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Sample records for ablative fractional co2

  1. Multi-center clinical study and review of fractional ablative CO2 laser resurfacing for the treatment of rhytides, photoaging, scars and striae.

    PubMed

    Alexiades-Armenakas, Macrene; Sarnoff, Deborah; Gotkin, Robert; Sadick, Neil

    2011-04-01

    Laser skin resurfacing has shifted over the past two decades from standard ablative resurfacing to non-ablative resurfacing and most recently, to fractional laser resurfacing. In this most recent category, fractional non-ablative lasers were first introduced followed by fractional ablative lasers, which offer an improved balance between safety and efficacy. In the current article, a review of fractional ablative resurfacing is presented alongside the results from a multi-center clinical study employing the fractional carbon dioxide (CO2) laser (SmartXide DOT, DEKA) for the treatment of rhytides, photoaging, scars and striae distensae.

  2. [Ablative and fractional lasers].

    PubMed

    Beylot, C; Grognard, C; Michaud, T

    2009-10-01

    The use of pulsed or scanning Carbon Dioxide, and pulsed Erbium-YAG lasers allows the programmable and reproducible photocoagulation of thin layers of the epidermis and superficial dermis. Thermal damage depends on the type of laser and is greater with CO(2) lasers. The degree of neocollagenesis is proportional to the thermal damage and is better with CO(2) lasers. Their main indication is the correction of photoaged facial skin but they can also be used for corrective dermatology, e.g. for scars and genodermatosis. Results are highly satisfactory but the technique is invasive and the patient experiences a social hindrance of around two weeks. Fractionated techniques treat 25% of the defective skin area at each session in noncontiguous microzones; four sessions are therefore necessary to treat the entire cutaneous surface. The treatment is given under topical anesthesia and is much less invasive, particularly with nonablative fractional laser treatment in which photothermolysis does not penetrate below the epidermis and/or the effects are slight, with no or very little social isolation. However, the results are much less satisfactory than the results of ablative laser and there is no firming effect. Other zones than the face can be treated. With the fractional CO(2) and Erbium ablative lasers, which have multiplied over the past 2 years, the much wider impacts cause perforation of the epidermis and there is a zone of ablation by laser photovaporization, with a zone of thermal damage below. The results are better in correcting photoaging of the face, without, however, achieving the efficacy of ablative lasers, which remain the reference technique. However, the effects are not insignificant, requiring at least 5 days of social isolation.

  3. The Role of the CO2 Laser and Fractional CO2 Laser in Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Omi, Tokuya; Numano, Kayoko

    2014-01-01

    Background: Tremendous advances have been made in the medical application of the laser in the past few decades. Many diseases in the dermatological field are now indications for laser treatment that qualify for reimbursement by many national health insurance systems. Among laser types, the carbon dioxide (CO2) laser remains an important system for the dermatologist. Rationale: The lasers used in photosurgery have wavelengths that differ according to their intended use and are of various types, but the CO2 laser is one of the most widely used lasers in the dermatology field. With its wavelength in the mid-infrared at 10,600 nm, CO2 laser energy is wellabsorbed in water. As skin contains a very high water percentage, this makes the CO2 laser ideal for precise, safe ablation with good hemostasis. In addition to its efficacy in ablating benign raised lesions, the CO2 laser has been reported to be effective in the field of esthetic dermatology in the revision of acne scars as well as in photorejuvenation. With the addition of fractionation of the beam of energy into myriad microbeams, the fractional CO2 laser has offered a bridge between the frankly full ablative indications and the nonablative skin rejuvenation systems of the 2000s in the rejuvenation of photoaged skin on and off the face. Conclusions: The CO2 laser remains an efficient, precise and safe system for the dermatologist. Technological advances in CO2 laser construction have meant smaller spot sizes and greater precision for laser surgery, and more flexibility in tip sizes and protocols for fractional CO2 laser treatment. The range of dermatological applications of the CO2 laser is expected to continue to increase in the future. PMID:24771971

  4. Fractional CO2 laser treatment for a skin graft.

    PubMed

    Stephan, Farid E; Habre, Maya B; Helou, Josiane F; Tohme, Roland G; Tomb, Roland R

    2016-01-01

    Skin grafts are widely used in reconstructive and plastic surgery, leaving an inevitable scar appearance on the body, affecting the quality of life of the patients. Fractional ablative lasers have become a leading procedure for the treatment of acne and burn scars. We report a case of a skin graft showing excellent improvement in overall appearance after three sessions of fractional CO2 laser. The undamaged tissue left between the microthermal treatment zones is responsible of collagen formation and reepithelialization. Remodeling and collagen formation are observed even 6 months after a fractional CO2 laser session. PMID:26052811

  5. Oxygen isotope fractionation in stratospheric CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thiemens, M. H.; Jackson, T.; Mauersberger, K.; Schueler, B.; Morton, J.

    1991-01-01

    A new cryogenic collection system has been flown on board a balloon gondola to obtain separate samples of ozone and carbon dioxide without entrapping major atmospheric gases. Precision laboratory isotopic analysis of CO2 samples collected between 26 and 35.5 km show a mass-independent enrichment in both O-17 and O-18 of about 11 per mil above tropospheric values. Ozone enrichment in its heavy isotopes was 9 to 16 percent in O3-50 and 8 to 11 percent in O3-49, respectively (Schueler et al., 1990). A mechanism to explain the isotope enrichment in CO2 has been recently proposed by Yung et al. (1991). The model is based on the isotope exchange between CO2 and O3 via O(1D), resulting in a transfer of the ozone isotope enrichment to carbon dioxide. Predicted enrichment and measured values agree well.

  6. Ablation studies of Y-Ba-Cu-oxide in oxygen using a pulsed CO 2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyer, P. E.; Key, P. H.; Monk, P.

    1992-01-01

    The depth of ablation of Y-Ba-Cu-oxide pellets as a function of pulsed CO 2 laser fluence has been measured. Up to fluences of ˜ 5 J cm -2 the data can be well fitted to a Beer's law dependence with absorption coefficient ∝ = 10 4 cm -1 and threshold fluence for ablation of 0.85 J cm -2. At higher fluences a self-regulating ablation rate regime, due to plasma formation, is encountered. Particulate deposits from 10.6 μm laser ablation are found to be much greater than with shorter wavelenghts and evidence of large particle formation by accretion of smaller ablation products is observed. The range of the ablation plume in low pressure oxygen has been studied as a function of laser fluence, irradiation spot size and ambient gas pressure and is compared with modelling.

  7. New aspects of CO2 laser ablation in skin photosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedelcu, Ioan; Nedelcu, Dana M.; Dumitras, Dan C.; Dutu, Constantin A.

    1994-12-01

    This paper presents the latest developments in CO2, ancillary equipment, and advanced surgical techniques used in treating a variety of different dermatologic disorders. To improve our knowledge on the laser treatment of several cutaneous lesions, we have performed a study on 871 cases, of which 690 are benign skin tumors and 181 are malignant skin tumors. Based on this large number of cases, information on post-operative course, recovery time, the quality of scars and aesthetic results, recurrences and hemostasis of blood vessels is given. This study presents indications for performing laser surgery and describes how to avoid complications and limit the potential risks associated with lasers.

  8. Dentin bond strength after ablation using a CO2 laser operating at high pulse repetition rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedayatollahnajafi, Saba; Staninec, Michal; Watanabe, Larry; Lee, Chulsung; Fried, Daniel

    2009-02-01

    Pulsed CO2 lasers show great promise for the rapid and efficient ablation of dental hard tissues. Our objective was to demonstrate that CO2 lasers operated at high repetition rates can be used for the rapid removal of dentin without excessive thermal damage and without compromising adhesion to restorative materials. Human dentin samples (3x3mm2) were rapidly ablated with a pulsed CO2 laser operating at a wavelength of 9.3-µm, pulse repetition rate of 300-Hz and an irradiation intensity of 18-J/cm2. The bond strength to composite was determined by the modified single plane shear test. There were 8 test groups each containing 10 blocks: negative control (non-irradiated non-etched), positive control (non-irradiated acid-etched), and six laser treated groups (three etched and three non-etched sets). The first and second etched and non-etched sets were ablated at a speed of 25 mm/sec and 50 mm/sec with water, respectively. The third set was also ablated at 50 mm/sec without application of water during laser irradiation. Minimal thermal damage was observed on the dentin surfaces for which water cooling was applied. Bond strengths exceeded 20 MPa for laser treated surfaces that were acid-etched after ablation (25-mm/sec: 29.9-MPa, 50-mm/sec: 21.3-MPa). The water-cooled etched laser groups all produced significantly stronger bonds than the negative control (p<0.001) and a lower bond strength than the positive control (p<0.05). These measurements demonstrate that dentin surfaces can be rapidly ablated by a CO2 lasers with minimal peripheral thermal damage. Additional studies are needed to determine if a lower bond strength than the acid-etched control samples is clinically significant where durability of these bonded restoration supersedes high bond strength.

  9. Silver nanoparticles generated by pulsed laser ablation in supercritical CO2 medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machmudah, Siti; Sato, Takayuki; Wahyudiono; Sasaki, Mitsuru; Goto, Motonobu

    2012-03-01

    Pulsed laser ablation (PLA) has been widely employed in industrial and biological applications and in other fields. The environmental conditions in which PLA is conducted are important parameters that affect both the solid particle cloud and the deposition produced by the plume. In this work, the generation of nanoparticles (NPs) has been developed by performing PLA of silver (Ag) plates in a supercritical CO2 medium. Ag NPs were successfully generated by allowing the selective generation of clusters. Laser ablation was performed with an excitation wavelength of 532 nm under various pressures and temperatures of CO2 medium. On the basis of the experimental result, both surface of the irradiated Ag plate and structure of Ag NPs were significantly affected by the changes in supercritical CO2 pressure and temperature. With increasing irradiation pressure, plume deposited in the surrounding crater created by the ablation was clearly observed. In Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM) the image of the generated Ag NPs on the silicon wafer and the morphology of Ag particles were basically a sphere-like structure. Ag particles contain NPs with large-varied diameter ranging from 5 nm to 1.2 μm. The bigger Ag NPs melted during the ablation process and then ejected smaller spherical Ag NPs, which formed nanoclusters attached on the molten Ag NPs. The smaller Ag NPs were also formed around the bigger Ag NPs. Based on the results, this new method can also be used to obtain advanced nano-structured materials.

  10. Microsecond enamel ablation with 10.6μm CO2 laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Góra, W. S.; McDonald, A.; Hand, D. P.; Shephard, J. D.

    2016-02-01

    Lasers have been previously been used for dental applications, however there remain issues with thermally-induced cracking. In this paper we investigate the impact of pulse length on CO2 laser ablation of human dental enamel. Experiments were carried in vitro on molar teeth without any modification to the enamel surface, such as grinding or polishing. In addition to varying the pulse length, we also varied pulse energy and focal position, to determine the most efficient ablation of dental hard tissue and more importantly to minimize or eradicate cracking. The maximum temperature rise during the multi pulse ablation process was monitored using a set of thermocouples embedded into the pulpal chamber. The application of a laser device in dental surgery allows removal of tissue with higher precision, which results in minimal loss of healthy dental tissue. In this study we use an RF discharge excited CO2 laser operating at 10.6μm. The wavelength of 10.6 μm overlaps with a phosphate band (PO3-4) absorption in dental hard tissue hence the CO2 laser radiation has been selected as a potential source for modification of the tissue. This research describes an in-depth analysis of single pulse laser ablation. To determine the parameters that are best suited for the ablation of hard dental tissue without thermal cracking, a range of pulse lengths (10-200 μs), and fluences (0-100 J/cm2) are tested. In addition, different laser focusing approaches are investigated to select the most beneficial way of delivering laser radiation to the surface (divergent/convergent beam). To ensure that these processes do not increase the temperature above the critical threshold and cause the necrosis of the tissue a set of thermocouples was placed into the pulpal chambers. Intermittent laser radiation was investigated with and without application of a water spray to cool down the ablation site and the adjacent area. Results show that the temperature can be kept below the critical threshold

  11. Photodynamic Therapy with Ablative Carbon Dioxide Fractional Laser in Treatment of Actinic Keratosis

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Yong Hyun; Lee, Dong Jun; Shin, Jaeyoung; Kang, Hee Young; Lee, Eun-So

    2013-01-01

    Background Recently, photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been shown to be an effective first-line treatment for actinic keratosis (AK). However, a major limitation of PDT is the long incubation time required to allow penetration of the photosensitizer. Objective The aim of this study was to assess if pretreatment with an ablative carbon dioxide (CO2) fractional laser can reduce the incubation time of the photosensitizer. Methods Initially, 29 patients with a total of 34 AK lesions were treated with an ablative CO2 fractional laser at Ajou University Hospital between January and December 2010. Immediately after the laser treatment, topical 20% 5-aminolevulinic acid or methyl-aminolevulinate was applied to the AK lesions and incubated for 70 to 90 minutes. Then, the treated areas were illuminated with a red light source. Improvement was clinically or histologically assessed eight weeks after the treatment. Results In spite of the short incubation time, 24 lesions (70.6%) showed a complete response (CR) within three sessions of PDT (10 lesions a clinical CR and 14 lesions a clinical/histological CR). There were no significant side effects associated with the combination of ablative CO2 fractional laser and PDT. Conclusion Ablative CO2 fractional laser may be considered an additional treatment option for reducing the incubation time of the photosensitizer in PDT. PMID:24371387

  12. Treatment of ulcers with ablative fractional lasers.

    PubMed

    Morton, Laurel M; Dover, Jeffrey S; Phillips, Tania J; Krakowski, Andrew C; Uebelhoer, Nathan S

    2015-03-01

    Chronic, nonhealing ulcers are a frustrating therapeutic challenge and investigation of innovative therapies continues to be an important research pursuit. One unique and newly applied intervention is the use of ablative fractional lasers. This technology has recently been employed for the treatment of hypertrophic, disfiguring and function-limiting scars, and was first shown to induce healing of chronic wounds in patients with persistent ulcers and erosions within traumatic scars. Recent reports suggest it may be applicable for other types of chronic wounds as well. The mechanism of action for this modality remains to be elucidated but possible factors include laser-induced collagen remodeling, photomicrodebridement and disruption of biofilms, and induction of a proper wound healing cascade.

  13. Multi-criteria optimization in CO2 laser ablation of multimode polymer waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamrin, K. F.; Zakariyah, S. S.; Sheikh, N. A.

    2015-12-01

    High interconnection density associated with current electronics products poses certain challenges in designing circuit boards. Methods, including laser-assisted microvia drilling and surface mount technologies for example, are being used to minimize the impacts of the problems. However, the bottleneck is significantly pronounced at bit data rates above 10 Gbit/s where losses, especially those due to crosstalk, become high. One solution is optical interconnections (OI) based on polymer waveguides. Laser ablation of the optical waveguides is viewed as a very compatible technique with ultraviolet laser sources, such as excimer and UV Nd:YAG lasers, being used due to their photochemical nature and minimal thermal effect when they interact with optical materials. In this paper, the authors demonstrate the application of grey relational analysis to determine the optimized processing parameters concerning fabrication of multimode optical polymer waveguides by using infra-red 10.6 μm CO2 laser micromachining to etch acrylate-based photopolymer (Truemode™). CO2 laser micromachining offers a low cost and high speed fabrication route needed for high volume productions as the wavelength of CO2 lasers can couple well with a variety of polymer substrates. Based on the highest grey relational grade, the optimized processing parameters are determined at laser power of 3 W and scanning speed of 100 mm/s.

  14. In vivo study on middle ear bone ablation with pulse CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xianzeng; Wang, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Zhenlin; Ye, Qing; Xie, Shusen

    2009-07-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of middle ear bone ablation in-vivo with pulse CO2 laser. Healthy male New Zealand rabbits were used in the experiment. Middle ear mastoid bone of animal model was completely exposed by surgeon with conventional method, and then Pulse CO2 laser with a wavelength of 10.6μm and pulse lengths of about 10ms was used to carry out the opening surgery. Laser fluence was 8.3 J/cm2 with a repetition rates of 60 Hz, the beam diameter was 1.0 mm. After opening surgery, whole middle ear mastoid bone was obtained and processed with traditional histological method, the morphology changes and thermal damage around the opening window were examined by light microscope. Total operation time and light irradiation time were recorded. It showed that pulse CO2 laser is suitable for the fenestration operation in middle ear bone, and this no-touch technique not only can obtain the similar outcome as traditional methods, but also present a lot of advantages compared to the traditional methods. With the development of laser technology and the appearance of relative instruments, especially when the thermal damage was efficiently controlled, fenestration operation in ear with laser systems will be possible in near future.

  15. Influence of water layer thickness on hard tissue ablation with pulsed CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xianzeng; Zhan, Zhenlin; Liu, Haishan; Zhao, Haibin; Xie, Shusen; Ye, Qing

    2012-03-01

    The theory of hard tissue ablation reported for IR lasers is based on a process of thermomechanical interaction, which is explained by the absorption of the radiation in the water component of the tissue. The microexplosion of the water is the cause of tissue fragments being blasted from hard tissue. The aim of this study is to evaluate the influence of the interdependence of water layer thickness and incident radiant exposure on ablation performance. A total of 282 specimens of bovine shank bone were irradiated with a pulse CO2 laser. Irradiation was carried out in groups: without a water layer and with a static water layer of thickness ranging from 0.2 to 1.2 mm. Each group was subdivided into five subgroups for different radiant exposures ranging from 18 to 84 J/cm2, respectively. The incision geometry, surface morphology, and microstructure of the cut walls as well as thermal injury were examined as a function of the water layer thickness at different radiant exposures. Our results demonstrate that the additional water layer is actually a mediator of laser-tissue interaction. There exists a critical thickness of water layer for a given radiant exposure, at which the additional water layer plays multiple roles, not only acting as a cleaner to produce a clean cut but also as a coolant to prevent bone heating and reduce thermal injury, but also helping to improve the regularity of the cut shape, smooth the cut surface, and enhance ablation rate and efficiency. The results suggest that desired ablation results depend on optimal selection of both water layer thickness and radiant exposure.

  16. Fractionation of carbon isotopes by phytoplankton and estimates of ancient CO2 levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, K. H.; Hayes, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    Reports of the 13C content of marine particulate organic carbon are compiled and on the basis of GEOSECS data and temperatures, concentrations, and isotopic compositions of dissolved CO2 in the waters in which the related phytoplankton grew are estimated. In this way, the fractionation of carbon isotopes during photosynthetic fixation of CO2 is found to be significantly correlated with concentrations of dissolved CO2. Because ancient carbon isotopic fractionations have been determined from analyses of sedimentary porphyrins [Popp et al., 1989], the relationship between isotopic fractionation and concentrations of dissolved CO2 developed here can be employed to estimate concentrations of CO2 dissolved in ancient oceans and, in turn, partial pressures of CO2 in ancient atmospheres. The calculations take into account the temperature dependence of chemical and isotopic equilibria in the dissolved-inorganic-carbon system and of air-sea equilibria. Paleoenvironmental temperatures for each sample are estimated from reconstructions of paleogeography, latitudinal temperature gradients, and secular changes in low-latitude sea surface temperature. It is estimated that atmospheric partial pressures of CO2 were over 1000 micro atm 160 - 100 Ma ago, then declined to values near 300 micro atm during the next 100 Ma. Analysis of a high-resolution record of carbon isotopic fractionation at the Cenomanian-Turonian boundary suggests that the partial pressure of CO2 in the atmosphere was drawn down from values near 840 micro atm to values near 700 micro atm during the anoxic event.

  17. Fractional CO2 laser: a novel therapeutic device upon photobiomodulation of tissue remodeling and cytokine pathway of tissue repair.

    PubMed

    Prignano, F; Campolmi, P; Bonan, P; Ricceri, F; Cannarozzo, G; Troiano, M; Lotti, T

    2009-11-01

    Minimally ablative fractional laser devices have gained acceptance as a preferred method for skin resurfacing. Notable improvements in facial rhytides, photodamage, acne scarring, and skin laxity have been reported. The aim of the present work was to compare how different CO(2) laser fluences, by modulating the secretory pathway of cytokines, are able to influence the wound-healing process, and how these fluences are associated with different clinical results. Eighteen patients, all with photodamaged skin, were treated using a fractional CO(2) laser (SmartXide DOT, Deka M.E.L.A., Florence, Italy) with varying laser fluences (2.07, 2.77, and 4.15 J/cm(2)). An immunocytochemical study was performed at defined end points in order to obtain information about specific cytokines of the microenvironment before and after treatment. The secretory pathway of cytokines changed depending on the re-epithelization and the different laser fluences. Different but significant improvements in wrinkles, skin texture, and hyperpigmentation were definitely obtained when using 2.07, 2.77, and 4.15 J/cm(2), indicating fractional CO(2) laser as a valuable tool in photorejuvenation with good clinical results, rapid downtime, and an excellent safety profile.

  18. Pseudoxanthoma Elasticum Treatment with Fractional CO2 Laser

    PubMed Central

    Remigio, Adelina Fátima do Nascimento; Moraes, Luciana Borsoi; Varoni, Andreza Cristina Camacho; Gemperli, Rolf; Ferreira, Marcus Castro

    2014-01-01

    Summary: Pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PE) is a rare genetic disease characterized by calcification and fragmentation of elastic fibers of the skin, retina, and cardiovascular system. We report a case of PE in which fractional carbon dioxide laser treatment was successfully used to achieve improvement of the cervical skin with 2-year follow-up, in a patient with Fitzpatrick skin type IV. After the fifth session, the patient presented with a local herpes infection. The postlaser reaction of the PE skin was similar to that of the normal skin, in terms of the duration of redness, pain, swelling, and duration of crusting. The overall cosmetic result was satisfactory, with improvement in skin texture, irregularity, volume, and distensibility. The herpetic infection reinforces the value of antiviral prophylaxis during laser treatment of extrafacial areas. PMID:25426402

  19. CO2 TEA Laser-Enhanced Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry (TELLAMIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Staci R.; Akpovo, Charlemagne A.; Ford, Alan; Herbert, Kenley; Johnson, Lewis

    2014-03-01

    Recently, it has been shown that the relative abundance of isotopes in enriched materials can be determined via laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) in a technique known as laser-ablation molecular isotopic spectroscopy (LAMIS). The original LAMIS work has focused on single-pulse (SP) LIBS for the excitation. However, dual-pulse (DP) LIBS reduces shot-to-shot variation and can lower detection limits of an element by about an order of magnitude or more. It also has the potential to improve the accuracy of the determination of the relative abundances of isotopes in LAMIS by minimizing the signal-to-noise ratio. In this work, a DP-LIBS technique for improving LAMIS relative-abundance information from a sample is presented. The new technique, called (TEA) Transverse-Excited breakdown in Atmosphere Laser-Enhanced Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry (TELLAMIS), uses a carbon dioxide (CO2) laser to increase the breakdown emission from LIBS in the LAMIS method. This technique is demonstrated on a collection of relative abundance isotopes of boron- 10 and boron-11 in varying concentrations in boric acid. Least-squares fitting to theoretical models are used to deduce plasma parameters and understand reproducibility of results. DTRA.

  20. Micromachining of microchannel on the polycarbonate substrate with CO 2 laser direct-writing ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Heng; Chen, Tao; Yao, Liying; Zuo, Tiechuan

    2009-05-01

    Low-power CO 2 laser direct-writing ablation was used to micromachine a microchannel on the polycarbonate substrate in this work. The influence of the process parameters (the laser power, the moving velocity of the laser beam and the scanning times) on the micromachining quality (the depth, the width and their aspect ratio) of the microchannel was experimentally studied. The depth and width of microchannel both increase with the increase of the laser power and the decrease of the moving velocity of the laser beam. When higher laser power and slower moving velocity were used, the polycarbonate surface bore more heat irradiated from the CO 2 laser for longer time which results in the formation of deeper and wider molten pool, hence the ability to fabricate bigger microchannel. Because of the effect of the laser power on the depth and width of microchannels, higher aspect (depth/width) ratio could be achieved using slower moving velocity and higher laser power, and it would reach a steady state when the laser power increases to 9.0 W possibly caused by the effect of laser power on the different directions of microchannel. The polycarbonate-polycarbonate chip was bonded with hot-press bonding technique.

  1. Photodynamic Therapy with Ablative Carbon Dioxide Fractional Laser for Treating Bowen Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sue Kyung; Park, Ji-Youn; Song, Hyo Sang; Kim, You-Sun

    2013-01-01

    Background Topical photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been increasingly used to treat malignant skin tumors including the Bowen disease. However, patients could be displeased with the long incubation time required for conventional PDT. Objective We evaluated the efficacy and safety of PDT with a short incubation time of ablative CO2 fractional laser pretreatment for treating Bowen disease. Methods Ten patients were included. Just before applying the topical photosensitizer, all lesions were treated with ablative CO2 fractional laser, following the application of methyl aminolevulinate and irradiation with red light (Aktilite CL 128). Histological confirmation, rebiopsy, and clinical assessments were performed. Adverse events were also recorded. Results Five of the ten (50%) lesions showed a complete response (CR) within three PDT sessions. After four treatment sessions, all lesions except one penile shaft lesion (90%) achieved clinical and histological CR or clinical CR only. The average number of treatments to CR was 3.70±1.70. The treatments showed favorable cosmetic outcomes and no serious adverse events. Conclusion The results suggest that pretreatment with an ablative fractional CO2 laser before PDT has similar treatment efficacy and requires a shorter photosensitizer incubation time compared with the conventional PDT method. PMID:24003277

  2. Graphite and ablative material response to CO2 laser, carbon-arc, and xenon-arc radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, W. D.

    1976-01-01

    The behavior was investigated of graphite and several charring ablators in a variety of high-radiative heat-flux environments. A commercial-grade graphite and nine state-of-the-art charring ablators were subjected to various radiative environments produced by a CO2 laser and a carbon arc. Graphite was also tested in xenon-arc radiation. Heat-flux levels ranged from 10 to 47 MW/sq m. Tests were conducted in air, nitrogen, helium, and a CO2-N2 mixture which simulated the Venus atmosphere. The experimental results were compared with theoretical results obtained with a one-dimensional charring-ablator analysis and a two-dimensional subliming-ablator analysis. Neither the graphite nor the charring ablators showed significant differences in appearance or microstructure after testing in the different radiative environments. The performance of phenolic nylon and graphite was predicted satisfactorily with existing analyses and published material property data. Good agreement between experimental and analytical results was obtained by using sublimation parameters from a chemical nonequilibrium analysis of graphite sublimation. Some charring ablators performed reasonably well and could withstand radiative fluxes of the level encountered in certain planetary entries. Other materials showed excessive surface recession and/or large amounts of cracking and spalling, and appear to be unsuitable for severe radiative environments.

  3. [Catheter ablation of persistent atrial fibrillation : pulmonary vein isolation, ablation of fractionated electrograms, stepwise approach or rotor ablation?].

    PubMed

    Scherr, D

    2015-02-01

    Catheter ablation is an established treatment option for patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). In paroxysmal AF ablation, pulmonary vein isolation alone is a well-defined procedural endpoint, leading to success rates of up to 80% with multiple procedures over 5 years of follow-up. The success rate in persistent AF ablation is significantly more limited. This is partly due to the rudimentary understanding of the substrate maintaining persistent AF. Three main pathophysiological concepts for this arrhythmia exist: the multiple wavelet hypothesis, the concept of focal triggers, mainly located in the pulmonary veins and the rotor hypothesis. However, the targets and endpoints of persistent AF ablation are ill-defined and there is no consensus on the optimal ablation strategy in these patients. Based on these concepts, several ablation approaches for persistent AF have emerged: pulmonary vein isolation, the stepwise approach (i.e. pulmonary vein isolation, ablation of fractionated electrograms and linear ablation), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and rotor-based approaches. Currently, persistent AF ablation is a second-line therapy option to restore and maintain sinus rhythm. Several factors, such as the presence of structural heart disease, duration of persistent AF and dilatation and possibly also the degree of fibrosis of the left atrium should influence the decision to perform persistent AF ablation. PMID:25687615

  4. Carbonation of brine impacted fractionated coal fly ash: implications for CO2 sequestration.

    PubMed

    Nyambura, Muriithi Grace; Mugera, Gitari Wilson; Felicia, Petrik Leslie; Gathura, Ndungu Patrick

    2011-03-01

    Coal combustion by-products such as fly ash (FA), brine and CO(2) from coal fired power plants have the potential to impact negatively on the environment. FA and brine can contaminate the soil, surface and ground water through leaching of toxic elements present in their matrices while CO(2) has been identified as a green house gas that contributes significantly towards the global warming effect. Reaction of CO(2) with FA/brine slurry can potentially provide a viable route for CO(2) sequestration via formation of mineral carbonates. Fractionated FA has varying amounts of CaO which not only increases the brine pH but can also be converted into an environmentally benign calcite. Carbonation efficiency of fractionated and brine impacted FA was investigated in this study. Controlled carbonation reactions were carried out in a reactor set-up to evaluate the effect of fractionation on the carbonation efficiency of FA. Chemical and mineralogical characteristics of fresh and carbonated ash were evaluated using XRF, SEM, and XRD. Brine effluents were characterized using ICP-MS and IC. A factorial experimental approach was employed in testing the variables. The 20-150 μm size fraction was observed to have the highest CO(2) sequestration potential of 71.84 kg of CO(2) per ton of FA while the >150 μm particles had the lowest potential of 36.47 kg of CO(2) per ton of FA. Carbonation using brine resulted in higher degree of calcite formation compared to the ultra-pure water carbonated residues. PMID:20970918

  5. Carbonation of brine impacted fractionated coal fly ash: implications for CO2 sequestration.

    PubMed

    Nyambura, Muriithi Grace; Mugera, Gitari Wilson; Felicia, Petrik Leslie; Gathura, Ndungu Patrick

    2011-03-01

    Coal combustion by-products such as fly ash (FA), brine and CO(2) from coal fired power plants have the potential to impact negatively on the environment. FA and brine can contaminate the soil, surface and ground water through leaching of toxic elements present in their matrices while CO(2) has been identified as a green house gas that contributes significantly towards the global warming effect. Reaction of CO(2) with FA/brine slurry can potentially provide a viable route for CO(2) sequestration via formation of mineral carbonates. Fractionated FA has varying amounts of CaO which not only increases the brine pH but can also be converted into an environmentally benign calcite. Carbonation efficiency of fractionated and brine impacted FA was investigated in this study. Controlled carbonation reactions were carried out in a reactor set-up to evaluate the effect of fractionation on the carbonation efficiency of FA. Chemical and mineralogical characteristics of fresh and carbonated ash were evaluated using XRF, SEM, and XRD. Brine effluents were characterized using ICP-MS and IC. A factorial experimental approach was employed in testing the variables. The 20-150 μm size fraction was observed to have the highest CO(2) sequestration potential of 71.84 kg of CO(2) per ton of FA while the >150 μm particles had the lowest potential of 36.47 kg of CO(2) per ton of FA. Carbonation using brine resulted in higher degree of calcite formation compared to the ultra-pure water carbonated residues.

  6. Analysis of the short-pulsed CO2 laser ablation process for optimizing the processing performance for cutting bony tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrwald, Markus; Burgner, Jessica; Platzek, Christoph; Feldmann, Claus; Raczkowsky, Jörg; Wörn, Heinz

    2010-02-01

    Recently we established an experimental setup for robot-assisted laser bone ablation using short-pulsed CO2 laser. Due to the comparable low processing speed of laser bone ablation the application in surgical interventions is not yet feasible. In order to optimize this ablation process, we conducted a series of experiments to derive parameters for a discrete process model. After applying single and multiple laser pulses with varying intensity onto bone, the resulting craters were measured using a confocal microscope in 3D. The resulting ablation volumes were evaluated by applying Gaussian function fitting. We then derived a logarithmic function for the depth prediction of laser ablation on bone. In order to increase the ablation performance we conducted experiments using alternate fluids replacing the water spray: pure glycerin, glycerin/water mixture, acids and bases. Because of the higher boiling point of glycerin compared to water we had expected deeper craters through the resulting higher temperatures. Experimental results showed that glycerin or a glycerin/water mix do not have any effect on the depth of the ablation craters. Additionally applying the acid or base on to the ablation site does only show minor benefits compared to water. Furthermore we preheated the chemicals with a low energy pulse prior to the ablation pulse, which also showed no effect. However, applying a longer soaking time of the chemicals induced nearly a doubling of the ablation depth in some cases. Furthermore with this longer soaking time, carbonization at the crater margins does not occur as is observed when using conventionally water spray.

  7. Effect of nonionic surfactant addition on Pyrex glass ablation using water-assisted CO2 laser processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, C. K.; Liao, M. W.; Lin, S. L.

    2010-04-01

    Pyrex glass etching using laser ablation is an important technology for the microfluid application to lab-on-a-chip devices but suffers from the formation of surface crack. In this article, the addition of nonionic surfactant to water for glass ablation using water-assisted CO2 laser processing (WACLAP) has been investigated to enhance ablation rate and to eliminate conventional surface defects of cracks in air. WACLAP for Pyrex glass ablation can reduce thermal-stress-induced crack with water cooling and hydrophilic nonionic surfactant to water can enhance ablation performance. Compared to pure water, the 15% weight percent Lauramidopropyl Betaine surfactant solutions for WACLAP can enhance ablation rate from 13.6 to 25 μm/pass of Pyrex glass ablation at a linear laser energy density of 2.11 J/cm, i.e., 24 W power, 114 mm/s scanning speed, and obtain through-wafer etching at 3.16 J/cm for 20 passes without cracks on the surface. Effect of surfactant concentration and linear energy density on WACLAP was also examined. The possible mechanism of surfactant-enhanced phenomenon was discussed by the Newton’s law of viscosity of surfactant solution.

  8. Experimental oxygen isotope fractionation between siderite-water and phosphoric acid liberated CO2-siderite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carothers, W.W.; Adami, L.H.; Rosenbauer, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    The equilibrium fractionation of O isotopes between synthetic siderite and water has been measured at temperatures ranging from 33?? to 197??C. The fractionation between siderite and water over this temperature range can be represented by the equation: 103 ln ?? = 3.13 ?? 106T-2 - 3.50. Comparison between the experimental and theoretical fractionations is favorable only at approximately 200??C; at lower temperatures, they generally differ by up to 2 permil. Siderite was prepared by the slow addition of ferrous chloride solutions to sodium bicarbonate solutions at the experimental temperatures. It was also used to determine the O isotope fractionation factors between phosphoric acid liberated CO2 and siderite. The fractionation factors for this pair at 25?? and 50??C are 1.01175 and 1.01075, respectively. Preliminary results of the measured C isotope fractionation between siderite and Co2 also indicate C isotopic equilibrium during precipitation of siderite. The measured distribution of 13C between siderite and CO2 coincides with the theoretical values only at about 120??C. Experimental and theoretical C fractionations differ up to 3 permil at higher and lower temperatures. ?? 1988.

  9. The effect of atmospheric CO2 concentration on carbon isotope fractionation in C3 land plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, Brian A.; Jahren, A. Hope

    2012-11-01

    Because atmospheric carbon dioxide is the ultimate source of all land-plant carbon, workers have suggested that pCO2 level may exert control over the amount of 13C incorporated into plant tissues. However, experiments growing plants under elevated pCO2 in both chamber and field settings, as well as meta-analyses of ecological and agricultural data, have yielded a wide range of estimates for the effect of pCO2 on the net isotopic discrimination (Δδ13Cp) between plant tissue (δ13Cp) and atmospheric CO2 (δ13CCO2). Because plant stomata respond sensitively to plant water status and simultaneously alter the concentration of pCO2 inside the plant (ci) relative to outside the plant (ca), any experiment that lacks environmental control over water availability across treatments could result in additional isotopic variation sufficient to mask or cancel the direct influence of pCO2 on Δδ13Cp. We present new data from plant growth chambers featuring enhanced dynamic stabilization of moisture availability and relative humidity, in addition to providing constant light, nutrient, δ13CCO2, and pCO2 level for up to four weeks of plant growth. Within these chambers, we grew a total of 191 C3 plants (128 Raphanus sativus plants and 63 Arabidopsis thaliana) across fifteen levels of pCO2 ranging from 370 to 4200 ppm. Three types of plant tissue were harvested and analyzed for carbon isotope value: above-ground tissues, below-ground tissues, and leaf-extracted nC31-alkanes. We observed strong hyperbolic correlations (R ⩾ 0.94) between the pCO2 level and Δδ13Cp for each type of plant tissue analyzed; furthermore the linear relationships previously suggested by experiments across small (10-350 ppm) changes in pCO2 (e.g., 300-310 ppm or 350-700 ppm) closely agree with the amount of fractionation per ppm increase in pCO2 calculated from our hyperbolic relationship. In this way, our work is consistent with, and provides a unifying relationship for, previous work on carbon isotopes

  10. YSGG 2790-nm superficial ablative and fractional ablative laser treatment.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kevin C; Schachter, G Daniel

    2011-05-01

    The 2790-nm wavelength YSGG laser was introduced for aesthetic purposes under the trade name Pearl by Cutera in 2007. In clinical use, the Pearl superficial resurfacing laser has proved effective and well tolerated for the correction of superficial brown epidermal dyschromia and superficial fine lines and scars, and the Pearl Fractional laser produces excellent improvement in both dyschromia and improvement of deeper lines and moderately deep acne scarring. The two laser treatments can be combined in a single treatment session on different parts of the face or on the entire face, depending on patient needs and priorities. PMID:21763987

  11. 13C fractionation of dinoflagellates - a new proxy for past CO2 levels?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoins, M.; Van de Waal, D. B.; Eberlein, T.; Reichart, G.; Sluijs, A.; Rost, B.

    2012-12-01

    Reliable reconstructions of atmospheric CO2 levels prior to ~1 million years ago are required to quantify climate sensitivity as well as ocean acidification in response to past carbon cycle perturbations. Despite recent progress, however, uncertainties in reconstructed values especially from the Paleogene and older, are still very large. We aim to develop a new proxy for CO2 concentrations based on the carbon isotopic fractionation of autotrophic marine dinoflagellates. Dinoflagellates feature RubisCO (type II) with the lowest CO2 affinity of all eukaryote phytoplankton, which makes this group inherently sensitive to changes in carbonate chemistry. Along with growth and carbon production also the 13C versus 12C incorporation, i.e., the 13C fractionation (ɛp), will likely be affected. Hence, the carbon isotopic composition of dinoflagellates may ultimately reflect the prevailing atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Crucially, microfossils of dinoflagellates, i.e. organic dinoflagellate cysts, have been recovered from ocean sediments as old as the Triassic (i.e. ~215 Ma BP). We performed dilute batch experiments with four dinoflagellate species: Alexandrium tamarense, Scrippsiella trochoidea, Gonyaulax spinifera and Protoceratium reticulatum. Cells were grown at various CO2 concentrations representing the Last Glacial Maximum (180 ppm), present day (380 ppm), and future projections (and estimates for distant past levels; 950 ppm and 1400 ppm). Consistent with expectations, ɛp increased with CO2 concentration in all four species (with a slope of up to 0.19 ‰ μM-1), while growth and carbon production (μc) had little effect. ɛp in relation to CO2 varied between species and strains, but the relation of ɛp to μc/CO2 was more consistent. First results of underlying processes affecting ɛp, including carbon acquisition and leakage, will be discussed. Considering that the cysts of P. reticulatum (Operculodinium centrocarpum) and G. spinifera (Spiniferites sp.) are

  12. The Use of CO2 Fractional Photothermolysis for the Treatment of Burn Scars.

    PubMed

    Levi, Benjamin; Ibrahim, Amir; Mathews, Katie; Wojcik, Brandon; Gomez, Jason; Fagan, Shawn; Austen, William Gerald; Goverman, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    A recent advancement in the treatment of burn scars has been the use of the carbon dioxide (CO2) laser to perform fractional photothermolysis. In this analysis, we describe our results and patient-reported outcomes with the use of fractional CO2 laser for the treatment of burn-related scarring. We performed a retrospective study of all patients who underwent CO2 laser procedures for treatment of symptomatic burn scars and skin grafts at one accredited regional burn center. Burn injury and laser treatment demographics, as well as complications, are reported. A questionnaire was administered to all patients and included patient-reported outcome measures aimed at understanding the patient experience and their subjective response to treatment. A total of 387 CO2 laser procedures were performed on 131 patients for the treatment of symptomatic burn scars and skin grafts between October 1, 2011, and May 1, 2014 (average, 2.95 procedures/patient; range, 1-11). Average time between injury and first laser was 597.35 days (range, 60-13,475). Average time between laser treatments (when multiple) was 117.73 days (range, 22-514). There were no infections requiring treatment with oral antibiotics. Overall patient satisfaction with laser therapy was 96.7%. Patients reported reductions in neuropathic pain, tightness (contracture), and pruritus (54.0, 50.6, and 49.0%, respectively). Fractional photothermolysis utilizing the CO2 laser is a safe and effective modality for the treatment of symptomatic burn scars, donor sites, and skin grafts. Patient satisfaction with this procedure is high, and complications are low. Significant improvements in scar appearance, pliability, tightness, neuropathic pain, and pruritus were commonly reported. PMID:26536539

  13. Late Ordovician land plant spore 13C fractionation records atmospheric CO2 and climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beerling, D. J.; Nelson, D. M.; Pearson, A.; Wellman, C.

    2008-12-01

    Molecular systematics and spore wall ultrastructure studies indicate that late Ordovician diad and triad fossil spores were likely produced by plants most closely related to liverworts. Here, we report the first δ13C estimates of Ordovician fossil land plant spores, which were obtained using a spooling wire micro-combustion device interfaced with an isotope-ratio mass spectrometer (Sessions et al., 2005, Analytical Chemistry, 77, 6519). The spores all originate from Saudi Arabia on the west of Gondwana and date to before (Cardadoc, ca. 460 Ma), during (443Ma) and after (Llandovery, ca. 440Ma) the Hirnantian glaciation. We use these numbers along with marine carbonate δ13C records to estimate atmospheric CO2 by implementing a theoretical model that captures the strong CO2-dependency of 13C fractionation in non-vascular land plants (Fletcher et al., 2008, Nature Geoscience, 1, 43). Although provisional at this stage, reconstructed CO2 changes are consistent with the Kump et al. (2008) (Paleo. Paleo. Paleo. 152, 173) 'weathering hypothesis' whereby pre-Hirnantian cooling is caused by relatively low CO2 (ca. 700ppm) related to enhanced weathering of young basaltic rocks during the early phase of the Taconic uplift, with background values subsequently rising to around double this value by the earliest Silurian. Further analyses will better constrain atmospheric CO2 change during the late Ordovician climatic perturbation and address controversial hypotheses concerning the causes and timing of the Earth system transition into an icehouse state.

  14. Laser tattoo removal with preceding ablative fractional treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cencič, Boris; Možina, Janez; Jezeršek, Matija

    2013-06-01

    A combined laser tattoo removal treatment, first the ablative fractional resurfacing (AFR) with an Er:YAG laser and then the q-switched (QSW) Nd:YAG laser treatment, was studied. Experiments show that significantly higher fluences can be used for the same tissue damage levels.

  15. Carbon Isotope Fractionation of 11 Acetogenic Strains Grown on H2 and CO2

    PubMed Central

    Dreisbach, Lisa K.; Conrad, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Acetogenic bacteria are able to grow autotrophically on hydrogen and carbon dioxide by using the acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) pathway. Acetate is the end product of this reaction. In contrast to the fermentative route of acetate production, which shows almost no fractionation of carbon isotopes, the acetyl-CoA pathway has been reported to exhibit a preference for light carbon. In Acetobacterium woodii the isotope fractionation factor (ε) for 13C and 12C has previously been reported to be ε = −58.6‰. To investigate whether such a strong fractionation is a general feature of acetogenic bacteria, we measured the stable carbon isotope fractionation factor of 10 acetogenic strains grown on H2 and CO2. The average fractionation factor was εTIC = −57.2‰ for utilization of total inorganic carbon and εacetate = −54.6‰ for the production of acetate. The strongest fractionation was found for Sporomusa sphaeroides (εTIC = −68.3‰), the lowest fractionation for Morella thermoacetica (εTIC = −38.2‰). To investigate the reproducibility of our measurements, we determined the fractionation factor of 21 biological replicates of Thermoanaerobacter kivui. In general, our study confirmed the strong fractionation of stable carbon during chemolithotrophic acetate formation in acetogenic bacteria. However, the specific characteristics of the bacterial strain, as well as the cultural conditions, may have a moderate influence on the overall fractionation. PMID:23275504

  16. Water-assisted CO(2) laser ablated glass and modified thermal bonding for capillary-driven bio-fluidic application.

    PubMed

    Chung, C K; Chang, H C; Shih, T R; Lin, S L; Hsiao, E J; Chen, Y S; Chang, E C; Chen, C C; Lin, C C

    2010-02-01

    The glass-based microfluidic chip has widely been applied to the lab-on-a-chip for clotting tests. Here, we have demonstrated a capillary driven flow chip using the water-assisted CO(2) laser ablation for crackless fluidic channels and holes as well as the modified low-temperature glass bonding with assistance of adhesive polymer film at 300 degrees Celsius. Effect of water depth on the laser ablation of glass quality was investigated. The surface hydrophilic property of glass and polymer film was measured by static contact angle method for hydrophilicity examination in comparison with the conventional polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) material. Both low-viscosity deionized water and high-viscosity whole blood were used for testing the capillary-driving flow behavior. The preliminary coagulation testing in the Y-channel chip was also performed using whole blood and CaCl(2) solution. The water-assisted CO(2) laser processing can cool down glass during ablation for less temperature gradient to eliminate the crack. The modified glass bonding can simplify the conventional complex fabrication procedure of glass chips, such as high-temperature bonding, long consuming time and high cost. Moreover, the developed fluidic glass chip has the merit of hydrophilic behavior conquering the problem of traditional hydrophobic recovery of polymer fluidic chips and shows the ability to drive high-viscosity bio-fluids.

  17. Cryospray ablation using pressurized CO2 for ablation of Barrett’s esophagus with early neoplasia: early termination of a prospective series

    PubMed Central

    Verbeek, Romy E.; Vleggaar, Frank P.; ten Kate, Fiebo J.; van Baal, Jantine W. P. M.; Siersema, Peter D.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cryotherapy is a relatively novel ablation modality for the endoscopic ablation of Barrett’s esophagus (BE). Data on the use of pressurized carbon dioxide (CO2) gas for cryoablation are scarce. Study aim: To determine the efficacy and safety of cryospray ablation using pressurized CO2 gas in the treatment of BE with early neoplasia. Methods: In this prospective single center case series, we aimed to include 30 patients with BE and early neoplasia. Nodular neoplastic lesions were treated with endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR). Residual BE mucosa was treated with cryospray ablation every 4 weeks until the complete BE segment was eliminated or up to seven treatment sessions. If no reduction of the BE segment was observed after two subsequent treatment sessions, cryoablation was terminated. Patients were contacted at days 1 and 4 post-treatment to evaluate the level of discomfort. Endoscopic and histologic follow-up evaluations were performed up to 24 months post-treatment. Results: After the inclusion of 10 patients, insufficient effect of cryoablation was observed, resulting in early termination of the study. In total, seven patients with intramucosal carcinoma (IMC) and three with high grade dysplasia (HGD) were included. Prior EMR was performed in nine patients. A median of 2.5 (IQR 2.0 – 4.0) cryoablation sessions were performed. At 6 months of follow-up, complete eradication of intestinal metaplasia was observed in 11 % (1 /9; one patient died, not treatment or disease related) of the patients and complete eradication of dysplasia in 44 % (4 /9). In three patients, HGD or IMC was detected during follow-up, and was endoscopically treated. Apart from a gastric perforation as a result of gastric distension caused by CO2 gas during the first treatment, cryospray treatments were well tolerated. Conclusion: After a short learning curve, cryoablation using CO2 gas was found to be a safe and well tolerated treatment modality. However, in our

  18. Stainless steel pinholes for fast fabrication of high-performance microchip electrophoresis devices by CO2 laser ablation.

    PubMed

    Yap, Yiing C; Guijt, Rosanne M; Dickson, Tracey C; King, Anna E; Breadmore, Michael C

    2013-11-01

    With the introduction of hobby laser engravers/cutters, the use of CO2 laser micromachining on poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) has the potential for flexible, low cost, rapid prototyping of microfluidic devices. Unfortunately, the feature size created by most entry-level CO2 laser micromachining systems is too large to become a functional tool in analytical microfluidics. In this paper, we report a novel method to reduce the feature size of microchannels and the bulges formed at the rim of the channel during CO2 laser micromachining by passing the laser beam through a stainless steel pinhole. Without the pinhole, the channel width was typically 300 μm wide. However, when 50 or 35 μm diameter pinholes were used, channel widths of 60 and 25 μm, respectively, could be obtained. The height of the bulge deposited directly next to the channel was reduced to less than 0.8 μm with the pinhole during ablation. Separations of fluorescent dyes on devices ablated with and without the pinhole were compared. On devices fabricated with the pinhole, the number of theoretical plates/m was 2.2-fold higher compared to devices fabricated without the pinhole, and efficiencies comparable to embossed PMMA and laser ablated glass chips were obtained. A mass-produced commercial hobby laser (retailing at ∼$2500), when equipped with a $500 pinhole, represents a rapid and low-cost approach to the rapid fabrication of rigid plastic microchips including the narrow microchannels required for microchip electrophoresis. PMID:24063252

  19. Time-Resolved Force and Schlieren Visualization Study of TEA CO2 Laser Ablation of Water Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiuqian; Hong, Yanji; Wen, Ming; Ye, Jifei; Cui, Cunyan

    2011-11-01

    Time-resolved force sensing technique was applied to the study of propulsive characteristics of water droplets for multi-pulse TEA (transversely excited at atmospheric pressure) CO2 laser propulsion. Laser-driven blast waves and associated flow dynamics in the impulse generation processes of ablation of water droplets were studied by Schlieren visualization. Experimental results showed that coupling coefficient and specific impulse decreased as the interval between laser pulses and pulse numbers was increased. The maximum speed of the blast wave in the opposite and same direction of laser propagation was respectively 10 km/s and 7 km/s.

  20. Dentin ablation-rate measurements in endodontics witj HF and CO2 laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makropoulou, Mersini I.; Serafetinides, Alexander A.; Khabbaz, Marouan; Sykaras, Sotirios; Tsikrikas, G. N.

    1996-01-01

    Recent studies focused on the ability of the laser light to enlarge the root canal during the endodontic therapy. The aim of this research is the experimental and theoretical study of the ablation rate of two infrared laser wavelengths on dentin. Thirty freshly extracted human teeth were longitudinally sectioned at thicknesses ranged from 0.5 to 2 mm, and irradiated on the root canal dentin. The measured ablation rates in dentinal wall of the root canal showed that the HF laser at 2.9 micrometer can more effectively penetrate into the tissue, whereas the carbon dioxide laser at 10.6 micrometer leads to high thermal damage of the ablation crater surroundings.

  1. Pulpal Effects of Enamel Ablation With a Microsecond Pulsed λ=9.3-μm CO2 Laser

    PubMed Central

    Staninec, Michal; Darling, Cynthia L.; Goodis, Harold E.; Pierre, Daniel; Cox, Darren P.; Fan, Kenneth; Larson, Michael; Parisi, Renaldo; Hsu, Dennis; Manesh, Saman K.; Ho, Chi; Hosseini, Mehran; Fried, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objectives In vitro studies have shown that CO2 lasers operating at the highly absorbed 9.3 and 9.6-μm wavelengths with a pulse duration in the range of 10–20-microsecond are well suited for the efficient ablation of enamel and dentin with minimal peripheral thermal damage. Even though these CO2 lasers are highly promising, they have yet to receive FDA approval. Clinical studies are necessary to determine if excessive heat deposition in the tooth may have any detrimental pulpal effects, particularly at higher ablative fluencies. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the pulpal safety of laser irradiation of tooth occlusal surfaces under the conditions required for small conservative preparations confined to enamel. Study Design/Materials and Methods Test subjects requiring removal of third molar teeth were recruited and teeth scheduled for extraction were irradiated using a pulsed CO2 laser at a wavelength of 9.3 μm operating at 25 or 50 Hz using a incident fluence of 20 J/cm2 for a total of 3,000 laser pulses (36 J) for both rates with water cooling. Two control groups were used, one with no treatment and one with a small cut made with a conventional high-speed hand-piece. No anesthetic was used for any of the procedures and tooth vitality was evaluated prior to treatment by heat, cold and electrical testing. Short term effects were observed on teeth extracted within 72 hours after treatment and long term effects were observed on teeth extracted 90 days after treatment. The pulps of the teeth were fixed with formalin immediately after extraction and subjected to histological examination. Additionally, micro-thermocouple measurements were used to estimate the potential temperature rise in the pulp chamber of extracted teeth employing the same irradiation conditions used in vivo. Results Pulpal thermocouple measurements showed the internal temperature rise in the tooth was within safe limits, 3.3±4°C without water cooling versus 1.7±6

  2. Assessing filtering of mountaintop CO2 mole fractions for application to inverse models of biosphere-atmosphere carbon exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, B.-G. J.; Desai, A. R.; Stephens, B. B.; Bowling, D. R.; Burns, S. P.; Watt, A. S.; Heck, S. L.; Sweeney, C.

    2012-02-01

    There is a widely recognized need to improve our understanding of biosphere-atmosphere carbon exchanges in areas of complex terrain including the United States Mountain West. CO2 fluxes over mountainous terrain are often difficult to measure due to unusual and complicated influences associated with atmospheric transport. Consequently, deriving regional fluxes in mountain regions with carbon cycle inversion of atmospheric CO2 mole fraction is sensitive to filtering of observations to those that can be represented at the transport model resolution. Using five years of CO2 mole fraction observations from the Regional Atmospheric Continuous CO2 Network in the Rocky Mountains (Rocky RACCOON), five statistical filters are used to investigate a range of approaches for identifying regionally representative CO2 mole fractions. Test results from three filters indicate that subsets based on short-term variance and local CO2 gradients across tower inlet heights retain nine-tenths of the total observations and are able to define representative diel variability and seasonal cycles even for difficult-to-model sites where the influence of local fluxes is much larger than regional mole fraction variations. Test results from two other filters that consider measurements from previous and following days using spline fitting or sliding windows are overly selective. Case study examples showed that these windowing-filters rejected measurements representing synoptic changes in CO2, which suggests that they are not well suited to filtering continental CO2 measurements. We present a novel CO2 lapse rate filter that uses CO2 differences between levels in the model atmosphere to select subsets of site measurements that are representative on model scales. Our new filtering techniques provide guidance for novel approaches to assimilating mountain-top CO2 mole fractions in carbon cycle inverse models.

  3. Effect of ablation rings and soil temperature on 3-year spring CO2 efflux along the Dalton Highway, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Winter and spring soil CO2 efflux measurements represent a significant component in the assessment of annual carbon budgets of tundra and boreal forest ecosystems, reflecting responses to climate change in the Arctic. This study was conducted in order to quantify CO2 efflux, using a portable chamber system at representative sites along the Dalton Highway. Study sites included three tundra, two white spruce, and three black spruce forest locations during the winter and spring seasons of 2010-2012; the study of these sites promised better understanding of winter and spring carbon contributions to the annual carbon budget, as well as the respective ablation-ring effects during spring. Three-year spring CO2 efflux depends on soil temperature at 5 cm depth on a regional scale. At their highest, Q10 values were 4.2 × 106, within the exposed tussock tundra of the upland tundra site, which tundra soils warmed from -0.9 to 0.5 °C, involving soil microbial activity. From the forest census (400 m2) of the two white spruce forest sites, CO2 emissions were estimated as 0.09-0.36 gC m-2 day-1 in winter and 0.14-4.95 gC m-2 day-1 in spring, corresponding to 1-3% and 1-27% of annual carbon, respectively. Contributions from spring CO2 emissions are likely to increase as exposed soils widen in average length (major axis) from the east-, west-, south-, and north-side lengths (minor axis). Considering the periods of winter and spring seasons across tundra and boreal forests, average winter- and spring-seasonal CO2 contributions to annual carbon budgets correspond roughly to 14-22% for tundra and 9-24% for boreal forest sites during 2011 and 2012. Spring carbon contributions, such as growing season CO2 emissions, are sensitive to subtle changes at the onset of spring and during the snow-covered period in northern high latitudes, in response to recent Arctic climate change.

  4. High CO2 emissions through porous media: Transport mechanisms and implications for flux measurement and fractionation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, William C.; Sorey, M.L.; Kennedy, B.M.; Stonestrom, D.A.; Rogie, J.D.; Shuster, D.L.

    2001-01-01

    Diffuse emissions of CO2 are known to be large around some volcanoes and hydrothermal areas. Accumulation-chamber measurements of CO2 flux are increasingly used to estimate the total magmatic or metamorphic CO2 released from such areas. To assess the performance of accumulation chamber systems at fluxes one to three orders of magnitude higher than normally encountered in soil respiration studies, a test system was constructed in the laboratory where known fluxes could be maintained through dry sand. Steady-state gas concentration profiles and fractionation effects observed in the 30-cm sand column nearly match those predicted by the Stefan-Maxwell equations, indicating that the test system was functioning successfully as a uniform porous medium. Eight groups of investigators tested their accumulation chamber equipment, all configured with continuous infrared gas analyzers (IRGA), in this system. Over a flux range of ~ 200-12,000 g m-2 day-1, 90% of their 203 flux measurements were 0-25% lower than the imposed flux with a mean difference of - 12.5%. Although this difference would seem to be within the range of acceptability for many geologic investigations, some potential sources for larger errors were discovered. A steady-state pressure gradient of -20 Pa/m was measured in the sand column at a flux of 11,200 g m-2 day-1. The derived permeability (50 darcies) was used in the dusty-gas model (DGM) of transport to quantify various diffusive and viscous flux components. These calculations were used to demonstrate that accumulation chambers, in addition to reducing the underlying diffusive gradient, severely disrupt the steady-state pressure gradient. The resultant diversion of the net gas flow is probably responsible for the systematically low flux measurements. It was also shown that the fractionating effects of a viscous CO2 efflux against a diffusive influx of air will have a major impact on some important geochemical indicators, such as N2/Ar, ??15N-N2, and 4He/22

  5. Stable carbon isotope fractionation of organic cyst-forming dinoflagellates: Evaluating the potential for a CO2 proxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoins, Mirja; Van de Waal, Dedmer B.; Eberlein, Tim; Reichart, Gert-Jan; Rost, Björn; Sluijs, Appy

    2015-07-01

    Over the past decades, significant progress has been made regarding the quantification and mechanistic understanding of stable carbon isotope fractionation (13C fractionation) in photosynthetic unicellular organisms in response to changes in the partial pressure of atmospheric CO2 (pCO2). However, hardly any data is available for organic cyst-forming dinoflagellates while this is an ecologically important group with a unique fossil record. We performed dilute batch experiments with four harmful dinoflagellate species known for their ability to form organic cysts: Alexandrium tamarense, Scrippsiella trochoidea, Gonyaulax spinifera and Protoceratium reticulatum. Cells were grown at a range of dissolved CO2 concentrations characterizing past, modern and projected future values (∼5-50 μmol L-1), representing atmospheric pCO2 of 180, 380, 800 and 1200 μatm. In all tested species, 13C fractionation depends on CO2 with a slope of up to 0.17‰ (μmol L)-1. Even more consistent correlations were found between 13C fractionation and the combined effects of particulate organic carbon quota (POC quota; pg C cell-1) and CO2. Carbon isotope fractionation as well as its response to CO2 is species-specific. These results may be interpreted as a first step towards a proxy for past pCO2 based on carbon isotope ratios of fossil organic dinoflagellate cysts. However, additional culture experiments focusing on environmental variables other than pCO2, physiological underpinning of the recorded response, testing for possible offsets in 13C values between cells and cysts, as well as field calibration studies are required to establish a reliable proxy.

  6. Ablation velocity and thermal damage of myocardial tissue using a CO2 laser for transmyocardial laser revascularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachinopoulou, Anna; Beek, Johan F.; van Leeuwen, Ton G. J. M.; Beek, W. J.

    1999-02-01

    Transmyocardial Laser Revascularization (TMLR) is a new experimental method for relief of angina pectoris in patients with severe coronary artery disease. TMLR aims at revascularizing chronic hibernating myocardium by creating transmural channels. One of the working mechanism hypotheses is that the endocardial side of the channels remains open, enabling perfusion of the hibernating myocardium directly from the left ventricle. Although the working mechanism of TMLR is still unknown (perfusion through patent channels, induction of angiogenesis, relief of angina through destruction of sympatic innervation, others?), first clinical studies are successful. Currently, the Heart LaserTM and other CO2 lasers, XeCl Excimer laser and Ho:YAG laser are under investigation for TMLR. The initial attempts of TMR with needles were soon replaced by laser induced channels. Efforts were focused on developing a CO2 laser that could penetrate a beating heart during its relaxation phase. Later, the position of the beam could be fixed in the myocardial wall using lasers with fiber delivery systems and perforation was achieved within multiple cycles. Various researchers reported on both patent and non-patent channels after TMLR. Our belief is that the extent of laser induced thermal damage is one of the factors that determine the clinical outcome and the extent of angiogenesis (and, possibly, the patency of the channel). The purpose of this study is to present a simple theoretical model to predict the extent of thermal damage around a transmyocardial channel. In vitro experiments were performed on myocardial bovine tissue and damage was assessed. The results were used to determine the final parameters of the approximating theoretical equation. To evaluate our results, we compared our results to in vitro data using the Heart LaserTM from the literature. Ablation velocities were also measured and the results were compared to ablation velocity calculations using a model described by Ostegar

  7. Ablation of dermal and mucosal lesions with a new CO2 laser application system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanovic, Sergije; Sedlmaier, Benedikt W.; Fuehrer, Ariane

    1997-05-01

    Laser treatment of skin changes has become common practice in recent years. The high absorption of the wavelength of the carbon-dioxide laser (10600 nm) is responsible for its low penetration depth in biological tissue. Shortening the exposure time minimizes thermic side effects such as carbonization and coagulation. This effect can be achieved with the SilkTouchTM scanner 767, since the focused laser beam is moved over a defined area by rapidly rotating mirrors. This enables controlled and reliable removal of certain dermal lesions, particularly hypertrophic scars, scars after common acne, wrinkles, rhinophyma and benign neoplasms like verruca vulgaris. Cosmetically favorable reepithelialization of the lasered surfaces results within a very short period of time. Benign mucosal changes of the upper aerodigestive tract can also be treated. Ablation is less traumatic for papillomas, fibromas, hyperplasias in the area of Waldeyer's tonsillar ring and certain laryngotracheal pathologies. Clinical examples demonstrate the advantages of this new mode of application.

  8. Comparison of the regional CO2 mole fraction filtering approaches at a WMO/GAW regional station in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, S. X.; Tans, P. P.; Steinbacher, M.; Zhou, L. X.; Luan, T.

    2015-12-01

    The identification of atmospheric CO2 observation data which are minimally influenced by very local emissions/removals is essential for trend analysis, for the estimation of regional sources and sinks, and for the modeling of long-range transport of CO2. In this study, four approaches are used to filter the atmospheric CO2 observation records from 2009 to 2011 at one World Meteorological Organization/Global Atmosphere Watch (WMO/GAW) regional station (Lin'an, LAN) in China. The methods are based on the concentration of atmospheric black carbon (BC), on a statistical approach (robust extraction of baseline signal, REBS), on CH4 as an auxiliary tracer (AUX), and on meteorological parameters (MET). All approaches do suitably well to capture the seasonal CO2 cycle at LAN. Differences are observed in the average regional mole fractions with annual values in the REBS method at least 1.7 ± 0.2 ppm higher than the other methods. The BC method may underestimate the regional CO2 mole fractions during the winter-spring period and should be treated with caution. The REBS method is a purely statistical method and it may also introduce errors on the regional CO2 mole fraction evaluations, as the filtered trend may be influenced by the "noisy" raw data series. Although there are correlations between CH4 and CO2 mole fractions at LAN, the different source/sink regimes may introduce bias on the regional CO2 estimation in the AUX method, typically in summer. Overall, the MET method seems to be the most favorable because it mainly focuses on the influence of potential local sources and sinks, and considers diurnal variations and meteorological conditions. Using the MET method, the annual growth rate of regional CO2 at LAN is determined to be 3.1 ± 0.01 ppm yr-1 (standard error) from 2009 to 2011.

  9. Study of the regional CO2 mole fractions filtering approach at a WMO/GAW regional station in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, S. X.; Tans, P. P.; Steinbacher, M.; Zhou, L. X.; Luan, T.

    2015-07-01

    The identification of atmospheric CO2 observation data which is minimally influenced by very local emissions/removals is essential for the estimation of trend analysis, regional sources and sinks, and for modeling of long-range transport of CO2. In this study, four approaches are used to filter the atmospheric CO2 observation records from 2009 to 2011 at one World Meteorological Organization/Global Atmosphere Watch (WMO/GAW) regional station (Lin'an, LAN) in China. The methods are based on the atmospheric black carbon concentration (BC), on a statistical approach (REBS), on CH4 as auxiliary tracer (AUX) and on meteorological parameters (MET). All approaches do suitably well to capture the seasonal CO2 cycle at LAN. Differences are observed in the average regional mole fractions with annual values in the REBS method at least 1.7 ± 0.2 ppm higher than the other methods. The BC method may underestimate the regional CO2 mole fractions during winter-spring period and should be treated with caution. The REBS method is a purely statistical method and it may also introduce errors on the regional CO2 mole fractions evaluations, as the filtered trend may be deviated by the "noisy" raw data series. Although there are correlations between CH4 and CO2 mole fractions at LAN, the different source/sink regimes may introduce bias on the regional CO2 estimation in the AUX method, typically in summer. Overall, the MET method seems to be the most favorable because it mainly focuses on the influence of potential local sources and sinks and considers diurnal variations, local topography, and meteorological conditions. Using the MET method, the annual growth rate of regional CO2 at LAN is determined to be 3.1 ± 0.01 ppm yr-1 (standard error) from 2009 to 2013.

  10. Quantifying uncertainty of past pCO2 determined from changes in C3 plant carbon isotope fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Ying; Schubert, Brian A.

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the past concentrations of atmospheric CO2 level (pCO2) is critical to understanding climate sensitivity to changing pCO2. Towards this, a new proxy for pCO2 has been developed based on changes in carbon isotope fractionation (Δ13C) in C3 land plants. The accuracy of this approach has been validated against ice-core pCO2 records, suggesting the potential to apply this proxy to other geological periods; however, no thorough uncertainty assessment of the proxy has been conducted. Here, we first analyze the uncertainty in the model-curve fit through the experimental data using a bootstrap approach. Then, errors of the five input parameters for the proxy are evaluated using sensitivity analysis; these include the carbon isotope composition of atmospheric CO2 (δ13CCO2) and that of the plant material (δ13Corg) for two time periods, a reference time (t = 0) and the time period of interest (t), and the value of pCO2 at time t = 0. We then propagated the errors on the reconstructed pCO2 using a Monte Carlo random sampling approach that combined the uncertainties of the curve fitting and the five inputs for a scenario in which the reference time was the Holocene with a target period for the reconstructed pCO2 during the Cenozoic. We find that the error in the reconstructed pCO2(t) increases with increasing pCO2(t), yet remains <122% (positive error) and <40% (negative error) for pCO2(t) < 1000 ppmv. The error assessment suggests that it can be used with confidence for much of the Cenozoic and perhaps the majority of the last 400 million years, which is characterized by pCO2 levels generally less than 1000 ppmv. Towards this, an application of this uncertainty analysis is presented for the Paleogene (52-63 Ma) using published data. The resulting pCO2(t) levels calculated using this method average 470 +288/-147 ppmv (1σ, n = 75), and overlap with previous pCO2(t) estimates determined for this time period using stomata, liverwort, and paleosol proxies. The

  11. Secondary fractionation processes of dissolved inorganic carbon and CO2 in thermal waters from active and quiescent volcanic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tassi, F.; Venturi, S.; Vaselli, O.; Cabassi, J.; Capecchiacci, F.

    2015-12-01

    Carbon dioxide is the main component of the dry gas phase in hydrothermal and volcanic fluids, being mainly produced by mantle degassing and thermometamorphic reactions on limestone at which a shallow contribution from microbial activity is commonly added. These three different sources can be recognized on the basis of the d13C values, since biogenic CO2 typically shows an isotopic signature significantly more negative (<-20‰ V-PDB) than that originated at depth (>-7‰ V-PDB). Intermediate d13C values are commonly interpreted as due to mixing processes between deep and shallow sources. In this study, the d13C values of CO2 and total dissolved inorganic carbon (TDIC) in thermal waters from distinct hydrothermal/volcanic systems, located in Italy (Campi Flegrei and Vulcano Island) and Chilean Andes (El Tatio), are reported. This dataset includes several carbon isotopic ratios that are not consistent with a pure shallow or deep CO2 origin. Nevertheless the relatively high CO2 concentrations and the water chemistry of these samples clearly indicate that they are not resulting by mixing between the deep and shallow end-members. Calcite deposition, which produces a strong isotopic fractionation on the pristine CO2, seems to represent a reliable alternative explanation for the observed data. It is worth noting that these peculiar isotopic and chemical features have recurrently been recognized in thermal water discharges from different volcanic areas. These results demonstrate that the release of CO2 from primary sources is strongly affected by secondary processes since they act as sinks of CO2. As a consequence, they play an important role for the evaluation of the global budget of CO2 discharged from these natural systems.

  12. The effects of atmospheric [CO2] on carbon isotope fractionation and magnesium incorporation into biogenic marine calcite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vieira, Veronica

    1997-01-01

    The influences of atmospheric carbon dioxide on the fractionation of carbon isotopes and the magnesium incorporation into biogenic marine calcite were investigated using samples of the calcareous alga Amphiroa and benthic foraminifer Sorites grown in the Biosphere 2 Ocean system under variable atmospheric CO2 concentrations (approximately 500 to 1200 ppm). Carbon isotope fractionation was studied in both the organic matter and the skeletal carbonate. Magnesium analysis was to be performed on the carbonate removed during decalcification. These data have not been collected due to technical problems. Carbon isotope data from Amphiroa yields a linear relation between [CO2] and Delta(sup 13)C(sub Corg)values suggesting that the fractionation of carbon isotopes during photosynthesis is positively correlated with atmospheric [CO2]. [CO2] and Delta(sup 13)C(sub Corg) values for Sorites produce a relation that is best described by a hyperbolic function where Delta(sup 13)C(sub Corg) values increase between 300 and 700 ppm and decrease from 700 to 1200 ppm. Further investigation of this relation and Sorites physiology is needed.

  13. Application of Carbon Isotope Fractionation during the Reduction Process from CO 2 to CH 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jin; Hu, Guoyi; Zhang, Ying; Yang, Guifang; Cui, Huiying; Cao, Hongming; Hu, Xülong

    The CO 2 reduced to CH 4 pathway is important for the generation of biogas in the geological history. The Quaternary biogenic gas fields in Qaidam Basin of China belong to the CO 2/H 2 reduction biogenic gas. According to the theory of H 2/CO 2 reduction, we have carried out the biosimulation experiments with different occurrences and different initial carbon isotope values of carbon sources. The experimental results indicate that there is a positive correlation between the δ 13C methane values and the δ 13C values of the substrate in products; In response to the existence of excessive substrate, the occurrence of substrate has its effect on the δ 13C methane values. The δ 13C methane values from free CO 2 reduced to CH 4 is relatively lower than those coming from HCO 3- and CO 32- ions. By applying to the Quaternary biogenic gas filed in the east of Qaidam Basin, the source and occurrences of the main substrate CO 2 are discussed, and these have import reference significance for evaluating the biogas resources and searching for favorable exploration areas.

  14. Oxygen isotope fractionation during spin-forbidden photolysis of CO2: Relevance to the atmosphere of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, J. R.; Stark, G.; Pack, A.; de Oliveira, N.; Nahon, L.

    2015-12-01

    The oxygen isotope composition of the Martian atmosphere is of interest for comparison with recent MSL SAM results, and to understand the origin of oxygen isotope anomalies (i.e., mass-independent fractionation or MIF) in secondary minerals in SNC meteorites. Our focus here is on spin-forbidden photolysis of CO2, CO2 + hv (>167 nm) → CO(X1S) + O(3P). The spin-forbidden photolysis of CO2 is unusual in the Martian atmosphere because of its high reaction rate from the upper atmosphere (80 km) all the way to the ground. This range of altitudes spans 4 orders of magnitude in atmospheric pressure, and occurs because of the gradual decrease in the CO2 cross sections from 167 to ~200 nm. Previous laboratory photolysis experiments on CO2 in the spin-allowed and spin-forbidden regions have yielded a remarkably large MIF signature (17O excess ~ 100 permil) in O2 product for photolysis at 185 nm. Recent theoretical cross sections for CO2 isotopologues argue for a much smaller MIF signature from spin-forbidden photolysis. Here, we report the results of photolysis experiments on CO2 at the Soleil synchrotron DESIRS beamline. High purity, natural isotope abundance CO2 was placed in a 20 cm photocell with MgF2 windows. Experiments were performed at 3 wavelengths (7% FWHM): 160 nm (spin-allowed), and at 175 nm and 185 nm (spin-forbidden). After VUV exposure, aliquots of the photolyzed CO2 were sent to the Department of Isotope Geology at the University of Goettingen for O isotope analysis. The isotope results show that the spin-allowed photolysis yields normal, mass-dependent fractionation in agreement with earlier work. Photolysis at 175 nm, which is mostly spin-forbidden, yields a small positive (or zero) MIF signature. Photolysis at 185 nm, which is entirely spin-forbidden, yields O2 with a negative MIF signature (D17O ~ -8 to -10 permil). The results at 185 nm disagree in magnitude and sign with the very large positive MIF signature previously reported, and provides support

  15. CO2 laser ablation of external genital lesions with a SwiftLase flashscanner: treatment of extramammary Paget's disease of the vulva, penile condylomata, and other lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacknoff, Eric J.; Schweitzer, Jay; Slatkine, Michael; Mead, Douglass S.

    1995-05-01

    The ability to vaporize extremely thin layers of epithelial tissue without any char and with minimal thermal necrosis is extremely advantageous in the treatment of superficial lesions of the external genitalia. We present a novel CO2 laser `SwiftLase' flashscan technology capable of providing char free ablation of 3 mm diameter lesions with only 150 micron residual thermal necrosis depth at power level as low as 10 watts. These power levels are achievable with a small transportable CO2 laser. The SwiftLaser is a miniature opto- mechanical scanner which homogeneously covers a 3 mm diameter surface with a 0.1 mm spot size focused beam within 0.1 seconds. The instantaneous beam's dwelling time is 1 millisecond. The instantaneous power density level at the focal point is higher than the threshold for char free ablation, thus providing a large char free ablation crater. Since depth of each ablated layer is 0.1 mm, the depth of treatment can be precisely controlled. The SwiftLaser technology has extensively and successfully been used in the last two years for the treatment of HPV in female lower tracts (Vulvectomy). The same technique may be performed with extramammary Paget's disease of the vulva, penile condylomata, and other epithelial disorders of the external genitalia without damage to surrounding healthy tissue. Technique and clinical results will be discussed.

  16. O3, CO2 and chemical fractionation in ponderosa pine saplings

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental factors can affect plant tissue quality which is important for quality of organic matter inputs into soil food webs and decomposition of soil organic matter. Thus the effects of increases in CO2 and O3 and their interactions were determined for various chemical fra...

  17. Carbon isotopic fractionation of CH4 and CO2 during canister desorption of coal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Strapoc, D.; Schimmelmann, A.; Mastalerz, Maria

    2006-01-01

    Canister desorption of coal gas from freshly sampled coal is commonly used for exploratory assessment of the coalbed methane (CBM) potential of a basin or prospect, as well as for the sampling of gas for isotopic determination of the gas origin. Compositional and ??13C isotopic time-series of desorbing CBM and carbon dioxide (CO2) over 3-4 months demonstrate considerable compositional and isotopic shifts over time. Non-stationary chemical and isotopic characteristics are due to differences in diffusivity and adsorbance behavior of gas molecules and must be taken into account when attempting to reproducibly sample coal gases. Off-line gas processing on a vacuum line and on-line GC/MS analyses were performed on coal gas samples from the Springfield and Seelyville Coal Members of the Pennsylvanian age that were cored in the SE Illinois Basin in SW Indiana, USA. The coals cover a narrow range of maturity from 0.54% to 0.64% vitrinite reflectance. Methane initially desorbed faster than CO2, resulting in a 50% increase of the CO 2 content in bulk desorbing gas on the 50th day relative to the first day of desorption. After 50 days of desorption, about 90% of all coal gas was desorbed. Over the same time period, ??13C values of incrementally sampled coal gas increased by 2??? and 9???, for CH 4 and CO2, respectively, testifying to the greater retention of 13CH4 and 13CO2 relative to 12CH4 and 12CO2. An isotopic mass balance of the individual, sequentially desorbed and sampled gas amounts yielded weighted mean ??13CCH4 and ??13CCO2 values for characterizing the cumulatively desorbed gas. The overall mean ??13C values were equivalent to ??13C values of gases that desorbed at a time when half of the potentially available gas had been desorbed from coal, corresponding in this study to a time between day 5 and day 12 of canister desorption at 15-18??C. The total expected gas volume and the ???50% midpoint can thus be approximated for a desorbing coal gas sample, based on a

  18. Rovibrational energies, partition functions and equilibrium fractionation of the CO2 isotopologues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerezo, J.; Bastida, A.; Requena, A.; Zúñiga, J.

    2014-11-01

    Rovibrational energy levels, partition functions and relative abundances of the stable isotopologues of CO2 in gas phase at equilibrium are calculated using an empirical Morse-cosine potential energy surface (PES) refined by fitting to the updated pure (l2=0) vibrational frequencies observed for the main 12C16O2 isotopologue. The rovibrational energy levels are calculated variationally using a system of optimized hyperspherical normal coordinates, and from these the vibrational terms Gv and rotational constants Bv of the isotopologues are determined. The refined potential surface is shown to be clearly superior to the original potential surface, with the former reproducing the observed values of the spectroscopic constants Gv and Bv with accuracies of about 0.1 cm-1 and 0.00020 cm-1, respectively, for levels with l2≥0 up to 10,000 cm-1 above the ground state. The internal partition functions of the isotopologues are calculated by approximated direct summation over the rovibrational energies and compared with both previous partition sums and values obtained from analytical expressions based on the harmonic oscillator and rigid rotor models. The partition functions calculated by approximated direct summation are then used to determine the abundances of the CO2 isotopologues at thermodynamic equilibrium using the method developed by Wang et al. [74]. Significant variations in the relative abundances of some of the CO2 multiple substituted isotopologues at terrestrial temperatures with respect to those provided by the classical harmonic-based Urey theory are found, which may be of relevance in geochemical processes.

  19. Successful treatment of traumatic scars with combined nonablative fractional laser and pinpoint technique of standard CO2 laser.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Shady M; Elsaie, Mohamed L; Kamel, Mohamed Ismail; Mohammed, Essam-Eldin

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the use of a pinpoint irradiation technique followed by nonablative fractional technique in treatment of traumatic scars. Thirteen patients with traumatic sacrs were treated with pinpoint technique of CO2 laser using traditional headpiece activating laser at a frequency (50 Hz) to deliver pulsed mode with power of 1 W using the focusing technique followed by 3-5 passes of the nonablative 1540 nm fractional Er:glass laser. An independent physician evaluator assessed the treatment outcomes using Vancouver scar scale (VSS) and 5-point grading scale (grade 0, no improvement; grade 1, 1-25%; grade 2, 26-50%; grade 3, 51-75%; grade 4, 76-100% improvement). After the final treatment, average percentage changes of VSS were 41.5%. Improvement was evident in terms of vascularity, pigmentation, and height, while insignificant in terms of Pliability. Based on physician's global assessment, mean grade of 2.5 was achieved. Patient's subjective satisfaction scores paralleled the physician's objective evaluation. Pinpoint irradiation technique by CO2 laser followed by nonablative fractional laser is a safe and effective modality in treatment of scars. PMID:26581805

  20. Surface treatment with a fractional CO2 laser enhances shear bond strength of resin cement to zirconia

    PubMed Central

    Alirezaei, Mehrnoosh

    2016-01-01

    Aims: The present study investigated the effect of different surface treatments on shear bond strength (SBS) of resin cement to zirconia. Materials and methods: Ninety zirconia blocks were prepared and divided into 6 groups of 15 by treatment. Group 1 served as the control group, whereas groups 2 and 3 were treated with air abrasion and a universal primer (Monobond plus), respectively. The remaining zirconia copings were treated with a fractional CO2 laser for 10 seconds using 10 W/10 mJ (group 4), 10 w/14 mJ (group 5) or 20 W/10 mJ (group 6). A luting cement (Clearfil SA) was bonded to the treated zirconia surfaces and cured for 40 seconds. SBS was measured with a universal testing machine and the type of bond failure was determined. Results: There was a statistically significant difference in SBS among the study groups (p<0.001). The highest SBS values were observed in the groups treated with the fractional CO2 laser at settings of 20 W/10 mJ (28.1 MPa) or 10 W/14 mJ (27.4 MPa), followed by the specimens treated with the universal primer (22.8 MPa). The control specimens exhibited the lowest SBS (9.4 MPa) among the study groups (p<0.05). There was no significant difference in the distribution of failure modes among the groups (p=0.871). Conclusions: The application of fractional CO2 laser can improve bond strength of resin cement to zirconia ceramic, and thus it could be considered as an appropriate alternative to conventional methods of zirconia surface treatment. PMID:27141151

  1. Efficacy and Safety of Fractional CO2 Laser Resurfacing in Non-hypertrophic Traumatic and Burn Scars

    PubMed Central

    Majid, Imran; Imran, Saher

    2015-01-01

    Background: Fractional photothermolysis is one of the most effective treatment options used to resurface scars of different aetiologies. Aim: To assess the efficacy and safety of fractional CO2 laser resurfacing treatment in the management of non-hypertrophic traumatic and burn scars. Materials and Methods: Twenty-five patients affected by non-hypertrophic traumatic and burn scars were treated with four sessions of fractional CO2 laser resurfacing treatment at 6-weekly intervals. Patients were photographed at each visit and finally, 3 months after the end of treatment schedule. Response to treatment was assessed clinically as well as by comparing the initial photograph of the patient with the one taken at the last follow-up visit 3-months after the final treatment session. Changes in skin texture, surface irregularity and pigmentation were assessed on a quartile grading scale and scored individually from 0 to 4. A mean of the three individual scores was calculated and the response was labelled as ‘excellent’ if the mean score achieved was >2. A score of 1-2 was labeled as good response while a score below 1 was labeled as ‘poor’ response. The subjective satisfaction of each patient with the treatment offered was also assessed at the last follow-up visit. Results: The commonest site of scarring treated was the face followed by hands. Response to treatment was rated as excellent in 60% (15/25) patients while 24% (6/25) and 16% (4/25) patients were labeled as good and poor responders, respectively. Skin texture showed better response than other variables with average score of 2.44. Linear post-traumatic scars were seen to respond less than other morphological types. Majority of the patients (19 out of 25) were highly satisfied with the treatment offered. No long-term adverse effects were noted in any patient. Conclusions: Fractional photothermolysis with a fractional CO2 laser gives excellent results in patients with post-burn scars with minimal adverse

  2. The association of fractional CO2 laser 10.600nm and photodynamic therapy in the treatment of onychomycosis*

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Guilherme Bueno; Antonio, João Roberto; Antonio, Carlos Roberto; Tomé, Fernanda Alves

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Onychomycosis is a fungal infection of the nails caused in most cases by dermatophytes Trichophyton rubrum and Trichophyton mentagrophytes. Despite numerous available antifungal drugs for therapy of this infection, the cure rate is low, with high rates of relapse after treatment and side effects. OBJECTIVES To present a new option for the treatment of onychomycosis, in search of a more effective and rapid method than conventional ones. METHODS Patients underwent two sessions of CO2 fractional laser 10.600nm associated with photodynamic therapy. Mycological and digital photography were performed before and after the treatment. RESULTS McNemar test with continuity correction and degrees of freedom = 1: for clinical cure rate, 13.06, with p=0.00005; for mycological cure, 17.05, with p=0.00005; 72% felt fully satisfied with the procedure. CONCLUSIONS The use of fractional CO2 laser 10.600nm associated with photodynamic therapy can be effective in the treatment of onychomycosis, decreasing the risk of systemic lesions that may be triggered with prolonged use of oral antifungals. PMID:26375214

  3. Final Report for Fractionation and Separation of Polydisperse Nanoparticles into Distinct Monodisperse Fractions Using CO2 Expanded Liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Chistopher Roberts

    2007-08-31

    The overall objective of this project was to facilitate efficient fractionation and separation of polydisperse metal nanoparticle populations into distinct monodisperse fractions using the tunable solvent properties of gas expanded liquids. Specifically, the dispersibility of ligand-stabilized nanoparticles in an organic solution was controlled by altering the ligand-solvent interaction (solvation) by the addition of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) gas as an antisolvent (thereby tailoring the bulk solvent strength) in a custom high pressure apparatus developed in our lab. This was accomplished by adjusting the CO{sub 2} pressure over the liquid dispersion, resulting in a simple means of tuning the nanoparticle precipitation by size. Overall, this work utilized the highly tunable solvent properties of organic/CO{sub 2} solvent mixtures to selectively size-separate dispersions of polydisperse nanoparticles (ranging from 1 to 20 nm in size) into monodisperse fractions ({+-}1nm). Specifically, three primary tasks were performed to meet the overall objective. Task 1 involved the investigation of the effects of various operating parameters (such as temperature, pressure, ligand length and ligand type) on the efficiency of separation and fractionation of Ag nanoparticles. In addition, a thermodynamic interaction energy model was developed to predict the dispersibility of different sized nanoparticles in the gas expanded liquids at various conditions. Task 2 involved the extension of the experimental procedures identified in task 1 to the separation of other metal particles used in catalysis such as Au as well as other materials such as semiconductor particles (e.g. CdSe). Task 3 involved using the optimal conditions identified in tasks 1 and 2 to scale up the process to handle sample sizes of greater than 1 g. An experimental system was designed to allow nanoparticles of increasingly smaller sizes to be precipitated sequentially in a vertical series of high pressure vessels by

  4. Fractional capacity electrolyzer development for CO2 and H2O electrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wynveen, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    The electrolyzer module was designed to produce 0.24 kg/d (0.53 lb/d) of breathable oxygen from the electrolysis of metabolic carbon dioxide and water vapor. The fractional capacity electrolyzer module is constructed from three electrochemical tube cells and contains only three critical seals. The module design illustrated an 84 percent reduction in the total number of seals for a one person capacity oxygen generating system based on the solid electrolyte carbon dioxide and water vapor electrolysis concept. The electrolyzer module was successfully endurance tested for 71 days.

  5. The Efficacy and Safety of Fractional CO2 Laser Combined with Topical Type A Botulinum Toxin for Facial Rejuvenation: A Randomized Controlled Split-Face Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jie; Ji, Xi; Li, Min; Chen, Xiao-e; Liu, Juan; Zhang, Jia-an; Luo, Dan; Zhou, Bing-rong

    2016-01-01

    Objective. We evaluated synergistic efficacy and safety of combined topical application of Botulinum Toxin Type A (BTX-A) with fractional CO2 laser for facial rejuvenation. Methods. Twenty female subjects were included for this split-face comparative study. One side of each subject's cheek was treated with fractional CO2 plus saline solution, and the other side was treated with fractional CO2 laser plus topical application of BTX-A. Patients received one session of treatment and evaluations were done at baseline, one, four, and twelve weeks after treatment. The outcome assessments included subjective satisfaction scale; blinded clinical assessment; and the biophysical parameters of roughness, elasticity, skin hydration, transepidermal water loss (TEWL), and the erythema and melanin index. Results. BTX-A combined with fractional CO2 laser sides showed higher physician's global assessment score, subject satisfaction score, roughness, skin hydration, and skin elasticity compared to that of fractional CO2 plus saline solution side at 12 weeks after treatment. TEWL and erythema and melanin index showed no significant differences between two sides at baseline, one, four, and twelve weeks after treatment. Conclusion. Topical application of BTX-A could enhance the rejuvenation effect of fractional CO2 laser. PMID:26998485

  6. BRYOCARB: A process-based model of thallose liverwort carbon isotope fractionation in response to CO 2, O 2, light and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Benjamin J.; Brentnall, Stuart J.; Quick, W. Paul; Beerling, David J.

    2006-12-01

    Evidence from laboratory experiments indicates that fractionation against the heavy stable isotope of carbon (Δ 13C) by bryophytes (liverworts and mosses) is strongly dependent on atmospheric CO 2. This physiological response may therefore provide the basis for developing a new terrestrial CO 2 proxy [Fletcher, B.J., Beerling, D.J., Brentnall, S.J., Royer, D.L., 2005. Fossil bryophytes as recorders of ancient CO 2 levels: experimental evidence and a Cretaceous case study. Global Biogeochem. Cycles19, GB3012]. Here, we establish a theoretical basis for the proxy by developing an extended model of bryophyte carbon isotope fractionation (BRYOCARB) that integrates the biochemical theory of photosynthetic CO 2 assimilation with controls on CO 2 supply by diffusion from the atmosphere. The BRYOCARB model is evaluated against measurements of the response of liverwort photosynthesis and Δ 13C to variations in atmospheric O 2, temperature and irradiance at different CO 2 concentrations. We show that the bryophyte proxy is at least as sensitive to variations in atmosphere CO 2 as the two other leading carbon isotope-based approaches to estimating palaeo-CO 2 levels ( δ13C of phytoplankton and of paleosols). Mathematical inversion of BRYOCARB provides a mechanistic means of estimating atmospheric CO 2 levels from fossil bryophyte carbon that can explicitly account for the effects of past differences in O 2 and climate.

  7. Precipitation of smithsonite under controlled pCO2 between 25 and 60° C - Fractionation of oxygen isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Füger, Anja; Mavromatis, Vasileios; Leis, Albrecht; Dietzel, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Owing to the large fractionation (i.e. Δ18Osolid-diss. ˜30) between carbonate minerals and aqueous fluids with respect to their 18O/16O composition, the oxygen isotope composition of carbonates has been a fundamental tool for the estimation of mineral formation temperature by the geoscience community. Indeed the last 6 decades, a wide number of experimental studies investigated the temperature relation of Δ18Osolid-diss. between divalent metal carbonates and aqueous fluids. To date however no experimental data exist for the temperature dependence of Δ18Osolid-diss. between smithsonite (ZnCO3) and fluid. This lack of data likely stems from a kinetic barrier effect, that of the dehydration of aqueous Zn2+ and the formation of hydrozincite (Zn5(CO3)2(OH)6). Smithsonite is a secondary zinc mineral that is one of the components of zinc ore bodies. It is formed through oxidation of primary zinc ores by the reaction with a carbonate source or by precipitation of zinc salt solutions with a CO2-saturated and bicarbonate-rich solution. In this study we hydrothermally synthesized smithsonite at the temperature range between 25 and 60 ° C and report the temperature dependence of oxygen isotope distribution between smithsonite and aqueous fluid. In order to avoid the formation of hydrozincite our experiments were conducted in titanium batch reactors using Teflon-inlets where the CO2 pressure was adjusted to 10 bars. The low pH conditions provoked by the elevated pCO2 applied, lead to the dissolution of hydrozincite, which is initially formed by mixing of Na2HCO3 (0.1 M) and Zn(NO3)2.4 H2O (0.02 M) solutions, to yield - under the prevailing conditions - the thermodynamically stable mineral smithsonite.

  8. Automatic processing of atmospheric CO2 and CH4 mole fractions at the ICOS Atmosphere Thematic Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazan, Lynn; Tarniewicz, Jérôme; Ramonet, Michel; Laurent, Olivier; Abbaris, Amara

    2016-09-01

    The Integrated Carbon Observation System Atmosphere Thematic Centre (ICOS ATC) automatically processes atmospheric greenhouse gases mole fractions of data coming from sites of the ICOS network. Daily transferred raw data files are automatically processed and archived. Data are stored in the ICOS atmospheric database, the backbone of the system, which has been developed with an emphasis on the traceability of the data processing. Many data products, updated daily, explore the data through different angles to support the quality control of the dataset performed by the principal operators in charge of the instruments. The automatic processing includes calibration and water vapor corrections as described in the paper. The mole fractions calculated in near-real time (NRT) are automatically revaluated as soon as a new instrument calibration is processed or when the station supervisors perform quality control. By analyzing data from 11 sites, we determined that the average calibration corrections are equal to 1.7 ± 0.3 µmol mol-1 for CO2 and 2.8 ± 3 nmol mol-1 for CH4. These biases are important to correct to avoid artificial gradients between stations that could lead to error in flux estimates when using atmospheric inversion techniques. We also calculated that the average drift between two successive calibrations separated by 15 days amounts to ±0.05 µmol mol-1 and ±0.7 nmol mol-1 for CO2 and CH4, respectively. Outliers are generally due to errors in the instrument configuration and can be readily detected thanks to the data products provided by the ATC. Several developments are still ongoing to improve the processing, including automated spike detection and calculation of time-varying uncertainties.

  9. Mapping and elemental fractionation of aerosols generated by laser-induced breakdown ablation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuheng; Bulatov, Valery; Singer, Liviu; Stricker, Josef; Schechter, Israel

    2005-12-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been used to map the distribution of particulate matter inside the plume created by laser ablation of a brass target. The spatial density distribution of the different components of the plume was determined in an attempt to reveal the mechanism of fractionation in the process of the laser ablation. In this experiment two Nd:YAG pulsed lasers were used. The first beam was focused on the target to generate a plume after breakdown of the surface. The second laser was focused on the plume and generated the second breakdown. The composition of the region probed by the second beam was determined by analyzing the spectral emission from the second breakdown. By scanning the probe time and position, the temporal and spatial evolution of the laser ablative plume could be discovered. Spatial and temporal fractionation was observed in brass plume.

  10. Investigation of Acid-Etched CO2 Laser Ablated Enamel Surfaces Using Polarization Sensitive Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Nahm, Byung J.; Kang, Hobin; Chan, Kenneth; Fried, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    A carbon dioxide laser operating at the highly absorbed wavelength of 9.3μm with a pulse duration of 10–15μs is ideally suited for caries removal and caries prevention. The enamel thermally modified by the laser has enhanced resistance to acid dissolution. This is an obvious advantage for caries prevention; however, it is often necessary to etch the enamel surface to increase adhesion to composite restorative materials and such surfaces may be more resistant to etching. The purpose of the study was to non-destructively measure the susceptibility of laser-ablated enamel surfaces to acid dissolution before and after acid-etching using Polarization Sensitive Optical Coherence Tomography (PS-OCT). PS-OCT was used to acquire images of bovine enamel surfaces after exposure to laser irradiation at ablative fluence, acid-etching, and a surface softened dissolution model. The integrated reflectivity from lesion and the lesion depth were measured using PS-OCT. Samples were also sectioned for examination by Polarized Light Microscopy (PLM). PS-OCT images showed that acid-etching greatly accelerated the formation of subsurface lesions on both laser-irradiated and non-irradiated surfaces (P<0.05). A 37.5% phosphoric acid etch removed the laser modified enamel layer after 5–10 seconds. PMID:23539418

  11. Investigation of acid-etched CO2 laser ablated enamel surfaces using polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahm, Byung J.; Kang, Hobin; Chan, Kenneth; Fried, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    A carbon dioxide laser operating at the highly absorbed wavelength of 9.3μm with a pulse duration of 10-15μs is ideally suited for caries removal and caries prevention. The enamel thermally modified by the laser has enhanced resistance to acid dissolution. This is an obvious advantage for caries prevention; however, it is often necessary to etch the enamel surface to increase adhesion to composite restorative materials and such surfaces may be more resistant to etching. The purpose of the study was to non-destructively measure the susceptibility of laser-ablated enamel surfaces to acid dissolution before and after acid-etching using Polarization Sensitive Optical Coherence Tomography (PS-OCT). PS-OCT was used to acquire images of bovine enamel surfaces after exposure to laser irradiation at ablative fluence, acid-etching, and a surface softened dissolution model. The integrated reflectivity from lesion and the lesion depth were measured using PS-OCT. Samples were also sectioned for examination by Polarized Light Microscopy (PLM). PS-OCT images showed that acid-etching greatly accelerated the formation of subsurface lesions on both laser-irradiated and non-irradiated surfaces (P<0.05). A 37.5% phosphoric acid etch removed the laser modified enamel layer after 5-10 seconds.

  12. Bacterial infections following non-ablative fractional laser treatment: a case series and discussion.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lisa Y; Kilmer, Suzanne L; Ross, E Victor; Avram, Mathew M

    2015-02-01

    Non-ablative fractional laser procedures have become increasingly popular since their introduction in 2004. The fractional 1,927 nm thulium laser is a non-ablative device that penetrates up to 300 μm in the skin and the 1,550 nm erbium:glass laser penetrates up to 1,400 μm. These procedures are considered minimally invasive with a high safety profile; therefore, infectious complications are exceedingly rare. However, we report five recent cases of bacterial infection with both gram-positive and gram-negative organisms following treatment with the fractional 1550/1927 nm laser approximately 1 day to 1 week post-procedure. One patient had a rapidly progressing pustular eruption with symptoms of sepsis. These patients were seen immediately, cultures were obtained and empiric antibiotic therapy was initiated. They recovered without long-term complications. Rapid-onset bacterial infections following non-ablative laser resurfacing with the 1550/1927 nm laser have not been previously reported in the literature. The infections can progress quickly and lead to serious sequelae, including systemic illness and severe scarring, if not identified and appropriately treated. We present these cases to highlight the importance of close surveillance and when appropriate, rapid intervention, following non-ablative fractional procedures, especially when patients present with atypical symptoms and signs. PMID:25586939

  13. Vesiculation and degassing in the 2005-6 submarine flow at 9°50'N, East Pacific Rise: Implications for volatile fluxes and CO2:He kinetic fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, P. J.; Graham, D. W.; Perfit, M. R.

    2012-12-01

    areas [3]. Precise analysis of dissolved H2O and S2- shows that these volatiles cannot account for the excess bubble volume in the EPR flow. Ongoing study using 3-D x-ray microtomography may show if methods of measuring vesicularity on polished sections need to be revised, or if bubble formation does not obey the ideal gas law. Using vesicles to estimate volatile concentrations and fluxes could lead to overestimates. Our new study also displays the clearest evidence to date for kinetic fractionation of CO2 and He during exsolution. CO2/He in vesicles varies by a factor of 15. We observe an excellent linear correlation (r2=0.98) between CO2/He ratio in vesicles and the fraction of total CO2 contained in vesicles. The slower diffusion of CO2 (compared to He) at magmatic conditions leads to lower values of vesicle CO2/He in the most rapidly emplaced glasses that have small, sparse vesicles. This shows that CO2:He could be used as a geospeedometer. It also shows that care must be exercised in estimates of magmatic CO2:He that are based on vesicle gas or dissolved volatiles alone. [1] Michael, PJ et al., 2008, Eos Trans. AGU, 89(53),V21B-2106 AGU [2] Soule, SA, et al., 2012, EPSL 327, 39-49 [3] Aubaud, CA et al..2004, EPSL 222, 391-406

  14. Detecting CO2 and CH4 Urban Emissions using Column-Integrated Dry Air mole Fractions, In-Situ Tower Dry Air Mole Fractions, and WRF Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillyard, P. W.; Lauvaux, T.; Podolske, J. R.; Iraci, L. T.; Miles, N. L.; Richardson, S.; Davis, K.; Roehl, C. M.; Wunch, D.; Wennberg, P. O.; Blavier, J. F.; Allen, N.; Barrow, E.; Deng, A.

    2015-12-01

    Total column measurements of atmospheric gases are important because of their ability to be performed via satellites that provide global coverage. Here we will present measurements of CO2 and CH4 dry air mole fractions obtained using a Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) as part of the Total Carbon Column Observing Nework (TCCON). These measurements were performed in Indianapolis as part of the Indianapolis Flux Experiment (INFLUX). We will extract urban emission signals using high resolution modeling and in-situ tower measurements of CO2 and CH4 mixing ratios. In addition to quantifying the influence of surface emissions on the column measurements, we will also decompose the atmospheric columns into sub-layers to identify the origin of air masses at various altitudes. We will show that the variability in the origins of air masses increases the complexity of the observed signals in the column, which limits our ability to combine surface and column measurements. This work will also highlight the potential application of using total column measurements to detect local urban signals. We conclude that the deployment of multiple column sensors is required in order to measure the upwind (background) and downwind (urban) conditions. Such work provides a test case for using these methods with satellite measurements such as GOSAT and OCO-2 that provide global coverage.

  15. Dynamics of pulsed laser ablation plasmas in high-density CO2 near the critical point investigated by time-resolved shadowgraph imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urabe, Keiichiro; Kato, Toru; Himeno, Shohei; Kato, Satoshi; Stauss, Sven; Baba, Motoyoshi; Suemoto, Tohru; Terashima, Kazuo

    2013-09-01

    Pulsed laser ablation (PLA) plasmas generated in high-density gases and liquids are promising for the synthesis of nanomaterials. However, the characteristics of such plasmas are still not well understood. In order to improve the understandings of PLA plasmas in high-density fluids including gases, liquids, and supercritical fluids (SCFs), we have investigated the dynamics of PLA plasmas in high-density carbon dioxide (CO2) . We report on experimental results of time-resolved shadowgraph imaging, from the generation of plasma plume to the extinction of cavitation bubbles. Shadowgraph images revealed that the PLA plasma dynamics showed two distinct behaviors. These are divided by gas-liquid coexistence curve and the so-called Widom line, which separates gas-like and liquid-like SCF domains. Furthermore, cavitation bubble observed in liquid CO2 near the critical point showed peculiar characteristics, the formation of an inner bubble and an outer shell structure, which so far has never been reported. The experiments indicate that thermophysical properties of PLA plasmas can be tuned by controlling solvent temperature and pressure around the critical point, which may be useful for materials processing. This work was supported financially in part by a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research on Innovative Areas (No. 21110002) from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology of Japan.

  16. Synthesis of oxocarbon-encapsulated gold nanoparticles with blue-shifted localized surface plasmon resonance by pulsed laser ablation in water with CO2 absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Rosso, T.; Rey, N. A.; Rosado, T.; Landi, S.; Larrude, D. G.; Romani, E. C.; Freire Junior, F. L.; Quinteiro, S. M.; Cremona, M.; Aucelio, R. Q.; Margheri, G.; Pandoli, O.

    2016-06-01

    Colloidal suspensions of oxocarbon-encapsulated gold nanoparticles have been synthesized in a one-step procedure by pulsed-laser ablation (PLA) at 532 nm of a solid gold target placed in aqueous solution containing CO2 absorbers, but without any stabilizing agent. Multi-wavelength surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy allows the identification of adsorbed amorphous carbon and graphite, Au-carbonyl, Au coordinated CO2-derived bicarbonates/carbonates and hydroxyl groups around the AuNPs core. Scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray analysis and high resolution transmission electron microscopy highlight the organic shell structure around the crystalline metal core. The stability of the colloidal solution of nanocomposites (NCs) seems to be driven by solvation forces and is achieved only in neutral or basic pH using monovalent hydroxide counter-ions (NaOH, KOH). The NCs are characterized by a blue shift of the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) band typical of metal-ligand stabilization by terminal π-back bonding, attributed to a core charging effect caused by Au-carbonyls. Total organic carbon measurements detect the final content of organic carbon in the colloidal solution of NCs that is about six times higher than the value of the water solution used to perform PLA. The colloidal dispersions of NCs are stable for months and are applied as analytical probes in amino glycoside antibiotic LSPR based sensing.

  17. Percutaneous Bone Marrow Transplantation Using Fractional Ablative Erbium:YAG Laser

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Menocal, Luis; Salgado, Marcela; Davis, Stephen; Waibel, Jill; Shabbir, Arsalan; Cox, Audrey; Badiavas, Evangelos V.

    2014-01-01

    Topical application of therapeutic agents has been a mainstay in Dermatology for the treatment of skin disorders but is not commonly used for systemic delivery. For a topically applied agent to reach distant body sites it must first overcome the barrier function of the skin and then penetrate into deeper structures before reaching the systemic circulation. This has limited the use of topically applied agents to those having specific charge, solubility and size restrictions. Pretreatment of the skin with ablative fractional laser appears to enhance the uptake of some topically applied drugs but the ability to effectively deliver agents to distant sites is largely unproven. In this report we used a fractional ablative Erb:YAG (Erbium/Yttrium Aluminum Garnet) laser to facilitate the transfer of bone marrow stem cells through the skin in a murine bone marrow transplant model. Chimerism could be detected in the peripheral blood of recipient C57BL/6 mice that were pretreated with ablative fractional laser and had topically applied enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) labeled bone marrow cells from syngeneic donor transgenic mice. This study indicates that fractional laser can be used to deliver stem cells through the skin and remain functionally intact. PMID:24667438

  18. Photosynthetic fractionation of 13C and concentrations of dissolved CO2 in the central equatorial Pacific during the last 255,000 years

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jasper, J. P.; Hayes, J. M.; Mix, A. C.; Prahl, F. G.

    1994-01-01

    Carbon isotopically based estimates of CO2 levels have been generated from a record of the photosynthetic fractionation of 13C [is equivalent to epsilon(p)] in a central equatorial Pacific sediment core that spans the last approximately 255 ka. Contents of 13C in phytoplanktonic biomass were determined by analysis of C37 alkadienones. These compounds are exclusive products of Prymnesiophyte algae which at present grow most abundantly at depths of 70-90 m in the central equatorial Pacific. A record of the isotopic composition of dissolved CO2 was constructed from isotopic analyses of the planktonic foraminifera Neogloboquadrina dutertrei, which calcifies at 70-90 m in the same region. Values of epsilon(p), derived by comparison of the organic and inorganic delta values, were transformed to yield concentrations of dissolved CO2 [is equivalent to c(e)] based on a new, site-specific calibration of the relationship between epsilon(p) and c(e). The calibration was based on reassessment of existing epsilon(p) versus c(e) data, which support a physiologically based model in which epsilon(p) is inversely related to c(e). Values of PCO2, the partial pressure of CO2 that would be in equilibrium with the estimated concentrations of dissolved CO2, were calculated using Henry's law and the temperature determined from the alkenone-unsaturation index U(K/37). Uncertainties in these values arise mainly from uncertainties about the appropriateness (particularly over time) of the site-specific relationship between epsilon(p) and 1/c(e). These are discussed in detail and it is concluded that the observed record of epsilon(p) most probably reflects significant variations in delta pCO2, the ocean-atmosphere disequilibrium, which appears to have ranged from approximately 110 microatmospheres during glacial intervals (ocean > atmosphere) to approximately 60 microatmospheres during interglacials. Fluxes of CO2 to the atmosphere would thus have been significantly larger during glacial

  19. Shadowgraph Imaging and Numerical Simulation of Cavitation Bubbles Formed in Pulsed Laser Ablation Plasmas in the Vicinity of the Critical Point of CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muneoka, Hitoshi; Himeno, Shohei; Urabe, Keiichiro; Stauss, Sven; Baba, Motoyoshi; Suemoto, Tohru; Terashima, Kazuo

    2015-09-01

    The characteristic behavior of cavitation bubbles formed in pulsed laser ablation plasmas in supercritical CO2 were investigated by shadowgraph imaging and numerical simulations. The time evolution of the cavitation bubbles could be divided into three phases near the critical point: Expansion, Double layer formation, and Contraction. The distribution of the refractive index was estimated from the variation of the direction of the refracted light in the shockwave in the expansion phase. It was suggested that the cause of the reduction of the transmitted light in the outer shell in the double-layer phase was not due to refraction, and the contributions of nanoparticles and clusters generated in supercritical fluids were implied. The characteristics in time evolution of the bubble size in the contraction phase, in particular almost constant position of the interface in a relatively long time, was proposed to be due to zero surface tension by numerical simulations. The results suggest that the properties and fluid structure peculiar to SCF affect the structure of cavitation bubbles.

  20. Magnetic and structural anisotropies in laser ablated epitaxial thin films of full-Heusler alloy Co2MnSi on SrTiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Himanshu; Rout, P. K.; Budhani, R. C.

    2013-03-01

    We present the thickness dependent magnetic properties of laser ablated epitaxial Co2MnSi (CMS)Heusler alloy thin films grown on (001) oriented SrTiO3 substrate. In order to study the intrinsic magnetic anisotropy, a highly ordered single crystal thin film of Heusler alloys is necessary. This provides a unique opportunity to determine the behavior of magnetization reversal, and affect important properties such as the coercive field and remanence. The two important sources of the magnetic anisotropy are the magnetic dipolar interaction and the spin-orbit interaction. The strain in films due to the lattice mismatch with the substrate affects the shape anisotropy while spin-orbit coupling changes magneto-crystalline anisotropy. We have observed an in-plane biaxial compressive strain in the films which relaxes with increasing film thickness. Although the hysteresis loops show an in-plane easy axis for all films, the single-domain phase diagram reveals a gradual transition from in-plane to out-of-plane transition of magnetization as the film thickness is decreased. The magnetization starts to cant as film thickness start to decrease and we found a canting angle of ~ 31.8° with respect to the film plane for our thinnest 5 nm CMS films. We acknowledge support from DIT, DST, CSIR and IIT Kanpur.

  1. CO2-dependent fractional crystallization of alkaline silicate magmas and unmixing of carbonatites within the intrusive complexes of Brava Island (Cape Verde)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidendorfer, D.; Schmidt, M. W.; Mattsson, H. B.

    2014-12-01

    Intrusive carbonatites often occur in intimate association with SiO2-undersaturated rocks such as melilitites, nephelinites, syenites and phonolites. The occurrence of carbonatites on five of the 10 main islands of the Cape Verde hotspot argues for a CO2-enriched mantle source. Whether alkali-poor carbonatites on the Cape Verdes directly represent small mantle melt fractions or form by extreme fractionation and/or liquid immiscibility from a CO2-rich silicate magma remains a matter of debate. This study focuses on the pyroxenites, nephelinites, ijolites, syenites, phonolites and carbonatites of the intrusive unit of Brava Island. This relative complete series allows for the deduction of a CO2-dependent fractionation pathway from the most primitive basanitic dikes towards phonolitic compositions through an ijolitic series. Major and trace element whole rock and mineral composition trends can be reproduced by fractionating a sequence of olivine, augite, perovskite, biotite, apatite, sodalite and FeTi-oxides, present as phenocrysts in the rocks corresponding to their fractionation interval. To reproduce the observed chemistry of the alkaline silicate rocks a total fractionation of ~87% is required. The melts evolve towards the carbonatite-silicate miscibility gap, an initial CO2 of 0.5 wt% would be sufficient to maintain CO2-saturation in the more evolved compositions. The modelled carbonatite compositions, conjugate to nepheline-syenites to phonolites, correspond well to the observed ones except for an alkali-enrichment with respect to the natural samples. The alkali-depleted nature of the small carbonatite intrusions and dikes on Brava is likely a consequence of fluid-release to the surrounding wall-rocks during crystallization, where fenitization can be observed. The trace element chemistry of primary carbonates and also cpx within both, the carbonatites and the associated silicate rocks, substantiates our fractionation model. Furthermore, carbonatite and silicate

  2. Large fractions of CO2-fixing microorganisms in pristine limestone aquifers appear to be involved in the oxidation of reduced sulfur and nitrogen compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herrmann, Martina; Rusznyák, Anna; Akob, Denise M.; Schulze, Isabel; Opitz, Sebastian; Totsche, Kai Uwe; Küsel, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    The traditional view of the dependency of subsurface environments on surface-derived allochthonous carbon inputs is challenged by increasing evidence for the role of lithoautotrophy in aquifer carbon flow. We linked information on autotrophy (Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle) with that from total microbial community analysis in groundwater at two superimposed—upper and lower—limestone groundwater reservoirs (aquifers). Quantitative PCR revealed that up to 17% of the microbial population had the genetic potential to fix CO2 via the Calvin cycle, with abundances of cbbM and cbbL genes, encoding RubisCO (ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase) forms I and II, ranging from 1.14 × 103 to 6 × 106 genes liter−1 over a 2-year period. The structure of the active microbial communities based on 16S rRNA transcripts differed between the two aquifers, with a larger fraction of heterotrophic, facultative anaerobic, soil-related groups in the oxygen-deficient upper aquifer. Most identified CO2-assimilating phylogenetic groups appeared to be involved in the oxidation of sulfur or nitrogen compounds and harbored both RubisCO forms I and II, allowing efficient CO2 fixation in environments with strong oxygen and CO2 fluctuations. The genera Sulfuricellaand Nitrosomonas were represented by read fractions of up to 78 and 33%, respectively, within the cbbM and cbbL transcript pool and accounted for 5.6 and 3.8% of 16S rRNA sequence reads, respectively, in the lower aquifer. Our results indicate that a large fraction of bacteria in pristine limestone aquifers has the genetic potential for autotrophic CO2 fixation, with energy most likely provided by the oxidation of reduced sulfur and nitrogen compounds.

  3. Large fractions of CO2-fixing microorganisms in pristine limestone aquifers appear to be involved in the oxidation of reduced sulfur and nitrogen compounds.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Martina; Rusznyák, Anna; Akob, Denise M; Schulze, Isabel; Opitz, Sebastian; Totsche, Kai Uwe; Küsel, Kirsten

    2015-04-01

    The traditional view of the dependency of subsurface environments on surface-derived allochthonous carbon inputs is challenged by increasing evidence for the role of lithoautotrophy in aquifer carbon flow. We linked information on autotrophy (Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle) with that from total microbial community analysis in groundwater at two superimposed-upper and lower-limestone groundwater reservoirs (aquifers). Quantitative PCR revealed that up to 17% of the microbial population had the genetic potential to fix CO2 via the Calvin cycle, with abundances of cbbM and cbbL genes, encoding RubisCO (ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase) forms I and II, ranging from 1.14 × 10(3) to 6 × 10(6) genes liter(-1) over a 2-year period. The structure of the active microbial communities based on 16S rRNA transcripts differed between the two aquifers, with a larger fraction of heterotrophic, facultative anaerobic, soil-related groups in the oxygen-deficient upper aquifer. Most identified CO2-assimilating phylogenetic groups appeared to be involved in the oxidation of sulfur or nitrogen compounds and harbored both RubisCO forms I and II, allowing efficient CO2 fixation in environments with strong oxygen and CO2 fluctuations. The genera Sulfuricella and Nitrosomonas were represented by read fractions of up to 78 and 33%, respectively, within the cbbM and cbbL transcript pool and accounted for 5.6 and 3.8% of 16S rRNA sequence reads, respectively, in the lower aquifer. Our results indicate that a large fraction of bacteria in pristine limestone aquifers has the genetic potential for autotrophic CO2 fixation, with energy most likely provided by the oxidation of reduced sulfur and nitrogen compounds.

  4. Effects of Ontogeny on δ13C of Plant- and Soil-Respired CO2 and on Respiratory Carbon Fractionation in C3 Herbaceous Species.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Yann; Buchmann, Nina; Barnard, Romain L

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge gaps regarding potential ontogeny and plant species identity effects on carbon isotope fractionation might lead to misinterpretations of carbon isotope composition (δ13C) of respired CO2, a widely-used integrator of environmental conditions. In monospecific mesocosms grown under controlled conditions, the δ13C of C pools and fluxes and leaf ecophysiological parameters of seven herbaceous species belonging to three functional groups (crops, forage grasses and legumes) were investigated at three ontogenetic stages of their vegetative cycle (young foliage, maximum growth rate, early senescence). Ontogeny-related changes in δ13C of leaf- and soil-respired CO2 and 13C/12C fractionation in respiration (ΔR) were species-dependent and up to 7‰, a magnitude similar to that commonly measured in response to environmental factors. At plant and soil levels, changes in δ13C of respired CO2 and ΔR with ontogeny were related to changes in plant physiological status, likely through ontogeny-driven changes in the C sink to source strength ratio in the aboveground plant compartment. Our data further showed that lower ΔR values (i.e. respired CO2 relatively less depleted in 13C) were observed with decreasing net assimilation. Our findings highlight the importance of accounting for ontogenetic stage and plant community composition in ecological studies using stable carbon isotopes.

  5. Effects of Ontogeny on δ13C of Plant- and Soil-Respired CO2 and on Respiratory Carbon Fractionation in C3 Herbaceous Species

    PubMed Central

    Salmon, Yann; Buchmann, Nina; Barnard, Romain L.

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge gaps regarding potential ontogeny and plant species identity effects on carbon isotope fractionation might lead to misinterpretations of carbon isotope composition (δ13C) of respired CO2, a widely-used integrator of environmental conditions. In monospecific mesocosms grown under controlled conditions, the δ13C of C pools and fluxes and leaf ecophysiological parameters of seven herbaceous species belonging to three functional groups (crops, forage grasses and legumes) were investigated at three ontogenetic stages of their vegetative cycle (young foliage, maximum growth rate, early senescence). Ontogeny-related changes in δ13C of leaf- and soil-respired CO2 and 13C/12C fractionation in respiration (ΔR) were species-dependent and up to 7‰, a magnitude similar to that commonly measured in response to environmental factors. At plant and soil levels, changes in δ13C of respired CO2 and ΔR with ontogeny were related to changes in plant physiological status, likely through ontogeny-driven changes in the C sink to source strength ratio in the aboveground plant compartment. Our data further showed that lower ΔR values (i.e. respired CO2 relatively less depleted in 13C) were observed with decreasing net assimilation. Our findings highlight the importance of accounting for ontogenetic stage and plant community composition in ecological studies using stable carbon isotopes. PMID:27010947

  6. Interactive effects of elevated CO2 and nitrogen deposition on fatty acid molecular and isotope composition of above- and belowground tree biomass and forest soil fractions.

    PubMed

    Griepentrog, Marco; Eglinton, Timothy I; Hagedorn, Frank; Schmidt, Michael W I; Wiesenberg, Guido L B

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and reactive nitrogen (N) concentrations have been increasing due to human activities and impact the global carbon (C) cycle by affecting plant photosynthesis and decomposition processes in soil. Large amounts of C are stored in plants and soils, but the mechanisms behind the stabilization of plant- and microbial-derived organic matter (OM) in soils are still under debate and it is not clear how N deposition affects soil OM dynamics. Here, we studied the effects of 4 years of elevated (13C-depleted) CO2 and N deposition in forest ecosystems established in open-top chambers on composition and turnover of fatty acids (FAs) in plants and soils. FAs served as biomarkers for plant- and microbial-derived OM in soil density fractions. We analyzed above- and belowground plant biomass of beech and spruce trees as well as soil density fractions for the total organic C and FA molecular and isotope (δ13C) composition. FAs did not accumulate relative to total organic C in fine mineral fractions, showing that FAs are not effectively stabilized by association with soil minerals. The δ13C values of FAs in plant biomass increased under high N deposition. However, the N effect was only apparent under elevated CO2 suggesting a N limitation of the system. In soil fractions, only isotope compositions of short-chain FAs (C16+18) were affected. Fractions of 'new' (experimental-derived) FAs were calculated using isotope depletion in elevated CO2 plots and decreased from free light to fine mineral fractions. 'New' FAs were higher in short-chain compared to long-chain FAs (C20-30), indicating a faster turnover of short-chain compared to long-chain FAs. Increased N deposition did not significantly affect the quantity of 'new' FAs in soil fractions, but showed a tendency of increased amounts of 'old' (pre-experimental) C suggesting that decomposition of 'old' C is retarded by high N inputs.

  7. Mapping Intercellular CO2 Mole Fraction (Ci) in Rosa rubiginosa Leaves Fed with Abscisic Acid by Using Chlorophyll Fluorescence Imaging1

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Sylvie; Genty, Bernard

    1998-01-01

    Imaging of photochemical yield of photosystem II (PSII) computed from leaf chlorophyll fluorescence images and gas-exchange measurements were performed on Rosa rubiginosa leaflets during abscisic acid (ABA) addition. In air ABA induced a decrease of both the net CO2 assimilation (An) and the stomatal water vapor conductance (gs). After ABA treatment, imaging in transient nonphotorespiratory conditions (0.1% O2) revealed a heterogeneous decrease of PSII photochemical yield. This decline was fully reversed by a transient high CO2 concentration (7400 μmol mol−1) in the leaf atmosphere. It was concluded that ABA primarily affected An by decreasing the CO2 supply at ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase. Therefore, the An versus intercellular mole fraction (Ci) relationship was assumed not to be affected by ABA, and images of Ci and gs were constructed from images of PSII photochemical yield under nonphotorespiratory conditions. The distribution of gs remained unimodal following ABA treatment. A comparison of calculations of Ci from images and gas exchange in ABA-treated leaves showed that the overestimation of Ci estimated from gas exchange was only partly due to heterogeneity. This overestimation was also attributed to the cuticular transpiration, which largely affects the calculation of the leaf conductance to CO2, when leaf conductance to water is low. PMID:9501127

  8. High-speed scanning ablation of dental hard tissues with a λ = 9.3 μm CO2 laser: adhesion, mechanical strength, heat accumulation, and peripheral thermal damage

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Daniel; Chang, Kwang; Hedayatollahnajafi, Saba; Staninec, Michal; Chan, Kenneth; Lee, Robert; Fried, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    CO2 lasers can be operated at high laser pulse repetition rates for the rapid and precise removal of dental decay. Excessive heat accumulation and peripheral thermal damage is a concern when using high pulse repetition rates. Peripheral thermal damage can adversely impact the mechanical strength of the irradiated tissue, particularly for dentin, and reduce the adhesion characteristics of the modified surfaces. The interpulpal temperature rise was recorded using microthermocouples situated at the roof of the pulp chamber on teeth that were occlusally ablated using a rapidly-scanned CO2 laser operating at 9.3 μm with a pulse duration of 10 to 15 μs and repetition rate of 300 Hz over a 2 min time course. The adhesion strength of laser treated enamel and dentin surfaces was measured for various laser scanning parameters with and without post-ablation acid etching using the single-plane shear test. The mechanical strength of laser-ablated dentin surfaces were determined via the four-point bend test and compared to control samples prepared with 320 grit wet sand paper to simulate conventional preparations. Thermocouple measurements indicated that the temperature remained below ambient temperature if water-cooling was used. There was no discoloration of either dentin or enamel laser treated surfaces, the surfaces were uniformly ablated, and there were no cracks visible. Four-point bend tests yielded mean mechanical strengths of 18.2 N (s.d. = 4.6) for ablated dentin and 18.1 N (s.d. = 2.7) for control (p > 0.05). Shear tests yielded mean bond strengths approaching 30 MPa for both enamel and dentin under certain irradiation conditions. These values were slightly lower than nonirradiated acid-etched control samples. Additional studies are needed to determine if the slightly lower bond strength than the acid-etched control samples is clinically significant. These measurements demonstrate that enamel and dentin surfaces can be rapidly ablated by CO2 lasers with minimal

  9. High-speed scanning ablation of dental hard tissues with a λ = 9.3 μm CO2 laser: adhesion, mechanical strength, heat accumulation, and peripheral thermal damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Daniel; Chang, Kwang; Hedayatollahnajafi, Saba; Staninec, Michal; Chan, Kenneth; Lee, Robert; Fried, Daniel

    2011-07-01

    CO2 lasers can be operated at high laser pulse repetition rates for the rapid and precise removal of dental decay. Excessive heat accumulation and peripheral thermal damage is a concern when using high pulse repetition rates. Peripheral thermal damage can adversely impact the mechanical strength of the irradiated tissue, particularly for dentin, and reduce the adhesion characteristics of the modified surfaces. The interpulpal temperature rise was recorded using microthermocouples situated at the roof of the pulp chamber on teeth that were occlusally ablated using a rapidly-scanned CO2 laser operating at 9.3 μm with a pulse duration of 10 to 15 μs and repetition rate of 300 Hz over a 2 min time course. The adhesion strength of laser treated enamel and dentin surfaces was measured for various laser scanning parameters with and without post-ablation acid etching using the single-plane shear test. The mechanical strength of laser-ablated dentin surfaces were determined via the four-point bend test and compared to control samples prepared with 320 grit wet sand paper to simulate conventional preparations. Thermocouple measurements indicated that the temperature remained below ambient temperature if water-cooling was used. There was no discoloration of either dentin or enamel laser treated surfaces, the surfaces were uniformly ablated, and there were no cracks visible. Four-point bend tests yielded mean mechanical strengths of 18.2 N (s.d. = 4.6) for ablated dentin and 18.1 N (s.d. = 2.7) for control (p > 0.05). Shear tests yielded mean bond strengths approaching 30 MPa for both enamel and dentin under certain irradiation conditions. These values were slightly lower than nonirradiated acid-etched control samples. Additional studies are needed to determine if the slightly lower bond strength than the acid-etched control samples is clinically significant. These measurements demonstrate that enamel and dentin surfaces can be rapidly ablated by CO2 lasers with minimal

  10. Online Determination of 18O Fractionation Between CO2 and Soil-Water during Soil Dessication by a Novel Mid-Infrared CO2 Isotope Analyzer Coupled to an Dynamic Chamber Incubation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, A.

    2015-12-01

    The stable oxygen isotope composition of CO2 is an important tracer for quantifying gas interactions between soils and atmosphere. Soils impact atmospheric 18O-CO2 signatures by CO2-H2O equilibration during diffusion of CO2 through the soil column. However, recent research has revealed that also catalytic reactions by carbonic anhydrase, an enzyme used by microorganisms for triggering the conversion of CO2 and water to bicarbonate and protons, is an important factor influencing the oxygen isotopic signature of CO2. In order to study the importance of biotic and abiotic factors for 18O-CO2, we used a novel mid infrared 18O/13C-CO2 analyser coupled to a dynamic chamber system, which allowed us to measure online 18O and 13C of a continuous CO2 stream percolating through soil samples while drying out from fully water saturated to air dry. Our results indicate that changes in CO2- 18O signatures peak at certain soil moistures levels, which is most probably catalysed by the activity of certain microbial groups under optimum growth conditions. More analyses with different soil types and depths, combined with molecular analyses are planned in order to understand the importance of microbial processes and dynamics for influencing soil-CO2 interactions.

  11. Enrichment desired quality chitosan fraction and advance yield by sequential static and static-dynamic supercritical CO2.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yi-Yin; Chin, Hui Yen; Tsai, Min-Lang

    2015-11-20

    This study aimed to establish the sequential static and static-dynamic supercritical carbon dioxide (SDCO2) fractionation conditions to obtain a higher yield and desired chitosan with lower polydispersity index (PDI) and higher degree of deacetylation (DD). The yield increased with increasing DD of used chitosan and amount of cosolvent. The yield of acetic acid cosolvent was higher than those of malic and citric acid cosolvents. SDCO2, compared to static supercritical carbon dioxide, has higher yield. The yield of extracted chitosan was 5.82-14.70% by SDCO2/acetic acid, which increases with increasing pressure. The DD of fractionated chitosan increased from 66.1% to 70.81-85.33%, while the PDI decreased from 3.97 to 1.69-3.16. The molecular weight changed from 622kDa to 412-649kDa, which increased as density of supercritical carbon dioxide increases. Hence, higher DD and lower PDI extracted chitosan can be obtained through controlling the temperature and pressure of SDCO2.

  12. A new sealed RF-excited CO2 laser for enamel ablation operating at 9.4μm with pulse duration of 26 μs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Kenneth H.; Jew, Jamison M.; Fried, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    Several studies over the past 20 years have identified that carbon dioxide lasers operating at wavelengths between 9.3 and 9.6-μm with pulse durations near 20-µs are ideal for hard tissue ablation. Those wavelengths are coincident with the peak absorption of the mineral phase and the pulse duration is close to the thermal relaxation time of the deposited energy of a few microseconds to minimize peripheral thermal damage and long enough to minimize plasma shielding effects to allow efficient ablation at practical rates. The desired pulse duration near 20-μs has been difficult to achieve since it is too long for TEA lasers and too short for RF-excited lasers for efficient operation. Recently, Coherent Inc. (Santa Clara, CA) developed the J5-V laser for microvia drilling which can produce laser pulses greater than 100 mJ in energy at 9.4-μm with a pulse duration of 26-µs and it can achieve pulse repetition rates of 3 KHz. We report the first results using this laser to ablate enamel and dentin. The onset of plasma shielding does not occur until the fluence exceeds 100 J/cm2 allowing efficient ablation at rates exceeding 50-μm per pulse. This laser is ideally suited for the selective ablation of carious lesions.

  13. Comparing the Healing Effects of Arnebia euchroma Ointment With Petrolatum on the Ulcers Caused by Fractional CO2 Laser: A Single-Blinded Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Aliasl, Jale; Khoshzaban, Fariba; Barikbin, Behrooz; Naseri, Mohsen; Kamalinejad, Mohammad; Emadi, Fatemeh; Razzaghi, Zahra; Talei, Daryush; Yousefi, Maryam; Aliasl, Fatemeh; Barati, Maryam; Mohseni-Moghaddam, Parvaneh; Hasheminejad, Seyed Abbas; Esmailzad Nami, Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Background: Arnebia euchroma ointment (AEO) has been used in Iranian traditional medicine for burn wound healing. Objectives: The aim of this study is to evaluate wound healing efficacy of AEO in burn wounds after fractional Co2 laser. Patients and Methods: This split-face, single-blinded, single-center clinical study was performed in Shohada-e-Tajrish Hospital, Tehran, Iran. A total of 26 subjects with facial acne scar, who were to receive fractional CO2 laser resurfacing were recruited. After laser procedure, AEO was applied to one side of the face and petrolatum on the other side for wound healing. Digital photographs were taken from acne scar area before resurfacing and on each of the assessment sessions. Three researchers, who were unaware of the applied medications, assessed these digital photographs for erythema, edema, epithelial confluence, crusting/scabbing, and general wound appearance. Subject’s irritations such as dryness and itching were evaluated on the second, fifth, and seventh days. Results: Our study indicated higher epithelial confluence and general wound appearance scores (P = 0.045 for both) and less erythema and edema on fifth day in petrolatum (P = 0.009 and P = 0.034, respectively). The results showed less crusting and erythema (P = 0.016 and P = 0.035, respectively) and higher general wound appearance scores in petrolatum on the second day (P = 0.035 and P = 0.001, respectively). Dryness was the most common subjective complaint in both groups; however, it was more severe in AEO, especially on the second day (P = 0.023). Conclusions: Despite the healing effects of AEO in burn wounds, petrolatum was more effective than AEO in post-laser wound. PMID:25558382

  14. A novel thermo-mechanical system enhanced transdermal delivery of hydrophilic active agents by fractional ablation.

    PubMed

    Sintov, Amnon C; Hofmann, Maja A

    2016-09-25

    The Tixel is a novel device based on a thermo-mechanical ablation technology that combines a sophisticated motion and a temperature control. The fractional technology is used to transfer a very precise thermal energy to the skin thereby creating an array of microchannels, accompanying by no signs of pain or inconvenience. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of the Tixel on the skin permeability of three hydrophilic molecular models: verapamil hydrochloride, diclofenac sodium, and magnesium ascorbyl phosphate. Tixel's gold-platted stainless steel tip heated to a temperature of 400°C was applied on skin for 8ms or 9ms at a protrusion of 400μm (the distance in which the tip protrudes beyond the distance gauge). The experiments were carried out partly in vivo in humans using a fluorescent dye and a confocal microscopy and partly in vitro using porcine skin and a Franz diffusion cell system. The results obtained in this study have shown that (a) no significant collateral damage to the skin tissue and no necrosis or dermal coagulation have been noted, (b) the microchannels remained open and endured for at least 6h, and (c) the skin permeability of hydrophilic molecules, which poorly penetrate the lipophilic stratum corneum barrier, was significantly enhanced by using Tixel's pretreatment. PMID:27480396

  15. Transient response of the CO2 airborne fraction to fluctuations in emissions: the role of climate-carbon feedbacks versus emissions growth rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landers, J. P.; Terenzi, F.; Khatiwala, S.

    2010-12-01

    The airborne fraction (AF), the proportion of anthropogenic CO2 emissions remaining in the atmosphere, has stayed remarkably constant over the past several decades. Studies have speculated that this historical constancy may be an inherent characteristic of the carbon cycle, leading to recent reports of an apparent increase in AF over the past few decades being interpreted in terms of a decrease in the efficiency of the ocean and land sinks. If this decrease is a response to hypothesized climate-carbon cycle feedbacks--for example changes in ocean circulation in the Southern Ocean due to global warming-induced increase in Westerlies--then it suggests an earlier than anticipated shift in the uptake capacity of the principal sinks that play a key role in mitigating the impact of human CO2 emissions on the climate system. Before invoking such mechanisms, however, it is important to distinguish variability due to feedbacks from that due to the intrinsic behavior of the system. Specifically, we believe that the large increase in emissions growth rate between the 1990s and the present decade -- from ~1% per year to over 3% per year -- may also serve as a viable explanation for decadal variability in the AF. Here, we use an ocean carbon cycle model driven by a state-of-the-art circulation state estimate coupled with an atmosphere and land biosphere, to explore and quantify the response of the AF to different idealized emission histories. The model closely reproduces the observed atmospheric and oceanic inventory of CO2 when forced with historical emissions. We find that the AF displays a complex transient behavior, taking on the O(100 y) to ``spin up'' to equilibrium. Moreover, its final steady state value depends sensitively on the shape of the emission history and, in particular, the rate-of-increase of the emissions. These results, which are qualitatively consistent with recent studies based on conceptual models (Gloor et al, 2010; Terenzi, PhD. Thesis, 2009), suggest

  16. Adjusted Left Atrial Emptying Fraction as a Predictor of Procedural Outcome after Catheter Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Im, Sung Il; Kim, Sun Won; Choi, Cheol Ung; Kim, Jin Won; Yong, Hwan Seok; Kim, Eung Ju; Rha, Seung-Woon; Park, Chang Gyu; Seo, Hong Seog; Oh, Dong Joo; Lim, Hong Euy

    2015-01-01

    Structural remodeling of the left atrium is a risk factor for recurrent arrhythmia after catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation; however, data are sparse regarding the role of functional left atrial remodeling in predicting procedural outcomes. We evaluated whether left atrial transport function could be used to predict recurrent atrial fibrillation. From July 2008 through August 2010, we enrolled 202 consecutive patients who underwent catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation (paroxysmal=120, persistent=82). Left atrial volumes (LAVs) were measured by means of multislice computed tomography at every 10% of the R-R interval, and measurements were adjusted for body surface area to yield the LAV index (LAVI) at baseline. The left atrial emptying fraction (LAEF) was calculated according to LAV differences. During the mean follow-up period of 10 ± 4 months after a single ablation procedure, atrial fibrillation recurred in 59 patients (paroxysmal=19, persistent=40). Multivariate analysis revealed that persistent atrial fibrillation, early mitral inflow velocity, LAVImax, LAVImin, LAEF, LAVImax/LAEF, and LAVImin/LAEF were all independent predictors of atrial fibrillation, but the best predictor was LAVImin/LAEF (β=1.329, P=0.001). The cutoff value was 1.61 (mL/m2)/%, and the sensitivity and specificity were 74.6% and 62.2%, respectively (area under the curve=0.761). Our study shows that adjusted left atrial emptying fraction with use of multislice computed tomography might be a useful, noninvasive method to select patients for ablation. PMID:26175632

  17. Interpreting the effect of CO2-induced ocean acidification on elemental partitioning in biogenic carbonates within the framework of Rayleigh fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmore, R. E.; Eagle, R.; Ries, J. B.; Tripati, A. K.

    2013-05-01

    The elemental composition of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) precipitated by marine invertebrates varies with the physico-chemical properties of seawater, and is thus used for reconstructing past oceanic conditions, including temperature, pH, and seawater composition. Previous studies have used a Rayleigh fractionation model to interpret elemental partitioning within a range of calcitic and aragonitic organisms, including foraminifera and corals. We present elemental ratios for 18 species of calcareous marine invertebrates, including echinoids, corals, bivalves, gastropods, calcifying algae, crustacea, and serpulid worms, which were reared at CO2-induced aragonite saturation states (±SD) of 2.5 (±0.4), 2.0 (±0.4), 1.5 (±0.3), and 0.7 (±0.2). Importantly, specimens were cultured simultaneously at the same temperature and in seawater sourced from the same reservoir, allowing comparison amongst taxa without regard to native water conditions. A combination of Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICPMS) and Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES) were used to determine the elemental ratios. We interpret the partitioning of strontium, magnesium, barium, manganese, boron, lithium and uranium within the biogenic carbonates of these 18 invertebrates, along with data from the literature for foraminifera and coccolithophores raised under varying pCO2 and temperature conditions, within a Rayleigh fractionation framework. Application of a Rayleigh model to these systems requires constraints on elemental partitioning into inorganic CaCO3. Our survey of the literature shows that there are limited data for some elements (e.g., Mn) and that, for others (e.g., Sr, Mg), there are a wide range of values reported for a given element. Given this uncertainty, we examine the impact that varying the nominal inorganic partition coefficient has on Rayleigh-derived estimates of calcium-utilization during calcification. The elements examined in this study

  18. A case of successfully treated recalcitrant EGFR inhibitor-induced acneiform eruption following non-ablative fractional laser.

    PubMed

    Choi, Joong Woon; Kim, Tae In; Jeong, Ki-Heon; Shin, Min Kyung

    2016-07-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor, a targeted therapy in the field of oncology, is a new drugs suggested for the cause of acneiform eruptions. The unresponsiveness to conventional acne therapy is a pivotal reason of seeking alternatives to treat drug-induced acneiform eruptions. A 30-year-old female treated with cetuximab, EGFR inhibitor presented with numerous sized erythematous papules and pustules on her face. All responses of oral medications and topical application were poor. She was treated with two passes of non-ablative 1550 nm fractional erbium glass laser with topical clindamycin. After three laser sessions, the skin lesions improved dramatically without any side effects. There is currently no single effective treatment for acneiform eruption. This report shed light on the possibility that non-ablative fractional laser can be an alternative for recalcitrant drug-induced acneiform eruptions. PMID:27146102

  19. Fractional Erbium laser in the treatment of photoaging: randomized comparative, clinical and histopathological study of ablative (2940nm) vs. non-ablative (1540nm) methods after 3 months*

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Juliano; Cuzzi, Tullia; Mandarim-de-Lacerda, Carlos Alberto; Manela-Azulay, Mônica

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Fractional non-ablative lasers keep the epidermis intact, while fractional ablative lasers remove it, making them theoretically more effective. OBJECTIVES To evaluate the clinical and histological alterations induced by fractional photothermolysis for treating photoaging, comparing the possible equivalence of multiple sessions of 1540nm Erbium, to one session of 2940nm Erbium. METHODS Eighteen patients (mean age 55.9) completed the treatment with three sessions of 1540nm fractional Erbium laser on one side of the face (50 mJ/mB, 15ms, 2 passes), and one session of 2940nm on the other side (5mJ/mB, 0.25ms, 2 passes). Biopsies were performed before and 3 months after treatment. Clinical, histological and morphometric evaluations were carried out. RESULTS All patients presented clinical improvement with no statistically significant difference (p> 0.05) between the treated sides. Histopathology revealed a new organization of collagen and elastic fibers, accompanied by edema, which was more evident with the 2940nm laser. This finding was confirmed by morphometry, which showed a decrease in collagen density for both treatments, with a statistical significance for the 2940nm laser (p > 0.001). CONCLUSIONS Three 1540nm sessions were clinically equivalent to one 2940nm session. The edema probably contributed to the positive results after three months, togheter with the new collagen and elastic fibers organization. The greater edema after the 2940nm session indicates that dermal remodeling takes longer than with 1540nm. It is possible that this histological superiority relates to a more prolonged effect, but a cohort longer than three months is needed to confirm that supposition. PMID:24770501

  20. CO2 and soil water potential as regulators of the growth and N fraction derived from fixation of a legume in tallgrass prairie communities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    CO2 enrichment may increase N input to ecosystems by increasing N2 fixation, but the fixation-CO2 response depends on factors such as soil water availability that are influenced by both CO2 and soil properties. We used the d15N natural abundance method to determine N2 fixation by the legume Desmant...

  1. Endometrial ablation

    MedlinePlus

    Hysteroscopy-endometrial ablation; Laser thermal ablation; Endometrial ablation-radiofrequency; Endometrial ablation-thermal balloon ablation; Rollerball ablation; Hydrothermal ablation; Novasure ablation

  2. Non-ablative fractional laser assists cutaneous delivery of small- and macro-molecules with minimal bacterial infection risk.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woan-Ruoh; Shen, Shing-Chuan; Aljuffali, Ibrahim A; Lin, Yin-Ku; Huang, Chang-Wei; Fang, Jia-You

    2016-09-20

    Use of the ablative laser has been approved to enhance topical drug penetration. Investigation into the usefulness of the non-ablative laser for assisting drug delivery is very limited. In this study, we explored the safety and efficacy of the non-ablative fractional erbium:glass (Er:glass) laser as an enhancement approach to promote drug permeation. Both pig and nude mouse skins were employed as transport barriers. We histologically examined the skin structure after laser exposure. The permeants of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), imiquimod, tretinoin, peptide, dextrans and quantum dots (QD) were used to evaluate in vitro and in vivo skin passage. The fractional laser selectively created an array of photothermal dots deep into the dermis with the preservation of the stratum corneum and epidermis. The barrier function of the skin could be recovered 8-60h post-irradiation depending on the laser spot densities. The application of the laser caused no local infection of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Compared to intact skin, ALA flux was enhanced up to 1200-fold after laser exposure. The penetration enhancement level by the laser was decreased following the increase of permeant lipophilicity. The skin accumulation of tretinoin, an extremely lipophilic drug, showed only a 2-fold elevation by laser irradiation. The laser promoted peptide penetration 10-fold compared to the control skin. Skin delivery of dextrans with a molecular weight (MW) of at least 40kDa could be achieved with the Er:glass laser. QD with a diameter of 20nm penetrated into the skin with the assistance of the non-ablative laser. The confocal microscopic images indicated the perpendicular and lateral diffusions of dextrans and nanoparticles via laser-created microscopic thermal zones. Controlled Er:glass laser irradiation offers a valid enhancement strategy to topically administer the permeants with a wide MW and lipophilicity range. PMID:27345564

  3. CO2-neutral fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goede, A. P. H.

    2015-08-01

    The need for storage of renewable energy (RE) generated by photovoltaic, concentrated solar and wind arises from the fact that supply and demand are ill-matched both geographically and temporarily. This already causes problems of overcapacity and grid congestion in countries where the fraction of RE exceeds the 20% level. A system approach is needed, which focusses not only on the energy source, but includes conversion, storage, transport, distribution, use and, last but not least, the recycling of waste. Furthermore, there is a need for more flexibility in the energy system, rather than relying on electrification, integration with other energy systems, for example the gas network, would yield a system less vulnerable to failure and better adapted to requirements. For example, long-term large-scale storage of electrical energy is limited by capacity, yet needed to cover weekly to seasonal demand. This limitation can be overcome by coupling the electricity net to the gas system, considering the fact that the Dutch gas network alone has a storage capacity of 552 TWh, sufficient to cover the entire EU energy demand for over a month. This lecture explores energy storage in chemicals bonds. The focus is on chemicals other than hydrogen, taking advantage of the higher volumetric energy density of hydrocarbons, in this case methane, which has an approximate 3.5 times higher volumetric energy density. More importantly, it allows the ready use of existing gas infrastructure for energy storage, transport and distribution. Intermittent wind electricity generated is converted into synthetic methane, the Power to Gas (P2G) scheme, by splitting feedstock CO2 and H2O into synthesis gas, a mixture of CO and H2. Syngas plays a central role in the synthesis of a range of hydrocarbon products, including methane, diesel and dimethyl ether. The splitting is accomplished by innovative means; plasmolysis and high-temperature solid oxygen electrolysis. A CO2-neutral fuel cycle is

  4. Effects of non-ablative fractional erbium glass laser treatment on gene regulation in human three-dimensional skin models.

    PubMed

    Amann, Philipp M; Marquardt, Yvonne; Steiner, Timm; Hölzle, Frank; Skazik-Voogt, Claudia; Heise, Ruth; Baron, Jens M

    2016-04-01

    Clinical experiences with non-ablative fractional erbium glass laser therapy have demonstrated promising results for dermal remodelling and for the indications of striae, surgical scars and acne scars. So far, molecular effects on human skin following treatment with these laser systems have not been elucidated. Our aim was to investigate laser-induced effects on skin morphology and to analyse molecular effects on gene regulation. Therefore, human three-dimensional (3D) organotypic skin models were irradiated with non-ablative fractional erbium glass laser systems enabling qRT-PCR, microarray and histological studies at same and different time points. A decreased mRNA expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) 3 and 9 was observed 3 days after treatment. MMP3 also remained downregulated on protein level, whereas the expression of other MMPs like MMP9 was recovered or even upregulated 5 days after irradiation. Inflammatory gene regulatory responses measured by the expression of chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligands (CXCL1, 2, 5, 6) and interleukin expression (IL8) were predominantly reduced. Epidermal differentiation markers such as loricrin, filaggrin-1 and filaggrin-2 were upregulated by both tested laser optics, indicating a potential epidermal involvement. These effects were also shown on protein level in the immunofluorescence analysis. This novel standardised laser-treated human 3D skin model proves useful for monitoring time-dependent ex vivo effects of various laser systems on gene expression and human skin morphology. Our study reveals erbium glass laser-induced regulations of MMP and interleukin expression. We speculate that these alterations on gene expression level could play a role for dermal remodelling, anti-inflammatory effects and increased epidermal differentiation. Our finding may have implications for further understanding of the molecular mechanism of erbium glass laser-induced effects on human skin.

  5. CO2-Neutral Fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goede, Adelbert; van de Sanden, Richard

    2016-06-01

    Mimicking the biogeochemical cycle of System Earth, synthetic hydrocarbon fuels are produced from recycled CO2 and H2O powered by renewable energy. Recapturing CO2 after use closes the carbon cycle, rendering the fuel cycle CO2 neutral. Non-equilibrium molecular CO2 vibrations are key to high energy efficiency.

  6. Non-ablative fractional laser in conjunction with microneedle arrays for improved cutaneous vaccination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ji; Li, Bo; Wu, Mei X.

    2015-03-01

    Skin is more potent than the muscle for vaccination, but it is not a common site for immunization to date owing, in part, to a relatively high rate of pains and skin irritation and difficulty of administration. Here, we show effective and lesion free cutaneous vaccination by a combination of a biodegradable microneedle array (MNs) and an FDA-approved nonablative fractional laser (NAFL). Delivering a vaccine into many micropores, instead of a single "big" pore in the skin, effectively segregated vaccine-induced inflammation into many microzones and resulted in quick resolution of the inflammation, provided that distances between any two micropores were far enough. When the inoculation site was treated by NAFL prior to insertion of the MNs comprised of PR8 model influenza vaccine, the mice displayed vigorous antigen-uptake, giving rise to strong, Th1-biased immunity. The mice were protected from a challenge of homologous influenza virus at a high dose as well as heterologous H1N1 and H3N2 viruses. The adjuvant effect of NAFL was ascribed primarily to activation of the dsDNA sensing pathway by dsDNA released from laser-damaged skin cells. Thus, mice deficient in the dsDNA sensing pathway, but not toll like receptor (TLR) or inflammasome pathways, showed poor response to NAFL. Importantly, both mice and swine exhibited strong, protective immunity, but no overt skin reactions with this approach, in sharp contrast to intradermal injections that caused severe, overt skin reactions. The effective lesion-free transcutaneous vaccination merits further clinical studies.

  7. CO2 -Responsive polymers.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shaojian; Theato, Patrick

    2013-07-25

    This Review focuses on the recent progress in the area of CO2 -responsive polymers and provides detailed descriptions of these existing examples. CO2 -responsive polymers can be categorized into three types based on their CO2 -responsive groups: amidine, amine, and carboxyl groups. Compared with traditional temperature, pH, or light stimuli-responsive polymers, CO2 -responsive polymers provide the advantage to use CO2 as a "green" trigger as well as to capture CO2 directly from air. In addition, the current challenges of CO2 -responsive polymers are discussed and the different solution methods are compared. Noteworthy, CO2 -responsive polymers are considered to have a prosperous future in various scientific areas.

  8. CO2 laser modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Barry

    1992-01-01

    The topics covered include the following: (1) CO2 laser kinetics modeling; (2) gas lifetimes in pulsed CO2 lasers; (3) frequency chirp and laser pulse spectral analysis; (4) LAWS A' Design Study; and (5) discharge circuit components for LAWS. The appendices include LAWS Memos, computer modeling of pulsed CO2 lasers for lidar applications, discharge circuit considerations for pulsed CO2 lidars, and presentation made at the Code RC Review.

  9. New insight in the treatment of refractory melasma: Laser Q-switched Nd: YAG non-ablative fractionated followed by intense pulsed light.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Paulo Rowilson; Pinto, Clovis Antonio Lopes; Mattos, Camila Bonati; Cabrini, Dayane Peverari; Tolosa, Joana Lugli

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to verify the results of the association of Q-switched Nd: YAG non-ablative fractionated with intense pulsed light, in order to treat patients with refractory melasma. The combination of these two devices seems to be the best treatment to combat hyperpigmentation produced by melasma, with low occurrence of side effects, which may be justified by the selective photothermolysis at subcellular level.

  10. Complete resolution of minocycline pigmentation following a single treatment with non-ablative 1550-nm fractional resurfacing in combination with the 755-nm Q-switched alexandrite laser.

    PubMed

    Vangipuram, Ramya K; DeLozier, Whitney L; Geddes, Elizabeth; Friedman, Paul M

    2016-03-01

    Pigmentation secondary to minocycline ingestion is an uncommon adverse event affecting 3.7-14.8% of treated individuals for which few effective therapies are available. Three patterns of minocycline pigmentation have a characteristic clinical and histological appearance. The pigment composition in each variety is different and occurs at varying skin depths. Accordingly, a tailored approach according to the type of minocycline pigmentation is crucial for treatment success. The purpose of this intervention was to evaluate the efficacy of non-ablative fractional photothermolysis in combination with the Q-switched alexandrite laser for the treatment of type I minocycline pigmentation on the face. A patient with type I minocycline pigmentation was treated with non-ablative 1550-nm fractional photothermolysis followed immediately by 755-nm Q-switched alexandrite laser and then observed clinically to determine the outcome of this modality. The patient was seen in clinic 1 month later following her single treatment session and 100% clearance of all blue facial pigment was observed. Non-ablative fractional photothermolysis in combination with the 755-nm Q-switched alexandrite laser should be considered for treatment of type I minocycline pigmentation.

  11. Complete resolution of minocycline pigmentation following a single treatment with non-ablative 1550-nm fractional resurfacing in combination with the 755-nm Q-switched alexandrite laser.

    PubMed

    Vangipuram, Ramya K; DeLozier, Whitney L; Geddes, Elizabeth; Friedman, Paul M

    2016-03-01

    Pigmentation secondary to minocycline ingestion is an uncommon adverse event affecting 3.7-14.8% of treated individuals for which few effective therapies are available. Three patterns of minocycline pigmentation have a characteristic clinical and histological appearance. The pigment composition in each variety is different and occurs at varying skin depths. Accordingly, a tailored approach according to the type of minocycline pigmentation is crucial for treatment success. The purpose of this intervention was to evaluate the efficacy of non-ablative fractional photothermolysis in combination with the Q-switched alexandrite laser for the treatment of type I minocycline pigmentation on the face. A patient with type I minocycline pigmentation was treated with non-ablative 1550-nm fractional photothermolysis followed immediately by 755-nm Q-switched alexandrite laser and then observed clinically to determine the outcome of this modality. The patient was seen in clinic 1 month later following her single treatment session and 100% clearance of all blue facial pigment was observed. Non-ablative fractional photothermolysis in combination with the 755-nm Q-switched alexandrite laser should be considered for treatment of type I minocycline pigmentation. PMID:26718463

  12. Effects of influent fractionation, kinetics, stoichiometry and mass transfer on CH4, H2 and CO2 production for (plant-wide) modeling of anaerobic digesters.

    PubMed

    Solon, Kimberly; Flores-Alsina, Xavier; Gernaey, Krist V; Jeppsson, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the importance of influent fractionation, kinetic, stoichiometric and mass transfer parameter uncertainties when modeling biogas production in wastewater treatment plants. The anaerobic digestion model no. 1 implemented in the plant-wide context provided by the benchmark simulation model no. 2 is used to quantify the generation of CH₄, H₂and CO₂. A comprehensive global sensitivity analysis based on (i) standardized regression coefficients (SRC) and (ii) Morris' screening's (MS's) elementary effects reveals the set of parameters that influence the biogas production uncertainty the most. This analysis is repeated for (i) different temperature regimes and (ii) different solids retention times (SRTs) in the anaerobic digester. Results show that both SRC and MS are good measures of sensitivity unless the anaerobic digester is operating at low SRT and mesophilic conditions. In the latter situation, and due to the intrinsic nonlinearities of the system, SRC fails in decomposing the variance of the model predictions (R² < 0.7) making MS a more reliable method. At high SRT, influent fractionations are the most influential parameters for predictions of CH₄and CO₂emissions. Nevertheless, when the anaerobic digester volume is decreased (for the same load), the role of acetate degraders gains more importance under mesophilic conditions, while lipids and fatty acid metabolism is more influential under thermophilic conditions. The paper ends with a critical discussion of the results and their implications during model calibration and validation exercises.

  13. Large Amplitude Spatial and Temporal Gradients in Atmospheric Boundary Layer CO2 Mole Fractions Detected With a Tower-Based Network in the U.S. Upper Midwest

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, Natasha; Richardson, S. J.; Davis, Kenneth J.; Lauvaux, Thomas; Andrews, A.; West, Tristram O.; Bandaru, Varaprasad; Crosson, Eric R.

    2012-02-21

    This study presents observations of atmospheric CO{sub 2} mole fraction from a nine-tower, regional network deployed during the North American Carbon Program's Mid-Continent Intensive during 2007-2009. Within this network in a largely agricultural area, mean atmospheric CO{sub 2} gradients were strongly correlated with both ground-based inventory data and estimates from satellite remote sensing. The average seasonal drawdown for corn-dominated sites (35 ppm) is significantly larger than has been observed at other continental boundary layer sites. Observed growing-season median CO{sub 2} gradients are strongly dependent on local flux. The gradients between cross-vegetation site-pairs, for example, average 2.0 ppm/100 km, four times larger than the similar-vegetation site-pair average. Daily-timescale gradients are as large as 5.5 ppm/100 km, but dominated by advection rather than local flux. Flooding in 2008 led to a region-wide 23 week delay in growing-season minima. The observations show that regional-scale CO{sub 2} mole fraction networks yield large, coherent signals governed largely by regional sources and sinks of CO{sub 2}.

  14. Effects of influent fractionation, kinetics, stoichiometry and mass transfer on CH4, H2 and CO2 production for (plant-wide) modeling of anaerobic digesters.

    PubMed

    Solon, Kimberly; Flores-Alsina, Xavier; Gernaey, Krist V; Jeppsson, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the importance of influent fractionation, kinetic, stoichiometric and mass transfer parameter uncertainties when modeling biogas production in wastewater treatment plants. The anaerobic digestion model no. 1 implemented in the plant-wide context provided by the benchmark simulation model no. 2 is used to quantify the generation of CH₄, H₂and CO₂. A comprehensive global sensitivity analysis based on (i) standardized regression coefficients (SRC) and (ii) Morris' screening's (MS's) elementary effects reveals the set of parameters that influence the biogas production uncertainty the most. This analysis is repeated for (i) different temperature regimes and (ii) different solids retention times (SRTs) in the anaerobic digester. Results show that both SRC and MS are good measures of sensitivity unless the anaerobic digester is operating at low SRT and mesophilic conditions. In the latter situation, and due to the intrinsic nonlinearities of the system, SRC fails in decomposing the variance of the model predictions (R² < 0.7) making MS a more reliable method. At high SRT, influent fractionations are the most influential parameters for predictions of CH₄and CO₂emissions. Nevertheless, when the anaerobic digester volume is decreased (for the same load), the role of acetate degraders gains more importance under mesophilic conditions, while lipids and fatty acid metabolism is more influential under thermophilic conditions. The paper ends with a critical discussion of the results and their implications during model calibration and validation exercises. PMID:25812096

  15. The impact of pCO2 and climate on D/H and 13C/12C fractionation of higher-plant biomarkers: Implications for paleoclimate and paleoelevation reconstruction during global warm periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hren, M. T.; Tipple, B. J.; Pagani, M.

    2012-12-01

    Stable hydrogen isotope compositions (D/H) of plant biomarkers record the hydrogen isotopic composition of leaf water at the time of plant growth. However, the magnitude of the apparent hydrogen isotope fractionation between biomarkers and precipitation can vary due to soil- or leaf-water evaporation or differing water-use strategies. As a result, climate-induced changes in soil- or leaf-water evaporation rates and/or changes in plant assemblages during periods of global warming and high atmospheric CO2 could impact apparent carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionations. We measured hydrogen and carbon isotope ratios of long-carbon chain n-alkanes from modern and ~50 million year old fossil leaves preserved in paleo-Sierra Nevada riverine sediments to determine how climate and ecosystem differences during a period of extremely high pCO2 impact the magnitude and variability of D/H and 13C/12C ratios of leaf-waxes across a topographic gradient. δDalkanes (nC27 to nC31) of individual fossil and modern leaves decrease systematically across the topographic gradient and follow the change in the D/H of precipitation due to orographic lifting and continuous rainout. Using estimated values of Eocene δDprecip at the Pacific margin (-43 to -61‰), apparent fractionations (ɛalkane - precip) for Eocene angiosperm trees are similar to that seen for modern, humid environments (~ -106 to -124‰ ±10‰ 1σ), and more negative than observed in modern sun-exposed leaves in the Sierra Nevada (-96 to -102‰) or soils (-87 to -92‰). Single site variability in leaf-wax δD from individual fossil angiosperms can exceed 20‰, but is considerably smaller than observed for modern, mixed angiosperm/gymnosperm forests of the seasonally dry Sierra Nevada range. δ13Calkane values show little or no systematic variation across the range. However, carbon isotope discrimination in ancient and modern leaves is similar, suggesting strong climatic and weak pCO2 controls on D/H and 13C/12C

  16. Triple combination treatment with fractional CO2 laser plus topical betamethasone solution and narrowband ultraviolet B for refractory vitiligo: a prospective, randomized half-body, comparative study.

    PubMed

    Li, Lu; Wu, Yan; Li, Li; Sun, Yan; Qiu, Li; Gao, Xing-Hua; Chen, Hong-Duo

    2015-01-01

    Vitiligo on extremities and/or bony prominences is very resistant to treatment. Twenty-five patients with symmetrical and stable vitiligo on extremities and/or bony prominences were enrolled. The treatment side received fractional carbon dioxide laser followed by topical compound betamethasone solution and narrowband ultraviolet B phototherapy. The control side received laser treatment plus phototherapy. The result of treatment side showed that 44% patients achieved over 50% re-pigmentation and patient satisfaction score was 5.12 ± 3.23, higher than those of control (p < 0.05). Adverse events were slight and tolerable. The triple combination treatment could be used as an alternative modality for refractory vitiligo.

  17. Modeling of Isotope Fractionation in Stratospheric CO2, N2O, CH4, and O3: Investigations of Stratospheric Chemistry and Transport, Stratosphere-Troposphere Exchange, and Their Influence on Global Isotope Budgets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boering, Kristie A.; Connell, Peter; Rotman, Douglas

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the isotopic fractionation of CH4 and hydrogen (H2) in the stratosphere by incorporating isotope-specific rate coefficients into the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) 2D model and comparing the model results with new observations from the NASA ER-2 aircraft (funded through a separate task under the Upper Atmosphere Research Program). The model results reveal that fractionation which occurs in the stratosphere has a significant influence on isotope compositions in the free troposphere, an important point which had previously been ignored, unrecognized or unquantified for many long-lived trace gases, including CH4 and H2 which we have focused our efforts on to date. Our analyses of the model results and new isotope observations have also been used to test how well the kinetic isotope effects are known, at least to within the uncertainties in model chemistry and transport. Overall, these results represent an important step forward in our understanding of isotope fractionation in the atmosphere and demonstrate that stratospheric isotope fractionation cannot be ignored in modeling studies which use isotope observations in the troposphere to infer the global budgets of CH4 (an important greenhouse gas) and of H2 (a gas whose atmospheric budget must be better quantified, particularly before a large human perturbation from fuel cell use is realized). Our analyses of model results and observations from the NASA ER-2 aircraft are briefly summarized separately below for CH4, H2, and H2O and for the contribution of these modeling studies to date to our understanding of isotope fractionation for N2O, CO2, and O3 as well.

  18. Modeling of Isotope Fractionation in Stratospheric CO2, N2O, CH4, and O3: Investigations of Stratospheric Chemistry and Transport, Stratosphere-Troposphere Exchange, and Their Influence on Global Isotope Budgets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boering, Kristie A.; Connell, Peter; Rotman, Douglas

    2005-01-01

    Until recently, the stable isotopic composition of chemically and datively important stratospheric species, such as ozone (O3), carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrous oxide (N2O), and methane (CH4), was largely unexplored, despite indications from the few measurements available and theoretical studies that global-scale isotopic variations will provide a unique tool for quantifying rates of global-scale mass transport into, within, and out of the stratosphere and for understanding the mechanisms of chemical reactions involved in ozone production. The number and geographical extent of observations are beginning to increase rapidly, however, as access to the stratosphere, both directly and by remote-sensing, has increased over the last 10 years and as new analytical techniques have been developed that make global-scale isotope measurements by whole-air sampling more feasible. The objective of this study, begun in April 1999, is to incorporate into the Livermore 2D model the likely photochemical fractionation processes that determine the isotopic compositions of stratospheric CO2, N2O, CH4, and O3, and to use the model results and new observations from NASA field campaigns in 1996 and 1997 to investigate stratospheric chemistry and mass transport. Additionally, since isotopic signatures from the stratosphere are transferred to the troposphere by downward transport at middle and high latitudes, the isotopic compositions may also serve as sensitive tracers of stratosphere-totroposphere transport. Comparisons of model results with stratospheric and upper tropospheric observations from these campaigns, as well as with ground-based observations from new NOAA and NSF-sponsored studies, will help determine whether the magnitudes of the stratospheric fractionation processes are large enough to use as global-scale tracers of transport into the troposphere and, if so, will be used to help constrain the degree of coupling between the troposphere and the stratosphere.

  19. CO2 blood test

    MedlinePlus

    Bicarbonate test; HCO3-; Carbon dioxide test; TCO2; Total CO2; CO2 test - serum ... Many medicines can interfere with blood test results. Your health care provider will tell you if you need to stop taking any medicines before you have this test. DO ...

  20. Outsourcing CO2 Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, S. J.; Caldeira, K. G.

    2009-12-01

    CO2 emissions from the burning of fossil fuels are the primary cause of global warming. Much attention has been focused on the CO2 directly emitted by each country, but relatively little attention has been paid to the amount of emissions associated with consumption of goods and services in each country. This consumption-based emissions inventory differs from the production-based inventory because of imports and exports of goods and services that, either directly or indirectly, involved CO2 emissions. Using the latest available data and reasonable assumptions regarding trans-shipment of embodied carbon through third-party countries, we developed a global consumption-based CO2 emissions inventory and have calculated associated consumption-based energy and carbon intensities. We find that, in 2004, 24% of CO2 emissions are effectively outsourced to other countries, with much of the developed world outsourcing CO2 emissions to emerging markets, principally China. Some wealthy countries, including Switzerland and Sweden, outsource over half of their consumption-based emissions, with many northern Europeans outsourcing more than three tons of emissions per person per year. The United States is both a big importer and exporter of emissions embodied in trade, outsourcing >2.6 tons of CO2 per person and at the same time as >2.0 tons of CO2 per person are outsourced to the United States. These large flows indicate that CO2 emissions embodied in trade must be taken into consideration when considering responsibility for increasing atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations.

  1. Accelerator mass spectrometry 14C determination in CO2 produced from laser decomposition of aragonite.

    PubMed

    Rosenheim, Brad E; Thorrold, Simon R; Roberts, Mark L

    2008-11-01

    The determination of (14)C in aragonite (CaCO(3)) decomposed thermally to CO(2) using an yttrium-aluminum-garnet doped neodymium laser is reported. Laser decomposition accelerator mass spectrometry (LD-AMS) measurements reproduce AMS determinations of (14)C from the conventional reaction of aragonite with concentrated phosphoric acid. The lack of significant differences between these sets of measurements indicates that LD-AMS radiocarbon dating can overcome the significant fractionation that has been observed during stable isotope (C and O) laser decomposition analysis of different carbonate minerals. The laser regularly converted nearly 30% of material removed into CO(2) despite it being optimized for ablation, where laser energy breaks material apart rather than chemically altering it. These results illustrate promise for using laser decomposition on the front-end of AMS systems that directly measure CO(2) gas. The feasibility of such measurements depends on (1) the improvement of material removal and/or CO(2) generation efficiency of the laser decomposition system and (2) the ionization efficiency of AMS systems measuring continuously flowing CO(2).

  2. Solutions that enable ablative radiotherapy for large liver tumors: Fractionated dose painting, simultaneous integrated protection, motion management, and computed tomography image guidance.

    PubMed

    Crane, Christopher H; Koay, Eugene J

    2016-07-01

    The emergence and success of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for the treatment of lung cancer have led to its rapid adoption for liver cancers. SBRT can achieve excellent results for small liver tumors. However, the vast majority of physicians interpret SBRT as meaning doses of radiation (range, 4-20 Gray [Gy]) that may not be ablative but are delivered within about 1 week (ie, in 3-6 fractions). Adherence to this approach has limited the effectiveness of SBRT for large liver tumors (>7 cm) because of the need to reduce doses to meet organ constraints. The prognosis for patients who present with large liver tumors is poor, with a median survival ≤12 months, and most of these patients die from tumor-related liver failure. Herein, the authors present a comprehensive solution to achieve ablative SBRT doses for patients with large liver tumors by using a combination of classic, modern, and novel concepts of radiotherapy: fractionation, dose painting, motion management, image guidance, and simultaneous integrated protection. The authors discuss these concepts in the context of large, inoperable liver tumors and review how this approach can substantially prolong survival for patients, most of whom otherwise have a very poor prognosis and few effective treatment options. Cancer 2016;122:1974-86. © 2016 American Cancer Society. PMID:26950735

  3. Combination ALA-PDT and Ablative Fractional Er:YAG Laser (2,940 nm) on the Treatment of Severe Acne

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Rui; Lin, Lin; Xiao, Yan; Hao, Fei; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Scarring is a very common complication of severe acne and is difficult to treat by conventional methods. 5-Aminolevulinic acid (ALA) photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a novel treatment for improving acne lesions. Fractional laser resurfacing is a promising treatment for scar treatment because of its unique ability to stimulate the wound healing response and its depth of penetration. Objective To evaluate the efficacy of combination therapies of ALA-PDT and ablative fractional Er:YAG laser (2,940 nm) for scarring lesions in severe acne patients. Methods A prospective, single-arm, pilot study. Forty subjects with severe acne were treated with 15% ALA-PDT for four times at 10-day intervals. They then received ablative fractional Er:YAG laser treatment five times at 4-week intervals. Three independent investigators evaluated subject outcomes at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months post-treatment (primary outcome); patients also provided self-assessments of improvement (secondary outcome). Results Significant reductions in acne score (P<0.01) were obtained at follow-up visits after 1, 3, 6, and 12 months. After 6 month, the lesions showed overall improvement in all of subjects (good to excellent in acne inflammatory lesions), 80% overall improvement in acne scars. After 12 months, most of subjects had improved hypertrophic/atrophic scars (good to excellent in 85%) and no one had recurrent acne inflammatory lesions. Patient self-evaluation also revealed good to excellent improvements (on average) in acne lesions and scarring, with significant improvements in self-esteem after 6 months post-treatment. Conclusions PDT can control the inflammation and improve the severity of acne lesions. Fractional resurfacing is a promising new treatment modality for scars by stimulating wound healing and remodeling. The combination therapy is a promising option for severe acne to prevent and improve car formation. PMID:24391075

  4. The Oceanic Sink for Anthropogenic CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Sabine, Chris; Feely, R. A.; Gruber, N.; Key, Robert; Lee, K.; Bullister, J.L.; Wanninkhof, R.; Wong, C. S.; Wallace, D.W.R.; Tilbrook, B.; Millero, F. J.; Peng, T.-H.; Kozyr, Alexander; Ono, Tsueno

    2004-01-01

    Using inorganic carbon measurements from an international survey effort in the 1990s and a tracer-based separation technique, we estimate a global oceanic anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) sink for the period from 1800 to 1994 of 118 19 petagrams of carbon. The oceanic sink accounts for ~48% of the total fossil-fuel and cement-manufacturing emissions, implying that the terrestrial biosphere was a net source of CO2 to the atmosphere of about 39 28 petagrams of carbon for this period. The current fraction of total anthropogenic CO2 emissions stored in the ocean appears to be about one-third of the long-term potential.

  5. The oceanic sink for anthropogenic CO2.

    PubMed

    Sabine, Christopher L; Feely, Richard A; Gruber, Nicolas; Key, Robert M; Lee, Kitack; Bullister, John L; Wanninkhof, Rik; Wong, C S; Wallace, Douglas W R; Tilbrook, Bronte; Millero, Frank J; Peng, Tsung-Hung; Kozyr, Alexander; Ono, Tsueno; Rios, Aida F

    2004-07-16

    Using inorganic carbon measurements from an international survey effort in the 1990s and a tracer-based separation technique, we estimate a global oceanic anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) sink for the period from 1800 to 1994 of 118 +/- 19 petagrams of carbon. The oceanic sink accounts for approximately 48% of the total fossil-fuel and cement-manufacturing emissions, implying that the terrestrial biosphere was a net source of CO2 to the atmosphere of about 39 +/- 28 petagrams of carbon for this period. The current fraction of total anthropogenic CO2 emissions stored in the ocean appears to be about one-third of the long-term potential.

  6. Controlled intra- and transdermal protein delivery using a minimally invasive Erbium:YAG fractional laser ablation technology.

    PubMed

    Bachhav, Y G; Heinrich, A; Kalia, Y N

    2013-06-01

    The aim of the study was (i) to investigate the feasibility of using fractional laser ablation to create micropore arrays in order to deliver proteins into and across the skin and (ii) to demonstrate how transport rates could be controlled by variation of poration and formulation conditions. Four proteins with very different structures and properties were investigated - equine heart cytochrome c (Cyt c; 12.4 kDa), recombinant human growth hormone expressed in Escherichia coli (hGH; 22 kDa), urinary follicle stimulating hormone (FSH; 30 kDa) and FITC-labelled bovine serum albumin (FITC-BSA; 70 kDa). The transport experiments were performed using a scanning Er:YAG diode pumped laser (P.L.E.A.S.E.®; Precise Laser Epidermal System). The distribution of FITC-BSA in the micropores following P.L.E.A.S.E.® poration was visualised by using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Porcine skin was used for the device parameter and CLSM studies; its validity as a model was confirmed by subsequent comparison with transport of Cyt c and FITC-BSA across P.L.E.A.S.E.® porated human skin. No protein transport (deposition or permeation) was observed across intact skin; however, P.L.E.A.S.E.® poration enabled total delivery after 24h of 48.2±8.9, 8.1±4.2, 0.2±0.1 and 273.3±30.6 μg/cm(2) for Cyt c, hGH, FSH and FITC-BSA, respectively, using 900 pores/135.9 cm(2). Calculation of permeability coefficients showed that there was no linear dependence of transport on molecular weight ((1.6±0.3), (0.1±0.05), (0.08±0.03) and (0.9±0.1)×10(-3) cm/h, for Cyt c, hGH, FSH and FITC-BSA, respectively); indeed, a U-shaped curve was observed. This suggested that molecular weight was not a sufficiently sensitive descriptor and that transport was more likely to be determined by the surface properties of the respective proteins since these would govern interactions with the local microenvironment. Increasing pore density (i.e. the number of micropores per unit area) had a statistically

  7. Fingerprinting captured CO2 using natural tracers: Determining CO2 fate and proving ownership

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flude, Stephanie; Gilfillan, Stuart; Johnston, Gareth; Stuart, Finlay; Haszeldine, Stuart

    2016-04-01

    In the long term, captured CO2 will most likely be stored in large saline formations and it is highly likely that CO2 from multiple operators will be injected into a single saline formation. Understanding CO2 behavior within the reservoir is vital for making operational decisions and often uses geochemical techniques. Furthermore, in the event of a CO2 leak, being able to identify the owner of the CO2 is of vital importance in terms of liability and remediation. Addition of geochemical tracers to the CO2 stream is an effective way of tagging the CO2 from different power stations, but may become prohibitively expensive at large scale storage sites. Here we present results from a project assessing whether the natural isotopic composition (C, O and noble gas isotopes) of captured CO2 is sufficient to distinguish CO2 captured using different technologies and from different fuel sources, from likely baseline conditions. Results include analytical measurements of CO2 captured from a number of different CO2 capture plants and a comprehensive literature review of the known and hypothetical isotopic compositions of captured CO2 and baseline conditions. Key findings from the literature review suggest that the carbon isotope composition will be most strongly controlled by that of the feedstock, but significant fractionation is possible during the capture process; oxygen isotopes are likely to be controlled by the isotopic composition of any water used in either the industrial process or the capture technology; and noble gases concentrations will likely be controlled by the capture technique employed. Preliminary analytical results are in agreement with these predictions. Comparison with summaries of likely storage reservoir baseline and shallow or surface leakage reservoir baseline data suggests that C-isotopes are likely to be valuable tracers of CO2 in the storage reservoir, while noble gases may be particularly valuable as tracers of potential leakage.

  8. Investigating 14CO2 chamber methodologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egan, J. E.; Phillips, C. L.; Nickerson, N. R.; Risk, D. A.

    2012-12-01

    The radiogenic isotope of carbon (14C) is an exceptionally useful tool in studying soil respired CO2, providing information about soil turnover rates, depths of production and the biological sources of production through partitioning. Unfortunately, little work has been done to thoroughly investigate the possibility of inherent biases in the current measurement techniques for 14CO2, caused by disturbances to the soil's natural diffusive regime, because of high costs and sampling logistics. Our aim in this study is to investigate the degree of bias present in the current sampling methodologies using a numerical model and laboratory calibration device. Four chamber techniques were tested numerically with varying fraction modern of production, δ13C of production, collar lengths, flux rates and diffusivities. Two of the chambers were then tested on the lab calibration device. One of these chambers, Iso-FD, has recently been tested for its use as a 13CO2 chamber and it does not induce gas transport fractionation biases present in other 13CO2 sampling methodologies. We then implemented it in the field to test its application as a 14CO2 chamber because of its excellent performance as a 13CO2chamber. Presented here are the results from the numerical modeling experiment, the laboratory calibration experiment and preliminary field results from the Iso-FD chamber.

  9. Global CO2 simulation using GOSAT-based surface CO2 flux estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, H.; Oda, T.; Saito, M.; Valsala, V.; Belikov, D.; Saeki, T.; Saito, R.; Morino, I.; Uchino, O.; Yoshida, Y.; Yokota, Y.; Bril, A.; Oshchepkov, S.; Andres, R. J.; Maksyutov, S.

    2012-04-01

    Investigating the distribution and temporal variability of surface CO2 fluxes is an active research topic in the field of contemporary carbon cycle dynamics. The technique central to this effort is atmospheric inverse modeling with which surface CO2 fluxes are estimated by making corrections to a priori flux estimates such that mismatches between model-predicted and observed CO2 concentrations are minimized. Past investigations were carried out by utilizing CO2 measurements collected in global networks of surface-based monitoring sites. Now, datasets of column-averaged CO2 dry air mole fraction (XCO2) retrieved from spectral soundings collected by GOSAT are available for complementing the surface-based CO2 observations. These space-based XCO2 data are expected to enhance the spatiotemporal coverage of the existing surface observation network and thus reduce uncertainty associated with the surface flux estimates. We estimated monthly CO2 fluxes in 64 sub-continental regions from a subset of the surface-based GLOBALVIEW CO2 data and the GOSAT FTS SWIR Level 2 XCO2 retrievals. We further simulated CO2 concentrations in 3-D model space using the surface flux estimates obtained. In this presentation, we report the result of a comparison between the simulated CO2 concentrations and independent surface observations. As part of an effort in inter-comparing GOSAT-based surface CO2 flux estimates, we also look at results yielded with XCO2 data retrieved with the PPDF-DOAS algorithm and those made available by the NASA Atmospheric CO2 Observations from Space team. For this study, we used version 08.1 of the National Institute for Environmental Studies atmospheric transport model, which was driven by the Japan Meteorological Agency's JCDAS wind analysis data. The CO2 forward simulations were performed on 2.5° × 2.5° horizontal grids at 32 vertical levels between the surface and the top of the atmosphere. The a priori flux dataset used was comprised of the sum of four

  10. Ablative fractional photothermolysis for the treatment of hypertrophic burn scars in adult and pediatric patients: a single surgeon's experience.

    PubMed

    Khandelwal, Anjay; Yelvington, Miranda; Tang, Xinyu; Brown, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Many patients develop hypertrophic scarring after a burn injury. Numerous treatment modalities have been described and are currently in practice. Photothermolysis or laser therapy has been recently described as an adjunct for management of hypertrophic burn scars. This study is a retrospective chart review of adult and pediatric patients undergoing fractional photothermolysis at a verified burn center examining treatment parameters as well as pre- and post-Vancouver Scar Scale scores. Forty-four patients underwent fractional photothermolysis during the study period of 8 months. Mean pretreatment score was 7.6, and mean posttreatment score was 5.4. The mean decrease in score was 2.2, which was found to be statistically significant. There were no complications. Fractional photothermolysis is a safe and efficacious adjunct therapy for hypertrophic burn scars. Prospective trials would be beneficial to determine optimal therapeutic strategies.

  11. CO 2 laser surgery in hemophilia treatment.

    PubMed

    Santos-Dias, A

    1992-08-01

    The use of CO 2 laser surgery between 1985 and 1991 in South Africa and Portugal for treatment of disorders in patients with mild to moderate cases of hemophilia A is discussed. Six cases of oral procedures and excision of skin tumors performed during this period are reported. In most of the cases of mild hemophilia no pre- or postoperative infusion of Factor VIII or desmopressin (DDAVP) was required. In some cases of moderate hemophilia, patients were infused with desmopressin (0.3 mug/kg body weight) and were treated postoperatively with the use of nasal desmopressin spray (150 mug to each nostril for four weeks following surgery). Factor VIII levels were measured before surgery. Follow up of four weeks was uneventful. The mean average power of the CO 2 laser was 20 W continuous and the pulse duration was 0.1 s for ablational procedures. For dermatologic procedures, a flexible plastic CO 2 laser hollow fiber was used (Flexilase, Sharplan, Allandale, NJ). We concluded that CO 2 laser surgery for hemophiliacs has a confirmed place in modern laser technology provided the standard precautions are taken and facilities are available.

  12. CO2 laser preionisation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiers, Gary D.

    1991-01-01

    The final report for work done during the reporting period of January 25, 1990 to January 24, 1991 is presented. A literature survey was conducted to identify the required parameters for effective preionization in TEA CO2 lasers and the methods and techniques for characterizing preionizers are reviewed. A numerical model of the LP-140 cavity was used to determine the cause of the transverse mode stability improvement obtained when the cavity was lengthened. The measurement of the voltage and current discharge pulses on the LP-140 were obtained and their subsequent analysis resulted in an explanation for the low efficiency of the laser. An assortment of items relating to the development of high-voltage power supplies is also provided. A program for analyzing the frequency chirp data files obtained with the HP time and frequency analyzer is included. A program to calculate the theoretical LIMP chirp is also included and a comparison between experiment and theory is made. A program for calculating the CO2 linewidth and its dependence on gas composition and pressure is presented. The program also calculates the number of axial modes under the FWHM of the line for a given resonator length. A graphical plot of the results is plotted.

  13. CO2 Laser Market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonsson, Samuel

    1989-03-01

    It gives me a great deal of pleasure to introduce our final speaker of this morning's session for two reasons: First of all, his company has been very much in the news not only in our own community but in the pages of Wall Street Journal and in the world economic press. And, secondly, we would like to welcome him to our shores. He is a temporary resident of the United States, for a few months, forsaking his home in Germany to come here and help with the start up of a new company which we believe, probably, ranks #1 as the world supplier of CO2 lasers now, through the combination of former Spectra Physics Industrial Laser Division and Rofin-Sinar GMBH. Samuel Simonsson is the Chairman of the Board of Rofin-Sinar, Inc., here in the U.S. and managing director of Rofin-Sinar GMBH. It is a pleasure to welcome him.

  14. Vadose Zone Remediation of CO2 Leakage from Geologic CO2 Storage Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yingqi; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Benson, Sally M.

    2004-03-03

    In the unlikely event that CO2 leakage from deep geologic CO2 sequestration sites reaches the vadose zone, remediation measures for removing the CO2 gas plume may have to be undertaken. Carbon dioxide leakage plumes are similar in many ways to volatile organic compound (VOC) vapor plumes, and the same remediation approaches are applicable. We present here numerical simulation results of passive and active remediation strategies for CO2 leakage plumes in the vadose zone. The starting time for the remediation scenarios is assumed to be after a steady-state CO2 leakage plume is established in the vadose zone, and the source of this plume has been cut off. We consider first passive remediation, both with and without barometric pumping. Next, we consider active methods involving extraction wells in both vertical and horizontal configurations. To compare the effectiveness of the various remediation strategies, we define a half-life of the CO2 plume as a convenient measure of the CO2 removal rate. For CO2 removal by passive remediation approaches such as barometric pumping, thicker vadose zones generally require longer remediation times. However, for the case of a thin vadose zone where a significant fraction of the CO2 plume mass resides within the high liquid saturation region near the water table, the half-life of the CO2 plume without barometric pumping is longer than for somewhat thicker vadose zones. As for active strategies, results show that a combination of horizontal and vertical wells is the most effective among the strategies investigated, as the performance of commonly used multiple vertical wells was not investigated.

  15. Ar + CO2 and He + CO2 Plasmas in ASTRAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boivin, R. F.; Gardner, A.; Munoz, J.; Kamar, O.; Loch, S.

    2007-11-01

    Spectroscopy study of the ASTRAL helicon plasma source running Ar + CO2 and He + CO2 gas mixes is presented. ASTRAL produces plasmas with the following parameters: ne = 10^10 - 10^13 cm-3, Te = 2 - 10 eV and Ti = 0.03 - 0.5 eV, B-field <= 1.3 kGauss, rf power <= 2 kWatt. A 0.33 m scanning monochromator is used for this study. Using Ar + CO2 gas mixes, very different plasmas are observed as the concentration of CO2 is changed. At low CO2 concentration, the bluish plasma is essentially atomic and argon transitions dominate the spectra. Weak C I and O I lines are present in the 750 - 1000 nm range. At higher CO2 concentration, the plasma becomes essentially molecular and is characterized by intense, white plasma columns. Here, spectra are filled with molecular bands (CO2, CO2^+, CO and CO^+). Limited molecular dissociative excitation processes associated with the production of C I and O I emission are also observed. On the other hand, He + CO2 plasmas are different. Here, rf matches are only possible at low CO2 concentration. Under these conditions, the spectra are characterized by strong C I and O I transitions with little or no molecular bands. Strong dissociative processes observed in these plasmas can be link to the high Te associated with He plasmas. An analysis of the spectra with possible scientific and industrial applications will be presented.

  16. Determining CO2 storage potential during miscible CO2 enhanced oil recovery: Noble gas and stable isotope tracers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shelton, Jenna L.; McIntosh, Jennifer C.; Hunt, Andrew; Beebe, Thomas L; Parker, Andrew D; Warwick, Peter; Drake, Ronald; McCray, John E.

    2016-01-01

    Rising atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations are fueling anthropogenic climate change. Geologic sequestration of anthropogenic CO2 in depleted oil reservoirs is one option for reducing CO2 emissions to the atmosphere while enhancing oil recovery. In order to evaluate the feasibility of using enhanced oil recovery (EOR) sites in the United States for permanent CO2 storage, an active multi-stage miscible CO2flooding project in the Permian Basin (North Ward Estes Field, near Wickett, Texas) was investigated. In addition, two major natural CO2 reservoirs in the southeastern Paradox Basin (McElmo Dome and Doe Canyon) were also investigated as they provide CO2 for EOR operations in the Permian Basin. Produced gas and water were collected from three different CO2 flooding phases (with different start dates) within the North Ward Estes Field to evaluate possible CO2 storage mechanisms and amounts of total CO2retention. McElmo Dome and Doe Canyon were sampled for produced gas to determine the noble gas and stable isotope signature of the original injected EOR gas and to confirm the source of this naturally-occurring CO2. As expected, the natural CO2produced from McElmo Dome and Doe Canyon is a mix of mantle and crustal sources. When comparing CO2 injection and production rates for the CO2 floods in the North Ward Estes Field, it appears that CO2 retention in the reservoir decreased over the course of the three injections, retaining 39%, 49% and 61% of the injected CO2 for the 2008, 2010, and 2013 projects, respectively, characteristic of maturing CO2 miscible flood projects. Noble gas isotopic composition of the injected and produced gas for the flood projects suggest no active fractionation, while δ13CCO2 values suggest no active CO2dissolution into formation water, or mineralization. CO2 volumes capable of dissolving in residual formation fluids were also estimated along with the potential to store pure-phase supercritical CO2. Using a combination

  17. Is CO2 ice permanent?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindner, Bernhard Lee

    1992-01-01

    Carbon dioxide ice has been inferred to exist at the south pole in summertime, but Earth based measurements in 1969 of water vapor in the Martian atmosphere suggest that all CO2 ice sublined from the southern polar cap and exposed underlying water ice. This implies that the observed summertime CO2 ice is of recent origin. It appears possible to construct an energy balance model that maintains seasonal CO2 ice at the south pole year round and still reasonably simulates the polar cap regression and atmospheric pressure data. This implies that the CO2 ice observed in the summertime south polar cap could be seasonal in origin, and that minor changes in climate could cause CO2 ice to completely vanish, as would appear to have happened in 1969. However, further research remains before it is certain whether the CO2 ice observed in the summertime south polar cap is seasonal or is part of a permanent reservoir.

  18. India Co2 Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharan, S.; Diffenbaugh, N. S.

    2010-12-01

    created a balance in between the “developed” and developing countries. If India was producing the same amounts of emissions per capita as the it would have a total of 20 billion metric tons of CO2 emissions annually.

  19. Co2 geological sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Tianfu

    2004-11-18

    Human activities are increasingly altering the Earth's climate. A particular concern is that atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) may be rising fast because of increased industrialization. CO{sub 2} is a so-called ''greenhouse gas'' that traps infrared radiation and may contribute to global warming. Scientists project that greenhouse gases such as CO{sub 2} will make the arctic warmer, which would melt glaciers and raise sea levels. Evidence suggests that climate change may already have begun to affect ecosystems and wildlife around the world. Some animal species are moving from one habitat to another to adapt to warmer temperatures. Future warming is likely to exceed the ability of many species to migrate or adjust. Human production of CO{sub 2} from fossil fuels (such as at coal-fired power plants) is not likely to slow down soon. It is urgent to find somewhere besides the atmosphere to put these increased levels of CO{sub 2}. Sequestration in the ocean and in soils and forests are possibilities, but another option, sequestration in geological formations, may also be an important solution. Such formations could include depleted oil and gas reservoirs, unmineable coal seams, and deep saline aquifers. In many cases, injection of CO2 into a geological formation can enhance the recovery of hydrocarbons, providing value-added byproducts that can offset the cost of CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration. Before CO{sub 2} gas can be sequestered from power plants and other point sources, it must be captured. CO{sub 2} is also routinely separated and captured as a by-product from industrial processes such as synthetic ammonia production, H{sub 2} production, and limestone calcination. Then CO{sub 2} must be compressed into liquid form and transported to the geological sequestration site. Many power plants and other large emitters of CO{sub 2} are located near geological formations that are amenable to CO{sub 2} sequestration.

  20. Stem girdling affects the quantity of CO2 transported in xylem as well as CO2 efflux from soil.

    PubMed

    Bloemen, Jasper; Agneessens, Laura; Van Meulebroek, Lieven; Aubrey, Doug P; McGuire, Mary Anne; Teskey, Robert O; Steppe, Kathy

    2014-02-01

    There is recent clear evidence that an important fraction of root-respired CO2 is transported upward in the transpiration stream in tree stems rather than fluxing to the soil. In this study, we aimed to quantify the contribution of root-respired CO2 to both soil CO2 efflux and xylem CO2 transport by manipulating the autotrophic component of belowground respiration. We compared soil CO2 efflux and the flux of root-respired CO2 transported in the transpiration stream in girdled and nongirdled 9-yr-old oak trees (Quercus robur) to assess the impact of a change in the autotrophic component of belowground respiration on both CO2 fluxes. Stem girdling decreased xylem CO2 concentration, indicating that belowground respiration contributes to the aboveground transport of internal CO2 . Girdling also decreased soil CO2 efflux. These results confirmed that root respiration contributes to xylem CO2 transport and that failure to account for this flux results in inaccurate estimates of belowground respiration when efflux-based methods are used. This research adds to the growing body of evidence that efflux-based measurements of belowground respiration underestimate autotrophic contributions.

  1. Estimates of CO2 since the mid-Miocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoll, Heather

    2016-04-01

    For past warm climates, direct CO2 determinations are unavailable. Our inferences of Antarctic ice sheet thresholds and climate sensitivity to CO2 are therefore strongly conditioned by the reliability of CO2 proxy reconstructions. For the Miocene, these rely heavily on proxies using the carbon isotopic fractionation of marine phytoplankton during photosynthesis (ep). While recent records are beginning to reveal more clearly the long term CO2 trends since the middle Miocene , the absolute CO2 concentrations are subject to higher uncertainty. This in turn influences the ability of models to simulate dynamic Antarctic ice sheet behavior in the context of expected ice sheet hysteresis. In this contribution, I discuss a new approach for estimating CO2 from published and new measurements of phytoplankton carbon isotopic fractionation using the ACTI-CO cell model. This approach accounts for the physiological adaptations made by phytoplankton cells to avoid falling below optimal photosynthetic rates as CO2 declines, the carbon concentrating mechanism. The model yields CO2 estimates which can be significantly (up to 2-fold) higher than those estimated from classic equations. Given the large degree of cooling since the late Miocene in extratropical sea surface temperature records, such CO2 estimates are consistent with a more conservative estimate of climate sensitivity over the last 12 Ma.

  2. CO2 laser therapy of rhinophyma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigt, Peggy; Jovanovic, Sergije; Sedlmaier, Benedikt W.

    2000-06-01

    Laser treatment of skin changes has become common practice in recent years. High absorption of the CO2 laser wavelength in water is responsible for its low penetration dpt in biological tissue. Shortening the tissue exposure time minimizes thermic side effects of laser radiation such as carbonization and coagulation. This can be achieved with scanner systems that move the focused laser beam over a defined area by microprocessor-controlled rapidly rotating mirrors. This enables controlled and reliable removal of certain dermal lesions, particularly hypertrophic scars, scars after common acne, wrinkles and rhinophyma. Laser ablation of rhinophyma is a stress-minimizing procedure for the surgeon and the patient, since it is nearly bloodless and can be performed under local anaesthesia. Cosmetically favorable reepithelization of the lasered surfaces is achieved within a very short period of time.

  3. CO2 interaction with geomaterials.

    SciTech Connect

    Guthrie, George D.; Al-Saidi, Wissam A.; Jordan, Kenneth D.; Voora, Vamsee, K.; Romanov, Vyacheslav N.; Lopano, Christina L; Myshakin, Eugene M.; Hur, Tae Bong; Warzinski, Robert P.; Lynn, Ronald J.; Howard, Bret H.; Cygan, Randall Timothy

    2010-09-01

    This work compares the sorption and swelling processes associated with CO2-coal and CO2-clay interactions. We investigated the mechanisms of interaction related to CO2 adsortion in micropores, intercalation into sub-micropores, dissolution in solid matrix, the role of water, and the associated changes in reservoir permeability, for applications in CO2 sequestration and enhanced coal bed methane recovery. The structural changes caused by CO2 have been investigated. A high-pressure micro-dilatometer was equipped to investigate the effect of CO2 pressure on the thermoplastic properties of coal. Using an identical dilatometer, Rashid Khan (1985) performed experiments with CO2 that revealed a dramatic reduction in the softening temperature of coal when exposed to high-pressure CO2. A set of experiments was designed for -20+45-mesh samples of Argonne Premium Pocahontas No.3 coal, which is similar in proximate and ultimate analysis to the Lower Kittanning seam coal that Khan used in his experiments. No dramatic decrease in coal softening temperature has been observed in high-pressure CO2 that would corroborate the prior work of Khan. Thus, conventional polymer (or 'geopolymer') theories may not be directly applicable to CO2 interaction with coals. Clays are similar to coals in that they represent abundant geomaterials with well-developed microporous structure. We evaluated the CO2 sequestration potential of clays relative to coals and investigated the factors that affect the sorption capacity, rates, and permanence of CO2 trapping. For the geomaterials comparison studies, we used source clay samples from The Clay Minerals Society. Preliminary results showed that expandable clays have CO2 sorption capacities comparable to those of coal. We analyzed sorption isotherms, XRD, DRIFTS (infrared reflectance spectra at non-ambient conditions), and TGA-MS (thermal gravimetric analysis) data to compare the effects of various factors on CO2 trapping. In montmorillonite, CO2

  4. Ablative non-fractional lasers for atrophic facial acne scars: a new modality of erbium:YAG laser resurfacing in Asians.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Ju; Kang, Jin Moon; Chung, Won Soon; Kim, Young Koo; Kim, Hei Sung

    2014-03-01

    Atrophic facial scars which commonly occur after inflammatory acne vulgaris can be extremely disturbing to patients both physically and psychologically. Treatment with fractional laser devices has become increasingly popular, but there has been disappointment in terms of effectiveness. The objective of this study was to assess the safety and efficacy of ablative full-face resurfacing on atrophic acne scars in the Korean population. A total of 22 patients, aged 25-44 years, underwent a new modality of resurfacing combining both short-pulsed and dual-mode erbium:yttrium-aluminum garnet (Er:YAG) laser. The patients had Fitzpatrick skin types ranging from III to V. Photographs were taken before and up to 6 months after treatment. Results were evaluated for the degree of clinical improvement and any adverse events. Degree of improvement was graded using a four-point scale: poor (1) = <25%, fair (2) = 25-50%, good (3) = 51-75%, and excellent (4) = >75%. Based on the blinded photo assessments by two independent reviewers, clinically and statistically significant mean improvement of 3.41 was observed (one-sample Wilcoxon signed rank test, P < 0.001). Complete wound healing occurred between 6 and 9 days. Erythema occurred in all patients and lasted longer than 3 months in two patients (9.1%). Postinflammatory hyperpigmentation occurred in ten patients (45.5%) and lasted longer than 3 months in one patient (4.5%). One patient experienced mild hypopigmentation (4.5%). Mild to moderate acne flare-up occurred in five patients (22.7%). No other adverse effects were observed. A new modality of Er:YAG laser resurfacing combining short-pulsed and dual-mode Er:YAG laser is a safe and very effective treatment modality for atrophic facial acne scars in Asians with darker skin tones.

  5. CO2 laser milling of hard tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Martin; Ivanenko, Mikhail; Harbecke, Daniela; Klasing, Manfred; Steigerwald, Hendrik; Hering, Peter

    2007-02-01

    Drilling of bone and tooth tissue belongs to recurrent medical procedures (screw- and pin-bores, bores for implant inserting, trepanation etc.). Small round bores can be in general quickly produced with mechanical drills. Problems arise however by angled drilling, by the necessity to fulfill the drilling without damaging of sensitive soft tissue beneath the bone, or by the attempt to mill precisely noncircular small cavities. We present investigations on laser hard tissue "milling", which can be advantageous for solving these problems. The "milling" is done with a CO2 laser (10.6 μm) with pulse duration of 50 - 100 μs, combined with a PC-controlled galvanic beam scanner and with a fine water-spray, which helps to avoid thermal side-effects. The damaging of underlying soft tissue can be prevented through control of the optical or acoustical ablation signal. The ablation of hard tissue is accompanied with a strong glowing, which is absent during the laser beam action on soft tissue. The acoustic signals from the diverse tissue types exhibit distinct differences in the spectral composition. Also computer image analysis could be a useful tool to control the operation. Laser "milling" of noncircular cavities with 1 - 4 mm width and about 10 mm depth is particularly interesting for dental implantology. In ex-vivo investigations we found conditions for fast laser "milling" of the cavities without thermal damage and with minimal tapering. It included exploration of different filling patterns (concentric rings, crosshatch, parallel lines and their combinations), definition of maximal pulse duration, repetition rate and laser power, optimal position of the spray. The optimized results give evidences for the applicability of the CO2 laser for biologically tolerable "milling" of deep cavities in the hard tissue.

  6. [The CO2 laser in dermatotherapy--use and indications].

    PubMed

    Landthaler, M; Haina, D; Hohenleutner, U; Seipp, W; Waidelich, W; Braun-Falco, O

    1988-04-01

    Due to the high absorption of infrared light in water the CO2 laser (lambda = 10,600 nm) is suitable for cutting and vaporizing tissue. The ablation of pathological tissue by means of the CO2 laser can be exactly controlled. The treated area is usually dry and clear since blood and lymph vessels up to a diameter of 1 mm are sealed. Postoperative swelling and pain are reduced compared with electrosurgery. Important and frequent indications for CO2 laser application are HPV papillomas (condylomata acuminata, common warts, bowenoid papules) and the removal of tattoos. The CO2 laser is also suitable for the removal of benign and disseminated lesions such as angiofibromas, syringomas, trichoepitheliomas, epidermal nevi etc. Lesions of the oral mucosa (leukoplakias, mucosal warts) can be removed by means of the CO2 laser. Additionally, the treatment of vascular lesions (nevi flammei, lymphangiomas, telangiectasias) has been described, although the CO2 laser does not operate in a vessel-specific manner. As this review article demonstrates, the CO2 laser has a broad range of applications and represents an enrichment of dermatotherapy. PMID:3290162

  7. Convergent Cenozoic CO2 history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royer, D. L.; Beerling, D. J.

    2011-12-01

    The quality and quantity of Cenozoic CO2 records have increased significantly in the last decade. Gains in quality have come primarily from a fuller accounting of confounding factors; examples include soil respiration rates in the pedogenic carbonate method, alkalinity and seawater δ11B in the boron method, and cell size in the alkenone phytoplankton method. Previously, variability across Cenozoic CO2 estimates in a given time period sometimes exceeded an order of magnitude, but through these improvements variability has been reduced to a factor of two or less. Further improvements in the record can probably be facilitated by more robust quantification of statistical error, generation of CO2 estimates at single locations from multiple methods, and cross-calibration with Pleistocene ice-core CO2 records (Beerling & Royer, 2011, Nature Geoscience 4: 418-420). An improved Cenozoic CO2 record offers opportunities for better understanding Earth system processes. We provide one example related to climate sensitivity. We find a significant relationship between CO2 radiative forcing and global temperature during the Cenozoic, even after accounting for forcings related to solar evolution and paleogeographic changes. Although the calculations are based on simple assumptions and should be taken as provisional, the mean Cenozoic climate sensitivity (3 °C or higher per CO2 doubling) is similar to or higher than calculations for the present-day (~3 °C per CO2 doubling).

  8. Leaves: Elevated CO2 levels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Burning fossil fuels and land use changes such as deforestation and urbanization have led to a dramatic rise in the concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere since the onset of the Industrial Revolution. The highly dilute CO2 from the atmosphere enters plant leaves where it is concentr...

  9. CO2 Sequestration short course

    SciTech Connect

    DePaolo, Donald J.; Cole, David R; Navrotsky, Alexandra; Bourg, Ian C

    2014-12-08

    Given the public’s interest and concern over the impact of atmospheric greenhouse gases (GHGs) on global warming and related climate change patterns, the course is a timely discussion of the underlying geochemical and mineralogical processes associated with gas-water-mineral-interactions encountered during geological sequestration of CO2. The geochemical and mineralogical processes encountered in the subsurface during storage of CO2 will play an important role in facilitating the isolation of anthropogenic CO2 in the subsurface for thousands of years, thus moderating rapid increases in concentrations of atmospheric CO2 and mitigating global warming. Successful implementation of a variety of geological sequestration scenarios will be dependent on our ability to accurately predict, monitor and verify the behavior of CO2 in the subsurface. The course was proposed to and accepted by the Mineralogical Society of America (MSA) and The Geochemical Society (GS).

  10. Isotopic disequilibrium during uptake of atmospheric CO2 into mine process waters: implications for CO2 sequestration.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Siobhan A; Barker, Shaun L L; Dipple, Gregory M; Atudorei, Viorel

    2010-12-15

    Dypingite, a hydrated Mg-carbonate mineral, was precipitated from high-pH, high salinity solutions to investigate controls on carbon fixation and to identify the isotopic characteristics of mineral sequestration in mine tailings. δ(13)C values of dissolved inorganic carbon content and synthetic dypingite are significantly more negative than those predicted for equilibrium exchange of CO(2) gas between the atmosphere and solution. The measured δ(13)C of aqueous carbonate species is consistent with a kinetic fractionation that results from a slow diffusion of atmospheric CO(2) into solution. During dypingite precipitation, dissolved inorganic carbon concentrations decrease and δ(13)C values become more negative, indicating that the rate of CO(2) uptake into solution was outpaced by the rate of carbon fixation within the precipitate. This implies that CO(2) gas uptake is rate-limiting to CO(2) fixation. δ(13)C of carbonate mineral precipitates in mine tailings and of DIC in mine process waters display similar (13)C-depletions that are inconsistent with equilibrium fractionation. Thus, the rate of carbon fixation in mine tailings may also be limited by supply of CO(2). Carbon sequestration could be accelerated by increasing the partial pressure of CO(2) in tailings ponds or by using chemicals that enhance the uptake of gaseous CO(2) into aqueous solution.

  11. Holiday CO2: Inference from the Salt Lake City data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryoo, J.; Fung, I. Y.; Ehleringer, J. R.; Stephens, B. B.

    2013-12-01

    A network of high-frequency CO2 sensors has been established in Salt Lake City (SLC), Utah (http://co2.utah.edu/), and the annual/monthly pattern of CO2 variability is consistent with a priori estimates of CO2 fluxes (McKain et al., 2012). Here we ask if short-term changes in anthropogenic sources can be detected, and present a case study of Thanksgiving holiday, when traffic and energy use patterns are expected to be different from that during the rest of the month. CO2 mole fraction is much higher during the Thanksgiving holidays than the other days in November 2008 for all 5 sites in SLC, and a similar pattern is found in other years. Taking into account that the wind speed is relatively low in downtown SLC compared to the other SLC sites, the downtown site is further investigated to minimize the meteorological influence on CO2. In order to understand the relative contributions to the high level of CO2 during the Thanksgiving holidays, we carried out a multiple linear regression (MLR) analysis of the rate of CO2 change against various sources. Mobile CO2 sources are assumed to be proportional to local traffic data and residential CO2 sources are assumed to depend exponentially on temperature. Vulcan data were used to specify the other anthropogenic sources (commercial, industrial, nonroad, electricity, aircraft, and cement). The MLR analysis shows that during the Thanksgiving holidays CO2 contributions from residential and commercial CO2 are larger than that during the rest of November, and mobile sources represent only a relatively small contribution. The study demonstrates the feasibility of detecting changes in urban source contributions using high-frequency measurements in combination with daily PBL height and local traffic volume data.

  12. Responses of Arabidopsis and wheat to rising CO2 depend on nitrogen source and nighttime CO2 levels.

    PubMed

    Asensio, Jose Salvador Rubio; Rachmilevitch, Shimon; Bloom, Arnold J

    2015-05-01

    A major contributor to the global carbon cycle is plant respiration. Elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations may either accelerate or decelerate plant respiration for reasons that have been uncertain. We recently established that elevated CO2 during the daytime decreases plant mitochondrial respiration in the light and protein concentration because CO2 slows the daytime conversion of nitrate (NO3 (-)) into protein. This derives in part from the inhibitory effect of CO2 on photorespiration and the dependence of shoot NO3 (-) assimilation on photorespiration. Elevated CO2 also inhibits the translocation of nitrite into the chloroplast, a response that influences shoot NO3 (-) assimilation during both day and night. Here, we exposed Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and wheat (Triticum aestivum) plants to daytime or nighttime elevated CO2 and supplied them with NO3 (-) or ammonium as a sole nitrogen (N) source. Six independent measures (plant biomass, shoot NO3 (-), shoot organic N, (15)N isotope fractionation, (15)NO3 (-) assimilation, and the ratio of shoot CO2 evolution to O2 consumption) indicated that elevated CO2 at night slowed NO3 (-) assimilation and thus decreased dark respiration in the plants reliant on NO3 (-). These results provide a straightforward explanation for the diverse responses of plants to elevated CO2 at night and suggest that soil N source will have an increasing influence on the capacity of plants to mitigate human greenhouse gas emissions. PMID:25755253

  13. Responses of Arabidopsis and Wheat to Rising CO2 Depend on Nitrogen Source and Nighttime CO2 Levels1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Rachmilevitch, Shimon

    2015-01-01

    A major contributor to the global carbon cycle is plant respiration. Elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations may either accelerate or decelerate plant respiration for reasons that have been uncertain. We recently established that elevated CO2 during the daytime decreases plant mitochondrial respiration in the light and protein concentration because CO2 slows the daytime conversion of nitrate (NO3−) into protein. This derives in part from the inhibitory effect of CO2 on photorespiration and the dependence of shoot NO3− assimilation on photorespiration. Elevated CO2 also inhibits the translocation of nitrite into the chloroplast, a response that influences shoot NO3− assimilation during both day and night. Here, we exposed Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and wheat (Triticum aestivum) plants to daytime or nighttime elevated CO2 and supplied them with NO3− or ammonium as a sole nitrogen (N) source. Six independent measures (plant biomass, shoot NO3−, shoot organic N, 15N isotope fractionation, 15NO3− assimilation, and the ratio of shoot CO2 evolution to O2 consumption) indicated that elevated CO2 at night slowed NO3− assimilation and thus decreased dark respiration in the plants reliant on NO3−. These results provide a straightforward explanation for the diverse responses of plants to elevated CO2 at night and suggest that soil N source will have an increasing influence on the capacity of plants to mitigate human greenhouse gas emissions. PMID:25755253

  14. Online CO2 and H2 O oxygen isotope fractionation allows estimation of mesophyll conductance in C4 plants, and reveals that mesophyll conductance decreases as leaves age in both C4 and C3 plants.

    PubMed

    Barbour, Margaret M; Evans, John R; Simonin, Kevin A; von Caemmerer, Susanne

    2016-05-01

    Mesophyll conductance significantly, and variably, limits photosynthesis but we currently have no reliable method of measurement for C4 plants. An online oxygen isotope technique was developed to allow quantification of mesophyll conductance in C4 plants and to provide an alternative estimate in C3 plants. The technique is compared to an established carbon isotope method in three C3 species. Mesophyll conductance of C4 species was similar to that in the C3 species measured, and declined in both C4 and C3 species as leaves aged from fully expanded to senescing. In cotton leaves, simultaneous measurement of carbon and oxygen isotope discrimination allowed the partitioning of total conductance to the chloroplasts into cell wall and plasma membrane versus chloroplast membrane components, if CO2 was assumed to be isotopically equilibrated with cytosolic water, and the partitioning remained stable with leaf age. The oxygen isotope technique allowed estimation of mesophyll conductance in C4 plants and, when combined with well-established carbon isotope techniques, may provide additional information on mesophyll conductance in C3 plants.

  15. What are the costs of limiting CO2 concentrations?

    SciTech Connect

    Edmonds, James A.; Sands, Ronald D.

    2003-01-01

    The problem of stabilizing the concentration of CO2 is fundamentally different than the problem of stabilizing the concentration of a conventional pollutant or even other non-CO2 greenhouse gases. A fraction of any net anthropogenic emission is permanently committed to the atmosphere and in the very long term net anthropogenic emissions must cease if atmospheric CO2 concentrations are to be stabilized. Many of the technologies that could play a large future role in limiting cumulative carbon emissions are minor elements in the present energy system. A portfolio of technologies will be needed to address the variety of technology needs across the world's regions and over time.

  16. CO2 Sequestration Crosswell Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morency, C.; Luo, Y.; Tromp, J.

    2010-12-01

    Geologic sequestration of CO2, a green house gas, represents an effort to reduce the large amount of CO2 generated as a by-product of fossil fuels combustion and emitted into the atmosphere. This process of sequestration involves CO2 storage deep underground into highly permeable porous media sealed by caprock. "4D seismics" is a natural non-intrusive monitoring technique which involves 3D time-lapse seismic surveys. The success of monitoring CO2 movement relies upon a proper description of the physics of the problem. We realize time-lapse migrations comparing acoustic, elastic (with or without Gassmann's formulae), and poroelastic simulations of 4D seismic imaging. This approach highlights the influence of using different physical theories on interpreting seismic data, and, more importantly, on extracting the CO2 signature from the seismic wave field. We investigate various types of inversions using (1) P-wave traveltimes, (2) P- & S-wave traveltimes and (3) P- & S-wave traveltimes and amplitudes. Simulations are performed using a spectral-element method, and finite-frequency sensitivity kernels, used in the non-linear iterative inversions, are calculated based on an adjoint method. Biot's equations are implemented in the forward and adjoint simulations to account for poroelastic effects.

  17. ACCURACY OF CO2 SENSORS

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, William J.; Faulkner, David; Sullivan, Douglas P.

    2008-10-01

    Are the carbon dioxide (CO2) sensors in your demand controlled ventilation systems sufficiently accurate? The data from these sensors are used to automatically modulate minimum rates of outdoor air ventilation. The goal is to keep ventilation rates at or above design requirements while adjusting the ventilation rate with changes in occupancy in order to save energy. Studies of energy savings from demand controlled ventilation and of the relationship of indoor CO2 concentrations with health and work performance provide a strong rationale for use of indoor CO2 data to control minimum ventilation rates1-7. However, this strategy will only be effective if, in practice, the CO2 sensors have a reasonable accuracy. The objective of this study was; therefore, to determine if CO2 sensor performance, in practice, is generally acceptable or problematic. This article provides a summary of study methods and findings ? additional details are available in a paper in the proceedings of the ASHRAE IAQ?2007 Conference8.

  18. Update on CO2 emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Friedingstein, P.; Houghton, R.A.; Marland, Gregg; Hackler, J.; Boden, Thomas A; Conway, T.J.; Canadell, J.G.; Raupach, Mike; Ciais, Philippe; Le Quere, Corrine

    2010-12-01

    Emissions of CO2 are the main contributor to anthropogenic climate change. Here we present updated information on their present and near-future estimates. We calculate that global CO2 emissions from fossil fuel burning decreased by 1.3% in 2009 owing to the global financial and economic crisis that started in 2008; this is half the decrease anticipated a year ago1. If economic growth proceeds as expected2, emissions are projected to increase by more than 3% in 2010, approaching the high emissions growth rates that were observed from 2000 to 20081, 3, 4. We estimate that recent CO2 emissions from deforestation and other land-use changes (LUCs) have declined compared with the 1990s, primarily because of reduced rates of deforestation in the tropics5 and a smaller contribution owing to forest regrowth elsewhere.

  19. The CO2nnect activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eugenia, Marcu

    2014-05-01

    Climate change is one of the biggest challenges we face today. A first step is the understanding the problem, more exactly what is the challenge and the differences people can make. Pupils need a wide competencies to meet the challenges of sustainable development - including climate change. The CO2nnect activities are designed to support learning which can provide pupils the abilities, skills, attitudes and awareness as well as knowledge and understanding of the issues. The project "Together for a clean and healthy world" is part of "The Global Educational Campaign CO2nnect- CO2 on the way to school" and it was held in our school in the period between February and October 2009. It contained a variety of curricular and extra-curricular activities, adapted to students aged from 11 to 15. These activities aimed to develop in students the necessary skills to understanding man's active role in improving the quality of the environment, putting an end to its degrading process and to reducing the effects of climate changes caused by the human intervention in nature, including transport- a source of CO2 pollution. The activity which I propose can be easily adapted to a wide range of age groups and linked to the curricula of many subjects: - Investigate CO2 emissions from travel to school -Share the findings using an international database -Compare and discuss CO2 emissions -Submit questions to a climate- and transport expert -Partner with other schools -Meet with people in your community to discuss emissions from transport Intended learning outcomes for pupils who participate in the CO2nnect campaign are: Understanding of the interconnected mobility- and climate change issue climate change, its causes and consequences greenhouse-gas emissions from transport and mobility the interlinking of social, environmental, cultural and economic aspects of the local transport system how individual choices and participation can contribute to creating a more sustainable development

  20. CO2 Flux Estimation Errors Associated with Moist Atmospheric Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parazoo, N. C.; Denning, A. S.; Kawa, S. R.; Pawson, S.; Lokupitiya, R.

    2012-01-01

    Vertical transport by moist sub-grid scale processes such as deep convection is a well-known source of uncertainty in CO2 source/sink inversion. However, a dynamical link between vertical transport, satellite based retrievals of column mole fractions of CO2, and source/sink inversion has not yet been established. By using the same offline transport model with meteorological fields from slightly different data assimilation systems, we examine sensitivity of frontal CO2 transport and retrieved fluxes to different parameterizations of sub-grid vertical transport. We find that frontal transport feeds off background vertical CO2 gradients, which are modulated by sub-grid vertical transport. The implication for source/sink estimation is two-fold. First, CO2 variations contained in moist poleward moving air masses are systematically different from variations in dry equatorward moving air. Moist poleward transport is hidden from orbital sensors on satellites, causing a sampling bias, which leads directly to small but systematic flux retrieval errors in northern mid-latitudes. Second, differences in the representation of moist sub-grid vertical transport in GEOS-4 and GEOS-5 meteorological fields cause differences in vertical gradients of CO2, which leads to systematic differences in moist poleward and dry equatorward CO2 transport and therefore the fraction of CO2 variations hidden in moist air from satellites. As a result, sampling biases are amplified and regional scale flux errors enhanced, most notably in Europe (0.43+/-0.35 PgC /yr). These results, cast from the perspective of moist frontal transport processes, support previous arguments that the vertical gradient of CO2 is a major source of uncertainty in source/sink inversion.

  1. Reducing cement's CO2 footprint

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    van Oss, Hendrik G.

    2011-01-01

    The manufacturing process for Portland cement causes high levels of greenhouse gas emissions. However, environmental impacts can be reduced by using more energy-efficient kilns and replacing fossil energy with alternative fuels. Although carbon capture and new cements with less CO2 emission are still in the experimental phase, all these innovations can help develop a cleaner cement industry.

  2. Excitation of CO2/+/ by electron impact on CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mentall, J. E.; Coplan, M. A.; Kushlis, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    Consideration of a discrepancy concerning the correct value of the cross section for excitation of the CO2(+) B state by electron impact on CO2. It is suggested that the reason for the disparate results obtained by various authors for the B state can be traced to a calibration error due to scattered light. In particular, the tungsten filament lamps used in the experiments cited have very low intensity at wavelengths below 3000 A where the B state emissions occur, so that even a small amount of scattered light in the spectrometer will produce a large error in the measured cross section. In a remeasurement of the cross section for excitation of the B state at an energy of 150 eV it was found that at 2900 A the scattered light signal, if uncorrected for, would introduce an error of about 50%.

  3. Current hot potatoes in atrial fibrillation ablation.

    PubMed

    Roten, Laurent; Derval, Nicolas; Pascale, Patrizio; Scherr, Daniel; Komatsu, Yuki; Shah, Ashok; Ramoul, Khaled; Denis, Arnaud; Sacher, Frédéric; Hocini, Mélèze; Haïssaguerre, Michel; Jaïs, Pierre

    2012-11-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation has evolved to the treatment of choice for patients with drug-resistant and symptomatic AF. Pulmonary vein isolation at the ostial or antral level usually is sufficient for treatment of true paroxysmal AF. For persistent AF ablation, drivers and perpetuators outside of the pulmonary veins are responsible for AF maintenance and have to be targeted to achieve satisfying arrhythmia-free success rate. Both complex fractionated atrial electrogram (CFAE) ablation and linear ablation are added to pulmonary vein isolation for persistent AF ablation. Nevertheless, ablation failure and necessity of repeat ablations are still frequent, especially after persistent AF ablation. Pulmonary vein reconduction is the main reason for arrhythmia recurrence after paroxysmal and to a lesser extent after persistent AF ablation. Failure of persistent AF ablation mostly is a consequence of inadequate trigger ablation, substrate modification or incompletely ablated or reconducting linear lesions. In this review we will discuss these points responsible for AF recurrence after ablation and review current possibilities on how to overcome these limitations. PMID:22920482

  4. Alteration of bentonite when contacted with supercritical CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jinseok, K.; Jo, H. Y.; Yun, S. T.

    2014-12-01

    Deep saline formations overlaid by impermeable caprocks with a high sealing capacity are attractive CO2 storage reservoirs. Shales, which consist of mainly clay minerals, are potential caprocks for the CO2 storage reservoirs. The properties of clay minerals in shales may affect the sealing capacity of shales. In this study, changes in clay minerals' properties when contacted with supercritical (SC) CO2 at various conditions were investigated. Bentonite, whichis composed of primarily montmorillonite, was used as the clay material in this study. Batch reactor tests on wet bentonite samples in the presence of SC CO2 with or without aqueous phases were conducted at high pressure (12 MPa) and moderate temperature (50 oC) conditions for a week. Results show that the bentonite samples obtained from the tests with SC CO2 had less change in porosity than those obtained from the tests without SC CO2 (vacuum-drying) at a given reaction time, indicating that the bentonite samples dried in the presence of SC CO2 maintained their structure. These results suggest that CO2 molecules can diffuse into interlayer of montmorillonite, which is a primary mineral of bentonite, and form a single CO2 molecule layer or double CO2 molecule layers. The CO2 molecules can displace water molecules in the interlayer, resulting in maintaining the interlayer spacing when dehydration occurs. Noticeable changes in reacted bentonite samples obtained from the tests with an aqueous phase (NaCl, CaCl2, or sea water) are decreases in the fraction of plagioclase and pyrite and formation of carbonate minerals (i.e., calcite and dolomite) and halite. In addition, no significant exchanges of Na or Ca on the exchangeable complex of the montmorillonite in the presence of SC CO2 occurred, resulting in no significant changes in the swelling capacity of bentonite samples after reacting with SC CO2 in the presence of aqueous phases. These results might be attributed by the CO2 molecule layer, which prevents

  5. The Nanoscale Basis of CO2 Trapping for Geologic Storage.

    PubMed

    Bourg, Ian C; Beckingham, Lauren E; DePaolo, Donald J

    2015-09-01

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is likely to be a critical technology to achieve large reductions in global carbon emissions over the next century. Research on the subsurface storage of CO2 is aimed at reducing uncertainties in the efficacy of CO2 storage in sedimentary rock formations. Three key parameters that have a nanoscale basis and that contribute uncertainty to predictions of CO2 trapping are the vertical permeability kv of seals, the residual CO2 saturation Sg,r in reservoir rocks, and the reactive surface area ar of silicate minerals. This review summarizes recent progress and identifies outstanding research needs in these areas. Available data suggest that the permeability of shale and mudstone seals is heavily dependent on clay fraction and can be extremely low even in the presence of fractures. Investigations of residual CO2 trapping indicate that CO2-induced alteration in the wettability of mineral surfaces may significantly influence Sg,r. Ultimately, the rate and extent of CO2 conversion to mineral phases are uncertain due to a poor understanding of the kinetics of slow reactions between minerals and fluids. Rapidly improving characterization techniques using X-rays and neutrons, and computing capability for simulating chemical interactions, provide promise for important advances.

  6. The Nanoscale Basis of CO2 Trapping for Geologic Storage.

    PubMed

    Bourg, Ian C; Beckingham, Lauren E; DePaolo, Donald J

    2015-09-01

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is likely to be a critical technology to achieve large reductions in global carbon emissions over the next century. Research on the subsurface storage of CO2 is aimed at reducing uncertainties in the efficacy of CO2 storage in sedimentary rock formations. Three key parameters that have a nanoscale basis and that contribute uncertainty to predictions of CO2 trapping are the vertical permeability kv of seals, the residual CO2 saturation Sg,r in reservoir rocks, and the reactive surface area ar of silicate minerals. This review summarizes recent progress and identifies outstanding research needs in these areas. Available data suggest that the permeability of shale and mudstone seals is heavily dependent on clay fraction and can be extremely low even in the presence of fractures. Investigations of residual CO2 trapping indicate that CO2-induced alteration in the wettability of mineral surfaces may significantly influence Sg,r. Ultimately, the rate and extent of CO2 conversion to mineral phases are uncertain due to a poor understanding of the kinetics of slow reactions between minerals and fluids. Rapidly improving characterization techniques using X-rays and neutrons, and computing capability for simulating chemical interactions, provide promise for important advances. PMID:26266820

  7. Spectroscopy Study of Ar + CO2 Plasmas in ASTRAL.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz, Jorge; Boivin, Robert; Kamar, Ola; Loch, Stuart; Ballance, Connor

    2006-10-01

    A spectroscopy study of the ASTRAL (Auburn Steady sTate Research fAciLity) helicon plasma source running Ar + CO2 gas mix is presented. ASTRAL produces Ar plasmas: ne = 10^10 to 10^13 cm-3, Te = 2 to 10 eV and Ti = 0.03 to 0.5 eV. A series of 7 large coils produce an axial magnetic field up to 1.3 kGauss. A fractional helix antenna is used to introduce rf power up to 2 kWatt. A spectrometer which features a 0.33 m Criss-Cross monochromator and a CCD camera is used for this study. Very different plasmas are produced following the relative importance of CO2 in the gas mixture. At low CO2 concentration, the plasmas are similar to those obtained with pure Ar with weak CO2, CO2^+, CO and CO^+ bands. The usual blue plasma core associated with intense Ar II transitions is observed with however a significant white glow coming from the outer plasma regions. At higher CO2 concentration, the plasma becomes essentially molecular and can be described as an intense white plasma column. Molecular dissociative processes associated with the production of strong C and O atomic lines are observed under specific plasma conditions. The atomic spectral lines are compared with ADAS modeling results. This study indicates the possible advantages of using a helicon source to control the CO2 plasma chemistry for industrial applications.

  8. Multiscale observations of CO2, 13CO2, and pollutants at Four Corners for emission verification and attribution.

    PubMed

    Lindenmaier, Rodica; Dubey, Manvendra K; Henderson, Bradley G; Butterfield, Zachary T; Herman, Jay R; Rahn, Thom; Lee, Sang-Hyun

    2014-06-10

    There is a pressing need to verify air pollutant and greenhouse gas emissions from anthropogenic fossil energy sources to enforce current and future regulations. We demonstrate the feasibility of using simultaneous remote sensing observations of column abundances of CO2, CO, and NO2 to inform and verify emission inventories. We report, to our knowledge, the first ever simultaneous column enhancements in CO2 (3-10 ppm) and NO2 (1-3 Dobson Units), and evidence of δ(13)CO2 depletion in an urban region with two large coal-fired power plants with distinct scrubbing technologies that have resulted in ∆NOx/∆CO2 emission ratios that differ by a factor of two. Ground-based total atmospheric column trace gas abundances change synchronously and correlate well with simultaneous in situ point measurements during plume interceptions. Emission ratios of ∆NOx/∆CO2 and ∆SO2/∆CO2 derived from in situ atmospheric observations agree with those reported by in-stack monitors. Forward simulations using in-stack emissions agree with remote column CO2 and NO2 plume observations after fine scale adjustments. Both observed and simulated column ∆NO2/∆CO2 ratios indicate that a large fraction (70-75%) of the region is polluted. We demonstrate that the column emission ratios of ∆NO2/∆CO2 can resolve changes from day-to-day variation in sources with distinct emission factors (clean and dirty power plants, urban, and fires). We apportion these sources by using NO2, SO2, and CO as signatures. Our high-frequency remote sensing observations of CO2 and coemitted pollutants offer promise for the verification of power plant emission factors and abatement technologies from ground and space.

  9. Multiscale observations of CO2, 13CO2, and pollutants at Four Corners for emission verification and attribution.

    PubMed

    Lindenmaier, Rodica; Dubey, Manvendra K; Henderson, Bradley G; Butterfield, Zachary T; Herman, Jay R; Rahn, Thom; Lee, Sang-Hyun

    2014-06-10

    There is a pressing need to verify air pollutant and greenhouse gas emissions from anthropogenic fossil energy sources to enforce current and future regulations. We demonstrate the feasibility of using simultaneous remote sensing observations of column abundances of CO2, CO, and NO2 to inform and verify emission inventories. We report, to our knowledge, the first ever simultaneous column enhancements in CO2 (3-10 ppm) and NO2 (1-3 Dobson Units), and evidence of δ(13)CO2 depletion in an urban region with two large coal-fired power plants with distinct scrubbing technologies that have resulted in ∆NOx/∆CO2 emission ratios that differ by a factor of two. Ground-based total atmospheric column trace gas abundances change synchronously and correlate well with simultaneous in situ point measurements during plume interceptions. Emission ratios of ∆NOx/∆CO2 and ∆SO2/∆CO2 derived from in situ atmospheric observations agree with those reported by in-stack monitors. Forward simulations using in-stack emissions agree with remote column CO2 and NO2 plume observations after fine scale adjustments. Both observed and simulated column ∆NO2/∆CO2 ratios indicate that a large fraction (70-75%) of the region is polluted. We demonstrate that the column emission ratios of ∆NO2/∆CO2 can resolve changes from day-to-day variation in sources with distinct emission factors (clean and dirty power plants, urban, and fires). We apportion these sources by using NO2, SO2, and CO as signatures. Our high-frequency remote sensing observations of CO2 and coemitted pollutants offer promise for the verification of power plant emission factors and abatement technologies from ground and space. PMID:24843169

  10. Reaction of CO2 and Carbonate Mineral in Seawater for Mitigation of CO2 and Ocean Acidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rau, G. H.

    2010-12-01

    A lab-scale seawater/mineral carbonate gas scrubber was found to remove up to 97% of CO2 in a simulated flue gas stream at ambient temperature and pressure, with a large fraction of this carbon ultimately converted to dissolved calcium bicarbonate. Contrary to predictions based on classical carbonate chemistry, up to 85% of the captured carbon was retained in solution, i.e., it did not degas or precipitate, even after full equilibration with air. This is because abiotic precipitation of CaCO3 from seawater is chemically inhibited up to dissolved concentrations approaching 20X supersaturation. Thus, above-ground CO2 hydration with seawater, reaction with mineral carbonate, and conversion to dissolved Ca(HCO3)2 may provide a relatively simple point-source CO2 capture and storage scheme at coastal locations. This approach is analogous to wet limestone scrubbing of flue gas that is commonly used for SO2 removal. Such low-tech CO2 mitigation could be especially relevant for retrofitting to existing coastal power plants and for deployment in the developing world, the primary source of future CO2 emissions. An electrochemically powered version of the preceding has been demonstrated for air capture of CO2. In any case, the addition of the resulting alkaline solution to the ocean would benefit marine ecosystems that are currently challenged by acidification. This is indicated by the widespread use of miniature CO2/carbonate mineral/seawater reactors in saltwater aquaria to generate alkalinity for preserving or enhancing coral and shellfish growth. Large-scale applications would thus allow use of the planet’s largest saline reservoir, the ocean, to safely and effectively store anthropogenic carbon in a form other than molecular CO2 or carbonic acid. This approach in essence hastens Nature's own very effective but slow CO2 mitigation process; carbonate mineral weathering is a major consumer of excess atmospheric CO2 and ocean acidity on geologic times scales.

  11. CO2 Acquisition Membrane (CAM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Larry W.; Way, J. Douglas; Vlasse, Marcus

    2003-01-01

    The objective of CAM is to develop, test, and analyze thin film membrane materials for separation and purification of carbon dioxide (CO2) from mixtures of gases, such as those found in the Martian atmosphere. The membranes are targeted toward In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) applications that will operate in extraterrestrial environments and support future unmanned and human space missions. A primary application is the Sabatier Electrolysis process that uses Mars atmosphere CO2 as raw material for producing water, oxygen, and methane for rocket fuel and habitat support. Other applications include use as an inlet filter to collect and concentrate Mars atmospheric argon and nitrogen gases for habitat pressurization, and to remove CO2 from breathing gases in Closed Environment Life Support Systems (CELSS). CAM membrane materials include crystalline faujasite (FAU) zeolite and rubbery polymers such as silicone rubber (PDMS) that have been shown in the literature and via molecular simulation to favor adsorption and permeation of CO2 over nitrogen and argon. Pure gas permeation tests using commercial PDMS membranes have shown that both CO2 permeance and the separation factor relative to other gases increase as the temperature decreases, and low (Delta)P(Sub CO2) favors higher separation factors. The ideal CO2/N2 separation factor increases from 7.5 to 17.5 as temperature decreases from 22 C to -30 C. For gas mixtures containing CO2, N2, and Ar, plasticization decreased the separation factors from 4.5 to 6 over the same temperature range. We currently synthesize and test our own Na(+) FAU zeolite membranes using standard formulations and secondary growth methods on porous alumina. Preliminary tests with a Na(+) FAU membrane at 22 C show a He/SF6 ideal separation factor of 62, exceeding the Knudsen diffusion selectivity by an order of magnitude. This shows that the membrane is relatively free from large defects and associated non-selective (viscous flow) transport

  12. The transport of CO2 into central Texas caves (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breecker, D.; Banner, J. L.; Larson, T.

    2013-12-01

    It is well established that CO2 is flushed out of caves by seasonal or synoptic temperature- and barometric pressure-driven ventilation. The mechanism by which CO2 is transported into caves is not as well studied and must be understood in order to quantify carbon (C) cycling through caves, soils and epikarst. Transport mechanisms into caves include gas and aqueous phase (i.e. drip-water) transport. We interpret δ13C values of cave-air CO2 and O2/Ar ratios of cave-air in order to distinguish between these transport mechanisms in three central Texas caves. Gas phase transport might allow cave-air to be used as a simple proxy for otherwise largely inaccessible epikarst air. Drip-water transport might allow measurements of individual drips to be scaled up to cave-integrated assessment of water flux, calcite precipitation, and degassing-related isotope fractionation using measurements of cave-air CO2. We start by assuming gas phase transport and then evaluate the consistency of the results. We apply to cave-air CO2 the theory for steady state soil CO2 transport, which involves mixing with atmospheric air and isotope fractionation by diffusion. This allows calculation of the C isotope composition of the reduced C source for cave-air CO2 (δ13Cr). Calculated cave-air δ13Cr values are consistent with observed soil δ13Cr values. For instance, where trees are evenly distributed at the surface, cave-air δ13Cr values (-24‰) remained within 1‰ of tree-dominated soil δ13Cr values and were 3.5 to 4.5 ‰ lower than grass-dominated soil δ13Cr values, suggesting that trees are the dominant C source. This internally consistent explanation suggests that CO2 diffuses and/or advects into these caves as a gas because aqueous transport into caves would likely result in different cave-air and soil δ13Cr values, as described next. The magnitude of the CO2(g) -HCO3-(aq) carbon isotope per mil fractionation factor is -8.4 ‰ at 20.5°C, the mean Inner Space Cavern drip

  13. Hydrogen coupled CO2 fixation in legume cropping systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philpott, T.; Cen, Y.; Layzell, D. B.; Kyser, K.; Scott, N. A.

    2009-05-01

    Electron flow from oxidation of excess H2 released by root nodules was shown to contribute to microbial CO2 fixation in soybean crops. This discovery has important implications for carbon storage in soils used to grow legumes; however, further research is needed to understand the fate and turnover time of this H2-coupled CO2 fixation. Isotopic labeling of soil through incubation with 13CO2 was used to elucidate movement of sequestered carbon into soil carbon pools. Measurement of isotopic shifts was determined using Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry. Preliminary experiments have confirmed CO2 uptake through an isotopic shift (Δ13C -20.4 to -14.5 ‰) in 24 hour incubated soils labeled with 13CO2 (1% v/v, 99.5 Atom%) under elevated H2 concentration (6000 ppm). Other incubation experiments have confirmed the biotic nature of observed CO2 uptake by comparing isotopic shifts in oven dried and autoclaved soils to moist soil. Under an elevated H2 atmosphere, no significant isotopic shift was observed in dry and autoclaved soils whereas moist soil showed an isotopic shift of Δ13C -21.9 to 11.4 ‰ over 48 hours. Future experiments will involve longer incubations (7 days) and will be aimed at determining isotopic shifts within soil carbon pools. Samples will be incubated and fractionated into microbial biomass, light fraction carbon, and acid stable carbon and subsequent isotopic analysis will be carried out. This will help determine the distribution of H2- coupled fixed CO2 within soil carbon pools and the turnover time of sequestered carbon. This and further research may lead to modification of greenhouse gas coefficients for leguminous crops that includes a CO2 fixation component.

  14. Atmospheric observations of carbon monoxide and fossil fuel CO2 emissions from East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turnbull, Jocelyn C.; Tans, Pieter P.; Lehman, Scott J.; Baker, David; Conway, Thomas J.; Chung, Y. S.; Gregg, Jay; Miller, John B.; Southon, John R.; Zhou, Ling-Xi

    2011-12-01

    Flask samples from two sites in East Asia, Tae-Ahn Peninsula, Korea (TAP), and Shangdianzi, China (SDZ), were measured for trace gases including CO2, CO and fossil fuel CO2 (CO2ff, derived from Δ14CO2observations). The five-year TAP record shows high CO2ff when local air comes from the Korean Peninsula. Most samples, however, reflect air masses from Northeastern China with lower CO2ff. Our small set of SDZ samples from winter 2009/2010 have strongly elevated CO2ff. Biospheric CO2 contributes substantially to total CO2variability at both sites, even in winter when non-fossil CO2 sources (including photosynthesis, respiration, biomass burning and biofuel use) contribute 20-30% of the total CO2 enhancement. Carbon monoxide (CO) correlates strongly with CO2ff. The SDZ and TAP far-field (China influenced) samples have CO: CO2ff ratios (RCO:CO2ff) of 47 ± 2 and 44 ± 3 ppb/ppm respectively, consistent with recent bottom-up inventory estimates and other observational studies. Locally influenced TAP samples fall into two distinct data sets, ascribed to air sourced from South Korea and North Korea. The South Korea samples have low RCO:CO2ffof 13 ± 3 ppb/ppm, slightly higher than bottom-up inventories, but consistent with emission ratios for other developed nations. We compare our CO2ff observations with modeled CO2ff using the FLEXPART Lagrangian particle dispersion model convolved with a bottom-up CO2ff emission inventories. The modeled annual mean CO2ff mole fractions are consistent with our observations when the model inventory includes the reported 63% increase in Chinese emissions from 2004 to 2010, whereas a model version which holds Chinese emissions flat is unable to replicate the observations.

  15. Viscosity Measurements and Correlation of the Squalane + CO2 Mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomida, D.; Kumagai, A.; Yokoyama, C.

    2007-02-01

    Experimental results for the viscosity of squalane + CO2 mixtures are reported. The viscosities were measured using a rolling ball viscometer. The experimental temperatures were 293.15, 313.15, 333.15, and 353.15 K, and pressures were 10.0, 15.0, and 20.0 MPa. The CO2 mole fraction of the mixtures varied from 0 to 0.417. The experimental uncertainties in viscosity were estimated to be within ±3.0%. The viscosity of the mixtures decreased with an increase in the CO2 mole fraction. The experimental data were compared with predictions from the Grunberg-Nissan and McAllister equations, which correlated the experimental data with maximum deviations of 10 and 8.7%, respectively.

  16. Effects of a superpulsed CO2 laser on human teeth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murgo, Dirian O. A.; Cerruti, Blanche; Redigolo, Marcela L.; Chavantes, Maria C.

    2001-10-01

    The effects of laser exposure on mineralized tissues like enamel have been explored for years as a technique to remove caries and for dental hard-tissue preparation. However the efficiency of this technique has been questioned. In this work, six freshly-extracted third molars were irradiated by a superpulse of CO2 laser, generally used in Transmyocardio Revascularization, and submitted to Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) analyzes. The cavities caused by laser irradiation on the dental tissues were analyzed considering its shape and depth. The CO2 superpulse presented a high efficiency in the removal of dental mass and no sign of carbonized tissue was found on the ablated surface. All cavities generated by laser irradiation presented a conic shape with average depth depending on energy density applied.

  17. Estimation of continuous anthropogenic CO2 using CO2, CO, δ13C(CO2) and Δ14C(CO2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardag, S. N.; Gerbig, C.; Janssens-Maenhout, G.; Levin, I.

    2015-07-01

    We investigate different methods for estimating anthropogenic CO2 using modelled continuous atmospheric concentrations of CO2 alone, as well as CO2 in combination with the surrogate tracers CO, δ13C(CO2) and Δ14C(CO2). These methods are applied at three hypothetical stations representing rural, urban and polluted conditions. We find that independent of the tracer used, an observation-based estimate of continuous anthropogenic CO2 is not feasible at rural measurement sites due to the low signal to noise ratio of anthropogenic CO2 estimates at such settings. At urban and polluted sites, potential future continuous Δ14C(CO2) measurements with a precision of 5 ‰ or better are most promising for anthropogenic CO2 determination (precision ca. 10-20%), but the insensitivity against CO2 contributions from biofuel emissions may reduce its accuracy in the future. Other tracers, such as δ13C(CO2) and CO could provide an accurate and already available alternative if all CO2 sources in the catchment area are well characterized with respect to their isotopic signature and CO to anthropogenic CO2 ratio. We suggest a strategy for calibrating these source characteristics on an annual basis using precise Δ14C(CO2) measurements on grab samples. The precision of anthropogenic CO2 determination using δ13C(CO2) is largely determined by the measurement precision of δ13C(CO2) and CO2. The precision when using the CO-method is mainly limited by the variation of natural CO sources and CO sinks. At present, continuous anthropogenic CO2 could be determined using the tracers δ13C(CO2) and/or CO with a precision of about 30 %, a mean bias of about 10 % and without significant diurnal discrepancies. This allows significant improvement, validation and bias reduction of highly resolved emission inventories using atmospheric observation and regional modelling.

  18. Atmospheric Verification of Point Source Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turnbull, J. C.; Keller, E. D.; Norris, M. W.; Wiltshire, R.; Baisden, W. T.; Brailsford, G. W.; Bromley, T.

    2015-12-01

    Large point sources (electricity generation and large-scale industry) make up roughly one third of all fossil fuel CO2 (CO2ff) emissions. Currently, these emissions are determined from self-reported inventory data, and sometimes from smokestack emissions monitoring, and the uncertainty in emissions from individual power plants is about 20%. We examine the utility of atmospheric 14C measurements combined with atmospheric transport modelling as a tool for independently quantifying point source CO2ff emissions, to both improve the accuracy of the reported emissions and for verification as we move towards a regulatory environment. We use the Kapuni Gas Treatment Facility as a test case. It is located in rural New Zealand with no other significant fossil fuel CO2 sources nearby, and emits CO2ff at ~0.1 Tg carbon per year. We use several different sampling methods to determine the 14C and hence the CO2ff content downwind of the emission source: grab flask samples of whole air; absorption of CO2 into sodium hydroxide integrated over many hours; and plant material which faithfully records the 14C content of assimilated CO2. We use a plume dispersion model to compare the reported emissions with our observed CO2ff mole fractions. We show that the short-term variability in plume dispersion makes it difficult to interpret the grab flask sample results, whereas the variability is averaged out in the integrated samples and we obtain excellent agreement between the reported and observed emissions, indicating that the 14C method can reliably be used to evaluated point source emissions.

  19. The NASA OCO-2 CO2 Directed Satellite Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crisp, David

    2011-01-01

    NASA's Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO) was designed to provide the measurements needed to estimate the atmospheric CO2 dry air mole fraction (XCO2) with the sensitivity, accuracy, and sampling density needed to quantify regional scale carbon sources and sinks over the globe and characterize their behavior over the annual cycle.

  20. Surface Condensation of CO2 onto Kaolinite

    SciTech Connect

    Schaef, Herbert T.; Glezakou, Vassiliki Alexandra; Owen, Antionette T.; Ramprasad, Sudhir; Martin, Paul F.; McGrail, B. Peter

    2014-02-11

    The fundamental adsorption behavior of gaseous and supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) onto poorly crystalline kaolinite (KGa-2) at conditions relevant to geologic sequestration has been investigated using a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and density functional theory (DFT) methods. The QCM data indicated linear adsorption of CO2 (0-0.3 mmol CO2/g KGa-2) onto the kaolinite surface up through the gaseous state (0.186 g/cm3). However in the supercritical region, CO2 adsorption increases dramatically, reaching a peak (0.9-1.0 mmol CO2/g KGa-2) near 0.43 g/cm3, before declining rapidly to surface adsorption values equivalent or below gaseous CO2. This adsorption profile was not observed with He or N2. Comparative density functional studies of CO2 interactions with kaolinite surface models rule out CO2 intercalation and confirm that surface adsorption is favored up to approximately 0.35 g/cm3 of CO2, showing distorted T-shaped CO2-CO2 clustering, typical of supercritical CO2 aggregation over the surface as the density increases. Beyond this point, the adsorption energy gain for any additional CO2 becomes less than the CO2 interaction energy (~0.2 eV) in the supercritical medium resulting in overall desorption of CO2 from the kaolinite surface.

  1. Thermal Protection during Percutaneous Thermal Ablation of Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kam, Anthony W.; Littrup, Peter J.; Walther, McClellan M.; Hvizda, Julia; Wood, Bradford J.

    2008-01-01

    Thermal injury to collateral structures is a known complication of thermal ablation of tumors. The authors present the use of CO2 dissection and inserted balloons to protect the bowel during percutaneous radiofrequency (RF) ablation and cryotherapy of primary and locally recurrent renal cell carcinoma. These techniques offer the potential to increase the number of tumors that can be treated with RF ablation or cryotherapy from a percutaneous approach. PMID:15231890

  2. Sorption enhanced CO2 methanation.

    PubMed

    Borgschulte, Andreas; Gallandat, Noris; Probst, Benjamin; Suter, Riccardo; Callini, Elsa; Ferri, Davide; Arroyo, Yadira; Erni, Rolf; Geerlings, Hans; Züttel, Andreas

    2013-06-28

    The transformation from the fatuous consumption of fossil energy towards a sustainable energy circle is most easily marketable by not changing the underlying energy carrier but generating it from renewable energy. Hydrocarbons can be principally produced from renewable hydrogen and carbon dioxide collected by biomass. However, research is needed to increase the energetic and economic efficiency of the process. We demonstrate the enhancement of CO2 methanation by sorption enhanced catalysis. The preparation and catalytic activity of sorption catalysts based on Ni particles in zeolites is reported. The functioning of the sorption catalysis is discussed together with the determination of the reaction mechanism, providing implications for new ways in catalysis. PMID:23673365

  3. Carbon dioxide (CO2) laser treatment of cutaneous papillomas in a common snapping turtle, Chelydra serpentina.

    PubMed

    Raiti, Paul

    2008-06-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) laser was used to treat multiple cutaneous papillomas on an adult female common snapping turtle, Chelydra serpentina serpentina. A combination of excisional and ablative techniques provided excellent intraoperative visibility and postoperative results due to the laser's unique ability to incise and vaporize soft tissue. PMID:18634218

  4. Vertical and horizontal soil CO2 transport and its exchanges with the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Cañete, Enrique P.; Serrano-Ortíz, Penélope; Kowalski, Andrew S.; Curiel Yuste, Jorge; Domingo, Francisco; Oyonarte, Cecilio

    2015-04-01

    The CO2 efflux from soils to the atmosphere constitutes one of the major fluxes of the terrestrial carbon cycle and is a key determinant for sources and sinks of CO2 in land-atmosphere exchanges. Because of their large global magnitude, even small changes in soil CO2 effluxes directly affect the atmospheric CO2 content. Despite much research, models of soil CO2 efflux rates are highly uncertain, with the positive or negative feedbacks between underground carbon pools and fluxes and their temperature sensitivities in future climate scenarios largely unknown. Now it is necessary to change the point of view regarding CO2 exchange studies from an inappropriately conceived static system in which all respired CO2 is directly emitted by molecular processes to the atmosphere, to a dynamic system with gas transport by three different processes: convection, advection and molecular diffusion. Here we study the effects of wind-induced advection on the soil CO2 molar fraction during two years in a shrubland plateau situated in the Southeast of Spain. A borehole and two subterranean profiles (vertical and horizontal) were installed to study CO2 transport in the soil. Exchanges with the atmosphere were measured by an eddy covariance tower. In the vertical profile, two CO2 sensors (GMP-343, Vaisala) were installed at 0.15m and 1.5m along with soil temperature and humidity probes. The horizontal profile was designed to measure horizontal movements in the soil CO2 molar fraction due to down-gradient CO2 from the plant, where the majority CO2 is produced, towards bare soil. Three CO2 sensors (GMM-222, Vaisala) were installed, the first below plant (under-plant), the second in bare soil separated 25 cm from the first sensor (near-plant) and the third in bare soil at 25 cm from the second sensor (bare soil). The results show how the wind induces the movement of subterranean air masses both horizontally and vertically, affecting atmospheric CO2 exchanges. The eddy covariance tower

  5. Impacts of elevated CO2 on plant-microbial interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, S.; Herman, D.; Nuccio, E. E.; Pett-Ridge, J.; Brodie, E.; He, Z.; Zhou, J.; Firestone, M.

    2014-12-01

    Rising atmospheric CO2 levels are predicted to alter C cycling and terrestrial ecosystem functions through effects on plant-microbial interactions. Under elevated CO2, plants transfer more C belowground. However, the fate, transformation and consequence of this extra C in soil are not well understood. We examined the influence of eCO2 on the belowground C cycling using Avena fatua, a common Mediterranean annual grass, with its root associated microbial community across multiple plant growth stages over one-growing season. Avena grown under eCO2 (700 ppm) 13CO2 increased both total C allocated belowground and the amount of root-derived 13C in the mineral-associated fraction. Although eCO2 did not show any significant impact on the abundance (quantified by qPCR) and composition (assessed by MiSeq 16S and ITS sequencing) of rhizosphere microbial community at any sampling time point, small but significant shifts on rhizosphere microbial functional potential were detected using GeoChip 5.0. In addition, the rhizosphere effect (i.e., impact of roots on rhizosphere community versus bulk soil) was much stronger in plants grown under eCO2 than these under ambient CO2 (aCO2). The rhizosphere enriched genes included key functional genes involved in C, N, P and S cycling as well as stress response. The signal intensities of a number of C cycling genes shifted significantly in rhizosphere communities associated with plants grown under eCO2, and many of these genes are involved in the decomposition of low molecular weight C compounds. When plants became senescent, the abundance of some genes encoding enzymes capable of decomposing macromolecular C compounds (e.g., xylanase, endopolygalacturonase) were significant higher in the rhizosphere of Avena grown in eCO2 than aCO2 condition, which may be due to the higher amount of Avena root debris detected at the end of season. Understanding modulations of plant-microbial interactions due to changing climate may allow improved

  6. A dispersion study of CO2 in a closed area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korinek, Tomas; Frana, Karel

    2016-06-01

    Predictions of air pollution dispersion in an indoor environment are important outputs to control a fresh air ventilation or energy building efficiency. This study deals with numerical simulations of a formation and dispersion of carbon dioxide (CO2) in a closed area. Numerical simulations were carried out by the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) approach. A simple domain with one pollution source was used for a validation of the mathematical model, in which values of the CO2 concentration were calculated using CFD and measured. The CO2 was created as a combustion product of the ethanol. There were used two different methods for the calculation of the CO2 formation. The first method adopted the species transport model with reactions and the second method was the non-premix combustion model based on the mixture fraction theory. The third method used in numerical simulations was a constant mass flow inlet of CO2. All computational methods provided a sufficient agreement of the CO2 concentration with the experimental data.

  7. Improvement of Atmospheric CO2 Inversion Analysis at JMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, T.; Maki, T.; Machida, T.; Matsuda, H.; Sawa, Y.; Niwa, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) has developed a new inversion system of atmospheric CO2 mole fraction and flux for better understanding of global carbon budget and contribution to global carbon cycle studies. The new system introduces a newly developed on-line atmospheric tracer transport model (GSAM-TM). Its tracer transport process is directly coupled with a low resolution version (TL95) of JMA's operational global numerical weather prediction (NWP) model (JMA_GSM), using mass conservative semi-Lagrangian scheme and Arakawa-Shubert mass flux scheme for vertical convective transportation. It represents mass transportation, mass conservation, and structures of tracer distribution more precisely than JMA's previous transport model (CDTM), which is off-line tracer transport model using semi-Lagrangian scheme and Kuo-based convection scheme with multiplying globally uniform coefficient for mass conservation. The new system also introduces new a priori fluxes for fossil fuel consumption and oceanic CO2 exchange. In this study, we compare CO2 mole fraction field and flux estimates of the new system against that of current annual JMA analysis with CDTM. The new system represents better atmospheric CO2 distribution structure than the current system does especially vertical gradient around tropopause. Due to improvement of fossil fuel CO2 diffusion estimates, analyzed regional budget over Eurasian Continent changed clearly. Budgets for less observation area (South America and Africa) are also changed. Globally averaged atmospheric CO2 budget is not changed significantly. This new system is planned to be operationally implemented in 2016, and we will further improve the CO2 inversion analysis for understanding of carbon cycle.

  8. Geologic controls influencing CO2 loss from a leaking well.

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, Polly L.; Martinez, Mario J.; McKenna, Sean Andrew; Klise, Katherine A.

    2010-12-01

    Injection of CO2 into formations containing brine is proposed as a long-term sequestration solution. A significant obstacle to sequestration performance is the presence of existing wells providing a transport pathway out of the sequestration formation. To understand how heterogeneity impacts the leakage rate, we employ two dimensional models of the CO2 injection process into a sandstone aquifer with shale inclusions to examine the parameters controlling release through an existing well. This scenario is modeled as a constant-rate injection of super-critical CO2 into the existing formation where buoyancy effects, relative permeabilities, and capillary pressures are employed. Three geologic controls are considered: stratigraphic dip angle, shale inclusion size and shale fraction. In this study, we examine the impact of heterogeneity on the amount and timing of CO2 released through a leaky well. Sensitivity analysis is performed to classify how various geologic controls influence CO2 loss. A 'Design of Experiments' approach is used to identify the most important parameters and combinations of parameters to control CO2 migration while making efficient use of a limited number of computations. Results are used to construct a low-dimensional description of the transport scenario. The goal of this exploration is to develop a small set of parametric descriptors that can be generalized to similar scenarios. Results of this work will allow for estimation of the amount of CO2 that will be lost for a given scenario prior to commencing injection. Additionally, two-dimensional and three-dimensional simulations are compared to quantify the influence that surrounding geologic media has on the CO2 leakage rate.

  9. Passive CO2 concentration in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Sage, Rowan F; Khoshravesh, Roxana

    2016-06-01

    Photorespiratory limitations on C3 photosynthesis are substantial in warm, low CO2 conditions. To compensate, certain plants evolved mechanisms to actively concentrate CO2 around Rubisco using ATP-supported CO2 pumps such as C4 photosynthesis. Plants can also passively accumulate CO2 without additional ATP expenditure by localizing the release of photorespired and respired CO2 around Rubisco that is diffusively isolated from peripheral air spaces. Passive accumulation of photorespired CO2 occurs when glycine decarboxylase is localized to vascular sheath cells in what is termed C2 photosynthesis, and through forming sheaths of chloroplasts around the periphery of mesophyll cells. The peripheral sheaths require photorespired CO2 to re-enter chloroplasts where it can be refixed. Passive accumulation of respiratory CO2 is common in organs such as stems, fruits and flowers, due to abundant heterotrophic tissues and high diffusive resistance along the organ periphery. Chloroplasts within these organs are able to exploit this high CO2 to reduce photorespiration. CO2 concentration can also be enhanced passively by channeling respired CO2 from roots and rhizomes into photosynthetic cells of stems and leaves via lacunae, aerenchyma and the xylem stream. Through passive CO2 concentration, C3 species likely improved their carbon economy and maintained fitness during episodes of low atmospheric CO2.

  10. Nonpenetrating glaucoma surgery using the CO2 laser: experimental studies in human cadaver eyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assia, Ehud I.; Barequet, Irina S.; Rosner, Mordechai; Belkin, Michael

    2001-06-01

    Non-penetrating trabeculectomy (NPT) is a potential replacement to conventional trabeculectomy, as it eliminates the necessity of penetrating the eye which is the cause of most of the complications entailed by the latter operation. NPT however, requires considerable surgical skill, is time consuming and entails complications of its own. We have shown that it can be easily performed by using the CO2 laser to ablate the sclera and corneoscleral tissues to the required depth. The use of the CO2 laser eliminates the danger of inadvertent perforation, a common complication of NPT as the tissue ablation ceases when the end-point of the operation, the aqueous humor percolation, is reached. Our experiments, performed on animal and human cadaver eyes showed that CO2 laser NPT rapid is easily mastered and performed rapid and eliminates almost completely the risk of complications.

  11. Femtosecond laser ablation of enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Quang-Tri; Bertrand, Caroline; Vilar, Rui

    2016-06-01

    The surface topographical, compositional, and structural modifications induced in human enamel by femtosecond laser ablation is studied. The laser treatments were performed using a Yb:KYW chirped-pulse-regenerative amplification laser system (560 fs and 1030 nm) and fluences up to 14 J/cm2. The ablation surfaces were studied by scanning electron microscopy, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, and micro-Raman spectroscopy. Regardless of the fluence, the ablation surfaces were covered by a layer of resolidified material, indicating that ablation is accompanied by melting of hydroxyapatite. This layer presented pores and exploded gas bubbles, created by the release of gaseous decomposition products of hydroxyapatite (CO2 and H2O) within the liquid phase. In the specimen treated with 1-kHz repetition frequency and 14 J/cm2, thickness of the resolidified material is in the range of 300 to 900 nm. The micro-Raman analysis revealed that the resolidified material contains amorphous calcium phosphate, while grazing incidence x-ray diffraction analysis allowed detecting traces of a calcium phosphate other than hydroxyapatite, probably β-tricalcium phosphate Ca3), at the surface of this specimen. The present results show that the ablation of enamel involves melting of enamel's hydroxyapatite, but the thickness of the altered layer is very small and thermal damage of the remaining material is negligible.

  12. Femtosecond laser ablation of enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Quang-Tri; Bertrand, Caroline; Vilar, Rui

    2016-06-01

    The surface topographical, compositional, and structural modifications induced in human enamel by femtosecond laser ablation is studied. The laser treatments were performed using a Yb:KYW chirped-pulse-regenerative amplification laser system (560 fs and 1030 nm) and fluences up to 14 J/cm2. The ablation surfaces were studied by scanning electron microscopy, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, and micro-Raman spectroscopy. Regardless of the fluence, the ablation surfaces were covered by a layer of resolidified material, indicating that ablation is accompanied by melting of hydroxyapatite. This layer presented pores and exploded gas bubbles, created by the release of gaseous decomposition products of hydroxyapatite (CO2 and H2O) within the liquid phase. In the specimen treated with 1-kHz repetition frequency and 14 J/cm2, thickness of the resolidified material is in the range of 300 to 900 nm. The micro-Raman analysis revealed that the resolidified material contains amorphous calcium phosphate, while grazing incidence x-ray diffraction analysis allowed detecting traces of a calcium phosphate other than hydroxyapatite, probably β-tricalcium phosphate Ca3), at the surface of this specimen. The present results show that the ablation of enamel involves melting of enamel's hydroxyapatite, but the thickness of the altered layer is very small and thermal damage of the remaining material is negligible.

  13. Optical properties of heusler alloys Co2FeSi, Co2FeAl, Co2CrAl, and Co2CrGa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shreder, E. I.; Svyazhin, A. D.; Belozerova, K. A.

    2013-11-01

    The results of an investigation of optical properties and the calculations of the electronic structure of Co2FeSi, Co2FeAl, Co2CrAl, and Co2CrGa Heusler alloys are presented. The main focus of our attention is the study of the spectral dependence of the real part (ɛ1) and imaginary part (ɛ2) of the dielectric constant in the range of wavelengths λ = 0.3-13 μm using the ellipsometric method. An anomalous behavior of the optical conductivity σ(ω) has been found in the infrared range in the Co2CrAl and Co2CrGa alloys, which differs substantially from that in the Co2FeSi and Co2FeAl alloys. The results obtained are discussed based on the calculations of the electronic structure.

  14. Mass spectrometric analysis of evolved CO2 during 9.6-μm CO2 irradiation of dental enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, John; Fried, Daniel

    2002-06-01

    Carbon dioxide laser irradiation induces chemical changes in dental hard tissues including, dehydration, decomposition, disproportionation, and vaporization. Such changes can lead to either an increase or decrease in susceptibility to acid dissolution and adversely affect the bond strength to restorative materials. The objective of this study was to measure the evolved molecular species produced during laser irradiation. Samples of bovine enamel were irradiated by a 9.6 micrometers TEA CO2 laser in a vacuum chamber connected to a quadruple mass spectrometer. At irradiation intensities above 0.37 J/cm2 an increase in evolved CO2 and H2O were detected indicative of thermal decomposition of the mineral phase. The respective ion yields changed markedly with increasing number of laser pulses suggesting that the decomposition was complete after less than ten laser pulses at irradiation intensities from 0.4 to 0.8 J/cm2. Above irradiation intensities of 1.0 J/cm2 there is continual emission after 50 laser pulses indicative of vaporization and material removal. At higher ablative fluence, higher mass species were detected due to the ejection of hydroxyapatite. This study demonstrates that mass spectroscopy can be used to directly probe laser induced physical and chemical changes in dental hard tissue during laser ablation.

  15. CO2 mitigation via accelerated limestone weathering

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rau, G.H.; Knauss, K.G.; Langer, W.H.; Caldeira, K.

    2004-01-01

    The climate and environmental impacts of the current, carbon-intensive energy usage demands that effective and practical energy alternatives and CO2 mitigation strategies be found. A discussion on CO2 mitigation via accelerated limestone weathering covers limestone and seawater availability and cost; reaction rates and densities; effectiveness in CO2 sequestration; and environmental impacts and benefits.

  16. Response of microalgae to elevated CO2 and temperature: impact of climate change on freshwater ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Xu, Xiaoguang; Fujibayashi, Megumu; Niu, Qigui; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Nishimura, Osamu

    2016-10-01

    To estimate the combined effects of elevated CO2 and temperature on microalgae, three typical and worldwide freshwater species, the green alga Scenedesmus acuminatus, the diatom Cyclotella meneghiniana, and the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa, as well as mixes of these three species were continuously cultured in controlled environment chambers with CO2 at 390 and 1000 ppm and temperatures of 20, 25, and 30 °C. CO2 and temperature significantly affected the production of microalgae. The cell productivity increased under elevated CO2 and temperature. Although the green alga dominated in the mixed culture within all CO2 and temperature conditions, rising temperature and CO2 intensified the competition of the cyanobacterium with other microalgae. CO2 affected the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) characteristics of the green alga and the cyanobacterium. Elevated CO2 induced the generation of humic substances in the EPS fractions of the green alga, the cyanobacterium, and the mixed culture. The extracellular carbohydrates of the diatom and the extracellular proteins of the cyanobacterium increased with elevated CO2 and temperature, while the extracellular carbohydrates and proteins of the green alga and the mixes increased under elevated CO2 and temperature. There were synergistic effects of CO2 and temperature on the productivity and the EPS of microalgae. Climate change related CO2 and temperature increases will promote autochthonous organic carbon production in aquatic ecosystems and facilitate the proliferation of cyanobacteria, which potentially changes the carbon cycling and undermines the functioning of ecosystems. PMID:27421856

  17. Response of microalgae to elevated CO2 and temperature: impact of climate change on freshwater ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Xu, Xiaoguang; Fujibayashi, Megumu; Niu, Qigui; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Nishimura, Osamu

    2016-10-01

    To estimate the combined effects of elevated CO2 and temperature on microalgae, three typical and worldwide freshwater species, the green alga Scenedesmus acuminatus, the diatom Cyclotella meneghiniana, and the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa, as well as mixes of these three species were continuously cultured in controlled environment chambers with CO2 at 390 and 1000 ppm and temperatures of 20, 25, and 30 °C. CO2 and temperature significantly affected the production of microalgae. The cell productivity increased under elevated CO2 and temperature. Although the green alga dominated in the mixed culture within all CO2 and temperature conditions, rising temperature and CO2 intensified the competition of the cyanobacterium with other microalgae. CO2 affected the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) characteristics of the green alga and the cyanobacterium. Elevated CO2 induced the generation of humic substances in the EPS fractions of the green alga, the cyanobacterium, and the mixed culture. The extracellular carbohydrates of the diatom and the extracellular proteins of the cyanobacterium increased with elevated CO2 and temperature, while the extracellular carbohydrates and proteins of the green alga and the mixes increased under elevated CO2 and temperature. There were synergistic effects of CO2 and temperature on the productivity and the EPS of microalgae. Climate change related CO2 and temperature increases will promote autochthonous organic carbon production in aquatic ecosystems and facilitate the proliferation of cyanobacteria, which potentially changes the carbon cycling and undermines the functioning of ecosystems.

  18. Infrared spectra and structures of the neutral and charged CrCO2 and Cr(CO2)2 isomers in solid neon.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingnan; Chen, Mohua; Zhou, Mingfei

    2014-08-01

    The reactions from codeposition of laser-ablated chromium atoms with carbon dioxide in excess neon are studied by infrared absorption spectroscopy. The species formed are identified by the effects of isotopic substitution on their infrared spectra. Density functional calculations are performed to support the spectral assignments and to interpret the geometric and electronic structures of the experimentally observed species. Besides the previously reported insertion products OCrCO and O2Cr(CO)2, the one-to-one Cr(CO2) complex and the one-to-two Cr(CO2)2 complex as well as the CrOCrCO and OCCrCO3 complexes are also formed. The Cr(CO2) complex is characterized to be side-on η(2)-C,O-coordinated. The Cr(CO2)2 complex is identified to involve a side-on η(2)-C,O-coordinated CO2 and an end-on η(1)-O-coordinated CO2. OCCrCO3 is a carbonate carbonyl complex predicted to have a planar structure with a η(2)-O,O-coordinated carbonate ligand. The CrOCrCO complex is predicted to be linear with a high-spin ground state. Besides the neutral molecules, charged species are also produced. The Cr(CO2)(+) and Cr(CO2)2(+) cation complexes are characterized to have linear end-on η(1)-O-coordinated structures with blue-shifted antisymmetric CO2 stretching vibrational frequencies. The OCrCO(-) anion is bent with the Cr-O and CO stretching frequencies red-shifted from those of OCrCO neutral molecule.

  19. Vehicle emissions of greenhouse gases and related tracers from a tunnel study: CO : CO2, N2O : CO2, CH4 : CO2, O2 : CO2 ratios, and the stable isotopes 13C and 18O in CO2 and CO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popa, M. E.; Vollmer, M. K.; Jordan, A.; Brand, W. A.; Pathirana, S. L.; Rothe, M.; Röckmann, T.

    2014-02-01

    Measurements of CO2, CO, N2O and CH4 mole fractions, O2 / N2 ratios and the stable isotopes 13C and 18O in CO2 and CO have been performed in air samples from the Islisberg highway tunnel (Switzerland). The molar CO : CO2 ratios, with an average of (4.15 ± 0.34) ppb:ppm, are lower than reported in previous studies, pointing to a reduction in CO emissions from traffic. The 13C in CO2 reflects the isotopic composition of the fuel. 18O in CO2 is slightly depleted compared to the 18O in atmospheric O2, and shows significant variability. In contrast, the δ13C values of CO show that significant fractionation takes place during CO destruction in the catalytic converter. 13C in CO is enriched by 3‰ compared to the 13C in the fuel burnt, while the 18O content is similar to that of atmospheric O2. We compute a fractionation constant of (-2.7 ± 0.7)‰ for 13C during CO destruction. The N2O : CO2 average ratio of (1.8 ± 0.2) × 10-2 ppb:ppm is significantly lower than in past studies, showing a reduction in N2O emissions likely related to improvements in the catalytic converter technology. We also observed small CH4 emissions, with an average CH4 : CO2 ratio of (4.6 ± 0.2) × 10-2 ppb:ppm. The O2 : CO2 ratios of (-1.47 ± 0.01) ppm:ppm are very close to the expected, theoretically calculated values of O2 depletion per CO2 enhancement.

  20. Structurally simple complexes of CO2.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Luke J; Robertson, Katherine N; Kemp, Richard A; Tuononen, Heikki M; Clyburne, Jason A C

    2015-03-01

    The ability to bind CO2 through the formation of low-energy, easily-broken, bonds could prove invaluable in a variety of chemical contexts. For example, weak bonds to CO2 would greatly decrease the cost of the energy-intensive sorbent-regeneration step common to most carbon capture technologies. Furthermore, exploration of this field could lead to the discovery of novel CO2 chemistry. Reduction of complexed carbon dioxide might generate chemical feedstocks for the preparation of value-added products, particularly transportation fuels or fuel precursors. Implementation on a large scale could help to drastically reduce CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere. However, literature examples of weakly bonded complexes of CO2 are relatively few and true coordination complexes to a 'naked' CO2 fragment are nearly unheard of. In this review article, a variety of complexes of CO2 featuring diverse binding modes and reactivity will be examined. Topics covered include: (A) inclusion complexes of CO2 in porous materials. (B) Zwitterionic carbamates produced from the reaction of CO2 with polyamines. (C) Carbamate salts produced from reaction of CO2 with two equivalents of an amine. (D) Insertion products of CO2 into acid-base adducts (e.g., metal complexes). (E) Lewis acid-base activated CO2, such as frustrated Lewis pair complexes. (F) Simple base-CO2 adducts, wherein the base-CO2 bond is the only interaction formed. Complexes in the last category are of particular interest, and include imidazol-2-carboxylates (N-heterocyclic carbene adducts of CO2) as well as a few other examples that lie outside NHC chemistry.

  1. Forest succession at elevated CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, James S.; Schlesinger, William H.

    2002-02-01

    We tested hypotheses concerning the response of forest succession to elevated CO2 in the FACTS-1 site at the Duke Forest. We quantified growth and survival of naturally recruited seedlings, tree saplings, vines, and shrubs under ambient and elevated CO2. We planted seeds and seedlings to augment sample sites. We augmented CO2 treatments with estimates of shade tolerance and nutrient limitation while controlling for soil and light effects to place CO2 treatments within the context of natural variability at the site. Results are now being analyzed and used to parameterize forest models of CO2 response.

  2. Isotopic CO2 Instrumentation for UAV Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, A.; Silver, J.

    2013-12-01

    Carbon dioxide is the largest component of anthroprogenic green house gas emissions. Knowing atmospheric 13CO2/12CO2 ratios precisely is important for understanding biogenic and anthroprogenic sources and sinks for carbon. Instrumentation mounted on UAV aircraft would enable important spatial isotopic CO2 information. However, current isotopic CO2 instrumentation have unfavorable attributes for UAV use, such as high power requirements, high cost, high weight, and large size. Here we present the early development of a compact isotopic CO2 instrument that is designed to nullify effects of pressure, temperature and moisture, and will ultimately be suitable for UAV deployment.

  3. Storing CO2 underground shows promising results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweigel, Peter; Gale, John

    Long-term underground storage of CO2 is an important element in concepts to reduce atmospheric CO2 emissions as the use of fossil fuels continues. The first results of a multinational research project evaluating the injection of CO2 into a saline aquifer in the North Sea are validating this method of CO2 reduction, and are serving to further define the research needed to develop the technology for large-scale applicability. Reducing the emission of substances that have potentially harmful effects on global climate— for example, CO2—has become a central issue of environmental policy at least since the 1997 Kyoto conference on climate change.

  4. Aminosilicone solvents for CO(2) capture.

    PubMed

    Perry, Robert J; Grocela-Rocha, Teresa A; O'Brien, Michael J; Genovese, Sarah; Wood, Benjamin R; Lewis, Larry N; Lam, Hubert; Soloveichik, Grigorii; Rubinsztajn, Malgorzata; Kniajanski, Sergei; Draper, Sam; Enick, Robert M; Johnson, J Karl; Xie, Hong-bin; Tapriyal, Deepak

    2010-08-23

    This work describes the first report of the use of an aminosilicone solvent mix for the capture of CO(2). To maintain a liquid state, a hydroxyether co-solvent was employed which allowed enhanced physisorption of CO(2) in the solvent mixture. Regeneration of the capture solvent system was demonstrated over 6 cycles and absorption isotherms indicate a 25-50 % increase in dynamic CO(2) capacity over 30 % MEA. In addition, proof of concept for continuous CO(2) absorption was verified. Additionally, modeling to predict heats of reaction of aminosilicone solvents with CO(2) was in good agreement with experimental results.

  5. Selecting CO2 Sources for CO2 Utilization by Environmental-Merit-Order Curves.

    PubMed

    von der Assen, Niklas; Müller, Leonard J; Steingrube, Annette; Voll, Philip; Bardow, André

    2016-02-01

    Capture and utilization of CO2 as alternative carbon feedstock for fuels, chemicals, and materials aims at reducing greenhouse gas emissions and fossil resource use. For capture of CO2, a large variety of CO2 sources exists. Since they emit much more CO2 than the expected demand for CO2 utilization, the environmentally most favorable CO2 sources should be selected. For this purpose, we introduce the environmental-merit-order (EMO) curve to rank CO2 sources according to their environmental impacts over the available CO2 supply. To determine the environmental impacts of CO2 capture, compression and transport, we conducted a comprehensive literature study for the energy demands of CO2 supply, and constructed a database for CO2 sources in Europe. Mapping these CO2 sources reveals that CO2 transport distances are usually small. Thus, neglecting transport in a first step, we find that environmental impacts are minimized by capturing CO2 first from chemical plants and natural gas processing, then from paper mills, power plants, and iron and steel plants. In a second step, we computed regional EMO curves considering transport and country-specific impacts for energy supply. Building upon regional EMO curves, we identify favorable locations for CO2 utilization with lowest environmental impacts of CO2 supply, so-called CO2 oases.

  6. Selecting CO2 Sources for CO2 Utilization by Environmental-Merit-Order Curves.

    PubMed

    von der Assen, Niklas; Müller, Leonard J; Steingrube, Annette; Voll, Philip; Bardow, André

    2016-02-01

    Capture and utilization of CO2 as alternative carbon feedstock for fuels, chemicals, and materials aims at reducing greenhouse gas emissions and fossil resource use. For capture of CO2, a large variety of CO2 sources exists. Since they emit much more CO2 than the expected demand for CO2 utilization, the environmentally most favorable CO2 sources should be selected. For this purpose, we introduce the environmental-merit-order (EMO) curve to rank CO2 sources according to their environmental impacts over the available CO2 supply. To determine the environmental impacts of CO2 capture, compression and transport, we conducted a comprehensive literature study for the energy demands of CO2 supply, and constructed a database for CO2 sources in Europe. Mapping these CO2 sources reveals that CO2 transport distances are usually small. Thus, neglecting transport in a first step, we find that environmental impacts are minimized by capturing CO2 first from chemical plants and natural gas processing, then from paper mills, power plants, and iron and steel plants. In a second step, we computed regional EMO curves considering transport and country-specific impacts for energy supply. Building upon regional EMO curves, we identify favorable locations for CO2 utilization with lowest environmental impacts of CO2 supply, so-called CO2 oases. PMID:26752014

  7. Residual CO2 trapping in Indiana limestone.

    PubMed

    El-Maghraby, Rehab M; Blunt, Martin J

    2013-01-01

    We performed core flooding experiments on Indiana limestone using the porous plate method to measure the amount of trapped CO(2) at a temperature of 50 °C and two pressures: 4.2 and 9 MPa. Brine was mixed with CO(2) for equilibration, then the mixture was circulated through a sacrificial core. Porosity and permeability tests conducted before and after 884 h of continuous core flooding confirmed negligible dissolution. A trapping curve for supercritical (sc)CO(2) in Indiana showing the relationship between the initial and residual CO(2) saturations was measured and compared with that of gaseous CO(2). The results were also compared with scCO(2) trapping in Berea sandstone at the same conditions. A scCO(2) residual trapping end point of 23.7% was observed, indicating slightly less trapping of scCO(2) in Indiana carbonates than in Berea sandstone. There is less trapping for gaseous CO(2) (end point of 18.8%). The system appears to be more water-wet under scCO(2) conditions, which is different from the trend observed in Berea; we hypothesize that this is due to the greater concentration of Ca(2+) in brine at higher pressure. Our work indicates that capillary trapping could contribute to the immobilization of CO(2) in carbonate aquifers.

  8. Microbial Growth under Supercritical CO2

    PubMed Central

    Peet, Kyle C.; Freedman, Adam J. E.; Hernandez, Hector H.; Britto, Vanya; Boreham, Chris; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan B.

    2015-01-01

    Growth of microorganisms in environments containing CO2 above its critical point is unexpected due to a combination of deleterious effects, including cytoplasmic acidification and membrane destabilization. Thus, supercritical CO2 (scCO2) is generally regarded as a sterilizing agent. We report isolation of bacteria from three sites targeted for geologic carbon dioxide sequestration (GCS) that are capable of growth in pressurized bioreactors containing scCO2. Analysis of 16S rRNA genes from scCO2 enrichment cultures revealed microbial assemblages of varied complexity, including representatives of the genus Bacillus. Propagation of enrichment cultures under scCO2 headspace led to isolation of six strains corresponding to Bacillus cereus, Bacillus subterraneus, Bacillus amyloliquefaciens, Bacillus safensis, and Bacillus megaterium. Isolates are spore-forming, facultative anaerobes and capable of germination and growth under an scCO2 headspace. In addition to these isolates, several Bacillus type strains grew under scCO2, suggesting that this may be a shared feature of spore-forming Bacillus spp. Our results provide direct evidence of microbial activity at the interface between scCO2 and an aqueous phase. Since microbial activity can influence the key mechanisms for permanent storage of sequestered CO2 (i.e., structural, residual, solubility, and mineral trapping), our work suggests that during GCS microorganisms may grow and catalyze biological reactions that influence the fate and transport of CO2 in the deep subsurface. PMID:25681188

  9. Joint CO2 and CH4 accountability for global warming

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kirk R.; Desai, Manish A.; Rogers, Jamesine V.; Houghton, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    We propose a transparent climate debt index incorporating both methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. We develop national historic emissions databases for both greenhouse gases to 2005, justifying 1950 as the starting point for global perspectives. We include CO2 emissions from fossil sources [CO2(f)], as well as, in a separate analysis, land use change and forestry. We calculate the CO2(f) and CH4 remaining in the atmosphere in 2005 from 205 countries using the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s Fourth Assessment Report impulse response functions. We use these calculations to estimate the fraction of remaining global emissions due to each country, which is applied to total radiative forcing in 2005 to determine the combined climate debt from both greenhouse gases in units of milliwatts per square meter per country or microwatts per square meter per person, a metric we term international natural debt (IND). Australia becomes the most indebted large country per capita because of high CH4 emissions, overtaking the United States, which is highest for CO2(f). The differences between the INDs of developing and developed countries decline but remain large. We use IND to assess the relative reduction in IND from choosing between CO2(f) and CH4`control measures and to contrast the imposed versus experienced health impacts from climate change. Based on 2005 emissions, the same hypothetical impact on world 2050 IND could be achieved by decreasing CH4 emissions by 46% as stopping CO2 emissions entirely, but with substantial differences among countries, implying differential optimal strategies. Adding CH4 shifts the basic narrative about differential international accountability for climate change. PMID:23847202

  10. Continuous Vocalization during Kendo Exercises Suppresses Expiration of CO2.

    PubMed

    Arikawa, H; Terada, T; Takahashi, T; Kizaki, K; Imai, H; Era, S

    2015-06-01

    One distinctive trait of kendo, the Japanese martial art of fencing, is the execution of sustained, high-effort vocalizations during actions. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of these vocalizations on respiratory functions. First, the intensity of 3 kendo exercises was quantified by measuring oxygen uptake (V̇O2) and comparing it with V̇O2max measured during treadmill tests of 8 university kendo athletes. Respiratory variables of these 8 athletes were then analyzed using a portable breath gas analyzer during the most intensive kendo exercise, kakari-keiko, with and without vocalization. Breathing frequency (fB) increased regardless of vocalization, but in trials with vocalization, fB and ventilation were significantly lower, and expiration time was significantly longer. Components of expired gases were also affected by vocalization. Although there was no significant difference in oxygen uptake, vocalization yielded a reduction in carbon dioxide output (V̇CO2) and an increase in fraction of end-tidal carbon dioxide (FetCO2). We thus conclude that these vocalizations greatly affect expiration breathing patterns in kendo. Moreover, repetition of kakari-keiko caused a reduction in V̇CO2 and an increase in FetCO2 and CO2 storage. We consider the possibility that the sustained high-effort vocalizations of kendo also increase cerebral blood flow.

  11. Continuous Vocalization during Kendo Exercises Suppresses Expiration of CO2.

    PubMed

    Arikawa, H; Terada, T; Takahashi, T; Kizaki, K; Imai, H; Era, S

    2015-06-01

    One distinctive trait of kendo, the Japanese martial art of fencing, is the execution of sustained, high-effort vocalizations during actions. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of these vocalizations on respiratory functions. First, the intensity of 3 kendo exercises was quantified by measuring oxygen uptake (V̇O2) and comparing it with V̇O2max measured during treadmill tests of 8 university kendo athletes. Respiratory variables of these 8 athletes were then analyzed using a portable breath gas analyzer during the most intensive kendo exercise, kakari-keiko, with and without vocalization. Breathing frequency (fB) increased regardless of vocalization, but in trials with vocalization, fB and ventilation were significantly lower, and expiration time was significantly longer. Components of expired gases were also affected by vocalization. Although there was no significant difference in oxygen uptake, vocalization yielded a reduction in carbon dioxide output (V̇CO2) and an increase in fraction of end-tidal carbon dioxide (FetCO2). We thus conclude that these vocalizations greatly affect expiration breathing patterns in kendo. Moreover, repetition of kakari-keiko caused a reduction in V̇CO2 and an increase in FetCO2 and CO2 storage. We consider the possibility that the sustained high-effort vocalizations of kendo also increase cerebral blood flow. PMID:25760149

  12. Infrared polarization spectroscopy of CO 2 at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alwahabi, Z. T.; Li, Z. S.; Zetterberg, J.; Aldén, M.

    2004-04-01

    Polarisation spectroscopy (PS) was used to probe CO 2 gas concentration in a CO 2/N 2 binary mixture at atmospheric pressure and ambient temperature. The CO 2 molecules were probed by a direct laser excitation to an overtone and combination vibrational state. The tuneable narrow linewidth infrared laser radiation at 2 μm was obtained by Raman shifting of the output from a single-longitudinal-mode pulsed alexandrite laser-system to the second Stokes component in a H 2 gas cell. Infrared polarisation spectroscopy (IRPS) and time-resolved infrared laser-induced fluorescence (IRLIF) spectra were collected. A linear dependence of the IRPS signal on the CO 2 mole fraction has been found. This indicates that the IRPS signal is only weakly affected by the molecular collisions and that the inter- and intra- molecular energy transfer processes do not strongly influence the molecular alignment at the time scale of the measurements. Thus IRPS holds great potential for quantitative instantaneous gas concentration diagnostics in general. This is especially important for molecules which do not posses an accessible optical transition such as CO, CO 2 and N 2O. In addition, an accurate experimental method to measure the extinction ratio of the IR polarisers employed in this study has been developed and applied. With its obvious merits as simplicity, easy alignment and high accuracy, the method can be generalized to all spectral regions, different polarisers and high extinction ratios.

  13. Fourier Transform Microwave Spectra of CO{2}-ETHYLENE Sulfide, CO{2}-ETHYLENE Oxide and CO{2}-PROPYLENE Oxide Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orita, Yukari; Kawashima, Yoshiyuki; Hirota, Eizi

    2010-06-01

    We have previously examined the difference in roles of O and S in structure and dynamics of the CO-ethylene oxide (EO) and CO-ethylene sulfide (ES) complexes. We have extended the investigation to CO{2}-EO and CO{2}-ES for comparison. We have also observed the CO{2}-propylene oxide (PO) complex, which is an important intermediate in the reaction of PO with CO{2} leading to polycarbonate. Both a-type and b-type transitions were observed for the CO{2}-EO and CO{2}-ES, but no c-type transitions were observed at all. We also detected the {34}S and {13}C isotopic species in natural abundance and the species containing {18}OCO and C{18}O% {2}, which were synthesized by burning paper in an {18}O{2} and{% 16}O{2} mixture. By analyzing the observed spectra we concluded the CO{2} moiety of CO{2}-EO and CO{2}-ES located in a plane % prependicular to the three-membered ring and bisecting the COC or CSC angle of EO or ES, respectively, as in the case of CO-EO and CO-ES complexes. An % ab initio MO calculation at the level of MP2/6-311G(d, p) yielded an optimized structure in good agreement with the experimental result. We have derived from the observed spectra the distance, the stretching force constant, and the binding energy of the bonds between the constituents of the CO{2}-EO and CO{2}-ES complexes and have found that the distances of the two complexes were shorter by 0.2Å than those in CO-EO and CO-ES, respectively, and that the intermolecular bonds were two times stronger in the CO{2} complexes than in the corresponding CO complexes. We have concluded from the observed spectra that the CO{2} moiety in CO{2}-PO is located on the PO three-membered ring plane opposite to the methyl group. The constituents in CO{2}-PO were more weakly bound than those in CO{2}-EO and CO{2}-ES. S. Sato, Y. Kawashima, Y. Tatamitani, and E. Hirota, 63rd International Symposium on Molecular Spectroscopy, WF05 (2008).

  14. Global CO2 Emission from Subaerial Volcanism: an additional insight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, N.; Hernandez Perez, P. A.; Padron, E.; Melian Rodriguez, G.; Nolasco, D.; Padilla, G.; Barrancos, J.; Rodriguez, F.; Dionis, S.; Hernandez, I.; Calvo, D.; Peraza, M.

    2012-12-01

    During the last two decades, scientists have paid attention to CO2 volcanic emission and its contribution to the global C budget. Excluding MORBs as a net source of CO2 to the atmosphere, the global CO2 discharge from subaerial volcanism has been estimated about ~ 300 Mt yr-1 and this rate accounts for both visible (plume & fumaroles) and non-visible (diffuse) volcanic gas emanations (Mörner & Etíope, 2002). However, CO2 emissions from volcanic lakes had not been considered to estimate the global CO2 discharge from subaerial volcanoes. A recent study by Pérez et al., 2011, has reported that global CO2 emission from volcanic lakes accounts for about 117 ± 19 Mt yr-1, being 94 ± 17 Mt yr-1 as deep-seated CO2. In order to improve the information on the global diffuse CO2 emission estimated by Mörner & Etíope (2002), about 50 Mt yr-1, an extensive research on diffuse CO2 emissions from subaerial volcanoes worldwide has been performed after evaluating the results of 287 diffuse CO2 emission surveys from 83 volcanic systems situated at 24 different countries and volcanic regions. The estimated diffuse CO2 emission at each survey has been normalized by the study area. Statistical-graphical analysis of the data showed three overlapping geochemical populations. The background mean is 2.8 t km-2 d-1 and represents 28.4 % of the total data. Peak population showed a mean of 969.5 t km-2 d-1 and represented 38.0 % of the data, and an intermediate group showed a mean of 72.4 t km-2 d-1 and represents 33.6 % of the data. Taking into account (i) the geometric mean of the normalized CO2 emission rates for each population, (ii) the average of the study area for each population, (iii) the fraction (%) of the three overlapping geochemical populations, and (iv) the number of active subaerial volcanoes in the world (~ 1400); the global diffuse CO2 emission from subaerial volcanism has been estimated about ~ 827 Mt yr-1 of which 437 Mt yr-1 could be reported as deep-seated CO2

  15. Rapid prototyping of biodegradable microneedle arrays by integrating CO2 laser processing and polymer molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, K. T.; Chung, C. K.

    2016-06-01

    An integrated technology of CO2 laser processing and polymer molding has been demonstrated for the rapid prototyping of biodegradable poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) microneedle arrays. Rapid and low-cost CO2 laser processing was used for the fabrication of a high-aspect-ratio microneedle master mold instead of conventional time-consuming and expensive photolithography and etching processes. It is crucial to use flexible polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) to detach PLGA. However, the direct CO2 laser-ablated PDMS could generate poor surfaces with bulges, scorches, re-solidification and shrinkage. Here, we have combined the polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) ablation and two-step PDMS casting process to form a PDMS female microneedle mold to eliminate the problem of direct ablation. A self-assembled monolayer polyethylene glycol was coated to prevent stiction between the two PDMS layers during the peeling-off step in the PDMS-to-PDMS replication. Then the PLGA microneedle array was successfully released by bending the second-cast PDMS mold with flexibility and hydrophobic property. The depth of the polymer microneedles can range from hundreds of micrometers to millimeters. It is linked to the PMMA pattern profile and can be adjusted by CO2 laser power and scanning speed. The proposed integration process is maskless, simple and low-cost for rapid prototyping with a reusable mold.

  16. Atmospheric CO2 Reconstructions from Polar Ice: What Do High-Resolution CO2 Records and δ13CO2 Analyses Tell Us about Past Climate and Global Carbon Cycle Processes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, J.; Eggleston, S.; Marcott, S. A.; Brook, E.; Chappellaz, J. A.; Köhler, P.; Joos, F.; Fischer, H.

    2014-12-01

    Today, a monitoring network measures atmospheric CO2 at high temporal and spatial resolution. Atmospheric transport models then calculate regional CO2 source and sink fluxes. Prior to this instrumental period, archived air, firn air, and air trapped in polar ice are the only direct atmospheric archives to reconstruct past CO2 changes. Only ice from Antarctica allows reliable CO2 measurements, either from classical ice cores or outcropping ice, while Greenland records are subject to in situ production. They provide high-resolution and high-precision CO2 reconstructions up to 800,000 years back in time. Ice core records have revealed an intimate connection between CO2 variations and major changes in Earth's climate and have fundamentally shaped the community's view of the global carbon cycle. Knowing the concentration of past atmospheric CO2 and the other greenhouse gases is key to provide the radiative forcing for climate simulations. Ice core reconstructions broadly fulfilled this task. On the contrary, we are far from a coherent understanding of the mechanisms driving these changes. Analyzing phase relations between CO2, other ice-core derived species, and proxies from marine sediment cores allow for the identification of factors likely responsible for the observed CO2 changes. Specifically, the strength of the Atlantic overturning circulation and Southern Ocean upwelling are thought to be key players. However, the observed CO2 changes cannot uniquely be related to a specific process. Here, stable carbon isotope analysis on CO2 extracted from ice provides additional constraints as any process leads to isotope fractionation of the reservoir. Analytical progress during the last decade affords us with a growing data set on this long-awaited parameter. This presentation provides a state-of-the-art overview on ice-based CO2 and its carbon isotopic signature focusing both on the long-term orbital changes as well as rapid changes documented during the last deglaciation.

  17. Exogenously produced CO2 doubles the CO2 efflux from three north temperate lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, Grace M.; Buelo, Cal D.; Cole, Jonathan J.; Pace, Michael L.

    2016-03-01

    It is well established that lakes are typically sources of CO2 to the atmosphere. However, it remains unclear what portion of CO2 efflux is from endogenously processed organic carbon or from exogenously produced CO2 transported into lakes. We estimated high-frequency CO2 and O2 efflux from three north temperate lakes in summer to determine the proportion of the total CO2 efflux that was exogenously produced. Two of the lakes were amended with nutrients to experimentally enhance endogenous CO2 uptake. In the unfertilized lake, 50% of CO2 efflux was from exogenous sources and hydrology had a large influence on efflux. In the fertilized lakes, endogenous CO2 efflux was negative (into the lake) yet exogenous CO2 made the lakes net sources of CO2 to the atmosphere. Shifts in hydrologic regimes and nutrient loading have the potential to change whether small lakes act primarily as reactors or vents in the watershed.

  18. Energyless CO2 Absorption, Generation, and Fixation Using Atmospheric CO2.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Fuyuhiko; Okada, Yasuhiko; Matsumoto, Chiaki; Yamada, Masayuki; Nakazawa, Kenta; Mukai, Chisato

    2016-01-01

    From an economic and ecological perspective, the efficient utilization of atmospheric CO2 as a carbon resource should be a much more important goal than reducing CO2 emissions. However, no strategy to harvest CO2 using atmospheric CO2 at room temperature currently exists, which is presumably due to the extremely low concentration of CO2 in ambient air (approximately 400 ppm=0.04 vol%). We discovered that monoethanolamine (MEA) and its derivatives efficiently absorbed atmospheric CO2 without requiring an energy source. We also found that the absorbed CO2 could be easily liberated with acid. Furthermore, a novel CO2 generator enabled us to synthesize a high value-added material (i.e., 2-oxazolidinone derivatives based on the metal catalyzed CO2-fixation at room temperature) from atmospheric CO2.

  19. CO2 transport over complex terrain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sun, Jielun; Burns, Sean P.; Delany, A.C.; Oncley, S.P.; Turnipseed, A.A.; Stephens, B.B.; Lenschow, D.H.; LeMone, M.A.; Monson, Russell K.; Anderson, D.E.

    2007-01-01

    CO2 transport processes relevant for estimating net ecosystem exchange (NEE) at the Niwot Ridge AmeriFlux site in the front range of the Rocky Mountains, Colorado, USA, were investigated during a pilot experiment. We found that cold, moist, and CO2-rich air was transported downslope at night and upslope in the early morning at this forest site situated on a ???5% east-facing slope. We found that CO2 advection dominated the total CO2 transport in the NEE estimate at night although there are large uncertainties because of partial cancellation of horizontal and vertical advection. The horizontal CO2 advection captured not only the CO2 loss at night, but also the CO2 uptake during daytime. We found that horizontal CO2 advection was significant even during daytime especially when turbulent mixing was not significant, such as in early morning and evening transition periods and within the canopy. Similar processes can occur anywhere regardless of whether flow is generated by orography, synoptic pressure gradients, or surface heterogeneity as long as CO2 concentration is not well mixed by turbulence. The long-term net effect of all the CO2 budget terms on estimates of NEE needs to be investigated. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Results of fractional ablative facial skin resurfacing with the erbium:yttrium-aluminium-garnet laser 1 week and 2 months after one single treatment in 30 patients.

    PubMed

    Trelles, Mario A; Mordon, Serge; Velez, Mariano; Urdiales, Fernando; Levy, Jean Luc

    2009-03-01

    The erbium:yttrium-aluminium-garnet (Er:YAG) laser has recently been used in the fractional resurfacing of photo-aged skin. Our study evaluated the results after one single session of fractional resurfacing with Er:YAG. Thirty women participated in the study, with an average age of 46 years, skin types from II to IV, and wrinkle grades I to III. The 2,940 nm Er:YAG system used (Pixel, Alma Laser, Israel) had variable pulse durations (1 ms to 2 ms) and energy densities (800 mJ/cm(2) to 1,400 mJ/cm(2)) which, together with the number of passes (four to eight), were selected as a function of wrinkle severity. All patients received only one treatment. Postoperative side effects were evaluated. The number of wrinkles was documented with clinical photography and was scored. Histological assessment was carried out on two patients before and 2 months after treatment. All patients completed the study. Of the patients, 93% reported good or very good improvement of the degree of their wrinkles, with a satisfaction index of 83%. Pain was not a problem during treatment, and there were no side effects except for in one phototype IV patient, who had hyperpigmentation. Histology 2 months after the single treatment demonstrated younger morphology of both the epidermis and dermis, with improvement of the pretreatment typical elastotic appearance. At the parameters used in our study, only one treatment session of Er:YAG laser could achieve effective skin rejuvenation, with effects recognized in both the dermis and, more importantly, the epidermis. This regimen offers an interesting alternative to the conventional approach of multi-session fractional resurfacing.

  1. Pseudo-data Inversions of California CO2 Fluxes Combining Tower Measurements of CO2 and 14CO2 with OCO2 Column CO2 Retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, M. L.; Jeong, S.; Bagley, J.; Frankenberg, C.; Parazoo, N.; Keeling, R. F.; Graven, H. D.

    2014-12-01

    The majority (~ 80 %) of California's greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are likely CO2 produced by fossil fuel combustion (ffCO2). While bottom-up estimates of State-annual total ffCO2 emissions are expected to be accurate to ~ 5-10% (68% confidence), net CO2 exchange at smaller spatial and temporal scales (and emissions of other GHGs) are likely less certain. Here, we report initial results of a Carbon Monitoring System (CMS) pseudo-data inversion study combining simulated total and radiocarbon CO2 sampling from a 10-site ground-based tower network with OCO2 satellite column CO2 retrievals. Fossil and biosphere CO2 signals are computed for tower and OCO2 observations across urban and rural areas of California including the South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB), Central Valley, and San Francisco Bay Area using the WRF-STILT transport model simulations coupled with prior fluxes from VULCAN (ffCO2) and CASA (bioCO2) fluxes respectively. Nominal uncertainties are assigned to the prior ffCO2 fluxes and estimated for the model-measurement differences including WRF and STILT model uncertainties and background subtraction. Reductions in posterior uncertainties for regional ffCO2 emissions are estimated for the tower pseudo-data using Bayesian inversions for monthly periods in multiple seasons. Ongoing work will include incorporation of OCO2 pseudo-data to estimate additional uncertainty reductions obtained for ffCO2 and bioCO2 exchange signals across California's urban and rural regions.

  2. A nonlinear convolution model for the evasion of CO2 injected into the deep ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kheshgi, Haroon S.; Archer, David E.

    2004-02-01

    Deep ocean storage of CO2 captured from, for example, flue gases is being considered as a potential response option to global warming concerns. For storage to be effective, CO2 injected into the deep ocean must remain sequestered from the atmosphere for a long time. However, a fraction of CO2 injected into the deep ocean is expected to eventually evade into the atmosphere. This fraction is expected to depend on the time since injection, the location of injection, and the future atmospheric concentration of CO2. We approximate the evasion of injected CO2 at specific locations using a nonlinear convolution model including explicitly the nonlinear response of CO2 solubility to future CO2 concentration and alkalinity and Green's functions for the transport of CO2 from injection locations to the ocean surface as well as alkalinity response to seafloor CaCO3 dissolution. Green's functions are calculated from the results of a three-dimensional model for ocean carbon cycle for impulses of CO2 either released to the atmosphere or injected a locations deep in the Pacific and Atlantic oceans. CO2 transport in the three-dimensional (3-D) model is governed by offline tracer transport in the ocean interior, exchange of CO2 with the atmosphere, and dissolution of ocean sediments. The convolution model is found to accurately approximate results of the 3-D model in test cases including both deep-ocean injection and sediment dissolution. The convolution model allows comparison of the CO2 evasion delay achieved by deep ocean injection with notional scenarios for CO2 stabilization and the time extent of the fossil fuel era.

  3. CO2 sequestration: Storage capacity guideline needed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frailey, S.M.; Finley, R.J.; Hickman, T.S.

    2006-01-01

    Petroleum reserves are classified for the assessment of available supplies by governmental agencies, management of business processes for achieving exploration and production efficiency, and documentation of the value of reserves and resources in financial statements. Up to the present however, the storage capacity determinations made by some organizations in the initial CO2 resource assessment are incorrect technically. New publications should thus cover differences in mineral adsorption of CO2 and dissolution of CO2 in various brine waters.

  4. R&D100: CO2 Memzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Rempe, Susan; Brinker, Jeff; Jiang, Ying-Bing; Vanegas, Juan

    2015-11-19

    By combining a water droplet loaded with CO2 enzymes in an ultrathin nanopore on a flexible substrate, researchers at Sandia National Laboratories realized the first technology that meets and exceeds DOE targets for cost-effective CO2 capture. When compared with the nearest membrane competitor, this technology delivers a three times permeation rate, twenty times higher selectivity, and ten time lower fabrication cost. The CO2 Memzyme has the potential to remove 90% of CO2 emissions and is forecasted to save the U.S. coal industry $90 billion a year compared to conventional technology.

  5. CO2 capture in different carbon materials.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Vicente; Ramírez-Lucas, Ana; Díaz, José Antonio; Sánchez, Paula; Romero, Amaya

    2012-07-01

    In this work, the CO(2) capture capacity of different types of carbon nanofibers (platelet, fishbone, and ribbon) and amorphous carbon have been measured at 26 °C as at different pressures. The results showed that the more graphitic carbon materials adsorbed less CO(2) than more amorphous materials. Then, the aim was to improve the CO(2) adsorption capacity of the carbon materials by increasing the porosity during the chemical activation process. After chemical activation process, the amorphous carbon and platelet CNFs increased the CO(2) adsorption capacity 1.6 times, whereas fishbone and ribbon CNFs increased their CO(2) adsorption capacity 1.1 and 8.2 times, respectively. This increase of CO(2) adsorption capacity after chemical activation was due to an increase of BET surface area and pore volume in all carbon materials. Finally, the CO(2) adsorption isotherms showed that activated amorphous carbon exhibited the best CO(2) capture capacity with 72.0 wt % of CO(2) at 26 °C and 8 bar.

  6. CO2 MITIGATION VIA ACCELERATED LIMESTONE WEATHERING

    SciTech Connect

    Rau, G H; Knauss, K G; Langer, W H; Caldeira, K G

    2004-02-27

    The climate and environmental impacts of our current, carbon-intensive energy usage demands that effective and practical energy alternatives and CO2 mitigation strategies be found. As part of this effort, various means of capturing and storing CO2 generated from fossil-fuel-based energy production are being investigated. One of the proposed methods involves a geochemistry-based capture and sequestration process that hydrates point-source, waste CO2 with water to produce a carbonic acid solution. This in turn is reacted and neutralized with limestone, thus converting the original CO2 gas to calcium bicarbonate in solution, the overall reaction being:

  7. Laser-assisted hair transplantation: histologic comparison between holmium:YAG and CO2 lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Eugene A.; Rabinov, C. Rose; Wong, Brian J.; Krugman, Mark E.

    1999-06-01

    The histological effects of flash-scanned CO2 (λ=10.6μm) and pulsed Holmium:YAG (Ho:YAG, λ=2.12μm) lasers were evaluated in human scalp following the creation of hair transplant recipient channels. Ho:YAG laser irradiation created larger zones of thermal injury adjacent to the laser channels than irradiation with the CO2 laser device. When the two lasers created recipient sites of nearly equal depth, the Holmium:YAG laser caused a larger region of lateral thermal damage (589.30μm) than the CO2 laser (118.07μm). In addition, Holmium:YAG irradiated specimens exhibited fractures or discontinuities beyond the region of clear thermal injury. This shearing effect is consistent with the photoacoustic mechanism of ablation associated with pulsed mid-IR laser irradiation. In contrast, channels created with the CO2 exhibited minimal epithelial disruption and significantly less lateral thermal damage. While the Holmium:YAG laser is a useful tool for ablation soft tissue with minimal char in select applications (sinus surgery, arthroscopic surgery), this study suggests that the use of the CO2 laser for the creation of transplantation recipient channels result in significantly less lateral thermal injury for the laser parameters employed.

  8. Mycorrhizal dynamics under CO2 and nitrogen enrichment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, M. O.; Ovasapyan, T.; Finzi, A.; Treseder, K.

    2006-12-01

    We tested the hypothesis that elevated atmospheric CO2 would increase the prevalence of mycorrhizal fungi, because plant investment in mycorrhizal fungi should increase if soil nutrients become limiting. Likewise, mycorrhizal abundance should decline under N fertilization. At four dates between December 2004 and November 2005, soil was collected from fertilized and unfertilized sectors within replicate rings of the Duke FACE experiment. CO2 fumigation began in summer of 1996, and N fertilization in spring of 2005. CO2 enrichment significantly increased colonization of roots by ectomycorrhizal fungi, from 31+/-4% root length in ambient plots to 39+/-4% in enriched plots (P=.036). We found no effect of CO2 or nitrogen fertilization on root colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi (average:43% root length), hyphal length of AM fungi (average: 1.2 m g-1 soil), or glomalin (average: 7.7 mg g-1 soil). Radiocarbon signatures indicated that glomalin residence times were approximately 7 years in this site, (Δ14C=107+/- 5.1), so this glycoprotein could constitute a longlived sink of nutrients. Neither elevated CO2 nor nitrogen fertilization altered ECM production of beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAG) or glycine aminopeptidase (GAP), which break down chitin and proteins, respectively. Moreover, ECM produced enzymes might only contribute to a small fraction (0 to 1.5%) of chitin and protein degradation in the soil. Our CO2 hypothesis was supported with respect to ECM fungi, but not AM fungi. The general lack of response to nitrogen may be due to the short duration of the fertilization treatment at the time of sample collection.

  9. CO2 Interaction with Geomaterials (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanov, V.; Howard, B. H.; Lynn, R. J.; Warzinski, R. P.; Hur, T.; Myshakin, E. M.; Lopano, C. L.; Voora, V. K.; Al-Saidi, W. A.; Jordan, K. D.; Cygan, R. T.; Guthrie, G. D.

    2010-12-01

    This work compares the sorption and swelling processes associated with CO2-coal and CO2-clay interactions. We investigated the mechanisms of interaction related to CO2 adsortion in micropores, intercalation into sub-micropores, dissolution in solid matrix, the role of water, and the associated changes in reservoir permeability, for applications in CO2 sequestration and enhanced coal bed methane recovery. The structural changes caused by CO2 have been investigated. A high-pressure micro-dilatometer was equipped to investigate the effect of CO2 pressure on the thermoplastic properties of coal. Using an identical dilatometer, Rashid Khan (1985) performed experiments with CO2 that revealed a dramatic reduction in the softening temperature of coal when exposed to high-pressure CO2. A set of experiments was designed for -20+45-mesh samples of Argonne Premium Pocahontas #3 coal, which is similar in proximate and ultimate analysis to the Lower Kittanning seam coal that Khan used in his experiments. No dramatic decrease in coal softening temperature has been observed in high-pressure CO2 that would corroborate the prior work of Khan. Thus, conventional polymer (or “geopolymer”) theories may not be directly applicable to CO2 interaction with coals. Clays are similar to coals in that they represent abundant geomaterials with well-developed microporous structure. We evaluated the CO2 sequestration potential of clays relative to coals and investigated the factors that affect the sorption capacity, rates, and permanence of CO2 trapping. For the geomaterials comparison studies, we used source clay samples from The Clay Minerals Society. Preliminary results showed that expandable clays have CO2 sorption capacities comparable to those of coal. We analyzed sorption isotherms, XRD, DRIFTS (infrared reflectance spectra at non-ambient conditions), and TGA-MS (thermal gravimetric analysis) data to compare the effects of various factors on CO2 trapping. In montmorillonite, CO2

  10. Does sedimentary organic delta 13C record variations in quaternary ocean [CO2(aq)]?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rau, G. H.; Froelich, P. N.; Takahashi, T.; Des Marais, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    Ocean surface water [CO2(aq)] variations based on glacial/interglacial changes in sediment delta 13Corg are shown to compare favorably with reconstructions based on ice core [CO2]. In particular, an approximate 80 microatmospheres increase in atmospheric pCO2 during the last glacial-interglacial transition is calculated to correspond to a 3-4 micromolar increase in ocean surface water [CO2(aq)] at atmospheric equilibrium. A widespread marine delta 13Corg decrease of 1-2% accompanied this event and was not preceded by an equivalent isotopic change in surface water total dissolved inorganic carbon. These observations support the hypothesis that [CO2(aq)] influences photosynthetic isotope fractionation between marine inorganic and organic carbon pools, and therefore that plankton/sediment delta 13Corg may serve as a proxy for surface water [CO2(aq)].

  11. Concurrent Co2+ and Sr2+ sorption from binary mixtures using aluminum industry waste: Kinetic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milenković, A.; Smičiklas, I.; Šljivić-Ivanović, M.; Vukelić, N.

    2015-12-01

    Multi-component sorption studies are essential to identify the applicability of red mud as a lowcost sorbent for the simultaneous removal of metal ions from wastewaters. Sorption kinetics of Co2+ and Sr2+ ions was investigated, at different total concentrations of mixtures and different molar ratios of two cations. Kinetics of metal sorption from binary systems was found to be well described by pseudo-second order rate model. Equilibrium sorbed amounts and equilibrium times for Co2+ sorption increased with the increase of its total concentration in the mixture, whereas pseudo-second order rate constants exhibited the opposite trend. Sr2+ sorption was strongly suppressed in the presence of Co2+ ions, and the removal efficiency decreased with increasing concentration and mole fraction of Co2+. Red mud can be used for simultaneous Co2+ and Sr2+ removal from mixtures of lower initial concentration, otherwise Co2+ sorption is dominant.

  12. A Method for Measuring Subcanopy CO2 Advection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staebler, R. M.; Fitzjarrald, D. R.

    2004-12-01

    Underestimation of nocturnal CO2 respiration under calm conditions remains an unsolved problem at many forest flux stations, and several groups are currently investigating the direct measurement of horizontal advection of CO2. This presentation will describe a systematic, relatively low-cost methodology developed to determine whether horizontal mean transport of CO2 accounts for the missing CO2 at the Harvard Forest (Petersham, MA). This methodology includes the characterization of subcanopy motions, determining the appropriate size of the subcanopy network required to make the measurements, developing a method of integrating the measurements in the vertical, and determining the required averaging time. Measurements were conducted over 4 years and produced data for 310 nights covering all seasons. Subcanopy flows were decoupled from the flows aloft 75% of the time. Conditions conducive to the generation of negative buoyancy near the forest floor, necessary for drainage flows to develop, were given in 92% of all nights. The occurrence of nocturnal drainage flows correlated well with "missing flux" problems ("deficit nights"), prompting us to propose an improvement on the commonly used friction velocity criterion (which requires u* to be larger than some empirical cut-off for the eddy fluxes to be considered credible). The "negative buoyancy forcing fraction", i.e. negative buoyancy as a fraction of the sum of the dynamic driving forces, can be shown to predict deficit nights significantly better than the u* cut-off. The appropriate horizontal size of the network of wind and CO2 sensors at the Harvard Forest was shown to be on the order of 100 m, ensuring that sensors were generally observing coherent processes on this scale or larger and thus displaying some correlation. Horizontal transport of CO2 was found to be restricted to the bottom ~10 m of the forest, facilitating the development of a method of integrating the horizontal CO2 gradients in the vertical

  13. Regional CO2 flux estimates for 2009-2010 based on GOSAT and ground-based CO2 observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksyutov, S.; Takagi, H.; Valsala, V. K.; Saito, M.; Oda, T.; Saeki, T.; Belikov, D. A.; Saito, R.; Ito, A.; Yoshida, Y.; Morino, I.; Uchino, O.; Andres, R. J.; Yokota, T.

    2013-09-01

    We present the application of a global carbon cycle modeling system to the estimation of monthly regional CO2 fluxes from the column-averaged mole fractions of CO2 (XCO2) retrieved from spectral observations made by the Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT). The regional flux estimates are to be publicly disseminated as the GOSAT Level 4 data product. The forward modeling components of the system include an atmospheric tracer transport model, an anthropogenic emissions inventory, a terrestrial biosphere exchange model, and an oceanic flux model. The atmospheric tracer transport was simulated using isentropic coordinates in the stratosphere and was tuned to reproduce the age of air. We used a fossil fuel emission inventory based on large point source data and observations of nighttime lights. The terrestrial biospheric model was optimized by fitting model parameters to observed atmospheric CO2 seasonal cycle, net primary production data, and a biomass distribution map. The oceanic surface pCO2 distribution was estimated with a 4-D variational data assimilation system based on reanalyzed ocean currents. Monthly CO2 fluxes of 64 sub-continental regions, between June 2009 and May 2010, were estimated from GOSAT FTS SWIR Level 2 XCO2 retrievals (ver. 02.00) gridded to 5° × 5° cells and averaged on a monthly basis and monthly-mean GLOBALVIEW-CO2 data. Our result indicated that adding the GOSAT XCO2 retrievals to the GLOBALVIEW data in the flux estimation brings changes to fluxes of tropics and other remote regions where the surface-based data are sparse. The uncertainties of these remote fluxes were reduced by as much as 60% through such addition. Optimized fluxes estimated for many of these regions, were brought closer to the prior fluxes by the addition of the GOSAT retrievals. In most of the regions and seasons considered here, the estimated fluxes fell within the range of natural flux variabilities estimated with the component models.

  14. CO2 Capture with Enzyme Synthetic Analogue

    SciTech Connect

    Cordatos, Harry

    2010-11-08

    Overview of an ongoing, 2 year research project partially funded by APRA-E to create a novel, synthetic analogue of carbonic anhydrase and incorporate it into a membrane for removal of CO2 from flue gas in coal power plants. Mechanism background, preliminary feasibility study results, molecular modeling of analogue-CO2 interaction, and program timeline are provided.

  15. Capturing CO2 via reactions in nanopores.

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Kevin; Nenoff, Tina Maria; Criscenti, Louise Jacqueline; Tang, Z; Dong, J. H.

    2008-10-01

    This one-year exploratory LDRD aims to provide fundamental understanding of the mechanism of CO2 scrubbing platforms that will reduce green house gas emission and mitigate the effect of climate change. The project builds on the team members expertise developed in previous LDRD projects to study the capture or preferential retention of CO2 in nanoporous membranes and on metal oxide surfaces. We apply Density Functional Theory and ab initio molecular dynamics techniques to model the binding of CO2 on MgO and CaO (100) surfaces and inside water-filled, amine group functionalized silica nanopores. The results elucidate the mechanisms of CO2 trapping and clarify some confusion in the literature. Our work identifies key future calculations that will have the greatest impact on CO2 capture technologies, and provides guidance to science-based design of platforms that can separate the green house gas CO2 from power plant exhaust or even from the atmosphere. Experimentally, we modify commercial MFI zeolite membranes and find that they preferentially transmit H2 over CO2 by a factor of 34. Since zeolite has potential catalytic capability to crack hydrocarbons into CO2 and H2, this finding paves the way for zeolite membranes that can convert biofuel into H2 and separate the products all in one step.

  16. CO2 Capture with Enzyme Synthetic Analogue

    SciTech Connect

    Cordatos, Harry

    2010-03-01

    Project overview provides background on carbonic anhydrase transport mechanism for CO2 in the human body and proposed approach for ARPA-E project to create a synthetic enzyme analogue and utilize it in a membrane for CO2 capture from flue gas.

  17. Can Transcutaneous CO2 Tension Be Used to Calculate Ventilatory Dead Space? A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Lakshminarayana, Pradeep H; Geeti, Adiba A; Darr, Umer M; Kaufman, David A

    2016-01-01

    Dead space fraction (V d/V t) measurement performed using volumetric capnography requires arterial blood gas (ABG) sampling to estimate the partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO2). In recent years, transcutaneous capnography (PtcCO2) has emerged as a noninvasive method of estimating PaCO2. We hypothesized that PtcCO2 can be used as a substitute for PaCO2 in the calculation of V d/V t. In this prospective pilot comparison study, 30 consecutive postcardiac surgery mechanically ventilated patients had V d/V t calculated separately using volumetric capnography by substituting PtcCO2 for PaCO2. The mean V d/V t calculated using PaCO2 and PtcCO2 was 0.48 ± 0.09 and 0.53 ± 0.08, respectively, with a strong positive correlation between the two methods of calculation (Pearson's correlation = 0.87, p < 0.05). Bland-Altman analysis showed a mean difference of -0.05 (95% CI: -0.01 to -0.09) between the two methods. PtcCO2 measurements can provide a noninvasive means to measure V d/V t, thus accessing important physiologic information and prognostic assessment in patients receiving mechanical ventilation. PMID:27688911

  18. Core-scale electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) monitoring of CO2-brine mixture in Fontainebleau sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosch, David; Ledo, Juanjo; Queralt, Pilar; Bellmunt, Fabian; Luquot, Linda; Gouze, Philippe

    2016-07-01

    The main goal of the monitoring stage of Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is to obtain an accurate estimation of the subsurface CO2 accumulation and to detect any possible leakage. Laboratory experiments are necessary to investigate the small scale processes governing the CO2-brine-rock interaction. They also provide a means to calibrate the results coming from field scale geophysical methods. In this work we set up an experimental system which is able to perform Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) measurements on centimeter-scale rock samples at various P-T conditions. We present the results of two new experiments related to CO2 monitoring, performed on a cylindrical (4 × 8 cm) Fontainebleau rock sample. In the first one, we have quantified the CO2 saturation at different volume fractions, representing zones from a deep saline aquifer with varying degrees of saturation. In the second one, we have monitored and quantified the effect of CO2 dissolution in the brine at a pressure of 40 bar during eight days, emulating the invasion of CO2 into a shallow aquifer. Results highlight the importance of accounting for the contribution of surface conductivity in highly CO2-saturated regions, even in clay-free rocks, and also for brine conductivity variation due to CO2 dissolution. Ignoring any of these effects will end up in a CO2 saturation underestimation. We present a modified CO2 saturation equation to account for these two influences.

  19. Can Transcutaneous CO2 Tension Be Used to Calculate Ventilatory Dead Space? A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Geeti, Adiba A.; Darr, Umer M.; Kaufman, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Dead space fraction (Vd/Vt) measurement performed using volumetric capnography requires arterial blood gas (ABG) sampling to estimate the partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO2). In recent years, transcutaneous capnography (PtcCO2) has emerged as a noninvasive method of estimating PaCO2. We hypothesized that PtcCO2 can be used as a substitute for PaCO2 in the calculation of Vd/Vt. In this prospective pilot comparison study, 30 consecutive postcardiac surgery mechanically ventilated patients had Vd/Vt calculated separately using volumetric capnography by substituting PtcCO2 for PaCO2. The mean Vd/Vt calculated using PaCO2 and PtcCO2 was 0.48 ± 0.09 and 0.53 ± 0.08, respectively, with a strong positive correlation between the two methods of calculation (Pearson's correlation = 0.87, p < 0.05). Bland-Altman analysis showed a mean difference of −0.05 (95% CI: −0.01 to −0.09) between the two methods. PtcCO2 measurements can provide a noninvasive means to measure Vd/Vt, thus accessing important physiologic information and prognostic assessment in patients receiving mechanical ventilation. PMID:27688911

  20. Can Transcutaneous CO2 Tension Be Used to Calculate Ventilatory Dead Space? A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Geeti, Adiba A.; Darr, Umer M.; Kaufman, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Dead space fraction (Vd/Vt) measurement performed using volumetric capnography requires arterial blood gas (ABG) sampling to estimate the partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO2). In recent years, transcutaneous capnography (PtcCO2) has emerged as a noninvasive method of estimating PaCO2. We hypothesized that PtcCO2 can be used as a substitute for PaCO2 in the calculation of Vd/Vt. In this prospective pilot comparison study, 30 consecutive postcardiac surgery mechanically ventilated patients had Vd/Vt calculated separately using volumetric capnography by substituting PtcCO2 for PaCO2. The mean Vd/Vt calculated using PaCO2 and PtcCO2 was 0.48 ± 0.09 and 0.53 ± 0.08, respectively, with a strong positive correlation between the two methods of calculation (Pearson's correlation = 0.87, p < 0.05). Bland-Altman analysis showed a mean difference of −0.05 (95% CI: −0.01 to −0.09) between the two methods. PtcCO2 measurements can provide a noninvasive means to measure Vd/Vt, thus accessing important physiologic information and prognostic assessment in patients receiving mechanical ventilation.

  1. Evasion of CO2 Injected into the Ocean in the Context of CO2 Stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kheshgi, H. S.

    2002-05-01

    The injection captured CO2 into the deep ocean is one potential option for sequestering CO2 from the atmosphere. Aspects of this potential option include cost, effects on the marine environment and the eventual evasion of injected CO2 to the atmosphere. Estimates of evasion are considered in the context of long-term scenarios for future CO2 emissions, including illustrative cases leading to stabilization of CO2 concentration at various levels. Ocean carbon cycle model results are used to illustrate how the timing of evasion of injected CO2 fits with current conceptions of the timing of future changes in atmospheric CO2 concentration. Of course, some CO2 emissions would be immediately incurred from the effort required to capture, transport and inject CO2. Modeled residence time for CO2 injected into the deep ocean exceeds the 100 year time scale usually considered in scenarios for future emissions, and the potential impacts of climate change. Illustrative cases leading monotonically to constant CO2 concentration have been highlighted by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change to give guidance on possible timing of emission reductions that may be required to stabilize CO2 concentrations at various levels. For cases considered, significant modeled evasion does not occur until long after CO2 emissions have reached a maximum and begun to decline. Illustrative cases can also lead to a maximum in CO2 concentration followed by a decline to lower, possibly constant, concentrations. In such cases, injection of emissions into the deep ocean leads to lower maximum CO2 concentrations, with less effect on concentrations later on in time. Alternative illustrative cases leading to stabilization of CO2 concentration provide a perspective to view evasion of injected CO2 in relation to emissions from technologies in the distant future.

  2. Effects of Laser Wavelength on Ablator Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    Wavelength-dependent or spectral radiation effects are potentially significant for thermal protection materials. NASA atmospheric entry simulations include trajectories with significant levels of shock layer radiation which is concentrated in narrow spectral lines. Tests using two different high powered lasers, the 10.6 micron LHMEL I CO2 laser and the near-infrared 1.07 micron fiber laser, on low density ablative thermal protection materials offer a unique opportunity to evaluate spectral effects. Test results indicated that the laser wavelength can impact the thermal response of an ablative material, in terms of bond-line temperatures, penetration times, mass losses, and char layer thicknesses.

  3. CO2 and Er:YAG laser interaction with grass tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jaehun; Ki, Hyungson

    2013-01-01

    Plant leaves are multi-component optical materials consisting of water, pigments, and dry matter, among which water is the predominant constituent. In this article, we investigate laser interaction with grass using CO2 and Er:YAG lasers theoretically and experimentally, especially targeting water in grass tissues. We have first studied the optical properties of light absorbing constituents of grass theoretically, and then have identified interaction regimes and constructed interaction maps through a systematic experiment. Using the interaction maps, we have studied how interaction regimes change as process parameters are varied. This study reveals some interesting findings concerning carbonization and ablation mechanisms, the effect of laser beam diameter, and the ablation efficiency and quality of CO2 and Er:YAG lasers.

  4. Gravimetric analysis of CO2 adsorption on activated carbon at various pressures and temperatures using piezoelectric microcantilevers.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yusung; Lee, Dongkyu; Lee, Sangkyu; Moon, Wonkyu; Jeon, Sangmin

    2011-09-15

    We investigated the adsorption and desorption of CO(2) on activated carbon using piezoelectric microcantilevers. After coating the free end of a cantilever with activated carbon, variations in the resonance frequency of the cantilever were measured as a function of CO(2) pressure, which is related to mass changes due to the adsorption or desorption of CO(2). The pressure-dependent viscous damping effects were compensated in the calculation of the CO(2) adsorption capacity of the activated carbon by comparing the frequency differences between the coated and uncoated cantilevers. The mass sensitivity of the piezoelectric cantilever was found to be better than 1 pg. The fractional coverage of CO(2) agreed with a Langmuir adsorption isotherm, indicating that a submonolayer of adsorbed CO(2) occurred on the surface of the activated carbon under the experimental conditions. The heat of adsorption was determined using the Clausius-Clapeyron relation and the fractional coverage of CO(2) at various temperatures and pressures.

  5. In situ measurement of atmospheric CO2 at the four WMO/GAW stations in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, S. X.; Zhou, L. X.; Tans, P. P.; Ciais, P.; Steinbacher, M.; Xu, L.; Luan, T.

    2014-03-01

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) mole fractions were continuously measured from January 2009 to December 2011 at four atmospheric observatories in China using cavity ring-down spectroscopy instruments. The stations are Lin'an (LAN), Longfengshan (LFS), Shangdianzi (SDZ), and Waliguan (WLG), which are regional (LAN, LFS, SDZ) or global (WLG) measurement stations of the World Meteorological Organization's Global Atmosphere Watch program (WMO/GAW). LAN is located near the megacity of Shanghai, in China's economically most developed region. LFS is in a forest and rice production area, close to the city of Harbin in northeastern China. SDZ is located 150 km northeast of Beijing. WLG, hosting the longest record of measured CO2 mole fractions in China, is a high-altitude site in northwestern China recording background CO2 concentration. The CO2 growth rates are 3.7 ± 1.2 ppm yr-1 for LAN, 2.7 ± 0.8 ppm yr-1 for LFS, 3.5 ± 1.6 ppm yr-1 for SDZ, and 2.2 ± 0.8 ppm yr-1 (1σ) for WLG during the period of 2009 to 2011. The highest annual mean CO2 mole fraction of 404.2 ± 3.9 ppm was observed at LAN in 2011. A comprehensive analysis of CO2 variations, their diurnal and seasonal cycles as well as the analysis of the influence of local sources on the CO2 mole fractions allows a characterization of the sampling sites and of the key processes driving the CO2 mole fractions. These data form a basis to improve our understanding of atmospheric CO2 variations in China and the underlying fluxes using atmospheric inversion models.

  6. Field Measurements of Respiratory Del13CO2 and Photodegradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Asperen, H.; Sabbatini, S.; Nicolini, G.; Warneke, T.; Papale, D.; Notholt, J.

    2014-12-01

    Carbon decomposition dynamics have been studied in a variety of ecosystems and its variation can mostly be explained in terms of environmental variables (e.g. temperature and precipitation). However, carbon dynamics in arid, water limited regions have shown to be very different and are still largely unknown. Several studies have indicated the importance of photodegradation, the direct breakdown of organic matter by sunlight, in these arid regions. A FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer) was set up to continuously measure concentrations of CO2, CH4, N2O, CO as well as del13C in CO2. The FTIR was connected to 2 different flux measurement systems: a Flux Gradient system and 2 flux chambers, providing a continuous data set of gas concentrations and biosphere-atmosphere gas fluxes at different heights and scales. Field measurements showed photodegradation induced carbon fluxes. Also, respiratory del13CO2 was determined by use of Keeling plots, and was determined to vary between -25‰ and -21‰. A clear diurnal pattern in respiratory del13CO2 was found, suggesting either different (dominant) respiratory processes between day and night or the effect of diffusive fractionation.

  7. Geophysical monitoring technology for CO2 sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jin-Feng; Li, Lin; Wang, Hao-Fan; Tan, Ming-You; Cui, Shi-Ling; Zhang, Yun-Yin; Qu, Zhi-Peng; Jia, Ling-Yun; Zhang, Shu-Hai

    2016-06-01

    Geophysical techniques play key roles in the measuring, monitoring, and verifying the safety of CO2 sequestration and in identifying the efficiency of CO2-enhanced oil recovery. Although geophysical monitoring techniques for CO2 sequestration have grown out of conventional oil and gas geophysical exploration techniques, it takes a long time to conduct geophysical monitoring, and there are many barriers and challenges. In this paper, with the initial objective of performing CO2 sequestration, we studied the geophysical tasks associated with evaluating geological storage sites and monitoring CO2 sequestration. Based on our review of the scope of geophysical monitoring techniques and our experience in domestic and international carbon capture and sequestration projects, we analyzed the inherent difficulties and our experiences in geophysical monitoring techniques, especially, with respect to 4D seismic acquisition, processing, and interpretation.

  8. Zinc depolarized electrochemical CO2 concentration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, R. R.; Marshall, R. D.; Schubert, F. H.

    1975-01-01

    Two zinc depolarized electrochemical carbon dioxide concentrator concepts were analytically and experimentally evaluated for portable life support system carbon dioxide (CO2) removal application. The first concept, referred to as the zinc hydrogen generator electrochemical depolarized CO2 concentrator, uses a ZHG to generate hydrogen for direct use in an EDC. The second concept, referred to as the zinc/electrochemical depolarized concentrator, uses a standard EDC cell construction modified for use with the Zn anode. The Zn anode is consumed and subsequently regenerated, thereby eliminating the need to supply H2 to the EDC for the CO2 removal process. The evaluation was based primarily on an analytical evaluation of the two ZnDCs at projected end item performance and hardware design levels. Both ZnDC concepts for PLSS CO2 removal application were found to be noncompetitive in both total equivalent launch weight and individual extravehicular activity mission volume when compared to other candidate regenerable PLSS CO2 scrubbers.

  9. Venting of CO2 at Enceladus’ Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matson, Dennis L.; Davies, Ashley G.; Johnson, Torrence V.; Combe, Jean-Philippe; McCord, Tom B.; Radebaugh, Jani

    2015-11-01

    Enceladus has CO2 surface deposits in its South Polar Region that have been recently mapped by J.-P. Combe et al. (2015 AGU Fall Meeting). Assuming that these are CO2 frost, we show how they can be formed. We use an ocean-water circulation model [1] that specifies pressure gradients that drive water to the surface from a relatively gas-rich, subsurface ocean. We now examine the movement of CO2 to the surface; formation of shallow CO2 gas pockets in the ice; and the venting of CO2, when at least some of the gas freezes to form frost. If the local heat flow is known (cf. [2]), then the depths of the corresponding gas pockets can be calculated. References: [1] Matson et al. (2012) Icarus, 221, 53-62. [2] Howett et al. (2011) J. Geophys. Res. 116, E03003. Acknowledgements: AGD thanks the NASA OPR Program for support.

  10. Ablative Thermal Protection: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laub, Bernie

    2003-01-01

    Contents include the following: Why ablative thermal protections - TPS. Ablative TPS chronology: strategic reentry systems, solid rocket motor nozzles, space (manned missions and planetary entry probes). Ablation mechanisms. Ablation material testing. Ablative material testing.

  11. The ins and outs of CO2.

    PubMed

    Raven, John A; Beardall, John

    2016-01-01

    It is difficult to distinguish influx and efflux of inorganic C in photosynthesizing tissues; this article examines what is known and where there are gaps in knowledge. Irreversible decarboxylases produce CO2, and CO2 is the substrate/product of enzymes that act as carboxylases and decarboxylases. Some irreversible carboxylases use CO2; others use HCO3(-). The relative role of permeation through the lipid bilayer versus movement through CO2-selective membrane proteins in the downhill, non-energized, movement of CO2 is not clear. Passive permeation explains most CO2 entry, including terrestrial and aquatic organisms with C3 physiology and biochemistry, terrestrial C4 plants and all crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plants, as well as being part of some mechanisms of HCO3(-) use in CO2 concentrating mechanism (CCM) function, although further work is needed to test the mechanism in some cases. However, there is some evidence of active CO2 influx at the plasmalemma of algae. HCO3(-) active influx at the plasmalemma underlies all cyanobacterial and some algal CCMs. HCO3(-) can also enter some algal chloroplasts, probably as part of a CCM. The high intracellular CO2 and HCO3(-) pools consequent upon CCMs result in leakage involving CO2, and occasionally HCO3(-). Leakage from cyanobacterial and microalgal CCMs involves up to half, but sometimes more, of the gross inorganic C entering in the CCM; leakage from terrestrial C4 plants is lower in most environments. Little is known of leakage from other organisms with CCMs, though given the leakage better-examined organisms, leakage occurs and increases the energetic cost of net carbon assimilation.

  12. Silvering substrates after CO2 snow cleaning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zito, Richard R.

    2005-09-01

    There have been some questions in the astronomical community concerning the quality of silver coatings deposited on substrates that have been cleaned with carbon dioxide snow. These questions center around the possible existence of carbonate ions left behind on the substrate by CO2. Such carbonate ions could react with deposited silver to produce insoluble silver carbonate, thereby reducing film adhesion and reflectivity. Carbonate ions could be produced from CO2 via the following mechanism. First, during CO2 snow cleaning, a small amount of moisture can condense on a surface. This is especially true if the jet of CO2 is allowed to dwell on one spot. CO2 gas can dissolve in this moisture, producing carbonic acid, which can undergo two acid dissociations to form carbonate ions. In reality, it is highly unlikely that charged carbonate ions will remain stable on a substrate for very long. As condensed water evaporates, Le Chatelier's principle will shift the equilibrium of the chain of reactions that produced carbonate back to CO2 gas. Furthermore, the hydration of CO2 reaction of CO2 with H20) is an extremely slow process, and the total dehydrogenation of carbonic acid is not favored. Living tissues that must carry out the equilibration of carbonic acid and CO2 use the enzyme carbonic anhydrase to speed up the reaction by a factor of one million. But no such enzymatic action is present on a clean mirror substrate. In short, the worst case analysis presented below shows that the ratio of silver atoms to carbonate radicals must be at least 500 million to one. The results of chemical tests presented here support this view. Furthermore, film lift-off tests, also presented in this report, show that silver film adhesion to fused silica substrates is actually enhanced by CO2 snow cleaning.

  13. The ins and outs of CO2

    PubMed Central

    Raven, John A.; Beardall, John

    2016-01-01

    It is difficult to distinguish influx and efflux of inorganic C in photosynthesizing tissues; this article examines what is known and where there are gaps in knowledge. Irreversible decarboxylases produce CO2, and CO2 is the substrate/product of enzymes that act as carboxylases and decarboxylases. Some irreversible carboxylases use CO2; others use HCO3 –. The relative role of permeation through the lipid bilayer versus movement through CO2-selective membrane proteins in the downhill, non-energized, movement of CO2 is not clear. Passive permeation explains most CO2 entry, including terrestrial and aquatic organisms with C3 physiology and biochemistry, terrestrial C4 plants and all crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plants, as well as being part of some mechanisms of HCO3 – use in CO2 concentrating mechanism (CCM) function, although further work is needed to test the mechanism in some cases. However, there is some evidence of active CO2 influx at the plasmalemma of algae. HCO3 – active influx at the plasmalemma underlies all cyanobacterial and some algal CCMs. HCO3 – can also enter some algal chloroplasts, probably as part of a CCM. The high intracellular CO2 and HCO3 – pools consequent upon CCMs result in leakage involving CO2, and occasionally HCO3 –. Leakage from cyanobacterial and microalgal CCMs involves up to half, but sometimes more, of the gross inorganic C entering in the CCM; leakage from terrestrial C4 plants is lower in most environments. Little is known of leakage from other organisms with CCMs, though given the leakage better-examined organisms, leakage occurs and increases the energetic cost of net carbon assimilation. PMID:26466660

  14. Dynamics of CO2 fluxes and concentrations during a shallow subsurface CO2 release

    SciTech Connect

    Lewicki, J.L.; Hilley, G.E.; Dobeck, L.; Spangler, L.

    2009-09-01

    A field facility located in Bozeman, Montana provides the opportunity to test methods to detect, locate, and quantify potential CO2 leakage from geologic storage sites. From 9 July to 7 August 2008, 0.3 t CO2 d{sup -1} were injected from a 100-m long, {approx}2.5 m deep horizontal well. Repeated measurements of soil CO2 fluxes on a grid characterized the spatio-temporal evolution of the surface leakage signal and quantified the surface leakage rate. Infrared CO2 concentration sensors installed in the soil at 30 cm depth at 0 to 10 m from the well and at 4 cm above the ground at 0 and 5 m from the well recorded surface breakthrough of CO2 leakage and migration of CO2 leakage through the soil. Temporal variations in CO2 concentrations were correlated with atmospheric and soil temperature, wind speed, atmospheric pressure, rainfall, and CO2 injection rate.

  15. Impact of 4-year CO2 injection on reservoir-rock integrity at the CO2 pilot site Ketzin (Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, S.; Förster, H.; Meier, A.; Pudlo, D.; Förster, A.; Gaupp, R.

    2013-12-01

    was observed in the CO2-penetrated reservoir rocks. Application of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Electron Microprobe Analysis (EMPA) revealed minor quantities (usually <2 vol-%) of various species of newly precipitated carbonates. The baseline study of the sandstones showed variable amounts of authigenic poikilitic dolomite as the only pre-existing carbonate species, which have not yet been observed in the sandstones exposed to CO2. In these rocks, small mineral aggregates occur, usually composed of a core of dolomite-ankerite solid solutions mantled by siderite, which itself is overgrown by calcite. Three potential CO32- sources for the newly formed carbonates have to be considered: (A) dolomite dissolution, (B) reactions of injected CO2 with the formation fluid, and (C) the drill mud. Further work will involve a reduction of the observation scale. Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (LA-ICP-MS) and Micro-Raman-Spectroscopy will provide space-resolved chemical data for an improved understanding of alteration processes that occurred at the micro- to sub-micrometer scale.

  16. Immunohistochemical investigation of wound healing in response to fractional photothermolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helbig, Doris; Bodendorf, Marc Oliver; Grunewald, Sonja; Kendler, Michael; Simon, Jan C.; Paasch, Uwe

    2009-11-01

    Despite growing clinical evidence of ablative fractional photothermolysis (AFP), little is known about the spatiotemporal molecular changes within the targeted compartments. Six subjects received three different single AFP treatments using a scanned 250 μm CO2-laser beam. Spatiotemporal changes of skin regeneration were estimated by immunohistochemical investigation (HSP70, HSP72, HSP47, TGFβ, procollagen III, CD3, CD20, and CD68) in skin samples 1 h, 3 days, and 14 days postintervention. The remodeling was uniformly started by regrowth of the epidermal compartment followed by partial to complete replacement of the microscopic ablation zones (MAZ) by newly synthesized condensed procollagen III. From day 3 to 14, the number of macrophages as well as giant cells surrounding the MAZ increased. TGFβ expression was highest 1 h to 3 days following AFP. HSP70 and HSP72 expressions were highest 3-14 days postintervention in the spinocellular layer leading to an upregulation of HSP47. AFP performed by a scanned CO2-laser results in an early epidermal remodeling, which is followed by a dermal remodeling leading to a replacement of the MAZ with newly synthesized (pro)-collagen. During this, an inflammatory infiltrate with CD3+ and CD20+ cells surrounds the MAZ. The count of macrophages and giant cells involved in the replacement of the necrotic zones seems to be crucial for wound healing.

  17. CO2 Accounting and Risk Analysis for CO2 Sequestration at Enhanced Oil Recovery Sites.

    PubMed

    Dai, Zhenxue; Viswanathan, Hari; Middleton, Richard; Pan, Feng; Ampomah, William; Yang, Changbing; Jia, Wei; Xiao, Ting; Lee, Si-Yong; McPherson, Brian; Balch, Robert; Grigg, Reid; White, Mark

    2016-07-19

    Using CO2 in enhanced oil recovery (CO2-EOR) is a promising technology for emissions management because CO2-EOR can dramatically reduce sequestration costs in the absence of emissions policies that include incentives for carbon capture and storage. This study develops a multiscale statistical framework to perform CO2 accounting and risk analysis in an EOR environment at the Farnsworth Unit (FWU), Texas. A set of geostatistical-based Monte Carlo simulations of CO2-oil/gas-water flow and transport in the Morrow formation are conducted for global sensitivity and statistical analysis of the major risk metrics: CO2/water injection/production rates, cumulative net CO2 storage, cumulative oil/gas productions, and CO2 breakthrough time. The median and confidence intervals are estimated for quantifying uncertainty ranges of the risk metrics. A response-surface-based economic model has been derived to calculate the CO2-EOR profitability for the FWU site with a current oil price, which suggests that approximately 31% of the 1000 realizations can be profitable. If government carbon-tax credits are available, or the oil price goes up or CO2 capture and operating expenses reduce, more realizations would be profitable. The results from this study provide valuable insights for understanding CO2 storage potential and the corresponding environmental and economic risks of commercial-scale CO2-sequestration in depleted reservoirs.

  18. CO2 Accounting and Risk Analysis for CO2 Sequestration at Enhanced Oil Recovery Sites.

    PubMed

    Dai, Zhenxue; Viswanathan, Hari; Middleton, Richard; Pan, Feng; Ampomah, William; Yang, Changbing; Jia, Wei; Xiao, Ting; Lee, Si-Yong; McPherson, Brian; Balch, Robert; Grigg, Reid; White, Mark

    2016-07-19

    Using CO2 in enhanced oil recovery (CO2-EOR) is a promising technology for emissions management because CO2-EOR can dramatically reduce sequestration costs in the absence of emissions policies that include incentives for carbon capture and storage. This study develops a multiscale statistical framework to perform CO2 accounting and risk analysis in an EOR environment at the Farnsworth Unit (FWU), Texas. A set of geostatistical-based Monte Carlo simulations of CO2-oil/gas-water flow and transport in the Morrow formation are conducted for global sensitivity and statistical analysis of the major risk metrics: CO2/water injection/production rates, cumulative net CO2 storage, cumulative oil/gas productions, and CO2 breakthrough time. The median and confidence intervals are estimated for quantifying uncertainty ranges of the risk metrics. A response-surface-based economic model has been derived to calculate the CO2-EOR profitability for the FWU site with a current oil price, which suggests that approximately 31% of the 1000 realizations can be profitable. If government carbon-tax credits are available, or the oil price goes up or CO2 capture and operating expenses reduce, more realizations would be profitable. The results from this study provide valuable insights for understanding CO2 storage potential and the corresponding environmental and economic risks of commercial-scale CO2-sequestration in depleted reservoirs. PMID:27362472

  19. CO2 deserts: implications of existing CO2 supply limitations for carbon management.

    PubMed

    Middleton, Richard S; Clarens, Andres F; Liu, Xiaowei; Bielicki, Jeffrey M; Levine, Jonathan S

    2014-10-01

    Efforts to mitigate the impacts of climate change will require deep reductions in anthropogenic CO2 emissions on the scale of gigatonnes per year. CO2 capture and utilization and/or storage technologies are a class of approaches that can substantially reduce CO2 emissions. Even though examples of this approach, such as CO2-enhanced oil recovery, are already being practiced on a scale >0.05 Gt/year, little attention has been focused on the supply of CO2 for these projects. Here, facility-scale data newly collected by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency was processed to produce the first comprehensive map of CO2 sources from industrial sectors currently supplying CO2 in the United States. Collectively these sources produce 0.16 Gt/year, but the data reveal the presence of large areas without access to CO2 at an industrially relevant scale (>25 kt/year). Even though some facilities with the capability to capture CO2 are not doing so and in some regions pipeline networks are being built to link CO2 sources and sinks, much of the country exists in "CO2 deserts". A life cycle analysis of the sources reveals that the predominant source of CO2, dedicated wells, has the largest carbon footprint further confounding prospects for rational carbon management strategies.

  20. Role of Sulfur Vapor on PGE-Fractionation Processes in Cu-Ni Deposits: Experimental Study by ICP-MS Laser Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peregoedova, A.; Barnes, S.; Baker, D. R.

    2004-05-01

    lesser extent Pt. Our experiments suggest that transport by S-vapor is not the mechanism for this remobilization, as Pd was not fractionated from Pt, and Cu was not significantly transported by the vapor compared to Ni. A more promising candidate for the remobilization of the Cu and Pd is the Cu-rich sulfide melts that formed in some experiments.

  1. CO2 laser micromachining of optical waveguides for interconnection on circuit boards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakariyah, Shefiu S.; Conway, Paul P.; Hutt, David A.; Wang, Kai; Selviah, David R.

    2012-12-01

    The introduction of microvia and surface mount technologies into the manufacturing process for printed circuit boards (PCBs) has significantly improved the interconnection density. However, as the speed of signals for data communication on the board approaches and begins to exceed 10 Gb/s, the loss and crosstalk of copper interconnections increase. To resolve these problems, optical interconnections (OI) have been suggested as a viable solution. Literature reports have proved the photochemical nature of excimer laser ablation with its minimal thermal effect, and other ultra-violet lasers are also being investigated for the fabrication of polymer waveguides by laser ablation. In this paper, the authors demonstrate the fabrication of multimode optical polymer waveguides by using infra-red 10.6 μm CO2 laser micromachining to etch acrylate-based photopolymer (Truemode™). CO2 lasers offer a low cost and high speed fabrication route as CO2 lasers can be used to cut through various engineering materials including polymers and metals. The paper characterises the relationship between the laser ablation power, the fabrication speed and the resulting effect on the waveguide optical insertion loss for the first time.

  2. 3D modelling of the early martian climate under a denser CO2 atmosphere: Temperatures and CO2 ice clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forget, F.; Wordsworth, R.; Millour, E.; Madeleine, J.-B.; Kerber, L.; Leconte, J.; Marcq, E.; Haberle, R. M.

    2013-01-01

    On the basis of geological evidence, it is often stated that the early martian climate was warm enough for liquid water to flow on the surface thanks to the greenhouse effect of a thick atmosphere. We present 3D global climate simulations of the early martian climate performed assuming a faint young Sun and a CO2 atmosphere with surface pressure between 0.1 and 7 bars. The model includes a detailed radiative transfer model using revised CO2 gas collision induced absorption properties, and a parameterisation of the CO2 ice cloud microphysical and radiative properties. A wide range of possible climates is explored using various values of obliquities, orbital parameters, cloud microphysic parameters, atmospheric dust loading, and surface properties. Unlike on present day Mars, for pressures higher than a fraction of a bar, surface temperatures vary with altitude because of the adiabatic cooling and warming of the atmosphere when it moves vertically. In most simulations, CO2 ice clouds cover a major part of the planet. Previous studies had suggested that they could have warmed the planet thanks to their scattering greenhouse effect. However, even assuming parameters that maximize this effect, it does not exceed +15 K. Combined with the revised CO2 spectroscopy and the impact of surface CO2 ice on the planetary albedo, we find that a CO2 atmosphere could not have raised the annual mean temperature above 0 °C anywhere on the planet. The collapse of the atmosphere into permanent CO2 ice caps is predicted for pressures higher than 3 bar, or conversely at pressure lower than 1 bar if the obliquity is low enough. Summertime diurnal mean surface temperatures above 0 °C (a condition which could have allowed rivers and lakes to form) are predicted for obliquity larger than 40° at high latitudes but not in locations where most valley networks or layered sedimentary units are observed. In the absence of other warming mechanisms, our climate model results are thus consistent

  3. Engineered yeast for enhanced CO2 mineralization†

    PubMed Central

    Barbero, Roberto; Carnelli, Lino; Simon, Anna; Kao, Albert; Monforte, Alessandra d’Arminio; Riccò, Moreno; Bianchi, Daniele; Belcher, Angela

    2014-01-01

    In this work, a biologically catalyzed CO2 mineralization process for the capture of CO2 from point sources was designed, constructed at a laboratory scale, and, using standard chemical process scale-up protocols, was modeled and evaluated at an industrial scale. A yeast display system in Saccharomyces cerevisae was used to screen several carbonic anhydrase isoforms and mineralization peptides for their impact on CO2 hydration, CaCO3 mineralization, and particle settling rate. Enhanced rates for each of these steps in the CaCO3 mineralization process were confirmed using quantitative techniques in lab-scale measurements. The effect of these enhanced rates on the CO2 capture cost in an industrial scale CO2 mineralization process using coal fly ash as the CaO source was evaluated. The model predicts a process using bCA2- yeast and fly ash is ~10% more cost effective per ton of CO2 captured than a process with no biological molecules, a savings not realized by wild-type yeast and high-temperature stable recombinant CA2 alone or in combination. The levelized cost of electricity for a power plant using this process was calculated and scenarios in which this process compares favorably to CO2 capture by MEA absorption process are presented. PMID:25289021

  4. Glacial CO2 Cycles: A Composite Scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broecker, W. S.

    2015-12-01

    There are three main contributors to the glacial drawdown of atmospheric CO2 content: starvation of the supply of carbon to the ocean-atmosphere reservoir, excess CO2 storage in the deep sea, and surface-ocean cooling. In this talk, I explore a scenario in which all three play significant roles. Key to this scenario is the assumption that deep ocean storage is related to the extent of nutrient stratification of the deep Atlantic. The stronger this stratification, the larger the storage of respiration CO2. Further, it is my contention that the link between Milankovitch insolation cycles and climate is reorganizations of the ocean's thermohaline circulation leading to changes in the deep ocean's CO2 storage. If this is the case, the deep Atlantic d13C record kept in benthic foraminifera shells tells us that deep ocean CO2 storage follows Northern Hemisphere summer insolation cycles and thus lacks the downward ramp so prominent in the records of sea level, benthic 18O and CO2. Rather, the ramp is created by the damping of planetary CO2 emissions during glacial time intervals. As it is premature to present a specific scenario, I provide an example as to how these three contributors might be combined. As their magnitudes and shapes remain largely unconstrained, the intent of this exercise is to provoke creative thinking.

  5. Estimating lake-atmosphere CO2 exchange

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, D.E.; Striegl, R.G.; Stannard, D.I.; Michmerhuizen, C.M.; McConnaughey, T.A.; LaBaugh, J.W.

    1999-01-01

    Lake-atmosphere CO2 flux was directly measured above a small, woodland lake using the eddy covariance technique and compared with fluxes deduced from changes in measured lake-water CO2 storage and with flux predictions from boundary-layer and surface-renewal models. Over a 3-yr period, lake-atmosphere exchanges of CO2 were measured over 5 weeks in spring, summer, and fall. Observed springtime CO2 efflux was large (2.3-2.7 ??mol m-2 s-1) immediately after lake-thaw. That efflux decreased exponentially with time to less than 0.2 ??mol m-2 s-1 within 2 weeks. Substantial interannual variability was found in the magnitudes of springtime efflux, surface water CO2 concentrations, lake CO2 storage, and meteorological conditions. Summertime measurements show a weak diurnal trend with a small average downward flux (-0.17 ??mol m-2 s-1) to the lake's surface, while late fall flux was trendless and smaller (-0.0021 ??mol m-2 s-1). Large springtime efflux afforded an opportunity to make direct measurement of lake-atmosphere fluxes well above the detection limits of eddy covariance instruments, facilitating the testing of different gas flux methodologies and air-water gas-transfer models. Although there was an overall agreement in fluxes determined by eddy covariance and those calculated from lake-water storage change in CO2, agreement was inconsistent between eddy covariance flux measurements and fluxes predicted by boundary-layer and surface-renewal models. Comparison of measured and modeled transfer velocities for CO2, along with measured and modeled cumulative CO2 flux, indicates that in most instances the surface-renewal model underpredicts actual flux. Greater underestimates were found with comparisons involving homogeneous boundary-layer models. No physical mechanism responsible for the inconsistencies was identified by analyzing coincidentally measured environmental variables.

  6. Regenerable Sorbent for CO2 Removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alptekin, Gokhan; Jayaraman, Ambal

    2013-01-01

    A durable, high-capacity regenerable sorbent can remove CO2 from the breathing loop under a Martian atmosphere. The system design allows near-ambient temperature operation, needs only a small temperature swing, and sorbent regeneration takes place at or above 8 torr, eliminating the potential for Martian atmosphere to leak into the regeneration bed and into the breathing loop. The physical adsorbent can be used in a metabolic, heat-driven TSA system to remove CO2 from the breathing loop of the astronaut and reject it to the Martian atmosphere. Two (or more) alternating sorbent beds continuously scrub and reject CO2 from the spacesuit ventilation loop. The sorbent beds are cycled, alternately absorbing CO2 from the vent loop and rejecting the adsorbed material into the environment at a high CO2 partial pressure (above 8 torr). The system does not need to run the adsorber at cryogenic temperatures, and uses a much smaller temperature swing. The sorbent removes CO2 via a weak chemical interaction. The interaction is strong enough to enable CO2 adsorption even at 3 to 7.6 torr. However, because the interaction between the surface adsorption sites and the CO2 is relatively weak, the heat input needed to regenerate the sorbent is much lower than that for chemical absorbents. The sorbent developed in this project could potentially find use in a large commercial market in the removal of CO2 emissions from coal-fired power plants, if regulations are put in place to curb carbon emissions from power plants.

  7. Geological factors affecting CO2 plume distribution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frailey, S.M.; Leetaru, H.

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the lateral extent of a CO2 plume has important implications with regards to buying/leasing pore volume rights, defining the area of review for an injection permit, determining the extent of an MMV plan, and managing basin-scale sequestration from multiple injection sites. The vertical and lateral distribution of CO2 has implications with regards to estimating CO2 storage volume at a specific site and the pore pressure below the caprock. Geologic and flow characteristics such as effective permeability and porosity, capillary pressure, lateral and vertical permeability anisotropy, geologic structure, and thickness all influence and affect the plume distribution to varying degrees. Depending on the variations in these parameters one may dominate the shape and size of the plume. Additionally, these parameters do not necessarily act independently. A comparison of viscous and gravity forces will determine the degree of vertical and lateral flow. However, this is dependent on formation thickness. For example in a thick zone with injection near the base, the CO2 moves radially from the well but will slow at greater radii and vertical movement will dominate. Generally the CO2 plume will not appreciably move laterally until the caprock or a relatively low permeability interval is contacted by the CO2. Conversely, in a relatively thin zone with the injection interval over nearly the entire zone, near the wellbore the CO2 will be distributed over the entire vertical component and will move laterally much further with minimal vertical movement. Assuming no geologic structure, injecting into a thin zone or into a thick zone immediately under a caprock will result in a larger plume size. With a geologic structure such as an anticline, CO2 plume size may be restricted and injection immediately below the caprock may have less lateral plume growth because the structure will induce downward vertical movement of the CO2 until the outer edge of the plume reaches a spill

  8. Refining the alkenone-pCO2 method: The role of algal growth conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, A.; Zhang, Y.; Huybers, P. J.; Pagani, M.

    2015-12-01

    The alkenone-pCO2 method based on carbon isotope fractionation during growth of haptophyte algae is one of the most widely used approaches to reconstruct atmospheric CO2 level in the Cenozoic. Based on the fractionation of stable carbon isotopes between dissolved CO2 and phytoplankton biomass, as represented by alkenone lipid biomarkers, this relationship (known as ɛp37:2) scales inversely with growth rate and cell volume to surface area ratio, and positively with CO2. Recently-published estimates for late Pleistocene CO2 levels, however, are poorly correlated with ice core CO2 records, suggesting that alkenone paleobarometry needs to be refined. Here we compiled published records over recent glacial-interglcial (G-IG) cycles and revised the relationship between algal growth rate, as expressed by the physiological parameter 'b', and dissolved phosphate concentration. We further show that the magnitude of change in ɛp37:2 over glacial-interglacial cycles at different sites is dependent on local nutrient conditions, highlighting the importance of constraining b for accurate CO2 estimates. The correlation between GDGT-2/3 ratio and back-calculated b at Ceara Rise (ODP Site 925) suggests that archaeal lipids could be used as proxies to calibrate b. Application of our variable-b method to reported data yields pCO2 estimates that are similar in both trends and magnitude to ice core-derived records.

  9. Natural Analog for Geologic Storage of CO2: CO2 accumulation in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Xu, T.; Liu, N.; Zhou, B.

    2012-12-01

    Natural accumulations of CO2 are potential analogues of CO2 geological storage that can provide useful information on the behaviour of supercritical CO2 in reservoirs. Natural CO2 accumulations are common across Northeast China, and, although they occur in a wide variety of geological settings, their distribution is principally controlled by the Mesozoic-Cenozoic rift basins and associated Quaternary volcanism. High CO2 concentrations (>60 CO2%) in natural gas reservoirs are usually related to volcanism and magmatism, and possesses mantle-genetic origin. CO2 reservoirs consist of sandstone, volcanic rocks and carbonate rocks with the buried depth from 2000-3000 m. Dawsonite is recognized in almost all of the CO2-bearing basin, which has been proved to share the same carbon source with CO2 in the reservoirs in Songliao basin, Hailaer basin and Donghai basin. Petrographic data show that dawsonite is abundant in feldspar- rich sandstone, volcanic rock fragment-rich sandstones and tuff. In some cases, high percentage of dawsonite cement constitutes a diagenetic seal, which occurs in the reservoir-mudstone caprock and prevents upward leakage of CO2. Besides dawsonite, mantle-genetic CO2 flux leads to the formation of calcite, ankerite and siderite. The statistics of porosity and permeability measured from the dawsonite-bearing sandstone and dawsonite-absent sandstone with the almost same burial depth in Songliao basin show that the mantle-genetic CO2 flux result in lower reservoir quality, suggesting that mineral trapping for CO2 is significant. Chemical analyses of formation water in Songliao basin and Hailaer basin indicate that the concentrations of TDS, HCO3-,CO32-, Mg2+,Ca2+ and Na+ + K+ in dawsonite-bearing sandstone are higher than that in dawsonite-absent sandstone. Distribution of CO2 and dawsonite is constrainted by the regional caprocks in the Songliao basin. The charging time of the mantle-genetic CO2 in China dates from 50 to 25 Ma.

  10. Atmospheric CO2 Removal by Enhancing Weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koster van Groos, A. F.; Schuiling, R. D.

    2014-12-01

    The increase of the CO2 content in the atmosphere by the release of anthropogenic CO2 may be addressed by the enhancement of weathering at the surface of the earth. The average emission of mantle-derived CO2 through volcanism is ~0.3 Gt/year (109 ton/year). Considering the ~3.000 Gt of CO2 present in the atmosphere, the residence time of CO2 in the earth's atmosphere is ~10,000 years. Because the vast proportion of carbon in biomass is recycled through the atmosphere, CO2 is continuously removed by a series of weathering reactions of silicate minerals and stored in calcium and magnesium carbonates. The addition of anthropogenic CO2 from fossil fuel and cement production, which currently exceeds 35 Gt/year and dwarfs the natural production 100-fold, cannot be compensated by current rates of weathering, and atmospheric CO2 levels are rising rapidly. To address this increase in CO2 levels, weathering rates would have to be accelerated on a commensurate scale. Olivine ((Mg,Fe)2SiO4) is the most reactive silicate mineral in the weathering process. This mineral is the major constituent in relatively common ultramafic rocks such as dunites (olivine content > 90%). To consume the current total annual anthropogenic release of CO2, using a simplified weathering reaction (Mg2SiO4 + 4CO2 + 4H2O --> 2 Mg2+ + 4HCO3- + H4SiO4) would require ~30 Gt/year or ~8-9 km3/year of dunite. This is a large volume; it is about double the total amount of ore and gravel currently mined (~ 17 Gt/year). To mine and crush these rocks to <100 μm costs ~ 8/ton. The transport and distribution over the earth's surface involves additional costs, that may reach 2-5/ton. Thus, the cost of remediation for the release of anthropogenic CO2 is 300-400 billion/year. This compares to a 2014 global GDP of ~80 trillion. Because weathering reactions require the presence of water and proceed more rapidly at higher temperatures, the preferred environments to enhance weathering are the wet tropics. From a socio

  11. CO2 Biogenic vs Anthropogenic Sectoral Contribution for INFLUX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Coto, I.; Prasad, K.; Hu, H.; Whetstone, J. R.; Miles, N. L.; Richardson, S.; Lauvaux, T.; Davis, K. J.; Turnbull, J. C.; Karion, A.; Sweeney, C.; Brewer, A.; Hardesty, M.; Cambaliza, M. O. L.; Shepson, P. B.; Patarasuk, R.; Gurney, K. R.

    2014-12-01

    The Indianapolis Flux Experiment (INFLUX) aims to use a top-down inversion methodology to quantify sources of Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions over an urban domain with high spatial and temporal resolution. This project is an experimental test bed which is intended to establish reliable methods for quantifying and validating GHG emissions independently of the inventory methods typically used for Measurement, Reporting and Verification (MRV) of pollution sources. Analyzing the contribution of different source types or sectors is a fundamental step in order to achieve an accuracy level desired for such MRV applications. This is especially challenging when attempting to determine anthropogenic emissions during the growing season since biological GHG fluxes reach a maximum at this time. To this end, the Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF-ARW) version 3.5.1 was used along with a modified version of the Green House Gases chemistry module for simulating the CO2 mole fraction transport during September and October 2013. Sectoral anthropogenic CO2 emissions were obtained from Hestia 2012 and from Vulcan 2002 beyond the spatial coverage of Hestia. Biogenic CO2 emissions were simulated by using an augmented version of the "Vegetation Photosynthesis and Respiration Model" (VPRM) included in WRF-CHEM. An implementation of the unconstrained nonlinear global optimization method of Nelder and Mead was employed to find the optimum values for the VPRM parameters for each vegetation category by using data from Ameriflux eddy covariance flux towers. Here we present a preliminary assessment of the relative contribution of biological vs sectoral anthropogenic CO2 fluxes on the INFLUX measurements network. The simulations are compared to tower and aircraft measurements that include trace gases with the capacity to distinguish observationally anthropogenic and biogenic CO2 sources and sinks. In addition, an evaluation of the sensitivity of the sectoral attribution to meteorological

  12. Towards international guidelines for CO2 storage resource estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennan, S.; Causebrook, R.; Gerling, J.; Heidug, W. K.; Holloway, S.; Lipponen, J.; McCoy, S.; Pagnier, H.; Warwick, P. D.; White, D. J.; Yoshimura, T.

    2012-12-01

    Currently there is no uniformly adopted methodology to estimate geological carbon dioxide (CO2) storage resource by country: each jurisdiction uses its own evaluation and estimation methodology. In 2011, the International Energy Agency (IEA) convened workshops among international geological surveys to recommend a common estimation methodology for all countries. Such a methodology should describe a typical process for developing assessments of CO2 storage resources; recommend a sound methodology for arriving at a jurisdictional or national-scale CO2 storage resource assessment that could be applied globally; and recommend a way to help policy makers understand what portion of the resource can be relied on and is likely to be technically accessible at a particular cost. The recommendations of the IEA workshops include: strata within a basin should be subdivided into Storage Assessment Units (SAU), which is defined as a mappable volume of rock that consists of a porous flow storage unit and an overlying regional sealing formation; estimation methods should be probabilistic; pore space in the SAU should be estimated; and constraints should be clearly stated. Furthermore, jurisdictions should identify their total accessible storage resource (TASR), which is defined as the fraction of the total pore volume that may retain CO2, within SAUs. Finally, all jurisdictions should employ a common set of storage efficiency factors. Storage efficiency factors determine the fraction of available pore space that can retain CO2 within an SAU. Reaching agreement on a common set of storage efficiency factors is difficult, as these values are still undetermined and have a high degree of uncertainty. The IEA has proposed to help jurisdictions decide which methodology suits its requirements, the jurisdictions choose from a continuum of existing methodologies that already deal with a range of potential constraints. The initial assessments should follow the use of the robust and fully

  13. Micrometeoroid ablation simulated in the laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternovsky, Zoltan; Thomas, Evan W.; DeLuca, Michael; Horanyi, Mihaly; Janches, Diego; Munsat, Tobin L.; Plane, John M. C.

    2016-04-01

    A facility is developed to simulate the ablation of micrometeoroids in laboratory conditions, which also allows measuring the ionization probability of the ablated material. An electrostatic dust accelerator is used to generate iron and meteoric analog particles with velocities 10-50 km/s. The particles are then introduced into a cell filled with nitrogen, air or carbon dioxide gas with pressures adjustable in the 0.02 - 0.5 Torr range, where the partial or complete ablation of the particle occurs over a short distance. An array of biased electrodes is used to collect the ionized products with spatial resolution along the ablating particles' path, allowing thus the study of the temporal resolution of the process. A simple ablation model is used to match the observations. For completely ablated particles the total collected charge directly yields the ionization efficiency for. The measurements using iron particles in N2 and air are in relatively good agreement with earlier data. The measurements with CO2 and He gases, however, are significantly different from the expectations.

  14. CO2 Sensing and CO2 Regulation of Stomatal Conductance: Advances and Open Questions.

    PubMed

    Engineer, Cawas B; Hashimoto-Sugimoto, Mimi; Negi, Juntaro; Israelsson-Nordström, Maria; Azoulay-Shemer, Tamar; Rappel, Wouter-Jan; Iba, Koh; Schroeder, Julian I

    2016-01-01

    Guard cells form epidermal stomatal gas-exchange valves in plants and regulate the aperture of stomatal pores in response to changes in the carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration ([CO2]) in leaves. Moreover, the development of stomata is repressed by elevated CO2 in diverse plant species. Evidence suggests that plants can sense [CO2] changes via guard cells and via mesophyll tissues in mediating stomatal movements. We review new discoveries and open questions on mechanisms mediating CO2-regulated stomatal movements and CO2 modulation of stomatal development, which together function in the CO2 regulation of stomatal conductance and gas exchange in plants. Research in this area is timely in light of the necessity of selecting and developing crop cultivars that perform better in a shifting climate. PMID:26482956

  15. Translucent CO2 ice on Mars ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Frederic; Andrieu, Francois; Douté, Sylvain; Schmitt, Bernard

    2016-10-01

    The Martian climate is driven by the condensation/sublimation of CO2 representing 95% of the atmosphere. Many active surface features (such dark spot, dark flows), have been potentially linked to CO2 exchange. Understanding the surface/atmosphere interactions is a major issue, for both atmospheric but also surface science. This study aims at estimating the physical properties of the seasonal CO2 ice deposits. Are these deposits granular or compact? What is the thickness of the ice? How much impurities are included within the ice? These questions have been highly debated in the literature, in particular the presence of a translucent slab ice, the link with the H2O cycle. In particular the cold jet geyser model requires translucent CO2 ice. We use radiative transfer models to simulate spectroscopic data from the CRISM instrument and perform an inversion to estimate model's parameters though time. We then discuss the consistency of the results with other datasets.

  16. Canopy leaf area constrains [CO2]-induced enhancement of productivity and partitioning among aboveground carbon pools

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Heather R.; Oren, Ram; Finzi, Adrien C.; Johnsen, Kurt H.

    2006-01-01

    Net primary productivity (NPP) is enhanced under future atmospheric [CO2] in temperate forests representing a broad range of productivity. Yet questions remain in regard to how elevated [CO2]-induced NPP enhancement may be affected by climatic variations and limiting nutrient resources, as well as how this additional production is distributed among carbon (C) pools of different longevities. Using 10 years of data from the Duke free-air CO2 enrichment (Duke FACE) site, we show that spatially, the major control of NPP was nitrogen (N) availability, through its control on canopy leaf area index (L). Elevated CO2 levels resulted in greater L, and thus greater NPP. After canopy closure had occurred, elevated [CO2] did not enhance NPP at a given L, regardless of soil water availability. Additionally, using published data from three other forest FACE sites and replacing L with leaf area duration (LD) to account for differences in growing season length, we show that aboveground NPP responded to [CO2] only through the enhancement of LD. For broadleaf forests, the fraction of aboveground NPP partitioned to wood biomass saturated with increasing LD and was not enhanced by [CO2], whereas it linearly decreased for the conifer forest but was enhanced by [CO2]. These results underscore the importance of resolving [CO2] effects on L to assess the response of NPP and C allocation. Further study is necessary to elucidate the mechanisms that control the differential allocation of C among aboveground pools in different forest types. PMID:17159159

  17. Diurnal variation in respiratory CO2 flux in an arid ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Asperen, Hella; Warneke, Thorsten; Sabbatini, Simone; Höpker, Martin; Chiti, Tommaso; Nicolini, Giacomo; Papale, Dario; Böhm, Michael; Notholt, Justus

    2016-04-01

    The application of stable isotopes to study ecosystem processes is increasingly used. However, continuous in-situ observation of CO2 concentrations, CO2 fluxes, and their isotopic components are still sparse. In this study, we present results from an arid grassland in Italy, in which continuous measurements of δ13CO2 and CO2 were performed by means of an in-situ Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer connected to a concentration-tower set up and to soil flux chambers. By use of Keeling plots, daily nighttime Keeling plot-intercepts and hourly flux chamber Keeling plot-intercepts could be derived. The flux chambers solely showed CO2 emission, with respiration peaks during the day. Keeling plot intercepts from the tower, overlooking the arid grassland, showed more enriched δ13CO2 values than Keeling plot intercepts derived from chamber measurements, indicating different dominating respiratory sources in their footprint. Flux chamber respiratory δ13CO2 values showed a daily pattern with on average 3.5‰ more depleted δ13CO2 fluxes during the night. It is hypothesized that the observed diurnal variation in respiratory δ13CO2 is a consequence of the physical process of diffusive fractionation taking place during the nocturnal boundary layer build up.

  18. Risk Assessment and Monitoring of Stored CO2 in Organic Rocks Under Non-Equilibrium Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Malhotra, Vivak

    2014-06-30

    The USA is embarking upon tackling the serious environmental challenges posed to the world by greenhouse gases, especially carbon dioxide (CO2). The dimension of the problem is daunting. In fact, according to the Energy Information Agency, nearly 6 billion metric tons of CO2 were produced in the USA in 2007 with coal-burning power plants contributing about 2 billion metric tons. To mitigate the concerns associated with CO2 emission, geological sequestration holds promise. Among the potential geological storage sites, unmineable coal seams and shale formations in particular show promise because of the probability of methane recovery while sequestering the CO2. However. the success of large-scale sequestration of CO2 in coal and shale would hinge on a thorough understanding of CO2's interactions with host reservoirs. An important parameter for successful storage of CO2 reservoirs would be whether the pressurized CO2 would remain invariant in coal and shale formations under reasonable internal and/or external perturbations. Recent research has brought to the fore the potential of induced seismicity, which may result in caprock compromise. Therefore, to evaluate the potential risks involved in sequestering CO2 in Illinois bituminous coal seams and shale, we studied: (i) the mechanical behavior of Murphysboro (Illinois) and Houchin Creek (Illinois) coals, (ii) thermodynamic behavior of Illinois bituminous coal at - 100oC ≤ T ≤ 300oC, (iii) how high pressure CO2 (up to 20.7 MPa) modifies the viscosity of the host, (iv) the rate of emission of CO2 from Illinois bituminous coal and shale cores if the cores, which were pressurized with high pressure (≤ 20.7 MPa) CO2, were exposed to an atmospheric pressure, simulating the development of leakage pathways, (v) whether there are any fractions of CO2 stored in these hosts which are resistance to emission by simply exposing the cores to atmospheric pressure, and (vi) how compressive shockwaves applied to the coal and shale

  19. How secure is subsurface CO2 storage? Controls on leakage in natural CO2 reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miocic, Johannes; Gilfillan, Stuart; McDermott, Christopher; Haszeldine, Stuart

    2014-05-01

    Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is the only industrial scale technology available to directly reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from fossil fuelled power plants and large industrial point sources to the atmosphere. The technology includes the capture of CO2 at the source and transport to subsurface storage sites, such as depleted hydrocarbon reservoirs or saline aquifers, where it is injected and stored for long periods of time. To have an impact on the greenhouse gas emissions it is crucial that there is no or only a very low amount of leakage of CO2 from the storage sites to shallow aquifers or the surface. CO2 occurs naturally in reservoirs in the subsurface and has often been stored for millions of years without any leakage incidents. However, in some cases CO2 migrates from the reservoir to the surface. Both leaking and non-leaking natural CO2 reservoirs offer insights into the long-term behaviour of CO2 in the subsurface and on the mechanisms that lead to either leakage or retention of CO2. Here we present the results of a study on leakage mechanisms of natural CO2 reservoirs worldwide. We compiled a global dataset of 49 well described natural CO2 reservoirs of which six are leaking CO2 to the surface, 40 retain CO2 in the subsurface and for three reservoirs the evidence is inconclusive. Likelihood of leakage of CO2 from a reservoir to the surface is governed by the state of CO2 (supercritical vs. gaseous) and the pressure in the reservoir and the direct overburden. Reservoirs with gaseous CO2 is more prone to leak CO2 than reservoirs with dense supercritical CO2. If the reservoir pressure is close to or higher than the least principal stress leakage is likely to occur while reservoirs with pressures close to hydrostatic pressure and below 1200 m depth do not leak. Additionally, a positive pressure gradient from the reservoir into the caprock averts leakage of CO2 into the caprock. Leakage of CO2 occurs in all cases along a fault zone, indicating that

  20. Study on CO2 global recycling system.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, M; Sakamoto, Y; Niwa, S

    2001-09-28

    In order to assist in finding ways to mitigate CO2 emission and to slow the depletion of fossil fuels we have established and evaluated a representative system, which consists of three technologies developed in our laboratory. These technologies were in CO2 recovery, hydrogen production and methanol synthesis and in addition we established the necessary supporting systems. Analysis of outline designs of the large scale renewable energy power generation system and this system and energy input for building plant, energy input for running plant has been conducted based on a case using this system for a 1000-MW coal fired power plant, followed by an evaluation of the material balance and energy balance. The results are as follows. Energy efficiency is 34%, the CO2 reduction rate is 41%, the balance ratio of the energy and CO2 of the system is 2.2 and 1.8, respectively, on the assumption that the primary renewable energy is solar thermal power generation, the stationary CO2 emission source is a coal-fired power plant and the generation efficiency of the methanol power plant is 60%. By adopting the system, 3.7 million tons of CO2 can be recovered, approximately 2.7 million tons of methanol can be produced, and 15.4 billion kWh of electricity can be generated per year. Compared to generating all electrical power using only coal, approximately 2.6 million tons of coal per year can be saved and approximately 2.15 million tons of CO2 emission can be reduced. Therefore, it is clearly revealed that this system would be effective to reduce CO2 emissions and to utilize renewable energy.

  1. Trapping atmospheric CO2 with gold.

    PubMed

    Collado, Alba; Gómez-Suárez, Adrián; Webb, Paul B; Kruger, Hedi; Bühl, Michael; Cordes, David B; Slawin, Alexandra M Z; Nolan, Steven P

    2014-10-01

    The ability of gold-hydroxides to fix CO2 is reported. [Au(IPr)(OH)] and [{Au(IPr)}2(μ-OH)][BF4] react with atmospheric CO2 to form the trigold carbonate complex [{Au(IPr)}3(μ(3)-CO3)][BF4]. Reactivity studies revealed that this complex behaves as two basic and one cationic Au centres, and that it is catalytically active. DFT calculations and kinetic experiments have been carried out.

  2. Clinical applications of CO2 laser resurfacing in the treatment of various pathologic skin disorders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giler, Shamai

    1997-12-01

    CO2 laser skin resurfacing devices are widely used in cosmetic surgery for the treatment of facial rhytides, acne scars and aging skin. This technique is also useful in the treatment of various benign and premalignant or multiple pathological skin conditions and disorders originating in the epidermal, dermal and skin appendages, vascular lesions, epidermal nevi, infected wounds and ulcers, and keloids. Various surgical techniques have been developed in our clinic using laser resurfacing in the treatment of more than 2,000 patients with various skin pathologic disorders. We describe our experience with the various techniques used. The precise depth control and ablation properties combined with the hemostatic and sterilizing effects of the CO2 laser beam, reduction of the possibility of bleeding, infection and damage to healthy tissues, make the CO2 laser resurfacing techniques the treatment of choice for cosmetic surgery and treatment of benign, premalignant and multiple pathologic skin conditions.

  3. On the Vertical Gradient in CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stine, A. R.; Fung, I. Y.

    2008-12-01

    Attempts to constrain surface fluxes of carbon from atmospheric measurements of carbon dioxide have primarily focused on surface boundary layer measurements, because information about surface fluxes is least diluted close to the locations where the fluxes occur. However, errors in model ventilation of air in the vertical can be misinterpreted as local surface fluxes. Satellites which measure column integrated CO2 are expected to represent a major advance in part because they observe the entire atmospheric column. Recent work has highlighted the fact that vertical gradients in carbon concentrations can give us information about where vertical mixing errors are likely to be misinterpreted as local surface fluxes, but passive tracer evidence suggests that models that capture vertical profiles on the ocean do poorly on the land (and vice versa), suggesting that the problem of correctly treating vertical mixing in inverse studies is more fundamental than picking the "best" model. We consider observations of the vertical gradient in CO2 from aircrafts and from a comparison of satellites that observe in the near infrared (which observe the column integrated CO2 field) and the thermal infrared (which observe the upper troposphere). We evaluate the feasibility of using these satellites for determining the vertical gradient in CO2. We examine how observations of the vertical gradient of CO2 allow us to differentiate the imprint of vertical mixing and the imprint in surface fluxes on the observed field of atmospheric CO2.

  4. Advanced CO2 Removal and Reduction System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alptekin, Gokhan; Dubovik, Margarita; Copeland, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    An advanced system for removing CO2 and H2O from cabin air, reducing the CO2, and returning the resulting O2 to the air is less massive than is a prior system that includes two assemblies . one for removal and one for reduction. Also, in this system, unlike in the prior system, there is no need to compress and temporarily store CO2. In this present system, removal and reduction take place within a single assembly, wherein removal is effected by use of an alkali sorbent and reduction is effected using a supply of H2 and Ru catalyst, by means of the Sabatier reaction, which is CO2 + 4H2 CH4 + O2. The assembly contains two fixed-bed reactors operating in alternation: At first, air is blown through the first bed, which absorbs CO2 and H2O. Once the first bed is saturated with CO2 and H2O, the flow of air is diverted through the second bed and the first bed is regenerated by supplying it with H2 for the Sabatier reaction. Initially, the H2 is heated to provide heat for the regeneration reaction, which is endothermic. In the later stages of regeneration, the Sabatier reaction, which is exothermic, supplies the heat for regeneration.

  5. The overlooked tropical oceanic CO2 sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibánhez, J. Severino P.; Araujo, Moacyr; Lefèvre, Nathalie

    2016-04-01

    The intense rainfall in the tropical Atlantic spatially overlaps with the spread of the Amazon plume. Based on remote-sensed sea surface salinity and rainfall, we removed the contribution of rainfall to the apparent Amazon plume area, thus refining the quantification of its extension (0.84 ± 0.06 × 106 km2 to 0.89 ± 0.06 × 106 km2). Despite the previous overestimation of the Amazon plume area due to the influence of rainfall (>16%), our calculated annual CO2 flux based on rainfall-corrected sea surface CO2 fugacity confirms that the Amazon River plume is an atmospheric CO2 sink of global importance (-7.61 ± 1.01 to -7.85 ± 1.02 Tg C yr-1). Yet we show that current sea-air CO2 flux assessments for the tropical Atlantic could be overestimated in about 10% by neglecting the CO2 sink associated to the Amazon plume. Thus, including the Amazon plume, the sea-air CO2 exchange for the tropical Atlantic is estimated to be 81.1 ± 1.1 to 81.5 ± 1.1 Tg C yr-1.

  6. Density of aqueous solutions of CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, Julio E.

    2001-10-10

    In this report, we present a numerical representation for the partial molar volume of CO2 in water and the calculation of the corresponding aqueous solution density. The motivation behind this work is related to the importance of having accurate representations for aqueous phase properties in the numerical simulation of carbon dioxide disposal into aquifers as well as in geothermal applications. According to reported experimental data the density of aqueous solutions of CO2 can be as much as 2-3% higher than pure water density. This density variation might produce an influence on the groundwater flow regime. For instance, in geologic sequestration of CO2, convective transport mixing might occur when, several years after injection of carbon dioxide has stopped, the CO2-rich gas phase is concentrated at the top of the formation, just below an overlaying caprock. In this particular case the heavier CO2 saturated water will flow downward and will be replaced by water with a lesser CO2 content.

  7. CO2 Acquisition Membrane (CAM) Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Larry W.

    2003-01-01

    The CO2 Acquisition Membrane (CAM) project was performed to develop, test, and analyze thin film membrane materials for separation and purification of carbon dioxide (CO2) from mixtures of gases, such as those found in the Martian atmosphere. The membranes developed in this project are targeted toward In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) applications, such as In Situ Propellant Production (ISPP) and In Situ Consumables Production (ISCP). These membrane materials may be used in a variety of ISRU systems, for example as the atmospheric inlet filter for an ISPP process to enhance the concentration of CO2 for use as a reactant gas, to passively separate argon and nitrogen trace gases from CO2 for habitat pressurization, to provide a system for removal of CO2 from breathing gases in a closed environment, or within a process stream to selectively separate CO2 from other gaseous components. The membranes identified and developed for CAM were evaluated for use in candidate ISRU processes and other gas separation applications, and will help to lay the foundation for future unmanned sample return and human space missions. CAM is a cooperative project split among three institutions: Lockheed Martin Astronautics (LMA), the Colorado School of Mines (CSM), and Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  8. CO2 cooling in terrestrial planet thermospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bougher, S. W.; Hunten, D. M.; Roble, R. G.

    1994-01-01

    We examine the recent progress in the debate on the CO2-O relaxation rate, its temperature dependence, and its corresponding impact on the thermospheric heat budgets of Venus, Earth, and Mars. This comparative approach provides the broadest range of conditions under which a common CO2-O relaxation rate should provide consistent results. New global mean calculations are presented for the heat budgets of these three planets using large CO2-O relaxation rates that have been inferred recently from Earth CO2 radiance measurements and laboratory studies. Results indicate that available Venus and Mars data constrain the CO2-O relaxation rate to be 2-4 x 10(exp -12)/cu cm/s at 300 K. For Venus, this strong cooling serves as an effective thermostat that gives rise to a small variation of thermospheric temperatures over the solar cycle, just as observed. Conversely, CO2 cooling does not appear to be dominant in the dayside heat budget of the Mars thermosphere over most of the solar cycle. For the Earth, this strong cooling implies that the lower thermosphere does not typically require significant eddy diffusion or heat conduction. However, global-scale dynamics or an additional heating mechanism may be needed to restore calculated temperatures to observed values when relaxation rates exceeding 2 x 10(exp -12)/cu cm/s are employed.

  9. Infrared laser ablation of dental enamel: influence of an applied water layer on ablation rate and peripheral damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashouri, Nahal; Shori, Ramesh K.; Cheung, Jason M.; Fried, Daniel

    2001-04-01

    Studies have shown that a water spray may augment the laser ablation rate of dental hard tissues in addition to reducing heat accumulation. However, the mechanism of augmentation is controversial and poorly understood. The influence of an optically thick applied water layer on the ablation rate was investigated at wavelengths in which water is a primary absorber and the magnitude of absorption varies markedly. Water was manually applied with a pipette and troughs were cut in enamel blocks using a laser scanning system. Q- switched and free running Er:YSGG and Er:YAG, free running Ho:YAG and 9.6 micrometers TEA CO2 laser systems were investigated. The addition of water increased the rate of ablation and produced a more desirable surface morphology during enamel ablation with all the erbium systems. Ablation was markedly more efficient for the Q-switched erbium lasers than for the longer free-running laser systems when a water layer was added. Although, the addition of a thick water layer reduced the rate of ablation during CO2 laser ablation, the addition of the water removed undesirable deposits of non-apatite mineral phases from the crater surface. There was extensive peripheral damage after irradiation with the Ho:YAG laser with and without added water without effective ablation of enamel. The results of this study suggest that water augments the ablation of dental enamel by aiding in the removal of loosely attached deposits of non-apatite mineral phase from the crater surface, thus producing a more desirable crater surface morphology. The non-apatite mineral phase interfere with subsequent laser pulses during erbium laser irradiation reducing the rate of ablation and their removal aids in maintaining efficient ablation during multiple pulses irradiation.

  10. CO2 enhancement of forest productivity constrained by limited nitrogen availability.

    PubMed

    Norby, Richard J; Warren, Jeffrey M; Iversen, Colleen M; Medlyn, Belinda E; McMurtrie, Ross E

    2010-11-01

    Stimulation of terrestrial plant production by rising CO(2) concentration is projected to reduce the airborne fraction of anthropogenic CO(2) emissions. Coupled climate-carbon cycle models are sensitive to this negative feedback on atmospheric CO(2), but model projections are uncertain because of the expectation that feedbacks through the nitrogen (N) cycle will reduce this so-called CO(2) fertilization effect. We assessed whether N limitation caused a reduced stimulation of net primary productivity (NPP) by elevated atmospheric CO(2) concentration over 11 y in a free-air CO(2) enrichment (FACE) experiment in a deciduous Liquidambar styraciflua (sweetgum) forest stand in Tennessee. During the first 6 y of the experiment, NPP was significantly enhanced in forest plots exposed to 550 ppm CO(2) compared with NPP in plots in current ambient CO(2), and this was a consistent and sustained response. However, the enhancement of NPP under elevated CO(2) declined from 24% in 2001-2003 to 9% in 2008. Global analyses that assume a sustained CO(2) fertilization effect are no longer supported by this FACE experiment. N budget analysis supports the premise that N availability was limiting to tree growth and declining over time--an expected consequence of stand development, which was exacerbated by elevated CO(2). Leaf- and stand-level observations provide mechanistic evidence that declining N availability constrained the tree response to elevated CO(2); these observations are consistent with stand-level model projections. This FACE experiment provides strong rationale and process understanding for incorporating N limitation and N feedback effects in ecosystem and global models used in climate change assessments.

  11. Will atmospheric CO2 concentration continue to increase if anthropogenic CO2 emissions cease?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDougall, A. H.; Eby, M.; Weaver, A. J.

    2013-12-01

    If anthropogenic CO2 emissions were to suddenly cease, the evolution of the atmospheric CO2 concentration would depend on the magnitude and sign of natural carbon sources and sinks. Experiments using Earth system models indicate that overall carbon sinks would dominate. However, these models have typically neglected the permafrost carbon pool, which has the potential to introduce an additional terrestrial source of carbon to the atmosphere. Here we use the University of Victoria Earth System Climate Model, which has recently been expanded to include permafrost carbon stocks and exchanges with the atmosphere. In a scenario of zeroed CO2 and sulphate aerosol emissions, we assess whether the warming induced by specified constant concentrations of non-CO2 greenhouse gases could slow the CO2 decline following zero emissions, or even reverse this trend and cause CO2 to increase over time. We find that a radiative forcing from non-CO2 gases of approximately 0.6 W m-2 results in a near balance of CO2 emissions from the terrestrial biosphere and uptake of CO2 by the oceans, resulting in near-constant atmospheric CO2 concentrations for at least a century after emissions are eliminated. At higher values of non-CO2 radiative forcing, CO2 concentrations increase over time, regardless of when emissions cease during the 21st century. Given that the present-day radiative forcing from non-CO2 greenhouse gases is about 0.95 W m-2, our results suggest that if we were to eliminate all CO2 and aerosols emissions without also decreasing non-CO2 greenhouse gas emissions, CO2 levels would increase over time, resulting in a small increase in climate warming. The sudden and total cessation of anthropogenic CO2 emissions is an unlikely future scenario. However, such cessation experiments provide a useful method for evaluating the relative strength of the terrestrial and oceanic carbon cycle feedbacks in the presence of forcing from non-CO2 greenhouse gasses.

  12. Primary, secondary, and tertiary amines for CO2 capture: designing for mesoporous CO2 adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Ko, Young Gun; Shin, Seung Su; Choi, Ung Su

    2011-09-15

    CO(2) emissions, from fossil-fuel-burning power plants, the breathing, etc., influence the global worming on large scale and the man's work efficiency on small scale. The reversible capture of CO(2) is a prominent feature of CO(2) organic-inorganic hybrid adsorbent to sequester CO(2). Herein, (3-aminopropyl) trimethoxysilane (APTMS), [3-(methylamino)propyl] trimethoxysilane (MAPTMS), and [3-(diethylamino) propyl] trimethoxysilane (DEAPTMS) are immobilized on highly ordered mesoporous silicas (SBA-15) to catch CO(2) as primary, secondary, and tertiary aminosilica adsorbents. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to analyze the immobilized APTMS, MAPTMS, and DEAPTMS on the SBA-15. We report an interesting discovery that the CO(2) adsorption and desorption on the adsorbent depend on the amine type of the aminosilica adsorbent. The adsorbed CO(2) was easily desorbed from the adsorbent with the low energy consumption in the order of tertiary, secondary, and primary amino-adsorbents while the adsorption amount and the bonding-affinity increased in the reverse order. The effectiveness of amino-functionalized (1(o), 2(o), and 3(o) amines) SBA-15s as a CO(2) capturing agent was investigated in terms of adsorption capacity, adsorption-desorption kinetics, and thermodynamics. This work demonstrates apt amine types to catch CO(2) and regenerate the adsorbent, which may open new avenues to designing "CO(2) basket". PMID:21708387

  13. Commitment accounting for CO2 emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, S. J.; Socolow, R. H.

    2013-12-01

    Long-lived energy infrastructure that burns fossil fuels represents a multi-decade 'commitment' to emit CO2. Today's global power sector, alone, represents hundreds of billions of tons of still unrealized 'committed emissions' of CO2. And every year, substantial new commitments to future emissions are made, as new power plants are built. The socioeconomic inertia of these commitments is a major barrier to climate change mitigation. Here, we quantify these annual commitments by a bottom-up analysis of all power plants commissioned between 1950 and 2011; assigning emission commitments to the year when each generator came on line. We find, assuming 40-year commitments, that the global commitment to future emissions from the world's generators in 2011 (the most recent year in our analysis) was 318 Gt CO2, of which 216 Gt CO2 were commitments from the world's coal-fired generators and 134 Gt CO2 were commitments from China's generators. Annual new global commitments exceeded 15 Gt CO2 per year in every year since 2000. Moreover, between 2005-2010 (the latest year of available emissions data), new global commitments were more than twice as large as actual emissions from all power plants. Country-specific ratios of new committed emissions to actual emissions, averaged over 1990-2010 were 4.1 for China, 2.6 for India, 0.9 for the EU, and 0.6 for the US. We urge that the reporting of annual CO2 emissions, already widely institutionalized, be augmented by 'commitment accounting' which makes these future emissions salient. Annual committed emissions and annual emissions of primary power infrastructure. New committed emissions (light green) have grown from approximately 4 Gt CO2 per year in 1960 to roughly 10 Gt CO2 per year between 1970-1995, and then to more than 15 Gt CO2 per year since 2000. Throughout this period, new committed emissions have exceeded annual emissions (blue curve, source: IEA). Although the commitments made 30-40 years ago have largely been realized (dark

  14. Precursory volcanic CO2 signals from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwandner, Florian M.; Carn, Simon A.; Kataoka, Fumie; Kuze, Akihiko; Shiomi, Kei; Goto, Naoki

    2016-04-01

    Identification of earliest signals heralding volcanic unrest benefits from the unambiguous detection of precursors that reflect deviation of magmatic systems from metastable background activity. Ascent and emplacement of new basaltic magma at depth may precede eruptions by weeks to months. Transient localized carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions stemming from exsolution from depressurized magma are expected, and have been observed weeks to months ahead of magmatic surface activity. Detecting such CO2 precursors by continuous ground-based monitoring operations is unfortunately not a widely implemented method yet, save a handful of volcanoes. Detecting CO2 emissions from space offers obvious advantages - however it is technologically challenging, not the least due to the increasing atmospheric burden of CO2, against which a surface emission signal is hard to discern. In a multi-year project, we have investigated the feasibility of space-borne detection of pre-eruptive volcanic CO2 passive degassing signals using observations from the Greenhouse Gas Observing SATellite (GOSAT). Since 2010, we have observed over 40 active volcanoes from space using GOSAT's special target mode. Over 72% of targets experienced at least one eruption over that time period, demonstrating the potential utility of space-borne CO2 observations in non-imaging target-mode (point source monitoring mode). While many eruption precursors don't produce large enough CO2 signals to exceed space-borne detection thresholds of current satellite sensors, some of our observations have nevertheless already shown significant positive anomalies preceding eruptions at basaltic volcanoes. In 2014, NASA launched its first satellite dedicated to atmospheric CO2 observation, the Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO-2). Its observation strategy differs from the single-shot GOSAT instrument. At the expense of GOSAT's fast time series capability (3-day repeat cycle, vs. 16 for OCO-2), its 8-footprint continuous swath can slice

  15. Exercise carbon dioxide (CO2) retention with inhaled CO2 and breathing resistance.

    PubMed

    Shykoff, Barbara E; Warkander, Dan E

    2012-01-01

    Combined effects on respiratory minute ventilation (VE)--and thus, on end-tidal carbon dioxide partial pressure (P(ET)CO2)--of breathing resistance and elevated inspired carbon dioxide (CO2) had not been determined during heavy exercise. In this Institutional Review Board-approved, dry, sea-level study, 12 subjects in each of three phases exercised to exhaustion at 85% peak oxygen uptake while V(E) and P(ET)CO2 were measured. Participants inhaled 0%, 1%, 2% or 3% CO2 in air, or 0% or 2% CO2 in oxygen, with or without breathing resistance, mimicking the U.S. Navy's MK 16 rebreather underwater breathing apparatus (UBA). Compared to air baseline (0% inspired CO2 in air without resistance): (1) Oxygen decreased baseline V(E) (p < 0.01); (2) Inspired CO2 increased V(E) and P(ET)CO2 (p < 0.01); (3) Resistance decreased V(E) (p < 0.01); (4) Inspired CO2 with resistance elevated P(ET)CO2 (p < 0.01). In air, V(E) did not change from that with resistance alone. In oxygen, V(E) returned to oxygen baseline. End-exercise P(ET)CO2 exceeded 60 Torr (8.0 kPa) in three tests. Subjects identified hypercapnia poorly. Results support dual optimization of arterial carbon dioxide partial pressure and respiratory effort. Because elevated CO2 may not increase V(E) if breathing resistance and VE are high, rebreather UBA safety requires very low inspired CO2.

  16. The effect of inspiratory muscle fatigue on breathing pattern and ventilatory response to CO2.

    PubMed Central

    Mador, M J; Tobin, M J

    1992-01-01

    1. The effects of inducing inspiratory muscle fatigue on the subsequent breathing pattern were examined during resting unstimulated breathing and during CO2 rebreathing. In addition, we examined whether induction of inspiratory muscle fatigue alters CO2 responsiveness. 2. Global inspiratory muscle fatigue and diaphragmatic fatigue were achieved by having subjects breathe against an inspiratory resistive load while generating a predetermined fraction of either their maximal mouth pressure or maximal transdiaphragmatic pressure until they were unable to generate the target pressure. 3. Induction of inspiratory muscle fatigue had no effect on the subsequent breathing pattern during either unstimulated breathing or during CO2 rebreathing. 4. Following induction of inspiratory muscle fatigue, the slope of the ventilatory response to CO2 was significantly decreased from 18.8 +/- 3.3 during control to 13.8 +/- 2.1 l min-1 (% end-tidal CO2 concentration)-1 with fatigue (P < 0.02). PMID:1484352

  17. Advanced CO2 Removal Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finn, John E.; Verma, Sunita; Forrest, Kindall; LeVan, M. Douglas

    2001-01-01

    The Advanced CO2 Removal Technical Task Agreement covers three active areas of research and development. These include a study of the economic viability of a hybrid membrane/adsorption CO2 removal system, sorbent materials development, and construction of a database of adsorption properties of important fixed gases on several adsorbent material that may be used in CO2 removal systems. The membrane/adsorption CO2 removal system was proposed as a possible way to reduce the energy consumption of the four-bed molecular sieve system now in use. Much of the energy used by the 4BMS is used to desorb water removed in the device s desiccant beds. These beds might be replaced by a desiccating membrane that moves the water from [he incoming stream directly into the outlet stream. The approach may allow the CO2 removal beds to operate at a lower temperature. A comparison between models of the 4BMS and hybrid systems is underway at Vanderbilt University. NASA Ames Research Center has been investigating a Ag-exchanged zeolites as a possible improvement over currently used Ca and Na zeolites for CO2 removal. Silver ions will complex with n:-bonds in hydrocarbons such as ethylene, giving remarkably improved selectivity for adsorption of those materials. Bonds with n: character are also present in carbon oxides. NASA Ames is also continuing to build a database for adsorption isotherms of CO2, N2, O2, CH4, and Ar on a variety of sorbents. This information is useful for analysis of existing hardware and design of new processes.

  18. Photolytic production of CO2 on Iapetus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Eric; Brown, R. H.

    2008-09-01

    Carbon Dioxide has been detected on the surface of Iapetus by Cassini's VIMS instrument at the 4.26 micron band. This CO2 is concentrated on the equatorial leading side, where we also see an abundance of dark material. The residence time of free CO2 on the surface of Iapetus is very short, thus the CO2 is unlikely to be in the form of frost; it is more likely that the CO2 is tightly bound in the form of complexed molecules. We explore the possibility of photolytically generating CO2 from a mixture of the carbon rich material and water ice that matches the expected composition of the dark material on Iapetus' surface. An ice regolith was created with flash frozen water that was crushed into sub-millimeter shards and mixed with amorphous 13C. The regolith was placed in a vacuum chamber with a surface area of 10 cm2 and a thickness of 2 cm and exposed to UV light from a deuterium lamp with peaks of flux centered around 121 and 160 nm. Temperatures were varied between 60 and 130K at a pressure of 10-8 torr. Both CO and CO2 were produced by photolytic reactions and detected by a mass spectrometer. Applying these results to Iapetus, Jeans escape calculations show that CO2 generated by photolysis will remain gravitationally bound to Iapetus for between 100 and 200 years, ballistically scattering across the surface until it is sequestered in a polar cold trap or escapes to space. The average particle will interact with the surface more than 1000 times before escaping unless interactions with surface grains causes it to become complexed, such as adsorption. We are continuing to evaluate the photochemistry for this simulated Iapetus surface using a Nicolet IR spectrometer to identify all the products generated and estimate the associated production rate.

  19. CO(2) Fixation in Opuntia Roots.

    PubMed

    Ting, I P; Dugger, W M

    1966-03-01

    Nonautotrophic CO(2) metabolism in Opuntia echinocarpa roots was studied with techniques of manometry and radiometry. The roots were grown in a one-quarter strength nutrient solution for several days; the distal 2 cm was used for physiological studies. The roots assimilated significant quantities of (14)CO(2) and appeared to show a crassulacean-type acid metabolism with respect to quality and quantity. Most of the (14)C activity was associated with the distal portion of the elongating root indicating correlation with metabolic activity. The (14)CO(2) assimilation was comparable to a crassulacean leaf succulent, but 3 times greater than that found for stem tissue of the same Opuntia species.The rates of O(2) and CO(2) exchange and estimated CO(2) fixation were 180, 123, and 57 mul/g per hour. A respiratory quotient of 0.66 was found.The products of (14)CO(2) fixation were similar in most respects to reported experiments with leaf succulents. Equilibration of the predominant malic acid with isocitric, succinic, and fumaric acids was not evident. The latter observation was interpreted as metabolic isolation of the fixation products rather than poor citric acid cycle activity.A rapid turnover of the fixed (14)CO(2) was measured by following decarboxlyation kinetics and by product analysis after a postincubation period. The first order rate constant for the steady state release was 4.4 x 10(-3) min(-1) with a half-time of 157.5 minutes. Amino acids decayed at a more rapid rate than organic acids.

  20. Carbon Dioxide Clusters: (CO_2)_6 to (CO_2)13

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKellar, A. R. W.; Oliaee, J. Norooz; Dehghany, M.; Moazzen-Ahmadi, N.

    2011-06-01

    We recenty reported assignments of specific infrared bands in the CO_2 νb{3} region (˜2350 wn) to (CO_2)_6, (CO_2)_7, (CO_2)_9, (CO_2)10, (CO_2)11, (CO_2)12, and (CO_2)13. Spectra are obtained by direct absorption using a rapid-scan tuneable diode laser spectrometer to probe a pulsed supersonic slit-jet expansion and assignments are facilitated by recent calculations of Takeuchi based on the Murthy potential. (CO_2)_6 is a symmetric top with S_6 point group symmetry which can be thought of as a stack of two planar cyclic trimers. (CO_2)13 is also an S_6 symmetric top, and consists of a single CO_2 monomer surrounded by an slightly distorted icosahedral cage. The remaining clusters are asymmetric tops without symmetry. Here we report additional CO_2 cluster results. Calculations based on the SAPT-s potential indicate that the structure of (CO_2)10 may be slightly different from that given by Takeuchi/Murthy. An additional band is observed for each of (CO_2)13 and (CO_2)10. A feature observed at 2378.2 wn is assigned as a (CO_2)_6 parallel combination band involving the sum of a fundamental and a low-lying intermolecular vibration. Most significantly, two bands are assigned to a second isomer of (CO_2)_6. This is also a symmetric top, but now with S_4 symmetry. The two symmetric hexamer isomers observed spectroscopically correspond well with the lowest energy structures given by both the SAPT-s and Murthy intermolecular potentials. [1] J. Norooz Oliaee, M. Dehgany, N. Moazzen-Ahmadi, and A.R.W. McKellar, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 13, 1297 (2011). [2] H. Takeuchi, J. Phys. Chem. A 107, 5703 (2008); C.S. Murthy, S.F. O'Shea, and I.R. McDonald, Mol. Phys. 50, 531 (1983). [3] R. Bukowski, J. Sadlej, B. Jeziorski, P. Jankowski, K. Szalewicz, S.A. Kucharski, H.L. Williams, and B.M. Rice, J. Chem. Phys. 110, 3785 (1999)

  1. The carbon isotope biogeochemistry of (epsilon)CO2 production in a methanogenic marine sediment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehme, Susan E.

    1993-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between sigma(CO2) delta(C-13) values and rates of the dominant remineralization processes at the organic-rich field site of Cape Lookout Bight, NC, the isotopic composition of porewater sigma(CO2) was measured on a seasonal basis. The sigma(CO2) delta(C-13) values varies seasonally in response to changes in rates of sulfate reduction and methanogenesis, the dominant remineralization processes at this site. A tube incubation experiment was also performed to determine the isotopic signature of the sigma(CO2) produced by sulfate reduction and methanogenesis. The delta(C-13) of the sigma(CO2) produced in the sulfate reduction zone determined from the tube incubation was -14.3 plus or minus 1.9, a value enriched in C-13 relative to the labile organic fraction. The C-13-enrichment may be caused by low rates of methanogenesis occurring in the sulfate reduction zone. The delta(C-13) of the sigma(CO2) produced in the methanogenic zone was estimated to be +44 per mil, whereas the co-produced methane was -65 per mil. The fractionation factor for CO2 reduction was calculated to be 1.055, a value in agreement with previous estimates at this site. The measured concentration and delta(C-13) of the sigma(CO2) at Cape Lookout was closely reproduced by a diagenetic model using the measured rates of sulfate reduction and sigma(CO2) production, and the isotopic signature of the sigma(CO2) production in the two biogeochemical zones.

  2. Characteristics of atmospheric CO2 and CH4 at the Shangdianzi regional background station in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Shuang-xi; Tans, Pieter P.; Dong, Fan; Zhou, Huaigang; Luan, Tian

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric CO2 and CH4 have been continuously measured at the Shangdianzi regional background station (SDZ) in China from 2009 to 2013. Based on the influences of local surface wind and long-distance transport, the observed records were flagged into locally influenced, Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei (BTH) influenced, and Russia, Mongolia, and Inner Mongolia autonomous region influenced (RMI). ∼ 81.4% of CO2 and ∼75.6% of CH4 mole fractions were flagged as locally representative, indicating that the atmospheric CO2 and CH4 at SDZ were strongly influenced by local sources and sinks. Cluster analysis of back trajectories proved that the atmospheric CO2 and CH4 were influenced by air masses from northwest (RMI) or from south and southeast (BTH). The CO2 and CH4 mole fractions in BTH are always higher than in RMI, with the largest difference of 11.5 ± 0.3 ppm for CO2 and 102 ± 1 ppb for CH4 in July. The annual growth rates of CO2 and CH4 in BTH are 3.8 ± 0.01 ppm yr-1 and 10 ± 0.1 ppb yr-1, respectively, which are apparently higher than those of the RMI and the global means. The long-term trends of CO2 and CH4 in BTH are deviating from those in RMI, with ratios of ∼1.0 ppm yr-1 for CO2 and ∼2 ppb yr-1 for CH4, indicating the strengths of CO2 and CH4 emission in Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei plain increased more than 20% every year.

  3. CO2 and CO Simulations and Their Source Signature Indicated by CO/CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawa, Randy; Huisheng, Bian

    2004-01-01

    Three years (2000-2002) atmospheric CO2 and CO fields are simulated by a Chemistry Transport Model driven by the assimilated meteorological fields from GEOS-4. The simulated CO2 and CO are evaluated by measurements from surface (CMDL), satellite (MOPITT/CO), and aircraft. The model-observation comparisons indicate reasonable agreement in both source and remote regions, and in the lower and upper troposphere. The simulation also captures the seasonality of CO2 and CO variations. The ratios of CO/CO2 are analyzed over different representative regions to identify the source signature, since the anthropogenic CO comes fiom the same combustion processes as CO2. This work enables us to improve satellite inversion estimates of CO2 sources and sinks by simultaneously using satellite CO measurement.

  4. Monitoring of near surface CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faber, E.; Möller, I.; Teschner, M.; Poggenburg, J.; Spickenbom, K.; Schulz, H. J.

    2009-04-01

    Monitoring of near surface CO2 ECKHARD FABER1, INGO MÖLLER1, MANFRED TESCHNER1, JÜRGEN POGGENBURG1, KAI SPICKENBOM1, HANS-MARTIN SCHULZ1,2 1Bundesanstalt für Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe (BGR), Stilleweg 2, D-30655 Hannover, e.faber@bgr.de 2present adress: GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam (GFZ), Telegrafenberg, D-14473 Potsdam Underground gas storage and sequestration of carbon dioxide is one of the methods to reduce the input of antropogenic CO2 into the atmosphere and its greenhouse effect. Storage of CO2 is planned in depleted reservoirs, in aquifers and in salt caverns. Storage sites must have very small leakage rates to safely store the CO2 for centuries. Thus, a careful investigation and site selection is crucial. However, any leakage of CO2 to the surface is potentially dangerous for humans and environment. Therefore, instruments and systems for the detection of any CO2 escaping the storage sites and reaching the atmosphere have to be developed. Systems to monitor gases in deep wells, groundwater and surface sediments for leaking CO2 are developed, tested and are contnuously improved. Our group is mainly analysing CO2 in shallow (down to 3 m) soil samples using automatically operating monitoring systems. The systems are equipped with sensors to measure CO2 (and other gases) concentrations and other environmental parameters (atmospheric pressure, ambient and soil temperatures, etc.). Data are measured in short intervals (minute to subminute), are stored locally and are transferred by telemetrical systems into the BGR laboratory (Weinlich et al., 2006). In addition to soil gases monitoring systems technical equipment is available for continuous underwater gas flow measurements. Several of those monitoring systems are installed in different areas like Czech Republic, Austria, Italy and Germany. To detect any leaking gas from a sequestration site after CO2 injection, the naturally existing CO2 concentration (before injection) must be known. Thus, the natural

  5. CO2 flux estimation accuracy evaluation of Global and Regional atmospheric CO2 mission concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, M.; Miller, C.; Weidner, R. J.; Duren, R. M.; Sander, S.; Eldering, A.

    2012-12-01

    We developed an observing system simulation experiment (OSSE) framework to evaluate mission-science-return quantitatively as a function of instrument payload, observation frequency, orbit, and sampling strategy for space-based remote sensing. The OSSE framework integrates GEOSChem and its adjoint system to perform forward/inverse modeling of the simulated measurements. During 2011-2012, we extended the OSSE framework to evaluate CO2 mission concepts in collaboration with the NASA's carbon monitoring system (CMS) flux pilot project team. In this paper, we employ the OSSE framework to analyze the science impact of multiple, simultaneous space-based column CO2 observations from simulated combinations of GOSAT, OCO-2, OCO-3, and a geo-stationary mission concept (GEOFTS). The OSSE process involved generating a CO2 concentration forecast, sampling the CO2 field at the appropriate time and location for each satellite sensor, incorporating realistic cloud climatologies to generate accurate clear-sky viewing statistics, retrieving CO2 profile simulaton in the presence of measurement noise, and finally assimilating the simulated column CO2 retrievals to estimate CO2 fluxes and flux uncertainty reductions. The OSSE process was applied over one-year-long mission period (2009/Jan - 2009/Dec) and the CO2 flux estimation error was analyzed to compute the probability density function (PDF) of CO2 flux estimation-error-reduction. The global OSSEs were performed in 2deg x 2.5 deg spatial resolution with the monthly-average CO2 flux estimation-error-reduction as the science-impact metric. Regional OSSEs were performed in 0.5 deg by 0.666 deg over N. America and the weekly average of the CO2 flux estimation-error-reduction was employed as the science-impact metric. We discuss the results and the projected performance of planned and potential space-based CO2 observing systems.

  6. Direct Copolymerization of CO2 and Diols.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Masazumi; Ito, Kazuki; Honda, Masayoshi; Nakagawa, Yoshinao; Sugimoto, Hiroshi; Tomishige, Keiichi

    2016-01-01

    Direct polymerization of CO2 and diols is promising as a simple and environmental-benign method in place of conventional processes using high-cost and/or hazardous reagents such as phosgene, carbon monoxide and epoxides, however, there are no reports on the direct method due to the inertness of CO2 and severe equilibrium limitation of the reaction. Herein, we firstly substantiate the direct copolymerization of CO2 and diols using CeO2 catalyst and 2-cyanopyridine promotor, providing the alternating cooligomers in high diol-based yield (up to 99%) and selectivity (up to >99%). This catalyst system is applicable to various diols including linear C4-C10 α,ω-diols to provide high yields of the corresponding cooligomers, which cannot be obtained by well-known methods such as copolymerization of CO2 and cyclic ethers and ring-opening polymerization of cyclic carbonates. This process provides us a facile synthesis method for versatile polycarbonates from various diols and CO2 owing to simplicity of diols modification. PMID:27075987

  7. The supply chain of CO2 emissions

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Steven J.; Peters, Glen P.; Caldeira, Ken

    2011-01-01

    CO2 emissions from the burning of fossil fuels are conventionally attributed to the country where the emissions are produced (i.e., where the fuels are burned). However, these production-based accounts represent a single point in the value chain of fossil fuels, which may have been extracted elsewhere and may be used to provide goods or services to consumers elsewhere. We present a consistent set of carbon inventories that spans the full supply chain of global CO2 emissions, finding that 10.2 billion tons CO2 or 37% of global emissions are from fossil fuels traded internationally and an additional 6.4 billion tons CO2 or 23% of global emissions are embodied in traded goods. Our results reveal vulnerabilities and benefits related to current patterns of energy use that are relevant to climate and energy policy. In particular, if a consistent and unavoidable price were imposed on CO2 emissions somewhere along the supply chain, then all of the parties along the supply chain would seek to impose that price to generate revenue from taxes collected or permits sold. The geographical concentration of carbon-based fuels and relatively small number of parties involved in extracting and refining those fuels suggest that regulation at the wellhead, mine mouth, or refinery might minimize transaction costs as well as opportunities for leakage. PMID:22006314

  8. Direct CO2-Methanation of flue gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Klaus; Fleige, Michael; Rachow, Fabian; Israel, Johannes; Schmeißer, Dieter

    2013-04-01

    Already discovered by Paul Sabatier in 1902 the Hydrogenation according to CO2 + 4H2 ->CH4 + 2H2O nowadays is discussed in the course of the "Power-to-Gas" approach to utilize excess energy from renewable electricity generation in times of oversupply of electricity. We investigate the behavior of this process in a simulated flue gas atmosphere of conventional base load power plants, which could be used as constant sources of the reactant CO2. In relation to an approach related to carbon capture and cycling, the conversion of CO2 directly from the flue gas of a conventional power plant is a new aspect and has several advantages: The conversion of CO2 into methane could be integrated directly into the combustion process. Even older power plants could be upgraded and used as a possible source for CO2, in the same sense as the amine cleaning of flue gas, as a post combustion process. Further, waste heat of the power plant could be used as process energy for the catalytic reaction. Therefore the influence of different flue gas compositions such as varying contents of nitrogen and residual oxygen are tested in a laboratory scale. The heterogeneous catalysis process is investigated with regard to conversion rates, yield and selectivity and long-term stability of the Ni-catalyst. Also the influence of typical contaminations like SO2 is investigated and will be presented.

  9. Direct Copolymerization of CO2 and Diols

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Masazumi; Ito, Kazuki; Honda, Masayoshi; Nakagawa, Yoshinao; Sugimoto, Hiroshi; Tomishige, Keiichi

    2016-01-01

    Direct polymerization of CO2 and diols is promising as a simple and environmental-benign method in place of conventional processes using high-cost and/or hazardous reagents such as phosgene, carbon monoxide and epoxides, however, there are no reports on the direct method due to the inertness of CO2 and severe equilibrium limitation of the reaction. Herein, we firstly substantiate the direct copolymerization of CO2 and diols using CeO2 catalyst and 2-cyanopyridine promotor, providing the alternating cooligomers in high diol-based yield (up to 99%) and selectivity (up to >99%). This catalyst system is applicable to various diols including linear C4-C10 α,ω-diols to provide high yields of the corresponding cooligomers, which cannot be obtained by well-known methods such as copolymerization of CO2 and cyclic ethers and ring-opening polymerization of cyclic carbonates. This process provides us a facile synthesis method for versatile polycarbonates from various diols and CO2 owing to simplicity of diols modification. PMID:27075987

  10. Atmospheric CO2 stabilization and ocean acidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Long; Caldeira, Ken

    2008-10-01

    We use a coupled climate/carbon-cycle model to examine the consequences of stabilizing atmospheric CO2 at different levels for ocean chemistry. Our simulations show the potential for major damage to at least some ocean ecosystems at atmospheric CO2 stabilization levels as low as 450 ppm. Before the industrial revolution, more than 98% of corals reefs were surrounded by waters that were >3.5 times saturated with respect to their skeleton materials (aragonite). If atmospheric CO2 is stabilized at 450 ppm only 8% of existing coral reefs will be surrounded by water with this saturation level. Also at this CO2 level 7% of the ocean South of 60°S will become undersaturated with respect to aragonite, and parts of the high latitude ocean will experience a decrease in pH by more than 0.2 units. Results presented here provide an independent and additional basis for choosing targets of atmospheric CO2 stabilization levels.

  11. Direct Copolymerization of CO2 and Diols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Masazumi; Ito, Kazuki; Honda, Masayoshi; Nakagawa, Yoshinao; Sugimoto, Hiroshi; Tomishige, Keiichi

    2016-04-01

    Direct polymerization of CO2 and diols is promising as a simple and environmental-benign method in place of conventional processes using high-cost and/or hazardous reagents such as phosgene, carbon monoxide and epoxides, however, there are no reports on the direct method due to the inertness of CO2 and severe equilibrium limitation of the reaction. Herein, we firstly substantiate the direct copolymerization of CO2 and diols using CeO2 catalyst and 2-cyanopyridine promotor, providing the alternating cooligomers in high diol-based yield (up to 99%) and selectivity (up to >99%). This catalyst system is applicable to various diols including linear C4-C10 α,ω-diols to provide high yields of the corresponding cooligomers, which cannot be obtained by well-known methods such as copolymerization of CO2 and cyclic ethers and ring-opening polymerization of cyclic carbonates. This process provides us a facile synthesis method for versatile polycarbonates from various diols and CO2 owing to simplicity of diols modification.

  12. Comparison of KTP, Thulium, and CO2 laser in stapedotomy using specialized visualization techniques: thermal effects.

    PubMed

    Kamalski, Digna M A; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf M; de Boorder, Tjeerd; Vincent, Robert; Trabelzini, Franco; Grolman, Wilko

    2014-06-01

    High-speed thermal imaging enables visualization of heating of the vestibule during laser-assisted stapedotomy, comparing KTP, CO2, and Thulium laser light. Perforation of the stapes footplate with laser bears the risk of heating of the inner ear fluids. The amount of heating depends on absorption of the laser light and subsequent tissue ablation. The ablation of the footplate is driven by strong water absorption for the CO2 and Thulium laser. For the KTP laser wavelength, ablation is driven by carbonization of the footplate and it might penetrate deep into the inner ear without absorption in water. The thermal effects were visualized in an inner ear model, using two new techniques: (1) high-speed Schlieren imaging shows relative dynamic changes of temperatures up to 2 ms resolution in the perilymph. (2) Thermo imaging provides absolute temperature measurements around the footplate up to 40 ms resolution. The high-speed Schlieren imaging showed minimal heating using the KTP laser. Both CO2 and Thulium laser showed heating below the footplate. Thulium laser wavelength generated heating up to 0.6 mm depth. This was confirmed with thermal imaging, showing a rise of temperature of 4.7 (±3.5) °C for KTP and 9.4 (±6.9) for Thulium in the area of 2 mm below the footplate. For stapedotomy, the Thulium and CO2 laser show more extended thermal effects compared to KTP. High-speed Schlieren imaging and thermal imaging are complimentary techniques to study lasers thermal effects in tissue.

  13. CO2-Binding-Organic-Liquids-Enhanced CO2 Capture using Polarity-Swing-Assisted Regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jian; Kutnyakov, Igor; Koech, Phillip K.; Zwoster, Andy; Howard, Chris; Zheng, Feng; Freeman, Charles J.; Heldebrant, David J.

    2013-01-01

    A new solvent-based CO2 capture process couples the unique attributes of non-aqueous, CO2-binding organic liquids (CO2BOLs) with the newly discovered polarity-swing-assisted regeneration (PSAR) process that is unique to switchable ionic liquids. Laboratory measurements with PSAR indicate the ability to achieve a regeneration effect at 75°C comparable to that at 120°C using thermal regeneration only. Initial measurements also indicate that the kinetic behavior of CO2 release is also improved with PSAR. Abstract cleared PNWD-SA-9743

  14. Light-duty vehicle CO2 targets consistent with 450 ppm CO2 stabilization.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Sandra L; Wallington, Timothy J; Maas, Heiko; Hass, Heinz

    2014-06-01

    We present a global analysis of CO2 emission reductions from the light-duty vehicle (LDV) fleet consistent with stabilization of atmospheric CO2 concentration at 450 ppm. The CO2 emission reductions are described by g CO2/km emission targets for average new light-duty vehicles on a tank-to-wheel basis between 2010 and 2050 that we call CO2 glide paths. The analysis accounts for growth of the vehicle fleet, changing patterns in driving distance, regional availability of biofuels, and the changing composition of fossil fuels. New light-duty vehicle fuel economy and CO2 regulations in the U.S. through 2025 and in the EU through 2020 are broadly consistent with the CO2 glide paths. The glide path is at the upper end of the discussed 2025 EU range of 68-78 g CO2/km. The proposed China regulation for 2020 is more stringent than the glide path, while the 2017 Brazil regulation is less stringent. Existing regulations through 2025 are broadly consistent with the light-duty vehicle sector contributing to stabilizing CO2 at approximately 450 ppm. The glide paths provide long-term guidance for LDV powertrain/fuel development. PMID:24798684

  15. Surface CO2 leakage during the first shallow subsurface CO2release experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Lewicki, J.L.; Oldenburg, C.; Dobeck, L.; Spangler, L.

    2007-09-15

    A new field facility was used to study CO2 migrationprocesses and test techniques to detect and quantify potential CO2leakage from geologic storage sites. For 10 days starting 9 July 2007,and for seven days starting 5 August 2007, 0.1 and 0.3 t CO2 d-1,respectively, were released from a ~;100-m long, sub-water table (~;2.5-mdepth) horizontal well. The spatio-temporal evolution of leakage wasmapped through repeated grid measurements of soil CO2 flux (FCO2). Thesurface leakage onset, approach to steady state, and post-release declinematched model predictions closely. Modeling suggested that minimal CO2was taken up by groundwater through dissolution, and CO2 spread out ontop of the water table. FCO2 spatial patterns were related to well designand soil physical properties. Estimates of total CO2 discharge along withsoil respiration and leakage discharge highlight the influence ofbackground CO2 flux variations on detection of CO2 leakagesignals.

  16. Pore-scale supercritical CO2 dissolution and mass transfer under imbibition conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chun; Zhou, Quanlin; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Oostrom, Mart; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Yu, Qingchun

    2016-06-01

    In modeling of geological carbon storage, dissolution of supercritical CO2 (scCO2) is often assumed to be instantaneous with equilibrium phase partitioning. In contrast, recent core-scale imbibition experiments have shown a prolonged depletion of residual scCO2 by dissolution, implying a non-equilibrium mechanism. In this study, eight pore-scale scCO2 dissolution experiments in a 2D heterogeneous, sandstone-analog micromodel were conducted at supercritical conditions (9 MPa and 40 °C). The micromodel was first saturated with deionized (DI) water and drained by injecting scCO2 to establish a stable scCO2 saturation. DI water was then injected at constant flow rates after scCO2 drainage was completed. High resolution time-lapse images of scCO2 and water distributions were obtained during imbibition and dissolution, aided by a scCO2-soluble fluorescent dye introduced with scCO2 during drainage. These images were used to estimate scCO2 saturations and scCO2 depletion rates. Experimental results show that (1) a time-independent, varying number of water-flow channels are created during imbibition and later dominant dissolution by the random nature of water flow at the micromodel inlet, and (2) a time-dependent number of water-flow channels are created by coupled imbibition and dissolution following completion of dominant imbibition. The number of water-flow paths, constant or transient in nature, greatly affects the overall depletion rate of scCO2 by dissolution. The average mass fraction of dissolved CO2 (dsCO2) in water effluent varies from 0.38% to 2.72% of CO2 solubility, indicating non-equilibrium scCO2 dissolution in the millimeter-scale pore network. In general, the transient depletion rate decreases as trapped, discontinuous scCO2 bubbles and clusters within water-flow paths dissolve, then remains low with dissolution of large bypassed scCO2 clusters at their interfaces with longitudinal water flow, and finally increases with coupled transverse water flow and

  17. Selective Adsorption and Selective Transport Diffusion of CO2-CH4 Binary Mixture in Coal Ultramicropores.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yongliang; Feng, Yanhui; Zhang, Xinxin

    2016-09-01

    The adsorption and diffusion of the CO2-CH4 mixture in coal and the underlying mechanisms significantly affect the design and operation of any CO2-enhanced coal-bed methane recovery (CO2-ECBM) project. In this study, bituminous coal was fabricated based on the Wiser molecular model and its ultramicroporous parameters were evaluated; molecular simulations were established through Grand Canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) and Molecular Dynamic (MD) methods to study the effects of temperature, pressure, and species bulk mole fraction on the adsorption isotherms, adsorption selectivity, three distinct diffusion coefficients, and diffusivity selectivity of the binary mixture in the coal ultramicropores. It turns out that the absolute adsorption amount of each species in the mixture decreases as temperature increases, but increases as its own bulk mole fraction increases. The self-, corrected, and transport diffusion coefficients of pure CO2 and pure CH4 all increase as temperature or/and their own bulk mole fractions increase. Compared to CH4, the adsorption and diffusion of CO2 are preferential in the coal ultramicropores. Adsorption selectivity and diffusivity selectivity were simultaneously employed to reveal that the optimal injection depth for CO2-ECBM is 800-1000 m at 308-323 K temperature and 8.0-10.0 MPa. PMID:27518119

  18. CO2 mitigation via accelerated limestone weathering

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rau, G.H.; Knauss, K.G.; Langer, W.H.; Caldeira, K.

    2004-01-01

    Accelerated weathering of limestone (AWL: CO22+ + CaCO3 + H2O ??? Ca2+ + 2HCO3- as a low-tech, inexpensive, high-capacity, environmentally-friendly CO2 capture and sequestration technology was evaluated. With access to seawater and limestone being essential to this approach, significant limestone resources were close to most CO2-emitting power plants along the coastal US. Waste fines, representing > 20% of current US crushed limestone production (> 109 tons/yr), could be used as an inexpensive source of AWL carbonate. AWL end-solution disposal in the ocean would significantly reduce effects on ocean pH and carbonate chemistry relative to those caused by direct atmospheric or ocean CO2 disposal. Indeed, the increase in ocean Ca2+ and bicarbonate offered by AWL should enhance growth of corals and other calcifying marine organisms.

  19. Sequestration of CO2 by concrete carbonation.

    PubMed

    Galan, Isabel; Andrade, Carmen; Mora, Pedro; Sanjuan, Miguel A

    2010-04-15

    Carbonation of reinforced concrete is one of the causes of corrosion, but it is also a way to sequester CO2. The characteristics of the concrete cover should ensure alkaline protection for the steel bars but should also be able to combine CO2 to a certain depth. This work attempts to advance the knowledge of the carbon footprint of cement. As it is one of the most commonly used materials worldwide, it is very important to assess its impact on the environment. In order to quantify the capacity of cement based materials to combine CO2 by means of the reaction with hydrated phases to produce calcium carbonate, Thermogravimetry and the phenolphthalein indicator have been used to characterize several cement pastes and concretes exposed to different environments. The combined effect of the main variables involved in this process is discussed. The moisture content of the concrete seems to be the most influential parameter. PMID:20225850

  20. Elevated CO2 promotes long-term nitrogen accumulation only in combination with nitrogen addition.

    PubMed

    Pastore, Melissa A; Megonigal, J Patrick; Langley, J Adam

    2016-01-01

    Biogeochemical models that incorporate nitrogen (N) limitation indicate that N availability will control the magnitude of ecosystem carbon uptake in response to rising CO2 . Some models, however, suggest that elevated CO2 may promote ecosystem N accumulation, a feedback that in the long term could circumvent N limitation of the CO2 response while mitigating N pollution. We tested this prediction using a nine-year CO2 xN experiment in a tidal marsh. Although the effects of CO2 are similar between uplands and wetlands in many respects, this experiment offers a greater likelihood of detecting CO2 effects on N retention on a decadal timescale because tidal marshes have a relatively open N cycle and can accrue soil organic matter rapidly. To determine how elevated CO2 affects N dynamics, we assessed the three primary fates of N in a tidal marsh: (1) retention in plants and soil, (2) denitrification to the atmosphere, and (3) tidal export. We assessed changes in N pools and tracked the fate of a (15) N tracer added to each plot in 2006 to quantify the fraction of added N retained in vegetation and soil, and to estimate lateral N movement. Elevated CO2 alone did not increase plant N mass, soil N mass, or (15) N label retention. Unexpectedly, CO2 and N interacted such that the combined N+CO2 treatment increased ecosystem N accumulation despite the stimulation in N losses indicated by reduced (15) N label retention. These findings suggest that in N-limited ecosystems, elevated CO2 is unlikely to increase long-term N accumulation and circumvent progressive N limitation without additional N inputs, which may relieve plant-microbe competition and allow for increased plant N uptake.

  1. Elevated CO2 promotes long-term nitrogen accumulation only in combination with nitrogen addition.

    PubMed

    Pastore, Melissa A; Megonigal, J Patrick; Langley, J Adam

    2016-01-01

    Biogeochemical models that incorporate nitrogen (N) limitation indicate that N availability will control the magnitude of ecosystem carbon uptake in response to rising CO2 . Some models, however, suggest that elevated CO2 may promote ecosystem N accumulation, a feedback that in the long term could circumvent N limitation of the CO2 response while mitigating N pollution. We tested this prediction using a nine-year CO2 xN experiment in a tidal marsh. Although the effects of CO2 are similar between uplands and wetlands in many respects, this experiment offers a greater likelihood of detecting CO2 effects on N retention on a decadal timescale because tidal marshes have a relatively open N cycle and can accrue soil organic matter rapidly. To determine how elevated CO2 affects N dynamics, we assessed the three primary fates of N in a tidal marsh: (1) retention in plants and soil, (2) denitrification to the atmosphere, and (3) tidal export. We assessed changes in N pools and tracked the fate of a (15) N tracer added to each plot in 2006 to quantify the fraction of added N retained in vegetation and soil, and to estimate lateral N movement. Elevated CO2 alone did not increase plant N mass, soil N mass, or (15) N label retention. Unexpectedly, CO2 and N interacted such that the combined N+CO2 treatment increased ecosystem N accumulation despite the stimulation in N losses indicated by reduced (15) N label retention. These findings suggest that in N-limited ecosystems, elevated CO2 is unlikely to increase long-term N accumulation and circumvent progressive N limitation without additional N inputs, which may relieve plant-microbe competition and allow for increased plant N uptake. PMID:26577708

  2. Horizontal displacement of carbon associated with agriculture and its impacts on atmospheric CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciais, P.; Bousquet, P.; Freibauer, A.; Naegler, T.

    2007-06-01

    The growth of crops represents a sink of atmospheric CO2, whereas biomass is consumed by humans and housed animals, yielding respiratory sources of CO2. This process induces a lateral displacement of carbon and creates geographic patterns of CO2 sources and sinks at the surface of the globe. We estimated the global carbon flux harvested in croplands to be 1290 TgC/yr. Most of this carbon is transported into domestic trade, whereas a small fraction (13%) enters into international trade circuits. We then calculated the global patterns of CO2 fluxes associated with food and feedstuff trade, using country-based agricultural statistics and activity maps of human and housed animal population densities. The CO2 flux maps show regional dipoles of sources and sinks in Asia and North America. The effect of these fluxes on atmospheric CO2 was simulated using a global atmospheric transport model. The mean latitudinal CO2 gradients induced by the displacement of crop products are fairly small (≈0.2 ppm) compared with observations (4-5 ppm), indicating that this process has a only a small influence in explaining the latitudinal distribution of CO2 fluxes. On the other hand, the simulated longitudinal mean atmospheric CO2 gradients at northern midlatitudes (≈ up to 0.5 ppm) are comparable to the ones measured between atmospheric stations, suggesting that CO2 fluxes from crop products trade are an important component of continental- and regional-scale CO2 budgets. Thus they should be accounted for as prior information in regional inversions.

  3. Molecular modeling of diffusion coefficient and ionic conductivity of CO2 in aqueous ionic solutions.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Ratés, Miquel; de Hemptinne, Jean-Charles; Bonet Avalos, Josep; Nieto-Draghi, Carlos

    2012-03-01

    Mass diffusion coefficients of CO(2)/brine mixtures under thermodynamic conditions of deep saline aquifers have been investigated by molecular simulation. The objective of this work is to provide estimates of the diffusion coefficient of CO(2) in salty water to compensate the lack of experimental data on this property. We analyzed the influence of temperature, CO(2) concentration,and salinity on the diffusion coefficient, the rotational diffusion, as well as the electrical conductivity. We observe an increase of the mass diffusion coefficient with the temperature, but no clear dependence is identified with the salinity or with the CO(2) mole fraction, if the system is overall dilute. In this case, we notice an important dispersion on the values of the diffusion coefficient which impairs any conclusive statement about the effect of the gas concentration on the mobility of CO(2) molecules. Rotational relaxation times for water and CO(2) increase by decreasing temperature or increasing the salt concentration. We propose a correlation for the self-diffusion coefficient of CO(2) in terms of the rotational relaxation time which can ultimately be used to estimate the mutual diffusion coefficient of CO(2) in brine. The electrical conductivity of the CO(2)-brine mixtures was also calculated under different thermodynamic conditions. Electrical conductivity tends to increase with the temperature and salt concentration. However, we do not observe any influence of this property with the CO(2) concentration at the studied regimes. Our results give a first evaluation of the variation of the CO(2)-brine mass diffusion coefficient, rotational relaxation times, and electrical conductivity under the thermodynamic conditions typically encountered in deep saline aquifers. PMID:22292779

  4. CO2 Enhancement of Forest Productivity Constrained by Limited Nitrogen Availability

    SciTech Connect

    Norby, Richard J; Warren, Jeffrey; Iversen, Colleen M; Medlyn, Belinda; McMurtrie, Ross

    2010-01-01

    Stimulation of terrestrial productivity by rising CO2 concentration is projected to reduce the airborne fraction of anthropogenic CO2 emissions; coupled climate-carbon (C) cycle models, including those used in the IPCC Fourth Assessment Report (AR4), are sensitive to this negative feedback on atmospheric CO2 1. The representation of the so-called CO2 fertilization effect in the 11 models used in AR4 and subsequent models2,3 was broadly consistent with experimental evidence from four free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiments, which indicated that net primary productivity (NPP) of forests was increased by 23 2% in response to atmospheric CO2 enrichment to 550 ppm4. Substantial uncertainty remains, however, because of the expectation that feedbacks through the nitrogen (N) cycle will reduce the CO2 stimulation of NPP5,6; these feedbacks were not included in the AR4 models and heretofore have not been confirmed by experiments in forests7. Here, we provide new evidence from a FACE experiment in a deciduous Liquidambar styraciflua (sweetgum) forest stand in Tennessee, USA, that N limitation has significantly reduced the stimulation of NPP by elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration (eCO2). Isotopic evidence and N budget analysis support the premise that N availability in this forest ecosystem has been declining over time, and declining faster in eCO2. Model analyses and evidence from leaf- and stand-level observations provide mechanistic evidence that declining N availability constrained the tree response to eCO2. These results provide a strong rationale and process understanding for incorporating N limitation and N feedback effects in ecosystem and global models used in climate change assessments.

  5. A carbon isotope record of CO2 levels during the late Quaternary.

    PubMed

    Jasper, J P; Hayes, J M

    1990-10-01

    Analyses of gases trapped in continental ice sheets have shown that the concentration of CO2 in the Earth's early atmosphere increased from 180 to 280 p.p.m. during the most recent glacial-interglacial transition. This change must have been driven by an increase in the concentration of CO2 dissolved in the mixed layer of the ocean. Biochemical and physiological factors associated with photosynthetic carbon fixation in this layer should lead to a relationship between concentrations of dissolved CO2 and the carbon isotopic composition of phytoplanktonic organic material, such that increased atmospheric CO2 should enhance the difference in 13C content between dissolved inorganic carbon and organic products of photosynthesis. Here we show that a signal related to atmospheric CO2 levels can be seen in the isotope record of a hemipelagic sediment core, which we can correlate with the CO2 record of the Vostok ice core. Calibration of the relationship between isotope fractionation and CO2 levels should permit the extrapolation of CO2 records to times earlier than those for which ice-core records are available.

  6. CO2 Orbital Trends in Comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Michael; Bodewits, Dennis; Feaga, Lori; Knight, Matthew; McKay, Adam; Snodgrass, Colin; Wooden, Diane

    2016-08-01

    Carbon dioxide is a primary volatile in comet nuclei, and potentially a major contributor to comet activity (i.e., the process of mass loss). However, CO2 cannot be observed directly from the ground, and past surveys of this molecule in comets were limited to space-borne snapshot observations. This situation limits our understanding of the behavior of CO2 in comets, and its role in driving comet mass loss. To address this deficiency, we were awarded a Cy11 Spitzer program designed to quantify the production rate of CO2 on >month-long timescales for 21 comets. We request an additional 269~hr in Cy13 to complete the Spitzer portion of our survey, and to add three more comets (46P/Wirtanen and 2 Target of Opportunity Oort cloud comets). Our survey is designed to probe the orbital trends of CO2 production in the comet population. We aim to: 1) examine the role of CO2 in the persistent post-perihelion activity observed in Jupiter-family comets; 2) measure the seasonal variations of CO2/H2O as a proxy for nucleus heterogeneity, when possible; 3) search for orbital trends sensitive to cumulative insolation as a proxy for nucleus layering; and 4) examine how Oort cloud comets evolve by comparing dynamically new and old targets. The final data set will allow us to investigate the effects of heating on the evolution of comets, if nucleus structures can be inferred through activity, and set the stage for JWST investigations into comet activity and composition.

  7. Why capture CO2 from the atmosphere?

    PubMed

    Keith, David W

    2009-09-25

    Air capture is an industrial process for capturing CO2 from ambient air; it is one of an emerging set of technologies for CO2 removal that includes geological storage of biotic carbon and the acceleration of geochemical weathering. Although air capture will cost more than capture from power plants when both are operated under the same economic conditions, air capture allows one to apply industrial economies of scale to small and mobile emission sources and enables a partial decoupling of carbon capture from the energy infrastructure, advantages that may compensate for the intrinsic difficulty of capturing carbon from the air.

  8. Why Capture CO2 from the Atmosphere?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keith, David W.

    2009-09-01

    Air capture is an industrial process for capturing CO2 from ambient air; it is one of an emerging set of technologies for CO2 removal that includes geological storage of biotic carbon and the acceleration of geochemical weathering. Although air capture will cost more than capture from power plants when both are operated under the same economic conditions, air capture allows one to apply industrial economies of scale to small and mobile emission sources and enables a partial decoupling of carbon capture from the energy infrastructure, advantages that may compensate for the intrinsic difficulty of capturing carbon from the air.

  9. CO2 Acquisition Membrane (CAM) Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, L. W.; Way, J. D.; Vlasse, M.

    2001-01-01

    The CO2 Acquisition Membrane (CAM) project will develop, test, and analyze membrane materials for separation and purification of carbon dioxide (CO2) from mixtures of gases, such as those found in the Martian atmosphere. The CAM technology will enable passive separation of these gases, allow energy efficient acquisition and purification of these important resources, and lay the foundation for future unmanned sample return and human space missions. The CAM membranes are targeted toward In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) applications, such as In Situ Propellant Production (ISPP) and In Situ Consumables Production (ISCP).

  10. CO2 laser cutting of natural granite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riveiro, A.; Mejías, A.; Soto, R.; Quintero, F.; del Val, J.; Boutinguiza, M.; Lusquiños, F.; Pardo, J.; Pou, J.

    2016-01-01

    Commercial black granite boards (trade name: "Zimbabwe black granite") 10 mm thick, were successfully cut by a 3.5 kW CO2 laser source. Cutting quality, in terms of kerf width and roughness of the cut wall, was assessed by means of statistically planned experiments. No chemical modification of the material in the cutting walls was detected by the laser beam action. Costs associated to the process were calculated, and the main factors affecting them were identified. Results reported here demonstrate that cutting granite boards could be a new application of CO2 laser cutting machines provided a supersonic nozzle is used.

  11. 10 MW Supercritical CO2 Turbine Test

    SciTech Connect

    Turchi, Craig

    2014-01-29

    The Supercritical CO2 Turbine Test project was to demonstrate the inherent efficiencies of a supercritical carbon dioxide (s-CO2) power turbine and associated turbomachinery under conditions and at a scale relevant to commercial concentrating solar power (CSP) projects, thereby accelerating the commercial deployment of this new power generation technology. The project involved eight partnering organizations: NREL, Sandia National Laboratories, Echogen Power Systems, Abengoa Solar, University of Wisconsin at Madison, Electric Power Research Institute, Barber-Nichols, and the CSP Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. The multi-year project planned to design, fabricate, and validate an s-CO2 power turbine of nominally 10 MWe that is capable of operation at up to 700°C and operates in a dry-cooled test loop. The project plan consisted of three phases: (1) system design and modeling, (2) fabrication, and (3) testing. The major accomplishments of Phase 1 included: Design of a multistage, axial-flow, s-CO2 power turbine; Design modifications to an existing turbocompressor to provide s-CO2 flow for the test system; Updated equipment and installation costs for the turbomachinery and associated support infrastructure; Development of simulation tools for the test loop itself and for more efficient cycle designs that are of greater commercial interest; Simulation of s-CO2 power cycle integration into molten-nitrate-salt CSP systems indicating a cost benefit of up to 8% in levelized cost of energy; Identification of recuperator cost as a key economic parameter; Corrosion data for multiple alloys at temperatures up to 650ºC in high-pressure CO2 and recommendations for materials-of-construction; and Revised test plan and preliminary operating conditions based on the ongoing tests of related equipment. Phase 1 established that the cost of the facility needed to test the power turbine at its full power and temperature would exceed the planned funding for Phases 2 and 3. Late

  12. Selective Oxytrifluoromethylation of Allylamines with CO2.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jian-Heng; Song, Lei; Zhou, Wen-Jun; Ju, Tao; Yin, Zhu-Bao; Yan, Si-Shun; Zhang, Zhen; Li, Jing; Yu, Da-Gang

    2016-08-16

    Reported is the first oxy-trifluoromethylation of allylamines with carbon dioxide (CO2 ) using copper catalysis, thus leading to important CF3 -containing 2-oxazolidones. It is also the first time CO2 , a nontoxic and easily available greenhouse gas, has been used to tune the difunctionalization of alkenes from amino- to oxy-trifluoromethylation. Of particular note, this multicomponent reaction is highly chemo-, regio-, and diastereoselective under redox-neutral and mild reaction conditions. Moreover, these reactions feature good functional-group tolerance, broad substrate scope, easy scalability and facile product diversification. The important products could also be formed with either spirocycles or two adjacent tetrasubstituted carbon centers. PMID:27411560

  13. Leak Path Development in CO2 Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torsater, M.; Todorovic, J.; Opedal, N.; Lavrov, A.

    2014-12-01

    Wells have in numerous scientific works been denoted the "weak link" of safe and cost-efficient CO2 Capture and Storage (CCS). Whether they are active or abandoned, all wells are man-made intrusions into the storage reservoir with sealing abilities depending on degradable materials like steel and cement. If dense CO2 is allowed to expand (e.g. due to leakage) it will cool down its surroundings and cause strong thermal and mechanical loading on the wellbore. In addition, CO2 reacts chemically with rock, cement and steel. To ensure long-term underground containment, it is therefore necessary to study how, why, where and when leakage occurs along CO2wells. If cement bonding to rock or casing is poor, leak paths can form already during drilling and completion of the well. In the present work, we have mapped the bonding quality of cement-rock and cement-steel interfaces - and measured their resistance towards CO2 flow. This involved a large experimental matrix including different rocks, steels, cement types and well fluids. The bonding qualities were measured on composite cores using micro computed tomography (µ-CT), and CO2 was flooded through the samples to determine leakage rates. These were further compared to numerical simulations of leakage through the digitalized µ-CT core data, and CO2chemical interactions with the materials were mapped using electron microscopy. We also present a new laboratory set-up for measuring how well integrity is affected by downhole temperature variations - and we showcase some initial results. Our work concludes that leak path development in CO2 wells depends critically on the drilling fluids and presflushes/spacers chosen already during drilling and completion of a well. Fluid films residing on rock and casing surfaces strongly degrade the quality of cement bonding. The operation of the well is also important, as even slight thermal cycling (between 10°C and 95°C on casing) leads to significant de-bonding of the annular cement.

  14. Crystallization of CO2 ice and the absence of amorphous CO2 ice in space

    PubMed Central

    Escribano, Rafael M.; Muñoz Caro, Guillermo M.; Cruz-Diaz, Gustavo A.; Rodríguez-Lazcano, Yamilet; Maté, Belén

    2013-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is one of the most relevant and abundant species in astrophysical and atmospheric media. In particular, CO2 ice is present in several solar system bodies, as well as in interstellar and circumstellar ice mantles. The amount of CO2 in ice mantles and the presence of pure CO2 ice are significant indicators of the temperature history of dust in protostars. It is therefore important to know if CO2 is mixed with other molecules in the ice matrix or segregated and whether it is present in an amorphous or crystalline form. We apply a multidisciplinary approach involving IR spectroscopy in the laboratory, theoretical modeling of solid structures, and comparison with astronomical observations. We generate an unprecedented highly amorphous CO2 ice and study its crystallization both by thermal annealing and by slow accumulation of monolayers from the gas phase under an ultrahigh vacuum. Structural changes are followed by IR spectroscopy. We also devise theoretical models to reproduce different CO2 ice structures. We detect a preferential in-plane orientation of some vibrational modes of crystalline CO2. We identify the IR features of amorphous CO2 ice, and, in particular, we provide a theoretical explanation for a band at 2,328 cm−1 that dominates the spectrum of the amorphous phase and disappears when the crystallization is complete. Our results allow us to rule out the presence of pure and amorphous CO2 ice in space based on the observations available so far, supporting our current view of the evolution of CO2 ice. PMID:23858474

  15. Plant community change mediates the response of foliar delta15N to CO2 enrichment in mesic grasslands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rising atmospheric CO2 concentration may change the isotopic signature of plant N by altering plant and microbial processes involved in the N cycle. Isotope fractionation theory and limited experimental evidence indicate that CO2 may increase leaf delta15N by increasing plant community productivity,...

  16. When CO2 kills: effects of magmatic CO2 flux on belowground biota at Mammoth Mountain, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarland, J.; Waldrop, M. P.; Mangan, M.

    2011-12-01

    The biomass, composition, and activity of the soil microbial community is tightly linked to the composition of the aboveground plant community. Microorganisms in aerobic surface soils, both free-living and plant-associated are largely structured by the availability of growth limiting carbon (C) substrates derived from plant inputs. When C availability declines following a catastrophic event such as the death of large swaths of trees, the number and composition of microorganisms in soil would be expected to decline and/or shift to unique microorganisms that have better survival strategies under starvation conditions. High concentrations of volcanic cold CO2 emanating from Mammoth Mountain near Horseshoe Lake on the southwestern edge of Long Valley Caldera, CA has resulted in a large kill zone of tree species, and associated soil microbial species. In July 2010, we assessed belowground microbial community structure in response to disturbance of the plant community along a gradient of soil CO2 concentrations grading from <0.6% (ambient forest) to >80% (no plant life). We employed a microbial community fingerprinting technique (automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis) to determine changes in overall community composition for three broad functional groups: fungi, bacteria, and archaea. To evaluate changes in ectomycorrhizal fungal associates along the CO2 gradient, we harvested root tips from lodgepole pine seedlings collected in unaffected forest as well as at the leading edge of colonization into the kill zone. We also measured soil C fractions (dissolved organic C, microbial biomass C, and non-extractable C) at 10 and 30 cm depth, as well as NH4+. Not surprisingly, our results indicate a precipitous decline in soil C, and microbial C with increasing soil CO2; phospholipid fatty acid analysis in conjunction with community fingerprinting indicate both a loss of fungal diversity as well as a dramatic decrease in biomass as one proceeds further into the kill zone

  17. Transendoscopic application of CO2 laser irradiation using the OmniGuide fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tate, Lloyd P., Jr.; Elce, Yvonne A.

    2005-04-01

    Transendoscopic laser surgery has been performed in large animals since 1984. It is used to treat many upper respiratory disorders, as well as urogenital diseases. Initially, the Nd:YAG laser was the laser of choice until the early 1990's, when smaller, more compact diode lasers entered the veterinary field. In the mid 1980's, several attempts were made to transmit CO2 laser energy transendoscopically. True success was not obtained until 2004 when the OmniGuide CO2 Laser Hollow Light Guide (fiber) was fabricated. Although there is attenuation of energy, this very flexible fiber allows the CO2 laser to be used transendoscopically for incision and ablation of tissue. Both healing and recuperation time are reduced, compared to other wavelengths transmitted through solid quartz fiber. The OmniGuide fiber can be coupled to the output ports of CO2 lasers commonly used in veterinary medicine. Transendoscopic application of the CO2 laser is advantageous in that there is no endoscopic white-out, no volume heating of tissue, and it provides accurate means of performing upper respiratory surgery in the standing large animal.

  18. TES/Aura L2 Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Nadir (TL2CO2N)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-01-30

    TES/Aura L2 Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Nadir (TL2CO2N) News:  TES News ... L2 Platform:  TES/Aura L2 Carbon Dioxide Spatial Coverage:  5.2 x 8.5 km nadir ... Subset Data: TES Order Tool Parameters:  Carbon Dioxide Order Data:  Reverb:   Order Data ...

  19. TES/Aura L2 Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Nadir (TL2CO2NS)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-01-30

    TES/Aura L2 Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Nadir (TL2CO2NS) News:  TES News ... L2 Platform:  TES/Aura L2 Carbon Dioxide Spatial Coverage:  5.3 x 8.5 km nadir ... Subset Data: TES Order Tool Parameters:  Carbon Dioxide Order Data:  Reverb:   Order Data ...

  20. Transport of root-derived CO2 via the transpiration stream affects aboveground tree physiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloemen, J.; McGuire, M. A.; Aubrey, D. P.; Teskey, R. O.; Steppe, K.

    2012-04-01

    Recent research on soil CO2 efflux has shown that belowground autotrophic respiration is largely underestimated using classical net CO2 flux measurements. Aubrey & Teskey (2009) found that in forest ecosystems a substantial portion of the CO2 released from root respiration remained within the root system and was transported aboveground in the stem via the transpiration stream. The magnitude of this upward movement of CO2 from belowground tissues suggested important implications for how we measure above- and belowground respiration. If a considerable fraction of root-respired CO2 is transported aboveground, where it might be fixed in woody and leaf tissues, then we are routinely underestimating the amount of C needed to sustain belowground tissues. In this study, we infused 13C labeled water into the base of field-grown poplar trees as a surrogate for root-respired CO2 to investigate the possible role of root-derived CO2 as substrate for carbon fixation. The label was transported upwards from the base of the tree toward the top. During its ascent, the 13C label was removed from the transpiration stream and fixed by chlorophyll-containing woody (young bark and xylem) and leaf (petiole) tissues. Moreover, based on 13C analysis of gas samples, we observed that up to 88 ± 0.10 % of the label applied was lost to the atmosphere by stem and branch efflux higher in the trees. Given that one-half of root-respired CO2 may follow this internal flux pathway (Aubrey & Teskey, 2009), we calculated that up to 44% of the root-respired CO2 could diffuse to the atmosphere once transported to the stem and branches. Thus, a large portion of CO2 that diffuses out of aboveground tissues may actually result from root respiration. Our results show that CO2 originating belowground can be transported internally to aboveground parts of trees, where it will have an important impact on tree physiology. Internal transport of CO2 indicates that the gas exchange approach to estimating above- and

  1. Nd:YAG laser cleaning of ablation debris from excimer-laser-ablated polyimide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Jianhui; Low, Jason; Lim, Puay K.; Lim, Pean

    2001-10-01

    In the processing of excimer laser ablation of nozzles on polyimide in air, both gases like CO2, CO and HCN and solid debris including C2 approximately C12 are produced in laser ablation area. In this paper, we reported for the first time a Nd:YAG laser cleaning of ablation debris generated in excimer laser ablation of polyimide. It demonstrated effective cleaning with the advantages of shortening cleaning cycle time and simplifying cleaning process. The laser used for the cleaning was a Q-switched and frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser with wavelength of 532 nm and repetition rate of 10 Hz. The laser cleaning effect was compared with conventional plasma ashing. AFM measurement showed that the Nd:YAG laser cleaning had no damage to the substrate. XPS results indicated that the polyimide surface cleaned with laser beam had a lower oxygen/carbon ratio than that of plasma ashing. The study shows that frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser cleaning is effective in ablation debris removal from excimer laser ablated polyimide.

  2. Laser ablation in analytical chemistry - A review

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, Richard E.; Mao, Xianglei; Liu, Haichen; Gonzalez, Jhanis; Mao, Samuel S.

    2001-10-10

    Laser ablation is becoming a dominant technology for direct solid sampling in analytical chemistry. Laser ablation refers to the process in which an intense burst of energy delivered by a short laser pulse is used to sample (remove a portion of) a material. The advantages of laser ablation chemical analysis include direct characterization of solids, no chemical procedures for dissolution, reduced risk of contamination or sample loss, analysis of very small samples not separable for solution analysis, and determination of spatial distributions of elemental composition. This review describes recent research to understand and utilize laser ablation for direct solid sampling, with emphasis on sample introduction to an inductively coupled plasma (ICP). Current research related to contemporary experimental systems, calibration and optimization, and fractionation is discussed, with a summary of applications in several areas.

  3. CO2 dispersion modelling over Paris region within the CO2-MEGAPARIS project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lac, C.; Donnelly, R. P.; Masson, V.; Pal, S.; Donier, S.; Queguiner, S.; Tanguy, G.; Ammoura, L.; Xueref-Remy, I.

    2012-10-01

    Accurate simulation of the spatial and temporal variability of tracer mixing ratios over urban areas is challenging, but essential in order to utilize CO2 measurements in an atmospheric inverse framework to better estimate regional CO2 fluxes. This study investigates the ability of a high-resolution model to simulate meteorological and CO2 fields around Paris agglomeration, during the March field campaign of the CO2-MEGAPARIS project. The mesoscale atmospheric model Meso-NH, running at 2 km horizontal resolution, is coupled with the Town-Energy Balance (TEB) urban canopy scheme and with the Interactions between Soil, Biosphere and Atmosphere CO2-reactive (ISBA-A-gs) surface scheme, allowing a full interaction of CO2 between the surface and the atmosphere. Statistical scores show a good representation of the Urban Heat Island (UHI) and urban-rural contrasts. Boundary layer heights (BLH) at urban, sub-urban and rural sites are well captured, especially the onset time of the BLH increase and its growth rate in the morning, that are essential for tall tower CO2 observatories. Only nocturnal BLH at sub-urban sites are slightly underestimated a few nights, with a bias less than 50 m. At Eiffel tower, the observed spikes of CO2 maxima occur every morning exactly at the time at which the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) growth reaches the measurement height. The timing of the CO2 cycle is well captured by the model, with only small biases on CO2 concentrations, mainly linked to the misrepresentation of anthropogenic emissions, as the Eiffel site is at the heart of trafic emission sources. At sub-urban ground stations, CO2 measurements exhibit maxima at the beginning and at the end of each night, when the ABL is fully contracted, with a very strong spatio-temporal variability. The CO2 cycle at these sites is generally well reproduced by the model, even if some biases on the nocturnal maxima appear in the Paris plume parly due to small errors on the vertical transport, or in

  4. Development of Novel CO2 Adsorbents for Capture of CO2 from Flue Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Fauth, D.J.; Filburn, T.P.; Gray, M.L.; Hedges, S.W.; Hoffman, J.; Pennline, H.W.; Filburn, T.

    2007-06-01

    Capturing CO2 emissions generated from fossil fuel-based power plants has received widespread attention and is considered a vital course of action for CO2 emission abatement. Efforts are underway at the Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory to develop viable energy technologies enabling the CO2 capture from large stationary point sources. Solid, immobilized amine sorbents (IAS) formulated by impregnation of liquid amines within porous substrates are reactive towards CO2 and offer an alternative means for cyclic capture of CO2 eliminating, to some degree, inadequacies related to chemical absorption by aqueous alkanolamine solutions. This paper describes synthesis, characterization, and CO2 adsorption properties for IAS materials previously tested to bind and release CO2 and water vapor in a closed loop life support system. Tetraethylenepentamine (TEPA), acrylonitrile-modified tetraethylenepentamine (TEPAN), and a single formulation consisting of TEPAN and N, N’-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)ethylenediamine (BED) were individually supported on a poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) substrate and examined. CO2 adsorption profiles leading to reversible CO2 adsorption capacities were obtained using thermogravimetry. Under 10% CO2 in nitrogen at 25°C and 1 atm, TEPA supported on PMMA over 60 minutes adsorbed ~3.2 mmol/g{sorbent} whereas, TEPAN supported on PMMA along with TEPAN and BED supported on PMMA adsorbed ~1.7 mmol/g{sorbent} and ~2.3 mmol/g{sorbent} respectively. Cyclic experiments with a 1:1 weight ratio of TEPAN and BED supported on poly (methyl methacrylate) beads utilizing a fixed-bed flow system with 9% CO2, 3.5% O2, nitrogen balance with trace gas constituents were studied. CO2 adsorption capacity was ~ 3 mmols CO2/g{sorbent} at 40°C and 1.4 atm. No beneficial effect on IAS performance was found using a moisture-laden flue gas mixture. Tests with 750 ppmv NO in a humidified gas stream revealed negligible NO sorption onto the IAS. A high SO2

  5. CO2 adsorption isotherm on clay minerals and the CO2 accessibility into the clay interlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gensterblum, Yves; Bertier, Pieter; Busch, Andreas; Rother, Gernot; Krooß, Bernhard

    2013-04-01

    Large-scale CO2 storage in porous rock formations at 1-3 km depth is seen as a global warming mitigation strategy. In this process, CO2 is separated from the flue gas of coal or gas power plants, compressed, and pumped into porous subsurface reservoirs with overlying caprocks (seals). Good seals are mechanically and chemically stable caprocks with low porosity and permeability. They prevent leakage of buoyant CO2 from the reservoir. Caprocks are generally comprised of thick layers of shale, and thus mainly consist of clay minerals. These clays can be affected by CO2-induced processes, such as swelling or dissolution. The interactions of CO2 with clay minerals in shales are at present poorly understood. Sorption measurements in combination scattering techniques could provide fundamental insight into the mechanisms governing CO2-clay interaction. Volumetric sorption techniques have assessed the sorption of supercritical CO2 onto coal (Gensterblum et al., 2010; Gensterblum et al., 2009), porous silica (Rother et al., 2012a) and clays as a means of exploring the potential of large-scale storage of anthropogenic CO2 in geological reservoirs (Busch et al., 2008). On different clay minerals and shales, positive values of excess sorption were measured at gas pressures up to 6 MPa, where the interfacial fluid is assumed to be denser than the bulk fluid. However, zero and negative values were obtained at higher densities, which suggests the adsorbed fluid becomes equal to and eventually less dense than the corresponding bulk fluid, or that the clay minerals expand on CO2 charging. Using a combination of neutron diffraction and excess sorption measurements, we recently deduced the interlayer density of scCO2 in Na-montmorillonite clay in its single-layer hydration state (Rother et al., 2012b), and confirmed its low density, as well as the expansion of the basal spacings. We performed neutron diffraction experiments at the FRMII diffractometer on smectite, kaolinite and illite

  6. Response of Nodularia spumigena to pCO2 - Part 3: Turnover of phosphorus compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unger, J.; Endres, S.; Wannicke, N.; Engel, A.; Voss, M.; Nausch, G.; Nausch, M.

    2012-10-01

    Diazotrophic cyanobacteria often form extensive summer blooms in the Baltic Sea driving their environment into phosphate limitation. One of the main species is the heterocystous cyanobacterium Nodularia spumigena. N. spumigena exhibits accelerated uptake of phosphate through the release of the exoenzyme alkaline phosphatase that also serves as an indicator of the hydrolysis of dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP). The present study investigated the utilization of DOP and its compounds (e.g. ATP) by N. spumigena during growth under varying CO2 concentrations, in order to estimate potential consequences of ocean acidification on the cell's supply with phosphorus. Cell growth, phosphorus pool fractions, and four DOP-compounds (ATP, DNA, RNA, and phospholipids) were determined in three set-ups with different CO2 concentrations (341, 399, and 508 μatm) during a 15-day batch experiment. The results showed rapid depletion of dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP) in all pCO2 treatments while DOP utilization increased with elevated pCO2, in parallel with the growth stimulation of N. spumigena. During the growth phase, DOP uptake was enhanced by a factor of 1.32 at 399 μatm and of 2.25 at 508 μatm compared to the lowest pCO2 concentration. Among the measured DOP compounds, none was found to accumulate preferentially during the incubation or in response to a specific pCO2 treatment. However, at the beginning 61.9 ± 4.3% of the DOP were not characterized but comprised the most highly utilized fraction. This is demonstrated by the decrement of this fraction to 27.4 ± 9.9% of total DOP during the growth phase, especially in response to the medium and high pCO2 treatment. Our results indicate a stimulated growth of diazotrophic cyanobacteria at increasing CO2 concentrations that is accompanied by increasing utilization of DOP as an alternative P source.

  7. Carbon Dioxide Laser Absorption Spectrometer (CO2LAS) Aircraft Measurements of CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, Lance E.; Spiers, Gary D.; Menzies, Robert T.; Jacob, Joseph C.; Hyon, Jason

    2011-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory Carbon Dioxide Laser Absorption Spectrometer (CO2LAS) utilizes Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) at 2.05 microns to obtain CO2 column mixing ratios weighted heavily in the boundary layer. CO2LAS employs a coherent detection receiver and continuous-wave Th:Ho:YLF laser transmitters with output powers around 100 milliwatts. An offset frequency-locking scheme coupled to an absolute frequency reference enables the frequencies of the online and offline lasers to be held to within 200 kHz of desired values. We describe results from 2009 field campaigns when CO2LAS flew on the Twin Otter. We also describe spectroscopic studies aimed at uncovering potential biases in lidar CO2 retrievals at 2.05 microns.

  8. Extraction of lipids from microalgae using CO2-expanded methanol and liquid CO2.

    PubMed

    Paudel, Ashok; Jessop, Michael J; Stubbins, Spencer H; Champagne, Pascale; Jessop, Philip G

    2015-05-01

    The use of CO2-expanded methanol (cxMeOH) and liquid carbon dioxide (lCO2) is proposed to extract lipids from Botryococcus braunii. When compressed CO2 dissolves in methanol, the solvent expands in volume, decreases in polarity and so increases in its selectivity for biodiesel desirable lipids. Solid phase extraction of the algal extract showed that the cxMeOH extracted 21 mg of biodiesel desirable lipids per mL of organic solvent compared to 3mg/mL using either neat methanol or chloroform/methanol mixture. The non-polar lCO2 showed a high affinity for non-polar lipids. Using lCO2, it is possible to extract up to 10% neutral lipids relative to the mass of dry algae. Unlike extractions using conventional solvents, these new methods require little to no volatile, flammable, or chlorinated organic solvents.

  9. Stereotactic CO2 laser therapy for hydrocephalus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozodoy-Pins, Rebecca L.; Harrington, James A.; Zazanis, George A.; Nosko, Michael G.; Lehman, Richard M.

    1994-05-01

    A new fiber-optic delivery system for CO2 radiation has been used to successfully treat non-communicating hydrocephalus. This system consists of a hollow sapphire waveguide employed in the lumen of a stereotactically-guided neuroendoscope. CO2 gas flows through the bore of the hollow waveguide, creating a path for the laser beam through the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). This delivery system has the advantages of both visualization and guided CO2 laser radiation without the same 4.3 mm diameter scope. Several patients with hydrocephalus were treated with this new system. The laser was used to create a passage in the floor of the ventricle to allow the flow of CSF from the ventricles to the sub-arachnoid space. Initial postoperative results demonstrated a relief of the clinical symptoms. Long-term results will indicate if this type of therapy will be superior to the use of implanted silicone shunts. Since CO2 laser radiation at 10.6 micrometers is strongly absorbed by the water in tissue and CSF, damage to tissue surrounding the lesion with each laser pulse is limited. The accuracy and safety of this technique may prove it to be an advantageous therapy for obstructive hydrocephalus.

  10. 76 FR 43489 - Deferral for CO2

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-20

    ... dioxide CO 2 e carbon dioxide equivalents EO Executive Order EPA U.S. Environmental Protection Agency FR... as the Tailoring Rule; 75 FR 31514), setting thresholds for GHG emissions that define when permits... bioenergy and other biogenic sources (75 FR 41173). The purpose of this CFI was to request comment...

  11. Photoemission study of SmCo2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, J.-S.; Yang, C. J.; Lee, Y. P.; Olson, C. G.; Cho, E.-J.; Oh, S.-J.; Anderson, R. O.; Liu, L. Z.; Park, J.-H.; Allen, J. W.; Ellis, W. P.

    1993-10-01

    The electronic structure of SmCo2 is investigated with photoemission spectroscopy (PES). All the PES spectra are consistent in showing that the bulk Sm ions are trivalent, but that the surface has divalent Sm ions and is probably inhomogeneously mixed valent. Both the Sm 4f valence band and Sm 3d core level PES spectra are found to be substantially broader than those of Sm metal. The observed larger linewidths for SmCo2, as compared to those of pure Sm metal, suggest a larger lifetime broadening, probably due to an increased number of valence-band electrons, and a larger 4f hybridization, mainly to Co 3d states. Weak satellite structures are observed in the Co 3d valence band and Co 2p core level PES spectra, indicating Co 3d correlation effects. The comparison of the experimental valence-band PES spectrum with the theoretical Co 3d projected local density of states also suggests that Co 3d correlation effects in SmCo2 are non-negligible.

  12. CO2 laser used in cosmetology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Chenglie

    1993-03-01

    Cases of various kinds of warts, nevi, papillomas, skin angiomas, ephilises, skin vegetation, scars and brandy noses were vaporized and solidified with a 2.5 - 8 W low power CO2 laser with an overall satisfaction rate up to 99.8% and the satisfaction rate for one time 92%.

  13. Porous Hexacyanometalates for CO2 capture applications

    SciTech Connect

    Motkuri, Radha K.; Thallapally, Praveen K.; McGrail, B. Peter

    2013-07-30

    Prussian blue analogues of M3[Fe(CN)6]2 x H2O (where M=Fe, Mn and Ni) were synthesized, characterized and tested for their gas sorption capabilities. The sorption studies reveal that, these Prussian blue materials preferentially sorb CO2 over N2 and CH4 at low pressure (1bar).

  14. Uncooled receivers for CO2 laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granovskii, A. B.; Iakovlev, V. A.

    1986-01-01

    Published data on low-inertia, uncooled, single-element and matrix-type radiation receivers that have a high degree of reliability and are immune from interference from various external sources are systematically summarized. Three basic types of receivers are examined: photonic receivers, thermal receivers, and receivers based on wave interaction. Principal attention is given to the CO2 laser radiation receiver.

  15. Blackbody-pumped CO2 laser experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiansen, W. H.; Insuik, R. J.

    1983-07-01

    Thermal radiation from a high temperature oven was used as an optical pump to achieve lasing from CO2 mixtures. Laser output as a function of blackbody temperature and gas conditions is described. This achievement represents the first blackbody cavity pumped laser and has potential for solar pumping. Previously announced in STAR as N83-10420

  16. Bosch CO2 Reduction System Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, R. F.; King, C. D.; Keller, E. E.

    1976-01-01

    Development of a Bosch process CO2 reduction unit was continued, and, by means of hardware modifications, the performance was substantially improved. Benefits of the hardware upgrading were demonstrated by extensive unit operation and data acquisition in the laboratory. This work was accomplished on a cold seal configuration of the Bosch unit.

  17. CO2 laser in stapes surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanovic, Sergije; Schoenfeld, Uwe; Berghaus, Andreas; Fischer, R.; Scherer, Hans H.

    1993-07-01

    Stapedotomy is not only one of the most successful interventions in otology but also one of the most dangerous for the inner ear. To reduce the risk of damaging middle and inner ear structures through manipulations with conventional instruments, the CO2 laser beam is used for perforating the footplate and removing the suprastructures. This non-contact technique aims at precise and controlled management of middle ear structures. Consideration is given to the impact of experimental data on the clinical application of the CO2 laser in stapes surgery. The discussion covers the advantages and disadvantages with regard to optical and tissue-related properties and points out possible dangers to the inner ear. Our experimental and clinical experience is taken as a basis for examining the surgical technique and the varying demands made on the laser beam in treating the stapedial tendon, crura and footplate. Attention is called to the need for additional instruments. Effective energy parameters for CO2 laser stapedeotomy are evaluated for different lasers. Application of the CO2 laser contributes towards optimization of this high-precision intervention and promises to reduce the incidence of inner ear damages in large numbers of cases. This technique appears useful particularly in difficult anatomic situations and, above all, for revisional operations.

  18. Artificial photosynthesis - CO2 towards methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazimek, D.; Czech, B.

    2011-03-01

    The new insight into the problem of carbon dioxide utilization into valuable compound - methanol and then its transformation into fuel is presented. Because the highly endothermic requirements of the reaction of CO2 hydrogenation a photocatalytic route is applied. Combining of the two reactions: water splitting and CO2 hydrogenation using H2O as a source of hydrogen at the same time and place are proposed. The studies over modified TiO2 catalysts supported on Al2O3 were conducted in a self-designed circulated photocatalytic reaction system under at room temperature and constant pressure. Experimental results indicated that the highest yield of the photoreduction of CO2 with H2O were obtained using TiO2 with the active anatase phase modified by Ru and WO3 addition. The conversion was very high - almost 97% of CO2 was transformed mainly into methanol (14%vol.) and into small amount of formic and acetic acid and ester.

  19. Agriculture waste and rising CO2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Currently, there are many uncertainties concerning agriculture’s role in global environmental change including the effects of rising atmospheric CO2 concentration. A viable and stable world food supply depends on productive agricultural systems, but environmental concerns within agriculture have to...

  20. Temporal variability in the sources and fluxes of CO2 in a residential area in an evergreen subtropical city

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weissert, L. F.; Salmond, J. A.; Turnbull, J. C.; Schwendenmann, L.

    2016-10-01

    Measurements of CO2 fluxes in temperate climates have shown that urban areas are a net source of CO2 and that photosynthetic CO2 uptake is generally not sufficient to offset local CO2 emissions. However, little is known about the role of vegetation in cities where biogenic CO2 uptake is not limited to a 2-8 months growing season. This study used the eddy covariance technique to quantify the atmospheric CO2 fluxes over a period of 12 months in a residential area in subtropical Auckland, New Zealand, where the vegetation cover (surface cover fraction: 47%) is dominated by evergreen vegetation. Radiocarbon isotope measurements of CO2 were conducted at three different times of the day (06:00-09:00, 12:00-15:00, 01:00-04:00) for four consecutive weekdays in summer and winter to differentiate anthropogenic sources of CO2 (fossil fuel combustion) from biogenic sources (ecosystem respiration, combustion of biofuel/biomass). The results reveal previously unreported patterns for CO2 fluxes, with no seasonal variability and negative (net uptake) CO2 midday fluxes throughout the year, demonstrating photosynthetic uptake by the evergreen vegetation all year-round. The winter radiocarbon measurements showed that 85% of the CO2 during the morning rush hour was attributed to fossil fuel emissions, when wind was from residential areas. However, for all other time periods radiocarbon measurements showed that fossil fuel combustion was not a large source of CO2, suggesting that biogenic processes likely dominate CO2 fluxes at this residential site. Overall, our findings highlight the importance of vegetation in residential areas to mitigate local CO2 emissions, particularly in cities with a climate that allows evergreen vegetation to maintain high photosynthetic rates over winter. As urban areas grow, urban planners need to consider the role of urban greenspace to mitigate urban CO2 emissions.

  1. Melt mixing causes negative correlation of trace element enrichment and CO2 content prior to an Icelandic eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neave, David A.; Maclennan, John; Edmonds, Marie; Thordarson, Thorvaldur

    2014-08-01

    Major elements, trace elements and volatiles were measured in 110 olivine-hosted melt inclusions from the subglacial Skuggafjöll eruption in the Eastern Volcanic Zone of Iceland. Variations in melt inclusion trace element concentrations can be accounted for by incomplete mixing of diverse mantle parental melts accompanied by variable extents of fractional crystallisation. Binary mixing between an incompatible trace element-enriched and depleted melts provides a good fit to observed variations in trace element ratios such as Ce/Y. Surprisingly, the CO2 contents of melt inclusions correlate negatively with their degree of trace element enrichment. Depleted, low-Ce/Y inclusions with ∼1200 ppm CO2 have high CO2/Nb contents (∼400), suggesting that melts experienced little or no CO2 exsolution before inclusion entrapment. Enriched, high-Ce/Y inclusions contain ∼300 ppm CO2, have low CO2/Nb (contents 50-100) and melts are likely to have exsolved much of their original CO2 contents prior to inclusion entrapment. The negative correlation between CO2 content and trace element enrichment may arise either from the more efficient exsolution of CO2 from enriched melts, or from the intrusion of CO2-supersaturated depleted melts into enriched melts that had already exsolved much of their original CO2 contents. Some inclusions have lower CO2 contents than predicted from binary mixing models, which suggests that at least some CO2 exsolution occurred concurrently with mixing. Enriched inclusions record entrapment pressures of ∼0.5 kbar. These pressures probably correspond to the depth of mixing. Higher pressures recorded in depleted inclusions may have resulted from the development of CO2 supersaturation during ascent from storage at ≥1.5 kbar. The presence of CO2 supersaturation in melt inclusions has the potential to constrain timescales of melt inclusion entrapment.

  2. Analysis of therapeutical effects of Er:YAG and CO2 laser post treatments of small hemangiomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remlová, E.; Vránová, J.; Rosina, J.; Navrátil, L.

    2011-09-01

    The main goal of our study was the evaluation of treatment efficiency of two types of ablative laser-CO2 and Er:YAG (or ERB) treatment. 183 patients (Er:YAG—105 patients, CO2—78 patients) were analyzed to compare the curative effects and adverse events, such as loss of pigment and appearance of scars caused by these two lasers. The results of the study showed the slightly better effectiveness of Er:YAG laser radiation in comparison with CO2 laser in the case of treatment of small hemangiomas up to 3 mm in diameter. In the Er:YAG laser application the curative effect was in 99%, hypo-pigmentation occurred in 18%, and scars in 70% of all treatments. In the CO2 laser application the curative effect was in 97%, hypo-pigmentation in 52%, and scars in 77% from all treatments.

  3. CO2 acquisition in Chlamydomonas acidophila is influenced mainly by CO2, not phosphorus, availability.

    PubMed

    Spijkerman, Elly; Stojkovic, Slobodanka; Beardall, John

    2014-09-01

    The extremophilic green microalga Chlamydomonas acidophila grows in very acidic waters (pH 2.3-3.4), where CO2 is the sole inorganic carbon source. Previous work has revealed that the species can accumulate inorganic carbon (Ci) and exhibits high affinity CO2 utilization under low-CO2 (air-equilibrium) conditions, similar to organisms with an active CO2 concentrating mechanism (CCM), whereas both processes are down-regulated under high CO2 (4.5 % CO2) conditions. Responses of this species to phosphorus (Pi)-limited conditions suggested a contrasting regulation of the CCM characteristics. Therefore, we measured external carbonic anhydrase (CAext) activities and protein expression (CAH1), the internal pH, Ci accumulation, and CO2-utilization in cells adapted to high or low CO2 under Pi-replete and Pi-limited conditions. Results reveal that C. acidophila expressed CAext activity and expressed a protein cross-reacting with CAH1 (the CAext from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii). Although the function of this CA remains unclear, CAext activity and high affinity CO2 utilization were the highest under low CO2 conditions. C. acidophila accumulated Ci and expressed the CAH1 protein under all conditions tested, and C. reinhardtii also contained substantial amounts of CAH1 protein under Pi-limitation. In conclusion, Ci utilization is optimized in C. acidophila under ecologically relevant conditions, which may enable optimal survival in its extreme Ci- and Pi-limited habitat. The exact physiological and biochemical acclimation remains to be further studied.

  4. Isolation of microorganisms from CO2 sequestration sites through enrichments under high pCO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peet, K. C.; Freedman, A. J.; Boreham, C.; Thompson, J. R.

    2012-12-01

    Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) in geologic formations has the potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuel processing and combustion. However, little is known about the effects that CO2 may have on biological activity in deep earth environments. To understand microorganisms associated with these environments, we have developed a simple high-pressure enrichment methodology to cultivate organisms capable of growth under supercritical CO2 (scCO2). Growth media targeting different subsurface functional metabolic groups is added to sterilized 316 stainless steel tubing sealed with quarter turn plug valves values and pressurized to 120-136 atm using a helium-padded CO2 tank, followed by incubation at 37 °C to achieve the scCO2 state. Repeated passages of crushed subsurface rock samples and growth media under supercritical CO2 headspaces are assessed for growth via microscopic enumeration. We have utilized this method to survey sandstone cores for microbes capable of growth under scCO2 from two different geologic sites targeted for carbon sequestration activities. Reproducible growth of microbial biomass under high pCO2 has been sustained from each site. Cell morphologies consist of primarily 1-2 μm rods and oval spores, with densities from 1E5-1E7 cells per ml of culture. We have purified and characterized a bacterial strain most closely related to Bacillus subterraneus (99% 16S rRNA identity) capable of growth under scCO2. Preliminary physiological characterization of this strain indicates it is a spore-forming facultative anaerobe able to grow in 0.5 to 50 ppt salinity. Genome sequencing and analysis currently in progress will help reveal genetic mechanisms of acclimation to high pCO2 conditions associated with geologic carbon sequestration.

  5. Sustained effects of atmospheric [CO2] and nitrogen availability on forest soil CO2 efflux.

    PubMed

    Oishi, A Christopher; Palmroth, Sari; Johnsen, Kurt H; McCarthy, Heather R; Oren, Ram

    2014-04-01

    Soil CO2 efflux (Fsoil ) is the largest source of carbon from forests and reflects primary productivity as well as how carbon is allocated within forest ecosystems. Through early stages of stand development, both elevated [CO2] and availability of soil nitrogen (N; sum of mineralization, deposition, and fixation) have been shown to increase gross primary productivity, but the long-term effects of these factors on Fsoil are less clear. Expanding on previous studies at the Duke Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) site, we quantified the effects of elevated [CO2] and N fertilization on Fsoil using daily measurements from automated chambers over 10 years. Consistent with previous results, compared to ambient unfertilized plots, annual Fsoil increased under elevated [CO2] (ca. 17%) and decreased with N (ca. 21%). N fertilization under elevated [CO2] reduced Fsoil to values similar to untreated plots. Over the study period, base respiration rates increased with leaf productivity, but declined after productivity saturated. Despite treatment-induced differences in aboveground biomass, soil temperature and water content were similar among treatments. Interannually, low soil water content decreased annual Fsoil from potential values - estimated based on temperature alone assuming nonlimiting soil water content - by ca. 0.7% per 1.0% reduction in relative extractable water. This effect was only slightly ameliorated by elevated [CO2]. Variability in soil N availability among plots accounted for the spatial variability in Fsoil , showing a decrease of ca. 114 g C m(-2) yr(-1) per 1 g m(-2) increase in soil N availability, with consistently higher Fsoil in elevated [CO2] plots ca. 127 g C per 100 ppm [CO2] over the +200 ppm enrichment. Altogether, reflecting increased belowground carbon partitioning in response to greater plant nutritional needs, the effects of elevated [CO2] and N fertilization on Fsoil in this stand are sustained beyond the early stages of stand development and

  6. The importance of internal CO2 gradients in tree roots for assessing belowground carbon allocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloemen, Jasper; De Bel, Bryan; Wittocx, Jonas; Anné, Thomas; McGuire, Mary Anne; Teskey, Robert O.; Steppe, Kathy

    2015-04-01

    In trees, it is known that allocation of recent assimilates belowground fuels metabolic processes like root respiration. Nonetheless, the fraction of carbon allocated belowground remains poorly quantified as the energetic costs of tree root metabolism remain largely unknown. Current estimates of root respiration are calculated from measurements of CO2 efflux from roots or soil. However, a substantial portion of CO2 released by root respiration might remain within the tree root system rather than diffusing into the soil environment, indicating that root respiration consumes substantially more carbohydrates than previously recognized. We measured internal CO2 concentration ([CO2]) and sap flow in three longitudinal sections of two large roots of American beech (Fagus grandifolia) and yellow poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera) trees (n=4 trees per species), while simultaneously measuring [CO2] in neighboring soil. We hypothesized that [CO2] would be lowest in soil and increase from the root tip to the base of the stem. We observed substantially higher [CO2] in tree roots (on average 8.5 ± 2.0 and 5.2 ± 1.9 Vol% for American beech and yellow poplar, respectively) compared with the soil environment (1.0 ± 0.4 and 1.3 ± 1.3 Vol% around American beech and yellow poplar, respectively), indicating that root tissues exert substantial barriers to outward diffusion of respired CO2. Moreover, we observed an internal [CO2] gradient from root tip to stem base which suggests that progressively more respired CO2 dissolved in flowing xylem sap as it moved from the soil through the root xylem. These results confirm that a fraction of root-respired CO2 concentrates in the xylem sap of the root system and fluxes upward within the tree. This CO2 that is removed from the site of respiration cannot be accounted for with measurements of CO2 efflux from roots or soil, indicating that efflux-based techniques underestimate the energetic costs of tree root metabolism and therefore the amount

  7. Glass drilling by longitudinally excited CO2 laser with short laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uno, Kazuyuki; Yamamoto, Takuya; Akitsu, Tetsuya; Jitsuno, Takahisa

    2015-03-01

    We developed a longitudinally excited CO2 laser that produces a short laser pulse. The laser was very simple and consisted of a 45-cm-long alumina ceramic pipe with an inner diameter of 9 mm, a pulse power supply, a step-up transformer, a storage capacitance, and a spark-gap switch. The laser pulse had a spike pulse and a pulse tail. The energy of the pulse tail was controlled by adjusting medium gas. Using three types of CO2 laser pulse with the same spike-pulse energy and the different pulse-tail energy, the characteristics of the hole drilling of synthetic silica glass was investigated. Higher pulse-tail energy gave deeper ablation depth. In the short laser pulse with the spike-pulse energy of 1.2 mJ, the spike pulse width of 162 ns, the pulse-tail energy of 24.6 mJ, and the pulse-tail length of 29.6 μs, 1000 shots irradiation produced the ablation depth of 988 μm. In the hole drilling of synthetic silica glass by the CO2 laser, a crack-free process was realized.

  8. Influence of secondary treatment with CO2 laser irradiation for mitigation site on fused silica surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yong; Zhou, Qiang; Qiu, Rong; Gao, Xiang; Wang, Hui-Li; Yao, Cai-Zhen; Wang, Jun-Bo; Zhao, Xin; Liu, Chun-Ming; Xiang, Xia; Zu, Xiao-Tao; Yuan, Xiao-Dong; Miao, Xin-Xiang

    2016-10-01

    The ablation debris and raised rim, as well as residual stress and deep crater will be formed during the mitigation of damage site with a CO2 laser irradiation on fused silica surface, which greatly affects the laser damage resistance of optics. In this study, the experimental study combined with numerical simulation is utilized to investigate the effect of the secondary treatment on a mitigated site by CO2 laser irradiation. The results indicate that the ablation debris and the raised rim can be completely eliminated and the depth of crater can be reduced. Notable results show that the residual stress of the mitigation site after treatment will reduce two-thirds of the original stress. Finally, the elimination and the controlling mechanism of secondary treatment on the debris and raised rim, as well as the reasons for changing the profile and stress are analyzed. The results can provide a reference for the optimization treatment of mitigation sites by CO2 laser secondary treatment. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61505170, 61505171, and 51535003), the Joint Fund of the National Natural Science Foundation of China, the Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics (Grant No. U1530109), and the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (Grant No. 2016M592709).

  9. Modelling the Martian CO2 Ice Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Listowski, Constantino; Määttänen, A.; Montmessin, F.; Lefèvre, F.

    2012-10-01

    Martian CO2 ice cloud formation represents a rare phenomenon in the Solar System: the condensation of the main component of the atmosphere. Moreover, on Mars, condensation occurs in a rarefied atmosphere (large Knudsen numbers, Kn) that limits the growth efficiency. These clouds form in the polar winter troposphere and in the mesosphere near the equator. CO2 ice cloud modeling has turned out to be challenging: recent efforts (e.g. [1]) fail in explaining typical small sizes (80 nm-130 nm) observed for mesospheric clouds [2]. Supercold pockets (T<< Tcond), which appear to be common in the mesosphere [3],might be exclusively responsible of the formation of such clouds, as a consequence of gravity waves propagating throughout the atmosphere [4]. In order to understand by modeling the effect CO2 clouds could have on the Martian climate, one needs to properly predict the crystal sizes, and so the growth rates involved. We will show that Earth microphysical crystal growth models, which deal with the condensation of trace gases, are misleading when transposed for CO2 cloud formation: they overestimate the growth rates at high saturation ratios. On the other hand, an approach based on the continuum regime (small Kn), corrected to account for the free molecular regime (high Kn) remains efficient. We present our new approach for modelling the growth of Martian CO2 cloud crystals, investigated with a 1D-microphysical model. [1] Colaprete, A., et al., (2008) PSS, 56, 150C [2] Montmessin, F., et al., (2006) Icarus, 183, 403-410 [3] Montmessin at al., (2011) mamo, 404-405 [4] Spiga, A., et al., (2012), GRL, 39, L02201 [5] Wood, S. E., (1999), Ph.D. thesis, UCLA [6] Young, J. B., J. Geophys. Res., 36, 294-2956, 1993

  10. CO2 Orbital Trends in Comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Michael; Feaga, Lori; Bodewits, Dennis; McKay, Adam; Snodgrass, Colin; Wooden, Diane

    2014-12-01

    Spacecraft missions to comets return a treasure trove of details of their targets, e.g., the Rosetta mission to comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, the Deep Impact experiment at comet 9P/Tempel 1, or even the flyby of C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring) at Mars. Yet, missions are rare, the diversity of comets is large, few comets are easily accessible, and comet flybys essentially return snapshots of their target nuclei. Thus, telescopic observations are necessary to place the mission data within the context of each comet's long-term behavior, and to further connect mission results to the comet population as a whole. We propose a large Cycle 11 project to study the long-term activity of past and potential future mission targets, and select bright Oort cloud comets to infer comet nucleus properties, which would otherwise require flyby missions. In the classical comet model, cometary mass loss is driven by the sublimation of water ice. However, recent discoveries suggest that the more volatile CO and CO2 ices are the likely drivers of some comet active regions. Surprisingly, CO2 drove most of the activity of comet Hartley 2 at only 1 AU from the Sun where vigorous water ice sublimation would be expected to dominate. Currently, little is known about the role of CO2 in comet activity because telluric absorptions prohibit monitoring from the ground. In our Cycle 11 project, we will study the CO2 activity of our targets through IRAC photometry. In conjunction with prior observations of CO2 and CO, as well as future data sets (JWST) and ongoing Earth-based projects led by members of our team, we will investigate both long-term activity trends in our target comets, with a particular goal to ascertain the connections between each comet's coma and nucleus.

  11. The MMCO-EOT conundrum: Same benthic δ18O, different CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stap, Lennert B.; Wal, Roderik S. W.; De Boer, Bas; Bintanja, Richard; Lourens, Lucas J.

    2016-09-01

    Knowledge on climate change during the Cenozoic largely stems from benthic δ18O records, which document combined effects of deep-sea temperature and ice volume. Information on CO2 is expanding but remains uncertain and intermittent. Attempts to reconcile δ18O, sea level, and CO2 by studying proxy data suffer from paucity of data and apparent inconsistencies among different records. One outstanding issue is the difference suggested by proxy CO2 data between the Eocene-Oligocene boundary (EOT) and the Middle-Miocene Climatic Optimum (MMCO), while similar levels of δ18O are shown during these times. This conundrum implies changing relations between δ18O, CO2, and temperature over time. Here we use a coupled climate-ice sheet model, forced by two different benthic δ18O records, to obtain continuous and mutually consistent records of δ18O, CO2, temperature, and sea level over the period 38 to 10 Myr ago. We show that the different CO2 levels between the EOT and MMCO can be explained neither by the standard configuration of our model nor by altering the uncertain ablation parametrization on the East Antarctic Ice Sheet. However, we offer an explanation for the MMCO-EOT conundrum by considering erosion and/or tectonic movement of Antarctica, letting the topography evolve over time. A decreasing height of the Antarctic continent leads to higher surface temperatures, reducing the CO2 needed to maintain the same ice volume. This also leads to an increasing contribution of ice volume to the δ18O signal. This result is, however, dependent on how the topographic changes are implemented in our ice sheet model.

  12. CO2 dispersion modelling over Paris region within the CO2-MEGAPARIS project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lac, C.; Donnelly, R. P.; Masson, V.; Pal, S.; Riette, S.; Donier, S.; Queguiner, S.; Tanguy, G.; Ammoura, L.; Xueref-Remy, I.

    2013-05-01

    Accurate simulation of the spatial and temporal variability of tracer mixing ratios over urban areas is a challenging and interesting task needed to be performed in order to utilise CO2 measurements in an atmospheric inverse framework and to better estimate regional CO2 fluxes. This study investigates the ability of a high-resolution model to simulate meteorological and CO2 fields around Paris agglomeration during the March field campaign of the CO2-MEGAPARIS project. The mesoscale atmospheric model Meso-NH, running at 2 km horizontal resolution, is coupled with the Town Energy Balance (TEB) urban canopy scheme and with the Interactions between Soil, Biosphere and Atmosphere CO2-reactive (ISBA-A-gs) surface scheme, allowing a full interaction of CO2 modelling between the surface and the atmosphere. Statistical scores show a good representation of the urban heat island (UHI) with stronger urban-rural contrasts on temperature at night than during the day by up to 7 °C. Boundary layer heights (BLH) have been evaluated on urban, suburban and rural sites during the campaign, and also on a suburban site over 1 yr. The diurnal cycles of the BLH are well captured, especially the onset time of the BLH increase and its growth rate in the morning, which are essential for tall tower CO2 observatories. The main discrepancy is a small negative bias over urban and suburban sites during nighttime (respectively 45 m and 5 m), leading to a few overestimations of nocturnal CO2 mixing ratios at suburban sites and a bias of +5 ppm. The diurnal CO2 cycle is generally well captured for all the sites. At the Eiffel tower, the observed spikes of CO2 maxima occur every morning exactly at the time at which the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) growth reaches the measurement height. At suburban ground stations, CO2 measurements exhibit maxima at the beginning and at the end of each night, when the ABL is fully contracted, with a strong spatio-temporal variability. A sensitivity test without

  13. Sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2) using red mud.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Vishwajeet S; Prasad, Murari; Khan, Jeeshan; Amritphale, S S; Singh, M; Raju, C B

    2010-04-15

    Red mud, an aluminium industry hazardous waste, has been reported to be an inexpensive and effective adsorbent. In the present work applicability of red mud for the sequestration of green house gases with reference to carbon dioxide has been studied. Red mud sample was separated into three different size fractions (RM I, RM II, RM III) of varying densities (1.5-2.2 g cm(-3)). Carbonation of each fraction of red mud was carried out separately at room temperature using a stainless steel reaction chamber at a fixed pressure of 3.5 bar. Effects of reaction time (0.5-12 h) and liquid to solid ratio (0.2-0.6) were studied for carbonation of red mud. Different instrumental techniques such as X-ray diffraction, FTIR and scanning electron microscope (SEM) were used to ascertain the different mineral phases before and after carbonation of each fraction of red mud. Characterization studies revealed the presence of boehmite, cancrinite, chantalite, hematite, gibbsite, anatase, rutile and quartz. Calcium bearing mineral phases (cancrinite and chantalite) were found responsible for carbonation of red mud. Maximum carbonation was observed for the fraction RM II having higher concentration of cancrinite. The carbonation capacity is evaluated to be 5.3 g of CO(2)/100 g of RM II.

  14. Reconstructing CO2 concentrations in basaltic melt inclusions using Raman analysis of vapor bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aster, Ellen M.; Wallace, Paul J.; Moore, Lowell R.; Watkins, James; Gazel, Esteban; Bodnar, Robert J.

    2016-09-01

    Melt inclusions record valuable information about pre-eruptive volatile concentrations of melts. However, a vapor bubble commonly forms in inclusions after trapping, and this decreases the dissolved CO2 concentration in the melt (glass) phase in the inclusion. To quantify CO2 loss to vapor bubbles, Raman spectroscopic analysis was used to determine the density of CO2 in bubbles in melt inclusions from two Cascade cinder cones near Mt. Lassen and two Mexican cinder cones (Jorullo, Parícutin). Using analyses of dissolved CO2 and H2O in the glass in the inclusions, the measured CO2 vapor densities were used to reconstruct the original dissolved CO2 contents of the melt inclusions at the time of trapping. Our results show that 30-90% of the CO2 in a melt inclusion is contained in the vapor bubble, values similar to those found in other recent studies. We developed a model for vapor bubble growth to show how post-entrapment bubbles form in melt inclusions as a result of cooling, crystallization, and eruptive quenching. The model allows us to predict the bubble volume fraction as a function of ΔT (the difference between the trapping temperature and eruptive temperature) and the amount of CO2 lost to a bubble. Comparison of the Raman and modeling methods shows highly variable agreement. For 10 of 17 inclusions, the two methods are within ± 550 ppm CO2 (avg. difference 290 ppm), equivalent to ±~300 bars uncertainty in estimated trapping pressure for restored inclusions. Discrepancies between the two methods occur for inclusions that have been strongly affected by post-entrapment diffusive H+ loss, because this process enhances bubble formation. For our dataset, restoring the CO2 lost to vapor bubbles increases inferred trapping pressures of the inclusions by 600 to as much as 4000 bars, highlighting the importance of accounting for vapor bubble formation in melt inclusion studies.

  15. Independent evaluation of point source fossil fuel CO2 emissions to better than 10.

    PubMed

    Turnbull, Jocelyn Christine; Keller, Elizabeth D; Norris, Margaret W; Wiltshire, Rachael M

    2016-09-13

    Independent estimates of fossil fuel CO2 (CO2ff) emissions are key to ensuring that emission reductions and regulations are effective and provide needed transparency and trust. Point source emissions are a key target because a small number of power plants represent a large portion of total global emissions. Currently, emission rates are known only from self-reported data. Atmospheric observations have the potential to meet the need for independent evaluation, but useful results from this method have been elusive, due to challenges in distinguishing CO2ff emissions from the large and varying CO2 background and in relating atmospheric observations to emission flux rates with high accuracy. Here we use time-integrated observations of the radiocarbon content of CO2 ((14)CO2) to quantify the recently added CO2ff mole fraction at surface sites surrounding a point source. We demonstrate that both fast-growing plant material (grass) and CO2 collected by absorption into sodium hydroxide solution provide excellent time-integrated records of atmospheric (14)CO2 These time-integrated samples allow us to evaluate emissions over a period of days to weeks with only a modest number of measurements. Applying the same time integration in an atmospheric transport model eliminates the need to resolve highly variable short-term turbulence. Together these techniques allow us to independently evaluate point source CO2ff emission rates from atmospheric observations with uncertainties of better than 10%. This uncertainty represents an improvement by a factor of 2 over current bottom-up inventory estimates and previous atmospheric observation estimates and allows reliable independent evaluation of emissions. PMID:27573818

  16. Tracking and verifying anthropogenic CO2 emissions over the Swiss Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oney, Brian; Brunner, Dominik; Henne, Stephan; Leuenberger, Markus

    2013-04-01

    The Swiss Plateau is the densely populated and industrialized part of Switzerland producing more than 90% of the country's total greenhouse gas emissions. Verification of the efficacy of emission mitigation measures in a post Kyoto Protocol era will require several levels of scrutiny at local and regional scales. We present a measurement and modeling system, which quantifies anthropogenic CO2 emissions at a regional scale using the Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART driven by output from a high-resolution regional scale atmospheric model (COSMO) and observations from two tall tower sites. These rural measurement sites are situated between the largest cities of Switzerland (Zürich, Geneva, Basel and Bern). We present methods used to discretize the anthropogenic CO2 signal from atmospheric CO2 measurements. First, we perform high resolution, time-inverted simulations of air transport combined with a new high quality Swiss CO2 emissions inventory to determine a model-estimated anthropogenic portion of the measured CO2. Second, we assess the utility of CO measurements and the relationship between CO2 and CO in combustion processes as a proxy to quantify the anthropogenic CO2 fraction directly from the measurements. We then compare these two methods in their ability to determine the anthropogenic portion of CO2 measurements at a high temporal resolution (hours). Finally, we assess the quality of the simulated atmospheric transport by comparing CO concentrations obtained with the same atmospheric transport model and a high resolution CO emission inventory with the measured CO concentrations. This comparison of methods for determining anthropogenic CO2 emissions provides information on how to independently certify reported CO2 emissions. This study is a first step towards a prototype GHG monitoring and verification system for the regional scale in a complex topographic setting, which constitutes a necessary component of emissions reporting.

  17. Monitoring Ocean CO2 Fluxes from Space: GOSAT and OCO-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crisp, David

    2012-01-01

    The ocean is a major component of the global carbon cycle, emitting over 330 billion tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) into the atmosphere each year, or about 10 times that emitted fossil fuel combustion and all other human activities [1, 2]. The ocean reabsorbs a comparable amount of CO2 each year, along with 25% of the CO2 emitted by these human activities. The nature and geographic distribution of the processes controlling these ocean CO2 fluxes are still poorly constrained by observations. A better understanding of these processes is essential to predict how this important CO2 sink may evolve as the climate changes.While in situ measurements of ocean CO2 fluxes can be very precise, the sampling density is far too sparse to quantify ocean CO2 sources and sinks over much of the globe. One way to improve the spatial resolution, coverage, and sampling frequency is to make observations of the column averaged CO2 dry air mole fraction, XCO2, from space [4, 5, 6]. Such measurements could provide global coverage at high resolution (< 100 km) on monthly time scales. High precision (< 1 part per million, ppm) is essential to resolve the small, near-surface CO2 variations associated with ocean fluxes and to better constrain the CO2 transport over the ocean. The Japanese Greenhouse gases Observing Satellite (GOSAT) and the NASA Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO) were first two space based sensors designed specifically for this task. GOSAT was successfully launched on January 23, 2009, and has been returning measurements of XCO2 since April 2009. The OCO mission was lost in February 2009, when its launch vehicle malfunctioned and failed to reach orbit. In early 2010, NASA authorized a re-flight of OCO, called OCO-2, which is currently under development.

  18. Experimental observation of fractional echoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karras, G.; Hertz, E.; Billard, F.; Lavorel, B.; Siour, G.; Hartmann, J.-M.; Faucher, O.; Gershnabel, Erez; Prior, Yehiam; Averbukh, Ilya Sh.

    2016-09-01

    We report the observation of fractional echoes in a double-pulse excited nonlinear system. Unlike standard echoes, which appear periodically at delays which are integer multiples of the delay between the two exciting pulses, the fractional echoes appear at rational fractions of this delay. We discuss the mechanism leading to this phenomenon, and provide experimental demonstration of fractional echoes by measuring third harmonic generation in a thermal gas of CO2 molecules excited by a pair of femtosecond laser pulses.

  19. Interactions between reducing CO2 emissions, CO2 removal and solar radiation management.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Naomi E; Lenton, Timothy M

    2012-09-13

    We use a simple carbon cycle-climate model to investigate the interactions between a selection of idealized scenarios of mitigated carbon dioxide emissions, carbon dioxide removal (CDR) and solar radiation management (SRM). Two CO(2) emissions trajectories differ by a 15-year delay in the start of mitigation activity. SRM is modelled as a reduction in incoming solar radiation that fully compensates the radiative forcing due to changes in atmospheric CO(2) concentration. Two CDR scenarios remove 300 PgC by afforestation (added to vegetation and soil) or 1000 PgC by bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (removed from system). Our results show that delaying the start of mitigation activity could be very costly in terms of the CDR activity needed later to limit atmospheric CO(2) concentration (and corresponding global warming) to a given level. Avoiding a 15-year delay in the start of mitigation activity is more effective at reducing atmospheric CO(2) concentrations than all but the maximum type of CDR interventions. The effects of applying SRM and CDR together are additive, and this shows most clearly for atmospheric CO(2) concentration. SRM causes a significant reduction in atmospheric CO(2) concentration due to increased carbon storage by the terrestrial biosphere, especially soils. However, SRM has to be maintained for many centuries to avoid rapid increases in temperature and corresponding increases in atmospheric CO(2) concentration due to loss of carbon from the land.

  20. CO2-helium and CO2-neon mixtures at high pressures.

    PubMed

    Mallick, B; Ninet, S; Le Marchand, G; Munsch, P; Datchi, F

    2013-01-28

    The properties of mixtures of carbon dioxide with helium or neon have been investigated as a function of CO(2) concentration and pressure up to 30 GPa at room temperature. The binary phase diagrams of these mixtures are determined over the full range of CO(2) concentrations using visual observations and Raman scattering measurements. Both diagrams are of eutectic type, with a fluid-fluid miscibility gap for CO(2) concentrations in the range [5, 75] mol. % for He and [8, 55] mol. % for Ne, and a complete separation between the two components in the solid phase. The absence of alloys or stoichiometric compounds for these two binary systems is consistent with the Hume-Rothery rules of hard sphere mixtures. The Raman spectra and x-ray diffraction patterns of solid CO(2) embedded in He or Ne for various initial concentrations have been measured up to 30 GPa and 12 GPa, respectively. The frequencies of the Raman modes and the volume of solid phase I are identical, within error bars, to those reported for 100% CO(2) samples, thus confirming the total immiscibility of CO(2) with He and Ne in the solid phase. These results demonstrate the possibility to perform high-pressure experiments on solid CO(2) under (quasi-)hydrostatic conditions using He or Ne as pressure transmitting medium.

  1. Root-derived CO2 efflux via xylem stream rivals soil CO2 efflux.

    SciTech Connect

    Aubrey, Doug, P.; Teskey, Robert, O.

    2009-07-01

    • Respiration consumes a large portion of annual gross primary productivity in forest ecosystems and is dominated by belowground metabolism. Here, we present evidence of a previously unaccounted for internal CO2 flux of large magnitude from tree roots through stems. If this pattern is shown to persist over time and in other forests, it suggests that belowground respiration has been grossly underestimated. • Using an experimental Populus deltoides plantation as a model system, we tested the hypothesis that a substantial portion of the CO2 released from belowground autotrophic respiration remains within tree root systems and is transported aboveground through the xylem stream rather than diffusing into the soil atmosphere. • On a daily basis, the amount of CO2 that moved upward from the root system into the stem via the xylem stream (0.26 mol CO2 m-2 d-1) rivalled that which diffused from the soil surface to the atmosphere (0.27 mol CO2 m-2 d-1). We estimated that twice the amount of CO2 derived from belowground autotrophic respiration entered the xylem stream as diffused into the soil environment. • Our observations indicate that belowground autotrophic respiration consumes substantially more carbohydrates than previously recognized and challenge the paradigm that all root-respired CO2 diffuses into the soil atmosphere.

  2. Geochemical Interaction of Middle Bakken Reservoir Rock and CO2 during CO2-Based Fracturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicot, J. P.; Lu, J.; Mickler, P. J.; Ribeiro, L. H.; Darvari, R.

    2015-12-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of geochemical interactions when CO2 is used to create the fractures necessary to produce hydrocarbons from low-permeability Middle Bakken sandstone. The primary objectives are to: (1) identify and understand the geochemical reactions related to CO2-based fracturing, and (2) assess potential changes of reservoir property. Three autoclave experiments were conducted at reservoir conditions exposing middle Bakken core fragments to supercritical CO2 (sc-CO2) only and to CO2-saturated synthetic brine. Ion-milled core samples were examined before and after the reaction experiments using scanning electron microscope, which enabled us to image the reaction surface in extreme details and unambiguously identify mineral dissolution and precipitation. The most significant changes in the reacted rock samples exposed to the CO2-saturated brine is dissolution of the carbonate minerals, particularly calcite which displays severely corrosion. Dolomite grains were corroded to a lesser degree. Quartz and feldspars remained intact and some pyrite framboids underwent slight dissolution. Additionally, small amount of calcite precipitation took place as indicated by numerous small calcite crystals formed at the reaction surface and in the pores. The aqueous solution composition changes confirm these petrographic observations with increase in Ca and Mg and associated minor elements and very slight increase in Fe and sulfate. When exposed to sc-CO2 only, changes observed include etching of calcite grain surface and precipitation of salt crystals (halite and anhydrite) due to evaporation of residual pore water into the sc-CO2 phase. Dolomite and feldspars remained intact and pyrite grains were slightly altered. Mercury intrusion capillary pressure tests on reacted and unreacted samples shows an increase in porosity when an aqueous phase is present but no overall porosity change caused by sc-CO2. It also suggests an increase in permeability

  3. The Relationship Between CO2 Levels and CO2 Related Symptoms Reported on the ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanBaalen, M.; Law, J.; Foy, M.; Wear, M. L.; Mason, S.; Mendez, C.; Meyers, V.

    2014-01-01

    Medical Operations, Toxicology, and the Lifetime Surveillance of Astronaut Health collaborated to assess the association of CO2 levels on board the International Space Station and USOS crew reported symptoms inflight, i.e. headache and vision changes. Private Medical Conference (PMC) documents and the weekly Space Medicine Operations Team (SMOT) Notes were used to provide a robust data set of inflight medical events. All events and non-events were documented independent of CO2 levels and other potential contributors. Average (arithmetic mean) and single point maximum ppCO2 was calculated for the 24 hours and 7 days prior to the PMC or SMOT date and time provided by LSAH. Observations falling within the first 7 days of flight (147) were removed from the datasets analyzed to avoid confounding with Space Adaptation Syndrome. The final analysis was based on 1716 observations. For headache, 46 headaches were observed. CO2 level, age at launch, time inflight, and data source were all significantly associated with headache. In particular, for each 1 mmHg increase in CO2, the odds of a crewmember reporting a headache doubled. For vision changes, 29 reports of vision changes were observed. These observations were not found to be statistically associated with CO2 levels as analyzed. While the incidence of headache has was not high (3%), headaches may be an indicator of underlying increases in intracranial pressure, which may result likely from the synergy between CO2-induced cerebral vasodilatation and decreased venous drainage in microgravity. Vision changes were inconsistently reported and as a result did not align appropriately with the CO2 levels. Further analysis is needed. Our results support ongoing efforts to lower the CO2 exposure limits in spacecraft.

  4. CO2 Emissions from the Los Angeles Basin During Spring of 2010 - Measurements vs. Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, S.; Jeong, S.; Fischer, M. L.; Xu, X.; Gurney, K. R.; Alvarez, S. L.; Rappenglueck, B.; Haman, C. L.; Lefer, B. L.; Miller, C. E.; Yung, Y. L.

    2011-12-01

    More than half of the world's population now lives in urban areas, contributing large fluxes of greenhouse gas to the atmosphere. Quantifying the spatiotemporal distribution of these emissions is critical for providing independent verification of future mitigation activities. We have used high precision measurements of CO2 and CO to determine the contribution of fossil fuel combustion (ffCO2 mixing ratio) to the total CO2 emissions in the Los Angeles basin during the CalNex-LA ground campaign of May-June 2010 in Pasadena. The ratio of COxs/CO2xs (the excess of each species above free tropospheric levels) varies significantly by time of day, giving a proxy for the fraction of ffCO2/CO2xs. Using an emission ratio for CO/CO2 for fossil fuel combustion of 0.011±0.002 (Wunch et al., 2009, Geophys Res Lett 36, L15810), we determined that burning of fossil fuels contributed ~50% overnight - 100% during midday of the total local contribution, resulting in ffCO2 of 13 - 23 ppm, respectively. These values compare very well with those calculated from Δ14C for measurements of two samples aggregated from 7-8 flask samples collected at 14:00 PST on alternate days during the first and second half of the CalNex-LA campaign: 17 and 24 ppm ffCO2, respectively. We then compared the measured values of ffCO2 with predictions combining a diurnally averaged version of the Vulcan 2.0 ffCO2 emission inventory (http://www.purdue.edu/eas/carbon/vulcan/index.php) and mesoscale transport computed with the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) and Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport (STILT) models. To evaluate transport model uncertainty, we compared predicted and measured planetary boundary layer height (PBLH) and found WRF predictions compared favorably with ceilometer measurements made during the day at the Pasadena site. Initial comparison of the diurnal cycle of ffCO2 determined by the CO/CO2 ratios to that predicted with a temporally constant map of diurnal mean emissions shows

  5. Laser ablation of blepharopigmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Tanenbaum, M.; Karas, S.; McCord, C.D. Jr. )

    1988-01-01

    This article discusses laser ablation of blepharopigmentation in four stages: first, experimentally, where pigment vaporization is readily achieved with the argon blue-green laser; second, in the rabbit animal model, where eyelid blepharopigmentation markings are ablated with the laser; third, in human subjects, where the argon blue-green laser is effective in the ablation of implanted eyelid pigment; and fourth, in a case report, where, in a patient with improper pigment placement in the eyelid, the laser is used to safely and effectively ablate the undesired pigment markings. This article describes in detail the new technique of laser ablation of blepharopigmentation. Potential complications associated with the technique are discussed.

  6. CO2 mineralization-bridge between storage and utilization of CO2.

    PubMed

    Geerlings, Hans; Zevenhoven, Ron

    2013-01-01

    CO2 mineralization comprises a chemical reaction between suitable minerals and the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide. The CO2 is effectively sequestered as a carbonate, which is stable on geological timescales. In addition, the variety of materials that can be produced through mineralization could find applications in the marketplace, which makes implementation of the technology more attractive. In this article, we review recent developments and assess the current status of the CO2 mineralization field. In an outlook, we briefly describe a few mineralization routes, which upon further development have the potential to be implemented on a large scale.

  7. Effects of CO2 on stomatal conductance: do stomata open at very high CO2 concentrations?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, R. M.; Mackowiak, C. L.; Yorio, N. C.; Sager, J. C.

    1999-01-01

    Potato and wheat plants were grown for 50 d at 400, 1000 and 10000 micromoles mol-1 carbon dioxide (CO2). and sweetpotato and soybean were grown at 1000 micromoles mol-1 CO2 in controlled environment chambers to study stomatal conductance and plant water use. Lighting was provided with fluorescent lamps as a 12 h photoperiod with 300 micromoles m-2 s-1 PAR. Mid-day stomatal conductances for potato were greatest at 400 and 10000 micromoles mol-1 and least at 1000 micromoles mol-1 CO2. Mid-day conductances for wheat were greatest at 400 micromoles mol-1 and least at 1000 and 10000 micromoles mol-1 CO2. Mid-dark period conductances for potato were significantly greater at 10000 micromoles mol-1 than at 400 or 1000 micromoles mol-1, whereas dark conductance for wheat was similar in all CO2 treatments. Temporarily changing the CO2 concentration from the native 1000 micromoles mol-1 to 400 micromoles mol-1 increased mid-day conductance for all species, while temporarily changing from 1000 to 10000 micromoles mol-1 also increased conductance for potato and sweetpotato. Temporarily changing the dark period CO2 from 1000 to 10000 micromoles mol-1 increased conductance for potato, soybean and sweetpotato. In all cases, the stomatal responses were reversible, i.e. conductances returned to original rates following temporary changes in CO2 concentration. Canopy water use for potato was greatest at 10000, intermediate at 400, and least at 1000 micromoles mol-1 CO2, whereas canopy water use for wheat was greatest at 400 and similar at 1000 and 10000 micromoles mol-1 CO2. Elevated CO2 treatments (i.e. 1000 and 10000 micromoles mol-1) resulted in increased plant biomass for both wheat and potato relative to 400 micromoles mol-1, and no injurious effects were apparent from the 10000 micromoles mol-1 treatment. Results indicate that super-elevated CO2 (i.e. 10000 micromoles mol-1) can increase stomatal conductance in some species, particularly during the dark period, resulting in

  8. Study of the fluid flow characteristics in a porous medium for CO2 geological storage using MRI.

    PubMed

    Song, Yongchen; Jiang, Lanlan; Liu, Yu; Yang, Mingjun; Zhou, Xinhuan; Zhao, Yuechao; Dou, Binlin; Abudula, Abuliti; Xue, Ziqiu

    2014-06-01

    The objective of this study was to understand fluid flow in porous media. Understanding of fluid flow process in porous media is important for the geological storage of CO2. The high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique was used to measure fluid flow in a porous medium (glass beads BZ-02). First, the permeability was obtained from velocity images. Next, CO2-water immiscible displacement experiments using different flow rates were investigated. Three stages were obtained from the MR intensity plot. With increasing CO2 flow rate, a relatively uniform CO2 distribution and a uniform CO2 front were observed. Subsequently, the final water saturation decreased. Using core analysis methods, the CO2 velocities were obtained during the CO2-water immiscible displacement process, which were applied to evaluate the capillary dispersion rate, viscous dominated fractional flow, and gravity flow function. The capillary dispersion rate dominated the effects of capillary, which was largest at water saturations of 0.5 and 0.6. The viscous-dominant fractional flow function varied with the saturation of water. The gravity fractional flow reached peak values at the saturation of 0.6. The gravity forces played a positive role in the downward displacements because they thus tended to stabilize the displacement process, thereby producing increased breakthrough times and correspondingly high recoveries. Finally, the relative permeability was also reconstructed. The study provides useful data regarding the transport processes in the geological storage of CO2.

  9. Radiocarbon-depleted CO2 evidence for fuel biodegradation at the Naval Air Station North Island (USA) fuel farm site.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Thomas J; Pound, Michael J; Lohr, Daniel; Coffin, Richard B

    2013-05-01

    Dissolved CO(2) radiocarbon and stable carbon isotope ratios were measured in groundwater from a fuel contaminated site at the North Island Naval Air Station in San Diego, CA (USA). A background groundwater sampling well and 16 wells in the underground fuel contamination zone were evaluated. For each sample, a two end-member isotopic mixing model was used to determine the fraction of CO(2) derived from fossil fuel. The CO(2) fraction from fossil sources ranged from 8 to 93% at the fuel contaminated site, while stable carbon isotope values ranged from -14 to +5‰VPDB. Wells associated with highest historical and contemporary fuel contamination showed the highest fraction of CO(2) derived from petroleum (fossil) sources. Stable carbon isotope ratios indicated sub-regions on-site with recycled CO(2) (δ(13)CO(2) as high as +5‰VPDB) - most likely resulting from methanogenesis. Ancillary measurements (pH and cations) were used to determine that no fossil CaCO(3), for instance limestone, biased the analytical conclusions. Radiocarbon analysis is verified as a viable and definitive technique for confirming fossil hydrocarbon conversion to CO(2) (complete oxidation) at hydrocarbon-contaminated groundwater sites. The technique should also be very useful for assessing the efficacy of engineered remediation efforts and by using CO(2) production rates, contaminant mass conversion over time and per unit volume.

  10. Assessing Atmospheric CO2 Entrapped in Clay Nanotubes using Residual Gas Analyzer.

    PubMed

    Das, Sankar; Maity, Abhijit; Pradhan, Manik; Jana, Subhra

    2016-02-16

    A residual gas analyzer (RGA) coupled with a high-vacuum chamber has been explored to measure atmospheric CO2 entrapped in aminosilane-modified clay nanotubes. Ambient CO2 uptake efficacy together with stability of these novel adsorbents composed of both primary and/or secondary amine sites has been demonstrated at standard ambient temperature and pressure. The unprecedented sensitivity and accuracy of the RGA-based mass spectrometry technique toward atmospheric CO2 measurement has been substantiated with a laser-based optical cavity-enhanced integrated cavity output spectroscopy. The adsorption kinetics of atmospheric CO2 on amine-functionalized clay nanotubes followed the fractional-order kinetic model compared to that of the pseudo-first-order or pseudo-second-order rate equations. The efficiency along with stability of these novel adsorbents has also been demonstrated by their repetitive use for CO2 capture in the oxidative environment. Our findings thus point to a fundamental study on the atmospheric CO2 adsorption by amine-loaded adsorbents using an easy handling and low-cost benchtop RGA-based mass spectrometer, opening a new strategy for CO2 capture and sequestering study. PMID:26790755

  11. Biofuels from crop residue can reduce soil carbon and increase CO2 emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liska, Adam J.; Yang, Haishun; Milner, Maribeth; Goddard, Steve; Blanco-Canqui, Humberto; Pelton, Matthew P.; Fang, Xiao X.; Zhu, Haitao; Suyker, Andrew E.

    2014-05-01

    Removal of corn residue for biofuels can decrease soil organic carbon (SOC; refs , ) and increase CO2 emissions because residue C in biofuels is oxidized to CO2 at a faster rate than when added to soil. Net CO2 emissions from residue removal are not adequately characterized in biofuel life cycle assessment (LCA; refs , , ). Here we used a model to estimate CO2 emissions from corn residue removal across the US Corn Belt at 580 million geospatial cells. To test the SOC model, we compared estimated daily CO2 emissions from corn residue and soil with CO2 emissions measured using eddy covariance, with 12% average error over nine years. The model estimated residue removal of 6 Mg per ha-1 yr-1 over five to ten years could decrease regional net SOC by an average of 0.47-0.66 Mg C ha-1 yr-1. These emissions add an average of 50-70 g CO2 per megajoule of biofuel (range 30-90) and are insensitive to the fraction of residue removed. Unless lost C is replaced, life cycle emissions will probably exceed the US legislative mandate of 60% reduction in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions compared with gasoline.

  12. Assessing Atmospheric CO2 Entrapped in Clay Nanotubes using Residual Gas Analyzer.

    PubMed

    Das, Sankar; Maity, Abhijit; Pradhan, Manik; Jana, Subhra

    2016-02-16

    A residual gas analyzer (RGA) coupled with a high-vacuum chamber has been explored to measure atmospheric CO2 entrapped in aminosilane-modified clay nanotubes. Ambient CO2 uptake efficacy together with stability of these novel adsorbents composed of both primary and/or secondary amine sites has been demonstrated at standard ambient temperature and pressure. The unprecedented sensitivity and accuracy of the RGA-based mass spectrometry technique toward atmospheric CO2 measurement has been substantiated with a laser-based optical cavity-enhanced integrated cavity output spectroscopy. The adsorption kinetics of atmospheric CO2 on amine-functionalized clay nanotubes followed the fractional-order kinetic model compared to that of the pseudo-first-order or pseudo-second-order rate equations. The efficiency along with stability of these novel adsorbents has also been demonstrated by their repetitive use for CO2 capture in the oxidative environment. Our findings thus point to a fundamental study on the atmospheric CO2 adsorption by amine-loaded adsorbents using an easy handling and low-cost benchtop RGA-based mass spectrometer, opening a new strategy for CO2 capture and sequestering study.

  13. State-resolved collisional relaxation of highly vibrationally excited CsH by CO2.

    PubMed

    Mu, Baoxia; Cui, Xiuhua; Shen, Yifan; Dai, Kang

    2015-09-01

    Quenching of highly vibrationally excited CsH(X(1)Σ(+), v=15-23) by collisions with CO2 was investigated. A significant fraction of the initial population of highly vibrationally excited CsH(v=22) was relaxed to a low vibrational level (Δv=-5). The near-resonant 5-1 vibration-to-vibration (V-V) energy was efficiently exchanged. The rate constants for the rotational levels of CO2(00(0)0) [J=36-60] and CO2(00(0)1) [J=5-31] from the collisions with excited CsH were determined. The experiments revealed that the collisions resulting in CO2(00(0)0) were accompanied by substantial excitation in rotation and translation. The vibrationally excited CO2(00(0)1) state exhibited rotational and translational energy distributions near those of the initial state. The total quenching rates relative to the probed state of excited CsH were determined for both CO2 states. The corresponding data indicated that the gains in the rotational and translational energies in CO2 were sensitive to the collisional depletion of excited CsH.

  14. Energy from CO2 using capacitive electrodes--theoretical outline and calculation of open circuit voltage.

    PubMed

    Paz-Garcia, J M; Schaetzle, O; Biesheuvel, P M; Hamelers, H V M

    2014-03-15

    Recently, a new technology has been proposed for the utilization of energy from CO2 emissions (Hamelers et al., 2014). The principle consists of controlling the dilution process of CO2-concentrated gas (e.g., exhaust gas) into CO2-dilute gas (e.g., air) thereby extracting a fraction of the released mixing energy. In this paper, we describe the theoretical fundamentals of this technology when using a pair of charge-selective capacitive electrodes. We focus on the behavior of the chemical system consisting of CO2 gas dissolved in water or monoethanolamine solution. The maximum voltage given for the capacitive cell is theoretically calculated, based on the membrane potential. The different aspects that affect this theoretical maximum value are discussed.

  15. CO2 Impacts on the Martian Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Michael; Bauer, James; Bodewits, Dennis; Farnham, Tony; Stevenson, Rachel; Yelle, Roger

    2014-09-01

    The dynamically new comet C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring) will pass Mars at the extremely close distance of 140,000 km on 2014 Oct 19. This encounter is unique---a record close approach to a planet with spacecraft that can observe its passage---and currently, all 5 Mars orbiters have plans to observe the comet and/or its effects on the planet. Gas from the comet's coma is expected to collide with the Martian atmosphere, altering the abundances of some species and producing significant heating, inflating the upper atmosphere. We propose DDT observations with Spitzer/IRAC to measure the comet's CO2+CO coma (observing window Oct 30 - Nov 20), to use these measurements to derive the coma's CO2 density at Mars during the closest approach, and to aid the interpretation of any observed effects or changes in the Martian atmosphere.

  16. Ultraviolet photoionization in CO2 TEA lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, S. J.; Smith, A. L. S.

    1988-07-01

    The effects of gas composition and spark parameters on the UV emission in CO2 TEA laser gas mixtures were investigated together with the nature of photoionization process and the photoelectron-loss mechanism. A linear relationship was found between N2 concentration and photoionization (with no such dependence on C concentration, from CO and CO2), but the increases in photoionization that could be effected by optimizing the spark discharge circuit parameters were much higher than those produced by changes in gas composition. UV emission was directly proportional to the amount of stored electrical energy in the spark-discharge circuit and to the cube of the peak current produced in the spark by the discharge of this energy. Photoionization was also found to be proportional to the spark electrode gap. It was found that free-space sparks gave a considerably broader emission pattern than a surface-guided notched spark.

  17. Increasing CO2 threatens human nutrition.

    PubMed

    Myers, Samuel S; Zanobetti, Antonella; Kloog, Itai; Huybers, Peter; Leakey, Andrew D B; Bloom, Arnold J; Carlisle, Eli; Dietterich, Lee H; Fitzgerald, Glenn; Hasegawa, Toshihiro; Holbrook, N Michele; Nelson, Randall L; Ottman, Michael J; Raboy, Victor; Sakai, Hidemitsu; Sartor, Karla A; Schwartz, Joel; Seneweera, Saman; Tausz, Michael; Usui, Yasuhiro

    2014-06-01

    Dietary deficiencies of zinc and iron are a substantial global public health problem. An estimated two billion people suffer these deficiencies, causing a loss of 63 million life-years annually. Most of these people depend on C3 grains and legumes as their primary dietary source of zinc and iron. Here we report that C3 grains and legumes have lower concentrations of zinc and iron when grown under field conditions at the elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration predicted for the middle of this century. C3 crops other than legumes also have lower concentrations of protein, whereas C4 crops seem to be less affected. Differences between cultivars of a single crop suggest that breeding for decreased sensitivity to atmospheric CO2 concentration could partly address these new challenges to global health. PMID:24805231

  18. Increasing CO2 threatens human nutrition.

    PubMed

    Myers, Samuel S; Zanobetti, Antonella; Kloog, Itai; Huybers, Peter; Leakey, Andrew D B; Bloom, Arnold J; Carlisle, Eli; Dietterich, Lee H; Fitzgerald, Glenn; Hasegawa, Toshihiro; Holbrook, N Michele; Nelson, Randall L; Ottman, Michael J; Raboy, Victor; Sakai, Hidemitsu; Sartor, Karla A; Schwartz, Joel; Seneweera, Saman; Tausz, Michael; Usui, Yasuhiro

    2014-06-01

    Dietary deficiencies of zinc and iron are a substantial global public health problem. An estimated two billion people suffer these deficiencies, causing a loss of 63 million life-years annually. Most of these people depend on C3 grains and legumes as their primary dietary source of zinc and iron. Here we report that C3 grains and legumes have lower concentrations of zinc and iron when grown under field conditions at the elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration predicted for the middle of this century. C3 crops other than legumes also have lower concentrations of protein, whereas C4 crops seem to be less affected. Differences between cultivars of a single crop suggest that breeding for decreased sensitivity to atmospheric CO2 concentration could partly address these new challenges to global health.

  19. Innovative Energy Strategies for CO2 Stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watts, Robert G.

    2002-08-01

    Many of the world's climate scientists believe that the build-up of heat-trapping CO2 in the atmosphere will lead to global warming unless we burn less fossil fuels. At the same time, energy must be supplied in increasing amounts for the developing world to continue its growth. This work discusses the feasibility of increasingly efficient energy use and the potential for supplying energy from sources that do not introduce CO2. The book analyzes the prospects for Earth-based renewables: solar, wind, biomass, hydroelectricity, geothermal and ocean energy. It then discusses nuclear fission and fusion, and the relatively new idea of harvesting solar energy on satellites or lunar bases. It will be essential reading for all those interested in energy issues.

  20. Synthesis, characterization and performance of single-component CO2-binding organic liquids (CO2BOL) for post combustion CO2 capture

    SciTech Connect

    Koech, Phillip K.; Heldebrant, David J.; Rainbolt, James E.; Zheng, Feng; Smurthwaite, Tricia D.

    2010-03-31

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) emission to the atmosphere will increase significantly with the shift to coal powered plants for energy generation. This increase in CO2 emission will contribute to climate change. There is need to capture and sequester large amounts of CO2 emitted from these coal power plants in order to mitigate the environmental effects. Here we report the synthesis, characterization and system performance of multiple third generation CO2 binding organic liquids (CO2BOLs) as a solvent system for post combustion gas capture. Alkanolguanidines and alkanolamidines are single component CO2BOLs that reversibly bind CO2 chemically as liquid zwitterionic amidinium / guanidinium alkylcarbonates. Three different alkanolguanidines and alkanolamidines were synthesized and studied for CO2 capacity and binding energetics. Solvent performance of these three CO2BOLs was evaluated by batch-wise CO2 uptake and release over multiple cycles. Synthesis of CO2BOLs, characterization, CO2 uptake, selectivity towards CO2 as well as solvent tolerance to water will be discussed.

  1. Pulpotomies with CO2 laser in dogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueiredo, Jose A. P.; Chavantes, Maria C.; Gioso, Marco A.; Pesce, Hildeberto F.; Jatene, Adib D.

    1995-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical aspects of dental pulps submitted to shallow pulpotomy followed by CO2 laser radiation at five different procedures. For this purpose, initially 66 dogs' teeth were opened and about 2 or 3 mm of coronal dental pulp was removed. Continuous irrigation with saline solution was implemented. The teeth were randomly divided into 6 groups of 11 each. After cessation of bleeding, in group I, CO2 laser (Xanar-20, USA) was irradiated for 1 second at a power of 5 watts; in group II, 2 seconds at 3 watts; in Group III, 2 seconds at 5 watts; in Group IV, 1 second at 3 watts; in Group V, a continuous mode at 3 watts; Group VI served as a control, with no laser irradiation. The results showed no clinical differences between the 3 W and 5 W powers. Time period of irradiation exposition influenced definitively the clinical appearance of the dental pulps. Groups I and IV (1 second) were unable to stop the bleeding, which persisted over 15 minutes for all teeth. This may be due to the intense heat generated by CO2 laser, causing vasodilatation. Groups II and III displayed a similar appearance, but bleeding stopped in about 10 minutes. Group V (continuous mode) had no bleeding after irradiation, but a plasma-like liquid would come out for almost 2 minutes. When comparing to the control (Group VI), all the pulps would assume a jelly-like aspect, with black granulated tissue on the surface, covering totally the pulps of Group V and partially the other groups. The histological results will be discussed in a further study. From the data obtained, it seems that CO2 laser irradiation for pulpotomies should be done in a continuous mode, for clinical convenience in terms of time taken and effective irradiation.

  2. Controls on the CO2 seasonal cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, J. B.; Forget, F.; Haberle, Robert M.; Schaeffer, J.; Lee, H.

    1993-01-01

    Surface pressure measurement performed by the Viking landers show substantial variations in pressure on seasonal timescales that are characterized by two local minima and two local maxima. These variations have widely been attributed to the seasonal condensation and sublimation of CO2 in the two polar regions. It has been somewhat of a surprise that the amplitude of the minimum and maximum that is dominated by the CO2 cycle in the north was much weaker than the corresponding amplitude of the south-dominated extrema. Another surprise was that the seasonal pressure cycle during years 2 and 3 of the Viking mission was so similar to that for year 1, despite the occurrence of two global dust storms during year 1 and none during years 2 and 3. An energy balance model that incorporates dynamical factors from general circulation model (GCM) runs in which the atmospheric dust opacity and seasonal date were systematically varied was used to model the observed seasonal pressure variations. The energy balance takes account of the following processes in determining the rates of CO2 condensation and sublimation at each longitudinal and latitudinal grid point: solar radiation, infrared radiation from the atmosphere and surface, subsurface heat conduction, and atmospheric heat advection. Condensation rates are calculated both at the surface and in the atmosphere. In addition, the energy balance model also incorporates information from the GCM runs on seasonal redistribution of surface pressure across the globe. Estimates of surface temperature of the seasonal CO2 caps were used to define the infrared radiative losses from the seasonal polar caps. The seasonal pressure variations measured at the Viking lander sites were closely reproduced.

  3. CO2 laser cold cathode research results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochuli, U.

    1973-01-01

    The construction and processing of four test lasers are discussed, and the test results are assessed. Tests show that the best performance was obtained from cathodes made from internally oxidized Ag-Cu alloys or pure Cu. Due to the cold cathode technology developments, sealed-off 1 w CO2 lasers with gas volumes of only 50 cu cm were duplicated, and have performed satisfactorily for more than 6000 hours.

  4. Continuous CO2 extractor and methods

    SciTech Connect

    None listed

    2010-06-15

    The purpose of this CRADA was to assist in technology transfer from Russia to the US and assist in development of the technology improvements and applications for use in the U.S. and worldwide. Over the period of this work, ORNL has facilitated design, development and demonstration of a low-pressure liquid extractor and development of initial design for high-pressure supercritical CO2 fluid extractor.

  5. Aerosol extinction measurements with CO2-lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagard, Arne; Persson, Rolf

    1992-01-01

    With the aim to develop a model for infrared extinction due to aerosols in slant paths in the lower atmosphere we perform measurements with a CO2-lidar. Earlier measurements with a transmissometer along horizontal paths have been used to develop relations between aerosol extinction and meteorological parameters. With the lidar measurements we hope to develop corresponding relations for altitude profiles of the aerosol extinction in the infrared. An important application is prediction of detection range for infrared imaging systems.

  6. Aridity under conditions of increased CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greve, Peter; Roderick, Micheal L.; Seneviratne, Sonia I.

    2016-04-01

    A string of recent of studies led to the wide-held assumption that aridity will increase under conditions of increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations and associated global warming. Such results generally build upon analyses of changes in the 'aridity index' (the ratio of potential evaporation to precipitation) and can be described as a direct thermodynamic effect on atmospheric water demand due to increasing temperatures. However, there is widespread evidence that contradicts the 'warmer is more arid' interpretation, leading to the 'global aridity paradox' (Roderick et al. 2015, WRR). Here we provide a comprehensive assessment of modeled changes in a broad set of dryness metrics (primarily based on a range of measures of water availability) over a large range of realistic atmospheric CO2 concentrations. We use an ensemble of simulations from of state-of-the-art climate models to analyse both equilibrium climate experiments and transient historical simulations and future projections. Our results show that dryness is, under conditions of increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations and related global warming, generally decreasing at global scales. At regional scales we do, however, identify areas that undergo changes towards drier conditions, located primarily in subtropical climate regions and the Amazon Basin. Nonetheless, the majority of regions, especially in tropical and mid- to northern high latitudes areas, display wetting conditions in a warming world. Our results contradict previous findings and highlight the need to comprehensively assess all aspects of changes in hydroclimatological conditions at the land surface. Roderick, M. L., P. Greve, and G. D. Farquhar (2015), On the assessment of aridity with changes in atmospheric CO2, Water Resour. Res., 51, 5450-5463

  7. Co-location of air capture, subseafloor CO2 sequestration, and energy production on the Kerguelen plateau.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, David S; Lackner, Klaus S; Han, Patrick; Slagle, Angela L; Wang, Tao

    2013-07-01

    Reducing atmospheric CO2 using a combination of air capture and offshore geological storage can address technical and policy concerns with climate mitigation. Because CO2 mixes rapidly in the atmosphere, air capture could operate anywhere and in principle reduce CO2 to preindustrial levels. We investigate the Kerguelen plateau in the Indian Ocean, which offers steady wind resources, vast subseafloor storage capacities, and minimal risk of economic damages or human inconvenience and harm. The efficiency of humidity swing driven air capture under humid and windy conditions is tested in the laboratory. Powered by wind, we estimate ∼75 Mt CO2/yr could be collected using air capture and sequestered below seafloor or partially used for synfuel. Our analysis suggests that Kerguelen offers a remote and environmentally secure location for CO2 sequestration using renewable energy. Regional reservoirs could hold over 1500 Gt CO2, sequestering a large fraction of 21st century emissions.

  8. Breadboard CO2 and humidity control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehm, A. M.

    1976-01-01

    A regenerable CO2 and humidity control system is being developed for potential use on shuttle as an alternate to the baseline lithium hydroxide (LiOH)/condensing heat exchanger system. The system utilizes a sorbent material, designated HS-C, to adsorb CO2 and water vapor from the cabin atmosphere. The material is regenerated by exposing it to space vacuum. A half-size breadboard system, utilizing a flight representative HS-C canister, was designed, built, and performance tested to shuttle requirements for total CO2 and total humidity removal. The use of a new chemical matrix material allowed significant optimization of the system design by packing the HS-C chemical into the core of a heat exchanger which is manifolded to form two separate and distinct beds. Breadboard system performance was proven by parametric testing and simulated mission testing over the full range of shuttle crew sizes and metabolic loadings. Vacuum desorption testing demonstrated considerable savings in previously projected shuttle vacuum duct sizing.

  9. Phase conjugation with CO 2 lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klingenberg, H. H.; Riede, W.; Hall, Th.

    1995-01-01

    A TEA CO 2 laser was used for the investigation of four-wave mixing (4WM) processes in sulfur hexafluoride (SF 6), an organic solvent (toluene), and III/V semiconductor wafers (InSb, InAs). The relevant involved grating mechanisms were probed by the 4WM technique. It was found that the decay times of the corresponding built-up transient gratings in the various nonlinear media differ by approximately six orders of magnitude. Furthermore, simulations of a phase conjugates mirror (PCM) were carried out by solving the Kirchhoff-Fresnel integral equations by complex conjugating the spatial field distribution at the PCM. Applying this technique an efficient production of low divergence high energy CO 2 laser pulses generated from a 4WM master oscillator/power amplifier (MOPA) scheme was predictable. For the modelling a large volume e-beam controlled CO 2 amplifier was placed along the signal beam. The optical homogeneity of the laser gas was disturbed by shock waves and by the laser-induced medium perturbation (LIMP) effect. The disturbing influence of both effects on the optical quality of the output radiation will be shown.

  10. Towards Overhauser DNP in supercritical CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Meerten, S. G. J.; Tayler, M. C. D.; Kentgens, A. P. M.; van Bentum, P. J. M.

    2016-06-01

    Overhauser Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (ODNP) is a well known technique to improve NMR sensitivity in the liquid state, where the large polarization of an electron spin is transferred to a nucleus of interest by cross-relaxation. The efficiency of the Overhauser mechanism for dipolar interactions depends critically on fast local translational dynamics at the timescale of the inverse electron Larmor frequency. The maximum polarization enhancement that can be achieved for 1H at high magnetic fields benefits from a low viscosity solvent. In this paper we investigate the option to use supercritical CO2 as a solvent for Overhauser DNP. We have investigated the diffusion constants and longitudinal nuclear relaxation rates of toluene in high pressure CO2. The change in 1H T1 by addition of TEMPO radical was analyzed to determine the Overhauser cross-relaxation in such a mixture, and is compared with calculations based on the Force Free Hard Sphere (FFHS) model. By analyzing the relaxation data within this model we find translational correlation times in the range of 2-4 ps, depending on temperature, pressure and toluene concentration. Such short correlation times may be instrumental for future Overhauser DNP applications at high magnetic fields, as are commonly used in NMR. Preliminary DNP experiments have been performed at 3.4 T on high pressure superheated water and model systems such as toluene in high pressure CO2.

  11. Low-Power CO2 Compression Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finn, John E.; Sridhar, K. R.; Kliss, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Presently, the most feasible processes for extracting oxygen from the Martian atmosphere either require or are much more efficient if the atmospheric CO2 feed is provided at pressures well above the Martian ambient. Electrical power for performing the desired compression is likely to be an extremely limited resource on the Mars surface. Even if "cheap" nuclear power is available at a central site/launch facility where rocket propellent and oxidant are manufactured, life support applications needing oxygen production capabilities, such as rovers, portable life support, and remote or independent exploration stations, will benefit from extremely low-power atmospheric compression technology, such as the one discussed here. Our experiments show the potential of one very low-power approach to performing CO2 compression that uses the Mars diurnal temperature cycle to drive a heat engine. The 1 kg compressor has been tested over an extended period in a Mars environmental simulation chamber that mimics the composition, pressure, and temperature cycles that can occur on the Martian surface. The simple design, which has very few moving parts and can easily be scaled to larger or smaller sizes, produces a CO2 stream at a rate of 100 g/ day at a quality and pressure suitable for a variety of oxygen production processes.

  12. Towards Overhauser DNP in supercritical CO2.

    PubMed

    van Meerten, S G J; Tayler, M C D; Kentgens, A P M; van Bentum, P J M

    2016-06-01

    Overhauser Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (ODNP) is a well known technique to improve NMR sensitivity in the liquid state, where the large polarization of an electron spin is transferred to a nucleus of interest by cross-relaxation. The efficiency of the Overhauser mechanism for dipolar interactions depends critically on fast local translational dynamics at the timescale of the inverse electron Larmor frequency. The maximum polarization enhancement that can be achieved for (1)H at high magnetic fields benefits from a low viscosity solvent. In this paper we investigate the option to use supercritical CO2 as a solvent for Overhauser DNP. We have investigated the diffusion constants and longitudinal nuclear relaxation rates of toluene in high pressure CO2. The change in (1)H T1 by addition of TEMPO radical was analyzed to determine the Overhauser cross-relaxation in such a mixture, and is compared with calculations based on the Force Free Hard Sphere (FFHS) model. By analyzing the relaxation data within this model we find translational correlation times in the range of 2-4ps, depending on temperature, pressure and toluene concentration. Such short correlation times may be instrumental for future Overhauser DNP applications at high magnetic fields, as are commonly used in NMR. Preliminary DNP experiments have been performed at 3.4T on high pressure superheated water and model systems such as toluene in high pressure CO2.

  13. Biosequestration of atmospheric CO2 and flue gas-containing CO2 by microalgae.

    PubMed

    Cheah, Wai Yan; Show, Pau Loke; Chang, Jo-Shu; Ling, Tau Chuan; Juan, Joon Ching

    2015-05-01

    The unceasing rise of greenhouse gas emission has led to global warming and climate change. Global concern on this phenomenon has put forward the microalgal-based CO2 sequestration aiming to sequester carbon back to the biosphere, ultimately reducing greenhouse effects. Microalgae have recently gained enormous attention worldwide, to be the valuable feedstock for renewable energy production, due to their high growth rates, high lipid productivities and the ability to sequester carbon. The photosynthetic process of microalgae uses atmospheric CO2 and CO2 from flue gases, to synthesize nutrients for their growth. In this review article, we will primarily discuss the efficiency of CO2 biosequestration by microalgae species, factors influencing microalgal biomass productions, microalgal cultivation systems, the potential and limitations of using flue gas for microalgal cultivation as well as the bio-refinery approach of microalgal biomass.

  14. Integration of the electrochemical depolorized CO2 concentrator with the Bosch CO2 reduction subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, F. H.; Wynveen, R. A.; Hallick, T. M.

    1976-01-01

    Regenerative processes for the revitalization of spacecraft atmospheres require an Oxygen Reclamation System (ORS) for the collection of carbon dioxide and water vapor and the recovery of oxygen from these metabolic products. Three life support subsystems uniquely qualified to form such an ORS are an Electrochemical CO2 Depolarized Concentrator (EDC), a CO2 Reduction Subsystem (BRS) and a Water Electrolysis Subsystem (WES). A program to develop and test the interface hardware and control concepts necessary for integrated operation of a four man capacity EDC with a four man capacity BRS was successfully completed. The control concept implemented proved successful in operating the EDC with the BRS for both constant CO2 loading as well as variable CO2 loading, based on a repetitive mission profile of the Space Station Prototype (SSP).

  15. Combined CO2-philicity and Ordered Mesoporosity for Highly Selective CO2 Capture at High Temperatures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Hoon; Lee, Hyeon Jeong; Lim, Soo Yeon; Kim, Byung Gon; Choi, Jang Wook

    2015-06-10

    Various dry sorbents have been lately introduced as promising media to capture carbon dioxide (CO2). However, it is still desirable to further improve their performance in diverse aspects, and high temperature selectivity of CO2 over other gases is clearly one of them. Here, we report a co-assembly approach to turn nonporous melamine resin to a highly ordered mesoporous polymeric network (space group: Im3̅m) containing high nitrogen content (∼18 at%). This mesoporous network shows anomalously increasing CO2/N2 selectivity with temperature rise, with the selectivity at 323 K reaching 117 (Henry method). This selectivity behavior is attributed to a combined effect of the high nitrogen content allowing for high binding affinity with CO2 and well-defined mesopores (2.5-2.9 nm) accelerating release of N2 with temperature rise. The given orthogonal approach suggests a new direction in designing dry sorbents with excellent selectivities at high temperatures. PMID:26000786

  16. Biosequestration of atmospheric CO2 and flue gas-containing CO2 by microalgae.

    PubMed

    Cheah, Wai Yan; Show, Pau Loke; Chang, Jo-Shu; Ling, Tau Chuan; Juan, Joon Ching

    2015-05-01

    The unceasing rise of greenhouse gas emission has led to global warming and climate change. Global concern on this phenomenon has put forward the microalgal-based CO2 sequestration aiming to sequester carbon back to the biosphere, ultimately reducing greenhouse effects. Microalgae have recently gained enormous attention worldwide, to be the valuable feedstock for renewable energy production, due to their high growth rates, high lipid productivities and the ability to sequester carbon. The photosynthetic process of microalgae uses atmospheric CO2 and CO2 from flue gases, to synthesize nutrients for their growth. In this review article, we will primarily discuss the efficiency of CO2 biosequestration by microalgae species, factors influencing microalgal biomass productions, microalgal cultivation systems, the potential and limitations of using flue gas for microalgal cultivation as well as the bio-refinery approach of microalgal biomass. PMID:25497054

  17. 46 CFR 108.433 - Quantity of CO2: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Quantity of CO2: General. 108.433 Section 108.433... Quantity of CO2: General. Each CO2 system must have enough gas to meet the quantity requirements of § 108.439 for the space requiring the greatest amount of CO2....

  18. 46 CFR 108.433 - Quantity of CO2: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Quantity of CO2: General. 108.433 Section 108.433... Quantity of CO2: General. Each CO2 system must have enough gas to meet the quantity requirements of § 108.439 for the space requiring the greatest amount of CO2....

  19. Anthropogenic point and area source CO2 plume measurements: Implications for spaceborne CO2 sensor design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, A. E.; Ryerson, T. B.; Peischl, J.; Parrish, D. D.; Trainer, M.; Tans, P. P.

    2011-12-01

    Anthropogenic point and area source CO2 plume measurements: Implications for spaceborne CO2 sensor design A. Andrews, T. Ryerson, J. Peischl, D. Parrish, M. Trainer, P. Tans An extensive dataset of CO2 concentrations including enhancements in point and area source plumes is available from in situ measurements collected using the NOAA P-3 and NCAR Electra research aircraft during seven major field projects from 1999 through 2010. Research flights sampled emission plumes from coal-, oil-, and natural gas-fired electric utility power plants, industrial facilities, and urban areas. Plume sampling often included horizontal transects at several altitudes and multiple distances downwind. CO2 data from crosswind transects upwind and downwind, coupled with ancillary measurements of co-emitted nitric oxide, nitrogen dioxide and sulfur dioxide, along with plume location, and wind speed and direction permit unambiguous attribution and quantification of atmospheric plumes from individual sources. Certain point sources were revisited on multiple flights over the course of 1-2 month long field projects and on successive field projects spanning several years. Sampling occurred primarily in the summertime, daytime continental boundary layer, with some plume studies performed after dark and in the spring, fall, and winter seasons. The data provide rigorously calibrated, measurement-based constraints on the expected range of atmospheric CO2 plume enhancements that can be used to assess satellite sensor concepts. Crosswind near-field (~5 km) transects in the summer daytime mixed-layer downwind of the strongest point sources were characterized by peak plume CO2 mixing ratio enhancements >100 ppm above background for the 100-m spatial averages reported from the moving aircraft. On many flights, the aircraft tracked such emissions plumes beyond 150 km downwind, or up to 10 hours of transport time, until plume enhancements were indistinguishable from background variability in CO2

  20. TES/Aura L2 Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Lite Nadir (TL2CO2LN)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-06-24

    TES/Aura L2 Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Lite Nadir (TL2CO2LN) News:  TES News ... L2 Instrument:  TES/Aura L2 Carbon Dioxide Spatial Coverage:  5.3 km nadir Spatial ... OPeNDAP Access:  OPeNDAP Parameters:  Carbon Dioxide Order Data:  Reverb:   Order Data ...

  1. Infrared spectroscopy of Mg-CO2 and Al-CO2 complexes in helium nanodroplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Brandon J.; Harruff-Miller, Barbara A.; Bunker, Christopher E.; Lewis, William K.

    2015-05-01

    The catalytic reduction of CO2 to produce hydrocarbon fuels is a topic that has gained significant attention. Development of efficient catalysts is a key enabler to such approaches, and metal-based catalysts have shown promise towards this goal. The development of a fundamental understanding of the interactions between CO2 molecules and metal atoms is expected to offer insight into the chemistry that occurs at the active site of such catalysts. In the current study, we utilize helium droplet methods to assemble complexes composed of a CO2 molecule and a Mg or Al atom. High-resolution infrared (IR) spectroscopy and optically selected mass spectrometry are used to probe the structure and binding of the complexes, and the experimental observations are compared with theoretical results determined from ab initio calculations. In both the Mg-CO2 and Al-CO2 systems, two IR bands are obtained: one assigned to a linear isomer and the other assigned to a T-shaped isomer. In the case of the Mg-CO2 complexes, the vibrational frequencies and rotational constants associated with the two isomers are in good agreement with theoretical values. In the case of the Al-CO2 complexes, the vibrational frequencies agree with theoretical predictions; however, the bands from both structural isomers exhibit significant homogeneous broadening sufficient to completely obscure the rotational structure of the bands. The broadening is consistent with an upper state lifetime of 2.7 ps for the linear isomer and 1.8 ps for the T-shaped isomer. The short lifetime is tentatively attributed to a prompt photo-induced chemical reaction between the CO2 molecule and the Al atom comprising the complex.

  2. An Experimental Study of Effects in Soils by Potential CO2 Seepage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Y.; Caramanna, G.; Nathanail, P.; Steven, M.; Maroto-Valer, M.

    2011-12-01

    Potential CO2 seepage during a CCS project will not only reduce its performing efficiency, but can also impact the local environment. Though scientists announce with confidence that CCS is a safe technology to store CO2 deep underground, it is essential to study the effects of CO2 seepage, to avoid any possible influences on soils. As a simplified environment, laboratory experiments can easily be controlled and vital to be studied to be compared with more complex natural analogues and modelling works. Recent research focuses on the effects on ecosystems of CO2 leakage. However, the impacts of long-term, low level exposure for both surface and subsurface ecosystems, as well as soil geochemistry changes are currently not clear. Moreover, previous work has focussed on pure CO2 leakage only and its impacts on the ecosystem. However, in a more realistic scenario the gas coming from a capture process may contain impurities, such as SO2, which are more dangerous than pure CO2 and could cause more severe consequences. Therefore, it is critical to assess the potential additional risks caused by CO2 leakage with impurities. Accordingly, both a batch and a continuous flow reactor were designed and used to study potential impacts caused by the CO2 seepage, focusing on soil geochemistry changes, due to different concentrations of CO2/SO2 mixtures. Stage 1- Batch experiments. In this stage, a soil sample was collected from the field and exposed to a controlled CO2/SO2 gas mixtures (100% CO2 and CO2:SO2=99:1). The water soluble fractions were measured before and after incubation. With 100% CO2 incubation it was found that: 1) the pH in the soil sample did not change significantly; 2) for soils with different moisture levels, greater moisture in the soil results in higher CO2 uptake during incubation; and 3) for sandy soils, small changes in CaCl2-exchangeable metal concentration, were observed after CO2 incubation. However, the increased concentration of toxic elements is still

  3. A Catalytic Sensor for Measurement of Radical Density in CO2 Plasmas

    PubMed Central

    Vesel, Alenka; Zaplotnik, Rok; Iacono, Jonathan; Balat-Pichelin, Marianne; Mozetic, Miran

    2012-01-01

    A catalytic sensor for the measurement of radical density in weakly ionized CO2 plasmas, created in a low-pressure electrodeless discharge, is presented. The CO2 plasma was created in a 4 cm wide borosilicate glass tube inside a copper coil connected to a radio frequency generator operating at 27.12 MHz with a nominal power of 250 W. The dissociation fraction of the CO2 molecules was measured in the early afterglow at pressures ranging from 10 Pa to 100 Pa, and at distances of up to 35 cm along the gas stream from the glowing plasma. The radical density peaked (2 × 1020 m−3) at 80 Pa. The density quickly decreased with increasing distance from the glowing plasma despite a rather large drift velocity. The dissociation fraction showed similar behavior, except that the maximum was obtained at somewhat lower pressure. The results were explained by rather intense surface recombination of radicals. PMID:23443372

  4. Low pCO2 Air-Polarized CO2 Concentrator Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, Franz H.

    1997-01-01

    Life Systems completed a Ground-based Space Station Experiment Development Study Program which verifies through testing the performance and applicability of the electrochemical Air-Polarized Carbon Dioxide Concentrator (APC) process technology for space missions requiring low (i.e., less than 3 mm Hg) CO2 partial pressure (pCO2) in the cabin atmosphere. Required test hardware was developed and testing was accomplished at an approximate one-person capacity CO2 removal level. Initially, two five-cell electrochemical modules using flight-like 0.5 sq ft cell hardware were tested individually, following by their testing at the integrated APC system level. Testing verified previously projected performance and established a database for sizing of APC systems. A four person capacity APC system was sized and compared with four candidate CO2 removal systems. At its weight of 252 lb, a volume of 7 cu ft and a power consumption of 566 W while operating at 2.2 mm Hg pCO2, the APC was surpassed only by an Electrochemical Depolarized CO2 Concentrator (EDC) (operating with H2), when compared on a total equivalent basis.

  5. CO2-Responsive Polymer-Functionalized Au Nanoparticles for CO2 Sensor.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ying; Promthaveepong, Kittithat; Li, Nan

    2016-08-16

    Metallic nanoparticles (NPs) coated with stimuli-responsive polymers (SRPs) exhibit tunable optical properties responding to external stimuli and show promising sensing applications. We present a new CO2-responsive polymer, poly(N-(3-amidino)-aniline) (PNAAN), coated gold NPs (AuNPs) synthesized by directly reducing HAuCl4 with a CO2-responsive monomer N-(3-amidino)-aniline (NAAN). The amidine group of PNAAN can be protonated into a hydrophilic amidinium group by dissolved CO2 (dCO2). This induces the PNAAN to swell and detach from the AuNP surface, resulting in AuNP aggregation and color change. By monitoring the UV absorbance change of AuNPs, a sensitive dCO2 sensor with a linear range of 0.0132 to 0.1584 hPa and a limit of detection (LOD) of 0.0024 hPa is developed. This method shows dramatic improvement in sensitivity and convenience of sample preparation compared with the previously reported dCO2 sensor. PMID:27459645

  6. Uncertainty analyses of CO2 plume expansion subsequent to wellbore CO2 leakage into aquifers

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, Zhangshuan; Bacon, Diana H.; Engel, David W.; Lin, Guang; Fang, Yilin; Ren, Huiying; Fang, Zhufeng

    2014-08-01

    In this study, we apply an uncertainty quantification (UQ) framework to CO2 sequestration problems. In one scenario, we look at the risk of wellbore leakage of CO2 into a shallow unconfined aquifer in an urban area; in another scenario, we study the effects of reservoir heterogeneity on CO2 migration. We combine various sampling approaches (quasi-Monte Carlo, probabilistic collocation, and adaptive sampling) in order to reduce the number of forward calculations while trying to fully explore the input parameter space and quantify the input uncertainty. The CO2 migration is simulated using the PNNL-developed simulator STOMP-CO2e (the water-salt-CO2 module). For computationally demanding simulations with 3D heterogeneity fields, we combined the framework with a scalable version module, eSTOMP, as the forward modeling simulator. We built response curves and response surfaces of model outputs with respect to input parameters, to look at the individual and combined effects, and identify and rank the significance of the input parameters.

  7. CO2-Responsive Polymer-Functionalized Au Nanoparticles for CO2 Sensor.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ying; Promthaveepong, Kittithat; Li, Nan

    2016-08-16

    Metallic nanoparticles (NPs) coated with stimuli-responsive polymers (SRPs) exhibit tunable optical properties responding to external stimuli and show promising sensing applications. We present a new CO2-responsive polymer, poly(N-(3-amidino)-aniline) (PNAAN), coated gold NPs (AuNPs) synthesized by directly reducing HAuCl4 with a CO2-responsive monomer N-(3-amidino)-aniline (NAAN). The amidine group of PNAAN can be protonated into a hydrophilic amidinium group by dissolved CO2 (dCO2). This induces the PNAAN to swell and detach from the AuNP surface, resulting in AuNP aggregation and color change. By monitoring the UV absorbance change of AuNPs, a sensitive dCO2 sensor with a linear range of 0.0132 to 0.1584 hPa and a limit of detection (LOD) of 0.0024 hPa is developed. This method shows dramatic improvement in sensitivity and convenience of sample preparation compared with the previously reported dCO2 sensor.

  8. CO2 Sequestration within Spent Oil Shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, H.; Worrall, F.; Gluyas, J.; Morgan, C.; Fraser, J.

    2013-12-01

    Worldwide deposits of oil shales are thought to represent ~3 trillion barrels of oil. Jordanian oil shale deposits are extensive and of high quality, and could represent 100 billion barrels of oil, leading to much interest and activity in the development of these deposits. The exploitation of oil shales has raised a number of environmental concerns including: land use, waste disposal, water consumption, and greenhouse gas emissions. The dry retorting of oil shales can overcome a number of the environmental impacts, but this leaves concerns over management of spent oil shale and CO2 production. In this study we propose that the spent oil shale can be used to sequester CO2 from the retorting process. Here we show that by conducting experiments using high pressure reaction facilities, we can achieve successful carbonation of spent oil shale. High pressure reactor facilities in the Department of Earth Sciences, Durham University, are capable of reacting solids with a range of fluids up to 15 MPa and 350°C, being specially designed for research with supercritical fluids. Jordanian spent oil shale was reacted with high pressure CO2 in order to assess whether there is potential for sequestration. Fresh and reacted materials were then examined by: Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS), Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA), X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) methods. Jordanian spent oil shale was found to sequester up to 5.8 wt % CO2, on reacting under supercritical conditions, which is 90% of the theoretical carbonation. Jordanian spent oil shale is composed of a large proportion of CaCO3, which on retorting decomposes, forming CaSO4 and Ca-oxides which are the focus of carbonation reactions. A factorially designed experiment was used to test different factors on the extent of carbonation, including: pressure; temperature; duration; and the water content. Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) techniques were then used to determine the significance of

  9. Process-dependent residual trapping of CO2 in sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Lin; Benson, Sally M.

    2014-04-01

    This paper demonstrates that the nature and extent of residual CO2 trapping depend on the process by which the CO2 phase is introduced into the rock. We compare residual trapping of CO2 in Berea Sandstone by imbibing water into a core containing either exsolved CO2 or CO2 introduced by drainage. X-ray computed tomography measurements are used to map the spatial distribution of CO2 preimbibition and postimbibition. Unlike during drainage where the CO2 distribution is strongly influenced by the heterogeneity of the rock, the distribution of exsolved CO2 is comparatively uniform. Postimbibition, the CO2 distribution retained the essential features for both the exsolved and drainage cases, but twice as much residual trapping is observed for exsolved CO2 even with similar preimbibition gas saturations. Residually trapped exsolved gas also disproportionately reduced water relative permeability. Development of process-dependent parameterization will help better manage subsurface flow processes and unlock benefits from gas exsolution.

  10. In-situ measurement of atmospheric CO2 at the four WMO/GAW stations in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, S. X.; Zhou, L. X.; Tans, P. P.; Ciais, P.; Steinbacher, M.; Xu, L.; Luan, T.

    2013-10-01

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) mole fractions were continuously measured from January 2009 to December 2011 at 4 atmospheric observatories in China ((Lin'an, LAN), (Longfengshan, LFS), (Shangdianzi, SDZ), and (Waliguan, WLG)) using Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy instruments. All sites are regional (LAN, LFS, SDZ) or global (WLG) measurement stations of the World Meteorological Organization/Global Atmosphere Watch program (WMO/GAW). LAN is located near the megacity of Shanghai, in China's most economically developed region. LFS is in a forest and rice production area, close to the city of Harbin in the northern east of China. SDZ is located 150 km north east of Beijing. WLG, hosting the longest record of measured CO2 mole fractions in China, is a high altitude site in northwest China recording background CO2 values. The CO2 growth rates are 2.2 ± 0.2 ppm yr-1 for LAN, 2.3 ± 0.2 ppm yr-1 for LFS, 2.0 ± 0.2 ppm yr-1 for SDZ, and 1.2 ± 0.1 ppm yr-1 (1σ) for WLG, during the period of 2009 to 2011. The growth rate at WLG may be underestimated due to the data gaps during the observation period. The highest annual mean CO2 mole fraction of 404.1 ± 4.1 ppm was observed at LAN in 2011. A comprehensive analysis of CO2 variations, their diurnal and seasonal cycles as well as the analysis of the influence of different wind regimes on the CO2 mole fractions allows a thorough characterization of the sampling sites and of the key processes driving the CO2 mole fractions. These data form a basis to improve our understanding of atmospheric CO2 variations in China and the underlying fluxes, using atmospheric inversion models.

  11. Reconstruction of historic fossil CO2 emissions using radiocarbonmeasurements from tree rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, M. W.; Turnbull, J. C.; Trimble, M.; Keller, E. D.; Baisden, W. T.; Renwick, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    This project aims to reconstruct historic fossil CO2 emissions from a point source. As a test case we use the Vector gas processing plant in Taranaki New Zealand which has emitted 0.1Tg C yr-1 (as CO2) since 1970. Previous work using air samples found 2-5 ppm mole fraction CO2ff 600m downwind of the plant; this study extends the data set back 30 years using radiocarbon measurements in tree rings. Trees incorporate CO2 from the local atmosphere into their cellulose which is laid down in annual growth rings during photosynthesis. To relate this to the fossil CO2 content of the air we measure 14C in annual tree rings at a local clean air site and compare this to measurements of 14C in the annual ring for the same year at our test site. Fossil CO2 is devoid of 14C so addition of CO2ff will cause an observed decrease in14C in samples directly related to the amount of CO2ff present. Trees growing immediately downwind of the Vector plant and from clean air locations in Taranaki and Wellington were cored. Annual rings were counted and cut into one year growth increments. Testing was performed on two cellulose extraction methods to confirm removal of contaminating material before the cellulose component was chemically isolated, combusted, graphitised and 14C measured by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry. We will present initial results of the data; showing that Wellington tree and Taranaki clean air trees compare well with the Wellington atmospheric record whereas trees growing downwind of the Vector plant demonstrate lower 14C content consistent with fossil CO2 addition. We compare historic CO2ff emissions as sampled by the trees with reported emissions from the Vector plant to quantify and evaluate the ability of the technique to monitor changes in fossil CO2 emissions. We demonstrate how this technique could be applied alongside complimentary methods to evaluate fossil CO2 emissions at point sources worldwide to determine compliance of CO2 emitters with emission reduction

  12. Nonequilibrium Ablation of Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milos, Frank S.; Chen, Yih K.; Gokcen, Tahir

    2012-01-01

    In previous work, an equilibrium ablation and thermal response model for Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator was developed. In general, over a wide range of test conditions, model predictions compared well with arcjet data for surface recession, surface temperature, in-depth temperature at multiple thermocouples, and char depth. In this work, additional arcjet tests were conducted at stagnation conditions down to 40 W/sq cm and 1.6 kPa. The new data suggest that nonequilibrium effects become important for ablation predictions at heat flux or pressure below about 80 W/sq cm or 10 kPa, respectively. Modifications to the ablation model to account for nonequilibrium effects are investigated. Predictions of the equilibrium and nonequilibrium models are compared with the arcjet data.

  13. Release of Dissolved CO2 from Water in Laboratory Porous Media Following Rapid Depressurization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crews, J. B.; Cooper, C. A.

    2011-12-01

    A bench-top laboratory study is undertaken to investigate the effects of seismic shocks on brine aquifers into which carbon dioxide has been injected for permanent storage. Long-term storage in deep saline aquifers has been proposed and studied as one of the most viable near-term options for sequestering fossil fuel-derived carbon dioxide from the atmosphere to curb anthropogenic climate change. Upon injection into the subsurface, it is expected that CO2, as either a gas or supercritical fluid, will mix convectively with the formation water. The possibility exists, however, that dissolved CO2 will come out of solution as a result of an earthquake. The effect is similar to that of slamming an unsealed container of carbonated beverage on a table; previously dissolved CO2 precipitates, forms bubbles, and rises due to buoyancy. In this study, we measure the change in gas-phase CO2 concentration as a function of the magnitude of the shock and the initial concentration of CO2. In addition, we investigate and seek to characterize the nucleation and transport of CO2 bubbles in a porous medium after a seismic shock. Experiments are conducted using a Hele-Shaw cell and a CCD camera to quantify the fraction of dissolved CO2 that comes out of solution as a result of a sharp mechanical impulse. The data are used to identify and constrain the conditions under which CO2 comes out of solution and, further, to understand the end-behavior of the precipitated gas-phase CO2 as it moves through or is immobilized in a porous medium.

  14. What is the maximum potential for CO2 sequestration by "stimulated" weathering on the global scale?

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Jens; Kempe, Stephan

    2008-12-01

    Natural chemical weathering of silicate rocks is a significant sink for soil and atmospheric CO(2). Previous work suggested that natural chemical weathering may be stimulated by applying finely ground silicate rocks to agricultural areas or forests [stimulated weathering (SW)]. However, it remained unknown if this technique is practical to sequester globally significant amounts of CO(2) under realistic conditions. Applying first estimates of "normal treatment" amounts from a literature review, we report here a theoretical global maximum potential of 65 10(6) t sequestered C a(-1) if SW would be applied homogenously on all agricultural and forested areas of the world. This is equivalent to 0.9% of anthropogenic CO(2) emissions (reference period 2000-2005). First, however, the assumed application of SW on most of the considered areas is not economically feasible because of logistic issues, and second the net-CO(2) sequestration is expected to amount to only a fraction of consumed CO(2) due to the energy demand of the application itself (currently ~11%). Unless progress in application procedures is provided, the recent realistic maximum net-CO(2)-consumption potential is expected to be much smaller than 0.1% of anthropogenic emissions, and the SW would thus not be one of the key techniques to reduce atmospheric CO(2) concentration. However, literature suggests that for some agricultural areas (croplands) and specifically for rice production areas in humid climates, this SW may be a feasible tool to support international efforts to sequester CO(2). SW may be cost effective for those areas if linked to the CO(2)-emission certificate trade in the future, and increases in crop production are taken into account.

  15. Atmospheric pCO2 Reconstructed across the Early Eocene Hyperthermals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Y.; Schubert, B.

    2015-12-01

    Negative carbon isotope excursions (CIEs) are commonly associated with extreme global warming. The Early Eocene is punctuated by five such CIEs, the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM, ca. 55.8 Ma), H1 (ca. 53.6 Ma), H2 (ca. 53.5 Ma), I1 (ca. 53.3 Ma), and I2 (ca. 53.2 Ma), each characterized by global warming. The negative CIEs are recognized in both marine and terrestrial substrates, but the terrestrial substrates exhibit a larger absolute magnitude CIE than the marine substrates. Here we reconcile the difference in CIE magnitude between the terrestrial and marine substrates for each of these events by accounting for the additional carbon isotope fractionation by C3 land plants in response to increased atmospheric pCO2. Our analysis yields background and peak pCO2 values for each of the events. Assuming a common mechanism for each event, we calculate that background pCO2 was not static across the Early Eocene, with the highest background pCO2 immediately prior to I2, the last of the five CIEs. Background pCO2 is dependent on the source used in our analysis with values ranging from 300 to 720 ppmv provided an injection of 13C-depleted carbon with δ13C value of -60‰ (e.g. biogenic methane). The peak pCO2 during each event scales according to the magnitude of CIE, and is therefore greatest during the PETM and smallest during H2. Both background and peak pCO2 are higher if we assume a mechanism of permafrost thawing (δ13C = -25‰). Our reconstruction of pCO2 across these events is consistent with trends in the δ18O value of deep-sea benthic foraminifera, suggesting a strong link between pCO2 and temperature during the Early Eocene.

  16. What is the maximum potential for CO2 sequestration by ``stimulated'' weathering on the global scale?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Jens; Kempe, Stephan

    2008-12-01

    Natural chemical weathering of silicate rocks is a significant sink for soil and atmospheric CO2. Previous work suggested that natural chemical weathering may be stimulated by applying finely ground silicate rocks to agricultural areas or forests [stimulated weathering (SW)]. However, it remained unknown if this technique is practical to sequester globally significant amounts of CO2 under realistic conditions. Applying first estimates of “normal treatment” amounts from a literature review, we report here a theoretical global maximum potential of 65 106 t sequestered C a-1 if SW would be applied homogenously on all agricultural and forested areas of the world. This is equivalent to 0.9% of anthropogenic CO2 emissions (reference period 2000 2005). First, however, the assumed application of SW on most of the considered areas is not economically feasible because of logistic issues, and second the net-CO2 sequestration is expected to amount to only a fraction of consumed CO2 due to the energy demand of the application itself (currently ~11%). Unless progress in application procedures is provided, the recent realistic maximum net-CO2-consumption potential is expected to be much smaller than 0.1% of anthropogenic emissions, and the SW would thus not be one of the key techniques to reduce atmospheric CO2 concentration. However, literature suggests that for some agricultural areas (croplands) and specifically for rice production areas in humid climates, this SW may be a feasible tool to support international efforts to sequester CO2. SW may be cost effective for those areas if linked to the CO2-emission certificate trade in the future, and increases in crop production are taken into account.

  17. The potential impacts of nutrient and CO2 variations on ecosystem oxidative ratio

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A fraction of fossil fuel carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions are being taken up by the terrestrial biosphere and the oceans. One particularly effective way of determining the sizes of these terrestrial biosphere and ocean carbon sinks is based on the measurements of changes in atmospheric oxygen (O2) a...

  18. Counter-current CO2 purification of partially deacylated sunflower