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Sample records for ablative fractional resurfacing

  1. Fractional ablative laser skin resurfacing: a review.

    PubMed

    Tajirian, Ani L; Tarijian, Ani L; Goldberg, David J

    2011-12-01

    Ablative laser technology has been in use for many years now. The large side effect profile however has limited its use. Fractional ablative technology is a newer development which combines a lesser side effect profile along with similar efficacy. In this paper we review fractional ablative laser skin resurfacing.

  2. Ablative fractional laser resurfacing helps treat restrictive pediatric scar contractures.

    PubMed

    Krakowski, Andrew C; Goldenberg, Alina; Eichenfield, Lawrence F; Murray, Jill-Peck; Shumaker, Peter R

    2014-12-01

    Conventional management of debilitating pediatric scar contractures, including hand therapy and surgery, may often be beset by delayed treatment, suboptimal results, and additional surgical morbidity. Ablative fractional laser resurfacing is an emerging adjunctive procedural option for scar contractures because of its promising efficacy and safety profile. However, its use to improve function has not been studied in the pediatric population. Herein we report 2 pediatric patients with recalcitrant scar contractures, causing persistent functional deficits, treated with an ablative fractional laser protocol. Both patients experienced rapid and cumulative subjective and objective improvements in range of motion and function as measured by an independent occupational therapist without reported complications. We highlight ablative fractional laser resurfacing as a novel and promising tool in the management of function-limiting scar contractures in children and propose that the technique be incorporated into existing scar treatment paradigms, guided by future research.

  3. Ablative skin resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Chwalek, Jennifer; Goldberg, David J

    2011-01-01

    Ablative skin resurfacing has remained the gold standard for treating photodamage and acne scars since the development of the first CO(2) lasers. CO(2) and Er:YAG lasers emit infrared light, which targets water resulting in tissue contraction and collagen formation. The first ablative laser systems created significant thermal damage resulting in unacceptably high rates of scarring and prolonged healing. Newer devices, such as high-energy pulsed lasers and fractional ablative lasers, are capable of achieving significant improvements with fewer side effects and shorter recovery times. While ablative resurfacing has become safer, careful patient selection is still important to avoid post-treatment scarring, dyspigmentation, and infections. Clinicians utilizing ablative devices need to be aware of possible side effects in order to maximize results and patient satisfaction. This chapter reviews the background of ablative lasers including the types of ablative lasers, mechanism of action, indications for ablative resurfacing, and possible side effects.

  4. Ablative skin resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Nidhi; Smith, Greg; Heffelfinger, Ryan

    2014-02-01

    Ablative laser resurfacing has evolved as a safe and effective treatment for skin rejuvenation. Although traditional lasers were associated with significant thermal damage and lengthy recovery, advances in laser technology have improved safety profiles and reduced social downtime. CO2 lasers remain the gold standard of treatment, and fractional ablative devices capable of achieving remarkable clinical improvement with fewer side effects and shorter recovery times have made it a more practical option for patients. Although ablative resurfacing has become safer, careful patient selection and choice of suitable laser parameters are essential to minimize complications and optimize outcomes. This article describes the current modalities used in ablative laser skin resurfacing and examines their efficacy, indications, and possible side effects.

  5. Fractional laser skin resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Alexiades-Armenakas, Macrene R; Dover, Jeffrey S; Arndt, Kenneth A

    2012-11-01

    Laser skin resurfacing (LSR) has evolved over the past 2 decades from traditional ablative to fractional nonablative and fractional ablative resurfacing. Traditional ablative LSR was highly effective in reducing rhytides, photoaging, and acne scarring but was associated with significant side effects and complications. In contrast, nonablative LSR was very safe but failed to deliver consistent clinical improvement. Fractional LSR has achieved the middle ground; it combined the efficacy of traditional LSR with the safety of nonablative modalities. The first fractional laser was a nonablative erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Er:YAG) laser that produced microscopic columns of thermal injury in the epidermis and upper dermis. Heralding an entirely new concept of laser energy delivery, it delivered the laser beam in microarrays. It resulted in microscopic columns of treated tissue and intervening areas of untreated skin, which yielded rapid reepithelialization. Fractional delivery was quickly applied to ablative wavelengths such as carbon dioxide, Er:YAG, and yttrium scandium gallium garnet (2,790 nm), providing more significant clinical outcomes. Adjustable laser parameters, including power, pitch, dwell time, and spot density, allowed for precise determination of percent surface area, affected penetration depth, and clinical recovery time and efficacy. Fractional LSR has been a significant advance to the laser field, striking the balance between safety and efficacy.

  6. Ablative fractional resurfacing for the treatment of traumatic scars and contractures.

    PubMed

    Uebelhoer, Nathan S; Ross, E Victor; Shumaker, Peter R

    2012-06-01

    After a decade of military conflict, thousands of wounded warriors have suffered debilitating and cosmetically disfiguring scars and scar contractures. Clearly, there is a need for effective scar treatment regimens to assist in the functional and cosmetic rehabilitation of these patients. Traditional treatments, including aggressive physical and occupational therapy and dedicated wound care, are essential. Adjunctive treatments with established laser technologies, such as vascular lasers and full-field ablative lasers, have had a somewhat limited role in scar contractures due to modest efficacy and/or an unacceptable side effect profile in compromised skin. Refractory scar contractures often require surgical revision, which can be effective, but is associated with additional surgical morbidity and a significant risk of recurrence. Furthermore, current scar treatment paradigms often dictate scar maturation for approximately a year to allow for spontaneous improvement before surgical intervention. Since 2009, the Dermatology Clinic at the Naval Medical Center San Diego has been treating scars and scar contractures in wounded warriors and others using ablative fractionated laser technology. Although traditionally associated with the rejuvenation of aged and photo-damaged skin, our clinical experience and a handful of early reports indicate that laser ablative fractional resurfacing demonstrates promising efficacy and an excellent side effect profile when applied to the functional and cosmetic enhancement of traumatic scars and contractures. This article discusses our clinical experience with ablative fractional resurfacing and its potential prominent role in rehabilitation from traumatic injuries, including a possible shift in scar treatment paradigms toward earlier procedural intervention. Potential benefits include the optimization of scar trajectory and higher levels of full or adapted function in a more favorable time course.

  7. Histological evaluation of vertical laser channels from ablative fractional resurfacing: an ex vivo pig skin model.

    PubMed

    Skovbølling Haak, Christina; Illes, Monica; Paasch, Uwe; Hædersdal, Merete

    2011-07-01

    Ablative fractional resurfacing (AFR) represents a new treatment potential for various skin conditions and new laser devices are being introduced. It is important to gain information about the impact of laser settings on the dimensions of the created laser channels for obtaining a safe and efficient treatment outcome. The aim of this study was to establish a standard model to document the histological tissue damage profiles after AFR and to test a new laser device at diverse settings. Ex vivo abdominal pig skin was treated with a MedArt 620, prototype fractional carbon dioxide (CO(2)) laser (Medart, Hvidovre, Denmark) delivering single microbeams (MB) with a spot size of 165 μm. By using a constant pulse duration of 2 ms, intensities of 1-18 W, single and 2-4 stacked pulses, energies were delivered in a range from 2-144 mJ/MB. Histological evaluations included 3-4 high-quality histological measurements for each laser setting (n = 28). AFR created cone-shaped laser channels. Ablation depths varied from reaching the superficial dermis (2 mJ, median 41 μm) to approaching the subcutaneous fat (144 mJ, median 1,943 μm) and correlated to the applied energy levels in an approximate linear relation (r(2) = 0.84, p < 0.001). The dermal ablation width increased slightly within the energy range of 4-144 mJ (median 163 μm). The thickness of the coagulation zone reached a plateau around 65 μm at energies levels above 16 mJ. The calculated volumes of ablated tissue increased with increasing energies. We suggest this ex vivo pig skin model to characterize AFR laser channels histologically.

  8. Laser Resurfacing: Full Field and Fractional.

    PubMed

    Pozner, Jason N; DiBernardo, Barry E

    2016-07-01

    Laser resurfacing is a very popular procedure worldwide. Full field and fractional lasers are used in many aesthetic practices. There have been significant advances in laser resurfacing in the past few years, which make patient treatments more efficacious and with less downtime. Erbium and carbon dioxide and ablative, nonablative, and hybrid fractional lasers are all extremely effective and popular tools that have a place in plastic surgery and dermatology offices.

  9. Successful Treatment of Tattoo-Induced Pseudolymphoma with Sequential Ablative Fractional Resurfacing Followed by Q-Switched Nd: YAG 532 nm Laser.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lucinda Siyun; Lucinda, Tan Siyun; Oon, Hazel Hwee; Hazel, Oon Hwee Boon; Lee, Joyce Siong Siong; Joyce, Lee Siong See; Chua, Sze Hon; Hon, Chua Sze

    2013-10-01

    Decorative tattooing has been linked with a range of complications, with pseudolymphoma being unusual and challenging to manage. We report a case of tattoo-induced pseudolymphoma, who failed treatment with potent topical and intralesional steroids. She responded well to sequential treatment with ablative fractional resurfacing (AFR) followed by Q-Switched (QS) Nd:YAG 532 nm laser. Interestingly, we managed to document the clearance of her tattoo pigments after laser treatments on histology and would like to highlight the use of special stains such as the Grocott's Methenamine Silver (GMS) stain as a useful method to assess the presence of tattoo pigment in cases where dense inflammatory infiltrates are present.

  10. Current Status of Fractional Laser Resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Carniol, Paul J; Hamilton, Mark M; Carniol, Eric T

    2015-01-01

    Fractional lasers were first developed based on observations of lasers designed for hair transplantation. In 2007, ablative fractional laser resurfacing was introduced. The fractionation allowed deeper tissue penetration, leading to greater tissue contraction, collagen production and tissue remodeling. Since then, fractional erbium:YAG resurfacing lasers have also been introduced. These lasers have yielded excellent results in treating photoaging, acne scarring, and dyschromia. With the adjustment of microspot density, pulse duration, number of passes, and fluence, the surgeon can adjust the treatment effects. These lasers have allowed surgeons to treat patients with higher Fitzpatrick skin types (types IV to VI) and greater individualize treatments to various facial subunits. Immunohistochemical analysis has demonstrated remodeling effects of the tissues for several months, producing longer lasting results. Adjuvant treatments are also under investigation, including concomitant face-lift, product deposition, and platelet-rich plasma. Finally, there is a short recovery time from treatment with these lasers, allowing patients to resume regular activities more quickly. Although there is a relatively high safety profile for ablative fractionated lasers, surgeons should be aware of the limitations of specific treatments and the associated risks and complications.

  11. Risk assessment of excess drug and sunscreen absorption via skin with ablative fractional laser resurfacing : optimization of the applied dose for postoperative care.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Yu; Fang, Chia-Lang; Al-Suwayeh, Saleh A; Yang, Hung-Hsu; Li, Yi-Ching; Fang, Jia-You

    2013-09-01

    The ablative fractional laser is a new modality used for surgical resurfacing. It is expected that laser treatment can generally deliver drugs into and across the skin, which is toxicologically relevant. The aim of this study was to establish skin absorption characteristics of antibiotics, sunscreens, and macromolecules via laser-treated skin and during postoperative periods. Nude mice were employed as the animal model. The skin received a single irradiation of a fractional CO2 laser, using fluences of 4-10 mJ with spot densities of 100-400 spots/cm(2). In vitro skin permeation using Franz cells was performed. Levels of skin water loss and erythema were evaluated, and histological examinations with staining by hematoxylin and eosin, cyclooxygenase-2, and claudin-1 were carried out. Significant signs of erythema, edema, and scaling of the skin treated with the fractional laser were evident. Inflammatory infiltration and a reduction in tight junctions were also observed. Laser treatment at 6 mJ increased tetracycline and tretinoin fluxes by 70- and 9-fold, respectively. A higher fluence resulted in a greater tetracycline flux, but lower skin deposition. On the other hand, tretinoin skin deposition increased following an increase in the laser fluence. The fractional laser exhibited a negligible effect on modulating oxybenzone absorption. Dextrans with molecular weights of 4 and 10 kDa showed increased fluxes from 0.05 to 11.05 and 38.54 μg/cm(2)/h, respectively. The optimized drug dose for skin treated with the fractional laser was 1/70-1/60 of the regular dose. The skin histology and drug absorption had recovered to a normal status within 2-3 days. Our findings provide the first report on risk assessment of excessive skin absorption after fractional laser resurfacing.

  12. Ablative non-fractional lasers for atrophic facial acne scars: a new modality of erbium:YAG laser resurfacing in Asians.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Ju; Kang, Jin Moon; Chung, Won Soon; Kim, Young Koo; Kim, Hei Sung

    2014-03-01

    Atrophic facial scars which commonly occur after inflammatory acne vulgaris can be extremely disturbing to patients both physically and psychologically. Treatment with fractional laser devices has become increasingly popular, but there has been disappointment in terms of effectiveness. The objective of this study was to assess the safety and efficacy of ablative full-face resurfacing on atrophic acne scars in the Korean population. A total of 22 patients, aged 25-44 years, underwent a new modality of resurfacing combining both short-pulsed and dual-mode erbium:yttrium-aluminum garnet (Er:YAG) laser. The patients had Fitzpatrick skin types ranging from III to V. Photographs were taken before and up to 6 months after treatment. Results were evaluated for the degree of clinical improvement and any adverse events. Degree of improvement was graded using a four-point scale: poor (1) = <25%, fair (2) = 25-50%, good (3) = 51-75%, and excellent (4) = >75%. Based on the blinded photo assessments by two independent reviewers, clinically and statistically significant mean improvement of 3.41 was observed (one-sample Wilcoxon signed rank test, P < 0.001). Complete wound healing occurred between 6 and 9 days. Erythema occurred in all patients and lasted longer than 3 months in two patients (9.1%). Postinflammatory hyperpigmentation occurred in ten patients (45.5%) and lasted longer than 3 months in one patient (4.5%). One patient experienced mild hypopigmentation (4.5%). Mild to moderate acne flare-up occurred in five patients (22.7%). No other adverse effects were observed. A new modality of Er:YAG laser resurfacing combining short-pulsed and dual-mode Er:YAG laser is a safe and very effective treatment modality for atrophic facial acne scars in Asians with darker skin tones.

  13. Ablative skin resurfacing with a novel microablative CO2 laser.

    PubMed

    Gotkin, Robert H; Sarnoff, Deborah S; Cannarozzo, Giovanni; Sadick, Neil S; Alexiades-Armenakas, Macrene

    2009-02-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) laser skin resurfacing has been a mainstay of facial rejuvenation since its introduction in the mid 1990s. Recently, a new generation of fractional or microablative CO2 lasers has been introduced to the marketplace. According to the concept of fractional photothermolysis, these lasers ablate only a fraction of the epidermal and dermal architecture in the treatment area. An array of microscopic thermal wounds is created that ablates the epidermis and dermis within very tiny zones; adjacent to these areas, the epidermis and dermis are spared. This microablative process of laser skin resurfacing has proven safe and effective not only for facial rejuvenation, but elsewhere on the body as well. It is capable of improving wrinkles, acne scars, and other types of atrophic scars and benign pigmented lesions associated with elastotic, sun-damaged skin. Because of the areas of spared epidermis and dermis inherent in a procedure that employs fractional photothermolysis, healing is more rapid compared to fully ablative CO2 laser skin resurfacing and downtime is proportionately reduced. A series of 32 consecutive patients underwent a single laser resurfacing procedure with the a new microablative CO2 laser. All patients were followed for a minimum of 6 months and were asked to complete patient satisfaction questionnaires; a 6 month postoperative photographic evaluation by an independent physician, not involved in the treatment, was also performed. Both sets of data were graded and reported on a quartile scale. Results demonstrated greater than 50% improvement in almost all patients with those undergoing treatment for wrinkles, epidermal pigment or solar elastosis deriving the greatest change for the better (>75%).

  14. In vivo non-invasive monitoring of collagen remodelling by two-photon microscopy after micro-ablative fractional laser resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Cicchi, Riccardo; Kapsokalyvas, Dimitrios; Troiano, Michela; Campolmi, Piero; Morini, Cristiano; Massi, Daniela; Cannarozzo, Giovanni; Lotti, Torello; Pavone, Francesco Saverio

    2014-11-01

    Non-linear optical microscopy is becoming popular as a non-invasive in vivo imaging modality in dermatology. In this study, combined TPF and SHG microscopy were used to monitor collagen remodelling in vivo after micro-ablative fractional laser resurfacing. Papillary dermis of living subjects, covering a wide age range, was imaged immediately before and forty days after treatment. A qualitative visual examination of acquired images demonstrated an age-dependent remodelling effect on collagen. Additional quantitative analysis of new collagen production was performed by means of two image analysis methods. A higher increase in SHG to TPF ratio, corresponding to a stronger treatment effectiveness, was found in older subjects, whereas the effect was found to be negligible in young, and minimal in middle age subjects. Analysis of collagen images also showed a dependence of the treatment effectiveness with age but with controversial results. While the diagnostic potential of in vivo multiphoton microscopy has already been demonstrated for skin cancer and other skin diseases, here we first successfully explore its potential use for a non-invasive follow-up of a laser-based treatment.

  15. Nonablative fractional laser resurfacing in Asian skin--a review.

    PubMed

    Sachdeva, Silonie

    2010-12-01

    Skin resurfacing has been a part of cosmetic dermatology for more than two decades now, and most of it has been ablative with traditional aggressive lasers including the CO(2) and erbium. The last few years have seen a revolutionary change with the invention of nonablative lasers for skin tightening. Fractional resurfacing is a new concept of cutaneous remodeling whereby laser-induced zones of microthermal injury are surrounded by normal untreated tissue that helps in quicker healing. The various wavelengths used are 1320, 1440, and 2940 nm with depth of penetration ranging from 25 μ to 1.2 mm. This article reviews the history of nonablative fractional laser resurfacing, its indications, contraindications, and a review of use in Asian skin with Fitzpatrick type III-VI.

  16. Results of fractional ablative facial skin resurfacing with the erbium:yttrium-aluminium-garnet laser 1 week and 2 months after one single treatment in 30 patients.

    PubMed

    Trelles, Mario A; Mordon, Serge; Velez, Mariano; Urdiales, Fernando; Levy, Jean Luc

    2009-03-01

    The erbium:yttrium-aluminium-garnet (Er:YAG) laser has recently been used in the fractional resurfacing of photo-aged skin. Our study evaluated the results after one single session of fractional resurfacing with Er:YAG. Thirty women participated in the study, with an average age of 46 years, skin types from II to IV, and wrinkle grades I to III. The 2,940 nm Er:YAG system used (Pixel, Alma Laser, Israel) had variable pulse durations (1 ms to 2 ms) and energy densities (800 mJ/cm(2) to 1,400 mJ/cm(2)) which, together with the number of passes (four to eight), were selected as a function of wrinkle severity. All patients received only one treatment. Postoperative side effects were evaluated. The number of wrinkles was documented with clinical photography and was scored. Histological assessment was carried out on two patients before and 2 months after treatment. All patients completed the study. Of the patients, 93% reported good or very good improvement of the degree of their wrinkles, with a satisfaction index of 83%. Pain was not a problem during treatment, and there were no side effects except for in one phototype IV patient, who had hyperpigmentation. Histology 2 months after the single treatment demonstrated younger morphology of both the epidermis and dermis, with improvement of the pretreatment typical elastotic appearance. At the parameters used in our study, only one treatment session of Er:YAG laser could achieve effective skin rejuvenation, with effects recognized in both the dermis and, more importantly, the epidermis. This regimen offers an interesting alternative to the conventional approach of multi-session fractional resurfacing.

  17. Complete resolution of minocycline pigmentation following a single treatment with non-ablative 1550-nm fractional resurfacing in combination with the 755-nm Q-switched alexandrite laser.

    PubMed

    Vangipuram, Ramya K; DeLozier, Whitney L; Geddes, Elizabeth; Friedman, Paul M

    2016-03-01

    Pigmentation secondary to minocycline ingestion is an uncommon adverse event affecting 3.7-14.8% of treated individuals for which few effective therapies are available. Three patterns of minocycline pigmentation have a characteristic clinical and histological appearance. The pigment composition in each variety is different and occurs at varying skin depths. Accordingly, a tailored approach according to the type of minocycline pigmentation is crucial for treatment success. The purpose of this intervention was to evaluate the efficacy of non-ablative fractional photothermolysis in combination with the Q-switched alexandrite laser for the treatment of type I minocycline pigmentation on the face. A patient with type I minocycline pigmentation was treated with non-ablative 1550-nm fractional photothermolysis followed immediately by 755-nm Q-switched alexandrite laser and then observed clinically to determine the outcome of this modality. The patient was seen in clinic 1 month later following her single treatment session and 100% clearance of all blue facial pigment was observed. Non-ablative fractional photothermolysis in combination with the 755-nm Q-switched alexandrite laser should be considered for treatment of type I minocycline pigmentation.

  18. The Effect of Conditioned Media of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells on Wound Healing after Ablative Fractional Carbon Dioxide Laser Resurfacing

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Bing-Rong; Xu, Yang; Guo, Shi-Lei; Xu, Yan; Wang, Ying; Zhu, Fen; Wu, Di; Yin, Zhi-Qiang; Luo, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the benefits of conditioned medium of Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSC-CM) on wound healing after fractional carbon dioxide laser resurfacing (FxCR) on human skin. Materials and Methods. Nineteen subjects were treated with FxCR on the bilateral inner arms. ADSC-CM was applied on FxCR site of one randomly selected arm. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL), skin color, and gross-elasticity of FxCR site on both arms were measured. Skin samples were taken by biopsy from three subjects 3 weeks after treatment for histopathological manifestations and mRNA expressions of procollagen types I and III, elastin genes were noted. Results. The index of erythema, melanin, and TEWL of the ADSC-CM-treated skin were significantly lower than those of the control side. The mRNA expression of type III procollagen in ADSC-CM-treated group at 3 weeks posttreatment was 2.6 times of that of the control group. Conclusion. Application of allograft ADSC-CM is an effective method for enhancing wound healing after FxCR, by reducing transient adverse effects such as erythema, hyperpigmentation, and increased TEWL. PMID:24381938

  19. Laser tattoo removal with preceding ablative fractional treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cencič, Boris; Možina, Janez; Jezeršek, Matija

    2013-06-01

    A combined laser tattoo removal treatment, first the ablative fractional resurfacing (AFR) with an Er:YAG laser and then the q-switched (QSW) Nd:YAG laser treatment, was studied. Experiments show that significantly higher fluences can be used for the same tissue damage levels.

  20. Fractional carbon dioxide laser and plasmakinetic skin resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Groff, William F; Fitzpatrick, Richard E; Uebelhoer, Nathan S

    2008-12-01

    Photodamage is one of the most common reasons that patients visit a dermatologist's office. Carbon dioxide (CO(2)) laser resurfacing has always been the gold standard for reversing photodamage. Because of the relatively high incidence of side effects and the prolonged downtime associated with CO(2) resurfacing, new technologies have emerged to address photodamage. Portrait skin regeneration (PSR) is a novel device that has been developed to treat photodamage, and this device yields fewer side effects and downtime than traditional CO(2) laser resurfacing. At our center, we have performed more than 500 high-energy PSR treatments and have developed a unique and highly effective treatment protocol. In addition, fractional CO(2) laser resurfacing has emerged as the latest technology developed to combat photoaging. This technology yields impressive results and is much safer and causes less downtime than traditional CO(2) laser resurfacing. In this article, we will review our treatment techniques and protocols as well as address patient selection, preoperative and postoperative care, and anesthesia.

  1. [Ablative and fractional lasers].

    PubMed

    Beylot, C; Grognard, C; Michaud, T

    2009-10-01

    The use of pulsed or scanning Carbon Dioxide, and pulsed Erbium-YAG lasers allows the programmable and reproducible photocoagulation of thin layers of the epidermis and superficial dermis. Thermal damage depends on the type of laser and is greater with CO(2) lasers. The degree of neocollagenesis is proportional to the thermal damage and is better with CO(2) lasers. Their main indication is the correction of photoaged facial skin but they can also be used for corrective dermatology, e.g. for scars and genodermatosis. Results are highly satisfactory but the technique is invasive and the patient experiences a social hindrance of around two weeks. Fractionated techniques treat 25% of the defective skin area at each session in noncontiguous microzones; four sessions are therefore necessary to treat the entire cutaneous surface. The treatment is given under topical anesthesia and is much less invasive, particularly with nonablative fractional laser treatment in which photothermolysis does not penetrate below the epidermis and/or the effects are slight, with no or very little social isolation. However, the results are much less satisfactory than the results of ablative laser and there is no firming effect. Other zones than the face can be treated. With the fractional CO(2) and Erbium ablative lasers, which have multiplied over the past 2 years, the much wider impacts cause perforation of the epidermis and there is a zone of ablation by laser photovaporization, with a zone of thermal damage below. The results are better in correcting photoaging of the face, without, however, achieving the efficacy of ablative lasers, which remain the reference technique. However, the effects are not insignificant, requiring at least 5 days of social isolation.

  2. Laser resurfacing pearls.

    PubMed

    Shah, Sonia; Alam, Murad

    2012-08-01

    Ablative skin resurfacing using the carbon dioxide laser was long considered the gold standard for treatment of photoaging, acne scars, and rhytids. However, conventional full-face carbon dioxide resurfacing is associated with significant risk of side effects and a prolonged postoperative recovery period. Fractional resurfacing has recently revolutionized laser surgery by offering close to comparable results with minimal side effects and a more rapid recovery. Although fractional devices have grown in popularity, and have essentially replaced traditional resurfacing, fractional resurfacing can still be a challenging modality to control precisely due to hardware variations across comparable devices, the range of settings that can be used, and patient-specific considerations. Certain precautions and rules of thumb can reduce the risk associated with fractional resurfacing, and increase the likelihood of a good outcome.

  3. Use of 1540nm fractionated erbium:glass laser for split skin graft resurfacing: a case study.

    PubMed

    Narinesingh, S; Lewis, S; Nayak, B S

    2013-09-01

    The field of laser skin resurfacing has evolved rapidly over the past two decades from ablative lasers, to nonablative systems using near-infrared, intense-pulsed light and radio-frequency systems, and most recently fractional laser resurfacing. Although fractional thermolysis is still in its infancy, its efficacy in in the treatment of skin disorders have been clearly demonstrated. Here we present a case report on the safety and efficacy of a 1540nm erbium:glass laser in the treatment of the waffle pattern of a meshed skin graft in a 38-year-old patient with type V skin in the Caribbean.

  4. Molecular effects of fractional carbon dioxide laser resurfacing on photodamaged human skin.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Michael J; Cohen, Marc; Hokugo, Akishige; Keller, Gregory S

    2010-01-01

    Objective To elucidate the sequential changes in protein expression that play a role in the clinically beneficial results seen with fractional carbon dioxide (CO(2)) laser resurfacing of the face and neck. Methods Nine healthy volunteers were recruited for participation from the senior author's facial plastic surgery practice. After informed consent was obtained, each volunteer underwent a 2-mm punch biopsy from a discrete area of infra-auricular neck skin prior to laser treatment. Patients then immediately underwent laser resurfacing of photodamaged face and neck skin at a minimal dose (30 W for 0.1 second) with the Pixel Perfect fractional CO(2) laser. On completion of the treatment, another biopsy specimen was taken adjacent to the first site. Additional biopsy specimens were subsequently taken from adjacent skin at 2 of 3 time points (day 7, day 14, or day 21). RNA was extracted from the specimens, and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and protein microarray analysis were performed. Comparisons were then made between time points using pairwise comparison testing. Results We found statistically significant changes in the gene expression of several matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). The data demonstrate a consistent up-regulation of MMPs 1, 3, 9, and 13, all of which have been previously reported for fully ablative CO(2) laser resurfacing. There was also a statistically significant increase in MMP-10 and MMP-11 levels in this data set. Conclusion This study suggests that the molecular mechanisms of action are similar for both fractional and fully ablative CO(2) laser resurfacing.

  5. Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Infection after Fractionated CO2 Laser Resurfacing

    PubMed Central

    Culton, Donna A.; Miller, Becky A.; Miller, Melissa B.; MacKuen, Courteney; Groben, Pamela; White, Becky; Cox, Gary M.; Stout, Jason E.

    2013-01-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria are increasingly associated with cutaneous infections after cosmetic procedures. Fractionated CO2 resurfacing, a widely used technique for photorejuvenation, has been associated with a more favorable side effect profile than alternative procedures. We describe 2 cases of nontuberculous mycobacterial infection after treatment with a fractionated CO2 laser at a private clinic. Densely distributed erythematous papules and pustules developed within the treated area within 2 weeks of the laser procedure. Diagnosis was confirmed by histologic analysis and culture. Both infections responded to a 4-month course of a multidrug regimen. An environmental investigation of the clinic was performed, but no source of infection was found. The case isolates differed from each other and from isolates obtained from the clinic, suggesting that the infection was acquired by postprocedure exposure. Papules and pustules after fractionated CO2 resurfacing should raise the suspicion of nontuberculous mycobacterial infection. PMID:23628077

  6. Combined fractional resurfacing (10600 nm/1540 nm): Tridimensional imaging evaluation of a new device for skin rejuvenation.

    PubMed

    Mezzana, Paolo; Valeriani, Maurizio; Valeriani, Roberto

    2016-11-01

    In this study were described the results, by tridimensional imaging evaluation, of the new "Combined Fractional Resurfacing" technique with the first fractional laser that overtakes the limits of traditional ablative, nonablative fractional resurfacing by combining CO2 ablative and GaAs nonablative lasers. These two wavelengths can work separately or in a mixed modality to give the best treatment choice to all the patients. In this study, it is demonstrated that the simultaneous combination of the CO2 wavelength (10600 nm) and GaAs wavelength (1540 nm) reduced the downtime, reduced pain during the treatment, and produced better results on fine wrinkles reduction and almost the same results on pigmentation as seen with 3D analysis by Antera (Miravex).

  7. Random fractional ultrapulsed CO2 resurfacing of photodamaged facial skin: long-term evaluation.

    PubMed

    Tretti Clementoni, Matteo; Galimberti, Michela; Tourlaki, Athanasia; Catenacci, Maximilian; Lavagno, Rosalia; Bencini, Pier Luca

    2013-02-01

    Although numerous papers have recently been published on ablative fractional resurfacing, there is a lack of information in literature on very long-term results. The aim of this retrospective study is to evaluate the efficacy, adverse side effects, and long-term results of a random fractional ultrapulsed CO2 laser on a large population with photodamaged facial skin. Three hundred twelve patients with facial photodamaged skin were enrolled and underwent a single full-face treatment. Six aspects of photodamaged skin were recorded using a 5 point scale at 3, 6, and 24 months after the treatment. The results were compared with a non-parametric statistical test, the Wilcoxon's exact test. Three hundred one patients completed the study. All analyzed features showed a significant statistical improvement 3 months after the procedure. Three months later all features, except for pigmentations, once again showed a significant statistical improvement. Results after 24 months were similar to those assessed 18 months before. No long-term or other serious complications were observed. From the significant number of patients analyzed, long-term results demonstrate not only how fractional ultrapulsed CO2 resurfacing can achieve good results on photodamaged facial skin but also how these results can be considered stable 2 years after the procedure.

  8. A new modality for fractional CO2 laser resurfacing for acne scars in Asians.

    PubMed

    Huang, Luping

    2013-02-01

    improvement of >75 %. This new modality of ablative conventional CO2 laser therapy with fractional CO2 laser resurfacing was shown to be safe and efficacious in the treatment of acne scars in Asian patients. It did not increase the risk of PIH compared to other reports of laser therapy and PIH. It is the hope that future study with combination therapy will further enhance the clinical results and thus lessen potential adverse events.

  9. Fractionated laser resurfacing corrects the inappropriate UVB response in geriatric skin.

    PubMed

    Spandau, Dan F; Lewis, Davina A; Somani, Ally-Khan; Travers, Jeffrey B

    2012-06-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancer is a disease primarily afflicting geriatric patients as evidenced by the fact that 80% of all non-melanoma skin cancers are diagnosed in patients over the age of 60 years. As such, geriatric skin responds to cancer-inducing UVB irradiation in a manner that allows the establishment of tumor cells. Currently, the only effective treatment for non-melanoma skin cancer is the removal of the tumors after they appear, indicating the need for a more cost-effective prophylactic therapy. Geriatric volunteers were treated with fractionated laser resurfacing therapy on either sun-protected (upper buttocks) or chronically sun-exposed (dorsal forearm) skin. Fractionated laser resurfacing therapy was shown to decrease the occurrence of senescent fibroblasts in geriatric dermis, increase the dermal expression of IGF-1, and correct the inappropriate UVB response observed in untreated geriatric skin. These responses to fractionated laser resurfacing were equal to the effects seen previously using the more aggressive wounding following dermabrasion. Furthermore, fractionated laser resurfacing was equally effective in both sun-protected and sun-exposed skin. The ability of fractionated laser resurfacing treatment to protect against the occurrence of UVB-damaged proliferating keratinocytes indicates the potential of fractionated laser resurfacing to reduce or prevent aging-associated non-melanoma skin cancer.

  10. Histologic effects of resurfacing lasers.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Joshua R; Greene, Ryan M; Green, Jeremy B

    2014-02-01

    By utilizing resurfacing lasers, physicians can significantly improve the appearance of sun-damaged skin, scars, and more. The carbon dioxide and erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet lasers were the first ablative resurfacing lasers to offer impressive results although these earlier treatments were associated with significant downtime. Later, nonablative resurfacing lasers such as the neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser proved effective, after a series of treatments with less downtime, but with more modest results. The theory of fractional photothermolysis has revolutionized resurfacing laser technology by increasing the safety profile of the devices while delivering clinical efficacy. A review of the histologic and molecular consequences of the resurfacing laser-tissue interaction allows for a better understanding of the devices and their clinical effects.

  11. Improving the outcome of fractional CO2 laser resurfacing using a probiotic skin cream: Preliminary clinical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Zoccali, Giovanni; Cinque, Benedetta; La Torre, Cristina; Lombardi, Francesca; Palumbo, Paola; Romano, Lucia; Mattei, Antonella; Orsini, Gino; Cifone, Maria Grazia; Giuliani, Maurizio

    2016-11-01

    As known, fractional CO2 resurfacing treatments are more effective than non-ablative ones against aging signs, but post-operative redness and swelling prolong the overall downtime requiring up to steroid administration in order to reduce these local systems. In the last years, an increasing interest has been focused on the possible use of probiotics for treating inflammatory and allergic conditions suggesting that they can exert profound beneficial effects on skin homeostasis. In this work, the Authors report their experience on fractional CO2 laser resurfacing and provide the results of a new post-operative topical treatment with an experimental cream containing probiotic-derived active principles potentially able to modulate the inflammatory reaction associated to laser-treatment. The cream containing DermaACB (CERABEST™) was administered post-operatively to 42 consecutive patients who were treated with fractional CO2 laser. All patients adopted the cream twice a day for 2 weeks. Grades were given according to outcome scale. The efficacy of the cream containing DermaACB was evaluated comparing the rate of post-operative signs vanishing with a control group of 20 patients topically treated with an antibiotic cream and a hyaluronic acid based cream. Results registered with the experimental treatment were good in 22 patients, moderate in 17, and poor in 3 cases. Patients using the study cream took an average time of 14.3 days for erythema resolution and 9.3 days for swelling vanishing. The post-operative administration of the cream containing DermaACB induces a quicker reduction of post-operative erythema and swelling when compared to a standard treatment.

  12. Treatment of Striae Distensae with Nonablative Fractional Laser versus Ablative CO2 Fractional Laser: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Yang, You Jin

    2011-01-01

    Background Striae distensae are atrophic dermal scars with overlying epidermal atrophy causing significant cosmetic concern. Although a variety of laser and light sources have been used for the treatment of striae distensae, to date no definite 'gold standard' treatment modality has been determined. Objective To assess and compare the efficacy and safety of nonablative fractional photothermolysis and ablative CO2 fractional laser resurfacing in the treatment of striae distensae. Methods Twenty-four ethnic South Korean patients with varying degrees of atrophic striae alba in the abdomen were enrolled in a randomized blind split study. The patients were treated with 1,550 nm fractional Er:Glass laser and ablative fractional CO2 laser resurfacing. Each half of the abdominal lesion was randomly selected and treated three times at intervals of 4-weeks using the same parameters. Digital photography was conducted and skin elasticity and the width of the widest striae in each subject were measured at the baseline and 4 weeks after the final treatment. Clinical improvement was assessed by comparing pre- and post-treatment clinical photographs by two blinded physicians and participant satisfaction rates were evaluated. Skin biopsies were taken from three participants. All adverse effects were reported during the study. Results Although they do not statistically differ, both treatments with nonablative fractional laser and ablative CO2 fractional laser showed a significant clinical and histopathologic improvement of striae distensae over pretreatment sites. Conclusion These results support the use of nonablative fractional laser and ablative CO2 fractional laser as effective and safe treatment modalities for striae distensae of Asian skin. However, neither treatment showed any greater clinical improvement than the other treatment. PMID:22148016

  13. Feasibility of ablative fractional laser-assisted drug delivery with optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chih-Hsun; Tsai, Meng-Tsan; Shen, Su-Chin; Ng, Chau Yee; Jung, Shih-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Fractional resurfacing creates hundreds of microscopic wounds in the skin without injuring surrounding tissue. This technique allows rapid wound healing owing to small injury regions, and has been proven as an effective method for repairing photodamaged skin. Recently, ablative fractional laser (AFL) treatment has been demonstrated to facilitate topical drug delivery into skin. However, induced fractional photothermolysis depends on several parameters, such as incident angle, exposure energy, and spot size of the fractional laser. In this study, we used fractional CO2 laser to induce microscopic ablation array on the nail for facilitating drug delivery through the nail. To ensure proper energy delivery without damaging tissue structures beneath the nail plate, optical coherence tomography (OCT) was implemented for quantitative evaluation of induced microscopic ablation zone (MAZ). Moreover, to further study the feasibility of drug delivery, normal saline was dripped on the exposure area of fingernail and the speckle variance in OCT signal was used to observe water diffusion through the ablative channels into the nail plate. In conclusion, this study establishes OCT as an effective tool for the investigation of fractional photothermolysis and water/drug delivery through microscopic ablation channels after nail fractional laser treatment. PMID:25426321

  14. Efficiency of Carbon Dioxide Fractional Laser in Skin Resurfacing

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Andrej

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The aim of the study was to confirm the efficiency and safety of the fractional CO2 laser in skin renewal and to check the possibility of having a synergistic effect in patients who besides carbon dioxide laser are treated with PRP (platelet-rich plasma) too. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The first group (Examined Group 1 or EG1) included 107 patients treated with fractional CO2 laser (Lutronic eCO2) as mono-therapy. The second group (Control Group or CG) covered 100 patients treated with neither laser nor plasma in the same period but subjected to local therapy with drugs or other physio-procedures under the existing protocols for treatment of certain diseases. The third group (Examined Group 2 or EG2) treated 25 patients with combined therapy of CO2 laser and PRP in the treatment of facial rejuvenation or treatment of acne scars. RESULTS: Patient’s satisfaction, in general, is significantly greater in both examined groups (EG1 and EG2) (p < 0.001). It was found the significant difference between control and examined group from the treatment in acne scar (Fisher exact two tailed p < 0.001). Patients satisfaction with the treatment effect in rejuvenation of the skin is significant (χ2 = 39.41; df = 4; p < 0.001). But, patients satisfaction from the treatment with HPV on the skin was significantly lower in examined group (treated with laser), p = 0.0002. CONCLUSION: Multifunctional fractional carbon dioxide laser used in treatment of patients with acne and pigmentation from acne, as well as in the treatment of scars from different backgrounds, is an effective and safe method that causes statistically significant better effect of the treatment, greater patients’ satisfaction, minimal side effects and statistically better response to the therapy, according to assessments by the patient and the therapist. PMID:27335599

  15. Safe and effective one-session fractional skin resurfacing using a carbon dioxide laser device in super-pulse mode: a clinical and histologic study.

    PubMed

    Trelles, Mario A; Shohat, Michael; Urdiales, Fernando

    2011-02-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO(2)) laser ablative fractional resurfacing produces skin damage, with removal of the epidermis and variable portions of the dermis as well as associated residual heating, resulting in new collagen formation and skin tightening. The nonresurfaced epidermis helps tissue to heal rapidly, with short-term postoperative erythema. The results for 40 patients (8 men and 32 women) after a single session of a fractional CO(2) resurfacing mode were studied. The treatments included resurfacing of the full face, periocular upper lip, and residual acne scars. The patients had skin prototypes 2 to 4 and wrinkle degrees 1 to 3. The histologic effects, efficacy, and treatment safety in various clinical conditions and for different phototypes are discussed. The CO(2) laser for fractional treatment is used in super-pulse mode. The beam is split by a lens into several microbeams, and super-pulse repetition is limited by the pulse width. The laser needs a power adaptation to meet the set fluence per microbeam. Laser pulsing can operate repeatedly on the same spot or be moved randomly over the skin, using several passes to achieve a desired residual thermal effect. Low, medium, and high settings are preprogrammed in the device, and they indicate the strength of resurfacing. A single treatment was given with the patient under topical anesthesia. However, the anesthesia was injected on areas of scar tissue. Medium settings (2 Hz, 30 W, 60 mJ) were used, and two passes were made for dark skins and degree 1 wrinkles. High settings (2 Hz, 60 W, 120 mJ) were used, and three passes were made for degree 3 wrinkles and scar tissue. Postoperatively, resurfaced areas were treated with an ointment of gentamycin, Retinol Palmitate, and DL-methionine (Novartis; Farmaceutics, S.A., Barcelona, Spain). Once epithelialization was achieved, antipigment and sun protection agents were recommended. Evaluations were performed 15 days and 2 months after treatment by both patients and

  16. Versatility of erbium YAG laser: from fractional skin rejuvenation to full-field skin resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Holcomb, J David

    2011-05-01

    For the laser surgeon, the Er-YAG laser is an invaluable tool that delivers unsurpassed ablation efficiency, and with appropriate functionality (quasi long-pulse feature) provides sufficient tissue coagulation to remodel deep rhytids. As such, the 2940-nm wavelength is well suited for routine laser skin rejuvenation in full-field, fractional, and point-beam modes with additional benefits, including applicability to diverse skin types, short healing times, and a low likelihood of energy-related complications.

  17. Immunohistochemical evaluation of the heat shock response to nonablative fractional resurfacing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hantash, Basil M.; Bedi, Vikramaditya P.; Struck, Steven K.; Chan, Kin F.

    2010-11-01

    Despite the emergence of nonablative fractional resurfacing (NFR) as a new therapeutic modality for skin photoaging, little is known about the molecular events that underlie the heat shock response to different treatment parameters. Human subjects are treated with a scanned 1550-nm fractional laser at pulse energies spanning 6 to 40 mJ and a 140-μm spot size. The heat shock response is assessed immunohistochemically immediately through 7 days posttreatment. At the immediately posttreatment time point, we observe subepidermal clefting in most sections. The basal epidermis and dermal zones of sparing are both found to express HSP47, but not HSP72. By day 1, expression of HSP72 is detected throughout the epidermis, while that of HSP47 remains restricted to the basal layer. Both proteins are detected surrounding the dermal portion of the microscopic treatment zone (MTZ). This pattern of expression persists through day 7 post-NFR, although neither protein is found within the MTZ. Immediately posttreatment, the mean collagen denaturation zone width is 50 μm at 6 mJ, increasing to 202 μm at 40 mJ. The zone of cell death exceeds the denaturation zone by 19 to 55% over this pulse energy range. The two zones converge by day 7 posttreatment.

  18. Outcomes of ablative fractional laser scar treatment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Deok-Woo; Hwang, Na-Hyun; Yoon, Eul-Sik; Dhong, Eun-Sang; Park, Seung-Ha

    2015-04-01

    Ablative fractional laser (AFL) systems are commonly used to treat various scars, and recent reports have indicated that early scar treatment with fractional lasers has good aesthetic results. Some scars respond dramatically to AFL treatment, incurring high levels of patient satisfaction; however, other scars respond poorly or became worse after treatment. This study was designed to clarify prognostic factors that predict AFL scar treatment outcomes. A total of 108 patients were included in this study. The fractional laser treatments were repeated every 4 weeks until the scar site was acceptable and no additional improvement was expected or the patient discontinued the treatment. The scar improvements were defined as changes in the Manchester scar scale (MSS) from before to after laser treatment. A digital camera was used to acquire digital photographs of the scars under the same light source, the same background, exposure, and white balance. This study developed a modification of the MSS for image analysis in which colour assessment was based on L*a*b* colour co-ordinates of the digital images. The mean MSS values prior to and after laser treatments were 11.6 ± 3.6 and 9.5 ± 2.9, respectively (p < 0.01). AFL treatment improved the qualities of each scar, and the improvements were evident in colour and contour. Scar elevation, pigmentation, high vascularity, early onset of treatment, and the number of treatment sessions were directly related to scar improvement after AFL therapy (p < 0.05). AFL treatments were effective methods for scar treatment. Clinicians can use these prognostic factors to determine treatment plans and to estimate scar improvement after AFL treatment.

  19. The role of transforming growth factor β1 in fractional laser resurfacing with a carbon dioxide laser.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xia; Ge, Hongmei; Zhou, Chuanqing; Chai, Xinyu; Deng, Hui

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of transforming growth factor β1 in mechanisms of cutaneous remodeling induced by fractional carbon dioxide laser treatment. The dorsal skin of Kunming mice was exposed to a single-pass fractional CO2 laser treatment. Biopsies were taken at 1 h and at 1, 3, 7, 14, 21, 28, and 56 days after treatment. Transforming growth factor (TGF) β1 expression in skin samples was evaluated by ELISA, dermal thickness by hematoxylin-eosin staining, collagen and elastic fibers by Ponceau S and Victoria blue double staining, and types I and III collagens by ELISA. The level of TGF β1 in the laser-treated areas of skin was significantly increased compared with that in the control areas on days 1 (p < 0.05), 3 (p < 0.01), and 7 (p < 0.05) and then decreased by day 14 after treatment, at which time it had returned to the baseline level. Dermal thickness and the amount of type I collagen of the skin of the laser-treated areas had increased significantly (p < 0.05) compared with that in control areas on days 28 and 56. Fibroblast proliferation showed a positive correlation with TGF β1 expression during the early stages (r = 0.789, p < 0.01), and there was a negative correlation between the level of TGF β1 and type I collagen in the late stages, after laser treatment (r = -0.546, p < 0.05). TGF β1 appears to be an important factor in fractional laser resurfacing.

  20. Efficacy of Punch Elevation Combined with Fractional Carbon Dioxide Laser Resurfacing in Facial Atrophic Acne Scarring: A Randomized Split-face Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Faghihi, Gita; Nouraei, Saeid; Asilian, Ali; Keyvan, Shima; Abtahi-Naeini, Bahareh; Rakhshanpour, Mehrdad; Nilforoushzadeh, Mohammad Ali; Hosseini, Sayed Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Background: A number of treatments for reducing the appearance of acne scars are available, but general guidelines for optimizing acne scar treatment do not exist. The aim of this study was to compare the clinical effectiveness and side effects of fractional carbon dioxide (CO2) laser resurfacing combined with punch elevation with fractional CO2 laser resurfacing alone in the treatment of atrophic acne scars. Materials and Methods: Forty-two Iranian subjects (age range 18–55) with Fitzpatrick skin types III to IV and moderate to severe atrophic acne scars on both cheeks received randomized split-face treatments: One side received fractional CO2 laser treatment and the other received one session of punch elevation combined with two sessions of laser fractional CO2 laser treatment, separated by an interval of 1 month. Two dermatologists independently evaluated improvement in acne scars 4 and 16 weeks after the last treatment. Side effects were also recorded after each treatment. Results: The mean ± SD age of patients was 23.4 ± 2.6 years. Clinical improvement of facial acne scarring was assessed by two dermatologists blinded to treatment conditions. No significant difference in evaluation was observed 1 month after treatment (P = 0.56). Their evaluation found that fractional CO2 laser treatment combined with punch elevation had greater efficacy than that with fractional CO2 laser treatment alone, assessed 4 months after treatment (P = 0.02). Among all side effects, coagulated crust formation and pruritus at day 3 after fractional CO2 laser treatment was significant on both treatment sides (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Concurrent use of fractional laser skin resurfacing with punch elevation offers a safe and effective approach for the treatment of acne scarring. PMID:26538695

  1. Next generation Er:YAG fractional ablative laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, A.; Vizhanyo, A.; Krammer, P.; Summer, S.; Gross, S.; Bragagna, T.; Böhler, C.

    2011-03-01

    Pantec Biosolutions AG presents a portable fractional ablative laser system based on a miniaturized diode pumped Er:YAG laser. The system can operate at repetition rates up to 500 Hz and has an incorporated beam deflection unit. It is smaller, lighter and cost efficient compared to systems based on lamp pumped Er:YAG lasers and incorporates a skin layer detection to guarantee precise control of the microporation process. The pulse parameters enable a variety of applications in dermatology and in general medicine, as demonstrated by first results on transdermal drug delivery of FSH (follicle stimulating hormone).

  2. Current role of resurfacing lasers.

    PubMed

    Hantash, B M; Gladstone, H B

    2009-06-01

    Resurfacing lasers have been the treatment of choice for diminishing rhytids and tightening skin. The carbon dioxide and erbium lasers have been the gold and silver standards. Despite their effectiveness, these resurfacing lasers have a very high risk profile including scarring, hyperpigmentation and hypopigmentation. Because of these side effects, various practitioners have tried alternative settings for these lasers as well as alternative wavelengths, particularly in the infrared spectrum. These devices have had less downtime, but their effectiveness has been limited to fine wrinkles. As with selective photothemolysis, a major advance in the field has been fractionated resurfacing which incorporates grids of microthermal zones that spares islands of skin. This concept permits less tissue damage and quicker tissue regeneration. Initially, fractionated resurfacing was limited to the nonablative mid-infrared spectrum. These resurfacing lasers is appropriate for those patients with acne scars, uneven skin tone, mild to moderate photodamage, and is somewhat effective for melasma. Importantly, because there is less overall tissue damage and stimulation of melanocytes, these lasers can be used in darker skin types. Downtime is 2-4 days of erythema and scaling. Yet, these nonablative fractionated devices required 5-6 treatments to achieve a moderate effect. Logically, the fractionated resurfacing has now been applied to the CO2 and the Erbium:Yag lasers. These devices can treat deeper wrinkles and tighten skin. Downtime appears to be 5-7 days. The long term effectiveness and the question of whether these fractionated devices will approach the efficacy of the standard resurfacing lasers is still in question. Ultimately either integrated devices which may use fractionated resurfacing, radiofrequency and a sensitizer, or combining different lasers in a single treatment may prove to be the most effective in reducing rhtyides, smoothing the skin topography and tightening the

  3. Comparison of the Effectiveness of Ablative and Non-Ablative Fractional Laser Treatments for Early Stage Thyroidectomy Scars

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Jin-Uk; Kim, Soo-Young; Kim, Woo-Kyung; Park, Seung-Ha; Lee, Byung-Il; Kim, Deok-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Background Open thyroidectomy is conventionally performed at the anterior side of neck, which is a body part with a comparatively great degree of open exposure; due to this, postoperative scarring may cause distress in patients. We aimed to compare the effects of ablative and nonablative fractional laser treatments on thyroidectomy scars. We examined medical records in a retrospective manner and analyzed scars based on their digital images by using the modified Manchester Scar Scale (mMSS). Methods Between February 2012 and May 2013, 55 patients with thyroidectomy scars were treated with ablative (34 patients) or nonablative (21 patients) fractional laser. Each patient underwent 4 laser treatment sessions in 3–4 week intervals, 1–2 months postoperatively. Scar improvement was assessed using patient images and the mMSS scale. Results The mean decrease in scar score was 3.91 and 3.47 in the ablative and nonablative groups, respectively; the reduction between 2 groups did not exhibit any significant difference (P=0.16). We used the scale once again to individually evaluate scar attributes. The nonablative group accounted for a considerably higher color score value (P=0.03); the ablative group accounted for a considerably higher contour score value (P<0.01). Patient satisfaction was high and no complications occurred. Conclusions Both types of fractional laser treatments can be used successfully for thyroidectomy scar treatment with minimal complications; however, results indicate that higher effectiveness may be obtained from the use of ablative and nonablative lasers for hypertrophic scars and early erythematous scars, respectively. Therefore, the appropriate laser for scar treatment should be selected according to its specific characteristics. PMID:27896191

  4. A novel approach to ablative fractional treatment of mature thermal burn scars.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Robert E

    2010-04-01

    This report details the use of a fractionated ablative Er:YAG laser in treating two cases of thermal burn injuries using a novel approach which matches the energy required to the depth of the burn scar. This method is termed "selective objective fractional technique (SOFT)".

  5. Fractionated doses of radioiodine for ablation of postsurgical thyroid tissue remnants

    SciTech Connect

    Arad, E.; Flannery, K.; Wilson, G.A.; O'Mara, R.E. )

    1990-10-01

    Patients who have differentiated thyroid carcinoma and have undergone total thyroidectomy are treated with radioiodine for ablation of functional thyroid remnants. Administration of a single therapeutic dose in excess of 30 mCi of l-131 requires hospitalization. In an attempt to obviate the necessity for hospitalization, the prospective ablative dose was divided into two or three fractions given at weekly intervals on an ambulatory basis. To assess the effectiveness of this approach, this group of patients was compared to a cohort of hospitalized patients treated with a single dose. Ablation was achieved in 9 out of 12 patients treated in a fractionated manner (a 75% success rate), whereas in 16 out of 20 patients given a single dose the thyroid remnants were completely eradicated (an 80% success rate). That the use of split, smaller doses administered at weekly intervals on an ambulatory basis presents a reasonable alternative for ablation of postsurgical, residual-functioning thyroid tissue.

  6. Elemental fractionation in 785 nm picosecond and femtosecond laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaheen, M. E.; Gagnon, J. E.; Fryer, B. J.

    2015-05-01

    Elemental fractionation and ICP-MS signal response were investigated for two different pulse width laser beams originating from the same laser system. Femtosecond and picosecond laser beams at pulse widths of 130 fs and 110 ps, respectively, and wavelength of 785 nm were used to ablate NIST 610 synthetic glass and SRM 1107 Naval Brass B at the same spot for 800 to 1000 laser pulses at different repetition rates (5 to 50 Hz). Elemental fractionation was found to depend on repetition rate and showed a trend with femtosecond laser ablation that is opposite to that observed in picosecond laser ablation for most measured isotopes. ICP-MS signal intensity was higher in femtosecond than picosecond LA-ICP-MS in both NIST 610 and naval brass when ablation was conducted under the same fluence and repetition rate. The differences in signal intensity were partly related to differences in particle size distribution between particles generated by femtosecond and picosecond laser pulses and the consequent differences in transport and ionization efficiencies. The main reason for the higher signal intensity resulting from femtosecond laser pulses was related to the larger crater sizes compared to those created during picosecond laser ablation. Elemental ratios measured using 66Zn/63Cu, 208Pb/238U, 232Th/238U, 66Zn/232Th and 66Zn/208Pb were found to change with the number of laser pulses with data points being more scattered in picosecond than femtosecond laser pulses. Reproducibility of replicate measurements of signal intensities, fractionation and elemental ratios was better for fs-LA-ICP-MS (RSD ~ 3 to 6%) than ps-LA-ICP-MS (RSD ~ 7 to 11%).

  7. A tectonic resurfacing model for Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, Sean C.

    1993-01-01

    Two remarkable aspects of the population of impact craters on Venus are that craters at all sizes are indistinguishable from a random population and that the vast majority of craters have not been significantly modified by tectonic strain or by volcanic flows external to the crater rim, despite evidence from Magellan images that volcanic and tectonic features are widespread on Venus. One interpretation of these observations is that most of the surface dates from the end of a catastrophic global resurfacing event that ceased about 500 My ago, and that the small fraction of craters volcanically embayed or modified by deformation indicates that volcanic and tectonic activity subsequent to that time has been at much lower levels. An alternative model, in which resurfacing occurs episodically in patches a few hundred kilometers in extent and there is a wider spectrum of surface ages, also appears to be consistent with the characteristics of impact craters on Venus. A number of potential mechanisms for catastrophic resurfacing of Venus have been proposed, ranging from geologically sudden convective destabilization of the global lithosphere to strongly time-dependent heat flux and melt generation in the underlying mantle. In most of these geophysical models, resurfacing occurs implicitly or explicitly by volcanism. We explore the hypothesis that, at least in the geologically recent history of Venus, the primary resurfacing mechanism has been tectonic deformation rather than volcanism. We show how such a hypothesis provides at least as good an explanation of a wide range of observations as do volcanic resurfacing models. Finally, we explore the implications of tectonic resurfacing hypothesis for the controversy over the recent resurfacing history of the planet.

  8. Comparison of the effectiveness of nonablative fractional laser versus ablative fractional laser in thyroidectomy scar prevention: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hei Sung; Lee, Ji Hae; Park, Young Min; Lee, Jun Young

    2012-04-01

    A scar is a mark that remains after the healing of a wound or other morbid processes. In the past, treatment was mainly focused on severe scarring, such as the hypertrophic and burn scars. However, scars from relatively minor wounds can also be stressful. The site of an open thyroidectomy is the anterior neck, a prominently exposed part of the body, where postoperative scarring can cause patients distress. The cosmetic outcome of the scar after thyroidectomy is of particular importance to women, who constitute the majority of patients with thyroid disease. Active prevention is more likely to yield better cosmetic results and would require fewer treatment sessions and less expense than scar revision procedures. Many interventions have been proposed, but there is yet no universal consensus on optimal treatment. Recently, focus has been made on 'laser scar prevention', where various types of lasers have been used to improve the appearance of scars. The purpose of this study was to improve the appearance of scars, by laser intervention of the wound healing process. In this pilot study, we comparatively examined the effect of non-ablative 1550-nm fractional Er: glass laser and ablative 2940-nm fractional Er: YAG laser on fresh surgical scars of patients with Fitzpatrick skin type III-IV.

  9. Universal Survival Curve and Single Fraction Equivalent Dose: Useful Tools in Understanding Potency of Ablative Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Clint; Papiez, Lech; Zhang Shichuan; Story, Michael; Timmerman, Robert D.

    2008-03-01

    Purpose: Overprediction of the potency and toxicity of high-dose ablative radiotherapy such as stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) by the linear quadratic (LQ) model led to many clinicians' hesitating to adopt this efficacious and well-tolerated therapeutic option. The aim of this study was to offer an alternative method of analyzing the effect of SBRT by constructing a universal survival curve (USC) that provides superior approximation of the experimentally measured survival curves in the ablative, high-dose range without losing the strengths of the LQ model around the shoulder. Methods and Materials: The USC was constructed by hybridizing two classic radiobiologic models: the LQ model and the multitarget model. We have assumed that the LQ model gives a good description for conventionally fractionated radiotherapy (CFRT) for the dose to the shoulder. For ablative doses beyond the shoulder, the survival curve is better described as a straight line as predicted by the multitarget model. The USC smoothly interpolates from a parabola predicted by the LQ model to the terminal asymptote of the multitarget model in the high-dose region. From the USC, we derived two equivalence functions, the biologically effective dose and the single fraction equivalent dose for both CFRT and SBRT. Results: The validity of the USC was tested by using previously published parameters of the LQ and multitarget models for non-small-cell lung cancer cell lines. A comparison of the goodness-of-fit of the LQ and USC models was made to a high-dose survival curve of the H460 non-small-cell lung cancer cell line. Conclusion: The USC can be used to compare the dose fractionation schemes of both CFRT and SBRT. The USC provides an empirically and a clinically well-justified rationale for SBRT while preserving the strengths of the LQ model for CFRT.

  10. Erbium:YAG laser resurfacing using a novel portable device.

    PubMed

    Gordon, James; Khan, Misbah H; Khatri, Khalil A

    2007-05-01

    Laser resurfacing of facial rhytids has become a popular treatment for many patients who have wrinkles, photodamage, and acne scarring. Erbium:YAG laser resurfacing has emerged as one of the safer, more effective methods of facial rejuvenation and its increasing popularity has led to its widespread use for resurfacing. However, size and high initial and maintenance cost are among the problems with currently available laser devices. The LightPod portable Erbium:YAG laser from Aerolase offers a new paradigm for more cost effective means of performing ablative resurfacing with reduced initial and maintenance cost and the ease of portability with significantly reduced size and weight. The objective of this pilot study was to analyze the efficacy of The LightPod Erbium:YAG laser in different skin types for various indications.

  11. Modeling of lung's electrical impedance using fractional calculus for analysis of heat generation during RF-ablation.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Nozomu; Kobayashi, Yo; Kikuchi, Hayato; Isobe, Yosuke; Lu, XiaoWei; Miyashita, Tomoyuki; Fujie, Masakatsu G

    2014-01-01

    Recently, Radio Frequency Ablation (RFA) is becoming a popular therapy for various cancers such as liver, breast, or lung cancer. RFA is one kinds of thermal therapy. However, it has been often reported about excessive ablation or non-ablation due to difficult control of ablation energy. In order to solve these difficulties, we have been proposed robotized RF-ablation system for precise cancer treatment. We have been tried to control heat energy by control of electromagnetic-wave frequency. In this paper, we reported about relation among electrical impedance of lung, lung's internal air volumes, and heat energy by use of electromagnetic-wave. In case of RFA for lung cancer, heat energy depends on electrical impedance and lung's internal air volumes. Electrical impedance has the dependence of electromagnetic-wave frequency and the dependence of lung's internal air volumes. Therefore, firstly we considered about fractional calculus model between lung's internal air volumes and electrical impedance. Secondly, we measured electric impedance frequency characteristic of lung with change of lung's internal air volumes. The measured and modeled results showed that use of fractional calculus realized high accurate model for electrical impedance of lung. And, from the results of numerical analysis of heat energy, it is supposed that control of electromagnetic-wave frequency has a small effectiveness for lung tissue ablation even if lung includes abundant air.

  12. A novel 1565 nm non-ablative fractional device for stretch marks: A preliminary report

    PubMed Central

    Tretti Clementoni, Matteo; Lavagno, Rosalia

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Striae Distensae (SD) is a very common dermatologic condition. We evaluated the effectiveness and safety of a novel non-ablative fractional 1565 nm laser (ResurFX) on the appearance of SD. Materials and methods: Twelve Caucasian subjects with various stages of SD received three non-ablative laser treatments. Each treatment consisted of two different laser settings, in order to achieve a demarcated dense impact together with a diffused deep impact. Three months after the last treatment, SD improvement was assessed by blinded and non-blinded reviewers using clinical images and 3D image analyses. Results: Good clinical improvement (between 51% and 75%) was observed in all patients. Most patients showed improvement of > 50% in the volume of depressions and in lesion color (91.7% and 83.3% of patients, respectively). The average pain during treatment was generally defined as tolerable and the average downtime was 4 days. Transient erythema and severe edema were noted immediately after the procedure, but long-lasting or severe adverse effects were not observed. All patients noted a good improvement and were satisfied with the treatment and the results. Conclusions: The treatment with the 1565 nm ResurFX laser resulted in improved pigmentation, volume, and textural appearance of SD. PMID:25633176

  13. Ablative fractional laser alters biodistribution of ingenol mebutate in the skin.

    PubMed

    Erlendsson, A M; Taudorf, E H; Eriksson, A H; Haak, C S; Zibert, J R; Paasch, U; Anderson, R R; Haedersdal, M

    2015-08-01

    Topically applied ingenol mebutate (IngMeb) is approved for field-treatment of actinic keratosis and is currently being investigated for treatment of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC). Ablative fractional lasers (AFXLs) generate microscopic ablation zones (MAZs) in the skin, which may help induce a deep penetration needed for effective treatment of NMSC. Using Franz diffusion cells, uptake and bio-distribution were investigated over 21 h in intact (n = 9) and AFXL-exposed porcine skin (n = 58). A 2940-nm fractional Er:YAG laser generated intraepidermal (11.2 mJ/MAZ; 66 μm deep, 177 μm wide) and intradermal (128 mJ/MAZ; 570 μm deep, 262 wide) MAZ's with 16, 97, and 195 MAZs/cm(2). Surface ablation densities corresponded to 0.5, 2.5, and 5 % for intraepidermal MAZs, and corresponded to 1, 5, and 10.5 % for intradermal MAZs. Liquid-chromatography-mass-spectrometry quantified deposition of IngMeb in stratum corneum, epidermis, dermis, and receiver chamber. In intact skin, IngMeb readily penetrated to the epidermal layer (1,314 ng, 41 % of the applied IngMeb), while dermal deposition was limited (508 ng, 16 %). In AFXL-exposed skin, a profound dermal deposition of IngMeb was achieved, while less accumulated in SC and epidermis. Uptake depended entirely on laser density; increasing coverage from 0 % to 0.5 %, 1 %, 2.5 %, 5 %, and 10.5 % enhanced dermal uptake 1.6-, 2.1-, 3.1-, 3.4-, and 3.9-fold, respectively (p < 0.0001). Channel depth did not influence drug uptake; at 5 % density, dermal deposition with intraepidermal and intradermal MAZs was analogous (1801 vs. 1744; p = 0.447). In conclusion, IngMeb readily distributes to superficial layers of intact skin, whereas dermal uptake is limited. Independent of channel depth, AFXL enhances dermal drug deposition, providing for customized topical delivery and potential use of IngMeb for treatment of NMSC.

  14. CO2 laser resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, R E

    2001-07-01

    The CO2 Laser offers a variety of unique features in resurfacing facial photodamage and acne scarring. These include hemostasis, efficient removal of the epidermis in a single pass, thermally induced tissue tightening, and safe, predictable tissue interaction. Knowledge of these mechanisms will result in the capability of using the CO2 laser effectively and safely whether the goal is superficial or deep treatment.

  15. Vehicle type affects filling of fractional laser-ablated channels imaged by optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Olesen, Uffe Høgh; Mogensen, Mette; Haedersdal, Merete

    2017-04-01

    Ablative fractional laser (AFXL) is an emerging method that enhances topical drug delivery. Penetrating the skin in microscopic, vertical channels, termed microscopic treatment zones (MTZs), the fractional technique circumvents the skin barrier and allows increased uptake of topically applied drugs. This study aims to elucidate the impact of vehicle type on the filling of MTZs from application of liquid, gel, and cream vehicles. Ex vivo pig skin was exposed to 10,600 nm fractional CO2 laser at 5% density, 120 μm beam diameter, and fluences of 40 and 80 mJ/microbeam (mJ/mb). Six repetitions were performed for each of six interventions (2 fluences and 3 vehicle types, n = 36). MTZ dimensions and filling by vehicle type were evaluated by optical coherence tomography, using blue tissue dye as a contrast-enhancing agent. Outcome measure was degree of MTZ filling assessed as percentages of empty, partially filled, and completely filled MTZs (108-127 MTZs/intervention analyzed) and evaluated statistically using Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn's tests. MTZs reached mid-dermal levels of 225 μm (40 mJ/mb) and 375 μm (80 mJ/mb) penetration depths (p < 0.0001). Filling of MTZs depended on type of applied vehicle. At 80 mJ/mb, liquid (67% completely filled, p < 0.01) and gel (60%, p < 0.05) formulations filled MTZs significantly better than cream formulation (31%). At 40 mJ/mb, liquid and gel formulations filled 90% (p < 0.05) and 77% (p > 0.05) of MTZs completely versus 55% for cream formulation. Thus, filling was overall greater for more superficial MTZs. In conclusion, vehicle type affects filling of MTZs, which may be of importance for AFXL-assisted drug delivery.

  16. In vivo histological evaluation of fractional ablative microplasma radio frequency technology using a roller tip: an animal study.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaodan; Fang, Lin; Huang, Luping

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the present study is to investigate the histological characteristics associated with microplasma radio frequency (MPRF) technology in an animal study using different treatment parameters. Two white piglets, aged 6 months, received MPRF treatment using a roller tip; the treatment site was located on the dorsal skin. Four groups of parameters were adopted regarding the performance of the treatment at four zones on the dorsum. Immediately, at 7 days and at 1, 3, and 6 months posttreatment, we observed the healing process and obtained specimens from each treatment zone. Hematoxylin and eosin and Masson stainings of histological sections were performed to assess the degree of tissue injury, the heat effect, the healing process, and neocollagenesis. Heat shock protein (HSP) was also detected using immunohistochemistry. The roller tip generated a fractional treatment, which had a general trend involving an increase in depth and width with increasing pulse energy and decreasing sliding speed. During the wound healing process, dermal neocollagenesis was stimulated, remodeled, and matured gradually. The expression of HSP47 and HPS72 was elevated in the dermis surrounding the microlesions after treatment; it peaked at 1 month posttreatment and became diffuse in the dermis. MPRF is a promising fractional skin resurfacing technique. The roller tip can be used with low risk in the entire treatment zone with rapid healing. An appropriate treatment regimen should be chosen to guarantee therapeutic efficacy and safety.

  17. Nonablative skin resurfacing: the role of PDT.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Rodriguez, Ricardo; López-Rodriguez, Laura

    2006-09-01

    As demand for less invasive, highly effective cosmetic procedures grows, dermatologists must continue to explore and develop new treatment options. Nonablative skin resurfacing techniques offer an effective and noninvasive treatment for photorejuvenation. Several studies have shown improvement of photodamaged skin and increased collagen production after nonablative treatments using vascular lasers, mid-infrared lasers, intense pulsed light, radiofrequency devices, fractional resurfacing, and plasma skin rejuvenation. Among the novel methods for maximizing the efficacy of nonablative treatment is the concurrent use of a photosensitizing agent. The light sources currently most used for photodynamic rejuvenation are intense pulsed light and pulsed dye laser. We present some preliminary results on rejuvenation using Metvix and red light. We are still far from a thorough understanding of the molecular mechanism of rejuvenation with this technique, although a nonspecific immune response could be involved. Understanding the laser-tissue interactions associated with photodynamic therapy is crucial in selecting patients that will most likely benefit.

  18. Fractional Erbium laser in the treatment of photoaging: randomized comparative, clinical and histopathological study of ablative (2940nm) vs. non-ablative (1540nm) methods after 3 months*

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Juliano; Cuzzi, Tullia; Mandarim-de-Lacerda, Carlos Alberto; Manela-Azulay, Mônica

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Fractional non-ablative lasers keep the epidermis intact, while fractional ablative lasers remove it, making them theoretically more effective. OBJECTIVES To evaluate the clinical and histological alterations induced by fractional photothermolysis for treating photoaging, comparing the possible equivalence of multiple sessions of 1540nm Erbium, to one session of 2940nm Erbium. METHODS Eighteen patients (mean age 55.9) completed the treatment with three sessions of 1540nm fractional Erbium laser on one side of the face (50 mJ/mB, 15ms, 2 passes), and one session of 2940nm on the other side (5mJ/mB, 0.25ms, 2 passes). Biopsies were performed before and 3 months after treatment. Clinical, histological and morphometric evaluations were carried out. RESULTS All patients presented clinical improvement with no statistically significant difference (p> 0.05) between the treated sides. Histopathology revealed a new organization of collagen and elastic fibers, accompanied by edema, which was more evident with the 2940nm laser. This finding was confirmed by morphometry, which showed a decrease in collagen density for both treatments, with a statistical significance for the 2940nm laser (p > 0.001). CONCLUSIONS Three 1540nm sessions were clinically equivalent to one 2940nm session. The edema probably contributed to the positive results after three months, togheter with the new collagen and elastic fibers organization. The greater edema after the 2940nm session indicates that dermal remodeling takes longer than with 1540nm. It is possible that this histological superiority relates to a more prolonged effect, but a cohort longer than three months is needed to confirm that supposition. PMID:24770501

  19. Endometrial ablation

    MedlinePlus

    Hysteroscopy-endometrial ablation; Laser thermal ablation; Endometrial ablation-radiofrequency; Endometrial ablation-thermal balloon ablation; Rollerball ablation; Hydrothermal ablation; Novasure ablation

  20. Conditioning in laser skin resurfacing - betulin emulsion and skin recovery.

    PubMed

    Metelmann, Hans-Robert; Podmelle, Fred; Waite, Peter D; Müller-Debus, Charlotte Friederieke; Hammes, Stefan; Funk, Wolfgang

    2013-04-01

    Laser skin resurfacing of the face by CO₂-laser ablation is causing superficial wounds that need rapid recovery to reduce the risk of infection, the risk of chronification and as a result the risk of unaesthetic scars. The question being addressed by this study is to demonstrate benefit of betulin emulsion skin care after CO₂-laser wounds. The outcome of this aesthetic comparison between betulin emulsion, moist wound dressing and gauze covering in promoting the recovery process in laser skin ablation is to demonstrate improved aesthetic benefit for the patient.

  1. Utilizing non-ablative fractional photothermolysis prior to ALA-photodynamic therapy in the treatment of acne vulgaris: a case series.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Sarah; Lin, Jennifer Y

    2017-04-01

    Aminolevulinic acid (ALA) photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an emerging modality in the treatment of acne. While ablative fractional lasers have been used to enhance drug delivery into the epidermis, recent evidence suggests that non-ablative fractional photothermolysis may also improve uptake of ALA. We explored the use of non-ablative 1550 nm laser as a safe alternative in the delivery of ALA prior to red-light PDT for refractory inflammatory and cystic acne. Subjects referred for treatment of acne refractory to several topical and oral regimens, including isotretinoin, were pre-treated with non-ablative fractional photothermolysis (NAFP). This was followed by 20 % ALA application with an incubation time of 1-3 h and then exposure to 50-100 J/cm(2) red light. Follow-up was at 1, 3, and 6 months. In all three cases, patients demonstrated marked reduction in inflammatory lesions. Two subjects had remission of acne after a single combination treatment. Non-ablative fractional laser applied immediately prior to PDT may be used in the treatment of acne with minimal side effects and fewer sessions needed than PDT alone. This may be due to enhanced delivery of ALA from pre-treating the skin with non-ablative fractional photothermolysis.

  2. In vivo confocal imaging of epidermal cell migration and dermal changes post nonablative fractional resurfacing: study of the wound healing process with corroborated histopathologic evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stumpp, Oliver F.; Bedi, Vikramaditya P.; Wyatt, Danica; Lac, Diana; Rahman, Zakia; Chan, Kin F.

    2009-03-01

    In vivo wound healing response post nonablative fractional laser treatment is evaluated. Seven healthy subjects receive treatments with a Fraxel re:store™ laser system on the forearm with pulse energies ranging from 10 to 70 mJ. The treatment sites are imaged at 1-h increments up to 40 h using confocal microscope z-stacks using 10-μm-depth spacing. At least five individual microscopic treatment zones are imaged per subject, time point, and treatment energy. Images are analyzed for tissue structure and morphology to classify each lesion as healed or not healed, depending on epidermal re-epithelialization at each time point and treatment energy. Probit analysis is used to statistically determine the ED50 and ED84 probabilities for a positive dose response (healed lesion) as a function of treatment energy. Confocal observations reveal epidermal keratinocyte migration patterns confirmed with histological analysis using hematoxylin and eosin (HE) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) staining at 10 mJ at 0, 7, 16, and 24-h post-treatment. Results indicate that more time is required to conclude re-epithelialization with larger lesion sizes (all less than 500 μm) corresponding to higher treatment energies. For the entire pulse energy range tested, epidermal re-epithelialization concludes between 10 to 22-h post-treatment for ED50 and 13 to 28 h for ED84.

  3. Resurfacing processes on Vesta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krohn, K.; Jaumann, R.; Otto, K.; Elbeshausen, D.; Stephan, K.; Kneissl, T.; Schmedemann, N.; Roatsch, T.; Raymond, C.; Russell, C.

    2014-07-01

    Planetary surfaces are steadily modified by endogenic processes. The most important resurfacing processes on dry airless bodies are: mass-wasting processes, volcanic activity, and tectonics due to impact cratering. Due to the absence of volcanic activity on Vesta [1], mass wasting and impact cratering are the most likely resurfacing processes on Vesta. The high elevation differences on Vesta [2] and the steady bombardment of Vesta's surface by impacts cause seismic shaking which promote material to move downwards. We analyzed different types of mass-wasting features in the South Polar Region, such as slumping blocks at the steep scarp Matronalia Rupes, spur-and-gully morphologies, and landslides in craters [3]. Collapse processes, instability of slopes, and seismic-triggered events cause the landslides, rotational slumping blocks on scarps, as well as spur-and-gully morphologies on crater walls and scarps. Spur-and-gully morphology is known to form on Mars and the Earth normally supported by liquid flow but, on Vesta, these features formed under dry conditions. At Matronalia Rupes, rotational rock slumping blocks are clearly exposed as material slumped down the scarp wall in a stair-stepped pattern, which is interrupted by minor scarps and covers the underlying terrain. This rotational rock slumping is affected by slope instability and gravitationally triggered events, such as seismic shaking mostly produced by impacts elsewhere on Vesta [3]. The sloping surface of Vesta cause not only the formation of mass wasting features, but also the formation of craters on slopes. These craters are in turn influenced by mass wasting and show an asymmetric crater shape with a sharp uphill rim and a smooth downhill rim. The craters show a sharp crater rim uphill and a smooth one downhill as well as ejecta on the downhill rim and only thin ejecta over the uphill rim. Three-dimensional numerical simulations have been performed to study the formation process of the unusual craters

  4. Effects of non-ablative fractional erbium glass laser treatment on gene regulation in human three-dimensional skin models.

    PubMed

    Amann, Philipp M; Marquardt, Yvonne; Steiner, Timm; Hölzle, Frank; Skazik-Voogt, Claudia; Heise, Ruth; Baron, Jens M

    2016-04-01

    Clinical experiences with non-ablative fractional erbium glass laser therapy have demonstrated promising results for dermal remodelling and for the indications of striae, surgical scars and acne scars. So far, molecular effects on human skin following treatment with these laser systems have not been elucidated. Our aim was to investigate laser-induced effects on skin morphology and to analyse molecular effects on gene regulation. Therefore, human three-dimensional (3D) organotypic skin models were irradiated with non-ablative fractional erbium glass laser systems enabling qRT-PCR, microarray and histological studies at same and different time points. A decreased mRNA expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) 3 and 9 was observed 3 days after treatment. MMP3 also remained downregulated on protein level, whereas the expression of other MMPs like MMP9 was recovered or even upregulated 5 days after irradiation. Inflammatory gene regulatory responses measured by the expression of chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligands (CXCL1, 2, 5, 6) and interleukin expression (IL8) were predominantly reduced. Epidermal differentiation markers such as loricrin, filaggrin-1 and filaggrin-2 were upregulated by both tested laser optics, indicating a potential epidermal involvement. These effects were also shown on protein level in the immunofluorescence analysis. This novel standardised laser-treated human 3D skin model proves useful for monitoring time-dependent ex vivo effects of various laser systems on gene expression and human skin morphology. Our study reveals erbium glass laser-induced regulations of MMP and interleukin expression. We speculate that these alterations on gene expression level could play a role for dermal remodelling, anti-inflammatory effects and increased epidermal differentiation. Our finding may have implications for further understanding of the molecular mechanism of erbium glass laser-induced effects on human skin.

  5. Fractional carbon dioxide laser in recalcitrant vulval lichen sclerosus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Andrew; Lim, Adrian; Fischer, Gayle

    2016-02-01

    Vulval lichen sclerosus is an uncommon skin condition that can usually be managed with topical corticosteroids to maintain remission. However, there is a subset of patients in whom it remains recalcitrant despite treatment with super-potent topical corticosteroids. We report a case series of four patients undergoing fractional carbon dioxide laser resurfacing and one with ablative carbon dioxide laser for severe, hyperkeratotic vulval lichen sclerosus not responding to super-potent topical corticosteroids. In these patients, carbon dioxide laser was successful in achieving remission. Their vulval lichen sclerosus was subsequently able to be maintained with topical corticosteroid treatment.

  6. Recontouring, resurfacing, and scar revision in skin cancer reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Michael J; Perro, Christopher A

    2009-08-01

    Residual disfigurement is a common problem for patients who have undergone skin cancer reconstruction. Restoring form and function in these patients is an artistic and technical endeavor. The efficacy of surgical scar revision, dermabrasion, chemical peels, and laser resurfacing is predicated upon the skin's innate ability to regenerate over time in response to mechanical, chemical, and thermal or ablative stresses. The patient and surgeon should be accepting of a process that is often gradual and may proceed in stages. Achieving proficiency with the secondary procedures for improving scars and local flaps may allow the motivated surgeon to mold an initially passable surgical result into an excellent one.

  7. Clinical applications of CO2 laser resurfacing in the treatment of various pathologic skin disorders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giler, Shamai

    1997-12-01

    CO2 laser skin resurfacing devices are widely used in cosmetic surgery for the treatment of facial rhytides, acne scars and aging skin. This technique is also useful in the treatment of various benign and premalignant or multiple pathological skin conditions and disorders originating in the epidermal, dermal and skin appendages, vascular lesions, epidermal nevi, infected wounds and ulcers, and keloids. Various surgical techniques have been developed in our clinic using laser resurfacing in the treatment of more than 2,000 patients with various skin pathologic disorders. We describe our experience with the various techniques used. The precise depth control and ablation properties combined with the hemostatic and sterilizing effects of the CO2 laser beam, reduction of the possibility of bleeding, infection and damage to healthy tissues, make the CO2 laser resurfacing techniques the treatment of choice for cosmetic surgery and treatment of benign, premalignant and multiple pathologic skin conditions.

  8. Re-epithelialization of the skin following CO2 laser resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Collawn, S S

    2001-09-01

    Wound healing following CO(2) laser resurfacing of the face is a complex process which must involve a rapid replacement of the ablated epidermis to protect the underlying structures in the skin from desiccation and deeper injury. The majority of cells that regenerate the epidermis come from the hair follicles, and cell movement out of the follicles is monitored using immunofluorescence with antibodies to keratin 17, an intermediate filament protein expressed in the migrating front of cells. This migration is enhanced with occlusive dressings used immediately after the resurfacing procedure. Skin biopsies have been examined at multiple time points following resurfacing, and re-epithelialization begins by 48 h in skin that has been occluded. Skin that has been left open with no treatment forms an eschar and has no keratinocyte migration at 48 h, thus displaying delayed wound healing.

  9. Fractional Laser Ablation for the Cutaneous Delivery of Triamcinolone Acetonide from Cryomilled Polymeric Microparticles: Creating Intraepidermal Drug Depots.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Mayank; Del Río-Sancho, Sergio; Sonaje, Kiran; Kalia, Yogeshvar N

    2016-02-01

    The efficacy of some dermatological therapies might be improved by the use of "high dose" intraepidermal drug reservoir systems that enable sustained and targeted local drug delivery, e.g., in the treatment of keloids and hypertrophic scars. Here, a fractionally ablative erbium:YAG laser was used to enable "needle-less" cutaneous deposition of polymeric microparticles containing triamcinolone acetonide (TA). The microparticles were prepared using a freeze-fracture technique employing cryomilling that resulted in drug loading efficiencies of ∼100%. They were characterized by several different techniques, including scanning electron microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry. TA was quantified by validated HPLC-UV and UHPLC-MS/MS analytical methods. In vitro release studies demonstrated the effect of polymer properties on TA release kinetics. Confocal laser scanning microscopy enabled visualization of cryomilled microparticles containing fluorescein and Nile Red in the cutaneous micropores and the subsequent release of fluorescein into the micropores and its diffusion throughout the epidermis and upper dermis. The biodistribution of TA, i.e. the amount of drug as a function of depth in skin, following microparticle application was much more uniform than with a TA suspension and delivery was selective for deposition with less transdermal permeation. These findings suggest that this approach may provide an effective, targeted and minimally invasive alternative to painful intralesional injections for the treatment of keloid scars.

  10. Skin resurfacing procedures: new and emerging options

    PubMed Central

    Loesch, Mathew M; Somani, Ally-Khan; Kingsley, Melanie M; Travers, Jeffrey B; Spandau, Dan F

    2014-01-01

    The demand for skin resurfacing and rejuvenating procedures has progressively increased in the last decade and has sparked several advances within the skin resurfacing field that promote faster healing while minimizing downtime and side effects for patients. Several technological and procedural skin resurfacing developments are being integrated into clinical practices today allowing clinicians to treat a broader range of patients’ skin types and pathologies than in years past, with noteworthy outcomes. This article will discuss some emerging and developing resurfacing therapies and treatments that are present today and soon to be available. PMID:25210469

  11. Skin resurfacing procedures: new and emerging options.

    PubMed

    Loesch, Mathew M; Somani, Ally-Khan; Kingsley, Melanie M; Travers, Jeffrey B; Spandau, Dan F

    2014-01-01

    The demand for skin resurfacing and rejuvenating procedures has progressively increased in the last decade and has sparked several advances within the skin resurfacing field that promote faster healing while minimizing downtime and side effects for patients. Several technological and procedural skin resurfacing developments are being integrated into clinical practices today allowing clinicians to treat a broader range of patients' skin types and pathologies than in years past, with noteworthy outcomes. This article will discuss some emerging and developing resurfacing therapies and treatments that are present today and soon to be available.

  12. Non-ablative fractional laser in conjunction with microneedle arrays for improved cutaneous vaccination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ji; Li, Bo; Wu, Mei X.

    2015-03-01

    Skin is more potent than the muscle for vaccination, but it is not a common site for immunization to date owing, in part, to a relatively high rate of pains and skin irritation and difficulty of administration. Here, we show effective and lesion free cutaneous vaccination by a combination of a biodegradable microneedle array (MNs) and an FDA-approved nonablative fractional laser (NAFL). Delivering a vaccine into many micropores, instead of a single "big" pore in the skin, effectively segregated vaccine-induced inflammation into many microzones and resulted in quick resolution of the inflammation, provided that distances between any two micropores were far enough. When the inoculation site was treated by NAFL prior to insertion of the MNs comprised of PR8 model influenza vaccine, the mice displayed vigorous antigen-uptake, giving rise to strong, Th1-biased immunity. The mice were protected from a challenge of homologous influenza virus at a high dose as well as heterologous H1N1 and H3N2 viruses. The adjuvant effect of NAFL was ascribed primarily to activation of the dsDNA sensing pathway by dsDNA released from laser-damaged skin cells. Thus, mice deficient in the dsDNA sensing pathway, but not toll like receptor (TLR) or inflammasome pathways, showed poor response to NAFL. Importantly, both mice and swine exhibited strong, protective immunity, but no overt skin reactions with this approach, in sharp contrast to intradermal injections that caused severe, overt skin reactions. The effective lesion-free transcutaneous vaccination merits further clinical studies.

  13. New insight in the treatment of refractory melasma: Laser Q-switched Nd: YAG non-ablative fractionated followed by intense pulsed light.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Paulo Rowilson; Pinto, Clovis Antonio Lopes; Mattos, Camila Bonati; Cabrini, Dayane Peverari; Tolosa, Joana Lugli

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to verify the results of the association of Q-switched Nd: YAG non-ablative fractionated with intense pulsed light, in order to treat patients with refractory melasma. The combination of these two devices seems to be the best treatment to combat hyperpigmentation produced by melasma, with low occurrence of side effects, which may be justified by the selective photothermolysis at subcellular level.

  14. Ablative fractionated erbium:YAG laser for the treatment of ice pick alar scars due to neodymium:YAG laser burns.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Joel L; Babcock, Michael J

    2009-01-01

    The authors present a case of ice pick scars forming in the nasal alar grooves of a patient who was treated with a 1064-nm neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) laser for facial telangiectasias. Treatment options for these types of scars are reviewed and specifically we report the success of an ablative fractionated 2940-nm erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG) laser.

  15. [Resurfacing arthroplasty of the hip].

    PubMed

    Knecht, A; Witzleb, W-C; Günther, K-P

    2005-01-01

    Currently, an increase in resurfacing arthroplasty in the treatment of hip osteoarthritis--especially in young adults--can be observed. New bearing technologies (mainly metal-on-metal surfaces) show better tribologic results than historical designs (e.g. the Wagner cup). At present, it is unclear whether these modifications and a definitively low dislocation rate--due to the large head diameter--can be supported by further good clinical results. The quantity as well as the quality of the available investigations prevents a definite opinion at the moment. Appropriate clinical studies with documented radiographic follow-up are necessary to compare the outcome of these new implants with standard techniques.

  16. Treatment of actinic keratoses and photodamage with non-contact fractional 1540-nm laser quasi-ablation: an ex vivo and clinical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Lapidoth, Moshe; Adatto, Maurice; Halachmi, Shlomit

    2013-02-01

    The main use of non-ablative fractional photothermolysis today is for the improvement of wrinkles and scars. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the effect of a "classic" non-ablative fractional 1540 nm on facial photodamaged skin and actinic keratoses. Seventeen patients with facial actinic keratoses (AKs) and photodamage underwent two or three laser treatments with fractional 1540-nm erbium glass laser at fluences of 75 mJ, 15 ms pulse duration, and 10-mm spot size in non-contact mode. Two blinded assessors and participants evaluated clinical improvement of treatment areas after 3 months, using a quartile grading scale (no improvement = 0, 1-25% improvement = 1, 26-50% = 2, 51-75% = 3, and 76-100% = 4). Three months after the last treatment, the mean level of improvement was 3.4 ± 0.72 for AK and 3.3 ± 0.54 for skin appearance. Adverse events observed after each treatment were moderate erythema, mild edema, erosions (two cases), and mild desquamation. No scarring or post-inflammatory pigmentary changes were observed. The clinical results were supported by histological changes observed in Yucatan pig studies in vivo and ex vivo. The 1540-nm fractional erbium glass laser in the non-contact mode is a safe and effective treatment for facial photodamage and AKs.

  17. Selective Patellar Resurfacing: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Antholz, Casey R; Cherian, Jeffrey J; Elmallah, Randa K; Jauregui, Julio J; Pierce, Todd P; Mont, Micael A

    2015-05-01

    Whether to resurface the patella during total knee arthroplasty (TKA) remains a controversial topic among orthopaedic surgeons, and we are still no closer to identifying which technique provides the best outcomes. Advocates for patellar resurfacing have adopted this technique in order to avoid the potential for post-operative anterior knee pain that may be associated with the need for future reoperations. However, reports have indicated that patellar resurfacing may be associated with increased complications such as patellar implant loosening, fracture, osteonecrosis, tendon injury, wear, and instability. More recently, studies have highlighted possible patient-specific and surgical factors, such as weight, body mass index, degree of chondromalacia, and patellar alignment, which may influence functional outcomes, and thus surgical decision making. However, currently there are minimal clear guidelines to help surgeons decide whether or not to resurface the patella. Our aim was to assess the current literature and present the evidence for and against patellar resurfacing, as well as to assess factors that may aid in deciding which procedure is more suitable for the specific patient. Ultimately, we believe there is a need for further research to identify the most appropriate candidates for patellar resurfacing.

  18. Histopathology of laser skin resurfacing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomsen, Sharon L.; Baldwin, Bonnie; Chi, Eric; Ellard, Jeff; Schwartz, Jon A.

    1997-05-01

    Pulsed carbon-dioxide laser skin resurfacing is a purportedly 'non-thermal' procedure enjoying wide application as a cosmetic treatment for skin wrinkles. Treatment success has been based on clinical assessments of skin smoothness. Skin lesions (1 cm2) created by one, two or three superimposed carbon-dioxide laser passes were placed on the backs of 28 'fuzzy' Harlan Sprague Dawley rats. The variable laser irradiation parameters included measured energies ranging from 112 to 387/pulse with pulse widths of 65 and 125 microseconds and a repetition rate of 8 Hz. The square, flat laser beam measured 3 mm2 at the focal point. The lesions were collected from 0 to 10 days after treatment for qualitative and quantitative histopathology. Thermal damage and treatment effect tended to increase in severity and, to a lesser extent, depth with increased delivery parameters. In acute lesions, the vacuolated and fragmented, desiccated and thermally coagulated epidermis was partially removed exposing the underlying thermally coagulated dermal collagen and cells. Epidermal and dermal necrosis and slough occurred between 24 to 72 hours after treatment. Epithelial regeneration originated from the adnexa and the lesion edges. Dermal fibrous scar formation began at 5 days below the regenerated epidermis and became more prominent at 7 and 10 days.

  19. Controlled intra- and transdermal protein delivery using a minimally invasive Erbium:YAG fractional laser ablation technology.

    PubMed

    Bachhav, Y G; Heinrich, A; Kalia, Y N

    2013-06-01

    The aim of the study was (i) to investigate the feasibility of using fractional laser ablation to create micropore arrays in order to deliver proteins into and across the skin and (ii) to demonstrate how transport rates could be controlled by variation of poration and formulation conditions. Four proteins with very different structures and properties were investigated - equine heart cytochrome c (Cyt c; 12.4 kDa), recombinant human growth hormone expressed in Escherichia coli (hGH; 22 kDa), urinary follicle stimulating hormone (FSH; 30 kDa) and FITC-labelled bovine serum albumin (FITC-BSA; 70 kDa). The transport experiments were performed using a scanning Er:YAG diode pumped laser (P.L.E.A.S.E.®; Precise Laser Epidermal System). The distribution of FITC-BSA in the micropores following P.L.E.A.S.E.® poration was visualised by using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Porcine skin was used for the device parameter and CLSM studies; its validity as a model was confirmed by subsequent comparison with transport of Cyt c and FITC-BSA across P.L.E.A.S.E.® porated human skin. No protein transport (deposition or permeation) was observed across intact skin; however, P.L.E.A.S.E.® poration enabled total delivery after 24h of 48.2±8.9, 8.1±4.2, 0.2±0.1 and 273.3±30.6 μg/cm(2) for Cyt c, hGH, FSH and FITC-BSA, respectively, using 900 pores/135.9 cm(2). Calculation of permeability coefficients showed that there was no linear dependence of transport on molecular weight ((1.6±0.3), (0.1±0.05), (0.08±0.03) and (0.9±0.1)×10(-3) cm/h, for Cyt c, hGH, FSH and FITC-BSA, respectively); indeed, a U-shaped curve was observed. This suggested that molecular weight was not a sufficiently sensitive descriptor and that transport was more likely to be determined by the surface properties of the respective proteins since these would govern interactions with the local microenvironment. Increasing pore density (i.e. the number of micropores per unit area) had a statistically

  20. The resurfacing controversy for Venus: An overview and a mechanistic perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, Sean C.

    1993-01-01

    Two remarkable aspects of the population of impact craters on Venus are that craters at all sizes are indistinguishable from a random population and that most craters have not been significantly modified by tectonic strain or by volcanic flows external to the crater rim, despite evidence from Magellan images that volcanic and tectonic features are widespread on Venus. One interpretation of these observations is that most of the surface dates from the end of a catastrophic global resurfacing event that ceased about 500 My ago, and that a small fraction of craters volcaniclly embayed or modified by deformation indicate that volcanic and tectonic activity subsequent to that time has been at much lower levels. A competing scenario, in which resurfacing occurs episodically in patches a few hundred kilometers in extent and there is a wider spectrum of surface ages, also appears to be consistent with the characteristics of impact craters on Venus. While geological and statistical studies of the crater population on Venus offer some promise for distinguishing between these two hypotheses, consideration of the possible mechanisms of catastrophic episodic resurfacing provides an independent perspective. Potential mechanisms for catastrophic resurfacing of Venus range from geologically sudden convective destabilization of the global lithosphere to strongly time-dependent heat flux and melt generation in the underlying mantle. For most of these mechanisms, resurfacing occurs implicitly or explicitly by volcanism. An alternative hypothesis is that, at least in the geologically recent history of Venus, the primary resurfacing mechanism has been tectonic deformation rather than volcanism. Because the rate of surface strain should be controlled by the temperature-dependent strength of the lower crust, a geologically rapid transition in surface strain rates should be the natural result of planetary cooling. This transition would occur at comparable times for areas of similar

  1. Erbium laser resurfacing for actinic cheilitis.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Joel L

    2013-11-01

    Actinic cheilitis is a precancerous condition characterized by grayish-whitish area(s) of discoloration on the mucosal lip, often blunting the demarcation between mucosa and cutaneous lip. Actinic cheilitis is considered to be an early part of the spectrum of squamous cell carcinoma. Squamous cell carcinoma specifically of the lip has a high rate of recurrence and metastasis through the oral cavity leading to a poor overall survival. Risk factors for the development of actinic cheilitis include chronic solar irradiation, increasing age, male gender, light skin complexion, immunosuppression, and possibly tobacco and alcohol consumption. Treatment options include topical pharmacotherapy (eg, fluorouracil, imiquimod) or procedural interventions (eg, cryotherapy, electrosurgery, surgical vermillionectomy, laser resurfacing), each with their known advantages and disadvantages. There is little consensus as to which treatment options offer the most clinical utility given the paucity of comparative clinical data. In my practice, laser resurfacing has become an important tool for the treatment of actinic cheilitis owing to its ease of use and overall safety, tolerability, and cosmetic acceptability. Herein the use of erbium laser resurfacing is described for three actinic cheilitis presentations for which I find it particularly useful: clinically prominent actinic cheilitis, biopsy-proven actinic cheilitis, and treatment of the entire lip following complete tumor excision of squamous cell carcinoma. All patients were treated with a 2940-nm erbium laser (Sciton Profile Contour Tunable Resurfacing Laser [TRL], Sciton, Inc., Palo Alto, CA).

  2. Revision of failed humeral head resurfacing arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Streubel, Philipp N.; Simone, Juan P.; Cofield, Robert H.; Sperling, John W.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to assess the outcomes of a consecutive series of patients who underwent revision surgery after humeral head resurfacing (HHR). Our joint registry was queried for all patients who underwent revision arthroplasty for failed HHR at our institution from 2005 to 2010. Eleven consecutive patients (average age 54 years; range 38-69 years) that underwent revision of 11 resurfacing arthroplasties were identified. The primary indication for resurfacing had been osteoarthritis in six, glenoid dysplasia in two, a chondral lesion in two, and postinstability arthropathy in one patient. The indication for revision was pain in 10 and infection in one patient. Seven patients had undergone an average of 1.9 surgeries prior to resurfacing (range 1-3). Materials and Methods: All patients were revised to stemmed arthroplasties, including one hemiarthroplasty, two reverse, and eight anatomic total shoulder arthroplasties at a mean 33 months after primary resurfacing (range 10-131 months). A deltopectoral approach was used in seven patients; four patients required an anteromedial approach due to severe scarring. Subscapularis attenuation was found in four cases, two of which required reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. Bone grafting was required in one glenoid and three humeri. Results: At a mean follow-up of 3.5 years (range 1.6-6.9 years), modified Neer score was rated as satisfactory in five patients and unsatisfactory in six. Abduction and external rotation improved from 73° to 88° (P = 0.32) and from 23° to 32° (P = 0.28) respectively. Reoperation was required in two patients, including one hematoma and one revision for instability. Conclusion: Outcomes of revision of HHR arthroplasty in this cohort did not improve upon those reported for revision of stemmed humeral implants. A comparative study would be required to allow for definitive conclusions to be made. PMID:26980986

  3. Diagnosis and management of skin resurfacing-related complications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Alexandra Y; Obagi, Suzan

    2009-02-01

    The field of skin resurfacing is undergoing rapid evolution with many new technologies that have developed, providing more choices for physicians and patients. Knowing the potential adverse effects associated with each skin resurfacing modality is paramount in selecting the appropriate approach for each candidate, thereby minimizing complications and achieving optimal results.

  4. Plasma skin resurfacing: personal experience and long-term results.

    PubMed

    Bentkover, Stuart H

    2012-05-01

    This article presents a comprehensive clinical approach to plasma resurfacing for skin regeneration. Plasma technology, preoperative protocols, resurfacing technique, postoperative care, clinical outcomes, evidence-based results, and appropriate candidates for this procedure are discussed. Specific penetration depth and specific laser energy measurements are provided. Nitrogen plasma skin regeneration is a skin-resurfacing technique that offers excellent improvement of mild to moderate skin wrinkles and overall skin rejuvenation. It also provides excellent improvement in uniformity of skin color and texture in patients with hyperpigmentation with Fitzpatrick skin types 1 through 4.

  5. The Emerging Resurfacing History of Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueredo, P.; Greeley, R.

    2002-12-01

    We have completed the geologic mapping and analysis of pole-to-pole transects across the leading and trailing hemispheres of Europa. Our results show that ~50% of the mapped areas has been resurfaced since the period of background ridged plains formation (comprising the last 50-100 Myr.): ~30% by tectonic processes and ~20% by chaotic disruption. Further, the geologic record indicates a transition from tectonic- to cryovolcanic-dominated resurfacing. The style of tectonic processes changed with time, from intensive, closely spaced fracturing and ridge building forming background plains, to infilling of inter-plate gaps forming broad bands, to gradually narrower and farther-spaced ridges and ridge complexes. In both hemispheres, these lineaments rotated with time in senses consistent with nonsynchronous rotation predictions. The lack of lineaments overprinting impact structures (with the exception of Tyre) suggests that the intensity of tectonic resurfacing decreased rapidly after the formation of ridged plains. Units associated with chaotic disruption overprint one another (in areas that broadly match regions where the regional thermal gradient has been raised by tidal dissipation), fragmenting the evidence for early cryovolcanic activity. Old, subdued chaos has been reworked to form younger chaos areas by merging of small patches of disruption; the most recent chaos features appear to be slightly elevated with respect to the surrounding plains. These observations suggest that chaos formed by disruption and emplacement of buoyant material from the subsurface, which became topographically and morphologically subdued with time. One possible interpretation of the mentioned trends and changes is the gradual thickening of Europa's lithosphere throughout the visible geologic history: the degree of fracturing and plate displacements decrease in a thickening shell, while lineaments become narrower and more widely spaced; formation of chaos regions can take place where the

  6. Liquid water and active resurfacing on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squyres, S. W.; Reynolds, R. T.; Cassen, P. M.; Peale, S. J.

    1983-01-01

    Arguments for recent resurfacing of Europa by H2O from a liquid layer are presented, based on new interpretations of recent spacecraft and earth-based observations and revised theoretical calculations. The heat flow in the core and shell due to tidal forces is discussed, and considerations of viscosity and convection in the interior are found to imply water retention in the outer 60 km or so of the silicates, forming a layer of water/ice many tens of km thick. The outer ice crust is considered to be too thin to support heat transport rates sufficient to freeze the underlying water. Observational evidence for the calculations would consist of an insulating layer of frosts derived from water boiling up between cracks in the surface crust. Evidence for the existence of such a frost layer, including the photometric function of Europa and the deposits of sulfur on the trailing hemisphere, is discussed.

  7. Catheter ablation.

    PubMed

    Fromer, M; Shenasa, M

    1991-02-01

    Catheter ablation is gaining increasing interest for the therapy of symptomatic, sustained arrhythmias of various origins. The scope of this review is to give an overview of the biophysical aspects and major characteristics of some of the most widely used energy sources in catheter ablation, e.g., the discharge of conventional defibrillators, modified defibrillators, laser light, and radiofrequency current application. Results from animal studies are considered to explain the basic mechanisms of catheter ablation. The recent achievements with the use of radiofrequency current to modify or ablate cardiac conduction properties are outlined in more detail.

  8. Present state of metal-on-metal hybrid hip resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Amstutz, Harlan C

    2008-01-01

    Bone conservation and preservation, joint stability, and low wear of the large metal-on-metal resurfacing bearings have been convincingly demonstrated in the current literature. The clinical results of 600 MM Hybrid Conserve Plus Resurfacing in 519 patients with an average follow-up of 6.9 years (range, 4.0-10.4 years) have been excellent. The average age was 48.9 years, 74% of the patients were male, and the study included all etiologies of the young with arthritis. The complication rates other than dislocation and fracture of the femoral neck are comparable between resurfacing and conventional total hip replacement. The incidence of femoral neck fracture is low (1.2% worldwide) with less than 0.6% in this series and none occurring in the last 5 years due to proper patient selection and improved surgical technique. Component loosening after metal-on-metal resurfacing has been significantly reduced and acetabular component loosening is uncommon and has not happened in this series. Femoral bone preparation and optimal cementing techniques are paramount to prevention of femoral loosening. Clearance between the cylindrically reamed part of the head and the component varies in different designs, and the surgeon must note the need for different cementing strategies for different recommended clearances. The learning curve of a surgeon undertaking resurfacing can be greatly reduced by observation and hands-on training in specialized centers with surgeons experienced in resurfacing.

  9. Thermal ablation.

    PubMed

    Webb, Heather; Lubner, Meghan G; Hinshaw, J Louis

    2011-04-01

    Image-guided tumor ablation refers to a group of treatment modalities that have emerged during the past 2 decades as important tools in the treatment of a wide range of tumors throughout the body. Although most widely recognized in the treatment of hepatic and renal malignancies, the role of thermal ablation has expanded to include lesions of the lung, breast, prostate, bone, as well as other organs and its clinical applications continue to increase. In the following article, we discuss the major thermal ablation modalities, their respective strengths and weaknesses, potential complications and how to avoid them, as well as possible future applications.

  10. Time series trends of the safety effects of pavement resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Park, Juneyoung; Abdel-Aty, Mohamed; Wang, Jung-Han

    2017-04-01

    This study evaluated the safety performance of pavement resurfacing projects on urban arterials in Florida using the observational before and after approaches. The safety effects of pavement resurfacing were quantified in the crash modification factors (CMFs) and estimated based on different ranges of heavy vehicle traffic volume and time changes for different severity levels. In order to evaluate the variation of CMFs over time, crash modification functions (CMFunctions) were developed using nonlinear regression and time series models. The results showed that pavement resurfacing projects decrease crash frequency and are found to be more safety effective to reduce severe crashes in general. Moreover, the results of the general relationship between the safety effects and time changes indicated that the CMFs increase over time after the resurfacing treatment. It was also found that pavement resurfacing projects for the urban roadways with higher heavy vehicle volume rate are more safety effective than the roadways with lower heavy vehicle volume rate. Based on the exploration and comparison of the developed CMFucntions, the seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average (SARIMA) and exponential functional form of the nonlinear regression models can be utilized to identify the trend of CMFs over time.

  11. Microseparation, fluid pressure and flow in failures of metal-on-metal hip resurfacing arthroplasties

    PubMed Central

    Wroblewski, B. M.; Siney, P. D.; Fleming, P. A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Metal-on-metal (MoM) hip resurfacing was introduced into clinical practice because it was perceived to be a better alternative to conventional total hip replacement for young and active patients. However, an increasing number of reports of complications have arisen focusing on design and orientation of the components, the generation of metallic wear particles and serum levels of metallic ions. The procedure introduced a combination of two elements: large-dimension components and hard abrasive particles of metal wear. The objective of our study was to investigate the theory that microseparation of the articular surfaces draws in a high volume of bursal fluid and its contents into the articulation, and at relocation under load would generate high pressures of fluid ejection, resulting in an abrasive water jet. Methods This theoretical concept using MoM resurfacing components (head diameter 55 mm) was modelled mathematically and confirmed experimentally using a material-testing machine that pushed the head into the cup at a rate of 1000 mm/min until fully engaged. Results The mathematical model showed the pattern but not the force of fluid ejection, the highest pressures were expected when the separation of the components was only a fraction of one millimetre. The experimental work confirmed the results; with the mean peak ejection pressure of 43 763 N/m2 equivalent to 306 mmHg or 5 psi. Conclusions The mechanical effect of the high-pressure abrasive water jet is the likely cause of the spectrum of complications reported with metal-on-metal resurfacing. Investigating serum levels of metallic elements may not be the best method for assessing the local mechanical effects of the abrasive water jet. PMID:23610667

  12. Catheter Ablation

    MedlinePlus

    ... you during the procedure. Machines will measure your heart’s activity. All types of ablation require cardiac catheterization to place flexible tubes, or catheters, inside your heart to make the scars. Your doctor will clean ...

  13. 21 CFR 888.3590 - Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing... Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  14. 21 CFR 888.3590 - Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing... Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  15. 21 CFR 888.3590 - Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing... Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  16. 21 CFR 888.3590 - Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing... Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  17. Why does carbon dioxide resurfacing work? A review.

    PubMed

    Ross, E V; McKinlay, J R; Anderson, R R

    1999-04-01

    Despite the unquestionable efficacy of carbon dioxide laser skin resurfacing, mechanisms for cosmetic enhancement remain poorly characterized. Histological studies have provided some insight into the cascade of events from initial laser impact to final skin rejuvenation. However, there are few comprehensive studies of gross and microscopic wound healing. Additionally, the literature is fragmented; excellent individual articles appear in journals from widely disparate disciplines. For example, some reports relevant to laser skin resurfacing are "sequestered" in the engineering literature. This article is intended to update the physician on laser skin resurfacing based on the broadest review of the current literature. It proceeds from a discussion of initial laser-tissue interactions, such as collagen denaturation, to examination of long-term biological sequelae. At some cost to scientific rigor, mathematical models describing laser-tissue interactions are not presented.

  18. Hip resurfacing arthroplasty complicated by mismatched implant components

    PubMed Central

    Calistri, Alessandro; Campbell, Patricia; Van Der Straeten, Catherine; De Smet, Koen Aimè

    2017-01-01

    Metal-on-metal hip resurfacing has gained popularity as a feasible treatment option for young and active patients with hip osteoarthritis and high functional expectations. This procedure should only be performed by surgeons who have trained specifically in this technique. Preoperative planning is essential for hip resurfacing in order to execute a successful operation and preview any technical problems. The authors present a case of a man who underwent a resurfacing arthroplasty for osteoarthritis of the left hip that was complicated by mismatched implant components that were revised three days afterwards for severe pain and leg length discrepancy. Such mistakes, although rare, can be prevented by educating operating room staff in the size and colour code tables provided by the companies on their prostheses or implant boxes. PMID:28361022

  19. Metal-on-Metal Hip Resurfacing Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Sehatzadeh, S; Kaulback, K; Levin, L

    2012-01-01

    Background Metal-on-metal (MOM) hip resurfacing arthroplasty (HRA) is in clinical use as an appropriate alternative to total hip arthroplasty in young patients. In this technique, a metal cap is placed on the femoral head to cover the damaged surface of the bone and a metal cup is placed in the acetabulum. Objectives The primary objective of this analysis was to compare the revision rates of MOM HRA using different implants with the benchmark set by the National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE). The secondary objective of this analysis was to review the literature regarding adverse biological effects associated with implant material. Review Methods A literature search was performed on February 13, 2012, to identify studies published from January 1, 2009, to February 13, 2012. Results The revision rates for MOM HRA using 6 different implants were reviewed. The revision rates for MOM HRA with 3 implants met the NICE criteria, i.e., a revision rate of 10% or less at 10 years. Two implants had short-term follow-ups and MOM HRA with one of the implants failed to meet the NICE criteria. Adverse tissue reactions resulting in failure of the implants have been reported by several studies. With a better understanding of the factors that influence the wear rate of the implants, adverse tissue reactions and subsequent implant failure can be minimized. Many authors have suggested that patient selection and surgical technique affect the wear rate and the risk of tissue reactions. The biological effects of high metal ion levels in the blood and urine of patients with MOM HRA implants are not known. Studies have shown an increase in chromosomal aberrations in patients with MOM articulations, but the clinical implications and long-term consequences of this increase are still unknown. Epidemiological studies have shown that patients with MOM HRA implants did not have an overall increase in mortality or risk of cancer. There is insufficient clinical data to confirm the

  20. The Safety and Efficacy of the 1540nm Non-Ablative Fractional XD Probe of Star Lux 500 Device in the Treatment of Striae Alba: Before-After Study

    PubMed Central

    Malekzad, Farhad; Shakoei, Safoura; Ayatollahi, Azin; Hejazi, Somayeh

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Striae distensae (SD) are a frequent skin condition for which treatment remains a challenge. The 1540-nm non-ablative fractional laser (Star Lux 500) has been shown to improve atrophic scars by increasing the amount of dermal collagen. To assess the safety and efficacy of the Star Lux 500 laser in the treatment of mature hypopigmented striae in Persian people (Striae Alba). Methods: Ten women aged 26–50 years with SD and Fitzpatrick skin types III–V were enrolled in the study. The exclusion criteria were a history of keloids, photosensitivity and collagen, elastin disorders as well as history of other striae treatment within one year. The lesions were treated with non-ablative fractional laser 1540nm, and a total of four treatments were given at 4-week intervals. Clinical standard photographs were taken before each treatment. Also, patients were followed up at 3 months after the last treatment. Clinical improvement was assessed by comparing baseline and post-treatment photographs by two independent blinded physicians using grading scale. Treatment efficacy analysis was performed via the comparison between the images taken before and after each treatment session. Results: There was a clinically appreciable improvement in striae ranging from 1 to 24%. A significant improvement in striae between the 16-week treatment and the 4-week treatment was identified (P<0.0001). Three months after the final treatment, patients showed noticeable improvement in the striae, compared with baseline (P<0.048). Mild post inflammatory hyperpigmentation was observed in one patient after the 8-week treatment and mild to moderate acne occurred in another patient after 4 weeks of treatment. Conclusion: Therapy with Star lux 500 laser had clinically and statistically striae improvement with no adverse events. This may be a safe and an effective treatment modality for Striae Alba lesions. PMID:25653821

  1. Photoaging and the clinical utility of fractional laser

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Juliano; Manela-Azulay, Mônica; Cuzzi, Tullia

    2016-01-01

    The description of atomic structure by Niels Bohr set the basis for the emergence of quantum physics. Based on these fundamentals, Einstein published in 1917 a paper on the amplification of energy by Stimulated Emission of Radiation as part of his quantum theories. In 1955, Townes and Gordon turned Einstein’s theories into practice, creating a coherent and amplified microwave device using ammonia gas in an optical medium. But it was at the beginning of the 1980s, that Anderson and Parrish published an article about the selective photothermolysis model which revolutionized clinical practice. The use of laser in photoaging began with CO2 (10,600 nm). In 1989, it was first used for resurfacing of a face with prominent photoaging. Ablative lasers have therefore had great popularity in the 1980s and 1990s, but prolonged postoperative time and significant risk of side effects have lowered the acceptance by patients. In 2004, the description of the fractionated radiation for the treatment of photoaging, by Mainstein, represented a great event. The stimulation of collagen occurred through fractional laser beams, which would reach the selected area while saving islands of sound skin. These islands accelerated the process of cicatrization of the treated tissue and shortened the postprocedure time. Furthermore, the fractionated radiation presented a smaller range of side effects, increasing the safety of the procedure. As mentioned earlier, as fractional lasers incise on the skin, they leave islands of healthy skin that accelerate recovery, while generating necrosis columns. Such necrosis columns remove damaged extracellular matrix material, allowing resettlement of fibroblasts. Such resettled fibroblasts, under the influence of a new tensile strength, restart to produce structures for extracellular matrix, such as collagen, elastin, and proteoglycans, in a more physiological way. Fractional lasers are considered by many dermatologists as the best choice in laser therapy

  2. Photoaging and the clinical utility of fractional laser.

    PubMed

    Borges, Juliano; Manela-Azulay, Mônica; Cuzzi, Tullia

    2016-01-01

    The description of atomic structure by Niels Bohr set the basis for the emergence of quantum physics. Based on these fundamentals, Einstein published in 1917 a paper on the amplification of energy by Stimulated Emission of Radiation as part of his quantum theories. In 1955, Townes and Gordon turned Einstein's theories into practice, creating a coherent and amplified microwave device using ammonia gas in an optical medium. But it was at the beginning of the 1980s, that Anderson and Parrish published an article about the selective photothermolysis model which revolutionized clinical practice. The use of laser in photoaging began with CO2 (10,600 nm). In 1989, it was first used for resurfacing of a face with prominent photoaging. Ablative lasers have therefore had great popularity in the 1980s and 1990s, but prolonged postoperative time and significant risk of side effects have lowered the acceptance by patients. In 2004, the description of the fractionated radiation for the treatment of photoaging, by Mainstein, represented a great event. The stimulation of collagen occurred through fractional laser beams, which would reach the selected area while saving islands of sound skin. These islands accelerated the process of cicatrization of the treated tissue and shortened the postprocedure time. Furthermore, the fractionated radiation presented a smaller range of side effects, increasing the safety of the procedure. As mentioned earlier, as fractional lasers incise on the skin, they leave islands of healthy skin that accelerate recovery, while generating necrosis columns. Such necrosis columns remove damaged extracellular matrix material, allowing resettlement of fibroblasts. Such resettled fibroblasts, under the influence of a new tensile strength, restart to produce structures for extracellular matrix, such as collagen, elastin, and proteoglycans, in a more physiological way. Fractional lasers are considered by many dermatologists as the best choice in laser therapy for

  3. The resurfacing history of Venus: Constraints from buffered crater densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreslavsky, Mikhail A.; Ivanov, Mikhail A.; Head, James W.

    2015-04-01

    Because of atmospheric shielding and endogenic resurfacing, the population of impact craters on Venus is small (about a thousand) and consists of large craters. This population has been used in numerous studies with the goal of deciphering the geologic and geodynamic history of Venus, but the nearly spatially random nature of the crater population has complicated efforts to understand this history. Here we utilize the recent 1:15 M-scale global geological map of Venus (Ivanov, M.A., Head, J.W. [2011]. Planet. Space Sci. 59, 1559-1600) to help address this problem. The global geological map provides a stratigraphic sequence of units, and known areas where each unit is exposed on the planet. For each crater on Venus we identify the specific geological units predating and postdating the crater. We perform a statistical analysis of this set of observations with a buffered crater density approach, which rigorously and consistently takes into account the large size of craters and the fact that many craters are known to predate and/or postdate more than one unit. In this analysis we consider crater emplacement as random and resurfacing history as determined (although unknown). We obtain formal confidence intervals for the mean ages of geological units and the mean age differences between the pairs of units at the unit boundaries. We find that (1) size-frequency distributions of craters superposed on each unit are consistent with each other; (2) regional plains and stratigraphically older units have similar crater retention ages; (3) stratigraphically younger units have a mean crater retention age significantly younger than the regional plains. These findings are readily and consistently explained by global resurfacing scenarios and are difficult to reconcile with equilibrium resurfacing scenarios. Our analysis also shows that the latest recorded part of intensive resurfacing period lasted on the order of 10% of the mean surface age (tens of millions of years). The

  4. Novel approach with fractional ultrapulse CO2 laser for the treatment of upper eyelid dermatochalasis and periorbital rejuvenation.

    PubMed

    Balzani, Alberto; Chilgar, Ram M; Nicoli, Marzia; Sapountzis, Stamatis; Lazzeri, Davide; Cervelli, Valerio; Nicoli, Fabio

    2013-11-01

    Fractional ultrapulse CO2 laser resurfacing improves photodamage, wrinkles, and acne scarring by ablation of damaged tissue with subsequent regeneration and remodeling of collagen. In this study, the authors examined the efficacy and safety of fractional CO2 laser and introduce a novel approach to the treatment of upper eyelid dermatochalasis. We treated 20 patients with low and moderate upper eyelid dermatochalasis. We did photographic analysis of results by measuring distance of upper eyelid fold and lateral eyebrow in vertical axis from a horizontal line joining medial and lateral canthi. All patients underwent UltraPulse CO2 laser (Microxel MX 7000) resurfacing at upper eyelid, superior to eyebrow, and in periorbital area. Measurements were taken before and at 3 and 6 months after the laser treatment. We evaluated results at 3 and 6 months after laser treatment and found that the UltraPulse CO2 laser induced elevation of eyelid crease and brow position (1.62 ± 0.69 and 2.110 ± 0.66 mm at 3 months; 1.63 ± 0.68 and 2.300 ± 0.67 mm at 6 months, respectively) as compared to before the treatment. Side effects were mild, patients reported minor crusting and oozing that resolved within 48 to 72 h, edema (1-2 days), and moderate postoperative erythema resolved within 4 days. These data illustrate the safety and efficacy of fractional ultrapulse CO2 laser in the treatment of low and moderate upper eyelid dermatochalasis with added advantage of nonsurgical brow lift.

  5. Primary total hip replacement versus hip resurfacing - hospital considerations.

    PubMed

    Ward, William G; Carter, Christina J; Barone, Marisa; Jinnah, Riyaz

    2011-01-01

    Multiple factors regarding surgical procedures and patient selection affect hospital staffing needs as well as hospital revenues. In order to better understand the potential impact on hospitals that hip arthroplasty device selection (standard total hip arthroplasty vs. resurfacing) creates, a review of all primary hip arthroplasties performed at one institution was designed to identify factors that impacted hospital staffing needs and revenue generation. All primary hip arthroplasties undertaken over three fiscal years (2008 to 2010) were reviewed, utilizing only hospital business office data and medical records data that had been previously extracted prior for billing purposes. Analysis confirmed differing demographics for two hip arthroplasty populations, with the resurfacing patients (compared to the conventional total hip arthroplasty population) consisting of younger patients (mean age, 50 vs. 61 years), who were more often male (75% vs. 45%), were more likely to have osteoarthritis as their primary diagnosis (83 vs. 67%) and were more often covered by managed care or commercial insurance (83 vs. 34%). They also had shorter hospital stays (mean length of stay, 2.3 vs. 4.1 days) and consequently provided a more favorable financial revenue stream to the hospital on a per patient basis. Several trends appeared during the study periods. There was a steady increase in all procedures in all groups except for the resurfacings, which decreased 26% in males and 53% in females between 2009 and 2010. Differences were observed in the demographics of patients presenting for resurfacing, compared to those presenting for conventional total hip arthroplasty. In addition to the revenue stream considerations, institutions undertaking a resurfacing program must commit the resources and planning in order to rehabilitate these patients more expeditiously than is usually required with conventional hip arthroplasty patients.

  6. Bipaddled anterolateral thigh perforator flap for simultaneous reconstruction of bilateral buccal defects following oral cancer ablation or release of oral submucous fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei-Chen; Changchien, Chih-Hsuan; Su, Yu-Min

    2016-01-01

    It is a challenge to simultaneously reconstruct bilateral buccal defects following oral cancer ablation or release of oral submucous fibrosis. In this study, we report two cases where bipaddled anterolateral thigh perforator flaps were used to resurface two separate buccal defects. PMID:27619322

  7. Similar patient-reported outcomes and performance after total knee arthroplasty with or without patellar resurfacing

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Abdulemir; Lindstrand, Anders; Nilsdotter, Anna; Sundberg, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Knee pain after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is not uncommon. Patellar retention in TKA is one cause of postoperative knee pain, and may lead to secondary addition of a patellar component. Patellar resurfacing in TKA is controversial. Its use ranges from 2% to 90% worldwide. In this randomized study, we compared the outcome after patellar resurfacing and after no resurfacing. Patients and methods We performed a prospective, randomized study of 74 patients with primary osteoarthritis who underwent a Triathlon CR TKA. The patients were randomized to either patellar resurfacing or no resurfacing. They filled out the VAS pain score and KOOS questionnaires preoperatively, and VAS pain, KOOS, and patient satisfaction 3, 12, and 72 months postoperatively. Physical performance tests were performed preoperatively and 3 months postoperatively. Results We found similar scores for VAS pain, patient satisfaction, and KOOS 5 subscales at 3, 12, and 72 months postoperatively in the 2 groups. Physical performance tests 3 months postoperatively were also similar in the 2 groups. No secondary resurfacing was performed in the group with no resurfacing during the first 72 months Interpretation Patellar resurfacing in primary Triathlon CR TKA is of no advantage regarding pain, physical performance, KOOS 5 subscales, or patient satisfaction compared to no resurfacing. None of the patients were reoperated with secondary addition of a patellar component within 6 years. According to these results, routine patellar resurfacing in primary Triathlon TKA appears to be unnecessary. PMID:27212102

  8. Laserpeel: a peeling concept revolution with laser resurfacing protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenenbaum, Alain

    2000-06-01

    The author who is inventor of EasyPeel then Laserpeel wants to introduce new ways to choose the right indications for patients asking for cosmetic surgery. A lifting is as if you take a shirt and want to reduce its size cutting it. A resurfacing is as if you put a shirt and want to iron it. A peeling was as if you changed the color and grain of the shirt. Laserpeel is as if you iron the shirt treated with amidon, transform the second hand shirt as new, up to date on with glance effect sand give it then a stretching disco new wave effect. So, indications of facial lifting decrease at the same speed at the increase of indications of 'LASERPEEL'. Laser CO2 resurfacing should reborn because the post redness appearance decreases in intensity and duration due to LASERPEEL. LASERPEEL should be considered too as a preventive therapy coupled with preventive treatment resulting from longevity tests.

  9. The trochanter slide osteotomy approach for resurfacing hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Pitto, Rocco P

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to assess the safety and efficacy of the greater trochanter slide osteotomy approach for resurfacing hip arthroplasty. Fifty consecutive hips (47 patients) with degenerative joint disease were enrolled in the study. Serial clinical and radiological assessments were performed after the index operation. At 1-year follow-up, the clinical outcome and patient satisfaction were rated excellent or good in all hips. The radiological assessment showed signs of satisfactory implant alignment. Periprosthetic fractures and non-unions of the greater trochanter were not observed. The greater trochanter slide osteotomy approach for resurfacing hip arthroplasty is a safe procedure and provides optimal exposure of the acetabulum and proximal femur, maintaining the soft-tissue integrity of the hip joint. Blood supply of the proximal femur is not violated using this approach.

  10. Monte Carlo modeling of the resurfacing of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullock, M. A.; Grinspoon, David H.; Head, James W., III

    1992-01-01

    We have developed a three-dimensional model of venusian resurfacing that employs Monte Carlo simulations of both impact cratering and volcanism. The model simulates the production of craters on Venus by using the observed mass distributions of Earth- and Venus-crossing asteroids and comets. Lava flows are modeled by an energy minimization technique to simulate the effects of local topography on the shape and extent of flows. The model is run under a wide range of assumptions regarding the scale and time evolution of volcanism on Venus. Regions of the parameter space that result in impact crater distributions and modifications that are currently observed will be explored to place limits on the possible volcanic resurfacing history of Venus.

  11. Monte Carlo computer simulations of Venus equilibrium and global resurfacing models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, D. D.; Strom, R. G.; Schaber, G. G.

    1992-01-01

    Two models have been proposed for the resurfacing history of Venus: (1) equilibrium resurfacing and (2) global resurfacing. The equilibrium model consists of two cases: in case 1, areas less than or equal to 0.03 percent of the planet are spatially randomly resurfaced at intervals of less than or greater than 150,000 yr to produce the observed spatially random distribution of impact craters and average surface age of about 500 m.y.; and in case 2, areas greater than or equal to 10 percent of the planet are resurfaced at intervals of greater than or equal to 50 m.y. The global resurfacing model proposes that the entire planet was resurfaced about 500 m.y. ago, destroying the preexisting crater population and followed by significantly reduced volcanism and tectonism. The present crater population has accumulated since then with only 4 percent of the observed craters having been embayed by more recent lavas. To test the equilibrium resurfacing model we have run several Monte Carlo computer simulations for the two proposed cases. It is shown that the equilibrium resurfacing model is not a valid model for an explanation of the observed crater population characteristics or Venus' resurfacing history. The global resurfacing model is the most likely explanation for the characteristics of Venus' cratering record. The amount of resurfacing since that event, some 500 m.y. ago, can be estimated by a different type of Monte Carolo simulation. To date, our initial simulation has only considered the easiest case to implement. In this case, the volcanic events are randomly distributed across the entire planet and, therefore, contrary to observation, the flooded craters are also randomly distributed across the planet.

  12. Thermal injuries as a result of CO2 laser resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Grossman, A R; Majidian, A M; Grossman, P H

    1998-09-01

    CO2 laser resurfacing of the face for fine wrinkles has gained great popularity over a short period of time. The use of the CO2 laser has proven to be effective in reducing or eliminating fine wrinkles. This tool in the surgeon's armamentarium has been added to those of dermabrasion and chemical peel. The theoretical advantage of the use of the CO2 laser for resurfacing has been better accuracy and reportedly more control of the depth of penetration. The use of the CO2 laser has been welcomed by many cosmetic surgeons. Until now, there have been few reported cases of complications with the use of the CO2 laser. To many, this would sound too good to be true; unfortunately, that is the case. The CO2 laser is a high-energy machine that can indeed cause thermal injury. This thermal injury can result in deep burns to the skin and hypertrophic scarring. We feel this is more common than is currently being reported, and we share our experience as a burn and wound care referral service. During an 18-month period, 20 consecutive patients were referred to our practice who had received injuries from the CO2 laser resurfacing laser. We present here in this review a summary of those injuries. The CO2 resurfacing laser is a very effective tool for the treatment of fine wrinkles, but it is not without the potential for serious complications. We urge caution with the use of the laser and prompt recognition and treatment of thermal injury to the skin.

  13. Resurfacing Damaged Articular Cartilage to Restore Compressive Properties

    PubMed Central

    Grenier, Stephanie; Donnelly, Patrick E.; Gittens, Jamila; Torzilli, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    Surface damage to articular cartilage is recognized as the initial underlying process causing the loss of mechanical function in early-stage osteoarthritis. In this study, we developed structure-modifying treatments to potentially prevent, stabilize or reverse the loss in mechanical function. Various polymers (chondroitin sulfate, carboxymethylcellulose, sodium hyaluronate) and photoinitiators (riboflavin, irgacure 2959) were applied to the surface of collagenase-degraded cartilage and crosslinked in situ using UV light irradiation. While matrix permeability and deformation significantly increased following collagenase-induced degradation of the superficial zone, resurfacing using tyramine-substituted sodium hyaluronate and riboflavin decreased both values to a level comparable to that of intact cartilage. Repetitive loading of resurfaced cartilage showed minimal variation in the mechanical response over a 7 day period. Cartilage resurfaced using a low concentration of riboflavin had viable cells in all zones while a higher concentration resulted in a thin layer of cell death in the uppermost superficial zone. Our approach to repair surface damage initiates a new therapeutic advance in the treatment of injured articular cartilage with potential benefits that include enhanced mechanical properties, reduced susceptibility to enzymatic degradation and reduced adhesion of macrophages. PMID:25468298

  14. Pellet ablation and ablation model development

    SciTech Connect

    Houlberg, W.A.

    1989-01-01

    A broad survey of pellet ablation is given, based primarily on information presented at this meeting. The implications of various experimental observations for ablation theory are derived from qualitative arguments of the physics involved. The major elements of a more complete ablation theory are then outlined in terms of these observations. This is followed by a few suggestions on improving the connections between theory and experimental results through examination of ablation data. Although this is a rather aggressive undertaking for such a brief (and undoubtedly incomplete) assessment, some of the discussion may help us advance the understanding of pellet ablation. 17 refs.

  15. 21 CFR 888.3580 - Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic... § 888.3580 Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device made...

  16. 21 CFR 888.3580 - Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic... § 888.3580 Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device made...

  17. 21 CFR 888.3580 - Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic... § 888.3580 Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device made...

  18. 21 CFR 888.3580 - Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic... § 888.3580 Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device made...

  19. 21 CFR 888.3400 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3400 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral...

  20. 21 CFR 888.3400 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3400 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral...

  1. 21 CFR 888.3400 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3400 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral...

  2. 21 CFR 888.3400 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3400 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral...

  3. 21 CFR 888.3400 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3400 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral...

  4. Surgical Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Ramlawi, Basel; Abu Saleh, Walid K

    2015-01-01

    The Cox-maze procedure for the restoration of normal sinus rhythm, initially developed by Dr. James Cox, underwent several iterations over the years. The main concept consists of creating a series of transmural lesions in the right and left atria that disrupt re-entrant circuits responsible for propagating the abnormal atrial fibrillation rhythm. The left atrial appendage is excluded as a component of the Maze procedure. For the first three iterations of the Cox- maze procedure, these lesions were performed using a surgical cut-and-sew approach that ensured transmurality. The Cox-Maze IV is the most currently accepted iteration. It achieves the same lesion set of the Cox- maze III but uses alternative energy sources to create the transmural lesions, potentially in a minimally invasive approach on the beating heart. High-frequency ultrasound, microwave, and laser energy have all been used with varying success in the past. Today, bipolar radiofrequency heat or cryotherapy cooling are the most accepted sources for creating linear lesions with consistent safety and transmurality. The robust and reliable nature of these energy delivery methods has yielded a success rate reaching 90% freedom from atrial fibrillation at 12 months. Such approaches offer a significant long-term advantage over catheter-based ablation, especially in patients having longstanding, persistent atrial fibrillation with characteristics such as dilated left atrial dimensions, poor ejection fraction, and failed catheter ablation. Based on these improved results, there currently is significant interest in developing a hybrid ablation strategy that incorporates the superior transmural robust lesions of surgical ablation, the reliable stroke prevention potential of epicardial left atrial appendage exclusion, and sophisticated mapping and confirmatory catheter-based ablation technology. Such a minimally invasive hybrid strategy for ablation may lead to the development of multidisciplinary "Afib teams" to

  5. Recall of the ASR XL Head and Hip Resurfacing Systems.

    PubMed

    Maurer-Ertl, Werner; Friesenbichler, Joerg; Holzer, Lukas A; Leitner, Lukas; Ogris, Kathrin; Maier, Michael; Leithner, Andreas

    2016-12-19

    At the beginning of the 21st century, use of large-diameter, metal-on-metal devices was a popular procedure for hip replacement in young and physically active patients; however, within a few years, the number of revisions increased, resulting in a worldwide recall for the articular surface replacement (ASR) system. Complication rates for the ASR devices implanted at the authors' department are reported, with revision rates of 32% and 30% in the ASR XL Head and ASR Resurfacing groups, respectively. Reasons for revision surgery were serum metal ion elevation, luxation or subluxation, aseptic loosening, soft tissue compromise (adverse reactions to metal debris [ARMD]), and infection. The calculated implant survival for the ASR XL Head system and the ASR Resurfacing device (DePuy Orthopaedics Inc, Warsaw, Indiana) in the current series was 79% and 90%, respectively, at 60 months. Symptomatic patients with metal-on-metal devices, with or without elevated metal ion concentrations, should undergo cross sectional imaging to exclude ARMD. In cases of increased metal ion concentrations, local pain, or ARMD, revision surgery has to be evaluated. In the future, closer monitoring of new implants is needed to prevent high failure rates, as seen with the ASR design. Furthermore, the withdrawal of the device highlights the importance of national implant registries. [Orthopedics. 201x; xx(x):xx-xx.].

  6. Thermal measurements of short-duration CO2 laser resurfacing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, David M.; Fried, Daniel; Reinisch, Lou; Bell, Thomas; Lyver, Rex

    1997-05-01

    The thermal consequences of a 100 microsecond carbon-dioxide laser used for skin resurfacing were examined with infrared radiometry. Human skin was evaluated in a cosmetic surgery clinic and extirpated rodent skin was measured in a research laboratory. Thermal relaxation following single pulses of in vivo human and ex vivo animal skin were quantitatively similar in the 30 - 1000 msec range. The thermal emission from the area of the irradiated tissue increased monotonically with increasing incident laser fluence. Extremely high peak temperatures during the 100 microsecond pulse are attributed to plume incandescence. Ejecta thermal emission may also contribute to our measurements during the first several msecs. The data are combined into a thermal relaxation model. Given known coefficients, and adjusting tissue absorption to reflect a 50% water content, and thermal conductivity of 2.3 times that of water, the measured (both animal back and human forearm) and calculated values coincide. The high thermal conductance suggests preferential thermal conduction along the protein matrix. The clinical observation of a resurfacing procedure clearly shows thermal overlap and build-up is a result of sequential, adjacent pulses. A decrease of 4 - 6 degrees Celsius in surface temperature at the treatment site that appeared immediately post-Tx and gradually diminished over several days is possibly a sign of dermal convective and/or evaporative cooling.

  7. Radiofrequency Ablation of Liver Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Site Index A-Z Radiofrequency Ablation (RFA) of Liver Tumors Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a treatment that ... of Liver Tumors? What is Radiofrequency Ablation of Liver Tumors? Radiofrequency ablation, sometimes referred to as RFA, ...

  8. Does patella resurfacing really matter? Pain and function in 972 patients after primary total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Espehaug, Birgitte; Havelin, Leif Ivar; Vollset, Stein Emil; Furnes, Ove

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose Resurfacing of the patella during primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is often recommended based on higher revision rates in non-resurfaced knees. As many of these revisions are insertions of a patella component due to pain, and since only patients with a non-resurfaced patella have the option of secondary resurfacing, we do not really know whether these patients have more pain and poorer function. The main purpose of the present paper was therefore to assess pain and function at least 2 years after surgery for unrevised primary non-resurfaced and resurfaced TKA, and secondary among prosthesis brands. Methods Information needed to calculate subscales from the knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS) was collected in a questionnaire given to 972 osteoarthritis patients with intact primary TKAs that had been reported to the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register. Pain and satisfaction on visual analog scales and improvement in EQ-5D index score ΔEQ-5D) were also used as outcomes. Outcomes were measured on a scale from 0 to 100 units (worst to best). To estimate differences in mean scores, we used multiple linear regression with adjustment for possible confounders. Results We did not observe any differences between resurfacing and non-resurfacing in any outcome, with estimated differences of ≤ 1.4 units and p-values of > 0.4. There was, however, a tendency of better results for the NexGen implant as compared to the reference brand AGC for symptoms (difference = 4.9, p = 0.05), pain (VAS) (difference = 8.3, p = 0.004), and satisfaction (VAS) (difference = 7.9, p = 0.02). However, none of these differences reached the stated level of minimal perceptible clinical difference. Interpretation Resurfacing of the patella has no clinical effect on pain and function after TKA. Differences between the brands investigated were small and they were assumed to be of minor importance. PMID:20158405

  9. Metal-on-Metal Total Hip Resurfacing Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The objective of this review was to assess the safety and effectiveness of metal on metal (MOM) hip resurfacing arthroplasty for young patients compared with that of total hip replacement (THR) in the same population. Clinical Need Total hip replacement has proved to be very effective for late middle-aged and elderly patients with severe degenerative diseases of the hips. As indications for THR began to include younger patients and those with a more active life style, the longevity of the implant became a concern. Evidence suggests that these patients experience relatively higher rates of early implant failure and the need for revision. The Swedish hip registry, for example, has demonstrated a survival rate in excess of 80% at 20 years for those aged over 65 years, whereas this figure was 33% by 16 years in those aged under 55 years. Hip resurfacing arthroplasty is a bone-conserving alternative to THR that restores normal joint biomechanics and load transfer. The technique has been used around the world for more than 10 years, specifically in the United Kingdom and other European countries. The Technology Metal-on-metal hip resurfacing arthroplasty is an alternative procedure to conventional THR in younger patients. Hip resurfacing arthroplasty is less invasive than THR and addresses the problem of preserving femoral bone stock at the initial operation. This means that future hip revisions are possible with THR if the initial MOM arthroplasty becomes less effective with time in these younger patients. The procedure involves the removal and replacement of the surface of the femoral head with a hollow metal hemisphere, which fits into a metal acetabular cup. Hip resurfacing arthroplasty is a technically more demanding procedure than is conventional THR. In hip resurfacing, the femoral head is retained, which makes it much more difficult to access the acetabular cup. However, hip resurfacing arthroplasty has several advantages over a

  10. Laser ablation in analytical chemistry - A review

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, Richard E.; Mao, Xianglei; Liu, Haichen; Gonzalez, Jhanis; Mao, Samuel S.

    2001-10-10

    Laser ablation is becoming a dominant technology for direct solid sampling in analytical chemistry. Laser ablation refers to the process in which an intense burst of energy delivered by a short laser pulse is used to sample (remove a portion of) a material. The advantages of laser ablation chemical analysis include direct characterization of solids, no chemical procedures for dissolution, reduced risk of contamination or sample loss, analysis of very small samples not separable for solution analysis, and determination of spatial distributions of elemental composition. This review describes recent research to understand and utilize laser ablation for direct solid sampling, with emphasis on sample introduction to an inductively coupled plasma (ICP). Current research related to contemporary experimental systems, calibration and optimization, and fractionation is discussed, with a summary of applications in several areas.

  11. Ages of fracturing and resurfacing in the Amenthes region, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maxwell, Ted A.; Mcgill, George E.

    1988-01-01

    An attempt is made to determine whether there is any tectonic evidence in the relatively recent history of the boundary zone that will place contraints on the origin of the Martian dichotomy. It is found that the timing of resurfacing events and structural modification of outlier plateaus and mesas in the Martian eastern hemisphere provides a contraint on the history of tectonic events along the cratered terrain-northern plains boundary. The circumferential grabens surrounding the Isidis basin ceased forming before the final emplacement of ridged plains on the adjacent northern lowlands. The cratered plateau east of the Isidis basin includes two crater populations; stripping of the rims of craters was complete before downfalling of the transition zone between the cratered terrain and the northern plains, and a young population of craters on the plateau records the same age as the ridged plains units north of the boundary.

  12. Groin pain following hip resurfacing: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    McArthur, John R; Costa, Matthew; Griffin, Damian R; Krikler, Steven J; Parsons, Nicholas; Foguet, Pedro R

    2011-01-01

    We compared 47 patients with groin pain following hip resurfacing to a matched control group. Functional scores and plain radiographs were assessed along with measurement of whole blood cobalt and chromium by inductively coupled mass spectrometry. Symptomatic patients underwent ultrasound scan of the affected hip. Mean functional outcomes were poor in those with pain and good in the control group. Groin pain was associated with valgus stem positioning and lower neck:head ratio (relatively narrow neck) (p=0.03, p=0.04 respectively). We classified patients with groin pain into two groups: biological and mechanical. The biological group had soft tissue abnormalities on USS and higher levels of cobalt and chromium (p=0.04, p=0.05 respectively). The mechanical group had normal USS, lower metal ion levels and more retroverted femoral components (p=0.01).

  13. MOLECULAR RESURFACING OF CARTILAGE WITH PROTEOGLYCAN 4 (PRG4)

    PubMed Central

    Chawla, Kanika; Ham, Hyun Ok; Nguyen, Trung; Messersmith, Phillip B.

    2010-01-01

    Early loss of proteoglycan 4 (PRG4), a lubricating glycoprotein implicated in boundary lubrication, from the cartilage surface has been associated with degeneration of cartilage and early onset of osteoarthritis. Viscosupplementation with hyaluronic acid and other macromolecules has been proposed as a treatment of osteoarthritis, however efficacy of viscosupplementation is variable and may be influenced by the short residence time of lubricant in the knee joint after injection. Recent studies have demonstrated the use of aldehyde (CHO) modified extracellular matrix proteins for targeted adherence to a biological tissue surface. We hypothesized that CHO could be exploited to enhance binding of lubricating proteoglycans to the surface of PRG4 depleted cartilage. The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of molecular resurfacing of cartilage with aldehyde modified PRG4. PRG4 was chemically functionalized with aldehyde (PRG4-CHO), and aldehyde plus Oregon Green (OG) fluorophore (PRG4-OG-CHO) to allow for differentiation of endogenous and exogenous PRG4. Cartilage disks depleted of native PRG4 were then treated with solutions of PRG4, PRG4-CHO, or PRG4-OG-CHO and then assayed for the presence of PRG4 by immunohistochemistry, ELISA, and fluorescence imaging. Repletion of cartilage surfaces was significantly enhanced with the inclusion of CHO compared to repletion with unmodified PRG4. These findings suggest a generalized approach that may be used for molecular resurfacing of tissue surfaces with PRG4 and other lubricating biomolecules, perhaps leading in the future to a convenient method for overcoming loss of lubrication during the early stages of osteoarthritis. PMID:20338268

  14. 21 CFR 888.3590 - Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) Classification. Class II. ...) translation in one or more planes. It has no linkage across-the-joint. This prosthesis is made of alloys, such as cobalt-chromium-molybdenum, and is intended to resurface one tibial condyle. The generic type...

  15. Nonequilibrium Ablation of Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milos, Frank S.; Chen, Yih K.; Gokcen, Tahir

    2012-01-01

    In previous work, an equilibrium ablation and thermal response model for Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator was developed. In general, over a wide range of test conditions, model predictions compared well with arcjet data for surface recession, surface temperature, in-depth temperature at multiple thermocouples, and char depth. In this work, additional arcjet tests were conducted at stagnation conditions down to 40 W/sq cm and 1.6 kPa. The new data suggest that nonequilibrium effects become important for ablation predictions at heat flux or pressure below about 80 W/sq cm or 10 kPa, respectively. Modifications to the ablation model to account for nonequilibrium effects are investigated. Predictions of the equilibrium and nonequilibrium models are compared with the arcjet data.

  16. Pulmonary ablation: a primer.

    PubMed

    Roberton, Benjamin J; Liu, David; Power, Mark; Wan, John M C; Stuart, Sam; Klass, Darren; Yee, John

    2014-05-01

    Percutaneous image-guided thermal ablation is safe and efficacious in achieving local control and improving outcome in the treatment of both early stage non-small-cell lung cancer and pulmonary metastatic disease, in which surgical treatment is precluded by comorbidity, poor cardiorespiratory reserve, or unfavorable disease distribution. Radiofrequency ablation is the most established technology, but new thermal ablation technologies such as microwave ablation and cryoablation may offer some advantages. The use of advanced techniques, such as induced pneumothorax and the popsicle stick technique, or combining thermal ablation with radiotherapy, widens the treatment options available to the multidisciplinary team. The intent of this article is to provide the reader with a practical knowledge base of pulmonary ablation by concentrating on indications, techniques, and follow-up.

  17. Renal Ablation Update

    PubMed Central

    Khiatani, Vishal; Dixon, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    Thermal ablative technologies have evolved considerably in the recent past and are now an important component of current clinical guidelines for the treatment of small renal masses. Both radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation have intermediate-term oncologic control that rivals surgical options, with favorable complication profiles. Studies comparing cryoablation and radiofrequency ablation show no significant difference in oncologic control or complication profile between the two modalities. Early data from small series with microwave ablation have shown similar promising results. Newer technologies including irreversible electroporation and high-intensity–focused ultrasound have theoretical advantages, but will require further research before becoming a routine part of the ablation armamentarium. The purpose of this review article is to discuss the current ablative technologies available, briefly review their mechanisms of action, discuss technical aspects of each, and provide current data supporting their use. PMID:25049445

  18. History of plains resurfacing in the Scandia region of Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tanaka, Kenneth L.; Fortezzo, Corey M.; Hayward, Rosalyn K.; Rodriguez, J. Alexis P.; Skinner, James A.

    2011-01-01

    We present a preliminary photogeologic map of the Scandia region of Mars with the objective of reconstructing its resurfacing history. The Scandia region includes the lower section of the regional lowland slope of Vastitas Borealis extending about 500–1800 km away from Alba Mons into the Scandia sub-basin below −4800 m elevation. Twenty mapped geologic units express the diverse stratigraphy of the region. We particularly focus on the materials making up the Vastitas Borealis plains and its Scandia sub-region, where erosional processes have obscured stratigraphic relations and made the reconstruction of the resurfacing history particularly challenging. Geologic mapping implicates the deposition, erosion, and deformation/degradation of geologic units predominantly during Late Hesperian and Early Amazonian time (~3.6–3.3 Ga). During this time, Alba Mons was active, outflow channels were debouching sediments into the northern plains, and basal ice layers of the north polar plateau were accumulating. We identify zones of regional tectonic contraction and extension as well as gradation and mantling. Depressions and scarps within these zones indicate collapse and gradation of Scandia outcrops and surfaces at scales of meters to hundreds of meters. We find that Scandia Tholi display concentric ridges, rugged peaks, irregular depressions, and moats that suggest uplift and tilting of layered plains material by diapirs and extrusion, erosion, and deflation of viscous, sedimentary slurries as previously suggested. These appear to be long-lived features that both pre-date and post-date impact craters. Mesa-forming features may have similar origins and occur along the southern margin of the Scandia region, including near the Phoenix Mars Lander site. Distinctive lobate materials associated with local impact craters suggest impact-induced mobilization of surface materials. We suggest that the formation of the Scandia region features potentially resulted from crustal heating

  19. Radiofrequency Ablation of Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Marc; Mikityansky, Igor; Kam, Anthony; Libutti, Steven K.; Walther, McClellan M.; Neeman, Ziv; Locklin, Julia K.; Wood, Bradford J.

    2004-09-15

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has been used for over 18 years for treatment of nerve-related chronic pain and cardiac arrhythmias. In the last 10 years, technical developments have increased ablation volumes in a controllable, versatile, and relatively inexpensive manner. The host of clinical applications for RFA have similarly expanded. Current RFA equipment, techniques, applications, results, complications, and research avenues for local tumor ablation are summarized.

  20. Lung Ablation: Whats New?

    PubMed

    Xiong, Lillian; Dupuy, Damian E

    2016-07-01

    Lung cancer had an estimated incidence of 221,200 in 2015, making up 13% of all cancer diagnoses. Tumor ablation is an important treatment option for nonsurgical lung cancer and pulmonary metastatic patients. Radiofrequency ablation has been used for over a decade with newer modalities, microwave ablation, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation presenting as additional and possibly improved treatment options for patients. This minimally invasive therapy is best for small primary lesions or favorably located metastatic tumors. These technologies can offer palliation and sometimes cure of thoracic malignancies. This article discusses the current available technologies and techniques available for tumor ablation.

  1. Ablative Thermal Protection System Fundamentals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, Robin A. S.

    2013-01-01

    This is the presentation for a short course on the fundamentals of ablative thermal protection systems. It covers the definition of ablation, description of ablative materials, how they work, how to analyze them and how to model them.

  2. Volcanic eruptions on Io: Heat flow, resurfacing, and lava composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blaney, Diana L.; Johnson, Torrence V.; Matson, Dennis L.; Veeder, Glenn J.

    1995-01-01

    We model an infrared outburst on Io as being due to a large, erupting lava flow which increased its area at a rate of 1.5 x 10(exp 5)/sq m and cooled from 1225 to 555 K over the 2.583-hr period of observation. The inferred effusion rate of 3 x 10(exp 5) cu m/sec for this eruption is very high, but is not unprece- dented on the Earth and is similar to the high eruption rates suggested for early lunar volcanism. Eruptions occur approxi- mately 6% of the time on Io. These eruptions provide ample resurfacing to explain Io's lack of impact craters. We suggest that the large total radiometric heat flow, 10(exp 14) W, and the size and temperature distribution of the thermal anomalies (McEwen et al. 1992; Veeder et al. 1994) can be accounted for by a series of silicate lava flows in various stages of cooling. We propose that the whole suite of Io's currently observed thermal anomalies was produced by multiple, high-eruptive-rate silicate flows within the past century.

  3. Hip resurfacing arthroplasty: A new method to assess and quantify learning phase.

    PubMed

    Aulakh, T S; Jayasekera, N; Singh, R; Patel, A; Kuiper, J H; Richardson, J B

    2014-09-01

    Hip resurfacing had initially gained acceptance and popularity as it helps preserve femoral bone stock. In this study we tried to answer the following questions; 1. Whether there is a learning curve for hip resurfacing? 2. Is it present in surgeons from non-developer centres? 3. Is it present in surgeons from developer centres as well? The Oswestry outcome centre was setup to serve an independent international registry for collecting, analysing and reporting outcomes following hip resurfacing. Over a 10 year period, 4535 patients (5000 hips) were recruited from different countries and within the UK from different centres in this study by 139 surgeons from 37 different countries. Our study has shown that function can be used to assess the level of surgical competence. The results from this multilevel analysis have helped to answer the questions posed in the introduction. Hip resurfacing is a surgical procedure with a learning phase and this learning effect is more pronounced in non-developer surgeons as compared to developer surgeons. Hip scores can be used to assess proficiency and competence of surgeons undertaking hip resurfacing arthroplasty.

  4. Safety and efficacy of 2,790-nm laser resurfacing for chest photoaging.

    PubMed

    Grunebaum, Lisa D; Murdock, Jennifer; Cofnas, Paul; Kaufman, Joely

    2015-01-01

    Chest photodamage is a common cosmetic complaint. Laser treatment of the chest may be higher risk than other areas. The objective of this study was to assess the safety and efficacy of 2,790-nm chest resurfacing for photodamage. Twelve patients with Fitzpatrick skin types I-III were enrolled in this university IRB-approved study. Photo documentation was obtained at baseline and each visit. A test spot with the 2,790-nm resurfacing laser was performed on the chest. Patients who did not have adverse effects from the test spot went on to have a full chest resurfacing procedure. Patients were instructed on standardized aftercare, including sunscreen. A 5-point healing and photodamage improvement scale was used to rate improvement by both investigators and the patients and was obtained at 2 weeks, 1 month, 2 months, and 3 months. One pass chest treatment with the 2,790-nm resurfacing laser at fluences greater than or equal to 3.0 mJ with 10% overlap leads to unacceptable rates of hyperpigmentation. Double pass chest treatment at fluences less than or equal to 2.5 mJ with 10% overlap leads to mild improvement in chest photodamage parameters without significant or persistent adverse effects. Laser treatment of aging/photodamaged chest skin remains a challenge due to the delicacy of chest skin. Mild improvement may be obtained with double pass resurfacing with the 2,790-nm wavelength.

  5. Erbium:YAG laser resurfacing increases skin permeability and the risk of excessive absorption of antibiotics and sunscreens: the influence of skin recovery on drug absorption.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woan-Ruoh; Shen, Shing-Chuan; Al-Suwayeh, Saleh A; Li, Yi-Ching; Fang, Jia-You

    2012-06-01

    While laser skin resurfacing is expected to result in reduced barrier function and increased risk of drug absorption, the extent of the increment has not yet been systematically investigated. We aimed to establish the skin permeation profiles of tetracycline and sunscreens after exposure to the erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG) laser during postoperative periods. Physiological and histopathological examinations were carried out for 5 days after laser treatment on nude mice. Percutaneous absorption of the permeants was determined by an in vitro Franz cell. Ablation depths varied in reaching the stratum corneum (10 μm, 2.5 J/cm²) to approach the epidermis (25 μm, 6.25 J/cm²) and upper dermis (40 μm, 10 J/cm²). Reepithelialization evaluated by transepidermal water loss was complete within 2-4 days and depended on the ablation depth. Epidermal hyperplasia was observed in the 40-μm-treated group. The laser was sufficient to disrupt the skin barrier and allow the transport of the permeants into and across the skin. The laser fluence was found to play an important role in modulating skin absorption. A 25-μm ablation depth increased tetracycline flux 84-fold. A much smaller enhancement (3.3-fold) was detected for tetracycline accumulation within the skin. The laser with different fluences produced enhancement of oxybenzone skin deposition of 3.4-6.4-fold relative to the untreated group. No penetration across the skin was shown regardless of whether titanium dioxide was applied to intact or laser-treated skin. However, laser resurfacing increased the skin deposition of titanium dioxide from 46 to 109-188 ng/g. Tetracycline absorption had recovered to the level of intact skin after 5 days, while more time was required for oxybenzone absorption. The in vivo skin accumulation and plasma concentration revealed that the laser could increase tetracycline absorption 2-3-fold. The experimental results indicated that clinicians should be cautious when determining the

  6. Sprayable lightweight ablative coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, William G. (Inventor); Sharpe, Max H. (Inventor); Hill, William E. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An improved lightweight, ablative coating is disclosed that may be spray applied and cured without the development of appreciable shrinkage cracks. The ablative mixture consists essentially of phenolic microballoons, hollow glass spheres, glass fibers, ground cork, a flexibilized resin binder, and an activated colloidal clay.

  7. Catheter Ablation of Fascicular Ventricular Tachycardia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yaowu; Fang, Zhen; Yang, Bing; Kojodjojo, Pipin; Chen, Hongwu; Ju, Weizhu; Cao, Kejiang; Chen, Minglong

    2015-01-01

    Background— Fascicular ventricular tachycardia (FVT) is a common form of sustained idiopathic left ventricular tachycardia with an Asian preponderance. This study aimed to prospectively investigate long-term clinical outcomes of patients undergoing ablation of FVT and identify predictors of arrhythmia recurrence. Methods and Results— Consecutive patients undergoing FVT ablation at a single tertiary center were enrolled. Activation mapping was performed to identify the earliest presystolic Purkinje potential during FVT that was targeted by radiofrequency ablation. Follow-up with clinic visits, ECG, and Holter monitoring was performed at least every 6 months. A total of 120 consecutive patients (mean age, 29.3±12.7 years; 82% men; all patients with normal ejection fraction) were enrolled. FVT involved left posterior fascicle and left anterior fascicle in 118 and 2 subjects, respectively. VT was noninducible in 3 patients, and ablation was acutely successful in 117 patients. With a median follow-up of 55.7 months, VT of a similar ECG morphology recurred in 17 patients, and repeat procedure confirmed FVT recurrence involving the same fascicle. Shorter VT cycle length was the only significant predictor of FVT recurrence (P=0.03). Six other patients developed new-onset upper septal FVT that was successfully ablated. Conclusions— Ablation of FVT guided by activation mapping is associated with a single procedural success rate without the use of antiarrhythmic drugs of 80.3%. Arrhythmia recurrences after an initially successful ablation were caused by recurrent FVT involving the same fascicle in two thirds of patients or new onset of upper septal FVT in the remainder. PMID:26386017

  8. Predictors of femoral neck fracture following hip resurfacing: a cadaveric study.

    PubMed

    Davis, Edward T; Olsen, Michael; Zdero, Rad; Smith, Gemma M; Waddell, James P; Schemitsch, Emil H

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to establish if radiological parameters, dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) and quantitative CT (qCT) could predict the risk of sustaining a femoral neck fracture following hip resurfacing. Twenty-one unilateral fresh frozen femurs were used. Each femur had a plain digital anteroposterior radiograph, DEXA scan and qCT scan. Femurs were then prepared for a Birmingham Hip Resurfacing femoral component and loaded to failure. Results demonstrated that gender and qCT measurements showed strong correlation with failure load. QCT could be used as an individual measure to predict risk of post-operative femoral neck fracture. However, when qCT is unavailable; gender, pre-operative DEXA scan and Neck Width measurements can be used together to assess risk of post-operative femoral neck fracture in patients due to undergo hip resurfacing.

  9. Venus resurfacing rates: Constraints provided by 3-D Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullock, M. A.; Grinspoon, D. H.; Head, J. W.

    1993-01-01

    A 3-D Monte Carlo model that simulates the evolving surface of Venus under the influence of a flux of impacting objects and a variety of styles of volcanic resurfacing was implemented. For given rates of impact events and resurfacing, the model predicts the size-frequency and areal distributions of surviving impact craters as a function of time. The number of craters partially modified by volcanic events is also calculated as the surface evolves. It was found that a constant, global resurfacing rate of approximately 0.4 km(sup 3)/yr is required to explain the observed distributions of both the entire crater population, and the population of craters partially modified by volcanic processes.

  10. Liquid water and resurfacing of Enceladus' south polar terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobie, G.; Besserer, J.; Cadek, O.; Choblet, G.; Sotin, C.

    2008-09-01

    Enceladus are the only solid objects in the Solar System to be sufficiently geologically active for their internal heat to be detected by remote sensing. Interestingly, the endogenic activity on Enceladus is only located on a specific region at the south pole, from which jets of water vapor and ice particles have been observed ([1], [2]). The current polar location of the thermal anomaly can possibly be explained by diapirinduced reorientation of the satellite [3], but the triggering of the thermal anomaly and the heat power required to sustain it over geologic timescales remain problematic. Using a three-dimensional viscoelastic numerical model simulating the response of Enceladus to tidal forcing, we have demonstrated in a previous recent study [4] that only interior models with a liquid water layer at depth can explain the observed magnitude of dissipation and its particular location at the south pole (Fig. 1). Moreover, as tidally-induced heat must be generated over a relatively broad region in the southern hemisphere to explain the observed thermal emission, we proposed that this heat is then transferred toward the south polar terrain where it could be episodically released during relatively short resurfacing events. In the present study, we investigate the thermal stability of localized liquid water reservoir at the rock-ice interface by performing simulations of thermal convection in three-dimensional spherical geometry with the numerical tool OEDIPUS ([5],[6]) and by computing the corresponding dissipation pattern using the method developped in [4]. Where liquid water is present, a constant temperature equal to the melting temperature of water ice is prescribed at the base of the ice shell. Outside this region, a constant heat flux owing to the radiogenic power coming out of the silicate core is prescribed. Figure 2 illustrates the temperature field obtained for varying size of the liquid reservoir (ranging from 60o to 120o). These preliminary results

  11. Facial resurfacing with split-thickness skin grafts in xeroderma pigmentosum variant.

    PubMed

    Tayeb, Talel; Laure, Boris; Sury, Florent; Lorette, Gérard; Goga, Dominique

    2011-10-01

    Xeroderma Pigmentosum (XP) is a rare systemic disease which is transmitted through an incomplete sex-linked recessive gene. As a result of this, exposure to the ultraviolet (UV) rays of the sun causes malignant skin lesions. One of the most effective treatment options for the malignant lesions is full-face resurfacing with skin grafts. These grafts should be harvested from areas that have not been affected by UV exposure or have at least been minimally affected. The authors present a patient with XP whose face was resurfaced by split-thickness skin grafts taken from the buttocks.

  12. Safe and effective carbon dioxide laser skin resurfacing of the neck.

    PubMed

    Kilmer, Suzanne L; Chotzen, Vera A; Silva, Susan K; McClaren, Marla L

    2006-08-01

    CO2 laser skin resurfacing remains the gold standard for treatment of photoaged facial skin. It can be used onto the neck to further blend in the treated area with non-treated, adjacent photodamaged skin as well as improve the superficial textural quality of the neck skin. This article provides an overview of laser skin resurfacing of the neck, including pre-operative evaluation, patient education and selection, laser settings and technique used, post-operative care, and identification and treatment of possible complications.

  13. Fixation of a Periprosthetic Intertrochanteric Hip Fracture below a Birmingham Hip Resurfacing

    PubMed Central

    Macdonald, J.; Robinson, A.; Brown, I.

    2014-01-01

    This case report involves a 56-year-old female (Mrs X) with a traumatic intertrochanteric hip fracture with subtrochanteric extension below a previous Birmingham hip resurfacing. Periprosthetic fractures following hip resurfacing are usually subcapital and treated with a revision or conservative management. We present an unusual surgical problem with an interesting solution stabilising the fracture using a proximal femoral locking compression plate (LCP). Eight months following surgery the patient is able to walk pain free and there is good fixation and stability. PMID:24995142

  14. Tumor Ablation and Nanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Manthe, Rachel L.; Foy, Susan P.; Krishnamurthy, Nishanth; Sharma, Blanka; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2010-01-01

    Next to surgical resection, tumor ablation is a commonly used intervention in the treatment of solid tumors. Tumor ablation methods include thermal therapies, photodynamic therapy, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) producing agents. Thermal therapies induce tumor cell death via thermal energy and include radiofrequency, microwave, high intensity focused ultrasound, and cryoablation. Photodynamic therapy and ROS producing agents cause increased oxidative stress in tumor cells leading to apoptosis. While these therapies are safe and viable alternatives when resection of malignancies is not feasible, they do have associated limitations that prevent their widespread use in clinical applications. To improve the efficacy of these treatments, nanoparticles are being studied in combination with nonsurgical ablation regimens. In addition to better thermal effect on tumor ablation, nanoparticles can deliver anticancer therapeutics that show synergistic anti-tumor effect in the presence of heat and can also be imaged to achieve precision in therapy. Understanding the molecular mechanism of nanoparticle-mediated tumor ablation could further help engineer nanoparticles of appropriate composition and properties to synergize the ablation effect. This review aims to explore the various types of nonsurgical tumor ablation methods currently used in cancer treatment and potential improvements by nanotechnology applications. PMID:20866097

  15. Thermal ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Head, Hayden W; Dodd, Gerald D

    2004-11-01

    Thermal ablation, as a form of minimally invasive therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), has become an important treatment modality. Because of the limitations of surgery, the techniques of thermal ablation have become standard therapies for HCC in some situations. This article reviews 4 thermal ablation techniques-radiofrequency (RF) ablation, microwave ablation, laser ablation, and cryoablation. Each of these techniques may have a role in treating HCC, and the mechanisms, equipment, patient selection, results, and complications of each are considered. Furthermore, combined therapies consisting of thermal ablation and adjuvant chemotherapy also show promise for enhancing these techniques. Important areas of research into thermal ablation remain, including improving the ability of ablation to treat larger tumors, determining the indications for each thermal ablation modality, optimizing image guidance, and obtaining good outcome data on the efficacy of these techniques.

  16. Moldable cork ablation material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A successful thermal ablative material was manufactured. Moldable cork sheets were tested for density, tensile strength, tensile elongation, thermal conductivity, compression set, and specific heat. A moldable cork sheet, therefore, was established as a realistic product.

  17. Endometrial Ablation for Menorrhagia

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Barry H.

    1992-01-01

    Endometrial ablation is a relatively new treatment for patients with persistent menorrhagia. The procedure can be performed by either laser photocoagulation or electrocoagulation; both have a very low risk of complication. Generally, less than 24 hours of hospitalization is required and return to normal activities, including work, is almost immediate. Endometrial ablation is likely to become a mainstay of treatment for menorrhagia as the technology and training become more readily available. PMID:21229128

  18. Current status of hemi-resurfacing arthroplasty for osteonecrosis of the hip: a 27-year experience.

    PubMed

    Amstutz, Harlan C; Le Duff, Michel J

    2009-04-01

    The purpose of the study discussed in this article is to review the authors' long-term experience with this procedure, compare their clinical results to those of other centers, particularly regarding the difficulty of predicting pain relief, and determine the role of hemi-resurfacing in the future.

  19. Multiple-digit resurfacing using a thin latissimus dorsi perforator flap.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Wha; Lee, Ho Jun; Kim, Jeong Tae; Kim, Youn Hwan

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic digit defects of high complexity and with inadequate local tissue represent challenging surgical problems. Recently, perforator flaps have been proposed for reconstructing large defects of the hand because of their thinness and pliability and minimal donor site morbidity. Here, we illustrate the use of thin latissimus dorsi perforator flaps for resurfacing multiple defects of distal digits. We describe the cases of seven patients with large defects, including digits, circumferential defects and multiple-digit defects, who underwent reconstruction with thin latissimus dorsi perforator flaps between January 2008 and March 2012. Single-digit resurfacing procedures were excluded. The mean age was 56.3 years and the mean flap size was 160.4 cm(2). All the flaps survived completely. Two patients had minor complications including partial flap loss and scar contracture. The mean follow-up period was 11.7 months. The ideal flap for digit resurfacing should be thin and amenable to moulding, have a long pedicle for microanastomosis and have minimal donor site morbidity. Thin flaps can be harvested by excluding the deep adipose layer, and their high pliability enables resurfacing without multiple debulking procedures. The latissimus dorsi perforator flap may be the best flap for reconstructing complex defects of the digits, such as large, multiple-digit or circumferential defects, which require complete wrapping of volar and dorsal surfaces.

  20. Hip resurfacing arthroplasty: mid-term results in 486 cases and current indication in our institution.

    PubMed

    Ribas, Manuel; Cardenas, Carlomagno; Astarita, Emanuele; Moya, Esther; Bellotti, Vittorio

    2014-10-02

    In the previous decade, metal-on-metal hip resurfacing has been considered an attractive option and theoretically advantageous over conventional total hip arthroplasty, especially in young active patients. Different authors have reported favourable mid-term clinical and functional results with acceptable survival rates. Proper indication and planning, as accurate technical execution have been advocated to be crucial elements for success.Concerns regarding serum metal ion levels and possible clinical implications have led in the last years to a decline in the use of metal-on-metal hip resurfacing and metal-on-metal bearings in general.The aim of this study is to present the results of our first 486 cases of hybrid hip resurfacing arthroplasties with a second generation cementing technique, and to describe our current restricted indication of this type of prosthesis, in the light of recent findings in the literature about the possible complications related to metallosis or improper patient selection. Global survivorship of our series was 97.9% at a mean follow-up of 7.2 years.In the second season of our experience the indication is restrictive. The candidate for a resurfacing hip replacement is a young and active male patient, with good bone quality, that has been made aware of the risks and benefits of this type of prosthesis.

  1. The Tribology of Explanted Hip Resurfacings Following Early Fracture of the Femur.

    PubMed

    Lord, James K; Langton, David J; Nargol, Antoni V F; Meek, R M Dominic; Joyce, Thomas J

    2015-10-15

    A recognized issue related to metal-on-metal hip resurfacings is early fracture of the femur. Most theories regarding the cause of fracture relate to clinical factors but an engineering analysis of failed hip resurfacings has not previously been reported. The objective of this work was to determine the wear volumes and surface roughness values of a cohort of retrieved hip resurfacings which were removed due to early femoral fracture, infection and avascular necrosis (AVN). Nine resurfacing femoral heads were obtained following early fracture of the femur, a further five were retrieved due to infection and AVN. All fourteen were measured for volumetric wear using a co-ordinate measuring machine. Wear rates were then calculated and regions of the articulating surface were divided into "worn" and "unworn". Roughness values in these regions were measured using a non-contacting profilometer. The mean time to fracture was 3.7 months compared with 44.4 months for retrieval due to infection and AVN. Average wear rates in the early fracture heads were 64 times greater than those in the infection and AVN retrievals. Given the high wear rates of the early fracture components, such wear may be linked to an increased risk of femoral neck fracture.

  2. The significance of orbital anatomy and periocular wrinkling when performing laser skin resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Trelles, M A; Pardo, L; Benedetto, A V; García-Solana, L; Torrens, J

    2000-03-01

    Knowledge of orbital anatomy and the interaction of muscle contractions, gravitational forces and photoagingis fundamental in understanding the limitations of carbon dioxide (CO2) laser skin resurfacing when rejuvenating the skin of the periocular area. Laser resurfacing does not change the mimetic behavior of the facial muscles nor does it influence gravitational forces. When resurfacing periocular tissue, the creation of scleral show and ectropion are a potential consequence when there is an over zealous attempt at improving the sagging malar fat pad and eyelid laxity by performing an excess amount of laser passes at the lateral portion of the lower eyelid. This results in an inadvertent widening of the palpebral fissure due to the lateral pull of the Orbicularis oculi. Retrospectively, 85 patients were studied, who had undergone periorbital resurfacing with a CO2 laser using anew treatment approach. The Sharplan 40C CO2 Feather Touchlaser was programmed with a circular scanning pattern and used just for the shoulders of the wrinkles. A final laser pass was performed with the same program over the entire lower eyelid skin surface, excluding the outer lateral portion (e.g. a truncated triangle-like area),corresponding to the lateral canthus. Only a single laser pass was delivered to the lateral canthal triangle to avoid widening the lateral opening of the eyelid, which might lead to the potential complications of scleral show and ectropion. When the area of the crows' feet is to be treated, three passes on the skin of this entire lateral orbital surface are completed by moving laterally and upward toward the hairline. Patients examined on days 1, 7, 15, 30, 60, and one year after laser resurfacing showed good results. At two months after treatment, the clinical improvement was rated by the patient and physician as being "very good" in 81 of the 85 patients reviewed. These patients underwent laser resurfacing without complications. The proposed technique of

  3. Infrared laser bone ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Nuss, R.C.; Fabian, R.L.; Sarkar, R.; Puliafito, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    The bone ablation characteristics of five infrared lasers, including three pulsed lasers (Nd:YAG, lambda = 1064 micron; Hol:YSGG, lambda = 2.10 micron; and Erb:YAG, lambda = 2.94 micron) and two continuous-wave lasers (Nd:YAG, lambda = 1.064 micron; and CO/sub 2/, lambda = 10.6 micron), were studied. All laser ablations were performed in vitro, using moist, freshly dissected calvarium of guinea pig skulls. Quantitative etch rates of the three pulsed lasers were calculated. Light microscopy of histologic sections of ablated bone revealed a zone of tissue damage of 10 to 15 micron adjacent to the lesion edge in the case of the pulsed Nd:YAG and the Erb:YAG lasers, from 20 to 90 micron zone of tissue damage for bone ablated by the Hol:YSGG laser, and 60 to 135 micron zone of tissue damage in the case of the two continuous-wave lasers. Possible mechanisms of bone ablation and tissue damage are discussed.

  4. Resurfacing History of Vastitas Borealis, Mars: Early Amazonian Climate Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, K. L.

    2001-12-01

    Geologic mapping of the north polar plains of Mars (>60° N.), aka Vastitas Borealis, based on Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) topography, reveals new insights into resurfacing events in the polar region during the Amazonian Period. Deposits making up the Vastitas Borealis Formation (VBF) were emplaced at the end of the Hesperian Period and covered this entire region except for lavas of northernmost Alba Patera. No evidence for a Hesperian polar plateau has been found, although Planum Boreum could bury such evidence. A plains deposit, the Scandia unit, ranges from 20 to 200 m thick and overlies the VBF between Alba Patera and Olympia Planitia. This unit is apparently friable, because it is preserved only as eroded remnants forming knobs and mesas, including those of Scandia Colles. The VBF and Scandia units both appear to be deformed by radial tilting and concentric folding of Alba Patera. Another deposit, the Boreum unit, forms the base of Planum Boreum and possibly high-standing knobs and mesas south of Chasma Boreale and underlies the evenly bedded polar layered deposits. MOC images and MOLA data reveal that this unit has irregular bedding, locally steep scarps, and a dark color and is interpreted by S. Byrne and B. Murray (personal commun.) as a frozen sand sea. The unit may be up to a kilometer thick along the margins of Chasma Boreale and thins out away from there, possibly underlying the northern, southward-sloping ejecta of a 24 km crater at 79° N., 299° W. Potentially, the Scandia and Boreum units could be remnants of a single deposit. Within Chasma Boreale, the chasma unit forms a tongue-shaped plateau as much as 350 m thick. This unit could be a lower section of the Boreum unit, but a lack of relict knobs or mesas on its surface suggests that the unit embays the Boreum unit instead. South of Olympia Planitia, the Scandia unit becomes difficult to trace, and volcanic-like forms possibly related to eruption of material and subsequent collapse and

  5. Hydrodynamic Efficiency of Ablation Propulsion with Pulsed Ion Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Buttapeng, Chainarong; Yazawa, Masaru; Harada, Nobuhiro; Suematsu, Hisayuki; Jiang Weihua; Yatsui, Kiyoshi

    2006-05-02

    This paper presents the hydrodynamic efficiency of ablation plasma produced by pulsed ion beam on the basis of the ion beam-target interaction. We used a one-dimensional hydrodynamic fluid compressible to study the physics involved namely an ablation acceleration behavior and analyzed it as a rocketlike model in order to investigate its hydrodynamic variables for propulsion applications. These variables were estimated by the concept of ablation driven implosion in terms of ablated mass fraction, implosion efficiency, and hydrodynamic energy conversion. Herein, the energy conversion efficiency of 17.5% was achieved. In addition, the results show maximum energy efficiency of the ablation process (ablation efficiency) of 67% meaning the efficiency with which pulsed ion beam energy-ablation plasma conversion. The effects of ion beam energy deposition depth to hydrodynamic efficiency were briefly discussed. Further, an evaluation of propulsive force with high specific impulse of 4000s, total impulse of 34mN and momentum to energy ratio in the range of {mu}N/W was also analyzed.

  6. Topographic and Morphologic Evidence for Flooding of Ganymede's Resurfaced Terrains by Low-Viscosity Water-Ice Lavas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKinnon, W. B.; Schenk, P. M.; Moore, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    Topographic mapping in at least three distinct regions of Ganymede reveals that smooth terrains are flat and are topographically depressed. This and embayment relationships are consistent with volcanic resurfacing. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  7. Shuttle subscale ablative nozzle tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, L. B.; Bailey, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    Recent subscale nozzle tests have identified new and promising carbon phenolic nozzle ablatives which utilize staple rayon, PAN, and pitch based carbon cloth. A 4-inch throat diameter submerged test nozzle designed for the 48-inch Jet Propulsion Laboratory char motor was used to evaluate five different designs incorporating 20 candidate ablatives. Test results indicate that several pitch and PAN-based carbon phenolic ablatives can provide erosion and char performance equivalent or superior to the present continuous rayon-based SRM ablative.

  8. Partial hemi-resurfacing of the hip joint--a new approach to treat local osteochondral defects?

    PubMed

    Jäger, Marcus; Begg, Malcom J W; Krauspe, Rüdiger

    2006-12-01

    There is currently renewed interest in articular resurfacing for the treatment of damaged hip-joint cartilage. In contrast to these implants, which involve endoprosthetic replacement of both articulating surfaces, we present a new joint-preserving technique that allows treatment of local osteochondral defects of the femoral head by partial hemi-resurfacing. In this study we describe the operative and technical aspects and problems for partial hemi-resurfacing of the hip joint and critically discuss indications for this procedure in one case. To guarantee an adequate view of the situs, we recommend a surgical approach involving trochanter flip osteotomy, followed by surgical dislocation of the hip joint. Besides partial hemi-resurfacing of the osteochondral defect, this approach allows treatment of associated labral tears and cartilage defects of the hip joint at the same time. For adequate implant fixation, good bone quality is required. Furthermore, osteochondral defects of limited extent and excellent patient compliance are essential for clinical success. In particular, prominence of the implant has to be avoided, which can lead to an irregular joint surface and may induce further cartilage destruction. Long-term studies on statistical populations will show if partial articular hemi-resurfacing is a bone-preserving and useful therapeutic alternative to hemi-resurfacing caps in the treatment of osteochondral hip-joint defects, especially in young patients.

  9. "Active" and "Passive" Lava Resurfacing Processes on Io: A Comparative Study of Loki Patera and Prometheus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, A. G.; Matson, D. L.; Leone, G.; Wilson, L.; Keszthelyi, L. P.

    2004-01-01

    Studies of Galileo Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) data and ground based data of volcanism at Prometheus and Loki Patera on Io reveal very different mechanisms of lava emplacement at these two volcanoes. Data analyses show that the periodic nature of Loki Patera s volcanism from 1990 to 2001 is strong evidence that Loki s resurfacing over this period resulted from the foundering of a crust on a lava lake. This process is designated passive , as there is no reliance on sub-surface processes: the foundering of the crust is inevitable. Prometheus, on the other hand, displays an episodicity in its activity which we designate active . Like Kilauea, a close analog, Prometheus s effusive volcanism is dominated by pulses of magma through the nearsurface plumbing system. Each system affords views of lava resurfacing processes through modelling.

  10. Clinical Performance of the ASR and ReCap Resurfacing Implants—7 Years Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    Borgwardt, Arne; Borgwardt, Lotte; Borgwardt, Lise; Zerahn, Bo; Fabricius, Sandra D; Ribel-Madsen, Søren

    2015-06-01

    We perform a non-randomized, consecutive pilot study on the ASR and ReCap resurfacing hip implants and have completed 7 years follow-up. Forty-six non-osteoporotic patients with hip osteoarthritis and anatomical conditions suitable for resurfacing were divided into 2 equal groups and operated sequentially, starting with the ASR implants. Sixteen patients operated with ASR and 19 patients with ReCap have been followed-up. There were no significant differences between the two groups preoperatively as to physical function, pain, or femoral BMD. The serum concentrations of cobalt and chromium were higher in the ASR group from 1/2 to 7 years postoperatively. Five of 16 ASR implants have been revised, and none of the ReCap implants. BMD below the femoral component increased in both groups.

  11. Highly cross-linked polyethylene in hip resurfacing arthroplasty: long-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Amstutz, Harlan C; Takamura, Karren M; Ebramzadeh, Edward; Le Duff, Michel J

    2015-01-01

    Highly cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) has improved wear properties. This study reports the results of a small series of patients treated over 10 years ago with a metal-on-XLPE hip resurfacing.A total of 21 hips in 20 patients received a hip resurfacing with a cobalt-chromium metal femoral head and metal-backed acetabular cup lined with a XLPE insert and were retrospectively studied. Kaplan-Meier Survivorship was calculated.Five patients who had initial extreme cystic disease in the femoral head failed due to femoral loosening. Survivorship was 95.2% at 5 years and 81.0% at 10 years.We found that XLPE wear was not implicated in these failures, which were primarily attributed to poor bone quality of the femoral head, early bone preparation, cementing technique and excessive head reaming to near the neck diameter, necessitated for the implantation of a thick two-part socket.

  12. Digital reconstruction and donor site resurfacing: a two-flap technique.

    PubMed

    Kang, Qing-Lin; Chai, Yi-Ming; Chen, Weijia; Zeng, Bing-Fang

    2007-01-01

    Use of a great toe pulp flap is one of the methods to repair partial soft-tissue defect of the thumb or other digits. However, the conventional application of free skin grafts to close the donor site may bring donor-site morbidity. The authors present a two-flap technique that a reverse first dorsal metatarsal artery (FDMA) flap resurfaces the defect of the free great toe pulp flap. Six patients with soft-tissue defects of the thumbs or fingers were treated with this technique. Both the pulp and reverse flaps survived uneventfully after reconstruction of the thumbs and fingers. The reverse flap to resurface the donor site on the great toe was sensate and durable. Satisfactory appearance and function were gained in all patients. Results revealed that this technique can be accepted as an alternative method when treating soft tissue defect of the thumb or finger.

  13. The Outerbridge Classification Predicts the Need for Patellar Resurfacing in TKA

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Cardero, Primitivo

    2009-01-01

    Patellar resurfacing (PR) in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is controversial. The Outerbridge classification of cartilage defects in the patella is commonly used in the literature. The purpose of this study was to determine if the Outerbridge classification can predict the need for PR as part of total knee arthroplasty. Between 1995 and 2000, we performed a prospective, randomized study of 500 TKAs. We carried out PR depending on the Outerbridge classification of the patella at the time of surgery. Patients with Outerbridge Grades I, II, and III formed Group A, whereas patients with Grade IV formed Group B. Within each group, resurfacing was completed on half of the patients. Group A had 328 patients (164 with PR, 164 without PR). In Group B, there were 172 patients (86 with PR, 86 without PR). An identical prosthetic design was used for both groups. The minimum followup was 5 years (average, 7.8 years) for both Group A and Group B. At the end of followup, we assessed the number of patients in each group that required secondary resurfacing as a result of patellofemoral pain. Patients in Group A required fewer revisions for PF pain. In Group A, only one patient required a secondary PR (0.6% rate), whereas in Group B, 10 patients needed PR (11.6% rate). In Group B, the risk of need of a patellar resurfacing was 21.5 times greater than in Group A. On the basis of these findings, we recommend PR in Outerbridge Grade IV patellae, but not in Grades I, II, and III. Level of Evidence: Level II, therapeutic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:19844770

  14. Percutaneous ablation of adrenal tumors.

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, Aradhana M; Locklin, Julia; Dupuy, Damian E; Wood, Bradford J

    2010-06-01

    Adrenal tumors comprise a broad spectrum of benign and malignant neoplasms and include functional adrenal adenomas, pheochromocytomas, primary adrenocortical carcinoma, and adrenal metastases. Percutaneous ablative approaches that have been described and used in the treatment of adrenal tumors include percutaneous radiofrequency ablation, cryoablation, microwave ablation, and chemical ablation. Local tumor ablation in the adrenal gland presents unique challenges, secondary to the adrenal gland's unique anatomic and physiological features. The results of clinical series employing percutaneous ablative techniques in the treatment of adrenal tumors are reviewed in this article. Clinical and technical considerations unique to ablation in the adrenal gland are presented, including approaches commonly used in our practices, and risks and potential complications are discussed.

  15. Temperature, age and crust thickness distributions of Loki Patera on Io: implications for resurfacing mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, A. G.

    2003-01-01

    A high-spatial-resolution, multi-wavelength observation by the Galileo NIMS instrument has been analysed to determine the temperature and area distribution of a large portion of the ionian volcano Loki Patera. The temperatures of the cooler components from a two-temperature fit to the data can be used to determine ages of the surface. The age of the floor along a profile across the floor of the caldera ranges from 10 to 80 days. This puts the start of the resurfacing in July/early August 2001, yielding a resurfacing rate of approximately 1 km/day, with the new lava spreading from the SW corner of the caldera in a NE direction. This rate is consistent with resurfacing by foundering of the crust on a lava lake. However,the temperature distribution may also result from the emplacement of flows. Implied crust thicknesses (derived using a lava cooling model) range from 2.6 to 0.9 m.

  16. Resurfacing of the Martian Highlands in the Amenthes and Tyrrhena region

    SciTech Connect

    Craddock, R.A.; Maxwell, T.A. )

    1990-08-30

    The southern cratered highlands of Mars contain a large population of flat-floored, rimless craters which have previously been interpreted to have formed by aeolian mantling or flood volcanism. Neither of these geologic processes accurately explains the observed morphology or the crater statistics. Geologic mapping in the Amenthes and Tyrrhena region indicates that craters with this morphology occur on undulating intercrater materials near the dichotomy boundary and on more rugged materials farther into the highlands containing numerous ancient valley networks. Cumulative size-frequency distribution curves indicate ages of N(5) = 790 (early to middle Noachian) and N(5) = 540 (middle Noachian) for the cratered plateau and cratered highland materials, respectively, opposite the observed stratigraphic relations. For crater diameters >16 km the population of impact craters is consistent with stratigraphy, but the population of smaller craters in the region indicates the importance of resurfacing. Superposed, fresh craters indicate a resurfacing event that ceased at N(5) = 200-250 (late Noachian to early Hesperian). Crater counts divided into 5{degree} latitudinal bins show an increase in the number of craters between the 8- and 50-km-diameter range with increasing northerly latitudes, suggesting that the resurfacing was not a single event. Statistical modelling of an erosive event capable of removing the continuous ejecta deposits from the craters, eroding them to reduce the apparent diameter, and simultaneously burying smaller eroded craters explains both the morphology of the flat-floored, rimless craters, and their population distribution.

  17. Surface Ages and Resurfacing Rates of the Polar Layered Deposits on Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herkenhoff, K. E.; Plaut, J.J.

    2000-01-01

    Interpretation of the polar stratigraphy of Mars in terms of global climate changes is complicated by the significant difference in surface ages between the north and south polar layered terrains inferred from crater statistics. We have reassessed the cratering record in both polar regions using Viking Orbiter and Mariner 9 images. No craters have been found in the north polar layered terrain, but the surface of most of the south polar layered deposits appears to have been stable for many of the orbital/axial cycles that are thought to have induced global climate changes on Mars. The inferred surface age of the south polar layered deposits (about 10 Ma) is two orders of magnitude greater than the surface age of the north polar layered deposits and residual cap (at most 100 ka). Similarly, modeled resurfacing rates are at least 20 times greater in the north than in the south. These results are consistent with the hypotheses that polar layered deposit resurfacing rates are highest in areas covered by perennial ice and that the differences in polar resurfacing rates result from the 6.4 km difference in elevation between the polar regions. Deposition on the portion of the south polar layered deposits that is not covered by the perennial ice cap may have ceased about 5 million years ago when the obliquity of Mars no longer exceeded 40??. ?? 2000 Academic Press.

  18. Ablation, Thermal Response, and Chemistry Program for Analysis of Thermal Protection Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milos, Frank S.; Chen, Yih-Kanq

    2010-01-01

    In previous work, the authors documented the Multicomponent Ablation Thermochemistry (MAT) and Fully Implicit Ablation and Thermal response (FIAT) programs. In this work, key features from MAT and FIAT were combined to create the new Fully Implicit Ablation, Thermal response, and Chemistry (FIATC) program. FIATC is fully compatible with FIAT (version 2.5) but has expanded capabilities to compute the multispecies surface chemistry and ablation rate as part of the surface energy balance. This new methodology eliminates B' tables, provides blown species fractions as a function of time, and enables calculations that would otherwise be impractical (e.g. 4+ dimensional tables) such as pyrolysis and ablation with kinetic rates or unequal diffusion coefficients. Equations and solution procedures are presented, then representative calculations of equilibrium and finite-rate ablation in flight and ground-test environments are discussed.

  19. Ablation of skeletal metastases: current status.

    PubMed

    Kurup, A Nicholas; Callstrom, Matthew R

    2010-08-01

    Image-guided percutaneous ablation of bone metastases is an effective, minimally invasive alternative to conventional therapies in the palliation of pain from metastatic disease. Ablative technologies applied in the treatment of skeletal metastases include radiofrequency ablation, cryoablation, microwave ablation, laser ablation, ethanol ablation, and, most recently, focused ultrasound. These ablative methods may be performed in combination with percutaneous cementoplasty to provide support and stabilization for metastases in weight-bearing bones at risk for pathologic fracture.

  20. Evaluation of the analytical capability of NIR femtosecond laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Takafumi; Kon, Yoshiaki

    2008-03-01

    A laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometric (LA-ICPMS) technique utilizing a titanium-sapphire (TiS) femtosecond laser (fs-laser) has been developed for elemental and isotopic analysis. The signal intensity profile, depth of the ablation pit and level of elemental fractionation were investigated in order to evaluate the analytical capability of the present fs-laser ablation-ICPMS technique. The signal intensity profile of (57)Fe, obtained from iron sulfide (FeS(2)), demonstrated that the resulting signal intensity of (57)Fe achieved by the fs-laser ablation was almost 4-times higher than that obtained by ArF excimer laser ablation under a similar energy fluence (5 J/cm(2)). In fs-laser ablation, there is no significant difference in a depth of the ablation pit between glass and zircon material, while in ArF laser ablation, the resulting crater depth on the zircon crystal was almost half the level than that obtained for glass material. Both the thermal-induced and particle size-related elemental fractionations, which have been thought to be main sources of analytical error in the LA-ICPMS analysis, were measured on a Harvard 91500 zircon crystal. The resulting fractionation indexes on the (206)Pb/(238)U (f(Pb/U)) and (238)U/(232)Th (f(U/Th)) ratios obtained by the present fs-laser ablation system were significantly smaller than those obtained by a conventional ArF excimer laser ablation system, demonstrative of smaller elemental fractionation. Using the present fs-laser ablation technique, the time profile of the signal intensity of (56)Fe and the isotopic ratios ((57)Fe/(54)Fe and (56)Fe/(54)Fe) have been measured on a natural pyrite (FeS(2)) sample. Repeatability in signal intensity of (56)Fe achieved by the fs-laser ablation system was significantly better than that obtained by ArF excimer laser ablation. Moreover, the resulting precision in (57)Fe/(54)Fe and (56)Fe/(54)Fe ratio measurements could be improved by the fs-laser ablation system

  1. Solid sampling with 193-nm excimer laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delmdahl, Ralph

    2007-02-01

    Reproducible and sensitive elemental analysis of solid samples is a crucial task in areas of geology (e.g. microanalysis of fluid inclusions), material sciences, industrial quality control as well as in environmental, forensic and biological studies. To date the most versatile detection method is mass-spectroscopic multi-element analysis. In order to obtain reproducible results, this requires transferring the solid sample into the gas-phase while preserving the sample's stoichiometric composition. Laser ablation in combination with Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) is a proven powerful technique to meet the requirements for reliable solid sample analysis. The sample is laser ablated in an air-tight cell and the aerosol is carried by an inert gas to a micro-wave induced plasma where its constituents are atomized and ionized prior to mass analysis. The 193 nm excimer laser ablation, in particular, provides athermal sample ablation with very precise lateral ablation and controlled depth profiling. The high photon energy and beam homogeneity of the 193 nm excimer laser system avoids elemental fractionation and permits clean ablation of even transmissive solid materials such as carbonates, fluorites and pure quartz.

  2. Analysis of ablation debris from natural and artificial iron meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, M. B.; Davis, A. S.

    1977-01-01

    Artificial ablation studies were performed on iron and nickel-iron samples using an arc-heated plasma of ionized air. Experiment conditions simulated a meteoroid traveling about 12 km/sec at an altitude of 70 km. The artificially produced fusion crusts and ablation debris show features very similar to natural fusion crusts of the iron meteorites Boguslavka, Norfork, and N'Kandhla and to magnetic spherules recovered from Mn nodules. X-ray diffraction, electron microprobe, optical, and scanning electron microscope analyses reveal that important mineralogical, elemental, and textural changes occur during ablation. Some metal is melted and ablated. The outer margin of the melted rind is oxidized and recrystallizes as a discontinuous crust of magnetite and wustite. Adjacent to the oxidized metallic ablation zone is an unoxidized metallic ablation zone in which structures such as Widmannstatten bands are obliterated as the metal is transformed to unequilibrated alpha 2 nickel-iron. Volatile elements are vaporized and less volatile elements undergo fractionation.

  3. Constraints on the history of open-basin lakes on Mars from the timing of volcanic resurfacing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goudge, T. A.; Mustard, J. F.; Head, J. W.; Fassett, C. I.

    2011-12-01

    A catalogue of 30 open-basin lakes on Mars [1] have been identified as volcanically resurfaced based on distinct morphology and mineralogy. Associated morphologies include: (1) smooth floor deposits with lobate margins; (2) high crater retention, especially at small crater sizes; (3) wrinkle ridges on the smooth floor deposits; (4) embayment of basin perimeters and older, stratigraphically underlying deposits; (5) "moat" structures surrounding the edge of the basin, suggesting subsidence of the volcanic fill [2]; (6) high thermal inertia based on THEMIS nighttime IR data [3]; and (7) roughness signatures characteristic of smooth, volcanic material [4]. In addition to studying the morphology of the open-basin lakes, the mineralogies of the floor deposits have been analyzed using orbital spectroscopy data returned from the CRISM and OMEGA instruments. This analysis reveals that these resurfaced basins contain strong mafic mineral signatures isolated to their interiors when clear spectroscopic signatures are visible. An analysis of the CRISM and OMEGA spectra reveal the presence of both olivine and pyroxene, based on distinct mineral absorptions at 1 and 2 μm, in many resurfaced basins; however, olivine appears to be the dominant mafic mineral in the majority of these units. These mineral signatures provide further evidence for the volcanic resurfacing of the studied open-basin lakes. Additionally, the studied open-basin lakes lack any evidence for mineralogical and morphologic features that would be expected for lava-water interaction. This indicates that these open-basin lakes were completely devoid of surficial water at the time of volcanic resurfacing. Ages for the resurfacing events have been determined through crater size-frequency distributions and indicate that the process of volcanic resurfacing occurred throughout the Hesperian and into the Amazonian, with the majority of basins being resurfaced in the earliest parts of the Hesperian, near the Noachian

  4. OCDR guided laser ablation device

    DOEpatents

    Dasilva, Luiz B.; Colston, Jr., Bill W.; James, Dale L.

    2002-01-01

    A guided laser ablation device. The device includes a mulitmode laser ablation fiber that is surrounded by one or more single mode optical fibers that are used to image in the vicinity of the laser ablation area to prevent tissue damage. The laser ablation device is combined with an optical coherence domain reflectometry (OCDR) unit and with a control unit which initializes the OCDR unit and a high power laser of the ablation device. Data from the OCDR unit is analyzed by the control unit and used to control the high power laser. The OCDR images up to about 3 mm ahead of the ablation surface to enable a user to see sensitive tissue such as a nerve or artery before damaging it by the laser.

  5. Catheter Ablation for Ventricular Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Nof, Eyal; Stevenson, William G; John, Roy M

    2013-01-01

    Catheter ablation has emerged as an important and effective treatment option for many recurrent ventricular arrhythmias. The approach to ablation and the risks and outcomes are largely determined by the nature of the severity and type of underlying heart disease. In patients with structural heart disease, catheter ablation can effectively reduce ventricular tachycardia (VT) episodes and implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) shocks. For VT and symptomatic premature ventricular beats that occur in the absence of structural heart disease, catheter ablation is often effective as the sole therapy. Advances in catheter technology, imaging and mapping techniques have improved success rates for ablation. This review discusses current approaches to mapping and ablation for ventricular arrhythmias. PMID:26835040

  6. Radiofrequency Ablation for Liver Cancer.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Amy

    2015-01-01

    Interventional ablative technologies aided by imaging techniques such as ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging have been crucial in managing patients with primary liver cancer and liver metastases over the past 20 years. Several ablative technologies have been used to treat liver cancer; however, radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has emerged as the most common ablative therapy for hepatic lesions, both in the United States and globally. RFA is the treatment of choice for patients who cannot have surgical resection of the liver. This article focuses on the role of imaging in RFA treatment of primary and metastatic hepatic lesions.

  7. Fractional randomness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapiero, Charles S.; Vallois, Pierre

    2016-11-01

    The premise of this paper is that a fractional probability distribution is based on fractional operators and the fractional (Hurst) index used that alters the classical setting of random variables. For example, a random variable defined by its density function might not have a fractional density function defined in its conventional sense. Practically, it implies that a distribution's granularity defined by a fractional kernel may have properties that differ due to the fractional index used and the fractional calculus applied to define it. The purpose of this paper is to consider an application of fractional calculus to define the fractional density function of a random variable. In addition, we provide and prove a number of results, defining the functional forms of these distributions as well as their existence. In particular, we define fractional probability distributions for increasing and decreasing functions that are right continuous. Examples are used to motivate the usefulness of a statistical approach to fractional calculus and its application to economic and financial problems. In conclusion, this paper is a preliminary attempt to construct statistical fractional models. Due to the breadth and the extent of such problems, this paper may be considered as an initial attempt to do so.

  8. Electrosensitization assists cell ablation by nanosecond pulsed electric field in 3D cultures

    PubMed Central

    Muratori, Claudia; Pakhomov, Andrei G.; Xiao, Shu; Pakhomova, Olga N.

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies reported a delayed increase of sensitivity to electroporation (termed “electrosensitization”) in mammalian cells that had been subjected to electroporation. Electrosensitization facilitated membrane permeabilization and reduced survival in cell suspensions when the electric pulse treatments were split in fractions. The present study was aimed to visualize the effect of sensitization and establish its utility for cell ablation. We used KLN 205 squamous carcinoma cells embedded in an agarose gel and cell spheroids in Matrigel. A local ablation was created by a train of 200 to 600 of 300-ns pulses (50 Hz, 300–600 V) delivered by a two-needle probe with 1-mm inter-electrode distance. In order to facilitate ablation by engaging electrosensitization, the train was split in two identical fractions applied with a 2- to 480-s interval. At 400–600 V (2.9–4.3 kV/cm), the split-dose treatments increased the ablation volume and cell death up to 2–3-fold compared to single-train treatments. Under the conditions tested, the maximum enhancement of ablation was achieved when two fractions were separated by 100 s. The results suggest that engaging electrosensitization may assist in vivo cancer ablation by reducing the voltage or number of pulses required, or by enabling larger inter-electrode distances without losing the ablation efficiency. PMID:26987779

  9. Asymptomatic pseudotumours after metal-on-metal hip resurfacing show little change within one year.

    PubMed

    van der Weegen, W; Brakel, K; Horn, R J; Hoekstra, H J; Sijbesma, T; Pilot, P; Nelissen, R G H H

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the natural course of unrevised asymptomatic pseudotumours after metal-on-metal (MoM) hip resurfacing during a six- to 12-month follow-up period. We used repeated metal artefact reduction sequence (MARS)-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), serum metal ion analysis and clinical examination to study 14 unrevised hips (mean patient age 52.7 years, 46 to 68, 5 female, 7 male) with a pseudotumour and 23 hips (mean patient age 52.8 years, 38 to 69, 7 female, 16 male) without a pseudotumour. The mean post-operative time to the first MARS-MRI scan was 4.3 years (2.2 to 8.3), and mean time between the first and second MARS-MRI scan was eight months (6 to 12). At the second MRI scan, the grade of severity of the pseudotumour had not changed in 35 hips. One new pseudotumour (Anderson C2 score, moderate) was observed, and one pseudotumour was downgraded from C2 (moderate) to C1 (mild). In general, the characteristics of the pseudotumours hardly changed. Repeated MARS-MRI scans within one year in patients with asymptomatic pseudotumours after MoM hip resurfacing showed little or no variation. In 23 patients without pseudotumour, one new asymptomatic pseudotumour was detected. This is the first longitudinal study on the natural history of pseudotumours using MARS-MRI scans in hip resurfacing, and mirrors recent results for 28 mm diameter MoM total hip replacement.

  10. Outcomes of hip resurfacing in a professional dancer: a case report.

    PubMed

    Dunleavy, Kim

    2012-02-01

    A new surgical option (hip resurfacing arthroplasty) is now available for younger patients with hip osteoarthritis. A more aggressive rehabilitation program than the typical total hip arthroplasty protocol is needed for active individuals. This case report describes interventions used to maximize function in a 46-year-old professional dancer after hip resurfacing with a progressive therapeutic exercise program. Exercise choices were selected to address dance-specific requirements while respecting healing of the posterior capsular incision. Strengthening focused on hip abduction, extension, and external rotation. Precautions included avoiding gluteal stretching until 6 months. Pelvic alignment and weight-bearing distribution were emphasized. The patient was able to return to rehearsal by 7 months, at which time strength was equivalent to the unaffected leg. Range of motion reached unaffected side values at week 8 for internal rotation, week 11 for extension, week 13 for adduction, and week 28 for flexion. External rotation and abduction were still limited at 1 year, which influenced pelvic alignment with resultant pain on the unaffected side. Functional and impairment outcomes are presented with timelines to provide a basis for postoperative benchmarks for active clients after hip resurfacing. Although this case report presents a dance-specific program, exercise progressions for other active individuals may benefit from similar exercise intensity and sports-specific focus. Future rehabilitation programs should take into account possible flexion and external rotation range limitations and the need for gluteal muscle strengthening along with symmetry and pelvic alignment correction. Long-term studies investigating intensity of rehabilitation are warranted for patients intending to participate in higher level athletic activity.

  11. High temperature ablative foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Matthew T. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An ablative foam composition is formed of approximately 150 to 250 parts by weight polymeric isocyanate having an isocyanate functionality of 2.6 to 3.2; approximately 15 to 30 parts by weight reactive flame retardant having a hydroxyl number range from 200-260; approximately 10 to 40 parts by weight non-reactive flame retardant; approximately 10 to 40 parts by weight nonhydrolyzable silicone copolymer having a hydroxyl number range from 75-205; and approximately 3 to 16 parts by weight amine initiated polyether resin having an isocyanate functionality greater than or equal to 3.0 and a hydroxyl number range from 400-800.

  12. Matricectomy and nail ablation.

    PubMed

    Baran, Robert; Haneke, Eckart

    2002-11-01

    Matricectomy refers to the complete extirpation of the nail matrix, resulting in permanent nail loss. Usually however, matricectomy is only partial, restricted to one or both lateral horns of the matrix. Nail ablation is the definitive removal of the entire nail organ. The most important common denominator in the successful matricectomy is the total removal or destruction of the matrix tissue. Matricectomy may be indicated for the management of onychauxis, onychogryphosis, congenital nail dystrophies, and chronic painful nail, such as recalcitrant ingrown toenail or split within the medial or lateral one-third of the nail.

  13. An alternative method for facial resurfacing: supraclavicular skin prefabrication by perforator fascia flap.

    PubMed

    Hocaoğlu, Emre

    2014-01-01

    Prefabrication of supraclavicular skin provides a useful source for flaps congruent with the face skin. Among various vascular sources that have been used for this purpose, anterolateral thigh fascia seems to represent a greater value because of having a long and strong vascular pedicle and negligible donor-site morbidity. In this regard, we present a technical report on using the lateral circumflex femoral artery perforator flap harvest technique in preparing an anterolateral thigh fascia flap for the prefabrication of the supraclavicular skin. The technique proved successful in resurfacing the facial skin of a young female patient with a giant congenital melanocytic hairy nevus on the left side of her face.

  14. Impact crater densities on volcanoes and coronae on venus: implications for volcanic resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Namiki, N; Solomon, S C

    1994-08-12

    The density of impact craters on large volcanoes on Venus is half the average crater density for the planet. The crater density on some classes of coronae is not significantly different from the global average density, but coronae with extensive associated volcanic deposits have lower crater densities. These results are inconsistent with both single-age and steady-state models for global resurfacing and suggest that volcanoes and coronae with associated volcanism have been active on Venus over the last 500 million years.

  15. The use of a pyrocarbon capitate resurfacing implant in chronic wrist disorders.

    PubMed

    Marcuzzi, A; Ozben, H; Russomando, A

    2014-07-01

    The present study describes the technique and results of proximal row carpectomy with resection of the head of the capitate and replacement with a pyrocarbon capitate resurfacing implant. The major indication for surgical treatment was arthritic changes on the head of the capitate. Patients were assessed by range of motion, grip strength, pain and functional scoring, and radiographic studies. In most patients, wrist function was improved and pain relief was obtained. This surgical procedure may represent a good alternative to total and partial wrist arthrodesis.

  16. Laser ablation in analytical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Russo, Richard E; Mao, Xianglei; Gonzalez, Jhanis J; Zorba, Vassilia; Yoo, Jong

    2013-07-02

    In 2002, we wrote an Analytical Chemistry feature article describing the Physics of Laser Ablation in Microchemical Analysis. In line with the theme of the 2002 article, this manuscript discusses current issues in fundamental research, applications based on detecting photons at the ablation site (LIBS and LAMIS) and by collecting particles for excitation in a secondary source (ICP), and directions for the technology.

  17. Facial resurfacing with a monoblock full-thickness skin graft after multiple malignant melanomas excision in xeroderma pigmentosum.

    PubMed

    Ozmen, Selahattin; Uygur, Safak; Eryilmaz, Tolga; Ak, Betul

    2012-09-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum is an autosomal recessive disease, characterized by vulnerability of the skin to solar radiation. Increase in sunlight-induced cancer is a direct consequence of an increase in mutated cells of the skin of patients with xeroderma pigmentosum. There is no specific technique for facial resurfacing in patients with xeroderma pigmentosum. In this article, a patient with xeroderma pigmentosum with multiple malignant melanomas on her face and radical excision of total facial skin followed by facial resurfacing with monoblock full-thickness skin graft from the abdomen is presented.

  18. ‘Pseudotumour’ invading the proximal femur with normal metal ions following metal on metal hip resurfacing

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Harry; Sugand, Kapil; Ali, Ibrahim; Smith, Jay

    2015-01-01

    A 75-year-old woman who had undergone hybrid metal-on-metal hip resurfacing 8 years earlier underwent revision arthroplasty because of hip, groin and lateral thigh pain. The main differential was aseptic loosening; however, serum cobalt and chromium levels were normal. Multiple imaging modalities revealed a periprosthetic, cystic soft tissue mass adjacent to the proximal femur. A large ‘pseudotumour’ with proximal femoral invasion was found at revision arthroplasty. We report the first finding of a ‘pseudotumour’ invading the proximal femur with normal metal ions following metal on metal hip resurfacing. PMID:25670783

  19. Simulation of Pellet Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parks, P. B.; Ishizaki, Ryuichi

    2000-10-01

    In order to clarify the structure of the ablation flow, 2D simulation is carried out with a fluid code solving temporal evolution of MHD equations. The code includes electrostatic sheath effect at the cloud interface.(P.B. Parks et al.), Plasma Phys. Contr. Fusion 38, 571 (1996). An Eulerian cylindrical coordinate system (r,z) is used with z in a spherical pellet. The code uses the Cubic-Interpolated Psudoparticle (CIP) method(H. Takewaki and T. Yabe, J. Comput. Phys. 70), 355 (1987). that divides the fluid equations into non-advection and advection phases. The most essential element of the CIP method is in calculation of the advection phase. In this phase, a cubic interpolated spatial profile is shifted in space according to the total derivative equations, similarly to a particle scheme. Since the profile is interpolated by using the value and the spatial derivative value at each grid point, there is no numerical oscillation in space, that often appears in conventional spline interpolation. A free boundary condition is used in the code. The possibility of a stationary shock will also be shown in the presentation because the supersonic ablation flow across the magnetic field is impeded.

  20. Thermal response and ablation characteristics of light weight ceramic ablators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tran, Huy K.; Rasky, Daniel J.; Esfahani, Lili

    1993-01-01

    An account is given of the thermal performance and ablation characteristics of the NASA-Ames Lightweight Ceramic Ablators (LCAs) in supersonic, high-enthalpy convective environments, which use low density ceramic or carbon fiber matrices as substrates for main structural support, with organic resin fillers. LCA densities are in the 0.224-1.282 g/cu cm range. In-depth temperature data have been obtained to determine thermal penetration depths and conductivity. The addition of SiC and PPMA is noted to significantly improve the ablation performance of LCAs with silica substrates. Carbon-based LCAs are the most mass-efficient at high flux levels.

  1. Economically and environmentally informed policy for road resurfacing: tradeoffs between costs and greenhouse gas emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reger, Darren; Madanat, Samer; Horvath, Arpad

    2014-10-01

    As road conditions worsen, users experience an increase in fuel consumption and vehicle wear and tear. This increases the costs incurred by the drivers, and also increases the amount of greenhouse gases (GHGs) that vehicles emit. Pavement condition can be improved through rehabilitation activities (resurfacing) to reduce the effects on users, but these activities also have significant cost and GHG emission impacts. The objective of pavement management is to minimize total societal (user and agency) costs. However, the environmental impacts associated with the cost-minimizing policy are not currently accounted for. We show that there exists a range of potentially optimal decisions, known as the Pareto frontier, in which it is not possible to decrease total emissions without increasing total costs and vice versa. This research explores these tradeoffs for a system of pavement segments. For a case study, a network was created from a subset of California’s highways using available traffic data. It was shown that the current resurfacing strategy used by the state’s transportation agency, Caltrans, does not fall on the Pareto frontier, meaning that significant savings in both total costs and total emissions can be achieved by switching to one of the optimal policies. The methods presented in this paper also allow the decision maker to evaluate the impact of other policies, such as reduced vehicle kilometers traveled or better construction standards.

  2. Implications of the Utopia Gravity Anomaly for the Resurfacing of the Northern Plains of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banerdt, W. B.

    2004-01-01

    Whereas the surface units of the northern plain of Mars generally exhibit ages ranging from late Hesperian to Amazonian, interpretation of precise topographic measurements indicate that the age of the underlying "basement" is early Noachian, or almost as old as the southern highlands. This suggests that widespread but relatively superficial resurfacing has occurred throughout the northern plains since the end of early heavy bombardment. In this abstract I examine some of the possible implications of the subsurface structure inferred for the Utopia basin from gravity data on the nature of this resurfacing. The large, shallow, circular depression in Utopia Planitia has been identified as a huge impact basin, based on both geological evidence and detailed analysis of MOLA topography. Its diameter (approx. 3000 km) is equivalent to that of the Hellas basin, as is its inferred age (early Noachian). However, whereas Hellas is extremely deep with rough terrain and large slopes, the Utopia basin is a smooth, shallow, almost imperceptible bowl. Conversely, Utopia displays one of the largest (non-Tharsis-related) positive geoid anomalies on Mars, in contrast to a much more subdued negative anomaly over Hellas.

  3. Blood levels of cobalt and chromium are inversely correlated to head size after metal-on-metal resurfacing arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Parry, Michael C; Eastaugh-Waring, Steve; Bannister, Gordon C; Learmonth, Ian D; Case, Charles Patrick; Blom, Ashley W

    2013-01-01

    Resurfacing arthroplasty has fallen out of favour in recent years due to unfavourable survivorship in joint registries and alarming reports of soft tissue reactions around metal on metal prostheses. Our aim was to assess the effect of head size, implant design and component positioning on metal production by resurfacing arthroplasties. We measured whole blood cobalt and chromium and component position in matched populations implanted with two designs of resurfacing arthroplasty over a two-year period. Both implants resulted in a significant increase in blood metal levels (p<0.001) though the ASR design generated significantly higher metal levels (p = 0.041). A significant inverse correlation was seen between component size and blood cobalt levels (p = 0.032) and blood chromium levels (p<0.001). No correlation was identified between component position and blood metal levels. Small diameter metal resurfacing components result in increased metal generation compared with larger components. As increased metal generation has been correlated to wear and therefore failure, caution must be used on implantation of smaller components and indeed, in those who require smaller components, alternative bearing materials should be considered. These results contrast with recent findings which have demonstrated early failure for larger diameter stemmed metal-on-metal prostheses.

  4. 21 CFR 888.3410 - Hip joint metal/polymer or ceramic/polymer semiconstrained resurfacing cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hip joint metal/polymer or ceramic/polymer... Devices § 888.3410 Hip joint metal/polymer or ceramic/polymer semiconstrained resurfacing cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/polymer or ceramic/polymer semi-constrained...

  5. 21 CFR 888.3410 - Hip joint metal/polymer or ceramic/polymer semiconstrained resurfacing cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hip joint metal/polymer or ceramic/polymer... Devices § 888.3410 Hip joint metal/polymer or ceramic/polymer semiconstrained resurfacing cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/polymer or ceramic/polymer semi-constrained...

  6. 21 CFR 888.3410 - Hip joint metal/polymer or ceramic/polymer semiconstrained resurfacing cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hip joint metal/polymer or ceramic/polymer... Devices § 888.3410 Hip joint metal/polymer or ceramic/polymer semiconstrained resurfacing cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/polymer or ceramic/polymer semi-constrained...

  7. 21 CFR 888.3410 - Hip joint metal/polymer or ceramic/polymer semiconstrained resurfacing cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hip joint metal/polymer or ceramic/polymer... Devices § 888.3410 Hip joint metal/polymer or ceramic/polymer semiconstrained resurfacing cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/polymer or ceramic/polymer semi-constrained...

  8. 21 CFR 888.3410 - Hip joint metal/polymer or ceramic/polymer semiconstrained resurfacing cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hip joint metal/polymer or ceramic/polymer... Devices § 888.3410 Hip joint metal/polymer or ceramic/polymer semiconstrained resurfacing cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/polymer or ceramic/polymer semi-constrained...

  9. [New techniques of tumor ablation (microwaves, electroporation)].

    PubMed

    de Baere, T

    2011-09-01

    Since the introduction of radiofrequency tumor ablation of liver tumors in the late 1990s, local destructive therapies have been applied to lung, renal and bone lesions. In addition, new techniques have been introduced to compensate for the limitations of radiofrequency ablation, namely the reduced rate of complete ablation for tumors larger than 3 cm and tumors near vessels larger than 3 mm. Microwave ablation is currently evolving rapidly. While it is a technique based on thermal ablation similar to radiofrequency ablation, there are significant differences between both techniques. Electroporation, of interest because of the non-thermal nature of the ablation process, also is under evaluation.

  10. Ablative heat shield design for space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiferth, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    Ablator heat shield configuration optimization studies were conducted for the orbiter. Ablator and reusable surface insulation (RSI) trajectories for design studies were shaped to take advantage of the low conductance of ceramic RSI and high temperature capability of ablators. Comparative weights were established for the RSI system and for direct bond and mechanically attached ablator systems. Ablator system costs were determined for fabrication, installation and refurbishment. Cost penalties were assigned for payload weight penalties, if any. The direct bond ablator is lowest in weight and cost. A mechanically attached ablator using a magnesium subpanel is highly competitive for both weight and cost.

  11. Electrophysiological mapping and radiofrequency catheter ablation for ventricular tachycardia in a patient with peripartum cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Tokuda, Michifumi; Stevenson, William G; Nagashima, Koichi; Rubin, David A

    2013-11-01

    A 38-year-old female with prior failed endocardial ablation for ventricular tachycardia (VT) was referred for further treatment. She had been diagnosed with peripartum cardiomyopathy 7 years before and had persistent left ventricular dysfunction with an ejection fraction of 20%. Epicardial voltage mapping showed extensive epicardial scar despite absence of endocardial scar. Five distinct VT morphologies were induced. Ablation was aided by electrogram characteristics, pace mapping, entrainment mapping, and establishing electrical inexcitability along areas of epicardial scar. After epicardial ablation no sustained VT was induced. She had been doing well without VT occurrence but died 1 year later unexpectedly at home.

  12. Magnetic and robotic navigation for catheter ablation: "joystick ablation".

    PubMed

    Ernst, Sabine

    2008-10-01

    Catheter ablation has become the treatment of choice to cure various arrhythmias in the last decades. The newest advancement of this general concept is made on the navigation ability using remote-controlled ablation catheters. This review summarizes the concept of the two currently available systems, followed by a critical review of the published clinical reports for each system, respectively. Despite the limited amount of data, an attempt to compare the two systems is made.

  13. Comment on 'The Global Resurfacing of Venus' by R. G. Strom, G.G. Schaber, and D.D. Dawson

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrick, Robert R.; Izenberg, Noam; Phillips, Roger J.

    1995-01-01

    The distribution of impact craters on Venus has been the subject of a great deal of analysis since the return of Magellan data. Phillips el al. (1992) performed Monte Carlo two-dimensional (2-D) modeling of the areal distribution of craters, and the results of that exercise allowed a restricted, but still quite large, range of possible planetary resurfacing histories, including the possibility that the crater, were emplaced on a geologically inactive planet. However, the nonrandom distribution of embayed and deformed craters (Phillips el al., 1992), the hypsometric distribution of craters (Herrick and Phillips, 1994), the varied degradation states of craters (Izenberg et al., 1994), their nonrandom distribution with different geologic terrain types (Namiki and Solomon, 1994; Price et al, 1994), and three-dimensional resurfacing modeling (Bullock el al., 1993) all seem to argue against that particular possibility. In contrast, Strom el al. (1994) have collected a refined and more comprehensive data set of impact features, and they input these data into more sophisticated 2-D Monte Carlo modeling and statistical analyses of the areal distribution of craters, the hypsometric distribution of craters, and the number of embayed craters. They concluded that 'Venus experienced a global resurfacing event about 300 m.y. ago followed by a dramatic reduction of volcanism and tectonism. This global resurfacing event ended abruptly (less than 10 m.y.). The present crater population has accumulated since then and remains largely intact . . . only about 4%-6% of the planet has been volcanically resurfaced since the global event . . .' If these conclusions are well-founded, this work certainly represents a significant advancement in restricting tile number of plausible resurfacing histories for the planet. If Strom et al. (1994) are correct, it would also mean that all of the other aforementioned works are in error to various degrees, or at least represent overzealous

  14. Comment on 'The Global Resurfacing of Venus' by R. G. Strom, G.G. Schaber, and D.D. Dawson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrick, Robert R.; Izenberg, Noam; Phillips, Roger J.

    1995-11-01

    The distribution of impact craters on Venus has been the subject of a great deal of analysis since the return of Magellan data. Phillips el al. (1992) performed Monte Carlo two-dimensional (2-D) modeling of the areal distribution of craters, and the results of that exercise allowed a restricted, but still quite large, range of possible planetary resurfacing histories, including the possibility that the crater, were emplaced on a geologically inactive planet. However, the nonrandom distribution of embayed and deformed craters (Phillips el al., 1992), the hypsometric distribution of craters (Herrick and Phillips, 1994), the varied degradation states of craters (Izenberg et al., 1994), their nonrandom distribution with different geologic terrain types (Namiki and Solomon, 1994; Price et al, 1994), and three-dimensional resurfacing modeling (Bullock el al., 1993) all seem to argue against that particular possibility. In contrast, Strom el al. (1994) have collected a refined and more comprehensive data set of impact features, and they input these data into more sophisticated 2-D Monte Carlo modeling and statistical analyses of the areal distribution of craters, the hypsometric distribution of craters, and the number of embayed craters. They concluded that 'Venus experienced a global resurfacing event about 300 m.y. ago followed by a dramatic reduction of volcanism and tectonism. This global resurfacing event ended abruptly (less than 10 m.y.). The present crater population has accumulated since then and remains largely intact . . . only about 4%-6% of the planet has been volcanically resurfaced since the global event . . .' If these conclusions are well-founded, this work certainly represents a significant advancement in restricting tile number of plausible resurfacing histories for the planet. If Strom et al. (1994) are correct, it would also mean that all of the other aforementioned works are in error to various degrees, or at least represent overzealous

  15. Standard addition method for laser ablation ICPMS using a spinning platform.

    PubMed

    Claverie, Fanny; Malherbe, Julien; Bier, Naomi; Molloy, John L; Long, Stephen E

    2013-04-02

    A method has been developed for the fast and easy determination of Pb, Sr, Ba, Ni, Cu, and Zn, which are of geological and environmental interest, in solid samples by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS) using a spinning sample platform. The platform, containing a sample and a standard, is spun during the ablation, allowing the quasi-simultaneous ablation of both materials. The aerosols resulting from the ablation of sample and standard were mixed in the ablation cell allowing quantification of analytes by standard additions. The proportion of standard versus sample of the mixing can be increased by performing the ablation further from the axis of rotation. The ablated masses have been determined using a new strategy based on isotope dilution analysis. This spinning laser ablation method has been applied to the Allende meteorite and four powdered standard reference materials (SRMs) fused in lithium borate glasses: two sediments as well as a soil and a rock material. SRM 612 (Trace Elements in Glass) was also analyzed despite having a matrix slightly different from the glass standard obtained by lithium borate fusion. The deviation from the certified values was found to be less than 15% for most of the mass fractions for all the elements and samples studied, with an average precision of 10%. These results demonstrate the validity of the proposed method for the direct and fast analysis of solid samples of different matrixes by standard additions, using a single standard sample.

  16. TPS Ablator Technologies for Interplanetary Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curry, Donald M.

    2004-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the status of Thermal Protection System (TPS) Ablator technologies and the preparation for use in interplanetary spacecraft. NASA does not have adequate TPS ablatives and sufficient selection for planned missions. It includes a comparison of shuttle and interplanetary TPS requirements, the status of mainline TPS charring ablator materials, a summary of JSC SBIR accomplishments in developing advanced charring ablators and the benefits of SBIR Ablator/fabrication technology.

  17. Hypofractionated ablative radiotherapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Christopher H.

    2016-01-01

    The role of radiation in locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer (LAPC) is controversial. Randomized trials evaluating standard doses of chemoradiation have not shown a significant benefit from the use of consolidative radiation. Results from non-randomized studies of 3–5-fraction stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) have been similar to standard chemoradiation, but with less toxicity and a shorter treatment time. Doses of SBRT have been reduced to subablative levels for the sake of tolerability. The benefit of both options is unclear. In contrast, ablative doses can be delivered using an SBRT technique in 15–28 fractions. The keys to the delivery of ablative doses are computed tomography (CT) image guidance and respiratory gating. Higher doses have resulted in encouraging long-term survival results. In this review, we present a comprehensive solution to achieving ablative doses for selected patients with pancreatic tumors by using a combination of classical, modern and novel concepts of radiotherapy: fractionation, CT image guidance, respiratory gating, intentional dose heterogeneity, and simultaneous integrated protection. PMID:27029741

  18. Understanding Multiplication of Fractions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweetland, Robert D.

    1984-01-01

    Discussed the use of Cuisenaire rods in teaching the multiplication of fractions. Considers whole number times proper fraction, proper fraction multiplied by proper fraction, mixed number times proper fraction, and mixed fraction multiplied by mixed fractions. (JN)

  19. Skin resurfacing in a circumferential full thickness burn to the penis: lessons learnt.

    PubMed

    Jabir, Shehab; Frew, Quentin; Thompson, Richard; Dziewulski, Peter

    2013-08-13

    A circumferential full-thickness burn to the penis is a rarely encountered injury. However, when it does occur, it proves a management challenge to the plastic and burns surgeon in terms of reconstruction. This is due to the need of not only regaining adequate function of the organ, but also because of the need for a pleasing aesthetic outcome. Split-skin grafts have been utilised successfully to resurface full thickness burns of the penis and have given good results. Yet the success of split-skin grafts, especially those applied to an anatomically challenging region of the body such as the penis, depends on a number of carefully thought-out steps. We discuss the case of a circumferential full-thickness burn to the penis which was treated with split-skin grafting and highlight important pitfalls that the plastic and burns surgeon need to be aware of to ensure a successful outcome.

  20. Skin resurfacing in a circumferential full thickness burn to the penis: lessons learnt

    PubMed Central

    Jabir, Shehab; Frew, Quentin; Thompson, Richard; Dziewulski, Peter

    2013-01-01

    A circumferential full-thickness burn to the penis is a rarely encountered injury. However, when it does occur, it proves a management challenge to the plastic and burns surgeon in terms of reconstruction. This is due to the need of not only regaining adequate function of the organ, but also because of the need for a pleasing aesthetic outcome. Split-skin grafts have been utilised successfully to resurface full thickness burns of the penis and have given good results. Yet the success of split-skin grafts, especially those applied to an anatomically challenging region of the body such as the penis, depends on a number of carefully thought-out steps. We discuss the case of a circumferential full-thickness burn to the penis which was treated with split-skin grafting and highlight important pitfalls that the plastic and burns surgeon need to be aware of to ensure a successful outcome. PMID:23946511

  1. Secondary Patellar Resurfacing after Primary Bicondylar Knee Arthroplasty did Not Meet Patients’ Expectations

    PubMed Central

    Correia, João; Sieder, Marc; Kendoff, Daniel; Citak, Mustafa; Gehrke, Thorsten; Klauser, Wolfgang; Haasper, Carl

    2012-01-01

    Secondary patella resurfacing is a controversial procedure which is applied in patients with anterior knee pain after a bicondylar knee arthroplasty (with unresurfaced patella). A group of 46 patients were submitted to this procedure and their satisfaction, range of motion and pain improvement was evaluated. 52.2% of the patients were satisfied with the procedure, with an improvement in pain (Visual Analogue Scale) of 65% and an improvement in range of motion in 56,5%, with roundabout half of the patients having no resolution to their complaints. Whilst an improvement was not achieved in all patients, as it was initially hypothesised, this procedure should be considered when a revision knee arthroplasty is performed with an unresurfaced patella. PMID:23002412

  2. Secondary Patellar Resurfacing after Primary Bicondylar Knee Arthroplasty did Not Meet Patients' Expectations.

    PubMed

    Correia, João; Sieder, Marc; Kendoff, Daniel; Citak, Mustafa; Gehrke, Thorsten; Klauser, Wolfgang; Haasper, Carl

    2012-01-01

    Secondary patella resurfacing is a controversial procedure which is applied in patients with anterior knee pain after a bicondylar knee arthroplasty (with unresurfaced patella). A group of 46 patients were submitted to this procedure and their satisfaction, range of motion and pain improvement was evaluated. 52.2% of the patients were satisfied with the procedure, with an improvement in pain (Visual Analogue Scale) of 65% and an improvement in range of motion in 56,5%, with roundabout half of the patients having no resolution to their complaints. Whilst an improvement was not achieved in all patients, as it was initially hypothesised, this procedure should be considered when a revision knee arthroplasty is performed with an unresurfaced patella.

  3. Hip resurfacing after iliofemoral distraction for type IV developmental dysplasia of the hip a case report.

    PubMed

    Sambri, A; Cadossi, M; Mazzotti, A; Faldini, C; Giannini, S

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis secondary to developmental dysplasia of the hip is a surgical challenge because of the modified anatomy of the acetabulum which is deficient in its shape with poor bone quality, torsional deformities of the femur and the altered morphology of femoral head. Particularly in Crowe type III and IV, additional surgical challenges are present, such as limb-length discrepancy and adductor muscle contractures. This is a bilateral hip dysplasia case where bilateral hip replacement was indicated, on the left side with a resurfacing one and on the other side a two stage procedure using a iliofemoral external fixator to restore equal leg length with a lower risk of complications. This case report shows both the negative clinical outcome of the left and the excellent one of the right hip where the dysplasia was much more severe. Patient selection and implant positioning are crucial in determining long-term results.

  4. Evidence for Recent Resurfacing of the Binary Kuiper Belt Object 1997 CS29

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinowitz, David L.; Schaefer, B.; Schaefer, M.; Tourtellotte, S.

    2009-09-01

    At solar phase angles less than 0.1 deg, some icy bodies exhibit an extraordinary opposition surge, suddenly brightening by 50% at near zero phase. Verbiscer et al [1] observed this phenomena for the icy Galilean satellites Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione, and Rhea and suggest the surge results from the light-scattering properties of freshly resurfaced icy regoliths. Buratti et al [2] and Earle et al [3] observed a similarly sharp opposition surge on Neptune's icy satellite Triton, which is known to have active cryovolcanoes. Here we examine the solar phase curves of 9 Trans-Neptunian Objects that we have measured at phase angles smaller than 0.1 deg (Rabinowitz et al [4], Schaefer et al [5]), including previously unpublished observations 1997 CS29 and 2005 UJ438. This sample includes hot and cold classical Kuiper-Belt objects, Plutinos, Centaurs, and three binary TNOs. Of all these targets, only 1997 CS29 has a sharp surge at near zero phase, and a nearly flat phase curve at large angles. Since this target is also a binary with an unusually large and close companion [6], we suggest that both 1997 CS29 and its companion have been resurfaced by each other's impact ejecta via the mechanism proposed by Stern [7], with fresh surface material producing the opposition spike. [1] Verbiscer, A., et al. 2007, Science, 315, 815; [2] Buratti, B. et al. 2007, Workshop on Ices, Oceans, and Fire: Satellites of the Outer Solar System, Boulder Colorado; [3] Earle, D., et al. 2008, BAAS, 40, 480; [4] Rabinowitz, D. et al. 2007, AJ, 133, 26; [5] Schaefer, B., et al. 2009, AJ, 137, 129; [6] Stephens, D. & Knoll, K. 2006, AJ, 131,1142;[7] Stern, S. A. 2009, Icarus, 199, 571.

  5. The digital global geologic map of Mars: chronostratigraphic ages, topographic and crater morphologic characteristics, and updated resurfacing history

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tanaka, K.L.; Robbins, S.J.; Fortezzo, C.M.; Skinner, J.A.; Hare, T.M.

    2014-01-01

    A new global geologic map of Mars has been completed in a digital, geographic information system (GIS) format using geospatially controlled altimetry and image data sets. The map reconstructs the geologic history of Mars, which includes many new findings collated in the quarter century since the previous, Viking-based global maps were published, as well as other discoveries that were made during the course of the mapping using new data sets. The technical approach enabled consistent and regulated mapping that is appropriate not only for the map's 1:20,000,000 scale but also for its widespread use by diverse audiences. Each geologic unit outcrop includes basic attributes regarding identity, location, area, crater densities, and chronostratigraphic age. In turn, units are grouped by geographic and lithologic types, which provide synoptic global views of material ages and resurfacing character for the Noachian, Hesperian, and Amazonian periods. As a consequence of more precise and better quality topographic and morphologic data and more complete crater-density dating, our statistical comparisons identify significant refinements for how Martian geologic terrains are characterized. Unit groups show trends in mean elevation and slope that relate to geographic occurrence and geologic origin. In comparison with the previous global geologic map series based on Viking data, the new mapping consists of half the number of units due to simpler, more conservative and globally based approaches to discriminating units. In particular, Noachian highland surfaces overall have high percentages of their areas now dated as an epoch older than in the Viking mapping. Minimally eroded (i.e., pristine) impact craters ≥3 km in diameter occur in greater proportion on Hesperian surfaces. This observation contrasts with a deficit of similarly sized craters on heavily cratered and otherwise degraded Noachian terrain as well as on young Amazonian surfaces. We interpret these as reflecting the

  6. The digital global geologic map of Mars: Chronostratigraphic ages, topographic and crater morphologic characteristics, and updated resurfacing history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, K. L.; Robbins, S. J.; Fortezzo, C. M.; Skinner, J. A.; Hare, T. M.

    2014-05-01

    A new global geologic map of Mars has been completed in a digital, geographic information system (GIS) format using geospatially controlled altimetry and image data sets. The map reconstructs the geologic history of Mars, which includes many new findings collated in the quarter century since the previous, Viking-based global maps were published, as well as other discoveries that were made during the course of the mapping using new data sets. The technical approach enabled consistent and regulated mapping that is appropriate not only for the map's 1:20,000,000 scale but also for its widespread use by diverse audiences. Each geologic unit outcrop includes basic attributes regarding identity, location, area, crater densities, and chronostratigraphic age. In turn, units are grouped by geographic and lithologic types, which provide synoptic global views of material ages and resurfacing character for the Noachian, Hesperian, and Amazonian periods. As a consequence of more precise and better quality topographic and morphologic data and more complete crater-density dating, our statistical comparisons identify significant refinements for how Martian geologic terrains are characterized. Unit groups show trends in mean elevation and slope that relate to geographic occurrence and geologic origin. In comparison with the previous global geologic map series based on Viking data, the new mapping consists of half the number of units due to simpler, more conservative and globally based approaches to discriminating units. In particular, Noachian highland surfaces overall have high percentages of their areas now dated as an epoch older than in the Viking mapping. Minimally eroded (i.e., pristine) impact craters ≥3 km in diameter occur in greater proportion on Hesperian surfaces. This observation contrasts with a deficit of similarly sized craters on heavily cratered and otherwise degraded Noachian terrain as well as on young Amazonian surfaces. We interpret these as reflecting the

  7. Leonid meteor ablation, energy exchange and trail morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Zinn, John; Judd, O'Dean P.; ReVelle, D. O.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes theoretical model studies of the interaction of Leonid meteoroids with the earth's atmosphere. Subject to some modest-to-strenuous approximations we compute the rates of ablation and deceleration, energy deposition, and terminal altitudes of the meteors as functions of their initial mass and bulk density, velocity, trajectory entry angle, drag coefficient, heat of ablation, and an ablation energy transfer fraction. We find that the dominant energy deposition in the atmosphere is associated with the stopping of the ablated meteor particles and vapor by the surrounding air. Then having computed the energy deposition rates versus altitude we compute the hydrodynamic and radiative expansion of the hot wake material in the radial direction, along with the associated air chemistry. From the computed results we can then plot two-dimensional temperature contours -- as functions of the instantaneous distance behind the meteor and radial distance from the center of the wake, at various altitudes along the meteor's path. We also compute the rates of emission of radiation and the radiative efficiency, and discuss comparisons with observations.

  8. Effect of simplifications of bone and components inclination on the elastohydrodynamic lubrication modeling of metal-on-metal hip resurfacing prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qingen; Liu, Feng; Fisher, John; Jin, Zhongmin

    2013-05-01

    It is important to study the lubrication mechanism of metal-on-metal hip resurfacing prosthesis in order to understand its overall tribological performance, thereby minimize the wear particles. Previous elastohydrodynamic lubrication studies of metal-on-metal hip resurfacing prosthesis neglected the effects of the orientations of the cup and head. Simplified pelvic and femoral bone models were also adopted for the previous studies. These simplifications may lead to unrealistic predictions. For the first time, an elastohydrodynamic lubrication model was developed and solved for a full metal-on-metal hip resurfacing arthroplasty. The effects of the orientations of components and the realistic bones on the lubrication performance of metal-on-metal hip resurfacing prosthesis were investigated by comparing the full model with simplified models. It was found that the orientation of the head played a very important role in the prediction of pressure distributions and film profiles of the metal-on-metal hip resurfacing prosthesis. The inclination of the hemispherical cup up to 45° had no appreciable effect on the lubrication performance of the metal-on-metal hip resurfacing prosthesis. Moreover, the combined effect of material properties and structures of bones was negligible. Future studies should focus on higher inclination angles, smaller coverage angle and microseparation related to the occurrences of edge loading.

  9. Femtosecond laser ablation of enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Quang-Tri; Bertrand, Caroline; Vilar, Rui

    2016-06-01

    The surface topographical, compositional, and structural modifications induced in human enamel by femtosecond laser ablation is studied. The laser treatments were performed using a Yb:KYW chirped-pulse-regenerative amplification laser system (560 fs and 1030 nm) and fluences up to 14 J/cm2. The ablation surfaces were studied by scanning electron microscopy, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, and micro-Raman spectroscopy. Regardless of the fluence, the ablation surfaces were covered by a layer of resolidified material, indicating that ablation is accompanied by melting of hydroxyapatite. This layer presented pores and exploded gas bubbles, created by the release of gaseous decomposition products of hydroxyapatite (CO2 and H2O) within the liquid phase. In the specimen treated with 1-kHz repetition frequency and 14 J/cm2, thickness of the resolidified material is in the range of 300 to 900 nm. The micro-Raman analysis revealed that the resolidified material contains amorphous calcium phosphate, while grazing incidence x-ray diffraction analysis allowed detecting traces of a calcium phosphate other than hydroxyapatite, probably β-tricalcium phosphate Ca3), at the surface of this specimen. The present results show that the ablation of enamel involves melting of enamel's hydroxyapatite, but the thickness of the altered layer is very small and thermal damage of the remaining material is negligible.

  10. Laser ablation studies of concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Savina, M.; Xu, Z.; Wang, Y.; Reed, C.; Pellin, M.

    1999-10-20

    Laser ablation was studied as a means of removing radioactive contaminants from the surface and near-surface regions of concrete. The authors present the results of ablation tests on cement and concrete samples using a 1.6 kW pulsed Nd:YAG laser with fiber optic beam delivery. The laser-surface interaction was studied using cement and high density concrete as targets. Ablation efficiency and material removal rates were determined as functions of irradiance and pulse overlap. Doped samples were also ablated to determine the efficiency with which surface contaminants were removed and captured in the effluent. The results show that the cement phase of the material melts and vaporizes, but the aggregate portion (sand and rock) fragments. The effluent consists of both micron-size aerosol particles and chunks of fragmented aggregate material. Laser-induced optical emission spectroscopy was used to analyze the surface during ablation. Analysis of the effluent showed that contaminants such as cesium and strontium were strongly segregated into different regions of the particle size distribution of the aerosol.

  11. Fragmentation and ablation during entry

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1997-09-01

    This note discusses objects that both fragment and ablate during entry, using the results of previous reports to describe the velocity, pressure, and fragmentation of entering objects. It shows that the mechanisms used there to describe the breakup of non-ablating objects during deceleration remain valid for most ablating objects. It treats coupled fragmentation and ablation during entry, building on earlier models that separately discuss the entry of objects that are hard, whose high heat of ablation permits little erosion, and those who are strong whose strength prevents fragmentation, which are discussed in ``Radiation from Hard Objects,`` ``Deceleration and Radiation of Strong, Hard, Asteroids During Atmospheric Impact,`` and ``Meteor Signature Interpretation.`` This note provides a more detailed treatment of the further breakup and separation of fragments during descent. It replaces the constraint on mass per unit area used earlier to determine the altitude and magnitude of peak power radiation with a detailed analytic solution of deceleration. Model predictions are shown to be in agreement with the key features of numerical calculations of deceleration. The model equations are solved for the altitudes of maximum radiation, which agree with numerical integrations. The model is inverted analytically to infer object size and speed from measurements of peak power and altitude to provide a complete model for the approximate inversion of meteor data.

  12. Thermal ablation of lung tumors.

    PubMed

    McTaggart, Ryan A; Dupuy, Damian E

    2007-06-01

    Thermal ablation can be applied to treat any thoracic malignancy: primary lung cancers, recurrent primary lung cancers, metastatic disease, chest wall masses, and painful, bony metastases. Since the first reported use of thermal ablation for lung cancer in 2000 there has been an explosive use of the procedure, and by 2010 the number of procedures to treat thoracic malignancy is expected to exceed 150,000 per year. Presently, thermal ablation is best used for patients with early-stage lung cancers in patients who are not surgical candidates, patients with small and favorably located pulmonary metastases, and patients in whom palliation of tumor-related symptoms is the goal. Radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, and cryoablation are novel treatment modalities for lung cancer and can safely accomplish tumor destruction and even complete eradication of tumor in patients who are not candidates for surgical resection. In this article, we discuss technical considerations for each modality and the periprocedure and postprocedure management of patients with this disease.

  13. Mystery Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhattacharyya, Sonalee; Namakshi, Nama; Zunker, Christina; Warshauer, Hiroko K.; Warshauer, Max

    2016-01-01

    Making math more engaging for students is a challenge that every teacher faces on a daily basis. These authors write that they are constantly searching for rich problem-solving tasks that cover the necessary content, develop critical-thinking skills, and engage student interest. The Mystery Fraction activity provided here focuses on a key number…

  14. Pitch Fractionation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-15

    13 3. Solvent Fractionation Experiments .................................... 15 4. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectra for A240 Petrolem Pitch AG 12...34 and Mesophase Pitch AG 164B ............................... 21 5. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectra ................................... 23 6...compared by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis using a Digilab Model FTS 14 spectrophotometer (Rockwell International, Anaheim, California

  15. Conjunction of Endocardial and Coronary Venous System Mapping to Ablate Ventricular Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Wo, Hung-Ta; Yeh, Jih-Kai; Chang, Po-Cheng; Wen, Ming-Shien; Wang, Chun-Chieh; Chou, Chung-Chuan; Yeh, San-Jou

    2016-01-01

    Background Ablation of idiopathic ventricular arrhythmias (VAs) with epicardial or intramural origins is technically challenging. Herein, we have described the successful ablation of left VAs via the coronary venous system (CVS) in conjunction with endocardial map guided by three-dimensional electroanatomical map in six patients. Methods Out of a total consecutive 84 patients with symptomatic idiopathic VAs, radiofrequency ablation via the CVS was performed on six patients (7%). Furthermore, we reviewed patient records and electrophysiologic studies with respect to clinical characteristics. Results Activation map was conducted in 5 patients, and the earliest activation sites were identified within the CVS. The preceding times to the onset of QRS complex were longer than those at the earliest endocardial sites (36.2 ± 5.6 ms vs. 14.2 ± 6.4 ms, p = 0.02, n = 5). Spiky fractionated long-duration potentials were recorded at the successful ablation sites in all 5 patients. The other patient received pacemapping only because of few spontaneous VAs during the procedure, and the best pacemap spot was found within the CVS. Irrigated catheters were required in 4 out of 6 patients because VAs were temporarily suppressed with regular ones. Conclusions Idiopathic VAs can be ablated via the CVS in conjunction with endocardial mapping. Additionally, spiky fractionated long-duration potential can function as a clue to identify the good ablation site. PMID:27274177

  16. Theoretical Modeling for Hepatic Microwave Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Punit

    2010-01-01

    Thermal tissue ablation is an interventional procedure increasingly being used for treatment of diverse medical conditions. Microwave ablation is emerging as an attractive modality for thermal therapy of large soft tissue targets in short periods of time, making it particularly suitable for ablation of hepatic and other tumors. Theoretical models of the ablation process are a powerful tool for predicting the temperature profile in tissue and resultant tissue damage created by ablation devices. These models play an important role in the design and optimization of devices for microwave tissue ablation. Furthermore, they are a useful tool for exploring and planning treatment delivery strategies. This review describes the status of theoretical models developed for microwave tissue ablation. It also reviews current challenges, research trends and progress towards development of accurate models for high temperature microwave tissue ablation. PMID:20309393

  17. Image-guided ablation of adrenal lesions.

    PubMed

    Yamakado, Koichiro

    2014-06-01

    Although laparoscopic adrenalectomy has remained the standard of care for the treatment for adrenal tumors, percutaneous image-guided ablation therapy, such as chemical ablation, radiofrequency ablation, cryoablation, and microwave ablation, has been shown to be clinically useful in many nonsurgical candidates. Ablation therapy has been used to treat both functioning adenomas and malignant tumors, including primary adrenal carcinoma and metastasis. For patients with functioning adenomas, biochemical and symptomatic improvement is achieved in 96 to 100% after ablation; for patients with malignant adrenal neoplasms, however, the survival benefit from ablation therapy remains unclear, though good initial results have been reported. This article outlines the current role of ablation therapy for adrenal lesions, as well as identifying some of the technical considerations for this procedure.

  18. Microwave ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Poggi, Guido; Tosoratti, Nevio; Montagna, Benedetta; Picchi, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    Although surgical resection is still the optimal treatment option for early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients with well compensated cirrhosis, thermal ablation techniques provide a valid non-surgical treatment alternative, thanks to their minimal invasiveness, excellent tolerability and safety profile, proven efficacy in local disease control, virtually unlimited repeatability and cost-effectiveness. Different energy sources are currently employed in clinics as physical agents for percutaneous or intra-surgical thermal ablation of HCC nodules. Among them, radiofrequency (RF) currents are the most used, while microwave ablations (MWA) are becoming increasingly popular. Starting from the 90s’, RF ablation (RFA) rapidly became the standard of care in ablation, especially in the treatment of small HCC nodules; however, RFA exhibits substantial performance limitations in the treatment of large lesions and/or tumors located near major heat sinks. MWA, first introduced in the Far Eastern clinical practice in the 80s’, showing promising results but also severe limitations in the controllability of the emitted field and in the high amount of power employed for the ablation of large tumors, resulting in a poor coagulative performance and a relatively high complication rate, nowadays shows better results both in terms of treatment controllability and of overall coagulative performance, thanks to the improvement of technology. In this review we provide an extensive and detailed overview of the key physical and technical aspects of MWA and of the currently available systems, and we want to discuss the most relevant published data on MWA treatments of HCC nodules in regard to clinical results and to the type and rate of complications, both in absolute terms and in comparison with RFA. PMID:26557950

  19. Implementation of Radiation, Ablation, and Free Energy Minimization Modules for Coupled Simulations of Hypersonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.; Johnston, Christopher O.; Thompson, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    A description of models and boundary conditions required for coupling radiation and ablation physics to a hypersonic flow simulation is provided. Chemical equilibrium routines for varying elemental mass fraction are required in the flow solver to integrate with the equilibrium chemistry assumption employed in the ablation models. The capability also enables an equilibrium catalytic wall boundary condition in the non-ablating case. The paper focuses on numerical implementation issues using FIRE II, Mars return, and Apollo 4 applications to provide context for discussion. Variable relaxation factors applied to the Jacobian elements of partial equilibrium relations required for convergence are defined. Challenges of strong radiation coupling in a shock capturing algorithm are addressed. Results are presented to show how the current suite of models responds to a wide variety of conditions involving coupled radiation and ablation.

  20. Side Effects of CO2-(Er:YAG) Laser Resurfacing and Dermatography as a Treatment. A 15-Year Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Velden, E. M.; Suyker-Hessels, J.; Drost, B.; Defrancq, J.; IJsselmuiden, O. E.; van Suylen, R. J.; Baruchin, A. M.

    2010-05-01

    Dermatography is the application of medical tattooing techniques. In the past, similar techniques were tried but none led to reproducible results. This study deals with the negative effects of CO2-(Er:YAG) laser treatment used for cosmetic facial resurfacing. These effects can be subdivided into two categories: the sequelae of poor (post-)operative techniques, and the inadequacy of postoperative treatment modalities. Dermatography has been applied to treat the adverse effects successfully.

  1. Laser ablation based fuel ignition

    DOEpatents

    Early, James W.; Lester, Charles S.

    1998-01-01

    There is provided a method of fuel/oxidizer ignition comprising: (a) application of laser light to a material surface which is absorptive to the laser radiation; (b) heating of the material surface with the laser light to produce a high temperature ablation plume which emanates from the heated surface as an intensely hot cloud of vaporized surface material; and (c) contacting the fuel/oxidizer mixture with the hot ablation cloud at or near the surface of the material in order to heat the fuel to a temperature sufficient to initiate fuel ignition.

  2. Laser ablation based fuel ignition

    DOEpatents

    Early, J.W.; Lester, C.S.

    1998-06-23

    There is provided a method of fuel/oxidizer ignition comprising: (a) application of laser light to a material surface which is absorptive to the laser radiation; (b) heating of the material surface with the laser light to produce a high temperature ablation plume which emanates from the heated surface as an intensely hot cloud of vaporized surface material; and (c) contacting the fuel/oxidizer mixture with the hot ablation cloud at or near the surface of the material in order to heat the fuel to a temperature sufficient to initiate fuel ignition. 3 figs.

  3. Transhemangioma Ablation of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Pua, Uei

    2012-12-15

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a well-established treatment modality in the treatment of early hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) [1]. Safe trajectory of the RFA probe is crucial in decreasing collateral tissue damage and unwarranted probe transgression. As a percutaneous technique, however, the trajectory of the needle is sometimes constrained by the available imaging plane. The presence of a hemangioma beside an HCC is uncommon but poses the question of safety related to probe transgression. We hereby describe a case of transhemangioma ablation of a dome HCC.

  4. Fraction Reduction through Continued Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carley, Holly

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a method of reducing fractions without factoring. The ideas presented may be useful as a project for motivated students in an undergraduate number theory course. The discussion is related to the Euclidean Algorithm and its variations may lead to projects or early examples involving efficiency of an algorithm.

  5. Isotope fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    A rash of new controversy has emerged around the subject of mass-independent isotope fractionation effects, particularly in the case of the oxygen isotopes. To be sure, the controversy has been around for awhile, but it has been given new impetus by the results of a recent study by Mark H. Thiemens and John E. Heidenreich III of the University of California, San Diego (Science, March 4, 1983).Gustav Arrhenius has been trying to convince the planetary science community that chemical effects in isotope fractionation processes could explain observations in meteorites that appear to be outside of the traditionally understood mass-dependent fractionations (G. Arrhenius, J . L. McCrumb, and N. F. Friedman, Astrophys. Space Sci, 65, 297, 1974). Robert Clayton had made the basic observations of oxygen in carbonaceous chondrites that the slope of the δ17 versus δ18 line was 1 instead of the slope of ½ characteristic of terrestrial rocks and lunar samples (Ann. Rev. Nucl. Part. Sci., 28, 501, 1978). The mass-independent effects were ascribed to the apparent contribution of an ancient presolar system component of O16.

  6. Ten-year results of a double-heat-treated metal-on-metal hip resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Daniel, J; Ziaee, H; Kamali, A; Pradhan, C; Band, T; McMinn, D J W

    2010-01-01

    Second-generation metal-on-metal bearings were introduced as a response to the considerable incidence of wear-induced failures associated with conventional replacements, especially in young patients. We present the results at ten years of a consecutive series of patients treated using a metal-on-metal hip resurfacing. A distinct feature of the bearings used in our series was that they had been subjected to double-heat treatments during the post-casting phase of their manufacture. In the past these bearings had not been subjected to thermal treatments, making this a unique metal-on-metal bearing which had not been used before in clinical practice. We report the outcome of 184 consecutive hips (160 patients) treated using a hybrid-fixed metal-on-metal hip resurfacing during 1996. Patients were invited for a clinicoradiological follow-up at a minimum of ten years. The Oxford hip score and anteroposterior and lateral radiographs were obtained. The mean age at operation was 54 years (21 to 75). A series of 107 consecutive hips (99 patients) who received the same prosthesis, but subjected to a single thermal treatment after being cast, between March 1994 and December 1995, were used as a control group for comparison. In the 1994 to 1995 group seven patients (seven hips) died from unrelated causes and there were four revisions (4%) for osteolysis and aseptic loosening. In the 1996 group nine patients died at a mean of 6.9 years after operation because of unrelated causes. There were 30 revisions (16%) at a mean of 7.3 years (1.2 to 10.9), one for infection at 1.2 years and 29 for osteolysis and aseptic loosening. Furthermore, in the latter group there were radiological signs of failure in 27 (24%) of the 111 surviving hips. The magnitude of the problem of osteolysis and aseptic loosening in the 1996 cohort did not become obvious until five years after the operation. Our results indicate that double-heat treatments of metal-on-metal bearings can lead to an increased

  7. Priming is key to effective incorporation of image-guided thermal ablation into immunotherapy protocols

    PubMed Central

    Silvestrini, Matthew T.; Ingham, Elizabeth S.; Mahakian, Lisa M.; Kheirolomoom, Azadeh; Liu, Yu; Fite, Brett Z.; Tam, Sarah M.; Tucci, Samantha T.; Watson, Katherine D.; Wong, Andrew W.; Monjazeb, Arta M.; Hubbard, Neil E.; Murphy, William J.; Borowsky, Alexander D.; Ferrara, Katherine W.

    2017-01-01

    Focal therapies play an important role in the treatment of cancers where palliation is desired, local control is needed, or surgical resection is not feasible. Pairing immunotherapy with such focal treatments is particularly attractive; however, there is emerging evidence that focal therapy can have a positive or negative impact on the efficacy of immunotherapy. Thermal ablation is an appealing modality to pair with such protocols, as tumors can be rapidly debulked (cell death occurring within minutes to hours), tumor antigens can be released locally, and treatment can be conducted and repeated without the concerns of radiation-based therapies. In a syngeneic model of epithelial cancer, we found that 7 days of immunotherapy (TLR9 agonist and checkpoint blockade), prior to thermal ablation, reduced macrophages and myeloid-derived suppressor cells and enhanced IFN-γ–producing CD8+ T cells, the M1 macrophage fraction, and PD-L1 expression on CD45+ cells. Continued treatment with immunotherapy alone or with immunotherapy combined with ablation (primed ablation) then resulted in a complete response in 80% of treated mice at day 90, and primed ablation expanded CD8+ T cells as compared with all control groups. When the tumor burden was increased by implantation of 3 orthotopic tumors, successive primed ablation of 2 discrete lesions resulted in survival of 60% of treated mice as compared with 25% of mice treated with immunotherapy alone. Alternatively, when immunotherapy was begun immediately after thermal ablation, the abscopal effect was diminished and none of the mice within the cohort exhibited a complete response. In summary, we found that immunotherapy begun before ablation can be curative and can enhance efficacy in the presence of a high tumor burden. Two mechanisms have potential to impact the efficacy of immunotherapy when begun immediately after thermal ablation: mechanical changes in the tumor microenvironment and inflammatory-mediated changes in immune

  8. Modern Advances in Ablative TPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatapathy, Ethiraj

    2013-01-01

    Topics covered include: Physics of Hypersonic Flow and TPS Considerations. Destinations, Missions and Requirements. State of the Art Thermal Protection Systems Capabilities. Modern Advances in Ablative TPS. Entry Systems Concepts. Flexible TPS for Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerators. Conformal TPS for Rigid Aeroshell. 3-D Woven TPS for Extreme Entry Environment. Multi-functional Carbon Fabric for Mechanically Deployable.

  9. Properties of the ablation process for excimer laser ablation of Y sub 1 Ba sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7

    SciTech Connect

    Neifeld, R.A.; Potenziani, E. ); Sinclair, W.R. ); Hill III, W.T.; Turner, B.; Pinkas, A. )

    1991-01-15

    The process of excimer laser ablation has been studied while varying the laser fluence from 0.237 to 19.1 J/cm{sup 2}. Ion time-of-flight, total charge, target etch depth per pulse, and etch volume per pulse have been measured. Results indicate a maximum ablation volume and minimum ionization fraction occur near 5 J/cm{sup 2}. Several of the parameters measured vary rapidly in the 1--5 J/cm{sup 2} range. Variation in these parameters strongly influences the properties of films grown by this technique.

  10. Esophageal papilloma: Flexible endoscopic ablation by radiofrequency

    PubMed Central

    del Genio, Gianmattia; del Genio, Federica; Schettino, Pietro; Limongelli, Paolo; Tolone, Salvatore; Brusciano, Luigi; Avellino, Manuela; Vitiello, Chiara; Docimo, Giovanni; Pezzullo, Angelo; Docimo, Ludovico

    2015-01-01

    Squamous papilloma of the esophagus is a rare benign lesion of the esophagus. Radiofrequency ablation is an established endoscopic technique for the eradication of Barrett esophagus. No cases of endoscopic ablation of esophageal papilloma by radiofrequency ablation (RFA) have been reported. We report a case of esophageal papilloma successfully treated with a single session of radiofrequency ablation. Endoscopic ablation of the lesion was achieved by radiofrequency using a new catheter inserted through the working channel of endoscope. The esophageal ablated tissue was removed by a specifically designed cup. Complete ablation was confirmed at 3 mo by endoscopy with biopsies. This case supports feasibility and safety of as a new potential indication for BarrxTM RFA in patients with esophageal papilloma. PMID:25789102

  11. Percutaneous ablation of benign bone tumors.

    PubMed

    Welch, Brian T; Welch, Timothy J

    2011-09-01

    Percutaneous image-guided ablation has become a standard of practice and one of the primary modalities for treatment of benign bone tumors. Ablation is most commonly used to treat osteoid osteomas but may also be used in the treatment of chondroblastomas, osteoblastomas, and giant cell tumors. Percutaneous image-guided ablation of benign bone tumors carries a high success rate (>90% in case series) and results in decreased morbidity, mortality, and expense compared with traditional surgical methods. The ablation technique most often applied to benign bone lesions is radiofrequency ablation. Because the ablation technique has been extensively applied to osteoid osteomas and because of the uncommon nature of other benign bone tumors, we will primarily focus this discussion on the percutaneous ablation of osteoid osteomas.

  12. Evidence and considerations in the application of chemical peels in skin disorders and aesthetic resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Rendon, Marta I; Berson, Diane S; Cohen, Joel L; Roberts, Wendy E; Starker, Isaac; Wang, Beatrice

    2010-07-01

    Chemical peeling is a popular, relatively inexpensive, and generally safe method for treatment of some skin disorders and to refresh and rejuvenate skin. This article focuses on chemical peels and their use in routine clinical practice. Chemical peels are classified by the depth of action into superficial, medium, and deep peels. The depth of the peel is correlated with clinical changes, with the greatest change achieved by deep peels. However, the depth is also associated with longer healing times and the potential for complications. A wide variety of peels are available, utilizing various topical agents and concentrations, including a recent salicylic acid derivative, beta-lipohydroxy acid, which has properties that may expand the clinical use of peels. Superficial peels, penetrating only the epidermis, can be used to enhance treatment for a variety of conditions, including acne, melasma, dyschromias, photodamage, and actinic keratoses. Medium-depth peels, penetrating to the papillary dermis, may be used for dyschromia, multiple solar keratoses, superficial scars, and pigmentary disorders. Deep peels, affecting reticular dermis, may be used for severe photoaging, deep wrinkles, or scars. Peels can be combined with other in-office facial resurfacing techniques to optimize outcomes and enhance patient satisfaction and allow clinicians to tailor the treatment to individual patient needs. Successful outcomes are based on a careful patient selection as well as appropriate use of specific peeling agents. Used properly, the chemical peel has the potential to fill an important therapeutic need in the dermatologist's and plastic surgeon's armamentarium.

  13. Tsunami waves extensively resurfaced the shorelines of an early Martian ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, J. Alexis P.; Fairén, Alberto G.; Tanaka, Kenneth L.; Zarroca, Mario; Linares, Rogelio; Platz, Thomas; Komatsu, Goro; Miyamoto, Hideaki; Kargel, Jeffrey S.; Yan, Jianguo; Gulick, Virginia; Higuchi, Kana; Baker, Victor R.; Glines, Natalie

    2016-05-01

    It has been proposed that ~3.4 billion years ago an ocean fed by enormous catastrophic floods covered most of the Martian northern lowlands. However, a persistent problem with this hypothesis is the lack of definitive paleoshoreline features. Here, based on geomorphic and thermal image mapping in the circum-Chryse and northwestern Arabia Terra regions of the northern plains, in combination with numerical analyses, we show evidence for two enormous tsunami events possibly triggered by bolide impacts, resulting in craters ~30 km in diameter and occurring perhaps a few million years apart. The tsunamis produced widespread littoral landforms, including run-up water-ice-rich and bouldery lobes, which extended tens to hundreds of kilometers over gently sloping plains and boundary cratered highlands, as well as backwash channels where wave retreat occurred on highland-boundary surfaces. The ice-rich lobes formed in association with the younger tsunami, showing that their emplacement took place following a transition into a colder global climatic regime that occurred after the older tsunami event. We conclude that, on early Mars, tsunamis played a major role in generating and resurfacing coastal terrains.

  14. Tsunami waves extensively resurfaced the shorelines of an early Martian ocean

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, J. Alexis P.; Fairén, Alberto G.; Tanaka, Kenneth L.; Zarroca, Mario; Linares, Rogelio; Platz, Thomas; Komatsu, Goro; Miyamoto, Hideaki; Kargel, Jeffrey S.; Yan, Jianguo; Gulick, Virginia; Higuchi, Kana; Baker, Victor R.; Glines, Natalie

    2016-01-01

    It has been proposed that ~3.4 billion years ago an ocean fed by enormous catastrophic floods covered most of the Martian northern lowlands. However, a persistent problem with this hypothesis is the lack of definitive paleoshoreline features. Here, based on geomorphic and thermal image mapping in the circum-Chryse and northwestern Arabia Terra regions of the northern plains, in combination with numerical analyses, we show evidence for two enormous tsunami events possibly triggered by bolide impacts, resulting in craters ~30 km in diameter and occurring perhaps a few million years apart. The tsunamis produced widespread littoral landforms, including run-up water-ice-rich and bouldery lobes, which extended tens to hundreds of kilometers over gently sloping plains and boundary cratered highlands, as well as backwash channels where wave retreat occurred on highland-boundary surfaces. The ice-rich lobes formed in association with the younger tsunami, showing that their emplacement took place following a transition into a colder global climatic regime that occurred after the older tsunami event. We conclude that, on early Mars, tsunamis played a major role in generating and resurfacing coastal terrains. PMID:27196957

  15. Dust levitation as a major resurfacing process on the surface of a saturnian icy satellite, Atlas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Naoyuki; Miyamoto, Hideaki

    2012-07-01

    A small inner satellite of Saturn, Atlas, has an enigmatic saucer-like shape explained by an accumulation of particles from A-ring of Saturn. However, its unusual smooth surface remains unexplained. Gardening through continuous particle impact events cannot be a unique explanation for the smoothness, because Prometheus does not exhibit a similar surface, though it too would have experienced a similar bombardment. Here, a detailed investigation using close-up images of Atlas reveals the surface to be (1) covered by fine particles (i.e., probably as small as several tens of micrometers); (2) mostly void of impact craters (i.e., only one has been thus far identified); and (3) continuously smooth, even between the equatorial ridge and the undulating polar region. These findings imply that some sort of crater-erasing process has been active on the surface of Atlas. From electro-static analyses, we propose that the upper-most layer of the fine particles can become electro-statically unstable and migrate as a result of dust levitation, which resulted in erasing craters on the surface of Atlas. If true, Atlas would represent the first recognized body where resurfacing is dominated by dust levitation.

  16. Partial humeral head resurfacing and Latarjet coracoid transfer for treatment of recurrent anterior glenohumeral instability.

    PubMed

    Moros, Chris; Ahmad, Christopher S

    2009-08-01

    Bone deficiencies of either the humeral head or glenoid fossa may cause recurrent shoulder instability following soft tissue stabilization procedures. The engaging Hill-Sachs lesion, a major risk factor for instability, has been identified in a majority of patients with recurrent anterior instability. Guidance for surgical management of large humeral head deficiency presents few available options, with even fewer clinical data to support any one technique. Anteroinferior glenoid deficiency has also been a well-documented source of recurrent instability. The Latarjet coracoid transfer procedure corrects the glenoid defect by restoring the architecture of the inferior rim. Although coracoid transfer addresses containment on the glenoid, a concomitant large humeral head defect is at risk for engagement on the corrected glenoid. This article describes a case of a 50-year-old man presenting with recurrent right shoulder dislocations status post-open stabilization procedure 10 years prior. Radiologic evaluation demonstrated a large Hill-Sachs lesion with adjacent chondral derangement and a nonunion bony Bankart lesion. The Arthrosurface HemiCap humeral head resurfacing prosthesis (Arthrosurface Inc, Franklin, Massachusetts) was used to address the Hill-Sachs lesion with a Latarjet coracoid transfer procedure. We were unable to identify examples in the literature of the HemiCap used in the correction of a Hill-Sachs lesion for recurrent anterior instability. The HemiCap prosthesis has the benefit of correcting the Hill-Sachs lesion and adjacent chondral defect while preserving uninvolved articular surface. The combination of surgical interventions produced a successful result.

  17. Tsunami waves extensively resurfaced the shorelines of an early Martian ocean.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, J Alexis P; Fairén, Alberto G; Tanaka, Kenneth L; Zarroca, Mario; Linares, Rogelio; Platz, Thomas; Komatsu, Goro; Miyamoto, Hideaki; Kargel, Jeffrey S; Yan, Jianguo; Gulick, Virginia; Higuchi, Kana; Baker, Victor R; Glines, Natalie

    2016-05-19

    It has been proposed that ~3.4 billion years ago an ocean fed by enormous catastrophic floods covered most of the Martian northern lowlands. However, a persistent problem with this hypothesis is the lack of definitive paleoshoreline features. Here, based on geomorphic and thermal image mapping in the circum-Chryse and northwestern Arabia Terra regions of the northern plains, in combination with numerical analyses, we show evidence for two enormous tsunami events possibly triggered by bolide impacts, resulting in craters ~30 km in diameter and occurring perhaps a few million years apart. The tsunamis produced widespread littoral landforms, including run-up water-ice-rich and bouldery lobes, which extended tens to hundreds of kilometers over gently sloping plains and boundary cratered highlands, as well as backwash channels where wave retreat occurred on highland-boundary surfaces. The ice-rich lobes formed in association with the younger tsunami, showing that their emplacement took place following a transition into a colder global climatic regime that occurred after the older tsunami event. We conclude that, on early Mars, tsunamis played a major role in generating and resurfacing coastal terrains.

  18. Evidence and Considerations in the Application of Chemical Peels in Skin Disorders and Aesthetic Resurfacing

    PubMed Central

    Berson, Diane S.; Cohen, Joel L.; Roberts, Wendy E.; Starker, Isaac; Wang, Beatrice

    2010-01-01

    Chemical peeling is a popular, relatively inexpensive, and generally safe method for treatment of some skin disorders and to refresh and rejuvenate skin. This article focuses on chemical peels and their use in routine clinical practice. Chemical peels are classified by the depth of action into superficial, medium, and deep peels. The depth of the peel is correlated with clinical changes, with the greatest change achieved by deep peels. However, the depth is also associated with longer healing times and the potential for complications. A wide variety of peels are available, utilizing various topical agents and concentrations, including a recent salicylic acid derivative, β-lipohydroxy acid, which has properties that may expand the clinical use of peels. Superficial peels, penetrating only the epidermis, can be used to enhance treatment for a variety of conditions, including acne, melasma, dyschromias, photodamage, and actinic keratoses. Medium-depth peels, penetrating to the papillary dermis, may be used for dyschromia, multiple solar keratoses, superficial scars, and pigmentary disorders. Deep peels, affecting reticular dermis, may be used for severe photoaging, deep wrinkles, or scars. Peels can be combined with other in-office facial resurfacing techniques to optimize outcomes and enhance patient satisfaction and allow clinicians to tailor the treatment to individual patient needs. Successful outcomes are based on a careful patient selection as well as appropriate use of specific peeling agents. Used properly, the chemical peel has the potential to fill an important therapeutic need in the dermatologist's and plastic surgeon's armamentarium. PMID:20725555

  19. Return to sporting activity after Birmingham hip resurfacing arthroplasty: Mid term results

    PubMed Central

    Sandiford, Nemandra; Muirhead-Allwood, SK; Skinner, JA

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hip resurfacing arthroplasty (HRA) is primarily indicated for young, active patients with disabling coxarthrosis who wish to remain active and return to sports after surgery. Relatively few prospective studies have assessed return to sporting activity and impact of gender and age on this. Materials and Methods: Seventy-nine consecutive patients treated with HRA were included. Patients were reviewed clinically and radiologically. Function was assessed using the modified University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) activity score. The Oxford, Harris and WOMAC hip scores were calculated. Results: Average age at the time of surgery was 54.9 years (range 34.5–73.6 years). Average preoperative and postoperative UCLA scores were 4 and 7.6 respectively. Patients were involved in 2 (0–4) sporting activities preoperatively and 2 (0–5) postoperatively. Preoperative and postoperative Oxford Hip Scores, Harris Hip Score and WOMAC scores were 40, 46 and 51 and 16, 94 and 3 respectively (P < 0.0001). Patients returned to sports at an average of 3 months postoperatively. Conclusion: Patients were able to return to sports by 3 months and perform the same number of activities at preoperative intensity. Activity levels are maintained up to the medium term with few complications. PMID:26806965

  20. Microwave Ablation Compared with Radiofrequency Ablation for Breast Tissue in an Ex Vivo Bovine Udder Model

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Toshihiro; Westphal, Saskia; Isfort, Peter; Braunschweig, Till; Penzkofer, Tobias Bruners, Philipp; Kichikawa, Kimihiko; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas Mahnken, Andreas H.

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: To compare the effectiveness of microwave (MW) ablation with radiofrequency (RF) ablation for treating breast tissue in a nonperfused ex vivo model of healthy bovine udder tissue. Materials and Methods: MW ablations were performed at power outputs of 25W, 35W, and 45W using a 915-MHz frequency generator and a 2-cm active tip antenna. RF ablations were performed with a bipolar RF system with 2- and 3-cm active tip electrodes. Tissue temperatures were continuously monitored during ablation. Results: The mean short-axis diameters of the coagulation zones were 1.34 {+-} 0.14, 1.45 {+-} 0.13, and 1.74 {+-} 0.11 cm for MW ablation at outputs of 25W, 35W, and 45W. For RF ablation, the corresponding values were 1.16 {+-} 0.09 and 1.26 {+-} 0.14 cm with electrodes having 2- and 3-cm active tips, respectively. The mean coagulation volumes were 2.27 {+-} 0.65, 2.85 {+-} 0.72, and 4.45 {+-} 0.47 cm{sup 3} for MW ablation at outputs of 25W, 35W, and 45W and 1.18 {+-} 0.30 and 2.29 {+-} 0.55 cm{sup 3} got RF ablation with 2- and 3-cm electrodes, respectively. MW ablations at 35W and 45W achieved significantly longer short-axis diameters than RF ablations (P < 0.05). The highest tissue temperature was achieved with MW ablation at 45W (P < 0.05). On histological examination, the extent of the ablation zone in MW ablations was less affected by tissue heterogeneity than that in RF ablations. Conclusion: MW ablation appears to be advantageous with respect to the volume of ablation and the shape of the margin of necrosis compared with RF ablation in an ex vivo bovine udder.

  1. Characterization of tracked radiofrequency ablation in phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chun-Cheng R.; Miga, Michael I.; Galloway, Robert L.

    2007-10-15

    In radiofrequency ablation (RFA), successful therapy requires accurate, image-guided placement of the ablation device in a location selected by a predictive treatment plan. Current planning methods rely on geometric models of ablations that are not sensitive to underlying physical processes in RFA. Implementing plans based on computational models of RFA with image-guided techniques, however, has not been well characterized. To study the use of computational models of RFA in planning needle placement, this work compared ablations performed with an optically tracked RFA device with corresponding models of the ablations. The calibration of the tracked device allowed the positions of distal features of the device, particularly the tips of the needle electrodes, to be determined to within 1.4{+-}0.6 mm of uncertainty. Ablations were then performed using the tracked device in a phantom system based on an agarose-albumin mixture. Images of the sliced phantom obtained from the ablation experiments were then compared with the predictions of a bioheat transfer model of RFA, which used the positional data of the tracked device obtained during ablation. The model was demonstrated to predict 90% of imaged pixels classified as being ablated. The discrepancies between model predictions and observations were analyzed and attributed to needle tracking inaccuracy as well as to uncertainties in model parameters. The results suggest the feasibility of using finite element modeling to plan ablations with predictable outcomes when implemented using tracked RFA.

  2. Quantitative solid sample analysis by ArF excimer laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delmdahl, Ralph; von Oldershausen, Georg

    2005-06-01

    Reproducible and sensitive elemental analysis of solid samples is a crucial task in areas of geology (e.g. microanalysis of fluid inclusions), material sciences, industrial quality control as well as in environmental, forensic and biological studies. To date the most versatile detection method is mass-spectroscopic multi-element analysis. In order to obtain reproducible results, this requires transferring the solid sample into the gas-phase while preserving the sample's stoichiometric composition. Laser Ablation in combination with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) is a proven powerful technique to meet the requirements for reliable solid sample analysis. The sample is laser ablated in an air-tight cell and the aerosol is carried by an inert gas to a micro-wave induced plasma where its constituents are atomized and ionized prior to mass analysis. The 193 nm excimer laser ablation, in particular, provides athermal sample ablation with very precise lateral ablation and controlled depth profiling. The high photon energy and beam homogeneity of the 193 nm excimer laser system avoids elemental fractionation and permits clean ablation of even transmissive solid materials such as carbonates, fluorites and pure quartz.

  3. Artificial meteor ablation studies: Olivine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, M. B.; Cunningham, G. G.

    1973-01-01

    Artificial meteor ablation was performed on a Mg-rich olivine sample using an arc-heated plasma of ionized air. Experimental conditions simulated a meteor traveling about 12 km/sec at an altitude of 70 km. The mineral content of the original olivine sample was 98% olivine (including traces of olivine alteration products) and 2% chromite. Forsterite content of the original olivine was Fo-89. After ablation, the forsterite content had increased to Fo-94 in the recrystallized olivine. In addition, lamella-like intergrowths of magnetite were prevalent constituents. Wherever magnetite occurred, there was an increase in Mg and a corresponding decrease in Fe for the recrystallized olivine. The Allende fusion crust consisted of a recrystallized olivine, which was more Mg-rich and Fe-deficient than the original meteorite's olivine, and abundant magnetite grains. Although troilite and pentlandite were the common opaque mineral constituents in this meteorite, magnetite was the principal opaque mineral found in the fusion crust.

  4. Laser Ablation for Medical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Ken-Ichi

    Medical applications of laser are measurement, laser surgery, in-situ monitoring, and processing of medical devices. In this paper, author briefly reviews the trends of medical applications, describes some new applications, and then discuss about the future trends and problems of medical applications. At present, the domestic market of laser equipment for medical applications is nearly 1/10 of that for industrial applications, which has registered significant growth continuously. Laser surgery as a minimum invasive surgery under arthroscope is expected to decrease the pain of patients. Precise processing such as cutting and welding is suitable for manufacturing medical devices. Pulsed laser deposition has been successfully applied to the thin film coating. The corneal refractive surgery by ArF excimer laser has been widely accepted for its highly safe operation. Laser ablation for retinal implant in the visual prosthesis is one of the promising applications of laser ablation in medicine. New applications with femtosecond laser are expected in the near future.

  5. Percutaneous ablation of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    D’Onofrio, Mirko; Ciaravino, Valentina; De Robertis, Riccardo; Barbi, Emilio; Salvia, Roberto; Girelli, Roberto; Paiella, Salvatore; Gasparini, Camilla; Cardobi, Nicolò; Bassi, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is a highly aggressive tumor with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. Prognosis and treatment depend on whether the tumor is resectable or not, which mostly depends on how quickly the diagnosis is made. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy can be both used in cases of non-resectable pancreatic cancer. In cases of pancreatic neoplasm that is locally advanced, non-resectable, but non-metastatic, it is possible to apply percutaneous treatments that are able to induce tumor cytoreduction. The aim of this article will be to describe the multiple currently available treatment techniques (radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation), their results, and their possible complications, with the aid of a literature review. PMID:27956791

  6. Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Richard E.; Bol'shakov, Alexander A.; Mao, Xianglei; McKay, Christopher P.; Perry, Dale L.; Sorkhabi, Osman

    2011-02-01

    A new method of performing optical isotopic analysis of condensed samples in ambient air and at ambient pressure has been developed: Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry (LAMIS). The technique uses radiative transitions from molecular species either directly vaporized from a sample or formed by associative mechanisms of atoms or ions in a laser ablation plume. This method is an advanced modification of a known atomic emission technique called laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The new method — LAMIS — can determine not only chemical composition but also isotopic ratios of elements in the sample. Isotopic measurements are enabled by significantly larger isotopic shifts found in molecular spectra relative to atomic spectra. Analysis can be performed from a distance and in real time. No sample preparation or pre-treatment is required. Detection of the isotopes of hydrogen, boron, carbon, and oxygen are discussed to illustrate the technique.

  7. Percutaneous ablation of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    D'Onofrio, Mirko; Ciaravino, Valentina; De Robertis, Riccardo; Barbi, Emilio; Salvia, Roberto; Girelli, Roberto; Paiella, Salvatore; Gasparini, Camilla; Cardobi, Nicolò; Bassi, Claudio

    2016-11-28

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is a highly aggressive tumor with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. Prognosis and treatment depend on whether the tumor is resectable or not, which mostly depends on how quickly the diagnosis is made. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy can be both used in cases of non-resectable pancreatic cancer. In cases of pancreatic neoplasm that is locally advanced, non-resectable, but non-metastatic, it is possible to apply percutaneous treatments that are able to induce tumor cytoreduction. The aim of this article will be to describe the multiple currently available treatment techniques (radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation), their results, and their possible complications, with the aid of a literature review.

  8. The effects of ablation on the cross section of planetary envelopes at capturing planetesimals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benvenuto, Omar G.; Brunini, Adrián

    2008-06-01

    We explore the cross section of giant planet envelopes at capturing planetesimals of different sizes. For this purpose we employ two sets of realistic planetary envelope models (computed assuming for the protoplanetary nebula masses of 10 and 5 times the mass of the minimum mass solar nebula), account for drag and ablation effects and study the trajectories along which planetesimals move. The core accretion of these models has been computed in the oligarchic growth regime [Fortier, A., Benvenuto, O.G., Brunini, A., 2007. Astron. Astrophys. 473, 311-322], which has also been considered for the velocities of the incoming planetesimals. This regime predicts velocities larger that those used in previous studies of this problem. As the rate of ablation is dependent on the third power of velocity, ablation is more important in the oligarchic growth regime. We compute energy and mass deposition, fractional ablated masses and the total cross section of planets for a wide range of values of the critical parameter of ablation. In computing the total cross section of the planet we have included the contributions due to mass deposited by planetesimals moving along unbound orbits. Our results indicate that, for the case of small planetary cores and low velocities for the incoming planetesimals, ablation has a negligible impact on the capture cross section in agreement with the results presented in Inaba and Ikoma [Inaba, S., Ikoma, M., 2003. Astron. Astrophys. 410, 711-723]. However for the case of larger cores and high velocities of the incoming planetesimals as predicted by the oligarchic growth regime, we find that ablation is important in determining the planetary cross section, being several times larger than the value corresponding ignoring ablation. This is so regardless of the size of the incoming planetesimals.

  9. Microwave Ablation Compared to Radiofrequency Ablation for Hepatic Lesions: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Huo, Ya Ruth; Eslick, Guy D

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of microwave (MW) ablation compared with radiofrequency (RF) ablation for hepatic lesions by using meta-analytic techniques. Overall, 16 studies involving 2,062 patients were included. MW ablation was found to have significantly better 6-year overall survival than RF ablation (odds ratio, 1.64, 95% confidence interval, 1.15-2.35), but this was based on a few articles (n = 3 of 16). MW ablation and RF ablation had similar 1-5-year overall survival, disease-free survival, local recurrence rate, and adverse events. Based on similar safety and efficacy outcomes, either MW ablation or RF ablation may be used for effective local hepatic therapy.

  10. Investigations of the Cavitation and Damage Thresholds of Histotripsy and Applications in Targeted Tissue Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlaisavljevich, Eli

    Histotripsy is a noninvasive ultrasound therapy that controls acoustic cavitation to mechanically fractionate soft tissue. This dissertation investigates the physical thresholds to initiate cavitation and produce tissue damage in histotripsy and factors affecting these thresholds in order to develop novel strategies for targeted tissue ablation. In the first part of this dissertation, the effects of tissue properties on histotripsy cavitation thresholds and damage thresholds were investigated. Results demonstrated that the histotripsy shock scattering threshold using multi-cycle pulses increases in stiffer tissues, while the histotripsy intrinsic threshold using single-cycle pulses is independent of tissue stiffness. Further, the intrinsic threshold slightly decreases with lower frequencies and significantly decreases with increasing temperature. The effects of tissue properties on the susceptibility to histotripsy-induced tissue damage were also investigated, demonstrating that stiffer tissues are more resistant to histotripsy. Two strategies were investigated for increasing the effectiveness of histotripsy for the treatment of stiffer tissues, with results showing that thermal preconditioning may be used to alter tissue susceptibility to histotripsy and that lower frequency treatments may increase the efficiency of histotripsy tissue ablation due to enhanced bubble expansion. In the second part of this dissertation, the feasibility of using histotripsy for targeted liver ablation was investigated in an intact in vivo porcine model, with results demonstrating that histotripsy was capable of non-invasively creating precise lesions throughout the entire liver. Additionally, a tissue selective ablation approach was developed, where histotripsy completely fractionated the liver tissue surrounding the major hepatic vessels and gallbladder while being self-limited at the boundaries of these critical structures. Finally, the long-term effects of histotripsy liver

  11. Tumor Thermal Ablation Enhancement by Micromaterials.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fan; Su, Hongying; Han, Xiangjun; Bao, Han; Qi, Ji

    2016-01-07

    Thermal ablation is a minimally invasive therapeutic technique that has shown remarkable potential in treating un resectable tumors. However, clinical applications have stalled, due to safety ambiguities, slow heat induction, lengthy ablation times, and post-therapeutic monitoring issues. To further improve treatment efficacy, an assortment of micro materials (eg, nano particulates of gold, silica, or iron oxide and single-walled carbon nanotubes) are under study as thermal ablative adjuncts.In recent years, the micro material domain has become especially interesting.In vivo and in vitro animal studies have validated the use of microspheres as embolic agents in liver tumors, in advance of radiofrequency ablation. Microcapsules and micro bubbles serving as ultrasound contrast and ablation sensibilizers are strong prospects for clinical applications. This review was conducted to explore benefits of the three aforementioned micro scale technologies, in conjunction with tumor thermal ablation.

  12. Percutaneous thermal ablation of primary lung cancer.

    PubMed

    de Baere, T; Tselikas, L; Catena, V; Buy, X; Deschamps, F; Palussière, J

    2016-10-01

    Percutaneous ablation of small-size non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has demonstrated feasibility and safety in nonsurgical candidates. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA), the most commonly used technique, has an 80-90% reported rate of complete ablation, with the best results obtained in tumors less than 2-3cm in diameter. The highest one-, three-, and five-year overall survival rates reported in NSCLC following RFA are 97.7%, 72.9%, and 55.7% respectively. Tumor size, tumor stage, and underlying comorbidities are the main predictors of survival. Other ablation techniques such as microwave or cryoablation may help overcome the limitations of RFA in the future, particularly for large tumors or those close to large vessels. Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) has its own complications and carries the risk of fiducial placement requiring multiple lung punctures. SABR has also demonstrated significant efficacy in treating small-size lung tumors and should be compared to percutaneous ablation.

  13. Image-guided ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lencioni, Riccardo; Crocetti, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Image-guided ablation is accepted as the best therapeutic choice for patients with early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) when surgical options-including resection and transplantation-are precluded. The term image-guided tumor ablation is defined as the direct application of chemical substances or sources of energy to a focal tumor in an attempt to achieve eradication or substantial tumor destruction. Over the past 25 years, several methods for local tumor destruction have been developed and clinically tested. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has shown superior anticancer effect and greater survival benefit with respect to the seminal percutaneous technique, ethanol injection, in meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials, and is currently established as the standard ablative modality. Nevertheless, novel thermal and nonthermal techniques for tumor ablation-including microwave ablation and irreversible electroporation-seem to have potential to improve the efficacy of RFA and are currently undergoing clinical investigation.

  14. Resurfacing glabrous skin defects in the hand: the thenar base donor site.

    PubMed

    Milner, Chris S; Thirkannad, Sunil M

    2014-06-01

    Defects of the glabrous skin surfaces of the palm and fingers result from numerous causes including larger fingertip injuries, unhealed burns, and after surgery for diverse pathologies. The qualities of glabrous skin are specifically tailored to the functional requirements of high-shear strength and robustness. Despite these unique properties, graft reconstruction of defects in the glabrous regions of the hand is frequently achieved with skin from nonglabrous donor sites such as the medial forearm. Nonglabrous skin has a poor color and texture match for such applications and is frequently associated with tender and unsightly donor scars. We describe our experiences of harvesting full-thickness grafts from the glabrous skin centered over the proximal flexion crease at the level of the metacarpophalangeal joint of the thumb. We have utilized this site to harvest skin grafts of up to 2 cm in width for the resurfacing of small-sized to medium-sized defects on the palmar surfaces of the hands and fingers in 28 patients under both traumatic and elective circumstances. The skin has an excellent type-match to the defect and is quick and easy to harvest due to its adjacent location to the defect. The donor scar matures quickly, and as it lies along the thumb base crease, it runs along one of the least used contact surfaces, thereby limiting the potential discomfort associated with FTSG harvest sites from other areas. Patient satisfaction with the procedure has been high, and it represents a useful alternative to traditional nonglabrous skin graft donor sites for small-sized to medium-sized defects.

  15. Anatomically shaped tissue-engineered cartilage with tunable and inducible anticytokine delivery for biological joint resurfacing

    PubMed Central

    Moutos, Franklin T.; Glass, Katherine A.; Compton, Sarah A.; Ross, Alison K.; Gersbach, Charles A.; Estes, Bradley T.

    2016-01-01

    Biological resurfacing of entire articular surfaces represents an important but challenging strategy for treatment of cartilage degeneration that occurs in osteoarthritis. Not only does this approach require anatomically sized and functional engineered cartilage, but the inflammatory environment within an arthritic joint may also inhibit chondrogenesis and induce degradation of native and engineered cartilage. The goal of this study was to use adult stem cells to engineer anatomically shaped, functional cartilage constructs capable of tunable and inducible expression of antiinflammatory molecules, specifically IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra). Large (22-mm-diameter) hemispherical scaffolds were fabricated from 3D woven poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) fibers into two different configurations and seeded with human adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs). Doxycycline (dox)-inducible lentiviral vectors containing eGFP or IL-1Ra transgenes were immobilized to the PCL to transduce ASCs upon seeding, and constructs were cultured in chondrogenic conditions for 28 d. Constructs showed biomimetic cartilage properties and uniform tissue growth while maintaining their anatomic shape throughout culture. IL-1Ra–expressing constructs produced nearly 1 µg/mL of IL-1Ra upon controlled induction with dox. Treatment with IL-1 significantly increased matrix metalloprotease activity in the conditioned media of eGFP-expressing constructs but not in IL-1Ra–expressing constructs. Our findings show that advanced textile manufacturing combined with scaffold-mediated gene delivery can be used to tissue engineer large anatomically shaped cartilage constructs that possess controlled delivery of anticytokine therapy. Importantly, these cartilage constructs have the potential to provide mechanical functionality immediately upon implantation, as they will need to replace a majority, if not the entire joint surface to restore function. PMID:27432980

  16. Dorsal foot resurfacing using free anterolateral thigh (ALT) flap in children.

    PubMed

    El-Gammal, Tarek A; El-Sayed, Amr; Kotb, Mohamed M; Saleh, Waleed Riad; Ragheb, Yasser Farouk; El-Refai, Omar; El Fahar, Mohammed Hassan Ali

    2013-05-01

    Very limited literature described the use of the free anterolateral thigh (ALT) among other flaps for pediatric lower limb reconstruction. The aim of this study is to present our experience using the free ALT flap for reconstruction of soft tissue defects over the dorsum of the foot and ankle in children. The study included 42 children aged 2.5-13 years with a mean of 6.18 years. Three children had crush injuries while the rest were victims of run over car accidents. All of the flaps were vascularized by at least two perforators; 88.23% were musculocutaneous and 11.77 were septocutaneous perforators. All flaps were raised in a subfascial plane. Initial thinning was performed in five flaps and 35% required subsequent debulking. Mean Flap surface area was 117.11 cm(2). The recipient arteries were the anterior tibial artery in 38 cases and posterior tibial artery in four cases. Venous anastomosis was performed to one vena commitant and in nine cases the long saphenous vein was additionally used. Mean ischemia time of the flap was 2 hours while total operative time averaged 6.3 hours. About 41% of donor sites were closed primarily while 59% required skin grafting. Primary flap survival rate was 92.8% (39/42 cases). Three flaps showed venous congestion. After venous reanastomosis, two flaps showed partial loss and one flap was lost completely. Post-operative hospital stay averaged 7.5 days. The free ALT flap could be as safe, reliable, and aesthetically appealing option for foot/ankle resurfacing in children after traumatic soft tissue loss.

  17. Implantation of scaffold-free engineered cartilage constructs in a rabbit model for chondral resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Jillian M; Ventura, Nicole M; Tse, M Yat; Winterborn, Andrew; Bardana, Davide D; Pang, Stephen C; Hurtig, Mark B; Waldman, Stephen D

    2014-02-01

    Joint resurfacing techniques offer an attractive treatment for damaged or diseased cartilage, as this tissue characteristically displays a limited capacity for self-repair. While tissue-engineered cartilage constructs have shown efficacy in repairing focal cartilage defects in animal models, a substantial number of cells are required to generate sufficient quantities of tissue for the repair of larger defects. In a previous study, we developed a novel approach to generate large, scaffold-free cartilaginous constructs from a small number of donor cells (20 000 cells to generate a 3-cm(2) tissue construct). As comparable thicknesses to native cartilage could be achieved, the purpose of the present study was to assess the ability of these constructs to survive implantation as well as their potential for the repair of critical-sized chondral defects in a rabbit model. Evaluated up to 6 months post-implantation, allogenic constructs survived weight bearing without a loss of implant fixation. Implanted constructs appeared to integrate near-seamlessly with the surrounding native cartilage and also to extensively remodel with increasing time in vivo. By 6 months post-implantation, constructs appeared to adopt both a stratified (zonal) appearance and a biochemical composition similar to native articular cartilage. In addition, constructs that expressed superficial zone markers displayed higher histological scores, suggesting that transcriptional prescreening of constructs prior to implantation may serve as an approach to achieve superior and/or more consistent reparative outcomes. As the results of this initial animal study were encouraging, future studies will be directed toward the repair of chondral defects in more mechanically demanding anatomical locations.

  18. Plasma-mediated ablation of biofilm contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhixiong; Wang, Xiaoliang; Huang, Huan

    2010-12-01

    Ultra-short pulsed laser removal of thin biofilm contamination on different substrates has been conducted via the use of plasma-mediated ablation. The biofilms were formed using sheep whole blood. The ablation was generated using a 1.2 ps ultra-short pulsed laser with wavelength centered at 1552 nm. The blood contamination was transformed into plasma and collected with a vacuum system. The single line ablation features have been measured. The ablation thresholds of blood contamination and bare substrates were determined. It is found that the ablation threshold of the blood contamination is lower than those of the beneath substrates including the glass slide, PDMS, and human dermal tissues. The ablation effects of different laser parameters (pulse overlap rate and pulse energy) were studied and ablation efficiency was measured. Proper ablation parameters were found to efficiently remove contamination with maximum efficiency and without damage to the substrate surface for the current laser system. Complete removal of blood contaminant from the glass substrate surface and freeze-dried dermis tissue surface was demonstrated by the USP laser ablation with repeated area scanning. No obvious thermal damage was found in the decontaminated glass and tissue samples.

  19. Percutaneous ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma: current status.

    PubMed

    McWilliams, Justin P; Yamamoto, Shota; Raman, Steven S; Loh, Christopher T; Lee, Edward W; Liu, David M; Kee, Stephen T

    2010-08-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is an increasingly common disease with dismal long-term survival. Percutaneous ablation has gained popularity as a minimally invasive, potentially curative therapy for HCC in nonoperative candidates. The seminal technique of percutaneous ethanol injection has been largely supplanted by newer modalities, including radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, cryoablation, and high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation. A review of these modalities, including technical success, survival rates, and complications, will be presented, as well as considerations for treatment planning and follow-up.

  20. Ablation of liver metastases: current status.

    PubMed

    Flanders, Vincent L; Gervais, Debra A

    2010-08-01

    Local ablative therapy for the treatment of metastatic disease to the liver has been evaluated most extensively in colorectal cancer with 5-year survival rates up to 55% after RF ablation. Recent findings suggest selected patients with other malignant processes may benefit as well, but conclusive evidence is limited. This article reviews the available literature regarding the use of radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, and cryoablation in the treatment of metastatic disease to the liver. The published results of each of these modalities in the treatment of metastatic disease to the liver are promising, and outcomes continue to be evaluated.

  1. Inductively Coupled Plasma: Fundamental Particle Investigations with Laser Ablation and Applications in Magnetic Sector Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Saetveit, Nathan Joe

    2008-01-01

    Particle size effects and elemental fractionation in laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) are investigated with nanosecond and femtosecond laser ablation, differential mobility analysis, and magnetic sector ICP-MS. Laser pulse width was found to have a significant influence on the LA particle size distribution and the elemental composition of the aerosol and thus fractionation. Emission from individual particles from solution nebulization, glass, and a pressed powder pellet are observed with high speed digital photography. The presence of intact particles in an ICP is shown to be a likely source of fractionation. A technique for the online detection of stimulated elemental release from neural tissue using magnetic sector ICP-MS is described. Detection limits of 1 μg L-1 or better were found for P, Mn, Fe, Cu, and Zn in a 60 μL injection in a physiological saline matrix.

  2. Analysis of iodinated contrast delivered during thermal ablation: is material trapped in the ablation zone?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Po-hung; Brace, Chris L.

    2016-08-01

    Intra-procedural contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) has been proposed to evaluate treatment efficacy of thermal ablation. We hypothesized that contrast material delivered concurrently with thermal ablation may become trapped in the ablation zone, and set out to determine whether such an effect would impact ablation visualization. CECT images were acquired during microwave ablation in normal porcine liver with: (A) normal blood perfusion and no iodinated contrast, (B) normal perfusion and iodinated contrast infusion or (C) no blood perfusion and residual iodinated contrast. Changes in CT attenuation were analyzed from before, during and after ablation to evaluate whether contrast was trapped inside of the ablation zone. Visualization was compared between groups using post-ablation contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Attenuation gradients were calculated at the ablation boundary and background to quantitate ablation conspicuity. In Group A, attenuation decreased during ablation due to thermal expansion of tissue water and water vaporization. The ablation zone was difficult to visualize (CNR  =  1.57  ±  0.73, boundary gradient  =  0.7  ±  0.4 HU mm-1), leading to ablation diameter underestimation compared to gross pathology. Group B ablations saw attenuation increase, suggesting that iodine was trapped inside the ablation zone. However, because the normally perfused liver increased even more, Group B ablations were more visible than Group A (CNR  =  2.04  ±  0.84, boundary gradient  =  6.3  ±  1.1 HU mm-1) and allowed accurate estimation of the ablation zone dimensions compared to gross pathology. Substantial water vaporization led to substantial attenuation changes in Group C, though the ablation zone boundary was not highly visible (boundary gradient  =  3.9  ±  1.1 HU mm-1). Our results demonstrate that despite iodinated contrast being trapped in the ablation zone, ablation visibility was

  3. Infra-red femtosecond laser ablation: Benefit for LA-ICP-MS elemental analysis?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poitrasson, F.; d'Abzac, F.; Freydier, R.; Seydoux-Guillaume, A.; Chmeleff, J.; Chatel, B.

    2011-12-01

    Femtosecond (fs) laser ablation systems have now been used for about a decade for elemental analysis in chemical and geosciences laboratories. Published studies investigated the influence of various analytical parameters, such as laser pulsewidth, wavelength, energy or ablation duration, on the quality of the analytical data produced by fs Laser Ablation-Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). It was rapidly found that under comparable analytical conditions, chemical fractionation effects that may occur during laser-induced particle production, transport and/or decomposition in the ICP-MS plasma torch become negligible in the fs laser ablation regime under 300 fs laser pulsewidth. Another major benefit of fs laser ablation is its restricted matrix-sensitive nature compared to ns laser ablation, thereby facilitating greatly LA-ICP-MS calibration for chemical analysis with a reference material having completely different optical and chemical properties compared to the sample to be analyzed (e.g., a standard glass to calibrate analyses of a phosphate mineral). This effect is particularly remarkable as it can be stated from both UV and IR fs laser ablation studies. Reproducible laser ablations of optical quality quartz can also be produced using such an IR laser. Precise, accurate and reproducible chemical analyses may be obtained using ns laser ablation systems. However, this is achieved under carefully controlled analytical conditions using state of the art ablation cells. Instead, it appears that fs laser ablation is making LA-ICP-MS analyses more reliable. More recently, analytical studies combined with high spatial resolution microscopic techniques allowed us to understand better the nature of fs laser-matter interaction through the direct examination of the laser-induced craters and of the particles produced. These investigations have shown the dominance of mechanical over thermal effects on the solids ablated using a fs laser. Whatever the

  4. Laser Navigation for Radiofrequency Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Varro, Zoltan; Locklin, Julia K. Wood, Bradford J.

    2004-09-15

    A 45-year-old male with renal cell carcinoma secondary to von-Hippel Lindau (VHL) disease presented for radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of kidney tumors. Due to his prior history of several partial nephrectomies and limited renal reserve, RFA was chosen because of its relatively nephron-sparing nature. A laser guidance device was used to help guide probe placement in an attempt to reduce procedure time and improve targeting accuracy. The device was successful at guiding needle placement, as both tumors were located with a single pass. Follow-up CT scan confirmed accurate needle placement, showing an area of coagulation necrosis covering the previously seen tumor.

  5. Combined Vascular and Orthopaedic Approach for a Pseudotumor Causing Deep Vein Thrombosis after Metal-on-Metal Hip Resurfacing Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Hamid, Hossam; Miles, Jonathan; Carrington, Richard W J; Hart, Alister; Loh, Alex; Skinner, John A

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Metal-on-metal (MoM) hip resurfacings have been associated with a variety of complications resulting from adverse reaction to metal debris. Pseudotumors have rarely been reported to cause deep venous thrombosis (DVT). Study Design. A case report and a review of the literature. Case Presentation. A 75-year-old female who had left metal-on-metal hip resurfacing 6 years ago presented with left groin pain associated with unilateral lower limb edema and swelling. By duplex and MRI studies, our patient had an extensive soft tissue necrosis associated with a large pelvic mass causing extensive DVT of the lower limb secondary to mechanical compression of the left iliac vein. Results. Our case was initially treated for DVT followed by dual surgical approach. The pseudotumor was excised through a separate iliofemoral approach and revision of the hip implant was undertaken through a posterior approach in the same setting. An inferior vena cava (IVC) filter was inserted to minimise the perioperative risks of handling the iliac veins. Conclusion. A combined approach with vascular surgeons is required. Combined resection of the pseudotumor and revision of the metal bearing surfaces is essential, in order to achieve a good surgical outcome in this rare complication.

  6. Resurfacing weight bearing areas of the heel. The role of the dorsalis pedis innervated free tissue transfer.

    PubMed

    Duncan, M J; Zuker, R M; Manktelow, R T

    1985-01-01

    Five cases of chronic ulceration following skin graft resurfacing of the weight bearing surface of the heel are presented. All were managed with debridement and coverage with a free innervated dorsalis pedis tissue transfer. The technical refinements that have contributed to the reliability of the flap include careful distal identification of the first dorsal metatarsal artery (FDMA) and division of the dorsalis pedis artery (DPA) under direct vision below the takeoff of the FDMA. Donor site morbidity has been minimized by taking care to preserve the extensor paratenon as a bed for the subsequent skin graft and by immobilization of the donor foot with plaster and bed rest for 10 days. Four of the patients were followed for 2, 4, 4, and 6 years; one was lost to follow-up. All were active with protective sensation in their flaps. No instances of flap breakdown and no significant donor site morbidity were noted. The dorsalis pedis innervated free tissue transfer is recommended as a reliable procedure for resurfacing weight bearing areas of the foot when simpler methods have failed.

  7. Preparation of silver nanoparticles in virgin coconut oil using laser ablation

    PubMed Central

    Zamiri, Reza; Azmi, B Z; Sadrolhosseini, Amir Reza; Ahangar, Hossein Abbastabar; Zaidan, A W; Mahdi, M A

    2011-01-01

    Laser ablation of a silver plate immersed in virgin coconut oil was carried out for fabrication of silver nanoparticles. A Nd:YAG laser at wavelengths of 1064 nm was used for ablation of the plate at different times. The virgin coconut oil allowed formation of nanoparticles with well-dispersed, uniform particle diameters that were stable for a reasonable length of time. The particle sizes and volume fraction of nanoparticles inside the solutions obtained at 15, 30, 45 min ablation times were 4.84, 5.18, 6.33 nm and 1.0 × 10−8, 1.6 × 10−8, 2.4 × 10−8, respectively. The presented method for preparation of silver nanoparticles in virgin coconut oil is environmentally friendly and may be considered a green method. PMID:21289983

  8. Preparation of silver nanoparticles in virgin coconut oil using laser ablation.

    PubMed

    Zamiri, Reza; Azmi, B Z; Sadrolhosseini, Amir Reza; Ahangar, Hossein Abbastabar; Zaidan, A W; Mahdi, M A

    2011-01-07

    Laser ablation of a silver plate immersed in virgin coconut oil was carried out for fabrication of silver nanoparticles. A Nd:YAG laser at wavelengths of 1064 nm was used for ablation of the plate at different times. The virgin coconut oil allowed formation of nanoparticles with well-dispersed, uniform particle diameters that were stable for a reasonable length of time. The particle sizes and volume fraction of nanoparticles inside the solutions obtained at 15, 30, 45 min ablation times were 4.84, 5.18, 6.33 nm and 1.0 × 10(-8), 1.6 × 10(-8), 2.4 × 10(-8), respectively. The presented method for preparation of silver nanoparticles in virgin coconut oil is environmentally friendly and may be considered a green method.

  9. Possible role for cryoballoon ablation of right atrial appendage tachycardia when conventional ablation fails.

    PubMed

    Amasyali, Basri; Kilic, Ayhan

    2015-06-01

    Focal atrial tachycardia arising from the right atrial appendage usually responds well to radiofrequency ablation; however, successful ablation in this anatomic region can be challenging. Surgical excision of the right atrial appendage has sometimes been necessary to eliminate the tachycardia and prevent or reverse the resultant cardiomyopathy. We report the case of a 48-year-old man who had right atrial appendage tachycardia resistant to multiple attempts at ablation with use of conventional radiofrequency energy guided by means of a 3-dimensional mapping system. The condition led to cardiomyopathy in 3 months. The arrhythmia was successfully ablated with use of a 28-mm cryoballoon catheter that had originally been developed for catheter ablation of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. To our knowledge, this is the first report of cryoballoon ablation without isolation of the right atrial appendage. It might also be an alternative to epicardial ablation or surgery when refractory atrial tachycardia originates from the right atrial appendage.

  10. Local Ablation for Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shi-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the second commonest cancer in Taiwan. The national surveillance program can detect HCC in its early stages, and various curative modalities (including surgical resection, orthotopic liver transplantation, and local ablation) are employed for the treatment of small HCC. Local ablation therapies are currently advocated for early-stage HCC that is unresectable because of co-morbidities, the need to preserve liver function, or refusal of resection. Among the various local ablation therapies, the most commonly used modalities include percutaneous ethanol injection and radiofrequency ablation (RFA); percutaneous acetic acid injection and microwave ablation are used less often. RFA is more commonly employed than other local ablative modalities in Taiwan because the technique is highly effective, minimally invasive, and requires fewer sessions. RFA is therefore advocated in Taiwan as the first-line curative therapy for unresectable HCC or even for resectable HCC. However, current RFA procedures are less effective against tumors that are in high-risk or difficult-to-ablate locations, are poorly visualized on ultrasonography (US), or are large. Recent advancements in RFA in Taiwan can resolve these issues by the creation of artificial ascites or pleural effusion, application of real-time virtual US assistance, use of combination therapy before RFA, or use of switching RF controllers with multiple electrodes. This review article provides updates on the clinical outcomes and advances in local ablative modalities (mostly RFA) for HCC in Taiwan. PMID:24159599

  11. Testing and evaluation of light ablation decontamination

    SciTech Connect

    Demmer, R.L.; Ferguson, R.L.

    1994-10-01

    This report details the testing and evaluation of light ablation decontamination. It details WINCO contracted research and application of light ablation efforts by Ames Laboratory. Tests were conducted with SIMCON (simulated contamination) coupons and REALCON (actual radioactive metal coupons) under controlled conditions to compare cleaning effectiveness, speed and application to plant process type equipment.

  12. Effective temperatures of polymer laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furzikov, Nickolay P.

    1991-09-01

    Effective temperatures of laser ablation of certain polymers are extracted from experimental dependences of ablation depths on laser fluences. Dependence of these temperatures on laser pulse durations is established. Comparison with the known thermodestruction data shows that the effective temperature corresponds to transient thermodestruction proceeding by the statistically most probable way.

  13. Ablative therapies for small renal tumours.

    PubMed

    Castro, Arturo; Jenkins, Lawrence C; Salas, Nelson; Lorber, Gideon; Leveillee, Raymond J

    2013-05-01

    Improvements in imaging technology have resulted in an increase in detection of small renal masses (SRMs). Minimally invasive ablation modalities, including cryoablation, radiofrequencey ablation, microwave ablation and irreversible electroporation, are currently being used to treat SRMs in select groups of patients. Cryoablation and radiofrequency ablation have been extensively studied. Presently, cryoablation is gaining popularity because the resulting ice ball can be visualized easily using ultrasonography. Tumour size and location are strong predictors of outcome of radiofrequency ablation. One of the main benefits of microwave ablation is that microwaves can propagate through all types of tissue, including desiccated and charred tissue, as well as water vapour, which might be formed during the ablation. Irreversible electroporation has been shown in animal studies to affect only the cell membrane of undesirable target tissues and to spare adjacent structures; however, clinical studies that depict the efficacy and safety of this treatment modality in humans are still sparse. As more experience is gained in the future, ablation modalities might be utilized in all patients with tumours <4 cm in diameter, rather than just as an alternative treatment for high-risk surgical patients.

  14. The Fatigue of Water Ice: Insight into the Tectonic Resurfacing of Tidally Deformed Icy Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, N. P.; Barr, A. C.; Hirth, G.; Cooper, R. F.

    2015-12-01

    allow us to determine how subcritical crack growth rates vary as a function of stress intensity, temperature and frequency. We will use our data to extrapolate to conditions present in the near-surface of icy satellites to determine the effect of fatigue on icy satellite resurfacing. [1] Hubner H. and Jillik J., (1977) J. Material Sci. 12.

  15. Lung Cancer Ablation: Technologies and Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Erica S.; Dupuy, Damian E.

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of lung cancers in 2012 is estimated to reach 226,160 new cases, with only a third of patients suitable surgical candidates. Tumor ablation has emerged as an important and efficacious treatment option for nonsurgical lung cancer patients. This localized minimally invasive therapy is best suited for small oligonodular lesions or favorably located metastatic tumors. Radiofrequency ablation has been in use for over a decade, and newer modalities including microwave ablation, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation have emerged as additional treatment options for patients. Ablation therapies can offer patients and clinicians a repeatable and effective therapy for palliation and, in some cases, cure of thoracic malignancies. This article discusses the available technologies and techniques available for tumor ablation of thoracic malignancies including patient selection, basic aspects of procedure technique, imaging follow-up, treatment outcomes, and comparisons between various therapies. PMID:24436530

  16. Lung cancer ablation: technologies and techniques.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Erica S; Dupuy, Damian E

    2013-06-01

    The incidence of lung cancers in 2012 is estimated to reach 226,160 new cases, with only a third of patients suitable surgical candidates. Tumor ablation has emerged as an important and efficacious treatment option for nonsurgical lung cancer patients. This localized minimally invasive therapy is best suited for small oligonodular lesions or favorably located metastatic tumors. Radiofrequency ablation has been in use for over a decade, and newer modalities including microwave ablation, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation have emerged as additional treatment options for patients. Ablation therapies can offer patients and clinicians a repeatable and effective therapy for palliation and, in some cases, cure of thoracic malignancies. This article discusses the available technologies and techniques available for tumor ablation of thoracic malignancies including patient selection, basic aspects of procedure technique, imaging follow-up, treatment outcomes, and comparisons between various therapies.

  17. Fractional CO2 laser treatment for a skin graft.

    PubMed

    Stephan, Farid E; Habre, Maya B; Helou, Josiane F; Tohme, Roland G; Tomb, Roland R

    2016-01-01

    Skin grafts are widely used in reconstructive and plastic surgery, leaving an inevitable scar appearance on the body, affecting the quality of life of the patients. Fractional ablative lasers have become a leading procedure for the treatment of acne and burn scars. We report a case of a skin graft showing excellent improvement in overall appearance after three sessions of fractional CO2 laser. The undamaged tissue left between the microthermal treatment zones is responsible of collagen formation and reepithelialization. Remodeling and collagen formation are observed even 6 months after a fractional CO2 laser session.

  18. Femtosecond ablation of ultrahard materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumitru, G.; Romano, V.; Weber, H. P.; Sentis, M.; Marine, W.

    Several ultrahard materials and coatings of definite interest for tribological applications were tested with respect to their response when irradiated with fs laser pulses. Results on cemented tungsten carbide and on titanium carbonitride are reported for the first time and compared with outcomes of investigations on diamond and titanium nitride. The experiments were carried out in air, in a regime of 5-8 J/cm2 fluences, using the beam of a commercial Ti:sapphire laser. The changes induced in the surface morphology were analysed with a Nomarski optical microscope, and with SEM and AFM techniques. From the experimental data and from the calculated incident energy density distributions, the damage and ablation threshold values were determined. As expected, the diamond showed the highest threshold, while the cemented tungsten carbide exhibited typical values for metallic surfaces. The ablation rates determined (under the above-mentioned experimental conditions) were in the range 0.1-0.2 μm per pulse for all the materials investigated.

  19. Ablative shielding for hypervelocity projectiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rucker, Michelle A. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A hypervelocity projectile shield which includes a hollow semi-flexible housing fabricated from a plastic like, or otherwise transparent membrane which is filled with a fluid (gas or liquid) is presented. The housing has a inlet valve, similar to that on a tire or basketball, to introduce an ablating fluid into the housing. The housing is attached by a Velcro mount or double-sided adhesive tape to the outside surface of a structure to be protected. The housings are arrayed in a side-by-side relationship for complete coverage of the surface to be protected. In use, when a hypervelocity projectile penetrates the outer wall of a housing it is broken up and then the projectile is ablated as it travels through the fluid, much like a meteorite 'burns up' as it enters the earth's atmosphere, and the housing is deflated. The deflated housing can be easily spotted for replacement, even from a distance. Replacement is then accomplished by simply pulling a deflated housing off the structure and installing a new housing.

  20. Tumor Ablation with Irreversible Electroporation

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sakere, Bassim; André, Franck; Bernat, Claire; Connault, Elisabeth; Opolon, Paule; Davalos, Rafael V.; Rubinsky, Boris; Mir, Lluis M.

    2007-01-01

    We report the first successful use of irreversible electroporation for the minimally invasive treatment of aggressive cutaneous tumors implanted in mice. Irreversible electroporation is a newly developed non-thermal tissue ablation technique in which certain short duration electrical fields are used to permanently permeabilize the cell membrane, presumably through the formation of nanoscale defects in the cell membrane. Mathematical models of the electrical and thermal fields that develop during the application of the pulses were used to design an efficient treatment protocol with minimal heating of the tissue. Tumor regression was confirmed by histological studies which also revealed that it occurred as a direct result of irreversible cell membrane permeabilization. Parametric studies show that the successful outcome of the procedure is related to the applied electric field strength, the total pulse duration as well as the temporal mode of delivery of the pulses. Our best results were obtained using plate electrodes to deliver across the tumor 80 pulses of 100 µs at 0.3 Hz with an electrical field magnitude of 2500 V/cm. These conditions induced complete regression in 12 out of 13 treated tumors, (92%), in the absence of tissue heating. Irreversible electroporation is thus a new effective modality for non-thermal tumor ablation. PMID:17989772

  1. Simple model for ablative stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikaelian, Karnig O.

    1992-11-01

    We present a simple analytic model for ablative stablization of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. In this model the effect of ablation is to move the peak of the perturbations to the location of peak pressure. This mechanism enhances the density-gradient stabilization, which is effective at short wavelengths, and it also enhances the stabilization of long-wavelength perturbations due to finite shell thickness. We consider the following density profile: exponential blowoff plasma with a density gradient β, followed by a constant-density shell of thickness δt. For perturbations of arbitrary wave number k, we present an explicit expression for the growth rate γ as a function of k, β, and δt. We find that ``thick'' shells defined by β δt>=1 have γ2>=0 for any k, while ``thin'' shells defined by β δt<1 can have γ2<0 for small k, reflecting stability by proximity to the back side of the shell. We also present lasnex simulations that are in good agreement with our analytic formulas.

  2. Stellar Ablation of Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Thomas E.; Horwitz, J. L.

    2007-01-01

    We review observations and theories of the solar ablation of planetary atmospheres, focusing on the terrestrial case where a large magnetosphere holds off the solar wind, so that there is little direct atmospheric impact, but also couples the solar wind electromagnetically to the auroral zones. We consider the photothermal escape flows known as the polar wind or refilling flows, the enhanced mass flux escape flows that result from localized solar wind energy dissipation in the auroral zones, and the resultant enhanced neutral atom escape flows. We term these latter two escape flows the "auroral wind." We review observations and theories of the heating and acceleration of auroral winds, including energy inputs from precipitating particles, electromagnetic energy flux at magnetohydrodynamic and plasma wave frequencies, and acceleration by parallel electric fields and by convection pickup processes also known as "centrifugal acceleration." We consider also the global circulation of ionospheric plasmas within the magnetosphere, their participation in magnetospheric disturbances as absorbers of momentum and energy, and their ultimate loss from the magnetosphere into the downstream solar wind, loading reconnection processes that occur at high altitudes near the magnetospheric boundaries. We consider the role of planetary magnetization and the accumulating evidence of stellar ablation of extrasolar planetary atmospheres. Finally, we suggest and discuss future needs for both the theory and observation of the planetary ionospheres and their role in solar wind interactions, to achieve the generality required for a predictive science of the coupling of stellar and planetary atmospheres over the full range of possible conditions.

  3. Radiofrequency catheter ablation of the atrioventricular junction from the left ventricle

    SciTech Connect

    Sousa, J.; el-Atassi, R.; Rosenheck, S.; Calkins, H.; Langberg, J.; Morady, F. )

    1991-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe a new technique for catheter ablation of the atrioventricular junction using radiofrequency energy delivered in the left ventricle. Catheter ablation of the atrioventricular (AV) junction using a catheter positioned across the tricuspid annulus was unsuccessful in eight patients with a mean {plus minus} SD age of 51 {plus minus} 19 years who had AV nodal reentry tachycardia (three patients), orthodromic tachycardia using a concealed midseptal accessory pathway, atrial tachycardia, atrial flutter (two patients), or atrial fibrillation. Before attempts at catheter ablation of the AV junction, each patient had been refractory to pharmacological therapy, and four had failed attempts at either catheter modification of the AV node using radiofrequency energy or surgical and catheter ablation of the accessory pathway. Conventional right-sided catheter ablation of the AV junction using radiofrequency energy in six patients and both radiofrequency energy and direct current shocks in two patients was ineffective. The mean amplitude of the His bundle potential recorded at the tricuspid annulus at the sites of unsuccessful AV junction ablation was 0.1 {plus minus} 0.08 mV, with a maximum His amplitude of 0.03-0.28 mV. A 7F deflectable-tip quadripolar electrode catheter with a 4-mm distal electrode was positioned against the upper left ventricular septum using a retrograde aortic approach from the femoral artery. Third-degree AV block was induced in each of the eight patients with 20-36 W applied for 15-30 seconds. The His bundle potential at the sites of successful AV junction ablation ranged from 0.06 to 0.99 mV, with a mean of 0.27 {plus minus} 0.32 mV. There was no rise in the creatine kinase-MB fraction and no complications occurred. An intrinsic escape rhythm of 30-60 beats/min was present in seven of the eight patients.

  4. Influence of the hydration state on the ultrashort laser ablation of dental hard tissues.

    PubMed

    Rego Filho, Francisco de Assis M G; Dutra-Corrêa, Maristela; Nicolodelli, Gustavo; Bagnato, Vanderlei S; de Araujo, Maria Tereza

    2013-01-01

    Since about 40 years, laser-based surgical tools have been used in medicine and dentistry to improve clinical protocols. In dentistry, femtosecond lasers have been claimed to be a potential ablation tool. It would, however, be good to perform a more fundamental investigation to understand ablation interaction mechanisms and possible side effects, depending on different specific components of the target tissue. The goal of this study is to show the changes of ablation characteristics in the femtosecond regime at different levels of structural water within dental hard tissues. Thirty human teeth samples were split into three hydration groups and subdivided into dentin and enamel groups (n = 5). The specimens were irradiated using a 70-fs Ti:sapphire laser (with a 1-kHz repetition rate and a 801-nm wavelength output). Ablation was performed using five different power levels and three exposure times. The results clearly show an inversely proportional dependence of the ablation threshold to the hydration level of the tissues. A known mathematical model was adapted in order to include the influence of the changes on the relative fractional composition of dental hard tissues. This analysis was consistent with the experimental results regarding the ablation threshold. High thermal and mechanical damages were observed as a high repetition rate had been applied. Macroscopic images and scanning electron microscopy images were used to preliminarily analyze both the thermal and mechanical damage thresholds, and their variations according to the hydration level present. By manipulating the hydration states, the modifications in the proportions of the molecules that build dental hard tissues clearly shift, and therefore, the characteristics of a plasma-induced ablation change.

  5. A novel choline cotransporter sequestration compartment in cholinergic neurons revealed by selective endosomal ablation.

    PubMed

    Ivy, Michael T; Newkirk, Robert F; Wang, Yilun; Townsel, James G

    2010-03-01

    The sodium-dependent, high affinity choline transporter - choline cotransporter - (ChCoT, aka: cho-1, CHT1, CHT) undergoes constitutive and regulated trafficking between the plasma membrane and cytoplasmic compartments. The pathways and regulatory mechanisms of this trafficking are not well understood. We report herein studies involving selective endosomal ablation to further our understanding of the trafficking of the ChCoT. Selective ablation of early sorting and recycling endosomes resulted in a decrease of approximately 75% of [3H]choline uptake and approximately 70% of [3H]hemicholinium-3 binding. Western blot analysis showed that ablation produced a similar decrease in ChCoTs in the plasma membrane subcellular fraction. The time frame for this loss was approximately 2 h which has been shown to be the constitutive cycling time for ChCoTs in this tissue. Ablation appears to be dependent on the intracellular cycling of transferrin-conjugated horseradish peroxidase and the selective deposition of transferrin-conjugated horseradish peroxidase in early endosomes, both sorting and recycling. Ablated brain slices retained their capacity to recruit via regulated trafficking ChCoTs to the plasma membrane. This recruitment of ChCoTs suggests that the recruitable compartment is distinct from the early endosomes. It will be necessary to do further studies to identify the novel sequestration compartment supportive of the ChCoT regulated trafficking.

  6. Effect of percutaneous renal sympathetic nerve radiofrequency ablation in patients with severe heart failure.

    PubMed

    Dai, Qiming; Lu, Jing; Wang, Benwen; Ma, Genshan

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the clinical feasibility and effects of percutaneous renal sympathetic nerve radiofrequency ablation in patients with heart failure. A total of 20 patients with heart failure were enrolled, aged from 47 to 75 years (63±10 years). They were divided into the standard therapy (n = 10), and renal nerve radiofrequency ablation groups (n = 10). There were 15 males and 5 female patients, including 8 ischemic cardiomyopathy, 8 dilated cardiomyopathy, and 8 hypertensive cardiopathy. All of the patients met the criteria of New York Heart Association classes III-IV cardiac function. Patients with diabetes and renal failure were excluded. Percutaneous renal sympathetic nerve radiofrequency ablation was performed on the renal artery wall under X-ray guidance. Serum electrolytes, neurohormones, and 24 h urine volume were recorded 24 h before and after the operation. Echocardiograms were performed to obtain left ventricular ejection fraction at baseline and 6 months. Heart rate, blood pressure, symptoms of dyspnea and edema were also monitored. After renal nerve ablation, 24 h urine volume was increased, while neurohormone levels were decreased compared with those of pre-operation and standard therapy. No obvious change in heart rate or blood pressure was recorded. Symptoms of heart failure were improved in patients after the operation. No complications were recorded in the study. Percutaneous renal sympathetic nerve radiofrequency ablation may be a feasible, safe, and effective treatment for the patients with severe congestive heart failure.

  7. Pulsed infrared laser ablation and clinical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Kin Foong

    Sufficient light energy deposited in tissue can result in ablation and excessive thermal and mechanical damage to adjacent tissues. The goals of this research are to investigate the mechanisms of pulsed infrared laser ablation of tissue, to optimize laser parameters for minimizing unnecessary damage to healthy tissue, and to explore the potential of using pulsed infrared lasers for clinical applications, especially laser lithotripsy. A dual-channel optical low coherence reflectometer was implemented to measure the expansion and collapse velocities of a Q-switched Ho:YAG (λ = 2.12 μm) laser-induced cavitation in water. Cavitation wall velocities up to 11 m/s were measured with this technique, and the results were in fair agreement with those calculated from fast-flash photographic images. The dependence of ablation threshold fluence on calculus absorption was examined. Preliminary results indicated that the product of optical absorption and ablation threshold fluence, which is the heat of ablation, remained constant for a given urinary calculus type and laser pulse duration. An extended study examined the influence of optical absorption on pulsed infrared laser ablation. An analytical photothermal ablation model was applied and compared to experimental ablation results using an infrared free-electron laser at selected wavelengths between 2.12 μm and 6.45 μm Results were in good agreement with the model, and the ablation depths of urinary calculi were highly dependent upon the calculus optical absorption as well as light attenuation within the intrapulse ablation plume. An efficient wavelength for ablation corresponded to the wavelength of the Er:YAG laser (λ = 2.94 μm) suggested this laser should be examined for laser lithotripsy. Schlieren flash photography, acoustic transient measurements with a piezoelectric polyvinylidene-fluoride needle-hydrophone, mass loss measurements, and chemical analyses were employed to study the ablation mechanisms of the free

  8. Investigation on nanoparticle distribution for thermal ablation of a tumour subjected to nanoparticle assisted thermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Soni, Sanjeev; Tyagi, Himanshu; Taylor, Robert A; Kumar, Amod

    2014-07-01

    This study investigates the effect of the distribution of nanoparticles delivered to a skin tumour for the thermal ablation conditions attained during thermal therapy. Ultimate aim is to define a distribution of nanoparticles as well as a combination of other therapeutic parameters to attain thermal ablation temperatures (50-60 °C) within whole of the tumour region. Three different cases of nanoparticle distributions are analysed under controlled conditions for all other parameters viz. irradiation intensity and duration, and volume fraction of nanoparticles. Results show that distribution of nanoparticles into only the periphery of tumour resulted in desired thermal ablation temperature in whole of tumour. For the tumour size considered in this study, an irradiation intensity of 1.25 W/cm(2) for duration of 300 s and a nanoparticle volume fraction of 0.001% was optimal to attain a temperature of ≥53 °C within the whole tumour region. It is concluded that distribution of nanoparticles in peripheral region of tumour, along with a controlled combination of other parameters, seems favourable and provides a promising pathway for thermal ablation of a tumour subjected to nanoparticle assisted thermal therapy.

  9. On the Ablation Models of Fuel Pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Rozhansky, V.A.; Senichenkov, I.Yu.

    2005-12-15

    The neutral gas shielding model and neutral-gas-plasma shielding model are analyzed qualitatively. The main physical processes that govern the formation of the shielding gas cloud and, consequently, the ablation rate are considered. For the neutral gas shielding model, simple formulas relating the ablation rate and cloud parameters to the parameters of the pellet and the background plasma are presented. The estimates of the efficiency of neutral gas shielding and plasma shielding are compared. It is shown that the main portion of the energy flux of the background electrons is released in the plasma cloud. Formulas for the ablation rate and plasma parameters are derived in the neutral-gas-plasma shielding model. The question is discussed as to why the neutral gas shielding model describes well the ablation rate of the pellet material, although it does not take into account the ionization effects and the effects associated with the interaction of ionized particles with the magnetic field. The reason is that the ablation rate depends weakly on the energy flux of hot electrons; as a result, the attenuation of this flux by the electrostatic shielding and plasma shielding has little effect on the ablation rate. This justifies the use of the neutral gas shielding model to estimate the ablation rate (to within a factor of about 2) over a wide range of parameters of the pellet and the background plasma.

  10. [Indications for catheter ablation of ventricular tachycardia].

    PubMed

    Deneke, T; Israel, C W; Krug, J; Nentwich, K; Müller, P; Mügge, A; Schade, A

    2013-09-01

    Ventricular tachyarrhythmias (VT) can cause sudden cardiac death. This can be prevented by an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) but approximately 25% of patients with an ICD develop electrical storm (≥ 3 VTs within 24 hours) during the course of 4-5 years. This is a life-threatening event even in the presence of an ICD, particularly if incessant VT is present, and may significantly deteriorate the patient's psychological state if multiple shocks are discharged. Catheter ablation of VT has developed into a standard procedure in many specialized electrophysiology centers. Patients with hemodynamically stable and unstable VT are amendable to substrate-based ablation strategies. Catheter ablation can be performed as emergency procedure in patients with electrical storm as well as electively in patients with monomorphic VT stored in ICD memory. In patients with ischemic or non-ischemic cardiomyopathy, VT ablation is complementary to ICD implantation and can reduce the number of ventricular arrhythmia episodes and shocks and should be performed early. In patients with electrical storm, catheter ablation can acutely achieve rhythm stabilization and may improve prognosis in the long term. Further indications for catheter ablation exist in patients with idiopathic VT where catheter ablation represents a curative therapy, and in patients with symptomatic or asymptomatic frequent premature ventricular beats which may improve prognosis in patients with heart failure and cardiac resynchronization therapy.

  11. Analysis of infrared laser tissue ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, Gordon P.; Timmerman, Brenda H.; Bryanston-Cross, Peter J.

    2005-04-01

    The mechanisms involved in infrared laser tissue ablation are studied using a free electron laser (FELIX) in order to clarify whether the increased ablation efficiency reported in literature for certain infrared wavelengths is due to a wavelength effect or to the specific pulse structure of the lasers that are generally used in these studies. Investigations are presented of ablation of vitreous from pigs" eyes using several techniques including protein gel electrophoresis and ablation plume visualization. The ablation effects of three different infrared wavelengths are compared: 3 mm, which is currently in clinical surgical use, and the wavelengths associated with the amide I and amide II bands, i.e. 6.2 mm and 6.45mm, respectively. The results suggest a different ablation mechanism to be in operation for each studied wavelength, thus indicating that the generally reported increased ablation efficiency in the 6-6.5 micron range is due to the wavelength rather than the typical free electron laser pulse structure.

  12. Thermal therapy, Part III: ablation techniques.

    PubMed

    Habash, Riadh W Y; Bansal, Rajeev; Krewski, Daniel; Alhafid, Hafid T

    2007-01-01

    Ablative treatments are gaining increasing attention as an alternative to standard surgical therapies, especially for patients with contraindication or those who refuse open surgery. Thermal ablation is used in clinical applications mainly for treating heart arrhythmias, benign prostate hyperplasia, and nonoperable liver tumors; there is also increasing application to other organ sites, including the kidney, lung, and brain. Potential benefits of thermal ablation include reduced morbidity and mortality in comparison with standard surgical resection and the ability to treat nonsurgical patients. The purpose of this review is to outline and discuss the engineering principles and biological responses by which thermal ablation techniques can provide elevation of temperature in organs within the human body. Because of the individual problems associated with each type of treatment, a wide range of ablation techniques have evolved including cryoablation as well as ultrasound, radiofrequency (RF), microwave, and laser ablation. Aspects of each ablation technique, including mechanisms of action, equipment required, selection of eligible patients, treatment techniques, and patient outcomes are presented, along with a discussion of limitations of the techniques and future research directions.

  13. Thermal protection system ablation sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorbunov, Sergey (Inventor); Martinez, Edward R. (Inventor); Scott, James B. (Inventor); Oishi, Tomomi (Inventor); Fu, Johnny (Inventor); Mach, Joseph G. (Inventor); Santos, Jose B. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An isotherm sensor tracks space vehicle temperatures by a thermal protection system (TPS) material during vehicle re-entry as a function of time, and surface recession through calibration, calculation, analysis and exposed surface modeling. Sensor design includes: two resistive conductors, wound around a tube, with a first end of each conductor connected to a constant current source, and second ends electrically insulated from each other by a selected material that becomes an electrically conductive char at higher temperatures to thereby complete an electrical circuit. The sensor conductors become shorter as ablation proceeds and reduced resistance in the completed electrical circuit (proportional to conductor length) is continually monitored, using measured end-to-end voltage change or current in the circuit. Thermocouple and/or piezoelectric measurements provide consistency checks on local temperatures.

  14. Radiofrequency Ablation: A Nursing Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Locklin, Julia K.; Wood, Bradford J.

    2008-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has emerged as a safe and predictable technology for treating certain patients with cancer who otherwise have few treatment options. Nurses need to be familiar with all phases of the RFA procedure to create an optimal environment for patients. This article offers a brief review of the RFA procedure and nurses' responsibilities in caring for these patients. Before RFA, nurses should focus on patient education and aggressive hydration. During the procedure, nurses can prevent injury by placing grounding pads appropriately, monitoring vital signs, and medicating patients as needed. After RFA, nurses should assess the skin puncture site, provide adequate pain relief, and, again, hydrate patients. Nurses who care appropriately for RFA recipients may help to improve patient outcomes and make an otherwise frightening procedure more comfortable. PMID:15973845

  15. Ablation of idiopathic ventricular tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Doreen; Kottkamp, Hans

    2010-09-01

    Idiopathic ventricular arrhythmias occur in patients without structural heart disease. They can arise from a variety of specific areas within both ventricles and in the supravalvular regions of the great arteries. Two main groups need to be differentiated: arrhythmias from the outflow tract (OT) region and idiopathic left ventricular, so-called fascicular, tachycardias (ILVTs). OT tachycardia typically originates in the right ventricular OT, but may also occur in the left ventricular OT, particularly in the sinuses of Valsalva or the anterior epicardium or the great cardiac vein. Activation mapping or pace mapping for the OT regions and mapping of diastolic potentials in ILVTs are the mapping techniques that are typically used. The ablation of idiopathic ventricular arrhythmias is highly successful, associated with only rare complications. Newly recognized entities of idiopathic ventricular tachycardias are those originating in the papillary muscles and in the atrioventricular annular regions.

  16. Nanosecond laser ablation of gold nanoparticle films

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, Seung H.; Choi, Yeonho; Hwang, David J.; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Chung, Jaewon; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2006-10-02

    Ablation of self-assembled monolayer protected gold nanoparticle films on polyimide was explored using a nanosecond laser. When the nanoparticle film was ablated and subsequently thermally sintered to a continuous film, the elevated rim structure by the expulsion of molten pool could be avoided and the ablation threshold fluence was reduced to a value at least ten times lower than the reported threshold for the gold film. This could be explained by the unusual properties of nanoparticle film such as low melting temperature, weak bonding between nanoparticles, efficient laser energy deposition, and reduced heat loss. Finally, submicron lines were demonstrated.

  17. IR laser ablation of dental enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fried, Daniel

    2000-03-01

    An overview of the basic mechanisms of IR laser ablation of dental enamel is presented. Enamel is a highly structured tissue consisting of an heterogeneous distribution of water, mineral, protein and lipid. Absorption bands of water and carbonated hydroxyapatite can be selectively targeted from 2.7 to 11-micrometer via several laser wavelengths. Mechanistic differences in the nature of ablation and the varying surface morphology produced can be explained by the microstructure of the tissue. Suggested criteria for the choice of the optimum laser parameters for clinical use, the influence of plasma shielding and the role of exogenous water on the mechanism of ablation are discussed.

  18. Diamond Ablators for Inertial Confinement Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Biener, J; Mirkarimi, P B; Tringe, J W; Baker, S L; Wang, Y M; Kucheyev, S O; Teslich, N E; Wu, K J; Hamza, A V; Wild, C; Woerner, E; Koidl, P; Bruehne, K; Fecht, H

    2005-06-21

    Diamond has a unique combination of physical properties for the inertial confinement fusion ablator application, such as appropriate optical properties, high atomic density, high yield strength, and high thermal conductivity. Here, we present a feasible concept to fabricate diamond ablator shells. The fabrication of diamond capsules is a multi-step process, which involves diamond chemical vapor deposition on silicon mandrels followed by polishing, microfabrication of holes, and removing of the silicon mandrel by an etch process. We also discuss the pros and cons of coarse-grained optical quality and nanocrystalline chemical vapor deposition diamond films for the ablator application.

  19. Radiofrequency Ablation of Persistent Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Hussein, Ayman A.; Saliba, Walid I.; Barakat, Amr; Bassiouny, Mohammed; Chamsi-Pasha, Mohammed; Al-Bawardy, Rasha; Hakim, Ali; Tarakji, Khaldoun; Baranowski, Bryan; Cantillon, Daniel; Dresing, Thomas; Tchou, Patrick; Martin, David O.; Varma, Niraj; Bhargava, Mandeep; Callahan, Thomas; Niebauer, Mark; Kanj, Mohamed; Chung, Mina; Natale, Andrea; Lindsay, Bruce D.; Wazni, Oussama M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Various ablation strategies of persistent atrial fibrillation (PersAF) have had disappointing outcomes, despite concerted clinical and research efforts, which could reflect progressive atrial fibrillation–related atrial remodeling. Methods and Results Two-year outcomes were assessed in 1241 consecutive patients undergoing first-time ablation of PersAF (2005–2012). The time intervals between the first diagnosis of PersAF and the ablation procedures were determined. Patients had echocardiograms and measures of B-type natriuretic peptide and C-reactive protein before the procedures. The median diagnosis-to-ablation time was 3 years (25th–75th percentiles 1–6.5). With longer diagnosis-to-ablation time (based on quartiles), there was a significant increase in recurrence rates in addition to an increase in B-type natriuretic peptide levels (P=0.01), C-reactive protein levels (P<0.0001), and left atrial size (P=0.03). The arrhythmia recurrence rates over 2 years were 33.6%, 52.6%, 57.1%, and 54.6% in the first, second, third, and fourth quartiles, respectively (Pcategorical<0.0001). In Cox Proportional Hazard analyses, B-type natriuretic peptide levels, C-reactive protein levels, and left atrial size were associated with arrhythmia recurrence. The diagnosis-to-ablation time had the strongest association with the ablation outcomes which persisted in multivariable Cox analyzes (hazard ratio for recurrence per +1Log diagnosis-to-ablation time 1.27, 95% confidence interval 1.14–1.43; P<0.0001; hazard ratio fourth versus first quartile 2.44, 95% confidence interval 1.68–3.65; Pcategorical<0.0001). Conclusions In patients with PersAF undergoing ablation, the time interval between the first diagnosis of PersAF and the catheter ablation procedure had a strong association with the ablation outcomes, such as shorter diagnosis-to-ablation times were associated with better outcomes and in direct association with markers of atrial remodeling. PMID:26763227

  20. Ablation of pulmonary malignancy: current status.

    PubMed

    Pua, Bradley B; Thornton, Raymond H; Solomon, Stephen B

    2010-08-01

    Since the first reported use of radiofrequency ablation of the lung in 2000, the field of image-guided lung ablation has received a considerable amount of attention. Survival studies have demonstrated the potential utility of thermal ablation in the treatment of patients with early-stage primary and limited secondary pulmonary tumors with promising results. Diagnostic imaging studies have advanced the understanding of the expected immediate postablation appearance of treated lesions, leading the way for early detection of local tumor progression. These survival studies and the expected imaging follow-up of these patients are reviewed herein.

  1. Use of a circular mapping and ablation catheter for ablation of atypical right ventricular outflow tract arrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Katritsis, Demosthenes G; Giazitzoglou, Eleftherios; Paxinos, George

    2010-02-01

    A new technique for ablation of persistent ectopic activity with atypical electrocardiographic characteristics at the vicinity of the right ventricular outflow tract is described. A new circular mapping and ablation catheter initially designed for pulmonary vein ablation was used. Abolition of ectopic activity was achieved with minimal fluoroscopy and ablation times.

  2. Periacetabular bone mineral density changes after resurfacing hip arthroplasty versus conventional total hip arthroplasty. A randomized controlled DEXA study.

    PubMed

    Smolders, José M H; Pakvis, Dean F; Hendrickx, Baudewijn W; Verdonschot, Nico; van Susante, Job L C

    2013-08-01

    A randomized controlled trial was performed to evaluate acetabular bone mineral density (BMD) changes after hip resurfacing (RHA) versus an established conventional total hip arthroplasty (THA). A total of 71 patients were allocated randomly to receive either an RHA press-fit cobalt-chromium cup (n=38) or a THA with a threaded titanium cup and polyethylene-metal-inlay insert (n=33). The BMD in five separate periacetabular regions of interest (ROI) was prospectively quantified preoperative until 24 months. We conclude that, in contrast to our hypothesis, periacetabular BMD was better preserved after RHA than after placement of a conventional THA. Long term follow-up studies are necessary to see whether this benefit in bone preservation sustains over longer time periods and whether it is turned into clinical benefits at future revision surgery.

  3. Flap prefabrication and stem cell-assisted tissue expansion: how we acquire a monoblock flap for full face resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingfeng; Zan, Tao; Li, Haizhou; Zhou, Shuangbai; Gu, Bin; Liu, Kai; Xie, Feng; Xie, Yun

    2014-01-01

    Total face skin and soft-tissue defects remain one of the biggest challenges in reconstructive surgery. Reconstruction of the entire face with uniform coverage and delicate features is difficult to achieve. To avoid the patchwork result seen in multiple flaps and skin grafts, 1 monoblock flap that has similar color, texture, and thickness might be an ideal option to minimize the incisional scars and several surgical procedures but is unavailable with current approaches because of the lack of sufficient matched tissue and the unreliable blood supply for such a large flap. To acquire a monoblock flap for full face reconstruction, we combine the prefabricated flaps, skin overexpansion, and bone marrow mononuclear stem cell transplantation for total facial resurfacing. In this article, we present our experience from our case series that provides universally matched skin and near-normal facial contour. It is a reliable and an excellent reconstructive option for massive facial skin defect.

  4. Detecting volcanic resurfacing of heavily cratered terrain: Flooding simulations on the Moon using Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitten, Jennifer L.; Head, James W.

    2013-09-01

    Early extrusive volcanism from mantle melting marks the transition from primary to secondary crust formation. Detection of secondary crust is often obscured by the high impact flux early in solar system history. To recognize the relationship between heavily cratered terrain and volcanic resurfacing, this study documents how volcanic resurfacing alters the impact cratering record and models the thickness, area, and volume of volcanic flood deposits. Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) data are used to analyze three different regions of the lunar highlands: the Hertzsprung basin; a farside heavily cratered region; and the central highlands. Lunar mare emplacement style is assumed to be similar to that of terrestrial flood basalts, involving large volumes of material extruded from dike-fed fissures over relatively short periods of time. Thus, each region was flooded at 0.5 km elevation intervals to simulate such volcanic flooding and to assess areal patterns, thickness, volumes, and emplacement history. These simulations show three primary stages of volcanic flooding: (1) Initial flooding is largely confined to individual craters and deposits are thick and localized; (2) basalt flows breach crater rim crests and are emplaced laterally between larger craters as thin widespread deposits; and (3) lateral spreading decreases in response to regional topographic variations and the deposits thicken and bury intermediate-sized and larger craters. Application of these techniques to the South Pole-Aitken basin shows that emplacement of ∼1-2 km of cryptomaria can potentially explain the paucity of craters 20-64 km in diameter on the floor of the basin relative to the distribution in the surrounding highlands.

  5. Pulsed and scanned carbon dioxide laser resurfacing 2 years after treatment: comparison by means of scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Trelles, Mario A; Garcia, Luisa; Rigau, Josepa; Allones, Inès; Velez, Marìano

    2003-05-01

    Studies have reported short-term and long-term (1-year) findings for laser skin resurfacing. Two of the most popular systems used for this procedure, the continuous-wave Sharplan 40C SilkTouch system and the pulsed Coherent 5000C UltraPulse system with a computer pattern generator, were previously compared for a range of follow-up times up to 1 year, using light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. This study analyzed the 2-year morphological differences using scanning electron microscopy. Tissue samples were obtained from 10 patients (age range, 50 to 72 years; skin types II and III) who had undergone laser resurfacing 2 years previously. One half of the face of each patient had been treated with the continuous-wave system and the other half with the pulsed system. The samples were subjected to scanning electron microscopy. On the continuous-wave-treated side, significantly better dermal collagen organization was observed at 2 years, with plump-appearing fibers that were closely knit to form a compact structure. On the side treated with the pulsed system, the collagen fibers in the papillary dermis were more loosely arranged and appeared drier. In both the continuous-wave-treated and pulsed-treated areas, the epidermis appeared healthy and exhibited some signs of age-related deterioration, with slightly flatter plaques and somewhat more flaking keratin on the pulsed-treated side. Probably because of the greater degree of residual thermal damage associated with the continuous-wave system, at 2 years after treatment there was more prolific synthesis and better orientation of collagen fibers, which were maintained for longer times, compared with the pulsed-treated specimens.

  6. Resurfacing history of the northern plains of Mars based on geologic mapping of Mars Global Surveyor data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tanaka, K.L.; Skinner, J.A.; Hare, T.M.; Joyal, T.; Wenker, A.

    2003-01-01

    Geologic mapping of the northern plains of Mars, based on Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter topography and Viking and Mars Orbiter Camera images, reveals new insights into geologic processes and events in this region during the Hesperian and Amazonian Periods. We propose four successive stages of lowland resurfacing likely related to the activity of near-surface volatiles commencing at the highland-lowland boundary (HLB) and progressing to lower topographic levels as follows (highest elevations indicated): Stage 1, upper boundary plains, Early Hesperian, <-2.0 to -2.9 km; Stage 2, lower boundary plains and outflow channel dissection, Late Hesperian, <-2.7 to -4.0 km; Stage 3, Vastitas Borealis Formation (VBF) surface, Late Hesperian to Early Amazonian, <-3.1 to -4.1 km; and Stage 4, local chaos zones, Early Amazonian, <-3.8 to -5.0 km. At Acidalia Mensa, Stage 2 and 3 levels may be lower (<-4.4 and -4.8 km, respectively). Contractional ridges form the dominant structure in the plains and developed from near the end of the Early Hesperian to the Early Amazonian. Geomorphic evidence for a northern-plains-filling ocean during Stage 2 is absent because one did not form or its evidence was destroyed by Stage 3 resurfacing. Remnants of possible Amazonian dust mantles occur on top of the VBF. The north polar layered deposits appear to be made up of an up to kilometer-thick lower sequence of sandy layers Early to Middle Amazonian in age overlain by Late Amazonian ice-rich dust layers; both units appear to have outliers, suggesting that they once were more extensive.

  7. Nanoscale ablation through optically trapped microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fardel, Romain; McLeod, Euan; Tsai, Yu-Cheng; Arnold, Craig B.

    2010-10-01

    The ability to directly create patterns with size scales below 100 nm is important for many applications where the production or repair of high resolution and density features is needed. Laser-based direct-write methods have the benefit of being able to quickly and easily modify and create structures on existing devices, but ablation can negatively impact the overall technique. In this paper we show that self-positioning of near-field objectives through the optical trap assisted nanopatterning (OTAN) method allows for ablation without harming the objective elements. Small microbeads are positioned in close proximity to a substrate where ablation is initiated. Upon ablation, these beads are temporarily displaced from the trap but rapidly return to the initial position. We analyze the range of fluence values for which this process occurs and find that there exists a critical threshold beyond which the beads are permanently ejected.

  8. Physical processes of laser tissue ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furzikov, Nickolay P.

    1991-05-01

    The revised ablation model applicable to homogeneous tissues is presented. It is based on the thermal mechanism and involves the instability of the laserinduced evaporation (thermodestruction) front the growth of the surface ripple structure the interference of the laser wave and of the surface wave arising by diffraction on the ripples Beer''s law violation the pulsed thermodestruction of the organic structural component the tissue water boiling and gas dynamic expansion of the resulting products into the surrounding medium which is followed by the shock wave formation. The UV and IR ablation schemes were implemented and compared to the corneal ablation experiments. The initial ablation pressure and temperature are given restored from the timeofflight measurements of the supersonic expansion of the product. 1.

  9. Evolving Ablative Therapies for Hepatic Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Hochwald, Steven N.

    2014-01-01

    The liver is a common site for both primary and secondary malignancy. Hepatic resection and transplantation are the two treatment modalities that have been shown to achieve complete cure, but only 10 to 20% of patients are candidates for these treatments. For the remaining patients, tumor ablation has emerged as the most promising alternative modality. In addition to providing local control and improving survival outcomes, tumor ablation also helps to down stage patients for potential curative treatments, both alone as well as in combination with other treatments. While tumor ablation can be achieved in multiple ways, the introduction of newer ablative techniques has shifted the focus from palliation to potentially curative treatment. Because the long-term safety and survival benefits are not substantive at present, it is important that we strive to evaluate the results from these studies using appropriate comparative outcome methodologies. PMID:24877069

  10. Thermal Ablation Modeling for Silicate Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yih-Kanq

    2016-01-01

    A general thermal ablation model for silicates is proposed. The model includes the mass losses through the balance between evaporation and condensation, and through the moving molten layer driven by surface shear force and pressure gradient. This model can be applied in the ablation simulation of the meteoroid and the glassy ablator for spacecraft Thermal Protection Systems. Time-dependent axisymmetric computations are performed by coupling the fluid dynamics code, Data-Parallel Line Relaxation program, with the material response code, Two-dimensional Implicit Thermal Ablation simulation program, to predict the mass lost rates and shape change. The predicted mass loss rates will be compared with available data for model validation, and parametric studies will also be performed for meteoroid earth entry conditions.

  11. Pharmacological Tests in Atrial Fibrillation Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Gourraud, Jean-Baptiste; Andrade, Jason G; Macle, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    The invasive management of atrial fibrillation (AF) has been considerably changed by the identification of major sites of AF initiation and/or maintenance within the pulmonary vein antra. Percutaneous catheter ablation of these targets has become the standard of care for sustained maintenance of sinus rhythm. Long-term failure of ablation is related to an inability to create a durable transmural lesion or to identify all of the non-pulmonary vein arrhythmia triggers. Pharmacological challenges during catheter ablation have been suggested to improve outcomes in both paroxysmal and persistent AF. Herein we review the mechanism and evidence for the use of pharmacological adjuncts during the catheter ablation of AF. PMID:28116081

  12. Microwave Tissue Ablation: Biophysics, Technology and Applications

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Microwave ablation is an emerging treatment option for many cancers, cardiac arrhythmias and other medical conditions. During treatment, microwaves are applied directly to tissues to produce rapid temperature elevations sufficient to produce immediate coagulative necrosis. The engineering design criteria for each application differ, with individual consideration for factors such as desired ablation zone size, treatment duration, and procedural invasiveness. Recent technological developments in applicator cooling, power control and system optimization for specific applications promise to increase the utilization of microwave ablation in the future. This article will review the basic biophysics of microwave tissue heating, provide an overview of the design and operation of current equipment, and outline areas for future research for microwave ablation. PMID:21175404

  13. Indications and options for endometrial ablation.

    PubMed

    2008-11-01

    Endometrial ablation is an effective therapeutic option for the management of menorrhagia in properly selected patients. Hysteroscopic and non-hysteroscopic techniques offer similar rates of symptom relief and patient satisfaction.

  14. Percutaneous ablation of malignant thoracic tumors.

    PubMed

    Ghaye, B

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of death related to cancer. Fifteen to thirty percent of patients with a localized lung cancer are actually inoperable as they present with poor general condition, limited cardiopulmonary function, or a too high surgical risk. Therefore, minimally invasive treatments are needed and percutaneous ablation seems an attractive option. Thermal ablation can be performed by delivering heat (radiofrequency, microwave, laser) or cold (cryotherapy) through a needle inserted into the tumor under CT guidance. The ideal lesion is less than 2 or 3 cm in diameter. Success of percutaneous thermal ablation appears to be close to those of surgery for localized lung cancer. Nevertheless studies are still needed to definitely assess the role of ablation compared to other emerging techniques, as stereotactic radiotherapy as well as potential synergy with other treatments.

  15. Fractional vector calculus and fractional Maxwell's equations

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasov, Vasily E.

    2008-11-15

    The theory of derivatives and integrals of non-integer order goes back to Leibniz, Liouville, Grunwald, Letnikov and Riemann. The history of fractional vector calculus (FVC) has only 10 years. The main approaches to formulate a FVC, which are used in the physics during the past few years, will be briefly described in this paper. We solve some problems of consistent formulations of FVC by using a fractional generalization of the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. We define the differential and integral vector operations. The fractional Green's, Stokes' and Gauss's theorems are formulated. The proofs of these theorems are realized for simplest regions. A fractional generalization of exterior differential calculus of differential forms is discussed. Fractional nonlocal Maxwell's equations and the corresponding fractional wave equations are considered.

  16. Flexible Ablators: Applications and Arcjet Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, James O.; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Beck, Robin A S.; Mcguire, Kathy; Prabhu, Dinesh K.; Gorbunov, Sergey

    2011-01-01

    Flexible ablators were conceived in 2009 to meet the technology pull for large, human Mars Exploration Class, 23 m diameter hypersonic inflatable aerodynamic decelerators. As described elsewhere, they have been recently undergoing initial technical readiness (TRL) advancement by NASA. The performance limits of flexible ablators in terms of maximum heat rates, pressure and shear remain to be defined. Further, it is hoped that this emerging technology will vastly expand the capability of future NASA missions involving atmospheric entry systems. This paper considers four topics of relevance to flexible ablators: (1) Their potential applications to near/far term human and robotic missions (2) Brief consideration of the balance between heat shield diameter, flexible ablator performance limits, entry vehicle controllability and aft-body shear layer impingement of interest to designers of very large entry vehicles, (3) The approach for developing bonding processes of flexible ablators for use on rigid entry bodies and (4) Design of large arcjet test articles that will enable the testing of flexible ablators in flight-like, combined environments (heat flux, pressure, shear and structural tensile loading). Based on a review of thermal protection system performance requirements for future entry vehicles, it is concluded that flexible ablators have broad applications to conventional, rigid entry body systems and are enabling to large deployable (both inflatable and mechanical) heat shields. Because of the game-changing nature of flexible ablators, it appears that NASA's Office of the Chief Technologist (OCT) will fund a focused, 3-year TRL advancement of the new materials capable of performance in heat fluxes in the range of 200-600 W/sq. cm. This support will enable the manufacture and use of the large-scale arcjet test designs that will be a key element of this OCT funded activity.

  17. Resonant laser ablation: mechanisms and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.E.; Allen, T.M.; Garrett, A.W.; Gill, C.G.; Hemberger, P.H.; Kelly, P.B.; Nogar, N.S.

    1996-10-01

    We report on aspects of resonant laser ablation (RLA) behavior for a number of sample types: metals, alloys, thin films, zeolites and soil. The versatility of RLA is demonstrated, with results on a variety of samples and in several mass spectrometers. In addition, the application to depth profiling of thin films is described; absolute removal rates and detection limits are also displayed. A discussion of possible mechanisms for low-power ablation is presented.

  18. Percutaneous ablation of colorectal lung metastases

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Stephen B.

    2015-01-01

    Lung metastasectomy can prolong survival in patients with metastatic colorectal carcinoma. Thermal ablation offers a potential solution with similar reported survival outcomes. It has minimal effect on pulmonary function, or quality of life, can be repeated, and may be considered more acceptable to patients because of the associated shorter hospital stay and recovery. This review describes the indications, technique, reported outcomes, complications and radiologic appearances after thermal ablation of colorectal lung metastases. PMID:26697202

  19. Multifractal analysis for grading complex fractionated electrograms in atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Orozco-Duque, A; Novak, D; Kremen, V; Bustamante, J

    2015-11-01

    Complex fractionated atrial electrograms provide an important tool for identifying arrhythmogenic substrates that can be used to guide catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation (AF). However, fractionation is a phenomenon that remains unclear. This paper aims to evaluate the multifractal properties of electrograms in AF in order to propose a method based on multifractal analysis able to discriminate between different levels of fractionation. We introduce a new method, the h-fluctuation index (hFI), where h is the generalised Hurst exponent, to extract information from the shape of the multifractal spectrum. Two multifractal frameworks are evaluated: multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis and wavelet transform modulus maxima. hFI is exemplified through its application in synthetic signals, and it is evaluated in a database of electrograms labeled on the basis of four degrees of fractionation. We compare the performance of hFI with other indexes, and find that hFI outperforms them. The results of the study provide evidence that multifractal analysis is useful for studying fractionation phenomena in AF electrograms, and indicate that hFI can be proposed as a tool for grade fractionation associated with the detection of target sites for ablation in AF.

  20. Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for oligometastatic disease in liver.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myungsoo; Son, Seok Hyun; Won, Yong Kyun; Kay, Chul Seung

    2014-01-01

    Liver metastasis in solid tumors, including colorectal cancer, is the most frequent and lethal complication. The development of systemic therapy has led to prolonged survival. However, in selected patients with a finite number of discrete lesions in liver, defined as oligometastatic state, additional local therapies such as surgical resection, radiofrequency ablation, cryotherapy, and radiotherapy can lead to permanent local disease control and improve survival. Among these, an advance in radiation therapy made it possible to deliver high dose radiation to the tumor more accurately, without impairing the liver function. In recent years, the introduction of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) has offered even more intensive tumor dose escalation in a few fractions with reduced dose to the adjacent normal liver. Many studies have shown that SABR for oligometastases is effective and safe, with local control rates widely ranging from 50% to 100% at one or two years. And actuarial survival at one and two years has been reported ranging from 72% to 94% and from 30% to 62%, respectively, without severe toxicities. In this paper, we described the definition and technical aspects of SABR, clinical outcomes including efficacy and toxicity, and related parameters after SABR in liver oligometastases from colorectal cancer.

  1. Numerical Studies of Ablative Mass Loss from Wind Accelerated Clouds.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knerr, Jeffrey Matthew

    1993-01-01

    We have used numerical hydrodynamics to study the acceleration of dense gas clouds via wind ram pressure. Our goal has been to examine a model for the explanation of broad absorption lines (BALs) seen in the spectra of a certain fraction of observed QSOs. This model postulates cool dense clouds moving at very high speeds as the source of the BALs. Furthermore, it invokes simple wind ram pressure as the acceleration mechanism for the clouds. A crucial question is whether the clouds can survive potentially disruptive fluid instabilities, allowing time for acceleration to speeds comparable to the wind velocity. Linear stability arguments imply Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability growth occurs on time scales much shorter than the acceleration time scale. These arguments conclude acceleration via ram pressure cannot produce bulk cloud velocities in excess of the cloud's internal sound speed. Our simulations show this is simply not true. We present two-dimensional slab-symmetric simulations where clouds are accelerated to speeds close to an order of magnitude greater than their internal sound speed. Ablative mass loss by the flow of shocked wind gas around the periphery of the clouds acts to limit the growth of potentially disruptive instabilities. Simulations run at different computational grid resolutions clearly show the stabilizing effect ablation has on the evolution of the clouds. Simplified models for line profiles have been developed using mass-velocity histograms generated from the numerical simulations. There is good qualitative agreement between the simulated line profiles and observed BAL profiles.

  2. The effect of ultrafast laser wavelength on ablation properties and implications on sample introduction in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    LaHaye, N. L.; Harilal, S. S.; Diwakar, P. K.; Hassanein, A.; Kulkarni, P.

    2013-07-14

    We investigated the role of femtosecond (fs) laser wavelength on laser ablation (LA) and its relation to laser generated aerosol counts and particle distribution, inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) signal intensity, detection limits, and elemental fractionation. Four different NIST standard reference materials (610, 613, 615, and 616) were ablated using 400 nm and 800 nm fs laser pulses to study the effect of wavelength on laser ablation rate, accuracy, precision, and fractionation. Our results show that the detection limits are lower for 400 nm laser excitation than 800 nm laser excitation at lower laser energies but approximately equal at higher energies. Ablation threshold was also found to be lower for 400 nm than 800 nm laser excitation. Particle size distributions are very similar for 400 nm and 800 nm wavelengths; however, they differ significantly in counts at similar laser fluence levels. This study concludes that 400 nm LA is more beneficial for sample introduction in ICP-MS, particularly when lower laser energies are to be used for ablation.

  3. Laser Ablated Carbon Nanodots for Light Emission.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Delfino; Camacho, Marco; Camacho, Miguel; Mayorga, Miguel; Weathers, Duncan; Salamo, Greg; Wang, Zhiming; Neogi, Arup

    2016-12-01

    The synthesis of fluorescent carbon dots-like nanostructures (CNDs) obtained through the laser ablation of a carbon solid target in liquid environment is reported. The ablation process was induced in acetone with laser pulses of 1064, 532, and 355 nm under different irradiation times. Close-spherical amorphous CNDs with sizes between 5 and 20 nm, whose abundance strongly depends on the ablation parameters were investigated using electron microscopy and was confirmed using absorption and emission spectroscopies. The π- π* electronic transition at 3.76 eV dominates the absorption for all the CNDs species synthesized under different irradiation conditions. The light emission is most efficient due to excitation at 3.54 eV with the photoluminescence intensity centered at 3.23 eV. The light emission from the CNDs is most efficient due to ablation at 355 nm. The emission wavelength of the CNDs can be tuned from the near-UV to the green wavelength region by controlling the ablation time and modifying the ablation and excitation laser wavelength.

  4. Pulsed HF laser ablation of dentin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papagiakoumou, Eirini I.; Papadopoulos, Dimitris N.; Makropoulou, Mersini I.; Khabbaz, Maruan G.; Serafetinides, Alexander A.

    2005-03-01

    The interaction of a TEA (Transversally Excited Atmospheric pressure) corona preionized oscillator double amplifier HF (hydrogen fluoride) laser beam with dentin tissue is reported. Pulses of 39 ns in the wavelength range of 2.65-3.35 μm and output energies in the range of 10-45 mJ, in a predominantly TEM00 beam were used to interact with dentin tissue. Ablation experiments were conducted with the laser beam directly focused on the tissue. Several samples of freshly extracted human teeth were used, cut longitudinally in facets of about 1mm thick and stored in phosphate buffered saline after being cleaned from the soft tissue remains. The experimental data (ablation thresholds, ablation rates) are discussed with respect to the ablation mechanism(s). Adequate tissue removal was observed and the ablation behavior was, in the greates part of the available fluences, almost linear. From the microscopic examination of teh samples, in a scanning electron microscope (SEM), the irradiated surfaces displayed oval craters (reflecting the laser beam shape) with absence of any melting or carbonization zone. It is suggested that the specific laser removes hard tissue by a combined photothermal and plasma mediated ablation mechanism, leaving a surface free from thermal damage and with a well-shaped crater.

  5. Initialized Fractional Calculus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzo, Carl F.; Hartley, Tom T.

    2000-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the need for a nonconstant initialization for the fractional calculus and establishes a basic definition set for the initialized fractional differintegral. This definition set allows the formalization of an initialized fractional calculus. Two basis calculi are considered; the Riemann-Liouville and the Grunwald fractional calculi. Two forms of initialization, terminal and side are developed.

  6. Tempered fractional calculus

    SciTech Connect

    Sabzikar, Farzad; Meerschaert, Mark M.; Chen, Jinghua

    2015-07-15

    Fractional derivatives and integrals are convolutions with a power law. Multiplying by an exponential factor leads to tempered fractional derivatives and integrals. Tempered fractional diffusion equations, where the usual second derivative in space is replaced by a tempered fractional derivative, govern the limits of random walk models with an exponentially tempered power law jump distribution. The limiting tempered stable probability densities exhibit semi-heavy tails, which are commonly observed in finance. Tempered power law waiting times lead to tempered fractional time derivatives, which have proven useful in geophysics. The tempered fractional derivative or integral of a Brownian motion, called a tempered fractional Brownian motion, can exhibit semi-long range dependence. The increments of this process, called tempered fractional Gaussian noise, provide a useful new stochastic model for wind speed data. A tempered fractional difference forms the basis for numerical methods to solve tempered fractional diffusion equations, and it also provides a useful new correlation model in time series.

  7. Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation for Treatment of Recurrent Retroperitoneal Liposarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Keil, Sebastian Bruners, Philipp; Brehmer, Bernhard; Mahnken, Andreas Horst

    2008-07-15

    Percutaneous CT-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is becoming more and more established in the treatment of various neoplasms, including retroperitoneal tumors of the kidneys and the adrenal glands. We report the case of RFA in a patient suffering from the third relapse of a retroperitoneal liposarcoma in the left psoas muscle. After repeated surgical resection and supportive radiation therapy of a primary retroperitoneal liposarcoma and two surgically treated recurrences, including replacement of the ureter by a fraction of the ileum, there was no option for further surgery. Thus, we considered RFA as the most suitable treatment option. Monopolar RFA was performed in a single session with a 2-cm umbrella-shaped LeVeen probe. During a 27-month follow-up period the patient remained free of tumor.

  8. Dust ablation in Pluto's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horanyi, Mihaly; Poppe, Andrew; Sternovsky, Zoltan

    2016-04-01

    Based on measurements by dust detectors onboard the Pioneer 10/11 and New Horizons spacecraft the total production rate of dust particles born in the Edgeworth Kuiper Belt (EKB) has been be estimated to be on the order of 5 ṡ 103 kg/s in the approximate size range of 1 - 10 μm. Dust particles are produced by collisions between EKB objects and their bombardment by both interplanetary and interstellar dust particles. Dust particles of EKB origin, in general, migrate towards the Sun due to Poynting-Robertson drag but their distributions are further sculpted by mean-motion resonances as they first approach the orbit of Neptune and later the other planets, as well as mutual collisions. Subsequently, Jupiter will eject the vast majority of them before they reach the inner solar system. The expected mass influx into Pluto atmosphere is on the order of 200 kg/day, and the arrival speed of the incoming particles is on the order of 3 - 4 km/s. We have followed the ablation history as function of speed and size of dust particles in Pluto's atmosphere, and found that volatile rich particles can fully sublimate due to drag heating and deposit their mass in narrow layers. This deposition might promote the formation of the haze layers observed by the New Horizons spacecraft. This talk will explore the constraints on the composition of the dust particles by comparing the altitude of the deposition layers to the observed haze layers.

  9. Radiofrequency Ablation Beyond the Liver

    PubMed Central

    Neeman, Ziv; Wood, Bradford J.

    2008-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has begun to show promise for extrahepatic indications. Although much of the reported work on image-guided RFA of liver neoplasms is quite promising, it is even earlier in the evaluation and validation process for extrahepatic RFA, with few short-term and no long-term studies reported. Although there are much more data for liver RFA with almost 3,000 cases reported in the literature, there are a number of ongoing investigations of RFA for tumors in the kidney, lung, bone, breast, bone, and adrenal gland. Debulking and pain control with RFA present palliative options becoming increasingly popular weapons in the interventionalist's oncology arsenal. Metastatic disease with a wide variety of primary histologies in a myriad of locations may be treated with RFA after a careful consideration of the risk-to-benefit ratio balance. The RFA technique can be slightly different outside the liver. Specifically, differing dielectric tissue characteristics may markedly alter the RFA treatment. Each different RFA system has a unique risk and advantage profile. Extrahepatic indications and contraindications will be suggested. Treatment tips and the unique complications and considerations will be introduced for some of the more common extrahepatic locations. PMID:12524646

  10. Plans and status of the Beryllium ablator campaign on NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kline, J. L.; Yi, S. A.; Simakov, A. N.; Wilson, D. C.; Olson, R. E.; Krasheninnikova, N. S.; Kyrala, G. A.; Perry, T. S.; Batha, S. H.; Dewald, E. L.; Edwards, M. J.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Meezan, N. B.

    2014-10-01

    Beryllium has long been known to have excellent properties for indirectly driven ICF implosions including enhanced ablation pressure, implosion velocity, and mass ablation rate. The high ablation velocity leads to stabilization of ablative hydrodynamic instabilities and higher ablation pressures. Recent ``high foot'' experiments have shown ablative Rayleigh-Taylor to be a leading cause of degraded performance for ICF implosions. While Beryllium ablators have these advantages, there are also risks associated with Beryllium target designs. A campaign is underway to design and to test these advantages for comparison with other ablator options and determine which provides the best path forward for ICF. Experiments using Beryllium ablators are expected to start in the late summer of 2014. This presentation will discuss the status of the experiments and layout the plans/goals for the campaign. This work is supported by the US DOE.

  11. Percutaneous Microwave Ablation of Renal Angiomyolipomas

    SciTech Connect

    Cristescu, Mircea; Abel, E. Jason; Wells, Shane Ziemlewicz, Timothy J.; Hedican, Sean P.; Lubner, Megan G. Hinshaw, J. Louis Brace, Christopher L. Lee, Fred T.

    2016-03-15

    PurposeTo evaluate the safety and efficacy of US-guided percutaneous microwave (MW) ablation in the treatment of renal angiomyolipoma (AML).Materials and MethodsFrom January 2011 to April 2014, seven patients (5 females and 2 males; mean age 51.4) with 11 renal AMLs (9 sporadic type and 2 tuberous sclerosis associated) with a mean size of 3.4 ± 0.7 cm (range 2.4–4.9 cm) were treated with high-powered, gas-cooled percutaneous MW ablation under US guidance. Tumoral diameter, volume, and CT/MR enhancement were measured on pre-treatment, immediate post-ablation, and delayed post-ablation imaging. Clinical symptoms and creatinine were assessed on follow-up visits.ResultsAll ablations were technically successful and no major complications were encountered. Mean ablation parameters were ablation power of 65 W (range 60–70 W), using 456 mL of hydrodissection fluid per patient, over 4.7 min (range 3–8 min). Immediate post-ablation imaging demonstrated mean tumor diameter and volume decreases of 1.8 % (3.4–3.3 cm) and 1.7 % (27.5–26.3 cm{sup 3}), respectively. Delayed imaging follow-up obtained at a mean interval of 23.1 months (median 17.6; range 9–47) demonstrated mean tumor diameter and volume decreases of 29 % (3.4–2.4 cm) and 47 % (27.5–12.1 cm{sup 3}), respectively. Tumoral enhancement decreased on immediate post-procedure and delayed imaging by CT/MR parameters, indicating decreased tumor vascularity. No patients required additional intervention and no patients experienced spontaneous bleeding post-ablation.ConclusionOur early experience with high-powered, gas-cooled percutaneous MW ablation demonstrates it to be a safe and effective modality to devascularize and decrease the size of renal AMLs.

  12. A systematic review of surgical ablation versus catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Kearney, Katherine; Stephenson, Rowan; Phan, Kevin; Chan, Wei Yen; Huang, Min Yin

    2014-01-01

    Background Atrial fibrillation (AF) is an increasingly prevalent condition in the ageing population, with significantly associated morbidity and mortality. Surgical and catheter ablative strategies both aim to reduce mortality and morbidity through freedom from AF. This review consolidates all currently available comparative data to evaluate these two interventions. Methods A systematic search was conducted across MEDLINE, PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews from January 2000 until August 2013. All studies were critically appraised and only those directly comparing surgical and catheter ablation were included. Results Seven studies were deemed suitable for analysis according to the inclusion criteria. Freedom from AF was significantly higher in the surgical ablation group versus the catheter ablation group at 6-month, 12-month and study endpoint follow-up periods. Subgroup analysis demonstrated similar trends, with higher freedom from AF in the surgical ablation group for paroxysmal AF patients. The incidence of pacemaker implantation was higher, while no difference in stroke or cardiac tamponade was demonstrated for the surgical versus catheter ablation groups. Conclusions Current evidence suggests that epicardial ablative strategies are associated with higher freedom from AF, higher pacemaker implantation rates and comparable neurological complications and cardiac tamponade incidence to catheter ablative treatment. Other complications and risks were poorly reported, which warrants further randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of adequate power and follow-up duration. PMID:24516794

  13. Online monitoring of nanoparticles formed during nanosecond laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nováková, Hana; Holá, Markéta; Vojtíšek-Lom, Michal; Ondráček, Jakub; Kanický, Viktor

    2016-11-01

    The particle size distribution of dry aerosol originating from laser ablation of glass material was monitored simultaneously with Laser Ablation - Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) analysis and two aerosol spectrometers - Fast Mobility Particle Sizer (FMPS) and Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (APS). The unique combination of LA-ICP-MS and FMPS offers the possibility of measuring the particle size distribution every 1 s of the ablation process in the size range of 5.6-560 nm. APS extends the information about particle concentration in the size range 0.54-17 μm. Online monitoring of the dry aerosol was performed for two ablation modes (spot and line with a duration of 80 s) with a 193 nm excimer laser system, using the glass reference material NIST 610 as a sample. Different sizes of laser spot for spot ablation and different scan speeds for line ablation were tested. It was found that the FMPS device is capable of detecting changes in particle size distribution at the first pulses of spot laser ablation and is suitable for laser ablation control simultaneously with LA-ICP-MS analysis. The studied parameters of laser ablation have an influence on the resulting particle size distribution. The line mode of laser ablation produces larger particles during the whole ablation process, while spot ablation produces larger particles only at the beginning, during the ablation of the intact layer of the ablated material. Moreover, spot ablation produces more primary nano-particles (in ultrafine mode size range < 100 nm) than line ablation. This effect is most probably caused by a reduced amount of large particles released from the spot ablation crater. The larger particles scavenge the ultrafine particles during the line ablation mode.

  14. Unicompartmental isoelastic resurfacing prosthesis for malignant tumor of the distal radius: A case report with a 3-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Ichihara, S; Hidalgo-Diaz, J J; Facca, S; Liverneaux, P

    2015-12-01

    We report a case of 74-year-old man in whom a unicompartmental isoelastic resurfacing prosthesis was used to reconstruct the distal radius after en-bloc resection of a malignant tumor. Thirty-nine months after the operation, on a visual analogic scale, pain score was 0/10 and range of motion was 25° of flexion, 5° of extension, 70° of pronation, 45° of supination, 20° of radial deviation, and 30° of ulnar deviation. The Quick DASH functional score was 72.72/100. With radiographic finding, the prosthesis was well-aligned, with no evidence of loosening but with slightly implant conflict with the lunate. This case report indicates that unicompartmental isoelastic resurfacing prosthesis seems a simple and reliable technique for distal radius reconstruction after en-bloc resection of malignant tumor.

  15. Contact pulsed Nd:YAG ablation of human dentin: ablation rates and tissue effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, David M.; Yessik, Michael J.

    1994-09-01

    Dentin from freshly extracted human teeth was exposed to flashlamp pumped Nd:YAG pulses (100 microsecond(s) duration, 50 - 200 mJ/pulse) delivered through a flat cut fiberoptic in contact with the dentin surface. Ablation depth and volume were measured optically and confirmed with electron microscope morphometrics. Ablation depth increased with force applied at the fiber tip up to 5 - 10 g. Above this ablation depths were insensitive to applied force. Craters made in dental stone were deeper and narrower than those made in normal dentin. Ablation depths per pulse and volumes per pulse decrease as the number of pulses increase. This is more prominent for 200 mJ pulses. At 60 mJ the ablation depths are the same from 10 to 100 Hz repetition rates, although qualitative changes (collateral damage) are greater at higher repetition rates. A progressive increase in collateral damage is seen from the 1st through the 200th pulse.

  16. Fraction Sense: Foundational Understandings.

    PubMed

    Fennell, Francis Skip; Karp, Karen

    2016-08-09

    The intent of this commentary is to identify elements of fraction sense and note how the research studies provided in this special issue, in related but somewhat different ways, validate the importance of such understandings. Proficiency with fractions serves as a prerequisite for student success in higher level mathematics, as well as serving as a gateway to many occupations and varied contexts beyond the mathematics classroom. Fraction sense is developed through instructional opportunities involving fraction equivalence and magnitude, comparing and ordering fractions, using fraction benchmarks, and computational estimation. Such foundations are then extended to operations involving fractions and decimals and applications involving proportional reasoning. These components of fraction sense are all addressed in the studies provided in this issue, with particular consideration devoted to the significant importance of the use of the number line as a central representational tool for conceptually understanding fraction magnitude.

  17. TEMPERED FRACTIONAL CALCULUS

    PubMed Central

    MEERSCHAERT, MARK M.; SABZIKAR, FARZAD; CHEN, JINGHUA

    2014-01-01

    Fractional derivatives and integrals are convolutions with a power law. Multiplying by an exponential factor leads to tempered fractional derivatives and integrals. Tempered fractional diffusion equations, where the usual second derivative in space is replaced by a tempered fractional derivative, govern the limits of random walk models with an exponentially tempered power law jump distribution. The limiting tempered stable probability densities exhibit semi-heavy tails, which are commonly observed in finance. Tempered power law waiting times lead to tempered fractional time derivatives, which have proven useful in geophysics. The tempered fractional derivative or integral of a Brownian motion, called a tempered fractional Brownian motion, can exhibit semi-long range dependence. The increments of this process, called tempered fractional Gaussian noise, provide a useful new stochastic model for wind speed data. A tempered difference forms the basis for numerical methods to solve tempered fractional diffusion equations, and it also provides a useful new correlation model in time series. PMID:26085690

  18. Radioiodine Remnant Ablation: A Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Bal, Chandra Sekhar; Padhy, Ajit Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Radioiodine remnant ablation (RRA) is considered a safe and effective method for eliminating residual thyroid tissue, as well as microscopic disease if at all present in thyroid bed following thyroidectomy. The rationale of RRA is that in the absence of thyroid tissue, serum thyroglobulin (Tg) measurement can be used as an excellent tumor marker. Other considerations are like the presence of significant remnant thyroid tissue makes detection and treatment of nodal or distant metastases difficult. Rarely, microscopic disease in the thyroid bed if not ablated, in the future, could be a source of anaplastic transformation. On the other hand, microscopic tumor emboli in distant sites could be the cause of distant metastasis too. The ablation of remnant tissue would in all probability eliminate these theoretical risks. It may be noted that all these are unproven contentious issues except postablation serum Tg estimation that could be a good tumor marker for detecting early biochemical recurrence in long-term follow-up strategy. Radioactive iodine is administered as a form of “adjuvant therapy” for remnant ablation. There have been several reports with regard to the administered dose for remnant ablation. The first report of a prospective randomized clinical trial was published from India by a prospective randomized study conducted at the All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi in the year 1996. The study reported that increasing the empirical 131I initial dose to more than 50 mCi results in plateauing of the dose-response curve and thus, conventional high-dose remnant ablation needs critical evaluation. Recently, two important studies were published: One from French group and the other from UK on a similar line. Interestingly, all three studies conducted in three different geographical regions of the world showed exactly similar conclusion. The new era of low-dose remnant ablation has taken a firm scientific footing across the continents. PMID:26420983

  19. Photoacoustic characterization of radiofrequency ablation lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchard, Richard; Dana, Nicholas; Di Biase, Luigi; Natale, Andrea; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2012-02-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) procedures are used to destroy abnormal electrical pathways in the heart that can cause cardiac arrhythmias. Current methods relying on fluoroscopy, echocardiography and electrical conduction mapping are unable to accurately assess ablation lesion size. In an effort to better visualize RFA lesions, photoacoustic (PA) and ultrasonic (US) imaging were utilized to obtain co-registered images of ablated porcine cardiac tissue. The left ventricular free wall of fresh (i.e., never frozen) porcine hearts was harvested within 24 hours of the animals' sacrifice. A THERMOCOOLR Ablation System (Biosense Webster, Inc.) operating at 40 W for 30-60 s was used to induce lesions through the endocardial and epicardial walls of the cardiac samples. Following lesion creation, the ablated tissue samples were placed in 25 °C saline to allow for multi-wavelength PA imaging. Samples were imaged with a VevoR 2100 ultrasound system (VisualSonics, Inc.) using a modified 20-MHz array that could provide laser irradiation to the sample from a pulsed tunable laser (Newport Corp.) to allow for co-registered photoacoustic-ultrasound (PAUS) imaging. PA imaging was conducted from 750-1064 nm, with a surface fluence of approximately 15 mJ/cm2 maintained during imaging. In this preliminary study with PA imaging, the ablated region could be well visualized on the surface of the sample, with contrasts of 6-10 dB achieved at 750 nm. Although imaging penetration depth is a concern, PA imaging shows promise in being able to reliably visualize RF ablation lesions.

  20. Subsurface ablation of atherosclerotic plaque using ultrafast laser pulses

    PubMed Central

    Lanvin, Thomas; Conkey, Donald B.; Frobert, Aurelien; Valentin, Jeremy; Goy, Jean-Jacques; Cook, Stéphane; Giraud, Marie-Noelle; Psaltis, Demetri

    2015-01-01

    We perform subsurface ablation of atherosclerotic plaque using ultrafast pulses. Excised mouse aortas containing atherosclerotic plaque were ablated with ultrafast near-infrared (NIR) laser pulses. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) was used to observe the ablation result, while the physical damage was inspected in histological sections. We characterize the effects of incident pulse energy on surface damage, ablation hole size, and filament propagation. We find that it is possible to ablate plaque just below the surface without causing surface damage, which motivates further investigation of ultrafast ablation for subsurface atherosclerotic plaque removal. PMID:26203381

  1. Subsurface ablation of atherosclerotic plaque using ultrafast laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Lanvin, Thomas; Conkey, Donald B; Frobert, Aurelien; Valentin, Jeremy; Goy, Jean-Jacques; Cook, Stéphane; Giraud, Marie-Noelle; Psaltis, Demetri

    2015-07-01

    We perform subsurface ablation of atherosclerotic plaque using ultrafast pulses. Excised mouse aortas containing atherosclerotic plaque were ablated with ultrafast near-infrared (NIR) laser pulses. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) was used to observe the ablation result, while the physical damage was inspected in histological sections. We characterize the effects of incident pulse energy on surface damage, ablation hole size, and filament propagation. We find that it is possible to ablate plaque just below the surface without causing surface damage, which motivates further investigation of ultrafast ablation for subsurface atherosclerotic plaque removal.

  2. New tumor ablation techniques for cancer treatment (microwave, electroporation).

    PubMed

    de Baere, T; Deschamps, F

    2014-01-01

    Since the introduction of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for the treatment of liver tumors at the end of the 1990s, indications for local ablation techniques have been extended to other organs, in particular, the lungs, kidneys and bones. These techniques have also been improved, in particular to try and overcome the limitations of radiofrequency techniques, especially the significant decrease in complete ablation rates for tumors larger than 3cm and tumors that are contiguous to vessels larger than 3mm. Microwave ablation is a rapidly developing thermal ablation technique similar to RFA but with numerous differences. Electroporation, a non-thermal ablation technique with other possibilities, is in earlier stages of clinical development.

  3. Accelerated reduction of post-skin-resurfacing erythema and discomfort with a combination of non-thermal blue and near infrared light.

    PubMed

    Trelles, Mario; Elman, Monica; Slatkine, Michael; Harth, Yoram

    2005-06-01

    The prolonged crusting and erythematic phases following chemical and laser skin resurfacing create discomfort and aggravate patients. Depending on the aggressiveness of the procedure, post-procedure erythema may last from three weeks to several months. iClearXL (CureLight Ltd) is a non-contact, non-thermal blue (405-420 nm)/near infrared (850-900 nm) dual-band light source emitting up to 60 J/cm2 on a 30 cm by 30 cm treatment area. The blue component of the light source has been proven to have a significant anti-inflammatory effect, whereas the near infrared component enhances vascular circulation as well as lymphatic drainage in the thin, necrotized papillary layer. Facial skin laser resurfacing was performed on twelve patients. Starting one day after resurfacing, six patients received a daily 20-minute treatment of blue (405-420 nm)/near infrared (850-900 nm) light for six consecutive days, and six control patients were treated with the usual topical care protocol. Twelve days after the procedure, the treated group had a weighted average erythema score of 0.33 as compared to 1.33 in the control group. Two months after the procedure, the treated group had a weighted average erythema score of 0.16 as compared to 0.83 in the control group. Twelve days after the procedure, the treated group had a weighted average discomfort score of 0.33 as compared to 0.83 in the control group. The tested combination of non-thermal blue (405-420 nm)/near infrared (850-900 nm) dual-band light was found to significantly shorten the duration of post-laser-resurfacing erythema and discomfort with no side effects.

  4. Infrared spectroscopic measurements of carbon monoxide within a high temperature ablative boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, S. D.; Tibère-Inglesse, A. C.; Laux, C. O.

    2016-12-01

    Theoretical studies have indicated that the formation of carbon monoxide within a high temperature ablative boundary layer can significantly alter the afterbody radiative heat transfer to the surface of a reentry capsule. This paper represents a first attempt to experimentally measure the concentration of carbon monoxide within the high temperature boundary layer surrounding an ablative material exposed to an atmospheric pressure air plasma. A plasma torch facility was used to produce the high temperature flow and a sample of ASTERM ablative material was inserted into the flow. At the stagnation point, the heat flux to the surface was estimated at 8 MW m-2 and the surface temperature at 2900  ±  100 K. Both emission and absorption spectroscopy techniques were used to measure the distribution of carbon monoxide within the flow. Emission spectroscopy yielded better signal-to-noise measurements, but the absorption spectroscopy measurements were used to validate emission measurements. In the cases examined, both emission and absorption measurements were consistent and in agreement with one another. Estimates of carbon monoxide temperature and mole fraction were deduced from the spectra taken within the boundary layer downstream of the stagnation point. No carbon monoxide was observed at the stagnation point. These measurements provide a test case for numerical simulations of plasma-ablator interactions.

  5. Outcome, revision rate and indication for revision following resurfacing hemiarthroplasty for osteoarthritis of the shoulder: 837 operations reported to the Danish Shoulder Arthroplasty Registry.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, J V; Polk, A; Sorensen, A K; Olsen, B S; Brorson, S

    2014-04-01

    In this study, we evaluated patient-reported outcomes, the rate of revision and the indications for revision following resurfacing hemiarthroplasty of the shoulder in patients with osteoarthritis. All patients with osteoarthritis who underwent primary resurfacing hemiarthroplasty and reported to the Danish Shoulder Arthroplasty Registry (DSR), between January 2006 and December 2010 were included. There were 772 patients (837 arthroplasties) in the study. The Western Ontario Osteoarthritis of the Shoulder (WOOS) index was used to evaluate patient-reported outcome 12 months (10 to 14) post-operatively. The rates of revision were calculated from the revisions reported to the DSR up to December 2011 and by checking deaths with the Danish National Register of Persons. A complete questionnaire was returned by 688 patients (82.2%). The mean WOOS was 67 (0 to 100). A total of 63 hemiarthroplasties (7.5%) required revision; the cumulative five-year rate of revision was 9.9%. Patients aged < 55 years had a statistically significant inferior WOOS score, which exceeded the minimal clinically important difference, compared with older patients (mean difference 14.2 (8.8; 95% CI 19.6; p < 0.001), but with no increased risk of revision. There was no significant difference in the mean WOOS or the risk of revision between designs of resurfacing hemiarthroplasty.

  6. Heart Failure Induced by Perinatal Ablation of Cardiac Myosin Light Chain Kinase.

    PubMed

    Islam, Yasmin F K; Joseph, Ryan; Chowdhury, Rajib R; Anderson, Robert H; Kasahara, Hideko

    2016-01-01

    Background: Germline knockout mice are invaluable in understanding the function of the targeted genes. Sometimes, however, unexpected phenotypes are encountered, due in part to the activation of compensatory mechanisms. Germline ablation of cardiac myosin light chain kinase (cMLCK) causes mild cardiac dysfunction with cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, whereas ablation in adult hearts results in acute heart failure with cardiomyocyte atrophy. We hypothesized that compensation after ablation of cMLCK is dependent on developmental staging and perinatal-onset of cMLCK ablation will result in more evident heart failure than germline ablation, but less profound when compared to adult-onset ablation. Methods and Results: The floxed-Mylk3 gene was ablated at the beginning of the perinatal stage using a single intra-peritoneal tamoxifen injection of 50 mg/kg into pregnant mice on the 19th day of gestation, this being the final day of gestation. The level of cMLCK protein level could no longer be detected 3 days after the injection, with these mice hereafter denoted as the perinatal Mylk3-KO. At postnatal day 19, shortly before weaning age, these mice showed reduced cardiac contractility with a fractional shortening 22.8 ± 1.0% (n = 7) as opposed to 31.4 ± 1.0% (n = 11) in controls. The ratio of the heart weight relative to body weight was significantly increased at 6.68 ± 0.28 mg/g (n = 12) relative to the two control groups, 5.90 ± 0.16 (flox/flox, n = 11) and 5.81 ± 0.33 (wild/wild/Cre, n = 5), accompanied by reduced body weight. Furthermore, their cardiomyocytes were elongated without thickening, with a long-axis of 101.8 ± 2.4 μm (n = 320) as opposed to 87.1 ± 1.6 μm (n = 360) in the controls. Conclusion: Perinatal ablation of cMLCK produces an increase of heart weight/body weight ratio, a reduction of contractility, and an increase in the expression of fetal genes. The perinatal Mylk3-KO cardiomyocytes were elongated in the absence of thickening, differing from the

  7. Approximate model for laser ablation of carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shusser, Michael

    2010-08-01

    The paper presents an approximate kinetic theory model of ablation of carbon by a nanosecond laser pulse. The model approximates the process as sublimation and combines conduction heat transfer in the target with the gas dynamics of the ablated plume which are coupled through the boundary conditions at the interface. The ablated mass flux and the temperature of the ablating material are obtained from the assumption that the ablation rate is restricted by the kinetic theory limitation on the maximum mass flux that can be attained in a phase-change process. To account for non-uniform distribution of the laser intensity while keeping the calculation simple the quasi-one-dimensional approximation is used in both gas and solid phases. The results are compared with the predictions of the exact axisymmetric model that uses the conservation relations at the interface derived from the momentum solution of the Boltzmann equation for arbitrary strong evaporation. It is seen that the simpler approximate model provides good accuracy.

  8. Design Calculations for NIF Convergent Ablator Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, R. E.; Callahan, D. A.; Hicks, D. G.; Landen, O. L.; Langer, S. H.; Meezan, N. B.; Spears, B. K.; Widmann, K.; Kline, J. L.; Wilson, D. C.; Petrasso, R. D.; Leeper, R. J.

    2010-11-01

    Design calculations for NIF convergent ablator experiments will be described. The convergent ablator experiments measure the implosion trajectory, velocity, and ablation rate of an x-ray driven capsule and are a important component of the U. S. National Ignition Campaign at NIF. The design calculations are post-processed to provide simulations of the key diagnostics -- 1) Dante measurements of hohlraum x-ray flux and spectrum, 2) streaked radiographs of the imploding ablator shell, 3) wedge range filter measurements of D-He3 proton output spectra, and 4) GXD measurements of the imploded core. The simulated diagnostics will be compared to the experimental measurements to provide an assessment of the accuracy of the design code predictions of hohlraum radiation temperature, capsule ablation rate, implosion velocity, shock flash areal density, and x-ray bang time. Post-shot versions of the design calculations are used to enhance the understanding of the experimental measurements and will assist in choosing parameters for subsequent shots and the path towards optimal ignition capsule tuning. *SNL, LLNL, and LANL are operated under US DOE contracts DE-AC04-94AL85000. DE-AC52-07NA27344, and DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  9. Fracture in Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, Parul; Chavez-Garcia, Jose; Pham, John

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a novel technique to understand the failure mechanisms inside thermal protection materials. The focus of this research is on the class of materials known as phenolic impregnated carbon ablators. It has successfully flown on the Stardust spacecraft and is the thermal protection system material chosen for the Mars Science Laboratory and SpaceX Dragon spacecraft. Although it has good thermal properties, structurally, it is a weak material. To understand failure mechanisms in carbon ablators, fracture tests were performed on FiberForm(Registered TradeMark) (precursor), virgin, and charred ablator materials. Several samples of these materials were tested to investigate failure mechanisms at a microstructural scale. Stress-strain data were obtained simultaneously to estimate the tensile strength and toughness. It was observed that cracks initiated and grew in the FiberForm when a critical stress limit was reached such that the carbon fibers separated from the binder. However, both for virgin and charred carbon ablators, crack initiation and growth occurred in the matrix (phenolic) phase. Both virgin and charred carbon ablators showed greater strength values compared with FiberForm samples, confirming that the presence of the porous matrix helps in absorbing the fracture energy.

  10. Lone Atrial Fibrillation Is Associated With Impaired Left Ventricular Energetics That Persists Despite Successful Catheter Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Wijesurendra, Rohan S.; Liu, Alexander; Eichhorn, Christian; Ariga, Rina; Levelt, Eylem; Clarke, William T.; Rodgers, Christopher T.; Karamitsos, Theodoros D.; Bashir, Yaver; Ginks, Matthew; Rajappan, Kim; Betts, Tim; Ferreira, Vanessa M.; Neubauer, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Lone atrial fibrillation (AF) may reflect a subclinical cardiomyopathy that persists after sinus rhythm (SR) restoration, providing a substrate for AF recurrence. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the effect of restoring SR by catheter ablation on left ventricular (LV) function and energetics in patients with AF but no significant comorbidities. Methods: Fifty-three patients with symptomatic paroxysmal or persistent AF and without significant valvular disease, uncontrolled hypertension, coronary artery disease, uncontrolled thyroid disease, systemic inflammatory disease, diabetes mellitus, or obstructive sleep apnea (ie, lone AF) undergoing ablation and 25 matched control subjects in SR were investigated. Magnetic resonance imaging quantified LV ejection fraction (LVEF), peak systolic circumferential strain (PSCS), and left atrial volumes and function, whereas phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy evaluated ventricular energetics (ratio of phosphocreatine to ATP). AF burden was determined before and after ablation by 7-day Holter monitoring; intermittent ECG event monitoring was also undertaken after ablation to investigate for asymptomatic AF recurrence. Results: Before ablation, both LV function and energetics were significantly impaired in patients compared with control subjects (LVEF, 61% [interquartile range (IQR), 52%–65%] versus 71% [IQR, 69%–73%], P<0.001; PSCS, –15% [IQR, –11 to –18%] versus −18% [IQR, –17% to –19%], P=0.002; ratio of phosphocreatine to ATP, 1.81±0.35 versus 2.05±0.29, P=0.004). As expected, patients also had dilated and impaired left atria compared with control subjects (all P<0.001). Early after ablation (1–4 days), LVEF and PSCS improved in patients recovering SR from AF (LVEF, 7.0±10%, P=0.005; PSCS, –3.5±4.3%, P=0.001) but were unchanged in those in SR during both assessments (both P=NS). At 6 to 9 months after ablation, AF burden reduced significantly (from 54% [IQR, 1.5%–100%] to

  11. Regional Variation across Canadian Centers in Radioiodine Administration for Thyroid Remnant Ablation in Well-Differentiated Thyroid Cancer Diagnosed in 2000–2010

    PubMed Central

    Rachinsky, I.; Rajaraman, M.; Zahedi, A.; Jefford, C.; McGibbon, A.; Young, J. E. M.; Pathak, K. A.; Badreddine, M.; De Brabandere, S.; Fong, H.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Use of radioactive iodine (RAI) ablation has been reported to vary significantly between studies. We explored variation in RAI ablation care patterns between seven thyroid cancer treatment centers in Canada. Methods. The Canadian Collaborative Network for Cancer of the Thyroid (CANNECT) is a collaborative registry to describe and analyze patterns of care for thyroid cancer. We analyzed data from seven participating centers on RAI ablation in patients diagnosed with well-differentiated (papillary and follicular) thyroid cancer between 2000 and 2010. We compared RAI ablation protocols including indications (based on TNM staging), preparation protocols, and administered dose. We excluded patients with known distant metastases at time of RAI ablation. Results. We included 3072 patients. There were no significant differences in TNM stage over time. RAI use increased in earlier years and then declined. The fraction of patients receiving RAI varied significantly between centers, ranging between 20–85% for T1, 44–100% for T2, 58–100% for T3, and 59–100% for T4. There were significant differences in the RAI doses between centers. Finally, there was major variation in the use of thyroid hormone withdrawal or rhTSH for preparation of RAI ablation. Conclusion. Our study identified significant variation in use of RAI for ablation in patients with well-differentiated thyroid cancer both between Canadian centers and over time. PMID:28025634

  12. Microwave ablation versus laser ablation in occluding lateral veins in goats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu-hong; Wang, Xiao-ping; Su, Wen-juan; Yuan, Yuan

    2016-02-01

    Increasing number of endovenous techniques are available for the treatment of saphenous vein reflux and endovenous laser ablation (EVLA) is a frequently used method. A newly developed alternative, based on thermal therapy, is endovenous microwave ablation (EMA). This study evaluated the effect of the two procedures, in terms of coagulation and histological changes, in occluding lateral veins in goats. Twelve animals were randomized into two group, with 6 treated with EMA (EMA group), and the rest 6 with EVLA (EVLA group). Results of coagulation, including coagulation, fibrinolysis and platelet activation, were assessed at three or four different time points: before, immediately after, 24 h (and 48 h) after ablation. The diameter change, a measure of efficacy, was ultrasonographically measured before and 1 month after the ablation. Histological changes were grossly and microscopically evaluated immediately, 1 and 3 month(s) after the ablation. The length of the ablated vein and preoperative average diameter were comparable between the two groups. In both EMA and EVLA groups, several coagulation parameters, fibrinolysis and platelet activation parameters only underwent slight changes. Ultrasound imaging displayed that the diameter reduction of the veins treated by EMA was significantly larger than by EVLA, in consistent with the results of macroscopic examination. Microscopic examination revealed necrosis and thickening of the vein wall, and occlusion of the lumen within 3 months after ablation in both EMA and EVLA groups. It is concluded that EMA is a minimally invasive therapy, which appears to be safe and effective for treatment of lateral veins in goats.

  13. Effects of material composition on the ablation performance of low density elastomeric ablators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tompkins, S. S.; Kabana, W. P.

    1973-01-01

    The ablation performance of materials composed of various concentrations of nylon, hollow silica spheres, hollow phenolic spheres, and four elastomeric resins was determined. Both blunt-body and flat-panel specimens were used, the cold-wall heating-rate ranges being 0.11 to 0.8 MW/sq m, respectively. The corresponding surface pressure ranges for these tests were 0.017 to 0.037 atmosphere and 0.004 to 0.005 atmosphere. Some of the results show that (1) the addition of nylon significantly improved the ablation performance, but the nylon was not compatible with one resin system; (2) panel and blunt-body specimen data do not show the same effect of phenolic sphere content on ablation effectiveness; and (3) there appears to be an optimum concentration of hollow silica spheres for good ablation performance. The composition of an efficient, nonproprietary ablator for lifting body application is identified and the ablation performance of this ablator is compared with the performance of three commercially available materials.

  14. DIY Fraction Pack.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Alan; Graham, Louise

    2003-01-01

    Describes a very successful attempt to teach fractions to year 5 pupils based on pupils making their own fraction pack. Children decided for themselves how to make the fractional slices used in the activity using colored cardboard sheets and templates of a paper circle consisting of 24 equal slices. (Author/NB)

  15. Thermal Ablation Modeling for Silicate Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yih-Kanq

    2016-01-01

    A thermal ablation model for silicates is proposed. The model includes the mass losses through the balance between evaporation and condensation, and through the moving molten layer driven by surface shear force and pressure gradient. This model can be applied in ablation simulations of the meteoroid or glassy Thermal Protection Systems for spacecraft. Time-dependent axi-symmetric computations are performed by coupling the fluid dynamics code, Data-Parallel Line Relaxation program, with the material response code, Two-dimensional Implicit Thermal Ablation simulation program, to predict the mass lost rates and shape change. For model validation, the surface recession of fused amorphous quartz rod is computed, and the recession predictions reasonably agree with available data. The present parametric studies for two groups of meteoroid earth entry conditions indicate that the mass loss through moving molten layer is negligibly small for heat-flux conditions at around 1 MW/cm(exp. 2).

  16. Deep Dive Topic: Choosing between ablators

    SciTech Connect

    Hurricane, O. A.; Thomas, C.; Olson, R.

    2015-07-14

    Recent data on implosions using identical hohlraums and very similar laser drives underscores the conundrum of making a clear choice of one ablator over another. Table I shows a comparison of Be and CH in a nominal length, gold, 575 μm-diameter, 1.6 mg/cc He gas-fill hohlraum while Table II shows a comparison of undoped HDC and CH in a +700 length, gold, 575 μm diameter, 1.6 mg/cc He gas fill hohlraum. As can be seen in the tables, the net integrated fusion performance of these ablators is the same to within error bars. In the case of the undoped HDC and CH ablators, the hot spot shapes of the implosions were nearly indistinguishable for the experiments listed in Table II.

  17. Numerical Modeling of Ablation Heat Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewing, Mark E.; Laker, Travis S.; Walker, David T.

    2013-01-01

    A unique numerical method has been developed for solving one-dimensional ablation heat transfer problems. This paper provides a comprehensive description of the method, along with detailed derivations of the governing equations. This methodology supports solutions for traditional ablation modeling including such effects as heat transfer, material decomposition, pyrolysis gas permeation and heat exchange, and thermochemical surface erosion. The numerical scheme utilizes a control-volume approach with a variable grid to account for surface movement. This method directly supports implementation of nontraditional models such as material swelling and mechanical erosion, extending capabilities for modeling complex ablation phenomena. Verifications of the numerical implementation are provided using analytical solutions, code comparisons, and the method of manufactured solutions. These verifications are used to demonstrate solution accuracy and proper error convergence rates. A simple demonstration of a mechanical erosion (spallation) model is also provided to illustrate the unique capabilities of the method.

  18. Optically thick ablation fronts. [in interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konigl, A.

    1984-01-01

    The physical characteristics of optically thick ablation fronts such as interstellar clouds are analyzed. Attention is given to cold clumps in both planar and spherical geometries and modifications caused by accelerations in a gravitational field or by evaporation of the clumps when encountered hot gas. The effects of ablation on the appearance of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability are examined in both linear and nonlinear regimes. The results of the calculations are applied to the astrophysical phenomena of cold clumps immersed in a supersonic flow, optically thick jets, and ablation in stellar envelopes. Evaporation in an optically thick front is projected to be orders of magnitude larger than evaporation in electron-conduction fronts in optically thin conditions. The optically thick processes could then be useful for modeling flows from, e.g., newly formed stars and active galactic nuclei.

  19. Laser ablated hard coating for microtools

    DOEpatents

    McLean, W. II; Balooch, M.; Siekhaus, W.J.

    1998-05-05

    Wear-resistant coatings composed of laser ablated hard carbon films, are deposited by pulsed laser ablation using visible light, on instruments such as microscope tips and micro-surgical tools. Hard carbon, known as diamond-like carbon (DLC), films produced by pulsed laser ablation using visible light enhances the abrasion resistance, wear characteristics, and lifetimes of small tools or instruments, such as small, sharp silicon tips used in atomic probe microscopy without significantly affecting the sharpness or size of these devices. For example, a 10--20 nm layer of diamond-like carbon on a standard silicon atomic force microscope (AFM) tip, enables the useful operating life of the tip to be increased by at least twofold. Moreover, the low inherent friction coefficient of the DLC coating leads to higher resolution for AFM tips operating in the contact mode. 12 figs.

  20. Specific Impulse Definition for Ablative Laser Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herren, Kenneth A.; Gregory, Don A.

    2004-01-01

    The term "specific impulse" is so ingrained in the field of rocket propulsion that it is unlikely that any fundamental argument would be taken seriously for its removal. It is not an ideal measure but it does give an indication of the amount of mass flow (mass loss/time), as in fuel rate, required to produce a measured thrust over some time period This investigation explores the implications of being able to accurately measure the ablation rate and how the language used to describe the specific impulse results may have to change slightly, and recasts the specific impulse as something that is not a time average. It is not currently possible to measure the ablation rate accurately in real time so it is generally just assumed that a constant amount of material will be removed for each laser pulse delivered The specific impulse dependence on the ablation rate is determined here as a correction to the classical textbook definition.

  1. Caries-selective ablation: the second threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennig, Thomas; Rechmann, Peter; Jeitner, Peter; Kaufmann, Raimund

    1993-07-01

    The aim of the study was to describe the appropriate fluence necessary for the effective removal of dental decay by ablation processes without or with at least minimal removal of healthy dentin. The experiments were conducted at two wavelengths [355 nm (frequency tripled, Q-switched Nd:YAG-laser) and 377 nm (frequency doubled, gain-switched Alexandrite-laser)] found to be close to the maximum of preferential absorption of carious dentin over healthy dentin. Optoacoustic techniques were applied to determine the ablation thresholds of healthy and carious dentin. The ablation efficiencies at characteristic fluences were determined using non-tactile microtopography. During all experiments a fiber optic delivery system was engaged.

  2. Performance of Conformable Ablators in Aerothermal Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, J.; Fan, W.; Skokova, K.; Stackpoole, M.; Beck, R.; Chavez-Garcia, J.

    2012-01-01

    Conformable Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator, a cousin of Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA), was developed at NASA Ames Research Center as a lightweight thermal protection system under the Fundamental Aeronautics Program. PICA is made using a brittle carbon substrate, which has a very low strain to failure. Conformable PICA is made using a flexible carbon substrate, a felt in this case. The flexible felt significantly increases the strain to failure of the ablator. PICA is limited by its thermal mechanical properties. Future NASA missions will require heatshields that are more fracture resistant than PICA and, as a result, NASA Ames is working to improve PICAs performance by developing conformable PICA to meet these needs. Research efforts include tailoring the chemistry of conformable PICA with varying amounts of additives to enhance mechanical properties and testing them in aerothermal environments. This poster shows the performance of conformable PICA variants in arc jets tests. Some mechanical and thermal properties will also be presented.

  3. Laser ablated hard coating for microtools

    DOEpatents

    McLean, II, William; Balooch, Mehdi; Siekhaus, Wigbert J.

    1998-05-05

    Wear-resistant coatings composed of laser ablated hard carbon films, are deposited by pulsed laser ablation using visible light, on instruments such as microscope tips and micro-surgical tools. Hard carbon, known as diamond-like carbon (DLC), films produced by pulsed laser ablation using visible light enhances the abrasion resistance, wear characteristics, and lifetimes of small tools or instruments, such as small, sharp silicon tips used in atomic probe microscopy without significantly affecting the sharpness or size of these devices. For example, a 10-20 nm layer of diamond-like carbon on a standard silicon atomic force microscope (AFM) tip, enables the useful operating life of the tip to be increased by at least twofold. Moreover, the low inherent friction coefficient of the DLC coating leads to higher resolution for AFM tips operating in the contact mode.

  4. Effects of endocardial microwave energy ablation

    PubMed Central

    Climent, Vicente; Hurlé, Aquilino; Ho, Siew Yen; Sánchez-Quintana, Damián

    2005-01-01

    Until recently the treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF) consisted primarily of palliation, mostly in the form of pharmacological intervention. However because of recent advances in nonpharmacologic therapies, the current expectation of patients and referring physicians is that AF will be cured, rather than palliated. In recent years there has been a rapid expansion in the availability and variety of energy sources and devices for ablation. One of these energies, microwave, has been applied clinically only in the last few years, and may be a promising technique that is potentially capable of treating a wide range of ventricular and supraventricular arrhythmias. The purpose of this study was to review microwave energy ablation in surgical treatment of AF with special interest in histology and ultrastructure of lesions produced by this endocardial ablation procedure. PMID:16943871

  5. Laser Thermal Ablation of Thyroid Benign Nodules

    PubMed Central

    Shahrzad, Mohammad Karim

    2015-01-01

    Thermal ablation therapies for benign thyroid nodules have been introduced in recent years to avoid the complications of traditional methods such as surgery. Despite the little complications and the reportedly acceptable efficacy of thermal ablation methods, quite few medical centers have sought the potential benefits of employing them. This paper provides an introduction to the literature, principles and advances of Percutaneous Laser Ablation therapy of thyroid benign nodules, as well as a discussion on its efficacy, complications and future. Several clinical research papers evaluating the thermal effect of laser on the alleviation of thyroid nodules have been reviewed to illuminate the important points. The results of this research can help researchers to advance the approach and medical centers to decide on investing in these novel therapies. PMID:26705459

  6. Catheter ablation of fascicular ventricular tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Ramprakash, B; Jaishankar, S; Rao, Hygriv B; Narasimhan, C

    2008-08-01

    Fascicular ventricular tachycardia (VT) is an idiopathic VT with right bundle branch block morphology and left-axis deviation occuring predominantly in young males. Fascicular tachycardia has been classified into three subtypes namely, left posterior fascicular VT, left anterior fascicular VT and upper septal fascicular VT. The mechanism of this tachycardia is believed to be localized reentry close to the fascicle of the left bundle branch. The reentrant circuit is composed of a verapamil sensitive zone, activated antegradely during tachycardia and the fast conduction Purkinje fibers activated retrogradely during tachycardia recorded as the pre Purkinje and the Purkinje potentials respectively. Catheter ablation is the preferred choice of therapy in patients with fascicular VT. Ablation is carried out during tachycardia, using conventional mapping techniques in majority of the patients, while three dimensional mapping and sinus rhythm ablation is reserved for patients with nonmappable tachycardia.

  7. Thermal Response Simulation of Ultra Light Weight Phenolic Carbon Ablator by the Use of the Ablation Analysis Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Sumio; Okuyama, Keiichi; Gibo, Kenta; Miyagi, Takuma; Suzuki, Toshiyuki; Fujita, Kazuhisa; Sakai, Takeharu; Nishio, Seiji; Watanabe, Akihiro

    A space vehicle which undergoes the atmospheric re-entry or a planetary entry needs the heat shield system to protect inner equipments against severe aerodynamic heating environments. Charring ablator is usually used for the heat shield system. In order to design the heat shield system, it is necessary to predict the thermal behavior under aerodynamic heating by ablation analysis. A computer code for charring ablation and thermal response analysis is newly developed for simulation of one-dimensional transient thermal behavior of charring ablation materials. The mathematical model for the charring ablation including basic equation and computational method of ablation analysis is briefly described. A new ultra light weight phenolic carbon ablator called LATS (Lightweight Ablator series for Transfer vehicle) was recently developed. Arc-heated tests of the LATS ablator were carried out and measured results of the temperature response and surface mass loss are compared with the simulation results of the ablation analysis program. The agreement between the results of simulation and measurement is found to be good. It is also found that the mathematical model used in the ablation code can be applied to the ablation analysis of the low density LATS ablator.

  8. Depth Profiling of Polymer Composites by Ultrafast Laser Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Christopher; Clayton, Clive; Longtin, Jon

    2009-03-01

    Past work has shown femtosecond laser ablation to be an athermal process at low fluences in polymer systems. The ablation rate in this low fluence regime is very low, allowing for micro-scale removal of material. We have taken advantage of this fact to perform shallow depth profiling ablation on carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites. Neat composite and resin samples were studied to establish reference ablation profiles. These profiles and the effects of the heterogeneous distribution of carbon fibers were observed through confocal laser profilometry and optical and scanning electron microscopy. Weathered materials that have been subjected to accelerated tests in artificial sunlight or water conditions were ablated to determine the correlation between exposure and change in ablation characteristics. Preliminary Raman and micro-ATR analysis performed before and after ablation shows no chemical changes indicative of thermal effects. The low-volume-ablation property was utilized in an attempt to expose the sizing-matrix interphase for analysis.

  9. Comparison of ultraviolet femtosecond and nanosecond laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry analysis in glass, monazite, and zircon.

    PubMed

    Poitrasson, Franck; Mao, Xianglei; Mao, Samuel S; Freydier, Rémi; Russo, Richard E

    2003-11-15

    We compared the analytical performance of ultraviolet femtosecond and nanosecond laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS). The benefit of ultrafast lasers was evaluated regarding thermal-induced chemical fractionation, that is otherwise well known to limit LA-ICPMS. Both lasers had a Gaussian beam energy profile and were tested using the same ablation system and ICPMS analyzer. Resulting crater morphologies and analytical signals showed more straightforward femtosecond laser ablation processes, with minimal thermal effects. Despite a less stable energy output, the ultrafast laser yielded elemental (Pb/U, Pb/Th) and Pb isotopic ratios that were more precise, repeatable, and accurate, even when compared to the best analytical conditions for the nanosecond laser. Measurements on NIST glasses, monazites, and zircon also showed that femtosecond LA-ICPMS calibration was less matrix-matched dependent and therefore more versatile.

  10. Thermal ablation of liver metastases from colorectal cancer: radiofrequency, microwave and laser ablation therapies.

    PubMed

    Vogl, Thomas J; Farshid, Parviz; Naguib, Nagy N N; Darvishi, Abbas; Bazrafshan, Babak; Mbalisike, Emmanuel; Burkhard, Thorsten; Zangos, Stephan

    2014-07-01

    Surgery is currently considered the treatment of choice for patients with colorectal cancer liver metastases (CRLM) when resectable. The majority of these patients can also benefit from systemic chemotherapy. Recently, local or regional therapies such as thermal ablations have been used with acceptable outcomes. We searched the medical literature to identify studies and reviews relevant to radiofrequency (RF) ablation, microwave (MW) ablation and laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT) in terms of local progression, survival indexes and major complications in patients with CRLM. Reviewed literature showed a local progression rate between 2.8 and 29.7 % of RF-ablated liver lesions at 12-49 months follow-up, 2.7-12.5 % of MW ablated lesions at 5-19 months follow-up and 5.2 % of lesions treated with LITT at 6-month follow-up. Major complications were observed in 4-33 % of patients treated with RF ablation, 0-19 % of patients treated with MW ablation and 0.1-3.5 % of lesions treated with LITT. Although not significantly different, the mean of 1-, 3- and 5-year survival rates for RF-, MW- and laser ablated lesions was (92.6, 44.7, 31.1 %), (79, 38.6, 21 %) and (94.2, 61.5, 29.2 %), respectively. The median survival in these methods was 33.2, 29.5 and 33.7 months, respectively. Thermal ablation may be an appropriate alternative in patients with CRLM who have inoperable liver lesions or have operable lesions as an adjunct to resection. However, further competitive evaluation should clarify the efficacy and priority of these therapies in patients with colorectal cancer liver metastases.

  11. Generalized eczematous reaction after fractional carbon dioxide laser therapy for tattoo allergy.

    PubMed

    Meesters, Arne A; De Rie, Menno A; Wolkerstorfer, Albert

    2016-12-01

    Allergic tattoo reactions form a therapeutically difficult entity. Treatment with conventional quality-switched lasers does not completely remove the allergenic particles and may lead to generalized hypersensitivity reactions. Recently, ablative fractional laser therapy was introduced as a treatment for allergic tattoo removal. We present two cases of allergic reactions to red tattoo ink treated with 10,600-nm fractional CO2 laser. At the end of treatment, almost complete removal of red ink accompanied by a significant reduction of symptoms was observed in the first patient, whereas the second patient developed an acute generalized eczematous reaction after five treatments. These findings confirm that ablative fractional laser therapy is capable of significant removal of tattoo ink in an allergic tattoo reaction. However, it implies a risk of generalized hypersensitivity reactions. To our knowledge, this is the first case of a generalized hypersensitivity reaction following treatment of tattoo allergy with the fractional CO2 laser.

  12. EUS-Guided Ethanol Ablation of Insulinomas

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Shan-yu; Lu, Xiu-ping; Jiang, Hai-xing

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Surgical resection is a standard treatment for insulinomas; however, it is associated with a high risk of complications and limited to specific suitable candidates. In recent years, endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided ethanol ablation of insulinomas has emerged as a new therapeutic option, especially for elderly patients and candidates unfit for surgery. We aimed to evaluate the feasibility and safety of this technique for insulinomas. Four patients diagnosed with insulinomas based on EUS–fine-needle aspiration and immunohistochemistry results underwent EUS-guided 95% ethanol ablation. A comprehensive literature review was performed to understand the current status of the feasibility, safety, and effects of EUS-guided ethanol ablation of insulinomas. EUS-guided ethanol ablation of insulinomas was successfully completed in all the 4 patients. There were no perioperative or postoperative complications. The patients were discharged at 3 days after the procedure. No recurrence of hypoglycemia or tumors was noted during follow-up (range, 3–6 months). Literature review showed 8 patients with insulinomas who underwent EUS-guided ethanol ablation. All the procedures were successful, with no need for further surgical treatment. Among these reviewed cases, 6 patients had no post-procedural complications, while other 2 patients showed a mild increase in the serum levels of lipase and/or pancreatic enzymes within 48 h post-procedure; furthermore, 1 of these 2 patients presented at a later date with medically controllable hematoma and ulceration. During follow-up, 6 patients remained asymptomatic and normoglycemic, while the 2 patients who presented post-procedural complications developed occasional mild confusion. EUS-guided ethanol ablation of insulinomas is an effective and safe modality, with an acceptable level of post-procedural complications. However, the long-term effects of this new therapeutic option need to be validated in a large randomized controlled

  13. Revisiting the interplay between ablation, collisional, and radiative processes during ns-laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Autrique, D.; Gornushkin, I.; Alexiades, V.; Chen, Z.; Bogaerts, A.; Rethfeld, B.

    2013-10-01

    A study of ns-laser ablation is presented, which focuses on the transient behavior of the physical processes that act in and above a copper sample. A dimensionless multiphase collisional radiative model describes the interplay between the ablation, collisional, and radiative mechanisms. Calculations are done for a 6 ns-Nd:YAG laser pulse operating at 532 nm and fluences up to 15 J/cm2. Temporal intensity profiles as well as transmissivities are in good agreement with experimental results. It is found that volumetric ablation mechanisms and photo-processes both play an essential role in the onset of ns-laser induced breakdown.

  14. Subcellular analysis by laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A; Shrestha, Bindesh

    2014-12-02

    In various embodiments, a method of laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LAESI-MS) may generally comprise micro-dissecting a cell comprising at least one of a cell wall and a cell membrane to expose at least one subcellular component therein, ablating the at least one subcellular component by an infrared laser pulse to form an ablation plume, intercepting the ablation plume by an electrospray plume to form ions, and detecting the ions by mass spectrometry.

  15. Ionic Hydrogel Monotherapy and in Combination with Antiviral-Antibiotic Prophylaxis, in the Post-procedure Management of Fractional Laser-Treated Patients

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The pre- and postoperative care for fractionated laser resurfacing is still controversial, especially in regard to the use of antibiotics to prevent bacterial infection and potential consequences. Recently, an ionic hydrogel has shown to be useful in the postoperative treatment of minor burns. The aim of this study is to evaluate the use of this hydrogel after fractional laser treatments targeting photoaging and chronoaging damage to skin. Design: A randomized prospective study. Setting: one plastic surgeon private practice. Participant: Fifty patients with chronoaging and photoaging cosmetic issues were enrolled in two different post-treatment regimens: ionic hydrogel alone and ionic hydrogel in combination with antibiotics. Measurements: Patients were evaluated for healing time, complications, and postoperative pain, the latter assessed with a 10-point visual analogue score. A questionnaire to investigate how patients managed through the postoperative phase was also provided to each patient. Results: No significant differences between the two groups were observed in regard to healing time, postoperative pain, complications, and patient satisfaction. Conclusion: Ionic hydrogel alone has shown to provide adequate skin care support in the postoperative phase of fractional-laser-resurfacing-treated patients. PMID:28210386

  16. Ablation of carbide materials with femtosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumitru, Gabriel; Romano, Valerio; Weber, Heinz P.; Sentis, Marc; Marine, Wladimir

    2003-01-01

    The response of cemented tungsten carbide and of titanium carbonitride was investigated with respect to damage and ablation properties, under interaction with ultrashort laser pulses. These carbide materials present high microhardness and are of significant interest for tribological applications. The experiments were carried out in air with a commercial Ti:sapphire laser at energy densities on the target up to 6.5 J/cm 2. The irradiated target surfaces were analyzed with optical, SEM and AFM techniques and the damage and ablation threshold values were determined using the measured spot diameters and the calculated incident energy density distributions.

  17. High throughput solar cell ablation system

    SciTech Connect

    Harley, Gabriel; Pass, Thomas; Cousins, Peter John; Viatella, John

    2014-10-14

    A solar cell is formed using a solar cell ablation system. The ablation system includes a single laser source and several laser scanners. The laser scanners include a master laser scanner, with the rest of the laser scanners being slaved to the master laser scanner. A laser beam from the laser source is split into several laser beams, with the laser beams being scanned onto corresponding wafers using the laser scanners in accordance with one or more patterns. The laser beams may be scanned on the wafers using the same or different power levels of the laser source.

  18. General Model for Multicomponent Ablation Thermochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milos, Frank S.; Marschall, Jochen; Rasky, Daniel J. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    A previous paper (AIAA 94-2042) presented equations and numerical procedures for modeling the thermochemical ablation and pyrolysis of thermal protection materials which contain multiple surface species. This work describes modifications and enhancements to the Multicomponent Ablation Thermochemistry (MAT) theory and code for application to the general case which includes surface area constraints, rate limited surface reactions, and non-thermochemical mass loss (failure). Detailed results and comparisons with data are presented for the Shuttle Orbiter reinforced carbon-carbon oxidation protection system which contains a mixture of sodium silicate (Na2SiO3), silica (SiO2), silicon carbide (SiC), and carbon (C).

  19. Testing of Advanced Conformal Ablative TPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasch, Matthew; Agrawal, Parul; Beck, Robin

    2013-01-01

    In support of the CA250 project, this paper details the results of a test campaign that was conducted at the Ames Arcjet Facility, wherein several novel low density thermal protection (TPS) materials were evaluated in an entry like environment. The motivation for these tests was to investigate whether novel conformal ablative TPS materials can perform under high heat flux and shear environment as a viable alternative to rigid ablators like PICA or Avcoat for missions like MSL and beyond. A conformable TPS over a rigid aeroshell has the potential to solve a number of challenges faced by traditional rigid TPS materials (such as tiled Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) system on MSL, and honeycomb-based Avcoat on the Orion Multi Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV)). The compliant (high strain to failure) nature of the conformable ablative materials will allow better integration of the TPS with the underlying aeroshell structure and enable monolithic-like configuration and larger segments to be used in fabrication.A novel SPRITE1 architecture, developed by the researchers at NASA Ames was used for arcjet testing. This small probe like configuration with 450 spherecone, enabled us to test the materials in a combination of high heat flux, pressure and shear environment. The heat flux near the nose were in the range of 500-1000 W/sq cm whereas in the flank section of the test article the magnitudes were about 50 of the nose, 250-500W/sq cm range. There were two candidate conformable materials under consideration for this test series. Both test materials are low density (0.28 g/cu cm) similar to Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) or Silicone Impregnated Refractory Ceramic Ablator (SIRCA) and are comprised of: A flexible carbon substrate (Carbon felt) infiltrated with an ablative resin system: phenolic (Conformal-PICA) or silicone (Conformal-SICA). The test demonstrated a successful performance of both the conformable ablators for heat flux conditions between 50

  20. Effects of Laser Wavelength on Ablator Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    Wavelength-dependent or spectral radiation effects are potentially significant for thermal protection materials. NASA atmospheric entry simulations include trajectories with significant levels of shock layer radiation which is concentrated in narrow spectral lines. Tests using two different high powered lasers, the 10.6 micron LHMEL I CO2 laser and the near-infrared 1.07 micron fiber laser, on low density ablative thermal protection materials offer a unique opportunity to evaluate spectral effects. Test results indicated that the laser wavelength can impact the thermal response of an ablative material, in terms of bond-line temperatures, penetration times, mass losses, and char layer thicknesses.

  1. Thermal tumor ablation in clinical use.

    PubMed

    Brace, C

    2011-01-01

    Although a surgical procedure is performed by visual inspection with histopathological assessment of the excised tumor and margins, percutaneous and noninvasive thermal ablation is performed strictly with the aid of imaging. Applicator guidance into the target zone, treatment monitoring and verification, and clinical follow-up rely on effective imaging. Detailed discussion of imaging is beyond the scope of this article, but the influence of imaging on the choice of thermal ablation or procedural approach will be discussed as needed. More information on imaging for interventional therapies can be found in other articles in this issue of IEEE Pulse.

  2. High throughput solar cell ablation system

    DOEpatents

    Harley, Gabriel; Pass, Thomas; Cousins, Peter John; Viatella, John

    2012-09-11

    A solar cell is formed using a solar cell ablation system. The ablation system includes a single laser source and several laser scanners. The laser scanners include a master laser scanner, with the rest of the laser scanners being slaved to the master laser scanner. A laser beam from the laser source is split into several laser beams, with the laser beams being scanned onto corresponding wafers using the laser scanners in accordance with one or more patterns. The laser beams may be scanned on the wafers using the same or different power levels of the laser source.

  3. Pitch fractionation. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberg, V.L.; White, J.L.

    1981-12-15

    Petroleum pitch (Ashland A240) has been subjected to thermal treatment and solvent fractionation to produce refined pitches to be evaluated as impregnants for carbon-carbon composites. The solvent fractions were obtained by sequential Soxhlet extraction with solvents such as hexane, cyclohexane, toluene, and pyridine. The most severe thermal treatment produced a mesophase pitch (approximately 50% mesophase); an appreciable portion of the mesophase was soluble in strong solvents. There were substantial differences in chemical composition and in pyrolysis behavior of the fractions. As the depth of fraction increased, the pyrolysis yield and bloating increased, and the microstructure of the coke became finer until glassy microconstituents were formed in the deepest fractions.

  4. Experimental measurement of ablation effects in plasma armature railguns

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, J.V.; Parsons, W.M.

    1986-01-01

    Experimental evidence supporting the importance of ablation in plasma armature railguns is presented. Experiments conducted using the HYVAX and MIDI-2 railguns are described. Several indirect effects of ablation are identified from the experimental results. An improved ablation model of plasma armature dynamics is proposed which incorporates the restrike process.

  5. Ablation techniques for primary and metastatic liver tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Michael J; Willatt, Jonathon; Majdalany, Bill S; Kielar, Ania Z; Chong, Suzanne; Ruma, Julie A; Pandya, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Ablative treatment methods have emerged as safe and effective therapies for patients with primary and secondary liver tumors who are not surgical candidates at the time of diagnosis. This article reviews the current literature and describes the techniques, complications and results for radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation. PMID:26839642

  6. Preliminary results after reconstruction of bony defects of the proximal humerus with an allograft-resurfacing composite.

    PubMed

    Ruggieri, P; Mavrogenis, A F; Guerra, G; Mercuri, M

    2011-08-01

    We retrospectively studied 14 patients with proximal and diaphyseal tumours and disappearing bone (Gorham's) disease of the humerus treated with wide resection and reconstruction using an allograft-resurfacing composite (ARC). There were ten women and four men, with a mean age of 35 years (8 to 69). At a mean follow-up of 25 months (10 to 89), two patients had a fracture of the allograft. In one of these it was revised with a similar ARC and in the other with an intercalary prosthesis. A further patient had an infection and a fracture of the allograft that was revised with a megaprosthesis. In all patients with an ARC, healing of the ARC-host bone interface was observed. One patient had failure of the locking mechanism of the total elbow replacement. The mean post-operative Musculoskeletal Tumor Society score for the upper extremity was 77% (46.7% to 86.7%), which represents good and excellent results; one patient had a poor result (46.7%). In the short term ARC effectively relieves pain and restores shoulder function in patients with wide resection of the proximal humerus. Fracture and infection remain significant complications.

  7. Humanization of an anti-human TNF-alpha antibody by variable region resurfacing with the aid of molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Feng, Jiannan; Li, Yan; Guo, Ning; Shen, Beifen

    2005-08-01

    The murine monoclonal antibody Z12 is of therapeutic interest for its neutralizing biological activity against human tumor necrosis factor-alpha (hTNF-alpha). We attempted to humanize Z12 with variable domain resurfacing guided by computer modeling. First, the genes of heavy and light chain variable region (VH, VL) of Z12 were cloned and the whole three-dimensional structure of Fv fragment was constructed by using homology-based modeling and molecular docking methods. Then the complex model of Fv interacting with hTNF-alpha whose crystal structure derived from PDB database was gained with computer-guided docking program. Based on this model, a humanized version was designed. The humanized Fab antibody was constructed, expressed and purified in the pComb3H vector system and it showed unaltered binding affinity to the antigen as determined by ELISA and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The method described here can be used to humanize other anti-hTNF-alpha antibodies.

  8. High incidence of pseudotumours after hip resurfacing even in low risk patients; results from an intensified MRI screening protocol.

    PubMed

    van der Weegen, Walter; Smolders, Jose M H; Sijbesma, Thea; Hoekstra, Henk J; Brakel, Koen; van Susante, Job L C

    2013-01-01

    We intensified our screening protocol for the presence of pseudotumours in a consecutive series of patients with a hip resurfacing arthroplasty (HRA), to establish whether we should be alert to the presence of 'silent' pseudotumours. Patients categorised with high risk (11 hips) and low risk (10 hips) for pseudotumour development and a control group (23 hips) were screened with metal artefact reduction sequence (MARS) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The Anderson classification to grade any metal-on-metal (MoM) disease present on MARS-MRI images was used. In 15 out of 44 MRI scans pseudotumours were observed (34.1%), of which six were graded with mild (13.6%), eight with moderate (18.2%) and one with severe MoM disease (2.3%). Twelve pseudotumours were present in asymptomatic patients (27.3%). Metal ion levels were normal in 80% of the MARS-MRI screened patients. As a consequence of our intensified screening protocol, one patient was revised for pseudotumour formation and another patient was scheduled for revision. Silent pseudotumours were observed in all three groups. Before our intensified screening protocol was initiated, no pseudotumours were encountered in our cohort of 289 HRAs. We concluded that clinical outcomes and plain radiographs for screening MoM patients underestimates the presence of pseudotumours in MoM patients. The true clinical relevance of these pseudotumours is still unclear.

  9. Hydrodynamic Mixing of Ablator Material into the Compressed Fuel and Hot Spot of Direct-Drive DT Cryogenic Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regan, S. P.; Goncharov, V. N.; Epstein, R.; Betti, R.; Bonino, M. J.; Cao, D.; Collins, T. J. B.; Campbell, E. M.; Forrest, C. J.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Harding, D. R.; Marozas, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; McKenty, P. W.; Sangster, T. C.; Stoeckl, C.; Luo, R. W.; Schoff, M. E.; Farrell, M.

    2016-10-01

    Hydrodynamic mixing of ablator material into the compressed fuel and hot spot of direct-drive DT cryogenic implosions is diagnosed using time-integrated, spatially resolved xray spectroscopy. The laser drive ablates most of the 8- μm-thick CH ablator, which is doped with trace amounts of Ge ( 0.5 at.) and surrounds the cryogenic DT layer. A small fraction of the ablator material is mixed into the compressed shell and the hot spot by the ablation-front Rayleigh-Taylor hydrodynamic instability seeded by laser imprint, the target mounting stalk, and surface debris. The amount of mix mass inferred from spectroscopic analysis of the Ge K-shell emission will be presented. This material is based upon work supported by the Department Of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944. Part of this work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  10. Glial Cells and Their Function in the Adult Brain: A Journey through the History of Their Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Jäkel, Sarah; Dimou, Leda

    2017-01-01

    Glial cells, consisting of microglia, astrocytes, and oligodendrocyte lineage cells as their major components, constitute a large fraction of the mammalian brain. Originally considered as purely non-functional glue for neurons, decades of research have highlighted the importance as well as further functions of glial cells. Although many aspects of these cells are well characterized nowadays, the functions of the different glial populations in the brain under both physiological and pathological conditions remain, at least to a certain extent, unresolved. To tackle these important questions, a broad range of depletion approaches have been developed in which microglia, astrocytes, or oligodendrocyte lineage cells (i.e., NG2-glia and oligodendrocytes) are specifically ablated from the adult brain network with a subsequent analysis of the consequences. As the different glial populations are very heterogeneous, it is imperative to specifically ablate single cell populations instead of inducing cell death in all glial cells in general. Thanks to modern genetic manipulation methods, the approaches can now directly be targeted to the cell type of interest making the ablation more specific compared to general cell ablation approaches that have been used earlier on. In this review, we will give a detailed summary on different glial ablation studies, focusing on the adult mouse central nervous system and the functional readouts. We will also provide an outlook on how these approaches could be further exploited in the future. PMID:28243193

  11. Ablation behaviors of carbon/carbon composites with C-SiC-TaC multi-interlayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhao-ke; Xiong, Xiang; Li, Guo-dong; Wang, Ya-lei

    2009-08-01

    Carbon/carbon composites with C-SiC-TaC multi-interlayers were prepared by isothermal chemical vapor infiltration. The ablation behaviors of the composites were tested with an oxyacetylene flame. The mass loss rate increases markedly in the initial 10 s, then reaches a steady state or decreases slightly in 10-40 s; while after 40 s, the mass loss rate increases remarkably. A similar trend is observed in the linear loss rate, except that it begins to increase only after 60 s. After ablation for 5 s, the composite surface consists in black carbon fibers and white ceramic oxides. After 20 s, three different regions with different ablation behaviors are observed: central, transition and border. After 100 s, the composites are severely ablated and the shape is completely destroyed. A cross-section of the composites after ablation for 20 s shows three distinct regions: a rugged oxide layer, a smooth oxide layer and the matrix. The tantalum compounds have not been able to protect efficiently the material from constant oxide evolution, possibly because of a too large pore volume fraction.

  12. Perivascular parenchymal extension of the ablation zone following liver microwave ablation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Saurabh; Siriwardana, Pulathis Nilantha; Johnston, Edward William; Bandula, Steven; Davidson, Brian Ritchie; Illing, Rowland Oliver

    2016-03-31

    A 69-year-old man who presented with abdominal discomfort was, on examination, found to have a palpable abdominal mass. Contrast-enhanced CT showed a mass arising from the inferior vena cava, which biopsy confirmed to be a leiomyosarcoma. One month after chemoradiotherapy, CT demonstrated a new 15 mm solitary central right liver metastasis. Microwave ablation (MWA) of the metastasis was performed using an Acculis Sulis V system (Angiodynamics, USA) at a power of 140 Watts for 4 min, with no immediate complications. After 1 month, MRI with gadolinium was performed to assess the liver ablation zone. The MRI demonstrated thrombosis of a right inferior hepatic vein branch leading to the ablation zone and extension of the ablation zone 1 cm into the tissue around the thrombosed vessel.

  13. Fractional CO2 laser as an effective modality in treatment of striae alba in skin types III and IV

    PubMed Central

    Naein, Farahnaz Fatemi; Soghrati, Mehrnaz

    2012-01-01

    Context: Rapid stretching of the skin over the weak connective tissue leads to development of striae distensae. Recently, researchers have shown special interest towards use of fractional photothermolysis in treatment of striae and several studies have shown its usefulness. Our aim was to assess the efficacy of Fractional CO2 laser in treatment of striae alba. Materials and Methods: A randomized clinical trial was carried out in female patients with striae alba. Ninety two striae were randomly selected and divided into two groups. Five sessions of laser resurfacing, were performed in Group 1, every 2–4 weeks. Group 2 was treated with 10% glycolic acid+0.05% tretinoin cream nightly during the study. Photographs were taken from the striae before and two weeks after the end of treatment. Mean surface area of striae compared between two groups. Patients’ views regarding the degree of improvement were assessed via visual analogue scale (VAS). Results: Forty six striae in Group 1 underwent laser resurfacing and 46 matched striae in Group 2, were treated with topical cream. Mean difference of striae surface area, was significantly decreased after treatment in Group 1 (-37.1±15.6 cm2) in comparison with Group 2(-7.9±9 cm2) (P value >0.001). Mean VAS was significantly higher in Group 1 (3.05±0.74) compared to Group 2 (0.63±0.66) (P value >0.001). Conclusions: Fractional photothermolysis via Fractional CO2 laser seems to be an effective method for treatment of striae alba. PMID:23825991

  14. Dividing Fractions: A Pedagogical Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Robert

    2016-01-01

    When dividing one fraction by a second fraction, invert, that is, flip the second fraction, then multiply it by the first fraction. To multiply fractions, simply multiply across the denominators, and multiply across the numerators to get the resultant fraction. So by inverting the division of fractions it is turned into an easy multiplication of…

  15. Efficacy and effects on cardiac function of radiofrequency catheter ablation vs. direct current cardioversion of persistent atrial fibrillation with left ventricular systolic dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Maojing; Cai, Shanglang; Ding, Wei; Deng, Yujie; Zhao, Qing

    2017-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of catheter ablation vs. direct current synchronized cardioversion (DCC) in patients with persistent atrial fibrillation (AF) and left ventricular systolic dysfunction, and to define baseline features of patients that will get more benefit from ablation. Methods From July 2013 to October 2014, 97 consecutive single-center patients with persistent AF and symptomatic heart failure (left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) <50%) underwent DCC followed by amiodarone (n = 40) or circumferential pulmonary vein isolation (PVI; n = 57) according to patient’s preference were recruited in the study. Post-ablation recurrence was treated with atrial roof and mitral isthmus lines ablation with or without PVI based on restoration or not of pulmonary vein (PV) potential conduction. Study outcomes were 12-month rate of sustained sinus rhythm (SR) and cardiac function. Baseline characteristics were compared between patients with and without cardiac function improvement post ablation. Results With similarly distributed characteristics at baseline, ablation (mean 1.8 procedures) relative to DCC yielded significantly higher level of 12-month SR maintenance rate (68.42% vs. 35%, P = 0.001); and better LVEF and New York Heart Association class. with significant effect for DCC only in maintained SR cases. Post ablation LVEF increased (>20% or to over 55%) in 31 (54.39%) patients with worse baseline cardiac function and ventricular rate control. Conclusions Catheter ablation relative to cardioversion of persistent AF with symptomatic heart failure yielded better 12-month SR maintenance and cardiac function. Compared with non-responders, patients with improved LVEF post-ablation had poorer ventricular rate control and cardiac function at baseline, suggesting a significant component of tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy in this group. PMID:28350861

  16. UV laser ablation patterns in intraocular lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagiou, D. P.; Evangelatos, Ch.; Apostolopoulos, A.; Spyratou, E.; Bacharis, C.; Makropoulou, M.; Serafetinides, A. A.

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate the effect of UV solid state laser radiation on intraocular lens (IOL) polymer surfaces as an alternative method to conventional surface shaping techniques for IOLs customization. Laser ablation experiments were performed on PMMA plates and commercially available hydrophobic and hydrophilic acrylic IOLs with the 5th harmonic of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (λ=213 nm). Circular arrays of holes were drilled on the polymer surface, covering the centre and the peripheries of the IOL. The morphology of the ablated IOL surface was examined with a conventional optical microscope (Leitz GMBH Wetzlar) and with a scanning electron microscope (SEM, Fei - Innova Nanoscope) at various laser parameters. Quantitative measurements of ablation rates were performed with a contact profilometer (Dektak-150), in which a mechanical stylus scanned across the surface of gold-coated IOLs (after SEM imaging) to measure variationsF in surface height. Laser interaction with IOLs depends on optical and mechanical material properties, in addition to laser radiation parameters. The exact ablation mechanism is discussed. Some polymer materials, depending on their properties, are more susceptible to the photothermal mechanism than the photochemical one or vice versa. In summary, every IOL polymer exhibits specific attributes in its interaction with the 5th harmonic of Nd:YAG laser.

  17. Organized Atrial Tachycardias after Atrial Fibrillation Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Castrejón-Castrejón, Sergio; Ortega, Marta; Pérez-Silva, Armando; Doiny, David; Estrada, Alejandro; Filgueiras, David; López-Sendón, José L.; Merino, José L.

    2011-01-01

    The efficacy of catheter-based ablation techniques to treat atrial fibrillation is limited not only by recurrences of this arrhythmia but also, and not less importantly, by new-onset organized atrial tachycardias. The incidence of such tachycardias depends on the type and duration of the baseline atrial fibrillation and specially on the ablation technique which was used during the index procedure. It has been repeatedly reported that the more extensive the left atrial surface ablated, the higher the incidence of organized atrial tachycardias. The exact origin of the pathologic substrate of these trachycardias is not fully understood and may result from the interaction between preexistent regions with abnormal electrical properties and the new ones resultant from radiofrequency delivery. From a clinical point of view these atrial tachycardias tend to remit after a variable time but in some cases are responsible for significant symptoms. A precise knowledge of the most frequent types of these arrhythmias, of their mechanisms and components is necessary for a thorough electrophysiologic characterization if a new ablation procedure is required. PMID:21941669

  18. Outpatient laser tonsillar ablation under local anaesthetic.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Peter J; Latif, Abdul

    2004-11-01

    Outpatient laser ablation of the palatine tonsils under local anaesthetic is an alternative technique to capsular tonsillectomy for recurrent tonsillitis under general anaesthetic. Laser tonsillotomy ablates up to 70% of the tonsillar tissue and is performed when patients choose not to have a conventional tonsillectomy, or are unfit for a general anaesthetic. The technique described here is an adaptation of Krespis' laser-assisted serial tonsillectomy (LAST) whereby only one sitting is required. Krespis' technique effectively eliminates recurrent tonsillitis in 96% of the cases over a 4-year follow-up period and represents the only substantial study looking at treating recurrent tonsillitis with outpatient laser ablation. This study is a retrospective postal survey of 19 patients who underwent laser tonsillar ablation under local anaesthetic for recurrent chronic tonsillitis from 1997 to 2001 and was performed in liaison with the clinical audit department at Basildon Hospital. We had a response rate of 74% and an admission rate of 0%, which compares favourably with day case tonsillectomy surgery. Of the patients, 75% did not experience further episodes of tonsillitis 12 months after the procedure and 77% of the patients were glad they had the operation. Although this technique does not completely eliminate tonsillitis, it offers an alternative for those patients who prefer a procedure that is done quickly in an outpatient setting without the additional problems of general anaesthesia, overnight hospital admission and long waiting lists.

  19. Highspeed laser ablation cutting of metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullmann, F.; Loeschner, U.; Hartwig, L.; Szczepanski, D.; Schille, J.; Gronau, S.; Knebel, T.; Drechsel, J.; Ebert, R.; Exner, H.

    2013-02-01

    In laser ablation cutting, irradiation of high-intense laser beams causes ejection of molten and evaporated material out of the cutting zone as a result of high pressure gradients, induced by expanding plasma plumes. This paper investigates highspeed laser ablation cutting of industrial grade metal sheets using high-brilliant continuous wave fiber lasers with output powers up to 5 kW. The laser beam was deflected with scan speeds up to 2700 m/min utilizing both a fast galvanometer scan system and a polygon scan system. By sharp laser beam focusing using different objectives with focal lengths ranging between 160 mm and 500 mm, small laser spot diameters between 16.5 μm and 60 μm were obtained, respectively. As a result high peak intensities between 3*108 W/cm² and 2.5*109 W/cm² were irradiated on the sample surface, and cutting kerfs with a maximum depth of 1.4 mm have been produced. In this study the impact of the processing parameters laser power, laser spot diameter, cutting speed, and number of scans on both the achievable cutting depth and the cutting edge quality was investigated. The ablation depths, the heights of the cutting burr, as well as the removed material volumes were evaluated by means of optical microscope images and cross section photographs. Finally highspeed laser ablation cutting was studied using an intensified ultra highspeed camera in order to get useful insights into the cutting process.

  20. Intumescent-ablator coatings using endothermic fillers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawko, P. M.; Riccitiello, S. R. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An intumescent-ablator coating composition which contains the ammonium salt of 1,4-nitroaniline-2-sulfonic acid or 4,4 dinitrosul fanilide, a polymeric binder system and about 5 to 30% weight of an endothermic filler is reported. The filler has a decomposition temperature about or within the exothermic region of the intumescent agent.

  1. Microwave ablation devices for interventional oncology.

    PubMed

    Ward, Robert C; Healey, Terrance T; Dupuy, Damian E

    2013-03-01

    Microwave ablation is one of the several options in the ablation armamentarium for the treatment of malignancy, offering several potential benefits when compared with other ablation, radiation, surgical and medical treatment modalities. The basic microwave system consists of the generator, power distribution system and antennas. Often under image (computed tomography or ultrasound) guidance, a needle-like antenna is inserted percutaneously into the tumor, where local microwave electromagnetic radiation is emitted from the probe's active tip, producing frictional tissue heating, capable of causing cell death by coagulation necrosis. Half of the microwave ablation systems use a 915 MHz generator and the other half use a 2450 MHz generator. To date, there are no completed clinical trials comparing microwave devices head-to-head. Prospective comparisons of microwave technology with other treatment alternatives, as well as head-to-head comparison with each microwave device, is needed if this promising field will garner more widespread support and use in the oncology community.

  2. Ablation Resistant Zirconium and Hafnium Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, Jeffrey (Inventor); White, Michael J. (Inventor); Kaufman, Larry (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    High temperature ablation resistant ceramic composites have been made. These ceramics are composites of zirconium diboride and zirconium carbide with silicon carbide, hafnium diboride and hafnium carbide with silicon carbide and ceramic composites which contain mixed diborides and/or carbides of zirconium and hafnium. along with silicon carbide.

  3. Laboratory Micrometeroid/Dust Ablation Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, E.; Horanyi, M.; Janches, D.; Munsat, T. L.; Plane, J. M. C.; Simolka, J.; Sternovsky, Z.

    2014-12-01

    Each day, somewhere between 5-270 tonnes of meteoric material ablates in Earth's upper atmosphere. Thisenormous range is significant because the Interplanetary Dust Particle (IDP) input has implications in ourunderstanding of meteor transport in the atmosphere, the formation of layers of metal atoms and ions,nucleation of noctilucent clouds, effects on stratospheric aerosols and O3 chemistry, and dust evolution inour solar system. As the dust ablates, it produces light, as well as a plasma trail of ionized atmosphericatoms and electrons. These meteor signatures are detected by photographic means, or by radar, but thereremain uncertainties in the luminous efficiency and ionization coefficient of meteors - two parameters thatare essential to evaluate densities, masses, height distributions and fluxes. Precise measurements of theseparameters would allow for not only an understanding of the layers of metal atoms and ions and meteoricsmoke particles in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere, but also would allow for the Earth's atmosphereto be used as a dust detector to detect and characterize the dust environment in our solar system. This work discusses the preliminary results of the new dust ablation facility at the 3 MV hypervelocity dust accelerator at the Institute for Modeling Plasma, Atmospheres and Cosmic Dust (IMPACT) at the University of Colorado, which aims to characterize the ionization coefficient and luminous efficiency of ablating micrometeroids.

  4. Combining Electrolysis and Electroporation for Tissue Ablation.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Mary; Rubinsky, Liel; Meir, Arie; Raju, Narayan; Rubinsky, Boris

    2015-08-01

    Electrolytic ablation is a method that operates by delivering low magnitude direct current to the target region over long periods of time, generating electrolytic products that destroy cells. This study was designed to explore the hypothesis stating that electrolytic ablation can be made more effective when the electrolysis-producing electric charges are delivered using electric pulses with field strength typical in reversible electroporation protocols. (For brevity we will refer to tissue ablation protocols that combine electroporation and electrolysis as E(2).) The mechanistic explanation of this hypothesis is related to the idea that products of electrolysis generated by E(2) protocols can gain access to the interior of the cell through the electroporation permeabilized cell membrane and therefore cause more effective cell death than from the exterior of an intact cell. The goal of this study is to provide a first-order examination of this hypothesis by comparing the charge dosage required to cause a comparable level of damage to a rat liver, in vivo, when using either conventional electrolysis or E(2) approaches. Our results show that E(2) protocols produce tissue damage that is consistent with electrolytic ablation. Furthermore, E(2) protocols cause damage comparable to that produced by conventional electrolytic protocols while delivering orders of magnitude less charge to the target tissue over much shorter periods of time.

  5. Atmospheric Profile Imprint in Firewall Ablation Coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ceplecha, Z.; Pecina, P.

    1984-01-01

    A general formula which expresses the distance along the meteoric fireball trajectory 1 as a function of t is discussed. Differential equations which include the motion and ablation of a single nonfragmenting meteor body are presented. The importance of the atmospheric density profile in the meteor formula is emphasized.

  6. Effect of Substrate Modification in Catheter Ablation of Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Gi-Byoung; Jin, Eun-Sun; Choi, HyungOh; Song, Hae-Geun; Kim, Sung-Hwan; Kim, Ki-Hun; Hwang, Eui-Seock; Park, Kyoung-Min; Kim, Jun; Rhee, Kyoung-Suk; Choi, Kee-Joon; Kim, You-Ho

    2012-01-01

    Catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation that targets complex fractionated electrogram sites has been widely applied in the management of persistent atrial fibrillation. The clinical outcomes of pulmonary vein isolation alone and pulmonary vein isolation plus the use of complex fractionated electrogram-guided ablation (CFEA) have not been fully compared in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. This prospective study included 70 patients with symptomatic paroxysmal atrial fibrillation that remained inducible after pulmonary vein isolation. For radio-frequency catheter ablation, patients were nonrandomly assigned to a control group (pulmonary vein isolation alone, Group 1, n=35) or a CFEA group (pulmonary vein isolation plus additional CFEA, Group 2, n=35). The times to first recurrence of atrial tachyarrhythmias were compared between the 2 groups. In Group 2, CFEA rendered atrial fibrillation noninducible in 16 patients (45.7%) and converted inducible atrial fibrillation into inducible atrial flutters in 12 patients (34.3%). Atrial fibrillation remained inducible in 7 patients (20%) after the combined ablation procedures. After a mean follow-up of 23 months, freedom from recurrence of atrial tachyarrhythmias was significantly higher in Group 2 than in Group 1 (P=0.037). In Group 1, all of the recurrent tachyarrhythmias were atrial fibrillation, whereas regular tachycardia was the major mechanism of recurrent arrhythmias in Group 2 (atrial tachycardia or atrial flutter in 5 of 6 patients and atrial fibrillation in 1 patient). We found that CFEA after pulmonary vein isolation significantly reduced recurrent atrial tachyarrhythmia and might modify the pattern of arrhythmia recurrence in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. PMID:22719147

  7. Microwave tumors ablation: principles, clinical applications and review of preliminary experiences.

    PubMed

    Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Laganà, Domenico; Mangini, Monica; Fontana, Federico; Dionigi, Gianlorenzo; Boni, Luigi; Rovera, Francesca; Cuffari, Salvatore; Fugazzola, Carlo

    2008-01-01

    Local ablative techniques have been developed to enable local control of unresectable tumors. Ablation has been performed with several modalities including ethanol ablation, laser ablation, cryoablation, and radiofrequency ablation. Microwave technology is a new thermal ablation technique for different types of tumors, providing all the benefits of radiofrequency and substantial advantages. Microwave ablation has been applied to liver, lung, kidney and more rarely to bone, pancreas and adrenal glands. Preliminary works show that microwave ablation may be a viable alternative to other ablation techniques in selected patients. However further studies are necessary to confirm short- and long-term effectiveness of the methods and to compare it with other ablative techniques, especially RF.

  8. Thermochemical Ablation Analysis of the Orion Heatshield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sixel, William

    2015-01-01

    The Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle will one day carry astronauts to the Moon and beyond, and Orion's heatshield is a critical component in ensuring their safe return to Earth. The Orion heatshield is the structural component responsible for absorbing the intense heating environment caused by re-entry to Earth's atmosphere. The heatshield is primarily composed of Avcoat, an ablative material that is consumed during the re-entry process. Ablation is primarily characterized by two processes: pyrolysis and recession. The decomposition of in-depth virgin material is known as pyrolysis. Recession occurs when the exposed surface of the heatshield reacts with the surrounding flow. The Orion heatshield design was changed from an individually filled Avcoat honeycomb to a molded block Avcoat design. The molded block Avcoat heatshield relies on an adhesive bond to keep it attached to the capsule. In some locations on the heatshield, the integrity of the adhesive bond cannot be verified. For these locations, a mechanical retention device was proposed. Avcoat ablation was modelled in CHAR and the in-depth virgin material temperatures were used in a Thermal Desktop model of the mechanical retention device. The retention device was analyzed and shown to cause a large increase in the maximum bondline temperature. In order to study the impact of individual ablation modelling parameters on the heatshield sizing process, a Monte Carlo simulation of the sizing process was proposed. The simulation will give the sensitivity of the ablation model to each of its input parameters. As part of the Monte Carlo simulation, statistical uncertainties on material properties were required for Avcoat. Several properties were difficult to acquire uncertainties for: the pyrolysis gas enthalpy, non-dimensional mass loss rate (B´c), and Arrhenius equation parameters. Variability in the elemental composition of Avcoat was used as the basis for determining the statistical uncertainty in pyrolysis gas

  9. Fascicular ventricular tachycardia: experience with radiofrequency ablation.

    PubMed

    Magalhaes, Sónia; Gonçalves, Helena; Primo, João; Sá, Ana Paula; Silva, Paula; Rosas, Rui; Gama, Vasco

    2006-05-01

    Fascicular ventricular tachycardia (VT), the commonest form of idiopathic left VT, occurs more frequently in young males without structural heart disease and usually presents as paroxysmal palpitations. It is subdivided into two more common subtypes, posterior and anterior. A macro-reentrant circuit involving a considerable and variable extent of the left interventricular septum is presumed to be the underlying arrhythmogenic mechanism. A slow conduction zone with particular sensitivity to verapamil participates in the circuit and it seems that diastolic potentials (DP) represent the electrical activity in or near this zone. The fascicles of the left bundle appear to constitute part of the retrograde pathway and Purkinje potentials (PP) are assumed to represent their activation. In the present retrospective study, the authors review twelve cases of fascicular VT (ten posterior and two anterior) evaluated in the electrophysiology laboratory. Although initial induction was obtained in all patients, reproducibility was poor as a consequence of frequent contact inhibition during endocardial mapping of the left ventricle and this meant that ablation was not possible in two cases. Two cases of associated atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia (AVNRT) and a case of associated atrioventricular reentrant tachycardia by a right posterior accessory pathway were documented, which suggest a correlated anatomic substrate. After ablation of the slow nodal pathway in one of the AVNRTs, fascicular VT was no longer inducible. Ablation of the fascicular VT was attempted in nine patients, at the tachycardia exit site (characterized by an early ventricular electrogram fused with a Purkinje potential) in two patients with anterior fascicular VT and in five patients with the posterior subtype, and near the slow conduction pathway (site with simultaneous recording of DP and PP) in the other two patients. The initial success rate with a single procedure was 78%, two of the ablations

  10. A study of particle generation during laser ablation with applications

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chunyi

    2005-01-01

    A study has been made of the generation of particles during laser ablation and has included size distribution measurements and observation of the formation processes. The particle size distribution with respect to different laser parameters was obtained in-line using a differential mobility analyzer (DMA) and a particle counter. The experimental results show that the particle size varies with laser energy, laser pulsewidth, ambient gas flow rate and sample properties. The results serve as a basis for controlling the size of nanoparticles generated by laser ablation. Laser shadowgraph imaging was used to study mass ejection processes and mechanisms. At higher laser irradiance, some particles were ejected in the liquid and even in the solid phase. Time-resolved images show the propagation of the shockwaves: external shockwaves propagate outward and decelerate, and internal shockwaves reflect back and forth between the gas contact surface and the sample surface. The internal shockwave is proposed to cause the ejection of liquid particles when the internal shockwave strikes the liquid molten layer. A simulation based on vapor plume expansion was carried out and provides satisfactory agreement with experimental results. Different material properties result in different particle ejection behavior:particle ejection for most materials including metals result in a conically shaped envelope for the ejected material while ejection for silicon resembles a liquid jet. The difference in density change when the materials melt was proposed to be an important factor in the different ejection behavior. The characteristics of particles generated by laser ablation have a strong influence on the chemical analysis of the irradiated sample. Large particles are more difficult to completely vaporize and ionize, and induced preferential vaporization causes fractionation (i.e. a detected chemical composition that differs from the sample material). Large particles also result in spikes in

  11. Aluminum X-ray mass-ablation rate measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Kline, John L.; Hager, Jonathan D.

    2016-10-15

    Measurements of the mass ablation rate of aluminum (Al) have been completed at the Omega Laser Facility. Measurements of the mass-ablation rate show Al is higher than plastic (CH), comparable to high density carbon (HDC), and lower than beryllium. The mass-ablation rate is consistent with predictions using a 1D Lagrangian code, Helios. Lastly, the results suggest Al capsules have a reasonable ablation pressure even with a higher albedo than beryllium or carbon ablators warranting further investigation into the viability of Al capsules for ignition should be pursued.

  12. Plume collimation for laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A.

    2016-06-07

    In various embodiments, a device may generally comprise a capillary having a first end and a second end; a laser to emit energy at a sample in the capillary to ablate the sample and generate an ablation plume in the capillary; an electrospray apparatus to generate an electrospray plume to intercept the ablation plume to produce ions; and a mass spectrometer having an ion transfer inlet to capture the ions. The ablation plume may comprise a collimated ablation plume. The device may comprise a flow cytometer. Methods of making and using the same are also described.

  13. Plume collimation for laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A.

    2014-09-09

    In various embodiments, a device may generally comprise a capillary having a first end and a second end; a laser to emit energy at a sample in the capillary to ablate the sample and generate an ablation plume in the capillary; an electrospray apparatus to generate an electrospray plume to intercept the ablation plume to produce ions; and a mass spectrometer having an ion transfer inlet to capture the ions. The ablation plume may comprise a collimated ablation plume. The device may comprise a flow cytometer. Methods of making and using the same are also described.

  14. Contemporary Status of Percutaneous Ablation for the Small Renal Mass.

    PubMed

    Shin, Benjamin J; Chick, Jeffrey Forris Beecham; Stavropoulos, S William

    2016-03-01

    Renal cell carcinoma is the tenth most common malignancy in the USA, with upwards of 61,000 new cases and resulting in more than 14,000 deaths annually. Although partial nephrectomy remains the standard treatment, image-guided nephron-sparing ablative techniques including cryoablation, radiofrequency ablation, and microwave ablation have emerged as treatment options in certain patient populations. Ablative therapies have high technical successes, low tumor recurrence rates, and preserve renal parenchymal volume. The purpose of this article is to provide an update on ablation therapies for small renal masses.

  15. Burn, freeze, or photo-ablate?: comparative symptom profile in Barrett's dysplasia patients undergoing endoscopic ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Kanwar Rupinder S.; Gross, Seth A.; Greenwald, Bruce D.; Hemminger, Lois L.; Wolfsen, Herbert C.

    2009-06-01

    Background: There are few data available comparing endoscopic ablation methods for Barrett's esophagus with high-grade dysplasia (BE-HGD). Objective: To determine differences in symptoms and complications associated with endoscopic ablation. Design: Prospective observational study. Setting: Two tertiary care centers in USA. Patients: Consecutive patients with BE-HGD Interventions: In this pilot study, symptoms profile data were collected for BE-HGD patients among 3 endoscopic ablation methods: porfimer sodium photodynamic therapy, radiofrequency ablation and low-pressure liquid nitrogen spray cryotherapy. Main Outcome Measurements: Symptom profiles and complications from the procedures were assessed 1-8 weeks after treatment. Results: Ten BE-HGD patients were treated with each ablation modality (30 patients total; 25 men, median age: 69 years (range 53-81). All procedures were performed in the clinic setting and none required subsequent hospitalization. The most common symptoms among all therapies were chest pain, dysphagia and odynophagia. More patients (n=8) in the porfimer sodium photodynamic therapy group reported weight loss compared to radio-frequency ablactation (n=2) and cryotherapy (n=0). Four patients in the porfimer sodium photodynamic therapy group developed phototoxicity requiring medical treatment. Strictures, each requiring a single dilation, were found in radiofrequency ablactation (n=1) and porfimer sodium photodynamic therapy (n=2) patients. Limitations: Small sample size, non-randomized study. Conclusions: These three endoscopic therapies are associated with different types and severity of post-ablation symptoms and complications.

  16. FRACTIONAL PEARSON DIFFUSIONS.

    PubMed

    Leonenko, Nikolai N; Meerschaert, Mark M; Sikorskii, Alla

    2013-07-15

    Pearson diffusions are governed by diffusion equations with polynomial coefficients. Fractional Pearson diffusions are governed by the corresponding time-fractional diffusion equation. They are useful for modeling sub-diffusive phenomena, caused by particle sticking and trapping. This paper provides explicit strong solutions for fractional Pearson diffusions, using spectral methods. It also presents stochastic solutions, using a non-Markovian inverse stable time change.

  17. FRACTIONAL PEARSON DIFFUSIONS

    PubMed Central

    Leonenko, Nikolai N.; Meerschaert, Mark M.

    2013-01-01

    Pearson diffusions are governed by diffusion equations with polynomial coefficients. Fractional Pearson diffusions are governed by the corresponding time-fractional diffusion equation. They are useful for modeling sub-diffusive phenomena, caused by particle sticking and trapping. This paper provides explicit strong solutions for fractional Pearson diffusions, using spectral methods. It also presents stochastic solutions, using a non-Markovian inverse stable time change. PMID:23626377

  18. Direct Pulmonary Vein Ablation with Stenosis Prevention Therapy

    PubMed Central

    DeSimone, Christopher V.; Holmes, David R.; Ebrille, Elisa; Syed, Faisal F.; Ladewig, Dorothy J.; Mikell, Susan B.; Powers, Joanne; Suddendorf, Scott H.; Gilles, Emily J.; Danielsen, Andrew J.; Hodge, David O.; Kapa, Suraj; Asirvatham, Samuel J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The dominant location of electrical triggers for initiating atrial fibrillation (AF) originates from the muscle sleeves inside pulmonary veins (PVs). Currently, radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is performed outside of the PVs to isolate, rather than directly ablate these tissues, due to the risk of intraluminal PV stenosis. Methods In 4 chronic canine experiments, we performed direct PV muscle sleeve RFA ± post-ablation drug-coated balloon (DCB) treatment with paclitaxel/everolimus. Of the 4 PVs, 2 PVs were ablated and treated with DCB, 1 PV was ablated without DCB treatment (positive control), and 1 PV was left as a negative control. Local electrograms were assessed in PVs for near-field signals and were targeted for ablation. After 12-14 weeks survival, PVs were interrogated for absence of near-field PV potentials, and each PV was assessed for stenosis. Results All canines survived the study period without cardiorespiratory complications, and remained ambulatory. In all canines, PVs that were ablated and treated with DCB remained without any significant intraluminal stenosis. In contrast, PVs that were ablated and not treated with DCB showed near or complete intraluminal stenosis. At terminal study, PV potentials remained undetectable. A blinded, histologic analysis demonstrated that ablated PVs without DCB treatment had extensive thrombus, fibrin, mineralization, and elastin disruption. Conclusion Our chronic canine data suggest that direct PV tissue ablation without subsequent stenosis is feasible with the use of post-ablation DCBs. PMID:26075706

  19. Electromagnetic measurement and modeling techniques for microwave ablation probes.

    PubMed

    Brannan, Joseph D

    2009-01-01

    Broadband scattering parameter measurement of a commercially available microwave ablation probe over the course of a 10 minute 45 Watt ablation cycle within ex-vivo bovine liver tissue is performed. Measurement results are compared to finite difference time domain simulation of the probe in non-ablated and fully ablated tissue geometries. Measurement and simulation results agree well from 0-3 GHz demonstrating the accuracy of a multi-compartmental ablation geometry modeling technique. The electromagnetic modeling technique presented in this paper introduces a useful design tool for optimizing microwave ablation probes without the need for multi-physics simulation packages. The relevance of tissue complex permittivity change with temperature to microwave ablation probe performance is discussed.

  20. Current status of thermal ablation treatments for lung malignancies.

    PubMed

    Dupuy, Damian E; Shulman, Maria

    2010-09-01

    About 75% of lung cancer patients are not surgical candidates, either due to advanced disease or medical comorbidities. Furthermore, conventional treatments that can be offered to these patients are beneficial only to a small percentage of them. Thermal ablation is a minimally invasive treatment that is commonly used in this group of patients, and which has shown promising results. Currently, the most widely used ablation techniques in the treatment of lung malignancies are radiofrequency ablation (RFA), microwave ablation, and cryoablation. Although the most studied technique is RFA, recent studies with microwave ablation and cryoablation have shown some advantages over RFA. This article reviews the application of thermal ablation in the thorax, including patient selection, basic aspects of procedure technique, imaging follow-up, treatment outcomes, and comparison of ablation techniques.

  1. Fractional radiofrequency combined with sonophoresis to facilitate skin penetration of 5-aminolevulinic acid.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong Min; Jeong, Ki-Heon; Bae, Myong Il; Lee, Sang-Jun; Kim, Nack-In; Shin, Min Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Ablative fractional technology has been used to improve transdermal drug delivery. However, there have been few previous in vivo investigations of the relative potency and methodology of fractional radiofrequency (RF) combined with sonophoresis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of fractional RF combined with sonophoresis on 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) penetration of the skin. Three male domestic swine were used. The skin of the pigs was exposed to fractional RF and/or sonophoresis, followed by topical ALA application. Fluorescence intensity (FI) of porphyrin fluorescence was measured. In both the epidermis and the dermis, FI increased after fractional RF and increased additionally with the addition of sonophoresis. Fractional RF with sonophoresis effectively enhanced ALA skin penetration. Pre-fractional RF followed by posttreatment with sonophoresis can be used for ALA-photodynamic therapy to achieve higher ALA uptake.

  2. Can Kindergartners Do Fractions?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cwikla, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Mathematics professor Julie Cwikla decided that she needed to investigate young children's understandings and see what precurricular partitioning notions young minds bring to the fraction table. Cwikla realized that only a handful of studies have examined how preschool-age and early elementary school-age students solve fraction problems (Empson…

  3. An Appetite for Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkerson, Trena L.; Bryan, Tommy; Curry, Jane

    2012-01-01

    This article describes how using candy bars as models gives sixth-grade students a taste for learning to represent fractions whose denominators are factors of twelve. Using paper models of the candy bars, students explored and compared fractions. They noticed fewer different representations for one-third than for one-half. The authors conclude…

  4. On fractional programming

    SciTech Connect

    Bajona-Xandri, C.; Martinez-Legaz, J.E.

    1994-12-31

    This paper studies the minimax fractional programming problem, assuming quasiconvexity of the objective function, under the lower subdifferentiability viewpoint. Necessary and sufficient optimality conditions and dual properties are found. We present applications of this theory to find the Pareto efficient solutions of a multiobjective fractional problem and to solve several economic models.

  5. (Carbon isotope fractionation inplants)

    SciTech Connect

    O'Leary, M.H.

    1990-01-01

    The objectives of this research are: To develop a theoretical and experimental framework for understanding isotope fractionations in plants; and to develop methods for using this isotope fractionation for understanding the dynamics of CO{sub 2} fixation in plants. Progress is described.

  6. Comparison of the fractional CO2 laser and the combined use of a pulsed dye laser with fractional CO2 laser in striae alba treatment

    PubMed Central

    Naeini, Farahnaz Fatemi; Nikyar, Zahra; Mokhtari, Fateme; Bahrami, Ahmadreza

    2014-01-01

    Background: No ideal treatment has been established for Striae distensae (SD), particularly in the late phase (Striae Alba (SA)). Various types of lasers have been recently proposed as treatment options for SD. This study aims to compare the clinical efficacy of a fractional CO2 laser as well as a combination of fractional CO2 laser and Pulsed dye Laser (PDL) in the treatment of SA. Materials and Methods: Eighty-eight SA lesions in three female patients were included. Lesions on each half of the body were randomly enrolled in each group. Group 1 (n = 44) were treated by Fractional CO2 laser resurfacing and group 2 (n = 44) by a combination of PDL and Fractional CO2 laser, alternately. Digital Photographs were taken and the surface area of each lesion was measured digitally (using the PictZar Digital Planimetry Software) at the baseline and four weeks after treatment. The clinical improvement was assessed by comparison of the pre- and post-treatment photos and the participants’ views about their degree of improvement, using a 10-point verbal analog scale (VAS). Results: The mean surface area decreased significantly in both groups after treatment. The mean difference between the pre- and post-treatment surface area was 0.62 ± 053 for group 2 and 0.41 ± 0.43 for group 1 (P-value = 0.03). Mean VAS and dermatologist assessed improvement scale in group 2 (6.68 ± 0.77 and 2.2 ± 0.76 respectively) were significantly higher than those in group 1 (5.45 ± 0.90 and 1.8±0.72 respectively, P-value <0.001 and 0.04 respectively). Conclusion: The combination of PDL and fractional CO2 laser was more effective than fractional CO2 laser alone and could be suggested as a clinical option in the treatment of SA. PMID:25250298

  7. Radiative ablation of disks around massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kee, Nathaniel Dylan

    Hot, massive stars (spectral types O and B) have extreme luminosities (10. 4 -10. 6 L?) that drive strong stellar winds through UV line-scattering.Some massive stars also have disks, formed by either decretion from the star (as in the rapidly rotating "Classical Be stars"), or accretion during the star's formation. This dissertation examines the role of stellar radiation in driving (ablating) material away from these circumstellar disks. A key result is that the observed month to year decay of Classical Be disks can be explained by line-driven ablation without, as previously done, appealing to anomalously strong viscous diffusion. Moreover, the higher luminosity of O stars leads to ablation of optically thin disks on dynamical timescales of order a day, providing a natural explanation for the lack of observed Oe stars. In addition to the destruction of Be disks, this dissertation also introduces a model for their formation by coupling observationally inferred non-radial pulsation modes and rapid stellar rotation to launch material into orbiting Keplerian disks of Be-like densities. In contrast to such Be decretion disks, star-forming accretion disks are much denser and so are generally optically thick to continuum processes. To circumvent the computational challenges associated with radiation hydrodynamics through optically thick media, we develop an approximate method for treating continuum absorption in the limit of geometrically thin disks. The comparison of ablation with and without continuum absorption shows that accounting for disk optical thickness leads to less than a 50% reduction in ablation rate, implying that ablation rate depends mainly on stellar properties like luminosity. Finally, we discuss the role of "thin-shell mixing" in reducing X-rays from colliding wind binaries. Laminar, adiabatic shocks produce well understood X-ray emission, but the emission from radiatively cooled shocks is more complex due to thin-shell instabilities. The parameter

  8. Temperature profiles of 980- and 1,470-nm endovenous laser ablation, endovenous radiofrequency ablation and endovenous steam ablation.

    PubMed

    Malskat, W S J; Stokbroekx, M A L; van der Geld, C W M; Nijsten, T E C; van den Bos, R R

    2014-03-01

    Endovenous thermal ablation (EVTA) techniques are very effective for the treatment of varicose veins, but their exact working mechanism is still not well documented. The lack of knowledge of mechanistic properties has led to a variety of EVTA protocols and a commercially driven dissemination of new or modified techniques without robust scientific evidence. The aim of this study is to compare temperature profiles of 980-and 1,470-nm endovenous laser ablation (EVLA), segmental radiofrequency ablation (RFA), and endovenous steam ablation (EVSA). In an experimental setting, temperature measurements were performed using thermocouples; raw potato was used to mimic a vein wall. Two laser wavelengths (980 and 1,470 nm) were used with tulip-tip fibers and 1,470 nm also with a radial-emitting fiber. Different powers and pullback speeds were used to achieve fluences of 30, 60, and 90 J/cm. For segmental RFA, 1 cycle of 20 s was analyzed. EVSA was performed with two and three pulses of steam per centimeter. Maximum temperature increase, time span of relevant temperature increase, and area under the curve of the time of relevant temperature increase were measured. In all EVLA settings, temperatures increased and decreased rapidly. High fluence is associated with significantly higher temperatures and increased time span of temperature rise. Temperature profiles of 980- and 1,470-nm EVLA with tulip-tip fibers did not differ significantly. Radial EVLA showed significantly higher maximum temperatures than tulip-tip EVLA. EVSA resulted in mild peak temperatures for longer durations than EVLA. Maximum temperatures with three pulses per centimeter were significantly higher than with two pulses. RFA temperature rises were relatively mild, resulting in a plateau-shaped temperature profile, similar to EVSA. Temperature increase during EVLA is fast with a high-peak temperature for a short time, where EVSA and RFA have longer plateau phases and lower maximum temperatures.

  9. Fractional dissipative standard map.

    PubMed

    Tarasov, Vasily E; Edelman, M

    2010-06-01

    Using kicked differential equations of motion with derivatives of noninteger orders, we obtain generalizations of the dissipative standard map. The main property of these generalized maps, which are called fractional maps, is long-term memory. The memory effect in the fractional maps means that their present state of evolution depends on all past states with special forms of weights. Already a small deviation of the order of derivative from the integer value corresponding to the regular dissipative standard map (small memory effects) leads to the qualitatively new behavior of the corresponding attractors. The fractional dissipative standard maps are used to demonstrate a new type of fractional attractors in the wide range of the fractional orders of derivatives.

  10. Global Modeling of Uranium Molecular Species Formation Using Laser-Ablated Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curreli, Davide; Finko, Mikhail; Azer, Magdi; Armstrong, Mike; Crowhurst, Jonathan; Radousky, Harry; Rose, Timothy; Stavrou, Elissaios; Weisz, David; Zaug, Joseph

    2016-10-01

    Uranium is chemically fractionated from other refractory elements in post-detonation nuclear debris but the mechanism is poorly understood. Fractionation alters the chemistry of the nuclear debris so that it no longer reflects the chemistry of the source weapon. The conditions of a condensing fireball can be simulated by a low-temperature plasma formed by vaporizing a uranium sample via laser heating. We have developed a global plasma kinetic model in order to model the chemical evolution of U/UOx species within an ablated plasma plume. The model allows to track the time evolution of the density and energy of an uranium plasma plume moving through an oxygen atmosphere of given fugacity, as well as other relevant quantities such as average electron and gas temperature. Comparison of model predictions with absorption spectroscopy of uranium-ablated plasmas provide preliminary insights on the key chemical species and evolution pathways involved during the fractionation process. This project was sponsored by the DoD, Defense Threat Reduction Agency, Grant HDTRA1-16-1-0020. This work was performed in part under the auspices of the U.S. DoE by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  11. Ablation of steel using picosecond laser pulses in burst mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lickschat, Peter; Demba, Alexander; Weissmantel, Steffen

    2017-02-01

    Results obtained in picosecond laser processing of steel applying the burst mode are presented. Using the burst mode, pulse trains, i.e., bursts, consisting of a number of picosecond pulses with an inter-pulse delay of 12.5 ns and 10 ps pulse duration are applied for material processing. Small cavities with sizes in the range of the laser beam diameter made by single-burst ablation are compared to quadratic cavities of 0.5 × 0.5 mm² produced by multiburst ablation and simultaneous scanning of the laser beam across the steel sample surface. The ablated volume per pulse within the burst was calculated either from the ablated volume per burst or from the ablation depth of the quadratic cavities. With the second to fourth pulses in the bursts, a reduction of the ablated volume per pulse in comparison with the first pulse in the bursts (i.e., to the use of single pulses) was found for both single- and multiburst ablation, which is assumed to be due to plasma shielding. By contrast, the ablated volume per pulse within the bursts increases for the fifth to eighth pulses. Heat accumulation effect and the influence of the heated plasma can be assumed to be the reason for these higher ablation rates. SEM micrographs also show that there is a higher melt ejection out of the laser processed area. This is indicated by the formation of bulges about the ablated area.

  12. Automated planning of ablation targets in atrial fibrillation treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keustermans, Johannes; De Buck, Stijn; Heidbüchel, Hein; Suetens, Paul

    2011-03-01

    Catheter based radio-frequency ablation is used as an invasive treatment of atrial fibrillation. This procedure is often guided by the use of 3D anatomical models obtained from CT, MRI or rotational angiography. During the intervention the operator accurately guides the catheter to prespecified target ablation lines. The planning stage, however, can be time consuming and operator dependent which is suboptimal both from a cost and health perspective. Therefore, we present a novel statistical model-based algorithm for locating ablation targets from 3D rotational angiography images. Based on a training data set of 20 patients, consisting of 3D rotational angiography images with 30 manually indicated ablation points, a statistical local appearance and shape model is built. The local appearance model is based on local image descriptors to capture the intensity patterns around each ablation point. The local shape model is constructed by embedding the ablation points in an undirected graph and imposing that each ablation point only interacts with its neighbors. Identifying the ablation points on a new 3D rotational angiography image is performed by proposing a set of possible candidate locations for each ablation point, as such, converting the problem into a labeling problem. The algorithm is validated using a leave-one-out-approach on the training data set, by computing the distance between the ablation lines obtained by the algorithm and the manually identified ablation points. The distance error is equal to 3.8+/-2.9 mm. As ablation lesion size is around 5-7 mm, automated planning of ablation targets by the presented approach is sufficiently accurate.

  13. Printable Nanophotonic Devices via Holographic Laser Ablation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qiancheng; Yetisen, Ali K; Sabouri, Aydin; Yun, Seok Hyun; Butt, Haider

    2015-09-22

    Holography plays a significant role in applications such as data storage, light trapping, security, and biosensors. However, conventional fabrication methods remain time-consuming, costly, and complex, limiting the fabrication of holograms and their extensive use. Here, we demonstrate a single-pulse laser ablation technique to write parallel surface gratings and Fresnel zone plates. We utilized a 6 ns high-energy green laser pulse to form interference patterns to record a surface grating with 820 nm periodicity and asymmetric zone plate holograms on 4.5 nm gold-coated substrates. The holographic recording process was completed within seconds. The optical characteristics of the interference patterns have been computationally modeled, and well-ordered polychromatic diffraction was observed from the fabricated holograms. The zone plate showed a significant diffraction angle of 32° from the normal incident for the focal point. The nanosecond laser interference ablation for rapid hologram fabrication holds great potential in a vast range of optical devices.

  14. Radiofrequency thermal ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Allgaier, H P; Galandi, D; Zuber, I; Blum, H E

    2001-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the major malignancies worldwide. Due to advanced or decompensated liver cirrhosis, comorbidity and multicentricity of the tumor lesions, 70-80% of HCC patients are inoperable at the time of diagnosis. Radiofrequency thermal ablation (RFTA) is a new minimally invasive and sage technique for the nonsurgical treatment of HCCs. Similar to other ablation techniques, the treatment strategy depends on several factors, including the patient's clinical status, the stage of liver cirrhosis and of the HCC. RFTA can be performed percutaneously, laparoscopically or after laparotomy. Advanced RFTA equipment, refined techniques of modifying tumor tissue response to RFTA, and combined treatment strategies should lead to better response rates even in larger HCCs.

  15. 3D Multifunctional Ablative Thermal Protection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, Jay; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Wilkinson, Curt; Mercer, Ken

    2015-01-01

    NASA is developing the Orion spacecraft to carry astronauts farther into the solar system than ever before, with human exploration of Mars as its ultimate goal. One of the technologies required to enable this advanced, Apollo-shaped capsule is a 3-dimensional quartz fiber composite for the vehicle's compression pad. During its mission, the compression pad serves first as a structural component and later as an ablative heat shield, partially consumed on Earth re-entry. This presentation will summarize the development of a new 3D quartz cyanate ester composite material, 3-Dimensional Multifunctional Ablative Thermal Protection System (3D-MAT), designed to meet the mission requirements for the Orion compression pad. Manufacturing development, aerothermal (arc-jet) testing, structural performance, and the overall status of material development for the 2018 EM-1 flight test will be discussed.

  16. Wire ablation scaling in Z pinches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Edmund; Sinars, Daniel; Mehlhorn, Tom; Oliver, Bryan

    2004-11-01

    We investigate the physical processes involved in wire ablation in Z pinches, using a combination of simple 1D steady-state analytic theory (similar in approach to that described in [1]) and simulations of the Z pinch under constant current drive conditions (using the radiation-MHD code ALEGRA-MHD). Of particular interest is the dependence of mass ablation rate on wire mass and drive current. We benchmark our scaling trends against simulations of a recently conducted series of experiments on Sandia National Laboratories' Z accelerator (Albuquerque, NM), in which only the mass of the wire array was varied. [1] V.V. Aleksandrov et al., Plasma Phys. Reports 27, 89 (2001) *Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockhead Martin Company for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  17. Laser ablation of gall bladder stones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marafi, M.; Makdisi, Y.; Bhatia, K. S.; Abdulah, A. H.; Kokaj, Y.; Mathew, K.; Quinn, F.; Qabazard, A.

    1999-06-01

    Study of laser interaction with calculi is presented. A system of Nd-Yag and Ho-Yag pulsed lasers were used to produce fluorescence and plasma signals at the stone surface surrounded by saline and bile fluids. Fourth harmonic from Nd-Yag laser was transmitted to the samples by graded UV optical fibres. Gall bladder stones of various compositions were subjected to the high power Ho-Yag laser. Temporal transients and spectral evolution of plasma and fluorescence signals were monitored by a streak camera. A profile of acoustic pressures generated by shock waves was recorded with sensitive hydrophones placed in the surrounding fluids. Ablation threshold, cavitation process and fluorescence dependence on the laser parameters were studied in detail. Potential of stone identification by fluorescence and possible hydrodynamic model for ablation of biological samples is discussed.

  18. Nozzle designs with pitch precursor ablatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blevins, H. R.; Bedard, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    Recent developments in carbon phenolic ablatives for solid rocket motor nozzles have yielded a pitch precursor carbon fiber offering significant raw material availability and cost saving advantages as compared to conventional rayon precursor material. This paper discusses the results of an experimental program conducted to assess the thermal performance and characterize the thermal properties of pitch precursor carbon phenolic ablatives. The end result of this program is the complete thermal characterization of pitch fabric, pitch mat, hybrid pitch/rayon fabric and pitch mat molding compound. With these properties determined an analytic capability now exists for predicting the thermal performance of these materials in rocket nozzle liner applications. Further planned efforts to verify material performance and analytical prediction procedures through actual rocket motor firings are also discussed.

  19. Ablation of neoplasia by direct current.

    PubMed

    Taylor, T V; Engler, P; Pullan, B R; Holt, S

    1994-08-01

    The application of low-voltage direct electrical current (DEC) has been studied in animals and humans for the ablation of anal condylomata, oesophageal cancer and Kaposi's sarcoma. Twenty milliamps of DEC passed through multiple 6 cm x 1 cm, flat-plate longitudinal electrodes into the squamous mucosa of the oesophagus of healthy dogs for periods ranging from 10 min to 2 h resulted in denudation and necrosis of the oesophageal mucosa at the site of application of the current. In humans, the application of DEC to two patients with benign anal condyloma acuminata, three patients with inoperable obstructing oesophageal cancer and one patient with disseminated Kaposi sarcoma resulted in striking necrosis of tumour tissue that was confirmed by macroscopic and microscopic studies. These initial findings imply promising therapeutic potential for the use of DEC as a simple, effective, safe, low-cost alternative for ablation of neoplasia.

  20. Palliative Radiofrequency Ablation for Recurrent Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jindal, Gaurav; Friedman, Marc; Locklin, Julia Wood, Bradford J.

    2006-06-15

    Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive local therapy for cancer. Its efficacy is now becoming well documented in many different organs, including liver, kidney, and lung. The goal of RFA is typically complete eradication of a tumor in lieu of an invasive surgical procedure. However, RFA can also play an important role in the palliative care of cancer patients. Tumors which are surgically unresectable and incompatible for complete ablation present the opportunity for RFA to be used in a new paradigm. Cancer pain runs the gamut from minor discomfort relieved with mild pain medication to unrelenting suffering for the patient, poorly controlled by conventional means. RFA is a tool which can potentially palliate intractable cancer pain. We present here a case in which RFA provided pain relief in a patient with metastatic prostate cancer with pain uncontrolled by conventional methods.

  1. Particle analysis using laser ablation mass spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Parker, Eric P.; Rosenthal, Stephen E.; Trahan, Michael W.; Wagner, John S.

    2003-09-09

    The present invention provides a method of quickly identifying bioaerosols by class, even if the subject bioaerosol has not been previously encountered. The method begins by collecting laser ablation mass spectra from known particles. The spectra are correlated with the known particles, including the species of particle and the classification (e.g., bacteria). The spectra can then be used to train a neural network, for example using genetic algorithm-based training, to recognize each spectra and to recognize characteristics of the classifications. The spectra can also be used in a multivariate patch algorithm. Laser ablation mass specta from unknown particles can be presented as inputs to the trained neural net for identification as to classification. The description below first describes suitable intelligent algorithms and multivariate patch algorithms, then presents an example of the present invention including results.

  2. [Atrial fibrillation ablation: application of nurse methodology].

    PubMed

    Ramos-González-Serna, Amelia; Mateos-García, M Dolores

    2011-01-01

    Ablation of pulmonary veins for treatment of atrial fibrillation involves applying radiofrequency energy wave by a catheter that causes a circumferential lesion to achieve electrical isolation and voltage drop in the interior. It is mainly applied when there is resistance to treatment and recurrence of symptoms affecting the quality of life of patients. The nurse is an important part of the multidisciplinary team who care for patients who undergo this procedure. The provision of comprehensive nursing care should include nursing procedures prior to, during, and after treatment to ensure the careful and systematic quality required. The aims of this article are: to provide specialised knowledge on the procedure of atrial fibrillation ablation, to describe the preparation of the electrophysiology laboratory, analyse nursing care and develop a standardized care plan for patients on whom this procedure is performed using the NANDA (North American Nursing Association) taxonomy and NIC (Nursing Intervention Classification).

  3. Monopole antennas for microwave catheter ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Labonte, S.; Blais, A.; Legault, S.R.; Ali, H.O.; Roy, L.

    1996-10-01

    The authors study the characteristics of various monopole antennas for microwave catheter ablation of the endocardium. The investigation is done with a computer model based on the finite-element method in the frequency domain. Three monopole geometries are considered: open-tip, dielectric-tip, and metal-tip. Calculations are made for the magnetic field, the reflection coefficient and the power deposition pattern of the antennas immersed in normal saline. The theoretical results are compared with measurements performed on prototypes and good agreement is obtained. The antenna characteristics suggest that the metal-tip monopole best fulfills the requirements of catheter ablation. The computer model is then used to compare metal-tip monopoles of different dimensions and to determine design trade-offs.

  4. Pulmonary radiofrequency ablation (Part 1): current state.

    PubMed

    Plasencia Martínez, J M

    2015-01-01

    The risks involved in surgical treatment and conventional radiotherapy in patients with early lung cancer or lung metastases often make these treatments difficult to justify. However, on the other hand, it is also unacceptable to allow these lesions to evolve freely because, left untreated, these neoplasms will usually lead to the death of the patient. In recent years, alternative local therapies have been developed, such as pulmonary radiofrequency ablation, which has proven to increase survival with a minimal risk of complications. There are common recommendations for these treatments, and although the specific indications for using one technique or another have yet to be established, there are clearly defined situations that will determine the outcome of the treatment. It is important to know these situations, because appropriate patient selection is essential for therapeutic success. This article aims to describe the characteristics and constraints of pulmonary radiofrequency ablation and to outline its role in thoracic oncology in light of the current evidence.

  5. Ventricular Tachycardia Originating from Moderator Band: New Perspective on Catheter Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jin-yi; Jiang, Jing-bo; He, Yan; Luo, Jian-chun

    2017-01-01

    A 59-year-old woman was referred to the institution with burdens of idiopathic ventricular tachycardia (IVT). Electroanatomic mapping revealed a complex fractionated, high frequency potential with long duration preceding the QRS onset of the IVT. The real end point of ablation was the disappearance of the conduction block of Purkinje potential during the sinus rhythm besides the disappearance of the inducible tachycardia. Location of distal catheter was at the moderator band (MB) by transthoracic echocardiography (TTE). Only irrigated radiofrequency current was delivered at both insertions of the MB which can completely eliminate the IVT. PMID:28197345

  6. Ablation, flux, and atmospheric implications of meteors inferred from stratospheric aerosol.

    PubMed

    Cziczo, D J; Thomson, D S; Murphy, D M

    2001-03-02

    Single-particle analyses of stratospheric aerosol show that about half of the particles contain 0.5 to 1.0 weight percent meteoritic iron by mass, requiring a total extraterrestrial influx of 8 to 38 gigagrams per year. The sodium/iron ratio in these stratospheric particles is higher and the magnesium/iron and calcium/iron ratios are lower than in chondritic meteorites, implying that the fraction of material that is ablated must lie at the low end of previous estimates and that the extraterrestrial component that resides in the mesosphere and stratosphere is not of chondritic composition.

  7. Steady State Pyrolysis and Ablation Investigation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-31

    and cracking of pyrolysable materials), black box models are used, based on wind tunnel and plasma jet experiments. In particular, interactions between...outgassing species coming from the in-depth decomposition of the organic resin (in the case of pyrolysable materials), carbon species coming from...multiplicity of physical phenomena involved and their potential non-linearities. Pyrolyse and ablation are efficient processes for aerothermal heat

  8. A Review of Laser Ablation Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phipps, Claude; Bohn, Willy; Lippert, Thomas; Sasoh, Akihiro; Schall, Wolfgang; Sinko, John

    2010-10-01

    Laser Ablation Propulsion is a broad field with a wide range of applications. We review the 30-year history of laser ablation propulsion from the transition from earlier pure photon propulsion concepts of Oberth and Sänger through Kantrowitz's original laser ablation propulsion idea to the development of air-breathing "Lightcraft" and advanced spacecraft propulsion engines. The polymers POM and GAP have played an important rôle in experiments and liquid ablation fuels show great promise. Some applications use a laser system which is distant from the propelled object, for example, on another spacecraft, the Earth or a planet. Others use a laser that is part of the spacecraft propulsion system on the spacecraft. Propulsion is produced when an intense laser beam strikes a condensed matter surface and produces a vapor or plasma jet. The advantages of this idea are that exhaust velocity of the propulsion engine covers a broader range than is available from chemistry, that it can be varied to meet the instantaneous demands of the particular mission, and that practical realizations give lower mass and greater simplicity for a payload delivery system. We review the underlying theory, buttressed by extensive experimental data. The primary problem in laser space propulsion theory has been the absence of a way to predict thrust and specific impulse over the transition from the vapor to the plasma regimes. We briefly discuss a method for combining two new vapor regime treatments with plasma regime theory, giving a smooth transition from one regime to the other. We conclude with a section on future directions.

  9. Stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betti, R.; McCrory, R. L.; Verdon, C. P.

    1993-08-01

    The linear stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts is carried out for a semi-infinite uniform medium. For a laser accelerated target, it is shown that a properly selected modulation of the laser intensity can lead to the dynamic stabilization or growth-rate reduction of a large portion of the unstable spectrum. The theory is in qualitative agreement with the numerical results obtained by using the two-dimensional hydrodynamic code ORCHID.

  10. Stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Betti, R.; McCrory, R.L.; Verdon, C.P. )

    1993-11-08

    The linear stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts is carried out for a semi-infinite uniform medium. For a laser accelerated target, it is shown that a properly selected modulation of the laser intensity can lead to the dynamic stabilization or growth-rate reduction of a large portion of the unstable spectrum. The theory is in qualitative agreement with the numerical results obtained by using the two-dimensional hydrodynamic code ORCHID.

  11. Stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betti, R.; McCrory, R. L.; Verdon, C. P.

    1993-11-01

    The linear stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts is carried out for a semi-infinite uniform medium. For a laser accelerated target, it is shown that a properly selected modulation of the laser intensity can lead to the dynamic stabilization or growth-rate reduction of a large portion of the unstable spectrum. The theory is in qualitative agreement with the numerical results obtained by using the two-dimensional hydrodynamic code orchid.

  12. Stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Betti, R.; McCrory, R.L.; Verdon, C.P.

    1993-08-01

    The linear stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts, is carried out for a semi-infinite uniform medium. For a laser accelerated target, it is shown that a properly selected modulation of the laser intensity can lead to the dynamic stabilization or growth-rate reduction of a large portion of the unstable spectrum. The theory is in qualitative agreement with the numerical results obtained by using the two-dimensional hydrodynamic code ORCHID.

  13. A Review of Laser Ablation Propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Phipps, Claude; Bohn, Willy; Lippert, Thomas; Sasoh, Akihiro; Schall, Wolfgang; Sinko, John

    2010-10-08

    Laser Ablation Propulsion is a broad field with a wide range of applications. We review the 30-year history of laser ablation propulsion from the transition from earlier pure photon propulsion concepts of Oberth and Saenger through Kantrowitz's original laser ablation propulsion idea to the development of air-breathing 'Lightcraft' and advanced spacecraft propulsion engines. The polymers POM and GAP have played an important role in experiments and liquid ablation fuels show great promise. Some applications use a laser system which is distant from the propelled object, for example, on another spacecraft, the Earth or a planet. Others use a laser that is part of the spacecraft propulsion system on the spacecraft. Propulsion is produced when an intense laser beam strikes a condensed matter surface and produces a vapor or plasma jet. The advantages of this idea are that exhaust velocity of the propulsion engine covers a broader range than is available from chemistry, that it can be varied to meet the instantaneous demands of the particular mission, and that practical realizations give lower mass and greater simplicity for a payload delivery system. We review the underlying theory, buttressed by extensive experimental data. The primary problem in laser space propulsion theory has been the absence of a way to predict thrust and specific impulse over the transition from the vapor to the plasma regimes. We briefly discuss a method for combining two new vapor regime treatments with plasma regime theory, giving a smooth transition from one regime to the other. We conclude with a section on future directions.

  14. Liver tumor ablation: percutaneous and open approaches.

    PubMed

    Padma, Srikanth; Martinie, John B; Iannitti, David A

    2009-12-15

    The global incidence of liver cancer is greater than a million cases a year. Surgical resection where applicable is still the standard of care for these patients. Various liver-directed regional therapies have been developed in an effort to treat the vast majority of unresectable liver tumors. This article reviews the principles behind various ablation therapies currently available for malignant liver tumors and their outcomes.

  15. Anatomical Ablation Strategy for Noninducible Fascicular Tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Talib, Ahmed Karim; Nogami, Akihiko

    2016-03-01

    The presence of structural heart disease does not exclude fascicular ventricular tachycardia (VT), especially if the VT is verapamil sensitive. An empirical anatomic approach is effective when fascicular VT is noninducible or if diastolic Purkinje potential (P1) cannot be recorded during VT mapping. Pace mapping at the successful ablation site is usually not effective because selective pacing of P1 is difficult and there is an antidromic activation of the proximal P1 potential.

  16. Design Calculations For NIF Convergent Ablator Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, R E; Hicks, D G; Meezan, N B; Callahan, D A; Landen, O L; Jones, O S; Langer, S H; Kline, J L; Wilson, D C; Rinderknecht, H; Zylstra, A; Petrasso, R D

    2011-10-25

    The NIF convergent ablation tuning effort is underway. In the early experiments, we have discovered that the design code simulations over-predict the capsule implosion velocity and shock flash rhor, but under-predict the hohlraum x-ray flux measurements. The apparent inconsistency between the x-ray flux and radiography data implies that there are important unexplained aspects of the hohlraum and/or capsule behavior.

  17. Fractional calculus in bioengineering.

    PubMed

    Magin, Richard L

    2004-01-01

    Fractional calculus (integral and differential operations of noninteger order) is not often used to model biological systems. Although the basic mathematical ideas were developed long ago by the mathematicians Leibniz (1695), Liouville (1834), Riemann (1892), and others and brought to the attention of the engineering world by Oliver Heaviside in the 1890s, it was not until 1974 that the first book on the topic was published by Oldham and Spanier. Recent monographs and symposia proceedings have highlighted the application of fractional calculus in physics, continuum mechanics, signal processing, and electromagnetics, but with few examples of applications in bioengineering. This is surprising because the methods of fractional calculus, when defined as a Laplace or Fourier convolution product, are suitable for solving many problems in biomedical research. For example, early studies by Cole (1933) and Hodgkin (1946) of the electrical properties of nerve cell membranes and the propagation of electrical signals are well characterized by differential equations of fractional order. The solution involves a generalization of the exponential function to the Mittag-Leffler function, which provides a better fit to the observed cell membrane data. A parallel application of fractional derivatives to viscoelastic materials establishes, in a natural way, hereditary integrals and the power law (Nutting/Scott Blair) stress-strain relationship for modeling biomaterials. In this review, I will introduce the idea of fractional operations by following the original approach of Heaviside, demonstrate the basic operations of fractional calculus on well-behaved functions (step, ramp, pulse, sinusoid) of engineering interest, and give specific examples from electrochemistry, physics, bioengineering, and biophysics. The fractional derivative accurately describes natural phenomena that occur in such common engineering problems as heat transfer, electrode/electrolyte behavior, and sub

  18. Interactive Volumetry Of Liver Ablation Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egger, Jan; Busse, Harald; Brandmaier, Philipp; Seider, Daniel; Gawlitza, Matthias; Strocka, Steffen; Voglreiter, Philip; Dokter, Mark; Hofmann, Michael; Kainz, Bernhard; Hann, Alexander; Chen, Xiaojun; Alhonnoro, Tuomas; Pollari, Mika; Schmalstieg, Dieter; Moche, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive technique that destroys cancer cells by heat. The heat results from focusing energy in the radiofrequency spectrum through a needle. Amongst others, this can enable the treatment of patients who are not eligible for an open surgery. However, the possibility of recurrent liver cancer due to incomplete ablation of the tumor makes post-interventional monitoring via regular follow-up scans mandatory. These scans have to be carefully inspected for any conspicuousness. Within this study, the RF ablation zones from twelve post-interventional CT acquisitions have been segmented semi-automatically to support the visual inspection. An interactive, graph-based contouring approach, which prefers spherically shaped regions, has been applied. For the quantitative and qualitative analysis of the algorithm’s results, manual slice-by-slice segmentations produced by clinical experts have been used as the gold standard (which have also been compared among each other). As evaluation metric for the statistical validation, the Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) has been calculated. The results show that the proposed tool provides lesion segmentation with sufficient accuracy much faster than manual segmentation. The visual feedback and interactivity make the proposed tool well suitable for the clinical workflow.

  19. Calcified lesion modeling for excimer laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Holly A.; Archuleta, Andrew; Splinter, Robert

    2009-06-01

    Objective: Develop a representative calcium target model to evaluate penetration of calcified plaque lesions during atherectomy procedures using 308 nm Excimer laser ablation. Materials and Methods: An in-vitro model representing human calcified plaque was analyzed using Plaster-of-Paris and cement based composite materials as well as a fibrinogen model. The materials were tested for mechanical consistency. The most likely candidate(s) resulting from initial mechanical and chemical screening was submitted for ablation testing. The penetration rate of specific multi-fiber catheter designs and a single fiber probe was obtained and compared to that in human cadaver calcified plaque. The effects of lasing parameters and catheter tip design on penetration speed in a representative calcified model were verified against the results in human cadaver specimens. Results: In Plaster of Paris, the best penetration was obtained using the single fiber tip configuration operating at 100 Fluence, 120 Hz. Calcified human lesions are twice as hard, twice as elastic as and much more complex than Plaster of Paris. Penetration of human calcified specimens was highly inconsistent and varied significantly from specimen to specimen and within individual specimens. Conclusions: Although Plaster of Paris demonstrated predictable increases in penetration with higher energy density and repetition rate, it can not be considered a totally representative laser ablation model for calcified lesions. This is in part due to the more heterogeneous nature and higher density composition of cadaver intravascular human calcified occlusions. Further testing will require a more representative model of human calcified lesions.

  20. Interactive Volumetry Of Liver Ablation Zones

    PubMed Central

    Egger, Jan; Busse, Harald; Brandmaier, Philipp; Seider, Daniel; Gawlitza, Matthias; Strocka, Steffen; Voglreiter, Philip; Dokter, Mark; Hofmann, Michael; Kainz, Bernhard; Hann, Alexander; Chen, Xiaojun; Alhonnoro, Tuomas; Pollari, Mika; Schmalstieg, Dieter; Moche, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive technique that destroys cancer cells by heat. The heat results from focusing energy in the radiofrequency spectrum through a needle. Amongst others, this can enable the treatment of patients who are not eligible for an open surgery. However, the possibility of recurrent liver cancer due to incomplete ablation of the tumor makes post-interventional monitoring via regular follow-up scans mandatory. These scans have to be carefully inspected for any conspicuousness. Within this study, the RF ablation zones from twelve post-interventional CT acquisitions have been segmented semi-automatically to support the visual inspection. An interactive, graph-based contouring approach, which prefers spherically shaped regions, has been applied. For the quantitative and qualitative analysis of the algorithm’s results, manual slice-by-slice segmentations produced by clinical experts have been used as the gold standard (which have also been compared among each other). As evaluation metric for the statistical validation, the Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) has been calculated. The results show that the proposed tool provides lesion segmentation with sufficient accuracy much faster than manual segmentation. The visual feedback and interactivity make the proposed tool well suitable for the clinical workflow. PMID:26482818

  1. Transurethral radio frequency ablation of the prostate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabalin, John N.

    1996-05-01

    Since 1993, radiofrequency ablation of the prostate has been studied as a potential treatment for symptomatic bladder outlet obstruction due to benign prostatic hyperplasia. Two transurethral radiofrequency delivery systems have been developed to the point of undergoing initial human clinical trials. The TUNATM system involves focal interstitial radiofrequency energy application, while the TURAPYTM system involves a circumferential application of radiofrequency energy to the prostatic urethra via a simple delivery catheter. Experimental studies in animal models and human prostate tissue have demonstrated the nature of radiofrequency induced tissue heating and thermal injury. Observed thermal effects are relatively focused, with steep temperature gradients occurring over a few millimeters from the radiofrequency emission source. This allows precise and focused tissue treatment with little or no danger of injury to surrounding structures. Early human clinical experience in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia has demonstrated efficacy in the relief of voiding symptoms and safety and minimal morbidity associated with this technology. The existing operative approaches are relatively simple. Ongoing development of more versatile delivery systems for radiofrequency ablation of the prostate is expected. Results from larger clinical trials with longer term followup will eventually allow adequate assessment of the role of radiofrequency ablation in the surgical management of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

  2. Thermal Convection on an Ablating Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehmedagic, Igbal; Thangam, Siva

    2015-11-01

    Modeling and analysis of thermal convection of a metallic targets subject to radiative flux is of relevance to various manufacturing processes as well as for the development of protective shields. The present work involves the computational modeling of metallic targets subject to high heat fluxes that are both steady and pulsed. Modeling of the ablation and associated fluid dynamics when metallic surfaces are exposed to high intensity pulsed laser fluence at normal atmospheric conditions is considered. The incident energy from the laser is partly absorbed and partly reflected by the surface during ablation and subsequent vaporization of the convecting melt also participates in the radiative exchange. The energy distribution during the process between the bulk and vapor phase strongly depends on optical and thermodynamic properties of the irradiated material, radiation wavelength, and laser pulse intensity and duration. Computational findings based on effective representation and prediction of the heat transfer, melting and vaporization of the targeting material as well as plume formation and expansion are presented and discussed in the context of various ablation mechanisms, variable thermo-physical and optical properties, plume expansion and surface geometry. Funded in part by U. S. Army ARDEC, Picatinny Arsenal, NJ.

  3. Status of the Ablative Laser Propulsion Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herren, Kenneth A.; Lin, Jun; Cohen, Tinothy; Pakhomov, Andrew V.; Thompson, M. Shane

    2004-01-01

    We present a short review of our laser-propulsion research as well as some of the current results of the Ablative Laser Propulsion (ALP) studies currently underway at the University of Alabama in Huntsville. It has been shown that direct surface ablation of a solid material produces high specific impulse (Isp) at relatively high energy conversion efficiency (20 - 40%). We detail measurements of specific impulse, thrust and coupling coefficients for elemental target materials both with single and with double pulse laser shots. We also present measurements taken using three independent methods for determination of Isp. The three methods produce consistent values from ion time-of-flight technique, impulse measurements and imaging of the expansion front of plasma plume. We present a demonstration of our ALP lightcraft, a small free-flying micro-vehicle that is propelled by ablation. For ALP lightcraft we use a subscale thin shell of nickel replicated over a diamond turned mandrel that produces a highly polished self-focusing, truncated at the focus parabolic mirror. The mass of the lightcraft is 54 mg and it is driven by 100-ps wide, 35-mJ laser pulses at 532 nm wavelength. This is an ongoing research. We also present the latest work on laserdriven micro-thrusters and detail some the near term goals of our program.

  4. Microwave soft tissue ablation (Invited Paper)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clegg, Peter J.; Cronin, Nigel J.

    2005-04-01

    Microsulis, in conjunction with the University of Bath have developed a set of novel microwave applicators for the ablation of soft tissues. These interstitial applicators have been designed for use in open surgical, laparoscopic and percutaneous settings and range in diameter from 2.4 to 7 mm. A 20 mm diameter flat faced interface applicator was developed as an adjunct to the open surgical interstitial applicator and has been applied to the treatment of surface breaking lesions in hepatobiliary surgery. Taken as a complete tool set the applicators are capable of treating a wide range of conditions in a safe and efficacious manner. The modality employs a radiated electromagnetic field at the allocated medical frequency of 2.45 GHz and powers between 30 and 150 Watts. Computer simulations, bench testing, safety and efficacy testing, ex-vivo and in-vivo work plus clinical trials have demonstrated that these systems are capable of generating large volumes of ablation in short times with favourable ablation geometries. Clinical studies have shown very low complication rates with minimal local recurrence. It is considered that this modality offers major advantages over currently marketed products. The technique is considered to be particularly safe as it is quick and there is no passage of current obviating the requirement for grounding pads. Since the microwave field operates primarily on water and all soft tissues with the exception of fat are made up of approximately 70% water the heating pattern is highly predictable making repeatability a key factor for this modality.

  5. Cryosurgery and needle ablation of renal lesions.

    PubMed

    Johnson, D B; Nakada, S Y

    2001-05-01

    Laparoscopic renal cryoablation is a minimally invasive alternative for treating renal tumors utilizing narrow probes cooled with a compressed gas such as argon or carbon dioxide. At this time, cryotherapy has shown the most promise as an alternative to partial nephrectomy as a nephron-sparing treatment for renal tumors. Radiofrequency ablation employs needle electrodes placed percutaneously directly into renal lesions to deliver energy, creating high temperatures leading to cell death. High-intensity focused ultrasound is a noninvasive technique in which focused ultrasound energy is applied to cause cell death within the focal zone. Microwave thermotherapy uses small applicators to deliver microwave energy to tissues, resulting in the generation of heat. Although RF, HIFU, and microwave thermotherapy show promise as energy sources for tumor ablation, they are in the early stages of development. Little is known about their acute and chronic histologic effects and long-term efficacy as a treatment for malignant disease. Further work is needed to develop cryosurgery and needle ablation in order to delineate what role these techniques will ultimately play in the management of RCC.

  6. [Ablation of idiopathic fascicular ventricular tachycardia].

    PubMed

    Gellér, László; Szilágyi, Szabolcs; Solymossy, Katalin; Srej, Marianna; Zima, Endre; Tahin, Tamás; Merkely, Béla

    2009-08-02

    Idiopathic fascicular ventricular tachycardia is an important and not very rare cardiac arrhythmia with specific electrocardiographic features and therapeutic options. Ventricular tachycardia is characterized by relatively narrow QRS complex and right bundle branch block pattern. The QRS axis depends on which fascicle is involved in the re-entry. Left axis deviation is noted with left posterior fascicular tachycardia and right axis deviation with left anterior fascicular tachycardia. A left septal fascicular tachycardia with normal QRS axis is also possible. Idiopathic fascicular tachycardia is usually seen in individuals without structural heart disease. Response to verapamil is an important feature of fascicular tachycardia. In some cases intravenous adenosine may also terminate the arrhythmia. During electrophysiology study, presystolic or diastolic potentials precede the QRS, presumed to originate from the Purkinje fibers. The potentials can be recorded during sinus rhythm and ventricular tachycardia in many patients with fascicular tachycardia. This potential (so-called Purkinje potential) has been used as a guide to catheter ablation. Correct diagnosis of fascicular tachycardia is very important because catheter ablation is very effective in the treatment of this type of ventricular tachycardia. In this review, we describe three patients with idiopathic ventricular tachycardia and their successful catheter ablation, and summarize the actual knowledge of the diagnosis and management of this special ventricular tachycardia.

  7. A study of ablation effects for an axisymmetric electromagnetic accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Ikuta, K. . Inst. of Plasma Physics)

    1989-01-01

    In order to give the additional forward thrust to the projectile other than the electromagnetic force, the axial symmetric launcher called ablation mass driver (AMD) has been proposed using sequential z pinches in a cylindrical electrode array. The additional driving force originates from the reaction of ablating hot gas from the ablator on the rear of the projectile, since the Joule heating by the high electric current for electromagnetic acceleration is not negligiblly small. The ablated gas becomes plasma which propagates along the field-null line of z pinch, giving the forward thrust to the projectile. A proto type AMD has been built at Texas Tech University in order to see the capabilities of AMD as a launcher, although a study on the effect of ablation will remain as a future work. This paper describes a device of accelerating water blob for the study of ablation effect during acceleration together with the experimental results.

  8. Modeling CO{sub 2} Laser Ablative Impulse with Polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Sinko, John E.; Phipps, Claude R.; Sasoh, Akihiro

    2010-10-08

    Laser ablation vaporization models have usually ignored the spatial dependence of the laser beam. Here, we consider effects from modeling using a Gaussian beam for both photochemical and photothermal conditions. The modeling results are compared to experimental and literature data for CO{sub 2} laser ablation of the polymer polyoxymethylene under vacuum, and discussed in terms of the ablated mass areal density and momentum coupling coefficient. Extending the scope of discussion, laser ablative impulse generation research has lacked a cohesive strategy for linking the vaporization and plasma regimes. Existing models, mostly formulated for ultraviolet laser systems or metal targets, appear to be inappropriate or impractical for applications requiring CO{sub 2} laser ablation of polymers. A recently proposed method for linking the vaporization and plasma regimes for analytical modeling is addressed here along with the implications of its use. Key control parameters are considered, along with the major propulsion parameters needed for laser ablation propulsion modeling.

  9. Influence of the Liquid on Femtosecond Laser Ablation of Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanitz, A.; Hoppius, J. S.; Gurevich, E. L.; Ostendorf, A.

    Ultrashort pulse laser ablation has become a very important industrial method for highly precise material removal ranging from sensitive thin film processing to drilling and cutting of metals. Over the last decade, a new method to produce pure nanoparticles emerged from this technique: Pulsed Laser Ablation in Liquids (PLAL). By this method, the ablation of material by a laser beam is used to generate a metal vapor within the liquid in order to obtain nanoparticles from its recondensation process. It is well known that the liquid significantly alters the ablation properties of the substrate, in our case iron. For example, the ablation rate and crater morphology differ depending on the used liquid. We present our studies on the efficiency and quality of ablated grooves in water, methanol, acetone, ethanol and toluene. The produced grooves are investigated by means of white-light interferometry, EDX and SEM.

  10. Fractional market dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskin, Nick

    2000-12-01

    A new extension of a fractality concept in financial mathematics has been developed. We have introduced a new fractional Langevin-type stochastic differential equation that differs from the standard Langevin equation: (i) by replacing the first-order derivative with respect to time by the fractional derivative of order μ; and (ii) by replacing “white noise” Gaussian stochastic force by the generalized “shot noise”, each pulse of which has a random amplitude with the α-stable Lévy distribution. As an application of the developed fractional non-Gaussian dynamical approach the expression for the probability distribution function (pdf) of the returns has been established. It is shown that the obtained fractional pdf fits well the central part and the tails of the empirical distribution of S&P 500 returns.

  11. Catalytic reforming of naphtha fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, K.C.; Vorhis, F.H.

    1980-09-16

    Production of motor gasoline and a btx-enriched reformate by fractionating a naphtha feedstock into a mid-boiling btxprecursor fraction, a relatively high-boiling fraction and a relatively low-boiling fraction; catalytically reforming the btxprecursor fraction in a first reforming zone; combining the relatively high-boiling and low-boiling fractions and catalytically reforming the combined fractions in a second reforming zone.

  12. Intracellular Cadmium Isotope Fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horner, T. J.; Lee, R. B.; Henderson, G. M.; Rickaby, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    Recent stable isotope studies into the biological utilization of transition metals (e.g. Cu, Fe, Zn, Cd) suggest several stepwise cellular processes can fractionate isotopes in both culture and nature. However, the determination of fractionation factors is often unsatisfactory, as significant variability can exist - even between different organisms with the same cellular functions. Thus, it has not been possible to adequately understand the source and mechanisms of metal isotopic fractionation. In order to address this problem, we investigated the biological fractionation of Cd isotopes within genetically-modified bacteria (E. coli). There is currently only one known biological use or requirement of Cd, a Cd/Zn carbonic anhydrase (CdCA, from the marine diatom T. weissfloggii), which we introduce into the E. coli genome. We have also developed a cleaning procedure that allows for the treating of bacteria so as to study the isotopic composition of different cellular components. We find that whole cells always exhibit a preference for uptake of the lighter isotopes of Cd. Notably, whole cells appear to have a similar Cd isotopic composition regardless of the expression of CdCA within the E. coli. However, isotopic fractionation can occur within the genetically modified E. coli during Cd use, such that Cd bound in CdCA can display a distinct isotopic composition compared to the cell as a whole. Thus, the externally observed fractionation is independent of the internal uses of Cd, with the largest Cd isotope fractionation occurring during cross-membrane transport. A general implication of these experiments is that trace metal isotopic fractionation most likely reflects metal transport into biological cells (either actively or passively), rather than relating to expression of specific physiological function and genetic expression of different metalloenzymes.

  13. Thermodynamics in Fractional Calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meilanov, R. P.; Magomedov, R. A.

    2014-11-01

    A generalization of thermodynamics in the formalism of fractional-order derivatives is given. Results of the traditional thermodynamics of Carnot, Clausius, and Helmholtz are obtained in the particular case where the exponent of a fractional-order derivative is equal to unity. A one-parametric "fractal" equation of state is obtained with account of the second virial coefficient. The application of the resulting equation of state in the case of the gas argon is considered.

  14. Symmetric continued fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Panprasitwech, Oranit; Laohakosol, Vichian; Chaichana, Tuangrat

    2010-11-11

    Explicit formulae for continued fractions with symmetric patterns in their partial quotients are constructed in the field of formal power series. Similar to the work of Cohn in 1996, which generalized the so-called folding lemma to {kappa}-fold symmetry, the notion of {kappa}-duplicating symmetric continued fractions is investigated using a modification of the 1995 technique due to Clemens, Merrill and Roeder.

  15. Ablation by ultrashort laser pulses: Atomistic and thermodynamic analysis of the processes at the ablation threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhyay, Arun K.; Inogamov, Nail A.; Rethfeld, Baerbel; Urbassek, Herbert M.

    2008-07-15

    Ultrafast laser irradiation of solids may ablate material off the surface. We study this process for thin films using molecular-dynamics simulation and thermodynamic analysis. Both metals and Lennard-Jones (LJ) materials are studied. We find that despite the large difference in thermodynamical properties between these two classes of materials--e.g., for aluminum versus LJ the ratio T{sub c}/T{sub tr} of critical to triple-point temperature differs by more than a factor of 4--the values of the ablation threshold energy E{sub abl} normalized to the cohesion energy, {epsilon}{sub abl}=E{sub abl}/E{sub coh}, are surprisingly universal: all are near 0.3 with {+-}30% scattering. The difference in the ratio T{sub c}/T{sub tr} means that for metals the melting threshold {epsilon}{sub m} is low, {epsilon}{sub m}<{epsilon}{sub abl}, while for LJ it is high, {epsilon}{sub m}>{epsilon}{sub abl}. This thermodynamical consideration gives a simple explanation for the difference between metals and LJ. It explains why despite the universality in {epsilon}{sub abl}, metals thermomechanically ablate always from the liquid state. This is opposite to LJ materials, which (near threshold) ablate from the solid state. Furthermore, we find that immediately below the ablation threshold, the formation of large voids (cavitation) in the irradiated material leads to a strong temporary expansion on a very slow time scale. This feature is easily distinguished from the acoustic oscillations governing the material response at smaller intensities, on the one hand, and the ablation occurring at larger intensities, on the other hand. This finding allows us to explain the puzzle of huge surface excursions found in experiments at near-threshold laser irradiation.

  16. Chromatographic methods of fractionation.

    PubMed

    Friesen, A D

    1987-01-01

    Chromatography's functional versatility, separation efficiency, gentle non-denaturing separating process and ease of automation and scale-up make it attractive for industrial scale protein purification. The Winnipeg Rh Institute's new Plasma Fractionation facility is an example of the use of chromatography for the large scale purification of plasma protein fractions. The fractionation facility has a capacity to process 800 litres of plasma per batch into blood clotting factor VIII and IX, albumin and intravenous immune serum globulin (i.v. ISG). Albumin and i.v. ISG are purified using ion exchange columns of DEAE-Sepharose (230 litre size), DEAE-Biogel (150 litre size) and CM-Sepharose (150 litre size). The chromatographic process is automated using a Modicon 584 Programmable Logic Controller to regulate valves, pumps and sensors which control plasma flow during fractionation. The stainless steel tanks and piping are automatically cleaned-in-place. The high degree of automation and cleaning provides efficient operation and sanitary processing. Chromatographic methods (DEAE-Sepharose and metal chelation) are also being used at the pilot scale to purify the human blood products superoxide dismutase and hemoglobin from outdated red blood cells. Characterization of the protein fractions produced by chromatography has shown them to be of equal or higher quality than fractions produced by other techniques.

  17. Percutaneous ablation therapies of inoperable pancreatic cancer: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Ierardi, Anna Maria; Lucchina, Natalie; Bacuzzi, Alessandro; Marco, De Chiara; Bracchi, Elena; Cocozza, Eugenio; Dionigi, Gianlorenzo; Tsetis, Dimitrios; Floridi, Chiara; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo

    2015-01-01

    Initial studies about ablation therapies of the pancreas were associated with significant morbidity and mortality, which limited widespread adoption. Development of techniques with high quality imaging used as guidance improve outcomes reducing complications. Moreover, only few experiences of percutaneous pancreatic ablations are reported. They are performed by very skilled operators in highly specialized centers. This review presents the current status of percutaneous local ablative therapies in the treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer. PMID:26424487

  18. Steerable sheath technology in the ablation of atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Jubin; Wong, Kelvin C K; Ginks, Matthew R; Bashir, Yaver; Betts, Timothy R; Rajappan, Kim

    2013-12-01

    Steerable sheaths have been shown to reduce procedure time in the catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF), where catheter positioning and stability is typically challenging. This review critically addresses and highlights the recent developments in design of sheaths used to manipulate the ablation catheter and how these developments may impact on the ablation procedure itself, in particular the likelihood of first-time success. Patents relating to steerable sheaths are reviewed and discussed to gauge potential future developments in this area.

  19. Revision of failed hip resurfacing to total hip arthroplasty rapidly relieves pain and improves function in the early post operative period

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    We reviewed the results of 25 consecutive patients who underwent revision of a hip resurfacing prosthesis to a total hip replacement. Revisions were performed for recurrent pain and effusion, infection and proximal femoral fractures. Both components were revised in 20 cases. There were 12 male and 13 female patients with average time to revision of 34.4 and 26.4 months respectively. The mean follow up period was 12.7 months (3 to 31). All patients reported relief of pain and excellent satisfaction scores. Two patients experienced stiffness up to three months post operatively. Pre operative Oxford, Harris and WOMAC hip scores were 39.1, 36.4 and 52.2 respectively. Mean post operative scores at last follow up were 17.4, 89.8 and 6.1 respectively (p < 0.001 for each score). These results show that conversion of hip resurfacing to total hip arthroplasty has high satisfaction rates. These results compare favourably with those for revision total hip arthroplasty. PMID:21114835

  20. Effects of laser ablation on cemented tungsten carbide surface quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, J. L.; Butler, D. L.; Sim, L. M.; Jarfors, A. E. W.

    2010-11-01

    Although laser micromachining has been touted as being the most promising way to fabricate micro tools, there has been no proper evaluation of the effects of laser ablation on bulk material properties. The current work demonstrates the effects of laser ablation on the properties of a cemented tungsten carbide surface. Of particular interest is the resultant increase in compressive residual stresses in the ablated surface. From this study it is seen that there are no adverse effects from laser ablation of cemented tungsten carbide that would preclude its use for the fabrication of micro-tools but a finishing process may not be avoidable.