times. Close-spherical amorphous CNDs with sizes between 5 and 20 nm, whose abundance strongly depends on the ablation parameters were investigated using electron microscopy and was confirmed using absorption and emission spectroscopies. The π- π* electronic transition at 3.76 eV dominates the absorption for all the CNDs species synthesized under different irradiation conditions. The light emission is most efficient due to excitation at 3.54 eV with the photoluminescence intensity centered at 3.23 eV. The light emission from the CNDs is most efficient due to ablation at 355 nm. The emission wavelength of the CNDs can be tuned from the near-UV to the green wavelength region by controlling the ablation time and modifying the ablation and excitation laser wavelength.

  8. Pulsed HF laser ablation of dentin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papagiakoumou, Eirini I.; Papadopoulos, Dimitris N.; Makropoulou, Mersini I.; Khabbaz, Maruan G.; Serafetinides, Alexander A.

    2005-03-01

    The interaction of a TEA (Transversally Excited Atmospheric pressure) corona preionized oscillator double amplifier HF (hydrogen fluoride) laser beam with dentin tissue is reported. Pulses of 39 ns in the wavelength range of 2.65-3.35 μm and output energies in the range of 10-45 mJ, in a predominantly TEM00 beam were used to interact with dentin tissue. Ablation experiments were conducted with the laser beam directly focused on the tissue. Several samples of freshly extracted human teeth were used, cut longitudinally in facets of about 1mm thick and stored in phosphate buffered saline after being cleaned from the soft tissue remains. The experimental data (ablation thresholds, ablation rates) are discussed with respect to the ablation mechanism(s). Adequate tissue removal was observed and the ablation behavior was, in the greates part of the available fluences, almost linear. From the microscopic examination of teh samples, in a scanning electron microscope (SEM), the irradiated surfaces displayed oval craters (reflecting the laser beam shape) with absence of any melting or carbonization zone. It is suggested that the specific laser removes hard tissue by a combined photothermal and plasma mediated ablation mechanism, leaving a surface free from thermal damage and with a well-shaped crater.

  9. Basic ablation phenomena during laser thrombolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathyam, Ujwal S.; Shearin, Alan; Prahl, Scott A.

    1997-05-01

    This paper presents studies of microsecond ablation phenomena that take place during laser thrombolysis. The main goals were to optimize laser parameters for efficient ablation, and to investigate the ablation mechanism. Gelatin containing an absorbing dye was used as the clot model. A parametric study was performed to identify the optimal wavelength, spot size, pulse energies, and repetition rate for maximum material removal. The minimum radiant exposures to achieve ablation at any wavelength were measured. The results suggest that most visible wavelengths were equally efficient at removing material at radiant exposures above threshold. Ablation was initiated at surface temperatures just above 100 degrees Celsius. A vapor bubble was formed during ablation. Less than 5% of the total pulse energy is coupled into the bubble energy. A large part of the delivered energy is unaccounted for and is likely released partly as acoustic transients from the vapor expansion and partly wasted as heat. The current laser and delivery systems may not be able to completely remove large clot burden that is sometimes encountered in heart attacks. However, laser thrombolysis may emerge as a favored treatment for strokes where the occlusion is generally smaller and rapid recanalization is of paramount importance. A final hypothesis is that laser thrombolysis should be done at radiant exposures close to threshold to minimize any damaging effects of the bubble dynamics on the vessel wall.

  10. Laser Ablation for Small Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Pacella, Claudio Maurizio; Francica, Giampiero; Di Costanzo, Giovanni Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignancies worldwide and is increasingly detected at small size (<5 cm) owing to surveillance programmes in high-risk patients. For these cases, curative therapies such as resection, liver transplantation, or percutaneous ablation have been proposed. When surgical options are precluded, image-guided tumor ablation is recommended as the most appropriate therapeutic choice in terms of tumor local control, safety, and improvement in survival. Laser ablation (LA) represents one of currently available loco-ablative techniques: light is delivered via flexible quartz fibers of diameter from 300 to 600 μm inserted into tumor lesion through either fine needles (21g Chiba needles) or large-bore catheters. The thermal destruction of tissue is achieved through conversion of absorbed light (usually infrared) into heat. A range of different imaging modalities have been used to guide percutaneous laser ablation, but ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging are most widely employed, according to local experience and resource availability. Available clinical data suggest that LA is highly effective in terms of tumoricidal capability with an excellent safety profile; the best results in terms of long-term survival are obtained in early HCC so that LA can be proposed not only in unresectable cases but, not differently from radiofrequency ablation, also as the first-line treatment. PMID:22191028

  11. Optical modeling of laser ablated microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gower, M. C.; Davies, E.; Holmes, A. S.

    2012-11-01

    From only an a priori knowledge of the optical parameters of a laser beam, the delivery system together with a substrate's material properties, a ray-tracing model capable of predicting the 3-D topology of micro/nanostructures machined by pulsed laser ablation has been developed. The model includes secondary illumination effects produced by the microstructure created by successive pulses (wall reflections, refraction, wave guiding, shadowing, etc.) as well as the complete optical properties of the beam delivery system. We have used material ablation by pulsed excimer lasers and associated beam delivery systems to demonstrate some of the capabilities of the model. Good agreement is obtained between computations and experimental results in terms of the predicted ablation depth per pulse and the wall taper angle of channels and holes. The model can predict ablated profiles of holes and indicate the most efficient drilling strategy in terms of material removal rates. The model also shows diffraction effects are not required to explain the tapering vertical walls observed when ablating microstructures. Finally, the model has been used to demonstrate aberrations in an optical imaging system limiting the creation of submicron features in an ablated microstructure. Provided photons are absorbed linearly in a substrate according to Beer's law with negligible thermal diffusion effects, the model is equally applicable to using other types of pulsed laser sources and systems with imaged or focused beams.

  12. Micrometeoroid ablation simulated in the laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternovsky, Zoltan; Thomas, Evan W.; DeLuca, Michael; Horanyi, Mihaly; Janches, Diego; Munsat, Tobin L.; Plane, John M. C.

    2016-04-01

    A facility is developed to simulate the ablation of micrometeoroids in laboratory conditions, which also allows measuring the ionization probability of the ablated material. An electrostatic dust accelerator is used to generate iron and meteoric analog particles with velocities 10-50 km/s. The particles are then introduced into a cell filled with nitrogen, air or carbon dioxide gas with pressures adjustable in the 0.02 - 0.5 Torr range, where the partial or complete ablation of the particle occurs over a short distance. An array of biased electrodes is used to collect the ionized products with spatial resolution along the ablating particles' path, allowing thus the study of the temporal resolution of the process. A simple ablation model is used to match the observations. For completely ablated particles the total collected charge directly yields the ionization efficiency for. The measurements using iron particles in N2 and air are in relatively good agreement with earlier data. The measurements with CO2 and He gases, however, are significantly different from the expectations.

  13. Laser Ablated Carbon Nanodots for Light Emission.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Delfino; Camacho, Marco; Camacho, Miguel; Mayorga, Miguel; Weathers, Duncan; Salamo, Greg; Wang, Zhiming; Neogi, Arup

    2016-12-01

    The synthesis of fluorescent carbon dots-like nanostructures (CNDs) obtained through the laser ablation of a carbon solid target in liquid environment is reported. The ablation process was induced in acetone with laser pulses of 1064, 532, and 355 nm under different irradiation times. Close-spherical amorphous CNDs with sizes between 5 and 20 nm, whose abundance strongly depends on the ablation parameters were investigated using electron microscopy and was confirmed using absorption and emission spectroscopies. The π- π* electronic transition at 3.76 eV dominates the absorption for all the CNDs species synthesized under different irradiation conditions. The light emission is most efficient due to excitation at 3.54 eV with the photoluminescence intensity centered at 3.23 eV. The light emission from the CNDs is most efficient due to ablation at 355 nm. The emission wavelength of the CNDs can be tuned from the near-UV to the green wavelength region by controlling the ablation time and modifying the ablation and excitation laser wavelength. PMID:27659953

  14. Novel Laser Ablation Technology for Surface Decontamination

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Chung H.

    2004-06-01

    Laser ablation for surface cleaning has been pursued for the removal of paint on airplanes. It has also been pursued for the cleaning of semiconductor surfaces. However, all these approaches have been pursued by laser ablation in air. For highly contaminated surface, laser ablation in air can easily cause secondary contamination. Thus it is not suitable to apply to achieve surface decontamination for DOE facilities since many of these facilities have radioactive contaminants on the surface. Any secondary contamination will be a grave concern. The objective of this project is to develop a novel technology for laser ablation in liquid for surface decontamination. It aims to achieve more efficient surface decontamination without secondary contamination and to evaluate the economic feasibility for large scale surface decontamination with laser ablation in liquid. When laser ablation is pursued in the solution, all the desorbed contaminants will be confined in liquid. The contaminants can be precipitated and subsequently contained in a small volume for disposal. It can reduce the risk of the decontamination workers. It can also reduce the volume of contaminants dramatically.

  15. A Rare Association of Trigeminal Autonomic Cephalgia: Pontine Capillary Telangiectasia

    PubMed Central

    Kurt, Erdal; Arslan, Sabina; Unal-Cevik, Isin; Karli Oguz, Kader; Tezer, F Irsel

    2015-01-01

    This report describes a case of pontine capillary telangiectasia in a 43-year-old woman with a clinical diagnosis of trigeminal autonomic cephalgia. The possible association with pontine capillary telangiectasia and trigeminal autonomic cephalgia is discussed. PMID:25963152

  16. Plans and status of the Beryllium ablator campaign on NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kline, J. L.; Yi, S. A.; Simakov, A. N.; Wilson, D. C.; Olson, R. E.; Krasheninnikova, N. S.; Kyrala, G. A.; Perry, T. S.; Batha, S. H.; Dewald, E. L.; Edwards, M. J.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Meezan, N. B.

    2014-10-01

    Beryllium has long been known to have excellent properties for indirectly driven ICF implosions including enhanced ablation pressure, implosion velocity, and mass ablation rate. The high ablation velocity leads to stabilization of ablative hydrodynamic instabilities and higher ablation pressures. Recent ``high foot'' experiments have shown ablative Rayleigh-Taylor to be a leading cause of degraded performance for ICF implosions. While Beryllium ablators have these advantages, there are also risks associated with Beryllium target designs. A campaign is underway to design and to test these advantages for comparison with other ablator options and determine which provides the best path forward for ICF. Experiments using Beryllium ablators are expected to start in the late summer of 2014. This presentation will discuss the status of the experiments and layout the plans/goals for the campaign. This work is supported by the US DOE.

  17. Successful non-operative management of left atrioesophageal fistula following catheter ablation.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Manabu; Morita, Hideki; Muramatsu, Kenichi; Sato, Akira; Nitta, Junichi; Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Adachi, Hideo

    2014-08-01

    Atrioesophageal fistula (AEF) is a potentially lethal complication of catheter radiofrequency ablation for atrial fibrillation. A 49-year-old man with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation who underwent catheter ablation around the pulmonary vein was admitted 31 days after the procedure, suffering seizures and fever. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed ischemia and multiple lesions of acute infarction in the right occipital lobe of the cerebrum. Computed tomography (CT) of the chest showed a small accumulation of air between the posterior left atrium and the esophagus, suggesting an AEF. Endoscopic snaring of the esophageal mucosa, repeated a few times, supported by nil by mouth and antibiotic therapy, resulted in improvement of his condition with no recurrence of symptoms. Subsequent chest CT scans confirmed disappearance of the leaked air and the patient was discharged home 45 days after admission with no neurological compromise.

  18. Spectrometer capillary vessel and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Linehan, John C.; Yonker, Clement R.; Zemanian, Thomas S.; Franz, James A.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention is an arrangement of a glass capillary tube for use in spectroscopy. In particular, the invention is a capillary arranged in a manner permitting a plurality or multiplicity of passes of a sample material through a spectroscopic measurement zone. In a preferred embodiment, the multi-pass capillary is insertable within a standard NMR sample tube. The present invention further includes a method of making the multi-pass capillary tube and an apparatus for spinning the tube.

  19. Spectrometer capillary vessel and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Linehan, J.C.; Yonker, C.R.; Zemanian, T.S.; Franz, J.A.

    1995-11-21

    The present invention is an arrangement of a glass capillary tube for use in spectroscopy. In particular, the invention is a capillary arranged in a manner permitting a plurality or multiplicity of passes of a sample material through a spectroscopic measurement zone. In a preferred embodiment, the multi-pass capillary is insertable within a standard NMR sample tube. The present invention further includes a method of making the multi-pass capillary tube and an apparatus for spinning the tube. 13 figs.

  20. Radiofrequency Ablation Beyond the Liver

    PubMed Central

    Neeman, Ziv; Wood, Bradford J.

    2008-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has begun to show promise for extrahepatic indications. Although much of the reported work on image-guided RFA of liver neoplasms is quite promising, it is even earlier in the evaluation and validation process for extrahepatic RFA, with few short-term and no long-term studies reported. Although there are much more data for liver RFA with almost 3,000 cases reported in the literature, there are a number of ongoing investigations of RFA for tumors in the kidney, lung, bone, breast, bone, and adrenal gland. Debulking and pain control with RFA present palliative options becoming increasingly popular weapons in the interventionalist's oncology arsenal. Metastatic disease with a wide variety of primary histologies in a myriad of locations may be treated with RFA after a careful consideration of the risk-to-benefit ratio balance. The RFA technique can be slightly different outside the liver. Specifically, differing dielectric tissue characteristics may markedly alter the RFA treatment. Each different RFA system has a unique risk and advantage profile. Extrahepatic indications and contraindications will be suggested. Treatment tips and the unique complications and considerations will be introduced for some of the more common extrahepatic locations. PMID:12524646

  1. Dust Ablation in Pluto's Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horanyi, M.; Poppe, A. R.; Sternovsky, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Based on measurements by in situ dust detectors onboard the Pioneer and New Horizon spacecraft the total production rate of dust particles born in the Kuiper belt can be estimated to be on the order of 5 x 10 ^3 kg/s in the approximate size range of 1 - 10 micron. These particles slowly migrate inward due to Poynting - Robertson drag and their spatial distribution is shaped by mean motion resonances with the gas giant planets in the outer solar system. The expected mass influx into Pluto's atmosphere is on the order of 50 kg/day, and the arrival speed of the incoming particles is on the order of 3 - 4 km/s. We have followed the ablation history as function of speed and size of dust particles in Pluto's atmosphere, and found that, if the particles are rich in volatiles, they can fully sublimate due to drag heating and deposit their mass in a narrow layer. This deposition might promote the formation of the haze layers observed by the New Horizons spacecraft. This talk will explore the constraints on the composition of the dust particles, as well as on our newly developed models of Pluto's atmosphere that can be learned by matching the altitude where haze layers could be formed.

  2. Dust ablation in Pluto's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horanyi, Mihaly; Poppe, Andrew; Sternovsky, Zoltan

    2016-04-01

    Based on measurements by dust detectors onboard the Pioneer 10/11 and New Horizons spacecraft the total production rate of dust particles born in the Edgeworth Kuiper Belt (EKB) has been be estimated to be on the order of 5 ṡ 103 kg/s in the approximate size range of 1 - 10 μm. Dust particles are produced by collisions between EKB objects and their bombardment by both interplanetary and interstellar dust particles. Dust particles of EKB origin, in general, migrate towards the Sun due to Poynting-Robertson drag but their distributions are further sculpted by mean-motion resonances as they first approach the orbit of Neptune and later the other planets, as well as mutual collisions. Subsequently, Jupiter will eject the vast majority of them before they reach the inner solar system. The expected mass influx into Pluto atmosphere is on the order of 200 kg/day, and the arrival speed of the incoming particles is on the order of 3 - 4 km/s. We have followed the ablation history as function of speed and size of dust particles in Pluto's atmosphere, and found that volatile rich particles can fully sublimate due to drag heating and deposit their mass in narrow layers. This deposition might promote the formation of the haze layers observed by the New Horizons spacecraft. This talk will explore the constraints on the composition of the dust particles by comparing the altitude of the deposition layers to the observed haze layers.

  3. Magnetocardiographically-guided catheter ablation.

    PubMed

    Fenici, R R; Covino, M; Cellerino, C; Di Lillo, M; De Filippo, M C; Melillo, G

    1995-12-01

    After more than 30 years since the first magnetocardiographic (MCG) recording was carried out with induction coils, MCG is now approaching the threshold of clinical use. During the last 5 years, in fact, there has been a growing interest of clinicians in this new method which provides an unrivalled accuracy for noninvasive, three-dimensional localization of intracardiac source. An increasing number of laboratories are reporting data validating the use of MCG as an effective method for preoperative localization of arrhythmogenic substrates and for planning the best catheter ablation approach for different arrhythmogenic substrates. In this article, available data from literature have been reviewed. We consider the clinical use of MCG to localize arrhythmogenic substrates in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome and in patients with ventricular tachycardia in order to assess the state-of-the-art of the method on a large number of patients. This article also addresses some suggestions for industrial development of more compact, medically oriented MCG equipments at reasonable cost.

  4. Lip Reconstruction after Tumor Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi, Ali; Kalantar Motamedi, Mohammad Hossein; Ebrahimi, Azin; Kazemi, Mohammad; Shams, Amin; Hashemzadeh, Haleh

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 25% of all oral cavity carcinomas involve the lips, and the primary management of these lesions is complete surgical resection. Loss of tissue in the lips after resection is treated with a variety of techniques, depending on the extension and location of the defect. Here we review highly accepted techniques of lip reconstruction and some of new trials with significant clinical results. Reconstruction choice is primarily depend to size of the defect, localization of defect, elasticity of tissues. But patient’s age, comorbidities, and motivation are also important. According to the defect location and size, different reconstruction methods can be used. For defects involved less than 30% of lips, primary closures are sufficient. In defects with 35–70% lip involvement, the Karapandzic, Abbe, Estlander, McGregor or Gillies’ fan flaps or their modifications can be used. When lip remaining tissues are insufficient, cheek tissue can be used in Webster and Bernard advancement flaps and their various modifications. Deltopectoral or radial forearm free flaps can be options for large defects of the lip extending to the Jaws. To achieve best functional and esthetic results, surgeons should be able to choose most appropriate reconstruction method. Considering defects’ size and location, patients’ expects and surgeon’s ability and knowledge, a variety of flaps are presented in order to reconstruct defects resulted from tumor ablation. It’s necessary for surgeons to trace the recent innovations in lip reconstruction to offer best choices to patients. PMID:27308236

  5. A systematic review of surgical ablation versus catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Kearney, Katherine; Stephenson, Rowan; Phan, Kevin; Chan, Wei Yen; Huang, Min Yin

    2014-01-01

    Background Atrial fibrillation (AF) is an increasingly prevalent condition in the ageing population, with significantly associated morbidity and mortality. Surgical and catheter ablative strategies both aim to reduce mortality and morbidity through freedom from AF. This review consolidates all currently available comparative data to evaluate these two interventions. Methods A systematic search was conducted across MEDLINE, PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews from January 2000 until August 2013. All studies were critically appraised and only those directly comparing surgical and catheter ablation were included. Results Seven studies were deemed suitable for analysis according to the inclusion criteria. Freedom from AF was significantly higher in the surgical ablation group versus the catheter ablation group at 6-month, 12-month and study endpoint follow-up periods. Subgroup analysis demonstrated similar trends, with higher freedom from AF in the surgical ablation group for paroxysmal AF patients. The incidence of pacemaker implantation was higher, while no difference in stroke or cardiac tamponade was demonstrated for the surgical versus catheter ablation groups. Conclusions Current evidence suggests that epicardial ablative strategies are associated with higher freedom from AF, higher pacemaker implantation rates and comparable neurological complications and cardiac tamponade incidence to catheter ablative treatment. Other complications and risks were poorly reported, which warrants further randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of adequate power and follow-up duration. PMID:24516794

  6. Online monitoring of nanoparticles formed during nanosecond laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nováková, Hana; Holá, Markéta; Vojtíšek-Lom, Michal; Ondráček, Jakub; Kanický, Viktor

    2016-11-01

    The particle size distribution of dry aerosol originating from laser ablation of glass material was monitored simultaneously with Laser Ablation - Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) analysis and two aerosol spectrometers - Fast Mobility Particle Sizer (FMPS) and Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (APS). The unique combination of LA-ICP-MS and FMPS offers the possibility of measuring the particle size distribution every 1 s of the ablation process in the size range of 5.6-560 nm. APS extends the information about particle concentration in the size range 0.54-17 μm. Online monitoring of the dry aerosol was performed for two ablation modes (spot and line with a duration of 80 s) with a 193 nm excimer laser system, using the glass reference material NIST 610 as a sample. Different sizes of laser spot for spot ablation and different scan speeds for line ablation were tested. It was found that the FMPS device is capable of detecting changes in particle size distribution at the first pulses of spot laser ablation and is suitable for laser ablation control simultaneously with LA-ICP-MS analysis. The studied parameters of laser ablation have an influence on the resulting particle size distribution. The line mode of laser ablation produces larger particles during the whole ablation process, while spot ablation produces larger particles only at the beginning, during the ablation of the intact layer of the ablated material. Moreover, spot ablation produces more primary nano-particles (in ultrafine mode size range < 100 nm) than line ablation. This effect is most probably caused by a reduced amount of large particles released from the spot ablation crater. The larger particles scavenge the ultrafine particles during the line ablation mode.

  7. Laser illumination of multiple capillaries that form a waveguide

    DOEpatents

    Dhadwal, H.S.; Quesada, M.A.; Studier, F.W.

    1998-08-04

    A system and method are disclosed for efficient laser illumination of the interiors of multiple capillaries simultaneously, and collection of light emitted from them. Capillaries in a parallel array can form an optical waveguide wherein refraction at the cylindrical surfaces confines side-on illuminating light to the core of each successive capillary in the array. Methods are provided for determining conditions where capillaries will form a waveguide and for assessing and minimizing losses due to reflection. Light can be delivered to the arrayed capillaries through an integrated fiber optic transmitter or through a pair of such transmitters aligned coaxially at opposite sides of the array. Light emitted from materials within the capillaries can be carried to a detection system through optical fibers, each of which collects light from a single capillary, with little cross talk between the capillaries. The collection ends of the optical fibers can be in a parallel array with the same spacing as the capillary array, so that the collection fibers can all be aligned to the capillaries simultaneously. Applicability includes improving the efficiency of many analytical methods that use capillaries, including particularly high-throughput DNA sequencing and diagnostic methods based on capillary electrophoresis. 35 figs.

  8. Cyclodextrin-Functionalized Monolithic Capillary Columns: Preparation and Chiral Applications.

    PubMed

    Adly, Frady G; Antwi, Nana Yaa; Ghanem, Ashraf

    2016-02-01

    In this review, the recently reported approaches for the preparation of cyclodextrin-functionalized capillary monolithic columns are highlighted, with few applications in chiral separations using capillary liquid chromatography (CLC) and capillary electrochromatography (CEC). Chirality 28:97-109, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Laser illumination of multiple capillaries that form a waveguide

    DOEpatents

    Dhadwal, Harbans S.; Quesada, Mark A.; Studier, F. William

    1998-08-04

    A system and method are disclosed for efficient laser illumination of the interiors of multiple capillaries simultaneously, and collection of light emitted from them. Capillaries in a parallel array can form an optical waveguide wherein refraction at the cylindrical surfaces confines side-on illuminating light to the core of each successive capillary in the array. Methods are provided for determining conditions where capillaries will form a waveguide and for assessing and minimizing losses due to reflection. Light can be delivered to the arrayed capillaries through an integrated fiber optic transmitter or through a pair of such transmitters aligned coaxially at opposite sides of the array. Light emitted from materials within the capillaries can be carried to a detection system through optical fibers, each of which collects light from a single capillary, with little cross talk between the capillaries. The collection ends of the optical fibers can be in a parallel array with the same spacing as the capillary array, so that the collection fibers can all be aligned to the capillaries simultaneously. Applicability includes improving the efficiency of many analytical methods that use capillaries, including particularly high-throughput DNA sequencing and diagnostic methods based on capillary electrophoresis.

  10. Application of CHESS single-bounce capillaries at synchrotron beamlines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, R.; Szebenyi, T.; Pfeifer, M.; Woll, A.; Smilgies, D.-M.; Finkelstein, K.; Dale, D.; Wang, Y.; Vila-Comamala, J.; Gillilan, R.; Cook, M.; Bilderback, D. H.

    2014-03-01

    Single-bounce capillaries are achromatic X-ray focusing optics that can provide efficient and high demagnification focusing with large numerical apertures. Capillary fabrication at CHESS can be customized according to specific application requirements. Exemplary applications are reviewed in this paper, as well as recent progress on condensers for high-resolution transmission X-ray microscopy and small focal size capillaries.

  11. 21 CFR 864.6150 - Capillary blood collection tube.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Capillary blood collection tube. 864.6150 Section... blood collection tube. (a) Identification. A capillary blood collection tube is a plain or heparinized glass tube of very small diameter used to collect blood by capillary action. (b) Classification. Class...

  12. 21 CFR 864.6150 - Capillary blood collection tube.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Capillary blood collection tube. 864.6150 Section... blood collection tube. (a) Identification. A capillary blood collection tube is a plain or heparinized glass tube of very small diameter used to collect blood by capillary action. (b) Classification. Class...

  13. 21 CFR 864.6150 - Capillary blood collection tube.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Capillary blood collection tube. 864.6150 Section... blood collection tube. (a) Identification. A capillary blood collection tube is a plain or heparinized glass tube of very small diameter used to collect blood by capillary action. (b) Classification. Class...

  14. 21 CFR 864.6150 - Capillary blood collection tube.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Capillary blood collection tube. 864.6150 Section... blood collection tube. (a) Identification. A capillary blood collection tube is a plain or heparinized glass tube of very small diameter used to collect blood by capillary action. (b) Classification. Class...

  15. 21 CFR 864.6150 - Capillary blood collection tube.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Capillary blood collection tube. 864.6150 Section... blood collection tube. (a) Identification. A capillary blood collection tube is a plain or heparinized glass tube of very small diameter used to collect blood by capillary action. (b) Classification. Class...

  16. Macroscopic theory for capillary-pressure hysteresis.

    PubMed

    Athukorallage, Bhagya; Aulisa, Eugenio; Iyer, Ram; Zhang, Larry

    2015-03-01

    In this article, we present a theory of macroscopic contact angle hysteresis by considering the minimization of the Helmholtz free energy of a solid-liquid-gas system over a convex set, subject to a constant volume constraint. The liquid and solid surfaces in contact are assumed to adhere weakly to each other, causing the interfacial energy to be set-valued. A simple calculus of variations argument for the minimization of the Helmholtz energy leads to the Young-Laplace equation for the drop surface in contact with the gas and a variational inequality that yields contact angle hysteresis for advancing/receding flow. We also show that the Young-Laplace equation with a Dirichlet boundary condition together with the variational inequality yields a basic hysteresis operator that describes the relationship between capillary pressure and volume. We validate the theory using results from the experiment for a sessile macroscopic drop. Although the capillary effect is a complex phenomenon even for a droplet as various points along the contact line might be pinned, the capillary pressure and volume of the drop are scalar variables that encapsulate the global quasistatic energy information for the entire droplet. Studying the capillary pressure versus volume relationship greatly simplifies the understanding and modeling of the phenomenon just as scalar magnetic hysteresis graphs greatly aided the modeling of devices with magnetic materials.

  17. Interaction of light particles with capillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tőkési, K.; DuBois, R. D.

    2013-04-01

    The possible similarities and differences between the transmission of slow highly charged ions and light particles, like positrons and electrons, through a single cylindrical, tapered glass capillary with large aspect ratio are studied. We address the question whether the guiding-effect is observable for low intensity positron beams.

  18. Using Capillary Flows to Pattern Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyawahare, Saurabh; Craig, Kate; Scherer, Axel

    2006-03-01

    One can appreciate how capillary forces cause unexpected patterns and shapes by looking at a soap bubble. Pattern formation by surface tension is seen in ring patterns of coffee stains, fingering patterns in Hele-Shaw cells, ordering of two dimensional micro-sphere crystals, combing of DNA and skeleton formation in marine creatures called radiolarians. Though comman, problems involving the understanding and control of the self-assembly mechanism need to be resolved before using capillary forces as a practical lithographic tool. Here, we report capillary flows create line patterns in evaporating liquids between closely spaced parallel plates. The widths of these lines range from a few microns to a few nanometers. Deliberate patterning of such lines requires pinning of the contact line and the presence of foaming surfactants. The position and type of line can be controlled with artificial pinning points and varying solutes respectively, and large-scale photolithography can be used to guide and control the definition of nanostructures. We provide ``proof of principle'' demonstrations of this method's application by creating lines of colloidal quantum dots and micro-spheres. This represents the first step in using capillary phenomena to create controlled, self--assembling, one-dimensional wire-like structures

  19. Imbibition of ``Open Capillary'': Fundamentals and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tani, Marie; Kawano, Ryuji; Kamiya, Koki; Okumura, Ko

    2015-11-01

    Control or transportation of small amount of liquid is one of the most important issues in various contexts including medical sciences or pharmaceutical industries to fuel delivery. We studied imbibition of ``open capillary'' both experimentally and theoretically, and found simple scaling laws for both statics and dynamics of the imbibition, similarly as that of imbibition of capillary tubes. Furthermore, we revealed the existence of ``precursor film,'' which developed ahead of the imbibing front, and the dynamics of it is described well by another scaling law for capillary rise in a corner. Then, to show capabilities of open capillaries, we demonstrated two experiments by fabricating micro mixing devices to achieve (1) simultaneous multi-color change of the Bromothymol blue (BTB) solution and (2) expression of the green florescent protein (GFP). This research was partly supported by ImPACT Program of Council for Science, Technology and Innovation (Cabinet Office, Government of Japan). M. T. is supported by the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science Research Fellowships for Young Scientists.

  20. Macroscopic theory for capillary-pressure hysteresis.

    PubMed

    Athukorallage, Bhagya; Aulisa, Eugenio; Iyer, Ram; Zhang, Larry

    2015-03-01

    In this article, we present a theory of macroscopic contact angle hysteresis by considering the minimization of the Helmholtz free energy of a solid-liquid-gas system over a convex set, subject to a constant volume constraint. The liquid and solid surfaces in contact are assumed to adhere weakly to each other, causing the interfacial energy to be set-valued. A simple calculus of variations argument for the minimization of the Helmholtz energy leads to the Young-Laplace equation for the drop surface in contact with the gas and a variational inequality that yields contact angle hysteresis for advancing/receding flow. We also show that the Young-Laplace equation with a Dirichlet boundary condition together with the variational inequality yields a basic hysteresis operator that describes the relationship between capillary pressure and volume. We validate the theory using results from the experiment for a sessile macroscopic drop. Although the capillary effect is a complex phenomenon even for a droplet as various points along the contact line might be pinned, the capillary pressure and volume of the drop are scalar variables that encapsulate the global quasistatic energy information for the entire droplet. Studying the capillary pressure versus volume relationship greatly simplifies the understanding and modeling of the phenomenon just as scalar magnetic hysteresis graphs greatly aided the modeling of devices with magnetic materials. PMID:25646688

  1. Analytical biotechnology: Capillary electrophoresis and chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, C.; Nikelly, J.G.

    1990-01-01

    The papers describe the separation, characterization, and equipment required for the electrophoresis or chromatography of cyclic nucleotides, pharmaceuticals, therapeutic proteins, recombinant DNA products, pheromones, peptides, and other biological materials. One paper, On-column radioisotope detection for capillary electrophoresis, has been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  2. Numerical simulations of capillary barrier field tests

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, C.E.; Stormont, J.C.

    1997-12-31

    Numerical simulations of two capillary barrier systems tested in the field were conducted to determine if an unsaturated flow model could accurately represent the observed results. The field data was collected from two 7-m long, 1.2-m thick capillary barriers built on a 10% grade that were being tested to investigate their ability to laterally divert water downslope. One system had a homogeneous fine layer, while the fine soil of the second barrier was layered to increase its ability to laterally divert infiltrating moisture. The barriers were subjected first to constant infiltration while minimizing evaporative losses and then were exposed to ambient conditions. The continuous infiltration period of the field tests for the two barrier systems was modelled to determine the ability of an existing code to accurately represent capillary barrier behavior embodied in these two designs. Differences between the field test and the model data were found, but in general the simulations appeared to adequately reproduce the response of the test systems. Accounting for moisture retention hysteresis in the layered system will potentially lead to more accurate modelling results and is likely to be important when developing reasonable predictions of capillary barrier behavior.

  3. Ultraviolet femtosecond and nanosecond laser ablation of silicon: Ablation efficiency and laser-induced plasma expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Xianzhong; Mao, Xianglei; Greif, Ralph; Russo, Richard E.

    2004-03-23

    Femtosecond laser ablation of silicon in air was studied and compared with nanosecond laser ablation at ultraviolet wavelength (266 nm). Laser ablation efficiency was studied by measuring crater depth as a function of pulse number. For the same number of laser pulses, the fs-ablated crater was about two times deeper than the ns-crater. The temperature and electron number density of the pulsed laser-induced plasma were determined from spectroscopic measurements. The electron number density and temperature of fs-pulse plasmas decreased faster than ns-pulse plasmas due to different energy deposition mechanisms. Images of the laser-induced plasma were obtained with femtosecond time-resolved laser shadowgraph imaging. Plasma expansion in both the perpendicular and the lateral directions to the laser beam were compared for femtosecond and nanosecond laser ablation.

  4. Femtosecond ultraviolet laser ablation of silver and comparison with nanosecond ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Toftmann, B.; Schou, J.; Doggett, B.; Budtz-Jorgensen, C.; Lunney, J. G.

    2013-02-28

    The ablation plume dynamics arising from ablation of silver with a 500 fs, 248 nm laser at {approx}2 J cm{sup -2} has been studied using angle-resolved Langmuir ion probe and thin film deposition techniques. For the same laser fluence, the time-of-flight ion signals from femtosecond and nanosecond laser ablation are similar; both show a singly peaked time-of-flight distribution. The angular distribution of ion emission and the deposition are well described by the adiabatic and isentropic model of plume expansion, though distributions for femtosecond ablation are significantly narrower. In this laser fluence regime, the energy efficiency of mass ablation is higher for femtosecond pulses than for nanosecond pulses, but the ion production efficiency is lower.

  5. Photoacoustic characterization of radiofrequency ablation lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchard, Richard; Dana, Nicholas; Di Biase, Luigi; Natale, Andrea; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2012-02-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) procedures are used to destroy abnormal electrical pathways in the heart that can cause cardiac arrhythmias. Current methods relying on fluoroscopy, echocardiography and electrical conduction mapping are unable to accurately assess ablation lesion size. In an effort to better visualize RFA lesions, photoacoustic (PA) and ultrasonic (US) imaging were utilized to obtain co-registered images of ablated porcine cardiac tissue. The left ventricular free wall of fresh (i.e., never frozen) porcine hearts was harvested within 24 hours of the animals' sacrifice. A THERMOCOOLR Ablation System (Biosense Webster, Inc.) operating at 40 W for 30-60 s was used to induce lesions through the endocardial and epicardial walls of the cardiac samples. Following lesion creation, the ablated tissue samples were placed in 25 °C saline to allow for multi-wavelength PA imaging. Samples were imaged with a VevoR 2100 ultrasound system (VisualSonics, Inc.) using a modified 20-MHz array that could provide laser irradiation to the sample from a pulsed tunable laser (Newport Corp.) to allow for co-registered photoacoustic-ultrasound (PAUS) imaging. PA imaging was conducted from 750-1064 nm, with a surface fluence of approximately 15 mJ/cm2 maintained during imaging. In this preliminary study with PA imaging, the ablated region could be well visualized on the surface of the sample, with contrasts of 6-10 dB achieved at 750 nm. Although imaging penetration depth is a concern, PA imaging shows promise in being able to reliably visualize RF ablation lesions.

  6. Recent advances of ionic liquids and polymeric ionic liquids in capillary electrophoresis and capillary electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Tang, Sheng; Liu, Shujuan; Guo, Yong; Liu, Xia; Jiang, Shengxiang

    2014-08-29

    Ionic liquids (ILs) and polymeric ionic liquids (PILs) with unique and fascinating properties have drawn considerable interest for their use in separation science, especially in chromatographic techniques. In this article, significant contributions of ILs and PILs in the improvement of capillary electrophoresis and capillary electrochromatography are described, and a specific overview of the most relevant examples of their applications in the last five years is also given. Accordingly, some general conclusions and future perspectives in these areas are discussed.

  7. Dynamics of a capillary invasion in a closed-end capillary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Hosub; Tripathi, Anubhav; Lee, Jinkee

    2014-11-01

    The position of fluid invasion in an open capillary increases as the square root of time and ceases when the capillary and hydrostatic forces are balanced, when viscous and inertia terms are negligible. Although this fluid invasion into open-end capillaries has been well described, detailed studies of fluid invasion in closed-end capillaries have not been explored thoroughly. Thus, we demonstrated, both theoretically and experimentally, a fluid invasion in closed-end capillaries, where the movement of the meniscus and the invasion velocity are accompanied by adiabatic gas compression inside the capillary. Theoretically, we found the fluid oscillations during invasion at short time scales by solving the one dimensional momentum balance. This oscillatory motion is evaluated in order to determine which physical forces dominate the different conditions, and is further described by a damped driven harmonic oscillator model. However, this oscillating motion is not observed in the experiments. This inconsistency is due to the following; first, a continuous decrease in the radius of the curvature caused by decreasing the invasion velocity and increasing pressure inside the close-ended capillary, and second, the shear stress increase in the short time scale by the plug like velocity profile within the entrance length. The viscous term of modified momentum equation can be written as K8/μl rc2dl/dt by using the multiplying factor K, which represents the increase of shear stress. The K is 7.3, 5.1 and 4.8 while capillary aspect ratio χc is 740, 1008 and 1244, respectively.

  8. UV-laser ablation of ionic liquid matrices.

    PubMed

    Hellwig, Nils; Thrun, Alexander; Muskat, Tassilo; Grotemeyer, Jürgen

    2009-12-01

    Ionic liquid matrices are a new class of matrices used in MALDI mass spectrometry. The ablation process of several ionic liquid matrices was studied by determining the velocity distribution of ablated neutral matrix molecules. This was done by a postionization approach, where the neutrals were ionized in the ablation plume by a second laser pulse. It was found that a second, time-delayed ablation event occurs consisting completely of neutral molecules. To explain this, the reflected-shockwave model is used, which assumes that the shockwave emerging from the laser ablation is reflected at the sample holder surface. When the shockwave arrives at the sample surface it causes a second ablation.

  9. Ablation threshold and ablation mechanism transition of polyoxymethylene irradiated by CO2 laser.

    PubMed

    Li, Gan; Cheng, Mousen; Li, Xiaokang

    2016-09-01

    Polyoxymethylene (POM) decomposes gradually as it is heated up by the irradiation of CO2 laser; the long-chain molecules of POM are broken into short chains, which leads to the lowering of the melting point and the critical temperature of the ablation products. When the product temperature is above the melting point, ablation comes up in the way of vaporization; when the product temperature is higher than the critical temperature, all liquid products are transformed into gas instantly and the ablation mechanism is changed. The laser fluence at which significant ablation is observed is defined as the ablation threshold, and the fluence corresponding to the ablation mechanism changing is denoted as the flyover threshold. In this paper, random pyrolysis is adopted to describe the pyrolytic decomposition of POM, and consequently, the components of the pyrolysis products under different pyrolysis rates are acquired. The Group Contribution method is used to count the thermodynamic properties of the pyrolysis products, and the melting point and the critical temperature of the product mixture are obtained by the Mixing Law. The Knudsen layer relationship is employed to evaluate the ablation mass removal when the product temperature is below the critical temperature. The gas dynamics conservation laws associated with the Jouguet condition are used to calculate the mass removal when the product temperature is higher than the critical temperature. Based on the model, a set of simulations for various laser intensities and lengths are carried out to generalize the relationships between the thresholds and the laser parameters. Besides the ablated mass areal density, which fits the experimental data quite well, the ablation temperature, pyrolysis rate, and product components are also discussed for a better understanding of the ablation mechanism of POM.

  10. Ablation threshold and ablation mechanism transition of polyoxymethylene irradiated by CO2 laser.

    PubMed

    Li, Gan; Cheng, Mousen; Li, Xiaokang

    2016-09-01

    Polyoxymethylene (POM) decomposes gradually as it is heated up by the irradiation of CO2 laser; the long-chain molecules of POM are broken into short chains, which leads to the lowering of the melting point and the critical temperature of the ablation products. When the product temperature is above the melting point, ablation comes up in the way of vaporization; when the product temperature is higher than the critical temperature, all liquid products are transformed into gas instantly and the ablation mechanism is changed. The laser fluence at which significant ablation is observed is defined as the ablation threshold, and the fluence corresponding to the ablation mechanism changing is denoted as the flyover threshold. In this paper, random pyrolysis is adopted to describe the pyrolytic decomposition of POM, and consequently, the components of the pyrolysis products under different pyrolysis rates are acquired. The Group Contribution method is used to count the thermodynamic properties of the pyrolysis products, and the melting point and the critical temperature of the product mixture are obtained by the Mixing Law. The Knudsen layer relationship is employed to evaluate the ablation mass removal when the product temperature is below the critical temperature. The gas dynamics conservation laws associated with the Jouguet condition are used to calculate the mass removal when the product temperature is higher than the critical temperature. Based on the model, a set of simulations for various laser intensities and lengths are carried out to generalize the relationships between the thresholds and the laser parameters. Besides the ablated mass areal density, which fits the experimental data quite well, the ablation temperature, pyrolysis rate, and product components are also discussed for a better understanding of the ablation mechanism of POM. PMID:27607281

  11. Stable glow discharge detector

    DOEpatents

    Koo, Jackson C.; Yu, Conrad M.

    2004-05-18

    A highly sensitive electronic ion cell for the measurement of trace elements in He carrier gas which involves glow discharge. A constant wave (CW) stable glow discharge detector which is controlled through a biased resistor, can detect the change of electron density caused by impurities in the He carrier gas by many orders of magnitude larger than that caused by direct ionization or electron capture. The stable glow discharge detector utilizes a floating pseudo-electrode to form a probe in or near the plasma and a solid rod electrode. By using this probe, the large variation of electron density due to trace amounts of impurities can be directly measured. The solid rod electrode provides greater stability and thus easier alignment.

  12. Effect of Laser Wavelength and Ablation Time on Pulsed Laser Ablation Synthesis of AL Nanoparticles in Ethanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baladi, A.; Mamoory, R. Sarraf

    Aluminum nanoparticles were synthesized by pulsed laser ablation of Al targets in ethanol for 5-15 minutes using the 1064 and 533 nm wavelengths of a Nd:YAG laser with energies of 280-320 mJ per pulse. It has been found that higher wavelength leads to significantly higher ablation efficiency, and finer spherical nanoparticles are also synthesized. Besides, it was obvious that higher ablation time resulted in higher ablated mass, while lower ablation rate was observed. Finer nanoparticles, moreover, are synthesized in higher ablation times.

  13. [Radiofrequency transcatheter ablation in atrial tachycardia].

    PubMed

    Velázquez Rodríguez, E; Morales Hernández, J A

    2000-01-01

    Incessant atrial tachycardia is an infrequent arrhythmia. Specially difficult to treat medically. Radiofrequency catheter ablation has been used successfully to cure a variety of supraventricular tachycardias. The purpose of this work is to report our initial experience in the treatment of atrial tachycardia. Ten patients, mean age 28.7 +/- 15 year with conventional drug-resistant symptomatic atrial tachycardia were treated with selective ablation of the focus using radiofrequency energy. It was found an abnormal automaticity in 10 tachycardias and in only one patient intra-atrial reentrant was supported. Radiofrequency energy was successful in 10 of 11 tachycardias with a mean of 9.3 +/- 6.8 applications using the technique of local atrial electrogram activation time with a mean value of -54 +/- -31 milliseconds at the successful ablation sites. No complications were observed and one patient had an early clinical recurrence. All patients with successful ablation are symptom-free, in sinus rhythm and without antiarrhythmic medications after 1 to 28 months of follow-up. Our initial experience support that radiofrequency catheter ablation is a safe and effective therapeutic option for incessant atrial tachycardia. PMID:10855411

  14. Fracture in Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, Parul; Chavez-Garcia, Jose; Pham, John

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a novel technique to understand the failure mechanisms inside thermal protection materials. The focus of this research is on the class of materials known as phenolic impregnated carbon ablators. It has successfully flown on the Stardust spacecraft and is the thermal protection system material chosen for the Mars Science Laboratory and SpaceX Dragon spacecraft. Although it has good thermal properties, structurally, it is a weak material. To understand failure mechanisms in carbon ablators, fracture tests were performed on FiberForm(Registered TradeMark) (precursor), virgin, and charred ablator materials. Several samples of these materials were tested to investigate failure mechanisms at a microstructural scale. Stress-strain data were obtained simultaneously to estimate the tensile strength and toughness. It was observed that cracks initiated and grew in the FiberForm when a critical stress limit was reached such that the carbon fibers separated from the binder. However, both for virgin and charred carbon ablators, crack initiation and growth occurred in the matrix (phenolic) phase. Both virgin and charred carbon ablators showed greater strength values compared with FiberForm samples, confirming that the presence of the porous matrix helps in absorbing the fracture energy.

  15. Design Calculations for NIF Convergent Ablator Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, R. E.; Callahan, D. A.; Hicks, D. G.; Landen, O. L.; Langer, S. H.; Meezan, N. B.; Spears, B. K.; Widmann, K.; Kline, J. L.; Wilson, D. C.; Petrasso, R. D.; Leeper, R. J.

    2010-11-01

    Design calculations for NIF convergent ablator experiments will be described. The convergent ablator experiments measure the implosion trajectory, velocity, and ablation rate of an x-ray driven capsule and are a important component of the U. S. National Ignition Campaign at NIF. The design calculations are post-processed to provide simulations of the key diagnostics -- 1) Dante measurements of hohlraum x-ray flux and spectrum, 2) streaked radiographs of the imploding ablator shell, 3) wedge range filter measurements of D-He3 proton output spectra, and 4) GXD measurements of the imploded core. The simulated diagnostics will be compared to the experimental measurements to provide an assessment of the accuracy of the design code predictions of hohlraum radiation temperature, capsule ablation rate, implosion velocity, shock flash areal density, and x-ray bang time. Post-shot versions of the design calculations are used to enhance the understanding of the experimental measurements and will assist in choosing parameters for subsequent shots and the path towards optimal ignition capsule tuning. *SNL, LLNL, and LANL are operated under US DOE contracts DE-AC04-94AL85000. DE-AC52-07NA27344, and DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  16. Design calculations for NIF convergent ablator experiments.

    SciTech Connect

    Callahan, Debra; Leeper, Ramon Joe; Spears, B. K.; Zylstra, A.; Seguin, F.; Landen, Otto L.; Petrasso, R. D.; Rinderknecht, H.; Kline, J. L.; Frenje, J.; Wilson, D. C.; Langer, S. H.; Widmann, K.; Meezan, Nathan B.; Hicks, Damien G.; Olson, Richard Edward

    2010-11-01

    Design calculations for NIF convergent ablator experiments will be described. The convergent ablator experiments measure the implosion trajectory, velocity, and ablation rate of an x-ray driven capsule and are a important component of the U. S. National Ignition Campaign at NIF. The design calculations are post-processed to provide simulations of the key diagnostics: (1) Dante measurements of hohlraum x-ray flux and spectrum, (2) streaked radiographs of the imploding ablator shell, (3) wedge range filter measurements of D-He3 proton output spectra, and (4) GXD measurements of the imploded core. The simulated diagnostics will be compared to the experimental measurements to provide an assessment of the accuracy of the design code predictions of hohlraum radiation temperature, capsule ablation rate, implosion velocity, shock flash areal density, and x-ray bang time. Post-shot versions of the design calculations are used to enhance the understanding of the experimental measurements and will assist in choosing parameters for subsequent shots and the path towards optimal ignition capsule tuning.

  17. Estimating hyperconcentrated flow discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2012-02-01

    Determining flow discharge in torrential mountain floods can help in managing flood risk. However, standard methods of estimating discharge have significant uncertainties. To reduce these uncertainties, Bodoque et al. developed an iterative methodological approach to flow estimation based on a method known as the critical depth method along with paleoflood evidence. They applied the method to study a flash flood that occurred on 17 December 1997 in the Arroyo Cabrera catchment in central Spain. This large flow event, triggered by torrential rains, was complex and included hyperconcentrated flows, which are flows of water mixed with significant amounts of sediment.

  18. Method of making tapered capillary tips with constant inner diameters

    DOEpatents

    Kelly, Ryan T.; Page, Jason S.; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.

    2009-02-17

    Methods of forming electrospray ionization emitter tips are disclosed herein. In one embodiment, an end portion of a capillary tube can be immersed into an etchant, wherein the etchant forms a concave meniscus on the outer surface of the capillary. Variable etching rates in the meniscus can cause an external taper to form. While etching the outer surface of the capillary wall, a fluid can be flowed through the interior of the capillary tube. Etching continues until the immersed portion of the capillary tube is completely etched away.

  19. The influence of artificial sealing on the capillary barrier's function.

    PubMed

    Trpkosová, Dagmar; Mls, Jirí

    2010-01-01

    Regulations for the sealing of landfill sites require two independent sealing components. To satisfy this requirement, the combined capillary barrier was developed using impermeable sheeting placed between the capillary layer and the capillary block of the traditional capillary barrier. In this study, a numerical model is introduced based on hydraulic characteristics obtained by means of measurements of samples of capillary barrier materials. To make a comparison possible, samples of a laboratory investigated barrier were measured. Two laboratory experiments with a simple and a combined capillary barrier were repeated using the developed numerical model and good agreement between computed and measured results was found. Subsequently, the model was used for investigating the effect of failure of the artificial sheeting on the capillary barrier's efficiency. The obtained results are presented and discussed. PMID:19853432

  20. Capillary leakage in travelers with dengue infection: implications for pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Meltzer, Eyal; Heyman, Zahava; Bin, Hanna; Schwartz, Eli

    2012-03-01

    Dengue hemorrhagic fever is characterized by the presence of a capillary leak syndrome. Its pathogenesis is presumed to differ from that of classical dengue fever (DF) and to be associated with secondary dengue infection. Returning travelers given a diagnosis of DF were evaluated for capillary leakage with abdominal sonography. Data were compared between travelers with primary/secondary infection defined by epidemiologic and serologic parameters. A total of 12 (34.3%) of 35 patients had sonographic signs of capillary leakage. Most (85%) patients with capillary leakage had classical DF. Capillary leak was diagnosed in 32% of primary dengue cases and in 40% of secondary dengue cases (P = 0.69). The two patients given a diagnosis of dengue hemorrhagic fever had primary infections. The high prevalence of capillary leakage among travelers, most of them with primary exposure to dengue, calls into question the importance of secondary infection in causing capillary leakage in dengue infection.

  1. How effective is microwave ablation for atrial fibrillation during concomitant cardiac surgery?

    PubMed

    MacDonald, David Robert Walker; Maruthappu, Mahiben; Nagendran, Myura

    2012-07-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiothoracic surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether performing microwave ablative procedures during concomitant cardiac surgical procedures is effective for the treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF). In total, 200 papers were found using the reported search, of which 12 represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. Major exclusion criteria included studies exclusively using bipolar ablation, ambiguous or unspecified ablation technique, other energy modalities and studies with highly variable or undisclosed follow-up time. One study reported that 66% of patients were in sinus rhythm (SR) with follow-ups ranging from 1 to 14 months and suggested that the risk of AF recurrence was significantly increased with a larger left atrial diameter (OR = 1.21, P = 0.02) and an increased duration of preoperative AF (OR = 2.14, P = 0.03). A separate study found no significant difference in the success rate on the basis of the concomitant procedure (coronary artery bypass grafting or mitral valve surgery, P > 0.5). In the only randomized trial identified, microwave ablation delivered significantly inferior SR restoration rates to radiofrequency (RF) ablation at all time points from discharge to 24 months. There is a large degree of heterogeneity in the studies, with patients' characteristics, for example type of AF, and patient management postoperatively, for example administration of anti-arrhythmias, being inconsistent. Of the 12 studies, nine assessed SR at a mean of 6-12 months and found postoperative success rates between 62 and 87%. One study looked at the medium range follow-up of 24 months with SR restoration at 71%. Two studies looked at the long-term follow-up (5 and 5.37 years) with SR restoration at 39 and 61%, respectively

  2. Capillary Penetration into Inclined Circular Glass Tubes.

    PubMed

    Trabi, Christophe L; Ouali, F Fouzia; McHale, Glen; Javed, Haadi; Morris, Robert H; Newton, Michael I

    2016-02-01

    The spontaneous penetration of a wetting liquid into a vertical tube against the force of gravity and the imbibition of the same liquid into a horizontal tube (or channel) are both driven by capillary forces and described by the same fundamental equations. However, there have been few experimental studies of the transition from one orientation to the other. We report systematic measurements of capillary penetration of polydimethylsiloxane oils of viscosities 9.6, 19.2, and 48.0 mPa·s into glass capillary tubes. We first report the effect of tube radii R between 140 and 675 μm on the dynamics of spontaneous imbibition. We show that the data can be fitted using the exact numerical solution to the governing equations and that these are similar to fits using the analytical viscogravitational approximation. However, larger diameter tubes show a rate of penetration slower than expected using an equilibrium contact angle and the known value of liquid viscosity. To account for the slowness, an increase in viscosity by a factor (η/ρ)(scaling) is needed. We show full agreement with theory requires the ratio R/κ(-1) ∼ 0.1 or less, where κ(-1) is the capillary length. In addition, we propose an experimental method that enables the determination of the dynamic contact angle during imbibition, which gives values that agree with the literature values. We then report measurements of dynamic penetration into the tubes of R = 190 and 650 μm for a range of inclination angles to the horizontal, φ, from 5 to 90°. We show that capillary penetration can still be fitted using the viscogravitational solution, rather than the Bosanquet solution which describes imbibition without gravity, even for inclination angles as low as 10°. Moreover, at these low angles, the effect of the tube radius is found to diminish and this appears to relate to an effective capillary length, κ(-1)(φ) = (γ(LV)/ρg sin φ)(1/2). PMID:26738739

  3. Excimer laser ablation of aluminum: influence of spot size on ablation rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaheen, M. E.; Gagnon, J. E.; Fryer, B. J.

    2016-11-01

    The dependence of ablation rate of an Al alloy on laser beam spot size (10–150 µm) was investigated using an ArF excimer laser operating at a wavelength of 193 nm and pulse width less than 4 ns. Ablation was conducted in air at a fluence of 11 J cm‑2 and at a repetition rate of 20 Hz. Surface morphology and depth of craters produced by a variable number of laser pulses were characterized using optical and scanning electron microscopy. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) was used as an additional diagnostic technique to estimate the amount of material ablated from craters produced by a laser beam of different diameters. Laser beam spot size and number of laser pulses applied to the same spot were found to influence crater morphology, ablation rate, shape and amount of particles deposited at or around the crater rim. Ablation rate was found to be less dependent on spot size for craters greater than 85 µm. A four-fold increase in ablation rate was observed with decreasing crater size from 150 µm to 10 µm.

  4. Depth Profiling of Polymer Composites by Ultrafast Laser Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Christopher; Clayton, Clive; Longtin, Jon

    2009-03-01

    Past work has shown femtosecond laser ablation to be an athermal process at low fluences in polymer systems. The ablation rate in this low fluence regime is very low, allowing for micro-scale removal of material. We have taken advantage of this fact to perform shallow depth profiling ablation on carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites. Neat composite and resin samples were studied to establish reference ablation profiles. These profiles and the effects of the heterogeneous distribution of carbon fibers were observed through confocal laser profilometry and optical and scanning electron microscopy. Weathered materials that have been subjected to accelerated tests in artificial sunlight or water conditions were ablated to determine the correlation between exposure and change in ablation characteristics. Preliminary Raman and micro-ATR analysis performed before and after ablation shows no chemical changes indicative of thermal effects. The low-volume-ablation property was utilized in an attempt to expose the sizing-matrix interphase for analysis.

  5. Radiofrequency catheter ablation in pediatric patients with supraventricular arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, L A; Lobban, J H; Schmidt, S B

    1995-01-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) ablation of foci leading to abnormal cardiac rhythms is rapidly becoming the procedure of choice in the management of arrhythmias in adults. This report reviews our initial experience with RF ablation in the pediatric population. PMID:8533398

  6. Specific Impulse Definition for Ablative Laser Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, Don A.; Herren, Kenneth A.

    2005-04-01

    The term "specific impulse" is so ingrained in the field of rocket propulsion that it is unlikely that any fundamental argument would be taken seriously for its removal. It is not an ideal measure but it does give an indication of the amount of mass flow (mass loss/time), as in fuel rate, required to produce a measured thrust over some time period. This investigation explores the implications of being able to accurately measure the ablation rate and how the language used to describe the specific impulse results may have to change slightly, and recasts the specific impulse as something that is not a time average. It is not currently possible to measure the ablation rate accurately in real time so it is generally just assumed that a constant amount of material will be removed for each laser pulse delivered. The specific impulse dependence on the ablation rate is determined here as a correction to the classical textbook definition.

  7. Simulation of Double-Pulse Laser Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Povarnitsyn, Mikhail E.; Khishchenko, Konstantin V.; Levashov, Pavel R.; Itina, Tatian E.

    2010-10-08

    We investigate the physical reasons of a strange decrease in the ablation depth observed in femtosecond double-pulse experiments with increasing delay between the pulses. Two ultrashort pulses of the same energy produce the crater which is less than that created by a single pulse. Hydrodynamic simulation shows that the ablation mechanism is suppressed when the delay between the pulses exceeds the electron-ion relaxation time. In this case, the interaction of the second laser pulse with the expanding target material leads to the formation of the second shock wave suppressing the rarefaction wave created by the first pulse. The modeling of the double-pulse ablation for different delays between pulses confirms this explanation.

  8. Numerical Modeling of Ablation Heat Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewing, Mark E.; Laker, Travis S.; Walker, David T.

    2013-01-01

    A unique numerical method has been developed for solving one-dimensional ablation heat transfer problems. This paper provides a comprehensive description of the method, along with detailed derivations of the governing equations. This methodology supports solutions for traditional ablation modeling including such effects as heat transfer, material decomposition, pyrolysis gas permeation and heat exchange, and thermochemical surface erosion. The numerical scheme utilizes a control-volume approach with a variable grid to account for surface movement. This method directly supports implementation of nontraditional models such as material swelling and mechanical erosion, extending capabilities for modeling complex ablation phenomena. Verifications of the numerical implementation are provided using analytical solutions, code comparisons, and the method of manufactured solutions. These verifications are used to demonstrate solution accuracy and proper error convergence rates. A simple demonstration of a mechanical erosion (spallation) model is also provided to illustrate the unique capabilities of the method.

  9. Performance of Conformable Ablators in Aerothermal Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, J.; Fan, W.; Skokova, K.; Stackpoole, M.; Beck, R.; Chavez-Garcia, J.

    2012-01-01

    Conformable Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator, a cousin of Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA), was developed at NASA Ames Research Center as a lightweight thermal protection system under the Fundamental Aeronautics Program. PICA is made using a brittle carbon substrate, which has a very low strain to failure. Conformable PICA is made using a flexible carbon substrate, a felt in this case. The flexible felt significantly increases the strain to failure of the ablator. PICA is limited by its thermal mechanical properties. Future NASA missions will require heatshields that are more fracture resistant than PICA and, as a result, NASA Ames is working to improve PICAs performance by developing conformable PICA to meet these needs. Research efforts include tailoring the chemistry of conformable PICA with varying amounts of additives to enhance mechanical properties and testing them in aerothermal environments. This poster shows the performance of conformable PICA variants in arc jets tests. Some mechanical and thermal properties will also be presented.

  10. Deep Dive Topic: Choosing between ablators

    SciTech Connect

    Hurricane, O. A.; Thomas, C.; Olson, R.

    2015-07-14

    Recent data on implosions using identical hohlraums and very similar laser drives underscores the conundrum of making a clear choice of one ablator over another. Table I shows a comparison of Be and CH in a nominal length, gold, 575 μm-diameter, 1.6 mg/cc He gas-fill hohlraum while Table II shows a comparison of undoped HDC and CH in a +700 length, gold, 575 μm diameter, 1.6 mg/cc He gas fill hohlraum. As can be seen in the tables, the net integrated fusion performance of these ablators is the same to within error bars. In the case of the undoped HDC and CH ablators, the hot spot shapes of the implosions were nearly indistinguishable for the experiments listed in Table II.

  11. Effects of endocardial microwave energy ablation

    PubMed Central

    Climent, Vicente; Hurlé, Aquilino; Ho, Siew Yen; Sánchez-Quintana, Damián

    2005-01-01

    Until recently the treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF) consisted primarily of palliation, mostly in the form of pharmacological intervention. However because of recent advances in nonpharmacologic therapies, the current expectation of patients and referring physicians is that AF will be cured, rather than palliated. In recent years there has been a rapid expansion in the availability and variety of energy sources and devices for ablation. One of these energies, microwave, has been applied clinically only in the last few years, and may be a promising technique that is potentially capable of treating a wide range of ventricular and supraventricular arrhythmias. The purpose of this study was to review microwave energy ablation in surgical treatment of AF with special interest in histology and ultrastructure of lesions produced by this endocardial ablation procedure. PMID:16943871

  12. Laser ablated hard coating for microtools

    DOEpatents

    McLean, W. II; Balooch, M.; Siekhaus, W.J.

    1998-05-05

    Wear-resistant coatings composed of laser ablated hard carbon films, are deposited by pulsed laser ablation using visible light, on instruments such as microscope tips and micro-surgical tools. Hard carbon, known as diamond-like carbon (DLC), films produced by pulsed laser ablation using visible light enhances the abrasion resistance, wear characteristics, and lifetimes of small tools or instruments, such as small, sharp silicon tips used in atomic probe microscopy without significantly affecting the sharpness or size of these devices. For example, a 10--20 nm layer of diamond-like carbon on a standard silicon atomic force microscope (AFM) tip, enables the useful operating life of the tip to be increased by at least twofold. Moreover, the low inherent friction coefficient of the DLC coating leads to higher resolution for AFM tips operating in the contact mode. 12 figs.

  13. Laser ablated hard coating for microtools

    DOEpatents

    McLean, II, William; Balooch, Mehdi; Siekhaus, Wigbert J.

    1998-05-05

    Wear-resistant coatings composed of laser ablated hard carbon films, are deposited by pulsed laser ablation using visible light, on instruments such as microscope tips and micro-surgical tools. Hard carbon, known as diamond-like carbon (DLC), films produced by pulsed laser ablation using visible light enhances the abrasion resistance, wear characteristics, and lifetimes of small tools or instruments, such as small, sharp silicon tips used in atomic probe microscopy without significantly affecting the sharpness or size of these devices. For example, a 10-20 nm layer of diamond-like carbon on a standard silicon atomic force microscope (AFM) tip, enables the useful operating life of the tip to be increased by at least twofold. Moreover, the low inherent friction coefficient of the DLC coating leads to higher resolution for AFM tips operating in the contact mode.

  14. Image-Guided Spinal Ablation: A Review.

    PubMed

    Tsoumakidou, Georgia; Koch, Guillaume; Caudrelier, Jean; Garnon, Julien; Cazzato, Roberto Luigi; Edalat, Faramarz; Gangi, Afshin

    2016-09-01

    The image-guided thermal ablation procedures can be used to treat a variety of benign and malignant spinal tumours. Small size osteoid osteoma can be treated with laser or radiofrequency. Larger tumours (osteoblastoma, aneurysmal bone cyst and metastasis) can be addressed with radiofrequency or cryoablation. Results on the literature of spinal microwave ablation are scarce, and thus it should be used with caution. A distinct advantage of cryoablation is the ability to monitor the ice-ball by intermittent CT or MRI. The different thermal insulation, temperature and electrophysiological monitoring techniques should be applied. Cautious pre-procedural planning and intermittent intra-procedural monitoring of the ablation zone can help reduce neural complications. Tumour histology, patient clinical-functional status and life-expectancy should define the most efficient and least disabling treatment option. PMID:27329231

  15. Specific Impulse Definition for Ablative Laser Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herren, Kenneth A.; Gregory, Don A.

    2004-01-01

    The term "specific impulse" is so ingrained in the field of rocket propulsion that it is unlikely that any fundamental argument would be taken seriously for its removal. It is not an ideal measure but it does give an indication of the amount of mass flow (mass loss/time), as in fuel rate, required to produce a measured thrust over some time period This investigation explores the implications of being able to accurately measure the ablation rate and how the language used to describe the specific impulse results may have to change slightly, and recasts the specific impulse as something that is not a time average. It is not currently possible to measure the ablation rate accurately in real time so it is generally just assumed that a constant amount of material will be removed for each laser pulse delivered The specific impulse dependence on the ablation rate is determined here as a correction to the classical textbook definition.

  16. Ablation therapy for left atrial autonomic modification.

    PubMed

    Malcolme-Lawes, Louisa; Sandler, Belinda C; Sikkel, Markus B; Lim, Phang Boon; Kanagaratnam, Prapa

    2016-08-01

    The autonomic nervous system is implicated in the multifactorial pathogenesis of atrial fibrillation (AF) but few studies have attempted neural targeting for therapeutic intervention. We have demonstrated that short bursts of stimulation, at specific sites of left atrial ganglionated plexi (GPs), trigger fibrillation-inducing atrial ectopy and importantly continuous stimulation of these sites may not induce AV block, the 'conventional' marker used to locate GPs. We have shown that these ectopy-triggering GP (ET-GP) sites are anatomically stable and can be rendered inactive by either ablation at the site or by ablation between the site and the adjacent pulmonary vein (PV). This may have important implications for planning patient specific strategies for ablation of paroxysmal AF in the future. PMID:27595199

  17. Ultrafast laser ablation of transparent materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Lara; Russ, Simone; Kaiser, Myriam; Kumkar, Malte; Faißt, Birgit; Weber, Rudolf; Graf, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    The present work investigates the influence of the pulse duration and the temporal spacing between pulses on the ablation of aluminosilicate glass by comparing the results obtained with pulse durations of 0.4 ps and 6 ps. We found that surface modifications occur already at fluences below the single pulse ablation threshold and that laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) emerge as a result of those surface modifications. For 0.4 ps the ablation threshold fluences is lower than for 6 ps. Scanning electron micrographs of LIPSS generated with 0.4 ps exhibit a more periodic and less coarse structure as compared to structures generated with 6 ps. Furthermore we report on the influence of temporal spacing between the pulses on the occurrence of LIPSS and the impact on the quality of the cutting edge. Keywords: LIPSS,

  18. Tumor Ablation: Common Modalities and General Practices

    PubMed Central

    Knavel, Erica M.; Brace, Christopher L.

    2014-01-01

    Tumor ablation is a minimally invasive technique that is commonly used in the treatment of tumors of the liver, kidney, bone, and lung. During tumor ablation, thermal energy is used to heat or cool tissue to cytotoxic levels (less than −40°C or more than 60°C). An additional technique is being developed that targets the permeability of the cell membrane and is ostensibly nonthermal. Within the classification of tumor ablation, there are several modalities used worldwide: radiofrequency, microwave, laser, high-intensity focused ultrasound, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation. Each technique, although similar in purpose, has specific and optimal indications. This review serves to discuss general principles and technique, reviews each modality, and discusses modality selection. PMID:24238374

  19. Thermal Ablation Modeling for Silicate Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yih-Kanq

    2016-01-01

    A thermal ablation model for silicates is proposed. The model includes the mass losses through the balance between evaporation and condensation, and through the moving molten layer driven by surface shear force and pressure gradient. This model can be applied in ablation simulations of the meteoroid or glassy Thermal Protection Systems for spacecraft. Time-dependent axi-symmetric computations are performed by coupling the fluid dynamics code, Data-Parallel Line Relaxation program, with the material response code, Two-dimensional Implicit Thermal Ablation simulation program, to predict the mass lost rates and shape change. For model validation, the surface recession of fused amorphous quartz rod is computed, and the recession predictions reasonably agree with available data. The present parametric studies for two groups of meteoroid earth entry conditions indicate that the mass loss through moving molten layer is negligibly small for heat-flux conditions at around 1 MW/cm(exp. 2).

  20. Catheter ablation of a monofocal premature ventricular complex triggering idiopathic ventricular fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Takatsuki, S; Mitamura, H; Ogawa, S

    2001-07-01

    A 62 year old man was admitted for evaluation of recurrent episodes of syncope. A surface ECG showed frequent repetitive premature ventricular complexes of right ventricular outflow tract origin. Ventricular fibrillation was inducible by programmed electrical stimulation but otherwise cardiac evaluation was unremarkable. A diagnosis of idiopathic ventricular fibrillation was made and an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) was installed. However, spontaneous ventricular fibrillation recurred, requiring repeated ICD discharges. The ventricular fibrillation was reproducibly triggered by a single premature ventricular complex with a specific QRS morphology. Radiofrequency catheter ablation was carried out to eradicate this complex. No ventricular fibrillation has developed after this procedure, and the patient does not require drug treatment.