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Sample records for ablative heat shield

  1. Ablative heat shield design for space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiferth, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    Ablator heat shield configuration optimization studies were conducted for the orbiter. Ablator and reusable surface insulation (RSI) trajectories for design studies were shaped to take advantage of the low conductance of ceramic RSI and high temperature capability of ablators. Comparative weights were established for the RSI system and for direct bond and mechanically attached ablator systems. Ablator system costs were determined for fabrication, installation and refurbishment. Cost penalties were assigned for payload weight penalties, if any. The direct bond ablator is lowest in weight and cost. A mechanically attached ablator using a magnesium subpanel is highly competitive for both weight and cost.

  2. Reflecting ablating heat shields for planetary entry.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, D. L.; Nachtsheim, P. R.; Howe, J. T.

    1972-01-01

    Heat shielding for planetary entry probes of future Jovian and Venusian missions will encounter heating levels well beyond those previously experienced. These entries are typically dominated by radiative heating from the shock layer. This paper demonstrates the potential of reflecting this incident radiation diffusely from an ablating material. This technique contrasts with the absorption experienced by char-forming or graphitic ablators. Two dielectric materials, Teflon (polytetra-fluoroethylene) and boron nitride, are examined for their ablative performance, including reflection, in a combined convective- and radiative-heating environment. For Teflon, at the conditions obtained, superimposition of radiative heating upon a convective stream causes no additional increase in surface recession over the convective only results. For boron nitride, an excellent room-temperature reflector in the visible spectrum, a decrease in reflectivity from 90 to 55 percent is experienced when the surface undergoes sublimation at high temperatures. The process of reflection in each of these materials is described in terms of backscattering from crystals. The significance of a sizable reflection as a mode of energy accommodation is demonstrated for Venusian entries as a potential reduction in mass loss due to ablation.

  3. Sensors measure surface ablation rate of reentry vehicle heat shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russel, J. M., III

    1966-01-01

    Sensors measure surface erosion rate of ablating material in reentry vehicle heat shield. Each sensor, which is placed at precise depths in the heat shield is activated when the ablator surface erodes to the location of a sensing point. Sensor depth and activation time determine ablator surface erosion rate.

  4. Low cost fabrication of ablative heat shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cecka, A. M.; Schofield, W. C.

    1972-01-01

    A material and process study was performed using subscale panels in an attempt to reduce the cost of fabricating ablative heat shield panels. Although no improvements were made in the material formulation, a significant improvement was obtained in the processing methods compared to those employed in the previous work. The principal feature of the new method is the press filling and curing of the ablation material in a single step with the bonding and curing of the face sheet. This method was chosen to replace the hand troweling and autoclave curing procedure used previously. Double-curvature panels of the same size as the flat panels were fabricated to investigate fabrication problems. It was determined that the same materials and processes used for flat panels can be used to produce the curved panels. A design with severe curvatures consisting of radii of 24 x 48 inches was employed for evaluation. Ten low-density and ten high-density panels were fabricated. With the exception of difficulties related to short run non-optimum tooling, excellent panel filling and density uniformity were obtained.

  5. Space Vehicle Heat Shield Having Edgewise Strips of Ablative Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blosser, Max L. (Inventor); Poteet, Carl C. (Inventor); Bouslog, Stan A. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A heat shield for a space vehicle comprises a plurality of phenolic impregnated carbon ablator (PICA) blocks secured to a surface of the space vehicle and arranged in a pattern with gaps therebetween. The heat shield further comprises a plurality of PICA strips disposed in the gaps between the PICA blocks. The PICA strips are mounted edgewise, such that the structural orientation of the PICA strips is substantially perpendicular to the structural orientation of the PICA blocks.

  6. Investigation of low-cost fabrication of ablative heat shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massions, V. P.; Mach, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    The fabrication, testing, and evaluation of materials and techniques employed in the fabrication of ablative heat shield panels are described. Results of this effort show projected reductions in labor man-hours for dielectric curing of panels when compared to panels molded in a steam-heated press. In addition, panels were fabricated with more than one density within the cross-section. These dual-density panels show significant weight and cost reduction potentials.

  7. Remote Recession Sensing of Ablative Heat Shield Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, Michael W.; Stackpoole, Margaret; Nawaz, Anuscheh; Gonzales, Gregory Lewis; Ho, Thanh

    2014-01-01

    Material recession and charring are two major processes determining the performance of ablative heat shield materials. Even in ground testing, the characterization of these two mechanisms relies on measurements of material thickness before and after testing, thus providing only information integrated over the test time. For recession measurements, optical methods such as imaging the sample surface during testing are under investigation but require high alignment and instrument effort, therefore being not established as a standard measurement method. For char depth measurements, the most common method so far consists in investigation of sectioned samples after testing or in the case of Stardust where core extractions were performed to determine char information. In flight, no reliable recession measurements are available, except total recession after recovering the heat shield on ground. Developments of mechanical recession sensors have been started but require substantial on board instrumentation adding mass and complexity. In this work, preliminary experiments to evaluate the feasibility of remote sensing of material recession and possibly char depth through optically observing the emission signatures of seeding materials in the post shock plasma is investigated. It is shown that this method can provide time resolved recession measurements without the necessity of accurate alignment procedures of the optical set-up and without any instrumentation on board of a spacecraft. Furthermore, recession data can be obtained without recovering flight hardware which would be a huge benefit for inexpensive heat shield material testing on board of small re-entry probes, e.g. on new micro-satellite re-entry probes as a possible future application of Cubesats or RBR

  8. A New Ablative Heat Shield Sensor Suite Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bose, Deepak

    2014-01-01

    A new sensor suite is developed to measure performance of ablative thermal protection systems used in planetary entry vehicles for robotic and human exploration. The new sensor suite measures ablation of the thermal protection system under extreme heating encountered during planetary entry. The sensor technology is compatible with a variety of thermal protection materials, and is applicable over a wide range of entry conditions.

  9. Development of Naphthalene PLIF for Visualizing Ablation Products From a Space Capsule Heat Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Combs, C. S.; Clemens, N. T.; Danehy, P. M.

    2014-01-01

    The Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) will use an ablative heat shield. To better design this heat shield and others that will undergo planetary entry, an improved understanding of the ablation process would be beneficial. Here, a technique developed at The University of Texas at Austin that uses planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of a low-temperature sublimating ablator (naphthalene) to enable visualization of the ablation products in a hypersonic flow is applied. Although high-temperature ablation is difficult and expensive to recreate in a laboratory environment, low-temperature sublimation creates a limited physics problem that can be used to explore ablation-product transport in a hypersonic flow-field. In the current work, a subscale capsule reentry vehicle model with a solid naphthalene heat shield has been tested in a Mach 5 wind tunnel. The PLIF technique provides images of the spatial distribution of sublimated naphthalene in the heat-shield boundary layer, separated shear layer, and backshell recirculation region. Visualizations of the capsule shear layer using both naphthalene PLIF and Schlieren imaging compared favorably. PLIF images have shown high concentrations of naphthalene in the capsule separated flow region, intermittent turbulent structures on the heat shield surface, and interesting details of the capsule shear layer structure. It was shown that, in general, the capsule shear layer appears to be more unsteady at lower angels of attack. The PLIF images demonstrated that during a wind tunnel run, as the model heated up, the rate of naphthalene ablation increased, since the PLIF signal increased steadily over the course of a run. Additionally, the shear layer became increasingly unsteady over the course of a wind tunnel run, likely because of increased surface roughness but also possibly because of the increased blowing. Regions with a relatively low concentration of naphthalene were also identified in the capsule backshell

  10. Visualization of Capsule Reentry Vehicle Heat Shield Ablation Using Naphthalene PLIF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Combs, Christopher S.; Clemens, Noel T.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2014-01-01

    The Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) will use an ablative heat shield and improved understanding of the ablation process would be beneficial for design purposes. Given that ablation is a multi-physics process involving heat and mass transfer, codes aiming to predict heat shield ablation are in need of experimental data pertaining to the turbulent transport of ablation products for validation. At The University of Texas at Austin, a technique is being developed that uses planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of a low-temperature sublimating ablator (naphthalene) to visualize the transport of ablation products in a supersonic flow. Since ablation at reentry temperatures can be difficult to recreate in a laboratory setting it is desirable to create a limited physics problem and simulate the ablation process at relatively low temperature conditions using naphthalene. A scaled Orion MPCV model with a solid naphthalene heat shield has been tested in a Mach 5 wind tunnel at various angles of attack in the current work. PLIF imaging reveals the distribution of the ablation products as they are transported into the heat-shield boundary layer and over the capsule shoulders into the separated shear layer and backshell recirculation region. Visualizations of the capsule shear layer using both naphthalene PLIF and Schlieren imaging compared favorably. High concentrations of naphthalene in the capsule separated flow region, intermittent turbulent structures on the heat shield surface, and interesting details of the capsule shear layer structure were observed using the naphthalene PLIF technique. The capsule shear layer was also shown to generally appear to be more turbulent at lower angles of attack. Furthermore, the PLIF signal increased steadily over the course of a run indicating that during a wind tunnel run the model heated up and the rate of naphthalene ablation increased. The shear layer showed increasing signs of turbulence over the course of a wind tunnel run

  11. Study of critical defects in ablative heat shield systems for the space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. C.; Rummel, W. D.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental results are presented for a program conducted to determine the effects of fabrication-induced defects on the performance of an ablative heat shield material. Exposures representing a variety of space shuttle orbiter mission environments-humidity acoustics, hot vacuum and cold vacuum-culuminating in entry heating and transonic acoustics, were simulated on large panels containing intentional defects. Nondestructive methods for detecting the defects, were investigated. The baseline materials were two honeycomb-reinforced low density, silicone ablators, MG-36 and SS-41. Principal manufacturing-induced defects displaying a critical potential included: off-curing of the ablator, extreme low density, undercut (or crushed) honeycomb reinforcements, and poor wet-coating of honeycomb.

  12. Finite-Rate Ablation Boundary Conditions for Carbon-Phenolic Heat-Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Y.-K.; Milos, Frank S.

    2003-01-01

    A formulation of finite-rate ablation surface boundary conditions, including oxidation, nitridation, and sublimation of carbonaceous material with pyrolysis gas injection, has been developed based on surface species mass conservation. These surface boundary conditions are discretized and integrated with a Navier-Stokes solver. This numerical procedure can predict aerothermal heating, chemical species concentration, and carbonaceous material ablation rate over the heatshield surface of re-entry space vehicles. In this study, the gas-gas and gas-surface interactions are established for air flow over a carbon-phenolic heatshield. Two finite-rate gas-surface interaction models are considered in the present study. The first model is based on the work of Park, and the second model includes the kinetics suggested by Zhluktov and Abe. Nineteen gas phase chemical reactions and four gas-surface interactions are considered in the present model. There is a total of fourteen gas phase chemical species, including five species for air and nine species for ablation products. Three test cases are studied in this paper. The first case is a graphite test model in the arc-jet stream; the second is a light weight Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator at the Stardust re-entry peak heating conditions, and the third is a fully dense carbon-phenolic heatshield at the peak heating point of a proposed Mars Sample Return Earth Entry Vehicle. Predictions based on both finite-rate gas- surface interaction models are compared with those obtained using B' tables, which were created based on the chemical equilibrium assumption. Stagnation point convective heat fluxes predicted using Park's finite-rate model are far below those obtained from chemical equilibrium B' tables and Zhluktov's model. Recession predictions from Zhluktov's model are generally lower than those obtained from Park's model and chemical equilibrium B' tables. The effect of species mass diffusion on predicted ablation rate is also

  13. Investigation of low-cost ablative heat shield fabrication for space shuttles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, H. H.

    1972-01-01

    Improvements in the processes and design to reduce the manufacturing costs for low density ablative panels for the space shuttle are discussed. The areas that were studied included methods of loading honeycomb core, alternative reinforcement concepts, and the use of reusable subpanels. A review of previous studies on the fabrication of low-cost ablative panels and on permissible defects that do not affect thermal performance was conducted. Considerable differences in the quoted prices for ablative panels, even though the various contractors had reported similar fabrication times were discovered. How these cost differences arise from different estimating criteria and which estimating assumptions and other costs must be included in order to arrive at a realistic price are discussed.

  14. Heat shielding for Venus entry probes.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, D. L.; Nicolet, W. E.

    1973-01-01

    Two contrasted approaches to ablative thermal protection of Venus entry probes are presented - a typical carbonaceous charring ablator and a dielectric reflective ablator. The interesting observation in this study is that mass loss is not the controlling variable in heat-shield sizing. A heat-soak problem determines the carbon phenolic sizing. For Teflon, the material thickness required to accomplish reflection is the sizing factor. The total heat-shield weight required to handle either steep or shallow entry is computed to be 13% less for a Teflon shield (if at least 3.2 mm are required for reflection) than for a charring ablator shield. If an efficient reflective backing is used with Teflon, the thickness can be reduced 1.0 mm and the computed weight is 31% less for Teflon than for the charring ablator. Such weight reductions may significantly increase the science payload weight of the miniprobes.

  15. Experimental determination of ablation vapor species from carbon phenolic heat-shield materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lincoln, K. A.

    1981-01-01

    The relative concentrations of vapors produced from carbon phenolic composites under thermal loadings approximating those expected at peak heating during vehicle entry into the atmospheres of the outer planets have been determined. The technique of vaporizing the surface of bulk samples by laser irradiation while measuring in situ the vapor species by mass spectrometry is described. Results show that vapor composition varies with irradiance level and with depth of heating (or extent of pyrolysis). Attempts are made to compare these experimental results with the theoretical predictions from computer codes.

  16. Characterization of Candidate Materials for Remote Recession Measurements of Ablative Heat Shield Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Bradley D.; Winter, Michael; Panerai, Francesco; Martin, Alexandre; Bailey, Sean C. C.; Stackpoole, Margaret; Danehy, Paul M.; Splinter, Scott

    2016-01-01

    A method of remotely measuring surface recession of a material sample in a plasma flow through emission spectroscopy of the post shock layer was characterized through experiments in the NASA Langley HYMETS arc jet facility. Different methods for delivering the seed products into the Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) material samples were investigated. Three samples were produced by seeding the PICA material with combinations of Al, Si, HfO2, VB2, Al2O3, SiO2, TiC, HfC, NaCl, and MgCl2 through infusing seed materials into a core of PICA, or through encapsulating seed material in an epoxy disk, mechanically bonding the disk to a PICA sample. The PICA samples seeded with the candidate tracers were then tested at surface temperatures near 2400 K under low pressure air plasma. The emission of Al, Ti, V, Na, and Mg in the post-shock layer was observed in the UV with a high resolution imaging spectrometer viewing the whole stagnation line from the side, and from UV to NIR with a fiber-coupled miniaturized spectrometer observing the sample surface in the wavelength range from 200 nm to 1,100 nm from the front through a collimator. Al, Na, and Mg were found to be emitting in the post-shock spectra even before the recession reached the seeding depth - therefore possibly characterizing the pyrolysis process rather than the recession itself. The appearance of Ti and V emission in the spectra was well correlated with the actual recession which was monitored through a video of the front surface of the sample. The applicability of a seed material as an indicator for recession appears to be related to the melting temperature of the seed material. Future parametric studies will be carried out in low power plasma facilities at the University of Kentucky.

  17. Ablative shielding for hypervelocity projectiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rucker, Michelle A. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A hypervelocity projectile shield which includes a hollow semi-flexible housing fabricated from a plastic like, or otherwise transparent membrane which is filled with a fluid (gas or liquid) is presented. The housing has a inlet valve, similar to that on a tire or basketball, to introduce an ablating fluid into the housing. The housing is attached by a Velcro mount or double-sided adhesive tape to the outside surface of a structure to be protected. The housings are arrayed in a side-by-side relationship for complete coverage of the surface to be protected. In use, when a hypervelocity projectile penetrates the outer wall of a housing it is broken up and then the projectile is ablated as it travels through the fluid, much like a meteorite 'burns up' as it enters the earth's atmosphere, and the housing is deflated. The deflated housing can be easily spotted for replacement, even from a distance. Replacement is then accomplished by simply pulling a deflated housing off the structure and installing a new housing.

  18. Numerical and Experimental Characterizations of the SiFRP Ablator for the Combustion Chamber Heat Shields of Liquid Rocket Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirai, Kenichi

    To design the LOX/LNG ablative combustor, it is indispensable to build up the mathematical ablation model. In this paper, the mathematical model of SiFRP has been developed, which successfully predicts the penetration depth of both charred and decomposed zones and also the temperature profiles in the various kinds of experimental results which have been conducted to verify the model. Using this model, the peripheral-zone temperature profiles in the combustor, that is to say, combustor wall heat flux profiles, are estimated to reproduce the char penetration depth which has encountered in the ground firing tests, and the model has been successfully applied to design a LOX/LNG combustor.

  19. Major uncertainties influencing entry probe heat shield design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Congdon, W.

    1974-01-01

    Factors influencing the design of an outer planet probe heat shield are discussed. Major factors included are: uncertainties in composition and scale height of the planet atmospheres; the augmentation/attenuation of entry heating by ablation products requires more computer study and testing; carbon heat shields, especially carbon phenolic, possessing improved resistance to spallation need developing; and white silica reflecting heat shields with improved resistance to bulk vitrification need further developing.

  20. Crumpled Heat Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Phoenix Mars Lander's Surface Stereo Imager took this image of the spacecraft's crumpled heat shield on Sept. 16, 2008, the 111th Martian day of the mission.

    The 2-1/2 meter (about 8-1/2 feet) heat shield landed southeast of Phoenix, about halfway between the spacecraft and its backshell/parachute. The backshell/parachute touched ground 300 meters (1,000 ft) to the south of the lander.

    The dark area to the right of the heat shield is the 'bounce mark' it made on impact with the Red Planet. This image is the highest-resolution image that will likely be taken by the lander, and is part of the 1,500-image 'Happily Ever After' panorama.

    The Phoenix mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is led by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  1. High purity silica reflective heat shield development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nachtscheim, P. R.; Blome, J. C.

    1976-01-01

    A hyperpure vitreous silica material is being developed for use as a reflective and ablative heat shield for planetary entry. Various purity grades and forms of raw materials were evaluated along with various processing methods. Slip casting of high purity grain was selected as the best processing method, resulting in a highly reflective material in the wavelength bands of interest (the visible and ultraviolet regions). The selected material was characterized with respect to optical, mechanical and physical properties using a limited number of specimens. The process has been scaled up to produce a one-half scale heat shield (18 in. dia.) (45.72 cm) for a Jupiter entry vehicle. This work is now being extended to improve the structural safety factor of the heat shield by making hyperpure silica material tougher through the addition of silica fibers.

  2. Combustor bulkhead heat shield assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Zeisser, M.H.

    1990-06-19

    This paper describes a gas turbine engine having an annular combustion chamber defined by an annular, inner liner, a concentric outer liner, and an upstream annular combustor head, wherein the head includes a radially extending bulkhead having circumferentially distributed openings for each receiving an individual fuel nozzle therethrough. It comprises: a segmented heat shield assembly, disposed between the combustion chamber interior and the bulkhead, including generally planar, sector shaped heat shields, each shield abutting circumferentially with two next adjacent shields and extending radially from proximate the inner liner to proximate the outer liner, the plurality of shields collectively defining an annular protective barrier, and wherein each sector shaped shield further includes an opening, corresponding to one of the bulkhead nozzle openings for likewise receiving the corresponding nozzle therethrough, the shield opening further including an annular lip extending toward the bulkhead and being received within the bulkhead opening, raised ridges on the shield backside, the ridges contacting the facing bulkhead surface and defining a flow path for a flow of cooling air issuing from a sized supply opening disposed in the bulkhead, the flow path running ultimately from adjacent the annular lip to the edges of each shield segment, wherein the raised edges extend fully along the lateral, circumferentially spaced edges of each shield segment and about the adjacent shield segments wherein the raised ridges further extend circumferentially between the annular lip and the abutting edge ridges.

  3. An Analysis of Ablation-Shield Requirements for Manned Reentry Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Leonard

    1960-01-01

    The problem of sublimation of material and accumulation of heat in an ablation shield is analyzed and the results are applied to the reentry of manned vehicles into the earth's atmosphere. The parameters which control the amount of sublimation and the temperature distribution within the ablation shield are determined and presented in a manner useful for engineering calculation. It is shown that the total mass loss from the shield during reentry and the insulation requirements may be given very simply in terms of the maximum deceleration of the vehicle or the total reentry time.

  4. Transient heat flux shielding using thermal metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayana, Supradeep; Savo, Salvatore; Sato, Yuki

    2013-05-01

    We have developed a heat shield based on a metamaterial engineering approach to shield a region from transient diffusive heat flow. The shield is designed with a multilayered structure to prescribe the appropriate spatial profile for heat capacity, density, and thermal conductivity of the effective medium. The heat shield was experimentally compared to other isotropic materials.

  5. Exploratory Environmental Tests of Several Heat Shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, George P.; Betts, John, Jr.

    1961-01-01

    Exploratory tests have been conducted with several conceptual radiative heat shields of composite construction. Measured transient temperature distributions were obtained for a graphite heat shield without insulation and with three types of insulating materials, and for a metal multipost heat shield, at surface temperatures of approximately 2,000 F and 1,450 F, respectively, by use of a radiant-heat facility. The graphite configurations suffered loss of surface material under repeated irradiation. Temperature distribution calculated for the metal heat shield by a numerical procedure was in good agreement with measured data. Environmental survival tests of the graphite heat shield without insulation, an insulated multipost heat shield, and a stainless-steel-tile heat shield were made at temperatures of 2,000 F and dynamic pressures of approximately 6,000 lb/sq ft, provided by an ethylene-heated jet operating at a Mach number of 2.0 and sea-level conditions. The graphite heat shield survived the simulated aerodynamic heating and pressure loading. A problem area exists in the design and materials for heat-resistant fasteners between the graphite shield and the base structure. The insulated multipost heat shield was found to be superior to the stainless-steel-tile heat shield in retarding heat flow. Over-lapped face-plate joints and surface smoothness of the insulated multi- post heat shield were not adversely affected by the test environment. The graphite heat shield without insulation survived tests made in the acoustic environment of a large air jet. This acoustic environment is random in frequency and has an overall noise level of 160 decibels.

  6. Thermal Protection System (Heat Shield) Development - Advanced Development Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kowal, T. John

    2010-01-01

    The Orion Thermal Protection System (TPS) ADP was a 3 1/2 year effort to develop ablative TPS materials for the Orion crew capsule. The ADP was motivated by the lack of available ablative TPS's. The TPS ADP pursued a competitive phased development strategy with succeeding rounds of development, testing and down selections. The Project raised the technology readiness level (TRL) of 8 different TPS materials from 5 different commercial vendors, eventual down selecting to a single material system for the Orion heat shield. In addition to providing a heat shield material and design for Orion on time and on budget, the Project accomplished the following: 1) Re-invigorated TPS industry & re-established a NASA competency to respond to future TPS needs; 2) Identified a potentially catastrophic problem with the planned MSL heat shield, and provided a viable, high TRL alternate heat shield design option; and 3) Transferred mature heat shield material and design options to the commercial space industry, including TPS technology information for the SpaceX Dragon capsule.

  7. High purity silica reflecting heat shield development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Congdon, W.

    1974-01-01

    A reflecting heat shield composed of fused silica in which the scattering results from the refractive index mismatch between silica particles and the voids introduced during the fabrication process is developed. Major considerations and conclusions of the development are: the best material to use is Type A, which is capable of ultra-high-purity and which does not show the 0.243 micrometer absorption band; the reflection efficiency of fused silica is decreased at higher temperatures due to the bathochromic shift of the ultraviolet cut-off; for a given silica material, over the wavelength region and particle sizes tested, the monodisperse particle size configurations produce higher reflectances than continuous particle size configurations; and the smaller monodisperse particle size configurations give higher reflectance than the larger ones. A reflecting silica configuration that is an efficient reflector of shock layer radiation at high ablation temperatures is achieved by tailoring the matrix for optimum scattering and using an ultra-high-purity material.

  8. Galileo Heat Shield Response Experiment Data Reduction and Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milos, Frank S.; Chen, Y.-K.; Henline, William D.; Rasky, Daniel J. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The Galileo heat shield response experiment consists of 10 Analog Resistance Ablation Detectors (ARADs) embedded in the carbon phenolic heat shield. As the vehicle descends into the atmosphere of Jupiter, these ARADs will in effect measure the recession as a function of time at various locations on the heat shield. This recession data will be used to reconstruct the time-dependent shape of the vehicle. The shape data is of critical importance to the Atmospheric Reconstruction Experiment which must know mass and drag coefficient of the vehicle in order to determine the structure of the Jovian atmosphere. The data is also intrinsically useful as a database for evaluating the accuracy of our numerical codes and methodology for predicting highly radiating reentry flowfields and coupled heat shield material response. This paper will document the reduction of the data from the ARAD sensors, reconstruction of the heat shield shape history, and comparison of the actual heat shield response with previous calculations and experiments. If possible, we will also include results from new calculations which couple the shock layer flow with the transient material response.

  9. Studying the Heat Shield's Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This image from NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity highlights the seal on the rover's protective heat shield. Engineers evaluated the performance of the protective shell's seal during a 36-sol investigation.

    After viewing these images, engineers were pleased with how the seal performed.

    This is an approximately true-color rendering of the scene acquired around 1:07 p.m. local solar time on Opportunity's sol 339 (Jan. 6, 2005) in an image mosaic using panoramic camera filters at wavelengths of 750, 530, and 430 nanometers.

  10. Heat-shield design for glovebox applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Frigo, A. A.

    1998-07-10

    Heat shields can often be used in place of insulation materials as an effective means of insulating glovebox furnace vessels. If used properly, shields can accomplish two important objectives: thermal insulation of the vessel to maintain a desired process temperature and protection of the glovebox, equipment, and user. A heat-shield assembly can be described as an arrangement of thin, properly-spaced, metal sheets that reduce radiation heat transfer. The main problem encountered in the design of a heat shield assembly is choosing the number of shields. In determining the heat transfer characteristics of a heat-shield assembly, a number of factors must be taken into consideration. The glovebox or outside environment, material properties, geometry, and operating temperature all have varying effects on the expected results. A simple method, for planar-horizontal and cylindrical-vertical shields, allowing the approximation of the outermost shield temperature, the practical number of shields, and the net heat-transfer rate will be presented. Methods used in the fabrication of heat-shield assemblies will also be discussed.

  11. Heat Shield Paves the Way for Commercial Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2014-01-01

    The Phenolic-Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) heat shield, a lightweight material designed to withstand high temperatures, was used for the Stardust’s reentry into Earth’s atmosphere. Hawthorne, California-based SpaceX later worked with the inventors at Ames Research Center to outfit PICA on its Dragon capsule, which is now delivering cargo to and from the International Space Station through NASA’s Commercial Resupply Services contracts program.

  12. Heat flow from the West African shield

    SciTech Connect

    Brigaud, F.; Lucazeau, F.; Ly, S.; Sauvage, J.F.

    1985-09-01

    The heat flow over Precambrian shields is generally lower than over other continental provinces. Previous observations at 9 sites of the West African shield have shown that heat flow ranges from 20 mW m/sup -2/ in Niger to 38-42 mW m/sup -2/ in Liberia, Ghana and Nigeria. Since some of these values are lower than expected for Precambrian shields, it is important to find out whether or not they are representative of the entire shield before trying to derive its thermal structure. In this paper, we present new heat flow determinations from seven sites of the West African shield. These indicate that the surface heat flow is comparable with that of other Precambrian shields in the world.

  13. Mars Exploration Rover Heat Shield Recontact Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raiszadeh, Behzad; Desai, Prasun N.; Michelltree, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The twin Mars Exploration Rover missions landed successfully on Mars surface in January of 2004. Both missions used a parachute system to slow the rover s descent rate from supersonic to subsonic speeds. Shortly after parachute deployment, the heat shield, which protected the rover during the hypersonic entry phase of the mission, was jettisoned using push-off springs. Mission designers were concerned about the heat shield recontacting the lander after separation, so a separation analysis was conducted to quantify risks. This analysis was used to choose a proper heat shield ballast mass to ensure successful separation with low probability of recontact. This paper presents the details of such an analysis, its assumptions, and the results. During both landings, the radar was able to lock on to the heat shield, measuring its distance, as it descended away from the lander. This data is presented and is used to validate the heat shield separation/recontact analysis.

  14. Extraterrestrial Regolith Derived Atmospheric Entry Heat Shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogue, Michael D.; Mueller, Robert P.; Sibille, Laurent; Hintze, Paul E.; Rasky, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    High-mass planetary surface access is one of NASAs technical challenges involving entry, descent and landing (EDL). During the entry and descent phase, frictional interaction with the planetary atmosphere causes a heat build-up to occur on the spacecraft, which will rapidly destroy it if a heat shield is not used. However, the heat shield incurs a mass penalty because it must be launched from Earth with the spacecraft, thus consuming a lot of precious propellant. This NASA Innovative Advanced Concept (NIAC) project investigated an approach to provide heat shield protection to spacecraft after launch and prior to each EDL thus potentially realizing significant launch mass savings. Heat shields fabricated in situ can provide a thermal-protection system for spacecraft that routinely enter a planetary atmosphere. By fabricating the heat shield with space resources from materials available on moons and asteroids, it is possible to avoid launching the heat-shield mass from Earth. Regolith has extremely good insulating properties and the silicates it contains can be used in the fabrication and molding of thermal-protection materials. In this paper, we will describe three types of in situ fabrication methods for heat shields and the testing performed to determine feasibility of this approach.

  15. Trajectory Based Heating and Ablation Calculations for MESUR Pathfinder Aeroshell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Y. K.; Henline, W. D.; Tauber, M. E.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Based on the geometry of Mars Environment Survey (MESUR) Pathfinder aeroshell and an estimated Mars entry trajectory, two-dimensional axisymmetric time dependent calculations have been obtained using GIANTS (Gauss-Siedel Implicit Aerothermodynamic Navier-Stokes code with Thermochemical Surface Conditions) code and CMA (Charring Material Thermal Response and Ablation) Program for heating analysis and heat shield material sizing. These two codes are interfaced using a loosely coupled technique. The flowfield and convective heat transfer coefficients are computed by the GIANTS code with a species balance condition for an ablating surface, and the time dependent in-depth conduction with surface blowing is simulated by the CMA code with a complete surface energy balance condition. In this study, SLA-561V has been selected as heat shield material. The solutions, including the minimum heat shield thicknesses over aeroshell forebody, pyrolysis gas blowing rates, surface heat fluxes and temperature distributions, flowfield, and in-depth temperature history of SLA-561V, are presented and discussed in detail.

  16. Curiosity Bids Goodbye to Heat Shield

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video of thumbnail images from the Mars Descent Imager (MARDI) on NASA's Curiosity rover shows the heat shield dropping away from the rover on Aug. 5 PDT (Aug. 6 EDT). It covers the first 25 s...

  17. Heat shield erosion in a dusty Martian atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadopoulos, Periklis; Tauber, Michael; Chang, I-Dee

    1992-01-01

    The study calculates the effects of dust particle impacts on the erosion of the forebody heat shield for a 26-m diameter aerobraking vehicle entering the Martian atmosphere at 8.6 km/s. An explicit thin-layer Navier-Stokes code is used to compute the dustless flowfield about the vehicle for the actual Martian atmospheric composition. The deceleration and melting of the dust particles within the forebody shock layer was computed for dust spherules having initial diameters from 1 to 19 microns. All the particles began vaporizing shortly after entering the shock layer, but most survived to hit the heat shield surface. The two different heat shield materials considered were Shuttle ceramic tiles with glassy surfaces and a moderate-density ablator. For a vehicle with a ballistic coefficient of 200 kg/sq m, a glassy heat shield surface experienced an average of 7 mm of surface erosion, or 20 times the thickness of the glassy layer on ceramic tiles.

  18. X-Ray Computed Tomography Inspection of the Stardust Heat Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNamara, Karen M.; Schneberk, Daniel J.; Empey, Daniel M.; Koshti, Ajay; Pugel, D. Elizabeth; Cozmuta, Ioana; Stackpoole, Mairead; Ruffino, Norman P.; Pompa, Eddie C.; Oliveras, Ovidio; Kontinos, Dean A.

    2010-01-01

    The "Stardust" heat shield, composed of a PICA (Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator) Thermal Protection System (TPS), bonded to a composite aeroshell, contains important features which chronicle its time in space as well as re-entry. To guide the further study of the Stardust heat shield, NASA reviewed a number of techniques for inspection of the article. The goals of the inspection were: 1) to establish the material characteristics of the shield and shield components, 2) record the dimensions of shield components and assembly as compared with the pre-flight condition, 3) provide flight infonnation for validation and verification of the FIAT ablation code and PICA material property model and 4) through the evaluation of the shield material provide input to future missions which employ similar materials. Industrial X-Ray Computed Tomography (CT) is a 3D inspection technology which can provide infonnation on material integrity, material properties (density) and dimensional measurements of the heat shield components. Computed tomographic volumetric inspections can generate a dimensionally correct, quantitatively accurate volume of the shield assembly. Because of the capabilities offered by X-ray CT, NASA chose to use this method to evaluate the Stardust heat shield. Personnel at NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) and Lawrence Livermore National Labs (LLNL) recently performed a full scan of the Stardust heat shield using a newly installed X-ray CT system at JSC. This paper briefly discusses the technology used and then presents the following results: 1. CT scans derived dimensions and their comparisons with as-built dimensions anchored with data obtained from samples cut from the heat shield; 2. Measured density variation, char layer thickness, recession and bond line (the adhesive layer between the PICA and the aeroshell) integrity; 3. FIAT predicted recession, density and char layer profiles as well as bondline temperatures Finally suggestions are made as to future uses

  19. Retro Rocket Motor Self-Penetrating Scheme for Heat Shield Exhaust Ports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marrese-Reading, Colleen; St.Vaughn, Josh; Zell, Peter; Hamm, Ken; Corliss, Jim; Gayle, Steve; Pain, Rob; Rooney, Dan; Ramos, Amadi; Lewis, Doug; Shepherd, Joe; Inaba, Kazuaki

    2009-01-01

    A preliminary scheme was developed for base-mounted solid-propellant retro rocket motors to self-penetrate the Orion Crew Module heat shield for configurations with the heat shield retained during landings on Earth. In this system the motors propel impactors into structural push plates, which in turn push through the heat shield ablator material. The push plates are sized such that the remaining port in the ablator material is large enough to provide adequate flow area for the motor exhaust plume. The push plate thickness is sized to assure structural integrity behind the ablative thermal protection material. The concept feasibility was demonstrated and the performance was characterized using a gas gun to launch representative impactors into heat shield targets with push plates. The tests were conducted using targets equipped with Fiberform(R) and PICA as the heat shield ablator material layer. The PICA penetration event times were estimated to be under 30 ms from the start of motor ignition. The mass of the system (not including motors) was estimated to be less than 2.3 kg (5 lbs) per motor. The configuration and demonstrations are discussed.

  20. Heating profiles on ICRF antenna Faraday shields

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, D.J.; Baity, F.W.; Hahs, C.L.; Riemer, B.W.; Ryan, P.M.; Williamson, D.E.

    1991-01-01

    A conceptual design for an uncooled Faraday shield for the BPX ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) antenna, which should withstand the proposed long-pulse operation, has been completed. A high-heat-flux, uncooled Faraday shield has also been designed for the fast-wave current drive (FWCD) antenna on D3-D. For both components, the improved understanding of the heating profiles made it possible to design for heat fluxes that would otherwise have been too close to mechanically established limits. The analytical effort is described in detail, with emphasis on the design work for the BPX ICRH antenna conceptual design and for the replacement Faraday shield for the D3-D FWCD antenna. Results of analyses are shown, and configuration issues involved in component modeling are discussed. 3 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Graphitic heat shields for solar probe missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundell, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    The feasibility of using a graphitic heat-shield system on a solar probe going to within 4 solar radii of the center of the sun is investigated. An analysis of graphite vaporization, with commonly used vaporization coefficients, indicates that the maximum mass-loss rate from a conical shield as large as 4 m in diameter can be kept low enough to avoid interference with measurements of the solar environment. In addition to the mass-loss problem, the problem of protecting the payload from the high-temperature (up to 2300 K) primary shield must be solved. An analysis of radiation exchange between concentric disks provides a technique for designing the intermediate shielding. The technique is applied to the design of a system for the Starprobe spacecraft, and it is found that a system with 10 shields and a payload surface temperature of 600 K will have a payload diameter of 2.45 m. Since this is 61% of the 4-m diameter of the primary shield, it is concluded that a graphitic heat-shield system is feasible for the Starprobe mission.

  2. Ablation article and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, W. D.; Sullivan, E. M. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An ablation article, such as a conical heat shield, having an ablating surface is provided with at least one discrete area of at least one seed material, such as aluminum. When subjected to ablation conditions, the seed material is ablated. Radiation emanating from the ablated seed material is detected to analyze ablation effects without disturbing the ablation surface. By providing different seed materials having different radiation characteristics, the ablating effects on various areas of the ablating surface can be analyzed under any prevailing ablation conditions. The ablating article can be provided with means for detecting the radiation characteristics of the ablated seed material to provide a self-contained analysis unit.

  3. Numerical Modeling of Ablation Heat Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewing, Mark E.; Laker, Travis S.; Walker, David T.

    2013-01-01

    A unique numerical method has been developed for solving one-dimensional ablation heat transfer problems. This paper provides a comprehensive description of the method, along with detailed derivations of the governing equations. This methodology supports solutions for traditional ablation modeling including such effects as heat transfer, material decomposition, pyrolysis gas permeation and heat exchange, and thermochemical surface erosion. The numerical scheme utilizes a control-volume approach with a variable grid to account for surface movement. This method directly supports implementation of nontraditional models such as material swelling and mechanical erosion, extending capabilities for modeling complex ablation phenomena. Verifications of the numerical implementation are provided using analytical solutions, code comparisons, and the method of manufactured solutions. These verifications are used to demonstrate solution accuracy and proper error convergence rates. A simple demonstration of a mechanical erosion (spallation) model is also provided to illustrate the unique capabilities of the method.

  4. Spallation of the Galileo probe heat shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundell, J. H.

    1982-06-01

    The Galileo probe heat shield will encounter severe radiative and convective heating during entry into Jupiter's atmosphere. The shield is made of two different carbon phenolic composites; one is chopped-molded, and the other is tape-wrapped, both of which tend to spall under intense heating conditions. To characterize this phenomenon, an experimental program, using a gasdynamic laser, was initiated. Tests were performed at a variety of radiation intensities, and both the total and spallation mass-loss rates were measured and correlated with intensity. These correlations were then applied to calculated flight heating conditions for two model atmospheres. Entry of a 310-kg probe into the nominal atmosphere would result in a spallation mass loss of 6.3 kg, or 7.4% of the expected thermochemical mass loss. Similarly, entry of that probe into the cool-dense atmosphere would result in 11.9 kg of spallation, or about 10% of the expected thermochemical mass loss.

  5. Spallation of the Galileo probe heat shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundell, J. H.

    1982-01-01

    The Galileo probe heat shield will encounter severe radiative and convective heating during entry into Jupiter's atmosphere. The shield is made of two different carbon phenolic composites; one is chopped-molded, and the other is tape-wrapped, both of which tend to spall under intense heating conditions. To characterize this phenomenon, an experimental program, using a gasdynamic laser, was initiated. Tests were performed at a variety of radiation intensities, and both the total and spallation mass-loss rates were measured and correlated with intensity. These correlations were then applied to calculated flight heating conditions for two model atmospheres. Entry of a 310-kg probe into the nominal atmosphere would result in a spallation mass loss of 6.3 kg, or 7.4% of the expected thermochemical mass loss. Similarly, entry of that probe into the cool-dense atmosphere would result in 11.9 kg of spallation, or about 10% of the expected thermochemical mass loss.

  6. Versatile honeycomb matrix heat shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zell, Peter T. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A thermal protection system for atmospheric entry of a vehicle, the system including a honeycomb structure with selected cross sectional shapes that receives and holds thermally cured thermal protection (TP) blocks that have corresponding cross sectional shapes. Material composition for TP blocks in different locations can be varied to account for different atmospheric heating characteristics at the different locations. TP block side walls may be attached to all, or to less than all, the corresponding honeycomb structure side walls.

  7. Heat flow from the Liberian precambrian shield

    SciTech Connect

    Sass, J.H.; Behrendt, J.C.

    1980-06-10

    Uncorrected heat flow in iron formation rocks from three areas within the Liberian part of the West African Shield ranges from 50 to more than 80 mW m/sup -2/. When corrections are applied for topography and refraction, the range of heat flow is narrowed to between 38 and 42 mW m/sup -2/. In comparison with heat flows from other parts of the West African Craton, these values are consistent with preliminary results from Ghana (42 +- 8 mW m/sup -2/) and Nigeria (38 +- 2 mW /sup -2/) but are somewhat higher than values from Niger (20 mW m/sup -2/) and neighboring Sierra Leone (26 mW m/sup -2/). The Liberian values are significantly lower than the heat flow offshore in the equatorial Atlantic Ocean (58 +- 8 mW m/sup -2/), suggesting large lateral temperature gradients within the lithosphere near the coast. Values of heat production from outcrops of crystalline basement rocks near the holes are between 2 and 2.3 ..mu..W m/sup -3/. A heat-flow/heat-production relation cannot be established because of the small range of values; however, assuming a 'characteristic depth' of 8 km (similar to the North American Craton) the reduced heat flow of from 20 to 25 mW m/sup -2/ is consistent with that from other Precambrian shields.

  8. Study of the ablative effects on tektites: Atmosphere entry of a swarm of tektites. [shielding by hypersonic wake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sepri, P.; Chen, K. K.

    1977-01-01

    The large variety of ablation markings observed on recovered tektites lead to the previously proposed swarm wake model which states that the lead peripheral tektites bore the blunt of aerodynamic heating upon entry, and that the bulk of tektites in the wake enjoyed partial shielding at the expense of the leaders. Further considerations are presented in support of this model. Quantitative assessments indicate that wake shielding might indeed have provided for substantially less heating than would have been experienced by a tektite entering an undisturbed atmosphere along a similar trajectory. For the case of strong wake shielding it is even possible that the surface temperature of a falling tektite had barely reached its melting point. In the distribution of tektites, there is a size band (near R = 0.5 cm) which is least susceptible to melting.

  9. Connecting the Dots: Lander, Heat Shield, Parachute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This enhanced-color image from Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter's High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera shows the Phoenix landing area viewed from orbit. The spacecraft appears more blue than it would in reality. From top to bottom are the Phoenix lander with its solar panels deployed on the Martian surface, the heat shield and bounce mark the heat shield made on the Martian surface, and the top of the Phoenix parachute attached to the bottom of the back shell.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  10. High purity silica reflective heat shield development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blome, J. C.; Drennan, D. N.; Schmitt, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    Measurements were made of reflectance in the vacuum ultraviolet down to 0.15 micron. Scattering coefficients (S) and absorption coefficients (K) were also measured. These coefficients express the optical properties and are used directly in a thermodynamic analysis for sizing a heat shield. The effect of the thin silica melt layer formed during entry was also studied from the standpoint of trapped radiant energy.

  11. Fusion neutronics-streaming, shielding, heating, activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freiesleben, H.; Richter, D.; Seidel, K.; Unholzer, S.

    2001-07-01

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) represents an important step towards a fusion power plant. Controlled fusion will be realized in a d-t-plasma magnetically confined by a Tokamak configuration. The first wall of the plasma chamber, blanket and vacuum vessel of ITER form a compact assembly for converting the kinetic energy of fusion neutrons into heat while simultaneously shielding the superconducting coils efficiently against neutron and accompanying photon radiation. This shielding system can be investigated with neutrons generated by low-energy accelerators. We report on experiments concerning shielding and streaming properties of a mock-up where energy spectra of both neutrons and protons were measured. They are compared with predictions of Monte Carlo calculations (code MCNP-4A) using various data libraries. The agreement justified the use of measured spectra as basis to calculate design parameters such as neutron and photon heating, radiation damage, gas production, and activation. Some of these parameters were also directly measured. The results validate the ITER design.

  12. Volume reflecting heat shields for entry into the giant planet atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, J. T.; Mcculley, L. D.

    1974-01-01

    The performance of a volume reflecting or backscattering silica heat shield is examined for an entry probe into the severe radiative environments of Saturn, Uranus, and Jupiter. The governing equations for the material response are solved numerically and include the effects of temperature-dependent thermal properties, temperature- and wavelength-dependent radiative properties, and surface recession caused by thermochemical ablation. The influence of the scattering properties on backface temperature is examined, and results are presented which show the required heat-shield thickness for the entry trajectories selected.

  13. Coupled Ablation, Heat Conduction, Pyrolysis, Shape Change and Spallation of the Galileo Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milos, Frank S.; Chen, Y.-K.; Rasky, Daniel J. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The Galileo probe enters the atmosphere of Jupiter in December 1995. This paper presents numerical methodology and detailed results of our final pre-impact calculations for the heat shield response. The calculations are performed using a highly modified version of a viscous shock layer code with massive radiation coupled with a surface thermochemical ablation and spallation model and with the transient in-depth thermal response of the charring and ablating heat shield. The flowfield is quasi-steady along the trajectory, but the heat shield thermal response is dynamic. Each surface node of the VSL grid is coupled with a one-dimensional thermal response calculation. The thermal solver includes heat conduction, pyrolysis, and grid movement owing to surface recession. Initial conditions for the heat shield temperature and density were obtained from the high altitude rarefied-flow calculations of Haas and Milos. Galileo probe surface temperature, shape, mass flux, and element flux are all determined as functions of time along the trajectory with spallation varied parametrically. The calculations also estimate the in-depth density and temperature profiles for the heat shield. All this information is required to determine the time-dependent vehicle mass and drag coefficient which are necessary inputs for the atmospheric reconstruction experiment on board the probe.

  14. Gamma heating in reflector heat shield of gas core reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lofthouse, J. H.; Kunze, J. F.; Young, T. E.; Young, R. C.

    1972-01-01

    Heating rate measurements made in a mock-up of a BeO heat shield for a gas core nuclear rocket engine yields results nominally a factor of two greater than calculated by two different methods. The disparity is thought to be caused by errors in neutron capture cross sections and gamma spectra from the low cross-section elements, D, O, and Be.

  15. Compression Pad Cavity Heating Augmentation on Orion Heat Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, Brian R.

    2011-01-01

    An experimental study has been conducted to assess the effects of compression pad cavities on the aeroheating environment of the Project Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle heat shield. Testing was conducted in Mach 6 and 10 perfect-gas wind tunnels to obtain heating measurements in and around the compression pads cavities using global phosphor thermography. Data were obtained over a wide range of Reynolds numbers that produced laminar, transitional, and turbulent flow within and downstream of the cavities. The effects of cavity dimensions on boundary-layer transition and heating augmentation levels were studied. Correlations were developed for transition onset and for the average cavity-heating augmentation.

  16. Space Shuttle Orbiter AFT heat shield seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walkover, L. J.

    1979-01-01

    The evolution of the orbiter aft heat shield seal (AHSS) design, which involved advancing mechanical seal technology in severe thermal environment is discussed. The baseline design, various improvements for engine access, and technical problem solution are presented. It is a structure and mechanism at the three main propulsion system (MPS) engine interfaces to the aft compartment structure. Access to each MPS engine requires disassembly and removal of the AHSS. Each AHSS accommodates the engine movement, is exposed to an extremely high temperature environment, and is part of the venting control of the aft compartment.

  17. Research and application of surface heat treatment for multipulse laser ablation of materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Song; Chen, Genyu; Zhou, Cong

    2015-11-01

    This study analysed a laser ablation platform and built heat transfer equations for multipulse laser ablation of materials. The equations include three parts: laser emission after the material melt and gasification; end of laser emission after the material melts and there is the presence of a super-hot layer and solid-phase heat transfer changes during material ablation. For each of the three parts, the effects of evaporation, plasma shielding and energy accumulation under the pulse interval were considered. The equations are reasonable, and all the required parameters are only related to the laser parameters and material properties, allowing the model to have a certain versatility and practicability. The model was applied for numerical simulation of the heat transfer characteristics in the multipulse laser ablation of bronze and diamond. Next, experiments were conducted to analyse the topography of a bronze-bonded diamond grinding wheel after multipulse laser ablation. The theoretical analysis and experimental results showed that multipulse laser can merge the truing and dressing on a bronze-bonded diamond grinding wheel. This study provides theoretical guidance for optimising the process parameters in the laser ablation of a bronze-bonded diamond grinding wheel. A comparative analysis showed that the numerical solution to the model is in good agreement with the experimental data, thus verifying the correctness and feasibility of the heat transfer model.

  18. Heat shield characterization: Outer planet atmospheric entry probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mezines, S. A.; Rusert, E. L.; Disser, E. F.

    1976-01-01

    A full scale carbon phenolic heat shield was fabricated for the Outer Planet Probe in order to demonstrate the feasibility of molding large carbon phenolic parts with a new fabrication processing method (multistep). The sphere-cone heat shield was molded as an integral unit with the nose cap plies configured into a double inverse chevron shape to achieve the desired ply orientation. The fabrication activity was successful and the feasibility of the multistep processing technology was established. Delaminations or unbonded plies were visible on the heat shield and resulted from excessive loss of resin and lack of sufficient pressure applied on the part during the curing cycle. A comprehensive heat shield characterization test program was conducted, including: nondestructive tests with the full scale heat shield and thermal and mechanical property tests with small test specimen.

  19. The kinetics of reaction of the by-products of ablative materials at high temperatures and the rate of heat transfer between hot surfaces and reactive gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spokes, G. N.; Beadle, P. C.; Gac, N. A.; Golden, D. M.; King, K. D.; Benson, S. W.

    1971-01-01

    Research has been conducted by means of laboratory experiments to enhance understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of heterogeneous and homogeneous chemical reactions taking place during ablative processes that accompany the reentry or manned space vehicles into planetary atmospheres. Fundamental mechanisms of those chemical reactions believed to be important in the thermal degradation of ablative plastic heat shield materials, and the gases evolved, are described.

  20. The SRB heat shield: Aeroelastic stability during reentry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ventres, C. S.; Dowell, E. H.

    1977-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests of a 3% scale model of the aft portion of the SRB equipped with partially scaled heat shields were conducted for the purpose of measuring fluctuating pressure levels in the aft skirt region. During these tests, the heat shields were observed to oscillate violently, the oscillations in some instances causing the heat shields to fail. High speed films taken during the tests reveal a regular pattern of waves in the fabric starting near the flow stagnation point and progressing around both sides of the annulus. The amplitude of the waves was too great, and their pattern too regular, for them to be attributed to the fluctuating pressure levels measured during the tests. The cause of the oscillations observed in the model heat shields, and whether or not similar oscillations will occur in the full scale SRB heat shield during reentry were investigated. Suggestions for modifying the heat shield so as to avoid the oscillations are provided, and recommendations are made for a program of vibration and wind tunnel tests of reduced-scale aeroelastic models of the heat shield.

  1. Flow-Dependent Vascular Heat Transfer during Microwave Thermal Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Jason; Hynes, Kieran; Brace, Christopher L.

    2012-01-01

    Microwave tumor ablation is an attractive option for thermal ablation because of its inherent benefits over radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in the treatment of solid tumors such as hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Microwave energy heats tissue to higher temperatures and at a faster rate than RFA, creating larger, more homogenous ablation zones. In this study, we investigate microwave heating near large vasculature using coupled fluid-flow and thermal analysis. Low-flow conditions are predicted to be more likely to cause cytotoxic heating and, therefore, vessel thrombosis and endothelial damage of downstream tissues. Such conditions may be more prevalent in patient with severe cirrhosis or compromised blood flow. High-flow conditions create the more familiar heat-sink effect that can protect perivascular tissues from the intended thermal damage. These results may help guide placement and use of microwave ablation technologies in future studies. PMID:23367194

  2. Fiber optic temperature profiling for thermal protection heat shields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Richard J.; Costa, Joannes M.; Moslehi, Behzad; Zarnescu, Livia; Hackney, Drew; Peters, Kara

    2014-04-01

    Reliable Thermal Protection System (TPS) sensors are needed to achieve better designs for spacecraft (probe) heatshields for missions requiring atmospheric aero-capture or entry/reentry. In particular, they will allow both reduced risk and heat-shield mass minimization, which will facilitate more missions and allow increased payloads and returns. For thermal measurements, Intelligent Fiber Optic Systems Corporation (IFOS) is providing a temperature monitoring system involving innovative lightweight, EMI-immune, high-temperature resistant Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensors with a thermal mass near that of TPS materials together with fast FBG sensor interrogation. The IFOS fiber optic sensing technology is highly sensitive and accurate. It is also low-cost and lends itself to high-volume production. Multiple sensing FBGs can be fabricated as arrays on a single fiber for simplified design and reduced cost. In this paper, we provide experimental results to demonstrate the temperature monitoring system using multi-sensor FBG arrays embedded in small-size Super-Light Ablator (SLA) coupon, which was thermally loaded to temperatures in the vicinity of the SLA charring temperature. In addition, a high temperature FBG array was fabricated and tested for 1000°C operation.

  3. Ames Research Center Shear Tests of SLA-561V Heat Shield Material for Mars-Pathfinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tauber, Michael; Tran, Huy; Henline, William; Cartledge, Alan; Hui, Frank; Tran, Duoc; Zimmerman, Norm

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the results of arc-jet testing at Ames Research Center on behalf of Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for the development of the Mars-Pathfinder heat shield. The current test series evaluated the performance of the ablating SLA-561V heat shield material under shear conditions. In addition, the effectiveness of several methods of repairing damage to the heat shield were evaluated. A total of 26 tests were performed in March 1994 in the 2 in. X 9 in. arc-heated turbulent Duct Facility, including runs to calibrate the facility to obtain the desired shear stress conditions. A total of eleven models were tested. Three different conditions of shear and heating were used. The non-ablating surface shear stresses and the corresponding, approximate, non-ablating surface heating rates were as follows: Condition 1, 170 N/m(exp 2) and 22 W/cm(exp 2); Condition 2, 240 N/m(exp 2) and 40 W/cm(exp 2); Condition 3, 390 N/m(exp 2) and 51 W/cm(exp 2). The peak shear stress encountered in flight is represented approximately by Condition 1; however, the heating rate was much less than the peak flight value. The peak heating rate that was available in the facility (at Condition 3) was about 30 percent less than the maximum value encountered during flight. Seven standard ablation models were tested, of which three models were instrumented with thermocouples to obtain in-depth temperature profiles and temperature contours. An additional four models contained a variety of repair plugs, gaps, and seams. These models were used to evaluated different repair materials and techniques, and the effect of gaps and construction seams. Mass loss and surface recession measurements were made on all models. The models were visually inspected and photographed before and after each test. The SLA-561 V performed well; even at test Condition 3, the char remained intact. Most of the resins used for repairs and gap fillers performed poorly. However, repair plugs made of SLA-561V performed

  4. Enabling a Better Aft Heat Shield Solution for Future Mars Science Laboratory Class Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGuire, Mary K.; Covington, Melmoth A.; Goldstein, Howard E.; Arnold, James O.; Beck, Robin

    2013-01-01

    System studies are described that compare masses and estimated manufacturing costs of options for the as-flown Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) aft body Thermal Light Weight Ablator (SLA) 561-V and its thickness was not optimized using the standard TPS Sizer Tool widely used for heat shield design. Use of the TPS sizing tool suggests that optimization of the SLA thickness could reduce the aft heat shield mass by 40 percent. Analysis of the predicted aft-shell aerothermodynamics suggests that the bulk of MSL class entry vehicle heat shields could incorporate Advanced Flexible Reusable Surface Insulation (AFRSI). AFRSI has a wellestablished record of relatively inexpensive manufacturing and flight certification based on its use on the lee side of the Space Shuttle. Runs with the TPS Sizer show that the AFRSI solution would be 60 percent lighter than the as-flown SLA. The issue of Reaction Control System (RCS) heating on the aft shell could be addressed by locally impregnating the AFRSI with silicone to enhance its robustness to short bursts ofheating. Stagnation point arcjet testing has shown that silicone impregnated AFRSI performs well at heat rates of 115 W/cm2 and 0.1 atmospheres for a duration of 40 seconds, far beyond conditions that are expected for MSL class vehicles. The paper concludes with a discussion of manufacturing processes for AFRSI, impregnation approaches and relative cost comparisons to the SLA solution.

  5. Transient Ablation of Teflon Hemispheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arai, Norio; Karashima, Kei-ichi; Sato, Kiyoshi

    1997-01-01

    For high-speed entry of space vehicles into atmospheric environments, ablation is a practical method for alleviating severe aerodynamic heating. Several studies have been undertaken on steady or quasi-steady ablation. However, ablation is a very complicated phenomenon in which a nonequilibrium chemical process is associated with an aerodynamic process that involves changes in body shape with time. Therefore, it seems realistic to consider that ablation is an unsteady phenomenon. In the design of an ablative heat-shield system, since the ultimate purpose of the heat shield is to keep the internal temperature of the space vehicle at a safe level during entry, the transient heat conduction characteristics of the ablator may be critical in the selection of the material and its thickness. This note presents an experimental study of transient ablation of Teflon, with particular emphasis on the change in body shape, the instantaneous internal temperature distribution, and the effect of thermal expansion on ablation rate.

  6. Heat-Based Tumor Ablation: Role of the Immune Response.

    PubMed

    Wu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    The ideal cancer therapy not only induces the death of all localized tumor cells with less damage to surrounding normal tissue, but also activates a systemic antitumor immunity. Heat-based tumor ablation has the potential to be such a treatment as it can minimal-invasively ablate a targeted tumor below the skin surface, and may subsequently augment host antitumor immunity. This chapter primarily introduces increasing pre-clinical and clinical evidence linking antitumor immune response to thermal tumor ablation, and then discusses the potential mechanisms involved in ablation-enhanced host antitumor immunity. The seminal studies performed so far indicate that although it is not possible to make definite conclusions on the connection between thermal ablation and antitumor immune response, it is nonetheless important to conduct extensive studies on the subject in order to elucidate the processes involved. PMID:26486336

  7. A technique for evaluating the Jovian entry-probe heat-shield material with a gasdynamic laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickey, R. R.; Lundell, J. H.

    1979-01-01

    The paper presents a technique for evaluating the Jovian entry-probe heat-shield material with a gasdynamic laser. This entry probe of Project Galileo will incorporate a forebody heat shield of carbon phenolic ablative; at the expected peak radiant intensity of 42 kW/sq cm this material can be evaluated by a CO2 gasdynamic laser. The typically quasigaussian spatial distribution of the laser output beam is converted to a spatially uniform beam by a new optical integrator; the ablation results can be related to the imposed intensity and then to the flight situation with a uniform beam. The tests show that the carbon phenolic tends to spall under intense radiation, and this process is quantified by a particle capture technique.

  8. The Influence of Ablation on Radiative Heating for Earth Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Christopher O.; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Sutton, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    Using the coupled ablation and radiation capability recently included in the LAURA flowfield solver, this paper investigates the influence of ablation on the shock-layer radiative heating for Earth entry. The extension of the HARA radiation model, which provides the radiation predictions in LAURA, to treat a gas consisting of the elements C, H, O, and N is discussed. It is shown that the absorption coefficient of air is increased with the introduction of the C and H elements. A simplified shock layer model is studied to show the impact of temperature, as well as the abundance of C and H, on the net absorption or emission from an ablation contaminated boundary layer. It is found that the ablation species reduce the radiative flux in the vacuum ultraviolet, through increased absorption, for all temperatures. However, in the infrared region of the spectrum, the ablation species increase the radiative flux, through strong emission, for temperatures above 3,000 K. Thus, depending on the temperature and abundance of ablation species, the contaminated boundary layer may either provide a net increase or decrease in the radiative flux reaching the wall. To assess the validity of the coupled ablation and radiation LAURA analysis, a previously analyzed Mars-return case (15.24 km/s), which contains significant ablation and radiation coupling, is studied. Exceptional agreement with previous viscous shock-layer results is obtained. A 40% decrease in the radiative flux is predicted for ablation rates equal to 20% of the free-stream mass flux. The Apollo 4 peak-heating case (10.24 km/s) is also studied. For ablation rates up to 3.4% of the free-stream mass flux, the radiative heating is reduced by up to 19%, while the convective heating is reduced by up to 87%. Good agreement with the Apollo 4 radiometer data is obtained by considering absorption in the radiometer cavity. For both the Mars return and the Apollo 4 cases, coupled radiation alone is found to reduce the radiative

  9. Preliminary Development of a Multifunctional Hot Structure Heat Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Sandra P.; Daryabeigi, Kamran; Samareh, Jamshid A.; Armand, Sasan C.; Perino, Scott V

    2014-01-01

    Development of a Multifunctional Hot Structure Heat Shield concept has initiated with the goal to provide advanced technology with significant benefits compared to the current state of the art heat shield technology. The concept is unique in integrating the function of the thermal protection system with the primary load carrying structural component. An advanced carbon-carbon material system has been evaluated for the load carrying structure, which will be utilized on the outer surface of the heat shield, and thus will operate as a hot structure exposed to the severe aerodynamic heating associated with planetary entry. Flexible, highly efficient blanket insulation has been sized for use underneath the hot structure to maintain desired internal temperatures. The approach was to develop a preliminary design to demonstrate feasibility of the concept. The preliminary results indicate that the concept has the potential to save both mass and volume with significantly less recession compared to traditional heat shield designs, and thus provide potential to enable new planetary missions.

  10. Ames Research Center Mars/Pathfinder Heat Shield Design Verification ARC-JET Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tran, Huy K.; Hui, Frank; Wercinski, Paul; Cartledge, Alan; Tauber, Mike; Tran, Duoc T.; Chen, Y. K.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Design verification tests were performed on samples representing the aerobrake of the Mars/Pathfinder vehicle. The test specimens consisted of the SLA-561V ablator bonded to the honeycomb structure. The primary objective was to evaluate the ablation materials performance and to measure temperatures within the ablator, at the structural bondline and at the back sheet of the honeycomb structure. Other objectives were to evaluate the effect of ablative repair plug material treatment and voids in the heat shield. A total of 29 models were provided for testing in the Ames 60MW arc-jet facility. Of these, 23 models were flat-faced and six remaining models were curved edge ones, intended to simulate the conditions on the curved rim of the forebody where the maximum shear occurred. Eight sets of test conditions were used. The stagnation point heating rates varied from 47 to 240 W/cm2 and the stagnation pressures from 0.15 to 0.27 atm. (The maximum flight values are 132 W/cm2 and 0.25 atm) The majority of these runs were made at a nominal stagnation pressure of 0.25 atm. Two higher pressure runs were made to check the current (denser) ablation material for spallation, or other forms of thermal stress failure. Over 60% of the flatfaced models yielded good thermocouple data and all produced useful surface recession information. Of the five curved-edge models that were tested, only one gave good data; the remaining ones experienced model-holder failure. The test results can be summarized by noting that no failure of the ablative material was observed on any model. Also, the bondline temperature design limit of 250 C was never reached within an equivalent flight time despite a stagnation point heat load that exceeded the maximum flight value by up to 130%. At heating rates of over 200W/cm2 and stagnation pressures of 0.25 atm, or greater, the average surface recessions exceeded 0.5 cm on some models. The surface roughness increased dramatically at pressures above 0.25 atm and

  11. Color Image of Phoenix Heat Shield and Bounce Mark

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This shows a color image from Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter's High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment camera. It shows the Phoenix heat shield and bounce mark on the Mars surface.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  12. Study of the ablative effects on tektites. [wake shielding during atmospheric entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sepri, P.; Chen, K. K.

    1976-01-01

    Equations are presented which provide approximate parameters describing surface heating and tektite deceleration during atmosphere passage. Numerical estimates of these parameters using typical initial and ambient conditions support the conclusion that the commonly assumed trajectories would not have produced some of the observed surface markings. It is suggested that tektites did not enter the atmosphere singly but rather in a swarm dense enough to afford wake shielding according to a shock envelope model which is proposed. A further aerodynamic mechanism is described which is compatible with hemispherical pits occurring on tektite surfaces.

  13. Isotherm Sensor Calibration Program for Mars Science Laboratory Heat Shield Flight Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santos, Jose A.; Oishi, Tomo; Martinez, Ed R.

    2011-01-01

    Seven instrumented sensor plugs were installed on the Mars Science Laboratory heat shield in December 2008 as part of the Mars Science Laboratory Entry, Descent, and Landing Instrumentation (MEDLI) project. These sensor plugs contain four in-depth thermocouples and one Hollow aErothermal Ablation and Temperature (HEAT) sensor. The HEAT sensor follows the time progression of a 700 C isotherm through the thickness of a thermal protection system (TPS) material. The data can be used to infer char depth and, when analyzed in conjunction with the thermocouple data, the thermal gradient through the TPS material can also be determined. However, the uncertainty on the isotherm value is not well defined. To address this uncertainty, a team at NASA Ames Research Center is carrying out a HEAT sensor calibration test program. The scope of this test program is described, and initial results from experiments conducted in the laboratory to study the isotherm temperature of the HEAT sensor are presented. Data from the laboratory tests indicate an isotherm temperature of 720 C 60 C. An overview of near term arc jet testing is also given, including preliminary data from 30.48cm 30.48cm PICA panels instrumented with two MEDLI sensor plugs and tested in the NASA Ames Panel Test Facility. Forward work includes analysis of the arc jet test data, including an evaluation of the isotherm value based on the instant in time when it reaches a thermocouple depth.

  14. Structural performance of two aerobrake hexagonal heat shield panel concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorsey, John T.; Dyess, James W.

    1992-01-01

    Structural sizing and performance are presented for two structural concepts for an aerobrake hexagonal heat shield panel. One concept features a sandwich construction with an aluminum honeycomb core and thin quasi-isotropic graphite-epoxy face sheets. The other concept features a skin-rib isogrid construction with thin quasi-isotropic graphite-epoxy skins and graphite-epoxy ribs oriented at 0, +60, and -60 degs along the panel. Linear static, linear bifurcation buckling, and nonlinear static analyses were performed to compare the structural performance of the two panel concepts and assess their feasibility for a lunar transfer vehicle aerobrake application.

  15. Vaporization characteristics of carbon heat shields under radiative heating.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davy, W. C.; Bar-Nun, A.

    1972-01-01

    Study of the vaporization characteristics of samples of ATJ graphite, a material that has been considered for use on a Jovian probe. These samples were subjected to radiative heating loads of approximately 2 kW/sq cm in argon atmospheres of pressures from 0.00046 to 1 atm. Surface temperatures, mass loss rates, and spatially resolved emission spectral data were recorded. These data are analyzed to determine carbon vapor pressure as a function of temperature and are compared with current models for the vapor pressure of carbon. The effects of finite vaporization (i.e., nonequilibrium) rates are considered and compared with experiment. Estimates of the heat of vaporization from an energy balance are also presented.

  16. Effects of polarization-charge shielding in microwave heating

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, M. S.; Lin, S. M.; Chiang, W. Y.; Barnett, L. R.; Chu, K. R.

    2015-08-15

    Heating of dielectric objects by radio frequency (RF) and microwaves has long been a method widely employed in scientific research and industrial applications. However, RF and microwave heating are often susceptible to an excessive temperature spread due to uneven energy deposition. The current study elucidates an important physical reason for this difficulty and proposes an effective remedy. Non-spherical samples are placed in an anechoic chamber, where it is irradiated by a traveling microwave wave with 99% intensity uniformity. Polarization charges induced on the samples tend to partially cancel the incident electric field and hence reduce the heating rate. The polarization-charge shielded heating rate is shown to be highly dependent on the sample's shape and its orientation relative to the wave electric field. For samples with a relatively high permittivity, the resultant uneven heating can become a major cause for the excessive temperature spread. It is also demonstrated that a circularly polarized wave, with its rapidly rotating electric field, can effectively even out the heating rate and hence the temperature spread.

  17. Oxidation and emittance of superalloys in heat shield applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiedemann, K. E.; Clark, R. K.; Unnam, J.

    1986-01-01

    Recently developed superalloys that form alumina coatings have a high potential for heat shield applications for advanced aerospace vehicles at temperatures above 1095C. Both INCOLOY alloy MA 956 (of the Inco Alloys International, Inc.), an iron-base oxide-dispersion-strengthened alloy, and CABOT alloy No. 214 (of the Cabot Corporation), an alumina-forming nickel-chromium alloy, have good oxidation resistance and good elevated temperature strength. The oxidation resistance of both alloys has been attributed to the formation of a thin alumina layer (alpha-Al2O3) at the surface. Emittance and oxidation data were obtained for simulated Space Shuttle reentry conditions using a hypersonic arc-heated wind tunnel. The surface oxides and substrate alloys were characterized using X-ray diffraction and scanning and transmission electron microscopy with an energy-dispersive X-ray analysis unit. The mass loss and emittance characteristics of the two alloys are discussed.

  18. High-purity silica reflecting heat shield development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Congdon, W. M.

    1974-01-01

    A high-purity, fused-silica reflecting heat shield for the thermal protection of outer-planet probes was developed. Factors that strongly influence the performance of a silica heat shield were studied. Silica-bonded silica configurations, each prepared by a different technique, were investigated and rated according to its relative merits. Slip-casting was selected as the preferred fabrication method because it produced good reflectivity and good strength, and is relatively easy to scale up for a full-size outer-planet probe. The slips were cast using a variety of different particle sizes: continuous particle-size slips; monodisperse particle-size slips; and blends of monodisperse particle-size slips were studied. In general, smaller particles gave the highest reflectance. The monodisperse slips as well as the blend slips gave a higher reflectance than the continuous particle-size slips. An upgraded and fused natural quartz was used to study the effects of microstructure on reflectance and as the baseline to ascertain the increase in reflectance obtained from using a higher-purity synthetic material.

  19. View of Spacecraft 012 Command Module during installation of heat shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    High angle view of Spacecraft 012 Command Module, looking toward -Z axis, during preparation for installation of the crew compartment heat shield, showing mechanics working on aft bay (41851); Spacecraft 012 looking toward -Y axis during installation of heat shield. Note uprighting system compressor in aft bay, at right, and Reaction Control System (RCS) valve module panel, center of photo (41852); Crew compartment heat shield being prepared for installation (41853).

  20. Castor-1C spent fuel storage cask decay heat, heat transfer, and shielding analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Rector, D.R.; McCann, R.A.; Jenquin, U.P.; Heeb, C.M.; Creer, J.M.; Wheeler, C.L.

    1986-12-01

    This report documents the decay heat, heat transfer, and shielding analyses of the Gesellschaft fuer Nuklear Services (GNS) CASTOR-1C cask used in a spent fuel storage demonstration performed at Preussen Elektra's Wurgassen nuclear power plant. The demonstration was performed between March 1982 and January 1984, and resulted in cask and fuel temperature data and cask exterior surface gamma-ray and neutron radiation dose rate measurements. The purpose of the analyses reported here was to evaluate decay heat, heat transfer, and shielding computer codes. The analyses consisted of (1) performing pre-look predictions (predictions performed before the analysts were provided the test data), (2) comparing ORIGEN2 (decay heat), COBRA-SFS and HYDRA (heat transfer), and QAD and DOT (shielding) results to data, and (3) performing post-test analyses if appropriate. Even though two heat transfer codes were used to predict CASTOR-1C cask test data, no attempt was made to compare the two codes. The codes are being evaluated with other test data (single-assembly data and other cask data), and to compare the codes based on one set of data may be premature and lead to erroneous conclusions.

  1. Woven Thermal Protection System Based Heat-shield for Extreme Entry Environments Technology (HEEET)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellerby, Donald; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Stackpoole, Margaret; Chinnapongse, Ronald; Munk, Michelle; Dillman, Robert; Feldman, Jay; Prabhu, Dinesh; Beerman, Adam

    2013-01-01

    NASA's future robotic missions utilizing an entry system into Venus and the outer planets, namely, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, result in extremely high entry conditions that exceed the capabilities of state of the art low to mid density ablators such as PICA or Avcoat. Therefore mission planners typically assume the use of a fully dense carbon phenolic heat shield similar to what was flown on Pioneer Venus and Galileo. Carbon phenolic is a robust TPS material however its high density and relatively high thermal conductivity constrain mission planners to steep entries, with high heat fluxes and pressures and short entry durations, in order for CP to be feasible from a mass perspective. The high entry conditions pose challenges for certification in existing ground based test facilities and the longer-term sustainability of CP will continue to pose challenges. In 2012 the Game Changing Development Program (GCDP) in NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate funded NASA ARC to investigate the feasibility of a Woven Thermal Protection System (WTPS) to meet the needs of NASA's most challenging entry missions. This project was highly successful demonstrating that a Woven TPS solution compares favorably to CP in performance in simulated reentry environments and provides the opportunity to manufacture graded materials that should result in overall reduced mass solutions and enable a much broader set of missions than does CP. Building off the success of the WTPS project GCDP has funded a follow on project to further mature and scale up the WTPS concept for insertion into future NASA robotic missions. The matured WTPS will address the CP concerns associated with ground based test limitations and sustainability. This presentation will briefly discuss results from the WTPS Project and the plans for WTPS maturation into a heat-shield for extreme entry environment.

  2. Woven Thermal Protection System Based Heat-shield for Extreme Entry Environments Technology (HEEET)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chinnapongse, Ronald; Ellerbe, Donald; Stackpoole, Maragaret; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Beerman, Adam; Feldman, Jay; Peterson Keith; Prabhu, Dinesh; Dillman, Robert; Munk, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    NASA's future robotic missions utilizing an entry system into Venus and the outer planets, namely, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, result in extremely severe entry conditions that exceed the capabilities of state of the art low to mid density ablators such as PICA or Avcoat. Therefore mission planners typically assume the use of a fully dense carbon phenolic heat shield similar to what was flown on Pioneer Venus and Galileo. Carbon phenolic (CP) is a robust TPS material however its high density and relatively high thermal conductivity constrain mission planners to steep entries, with high heat fluxes and pressures and short entry durations, in order for CP to be feasible from a mass perspective. The high entry conditions pose challenges for certification in existing ground based test facilities and the longer-­-term sustainability of CP will continue to pose challenges. In 2012 the Game Changing Development Program (GCDP) in NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate funded NASA ARC to investigate the feasibility of a Woven Thermal Protection System (WTPS) to meet the needs of NASA's most challenging entry missions. This project was highly successful demonstrating that a Woven TPS solution compares favorably to CP in performance in simulated reentry environments and provides the opportunity to manufacture graded materials that should result in overall reduced mass solutions and enable a much broader set of missions than does CP. Building off the success of the WTPS project GCDP has funded a follow on project to further mature and scale up the WTPS concept for insertion into future NASA robotic missions. The matured WTPS will address the CP concerns associated with ground based test limitations and sustainability. This presentation will briefly discuss results from the WTPS Project and the plans for WTPS maturation into a heat-­-shield for extreme entry environment.

  3. Heating Augmentation Due to Compression Pad Cavities on the Project Orion CEV Heat Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, Brian R.

    2009-01-01

    An experimental study has been conducted to assess the effects of compression pad cavities on the aeroheating environment of the Project Orion CEV heat-shield. Testing was conducted in Mach 6 and Mach 10 perfect-gas wind tunnels to obtain heating measurements in and around the compression pads cavities using global phosphor thermography. Data were obtained over a wide range of Reynolds numbers that produced laminar, transitional, and turbulent flow within and downstream of the cavities. The effects of cavity dimensions on boundary-layer transition and heating augmentation levels were studied. Correlations were developed for transition onset and for the average cavity-heating augmentation.

  4. The heat shield for the Mars Polar Lander is attached

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2), workers get ready to lift the heat shield for the Mars Polar Lander off the workstand before attaching it to the lander. Scheduled to be launched on Jan. 3, 1999, the lander is a solar- powered spacecraft designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere. It is the second spacecraft to be launched in a pair of Mars '98 missions. The first is the Mars Climate Orbiter, which is due to be launched aboard a Delta II rocket from Launch Complex 17A on Dec. 11, 1998.

  5. The heat shield for the Mars Polar Lander is attached

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2), workers lower the heat shield onto the Mars Polar Lander. Scheduled to be launched on Jan. 3, 1999, the lander is a solar- powered spacecraft designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere. It is the second spacecraft to be launched in a pair of Mars '98 missions. The first is the Mars Climate Orbiter, which is due to be launched aboard a Delta II rocket from Launch Complex 17A on Dec. 11, 1998.

  6. Heating Augmentation in Laminar Flow Due to Heat-Shield Cavities on the Project Orion CEV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, Brian R.

    2008-01-01

    An experimental study has been conducted to assess the effects of compression pad cavities on the aeroheating environment of the Project Orion CEV heat-shield at laminar conditions. Testing was conducted in Mach 6 and Mach 10 perfect-gas wind tunnels to obtain heating measurements on and around the compression pads using global phosphor thermography. Consistent trends in heating augmentation levels were observed in the data and correlations of average and maximum heating at the cavities were formulated in terms of the local boundary-layer parameters and cavity dimensions. Additional heating data from prior testing of Genesis and Mars Science Laboratory models were also examined to extend the parametric range of cavity heating correlations.

  7. Circular radiation heat shields with temperature dependent emissivities: transient and steady-state analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, H.; Li, X.; Hu, S.; Li, Z.; Chen, A.

    2016-03-01

    Radiation heat loss is an important type of heat loss in thermal systems. In this work, a numerical study of the transient response of two circular radiation heat shields inserted between two parallel and circular surfaces of emissivities ɛ1 and ɛ2 is presented. The same dimensions have been assumed for the two main radiating surfaces and the two radiation shields. The radiation shields are assumed to have different emissivities on their top (ɛ3 and ɛ5) and bottom ( ɛ4 and ɛ6) surfaces, and both are assumed to be different but linear functions of temperature. A specific configuration is investigated in detail to highlight the transient temperature and heat transfer characteristics of the system. Some new results for the transient temperature and heat transfer characteristics of the system such as the effect of shield location, shield emissivities, the temperature dependence of shield emissivities, system dimensions, temperatures of the hot and cold surfaces and emissivities of the hot and cold surfaces are presented for future references. It has been observed that increasing the temperature of the first radiation shield by changing a parameter such as surface emissivity or distance between the radiation shield or the temperature of the hot surface, will not necessarily decrease the temperature of the second radiation shield.

  8. Pulsed IR laser ablation of organic polymers in air: shielding effects and plasma pipe formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchenko, A. N.; Shulepov, M. A.; Tel'minov, A. E.; Zakharov, L. A.; Paletsky, A. A.; Bulgakova, N. M.

    2011-09-01

    We report the effect of 'plasma pipe' formation on pulsed laser ablation of organic polymers in air under normal conditions. Ablation of polymers (PMMA, polyimide) is carried out in a wide range of CO2 laser fluences with special attention to plasma formation in the ablation products. Evolution of laser ablation plumes in air under different pressures is investigated with simultaneous registration of radiation spectra of the ablation products. An analysis based on thermo-chemical modelling is performed to elucidate the effects of laser light attenuation upon ablation, including plasma and chemical processes in a near-target space. The analysis has shown that the experimental observations of plume development in air can be explained by a combination of processes including formation of a pre-ionized channel along the laser beam propagation, laser-supported detonation wave and effective combustion of the polymer ablation products. A scenario of a streamer-like polymer plasma flow within an air plasma pipe created via laser-induced breakdown is proposed.

  9. Regolith-Derived Heat Shield for Planetary Body Entry and Descent System with In-Situ Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogue, Michael D.; Mueller, Robert P.; Sibille, Laurent; Hintze, Paul E.; Rasky, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    High-mass planetary surface access is one of NASA's Grand Challenges involving entry, descent, and landing (EDL). Heat shields fabricated in-situ can provide a thermal protection system for spacecraft that routinely enter a planetary atmosphere. Fabricating the heat shield from extraterrestrial regolith will avoid the costs of launching the heat shield mass from Earth. This project investigated three methods to fabricate heat shield using extraterrestrial regolith and performed preliminary work on mission architectures.

  10. Regolith-Derived Heat Shield for Planetary Body Entry and Descent System with In-Situ Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogue, Michael D.; Mueller, Robert P.; Sibille, Laurent; Hintze, Paul E.; Rasky, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    High-mass planetary surface access is one of NASA's Grand Challenges involving entry, descent, and landing (EDL). Heat shields fabricated in-situ can provide a thermal protection system for spacecraft that routinely enter a planetary atmosphere. Fabricating the heat shield from extraterrestrial regolith will avoid the costs of launching the heat shield mass from Earth. This project will investigate three methods to fabricate heat shield using extraterrestrial regolith.

  11. Evaluation of dispersion strengthened nickel-base alloy heat shields for space shuttle application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R., Jr.; Killpatrick, D. H.

    1975-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and testing of a full-size, full-scale TD Ni-20Cr heat shield test array in simulated mission environments is described along with the design and fabrication of two additional full-size, full-scale test arrays to be tested in flowing gas test facilities at the NASA Langley Research Center. Cost and reusability evaluations of TD Ni-20Cr heat shield systems are presented, and weight estimates of a TD Ni-20Cr heat shield system for use on a shuttle orbiter vehicle are made. Safe-line expectancy of a TD Ni-20Cr heat shield system is assessed. Non-destructive test techniques are evaluated to determine their effectiveness in quality assurance checks of TD Ni-20Cr components such as heat shields, heat shield supports, close-out panels, formed cover strips, and edge seals. Results of tests on a braze reinforced full-scale, subsize panel are included. Results show only minor structural degradation in the main TD Ni-20Cr heat shields of the test array during simulated mission test cycles.

  12. On thermal stress failure of the SNAP-19A RTG heat shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, W. C.; Anderson, L. A.

    1974-01-01

    Results of a study on thermal stress problems in an amorphous graphite heat shield that is part of the launch-abort protect system for the SNAP-19A radio-isotope thermoelectric generators (RTG) that will be used on the Viking Mars Lander are presended. The first result is from a thermal stress analysis of a full-scale RTG heat source that failed to survive a suborbital entry flight test, possibly due to thermal stress failure. It was calculated that the maximum stress in the heat shield was only 50 percent of the ultimate strength of the material. To provide information on the stress failure criterion used for this calculation, some heat shield specimens were fractured under abort entry conditions in a plasma arc facility. It was found that in regions free of stress concentrations the POCO graphite heat shield material did fracture when the local stress reached the ultimate uniaxial stress of the material.

  13. Radiation and Ablation Cooling for Manned Reentry Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, L.

    1960-01-01

    The necessity of reducing heat transfer to reentry vehicles has led I to the consideration of both radiative and ablation shields. The paper reviews briefly the heating problems for manned vehicles and the means whereby ablation and radiation afford thermal protection. The principal energy disposal and weight parameters are then presented and their relation to the vehicle and trajectory parameters is discussed. A comparative analysis of three types of ablation shield is made and broad conclusions are drawn as to the type of shield most appropriate to manned reentry vehicles.

  14. Estimation of surface heat flux for ablation and charring of thermal protection material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Wei-qi; He, Kai-feng; Zhou, Yu

    2016-07-01

    Ablation of the thermal protection material of the reentry hypersonic flight vehicle is a complex physical and chemical process. To estimate the surface heat flux from internal temperature measurement is much more complex than the conventional inverse heat conduction problem case. In the paper, by utilizing a two-layer pyrogeneration-plane ablation model to model the ablation and charring of the material, modifying the finite control volume method to suit for the numerical simulation of the heat conduction equation with variable-geometry, the CGM along with the associated adjoint problem is developed to estimate the surface heat flux. This estimation method is verified with a numerical example at first, the results show that the estimation method is feasible and robust. The larger is the measurement noise, the greater is the deviation of the estimated result from the exact value, and the measurement noise of ablated surface position has a significant and more direct influence on the estimated result of surface heat flux. Furthermore, the estimation method is used to analyze the experimental data of ablation of blunt Carbon-phenolic material Narmco4028 in an arc-heater. It is shown that the estimated surface heat flux agrees with the heating power value of the arc-heater, and the estimation method is basically effective and potential to treat the engineering heat conduction problem with ablation.

  15. Carbon phenolic heat shields for Jupiter/Saturn/Uranus entry probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mezines, S.

    1974-01-01

    Carbon phenolic heat shield technology is reviewed. Heat shield results from the outer planetary probe mission studies are summarized along with results of plasma jet testing of carbon phenolic conducted in a ten megawatt facility. Missile flight data is applied to planetary entry conditions. A carbon phenolic heat shield material is utilized and tailored to accommodate each of the probe missions. An integral heat shield approach is selected over in order to eliminate a high temperature interface problem and permit direct bonding of the carbon phenolic to the structural honeycomb sandwich. The sandwich is filled with a very fine powder to minimize degradation of its insulation properties by the high conductive hydrogen/helium gases during the long atmospheric descent phase.

  16. Regolith Derived Heat Shield for Planetary Body Entry and Descent System with In Situ Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogue, Michael D.; Mueller, Robert P.; Sibille, Laurent; Hintze, Paul E.; Rasky, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    This NIAC project investigated an innovative approach to provide heat shield protection to spacecraft after launch and prior to each EDL thus potentially realizing significant launch mass savings. Heat shields fabricated in situ can provide a thermal-protection system for spacecraft that routinely enter a planetary atmosphere. By fabricating the heat shield with space resources from materials available on moons and asteroids, it is possible to avoid launching the heat-shield mass from Earth. Regolith has extremely good insulating properties and the silicates it contains can be used in the fabrication and molding of thermal-protection materials. Such in situ developed heat shields have been suggested before by Lewis. Prior research efforts have shown that regolith properties can be compatible with very-high temperature resistance. Our project team is highly experienced in regolith processing and thermal protection systems (TPS). Routine access to space and return from any planetary surface requires dealing with heat loads experienced by the spacecraft during reentry. Our team addresses some of the key issues with the EDL of human-scale missions through a highly innovative investigation of heat shields that can be fabricated in space by using local resources on asteroids and moons. Most space missions are one-way trips, dedicated to placing an asset in space for economical or scientific gain. However, for human missions, a very-reliable heat-shield system is necessary to protect the crew from the intense heat experienced at very high entry velocities of approximately 11 km/s at approximately Mach 33 (Apollo). For a human mission to Mars, the return problem is even more difficult, with predicted velocities of up to 14 km/s, at approximately Mach 42 at the Earth-atmosphere entry. In addition to human return, it is very likely that future space-travel architecture will include returning cargo to the Earth, either for scientific purposes or for commercial reasons

  17. Regolith Derived Heat Shield for Planetary Body Entry and Descent System with In Situ Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogue, Michael D.; Meuller, Robert P.; Sibille, Laurent; Hintze, Paul E.; Rasky, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    This NIAC project investigated an innovative approach to provide heat shield protection to spacecraft after launch and prior to each EDL thus potentially realizing significant launch mass savings. Heat shields fabricated in situ can provide a thermal-protection system for spacecraft that routinely enter a planetary atmosphere. By fabricating the heat shield with space resources from materials available on moons and asteroids, it is possible to avoid launching the heat-shield mass from Earth. Regolith has extremely good insulating properties and the silicates it contains can be used in the fabrication and molding of thermal-protection materials. Such in situ developed heat shields have been suggested before by Lewis. Prior research efforts have shown that regolith properties can be compatible with very-high temperature resistance. Our project team is highly experienced in regolith processing and thermal protection systems (TPS). Routine access to space and return from any planetary surface requires dealing with heat loads experienced by the spacecraft during reentry. Our team addresses some of the key issues with the EDL of human-scale missions through a highly innovative investigation of heat shields that can be fabricated in space by using local resources on asteroids and moons. Most space missions are one-way trips, dedicated to placing an asset in space for economical or scientific gain. However, for human missions, a very-reliable heat-shield system is necessary to protect the crew from the intense heat experienced at very high entry velocities of approximately 11 km/s at approximately Mach 33 (Apollo). For a human mission to Mars, the return problem is even more difficult, with predicted velocities of up to 14 km/s, at approximately Mach 42 at the Earth-atmosphere entry. In addition to human return, it is very likely that future space-travel architecture will include returning cargo to the Earth, either for scientific purposes or for commercial reasons

  18. Experimental Evaluation of the Heat Sink Effect in Hepatic Microwave Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Ringe, Kristina I.; Lutat, Carolin; Rieder, Christian; Schenk, Andrea; Wacker, Frank; Raatschen, Hans-Juergen

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate and quantify the heat sink effect in hepatic microwave ablation (MWA) in a standardized ex vivo model, and to analyze the influence of vessel distance and blood flow on lesion volume and shape. Materials and Methods 108 ex vivo MWA procedures were performed in freshly harvested pig livers. Antennas were inserted parallel to non-perfused and perfused (700,1400 ml/min) glass tubes (diameter 5mm) at different distances (10, 15, 20mm). Ablation zones (radius, area) were analyzed and compared (Kruskal-Wallis Test, Dunn’s multiple comparison Test). Temperature changes adjacent to the tubes were measured throughout the ablation cycle. Results Maximum temperature decreased significantly with increasing flow and distance (p<0.05). Compared to non-perfused tubes, ablation zones were significantly deformed by perfused tubes within 15mm distance to the antenna (p<0.05). At a flow rate of 700ml/min ablation zone radius was reduced to 37.2% and 80.1% at 10 and 15mm tube distance, respectively; ablation zone area was reduced to 50.5% and 89.7%, respectively. Conclusion Significant changes of ablation zones were demonstrated in a pig liver model. Considerable heat sink effect was observed within a diameter of 15mm around simulated vessels, dependent on flow rate. This has to be taken into account when ablating liver lesions close to vessels. PMID:26222431

  19. Transport properties associated with carbon-phenolic ablators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biolsi, L.

    1982-01-01

    Entry vehicle heat shields designed for entry into the atmosphere of the outer planets are usually made of carbonaceous material such as carbon-phenolic ablator. Ablative injection of this material is an important mechanism for reducing the heat at the surface of the entry vehicle. Conductive transport properties in the shock layer are important for some entry conditions. The kinetic theory of gases has been used to calculate the transport properties for 17 gaseous species obtained from the ablation of carbon-phenolic heat shields. Results are presented for the pure species and for the gas mixture.

  20. Regolith-Derived Heat Shield for Planetary Body Entry and Descent System with In Situ Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogue, Michael D.; Mueller, Robert P.; Rasky, Daniel J.; Hintze, Paul E.; Sibille, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we will discuss a new mass-efficient and innovative way of protecting high-mass spacecraft during planetary Entry, Descent & Landing (EDL). Heat shields fabricated in situ can provide a thermal-protection system (TPS) for spacecraft that routinely enter a planetary atmosphere. By fabricating the heat shield with space resources from regolith materials available on moons and asteroids, it is possible to avoid launching the heat-shield mass from Earth. Three regolith processing and manufacturing methods will be discussed: 1) oxygen & metal extraction ISRU processes produce glassy melts enriched in alumina and titania, processed to obtain variable density, high melting point and heat-resistance; 2) compression and sintering of the regolith yield low density materials; 3) in-situ derived high-temperature polymers are created to bind regolith particles together, with a lower energy budget.

  1. Shielded regeneration heating element for a particulate filter

    DOEpatents

    Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI; Ament, Frank [Troy, MI

    2011-01-04

    An exhaust system includes a particulate filter (PF) that is disposed downstream from an engine. The PF filters particulates within an exhaust from the engine. A heating element heats particulate matter in the PF. A catalyst substrate or a flow converter is disposed upstream from said heating element. The catalyst substrate oxidizes the exhaust prior to reception by the heating element. The flow converter converts turbulent exhaust flow to laminar exhaust flow prior to reception by the heating element.

  2. Analysis of laser ablation dynamics of CFRP in order to reduce heat affected zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Yuji; Tsukamoto, Masahiro; Nariyama, Tatsuya; Nakai, Kazuki; Matsuoka, Fumihiro; Takahashi, Kenjiro; Masuno, Shinichiro; Ohkubo, Tomomasa; Nakano, Hitoshi

    2014-03-01

    A carbon fiber reinforced plastic [CFRP], which has high strength, light weight and weather resistance, is attractive material applied for automobile, aircraft and so on. The laser processing of CFRP is one of suitable way to machining tool. However, thermal affected zone was formed at the exposure part, since the heat conduction property of the matrix is different from that of carbon fiber. In this paper, we demonstrated that the CFRP plates were cut with UV nanosecond laser to reduce the heat affected zone. The ablation plume and ablation mass were investigated by laser microscope and ultra-high speed camera. Furthermore, the ablation model was constructed by energy balance, and it was confirmed that the ablation rate was 0.028 μg/ pulse in good agreement with the calculation value of 0.03 μg/ pulse.

  3. Heat Shielding: A Novel Method of Colonial Thermoregulation in Honey Bees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starks, Philip T.; Gilley, David C.

    Honey bees, Apis mellifera, maintain constant colony temperatures throughout the year. Honey bees fan their wings to cool the colony, and often spread fluid in conjunction with this behavior to induce evaporative cooling. We present an additional, previously undescribed mechanism used by the honey bee to maintain constant colony temperature in response to localized temperature increases. Worker bees shield the comb from external heat sources by positioning themselves on hot interior regions of the hive's walls. Although honey comb and brood comb were both shielded, the temperature-sensitive brood received a greater number of heat shielders and was thus better protected from overheating. Heat shielding appears to be a context-dependent adaptive behavior performed by worker bees who would previously have been considered "unemployed."

  4. Regolith-Derived Heat Shield for Planetary Body Entry and Descent System with In Situ Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogue, Michael D.; Mueller, Robert P.; Rasky, Daniel; Hintze, Paul; Sibille, Laurent

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we will discuss a new mass-efficient and innovative way of protecting high-mass spacecraft during planetary Entry, Descent & Landing (EDL). Heat shields fabricated in situ can provide a thermal-protection system (TPS) for spacecraft that routinely enter a planetary atmosphere. By fabricating the heat shield with space resources from regolith materials available on moons and asteroids, it is possible to avoid launching the heat-shield mass from Earth. Two regolith processing and manufacturing methods will be discussed: 1) Compression and sintering of the regolith to yield low density materials; 2) Formulations of a High-temperature silicone RTV (Room Temperature Vulcanizing) compound are used to bind regolith particles together. The overall positive results of torch flame impingement tests and plasma arc jet testing on the resulting samples will also be discussed.

  5. Aft Engine shop worker removes a heat shield on Columbia's main engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Doug Buford, with the Aft Engine shop, works at removing a heat shield on Columbia, in the Orbiter Processing Facility. After small cracks were discovered on the LH2 Main Propulsion System (MPS) flow liners in two other orbiters, program managers decided to move forward with inspections on Columbia before clearing it for flight on STS-107. After removal of the heat shields, the three main engines will be removed. Inspections of the flow liners will follow. The July 19 launch of Columbia on STS-107 has been delayed a few weeks

  6. Aft Engine shop worker removes a heat shield on Columbia's main engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Doug Buford, with the Aft Engine shop, works at removing a heat shield on Columbia, in the Orbiter Processing Facility. After small cracks were discovered on the LH2 Main Propulsion System (MPS) flow liners in two other orbiters, program managers decided to move forward with inspections on Columbia before clearing it for flight on STS-107. After removal of the heat shields, the three main engines will be removed. Inspections of the flow liners will follow. The July 19 launch of Columbia on STS-107 has been delayed a few weeks

  7. Impact of heat shield structure in the growth process of Czochralski silicon derived from numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jing; Liu, Ding; Zhao, Yue; Jiao, Shangbin

    2014-05-01

    Further development of the photovoltaic industry is restricted by the productivity of mono-crystalline silicon technology due to its requirements of low cost and high efficient photocells. The heat shield is not only the important part of the thermal field in Czochralski(Cz) mono-crystalline silicon furnace, but also one of the most important factors influencing the silicon crystal growth. Large-diameter Cz-Si crystal growth process is taken as the study object. Based on FEM numerical simulation, different heat shield structures are analyzed to investigate the heater power, the melt-crystal interface shape, the argon flow field, and the oxygen concentration at the melt-crystal interface in the process of large Cz-Si crystal growth. The impact of these factors on the growth efficiency and crystal quality are analyzed. The results show that the oxygen concentration on the melt-crystal interface and the power consumption of the heater stay high due to the lack of a heat shield in the crystal growth system. Argon circumfluence is generated on the external side of the right angle heat shield. By the right-angle heat shield, the speed of gas flow is lowered on the melt free surface, and the temperature gradient of the free surface is increased around the melt-crystal interface. It is not conducive for the stable growth of crystal. The shape of the melt-crystal interface and the argon circulation above the melt free surface are improved by the inclined heat shield. Compared with the others, the system pulling rate is increased and the lowest oxygen concentration is achieved at the melt-crystal interface with the composite heat shield. By the adoption of the optimized composite heat shield in experiment, the real melt-crystal interface shapes and its deformation laws obtained by Quick Pull Separation Method at different pulling rates agree with the simulation results. The results show that the method of simulation is feasible. The proposed research provides the theoretical

  8. Thermal fatigue tests of a radiative heat shield panel for a hypersonic transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, Granville L.; Clark, Ronald K.; Sharpe, Ellsworth L.

    1985-01-01

    A pair of corrugation stiffened, beaded skin Rene 41 heat shield panels were exposed to 20,000 thermal cycles between room temperature and 1450 F to evaluate the thermal fatigue response of Rene 41 metallic heat shields for hypersonic cruise aircraft applications. At the conclusion of the tests, the panels retained substantial structural integrity; however, there were cracks and excessive wear in the vicinity of fastener holes and there was an 80-percent loss in ductility of the skin. Shrinkage of the panel which caused the cracks and wear must be considered in design of panels for Thermal Protection Systems (TPS) applications.

  9. Physiologic implications of two different heat shields for infants under radiant warmers

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgart, S.; Fox, W.W.; Polin, R.A.

    1982-05-01

    To study the effects of two different heat shields commonly used under radiant warmers (thin plastic blanket vs a plastic body hood) on premature newborn infants, eight neonates were studied to measure insensible water loss and radiant power density at the skin under control and two shielded conditions. The body hood was found to diminish transmission of radiant heat to the infant's skin by 80%, absorbing heat and becoming warm (P less than 0.001). The plastic blanket absorbed only 15% of radiant warmer heat output (P less than 0.01). Insensible water loss was significantly less under the plastic blanket (1.88 +/- 0.4) ml/kg/hour) than under control (2.70 +/- 0.50 ml/kg/hour, P less than 0.01) and hood (2.86 +/- 0.32 ml/kg/hour, P less than 0.05) conditions. There was no decrease in insensible water loss under the hood compared to controls. This study demonstrates that a thin plastic blanket is the more effective shield against insensible water loss under a radiant warmer. Caution should be exercised with any shielding device to prevent interference with radiant heat delivery.

  10. Radiative properties of advanced spacecraft heat shield materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunnington, G. R.; Funai, A. I.; Mcnab, T. K.

    1983-01-01

    Experimental results are presented to show the effects of simulated reentry exposure by convective heating and by radiant heating on spectral and total emittance of statically oxidized Inconel 617 and Haynes HS188 superalloys to 1260 K and a silicide coatea (R512E) columbium 752 alloy to 1590 K. Convective heating exposures were conducted in a supersonic arc plasma wind tunnel using a wedge-shaped specimen configuration. Radiant tests were conducted at a pressure of .003 atmospheres of dry air at a flow velocity of several meters per second. Convective heating specimens were subjected to 8, 20, and 38 15-min heating cycles, and radiant heating specimens were tested for 10, 20, 50, and 100 30-min heating cycles. Changes in radiative properties are explained in terms of changes in composition resulting from simulated reentry tests. The methods used to evaluate morphological, compositional and crystallographic changes include: Auger electron spectroscopy; scanning electron microscopy; X-ray diffraction analysis; and electron microprobe analysis.

  11. Reflecting heat shields made of microstructured fused silica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Congdon, W. M.

    1975-01-01

    Heat sheidls constructed from selected monodisperse distributions of high-purity fused-silica particles are efficient reflectors of visible and near-UV radiation generated in shock-layer of space probe during atmospheric entry.

  12. Composite Structures Materials Testing for the Orion Crew Vehicle Heat Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khemani, Farah N.

    2011-01-01

    As research is being performed for the new heat shield for the Orion capsule, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is developing the first composite heat shield. As an intern of the Structures Branch in the Engineering Directorate (ES 2), my main task was to set up a test plan to determine the material properties of the honeycomb that will be used on the Orion Crew Module heat shield to verify that the composite is suitable for the capsule. Before conducting composite shell tests, which are performed to simulate the crush performance of the heat shield on the capsule, it is necessary to determine the compression and shear properties of the composite used on the shell. During this internship, I was responsible for developing a test plan, designing parts for the test fixtures as well as getting them fabricated for the honeycomb shear and compression testing. This involved work in Pro/Engineer as well as coordinating with Fab Express, the Building 9 Composite Shop and the Structures Test Laboratory (STL). The research and work executed for this project will be used for composite sandwich panel testing in the future as well. As a part of the Structures Branch, my main focus was to research composite structures. This involves system engineering and integration (SE&I) integration, manufacturing, and preliminary testing. The procedures for these projects that were executed during this internship included design work, conducting tests and performing analysis.

  13. Castable thermal insulation for use as heat shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mountvala, A. J.; Nakamura, H. H.; Rechter, H. L.

    1974-01-01

    Structural members supporting the afterburners of high thrust rocket engines are subjected to extreme heating, along with severe vibration and high acceleration levels during early lift-off. Chemically-bonded, castable, zircon composite foams were developed and successfully tested to meet specific, laboratory simulated lift-off conditions.

  14. A Comparison of Direct Heating During Radiofrequency and Microwave Ablation in Ex Vivo Liver

    SciTech Connect

    Andreano, Anita; Brace, Christopher L.

    2013-04-15

    This study was designed to determine the magnitude and spatial distribution of temperature elevations when using 480 kHz RF and 2.45 GHz microwave energy in ex vivo liver models. A total of 60 heating cycles (20 s at 90 W) were performed in normal, RF-ablated, and microwave-ablated liver tissues (n = 10 RF and n = 10 microwave in each tissue type). Heating cycles were performed using a 480-kHz generator and 3-cm cooled-tip electrode (RF) or a 2.45-GHz generator and 14-gauge monopole (microwave) and were designed to isolate direct heating from each energy type. Tissue temperatures were measured by using fiberoptic thermosensors 5, 10, and 15 mm radially from the ablation applicator at the depth of maximal heating. Power delivered, sensor location, heating rates, and maximal temperatures were compared using mixed effects regression models. No significant differences were noted in mean power delivered or thermosensor locations between RF and microwave heating groups (P > 0.05). Microwaves produced significantly more rapid heating than RF at 5, 10, and 15 mm in normal tissue (3.0 vs. 0.73, 0.85 vs. 0.21, and 0.17 vs. 0.09 Degree-Sign C/s; P < 0.05); and at 5 and 10 mm in ablated tissues (2.3 {+-} 1.4 vs. 0.7 {+-} 0.3, 0.5 {+-} 0.3 vs. 0.2 {+-} 0 Degree-Sign C/s, P < 0.05). The radial depth of heating was {approx}5 mm greater for microwaves than RF. Direct heating obtained with 2.45-GHz microwave energy using a single needle-like applicator is faster and covers a larger volume of tissue than 480-kHz RF energy.

  15. Heating and ablation of tokamak graphite by pulsed nanosecond Nd-YAG lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Semerok, A.; Fomichev, S. V.; Weulersse, J.-M.; Brygo, F.; Thro, P.-Y.; Grisolia, C.

    2007-04-15

    The results on laser heating and ablation of graphite tiles of thermonuclear tokamaks are presented. Two pulsed Nd-YAG lasers (20 Hz repetition rate, 5 ns pulse duration and 10 kHz repetition rate, 100 ns pulse duration) were applied for ablation measurements. The ablation thresholds (1.0{+-}0.5 J/cm{sup 2} for 5 ns and 2.5{+-}0.5 J/cm{sup 2} for 100 ns laser pulses) were determined for the Tore Supra tokamak graphite tiles (backside) nonexposed to plasma. The high repetition rate Nd-YAG laser (10 kHz, 100 ns pulse duration) and the developed pyrometer system were applied for graphite heating measurements. Some unexpected features of laser heating of the graphite surface were observed. They were explained by the presence of a thin surface layer with the properties different from those of the bulk graphite. The theoretical models of laser heating and near-threshold ablation of graphite with imperfectly adhered layer were developed to interpret the experimental results.

  16. Heat Shielding Characteristics and Thermostructural Performance of a Superalloy Honeycomb Sandwich Thermal Protection System (TPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.

    2004-01-01

    Heat-transfer, thermal bending, and mechanical buckling analyses have been performed on a superalloy "honeycomb" thermal protection system (TPS) for future hypersonic flight vehicles. The studies focus on the effect of honeycomb cell geometry on the TPS heat-shielding performance, honeycomb cell wall buckling characteristics, and the effect of boundary conditions on the TPS thermal bending behavior. The results of the study show that the heat-shielding performance of a TPS panel is very sensitive to change in honeycomb core depth, but insensitive to change in honeycomb cell cross-sectional shape. The thermal deformations and thermal stresses in the TPS panel are found to be very sensitive to the edge support conditions. Slight corrugation of the honeycomb cell walls can greatly increase their buckling strength.

  17. Metal-wool heat shields for space shuttle. [design, fabrication, and attachment to structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. C.; Clure, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    The packaging of metal wool for reusable thermal heat shields applied to aerodynamic and other surfaces for the space shuttle was analyzed and designed, and samples were fabricated and experimentally studied. Parametric trends were prepared for selected configurations. An all-metal thermally efficient, reliable, reusable and producible heat shield system was designed and structurally tested for use on spacecraft aerodynamic surfaces where temperatures do not exceed 810 K. Stainless steel sheet, primarily for structure and secondarily in the transverse plane for thermal expansion, was shown to accommodate thermal expansion in all directions when restrained at the edges and heated to 1360 K. Aerodynamic loads of 0.35 x 1000,000 newtons/sq meter, and higher, may be easily accepted by structures of this design. Seven all-metal thermal protection specimens, 12.7 cm square and 2.5 cm thick were fabricated and are being experimentally evaluated at simulated shuttle entry conditions in an arc jet facility.

  18. Evaluation of dispersion strengthened nickel-base alloy heat shields for space shuttle application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R., Jr.; Killpatrick, D. H.

    1973-01-01

    The work reported constitutes the first phase of a two-phase program. Vehicle environments having critical effects on the thermal protection system are defined; TD Ni-20Cr material characteristics are reviewed and compared with TD Ni-20Cr produced in previous development efforts; cyclic load, temperature, and pressure effects on TD Ni-20Cr sheet material are investigated; the effects of braze reinforcement in improving the efficiency of spotwelded, diffusion-bonded, or seam-welded joints are evaluated through tests of simple lap-shear joint samples; parametric studies of metallic radiative thermal protection systems are reported; and the design, instrumentation, and testing of full-scale subsize heat shield panels are described. Tests of full-scale subsize panels included simulated meteoroid impact tests; simulated entry flight aerodynamic heating in an arc-heated plasma stream; programmed differential pressure loads and temperatures simulating mission conditions; and acoustic tests simulating sound levels experienced by heat shields during about boost flight. Test results are described, and the performances of two heat shield designs are compared and evaluated.

  19. The response of heat-shield materials to intense laser radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundell, J. H.; Dickey, R. R.

    1978-01-01

    Experimental results for the response of ATJ graphite, Carbitex 100, and carbon phenolic to intense continuous-wave laser radiation are presented. Both penetration and mass-loss test techniques are used and compared. The results are also compared with a simple ablation theory applicable to laser irradiation. Reasons for the disparity between experiment and theory, and applicability of the results to other heating situations, such as planetary entry, are discussed.

  20. Energy transfer in volume-reflecting heat shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weston, K. C.

    1974-01-01

    An approximate analysis of radiative transfer in highly scattering materials was developed based on the Kubelka-Munk differential equations--a set of two differential equations representing the spatial rate of change of radiative half-fluxes within the scattering media. These approximate solutions of the Kubelka-Munk equations together with analytic solutions for the steady state temperature distribution for two types of boundary conditions are given. These solutions show the influence of back surface reflectance, scattering power, incident radiative flux parameter and boundary conductive flux parameter on overall reflectance and temperature distributions. This radiation field analysis, adapted to spherical geometry, was applied to the evaluation of the thermal performance of teflon and fritted quartz as heat protection materials for entry into the atmosphere of Jupiter.

  1. Optical Property Enhancement and Durability Evaluation of Heat Receiver Aperture Shield Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Kim K.; Jaworske, Donald A.; Smith, Daniela C.

    1998-01-01

    Under the Solar Dynamic Flight Demonstration (SDFD) program, NASA Lewis Research Center worked with AlliedSignal Aerospace, the heat receiver contractor, on the development, characterization and durability testing of refractory metals to obtain appropriate optical and thermal properties for the SDFD heat receiver aperture shield. Molybdenum and tungsten foils were grit-blasted using silicon carbide or alumina grit under various grit-blasting conditions for optical property enhancement. Black rhenium coated tungsten foil was also evaluated. Tungsten, black rhenium-coated tungsten, and grit-blasted tungsten screens of various mesh sizes were placed over the pristine and grit-blasted foils for optical property characterization. Grit-blasting was found to be effective in decreasing the specular reflectance and the absorptance/emittance ratio of the refractory foils. The placement of a screen further enhanced these optical properties, with a grit-blasted screen over a grit-blasted foil producing the best results. Based on the optical property enhancement results, samples were tested for atomic oxygen and vacuum heat treatment durability. Grit-blasted (Al2O3 grit) 2 mil tungsten foil was chosen for the exterior layer of the SDFD heat receiver aperture shield. A 0.007 in. wire diameter, 20 x 20 mesh tungsten screen was chosen to cover the tungsten foil. Based on these test results, a heat receiver aperture shield test unit has been built with the screen covered grit-blast tungsten foil exterior layers. The aperture shield was tested and verified the thermal and structural durability of the outer foil layers during an off-pointing period.

  2. Evaluation of coated columbium alloy heat shields for space shuttle thermal protection system application. Volume 2, phase 2: Subsize heat shield and small size TPS evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, W. E.

    1973-01-01

    Initially a trade study was conducted of seven heat shield configurations. These were evaluated for structural reliability, fabricability, weight, inspectability, and refurbishability. Two concepts, a tee-stiffened and an open corrugation, were selected as offering the most potential for system success. Fourteen subsize heat shields of a full scale section were fabricated from C-129Y and Cb-752 and silicide coated with R-512E. These subsize panels were subjected to a simulated flight profile representing temperature, local surface pressures, and applied pressure differential loads. All corrugated panels of both alloys sustained 100 cycles without structural or coating failure. All Cb-752/R-512E panels performed well with one panel being successfully repaired after 66 cycles and completing 100 cycles. As a result of this evaluating the Cb-752/R-512E system was selected for hardware application during the subsequent phases. In addition, the tee-stiffened configuration was selected for further development and application in Phase III. This selection was based on an overall assessment of relative weight, cost, and structural performance of the tee-stiffened and open corrugation TPS.

  3. Heat generation caused by ablation of dental restorative materials with an ultra short pulse laser (USPL) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Andreas; Wehry, Richard; Brede, Olivier; Frentzen, Matthias; Schelle, Florian

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess heat generation in dental restoration materials following laser ablation using an Ultra Short Pulse Laser (USPL) system. Specimens of phosphate cement (PC), ceramic (CE) and composite (C) were used. Ablation was performed with an Nd:YVO4 laser at 1064 nm and a pulse length of 8 ps. Heat generation during laser ablation depended on the thickness of the restoration material. A time delay for temperature increase was observed in the PC and C group. Employing the USPL system for removal of restorative materials, heat generation has to be considered.

  4. Fused slurry silicide coatings for columbium alloys reentry heat shields. Volume 1: Evaluation analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzgerald, B.

    1973-01-01

    The R-512E (Si-20Cr-20Fe) fused slurry silicide coating process was optimized to coat full size (20in x 20in) single face rib and corrugation stiffened panels fabricated from FS-85 columbium alloy for 100 mission space shuttle heat shield applications. Structural life under simulated space shuttle lift-off stresses and reentry conditions demonstrated reuse capability well beyond 100 flights for R-512E coated FS-85 columbium heat shield panels. Demonstrated coating damage tolerance showed no immediate structural failure on exposure. The FS-85 columbium alloy was selected from five candidate alloys (Cb-752, C-129Y, WC-3015, B-66 and FS-85) based on the evaluation tests which have designed to determine: (1) change in material properties due to coating and reuse; (2) alloy tolerance to coating damage; (3) coating emittance characteristics under reuse conditions; and (4) new coating chemistries for improved coating life.

  5. Bone tissue heating and ablation by short and ultrashort laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letfullin, Renat R.; Rice, Colin E. W.; George, Thomas F.

    2010-02-01

    Biological hard tissues, such as those found in bone and teeth, are complex tissues that build a strong mineral structure over an organic matrix framework. The laser-matter interaction for bone hard tissues holds great interest to laser surgery and laser dentistry; the use of short/ultrashort pulses, in particular, shows interesting behaviors not seen in continuous wave lasers. High laser energy densities in ultrashort pulses can be focused on a small irradiated surface (spot diameter is 10-50 μm) leading to rapid temperature rise and thermal ablation of the bone tissue. Ultrashort pulses, specifically those in the picosecond and femtosecond ranges, impose several challenges in modeling bone tissue response. In the present paper we perform time-dependent thermal simulations of short and ultrashort pulse laser-bone interactions in singlepulse and multipulse (set of ultrashort pulses) modes of laser heating. A comparative analysis for both radiation modes is discussed for laser heating of different types of the solid bone on the nanosecond, picosecond and femtosecond time scales. It is shown that ultrashort laser pulses with high energy densities can ablate bone tissue without heating tissues bordering the ablation creator. This reaction is particularly desirable as heat accumulation and thermal damage are the main factors affecting tissue regrowth rates, and thus patient recovery times.

  6. Heat generation caused by ablation of dental hard tissues with an ultrashort pulse laser (USPL) system.

    PubMed

    Braun, Andreas; Krillke, Raphael Franz; Frentzen, Matthias; Bourauel, Christoph; Stark, Helmut; Schelle, Florian

    2015-02-01

    Heat generation during the removal of dental hard tissues may lead to a temperature increase and cause painful sensations or damage dental tissues. The aim of this study was to assess heat generation in dental hard tissues following laser ablation using an ultrashort pulse laser (USPL) system. A total of 85 specimens of dental hard tissues were used, comprising 45 specimens of human dentine evaluating a thickness of 1, 2, and 3 mm (15 samples each) and 40 specimens of human enamel with a thickness of 1 and 2 mm (20 samples each). Ablation was performed with an Nd:YVO4 laser at 1,064 nm, a pulse duration of 9 ps, and a repetition rate of 500 kHz with an average output power of 6 W. Specimens were irradiated for 0.8 s. Employing a scanner system, rectangular cavities of 1-mm edge length were generated. A temperature sensor was placed at the back of the specimens, recording the temperature during the ablation process. All measurements were made employing a heat-conductive paste without any additional cooling or spray. Heat generation during laser ablation depended on the dental hard tissue (enamel or dentine) and the thickness of the respective tissue (p < 0.05). Highest temperature increase could be observed in the 1-mm thickness group for enamel. Evaluating the 1-mm group for dentine, a significantly lower temperature increase could be measured (p < 0.05) with lowest values in the 3-mm group (p < 0.05). A time delay for temperature increase during the ablation process depending on the material thickness was observed for both hard tissues (p < 0.05). Employing the USPL system to remove dental hard tissues, heat generation has to be considered. Especially during laser ablation next to pulpal tissues, painful sensations and potential thermal injury of pulp tissue might occur. PMID:23666547

  7. Optimization of a Mu2e production solenoid heat and radiation shield using MARS15

    SciTech Connect

    Pronskikh, V.S.; Mokhov, N.V.; /Fermilab

    2011-02-01

    A Monte-Carlo study of several Mu2e Production Solenoid (PS) absorber (heat shield) versions using the MARS15 code has been performed. Optimizations for material as well as cost (amount of tungsten) have been carried out. Studied are such quantities as the number of displacements per atom (DPA) in the helium-cooled solenoid superconducting coils, power density and dynamic heat load in various parts of the PS and its surrounding structures. Prompt dose, residual dose, secondary particle flux are also simulated in the PS structures and the experimental hall. A preliminary choice of the PS absorber design is made on the ground of these studies.

  8. A Simplified Approach for the Rapid Generation of Transient Heat-Shield Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wurster, Kathryn E.; Zoby, E. Vincent; Mills, Janelle C.; Kamhawi, Hilmi

    2007-01-01

    A simplified approach has been developed whereby transient entry heating environments are reliably predicted based upon a limited set of benchmark radiative and convective solutions. Heating, pressure and shear-stress levels, non-dimensionalized by an appropriate parameter at each benchmark condition are applied throughout the entry profile. This approach was shown to be valid based on the observation that the fully catalytic, laminar distributions examined were relatively insensitive to altitude as well as velocity throughout the regime of significant heating. In order to establish a best prediction by which to judge the results that can be obtained using a very limited benchmark set, predictions based on a series of benchmark cases along a trajectory are used. Solutions which rely only on the limited benchmark set, ideally in the neighborhood of peak heating, are compared against the resultant transient heating rates and total heat loads from the best prediction. Predictions based on using two or fewer benchmark cases at or near the trajectory peak heating condition, yielded results to within 5-10 percent of the best predictions. Thus, the method provides transient heating environments over the heat-shield face with sufficient resolution and accuracy for thermal protection system design and also offers a significant capability to perform rapid trade studies such as the effect of different trajectories, atmospheres, or trim angle of attack, on convective and radiative heating rates and loads, pressure, and shear-stress levels.

  9. Modeling of Heat Transfer and Ablation of Refractory Material Due to Rocket Plume Impingement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Michael F.; Vu, Bruce T.

    2012-01-01

    CR Tech's Thermal Desktop-SINDA/FLUINT software was used in the thermal analysis of a flame deflector design for Launch Complex 39B at Kennedy Space Center, Florida. The analysis of the flame deflector takes into account heat transfer due to plume impingement from expected vehicles to be launched at KSC. The heat flux from the plume was computed using computational fluid dynamics provided by Ames Research Center in Moffet Field, California. The results from the CFD solutions were mapped onto a 3-D Thermal Desktop model of the flame deflector using the boundary condition mapping capabilities in Thermal Desktop. The ablation subroutine in SINDA/FLUINT was then used to model the ablation of the refractory material.

  10. Heat Shield for Extreme Entry Environment Technology for Near-Term Robotic Science Missions and Longer Term Human Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatapathy, E.; Ellerby, D.

    2014-06-01

    Heat shield for Extreme Entry Environment is currently funded for technology development for mission infusion into Discovery-13 and New Frontier-4 completed missions. We will describe the technology and the approach to TRL 6 to meet infusion challenges.

  11. Heat Shield Cavity Parametric Experimental Aeroheating for a Proposed Mars Smart Lander Aeroshell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liechty, Derek S.; Hollis, Brian R.

    2002-01-01

    The proposed Mars Smart Lander is to be attached through its aeroshell to the main spacecraft bus, thereby producing cavities in the heat shield. To study the effects these cavities will have on the heating levels experienced by the heat shield, an experimental aeroheating investigation was performed at the NASA Langley Research Center in the 20-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel. The effects of Reynolds number, angle-of-attack, and cavity size and location on aero-heating levels and distributions were determined and are presented. To aid the discussion on the effects of the cavities, laminar, thin-layer Navier-Stokes flow field solutions were post-processed to calculate relevant boundary layer properties such as boundary layer height and momentum thickness, edge Mach number, and streamwise pressure gradient. It was found that the effect of the cavities varies with angle-of-attack, freestream Reynolds number, and cavity size and location. The presence of a cavity raised the downstream heating rates by as much as 325% as a result of boundary layer transition.

  12. Effect of heat shielding on convective and evaporative heat losses and on radiant heat transfer in the premature infant

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgart, S.; Engle, W.D.; Fox, W.W.; Polin, R.A.

    1981-12-01

    Ten premature infants nursed on servocontrolled radiant warmer beds were studied in three environments designed to alter one or more factors affecting heat transfer (convection, evaporation, and radiation). In the control environment, infants were nursed supine on an open warmer bed. The second environment (walled chamber) was designed to reduce convection and evaporation by placing plastic walls circumferentially around the bed. In the third environment convection and evaporation were minimized by covering infants with a plastic blanket. Air turbulence, insensible water loss, and radiant warmer power were measured in each environment. There was a significant reduction in mean air velocity in the walled chamber and under the plastic blanket when compared to the control environment. A parallel decrease in insensible water loss occurred. In contrast, radiant power demand was the same for control and walled environments, but decreased significantly when infants were covered by the plastic blanket. This study suggests that convection is an important factor influencing evaporation in neonates nursed under radiant warmers. The thin plastic blanket was the most effective shield, significantly reducing radiant power demand.

  13. Endometrial ablation

    MedlinePlus

    Hysteroscopy-endometrial ablation; Laser thermal ablation; Endometrial ablation-radiofrequency; Endometrial ablation-thermal balloon ablation; Rollerball ablation; Hydrothermal ablation; Novasure ablation

  14. Evidence for Physical Weathering of Iron Meteorite Meridiani Planum (Heat Shield Rock) on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashley, J. W.; McCoy, T. J.; Schröder, C.

    2009-12-01

    Meteorites on the surfaces of other solar system bodies can provide natural experiments for monitoring weathering processes. In the case of Mars, clues to the more subtle aspects of water occurrence and reaction may be revealed by the effects of highly sensitive aqueous alteration processes, while physical processes may be recorded through aeolian abrasion effects. Over the past 2000 sols, the two Mars Exploration Rover (MER) spacecraft have formally identified a minimum of 11 meteorite candidates [1-3], with many more unofficial candidates likely, posing an intriguing set of questions concerning their chemical, mineralogical, and morphological conditions. Five meteorite candidates, including the newly discovered MER-B rock Block Island, and one confirmed meteorite [Meridiani Planum (MP; originally Heat Shield Rock)] [4] have been investigated with the rover arm instruments. All contain levels of ferric iron, which should not be present in pristine samples (i.e. without fusion crust and/or alteration phases). Moreover, preliminary morphologic evidence contributes to the case of possible chemical weathering in Block Island. Scrutiny of a Microscopic Imager (MI) mosaic of MP shows clear evidence for both localized aeolian sculpting, and the Widmanstätten pattern common to sliced and acid-etched surfaces of many iron-nickel meteorites. These latter features are manifest as millimeter-sized chevrons and subparallel linearities, most prominent across a partially brushed surface approximately 3 x 2 cm in area. Similar patterns are observed on a number of hot and cold desert meteorites (e.g. Drum Mountain and Ft. Stockton), and are attributed to physical ablation by sand grains differentially weathering the kamacite and taenite lamellae within the rock. A similar or identical process is interpreted as responsible for the features observed in MP. Other macro-scale features on MP are of questionable weathering origin. While some prefer a regmaglypt interpretation for the

  15. Galileo probe forebody entry thermal protection - Aerothermal environments and heat shielding requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolet, W. E.; Davy, W. C.; Wilson, J. F.

    1980-01-01

    Solutions are presented for the aerothermal heating environments and the material thermal response for the forebody heatshield on the candidate 242 kg Galileo probe entering the modeled nominal and cold-dense Jovian atmospheres. In the flowfield analysis, a finite difference procedure was employed to obtain benchmark predictions of pressure, radiation and convective heating rates (both laminar and turbulent) and the corresponding wall blowing obtained under the steady state approximation. The fluxes over the probe flank were found to be in a range where spallation is an important mass loss mechanism. The predicted heating rates were also used as boundary conditions for a charring materials ablation which was used to predict thermochemical based surface recession, mass loss and bondline temperatures. The contingency factor of 30% currently employed by NASA was found to be insufficient for entry into the cold-dense atmosphere.

  16. Vapor Grown Carbon Fiber/Phenolic Matrix Composites for Rocket Nozzles and Heat Shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patton, R. D.; Pittman, C. U., Jr.; Wang, L.; Day, A.; Hill, J. R.

    2001-01-01

    The ablation and mechanical and thermal properties of vapor grown carbon fiber (VGCF)/phenolic resin composites were evaluated to determine the potential of using this material in solid rocket motor nozzles. Composite specimens with varying VGCF loading (30%-50% wt) including one sample with ex-rayon carbon fiber plies were prepared and exposed to a plasma torch for 20 s with a heat flux of 16.5 MW/sq m at approximately 1650 C. Low erosion rates and little char formation were observed, confirming that these materials were promising for rocket motor nozzle materials. When fiber loadings increased, mechanical properties and ablative properties improved. The VGCF composites had low thermal conductivities (approximately 0.56 W/m-C) indicating they were good insulating materials. If a 65% fiber loading in VGCF composite can be achieved, then ablative properties are projected to be comparable to or better than the composite material currently used on the Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM).

  17. Thermal, epithermal and thermalized neutron attenuation properties of ilmenite-serpentine heat resistant concrete shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kany, A. M. I.; El-Gohary, M. I.; Kamal, S. M.

    1994-07-01

    Experimental measurements were carried out to study the attenuation properties of low-energy neutrons transmitted through unheated and preheated barries of heavy-weight, highly hydrated and heat-resistant concrete shields. The concrete shields under investigation have been prepared from naturally occurring ilmenite and serpentine Egyptian ores. A collimated beam obtained from an Am-Be source was used as a source of neutrons, while the measurements of total thermal, epithermal, and thermalized neutron fluxes were performed using a BF-3 detector, multichannel analyzer and Cd filter. Results show that the ilmenite-serpentine concrete proved to be a better thermal, epithermal and thermalized neutron attenuator than the ordinary concrete especially at a high temperature of concrete exposure.

  18. Experimental and analytical determination of vibration characteristics of corrugated, flexibly supported, heat-shield panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carden, H. D.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental and analytical natural frequencies, nodal patterns, and typical modal displacements for a corrugated, flexibly supported, heat-shield panel are discussed. Good correlation was found between the experimental data and NASTRAN analytical results for the corrugated panel over a relatively wide frequency spectrum covered in the investigation. Of the two experimental techniques used for mode shape and displacement measurements (a noncontacting displacement sensor system and a holographic technique using a helium-neon, continuous-wave laser), the holographic technique was found, in the present investigation, to be faster and better suited for determining a large number of complex nodal patterns of the corrugated panel.

  19. Elimination of Heat-Shielding for Geothermal Tools Operating Up To 300 Degress Celsius

    SciTech Connect

    HENFLING,JOSEPH A.; NORMANN,RANDY A.

    1999-10-07

    This report focuses Sandia National Laboratories' effort to create high-temperature logging tools for geothermal applications not requiring heat-shielding. Tool electronics can operate up to 300 C with a few limiting components operating to 250 C. Second generation electronics are needed to increase measurement accuracy and extend the operating range to 300 and then 350 C are identified. Custom development of high-temperature batteries and assembling techniques are touched on. Outcomes of this work are discussed and new directions for developing high-temperature industry are suggested.

  20. A shielded storage and processing facility for radioisotope thermoelectric generator heat source production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherrell, Dennis L.

    1993-01-01

    A shielded storage rack has been installed as part of the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility (RPSF) at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in Washington State. The RPSF is designed to replace an existing facility at DOE's Mound Site near Dayton, Ohio, where General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules are currently assembled and installed into Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG). The overall design goal of the RPSF is to increase annual production throughput, while at the same time reducing annual radiation exposure to personnel. The shield rack design successfully achieved this goal for the Module Reduction and Monitoring Facility (MRMF), which processes and stores assembled GPHS modules, prior to their installation into RTGs. The shield rack design is simple and effective, with the result that background radiation levels within Hanford's MRMF room are calculated at just over three percent of those typically experienced during operation of the existing MRMF at Mound, despite the fact that Hanford's calculations assume five times the GPHS inventory of that assumed for Mound.

  1. A shielded storage and processing facility for radioisotope thermoelectric generator heat source production

    SciTech Connect

    Sherrell, D.L.

    1992-06-01

    This report discusses a shielded storage rack which has been installed as part of the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility (RPSF) at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in Washington State. The RPSF is designed to replace an existing facility at DOE's Mound Site near Dayton, Ohio, where General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules are currently assembled and installed into Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG). The overall design goal of the RPSF is to increase annual production throughput, while at the same time reducing annual radiation exposure to personnel. The shield rack design successfully achieved this goal for the Module Reduction and Monitoring Facility (MRMF), which process and stores assembled GPHS modules, prior to their installation into RTGS. The shield rack design is simple and effective, with the result that background radiation levels within Hanford's MRMF room are calculated at just over three percent of those typically experienced during operation of the existing MRMF at Mound, despite the fact that Hanford's calculations assume five times the GPHS inventory of that assumed for Mound.

  2. A shielded storage and processing facility for radioisotope thermoelectric generator heat source production

    SciTech Connect

    Sherrell, D.L.

    1992-06-01

    This report discusses a shielded storage rack which has been installed as part of the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility (RPSF) at the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site in Washington State. The RPSF is designed to replace an existing facility at DOE`s Mound Site near Dayton, Ohio, where General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules are currently assembled and installed into Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG). The overall design goal of the RPSF is to increase annual production throughput, while at the same time reducing annual radiation exposure to personnel. The shield rack design successfully achieved this goal for the Module Reduction and Monitoring Facility (MRMF), which process and stores assembled GPHS modules, prior to their installation into RTGS. The shield rack design is simple and effective, with the result that background radiation levels within Hanford`s MRMF room are calculated at just over three percent of those typically experienced during operation of the existing MRMF at Mound, despite the fact that Hanford`s calculations assume five times the GPHS inventory of that assumed for Mound.

  3. Flexible Ablators: Applications and Arcjet Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, James O.; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Beck, Robin A S.; Mcguire, Kathy; Prabhu, Dinesh K.; Gorbunov, Sergey

    2011-01-01

    Flexible ablators were conceived in 2009 to meet the technology pull for large, human Mars Exploration Class, 23 m diameter hypersonic inflatable aerodynamic decelerators. As described elsewhere, they have been recently undergoing initial technical readiness (TRL) advancement by NASA. The performance limits of flexible ablators in terms of maximum heat rates, pressure and shear remain to be defined. Further, it is hoped that this emerging technology will vastly expand the capability of future NASA missions involving atmospheric entry systems. This paper considers four topics of relevance to flexible ablators: (1) Their potential applications to near/far term human and robotic missions (2) Brief consideration of the balance between heat shield diameter, flexible ablator performance limits, entry vehicle controllability and aft-body shear layer impingement of interest to designers of very large entry vehicles, (3) The approach for developing bonding processes of flexible ablators for use on rigid entry bodies and (4) Design of large arcjet test articles that will enable the testing of flexible ablators in flight-like, combined environments (heat flux, pressure, shear and structural tensile loading). Based on a review of thermal protection system performance requirements for future entry vehicles, it is concluded that flexible ablators have broad applications to conventional, rigid entry body systems and are enabling to large deployable (both inflatable and mechanical) heat shields. Because of the game-changing nature of flexible ablators, it appears that NASA's Office of the Chief Technologist (OCT) will fund a focused, 3-year TRL advancement of the new materials capable of performance in heat fluxes in the range of 200-600 W/sq. cm. This support will enable the manufacture and use of the large-scale arcjet test designs that will be a key element of this OCT funded activity.

  4. The Influence of Shielding Gas and Heat Input on the Mechanical Properties of Laser Welds in Ferritic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keskitalo, M.; Sundqvist, J.; Mäntyjärvi, K.; Powell, J.; Kaplan, A. F. H.

    Laser welding of ferritic steel in normal atmosphere gives rise to weld embrittlement and poor formability. This paper demonstrates that the addition of an argon gas shield to the welding process results in tough, formable welds. Post weld heat treatment and microscopic analysis has suggested that the poor ductility of welds produced without a gas shield is, to some extent, the result of the presence of oxides in the weld metal.

  5. Evaluation of dispersion strengthened nickel-base alloy heat shields for space shuttle application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R., Jr.; Killpatrick, D. H.

    1976-01-01

    The results obtained in a program to evaluate dispersion-strengthened nickel-base alloys for use in a metallic radiative thermal protection system operating at surface temperatures to 1477 K for the space shuttle were presented. Vehicle environments having critical effects on the thermal protection system are defined; TD Ni-20Cr characteristics of material used in the current study are compared with previous results; cyclic load, temperature, and pressure effects on sheet material residual strength are investigated; the effects of braze reinforcement in improving the efficiency of spotwelded joints are evaluated; parametric studies of metallic radiative thermal protection systems are reported; and the design, instrumentation, and testing of full scale subsize heat shield panels in two configurations are described. Initial tests of full scale subsize panels included simulated meteoroid impact tests, simulated entry flight aerodynamic heating, programmed differential pressure loads and temperatures simulating mission conditions, and acoustic tests simulating sound levels experienced during boost flight.

  6. Development, fabrication and test of a high purity silica heat shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rusert, E. L.; Drennan, D. N.; Biggs, M. S.

    1978-01-01

    A highly reflective hyperpure ( 25 ppm ion impurities) slip cast fused silica heat shield material developed for planetary entry probes was successfully scaled up. Process development activities for slip casting large parts included green strength improvements, casting slip preparation, aggregate casting, strength, reflectance, and subscale fabrication. Successful fabrication of a one-half scale Saturn probe (shape and size) heat shield was accomplished while maintaining the silica high purity and reflectance through the scale-up process. However, stress analysis of this original aggregate slip cast material indicated a small margin of safety (MS. = +4%) using a factor of safety of 1.25. An alternate hyperpure material formulation to increase the strength and toughness for a greater safety margin was evaluated. The alternate material incorporates short hyperpure silica fibers into the casting slip. The best formulation evaluated has a 50% by weight fiber addition resulting in an 80% increase in flexural strength and a 170% increase in toughness over the original aggregate slip cast materials with comparable reflectance.

  7. Validation of PICA Ablation and Thermal-Response Model at Low Heat Flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milos, Frank S.; Chen, Yih-Kanq

    2009-01-01

    Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) was the forebody heatshield material on the Stardust sample-return capsule and is also a primary candidate material for the Mars Science Lander (MSL), the Orion Crew Module, and the SpaceX Dragon vehicle. As part of the heatshield qualification for Orion, physical and thermal properties of virgin and charred PICA were measured, and an ablation and thermal response model was developed. We validated the model by comparing it with recession and temperature data from stagnation arcjet tests conducted over a wide range of stagnation heat flux of 107 to 1102 W/sq cm. The effect of orthotropic thermal conductivity was evident in the thermal response of the arcjet models. In general, model predictions compared well with the data; however, the uncertainty of the recession prediction was greatest for heat fluxes below 200 W/sq cm. More recent MSL testing focused on the low heat flux regime of 45 to 250 W/sq cm. The new results confirm the recession uncertainty, especially for pressures below 6 kPa. In this work we focus on improving the model predictions for MSL and Orion tests below 250 W/sq cm.

  8. Modelling of labour productivity loss due to climate change: HEAT-SHIELD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjellstrom, Tord; Daanen, Hein

    2016-04-01

    Climate change will bring higher heat levels (temperature and humidity combined) to large parts of the world. When these levels reach above thresholds well defined by human physiology, the ability to maintain physical activity levels decrease and labour productivity is reduced. This impact is of particular importance in work situations in areas with long high intensity hot seasons, but also affects cooler areas during heat waves. Our modelling of labour productivity loss includes climate model data of the Inter-Sectoral Impact Model Inter-comparison Project (ISI-MIP), calculations of heat stress indexes during different months, estimations of work capacity loss and its annual impacts in different parts of the world. Different climate models will be compared for the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) and the outcomes of the 2015 Paris Climate Conference (COP21) agreements. The validation includes comparisons of modelling outputs with actual field studies using historical heat data. These modelling approaches are a first stage contribution to the European Commission funded HEAT-SHIELD project.

  9. Estimating Orion Heat Shield Failure Due To Ablator Cracking During The EFT-1 Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vander Kam, Jeremy C.; Gage, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The Orion EFT-1 heatshield suffered from two major certification challenges: First, the mechanical properties used in design were not evident in the flight hardware and second, the flight article itself cracked during fabrication. The combination of these events motivated the Orion Program to pursue an engineering-level Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) as part of heatshield certification rationale. The PRA provided loss of Mission (LOM) likelihoods considering the probability of a crack occurring during the mission and the likelihood of subsequent structure over-temperature. The methods and input data for the PRA are presented along with a discussion of the test data used to anchor the results. The Orion program accepted an EFT-1 Loss of Vehicle (LOV) risk of 1-in-160,000 due to in-mission Avcoat cracking based on the results of this analysis. Conservatisms in the result, along with future considerations for Exploration Missions (EM) are also addressed.

  10. Dry Block Calibrator Using Heat Flux Sensors and an Adiabatic Shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohmann, M.; Marin, S.; Schalles, M.; Krapf, G.; Fröhlich, T.

    2015-08-01

    The main problems of conventional dry block calibrators are axial temperature gradients and calibration results which are strongly influenced by the geometry and the thermal properties of the thermometers under test. To overcome these disadvantages, a new dry block calibrator with improved homogeneity of the inner temperature field was developed for temperatures in the range from room temperature up to . The inner part of the dry block calibrator is a cylindrical normalization block which is divided into three parts in the axial direction. Between these parts, heat flux sensors are placed to measure the heat flux in the axial direction inside the normalization block. Each part is attached to a separate tube-shaped heating zone of which the heating power can be controlled in a way that the axial heat flux measured by means of the heat flux sensors is zero. Additionally, an internal reference thermometer is used to control the absolute value of the temperature inside the normalization block. To minimize the radial heat flux, an adiabatic shield is constructed which is composed of a secondary heating zone that encloses the whole assembly. For rapid changes of the set point from high to low temperatures, the design contains an additional ventilation system to cool the normalization block. The present paper shows the operating principle as well as the results of the design process, in which numerical simulations based on the finite element method were used to evaluate and optimize the design of the dry block calibrator. The final optimized design can be used to build a prototype of the dry block calibrator.

  11. Family System of Advanced Charring Ablators for Planetary Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Congdon, William M.; Curry, Donald M.

    2005-01-01

    Advanced Ablators Program Objectives: 1) Flight-ready(TRL-6) ablative heat shields for deep-space missions; 2) Diversity of selection from family-system approach; 3) Minimum weight systems with high reliability; 4) Optimized formulations and processing; 5) Fully characterized properties; and 6) Low-cost manufacturing. Definition and integration of candidate lightweight structures. Test and analysis database to support flight-vehicle engineering. Results from production scale-up studies and production-cost analyses.

  12. Simulation of ablation in Earth atmospheric entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keenan, James A.; Candler, Graham V.

    1993-01-01

    The process of ablation for Earth atmospheric entry is simulated using a computational approach that allows thermo-chemical nonequilibrium of the flow field and ablation gases. The heat pulse into the heat shield is modeled. The flowfield and graphite heat shield are coupled through surface mass and energy balances. The surface thermochemistry involves the oxidation of graphite and allows for catalytic recombination of diatomic oxygen. Steady-state simulations are performed on a one meter nose radius sphere at an altitude of 65/km and at freestream velocities of 8 km/s and 10 km/s. A transient simulation is performed at 65 km altitude and a freestream velocity of 10 km/s.

  13. BWR spent fuel storage cask performance test. Volume 1. Cask handling experience and decay heat, heat transfer, and shielding data

    SciTech Connect

    McKinnon, M.A.; Doman, J.W.; Tanner, J.E.; Guenther, R.J.; Creer, J.M.; King, C.E.

    1986-02-01

    This report documents a heat transfer and shielding performance test conducted on a Ridihalgh, Eggers and Associates REA 2023 boiling water reactor (BWR) spent fuel storage cask. The testing effort consisted of three parts: pretest preparations, performance testing, and post-test activities. Pretest preparations included conducting cask handling dry runs and characterizing BWR spent fuel assemblies from Nebraska Public Power District's Cooper Nuclear Station. The performance test matrix included 14 runs consisting of two loadings, two cask orientations, and three backfill environments. Post-test activities included calorimetry and axial radiation scans of selected fuel assemblies, in-basin sipping of each assembly, crud collection, video and photographic scans, and decontamination of the cask interior and exterior.

  14. Evaluation of coated columbium alloy heat shields for space shuttle thermal protection system application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, W. E.

    1977-01-01

    A three-phase program to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of a metallic heat shield suitable for use on Space Shuttle Orbiter class vehicles at operating surface temperatures of up to 1590 K (2400 F) is summarized. An orderly progression of configuration studies, material screening tests, and subscale structural tests was performed. Scale-up feasibility was demonstrated in the final phase when a sizable nine-panel array was fabricated and successfully tested. The full-scale tests included cyclic testing at reduced air pressure to 1590 K (2400 F) and up to 158 dB overall sound pressure level. The selected structural configuration and design techniques succesfully eliminated thermal induced failures. The thermal/structural performance of the system was repeatedly demonstrated. Practical and effective field repair methods for coated columbium alloys were demonstrated. Major uncertainties of accessibility, refurbishability, and durability were eliminated.

  15. Development of fused slurry silicide coatings for tantalum reentry heat shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warnock, R. V.; Stetson, A. R.

    1972-01-01

    A fused slurry silicide coating was developed to provide atmospheric reentry protection for the 90Ta-lOW alloy. Overlaying the silicide with a highly refractory glass greatly improved total lifetime and reliability of the coating system. Low pressure, slow cycle lifetimes in excess of 100 cycles were consistently recorded for 1700 K - 13 and 1300 N/sq m test conditions. A minimum of 25 cycles was obtained for 1810 K - 1300 N/sq m conditions. About 50 simulated reentry cycles (variable temperature, pressure, and stress) were endured by coated 1-inch miniature heat shield panels when exposed to a maximum of 1700 K and either internal or external pressure conditions.

  16. Sequential activation of multiple grounding pads reduces skin heating during radiofrequency tumor ablation

    PubMed Central

    HAEMMERICH, DIETER; SCHUTT, DAVID JAMES

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Radiofrequency (RF) tumor ablation has become an accepted treatment modality for tumors not amenable to surgery. Skin burns due to ground pad heating may become a limiting factor for further increase in ablation zone dimensions and generator power. We investigated a method were groups of ground pads are sequentially activated to reduce skin heating. Methods We compared conventional operation (i.e. simultaneous connection of all pads) to sequentially switched activation of the pads where different pad combinations are active for periods of ∼0.3 − 8 s. The timing during sequential activation was adjusted to keep the leading edge temperature equal between the pads. We created Finite Element Method computer models of three pads (5 × 5 cm, 1 cm apart) placed in line with the RF electrode on a human thigh to determine differences in tissue heating during simultaneous and sequential ground pad activation. We performed experiments with three ground pads (5 × 10 cm, 4 cm apart) placed on a tissue phantom (1.5 A, 12 min) and measured pad surface and leading edge temperatures. Results Temperature rise below the leading edge for proximal, middle and distal ground pad in relation to active electrode location was 5.9°C ± 0.1°C, 0.8°C ± 0.1°C and 0.3°C ± 0.1°C for conventional operation, and 3.3°C ± 0.1°C, 3.4°C ± 0.2°C and 3.4°C ± 0.2°C for sequentially activated operation in the experiments (p < 0.001). Conclusion Sequential activation of multiple ground pads resulted in reduced maximum tissue temperature. This may reduce the incidence of ground pad burns and may allow higher power RF generators. PMID:18038286

  17. Pulse-echo ultrasonic inspection system for in-situ nondestructive inspection of Space Shuttle RCC heat shields.

    SciTech Connect

    Roach, Dennis Patrick; Walkington, Phillip D.; Rackow, Kirk A.

    2005-06-01

    The reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) heat shield components on the Space Shuttle's wings must withstand harsh atmospheric reentry environments where the wing leading edge can reach temperatures of 3,000 F. Potential damage includes impact damage, micro cracks, oxidation in the silicon carbide-to-carbon-carbon layers, and interlaminar disbonds. Since accumulated damage in the thick, carbon-carbon and silicon-carbide layers of the heat shields can lead to catastrophic failure of the Shuttle's heat protection system, it was essential for NASA to institute an accurate health monitoring program. NASA's goal was to obtain turnkey inspection systems that could certify the integrity of the Shuttle heat shields prior to each mission. Because of the possibility of damaging the heat shields during removal, the NDI devices must be deployed without removing the leading edge panels from the wing. Recently, NASA selected a multi-method approach for inspecting the wing leading edge which includes eddy current, thermography, and ultrasonics. The complementary superposition of these three inspection techniques produces a rigorous Orbiter certification process that can reliably detect the array of flaws expected in the Shuttle's heat shields. Sandia Labs produced an in-situ ultrasonic inspection method while NASA Langley developed the eddy current and thermographic techniques. An extensive validation process, including blind inspections monitored by NASA officials, demonstrated the ability of these inspection systems to meet the accuracy, sensitivity, and reliability requirements. This report presents the ultrasonic NDI development process and the final hardware configuration. The work included the use of flight hardware and scrap heat shield panels to discover and overcome the obstacles associated with damage detection in the RCC material. Optimum combinations of custom ultrasonic probes and data analyses were merged with the inspection procedures needed to properly survey the heat

  18. Endometrial ablation

    MedlinePlus

    ... can be seen on the video screen. Small tools can be used through the scope to remove abnormal growths or tissue for examination. Ablation uses heat, cold, or electricity to destroy the lining of the womb. The ...

  19. Heat Stress-Induced PI3K/mTORC2-Dependent AKT Signaling Is a Central Mediator of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Survival to Thermal Ablation Induced Heat Stress.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Scott M; Callstrom, Matthew R; Jondal, Danielle E; Butters, Kim A; Knudsen, Bruce E; Anderson, Jill L; Lien, Karen R; Sutor, Shari L; Lee, Ju-Seog; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S; Grande, Joseph P; Roberts, Lewis R; Woodrum, David A

    2016-01-01

    Thermal ablative therapies are important treatment options in the multidisciplinary care of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), but lesions larger than 2-3 cm are plagued with high local recurrence rates and overall survival of these patients remains poor. Currently no adjuvant therapies exist to prevent local HCC recurrence in patients undergoing thermal ablation. The molecular mechanisms mediating HCC resistance to thermal ablation induced heat stress and local recurrence remain unclear. Here we demonstrate that the HCC cells with a poor prognostic hepatic stem cell subtype (Subtype HS) are more resistant to heat stress than HCC cells with a better prognostic hepatocyte subtype (Subtype HC). Moreover, sublethal heat stress rapidly induces phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) dependent-protein kinase B (AKT) survival signaling in HCC cells in vitro and at the tumor ablation margin in vivo. Conversely, inhibition of PI3K/mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2)-dependent AKT phosphorylation or direct inhibition of AKT function both enhance HCC cell killing and decrease HCC cell survival to sublethal heat stress in both poor and better prognostic HCC subtypes while mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1)-inhibition has no impact. Finally, we showed that AKT isoforms 1, 2 and 3 are differentially upregulated in primary human HCCs and that overexpression of AKT correlates with worse tumor biology and pathologic features (AKT3) and prognosis (AKT1). Together these findings define a novel molecular mechanism whereby heat stress induces PI3K/mTORC2-dependent AKT survival signaling in HCC cells and provide a mechanistic rationale for adjuvant AKT inhibition in combination with thermal ablation as a strategy to enhance HCC cell killing and prevent local recurrence, particularly at the ablation margin. PMID:27611696

  20. Optimization of the Mu2e Production Solenoid Heat and Radiation Shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pronskikh, V. S.; Coleman, R.; Glenzinski, D.; Kashikhin, V. V.; Mokhov, N. V.

    2014-03-01

    The Mu2e experiment at Fermilab is designed to study the conversion of a negative muon to electron in the field of a nucleus without emission of neutrinos. Observation of this process would provide unambiguous evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model, and can point to new physics beyond the reach of the LHC. The main parts of the Mu2e apparatus are its superconducting solenoids: Production Solenoid (PS), Transport Solenoid (TS), and Detector Solenoid (DS). Being in the vicinity of the beam, PS magnets are most subjected to the radiation damage. In order for the PS superconducting magnet to operate reliably, the peak neutron flux in the PS coils must be reduced by 3 orders of magnitude by means of sophisticatedly designed massive Heat and Radiation Shield (HRS), optimized for the performance and cost. An issue with radiation damage is related to large residual electrical resistivity degradation in the superconducting coils, especially its Al stabilizer. A detailed MARS15 analysis and optimization of the HRS has been carried out both to satisfy the Mu2e requirements to the radiation quantities (such as displacements per atom, peak temperature and power density in the coils, absorbed dose in the insulation, and dynamic heat load) and cost. Results of MARS15 simulations of these radiation quantities are reported and optimized HRS models are presented; it is shown that design levels satisfy all requirements.

  1. High-temperature metal purification using a compact, portable rf heating and levitation system on the wake shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahs, C. A.

    1990-01-01

    The potential use of a compact, battery-operated rf levitator and heating system to purify high-temperature melting materials in space is described. The wake shield now being fabricated for the Space Vacuum Epitaxy Center will provide an Ultra-high vacuum (10(exp -14) Torr hydrogen, 10(exp -14) Torr helium, 10(exp -30) Torr oxygen). The use of the wake shield to purify Nb, Ti, W, Ir, and other metals to a purity level not achievable on earth is described.

  2. Non-linear dual-phase-lag model for analyzing heat transfer phenomena in living tissues during thermal ablation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, P; Kumar, Dinesh; Rai, K N

    2016-08-01

    In this article, a non-linear dual-phase-lag (DPL) bio-heat transfer model based on temperature dependent metabolic heat generation rate is derived to analyze the heat transfer phenomena in living tissues during thermal ablation treatment. The numerical solution of the present non-linear problem has been done by finite element Runge-Kutta (4,5) method which combines the essence of Runge-Kutta (4,5) method together with finite difference scheme. Our study demonstrates that at the thermal ablation position temperature predicted by non-linear and linear DPL models show significant differences. A comparison has been made among non-linear DPL, thermal wave and Pennes model and it has been found that non-linear DPL and thermal wave bio-heat model show almost same nature whereas non-linear Pennes model shows significantly different temperature profile at the initial stage of thermal ablation treatment. The effect of Fourier number and Vernotte number (relaxation Fourier number) on temperature profile in presence and absence of externally applied heat source has been studied in detail and it has been observed that the presence of externally applied heat source term highly affects the efficiency of thermal treatment method. PMID:27503734

  3. New methods to detect particle velocity and mass flux in arc-heated ablation/erosion facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brayton, D. B.; Bomar, B. W.; Seibel, B. L.; Elrod, P. D.

    1980-01-01

    Arc-heated flow facilities with injected particles are used to simulate the erosive and ablative/erosive environments encountered by spacecraft re-entry through fog, clouds, thermo-nuclear explosions, etc. Two newly developed particle diagnostic techniques used to calibrate these facilities are discussed. One technique measures particle velocity and is based on the detection of thermal radiation and/or chemiluminescence from the hot seed particles in a model ablation/erosion facility. The second technique measures a local particle rate, which is proportional to local particle mass flux, in a dust erosion facility by photodetecting and counting the interruptions of a focused laser beam by individual particles.

  4. Heat-Irrigate Effect' of Radiofrequency Ablation on Relevant Regional Hepatocyte in Living Swine Liver-Initial Study on Pathology.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Kai; Chen, Jiye; Liu, Yang; Liu, Jiang; Liu, Aijun; Dong, Jiahong; Huang, Zhiqiang

    2015-05-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is one of the effective methods for HCC treatment. However, because of the "heat-sink effect" (HSE), it is very difficult to achieve a complete ablation in intrahepatic tumors. This study establishes the animal model of RFA on living swine liver and observes the 'heat-irrigate effect' on relevant regional hepatocytes. Three liver segments of 6 Guangxi Bama mini-pigs were selected to be ablated closed to segmental outflow vessel under surveillance of sonography for 6 min, and pathological changes of relevant downstream region were observed. We observed an elliptic shape of ablated area with diameter of 2.2 ± 1.1 cm on gross liver. Thermal damage was seen in downstream regional of relevant portal vein under microscope. However, adjacent area around the vessel was remained intact. In conclusion, the 'heat-irrigate effect' in RFA could cause thermal damage along the downstream region of relevant portal vein and this influence decreased gradually toward the surface. PMID:25416583

  5. A 2-D Test Problem for CFD Modeling Heat Transfer in Spent Fuel Transfer Cask Neutron Shields

    SciTech Connect

    Zigh, Ghani; Solis, Jorge; Fort, James A.

    2011-01-14

    In the United States, commercial spent nuclear fuel is typically moved from spent fuel pools to outdoor dry storage pads within a transfer cask system that provides radiation shielding to protect personnel and the surrounding environment. The transfer casks are cylindrical steel enclosures with integral gamma and neutron radiation shields. Since the transfer cask system must be passively cooled, decay heat removal from spent nuclear fuel canister is limited by the rate of heat transfer through the cask components, and natural convection from the transfer cask surface. The primary mode of heat transfer within the transfer cask system is conduction, but some cask designs incorporate a liquid neutron shield tank surrounding the transfer cask structural shell. In these systems, accurate prediction of natural convection within the neutron shield tank is an important part of assessing the overall thermal performance of the transfer cask system. The large-scale geometry of the neutron shield tank, which is typically an annulus approximately 2 meters in diameter but only 5-10 cm in thickness, and the relatively small scale velocities (typically less than 5 cm/s) represent a wide range of spatial and temporal scales that contribute to making this a challenging problem for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling. Relevant experimental data at these scales are not available in the literature, but some recent modeling studies offer insights into numerical issues and solutions; however, the geometries in these studies, and for the experimental data in the literature at smaller scales, all have large annular gaps that are not prototypic of the transfer cask neutron shield. This paper presents results for a simple 2-D problem that is an effective numerical analog for the neutron shield application. Because it is 2-D, solutions can be obtained relatively quickly allowing a comparison and assessment of sensitivity to model parameter changes. Turbulence models are considered as

  6. Correlations for Boundary-Layer Transition on Mars Science Laboratory Entry Vehicle Due to Heat-Shield Cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, Brian R.; Liechty, Derek S.

    2008-01-01

    The influence of cavities (for attachment bolts) on the heat-shield of the proposed Mars Science Laboratory entry vehicle has been investigated experimentally and computationally in order to develop a criterion for assessing whether the boundary layer becomes turbulent downstream of the cavity. Wind tunnel tests were conducted on the 70-deg sphere-cone vehicle geometry with various cavity sizes and locations in order to assess their influence on convective heating and boundary layer transition. Heat-transfer coefficients and boundary-layer states (laminar, transitional, or turbulent) were determined using global phosphor thermography.

  7. Experimental measurement of ablation rate of wood pieces, undergoing fast pyrolysis by contact with a heated wall

    SciTech Connect

    Lede, J.; Panagopoulos, J.; Villermaux, J.

    1983-01-01

    The conventional pyrolysis of biomass yields about equal amounts of gases, char and tar. When pyrolysis is carried out in severe heating conditions, the reaction products can be almost entirely gaseous and contain significant amounts of light unsaturated hydrocarbons. Authors involved in such research, generally recommend several types of conditions: small wood particles, high temperatures, high heating rates, high heat fluxes, etc. Few of them have associated the idea of ablation regime, to the observation of the fast pyrolysis reaction. Actually, the apparent rate of reaction is a function of two competitive processes within the wood particle: the rate of heat transfer and the rate of chemical decomposition of wood itself. If chemical processes are very fast, the heat transfer is rate controlling: this is the so called ablation regime characterized by a thin superficial layer of reacting wood). Such a regime can be represented by the rate at which the reacting layer moves towards the cold unreacted core of the piece of wood (ablation rate v) and the thickness of this reacting layer (e).

  8. Effect of heat treatment on ZrO 2 -embedded electrospun carbon fibers used for efficient electromagnetic interference shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Ji Sun; Kim, Jong Gu; Bae, Tae-Sung; Lee, Young-Seak

    2011-10-01

    ZrO 2 -embedded carbon fibers were prepared for use as an electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding material by electrospinning and heat treatment methods. Structural changes were observed in the ZrO 2 and in the carbon structures by XRD and Raman spectroscopy, respectively. During heat treatment, XRD analysis results revealed a transition from a monoclinic structure to a tetragonal structure in ZrO 2 and a graphitization in the structural formation of carbon fibers was observed by Raman spectroscopy. It was observed that these structural changes in the ZrO 2 and the carbon fibers improved the real and imaginary permittivities by a factor of more than 3.5. The EMI shielding efficiency (SE) improved along with the permittivity with higher treatment temperatures and greater amounts of embedded ZrO 2 ; the highest average EMI SE achieved was 31.79 dB in 800-8500 MHz. The heat treatment played an important role in the improvements in the permittivity and in the EMI SE because of the heat-induced structural changes of the ZrO 2 -embedded electrospun carbon fibers. We suggest that the EMI shielding of the fibers is primarily due to the absorption of electromagnetic waves, which prevents secondary EMI by reflection of electromagnetic waves.

  9. Sequential Activation of a Segmented Ground Pad Reduces Skin Heating During Radiofrequency Tumor Ablation: Optimization via Computational Models

    PubMed Central

    Schutt, David J.; Haemmerich, Dieter

    2009-01-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) ablation has become an accepted treatment modality for unresectable tumors. The need for larger ablation zones has resulted in increased RF generator power. Skin burns due to ground pad heating are increasingly limiting further increases in generator power, and thus, ablation zone size. We investigated a method for reducing ground pad heating in which a commercial ground pad is segmented into multiple ground electrodes, with sequential activation of ground electrode subsets. We created finite-element method computer models of a commercial ground pad (14 × 23 cm) and compared normal operation of a standard pad to sequential activation of a segmented pad (two to five separate ground electrode segments). A constant current of 1 A was applied for 12 min in all simulations. Time periods during sequential activation simulations were adjusted to keep the leading edge temperatures at each ground electrode equal. The maximum temperature using standard activation of the commercial pad was 41.7 °C. For sequential activation of a segmented pad, the maximum temperature ranged from 39.3 °C (five segments) to 40.9 °C (two segments). Sequential activation of a segmented ground pad resulted in lower tissue temperatures. This method may reduce the incidence of ground pad burns and enable the use of higher power generators during RF tumor ablation. PMID:18595807

  10. Heat Sink Effect on Tumor Ablation Characteristics as Observed in Monopolar Radiofrequency, Bipolar Radiofrequency, and Microwave, Using Ex Vivo Calf Liver Model

    PubMed Central

    Pillai, Krishna; Akhter, Javid; Chua, Terence C.; Shehata, Mena; Alzahrani, Nayef; Al-Alem, Issan; Morris, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Thermal ablation of liver tumors near large blood vessels is affected by the cooling effect of blood flow, leading to incomplete ablation. Hence, we conducted a comparative investigation of heat sink effect in monopolar (MP) and bipolar (BP) radiofrequency ablation (RFA), and microwave (MW) ablation devices. With a perfused calf liver, the ablative performances (volume, mass, density, dimensions), with and without heat sink, were measured. Heat sink was present when the ablative tip of the probes were 8.0 mm close to a major hepatic vein and absent when >30 mm away. Temperatures (T1 and T2) on either side of the hepatic vein near the tip of the probes, heating probe temperature (T3), outlet perfusate temperature (T4), and ablation time were monitored. With or without heat sink, BP radiofrequency ablated a larger volume and mass, compared with MP RFA or MW ablation, with latter device producing the highest density of tissue ablated. MW ablation produced an ellipsoidal shape while radiofrequency devices produced spheres. Percentage heat sink effect in Bipolar radiofrequency : Mono-polar radiofrequency : Microwave was (Volume) 33:41:22; (mass) 23:56:34; (density) 9.0:26:18; and (relative elipscity) 5.8:12.9:1.3, indicating that BP and MW devices were less affected. Percentage heat sink effect on time (minutes) to reach maximum temperature (W) = 13.28:9.2:29.8; time at maximum temperature (X) is 87:66:16.66; temperature difference (Y) between the thermal probes (T3) and the temperature (T1 + T2)/2 on either side of the hepatic vessel was 100:87:20; and temperature difference between the (T1 + T2)/2 and temperature of outlet circulating solution (T4), Z was 20.33:30.23:37.5. MW and BP radiofrequencies were less affected by heat sink while MP RFA was the most affected. With a single ablation, BP radiofrequency ablated a larger volume and mass regardless of heat sink. PMID:25738477

  11. Heat sink effect on tumor ablation characteristics as observed in monopolar radiofrequency, bipolar radiofrequency, and microwave, using ex vivo calf liver model.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Krishna; Akhter, Javid; Chua, Terence C; Shehata, Mena; Alzahrani, Nayef; Al-Alem, Issan; Morris, David L

    2015-03-01

    Thermal ablation of liver tumors near large blood vessels is affected by the cooling effect of blood flow, leading to incomplete ablation. Hence, we conducted a comparative investigation of heat sink effect in monopolar (MP) and bipolar (BP) radiofrequency ablation (RFA), and microwave (MW) ablation devices.With a perfused calf liver, the ablative performances (volume, mass, density, dimensions), with and without heat sink, were measured. Heat sink was present when the ablative tip of the probes were 8.0 mm close to a major hepatic vein and absent when >30 mm away. Temperatures (T1 and T2) on either side of the hepatic vein near the tip of the probes, heating probe temperature (T3), outlet perfusate temperature (T4), and ablation time were monitored.With or without heat sink, BP radiofrequency ablated a larger volume and mass, compared with MP RFA or MW ablation, with latter device producing the highest density of tissue ablated. MW ablation produced an ellipsoidal shape while radiofrequency devices produced spheres.Percentage heat sink effect in Bipolar radiofrequency : Mono-polar radiofrequency : Microwave was (Volume) 33:41:22; (mass) 23:56:34; (density) 9.0:26:18; and (relative elipscity) 5.8:12.9:1.3, indicating that BP and MW devices were less affected.Percentage heat sink effect on time (minutes) to reach maximum temperature (W) = 13.28:9.2:29.8; time at maximum temperature (X) is 87:66:16.66; temperature difference (Y) between the thermal probes (T3) and the temperature (T1 + T2)/2 on either side of the hepatic vessel was 100:87:20; and temperature difference between the (T1 + T2)/2 and temperature of outlet circulating solution (T4), Z was 20.33:30.23:37.5.MW and BP radiofrequencies were less affected by heat sink while MP RFA was the most affected. With a single ablation, BP radiofrequency ablated a larger volume and mass regardless of heat sink. PMID:25738477

  12. Preparation and Ablating Behavior of FGM used in a Heat Flux Rocket Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiaodong; Han, Jiecai; Zhang, Xinghong

    2002-01-01

    rocket engine. As a result, TiB2-Cu FGM showed excellent resistant ablating properties. There is only a little loss of the mass after heated for 40 seconds in the wind tunnel. Meanwhile no cracks and breakup appeared in the FGM under the sharp thermal shock condition. Key words: functionally graded materials, combustion synthesis, ablation, thermal shock, thermal stress

  13. High temperature metal purification using a compact portable rf heating and levitation system on the wake shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahs, C. A.

    1990-01-01

    The Wake Shield Facility (WSF) can provide an ideal vacuum environment for the purification of high temperature metals in space. The Modular Electromagnetic Levitator (MEL), will provide the opportunity to study undercooling of metals in space and allow to determine material properties in space. The battery powered rf levitation and heating system developed for the MEL demonstrated efficiency of 36 percent. This system is being considered to purify metals at temperatures below 3000 C.

  14. MODELING HEAT TRANSFER IN SPENT FUEL TRANSFER CASK NEUTRON SHIELDS – A CHALLENGING PROBLEM IN NATURAL CONVECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Fort, James A.; Cuta, Judith M.; Bajwa, C.; Baglietto, E.

    2010-07-18

    In the United States, commercial spent nuclear fuel is typically moved from spent fuel pools to outdoor dry storage pads within a transfer cask system that provides radiation shielding to protect personnel and the surrounding environment. The transfer casks are cylindrical steel enclosures with integral gamma and neutron radiation shields. Since the transfer cask system must be passively cooled, decay heat removal from spent nuclear fuel canister is limited by the rate of heat transfer through the cask components, and natural convection from the transfer cask surface. The primary mode of heat transfer within the transfer cask system is conduction, but some cask designs incorporate a liquid neutron shield tank surrounding the transfer cask structural shell. In these systems, accurate prediction of natural convection within the neutron shield tank is an important part of assessing the overall thermal performance of the transfer cask system. The large-scale geometry of the neutron shield tank, which is typically an annulus approximately 2 meters in diameter but only 10-15 cm in thickness, and the relatively small scale velocities (typically less than 5 cm/s) represent a wide range of spatial and temporal scales that contribute to making this a challenging problem for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling. Relevant experimental data at these scales are not available in the literature, but some recent modeling studies offer insights into numerical issues and solutions; however, the geometries in these studies, and for the experimental data in the literature at smaller scales, all have large annular gaps that are not prototypic of the transfer cask neutron shield. This paper proposes that there may be reliable CFD approaches to the transfer cask problem, specifically coupled steady-state solvers or unsteady simulations; however, both of these solutions take significant computational effort. Segregated (uncoupled) steady state solvers that were tested did not

  15. Preliminary Evaluation of Convective Heat Transfer in a Water Shield for a Surface Power Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson J. Boise; Reid, Robert S.

    2007-01-01

    As part of the Vision for Space Exploration, the end of the next decade will bring man back to the surface of the moon. A crucial issue for the establishment of human presence on the moon will be the availability of compact power sources. This presence could require greater than 10's of kWt's in follow on years. Nuclear reactors are well suited to meet the needs for power generation on the lunar or Martian surface. Radiation shielding is a key component of any surface power reactor system. Several competing concepts exist for lightweight, safe, robust shielding systems such as a water shield, lithium hydride (LiH), and boron carbide. Water offers several potential advantages, including reduced cost, reduced technical risk, and reduced mass. Water has not typically been considered for space reactor applications because of the need for gravity to fix the location of any vapor that could form radiation streaming paths. The water shield concept relies on the predictions of passive circulation of the shield water by natural convection to adequately cool the shield. This prediction needs to be experimentally evaluated, especially for shields with complex geometries. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center has developed the experience and facilities necessary to do this evaluation in its Early Flight Fission - Test Facility (EFF-TF).

  16. Results of tests on a specimen of the SRB aft skirt heat shield curtain in the MSFC LRLF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, W. G.

    1980-01-01

    A full scale segment of the actual Solid Rocket Booster aft skirt heat shield curtain was tested in the Large Radiant Lamp Facility (LRLF) at Marshall Space Flight Center. The curtain was mounted in the horizontal position in the same manner as it is to be mounted on the SRB. A shaker rig was designed and used to provide a motion of the curtain, simulating that to be caused in flight by vehicle acoustics. Thermocouples were used to monitor curtain materials temperatures. Both ascent and reentry heat loads were applied to the test specimen. All aspects of the test setup performed as expected, and the test was declared successful.

  17. Results of tests of the SRB aft skirt heat shield curtain in the MSFC Hot Gas Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, W. G.

    1982-01-01

    During the first two space shuttle flights the aft skirt heat shield curtain performed well during ascent but failed during reentry. This exposed the inside of the skirt and its subsystems to reentry heating. The resulting exposure damaged various expensive systems items and therefore a curtain reassessment is required. As a part of this reassessment, tests were conducted in the MSFC Hot Gas Facility (HGF). The purposes of these tests were to determine if the curtain would fail in a manner similar to that in flight and to demonstrate that meaningful tests of the curtain can be conducted in the HGF.

  18. Heat generation and transfer behaviors of ti-coated carbon steel rod adaptable for ablation therapy of oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Naohara, Takashi; Aono, Hiromichi; Maehara, Tsunehiro; Hirazawa, Hideyuki; Matsutomo, Shinya; Watanabe, Yuji

    2013-01-01

    For the purpose of developing a novel ablation therapy for oral cancer, the heat generation and transfer properties of a Ti-coated carbon steel rod with 20-mm length and 1.8-mm outer diameter were investigated by means of a high-frequency induction technique at 300 kHz. The heat generation measurement performed using water (15 mL) revealed that the difference of the inclination angles (θ = 0°, 45° and 90°) relative to the magnetic flux direction only slightly affects the heating behavior, exhibiting the overlapped temperature curves during an induction time of 1200 s. These results suggest that the effect of the shape magnetic anisotropy is almost eliminated, being convenient for the precise control of the ablation temperature in clinical use. In the experiments utilizing a tissue-mimicking phantom, the heat transfer concentrically occurred in the lateral direction for both the planar surface and a 10-mm deep cross-section. However, the former exhibited a considerably lower increase in temperature (ΔT), probably due to the effect of heat dissipation to the ambient air. No significant heat transfer was found to occur to the lower side of the inserted Ti-coated carbon steel rod, which is situated in the longitudinal direction. PMID:24955829

  19. A Study of Heat Stress in Extremely Hot Environments, and the Infra-red Reflectance of Some Potential Shielding Materials

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Charles E.; Scherberger, Richard F.; Miller, Franklin A.

    1960-01-01

    In the course of evaluating industrial heat exposures, three very hot environments having heat stress indices over 300 have been analysed by the techniques of Haines and Hatch (1952) and Belding and Hatch (1955). In addition, pulse and oral temperature measurements were made on three subjects exposed to these environments. These studies indicate that the methods of Haines and Hatch and Belding and Hatch tend to err on the side of safety when applied to very hot areas. Safe exposure times calculated by their techniques are approximately one-third those determined by either physiological measurement or by safe tolerance curves recommended by the American Society of Heating and Ventilation Engineers (ASHVE). The intelligent use of shielding as a method of protecting workers from radiant heat requires a knowledge of the infra-red reflectance curves of common industrial materials. Nineteen such curves are included. Images PMID:14416497

  20. BWR spent fuel storage cask performance test. Volume 2. Pre- and post-test decay heat, heat transfer, and shielding analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Wiles, L.E.; Lombardo, N.J.; Heeb, C.M.; Jenquin, U.P.; Michener, T.E.; Wheeler, C.L.; Creer, J.M.; McCann, R.A.

    1986-06-01

    This report describes the decay heat, heat transfer, and shielding analyses conducted in support of performance testing of a Ridhihalgh, Eggers and Associates REA 2033 boiling water reactor (BWR) spent fuel storage cask. The cask testing program was conducted for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Commercial Spent Fuel Management Program by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and by General Electric at the latters' Morris Operation (GE-MO) as reported in Volume I. The analyses effort consisted of performing pretest calculations to (1) select spent fuel for the test; (2) symmetrically load the spent fuel assemblies in the cask to ensure lateral symmetry of decay heat generation rates; (3) optimally locate temperature and dose rate instrumentation in the cask and spent fuel assemblies; and (4) evaluate the ORIGEN2 (decay heat), HYDRA and COBRA-SFS (heat transfer), and QAD and DOT (shielding) computer codes. The emphasis of this second volume is on the comparison of code predictions to experimental test data in support of the code evaluation process. Code evaluations were accomplished by comparing pretest (actually pre-look, since some predictions were not completed until testing was in progress) predictions with experimental cask testing data reported in Volume I. No attempt was made in this study to compare the two heat transfer codes because results of other evaluations have not been completed, and a comparison based on one data set may lead to erroneous conclusions.

  1. Carbon Nanotube-Enhanced Carbon-Phenenolic Ablator Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kikolaev, P.; Stackpoole, M.; Fan, W.; Cruden, B. A.; Waid, M.; Moloney, P.; Arepalli, S.; Arnold, J.; Partridge, H.; Yowell, L.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the use of PICA (phenolic impregnated carbon ablator) as the selected material for heat shielding for future earth return vehicles. It briefly reviews the manufacturing of PICA and the advantages for the use of heat shielding, and then explains the reason for using Carbon Nanotubes to improve strength of phenolic resin that binds carbon fibers together. It reviews the work being done to create a carbon nanotube enhanced PICA. Also shown are various micrographic images of the various PICA materials.

  2. Experimental Studies of the Aerothermal Characteristics of the Project Orion CEV heat Shield in High Speed Transitional and Turbulent Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wadhams, T.P.; MacLean, M.; Holden, M.S.; Cassady, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    An experimental program has been completed by CUBRC exploring laminar, transitional, and turbulent flows over a 7.0% scale model of the Project ORION CEV geometry. This program was executed primarily to answer questions concerning the increase in heat transfer on the windward, or "hot shoulder" of the CEV heat shield from laminar to turbulent flow. To answer these questions CUBRC constructed and instrumented a 14.0 inch diameter Project ORION CEV model and ran a range of Reynolds numbers based on diameter from 1.0 to over 40 million at a Mach number of 8.0. These Reynolds numbers were selected to cover laminar to turbulent heating data on the "hot shoulder". Data obtained during these runs will be used to guide design decisions as they apply to heat shield thickness and extent. Several experiments at higher enthalpies were achieved to obtain data for code validation with real gas effects and transition. CUBRC also performed computation studies of these experiments to aid in the data reduction process and study turbulence modeling.

  3. Heating characteristics of antenna arrays used in microwave ablation: A theoretical parametric study.

    PubMed

    Karampatzakis, Andreas; Kühn, Sven; Tsanidis, George; Neufeld, Esra; Samaras, Theodoros; Kuster, Niels

    2013-10-01

    A numerical study of the performance of antenna arrays used in microwave ablation (MWA) is carried out. Double-slot coaxial antennas in triangular and square configurations are studied. Clinical (healthy vs. malignant) and experimental (in vs. ex vivo) scenarios for hepatic cancer treatment are modeled, and further application in bone and lung tissue is examined. It is found that triangular arrays can create spherical ablation zones, while square configurations result in flatter ones. Thresholds in power and application times for creating continuous ablation zones are calculated, and the characteristics of the latter are quantified. PMID:24034722

  4. Numerical calculation of the parameters of the efflux from a helium dewar used for cooling of heat shields in a satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brendley, K.; Chato, J. C.

    1982-01-01

    The parameters of the efflux from a helium dewar in space were numerically calculated. The flow was modeled as a one dimensional compressible ideal gas with variable properties. The primary boundary conditions are flow with friction and flow with heat transfer and friction. Two PASCAL programs were developed to calculate the efflux parameters: EFFLUZD and EFFLUXM. EFFLUXD calculates the minimum mass flow for the given shield temperatures and shield heat inputs. It then calculates the pipe lengths, diameter, and fluid parameters which satisfy all boundary conditions. Since the diameter returned by EFFLUXD is only rarely of nominal size, EFFLUXM calculates the mass flow and shield heat exchange for given pipe lengths, diameter, and shield temperatures.

  5. Microwave Ablation of Hepatic Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Lubner, Meghan G.; Brace, Christopher L.; Ziemlewicz, Tim J.; Hinshaw, J. Louis; Lee, Fred T.

    2013-01-01

    Microwave ablation is an extremely promising heat-based thermal ablation modality that has particular applicability in treating hepatic malignancies. Microwaves can generate very high temperatures in very short time periods, potentially leading to improved treatment efficiency and larger ablation zones. As the available technology continues to improve, microwave ablation is emerging as a valuable alternative to radiofrequency ablation in the treatment of hepatic malignancies. This article reviews the current state of microwave ablation including technical and clinical considerations. PMID:24436518

  6. Thermal, Radiation and Impact Protective Shields (TRIPS) for Robotic and Human Space Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loomis, M. P.; Arnold, J. L.

    2005-01-01

    New concepts for protective shields for NASA s Crew Exploration Vehicles (CEVs) and planetary probes offer improved mission safety and affordability. Hazards include radiation from cosmic rays and solar particle events, hypervelocity impacts from orbital debris/ micrometeorites, and the extreme heating environment experienced during entry into planetary atmospheres. The traditional approach for the design of protection systems for these hazards has been to create single-function shields, i.e. ablative and blanket-based heat shields for thermal protection systems (TPS), polymer or other low-molecular-weight materials for radiation shields, and multilayer, Whipple-type shields for protection from hypervelocity impacts. This paper introduces an approach for the development of a single, multifunctional protective shield, employing nanotechnology- based materials, to serve simultaneously as a TPS, an impact shield and as the first line of defense against radiation. The approach is first to choose low molecular weight ablative TPS materials, (existing and planned for development) and add functionalized carbon nanotubes. Together they provide both thermal and radiation (TR) shielding. Next, impact protection (IP) is furnished through a tough skin, consisting of hard, ceramic outer layers (to fracture the impactor) and sublayers of tough, nanostructured fabrics to contain the debris cloud from the impactor before it can penetrate the spacecraft s interior.

  7. On the Ablation Models of Fuel Pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Rozhansky, V.A.; Senichenkov, I.Yu.

    2005-12-15

    The neutral gas shielding model and neutral-gas-plasma shielding model are analyzed qualitatively. The main physical processes that govern the formation of the shielding gas cloud and, consequently, the ablation rate are considered. For the neutral gas shielding model, simple formulas relating the ablation rate and cloud parameters to the parameters of the pellet and the background plasma are presented. The estimates of the efficiency of neutral gas shielding and plasma shielding are compared. It is shown that the main portion of the energy flux of the background electrons is released in the plasma cloud. Formulas for the ablation rate and plasma parameters are derived in the neutral-gas-plasma shielding model. The question is discussed as to why the neutral gas shielding model describes well the ablation rate of the pellet material, although it does not take into account the ionization effects and the effects associated with the interaction of ionized particles with the magnetic field. The reason is that the ablation rate depends weakly on the energy flux of hot electrons; as a result, the attenuation of this flux by the electrostatic shielding and plasma shielding has little effect on the ablation rate. This justifies the use of the neutral gas shielding model to estimate the ablation rate (to within a factor of about 2) over a wide range of parameters of the pellet and the background plasma.

  8. Increased Duration of Heating Boosts Local Drug Deposition during Radiofrequency Ablation in Combination with Thermally Sensitive Liposomes (ThermoDox) in a Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Swenson, Christine E.; Haemmerich, Dieter; Maul, Donald H.; Knox, Bridget; Ehrhart, Nicole; Reed, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is used for the local treatment of liver cancer. RFA is effective for small (<3cm) tumors, but for tumors > 3 cm, there is a tendency to leave viable tumor cells in the margins or clefts of overlapping ablation zones. This increases the possibility of incomplete ablation or local recurrence. Lyso-Thermosensitive Liposomal Doxorubicin (LTLD), is a thermally sensitive liposomal doxorubicin formulation for intravenous administration, that rapidly releases its drug content when exposed to temperatures >40°C. When used with RFA, LTLD releases its doxorubicin in the vasculature around the zone of ablation-induced tumor cell necrosis, killing micrometastases in the ablation margin. This may reduce recurrence and be more effective than thermal ablation alone. Purpose The purpose of this study was to optimize the RFA procedure used in combination with LTLD to maximize the local deposition of doxorubicin in a swine liver model. Pigs were anaesthetized and the liver was surgically exposed. Each pig received a single, 50 mg/m2 dose of the clinical LTLD formulation (ThermoDox®). Subsequently, ablations were performed with either 1, 3 or 6 sequential, overlapping needle insertions in the left medial lobe with total ablation time of 15, 45 or 90 minutes respectively. Two different RFA generators and probes were evaluated. After the final ablation, the ablation zone (plus 3 cm margin) was dissected out and examined for doxorubicin concentration by LC/MS and fluorescence. Conclusion The mean Cmax of plasma total doxorubicin was 26.5 μg/ml at the end of the infusion. Overall, increased heat time from 15 to 45 to 90 minutes shows an increase in both the amount of doxorubicin deposited (up to ~100 μg/g) and the width of the ablation target margin to which doxorubicin is delivered as determined by tissue homogenization and LC/MS detection of doxorubicin and by fluorescent imaging of tissues. PMID:26431204

  9. Non-Intrusive Sensor for In-Situ Measurement of Recession Rate of Ablative and Eroding Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadopoulos, George (Inventor); Tiliakos, Nicholas (Inventor); Benel, Gabriel (Inventor); Thomson, Clint (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A non-intrusive sensor for in-situ measurement of recession rate of heat shield ablatives. An ultrasonic wave source is carried in the housing. A microphone is also carried in the housing, for collecting the reflected ultrasonic waves from an interface surface of the ablative material. A time phasing control circuit is also included for time-phasing the ultrasonic wave source so that the waves reflected from the interface surface of the ablative material focus on the microphone, to maximize the acoustic pressure detected by the microphone and to mitigate acoustic velocity variation effects through the material through a de-coupling process that involves a software algorithm. A software circuit for computing the location off of which the ultrasonic waves scattered to focus back at the microphone is also included, so that the recession rate of the heat shield ablative may be monitored in real-time through the scan-focus approach.

  10. Exploration of pulse timing for multiple laser hits within a combined heat transfer, phase change, and gas dynamics model for laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullenix, Nathan; Povitsky, Alex

    2007-05-01

    Laser ablation involves heat transfer, phase changes and/or chemical reactions, and gas dynamics. All three of these processes are tightly coupled with each other. A model has previously been developed to simulate the nanosecond scale laser ablation of carbon. This model has been extended to accommodate longer term simulations and multiple laser pulses. The effects of varying the timing of a second laser pulse by tens of nanoseconds are explored. It is shown that by changing this interval one can control the total mass ablated and the mass transfer rate.

  11. Complex permittivity measurements during high temperature recycling of space shuttle antenna window and dielectric heat shield materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bassett, H. L.; Bomar, S. H., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The research performed and the data obtained on candidate space shuttle antenna window and heat shield materials are presented. The measurement technique employs a free-space focused beam microwave bridge for obtaining RF transmission data, and a device which rotates a sample holder which is heated on one side by natural gas-air flames. The surface temperature of each sample is monitored by IR pyrometry; embedded and rear surface thermocouples are also used in obtaining temperature data. The surface of the sample undergoing test is subjected to approximately the same temperature/time profile that occurs at a proposed antenna position on the space shuttle as it re-enters. The samples are cycled through ten of these temperature profiles to determine the recycling effects. Very little change was noted in the materials due to the recycling.

  12. Experimental study of carbon materials behavior under high temperature and VUV radiation: Application to Solar Probe+ heat shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eck, J.; Sans, J.-L.; Balat-Pichelin, M.

    2011-02-01

    The aim of the Solar Probe Plus (SP+) mission is to understand how the solar corona is heated and how the solar wind is accelerated. To achieve these goals, in situ measurements are necessary and the spacecraft has to approach the Sun as close as 9.5 solar radii. This trajectory induces extreme environmental conditions such as high temperatures and intense Vacuum Ultraviolet radiation (VUV). To protect the measurement and communication instruments, a heat shield constituted of a carbon material is placed on the top of the probe. In this study, the physical and chemical behavior of carbon materials is experimentally investigated under high temperatures (1600-2100 K), high vacuum (10-4 Pa) and VUV radiation in conditions near those at perihelion for SP+. Thanks to several in situ and ex situ characterizations, it was found that VUV radiation induced modification of outgassing and of mass loss rate together with alteration of microstructure and morphology.

  13. Effects of heat transfer and energy absorption in the ablation of biological tissues by pulsetrain-burst (>100 MHz) ultrafast laser processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrester, Paul; Bol, Kieran; Lilge, Lothar; Marjoribanks, Robin

    2006-09-01

    Energy absorption and heat transfer are important factors for regulating the effects of ablation of biological tissues. Heat transfer to surrounding material may be desirable when ablating hard tissue, such as teeth or bone, since melting can produce helpful material modifications. However, when ablating soft tissue it is important to minimize heat transfer to avoid damage to healthy tissue - for example, in eye refractive surgery (e.g., Lasik), nanosecond pulses produce gross absorption and heating in tissue, leading to shockwaves, which kill and thin the non-replicating epithelial cells on the inside of the cornea; ultrafast pulses are recognized to reduce this effect. Using a laser system that delivers 1ps pulses in 10μs pulsetrains at 133MHz we have studied a range of heat- and energy-transfer effects on hard and soft tissue. We describe the ablation of tooth dentin and enamel under various conditions to determine the ablation rate and chemical changes that occur. Furthermore, we characterize the impact of pulsetrain-burst treatment of collagen-based tissue to determine more efficient methods of energy transfer to soft tissues. By studying the optical science of laser tissue interaction we hope to be able to make qualitative improvements to medical treatments using lasers.

  14. Pressure Venting Tests of Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blosser, Max L.; Knutson, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    A series of tests was devised to investigate the pressure venting behavior of one of the candidate ablators for the Orion capsule heat shield. Three different specimens of phenolic impregnated carbon ablator (PICA) were instrumented with internal pressure taps and subjected to rapid pressure changes from near vacuum to one atmosphere and simulated Orion ascent pressure histories. The specimens vented rapidly to ambient pressure and sustained no detectable damage during testing. Peak pressure differences through the thickness of a 3-inch-thick specimen were less than 1 psi during a simulated ascent pressure history.

  15. Wake Shield Target Protection

    SciTech Connect

    Valmianski, Emanuil I.; Petzoldt, Ronald W.; Alexander, Neil B.

    2003-05-15

    The heat flux from both gas convection and chamber radiation on a direct drive target must be limited to avoid target damage from excessive D-T temperature increase. One of the possibilities of protecting the target is a wake shield flying in front of the target. A shield will also reduce drag force on the target, thereby facilitating target tracking and position prediction. A Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code was used to calculate convection heat loads as boundary conditions input into ANSYS thermal calculations. These were used for studying the quality of target protection depending on various shapes of shields, target-shield distance, and protective properties of the shield moving relative to the target. The results show that the shield can reduce the convective heat flux by a factor of 2 to 5 depending on pressure, temperature, and velocity. The protective effect of a shield moving relative to the target is greater than the protective properties of a fixed shield. However, the protective effect of a shield moving under the drag force is not sufficient for bringing the heat load on the target down to the necessary limit. Some other ways of diminishing heat flux using a protective shield are discussed.

  16. Simultaneous detection of nonpolar and polar compounds by heat-assisted laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Vaikkinen, Anu; Shrestha, Bindesh; Nazarian, Javad; Kostiainen, Risto; Vertes, Akos; Kauppila, Tiina J

    2013-01-01

    A heat-assisted laser ablation electrospray ionization (HA-LAESI) method for the simultaneous mass spectrometric analysis of nonpolar and polar analytes was developed. The sample was introduced using mid-infrared laser ablation of a water-rich target. The ablated analytes were ionized with an electrospray plume, which was intercepted by a heated nitrogen gas jet that enhanced the ionization of analytes of low polarity. The feasibility of HA-LAESI was tested by analyzing, e.g., naphtho[2,3-a]pyrene, cholesterol, tricaprylin, 1,1',2,2'-tetramyristoyl cardiolipin, bradykinin fragment 1-8, and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycerol. HA-LAESI was found better suited for low polarity compounds than conventional LAESI, whereas polar compounds were observed with both techniques. The sensitivity of HA-LAESI for the polar bradykinin fragment 1-8 was slightly lower than observed for LAESI. HA-LAESI showed a linear response for 500 nM to 1.0 mM solutions (n = 11) of verapamil with R(2) = 0.988. HA-LAESI was applied for the direct analysis of tissue samples, e.g., avocado (Persea americana) mesocarp and mouse brain tissue sections. Spectra of the avocado showed abundant triglyceride ion peaks, and the results for the mouse brain sections showed cholesterol as the main species. Conventional LAESI shows significantly lower ionization efficiency for these neutral lipids. HA-LAESI can be applied to the analysis of nonpolar and polar analytes, and it extends the capabilities of conventional LAESI to nonpolar and neutral compounds. PMID:23199051

  17. Influence of electrical and thermal properties on RF ablation of breast cancer: is the tumour preferentially heated?

    PubMed Central

    Ekstrand, Vilhelm; Wiksell, Hans; Schultz, Inkeri; Sandstedt, Bengt; Rotstein, Samuel; Eriksson, Anders

    2005-01-01

    Background Techniques based on radio frequency (RF) energy have many applications in medicine, in particular tumour ablation. Today, mammography screening detects many breast cancers at an early stage, facilitating treatment by minimally invasive techniques such as radio frequency ablation (RFA). The breast cancer is mostly surrounded by fat, which during RFA-treatment could result in preferential heating of the tumour due to the substantial differences in electrical parameters. The object of this study was to investigate if this preferential heating existed during experimental in vitro protocols and during computer simulations. Methods Excised breast material from four patients with morphologically diagnosed breast cancers were treated with our newly developed RFA equipment. Subsequently, two finite element method (FEM) models were developed; one with only fat and one with fat and an incorporated breast cancer of varying size. The FEM models were solved using temperature dependent electrical conductivity versus constant conductivity, and transient versus steady-state analyses. Results Our experimental study performed on excised breast tissue showed a preferential heating of the tumour, even if associated with long tumour strands. The fat between these tumour strands was surprisingly unaffected. Furthermore, the computer simulations demonstrated that the difference in electrical and thermal parameters between fat and tumour tissue can cause preferential heating of the tumour. The specific absorption rate (SAR) distribution changed significantly when a tumour was present in fatty tissue. The degree of preferential heating depended on tissue properties, tumour shape, and placement relative to the electrode. Temperature dependent electrical conductivity increased the thermal lesion volume, but did not change the preferential heating. Transient solutions decreased the thermal lesion volume but increased the preferential heating of the tumour. Conclusion Both the

  18. Evaluation of coated columbium alloy heat shields for space shuttle thermal protection system application. Volume 3, phase 3: Full size TPS evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baer, J. W.; Black, W. E.

    1974-01-01

    The thermal protection system (TPS), designed for incorporation with space shuttle orbiter systems, consists of one primary heat shield thermally and structurally isolated from the test fixture by eight peripheral guard panels, all encompassing an area of approximately 12 sq ft. TPS components include tee-stiffened Cb 752/R-512E heat shields, bi-metallic support posts, panel retainers, and high temperature insulation blankets. The vehicle primary structure was simulated by a titanium skin, frames, and stiffeners. Test procedures, manufacturing processes, and methods of analysis are fully documented. For Vol. 1, see N72-30948; for Vol. 2, see N74-15660.

  19. Self-Regulated Plasma Heat Flux Mitigation Due to Liquid Sn Vapor Shielding.

    PubMed

    van Eden, G G; Morgan, T W; Aussems, D U B; van den Berg, M A; Bystrov, K; van de Sanden, M C M

    2016-04-01

    A steady-state high-flux H or He plasma beam was balanced against the pressure of a Sn vapor cloud for the first time, resulting in a self-regulated heat flux intensity near the liquid surface. A temperature response of the liquid surface characterized by a decoupling from the received heating power and significant cooling of the plasma in the neutral Sn cloud were observed. The plasma heat flux impinging on the target was found to be mitigated, as heat was partially dissipated by volumetric processes in the vapor cloud rather than wholly by surface effects. These results motivate further exploration of liquid metal solutions to the critical challenge of heat and particle flux handling in fusion power plants. PMID:27081983

  20. Self-Regulated Plasma Heat Flux Mitigation Due to Liquid Sn Vapor Shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Eden, G. G.; Morgan, T. W.; Aussems, D. U. B.; van den Berg, M. A.; Bystrov, K.; van de Sanden, M. C. M.

    2016-04-01

    A steady-state high-flux H or He plasma beam was balanced against the pressure of a Sn vapor cloud for the first time, resulting in a self-regulated heat flux intensity near the liquid surface. A temperature response of the liquid surface characterized by a decoupling from the received heating power and significant cooling of the plasma in the neutral Sn cloud were observed. The plasma heat flux impinging on the target was found to be mitigated, as heat was partially dissipated by volumetric processes in the vapor cloud rather than wholly by surface effects. These results motivate further exploration of liquid metal solutions to the critical challenge of heat and particle flux handling in fusion power plants.

  1. Thermocouple shield

    SciTech Connect

    Ripley, Edward B.

    2009-11-24

    A thermocouple shield for use in radio frequency fields. In some embodiments the shield includes an electrically conductive tube that houses a standard thermocouple having a thermocouple junction. The electrically conductive tube protects the thermocouple from damage by an RF (including microwave) field and mitigates erroneous temperature readings due to the microwave or RF field. The thermocouple may be surrounded by a ceramic sheath to further protect the thermocouple. The ceramic sheath is generally formed from a material that is transparent to the wavelength of the microwave or RF energy. The microwave transparency property precludes heating of the ceramic sheath due to microwave coupling, which could affect the accuracy of temperature measurements. The ceramic sheath material is typically an electrically insulating material. The electrically insulative properties of the ceramic sheath help avert electrical arcing, which could damage the thermocouple junction. The electrically conductive tube is generally disposed around the thermocouple junction and disposed around at least a portion of the ceramic sheath. The concepts of the thermocouple shield may be incorporated into an integrated shielded thermocouple assembly.

  2. Toughness evaluation of a shielded metal arc carbon-manganese steel welded joint subjected to multiple post weld heat treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Bott, I.S.; Teixeira, J.C.G.

    1999-12-01

    This study was part of a program to investigate the influence of multiple post weld heat treatment (PWHT) on the fracture toughness and defect tolerance of a welded joint. The present work reports base metal data obtained for a quenched and tempered BS7191 Grade 450EM steel (0.10wt%C-1.08wt%Mn), weld metal data for a ferritic multipass weld obtained by shielded metal arc welding using an AWS E-9018M type electrode, and heat affected zone (HAZ) data obtained using a modified bead on groove technique for different PWHT conditions. The effect of the repeated heat treatment cycles on the mechanical properties was evaluated by hardness tests and toughness testing assessed by Charpy V-notch and crack tip opening displacement (CTOD) techniques. The characterization of the microstructure was undertaken utilizing optical and electron microscopy. As fabrication codes for new equipment do not allow more than three PWHT cycles, the application of more cycles is only justifiable for old equipment when a fitness for purpose criterion is applied and these restrictions are not applicable. The results obtained are currently applied in repair work and revamps of pressure vessels and gas storage tanks.

  3. Optimization by means of an analytical heat transfer model of a thermal insulation for CSP applications based on radiative shields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaetano, A.; Roncolato, J.; Montorfano, D.; Barbato, M. C.; Ambrosetti, G.; Pedretti, A.

    2016-05-01

    The employment of new gaseous heat transfer fluids as air or CO2, which are cheaper and environmentally friendly, is drawing more and more attention within the field of Concentrated Solar Power applications. However, despite the advantages, their use requires receivers with a larger heat transfer area and flow cross section with a consequent greater volume of thermal insulation. Solid thermal insulations currently used present high thermal inertia which is energetically penalizing during the daily transient phases faced by the main plant components (e.g. receivers). With the aim of overcoming this drawback a thermal insulation based on radiative shields is presented in this study. Starting from an initial layout comprising a solid thermal insulation layer, the geometry was optimized avoiding the use of the solid insulation keeping performance and fulfilling the geometrical constraints. An analytical Matlab model was implemented to assess the system thermal behavior in terms of heat loss taking into account conductive, convective and radiative contributions. Accurate 2D Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations were run to validate the Matlab model which was then used to select the most promising among three new different designs.

  4. Increased Heating Efficiency and Selective Thermal Ablation of Malignant Tissue with DNA-Encased Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Nanoparticles, including multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), strongly absorb near-infrared (nIR) radiation and efficiently convert absorbed energy to released heat which can be used for localized hyperthermia applications. We demonstrate for the first time that DNA-encasement increases heat emission following nIR irradiation of MWNTs, and DNA-encased MWNTs can be used to safely eradicate a tumor mass in vivo. Upon irradiation of DNA-encased MWNTs, heat is generated with a linear dependence on irradiation time and laser power. DNA-encasement resulted in a 3-fold reduction in the concentration of MWNTs required to impart a 10 °C temperature increase in bulk solution temperature. A single treatment consisting of intratumoral injection of MWNTs (100 μL of a 500 μg/mL solution) followed by laser irradiation at 1064 nm, 2.5 W/cm2 completely eradicated PC3 xenograft tumors in 8/8 (100%) of nude mice. Tumors that received only MWNT injection or laser irradiation showed growth rates indistinguishable from nontreated control tumors. Nonmalignant tissues displayed no long-term damage from treatment. The results demonstrate that DNA-encased MWNTs are more efficient at converting nIR irradiation into heat compared to nonencased MWNTs and that DNA-encased MWNTs can be used safely and effectively for the selective thermal ablation of malignant tissue in vivo. PMID:19655728

  5. Modeling of nanosecond-laser ablation: calculations based on a nonstationary averaging technique (spatial moments)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, N. D.; Luk'yanchuk, Boris S.; Bityurin, Nikita M.; Baeuerle, D.

    1998-09-01

    dependence in (alpha) g (T). Small vaporization enthalpy results in a sub-linear h((phi) ) dependence, which, nevertheless, remains faster than logarithmic. With weakly absorbing materials ablation may proceed in two significantly different regimes -- without or with ablation of the heated subsurface layer. The latter occurs at higher fluences and reveals significantly higher ablation temperatures, but is weakly reflected on the ablation curves. Calculations are performed in order to study the: (1) Influence of the duration and temporal profile of the laser pulse on the threshold fluence, (phi) th. This is particularly important for strong absorbers were the heat conduction determines the temperature distribution. (2) Influence of the temperature dependences in material parameters on the ablation curves (ablated depth versus laser fluence) for regimes (phi) approximately equals (phi) th and (phi) very much greater than (phi) th. (3) Consequences of shielding of the incoming radiation at high fluences. (4) Differences in ablation curves for materials with big and small ablation enthalpy (e.g., metals and polymers which ablate differences in ablation curves for materials with big and small ablation enthalpy (e.g., metals and polymers which ablate thermally). Nanosecond laser ablation has been studied for a large variety of different materials and laser wavelengths. As an illustrative example, the method is applied to the quantitative anlaysis of the single pulse ablation of polyimide Kapton TM H.

  6. On vapor shielding of dust grains of iron, molybdenum, and tungsten in fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, B. T.; Smirnov, R. D. Krasheninnikov, S. I.

    2014-02-15

    The shielding effects of ablation cloud around a small dust grain composed of iron, molybdenum, or tungsten in fusion plasmas are considered. These include collisional dissipation of momentum flux of impinging plasma ions, heat transfer by secondary plasma created due to electron impact ionization of the ablated atoms, and radiative plasma power losses in the ablation cloud. The maximum radius, which limits applicability of existing dust-plasma interaction models neglecting the cloud shielding effects, for dust grains of the considered high-Z metals is calculated as function of plasma parameters. The thermal bifurcation triggered by thermionic electron emission from dust grains, observed for some of the considered materials, is analyzed. The results are compared with previous calculations for dust composed of low-Z fusion related materials, i.e., lithium, beryllium, and carbon.

  7. Evaluation of the energy transfer in the char zone during ablation. Part 2: In-depth response of ablative composites, volume 1. Ph.D. Thesis, 1975. Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pike, R. W.; Delvalle, E. G.

    1974-01-01

    The decomposition of ablative composites is described along with the transport phenomena of pyrolysis gases which result from the decomposition of these plastics as they flow through the porous char of char-forming ablators. The pyrolysis products are those formed by the thermal degradation of nylon-phenolic resin and silicone elastomer composites. Emphasis is placed on the nature and extent of chemical reactions of the pyrolysis products and the char, along with the energy absorbed by the combined pyrolysis and char zone. Chemical reactions with thermodynamically consistent kinetic data are determined in order to develop a realistic analysis for predicting the thermal performance of ablative heat shields.

  8. Numerical simulations of heat and mass transfer at ablating surface in hypersonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocharov, A. N.; Golovin, N. N.; Petrovskiy, V. P.; Teplyakov, I. O.

    2015-11-01

    The numerical technique was developed to solve heat and mass transfer problem in 3D hypersonic flow taking into account destruction of thermal protection system. Described technique was applied for calculation of heat and mass transfer in sphere-cone shaped body. The data on temperature, heat flux and mass flux were obtained.

  9. Lightweight Shield Against Space Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redmon, John W., Jr.; Lawson, Bobby E.; Miller, Andre E.; Cobb, W. E.

    1992-01-01

    Report presents concept for lightweight, deployable shield protecting orbiting spacecraft against meteoroids and debris, and functions as barrier to conductive and radiative losses of heat. Shield made in four segments providing 360 degree coverage of cylindrical space-station module.

  10. Aerodynamic Analysis of Simulated Heat Shield Recession for the Orion Command Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bibb, Karen L.; Alter, Stephen J.; Mcdaniel, Ryan D.

    2008-01-01

    The aerodynamic effects of the recession of the ablative thermal protection system for the Orion Command Module of the Crew Exploration Vehicle are important for the vehicle guidance. At the present time, the aerodynamic effects of recession being handled within the Orion aerodynamic database indirectly with an additional safety factor placed on the uncertainty bounds. This study is an initial attempt to quantify the effects for a particular set of recessed geometry shapes, in order to provide more rigorous analysis for managing recession effects within the aerodynamic database. The aerodynamic forces and moments for the baseline and recessed geometries were computed at several trajectory points using multiple CFD codes, both viscous and inviscid. The resulting aerodynamics for the baseline and recessed geometries were compared. The forces (lift, drag) show negligible differences between baseline and recessed geometries. Generally, the moments show a difference between baseline and recessed geometries that correlates with the maximum amount of recession of the geometry. The difference between the pitching moments for the baseline and recessed geometries increases as Mach number decreases (and the recession is greater), and reach a value of -0.0026 for the lowest Mach number. The change in trim angle of attack increases from approx. 0.5deg at M = 28.7 to approx. 1.3deg at M = 6, and is consistent with a previous analysis with a lower fidelity engineering tool. This correlation of the present results with the engineering tool results supports the continued use of the engineering tool for future work. The present analysis suggests there does not need to be an uncertainty due to recession in the Orion aerodynamic database for the force quantities. The magnitude of the change in pitching moment due to recession is large enough to warrant inclusion in the aerodynamic database. An increment in the uncertainty for pitching moment could be calculated from these results and

  11. Space vehicle engine and heat shield environment review. Volume 1: Engineering analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcanelly, W. B.; Young, C. T. K.

    1973-01-01

    Methods for predicting the base heating characteristics of a multiple rocket engine installation are discussed. The environmental data is applied to the design of adequate protection system for the engine components. The methods for predicting the base region thermal environment are categorized as: (1) scale model testing, (2) extrapolation of previous and related flight test results, and (3) semiempirical analytical techniques.

  12. 3D Multifunctional Ablative Thermal Protection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, Jay; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Wilkinson, Curt; Mercer, Ken

    2015-01-01

    NASA is developing the Orion spacecraft to carry astronauts farther into the solar system than ever before, with human exploration of Mars as its ultimate goal. One of the technologies required to enable this advanced, Apollo-shaped capsule is a 3-dimensional quartz fiber composite for the vehicle's compression pad. During its mission, the compression pad serves first as a structural component and later as an ablative heat shield, partially consumed on Earth re-entry. This presentation will summarize the development of a new 3D quartz cyanate ester composite material, 3-Dimensional Multifunctional Ablative Thermal Protection System (3D-MAT), designed to meet the mission requirements for the Orion compression pad. Manufacturing development, aerothermal (arc-jet) testing, structural performance, and the overall status of material development for the 2018 EM-1 flight test will be discussed.

  13. High-speed scanning ablation of dental hard tissues with a λ=9.3-μm CO2 laser: heat accumulation and peripheral thermal damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Daniel; Staninec, Michal; Lee, Chulsung; Fried, Daniel

    2010-02-01

    A mechanically scanned CO2 laser operated at high laser pulse repetition rates can be used to rapidly and precisely remove dental decay. This study aims to determine whether these laser systems can safely ablate enamel and dentin without excessive heat accumulation and peripheral thermal damage. Peripheral thermal damage can adversely impact the mechanical strength of the irradiated tissue, particularly for dentin, and reduce the adhesion characteristics of the modified surfaces. Samples were derived from noncarious extracted molars. Pulpal temperatures were recorded using microthermocouples situated at the pulp chamber roof of samples (n=12), which were occlusally ablated using a rapid-scanning, water-cooled 300 Hz CO2 laser over a two minute time course. The mechanical strength of facially ablated dentin (n=10) was determined via four-point bend test and compared to control samples (n=10) prepared with 320 grit wet sand paper to simulate conventional preparations. Composite-to-enamel bond strength was measured via single-plane shear test for ablated/non-etched (n=10) and ablated/acid-etched (n=8) samples and compared to control samples (n=9) prepared by 320 grit wet sanding. Thermocouple measurements indicated that the temperature remained below ambient temperature at 19.0°C (s.d.=0.9) if water-cooling was used. There was no discoloration of either dentin and enamel, the treated surfaces were uniformly ablated and there were no cracks observable on the laser treated surfaces. Fourpoint bend tests yielded mean mechanical strengths of 18.2 N (s.d.=4.6) for ablated dentin and 18.1 N (s.d.=2.7) for control (p>0.05). Shear tests yielded mean bond strengths of 31.2 MPa (s.d.=2.5, p<0.01) for ablated/acid-etched samples, 5.2 MPa (s.d.=2.4, p<0.001) for ablated/non-etched samples, and 37.0 MPa (s.d.=3.6) for control. The results indicate that a rapid-scanning 300 Hz CO2 laser can effectively ablate dentin and enamel without excessive heat accumulation and with minimal

  14. Non-Spitzer heat flow in a steadily ablating laser-produced plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, A.R.

    1985-06-01

    Electron energy transport in a laser-produced ablating plasma is modeled by the Vlasov--Fokker--Planck equation for electrons and the fluid equations for cold ions. These equations are solved using approximations which maintain good accuracy but allow faster computational solution than was previously possible. It is found that the spatial profiles for temperature and density in planar geometry differ very little from those calculated from the Spitzer conductivity. At high laser intensities, the plasma flow diverges as it flows away from the solid target and the effects of nonplanar flow are important. This is modeled by the adoption of spherical geometry, and it is found that the Spitzer conductivity breaks down and the temperature and density profiles differ significantly from those calculated using the Spitzer conductivity.

  15. Does Artificial Ascites Induce the Heat-Sink Phenomenon during Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation of the Hepatic Subcapsular Area?: an in vivo Experimental Study Using a Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-sun; Choi, Dongil; Lim, Hyo K.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of the heat-sink phenomenon induced by artificial ascites on the size of the ablation zone during percutaneous radiofrequency (RF) ablation of the hepatic subcapsular area in an in vivo rabbit model. Materials and Methods A total of 21 percutaneous rabbit liver RF ablations were performed with and without artificial ascites (5% dextrose aqueous solution). The rabbits were divided into three groups: a) control group (C, n = 7); b) room temperature ascites group (R, n = 7); and c) warmed ascites group (W, n = 7). The tip of a 1 cm, internally cooled electrode was placed on the subcapsular region of the hepatic dome via ultrasound guidance, and ablation was continued for 6 min. Changes in temperature of the ascites were monitored during the ablation. The size of the ablation zones of the excised livers and immediate complications rates were compared statistically between the groups (Mann-Whitney U test, Kruskal-Wallis test, linear-by-linear association, p = 0.05). Results One rabbit from the "W" group expired during the procedure. In all groups, the ascites temperatures approached their respective body temperatures as the ablations continued; however, a significant difference in ascites temperature was found between groups "W" and "R" throughout the procedures (39.2±0.4℃ in group W and 33.4±4.3℃ in group R at 6 min, p = 0.003). No significant difference was found between the size of the ablation zones (782.4±237.3 mL in group C, 1,172.0±468.9 mL in group R, and 1,030.6±665.1 mL in group W, p = 0.170) for the excised liver specimens. Diaphragmatic injury was identified in three of seven cases (42.9%) upon visual inspection of group "C" rabbits (p = 0.030). Conclusion Artificial ascites are not likely to cause a significant heat-sink phenomenon in the percutaneous RF ablation of the hepatic subcapsular region. PMID:19182502

  16. Heat shields for aircraft - A new concept to save lives in crash fires.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neel, C. B.; Parker, J. A.; Fish, R. H.; Henshaw, J.; Newland, J. H.; Tempesta, F. L.

    1971-01-01

    A passenger compartment surrounded by a fire-retardant shell, to protect the occupants long enough for the fire to burn out or for fire-fighting equipment to reach the aircraft and extinguish it, is proposed as a new concept for saving lives in crash fires. This concept is made possible by the recent development of two new fire-retardant materials: a very lightweight foam plastic, called polyisocyanurate foam, and an intumescent paint. Exposed to heat, the intumescent paint expands to many times its original thickness and insulates the surface underneath it. Demonstration tests are illustrated, described and discussed. However, some problems, such as preventing fuselage rupture and protecting windows, must be solved before such a system can be used.

  17. Ablative therapies for renal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Rajan; Leveillee, Raymond J.

    2010-01-01

    Owing to an increased use of diagnostic imaging for evaluating patients with other abdominal conditions, incidentally discovered kidney masses now account for a majority of renal tumors. Renal ablative therapy is assuming a more important role in patients with borderline renal impairment. Renal ablation uses heat or cold to bring about cell death. Radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation are two such procedures, and 5-year results are now emerging from both modalities. Renal biopsy at the time of ablation is extremely important in order to establish tissue diagnosis. Real-time temperature monitoring at the time of radiofrequency ablation is very useful to ensure adequacy of ablation. PMID:21789083

  18. Tunable solar-heat shielding property of transparent films based on mesoporous Sb-doped SnO₂ microspheres.

    PubMed

    Li, Yusheng; Liu, Jie; Liang, Jie; Yu, Xibin; Li, Dongjia

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, mesoporous antimony doped tin oxide (ATO) microspheres are synthesized via a solvothermal method from a methanol system with the surfactant followed by a thermal treatment process. Morphology studies reveal that the spherical products obtained by polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) templating result in a higher uniformity in size. Such obtained ATO microspheres with a secondary particle size ranging between 200 and 800 nm consist of packed tiny nanocrystals and have high specific surface area (∼98 m(2) g(-1)). The effect of Sb doping on the structural and electrical properties of SnO2 microspheres is studied. Because of the substitution of Sn(4+) with Sb(5+) accompanied by forming a shallow donor level close to the conduction band of SnO2, a lower resistivity of powder pellet can be achieved, which corresponds to the spectrally selective property of films. The application of ATO microspheres provides an example of transparent coatings; depending on Sb concentration in SnO2 and solid content of coatings, transparent films with tunable solar-heat shielding property are obtained. PMID:25774799

  19. Heating Before Eating: X-Ray Observations of Redback Millisecond Pulsar Systems in the Ablation State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Mallory; McLaughlin, Maura; Ray, Paul S.; Ransom, Scott M.; Hessels, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Redbacks are eclipsing millisecond radio pulsars in close orbits around companions which are non-degenerate and nearly Roche-lobe filling. Several have been observed to transition between a state where the radio pulsar is visible and there is X-ray emission from a shock between the pulsar wind and the ablated material off of the companion, and a state where there appears to be an accretion disk and the radio pulsations are not visible. Here we present X-Ray studies of two recently discovered systems. A Chandra observation of PSR J1628-3205 over its entire 5 hour orbit with Chandra shows little evidence for X-Ray variability. An XMM-Newton observation of PSR J2129-0429 over its 15.2 hour orbit shows strong orbital variability with an intriguing two peaked light curve. We compare these systems' X-Ray properties to other redbacks and comment on the differences between their properities and those of black widows.

  20. Design and Laboratory Validation of a Capacitive Sensor for Measuring the Recession of Thin-Layered Ablator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noffz, Gregory K.; Bowman, Michael P.

    1996-01-01

    Flight vehicles are typically instrumented with subsurface thermocouples to estimate heat transfer at the surface using inverse analysis procedures. If the vehicle has an ablating heat shield, however, temperature time histories from subsurface thermocouples no longer provide enough information to estimate heat flux at the surface. In this situation, the geometry changes and thermal energy leaves the surface in the form of ablation products. The ablation rate is required to estimate heat transfer to the surface. A new concept for a capacitive sensor has been developed to measure ablator depth using the ablator's dielectric effect on a capacitor's fringe region. Relying on the capacitor's fringe region enables the gage to be flush mounted in the vehicle's permanent structure and not intrude into the ablative heat shield applied over the gage. This sensor's design allows nonintrusive measurement of the thickness of dielectric materials, in particular, the recession rates of low-temperature ablators applied in thin (0.020 to 0.060 in. (0.05 to 0.15 mm)) layers. Twenty capacitive gages with 13 different sensing element geometries were designed, fabricated, and tested. A two-dimensional finite-element analysis was performed on several candidate geometries. Calibration procedures using ablator-simulating shims are described. A one-to-one correspondence between system output and dielectric material thickness was observed out to a thickness of 0.055 in. (1.4 mm) for a material with a permittivity about three times that of air or vacuum. A novel method of monitoring the change in sensor capacitance was developed. This technical memorandum suggests further improvements in gage design and fabrication techniques.

  1. High temperature glass thermal control structure and coating. [for application to spacecraft reusable heat shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, D. A.; Goldstein, H. E.; Leiser, D. B. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A high temperature stable and solar radiation stable thermal control coating is described which is useful either as such, applied directly to a member to be protected, or applied as a coating on a re-usable surface insulation (RSI). It has a base coat layer and an overlay glass layer. The base coat layer has a high emittance, and the overlay layer is formed from discrete, but sintered together glass particles to give the overlay layer a high scattering coefficient. The resulting two-layer space and thermal control coating has an absorptivity-to-emissivity ratio of less than or equal to 0.4 at room temperature, with an emittance of 0.8 at 1200 F. It is capable of exposure to either solar radiation or temperatures as high as 2000 F without significant degradation. When used as a coating on a silica substrate to give an RSI structure, the coatings of this invention show significantly less reduction in emittance after long term convective heating and less residual strain than prior art coatings for RSI structures.

  2. Moldable cork ablation material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A successful thermal ablative material was manufactured. Moldable cork sheets were tested for density, tensile strength, tensile elongation, thermal conductivity, compression set, and specific heat. A moldable cork sheet, therefore, was established as a realistic product.

  3. Heat Shield Employing Cured Thermal Protection Material Blocks Bonded in a Large-Cell Honeycomb Matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zell, Peter

    2012-01-01

    A document describes a new way to integrate thermal protection materials on external surfaces of vehicles that experience the severe heating environments of atmospheric entry from space. Cured blocks of thermal protection materials are bonded into a compatible, large-cell honeycomb matrix that can be applied on the external surfaces of the vehicles. The honeycomb matrix cell size, and corresponding thermal protection material block size, is envisioned to be between 1 and 4 in. (.2.5 and 10 cm) on a side, with a depth required to protect the vehicle. The cell wall thickness is thin, between 0.01 and 0.10 in. (.0.025 and 0.25 cm). A key feature is that the honeycomb matrix is attached to the vehicle fs unprotected external surface prior to insertion of the thermal protection material blocks. The attachment integrity of the honeycomb can then be confirmed over the full range of temperature and loads that the vehicle will experience. Another key feature of the innovation is the use of uniform-sized thermal protection material blocks. This feature allows for the mass production of these blocks at a size that is convenient for quality control inspection. The honeycomb that receives the blocks must have cells with a compatible set of internal dimensions. The innovation involves the use of a faceted subsurface under the honeycomb. This provides a predictable surface with perpendicular cell walls for the majority of the blocks. Some cells will have positive tapers to accommodate mitered joints between honeycomb panels on each facet of the subsurface. These tapered cells have dimensions that may fall within the boundaries of the uniform-sized blocks.

  4. Performance of a Light-Weight Ablative Thermal Protection Material for the Stardust Mission Sample Return Capsule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Covington, M. A.

    2005-01-01

    New tests and analyses are reported that were carried out to resolve testing uncertainties in the original development and qualification of a lightweight ablative material used for the Stardust spacecraft forebody heat shield. These additional arcjet tests and analyses confirmed the ablative and thermal performance of low density Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) material used for the Stardust design. Testing was done under conditions that simulate the peak convective heating conditions (1200 W/cm2 and 0.5 atm) expected during Earth entry of the Stardust Sample Return Capsule. Test data and predictions from an ablative material response computer code for the in-depth temperatures were compared to guide iterative adjustment of material thermophysical properties used in the code so that the measured and predicted temperatures agreed. The PICA recession rates and maximum internal temperatures were satisfactorily predicted by the computer code with the revised properties. Predicted recession rates were also in acceptable agreement with measured rates for heating conditions 37% greater than the nominal peak heating rate of 1200 W/sq cm. The measured in-depth temperature response data show consistent temperature rise deviations that may be caused by an undocumented endothermic process within the PICA material that is not accurately modeled by the computer code. Predictions of the Stardust heat shield performance based on the present evaluation provide evidence that the maximum adhesive bondline temperature will be much lower than the maximum allowable of 250 C and an earlier design prediction. The re-evaluation also suggests that even with a 25 percent increase in peak heating rates, the total recession of the heat shield would be a small fraction of the as-designed thickness. These results give confidence in the Stardust heat shield design and confirm the potential of PICA material for use in new planetary probe and sample return applications.

  5. Development of lightweight ceramic ablators and arc-jet test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tran, Huy K.

    1994-01-01

    Lightweight ceramic ablators (LCA's) were recently developed at Ames to investigate the use of low density fibrous substrates and organic resins as high temperature, high strength ablative heat shields. Unlike the traditional ablators, LCA's use porous ceramic/carbon fiber matrices as substrates for structural support, and polymeric resins as fillers. Several substrates and resins were selected for the initial studies, and the best performing candidates were further characterized. Three arcjet tests were conducted to determine the LCA's thermal performance and ablation characteristics in a high enthalpy, hypersonic flow environment. Mass loss and recession measurements were obtained for each sample at post test, and the recession rates were determined from high speed motion films. Surface temperatures were also obtained from optical pyrometers.

  6. Thermal Convection on an Ablating Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehmedagic, Igbal; Thangam, Siva

    2015-11-01

    Modeling and analysis of thermal convection of a metallic targets subject to radiative flux is of relevance to various manufacturing processes as well as for the development of protective shields. The present work involves the computational modeling of metallic targets subject to high heat fluxes that are both steady and pulsed. Modeling of the ablation and associated fluid dynamics when metallic surfaces are exposed to high intensity pulsed laser fluence at normal atmospheric conditions is considered. The incident energy from the laser is partly absorbed and partly reflected by the surface during ablation and subsequent vaporization of the convecting melt also participates in the radiative exchange. The energy distribution during the process between the bulk and vapor phase strongly depends on optical and thermodynamic properties of the irradiated material, radiation wavelength, and laser pulse intensity and duration. Computational findings based on effective representation and prediction of the heat transfer, melting and vaporization of the targeting material as well as plume formation and expansion are presented and discussed in the context of various ablation mechanisms, variable thermo-physical and optical properties, plume expansion and surface geometry. Funded in part by U. S. Army ARDEC, Picatinny Arsenal, NJ.

  7. Diminished tektite ablation in the wake of a swarm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sepri, P.; Chen, K. K.; Okeefe, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    Observations of ablation markings on tektite surfaces reveal that a large variation in aerodynamic heating must have occurred among the members of a swarm during atmospheric entry. In a few cases, the existence of jagged features indicates that these tektite surfaces may have barely reached the melting temperature. Such an observation seems to be incompatible with the necessarily large heating rates suffered by other tektites which exhibit the ring wave melt flow. A reconciliation is proposed in the form of a wake shielding model which is a natural consequence of swarm entry. Calculations indicate that the observed ablation variations are actually possible for swarm entry at greater than escape velocity. This aerodynamic conclusion provides support for the arguments favoring extraterrestrial origin of tektites.

  8. Potassium titanyl phosphate laser tissue ablation: development and experimental validation of a new numerical model.

    PubMed

    Elkhalil, Hossam; Akkin, Taner; Pearce, John; Bischof, John

    2012-10-01

    The photoselective vaporization of prostate (PVP) green light (532 nm) laser is increasingly being used as an alternative to the transurethral resection of prostate (TURP) for treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in older patients and those who are poor surgical candidates. In order to achieve the goals of increased tissue removal volume (i.e., "ablation" in the engineering sense) and reduced collateral thermal damage during the PVP green light treatment, a two dimensional computational model for laser tissue ablation based on available parameters in the literature has been developed and compared to experiments. The model is based on the control volume finite difference and the enthalpy method with a mechanistically defined energy necessary to ablate (i.e., physically remove) a volume of tissue (i.e., energy of ablation E(ab)). The model was able to capture the general trends experimentally observed in terms of ablation and coagulation areas, their ratio (therapeutic index (TI)), and the ablation rate (AR) (mm(3)/s). The model and experiment were in good agreement at a smaller working distance (WD) (distance from the tissue in mm) and a larger scanning speed (SS) (laser scan speed in mm/s). However, the model and experiment deviated somewhat with a larger WD and a smaller SS; this is most likely due to optical shielding and heat diffusion in the laser scanning direction, which are neglected in the model. This model is a useful first step in the mechanistic prediction of PVP based BPH laser tissue ablation. Future modeling efforts should focus on optical shielding, heat diffusion in the laser scanning direction (i.e., including 3D effects), convective heat losses at the tissue boundary, and the dynamic optical, thermal, and coagulation properties of BPH tissue. PMID:23083193

  9. Corium shield

    DOEpatents

    McDonald, Douglas B.; Buchholz, Carol E.

    1994-01-01

    A shield for restricting molten corium from flowing into a water sump disposed in a floor of a containment vessel includes upper and lower walls which extend vertically upwardly and downwardly from the floor for laterally bounding the sump. The upper wall includes a plurality of laterally spaced apart flow channels extending horizontally therethrough, with each channel having a bottom disposed coextensively with the floor for channeling water therefrom into the sump. Each channel has a height and a length predeterminedly selected for allowing heat from the molten corium to dissipate through the upper and lower walls as it flows therethrough for solidifying the molten corium therein to prevent accumulation thereof in the sump.

  10. Nonequilibrium Ablation of Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milos, Frank S.; Chen, Yih K.; Gokcen, Tahir

    2012-01-01

    In previous work, an equilibrium ablation and thermal response model for Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator was developed. In general, over a wide range of test conditions, model predictions compared well with arcjet data for surface recession, surface temperature, in-depth temperature at multiple thermocouples, and char depth. In this work, additional arcjet tests were conducted at stagnation conditions down to 40 W/sq cm and 1.6 kPa. The new data suggest that nonequilibrium effects become important for ablation predictions at heat flux or pressure below about 80 W/sq cm or 10 kPa, respectively. Modifications to the ablation model to account for nonequilibrium effects are investigated. Predictions of the equilibrium and nonequilibrium models are compared with the arcjet data.

  11. Heat Transfer And Vapor Dynamics Induced By Nanosecond Laser Ablation Of Titanium Target

    SciTech Connect

    Hamadi, F.; Amara, E. H.; Mezaoui, D.

    2008-09-23

    A numerical modelling describing a pulsed nanosecond laser interaction with a titanium target is presented, resulting in the study of the plume expansion in vacuum or in background gas, using the species transport model available in Fluent computational fluid dynamics code. The heat transfers in the solid target and the molten material are modeled using an enthalpy formulation for the solid-liquid phase changing. The effect of laser fluences is investigated, and results are presented as a function of time. Moreover, the plasma or the vapour dynamics is calculated by solving a set of Navier-Stokes equations. The plasma absorption by inverse Bremsstrahlung, the ionization states and the density profiles of the Titanium ions and electrons in the plume are interactively included in the Fluent calculation process by the mean of User Defined Functions (UDFs) used in order to take into account the specificity of our problem. The ionization is computed by solving the Saha-Eggert equation assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) conditions.

  12. Thermal protection for hypervelocity flight in earth's atmosphere by use of radiation backscattering ablating materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, John T.; Yang, Lily

    1991-01-01

    A heat-shield-material response code predicting the transient performance of a material subject to the combined convective and radiative heating associated with the hypervelocity flight is developed. The code is dynamically interactive to the heating from a transient flow field, including the effects of material ablation on flow field behavior. It accomodates finite time variable material thickness, internal material phase change, wavelength-dependent radiative properties, and temperature-dependent thermal, physical, and radiative properties. The equations of radiative transfer are solved with the material and are coupled to the transfer energy equation containing the radiative flux divergence in addition to the usual energy terms.

  13. Aerothermodynamic Testing of Protuberances and Penetrations on the NASA Crew Exploration Vehicle Heat Shield in the NASA Langley 20-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liechty, Derek S.

    2008-01-01

    An experimental wind tunnel program is being conducted in support of an Agency wide effort to develop a replacement for the Space Shuttle and to support the NASA s long-term objective of returning to the moon and then on to Mars. This paper documents experimental measurements made on several scaled ceramic heat transfer models of the proposed Crew Exploration Vehicle. Global heat transfer images and heat transfer distributions obtained using phosphor thermography were used to infer interference heating on the Crew Exploration Vehicle Cycle 1 heat shield from local protuberances and penetrations for both laminar and turbulent heating conditions. Test parametrics included free stream Reynolds numbers of 1.0x10(exp 6)/ft to 7.25x10(exp 6)/ft in Mach 6 air at a fixed angle-of-attack. Single arrays of discrete boundary layer trips were used to trip the boundary layer approaching the protuberances/penetrations to a turbulent state. Also, the effects of three compression pad diameters, two radial locations of compression pad/tension tie location, compression pad geometry, and rotational position of compression pad/tension tie were examined. The experimental data highlighted in this paper are to be used to validate CFD tools that will be used to generate the flight aerothermodynamic database. Heat transfer measurements will also assist in the determination of the most appropriate engineering methods that will be used to assess local flight environments associated with protuberances/penetrations of the CEV thermal protection system.

  14. Trajectory-based heating analysis for the ESA/Rosetta earth return vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henline, William D.; Tauber, Michael E.

    1993-01-01

    A coupled, trajectory based flowfield and material thermal response analysis is presented for the European Space Agency (ESA) proposed Rosetta comet nucleus sample return vehicle. The probe returns to Earth along a hyperbolic trajectory with an entry velocity of 16.5 km/sec and requires an ablative heat shield on the forebody. Combined radiative and convective, ablating flowfield analyses were performed for the significant heating portion of the shallow ballistic entry trajectory. Both quasi-steady ablation and fully transient analyses were performed for a heat shield composed of carbon-phenolic ablative material. Quasi-steady analysis was performed using the two-dimensional, axisymmetric codes RASLE and BLIMPK. Transient computational results were obtained from the one-dimensional ablation/conduction code, CMA. Results are presented for heating, temperature and ablation rate distributions over the probe forebody for various trajectory points. Comparison of transient and quasi-steady results indicates that, for the heating pulse encountered by this probe, the quasi-static approach is conservative from the standpoint of predicted surface recession.

  15. Trajectory-based heating analysis for the European Space Agency/Rosetta Earth Return Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henline, William D.; Tauber, Michael E.

    1994-01-01

    A coupled, trajectory-based flowfield and material thermal-response analysis is presented for the European Space Agency proposed Rosetta comet nucleus sample return vehicle. The probe returns to earth along a hyperbolic trajectory with an entry velocity of 16.5 km/s and requires an ablative heat shield on the forebody. Combined radiative and convective ablating flowfield analyses were performed for the significant heating portion of the shallow ballistic entry trajectory. Both quasisteady ablation and fully transient analyses were performed for a heat shield composed of carbon-phenolic ablative material. Quasisteady analysis was performed using the two-dimensional axisymmetric codes RASLE and BLIMPK. Transient computational results were obtained from the one-dimensional ablation/conduction code CMA. Results are presented for heating, temperature, and ablation rate distributions over the probe forebody for various trajectory points. Comparison of transient and quasisteady results indicates that, for the heating pulse encountered by this probe, the quasisteady approach is conservative from the standpoint of predicted surface recession.

  16. PERF - A new approach to the experimental study of radiative aerodynamic heating and radiative blockage by ablation products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walberg, G.

    1974-01-01

    The present work describes a facility designed to validate the various aspects of radiative flow field theory, including the absorption of shock layer radiation by ablation products. The facility is capable of producing radiation with a spectrum similar to that of an entry vehicle shock layer and is designed to allow measurements at vacuum ultraviolet wavelengths where the most significant absorption by ablation products is predicted to occur. The design concept of the facility is presented along with results of theoretical analyses carried out to assess its research potential. Experimental data obtained during tests that simulated earth and Venusian entry and in which simulated ablation products were injected into the stagnation region flow field are discussed.

  17. The potential of high heat generating granites as EGS source to generate power and reduce CO2 emissions, western Arabian shield, Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekharam, D.; Lashin, A.; Al Arifi, N.; Al Bassam, A.; El Alfy, M.; Ranjith, P. G.; Varun, C.; Singh, H. K.

    2015-12-01

    Saudi Arabia's dependence on oil and gas to generate electricity and to desalinate sea water is widely perceived to be economically and politically unsustainable. A recent business as usual simulation concluded that the Kingdom would become an oil importer by 2038. There is an opportunity for the country to over come this problem by using its geothermal energy resources. The heat flow and heat generation values of the granites spread over a cumulative area of 161,467 sq. km and the regional stress regime over the western Saudi Arabian shield strongly suggest that this entire area is potential source of energy to support 1) electricity generation, 2) fresh water generation through desalination and 3) extensive agricultural activity for the next two decades. The country can adopt a policy to harness this vast untapped enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) to mitigate climate and fresh water related issues and increase the quantity of oil for export. The country has inherent expertise to develop this resource.

  18. Tumor Ablation and Nanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Manthe, Rachel L.; Foy, Susan P.; Krishnamurthy, Nishanth; Sharma, Blanka; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2010-01-01

    Next to surgical resection, tumor ablation is a commonly used intervention in the treatment of solid tumors. Tumor ablation methods include thermal therapies, photodynamic therapy, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) producing agents. Thermal therapies induce tumor cell death via thermal energy and include radiofrequency, microwave, high intensity focused ultrasound, and cryoablation. Photodynamic therapy and ROS producing agents cause increased oxidative stress in tumor cells leading to apoptosis. While these therapies are safe and viable alternatives when resection of malignancies is not feasible, they do have associated limitations that prevent their widespread use in clinical applications. To improve the efficacy of these treatments, nanoparticles are being studied in combination with nonsurgical ablation regimens. In addition to better thermal effect on tumor ablation, nanoparticles can deliver anticancer therapeutics that show synergistic anti-tumor effect in the presence of heat and can also be imaged to achieve precision in therapy. Understanding the molecular mechanism of nanoparticle-mediated tumor ablation could further help engineer nanoparticles of appropriate composition and properties to synergize the ablation effect. This review aims to explore the various types of nonsurgical tumor ablation methods currently used in cancer treatment and potential improvements by nanotechnology applications. PMID:20866097

  19. Ablation of high-Z material dust grains in edge plasmas of magnetic fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Marenkov, E. D.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.

    2014-12-15

    The model, including shielding effects of high-Z dust grain ablation in tokamak edge plasma, is presented. In a contrast to shielding models developed for pellets ablation in a hot plasma core, this model deals with the dust grain ablation in relatively cold edge plasma. Using some simplifications, a closed set of equations determining the grain ablation rate Γ is derived and analyzed both analytically and numerically. The scaling law for Γ versus grain radius and ambient plasma parameters is obtained and confirmed by the results of numerical solutions. The results obtained are compared with both dust grain models containing no shielding effects and the pellet ablation models.

  20. Ablation of high-Z material dust grains in edge plasmas of magnetic fusion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marenkov, E. D.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.

    2014-12-01

    The model, including shielding effects of high-Z dust grain ablation in tokamak edge plasma, is presented. In a contrast to shielding models developed for pellets ablation in a hot plasma core, this model deals with the dust grain ablation in relatively cold edge plasma. Using some simplifications, a closed set of equations determining the grain ablation rate Γ is derived and analyzed both analytically and numerically. The scaling law for Γ versus grain radius and ambient plasma parameters is obtained and confirmed by the results of numerical solutions. The results obtained are compared with both dust grain models containing no shielding effects and the pellet ablation models.

  1. An Approximate Ablative Thermal Protection System Sizing Tool for Entry System Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dec, John A.; Braun, Robert D.

    2006-01-01

    A computer tool to perform entry vehicle ablative thermal protection systems sizing has been developed. Two options for calculating the thermal response are incorporated into the tool. One, an industry-standard, high-fidelity ablation and thermal response program was integrated into the tool, making use of simulated trajectory data to calculate its boundary conditions at the ablating surface. Second, an approximate method that uses heat of ablation data to estimate heat shield recession during entry has been coupled to a one-dimensional finite-difference calculation that calculates the in-depth thermal response. The in-depth solution accounts for material decomposition, but does not account for pyrolysis gas energy absorption through the material. Engineering correlations are used to estimate stagnation point convective and radiative heating as a function of time. The sizing tool calculates recovery enthalpy, wall enthalpy, surface pressure, and heat transfer coefficient. Verification of this tool is performed by comparison to past thermal protection system sizings for the Mars Pathfinder and Stardust entry systems and calculations are performed for an Apollo capsule entering the atmosphere at lunar and Mars return speeds.

  2. An Approximate Ablative Thermal Protection System Sizing Tool for Entry System Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dec, John A.; Braun, Robert D.

    2005-01-01

    A computer tool to perform entry vehicle ablative thermal protection systems sizing has been developed. Two options for calculating the thermal response are incorporated into the tool. One, an industry-standard, high-fidelity ablation and thermal response program was integrated into the tool, making use of simulated trajectory data to calculate its boundary conditions at the ablating surface. Second, an approximate method that uses heat of ablation data to estimate heat shield recession during entry has been coupled to a one-dimensional finite-difference calculation that calculates the in-depth thermal response. The in-depth solution accounts for material decomposition, but does not account for pyrolysis gas energy absorption through the material. Engineering correlations are used to estimate stagnation point convective and radiative heating as a function of time. The sizing tool calculates recovery enthalpy, wall enthalpy, surface pressure, and heat transfer coefficient. Verification of this tool is performed by comparison to past thermal protection system sizings for the Mars Pathfinder and Stardust entry systems and calculations are performed for an Apollo capsule entering the atmosphere at lunar and Mars return speeds.

  3. Actively driven thermal radiation shield

    DOEpatents

    Madden, Norman W.; Cork, Christopher P.; Becker, John A.; Knapp, David A.

    2002-01-01

    A thermal radiation shield for cooled portable gamma-ray spectrometers. The thermal radiation shield is located intermediate the vacuum enclosure and detector enclosure, is actively driven, and is useful in reducing the heat load to mechanical cooler and additionally extends the lifetime of the mechanical cooler. The thermal shield is electrically-powered and is particularly useful for portable solid-state gamma-ray detectors or spectrometers that dramatically reduces the cooling power requirements. For example, the operating shield at 260K (40K below room temperature) will decrease the thermal radiation load to the detector by 50%, which makes possible portable battery operation for a mechanically cooled Ge spectrometer.

  4. Modular shield

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, Keith W.

    2002-01-01

    A modular system for containing projectiles has a sheet of material including at least a polycarbonate layer held by a metal frame having a straight frame member corresponding to each straight edge of the sheet. Each frame member has a U-shaped shield channel covering and holding a straight edge of the sheet and an adjacent U-shaped clamp channel rigidly held against the shield channel. A flexible gasket separates each sheet edge from its respective shield channel; and each frame member is fastened to each adjacent frame member only by clamps extending between adjacent clamp channels.

  5. Simulated Reentry Heating by Torching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, Gale A.

    2008-01-01

    The two first order reentry heating parameters are peak heating flux (W/square cm) and peak heat load (kJ/square cm). Peak heating flux (and deceleration, gs) is higher for a ballistic reentry and peak heat load is higher for a lifting reentry. Manned vehicle reentries are generally lifting reentries at nominal 1-5 gs so that personnel will not be crushed by high deceleration force. A few off-nominal manned reentries have experienced 8 or more gs with corresponding high heating flux (but below nominal heat load). The Shuttle Orbiter reentries provide about an order of magnitude difference in peak heating flux at mid-bottom (TPS tiles, approximately 6 W/square cm or 5 BTU/square ft - sec) and leading edge (RCC, approximately 60 W/square cm or 50 BTU/square ft- sec). Orion lunar return and Mars sample lander are of the same order of magnitude as orbiter leading edge peak heat loads. Flight temperature measurements are available for some orbiter TPS tile and RCC locations. Return-to-Flight on-orbit tile-repair-candidate-material-heating performance was evaluated by matching propane torch heating of candidate-materials temperatures at several depths to orbiter TPS tile flight-temperatures. Char and ash characteristics, heat expansion, and temperature histories at several depths of the cure-in-place ablator were some of the TPS repair material performance characteristics measured. The final char surface was above the initial surface for the primary candidate (silicone based) material, in contrast to a receded surface for the Apollo-type ablative heat shield material. Candidate TPS materials for Orion CEV (LEO and lunar return), and for Mars sample lander (MSL) are now being evaluated. Torching of a candidate ablator material, PICA, was performed to match the ablation experienced by the STARDUST PICA heat shield. Torching showed that the carbon fiberform skeleton in a sample of PICA was inhomogeneous in that sample, and allowed measurements (of the clumps and voids) of

  6. Simulated Reentry Heating by Torching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, Gale A.

    2008-01-01

    The two first order reentry heating parameters are peak heating flux (W/cm2) and peak heat load (kJ/cm2). Peak heating flux (and deceleration, gs) is higher for a ballistic reentry and peak heat load is higher for a lifting reentry. Manned vehicle reentries are generally lifting reentries at nominal 1-5 gs so that personnel will not be crushed by high deceleration force. A few off-nominal manned reentries have experienced 8 or more gs with corresponding high heating flux (but below nominal heat load). The Shuttle Orbiter reentries provide about an order of magnitude difference in peak heating flux at mid-bottom (TPS tiles, approximately 6 W/cm2 or 5 BTU/ft2- sec) and leading edge (RCC, approximately 60 W/cm2 or 50 BTU/ft2- sec). Orion lunar return and Mars sample lander are of the same order of magnitude as orbiter leading edge peak heat loads. Flight temperature measurements are available for some orbiter TPS tile and RCC locations. Return-to-Flight on-orbit tile-repair-candidate-material-heating performance was evaluated by matching propane torch heating of candidate-materials temperatures at several depths to orbiter TPS tile flight-temperatures. Char and ash characteristics, heat expansion, and temperature histories at several depths of the cure-in-place ablator were some of the TPS repair material performance characteristics measured. The final char surface was above the initial surface for the primary candidate (silicone based) material, in contrast to a receded surface for the Apollo-type ablative heat shield material. Candidate TPS materials for Orion CEV (LEO and lunar return), and for Mars sample lander are now being evaluated. Torching of a candidate ablator material, PICA, was performed to match the ablation experienced by the STARDUST PICA heat shield. Torching showed that the carbon fiberform skeleton in a sample of PICA was inhomogeneous in that sample, and allowed measurements (of the clumps and voids) of the inhomogeneity. Additional reentry

  7. Ablative system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, V. H. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A carrier liquid containing ablative material bodies is connected to a plenum chamber wall with openings to a high temperature environment. The liquid and bodies pass through the openings of the wall to form a self replacing ablative surface. The wall is composed of honeycomb layers, spheres containing ablative whiskers or wads, and a hardening catalyst for the carrier liquid. The wall also has woven wicks of ablative material fibers that extend through the wall openings and into plenum chamber which contains the liquid.

  8. Experimental performance of an ablative material as an external insulator for a hypersonic research aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puster, R. L.; Chapman, A. J.

    1977-01-01

    An ablative material composed of silica-filled elastomeric silicone was tested to evaluate its thermal and structural performance as an external insulator, or heat shield, for a hypersonic research aircraft. The material was also tested to determine whether it would form a durable char layer when initially heated and thereafter function primarily as an insulator with little further pyrolysis or char removal. Aerothermal tests were representative of nominal Mach 6 cruise conditions of the aircraft, and additional tests were representative of Mach 8 cruise and interference heating conditions. Radiant heating tests were used to simulate the complete nominal Mach 6 surface-temperature history. The silica char that formed during aerothermal tests was not durable. The char experienced a general and preferential surface recession, with the primary mechanism for char removal being erosion. Tests revealed that radiant heating is not a valid technique for simulating aerodynamic heating of the material.

  9. REACTOR SHIELD

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; Ohlinger, L.E.; Young, G.J.; Weinberg, A.M.

    1959-02-17

    Radiation shield construction is described for a nuclear reactor. The shield is comprised of a plurality of steel plates arranged in parallel spaced relationship within a peripheral shell. Reactor coolant inlet tubes extend at right angles through the plates and baffles are arranged between the plates at right angles thereto and extend between the tubes to create a series of zigzag channels between the plates for the circulation of coolant fluid through the shield. The shield may be divided into two main sections; an inner section adjacent the reactor container and an outer section spaced therefrom. Coolant through the first section may be circulated at a faster rate than coolant circulated through the outer section since the area closest to the reactor container is at a higher temperature and is more radioactive. The two sections may have separate cooling systems to prevent the coolant in the outer section from mixing with the more contaminated coolant in the inner section.

  10. Radiation Shielding Materials and Containers Incorporating Same

    SciTech Connect

    Mirsky, Steven M.; Krill, Stephen J.; and Murray, Alexander P.

    2005-11-01

    An improved radiation shielding material and storage systems for radioactive materials incorporating the same. The PYRolytic Uranium Compound (''PYRUC'') shielding material is preferably formed by heat and/or pressure treatment of a precursor material comprising microspheres of a uranium compound, such as uranium dioxide or uranium carbide, and a suitable binder. The PYRUC shielding material provides improved radiation shielding, thermal characteristic, cost and ease of use in comparison with other shielding materials. The shielding material can be used to form containment systems, container vessels, shielding structures, and containment storage areas, all of which can be used to house radioactive waste. The preferred shielding system is in the form of a container for storage, transportation, and disposal of radioactive waste. In addition, improved methods for preparing uranium dioxide and uranium carbide microspheres for use in the radiation shielding materials are also provided.

  11. Radiation shielding materials and containers incorporating same

    DOEpatents

    Mirsky, Steven M.; Krill, Stephen J.; Murray, Alexander P.

    2005-11-01

    An improved radiation shielding material and storage systems for radioactive materials incorporating the same. The PYRolytic Uranium Compound ("PYRUC") shielding material is preferably formed by heat and/or pressure treatment of a precursor material comprising microspheres of a uranium compound, such as uranium dioxide or uranium carbide, and a suitable binder. The PYRUC shielding material provides improved radiation shielding, thermal characteristic, cost and ease of use in comparison with other shielding materials. The shielding material can be used to form containment systems, container vessels, shielding structures, and containment storage areas, all of which can be used to house radioactive waste. The preferred shielding system is in the form of a container for storage, transportation, and disposal of radioactive waste. In addition, improved methods for preparing uranium dioxide and uranium carbide microspheres for use in the radiation shielding materials are also provided.

  12. Acute Cor Pulmonale and Right Heat Failure Complicating Ethanol Ablative Therapy: Anesthetic and Radiologic Considerations and Management

    SciTech Connect

    Naik, Bhiken; Matsumoto, Alan H.

    2013-10-15

    Ethanol is an effective ablative agent used for the treatment of certain solid organ tumors and vascular malformations (VMs). The egress of ethanol beyond the target tissue can be associated with significant changes to the cardiopulmonary system that can lead to cardiac arrest. This article reviews the contemporary role of ethanol in tumor and VM treatment and discusses the physiological mechanisms of acute pulmonary hypertension and cardiovascular collapse. The importance of periprocedural recognition of the hemodynamic changes that can occur with the use of ethanol and the treatment of this condition are discussed.

  13. Lithospheric structure of southern Indian shield and adjoining oceans: integrated modelling of topography, gravity, geoid and heat flow data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Niraj; Zeyen, H.; Singh, A. P.; Singh, B.

    2013-07-01

    For the present 2-D lithospheric density modelling, we selected three geotransects of more than 1000 km in length each crossing the southern Indian shield, south of 16°N, in N-S and E-W directions. The model is based on the assumption of local isostatic equilibrium and is constrained by the topography, gravity and geoid anomalies, by geothermal data, and where available by seismic data. Our integrated modelling approach reveals a crustal configuration with the Moho depth varying from ˜40 km beneath the Dharwar Craton, and ˜39 km beneath the Southern Granulite Terrane to about 15-20 km beneath the adjoining oceans. The lithospheric thickness varies significantly along the three profiles from ˜70-100 km under the adjoining oceans to ˜130-135 km under the southern block of Southern Granulite Terrane including Sri Lanka and increasing gradually to ˜165-180 km beneath the northern block of Southern Granulite Terrane and the Dharwar Craton. This step-like lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) structure indicates a normal lithospheric thickness beneath the adjoining oceans, the northern block of Southern Granulite Terrane and the Dharwar Craton. The thin lithosphere below the southern block of Southern Granulite Terrane including Sri Lanka is, however, atypical considering its age. Our results suggest that the southern Indian shield as a whole cannot be supported isostatically only by thickened crust; a thin and hot lithosphere beneath the southern block of Southern Granulite Terrane including Sri Lanka is required to explain the high topography, gravity, geoid and crustal temperatures. The widespread thermal perturbation during Pan-African (550 Ma) metamorphism and the breakup of Gondwana during late Cretaceous are proposed as twin cause mechanism for the stretching and/or convective removal of the lower part of lithospheric mantle and its replacement by hotter and lighter asthenosphere in the southern block of Southern Granulite Terrane including Sri Lanka

  14. Implicit Coupling Approach for Simulation of Charring Carbon Ablators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yih-Kanq; Gokcen, Tahir

    2013-01-01

    This study demonstrates that coupling of a material thermal response code and a flow solver with nonequilibrium gas/surface interaction for simulation of charring carbon ablators can be performed using an implicit approach. The material thermal response code used in this study is the three-dimensional version of Fully Implicit Ablation and Thermal response program, which predicts charring material thermal response and shape change on hypersonic space vehicles. The flow code solves the reacting Navier-Stokes equations using Data Parallel Line Relaxation method. Coupling between the material response and flow codes is performed by solving the surface mass balance in flow solver and the surface energy balance in material response code. Thus, the material surface recession is predicted in flow code, and the surface temperature and pyrolysis gas injection rate are computed in material response code. It is demonstrated that the time-lagged explicit approach is sufficient for simulations at low surface heating conditions, in which the surface ablation rate is not a strong function of the surface temperature. At elevated surface heating conditions, the implicit approach has to be taken, because the carbon ablation rate becomes a stiff function of the surface temperature, and thus the explicit approach appears to be inappropriate resulting in severe numerical oscillations of predicted surface temperature. Implicit coupling for simulation of arc-jet models is performed, and the predictions are compared with measured data. Implicit coupling for trajectory based simulation of Stardust fore-body heat shield is also conducted. The predicted stagnation point total recession is compared with that predicted using the chemical equilibrium surface assumption

  15. Metallic targets ablation by laser plasma production in a vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beilis, I. I.

    2016-03-01

    A model of metallic target ablation and metallic plasma production by laser irradiation is reported. The model considers laser energy absorption by the plasma, electron emission from hot targets and ion flux to the target from the plasma as well as an electric sheath produced at the target-plasma interface. The proposed approach takes into account that the plasma, partially shields the laser radiation from the target, and also converts absorbed laser energy to kinetic and potential energies of the charged plasma particles, which they transport not only through the ambient vacuum but also through the electrostatic sheath to the solid surface. Therefore additional plasma heating by the accelerated emitted electrons and target heating caused by bombardment of it by the accelerated ions are considered. A system of equations, including equations for solid heat conduction, plasma generation, and plasma expansion, is solved self-consistently. The results of calculations explain the measured dependencies of ablation yield (μ g/pulse) for Al, Ni, and Ti targets on laser fluence in range of (5-21)J/cm2 published previously by Torrisi et al.

  16. Laser ablation based fuel ignition

    DOEpatents

    Early, J.W.; Lester, C.S.

    1998-06-23

    There is provided a method of fuel/oxidizer ignition comprising: (a) application of laser light to a material surface which is absorptive to the laser radiation; (b) heating of the material surface with the laser light to produce a high temperature ablation plume which emanates from the heated surface as an intensely hot cloud of vaporized surface material; and (c) contacting the fuel/oxidizer mixture with the hot ablation cloud at or near the surface of the material in order to heat the fuel to a temperature sufficient to initiate fuel ignition. 3 figs.

  17. Laser ablation based fuel ignition

    DOEpatents

    Early, James W.; Lester, Charles S.

    1998-01-01

    There is provided a method of fuel/oxidizer ignition comprising: (a) application of laser light to a material surface which is absorptive to the laser radiation; (b) heating of the material surface with the laser light to produce a high temperature ablation plume which emanates from the heated surface as an intensely hot cloud of vaporized surface material; and (c) contacting the fuel/oxidizer mixture with the hot ablation cloud at or near the surface of the material in order to heat the fuel to a temperature sufficient to initiate fuel ignition.

  18. Use of shock-wave heating for faster and safer ablation of tissue volumes in high intensity focused ultrasound therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khokhlova, V.; Yuldashev, P.; Sinilshchikov, I.; Partanen, A.; Khokhlova, T.; Farr, N.; Kreider, W.; Maxwell, A.; Sapozhnikov, O.

    2015-10-01

    Simulation of enhanced heating of clinically relevant tissue volumes using nonlinear ultrasound waves generated by a multi-element HIFU phased array were conducted based on the combined Westervelt and bio-heat equations. A spatial spectral approach using the fast Fourier transform algorithm and a corresponding analytic solution to the bioheat equation were used to optimize temperature modeling in tissue. Localized shock-wave heating within a much larger treated tissue volume and short, single HIFU pulses within a much longer overall exposure time were accounted for in the algorithm. Separation of processes with different time and spatial scales made the calculations faster and more accurate. With the proposed method it was shown that for the same time-average power, the use of high peak power pulsing schemes that produce high-amplitude shocks at the focus result in faster tissue heating compared to harmonic, continuous-wave sonications. Nonlinear effects can significantly accelerate volumetric heating while also permitting greater spatial control to reduce the impact on surrounding tissues. Such studies can be further used to test and optimize various steering trajectories of shock-wave sonications for faster and more controlled treatment of tissue volumes.

  19. Drip Shield Emplacement Gantry Concept

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, R.A.; Cron, J.

    2000-03-29

    This design analysis has shown that, on a conceptual level, the emplacement of drip shields is feasible with current technology and equipment. A plan for drip shield emplacement was presented using a Drip Shield Transporter, a Drip Shield Emplacement Gantry, a locomotive, and a Drip Shield Gantry Carrier. The use of a Drip Shield Emplacement Gantry as an emplacement concept results in a system that is simple, reliable, and interfaces with the numerous other exising repository systems. Using the Waste Emplacement/Retrieval System design as a basis for the drip shield emplacement concept proved to simplify the system by using existing equipment, such as the gantry carrier, locomotive, Electrical and Control systems, and many other systems, structures, and components. Restricted working envelopes for the Drip Shield Emplacement System require further consideration and must be addressed to show that the emplacement operations can be performed as the repository design evolves. Section 6.1 describes how the Drip Shield Emplacement System may use existing equipment. Depending on the length of time between the conclusion of waste emplacement and the commencement of drip shield emplacement, this equipment could include the locomotives, the gantry carrier, and the electrical, control, and rail systems. If the exisiting equipment is selected for use in the Drip Shield Emplacement System, then the length of time after the final stages of waste emplacement and start of drip shield emplacement may pose a concern for the life cycle of the system (e.g., reliability, maintainability, availability, etc.). Further investigation should be performed to consider the use of existing equipment for drip shield emplacement operations. Further investigation will also be needed regarding the interfaces and heat transfer and thermal effects aspects. The conceptual design also requires further design development. Although the findings of this analysis are accurate for the assumptions made

  20. F-doped VO2 nanoparticles for thermochromic energy-saving foils with modified color and enhanced solar-heat shielding ability.

    PubMed

    Dai, Lei; Chen, Shi; Liu, Jianjun; Gao, Yanfeng; Zhou, Jiadong; Chen, Zhang; Cao, Chuanxiang; Luo, Hongjie; Kanehira, Minoru

    2013-07-28

    F-doped VO2 (M1) nanoparticles were prepared via one-pot hydrothermal synthesis. The F-doping can minimise the size of the VO2 (M1) nanoparticles, induce a homogeneous size distribution and effectively decrease the phase transition temperature to 35 °C at 2.93% F in VO2. VO2 smart glass foils obtained by casting these nanoparticles exhibit excellent thermochromism in the near-infrared region, which suggests that these foils can be used for energy-efficient glass. Compared to a pure VO2 foil, the 2.93% F-doped VO2 foil exhibits an increased solar-heat shielding ability (35.1%) and a modified comfortable colour, while still retaining an excellent solar modulation ability (10.7%) and an appropriate visible transmittance (48.7%). The F-doped VO2 foils are the first to simultaneously meet the requirements of a reduced phase transition temperature, diluted colour and excellent thermochromic properties, and these properties make the further improved F-doped VO2 foils suitable for commercial applications in energy efficient glass. PMID:23752949

  1. Laminar and turbulent flow solutions with radiation and ablation injection for Jovian entry. [radiative heating rates for the Galileo probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, A.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1980-01-01

    Laminar and turbulent flow-field solutions with coupled carbon-phenolic mass injection are presented for the forebody of a probe entering a nominal Jupiter atmosphere. Solutions are obtained for a 35-degree hyperboloid and for a 45-degree spherically blunted cone using a time-dependent, finite-difference method. The radiative heating rates for the coupled laminar flow are significantly reduced as compared to the corresponding no-blowing case; however, for the coupled turbulent flow, it is found that the surface radiative heating rates are substantially increased and often exceed the corresponding no-blowing values. Turbulence is found to have no effect on the surface radiative heating rates for the no-blowing solutions. The present results are compared with the other available solutions, and some additional solutions are presented.

  2. Sound shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creel, T. R., Jr.; Beckwith, I. E. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    An improved test section for a supersonic or hypersonic wind tunnel is disclosed wherein the model tested is shielded from the noise normally radiated by the turbulent tunnel wall boundary layer. A vacuum plenum surrounds spaced rod elements making up the test chamber to extract some of the boundary layer as formed along the rod elements during a test to thereby delay the tendency of the rod boundary layers to become turbulent. Novel rod construction involves bending each rod slightly prior to machining the bent area to provide a flat segment on each rod for connection with the flat entrance fairing. Rods and fairing are secured to provide a test chamber incline on the order of 1 deg outward from the noise shield centerline to produce up to 65% reduction of the root mean square (rms) pressure over previously employed wind tunnel test sections at equivalent Reynolds numbers.

  3. PROVING EXPERIMENTS AND ANALYSIS OF ROOFTOP HEAT SHIELD EXPERIMENT WITH WATER CONTAIN CONCRETE BOAD THAT USES ELEMENTARY SCHOOL BUILDING

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Akinori; 日根, 隆夫; Okuda, Yoshio; Koyama, Hiroyuki; Hada, Yuuichi

    In this study, the reduction effect of the heat inflow on the rooftop and the indoor thermal environment was measured by using the elementary school building, the rooftop of the bilding was covered with the water contain concrete boards. And, conserve energy effect and effectiveness for the indoor thermal environment improvement were evaluated. The effect of the decrease of the surface temperature and the slab side temperature at water contain concrete boad plot remarkably from the measurement result during the July-September of 2010, the temperatures decrease 22°C at the surface, 15°C at the waterproof layer surface that was caused compared with the gravel covered roof. The water contain concrete boards plot always drove the ceiling side temperature and the indoor temperature low as a result of comparing with the indoor condition of the control plot. The temperature fluctuate was small at time that opened the window and ventilated, and ventilation was discontinued, it became big temperatures fluctuate. The effect of the decrease of 0.5°C in PMV and 0.5 in WBGT was caused while the room had sealed up, and the effect of the decrease of 0.3 in WBGT was caused while the ventilated state.

  4. Advanced Rigid Ablative TPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasch, Matthew J.

    2011-01-01

    NASA Exploration Systems Mission Directorate s (ESMD) Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) Technology Development Project (TDP) and the NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate s (ARMD) Hypersonics Project are developing new advanced rigid ablators in an effort to substantially increase reliability, decrease mass, and reduce life cycle cost of rigid aeroshell-based entry systems for multiple missions. Advanced Rigid Ablators combine ablation resistant top layers capable of high heat flux entry and enable high-speed EDL with insulating mass-efficient bottom that, insulate the structure and lower the areal weight. These materials may benefit Commercial Orbital Transportation Services (COTS) vendors and may potentially enable new NASA missions for higher velocity returns (e.g. asteroid, Mars). The materials have been thermally tested to 400-450 W/sq cm at the Laser Hardened Materials Evaluation Lab (LHMEL), Hypersonics Materials Evaluation Test System (HyMETS) and in arcjet facilities. Tested materials exhibit much lower backface temperatures and reduced recession over the baseline materials (PICA). Although the EDL project is ending in FY11, NASA in-house development of advanced ablators will continue with a focus on varying resin systems and fiber/resin interactions.

  5. Optimation of cooled shields in insulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chato, J. C.; Khodadadi, J. M.; Seyed-Yagoobi, J.

    1984-01-01

    A method to optimize the location, temperature, and heat dissipation rate of each cooled shield inside an insulation layer was developed. The method is based on the minimization of the entropy production rate which is proportional to the heat leak across the insulation. It is shown that the maximum number of shields to be used in most practical applications is three. However, cooled shields are useful only at low values of the overall, cold wall to hot wall absolute temperature ratio. The performance of the insulation system is relatively insensitive to deviations from the optimum values of the temperature and location of the cooling shields. Design curves for rapid estimates of the locations and temperatures of cooling shields in various types of insulations, and an equation for calculating the cooling loads for the shields are presented.

  6. Wake shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bannister, Tommy; Karr, Gerald R.

    1987-01-01

    Progress on the modeling of the flow field around a wake shield using a recently obtained code based on the Monte Carlo method is discussed. The direct simulation Monte Carlo method is a method for solving the Boltzman Equation using an approximation to the collision integral term. The collision integrand is evaluated for randomly selected values of its arguments and the summation will approach the integral for large enough samples. The collision effects may be modeled for either hard sphere or various power law potentials. The convective side of the Boltzman equation is approximated over a time step using a simple trajectory calculation of molecules as they travel through the domain of interest.

  7. Carbon Nanotube-enhanced Carbon-phenolic Ablator Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikolaev, P.; Stackpoole, M.; Fan, W.; Cruden, B.; Waid, M.; Maloney, P.; Arepalli, S.; Arnold, J.; Partridge, H.; Yowell, L.

    2006-01-01

    Phenolic impregnated carbon ablator (PICA) is a thermal protection system (TPS) material developed at NASA Ames Research Center in the mid-90 s for Discovery missions. It was used on the Stardust return capsule heat shield which successfully executed the highest speed Earth entry to date on January 15, 2006. PICA is a porous fibrous carbon insulation infiltrated with phenolic resin, and is an excellent ablator that is effective for heating rates up to 1000 W/sq cm. It is one of several candidate TPS materials for the next generation of crewed spacecraft for Lunar and Mars missions. We will describe an ongoing research effort at NASA to improve mechanical properties of the phenolic matrix with carbon nanotubes. The aim is two-fold: to increase overall TPS strength during reentry and to improve Micrometeoroid/Orbital Debris (MMOD) protection in space. The former requires at least a good dispersion of nanotubes in phenolic, while the latter also requires covalent bonding between them to couple and transfer impact energy effectively from matrix to nanotubes. We will discuss the required chemical functionalization of nanotubes, processing issues and test results.

  8. Development of Low Density Flexible Carbon Phenolic Ablators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stackpole, Mairead; Thornton, Jeremy; Fan, Wendy; Agrawal, Parul; Doxtad, Evan; Gasch, Matt

    2011-01-01

    Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) was the enabling TPS material for the Stardust mission where it was used as a single piece heatshield. PICA has the advantages of low density (0.27g/cm3) coupled with efficient ablative capability at high heat fluxes. Under the Orion program, PICA was also shown to be capable of both ISS and lunar return missions however some unresolved issues remain for its application in a tiled configuration for the Orion-specific design. In particular, the problem of developing an appropriate gap filler resulted in the Orion program selecting AVCOAT as the primary heatshield material over PICA. We are currently looking at alternative architectures to yield flexible and more conformal carbon phenolic materials with comparable densities to PICA that will address some of the design issues faced in the application of a tiled PICA heat shield. These new materials are viable TPS candidates for upcoming NASA missions and as material candidates for private sector Commercial Orbital Transportation Services (COTS). This presentation will discuss flexible alternatives to PICA and include preliminary mechanical and thermal properties as well as arc jet and LHMEL screening test results.

  9. Composite Aerogel Multifoil Protective Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    New technologies are needed to survive the temperatures, radiation, and hypervelocity particles that exploration spacecraft encounter. Multilayer insulations (MLIs) have been used on many spacecraft as thermal insulation. Other materials and composites have been used as micrometeorite shielding or radiation shielding. However, no material composite has been developed and employed as a combined thermal insulation, micrometeorite, and radiation shielding. By replacing the scrims that have been used to separate the foil layers in MLIs with various aerogels, and by using a variety of different metal foils, the overall protective performance of MLIs can be greatly expanded to act as thermal insulation, radiation shielding, and hypervelocity particle shielding. Aerogels are highly porous, low-density solids that are produced by the gelation of metal alkoxides and supercritical drying. Aerogels have been flown in NASA missions as a hypervelocity particle capture medium (Stardust) and as thermal insulation (2003 MER). Composite aerogel multifoil protective shielding would be used to provide thermal insulation, while also shielding spacecraft or components from radiation and hypervelocity particle impacts. Multiple layers of foil separated by aerogel would act as a thermal barrier by preventing the transport of heat energy through the composite. The silica aerogel would act as a convective and conductive thermal barrier, while the titania powder and metal foils would absorb and reflect the radiative heat. It would also capture small hypervelocity particles, such as micrometeorites, since it would be a stuffed, multi-shock Whipple shield. The metal foil layers would slow and break up the impacting particles, while the aerogel layers would convert the kinetic energy of the particles to thermal and mechanical energy and stop the particles.

  10. Ablation enhancement of silicon by ultrashort double-pulse laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Xin; Shin, Yung C.

    2014-09-15

    In this study, the ultrashort double-pulse ablation of silicon is investigated. An atomistic simulation model is developed to analyze the underlying physics. It is revealed that the double-pulse ablation could significantly increase the ablation rate of silicon, compared with the single pulse ablation with the same total pulse energy, which is totally different from the case of metals. In the long pulse delay range (over 1 ps), the enhancement is caused by the metallic transition of melted silicon with the corresponding absorption efficiency. At ultrashort pulse delay (below 1 ps), the enhancement is due to the electron excitation by the first pulse. The enhancement only occurs at low and moderate laser fluence. The ablation is suppressed at high fluence due to the strong plasma shielding effect.

  11. Ultrasonic characterization of laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J. A.; Telschow, K. L.

    When a pulsed laser beam strikes the surface of an absorbing material, ultrasonic waves are generated due to thermoelectric expansion and, at higher laser power densities, ablation of the material. These sound generation mechanisms have been the subject of numerous theoretical and experimental studies and are now fairly well understood. In particular, it has been established that at low power densities the thermoelastic mechanism is well described by a surface center of expansion. This mechanism produces a characteristic waveform whose amplitude is proportional to the energy absorbed from the laser pulse and also dependent on the thermal and elastic properties of the material. The ablation ultrasonic source can be described by a point normal force acting on the material surface. For laser power densities near the ablation onset, the time dependence of the source is that of the laser pulse. The resultant waveform recorded on epicenter (source and detector collinear) has a sharp peak determined by the momentum impulse delivered to the material by the ablation process. Particularly in the near ablation onset region, this ultrasonic displacement peak can be used to characterize the ablation process occurring at the material surface. The onset power density for ablation and subsequent ablation dependence on power density are material dependent and thought to be a function of the heat capacity and thermal conductivity of the material. With this in mind, it is possible that these ablation signals could be used to characterize material microstructures, and perhaps material mechanical properties such as hardness, through microstructural changes of the material thermal parameters. This paper explores this question for samples of Type 304 stainless steel with microstructures controlled through work hardening and annealing.

  12. Absorption of a single 500 fs laser pulse at the surface of fused silica: Energy balance and ablation efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Varkentina, N.; Sanner, N.; Lebugle, M.; Sentis, M.; Utéza, O.

    2013-11-07

    Ablation of fused silica by a single femtosecond laser pulse of 500 fs pulse duration is investigated from the perspective of efficiency of incident photons to remove matter. We measure the reflected and transmitted fractions of the incident pulse energy as a function of fluence, allowing us to recover the evolution of absorption at the material surface. At the ablation threshold fluence, 25% of incident energy is absorbed. At high fluences, this ratio saturates around 70% due to the appearance of a self-triggered plasma mirror (or shielding) effect. By using the energy balance retrieved experimentally and measurements of the ablated volume, we show that the amount of absorbed energy is far above the bonding energy of fused silica at rest and also above the energy barrier to ablate the material under non-equilibrium thermodynamic conditions. Our results emphasize the crucial role of transient plasma properties during the laser pulse and suggest that the major part of the absorbed energy has been used to heat the plasma formed at the surface of the material. A fluence range yielding an efficient and high quality ablation is also defined, which makes the results relevant for femtosecond micromachining processes.

  13. Solar Wind Ablation of Terrestrial Planet Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Thomas Earle; Fok, Mei-Ching H.; Delcourt, Dominique C.

    2009-01-01

    Internal plasma sources usually arise in planetary magnetospheres as a product of stellar ablation processes. With the ignition of a new star and the onset of its ultraviolet and stellar wind emissions, much of the volatiles in the stellar system undergo a phase transition from gas to plasma. Condensation and accretion into a disk is replaced by radiation and stellar wind ablation of volatile materials from the system- Planets or smaller bodies that harbor intrinsic magnetic fields develop an apparent shield against direct stellar wind impact, but UV radiation still ionizes their gas phases, and the resulting internal plasmas serve to conduct currents to and from the central body along reconnected magnetic field linkages. Photoionization and thermalization of electrons warms the ionospheric topside, enhancing Jeans' escape of super-thermal particles, with ambipolar diffusion and acceleration. Moreover, observations and simulations of auroral processes at Earth indicate that solar wind energy dissipation is concentrated by the geomagnetic field by a factor of 10-100, enhancing heavy species plasma and gas escape from gravity, and providing more current carrying capacity. Thus internal plasmas enable coupling with the plasma, neutral gas and by extension, the entire body. The stellar wind is locally loaded and slowed to develop the required power. The internal source plasma is accelerated and heated, inflating the magnetosphere as it seeks escape, and is ultimately blown away in the stellar wind. Bodies with little sensible atmosphere may still produce an exosphere of sputtered matter when exposed to direct solar wind impact. Bodies with a magnetosphere and internal sources of plasma interact more strongly with the stellar wind owing to the magnetic linkage between the two created by reconnection.

  14. Advanced Multifunctional MMOD Shield: Radiation Shielding Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rojdev, Kristina; Christiansen, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Deep space missions must contend with a harsh radiation environment Impacts to crew and electronics. Need to invest in multifunctionality for spacecraft optimization. MMOD shield. Goals: Increase radiation mitigation potential. Retain overall MMOD shielding performance.

  15. Innovative technologies for Faraday shield cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenfeld, J.H.; Lindemuth, J.E.; North, M.T.; Goulding, R.H.

    1995-12-31

    Alternative advanced technologies are being evaluated for use in cooling the Faraday shields used for protection of ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICR) antennae in Tokamaks. Two approaches currently under evaluation include heat pipe cooling and gas cooling. A Monel/water heat pipe cooled Faraday shield has been successfully demonstrated. Heat pipe cooling offers the advantage of reducing the amount of water discharged into the Tokamak in the event of a tube weld failure. The device was recently tested on an antenna at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The heat pipe design uses inclined water heat pipes with warm water condensers located outside of the plasma chamber. This approach can passively remove absorbed heat fluxes in excess of 200 W/cm{sup 2};. Helium-cooled Faraday shields are also being evaluated. This approach offers the advantage of no liquid discharge into the Tokamak in the event of a tube failure. Innovative internal cooling structures based on porous metal cooling are being used to develop a helium-cooled Faraday shield structure. This approach can dissipate the high heat fluxes typical of Faraday shield applications while minimizing the required helium blower power. Preliminary analysis shows that nominal helium flow and pressure drop can sufficiently cool a Faraday shield in typical applications. Plans are in progress to fabricate and test prototype hardware based on this approach.

  16. High-speed scanning ablation of dental hard tissues with a λ = 9.3 μm CO2 laser: adhesion, mechanical strength, heat accumulation, and peripheral thermal damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Daniel; Chang, Kwang; Hedayatollahnajafi, Saba; Staninec, Michal; Chan, Kenneth; Lee, Robert; Fried, Daniel

    2011-07-01

    CO2 lasers can be operated at high laser pulse repetition rates for the rapid and precise removal of dental decay. Excessive heat accumulation and peripheral thermal damage is a concern when using high pulse repetition rates. Peripheral thermal damage can adversely impact the mechanical strength of the irradiated tissue, particularly for dentin, and reduce the adhesion characteristics of the modified surfaces. The interpulpal temperature rise was recorded using microthermocouples situated at the roof of the pulp chamber on teeth that were occlusally ablated using a rapidly-scanned CO2 laser operating at 9.3 μm with a pulse duration of 10 to 15 μs and repetition rate of 300 Hz over a 2 min time course. The adhesion strength of laser treated enamel and dentin surfaces was measured for various laser scanning parameters with and without post-ablation acid etching using the single-plane shear test. The mechanical strength of laser-ablated dentin surfaces were determined via the four-point bend test and compared to control samples prepared with 320 grit wet sand paper to simulate conventional preparations. Thermocouple measurements indicated that the temperature remained below ambient temperature if water-cooling was used. There was no discoloration of either dentin or enamel laser treated surfaces, the surfaces were uniformly ablated, and there were no cracks visible. Four-point bend tests yielded mean mechanical strengths of 18.2 N (s.d. = 4.6) for ablated dentin and 18.1 N (s.d. = 2.7) for control (p > 0.05). Shear tests yielded mean bond strengths approaching 30 MPa for both enamel and dentin under certain irradiation conditions. These values were slightly lower than nonirradiated acid-etched control samples. Additional studies are needed to determine if the slightly lower bond strength than the acid-etched control samples is clinically significant. These measurements demonstrate that enamel and dentin surfaces can be rapidly ablated by CO2 lasers with minimal

  17. Fracture in Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, Parul; Chavez-Garcia, Jose F.

    2011-01-01

    The thermal protection materials used for spacecraft heat shields are subjected to various thermal-mechanical loads during an atmospheric entry which can threaten the structural integrity of the system. This paper discusses the development of a novel technique to understand the failure mechanisms inside thermal protection materials. The focus of research is Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA). It has successfully flown on the Stardust spacecraft and is the TPS material chosen for the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) and Dragon spacecraft. Although PICA has good thermal properties, structurally, it is a weak material. In order to thoroughly understand failure in PICA, fracture tests were performed on FiberForm* (precursor of PICA), virgin and charred PICA materials. Several samples of these materials were tested to investigate failure mechanisms at a microstructural scale. Stress-strain data were obtained simultaneously to estimate the fracture toughness. It was found that cracks initiated and grew in the FiberForm when a critical stress limit was reached such that the carbon fibers separated from the binder. However, both for virgin and charred PICA, crack initiation and growth occurred in the matrix (phenolic) phase. Both virgin and charred PICA showed greater strength values compared to FiberForm coupons, confirming that the presence of the porous matrix helps in absorbing the fracture energy.

  18. Fracture in Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, Parul; Chavez-Garcia, Jose F.

    2011-01-01

    The thermal protection materials used for spacecraft heat shields are subjected to various thermal-mechanical loads during an atmospheric reentry which can threaten the structural integrity of the system. This paper discusses the development of a novel technique to understand the failure mechanisms inside the thermal protection material, Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA). PICA has successfully flown on the Stardust spacecraft and was the TPS material chosen for the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL), that will fly in 2011. Although PICA has good thermal properties, structurally, it is a weak material. To thoroughly understand failure in PICA, experiments were performed using FiberForm(Registered TradeMark) (precursor of PICA), virgin and furnace-charred PICA. Several small samples were tested inside an electron microscope to investigate the failure mechanisms. Micrographs were obtained before and after the failure in order to study crack initiation and growth. Videos were obtained to capture failure mechanisms in real time. Stress-strain data was obtained simultaneously for all the samples with the help of a data acquisition system, integrated to the mechanical stages. It was found that cracks initiated and grew in the FiberForm when a critical stress limit was reached such that the carbon fibers separated from the binder. However, both for virgin and charred PICA, crack initiation and growth occurred in the matrix (phenolic) phase. Both virgin and charred PICA showed greater strength values compared to FiberForm coupons, confirming that the presence of the porous matrix helps in absorbing the fracture energy.

  19. Magnetic shielding

    DOEpatents

    Kerns, J.A.; Stone, R.R.; Fabyan, J.

    1985-02-12

    A magnetically-conductive filler material bridges the gap between a multi-part magnetic shield structure which substantially encloses a predetermined volume so as to minimize the ingress or egress of magnetic fields with respect to that volume. The filler material includes a heavy concentration of single-magnetic-domain-sized particles of a magnetically conductive material (e.g. soft iron, carbon steel or the like) dispersed throughout a carrier material which is generally a non-magnetic material that is at least sometimes in a plastic or liquid state. The maximum cross-sectional particle dimension is substantially less than the nominal dimension of the gap to be filled. An epoxy base material (i.e. without any hardening additive) low volatility vacuum greases or the like may be used for the carrier material. The structure is preferably exposed to the expected ambient field while the carrier is in a plastic or liquid state so as to facilitate alignment of the single-magnetic-domain-sized particles with the expected magnetic field lines.

  20. Magnetic shielding

    DOEpatents

    Kerns, J.A.; Stone, R.R.; Fabyan, J.

    1987-10-06

    A magnetically-conductive filler material bridges the gap between a multi-part magnetic shield structure which substantially encloses a predetermined volume so as to minimize the ingress or egress of magnetic fields with respect to that volume. The filler material includes a heavy concentration of single-magnetic-domain-sized particles of a magnetically conductive material (e.g. soft iron, carbon steel or the like) dispersed throughout a carrier material which is generally a non-magnetic material that is at least sometimes in a plastic or liquid state. The maximum cross-sectional particle dimension is substantially less than the nominal dimension of the gap to be filled. An epoxy base material (i.e. without any hardening additive) low volatility vacuum greases or the like may be used for the carrier material. The structure is preferably exposed to the expected ambient magnetic field while the carrier is in a plastic or liquid state so as to facilitate alignment of the single-magnetic-domain-sized particles with the expected magnetic field lines. 3 figs.

  1. Magnetic shielding

    DOEpatents

    Kerns, John A.; Stone, Roger R.; Fabyan, Joseph

    1987-01-01

    A magnetically-conductive filler material bridges the gap between a multi-part magnetic shield structure which substantially encloses a predetermined volume so as to minimize the ingress or egress of magnetic fields with respect to that volume. The filler material includes a heavy concentration of single-magnetic-domain-sized particles of a magnetically conductive material (e.g. soft iron, carbon steel or the like) dispersed throughout a carrier material which is generally a non-magnetic material that is at least sometimes in a plastic or liquid state. The maximum cross-sectional particle dimension is substantially less than the nominal dimension of the gap to be filled. An epoxy base material (i.e. without any hardening additive) low volatility vacuum greases or the like may be used for the carrier material. The structure is preferably exposed to the expected ambient magnetic field while the carrier is in a plastic or liquid state so as to facilitate alignment of the single-magnetic-domain-sized particles with the expected magnetic field lines.

  2. Prompt response and durability of polymer ablation from synthetic fibers irradiated by thermal plasmas for arc resistant clothes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Masahiro; Shinsei, Naoki; Tanaka, Yasunori; Uesugi, Yoshihiko; Ishijima, Tatsuo; Mio, Wataru; Hagi, Hiroyasu; Uchibori, Keita

    2013-06-01

    Interactions between thermal plasmas and synthetic fibers such as polyamide, polyester, phenol and aramid were investigated by thermal plasma irradiation technique. Understanding the above interactions is crucial to design effective flame retardant synthetic fiber clothes with arc resistance to protect a human from arc flash accidents. To investigate the interactions, an Ar inductively coupled thermal plasma (ICTP) was used instead of the arc discharge because the ICTP has high controllability and no contamination. The ICTP irradiation raises polymer ablation in case of polyamide and polyester. Two features of the polymer ablation such as prompt response and durability were fundamentally investigated from viewpoint of shielding the heat flux. It was found that polyamide fiber has both a high prompt response and a long durability.

  3. Advanced Multifunctional MMOD Shield: Radiation Shielding Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rojdev, Kristina; Christiansen, Eric

    2011-01-01

    As NASA is looking to explore further into deep space, multifunctional materials are a necessity for decreasing complexity and mass. One area where multifunctional materials could be extremely beneficial is in the micrometeoroid orbital debris (MMOD) shield. A typical MMOD shield on the International Space Station (ISS) is a stuffed whipple shield consisting of multiple layers. One of those layers is the thermal blanket, or multi-layer insulation (MLI). By increasing the MMOD effectiveness of MLI blankets, while still preserving their thermal capabilities, could allow for a less massive MMOD shield. Thus, a study was conducted to evaluate concept MLI blankets for MMOD shields. In conjunction, these MLI blankets and the subsequent MMOD shields were also evaluated for their radiation shielding effectiveness towards protecting crew. These concepts were evaluated against the ISS MLI blankets and the ISS MMOD shield, which acted as the baseline. These radiation shielding assessments were performed using the high charge and energy transport software (HZETRN). This software is based on a one-dimensional formula of the Boltzmann transport equation with a straight-ahead approximation. Each configuration was evaluated against the following environments to provide a diverse view of radiation shielding effectiveness in most space environments within the heliosphere: August 1972 solar particle event, October 1989 solar particle event, 1982 galactic cosmic ray environment (during solar maximum), 1987 galactic cosmic ray environment (during solar minimum), and a low earth orbit environment in 1970 that corresponded to an altitude of 400 km and inclination of 51.6 . Both the absorbed dose and the dose equivalent were analyzed, but the focus of the discussion was on the dose equivalent since the data is most concerned with radiation shielding of the crew. The following paper outlines the evaluations performed and discusses the results and conclusions of this evaluation for

  4. Space reactor shielding fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, F. H.

    1972-01-01

    The fabrication of space reactor neutron shielding by a melting and casting process utilizing lithium hydride is described. The first neutron shield fabricated is a large pancake shape 86 inches in diameter, containing about 1700 pounds of lithium hydride. This shield, fabricated by the unique melting and casting process, is the largest lithium hydride shield ever built.

  5. Laser ablation of human tooth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franklin, Sushmita R.; Chauhan, P.; Mitra, A.; Thareja, R. K.

    2005-05-01

    We report the measurements of ablation threshold of human tooth in air using photo-thermal deflection technique. A third harmonic (355nm) of Nd:YAG (yttrium aluminum garnet) laser was used for irradiation and a low power helium neon laser as a probe beam. The experimental observations of ablation threshold in conjunction with theoretical model based on heat conduction equations for simulating the interaction of a laser radiation with a calcified tissue are used to estimate the absorption coefficient of human tooth.

  6. Advanced Multifunctional MMOD Shield: Radiation Shielding Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rojdev, Kristina; Christiansen, Eric

    2013-01-01

    As NASA is looking to explore further into deep space, multifunctional materials are a necessity for decreasing complexity and mass. One area where multifunctional materials could be extremely beneficial is in the micrometeoroid orbital debris (MMOD) shield. A typical MMOD shield on the International Space Station (ISS) is a stuffed whipple shield consisting of multiple layers. One of those layers is the thermal blanket, or multi-layer insulation (MLI). Increasing the MMOD effectiveness of MLI blankets, while still preserving their thermal capabilities, could allow for a less massive MMOD shield. Thus, a study was conducted to evaluate a concept MLI blanket for an MMOD shield. In conjunction, this MLI blanket and the subsequent MMOD shield was also evaluated for its radiation shielding effectiveness towards protecting crew. The overall MMOD shielding system using the concept MLI blanket proved to only have a marginal increase in the radiation mitigating properties. Therefore, subsequent analysis was performed on various conceptual MMOD shields to determine the combination of materials that may prove superior for radiation mitigating purposes. The following paper outlines the evaluations performed and discusses the results and conclusions of this evaluation for radiation shielding effectiveness.

  7. Thermal response and ablation characteristics of lightweight ceramic ablators

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, H.K.; Rasky, D.J.; Esfahani, L.

    1994-11-01

    This paper presents the thermal performance and ablation characteristics of the newly developed lightweight ceramic ablators (LCAs) in a supersonic, high-enthalpy convective environment. Lightweight ceramic ablators were recently conceived and developed at NASA Ames using low-density ceramic or carbon fibrous matrices as substrates for main structural support and organic resins as fillers. These LCAs were successfully produced with densities ranging from approximately 0.224 to 1.282 g/cu cm. Several infiltrants with different char yields were used to study the effect on surface recession. Tests were conducted in the NASA Ames arc-jet facilities. Material thermal performance was evaluated at cold-wall heat fluxes from 113.5 to 1634 W/sq cm, and stagnation pressures of 0.018 to 0.331 atm. Conventional ablators such as SLA-561, Avcoat 5026-39HC, MA-25S, and balsa wood were tested at the same heat fluxes for direct comparison. Surface temperature was measured using optical pyrometers, and the recession rates were obtained from the high-speed films. In-depth temperature data were obtained to determine the thermal penetration depths and conductivity. Preliminary results indicated that most LCAs performed comparably to or better than conventional ablators. At low flux levels (less than 454 W/sq cm), the addition of silicon carbide and polymethyl methacrylate significantly improved the ablation performance of silica substrates. The carbon-based LCAs were the most mass-efficient at high flux levels (greater than 454 W/sq cm). 16 refs.

  8. Design of a substrate heater for calcium hydroxyapatite coating by pulsed laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, T.; Havstad, M.A.

    1995-07-24

    Calcium hydroxyapatite (HA) is the main chemical constituent of bone. When replacement hip joints are coated with this chemical, the body may be more likely to accept the artificial joint, forming new bone that bonds the joint to the original leg bone. HA deposited by laser ablation in vacuum adheres to the substrate better at high temperatures of up to 700 C. This heater should be capable of uniformly heating to 700 C a silicon disk 150 mm in diameter. The heater consists of two wire heating coils brazed into a disk of stainless steel, with tantalum shields on top and at the sides of the heater to minimize radiation loss. Three spring-rotation clamps at the bottom of the heater hold the substrate disk in place. This report describes the heater and how it was developed, including design evolution and thermal modeling. Also, detailed information about parts is discussed.

  9. Fragmentation and ablation during entry

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1997-09-01

    This note discusses objects that both fragment and ablate during entry, using the results of previous reports to describe the velocity, pressure, and fragmentation of entering objects. It shows that the mechanisms used there to describe the breakup of non-ablating objects during deceleration remain valid for most ablating objects. It treats coupled fragmentation and ablation during entry, building on earlier models that separately discuss the entry of objects that are hard, whose high heat of ablation permits little erosion, and those who are strong whose strength prevents fragmentation, which are discussed in ``Radiation from Hard Objects,`` ``Deceleration and Radiation of Strong, Hard, Asteroids During Atmospheric Impact,`` and ``Meteor Signature Interpretation.`` This note provides a more detailed treatment of the further breakup and separation of fragments during descent. It replaces the constraint on mass per unit area used earlier to determine the altitude and magnitude of peak power radiation with a detailed analytic solution of deceleration. Model predictions are shown to be in agreement with the key features of numerical calculations of deceleration. The model equations are solved for the altitudes of maximum radiation, which agree with numerical integrations. The model is inverted analytically to infer object size and speed from measurements of peak power and altitude to provide a complete model for the approximate inversion of meteor data.

  10. Radiation Shielding Design and Orientation Considerations for a 1 kWe Heat Pipe Cooled Reactor Utilized to Bore Through the Ice Caps of Mars

    SciTech Connect

    Fensin, Michael L.; Elliott, John O.; Lipinski, Ronald J.; Poston, David I.

    2006-01-20

    The goal in designing any space power system is to develop a system able to meet the mission requirements for success while minimizing the overall costs. The mission requirements for the this study was to develop a reactor (with Stirling engine power conversion) and shielding configuration able to fit, along with all the other necessary science equipment, in a Cryobot 3 m high with {approx}0.5 m diameter hull, produce 1 kWe for 5yrs, and not adversely affect the mission science by keeping the total integrated dose to the science equipment below 150 krad. Since in most space power missions the overall system mass dictates the mission cost, the shielding designs in this study incorporated Martian water extracted at the startup site in order to minimize the tungsten and LiH mass loading at launch. Different reliability and mass minimization concerns led to three design configuration evolutions. With the help of implementing Martian water and configuring the reactor as far from the science equipment as possible, the needed tungsten and LiH shield mass was minimized. This study further characterizes the startup dose and the necessary mission requirements in order to ensure integrity of the surface equipment during reactor startup phase.

  11. Smart window coating based on F-TiO2-KxWO3 nanocomposites with heat shielding, ultraviolet isolating, hydrophilic and photocatalytic performance

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tongyao; Liu, Bin; Wang, Jing; Yang, Linfen; Ma, Xinlong; Li, Hao; Zhang, Yihong; Yin, Shu; Sato, Tsugio; Sekino, Tohru; Wang, Yuhua

    2016-01-01

    A series of smart window coated multifunctional NIR shielding-photocatalytic films were fabricated successfully through KxWO3 and F-TiO2 in a low-cost and environmentally friendly process. Based on the synergistic effect of KxWO3 and F-TiO2, the optimal proportion of KxWO3 to F-TiO2 was investigated and the FT/2KWO nanocomposite film exhibited strong near-infrared, ultraviolet light shielding ability, good visible light transmittance, high photocatalytic activity and excellent hydrophilic capacity. This film exhibited better thermal insulation capacity than ITO and higher photocatalytic activity than P25. Meanwhile, the excellent stability of this film was examined by the cycle photocatalytic degradation and thermal insulation experiments. Overall, this work is expected to provide a possibility in integrating KxWO3 with F-TiO2, so as to obtain a multifunctional NIR shielding-photocatalytic nanocomposite film in helping solve the energy crisis and deteriorating environmental issues. PMID:27265778

  12. Smart window coating based on F-TiO2-KxWO3 nanocomposites with heat shielding, ultraviolet isolating, hydrophilic and photocatalytic performance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tongyao; Liu, Bin; Wang, Jing; Yang, Linfen; Ma, Xinlong; Li, Hao; Zhang, Yihong; Yin, Shu; Sato, Tsugio; Sekino, Tohru; Wang, Yuhua

    2016-01-01

    A series of smart window coated multifunctional NIR shielding-photocatalytic films were fabricated successfully through KxWO3 and F-TiO2 in a low-cost and environmentally friendly process. Based on the synergistic effect of KxWO3 and F-TiO2, the optimal proportion of KxWO3 to F-TiO2 was investigated and the FT/2KWO nanocomposite film exhibited strong near-infrared, ultraviolet light shielding ability, good visible light transmittance, high photocatalytic activity and excellent hydrophilic capacity. This film exhibited better thermal insulation capacity than ITO and higher photocatalytic activity than P25. Meanwhile, the excellent stability of this film was examined by the cycle photocatalytic degradation and thermal insulation experiments. Overall, this work is expected to provide a possibility in integrating KxWO3 with F-TiO2, so as to obtain a multifunctional NIR shielding-photocatalytic nanocomposite film in helping solve the energy crisis and deteriorating environmental issues. PMID:27265778

  13. Smart window coating based on F-TiO2-KxWO3 nanocomposites with heat shielding, ultraviolet isolating, hydrophilic and photocatalytic performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tongyao; Liu, Bin; Wang, Jing; Yang, Linfen; Ma, Xinlong; Li, Hao; Zhang, Yihong; Yin, Shu; Sato, Tsugio; Sekino, Tohru; Wang, Yuhua

    2016-06-01

    A series of smart window coated multifunctional NIR shielding-photocatalytic films were fabricated successfully through KxWO3 and F-TiO2 in a low-cost and environmentally friendly process. Based on the synergistic effect of KxWO3 and F-TiO2, the optimal proportion of KxWO3 to F-TiO2 was investigated and the FT/2KWO nanocomposite film exhibited strong near-infrared, ultraviolet light shielding ability, good visible light transmittance, high photocatalytic activity and excellent hydrophilic capacity. This film exhibited better thermal insulation capacity than ITO and higher photocatalytic activity than P25. Meanwhile, the excellent stability of this film was examined by the cycle photocatalytic degradation and thermal insulation experiments. Overall, this work is expected to provide a possibility in integrating KxWO3 with F-TiO2, so as to obtain a multifunctional NIR shielding-photocatalytic nanocomposite film in helping solve the energy crisis and deteriorating environmental issues.

  14. Radiation Shielding Design and Orientation Considerations for a 1 kWe Heat Pipe Cooled Reactor Utilized to Bore Through the Ice Caps of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fensin, Michael L.; Elliott, John O.; Lipinski, Ronald J.; Poston, David I.

    2006-01-01

    The goal in designing any space power system is to develop a system able to meet the mission requirements for success while minimizing the overall costs. The mission requirements for the this study was to develop a reactor (with Stirling engine power conversion) and shielding configuration able to fit, along with all the other necessary science equipment, in a Cryobot 3 m high with ~0.5 m diameter hull, produce 1 kWe for 5yrs, and not adversely affect the mission science by keeping the total integrated dose to the science equipment below 150 krad. Since in most space power missions the overall system mass dictates the mission cost, the shielding designs in this study incorporated Martian water extracted at the startup site in order to minimize the tungsten and LiH mass loading at launch. Different reliability and mass minimization concerns led to three design configuration evolutions. With the help of implementing Martian water and configuring the reactor as far from the science equipment as possible, the needed tungsten and LiH shield mass was minimized. This study further characterizes the startup dose and the necessary mission requirements in order to ensure integrity of the surface equipment during reactor startup phase.

  15. Meteoroid/Debris Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, Eric L.

    2003-01-01

    This report provides innovative, low-weight shielding solutions for spacecraft and the ballistic limit equations that define the shield's performance in the meteoroid/debris environment. Analyses and hypervelocity impact testing results are described that have been used in developing the shields and equations. Spacecraft shielding design and operational practices described in this report are used to provide effective spacecraft protection from meteoroid and debris impacts. Specific shield applications for the International Space Station (ISS), Space Shuttle Orbiter and the CONTOUR (Comet Nucleus Tour) space probe are provided. Whipple, Multi-Shock and Stuffed Whipple shield applications are described.

  16. Photochemical Ablation of Organic Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrison, Barbara

    2004-03-01

    As discovered by Srinivasan in 1982, irradiation of materials by far UV laser light can lead to photochemical ablation, a process distinct from normal thermal ablation in which the laser primarily heats the material. A versatile mesoscopic model for molecular dynamics simulations of the laser ablation phenomena is presented. The model incorporates both the thermal and photochemical events, that is, both heating of the system and UV induced bond-cleavage followed by abstraction and radical-radical recombination reactions. The results from the simulations are compared to experimental data and the basic physics and chemistry for each irradiation regime are discussed. Initial results from polymer ablation simulations will be presented. L. V. Zhigilei, P. B. S. Kodali and B. J. Garrison, J. Phys. Chem. B, 102, 2845-2853 (1998); L. V. Zhigilei and B. J. Garrison, Journal of Applied Physics, 88, 1281-1298 (2000). Y. G. Yingling, L. V. Zhigilei and B. J. Garrison, J. Photochemistry and Photobiology A: Chemistry, 145, 173-181 (2001); Y. G. Yingling and B. J. Garrison, Chem. Phys. Lett., 364, 237-243 (2002).

  17. Modeling Ablation of Fibrous Materials from Bulk to Knudsen Regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lachaud, Jean; Mansour, Nagi N.

    2008-01-01

    Material-environment interactions are analyzed at microscopic scale to explain the lower than expected density observed by post-flight analysis of the char layer on the Stardust shield. Mass transfer, ablation (oxidation), and surface recession of fibrous material is simulated in 3D using a Monte-Carlo simulation tool. Ablation is found to occur either at the surface or in volume depending on Knudsen and Thiele number values. This study supports the idea of volume ablation followed by possible carbon fiber spallation that may explain post-flight analyses.

  18. Emission Spectroscopic Boundary Layer Investigation during Ablative Material Testing in Plasmatron

    PubMed Central

    Helber, Bernd; Chazot, Olivier; Hubin, Annick; Magin, Thierry E.

    2016-01-01

    Ablative Thermal Protection Systems (TPS) allowed the first humans to safely return to Earth from the moon and are still considered as the only solution for future high-speed reentry missions. But despite the advancements made since Apollo, heat flux prediction remains an imperfect science and engineers resort to safety factors to determine the TPS thickness. This goes at the expense of embarked payload, hampering, for example, sample return missions. Ground testing in plasma wind-tunnels is currently the only affordable possibility for both material qualification and validation of material response codes. The subsonic 1.2MW Inductively Coupled Plasmatron facility at the von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics is able to reproduce a wide range of reentry environments. This protocol describes a procedure for the study of the gas/surface interaction on ablative materials in high enthalpy flows and presents sample results of a non-pyrolyzing, ablating carbon fiber precursor. With this publication, the authors envisage the definition of a standard procedure, facilitating comparison with other laboratories and contributing to ongoing efforts to improve heat shield reliability and reduce design uncertainties. The described core techniques are non-intrusive methods to track the material recession with a high-speed camera along with the chemistry in the reactive boundary layer, probed by emission spectroscopy. Although optical emission spectroscopy is limited to line-of-sight measurements and is further constrained to electronically excited atoms and molecules, its simplicity and broad applicability still make it the technique of choice for analysis of the reactive boundary layer. Recession of the ablating sample further requires that the distance of the measurement location with respect to the surface is known at all times during the experiment. Calibration of the optical system of the applied three spectrometers allowed quantitative comparison. At the fiber scale

  19. The absorption and radiation of a tungsten plasma plume during nanosecond laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Moscicki, T. Hoffman, J.; Chrzanowska, J.

    2015-10-15

    In this paper, the effect of absorption of the laser beam and subsequent radiation on the dynamics of a tungsten plasma plume during pulsed laser ablation is analyzed. Different laser wavelengths are taken into consideration. The absorption and emission coefficients of tungsten plasma in a pressure range of 0.1–100 MPa and temperature up to 70 000 K are presented. The shielding effects due to the absorption and radiation of plasma may have an impact on the course of ablation. The numerical model that describes the tungsten target heating and the formation of the plasma and its expansion were made for 355 nm and 1064 nm wavelengths of a Nd:YAG laser. The laser beam with a Gaussian profile was focused to a spot size of 0.055 mm{sup 2} with a power density of 1 × 10{sup 9 }W/cm{sup 2} (10 ns full width half maximum pulse duration). The plasma expands into air at ambient pressure of 1 mPa. The use of the shorter wavelength causes faster heating of the target, thus the higher ablation rate. The consequences of a higher ablation rate are slower expansion and smaller dimensions of the plasma plume. The higher plasma temperature in the case of 1064 nm is due to the lower density and lower plasma radiation. In the initial phase of propagation of the plasma plume, when both the temperature and pressure are very high, the dominant radiation is emission due to photo-recombination. However, for a 1064 nm laser wavelength after 100 ns of plasma expansion, the radiation of the spectral lines is up to 46.5% of the total plasma radiation and should not be neglected.

  20. Emission Spectroscopic Boundary Layer Investigation during Ablative Material Testing in Plasmatron.

    PubMed

    Helber, Bernd; Chazot, Olivier; Hubin, Annick; Magin, Thierry E

    2016-01-01

    Ablative Thermal Protection Systems (TPS) allowed the first humans to safely return to Earth from the moon and are still considered as the only solution for future high-speed reentry missions. But despite the advancements made since Apollo, heat flux prediction remains an imperfect science and engineers resort to safety factors to determine the TPS thickness. This goes at the expense of embarked payload, hampering, for example, sample return missions. Ground testing in plasma wind-tunnels is currently the only affordable possibility for both material qualification and validation of material response codes. The subsonic 1.2MW Inductively Coupled Plasmatron facility at the von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics is able to reproduce a wide range of reentry environments. This protocol describes a procedure for the study of the gas/surface interaction on ablative materials in high enthalpy flows and presents sample results of a non-pyrolyzing, ablating carbon fiber precursor. With this publication, the authors envisage the definition of a standard procedure, facilitating comparison with other laboratories and contributing to ongoing efforts to improve heat shield reliability and reduce design uncertainties. The described core techniques are non-intrusive methods to track the material recession with a high-speed camera along with the chemistry in the reactive boundary layer, probed by emission spectroscopy. Although optical emission spectroscopy is limited to line-of-sight measurements and is further constrained to electronically excited atoms and molecules, its simplicity and broad applicability still make it the technique of choice for analysis of the reactive boundary layer. Recession of the ablating sample further requires that the distance of the measurement location with respect to the surface is known at all times during the experiment. Calibration of the optical system of the applied three spectrometers allowed quantitative comparison. At the fiber scale

  1. Analysis of electromagnetic scattering characteristics for a HTV-2 type flight vehicle ablation flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Chun; Nie, Liang; Chen, Weifang

    2014-12-01

    This paper describes the methodology for computing hypersonic flight vehicle electromagnetic scattering characteristics under condition of thermochemical nonequilibrium ablation flow using Maxwell Equations and Navier-Stokes Equations. Some previous work has been report by Bhaskar et al. (2005) for calculating microwave scattering from metallic objects shielded by a plasma shroud and by Chen et al. (2005) for predicting charring material ablation and shape change on hypersonic reentry vehicles. For obtaining the flow field parameters especially thermochemical nonequilibrium ablation flow components, 13 species 34 reactions chemical reaction model and heat conduction model were utilized for flow field and structure temperature field simulation respectively. In consideration of rarefied effect, Slip boundary condition was also used in the process of solving N-S Equations. Based on the flow field results, a piecewise linear current density recursive convolution finite-difference time-domain (PLJERC-FDTD) algorithm was applied to calculate backward Radar Cross-Section (RCS) and bistatic RCS in P&L-band. Through above methods, the electromagnetic scattering characteristics of a HTV-2 type vehicle wrapped in carbon based material were studied.

  2. Testing the bioelectric shield.

    PubMed

    Blackmore, Susan J; Rose, Nicholas

    2002-01-01

    A pendant was claimed to provide numerous health benefits, including reduced stress, increased strength, and protection from electromagnetic radiation from computers and mobile phones. Three experiments tested the effectiveness of this pendant's effect as a bioelectric shield. In the first experiment, 12 subjects who work with computers wore shields (6 real, 6 sham) for several weeks and were regularly tested for hand strength and mood changes. Both types of shield increased calmness, but the real shields did not have any greater effect. In 2 further studies (in each N=40) hand strength was measured at baseline, with mobile phone, and with mobile phone and bioelectric or sham shield. The shields did not differ in their effects. Both studies showed a significant correlation between the change in strength with and without the shield and subjects'scores on a questionnaire concerning their belief in and use of alternative therapies. The shields appear to produce a measurable placebo effect but are otherwise ineffective. PMID:12233804

  3. Integrated Solar Concentrator and Shielded Radiator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, David Larry

    2010-01-01

    A shielded radiator is integrated within a solar concentrator for applications that require protection from high ambient temperatures with little convective heat transfer. This innovation uses a reflective surface to deflect ambient thermal radiation, shielding the radiator. The interior of the shield is also reflective to provide a view factor to deep space. A key feature of the shield is the parabolic shape that focuses incoming solar radiation to a line above the radiator along the length of the trough. This keeps the solar energy from adding to the radiator load. By placing solar cells along this focal line, the concentration of solar energy reduces the number and mass of required cells. By shielding the radiator, the effective reject temperature is much lower, allowing lower radiator temperatures. This is particularly important for lower-temperature processes, like habitat heat rejection and fuel cell operations where a high radiator temperature is not feasible. Adding the solar cells in the focal line uses the concentrating effect of the shield to advantage to accomplish two processes with a single device. This shield can be a deployable, lightweight Mylar structure for compact transport.

  4. Effect of oxygen barrier coatings on oxidation and embrittlement of Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo foil in heat shield applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, R. K.; Unnam, J.; Wiedemann, K. E.

    1986-01-01

    Because of the loss of ductility with exposure to oxidizing conditions, long time applications of titanium alloys have been limited to temperatures below 700 K and short time applications have been limited to temperatures below 815 K. Oxygen barrier coatings for shielding Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo alloy from oxidation during exposure to high temperatures were studied using foil gage specimens. The coatings included micrometer-thick sputtered SiO2 and chemical-vapor-deposited silicate layers both with and without an aluminum basecoat. The oxidation rates and resistance to embrittlement of the coated specimens were significantly better than those of the uncoated specimens.

  5. Radiofrequency ablation during continuous saline infusion can extend ablation margins

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Toru; Kubota, Tomoyuki; Horigome, Ryoko; Kimura, Naruhiro; Honda, Hiroki; Iwanaga, Akito; Seki, Keiichi; Honma, Terasu; Yoshida, Toshiaki

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether fluid injection during radiofrequency ablation (RFA) can increase the coagulation area. METHODS: Bovine liver (1-2 kg) was placed on an aluminum tray with a return electrode affixed to the base, and the liver was punctured by an expandable electrode. During RFA, 5% glucose; 50% glucose; or saline fluid was infused continuously at a rate of 1.0 mL/min through the infusion line connected to the infusion port. The area and volume of the thermocoagulated region of bovine liver were determined after RFA. The Joule heat generated was determined from the temporal change in output during the RFA experiment. RESULTS: No liquid infusion was 17.3 ± 1.6 mL, similar to the volume of a 3-cm diameter sphere (14.1 mL). Mean thermocoagulated volume was significantly larger with continuous infusion of saline (29.3 ± 3.3 mL) than with 5% glucose (21.4 ± 2.2 mL), 50% glucose (16.5 ± 0.9 mL) or no liquid infusion (17.3 ± 1.6 mL). The ablated volume for RFA with saline was approximately 1.7-times greater than for RFA with no liquid infusion, representing a significant difference between these two conditions. Total Joule heat generated during RFA was highest with saline, and lowest with 50% glucose. CONCLUSION: RFA with continuous saline infusion achieves a large ablation zone, and may help inhibit local recurrence by obtaining sufficient ablation margins. RFA during continuous saline infusion can extend ablation margins, and may be prevent local recurrence. PMID:23483097

  6. NEUTRONIC REACTOR SHIELD

    DOEpatents

    Fermi, E.; Zinn, W.H.

    1957-09-24

    The reactor radiation shield material is comprised of alternate layers of iron-containing material and compressed cellulosic material, such as masonite. The shielding material may be prefabricated in the form of blocks, which can be stacked together in ary desired fashion to form an effective shield.

  7. Microwave ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Poggi, Guido; Tosoratti, Nevio; Montagna, Benedetta; Picchi, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    Although surgical resection is still the optimal treatment option for early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients with well compensated cirrhosis, thermal ablation techniques provide a valid non-surgical treatment alternative, thanks to their minimal invasiveness, excellent tolerability and safety profile, proven efficacy in local disease control, virtually unlimited repeatability and cost-effectiveness. Different energy sources are currently employed in clinics as physical agents for percutaneous or intra-surgical thermal ablation of HCC nodules. Among them, radiofrequency (RF) currents are the most used, while microwave ablations (MWA) are becoming increasingly popular. Starting from the 90s’, RF ablation (RFA) rapidly became the standard of care in ablation, especially in the treatment of small HCC nodules; however, RFA exhibits substantial performance limitations in the treatment of large lesions and/or tumors located near major heat sinks. MWA, first introduced in the Far Eastern clinical practice in the 80s’, showing promising results but also severe limitations in the controllability of the emitted field and in the high amount of power employed for the ablation of large tumors, resulting in a poor coagulative performance and a relatively high complication rate, nowadays shows better results both in terms of treatment controllability and of overall coagulative performance, thanks to the improvement of technology. In this review we provide an extensive and detailed overview of the key physical and technical aspects of MWA and of the currently available systems, and we want to discuss the most relevant published data on MWA treatments of HCC nodules in regard to clinical results and to the type and rate of complications, both in absolute terms and in comparison with RFA. PMID:26557950

  8. Surgical Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Ramlawi, Basel; Abu Saleh, Walid K

    2015-01-01

    The Cox-maze procedure for the restoration of normal sinus rhythm, initially developed by Dr. James Cox, underwent several iterations over the years. The main concept consists of creating a series of transmural lesions in the right and left atria that disrupt re-entrant circuits responsible for propagating the abnormal atrial fibrillation rhythm. The left atrial appendage is excluded as a component of the Maze procedure. For the first three iterations of the Cox- maze procedure, these lesions were performed using a surgical cut-and-sew approach that ensured transmurality. The Cox-Maze IV is the most currently accepted iteration. It achieves the same lesion set of the Cox- maze III but uses alternative energy sources to create the transmural lesions, potentially in a minimally invasive approach on the beating heart. High-frequency ultrasound, microwave, and laser energy have all been used with varying success in the past. Today, bipolar radiofrequency heat or cryotherapy cooling are the most accepted sources for creating linear lesions with consistent safety and transmurality. The robust and reliable nature of these energy delivery methods has yielded a success rate reaching 90% freedom from atrial fibrillation at 12 months. Such approaches offer a significant long-term advantage over catheter-based ablation, especially in patients having longstanding, persistent atrial fibrillation with characteristics such as dilated left atrial dimensions, poor ejection fraction, and failed catheter ablation. Based on these improved results, there currently is significant interest in developing a hybrid ablation strategy that incorporates the superior transmural robust lesions of surgical ablation, the reliable stroke prevention potential of epicardial left atrial appendage exclusion, and sophisticated mapping and confirmatory catheter-based ablation technology. Such a minimally invasive hybrid strategy for ablation may lead to the development of multidisciplinary "Afib teams" to

  9. Microwave ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Poggi, Guido; Tosoratti, Nevio; Montagna, Benedetta; Picchi, Chiara

    2015-11-01

    Although surgical resection is still the optimal treatment option for early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients with well compensated cirrhosis, thermal ablation techniques provide a valid non-surgical treatment alternative, thanks to their minimal invasiveness, excellent tolerability and safety profile, proven efficacy in local disease control, virtually unlimited repeatability and cost-effectiveness. Different energy sources are currently employed in clinics as physical agents for percutaneous or intra-surgical thermal ablation of HCC nodules. Among them, radiofrequency (RF) currents are the most used, while microwave ablations (MWA) are becoming increasingly popular. Starting from the 90s', RF ablation (RFA) rapidly became the standard of care in ablation, especially in the treatment of small HCC nodules; however, RFA exhibits substantial performance limitations in the treatment of large lesions and/or tumors located near major heat sinks. MWA, first introduced in the Far Eastern clinical practice in the 80s', showing promising results but also severe limitations in the controllability of the emitted field and in the high amount of power employed for the ablation of large tumors, resulting in a poor coagulative performance and a relatively high complication rate, nowadays shows better results both in terms of treatment controllability and of overall coagulative performance, thanks to the improvement of technology. In this review we provide an extensive and detailed overview of the key physical and technical aspects of MWA and of the currently available systems, and we want to discuss the most relevant published data on MWA treatments of HCC nodules in regard to clinical results and to the type and rate of complications, both in absolute terms and in comparison with RFA. PMID:26557950

  10. Gravity Scaling of a Power Reactor Water Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Robert S.; Pearson, J. Boise

    2008-01-01

    Water based reactor shielding is being considered as an affordable option for use on initial lunar surface power systems. Heat dissipation in the shield from nuclear sources must be rejected by an auxiliary thermal hydraulic cooling system. The mechanism for transferring heat through the shield is natural convection between the core surface and an array of thermosyphon radiator elements. Natural convection in a 100 kWt lunar surface reactor shield design has been previously evaluated at lower power levels (Pearson, 2007). The current baseline assumes that 5.5 kW are dissipated in the water shield, the preponderance on the core surface, but with some volumetric heating in the naturally circulating water as well. This power is rejected by a radiator located above the shield with a surface temperature of 370 K. A similarity analysis on a water-based reactor shield is presented examining the effect of gravity on free convection between a radiation shield inner vessel and a radiation shield outer vessel boundaries. Two approaches established similarity: 1) direct scaling of Rayleigh number equates gravity-surface heat flux products, 2) temperature difference between the wall and thermal boundary layer held constant on Earth and the Moon. Nussult number for natural convection (laminar and turbulent) is assumed of form Nu = CRa(sup n). These combined results estimate similarity conditions under Earth and Lunar gravities. The influence of reduced gravity on the performance of thermosyphon heat pipes is also examined.

  11. Gravity Scaling of a Power Reactor Water Shield

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, Robert S.; Pearson, J. Boise

    2008-01-21

    Water based reactor shielding is being considered as an affordable option for potential use on initial lunar surface reactor power systems. Heat dissipation in the shield from nuclear sources must be rejected by an auxillary thermal hydraulic cooling system. The mechanism for transferring heat through the shield is natural convection between the core surface and an array of thermosyphon radiator elements. Natural convection in a 100 kWt lunar surface reactor shield design has been previously evaluated at lower power levels (Pearson, 2006). The current baseline assumes that 5.5 kW are dissipated in the water shield, the preponderance on the core surface, but with some volumetric heating in the naturally circulating water as well. This power is rejected by a radiator located above the shield with a surface temperature of 370 K. A similarity analysis on a water-based reactor shield is presented examining the effect of gravity on free convection between a radiation shield inner vessel and a radiation shield outer vessel boundaries. Two approaches established similarity: 1) direct scaling of Rayleigh number equates gravity-surface heat flux products, 2) temperature difference between the wall and thermal boundary layer held constant on Earth and the Moon. Nussult number for natural convection (laminar and turbulent) is assumed of form Nu = CRa{sup n}. These combined results estimate similarity conditions under Earth and Lunar gravities. The influence of reduced gravity on the performance of thermosyphon heat pipes is also examined.

  12. Rotating shielded crane system

    DOEpatents

    Commander, John C.

    1988-01-01

    A rotating, radiation shielded crane system for use in a high radiation test cell, comprises a radiation shielding wall, a cylindrical ceiling made of radiation shielding material and a rotatable crane disposed above the ceiling. The ceiling rests on an annular ledge intergrally attached to the inner surface of the shielding wall. Removable plugs in the ceiling provide access for the crane from the top of the ceiling into the test cell. A seal is provided at the interface between the inner surface of the shielding wall and the ceiling.

  13. Ion beam thruster shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Power, J. L. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An ion thruster beam shield is provided that comprises a cylindrical housing that extends downstream from the ion thruster and a plurality of annular vanes which are spaced along the length of the housing, and extend inwardly from the interior wall of the housing. The shield intercepts and stops all charge exchange and beam ions, neutral propellant, and sputter products formed due to the interaction of beam and shield emanating from the ion thruster outside of a fixed conical angle from the thruster axis. Further, the shield prevents the sputter products formed during the operation of the engine from escaping the interior volume of the shield.

  14. Photophysical ablation of porous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksenov, Valerii P.; Mikhailova, G. N.

    2004-07-01

    Laser ablation of porous silicon as a function of laser wavelength and width of silicon nanowires was studied in our experiments. The time-resolved evolution of the cloud of the porous silicon particles produced by laser ablation is studied in situ by the analysis of the kinetics of photoluminescence signal. The laser ablation of porous silicon produced by pulses of 532 nm or 337 nm radiation with addition of synchronized power pulses of 1064 nm radiation. The cloud of the nanometer-sized silicon crystallites had the high enhancement of luminescence quantum efficiency in the red region of spectra. The slow PL kinetics component, which is due to the localized carriers, decays on a millisecond time scale. The squeezed electron-hole plasma heating by IR-laser radiation may produce a damage of silicon nanowires. The fragments of nanowires in cloud must be smaller, than the critical length. The energy of excitation of e-h pair in fragment with contribution of longitude quantum modes must be lower than energy of the excited photons. Particles with lesser length don't absorb excited laser radiation and don't damage. For this case we may speak about the quantum mechanism of laser ablation of nanowires.

  15. CFD Analysis of Hypersonic Flowfields With Surface Thermochemistry and Ablation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henline, W. D.

    1997-01-01

    In the past forty years much progress has been made in computational methods applied to the solution of problems in spacecraft hypervelocity flow and heat transfer. Although the basic thermochemical and physical modeling techniques have changed little in this time, several orders of magnitude increase in the speed of numerically solving the Navier-Stokes and associated energy equations have been achieved. The extent to which this computational power can be applied to the design of spacecraft heat shields is dependent on the proper coupling of the external flow equations to the boundary conditions and governing equations representing the thermal protection system in-depth conduction, pyrolysis and surface ablation phenomena. A discussion of the techniques used to do this in past problems as well as the current state-of-art is provided. Specific examples, including past missions such as Galileo, together with the more recent case studies of ESA/Rosetta Sample Comet Return, Mars Pathfinder and X-33 will be discussed. Modeling assumptions, design approach and computational methods and results are presented.

  16. Microscreen radiation shield for thermoelectric generator

    DOEpatents

    Hunt, Thomas K.; Novak, Robert F.; McBride, James R.

    1990-01-01

    The present invention provides a microscreen radiation shield which reduces radiative heat losses in thermoelectric generators such as sodium heat engines without reducing the efficiency of operation of such devices. The radiation shield is adapted to be interposed between a reaction zone and a means for condensing an alkali metal vapor in a thermoelectric generator for converting heat energy directly to electrical energy. The radiation shield acts to reflect infrared radiation emanating from the reaction zone back toward the reaction zone while permitting the passage of the alkali metal vapor to the condensing means. The radiation shield includes a woven wire mesh screen or a metal foil having a plurality of orifices formed therein. The orifices in the foil and the spacing between the wires in the mesh is such that radiant heat is reflected back toward the reaction zone in the interior of the generator, while the much smaller diameter alkali metal atoms such as sodium pass directly through the orifices or along the metal surfaces of the shield and through the orifices with little or no impedance.

  17. Laser-ablation processes

    SciTech Connect

    Dingus, R.S.

    1992-01-01

    The various mechanisms by which ablation of materials can be induced with lasers are discussed in this paper. The various ablation processes and potential applications are reviewed from the threshold for ablation up to fluxes of about 10{sup 13} W/cm{sup 2}, with emphasis on three particular processes; namely, front-surface spallation, two-dimensional blowoff, and contained vaporization.

  18. Rarefaction after fast laser heating of thin metal film on a glass mount: spallation and inflation from one-dimensional to three-dimensional ablation flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inogamov, Nail; Khokhlov, Viktor; Petrov, Yury; Zhakhovsky, Vasily; Migdal, Kirill; Ilnitsky, Denis; Hasegawa, Noboru; Nishikino, Masaharu; Yamagiwa, Mitsuru; Ishino, Masahiko; Kawachi, Tetsuya; Faenov, Anatoly; Pikuz, Tatiana; Takayoshi, Shintaro; Eyama, Takashi; Kakimoto, Naoya; Tomita, Takuro; Baba, Motoyoshi; Minami, Yasuo; Suemoto, Tohru

    2015-06-01

    We numerically and experimentally consider the effect of subpicosecond Ti:sapp laser pump pulse onto 60-100 nm silver and gold films mounted onto a silica substrate. Pump pulse spalls out the film from the substrate. Influence of diameter of a laser irradiated spot 1-100 microns on a film surface is studied. A cupola like spallation shell is flying from the substrate. For the large spot the soft X-ray probe laser is used for measuring the ablation process. The research (NAI, VVZh, VAKh, DKI, YVP, KPM, AYF, TAP) has been performed under financial support from Russian Science Foundation (RSCF) (Project No. 14-19-01599).

  19. Laser ablation of blepharopigmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Tanenbaum, M.; Karas, S.; McCord, C.D. Jr. )

    1988-01-01

    This article discusses laser ablation of blepharopigmentation in four stages: first, experimentally, where pigment vaporization is readily achieved with the argon blue-green laser; second, in the rabbit animal model, where eyelid blepharopigmentation markings are ablated with the laser; third, in human subjects, where the argon blue-green laser is effective in the ablation of implanted eyelid pigment; and fourth, in a case report, where, in a patient with improper pigment placement in the eyelid, the laser is used to safely and effectively ablate the undesired pigment markings. This article describes in detail the new technique of laser ablation of blepharopigmentation. Potential complications associated with the technique are discussed.

  20. Documentation of the detailed radiation property data for the radiation-ablation code RASLE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henline, William D.

    1991-01-01

    This report is a documentation of the necessary radiation property input data for the radiating shock layer simulation code RASLE. The tabulated data are required to simulate systems which are composed of oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, hydrogen, and silicon. These data are needed to compute the flowfield effects of many practical ablative, hypersonic vehicle heat shield materials. A brief outline description is provided for the RASLE code. A more detailed discussion is provided for the RASLE code non-grey gas spectral radiation model. This model is related to the required radiation property data which are tabulated at the end of the report. Other correlations needed for the RASLE simulations are not discussed, since these are automatically included in the program and no input data are required.

  1. Boundary Layer Transition over Blunt Hypersonic Vehicles Including Effects of Ablation-Induced Out-Gassing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Fei; Choudhari, Meelan; Chang, Chau-Lyan; White, Jeffery

    2011-01-01

    Computations are performed to study the boundary layer instability mechanisms pertaining to hypersonic flow over blunt capsules. For capsules with ablative heat shields, transition may be influenced both by out-gassing associated with surface pyrolysis and the resulting modification of surface geometry including the formation of micro-roughness. To isolate the effects of out-gassing, this paper examines the stability of canonical boundary layer flows over a smooth surface in the presence of gas injection into the boundary layer. For a slender cone, the effects of out-gassing on the predominantly second mode instability are found to be stabilizing. In contrast, for a blunt capsule flow dominated by first mode instability, out-gassing is shown to be destabilizing. Analogous destabilizing effects of outgassing are also noted for both stationary and traveling modes of crossflow instability over a blunt sphere-cone configuration at angle of attack.

  2. Quantification and controllability study of minimally invasive exothermic chemo-ablation therapy for tumor ablation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ran; Huang, Yu; Liu, Jing

    2009-01-01

    The recently proposed exothermic chemical reaction based tumor hyperthermia method presented a new way of realizing truly minimally invasive treatment for tumor. This method utilizes heat generated from the reaction between acid and alkali solutions to allow for tumor ablation. Successful clinical implementation of this method requires a clearer understanding and quantification of the ablation area such that a more controllable operation can be made. A number of in-vitro and in-vivo experiments are designed to examine the features of thermal chemo-ablation therapy which include micro and macro characteristics of ablated tissue and temperature change during the ablation process. A Quantitative study on the relationship between velocity and ablation volume as well as a Graphical User Interface in Matlab for computerized ablation area analysis are also presented in this article. We present in here two instrument designs for thermal chemo-ablation and have completed the prototype design for the injection pump which has been tested and successfully applied in ex-vivo and vivo experiments. PMID:19963802

  3. Shield Design for Lunar Surface Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Gregory A.

    2006-01-20

    A shielding concept for lunar surface applications of nuclear power is presented herein. The reactor, primary shield, reactor equipment and power generation module are placed in a cavity in the lunar surface. Support structure and heat rejection radiator panels are on the surface, outside the cavity. The reactor power of 1,320 kWt was sized to deliver 50 kWe from a thermoelectric power conversion subsystem. The dose rate on the surface is less than 0.6 mRem/hr at 100 meters from the reactor. Unoptimized shield mass is 1,020 kg which is much lighter than a comparable 4{pi} shield weighing in at 17,000 kg.

  4. Thermal testing of solid neutron shielding materials

    SciTech Connect

    Boonstra, R.H. )

    1990-03-01

    The GA-4 and GA-9 spent fuel shipping casks employ a solid neutron shielding material. During a hypothetical thermal accident, any combustion of the neutron shield must not compromise the ability of the cask to contain the radioactive contents. A two-phase thermal testing program was carried out to assist in selecting satisfactory shielding materials. In the first phase, small-scale screening tests were performed on nine candidate materials using ASTM procedures. From these initial results, three of the nine candidates were chosen for inclusion in the second phase of testing, These materials were Bisco Products NS-4-FR, Reactor Experiments 201-1, and Reactor Experiments 207. In the second phase, each selected material was fabricated into a test article which simulated a full-scale of neutron shield from the cask. The test article was heated in an environmental prescribed by NRC regulations. Results of this second testing phase showed that all three materials are thermally acceptable.

  5. Shield Design for Lunar Surface Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Gregory A.

    2006-01-01

    A shielding concept for lunar surface applications of nuclear power is presented herein. The reactor, primary shield, reactor equipment and power generation module are placed in a cavity in the lunar surface. Support structure and heat rejection radiator panels are on the surface, outside the cavity. The reactor power of 1,320 kWt was sized to deliver 50 kWe from a thermoelectric power conversion subsystem. The dose rate on the surface is less than 0.6 mRem/hr at 100 meters from the reactor. Unoptimized shield mass is 1,020 kg which is much lighter than a comparable 4π shield weighing in at 17,000 kg.

  6. Cable shield connecting device

    DOEpatents

    Silva, Frank A.

    1979-01-01

    A cable shield connecting device for installation on a high voltage cable of the type having a metallic shield, the device including a relatively conformable, looped metal bar for placement around a bared portion of the metallic shield to extend circumferentially around a major portion of the circumference of the metallic shield while being spaced radially therefrom, a plurality of relatively flexible metallic fingers affixed to the bar, projecting from the bar in an axial direction and spaced circumferentially along the bar, each finger being attached to the metallic shield at a portion located remote from the bar to make electrical contact with the metallic shield, and a connecting conductor integral with the bar.

  7. RADIATION SHIELDING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; Young, G.J.

    1958-09-23

    ABS>A radiation shield that is suitable for the protection of personnel from both gamma rays and nentrons is described. The shield is comprised of a hollow wall and an aggregate consisting of iron and water in approximately equal amounts by volume substantially filling the wall. A means is provided to circulate the water through the wall to cool the shield when in use.

  8. Rail gun performance and plasma characteristics due to wall ablation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, P. K.

    1986-01-01

    The experiment of Bauer, et al. (1982) is analyzed by considering wall ablation and viscous drag in the plasma. Plasma characteristics are evaluated through a simple fluid-mechanical analysis considering only wall ablation. By equating the energy dissipated in the plasma with the radiation heat loss, the average properties of the plasma are determined as a function of time.

  9. Performance of solar shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwinghamer, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    The loss of the micrometeoroid shield from the Orbital Workshop section of Skylab I, about 63 seconds after lift-off, proved to be the harbinger of a prodigious effort to quickly develop a workable substitute for the carefully tailored passive portion of the thermal-control system. The paper describes the intensive ten-day around-the-clock effort in which numerous potential thermal-shield materials were assessed, and during which period ten specific shield designs were developed and carried through various stages of development and test. Thermal-shield materials data are discussed, including optical, strength, fatigue, outgassing, tackiness, ultraviolet radiation, and material 'memory' properties.

  10. RADIATION SHIELDING COMPOSITION

    DOEpatents

    Dunegan, H.L.

    1963-01-29

    A light weight radiation shielding composition is described whose mechanical and radiological properties can be varied within wide limits. The composition of this shielding material consists of four basic ingredients: powder of either Pb or W, a plastic resin, a resin plasticizer, and a polymerization catalyst to promote an interaction of the plasticizer with the plastic resin. Air may be mixed into the above ingredients in order to control the density of the final composition. For equivalent gamma attenuation, the shielding composition weighs one-third to one-half as much as conventional Pb shielding. (AEC)

  11. Artificial meteor ablation studies: Olivine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, M. B.; Cunningham, G. G.

    1973-01-01

    Artificial meteor ablation was performed on a Mg-rich olivine sample using an arc-heated plasma of ionized air. Experimental conditions simulated a meteor traveling about 12 km/sec at an altitude of 70 km. The mineral content of the original olivine sample was 98% olivine (including traces of olivine alteration products) and 2% chromite. Forsterite content of the original olivine was Fo-89. After ablation, the forsterite content had increased to Fo-94 in the recrystallized olivine. In addition, lamella-like intergrowths of magnetite were prevalent constituents. Wherever magnetite occurred, there was an increase in Mg and a corresponding decrease in Fe for the recrystallized olivine. The Allende fusion crust consisted of a recrystallized olivine, which was more Mg-rich and Fe-deficient than the original meteorite's olivine, and abundant magnetite grains. Although troilite and pentlandite were the common opaque mineral constituents in this meteorite, magnetite was the principal opaque mineral found in the fusion crust.

  12. Thermal contact conductance and thermal shield design for superconducting magnet systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nilles, M.J.; Lehmann, G.A.

    1994-12-31

    The aluminum radiation shields in the SSC Quadrupole magnets are conductively cooled from the cryogen flow in the 80 K and 20 K flow circuits. As the shield temperature is very sensitive to the effective heat transfer rate between the shield-piping interface, the method of shield mounting and heat sinking is critical. Cost and reliability concerns also drive the design. Here, the authors discuss critical issues that can have a limiting effect on the shield thermal performance. The spring-type action of the shield clamps it in place and heat transfer across the interface depends on thermal contact conductance. Thermally induced stresses can be relieved by allowing the shield and piping to slide relative to each other. Test results are presented on stainless steel-aluminum thermal contact conductance and its effect on the shield performance is discussed.

  13. NEUTRONIC REACTOR SHIELDING

    DOEpatents

    Borst, L.B.

    1961-07-11

    A special hydrogenous concrete shielding for reactors is described. In addition to Portland cement and water, the concrete essentially comprises 30 to 60% by weight barytes aggregate for enhanced attenuation of fast neutrons. The biological shields of AEC's Oak Ridge Graphite Reactor and Materials Testing Reactor are particular embodiments.

  14. Gamma ray detector shield

    DOEpatents

    Ohlinger, R.D.; Humphrey, H.W.

    1985-08-26

    A gamma ray detector shield comprised of a rigid, lead, cylindrical-shaped vessel having upper and lower portions with an pneumatically driven, sliding top assembly. Disposed inside the lead shield is a gamma ray scintillation crystal detector. Access to the gamma detector is through the sliding top assembly.

  15. Ablation threshold and ablation mechanism transition of polyoxymethylene irradiated by CO2 laser.

    PubMed

    Li, Gan; Cheng, Mousen; Li, Xiaokang

    2016-09-01

    Polyoxymethylene (POM) decomposes gradually as it is heated up by the irradiation of CO2 laser; the long-chain molecules of POM are broken into short chains, which leads to the lowering of the melting point and the critical temperature of the ablation products. When the product temperature is above the melting point, ablation comes up in the way of vaporization; when the product temperature is higher than the critical temperature, all liquid products are transformed into gas instantly and the ablation mechanism is changed. The laser fluence at which significant ablation is observed is defined as the ablation threshold, and the fluence corresponding to the ablation mechanism changing is denoted as the flyover threshold. In this paper, random pyrolysis is adopted to describe the pyrolytic decomposition of POM, and consequently, the components of the pyrolysis products under different pyrolysis rates are acquired. The Group Contribution method is used to count the thermodynamic properties of the pyrolysis products, and the melting point and the critical temperature of the product mixture are obtained by the Mixing Law. The Knudsen layer relationship is employed to evaluate the ablation mass removal when the product temperature is below the critical temperature. The gas dynamics conservation laws associated with the Jouguet condition are used to calculate the mass removal when the product temperature is higher than the critical temperature. Based on the model, a set of simulations for various laser intensities and lengths are carried out to generalize the relationships between the thresholds and the laser parameters. Besides the ablated mass areal density, which fits the experimental data quite well, the ablation temperature, pyrolysis rate, and product components are also discussed for a better understanding of the ablation mechanism of POM. PMID:27607281

  16. Ablative Rocket Deflector Testing and Computational Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allgood, Daniel C.; Lott, Jeffrey W.; Raines, Nickey

    2010-01-01

    A deflector risk mitigation program was recently conducted at the NASA Stennis Space Center. The primary objective was to develop a database that characterizes the behavior of industry-grade refractory materials subjected to rocket plume impingement conditions commonly experienced on static test stands. The program consisted of short and long duration engine tests where the supersonic exhaust flow from the engine impinged on an ablative panel. Quasi time-dependent erosion depths and patterns generated by the plume impingement were recorded for a variety of different ablative materials. The erosion behavior was found to be highly dependent on the material s composition and corresponding thermal properties. For example, in the case of the HP CAST 93Z ablative material, the erosion rate actually decreased under continued thermal heating conditions due to the formation of a low thermal conductivity "crystallization" layer. The "crystallization" layer produced near the surface of the material provided an effective insulation from the hot rocket exhaust plume. To gain further insight into the complex interaction of the plume with the ablative deflector, computational fluid dynamic modeling was performed in parallel to the ablative panel testing. The results from the current study demonstrated that locally high heating occurred due to shock reflections. These localized regions of shock-induced heat flux resulted in non-uniform erosion of the ablative panels. In turn, it was observed that the non-uniform erosion exacerbated the localized shock heating causing eventual plume separation and reversed flow for long duration tests under certain conditions. Overall, the flow simulations compared very well with the available experimental data obtained during this project.

  17. Renal Ablation Update

    PubMed Central

    Khiatani, Vishal; Dixon, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    Thermal ablative technologies have evolved considerably in the recent past and are now an important component of current clinical guidelines for the treatment of small renal masses. Both radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation have intermediate-term oncologic control that rivals surgical options, with favorable complication profiles. Studies comparing cryoablation and radiofrequency ablation show no significant difference in oncologic control or complication profile between the two modalities. Early data from small series with microwave ablation have shown similar promising results. Newer technologies including irreversible electroporation and high-intensity–focused ultrasound have theoretical advantages, but will require further research before becoming a routine part of the ablation armamentarium. The purpose of this review article is to discuss the current ablative technologies available, briefly review their mechanisms of action, discuss technical aspects of each, and provide current data supporting their use. PMID:25049445

  18. Renal ablation update.

    PubMed

    Khiatani, Vishal; Dixon, Robert G

    2014-06-01

    Thermal ablative technologies have evolved considerably in the recent past and are now an important component of current clinical guidelines for the treatment of small renal masses. Both radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation have intermediate-term oncologic control that rivals surgical options, with favorable complication profiles. Studies comparing cryoablation and radiofrequency ablation show no significant difference in oncologic control or complication profile between the two modalities. Early data from small series with microwave ablation have shown similar promising results. Newer technologies including irreversible electroporation and high-intensity-focused ultrasound have theoretical advantages, but will require further research before becoming a routine part of the ablation armamentarium. The purpose of this review article is to discuss the current ablative technologies available, briefly review their mechanisms of action, discuss technical aspects of each, and provide current data supporting their use. PMID:25049445

  19. Laser Ablation for Small Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Pacella, Claudio Maurizio; Francica, Giampiero; Di Costanzo, Giovanni Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignancies worldwide and is increasingly detected at small size (<5 cm) owing to surveillance programmes in high-risk patients. For these cases, curative therapies such as resection, liver transplantation, or percutaneous ablation have been proposed. When surgical options are precluded, image-guided tumor ablation is recommended as the most appropriate therapeutic choice in terms of tumor local control, safety, and improvement in survival. Laser ablation (LA) represents one of currently available loco-ablative techniques: light is delivered via flexible quartz fibers of diameter from 300 to 600 μm inserted into tumor lesion through either fine needles (21g Chiba needles) or large-bore catheters. The thermal destruction of tissue is achieved through conversion of absorbed light (usually infrared) into heat. A range of different imaging modalities have been used to guide percutaneous laser ablation, but ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging are most widely employed, according to local experience and resource availability. Available clinical data suggest that LA is highly effective in terms of tumoricidal capability with an excellent safety profile; the best results in terms of long-term survival are obtained in early HCC so that LA can be proposed not only in unresectable cases but, not differently from radiofrequency ablation, also as the first-line treatment. PMID:22191028

  20. Basic ablation phenomena during laser thrombolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathyam, Ujwal S.; Shearin, Alan; Prahl, Scott A.

    1997-05-01

    This paper presents studies of microsecond ablation phenomena that take place during laser thrombolysis. The main goals were to optimize laser parameters for efficient ablation, and to investigate the ablation mechanism. Gelatin containing an absorbing dye was used as the clot model. A parametric study was performed to identify the optimal wavelength, spot size, pulse energies, and repetition rate for maximum material removal. The minimum radiant exposures to achieve ablation at any wavelength were measured. The results suggest that most visible wavelengths were equally efficient at removing material at radiant exposures above threshold. Ablation was initiated at surface temperatures just above 100 degrees Celsius. A vapor bubble was formed during ablation. Less than 5% of the total pulse energy is coupled into the bubble energy. A large part of the delivered energy is unaccounted for and is likely released partly as acoustic transients from the vapor expansion and partly wasted as heat. The current laser and delivery systems may not be able to completely remove large clot burden that is sometimes encountered in heart attacks. However, laser thrombolysis may emerge as a favored treatment for strokes where the occlusion is generally smaller and rapid recanalization is of paramount importance. A final hypothesis is that laser thrombolysis should be done at radiant exposures close to threshold to minimize any damaging effects of the bubble dynamics on the vessel wall.

  1. Radiofrequency Ablation of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Marc; Mikityansky, Igor; Kam, Anthony; Libutti, Steven K.; Walther, McClellan M.; Neeman, Ziv; Locklin, Julia K.; Wood, Bradford J.

    2008-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has been used for over 18 years for treatment of nerve-related chronic pain and cardiac arrhythmias. In the last 10 years, technical developments have increased ablation volumes in a controllable, versatile, and relatively inexpensive manner. The host of clinical applications for RFA have similarly expanded. Current RFA equipment, techniques, applications, results, complications, and research avenues for local tumor ablation are summarized. PMID:15383844

  2. Radiofrequency Ablation of Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Marc; Mikityansky, Igor; Kam, Anthony; Libutti, Steven K.; Walther, McClellan M.; Neeman, Ziv; Locklin, Julia K.; Wood, Bradford J.

    2004-09-15

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has been used for over 18 years for treatment of nerve-related chronic pain and cardiac arrhythmias. In the last 10 years, technical developments have increased ablation volumes in a controllable, versatile, and relatively inexpensive manner. The host of clinical applications for RFA have similarly expanded. Current RFA equipment, techniques, applications, results, complications, and research avenues for local tumor ablation are summarized.

  3. Lung Ablation: Whats New?

    PubMed

    Xiong, Lillian; Dupuy, Damian E

    2016-07-01

    Lung cancer had an estimated incidence of 221,200 in 2015, making up 13% of all cancer diagnoses. Tumor ablation is an important treatment option for nonsurgical lung cancer and pulmonary metastatic patients. Radiofrequency ablation has been used for over a decade with newer modalities, microwave ablation, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation presenting as additional and possibly improved treatment options for patients. This minimally invasive therapy is best for small primary lesions or favorably located metastatic tumors. These technologies can offer palliation and sometimes cure of thoracic malignancies. This article discusses the current available technologies and techniques available for tumor ablation. PMID:27050331

  4. Ablative Thermal Protection System Fundamentals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, Robin A. S.

    2013-01-01

    This is the presentation for a short course on the fundamentals of ablative thermal protection systems. It covers the definition of ablation, description of ablative materials, how they work, how to analyze them and how to model them.

  5. Effects of material composition on the ablation performance of low density elastomeric ablators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tompkins, S. S.; Kabana, W. P.

    1973-01-01

    The ablation performance of materials composed of various concentrations of nylon, hollow silica spheres, hollow phenolic spheres, and four elastomeric resins was determined. Both blunt-body and flat-panel specimens were used, the cold-wall heating-rate ranges being 0.11 to 0.8 MW/sq m, respectively. The corresponding surface pressure ranges for these tests were 0.017 to 0.037 atmosphere and 0.004 to 0.005 atmosphere. Some of the results show that (1) the addition of nylon significantly improved the ablation performance, but the nylon was not compatible with one resin system; (2) panel and blunt-body specimen data do not show the same effect of phenolic sphere content on ablation effectiveness; and (3) there appears to be an optimum concentration of hollow silica spheres for good ablation performance. The composition of an efficient, nonproprietary ablator for lifting body application is identified and the ablation performance of this ablator is compared with the performance of three commercially available materials.

  6. Surgical Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Ramlawi, Basel; Abu Saleh, Walid K.

    2015-01-01

    The Cox-maze procedure for the restoration of normal sinus rhythm, initially developed by Dr. James Cox, underwent several iterations over the years. The main concept consists of creating a series of transmural lesions in the right and left atria that disrupt re-entrant circuits responsible for propagating the abnormal atrial fibrillation rhythm. The left atrial appendage is excluded as a component of the Maze procedure. For the first three iterations of the Cox- maze procedure, these lesions were performed using a surgical cut-and-sew approach that ensured transmurality. The Cox-Maze IV is the most currently accepted iteration. It achieves the same lesion set of the Cox- maze III but uses alternative energy sources to create the transmural lesions, potentially in a minimally invasive approach on the beating heart. High-frequency ultrasound, microwave, and laser energy have all been used with varying success in the past. Today, bipolar radiofrequency heat or cryotherapy cooling are the most accepted sources for creating linear lesions with consistent safety and transmurality. The robust and reliable nature of these energy delivery methods has yielded a success rate reaching 90% freedom from atrial fibrillation at 12 months. Such approaches offer a significant long-term advantage over catheter-based ablation, especially in patients having longstanding, persistent atrial fibrillation with characteristics such as dilated left atrial dimensions, poor ejection fraction, and failed catheter ablation. Based on these improved results, there currently is significant interest in developing a hybrid ablation strategy that incorporates the superior transmural robust lesions of surgical ablation, the reliable stroke prevention potential of epicardial left atrial appendage exclusion, and sophisticated mapping and confirmatory catheter-based ablation technology. Such a minimally invasive hybrid strategy for ablation may lead to the development of multidisciplinary “Afib teams

  7. MEANS FOR SHIELDING REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Garrison, W.M.; McClinton, L.T.; Burton, M.

    1959-03-10

    A reactor of the heterageneous, heavy water moderated type is described. The reactor is comprised of a plurality of vertically disposed fuel element tubes extending through a tank of heavy water moderator and adapted to accommodate a flow of coolant water in contact with the fuel elements. A tank containing outgoing coolant water is disposed above the core to function is a radiation shield. Unsaturated liquid hydrocarbon is floated on top of the water in the shield tank to reduce to a minimum the possibility of the occurrence of explosive gaseous mixtures resulting from the neutron bombardment of the water in the shield tank.

  8. Laser-launched flyer plate and confined laser ablation for shock wave loading: validation and applications.

    PubMed

    Paisley, Dennis L; Luo, Sheng-Nian; Greenfield, Scott R; Koskelo, Aaron C

    2008-02-01

    We present validation and some applications of two laser-driven shock wave loading techniques: laser-launched flyer plate and confined laser ablation. We characterize the flyer plate during flight and the dynamically loaded target with temporally and spatially resolved diagnostics. With transient imaging displacement interferometry, we demonstrate that the planarity (bow and tilt) of the loading induced by a spatially shaped laser pulse is within 2-7 mrad (with an average of 4+/-1 mrad), similar to that in conventional techniques including gas gun loading. Plasma heating of target is negligible, in particular, when a plasma shield is adopted. For flyer plate loading, supported shock waves can be achieved. Temporal shaping of the drive pulse in confined laser ablation allows for flexible loading, e.g., quasi-isentropic, Taylor-wave, and off-Hugoniot loading. These techniques can be utilized to investigate such dynamic responses of materials as Hugoniot elastic limit, plasticity, spall, shock roughness, equation of state, phase transition, and metallurgical characteristics of shock-recovered samples. PMID:18315311

  9. EBT-P gamma-ray shielding system

    SciTech Connect

    Gohar, Y.

    1981-12-01

    An elaborate study was carried out for the coil and biological shield of the ELMO Bumpy Torus proof-of-principle (EBT-P) device. A three-dimensional scoping study for the coil shield was performed for four different shielding options to define the heat load for each component and check the compliance with the design criterion of 10 watts maximum heat per coil from the gamma ray sources. Also, a detailed biological dose survey was performed which included: (a) the dose equivalent inside and outside the building, (b) the dose equivalent from the two mazes of the machine room, and (c) the skyshine contribution to the dose equivalent.

  10. Testing of Advanced Conformal Ablative TPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasch, Matthew; Agrawal, Parul; Beck, Robin

    2013-01-01

    In support of the CA250 project, this paper details the results of a test campaign that was conducted at the Ames Arcjet Facility, wherein several novel low density thermal protection (TPS) materials were evaluated in an entry like environment. The motivation for these tests was to investigate whether novel conformal ablative TPS materials can perform under high heat flux and shear environment as a viable alternative to rigid ablators like PICA or Avcoat for missions like MSL and beyond. A conformable TPS over a rigid aeroshell has the potential to solve a number of challenges faced by traditional rigid TPS materials (such as tiled Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) system on MSL, and honeycomb-based Avcoat on the Orion Multi Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV)). The compliant (high strain to failure) nature of the conformable ablative materials will allow better integration of the TPS with the underlying aeroshell structure and enable monolithic-like configuration and larger segments to be used in fabrication.A novel SPRITE1 architecture, developed by the researchers at NASA Ames was used for arcjet testing. This small probe like configuration with 450 spherecone, enabled us to test the materials in a combination of high heat flux, pressure and shear environment. The heat flux near the nose were in the range of 500-1000 W/sq cm whereas in the flank section of the test article the magnitudes were about 50 of the nose, 250-500W/sq cm range. There were two candidate conformable materials under consideration for this test series. Both test materials are low density (0.28 g/cu cm) similar to Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) or Silicone Impregnated Refractory Ceramic Ablator (SIRCA) and are comprised of: A flexible carbon substrate (Carbon felt) infiltrated with an ablative resin system: phenolic (Conformal-PICA) or silicone (Conformal-SICA). The test demonstrated a successful performance of both the conformable ablators for heat flux conditions between 50

  11. What Is Radiation Shielding?

    NASA Video Gallery

    Kerry Lee, NASA Orion radiation system manager, explains how radiation shielding is used to block harmful particles coming into the spacecraft without producing secondary particles that can cause e...

  12. ALS synchrotron radiation shielding

    SciTech Connect

    Donahue, R.J.

    1995-10-01

    This note discusses the assumptions and results of synchrotron radiation shielding estimates for ALS bend magnet and wiggler beamlines. Estimates of gas bremsstrahlung production are not included and are dealt with elsewhere.

  13. SNS shielding analyses overview

    SciTech Connect

    Popova, Irina; Gallmeier, Franz; Iverson, Erik B; Lu, Wei; Remec, Igor

    2015-01-01

    This paper gives an overview on on-going shielding analyses for Spallation Neutron Source. Presently, the most of the shielding work is concentrated on the beam lines and instrument enclosures to prepare for commissioning, save operation and adequate radiation background in the future. There is on-going work for the accelerator facility. This includes radiation-protection analyses for radiation monitors placement, designing shielding for additional facilities to test accelerator structures, redesigning some parts of the facility, and designing test facilities to the main accelerator structure for component testing. Neutronics analyses are required as well to support spent structure management, including waste characterisation analyses, choice of proper transport/storage package and shielding enhancement for the package if required.

  14. Adhesive particle shielding

    DOEpatents

    Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott; Rader, Daniel John; Walton, Christopher; Folta, James

    2009-01-06

    An efficient device for capturing fast moving particles has an adhesive particle shield that includes (i) a mounting panel and (ii) a film that is attached to the mounting panel wherein the outer surface of the film has an adhesive coating disposed thereon to capture particles contacting the outer surface. The shield can be employed to maintain a substantially particle free environment such as in photolithographic systems having critical surfaces, such as wafers, masks, and optics and in the tools used to make these components, that are sensitive to particle contamination. The shield can be portable to be positioned in hard-to-reach areas of a photolithography machine. The adhesive particle shield can incorporate cooling means to attract particles via the thermophoresis effect.

  15. An analytical and experimental evaluation of shadow shields and their support members

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stochl, R. J.; Boyle, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    Experimental tests were performed on a model shadow shield thermal protection system to examine the effect of certain configuration variables. The experimental results were used to verify the ability of an analytical program to predict the shadow shield performance including the shield-support interaction. In general, the analysis (assuming diffuse surfaces) agreed well with the experimental support temperature profiles. The agreement for the shield profiles was not as good. The results demonstrated: (1) shadow shields can be effective in reducing the heat transfer into cryogenic propellant tanks, and (2) the conductive heat transfer through supports can be reduced by selective surface coatings.

  16. Shielded cells transfer automation

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, J J

    1984-01-01

    Nuclear waste from shielded cells is removed, packaged, and transferred manually in many nuclear facilities. Radiation exposure is absorbed by operators during these operations and limited only through procedural controls. Technological advances in automation using robotics have allowed a production waste removal operation to be automated to reduce radiation exposure. The robotic system bags waste containers out of glove box and transfers them to a shielded container. Operators control the system outside the system work area via television cameras. 9 figures.

  17. Space Station MMOD Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, Eric

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes International Space Station (ISS) shielding for micrometeoroid orbital debris (MMOD) protection, requirements for protection, and the technical approach to meeting requirements. Current activities in MMOD protection for ISS will be described, including efforts to augment MMOD protection by adding shields on-orbit. Observed MMOD impacts on ISS elements such as radiators, modules and returned hardware will be described. Comparisons of the observed damage with predicted damage using risk assessment software will be made.

  18. Analysis of internal ablation for the thermal control of aerospace vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camberos, Jose A.; Roberts, Leonard

    1989-01-01

    A new method of thermal protection for transatmospheric vehicles is introduced. The method involves the combination of radiation, ablation and transpiration cooling. By placing an ablating material behind a fixed-shape, porous outer shield, the effectiveness of transpiration cooling is made possible while retaining the simplicity of a passive mechanism. A simplified one-dimensional approach is used to derive the governing equations. Reduction of these equations to non-dimensional form yields two parameters which characterize the thermal protection effectiveness of the shield and ablator combination for a given trajectory. The non-dimensional equations are solved numerically for a sample trajectory corresponding to glide re-entry. Four typical ablators are tested and compared with results obtained by using the thermal properties of water. For the present level of analysis, the numerical computations adequately support the analytical model.

  19. The Effect of Diffusional Transport and Surface Catalysis on the Aerothermodynamic Heating for Martian Atmospheric Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henline, William D.; Papadopoulos, Periklis; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    For the reentry heating of 70-degree blunt sphere-cones entering Mars at velocities in excess of 6 km/sec, a study was performed to determine the magnitude of both convective and catalytic heating on the cone forebody. Case studies of the peak heating conditions for the current NASA Mars Pathfinder entry probe, as well as the peak heating conditions of the proposed NASA Mars 2001 aerobraking orbiter mission were performed. Since the actual behavior of the chemical recombination of Mars atmosphere hypersonic shock layer species on heat shield materials is not known, and no experimental studies of any consequence have been done to determine surface reaction rates for the CO2 system, a parametric analysis of various reaction schemes and surface catalytic mechanistic models was performed. In many cases the actual Mars entry probe will have a heat shield composed of an ablative material which can either partially or completely preclude the existence of catalytic surface recombination phenomena. The extent of this blockage effect has not been examined at this time and is not considered in this effort. Instead only non-ablative computations are performed to separately evaluate the full extent of the surface catalysis and related diffusional phenomena. Parametric studies include peak heating point comparisons of non-catalytic, partially catalytic and fully catalytic total surface heat transfer for three difference surface recombination catalytic mechanisms (with and without simultaneous CO + O and O + O recombination) as well as with different species diffusion models. Diffusion model studies include constant Schmidt number (equal diffusivities) and the bifurcation, approximate multi-component diffusion model. Since the gas phase reaction kinetics for the Mars CO2 based atmosphere have also not been validated, the effect of two different (fast and slow) sets of gas kinetics on heat transfer is presented.

  20. Point-Kernel Shielding Code System.

    1982-02-17

    Version 00 QAD-BSA is a three-dimensional, point-kernel shielding code system based upon the CCC-48/QAD series. It is designed to calculate photon dose rates and heating rates using exponential attenuation and infinite medium buildup factors. Calculational provisions include estimates of fast neutron penetration using data computed by the moments method. Included geometry routines can describe complicated source and shield geometries. An internal library contains data for many frequently used structural and shielding materials, enabling the codemore » to solve most problems with only source strengths and problem geometry required as input. This code system adapts especially well to problems requiring multiple sources and sources with asymmetrical geometry. In addition to being edited separately, the total interaction rates from many sources may be edited at each detector point. Calculated photon interaction rates agree closely with those obtained using QAD-P5A.« less

  1. Vehicle drive module having improved EMI shielding

    DOEpatents

    Beihoff, Bruce C.; Kehl, Dennis L.; Gettelfinger, Lee A.; Kaishian, Steven C.; Phillips, Mark G.; Radosevich, Lawrence D.

    2006-11-28

    EMI shielding in an electric vehicle drive is provided for power electronics circuits and the like via a direct-mount reference plane support and shielding structure. The thermal support may receive one or more power electronic circuits. The support may aid in removing heat from the circuits through fluid circulating through the support. The support forms a shield from both external EMI/RFI and from interference generated by operation of the power electronic circuits. Features may be provided to permit and enhance connection of the circuitry to external circuitry, such as improved terminal configurations. Modular units may be assembled that may be coupled to electronic circuitry via plug-in arrangements or through interface with a backplane or similar mounting and interconnecting structures.

  2. Power converter having improved EMI shielding

    DOEpatents

    Beihoff, Bruce C.; Kehl, Dennis L.; Gettelfinger, Lee A.; Kaishian, Steven C.; Phillips, Mark G.; Radosevich, Lawrence D.

    2006-06-13

    EMI shielding is provided for power electronics circuits and the like via a direct-mount reference plane support and shielding structure. The thermal support may receive one or more power electronic circuits. The support may aid in removing heat from the circuits through fluid circulating through the support. The support forms a shield from both external EMI/RFI and from interference generated by operation of the power electronic circuits. Features may be provided to permit and enhance connection of the circuitry to external circuitry, such as improved terminal configurations. Modular units may be assembled that may be coupled to electronic circuitry via plug-in arrangements or through interface with a backplane or similar mounting and interconnecting structures.

  3. Thermal Ablation Modeling for Silicate Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yih-Kanq

    2016-01-01

    A thermal ablation model for silicates is proposed. The model includes the mass losses through the balance between evaporation and condensation, and through the moving molten layer driven by surface shear force and pressure gradient. This model can be applied in ablation simulations of the meteoroid or glassy Thermal Protection Systems for spacecraft. Time-dependent axi-symmetric computations are performed by coupling the fluid dynamics code, Data-Parallel Line Relaxation program, with the material response code, Two-dimensional Implicit Thermal Ablation simulation program, to predict the mass lost rates and shape change. For model validation, the surface recession of fused amorphous quartz rod is computed, and the recession predictions reasonably agree with available data. The present parametric studies for two groups of meteoroid earth entry conditions indicate that the mass loss through moving molten layer is negligibly small for heat-flux conditions at around 1 MW/cm(exp. 2).

  4. Tumor Ablation: Common Modalities and General Practices

    PubMed Central

    Knavel, Erica M.; Brace, Christopher L.

    2014-01-01

    Tumor ablation is a minimally invasive technique that is commonly used in the treatment of tumors of the liver, kidney, bone, and lung. During tumor ablation, thermal energy is used to heat or cool tissue to cytotoxic levels (less than −40°C or more than 60°C). An additional technique is being developed that targets the permeability of the cell membrane and is ostensibly nonthermal. Within the classification of tumor ablation, there are several modalities used worldwide: radiofrequency, microwave, laser, high-intensity focused ultrasound, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation. Each technique, although similar in purpose, has specific and optimal indications. This review serves to discuss general principles and technique, reviews each modality, and discusses modality selection. PMID:24238374

  5. Convergent ablator performance measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, D. G.; Spears, B. K.; Braun, D. G.; Sorce, C. M.; Celliers, P. M.; Collins, G. W.; Landen, O. L.; Olson, R. E.

    2010-10-15

    The velocity and remaining ablator mass of an imploding capsule are critical metrics for assessing the progress toward ignition of an inertially confined fusion experiment. These and other convergent ablator performance parameters have been measured using a single streaked x-ray radiograph. Traditional Abel inversion of such a radiograph is ill-posed since backlighter intensity profiles and x-ray attenuation by the ablated plasma are unknown. To address this we have developed a regularization technique which allows the ablator density profile {rho}(r) and effective backlighter profile I{sub 0}(y) at each time step to be uniquely determined subject to the constraints that {rho}(r) is localized in radius space and I{sub 0}(y) is delocalized in object space. Moments of {rho}(r) then provide the time-resolved areal density, mass, and average radius (and thus velocity) of the remaining ablator material. These results are combined in the spherical rocket model to determine the ablation pressure and mass ablation rate during the implosion. The technique has been validated on simulated radiographs of implosions at the National Ignition Facility [Miller et al., Nucl. Fusion 44, 228 (2004)] and implemented on experiments at the OMEGA laser facility [Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)].

  6. Convergent ablator performance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, D. G.; Spears, B. K.; Braun, D. G.; Olson, R. E.; Sorce, C. M.; Celliers, P. M.; Collins, G. W.; Landen, O. L.

    2010-10-01

    The velocity and remaining ablator mass of an imploding capsule are critical metrics for assessing the progress toward ignition of an inertially confined fusion experiment. These and other convergent ablator performance parameters have been measured using a single streaked x-ray radiograph. Traditional Abel inversion of such a radiograph is ill-posed since backlighter intensity profiles and x-ray attenuation by the ablated plasma are unknown. To address this we have developed a regularization technique which allows the ablator density profile ρ(r ) and effective backlighter profile I0(y) at each time step to be uniquely determined subject to the constraints that ρ(r ) is localized in radius space and I0(y) is delocalized in object space. Moments of ρ(r ) then provide the time-resolved areal density, mass, and average radius (and thus velocity) of the remaining ablator material. These results are combined in the spherical rocket model to determine the ablation pressure and mass ablation rate during the implosion. The technique has been validated on simulated radiographs of implosions at the National Ignition Facility [Miller et al., Nucl. Fusion 44, 228 (2004)] and implemented on experiments at the OMEGA laser facility [Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)].

  7. Shielding Development for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caffrey, Jarvis A.; Gomez, Carlos F.; Scharber, Luke L.

    2015-01-01

    Radiation shielding analysis and development for the Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (NCPS) effort is currently in progress and preliminary results have enabled consideration for critical interfaces in the reactor and propulsion stage systems. Early analyses have highlighted a number of engineering constraints, challenges, and possible mitigating solutions. Performance constraints include permissible crew dose rates (shared with expected cosmic ray dose), radiation heating flux into cryogenic propellant, and material radiation damage in critical components. Design strategies in staging can serve to reduce radiation scatter and enhance the effectiveness of inherent shielding within the spacecraft while minimizing the required mass of shielding in the reactor system. Within the reactor system, shield design is further constrained by the need for active cooling with minimal radiation streaming through flow channels. Material selection and thermal design must maximize the reliability of the shield to survive the extreme environment through a long duration mission with multiple engine restarts. A discussion of these challenges and relevant design strategies are provided for the mitigation of radiation in nuclear thermal propulsion.

  8. Navigation Systems for Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Wood, B. J.; Kruecker, J.; Abi-Jaoudeh, N; Locklin, J.; Levy, E.; Xu, S.; Solbiati, L.; Kapoor, A.; Amalou, H.; Venkatesan, A.

    2010-01-01

    Navigation systems, devices and intra-procedural software are changing the way we practice interventional oncology. Prior to the development of precision navigation tools integrated with imaging systems, thermal ablation of hard-to-image lesions was highly dependent upon operator experience, spatial skills, and estimation of positron emission tomography-avid or arterial-phase targets. Numerous navigation systems for ablation bring the opportunity for standardization and accuracy that extends our ability to use imaging feedback during procedures. Existing systems and techniques are reviewed, and specific clinical applications for ablation are discussed to better define how these novel technologies address specific clinical needs, and fit into clinical practice. PMID:20656236

  9. Ablation of kidney tumors.

    PubMed

    Karam, Jose A; Ahrar, Kamran; Matin, Surena F

    2011-04-01

    While surgical excision remains the gold standard for curative treatment of small renal cell carcinomas, ablative therapy has a place as a minimally invasive, kidney function-preserving therapy in carefully selected patients who are poor candidates for surgery. Although laparoscopic cryoablation and percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) are commonly performed, percutaneous cryoablation and laparoscopic RFA are reportedly being performed with increasing frequency. The renal function and complication profiles following ablative therapy are favorable, while oncologic outcomes lag behind those of surgery, thus reinforcing the need for careful patient selection. PMID:21377587

  10. GPU-based real-time approximation of the ablation zone for radiofrequency ablation.

    PubMed

    Rieder, Christian; Kröger, Tim; Schumann, Christian; Hahn, Horst K

    2011-12-01

    Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is becoming a standard minimally invasive clinical procedure for the treatment of liver tumors. However, planning the applicator placement such that the malignant tissue is completely destroyed, is a demanding task that requires considerable experience. In this work, we present a fast GPU-based real-time approximation of the ablation zone incorporating the cooling effect of liver vessels. Weighted distance fields of varying RF applicator types are derived from complex numerical simulations to allow a fast estimation of the ablation zone. Furthermore, the heat-sink effect of the cooling blood flow close to the applicator's electrode is estimated by means of a preprocessed thermal equilibrium representation of the liver parenchyma and blood vessels. Utilizing the graphics card, the weighted distance field incorporating the cooling blood flow is calculated using a modular shader framework, which facilitates the real-time visualization of the ablation zone in projected slice views and in volume rendering. The proposed methods are integrated in our software assistant prototype for planning RFA therapy. The software allows the physician to interactively place virtual RF applicator models. The real-time visualization of the corresponding approximated ablation zone facilitates interactive evaluation of the tumor coverage in order to optimize the applicator's placement such that all cancer cells are destroyed by the ablation. PMID:22034298

  11. Resonant Faraday shield ICRH antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cattanei, G.; W7-AS Team

    2002-05-01

    ICRH has proved to be an efficient method of heating the plasma in toroidal devices. The high voltages needed at the coupling structure are, however, a severe handicap of this method. The possibility is investigated of having the highest voltages between the bars of the Faraday shield (FS), where they are both necessary and easier to maintain. For this purpose a resonant Faraday shield (RFS) antenna where the first and last bars of the FS are connected by an inductive strip is proposed. In front of this strip there is a second strip, fed, as in a conventional antenna, by an RF generator. It is shown that if the toroidal length of the FS is larger than λ/2 the strip connecting the bars of the FS acts as the secondary coil of a tuned transformer, the strip fed by the generator being the primary. It is therefore possible, by varying the frequency and the distance between the two strips, i.e. the coupling coefficient, to match the impedance of the primary to that of the generator.

  12. Optodynamic aspect of a pulsed laser ablation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrovatin, Rok; Možina, Janez

    1995-02-01

    A study of a pulsed laser ablation process is presented from a novel, optodynamic aspect. By quantitative analysis of laser-induced bulk ultrasonic and blast waves in the air the ablation dynamics is characterized. In this way the influence of the laser pulse parameters and of the interacting material on the ablation process was assessed. By the analysis of the laser drilling process of thin layered samples the material influence was demonstrated. Besides the ultrasonic evaluation of the laser pulse power density the plasma shielding for 10 ns laser pulses was analyzed by the same method. All measurements were noncontact. Bulk waves in the solid and blast waves in the air were measured simultaneously, an interferometric and a probe beam deflection method were used, respectively.

  13. Nanoscale patterning of graphene through femtosecond laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Sahin, R.; Akturk, S.; Simsek, E.

    2014-02-03

    We report on nanometer-scale patterning of single layer graphene on SiO{sub 2}/Si substrate through femtosecond laser ablation. The pulse fluence is adjusted around the single-pulse ablation threshold of graphene. It is shown that, even though both SiO{sub 2} and Si have more absorption in the linear regime compared to graphene, the substrate can be kept intact during the process. This is achieved by scanning the sample under laser illumination at speeds yielding a few numbers of overlapping pulses at a certain point, thereby effectively shielding the substrate. By adjusting laser fluence and translation speed, 400 nm wide ablation channels could be achieved over 100 μm length. Raster scanning of the sample yields well-ordered periodic structures, provided that sufficient gap is left between channels. Nanoscale patterning of graphene without substrate damage is verified with Scanning Electron Microscope and Raman studies.

  14. Radiation shielding composition

    DOEpatents

    Quapp, William J.; Lessing, Paul A.

    1998-01-01

    A composition for use as a radiation shield. The shield is a concrete product containing a stable uranium aggregate for attenuating gamma rays and a neutron absorbing component, the uranium aggregate and neutron absorbing component being present in the concrete product in sufficient amounts to provide a concrete having a density between about 4 and about 15 grams/cm.sup.3 and which will at a predetermined thickness, attenuate gamma rays and absorb neutrons from a radioactive material of projected gamma ray and neutron emissions over a determined time period. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing radioactive materials that emit gamma rays and neutrons. The concrete container preferably comprises a metal liner and/or a metal outer shell. The resulting radiation shielding container has the potential of being structurally sound, stable over a long period of time, and, if desired, readily mobile.

  15. Radiation shielding composition

    DOEpatents

    Quapp, William J.; Lessing, Paul A.

    2000-12-26

    A composition for use as a radiation shield. The shield is a concrete product containing a stable uranium aggregate for attenuating gamma rays and a neutron absorbing component, the uranium aggregate and neutron absorbing component being present in the concrete product in sufficient amounts to provide a concrete having a density between about 4 and about 15 grams/cm.sup.3 and which will at a predetermined thickness, attenuate gamma rays and absorb neutrons from a radioactive material of projected gamma ray and neutron emissions over a determined time period. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing radioactive materials that emit gamma rays and neutrons. The concrete container preferably comprises a metal liner and/or a metal outer shell. The resulting radiation shielding container has the potential of being structurally sound, stable over a long period of time, and, if desired, readily mobile.

  16. Radiation shielding composition

    DOEpatents

    Quapp, W.J.; Lessing, P.A.

    1998-07-28

    A composition is disclosed for use as a radiation shield. The shield is a concrete product containing a stable uranium aggregate for attenuating gamma rays and a neutron absorbing component, the uranium aggregate and neutron absorbing component being present in the concrete product in sufficient amounts to provide a concrete having a density between about 4 and about 15 grams/cm{sup 3} and which will at a predetermined thickness, attenuate gamma rays and absorb neutrons from a radioactive material of projected gamma ray and neutron emissions over a determined time period. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing radioactive materials that emit gamma rays and neutrons. The concrete container preferably comprises a metal liner and/or a metal outer shell. The resulting radiation shielding container has the potential of being structurally sound, stable over a long period of time, and, if desired, readily mobile. 5 figs.

  17. Ablative skin resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Nidhi; Smith, Greg; Heffelfinger, Ryan

    2014-02-01

    Ablative laser resurfacing has evolved as a safe and effective treatment for skin rejuvenation. Although traditional lasers were associated with significant thermal damage and lengthy recovery, advances in laser technology have improved safety profiles and reduced social downtime. CO2 lasers remain the gold standard of treatment, and fractional ablative devices capable of achieving remarkable clinical improvement with fewer side effects and shorter recovery times have made it a more practical option for patients. Although ablative resurfacing has become safer, careful patient selection and choice of suitable laser parameters are essential to minimize complications and optimize outcomes. This article describes the current modalities used in ablative laser skin resurfacing and examines their efficacy, indications, and possible side effects. PMID:24488638

  18. Cardiac ablation procedures

    MedlinePlus

    ... Accessory pathway, such as Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome Atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter Ventricular tachycardia ... consensus statement on catheter and surgical ablation of atrial fibrillation: ... for personnel, policy, procedures and follow-up. ...

  19. Shields-1, A SmallSat Radiation Shielding Technology Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomsen, D. Laurence, III; Kim, Wousik; Cutler, James W.

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center Shields CubeSat initiative is to develop a configurable platform that would allow lower cost access to Space for materials durability experiments, and to foster a pathway for both emerging and commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) radiation shielding technologies to gain spaceflight heritage in a relevant environment. The Shields-1 will be Langleys' first CubeSat platform to carry out this mission. Radiation shielding tests on Shields-1 are planned for the expected severe radiation environment in a geotransfer orbit (GTO), where advertised commercial rideshare opportunities and CubeSat missions exist, such as Exploration Mission 1 (EM-1). To meet this objective, atomic number (Z) graded radiation shields (Zshields) have been developed. The Z-shield properties have been estimated, using the Space Environment Information System (SPENVIS) radiation shielding computational modeling, to have 30% increased shielding effectiveness of electrons, at half the thickness of a corresponding single layer of aluminum. The Shields-1 research payload will be made with the Z-graded radiation shields of varying thicknesses to create dose-depth curves to be compared with baseline materials. Additionally, Shields-1 demonstrates an engineered Z-grade radiation shielding vault protecting the systems' electronic boards. The radiation shielding materials' performances will be characterized using total ionizing dose sensors. Completion of these experiments is expected to raise the technology readiness levels (TRLs) of the tested atomic number (Z) graded materials. The most significant contribution of the Z-shields for the SmallSat community will be that it enables cost effective shielding for small satellite systems, with significant volume constraints, while increasing the operational lifetime of ionizing radiation sensitive components. These results are anticipated to increase the development of CubeSat hardware design for increased mission lifetimes, and enable

  20. Modeling and Validation of Microwave Ablations with Internal Vaporization

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Jason; Birla, Sohan; Bedoya, Mariajose; Jones, David; Subbiah, Jeyam; Brace, Christopher L.

    2014-01-01

    Numerical simulation is increasingly being utilized for computer-aided design of treatment devices, analysis of ablation growth, and clinical treatment planning. Simulation models to date have incorporated electromagnetic wave propagation and heat conduction, but not other relevant physics such as water vaporization and mass transfer. Such physical changes are particularly noteworthy during the intense heat generation associated with microwave heating. In this work, a numerical model was created that integrates microwave heating with water vapor generation and transport by using porous media assumptions in the tissue domain. The heating physics of the water vapor model was validated through temperature measurements taken at locations 5, 10 and 20 mm away from the heating zone of the microwave antenna in homogenized ex vivo bovine liver setup. Cross-sectional area of water vapor transport was validated through intra-procedural computed tomography (CT) during microwave ablations in homogenized ex vivo bovine liver. Iso-density contours from CT images were compared to vapor concentration contours from the numerical model at intermittent time points using the Jaccard Index. In general, there was an improving correlation in ablation size dimensions as the ablation procedure proceeded, with a Jaccard Index of 0.27, 0.49, 0.61, 0.67 and 0.69 at 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 minutes. This study demonstrates the feasibility and validity of incorporating water vapor concentration into thermal ablation simulations and validating such models experimentally. PMID:25330481

  1. Modeling and validation of microwave ablations with internal vaporization.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Jason; Birla, Sohan; Bedoya, Mariajose; Jones, David; Subbiah, Jeyam; Brace, Christopher L

    2015-02-01

    Numerical simulation is increasingly being utilized for computer-aided design of treatment devices, analysis of ablation growth, and clinical treatment planning. Simulation models to date have incorporated electromagnetic wave propagation and heat conduction, but not other relevant physics such as water vaporization and mass transfer. Such physical changes are particularly noteworthy during the intense heat generation associated with microwave heating. In this paper, a numerical model was created that integrates microwave heating with water vapor generation and transport by using porous media assumptions in the tissue domain. The heating physics of the water vapor model was validated through temperature measurements taken at locations 5, 10, and 20 mm away from the heating zone of the microwave antenna in homogenized ex vivo bovine liver setup. Cross-sectional area of water vapor transport was validated through intraprocedural computed tomography (CT) during microwave ablations in homogenized ex vivo bovine liver. Iso-density contours from CT images were compared to vapor concentration contours from the numerical model at intermittent time points using the Jaccard index. In general, there was an improving correlation in ablation size dimensions as the ablation procedure proceeded, with a Jaccard index of 0.27, 0.49, 0.61, 0.67, and 0.69 at 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 min, respectively. This study demonstrates the feasibility and validity of incorporating water vapor concentration into thermal ablation simulations and validating such models experimentally. PMID:25330481

  2. Laser ablation of concrete.

    SciTech Connect

    Savina, M.

    1998-10-05

    Laser ablation is effective both as an analytical tool and as a means of removing surface coatings. The elemental composition of surfaces can be determined by either mass spectrometry or atomic emission spectroscopy of the atomized effluent. Paint can be removed from aircraft without damage to the underlying aluminum substrate, and environmentally damaged buildings and sculptures can be restored by ablating away deposited grime. A recent application of laser ablation is the removal of radioactive contaminants from the surface and near-surface regions of concrete. We present the results of ablation tests on concrete samples using a high power pulsed Nd:YAG laser with fiber optic beam delivery. The laser-surface interaction was studied on various model systems consisting of Type I Portland cement with varying amounts of either fine silica or sand in an effort to understand the effect of substrate composition on ablation rates and mechanisms. A sample of non-contaminated concrete from a nuclear power plant was also studied. In addition, cement and concrete samples were doped with non-radioactive isotopes of elements representative of cooling waterspills, such as cesium and strontium, and analyzed by laser-resorption mass spectrometry to determine the contamination pathways. These samples were also ablated at high power to determine the efficiency with which surface contaminants are removed and captured. The results show that the neat cement matrix melts and vaporizes when little or no sand or aggregate is present. Surface flows of liquid material are readily apparent on the ablated surface and the captured aerosol takes the form of glassy beads up to a few tens of microns in diameter. The presence of sand and aggregate particles causes the material to disaggregate on ablation, with intact particles on the millimeter size scale leaving the surface. Laser resorption mass spectrometric analysis showed that cesium and potassium have similar chemical environments in the

  3. Glove box shield

    DOEpatents

    Brackenbush, Larry W.; Hoenes, Glenn R.

    1981-01-01

    According to the present invention, a shield for a glove box housing radioactive material is comprised of spaced apart clamping members which maintain three overlapping flaps in place therebetween. There is a central flap and two side flaps, the side flaps overlapping at the interior edges thereof and the central flap extending past the intersection of the side flaps in order to insure that the shield is always closed when the user withdraws his hand from the glove box. Lead loaded neoprene rubber is the preferred material for the three flaps, the extent of lead loading depending upon the radiation levels within the glove box.

  4. Glove box shield

    DOEpatents

    Brackenbush, L.W.; Hoenes, G.R.

    A shield for a glove box housing radioactive material is comprised of spaced apart clamping members which maintain three overlapping flaps in place therebetween. There is a central flap and two side flaps, the side flaps overlapping at the interior edges thereof and the central flap extending past the intersection of the side flaps in order to insure that the shield is always closed when the user wthdraws his hand from the glove box. Lead loaded neoprene rubber is the preferred material for the three flaps, the extent of lead loading depending upon the radiation levels within the glove box.

  5. Bumper shield analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Oyer, A.T.

    1986-07-01

    To initially examine the effectiveness of a shield surrounding a reentry vehicle, we used the hypervelocity hydrodynamic impact code, LASOIL. We completed a four-by-four matrix of 16 two-dimensional numerical impact simulations of 1-g tungsten cylinders striking circular plates. The variable parameters were the projectile impact velocity (10, 20, 40, and 80 km/s) and the plate thickness (1, 2, 4, and 8 mm). In each case, the projectile was destroyed in the impact. The shield was penetrated but retained negliible momentum from the impact. The resultant debris cloud was low-density debris and vapor.

  6. Composition for radiation shielding

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1994-01-01

    A composition for use as a radiation shield. The shield has a depleted urum core for absorbing gamma rays and a bismuth coating for preventing chemical corrosion and absorbing gamma rays. Alternatively, a sheet of gadolinium may be positioned between the uranium core and the bismuth coating for absorbing neutrons. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing materials that emit radiation such as gamma rays and neutrons. The container is preferably formed by casting bismuth around a pre-formed uranium container having a gadolinium sheeting, and allowing the bismuth to cool. The resulting container is a structurally sound, corrosion-resistant, radiation-absorbing container.

  7. Foam Core Shielding for Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Marc

    2007-01-01

    A foam core shield (FCS) system is now being developed to supplant multilayer insulation (MLI) systems heretofore installed on spacecraft for thermal management and protection against meteoroid impacts. A typical FCS system consists of a core sandwiched between a face sheet and a back sheet. The core can consist of any of a variety of low-to-medium-density polymeric or inorganic foams chosen to satisfy application-specific requirements regarding heat transfer and temperature. The face sheet serves to shock and thereby shatter incident meteoroids, and is coated on its outer surface to optimize its absorptance and emittance for regulation of temperature. The back sheet can be dimpled to minimize undesired thermal contact with the underlying spacecraft component and can be metallized on the surface facing the component to optimize its absorptance and emittance. The FCS systems can perform better than do MLI systems, at lower mass and lower cost and with greater volumetric efficiency.

  8. Using the shield for thermal energy storage in PULSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sager, G. T.; Wong, C. P. C.; Sze, D.-K.; Bathe, C. G.; Blanchard, J. P.; Brimer, C.; Cheng, E. T.; El-Guebaly, L. A.; Hasan, M. Z.; Najmabadi, F.

    1994-04-01

    The PULSAR pulsed tokamak power plant design utilizes the outboard shield for thermal energy storage to maintain full 1000 MW(e) output during the dwell period of 200 s. Thermal energy resulting from direct nuclear heating is accumulated in the shield during the 7200 s fusion power production phase. The maximum shield temperature may be much higher than that for the blanket because radiation damage is significantly reduced. During the dwell period, thermal power discharged from the shield and coolant temperature are simultaneously regulated by controlling the coolant mass flow rate at the shield inlet. This is facilitated by throttled coolant bypass. Design concepts using helium and lithium coolant have been developed. Two-dimensional, time-dependent thermal hydraulic calculations were performed to confirm performance capabilities required of the design concepts. The results indicate that the system design and performance can accommodate uncertainties in material limits or the length of the dwell period.

  9. Ablation characteristics of quantum square pulse mode dental erbium laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukač, Nejc; Suhovršnik, Tomaž; Lukač, Matjaž; Jezeršek, Matija

    2016-01-01

    Erbium lasers are by now an accepted tool for performing ablative medical procedures, especially when minimal invasiveness is desired. Ideally, a minimally invasive laser cutting procedure should be fast and precise, and with minimal pain and thermal side effects. All these characteristics are significantly influenced by laser pulse duration, albeit not in the same manner. For example, high cutting efficacy and low heat deposition are characteristics of short pulses, while vibrations and ejected debris screening are less pronounced at longer pulse durations. We report on a study of ablation characteristics on dental enamel and cementum, of a chopped-pulse Er:YAG [quantum square pulse (QSP)] mode, which was designed to reduce debris screening during an ablation process. It is shown that in comparison to other studied standard Er:YAG and Er,Cr:YSGG laser pulse duration modes, the QSP mode exhibits the highest ablation drilling efficacy with lowest heat deposition and reduced vibrations, demonstrating that debris screening has a considerable influence on the ablation process. By measuring single-pulse ablation depths, we also show that tissue desiccation during the consecutive delivery of laser pulses leads to a significant reduction of the intrinsic ablation efficacy that cannot be fully restored under clinical settings by rehydrating the tooth using an external water spray.

  10. Overview of the CHarring Ablator Response (CHAR) Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amar, Adam J.; Oliver, A. Brandon; Kirk, Benjamin S.; Salazar, Giovanni; Droba, Justin

    2016-01-01

    An overview of the capabilities of the CHarring Ablator Response (CHAR) code is presented. CHAR is a one-, two-, and three-dimensional unstructured continuous Galerkin finite-element heat conduction and ablation solver with both direct and inverse modes. Additionally, CHAR includes a coupled linear thermoelastic solver for determination of internal stresses induced from the temperature field and surface loading. Background on the development process, governing equations, material models, discretization techniques, and numerical methods is provided. Special focus is put on the available boundary conditions including thermochemical ablation, surface-to-surface radiation exchange, and flowfield coupling. Finally, a discussion of ongoing development efforts is presented.

  11. Overview of the CHarring Ablator Response (CHAR) Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amar, Adam J.; Oliver, A. Brandon; Kirk, Benjamin S.; Salazar, Giovanni; Droba, Justin

    2016-01-01

    An overview of the capabilities of the CHarring Ablator Response (CHAR) code is presented. CHAR is a one-, two-, and three-dimensional unstructured continuous Galerkin finite-element heat conduction and ablation solver with both direct and inverse modes. Additionally, CHAR includes a coupled linear thermoelastic solver for determination of internal stresses induced from the temperature field and surface loading. Background on the development process, governing equations, material models, discretization techniques, and numerical methods is provided. Special focus is put on the available boundary conditions including thermochemical ablation and contact interfaces, and example simulations are included. Finally, a discussion of ongoing development efforts is presented.

  12. Preliminary Analysis of a Water Shield for a Surface Power Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, J. Boise

    2006-01-01

    A water based shielding system is being investigated for use on initial lunar surface power systems. The use of water may lower overall cost (as compared to development cost for other materials) and simplify operations in the setup and handling. The thermal hydraulic performance of the shield is of significant interest. The mechanism for transferring heat through the shield is natural convection. A simple 1-D thermal model indicates the necessity of natural convection to maintain acceptable temperatures and pressures in the water shield. CFD analysis is done to quantify the natural convection in the shield, and predicts sufficient natural convection to transfer heat through the shield with small temperature gradients. A test program will he designed to experimentally verify the thermal hydraulic performance of the shield, and to anchor the CFD models to experimental results.

  13. Ablation and radiation coupled viscous hypersonic shock layers, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engel, C. D.

    1971-01-01

    The results for a stagnation-line analysis of the radiative heating of a phenolic-nylon ablator are presented. The analysis includes flow field coupling with the ablator surface, equilibrium chemistry, a step-function diffusion model and a coupled line and continuum radiation calculation. This report serves as the documentation, i e. users manual and operating instructions for the computer programs listed in the report.

  14. Lightweight blast shield

    DOEpatents

    Mixon, Larry C.; Snyder, George W.; Hill, Scott D.; Johnson, Gregory L.; Wlodarski, J. Frank; von Spakovsky, Alexis P.; Emerson, John D.; Cole, James M.; Tipton, John P.

    1991-01-01

    A tandem warhead missile arrangement that has a composite material housing structure with a first warhead mounted at one end and a second warhead mounted near another end of the composite structure with a dome shaped composite material blast shield mounted between the warheads to protect the second warhead from the blast of the first warhead.

  15. Magsat investigation. [Canadian shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, D. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    A computer program was prepared for modeling segments of the Earth's crust allowing for heterogeneity in magnetization in calculating the Earth's field at Magsat heights. This permits investigation of a large number of possible models in assessing the magnetic signatures of subprovinces of the Canadian shield. The fit between the model field and observed fields is optimized in a semi-automatic procedure.

  16. Analysis of shield tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, W. Q.; Yue, Z. Q.; Tham, L. G.; Zhu, H. H.; Lee, C. F.; Hashimoto, T.

    2004-01-01

    This paper proposes a two-dimensional finite element model for the analysis of shield tunnels by taking into account the construction process which is divided into four stages. The soil is assumed to behave as an elasto-plastic medium whereas the shield is simulated by beam-joint discontinuous model in which curved beam elements and joint elements are used to model the segments and joints, respectively. As grout is usually injected to fill the gap between the lining and the soil, the property parameters of the grout are chosen in such a way that they can reflect the state of the grout at each stage. Furthermore, the contact condition between the soil and lining will change with the construction stage, and therefore, different stress-releasing coefficients are used to account for the changes. To assess the accuracy that can be attained by the method in solving practical problems, the shield tunnelling in the No. 7 Subway Line Project in Osaka, Japan, is used as a case history for our study. The numerical results are compared with those measured in the field. The results presented in the paper show that the proposed numerical procedure can be used to effectively estimate the deformation, stresses and moments experienced by the surrounding soils and the concrete lining segments. The analysis and method presented in this paper can be considered to be useful for other subway construction projects involving shield tunnelling in soft soils. Copyright

  17. Shield against radiations

    SciTech Connect

    Grifoni, S.

    1988-02-23

    This patent describes a shield against ionizing radiations that comprises at least one layer of an aggregate-containing cement-based conglomerate or an aggregate-containing cement-based mortar wherein the aggregate consists essentially of floated galena or mixtures thereof which at least one boron mineral.

  18. Shield For Flexible Pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponton, Michael K.; Williford, Clifford B.; Lagen, Nicholas T.

    1995-01-01

    Cylindrical shield designed to fit around flexible pipe to protect nearby workers from injury and equipment from damage if pipe ruptures. Designed as pressure-relief device. Absorbs impact of debris ejected radially from broken flexible pipe. Also redirects flow of pressurized fluid escaping from broken pipe onto flow path allowing for relief of pressure while minimizing potential for harm.

  19. Efficacy of Cosmic Ray Shields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, Nicholas

    2015-10-01

    This research involved testing various types of shielding with a self-constructed Berkeley style cosmic ray detector, in order to evaluate the materials of each type of shielding's effectiveness at blocking cosmic rays and the cost- and size-efficiency of the shields as well. The detector was constructed, then tested for functionality and reliability. Following confirmation, the detector was then used at three different locations to observe it altitude or atmospheric conditions had any effect on the effectiveness of certain shields. Multiple types of shielding were tested with the detector, including combinations of several shields, primarily aluminum, high-iron steel, polyethylene plastic, water, lead, and a lead-alternative radiation shield utilized in radiology. These tests regarding both the base effectiveness and the overall efficiency of shields is designed to support future space exploratory missions where the risk of exposure to possibly lethal amounts of cosmic rays for crew and the damage caused to unshielded electronics are of serious concern.

  20. Stellar Ablation of Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Thomas E.; Horwitz, J. L.

    2007-01-01

    We review observations and theories of the solar ablation of planetary atmospheres, focusing on the terrestrial case where a large magnetosphere holds off the solar wind, so that there is little direct atmospheric impact, but also couples the solar wind electromagnetically to the auroral zones. We consider the photothermal escape flows known as the polar wind or refilling flows, the enhanced mass flux escape flows that result from localized solar wind energy dissipation in the auroral zones, and the resultant enhanced neutral atom escape flows. We term these latter two escape flows the "auroral wind." We review observations and theories of the heating and acceleration of auroral winds, including energy inputs from precipitating particles, electromagnetic energy flux at magnetohydrodynamic and plasma wave frequencies, and acceleration by parallel electric fields and by convection pickup processes also known as "centrifugal acceleration." We consider also the global circulation of ionospheric plasmas within the magnetosphere, their participation in magnetospheric disturbances as absorbers of momentum and energy, and their ultimate loss from the magnetosphere into the downstream solar wind, loading reconnection processes that occur at high altitudes near the magnetospheric boundaries. We consider the role of planetary magnetization and the accumulating evidence of stellar ablation of extrasolar planetary atmospheres. Finally, we suggest and discuss future needs for both the theory and observation of the planetary ionospheres and their role in solar wind interactions, to achieve the generality required for a predictive science of the coupling of stellar and planetary atmospheres over the full range of possible conditions.

  1. SSC environmental radiation shielding

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, J.D.

    1987-07-01

    The environmental radiation shielding requirements of the SSC have been evaluated using currently available computational tools that incorporate the well known processes of energy loss and degradation of high energy particles into Monte Carlo computer codes. These tools permit determination of isodose contours in the matter surrounding a source point and therefore the specification of minimum thicknesses or extents of shielding in order to assure annual dose equivalents less than some specified design amount. For the general public the annual dose equivalent specified in the design is 10 millirem, small compared to the dose from naturally occurring radiation. The types of radiation fall into two classes for the purposes of shielding determinations-hadrons and muons. The sources of radiation at the SSC of concern for the surrounding environment are the interaction regions, the specially designed beam dumps into which the beams are dumped from time to time, and beam clean-up regions where stops remove the beam halo in order to reduce experimental backgrounds. A final, unlikely source of radiation considered is the accidental loss of the full beam at some point around the ring. Conservative choices of a luminosity of 10{sup 34} cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1} and a beam current three times design have been made in calculating the required shielding and boundaries of the facility. In addition to determination of minimum distances for the annual dose equivalents, the question of possible radioactivity produced in nearby wells or in municipal water supplies is addressed. The designed shielding distances and beam dumps are such that the induced radioactivity in ground water is safely smaller than the levels permitted by EPA and international agencies.

  2. Spacecraft Electrostatic Radiation Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This project analyzed the feasibility of placing an electrostatic field around a spacecraft to provide a shield against radiation. The concept was originally proposed in the 1960s and tested on a spacecraft by the Soviet Union in the 1970s. Such tests and analyses showed that this concept is not only feasible but operational. The problem though is that most of this work was aimed at protection from 10- to 100-MeV radiation. We now appreciate that the real problem is 1- to 2-GeV radiation. So, the question is one of scaling, in both energy and size. Can electrostatic shielding be made to work at these high energy levels and can it protect an entire vehicle? After significant analysis and consideration, an electrostatic shield configuration was proposed. The selected architecture was a torus, charged to a high negative voltage, surrounding the vehicle, and a set of positively charged spheres. Van de Graaff generators were proposed as the mechanism to move charge from the vehicle to the torus to generate the fields necessary to protect the spacecraft. This design minimized complexity, residual charge, and structural forces and resolved several concerns raised during the internal critical review. But, it still is not clear if such a system is costeffective or feasible, even though several studies have indicated usefulness for radiation protection at energies lower than that of the galactic cosmic rays. Constructing such a system will require power supplies that can generate voltages 10 times that of the state of the art. Of more concern is the difficulty of maintaining the proper net charge on the entire structure and ensuring that its interaction with solar wind will not cause rapid discharge. Yet, if these concerns can be resolved, such a scheme may provide significant radiation shielding to future vehicles, without the excessive weight or complexity of other active shielding techniques.

  3. Flexible Multi-Shock Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, Eric L. (Inventor); Crews, Jeanne L. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Flexible multi-shock shield system and method are disclosed for defending against hypervelocity particles. The flexible multi-shock shield system and method may include a number of flexible bumpers or shield layers spaced apart by one or more resilient support layers, all of which may be encapsulated in a protective cover. Fasteners associated with the protective cover allow the flexible multi-shock shield to be secured to the surface of a structure to be protected.

  4. Gravity Scaling of a Power Reactor Water Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Robert S.; Pearson, J. Boise

    2007-01-01

    A similarity analysis on a water-based reactor shield examined the effect of gravity on free convection between a reactor shield inner and outer vessel boundaries. Two approaches established similarity between operation on the Earth and the Moon: 1) direct scaling of Rayleigh number equating gravity-surface heat flux products, 2) temperature difference between the wall and thermal boundary layer held constant. Nusselt number for natural convection (laminar and turbulent) is assumed of form Nu = CRa(sup n).

  5. An assessment of the readiness of ablative materials for preflight application to the shuttle orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tompkins, S. S.; Brewer, W. D.; Clark, R. K.; Pittman, C. M.; Brinkley, K. L.

    1980-01-01

    The shuttle orbiter relies primarily on a reusable surface insulation (RSI) thermal protection system (TPS). The RSI is very efficient in its thermal performance; however, the RSI tile system has shown poor mechanical integrity. The state-of-the-art of the ablative TPS is reviewed, and an assessment made of the ablator's readiness for use on the shuttle orbiter. Unresolved technical issues with regard to the ablative TPS are identified. Short time, highly focused analytical and experimental programs were initiated to: (1) identify candidate ablation materials; (2) assess the data base for these materials; (3) evaluate the need and kind of waterproof coating; (4) calculate thermal and other stresses in an ablator tile; (5) identify an acceptable ablator/RSI tile joint filler; and (6) assess the sensitivity of the ablator to sequential heat pulses. Results from some of these programs are discussed.

  6. Atrial fibrillation ablation.

    PubMed

    Pappone, Carlo; Santinelli, Vincenzo

    2012-06-01

    Atrial fibrillation is the commonest cardiac arrhythmia, with significant morbidity related to symptoms, heart failure, and thromboembolism, which is associated with excess mortality. Over the past 10 years, many centers worldwide have reported high success rates and few complications after a single ablation procedure in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. Recent studies indicate a short-term and long-term superiority of catheter ablation as compared with conventional antiarrhythmic drug therapy in terms of arrhythmia recurrence, quality of life, and arrhythmia progression. As a result, catheter ablation is evolving to a front-line therapy in many patients with atrial fibrillation. However, in patients with persistent long-standing atrial fibrillation catheter ablation strategy is more complex and time-consuming, frequently requiring repeat procedures to achieve success rates as high as in paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. In the near future, however, with growing experience and evolving technology, catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation may be extended also to patients with long-standing atrial fibrillation. PMID:22541284

  7. Infrared laser bone ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Nuss, R.C.; Fabian, R.L.; Sarkar, R.; Puliafito, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    The bone ablation characteristics of five infrared lasers, including three pulsed lasers (Nd:YAG, lambda = 1064 micron; Hol:YSGG, lambda = 2.10 micron; and Erb:YAG, lambda = 2.94 micron) and two continuous-wave lasers (Nd:YAG, lambda = 1.064 micron; and CO/sub 2/, lambda = 10.6 micron), were studied. All laser ablations were performed in vitro, using moist, freshly dissected calvarium of guinea pig skulls. Quantitative etch rates of the three pulsed lasers were calculated. Light microscopy of histologic sections of ablated bone revealed a zone of tissue damage of 10 to 15 micron adjacent to the lesion edge in the case of the pulsed Nd:YAG and the Erb:YAG lasers, from 20 to 90 micron zone of tissue damage for bone ablated by the Hol:YSGG laser, and 60 to 135 micron zone of tissue damage in the case of the two continuous-wave lasers. Possible mechanisms of bone ablation and tissue damage are discussed.

  8. Ablation of Myocardial Tissue With Nanosecond Pulsed Electric Fields

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Fei; Varghese, Frency; Pakhomov, Andrei G.; Semenov, Iurii; Xiao, Shu; Philpott, Jonathan; Zemlin, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Background Ablation of cardiac tissue is an essential tool for the treatment of arrhythmias, particularly of atrial fibrillation, atrial flutter, and ventricular tachycardia. Current ablation technologies suffer from substantial recurrence rates, thermal side effects, and long procedure times. We demonstrate that ablation with nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) can potentially overcome these limitations. Methods We used optical mapping to monitor electrical activity in Langendorff-perfused New Zealand rabbit hearts (n = 12). We repeatedly inserted two shock electrodes, spaced 2–4 mm apart, into the ventricles (through the entire wall) and applied nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) (5–20 kV/cm, 350 ns duration, at varying pulse numbers and frequencies) to create linear lesions of 12–18 mm length. Hearts were stained either with tetrazolium chloride (TTC) or propidium iodide (PI) to determine the extent of ablation. Some stained lesions were sectioned to obtain the three-dimensional geometry of the ablated volume. Results In all animals (12/12), we were able to create nonconducting lesions with less than 2 seconds of nsPEF application per site and minimal heating (< 0.2°C) of the tissue. The geometry of the ablated volume was smoother and more uniform throughout the wall than typical for RF ablation. The width of the lesions could be controlled up to 6 mm via the electrode spacing and the shock parameters. Conclusions Ablation with nsPEFs is a promising alternative to radiofrequency (RF) ablation of AF. It may dramatically reduce procedure times and produce more consistent lesion thickness than RF ablation. PMID:26658139

  9. Tumour ablation: technical aspects

    PubMed Central

    Bodner, Gerd; Bale, Reto

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Image-guided percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive, relatively low-risk procedure for tumour treatment. Local recurrence and survival rates depend on the rate of complete ablation of the entire tumour including a sufficient margin of surrounding healthy tissue. Currently a variety of different RFA devices are available. The interventionalist must be able to predict the configuration and extent of the resulting ablation necrosis. Accurate planning and execution of RFA according to the size and geometry of the tumour is essential. In order to minimize complications, individualized treatment strategies may be necessary for tumours close to vital structures. This review examines the state-of-the art of different device technologies, approaches, and treatment strategies for percutaneous RFA of liver tumours. PMID:19965296

  10. Advanced Ablative TPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasch, Matthew J.

    2011-01-01

    Early NASA missions (Gemini, Apollo, Mars Viking) employed new ablative TPS that were tailored for the entry environment. After 40 years, heritage ablative TPS materials using Viking or Pathfinder era materials are at or near their performance limits and will be inadequate for future exploration missions. Significant advances in TPS materials technology are needed in order to enable any subsequent human exploration missions beyond Low Earth Orbit. This poster summarizes some recent progress at NASA in developing families of advanced rigid/conformable and flexible ablators that could potentially be used for thermal protection in planetary entry missions. In particular the effort focuses technologies required to land heavy (approx.40 metric ton) masses on Mars to facilitate future exploration plans.

  11. Microwave ablation energy delivery: Influence of power pulsing on ablation results in an ex vivo and in vivo liver model

    PubMed Central

    Bedoya, Mariajose; del Rio, Alejandro Muñoz; Chiang, Jason; Brace, Christopher L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare the impact of continuous and pulsed energy deliveries on microwave ablation growth and shape in unperfused and perfused liver models. Methods: A total of 15 kJ at 2.45 GHz was applied to ex vivo bovine liver using one of five delivery methods (n = 50 total, 10 per group): 25 W continuous for 10 min (25 W average), 50 W continuous for 5 min (50 W average), 100 W continuous for 2.5 min (100 W average), 100 W pulsed for 10 min (25 W average), and 100 W pulsed for 5 min (50 W average). A total of 30 kJ was applied to in vivo porcine livers (n = 35, 7 per group) using delivery methods similar to the ex vivo study, but with twice the total ablation time to offset heat loss to blood perfusion. Temperatures were monitored 5–20 mm from the ablation antenna, with values over 60 °C indicating acute cellular necrosis. Comparisons of ablation size and shape were made between experimental groups based on total energy delivery, average power applied, and peak power using ANOVA with post-hoc pairwise tests. Results: No significant differences were noted in ablation sizes or circularities between pulsed and continuous groups in ex vivo tissue. Temperature data demonstrated more rapid heating in pulsed ablations, suggesting that pulsing may overcome blood perfusion and coagulate tissues more rapidly in vivo. Differences in ablation size and shape were noted in vivo despite equivalent energy delivery among all groups. Overall, the largest ablation volume in vivo was produced with 100 W continuous for 5 min (265.7 ± 208.1 cm3). At 25 W average, pulsed-power ablation volumes were larger than continuous-power ablations (67.4 ± 34.5 cm3 versus 23.6 ± 26.5 cm3, P = 0.43). Similarly, pulsed ablations produced significantly greater length (P ≤ 0.01), with increase in diameter (P = 0.09) and a slight decrease in circularity (P = 0.97). When comparing 50 W average power groups, moderate differences in size were noted (P ≥ 0.06) and

  12. Developing the model of laser ablation by considering the interplay between emission and expansion of aluminum plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Rezaei, F.; Tavassoli, S. H.

    2013-01-15

    In the present study, the ablation behavior of aluminum target and its plasma radiation in noble ambient gases by a laser pulse with wavelength of 266 nm and pulse duration of 10 ns are numerically studied. A thermal model of laser ablation considering heat conduction, Euler equations, Saha-Eggert equations, Knudsen layer, mass and energy balance relations and optical shielding effects are used for calculation of plasma parameters. Effects of excitation energy on plasma expansion and its emissivity are investigated. Time and spatial-resolved plasma emission including bremsstrahlung, recombination and spectral emission at early delay times after laser irradiation is obtained. Effects of two ambient gases (He and Ar) as well as different gas pressures of 100, 300, 500, and 760 Torr on plasma expansion and its spectrum are studied. Results illustrate that at initial delay times, especially at high noble gas pressures, ionic lines have the maximum intensities, while at later times neutral lines dominate. When the pressure of ambient gas increases, a confinement of the plasma plume is predicted and the intensity of neutral lines decreases. Continuous emission increases with wavelength in both ambient gases. Spatially resolved analysis shows that an intense continuous emission is predicted next to the sample surface decreasing with distance from the latter.

  13. Roof Shield for Advance and Retreat Mining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, E. V.

    1985-01-01

    Shield sections change their configuration to suit mining mode. Articulation cylinders raise rear shield to advance position, and locking cylinders hold it there. To change to retreat position articulation cylinders lower shield. Locking pins at edge of outermost shield plate latch shield to chock base. Shield accommodates roof heights ranging from 36 to 60 inches (0.9 to 1.52 meters).

  14. Capacitive Proximity Sensors With Additional Driven Shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcconnell, Robert L.

    1993-01-01

    Improved capacitive proximity sensors constructed by incorporating one or more additional driven shield(s). Sensitivity and range of sensor altered by adjusting driving signal(s) applied to shield(s). Includes sensing electrode and driven isolating shield that correspond to sensing electrode and driven shield.

  15. Composition for radiation shielding

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1994-08-02

    A composition for use as a radiation shield is disclosed. The shield has a depleted uranium core for absorbing gamma rays and a bismuth coating for preventing chemical corrosion and absorbing gamma rays. Alternatively, a sheet of gadolinium may be positioned between the uranium core and the bismuth coating for absorbing neutrons. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing materials that emit radiation such as gamma rays and neutrons. The container is preferably formed by casting bismuth around a pre-formed uranium container having a gadolinium sheeting, and allowing the bismuth to cool. The resulting container is a structurally sound, corrosion-resistant, radiation-absorbing container. 2 figs.

  16. Gas shielding apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Brandt, Daniel

    1985-01-01

    An apparatus for preventing oxidation by uniformly distributing inert shielding gas over the weld area of workpieces such as pipes being welded together. The apparatus comprises a chamber and a gas introduction element. The chamber has an annular top wall, an annular bottom wall, an inner side wall and an outer side wall connecting the top and bottom walls. One side wall is a screen and the other has a portion defining an orifice. The gas introduction element has a portion which encloses the orifice and can be one or more pipes. The gas introduction element is in fluid communication with the chamber and introduces inert shielding gas into the chamber. The inert gas leaves the chamber through the screen side wall and is dispersed evenly over the weld area.

  17. Multilayer radiation shield

    SciTech Connect

    Urbahn, John Arthur; Laskaris, Evangelos Trifon

    2009-06-16

    A power generation system including: a generator including a rotor including a superconductive rotor coil coupled to a rotatable shaft; a first prime mover drivingly coupled to the rotatable shaft; and a thermal radiation shield, partially surrounding the rotor coil, including at least a first sheet and a second sheet spaced apart from the first sheet by centripetal force produced by the rotatable shaft. A thermal radiation shield for a generator including a rotor including a super-conductive rotor coil including: a first sheet having at least one surface formed from a low emissivity material; and at least one additional sheet having at least one surface formed from a low emissivity material spaced apart from the first sheet by centripetal force produced by the rotatable shaft, wherein each successive sheet is an incrementally greater circumferential arc length and wherein the centripetal force shapes the sheets into a substantially catenary shape.

  18. Gas shielding apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Brandt, D.

    1984-06-05

    An apparatus for preventing oxidation by uniformly distributing inert shielding gas over the weld area of workpieces such as pipes being welded together. The apparatus comprises a chamber and a gas introduction element. The chamber has an annular top wall, an annular bottom wall, an inner side wall and an outer side wall connecting the top and bottom walls. One side wall is a screen and the other has a portion defining an orifice. The gas introduction element has a portion which encloses the orifice and can be one or more pipes. The gas introduction element is in fluid communication with the chamber and introduces inert shielding gas into the chamber. The inert gas leaves the chamber through the screen side wall and is dispersed evenly over the weld area.

  19. Whipple bumper shield simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Hertel, E.S.; Chhabildas, L.C. ); Hill, S.A. . George C. Marshall Space Flight Center)

    1991-01-01

    The Whipple bumper is a space shield designed to protect a space station from the most hazardous orbital space debris environment. A series of numerical simulations has been performed using the multi-dimensional hydrodynamics code CTH to estimate the effectiveness of the thin Whipple bumper design. These simulations are performed for impact velocities of {approximately}10 km/s which are now accessible by experiments using the Sandia hypervelocity launcher facility. For a {approximately}10 km/s impact by a 0.7 gm aluminum flier plate, the experimental results indicate that the debris cloud resulting upon impact of the bumper shield by the flier plate, completely penetrates the sub-structure. The CTH simulations also predict complete penetration by the subsequent debris cloud. 5 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Underwater excimer laser ablation of polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elaboudi, I.; Lazare, S.; Belin, C.; Talaga, D.; Labrugère, C.

    2008-09-01

    In this paper, we study the photoablation kinetic of poly (ethylene terephthalate) (PET), polycarbonate (PC), polyimide (PI) and polystyrene (PS) in both air and water. Compared to the results obtained in air, we highlight the decrease of the ablation threshold (AT) of polyesters in contact with water as a function of polymer chemical structure. In order to check the expected hydrolytic reaction of polyesters near the ablation threshold, the chemical modification of the polymer surfaces, as well the composition of the ablation products, were investigated after irradiation near the fluence of ablation threshold in air (air- F t ) by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and confocal Raman microspectroscopy. The morphology of polymers obtained by underwater irradiation and near the air- F t was also examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). To understand the process and its dynamics in contact with water, we consider the model of temperature at the polymer-water interface based on the semi-analytical solution of the transit heat-diffusion equation.

  1. Shuttle subscale ablative nozzle tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, L. B.; Bailey, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    Recent subscale nozzle tests have identified new and promising carbon phenolic nozzle ablatives which utilize staple rayon, PAN, and pitch based carbon cloth. A 4-inch throat diameter submerged test nozzle designed for the 48-inch Jet Propulsion Laboratory char motor was used to evaluate five different designs incorporating 20 candidate ablatives. Test results indicate that several pitch and PAN-based carbon phenolic ablatives can provide erosion and char performance equivalent or superior to the present continuous rayon-based SRM ablative.

  2. Shielding considerations for satellite microelectronics

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, W.C.; Drumm, C.R.; Roeske, S.B.; Scrivner, G.J.

    1996-12-01

    Shielding for space microelectronics needs to provide an acceptable dose rate with minimum shield mass. The analysis presented here shows that the best approach is, in general, to use a graded-Z shield, with a high-Z layer sandwiched between two low-Z materials. A graded-Z shield is shown to reduce the electron dose rate by more than sixty percent over a single-material shield of the same areal density. For protons, the optimal shield would consist of a single, low-Z material layer. However, it is shown that a graded-Z shield is nearly as effective as a single-material shield, as long as a low-Z layer is located adjacent to the microelectronics. A specific shield design depends upon the details of the radiation environment, system model, design margins/levels, compatibility of shield materials, etc. Therefore, the authors present here general principles for designing effective shields and describe how the computer codes are used for this application.

  3. Ablative thermal protection systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaniman, J.; Fisher, R.; Wojciechowski, C.; Dean, W.

    1983-01-01

    The procedures used to establish the TPS (thermal protection system) design of the SRB (solid rocket booster) element of the Space Shuttle vehicle are discussed. A final evaluation of the adequacy of this design will be made from data obtained from the first five Shuttle flights. Temperature sensors installed at selected locations on the SRB structure covered by the TPS give information as a function of time throughout the flight. Anomalies are to be investigated and computer design thermal models adjusted if required. In addition, the actual TPS ablator material loss is to be measured after each flight and compared with analytically determined losses. The analytical methods of predicting ablator performance are surveyed.

  4. Skylab Solar Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A sail like sunshade for possible use as a sunscreen for the Skylab Orbital Workshop (OWS) is shown being fabricated in the GE Building across the street from Johnson Space Center, Houston Texas. Three people help the steamstress feed the material through the sewing machine. The three-layered sunshade will be composed of a top layer of aluminized mylar, a middle layer of laminated nylon ripstop, and a bottom layer of thin nylon. Working on the sunshade are from left to right: Dale Gentry, Elizabeth Gauldin, Alyene Baker, and James H. Barnett Jr. Mrs. Baker, a GE employee, operates the double needle Singer sewing machine. Barnett is head of the Crew Equipment Development Section of JSC Crew Systems Division. Mrs. Gauldin is also with the Crew Systems Division. Gentry works for GE. The work shown here is part of the crash program underway to prepare a sunshield for Skylab to replace the orginal shield which was lost when Skylab 1 was launched on May 14, 1973. The improvised solar shield selected to be used will be carried to Earth orbit by the Skylab 2 crewman who will then deploy the reflective parasol to shade part of the OWS from the hot rays of the sun. Loss of the orginal sun shield has caused an overheating problem. in the Orbital Work Shop.

  5. Numerical investigation on target implosions driven by radiation ablation and shock compression in dynamic hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Delong; Sun, Shunkai; Zhao, Yingkui; Ding, Ning; Wu, Jiming; Dai, Zihuan; Yin, Li; Zhang, Yang; Xue, Chuang

    2015-05-15

    In a dynamic hohlraum driven inertial confinement fusion (ICF) configuration, the target may experience two different kinds of implosions. One is driven by hohlraum radiation ablation, which is approximately symmetric at the equator and poles. The second is caused by the radiating shock produced in Z-pinch dynamic hohlraums, only taking place at the equator. To gain a symmetrical target implosion driven by radiation ablation and avoid asymmetric shock compression is a crucial issue in driving ICF using dynamic hohlraums. It is known that when the target is heated by hohlraum radiation, the ablated plasma will expand outward. The pressure in the shocked converter plasma qualitatively varies linearly with the material temperature. However, the ablation pressure in the ablated plasma varies with 3.5 power of the hohlraum radiation temperature. Therefore, as the hohlraum temperature increases, the ablation pressure will eventually exceed the shock pressure, and the expansion of the ablated plasma will obviously weaken the shock propagation and decrease its velocity after propagating into the ablator plasma. Consequently, longer time duration is provided for the symmetrical target implosion driven by radiation ablation. In this paper these processes are numerically investigated by changing drive currents or varying load parameters. The simulation results show that a critical hohlraum radiation temperature is needed to provide a high enough ablation pressure to decelerate the shock, thus providing long enough time duration for the symmetric fuel compression driven by radiation ablation.

  6. Numerical investigation on target implosions driven by radiation ablation and shock compression in dynamic hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Delong; Sun, Shunkai; Zhao, Yingkui; Ding, Ning; Wu, Jiming; Dai, Zihuan; Yin, Li; Zhang, Yang; Xue, Chuang

    2015-05-01

    In a dynamic hohlraum driven inertial confinement fusion (ICF) configuration, the target may experience two different kinds of implosions. One is driven by hohlraum radiation ablation, which is approximately symmetric at the equator and poles. The second is caused by the radiating shock produced in Z-pinch dynamic hohlraums, only taking place at the equator. To gain a symmetrical target implosion driven by radiation ablation and avoid asymmetric shock compression is a crucial issue in driving ICF using dynamic hohlraums. It is known that when the target is heated by hohlraum radiation, the ablated plasma will expand outward. The pressure in the shocked converter plasma qualitatively varies linearly with the material temperature. However, the ablation pressure in the ablated plasma varies with 3.5 power of the hohlraum radiation temperature. Therefore, as the hohlraum temperature increases, the ablation pressure will eventually exceed the shock pressure, and the expansion of the ablated plasma will obviously weaken the shock propagation and decrease its velocity after propagating into the ablator plasma. Consequently, longer time duration is provided for the symmetrical target implosion driven by radiation ablation. In this paper these processes are numerically investigated by changing drive currents or varying load parameters. The simulation results show that a critical hohlraum radiation temperature is needed to provide a high enough ablation pressure to decelerate the shock, thus providing long enough time duration for the symmetric fuel compression driven by radiation ablation.

  7. Nonthermal ablation of deep brain targets: A simulation study on a large animal model

    PubMed Central

    Top, Can Barış; White, P. Jason; McDannold, Nathan J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Thermal ablation with transcranial MRI-guided focused ultrasound (FUS) is currently limited to central brain targets because of heating and other beam effects caused by the presence of the skull. Recently, it was shown that it is possible to ablate tissues without depositing thermal energy by driving intravenously administered microbubbles to inertial cavitation using low-duty-cycle burst sonications. A recent study demonstrated that this ablation method could ablate tissue volumes near the skull base in nonhuman primates without thermally damaging the nearby bone. However, blood–brain disruption was observed in the prefocal region, and in some cases, this region contained small areas of tissue damage. The objective of this study was to analyze the experimental model with simulations and to interpret the cause of these effects. Methods: The authors simulated prior experiments where nonthermal ablation was performed in the brain in anesthetized rhesus macaques using a 220 kHz clinical prototype transcranial MRI-guided FUS system. Low-duty-cycle sonications were applied at deep brain targets with the ultrasound contrast agent Definity. For simulations, a 3D pseudospectral finite difference time domain tool was used. The effects of shear mode conversion, focal steering, skull aberrations, nonlinear propagation, and the presence of skull base on the pressure field were investigated using acoustic and elastic wave propagation models. Results: The simulation results were in agreement with the experimental findings in the prefocal region. In the postfocal region, however, side lobes were predicted by the simulations, but no effects were evident in the experiments. The main beam was not affected by the different simulated scenarios except for a shift of about 1 mm in peak position due to skull aberrations. However, the authors observed differences in the volume, amplitude, and distribution of the side lobes. In the experiments, a single element passive

  8. Resin-Impregnated Carbon Ablator: A New Ablative Material for Hyperbolic Entry Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esper, Jaime; Lengowski, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Ablative materials are required to protect a space vehicle from the extreme temperatures encountered during the most demanding (hyperbolic) atmospheric entry velocities, either for probes launched toward other celestial bodies, or coming back to Earth from deep space missions. To that effect, the resin-impregnated carbon ablator (RICA) is a high-temperature carbon/phenolic ablative thermal protection system (TPS) material designed to use modern and commercially viable components in its manufacture. Heritage carbon/phenolic ablators intended for this use rely on materials that are no longer in production (i.e., Galileo, Pioneer Venus); hence the development of alternatives such as RICA is necessary for future NASA planetary entry and Earth re-entry missions. RICA s capabilities were initially measured in air for Earth re-entry applications, where it was exposed to a heat flux of 14 MW/sq m for 22 seconds. Methane tests were also carried out for potential application in Saturn s moon Titan, with a nominal heat flux of 1.4 MW/sq m for up to 478 seconds. Three slightly different material formulations were manufactured and subsequently tested at the Plasma Wind Tunnel of the University of Stuttgart in Germany (PWK1) in the summer and fall of 2010. The TPS integrity was well preserved in most cases, and results show great promise.

  9. Impact of varying debris cover thickness on ablation: a case study for Koxkar Glacier in the Tien Shan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juen, M.; Mayer, C.; Lambrecht, A.; Han, H.; Liu, S.

    2014-03-01

    To quantify the ablation processes on a debris covered glacier, a simple distributed ablation model has been developed and applied to a selected glacier. For this purpose, a set of field measurements was carried out to collect empirical data. A morphometric analysis of the glacier surface enables us to capture statistically the areal distribution of topographic features that influence debris thickness and consequently ablation. Remote-sensing techniques, using high-resolution satellite imagery, were used to extrapolate the in situ point measurements to the whole ablation area and to map and classify melt-relevant surface types. As a result, a practically applicable method is presented that allows the estimation of ablation on a debris covered glacier by combining field data and remote-sensing information. The sub-debris ice ablation accounts for about 24% of the entire ice ablation, while the percentage of the moraine covered area accounts for approximately 32% of the entire glacierized area. Although the ice cliffs occupy only 1.7% of the debris covered area, the melt amount accounts for approximately 12% of the total sub-debris ablation and 2.5% of the total ablation respectively. Our study highlights the influence of debris cover on the response of the glacier terminus in a particular climate setting. Due to the fact that melt rates beyond 0.1 m of moraine cover are highly restricted, the shielding effect of the debris cover dominates over the temperature and elevation dependence of the ablation in the bare ice case.

  10. Impact of varying debris cover thickness on catchment scale ablation: a case study for Koxkar glacier in the Tien Shan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juen, M.; Mayer, C.; Lambrecht, A.; Haidong, H.; Shiyin, L.

    2013-11-01

    To quantify the ablation processes on a debris covered glacier, a simple distributed ablation model has been developed and applied to a selected glacier. For this purpose, a bundle of field measurements was carried out to collect empirical data. A morphometric analysis of the glacier surface enables us to statistically capture the areal distribution of topographic features that influence debris thickness and consequently ablation. Remote sensing techniques, using high resolution satellite imagery, were used to extrapolate the ground truth results to the whole ablation area and to map and classify melt-relevant surface types. As a result, a practically applicable method is presented, that allows the estimation of ablation on a debris covered glacier by combining field data and remote sensing information. The sub-debris ice ablation accounts for about 19% of the entire ice ablation, while the percentage of the moraine covered area accounts for approximately 32% of the entire glacerized area. Although the ice cliffs occupy only 1.7% of the debris covered area the melt amount accounts for approximately 15% of the total sub-debris ablation and 2.7% of the total ablation respectively. Our study highlights the influence of debris cover on the response of the glacier terminus to climate warming. Due to the fact that melt rates beyond 0.1m of moraine cover are highly restricted the shielding effect of the debris cover dominates over the temperature- and elevation dependence of the ablation in the bare ice case.

  11. Therapeutic stimulation versus ablation.

    PubMed

    Hariz, Marwan I; Hariz, Gun-Marie

    2013-01-01

    The renaissance of functional stereotactic neurosurgery was pioneered in the mid 1980s by Laitinen's introduction of Leksell's posteroventral pallidotomy for Parkinson´s disease (PD). This ablative procedure experienced a worldwide spread in the 1990s, owing to its excellent effect on dyskinesias and other symptoms of post-l-dopa PD. Modern deep brain stimulation (DBS), pioneered by Benabid and Pollak in 1987 for the treatment of tremor, first became popular when it was applied to the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in the mid 1990s, where it demonstrated a striking effect on all cardinal symptoms of advanced PD, and permitted reduced dosages of medication. DBS, as a nondestructive, adaptable, and reversible procedure that is proving safe in bilateral surgery on basal ganglia, has great appeal to clinicians and patients alike, despite the fact that it is expensive, laborious, and relies on very strict patient selection criteria, especially for STN DBS. Psychiatric surgery has experienced the same phenomenon, with DBS supplanting completely stereotactic ablative procedures. This chapter discusses the pros and cons of ablation versus stimulation and investigates the reasons why DBS has overshadowed proven efficient ablative procedures such as pallidotomy for PD, and capsulotomy and cingulotomy for obsessive-compulsive disorder and depression. PMID:24112885

  12. New Ablation Technologies and Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Berte, Benjamin; Yamashita, Seigo; Derval, Nicolas; Denis, Arnaud; Shah, Ashok; Amraoui, Sana; Hocini, Meleze; Haissaguerre, Michel; Jais, Pierre; Sacher, Frederic

    2014-01-01

    Catheter ablation is an established treatment strategy for a range of different cardiac arrhythmias. Over the past decade two major areas of expansion have been ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular tachycardia (VT) in the context of structurally abnormal hearts. In parallel with the expanding role of catheter ablation for AF and VT, multiple novel technologies have been developed which aim to increase safety and procedural success. Areas of development include novel catheter designs, novel navigation technologies and higher resolution imaging techniques. The aim of the present review is to provide an overview of novel developments in AF ablation and VT ablation in patients with of structural cardiac diseases. PMID:26835075

  13. New Ablation Technologies and Techniques.

    PubMed

    Mahida, Saagar; Berte, Benjamin; Yamashita, Seigo; Derval, Nicolas; Denis, Arnaud; Shah, Ashok; Amraoui, Sana; Hocini, Meleze; Haissaguerre, Michel; Jais, Pierre; Sacher, Frederic

    2014-08-01

    Catheter ablation is an established treatment strategy for a range of different cardiac arrhythmias. Over the past decade two major areas of expansion have been ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular tachycardia (VT) in the context of structurally abnormal hearts. In parallel with the expanding role of catheter ablation for AF and VT, multiple novel technologies have been developed which aim to increase safety and procedural success. Areas of development include novel catheter designs, novel navigation technologies and higher resolution imaging techniques. The aim of the present review is to provide an overview of novel developments in AF ablation and VT ablation in patients with of structural cardiac diseases. PMID:26835075

  14. Artificial meteor ablation studies. [for identification of cosmic dust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, M. B.

    1973-01-01

    Artificial meteor ablation was performed on natural minerals, composed predominately of magnetite and hematite, using an arc heated plasma stream of air. Analysis of the ablated debris indicated most was composed of two or more minerals. The more volatile elements were depleted and the relative abundance of Fe increased as a result of both volatile depletion and a reduction in its oxidation state. Hematite was converted to magnetite in the ablation zone, and quartz and apatite minerals were converted to an Fe-rich glass consisting of varying amounts of Si, P, Cl, and Ca, depending upon the accessory minerals available at the time of melting. Artificially created ablation products from iron oxides exhibited unique properties depending on the composition of the original material and the environmental conditions of formation. In addition to the accepted elemental criteria, these properties were morphologic characteristics, textural parameters, and the existence of metastable minerals.

  15. A Simulation of Laser Ablation During the Laser Pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Motoyuki; Ventzek, Peter L. G.; Sakai, Y.; Date, H.; Tagashira, H.; Kitamori, K.

    1996-10-01

    Charge damage considerations in plasma assisted etching are prompting the development of neutral beam sources. Already, anisotropic etching of has been demonstrated by neutral beams generated by exhausting heated ecthing gases into vacuum via a nozzle. Laser ablation of condensed etching gases may also be an attractive alternative means of generating neutral beams. Laser ablation coupled with electrical breakdown of the ablation plume may afford some degree of control over a neutral beam's dissociation fraction and ion content. Results from a Monte Carlo simulation of the laser ablation plume as it expands into vacuum at time-scales during the laser pulse will be presented. The model includes both heavy particle interactions and photochemistry. In particular, the influence of the initial particle angular distribution on the beam spread will be demonstrated as will the relationship between laser beam energy and initial ionization and dissociation fraction.

  16. Interactive Volumetry Of Liver Ablation Zones.

    PubMed

    Egger, Jan; Busse, Harald; Brandmaier, Philipp; Seider, Daniel; Gawlitza, Matthias; Strocka, Steffen; Voglreiter, Philip; Dokter, Mark; Hofmann, Michael; Kainz, Bernhard; Hann, Alexander; Chen, Xiaojun; Alhonnoro, Tuomas; Pollari, Mika; Schmalstieg, Dieter; Moche, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive technique that destroys cancer cells by heat. The heat results from focusing energy in the radiofrequency spectrum through a needle. Amongst others, this can enable the treatment of patients who are not eligible for an open surgery. However, the possibility of recurrent liver cancer due to incomplete ablation of the tumor makes post-interventional monitoring via regular follow-up scans mandatory. These scans have to be carefully inspected for any conspicuousness. Within this study, the RF ablation zones from twelve post-interventional CT acquisitions have been segmented semi-automatically to support the visual inspection. An interactive, graph-based contouring approach, which prefers spherically shaped regions, has been applied. For the quantitative and qualitative analysis of the algorithm's results, manual slice-by-slice segmentations produced by clinical experts have been used as the gold standard (which have also been compared among each other). As evaluation metric for the statistical validation, the Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) has been calculated. The results show that the proposed tool provides lesion segmentation with sufficient accuracy much faster than manual segmentation. The visual feedback and interactivity make the proposed tool well suitable for the clinical workflow. PMID:26482818

  17. Interactive Volumetry Of Liver Ablation Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egger, Jan; Busse, Harald; Brandmaier, Philipp; Seider, Daniel; Gawlitza, Matthias; Strocka, Steffen; Voglreiter, Philip; Dokter, Mark; Hofmann, Michael; Kainz, Bernhard; Hann, Alexander; Chen, Xiaojun; Alhonnoro, Tuomas; Pollari, Mika; Schmalstieg, Dieter; Moche, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive technique that destroys cancer cells by heat. The heat results from focusing energy in the radiofrequency spectrum through a needle. Amongst others, this can enable the treatment of patients who are not eligible for an open surgery. However, the possibility of recurrent liver cancer due to incomplete ablation of the tumor makes post-interventional monitoring via regular follow-up scans mandatory. These scans have to be carefully inspected for any conspicuousness. Within this study, the RF ablation zones from twelve post-interventional CT acquisitions have been segmented semi-automatically to support the visual inspection. An interactive, graph-based contouring approach, which prefers spherically shaped regions, has been applied. For the quantitative and qualitative analysis of the algorithm’s results, manual slice-by-slice segmentations produced by clinical experts have been used as the gold standard (which have also been compared among each other). As evaluation metric for the statistical validation, the Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) has been calculated. The results show that the proposed tool provides lesion segmentation with sufficient accuracy much faster than manual segmentation. The visual feedback and interactivity make the proposed tool well suitable for the clinical workflow.

  18. Interactive Volumetry Of Liver Ablation Zones

    PubMed Central

    Egger, Jan; Busse, Harald; Brandmaier, Philipp; Seider, Daniel; Gawlitza, Matthias; Strocka, Steffen; Voglreiter, Philip; Dokter, Mark; Hofmann, Michael; Kainz, Bernhard; Hann, Alexander; Chen, Xiaojun; Alhonnoro, Tuomas; Pollari, Mika; Schmalstieg, Dieter; Moche, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive technique that destroys cancer cells by heat. The heat results from focusing energy in the radiofrequency spectrum through a needle. Amongst others, this can enable the treatment of patients who are not eligible for an open surgery. However, the possibility of recurrent liver cancer due to incomplete ablation of the tumor makes post-interventional monitoring via regular follow-up scans mandatory. These scans have to be carefully inspected for any conspicuousness. Within this study, the RF ablation zones from twelve post-interventional CT acquisitions have been segmented semi-automatically to support the visual inspection. An interactive, graph-based contouring approach, which prefers spherically shaped regions, has been applied. For the quantitative and qualitative analysis of the algorithm’s results, manual slice-by-slice segmentations produced by clinical experts have been used as the gold standard (which have also been compared among each other). As evaluation metric for the statistical validation, the Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) has been calculated. The results show that the proposed tool provides lesion segmentation with sufficient accuracy much faster than manual segmentation. The visual feedback and interactivity make the proposed tool well suitable for the clinical workflow. PMID:26482818

  19. Percutaneous Ablation of Adrenal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesan, Aradhana M.; Locklin, Julia; Dupuy, Damian E.; Wood, Bradford J.

    2010-01-01

    Adrenal tumors comprise a broad spectrum of benign and malignant neoplasms, and include functional adrenal adenomas, pheochromocytomas, primary adrenocortical carcinoma and adrenal metastases. Percutaneous ablative approaches that have been described and used in the treatment of adrenal tumors include percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA), cryoablation, microwave ablation and chemical ablation. Local tumor ablation in the adrenal gland presents unique challenges, secondary to the adrenal gland’s unique anatomic and physiologic features. The results of clinical series employing percutaneous ablative techniques in the treatment of adrenal tumors are reviewed in this article. Clinical and technical considerations unique to ablation in the adrenal gland are presented, including approaches commonly used in our practices, and risks and potential complications are discussed. PMID:20540918

  20. Measurement of the transient shielding effectiveness of shielding cabinets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herlemann, H.; Koch, M.

    2008-05-01

    Recently, new definitions of shielding effectiveness (SE) for high-frequency and transient electromagnetic fields were introduced by Klinkenbusch (2005). Analytical results were shown for closed as well as for non closed cylindrical shields. In the present work, the shielding performance of different shielding cabinets is investigated by means of numerical simulations and measurements inside a fully anechoic chamber and a GTEM-cell. For the GTEM-cell-measurements, a downscaled model of the shielding cabinet is used. For the simulations, the numerical tools CONCEPT II and COMSOL MULTIPHYSICS were available. The numerical results agree well with the measurements. They can be used to interpret the behaviour of the shielding effectiveness of enclosures as function of frequency. From the measurement of the electric and magnetic fields with and without the enclosure in place, the electric and magnetic shielding effectiveness as well as the transient shielding effectiveness of the enclosure are calculated. The transient SE of four different shielding cabinets is determined and discussed.

  1. Spacecraft ceramic protective shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larriva, Rene F. (Inventor); Nelson, Anne (M.); Czechanski, James G. (Inventor); Poff, Ray E. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A low areal density protective shield apparatus, and method for making same, for protecting spacecraft structures from impact with hypervelocity objects, including a bumper member comprising a bumper ceramic layer, a bumper shock attenuator layer, and a bumper confining layer. The bumper ceramic layer can be SiC or B.sub.4 C; the bumper shock attenuator layer can be zirconia felt; and the bumper confining layer can be aluminum. A base armor member can be spaced from the bumper member and a ceramic fiber-based curtain can be positioned between the bumper and base armor members.

  2. Passive Shielding in CUORE

    SciTech Connect

    Bellini, F.; Cosmelli, C.; Dafinei, I.; Diemoz, S.; Faccini, R.; Ferroni, F.; Gargiulo, C.; Longo, E.; Morganti, S.; Tomei, C.; Vignati, M.; Alessandria, F.; Andreotti, E.; Foggetta, L.; Giuliani, A.; Pedretti, M.; Sangiorgio, S.; Ardito, R.; Arnaboldi, C.; Brofferio, C.

    2007-03-28

    The nature of neutrino mass is one of the friontier problems of fundamental physics. Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay (0{nu}DBD) is a powerful tool to investigate the mass hierarchy and possible extensions of the Standard Model. CUORE is a 1-Ton next generation experiment, made of 1000 Te bolometers, aiming at reaching a background of 0.01 (possibly 0.001) counts keV-1kg-1y-1 and therefore a mass sensitivity of few tens of meV The background contribution due to environmental neutrons, muon-induced neutrons in the shieldings and external gamma is discussed.

  3. Thermochemical Ablation Analysis of the Orion Heatshield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sixel, William

    2015-01-01

    The Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle will one day carry astronauts to the Moon and beyond, and Orion's heatshield is a critical component in ensuring their safe return to Earth. The Orion heatshield is the structural component responsible for absorbing the intense heating environment caused by re-entry to Earth's atmosphere. The heatshield is primarily composed of Avcoat, an ablative material that is consumed during the re-entry process. Ablation is primarily characterized by two processes: pyrolysis and recession. The decomposition of in-depth virgin material is known as pyrolysis. Recession occurs when the exposed surface of the heatshield reacts with the surrounding flow. The Orion heatshield design was changed from an individually filled Avcoat honeycomb to a molded block Avcoat design. The molded block Avcoat heatshield relies on an adhesive bond to keep it attached to the capsule. In some locations on the heatshield, the integrity of the adhesive bond cannot be verified. For these locations, a mechanical retention device was proposed. Avcoat ablation was modelled in CHAR and the in-depth virgin material temperatures were used in a Thermal Desktop model of the mechanical retention device. The retention device was analyzed and shown to cause a large increase in the maximum bondline temperature. In order to study the impact of individual ablation modelling parameters on the heatshield sizing process, a Monte Carlo simulation of the sizing process was proposed. The simulation will give the sensitivity of the ablation model to each of its input parameters. As part of the Monte Carlo simulation, statistical uncertainties on material properties were required for Avcoat. Several properties were difficult to acquire uncertainties for: the pyrolysis gas enthalpy, non-dimensional mass loss rate (B´c), and Arrhenius equation parameters. Variability in the elemental composition of Avcoat was used as the basis for determining the statistical uncertainty in pyrolysis gas

  4. Astronaut Jack Lousma During EVA to Deploy Twin Pole Sun Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Skylab-3 was the second marned mission in the skylab project. The crew spent 59 days in orbit. In this photo, Astronaut Jack Lousma deploys the Twin Pole Sun Shield created by Marshall Space Flight Center team members to replace the micrometeoroid shield, a thin protective cylinder surrounding the workshop protecting it from tiny space particles and the sun's scorching heat. The shield was damaged during the Skylab-2 mission.

  5. Effects of shields on cables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Aircraft wiring subjected to rapidly changing electromagnetic fields was considered. The ways in which shielded cables reduce surge voltages were studied along with the ways in which common practice regarding the use of shields may be at variance with the use required for the control of lightning effects. Courses in which this apparent conflict of use may be resolved were suggested. Noise currents flowing on shields of cables related to the noise signals coupled onto signal conductors were also investigated.

  6. Ablation and Thermal Response Property Model Validation for Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milos, F. S.; Chen, Y.-K.

    2009-01-01

    Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator was the heatshield material for the Stardust probe and is also a candidate heatshield material for the Orion Crew Module. As part of the heatshield qualification for Orion, physical and thermal properties were measured for newly manufactured material, included emissivity, heat capacity, thermal conductivity, elemental composition, and thermal decomposition rates. Based on these properties, an ablation and thermal-response model was developed for temperatures up to 3500 K and pressures up to 100 kPa. The model includes orthotropic and pressure-dependent thermal conductivity. In this work, model validation is accomplished by comparison of predictions with data from many arcjet tests conducted over a range of stagnation heat flux and pressure from 107 Watts per square centimeter at 2.3 kPa to 1100 Watts per square centimeter at 84 kPa. Over the entire range of test conditions, model predictions compare well with measured recession, maximum surface temperatures, and in depth temperatures.

  7. Automated microwave ablation therapy planning with single and multiple entry points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Sheena X.; Dalal, Sandeep; Kruecker, Jochen

    2012-02-01

    Microwave ablation (MWA) has become a recommended treatment modality for interventional cancer treatment. Compared with radiofrequency ablation (RFA), MWA provides more rapid and larger-volume tissue heating. It allows simultaneous ablation from different entry points and allows users to change the ablation size by controlling the power/time parameters. Ablation planning systems have been proposed in the past, mainly addressing the needs for RFA procedures. Thus a planning system addressing MWA-specific parameters and workflows is highly desirable to help physicians achieve better microwave ablation results. In this paper, we design and implement an automated MWA planning system that provides precise probe locations for complete coverage of tumor and margin. We model the thermal ablation lesion as an ellipsoidal object with three known radii varying with the duration of the ablation and the power supplied to the probe. The search for the best ablation coverage can be seen as an iterative optimization problem. The ablation centers are steered toward the location which minimizes both un-ablated tumor tissue and the collateral damage caused to the healthy tissue. We assess the performance of our algorithm using simulated lesions with known "ground truth" optimal coverage. The Mean Localization Error (MLE) between the computed ablation center in 3D and the ground truth ablation center achieves 1.75mm (Standard deviation of the mean (STD): 0.69mm). The Mean Radial Error (MRE) which is estimated by comparing the computed ablation radii with the ground truth radii reaches 0.64mm (STD: 0.43mm). These preliminary results demonstrate the accuracy and robustness of the described planning algorithm.

  8. Dynamics of tissue shrinkage during ablative temperature exposures

    PubMed Central

    Rossmann, Christian; Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth; Rattay, Frank; Haemmerich, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    There is a lack of studies that examine dynamics of heat-induced shrinkage of organ tissues. Clinical procedures such as radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation or high-intensity focused ultrasound, use heat to treat diseases such as cancer and cardiac arrhythmia. When heat is applied to tissues, shrinkage occurs due to protein denaturation, dehydration, and contraction of collagen at temperatures greater 50ºC. This is particularly relevant for image-guided procedures such as tumor ablation, where pre- and post-treatment images are compared and any changes in dimensions must be considered to avoid misinterpretations of the treatment outcome. We present data from ex vivo, isothermal shrinkage tests in porcine liver tissue, where axial changes in tissue length were recorded during 15 minutes of heating to temperatures between 60 and 95ºC. A mathematical model was developed to accurately describe the time and temperature-dependent shrinkage behavior. Shrinkage dynamics had same characteristics independent of temperature; the estimated relative shrinkage, adjusted for time since death, after 15 min heating to temperatures of 60, 65, 75, 85 and 95ºC, was 12.3, 13.8, 16.6, 19.2, and 21.7%, respectively. Our results demonstrate shrinkage dynamics of organ tissues, and suggest the importance of considering tissue shrinkage for thermal ablative treatments. PMID:24345880

  9. Successful lysis in a stroke following endovenous laser ablation and extensive miniphlebectomy of varicose veins.

    PubMed

    Spinedi, Luca; Staub, Daniel; Uthoff, Heiko

    2016-05-01

    Stroke is a very rare but potential fatal complication of endovenous thermal treatment in patients with a right-to-left shunt. To our best knowledge, there are only two reports in the literature of stroke after endovenous thermal ablation of varicose veins, one after endovenous laser ablation and one after radiofrequency ablation and phlebectomy, both treated conservatively. This report describes a successful lysis in a patient with an ischemic stroke associated with bilateral endovenous heat-induced thrombosis class I after endovenous laser ablation of both great saphenous vein and extensive miniphlebectomy in a patient with an unknown patent foramen ovale. PMID:26447137

  10. Plasma-mediated ablation: An optical tool for submicrometer surgery on neuronal and vascular systems

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Philbert S.; Blinder, Pablo; Migliori, Benjamin J.; Neev, Joseph; Jin, Yishi; Squier, Jeffrey A.; Kleinfeld, David

    2009-01-01

    Plasma-mediated ablation makes use of high energy laser pulses to ionize molecules within the first few femtoseconds of the pulse. This process leads to a submicrometer-sized bubble of plasma that can ablate tissue with negligible heat transfer and collateral damage to neighboring tissue. We review the physics of plasma-mediated ablation and its use as a tool to generate targeted insults at the subcellular level to neurons and blood vessels deep within nervous tissue. Illustrative examples from axon regeneration and microvascular research illustrate the utility of this tool. We further discuss the use of ablation as an integral part of automated histology. PMID:19269159

  11. Stiffness characteristics of longwall shields

    SciTech Connect

    Barczak, T.M.; Schwemmer, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    Since longwall strata activity is characterized by roof-to-floor and face-to-waste displacements, a model with two degrees of freedom was used to describe the load-displacement relationship of the shield structure. The model considers the support as an elastic body and relates horizontal and vertical resultant forces acting on the support to associated displacements as a function of the stiffness of the support structure. Stiffness coefficients under full canopy and base contact configurations were determined by controlled displacement loading of longwall shields in the Bureau's Mine Roof Simulator. These two-legged longwall shields of different manufacture were investigated. The stiffness characteristics of these shields were evaluated relative to two parameters, namely, shield height and setting pressure. The tests results indicate a reduction in shield stiffness for increasing height. Setting pressure was found to have less of an effect on shield stiffness, producing only a slight increase in stiffness as setting pressure increased. Similar trends were observed for all three shields, indicating a similarity in stiffness characteristics for shields of the same basic configuration.

  12. Hypervelocity impact shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cour-Palais, Burton G. (Inventor); Crews, Jeanne Lee (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A hypervelocity impact shield and method for protecting a wall structure, such as a spacecraft wall, from impact with particles of debris having densities of about 2.7 g/cu cm and impact velocities up to 16 km/s are disclosed. The shield comprises a stack of ultra thin sheets of impactor disrupting material supported and arranged by support means in spaced relationship to one another and mounted to cover the wall in a position for intercepting the particles. The sheets are of a number and spacing such that the impacting particle and the resulting particulates of the impacting particle and sheet material are successively impact-shocked to a thermal state of total melt and/or vaporization to a degree as precludes perforation of the wall. The ratio of individual sheet thickness to the theoretical diameter of particles of debris which may be of spherical form is in the range of 0.03 to 0.05. The spacing between adjacent sheets is such that the debris cloud plume of liquid and vapor resulting from an impacting particle penetrating a sheet does not puncture the next adjacent sheet prior to the arrival thereat of fragment particulates of sheet material and the debris particle produced by a previous impact.

  13. Iron shielded MRI optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borghi, C. A.; Fabbri, M.

    1998-09-01

    The design of the main current systems of an actively shielded and of an iron shielded MRI device for nuclear resonance imaging, is considered. The model for the analysis of the magnetic induction produced by the current system, is based on the combination of a Boundary Element technique and of the integration of two Fredholm integral equations of the first and the second kind. The equivalent current magnetization model is used for the calculation of the magnetization produced by the iron shield. High field uniformity in a spherical region inside the device, and a low stray field in the neighborhood of the device are required. In order to meet the design requirements a multi-objective global minimization problem is solved. The minimization method is based on the combination of the filled function technique and the (1+1) evolution strategy algorithm. The multi-objective problem is treated by means of a penalty method. The actively shielded MRI system results to utilize larger amount of conductor and produce higher magnetic energy than the iron shield device. On veut étudier le projet du système des courants principaux d'un MRI à écran en fer et d'un MRI à écran actif. Le modèle d'analyse du champ magnétique produit par le système de courants est basé sur la combinaison d'une technique Boundary Element et de l'intégration de deux équations intégrales de Fredholm de première et de seconde sorte. On utilise pour calculer la magnétisation produite par l'écran en fer le modèle à cou rants de magné ti sa tion équivalents. On exige une élévation uniforme du champ dans une région sphérique au cœur de l'appareil et un bas champ magnétique dispersé à proximité de l'appareil. Dans le but de répondre aux impératifs du projet, on va résoudre un problème multiobjectif de minimisation globale. On utilise une technique de minimisation obtenue par la combinaison des méthodes “Filled Function” et “(1+1) Evolution Strategy”. Le probl

  14. PBF Cubicle 13. Shield wall details illustrate shielding technique of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PBF Cubicle 13. Shield wall details illustrate shielding technique of stepped penetrations and brick layout scheme for valve stem extension sleeve. Aerojet Nuclear Company. Date: May 1976. INEEL index no. 761-0620-00-400-195280 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, SPERT-I & Power Burst Facility Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  15. Pivotably mounted reactor shroud shield and shielding method

    SciTech Connect

    Hankinson, M.F.

    1987-03-31

    A method is described for shielding persons working around a nuclear reactor having a reactor head an a shroud extending upward from the reactor head, comprising: (a) mounting a plurality of swingout arms around the shroud, each swingout arm being pivotable about a respective axis that is substantially vertical and that is fixed with respect to the shroud; (b) positioning a shielding member adjacent a swingout arm with a hoist; (c) pivoting the swingout arm horizontally away from the shroud and toward the hoist; (d) transferring the shielding member from the hoist to the swingout arm so that the swingout arm supports the shielding member; (e) pivoting the swingout arm horizontally back toward the shroud; and (f) repeating steps (b) through (c) until the shroud is substantially surrounded by shielding members.

  16. High resolution selective multilayer laser processing by nanosecond laser ablation of metal nanoparticle films

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, Seung H.; Pan Heng; Hwang, David J.; Chung, Jaewon; Ryu, Sangil; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2007-11-01

    Ablation of gold nanoparticle films on polymer was explored using a nanosecond pulsed laser, with the goal to achieve feature size reduction and functionality not amenable with inkjet printing. The ablation threshold fluence for the unsintered nanoparticle deposit was at least ten times lower than the reported threshold for the bulk film. This could be explained by the combined effects of melting temperature depression, lower conductive heat transfer loss, strong absorption of the incident laser beam, and the relatively weak bonding between nanoparticles. The ablation physics were verified by the nanoparticle sintering characterization, ablation threshold measurement, time resolved ablation plume shadowgraphs, analysis of ablation ejecta, and the measurement and calculation of optical properties. High resolution and clean feature fabrication with small energy and selective multilayer processing are demonstrated.

  17. Single-shot ablation threshold of chromium using UV femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, S. P.; Fedosejevs, R.

    2014-07-01

    Single-shot ablation threshold for thin chromium film was studied using 266 nm, femtosecond laser pulses. Chromium is a useful material in the nanotechnology industry and information on ablation threshold using UV femtosecond pulses would help in precise micromachining of the material. The ablation threshold was determined by measuring the ablation crater diameters as a function of incident laser pulse energy. Absorption of 266 nm light on the chromium film was also measured under our experimental conditions, and the absorbed energy single-shot ablation threshold fluence was 46 ± 5 mJ/cm2. The experimental ablation threshold fluence value was compared to time-dependent heat flow calculations based on the two temperature model for ultrafast laser pulses. The model predicts a value of 31.6 mJ/cm2 which is qualitatively consistent with the experimentally obtained value, given the simplicity of the model.

  18. Effect of water to ablative performance under solid rocket exhaust environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, M. J.; Koo, J. H.; Sickler, F. M.; Lecureux, F.; Dash, S. M.

    1993-06-01

    The local environment during a missile firing is particularly hostile. Thermal protection of the missile launcher structure is often achieved with ablatives. Ablatives erode when subjected to high-temperature rocket exhaust, but the backside temperature of the protected structure remains relatively cool due to the insulative nature of ablatives. Multiple missile firings can completely erode the ablative, exposing the launching system components to an extremely high temperature. This investigation addresses the concept of injecting water into the missile plume to reduce the amount of ablative erosion per missile firing. This concept also reduces the amount of ablative materials needed in missile launching systems. Injecting water into the exhaust plume in a controlled laboratory environment was performed. Heat flux and material erosion measurements were compared in this study.

  19. Observation of pellet ablation behaviour on the Large Helical Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, R.; Yamada, H.; Tanaka, K.; Tokuzawa, T.; Murakami, S.; Goto, M.; Morita, S.; Ohyabu, N.; Kawahata, K.; Motojima, O.; LHD Experimental Group

    2004-05-01

    Hydrogen ice pellets have been injected using two different location configurations, namely outer port injection and coil side injection, in the large helical device. The behaviour of the pellet ablation has been observed using a fast camera, which possesses high spatial and time resolution. Striking toroidal deflection of the pellet trajectory is observed. The deflection is in the direction of tangential neutral beam injection. The toroidal velocity ultimately reaches 1000 m s-1 or more. The possibility of a rocket effect due to a unilateral ablation by the fast ions is discussed. The effective penetration depth of the pellet, which is measured by images, agrees with the prediction from the neutral-gas-shielding model. The penetration depth is compared with the measured deposition profile of the pellet.

  20. Modeling of anisotropic ablation of the concrete during Molten Core Concrete Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Kyoung Min

    This work proposes a model to explain concrete anisotropic ablation by corium during a Molten Corium Concrete Interaction (MCCI). As a result of recent MCCI prototypic material experiments, CCI and VULCANO tests, one observes that concrete ablation behavior consistently depends on the concrete materials used in the experiments. Specifically, tests with Limestone-Common-Sand (LCS) concrete yielded isotropic concrete ablation; i.e., equal axial and radial concrete erosion. This is in comparison to anisotropic ablation in tests with Siliceous (SIL) concrete, where radial ablation was much larger than axial ablation. This was an unexpected result, because prior results of many MCCI simulant experiments indicated that nearly isotropic ablation was expected in prototypic material experiments regardless of concrete type. A new phenomenological model is proposed in this work based on a hypothesis that unifies the result of both previous simulant and prototypic material experiments; i.e., heat transfer area enhancement and delayed gas release caused by the presence of un-melted solid aggregate material that enters the molten pool. This model offers a logical and phenomenological explanation concerning anisotropic ablation as well as the capability to simulate anisotropic ablation. This model is implemented into the CORQUENCH code as part of this work. Comparisons of simulation results obtained with this new model to the CCI experiments for cases with siliceous concrete and anisotropic ablation show better agreement with the test data than the existing model.

  1. Dual thermal ablation modality of solid tumors in a mouse model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafirstein, Gal; Barnes, Klressa; Hennings, Leah; Webber, Jessica; Moros, Eduardo G.; Przybyla, Beata; Griffin, Robert J.

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: Develop a new combination therapy consisting of cryoablation and conductive high-temperature ablation for enhanced thermal ablation of solid tumors. Methods: We have constructed an invasive probe that can be used for consecutive cryoablation and hightemperature ablation (C/HTA), with a single insertion. The C/HTA probe was tested, in Balb/c mice bearing solid 4T1 tumors, in comparison to cryoablation and high temperature ablation, only. Three days after ablation, the diameter of the ablated zone was evaluated with pathological examination. Results: The C/HTA device can be used to induce larger ablation zones, in comparison to high temperature or cryoablation alone, and at lower thermal doses and temperatures than either modality alone. Conclusions: The relatively high thermal conductivity of ice, in comparison to water and native tissue, enables rapid heating of the ice-ball that result in improved conductive high temperature ablation. The new dual thermal modality improves ablation outcomes at lower thermal doses in comparison to a single ablation modality.

  2. Material considerations in the design of a bulk shield for the Fusion Engineering Device

    SciTech Connect

    Kirchner, J.; Engholm, B.A.

    1981-01-01

    The FED bulk shield provides protection from high-energy neutrons and gamma rays and removes nuclear heat generated. Bulk shield optimization calculations were conducted using the Los Alamos ONEDANT discrete ordinates and the General Atomic PATH point kernel codes. Six candidate steel alloys were considered.

  3. Self-sealing solar collector shield

    SciTech Connect

    Katona, J.W.

    1980-03-25

    Window structure for a solar collector shield or the like having a frame defining a row of separate window openings. A selfcontained window unit is installed in each opening. Each window unit comprises a pair of rectangular glass panes held in laterally spaced parallel relation by a peripheral window frame. A mounting frame is provided for mounting each window unit in its window opening. Each mounting frame has overlapping frame members. Adjacent side frame members of adjacent window units also overlap. The overlap is for the purpose of excluding moisture and preventing heat loss. A peripheral window seal is provided for the same purpose.

  4. Topographic evidence for shield volcanism on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, J. M.; Mcewen, A. S.; Albin, E. F.; Greeley, R.

    1986-01-01

    Similarities between terrestrial shield volcanoes and a volcano on Io observed in Voyager I imagery of the satellite at 30 deg S, 246 deg W are delineated. A photoclinometry model was used to numerically estimate the slope based on the Minnaert photometric function. The slope values are accurate to within 10 deg on the sun-facing slope and 1 deg on the shadow side. As found with shield volcanoes, the feature has a central edifice, 40-50 km in diameter, and a broad, elliptical base, 77 x 90 km across. The summit of the Io volcano is 2.2-2.8 km above the surrounding plane and contains a caldera about 5 km in diameter. The similarity in shape between basaltic terrestrial shield volcanoes and the Io volcano indicates that the Io feature may also be composed of basalt. The composition could be sulfur if the heat flow was under 0.05 W/sq m, as it might have been in later stages of formation.

  5. Topographic evidence for shield volcanism on Io

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J.M.; Mcewen, A.S.; Albin, E.F.; Greeley, R.

    1986-07-01

    Similarities between terrestrial shield volcanoes and a volcano on Io observed in Voyager I imagery of the satellite at 30/sup 0/ S, 246/sup 0/ W are delineated. A photoclinometry model was used to numerically estimate the slope based on the Minnaert photometric function. The slope values are accurate to within 10 deg on the sun-facing slope and 1 deg on the shadow side. As found with shield volcanoes, the feature has a central edifice, 40-50 km in diameter, and a broad, elliptical base, 77 x 90 km across. The summit of the Io volcano is 2.2-2.8 km above the surrounding plane and contains a caldera about 5 km in diameter. The similarity in shape between basaltic terrestrial shield volcanoes and the Io volcano indicates that the Io feature may also be composed of basalt. The composition could be sulfur if the heat flow was under 0.05 W/sq m, as it might have been in later stages of formation. 9 references.

  6. Radiofrequency Ablation of Metastatic Pheochromocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesan, Aradhana M.; Locklin, Julia; Lai, Edwin W.; Adams, Karen T.; Fojo, Antonio Tito; Pacak, Karel; Wood, Bradford J.

    2013-01-01

    In the present report on the preliminary safety and effectiveness of radiofrequency (RF) ablation for pheochromocytoma metastases, seven metastases were treated in six patients (mean size, 3.4 cm; range, 2.2–6 cm). α- and β-adrenergic and catecholamine synthesis inhibition and intraprocedural anesthesia monitoring were used. Safety was assessed by recording ablation-related complications. Complete ablation was defined as a lack of enhancement within the ablation zone on follow-up computed tomography. No serious adverse sequelae were observed. Complete ablation was achieved in six of seven metastases (mean follow-up, 12.3 months; range, 2.5–28 months). In conclusion, RF ablation may be safely performed for metastatic pheochromocytoma given careful attention to peri-procedural management. PMID:19875067

  7. OCDR guided laser ablation device

    DOEpatents

    Dasilva, Luiz B.; Colston, Jr., Bill W.; James, Dale L.

    2002-01-01

    A guided laser ablation device. The device includes a mulitmode laser ablation fiber that is surrounded by one or more single mode optical fibers that are used to image in the vicinity of the laser ablation area to prevent tissue damage. The laser ablation device is combined with an optical coherence domain reflectometry (OCDR) unit and with a control unit which initializes the OCDR unit and a high power laser of the ablation device. Data from the OCDR unit is analyzed by the control unit and used to control the high power laser. The OCDR images up to about 3 mm ahead of the ablation surface to enable a user to see sensitive tissue such as a nerve or artery before damaging it by the laser.

  8. Reflective Shields for Artificial Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouquet, F. L.

    1986-01-01

    Report proposes reflective shield that protects spacecraft from radiant energy. Also gives some protection against particle beams and cosmic rays. Conceptual shield essentially advanced version of decorative multifaceted mirror balls often hung over dance floors. Mirror facets disperse radiant energy in many directions.

  9. Radiation Shielding Optimization on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slaba, Tony C.; Mertens, Chris J.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2013-01-01

    Future space missions to Mars will require radiation shielding to be optimized for deep space transit and an extended stay on the surface. In deep space, increased shielding levels and material optimization will reduce the exposure from most solar particle events (SPE) but are less effective at shielding against galactic cosmic rays (GCR). On the surface, the shielding provided by the Martian atmosphere greatly reduces the exposure from most SPE, and long-term GCR exposure is a primary concern. Previous work has shown that in deep space, additional shielding of common materials such as aluminum or polyethylene does not significantly reduce the GCR exposure. In this work, it is shown that on the Martian surface, almost any amount of aluminum shielding increases exposure levels for humans. The increased exposure levels are attributed to neutron production in the shield and Martian regolith as well as the electromagnetic cascade induced in the Martian atmosphere. This result is significant for optimization of vehicle and shield designs intended for the surface of Mars.

  10. Analysis of ablation debris from natural and artificial iron meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, M. B.; Davis, A. S.

    1977-01-01

    Artificial ablation studies were performed on iron and nickel-iron samples using an arc-heated plasma of ionized air. Experiment conditions simulated a meteoroid traveling about 12 km/sec at an altitude of 70 km. The artificially produced fusion crusts and ablation debris show features very similar to natural fusion crusts of the iron meteorites Boguslavka, Norfork, and N'Kandhla and to magnetic spherules recovered from Mn nodules. X-ray diffraction, electron microprobe, optical, and scanning electron microscope analyses reveal that important mineralogical, elemental, and textural changes occur during ablation. Some metal is melted and ablated. The outer margin of the melted rind is oxidized and recrystallizes as a discontinuous crust of magnetite and wustite. Adjacent to the oxidized metallic ablation zone is an unoxidized metallic ablation zone in which structures such as Widmannstatten bands are obliterated as the metal is transformed to unequilibrated alpha 2 nickel-iron. Volatile elements are vaporized and less volatile elements undergo fractionation.

  11. Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation of spinal osteoid osteoma under CT guidance

    PubMed Central

    Morassi, L G; Kokkinis, K; Karargyris, O; Vlachou, I; Kalokairinou, K; Pneumaticos, S G

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Osteoid osteoma (OO) accounts for approximately 10–12% of all benign bone tumours and 3% of all bone tumours. Spinal involvement appears in 10–25% of all cases. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of CT-guided radiofrequency (RF) ablation in the treatment of spinal OOs and report our experience. Methods: 13 patients suffering from spinal OO and treated at the authors' institution using CT-guided RF ablation were retrospectively evaluated. The RF probe was introduced through a 11-G Jamshidi® needle, and the lesion was heated at 90 °C for 6 min. Results: All procedures were considered technically successful as the correct positioning of the probe was proven by CT. 11 of the 13 patients reported pain relief after RF ablation. In two cases, RF ablation was repeated 1 month after the first procedure. Pain relief was achieved in both cases after the second procedure. No recurrence was reported throughout the follow-up. No complications like skin burn, soft-tissue haematoma, infection, vessel damage or neurological deficit were reported. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that CT-guided percutaneous RF ablation is a safe and effective method for the treatment of spinal OOs. Advances in knowledge: The data of this study support the efficacy and safety of the recently applied CT-guided percutaneous RF ablation technique for the treatment of spinal OOs. PMID:24712322

  12. Multiple target laser ablation system

    DOEpatents

    Mashburn, Douglas N.

    1996-01-01

    A laser ablation apparatus and method are provided in which multiple targets consisting of material to be ablated are mounted on a movable support. The material transfer rate is determined for each target material, and these rates are stored in a controller. A position detector determines which target material is in a position to be ablated, and then the controller controls the beam trigger timing and energy level to achieve a desired proportion of each constituent material in the resulting film.

  13. Multiple target laser ablation system

    DOEpatents

    Mashburn, D.N.

    1996-01-09

    A laser ablation apparatus and method are provided in which multiple targets consisting of material to be ablated are mounted on a movable support. The material transfer rate is determined for each target material, and these rates are stored in a controller. A position detector determines which target material is in a position to be ablated, and then the controller controls the beam trigger timing and energy level to achieve a desired proportion of each constituent material in the resulting film. 3 figs.

  14. Shielded Canister Transporter

    SciTech Connect

    Eidem, G.G. Jr.; Fages, R.

    1993-08-01

    The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) will produce canisters filled with high-level radioactive waste immobilized in borosilicate glass. This report discusses a Shielded Canister Transporter (SCT) which will provide the means for safe transportation and handling of the canisters from the Vitrification Building to the Canister Storage Building (CSB). The stainless steel canisters are 0.61 meters in diameter, 3.0 meters tall, and weigh approximately 2,135 kilograms, with a maximum exterior surface dose rate of 90,000 R/hr. The canisters are placed into storage tubes to a maximum of three tall (two for overpack canisters) with an impact limiter placed at the tube bottom and between each canister. A floor plug seals the top of the storage tube at the operating floor level of the CSB.

  15. NEUTRON SHIELDING STRUCTURE

    DOEpatents

    Mattingly, J.T.

    1962-09-25

    A lightweight neutron shielding structure comprises a honeycomb core which is filled with a neutron absorbing powder. The honeycomb core is faced with parallel planar facing sheets to form a lightweight rigid unit. Suitable absorber powders are selected from among the following: B, B/sub 4/C, B/sub 2/O/ sub 3/, CaB/sub 6/, Li/sub 2/CO3, LiOH, LiBO/sub 2/, Li/s ub 2/O. The facing sheets are constructed of a neutron moderating material, so that fast neutrons will be moderated while traversing the facing sheets, and ultimately be absorbed by the absorber powder in the honeycomb. Beryllium is a preferred moderator material for use in the facing sheets. The advantage of the structure is that it combines the rigidity and light weight of a honeycomb construction with the neutron absorption properties of boron and lithium. (AEC)

  16. Shielding and fragmentation studies.

    PubMed

    Zeitlin, C; Guetersloh, S; Heilbronn, L; Miller, J

    2005-01-01

    Radiation dosimetry for manned spaced missions depends on the ability to adequately describe the process of high-energy ion transport through many materials. Since the types of possible nuclear interactions are many and complex, transport models are used which depend upon a reliable source of experimental data. To expand the heavy ion database used in the models we have been measuring charge-changing cross sections and fragment production cross sections from heavy-ion interactions in various elementa targets. These include materials flown on space missions such as carbon and aluminium, as well as those important in radiation dosimetry such as hydrogen, nitrogen and water. Measuring heavy-ion fragmentation through these targets also gives us the ability to determine the effectiveness of new materials proposed for shielding such as graphite composites and polyethylene hybrids. Measurement without a target present gives an indication of the level of contamination of the primary beam, which is also important in radiobiology experiments. PMID:16604611

  17. Two-Dimensional Finite Element Ablative Thermal Response Analysis of an Arcjet Stagnation Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dec, John A.; Laub, Bernard; Braun, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    The finite element ablation and thermal response (FEAtR, hence forth called FEAR) design and analysis program simulates the one, two, or three-dimensional ablation, internal heat conduction, thermal decomposition, and pyrolysis gas flow of thermal protection system materials. As part of a code validation study, two-dimensional axisymmetric results from FEAR are compared to thermal response data obtained from an arc-jet stagnation test in this paper. The results from FEAR are also compared to the two-dimensional axisymmetric computations from the two-dimensional implicit thermal response and ablation program under the same arcjet conditions. The ablating material being used in this arcjet test is phenolic impregnated carbon ablator with an LI-2200 insulator as backup material. The test is performed at the NASA, Ames Research Center Interaction Heating Facility. Spatially distributed computational fluid dynamics solutions for the flow field around the test article are used for the surface boundary conditions.

  18. Microwave Lung Ablation Complicated by Bronchocutaneous Fistula: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Bui, James T.; Gaba, Ron C.; Knuttinen, M. Grace; Omene, Benedictta O.; Shon, Andrew; Martinez, Brandon K.; Owens, Charles A.

    2011-01-01

    Microwave ablation is a developing treatment option for unresectable lung cancer. Early experience suggests that it may have advantages over radiofrequency (RF) ablation with larger ablation zones, shorter heating times, less susceptibility to heat sink, effectiveness in charred lung, synergism with multiple applicators, no need for grounding pads, and similar survival benefit. Newer microwave ablation devices are being developed and as their use becomes more prevalent, a greater understanding of device limitations and complications are important. Herein we describe a microwave lung ablation complicated by bronchocutaneous fistula (BCF) and its treatment. BCF treatment options include close monitoring, surgical closure, percutaneous sealant injection, and endoscopic plug or sealant in those who are not surgical candidates. PMID:22654252

  19. Welding shield for coupling heaters

    DOEpatents

    Menotti, James Louis

    2010-03-09

    Systems for coupling end portions of two elongated heater portions and methods of using such systems to treat a subsurface formation are described herein. A system may include a holding system configured to hold end portions of the two elongated heater portions so that the end portions are abutted together or located near each other; a shield for enclosing the end portions, and one or more inert gas inlets configured to provide at least one inert gas to flush the system with inert gas during welding of the end portions. The shield may be configured to inhibit oxidation during welding that joins the end portions together. The shield may include a hinged door that, when closed, is configured to at least partially isolate the interior of the shield from the atmosphere. The hinged door, when open, is configured to allow access to the interior of the shield.

  20. Lunar Surface Reactor Shielding Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Shawn; Lipinksi, Ronald; McAlpine, William

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear reactor system could provide power to support a long term human exploration to the moon. Such a system would require shielding to protect astronauts from its emitted radiations. Shielding studies have been performed for a Gas Cooled Reactor (GCR) system because it is considered to be the most suitable nuclear reactor system available for lunar exploration, based on its tolerance of oxidizing lunar regolith and its good conversion efficiency (Wright, 2003). The goals of the shielding studies were to provide optimal material shielding configuration that reduces the dose (rem) to the required level in order to protect astronauts, and to estimate the mass of regolith that would provide an equivalent protective effect if it were used as the shielding material. All calculations were performed using MCNPX code, a Monte Carlo transport code.

  1. Portable convertible blast effects shield

    DOEpatents

    Pastrnak, John W.; Hollaway, Rocky; Henning, Carl D.; Deteresa, Steve; Grundler, Walter; Hagler, Lisle B.; Kokko, Edwin; Switzer, Vernon A

    2007-05-22

    A rapidly deployable portable convertible blast effects shield/ballistic shield includes a set two or more telescoping cylindrical rings operably connected to each other to convert between a telescopically-collapsed configuration for storage and transport, and a telescopically-extended upright configuration forming an expanded inner volume. In a first embodiment, the upright configuration provides blast effects shielding, such as against blast pressures, shrapnel, and/or fire balls. And in a second embodiment, the upright configuration provides ballistic shielding, such as against incoming weapons fire, shrapnel, etc. Each ring has a high-strength material construction, such as a composite fiber and matrix material, capable of substantially inhibiting blast effects and impinging projectiles from passing through the shield. And the set of rings are releasably securable to each other in the telescopically-extended upright configuration, such as by click locks.

  2. Portable convertible blast effects shield

    DOEpatents

    Pastrnak, John W.; Hollaway, Rocky; Henning, Carl D.; Deteresa, Steve; Grundler, Walter; Hagler, Lisle B.; Kokko, Edwin; Switzer, Vernon A.

    2011-03-15

    A rapidly deployable portable convertible blast effects shield/ballistic shield includes a set two or more frusto-conically-tapered telescoping rings operably connected to each other to convert between a telescopically-collapsed configuration for storage and transport, and a telescopically-extended upright configuration forming an expanded inner volume. In a first embodiment, the upright configuration provides blast effects shielding, such as against blast pressures, shrapnel, and/or fire balls. And in a second embodiment, the upright configuration provides ballistic shielding, such as against incoming weapons fire, shrapnel, etc. Each ring has a high-strength material construction, such as a composite fiber and matrix material, capable of substantially inhibiting blast effects and impinging projectiles from passing through the shield. And the set of rings are releasably securable to each other in the telescopically-extended upright configuration by the friction fit of adjacent pairs of frusto-conically-tapered rings to each other.

  3. Portable convertible blast effects shield

    DOEpatents

    Pastrnak, John W.; Hollaway, Rocky; Henning, Carl D.; Deteresa, Steve; Grundler, Walter; Hagler,; Lisle B.; Kokko, Edwin; Switzer, Vernon A

    2010-10-26

    A rapidly deployable portable convertible blast effects shield/ballistic shield includes a set two or more telescoping cylindrical rings operably connected to each other to convert between a telescopically-collapsed configuration for storage and transport, and a telescopically-extended upright configuration forming an expanded inner volume. In a first embodiment, the upright configuration provides blast effects shielding, such as against blast pressures, shrapnel, and/or fire balls. And in a second embodiment, the upright configuration provides ballistic shielding, such as against incoming weapons fire, shrapnel, etc. Each ring has a high-strength material construction, such as a composite fiber and matrix material, capable of substantially inhibiting blast effects and impinging projectiles from passing through the shield. And the set of rings are releasably securable to each other in the telescopically-extended upright configuration, such as by click locks.

  4. Ablation and Other Local Therapy for Kidney Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... how the procedure is being done. Possible side effects include bleeding and damage to the kidneys or other nearby organs. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) This technique uses high-energy radio waves to heat the tumor. A thin, needle-like probe is ...

  5. Stagnation-Point Shielding by Melting and Vaporization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Leonard

    1959-01-01

    An approximate theoretical analysis was made of the shielding mechanism whereby the rate of heat transfer to the forward stagnation point of blunt bodies is reduced by melting and evaporation. General qualitative results are given and a numerical example, the melting and evaporation of ice, is presented and discussed in detail.

  6. Performance of solar shields. [Skylab 1 micrometeoroid shield difficulties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwinghamer, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    The loss of the micrometeoroid shield from the Orbital Workshop section of Skylab 1 about 63 seconds after lift-off, was the catalyst for a prodigious effort to develop a substitute for the passive portion of the thermal control system. An intensive effort is described in which numerous potential thermal shield materials were assessed, and during which period ten specific shield designs were developed and carried through various stages of development and test. Thermal shield materials data are discussed, including optical, strength, fatigue, outgassing, tackiness, ultraviolet radiation, and material memory properties. Specifically addressed are thermal shield materials selection criteria and the design, development, and test requirements associated with the successful development of Skylab thermal shields, and specifically the two thermal shields subsequently deployed over the exposed gold foil skin of the Orbital Workshop. Also considered are the general performance and thermal improvements provided by both the parasol design deployed by the Skylab 1 crew, and the sail design deployed by the Skylab 2 crew.

  7. Plasma mediated ablation of biological tissues with ultrashort laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Oraevsky, A.A. |; DaSilva, L.B.; Feit, M.D.

    1995-03-08

    Plasma mediated ablation of collagen gels and porcine cornea was studied at various laser pulse durations in the range from 350 fs to 1 ns at 1,053 nm wavelength. A time resolved stress detection technique was employed to measure transient stress profiles and amplitudes. Optical microscopy was used to characterize ablation craters qualitatively, while a wide band acoustic transducer helped to quantify tissue mechanical response and the ablation threshold. The ablation threshold was measured as a function of laser pulse duration and linear absorption coefficient. For nanosecond pulses the ablation threshold was found to have a strong dependence on the linear absorption coefficient of the material. As the pulse length decreased into the subpicosecond regime the ablation threshold became insensitive to the linear absorption coefficient. The ablation efficiency was found to be insensitive to both the laser pulse duration and the linear absorption coefficient. High quality ablation craters with no thermal or mechanical damage to surrounding material were obtained with 350 fs laser pulses. The mechanism of optical breakdown at the tissue surface was theoretically investigated. In the nanosecond regime, optical breakdown proceeds as an electron collisional avalanche ionization initiated by thermal seed electrons. These seed electrons are created by heating of the tissue by linear absorption. In the ultrashort pulse range, optical breakdown is initiated by the multiphoton ionization of the irradiated medium (6 photons in case of tissue irradiated at 1,053 nm wavelength), and becomes less sensitive to the linear absorption coefficient. The energy deposition profile is insensitive to both the laser pulse duration and the linear absorption coefficient.

  8. The effects of fat layer on temperature distribution during microwave atrial fibrillation catheter ablation.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Fei; Nan, Qun; Guo, Xuemei

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the effects of fat layer on the temperature distribution during microwave atrial fibrillation catheter ablation in the conditions of different ablation time; 3D finite element models (fat layer and no fat layer) were built, and temperature distribution was obtained based on coupled electromagnetic-thermal analysis at 2.45 GHz and 30 W of microwave power. Results shown: in the endocardial ablation, the existence of the fat layer did not affect the shape of the 50 °C contour before 30 s. The increase speed of depth became quite slowly in the model with fat layer after 30 s. When ablation depth needed fixed, there are no significant effect on effectively ablation depth whether fat layer over or not. However, the existence of fat layer makes the temperature lower in the myocardium, and maximum temperature point closer to the myocardium surface. What is more, in the model with fat layer, effective ablation reach lower maximum temperature and the shallower depth of 50 °C contour. But there are larger ablation axial length and transverse width. In this case, doctor should ensure safety of normal cardiac tissue around the target tissue. In the epicardial ablation, the existence of fat layer seriously affects result of the microwave ablation. The epicardial ablation needs more heating time to create lesion. But epicardial ablation can be better controlled in the shape of effective ablation area because of the slowly increase of target variables after the appearing of 50 °C contour. Doctor can choose endocardial or epicardial ablation in different case of clinic requirement. PMID:26296248

  9. A model for thermal ablation of biological tissue using laser radiation.

    PubMed

    Partovi, F; Izatt, J A; Cothren, R M; Kittrell, C; Thomas, J E; Strikwerda, S; Kramer, J R; Feld, M S

    1987-01-01

    We present a theory of thermal laser ablation based on the heat equation and on an energy balance equation derived from it. Ablation is assumed to be brought about by the heating and evaporation of tissue water. The model is three-dimensional, and scattering and the water-steam phase transition are explicitly taken into account. The model predicts threshold parameters and a steady-state ablation velocity in terms of the optical and thermal properties of the tissue and the laser beam intensity and spot diameter. PMID:3613805

  10. Dynamical modeling of laser ablation processes

    SciTech Connect

    Leboeuf, J.N.; Chen, K.R.; Donato, J.M.; Geohegan, D.B.; Liu, C.L.; Puretzky, A.A.; Wood, R.F.

    1995-09-01

    Several physics and computational approaches have been developed to globally characterize phenomena important for film growth by pulsed laser deposition of materials. These include thermal models of laser-solid target interactions that initiate the vapor plume; plume ionization and heating through laser absorption beyond local thermodynamic equilibrium mechanisms; gas dynamic, hydrodynamic, and collisional descriptions of plume transport; and molecular dynamics models of the interaction of plume particles with the deposition substrate. The complexity of the phenomena involved in the laser ablation process is matched by the diversity of the modeling task, which combines materials science, atomic physics, and plasma physics.

  11. Mechanical shielding reduces weld surface cracking in 6061 T6 aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, J. E.

    1968-01-01

    Mechanical shield of high melting point material protects 6061-T6 aluminum welded with high frequency ac tungsten arc equipment. It is held in place around the weld bead area and eliminates heat check cracks.

  12. EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION OF THE THERMAL PERFORMANCE OF A WATER SHIELD FOR A SURFACE POWER REACTOR

    SciTech Connect

    REID, ROBERT S.; PEARSON, J. BOSIE; STEWART, ERIC T.

    2007-01-16

    Water based reactor shielding is being investigated for use on initial lunar surface power systems. A water shield may lower overall cost (as compared to development cost for other materials) and simplify operations in the setup and handling. The thermal hydraulic performance of the shield is of significant interest. The mechanism for transferring heat through the shield is natural convection. Natural convection in a 100 kWt lunar surface reactor shield design is evaluated with 2 kW power input to the water in the Water Shield Testbed (WST) at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The experimental data from the WST is used to validate a CFD model. Performance of the water shield on the lunar surface is then predicted with a CFD model anchored to test data. The experiment had a maximum water temperature of 75 C. The CFD model with 1/6-g predicts a maximum water temperature of 88 C with the same heat load and external boundary conditions. This difference in maximum temperature does not greatly affect the structural design of the shield, and demonstrates that it may be possible to use water for a lunar reactor shield.

  13. Experimental Evaluation of the Thermal Performance of a Water Shield for a Surface Power Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, J. Boise; Stewart, Eric T.; Reid, Robert S.

    2007-01-30

    Water based reactor shielding is being investigated for use on initial lunar surface power systems. A water shield may lower overall cost (as compared to development cost for other materials) and simplify operations in the setup and handling. The thermal hydraulic performance of the shield is of significant interest. The mechanism for transferring heat through the shield is natural convection. Natural convection in a 100 kWt lunar surface reactor shield design is evaluated with 2 kW power input to the water in the Water Shield Testbed (WST) at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The experimental data from the WST is used to validate a CFD model. Performance of the water shield on the lunar surface is then predicted with a CFD model anchored to test data. The experiment had a maximum water temperature of 75 deg. C. The CFD model with 1/6-g predicts a maximum water temperature of 88 deg. C with the same heat load and external boundary conditions. This difference in maximum temperature does not greatly affect the structural design of the shield, and demonstrates that it may be possible to use water for a lunar reactor shield.

  14. Upgrade of the LHC magnet interconnections thermal shielding

    SciTech Connect

    Musso, Andrea; Barlow, Graeme; Bastard, Alain; Charrondiere, Maryline; Deferne, Guy; Dib, Gaëlle; Duret, Max; Guinchard, Michael; Prin, Hervé; Craen, Arnaud Vande; Villiger, Gilles; Chrul, Anna; Damianoglou, Dimitrios; Strychalski, Michał; Wright, Loren

    2014-01-29

    The about 1700 interconnections (ICs) between the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) superconducting magnets include thermal shielding at 50-75 K, providing continuity to the thermal shielding of the magnet cryostats to reduce the overall radiation heat loads to the 1.9 K helium bath of the magnets. The IC shield, made of aluminum, is conduction-cooled via a welded bridge to the thermal shield of the adjacent magnets which is actively cooled. TIG welding of these bridges made in the LHC tunnel at installation of the magnets induced a considerable risk of fire hazard due to the proximity of the multi-layer insulation of the magnet shields. A fire incident occurred in one of the machine sectors during machine installation, but fortunately with limited consequences thanks to prompt intervention of the operators. LHC is now undergoing a 2 years technical stop during which all magnet's ICs will have to be opened to consolidate the magnet electrical connections. The IC thermal shields will therefore have to be removed and re-installed after the work is completed. In order to eliminate the risk of fire hazard when re-welding, it has been decided to review the design of the IC shields, by replacing the welded bridges with a mechanical clamping which also preserves its thermal function. An additional advantage of this new solution is the ease in dismantling for maintenance, and eliminating weld-grinding operations at removal needing radioprotection measures because of material activation after long-term operation of the LHC. This paper describes the new design of the IC shields and in particular the theoretical and experimental validation of its thermal performance. Furthermore a status report of the on-going upgrade work in the LHC is given.

  15. Upgrade of the LHC magnet interconnections thermal shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musso, Andrea; Barlow, Graeme; Bastard, Alain; Charrondiere, Maryline; Chrul, Anna; Damianoglou, Dimitrios; Deferne, Guy; Dib, Gaëlle; Duret, Max; Guinchard, Michael; Prin, Hervé; Strychalski, Michał; Craen, Arnaud Vande; Villiger, Gilles; Wright, Loren

    2014-01-01

    The about 1700 interconnections (ICs) between the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) superconducting magnets include thermal shielding at 50-75 K, providing continuity to the thermal shielding of the magnet cryostats to reduce the overall radiation heat loads to the 1.9 K helium bath of the magnets. The IC shield, made of aluminum, is conduction-cooled via a welded bridge to the thermal shield of the adjacent magnets which is actively cooled. TIG welding of these bridges made in the LHC tunnel at installation of the magnets induced a considerable risk of fire hazard due to the proximity of the multi-layer insulation of the magnet shields. A fire incident occurred in one of the machine sectors during machine installation, but fortunately with limited consequences thanks to prompt intervention of the operators. LHC is now undergoing a 2 years technical stop during which all magnet's ICs will have to be opened to consolidate the magnet electrical connections. The IC thermal shields will therefore have to be removed and re-installed after the work is completed. In order to eliminate the risk of fire hazard when re-welding, it has been decided to review the design of the IC shields, by replacing the welded bridges with a mechanical clamping which also preserves its thermal function. An additional advantage of this new solution is the ease in dismantling for maintenance, and eliminating weld-grinding operations at removal needing radioprotection measures because of material activation after long-term operation of the LHC. This paper describes the new design of the IC shields and in particular the theoretical and experimental validation of its thermal performance. Furthermore a status report of the on-going upgrade work in the LHC is given.

  16. Lunar Surface Reactor Shielding Study

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Shawn; McAlpine, William; Lipinski, Ronald

    2006-01-20

    A nuclear reactor system could provide power to support long term human exploration of the moon. Such a system would require shielding to protect astronauts from its emitted radiations. Shielding studies have been performed for a Gas Cooled Reactor system because it is considered to be the most suitable nuclear reactor system available for lunar exploration, based on its tolerance of oxidizing lunar regolith and its good conversion efficiency. The goals of the shielding studies were to determine a material shielding configuration that reduces the dose (rem) to the required level in order to protect astronauts, and to estimate the mass of regolith that would provide an equivalent protective effect if it were used as the shielding material. All calculations were performed using MCNPX, a Monte Carlo transport code. Lithium hydride must be kept between 600 K and 700 K to prevent excessive swelling from large amounts of gamma or neutron irradiation. The issue is that radiation damage causes separation of the lithium and the hydrogen, resulting in lithium metal and hydrogen gas. The proposed design uses a layer of B4C to reduce the combined neutron and gamma dose to below 0.5Grads before the LiH is introduced. Below 0.5Grads the swelling in LiH is small (less than about 1%) for all temperatures. This approach causes the shield to be heavier than if the B4C were replaced by LiH, but it makes the shield much more robust and reliable.

  17. Dust Ablation in Pluto's Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horanyi, M.; Poppe, A. R.; Sternovsky, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Based on measurements by in situ dust detectors onboard the Pioneer and New Horizon spacecraft the total production rate of dust particles born in the Kuiper belt can be estimated to be on the order of 5 x 10 ^3 kg/s in the approximate size range of 1 - 10 micron. These particles slowly migrate inward due to Poynting - Robertson drag and their spatial distribution is shaped by mean motion resonances with the gas giant planets in the outer solar system. The expected mass influx into Pluto's atmosphere is on the order of 50 kg/day, and the arrival speed of the incoming particles is on the order of 3 - 4 km/s. We have followed the ablation history as function of speed and size of dust particles in Pluto's atmosphere, and found that, if the particles are rich in volatiles, they can fully sublimate due to drag heating and deposit their mass in a narrow layer. This deposition might promote the formation of the haze layers observed by the New Horizons spacecraft. This talk will explore the constraints on the composition of the dust particles, as well as on our newly developed models of Pluto's atmosphere that can be learned by matching the altitude where haze layers could be formed.

  18. Dust ablation in Pluto's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horanyi, Mihaly; Poppe, Andrew; Sternovsky, Zoltan

    2016-04-01

    Based on measurements by dust detectors onboard the Pioneer 10/11 and New Horizons spacecraft the total production rate of dust particles born in the Edgeworth Kuiper Belt (EKB) has been be estimated to be on the order of 5 ṡ 103 kg/s in the approximate size range of 1 - 10 μm. Dust particles are produced by collisions between EKB objects and their bombardment by both interplanetary and interstellar dust particles. Dust particles of EKB origin, in general, migrate towards the Sun due to Poynting-Robertson drag but their distributions are further sculpted by mean-motion resonances as they first approach the orbit of Neptune and later the other planets, as well as mutual collisions. Subsequently, Jupiter will eject the vast majority of them before they reach the inner solar system. The expected mass influx into Pluto atmosphere is on the order of 200 kg/day, and the arrival speed of the incoming particles is on the order of 3 - 4 km/s. We have followed the ablation history as function of speed and size of dust particles in Pluto's atmosphere, and found that volatile rich particles can fully sublimate due to drag heating and deposit their mass in narrow layers. This deposition might promote the formation of the haze layers observed by the New Horizons spacecraft. This talk will explore the constraints on the composition of the dust particles by comparing the altitude of the deposition layers to the observed haze layers.

  19. High temperature ablative foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Matthew T. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An ablative foam composition is formed of approximately 150 to 250 parts by weight polymeric isocyanate having an isocyanate functionality of 2.6 to 3.2; approximately 15 to 30 parts by weight reactive flame retardant having a hydroxyl number range from 200-260; approximately 10 to 40 parts by weight non-reactive flame retardant; approximately 10 to 40 parts by weight nonhydrolyzable silicone copolymer having a hydroxyl number range from 75-205; and approximately 3 to 16 parts by weight amine initiated polyether resin having an isocyanate functionality greater than or equal to 3.0 and a hydroxyl number range from 400-800.

  20. Thermochromic tissue-mimicking phantom for optimisation of thermal tumour ablation.

    PubMed

    Negussie, Ayele H; Partanen, Ari; Mikhail, Andrew S; Xu, Sheng; Abi-Jaoudeh, Nadine; Maruvada, Subha; Wood, Bradford J

    2016-05-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to (1) develop a novel tissue-mimicking thermochromic (TMTC) phantom that permanently changes colour from white to magenta upon heating above ablative temperatures, and (2) assess its utility for specific applications in evaluating thermal therapy devices. Materials and methods Polyacrylamide gel mixed with thermochromic ink was custom made to produce a TMTC phantom that changes its colour upon heating above biological ablative temperatures (> 60 °C). The thermal properties of the phantom were characterised, and compared to those of human tissue. In addition, utility of this phantom as a tool for the assessment of laser and microwave thermal ablation was examined. Results The mass density, thermal conductivity, and thermal diffusivity of the TMTC phantom were measured as 1033 ± 1.0 kg/m(3), 0.590 ± 0.015 W/m.K, and 0.145 ± 0.002 mm(2)/s, respectively, and found to be in agreement with reported values for human soft tissues. Heating the phantom with laser and microwave ablation devices produced clearly demarcated regions of permanent colour change geographically corresponding to regions with temperature elevations above 60 °C. Conclusion The TMTC phantom provides direct visualisation of ablation dynamics, including ablation volume and geometry as well as peak absolute temperatures within the treated region post-ablation. This phantom can be specifically tailored for different thermal therapy modalities, such as radiofrequency, laser, microwave, or therapeutic ultrasound ablation. Such modality-specific phantoms may enable better quality assurance, device characterisation, and ablation parameter optimisation, or optimise the study of dynamic heating parameters integral to drug device combination therapies relying upon heat. PMID:27099078