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Sample records for ablative radiotherapy sabr

  1. Stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR) for primary and secondary lung tumours

    PubMed Central

    Gaya, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR) represents a technological breakthrough in radiotherapy technique, with proven benefits to patients in terms of improved tumour control and overall survival. The key components of SABR are described. The current evidence base for SABR for the treatment of primary and secondary lung tumours is appraised, and key ongoing trials are identified. PMID:23023165

  2. EF5 PET of Tumor Hypoxia: A Predictive Imaging Biomarker of Response to Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR) for Early Lung Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    Predictive Imaging Biomarker of Response to Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR) for Early Lung Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Billy W...CONTRACT NUMBER Response to Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR) for Early Lung Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0236 5c...NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Purpose and scope: Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) has become a new standard of care for early stage lung

  3. Patient specific quality control for Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiotherapy (SABR): it takes more than one phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kron, T.; Ungureanu, E.; Antony, R.; Hardcastle, N.; Clements, N.; Ukath, J.; Fox, C.; Lonski, P.; Wanigaratne, D.; Haworth, A.

    2017-01-01

    Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiotherapy (SABR) is an extension of the concepts of Stereotactic Radiosurgery from intracranial procedures to extracranial targets. This brings with it new technological challenges for set-up of a SABR program and continuing quality assurance. Compared with intracranial procedures SABR requires consideration of motion and inhomogeneities and has to deal with a much larger variety of targets ranging from lung to liver, kidney and bone. To meet many of the challenges virtually all advances in modern radiotherapy, such as Intensity Modulated and Image Guided Radiation Therapy (IMRT and IGRT) are used. Considering the few fractions and high doses per fraction delivered to complex targets it is not surprising that patient specific quality control is considered essential for safe delivery. Given the variety of targets and clinical scenarios we employ different strategies for different patients to ensure that the most important aspects of the treatment are appropriately tested, be it steep dose gradients, inhomogeneities or the delivery of dose in the presence of motion. The current paper reviews the different approaches and phantoms utilised at Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre for SABR QA.

  4. Survey of stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy in the UK by the QA group on behalf of the UK SABR Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Baker, A; Scott, A J D; Webster, G J

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To ascertain the progress being made towards the implementation of stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR) treatment in the UK, to obtain details of current practice in centres with an active treatment programme and to assess the projected future provision. Methods: In August 2012, an online questionnaire was sent to all 65 UK radiotherapy institutions. The included questions covered the current number of patients being treated and the intended number of patients for each clinical site; immobilization and motion management methods; CT scanning protocols; target and organ-at-risk delineation; treatment planning; image-guidance and treatment protocols; and quality assurance methods. Results: 48/65 (74%) institutions responded by the end of November 2012, with 15 indicating an active SABR programme. A further four centres indicated that a SABR protocol had been established but was not yet in clinical use. 14 of the 29 remaining responses stated an intention to develop a SABR programme in the next 2 years. Conclusion: The survey responses confirm that SABR provision in the UK is increasing and that this should be expected to continue in the next 2 years. A projection of the future uptake would suggest that by the end of 2014, UK SABR provision will be broadly in line with international practice. PMID:24620840

  5. Surgery versus stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer: less is not more

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Scott J.

    2016-01-01

    High level evidence from randomized studies comparing surgery to stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) is lacking and available retrospective cohort and case control studies are highly variable in how thoroughly they define and stage lung cancer, in how they determine operability, and in the offered surgical approaches to operable lung cancer (open vs. video-assisted). This makes it difficult to compare best radiotherapy and best surgery approaches to treatment and to be confident in conclusions of equipoise between the two modalities. What has become clear from the controversy surrounding surgery versus SABR for early stage lung cancer is the desire to optimize treatment efficacy while minimizing invasiveness and morbidity. This review highlights the ongoing debate in light of these goals. PMID:27195137

  6. Improved survival with stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) over lobectomy for early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC): addressing the fallout of disruptive randomized data

    PubMed Central

    Kavanagh, Brian D.; Karam, Sana D.

    2015-01-01

    The gold-standard therapy for early stage non-small cell lung cancer (esNSCLC) has historically been lobectomy with mediastinal lymph node dissection. However, up to one-third of patients with esNSCLC are considered medically-inoperable due to factors such as advanced age and comorbid illnesses. The past decade has witnessed a dramatic increase in the use of high-dose conformal radiotherapy delivered over 1-5 fractions, synonymously termed stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) or stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). High rates of tumor control and favorable toxicity profiles have led to the adoption of SABR as the treatment of choice for medically-inoperable patients. Limited but growing data exist using SABR for medically-operable patients who are also candidates for lobectomy. A recent pooled analysis of two multicenter prospective randomized trials, the STARS (NCT00840749) and ROSEL (NCT00687986) protocols, published by Chang and colleagues (PMID 25981812) reported improved overall survival (OS) and reduced toxicity with SABR over lobectomy for medically-operable patients with esNSCLC. In this article we review the outcomes of this analysis in the context of existing radiotherapy and surgical data for NSCLC. Further, we discuss the potential causes and implications of these provocative results, including the shifting balance between oncologic control and treatment-related mortality in comparisons of SABR and surgical resection, termed the Head Start Effect. PMID:26244136

  7. Long term survival with stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) versus thoracoscopic sublobar lung resection in elderly people: national population based study with propensity matched comparative analysis

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Subroto; Lee, Paul C; Mao, Jialin; Isaacs, Abby J

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To compare cancer specific survival after thoracoscopic sublobar lung resection and stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for tumors ≤2 cm in size and thoracoscopic resection (sublobar resection or lobectomy) and SABR for tumors ≤5 cm in size. Design National population based retrospective cohort study with propensity matched comparative analysis. Setting Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registry linked with Medicare database in the United States. Participants Patients aged ≥66 with lung cancer undergoing SABR or thoracoscopic lobectomy or sublobar resection from 1 Oct 2007 to 31 June 2012 and followed up to 31 December 2013. Main outcome measures Cancer specific survival after SABR or thoracoscopic surgery for lung cancer. Results 690 (275 (39.9%) SABR and 415 (60.1%) thoracoscopic sublobar lung resection) and 2967 (714 (24.1%) SABR and 2253 (75.9%) thoracoscopic resection) patients were included in primary and secondary analyses. The average age of the entire cohort was 76. Follow-up of the entire cohort ranged from 0 to 6.25 years, with an average of three years. In the primary analysis of patients with tumors sized ≤2 cm, 37 (13.5%) undergoing SABR and 44 (10.6%) undergoing thoracoscopic sublobar resection died from lung cancer, respectively. The cancer specific survival diverged after one year, but in the matched analysis (201 matched patients in each group) there was no significant difference between the groups (SABR v sublobar lung resection mortality: hazard ratio 1.32, 95% confidence interval 0.77 to 2.26; P=0.32). Estimated cancer specific survival at three years after SABR and thoracoscopic sublobar lung resection was 82.6% and 86.4%, respectively. The secondary analysis (643 matched patients in each group) showed that thoracoscopic resection was associated with improved cancer specific survival over SABR in patients with tumors sized ≤5 cm (SABR v resection mortality: hazard ratio 2.10, 1.52 to 2.89; P<0

  8. Radiation-induced second primary cancer risks from modern external beam radiotherapy for early prostate cancer: impact of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and flattening filter free (FFF) radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Louise J.; Thompson, Christopher M.; Lilley, John; Cosgrove, Vivian; Franks, Kevin; Sebag-Montefiore, David; Henry, Ann M.

    2015-02-01

    Risks of radiation-induced second primary cancer following prostate radiotherapy using 3D-conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), flattening filter free (FFF) and stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) were evaluated. Prostate plans were created using 10 MV 3D-CRT (78 Gy in 39 fractions) and 6 MV 5-field IMRT (78 Gy in 39 fractions), VMAT (78 Gy in 39 fractions, with standard flattened and energy-matched FFF beams) and SABR (42.7 Gy in 7 fractions with standard flattened and energy-matched FFF beams). Dose-volume histograms from pelvic planning CT scans of three prostate patients, each planned using all 6 techniques, were used to calculate organ equivalent doses (OED) and excess absolute risks (EAR) of second rectal and bladder cancers, and pelvic bone and soft tissue sarcomas, using mechanistic, bell-shaped and plateau models. For organs distant to the treatment field, chamber measurements recorded in an anthropomorphic phantom were used to calculate OEDs and EARs using a linear model. Ratios of OED give relative radiation-induced second cancer risks. SABR resulted in lower second cancer risks at all sites relative to 3D-CRT. FFF resulted in lower second cancer risks in out-of-field tissues relative to equivalent flattened techniques, with increasing impact in organs at greater distances from the field. For example, FFF reduced second cancer risk by up to 20% in the stomach and up to 56% in the brain, relative to the equivalent flattened technique. Relative to 10 MV 3D-CRT, 6 MV IMRT or VMAT with flattening filter increased second cancer risks in several out-of-field organs, by up to 26% and 55%, respectively. For all techniques, EARs were consistently low. The observed large relative differences between techniques, in absolute terms, were very low, highlighting the importance of considering absolute risks alongside the corresponding relative risks, since when absolute

  9. Short report: interim safety results for a phase II trial measuring the integration of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) plus surgery for early stage non-small cell lung cancer (MISSILE-NSCLC).

    PubMed

    Palma, David A; Nguyen, Timothy K; Kwan, Keith; Gaede, Stewart; Landis, Mark; Malthaner, Richard; Fortin, Dalilah; Louie, Alexander V; Frechette, Eric; Rodrigues, George B; Yaremko, Brian; Yu, Edward; Dar, A Rashid; Lee, Ting-Yim; Gratton, Al; Warner, Andrew; Ward, Aaron; Inculet, Richard

    2017-01-27

    A phase II trial was launched to evaluate if neoadjuvant stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) before surgery improves oncologic outcomes in patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We report a mandated interim safety analysis for the first 10 patients who completed protocol treatment. Operable patients with biopsy-proven T1-2 N0 NSCLC were eligible. SABR was delivered using a risk-adapted fractionation (54Gy/3 fractions, 55/5 or 60/8). Surgical resection was planned 10 weeks later at a high-volume center (>200 lung cancer resections annually). Patients were imaged with dynamic positron emission tomography-computed tomography scans using (18)F-fludeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG-PET CT) and dynamic contrast-enhanced CT before SABR and again before surgery. Toxicity was recorded using CTCAE version 4.0. Twelve patients were enrolled between 09/2014 and 09/2015. Two did not undergo surgery, due to patient or surgeon preference; neither patient has developed toxicity or recurrence. For the 10 patients completing both treatments, median age was 70 (range: 54-76), 60% had T1 disease, and 60% had adenocarcinoma. Median FEV1 was 73% predicted (range: 54-87%). Median time to surgery post-SABR was 10.1 weeks (range: 9.3-15.6 weeks). Surgery consisted of lobectomy (n = 8) or wedge resection (n = 2). Median follow-up post-SABR was 6.3 months. After combined treatment, the rate of acute grade 3-4 toxicity was 10%. There was no post-operative mortality at 90 days. The small sample size included herein precludes any definitive conclusions regarding overall toxicity rates until larger datasets are available. However, these data may inform others who are designing or conducting similar trials.

  10. Sci—Sat AM: Stereo — 08: Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR) for low, intermediate and high risk prostate cancer using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) with a 10x Flattening Filter Free (FFF) beam

    SciTech Connect

    Mestrovic, A; Fortin, D; Alexander, A

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility of using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) with a 10x Flattening Filter Free (FFF) beam for Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR) for low, intermediate and high risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Ten anonymized patient CT data sets were used in this planning study. For each patient CT data set, three sets of contours were generated: 1) low risk, 2) intermediate risk, and 3) high risk scenarios. For each scenario, a single-arc and a double-arc VMAT treatment plans were created. Plans were generated with the Varian Eclipse™ treatment planning system for a Varian TrueBeam™ linac equipped with Millenium 120 MLC. Plans were created using a 10x-FFF beam with a maximum dose rate of 2400 MU/min. Dose prescription was 36.25Gy/5 fractions with the planning objective of covering 99% of the Planning Target Volume with the 95% of the prescription dose. Normal tissue constraints were based on provincial prostate SABR planning guidelines, derived from national and international prostate SABR protocols. Plans were evaluated and compared in terms of: 1) dosimetric plan quality, and 2) treatment delivery efficiency. Results: Both single-arc and double-arc VMAT plans were able to meet the planning goals for low, intermediate and high risk scenarios. No significant dosimetric differences were observed between the plans. However, the treatment time was significantly lower for a single-arc VMAT plans. Conclusions: Prostate SABR treatments are feasible with 10x-FFF VMAT technique. A single-arc VMAT offers equivalent dosimetric plan quality and a superior treatment delivery efficiency, compared to a double-arc VMAT.

  11. TU-F-BRE-07: In Vivo Neutron Detection in Patients Undergoing Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR) for Primary Kidney Cancer Using 6Li and 7Li Enriched TLD Pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Lonski, P; Kron, T; Franich, R; Keehan, S; Siva, S; Taylor, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for primary kidney cancer often involves the use of high-energy photons combined with a large number of monitor units. While important for risk assessment, the additional neutron dose to untargeted healthy tissue is not accounted for in treatment planning. This work aims to detect out-of-field neutrons in vivo for patients undergoing SABR with high-energy (>10 MV) photons and provides preliminary estimates of neutron effective dose. Methods: 3 variations of high-sensitivity LiF:Mg,Cu,P thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) material, each with varying {sup 6}Li / {sup 7}Li concentrations, were used in custom-made Perspex holders for in vivo measurements. The variation in cross section for thermal neutrons between Li isotopes was exploited to distinguish neutron from photon signal. Measurements were made out-of-field for 7 patients, each undergoing 3D-conformal SABR treatment for primary kidney cancer on a Varian 21iX linear accelerator. Results: In vivo measurements show increased signal for the {sup 6}Li enriched material for patients treated with 18 MV photons. Measurements on one SABR patient treated using only 6 MV showed no difference between the 3 TLD materials. The out-of-field photon signal decreased exponentially with distance from the treatment field. The neutron signal, taken as the difference between {sup 6}Li enriched and {sup 7}Li enriched TLD response, remains almost constant up to 50 cm from the beam central axis. Estimates of neutron effective dose from preliminary TLD calibration suggest between 10 and 30 mSv per 1000 MU delivered at 18 MV for the 7 patients. Conclusion: TLD was proven to be a useful tool for the purpose of in vivo neutron detection at out-of-field locations. Further work is required to understand the relationship between TL signal and neutron dose. Dose estimates based on preliminary TLD calibration in a neutron beam suggest the additional neutron dose was <30 mSv per 1000 MU at 18 MV.

  12. EF5 PET of Tumor Hypoxia: A Predictive Imaging Biomarker of Response to Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR) for Early Lung Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    stage lung cancer in patients who are not candidates for surgery because of excessive surgical risk, and will be an important treatment option for a...has become a new standard of care for early stage lung cancer in patients who are not candidates for surgery because of excessive surgical risk...ups are complete to date for the enrolled patients. Scheduled follow-up imaging is at 3-month intervals post-SABR. There has been no evidence of

  13. Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for oligometastatic disease in liver.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myungsoo; Son, Seok Hyun; Won, Yong Kyun; Kay, Chul Seung

    2014-01-01

    Liver metastasis in solid tumors, including colorectal cancer, is the most frequent and lethal complication. The development of systemic therapy has led to prolonged survival. However, in selected patients with a finite number of discrete lesions in liver, defined as oligometastatic state, additional local therapies such as surgical resection, radiofrequency ablation, cryotherapy, and radiotherapy can lead to permanent local disease control and improve survival. Among these, an advance in radiation therapy made it possible to deliver high dose radiation to the tumor more accurately, without impairing the liver function. In recent years, the introduction of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) has offered even more intensive tumor dose escalation in a few fractions with reduced dose to the adjacent normal liver. Many studies have shown that SABR for oligometastases is effective and safe, with local control rates widely ranging from 50% to 100% at one or two years. And actuarial survival at one and two years has been reported ranging from 72% to 94% and from 30% to 62%, respectively, without severe toxicities. In this paper, we described the definition and technical aspects of SABR, clinical outcomes including efficacy and toxicity, and related parameters after SABR in liver oligometastases from colorectal cancer.

  14. Maximizing Benefits from Maintenance Pemetrexed with Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy in Oligoprogressive Non-Squamous Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Shao-Lun; Hsu, Feng-Ming; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Ho, Chao-Chi; Yang, James Chih-Hsin; Cheng, Jason Chia-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    Maintenance pemetrexed offers survival benefit with well-tolerated toxicities for advanced non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We present 3 consecutively enrolled patients with advanced non-squamous NSCLC, receiving stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for oligoprogressive disease during maintenance pemetrexed. All of them had sustained local control of thoracic oligoprogression after the SABR, while maintenance pemetrexed were kept for additionally long progression-free interval. SABR targeting oligoprogression with continued pemetrexed is an effective and safe approach to extend exposure of maintenance pemetrexed, thus maximizing the benefit from it. PMID:27721771

  15. Commissioning and initial stereotactic ablative radiotherapy experience with Vero.

    PubMed

    Solberg, Timothy D; Medin, Paul M; Ramirez, Ezequiel; Ding, Chuxiong; Foster, Ryan D; Yordy, John

    2014-03-06

    The purpose of this study is to describe the comprehensive commissioning process and initial clinical performance of the Vero linear accelerator, a new radiotherapy device recently installed at UT Southwestern Medical Center specifically developed for delivery of image-guided stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR). The Vero system utilizes a ring gantry to integrate a beam delivery platform with image guidance systems. The ring is capable of rotating ± 60° about the vertical axis to facilitate noncoplanar beam arrangements ideal for SABR delivery. The beam delivery platform consists of a 6 MV C-band linac with a 60 leaf MLC projecting a maximum field size of 15 × 15 cm² at isocenter. The Vero planning and delivery systems support a range of treatment techniques, including fixed beam conformal, dynamic conformal arcs, fixed gantry IMRT in either SMLC (step-and-shoot) or DMLC (dynamic) delivery, and hybrid arcs, which combines dynamic conformal arcs and fixed beam IMRT delivery. The accelerator and treatment head are mounted on a gimbal mechanism that allows the linac and MLC to pivot in two dimensions for tumor tracking. Two orthogonal kV imaging subsystems built into the ring facilitate both stereoscopic and volumetric (CBCT) image guidance. The system is also equipped with an always-active electronic portal imaging device (EPID). We present our commissioning process and initial clinical experience focusing on SABR applications with the Vero, including: (1) beam data acquisition; (2) dosimetric commissioning of the treatment planning system, including evaluation of a Monte Carlo algorithm in a specially-designed anthropomorphic thorax phantom; (3) validation using the Radiological Physics Center thorax, head and neck (IMRT), and spine credentialing phantoms; (4) end-to-end evaluation of IGRT localization accuracy; (5) ongoing system performance, including isocenter stability; and (6) clinical SABR applications.

  16. Results of patient specific quality assurance for patients undergoing stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for lung lesions.

    PubMed

    Hardcastle, Nicholas; Clements, Natalie; Chesson, Brent; Aarons, Yolanda; Cramb, Jim; Siva, Shankar; Wanigaratne, Derrick M; Ball, David; Kron, Tomas

    2014-03-01

    Hypofractionated image guided radiotherapy of extracranial targets has become increasingly popular as a treatment modality for inoperable patients with one or more small lesions, often referred to as stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR). This report details the results of the physical quality assurance (QA) program used for the first 33 lung cancer SABR radiotherapy 3D conformal treatment plans in our centre. SABR involves one or few fractions of high radiation dose delivered in many small fields or arcs with tight margins to mobile targets often delivered through heterogeneous media with non-coplanar beams. We have conducted patient-specific QA similar to the more common intensity modulated radiotherapy QA with particular reference to motion management. Individual patient QA was performed in a Perspex phantom using point dose verification with an ionisation chamber and radiochromic film for verification of the dose distribution both with static and moving detectors to verify motion management strategies. While individual beams could vary by up to 7%, the total dose in the target was found to be within ±2% of the prescribed dose for all 33 plans. Film measurements showed qualitative and quantitative agreement between planned and measured isodose line shapes and dimensions. The QA process highlighted the need to account for couch transmission and demonstrated that the ITV construction was appropriate for the treatment technique used. QA is essential for complex radiotherapy deliveries such as SABR. We found individual patient QA helpful in setting up the technique and understanding potential weaknesses in SABR workflow, thus providing confidence in SABR delivery.

  17. Mathematical modelling of tumour volume dynamics in response to stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tariq, Imran; Humbert-Vidan, Laia; Chen, Tao; South, Christopher P.; Ezhil, Veni; Kirkby, Norman F.; Jena, Rajesh; Nisbet, Andrew

    2015-05-01

    This paper reports a modelling study of tumour volume dynamics in response to stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR). The main objective was to develop a model that is adequate to describe tumour volume change measured during SABR, and at the same time is not excessively complex as lacking support from clinical data. To this end, various modelling options were explored, and a rigorous statistical method, the Akaike information criterion, was used to help determine a trade-off between model accuracy and complexity. The models were calibrated to the data from 11 non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with SABR. The results showed that it is feasible to model the tumour volume dynamics during SABR, opening up the potential for using such models in a clinical environment in the future.

  18. Increasing the Therapeutic Ratio of Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy by Individualized Isotoxic Dose Prescription.

    PubMed

    Zindler, Jaap D; Thomas, Charles R; Hahn, Stephen M; Hoffmann, Aswin L; Troost, Esther G C; Lambin, Philippe

    2016-02-01

    To obtain a favorable tradeoff between treatment benefits and morbidity ("therapeutic ratio"), radiotherapy (RT) dose is prescribed according to the tumor volume, with the goal of controlling the disease while respecting normal tissue tolerance levels. We propose a new paradigm for tumor dose prescription in stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) based on organ-at-risk (OAR) tolerance levels called isotoxic dose prescription (IDP), which is derived from experiences and limitations of conventionally fractionated radiotherapy. With IDP, the radiation dose is prescribed based on the predefined level of normal tissue complication probability of a nearby dose-limiting OAR at a prespecified dose-volume constraint. Simultaneously, the prescribed total tumor dose (TTD) is maximized to the technically highest achievable level in order to increase the local tumor control probability (TCP). IDP is especially relevant for tumors located at eloquent locations or for large tumors in which severe toxicity has been described. IDP will result in a lower RT dose or a treatment scheduled with more fractions if the OAR tolerance level is exceeded, and potential dose escalation occurs when the OAR tolerance level allows it and when it is expected to be beneficial (if TCP < 90%). For patients with small tumors at noneloquent sites, the current SABR dose prescription already results in high rates of local control at low toxicity rates. In this review, the concept of IDP is described in the context of SABR.

  19. Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy with CyberKnife for advanced thymic carcinoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Fan, C Y; Huang, W Y; Jen, Y M; Lin, M J; Lin, K T

    2015-10-01

    Thymic carcinoma is a rare but lethal mediastinal cancer. The optimal treatment for advanced thymic carcinoma is not yet established. This report is the first known of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (sabr) with CyberKnife (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA, U.S.A.) as definitive therapy for thymic carcinoma. The patient, a 70-year-old woman with thymic carcinoma, invasion into neighboring organs, and pleural metastases-underwent CyberKnife sabr at 40 Gy in 5 fractions for two lesions, one in the thymus and one in the right paraspinal pleura. After 61 months of observation, a partial response was observed in the irradiated fields. However, disease progression in the non-irradiated pleura was noted. The patient underwent salvage CyberKnife sabr for the four initially nonirradiated pleural lesions. Computed tomography images obtained 10 months after the salvage therapy revealed a partial response. The patient is living, with progression-free irradiated lesions and no radiation-related toxicity. CyberKnife sabr is feasible for patients who are unable to undergo either surgery or conventionally fractionated radiation therapy.

  20. Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy Should Be Combined With a Hypoxic Cell Radiosensitizer

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, J. Martin; Diehn, Maximilian; Loo, Billy W.

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of tumor hypoxia on the expected level of cell killing by regimens of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) and to determine the extent to which the negative effect of hypoxia could be prevented using a clinically available hypoxic cell radiosensitizer. Results and Discussion: We have calculated the expected level of tumor cell killing from regimens of SABR, both with and without the assumption that 20% of the tumor cells are hypoxic, using the standard linear quadratic model and the universal survival curve modification. We compare the results obtained with our own clinical data for lung tumors of different sizes and with published data from other studies. We also have calculated the expected effect on cell survival of adding the hypoxic cell sensitizer etanidazole at clinically achievable drug concentrations. Modeling tumor cell killing with any of the currently used regimens of SABR produces results that are inconsistent with the majority of clinical findings if tumor hypoxia is not considered. However, with the assumption of tumor hypoxia, the expected level of cell killing is consistent with clinical data. For only some of the smallest tumors are the clinical data consistent with no tumor hypoxia, but there could be other reasons for the sensitivity of these tumors. The addition of etanidazole at clinically achievable tumor concentrations produces a large increase in the expected level of tumor cell killing from the large radiation doses used in SABR. Conclusions: The presence of tumor hypoxia is a major negative factor in limiting the curability of tumors by SABR at radiation doses that are tolerable to surrounding normal tissues. However, this negative effect of hypoxia could be overcome by the addition of clinically tolerable doses of the hypoxic cell radiosensitizer etanidazole.

  1. Outcomes of Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy in Patients With Potentially Operable Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lagerwaard, Frank J.; Verstegen, Naomi E.; Haasbeek, Cornelis J.A.; Slotman, Ben J.; Paul, Marinus A.; Smit, Egbert F.; Senan, Suresh

    2012-05-01

    Background: Approximately two-thirds of patients with early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in The Netherlands currently undergo surgical resection. As an increasing number of fit patients have elected to undergo stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) in recent years, we studied outcomes after SABR in patients with potentially operable stage I NSCLC. Methods and Materials: In an institutional prospective database collected since 2003, 25% of lung SABR cases (n = 177 patients) were found to be potentially operable when the following patients were excluded: those with (1) synchronous lung tumors or other malignancy, (2) prior high-dose radiotherapy/pneumonectomy, (3) chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with a severity score of 3-4 according to the Global initiative for Obstructive Lung Disease classification. (4) a performance score of {>=}3, and (5) other comorbidity precluding surgery. Study patients included 101 males and 76 females, with a median age of 76 years old, 60% of whom were staged as T1 and 40% of whom were T2. Median Charlson comorbidity score was 2 (range, 0-5). A SABR dose of 60 Gy was delivered using a risk-adapted scheme in 3, 5, or 8 fractions, depending on tumor size and location. Follow-up chest computed tomography scans were obtained at 3, 6, and 12 months and yearly thereafter. Results: Median follow-up was 31.5 months; and median overall survival (OS) was 61.5 months, with 1- and 3-year survival rates of 94.7% and 84.7%, respectively. OS rates at 3 years in patients with (n = 59) and without (n = 118) histological diagnosis did not differ significantly (96% versus 81%, respectively, p = 0.39). Post-SABR 30-day mortality was 0%, while predicted 30-day mortality for a lobectomy, derived using the Thoracoscore predictive model (Falcoz PE et al. J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 2007;133:325-332), would have been 2.6%. Local control rates at 1 and 3 years were 98% and 93%, respectively. Regional and distant failure rates at 3 years were each

  2. Residual {sup 18}F-FDG-PET Uptake 12 Weeks After Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy for Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Predicts Local Control

    SciTech Connect

    Bollineni, Vikram Rao; Widder, Joachim; Pruim, Jan; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Wiegman, Erwin M.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate the prognostic value of [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) uptake at 12 weeks after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: From November 2006 to February 2010, 132 medically inoperable patients with proven Stage I NSCLC or FDG-PET-positive primary lung tumors were analyzed retrospectively. SABR consisted of 60 Gy delivered in 3 to 8 fractions. Maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) of the treated lesion was assessed 12 weeks after SABR, using FDG-PET. Patients were subsequently followed at regular intervals using computed tomography (CT) scans. Association between post-SABR SUV{sub max} and local control (LC), mediastinal failure, distant failure, overall survival (OS), and disease-specific survival (DSS) was examined. Results: Median follow-up time was 17 months (range, 3-40 months). Median lesion size was 25 mm (range, 9-70 mm). There were 6 local failures: 15 mediastinal failures, 15 distant failures, 13 disease-related deaths, and 16 deaths from intercurrent diseases. Glucose corrected post-SABR median SUV{sub max} was 3.0 (range, 0.55-14.50). Using SUV{sub max} 5.0 as a cutoff, the 2-year LC was 80% versus 97.7% for high versus low SUV{sub max}, yielding an adjusted subhazard ratio (SHR) for high post-SABR SUV{sub max} of 7.3 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.4-38.5; p = 0.019). Two-year DSS rates were 74% versus 91%, respectively, for high and low SUV{sub max} values (SHR, 2.2; 95% CI, 0.8-6.3; p = 0.113). Two-year OS was 62% versus 81% (hazard ratio [HR], 1.6; 95% CI, 0.7-3.7; p = 0.268). Conclusions: Residual FDG uptake (SUV{sub max} {>=}5.0) 12 weeks after SABR signifies increased risk of local failure. A single FDG-PET scan at 12 weeks could be used to tailor further follow-up according to the risk of failure, especially in patients potentially eligible for salvage surgery.

  3. PD-1 Restrains Radiotherapy-Induced Abscopal Effect

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sean S.; Dong, Haidong; Liu, Xin; Harrington, Susan M.; Krco, Christopher J.; Grams, Michael P.; Mansfield, Aaron S.; Furutani, Keith M.; Olivier, Kenneth R.; Kwon, Eugene D.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the influence of PD-1 expression on the systemic antitumor response (abscopal effect) induced by stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) in preclinical melanoma and renal cell carcinoma models. We compared the SABR-induced antitumor response in PD-1-expressing wild-type (WT) and PD-1-deficient knockout (KO) mice, and found that PD-1 expression compromises the survival of tumor-bearing mice treated with SABR. None of the PD-1 WT mice survived beyond 25 days, whereas 20% of the PD-1 KO mice survived beyond 40 days. Similarly, PD-1-blocking antibody in WT mice was able to recapitulate SABR-induced antitumor responses observed in PD-1 KO mice and led to increased survival. The combination of SABR plus PD-1 blockade induced near complete regression of the irradiated primary tumor (synergistic effect), as opposed to SABR alone or SABR plus control antibody. The combination of SABR plus PD-1 blockade therapy elicited a 66% reduction in size of non-irradiated, secondary tumors outside the SABR radiation field (abscopal effect). The observed abscopal effect was tumor-specific and was not dependent on tumor histology or host genetic background. The CD11ahigh CD8+ T-cell phenotype identifies a tumor-reactive population, which was associated in frequency and function with a SABR-induced antitumor immune response in PD-1 KO mice. We conclude that SABR induces an abscopal tumor-specific immune response in both the irradiated and non-irradiated tumors, which is potentiated by PD-1 blockade. The combination of SABR and PD-1 blockade has the potential to translate into a potent immunotherapy strategy in the management of metastatic cancer patients. PMID:25701325

  4. PD-1 Restrains Radiotherapy-Induced Abscopal Effect.

    PubMed

    Park, Sean S; Dong, Haidong; Liu, Xin; Harrington, Susan M; Krco, Christopher J; Grams, Michael P; Mansfield, Aaron S; Furutani, Keith M; Olivier, Kenneth R; Kwon, Eugene D

    2015-06-01

    We investigated the influence of PD-1 expression on the systemic antitumor response (abscopal effect) induced by stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) in preclinical melanoma and renal cell carcinoma models. We compared the SABR-induced antitumor response in PD-1-expressing wild-type (WT) and PD-1-deficient knockout (KO) mice and found that PD-1 expression compromises the survival of tumor-bearing mice treated with SABR. None of the PD-1 WT mice survived beyond 25 days, whereas 20% of the PD-1 KO mice survived beyond 40 days. Similarly, PD-1-blocking antibody in WT mice was able to recapitulate SABR-induced antitumor responses observed in PD-1 KO mice and led to increased survival. The combination of SABR plus PD-1 blockade induced near complete regression of the irradiated primary tumor (synergistic effect), as opposed to SABR alone or SABR plus control antibody. The combination of SABR plus PD-1 blockade therapy elicited a 66% reduction in size of nonirradiated, secondary tumors outside the SABR radiation field (abscopal effect). The observed abscopal effect was tumor specific and was not dependent on tumor histology or host genetic background. The CD11a(high) CD8(+) T-cell phenotype identifies a tumor-reactive population, which was associated in frequency and function with a SABR-induced antitumor immune response in PD-1 KO mice. We conclude that SABR induces an abscopal tumor-specific immune response in both the irradiated and nonirradiated tumors, which is potentiated by PD-1 blockade. The combination of SABR and PD-1 blockade has the potential to translate into a potent immunotherapy strategy in the management of patients with metastatic cancer.

  5. Percutaneous thermal ablation of primary lung cancer.

    PubMed

    de Baere, T; Tselikas, L; Catena, V; Buy, X; Deschamps, F; Palussière, J

    2016-10-01

    Percutaneous ablation of small-size non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has demonstrated feasibility and safety in nonsurgical candidates. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA), the most commonly used technique, has an 80-90% reported rate of complete ablation, with the best results obtained in tumors less than 2-3cm in diameter. The highest one-, three-, and five-year overall survival rates reported in NSCLC following RFA are 97.7%, 72.9%, and 55.7% respectively. Tumor size, tumor stage, and underlying comorbidities are the main predictors of survival. Other ablation techniques such as microwave or cryoablation may help overcome the limitations of RFA in the future, particularly for large tumors or those close to large vessels. Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) has its own complications and carries the risk of fiducial placement requiring multiple lung punctures. SABR has also demonstrated significant efficacy in treating small-size lung tumors and should be compared to percutaneous ablation.

  6. Novel application of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy using CyberKnife(®) for early-stage renal cell carcinoma in patients with pre-existing chronic kidney disease: Initial clinical experiences.

    PubMed

    Lo, Cheng-Hsiang; Huang, Wen-Yen; Chao, Hsing-Lung; Lin, Kuen-Tze; Jen, Yee-Min

    2014-07-01

    The treatment of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in patients diagnosed with chronic kidney disease (CKD) requires particular care in order to preserve the remaining renal function. The present study aimed to investigate the potential of a novel nephron-sparing treatment, which is capable of targeting tumors embedded deep within tissues. The present study analyzed three patients, with pre-existing CKD and multiple comorbidities, who were successfully treated for stage I RCC using the CyberKnife(®) stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) system. The total prescribed dose was 40 Gy in five fractions administered over five consecutive days. Treatment efficiency was determined using computed tomography scans of the tumors and periodic measurements of the glomerular filtration rate over a period of 12-40 months. Local control, defined as a radiologically stable condition, was achieved in all patients. Lung metastasis was observed in one patient nine months after SABR; however, the side-effects were generally mild and self-limiting. One patient developed renal failure 26 months after SABR, while the severity of CKD was only marginally altered in the other two patients and renal failure did not occur. In conclusion, in the present study, SABR with CyberKnife(®) was observed to be well tolerated in the patients, with an acceptable acute toxicity effect. Therefore, it may represent a potential therapeutic option for patients with early-stage RCC who have previously been diagnosed with CKD, but for whom other nephron-sparing treatments are contraindicated.

  7. Dosimetric comparison of a 6-MV flattening-filter and a flattening-filter-free beam for lung stereotactic ablative radiotherapy treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yon-Lae; Chung, Jin-Beom; Kim, Jae-Sung; Lee, Jeong-Woo; Kim, Jin-Young; Kang, Sang-Won; Suh, Tae-Suk

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility of clinical usage of a flattening-filter-free (FFF) beam for treatment with lung stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR). Ten patients were treated with SABR and a 6-MV FFF beam for this study. All plans using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) were optimized in the Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS) by using the Acuros XB (AXB) dose calculation algorithm and were delivered by using a Varian TrueBeam ™ linear accelerator equipped with a high-definition (HD) multi-leaf collimator. The prescription dose used was 48 Gy in 4 fractions. In order to compare the plan using a conventional 6-MV flattening-filter (FF) beam, the SABR plan was recalculated under the condition of the same beam settings used in the plan employing the 6-MV FFF beam. All dose distributions were calculated by using Acuros XB (AXB, version 11) and a 2.5-mm isotropic dose grid. The cumulative dosevolume histograms (DVH) for the planning target volume (PTV) and all organs at risk (OARs) were analyzed. Technical parameters, such as total monitor units (MUs) and the delivery time, were also recorded and assessed. All plans for target volumes met the planning objectives for the PTV ( i.e., V95% > 95%) and the maximum dose ( i.e., Dmax < 110%) revealing adequate target coverage for the 6-MV FF and FFF beams. Differences in DVH for target volumes (PTV and clinical target volume (CTV)) and OARs on the lung SABR plans from the interchange of the treatment beams were small, but showed a marked reduction (52.97%) in the treatment delivery time. The SABR plan with a FFF beam required a larger number of MUs than the plan with the FF beam, and the mean difference in MUs was 4.65%. This study demonstrated that the use of the FFF beam for lung SABR plan provided better treatment efficiency relative to 6-MV FF beam. This strategy should be particularly beneficial for high dose conformity to the lung and decreased intra-fraction movements because of

  8. Accuracy of Breath-hold CT in Treatment Planning for Lung Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Martel, Charles; Campeau, Marie-Pierre; Filion, Édith; Roberge, David; Bahig, Houda; Vu, Toni; Lambert, Louise; Boudam, Karim; Carrier, Jean-Francois

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The objectives of this study are (1) to measure concordance of tumor position on breath-hold (BH) computed tomography (CT) scans relative to the natural tumor path during free breathing (FB) and (2) to evaluate the benefits of the breathing monitoring device Abches (Apex Medical, Tokyo) for stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) treatment planning. Methods: In 53 lung cancer patients treated with CyberKnife™ robotic radiosurgery system, FB four-dimensional computerized tomography (4DCT) and end-expiration (EE) BH CT images were obtained. Extent of natural tumor motion was assessed with rigid registration derived from end-inspiration (EI) and EE phases of the 4DCT. Tumor displacement in BH scans relative to the natural tumor path was measured relative to the EE 4DCT phase. Results: Mean tumor motion (+/- 1 SD) during natural FB was 1 ± 1 mm, 2 ± 2 mm, and 6 ± 6 mm in medio-lateral, anterior-posterior, and cranio-caudal directions, respectively. Tumor position on BH CT scan was closer to EE than EI 4DCT phase for 35/53 patients (66%). Difference of BH tumor position vs. EE state was 4 ± 3 mm. Gross tumor displacements perpendicular to natural tumor path were as great as 11 mm (anterior-posterior) and were seen with or without the breathing monitoring device. Conclusion: Tumor position during BH CT may not accurately correspond to positions observed on FB 4DCT. Hence, accurate and custom 4D analysis for each individual patient is recommended for treatment planning, especially those involving BH acquisitions. PMID:28003937

  9. SU-E-T-91: Accuracy of Dose Calculation Algorithms for Patients Undergoing Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Tajaldeen, A; Ramachandran, P; Geso, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate and quantify the variation in dose distributions in small field lung cancer radiotherapy using seven different dose calculation algorithms. Methods: The study was performed in 21 lung cancer patients who underwent Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiotherapy (SABR). Two different methods (i) Same dose coverage to the target volume (named as same dose method) (ii) Same monitor units in all algorithms (named as same monitor units) were used for studying the performance of seven different dose calculation algorithms in XiO and Eclipse treatment planning systems. The seven dose calculation algorithms include Superposition, Fast superposition, Fast Fourier Transform ( FFT) Convolution, Clarkson, Anisotropic Analytic Algorithm (AAA), Acurous XB and pencil beam (PB) algorithms. Prior to this, a phantom study was performed to assess the accuracy of these algorithms. Superposition algorithm was used as a reference algorithm in this study. The treatment plans were compared using different dosimetric parameters including conformity, heterogeneity and dose fall off index. In addition to this, the dose to critical structures like lungs, heart, oesophagus and spinal cord were also studied. Statistical analysis was performed using Prism software. Results: The mean±stdev with conformity index for Superposition, Fast superposition, Clarkson and FFT convolution algorithms were 1.29±0.13, 1.31±0.16, 2.2±0.7 and 2.17±0.59 respectively whereas for AAA, pencil beam and Acurous XB were 1.4±0.27, 1.66±0.27 and 1.35±0.24 respectively. Conclusion: Our study showed significant variations among the seven different algorithms. Superposition and AcurosXB algorithms showed similar values for most of the dosimetric parameters. Clarkson, FFT convolution and pencil beam algorithms showed large differences as compared to superposition algorithms. Based on our study, we recommend Superposition and AcurosXB algorithms as the first choice of

  10. Hypofractionated ablative radiotherapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Christopher H.

    2016-01-01

    The role of radiation in locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer (LAPC) is controversial. Randomized trials evaluating standard doses of chemoradiation have not shown a significant benefit from the use of consolidative radiation. Results from non-randomized studies of 3–5-fraction stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) have been similar to standard chemoradiation, but with less toxicity and a shorter treatment time. Doses of SBRT have been reduced to subablative levels for the sake of tolerability. The benefit of both options is unclear. In contrast, ablative doses can be delivered using an SBRT technique in 15–28 fractions. The keys to the delivery of ablative doses are computed tomography (CT) image guidance and respiratory gating. Higher doses have resulted in encouraging long-term survival results. In this review, we present a comprehensive solution to achieving ablative doses for selected patients with pancreatic tumors by using a combination of classical, modern and novel concepts of radiotherapy: fractionation, CT image guidance, respiratory gating, intentional dose heterogeneity, and simultaneous integrated protection. PMID:27029741

  11. Evolution of Hypofractionated Accelerated Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer – The Sunnybrook Experience

    PubMed Central

    Musunuru, Hima Bindu; Cheung, Patrick; Loblaw, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR) is a newer method of ultra hypo fractionated radiotherapy that uses combination of image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), to deliver high doses of radiation in a few fractions to a target, at the same time sparing the surrounding organs at risk (OAR). SABR is ideal for treating small volumes of disease and has been introduced in a number of disease sites including brain, lung, liver, spine, and prostate. Given the radiobiological advantages of treating prostate cancer with high doses per fraction, SABR is becoming a standard of care for low and intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients based upon the results from Sunnybrook and also the US-based prostate SABR consortium. This review examines the development of moderate and ultra hypo-fractionation schedules at the Odette Cancer centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences. Moderate hypo-fractionation protocol was first developed in 2001 for intermediate-risk prostate cancer and from there on different treatment schedules including SABR evolved for all risk groups. PMID:25452934

  12. Effect of different breathing patterns in the same patient on stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy dosimetry for primary renal cell carcinoma: A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Pham, Daniel; Kron, Tomas; Foroudi, Farshad; Siva, Shankar

    2013-10-01

    Stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR) for primary renal cell carcinoma (RCC) targets requires motion management strategies to verify dose delivery. This case study highlights the effect of a change in patient breathing amplitude on the dosimetry to organs at risk and target structures. A 73-year-old male patient was planned for receiving 26 Gy of radiation in 1 fraction of SABR for a left primary RCC. The patient was simulated with four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) and the tumor internal target volume (ITV) was delineated using the 4DCT maximum intensity projection. However, the initially planned treatment was abandoned at the radiation oncologist's discretion after pretreatment cone-beam CT (CBCT) motion verification identified a greater than 50% reduction in superior to inferior diaphragm motion as compared with the planning 4DCT. This patient was resimulated with respiratory coaching instructions. To assess the effect of the change in breathing on the dosimetry to the target, each plan was recalculated on the data set representing the change in breathing condition. A change from smaller to larger breathing showed a 46% loss in planning target volume (PTV) coverage, whereas a change from larger breathing to smaller breathing resulted in an 8% decrease in PTV coverage. ITV coverage was similarly reduced by 8% in both scenarios. This case study highlights the importance of tools to verify breathing motion prior to treatment delivery. 4D image guided radiation therapy verification strategies should focus on not only verifying ITV margin coverage but also the effect on the surrounding organs at risk.

  13. Effect of different breathing patterns in the same patient on stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy dosimetry for primary renal cell carcinoma: a case study.

    PubMed

    Pham, Daniel; Kron, Tomas; Foroudi, Farshad; Siva, Shankar

    2013-01-01

    Stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR) for primary renal cell carcinoma (RCC) targets requires motion management strategies to verify dose delivery. This case study highlights the effect of a change in patient breathing amplitude on the dosimetry to organs at risk and target structures. A 73-year-old male patient was planned for receiving 26Gy of radiation in 1 fraction of SABR for a left primary RCC. The patient was simulated with four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) and the tumor internal target volume (ITV) was delineated using the 4DCT maximum intensity projection. However, the initially planned treatment was abandoned at the radiation oncologist's discretion after pretreatment cone-beam CT (CBCT) motion verification identified a greater than 50% reduction in superior to inferior diaphragm motion as compared with the planning 4DCT. This patient was resimulated with respiratory coaching instructions. To assess the effect of the change in breathing on the dosimetry to the target, each plan was recalculated on the data set representing the change in breathing condition. A change from smaller to larger breathing showed a 46% loss in planning target volume (PTV) coverage, whereas a change from larger breathing to smaller breathing resulted in an 8% decrease in PTV coverage. ITV coverage was similarly reduced by 8% in both scenarios. This case study highlights the importance of tools to verify breathing motion prior to treatment delivery. 4D image guided radiation therapy verification strategies should focus on not only verifying ITV margin coverage but also the effect on the surrounding organs at risk.

  14. SU-E-T-290: Dosimetric Accuracy of Acuros XB and Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm in Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy of Small Lung Lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Amy S; Yang, Y; Bush, K; Fahimian, B; Hsu, A

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The accuracy of dose calculation for lung stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) of small lesions critically depends on the proper modeling of the lateral scatter in heterogeneous media. In recent years, grid-based Boltzman solvers such as Acuros XB (AXB) have been introduced for enhanced modeling of radiation transport in heterogeneous media. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the dosimetric impact of dose calculation between AXB and convolution-superposition algorithms such as analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA) for small lesion sizes and different beam energies. Methods: Five lung SABR VMAT cases with GTV ranged from 0.8cm to 2.5cm in diameter were studied. For each case, doses were calculated by AAA, AXB (V11031) and Monte Carlo simulation (MC) with the same plan parameters for 10MV and 6MV. The dose calculation accuracy were evaluated by comparing DVHs and dose distributions with MC as the benchmark. The accuracy of calculated dose was also validated by EBT3 film measurement with a field size of 3cmx3cm in a thorax phantom. Results: For 10MV and GTV less than 1cm, dose calculated by AXB agrees well with MC compared to AAA. Dose difference calculated with AXB and AAA could be up to 30%. For GTV greater than 2cm, calculation results of AXB and AAA agree within 5% in GTV. For 6MV, the difference between calculated doses by AXB and AAA is less 10% for GTV less than 1cm. Based on film measurements, lung dose was overestimated 10% and 20% by AAA for 6MV and 10MV. Conclusion: Lateral scatter and transport is modeled more accurately by AXB than AAA in heterogeneous media, especially for small field size and high energy beams. The accuracy depends on the assigned material in calculation. If grid-based Boltzman solvers or MC are not available for calculation, lower energy beams should be used for treatment.

  15. Technical advances in external radiotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Park, Shin-Hyung; Kim, Jae-Chul; Kang, Min Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy techniques have substantially improved in the last two decades. After the introduction of 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, radiotherapy has been increasingly used for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Currently, more advanced techniques, including intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR), and charged particle therapy, are used for the treatment of HCC. IMRT can escalate the tumor dose while sparing the normal tissue even though the tumor is large or located near critical organs. SABR can deliver a very high radiation dose to small HCCs in a few fractions, leading to high local control rates of 84%-100%. Various advanced imaging modalities are used for radiotherapy planning and delivery to improve the precision of radiotherapy. These advanced techniques enable the delivery of high dose radiotherapy for early to advanced HCCs without increasing the radiation-induced toxicities. However, as there have been no effective tools for the prediction of the response to radiotherapy or recurrences within or outside the radiation field, future studies should focus on selecting the patients who will benefit from radiotherapy. PMID:27621577

  16. SU-E-J-207: Assessing the Validity of 4D-CT Based Target Volumes and Free Breathing CBCT Localization in Lung Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy (SABR)

    SciTech Connect

    Badkul, R; Pokhrel, D; Jiang, H; Park, J; Wang, F; Kumar, P

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Four-dimensional-computed-tomography(4D-CT) imaging for target-volume delineation and cone-beam-tomography(CBCT) for treatment localization are widely utilized in lung-SABR.Aim of this study was to perform a quantitative-assessment and inter-comparison of Internal-targetvolumes( ITV) drawn on various phases of breathing-cycle 4D-CT-scans, Maximum-intensity-projection(MIP), average-intensity-projection(AIP)and static CT-scans of lung-motion-phantom to simulate lung-SABR patient geometry. We also analyzed and compared the ITVs drawn on freebreathing- CBCT. Materials and Methods: 4D-CT-scans were acquired on Philips big-bore 16slice CT and Bellows-respiratory monitoring-system using retrospective phase-binning method. Each respiratory cycle divided into 10-phases. Quasar-Phantom with lung-inserts and 3cm-diameter nylonball to simulate tumor and was placed on respiratory-motion-platform for 4D-CT and CBCT-acquisition. Amplitudes of motions: 0.5,1.0,2.0,3.0cm in superior-inferior direction with breathing-cycle time of 6,5,4,6sec, respectively used.4D-CTs with 10-phases(0%to90%)for each excursion-set and 3D-CT for static-phantom exported to iPlan treatment-planningsystem( TPS).Tumor-volumes delineated in all phases of 4D-CT, MIP,AIP,CBCT scans using fixed-HU-threshold(−500to1000)values automatically.For each 4D-dataset ITV obtained by unifying the tumorcontours on all phases.CBCT-ITV-volumes were drawn in Eclipse-TPS. Results: Mean volume of tumor contours for all phases compared with static 3D-CT were 0.62±0.08%, 1.67±0.26%, 4.77±0.54% and 9.27±1.23% for 0.5cm,1cm,2cm,3cm excursions respectively. Differences of mean Union-ITV with MIP-ITV were close(≤2.4%).Mean Union-ITV from expected-theoretical values differed from −4.9% to 3.8%.Union-ITV and MIP-ITV were closer within 2.3%. AIP-ITVs were underestimated from 14 to 32% compared to union-ITV for all motion datasets. Differences of −5.9% to −44% and −5% to 6.7% for CBCT-ITV from MIP-ITV and AIP

  17. A feasibility study evaluating the relationship between dose and focal liver reaction in stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for liver cancer based on intensity change of Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced magnetic resonance images

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Sang Hoon; Yu, Jeong Il; Lim, Do Hoon; Han, Youngyih

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In order to evaluate the relationship between the dose to the liver parenchyma and focal liver reaction (FLR) after stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR), we suggest a novel method using a three-dimensional dose distribution and change in signal intensity of gadoxetate disodium-gadolinium ethoxybenzyl diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-EOB-DTPA)-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) hepatobiliary phase images. Materials and Methods In our method, change of the signal intensity between the pretreatment and follow-up hepatobiliary phase images of Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI was calculated and then threshold dose (TD) for developing FLR was obtained from correlation of dose with the change of the signal intensity. For validation of the method, TDs for six patients, who had been treated for liver cancer with SABR with 45–60 Gy in 3 fractions, were calculated using the method, and we evaluated concordance between volume enclosed by isodose of TD by the method and volume identified as FLR by a physician. Results The dose to normal liver was correlated with change in signal intensity between pretreatment and follow-up MRI with a median R2 of 0.935 (range, 0.748 to 0.985). The median TD by the method was 23.5 Gy (range, 18.3 to 39.4 Gy). The median value of concordance was 84.5% (range, 44.7% to 95.9%). Conclusion Our method is capable of providing a quantitative evaluation of the relationship between dose and intensity changes on follow-up MRI, as well as determining individual TD for developing FLR. We expect our method to provide better information about the individual relationship between dose and FLR in radiotherapy for liver cancer. PMID:27104169

  18. Treatment Plan Technique and Quality for Single-Isocenter Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy of Multiple Lung Lesions with Volumetric-Modulated Arc Therapy or Intensity-Modulated Radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Quan, Kimmen; Xu, Karen M; Lalonde, Ron; Horne, Zachary D; Bernard, Mark E; McCoy, Chuck; Clump, David A; Burton, Steven A; Heron, Dwight E

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to provide a practical approach to the planning technique and evaluation of plan quality for the multi-lesion, single-isocenter stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) of the lung. Eleven patients with two or more lung lesions underwent single-isocenter volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) radiosurgery or IMRS. All plans were normalized to the target maximum dose. For each plan, all targets were treated to the same dose. Plan conformity and dose gradient were maximized with dose-control tuning structures surrounding targets. For comparison, multi-isocenter plans were retrospectively created for four patients. Conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), gradient index (GI), and gradient distance (GD) were calculated for each plan. V5, V10, and V20 of the lung and organs at risk (OARs) were collected. Treatment time and total monitor units (MUs) were also recorded. One patient had four lesions and the remainder had two lesions. Six patients received VMAT and five patients received intensity-modulated radiosurgery (IMRS). For those treated with VMAT, two patients received 3-arc VMAT and four received 2-arc VMAT. For those treated with IMRS, two patients were treated with 10 and 11 beams, respectively, and the rest received 12 beams. Prescription doses ranged from 30 to 54 Gy in three to five fractions. The median prescribed isodose line was 84% (range: 80-86%). The median maximum dose was 57.1 Gy (range: 35.7-65.1 Gy). The mean combined PTV was 49.57 cm(3) (range: 14.90-87.38 cm(3)). For single-isocenter plans, the median CI was 1.15 (range: 0.97-1.53). The median HI was 1.19 (range: 1.16-1.28). The median GI was 4.60 (range: 4.16-7.37). The median maximum radiation dose (Dmax) to total lung was 55.6 Gy (range: 35.7-62.0 Gy). The median mean radiation dose to the lung (Dmean) was 4.2 Gy (range: 1.1-9.3 Gy). The median lung V5 was 18.7% (range: 3.8-41.3%). There was no significant difference in CI, HI, GI, GD, V5, V10

  19. Universal Survival Curve and Single Fraction Equivalent Dose: Useful Tools in Understanding Potency of Ablative Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Clint; Papiez, Lech; Zhang Shichuan; Story, Michael; Timmerman, Robert D.

    2008-03-01

    Purpose: Overprediction of the potency and toxicity of high-dose ablative radiotherapy such as stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) by the linear quadratic (LQ) model led to many clinicians' hesitating to adopt this efficacious and well-tolerated therapeutic option. The aim of this study was to offer an alternative method of analyzing the effect of SBRT by constructing a universal survival curve (USC) that provides superior approximation of the experimentally measured survival curves in the ablative, high-dose range without losing the strengths of the LQ model around the shoulder. Methods and Materials: The USC was constructed by hybridizing two classic radiobiologic models: the LQ model and the multitarget model. We have assumed that the LQ model gives a good description for conventionally fractionated radiotherapy (CFRT) for the dose to the shoulder. For ablative doses beyond the shoulder, the survival curve is better described as a straight line as predicted by the multitarget model. The USC smoothly interpolates from a parabola predicted by the LQ model to the terminal asymptote of the multitarget model in the high-dose region. From the USC, we derived two equivalence functions, the biologically effective dose and the single fraction equivalent dose for both CFRT and SBRT. Results: The validity of the USC was tested by using previously published parameters of the LQ and multitarget models for non-small-cell lung cancer cell lines. A comparison of the goodness-of-fit of the LQ and USC models was made to a high-dose survival curve of the H460 non-small-cell lung cancer cell line. Conclusion: The USC can be used to compare the dose fractionation schemes of both CFRT and SBRT. The USC provides an empirically and a clinically well-justified rationale for SBRT while preserving the strengths of the LQ model for CFRT.

  20. Radiomics versus physician assessment for the early prediction of local cancer recurrence after stereotactic radiotherapy for lung cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattonen, Sarah A.; Johnson, Carol; Palma, David A.; Rodrigues, George; Louie, Alexander V.; Senan, Suresh; Yeung, Timothy P. C.; Ward, Aaron D.

    2016-03-01

    Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) has recently become a standard treatment option for patients with early-stage lung cancer, which achieves local control rates similar to surgery. Local recurrence following SABR typically presents after one year post-treatment. However, benign radiological changes mimicking local recurrence can appear on CT imaging following SABR, complicating the assessment of response. We hypothesize that subtle changes on early post- SABR CT images are important in predicting the eventual incidence of local recurrence and would be extremely valuable to support timely salvage interventions. The objective of this study was to extract radiomic image features on post-SABR follow-up images for 45 patients (15 with local recurrence and 30 without) to aid in the early prediction of local recurrence. Three blinded thoracic radiation oncologists were also asked to score follow-up images as benign injury or local recurrence. A radiomic signature consisting of five image features demonstrated a classification error of 24%, false positive rate (FPR) of 24%, false negative rate (FNR) of 23%, and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.85 at 2-5 months post-SABR. At the same time point, three physicians assessed the majority of images as benign injury for overall errors of 34-37%, FPRs of 0-4%, and FNRs of 100%. These results suggest that radiomics can detect early changes associated with local recurrence which are not typically considered by physicians. We aim to develop a decision support system which could potentially allow for early salvage therapy of patients with local recurrence following SABR.

  1. Survival and Quality of Life After Stereotactic or 3D-Conformal Radiotherapy for Inoperable Early-Stage Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Widder, Joachim; Postmus, Douwe; Ubbels, Jan F.; Wiegman, Erwin M.; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate survival and local recurrence after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) or three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) administered for early-stage primary lung cancer and to investigate longitudinal changes of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) parameters after either treatment. Methods and Materials: Two prospective cohorts of inoperable patients with T1-2N0M0 primary lung tumors were analyzed. Patients received 70 Gy in 35 fractions with 3D-CRT or 60 Gy in three to eight fractions with SABR. Global quality of life (GQOL), physical functioning (PF), and patient-rated dyspnea were assessed using the respective dimensions of European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Core Questionnaire-C30 and LC13. HRQOL was analyzed using multivariate linear mixed-effects modeling, survival and local control (LC) using the Kaplan-Meier method, Cox proportional hazards analysis, and Fine and Gray multivariate competing risk analysis as appropriate. Results: Overall survival (OS) was better after SABR compared with 3D-CRT with a HR of 2.6 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.5-4.8; p < 0.01). 3D-CRT conferred a subhazard ratio for LC of 5.0 (95% CI: 1.7-14.7; p < 0.01) compared with SABR. GQOL and PF were stable after SABR (p = 0.21 and p = 0.62, respectively). Dyspnea increased after SABR by 3.2 out of 100 points (95% CI: 1.0-5.3; p < 0.01), which is clinically insignificant. At 1 year, PF decreased by an excess of 8.7 out of 100 points (95% CI: 2.8-14.7; p < 0.01) after 3D-CRT compared with SABR. Conclusion: In this nonrandomized comparison of two prospective cohorts of medically inoperable patients with Stage I lung cancer, OS and LC were better after SABR. GQOL, PF, and patient-rated dyspnea were stable after SABR, whereas PF decreased after 3D-CRT approaching clinical significance already at 1 year.

  2. Scleroderma 'en coup de sabre'.

    PubMed Central

    David, J; Wilson, J; Woo, P

    1991-01-01

    A case of scleroderma 'en coup de sabre' presenting with uveitis, predominantly posterior, and intractable grand mal seizures is described. The histopathology specimens and neuroradiology investigations reaffirm the clinical impression that inflammation is not solely confined to the skin in this form of linear scleroderma. Images PMID:1903032

  3. A Phase II Trial of Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiotherapy for Low-Risk Prostate Cancer Using a Non-Robotic Linear Accelerator and Real-Time Target Tracking: Report of Toxicity, Quality of Life, and Disease Control Outcomes with 5-Year Minimum Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Mantz, Constantine

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objective(s): Herein, we report the results of an IRB-approved phase II trial of Varian Trilogy/TrueBeam-based stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR) monotherapy for low-risk prostate cancer using the Calypso® System to provide real-time electromagnetic tracking of the prostate’s position during treatment delivery. Materials/Methods: A total of 102 low-risk patients completed protocol treatment between January 2007 and May 2009. A total dose of 40.0 Gy in 5 every-other-day fractions of 8.0 Gy was prescribed to the planning target volume. Target setup and tracking procedures were as follows: (1) the Calypso® System was used to achieve target setup prior to each fraction; (2) conebeam CT imaging was then used for correction of setup error and for assessment of target and organs-at-risk deformations; (3) after treatment delivery was initiated, the Calypso® System then provided real-time intrafractional target tracking. The NCI CTCAE v3.0 was used to assess urinary and rectal toxicity during treatment and at defined follow-up time points. Biochemical response and quality of life measurements were made at concurrent follow-up points. Results: Urinary toxicities were most common. At 6 months, 19.6, 2.9, and 4.9% of patients reported grades 1–2 urinary frequency, dysuria, and retention, respectively. Rectal toxicities were uncommon. By 12 months, 2.9% of patients reported painless rectal bleeding with subsequent symptom resolution without requiring invasive interventions. Quality of life measurements demonstrated a significant decline over baseline in urinary irritative/obstructive scores at 1 month following SABR but otherwise did not demonstrate any difference for bowel, bladder, and sexual function scores at any other follow-up time point. One patient suffered biochemical recurrence at 6 years following SABR. Conclusion: At 5 years, minimum follow-up for this favorable patient cohort, prostate SABR resulted in favorable toxicity

  4. SU-E-T-131: Dosimetric Impact and Evaluation of Different Heterogenity Algorithm in Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Plan for Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy Lung Treatment with the Flattening Filter Free Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, J; Kim, J; Lee, J; Kim, Y

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The present study aimed to investigate the dosimetric impacts of the anisotropic analytic algorithm (AAA) and the Acuros XB (AXB) plan for lung stereotactic ablative radiation therapy using flattening filter-free (FFF) beam. We retrospectively analyzed 10 patients. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 10 patients. The dosimetric parameters for the target and organs at risk (OARs) from the treatment plans calculated with these dose calculation algorithms were compared. The technical parameters, such as the computation times and the total monitor units (MUs), were also evaluated. Results: A comparison of DVHs from AXB and AAA showed that the AXB plan produced a high maximum PTV dose by average 4.40% with a statistical significance but slightly lower mean PTV dose by average 5.20% compared to the AAA plans. The maximum dose to the lung was slightly higher in the AXB compared to the AAA. For both algorithms, the values of V5, V10 and V20 for ipsilateral lung were higher in the AXB plan more than those of AAA. However, these parameters for contralateral lung were comparable. The differences of maximum dose for the spinal cord and heart were also small. The computation time of AXB was found fast with the relative difference of 13.7% than those of AAA. The average of monitor units (MUs) for all patients was higher in AXB plans than in the AAA plans. These results indicated that the difference between AXB and AAA are large in heterogeneous region with low density. Conclusion: The AXB provided the advantages such as the accuracy of calculations and the reduction of the computation time in lung stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) with using FFF beam, especially for VMAT planning. In dose calculation with the media of different density, therefore, the careful attention should be taken regarding the impacts of different heterogeneity correction algorithms. The authors report no conflicts of interest.

  5. Intermittent androgen ablation in patients with biochemical failure after pelvic radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Cury, Fabio L.B.; Souhami, Luis . E-mail: luis.souhami@muhc.mcgill.ca; Rajan, Raghu; Tanguay, Simon; Gagnon, Bruno; Duclos, Marie; Shenouda, George; Faria, Sergio L.; David, Marc; Freeman, Carolyn R.

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy of intermittent androgen ablation (IAA) in patients with biochemical failure after radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Thirty-nine patients received a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone analog every 2 months for a total of 4 doses. IAA was then discontinued if serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) fell to a normal level with a castrate level of testosterone. Therapy was restarted when the serum PSA level reached {>=}10 ng/mL and was discontinued if hormone resistance or unacceptable toxicity occurred. Results: Median PSA was 9.1 ng/mL at the time of first IAA. The median time between the first and the second cycles was 20.1 months, decreasing to 15.5 months between the third and fourth cycles. Two patients discontinued the treatment because of severe hot flushes. Four patients developed hormone resistance. With a median follow-up of 56.4 months, 5-year survival is 92.3%. Three patients died of unrelated causes. The incidence of distant metastasis is 6.8%. Conclusions: The use of IAA seems to be a safe and effective treatment for patients with biochemical failure post radiotherapy and no evidence of metastatic disease. The use of IAA limits hormone-related side effects and health care costs without an apparent increase in the risk for the development of metastatic disease.

  6. The Potential Role of Respiratory Motion Management and Image Guidance in the Reduction of Severe Toxicities Following Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy for Patients with Centrally Located Early Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer or Lung Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Alexander; Nguyen, Nam Phong; Komaki, Ritsuko

    2014-01-01

    Image guidance allows delivery of very high doses of radiation over a few fractions, known as stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR). This treatment is associated with excellent outcome for early stage non-small cell lung cancer and metastases to the lungs. In the delivery of SABR, central location constantly poses a challenge due to the difficulty of adequately sparing critical thoracic structures that are immediately adjacent to the tumor if an ablative dose of radiation is to be delivered to the tumor target. As of current, various respiratory motion management and image guidance strategies can be used to ensure accurate tumor target localization prior and/or during daily treatment, which allows for maximal and safe reduction of set up margins. The incorporation of both may lead to the most optimal normal tissue sparing and the most accurate SABR delivery. Here, the clinical outcome, treatment related toxicities, and the pertinent respiratory motion management/image guidance strategies reported in the current literature on SABR for central lung tumors are reviewed. PMID:25009800

  7. Comparison of VMAT-SABR treatment plans with flattening filter (FF) and flattening filter-free (FFF) beam for localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jin-Beom; Kim, Jae-Sung; Eom, Keun-Yong; Kim, In-Ah; Kang, Sang-Won; Lee, Jeong-Woo; Kim, Jin-Young; Suh, Tae-Suk

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of using a flattening filter-free (FFF) beam with an endorectal balloon for stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR) of clinically localized prostate cancer. We assessed plans of SABR with volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) that used a flattening filter (FF) beam and an FFF beam and compared the verification results of dosimetric quality assurance for all pretreatment plans. A total of 20 patients with prostate cancer were enrolled in the study. SABR plans using VMAT with two full arcs were optimized in the Eclipse treatment planning system. All plans prescribed 42.7 Gy in 7 fractions of 6.1 Gy each. Four SABR plans were computed for each patient: two with FF beams and two with FFF beams of 6 and 10 MV. For all plans, the cumulative dose-volume histograms (DVHs) for the target volumes and organs at risk (OARs) were recorded and compared. Pretreatment quality assurance (QA) was performed using the I'mRT MatriXX system and radiochromic EBT3 film to verify treatment delivery, and gamma analysis was used to quantify the agreement between calculations and measurements. In addition, total monitor units (MUs) and delivery time were investigated as technical parameters of delivery. All four plans achieved adequate dose conformity to the target volumes and had comparable dosimetric data. The DVHs of all four plans for each patient were very similar. All plans were highly conformal with CI<1.05 and CN>0.90, and the doses were homogeneous (HI = 0.08-0.15). Sparing for the bladder and rectum was slightly better with the 10 MV FF and FFF plans than with the 6 MV FF and FFF plans, but the difference was negligible. However, there was no significant difference in sparing for the other OARs. The mean agreement with the 3%/3% mm criterion was higher than 97% for verifying all plans. For the 2%/2% mm criterion, the corresponding agreement values were more than 90%, which showed that the plans were acceptable

  8. Comparison of VMAT-SABR treatment plans with flattening filter (FF) and flattening filter-free (FFF) beam for localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jin-Beom; Kim, Jae-Sung; Eom, Keun-Yong; Kim, In-Ah; Kang, Sang-Won; Lee, Jeong-Woo; Kim, Jin-Young; Suh, Tae-Suk

    2015-11-08

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of using a flattening filter-free (FFF) beam with an endorectal balloon for stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR) of clinically localized prostate cancer. We assessed plans of SABR with volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) that used a flattening filter (FF) beam and an FFF beam and compared the verification results of dosimetric quality assurance for all pretreatment plans. A total of 20 patients with prostate cancer were enrolled in the study. SABR plans using VMAT with two full arcs were optimized in the Eclipse treatment planning system. All plans prescribed 42.7 Gy in 7 fractions of 6.1 Gy each. Four SABR plans were computed for each patient: two with FF beams and two with FFF beams of 6 and 10 MV. For all plans, the cumulative dose-volume histograms (DVHs) for the target volumes and organs at risk (OARs) were recorded and compared. Pretreatment quality assurance (QA) was performed using the I'mRT MatriXX system and radiochromic EBT3 film to verify treatment delivery, and gamma analysis was used to quantify the agreement between calculations and measurements. In addition, total monitor units (MUs) and delivery time were investigated as technical parameters of delivery. All four plans achieved adequate dose conformity to the target volumes and had comparable dosimetric data. The DVHs of all four plans for each patient were very similar. All plans were highly conformal with CI < 1.05 and CN > 0.90, and the doses were homogeneous (HI = 0.08-0.15). Sparing for the bladder and rectum was slightly better with the 10 MV FF and FFF plans than with the 6 MV FF and FFF plans, but the difference was negligible. However, there was no significant difference in sparing for the other OARs. The mean agreement with the 3%/3 mm criterion was higher than 97% for verifying all plans. For the 2%/2 mm criterion, the corresponding agreement values were more than 90%, which showed that the plans were acceptable

  9. Texture analysis of automatic graph cuts segmentations for detection of lung cancer recurrence after stereotactic radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattonen, Sarah A.; Palma, David A.; Haasbeek, Cornelis J. A.; Senan, Suresh; Ward, Aaron D.

    2015-03-01

    Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) is a treatment for early-stage lung cancer with local control rates comparable to surgery. After SABR, benign radiation induced lung injury (RILI) results in tumour-mimicking changes on computed tomography (CT) imaging. Distinguishing recurrence from RILI is a critical clinical decision determining the need for potentially life-saving salvage therapies whose high risks in this population dictate their use only for true recurrences. Current approaches do not reliably detect recurrence within a year post-SABR. We measured the detection accuracy of texture features within automatically determined regions of interest, with the only operator input being the single line segment measuring tumour diameter, normally taken during the clinical workflow. Our leave-one-out cross validation on images taken 2-5 months post-SABR showed robustness of the entropy measure, with classification error of 26% and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.77 using automatic segmentation; the results using manual segmentation were 24% and 0.75, respectively. AUCs for this feature increased to 0.82 and 0.93 at 8-14 months and 14-20 months post SABR, respectively, suggesting even better performance nearer to the date of clinical diagnosis of recurrence; thus this system could also be used to support and reinforce the physician's decision at that time. Based on our ongoing validation of this automatic approach on a larger sample, we aim to develop a computer-aided diagnosis system which will support the physician's decision to apply timely salvage therapies and prevent patients with RILI from undergoing invasive and risky procedures.

  10. Outcomes After Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy or Radiofrequency Ablation for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wahl, Daniel R.; Stenmark, Matthew H.; Tao, Yebin; Pollom, Erqi L.; Caoili, Elaine M.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Schipper, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Data guiding selection of nonsurgical treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are lacking. We therefore compared outcomes between stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) and radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for HCC. Patients and Methods From 2004 to 2012, 224 patients with inoperable, nonmetastatic HCC underwent RFA (n = 161) to 249 tumors or image-guided SBRT (n = 63) to 83 tumors. We applied inverse probability of treatment weighting to adjust for imbalances in treatment assignment. Freedom from local progression (FFLP) and toxicity were retrospectively analyzed. Results RFA and SBRT groups were similar with respect to number of lesions treated per patient, type of underlying liver disease, and tumor size (median, 1.8 v 2.2 cm in maximum diameter; P = .14). However, the SBRT group had lower pretreatment Child-Pugh scores (P = .003), higher pretreatment alpha-fetoprotein levels (P = .04), and a greater number of prior liver-directed treatments (P < .001). One- and 2-year FFLP for tumors treated with RFA were 83.6% and 80.2% v 97.4% and 83.8% for SBRT. Increasing tumor size predicted for FFLP in patients treated with RFA (hazard ratio [HR], 1.54 per cm; P = .006), but not with SBRT (HR, 1.21 per cm; P = .617). For tumors ≥ 2 cm, there was decreased FFLP for RFA compared with SBRT (HR, 3.35; P = .025). Acute grade 3+ complications occurred after 11% and 5% of RFA and SBRT treatments, respectively (P = .31). Overall survival 1 and 2 years after treatment was 70% and 53% after RFA and 74% and 46% after SBRT. Conclusion Both RFA and SBRT are effective local treatment options for inoperable HCC. Although these data are retrospective, SBRT appears to be a reasonable first-line treatment of inoperable, larger HCC. PMID:26628466

  11. Stereotactic Ablative Radiosurgery for Locally Advanced or Recurrent Skull Base Malignancies with Prior External Beam Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Karen M.; Quan, Kimmen; Clump, David A.; Ferris, Robert L.; Heron, Dwight E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) is an attractive modality to treat malignancies invading the skull base as it can deliver a highly conformal dose with minimal toxicity. However, variation exists in the prescribed dose and fractionation. The purpose of our study is to examine the local control, survival, and toxicities in SABR for the treatment of previously irradiated malignant skull base tumors. Materials and methods: A total of 31 patients and 40 locally advanced or recurrent head and neck malignancies involving the skull base treated with a common SABR regimen, which delivers a radiation dose of 44 Gy in 5 fractions from January 1st, 2004 to December 31st, 2013, were retrospectively reviewed. The local control rate (LC), progression-free survival rate, overall survival (OS) rate, and toxicities were reported. Results: The median follow-up time of all patients was 11.4 months (range: 0.6–67.2 months). The median tumor volume was 27 cm3 (range: 2.4–205 cm3). All patients received prior external beam radiation therapy with a median radiation dose of 64 Gy (range: 24–75.6 Gy) delivered in 12–42 fractions. Twenty patients had surgeries prior to SABR. Nineteen patients received chemotherapy. Specifically, eight patients received concurrent cetuximab (Erbitux™) with SABR. The median time-to-progression (TTP) was 3.3 months (range: 0–16.9 months). For the 29 patients (93.5%) who died, the median time from the end of first SABR to death was 10.3 months (range: 0.5–41.4 months). The estimated 1-year OS rate was 35%. The estimated 2-year OS rate was 12%. Treatment was well-tolerated without grade 4 or 5 treatment-related toxicities. Conclusion: Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy has been shown to achieve low toxicities in locally advanced or recurrent, previously irradiated head and neck malignancies invading the skull base. PMID:25853093

  12. The Molecular Mechanism of the Supra-Additive Response of Prostate Cancer to Androgen Ablation and Radiotherapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-02-01

    Biol. Phys., 43: 607-616, 1999. wild-type p53 gene and induction of apoptosis in cervical cancer . 29. Lang, F. F., Yung, W. K. A., Raju, U., Libunao... cervical cancer . Cancer Res 1996;56:3047- 25. Li JH, Lax SA, Kim J, et al. The effects of ionizing radiation 3054. and adenoviral p53 therapy in...Mechanism of the Supra-Additive Response of Prostate Cancer to Androgen Ablation and Radiotherapy PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Alan Pollack, M.D., Ph.D

  13. On the dose to a moving target in stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy to lung tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feygelman, V.; Dilling, T. J.; Moros, E. G.; Zhang, G. G.

    2017-01-01

    This review summarizes the hierarchy of potential dose inaccuracies in lung SABR in terms of their expected clinical impact. The two main terms are targeting accuracy and adequacy of the dose calculation algorithm. One can associate dose-errors at the 50-100% (zero order) and 10-20% (first order) levels with the former and the latter, respectively. At the first order level, strong evidence exists that using dose algorithms which do not account for 3D density scaling is associated with diminished local control. On the other hand, the second-order target dose-errors due to either static approximations to full 4D calculations, or interplay during modulated delivery, are rather unlikely to rise above 5% (conservatively, ≤ 1% tumor control probability change).

  14. A preclinical rodent model of acute radiation-induced lung injury after ablative focal irradiation reflecting clinical stereotactic body radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hong, Zhen-Yu; Lee, Hae-June; Choi, Won Hoon; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Eun, Sung Ho; Lee, Jung Il; Park, Kwangwoo; Lee, Ji Min; Cho, Jaeho

    2014-07-01

    In a previous study, we established an image-guided small-animal micro-irradiation system mimicking clinical stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). The goal of this study was to develop a rodent model of acute phase lung injury after ablative irradiation. A radiation dose of 90 Gy was focally delivered to the left lung of C57BL/6 mice using a small animal stereotactic irradiator. At days 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11 and 14 after irradiation, the lungs were perfused with formalin for fixation and paraffin sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and Masson's trichrome. At days 7 and 14 after irradiation, micro-computed tomography (CT) images of the lung were taken and lung functional measurements were performed with a flexiVent™ system. Gross morphological injury was evident 9 days after irradiation of normal lung tissues and dynamic sequential events occurring during the acute phase were validated by histopathological analysis. CT images of the mouse lungs indicated partial obstruction located in the peripheral area of the left lung. Significant alteration in inspiratory capacity and tissue damping were detected on day 14 after irradiation. An animal model of radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) in the acute phase reflecting clinical stereotactic body radiotherapy was established and validated with histopathological and functional analysis. This model enhances our understanding of the dynamic sequential events occurring in the acute phase of radiation-induced lung injury induced by ablative dose focal volume irradiation.

  15. Skylon Aerodynamics and SABRE Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Unmeel; Afosmis, Michael; Bowles, Jeffrey; Pandya, Shishir

    2015-01-01

    An independent partial assessment is provided of the technical viability of the Skylon aerospace plane concept, developed by Reaction Engines Limited (REL). The objectives are to verify REL's engineering estimates of airframe aerodynamics during powered flight and to assess the impact of Synergetic Air-Breathing Rocket Engine (SABRE) plumes on the aft fuselage. Pressure lift and drag coefficients derived from simulations conducted with Euler equations for unpowered flight compare very well with those REL computed with engineering methods. The REL coefficients for powered flight are increasingly less acceptable as the freestream Mach number is increased beyond 8.5, because the engineering estimates did not account for the increasing favorable (in terms of drag and lift coefficients) effect of underexpanded rocket engine plumes on the aft fuselage. At Mach numbers greater than 8.5, the thermal environment around the aft fuselage is a known unknown-a potential design and/or performance risk issue. The adverse effects of shock waves on the aft fuselage and plumeinduced flow separation are other potential risks. The development of an operational reusable launcher from the Skylon concept necessitates the judicious use of a combination of engineering methods, advanced methods based on required physics or analytical fidelity, test data, and independent assessments.

  16. Imaging texture analysis for automated prediction of lung cancer recurrence after stereotactic radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Mattonen, Sarah A.; Tetar, Shyama; Palma, David A.; Louie, Alexander V.; Senan, Suresh; Ward, Aaron D.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Benign radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) is not uncommon following stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for lung cancer and can be difficult to differentiate from tumor recurrence on follow-up imaging. We previously showed the ability of computed tomography (CT) texture analysis to predict recurrence. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the accuracy of recurrence prediction using manual region-of-interest segmentation to that of a semiautomatic approach. We analyzed 22 patients treated for 24 lesions (11 recurrences, 13 RILI). Consolidative and ground-glass opacity (GGO) regions were manually delineated. The longest axial diameter of the consolidative region on each post-SABR CT image was measured. This line segment is routinely obtained as part of the clinical imaging workflow and was used as input to automatically delineate the consolidative region and subsequently derive a periconsolidative region to sample GGO tissue. Texture features were calculated, and at two to five months post-SABR, the entropy texture measure within the semiautomatic segmentations showed prediction accuracies [areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC): 0.70 to 0.73] similar to those of manual GGO segmentations (AUC: 0.64). After integration into the clinical workflow, this decision support system has the potential to support earlier salvage for patients with recurrence and fewer investigations of benign RILI. PMID:26835492

  17. CyberKnife Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy as an Option of Treatment for Patients With Prostate Cancer Having Oligometastatic Lymph Nodes: Single-Center Study Outcome Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Napieralska, Aleksandra; Miszczyk, Leszek; Stąpór-Fudzińska, Małgorzata

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of CyberKnife-based stereotactic ablative radiotherapy on prostate cancer lymph node metastases. Our material consisted of 18 patients with 31 metastatic lymph nodes irradiated between 2011 and 2014 using CyberKnife-based stereotactic ablative radiotherapy. Patients were irradiated using fraction dose varied from 6 to 15 Gy (median 10), to the total dose of 24 to 45 Gy (median 30). Irradiated lymph node size varied from 0.4 to 4.0 cm. In all, 9 patients had single lymph node metastasis and 9 patients had metastases of 2 to 4 lymph nodes. Prostate-specific antigen concentration before radiotherapy varied from 0.01 to 15.58 (mean 6.97; median 4.66). All patients at the time of radiotherapy and follow-up received androgen deprivation therapy. Mann-Whitney U, Kaplan-Meier method, and log-rank tests were used in statistical analysis. We obtained the following results: after CyberKnife stereotactic ablative radiotherapy, prostate-specific antigen concentration dropped in majority of cases and during the last control varied from 0.00 to 258.00 (median 2.5), and was lower in patients without dissemination to other organs (P = .01). Complete regression was found in 12 lesions, stable disease in 13, and progression in 4. In 7 patients, the dissemination to other organs occurred. Our results allow us to conclude that CyberKnife stereotactic ablative radiotherapy of prostate cancer lymph node oligometastases gives good local control and relatively good prostate-specific antigen response.

  18. Comprehensive dosimetric planning comparison for early-stage, non-small cell lung cancer with SABR: fixed-beam IMRT versus VMAT versus TomoTherapy.

    PubMed

    Xhaferllari, Ilma; El-Sherif, Omar; Gaede, Stewart

    2016-09-01

    Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is emerging as a leading technology in treating early-stage, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR). However, two other modalities capable of delivering intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) include fixed-beam and helical TomoTherapy (HT). This study aims to provide an extensive dosimetric comparison among these various IMRT techniques for treating early-stage NSCLC with SABR. Ten early-stage NSCLC patients were retrospectively optimized using three fixed-beam techniques via nine to eleven beams (high and low modulation step-and-shoot (SS), and sliding window (SW)), two VMAT techniques via two partial arcs (SmartArc (SA) and RapidArc (RA)), and three HT techniques via three different fan beam widths (1 cm, 2.5 cm, and 5 cm) for 80 plans total. Fixed-beam and VMAT plans were generated using flattening filter-free beams. SS and SA, HT treatment plans, and SW and RA were optimized using Pinnacle v9.1, Tomoplan v.3.1.1, and Eclipse (Acuros XB v11.3 algorithm), respectively. Dose-volume histogram statistics, dose conformality, and treatment delivery efficiency were analyzed. VMAT treatment plans achieved significantly lower values for contralateral lung V5Gy(p≤0.05) compared to the HT plans, and significantly lower mean lung dose (p<0.006) compared to HT 5 cm treatment plans. In the comparison between the VMAT techniques, a significant reduction in the total monitor units (p=0.05) was found in the SA plans, while a significant decrease was observed in the dose falloff parameter, D2cm, (p=0.05), for the RA treatments. The maximum cord dose was significantly reduced (p=0.017) in grouped RA&SA plans compared to SS. Estimated treatment time was significantly higher for HT and fixed-beam plans compared to RA&SA (p<0.001). Although, a significant difference was not observed in the RA vs. SA (p=0.393). RA&SA outperformed HT in all parameters measured. Despite an increase in dose to the

  19. Comprehensive dosimetric planning comparison for early-stage, non-small cell lung cancer with SABR: fixed-beam IMRT versus VMAT versus TomoTherapy.

    PubMed

    Xhaferllari, Ilma; El-Sherif, Omar; Gaede, Stewart

    2016-09-08

    Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is emerging as a leading technology in treating early-stage, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR). However, two other modalities capable of deliver-ing intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) include fixed-beam and helical TomoTherapy (HT). This study aims to provide an extensive dosimetric compari-son among these various IMRT techniques for treating early-stage NSCLC with SABR. Ten early-stage NSCLC patients were retrospectively optimized using three fixed-beam techniques via nine to eleven beams (high and low modulation step-and-shoot (SS), and sliding window (SW)), two VMAT techniques via two partial arcs (SmartArc (SA) and RapidArc (RA)), and three HT techniques via three different fan beam widths (1 cm, 2.5 cm, and 5 cm) for 80 plans total. Fixed-beam and VMAT plans were generated using flattening filter-free beams. SS and SA, HT treatment plans, and SW and RA were optimized using Pinnacle v9.1, Tomoplan v.3.1.1, and Eclipse (Acuros XB v11.3 algorithm), respectively. Dose-volume histogram statistics, dose conformality, and treatment delivery efficiency were analyzed. VMAT treatment plans achieved significantly lower values for contralat-eral lung V5Gy (p ≤ 0.05) compared to the HT plans, and significantly lower mean lung dose (p < 0.006) compared to HT 5 cm treatment plans. In the comparison between the VMAT techniques, a significant reduction in the total monitor units (p = 0.05) was found in the SA plans, while a significant decrease was observed in the dose falloff parameter, D2cm, (p = 0.05), for the RA treatments. The maximum cord dose was significantly reduced (p = 0.017) in grouped RA&SA plans com-pared to SS. Estimated treatment time was significantly higher for HT and fixed-beam plans compared to RA&SA (p < 0.001). Although, a significant difference was not observed in the RA vs. SA (p = 0.393). RA&SA outperformed HT in all parameters measured. Despite an

  20. SU-C-BRA-07: Virtual Bronchoscopy-Guided IMRT Planning for Mapping and Avoiding Radiation Injury to the Airway Tree in Lung SAbR

    SciTech Connect

    Sawant, A; Modiri, A; Bland, R; Yan, Y; Ahn, C; Timmerman, R

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Post-treatment radiation injury to central and peripheral airways is a potentially important, yet under-investigated determinant of toxicity in lung stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SAbR). We integrate virtual bronchoscopy technology into the radiotherapy planning process to spatially map and quantify the radiosensitivity of bronchial segments, and propose novel IMRT planning that limits airway dose through non-isotropic intermediate- and low-dose spillage. Methods: Pre- and ∼8.5 months post-SAbR diagnostic-quality CT scans were retrospectively collected from six NSCLC patients (50–60Gy in 3–5 fractions). From each scan, ∼5 branching levels of the bronchial tree were segmented using LungPoint, a virtual bronchoscopic navigation system. The pre-SAbR CT and the segmented bronchial tree were imported into the Eclipse treatment planning system and deformably registered to the planning CT. The five-fraction equivalent dose from the clinically-delivered plan was calculated for each segment using the Universal Survival Curve model. The pre- and post-SAbR CTs were used to evaluate radiation-induced segmental collapse. Two of six patients exhibited significant segmental collapse with associated atelectasis and fibrosis, and were re-planned using IMRT. Results: Multivariate stepwise logistic regression over six patients (81 segments) showed that D0.01cc (minimum point dose within the 0.01cc receiving highest dose) was a significant independent factor associated with collapse (odds-ratio=1.17, p=0.010). The D0.01cc threshold for collapse was 57Gy, above which, collapse rate was 45%. In the two patients exhibiting segmental collapse, 22 out of 32 segments showed D0.01cc >57Gy. IMRT re-planning reduced D0.01cc below 57Gy in 15 of the 22 segments (68%) while simultaneously achieving the original clinical plan objectives for PTV coverage and OAR-sparing. Conclusion: Our results indicate that the administration of lung SAbR can Result in significant injury to

  1. Monte Carlo calculation of dose distributions in oligometastatic patients planned for spine stereotactic ablative radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Moiseenko, V; Liu, M; Loewen, S; Kosztyla, R; Vollans, E; Lucido, J; Fong, M; Vellani, R; Popescu, I A

    2013-10-21

    Dosimetric consequences of plans optimized using the analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA) implemented in the Varian Eclipse treatment planning system for spine stereotactic body radiotherapy were evaluated by re-calculating with BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc Monte Carlo. Six patients with spinal vertebral metastases were planned using volumetric modulated arc therapy. The planning goal was to cover at least 80% of the planning target volume with a prescribed dose of 35 Gy in five fractions. Tissue heterogeneity-corrected AAA dose distributions for the planning target volume and spinal canal planning organ-at-risk volume were compared against those obtained from Monte Carlo. The results showed that the AAA overestimated planning target volume coverage with the prescribed dose by up to 13.5% (mean 8.3% +/- 3.2%) when compared to Monte Carlo simulations. Maximum dose to spinal canal planning organ-at-risk volume calculated with Monte Carlo was consistently smaller than calculated with the treatment planning system and remained under spinal cord dose tolerance. Differences in dose distribution appear to be related to the dosimetric effects of accounting for body composition in Monte Carlo simulations. In contrast, the treatment planning system assumes that all tissues are water-equivalent in their composition and only differ in their electron density.

  2. Improved therapeutic outcomes of thermal ablation on rat orthotopic liver allograft sarcoma models by radioiodinated hypericin induced necrosis targeted radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Long; Zhang, Jian; Ma, Tengchuang; Yao, Nan; Gao, Meng; Shan, Xin; Ni, Yicheng; Shao, Haibo; Xu, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Residual tumor resulting in tumor recurrence after various anticancer therapies is an unmet challenge in current clinical oncology. This study aimed to investigate the hypothesis that radioiodinated hypericin (131I-Hyp) may inhibit residual tumor recurrence after microwave ablation (MWA) on rat orthotopic liver allograft sarcoma models. Thirty Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats with hepatic tumors were divided into three groups: Group A received laparotomy MWA and sequential intravenous injection (i.v.) of 131I labelled hypericin (131I-Hyp) in a time interval of 24 h; Group B received only laparotomy MWA; Group C was a blank control. Tumor inhibitory effects were monitored with in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and these findings were compared to histopathology data before (baseline, day 0) and 1, 4, and 8 days after MWA. In addition, biodistribution of 131I-Hyp was assessed with in vivo single-photon emission computed tomography-computed tomography (SPECT-CT) imaging, in vitro autoradiography, fluorescent microscopy, and gamma counting. A fast clearance of 131I-Hyp and increasing deposit in necrotic tumors appeared over time, with a significantly higher radioactivity than other organs (0.9169 ± 1.1138 % ID/g, P < 0.01) on day 9. Tumor growth was significantly slowed down in group A compared to group B and C according to MRI images and corresponding tumor doubling time (12.13 ± 1.99, 4.09 ± 0.97, 3.36 ± 0.72 days respectively). The crescent tagerability of 131I-Hyp to necrosis was visualized consistently by autoradiography and fluorescence microscopy. In conclusion, 131I-Hyp induced necrosis targeted radiotherapy improved therapeutic outcomes of MWA on rat orthotopic liver allograft sarcoma models. PMID:27285983

  3. Endometrial ablation

    MedlinePlus

    Hysteroscopy-endometrial ablation; Laser thermal ablation; Endometrial ablation-radiofrequency; Endometrial ablation-thermal balloon ablation; Rollerball ablation; Hydrothermal ablation; Novasure ablation

  4. Ipilimumab with Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy: Phase I Results and Immunologic Correlates from Peripheral T Cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chad; Welsh, James W; de Groot, Patricia; Massarelli, Erminia; Chang, Joe Y; Hess, Kenneth R; Basu, Sreyashi; Curran, Michael A; Cabanillas, Maria E; Subbiah, Vivek; Fu, Siqing; Tsimberidou, Apostolia M; Karp, Daniel; Gomez, Daniel R; Diab, Adi; Komaki, Ritsuko; Heymach, John V; Sharma, Padmanee; Naing, Aung; Hong, David S

    2017-03-15

    Purpose: Little prospective data are available on clinical outcomes and immune correlates from combination radiation and immunotherapy. We conducted a phase I trial (NCT02239900) testing stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) with ipilimumab.Experimental Design: SABR was given either concurrently (1 day after the first dose) or sequentially (1 week after the second dose) with ipilimumab (3 mg/kg every 3 weeks for 4 doses) to five treatment groups: concurrent 50 Gy (in 4 fractions) to liver; sequential 50 Gy (in 4 fractions) to liver; concurrent 50 Gy (in 4 fractions) to lung; sequential 50 Gy (in 4 fractions) to lung; and sequential 60 Gy (in 10 fractions) to lung or liver. MTD was determined with a 3 + 3 dose de-escalation design. Immune marker expression was assessed by flow cytometry.Results: Among 35 patients who initiated ipilimumab, 2 experienced dose-limiting toxicity and 12 (34%) grade 3 toxicity. Response outside the radiation field was assessable in 31 patients. Three patients (10%) exhibited partial response and 7 (23%) experienced clinical benefit (defined as partial response or stable disease lasting ≥6 months). Clinical benefit was associated with increases in peripheral CD8(+) T cells, CD8(+)/CD4(+) T-cell ratio, and proportion of CD8(+) T cells expressing 4-1BB and PD1. Liver (vs. lung) irradiation produced greater T-cell activation, reflected as increases in the proportions of peripheral T cells expressing ICOS, GITR, and 4-1BB.Conclusions: Combining SABR and ipilimumab was safe with signs of efficacy, peripheral T-cell markers may predict clinical benefit, and systemic immune activation was greater after liver irradiation. Clin Cancer Res; 23(6); 1388-96. ©2016 AACR.

  5. F-86 Sabre on lakebed, front view

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1954-01-01

    With the NACA High-Speed Flight Station (HSFS) main building (4800) in the background the North American F-86F (Serial #52-5426) Sabre sits on the Rogers Dry lakebed just off the NACA ramp in 1954. This was soon after the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics unit moved from South Base at Edwards Air Force Base to the new building that still houses the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, successor to the HSFS. The F-86F performed both pitch-up research and duties as a chase aircraft for the D-558-2. Its stay at the HSFS was brief. It arrived on June 23, 1954, and left on September 10 the same year. The F-86 had a 35 degree sweptwing and a wing span of 37 feet 1 inch with a General Electric J47-GE engine. It was the first U.S. sweptwing fighter and saw extensive action in the Korean War. It could slightly exceed Mach 1 in a dive.

  6. LIGHT-SABRE enables efficient in-magnet catalytic hyperpolarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theis, Thomas; Truong, Milton; Coffey, Aaron M.; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.; Warren, Warren S.

    2014-11-01

    Nuclear spin hyperpolarization overcomes the sensitivity limitations of traditional NMR and MRI, but the most general method demonstrated to date (dynamic nuclear polarization) has significant limitations in scalability, cost, and complex apparatus design. As an alternative, signal amplification by reversible exchange (SABRE) of parahydrogen on transition metal catalysts can hyperpolarize a variety of substrates, but to date this scheme has required transfer of the sample to low magnetic field or very strong RF irradiation. Here we demonstrate "Low-Irradiation Generation of High Tesla-SABRE" (LIGHT-SABRE) which works with simple pulse sequences and low power deposition; it should be usable at any magnetic field and for hyperpolarization of many different nuclei. This approach could drastically reduce the cost and complexity of producing hyperpolarized molecules.

  7. A review of kidney motion under free, deep and forced-shallow breathing conditions: implications for stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy treatment.

    PubMed

    Pham, D; Kron, T; Foroudi, F; Schneider, M; Siva, S

    2014-08-01

    Motion management strategies are important during stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy for abdominal targets. The kidney is a mobile retroperitoneal organ that moves with respiration. A review of the literature was performed to investigate the reported degree of kidney motion associated with various breathing conditions. A structured search was performed using Medline from January 1970 to May 2013 for all publications describing cranial-caudal kidney motion. Relevance to radiotherapy practice was reviewed based on any breathing instructions and/or immobilization equipment that could affect breathing pattern. Studies were categorized under three types of breathing conditions: Forced-shallow, breath-hold/deep and free. A total of 25 publications were identified describing cranial-caudal kidney motion with a combined total of 415 participants. Three publications described forced-shallow breathing using prone positioning or abdominal compression plates. Prone positioning, compared to supine positioning, did little to minimise kidney motion, however use of compression plates can result in kidney motion of less than 5 mm. Eight publications described deep breathing/breath hold techniques that showed average kidney motion ranging between 10 mm-40 mm. Fifteen publications investigated kidney motion under free breathing with the majority reporting mean motion of less than 10 mm. Kidney movement of up to 8.1 mm in the anterior posterior direction and 6.2 mm laterally were reported with no indications that breathing technique can influence the extent of this motion. In summary, kidney movement is complex and consideration should be made to ensure that motion management strategies provide the desired radiotherapy benefit. There are limited publications on the effectiveness of abdominal compression on reducing kidney motion which warrant further investigation in this area.

  8. SABRE observations of Pi2 pulsations: case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradshaw, E. G.; Lester, M.

    1997-01-01

    The characteristics of substorm-associated Pi2 pulsations observed by the SABRE coherent radar system during three separate case studies are presented. The SABRE field of view is well positioned to observe the differences between the auroral zone pulsation signature and that observed at mid-latitudes. During the first case study the SABRE field of view is initially in the eastward electrojet, equatorward and to the west of the substorm-enhanced electrojet current. As the interval progresses, the western, upward field-aligned current of the substorm current wedge moves westward across the longitudes of the radar field of view. The westward motion of the wedge is apparent in the spatial and temporal signatures of the associated Pi2 pulsation spectra and polarisation sense. During the second case study, the complex field-aligned and ionospheric currents associated with the pulsation generation region move equatorward into the SABRE field of view and then poleward out of it again after the third pulsation in the series. The spectral content of the four pulsations during the interval indicate different auroral zone and mid-latitude signatures. The final case study is from a period of low magnetic activity when SABRE observes a Pi2 pulsation signature from regions equatorward of the enhanced substorm currents. There is an apparent mode change between the signature observed by SABRE in the ionosphere and that on the ground by magnetometers at latitudes slightly equatorward of the radar field of view. The observations are discussed in terms of published theories of the generation mechanisms for this type of pulsation. Different signatures are observed by SABRE depending on the level of magnetic activity and the position of the SABRE field of view relative to the pulsation generation region. A twin source model for Pi2 pulsation generation provides the clearest explanation of the signatures observed Acknowledgements. The authors are grateful to Prof. D. J. Southwood

  9. SABR fusion-fission hybrid transmutation reactor design concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stacey, Weston

    2009-11-01

    A conceptual design has been developed for a sub-critical advanced burner reactor (SABR) consisting of i) a sodium cooled fast reactor fueled with the transuranics (TRU) from spent nuclear fuel, and ii) a D-T tokamak fusion neutron source based on ITER physics and technology. Subcritical operation enables more efficient transmutation fuel cycles in TRU fueled reactors (without compromising safety), which may be essential for significant reduction in high-level waste repository requirements. ITER will serve as the prototype for the fusion neutron source, which means SABRs could be implemented to help close the nuclear fuel cycle during the 2^nd quarter of the century.

  10. METRICS OF PERFORMANCE FOR THE SABRE MICROCOSM STUDY (ABSTRACT ONLY)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The SABRE (Source Area BioREmediation) project will evaluate accelerated anaerobic bioremediation of chlorinated solvents in areas of high concentration, such as DNAPL source areas. In preparation for a field scale pilot test, a laboratory microcosm study was conducted to provide...

  11. CHARACTERIZING THE MICROBIAL COMMUNITY IN SABRE MICROCOSM STUDIES (ABSTRACT ONLY)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The SABRE (Source Area BioREmediation) project will evaluate accelerated anaerobic bioremediation of chlorinated solvents in areas of high concentration, such as DNAPL source areas. In preparation for a field scale pilot test, laboratory microcosm and column studies were conducte...

  12. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy and Radiofrequency Ablation for Medically Inoperable, Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Sher, David J.

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: The standard management of medically inoperable Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) conventionally has been fractionated three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT). The relatively poor local control rate and inconvenience associated with this therapy have prompted the development of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), a technique that delivers very high doses of irradiation typically over 3 to 5 sessions. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has also been investigated as a less costly, single-day therapy that thermally ablates small, peripheral tumors. The cost-effectiveness of these three techniques has never been compared. Methods and Materials: We developed a Markov model to describe health states of 65-year-old men with medically inoperable NSCLC after treatment with 3D-CRT, SBRT, and RFA. Given their frail state, patients were assumed to receive supportive care after recurrence. Utility values, recurrence risks, and costs were adapted from the literature. Sensitivity analyses were performed to model uncertainty in these parameters. Results: The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for SBRT over 3D-CRT was $6,000/quality-adjusted life-year, and the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for SBRT over RFA was $14,100/quality-adjusted life-year. One-way sensitivity analysis showed that the results were robust across a range of tumor sizes, patient utility values, and costs. This result was confirmed with probabilistic sensitivity analyses that varied local control rates and utilities. Conclusion: In comparison to 3D-CRT and RFA, SBRT was the most cost-effective treatment for medically inoperable NSCLC over a wide range of treatment and disease assumptions. On the basis of efficacy and cost, SBRT should be the primary treatment approach for this disease.

  13. MDM2 Inhibition Sensitizes Prostate Cancer Cells to Androgen Ablation and Radiotherapy in a p53-Dependent Manner12

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Felix Y.; Zhang, Yu; Kothari, Vishal; Evans, Joseph R.; Jackson, William C.; Chen, Wei; Johnson, Skyler B.; Luczak, Connor; Wang, Shaomeng; Hamstra, Daniel A.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Increased murine double minute 2 (MDM2) expression, independent of p53 status, is associated with increased cancer-specific mortality for men with prostate cancer treated with radiotherapy. We assessed MI-219, a small molecule inhibitor of MDM2 with improved pharmacokinetics over nutlin-3, for sensitization of prostate cancer cells to radiotherapy and androgen deprivation therapy, a standard treatment option for men with high-risk prostate cancer. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: The effect of MDM2 inhibition by MI-219 was assessed in vitro and in vivo with mouse xenograft models across multiple prostate cancer cell lines containing varying p53 functional status. RESULTS: MDM2 inhibition by MI-219 resulted in dose- and time-dependent p53 activation and decreased clonogenic cell survival after radiation in a p53-dependent manner. Mechanistically, radiosensitization following inhibition of MDM2 was largely the result of p53-dependent increases in apoptosis and DNA damage as evidenced by Annexin V flow cytometry and γ-H2AX foci immunofluorescence. Similarly, treatment with MI-219 enhanced response to antiandrogen therapy via a p53-dependent increase in apoptotic cell death. Lastly, triple therapy with radiation, androgen deprivation therapy, and MI-219 decreased xenograft tumor growth compared with any single- or double-agent treatment. CONCLUSION: MDM2 inhibition with MI-219 results in p53-dependent sensitization of prostate cancer cells to radiation, antiandrogen therapy, and the combination. These findings support MDM2 small molecule inhibitor therapy as a therapy intensification strategy to improve clinical outcomes in high-risk localized prostate cancer. TRANSLATIONAL RELEVANCE: The combination of radiotherapy and androgen deprivation therapy is a standard treatment option for men with high-risk prostate cancer. Despite improvements in outcomes when androgen deprivation therapy is added to radiation, men with high-risk prostate cancer have significant risk for

  14. Scleroderma en coup de sabre treated with polymethylmethacrylate - Case report*

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Joanna Pimenta de Araujo; Serra, Márcio Soares; Lima, Ricardo Barbosa; D’Acri, Antônio Macedo; Martins, Carlos José

    2016-01-01

    The scleroderma en coup de sabre is a variant of localized scleroderma that occurs preferentially in children. The disease progresses with a proliferative and inflammatory phase and later atrophy and residual deformity, which are treated with surgical techniques such as injectable fillers, transplanted or autologous fat grafting and resection of the lesion. Among the most widely used fillers is hyaluronic acid. However, there are limitations that motivate the search for alternatives, such as polymethylmethacrylate, a permanent filler that is biocompatible, non-toxic, non-mutagenic and immunologically inert. In order to illustrate its application, a case of scleroderma en coup de sabre in a 17-year-old patient, who was treated with polymethylmethacrylate with excellent aesthetic results, is reported. PMID:27192521

  15. Targeted percutaneous microwave ablation at the pulmonary lesion combined with mediastinal radiotherapy with or without concurrent chemotherapy in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer evaluation in a randomized comparison study.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xinglu; Ye, Xin; Liu, Gang; Zhang, Tingping

    2015-09-01

    Concurrent chemoradiotherapy is the standard treatment for patients with locally advanced lung cancer. The most common dose-limiting adverse effect of thoracic radiotherapy (RT) is radiation pneumonia (RP). A randomized comparison study was designed to investigate targeted percutaneous microwave ablation at pulmonary lesion combined with mediastinal RT with or without chemotherapy (ablation group) in comparison with RT (target volume includes pulmonary tumor and mediastinal node) with or without chemotherapy (RT group) for the treatment of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs). From 2009 to 2012, patients with stage IIIA or IIIB NSCLCs who refused to undergo surgery or were not suitable for surgery were enrolled. Patients were randomly assigned to the RT group (n = 47) or ablation group (n = 51). Primary outcomes were the incidence of RP and curative effectiveness (complete response, partial response, and stable disease); secondary outcome was the 2-year overall survival (OS). Fifteen patients (31.9%) in the RT and two (3.9%) in the ablation group experienced RP (P < 0.001). The ratio of effective cases was 85.1 versus 80.4% for mediastinal lymph node (P = 0.843) and 83.0 versus 100% for pulmonary tumors (P = 0.503), respectively, for the RT and ablation groups. Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated 2-year OS rate of NSCLC patients in ablation group was higher than RT group, but no statistical difference (log-rank test, P = 0.297). Percutaneous microwave ablation followed by RT for inoperable stage III NSCLCs may result in a lower rate of RP and better local control than radical RT treatments.

  16. Pulmonary ablation: a primer.

    PubMed

    Roberton, Benjamin J; Liu, David; Power, Mark; Wan, John M C; Stuart, Sam; Klass, Darren; Yee, John

    2014-05-01

    Percutaneous image-guided thermal ablation is safe and efficacious in achieving local control and improving outcome in the treatment of both early stage non-small-cell lung cancer and pulmonary metastatic disease, in which surgical treatment is precluded by comorbidity, poor cardiorespiratory reserve, or unfavorable disease distribution. Radiofrequency ablation is the most established technology, but new thermal ablation technologies such as microwave ablation and cryoablation may offer some advantages. The use of advanced techniques, such as induced pneumothorax and the popsicle stick technique, or combining thermal ablation with radiotherapy, widens the treatment options available to the multidisciplinary team. The intent of this article is to provide the reader with a practical knowledge base of pulmonary ablation by concentrating on indications, techniques, and follow-up.

  17. Spin polarization transfer mechanisms of SABRE: A magnetic field dependent study.

    PubMed

    Pravdivtsev, Andrey N; Ivanov, Konstantin L; Yurkovskaya, Alexandra V; Petrov, Pavel A; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich; Kaptein, Robert; Vieth, Hans-Martin

    2015-12-01

    We have investigated the magnetic field dependence of Signal Amplification By Reversible Exchange (SABRE) arising from binding of para-hydrogen (p-H2) and a substrate to a suitable transition metal complex. The magnetic field dependence of the amplification of the (1)H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) signals of the released substrates and dihydrogen, and the transient transition metal dihydride species shows characteristic patterns, which is explained using the theory presented here. The generation of SABRE is most efficient at low magnetic fields due to coherent spin mixing at nuclear spin Level Anti-Crossings (LACs) in the SABRE complexes. We studied two Ir-complexes and have shown that the presence of a (31)P atom in the SABRE complex doubles the number of LACs and, consequently, the number of peaks in the SABRE field dependence. Interestingly, the polarization of SABRE substrates is always accompanied by the para-to-ortho conversion in dihydride species that results in enhancement of the NMR signal of free (H2) and catalyst-bound H2 (Ir-HH). The field dependences of hyperpolarized H2 and Ir-HH by means of SABRE are studied here, for the first time, in detail. The field dependences depend on the chemical shifts and coupling constants of Ir-HH, in which the polarization transfer takes place. A negative coupling constant of -7Hz between the two chemically equivalent but magnetically inequivalent hydride nuclei is determined, which indicates that Ir-HH is a dihydride with an HH distance larger than 2Å. Finally, the field dependence of SABRE at high fields as found earlier has been investigated and attributed to polarization transfer to the substrate by cross-relaxation. The present study provides further evidence for the key role of LACs in the formation of SABRE-derived polarization. Understanding the spin dynamics behind the SABRE method opens the way to optimizing its performance and overcoming the main limitation of NMR, its notoriously low sensitivity.

  18. 15N Hyperpolarization by Reversible Exchange Using SABRE-SHEATH

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    NMR signal amplification by reversible exchange (SABRE) is a NMR hyperpolarization technique that enables nuclear spin polarization enhancement of molecules via concurrent chemical exchange of a target substrate and parahydrogen (the source of spin order) on an iridium catalyst. Recently, we demonstrated that conducting SABRE in microtesla fields provided by a magnetic shield enables up to 10% 15N-polarization (Theis, T.; et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc.2015, 137, 1404). Hyperpolarization on 15N (and heteronuclei in general) may be advantageous because of the long-lived nature of the hyperpolarization on 15N relative to the short-lived hyperpolarization of protons conventionally hyperpolarized by SABRE, in addition to wider chemical shift dispersion and absence of background signal. Here we show that these unprecedented polarization levels enable 15N magnetic resonance imaging. We also present a theoretical model for the hyperpolarization transfer to heteronuclei, and detail key parameters that should be optimized for efficient 15N-hyperpolarization. The effects of parahydrogen pressure, flow rate, sample temperature, catalyst-to-substrate ratio, relaxation time (T1), and reversible oxygen quenching are studied on a test system of 15N-pyridine in methanol-d4. Moreover, we demonstrate the first proof-of-principle 13C-hyperpolarization using this method. This simple hyperpolarization scheme only requires access to parahydrogen and a magnetic shield, and it provides large enough signal gains to enable one of the first 15N images (2 × 2 mm2 resolution). Importantly, this method enables hyperpolarization of molecular sites with NMR T1 relaxation times suitable for biomedical imaging and spectroscopy. PMID:25960823

  19. SABRE: a bio-inspired fault-tolerant electronic architecture.

    PubMed

    Bremner, P; Liu, Y; Samie, M; Dragffy, G; Pipe, A G; Tempesti, G; Timmis, J; Tyrrell, A M

    2013-03-01

    As electronic devices become increasingly complex, ensuring their reliable, fault-free operation is becoming correspondingly more challenging. It can be observed that, in spite of their complexity, biological systems are highly reliable and fault tolerant. Hence, we are motivated to take inspiration for biological systems in the design of electronic ones. In SABRE (self-healing cellular architectures for biologically inspired highly reliable electronic systems), we have designed a bio-inspired fault-tolerant hierarchical architecture for this purpose. As in biology, the foundation for the whole system is cellular in nature, with each cell able to detect faults in its operation and trigger intra-cellular or extra-cellular repair as required. At the next level in the hierarchy, arrays of cells are configured and controlled as function units in a transport triggered architecture (TTA), which is able to perform partial-dynamic reconfiguration to rectify problems that cannot be solved at the cellular level. Each TTA is, in turn, part of a larger multi-processor system which employs coarser grain reconfiguration to tolerate faults that cause a processor to fail. In this paper, we describe the details of operation of each layer of the SABRE hierarchy, and how these layers interact to provide a high systemic level of fault tolerance.

  20. Enhancing NMR of insensitive nuclei by transfer of SABRE spin hyperpolarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pravdivtsev, Andrey N.; Yurkovskaya, Alexandra V.; Zimmermann, Herbert; Vieth, Hans-Martin; Ivanov, Konstantin L.

    2016-09-01

    We describe the performance of methods for enhancing NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) signals of "insensitive", but important NMR nuclei, which are based on the SABRE (Signal Amplification By Reversible Exchange) technique, i.e., on spin order transfer from parahydrogen (H2 molecule in its nuclear singlet spin state) to a substrate in a transient organometallic complex. Here such transfer is performed at high magnetic fields by INEPT-type NMR pulse sequences, modified for SABRE. Signal enhancements up to three orders of magnitude are obtained for 15N nuclei; the possibility of sensitive detection of 2D-NMR 1H-15N spectra of SABRE complexes and substrates is demonstrated.

  1. SABRE MULTI-LAB, STATISTICALLY-BASED MICROCOSM STUDY FOR TCE SOURCE ZONE REMEDIATION (ABSTRACT ONLY)

    EPA Science Inventory

    SABRE (source area bioremediation) is a public/private consortium of twelve companies, two government agencies, and three research institutions whose charter is to determine if enhanced anaerobic bioremediation can result in effective and quantifiable treatment of chlorinated sol...

  2. Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiation Therapy for Octogenarians With Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, Atsuya; Sanuki, Naoko; Eriguchi, Takahisa; Kaneko, Takeshi; Morita, Satoshi; Handa, Hiroshi; Aoki, Yousuke; Oku, Yohei; Kunieda, Etsuo

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively investigate treatment outcomes of stereotactic ablative body radiation therapy (SABR) for octogenarians with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Between 2005 and 2012, 109 patients aged ≥80 years with T1-2N0M0 NSCLC were treated with SABR: 47 patients had histology-unproven lung cancer; 62 patients had pathologically proven NSCLC. The prescribed doses were either 50 Gy/5 fractions for peripheral tumors or 40 Gy/5 fractions for centrally located tumors. The treatment outcomes, toxicities, and the correlating factors for overall survival (OS) were evaluated. Results: The median follow-up duration after SABR was 24.2 (range, 3.0-64.6) months. Only limited toxicities were observed, except for 1 grade 5 radiation pneumonitis. The 3-year local, regional, and distant metastasis-free survival rates were 82.3%, 90.1%, and 76.8%, respectively. The OS and lung cancer-specific survival rates were 53.7% and 70.8%, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that medically inoperable, low body mass index, high T stage, and high C-reactive protein were the predictors for short OS. The OS for the operable octogenarians was significantly better than that for inoperable (P<.01). Conclusions: Stereotactic ablative body radiation therapy for octogenarians was feasible, with excellent OS. Multivariate analysis revealed that operability was one of the predictors for OS. For medically operable octogenarians with early-stage NSCLC, SABR should be prospectively compared with resection.

  3. Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy as First Local Therapy for Lung Oligometastases From Colorectal Cancer: A Single-Institution Cohort Study

    SciTech Connect

    Filippi, Andrea Riccardo; Badellino, Serena; Ceccarelli, Manuela; Guarneri, Alessia; Franco, Pierfrancesco; Monagheddu, Chiara; Spadi, Rosella; Ragona, Riccardo; Racca, Patrizia; Ricardi, Umberto

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To estimate stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) efficacy and its potential role as an alternative to surgery for the treatment of lung metastases from colorectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty consecutive patients who received SABR as first local therapy at the time of lung progression were included, from 2004 to 2014. The primary study endpoint was overall survival. Secondary endpoints were progression-free survival and safety. Results: A single nodule was treated in 26 patients (65%), 2 nodules in 10 patients (25%), 3 in 3 patients (7.5%), and 4 in 1 patient (2.5%), for a total of 59 lesions. The median delivered biological effective dose was 96 Gy, in 1 to 8 daily fractions. Median follow-up time was 20 months (range, 3-72 months). Overall survival rates at 1, 2, and 5 years were, respectively, 84%, 73%, and 39%, with 14 patients (35%) dead. Median overall survival was 46 months. Progression occurred in 25 patients (62.5%), at a median interval of 8 months; failure at SABR site was observed in 3 patients (7.5%). Progression-free survival rates were 49% and 27% at 1 and 2 years, respectively. Discussion: The results of this retrospective exploratory analysis suggest safety and efficacy of SABR in patients affected with colorectal cancer lung oligometastases and urge inclusion of SABR in prospective clinical trials.

  4. WE-E-BRE-02: BEST IN PHYSICS (THERAPY) - Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Renal Sympathetic Ablation for the Treatment of Refractory Hypertension

    SciTech Connect

    Maxim, P; Wheeler, M; Loo, B; Maguire, P

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To determine the safety and efficacy of stereotactic radiotherapy as a novel treatment for patients with refractory hypertension in a swine model. Uncontrolled hypertension is a significant contributor to morbidity and mortality, substantially increasing the risk of ischemic stroke, ischemic heart disease, and kidney failure. Methods: High-resolution computed tomography (CT) images of anesthetized pigs were acquired and treatment plans for each renal artery and nerve were developed using our clinically implemented treatment planning system. Stereotactic radiotherapy, 40Gy in single fraction was delivered bilaterally to the renal nerves using a state-of-the-art medical linear accelerator under image guidance utilizing dynamic conformal arcs. Dose to nearby critical organs was evaluated by dosevolume histogram analysis and correlated to toxicity data obtained through follow up pathology analysis. The animals were observed for six months with serial measurements of blood pressure, urine analysis, serum laboratories, and overall clinical and behavioral status. Results: All animals survived to the follow-up point without evidence of renal dysfunction (stable serum creatinine), skin changes, or behavioral changes that might suggest animal discomfort. Plasma norepinephrine levels (ng/ml) were followed monthly for 6 months. The average reduction observed was 63%, with the median reduction at 73.5%. Microscopic evaluation 4–6 weeks after treatment showed evidence of damage to the nerves around treated renal arteries. Considerable attenuation in pan neurofilament expression by immunohistochemistry was observed with some vacuolar changes indicative of injury. There was no histological or immunohistochemical evidence of damage to nearby spinal cord or spinal nerve root structures. Conclusion: Our preclinical studies have shown stereotactic radiotherapy to the renal sympathetic plexus to be safe and effective in reducing blood pressure, thus this approach holds great

  5. Lung Volume Reduction After Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy of Lung Tumors: Potential Application to Emphysema

    SciTech Connect

    Binkley, Michael S.; Shrager, Joseph B.; Leung, Ann N.; Popat, Rita; Trakul, Nicholas; Atwood, Todd F.; Chaudhuri, Aadel; Maxim, Peter G.; Diehn, Maximilian; Loo, Billy W.

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: Lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) improves dyspnea and other outcomes in selected patients with severe emphysema, but many have excessive surgical risk for LVRS. We analyzed the dose-volume relationship for lobar volume reduction after stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) of lung tumors, hypothesizing that SABR could achieve therapeutic volume reduction if applied in emphysema. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively identified patients treated from 2007 to 2011 who had SABR for 1 lung tumor, pre-SABR pulmonary function testing, and ≥6 months computed tomographic (CT) imaging follow-up. We contoured the treated lobe and untreated adjacent lobe(s) on CT before and after SABR and calculated their volume changes relative to the contoured total (bilateral) lung volume (TLV). We correlated lobar volume reduction with the volume receiving high biologically effective doses (BED, α/β = 3). Results: 27 patients met the inclusion criteria, with a median CT follow-up time of 14 months. There was no grade ≥3 toxicity. The median volume reduction of the treated lobe was 4.4% of TLV (range, −0.4%-10.8%); the median expansion of the untreated adjacent lobe was 2.6% of TLV (range, −3.9%-11.6%). The volume reduction of the treated lobe was positively correlated with the volume receiving BED ≥60 Gy (r{sup 2}=0.45, P=.0001). This persisted in subgroups determined by high versus low pre-SABR forced expiratory volume in 1 second, treated lobe CT emphysema score, number of fractions, follow-up CT time, central versus peripheral location, and upper versus lower lobe location, with no significant differences in effect size between subgroups. Volume expansion of the untreated adjacent lobe(s) was positively correlated with volume reduction of the treated lobe (r{sup 2}=0.47, P<.0001). Conclusions: We identified a dose-volume response for treated lobe volume reduction and adjacent lobe compensatory expansion after lung tumor SABR, consistent across

  6. Spatial And Temporal Distribution Of Microbial Communities In A TCE DNAPL Site: SABRE Field Studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    The SABRE (Source Area BioREmediation) project was conducted to evaluate accelerated anaerobic bioremediation of chlorinated solvents in areas of high concentration, such as DNAPL source areas. To study performance of this technology, a test cell was constructed with a longitudi...

  7. Characterizing The Microbial Community In A TCE DNAPL Site: SABRE Column And Field Studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    The SABRE (Source Area BioREmediation) project is evaluating accelerated anaerobic bioremediation of chlorinated solvents in areas of high concentration, such as DNAPL source areas. In support of a field scale pilot test, column studies were conducted to design the system and ob...

  8. Predicting Overall Survival After Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy in Early-Stage Lung Cancer: Development and External Validation of the Amsterdam Prognostic Model

    SciTech Connect

    Louie, Alexander V.; Haasbeek, Cornelis J.A.; Mokhles, Sahar; Rodrigues, George B.; Stephans, Kevin L.; Lagerwaard, Frank J.; Palma, David A.; Videtic, Gregory M.M.; Warner, Andrew; Takkenberg, Johanna J.M.; Reddy, Chandana A.; Maat, Alex P.W.M.; Woody, Neil M.; Slotman, Ben J.; Senan, Suresh

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: A prognostic model for 5-year overall survival (OS), consisting of recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) and a nomogram, was developed for patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (ES-NSCLC) treated with stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR). Methods and Materials: A primary dataset of 703 ES-NSCLC SABR patients was randomly divided into a training (67%) and an internal validation (33%) dataset. In the former group, 21 unique parameters consisting of patient, treatment, and tumor factors were entered into an RPA model to predict OS. Univariate and multivariate models were constructed for RPA-selected factors to evaluate their relationship with OS. A nomogram for OS was constructed based on factors significant in multivariate modeling and validated with calibration plots. Both the RPA and the nomogram were externally validated in independent surgical (n=193) and SABR (n=543) datasets. Results: RPA identified 2 distinct risk classes based on tumor diameter, age, World Health Organization performance status (PS) and Charlson comorbidity index. This RPA had moderate discrimination in SABR datasets (c-index range: 0.52-0.60) but was of limited value in the surgical validation cohort. The nomogram predicting OS included smoking history in addition to RPA-identified factors. In contrast to RPA, validation of the nomogram performed well in internal validation (r{sup 2}=0.97) and external SABR (r{sup 2}=0.79) and surgical cohorts (r{sup 2}=0.91). Conclusions: The Amsterdam prognostic model is the first externally validated prognostication tool for OS in ES-NSCLC treated with SABR available to individualize patient decision making. The nomogram retained strong performance across surgical and SABR external validation datasets. RPA performance was poor in surgical patients, suggesting that 2 different distinct patient populations are being treated with these 2 effective modalities.

  9. Precision radiotherapy for brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Ying; Guo, Zhanwen; Zhang, Haibo; Wang, Ning; Xu, Ying

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Precision radiotherapy plays an important role in the management of brain tumors. This study aimed to identify global research trends in precision radiotherapy for brain tumors using a bibliometric analysis of the Web of Science. DATA RETRIEVAL: We performed a bibliometric analysis of data retrievals for precision radiotherapy for brain tumors containing the key words cerebral tumor, brain tumor, intensity-modulated radiotherapy, stereotactic body radiation therapy, stereotactic ablative radiotherapy, imaging-guided radiotherapy, dose-guided radiotherapy, stereotactic brachytherapy, and stereotactic radiotherapy using the Web of Science. SELECTION CRITERIA: Inclusion criteria: (a) peer-reviewed articles on precision radiotherapy for brain tumors which were published and indexed in the Web of Science; (b) type of articles: original research articles and reviews; (c) year of publication: 2002-2011. Exclusion criteria: (a) articles that required manual searching or telephone access; (b) Corrected papers or book chapters. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: (1) Annual publication output; (2) distribution according to country; (3) distribution according to institution; (4) top cited publications; (5) distribution according to journals; and (6) comparison of study results on precision radiotherapy for brain tumors. RESULTS: The stereotactic radiotherapy, intensity-modulated radiotherapy, and imaging-guided radiotherapy are three major methods of precision radiotherapy for brain tumors. There were 260 research articles addressing precision radiotherapy for brain tumors found within the Web of Science. The USA published the most papers on precision radiotherapy for brain tumors, followed by Germany and France. European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, German Cancer Research Center and Heidelberg University were the most prolific research institutes for publications on precision radiotherapy for brain tumors. Among the top 13 research institutes publishing in this field, seven

  10. Dynamical Safety Analysis of the SABR Fusion-Fission Hybrid Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumner, Tyler; Stacey, Weston; Ghiaassian, Seyed

    2009-11-01

    A hybrid fusion-fission reactor for the transmutation of spent nuclear fuel is being developed at Georgia Tech. The Subcritical Advanced Burner Reactor (SABR) is a 3000 MWth sodium-cooled, metal TRU-Zr fueled fast reactor driven by a tokamak fusion neutron source based on ITER physics and technology. We are investigating the accident dynamics of SABR's coupled fission, fusion and heat removal systems to explore the safety characteristics of a hybrid reactor. Possible accident scenarios such as loss of coolant mass flow (LOFA), of power (LOPA) and of heat sink (LOHSA), as well as inadvertent reactivity insertions and fusion source excursion are being analyzed using the RELAP5-3D code, the ATHENA version of which includes liquid metal coolants.

  11. High field hyperpolarization-EXSY experiment for fast determination of dissociation rates in SABRE complexes.

    PubMed

    Hermkens, Niels K J; Feiters, Martin C; Rutjes, Floris P J T; Wijmenga, Sybren S; Tessari, Marco

    2017-03-01

    SABRE (Signal Amplification By Reversible Exchange) is a nuclear spin hyperpolarization technique based on the reversible concurrent binding of small molecules and para-hydrogen (p-H2) to an iridium metal complex in solution. At low magnetic field, spontaneous conversion of p-H2 spin order to enhanced longitudinal magnetization of the nuclear spins of the other ligands occurs. Subsequent complex dissociation results in hyperpolarized substrate molecules in solution. The lifetime of this complex plays a crucial role in attained SABRE NMR signal enhancements. Depending on the ligands, vastly different dissociation rates have been previously measured using EXSY or selective inversion experiments. However, both these approaches are generally time-consuming due to the long recycle delays (up to 2min) necessary to reach thermal equilibrium for the nuclear spins of interest. In the cases of dilute solutions, signal averaging aggravates the problem, further extending the experimental time. Here, a new approach is proposed based on coherent hyperpolarization transfer to substrate protons in asymmetric complexes at high magnetic field. We have previously shown that such asymmetric complexes are important for application of SABRE to dilute substrates. Our results demonstrate that a series of high sensitivity EXSY spectra can be collected in a short experimental time thanks to the NMR signal enhancement and much shorter recycle delay.

  12. SABRE: Dark matter annual modulation detection in the northern and southern hemispheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomei, C.

    2017-02-01

    SABRE (Sodium-iodide with Active Background REjection) is a new NaI(Tl) experiment designed to search for galactic Dark Matter through the annual modulation signature. SABRE will consist of highly pure NaI(Tl) crystals operated in an active liquid scintillator veto. The SABRE experiment will follow a two-phase approach. In the first phase, one high-purity NaI(Tl) crystal will be operated at LNGS in an active liquid scintillator veto with the goal of demonstrating backgrounds low enough for a sensitive test of the DAMA/LIBRA result. An unprecedented radio-purity for both the NaI powder and the crystal growth will be needed to achieve this goal. The second phase will consist in building two high-purity NaI(Tl) detector arrays, with a total mass of about 50 kg each, located at LNGS and in the Stawell Gold Mine in Australia. The operation of twin full-scale experiments in both the northern and the southern hemispheres will strengthen the reliability of the result against any possible seasonal systematic effect.

  13. High field hyperpolarization-EXSY experiment for fast determination of dissociation rates in SABRE complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermkens, Niels K. J.; Feiters, Martin C.; Rutjes, Floris P. J. T.; Wijmenga, Sybren S.; Tessari, Marco

    2017-03-01

    SABRE (Signal Amplification By Reversible Exchange) is a nuclear spin hyperpolarization technique based on the reversible concurrent binding of small molecules and para-hydrogen (p-H2) to an iridium metal complex in solution. At low magnetic field, spontaneous conversion of p-H2 spin order to enhanced longitudinal magnetization of the nuclear spins of the other ligands occurs. Subsequent complex dissociation results in hyperpolarized substrate molecules in solution. The lifetime of this complex plays a crucial role in attained SABRE NMR signal enhancements. Depending on the ligands, vastly different dissociation rates have been previously measured using EXSY or selective inversion experiments. However, both these approaches are generally time-consuming due to the long recycle delays (up to 2 min) necessary to reach thermal equilibrium for the nuclear spins of interest. In the cases of dilute solutions, signal averaging aggravates the problem, further extending the experimental time. Here, a new approach is proposed based on coherent hyperpolarization transfer to substrate protons in asymmetric complexes at high magnetic field. We have previously shown that such asymmetric complexes are important for application of SABRE to dilute substrates. Our results demonstrate that a series of high sensitivity EXSY spectra can be collected in a short experimental time thanks to the NMR signal enhancement and much shorter recycle delay.

  14. Catheter ablation.

    PubMed

    Fromer, M; Shenasa, M

    1991-02-01

    Catheter ablation is gaining increasing interest for the therapy of symptomatic, sustained arrhythmias of various origins. The scope of this review is to give an overview of the biophysical aspects and major characteristics of some of the most widely used energy sources in catheter ablation, e.g., the discharge of conventional defibrillators, modified defibrillators, laser light, and radiofrequency current application. Results from animal studies are considered to explain the basic mechanisms of catheter ablation. The recent achievements with the use of radiofrequency current to modify or ablate cardiac conduction properties are outlined in more detail.

  15. Sci—Thur AM: YIS - 05: 10X-FFF VMAT for Lung SABR: an Investigation of Peripheral Dose

    SciTech Connect

    Mader, J; Mestrovic, A

    2014-08-15

    Flattening Filter Free (FFF) beams exhibit high dose rates, reduced head scatter, leaf transmission and leakage radiation. For VMAT lung SABR, treatment time can be significantly reduced using high dose rate FFF beams while maintaining plan quality and accuracy. Another possible advantage offered by FFF beams for VMAT lung SABR is the reduction in peripheral dose. The focus of this study was to investigate and quantify the reduction of peripheral dose offered by FFF beams for VMAT lung SABR. The peripheral doses delivered by VMAT Lung SABR treatments using FFF and flattened beams were investigated for the Varian Truebeam linac. This study was conducted in three stages, (1): ion chamber measurement of peripheral dose for various plans, (2): validation of AAA, Acuros XB and Monte Carlo for peripheral dose using measured data, and (3): using the validated Monte Carlo model to evaluate peripheral doses for 6 VMAT lung SABR treatments. Three energies, 6X, 10X, and 10X-FFF were used for all stages. Measured data indicates that 10X-FFF delivers the lowest peripheral dose of the three energies studied. AAA and Acuros XB dose calculation algorithms were identified as inadequate, and Monte Carlo was validated for accurate peripheral dose prediction. The Monte Carlo-calculated VMAT lung SABR plans show a significant reduction in peripheral dose for 10X-FFF plans compared to the standard 6X plans, while no significant reduction was showed when compared to 10X. This reduction combined with shorter treatment time makes 10X-FFF beams the optimal choice for superior VMAT lung SABR treatments.

  16. Thermal ablation.

    PubMed

    Webb, Heather; Lubner, Meghan G; Hinshaw, J Louis

    2011-04-01

    Image-guided tumor ablation refers to a group of treatment modalities that have emerged during the past 2 decades as important tools in the treatment of a wide range of tumors throughout the body. Although most widely recognized in the treatment of hepatic and renal malignancies, the role of thermal ablation has expanded to include lesions of the lung, breast, prostate, bone, as well as other organs and its clinical applications continue to increase. In the following article, we discuss the major thermal ablation modalities, their respective strengths and weaknesses, potential complications and how to avoid them, as well as possible future applications.

  17. Catheter Ablation

    MedlinePlus

    ... you during the procedure. Machines will measure your heart’s activity. All types of ablation require cardiac catheterization to place flexible tubes, or catheters, inside your heart to make the scars. Your doctor will clean ...

  18. TU-AB-201-06: Evaluation of Electromagnetically Guided High- Dose Rate Brachytherapy for Ablative Treatment of Lung Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Pinkham, D.W.; Shultz, D.; Loo, B.W.; Sung, A.; Diehn, M.; Fahimian, B.P.

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The advent of electromagnetic navigation bronchoscopy has enabled minimally invasive access to peripheral lung tumors previously inaccessible by optical bronchoscopes. As an adjunct to Stereotactic Ablative Radiosurgery (SABR), implantation of HDR catheters can provide focal treatments for multiple metastases and sites of retreatments. The authors evaluate a procedure to deliver ablative doses via Electromagnetically-Guided HDR (EMG-HDR) to lung metastases, quantify the resulting dosimetry, and assess its role in the comprehensive treatment of lung cancer. Methods: A retrospective study was conducted on ten patients, who, from 2009 to 2011, received a hypo-fractionated SABR regimen with 6MV VMAT to lesions in various lobes ranging from 1.5 to 20 cc in volume. A CT visible pathway was delineated for EM guided placement of an HDR applicator (catheter) and dwell times were optimized to ensure at least 98% prescription dose coverage of the GTV. Normal tissue doses were calculated using inhomogeneity corrections via a grid-based Boltzmann solver (Acuros-BV-1.5.0). Results: With EMG-HDR, an average of 83% (+/−9% standard deviation) of each patient’s GTV received over 200% of the prescription dose, as compared to SABR where the patients received an average maximum dose of 125% (+/−5%). EMG-HDR enabled a 59% (+/−12%) decrease in the aorta maximum dose, a 63% (+/−26%) decrease in the spinal cord max dose, and 57% (+/−23%) and 70% (+/−17%) decreases in the volume of the body receiving over 50% and 25% of the prescription dose, respectively. Conclusion: EMG-HDR enables delivery of higher ablative doses to the GTV, while concurrently reducing surrounding normal tissue doses. The single catheter approach shown here is limited to targets smaller than 20 cc. As such, the technique enables ablation of small lesions and a potentially safe and effective retreatment option in situations where external beam utility is limited by normal tissue constraints.

  19. Image-guided ablative therapies for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Amita; Abtin, Fereidoun; Shepard, Jo-Anne O

    2012-09-01

    Lung cancer is the commonest cause of death in adults. Although the treatment of choice is surgical resection with lobectomy, many patients are nonsurgical candidates because of medical comorbidities. Patients may also have recurrent disease after resection or radiotherapy and some patients refuse surgical options. Image-guided ablation has been recently introduced as a safe, alternative treatment of localized disease in carefully selected patients. This article discusses the principles, technique, and follow-up of the 3 main ablative therapies currently used in the lung, radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, and percutaneous cryotherapy.

  20. Percutaneous ablation of malignant thoracic tumors.

    PubMed

    Ghaye, B

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of death related to cancer. Fifteen to thirty percent of patients with a localized lung cancer are actually inoperable as they present with poor general condition, limited cardiopulmonary function, or a too high surgical risk. Therefore, minimally invasive treatments are needed and percutaneous ablation seems an attractive option. Thermal ablation can be performed by delivering heat (radiofrequency, microwave, laser) or cold (cryotherapy) through a needle inserted into the tumor under CT guidance. The ideal lesion is less than 2 or 3 cm in diameter. Success of percutaneous thermal ablation appears to be close to those of surgery for localized lung cancer. Nevertheless studies are still needed to definitely assess the role of ablation compared to other emerging techniques, as stereotactic radiotherapy as well as potential synergy with other treatments.

  1. Percutaneous ablation of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    D’Onofrio, Mirko; Ciaravino, Valentina; De Robertis, Riccardo; Barbi, Emilio; Salvia, Roberto; Girelli, Roberto; Paiella, Salvatore; Gasparini, Camilla; Cardobi, Nicolò; Bassi, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is a highly aggressive tumor with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. Prognosis and treatment depend on whether the tumor is resectable or not, which mostly depends on how quickly the diagnosis is made. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy can be both used in cases of non-resectable pancreatic cancer. In cases of pancreatic neoplasm that is locally advanced, non-resectable, but non-metastatic, it is possible to apply percutaneous treatments that are able to induce tumor cytoreduction. The aim of this article will be to describe the multiple currently available treatment techniques (radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation), their results, and their possible complications, with the aid of a literature review. PMID:27956791

  2. Percutaneous ablation of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    D'Onofrio, Mirko; Ciaravino, Valentina; De Robertis, Riccardo; Barbi, Emilio; Salvia, Roberto; Girelli, Roberto; Paiella, Salvatore; Gasparini, Camilla; Cardobi, Nicolò; Bassi, Claudio

    2016-11-28

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is a highly aggressive tumor with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. Prognosis and treatment depend on whether the tumor is resectable or not, which mostly depends on how quickly the diagnosis is made. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy can be both used in cases of non-resectable pancreatic cancer. In cases of pancreatic neoplasm that is locally advanced, non-resectable, but non-metastatic, it is possible to apply percutaneous treatments that are able to induce tumor cytoreduction. The aim of this article will be to describe the multiple currently available treatment techniques (radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation), their results, and their possible complications, with the aid of a literature review.

  3. Method and apparatus for shadow aperture backscatter radiography (SABR) system and protocol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shedlock, Daniel (Inventor); Jacobs, Alan M. (Inventor); Jacobs, Sharon Auerback (Inventor); Dugan, Edward (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A shadow aperture backscatter radiography (SABR) system includes at least one penetrating radiation source for providing a penetrating radiation field, and at least one partially transmissive radiation detector, wherein the partially transmissive radiation detector is interposed between an object region to be interrogated and the radiation source. The partially transmissive radiation detector transmits a portion of the illumination radiation field. A shadow aperture having a plurality of radiation attenuating regions having apertures therebetween is disposed between the radiation source and the detector. The apertures provide illumination regions for the illumination radiation field to reach the object region, wherein backscattered radiation from the object is detected and generates an image by the detector in regions of the detector that are shadowed by the radiation attenuation regions.

  4. [Hepatic tumors and radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Rio, E; Mornex, F; Peiffert, D; Huertas, A

    2016-09-01

    Recent technological developments led to develop the concept of focused liver radiation therapy. We must distinguish primary and secondary tumors as the indications are restricted and must be discussed as an alternative to surgical or medical treatments. For hepatocellular carcinoma 5 to 10cm (or more), a conformational radiation with or without intensity modulation is performed. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is being evaluated and is increasingly proposed as an alternative to radiofrequency ablative treatment for primary or secondary tumors (typically less than 5cm). Tumor (and liver) movements induced by respiratory motions must be taken into account. Strict dosimetric criteria must be met with particular attention to the dose-volume histograms to liver and the hollow organs, including cases of SBRT.

  5. Validation of the subtle and blatant racism scale for Asian American college students (SABR-A(2)).

    PubMed

    Yoo, Hyung Chol; Steger, Michael F; Lee, Richard M

    2010-07-01

    This investigation describes the validation of a measure of perceived racism developed to assess racial experiences of Asian American college students. In three studies across two different regions of the United States, there was strong evidence for the validation of the 8-item Subtle and Blatant Racism Scale for Asian American College Students (SABR-A2). The subtle racism subscale refers to instances of discrimination attributable implicitly to racial bias or stereotype, whereas the blatant racism subscale refers to instances of discrimination attributable explicitly to racial bias or stereotype. The two-subscale structure of the SABR-A2 was supported by exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses and demonstrated discriminant, convergent, and incremental validity, as well as internal reliability and stability over 2 weeks.

  6. SU-E-T-520: Investigation of the Impact of Respiratory Motion On Spine SAbR Dose Distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, R; Ding, C; Jiang, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose Spine SRS/SAbR treatment plans typically require very steep dose gradients to meet spinal cord constraints and it is crucial that the dose distribution be accurate. However, these plans are typically calculated on helical free-breathing CT scans, which often contain motion artifacts. While the spine itself doesn’t exhibit very much intra-fraction motion, tissues around the spine, particularly the liver, do move with respiration. We investigated the dosimetric effect of liver motion on dose distributions calculated on helical free-breathing CT scans for spine SAbR delivered to the T and L spine. Methods We took 5 spine SAbR plans and used density overrides to simulate an average reconstruction CT image set, which would more closely represent the patient anatomy during treatment. The value used for the density override was 0.66 g/cc. All patients were planned using our standard beam arrangement, which consists of 13 coplanar step and shoot IMRT beams. The original plan was recalculated with the same MU on the “average” scan and target coverage and spinal cord dose were compared to the original plan. Results The average changes in minimum PTV dose, PTV coverage, max cord dose and volume of cord receiving 10 Gy were 0.6%, 0.8%, 0.3% and 4.4% (0.012 cc), respectively. Conclusion SAbR spine plans are surprisingly robust relative to surrounding organ motion due to respiration. Motion artifacts in helical planning CT scans do not cause clinically significant differences when these plans are re-calculated on pseudo-average CT reconstructions. This is likely due to the beam arrangement used because only three beams pass through the liver and only one beam passes completely through the density override. The effect of the respiratory motion on VMAT plans for spine SAbR is being evaluated.

  7. Pellet ablation and ablation model development

    SciTech Connect

    Houlberg, W.A.

    1989-01-01

    A broad survey of pellet ablation is given, based primarily on information presented at this meeting. The implications of various experimental observations for ablation theory are derived from qualitative arguments of the physics involved. The major elements of a more complete ablation theory are then outlined in terms of these observations. This is followed by a few suggestions on improving the connections between theory and experimental results through examination of ablation data. Although this is a rather aggressive undertaking for such a brief (and undoubtedly incomplete) assessment, some of the discussion may help us advance the understanding of pellet ablation. 17 refs.

  8. SABR: Photochemical Dose–Response Bead Screening in Droplets

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    With the potential for each droplet to act as a unique reaction vessel, droplet microfluidics is a powerful tool for high-throughput discovery. Any attempt at compound screening miniaturization must address the significant scaling inefficiencies associated with library handling and distribution. Eschewing microplate-based compound collections for one-bead-one-compound (OBOC) combinatorial libraries, we have developed hνSABR (Light-Induced and -Graduated High-Throughput Screening After Bead Release), a microfluidic architecture that integrates a suspension hopper for compound library bead introduction, droplet generation, microfabricated waveguides to deliver UV light to the droplet flow for photochemical compound dosing, incubation, and laser-induced fluorescence for assay readout. Avobenzone-doped PDMS (0.6% w/w) patterning confines UV exposure to the desired illumination region, generating intradroplet compound concentrations (>10 μM) that are reproducible between devices. Beads displaying photochemically cleavable pepstatin A were distributed into droplets and exposed with five different UV intensities to demonstrate dose–response screening in an HIV-1 protease activity assay. This microfluidic architecture introduces a new analytical approach for OBOC library screening, and represents a key component of a next-generation distributed small molecule discovery platform. PMID:26815064

  9. Functional anatomy of the forelimb in Promegantereon* ogygia (Felidae, Machairodontinae, Smilodontini) from the late miocene of spain and the origins of the sabre-toothed felid model.

    PubMed

    Salesa, Manuel J; Antón, Mauricio; Turner, Alan; Morales, Jorge

    2010-03-01

    We examine the functional anatomy of the forelimb in the primitive sabre-toothed cat Promegantereon ogygia in comparison with that of the extant pantherins, other felids and canids. The study reveals that this early machairodontine had already developed strong forelimbs and a short and robust thumb, a combination that probably allowed P. ogygia to exert relatively greater forces than extant pantherins. These features can be clearly related to the evolution of the sabre-toothed cat hunting method, in which the rapid killing of prey was achieved with a precise canine shear-bite to the throat. In this early sabre-toothed cat from the Late Miocene, the strong forelimbs and thumb were adapted to achieve the rapid immobilization of prey, thus decreasing the risk of injury and minimizing energy expenditure. We suggest that these were the major evolutionary pressures that led to the appearance of the sabre-toothed cat model from the primitive forms of the Middle Miocene, rather than the hunting of very large prey, although these adaptations reached their highest development in the more advanced sabre-toothed cats of the Plio-Pleistocene, such as Smilodon and Homotherium. Although having very different body proportions, these later animals developed such extremely powerful forelimbs that they were probably able to capture relatively larger prey than extant pantherins.

  10. Functional anatomy of the forelimb in Promegantereon* ogygia (Felidae, Machairodontinae, Smilodontini) from the Late Miocene of Spain and the origins of the sabre-toothed felid model

    PubMed Central

    Salesa, Manuel J; Antón, Mauricio; Turner, Alan; Morales, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    We examine the functional anatomy of the forelimb in the primitive sabre-toothed cat Promegantereon ogygia in comparison with that of the extant pantherins, other felids and canids. The study reveals that this early machairodontine had already developed strong forelimbs and a short and robust thumb, a combination that probably allowed P. ogygia to exert relatively greater forces than extant pantherins. These features can be clearly related to the evolution of the sabre-toothed cat hunting method, in which the rapid killing of prey was achieved with a precise canine shear-bite to the throat. In this early sabre-toothed cat from the Late Miocene, the strong forelimbs and thumb were adapted to achieve the rapid immobilization of prey, thus decreasing the risk of injury and minimizing energy expenditure. We suggest that these were the major evolutionary pressures that led to the appearance of the sabre-toothed cat model from the primitive forms of the Middle Miocene, rather than the hunting of very large prey, although these adaptations reached their highest development in the more advanced sabre-toothed cats of the Plio-Pleistocene, such as Smilodon and Homotherium. Although having very different body proportions, these later animals developed such extremely powerful forelimbs that they were probably able to capture relatively larger prey than extant pantherins. PMID:20039979

  11. Synergistic Effects of Gold Nanocages in Hyperthermia and Radiotherapy Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ai-wei; Guo, Wei-hua; Qi, Ya-fei; Wang, Jian-zhen; Ma, Xiang-xing; Yu, De-xin

    2016-06-01

    Gold nanocages (GNCs) are a promising material that not only converts near infrared (NIR) light to heat for the ablation of tumors but also acts as a radiosensitizer. The combination of hyperthermia and radiotherapy has a synergistic effect that can lead to significant tumor cell necrosis. In the current study, we synthesized GNCs that offered the combined effects of hyperthermia and radiotherapy. This combination strategy resulted in increased tumor cell apoptosis and significant tumor tissue necrosis. We propose that GNCs can be used for clinical treatment and to potentially overcome resistance to radiotherapy by clearly increasing the antitumor effect.

  12. SU-E-J-153: Reconstructing 4D Cone Beam CT Images for Clinical QA of Lung SABR Treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Beaudry, J; Bergman, A; Cropp, R

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To verify that the planned Primary Target Volume (PTV) and Internal Gross Tumor Volume (IGTV) fully enclose a moving lung tumor volume as visualized on a pre-SABR treatment verification 4D Cone Beam CT. Methods: Daily 3DCBCT image sets were acquired immediately prior to treatment for 10 SABR lung patients using the on-board imaging system integrated into a Varian TrueBeam (v1.6: no 4DCBCT module available). Respiratory information was acquired during the scan using the Varian RPM system. The CBCT projections were sorted into 8 bins offline, both by breathing phase and amplitude, using in-house software. An iterative algorithm based on total variation minimization, implemented in the open source reconstruction toolkit (RTK), was used to reconstruct the binned projections into 4DCBCT images. The relative tumor motion was quantified by tracking the centroid of the tumor volume from each 4DCBCT image. Following CT-CBCT registration, the planning CT volumes were compared to the location of the CBCT tumor volume as it moves along its breathing trajectory. An overlap metric quantified the ability of the planned PTV and IGTV to contain the tumor volume at treatment. Results: The 4DCBCT reconstructed images visibly show the tumor motion. The mean overlap between the planned PTV (IGTV) and the 4DCBCT tumor volumes was 100% (94%), with an uncertainty of 5% from the 4DCBCT tumor volume contours. Examination of the tumor motion and overlap metric verify that the IGTV drawn at the planning stage is a good representation of the tumor location at treatment. Conclusion: It is difficult to compare GTV volumes from a 4DCBCT and a planning CT due to image quality differences. However, it was possible to conclude the GTV remained within the PTV 100% of the time thus giving the treatment staff confidence that SABR lung treatements are being delivered accurately.

  13. Strategies for the hyperpolarization of acetonitrile and related ligands by SABRE.

    PubMed

    Mewis, Ryan E; Green, Richard A; Cockett, Martin C R; Cowley, Michael J; Duckett, Simon B; Green, Gary G R; John, Richard O; Rayner, Peter J; Williamson, David C

    2015-01-29

    We report on a strategy for using SABRE (signal amplification by reversible exchange) for polarizing (1)H and (13)C nuclei of weakly interacting ligands which possess biologically relevant and nonaromatic motifs. We first demonstrate this via the polarization of acetonitrile, using Ir(IMes)(COD)Cl as the catalyst precursor, and confirm that the route to hyperpolarization transfer is via the J-coupling network. We extend this work to the polarization of propionitrile, benzylnitrile, benzonitrile, and trans-3-hexenedinitrile in order to assess its generality. In the (1)H NMR spectrum, the signal for acetonitrile is enhanced 8-fold over its thermal counterpart when [Ir(H)2(IMes)(MeCN)3](+) is the catalyst. Upon addition of pyridine or pyridine-d5, the active catalyst changes to [Ir(H)2(IMes)(py)2(MeCN)](+) and the resulting acetonitrile (1)H signal enhancement increases to 20- and 60-fold, respectively. In (13)C NMR studies, polarization transfers optimally to the quaternary (13)C nucleus of MeCN while the methyl (13)C is hardly polarized. Transfer to (13)C is shown to occur first via the (1)H-(1)H coupling between the hydrides and the methyl protons and then via either the (2)J or (1)J couplings to the respective (13)Cs, of which the (2)J route is more efficient. These experimental results are rationalized through a theoretical treatment which shows excellent agreement with experiment. In the case of MeCN, longitudinal two-spin orders between pairs of (1)H nuclei in the three-spin methyl group are created. Two-spin order states, between the (1)H and (13)C nuclei, are also created, and their existence is confirmed for Me(13)CN in both the (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra using the Only Parahydrogen Spectroscopy protocol.

  14. Salt Bridge Rearrangement (SaBRe) Explains the Dissociation Behavior of Noncovalent Complexes.

    PubMed

    Loo, Rachel R Ogorzalek; Loo, Joseph A

    2016-06-01

    Native electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry, with gas-phase activation and solution compositions that partially release subcomplexes, can elucidate topologies of macromolecular assemblies. That so much complexity can be preserved in gas-phase assemblies is remarkable, although a long-standing conundrum has been the differences between their gas- and solution-phase decompositions. Collision-induced dissociation of multimeric noncovalent complexes typically distributes products asymmetrically (i.e., by ejecting a single subunit bearing a large percentage of the excess charge). That unexpected behavior has been rationalized as one subunit "unfolding" to depart with more charge. We present an alternative explanation based on heterolytic ion-pair scission and rearrangement, a mechanism that inherently partitions charge asymmetrically. Excessive barriers to dissociation are circumvented in this manner, when local charge rearrangements access a lower-barrier surface. An implication of this ion pair consideration is that stability differences between high- and low-charge state ions usually attributed to Coulomb repulsion may, alternatively, be conveyed by attractive forces from ion pairs (salt bridges) stabilizing low-charge state ions. Should the number of ion pairs be roughly inversely related to charge, symmetric dissociations would be favored from highly charged complexes, as observed. Correlations between a gas-phase protein's size and charge reflect the quantity of restraining ion pairs. Collisionally-facilitated salt bridge rearrangement (SaBRe) may explain unusual size "contractions" seen for some activated, low charge state complexes. That some low-charged multimers preferentially cleave covalent bonds or shed small ions to disrupting noncovalent associations is also explained by greater ion pairing in low charge state complexes. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  15. A scrutiny of heterogeneity at the TCE Source Area BioREmediation (SABRE) test site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivett, M.; Wealthall, G. P.; Mcmillan, L. A.; Zeeb, P.

    2015-12-01

    A scrutiny of heterogeneity at the UK's Source Area BioREmediation (SABRE) test site is presented to better understand how spatial heterogeneity in subsurface properties and process occurrence may constrain performance of enhanced in-situ bioremediation (EISB). The industrial site contained a 25 to 45 year old trichloroethene (TCE) dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) that was exceptionally well monitored via a network of multilevel samplers and high resolution core sampling. Moreover, monitoring was conducted within a 3-sided sheet-pile cell that allowed a controlled streamtube of flow to be drawn through the source zone by an extraction well. We primarily focus on the longitudinal transect of monitoring along the length of the cell that provides a 200 groundwater point sample slice along the streamtube of flow through the DNAPL source zone. TCE dechlorination is shown to be significant throughout the cell domain, but spatially heterogeneous in occurrence and progress of dechlorination to lesser chlorinated ethenes - it is this heterogeneity in dechlorination that we primarily scrutinise. We illustrate the diagnostic use of the relative occurrence of TCE parent and daughter compounds to confirm: dechlorination in close proximity to DNAPL and enhanced during the bioremediation; persistent layers of DNAPL into which gradients of dechlorination products are evident; fast flowpaths through the source zone where dechlorination is less evident; and, the importance of underpinning flow regime understanding on EISB performance. Still, even with such spatial detail, there remains uncertainty over the dataset interpretation. These includes poor closure of mass balance along the cell length for the multilevel sampler based monitoring and points to needs to still understand lateral flows (even in the constrained cell), even greater spatial resolution of point monitoring and potentially, not easily proven, ethene degradation loss.

  16. Salt Bridge Rearrangement (SaBRe) Explains the Dissociation Behavior of Noncovalent Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loo, Rachel R. Ogorzalek; Loo, Joseph A.

    2016-06-01

    Native electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry, with gas-phase activation and solution compositions that partially release subcomplexes, can elucidate topologies of macromolecular assemblies. That so much complexity can be preserved in gas-phase assemblies is remarkable, although a long-standing conundrum has been the differences between their gas- and solution-phase decompositions. Collision-induced dissociation of multimeric noncovalent complexes typically distributes products asymmetrically (i.e., by ejecting a single subunit bearing a large percentage of the excess charge). That unexpected behavior has been rationalized as one subunit "unfolding" to depart with more charge. We present an alternative explanation based on heterolytic ion-pair scission and rearrangement, a mechanism that inherently partitions charge asymmetrically. Excessive barriers to dissociation are circumvented in this manner, when local charge rearrangements access a lower-barrier surface. An implication of this ion pair consideration is that stability differences between high- and low-charge state ions usually attributed to Coulomb repulsion may, alternatively, be conveyed by attractive forces from ion pairs (salt bridges) stabilizing low-charge state ions. Should the number of ion pairs be roughly inversely related to charge, symmetric dissociations would be favored from highly charged complexes, as observed. Correlations between a gas-phase protein's size and charge reflect the quantity of restraining ion pairs. Collisionally-facilitated salt bridge rearrangement (SaBRe) may explain unusual size "contractions" seen for some activated, low charge state complexes. That some low-charged multimers preferentially cleave covalent bonds or shed small ions to disrupting noncovalent associations is also explained by greater ion pairing in low charge state complexes.

  17. Strategies for the Hyperpolarization of Acetonitrile and Related Ligands by SABRE

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We report on a strategy for using SABRE (signal amplification by reversible exchange) for polarizing 1H and 13C nuclei of weakly interacting ligands which possess biologically relevant and nonaromatic motifs. We first demonstrate this via the polarization of acetonitrile, using Ir(IMes)(COD)Cl as the catalyst precursor, and confirm that the route to hyperpolarization transfer is via the J-coupling network. We extend this work to the polarization of propionitrile, benzylnitrile, benzonitrile, and trans-3-hexenedinitrile in order to assess its generality. In the 1H NMR spectrum, the signal for acetonitrile is enhanced 8-fold over its thermal counterpart when [Ir(H)2(IMes)(MeCN)3]+ is the catalyst. Upon addition of pyridine or pyridine-d5, the active catalyst changes to [Ir(H)2(IMes)(py)2(MeCN)]+ and the resulting acetonitrile 1H signal enhancement increases to 20- and 60-fold, respectively. In 13C NMR studies, polarization transfers optimally to the quaternary 13C nucleus of MeCN while the methyl 13C is hardly polarized. Transfer to 13C is shown to occur first via the 1H–1H coupling between the hydrides and the methyl protons and then via either the 2J or 1J couplings to the respective 13Cs, of which the 2J route is more efficient. These experimental results are rationalized through a theoretical treatment which shows excellent agreement with experiment. In the case of MeCN, longitudinal two-spin orders between pairs of 1H nuclei in the three-spin methyl group are created. Two-spin order states, between the 1H and 13C nuclei, are also created, and their existence is confirmed for Me13CN in both the 1H and 13C NMR spectra using the Only Parahydrogen Spectroscopy protocol. PMID:25539423

  18. Genome-wide transcription responses to synchrotron microbeam radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Sprung, Carl N; Yang, Yuqing; Forrester, Helen B; Li, Jason; Zaitseva, Marina; Cann, Leonie; Restall, Tina; Anderson, Robin L; Crosbie, Jeffrey C; Rogers, Peter A W

    2012-10-01

    The majority of cancer patients achieve benefit from radiotherapy. A significant limitation of radiotherapy is its relatively low therapeutic index, defined as the maximum radiation dose that causes acceptable normal tissue damage to the minimum dose required to achieve tumor control. Recently, a new radiotherapy modality using synchrotron-generated X-ray microbeam radiotherapy has been demonstrated in animal models to ablate tumors with concurrent sparing of normal tissue. Very little work has been undertaken into the cellular and molecular mechanisms that differentiate microbeam radiotherapy from broad beam. The purpose of this study was to investigate and compare the whole genome transcriptional response of in vivo microbeam radiotherapy versus broad beam irradiated tumors. We hypothesized that gene expression changes after microbeam radiotherapy are different from those seen after broad beam. We found that in EMT6.5 tumors at 4-48 h postirradiation, microbeam radiotherapy differentially regulates a number of genes, including major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II antigen gene family members, and other immunity-related genes including Ciita, Ifng, Cxcl1, Cxcl9, Indo and Ubd when compared to broad beam. Our findings demonstrate molecular differences in the tumor response to microbeam versus broad beam irradiation and these differences provide insight into the underlying mechanisms of microbeam radiotherapy and broad beam.

  19. SU-E-J-84: Quantitative Dosimetry Assessment of the Impact of Image Artifacts of Metal Implants in Spinal SABR Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, T; Zhang, M; Hanft, S; Green, R; Yue, N; Goyal, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Metal rods are frequently used to stabilize the spine in patients with metastatic disease. The high Z material causes imaging artifacts in the surrounding tissue in CT scans, which introduces dosimetric uncertainty when inhomogeneity correction is enabled for radiation treatment planning. The purpose of this study is to quantify the dosimetric deviations caused by the imaging artifacts and to evaluate the effectiveness of using Hounsfield units (HU) overwriting to reduce dosimetric uncertainties. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed treatment plans for 4 patients with metal implants who received stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) for metastatic disease to the spine on Tomotherapy HiArt. For all four patients, the region of imaging artifact surrounding the metal implants was contoured and the pixel HU’s were overwritten to be water equivalent. We then generated adaptive treatment plans for these patients using the MVCT pretreatment set up images and batched beamlets in the original treatment plans. The dosimetry deviation between the adaptive and original plans were compared and quantitatively analyzed. Results: For three out of four patient, the major OAR (spinal cord) dose (0.35cc or 10% according to protocols and fractionation) increased (2.7%, 5.5%, 0%, 3.9%, mean=3.0±2.3%, p=0.04), and the PTV dose (D90 or D95 as per prescription) increased for all four patients ( 2%, 5%, 0.7%, 3.6%, mean=2.8±1.9%, p=0.03) in the adaptive plan with HU overwriting. The average point dose deviation of the Tomotherapy DQA for the same patients was −1.0±1.0%. For plans without HU overwriting, the dose deviation from the treatment plan will increase. Conclusion: The metal implant and the imaging artifacts may cause a significant dosimetric impact on radiation treatment plans for spinal disease. The dose to the PTV and the spinal cord was under-calculated in treatment plans without considering the imaging artifacts. HU overwriting can reduce the dosimetry

  20. Radiofrequency Ablation of Liver Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Site Index A-Z Radiofrequency Ablation (RFA) of Liver Tumors Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a treatment that ... of Liver Tumors? What is Radiofrequency Ablation of Liver Tumors? Radiofrequency ablation, sometimes referred to as RFA, ...

  1. Ablative skin resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Chwalek, Jennifer; Goldberg, David J

    2011-01-01

    Ablative skin resurfacing has remained the gold standard for treating photodamage and acne scars since the development of the first CO(2) lasers. CO(2) and Er:YAG lasers emit infrared light, which targets water resulting in tissue contraction and collagen formation. The first ablative laser systems created significant thermal damage resulting in unacceptably high rates of scarring and prolonged healing. Newer devices, such as high-energy pulsed lasers and fractional ablative lasers, are capable of achieving significant improvements with fewer side effects and shorter recovery times. While ablative resurfacing has become safer, careful patient selection is still important to avoid post-treatment scarring, dyspigmentation, and infections. Clinicians utilizing ablative devices need to be aware of possible side effects in order to maximize results and patient satisfaction. This chapter reviews the background of ablative lasers including the types of ablative lasers, mechanism of action, indications for ablative resurfacing, and possible side effects.

  2. Determination of long-range scalar 1H-1H coupling constants responsible for polarization transfer in SABRE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eshuis, Nan; Aspers, Ruud L. E. G.; van Weerdenburg, Bram J. A.; Feiters, Martin C.; Rutjes, Floris P. J. T.; Wijmenga, Sybren S.; Tessari, Marco

    2016-04-01

    SABRE (Signal Amplification By Reversible Exchange) nuclear spin hyperpolarization method can provide strongly enhanced NMR signals as a result of the reversible association of small molecules with para-hydrogen (p-H2) at an iridium metal complex. The conversion of p-H2 singlet order to enhanced substrate proton magnetization within such complex is driven by the scalar coupling interactions between the p-H2 derived hydrides and substrate nuclear spins. In the present study these long-range homonuclear couplings are experimentally determined for several SABRE substrates using an NMR pulse sequence for coherent hyperpolarization transfer at high magnetic field. Pyridine and pyrazine derivatives appear to have a similar ∼1.2 Hz 4J coupling to p-H2 derived hydrides for their ortho protons, and a much lower 5J coupling for their meta protons. Interestingly, the 4J hydride-substrate coupling for five-membered N-heterocyclic substrates is well below 1 Hz.

  3. Determination of long-range scalar (1)H-(1)H coupling constants responsible for polarization transfer in SABRE.

    PubMed

    Eshuis, Nan; Aspers, Ruud L E G; van Weerdenburg, Bram J A; Feiters, Martin C; Rutjes, Floris P J T; Wijmenga, Sybren S; Tessari, Marco

    2016-04-01

    SABRE (Signal Amplification By Reversible Exchange) nuclear spin hyperpolarization method can provide strongly enhanced NMR signals as a result of the reversible association of small molecules with para-hydrogen (p-H2) at an iridium metal complex. The conversion of p-H2 singlet order to enhanced substrate proton magnetization within such complex is driven by the scalar coupling interactions between the p-H2 derived hydrides and substrate nuclear spins. In the present study these long-range homonuclear couplings are experimentally determined for several SABRE substrates using an NMR pulse sequence for coherent hyperpolarization transfer at high magnetic field. Pyridine and pyrazine derivatives appear to have a similar ∼1.2 Hz (4)J coupling to p-H2 derived hydrides for their ortho protons, and a much lower (5)J coupling for their meta protons. Interestingly, the (4)J hydride-substrate coupling for five-membered N-heterocyclic substrates is well below 1 Hz.

  4. Pulmonary radiofrequency ablation (Part 1): current state.

    PubMed

    Plasencia Martínez, J M

    2015-01-01

    The risks involved in surgical treatment and conventional radiotherapy in patients with early lung cancer or lung metastases often make these treatments difficult to justify. However, on the other hand, it is also unacceptable to allow these lesions to evolve freely because, left untreated, these neoplasms will usually lead to the death of the patient. In recent years, alternative local therapies have been developed, such as pulmonary radiofrequency ablation, which has proven to increase survival with a minimal risk of complications. There are common recommendations for these treatments, and although the specific indications for using one technique or another have yet to be established, there are clearly defined situations that will determine the outcome of the treatment. It is important to know these situations, because appropriate patient selection is essential for therapeutic success. This article aims to describe the characteristics and constraints of pulmonary radiofrequency ablation and to outline its role in thoracic oncology in light of the current evidence.

  5. Nonequilibrium Ablation of Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milos, Frank S.; Chen, Yih K.; Gokcen, Tahir

    2012-01-01

    In previous work, an equilibrium ablation and thermal response model for Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator was developed. In general, over a wide range of test conditions, model predictions compared well with arcjet data for surface recession, surface temperature, in-depth temperature at multiple thermocouples, and char depth. In this work, additional arcjet tests were conducted at stagnation conditions down to 40 W/sq cm and 1.6 kPa. The new data suggest that nonequilibrium effects become important for ablation predictions at heat flux or pressure below about 80 W/sq cm or 10 kPa, respectively. Modifications to the ablation model to account for nonequilibrium effects are investigated. Predictions of the equilibrium and nonequilibrium models are compared with the arcjet data.

  6. Colorectal Histology Is Associated With an Increased Risk of Local Failure in Lung Metastases Treated With Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Binkley, Michael S.; Trakul, Nicholas; Jacobs, Lisa Rose; Eyben, Rie von; Le, Quynh-Thu; Maxim, Peter G.; Loo, Billy W.; Shultz, David Benjamin; Diehn, Maximilian

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) is increasingly used to treat lung oligometastases. We set out to determine the safety and efficacy of this approach and to identify factors associated with outcomes. Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective study of patients treated with SABR for metastatic lung tumors at our institution from 2003 to 2014. We assessed the association between various patient and treatment factors with local failure (LF), progression, subsequent treatment, systemic treatment, and overall survival (OS), using univariate and multivariate analyses. Results: We identified 122 tumors in 77 patients meeting inclusion criteria for this study. Median follow-up was 22 months. The 12- and 24-month cumulative incidence rates of LF were 8.7% and 16.2%, respectively; the 24-month cumulative incidence rates of progression, subsequent treatment, and subsequent systemic treatment were 75.2%, 64.5%, and 35.1%, respectively. Twenty-four-month OS was 74.6%, and median OS was 36 months. Colorectal metastases had a significantly higher cumulative incidence of LF at 12 and 24 months (25.5% and 42.2%, respectively), than all other histologies (4.4% and 9.9%, respectively; P<.0004). The 24-month cumulative incidences of LF for colorectal metastases treated with a biologically effective dose at α/β = 10 (BED{sub 10}) of <100 Gy versus BED{sub 10} of ≥100 Gy were 62.5% and 16.7%, respectively (P=.08). Toxicity was minimal, with only a single grade 3 or higher event observed. Conclusions: SABR for metastatic lung tumors appears to be safe and effective with excellent local control, treatment-free intervals, and OS. An exception is metastases from colorectal cancer, which have a high LF rate consistent with a radioresistant phenotype, suggesting a potential role for dose escalation.

  7. Renal Ablation Update

    PubMed Central

    Khiatani, Vishal; Dixon, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    Thermal ablative technologies have evolved considerably in the recent past and are now an important component of current clinical guidelines for the treatment of small renal masses. Both radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation have intermediate-term oncologic control that rivals surgical options, with favorable complication profiles. Studies comparing cryoablation and radiofrequency ablation show no significant difference in oncologic control or complication profile between the two modalities. Early data from small series with microwave ablation have shown similar promising results. Newer technologies including irreversible electroporation and high-intensity–focused ultrasound have theoretical advantages, but will require further research before becoming a routine part of the ablation armamentarium. The purpose of this review article is to discuss the current ablative technologies available, briefly review their mechanisms of action, discuss technical aspects of each, and provide current data supporting their use. PMID:25049445

  8. Radiofrequency Ablation of Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Marc; Mikityansky, Igor; Kam, Anthony; Libutti, Steven K.; Walther, McClellan M.; Neeman, Ziv; Locklin, Julia K.; Wood, Bradford J.

    2004-09-15

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has been used for over 18 years for treatment of nerve-related chronic pain and cardiac arrhythmias. In the last 10 years, technical developments have increased ablation volumes in a controllable, versatile, and relatively inexpensive manner. The host of clinical applications for RFA have similarly expanded. Current RFA equipment, techniques, applications, results, complications, and research avenues for local tumor ablation are summarized.

  9. [Radiotherapy of bone metastases].

    PubMed

    Thureau, S; Vieillard, M-H; Supiot, S; Lagrange, J-L

    2016-09-01

    Radiotherapy plays a major role in palliative treatment of bone metastases. Recent developments of stereotactic radiotherapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy give the possibility to treat oligometastatic diseases. The objective of this paper is to report indications and treatment modalities of radiotherapy in these situations.

  10. Lung Ablation: Whats New?

    PubMed

    Xiong, Lillian; Dupuy, Damian E

    2016-07-01

    Lung cancer had an estimated incidence of 221,200 in 2015, making up 13% of all cancer diagnoses. Tumor ablation is an important treatment option for nonsurgical lung cancer and pulmonary metastatic patients. Radiofrequency ablation has been used for over a decade with newer modalities, microwave ablation, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation presenting as additional and possibly improved treatment options for patients. This minimally invasive therapy is best for small primary lesions or favorably located metastatic tumors. These technologies can offer palliation and sometimes cure of thoracic malignancies. This article discusses the current available technologies and techniques available for tumor ablation.

  11. [Radiotherapy and targeted therapy/immunotherapy].

    PubMed

    Antoni, D; Bockel, S; Deutsch, E; Mornex, F

    2016-10-01

    Thanks to recent advances achieved in oncologic systemic and local ablative treatment, the treatments become more and more efficient in term of local control and overall survival. Thus, the targeted therapies, immunotherapy or stereotactic radiotherapy have modified the management of patients, especially in case of oligometastatic disease. Many questions are raised by these innovations, particularly the diagnosis and management of new side effects or that of the combination of these different treatments, depending on the type of primary tumor. Fundamental data are available, while clinical data are still limited. Ongoing trials should help to clarify the clinical management protocols. This manuscript is a review of the combination of radiotherapy and targeted therapy/immunotherapy.

  12. Ablative Thermal Protection System Fundamentals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, Robin A. S.

    2013-01-01

    This is the presentation for a short course on the fundamentals of ablative thermal protection systems. It covers the definition of ablation, description of ablative materials, how they work, how to analyze them and how to model them.

  13. Monte Carlo validation of the TrueBeam 10XFFF phase–space files for applications in lung SABR

    SciTech Connect

    Teke, Tony; Duzenli, Cheryl; Bergman, Alanah; Viel, Francis; Atwal, Parmveer; Gete, Ermias

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: To establish the clinical acceptability of universal Monte Carlo phase–space data for the 10XFFF (flattening filter free) photon beam on the Varian TrueBeam Linac, including previously unreported data for small fields, output factors, and inhomogeneous media. The study was particularly aimed at confirming the suitability for use in simulations of lung stereotactic ablative radiotherapy treatment plans. Methods: Monte Carlo calculated percent depth doses (PDDs), transverse profiles, and output factors for the TrueBeam 10 MV FFF beam using generic phase–space data that have been released by the Varian MC research team were compared with in-house measurements and published data from multiple institutions (ten Linacs from eight different institutions). BEAMnrc was used to create field size specific phase–spaces located underneath the jaws. Doses were calculated with DOSXYZnrc in a water phantom for fields ranging from 1 × 1 to 40 × 40 cm{sup 2}. Particular attention was paid to small fields (down to 1 × 1 cm{sup 2}) and dose per pulse effects on dosimeter response for high dose rate 10XFFF beams. Ion chamber measurements were corrected for changes in ion collection efficiency (P{sub ion}) with increasing dose per pulse. MC and ECLIPSE ANISOTROPIC ANALYTICAL ALGORITHM (AAA) calculated PDDs were compared to Gafchromic film measurement in inhomogeneous media (water, bone, lung). Results: Measured data from all machines agreed with Monte Carlo simulations within 1.0% and 1.5% for PDDs and in-field transverse profiles, respectively, for field sizes >1 × 1 cm{sup 2} in a homogeneous water phantom. Agreements in the 80%–20% penumbra widths were better than 2 mm for all the fields that were compared. For all the field sizes considered, the agreement between their measured and calculated output factors was within 1.1%. Monte Carlo results for dose to water at water/bone, bone/lung, and lung/water interfaces as well as within lung agree with film

  14. Gold Nanoparticle Hyperthermia Reduces Radiotherapy Dose

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lynn; Slatkin, Daniel N.; Dilmanian, F. Avraham; Vadas, Timothy M.; Smilowitz, Henry M.

    2014-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles can absorb near infrared light, resulting in heating and ablation of tumors. Gold nanoparticles have also been used for enhancing the dose of X-rays in tumors during radiotherapy. The combination of hyperthermia and radiotherapy is synergistic, importantly allowing a reduction in X-ray dose with improved therapeutic results. Here we intratumorally infused small 15 nm gold nanoparticles engineered to be transformed from infrared-transparent to infrared-absorptive by the tumor, which were then heated by infrared followed by X-ray treatment. Synergy was studied using a very radioresistant subcutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCCVII) in mice. It was found that the dose required to control 50% of the tumors, normally 55 Gy, could be reduced to <15 Gy (a factor of >3.7). Gold nanoparticles therefore provide a method to combine hyperthermia and radiotherapy to drastically reduce the X-ray radiation needed, thus sparing normal tissue, reducing the side effects, and making radiotherapy more effective. PMID:24990355

  15. Sprayable lightweight ablative coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, William G. (Inventor); Sharpe, Max H. (Inventor); Hill, William E. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An improved lightweight, ablative coating is disclosed that may be spray applied and cured without the development of appreciable shrinkage cracks. The ablative mixture consists essentially of phenolic microballoons, hollow glass spheres, glass fibers, ground cork, a flexibilized resin binder, and an activated colloidal clay.

  16. The Chronic Encephalopathy of Parry Romberg Syndrome and En Coupe De Sabre with a 31-Year-History in a West Indian Woman: Clinical, Immunologic and Neuroimaging Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Seegobin, Karan; Abdool, Kamille; Ramcharan, Kanterpersad; Dyaanand, Haramnauth; Rampersad, Fidel

    2016-01-01

    We describe a case of Parry Romberg syndrome/en coupe de sabre in a woman whose disease started as seizures at age 8 but was diagnosed at the age 39. During these 31 years she got married, completed a first degree at university, had two successful pregnancies and has been gainfully employed. The features of generalized tonic-clonic seizures, autoimmune abnormalities, ocular abnormalities, morphea en coup de sabre and brain imaging abnormalities were present. Areas of parietal lobe cerebral calcification were encountered on the computed tomographic scan and bilateral periventricular white matter changes on the magnetic resonance imaging with frontal, temporal and parietal lobe brain atrophy ipsilateral to the facial hemiatrophy. Clinical, immunologic and neuroradiological abnormalities are discussed. In some cases, this illness can run a benign and stable course. PMID:27761227

  17. Tumor Ablation and Nanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Manthe, Rachel L.; Foy, Susan P.; Krishnamurthy, Nishanth; Sharma, Blanka; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2010-01-01

    Next to surgical resection, tumor ablation is a commonly used intervention in the treatment of solid tumors. Tumor ablation methods include thermal therapies, photodynamic therapy, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) producing agents. Thermal therapies induce tumor cell death via thermal energy and include radiofrequency, microwave, high intensity focused ultrasound, and cryoablation. Photodynamic therapy and ROS producing agents cause increased oxidative stress in tumor cells leading to apoptosis. While these therapies are safe and viable alternatives when resection of malignancies is not feasible, they do have associated limitations that prevent their widespread use in clinical applications. To improve the efficacy of these treatments, nanoparticles are being studied in combination with nonsurgical ablation regimens. In addition to better thermal effect on tumor ablation, nanoparticles can deliver anticancer therapeutics that show synergistic anti-tumor effect in the presence of heat and can also be imaged to achieve precision in therapy. Understanding the molecular mechanism of nanoparticle-mediated tumor ablation could further help engineer nanoparticles of appropriate composition and properties to synergize the ablation effect. This review aims to explore the various types of nonsurgical tumor ablation methods currently used in cancer treatment and potential improvements by nanotechnology applications. PMID:20866097

  18. [Radiotherapy of hypopharynx cancers].

    PubMed

    Pointreau, Y; Lafond, C; Trémolières, P; Legouté, F; Servagi-Vernat, S; Giraud, P; Maingon, P; Calais, G; Lapeyre, M

    2016-09-01

    The intensity-modulated radiotherapy is the gold standard in the treatment of hypopharynx cancers. Early T1 and T2 tumours could be treated by exclusive radiotherapy or surgery. For tumours requiring total pharyngolaryngectomy (T2 or T3), induction chemotherapy followed by exclusive radiotherapy or concurrent chemoradiotherapy are possible. For T4 tumours, surgery must be proposed. The treatment of lymph nodes is based on the initial treatment of the primary tumour. In non-surgical procedure, in case of sequential radiotherapy, curative dose is 70Gy and prophylactic dose is 50Gy. An integrated simultaneous boost radiotherapy is allowed (70Gy in 2Gy per fraction and 56Gy in 1.8Gy per fraction or 70Gy in 2.12Gy per fraction). Postoperatively, radiotherapy is used for locally advanced cancers with dose levels based on pathologic criteria (66Gy for R1 resection, 50 to 54Gy for complete resection). Volume delineation is based on guidelines.

  19. Heavy-ion radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanai, Tatsuaki

    2000-11-01

    Heavy-ion radiotherapy using high-energy carbon beams has been performed at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Japan. The physical frame works for heavy-ion radiotherapy are established using physical understandings of radiation physics. In order to increase the accuracy of heavy-ion radiotherapy, many physical problems should be solved. Unsolved problems, such as the depth dose distributions, range of heavy-ion in patients and heavy-ion dosimetry in the radiation therapy, are discussed. .

  20. Thermal ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Head, Hayden W; Dodd, Gerald D

    2004-11-01

    Thermal ablation, as a form of minimally invasive therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), has become an important treatment modality. Because of the limitations of surgery, the techniques of thermal ablation have become standard therapies for HCC in some situations. This article reviews 4 thermal ablation techniques-radiofrequency (RF) ablation, microwave ablation, laser ablation, and cryoablation. Each of these techniques may have a role in treating HCC, and the mechanisms, equipment, patient selection, results, and complications of each are considered. Furthermore, combined therapies consisting of thermal ablation and adjuvant chemotherapy also show promise for enhancing these techniques. Important areas of research into thermal ablation remain, including improving the ability of ablation to treat larger tumors, determining the indications for each thermal ablation modality, optimizing image guidance, and obtaining good outcome data on the efficacy of these techniques.

  1. SU-E-T-215: Comparison of VMAT-SABR Treatment Plans with Flattened Filter (FF) Beam and Flattening Filter-Free (FFF) Beam for Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, J; Kim, J; Kang, S; Suh, T

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to access VMAT-SABR plan using flattening filter (FF) and flattening filter-free (FFF) beam, and compare the verification results for all pretreatment plans. Methods: SABR plans for 20 prostate patients were optimized in the Eclipse treatment planning system. A prescription dose was 42.7 Gy/7 fractions. Four SABR plans for each patient were calculated using Acuros XB algorithm with both FF and FFF beams of 6- and 10-MV. The dose-volume histograms (DVH) and technical parameters were recorded and compared. A pretreatment verification was performed and the gamma analysis was used to quantify the agreement between calculations and measurements. Results: For each patient, the DVHs are closely similar for plans of four different beams. There are small differences showed in dose distributions and corresponding DVHs when comparing the each plan related to the same patient. Sparing on bladder and rectum was slightly better on plans with 10-MV FF and FFF than with 6-MV FF and FFF, but this difference was negligible. However, there was no significance in the other OARs. The mean agreement of 3%/3mm criteria was higher than 97% in all plans. The mean MUs and deliver time employed was 1701±101 and 3.02±0.17 min for 6-MV FF, 1870±116 and 1.69±0.08 min for 6-MV FFF, 1471±86 and 2.68±0.14 min for 10-MV FF, and 1619±101 and 0.98±0.04 min for 10-MV FFF, respectively. Conclusion: Dose distributions on prostate SABR plans using FFF beams were similar to those generated by FF beams. However, the use of FFF beam offers a clear benefit in delivery time when compared to FF beam. Verification of pretreatment also represented the acceptable and comparable results in all plans using FF beam as well as FFF beam. Therefore, this study suggests that the use of FFF beam is feasible and efficient technique for prostate SABR.

  2. [Radiotherapy of oropharynx carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Servagi Vernat, S; Tochet, F; Vieillevigne, L; Pointreau, Y; Maingon, P; Giraud, P

    2016-09-01

    Indication, doses, technique of radiotherapy and concomitant chemotherapy for oropharynx carcinoma are presented. The recommendations for delineation of the target volumes and organs at risk are detailed.

  3. Ablation of the locally advanced pancreatic cancer: An introduction and brief summary of techniques.

    PubMed

    Petrou, Athanasios; Moris, Demetrios; Paul Tabet, Patrick; David Wensley Richards, Brian; Kourounis, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is a lethal and late presenting malignancy with dismal survival rates. An estimated total of 330,000 people died from this malignancy in 2012. Although there have been improvements in diagnostic and treatment methods, the survival of late stage pancreatic cancer has not shown significant improvement in the past 4 decades. Multiple treatment approaches are available including chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and immunotherapy, but to this day surgical resection remains the only curative treatment option. Ablative techniques use various forms of energy to cause local tissue destruction through necrosis or apoptosis. They are relevant in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma as they are a treatment option in non-resectable tumors where their use ranges from symptom control to reducing tumor size for resection. In this narrative review we have grouped and outlined the various ablative methods, classifying them into thermal (Radiofrequency ablation, Microwave ablation, High Intensity Focused Ultrasound ablation, Cryoablation), and non-thermal ablative methods (Irreversible Electroporation (NanoKnife®), Photodynamic Therapy). This is followed by a description and review of the available evidence on survival and complications for each of these ablative methods. According to the literature, thermal ablative methods appear to be more accessible but are implicated with more complications than non thermal ablative methods which show the most promise.

  4. Prostate Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy Using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy to Dominant Intraprostatic Lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, Louise J.; Lilley, John; Thompson, Christopher M.; Cosgrove, Vivian; Mason, Josh; Sykes, Jonathan; Franks, Kevin; Sebag-Montefiore, David; Henry, Ann M.

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate boosting dominant intraprostatic lesions (DILs) in the context of stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) and to examine the impact on tumor control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). Methods and Materials: Ten prostate datasets were selected. DILs were defined using T2-weighted, dynamic contrast-enhanced and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. Four plans were produced for each dataset: (1) no boost to DILs; (2) boost to DILs, no seminal vesicles in prescription; (3) boost to DILs, proximal seminal vesicles (proxSV) prescribed intermediate dose; and (4) boost to DILs, proxSV prescribed higher dose. The prostate planning target volume (PTV) prescription was 42.7 Gy in 7 fractions. DILs were initially prescribed 115% of the PTV{sub Prostate} prescription, and PTV{sub DIL} prescriptions were increased in 5% increments until organ-at-risk constraints were reached. TCP and NTCP calculations used the LQ-Poisson Marsden, and Lyman-Kutcher-Burman models respectively. Results: When treating the prostate alone, the median PTV{sub DIL} prescription was 125% (range: 110%-140%) of the PTV{sub Prostate} prescription. Median PTV{sub DIL} D50% was 55.1 Gy (range: 49.6-62.6 Gy). The same PTV{sub DIL} prescriptions and similar PTV{sub DIL} median doses were possible when including the proxSV within the prescription. TCP depended on prostate α/β ratio and was highest with an α/β ratio = 1.5 Gy, where the additional TCP benefit of DIL boosting was least. Rectal NTCP increased with DIL boosting and was considered unacceptably high in 5 cases, which, when replanned with an emphasis on reducing maximum dose to 0.5 cm{sup 3} of rectum (Dmax{sub 0.5cc}), as well as meeting existing constraints, resulted in considerable rectal NTCP reductions. Conclusions: Boosting DILs in the context of SABR is technically feasible but should be approached with caution. If this therapy is adopted, strict rectal

  5. Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy for Subcentimeter Lung Tumors: Clinical, Dosimetric, and Image Guidance Considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Louie, Alexander V.; Senan, Suresh; Dahele, Max; Slotman, Ben J.; Verbakel, Wilko F.A.R.

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: Use of stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) for subcentimeter lung tumors is controversial. We report our outcomes for tumors with diameter ≤1 cm and their visibility on cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans and retrospectively evaluate the planned dose using a deterministic dose calculation algorithm (Acuros XB [AXB]). Methods and Materials: We identified subcentimeter tumors from our institutional SABR database. Tumor size was remeasured on an artifact-free phase of the planning 4-dimensional (4D)-CT. Clinical plan doses were generated using either a pencil beam convolution or an anisotropic analytic algorithm (AAA). All AAA plans were recalculated using AXB, and differences among D95 and mean dose for internal target volume (ITV) and planning target volume (PTV) on the average intensity CT dataset, as well as for gross tumor volume (GTV) on the end respiratory phases were reported. For all AAA patients, CBCT scans acquired during each treatment fraction were evaluated for target visibility. Progression-free and overall survival rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Thirty-five patients with 37 subcentimeter tumors were eligible for analysis. For the 22 AAA plans recalculated using AXB, Mean D95 ± SD values were 2.2 ± 4.4% (ITV) and 2.5 ± 4.8% (PTV) lower using AXB; whereas mean doses were 2.9 ± 4.9% (ITV) and 3.7 ± 5.1% (PTV) lower. Calculated AXB doses were significantly lower in one patient (difference in mean ITV and PTV doses, as well as in mean ITV and PTV D95 ranged from 22%-24%). However, the end respiratory phase GTV received at least 95% of the prescription dose. Review of 92 CBCT scans from all AAA patients revealed that the tumor was visualized in 82 images, and its position could be inferred in other images. The 2-year local progression-free survival was 100%. Conclusions: Patients with subcentimeter lung tumors are good candidates for SABR, given the dosimetry, ability to localize

  6. Ablative skin resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Nidhi; Smith, Greg; Heffelfinger, Ryan

    2014-02-01

    Ablative laser resurfacing has evolved as a safe and effective treatment for skin rejuvenation. Although traditional lasers were associated with significant thermal damage and lengthy recovery, advances in laser technology have improved safety profiles and reduced social downtime. CO2 lasers remain the gold standard of treatment, and fractional ablative devices capable of achieving remarkable clinical improvement with fewer side effects and shorter recovery times have made it a more practical option for patients. Although ablative resurfacing has become safer, careful patient selection and choice of suitable laser parameters are essential to minimize complications and optimize outcomes. This article describes the current modalities used in ablative laser skin resurfacing and examines their efficacy, indications, and possible side effects.

  7. Moldable cork ablation material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A successful thermal ablative material was manufactured. Moldable cork sheets were tested for density, tensile strength, tensile elongation, thermal conductivity, compression set, and specific heat. A moldable cork sheet, therefore, was established as a realistic product.

  8. Endometrial Ablation for Menorrhagia

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Barry H.

    1992-01-01

    Endometrial ablation is a relatively new treatment for patients with persistent menorrhagia. The procedure can be performed by either laser photocoagulation or electrocoagulation; both have a very low risk of complication. Generally, less than 24 hours of hospitalization is required and return to normal activities, including work, is almost immediate. Endometrial ablation is likely to become a mainstay of treatment for menorrhagia as the technology and training become more readily available. PMID:21229128

  9. Control of a large vacuum wave precursor on the SABRE voltage adder MITL and extraction ion diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuneo, M. E.; Hanson, D. L.; Poukey, J. W.; Menge, P. R.; Savage, M. E.; Smith, J. R.; Bernard, M. A.

    SABRE is a ten-cavity magnetically insulated voltage adder (6MV, 300 kA) used to study ion beam production in high voltage extraction applied-B ion diodes. Observations indicate that the machine power initially propagates in a large-amplitude vacuum wave prior to electron emission. This vacuum wave 'precursor' has an important impact on the turn-on and impedance history of ion diodes. Some typical precursor characteristics are shown using transmission line, diode, and beam current and voltage data and are compared to TWOQUICK simulations. Two techniques are under investigation to control the precursor and its effects on diode performance. A plasma opening switch (POS) has been used to erode the precursor. Field enhancing inserts are also planned to decrease the macroscopic field required for electron emission from the cathode. This will limit the distance over which vacuum and insulated waves separate by propagation at different velocities. Experimental data from the POS technique and TWOQUICK simulations of the insert technique are presented and discussed.

  10. [Radiotherapy of skin cancers].

    PubMed

    Hennequin, C; Rio, E; Mahé, M-A

    2016-09-01

    The indications of radiotherapy for skin cancers are not clearly defined because of the lack of randomised trials or prospective studies. For basal cell carcinomas, radiotherapy frequently offers a good local control, but a randomized trial showed that surgery is more efficient and less toxic. Indications of radiotherapy are contra-indications of surgery for patients older than 60, non-sclerodermiform histology and occurring in non-sensitive areas. Adjuvant radiotherapy could be proposed to squamous cell carcinomas, in case of poor prognostic factors. Dose of 60 to 70Gy are usually required, and must be modulated to the size of the lesions. Adjuvant radiotherapy seems beneficial for desmoplastic melanomas but not for the other histological types. Prophylactic nodal irradiation (45 to 50Gy), for locally advanced tumours (massive nodal involvement), decreases the locoregional failure rate but do not increase survival. Adjuvant radiotherapy (50 to 56Gy) for Merckel cell carcinomas increases also the local control rate, as demonstrated by meta-analysis and a large epidemiological study. Nodal areas must be included, if there is no surgical exploration (sentinel lymph node dissection). Kaposi sarcomas are radiosensitive and could be treated with relatively low doses (24 to 30Gy). Also, cutaneous lymphomas are good indications for radiotherapy: B lymphomas are electively treated with limited fields. The role of total skin electron therapy for T-lymphomas is still discussed; but palliative radiotherapy is very efficient in case of cutaneous nodules.

  11. Threshold Doses for Focal Liver Reaction After Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiation Therapy for Small Hepatocellular Carcinoma Depend on Liver Function: Evaluation on Magnetic Resonance Imaging With Gd-EOB-DTPA

    SciTech Connect

    Sanuki, Naoko; Takeda, Atsuya; Oku, Yohei; Eriguchi, Takahisa; Nishimura, Shuichi; Aoki, Yosuke; Mizuno, Tomikazu; Iwabuchi, Shogo; Kunieda, Etsuo

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: Focal liver reaction (FLR) appears on radiographic images after stereotactic ablative body radiation therapy (SABR) in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and chronic liver disease. We investigated the threshold dose (TD) of FLR and possible factors affecting the TD on gadoxetate acid (Gd-EOB-DTPA)-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods and Materials: In 50 patients who were treated with SABR for small HCC and followed up by MRI for >6 months, FLR, seen as a hypointense area, was evaluated on the hepatobiliary phase of Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI. The follow-up MRI with the largest extent of FLR was fused to the planning computed tomography (CT) image, and patients with good image fusion concordance were eligible. After delineating the border of the FLR manually, a dose–volume histogram was used to identify the TD for the FLR. Clinical and volumetric factors were analyzed for correlation with the TD. Results: A total of 45 patients were eligible for analysis with a median image fusion concordance of 84.9% (range, 71.6-95.4%). The median duration between SABR and subsequent hepatobiliary phase MRI with the largest extent of FLR was 3 months (range, 1-6 months). The median TD for FLR was 28.0 Gy (range, 22.3-36.4 Gy). On univariate analysis, pre-treatment Child-Pugh (CP) score and platelet count were significantly correlated with the TD. On multiple linear regression analysis, CP score was the only parameter that predicted TD. Median TDs were 30.5 Gy (range, 26.2.3-36.4 Gy) and 25.2 Gy (range, 22.3-27.5 Gy) for patients with CP-A and CP-B disease, respectively. Conclusion: The TD was significantly correlated with baseline liver function. We propose 30 Gy for CP-A disease and 25 Gy for CP-B disease in 5 fractions as TDs for FLR after SABR for patients with HCC and chronic liver disease. Use of these TDs will help to predict potential loss of liver tissue after SABR.

  12. [Prostate cancer external beam radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    de Crevoisier, R; Pommier, P; Latorzeff, I; Chapet, O; Chauvet, B; Hennequin, C

    2016-09-01

    The prostate external beam radiotherapy techniques are described, when irradiating the prostate or after prostatectomy, with and without pelvic lymph nodes. The following parts are presented: indications of radiotherapy, total dose and fractionation, planning CT image acquisition, volume of interest delineation (target volumes and organs at risk) and margins, Intensity modulated radiotherapy planning and corresponding dose-volume constraints, and finally Image guided radiotherapy.

  13. Infrared laser bone ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Nuss, R.C.; Fabian, R.L.; Sarkar, R.; Puliafito, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    The bone ablation characteristics of five infrared lasers, including three pulsed lasers (Nd:YAG, lambda = 1064 micron; Hol:YSGG, lambda = 2.10 micron; and Erb:YAG, lambda = 2.94 micron) and two continuous-wave lasers (Nd:YAG, lambda = 1.064 micron; and CO/sub 2/, lambda = 10.6 micron), were studied. All laser ablations were performed in vitro, using moist, freshly dissected calvarium of guinea pig skulls. Quantitative etch rates of the three pulsed lasers were calculated. Light microscopy of histologic sections of ablated bone revealed a zone of tissue damage of 10 to 15 micron adjacent to the lesion edge in the case of the pulsed Nd:YAG and the Erb:YAG lasers, from 20 to 90 micron zone of tissue damage for bone ablated by the Hol:YSGG laser, and 60 to 135 micron zone of tissue damage in the case of the two continuous-wave lasers. Possible mechanisms of bone ablation and tissue damage are discussed.

  14. Shuttle subscale ablative nozzle tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, L. B.; Bailey, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    Recent subscale nozzle tests have identified new and promising carbon phenolic nozzle ablatives which utilize staple rayon, PAN, and pitch based carbon cloth. A 4-inch throat diameter submerged test nozzle designed for the 48-inch Jet Propulsion Laboratory char motor was used to evaluate five different designs incorporating 20 candidate ablatives. Test results indicate that several pitch and PAN-based carbon phenolic ablatives can provide erosion and char performance equivalent or superior to the present continuous rayon-based SRM ablative.

  15. Recruitment in Radiotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deeley, T. J.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    The Faculty Board of Radiotherapy and Oncology of the Royal College of Radiobiologists surveyed the factors thought to influence recruitment into the specialty. Possible factors listed in replies of 36 questionnaires are offered. (LBH)

  16. Treatment of bone tumours by radiofrequency thermal ablation.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Fernando Ruiz; Del Mar Castellano García, María; Montes, Jose Luis Martínez; García, Manuel Ruiz; Fernández, Juan Miguel Tristán

    2009-03-01

    Radiofrequency thermal ablation (RFTA) is considered the treatment of choice for osteoid osteomas, in which it has long been safely used. Other benign conditions (chondroblastoma, osteoblastoma, giant cell tumour, etc.) can also be treated by this technique, which is less invasive than traditional surgical procedures. RFTA ablation is also an option for the palliation of localized, painful osteolytic metastatic and myeloma lesions. The reduction in pain improves the quality of life of patients with cancer, who often have multiple morbidities and a limited life expectancy. In some cases, these patients are treated with RFTA because conventional therapies (surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, etc.) have been exhausted. In other cases, it is combined with conventional therapies or other percutaneous treatments, e.g., cementoplasty, offering faster pain relief and bone strengthening. A multidisciplinary approach to the management of these patients is recommended to select the optimal treatment, including orthopaedic surgeons, neurosurgeons, medical and radiation oncologists and interventional radiologists.

  17. Percutaneous ablation of adrenal tumors.

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, Aradhana M; Locklin, Julia; Dupuy, Damian E; Wood, Bradford J

    2010-06-01

    Adrenal tumors comprise a broad spectrum of benign and malignant neoplasms and include functional adrenal adenomas, pheochromocytomas, primary adrenocortical carcinoma, and adrenal metastases. Percutaneous ablative approaches that have been described and used in the treatment of adrenal tumors include percutaneous radiofrequency ablation, cryoablation, microwave ablation, and chemical ablation. Local tumor ablation in the adrenal gland presents unique challenges, secondary to the adrenal gland's unique anatomic and physiological features. The results of clinical series employing percutaneous ablative techniques in the treatment of adrenal tumors are reviewed in this article. Clinical and technical considerations unique to ablation in the adrenal gland are presented, including approaches commonly used in our practices, and risks and potential complications are discussed.

  18. Ablation of skeletal metastases: current status.

    PubMed

    Kurup, A Nicholas; Callstrom, Matthew R

    2010-08-01

    Image-guided percutaneous ablation of bone metastases is an effective, minimally invasive alternative to conventional therapies in the palliation of pain from metastatic disease. Ablative technologies applied in the treatment of skeletal metastases include radiofrequency ablation, cryoablation, microwave ablation, laser ablation, ethanol ablation, and, most recently, focused ultrasound. These ablative methods may be performed in combination with percutaneous cementoplasty to provide support and stabilization for metastases in weight-bearing bones at risk for pathologic fracture.

  19. [Radiotherapy of larynx cancers].

    PubMed

    Pointreau, Y; Lafond, C; Legouté, F; Trémolières, P; Servagi-Vernat, S; Giraud, P; Maingon, P; Calais, G; Lapeyre, M

    2016-09-01

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy is the gold standard in the treatment of larynx cancers (except T1 glottic tumour). Early T1 and T2 tumours may be treated by exclusive radiation or surgery. For tumours requiring total laryngectomy (T2 or T3), induction chemotherapy followed by exclusive radiotherapy or concurrent chemoradiotherapy is possible. For T4 tumour, surgery must be proposed. The treatment of lymph nodes is based on the initial treatment of the primary tumour. In non-surgical procedure, in case of sequential radiotherapy, the curative dose is 70Gy and the prophylactic dose is 50Gy. An integrated simultaneous boost radiotherapy is allowed (70Gy in 2Gy per fraction and 56Gy in 1.8Gy per fraction or 70Gy in 2.12Gy per fraction). Postoperatively, radiotherapy is used in locally advanced cancer with dose levels based on pathologic criteria (66Gy for R1 resection, 50 to 54Gy for complete resection). Volume delineation was based on guidelines.

  20. [Ablative and fractional lasers].

    PubMed

    Beylot, C; Grognard, C; Michaud, T

    2009-10-01

    The use of pulsed or scanning Carbon Dioxide, and pulsed Erbium-YAG lasers allows the programmable and reproducible photocoagulation of thin layers of the epidermis and superficial dermis. Thermal damage depends on the type of laser and is greater with CO(2) lasers. The degree of neocollagenesis is proportional to the thermal damage and is better with CO(2) lasers. Their main indication is the correction of photoaged facial skin but they can also be used for corrective dermatology, e.g. for scars and genodermatosis. Results are highly satisfactory but the technique is invasive and the patient experiences a social hindrance of around two weeks. Fractionated techniques treat 25% of the defective skin area at each session in noncontiguous microzones; four sessions are therefore necessary to treat the entire cutaneous surface. The treatment is given under topical anesthesia and is much less invasive, particularly with nonablative fractional laser treatment in which photothermolysis does not penetrate below the epidermis and/or the effects are slight, with no or very little social isolation. However, the results are much less satisfactory than the results of ablative laser and there is no firming effect. Other zones than the face can be treated. With the fractional CO(2) and Erbium ablative lasers, which have multiplied over the past 2 years, the much wider impacts cause perforation of the epidermis and there is a zone of ablation by laser photovaporization, with a zone of thermal damage below. The results are better in correcting photoaging of the face, without, however, achieving the efficacy of ablative lasers, which remain the reference technique. However, the effects are not insignificant, requiring at least 5 days of social isolation.

  1. [Radiotherapy for retroperitoneal sarcomas].

    PubMed

    Sargos, P; Stoeckle, E; Henriques de Figueiredo, B; Antoine, M; Delannes, M; Mervoyer, A; Kantor, G

    2016-10-01

    The management of retroperitoneal sarcoma can be very challenging, and the quality of initial treatment strategy appears to be a crucial prognostic factor. En bloc surgery is currently the standard of care for these rare tumours and perioperative treatments such as chemotherapy or radiotherapy have not been validated yet. However, local-regional relapse constitutes the most common disease course. While adjuvant radiotherapy is less and less common due to gastrointestinal toxicities, preoperative radiation therapy offers numerous advantages and is being evaluated as part of a national multicentre phase II study (TOMOREP trial) and is the subject of a European randomized phase III study (STRASS trial). The objective of this article is to present data on preoperative irradiation in terms of dose, volumes and optimal radiotherapy techniques for the treatment of this rare disease.

  2. OCDR guided laser ablation device

    DOEpatents

    Dasilva, Luiz B.; Colston, Jr., Bill W.; James, Dale L.

    2002-01-01

    A guided laser ablation device. The device includes a mulitmode laser ablation fiber that is surrounded by one or more single mode optical fibers that are used to image in the vicinity of the laser ablation area to prevent tissue damage. The laser ablation device is combined with an optical coherence domain reflectometry (OCDR) unit and with a control unit which initializes the OCDR unit and a high power laser of the ablation device. Data from the OCDR unit is analyzed by the control unit and used to control the high power laser. The OCDR images up to about 3 mm ahead of the ablation surface to enable a user to see sensitive tissue such as a nerve or artery before damaging it by the laser.

  3. Catheter Ablation for Ventricular Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Nof, Eyal; Stevenson, William G; John, Roy M

    2013-01-01

    Catheter ablation has emerged as an important and effective treatment option for many recurrent ventricular arrhythmias. The approach to ablation and the risks and outcomes are largely determined by the nature of the severity and type of underlying heart disease. In patients with structural heart disease, catheter ablation can effectively reduce ventricular tachycardia (VT) episodes and implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) shocks. For VT and symptomatic premature ventricular beats that occur in the absence of structural heart disease, catheter ablation is often effective as the sole therapy. Advances in catheter technology, imaging and mapping techniques have improved success rates for ablation. This review discusses current approaches to mapping and ablation for ventricular arrhythmias. PMID:26835040

  4. Radiotherapy for lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bleehen, N.M.; Cox, J.D.

    1985-05-01

    The role of radiation therapy in the management of lung cancer was reviewed at a workshop held in Cambridge, England, in June 1984. It was concluded that there was a continuing role for radiation therapy in the primary management of small cell lung cancer, including the loco-regional treatment for patients with limited disease. Radical radiotherapy for patients with non-small cell carcinoma could be curative for a proportion of patients with limited disease. Careful planning and quality control was essential. Palliative radiotherapy provided useful treatment for many other patients. Other related aspects of treatment are also presented.

  5. Radiofrequency Ablation for Liver Cancer.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Amy

    2015-01-01

    Interventional ablative technologies aided by imaging techniques such as ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging have been crucial in managing patients with primary liver cancer and liver metastases over the past 20 years. Several ablative technologies have been used to treat liver cancer; however, radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has emerged as the most common ablative therapy for hepatic lesions, both in the United States and globally. RFA is the treatment of choice for patients who cannot have surgical resection of the liver. This article focuses on the role of imaging in RFA treatment of primary and metastatic hepatic lesions.

  6. High temperature ablative foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Matthew T. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An ablative foam composition is formed of approximately 150 to 250 parts by weight polymeric isocyanate having an isocyanate functionality of 2.6 to 3.2; approximately 15 to 30 parts by weight reactive flame retardant having a hydroxyl number range from 200-260; approximately 10 to 40 parts by weight non-reactive flame retardant; approximately 10 to 40 parts by weight nonhydrolyzable silicone copolymer having a hydroxyl number range from 75-205; and approximately 3 to 16 parts by weight amine initiated polyether resin having an isocyanate functionality greater than or equal to 3.0 and a hydroxyl number range from 400-800.

  7. Matricectomy and nail ablation.

    PubMed

    Baran, Robert; Haneke, Eckart

    2002-11-01

    Matricectomy refers to the complete extirpation of the nail matrix, resulting in permanent nail loss. Usually however, matricectomy is only partial, restricted to one or both lateral horns of the matrix. Nail ablation is the definitive removal of the entire nail organ. The most important common denominator in the successful matricectomy is the total removal or destruction of the matrix tissue. Matricectomy may be indicated for the management of onychauxis, onychogryphosis, congenital nail dystrophies, and chronic painful nail, such as recalcitrant ingrown toenail or split within the medial or lateral one-third of the nail.

  8. [Radiotherapy of breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Hennequin, C; Barillot, I; Azria, D; Belkacémi, Y; Bollet, M; Chauvet, B; Cowen, D; Cutuli, B; Fourquet, A; Hannoun-Lévi, J M; Leblanc, M; Mahé, M A

    2016-09-01

    In breast cancer, radiotherapy is an essential component of the treatment. After conservative surgery for an infiltrating carcinoma, radiotherapy must be systematically performed, regardless of the characteristics of the disease, because it decreases the rate of local recurrence and by this way, specific mortality. Partial breast irradiation could not be proposed routinely but only in very selected and informed patients. For ductal carcinoma in situ, adjuvant radiotherapy must be also systematically performed after lumpectomy. After mastectomy, chest wall irradiation is required for pT3-T4 tumours and if there is an axillary nodal involvement, whatever the number of involved lymph nodes. After neo-adjuvant chemotherapy and mastectomy, in case of pN0 disease, chest wall irradiation is recommended if there is a clinically or radiologically T3-T4 or node positive disease before chemotherapy. Axillary irradiation is recommended only if there is no axillary surgical dissection and a positive sentinel lymph node. Supra and infra-clavicular irradiation is advised in case of positive axillary nodes. Internal mammary irradiation must be discussed case by case, according to the benefit/risk ratio (cardiac toxicity). Dose to the chest wall or the breast must be between 45-50Gy with a conventional fractionation. A boost dose over the tumour bed is required if the patient is younger than 60 years old. Hypofractionation (42.5 Gy in 16 fractions, or 41.6 Gy en 13 or 40 Gy en 15) is possible after tumorectomy and if a nodal irradiation is not mandatory. Delineation of the breast, the chest wall and the nodal areas are based on clinical and radiological evaluations. 3D-conformal irradiation is the recommended technique, intensity-modulated radiotherapy must be proposed only in case of specific clinical situations. Respiratory gating could be useful to decrease the cardiac dose. Concomitant administration of chemotherapy in unadvised, but hormonal treatment could be start with

  9. Laser ablation in analytical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Russo, Richard E; Mao, Xianglei; Gonzalez, Jhanis J; Zorba, Vassilia; Yoo, Jong

    2013-07-02

    In 2002, we wrote an Analytical Chemistry feature article describing the Physics of Laser Ablation in Microchemical Analysis. In line with the theme of the 2002 article, this manuscript discusses current issues in fundamental research, applications based on detecting photons at the ablation site (LIBS and LAMIS) and by collecting particles for excitation in a secondary source (ICP), and directions for the technology.

  10. Simulation of Pellet Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parks, P. B.; Ishizaki, Ryuichi

    2000-10-01

    In order to clarify the structure of the ablation flow, 2D simulation is carried out with a fluid code solving temporal evolution of MHD equations. The code includes electrostatic sheath effect at the cloud interface.(P.B. Parks et al.), Plasma Phys. Contr. Fusion 38, 571 (1996). An Eulerian cylindrical coordinate system (r,z) is used with z in a spherical pellet. The code uses the Cubic-Interpolated Psudoparticle (CIP) method(H. Takewaki and T. Yabe, J. Comput. Phys. 70), 355 (1987). that divides the fluid equations into non-advection and advection phases. The most essential element of the CIP method is in calculation of the advection phase. In this phase, a cubic interpolated spatial profile is shifted in space according to the total derivative equations, similarly to a particle scheme. Since the profile is interpolated by using the value and the spatial derivative value at each grid point, there is no numerical oscillation in space, that often appears in conventional spline interpolation. A free boundary condition is used in the code. The possibility of a stationary shock will also be shown in the presentation because the supersonic ablation flow across the magnetic field is impeded.

  11. [Radiotherapy for Graves' ophthalmopathy].

    PubMed

    Kuhnt, T; Müller, A C; Janich, M; Gerlach, R; Hädecke, J; Duncker, G I W; Dunst, J

    2004-11-01

    Graves' ophthalmopathy (GO) is the most frequent extrathyroidal manifestation of Graves' disease, an autoimmune disorder of the thyroid, whereas the precise pathogenesis still remains unclear. In Hashimoto's thyroiditis the occurrence of proptosis is an extremely rare event. The therapy for middle and severe courses of GO shows in partly disappointing results, although several therapy modalities are possible (glucocorticoid therapy, radiotherapy, antithyroid drug treatment, surgery). All these therapies lead in only 40 - 70 % to an improvement of the pathogenic symptoms. An intensive interdisciplinary cooperation is necessary to satisfy the requirements for the treatment of Graves' ophthalmopathy. As a consequence of the very different results of the few of clinical studies that were accomplished with reference to this topic, treatment by radiotherapy in the management of the disease is presently controversially discussed. In the German-speaking countries the radiotherapy is, however, firmly established as a therapy option in the treatment of the moderate disease classes (class 2-5 according to NO SPECS), especially if diplopia is present. This article describes the sequences, dosages and fractionation schemes as well as the risks and side effects of the radiotherapy. Altogether, radiotherapy is assessed as an effective and sure method. The administration of glucocorticoids can take place before the beginning of or during the radiotherapy. For the success of treatment the correct selection of patients who may possibly profit from a radiotherapy is absolutely essential. By realising that GO proceeds normally over a period of 2-5 years, which is followed by a period of fibrotic alteration, the application of the radiotherapy in the early, active phase is indispensable. A precise explanation for the effects of radiotherapy in treatment of the GO does not exist at present. The determination of the most effective irradiation doses was made from retrospectively evaluated

  12. Thermal response and ablation characteristics of light weight ceramic ablators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tran, Huy K.; Rasky, Daniel J.; Esfahani, Lili

    1993-01-01

    An account is given of the thermal performance and ablation characteristics of the NASA-Ames Lightweight Ceramic Ablators (LCAs) in supersonic, high-enthalpy convective environments, which use low density ceramic or carbon fiber matrices as substrates for main structural support, with organic resin fillers. LCA densities are in the 0.224-1.282 g/cu cm range. In-depth temperature data have been obtained to determine thermal penetration depths and conductivity. The addition of SiC and PPMA is noted to significantly improve the ablation performance of LCAs with silica substrates. Carbon-based LCAs are the most mass-efficient at high flux levels.

  13. Radiotherapy for bone pain.

    PubMed Central

    Needham, P R; Mithal, N P; Hoskin, P J

    1994-01-01

    Painful bone metastases are a common problem for cancer patients. Although current evidence supports the use of a single fraction of radiotherapy as the treatment of choice, many radiotherapists, for a variety of reasons, continue to use fractionated regimens. Over one six month period 105 patients received external beam irradiation for painful bone metastases at the Royal London Hospital (RLH). Thirty-one per cent of the patients were aged 70 or over. The treatment of 97 of these patients was assessed. They had a total of 280 sites treated over the course of their disease. Fifty-nine per cent of sites treated received a fractionated course of radiotherapy. Site significantly influenced fractionation. Overall response rates of 82% were achieved. Fractionation did not appear to influence this. Ten patients received large field irradiation. Fifteen patients had five or more sites irradiated, of whom only one received hemibody irradiation. PMID:7523672

  14. Melanoma: Last call for radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Espenel, Sophie; Vallard, Alexis; Rancoule, Chloé; Garcia, Max-Adrien; Guy, Jean-Baptiste; Chargari, Cyrus; Deutsch, Eric; Magné, Nicolas

    2017-02-01

    Melanoma is traditionally considered to be a radioresistant tumor. However, radiotherapy and immunotherapy latest developments might upset this radiobiological dogma. Stereotactic radiotherapy allows high dose per fraction delivery, with high dose rate. More DNA lethal damages, less sublethal damages reparation, endothelial cell apoptosis, and finally clonogenic cell dysfunction are produced, resulting in improved local control. Radiotherapy can also enhance immune responses, inducing neoantigens formation, tumor antigen presentation, and cytokines release. A synergic effect of radiotherapy with immunotherapy is expected, and might lead to abscopal effects. If hadrontherapy biological properties seem able to suppress hypoxia-induced radioresistance and increase biological efficacy, ballistic advantages over photon radiations might also improve radiotherapy outcomes on usually poor prognosis locations. The present review addresses biological and clinical effects of high fraction dose, bystander effect, abscopal effect, and hadrontherapy features in melanoma. Clinical trials results are warranted to establish indications of innovative radiotherapy in melanoma.

  15. Accident prevention in radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Holmberg, O

    2007-01-01

    In order to prevent accidents in radiotherapy, it is important to learn from accidents that have occurred previously. Lessons learned from a number of accidents are summarised and underlying patterns are looked for in this paper. Accidents can be prevented by applying several safety layers of preventive actions. Categories of these preventive actions are discussed together with specific actions belonging to each category of safety layer. PMID:21614274

  16. [Radiotherapy of bladder cancer].

    PubMed

    Riou, O; Chauvet, B; Lagrange, J-L; Martin, P; Llacer Moscardo, C; Charissoux, M; Lauche, O; Aillères, N; Fenoglietto, P; Azria, D

    2016-09-01

    Surgery (radical cystectomy) is the standard treatment of muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Radiochemotherapy has risen as an alternative treatment option to surgery as part as organ-sparing combined modality treatment or for patients unfit for surgery. Radiochemotherapy achieves 5-year bladder intact survival of 40 to 65% and 5-year overall survival of 40 to 50% with excellent quality of life. This article introduces the French recommendations for radiotherapy of bladder cancer: indications, exams, technique, dosimetry, delivery and image guidance.

  17. Radiotherapy DICOM packet sniffing.

    PubMed

    Ackerly, T; Gesoand, M; Smith, R

    2008-09-01

    The Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) standard is meant to allow communication of medical images between equipment provided by different vendors, but when two applications do not interact correctly in a multi-vendor environment it is often first necessary to demonstrate non-compliance of either the sender or the receiver before a resolution to the problem can be progressed. Sometimes the only way to do this is to monitor the network communication between the two applications to find out which one is not complying with the DICOM standard. Packet sniffing is a technique of network traffic analysis by passive observation of all information transiting a point on the network, regardless of the specified sender or receiver. DICOM packet sniffing traps and interprets the network communication between two DICOM applications to determine which is non compliant. This is illustrated with reference to three examples, a radiotherapy planning system unable to receive CT data from a particular CT scanner, a radiotherapy simulator unable to print correctly on a DICOM printer, and a PACS unable to respond when queried about what images it has in its archive by a radiotherapy treatment planning system. Additionally in this work it has been proven that it is feasible to extract DICOM images from the intercepted network data. This process can be applied to determine the cause of a DICOM image being rendered differently by the sender and the receiver.

  18. Imaging in radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Van den Berge, D L; De Ridder, M; Storme, G A

    2000-10-01

    Radiotherapy, more then any other treatment modality, relies heavily and often exclusively on medical imaging to determine the extent of disease and the spatial relation between target region and neighbouring healthy tissues. Radically new approaches to radiation delivery are inspired on CT scanning and treat patients in a slice-by-slice fashion using intensity modulated megavoltage fan beams. For quality assurance of complex 3-D dose distributions, MR based 3-D verificative dosimetry on irradiated phantoms has been described. As treatment delivery becomes increasingly refined, the need for accurate target definition increases as well and sophisticated imaging tools like image fusion and 3-D reconstruction are routinely used for treatment planning. While in the past patients were positioned on the treatment machines based exclusively on surface topography and the well-known skin marks, such approach is no longer sufficient for high-accuracy radiotherapy and special imaging tools like on-line portal imaging are used to verify and correct target positioning. Much of these applications rely on digital image processing, transmission and storage, and the development of standards, like DICOM and PACS have greatly contributed to these applications. Digital imaging plays an increasing role in many areas in radiotherapy and has been fundamental in new developments that have demonstrated impact on patient care.

  19. [Radiotherapy for primary lung carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Giraud, P; Lacornerie, T; Mornex, F

    2016-09-01

    Indication, doses, technique of radiotherapy and concomitant chemotherapy, for primary lung carcinoma are presented. The recommendations for delineation of the target volumes and organs at risk are detailed.

  20. [New techniques of tumor ablation (microwaves, electroporation)].

    PubMed

    de Baere, T

    2011-09-01

    Since the introduction of radiofrequency tumor ablation of liver tumors in the late 1990s, local destructive therapies have been applied to lung, renal and bone lesions. In addition, new techniques have been introduced to compensate for the limitations of radiofrequency ablation, namely the reduced rate of complete ablation for tumors larger than 3 cm and tumors near vessels larger than 3 mm. Microwave ablation is currently evolving rapidly. While it is a technique based on thermal ablation similar to radiofrequency ablation, there are significant differences between both techniques. Electroporation, of interest because of the non-thermal nature of the ablation process, also is under evaluation.

  1. Ablative heat shield design for space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiferth, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    Ablator heat shield configuration optimization studies were conducted for the orbiter. Ablator and reusable surface insulation (RSI) trajectories for design studies were shaped to take advantage of the low conductance of ceramic RSI and high temperature capability of ablators. Comparative weights were established for the RSI system and for direct bond and mechanically attached ablator systems. Ablator system costs were determined for fabrication, installation and refurbishment. Cost penalties were assigned for payload weight penalties, if any. The direct bond ablator is lowest in weight and cost. A mechanically attached ablator using a magnesium subpanel is highly competitive for both weight and cost.

  2. [Radiotherapy of soft tissue sarcomas of the extremities and superficial trunk].

    PubMed

    Ágoston, Péter; Kliton, Jorgo; Mátrai, Zoltán; Polgár, Csaba

    2014-03-01

    Soft tissue sarcomas represent a histopathologically and clinically heterogeneous group of tumors that make up around 1% of malignancies, in which soft tissue sarcomas of the extremities and superficial trunk (STSET) are treated with more or less the same strategy. Over the past 30 years, there has been a migration away from amputation and radical ablative surgical procedures for localized STSET toward more conservative, function-preserving surgery combined with radiotherapy +/- chemotherapy. The latter complex treatment ensures equal local control to radical surgery. This multidisciplinary management includes organ sparing surgery as the main procedure but also radiotherapy of different types applied before, during or after the surgery, chemotherapy depending of the stadium of the tumor and plastic, reconstructive surgery, and last but not least rehabilitation of the patient after treatment. In this publication we overview the practical guidelines for the treatment of STSET based on the available literature from the last decades. Indication and timing of radiotherapy of STSET as well as available external beam and brachytherapy techniques are summarized. The prescribed radiation dose, the role of alternative fractionations, the combination of radiotherapy and systemic chemotherapy, hyperthermia or limb perfusion regards to STSET are also discussed. Practical considerations of radiotherapy, the target volumes and the role of newer radiotherapy technology in STSET treatment are overviewed.

  3. Magnetic and robotic navigation for catheter ablation: "joystick ablation".

    PubMed

    Ernst, Sabine

    2008-10-01

    Catheter ablation has become the treatment of choice to cure various arrhythmias in the last decades. The newest advancement of this general concept is made on the navigation ability using remote-controlled ablation catheters. This review summarizes the concept of the two currently available systems, followed by a critical review of the published clinical reports for each system, respectively. Despite the limited amount of data, an attempt to compare the two systems is made.

  4. TPS Ablator Technologies for Interplanetary Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curry, Donald M.

    2004-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the status of Thermal Protection System (TPS) Ablator technologies and the preparation for use in interplanetary spacecraft. NASA does not have adequate TPS ablatives and sufficient selection for planned missions. It includes a comparison of shuttle and interplanetary TPS requirements, the status of mainline TPS charring ablator materials, a summary of JSC SBIR accomplishments in developing advanced charring ablators and the benefits of SBIR Ablator/fabrication technology.

  5. [Extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer and oligometastases].

    PubMed

    Riesterer, Oliver

    2013-10-16

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is a new radiation technique that combines improvements in radiotherapy planning, intensity modulation and image guidance. The use of SBRT enables radiotherapy to be delivered instead of in six weeks in only a few days and with ablative total dose. Prospective phase II studies in patients with inoperable early stage non-small cell lung cancer demonstrate that the use of SBRT results in local control rates of 85-95% with acceptable toxicity. SBRT is also increasingly used for treatment of metastases in the lung, liver, retroperitoneum and in bones. Because SBRT enables a locally curative dose to be delivered in a time efficient manner this technique also opens up new perspectives for the treatment of patients with oligometastases.

  6. Particle radiotherapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Suefuji, Hiroaki; Sinoto, Makoto; Matsunobu, Akira; Toyama, Shingo; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Kudo, Sho

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in external beam radiotherapy have allowed us to deliver higher doses to the tumors while decreasing doses to the surrounding tissues. Dose escalation using high-precision radiotherapy has improved the treatment outcomes of prostate cancer. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy has been widely used throughout the world as the most advanced form of photon radiotherapy. In contrast, particle radiotherapy has also been under development, and has been used as an effective and non-invasive radiation modality for prostate and other cancers. Among the particles used in such treatments, protons and carbon ions have the physical advantage that the dose can be focused on the tumor with only minimal exposure of the surrounding normal tissues. Furthermore, carbon ions also have radiobiological advantages that include higher killing effects on intrinsic radio-resistant tumors, hypoxic tumor cells and tumor cells in the G0 or S phase. However, the degree of clinical benefit derived from these theoretical advantages in the treatment of prostate cancer has not been adequately determined. The present article reviews the available literature on the use of particle radiotherapy for prostate cancer as well as the literature on the physical and radiobiological properties of this treatment, and discusses the role and the relative merits of particle radiotherapy compared with current photon-based radiotherapy, with a focus on proton beam therapy and carbon ion radiotherapy.

  7. Bystander effects and radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Marín, Alicia; Martín, Margarita; Liñán, Olga; Alvarenga, Felipe; López, Mario; Fernández, Laura; Büchser, David; Cerezo, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effects are defined as biological effects expressed after irradiation by cells whose nuclei have not been directly irradiated. These effects include DNA damage, chromosomal instability, mutation, and apoptosis. There is considerable evidence that ionizing radiation affects cells located near the site of irradiation, which respond individually and collectively as part of a large interconnected web. These bystander signals can alter the dynamic equilibrium between proliferation, apoptosis, quiescence or differentiation. The aim of this review is to examine the most important biological effects of this phenomenon with regard to areas of major interest in radiotherapy. Such aspects include radiation-induced bystander effects during the cell cycle under hypoxic conditions when administering fractionated modalities or combined radio-chemotherapy. Other relevant aspects include individual variation and genetics in toxicity of bystander factors and normal tissue collateral damage. In advanced radiotherapy techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), the high degree of dose conformity to the target volume reduces the dose and, therefore, the risk of complications, to normal tissues. However, significant doses can accumulate out-of-field due to photon scattering and this may impact cellular response in these regions. Protons may offer a solution to reduce out-of-field doses. The bystander effect has numerous associated phenomena, including adaptive response, genomic instability, and abscopal effects. Also, the bystander effect can influence radiation protection and oxidative stress. It is essential that we understand the mechanisms underlying the bystander effect in order to more accurately assess radiation risk and to evaluate protocols for cancer radiotherapy.

  8. Radiotherapy in the UK

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsay, S.

    1993-10-09

    What is wrong with radiation treatment in the UK Is it bad practice or merely bad publicity Between 1982 and 1991, 1,000 patients receiving isocentric radiation therapy at the North Staffordshire Royal Infirmary received a substantial underdose of radiation; the clinical report on this incident was published last week. The operator had been using a correction factor for tumor-to-skin distance, unaware that this factor had already been applied by the computer system. Although the report pointed out that it is not surprising that the clinicians were not alerted to the undertreatment, is also noted that there were no resources at the hospital to audit the outcome of radiotherapy.

  9. [Radiotherapy during pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Mazeron, R; Barillot, I; Mornex, F; Giraud, P

    2016-09-01

    The diagnostic of cancer during pregnancy is a rare and delicate situation. As the developments of the embryo and the human fetus are extremely sensitive to ionizing radiations, the treatment of these tumors should be discussed. The studies - preclinical and clinical - based mostly on exposure accidents show that subdiaphragmatic treatments are possible during pregnancy. When radiotherapy is used, phantom estimations of the dose to the fetus, confirmed by in vivo measurements are required. Irradiation and imaging techniques should be arranged to decrease as much as possible the dose delivered to the fetus and hold below the threshold of 0.1Gy.

  10. Imaging in radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calandrino, R.; Del Maschio, A.; Cattaneo, G. M.; Castiglioni, I.

    2009-09-01

    The diagnostic methodologies used for the radiotherapy planning have undergone great developments in the last 30 years. Since the 1980s, after the introduction of the CT scanner, the modality for the planning moved beyond the planar 2D assessment to approach a real and more realistic volumetric 3D definition. Consequently the dose distribution, previously obtained by means of an overly simple approximation, became increasingly complex, better tailoring the true shape of the tumour. The final therapeutic improvement has been obtained by a parallel increase in the complexity of the irradiating units: the Linacs for therapy have, in fact, been equipped with a full accessory set capable to modulate the fluence (IMRT) and to check the correct target position continuously during the therapy session (IMRT-IGRT). The multimodal diagnostic approach, which integrates diagnostic information, from images of the patient taken with CT, NMR, PET and US, further improves the data for a biological and topological optimization of the radiotherapy plan and consequently of the dose distribution in the Planning Target Volume. Proteomic and genomic analysis will be the next step in tumour diagnosis. These methods will provide the planners with further information, for a true personalization of the treatment regimen and the assessment of the predictive essays for each tumour and each patient.

  11. Fertility impairment in radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kuźba-Kryszak, Tamara; Nowikiewicz, Tomasz; Żyromska, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    Infertility as a result of antineoplastic therapy is becoming a very important issue due to the growing incidence of neoplastic diseases. Routinely applied antineoplastic treatments and the illness itself lead to fertility disorders. Therapeutic methods used in antineoplastic treatment may cause fertility impairment or sterilization due to permanent damage to reproductive cells. The risk of sterilization depends on the patient's sex, age during therapy, type of neoplasm, radiation dose and treatment area. It is known that chemotherapy and radiotherapy can lead to fertility impairment and the combination of these two gives an additive effect. The aim of this article is to raise the issue of infertility in these patients. It is of growing importance due to the increase in the number of children and young adults who underwent radiotherapy in the past. The progress in antineoplastic therapy improves treatment results, but at the same time requires a deeper look at existential needs of the patient. Reproductive function is an integral element of self-esteem and should be taken into account during therapy planning. PMID:27647982

  12. [Hodgkin's lymphoma and radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Datsenko, P V; Panshin, G A

    2015-01-01

    After a median observation time of 4,5 years, 440 patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma stage I-IV to the Ann Arbor classification were treated with radiotherapy (2200 lymph areas) and ABVD (n=204) or BEACOPP (n=117) or CEA/ABVD (lomustine, etoposide, adriamycine, bleomycine, vinblastine and dacarbacine; n=119) regimens in 1995-2012. Correct allocation of groups with "CR or PR ≥80%" and "PR: 0-79%", after first-line chemotherapy, is extremely important for following RT planning. Adaptation of patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma can take place only after successful treatment, the probability of relapse and fear of repeated courses strongly interfere with this process, especially in the first years after its closure. Duration of remission period, especially in young people, is no less important than the criteria for overall survival. It is impossible to build recommendations for treatment for Hodgkin's lymphoma, based only on long-term survival rates. Importance of radiotherapy in reducing the number of relapses is undeniable, so the idea that the development of the role of chemotherapy in the treatment of the ray method Hodgkin's lymphoma gradually becomes secondary is in serious doubt. Our findings suggest the importance of both maintaining a high disease-free survival and reducing long-term complications in designing treatments of Hodgkin's lymphoma.

  13. [Stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy for brain metastases].

    PubMed

    Tanguy, Ronan; Métellus, Philippe; Mornex, Françoise; Mazeron, Jean-Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Brain metastases management is still controversial even though many trials are trying to define the respective roles of neurosurgery, whole-brain radiotherapy, single-dose stereotactic radiotherapy and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. In this article, we review data from trials that examine the role of radiosurgery and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy in the management of brain metastases.

  14. Radiofrequency thermal ablation in painful myeloma of the clavicle.

    PubMed

    Gharaei, Helen; Imani, Farnad; Vakily, Masoud

    2014-01-01

    A 57-year-old male patient had myeloma. He had severe pain in the left clavicle that did not respond to radiotherapy; therefore, it was treated with radiofrequency thermal ablation (RFTA). Under fluoroscopic guidance, two RF needles at a distance of 1.5 cm from each other were inserted into the mass and conventional radiofrequency (90℃ and 60 seconds) at two different depths (1 cm apart) was applied. Then, 2 ml of 0.5% ropivacaine along with triamcinolone 40 mg was injected in each needle. The visual analogue pain score (VAS from 0 to 10) was decreased from 8 to 0. In the next 3 months of follow-up, the patient was very satisfied with the procedure and the mass gradually became smaller. There were no complications. This study shows that RFTA could be a useful method for pain management in painful osteolytic myeloma lesions in the clavicle.

  15. Radiofrequency Thermal Ablation in Painful Myeloma of the Clavicle

    PubMed Central

    Imani, Farnad; Vakily, Masoud

    2014-01-01

    A 57-year-old male patient had myeloma. He had severe pain in the left clavicle that did not respond to radiotherapy; therefore, it was treated with radiofrequency thermal ablation (RFTA). Under fluoroscopic guidance, two RF needles at a distance of 1.5 cm from each other were inserted into the mass and conventional radiofrequency (90℃ and 60 seconds) at two different depths (1 cm apart) was applied. Then, 2 ml of 0.5% ropivacaine along with triamcinolone 40 mg was injected in each needle. The visual analogue pain score (VAS from 0 to 10) was decreased from 8 to 0. In the next 3 months of follow-up, the patient was very satisfied with the procedure and the mass gradually became smaller. There were no complications. This study shows that RFTA could be a useful method for pain management in painful osteolytic myeloma lesions in the clavicle. PMID:24478905

  16. Femtosecond laser ablation of enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Quang-Tri; Bertrand, Caroline; Vilar, Rui

    2016-06-01

    The surface topographical, compositional, and structural modifications induced in human enamel by femtosecond laser ablation is studied. The laser treatments were performed using a Yb:KYW chirped-pulse-regenerative amplification laser system (560 fs and 1030 nm) and fluences up to 14 J/cm2. The ablation surfaces were studied by scanning electron microscopy, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, and micro-Raman spectroscopy. Regardless of the fluence, the ablation surfaces were covered by a layer of resolidified material, indicating that ablation is accompanied by melting of hydroxyapatite. This layer presented pores and exploded gas bubbles, created by the release of gaseous decomposition products of hydroxyapatite (CO2 and H2O) within the liquid phase. In the specimen treated with 1-kHz repetition frequency and 14 J/cm2, thickness of the resolidified material is in the range of 300 to 900 nm. The micro-Raman analysis revealed that the resolidified material contains amorphous calcium phosphate, while grazing incidence x-ray diffraction analysis allowed detecting traces of a calcium phosphate other than hydroxyapatite, probably β-tricalcium phosphate Ca3), at the surface of this specimen. The present results show that the ablation of enamel involves melting of enamel's hydroxyapatite, but the thickness of the altered layer is very small and thermal damage of the remaining material is negligible.

  17. Laser ablation studies of concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Savina, M.; Xu, Z.; Wang, Y.; Reed, C.; Pellin, M.

    1999-10-20

    Laser ablation was studied as a means of removing radioactive contaminants from the surface and near-surface regions of concrete. The authors present the results of ablation tests on cement and concrete samples using a 1.6 kW pulsed Nd:YAG laser with fiber optic beam delivery. The laser-surface interaction was studied using cement and high density concrete as targets. Ablation efficiency and material removal rates were determined as functions of irradiance and pulse overlap. Doped samples were also ablated to determine the efficiency with which surface contaminants were removed and captured in the effluent. The results show that the cement phase of the material melts and vaporizes, but the aggregate portion (sand and rock) fragments. The effluent consists of both micron-size aerosol particles and chunks of fragmented aggregate material. Laser-induced optical emission spectroscopy was used to analyze the surface during ablation. Analysis of the effluent showed that contaminants such as cesium and strontium were strongly segregated into different regions of the particle size distribution of the aerosol.

  18. Fragmentation and ablation during entry

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1997-09-01

    This note discusses objects that both fragment and ablate during entry, using the results of previous reports to describe the velocity, pressure, and fragmentation of entering objects. It shows that the mechanisms used there to describe the breakup of non-ablating objects during deceleration remain valid for most ablating objects. It treats coupled fragmentation and ablation during entry, building on earlier models that separately discuss the entry of objects that are hard, whose high heat of ablation permits little erosion, and those who are strong whose strength prevents fragmentation, which are discussed in ``Radiation from Hard Objects,`` ``Deceleration and Radiation of Strong, Hard, Asteroids During Atmospheric Impact,`` and ``Meteor Signature Interpretation.`` This note provides a more detailed treatment of the further breakup and separation of fragments during descent. It replaces the constraint on mass per unit area used earlier to determine the altitude and magnitude of peak power radiation with a detailed analytic solution of deceleration. Model predictions are shown to be in agreement with the key features of numerical calculations of deceleration. The model equations are solved for the altitudes of maximum radiation, which agree with numerical integrations. The model is inverted analytically to infer object size and speed from measurements of peak power and altitude to provide a complete model for the approximate inversion of meteor data.

  19. Thermal ablation of lung tumors.

    PubMed

    McTaggart, Ryan A; Dupuy, Damian E

    2007-06-01

    Thermal ablation can be applied to treat any thoracic malignancy: primary lung cancers, recurrent primary lung cancers, metastatic disease, chest wall masses, and painful, bony metastases. Since the first reported use of thermal ablation for lung cancer in 2000 there has been an explosive use of the procedure, and by 2010 the number of procedures to treat thoracic malignancy is expected to exceed 150,000 per year. Presently, thermal ablation is best used for patients with early-stage lung cancers in patients who are not surgical candidates, patients with small and favorably located pulmonary metastases, and patients in whom palliation of tumor-related symptoms is the goal. Radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, and cryoablation are novel treatment modalities for lung cancer and can safely accomplish tumor destruction and even complete eradication of tumor in patients who are not candidates for surgical resection. In this article, we discuss technical considerations for each modality and the periprocedure and postprocedure management of patients with this disease.

  20. Radiotherapy in Phyllodes Tumour

    PubMed Central

    Sasidharan, Balukrishna; Manipadam, Marie Therese; Paul, M J; Backianathan, Selvamani

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Phyllodes Tumour (PT) of the breast is a relatively rare breast neoplasm (<1%) with diverse range of pathology and biological behaviour. Aim To describe the clinical course of PT and to define the role of Radiotherapy (RT) in PT of the breast. Materials and Methods Retrospective analysis of hospital data of patients with PT presented from 2005 to 2014 was done. Descriptive statistics was used to analyze the results. Simple description of data was done in this study. Age and duration of symptoms were expressed in median and range. Percentages, tables and general discussions were used to understand the meaning of the data analyzed. Results Out of the 98 patients, 92 were eligible for analysis. The median age of presentation was 43 years. A total of 64/92 patients were premenopausal. There was no side predilection for this tumour but 57/92 patients presented as an upper outer quadrant lump. Fifty percent of the patients presented as giant (10 cm) PT. The median duration of symptoms was 12 months (range: 1-168 months). A 60% of patients had Benign (B), 23% had Borderline (BL) and 17% had malignant (M) tumours. The surgical treatment for benign histology included Lumpectomy (L) for 15%, Wide Local Excision (WLE) for 48%, and Simple Mastectomy (SM) for 37%. All BL and M tumours were treated with WLE or SM. There was no recurrence in B and BL group when the margin was ≥1 cm. All non-metastatic M tumours received adjuvant RT irrespective of their margin status. Total 3/16 patients with M developed local recurrence. Total 6/16 M patients had distant metastases (lung or bone). Our median duration of follow up was 20 months (range: 1-120 months). Conclusion Surgical resection with adequate margins (>1 cm) gave excellent local control in B and BL tumours. For patients with BL PT, local radiotherapy is useful, if margins are close or positive even after the best surgical resection. There is a trend towards improved local control with adjuvant radiotherapy for

  1. [Respiratory synchronization and breast radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Mège, A; Ziouèche-Mottet, A; Bodez, V; Garcia, R; Arnaud, A; de Rauglaudre, G; Pourel, N; Chauvet, B

    2016-10-01

    Adjuvant radiation therapy following breast cancer surgery continues to improve locoregional control and overall survival. But the success of highly targeted-conformal radiotherapy such as intensity-modulated techniques, can be compromised by respiratory motion. The intrafraction motion can potentially result in significant under- or overdose, and also expose organs at risk. This article summarizes the respiratory motion and its effects on imaging, dose calculation and dose delivery by radiotherapy for breast cancer. We will review the methods of respiratory synchronization available for breast radiotherapy to minimize the respiratory impact and to spare organs such as heart and lung.

  2. [Task sharing with radiotherapy technicians in image-guided radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Diaz, O; Lorchel, F; Revault, C; Mornex, F

    2013-10-01

    The development of accelerators with on-board imaging systems now allows better target volumes reset at the time of irradiation (image-guided radiotherapy [IGRT]). However, these technological advances in the control of repositioning led to a multiplication of tasks for each actor in radiotherapy and increase the time available for the treatment, whether for radiotherapy technicians or radiation oncologists. As there is currently no explicit regulatory framework governing the use of IGRT, some institutional experiments show that a transfer is possible between radiation oncologists and radiotherapy technicians for on-line verification of image positioning. Initial training for every technical and drafting procedures within institutions will improve audit quality by reducing interindividual variability.

  3. Theoretical Modeling for Hepatic Microwave Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Punit

    2010-01-01

    Thermal tissue ablation is an interventional procedure increasingly being used for treatment of diverse medical conditions. Microwave ablation is emerging as an attractive modality for thermal therapy of large soft tissue targets in short periods of time, making it particularly suitable for ablation of hepatic and other tumors. Theoretical models of the ablation process are a powerful tool for predicting the temperature profile in tissue and resultant tissue damage created by ablation devices. These models play an important role in the design and optimization of devices for microwave tissue ablation. Furthermore, they are a useful tool for exploring and planning treatment delivery strategies. This review describes the status of theoretical models developed for microwave tissue ablation. It also reviews current challenges, research trends and progress towards development of accurate models for high temperature microwave tissue ablation. PMID:20309393

  4. Image-guided ablation of adrenal lesions.

    PubMed

    Yamakado, Koichiro

    2014-06-01

    Although laparoscopic adrenalectomy has remained the standard of care for the treatment for adrenal tumors, percutaneous image-guided ablation therapy, such as chemical ablation, radiofrequency ablation, cryoablation, and microwave ablation, has been shown to be clinically useful in many nonsurgical candidates. Ablation therapy has been used to treat both functioning adenomas and malignant tumors, including primary adrenal carcinoma and metastasis. For patients with functioning adenomas, biochemical and symptomatic improvement is achieved in 96 to 100% after ablation; for patients with malignant adrenal neoplasms, however, the survival benefit from ablation therapy remains unclear, though good initial results have been reported. This article outlines the current role of ablation therapy for adrenal lesions, as well as identifying some of the technical considerations for this procedure.

  5. Radiotherapy Planning using MRI

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Maria A; Payne, Geoffrey S

    2016-01-01

    The use of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in Radiotherapy (RT) planning is rapidly expanding. We review the wide range of image contrast mechanisms available to MRI and the way they are exploited for RT planning. However a number of challenges are also considered: the requirements that MR images are acquired in the RT treatment position, that they are geometrically accurate, that effects of patient motion during the scan are minimised, that tissue markers are clearly demonstrated, that an estimate of electron density can be obtained. These issues are discussed in detail, prior to the consideration of a number of specific clinical applications. This is followed by a brief discussion on the development of real-time MRI-guided RT. PMID:26509844

  6. Radiotherapy on hidradenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lalya, Issam; Hadadi, Khalid; Tazi, El Mehdi; Lalya, Ilham; Bazine, Amine; Andaloussy, Khalid; Elmarjany, Mohamed; Sifat, Hassan; Hassouni, Khalid; Kebdani, Tayeb; Mansouri, Hamid; Benjaafar, Noureddine; Elgueddari, Brahim Khalil

    2011-01-01

    Context: Clear cell Hidradenocarcinoma is a rare carcinoma arising from sweat glands. It is an aggressive tumor that most metastasizes to regional lymph nodes and distant viscera; surgery with safe margins is the mainstay of treatment. Case Report: We report a case of 68-year-old woman who presented with an invasive clear cell hidradenocarcinoma situated in the left parotid area which recurred 5 months after surgery, this recurrence was managed successfully by high-dose irradiation of the tumor bed (66 Gy) and regional lymphatic chains (50 Gy), after a follow-up of more than 15 months, the patient is in good local control without significant toxicity. Conclusion: Post operative radiotherapy allows better local control and should be mandatory when histological features predictive of recurrence are present: positive margins, histology poorly differentiated, perineural invasion, vascular and lymphatic invasion, lymph node involvement, and extracapsular spread. PMID:22540063

  7. [Radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Maingon, P; Blanchard, P; Bidault, F; Calmels, L

    2016-09-01

    Nasapharyngeal carcinoma is a rare disease. Oftenly, the diagnostic is made for advanced disease. Localized tumors, T1 or T2 NO observed a good prognosis and are locally controlled in more than 90 % of the cases by radiotherapy alone. The standard treatment of locally advanced disease is combined chemoradiation. A special vigilance of fast decrease of the volume of the pathological lymph nodes, sometimes associated to loss of weight might indicate an adaptive dosimetric revision. The treatment of recurrent disease is of great importance. Surgical indications are limited but should be discussed in multidisciplinary tumor board when possible. Surgical nodal sampling has to be proposed for nodal recurrence as well as reirradiation, which could be indicated according to the technical issues.

  8. Pion radiotherapy at LAMPF

    SciTech Connect

    Bush, S.E.; Smith, A.R.; Zink, S.

    1982-12-01

    Clinical investigations of pi meson radiotherapy were conducted by the Cancer Research and Treatment Center of the University of New Mexico and the Los Alamos National Laboratory from 1974 until 1982. Two hundred and thirty patients have been treated for a variety of locally advanced primary and metastatic neoplasms. One hundred and ninety-six patients have been followed for a minimum of 18 months. Crude survival data range from 11% for unresectable pancreatic carcinoma to 82% for Stages C and D1 adenocarcinoma of the prostate. Acute tolerance of normal tissues is approximately 4500 pion rad in 36 fractions over 7 weeks. Severe chronic reactions have appeared with increasing frequency after doses in excess of 4000 pion rad.

  9. Microwave ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Poggi, Guido; Tosoratti, Nevio; Montagna, Benedetta; Picchi, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    Although surgical resection is still the optimal treatment option for early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients with well compensated cirrhosis, thermal ablation techniques provide a valid non-surgical treatment alternative, thanks to their minimal invasiveness, excellent tolerability and safety profile, proven efficacy in local disease control, virtually unlimited repeatability and cost-effectiveness. Different energy sources are currently employed in clinics as physical agents for percutaneous or intra-surgical thermal ablation of HCC nodules. Among them, radiofrequency (RF) currents are the most used, while microwave ablations (MWA) are becoming increasingly popular. Starting from the 90s’, RF ablation (RFA) rapidly became the standard of care in ablation, especially in the treatment of small HCC nodules; however, RFA exhibits substantial performance limitations in the treatment of large lesions and/or tumors located near major heat sinks. MWA, first introduced in the Far Eastern clinical practice in the 80s’, showing promising results but also severe limitations in the controllability of the emitted field and in the high amount of power employed for the ablation of large tumors, resulting in a poor coagulative performance and a relatively high complication rate, nowadays shows better results both in terms of treatment controllability and of overall coagulative performance, thanks to the improvement of technology. In this review we provide an extensive and detailed overview of the key physical and technical aspects of MWA and of the currently available systems, and we want to discuss the most relevant published data on MWA treatments of HCC nodules in regard to clinical results and to the type and rate of complications, both in absolute terms and in comparison with RFA. PMID:26557950

  10. Surgical Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Ramlawi, Basel; Abu Saleh, Walid K

    2015-01-01

    The Cox-maze procedure for the restoration of normal sinus rhythm, initially developed by Dr. James Cox, underwent several iterations over the years. The main concept consists of creating a series of transmural lesions in the right and left atria that disrupt re-entrant circuits responsible for propagating the abnormal atrial fibrillation rhythm. The left atrial appendage is excluded as a component of the Maze procedure. For the first three iterations of the Cox- maze procedure, these lesions were performed using a surgical cut-and-sew approach that ensured transmurality. The Cox-Maze IV is the most currently accepted iteration. It achieves the same lesion set of the Cox- maze III but uses alternative energy sources to create the transmural lesions, potentially in a minimally invasive approach on the beating heart. High-frequency ultrasound, microwave, and laser energy have all been used with varying success in the past. Today, bipolar radiofrequency heat or cryotherapy cooling are the most accepted sources for creating linear lesions with consistent safety and transmurality. The robust and reliable nature of these energy delivery methods has yielded a success rate reaching 90% freedom from atrial fibrillation at 12 months. Such approaches offer a significant long-term advantage over catheter-based ablation, especially in patients having longstanding, persistent atrial fibrillation with characteristics such as dilated left atrial dimensions, poor ejection fraction, and failed catheter ablation. Based on these improved results, there currently is significant interest in developing a hybrid ablation strategy that incorporates the superior transmural robust lesions of surgical ablation, the reliable stroke prevention potential of epicardial left atrial appendage exclusion, and sophisticated mapping and confirmatory catheter-based ablation technology. Such a minimally invasive hybrid strategy for ablation may lead to the development of multidisciplinary "Afib teams" to

  11. Laser ablation based fuel ignition

    DOEpatents

    Early, James W.; Lester, Charles S.

    1998-01-01

    There is provided a method of fuel/oxidizer ignition comprising: (a) application of laser light to a material surface which is absorptive to the laser radiation; (b) heating of the material surface with the laser light to produce a high temperature ablation plume which emanates from the heated surface as an intensely hot cloud of vaporized surface material; and (c) contacting the fuel/oxidizer mixture with the hot ablation cloud at or near the surface of the material in order to heat the fuel to a temperature sufficient to initiate fuel ignition.

  12. Laser ablation based fuel ignition

    DOEpatents

    Early, J.W.; Lester, C.S.

    1998-06-23

    There is provided a method of fuel/oxidizer ignition comprising: (a) application of laser light to a material surface which is absorptive to the laser radiation; (b) heating of the material surface with the laser light to produce a high temperature ablation plume which emanates from the heated surface as an intensely hot cloud of vaporized surface material; and (c) contacting the fuel/oxidizer mixture with the hot ablation cloud at or near the surface of the material in order to heat the fuel to a temperature sufficient to initiate fuel ignition. 3 figs.

  13. Transhemangioma Ablation of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Pua, Uei

    2012-12-15

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a well-established treatment modality in the treatment of early hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) [1]. Safe trajectory of the RFA probe is crucial in decreasing collateral tissue damage and unwarranted probe transgression. As a percutaneous technique, however, the trajectory of the needle is sometimes constrained by the available imaging plane. The presence of a hemangioma beside an HCC is uncommon but poses the question of safety related to probe transgression. We hereby describe a case of transhemangioma ablation of a dome HCC.

  14. Cold Atmospheric Plasma for Selectively Ablating Metastatic Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mian; Holmes, Benjamin; Cheng, Xiaoqian; Zhu, Wei; Keidar, Michael; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2013-01-01

    Traditional breast cancer treatments such as surgery and radiotherapy contain many inherent limitations with regards to incomplete and nonselective tumor ablation. Cold atomospheric plasma (CAP) is an ionized gas where the ion temperature is close to room temperature. It contains electrons, charged particles, radicals, various excited molecules, UV photons and transient electric fields. These various compositional elements have the potential to either enhance and promote cellular activity, or disrupt and destroy them. In particular, based on this unique composition, CAP could offer a minimally-invasive surgical approach allowing for specific cancer cell or tumor tissue removal without influencing healthy cells. Thus, the objective of this research is to investigate a novel CAP-based therapy for selectively bone metastatic breast cancer treatment. For this purpose, human metastatic breast cancer (BrCa) cells and bone marrow derived human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were separately treated with CAP, and behavioral changes were evaluated after 1, 3, and 5 days of culture. With different treatment times, different BrCa and MSC cell responses were observed. Our results showed that BrCa cells were more sensitive to these CAP treatments than MSCs under plasma dose conditions tested. It demonstrated that CAP can selectively ablate metastatic BrCa cells in vitro without damaging healthy MSCs at the metastatic bone site. In addition, our study showed that CAP treatment can significantly inhibit the migration and invasion of BrCa cells. The results suggest the great potential of CAP for breast cancer therapy. PMID:24040051

  15. Fractional ablative laser skin resurfacing: a review.

    PubMed

    Tajirian, Ani L; Tarijian, Ani L; Goldberg, David J

    2011-12-01

    Ablative laser technology has been in use for many years now. The large side effect profile however has limited its use. Fractional ablative technology is a newer development which combines a lesser side effect profile along with similar efficacy. In this paper we review fractional ablative laser skin resurfacing.

  16. Bone Health and Pelvic Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Higham, C E; Faithfull, S

    2015-11-01

    Survivors who have received pelvic radiotherapy make up many of the long-term cancer population, with therapies for gynaecological, bowel, bladder and prostate malignancies. Individuals who receive radiotherapy to the pelvis as part of their cancer treatment are at risk of insufficiency fractures. Symptoms of insufficiency fractures include pelvic and back pain and immobility, which can affect substantially quality of life. This constellation of symptoms can occur within 2 months of radiotherapy up to 63 months post-treatment, with a median incidence of 6-20 months. As a condition it is under reported and evidence is poor as to the contributing risk factors, causation and best management to improve the patient's bone health and mobility. As radiotherapy advances, chronic symptoms, such as insufficiency fractures, as a consequence of treatment need to be better understood and reviewed. This overview explores the current evidence for the effect of radiotherapy on bone health and insufficiency fractures and identifies what we know and where gaps in our knowledge lie. The overview concludes with the need to take seriously complaints of pelvic pain from patients after pelvic radiotherapy and to investigate and manage these symptoms more effectively. There is a clear need for definitive research in this field to provide the evidence-based guidance much needed in practice.

  17. Modern Advances in Ablative TPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatapathy, Ethiraj

    2013-01-01

    Topics covered include: Physics of Hypersonic Flow and TPS Considerations. Destinations, Missions and Requirements. State of the Art Thermal Protection Systems Capabilities. Modern Advances in Ablative TPS. Entry Systems Concepts. Flexible TPS for Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerators. Conformal TPS for Rigid Aeroshell. 3-D Woven TPS for Extreme Entry Environment. Multi-functional Carbon Fabric for Mechanically Deployable.

  18. WE-E-17A-02: Predictive Modeling of Outcome Following SABR for NSCLC Based On Radiomics of FDG-PET Images

    SciTech Connect

    Li, R; Aguilera, T; Shultz, D; Rubin, D; Diehn, M; Loo, B

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: This study aims to develop predictive models of patient outcome by extracting advanced imaging features (i.e., Radiomics) from FDG-PET images. Methods: We acquired pre-treatment PET scans for 51 stage I NSCLC patients treated with SABR. We calculated 139 quantitative features from each patient PET image, including 5 morphological features, 8 statistical features, 27 texture features, and 100 features from the intensity-volume histogram. Based on the imaging features, we aim to distinguish between 2 risk groups of patients: those with regional failure or distant metastasis versus those without. We investigated 3 pattern classification algorithms: linear discriminant analysis (LDA), naive Bayes (NB), and logistic regression (LR). To avoid the curse of dimensionality, we performed feature selection by first removing redundant features and then applying sequential forward selection using the wrapper approach. To evaluate the predictive performance, we performed 10-fold cross validation with 1000 random splits of the data and calculated the area under the ROC curve (AUC). Results: Feature selection identified 2 texture features (homogeneity and/or wavelet decompositions) for NB and LR, while for LDA SUVmax and one texture feature (correlation) were identified. All 3 classifiers achieved statistically significant improvements over conventional PET imaging metrics such as tumor volume (AUC = 0.668) and SUVmax (AUC = 0.737). Overall, NB achieved the best predictive performance (AUC = 0.806). This also compares favorably with MTV using the best threshold at an SUV of 11.6 (AUC = 0.746). At a sensitivity of 80%, NB achieved 69% specificity, while SUVmax and tumor volume only had 36% and 47% specificity. Conclusion: Through a systematic analysis of advanced PET imaging features, we are able to build models with improved predictive value over conventional imaging metrics. If validated in a large independent cohort, the proposed techniques could potentially aid in

  19. Esophageal papilloma: Flexible endoscopic ablation by radiofrequency

    PubMed Central

    del Genio, Gianmattia; del Genio, Federica; Schettino, Pietro; Limongelli, Paolo; Tolone, Salvatore; Brusciano, Luigi; Avellino, Manuela; Vitiello, Chiara; Docimo, Giovanni; Pezzullo, Angelo; Docimo, Ludovico

    2015-01-01

    Squamous papilloma of the esophagus is a rare benign lesion of the esophagus. Radiofrequency ablation is an established endoscopic technique for the eradication of Barrett esophagus. No cases of endoscopic ablation of esophageal papilloma by radiofrequency ablation (RFA) have been reported. We report a case of esophageal papilloma successfully treated with a single session of radiofrequency ablation. Endoscopic ablation of the lesion was achieved by radiofrequency using a new catheter inserted through the working channel of endoscope. The esophageal ablated tissue was removed by a specifically designed cup. Complete ablation was confirmed at 3 mo by endoscopy with biopsies. This case supports feasibility and safety of as a new potential indication for BarrxTM RFA in patients with esophageal papilloma. PMID:25789102

  20. Percutaneous ablation of benign bone tumors.

    PubMed

    Welch, Brian T; Welch, Timothy J

    2011-09-01

    Percutaneous image-guided ablation has become a standard of practice and one of the primary modalities for treatment of benign bone tumors. Ablation is most commonly used to treat osteoid osteomas but may also be used in the treatment of chondroblastomas, osteoblastomas, and giant cell tumors. Percutaneous image-guided ablation of benign bone tumors carries a high success rate (>90% in case series) and results in decreased morbidity, mortality, and expense compared with traditional surgical methods. The ablation technique most often applied to benign bone lesions is radiofrequency ablation. Because the ablation technique has been extensively applied to osteoid osteomas and because of the uncommon nature of other benign bone tumors, we will primarily focus this discussion on the percutaneous ablation of osteoid osteomas.

  1. Microwave Ablation Compared with Radiofrequency Ablation for Breast Tissue in an Ex Vivo Bovine Udder Model

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Toshihiro; Westphal, Saskia; Isfort, Peter; Braunschweig, Till; Penzkofer, Tobias Bruners, Philipp; Kichikawa, Kimihiko; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas Mahnken, Andreas H.

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: To compare the effectiveness of microwave (MW) ablation with radiofrequency (RF) ablation for treating breast tissue in a nonperfused ex vivo model of healthy bovine udder tissue. Materials and Methods: MW ablations were performed at power outputs of 25W, 35W, and 45W using a 915-MHz frequency generator and a 2-cm active tip antenna. RF ablations were performed with a bipolar RF system with 2- and 3-cm active tip electrodes. Tissue temperatures were continuously monitored during ablation. Results: The mean short-axis diameters of the coagulation zones were 1.34 {+-} 0.14, 1.45 {+-} 0.13, and 1.74 {+-} 0.11 cm for MW ablation at outputs of 25W, 35W, and 45W. For RF ablation, the corresponding values were 1.16 {+-} 0.09 and 1.26 {+-} 0.14 cm with electrodes having 2- and 3-cm active tips, respectively. The mean coagulation volumes were 2.27 {+-} 0.65, 2.85 {+-} 0.72, and 4.45 {+-} 0.47 cm{sup 3} for MW ablation at outputs of 25W, 35W, and 45W and 1.18 {+-} 0.30 and 2.29 {+-} 0.55 cm{sup 3} got RF ablation with 2- and 3-cm electrodes, respectively. MW ablations at 35W and 45W achieved significantly longer short-axis diameters than RF ablations (P < 0.05). The highest tissue temperature was achieved with MW ablation at 45W (P < 0.05). On histological examination, the extent of the ablation zone in MW ablations was less affected by tissue heterogeneity than that in RF ablations. Conclusion: MW ablation appears to be advantageous with respect to the volume of ablation and the shape of the margin of necrosis compared with RF ablation in an ex vivo bovine udder.

  2. [Adaptative radiotherapy: The case for MRI-guided radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Maingon, P

    2016-10-01

    The concept of image-guided radiotherapy benefits from the development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) associated with different capacities of tissue analyses such as spectroscopy or diffusion analysis. The production of devices allowing the repositioning of patients through MRI represents a strong added value without delivering any additional dose to the patient while the optimization of the adaptative strategies are facilitated by a better contrast of the soft tissues compared to the scanner. The advantages of MRI are well demonstrated for brain tumours, head and neck carcinomas, pelvic tumors, mediastinal malignancies, gastrointestinal tract diseases. Adaptative radiotherapy inaugurates a new area of radiotherapy with different modalities. Several technological solutions are provided or discussed allowing the patients to benefit from thses new technologies as soon as possible.

  3. [Postoperative radiotherapy of prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Guérif, S; Latorzeff, I; Lagrange, J-L; Hennequin, C; Supiot, S; Garcia, A; François, P; Soulié, M; Richaud, P; Salomon, L

    2014-10-01

    Between 10 and 40% of patients who have undergone a radical prostatectomy may have a biologic recurrence. Local or distant failure represents the possible patterns of relapse. Patients at high-risk for local relapse have extraprostatic disease, positive surgical margins or seminal vesicles infiltration or high Gleason score at pathology. Three phase-III randomized clinical trials have shown that, for these patients, adjuvant irradiation reduces the risk of tumoral progression without higher toxicity. Salvage radiotherapy for late relapse allows a disease control in 60-70% of the cases. Several research in order to improve the therapeutic ratio of the radiotherapy after prostatectomy are evaluate in the French Groupe d'Étude des Tumeurs Urogénitales (Gétug) and of the French association of urology (Afu). The Gétug-Afu 17 trial will provide answers to the question of the optimal moment for postoperative radiotherapy for pT3-4 R1 pN0 Nx patients, with the objective of comparing an immediate treatment to a differed early treatment initiated at biological recurrence. The Gétug-Afu 22 questions the place of a short hormonetherapy combined with image-guided, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in adjuvant situation for a detectable prostate specific antigen (PSA). The implementation of a multicenter quality control within the Gétug-Afu in order to harmonize a modern postoperative radiotherapy will allow the development of a dose escalation IMRT after surgery.

  4. Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy for Centrally Located Early Stage or Isolated Parenchymal Recurrences of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: How to Fly in a “No Fly Zone”

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Joe Y.; Li, Qiao-Qiao; Xu, Qing-Yong; Allen, Pamela K.; Rebueno, Neal; Gomez, Daniel R.; Balter, Peter; Komaki, Ritsuko; Mehran, Reza; Swisher, Stephen G.; Roth, Jack A.

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: We extended our previous experience with stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR; 50 Gy in 4 fractions) for centrally located non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC); explored the use of 70 Gy in 10 fractions for cases in which dose-volume constraints could not be met with the previous regimen; and suggested modified dose-volume constraints. Methods and Materials: Four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT)-based volumetric image-guided SABR was used for 100 patients with biopsy-proven, central T1-T2N0M0 (n=81) or isolated parenchymal recurrence of NSCLC (n=19). All disease was staged with positron emission tomography/CT; all tumors were within 2 cm of the bronchial tree, trachea, major vessels, esophagus, heart, pericardium, brachial plexus, or vertebral body. Endpoints were toxicity, overall survival (OS), local and regional control, and distant metastasis. Results: At a median follow-up time of 30.6 months, median OS time was 55.6 months, and the 3-year OS rate was 70.5%. Three-year cumulative actuarial local, regional, and distant control rates were 96.5%, 87.9%, and 77.2%, respectively. The most common toxicities were chest-wall pain (18% grade 1, 13% grade 2) and radiation pneumonitis (11% grade 2 and 1% grade 3). No patient experienced grade 4 or 5 toxicity. Among the 82 patients receiving 50 Gy in 4 fractions, multivariate analyses showed mean total lung dose >6 Gy, V{sub 20} >12%, or ipsilateral lung V{sub 30} >15% to independently predict radiation pneumonitis; and 3 of 9 patients with brachial plexus D{sub max} >35 Gy experienced brachial neuropathy versus none of 73 patients with brachial D{sub max} <35 Gy (P=.001). Other toxicities were analyzed and new dose-volume constraints are proposed. Conclusions: SABR for centrally located lesions produces clinical outcomes similar to those for peripheral lesions when normal tissue constraints are respected.

  5. Characterization of tracked radiofrequency ablation in phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chun-Cheng R.; Miga, Michael I.; Galloway, Robert L.

    2007-10-15

    In radiofrequency ablation (RFA), successful therapy requires accurate, image-guided placement of the ablation device in a location selected by a predictive treatment plan. Current planning methods rely on geometric models of ablations that are not sensitive to underlying physical processes in RFA. Implementing plans based on computational models of RFA with image-guided techniques, however, has not been well characterized. To study the use of computational models of RFA in planning needle placement, this work compared ablations performed with an optically tracked RFA device with corresponding models of the ablations. The calibration of the tracked device allowed the positions of distal features of the device, particularly the tips of the needle electrodes, to be determined to within 1.4{+-}0.6 mm of uncertainty. Ablations were then performed using the tracked device in a phantom system based on an agarose-albumin mixture. Images of the sliced phantom obtained from the ablation experiments were then compared with the predictions of a bioheat transfer model of RFA, which used the positional data of the tracked device obtained during ablation. The model was demonstrated to predict 90% of imaged pixels classified as being ablated. The discrepancies between model predictions and observations were analyzed and attributed to needle tracking inaccuracy as well as to uncertainties in model parameters. The results suggest the feasibility of using finite element modeling to plan ablations with predictable outcomes when implemented using tracked RFA.

  6. Artificial meteor ablation studies: Olivine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, M. B.; Cunningham, G. G.

    1973-01-01

    Artificial meteor ablation was performed on a Mg-rich olivine sample using an arc-heated plasma of ionized air. Experimental conditions simulated a meteor traveling about 12 km/sec at an altitude of 70 km. The mineral content of the original olivine sample was 98% olivine (including traces of olivine alteration products) and 2% chromite. Forsterite content of the original olivine was Fo-89. After ablation, the forsterite content had increased to Fo-94 in the recrystallized olivine. In addition, lamella-like intergrowths of magnetite were prevalent constituents. Wherever magnetite occurred, there was an increase in Mg and a corresponding decrease in Fe for the recrystallized olivine. The Allende fusion crust consisted of a recrystallized olivine, which was more Mg-rich and Fe-deficient than the original meteorite's olivine, and abundant magnetite grains. Although troilite and pentlandite were the common opaque mineral constituents in this meteorite, magnetite was the principal opaque mineral found in the fusion crust.

  7. Laser Ablation for Medical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Ken-Ichi

    Medical applications of laser are measurement, laser surgery, in-situ monitoring, and processing of medical devices. In this paper, author briefly reviews the trends of medical applications, describes some new applications, and then discuss about the future trends and problems of medical applications. At present, the domestic market of laser equipment for medical applications is nearly 1/10 of that for industrial applications, which has registered significant growth continuously. Laser surgery as a minimum invasive surgery under arthroscope is expected to decrease the pain of patients. Precise processing such as cutting and welding is suitable for manufacturing medical devices. Pulsed laser deposition has been successfully applied to the thin film coating. The corneal refractive surgery by ArF excimer laser has been widely accepted for its highly safe operation. Laser ablation for retinal implant in the visual prosthesis is one of the promising applications of laser ablation in medicine. New applications with femtosecond laser are expected in the near future.

  8. Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Richard E.; Bol'shakov, Alexander A.; Mao, Xianglei; McKay, Christopher P.; Perry, Dale L.; Sorkhabi, Osman

    2011-02-01

    A new method of performing optical isotopic analysis of condensed samples in ambient air and at ambient pressure has been developed: Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry (LAMIS). The technique uses radiative transitions from molecular species either directly vaporized from a sample or formed by associative mechanisms of atoms or ions in a laser ablation plume. This method is an advanced modification of a known atomic emission technique called laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The new method — LAMIS — can determine not only chemical composition but also isotopic ratios of elements in the sample. Isotopic measurements are enabled by significantly larger isotopic shifts found in molecular spectra relative to atomic spectra. Analysis can be performed from a distance and in real time. No sample preparation or pre-treatment is required. Detection of the isotopes of hydrogen, boron, carbon, and oxygen are discussed to illustrate the technique.

  9. Expanding global access to radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Atun, Rifat; Jaffray, David A; Barton, Michael B; Bray, Freddie; Baumann, Michael; Vikram, Bhadrasain; Hanna, Timothy P; Knaul, Felicia M; Lievens, Yolande; Lui, Tracey Y M; Milosevic, Michael; O'Sullivan, Brian; Rodin, Danielle L; Rosenblatt, Eduardo; Van Dyk, Jacob; Yap, Mei Ling; Zubizarreta, Eduardo; Gospodarowicz, Mary

    2015-09-01

    Radiotherapy is a critical and inseparable component of comprehensive cancer treatment and care. For many of the most common cancers in low-income and middle-income countries, radiotherapy is essential for effective treatment. In high-income countries, radiotherapy is used in more than half of all cases of cancer to cure localised disease, palliate symptoms, and control disease in incurable cancers. Yet, in planning and building treatment capacity for cancer, radiotherapy is frequently the last resource to be considered. Consequently, worldwide access to radiotherapy is unacceptably low. We present a new body of evidence that quantifies the worldwide coverage of radiotherapy services by country. We show the shortfall in access to radiotherapy by country and globally for 2015-35 based on current and projected need, and show substantial health and economic benefits to investing in radiotherapy. The cost of scaling up radiotherapy in the nominal model in 2015-35 is US$26·6 billion in low-income countries, $62·6 billion in lower-middle-income countries, and $94·8 billion in upper-middle-income countries, which amounts to $184·0 billion across all low-income and middle-income countries. In the efficiency model the costs were lower: $14·1 billion in low-income, $33·3 billion in lower-middle-income, and $49·4 billion in upper-middle-income countries-a total of $96·8 billion. Scale-up of radiotherapy capacity in 2015-35 from current levels could lead to saving of 26·9 million life-years in low-income and middle-income countries over the lifetime of the patients who received treatment. The economic benefits of investment in radiotherapy are very substantial. Using the nominal cost model could produce a net benefit of $278·1 billion in 2015-35 ($265·2 million in low-income countries, $38·5 billion in lower-middle-income countries, and $239·3 billion in upper-middle-income countries). Investment in the efficiency model would produce in the same period an even

  10. [Head and neck adaptive radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Graff, P; Huger, S; Kirby, N; Pouliot, J

    2013-10-01

    Onboard volumetric imaging systems can provide accurate data of the patient's anatomy during a course of head and neck radiotherapy making it possible to assess the actual delivered dose and to evaluate the dosimetric impact of complex daily positioning variations and gradual anatomic changes such as geometric variations of tumors and normal tissues or shrinkage of external contours. Adaptive radiotherapy is defined as the correction of a patient's treatment planning to adapt for individual variations observed during treatment. Strategies are developed to selectively identify patients that require replanning because of an intolerable dosimetric drift. Automated tools are designed to limit time consumption. Deformable image registration algorithms are the cornerstones of these strategies, but a better understanding of their limits of validity is required before adaptive radiotherapy can be safely introduced to daily practice. Moreover, strict evaluation of the clinical benefits is yet to be proven.

  11. Inflammatory Skin Conditions Associated With Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hernández Aragüés, I; Pulido Pérez, A; Suárez Fernández, R

    2017-04-01

    Radiotherapy for cancer is used increasingly. Because skin cells undergo rapid turnover, the ionizing radiation of radiotherapy has collateral effects that are often expressed in inflammatory reactions. Some of these reactions-radiodermatitis and recall phenomenon, for example-are very familiar to dermatologists. Other, less common radiotherapy-associated skin conditions are often underdiagnosed but must also be recognized.

  12. Radiotherapy supports protective tumor-specific immunity

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Anurag; Sharma, Anu; von Boehmer, Lotta; Surace, Laura; Knuth, Alexander; van den Broek, Maries

    2012-01-01

    Radiotherapy is an important therapeutic option for the treatment of cancer. Growing evidence indicates that, besides inducing an irreversible DNA damage, radiotherapy promotes tumor-specific immune response, which significantly contribute to therapeutic efficacy. We postulate that radiotherapy activates tumor-associated dendritic cells, thus changing the tolerogenic tumor environment into an immunogenic one. PMID:23264910

  13. Exploiting tumor shrinkage through temporal optimization of radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unkelbach, Jan; Craft, David; Hong, Theodore; Papp, Dávid; Ramakrishnan, Jagdish; Salari, Ehsan; Wolfgang, John; Bortfeld, Thomas

    2014-06-01

    In multi-stage radiotherapy, a patient is treated in several stages separated by weeks or months. This regimen has been motivated mostly by radiobiological considerations, but also provides an approach to reduce normal tissue dose by exploiting tumor shrinkage. The paper considers the optimal design of multi-stage treatments, motivated by the clinical management of large liver tumors for which normal liver dose constraints prohibit the administration of an ablative radiation dose in a single treatment. We introduce a dynamic tumor model that incorporates three factors: radiation induced cell kill, tumor shrinkage, and tumor cell repopulation. The design of multi-stage radiotherapy is formulated as a mathematical optimization problem in which the total dose to the normal tissue is minimized, subject to delivering the prescribed dose to the tumor. Based on the model, we gain insight into the optimal administration of radiation over time, i.e. the optimal treatment gaps and dose levels. We analyze treatments consisting of two stages in detail. The analysis confirms the intuition that the second stage should be delivered just before the tumor size reaches a minimum and repopulation overcompensates shrinking. Furthermore, it was found that, for a large range of model parameters, approximately one-third of the dose should be delivered in the first stage. The projected benefit of multi-stage treatments in terms of normal tissue sparing depends on model assumptions. However, the model predicts large dose reductions by more than a factor of 2 for plausible model parameters. The analysis of the tumor model suggests that substantial reduction in normal tissue dose can be achieved by exploiting tumor shrinkage via an optimal design of multi-stage treatments. This suggests taking a fresh look at multi-stage radiotherapy for selected disease sites where substantial tumor regression translates into reduced target volumes.

  14. Clinical quality standards for radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Aim of the study The technological progress that is currently being witnessed in the areas of diagnostic imaging, treatment planning systems and therapeutic equipment has caused radiotherapy to become a high-tech and interdisciplinary domain involving staff of various backgrounds. This allows steady improvement in therapy results, but at the same time makes the diagnostic, imaging and therapeutic processes more complex and complicated, requiring every stage of those processes to be planned, organized, controlled and improved so as to assure high quality of services provided. The aim of this paper is to present clinical quality standards for radiotherapy as developed by the author. Material and methods In order to develop the quality standards, a comparative analysis was performed between European and Polish legal acts adopted in the period of 1980-2006 and the universal industrial ISO 9001:2008 standard, defining requirements for quality management systems, and relevant articles published in 1984-2009 were reviewed, including applicable guidelines and recommendations of American, international, European and Polish bodies, such as the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), the European Society for Radiotherapy & Oncology (ESTRO), the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and the Organisation of European Cancer Institutes (OECI) on quality assurance and management in radiotherapy. Results As a result, 352 quality standards for radiotherapy were developed and categorized into the following three groups: 1 – organizational standards; 2 – physico-technical standards and 3 – clinical standards. Conclusion Proposed clinical quality standards for radiotherapy can be used by any institution using ionizing radiation for medical purposes. However, standards are of value only if they are implemented, reviewed, audited and improved, and if there is a clear mechanism in place to monitor and address failure to meet agreed standards. PMID:23788854

  15. Second Malignant Neoplasms Following Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sanath

    2012-01-01

    More than half of all cancer patients receive radiotherapy as a part of their treatment. With the increasing number of long-term cancer survivors, there is a growing concern about the risk of radiation induced second malignant neoplasm [SMN]. This risk appears to be highest for survivors of childhood cancers. The exact mechanism and dose-response relationship for radiation induced malignancy is not well understood, however, there have been growing efforts to develop strategies for the prevention and mitigation of radiation induced cancers. This review article focuses on the incidence, etiology, and risk factors for SMN in various organs after radiotherapy. PMID:23249860

  16. Microwave Ablation Compared to Radiofrequency Ablation for Hepatic Lesions: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Huo, Ya Ruth; Eslick, Guy D

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of microwave (MW) ablation compared with radiofrequency (RF) ablation for hepatic lesions by using meta-analytic techniques. Overall, 16 studies involving 2,062 patients were included. MW ablation was found to have significantly better 6-year overall survival than RF ablation (odds ratio, 1.64, 95% confidence interval, 1.15-2.35), but this was based on a few articles (n = 3 of 16). MW ablation and RF ablation had similar 1-5-year overall survival, disease-free survival, local recurrence rate, and adverse events. Based on similar safety and efficacy outcomes, either MW ablation or RF ablation may be used for effective local hepatic therapy.

  17. Tumor Thermal Ablation Enhancement by Micromaterials.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fan; Su, Hongying; Han, Xiangjun; Bao, Han; Qi, Ji

    2016-01-07

    Thermal ablation is a minimally invasive therapeutic technique that has shown remarkable potential in treating un resectable tumors. However, clinical applications have stalled, due to safety ambiguities, slow heat induction, lengthy ablation times, and post-therapeutic monitoring issues. To further improve treatment efficacy, an assortment of micro materials (eg, nano particulates of gold, silica, or iron oxide and single-walled carbon nanotubes) are under study as thermal ablative adjuncts.In recent years, the micro material domain has become especially interesting.In vivo and in vitro animal studies have validated the use of microspheres as embolic agents in liver tumors, in advance of radiofrequency ablation. Microcapsules and micro bubbles serving as ultrasound contrast and ablation sensibilizers are strong prospects for clinical applications. This review was conducted to explore benefits of the three aforementioned micro scale technologies, in conjunction with tumor thermal ablation.

  18. Image-guided ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lencioni, Riccardo; Crocetti, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Image-guided ablation is accepted as the best therapeutic choice for patients with early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) when surgical options-including resection and transplantation-are precluded. The term image-guided tumor ablation is defined as the direct application of chemical substances or sources of energy to a focal tumor in an attempt to achieve eradication or substantial tumor destruction. Over the past 25 years, several methods for local tumor destruction have been developed and clinically tested. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has shown superior anticancer effect and greater survival benefit with respect to the seminal percutaneous technique, ethanol injection, in meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials, and is currently established as the standard ablative modality. Nevertheless, novel thermal and nonthermal techniques for tumor ablation-including microwave ablation and irreversible electroporation-seem to have potential to improve the efficacy of RFA and are currently undergoing clinical investigation.

  19. [Which rules apply to hypofractionated radiotherapy?].

    PubMed

    Supiot, S; Clément-Colmou, K; Paris, F; Corre, I; Chiavassa, S; Delpon, G

    2015-10-01

    Hypofractionated radiotherapy is now more widely prescribed due to improved targeting techniques (intensity modulated radiotherapy, image-guided radiotherapy and stereotactic radiotherapy). Low dose hypofractionated radiotherapy is routinely administered mostly for palliative purposes. High or very high dose hypofractionated irradiation must be delivered according to very strict procedures since every minor deviation can lead to major changes in dose delivery to the tumor volume and organs at risk. Thus, each stage of the processing must be carefully monitored starting from the limitations and the choice of the hypofractionation technique, tumour contouring and dose constraints prescription, planning and finally dose calculation and patient positioning verification.

  20. Cisplatin-tethered gold nanospheres for multimodal chemo-radiotherapy of glioblastoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setua, Sonali; Ouberai, Myriam; Piccirillo, Sara G.; Watts, Colin; Welland, Mark

    2014-08-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) remains the most aggressive and challenging brain tumour to treat. We report the first successful chemo-radiotherapy on patient derived treatment resistant GBM cells using a cisplatin-tethered gold nanosphere. After intracellular uptake, the nanosphere effects DNA damage which initiates caspase-mediated apoptosis in those cells. In the presence of radiation, both gold and platinum of cisplatin, serve as high atomic number radiosensitizers leading to the emission of ionizing photoelectrons and Auger electrons. This resulted in enhanced synergy between cisplatin and radiotherapy mediated cytotoxicity, and photo/Auger electron mediated radiosensitisation leading to complete ablation of the tumour cells in an in vitro model system. This study demonstrates the potential of designed nanoparticles to target aggressive cancers in the patient derived cell lines providing a platform to move towards treatment strategies.Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) remains the most aggressive and challenging brain tumour to treat. We report the first successful chemo-radiotherapy on patient derived treatment resistant GBM cells using a cisplatin-tethered gold nanosphere. After intracellular uptake, the nanosphere effects DNA damage which initiates caspase-mediated apoptosis in those cells. In the presence of radiation, both gold and platinum of cisplatin, serve as high atomic number radiosensitizers leading to the emission of ionizing photoelectrons and Auger electrons. This resulted in enhanced synergy between cisplatin and radiotherapy mediated cytotoxicity, and photo/Auger electron mediated radiosensitisation leading to complete ablation of the tumour cells in an in vitro model system. This study demonstrates the potential of designed nanoparticles to target aggressive cancers in the patient derived cell lines providing a platform to move towards treatment strategies. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional figures. See DOI: 10.1039/c

  1. Plasma-mediated ablation of biofilm contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhixiong; Wang, Xiaoliang; Huang, Huan

    2010-12-01

    Ultra-short pulsed laser removal of thin biofilm contamination on different substrates has been conducted via the use of plasma-mediated ablation. The biofilms were formed using sheep whole blood. The ablation was generated using a 1.2 ps ultra-short pulsed laser with wavelength centered at 1552 nm. The blood contamination was transformed into plasma and collected with a vacuum system. The single line ablation features have been measured. The ablation thresholds of blood contamination and bare substrates were determined. It is found that the ablation threshold of the blood contamination is lower than those of the beneath substrates including the glass slide, PDMS, and human dermal tissues. The ablation effects of different laser parameters (pulse overlap rate and pulse energy) were studied and ablation efficiency was measured. Proper ablation parameters were found to efficiently remove contamination with maximum efficiency and without damage to the substrate surface for the current laser system. Complete removal of blood contaminant from the glass substrate surface and freeze-dried dermis tissue surface was demonstrated by the USP laser ablation with repeated area scanning. No obvious thermal damage was found in the decontaminated glass and tissue samples.

  2. Percutaneous ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma: current status.

    PubMed

    McWilliams, Justin P; Yamamoto, Shota; Raman, Steven S; Loh, Christopher T; Lee, Edward W; Liu, David M; Kee, Stephen T

    2010-08-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is an increasingly common disease with dismal long-term survival. Percutaneous ablation has gained popularity as a minimally invasive, potentially curative therapy for HCC in nonoperative candidates. The seminal technique of percutaneous ethanol injection has been largely supplanted by newer modalities, including radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, cryoablation, and high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation. A review of these modalities, including technical success, survival rates, and complications, will be presented, as well as considerations for treatment planning and follow-up.

  3. Ablation of liver metastases: current status.

    PubMed

    Flanders, Vincent L; Gervais, Debra A

    2010-08-01

    Local ablative therapy for the treatment of metastatic disease to the liver has been evaluated most extensively in colorectal cancer with 5-year survival rates up to 55% after RF ablation. Recent findings suggest selected patients with other malignant processes may benefit as well, but conclusive evidence is limited. This article reviews the available literature regarding the use of radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, and cryoablation in the treatment of metastatic disease to the liver. The published results of each of these modalities in the treatment of metastatic disease to the liver are promising, and outcomes continue to be evaluated.

  4. Monte Carlo modeling of HD120 multileaf collimator on Varian TrueBeam linear accelerator for verification of 6X and 6X FFF VMAT SABR treatment plans.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Alanah M; Gete, Ermias; Duzenli, Cheryl; Teke, Tony

    2014-05-08

    A Monte Carlo (MC) validation of the vendor-supplied Varian TrueBeam 6 MV flattened (6X) phase-space file and the first implementation of the Siebers-Keall MC MLC model as applied to the HD120 MLC (for 6X flat and 6X flattening filter-free (6X FFF) beams) are described. The MC model is validated in the context of VMAT patient-specific quality assurance. The Monte Carlo commissioning process involves: 1) validating the calculated open-field percentage depth doses (PDDs), profiles, and output factors (OF), 2) adapting the Siebers-Keall MLC model to match the new HD120-MLC geometry and material composition, 3) determining the absolute dose conversion factor for the MC calculation, and 4) validating this entire linac/MLC in the context of dose calculation verification for clinical VMAT plans. MC PDDs for the 6X beams agree with the measured data to within 2.0% for field sizes ranging from 2 × 2 to 40 × 40 cm2. Measured and MC profiles show agreement in the 50% field width and the 80%-20% penumbra region to within 1.3 mm for all square field sizes. MC OFs for the 2 to 40 cm2 square fields agree with measurement to within 1.6%. Verification of VMAT SABR lung, liver, and vertebra plans demonstrate that measured and MC ion chamber doses agree within 0.6% for the 6X beam and within 2.0% for the 6X FFF beam. A 3D gamma factor analysis demonstrates that for the 6X beam, > 99% of voxels meet the pass criteria (3%/3 mm). For the 6X FFF beam, > 94% of voxels meet this criteria. The TrueBeam accelerator delivering 6X and 6X FFF beams with the HD120 MLC can be modeled in Monte Carlo to provide an independent 3D dose calculation for clinical VMAT plans. This quality assurance tool has been used clinically to verify over 140 6X and 16 6X FFF TrueBeam treatment plans.

  5. Radiotherapy T1 glottic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Zablow, A.I.; Erba, P.S.; Sanfillippo, L.J.

    1989-11-01

    From 1970 to 1985, curative radiotherapy was administered to 63 patients with stage I carcinoma of the true vocal cords. Precision radiotherapeutic technique yields cure rates comparable to surgical results. Good voice quality was preserved in a high percentage of patients.

  6. Analysis of iodinated contrast delivered during thermal ablation: is material trapped in the ablation zone?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Po-hung; Brace, Chris L.

    2016-08-01

    Intra-procedural contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) has been proposed to evaluate treatment efficacy of thermal ablation. We hypothesized that contrast material delivered concurrently with thermal ablation may become trapped in the ablation zone, and set out to determine whether such an effect would impact ablation visualization. CECT images were acquired during microwave ablation in normal porcine liver with: (A) normal blood perfusion and no iodinated contrast, (B) normal perfusion and iodinated contrast infusion or (C) no blood perfusion and residual iodinated contrast. Changes in CT attenuation were analyzed from before, during and after ablation to evaluate whether contrast was trapped inside of the ablation zone. Visualization was compared between groups using post-ablation contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Attenuation gradients were calculated at the ablation boundary and background to quantitate ablation conspicuity. In Group A, attenuation decreased during ablation due to thermal expansion of tissue water and water vaporization. The ablation zone was difficult to visualize (CNR  =  1.57  ±  0.73, boundary gradient  =  0.7  ±  0.4 HU mm-1), leading to ablation diameter underestimation compared to gross pathology. Group B ablations saw attenuation increase, suggesting that iodine was trapped inside the ablation zone. However, because the normally perfused liver increased even more, Group B ablations were more visible than Group A (CNR  =  2.04  ±  0.84, boundary gradient  =  6.3  ±  1.1 HU mm-1) and allowed accurate estimation of the ablation zone dimensions compared to gross pathology. Substantial water vaporization led to substantial attenuation changes in Group C, though the ablation zone boundary was not highly visible (boundary gradient  =  3.9  ±  1.1 HU mm-1). Our results demonstrate that despite iodinated contrast being trapped in the ablation zone, ablation visibility was

  7. Preoperative radiofrequency ablation in painful osteolytic long bone metastases.

    PubMed

    Di Francesco, Alexander; Flamini, Stefano; Zugaro, Luigi; Zoccali, Carmine

    2012-08-01

    This study aimed to determine whether Radiofrequency Ablation (RFA) followed by prophylactic internal fixation produces better palliation in terms of pain and reduces the need for blood transfusion more than radiotherapy and surgical stabilization (RT-SS). Patients with solitary long bone metastases and a pain score of 5 or more on the VAS scale were selected. Fifteen patients were treated with RFA and surgical stabilization (RFA-SS) and were compared with a matched group (15 subjects) treated by radiotherapy and surgical stabilization (RT-SS). A complete response in terms of pain relief at 12 weeks was documented in 20% (3/15) and 533% (8/15) of the subjects treated by RT-SS or RFA-SS, respectively (p = 0.027). The overall response rate at 12 weeks was 93.3% (14 patients) in the group treated by RFA-SS and 59.9% (9 patients) in the group treated by RT-SS (p = 0.048). Although recurrent pain was documented more frequently after RT-SS (26.6%) than after RFA-SS (6.7%) the difference did not reach statistical significance. The morbidity related to RT-SS did not significantly differ when the treatment was associated with RFA. We observed a reduction in blood transfusion, as 3 patients in the RT-SS group required a blood transfusion, versus none in the RFA-SS group. Our results suggest that RFA-SS is safe and is more effective than RT-SS; furthermore, RFA may become an option for patients with metastases of the long bones to prevent tumour dissemination and reduce intraoperative blood loss. The findings described here should serve as a framework around which to design future clinical trials.

  8. Laser Navigation for Radiofrequency Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Varro, Zoltan; Locklin, Julia K. Wood, Bradford J.

    2004-09-15

    A 45-year-old male with renal cell carcinoma secondary to von-Hippel Lindau (VHL) disease presented for radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of kidney tumors. Due to his prior history of several partial nephrectomies and limited renal reserve, RFA was chosen because of its relatively nephron-sparing nature. A laser guidance device was used to help guide probe placement in an attempt to reduce procedure time and improve targeting accuracy. The device was successful at guiding needle placement, as both tumors were located with a single pass. Follow-up CT scan confirmed accurate needle placement, showing an area of coagulation necrosis covering the previously seen tumor.

  9. Possible role for cryoballoon ablation of right atrial appendage tachycardia when conventional ablation fails.

    PubMed

    Amasyali, Basri; Kilic, Ayhan

    2015-06-01

    Focal atrial tachycardia arising from the right atrial appendage usually responds well to radiofrequency ablation; however, successful ablation in this anatomic region can be challenging. Surgical excision of the right atrial appendage has sometimes been necessary to eliminate the tachycardia and prevent or reverse the resultant cardiomyopathy. We report the case of a 48-year-old man who had right atrial appendage tachycardia resistant to multiple attempts at ablation with use of conventional radiofrequency energy guided by means of a 3-dimensional mapping system. The condition led to cardiomyopathy in 3 months. The arrhythmia was successfully ablated with use of a 28-mm cryoballoon catheter that had originally been developed for catheter ablation of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. To our knowledge, this is the first report of cryoballoon ablation without isolation of the right atrial appendage. It might also be an alternative to epicardial ablation or surgery when refractory atrial tachycardia originates from the right atrial appendage.

  10. Local Ablation for Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shi-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the second commonest cancer in Taiwan. The national surveillance program can detect HCC in its early stages, and various curative modalities (including surgical resection, orthotopic liver transplantation, and local ablation) are employed for the treatment of small HCC. Local ablation therapies are currently advocated for early-stage HCC that is unresectable because of co-morbidities, the need to preserve liver function, or refusal of resection. Among the various local ablation therapies, the most commonly used modalities include percutaneous ethanol injection and radiofrequency ablation (RFA); percutaneous acetic acid injection and microwave ablation are used less often. RFA is more commonly employed than other local ablative modalities in Taiwan because the technique is highly effective, minimally invasive, and requires fewer sessions. RFA is therefore advocated in Taiwan as the first-line curative therapy for unresectable HCC or even for resectable HCC. However, current RFA procedures are less effective against tumors that are in high-risk or difficult-to-ablate locations, are poorly visualized on ultrasonography (US), or are large. Recent advancements in RFA in Taiwan can resolve these issues by the creation of artificial ascites or pleural effusion, application of real-time virtual US assistance, use of combination therapy before RFA, or use of switching RF controllers with multiple electrodes. This review article provides updates on the clinical outcomes and advances in local ablative modalities (mostly RFA) for HCC in Taiwan. PMID:24159599

  11. Testing and evaluation of light ablation decontamination

    SciTech Connect

    Demmer, R.L.; Ferguson, R.L.

    1994-10-01

    This report details the testing and evaluation of light ablation decontamination. It details WINCO contracted research and application of light ablation efforts by Ames Laboratory. Tests were conducted with SIMCON (simulated contamination) coupons and REALCON (actual radioactive metal coupons) under controlled conditions to compare cleaning effectiveness, speed and application to plant process type equipment.

  12. Effective temperatures of polymer laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furzikov, Nickolay P.

    1991-09-01

    Effective temperatures of laser ablation of certain polymers are extracted from experimental dependences of ablation depths on laser fluences. Dependence of these temperatures on laser pulse durations is established. Comparison with the known thermodestruction data shows that the effective temperature corresponds to transient thermodestruction proceeding by the statistically most probable way.

  13. Ablative therapies for small renal tumours.

    PubMed

    Castro, Arturo; Jenkins, Lawrence C; Salas, Nelson; Lorber, Gideon; Leveillee, Raymond J

    2013-05-01

    Improvements in imaging technology have resulted in an increase in detection of small renal masses (SRMs). Minimally invasive ablation modalities, including cryoablation, radiofrequencey ablation, microwave ablation and irreversible electroporation, are currently being used to treat SRMs in select groups of patients. Cryoablation and radiofrequency ablation have been extensively studied. Presently, cryoablation is gaining popularity because the resulting ice ball can be visualized easily using ultrasonography. Tumour size and location are strong predictors of outcome of radiofrequency ablation. One of the main benefits of microwave ablation is that microwaves can propagate through all types of tissue, including desiccated and charred tissue, as well as water vapour, which might be formed during the ablation. Irreversible electroporation has been shown in animal studies to affect only the cell membrane of undesirable target tissues and to spare adjacent structures; however, clinical studies that depict the efficacy and safety of this treatment modality in humans are still sparse. As more experience is gained in the future, ablation modalities might be utilized in all patients with tumours <4 cm in diameter, rather than just as an alternative treatment for high-risk surgical patients.

  14. Lung Cancer Ablation: Technologies and Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Erica S.; Dupuy, Damian E.

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of lung cancers in 2012 is estimated to reach 226,160 new cases, with only a third of patients suitable surgical candidates. Tumor ablation has emerged as an important and efficacious treatment option for nonsurgical lung cancer patients. This localized minimally invasive therapy is best suited for small oligonodular lesions or favorably located metastatic tumors. Radiofrequency ablation has been in use for over a decade, and newer modalities including microwave ablation, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation have emerged as additional treatment options for patients. Ablation therapies can offer patients and clinicians a repeatable and effective therapy for palliation and, in some cases, cure of thoracic malignancies. This article discusses the available technologies and techniques available for tumor ablation of thoracic malignancies including patient selection, basic aspects of procedure technique, imaging follow-up, treatment outcomes, and comparisons between various therapies. PMID:24436530

  15. Lung cancer ablation: technologies and techniques.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Erica S; Dupuy, Damian E

    2013-06-01

    The incidence of lung cancers in 2012 is estimated to reach 226,160 new cases, with only a third of patients suitable surgical candidates. Tumor ablation has emerged as an important and efficacious treatment option for nonsurgical lung cancer patients. This localized minimally invasive therapy is best suited for small oligonodular lesions or favorably located metastatic tumors. Radiofrequency ablation has been in use for over a decade, and newer modalities including microwave ablation, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation have emerged as additional treatment options for patients. Ablation therapies can offer patients and clinicians a repeatable and effective therapy for palliation and, in some cases, cure of thoracic malignancies. This article discusses the available technologies and techniques available for tumor ablation of thoracic malignancies including patient selection, basic aspects of procedure technique, imaging follow-up, treatment outcomes, and comparisons between various therapies.

  16. Femtosecond ablation of ultrahard materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumitru, G.; Romano, V.; Weber, H. P.; Sentis, M.; Marine, W.

    Several ultrahard materials and coatings of definite interest for tribological applications were tested with respect to their response when irradiated with fs laser pulses. Results on cemented tungsten carbide and on titanium carbonitride are reported for the first time and compared with outcomes of investigations on diamond and titanium nitride. The experiments were carried out in air, in a regime of 5-8 J/cm2 fluences, using the beam of a commercial Ti:sapphire laser. The changes induced in the surface morphology were analysed with a Nomarski optical microscope, and with SEM and AFM techniques. From the experimental data and from the calculated incident energy density distributions, the damage and ablation threshold values were determined. As expected, the diamond showed the highest threshold, while the cemented tungsten carbide exhibited typical values for metallic surfaces. The ablation rates determined (under the above-mentioned experimental conditions) were in the range 0.1-0.2 μm per pulse for all the materials investigated.

  17. Ablative shielding for hypervelocity projectiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rucker, Michelle A. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A hypervelocity projectile shield which includes a hollow semi-flexible housing fabricated from a plastic like, or otherwise transparent membrane which is filled with a fluid (gas or liquid) is presented. The housing has a inlet valve, similar to that on a tire or basketball, to introduce an ablating fluid into the housing. The housing is attached by a Velcro mount or double-sided adhesive tape to the outside surface of a structure to be protected. The housings are arrayed in a side-by-side relationship for complete coverage of the surface to be protected. In use, when a hypervelocity projectile penetrates the outer wall of a housing it is broken up and then the projectile is ablated as it travels through the fluid, much like a meteorite 'burns up' as it enters the earth's atmosphere, and the housing is deflated. The deflated housing can be easily spotted for replacement, even from a distance. Replacement is then accomplished by simply pulling a deflated housing off the structure and installing a new housing.

  18. Tumor Ablation with Irreversible Electroporation

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sakere, Bassim; André, Franck; Bernat, Claire; Connault, Elisabeth; Opolon, Paule; Davalos, Rafael V.; Rubinsky, Boris; Mir, Lluis M.

    2007-01-01

    We report the first successful use of irreversible electroporation for the minimally invasive treatment of aggressive cutaneous tumors implanted in mice. Irreversible electroporation is a newly developed non-thermal tissue ablation technique in which certain short duration electrical fields are used to permanently permeabilize the cell membrane, presumably through the formation of nanoscale defects in the cell membrane. Mathematical models of the electrical and thermal fields that develop during the application of the pulses were used to design an efficient treatment protocol with minimal heating of the tissue. Tumor regression was confirmed by histological studies which also revealed that it occurred as a direct result of irreversible cell membrane permeabilization. Parametric studies show that the successful outcome of the procedure is related to the applied electric field strength, the total pulse duration as well as the temporal mode of delivery of the pulses. Our best results were obtained using plate electrodes to deliver across the tumor 80 pulses of 100 µs at 0.3 Hz with an electrical field magnitude of 2500 V/cm. These conditions induced complete regression in 12 out of 13 treated tumors, (92%), in the absence of tissue heating. Irreversible electroporation is thus a new effective modality for non-thermal tumor ablation. PMID:17989772

  19. Simple model for ablative stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikaelian, Karnig O.

    1992-11-01

    We present a simple analytic model for ablative stablization of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. In this model the effect of ablation is to move the peak of the perturbations to the location of peak pressure. This mechanism enhances the density-gradient stabilization, which is effective at short wavelengths, and it also enhances the stabilization of long-wavelength perturbations due to finite shell thickness. We consider the following density profile: exponential blowoff plasma with a density gradient β, followed by a constant-density shell of thickness δt. For perturbations of arbitrary wave number k, we present an explicit expression for the growth rate γ as a function of k, β, and δt. We find that ``thick'' shells defined by β δt>=1 have γ2>=0 for any k, while ``thin'' shells defined by β δt<1 can have γ2<0 for small k, reflecting stability by proximity to the back side of the shell. We also present lasnex simulations that are in good agreement with our analytic formulas.

  20. Stellar Ablation of Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Thomas E.; Horwitz, J. L.

    2007-01-01

    We review observations and theories of the solar ablation of planetary atmospheres, focusing on the terrestrial case where a large magnetosphere holds off the solar wind, so that there is little direct atmospheric impact, but also couples the solar wind electromagnetically to the auroral zones. We consider the photothermal escape flows known as the polar wind or refilling flows, the enhanced mass flux escape flows that result from localized solar wind energy dissipation in the auroral zones, and the resultant enhanced neutral atom escape flows. We term these latter two escape flows the "auroral wind." We review observations and theories of the heating and acceleration of auroral winds, including energy inputs from precipitating particles, electromagnetic energy flux at magnetohydrodynamic and plasma wave frequencies, and acceleration by parallel electric fields and by convection pickup processes also known as "centrifugal acceleration." We consider also the global circulation of ionospheric plasmas within the magnetosphere, their participation in magnetospheric disturbances as absorbers of momentum and energy, and their ultimate loss from the magnetosphere into the downstream solar wind, loading reconnection processes that occur at high altitudes near the magnetospheric boundaries. We consider the role of planetary magnetization and the accumulating evidence of stellar ablation of extrasolar planetary atmospheres. Finally, we suggest and discuss future needs for both the theory and observation of the planetary ionospheres and their role in solar wind interactions, to achieve the generality required for a predictive science of the coupling of stellar and planetary atmospheres over the full range of possible conditions.

  1. Thermal infrared images to quantify thermal ablation effects of acid and base on target tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ran; Wang, Jia; Liu, Jing

    2015-07-01

    Hyperthermia (42-46°C), treatment of tumor tissue through elevated temperature, offers several advantages including high cost-effectiveness, highly targeted ablation and fewer side effects and hence higher safety level over traditional therapies such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Recently, hyperthermia using heat release through exothermic acid-base neutralization comes into view owing to its relatively safe products of salt and water and highly confined ablation. However, lack of quantitative understanding of the spatial and temporal temperature profiles that are produced by simultaneous diffusion of liquid chemical and its chemical reaction within tumor tissue impedes the application of this method. This article is dedicated to quantify thermal ablation effects of acid and base both individually and as in neutralization via infrared captured thermal images. A theoretical model is used to approximate specific heat absorption rate (SAR) based on experimental measurements that contrast two types of tissue, normal pork and pig liver. According to the computation, both pork and liver tissue has a higher ability in absorbing hydrochloric acid (HCl) than sodium hydroxide, hence suggesting that a reduced dosage for HCl is appropriate in a surgery. The heating effect depends heavily on the properties of tissue types and amount of chemical reagents administered. Given thermal parameters such as SAR for different tissues, a computational model can be made in predicting temperature transitions which will be helpful in planning and optimizing surgical hyperthermia procedures.

  2. Thermal infrared images to quantify thermal ablation effects of acid and base on target tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ran E-mail: liuran@tsinghua.edu.cn; Liu, Jing E-mail: liuran@tsinghua.edu.cn; Wang, Jia

    2015-07-15

    Hyperthermia (42-46°C), treatment of tumor tissue through elevated temperature, offers several advantages including high cost-effectiveness, highly targeted ablation and fewer side effects and hence higher safety level over traditional therapies such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Recently, hyperthermia using heat release through exothermic acid-base neutralization comes into view owing to its relatively safe products of salt and water and highly confined ablation. However, lack of quantitative understanding of the spatial and temporal temperature profiles that are produced by simultaneous diffusion of liquid chemical and its chemical reaction within tumor tissue impedes the application of this method. This article is dedicated to quantify thermal ablation effects of acid and base both individually and as in neutralization via infrared captured thermal images. A theoretical model is used to approximate specific heat absorption rate (SAR) based on experimental measurements that contrast two types of tissue, normal pork and pig liver. According to the computation, both pork and liver tissue has a higher ability in absorbing hydrochloric acid (HCl) than sodium hydroxide, hence suggesting that a reduced dosage for HCl is appropriate in a surgery. The heating effect depends heavily on the properties of tissue types and amount of chemical reagents administered. Given thermal parameters such as SAR for different tissues, a computational model can be made in predicting temperature transitions which will be helpful in planning and optimizing surgical hyperthermia procedures.

  3. [Stereotactic radiotherapy for pelvic tumors].

    PubMed

    Mazeron, R; Fumagalli, I

    2014-01-01

    Extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy is booming. The development and spread of dedicated accelerators coupled with efficient methods of repositioning can now allow treatments of mobile lesions with moderate size, with high doses per fraction. Intuitively, except for the prostate, pelvic tumours, often requiring irradiation of regional lymph node drainage, lend little to this type of treatment. However, in some difficult circumstances, such as boost or re-radiation, stereotactic irradiation condition is promising and clinical experiences have already been reported.

  4. Intraoperative radiotherapy for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Norman R.; Pigott, Katharine H.; Brew-Graves, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Intra-operative radiotherapy (IORT) as a treatment for breast cancer is a relatively new technique that is designed to be a replacement for whole breast external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in selected women suitable for breast-conserving therapy. This article reviews twelve reasons for the use of the technique, with a particular emphasis on targeted intra-operative radiotherapy (TARGIT) which uses X-rays generated from a portable device within the operating theatre immediately after the breast tumour (and surrounding margin of healthy tissue) has been removed. The delivery of a single fraction of radiotherapy directly to the tumour bed at the time of surgery, with the capability of adding EBRT at a later date if required (risk-adaptive technique) is discussed in light of recent results from a large multinational randomised controlled trial comparing TARGIT with EBRT. The technique avoids irradiation of normal tissues such as skin, heart, lungs, ribs and spine, and has been shown to improve cosmetic outcome when compared with EBRT. Beneficial aspects to both institutional and societal economics are discussed, together with evidence demonstrating excellent patient satisfaction and quality of life. There is a discussion of the published evidence regarding the use of IORT twice in the same breast (for new primary cancers) and in patients who would never be considered for EBRT because of their special circumstances (such as the frail, the elderly, or those with collagen vascular disease). Finally, there is a discussion of the role of the TARGIT Academy in developing and sustaining high standards in the use of the technique. PMID:25083504

  5. Pulsed infrared laser ablation and clinical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Kin Foong

    Sufficient light energy deposited in tissue can result in ablation and excessive thermal and mechanical damage to adjacent tissues. The goals of this research are to investigate the mechanisms of pulsed infrared laser ablation of tissue, to optimize laser parameters for minimizing unnecessary damage to healthy tissue, and to explore the potential of using pulsed infrared lasers for clinical applications, especially laser lithotripsy. A dual-channel optical low coherence reflectometer was implemented to measure the expansion and collapse velocities of a Q-switched Ho:YAG (λ = 2.12 μm) laser-induced cavitation in water. Cavitation wall velocities up to 11 m/s were measured with this technique, and the results were in fair agreement with those calculated from fast-flash photographic images. The dependence of ablation threshold fluence on calculus absorption was examined. Preliminary results indicated that the product of optical absorption and ablation threshold fluence, which is the heat of ablation, remained constant for a given urinary calculus type and laser pulse duration. An extended study examined the influence of optical absorption on pulsed infrared laser ablation. An analytical photothermal ablation model was applied and compared to experimental ablation results using an infrared free-electron laser at selected wavelengths between 2.12 μm and 6.45 μm Results were in good agreement with the model, and the ablation depths of urinary calculi were highly dependent upon the calculus optical absorption as well as light attenuation within the intrapulse ablation plume. An efficient wavelength for ablation corresponded to the wavelength of the Er:YAG laser (λ = 2.94 μm) suggested this laser should be examined for laser lithotripsy. Schlieren flash photography, acoustic transient measurements with a piezoelectric polyvinylidene-fluoride needle-hydrophone, mass loss measurements, and chemical analyses were employed to study the ablation mechanisms of the free

  6. Study of 201 Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Given Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy Shows Local Control Dependence on Dose Calculation Algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Latifi, Kujtim; Oliver, Jasmine; Baker, Ryan; Dilling, Thomas J.; Stevens, Craig W.; Kim, Jongphil; Yue, Binglin; DeMarco, MaryLou; Zhang, Geoffrey G.; Moros, Eduardo G.; Feygelman, Vladimir

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: Pencil beam (PB) and collapsed cone convolution (CCC) dose calculation algorithms differ significantly when used in the thorax. However, such differences have seldom been previously directly correlated with outcomes of lung stereotactic ablative body radiation (SABR). Methods and Materials: Data for 201 non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with SABR were analyzed retrospectively. All patients were treated with 50 Gy in 5 fractions of 10 Gy each. The radiation prescription mandated that 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) receive the prescribed dose. One hundred sixteen patients were planned with BrainLab treatment planning software (TPS) with the PB algorithm and treated on a Novalis unit. The other 85 were planned on the Pinnacle TPS with the CCC algorithm and treated on a Varian linac. Treatment planning objectives were numerically identical for both groups. The median follow-up times were 24 and 17 months for the PB and CCC groups, respectively. The primary endpoint was local/marginal control of the irradiated lesion. Gray's competing risk method was used to determine the statistical differences in local/marginal control rates between the PB and CCC groups. Results: Twenty-five patients planned with PB and 4 patients planned with the CCC algorithms to the same nominal doses experienced local recurrence. There was a statistically significant difference in recurrence rates between the PB and CCC groups (hazard ratio 3.4 [95% confidence interval: 1.18-9.83], Gray's test P=.019). The differences (Δ) between the 2 algorithms for target coverage were as follows: ΔD99{sub GITV} = 7.4 Gy, ΔD99{sub PTV} = 10.4 Gy, ΔV90{sub GITV} = 13.7%, ΔV90{sub PTV} = 37.6%, ΔD95{sub PTV} = 9.8 Gy, and ΔD{sub ISO} = 3.4 Gy. GITV = gross internal tumor volume. Conclusions: Local control in patients receiving who were planned to the same nominal dose with PB and CCC algorithms were statistically significantly different. Possible alternative

  7. Adjuvant and Definitive Radiotherapy for Adrenocortical Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Sabolch, Aaron; Feng, Mary; Griffith, Kent; Hammer, Gary; Doherty, Gerard; Ben-Josef, Edgar

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of both adjuvant and definitive radiotherapy on local control of adrenocortical carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Outcomes were analyzed from 58 patients with 64 instances of treatment for adrenocortical carcinoma at the University of Michigan's Multidisciplinary Adrenal Cancer Clinic. Thirty-seven of these instances were for primary disease, whereas the remaining 27 were for recurrent disease. Thirty-eight of the treatment regimens involved surgery alone, 10 surgery plus adjuvant radiotherapy, and 16 definitive radiotherapy for unresectable disease. The effects of patient, tumor, and treatment factors were modeled simultaneously using multiple variable Cox proportional hazards regression for associations with local recurrence, distant recurrence, and overall survival. Results: Local failure occurred in 16 of the 38 instances that involved surgery alone, in 2 of the 10 that consisted of surgery plus adjuvant radiotherapy, and in 1 instance of definitive radiotherapy. Lack of radiotherapy use was associated with 4.7 times the risk of local failure compared with treatment regimens that involved radiotherapy (95% confidence interval, 1.2-19.0; p = 0.030). Conclusions: Radiotherapy seems to significantly lower the risk of local recurrence/progression in patients with adrenocortical carcinoma. Adjuvant radiotherapy should be strongly considered after surgical resection.

  8. On the Ablation Models of Fuel Pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Rozhansky, V.A.; Senichenkov, I.Yu.

    2005-12-15

    The neutral gas shielding model and neutral-gas-plasma shielding model are analyzed qualitatively. The main physical processes that govern the formation of the shielding gas cloud and, consequently, the ablation rate are considered. For the neutral gas shielding model, simple formulas relating the ablation rate and cloud parameters to the parameters of the pellet and the background plasma are presented. The estimates of the efficiency of neutral gas shielding and plasma shielding are compared. It is shown that the main portion of the energy flux of the background electrons is released in the plasma cloud. Formulas for the ablation rate and plasma parameters are derived in the neutral-gas-plasma shielding model. The question is discussed as to why the neutral gas shielding model describes well the ablation rate of the pellet material, although it does not take into account the ionization effects and the effects associated with the interaction of ionized particles with the magnetic field. The reason is that the ablation rate depends weakly on the energy flux of hot electrons; as a result, the attenuation of this flux by the electrostatic shielding and plasma shielding has little effect on the ablation rate. This justifies the use of the neutral gas shielding model to estimate the ablation rate (to within a factor of about 2) over a wide range of parameters of the pellet and the background plasma.

  9. [Indications for catheter ablation of ventricular tachycardia].

    PubMed

    Deneke, T; Israel, C W; Krug, J; Nentwich, K; Müller, P; Mügge, A; Schade, A

    2013-09-01

    Ventricular tachyarrhythmias (VT) can cause sudden cardiac death. This can be prevented by an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) but approximately 25% of patients with an ICD develop electrical storm (≥ 3 VTs within 24 hours) during the course of 4-5 years. This is a life-threatening event even in the presence of an ICD, particularly if incessant VT is present, and may significantly deteriorate the patient's psychological state if multiple shocks are discharged. Catheter ablation of VT has developed into a standard procedure in many specialized electrophysiology centers. Patients with hemodynamically stable and unstable VT are amendable to substrate-based ablation strategies. Catheter ablation can be performed as emergency procedure in patients with electrical storm as well as electively in patients with monomorphic VT stored in ICD memory. In patients with ischemic or non-ischemic cardiomyopathy, VT ablation is complementary to ICD implantation and can reduce the number of ventricular arrhythmia episodes and shocks and should be performed early. In patients with electrical storm, catheter ablation can acutely achieve rhythm stabilization and may improve prognosis in the long term. Further indications for catheter ablation exist in patients with idiopathic VT where catheter ablation represents a curative therapy, and in patients with symptomatic or asymptomatic frequent premature ventricular beats which may improve prognosis in patients with heart failure and cardiac resynchronization therapy.

  10. Analysis of infrared laser tissue ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, Gordon P.; Timmerman, Brenda H.; Bryanston-Cross, Peter J.

    2005-04-01

    The mechanisms involved in infrared laser tissue ablation are studied using a free electron laser (FELIX) in order to clarify whether the increased ablation efficiency reported in literature for certain infrared wavelengths is due to a wavelength effect or to the specific pulse structure of the lasers that are generally used in these studies. Investigations are presented of ablation of vitreous from pigs" eyes using several techniques including protein gel electrophoresis and ablation plume visualization. The ablation effects of three different infrared wavelengths are compared: 3 mm, which is currently in clinical surgical use, and the wavelengths associated with the amide I and amide II bands, i.e. 6.2 mm and 6.45mm, respectively. The results suggest a different ablation mechanism to be in operation for each studied wavelength, thus indicating that the generally reported increased ablation efficiency in the 6-6.5 micron range is due to the wavelength rather than the typical free electron laser pulse structure.

  11. Thermal therapy, Part III: ablation techniques.

    PubMed

    Habash, Riadh W Y; Bansal, Rajeev; Krewski, Daniel; Alhafid, Hafid T

    2007-01-01

    Ablative treatments are gaining increasing attention as an alternative to standard surgical therapies, especially for patients with contraindication or those who refuse open surgery. Thermal ablation is used in clinical applications mainly for treating heart arrhythmias, benign prostate hyperplasia, and nonoperable liver tumors; there is also increasing application to other organ sites, including the kidney, lung, and brain. Potential benefits of thermal ablation include reduced morbidity and mortality in comparison with standard surgical resection and the ability to treat nonsurgical patients. The purpose of this review is to outline and discuss the engineering principles and biological responses by which thermal ablation techniques can provide elevation of temperature in organs within the human body. Because of the individual problems associated with each type of treatment, a wide range of ablation techniques have evolved including cryoablation as well as ultrasound, radiofrequency (RF), microwave, and laser ablation. Aspects of each ablation technique, including mechanisms of action, equipment required, selection of eligible patients, treatment techniques, and patient outcomes are presented, along with a discussion of limitations of the techniques and future research directions.

  12. Thermal protection system ablation sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorbunov, Sergey (Inventor); Martinez, Edward R. (Inventor); Scott, James B. (Inventor); Oishi, Tomomi (Inventor); Fu, Johnny (Inventor); Mach, Joseph G. (Inventor); Santos, Jose B. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An isotherm sensor tracks space vehicle temperatures by a thermal protection system (TPS) material during vehicle re-entry as a function of time, and surface recession through calibration, calculation, analysis and exposed surface modeling. Sensor design includes: two resistive conductors, wound around a tube, with a first end of each conductor connected to a constant current source, and second ends electrically insulated from each other by a selected material that becomes an electrically conductive char at higher temperatures to thereby complete an electrical circuit. The sensor conductors become shorter as ablation proceeds and reduced resistance in the completed electrical circuit (proportional to conductor length) is continually monitored, using measured end-to-end voltage change or current in the circuit. Thermocouple and/or piezoelectric measurements provide consistency checks on local temperatures.

  13. Radiofrequency Ablation: A Nursing Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Locklin, Julia K.; Wood, Bradford J.

    2008-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has emerged as a safe and predictable technology for treating certain patients with cancer who otherwise have few treatment options. Nurses need to be familiar with all phases of the RFA procedure to create an optimal environment for patients. This article offers a brief review of the RFA procedure and nurses' responsibilities in caring for these patients. Before RFA, nurses should focus on patient education and aggressive hydration. During the procedure, nurses can prevent injury by placing grounding pads appropriately, monitoring vital signs, and medicating patients as needed. After RFA, nurses should assess the skin puncture site, provide adequate pain relief, and, again, hydrate patients. Nurses who care appropriately for RFA recipients may help to improve patient outcomes and make an otherwise frightening procedure more comfortable. PMID:15973845

  14. Ablation of idiopathic ventricular tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Doreen; Kottkamp, Hans

    2010-09-01

    Idiopathic ventricular arrhythmias occur in patients without structural heart disease. They can arise from a variety of specific areas within both ventricles and in the supravalvular regions of the great arteries. Two main groups need to be differentiated: arrhythmias from the outflow tract (OT) region and idiopathic left ventricular, so-called fascicular, tachycardias (ILVTs). OT tachycardia typically originates in the right ventricular OT, but may also occur in the left ventricular OT, particularly in the sinuses of Valsalva or the anterior epicardium or the great cardiac vein. Activation mapping or pace mapping for the OT regions and mapping of diastolic potentials in ILVTs are the mapping techniques that are typically used. The ablation of idiopathic ventricular arrhythmias is highly successful, associated with only rare complications. Newly recognized entities of idiopathic ventricular tachycardias are those originating in the papillary muscles and in the atrioventricular annular regions.

  15. Nanosecond laser ablation of gold nanoparticle films

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, Seung H.; Choi, Yeonho; Hwang, David J.; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Chung, Jaewon; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2006-10-02

    Ablation of self-assembled monolayer protected gold nanoparticle films on polyimide was explored using a nanosecond laser. When the nanoparticle film was ablated and subsequently thermally sintered to a continuous film, the elevated rim structure by the expulsion of molten pool could be avoided and the ablation threshold fluence was reduced to a value at least ten times lower than the reported threshold for the gold film. This could be explained by the unusual properties of nanoparticle film such as low melting temperature, weak bonding between nanoparticles, efficient laser energy deposition, and reduced heat loss. Finally, submicron lines were demonstrated.

  16. IR laser ablation of dental enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fried, Daniel

    2000-03-01

    An overview of the basic mechanisms of IR laser ablation of dental enamel is presented. Enamel is a highly structured tissue consisting of an heterogeneous distribution of water, mineral, protein and lipid. Absorption bands of water and carbonated hydroxyapatite can be selectively targeted from 2.7 to 11-micrometer via several laser wavelengths. Mechanistic differences in the nature of ablation and the varying surface morphology produced can be explained by the microstructure of the tissue. Suggested criteria for the choice of the optimum laser parameters for clinical use, the influence of plasma shielding and the role of exogenous water on the mechanism of ablation are discussed.

  17. Diamond Ablators for Inertial Confinement Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Biener, J; Mirkarimi, P B; Tringe, J W; Baker, S L; Wang, Y M; Kucheyev, S O; Teslich, N E; Wu, K J; Hamza, A V; Wild, C; Woerner, E; Koidl, P; Bruehne, K; Fecht, H

    2005-06-21

    Diamond has a unique combination of physical properties for the inertial confinement fusion ablator application, such as appropriate optical properties, high atomic density, high yield strength, and high thermal conductivity. Here, we present a feasible concept to fabricate diamond ablator shells. The fabrication of diamond capsules is a multi-step process, which involves diamond chemical vapor deposition on silicon mandrels followed by polishing, microfabrication of holes, and removing of the silicon mandrel by an etch process. We also discuss the pros and cons of coarse-grained optical quality and nanocrystalline chemical vapor deposition diamond films for the ablator application.

  18. Radiofrequency Ablation of Persistent Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Hussein, Ayman A.; Saliba, Walid I.; Barakat, Amr; Bassiouny, Mohammed; Chamsi-Pasha, Mohammed; Al-Bawardy, Rasha; Hakim, Ali; Tarakji, Khaldoun; Baranowski, Bryan; Cantillon, Daniel; Dresing, Thomas; Tchou, Patrick; Martin, David O.; Varma, Niraj; Bhargava, Mandeep; Callahan, Thomas; Niebauer, Mark; Kanj, Mohamed; Chung, Mina; Natale, Andrea; Lindsay, Bruce D.; Wazni, Oussama M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Various ablation strategies of persistent atrial fibrillation (PersAF) have had disappointing outcomes, despite concerted clinical and research efforts, which could reflect progressive atrial fibrillation–related atrial remodeling. Methods and Results Two-year outcomes were assessed in 1241 consecutive patients undergoing first-time ablation of PersAF (2005–2012). The time intervals between the first diagnosis of PersAF and the ablation procedures were determined. Patients had echocardiograms and measures of B-type natriuretic peptide and C-reactive protein before the procedures. The median diagnosis-to-ablation time was 3 years (25th–75th percentiles 1–6.5). With longer diagnosis-to-ablation time (based on quartiles), there was a significant increase in recurrence rates in addition to an increase in B-type natriuretic peptide levels (P=0.01), C-reactive protein levels (P<0.0001), and left atrial size (P=0.03). The arrhythmia recurrence rates over 2 years were 33.6%, 52.6%, 57.1%, and 54.6% in the first, second, third, and fourth quartiles, respectively (Pcategorical<0.0001). In Cox Proportional Hazard analyses, B-type natriuretic peptide levels, C-reactive protein levels, and left atrial size were associated with arrhythmia recurrence. The diagnosis-to-ablation time had the strongest association with the ablation outcomes which persisted in multivariable Cox analyzes (hazard ratio for recurrence per +1Log diagnosis-to-ablation time 1.27, 95% confidence interval 1.14–1.43; P<0.0001; hazard ratio fourth versus first quartile 2.44, 95% confidence interval 1.68–3.65; Pcategorical<0.0001). Conclusions In patients with PersAF undergoing ablation, the time interval between the first diagnosis of PersAF and the catheter ablation procedure had a strong association with the ablation outcomes, such as shorter diagnosis-to-ablation times were associated with better outcomes and in direct association with markers of atrial remodeling. PMID:26763227

  19. Ablation of pulmonary malignancy: current status.

    PubMed

    Pua, Bradley B; Thornton, Raymond H; Solomon, Stephen B

    2010-08-01

    Since the first reported use of radiofrequency ablation of the lung in 2000, the field of image-guided lung ablation has received a considerable amount of attention. Survival studies have demonstrated the potential utility of thermal ablation in the treatment of patients with early-stage primary and limited secondary pulmonary tumors with promising results. Diagnostic imaging studies have advanced the understanding of the expected immediate postablation appearance of treated lesions, leading the way for early detection of local tumor progression. These survival studies and the expected imaging follow-up of these patients are reviewed herein.

  20. Use of a circular mapping and ablation catheter for ablation of atypical right ventricular outflow tract arrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Katritsis, Demosthenes G; Giazitzoglou, Eleftherios; Paxinos, George

    2010-02-01

    A new technique for ablation of persistent ectopic activity with atypical electrocardiographic characteristics at the vicinity of the right ventricular outflow tract is described. A new circular mapping and ablation catheter initially designed for pulmonary vein ablation was used. Abolition of ectopic activity was achieved with minimal fluoroscopy and ablation times.

  1. GammaPod—A new device dedicated for stereotactic radiotherapy of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Cedric X.; Shao, Xinyu; Zhang, Jin; Regine, William; Zheng, Mike; Yu, Ying S.; Deng, Jianchun; Duan, Zhengcheng

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This paper introduces a new external beam radiotherapy device named GammaPod that is dedicated for stereotactic radiotherapy of breast cancer. Methods: The design goal of the GammaPod as a dedicated system for treating breast cancer is the ability to deliver ablative doses with sharp gradients under stereotactic image guidance. Stereotactic localization of the breast is achieved by a vacuum-assisted breast immobilization cup with built-in stereotactic frame. Highly focused radiation is achieved at the isocenter due to the cross-firing from 36 radiation arcs generated by rotating 36 individual Cobalt-60 beams. The dedicated treatment planning system optimizes an optimal path of the focal spot using an optimization algorithm borrowed from computational geometry such that the target can be covered by 90%–95% of the prescription dose and the doses to surrounding tissues are minimized. The treatment plan is intended to be delivered with continuous motion of the treatment couch. In this paper the authors described in detail the gamma radiation unit, stereotactic localization of the breast, and the treatment planning system of the GammaPod system. Results: A prototype GammaPod system was installed at University of Maryland Medical Center and has gone through a thorough functional, geometric, and dosimetric testing. The mechanical and functional performances of the system all meet the functional specifications. Conclusions: An image-guided breast stereotactic radiotherapy device, named GammaPod, has been developed to deliver highly focused and localized doses to a target in the breast under stereotactic image guidance. It is envisioned that the GammaPod technology has the potential to significantly shorten radiation treatments and even eliminate surgery by ablating the tumor and sterilizing the tumor bed simultaneously. PMID:23635251

  2. GammaPod-A new device dedicated for stereotactic radiotherapy of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Cedric X.; Shao Xinyu; Deng Jianchun; Duan Zhengcheng; Zhang Jin; Zheng, Mike; Yu, Ying S.; Regine, William

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: This paper introduces a new external beam radiotherapy device named GammaPod that is dedicated for stereotactic radiotherapy of breast cancer. Methods: The design goal of the GammaPod as a dedicated system for treating breast cancer is the ability to deliver ablative doses with sharp gradients under stereotactic image guidance. Stereotactic localization of the breast is achieved by a vacuum-assisted breast immobilization cup with built-in stereotactic frame. Highly focused radiation is achieved at the isocenter due to the cross-firing from 36 radiation arcs generated by rotating 36 individual Cobalt-60 beams. The dedicated treatment planning system optimizes an optimal path of the focal spot using an optimization algorithm borrowed from computational geometry such that the target can be covered by 90%-95% of the prescription dose and the doses to surrounding tissues are minimized. The treatment plan is intended to be delivered with continuous motion of the treatment couch. In this paper the authors described in detail the gamma radiation unit, stereotactic localization of the breast, and the treatment planning system of the GammaPod system. Results: A prototype GammaPod system was installed at University of Maryland Medical Center and has gone through a thorough functional, geometric, and dosimetric testing. The mechanical and functional performances of the system all meet the functional specifications. Conclusions: An image-guided breast stereotactic radiotherapy device, named GammaPod, has been developed to deliver highly focused and localized doses to a target in the breast under stereotactic image guidance. It is envisioned that the GammaPod technology has the potential to significantly shorten radiation treatments and even eliminate surgery by ablating the tumor and sterilizing the tumor bed simultaneously.

  3. TU-B-210-01: MRg HIFU - Bone and Soft Tissue Tumor Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Ghanouni, P.

    2015-06-15

    MR guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS), or alternatively high-intensity focused ultrasound (MRgHIFU), is approved for thermal ablative treatment of uterine fibroids and pain palliation in bone metastases. Ablation of malignant tumors is under active investigation in sites such as breast, prostate, brain, liver, kidney, pancreas, and soft tissue. Hyperthermia therapy with MRgFUS is also feasible, and may be used in conjunction with radiotherapy and for local targeted drug delivery. MRI allows in situ target definition and provides continuous temperature monitoring and subsequent thermal dose mapping during HIFU. Although MRgHIFU can be very precise, treatment of mobile organs is challenging and advanced techniques are required because of artifacts in MR temperature mapping, the need for intercostal firing, and need for gated HIFU or tracking of the lesion in real time. The first invited talk, “MR guided Focused Ultrasound Treatment of Tumors in Bone and Soft Tissue”, will summarize the treatment protocol and review results from treatment of bone tumors. In addition, efforts to extend this technology to treat both benign and malignant soft tissue tumors of the extremities will be presented. The second invited talk, “MRI guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound – Advanced Approaches for Ablation and Hyperthermia”, will provide an overview of techniques that are in or near clinical trials for thermal ablation and hyperthermia, with an emphasis of applications in abdominal organs and breast, including methods for MRTI and tracking targets in moving organs. Learning Objectives: Learn background on devices and techniques for MR guided HIFU for cancer therapy Understand issues and current status of clinical MRg HIFU Understand strategies for compensating for organ movement during MRgHIFU Understand strategies for strategies for delivering hyperthermia with MRgHIFU CM - research collaboration with Philips.

  4. TU-B-210-02: MRg HIFU - Advanced Approaches for Ablation and Hyperthermia

    SciTech Connect

    Moonen, C.

    2015-06-15

    MR guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS), or alternatively high-intensity focused ultrasound (MRgHIFU), is approved for thermal ablative treatment of uterine fibroids and pain palliation in bone metastases. Ablation of malignant tumors is under active investigation in sites such as breast, prostate, brain, liver, kidney, pancreas, and soft tissue. Hyperthermia therapy with MRgFUS is also feasible, and may be used in conjunction with radiotherapy and for local targeted drug delivery. MRI allows in situ target definition and provides continuous temperature monitoring and subsequent thermal dose mapping during HIFU. Although MRgHIFU can be very precise, treatment of mobile organs is challenging and advanced techniques are required because of artifacts in MR temperature mapping, the need for intercostal firing, and need for gated HIFU or tracking of the lesion in real time. The first invited talk, “MR guided Focused Ultrasound Treatment of Tumors in Bone and Soft Tissue”, will summarize the treatment protocol and review results from treatment of bone tumors. In addition, efforts to extend this technology to treat both benign and malignant soft tissue tumors of the extremities will be presented. The second invited talk, “MRI guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound – Advanced Approaches for Ablation and Hyperthermia”, will provide an overview of techniques that are in or near clinical trials for thermal ablation and hyperthermia, with an emphasis of applications in abdominal organs and breast, including methods for MRTI and tracking targets in moving organs. Learning Objectives: Learn background on devices and techniques for MR guided HIFU for cancer therapy Understand issues and current status of clinical MRg HIFU Understand strategies for compensating for organ movement during MRgHIFU Understand strategies for strategies for delivering hyperthermia with MRgHIFU CM - research collaboration with Philips.

  5. Laser ablation in analytical chemistry - A review

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, Richard E.; Mao, Xianglei; Liu, Haichen; Gonzalez, Jhanis; Mao, Samuel S.

    2001-10-10

    Laser ablation is becoming a dominant technology for direct solid sampling in analytical chemistry. Laser ablation refers to the process in which an intense burst of energy delivered by a short laser pulse is used to sample (remove a portion of) a material. The advantages of laser ablation chemical analysis include direct characterization of solids, no chemical procedures for dissolution, reduced risk of contamination or sample loss, analysis of very small samples not separable for solution analysis, and determination of spatial distributions of elemental composition. This review describes recent research to understand and utilize laser ablation for direct solid sampling, with emphasis on sample introduction to an inductively coupled plasma (ICP). Current research related to contemporary experimental systems, calibration and optimization, and fractionation is discussed, with a summary of applications in several areas.

  6. Nanoscale ablation through optically trapped microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fardel, Romain; McLeod, Euan; Tsai, Yu-Cheng; Arnold, Craig B.

    2010-10-01

    The ability to directly create patterns with size scales below 100 nm is important for many applications where the production or repair of high resolution and density features is needed. Laser-based direct-write methods have the benefit of being able to quickly and easily modify and create structures on existing devices, but ablation can negatively impact the overall technique. In this paper we show that self-positioning of near-field objectives through the optical trap assisted nanopatterning (OTAN) method allows for ablation without harming the objective elements. Small microbeads are positioned in close proximity to a substrate where ablation is initiated. Upon ablation, these beads are temporarily displaced from the trap but rapidly return to the initial position. We analyze the range of fluence values for which this process occurs and find that there exists a critical threshold beyond which the beads are permanently ejected.

  7. Physical processes of laser tissue ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furzikov, Nickolay P.

    1991-05-01

    The revised ablation model applicable to homogeneous tissues is presented. It is based on the thermal mechanism and involves the instability of the laserinduced evaporation (thermodestruction) front the growth of the surface ripple structure the interference of the laser wave and of the surface wave arising by diffraction on the ripples Beer''s law violation the pulsed thermodestruction of the organic structural component the tissue water boiling and gas dynamic expansion of the resulting products into the surrounding medium which is followed by the shock wave formation. The UV and IR ablation schemes were implemented and compared to the corneal ablation experiments. The initial ablation pressure and temperature are given restored from the timeofflight measurements of the supersonic expansion of the product. 1.

  8. Evolving Ablative Therapies for Hepatic Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Hochwald, Steven N.

    2014-01-01

    The liver is a common site for both primary and secondary malignancy. Hepatic resection and transplantation are the two treatment modalities that have been shown to achieve complete cure, but only 10 to 20% of patients are candidates for these treatments. For the remaining patients, tumor ablation has emerged as the most promising alternative modality. In addition to providing local control and improving survival outcomes, tumor ablation also helps to down stage patients for potential curative treatments, both alone as well as in combination with other treatments. While tumor ablation can be achieved in multiple ways, the introduction of newer ablative techniques has shifted the focus from palliation to potentially curative treatment. Because the long-term safety and survival benefits are not substantive at present, it is important that we strive to evaluate the results from these studies using appropriate comparative outcome methodologies. PMID:24877069

  9. Thermal Ablation Modeling for Silicate Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yih-Kanq

    2016-01-01

    A general thermal ablation model for silicates is proposed. The model includes the mass losses through the balance between evaporation and condensation, and through the moving molten layer driven by surface shear force and pressure gradient. This model can be applied in the ablation simulation of the meteoroid and the glassy ablator for spacecraft Thermal Protection Systems. Time-dependent axisymmetric computations are performed by coupling the fluid dynamics code, Data-Parallel Line Relaxation program, with the material response code, Two-dimensional Implicit Thermal Ablation simulation program, to predict the mass lost rates and shape change. The predicted mass loss rates will be compared with available data for model validation, and parametric studies will also be performed for meteoroid earth entry conditions.

  10. Pharmacological Tests in Atrial Fibrillation Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Gourraud, Jean-Baptiste; Andrade, Jason G; Macle, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    The invasive management of atrial fibrillation (AF) has been considerably changed by the identification of major sites of AF initiation and/or maintenance within the pulmonary vein antra. Percutaneous catheter ablation of these targets has become the standard of care for sustained maintenance of sinus rhythm. Long-term failure of ablation is related to an inability to create a durable transmural lesion or to identify all of the non-pulmonary vein arrhythmia triggers. Pharmacological challenges during catheter ablation have been suggested to improve outcomes in both paroxysmal and persistent AF. Herein we review the mechanism and evidence for the use of pharmacological adjuncts during the catheter ablation of AF. PMID:28116081

  11. Microwave Tissue Ablation: Biophysics, Technology and Applications

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Microwave ablation is an emerging treatment option for many cancers, cardiac arrhythmias and other medical conditions. During treatment, microwaves are applied directly to tissues to produce rapid temperature elevations sufficient to produce immediate coagulative necrosis. The engineering design criteria for each application differ, with individual consideration for factors such as desired ablation zone size, treatment duration, and procedural invasiveness. Recent technological developments in applicator cooling, power control and system optimization for specific applications promise to increase the utilization of microwave ablation in the future. This article will review the basic biophysics of microwave tissue heating, provide an overview of the design and operation of current equipment, and outline areas for future research for microwave ablation. PMID:21175404

  12. Indications and options for endometrial ablation.

    PubMed

    2008-11-01

    Endometrial ablation is an effective therapeutic option for the management of menorrhagia in properly selected patients. Hysteroscopic and non-hysteroscopic techniques offer similar rates of symptom relief and patient satisfaction.

  13. Flexible Ablators: Applications and Arcjet Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, James O.; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Beck, Robin A S.; Mcguire, Kathy; Prabhu, Dinesh K.; Gorbunov, Sergey

    2011-01-01

    Flexible ablators were conceived in 2009 to meet the technology pull for large, human Mars Exploration Class, 23 m diameter hypersonic inflatable aerodynamic decelerators. As described elsewhere, they have been recently undergoing initial technical readiness (TRL) advancement by NASA. The performance limits of flexible ablators in terms of maximum heat rates, pressure and shear remain to be defined. Further, it is hoped that this emerging technology will vastly expand the capability of future NASA missions involving atmospheric entry systems. This paper considers four topics of relevance to flexible ablators: (1) Their potential applications to near/far term human and robotic missions (2) Brief consideration of the balance between heat shield diameter, flexible ablator performance limits, entry vehicle controllability and aft-body shear layer impingement of interest to designers of very large entry vehicles, (3) The approach for developing bonding processes of flexible ablators for use on rigid entry bodies and (4) Design of large arcjet test articles that will enable the testing of flexible ablators in flight-like, combined environments (heat flux, pressure, shear and structural tensile loading). Based on a review of thermal protection system performance requirements for future entry vehicles, it is concluded that flexible ablators have broad applications to conventional, rigid entry body systems and are enabling to large deployable (both inflatable and mechanical) heat shields. Because of the game-changing nature of flexible ablators, it appears that NASA's Office of the Chief Technologist (OCT) will fund a focused, 3-year TRL advancement of the new materials capable of performance in heat fluxes in the range of 200-600 W/sq. cm. This support will enable the manufacture and use of the large-scale arcjet test designs that will be a key element of this OCT funded activity.

  14. Resonant laser ablation: mechanisms and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.E.; Allen, T.M.; Garrett, A.W.; Gill, C.G.; Hemberger, P.H.; Kelly, P.B.; Nogar, N.S.

    1996-10-01

    We report on aspects of resonant laser ablation (RLA) behavior for a number of sample types: metals, alloys, thin films, zeolites and soil. The versatility of RLA is demonstrated, with results on a variety of samples and in several mass spectrometers. In addition, the application to depth profiling of thin films is described; absolute removal rates and detection limits are also displayed. A discussion of possible mechanisms for low-power ablation is presented.

  15. Percutaneous ablation of colorectal lung metastases

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Stephen B.

    2015-01-01

    Lung metastasectomy can prolong survival in patients with metastatic colorectal carcinoma. Thermal ablation offers a potential solution with similar reported survival outcomes. It has minimal effect on pulmonary function, or quality of life, can be repeated, and may be considered more acceptable to patients because of the associated shorter hospital stay and recovery. This review describes the indications, technique, reported outcomes, complications and radiologic appearances after thermal ablation of colorectal lung metastases. PMID:26697202

  16. Radiotherapy in patients with connective tissue diseases.

    PubMed

    Giaj-Levra, Niccolò; Sciascia, Savino; Fiorentino, Alba; Fersino, Sergio; Mazzola, Rosario; Ricchetti, Francesco; Roccatello, Dario; Alongi, Filippo

    2016-03-01

    The decision to offer radiotherapy in patients with connective tissue diseases continues to be challenging. Radiotherapy might trigger the onset of connective tissue diseases by increasing the expression of self-antigens, diminishing regulatory T-cell activity, and activating effectors of innate immunity (dendritic cells) through Toll-like receptor-dependent mechanisms, all of which could potentially lead to breaks of immune tolerance. This potential risk has raised some debate among radiation oncologists about whether patients with connective tissue diseases can tolerate radiation as well as people without connective tissue diseases. Because the number of patients with cancer and connective tissue diseases needing radiotherapy will probably increase due to improvements in medical treatment and longer life expectancy, the issue of interactions between radiotherapy and connective tissue diseases needs to be clearer. In this Review, we discuss available data and evidence for patients with connective tissue diseases treated with radiotherapy.

  17. Laser Ablated Carbon Nanodots for Light Emission.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Delfino; Camacho, Marco; Camacho, Miguel; Mayorga, Miguel; Weathers, Duncan; Salamo, Greg; Wang, Zhiming; Neogi, Arup

    2016-12-01

    The synthesis of fluorescent carbon dots-like nanostructures (CNDs) obtained through the laser ablation of a carbon solid target in liquid environment is reported. The ablation process was induced in acetone with laser pulses of 1064, 532, and 355 nm under different irradiation times. Close-spherical amorphous CNDs with sizes between 5 and 20 nm, whose abundance strongly depends on the ablation parameters were investigated using electron microscopy and was confirmed using absorption and emission spectroscopies. The π- π* electronic transition at 3.76 eV dominates the absorption for all the CNDs species synthesized under different irradiation conditions. The light emission is most efficient due to excitation at 3.54 eV with the photoluminescence intensity centered at 3.23 eV. The light emission from the CNDs is most efficient due to ablation at 355 nm. The emission wavelength of the CNDs can be tuned from the near-UV to the green wavelength region by controlling the ablation time and modifying the ablation and excitation laser wavelength.

  18. Pulsed HF laser ablation of dentin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papagiakoumou, Eirini I.; Papadopoulos, Dimitris N.; Makropoulou, Mersini I.; Khabbaz, Maruan G.; Serafetinides, Alexander A.

    2005-03-01

    The interaction of a TEA (Transversally Excited Atmospheric pressure) corona preionized oscillator double amplifier HF (hydrogen fluoride) laser beam with dentin tissue is reported. Pulses of 39 ns in the wavelength range of 2.65-3.35 μm and output energies in the range of 10-45 mJ, in a predominantly TEM00 beam were used to interact with dentin tissue. Ablation experiments were conducted with the laser beam directly focused on the tissue. Several samples of freshly extracted human teeth were used, cut longitudinally in facets of about 1mm thick and stored in phosphate buffered saline after being cleaned from the soft tissue remains. The experimental data (ablation thresholds, ablation rates) are discussed with respect to the ablation mechanism(s). Adequate tissue removal was observed and the ablation behavior was, in the greates part of the available fluences, almost linear. From the microscopic examination of teh samples, in a scanning electron microscope (SEM), the irradiated surfaces displayed oval craters (reflecting the laser beam shape) with absence of any melting or carbonization zone. It is suggested that the specific laser removes hard tissue by a combined photothermal and plasma mediated ablation mechanism, leaving a surface free from thermal damage and with a well-shaped crater.

  19. Ion-induced nuclear radiotherapy

    DOEpatents

    Horn, Kevin M.; Doyle, Barney L.

    1996-01-01

    Ion-induced Nuclear Radiotherapy (INRT) is a technique for conducting radiosurgery and radiotherapy with a very high degree of control over the spatial extent of the irradiated volume and the delivered dose. Based upon the concept that low energy, ion induced atomic and nuclear reactions can be used to produce highly energetic reaction products at the site of a tumor, the INRT technique is implemented through the use of a conduit-needle or tube which conducts a low energy ion beam to a position above or within the intended treatment area. At the end of the conduit-needle or tube is a specially fabricated target which, only when struck by the ion beam, acts as a source of energetic radiation products. The inherent limitations in the energy, and therefore range, of the resulting reaction products limits the spatial extent of irradiation to a pre-defined volume about the point of reaction. Furthermore, since no damage is done to tissue outside this irradiated volume, the delivered dose may be made arbitrarily large. INRT may be used both as a point-source of radiation at the site of a small tumor, or as a topical bath of radiation to broad areas of diseased tissue.

  20. Ion-induced nuclear radiotherapy

    DOEpatents

    Horn, K.M.; Doyle, B.L.

    1996-08-20

    Ion-induced Nuclear Radiotherapy (INRT) is a technique for conducting radiosurgery and radiotherapy with a very high degree of control over the spatial extent of the irradiated volume and the delivered dose. Based upon the concept that low energy, ion induced atomic and nuclear reactions can be used to produce highly energetic reaction products at the site of a tumor, the INRT technique is implemented through the use of a conduit-needle or tube which conducts a low energy ion beam to a position above or within the intended treatment area. At the end of the conduit-needle or tube is a specially fabricated target which, only when struck by the ion beam, acts as a source of energetic radiation products. The inherent limitations in the energy, and therefore range, of the resulting reaction products limits the spatial extent of irradiation to a pre-defined volume about the point of reaction. Furthermore, since no damage is done to tissue outside this irradiated volume, the delivered dose may be made arbitrarily large. INRT may be used both as a point-source of radiation at the site of a small tumor, or as a topical bath of radiation to broad areas of diseased tissue. 25 figs.

  1. Dust ablation in Pluto's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horanyi, Mihaly; Poppe, Andrew; Sternovsky, Zoltan

    2016-04-01

    Based on measurements by dust detectors onboard the Pioneer 10/11 and New Horizons spacecraft the total production rate of dust particles born in the Edgeworth Kuiper Belt (EKB) has been be estimated to be on the order of 5 ṡ 103 kg/s in the approximate size range of 1 - 10 μm. Dust particles are produced by collisions between EKB objects and their bombardment by both interplanetary and interstellar dust particles. Dust particles of EKB origin, in general, migrate towards the Sun due to Poynting-Robertson drag but their distributions are further sculpted by mean-motion resonances as they first approach the orbit of Neptune and later the other planets, as well as mutual collisions. Subsequently, Jupiter will eject the vast majority of them before they reach the inner solar system. The expected mass influx into Pluto atmosphere is on the order of 200 kg/day, and the arrival speed of the incoming particles is on the order of 3 - 4 km/s. We have followed the ablation history as function of speed and size of dust particles in Pluto's atmosphere, and found that volatile rich particles can fully sublimate due to drag heating and deposit their mass in narrow layers. This deposition might promote the formation of the haze layers observed by the New Horizons spacecraft. This talk will explore the constraints on the composition of the dust particles by comparing the altitude of the deposition layers to the observed haze layers.

  2. Radiofrequency Ablation Beyond the Liver

    PubMed Central

    Neeman, Ziv; Wood, Bradford J.

    2008-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has begun to show promise for extrahepatic indications. Although much of the reported work on image-guided RFA of liver neoplasms is quite promising, it is even earlier in the evaluation and validation process for extrahepatic RFA, with few short-term and no long-term studies reported. Although there are much more data for liver RFA with almost 3,000 cases reported in the literature, there are a number of ongoing investigations of RFA for tumors in the kidney, lung, bone, breast, bone, and adrenal gland. Debulking and pain control with RFA present palliative options becoming increasingly popular weapons in the interventionalist's oncology arsenal. Metastatic disease with a wide variety of primary histologies in a myriad of locations may be treated with RFA after a careful consideration of the risk-to-benefit ratio balance. The RFA technique can be slightly different outside the liver. Specifically, differing dielectric tissue characteristics may markedly alter the RFA treatment. Each different RFA system has a unique risk and advantage profile. Extrahepatic indications and contraindications will be suggested. Treatment tips and the unique complications and considerations will be introduced for some of the more common extrahepatic locations. PMID:12524646

  3. Plans and status of the Beryllium ablator campaign on NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kline, J. L.; Yi, S. A.; Simakov, A. N.; Wilson, D. C.; Olson, R. E.; Krasheninnikova, N. S.; Kyrala, G. A.; Perry, T. S.; Batha, S. H.; Dewald, E. L.; Edwards, M. J.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Meezan, N. B.

    2014-10-01

    Beryllium has long been known to have excellent properties for indirectly driven ICF implosions including enhanced ablation pressure, implosion velocity, and mass ablation rate. The high ablation velocity leads to stabilization of ablative hydrodynamic instabilities and higher ablation pressures. Recent ``high foot'' experiments have shown ablative Rayleigh-Taylor to be a leading cause of degraded performance for ICF implosions. While Beryllium ablators have these advantages, there are also risks associated with Beryllium target designs. A campaign is underway to design and to test these advantages for comparison with other ablator options and determine which provides the best path forward for ICF. Experiments using Beryllium ablators are expected to start in the late summer of 2014. This presentation will discuss the status of the experiments and layout the plans/goals for the campaign. This work is supported by the US DOE.

  4. Percutaneous Microwave Ablation of Renal Angiomyolipomas

    SciTech Connect

    Cristescu, Mircea; Abel, E. Jason; Wells, Shane Ziemlewicz, Timothy J.; Hedican, Sean P.; Lubner, Megan G. Hinshaw, J. Louis Brace, Christopher L. Lee, Fred T.

    2016-03-15

    PurposeTo evaluate the safety and efficacy of US-guided percutaneous microwave (MW) ablation in the treatment of renal angiomyolipoma (AML).Materials and MethodsFrom January 2011 to April 2014, seven patients (5 females and 2 males; mean age 51.4) with 11 renal AMLs (9 sporadic type and 2 tuberous sclerosis associated) with a mean size of 3.4 ± 0.7 cm (range 2.4–4.9 cm) were treated with high-powered, gas-cooled percutaneous MW ablation under US guidance. Tumoral diameter, volume, and CT/MR enhancement were measured on pre-treatment, immediate post-ablation, and delayed post-ablation imaging. Clinical symptoms and creatinine were assessed on follow-up visits.ResultsAll ablations were technically successful and no major complications were encountered. Mean ablation parameters were ablation power of 65 W (range 60–70 W), using 456 mL of hydrodissection fluid per patient, over 4.7 min (range 3–8 min). Immediate post-ablation imaging demonstrated mean tumor diameter and volume decreases of 1.8 % (3.4–3.3 cm) and 1.7 % (27.5–26.3 cm{sup 3}), respectively. Delayed imaging follow-up obtained at a mean interval of 23.1 months (median 17.6; range 9–47) demonstrated mean tumor diameter and volume decreases of 29 % (3.4–2.4 cm) and 47 % (27.5–12.1 cm{sup 3}), respectively. Tumoral enhancement decreased on immediate post-procedure and delayed imaging by CT/MR parameters, indicating decreased tumor vascularity. No patients required additional intervention and no patients experienced spontaneous bleeding post-ablation.ConclusionOur early experience with high-powered, gas-cooled percutaneous MW ablation demonstrates it to be a safe and effective modality to devascularize and decrease the size of renal AMLs.

  5. A systematic review of surgical ablation versus catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Kearney, Katherine; Stephenson, Rowan; Phan, Kevin; Chan, Wei Yen; Huang, Min Yin

    2014-01-01

    Background Atrial fibrillation (AF) is an increasingly prevalent condition in the ageing population, with significantly associated morbidity and mortality. Surgical and catheter ablative strategies both aim to reduce mortality and morbidity through freedom from AF. This review consolidates all currently available comparative data to evaluate these two interventions. Methods A systematic search was conducted across MEDLINE, PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews from January 2000 until August 2013. All studies were critically appraised and only those directly comparing surgical and catheter ablation were included. Results Seven studies were deemed suitable for analysis according to the inclusion criteria. Freedom from AF was significantly higher in the surgical ablation group versus the catheter ablation group at 6-month, 12-month and study endpoint follow-up periods. Subgroup analysis demonstrated similar trends, with higher freedom from AF in the surgical ablation group for paroxysmal AF patients. The incidence of pacemaker implantation was higher, while no difference in stroke or cardiac tamponade was demonstrated for the surgical versus catheter ablation groups. Conclusions Current evidence suggests that epicardial ablative strategies are associated with higher freedom from AF, higher pacemaker implantation rates and comparable neurological complications and cardiac tamponade incidence to catheter ablative treatment. Other complications and risks were poorly reported, which warrants further randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of adequate power and follow-up duration. PMID:24516794

  6. Online monitoring of nanoparticles formed during nanosecond laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nováková, Hana; Holá, Markéta; Vojtíšek-Lom, Michal; Ondráček, Jakub; Kanický, Viktor

    2016-11-01

    The particle size distribution of dry aerosol originating from laser ablation of glass material was monitored simultaneously with Laser Ablation - Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) analysis and two aerosol spectrometers - Fast Mobility Particle Sizer (FMPS) and Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (APS). The unique combination of LA-ICP-MS and FMPS offers the possibility of measuring the particle size distribution every 1 s of the ablation process in the size range of 5.6-560 nm. APS extends the information about particle concentration in the size range 0.54-17 μm. Online monitoring of the dry aerosol was performed for two ablation modes (spot and line with a duration of 80 s) with a 193 nm excimer laser system, using the glass reference material NIST 610 as a sample. Different sizes of laser spot for spot ablation and different scan speeds for line ablation were tested. It was found that the FMPS device is capable of detecting changes in particle size distribution at the first pulses of spot laser ablation and is suitable for laser ablation control simultaneously with LA-ICP-MS analysis. The studied parameters of laser ablation have an influence on the resulting particle size distribution. The line mode of laser ablation produces larger particles during the whole ablation process, while spot ablation produces larger particles only at the beginning, during the ablation of the intact layer of the ablated material. Moreover, spot ablation produces more primary nano-particles (in ultrafine mode size range < 100 nm) than line ablation. This effect is most probably caused by a reduced amount of large particles released from the spot ablation crater. The larger particles scavenge the ultrafine particles during the line ablation mode.

  7. Contact pulsed Nd:YAG ablation of human dentin: ablation rates and tissue effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, David M.; Yessik, Michael J.

    1994-09-01

    Dentin from freshly extracted human teeth was exposed to flashlamp pumped Nd:YAG pulses (100 microsecond(s) duration, 50 - 200 mJ/pulse) delivered through a flat cut fiberoptic in contact with the dentin surface. Ablation depth and volume were measured optically and confirmed with electron microscope morphometrics. Ablation depth increased with force applied at the fiber tip up to 5 - 10 g. Above this ablation depths were insensitive to applied force. Craters made in dental stone were deeper and narrower than those made in normal dentin. Ablation depths per pulse and volumes per pulse decrease as the number of pulses increase. This is more prominent for 200 mJ pulses. At 60 mJ the ablation depths are the same from 10 to 100 Hz repetition rates, although qualitative changes (collateral damage) are greater at higher repetition rates. A progressive increase in collateral damage is seen from the 1st through the 200th pulse.

  8. Radioiodine Remnant Ablation: A Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Bal, Chandra Sekhar; Padhy, Ajit Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Radioiodine remnant ablation (RRA) is considered a safe and effective method for eliminating residual thyroid tissue, as well as microscopic disease if at all present in thyroid bed following thyroidectomy. The rationale of RRA is that in the absence of thyroid tissue, serum thyroglobulin (Tg) measurement can be used as an excellent tumor marker. Other considerations are like the presence of significant remnant thyroid tissue makes detection and treatment of nodal or distant metastases difficult. Rarely, microscopic disease in the thyroid bed if not ablated, in the future, could be a source of anaplastic transformation. On the other hand, microscopic tumor emboli in distant sites could be the cause of distant metastasis too. The ablation of remnant tissue would in all probability eliminate these theoretical risks. It may be noted that all these are unproven contentious issues except postablation serum Tg estimation that could be a good tumor marker for detecting early biochemical recurrence in long-term follow-up strategy. Radioactive iodine is administered as a form of “adjuvant therapy” for remnant ablation. There have been several reports with regard to the administered dose for remnant ablation. The first report of a prospective randomized clinical trial was published from India by a prospective randomized study conducted at the All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi in the year 1996. The study reported that increasing the empirical 131I initial dose to more than 50 mCi results in plateauing of the dose-response curve and thus, conventional high-dose remnant ablation needs critical evaluation. Recently, two important studies were published: One from French group and the other from UK on a similar line. Interestingly, all three studies conducted in three different geographical regions of the world showed exactly similar conclusion. The new era of low-dose remnant ablation has taken a firm scientific footing across the continents. PMID:26420983

  9. Photoacoustic characterization of radiofrequency ablation lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchard, Richard; Dana, Nicholas; Di Biase, Luigi; Natale, Andrea; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2012-02-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) procedures are used to destroy abnormal electrical pathways in the heart that can cause cardiac arrhythmias. Current methods relying on fluoroscopy, echocardiography and electrical conduction mapping are unable to accurately assess ablation lesion size. In an effort to better visualize RFA lesions, photoacoustic (PA) and ultrasonic (US) imaging were utilized to obtain co-registered images of ablated porcine cardiac tissue. The left ventricular free wall of fresh (i.e., never frozen) porcine hearts was harvested within 24 hours of the animals' sacrifice. A THERMOCOOLR Ablation System (Biosense Webster, Inc.) operating at 40 W for 30-60 s was used to induce lesions through the endocardial and epicardial walls of the cardiac samples. Following lesion creation, the ablated tissue samples were placed in 25 °C saline to allow for multi-wavelength PA imaging. Samples were imaged with a VevoR 2100 ultrasound system (VisualSonics, Inc.) using a modified 20-MHz array that could provide laser irradiation to the sample from a pulsed tunable laser (Newport Corp.) to allow for co-registered photoacoustic-ultrasound (PAUS) imaging. PA imaging was conducted from 750-1064 nm, with a surface fluence of approximately 15 mJ/cm2 maintained during imaging. In this preliminary study with PA imaging, the ablated region could be well visualized on the surface of the sample, with contrasts of 6-10 dB achieved at 750 nm. Although imaging penetration depth is a concern, PA imaging shows promise in being able to reliably visualize RF ablation lesions.

  10. Catheter Ablation of Fascicular Ventricular Tachycardia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yaowu; Fang, Zhen; Yang, Bing; Kojodjojo, Pipin; Chen, Hongwu; Ju, Weizhu; Cao, Kejiang; Chen, Minglong

    2015-01-01

    Background— Fascicular ventricular tachycardia (FVT) is a common form of sustained idiopathic left ventricular tachycardia with an Asian preponderance. This study aimed to prospectively investigate long-term clinical outcomes of patients undergoing ablation of FVT and identify predictors of arrhythmia recurrence. Methods and Results— Consecutive patients undergoing FVT ablation at a single tertiary center were enrolled. Activation mapping was performed to identify the earliest presystolic Purkinje potential during FVT that was targeted by radiofrequency ablation. Follow-up with clinic visits, ECG, and Holter monitoring was performed at least every 6 months. A total of 120 consecutive patients (mean age, 29.3±12.7 years; 82% men; all patients with normal ejection fraction) were enrolled. FVT involved left posterior fascicle and left anterior fascicle in 118 and 2 subjects, respectively. VT was noninducible in 3 patients, and ablation was acutely successful in 117 patients. With a median follow-up of 55.7 months, VT of a similar ECG morphology recurred in 17 patients, and repeat procedure confirmed FVT recurrence involving the same fascicle. Shorter VT cycle length was the only significant predictor of FVT recurrence (P=0.03). Six other patients developed new-onset upper septal FVT that was successfully ablated. Conclusions— Ablation of FVT guided by activation mapping is associated with a single procedural success rate without the use of antiarrhythmic drugs of 80.3%. Arrhythmia recurrences after an initially successful ablation were caused by recurrent FVT involving the same fascicle in two thirds of patients or new onset of upper septal FVT in the remainder. PMID:26386017

  11. Subsurface ablation of atherosclerotic plaque using ultrafast laser pulses

    PubMed Central

    Lanvin, Thomas; Conkey, Donald B.; Frobert, Aurelien; Valentin, Jeremy; Goy, Jean-Jacques; Cook, Stéphane; Giraud, Marie-Noelle; Psaltis, Demetri

    2015-01-01

    We perform subsurface ablation of atherosclerotic plaque using ultrafast pulses. Excised mouse aortas containing atherosclerotic plaque were ablated with ultrafast near-infrared (NIR) laser pulses. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) was used to observe the ablation result, while the physical damage was inspected in histological sections. We characterize the effects of incident pulse energy on surface damage, ablation hole size, and filament propagation. We find that it is possible to ablate plaque just below the surface without causing surface damage, which motivates further investigation of ultrafast ablation for subsurface atherosclerotic plaque removal. PMID:26203381

  12. Subsurface ablation of atherosclerotic plaque using ultrafast laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Lanvin, Thomas; Conkey, Donald B; Frobert, Aurelien; Valentin, Jeremy; Goy, Jean-Jacques; Cook, Stéphane; Giraud, Marie-Noelle; Psaltis, Demetri

    2015-07-01

    We perform subsurface ablation of atherosclerotic plaque using ultrafast pulses. Excised mouse aortas containing atherosclerotic plaque were ablated with ultrafast near-infrared (NIR) laser pulses. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) was used to observe the ablation result, while the physical damage was inspected in histological sections. We characterize the effects of incident pulse energy on surface damage, ablation hole size, and filament propagation. We find that it is possible to ablate plaque just below the surface without causing surface damage, which motivates further investigation of ultrafast ablation for subsurface atherosclerotic plaque removal.

  13. New tumor ablation techniques for cancer treatment (microwave, electroporation).

    PubMed

    de Baere, T; Deschamps, F

    2014-01-01

    Since the introduction of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for the treatment of liver tumors at the end of the 1990s, indications for local ablation techniques have been extended to other organs, in particular, the lungs, kidneys and bones. These techniques have also been improved, in particular to try and overcome the limitations of radiofrequency techniques, especially the significant decrease in complete ablation rates for tumors larger than 3cm and tumors that are contiguous to vessels larger than 3mm. Microwave ablation is a rapidly developing thermal ablation technique similar to RFA but with numerous differences. Electroporation, a non-thermal ablation technique with other possibilities, is in earlier stages of clinical development.

  14. Approximate model for laser ablation of carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shusser, Michael

    2010-08-01

    The paper presents an approximate kinetic theory model of ablation of carbon by a nanosecond laser pulse. The model approximates the process as sublimation and combines conduction heat transfer in the target with the gas dynamics of the ablated plume which are coupled through the boundary conditions at the interface. The ablated mass flux and the temperature of the ablating material are obtained from the assumption that the ablation rate is restricted by the kinetic theory limitation on the maximum mass flux that can be attained in a phase-change process. To account for non-uniform distribution of the laser intensity while keeping the calculation simple the quasi-one-dimensional approximation is used in both gas and solid phases. The results are compared with the predictions of the exact axisymmetric model that uses the conservation relations at the interface derived from the momentum solution of the Boltzmann equation for arbitrary strong evaporation. It is seen that the simpler approximate model provides good accuracy.

  15. Design Calculations for NIF Convergent Ablator Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, R. E.; Callahan, D. A.; Hicks, D. G.; Landen, O. L.; Langer, S. H.; Meezan, N. B.; Spears, B. K.; Widmann, K.; Kline, J. L.; Wilson, D. C.; Petrasso, R. D.; Leeper, R. J.

    2010-11-01

    Design calculations for NIF convergent ablator experiments will be described. The convergent ablator experiments measure the implosion trajectory, velocity, and ablation rate of an x-ray driven capsule and are a important component of the U. S. National Ignition Campaign at NIF. The design calculations are post-processed to provide simulations of the key diagnostics -- 1) Dante measurements of hohlraum x-ray flux and spectrum, 2) streaked radiographs of the imploding ablator shell, 3) wedge range filter measurements of D-He3 proton output spectra, and 4) GXD measurements of the imploded core. The simulated diagnostics will be compared to the experimental measurements to provide an assessment of the accuracy of the design code predictions of hohlraum radiation temperature, capsule ablation rate, implosion velocity, shock flash areal density, and x-ray bang time. Post-shot versions of the design calculations are used to enhance the understanding of the experimental measurements and will assist in choosing parameters for subsequent shots and the path towards optimal ignition capsule tuning. *SNL, LLNL, and LANL are operated under US DOE contracts DE-AC04-94AL85000. DE-AC52-07NA27344, and DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  16. Fracture in Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, Parul; Chavez-Garcia, Jose; Pham, John

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a novel technique to understand the failure mechanisms inside thermal protection materials. The focus of this research is on the class of materials known as phenolic impregnated carbon ablators. It has successfully flown on the Stardust spacecraft and is the thermal protection system material chosen for the Mars Science Laboratory and SpaceX Dragon spacecraft. Although it has good thermal properties, structurally, it is a weak material. To understand failure mechanisms in carbon ablators, fracture tests were performed on FiberForm(Registered TradeMark) (precursor), virgin, and charred ablator materials. Several samples of these materials were tested to investigate failure mechanisms at a microstructural scale. Stress-strain data were obtained simultaneously to estimate the tensile strength and toughness. It was observed that cracks initiated and grew in the FiberForm when a critical stress limit was reached such that the carbon fibers separated from the binder. However, both for virgin and charred carbon ablators, crack initiation and growth occurred in the matrix (phenolic) phase. Both virgin and charred carbon ablators showed greater strength values compared with FiberForm samples, confirming that the presence of the porous matrix helps in absorbing the fracture energy.

  17. [Radiotherapy of benign intracranial tumors].

    PubMed

    Delannes, M; Latorzeff, I; Chand, M E; Huchet, A; Dupin, C; Colin, P

    2016-09-01

    Most of the benign intracranial tumors are meningiomas, vestibular schwannomas, pituitary adenomas, craniopharyngiomas, and glomus tumors. Some of them grow very slowly, and can be observed without specific treatment, especially if they are asymptomatic. Symptomatic or growing tumors are treated by surgery, which is the reference treatment. When surgery is not possible, due to the location of the lesion, or general conditions, radiotherapy can be applied, as it is if there is a postoperative growing residual tumor, or a local relapse. Indications have to be discussed in polydisciplinary meetings, with precise evaluation of the benefit and risks of the treatments. The techniques to be used are the most modern ones, as multimodal imaging and image-guided radiation therapy. Stereotactic treatments, using fractionated or single doses depending on the size or the location of the tumors, are commonly realized, to avoid as much a possible the occurrence of late side effects.

  18. Radiotherapy for Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Contessa, Joseph N.; Griffith, Kent A.; Wolff, Elizabeth; Ensminger, William; Zalupski, Mark; Ben-Josef, Edgar

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNTs) are rare malignant neoplasms considered to be resistant to radiotherapy (RT), although data on efficacy are scarce. We reviewed our institutional experience to further delineate the role of RT for patients with PNTs. Methods and Materials: Between 1986 and 2006, 36 patients with PNTs were treated with RT to 49 sites. Of these 36 patients, 23 had radiographic follow-up data, which were used to determine the tumor response rate and freedom from local progression. Long-term toxicity was graded according to the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events. Results: The overall response rate to RT was 39% (13% complete response, 26% partial response, 56% stable disease, and 4% progressive disease). A significant difference in the freedom from local progression between the groups receiving either greater than or less than the median 2 Gy/fraction biologically equivalent dose of 49.6 Gy was found, with all radiographic progression occurring in patients who had received <=32 Gy. The actuarial 3-year local freedom from progression rate was 49%. Palliation was achieved in 90% of patients, with either improvement or resolution of symptoms after RT. Of 35 patients, 33 had metastatic disease at their referral for RT, and the median overall survival for this patient population was 2 years. Three long-term Grade 3 or greater toxicities were recorded. Conclusion: RT is an effective modality for achieving local control in patients with PNTs. RT produces high rates of symptomatic palliation and freedom from local progression. Prospective trials of radiotherapy for PNTs are warranted.

  19. Microwave ablation versus laser ablation in occluding lateral veins in goats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu-hong; Wang, Xiao-ping; Su, Wen-juan; Yuan, Yuan

    2016-02-01

    Increasing number of endovenous techniques are available for the treatment of saphenous vein reflux and endovenous laser ablation (EVLA) is a frequently used method. A newly developed alternative, based on thermal therapy, is endovenous microwave ablation (EMA). This study evaluated the effect of the two procedures, in terms of coagulation and histological changes, in occluding lateral veins in goats. Twelve animals were randomized into two group, with 6 treated with EMA (EMA group), and the rest 6 with EVLA (EVLA group). Results of coagulation, including coagulation, fibrinolysis and platelet activation, were assessed at three or four different time points: before, immediately after, 24 h (and 48 h) after ablation. The diameter change, a measure of efficacy, was ultrasonographically measured before and 1 month after the ablation. Histological changes were grossly and microscopically evaluated immediately, 1 and 3 month(s) after the ablation. The length of the ablated vein and preoperative average diameter were comparable between the two groups. In both EMA and EVLA groups, several coagulation parameters, fibrinolysis and platelet activation parameters only underwent slight changes. Ultrasound imaging displayed that the diameter reduction of the veins treated by EMA was significantly larger than by EVLA, in consistent with the results of macroscopic examination. Microscopic examination revealed necrosis and thickening of the vein wall, and occlusion of the lumen within 3 months after ablation in both EMA and EVLA groups. It is concluded that EMA is a minimally invasive therapy, which appears to be safe and effective for treatment of lateral veins in goats.

  20. Effects of material composition on the ablation performance of low density elastomeric ablators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tompkins, S. S.; Kabana, W. P.

    1973-01-01

    The ablation performance of materials composed of various concentrations of nylon, hollow silica spheres, hollow phenolic spheres, and four elastomeric resins was determined. Both blunt-body and flat-panel specimens were used, the cold-wall heating-rate ranges being 0.11 to 0.8 MW/sq m, respectively. The corresponding surface pressure ranges for these tests were 0.017 to 0.037 atmosphere and 0.004 to 0.005 atmosphere. Some of the results show that (1) the addition of nylon significantly improved the ablation performance, but the nylon was not compatible with one resin system; (2) panel and blunt-body specimen data do not show the same effect of phenolic sphere content on ablation effectiveness; and (3) there appears to be an optimum concentration of hollow silica spheres for good ablation performance. The composition of an efficient, nonproprietary ablator for lifting body application is identified and the ablation performance of this ablator is compared with the performance of three commercially available materials.

  1. Thermal Ablation Modeling for Silicate Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yih-Kanq

    2016-01-01

    A thermal ablation model for silicates is proposed. The model includes the mass losses through the balance between evaporation and condensation, and through the moving molten layer driven by surface shear force and pressure gradient. This model can be applied in ablation simulations of the meteoroid or glassy Thermal Protection Systems for spacecraft. Time-dependent axi-symmetric computations are performed by coupling the fluid dynamics code, Data-Parallel Line Relaxation program, with the material response code, Two-dimensional Implicit Thermal Ablation simulation program, to predict the mass lost rates and shape change. For model validation, the surface recession of fused amorphous quartz rod is computed, and the recession predictions reasonably agree with available data. The present parametric studies for two groups of meteoroid earth entry conditions indicate that the mass loss through moving molten layer is negligibly small for heat-flux conditions at around 1 MW/cm(exp. 2).

  2. Deep Dive Topic: Choosing between ablators

    SciTech Connect

    Hurricane, O. A.; Thomas, C.; Olson, R.

    2015-07-14

    Recent data on implosions using identical hohlraums and very similar laser drives underscores the conundrum of making a clear choice of one ablator over another. Table I shows a comparison of Be and CH in a nominal length, gold, 575 μm-diameter, 1.6 mg/cc He gas-fill hohlraum while Table II shows a comparison of undoped HDC and CH in a +700 length, gold, 575 μm diameter, 1.6 mg/cc He gas fill hohlraum. As can be seen in the tables, the net integrated fusion performance of these ablators is the same to within error bars. In the case of the undoped HDC and CH ablators, the hot spot shapes of the implosions were nearly indistinguishable for the experiments listed in Table II.

  3. Numerical Modeling of Ablation Heat Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewing, Mark E.; Laker, Travis S.; Walker, David T.

    2013-01-01

    A unique numerical method has been developed for solving one-dimensional ablation heat transfer problems. This paper provides a comprehensive description of the method, along with detailed derivations of the governing equations. This methodology supports solutions for traditional ablation modeling including such effects as heat transfer, material decomposition, pyrolysis gas permeation and heat exchange, and thermochemical surface erosion. The numerical scheme utilizes a control-volume approach with a variable grid to account for surface movement. This method directly supports implementation of nontraditional models such as material swelling and mechanical erosion, extending capabilities for modeling complex ablation phenomena. Verifications of the numerical implementation are provided using analytical solutions, code comparisons, and the method of manufactured solutions. These verifications are used to demonstrate solution accuracy and proper error convergence rates. A simple demonstration of a mechanical erosion (spallation) model is also provided to illustrate the unique capabilities of the method.

  4. Optically thick ablation fronts. [in interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konigl, A.

    1984-01-01

    The physical characteristics of optically thick ablation fronts such as interstellar clouds are analyzed. Attention is given to cold clumps in both planar and spherical geometries and modifications caused by accelerations in a gravitational field or by evaporation of the clumps when encountered hot gas. The effects of ablation on the appearance of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability are examined in both linear and nonlinear regimes. The results of the calculations are applied to the astrophysical phenomena of cold clumps immersed in a supersonic flow, optically thick jets, and ablation in stellar envelopes. Evaporation in an optically thick front is projected to be orders of magnitude larger than evaporation in electron-conduction fronts in optically thin conditions. The optically thick processes could then be useful for modeling flows from, e.g., newly formed stars and active galactic nuclei.

  5. Laser ablated hard coating for microtools

    DOEpatents

    McLean, W. II; Balooch, M.; Siekhaus, W.J.

    1998-05-05

    Wear-resistant coatings composed of laser ablated hard carbon films, are deposited by pulsed laser ablation using visible light, on instruments such as microscope tips and micro-surgical tools. Hard carbon, known as diamond-like carbon (DLC), films produced by pulsed laser ablation using visible light enhances the abrasion resistance, wear characteristics, and lifetimes of small tools or instruments, such as small, sharp silicon tips used in atomic probe microscopy without significantly affecting the sharpness or size of these devices. For example, a 10--20 nm layer of diamond-like carbon on a standard silicon atomic force microscope (AFM) tip, enables the useful operating life of the tip to be increased by at least twofold. Moreover, the low inherent friction coefficient of the DLC coating leads to higher resolution for AFM tips operating in the contact mode. 12 figs.

  6. Specific Impulse Definition for Ablative Laser Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herren, Kenneth A.; Gregory, Don A.

    2004-01-01

    The term "specific impulse" is so ingrained in the field of rocket propulsion that it is unlikely that any fundamental argument would be taken seriously for its removal. It is not an ideal measure but it does give an indication of the amount of mass flow (mass loss/time), as in fuel rate, required to produce a measured thrust over some time period This investigation explores the implications of being able to accurately measure the ablation rate and how the language used to describe the specific impulse results may have to change slightly, and recasts the specific impulse as something that is not a time average. It is not currently possible to measure the ablation rate accurately in real time so it is generally just assumed that a constant amount of material will be removed for each laser pulse delivered The specific impulse dependence on the ablation rate is determined here as a correction to the classical textbook definition.

  7. Caries-selective ablation: the second threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennig, Thomas; Rechmann, Peter; Jeitner, Peter; Kaufmann, Raimund

    1993-07-01

    The aim of the study was to describe the appropriate fluence necessary for the effective removal of dental decay by ablation processes without or with at least minimal removal of healthy dentin. The experiments were conducted at two wavelengths [355 nm (frequency tripled, Q-switched Nd:YAG-laser) and 377 nm (frequency doubled, gain-switched Alexandrite-laser)] found to be close to the maximum of preferential absorption of carious dentin over healthy dentin. Optoacoustic techniques were applied to determine the ablation thresholds of healthy and carious dentin. The ablation efficiencies at characteristic fluences were determined using non-tactile microtopography. During all experiments a fiber optic delivery system was engaged.

  8. Performance of Conformable Ablators in Aerothermal Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, J.; Fan, W.; Skokova, K.; Stackpoole, M.; Beck, R.; Chavez-Garcia, J.

    2012-01-01

    Conformable Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator, a cousin of Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA), was developed at NASA Ames Research Center as a lightweight thermal protection system under the Fundamental Aeronautics Program. PICA is made using a brittle carbon substrate, which has a very low strain to failure. Conformable PICA is made using a flexible carbon substrate, a felt in this case. The flexible felt significantly increases the strain to failure of the ablator. PICA is limited by its thermal mechanical properties. Future NASA missions will require heatshields that are more fracture resistant than PICA and, as a result, NASA Ames is working to improve PICAs performance by developing conformable PICA to meet these needs. Research efforts include tailoring the chemistry of conformable PICA with varying amounts of additives to enhance mechanical properties and testing them in aerothermal environments. This poster shows the performance of conformable PICA variants in arc jets tests. Some mechanical and thermal properties will also be presented.

  9. Laser ablated hard coating for microtools

    DOEpatents

    McLean, II, William; Balooch, Mehdi; Siekhaus, Wigbert J.

    1998-05-05

    Wear-resistant coatings composed of laser ablated hard carbon films, are deposited by pulsed laser ablation using visible light, on instruments such as microscope tips and micro-surgical tools. Hard carbon, known as diamond-like carbon (DLC), films produced by pulsed laser ablation using visible light enhances the abrasion resistance, wear characteristics, and lifetimes of small tools or instruments, such as small, sharp silicon tips used in atomic probe microscopy without significantly affecting the sharpness or size of these devices. For example, a 10-20 nm layer of diamond-like carbon on a standard silicon atomic force microscope (AFM) tip, enables the useful operating life of the tip to be increased by at least twofold. Moreover, the low inherent friction coefficient of the DLC coating leads to higher resolution for AFM tips operating in the contact mode.

  10. Effects of endocardial microwave energy ablation

    PubMed Central

    Climent, Vicente; Hurlé, Aquilino; Ho, Siew Yen; Sánchez-Quintana, Damián

    2005-01-01

    Until recently the treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF) consisted primarily of palliation, mostly in the form of pharmacological intervention. However because of recent advances in nonpharmacologic therapies, the current expectation of patients and referring physicians is that AF will be cured, rather than palliated. In recent years there has been a rapid expansion in the availability and variety of energy sources and devices for ablation. One of these energies, microwave, has been applied clinically only in the last few years, and may be a promising technique that is potentially capable of treating a wide range of ventricular and supraventricular arrhythmias. The purpose of this study was to review microwave energy ablation in surgical treatment of AF with special interest in histology and ultrastructure of lesions produced by this endocardial ablation procedure. PMID:16943871

  11. Laser Thermal Ablation of Thyroid Benign Nodules

    PubMed Central

    Shahrzad, Mohammad Karim

    2015-01-01

    Thermal ablation therapies for benign thyroid nodules have been introduced in recent years to avoid the complications of traditional methods such as surgery. Despite the little complications and the reportedly acceptable efficacy of thermal ablation methods, quite few medical centers have sought the potential benefits of employing them. This paper provides an introduction to the literature, principles and advances of Percutaneous Laser Ablation therapy of thyroid benign nodules, as well as a discussion on its efficacy, complications and future. Several clinical research papers evaluating the thermal effect of laser on the alleviation of thyroid nodules have been reviewed to illuminate the important points. The results of this research can help researchers to advance the approach and medical centers to decide on investing in these novel therapies. PMID:26705459

  12. Catheter ablation of fascicular ventricular tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Ramprakash, B; Jaishankar, S; Rao, Hygriv B; Narasimhan, C

    2008-08-01

    Fascicular ventricular tachycardia (VT) is an idiopathic VT with right bundle branch block morphology and left-axis deviation occuring predominantly in young males. Fascicular tachycardia has been classified into three subtypes namely, left posterior fascicular VT, left anterior fascicular VT and upper septal fascicular VT. The mechanism of this tachycardia is believed to be localized reentry close to the fascicle of the left bundle branch. The reentrant circuit is composed of a verapamil sensitive zone, activated antegradely during tachycardia and the fast conduction Purkinje fibers activated retrogradely during tachycardia recorded as the pre Purkinje and the Purkinje potentials respectively. Catheter ablation is the preferred choice of therapy in patients with fascicular VT. Ablation is carried out during tachycardia, using conventional mapping techniques in majority of the patients, while three dimensional mapping and sinus rhythm ablation is reserved for patients with nonmappable tachycardia.

  13. Intraoperative Radiotherapy in Childhood Malignant Astrocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Sohail R.; Haddy, Theresa B.; Ashayeri, Ebrahim; Goldson, Alfred L.

    1984-01-01

    A 12-year-old black male patient with glioblastoma multiforme was treated with intraoperative radiotherapy followed by conventional external beam radiation and chemotherapy. The authors' clinical experience with these therapeutic measures is discussed. PMID:6330375

  14. Historical aspects of heavy ion radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Raju, M.R.

    1995-03-01

    This paper presents historical developments of heavy-ion radiotherapy including discussion of HILAC and HIMAC and discussion of cooperation between Japan and the United States, along with personal reflections.

  15. Imaging Instrumentation and Techniques for Precision Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parodi, Katia; Parodi, Katia; Thieke, Christian; Thieke, Christian

    Over the last decade, several technological advances have considerably improved the achievable precision of dose delivery in radiation therapy. Clinical exploitation of the superior tumor-dose conformality offered by modern radiotherapy techniques like intensity-modulated radiotherapy and ion beam therapy requires morphological and functional assessment of the tumor during the entire therapy chain from treatment planning to beam application and treatment response evaluation. This chapter will address the main rationale and role of imaging in state-of-the-art external beam radiotherapy. Moreover, it will present the status of novel imaging instrumentation and techniques being nowadays introduced in clinical use or still under development for image guidance and, ultimately, dose guidance of precision radiotherapy.

  16. [Conformal radiotherapy for vertebral bone metastasis].

    PubMed

    Faivre, J C; Py, J F; Vogin, G; Martinage, G; Salleron, J; Royer, P; Grandgirard, N; Pasquier, D; Thureau, S

    2016-10-01

    Analgesic external beam radiation therapy is a standard of care for patients with uncomplicated painful bone metastases and/or prevention of bone complications. In case of fracture risk, radiation therapy is performed after surgery in a consolidation of an analgesic purpose and stabilizing osteosynthesis. Radiotherapy is mandatory after vertebroplasty or kyphoplasty. Spinal cord compression - the only emergency in radiation therapy - is indicated postoperatively either exclusively for non surgical indication. Analgesic re-irradiation is possible in the case of insufficient response or recurrent pain after radiotherapy. Metabolic radiation, bisphosphonates or denosumab do not dissuade external radiation therapy for pain relief. Systemic oncological treatments can be suspended with a period of wash out given the risk of radiosensitization or recall phenomenon. Better yet, the intensity modulated radiotherapy and stereotactic radiotherapy can be part of a curative strategy for oligometastatic patients and suggest new treatment prospects.

  17. [Hopes of high dose-rate radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Fouillade, Charles; Favaudon, Vincent; Vozenin, Marie-Catherine; Romeo, Paul-Henri; Bourhis, Jean; Verrelle, Pierre; Devauchelle, Patrick; Patriarca, Annalisa; Heinrich, Sophie; Mazal, Alejandro; Dutreix, Marie

    2017-03-07

    In this review, we present the synthesis of the newly acquired knowledge concerning high dose-rate irradiations and the hopes that these new radiotherapy modalities give rise to. The results were presented at a recent symposium on the subject.

  18. [Radiotherapy of carcinoma of the salivary glands].

    PubMed

    Servagi-Vernat, S; Tochet, F

    2016-09-01

    Indication, doses, and technique of radiotherapy for salivary glands carcinoma are presented, and the contribution of neutrons and carbon ions. The recommendations for delineation of the target volumes and organs at risk are detailed.

  19. Heavy particle radiotherapy: prospects and pitfalls

    SciTech Connect

    Faju, M.R.

    1980-01-01

    The use of heavy particles in radiotherapy of tumor volumes is examined. Particles considered are protons, helium ions, heavy ions, negative pions, and fast neutrons. Advantages and disadvantages are discussed. (ACR)

  20. Intracranial aneurysm formation after radiotherapy for medulloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Kamide, Tomoya; Mohri, Masanao; Misaki, Kouichi; Uchiyama, Naoyuki; Nakada, Mitsutoshi

    2016-01-01

    Background: The development of an intracranial aneurysm after radiotherapy is rare but secondary effect of cranial irradiation in a primary disease treatment. Case Description: The patient was a 17-year-old male adolescent who was diagnosed as having a posterior fossa medulloblastoma when he was 8 years old. He had undergone tumor resection with radiotherapy and chemotherapy. A distal posterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysm was identified by magnetic resonance imaging 8 years after radiotherapy and grew rapidly throughout the next 1 year. The patient underwent microsurgical clipping and was discharged without deficit. Conclusion: This experience demonstrates that physicians caring for patients who have undergone intracranial radiotherapy should carefully consider the possibility of an aneurysmal formation when conducting follow-up imaging. PMID:27999713

  1. Thermal Response Simulation of Ultra Light Weight Phenolic Carbon Ablator by the Use of the Ablation Analysis Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Sumio; Okuyama, Keiichi; Gibo, Kenta; Miyagi, Takuma; Suzuki, Toshiyuki; Fujita, Kazuhisa; Sakai, Takeharu; Nishio, Seiji; Watanabe, Akihiro

    A space vehicle which undergoes the atmospheric re-entry or a planetary entry needs the heat shield system to protect inner equipments against severe aerodynamic heating environments. Charring ablator is usually used for the heat shield system. In order to design the heat shield system, it is necessary to predict the thermal behavior under aerodynamic heating by ablation analysis. A computer code for charring ablation and thermal response analysis is newly developed for simulation of one-dimensional transient thermal behavior of charring ablation materials. The mathematical model for the charring ablation including basic equation and computational method of ablation analysis is briefly described. A new ultra light weight phenolic carbon ablator called LATS (Lightweight Ablator series for Transfer vehicle) was recently developed. Arc-heated tests of the LATS ablator were carried out and measured results of the temperature response and surface mass loss are compared with the simulation results of the ablation analysis program. The agreement between the results of simulation and measurement is found to be good. It is also found that the mathematical model used in the ablation code can be applied to the ablation analysis of the low density LATS ablator.

  2. Depth Profiling of Polymer Composites by Ultrafast Laser Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Christopher; Clayton, Clive; Longtin, Jon

    2009-03-01

    Past work has shown femtosecond laser ablation to be an athermal process at low fluences in polymer systems. The ablation rate in this low fluence regime is very low, allowing for micro-scale removal of material. We have taken advantage of this fact to perform shallow depth profiling ablation on carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites. Neat composite and resin samples were studied to establish reference ablation profiles. These profiles and the effects of the heterogeneous distribution of carbon fibers were observed through confocal laser profilometry and optical and scanning electron microscopy. Weathered materials that have been subjected to accelerated tests in artificial sunlight or water conditions were ablated to determine the correlation between exposure and change in ablation characteristics. Preliminary Raman and micro-ATR analysis performed before and after ablation shows no chemical changes indicative of thermal effects. The low-volume-ablation property was utilized in an attempt to expose the sizing-matrix interphase for analysis.

  3. Thermal ablation of liver metastases from colorectal cancer: radiofrequency, microwave and laser ablation therapies.

    PubMed

    Vogl, Thomas J; Farshid, Parviz; Naguib, Nagy N N; Darvishi, Abbas; Bazrafshan, Babak; Mbalisike, Emmanuel; Burkhard, Thorsten; Zangos, Stephan

    2014-07-01

    Surgery is currently considered the treatment of choice for patients with colorectal cancer liver metastases (CRLM) when resectable. The majority of these patients can also benefit from systemic chemotherapy. Recently, local or regional therapies such as thermal ablations have been used with acceptable outcomes. We searched the medical literature to identify studies and reviews relevant to radiofrequency (RF) ablation, microwave (MW) ablation and laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT) in terms of local progression, survival indexes and major complications in patients with CRLM. Reviewed literature showed a local progression rate between 2.8 and 29.7 % of RF-ablated liver lesions at 12-49 months follow-up, 2.7-12.5 % of MW ablated lesions at 5-19 months follow-up and 5.2 % of lesions treated with LITT at 6-month follow-up. Major complications were observed in 4-33 % of patients treated with RF ablation, 0-19 % of patients treated with MW ablation and 0.1-3.5 % of lesions treated with LITT. Although not significantly different, the mean of 1-, 3- and 5-year survival rates for RF-, MW- and laser ablated lesions was (92.6, 44.7, 31.1 %), (79, 38.6, 21 %) and (94.2, 61.5, 29.2 %), respectively. The median survival in these methods was 33.2, 29.5 and 33.7 months, respectively. Thermal ablation may be an appropriate alternative in patients with CRLM who have inoperable liver lesions or have operable lesions as an adjunct to resection. However, further competitive evaluation should clarify the efficacy and priority of these therapies in patients with colorectal cancer liver metastases.

  4. EUS-Guided Ethanol Ablation of Insulinomas

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Shan-yu; Lu, Xiu-ping; Jiang, Hai-xing

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Surgical resection is a standard treatment for insulinomas; however, it is associated with a high risk of complications and limited to specific suitable candidates. In recent years, endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided ethanol ablation of insulinomas has emerged as a new therapeutic option, especially for elderly patients and candidates unfit for surgery. We aimed to evaluate the feasibility and safety of this technique for insulinomas. Four patients diagnosed with insulinomas based on EUS–fine-needle aspiration and immunohistochemistry results underwent EUS-guided 95% ethanol ablation. A comprehensive literature review was performed to understand the current status of the feasibility, safety, and effects of EUS-guided ethanol ablation of insulinomas. EUS-guided ethanol ablation of insulinomas was successfully completed in all the 4 patients. There were no perioperative or postoperative complications. The patients were discharged at 3 days after the procedure. No recurrence of hypoglycemia or tumors was noted during follow-up (range, 3–6 months). Literature review showed 8 patients with insulinomas who underwent EUS-guided ethanol ablation. All the procedures were successful, with no need for further surgical treatment. Among these reviewed cases, 6 patients had no post-procedural complications, while other 2 patients showed a mild increase in the serum levels of lipase and/or pancreatic enzymes within 48 h post-procedure; furthermore, 1 of these 2 patients presented at a later date with medically controllable hematoma and ulceration. During follow-up, 6 patients remained asymptomatic and normoglycemic, while the 2 patients who presented post-procedural complications developed occasional mild confusion. EUS-guided ethanol ablation of insulinomas is an effective and safe modality, with an acceptable level of post-procedural complications. However, the long-term effects of this new therapeutic option need to be validated in a large randomized controlled

  5. [Radiotherapy for small cell lung carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Pourel, N

    2016-10-01

    Radiotherapy for small cell lung carcinoma has known significant improvements over the past 10 years especially through routine use of PET-CT in the initial work-up and contouring before treatment. Prophylactic cranial irradiation remains a standard of care for locally advanced disease and is a subject of controversy for metastatic disease. A new indication for thoracic radiotherapy may soon arise for metastatic disease, still confirmation studies are ongoing.

  6. Blisters - an unusual effect during radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Höller, U; Schubert, T; Budach, V; Trefzer, U; Beyer, M

    2013-11-01

    The skin reaction to radiation is regularly monitored in order to detect enhanced radiosensitivity of the patient, unexpected interactions (e.g. with drugs) or any inadvertent overdosage. It is important to distinguish secondary disease from radiation reaction to provide adequate treatment and to avoid unnecessary discontinuation of radiotherapy. A case of bullous eruption or blisters during radiotherapy of the breast is presented. Differential diagnoses bullous pemphigoid, pemphigus vulgaris, and bullous impetigo are discussed and treatment described.

  7. Radiotherapy in the treatment of vertebral hemangiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Faria, S.L.; Schlupp, W.R.; Chiminazzo, H. Jr.

    1985-02-01

    Symptomatic vertebral hemangiomas are not common. Although radiotherapy has been used as treatment, the data are sparse concerning total dose, fractionation and results. The authors report nine patients with vertebral hemangioma treated with 3000-4000 rad, 200 rad/day, 5 fractions per week, followed from 6 to 62 months. Seventy-seven percent had complete or almost complete disappearance of the symptoms. Radiotherapy schedules are discussed.

  8. Revisiting the interplay between ablation, collisional, and radiative processes during ns-laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Autrique, D.; Gornushkin, I.; Alexiades, V.; Chen, Z.; Bogaerts, A.; Rethfeld, B.

    2013-10-01

    A study of ns-laser ablation is presented, which focuses on the transient behavior of the physical processes that act in and above a copper sample. A dimensionless multiphase collisional radiative model describes the interplay between the ablation, collisional, and radiative mechanisms. Calculations are done for a 6 ns-Nd:YAG laser pulse operating at 532 nm and fluences up to 15 J/cm2. Temporal intensity profiles as well as transmissivities are in good agreement with experimental results. It is found that volumetric ablation mechanisms and photo-processes both play an essential role in the onset of ns-laser induced breakdown.

  9. Subcellular analysis by laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A; Shrestha, Bindesh

    2014-12-02

    In various embodiments, a method of laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LAESI-MS) may generally comprise micro-dissecting a cell comprising at least one of a cell wall and a cell membrane to expose at least one subcellular component therein, ablating the at least one subcellular component by an infrared laser pulse to form an ablation plume, intercepting the ablation plume by an electrospray plume to form ions, and detecting the ions by mass spectrometry.

  10. Ablation of carbide materials with femtosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumitru, Gabriel; Romano, Valerio; Weber, Heinz P.; Sentis, Marc; Marine, Wladimir

    2003-01-01

    The response of cemented tungsten carbide and of titanium carbonitride was investigated with respect to damage and ablation properties, under interaction with ultrashort laser pulses. These carbide materials present high microhardness and are of significant interest for tribological applications. The experiments were carried out in air with a commercial Ti:sapphire laser at energy densities on the target up to 6.5 J/cm 2. The irradiated target surfaces were analyzed with optical, SEM and AFM techniques and the damage and ablation threshold values were determined using the measured spot diameters and the calculated incident energy density distributions.

  11. High throughput solar cell ablation system

    SciTech Connect

    Harley, Gabriel; Pass, Thomas; Cousins, Peter John; Viatella, John

    2014-10-14

    A solar cell is formed using a solar cell ablation system. The ablation system includes a single laser source and several laser scanners. The laser scanners include a master laser scanner, with the rest of the laser scanners being slaved to the master laser scanner. A laser beam from the laser source is split into several laser beams, with the laser beams being scanned onto corresponding wafers using the laser scanners in accordance with one or more patterns. The laser beams may be scanned on the wafers using the same or different power levels of the laser source.

  12. General Model for Multicomponent Ablation Thermochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milos, Frank S.; Marschall, Jochen; Rasky, Daniel J. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    A previous paper (AIAA 94-2042) presented equations and numerical procedures for modeling the thermochemical ablation and pyrolysis of thermal protection materials which contain multiple surface species. This work describes modifications and enhancements to the Multicomponent Ablation Thermochemistry (MAT) theory and code for application to the general case which includes surface area constraints, rate limited surface reactions, and non-thermochemical mass loss (failure). Detailed results and comparisons with data are presented for the Shuttle Orbiter reinforced carbon-carbon oxidation protection system which contains a mixture of sodium silicate (Na2SiO3), silica (SiO2), silicon carbide (SiC), and carbon (C).

  13. Testing of Advanced Conformal Ablative TPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasch, Matthew; Agrawal, Parul; Beck, Robin

    2013-01-01

    In support of the CA250 project, this paper details the results of a test campaign that was conducted at the Ames Arcjet Facility, wherein several novel low density thermal protection (TPS) materials were evaluated in an entry like environment. The motivation for these tests was to investigate whether novel conformal ablative TPS materials can perform under high heat flux and shear environment as a viable alternative to rigid ablators like PICA or Avcoat for missions like MSL and beyond. A conformable TPS over a rigid aeroshell has the potential to solve a number of challenges faced by traditional rigid TPS materials (such as tiled Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) system on MSL, and honeycomb-based Avcoat on the Orion Multi Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV)). The compliant (high strain to failure) nature of the conformable ablative materials will allow better integration of the TPS with the underlying aeroshell structure and enable monolithic-like configuration and larger segments to be used in fabrication.A novel SPRITE1 architecture, developed by the researchers at NASA Ames was used for arcjet testing. This small probe like configuration with 450 spherecone, enabled us to test the materials in a combination of high heat flux, pressure and shear environment. The heat flux near the nose were in the range of 500-1000 W/sq cm whereas in the flank section of the test article the magnitudes were about 50 of the nose, 250-500W/sq cm range. There were two candidate conformable materials under consideration for this test series. Both test materials are low density (0.28 g/cu cm) similar to Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) or Silicone Impregnated Refractory Ceramic Ablator (SIRCA) and are comprised of: A flexible carbon substrate (Carbon felt) infiltrated with an ablative resin system: phenolic (Conformal-PICA) or silicone (Conformal-SICA). The test demonstrated a successful performance of both the conformable ablators for heat flux conditions between 50

  14. Effects of Laser Wavelength on Ablator Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    Wavelength-dependent or spectral radiation effects are potentially significant for thermal protection materials. NASA atmospheric entry simulations include trajectories with significant levels of shock layer radiation which is concentrated in narrow spectral lines. Tests using two different high powered lasers, the 10.6 micron LHMEL I CO2 laser and the near-infrared 1.07 micron fiber laser, on low density ablative thermal protection materials offer a unique opportunity to evaluate spectral effects. Test results indicated that the laser wavelength can impact the thermal response of an ablative material, in terms of bond-line temperatures, penetration times, mass losses, and char layer thicknesses.

  15. Thermal tumor ablation in clinical use.

    PubMed

    Brace, C

    2011-01-01

    Although a surgical procedure is performed by visual inspection with histopathological assessment of the excised tumor and margins, percutaneous and noninvasive thermal ablation is performed strictly with the aid of imaging. Applicator guidance into the target zone, treatment monitoring and verification, and clinical follow-up rely on effective imaging. Detailed discussion of imaging is beyond the scope of this article, but the influence of imaging on the choice of thermal ablation or procedural approach will be discussed as needed. More information on imaging for interventional therapies can be found in other articles in this issue of IEEE Pulse.

  16. High throughput solar cell ablation system

    DOEpatents

    Harley, Gabriel; Pass, Thomas; Cousins, Peter John; Viatella, John

    2012-09-11

    A solar cell is formed using a solar cell ablation system. The ablation system includes a single laser source and several laser scanners. The laser scanners include a master laser scanner, with the rest of the laser scanners being slaved to the master laser scanner. A laser beam from the laser source is split into several laser beams, with the laser beams being scanned onto corresponding wafers using the laser scanners in accordance with one or more patterns. The laser beams may be scanned on the wafers using the same or different power levels of the laser source.

  17. Harnessing the immunomodulatory effect of thermal and non-thermal ablative therapies for cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Bastianpillai, Christopher; Petrides, Neophytos; Shah, Taimur; Guillaumier, Stephanie; Ahmed, Hashim U; Arya, Manit

    2015-12-01

    Minimally invasive interventional therapies are evolving rapidly and their use for the treatment of solid tumours is becoming more extensive. The in situ destruction of solid tumours by such therapies is thought to release antigens that can prime an antitumour immune response. In this review, we offer an overview of the current evidence for immune response activation associated with the utilisation of the main thermal and non-thermal ablation therapies currently in use today. This is followed by an assessment of the hypothesised mechanisms behind this immune response priming and by a discussion of potential methods of harnessing this specific response, which may subsequently be applicable in the treatment of cancer patients. References were identified through searches of PubMed/MEDLINE and Cochrane databases to identify peer-reviewed original articles, meta-analyses and reviews. Papers were searched from 1850 until October 2014. Articles were also identified through searches of the authors' files. Only papers published in English were reviewed. Thermal and non-thermal therapies have the potential to stimulate antitumour immunity although the current body of evidence is based mostly on murine trials or small-scale phase 1 human trials. The evidence for this immune-modulatory response is currently the strongest in relation to cryotherapy and radiotherapy, although data is accumulating for related ablative treatments such as high-intensity focused ultrasound, radiofrequency ablation and irreversible electroporation. This effect may be greatly enhanced by combining these therapies with other immunostimulatory interventions. Evidence is emerging into the immunomodulatory effect associated with thermal and non-thermal ablative therapies used in cancer treatment in addition to the mechanism behind this effect and how it may be harnessed for therapeutic use. A potential exists for treatment approaches that combine ablation of the primary tumour with control and possible

  18. Radiotherapy for Vestibular Schwannomas: A Critical Review

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Erin S.; Suh, John H.

    2011-03-15

    Vestibular schwannomas are slow-growing tumors of the myelin-forming cells that cover cranial nerve VIII. The treatment options for patients with vestibular schwannoma include active observation, surgical management, and radiotherapy. However, the optimal treatment choice remains controversial. We have reviewed the available data and summarized the radiotherapeutic options, including single-session stereotactic radiosurgery, fractionated conventional radiotherapy, fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, and proton beam therapy. The comparisons of the various radiotherapy modalities have been based on single-institution experiences, which have shown excellent tumor control rates of 91-100%. Both stereotactic radiosurgery and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy have successfully improved cranial nerve V and VII preservation to >95%. The mixed data regarding the ideal hearing preservation therapy, inherent biases in patient selection, and differences in outcome analysis have made the comparison across radiotherapeutic modalities difficult. Early experience using proton therapy for vestibular schwannoma treatment demonstrated local control rates of 84-100% but disappointing hearing preservation rates of 33-42%. Efforts to improve radiotherapy delivery will focus on refined dosimetry with the goal of reducing the dose to the critical structures. As future randomized trials are unlikely, we suggest regimented pre- and post-treatment assessments, including validated evaluations of cranial nerves V, VII, and VIII, and quality of life assessments with long-term prospective follow-up. The results from such trials will enhance the understanding of therapy outcomes and improve our ability to inform patients.

  19. [Experience with radiofrequency ablation in the treatment of unresectable pelvic recurrence of rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Mátrai, Zoltán; Fehér, István; Péley, Gábor; Rényi Vámos, Ferenc; Farkas, Emil; Sulyok, Zoltán; Kovács, Tibor; Köves, István

    2005-02-01

    More than half of colorectal cancers are located in the rectum, and the number of such cancers is increasing. In Hungary colorectal cancers are diagnosed predominantly in advanced stages. In the last five years 736 patients with colorectal cancer were operated on at our Department, with the following stage distribution: Dukes A 10%, BI 10%, B2 31%, C 36% and D 13%. The local recurrence rate is decreasing since the introduction of total mesorectal excision and preoperative radiation. Effective treatment options are however poor for unresectable pelvic recurrences. Chemo- and radiotherapy have severe limitations in this advanced stage cancer. In recent years there are a few publications on the minimal-invasive radiofrequency tumour ablation (RFTA) technique, which is an effective treatment for primary and metastatic liver carcinomas and is a new palliative for the local treatment of pelvic recurrence. The aim of this study was to assess the response to treatment using ultrasound-guided radiofrequency ablation in two patients with unresectable pelvic recurrent rectal cancer.

  20. Experimental measurement of ablation effects in plasma armature railguns

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, J.V.; Parsons, W.M.

    1986-01-01

    Experimental evidence supporting the importance of ablation in plasma armature railguns is presented. Experiments conducted using the HYVAX and MIDI-2 railguns are described. Several indirect effects of ablation are identified from the experimental results. An improved ablation model of plasma armature dynamics is proposed which incorporates the restrike process.

  1. Ablation techniques for primary and metastatic liver tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Michael J; Willatt, Jonathon; Majdalany, Bill S; Kielar, Ania Z; Chong, Suzanne; Ruma, Julie A; Pandya, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Ablative treatment methods have emerged as safe and effective therapies for patients with primary and secondary liver tumors who are not surgical candidates at the time of diagnosis. This article reviews the current literature and describes the techniques, complications and results for radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation. PMID:26839642

  2. External-beam radiotherapy: A realistic therapeutic option for the gastric antral vascular ectasia

    PubMed Central

    Montero, Angel; Fernández-Lizarbe, Eva; Rodríguez, Miguel-Ángel; Hernanz, Raúl; Polo, Alfredo; Ramos, Alfredo

    2012-01-01

    The gastric antral vascular ectasia (GAVE) is a well recognizable endoscopic entity characterized by the presence of multiple linear angioectatic vessels predominantly located in the antrum, with a typical appearance of “watermelon stomach”. This condition typically affects elderly females presenting as iron-deficiency anaemia due to chronic gastric bleeding. Standard treatment is endoscopic ablation of the gastric mucosa. For non-responders, radical surgery is considered a curative treatment but with considerable morbidity and mortality. Radiation therapy is a well-known alternative for many benign diseases, including anomalous vascular hyperproliferative diseases, although its role has not been defined for GAVE. The present case illustrates the efficacy and tolerance of radiotherapy in the treatment of symptomatic gastric watermelon. PMID:24377029

  3. Perivascular parenchymal extension of the ablation zone following liver microwave ablation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Saurabh; Siriwardana, Pulathis Nilantha; Johnston, Edward William; Bandula, Steven; Davidson, Brian Ritchie; Illing, Rowland Oliver

    2016-03-31

    A 69-year-old man who presented with abdominal discomfort was, on examination, found to have a palpable abdominal mass. Contrast-enhanced CT showed a mass arising from the inferior vena cava, which biopsy confirmed to be a leiomyosarcoma. One month after chemoradiotherapy, CT demonstrated a new 15 mm solitary central right liver metastasis. Microwave ablation (MWA) of the metastasis was performed using an Acculis Sulis V system (Angiodynamics, USA) at a power of 140 Watts for 4 min, with no immediate complications. After 1 month, MRI with gadolinium was performed to assess the liver ablation zone. The MRI demonstrated thrombosis of a right inferior hepatic vein branch leading to the ablation zone and extension of the ablation zone 1 cm into the tissue around the thrombosed vessel.

  4. [Stereotactic ablative irradiation for lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Antoni, D; Srour, I; Noël, G; Mornex, F

    2014-01-01

    Stereotactic radiotherapy for lung cancer is a technique that is now well established in the therapeutic arsenal. Protocols are effective, with very high local control rate and an acceptable rate of survival if one takes into account the patient's age and comorbidities. Complications are rare. This review of the literature analyses the whole process of the therapeutic indications and future prospects.

  5. Adapting radiotherapy to hypoxic tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinen, Eirik; Søvik, Åste; Hristov, Dimitre; Bruland, Øyvind S.; Rune Olsen, Dag

    2006-10-01

    In the current work, the concepts of biologically adapted radiotherapy of hypoxic tumours in a framework encompassing functional tumour imaging, tumour control predictions, inverse treatment planning and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) were presented. Dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCEMRI) of a spontaneous sarcoma in the nasal region of a dog was employed. The tracer concentration in the tumour was assumed related to the oxygen tension and compared to Eppendorf histograph measurements. Based on the pO2-related images derived from the MR analysis, the tumour was divided into four compartments by a segmentation procedure. DICOM structure sets for IMRT planning could be derived thereof. In order to display the possible advantages of non-uniform tumour doses, dose redistribution among the four tumour compartments was introduced. The dose redistribution was constrained by keeping the average dose to the tumour equal to a conventional target dose. The compartmental doses yielding optimum tumour control probability (TCP) were used as input in an inverse planning system, where the planning basis was the pO2-related tumour images from the MR analysis. Uniform (conventional) and non-uniform IMRT plans were scored both physically and biologically. The consequences of random and systematic errors in the compartmental images were evaluated. The normalized frequency distributions of the tracer concentration and the pO2 Eppendorf measurements were not significantly different. 28% of the tumour had, according to the MR analysis, pO2 values of less than 5 mm Hg. The optimum TCP following a non-uniform dose prescription was about four times higher than that following a uniform dose prescription. The non-uniform IMRT dose distribution resulting from the inverse planning gave a three times higher TCP than that of the uniform distribution. The TCP and the dose-based plan quality depended on IMRT parameters defined in the inverse planning procedure (fields

  6. UV laser ablation patterns in intraocular lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagiou, D. P.; Evangelatos, Ch.; Apostolopoulos, A.; Spyratou, E.; Bacharis, C.; Makropoulou, M.; Serafetinides, A. A.

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate the effect of UV solid state laser radiation on intraocular lens (IOL) polymer surfaces as an alternative method to conventional surface shaping techniques for IOLs customization. Laser ablation experiments were performed on PMMA plates and commercially available hydrophobic and hydrophilic acrylic IOLs with the 5th harmonic of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (λ=213 nm). Circular arrays of holes were drilled on the polymer surface, covering the centre and the peripheries of the IOL. The morphology of the ablated IOL surface was examined with a conventional optical microscope (Leitz GMBH Wetzlar) and with a scanning electron microscope (SEM, Fei - Innova Nanoscope) at various laser parameters. Quantitative measurements of ablation rates were performed with a contact profilometer (Dektak-150), in which a mechanical stylus scanned across the surface of gold-coated IOLs (after SEM imaging) to measure variationsF in surface height. Laser interaction with IOLs depends on optical and mechanical material properties, in addition to laser radiation parameters. The exact ablation mechanism is discussed. Some polymer materials, depending on their properties, are more susceptible to the photothermal mechanism than the photochemical one or vice versa. In summary, every IOL polymer exhibits specific attributes in its interaction with the 5th harmonic of Nd:YAG laser.

  7. Organized Atrial Tachycardias after Atrial Fibrillation Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Castrejón-Castrejón, Sergio; Ortega, Marta; Pérez-Silva, Armando; Doiny, David; Estrada, Alejandro; Filgueiras, David; López-Sendón, José L.; Merino, José L.

    2011-01-01

    The efficacy of catheter-based ablation techniques to treat atrial fibrillation is limited not only by recurrences of this arrhythmia but also, and not less importantly, by new-onset organized atrial tachycardias. The incidence of such tachycardias depends on the type and duration of the baseline atrial fibrillation and specially on the ablation technique which was used during the index procedure. It has been repeatedly reported that the more extensive the left atrial surface ablated, the higher the incidence of organized atrial tachycardias. The exact origin of the pathologic substrate of these trachycardias is not fully understood and may result from the interaction between preexistent regions with abnormal electrical properties and the new ones resultant from radiofrequency delivery. From a clinical point of view these atrial tachycardias tend to remit after a variable time but in some cases are responsible for significant symptoms. A precise knowledge of the most frequent types of these arrhythmias, of their mechanisms and components is necessary for a thorough electrophysiologic characterization if a new ablation procedure is required. PMID:21941669

  8. Outpatient laser tonsillar ablation under local anaesthetic.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Peter J; Latif, Abdul

    2004-11-01

    Outpatient laser ablation of the palatine tonsils under local anaesthetic is an alternative technique to capsular tonsillectomy for recurrent tonsillitis under general anaesthetic. Laser tonsillotomy ablates up to 70% of the tonsillar tissue and is performed when patients choose not to have a conventional tonsillectomy, or are unfit for a general anaesthetic. The technique described here is an adaptation of Krespis' laser-assisted serial tonsillectomy (LAST) whereby only one sitting is required. Krespis' technique effectively eliminates recurrent tonsillitis in 96% of the cases over a 4-year follow-up period and represents the only substantial study looking at treating recurrent tonsillitis with outpatient laser ablation. This study is a retrospective postal survey of 19 patients who underwent laser tonsillar ablation under local anaesthetic for recurrent chronic tonsillitis from 1997 to 2001 and was performed in liaison with the clinical audit department at Basildon Hospital. We had a response rate of 74% and an admission rate of 0%, which compares favourably with day case tonsillectomy surgery. Of the patients, 75% did not experience further episodes of tonsillitis 12 months after the procedure and 77% of the patients were glad they had the operation. Although this technique does not completely eliminate tonsillitis, it offers an alternative for those patients who prefer a procedure that is done quickly in an outpatient setting without the additional problems of general anaesthesia, overnight hospital admission and long waiting lists.

  9. Highspeed laser ablation cutting of metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullmann, F.; Loeschner, U.; Hartwig, L.; Szczepanski, D.; Schille, J.; Gronau, S.; Knebel, T.; Drechsel, J.; Ebert, R.; Exner, H.

    2013-02-01

    In laser ablation cutting, irradiation of high-intense laser beams causes ejection of molten and evaporated material out of the cutting zone as a result of high pressure gradients, induced by expanding plasma plumes. This paper investigates highspeed laser ablation cutting of industrial grade metal sheets using high-brilliant continuous wave fiber lasers with output powers up to 5 kW. The laser beam was deflected with scan speeds up to 2700 m/min utilizing both a fast galvanometer scan system and a polygon scan system. By sharp laser beam focusing using different objectives with focal lengths ranging between 160 mm and 500 mm, small laser spot diameters between 16.5 μm and 60 μm were obtained, respectively. As a result high peak intensities between 3*108 W/cm² and 2.5*109 W/cm² were irradiated on the sample surface, and cutting kerfs with a maximum depth of 1.4 mm have been produced. In this study the impact of the processing parameters laser power, laser spot diameter, cutting speed, and number of scans on both the achievable cutting depth and the cutting edge quality was investigated. The ablation depths, the heights of the cutting burr, as well as the removed material volumes were evaluated by means of optical microscope images and cross section photographs. Finally highspeed laser ablation cutting was studied using an intensified ultra highspeed camera in order to get useful insights into the cutting process.

  10. Intumescent-ablator coatings using endothermic fillers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawko, P. M.; Riccitiello, S. R. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An intumescent-ablator coating composition which contains the ammonium salt of 1,4-nitroaniline-2-sulfonic acid or 4,4 dinitrosul fanilide, a polymeric binder system and about 5 to 30% weight of an endothermic filler is reported. The filler has a decomposition temperature about or within the exothermic region of the intumescent agent.

  11. Microwave ablation devices for interventional oncology.

    PubMed

    Ward, Robert C; Healey, Terrance T; Dupuy, Damian E

    2013-03-01

    Microwave ablation is one of the several options in the ablation armamentarium for the treatment of malignancy, offering several potential benefits when compared with other ablation, radiation, surgical and medical treatment modalities. The basic microwave system consists of the generator, power distribution system and antennas. Often under image (computed tomography or ultrasound) guidance, a needle-like antenna is inserted percutaneously into the tumor, where local microwave electromagnetic radiation is emitted from the probe's active tip, producing frictional tissue heating, capable of causing cell death by coagulation necrosis. Half of the microwave ablation systems use a 915 MHz generator and the other half use a 2450 MHz generator. To date, there are no completed clinical trials comparing microwave devices head-to-head. Prospective comparisons of microwave technology with other treatment alternatives, as well as head-to-head comparison with each microwave device, is needed if this promising field will garner more widespread support and use in the oncology community.

  12. Ablation Resistant Zirconium and Hafnium Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, Jeffrey (Inventor); White, Michael J. (Inventor); Kaufman, Larry (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    High temperature ablation resistant ceramic composites have been made. These ceramics are composites of zirconium diboride and zirconium carbide with silicon carbide, hafnium diboride and hafnium carbide with silicon carbide and ceramic composites which contain mixed diborides and/or carbides of zirconium and hafnium. along with silicon carbide.

  13. Laboratory Micrometeroid/Dust Ablation Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, E.; Horanyi, M.; Janches, D.; Munsat, T. L.; Plane, J. M. C.; Simolka, J.; Sternovsky, Z.

    2014-12-01

    Each day, somewhere between 5-270 tonnes of meteoric material ablates in Earth's upper atmosphere. Thisenormous range is significant because the Interplanetary Dust Particle (IDP) input has implications in ourunderstanding of meteor transport in the atmosphere, the formation of layers of metal atoms and ions,nucleation of noctilucent clouds, effects on stratospheric aerosols and O3 chemistry, and dust evolution inour solar system. As the dust ablates, it produces light, as well as a plasma trail of ionized atmosphericatoms and electrons. These meteor signatures are detected by photographic means, or by radar, but thereremain uncertainties in the luminous efficiency and ionization coefficient of meteors - two parameters thatare essential to evaluate densities, masses, height distributions and fluxes. Precise measurements of theseparameters would allow for not only an understanding of the layers of metal atoms and ions and meteoricsmoke particles in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere, but also would allow for the Earth's atmosphereto be used as a dust detector to detect and characterize the dust environment in our solar system. This work discusses the preliminary results of the new dust ablation facility at the 3 MV hypervelocity dust accelerator at the Institute for Modeling Plasma, Atmospheres and Cosmic Dust (IMPACT) at the University of Colorado, which aims to characterize the ionization coefficient and luminous efficiency of ablating micrometeroids.

  14. Combining Electrolysis and Electroporation for Tissue Ablation.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Mary; Rubinsky, Liel; Meir, Arie; Raju, Narayan; Rubinsky, Boris

    2015-08-01

    Electrolytic ablation is a method that operates by delivering low magnitude direct current to the target region over long periods of time, generating electrolytic products that destroy cells. This study was designed to explore the hypothesis stating that electrolytic ablation can be made more effective when the electrolysis-producing electric charges are delivered using electric pulses with field strength typical in reversible electroporation protocols. (For brevity we will refer to tissue ablation protocols that combine electroporation and electrolysis as E(2).) The mechanistic explanation of this hypothesis is related to the idea that products of electrolysis generated by E(2) protocols can gain access to the interior of the cell through the electroporation permeabilized cell membrane and therefore cause more effective cell death than from the exterior of an intact cell. The goal of this study is to provide a first-order examination of this hypothesis by comparing the charge dosage required to cause a comparable level of damage to a rat liver, in vivo, when using either conventional electrolysis or E(2) approaches. Our results show that E(2) protocols produce tissue damage that is consistent with electrolytic ablation. Furthermore, E(2) protocols cause damage comparable to that produced by conventional electrolytic protocols while delivering orders of magnitude less charge to the target tissue over much shorter periods of time.

  15. Atmospheric Profile Imprint in Firewall Ablation Coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ceplecha, Z.; Pecina, P.

    1984-01-01

    A general formula which expresses the distance along the meteoric fireball trajectory 1 as a function of t is discussed. Differential equations which include the motion and ablation of a single nonfragmenting meteor body are presented. The importance of the atmospheric density profile in the meteor formula is emphasized.

  16. Microwave tumors ablation: principles, clinical applications and review of preliminary experiences.

    PubMed

    Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Laganà, Domenico; Mangini, Monica; Fontana, Federico; Dionigi, Gianlorenzo; Boni, Luigi; Rovera, Francesca; Cuffari, Salvatore; Fugazzola, Carlo

    2008-01-01

    Local ablative techniques have been developed to enable local control of unresectable tumors. Ablation has been performed with several modalities including ethanol ablation, laser ablation, cryoablation, and radiofrequency ablation. Microwave technology is a new thermal ablation technique for different types of tumors, providing all the benefits of radiofrequency and substantial advantages. Microwave ablation has been applied to liver, lung, kidney and more rarely to bone, pancreas and adrenal glands. Preliminary works show that microwave ablation may be a viable alternative to other ablation techniques in selected patients. However further studies are necessary to confirm short- and long-term effectiveness of the methods and to compare it with other ablative techniques, especially RF.

  17. Thermochemical Ablation Analysis of the Orion Heatshield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sixel, William

    2015-01-01

    The Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle will one day carry astronauts to the Moon and beyond, and Orion's heatshield is a critical component in ensuring their safe return to Earth. The Orion heatshield is the structural component responsible for absorbing the intense heating environment caused by re-entry to Earth's atmosphere. The heatshield is primarily composed of Avcoat, an ablative material that is consumed during the re-entry process. Ablation is primarily characterized by two processes: pyrolysis and recession. The decomposition of in-depth virgin material is known as pyrolysis. Recession occurs when the exposed surface of the heatshield reacts with the surrounding flow. The Orion heatshield design was changed from an individually filled Avcoat honeycomb to a molded block Avcoat design. The molded block Avcoat heatshield relies on an adhesive bond to keep it attached to the capsule. In some locations on the heatshield, the integrity of the adhesive bond cannot be verified. For these locations, a mechanical retention device was proposed. Avcoat ablation was modelled in CHAR and the in-depth virgin material temperatures were used in a Thermal Desktop model of the mechanical retention device. The retention device was analyzed and shown to cause a large increase in the maximum bondline temperature. In order to study the impact of individual ablation modelling parameters on the heatshield sizing process, a Monte Carlo simulation of the sizing process was proposed. The simulation will give the sensitivity of the ablation model to each of its input parameters. As part of the Monte Carlo simulation, statistical uncertainties on material properties were required for Avcoat. Several properties were difficult to acquire uncertainties for: the pyrolysis gas enthalpy, non-dimensional mass loss rate (B´c), and Arrhenius equation parameters. Variability in the elemental composition of Avcoat was used as the basis for determining the statistical uncertainty in pyrolysis gas

  18. Fascicular ventricular tachycardia: experience with radiofrequency ablation.

    PubMed

    Magalhaes, Sónia; Gonçalves, Helena; Primo, João; Sá, Ana Paula; Silva, Paula; Rosas, Rui; Gama, Vasco

    2006-05-01

    Fascicular ventricular tachycardia (VT), the commonest form of idiopathic left VT, occurs more frequently in young males without structural heart disease and usually presents as paroxysmal palpitations. It is subdivided into two more common subtypes, posterior and anterior. A macro-reentrant circuit involving a considerable and variable extent of the left interventricular septum is presumed to be the underlying arrhythmogenic mechanism. A slow conduction zone with particular sensitivity to verapamil participates in the circuit and it seems that diastolic potentials (DP) represent the electrical activity in or near this zone. The fascicles of the left bundle appear to constitute part of the retrograde pathway and Purkinje potentials (PP) are assumed to represent their activation. In the present retrospective study, the authors review twelve cases of fascicular VT (ten posterior and two anterior) evaluated in the electrophysiology laboratory. Although initial induction was obtained in all patients, reproducibility was poor as a consequence of frequent contact inhibition during endocardial mapping of the left ventricle and this meant that ablation was not possible in two cases. Two cases of associated atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia (AVNRT) and a case of associated atrioventricular reentrant tachycardia by a right posterior accessory pathway were documented, which suggest a correlated anatomic substrate. After ablation of the slow nodal pathway in one of the AVNRTs, fascicular VT was no longer inducible. Ablation of the fascicular VT was attempted in nine patients, at the tachycardia exit site (characterized by an early ventricular electrogram fused with a Purkinje potential) in two patients with anterior fascicular VT and in five patients with the posterior subtype, and near the slow conduction pathway (site with simultaneous recording of DP and PP) in the other two patients. The initial success rate with a single procedure was 78%, two of the ablations

  19. Aluminum X-ray mass-ablation rate measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Kline, John L.; Hager, Jonathan D.

    2016-10-15

    Measurements of the mass ablation rate of aluminum (Al) have been completed at the Omega Laser Facility. Measurements of the mass-ablation rate show Al is higher than plastic (CH), comparable to high density carbon (HDC), and lower than beryllium. The mass-ablation rate is consistent with predictions using a 1D Lagrangian code, Helios. Lastly, the results suggest Al capsules have a reasonable ablation pressure even with a higher albedo than beryllium or carbon ablators warranting further investigation into the viability of Al capsules for ignition should be pursued.

  20. Plume collimation for laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A.

    2016-06-07

    In various embodiments, a device may generally comprise a capillary having a first end and a second end; a laser to emit energy at a sample in the capillary to ablate the sample and generate an ablation plume in the capillary; an electrospray apparatus to generate an electrospray plume to intercept the ablation plume to produce ions; and a mass spectrometer having an ion transfer inlet to capture the ions. The ablation plume may comprise a collimated ablation plume. The device may comprise a flow cytometer. Methods of making and using the same are also described.

  1. Plume collimation for laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A.

    2014-09-09

    In various embodiments, a device may generally comprise a capillary having a first end and a second end; a laser to emit energy at a sample in the capillary to ablate the sample and generate an ablation plume in the capillary; an electrospray apparatus to generate an electrospray plume to intercept the ablation plume to produce ions; and a mass spectrometer having an ion transfer inlet to capture the ions. The ablation plume may comprise a collimated ablation plume. The device may comprise a flow cytometer. Methods of making and using the same are also described.

  2. Contemporary Status of Percutaneous Ablation for the Small Renal Mass.

    PubMed

    Shin, Benjamin J; Chick, Jeffrey Forris Beecham; Stavropoulos, S William

    2016-03-01

    Renal cell carcinoma is the tenth most common malignancy in the USA, with upwards of 61,000 new cases and resulting in more than 14,000 deaths annually. Although partial nephrectomy remains the standard treatment, image-guided nephron-sparing ablative techniques including cryoablation, radiofrequency ablation, and microwave ablation have emerged as treatment options in certain patient populations. Ablative therapies have high technical successes, low tumor recurrence rates, and preserve renal parenchymal volume. The purpose of this article is to provide an update on ablation therapies for small renal masses.

  3. Burn, freeze, or photo-ablate?: comparative symptom profile in Barrett's dysplasia patients undergoing endoscopic ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Kanwar Rupinder S.; Gross, Seth A.; Greenwald, Bruce D.; Hemminger, Lois L.; Wolfsen, Herbert C.

    2009-06-01

    Background: There are few data available comparing endoscopic ablation methods for Barrett's esophagus with high-grade dysplasia (BE-HGD). Objective: To determine differences in symptoms and complications associated with endoscopic ablation. Design: Prospective observational study. Setting: Two tertiary care centers in USA. Patients: Consecutive patients with BE-HGD Interventions: In this pilot study, symptoms profile data were collected for BE-HGD patients among 3 endoscopic ablation methods: porfimer sodium photodynamic therapy, radiofrequency ablation and low-pressure liquid nitrogen spray cryotherapy. Main Outcome Measurements: Symptom profiles and complications from the procedures were assessed 1-8 weeks after treatment. Results: Ten BE-HGD patients were treated with each ablation modality (30 patients total; 25 men, median age: 69 years (range 53-81). All procedures were performed in the clinic setting and none required subsequent hospitalization. The most common symptoms among all therapies were chest pain, dysphagia and odynophagia. More patients (n=8) in the porfimer sodium photodynamic therapy group reported weight loss compared to radio-frequency ablactation (n=2) and cryotherapy (n=0). Four patients in the porfimer sodium photodynamic therapy group developed phototoxicity requiring medical treatment. Strictures, each requiring a single dilation, were found in radiofrequency ablactation (n=1) and porfimer sodium photodynamic therapy (n=2) patients. Limitations: Small sample size, non-randomized study. Conclusions: These three endoscopic therapies are associated with different types and severity of post-ablation symptoms and complications.

  4. Radiotherapy Treatment Planning for Testicular Seminoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wilder, Richard B.; Buyyounouski, Mark K.; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Beard, Clair J.

    2012-07-15

    Virtually all patients with Stage I testicular seminoma are cured regardless of postorchiectomy management. For patients treated with adjuvant radiotherapy, late toxicity is a major concern. However, toxicity may be limited by radiotherapy techniques that minimize radiation exposure of healthy normal tissues. This article is an evidence-based review that provides radiotherapy treatment planning recommendations for testicular seminoma. The minority of Stage I patients who choose adjuvant treatment over surveillance may be considered for (1) para-aortic irradiation to 20 Gy in 10 fractions, or (2) carboplatin chemotherapy consisting of area under the curve, AUC = 7 Multiplication-Sign 1-2 cycles. Two-dimensional radiotherapy based on bony anatomy is a simple and effective treatment for Stage IIA or IIB testicular seminoma. Centers with expertise in vascular and nodal anatomy may consider use of anteroposterior-posteroanterior fields based on three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy instead. For modified dog-leg fields delivering 20 Gy in 10 fractions, clinical studies support placement of the inferior border at the top of the acetabulum. Clinical and nodal mapping studies support placement of the superior border of all radiotherapy fields at the top of the T12 vertebral body. For Stage IIA and IIB patients, an anteroposterior-posteroanterior boost is then delivered to the adenopathy with a 2-cm margin to the block edge. The boost dose consists of 10 Gy in 5 fractions for Stage IIA and 16 Gy in 8 fractions for Stage IIB. Alternatively, bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin chemotherapy for 3 cycles or etoposide and cisplatin chemotherapy for 4 cycles may be delivered to Stage IIA or IIB patients (e.g., if they have a horseshoe kidney, inflammatory bowel disease, or a history of radiotherapy).

  5. Direct Pulmonary Vein Ablation with Stenosis Prevention Therapy

    PubMed Central

    DeSimone, Christopher V.; Holmes, David R.; Ebrille, Elisa; Syed, Faisal F.; Ladewig, Dorothy J.; Mikell, Susan B.; Powers, Joanne; Suddendorf, Scott H.; Gilles, Emily J.; Danielsen, Andrew J.; Hodge, David O.; Kapa, Suraj; Asirvatham, Samuel J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The dominant location of electrical triggers for initiating atrial fibrillation (AF) originates from the muscle sleeves inside pulmonary veins (PVs). Currently, radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is performed outside of the PVs to isolate, rather than directly ablate these tissues, due to the risk of intraluminal PV stenosis. Methods In 4 chronic canine experiments, we performed direct PV muscle sleeve RFA ± post-ablation drug-coated balloon (DCB) treatment with paclitaxel/everolimus. Of the 4 PVs, 2 PVs were ablated and treated with DCB, 1 PV was ablated without DCB treatment (positive control), and 1 PV was left as a negative control. Local electrograms were assessed in PVs for near-field signals and were targeted for ablation. After 12-14 weeks survival, PVs were interrogated for absence of near-field PV potentials, and each PV was assessed for stenosis. Results All canines survived the study period without cardiorespiratory complications, and remained ambulatory. In all canines, PVs that were ablated and treated with DCB remained without any significant intraluminal stenosis. In contrast, PVs that were ablated and not treated with DCB showed near or complete intraluminal stenosis. At terminal study, PV potentials remained undetectable. A blinded, histologic analysis demonstrated that ablated PVs without DCB treatment had extensive thrombus, fibrin, mineralization, and elastin disruption. Conclusion Our chronic canine data suggest that direct PV tissue ablation without subsequent stenosis is feasible with the use of post-ablation DCBs. PMID:26075706

  6. Electromagnetic measurement and modeling techniques for microwave ablation probes.

    PubMed

    Brannan, Joseph D

    2009-01-01

    Broadband scattering parameter measurement of a commercially available microwave ablation probe over the course of a 10 minute 45 Watt ablation cycle within ex-vivo bovine liver tissue is performed. Measurement results are compared to finite difference time domain simulation of the probe in non-ablated and fully ablated tissue geometries. Measurement and simulation results agree well from 0-3 GHz demonstrating the accuracy of a multi-compartmental ablation geometry modeling technique. The electromagnetic modeling technique presented in this paper introduces a useful design tool for optimizing microwave ablation probes without the need for multi-physics simulation packages. The relevance of tissue complex permittivity change with temperature to microwave ablation probe performance is discussed.

  7. Current status of thermal ablation treatments for lung malignancies.

    PubMed

    Dupuy, Damian E; Shulman, Maria

    2010-09-01

    About 75% of lung cancer patients are not surgical candidates, either due to advanced disease or medical comorbidities. Furthermore, conventional treatments that can be offered to these patients are beneficial only to a small percentage of them. Thermal ablation is a minimally invasive treatment that is commonly used in this group of patients, and which has shown promising results. Currently, the most widely used ablation techniques in the treatment of lung malignancies are radiofrequency ablation (RFA), microwave ablation, and cryoablation. Although the most studied technique is RFA, recent studies with microwave ablation and cryoablation have shown some advantages over RFA. This article reviews the application of thermal ablation in the thorax, including patient selection, basic aspects of procedure technique, imaging follow-up, treatment outcomes, and comparison of ablation techniques.

  8. Is surgery still the optimal treatment for stage I non-small cell lung cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Moghanaki, Drew

    2016-01-01

    There is debate about what is the optimal treatment for operable stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Although surgery has been the standard of care for centuries, recent retrospective and prospective randomized studies indicated that stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) could be an option for this group of patients with similar survival and less toxicities. However, to change the standard of care, more studies are needed and participating ongoing larger randomized studies is the best approach to resolve this controversy. PMID:27183993

  9. A systematic review of antiproton radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittner, Martin-Immanuel; Grosu, Anca-Ligia; Wiedenmann, Nicole; Wilkens, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Antiprotons have been proposed as possible particles for radiotherapy; over the past years, the renewed interest in the potential biomedical relevance led to an increased research activity. It is the aim of this review to deliver a comprehensive overview regarding the evidence accumulated so far, analysing the background and depicting the current status of antiprotons in radiotherapy. A literature search has been conducted, including major scientific and commercial databases. All articles and a number of relevant conference abstracts published in the respective field have been included in this systematic review. The physical basis of antiproton radiotherapy is complex; however, the characterisation of the energy deposition profile supports its potential use in radiotherapy. Also the dosimetry improved considerably over the past few years. Regarding the biological properties, data on the effects on cells are presented; however, definite conclusions regarding the relative biological effectiveness cannot be made at the moment and radiobiological evidence of enhanced effectiveness remains scarce. In addition, there is new evidence supporting the potential imaging properties, for example for online dose verification. Clinical settings which might profit from the use of antiprotons have been further tracked. Judging from the evidence available so far, clinical constellations requiring optimal sparing in the entrance region of the beam and re-irradiations might profit most from antiproton radiotherapy. While several open questions remain to be answered, first steps towards a thorough characterisation of this interesting modality have been made.

  10. A systematic review of antiproton radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittner, Martin-Immanuel; Grosu, Anca-Ligia; Wiedenmann, Nicole; Wilkens, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Antiprotons have been proposed as possible particles for radiotherapy; over the past years, the renewed interest in the potential biomedical relevance led to an increased research activity. It is the aim of this review to deliver a comprehensive overview regarding the evidence accumulated so far, analysing the background and depicting the current status of antiprotons in radiotherapy. A literature search has been conducted, including major scientific and commercial databases. All articles and a number of relevant conference abstracts published in the respective field have been included in this systematic review. The physical basis of antiproton radiotherapy is complex; however, the characterisation of the energy deposition profile supports its potential use in radiotherapy. Also the dosimetry improved considerably over the past few years. Regarding the biological properties, data on the effects on cells are presented; however, definite conclusions regarding the relative biological effectiveness cannot be made at the moment and radiobiological evidence of enhanced effectiveness remains scarce. In addition, there is new evidence supporting the potential imaging properties, for example for online dose verification. Clinical settings which might profit from the use of antiprotons have been further tracked. Judging from the evidence available so far, clinical constellations requiring optimal sparing in the entrance region of the beam and re-irradiations might profit most from antiproton radiotherapy. While several open questions remain to be answered, first steps towards a thorough characterisation of this interesting modality have been made.

  11. Fiducial marker guided prostate radiotherapy: a review.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Angela G M; Jain, Suneil; Hounsell, Alan R; O'Sullivan, Joe M

    2016-12-01

    Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) is an essential tool in the accurate delivery of modern radiotherapy techniques. Prostate radiotherapy positioned using skin marks or bony anatomy may be adequate for delivering a relatively homogeneous whole-pelvic radiotherapy dose, but these surrogates are not reliable when using reduced margins, dose escalation or hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. Fiducial markers (FMs) for prostate IGRT have been in use since the 1990s. They require surgical implantation and provide a surrogate for the position of the prostate gland. A variety of FMs are available and they can be used in a number of ways. This review aimed to establish the evidence for using prostate FMs in terms of feasibility, implantation procedures, types of FMs used, FM migration, imaging modalities used and the clinical impact of FMs. A search strategy was defined and a literature search was carried out in Medline. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied, which resulted in 50 articles being included in this review. The evidence demonstrates that FMs provide a more accurate surrogate for the position of the prostate than either external skin marks or bony anatomy. A combination of FM alignment and soft-tissue analysis is currently the most effective and widely available approach to ensuring accuracy in prostate IGRT. FM implantation is safe and well tolerated. FM migration is possible but minimal. Standardization of all techniques and procedures in relation to the use of prostate FMs is required. Finally, a clinical trial investigating a non-surgical alternative to prostate FMs is introduced.

  12. CD47 in the tumor microenvironment limits cooperation between antitumor T-cell immunity and radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Soto-Pantoja, David R; Terabe, Masaki; Ghosh, Arunima; Ridnour, Lisa A; DeGraff, William G; Wink, David A; Berzofsky, Jay A; Roberts, David D

    2014-12-01

    Although significant advances in radiotherapy have increased its effectiveness in many cancer settings, general strategies to widen the therapeutic window between normal tissue toxicity and malignant tumor destruction would still offer great value. CD47 blockade has been found to confer radioprotection to normal tissues while enhancing tumor radiosensitivity. Here, we report that CD47 blockade directly enhances tumor immunosurveillance by CD8(+) T cells. Combining CD47 blockade with irradiation did not affect fibrosarcoma growth in T cell-deficient mice, whereas adoptive transfer of tumor-specific CD8(+) T cells restored combinatorial efficacy. Furthermore, ablation of CD8(+) T cells abolished radiotherapeutic response in immunocompetent syngeneic hosts. CD47 blockade in either target cells or effector cells was sufficient to enhance antigen-dependent CD8(+) CTL-mediated tumor cell killing in vitro. In CD47-deficient syngeneic hosts, engrafted B16 melanomas were 50% more sensitive to irradiation, establishing that CD47 expression in the microenvironment was sufficient to limit tumor radiosensitivity. Mechanistic investigations revealed increased tumor infiltration by cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells in a CD47-deficient microenvironment, with an associated increase in T cell-dependent intratumoral expression of granzyme B. Correspondingly, an inverse correlation between CD8(+) T-cell infiltration and CD47 expression was observed in human melanomas. Our findings establish that blocking CD47 in the context of radiotherapy enhances antitumor immunity by directly stimulating CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells, with the potential to increase curative responses.

  13. A dose comparison of proton radiotherapy and photon radiotherapy for pediatric brain tumor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. Y.; Cho, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of photon radiotherapy and to compare the dose of treatment planning between proton radiotherapy and 3D conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) for pediatric brain tumor patients. This study was conducted in five pediatric brain tumor patients who underwent craniospinal irradiation treatment from October 2013 to April 2014 in the hospital. The study compared organs at risk (OARs) by assessing the dose distribution of normal tissue from the proton plan and 3D-CRT. Furthermore, this study assessed the treatment plans by looking at the homogeneity index (HI) and conformity index (CI). As a result, the study revealed OARs due to the small volume proton radiotherapy dose distribution in the normal tissue. Also, by comparing HI and CI between the 3D-CRT and proton radiotherapy plan, the study found that the dose of proton radiotherapy plan was homogenized. When conducting 3D-CRT and proton radiotherapy in a dose-volume histogram comparison, the dose of distribution turned out to be low. Consequently, proton radiotherapy is used for protecting the normal tissue, and is used in tumor tissue as a homogenized dose for effective treatment.

  14. Spine radiosurgery for the local treatment of spine metastases: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy, image guidance, clinical aspects and future directions

    PubMed Central

    de Moraes, Fabio Ynoe; Taunk, Neil Kanth; Laufer, Ilya; Neves-Junior, Wellington Furtado Pimenta; Hanna, Samir Abdallah; de Andrade Carvalho, Heloisa; Yamada, Yoshiya

    2016-01-01

    Many cancer patients will develop spinal metastases. Local control is important for preventing neurologic compromise and to relieve pain. Stereotactic body radiotherapy or spinal radiosurgery is a new radiation therapy technique for spinal metastasis that can deliver a high dose of radiation to a tumor while minimizing the radiation delivered to healthy, neighboring tissues. This treatment is based on intensity-modulated radiotherapy, image guidance and rigid immobilization. Spinal radiosurgery is an increasingly utilized treatment method that improves local control and pain relief after delivering ablative doses of radiation. Here, we present a review highlighting the use of spinal radiosurgery for the treatment of metastatic tumors of the spine. The data used in the review were collected from both published studies and ongoing trials. We found that spinal radiosurgery is safe and provides excellent tumor control (up to 94% local control) and pain relief (up to 96%), independent of histology. Extensive data regarding clinical outcomes are available; however, this information has primarily been generated from retrospective and nonrandomized prospective series. Currently, two randomized trials are enrolling patients to study clinical applications of fractionation schedules spinal Radiosurgery. Additionally, a phase I clinical trial is being conducted to assess the safety of concurrent stereotactic body radiotherapy and ipilimumab for spinal metastases. Clinical trials to refine clinical indications and dose fractionation are ongoing. The concomitant use of targeted agents may produce better outcomes in the future. PMID:26934240

  15. Is radiation-induced ovarian ablation in breast cancer an obsolete procedure? Results of a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Asiri, Mushabbab Al; Tunio, Mutahir A; Abdulmoniem, Reham

    2016-01-01

    Background A meta-analysis was conducted to assess the impact of radiation-induced ovarian ablation (RT-OA) on amenorrhea cessation rates, progression-free survival, and overall survival in pre/perimenopausal women with breast cancer. Materials and methods The Medline, CANCERLIT, and Cochrane Library databases and search engines were searched to identify randomized controlled studies comparing RT-OA with control for early or metastatic breast cancer. Further, radiotherapy doses, techniques, and associated side effects were evaluated. Results Six controlled trials with a total patient population of 3,317 were identified. Pooled results from these trials showed significant amenorrhea rates (P<0.00001) and increase in progression-free survival in patients treated with RT-OA (P<0.00001). However, there was no difference in overall survival (P=0.37). The majority of patients were treated with larger field sizes with parallel-opposed anteroposterior and posteroanterior pelvic fields. RT-OA was generally well tolerated. Radiotherapy doses of 1,500 cGy in five fractions, 1,500 cGy in four fractions, 1,600 cGy in four fractions, and 2,000 cGy in ten fractions were associated with excellent amenorrhea rates. The resultant funnel plot showed no publication bias (Egger test P=0.16). Conclusion RT-OA is cost-effective and can safely be used in pre/perimenopausal women with metastatic breast cancer, or if luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone analogs are contraindicated, or in patients in whom fertility preservation is not an issue. Radiation dose of 1,500 cGy in five fractions, 1,500 cGy in four fractions, 1,600 cGy in four fractions, and 2,000 cGy in ten fractions showed more efficacies. However, further studies incorporating three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy are warranted. PMID:27307764

  16. Radiative ablation of disks around massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kee, Nathaniel Dylan

    Hot, massive stars (spectral types O and B) have extreme luminosities (10. 4 -10. 6 L?) that drive strong stellar winds through UV line-scattering.Some massive stars also have disks, formed by either decretion from the star (as in the rapidly rotating "Classical Be stars"), or accretion during the star's formation. This dissertation examines the role of stellar radiation in driving (ablating) material away from these circumstellar disks. A key result is that the observed month to year decay of Classical Be disks can be explained by line-driven ablation without, as previously done, appealing to anomalously strong viscous diffusion. Moreover, the higher luminosity of O stars leads to ablation of optically thin disks on dynamical timescales of order a day, providing a natural explanation for the lack of observed Oe stars. In addition to the destruction of Be disks, this dissertation also introduces a model for their formation by coupling observationally inferred non-radial pulsation modes and rapid stellar rotation to launch material into orbiting Keplerian disks of Be-like densities. In contrast to such Be decretion disks, star-forming accretion disks are much denser and so are generally optically thick to continuum processes. To circumvent the computational challenges associated with radiation hydrodynamics through optically thick media, we develop an approximate method for treating continuum absorption in the limit of geometrically thin disks. The comparison of ablation with and without continuum absorption shows that accounting for disk optical thickness leads to less than a 50% reduction in ablation rate, implying that ablation rate depends mainly on stellar properties like luminosity. Finally, we discuss the role of "thin-shell mixing" in reducing X-rays from colliding wind binaries. Laminar, adiabatic shocks produce well understood X-ray emission, but the emission from radiatively cooled shocks is more complex due to thin-shell instabilities. The parameter

  17. Temperature profiles of 980- and 1,470-nm endovenous laser ablation, endovenous radiofrequency ablation and endovenous steam ablation.

    PubMed

    Malskat, W S J; Stokbroekx, M A L; van der Geld, C W M; Nijsten, T E C; van den Bos, R R

    2014-03-01

    Endovenous thermal ablation (EVTA) techniques are very effective for the treatment of varicose veins, but their exact working mechanism is still not well documented. The lack of knowledge of mechanistic properties has led to a variety of EVTA protocols and a commercially driven dissemination of new or modified techniques without robust scientific evidence. The aim of this study is to compare temperature profiles of 980-and 1,470-nm endovenous laser ablation (EVLA), segmental radiofrequency ablation (RFA), and endovenous steam ablation (EVSA). In an experimental setting, temperature measurements were performed using thermocouples; raw potato was used to mimic a vein wall. Two laser wavelengths (980 and 1,470 nm) were used with tulip-tip fibers and 1,470 nm also with a radial-emitting fiber. Different powers and pullback speeds were used to achieve fluences of 30, 60, and 90 J/cm. For segmental RFA, 1 cycle of 20 s was analyzed. EVSA was performed with two and three pulses of steam per centimeter. Maximum temperature increase, time span of relevant temperature increase, and area under the curve of the time of relevant temperature increase were measured. In all EVLA settings, temperatures increased and decreased rapidly. High fluence is associated with significantly higher temperatures and increased time span of temperature rise. Temperature profiles of 980- and 1,470-nm EVLA with tulip-tip fibers did not differ significantly. Radial EVLA showed significantly higher maximum temperatures than tulip-tip EVLA. EVSA resulted in mild peak temperatures for longer durations than EVLA. Maximum temperatures with three pulses per centimeter were significantly higher than with two pulses. RFA temperature rises were relatively mild, resulting in a plateau-shaped temperature profile, similar to EVSA. Temperature increase during EVLA is fast with a high-peak temperature for a short time, where EVSA and RFA have longer plateau phases and lower maximum temperatures.

  18. Differences in breast tissue oxygenation following radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Dornfeld, Ken; Gessert, Charles E; Renier, Colleen M; McNaney, David D; Urias, Rodolfo E; Knowles, Denise M; Beauduy, Jean L; Widell, Sherry L; McDonald, Bonita L

    2011-08-01

    Tissue perfusion and oxygenation changes following radiotherapy may result from and/or contribute to the toxicity of treatment. Breast tissue oxygenation levels were determined in the treated and non-treated breast 1 year after radiotherapy for breast conserving treatment. Transcutaneous oxygenation varied between subjects in both treated and non-treated breast. Subjects without diabetes mellitus (n=16) had an average oxygenation level of 64.8 ± 19.9mmHg in the irradiated breast and an average of 72.3 ± 18.1mmHg (p=0.018) at the corresponding location in the control breast. Patients with diabetes (n=4) showed a different oxygenation pattern, with lower oxygenation levels in control tissue and no decrease in the irradiated breast. This study suggests oxygenation levels in normal tissues vary between patients and may respond differently after radiotherapy.

  19. Oral verrucous carcinoma. Treatment with radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, M.K.; Sankaranarayanan, R.; Padmanabhan, T.K.; Madhu, C.S.

    1988-02-01

    Fifty-two cases of oral verrucous carcinoma treated with radiotherapy at the Regional Cancer Centre, Trivandrum, Kerala, India in 1982 were evaluated to determine the distribution within the oral cavity, clinical extent, and effectiveness of radiotherapy in controlling the disease. The most common site was the buccal mucosa. Fifty percent of the patients had clinically negative regional lymph nodes and 33% were in earlier stages (T1, T2, N0, and M0). The overall 3-year no evidence of disease (NED) survival rate was 44%. The 3-year NED survival rate with radium implant was 86%. We cannot comment on anaplastic transformation after radiotherapy because our treatment failures have not been subjected for biopsy concerning this matter. Because the results are comparable with those of well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma, we think that the treatment policies advocated for oral squamous cell carcinoma are also applicable to oral verrucous carcinoma.

  20. [Good practice of image-guided radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    de Crevoisier, R; Créhange, G; Castelli, J; Lafond, C; Delpon, G

    2015-10-01

    Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) aims to take into account the anatomical variations occurring during the course of radiotherapy, by direct or indirect visualization of the target volume followed by a corrective action. The movements of the target, or at least the set-up errors are corrected by moving the treatment table, corresponding to the simplest and most validated IGRT modality in a standard practice. The deformations of the target volume and organs at risk are however much more common, and unfortunately much more complicated to consider, requiring multiple planning before or during the treatment, corresponding to the adaptive radiotherapy strategies. The planning target volume must be carefully chosen according to these anatomic variations. This article reviews the modalities of IGRT, standard or under evaluation, according to the different tumour sites.

  1. Radiotherapy-induced hypopituitarism: a review.

    PubMed

    Sathyapalan, Thozhukat; Dixit, Sanjay

    2012-05-01

    Hypopituitarism is a disorder caused by impaired hormonal secretions from the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. Radiotherapy is the most common cause of iatrogenic hypopituitarism. The hypothalamic-pituitary axis inadvertently gets irradiated in patients receiving prophylactic cranial radiotherapy for leukemia, total body irradiation and radiotherapy for intracranial, base skull, sinonasal and nasopharyngeal tumors. Radiation-induced hypopituitarism (RIH) is insidious, progressive and largely nonreversible. Mostly, RIH involves one hypothalamic-pituitary axis; however, multiple hormonal axes deficiency starts developing at higher doses. Although the clinical effects of the hypopituitarism are more profound in children and young adults, its implications in older adults are being increasingly recognized. The risk continues to persist or increase up to 10 years following radiation exposure. The clinical management of hypopituitarism is challenging both for the patients and healthcare providers. Here we have reviewed the scale of the problem, the risk factors and the management of RIH.

  2. One hundred years of radiotherapy in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Dincer, M; Kuter, S

    2001-10-01

    The study and practice of radiology in Turkey began in 1897, only 2 years after the discovery of X-rays. A simple X-ray machine was constructed in Istanbul, consisting of a Crookes tube, a Ruhmkorff coil, and a home-made battery. This machine was first used on wounded soldiers, for diagnostic purposes. The first report of X-rays being used therapeutically in Turkey was published in a national journal in 1904. By 1933, the most up-to-date radiotherapy equipment of the time had been installed in every major city in the country. Innovative radiotherapy techniques, such as rotational treatment, were also being tried in 1930s. Today, there are 45 radiotherapy centres in Turkey, and 400 radiation oncologists and 80 medical physicists practise there.

  3. TH-E-BRF-01: Exploiting Tumor Shrinkage in Split-Course Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Unkelbach, J; Craft, D; Hong, T; Papp, D; Wolfgang, J; Bortfeld, T; Ramakrishnan, J; Salari, E

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: In split-course radiotherapy, a patient is treated in several stages separated by weeks or months. This regimen has been motivated by radiobiological considerations. However, using modern image-guidance, it also provides an approach to reduce normal tissue dose by exploiting tumor shrinkage. In this work, we consider the optimal design of split-course treatments, motivated by the clinical management of large liver tumors for which normal liver dose constraints prohibit the administration of an ablative radiation dose in a single treatment. Methods: We introduce a dynamic tumor model that incorporates three factors: radiation induced cell kill, tumor shrinkage, and tumor cell repopulation. The design of splitcourse radiotherapy is formulated as a mathematical optimization problem in which the total dose to the liver is minimized, subject to delivering the prescribed dose to the tumor. Based on the model, we gain insight into the optimal administration of radiation over time, i.e. the optimal treatment gaps and dose levels. Results: We analyze treatments consisting of two stages in detail. The analysis confirms the intuition that the second stage should be delivered just before the tumor size reaches a minimum and repopulation overcompensates shrinking. Furthermore, it was found that, for a large range of model parameters, approximately one third of the dose should be delivered in the first stage. The projected benefit of split-course treatments in terms of liver sparing depends on model assumptions. However, the model predicts large liver dose reductions by more than a factor of two for plausible model parameters. Conclusion: The analysis of the tumor model suggests that substantial reduction in normal tissue dose can be achieved by exploiting tumor shrinkage via an optimal design of multi-stage treatments. This suggests taking a fresh look at split-course radiotherapy for selected disease sites where substantial tumor regression translates into reduced

  4. Ablation of steel using picosecond laser pulses in burst mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lickschat, Peter; Demba, Alexander; Weissmantel, Steffen

    2017-02-01

    Results obtained in picosecond laser processing of steel applying the burst mode are presented. Using the burst mode, pulse trains, i.e., bursts, consisting of a number of picosecond pulses with an inter-pulse delay of 12.5 ns and 10 ps pulse duration are applied for material processing. Small cavities with sizes in the range of the laser beam diameter made by single-burst ablation are compared to quadratic cavities of 0.5 × 0.5 mm² produced by multiburst ablation and simultaneous scanning of the laser beam across the steel sample surface. The ablated volume per pulse within the burst was calculated either from the ablated volume per burst or from the ablation depth of the quadratic cavities. With the second to fourth pulses in the bursts, a reduction of the ablated volume per pulse in comparison with the first pulse in the bursts (i.e., to the use of single pulses) was found for both single- and multiburst ablation, which is assumed to be due to plasma shielding. By contrast, the ablated volume per pulse within the bursts increases for the fifth to eighth pulses. Heat accumulation effect and the influence of the heated plasma can be assumed to be the reason for these higher ablation rates. SEM micrographs also show that there is a higher melt ejection out of the laser processed area. This is indicated by the formation of bulges about the ablated area.

  5. Pelvic radiotherapy and sexual function in women

    PubMed Central

    Froeding, Ligita Paskeviciute

    2015-01-01

    Background During the past decade there has been considerable progress in developing new radiation methods for cancer treatment. Pelvic radiotherapy constitutes the primary or (neo) adjuvant treatment of many pelvic cancers e.g., locally advanced cervical and rectal cancer. There is an increasing focus on late effects and an increasing awareness that patient reported outcomes (PROs) i.e., patient assessment of physical, social, psychological, and sexual functioning provides the most valid information on the effects of cancer treatment. Following cure of cancer allow survivors focus on quality of life (QOL) issues; sexual functioning has proved to be one of the most important aspects of concern in long-term survivors. Methods An updated literature search in PubMed was performed on pelvic radiotherapy and female sexual functioning/dysfunction. Studies on gynaecological, urological and gastrointestinal cancers were included. The focus was on the period from 2010 to 2014, on studies using PROs, on potential randomized controlled trials (RCTs) where female sexual dysfunction (FSD) at least constituted a secondary outcome, and on studies reporting from modern radiotherapy modalities. Results The literature search revealed a few RCTs with FSD evaluated as a PRO and being a secondary outcome measure in endometrial and in rectal cancer patients. Very limited information could be extracted regarding FSD in bladder, vulva, and anal cancer patients. The literature before and after 2010 confirms that pelvic radiotherapy, independent on modality, increases the risk significantly for FSD both compared to data from age-matched healthy control women and compared to data on patients treated by surgery only. There was only very limited data available on modern radiotherapy modalities. These are awaited during the next five years. Several newer studies confirm that health care professionals are still reluctant to discuss treatment induced sexual dysfunction with patients. Conclusions

  6. Meningioma after radiotherapy for Hodgkin's disease.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, M; Rosenstein, M; Figura, J H

    1999-08-01

    The most common second primary tumors after treatment of childhood Hodgkin's disease are leukemia, lymphoma, breast cancer, soft tissue sarcoma, and thyroid cancer. Although intracranial meningioma has been reported after radiotherapy to the scalp for benign conditions and for intracranial primary brain tumors, this appears to be an extremely rare sequelae of treatment for Hodgkin's disease. The authors describe a 15-year-old boy who underwent radiotherapy for Hodgkin's disease and in whom a meningioma developed in the posterior fossa 27 years later.

  7. Automated planning of ablation targets in atrial fibrillation treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keustermans, Johannes; De Buck, Stijn; Heidbüchel, Hein; Suetens, Paul

    2011-03-01

    Catheter based radio-frequency ablation is used as an invasive treatment of atrial fibrillation. This procedure is often guided by the use of 3D anatomical models obtained from CT, MRI or rotational angiography. During the intervention the operator accurately guides the catheter to prespecified target ablation lines. The planning stage, however, can be time consuming and operator dependent which is suboptimal both from a cost and health perspective. Therefore, we present a novel statistical model-based algorithm for locating ablation targets from 3D rotational angiography images. Based on a training data set of 20 patients, consisting of 3D rotational angiography images with 30 manually indicated ablation points, a statistical local appearance and shape model is built. The local appearance model is based on local image descriptors to capture the intensity patterns around each ablation point. The local shape model is constructed by embedding the ablation points in an undirected graph and imposing that each ablation point only interacts with its neighbors. Identifying the ablation points on a new 3D rotational angiography image is performed by proposing a set of possible candidate locations for each ablation point, as such, converting the problem into a labeling problem. The algorithm is validated using a leave-one-out-approach on the training data set, by computing the distance between the ablation lines obtained by the algorithm and the manually identified ablation points. The distance error is equal to 3.8+/-2.9 mm. As ablation lesion size is around 5-7 mm, automated planning of ablation targets by the presented approach is sufficiently accurate.

  8. Printable Nanophotonic Devices via Holographic Laser Ablation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qiancheng; Yetisen, Ali K; Sabouri, Aydin; Yun, Seok Hyun; Butt, Haider

    2015-09-22

    Holography plays a significant role in applications such as data storage, light trapping, security, and biosensors. However, conventional fabrication methods remain time-consuming, costly, and complex, limiting the fabrication of holograms and their extensive use. Here, we demonstrate a single-pulse laser ablation technique to write parallel surface gratings and Fresnel zone plates. We utilized a 6 ns high-energy green laser pulse to form interference patterns to record a surface grating with 820 nm periodicity and asymmetric zone plate holograms on 4.5 nm gold-coated substrates. The holographic recording process was completed within seconds. The optical characteristics of the interference patterns have been computationally modeled, and well-ordered polychromatic diffraction was observed from the fabricated holograms. The zone plate showed a significant diffraction angle of 32° from the normal incident for the focal point. The nanosecond laser interference ablation for rapid hologram fabrication holds great potential in a vast range of optical devices.

  9. Radiofrequency thermal ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Allgaier, H P; Galandi, D; Zuber, I; Blum, H E

    2001-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the major malignancies worldwide. Due to advanced or decompensated liver cirrhosis, comorbidity and multicentricity of the tumor lesions, 70-80% of HCC patients are inoperable at the time of diagnosis. Radiofrequency thermal ablation (RFTA) is a new minimally invasive and sage technique for the nonsurgical treatment of HCCs. Similar to other ablation techniques, the treatment strategy depends on several factors, including the patient's clinical status, the stage of liver cirrhosis and of the HCC. RFTA can be performed percutaneously, laparoscopically or after laparotomy. Advanced RFTA equipment, refined techniques of modifying tumor tissue response to RFTA, and combined treatment strategies should lead to better response rates even in larger HCCs.

  10. 3D Multifunctional Ablative Thermal Protection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, Jay; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Wilkinson, Curt; Mercer, Ken

    2015-01-01

    NASA is developing the Orion spacecraft to carry astronauts farther into the solar system than ever before, with human exploration of Mars as its ultimate goal. One of the technologies required to enable this advanced, Apollo-shaped capsule is a 3-dimensional quartz fiber composite for the vehicle's compression pad. During its mission, the compression pad serves first as a structural component and later as an ablative heat shield, partially consumed on Earth re-entry. This presentation will summarize the development of a new 3D quartz cyanate ester composite material, 3-Dimensional Multifunctional Ablative Thermal Protection System (3D-MAT), designed to meet the mission requirements for the Orion compression pad. Manufacturing development, aerothermal (arc-jet) testing, structural performance, and the overall status of material development for the 2018 EM-1 flight test will be discussed.

  11. Wire ablation scaling in Z pinches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Edmund; Sinars, Daniel; Mehlhorn, Tom; Oliver, Bryan

    2004-11-01

    We investigate the physical processes involved in wire ablation in Z pinches, using a combination of simple 1D steady-state analytic theory (similar in approach to that described in [1]) and simulations of the Z pinch under constant current drive conditions (using the radiation-MHD code ALEGRA-MHD). Of particular interest is the dependence of mass ablation rate on wire mass and drive current. We benchmark our scaling trends against simulations of a recently conducted series of experiments on Sandia National Laboratories' Z accelerator (Albuquerque, NM), in which only the mass of the wire array was varied. [1] V.V. Aleksandrov et al., Plasma Phys. Reports 27, 89 (2001) *Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockhead Martin Company for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  12. Laser ablation of gall bladder stones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marafi, M.; Makdisi, Y.; Bhatia, K. S.; Abdulah, A. H.; Kokaj, Y.; Mathew, K.; Quinn, F.; Qabazard, A.

    1999-06-01

    Study of laser interaction with calculi is presented. A system of Nd-Yag and Ho-Yag pulsed lasers were used to produce fluorescence and plasma signals at the stone surface surrounded by saline and bile fluids. Fourth harmonic from Nd-Yag laser was transmitted to the samples by graded UV optical fibres. Gall bladder stones of various compositions were subjected to the high power Ho-Yag laser. Temporal transients and spectral evolution of plasma and fluorescence signals were monitored by a streak camera. A profile of acoustic pressures generated by shock waves was recorded with sensitive hydrophones placed in the surrounding fluids. Ablation threshold, cavitation process and fluorescence dependence on the laser parameters were studied in detail. Potential of stone identification by fluorescence and possible hydrodynamic model for ablation of biological samples is discussed.

  13. Nozzle designs with pitch precursor ablatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blevins, H. R.; Bedard, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    Recent developments in carbon phenolic ablatives for solid rocket motor nozzles have yielded a pitch precursor carbon fiber offering significant raw material availability and cost saving advantages as compared to conventional rayon precursor material. This paper discusses the results of an experimental program conducted to assess the thermal performance and characterize the thermal properties of pitch precursor carbon phenolic ablatives. The end result of this program is the complete thermal characterization of pitch fabric, pitch mat, hybrid pitch/rayon fabric and pitch mat molding compound. With these properties determined an analytic capability now exists for predicting the thermal performance of these materials in rocket nozzle liner applications. Further planned efforts to verify material performance and analytical prediction procedures through actual rocket motor firings are also discussed.

  14. Ablation of neoplasia by direct current.

    PubMed

    Taylor, T V; Engler, P; Pullan, B R; Holt, S

    1994-08-01

    The application of low-voltage direct electrical current (DEC) has been studied in animals and humans for the ablation of anal condylomata, oesophageal cancer and Kaposi's sarcoma. Twenty milliamps of DEC passed through multiple 6 cm x 1 cm, flat-plate longitudinal electrodes into the squamous mucosa of the oesophagus of healthy dogs for periods ranging from 10 min to 2 h resulted in denudation and necrosis of the oesophageal mucosa at the site of application of the current. In humans, the application of DEC to two patients with benign anal condyloma acuminata, three patients with inoperable obstructing oesophageal cancer and one patient with disseminated Kaposi sarcoma resulted in striking necrosis of tumour tissue that was confirmed by macroscopic and microscopic studies. These initial findings imply promising therapeutic potential for the use of DEC as a simple, effective, safe, low-cost alternative for ablation of neoplasia.

  15. Palliative Radiofrequency Ablation for Recurrent Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jindal, Gaurav; Friedman, Marc; Locklin, Julia Wood, Bradford J.

    2006-06-15

    Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive local therapy for cancer. Its efficacy is now becoming well documented in many different organs, including liver, kidney, and lung. The goal of RFA is typically complete eradication of a tumor in lieu of an invasive surgical procedure. However, RFA can also play an important role in the palliative care of cancer patients. Tumors which are surgically unresectable and incompatible for complete ablation present the opportunity for RFA to be used in a new paradigm. Cancer pain runs the gamut from minor discomfort relieved with mild pain medication to unrelenting suffering for the patient, poorly controlled by conventional means. RFA is a tool which can potentially palliate intractable cancer pain. We present here a case in which RFA provided pain relief in a patient with metastatic prostate cancer with pain uncontrolled by conventional methods.

  16. Particle analysis using laser ablation mass spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Parker, Eric P.; Rosenthal, Stephen E.; Trahan, Michael W.; Wagner, John S.

    2003-09-09

    The present invention provides a method of quickly identifying bioaerosols by class, even if the subject bioaerosol has not been previously encountered. The method begins by collecting laser ablation mass spectra from known particles. The spectra are correlated with the known particles, including the species of particle and the classification (e.g., bacteria). The spectra can then be used to train a neural network, for example using genetic algorithm-based training, to recognize each spectra and to recognize characteristics of the classifications. The spectra can also be used in a multivariate patch algorithm. Laser ablation mass specta from unknown particles can be presented as inputs to the trained neural net for identification as to classification. The description below first describes suitable intelligent algorithms and multivariate patch algorithms, then presents an example of the present invention including results.

  17. [Atrial fibrillation ablation: application of nurse methodology].

    PubMed

    Ramos-González-Serna, Amelia; Mateos-García, M Dolores

    2011-01-01

    Ablation of pulmonary veins for treatment of atrial fibrillation involves applying radiofrequency energy wave by a catheter that causes a circumferential lesion to achieve electrical isolation and voltage drop in the interior. It is mainly applied when there is resistance to treatment and recurrence of symptoms affecting the quality of life of patients. The nurse is an important part of the multidisciplinary team who care for patients who undergo this procedure. The provision of comprehensive nursing care should include nursing procedures prior to, during, and after treatment to ensure the careful and systematic quality required. The aims of this article are: to provide specialised knowledge on the procedure of atrial fibrillation ablation, to describe the preparation of the electrophysiology laboratory, analyse nursing care and develop a standardized care plan for patients on whom this procedure is performed using the NANDA (North American Nursing Association) taxonomy and NIC (Nursing Intervention Classification).

  18. Monopole antennas for microwave catheter ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Labonte, S.; Blais, A.; Legault, S.R.; Ali, H.O.; Roy, L.

    1996-10-01

    The authors study the characteristics of various monopole antennas for microwave catheter ablation of the endocardium. The investigation is done with a computer model based on the finite-element method in the frequency domain. Three monopole geometries are considered: open-tip, dielectric-tip, and metal-tip. Calculations are made for the magnetic field, the reflection coefficient and the power deposition pattern of the antennas immersed in normal saline. The theoretical results are compared with measurements performed on prototypes and good agreement is obtained. The antenna characteristics suggest that the metal-tip monopole best fulfills the requirements of catheter ablation. The computer model is then used to compare metal-tip monopoles of different dimensions and to determine design trade-offs.

  19. Macrophages loaded with gold nanoshells for photothermal ablation of glioma: An in vitro model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makkouk, Amani Riad

    The current median survival of patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common type of glioma, remains at 14.6 months despite multimodal treatments (surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy). This research aims to study the feasibility of photothermal ablation of glioma using gold nanoshells that are heated upon laser irradiation at their resonance wavelength. The novelty of our approach lies in improving nanoshell tumor delivery by loading them in macrophages, which are known to be recruited to gliomas via tumor-released chemoattractive agents. Ferumoxides, superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles, are needed as an additional macrophage load in order to visualize macrophage accumulation in the tumor with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) prior to laser irradiation. The feasibility of this approach was studied in an in vitro model of glioma spheroids with the use of continuous wave (CW) laser light for ablation. The optimal loading of both murine and rat macrophages with Ferumoxides was determined using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). Higher concentrations of SPIO were observed in rat macrophages, and the optimal concentration was chosen at 100 microg Fe/ml. Macrophages were found to be very sensitive to near infra-red (NIR) laser irradiation, and their use as vehicles was thus not expected to hinder the function of loaded nanoshells as tumor-ablating tools. The intracellular presence of gold nanoshells in macrophages was confirmed with TEM imaging. Next, the loading of both murine and rat macrophages with gold nanoshells was studied using UV/Vis spectrophotometry, where higher nanoshell uptake was found in rat macrophages. Incubation of loaded murine and rat macrophages with rat C-6 and human ACBT spheroids, respectively, resulted in their infiltration of the spheroids. Subsequent laser irradiation at 55 W/cm2 for 10 min and follow-up of spheroid average diameter size over 14 days post-irradiation showed that

  20. Steady State Pyrolysis and Ablation Investigation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-31

    and cracking of pyrolysable materials), black box models are used, based on wind tunnel and plasma jet experiments. In particular, interactions between...outgassing species coming from the in-depth decomposition of the organic resin (in the case of pyrolysable materials), carbon species coming from...multiplicity of physical phenomena involved and their potential non-linearities. Pyrolyse and ablation are efficient processes for aerothermal heat

  1. A Review of Laser Ablation Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phipps, Claude; Bohn, Willy; Lippert, Thomas; Sasoh, Akihiro; Schall, Wolfgang; Sinko, John

    2010-10-01

    Laser Ablation Propulsion is a broad field with a wide range of applications. We review the 30-year history of laser ablation propulsion from the transition from earlier pure photon propulsion concepts of Oberth and Sänger through Kantrowitz's original laser ablation propulsion idea to the development of air-breathing "Lightcraft" and advanced spacecraft propulsion engines. The polymers POM and GAP have played an important rôle in experiments and liquid ablation fuels show great promise. Some applications use a laser system which is distant from the propelled object, for example, on another spacecraft, the Earth or a planet. Others use a laser that is part of the spacecraft propulsion system on the spacecraft. Propulsion is produced when an intense laser beam strikes a condensed matter surface and produces a vapor or plasma jet. The advantages of this idea are that exhaust velocity of the propulsion engine covers a broader range than is available from chemistry, that it can be varied to meet the instantaneous demands of the particular mission, and that practical realizations give lower mass and greater simplicity for a payload delivery system. We review the underlying theory, buttressed by extensive experimental data. The primary problem in laser space propulsion theory has been the absence of a way to predict thrust and specific impulse over the transition from the vapor to the plasma regimes. We briefly discuss a method for combining two new vapor regime treatments with plasma regime theory, giving a smooth transition from one regime to the other. We conclude with a section on future directions.

  2. Stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betti, R.; McCrory, R. L.; Verdon, C. P.

    1993-08-01

    The linear stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts is carried out for a semi-infinite uniform medium. For a laser accelerated target, it is shown that a properly selected modulation of the laser intensity can lead to the dynamic stabilization or growth-rate reduction of a large portion of the unstable spectrum. The theory is in qualitative agreement with the numerical results obtained by using the two-dimensional hydrodynamic code ORCHID.

  3. Stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Betti, R.; McCrory, R.L.; Verdon, C.P. )

    1993-11-08

    The linear stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts is carried out for a semi-infinite uniform medium. For a laser accelerated target, it is shown that a properly selected modulation of the laser intensity can lead to the dynamic stabilization or growth-rate reduction of a large portion of the unstable spectrum. The theory is in qualitative agreement with the numerical results obtained by using the two-dimensional hydrodynamic code ORCHID.

  4. Stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betti, R.; McCrory, R. L.; Verdon, C. P.

    1993-11-01

    The linear stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts is carried out for a semi-infinite uniform medium. For a laser accelerated target, it is shown that a properly selected modulation of the laser intensity can lead to the dynamic stabilization or growth-rate reduction of a large portion of the unstable spectrum. The theory is in qualitative agreement with the numerical results obtained by using the two-dimensional hydrodynamic code orchid.

  5. Stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Betti, R.; McCrory, R.L.; Verdon, C.P.

    1993-08-01

    The linear stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts, is carried out for a semi-infinite uniform medium. For a laser accelerated target, it is shown that a properly selected modulation of the laser intensity can lead to the dynamic stabilization or growth-rate reduction of a large portion of the unstable spectrum. The theory is in qualitative agreement with the numerical results obtained by using the two-dimensional hydrodynamic code ORCHID.

  6. A Review of Laser Ablation Propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Phipps, Claude; Bohn, Willy; Lippert, Thomas; Sasoh, Akihiro; Schall, Wolfgang; Sinko, John

    2010-10-08

    Laser Ablation Propulsion is a broad field with a wide range of applications. We review the 30-year history of laser ablation propulsion from the transition from earlier pure photon propulsion concepts of Oberth and Saenger through Kantrowitz's original laser ablation propulsion idea to the development of air-breathing 'Lightcraft' and advanced spacecraft propulsion engines. The polymers POM and GAP have played an important role in experiments and liquid ablation fuels show great promise. Some applications use a laser system which is distant from the propelled object, for example, on another spacecraft, the Earth or a planet. Others use a laser that is part of the spacecraft propulsion system on the spacecraft. Propulsion is produced when an intense laser beam strikes a condensed matter surface and produces a vapor or plasma jet. The advantages of this idea are that exhaust velocity of the propulsion engine covers a broader range than is available from chemistry, that it can be varied to meet the instantaneous demands of the particular mission, and that practical realizations give lower mass and greater simplicity for a payload delivery system. We review the underlying theory, buttressed by extensive experimental data. The primary problem in laser space propulsion theory has been the absence of a way to predict thrust and specific impulse over the transition from the vapor to the plasma regimes. We briefly discuss a method for combining two new vapor regime treatments with plasma regime theory, giving a smooth transition from one regime to the other. We conclude with a section on future directions.

  7. Liver tumor ablation: percutaneous and open approaches.

    PubMed

    Padma, Srikanth; Martinie, John B; Iannitti, David A

    2009-12-15

    The global incidence of liver cancer is greater than a million cases a year. Surgical resection where applicable is still the standard of care for these patients. Various liver-directed regional therapies have been developed in an effort to treat the vast majority of unresectable liver tumors. This article reviews the principles behind various ablation therapies currently available for malignant liver tumors and their outcomes.

  8. Anatomical Ablation Strategy for Noninducible Fascicular Tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Talib, Ahmed Karim; Nogami, Akihiko

    2016-03-01

    The presence of structural heart disease does not exclude fascicular ventricular tachycardia (VT), especially if the VT is verapamil sensitive. An empirical anatomic approach is effective when fascicular VT is noninducible or if diastolic Purkinje potential (P1) cannot be recorded during VT mapping. Pace mapping at the successful ablation site is usually not effective because selective pacing of P1 is difficult and there is an antidromic activation of the proximal P1 potential.

  9. Design Calculations For NIF Convergent Ablator Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, R E; Hicks, D G; Meezan, N B; Callahan, D A; Landen, O L; Jones, O S; Langer, S H; Kline, J L; Wilson, D C; Rinderknecht, H; Zylstra, A; Petrasso, R D

    2011-10-25

    The NIF convergent ablation tuning effort is underway. In the early experiments, we have discovered that the design code simulations over-predict the capsule implosion velocity and shock flash rhor, but under-predict the hohlraum x-ray flux measurements. The apparent inconsistency between the x-ray flux and radiography data implies that there are important unexplained aspects of the hohlraum and/or capsule behavior.

  10. Interactive Volumetry Of Liver Ablation Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egger, Jan; Busse, Harald; Brandmaier, Philipp; Seider, Daniel; Gawlitza, Matthias; Strocka, Steffen; Voglreiter, Philip; Dokter, Mark; Hofmann, Michael; Kainz, Bernhard; Hann, Alexander; Chen, Xiaojun; Alhonnoro, Tuomas; Pollari, Mika; Schmalstieg, Dieter; Moche, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive technique that destroys cancer cells by heat. The heat results from focusing energy in the radiofrequency spectrum through a needle. Amongst others, this can enable the treatment of patients who are not eligible for an open surgery. However, the possibility of recurrent liver cancer due to incomplete ablation of the tumor makes post-interventional monitoring via regular follow-up scans mandatory. These scans have to be carefully inspected for any conspicuousness. Within this study, the RF ablation zones from twelve post-interventional CT acquisitions have been segmented semi-automatically to support the visual inspection. An interactive, graph-based contouring approach, which prefers spherically shaped regions, has been applied. For the quantitative and qualitative analysis of the algorithm’s results, manual slice-by-slice segmentations produced by clinical experts have been used as the gold standard (which have also been compared among each other). As evaluation metric for the statistical validation, the Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) has been calculated. The results show that the proposed tool provides lesion segmentation with sufficient accuracy much faster than manual segmentation. The visual feedback and interactivity make the proposed tool well suitable for the clinical workflow.

  11. Calcified lesion modeling for excimer laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Holly A.; Archuleta, Andrew; Splinter, Robert

    2009-06-01

    Objective: Develop a representative calcium target model to evaluate penetration of calcified plaque lesions during atherectomy procedures using 308 nm Excimer laser ablation. Materials and Methods: An in-vitro model representing human calcified plaque was analyzed using Plaster-of-Paris and cement based composite materials as well as a fibrinogen model. The materials were tested for mechanical consistency. The most likely candidate(s) resulting from initial mechanical and chemical screening was submitted for ablation testing. The penetration rate of specific multi-fiber catheter designs and a single fiber probe was obtained and compared to that in human cadaver calcified plaque. The effects of lasing parameters and catheter tip design on penetration speed in a representative calcified model were verified against the results in human cadaver specimens. Results: In Plaster of Paris, the best penetration was obtained using the single fiber tip configuration operating at 100 Fluence, 120 Hz. Calcified human lesions are twice as hard, twice as elastic as and much more complex than Plaster of Paris. Penetration of human calcified specimens was highly inconsistent and varied significantly from specimen to specimen and within individual specimens. Conclusions: Although Plaster of Paris demonstrated predictable increases in penetration with higher energy density and repetition rate, it can not be considered a totally representative laser ablation model for calcified lesions. This is in part due to the more heterogeneous nature and higher density composition of cadaver intravascular human calcified occlusions. Further testing will require a more representative model of human calcified lesions.

  12. Interactive Volumetry Of Liver Ablation Zones

    PubMed Central

    Egger, Jan; Busse, Harald; Brandmaier, Philipp; Seider, Daniel; Gawlitza, Matthias; Strocka, Steffen; Voglreiter, Philip; Dokter, Mark; Hofmann, Michael; Kainz, Bernhard; Hann, Alexander; Chen, Xiaojun; Alhonnoro, Tuomas; Pollari, Mika; Schmalstieg, Dieter; Moche, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive technique that destroys cancer cells by heat. The heat results from focusing energy in the radiofrequency spectrum through a needle. Amongst others, this can enable the treatment of patients who are not eligible for an open surgery. However, the possibility of recurrent liver cancer due to incomplete ablation of the tumor makes post-interventional monitoring via regular follow-up scans mandatory. These scans have to be carefully inspected for any conspicuousness. Within this study, the RF ablation zones from twelve post-interventional CT acquisitions have been segmented semi-automatically to support the visual inspection. An interactive, graph-based contouring approach, which prefers spherically shaped regions, has been applied. For the quantitative and qualitative analysis of the algorithm’s results, manual slice-by-slice segmentations produced by clinical experts have been used as the gold standard (which have also been compared among each other). As evaluation metric for the statistical validation, the Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) has been calculated. The results show that the proposed tool provides lesion segmentation with sufficient accuracy much faster than manual segmentation. The visual feedback and interactivity make the proposed tool well suitable for the clinical workflow. PMID:26482818

  13. Transurethral radio frequency ablation of the prostate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabalin, John N.

    1996-05-01

    Since 1993, radiofrequency ablation of the prostate has been studied as a potential treatment for symptomatic bladder outlet obstruction due to benign prostatic hyperplasia. Two transurethral radiofrequency delivery systems have been developed to the point of undergoing initial human clinical trials. The TUNATM system involves focal interstitial radiofrequency energy application, while the TURAPYTM system involves a circumferential application of radiofrequency energy to the prostatic urethra via a simple delivery catheter. Experimental studies in animal models and human prostate tissue have demonstrated the nature of radiofrequency induced tissue heating and thermal injury. Observed thermal effects are relatively focused, with steep temperature gradients occurring over a few millimeters from the radiofrequency emission source. This allows precise and focused tissue treatment with little or no danger of injury to surrounding structures. Early human clinical experience in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia has demonstrated efficacy in the relief of voiding symptoms and safety and minimal morbidity associated with this technology. The existing operative approaches are relatively simple. Ongoing development of more versatile delivery systems for radiofrequency ablation of the prostate is expected. Results from larger clinical trials with longer term followup will eventually allow adequate assessment of the role of radiofrequency ablation in the surgical management of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

  14. Thermal Convection on an Ablating Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehmedagic, Igbal; Thangam, Siva

    2015-11-01

    Modeling and analysis of thermal convection of a metallic targets subject to radiative flux is of relevance to various manufacturing processes as well as for the development of protective shields. The present work involves the computational modeling of metallic targets subject to high heat fluxes that are both steady and pulsed. Modeling of the ablation and associated fluid dynamics when metallic surfaces are exposed to high intensity pulsed laser fluence at normal atmospheric conditions is considered. The incident energy from the laser is partly absorbed and partly reflected by the surface during ablation and subsequent vaporization of the convecting melt also participates in the radiative exchange. The energy distribution during the process between the bulk and vapor phase strongly depends on optical and thermodynamic properties of the irradiated material, radiation wavelength, and laser pulse intensity and duration. Computational findings based on effective representation and prediction of the heat transfer, melting and vaporization of the targeting material as well as plume formation and expansion are presented and discussed in the context of various ablation mechanisms, variable thermo-physical and optical properties, plume expansion and surface geometry. Funded in part by U. S. Army ARDEC, Picatinny Arsenal, NJ.

  15. Status of the Ablative Laser Propulsion Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herren, Kenneth A.; Lin, Jun; Cohen, Tinothy; Pakhomov, Andrew V.; Thompson, M. Shane

    2004-01-01

    We present a short review of our laser-propulsion research as well as some of the current results of the Ablative Laser Propulsion (ALP) studies currently underway at the University of Alabama in Huntsville. It has been shown that direct surface ablation of a solid material produces high specific impulse (Isp) at relatively high energy conversion efficiency (20 - 40%). We detail measurements of specific impulse, thrust and coupling coefficients for elemental target materials both with single and with double pulse laser shots. We also present measurements taken using three independent methods for determination of Isp. The three methods produce consistent values from ion time-of-flight technique, impulse measurements and imaging of the expansion front of plasma plume. We present a demonstration of our ALP lightcraft, a small free-flying micro-vehicle that is propelled by ablation. For ALP lightcraft we use a subscale thin shell of nickel replicated over a diamond turned mandrel that produces a highly polished self-focusing, truncated at the focus parabolic mirror. The mass of the lightcraft is 54 mg and it is driven by 100-ps wide, 35-mJ laser pulses at 532 nm wavelength. This is an ongoing research. We also present the latest work on laserdriven micro-thrusters and detail some the near term goals of our program.

  16. Microwave soft tissue ablation (Invited Paper)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clegg, Peter J.; Cronin, Nigel J.

    2005-04-01

    Microsulis, in conjunction with the University of Bath have developed a set of novel microwave applicators for the ablation of soft tissues. These interstitial applicators have been designed for use in open surgical, laparoscopic and percutaneous settings and range in diameter from 2.4 to 7 mm. A 20 mm diameter flat faced interface applicator was developed as an adjunct to the open surgical interstitial applicator and has been applied to the treatment of surface breaking lesions in hepatobiliary surgery. Taken as a complete tool set the applicators are capable of treating a wide range of conditions in a safe and efficacious manner. The modality employs a radiated electromagnetic field at the allocated medical frequency of 2.45 GHz and powers between 30 and 150 Watts. Computer simulations, bench testing, safety and efficacy testing, ex-vivo and in-vivo work plus clinical trials have demonstrated that these systems are capable of generating large volumes of ablation in short times with favourable ablation geometries. Clinical studies have shown very low complication rates with minimal local recurrence. It is considered that this modality offers major advantages over currently marketed products. The technique is considered to be particularly safe as it is quick and there is no passage of current obviating the requirement for grounding pads. Since the microwave field operates primarily on water and all soft tissues with the exception of fat are made up of approximately 70% water the heating pattern is highly predictable making repeatability a key factor for this modality.

  17. Cryosurgery and needle ablation of renal lesions.

    PubMed

    Johnson, D B; Nakada, S Y

    2001-05-01

    Laparoscopic renal cryoablation is a minimally invasive alternative for treating renal tumors utilizing narrow probes cooled with a compressed gas such as argon or carbon dioxide. At this time, cryotherapy has shown the most promise as an alternative to partial nephrectomy as a nephron-sparing treatment for renal tumors. Radiofrequency ablation employs needle electrodes placed percutaneously directly into renal lesions to deliver energy, creating high temperatures leading to cell death. High-intensity focused ultrasound is a noninvasive technique in which focused ultrasound energy is applied to cause cell death within the focal zone. Microwave thermotherapy uses small applicators to deliver microwave energy to tissues, resulting in the generation of heat. Although RF, HIFU, and microwave thermotherapy show promise as energy sources for tumor ablation, they are in the early stages of development. Little is known about their acute and chronic histologic effects and long-term efficacy as a treatment for malignant disease. Further work is needed to develop cryosurgery and needle ablation in order to delineate what role these techniques will ultimately play in the management of RCC.

  18. [Ablation of idiopathic fascicular ventricular tachycardia].

    PubMed

    Gellér, László; Szilágyi, Szabolcs; Solymossy, Katalin; Srej, Marianna; Zima, Endre; Tahin, Tamás; Merkely, Béla

    2009-08-02

    Idiopathic fascicular ventricular tachycardia is an important and not very rare cardiac arrhythmia with specific electrocardiographic features and therapeutic options. Ventricular tachycardia is characterized by relatively narrow QRS complex and right bundle branch block pattern. The QRS axis depends on which fascicle is involved in the re-entry. Left axis deviation is noted with left posterior fascicular tachycardia and right axis deviation with left anterior fascicular tachycardia. A left septal fascicular tachycardia with normal QRS axis is also possible. Idiopathic fascicular tachycardia is usually seen in individuals without structural heart disease. Response to verapamil is an important feature of fascicular tachycardia. In some cases intravenous adenosine may also terminate the arrhythmia. During electrophysiology study, presystolic or diastolic potentials precede the QRS, presumed to originate from the Purkinje fibers. The potentials can be recorded during sinus rhythm and ventricular tachycardia in many patients with fascicular tachycardia. This potential (so-called Purkinje potential) has been used as a guide to catheter ablation. Correct diagnosis of fascicular tachycardia is very important because catheter ablation is very effective in the treatment of this type of ventricular tachycardia. In this review, we describe three patients with idiopathic ventricular tachycardia and their successful catheter ablation, and summarize the actual knowledge of the diagnosis and management of this special ventricular tachycardia.

  19. Radiotherapy in the management of early breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei

    2013-03-15

    Radiotherapy is an indispensible part of the management of all stages of breast cancer. In this article, the common indications for radiotherapy in the management of early breast cancer (stages 0, I, and II) are reviewed, including whole-breast radiotherapy as part of breast-conserving treatment for early invasive breast cancer and pre-invasive disease of ductal carcinoma in situ, post-mastectomy radiotherapy, locoregional radiotherapy, and partial breast irradiation. Key clinical studies that underpin our current practice are discussed briefly.

  20. A study of ablation effects for an axisymmetric electromagnetic accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Ikuta, K. . Inst. of Plasma Physics)

    1989-01-01

    In order to give the additional forward thrust to the projectile other than the electromagnetic force, the axial symmetric launcher called ablation mass driver (AMD) has been proposed using sequential z pinches in a cylindrical electrode array. The additional driving force originates from the reaction of ablating hot gas from the ablator on the rear of the projectile, since the Joule heating by the high electric current for electromagnetic acceleration is not negligiblly small. The ablated gas becomes plasma which propagates along the field-null line of z pinch, giving the forward thrust to the projectile. A proto type AMD has been built at Texas Tech University in order to see the capabilities of AMD as a launcher, although a study on the effect of ablation will remain as a future work. This paper describes a device of accelerating water blob for the study of ablation effect during acceleration together with the experimental results.

  1. Modeling CO{sub 2} Laser Ablative Impulse with Polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Sinko, John E.; Phipps, Claude R.; Sasoh, Akihiro

    2010-10-08

    Laser ablation vaporization models have usually ignored the spatial dependence of the laser beam. Here, we consider effects from modeling using a Gaussian beam for both photochemical and photothermal conditions. The modeling results are compared to experimental and literature data for CO{sub 2} laser ablation of the polymer polyoxymethylene under vacuum, and discussed in terms of the ablated mass areal density and momentum coupling coefficient. Extending the scope of discussion, laser ablative impulse generation research has lacked a cohesive strategy for linking the vaporization and plasma regimes. Existing models, mostly formulated for ultraviolet laser systems or metal targets, appear to be inappropriate or impractical for applications requiring CO{sub 2} laser ablation of polymers. A recently proposed method for linking the vaporization and plasma regimes for analytical modeling is addressed here along with the implications of its use. Key control parameters are considered, along with the major propulsion parameters needed for laser ablation propulsion modeling.

  2. Influence of the Liquid on Femtosecond Laser Ablation of Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanitz, A.; Hoppius, J. S.; Gurevich, E. L.; Ostendorf, A.

    Ultrashort pulse laser ablation has become a very important industrial method for highly precise material removal ranging from sensitive thin film processing to drilling and cutting of metals. Over the last decade, a new method to produce pure nanoparticles emerged from this technique: Pulsed Laser Ablation in Liquids (PLAL). By this method, the ablation of material by a laser beam is used to generate a metal vapor within the liquid in order to obtain nanoparticles from its recondensation process. It is well known that the liquid significantly alters the ablation properties of the substrate, in our case iron. For example, the ablation rate and crater morphology differ depending on the used liquid. We present our studies on the efficiency and quality of ablated grooves in water, methanol, acetone, ethanol and toluene. The produced grooves are investigated by means of white-light interferometry, EDX and SEM.

  3. The Leicester radiotherapy bite block: an aid to head and neck radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hollows, P; Hayter, J P; Vasanthan, S

    2001-02-01

    We describe the construction of a custom-made bite block to be used during external beam radiotherapy to the oral cavity. The bite block is made with standard maxillofacial prosthetic techniques and materials. The design allows accurate and reproducible positioning of the perioral tissues to aid planning of radiotherapy and treatment. The compressibility of this device improves comfort for the patient, while it is in use.

  4. Ablation by ultrashort laser pulses: Atomistic and thermodynamic analysis of the processes at the ablation threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhyay, Arun K.; Inogamov, Nail A.; Rethfeld, Baerbel; Urbassek, Herbert M.

    2008-07-15

    Ultrafast laser irradiation of solids may ablate material off the surface. We study this process for thin films using molecular-dynamics simulation and thermodynamic analysis. Both metals and Lennard-Jones (LJ) materials are studied. We find that despite the large difference in thermodynamical properties between these two classes of materials--e.g., for aluminum versus LJ the ratio T{sub c}/T{sub tr} of critical to triple-point temperature differs by more than a factor of 4--the values of the ablation threshold energy E{sub abl} normalized to the cohesion energy, {epsilon}{sub abl}=E{sub abl}/E{sub coh}, are surprisingly universal: all are near 0.3 with {+-}30% scattering. The difference in the ratio T{sub c}/T{sub tr} means that for metals the melting threshold {epsilon}{sub m} is low, {epsilon}{sub m}<{epsilon}{sub abl}, while for LJ it is high, {epsilon}{sub m}>{epsilon}{sub abl}. This thermodynamical consideration gives a simple explanation for the difference between metals and LJ. It explains why despite the universality in {epsilon}{sub abl}, metals thermomechanically ablate always from the liquid state. This is opposite to LJ materials, which (near threshold) ablate from the solid state. Furthermore, we find that immediately below the ablation threshold, the formation of large voids (cavitation) in the irradiated material leads to a strong temporary expansion on a very slow time scale. This feature is easily distinguished from the acoustic oscillations governing the material response at smaller intensities, on the one hand, and the ablation occurring at larger intensities, on the other hand. This finding allows us to explain the puzzle of huge surface excursions found in experiments at near-threshold laser irradiation.

  5. Post-radiotherapy hypothyroidism in dogs treated for thyroid carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Amores-Fuster, I; Cripps, P; Blackwood, L

    2017-03-01

    Hypothyroidism is a common adverse event after head and neck radiotherapy in human medicine, but uncommonly reported in canine patients. Records of 21 dogs with histologically or cytologically confirmed thyroid carcinoma receiving definitive or hypofractionated radiotherapy were reviewed. Nine cases received 48 Gy in 12 fractions, 10 received 36 Gy in 4 fractions and 2 received 32 Gy in 4 fractions. Seventeen cases had radiotherapy in a post-operative setting. Ten cases developed hypothyroidism (47.6%) after radiotherapy. The development of hypothyroidism was not associated with the radiotherapy protocol used. Median time to diagnosis of hypothyroidism was 6 months (range, 1-13 months). Hypothyroidism is a common side effect following radiotherapy for thyroid carcinomas. Monitoring of thyroid function following radiotherapy is recommended. No specific risk factors have been identified.

  6. Breast Cancer Patients’ Experience of External-Beam Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Schnur, Julie B.; Ouellette, Suzanne C.; Bovbjerg, Dana H.; Montgomery, Guy H.

    2013-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a critical component of treatment for the majority of women with breast cancer, particularly those who receive breast conserving surgery. Although medically beneficial, radiotherapy can take a physical and psychological toll on patients. However, little is known about the specific thoughts and feelings experienced by women undergoing breast cancer radiotherapy. Therefore, the study aim was to use qualitative research methods to develop an understanding of these thoughts and feelings based on 180 diary entries, completed during radiotherapy by 15 women with Stage 0-III breast cancer. Thematic analysis identified four primary participant concerns: (a) a preoccupation with time; (b) fantasies (both optimistic and pessimistic) about life following radiotherapy; (c) the toll their side-effect experience takes on their self-esteem; and (d) feeling mystified by radiotherapy. These themes are consistent with previous literature on illness and identity. These findings have implications for the treatment and care of women undergoing breast cancer radiotherapy. PMID:19380502

  7. Radiotherapy for inverted papilloma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Levendag, P C; Annyas, A A; Escajadillo, J R; Elema, J D

    1984-06-01

    Inverted papilloma is an infrequent tumour of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses associated with controversy. The incidence of carcinoma in situ associated with inverted papilloma, has not been very well documented until now. Therefore, we present a case report characterized by an aggressive clinical behaviour, treated by extensive surgery and ultimately controlled by radiotherapy.

  8. Results of radiotherapy for Peyronie's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Niewald, Marcus . E-mail: ramnie@uniklinikum-saarland.de; Wenzlawowicz, Knut v.; Fleckenstein, Jochen; Wisser, Lothar; Derouet, Harry; Ruebe, Christian

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively review the results of radiotherapy for Peyronie's disease. Patients and Methods: In the time interval 1983-2000, 154 patients in our clinic were irradiated for Peyronie's disease. Of those, 101 had at least one complete follow-up data set and are the subject of this study. In the majority of patients, penis deviation was between 30 and 50{sup o}, there were one or two indurated foci with a diameter between 5 and 15 mm. Pain was recorded in 48/92 patients. Seventy-two of the 101 patients received radiotherapy with a total dose of 30 Gy, and 25 received 36 Gy in daily fractions of 2.0 Gy. The remaining patients received the following dosage: 34 Gy (1 patient), 38-40 Gy (3 patients). Mean duration of follow-up was 5 years. Results: The best results ever at any time during follow-up were an improvement of deviation in 47%, reduction of number of foci in 32%, reduction of size of foci in 49%, and less induration in 52%. Approximately 50% reported pain relief after radiotherapy. There were 28 patients with mild acute dermatitis and only 4 patients with mild urethritis. There were no long-term side effects. Conclusion: Our results compare well with those of other studies in the literature. In our patient cohort, radiotherapy was an effective therapy option with only very rare and mild side effects.

  9. Percutaneous ablation therapies of inoperable pancreatic cancer: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Ierardi, Anna Maria; Lucchina, Natalie; Bacuzzi, Alessandro; Marco, De Chiara; Bracchi, Elena; Cocozza, Eugenio; Dionigi, Gianlorenzo; Tsetis, Dimitrios; Floridi, Chiara; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo

    2015-01-01

    Initial studies about ablation therapies of the pancreas were associated with significant morbidity and mortality, which limited widespread adoption. Development of techniques with high quality imaging used as guidance improve outcomes reducing complications. Moreover, only few experiences of percutaneous pancreatic ablations are reported. They are performed by very skilled operators in highly specialized centers. This review presents the current status of percutaneous local ablative therapies in the treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer. PMID:26424487

  10. Steerable sheath technology in the ablation of atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Jubin; Wong, Kelvin C K; Ginks, Matthew R; Bashir, Yaver; Betts, Timothy R; Rajappan, Kim

    2013-12-01

    Steerable sheaths have been shown to reduce procedure time in the catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF), where catheter positioning and stability is typically challenging. This review critically addresses and highlights the recent developments in design of sheaths used to manipulate the ablation catheter and how these developments may impact on the ablation procedure itself, in particular the likelihood of first-time success. Patents relating to steerable sheaths are reviewed and discussed to gauge potential future developments in this area.

  11. Effects of laser ablation on cemented tungsten carbide surface quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, J. L.; Butler, D. L.; Sim, L. M.; Jarfors, A. E. W.

    2010-11-01

    Although laser micromachining has been touted as being the most promising way to fabricate micro tools, there has been no proper evaluation of the effects of laser ablation on bulk material properties. The current work demonstrates the effects of laser ablation on the properties of a cemented tungsten carbide surface. Of particular interest is the resultant increase in compressive residual stresses in the ablated surface. From this study it is seen that there are no adverse effects from laser ablation of cemented tungsten carbide that would preclude its use for the fabrication of micro-tools but a finishing process may not be avoidable.

  12. Osteoid Osteoma: Experience with Laser- and Radiofrequency-Induced Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Gebauer, Bernhard Tunn, Per-Ulf; Gaffke, Gunnar; Melcher, Ingo; Felix, Roland; Stroszczynski, Christian

    2006-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the clinical outcome of osteoid osteoma treated by thermal ablation after drill opening. A total of 17 patients and 20 procedures were included. All patients had typical clinical features (age, pain) and a typical radiograph showing a nidus. In 5 cases, additional histological specimens were acquired. After drill opening of the osteoid osteoma nidus, 12 thermal ablations were induced by laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) (9F Power-Laser-Set; Somatex, Germany) and 8 ablations by radiofrequency ablation (RFA) (RITA; StarBurst, USA). Initial clinical success with pain relief has been achieved in all patients after the first ablation. Three patients had an osteoid osteoma recurrence after 3, 9, and 10 months and were successfully re-treated by thermal ablation. No major complication and one minor complication (sensible defect) were recorded. Thermal ablation is a safe and minimally invasive therapy option for osteoid osteoma. Although the groups are too small for a comparative analysis, we determined no difference between laser- and radiofrequency-induced ablation in clinical outcome after ablation.

  13. Recent Advances in Tumor Ablation for Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kang, Tae Wook; Rhim, Hyunchul

    2015-09-01

    Image-guided tumor ablation for early stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is an accepted non-surgical treatment that provides excellent local tumor control and favorable survival benefit. This review summarizes the recent advances in tumor ablation for HCC. Diagnostic imaging and molecular biology of HCC has recently undergone marked improvements. Second-generation ultrasonography (US) contrast agents, new computed tomography (CT) techniques, and liver-specific contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have enabled the early detection of smaller and inconspicuous HCC lesions. Various imaging-guidance tools that incorporate imaging-fusion between real-time US and CT/MRI, that are now common for percutaneous tumor ablation, have increased operator confidence in the accurate targeting of technically difficult tumors. In addition to radiofrequency ablation (RFA), various therapeutic modalities including microwave ablation, irreversible electroporation, and high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation have attracted attention as alternative energy sources for effective locoregional treatment of HCC. In addition, combined treatment with RFA and chemoembolization or molecular agents may be able to overcome the limitation of advanced or large tumors. Finally, understanding of the biological mechanisms and advances in therapy associated with tumor ablation will be important for successful tumor control. All these advances in tumor ablation for HCC will result in significant improvement in the prognosis of HCC patients. In this review, we primarily focus on recent advances in molecular tumor biology, diagnosis, imaging-guidance tools, and therapeutic modalities, and refer to the current status and future perspectives for tumor ablation for HCC.

  14. Nanochemical effects in femtosecond laser ablation of metals

    SciTech Connect

    Vorobyev, A. Y.; Guo, Chunlei

    2013-02-18

    We study chemical energy released from the oxidation of aluminum in multipulse femtosecond laser ablation in air and oxygen. Our study shows that the released chemical energy amounts to about 13% of the incident laser energy, and about 50% of the ablated material is oxidized. The ablated material mass per laser pulse is measured to be on the nanogram scale. Our study indicates that femtosecond laser ablation is capable of inducing nanochemical reactions since the femtosecond laser pulse can controllably produce nanoparticles, clusters, and atoms from a solid target.

  15. Streaked radiography measurements of convergent ablator performance (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, D. G.; Spears, B. K.; Braun, D. G.; Olson, R. E.; Sorce, C. M.; Celliers, P. M.; Collins, G. W.; Landen, O. L.

    2010-10-15

    The velocity and remaining ablator mass of an imploding capsule are critical metrics for assessing the progress toward ignition of an inertially confined fusion experiment. These and other ablator rocket parameters have been measured using a single streaked x-ray radiograph. A regularization technique has been used to determine the ablator density profile {rho}(r) at each time step; moments of {rho}(r) then provide the areal density, average radius, and mass of the unablated, or remaining, ablator material, with the velocity determined from the time derivative of the average radius. The technique has been implemented on experiments at the OMEGA laser facility.

  16. The Emprint™ Ablation System with Thermosphere™ Technology: One of the Newer Next-Generation Microwave Ablation Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Alonzo, Marc; Bos, Aaron; Bennett, Shelby; Ferral, Hector

    2015-01-01

    Microwave ablation is a recent development in the field of tumor ablation that uses electromagnetic waves to establish a microwave near-field with direct tissue heating. Some of the limitations of the earlier generation devices had been unpredictable size and shape of the ablation zones with changes in the surrounding tissue environment as well as differences across various different tissue types. The Emprint Ablation System with Thermosphere Technology (Covidien, Boulder, CO) is the most recent generation ablation system that attempts to produce predictable large spherical zones of ablation despite varying tissue environments across different tissue types such as liver, lung, and bone to name a few. This article will discuss these recent device developments as well as review some basic microwave characteristics. PMID:26622094

  17. Neo-adjuvant radiotherapy in rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Glimelius, Bengt

    2013-01-01

    In rectal cancer treatment, attention has focused on the local primary tumour and the regional tumour cell deposits to diminish the risk of a loco-regional recurrence. Several large randomized trials have also shown that combinations of surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy have markedly reduced the risk of a loco-regional recurrence, but this has not yet had any major influence on overall survival. The best results have been achieved when the radiotherapy has been given preoperatively. Preoperative radiotherapy improves loco-regional control even when surgery has been optimized to improve lateral clearance, i.e., when a total mesorectal excision has been performed. The relative reduction is then 50%-70%. The value of radiotherapy has not been tested in combination with more extensive surgery including lateral lymph node clearance, as practised in some Asian countries. Many details about how the radiotherapy is performed are still open for discussion, and practice varies between countries. A highly fractionated radiation schedule (5 Gy × 5), proven efficacious in many trials, has gained much popularity in some countries, whereas a conventionally fractionated regimen (1.8-2.0 Gy × 25-28), often combined with chemotherapy, is used in other countries. The additional therapy adds morbidity to the morbidity that surgery causes, and should therefore be administered only when the risk of loco-regional recurrence is sufficiently high. The best integration of the weakest modality, to date the drugs (conventional cytotoxics and biologicals) is not known. A new generation of trials exploring the best sequence of treatments is required. Furthermore, there is a great need to develop predictors of response, so that treatment can be further individualized and not solely based upon clinical factors and anatomic imaging. PMID:24379566

  18. Model-based feasibility assessment and evaluation of prostate hyperthermia with a commercial MR-guided endorectal HIFU ablation array

    PubMed Central

    Salgaonkar, Vasant A.; Prakash, Punit; Rieke, Viola; Ozhinsky, Eugene; Plata, Juan; Kurhanewicz, John; Hsu, I-C. (Joe); Diederich, Chris J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Feasibility of targeted and volumetric hyperthermia (40–45 °C) delivery to the prostate with a commercial MR-guided endorectal ultrasound phased array system, designed specifically for thermal ablation and approved for ablation trials (ExAblate 2100, Insightec Ltd.), was assessed through computer simulations and tissue-equivalent phantom experiments with the intention of fast clinical translation for targeted hyperthermia in conjunction with radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Methods: The simulations included a 3D finite element method based biothermal model, and acoustic field calculations for the ExAblate ERUS phased array (2.3 MHz, 2.3 × 4.0 cm2, ∼1000 channels) using the rectangular radiator method. Array beamforming strategies were investigated to deliver protracted, continuous-wave hyperthermia to focal prostate cancer targets identified from representative patient cases. Constraints on power densities, sonication durations and switching speeds imposed by ExAblate hardware and software were incorporated in the models. Preliminary experiments included beamformed sonications in tissue mimicking phantoms under MR temperature monitoring at 3 T (GE Discovery MR750W). Results: Acoustic intensities considered during simulation were limited to ensure mild hyperthermia (Tmax < 45 °C) and fail-safe operation of the ExAblate array (spatial and time averaged acoustic intensity ISATA < 3.4 W/cm2). Tissue volumes with therapeutic temperature levels (T > 41 °C) were estimated. Numerical simulations indicated that T > 41 °C was calculated in 13–23 cm3 volumes for sonications with planar or diverging beam patterns at 0.9–1.2 W/cm2, in 4.5–5.8 cm3 volumes for simultaneous multipoint focus beam patterns at ∼0.7 W/cm2, and in ∼6.0 cm3 for curvilinear (cylindrical) beam patterns at 0.75 W/cm2. Focused heating patterns may be practical for treating focal disease in a single posterior quadrant of the prostate and diffused heating patterns may be

  19. Model-based feasibility assessment and evaluation of prostate hyperthermia with a commercial MR-guided endorectal HIFU ablation array

    SciTech Connect

    Salgaonkar, Vasant A. Hsu, I-C.; Diederich, Chris J.; Prakash, Punit; Rieke, Viola; Ozhinsky, Eugene; Kurhanewicz, John; Plata, Juan

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Feasibility of targeted and volumetric hyperthermia (40–45 °C) delivery to the prostate with a commercial MR-guided endorectal ultrasound phased array system, designed specifically for thermal ablation and approved for ablation trials (ExAblate 2100, Insightec Ltd.), was assessed through computer simulations and tissue-equivalent phantom experiments with the intention of fast clinical translation for targeted hyperthermia in conjunction with radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Methods: The simulations included a 3D finite element method based biothermal model, and acoustic field calculations for the ExAblate ERUS phased array (2.3 MHz, 2.3 × 4.0 cm{sup 2}, ∼1000 channels) using the rectangular radiator method. Array beamforming strategies were investigated to deliver protracted, continuous-wave hyperthermia to focal prostate cancer targets identified from representative patient cases. Constraints on power densities, sonication durations and switching speeds imposed by ExAblate hardware and software were incorporated in the models. Preliminary experiments included beamformed sonications in tissue mimicking phantoms under MR temperature monitoring at 3 T (GE Discovery MR750W). Results: Acoustic intensities considered during simulation were limited to ensure mild hyperthermia (T{sub max} < 45 °C) and fail-safe operation of the ExAblate array (spatial and time averaged acoustic intensity I{sub SATA} < 3.4 W/cm{sup 2}). Tissue volumes with therapeutic temperature levels (T > 41 °C) were estimated. Numerical simulations indicated that T > 41 °C was calculated in 13–23 cm{sup 3} volumes for sonications with planar or diverging beam patterns at 0.9–1.2 W/cm{sup 2}, in 4.5–5.8 cm{sup 3} volumes for simultaneous multipoint focus beam patterns at ∼0.7 W/cm{sup 2}, and in ∼6.0 cm{sup 3} for curvilinear (cylindrical) beam patterns at 0.75 W/cm{sup 2}. Focused heating patterns may be practical for treating focal disease in a single posterior

  20. CT-guided Bipolar and Multipolar Radiofrequency Ablation (RF Ablation) of Renal Cell Carcinoma: Specific Technical Aspects and Clinical Results

    SciTech Connect

    Sommer, C. M.; Lemm, G.; Hohenstein, E.; Bellemann, N.; Stampfl, U.; Goezen, A. S.; Rassweiler, J.; Kauczor, H. U.; Radeleff, B. A.; Pereira, P. L.

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. This study was designed to evaluate the clinical efficacy of CT-guided bipolar and multipolar radiofrequency ablation (RF ablation) of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and to analyze specific technical aspects between both technologies. Methods. We included 22 consecutive patients (3 women; age 74.2 {+-} 8.6 years) after 28 CT-guided bipolar or multipolar RF ablations of 28 RCCs (diameter 2.5 {+-} 0.8 cm). Procedures were performed with a commercially available RF system (Celon AG Olympus, Berlin, Germany). Technical aspects of RF ablation procedures (ablation mode [bipolar or multipolar], number of applicators and ablation cycles, overall ablation time and deployed energy, and technical success rate) were analyzed. Clinical results (local recurrence-free survival and local tumor control rate, renal function [glomerular filtration rate (GFR)]) and complication rates were evaluated. Results. Bipolar RF ablation was performed in 12 procedures and multipolar RF ablation in 16 procedures (2 applicators in 14 procedures and 3 applicators in 2 procedures). One ablation cycle was performed in 15 procedures and two ablation cycles in 13 procedures. Overall ablation time and deployed energy were 35.0 {+-} 13.6 min and 43.7 {+-} 17.9 kJ. Technical success rate was 100 %. Major and minor complication rates were 4 and 14 %. At an imaging follow-up of 15.2 {+-} 8.8 months, local recurrence-free survival was 14.4 {+-} 8.8 months and local tumor control rate was 93 %. GFR did not deteriorate after RF ablation (50.8 {+-} 16.6 ml/min/1.73 m{sup 2} before RF ablation vs. 47.2 {+-} 11.9 ml/min/1.73 m{sup 2} after RF ablation; not significant). Conclusions. CT-guided bipolar and multipolar RF ablation of RCC has a high rate of clinical success and low complication rates. At short-term follow-up, clinical efficacy is high without deterioration of the renal function.

  1. Mechanism study of skin tissue ablation by nanosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Qiyin

    Understanding the fundamental mechanisms in laser tissue ablation is essential to improve clinical laser applications by reducing collateral damage and laser pulse energy requirement. The motive of this dissertation is to study skin tissue ablation by nanosecond laser pulses in a wide spectral region from near-infrared to ultraviolet for a clear understanding of the mechanism that can be used to improve future design of the pulsed lasers for dermatology and plastic surgery. Multiple laser and optical configurations have been constructed to generate 9 to 12ns laser pulses with similar profiles at 1064. 532, 266 and 213nm for this study of skin tissue ablation. Through measurements of ablation depth as a function cf laser pulse energy, the 589nm spectral line in the secondary radiation from ablated skin tissue samples was identified as the signature of the occurrence of ablation. Subsequently, this spectral signature has been used to investigate the probabilistic process of the ablation near the threshold at the four wavelengths. Measurements of the ablation probability were conducted as a function of the electrical field strength of the laser pulse and the ablation thresholds in a wide spectral range from 1064nm to 213nm were determined. Histology analysis and an optical transmission method were applied in assessing of the ablation depth per pulse to study the ablation process at irradiance levels higher than threshold. Because more than 70% of the wet weight of the skin tissue is water, optical breakdown and backscattering in water was also investigated along with a nonlinear refraction index measurement using a z-scan technique. Preliminary studies on ablation of a gelatin based tissue phantom are also reported. The current theoretical models describing ablation of soft tissue ablation by short laser pulses were critically reviewed. Since none of the existing models was found capable of explaining the experimental results, a new plasma-mediated model was developed

  2. Resin-Impregnated Carbon Ablator: A New Ablative Material for Hyperbolic Entry Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esper, Jaime; Lengowski, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Ablative materials are required to protect a space vehicle from the extreme temperatures encountered during the most demanding (hyperbolic) atmospheric entry velocities, either for probes launched toward other celestial bodies, or coming back to Earth from deep space missions. To that effect, the resin-impregnated carbon ablator (RICA) is a high-temperature carbon/phenolic ablative thermal protection system (TPS) material designed to use modern and commercially viable components in its manufacture. Heritage carbon/phenolic ablators intended for this use rely on materials that are no longer in production (i.e., Galileo, Pioneer Venus); hence the development of alternatives such as RICA is necessary for future NASA planetary entry and Earth re-entry missions. RICA s capabilities were initially measured in air for Earth re-entry applications, where it was exposed to a heat flux of 14 MW/sq m for 22 seconds. Methane tests were also carried out for potential application in Saturn s moon Titan, with a nominal heat flux of 1.4 MW/sq m for up to 478 seconds. Three slightly different material formulations were manufactured and subsequently tested at the Plasma Wind Tunnel of the University of Stuttgart in Germany (PWK1) in the summer and fall of 2010. The TPS integrity was well preserved in most cases, and results show great promise.

  3. Similarities and differences in ablative and non-ablative iron oxide nanoparticle hyperthermia cancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petryk, Alicia A.; Misra, Adwiteeya; Kastner, Elliot J.; Mazur, Courtney M.; Petryk, James D.; Hoopes, P. Jack

    2015-03-01

    The use of hyperthermia to treat cancer is well studied and has utilized numerous delivery techniques, including microwaves, radio frequency, focused ultrasound, induction heating, infrared radiation, warmed perfusion liquids (combined with chemotherapy), and recently, metallic nanoparticles (NP) activated by near infrared radiation (NIR) and alternating magnetic field (AMF) based platforms. It has been demonstrated by many research groups that ablative temperatures and cytotoxicity can be produced with locally NP-based hyperthermia. Such ablative NP techniques have demonstrated the potential for success. Much attention has also been given to the fact that NP may be administered systemically, resulting in a broader cancer therapy approach, a lower level of tumor NP content and a different type of NP cancer therapy (most likely in the adjuvant setting). To use NP based hyperthermia successfully as a cancer treatment, the technique and its goal must be understood and utilized in the appropriate clinical context. The parameters include, but are not limited to, NP access to the tumor (large vs. small quantity), cancer cell-specific targeting, drug carrying capacity, potential as an ionizing radiation sensitizer, and the material properties (magnetic characteristics, size and charge). In addition to their potential for cytotoxicity, the material properties of the NP must also be optimized for imaging, detection and direction. In this paper we will discuss the differences between, and potential applications for, ablative and non-ablative magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia.

  4. Radiofrequency ablation for benign thyroid nodules.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, S; Stacul, F; Zecchin, M; Dobrinja, C; Zanconati, F; Fabris, B

    2016-09-01

    Benign thyroid nodules are an extremely common occurrence. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is gaining ground as an effective technique for their treatment, in case they become symptomatic. Here we review what are the current indications to RFA, its outcomes in terms of efficacy, tolerability, and cost, and also how it compares to the other conventional and experimental treatment modalities for benign thyroid nodules. Moreover, we will also address the issue of treating with this technique patients with cardiac pacemakers (PM) or implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICD), as it is a rather frequent occurrence that has never been addressed in detail in the literature.

  5. Dopant Distribution in NIF Beryllium Ablator Capsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, H.; Xu, H. W.; Youngblood, K. P.; Wall, D. R.; Stephens, R. B.; Moreno, K. A.; Nikroo, A.; Salmonson, J. D.; Haan, S. W.; Wu, K. J.; Wang, Y. M.; Hamza, A. V.

    2012-10-01

    Good implosion performance requires capsule ablator material with spherically uniform x-ray opacity, which is controlled by one of several dopants (Cu, Si, Al, etc.) in the Be shell. During production, the dopant concentration is radially stepped. However, the various Be-dopant interactions result in vastly different dopant distribution patterns, some quite inhomogeneous. We have characterized these structures and established the phenomenological basis and the magnitudes of the inhomogeneity both in spatial length scales and in atomic percent. We will discuss the case of inhomogeneous Cu diffusion in detail, followed by discussions of other dopants and the estimate of the impact of these structures on target implosion.

  6. Dynamical modeling of laser ablation processes

    SciTech Connect

    Leboeuf, J.N.; Chen, K.R.; Donato, J.M.; Geohegan, D.B.; Liu, C.L.; Puretzky, A.A.; Wood, R.F.

    1995-09-01

    Several physics and computational approaches have been developed to globally characterize phenomena important for film growth by pulsed laser deposition of materials. These include thermal models of laser-solid target interactions that initiate the vapor plume; plume ionization and heating through laser absorption beyond local thermodynamic equilibrium mechanisms; gas dynamic, hydrodynamic, and collisional descriptions of plume transport; and molecular dynamics models of the interaction of plume particles with the deposition substrate. The complexity of the phenomena involved in the laser ablation process is matched by the diversity of the modeling task, which combines materials science, atomic physics, and plasma physics.

  7. Inertial effects in laser-driven ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Harrach, R.J.; Szeoke, A.; Howard, W.M.

    1983-07-15

    The gasdynamic partial differential equations (PDE's) governing the motion of an ablatively accelerated target (rocket) contain an inertial force term that arises from acceleration of the reference frame in which the PDE's are written. We give a simple, intuitive description of this effect, and estimate its magnitude and parametric dependences by means of approximate analytical formulas inferred from our computer hydrocode calculations. Often this inertial term is negligible, but for problems in the areas of laser fusion and laser equation of state studies we find that it can substantially reduce the attainable hydrodynamic efficiency of acceleration and implosion.

  8. Excimer laser ablation of the cornea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettit, George H.; Ediger, Marwood N.; Weiblinger, Richard P.

    1995-03-01

    Pulsed ultraviolet laser ablation is being extensively investigated clinically to reshape the optical surface of the eye and correct vision defects. Current knowledge of the laser/tissue interaction and the present state of the clinical evaluation are reviewed. In addition, the principal findings of internal Food and Drug Administration research are described in some detail, including a risk assessment of the laser-induced-fluorescence and measurement of the nonlinear optical properties of cornea during the intense UV irradiation. Finally, a survey is presented of the alternative laser technologies being explored for this ophthalmic application.

  9. Sprayable low density ablator and application process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharpe, M. H.; Hill, W. E.; Simpson, W. G.; Carter, J. M.; Brown, E. L.; King, H. M.; Schuerer, P. H.; Webb, D. D. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A sprayable, low density ablative composition is described consisting esentially of: (1) 100 parts by weight of a mixture of 25-65% by weight of phenolic microballoons, 0-20% by weight of glass microballoons, 4-10% by weight of glass fibers, 25-45% by weight of an epoxy-modified polyurethane resin, 2-4% by weight of a bentonite dispersing aid, and 1-2% by weight of an alcohol activator for the bentonite; (2) 1-10 parts by weight of an aromatic amine curing agent; and (3) 200-400 parts by weight of a solvent.

  10. Solar cell contact formation using laser ablation

    DOEpatents

    Harley, Gabriel; Smith, David D.; Cousins, Peter John

    2015-07-21

    The formation of solar cell contacts using a laser is described. A method of fabricating a back-contact solar cell includes forming a poly-crystalline material layer above a single-crystalline substrate. The method also includes forming a dielectric material stack above the poly-crystalline material layer. The method also includes forming, by laser ablation, a plurality of contacts holes in the dielectric material stack, each of the contact holes exposing a portion of the poly-crystalline material layer; and forming conductive contacts in the plurality of contact holes.

  11. Solar cell contact formation using laser ablation

    DOEpatents

    Harley, Gabriel; Smith, David D.; Cousins, Peter John

    2014-07-22

    The formation of solar cell contacts using a laser is described. A method of fabricating a back-contact solar cell includes forming a poly-crystalline material layer above a single-crystalline substrate. The method also includes forming a dielectric material stack above the poly-crystalline material layer. The method also includes forming, by laser ablation, a plurality of contacts holes in the dielectric material stack, each of the contact holes exposing a portion of the poly-crystalline materiat layer; and forming conductive contacts in the plurality of contact holes.

  12. Solar cell contact formation using laser ablation

    DOEpatents

    Harley, Gabriel; Smith, David; Cousins, Peter

    2012-12-04

    The formation of solar cell contacts using a laser is described. A method of fabricating a back-contact solar cell includes forming a poly-crystalline material layer above a single-crystalline substrate. The method also includes forming a dielectric material stack above the poly-crystalline material layer. The method also includes forming, by laser ablation, a plurality of contacts holes in the dielectric material stack, each of the contact holes exposing a portion of the poly-crystalline material layer; and forming conductive contacts in the plurality of contact holes.

  13. Antibacterial effects of laser ablated Ni nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamaila, S.; Wali, H.; Sharif, R.; Nazir, J.; Zafar, N.; Rafique, M. S.

    2013-10-01

    The interaction of nickel nanoparticles with Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria has been studied. The nickel nanoparticles have been fabricated by continuous wave laser ablation of nickel target and their properties are studied using different characterization techniques. The antibacterial activity of nickel nanoparticles was checked against E. coli bacteria. Escherichia coli were cultured in nutrients broth and different concentrations of nickel nanoparticles were added to bacterial culture solution to investigate the interaction of nickel nanoparticles with bacteria and to check toxicity of the nickel nanoparticles against E. coli. The fabricated Ni nanoparticles have exhibited considerable antimicrobial activity against E. coli.

  14. Rail gun performance and plasma characteristics due to wall ablation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, P. K.

    1986-01-01

    The experiment of Bauer, et al. (1982) is analyzed by considering wall ablation and viscous drag in the plasma. Plasma characteristics are evaluated through a simple fluid-mechanical analysis considering only wall ablation. By equating the energy dissipated in the plasma with the radiation heat loss, the average properties of the plasma are determined as a function of time.

  15. A Theoretical Study of Stagnation-Point Ablation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Leonard

    1959-01-01

    A simplified analysis is made of ablation cooling near the stagnation point of a two-dimensional or axisymmetric body which occurs as the body vaporizes directly from the solid state. The automatic shielding mechanism Is discussed and the important thermal properties required by a good ablation material are given. The results of the analysis are given in terms of dimensionless parameters.

  16. Mid-infrared laser ablation of intraocular acrylic lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spyratou, E.; Makropoulou, M.; Bacharis, C.; Serafetinides, A. A.

    2007-05-01

    Ablation rates measurements with free-running Er:YAG laser (λ=2.94 μm) were performed in hydrophilic acrylic intraocular lenses. We studied the role of water in the laser ablation mechanisms by using hydrophilic lenses with different concentrations of H II0 and D II0. A mathematical model simulated the experimental results.

  17. Percutaneous image-guided ablation of breast tumors: an overview.

    PubMed

    Sag, Alan A; Maybody, Majid; Comstock, Christopher; Solomon, Stephen B

    2014-06-01

    Percutaneous non-surgical image-guided ablation is emerging as an adjunct or alternative to surgery in the management of benign and malignant breast tumors. This review covers the current state of the literature regarding percutaneous image-guided ablation modalities, clinical factors regarding patient selection, and future directions for research.

  18. Ultrashort laser ablation of PMMA and intraocular lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafetinides, A. A.; Makropoulou, M.; Fabrikesi, E.; Spyratou, E.; Bacharis, C.; Thomson, R. R.; Kar, A. K.

    2008-10-01

    The use of intraocular lenses (IOLs) is the most promising method to restore vision after cataract surgery. Several new materials, techniques, and patterns have been studied for forming and etching IOLs to improve their optical properties and reduce diffractive aberrations. This study is aimed at investigating the use of ultrashort laser pulses to ablate the surface of PMMA and intraocular lenses, and thus provide an alternative to conventional techniques. Ablation experiments were conducted using various polymer substrates (PMMA samples, hydrophobic acrylic IOL, yellow azo dye doped IOL, and hydrophilic acrylic IOL consist of 25% H2O). The irradiation was performed using 100 fs pulses of 800 nm radiation from a regeneratively amplified Ti:sapphire laser system. We investigated the ablation efficiency and the phenomenology of the ablated patterns by probing the ablation depth using a profilometer. The surface modification was examined using a high resolution optical microscope (IOLs) or atomic force microscope—AFM (PMMA samples). It was found that different polymers exhibited different ablation characteristics, a result that we attribute to the differing optical properties of the materials. In particular, it was observed that the topography of the ablation tracks created on the hydrophilic intraocular lenses was smoother in comparison to those created on the PMMA and hydrophobic lens. The yellow doped hydrophobic intraocular lenses show higher ablation efficiency than undoped hydrophobic acrylic lenses.

  19. Ultrafast laser ablation for targeted atherosclerotic plaque removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanvin, Thomas; Conkey, Donald B.; Descloux, Laurent; Frobert, Aurelien; Valentin, Jeremy; Goy, Jean-Jacques; Cook, Stéphane; Giraud, Marie-Noelle; Psaltis, Demetri

    2015-07-01

    Coronary artery disease, the main cause of heart disease, develops as immune cells and lipids accumulate into plaques within the coronary arterial wall. As a plaque grows, the tissue layer (fibrous cap) separating it from the blood flow becomes thinner and increasingly susceptible to rupturing and causing a potentially lethal thrombosis. The stabilization and/or treatment of atherosclerotic plaque is required to prevent rupturing and remains an unsolved medical problem. Here we show for the first time targeted, subsurface ablation of atherosclerotic plaque using ultrafast laser pulses. Excised atherosclerotic mouse aortas were ablated with ultrafast near-infrared (NIR) laser pulses. The physical damage was characterized with histological sections of the ablated atherosclerotic arteries from six different mice. The ultrafast ablation system was integrated with optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging for plaque-specific targeting and monitoring of the resulting ablation volume. We find that ultrafast ablation of plaque just below the surface is possible without causing damage to the fibrous cap, which indicates the potential use of ultrafast ablation for subsurface atherosclerotic plaque removal. We further demonstrate ex vivo subsurface ablation of a plaque volume through a catheter device with the high-energy ultrafast pulse delivered via hollow-core photonic crystal fiber.

  20. Laser ablation synthesis and spectral characterization of ruby nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, M. S.; Bardina, A. A.; Savelyev, A. G.; Khramov, V. N.; Khaydukov, E. V.

    2016-04-01

    The laser ablation method was implemented for synthesis of ruby nanoparticles. Nanoparticles were obtained by nanosecond ablation of bulk ruby crystal in 10% ethanol water solution. The nanoparticles enable water colloid stability and exhibit narrow photoluminescent line at 694 nm when pumped at blue-green spectral range. The ruby nanoparticles were characterized by SEM and Z-sizer.

  1. Trowelable ablative coating composition and method of use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Headrick, Stephen E. (Inventor); Hill, Roger L. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A trowelable ablative coating composition is disclosed. The composition comprises an epoxy resin, an amide curing agent, glass microspheres and ground cork. A method for protecting a substrate is also disclosed. The method comprises applying the trowelable ablative coating discussed above to a substrate and curing the coating composition.

  2. Trowelable ablative coating composition and method of use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Headrick, Stephen E. (Inventor); Hill, Roger L. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A trowelable ablative coating composition is disclosed. The composition comprises an epoxy resin, an amide curing agent, glass microspheres and ground cork. A method for protecting a substrate is also disclosed. The method comprises applying the trowelable ablative coating discussed above to a substrate and curing the coating composition.

  3. Bone radiofrequency ablation combined with prophylactic internal fixation for metastatic bone tumor of the femur from hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Koichi; Miyake, Ryoko; Shiina, Shuichiro; Shinoda, Yusuke; Okuma, Tomotake; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Goto, Takahiro; Nakamura, Kozo; Kawano, Hirotaka

    2012-08-01

    A 64-year-old man with 6-year history of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) was referred to us regarding bone metastasis to the right proximal femur. Although he underwent radiotherapy for pain palliation and local tumor control, the pain persisted and the tumor relapsed 3 months after the radiotherapy and he was thought to be at high risk of pathologic fracture. Given hypervascularity and large tumor size, a prophylactic internal fixation combined with adjuvant radiofrequency ablation (RFA) was proposed to reduce blood loss and prevent viable tumor cells being disseminated. His postoperative course was uneventful without requiring blood transfusion and preoperative symptoms immediately disappeared after surgery. He became capable of weight-bearing walk with a single cane and was almost asymptomatic without local progression on the plain radiographs when he died 14 months after surgery. Combination therapy of RFA and internal fixation using intramedullary nailing for metastases of the long bones from HCC seems to be a very promising technique both for sufficient pain relief and for local control of the tumor. Adjuvant RFA may become a potential option for patients with metastases of the long bones for the purpose of prevention of tumor dissemination and reduction of intraoperative blood loss.

  4. Second cancers following radiotherapy for cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, R.E.

    1997-03-01

    The study of second cancer risk after radiotherapy provides a unique opportunity to study carcinogenesis since large groups of humans are deliberately exposed to substantial doses of radiation in order to cure disease. Detailed radiotherapy records for cancer patients allow precise quantification of organ dose, and population-based cancer registries are frequently available to provide access to large groups of patients who are closely followed for long periods. Moreover, cancer patients treated with surgery alone (no radiation) are frequently available to serve as a non-irradiated comparison group. New information can be provided on relatively insensitive organs, and low dose exposures in the range of scientific interest are received by organs outside the radiation treatment fields. This paper will review several recently completed studies that characterize the risk of radiation-induced second cancers. Emphasis will be given to studies providing new information on the dose-response relationship of radiation-induced leukemia, breast cancer and lung cancer.

  5. [Radiotherapy as primary treatment for chemodectoma?].

    PubMed

    Verniers, D; Van Limbergen, E; Leysen, J; Ostyn, F; Segers, A

    1990-01-01

    Chemodectomas are slowly growing tumours originating in the chemoreceptor bodies. The diagnosis is based on typical clinical symptoms and radiological investigation. CT scanning with contrast enhancement permits to establish diagnosis in most cases and gives a correct idea of tumour size, tumour extension, displacement of arteries and bone destruction. Small tympanic chemodectomas are successfully managed by surgery, without causing additional cranial nerve palsies. Surgery of larger lesions is frequently followed by a high percentage of local recurrence (greater than 50%) and important morbidity (neurologic sequelae). Our present series confirms that these tumours can successfully be treated by radiotherapy. Persisting local control rates can be obtained in more than 90% of cases with moderate doses (45-50 Gy in 5 weeks) of carefully planned radiotherapy.

  6. Perianal Paget disease treated definitively with radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Mann, J; Lavaf, A; Tejwani, A; Ross, P; Ashamalla, H

    2012-12-01

    Extramammary Paget disease (empd) is a relatively rare cutaneous disorder described as an apocrine gland tumour occurring in both a benign and a malignant form with metastatic potential. The areas of the body affected are the vulva, perianal region, penis, scrotum, perineum, and axilla, all of which contain apocrine glands. When empd affects the perianal region, it is called perianal Paget disease (ppd). All forms of empd, including ppd, are typically treated by wide surgical excision. Perianal Paget disease usually occurs later in life in patients who are often poor surgical candidates, but the available literature is scarce regarding other treatment modalities, including definitive radiotherapy. We contend that ppd can be safely and effectively treated with radiotherapy, and here, we present the case of a 75-year-old woman with ppd who was successfully so treated. A brief review of the literature concerning the diagnosis, natural history, and treatment of ppd is also included.

  7. Proton Radiotherapy for Solid Tumors of Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Cotter, Shane E.; McBride, Sean M.; Yock, Torunn I.

    2012-01-01

    The increasing efficacy of pediatric cancer therapy over the past four decades has produced many long-term survivors that now struggle with serious treatment related morbidities affecting their quality of life. Radiation therapy is responsible for a significant proportion of these late effects, but a relatively new and emerging modality, proton radiotherapy hold great promise to drastically reduce these treatment related late effects in long term survivors by sparing dose to normal tissues. Dosimetric studies of proton radiotherapy compared with best available photon based treatment show significant dose sparing to developing normal tissues. Furthermore, clinical data are now emerging that begin to quantify the benefit in decreased late treatment effects while maintaining excellent cancer control rates. PMID:22417062

  8. Dynamics of Laser Ablation in Superfluid ^4{He}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buelna, X.; Popov, E.; Eloranta, J.

    2017-02-01

    Pulsed laser ablation of metal targets immersed in superfluid ^4{He} is visualized by time-resolved shadowgraph photography and the products are analyzed by post-experiment atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements. The expansion dynamics of the gaseous ablation half-bubble on the target surface appears underdamped and follows the predicted behavior for the thermally induced bubble growth mechanism. An inherent instability of the ablation bubble appears near its maximum radius and no tightly focused cavity collapse or rebound events are observed. During the ablation bubble retreat phase, the presence of sharp edges in the target introduces flow patterns that lead to the creation of large classical vortex rings. Furthermore, on the nanometer scale, AFM data reveal that the metal nanoparticles created by laser ablation are trapped in spherical vortex tangles and quantized vortex rings present in the non-equilibrium liquid.

  9. Nanoparticle fabrication of hydroxyapatite by laser ablation in water

    SciTech Connect

    Musaev, O. R.; Wieliczka, D. M.; Wrobel, J. M.; Kruger, M. B.; Dusevich, V.

    2008-10-15

    Synthetic polycrystalline hydroxyapatite was ablated in water with 337 nm radiation from a UV nitrogen pulsed laser. According to transmission electron microscopy micrographs, the ablated particles were approximately spherical and had a size of {approx}80 nm. Raman spectroscopic analysis demonstrated that particles had the same structure as the original crystal. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed that the surface chemical composition was close to that of the original material. The characteristics of the ablated particles and estimations of the temperature rise of the hydroxyapatite surface under laser irradiation are consistent with the mechanism of explosive boiling being responsible for ablation. The experimental observations offer the basis for preparation of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles by laser ablation in water.

  10. Computational modeling of ultra-short-pulse ablation of enamel

    SciTech Connect

    London, R.A.; Bailey, D.S.; Young, D.A.

    1996-02-29

    A computational model for the ablation of tooth enamel by ultra-short laser pulses is presented. The role of simulations using this model in designing and understanding laser drilling systems is discussed. Pulses of duration 300 sec and intensity greater than 10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2} are considered. Laser absorption proceeds via multi-photon initiated plasma mechanism. The hydrodynamic response is calculated with a finite difference method, using an equation of state constructed from thermodynamic functions including electronic, ion motion, and chemical binding terms. Results for the ablation efficiency are presented. An analytic model describing the ablation threshold and ablation depth is presented. Thermal coupling to the remaining tissue and long-time thermal conduction are calculated. Simulation results are compared to experimental measurements of the ablation efficiency. Desired improvements in the model are presented.

  11. Far-ultraviolet laser ablation of the cornea: photoacoustic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan, R.; Dyer, P.E.; Braren, B.

    1987-01-01

    Wide bandwidth piezoelectric transducers made of thin (9 microns) polyvinylidene fluoride film have been used to make time-resolved measurements of the stress-wave generated by far-ultraviolet (193 nm) laser ablation in corneal tissue in vitro. At high fluence (approximately 250 mJ/cm2), ablation commences within 10 ns (+/- 5 ns) of the laser pulse and generates short acoustic impulses (approximately 30 ns). The time profile of the ablation, when coupled to the energy requirements for ablation from earlier work, allows the estimation of a temperature and a half-life for the thermal decomposition of the collagen in cornea. These values do not support a photothermal mechanism for the ablation under the experimental conditions.

  12. Laser ablation of a turbid medium: Modeling and experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Brygo, F.; Semerok, A.; Weulersse, J.-M.; Thro, P.-Y.; Oltra, R.

    2006-08-01

    Q-switched Nd:YAG laser ablation of a turbid medium (paint) is studied. The optical properties (absorption coefficient, scattering coefficient, and its anisotropy) of a paint are determined with a multiple scattering model (three-flux model), and from measurements of reflection-transmission of light through thin layers. The energy deposition profiles are calculated at wavelengths of 532 nm and 1.064 {mu}m. They are different from those described by a Lambert-Beer law. In particular, the energy deposition of the laser beam is not maximum on the surface but at some depth inside the medium. The ablated rate was measured for the two wavelengths and compared with the energy deposition profile predicted by the model. This allows us to understand the evolution of the ablated depth with the wavelength: the more the scattering coefficient is higher, the more the ablated depth and the threshold fluence of ablation decrease.

  13. Pulsed Tm:YAG laser ablation of knee joint tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wei-Qiang; Vari, Sandor G.; Duffy, J. T.; Miller, J. M.; Weiss, Andrew B.; Fishbein, Michael C.; Grundfest, Warren S.

    1992-06-01

    We investigated the effect of a free-running 2.01 micron pulsed Tm:YAG laser on bovine knee joint tissues. Ablation rates of fresh fibrocartilage, hyaline cartilage, and bone were measured in saline as a function of laser fluence (160 - 640 J/cm2) and fiber core size (400 and 600 microns). All tissues could be effectively ablated and the ablation rate increased linearly with the increasing fluence. Use of fibers of different core sizes, while maintaining constant energy fluence, did not result in significant difference in ablation rate. Histology analyses of the ablated tissue samples reveal average Tm:YAG radiation induced thermal damage (denatunalization) zones ranging between 130 and 540 microns, depending on the laser parameters and the tissue type.

  14. From Laser Desorption to Laser Ablation of Biopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franz, Hillenkamp

    1998-03-01

    For selected indications laser ablation and cutting of biological tissues is clinical practice. Preferentially lasers with emission wavelengths in the far UV and the mid IR are used, for which tissue absorption is very high. Morphologically the ablation sites look surprisingly similar for the two wavelength ranges, despite of the very different prim y putative interaction mechanisms. Ablation depth as a function of fluence follows a sigmoidal curve. Even factors below the nominal ablation threshold superficial layers of material get removed from the surface. This is the fluence range for Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization (MALDI). Evidence will be presented which suggest that strong similarities exist between the desorption and ablation processes both for UV- as well as for IR-wavelengths.

  15. Thermal ablation of hepatic malignancy: useful but still not optimal.

    PubMed

    Nicholl, M B; Bilchik, A J

    2008-03-01

    The mortality associated with primary and metastatic hepatic malignancies remains high because few patients are candidates for hepatic resection or transplantation. Resection is the most effective treatment for liver tumors but may be contraindicated by factors such as the tumor's location; hepatic transplantation can cure primary hepatocellular carcinoma and underlying cirrhosis, but a donor may not be immediately available. When resection or transplantation is not possible, thermal ablation is a reasonable therapeutic option. Effective destruction of tumors can be achieved with low recurrence rates and minimal complications or risk of death. In patients with primary hepatic malignancy, ablation treatment does not preclude subsequent transplantation. Although radiofrequency ablation is currently the most widely used thermal ablative technique for hepatic malignancy, microwave ablation is gaining popularity and eventually may prove to be more effective.

  16. Heat-Based Tumor Ablation: Role of the Immune Response.

    PubMed

    Wu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    The ideal cancer therapy not only induces the death of all localized tumor cells with less damage to surrounding normal tissue, but also activates a systemic antitumor immunity. Heat-based tumor ablation has the potential to be such a treatment as it can minimal-invasively ablate a targeted tumor below the skin surface, and may subsequently augment host antitumor immunity. This chapter primarily introduces increasing pre-clinical and clinical evidence linking antitumor immune response to thermal tumor ablation, and then discusses the potential mechanisms involved in ablation-enhanced host antitumor immunity. The seminal studies performed so far indicate that although it is not possible to make definite conclusions on the connection between thermal ablation and antitumor immune response, it is nonetheless important to conduct extensive studies on the subject in order to elucidate the processes involved.

  17. Locally ablative therapies for primary and metastatic liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, David; Kang, Josephine; Madoff, David C

    2014-08-01

    Locally ablative therapies have an increasing role in the effective multidisciplinary approach towards the treatment of both primary and metastatic liver tumors. In patients who are not considered surgical candidates and have low volume disease, these therapies have now become established into consensus practice guidelines. A large range of therapeutic options exist including percutaneous ethanol injection (PEI), radiofrequency ablation (RFA), microwave ablation (MWA), cryoablation, percutaneous laser ablation (PLA), irreversible electroporation (IRE), stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU); each having benefits and drawbacks. The greatest body of evidence supporting clinical utility in the liver currently exists for RFA, with PEI having fallen out of favor. MWA, IRE, SBRT and HIFU are relatively nascent technologies, and outcomes data supporting their use is promising. Future directions of ablative therapies include tandem approaches to improve efficacy in the treatment of liver tumors.

  18. Laser ablation with applied magnetic field for electric propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batishcheva, Alla; Batishchev, Oleg; Cambier, Jean-Luc

    2012-10-01

    Using ultrafast lasers with tera-watt-level power allows efficient ablation and ionization of solid-density materials [1], creating dense and hot (˜100eV) plasma. We propose ablating small droplets in the magnetic nozzle configurations similar to mini-helicon plasma source [2]. Such approach may improve the momentum coupling compared to ablation of solid surfaces and facilitate plasma detachment. Results of 2D modeling of solid wire ablation in the applied magnetic field are presented and discussed. [4pt] [1] O. Batishchev et al, Ultrafast Laser Ablation for Space Propulsion, AIAA technical paper 2008-5294, -16p, 44th JPC, Hartford, 2008.[0pt] [2] O. Batishchev and J.L. Cambier, Experimental Study of the Mini-Helicon Thruster, Air Force Research Laboratory Report, AFRL-RZ-ED-TR-2009-0020, 2009.

  19. Status of radiotherapy in a multidisciplinary cancer board.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Mayumi; Nemoto, Kenji; Miwa, Misako; Ohta, Ibuki; Nomiya, Takuma; Yamakawa, Mayumi; Itho, Yuriko; Fukui, Tadahisa; Yoshioka, Takashi

    2014-03-01

    Multidisciplinary cancer boards (CBs) for making cancer treatment decisions have become popular in many countries; however, the status of radiotherapy in CBs and the influence of CBs on radiotherapy decisions have not been studied. To clarify these issues, we reviewed the minutes of our CBs from February 2010 to March 2012, and we classified planned treatments discussed at the CBs into five categories and analyzed decisions concerning radiotherapy in each category. The fraction of cases for which radiotherapy was recommended was 536/757 (71%). These cases included 478 cases (63%) for which radiation therapy was planned and four cases (0.5%) for which radiation therapy was unexpectedly recommended. On the other hand, radiation therapy was canceled in 21 cases (4%) for which radiation therapy had been planned. This study showed that radiotherapy was discussed in many cases at CBs and that CBs have a great influence on decisions concerning radiotherapy.

  20. Diagnostic characterization of ablation plasma ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, B.; Gilgenbach, R. M.; Jones, M. C.; Johnston, M. D.; Lau, Y. Y.; Wang, L. M.; Lian, J.; Doll, G. L.; Lazarides, A.

    2003-06-01

    Experiments are reported in which two configurations for ablation-plasma-ion-implantation (APII) are characterized by diagnostics and compared. The first configuration oriented the target parallel to the deposition substrate. This orientation yielded ion-beam-assisted deposition of thin films. A delay (>5 μs) between laser and high voltage was necessary for this geometry to avoid arcing between negatively biased substrate and target. The second experimental configuration oriented the target perpendicular to the deposition substrate, reducing arcing, even for zero/negative delay between the laser and the high voltage pulse. This orientation also reduced neutral atom, ballistic deposition on the substrate resulting in a pure ion implantation mode. Ion density measurements were made by resonant laser diagnostics and Langmuir probes, yielding total ion populations in the range of 1014. Implanted ion doses were estimated by electrical diagnostics, and materials analysis, including x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, yielding implanted doses in the range 1012 ions/cm2 per pulse. This yields an APII efficiency of order 10% for implantation of laser ablated ions. Scaling of ion dose with voltage agrees well with a theory assuming the Child-Langmuir law and that the ion current at the sheath edge is due to the uncovering of the ions by the movement of the sheath. Thin film analysis showed excellent adhesion with smoother films for an accelerating voltage of -3.2 kV; higher voltages (-7.7 kV) roughened the film.